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Sample records for level ionising radiation

  1. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Ionising and non-ionising radiation and cancer.

    PubMed

    McColl, Neil; Auvinen, Anssi; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Espina, Carolina; Erdmann, Friederike; de Vries, Esther; Greinert, Rüdiger; Harrison, John; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Ionising radiation can transfer sufficient energy to ionise molecules, and this can lead to chemical changes, including DNA damage in cells. Key evidence for the carcinogenicity of ionising radiation comes from: follow-up studies of the survivors of the atomic bombings in Japan; other epidemiological studies of groups that have been exposed to radiation from medical, occupational or environmental sources; experimental animal studies; and studies of cellular responses to radiation. Considering exposure to environmental ionising radiation, inhalation of naturally occurring radon is the major source of radiation in the population - in doses orders of magnitude higher than those from nuclear power production or nuclear fallout. Indoor exposure to radon and its decay products is an important cause of lung cancer; radon may cause approximately one in ten lung cancers in Europe. Exposures to radon in buildings can be reduced via a three-step process of identifying those with potentially elevated radon levels, measuring radon levels, and reducing exposure by installation of remediation systems. In the 4th Edition of the European Code against Cancer it is therefore recommended to: "Find out if you are exposed to radiation from naturally high radon levels in your home. Take action to reduce high radon levels". Non-ionising types of radiation (those with insufficient energy to ionise molecules) - including extremely low-frequency electric and magnetic fields as well as radiofrequency electromagnetic fields - are not an established cause of cancer and are therefore not addressed in the recommendations to reduce cancer risk. PMID:26126928

  2. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Ionising and non-ionising radiation and cancer.

    PubMed

    McColl, Neil; Auvinen, Anssi; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Espina, Carolina; Erdmann, Friederike; de Vries, Esther; Greinert, Rüdiger; Harrison, John; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Ionising radiation can transfer sufficient energy to ionise molecules, and this can lead to chemical changes, including DNA damage in cells. Key evidence for the carcinogenicity of ionising radiation comes from: follow-up studies of the survivors of the atomic bombings in Japan; other epidemiological studies of groups that have been exposed to radiation from medical, occupational or environmental sources; experimental animal studies; and studies of cellular responses to radiation. Considering exposure to environmental ionising radiation, inhalation of naturally occurring radon is the major source of radiation in the population - in doses orders of magnitude higher than those from nuclear power production or nuclear fallout. Indoor exposure to radon and its decay products is an important cause of lung cancer; radon may cause approximately one in ten lung cancers in Europe. Exposures to radon in buildings can be reduced via a three-step process of identifying those with potentially elevated radon levels, measuring radon levels, and reducing exposure by installation of remediation systems. In the 4th Edition of the European Code against Cancer it is therefore recommended to: "Find out if you are exposed to radiation from naturally high radon levels in your home. Take action to reduce high radon levels". Non-ionising types of radiation (those with insufficient energy to ionise molecules) - including extremely low-frequency electric and magnetic fields as well as radiofrequency electromagnetic fields - are not an established cause of cancer and are therefore not addressed in the recommendations to reduce cancer risk.

  3. Lightning-driven inner radiation belt energy deposition into the atmosphere: implications for ionisation-levels and neutral chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodger, C. J.; Enell, C.-F.; Turunen, E.; Clilverd, M. A.; Thomson, N. R.; Verronen, P. T.

    2007-08-01

    Lightning-generated whistlers lead to coupling between the troposphere, the Van Allen radiation belts and the lower-ionosphere through Whistler-induced electron precipitation (WEP). Lightning produced whistlers interact with cyclotron resonant radiation belt electrons, leading to pitch-angle scattering into the bounce loss cone and precipitation into the atmosphere. Here we consider the relative significance of WEP to the lower ionosphere and atmosphere by contrasting WEP produced ionisation rate changes with those from Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) and solar photoionisation. During the day, WEP is never a significant source of ionisation in the lower ionosphere for any location or altitude. At nighttime, GCR is more significant than WEP at altitudes <68 km for all locations, above which WEP starts to dominate in North America and Central Europe. Between 75 and 80 km altitude WEP becomes more significant than GCR for the majority of spatial locations at which WEP deposits energy. The size of the regions in which WEP is the most important nighttime ionisation source peaks at ~80 km, depending on the relative contributions of WEP and nighttime solar Lyman-α. We also used the Sodankylä Ion Chemistry (SIC) model to consider the atmospheric consequences of WEP, focusing on a case-study period. Previous studies have also shown that energetic particle precipitation can lead to large-scale changes in the chemical makeup of the neutral atmosphere by enhancing minor chemical species that play a key role in the ozone balance of the middle atmosphere. However, SIC modelling indicates that the neutral atmospheric changes driven by WEP are insignificant due to the short timescale of the WEP bursts. Overall we find that WEP is a significant energy input into some parts of the lower ionosphere, depending on the latitude/longitude and altitude, but does not play a significant role in the neutral chemistry of the mesosphere.

  4. Nucleoplasmic bridges and acrocentric chromosome associations as early markers of exposure to low levels of ionising radiation in occupationally exposed hospital workers.

    PubMed

    Caradonna, Fabio

    2015-03-01

    Ionising radiation, with the contribution of telomere shortening, induces DNA double-strand breaks that result in chromosome end fusion, nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs) and chromosome aberrations (ChAbs) as well as dicentric chromosomes. In order to investigate the chromosomal damage induced by occupational ionising radiation at low exposure levels, and to find early markers of health hazard, peripheral lymphocytes of occupationally exposed hospital workers were cytogenetically analysed. Results showed a significant difference in the frequency of ChAbs in exposed subjects relative to controls. A significant number of NPBs between nuclei of binucleated cultured lymphocytes from exposed subjects were also observed, as well as a consistent amount of acrocentric chromosomes with associations of their short arms. Excluding confounding factors, the frequencies of all these three biological endpoints differed significantly in exposed subjects from those in controls. Because the absence of telomeres and/or their short length could be a common root for both the findings, we utilised fluorescence in situ hybridisation technique with telomeric repeat as probe to demonstrate that, in exposed subjects, chromatin of short arms of involved acrocentric chromosomes did not exhibit a telomeric shortening but appeared strongly decondensed. This finding suggests that NPBs and telomeric acrocentric association should be regarded as early markers of exposure to low levels of ionising radiation and their increase should be seen as an early warning for the health of the involved workers. PMID:25381312

  5. Dosimetry of ionising radiation in modern radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kron, Tomas; Lehmann, Joerg; Greer, Peter B.

    2016-07-01

    Dosimetry of ionising radiation is a well-established and mature branch of physical sciences with many applications in medicine and biology. In particular radiotherapy relies on dosimetry for optimisation of cancer treatment and avoidance of severe toxicity for patients. Several novel developments in radiotherapy have introduced new challenges for dosimetry with small and dynamically changing radiation fields being central to many of these applications such as stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy. There is also an increasing awareness of low doses given to structures not in the target region and the associated risk of secondary cancer induction. Here accurate dosimetry is important not only for treatment optimisation but also for the generation of data that can inform radiation protection approaches in the future. The article introduces some of the challenges and highlights the interdependence of dosimetric calculations and measurements. Dosimetric concepts are explored in the context of six application fields: reference dosimetry, small fields, low dose out of field, in vivo dosimetry, brachytherapy and auditing of radiotherapy practice. Recent developments of dosimeters that can be used for these purposes are discussed using spatial resolution and number of dimensions for measurement as sorting criteria. While dosimetry is ever evolving to address the needs of advancing applications of radiation in medicine two fundamental issues remain: the accuracy of the measurement from a scientific perspective and the importance to link the measurement to a clinically relevant question. This review aims to provide an update on both of these.

  6. Dosimetry of ionising radiation in modern radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Kron, Tomas; Lehmann, Joerg; Greer, Peter B

    2016-07-21

    Dosimetry of ionising radiation is a well-established and mature branch of physical sciences with many applications in medicine and biology. In particular radiotherapy relies on dosimetry for optimisation of cancer treatment and avoidance of severe toxicity for patients. Several novel developments in radiotherapy have introduced new challenges for dosimetry with small and dynamically changing radiation fields being central to many of these applications such as stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy. There is also an increasing awareness of low doses given to structures not in the target region and the associated risk of secondary cancer induction. Here accurate dosimetry is important not only for treatment optimisation but also for the generation of data that can inform radiation protection approaches in the future. The article introduces some of the challenges and highlights the interdependence of dosimetric calculations and measurements. Dosimetric concepts are explored in the context of six application fields: reference dosimetry, small fields, low dose out of field, in vivo dosimetry, brachytherapy and auditing of radiotherapy practice. Recent developments of dosimeters that can be used for these purposes are discussed using spatial resolution and number of dimensions for measurement as sorting criteria. While dosimetry is ever evolving to address the needs of advancing applications of radiation in medicine two fundamental issues remain: the accuracy of the measurement from a scientific perspective and the importance to link the measurement to a clinically relevant question. This review aims to provide an update on both of these. PMID:27351409

  7. Invasive oral cancer stem cells display resistance to ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Gemenetzidis, Emilios; Gammon, Luke; Biddle, Adrian; Emich, Helena; Mackenzie, Ian C

    2015-12-22

    There is a significant amount of evidence to suggest that human tumors are driven and maintained by a sub-population of cells, known as cancer stem cells (CSC). In the case of head and neck cancer, such cells have been characterised by high expression levels of CD44 cell surface glycoprotein, while we have previously shown the presence of two diverse oral CSC populations in vitro, with different capacities for cell migration and proliferation. Here, we examined the response of oral CSC populations to ionising radiation (IR), a front-line measure for the treatment of head and neck tumors. We show that oral CSC initially display resistance to IR-induced growth arrest as well as relative apoptotic resistance. We propose that this is a result of preferential activation of the DNA damagerepair pathway in oral CSC with increased activation of ATM and BRCA1, elevated levels of DNA repair proteins RAD52, XLF, and a significantly faster rate of DNA double-strand-breaks clearance 24 hours following IR. By visually identifying CSC sub-populations undergoing EMT, we show that EMT-CSC represent the majority of invasive cells, and are more radio-resistant than any other population in re-constructed 3D tissues. We provide evidence that IR is not sufficient to eliminate CSC in vitro, and that sensitization of CD44hi/ESAlow cells to IR, followed by secondary EMT blockade, could be critical in order to reduce primary tumor recurrence, but more importantly to be able to eradicate cells capable of invasion and distant metastasis.

  8. Protection of the environment from ionising radiation: ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Oughton, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The paper identifies some of the main ethical issues concerning the protection of the environment from radiation and suggests ways in which ethics can aid in developing a system of protection. After a presentation of background on ethical theory and environmental ethics, three main issues related to environmental protection are discussed: First, the question of valuing the environment and implications for the definition of harm and monetary valuation of environmental goods; second, difficulties with scientific uncertainty and applications of the precautionary principle; and third, issues concerned with the distribution of risk and its relevance for participation in decision-making. In summary, the paper argues that there are strong ethical grounds to provide for the protection of the environment and that, all other things being equal, there is no reason to treat ionising radiation differently to other environmental stressors.

  9. Hazards of ionising radiation: 100 years of observations on man.

    PubMed Central

    Doll, R.

    1995-01-01

    In November 1895, when Conrad Röntgen serendipitously discovered X-rays, epidemiology was effectively limited to the study of infectious disease. What little epidemiological work was done in other fields was done as part of clinical medicine or under the heading of geographical pathology. The risks from exposure to X-rays and subsequently from other types of ionising radiation were consequently discovered by qualitative association or animal experiment. They did not begin to be quantified in humans until half a century later, when epidemiology emerged as a scientific discipline capable of quantifying risks of non-infectious disease and the scientific world was alerted to the need for assessing the effects of the radiation to which large populations might be exposed by the use of nuclear energy in peace and war. PMID:8519643

  10. Protection of the environment from ionising radiation: ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Oughton, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The paper identifies some of the main ethical issues concerning the protection of the environment from radiation and suggests ways in which ethics can aid in developing a system of protection. After a presentation of background on ethical theory and environmental ethics, three main issues related to environmental protection are discussed: First, the question of valuing the environment and implications for the definition of harm and monetary valuation of environmental goods; second, difficulties with scientific uncertainty and applications of the precautionary principle; and third, issues concerned with the distribution of risk and its relevance for participation in decision-making. In summary, the paper argues that there are strong ethical grounds to provide for the protection of the environment and that, all other things being equal, there is no reason to treat ionising radiation differently to other environmental stressors. PMID:12590067

  11. Occupational exposure to ionising radiation and mortality among workers of the former Spanish Nuclear Energy Board.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Artalejo, F; Castaño Lara, S; de Andrés Manzano, B; García Ferruelo, M; Iglesias Martín, L; Calero, J R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Firstly, to ascertain whether mortality among workers of the former Spanish Nuclear Energy Board (Junta de Energía Nuclear-JEN) was higher than that for the Spanish population overall; and secondly, if this were so, to ascertain whether this difference was associated with exposure to ionising radiation. METHODS: A retrospective follow up of a cohort of 5657 workers was carried out for the period 1954-92. Cohort mortality was compared with that for the Spanish population overall, with standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) adjusted for sex, age, and calendar period. Also, Poisson models were used to analyse mortality from lung cancer in the cohort by level of exposure to ionising radiation. RESULTS: Workers' median and mean cumulative exposures were 4.04 and 11.42 mSv, respectively. Mean annual exposure was 1.33 mSv. Excess mortality due to bone tumours was found for the cohort as a whole (six deaths observed; SMR 2.95; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.08 to 6.43). Among miners, excess mortality was found for non-malignant respiratory diseases (SMR 2.94; 95% CI 2.27 to 3.75), and for lung cancer bordering on statistical significance (SMR 1.50; 95% CI 0.96 to 2.23; P = 0.055). Relative risks of dying of lung cancer from ionising radiation in the dose quartiles 2, 3, and 4 versus the lowest dose quartile, were 1.00, 1.64, and 0.94, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Excess mortality from lung cancer was found among JEN miners. Nevertheless, no clear relation was found between mortality from lung cancer and level of exposure to ionising radiation in the JEN cohort. Continued follow up of the cohort is required to confirm excess mortality from bone tumours. PMID:9155782

  12. Comparison of low and high dose ionising radiation using topological analysis of gene coexpression networks

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The growing use of imaging procedures in medicine has raised concerns about exposure to low-dose ionising radiation (LDIR). While the disastrous effects of high dose ionising radiation (HDIR) is well documented, the detrimental effects of LDIR is not well understood and has been a topic of much debate. Since little is known about the effects of LDIR, various kinds of wet-lab and computational analyses are required to advance knowledge in this domain. In this paper we carry out an “upside-down pyramid” form of systems biology analysis of microarray data. We characterised the global genomic response following 10 cGy (low dose) and 100 cGy (high dose) doses of X-ray ionising radiation at four time points by analysing the topology of gene coexpression networks. This study includes a rich experimental design and state-of-the-art computational systems biology methods of analysis to study the differences in the transcriptional response of skin cells exposed to low and high doses of radiation. Results Using this method we found important genes that have been linked to immune response, cell survival and apoptosis. Furthermore, we also were able to identify genes such as BRCA1, ABCA1, TNFRSF1B, MLLT11 that have been associated with various types of cancers. We were also able to detect many genes known to be associated with various medical conditions. Conclusions Our method of applying network topological differences can aid in identifying the differences among similar (eg: radiation effect) yet very different biological conditions (eg: different dose and time) to generate testable hypotheses. This is the first study where a network level analysis was performed across two different radiation doses at various time points, thereby illustrating changes in the cellular response over time. PMID:22594378

  13. A study of ionisation of free and clustered molecules under the action of femtosecond laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Apatin, V M; Kompanets, V O; Lokhman, V N; Ogurok, N-D D; Poydashev, D G; Ryabov, E A; Chekalin, S V

    2014-05-30

    We have investigated the processes of excitation and ionisation of monomers and clusters of CF{sub 3}I, IF{sub 2}CCOF and Fe(CO){sub 5} molecules under the action of femtosecond laser radiation at the wavelengths of 266, 400 and 800 nm. It is concluded that the nature of the excitation of free molecules and clustered molecules by femtosecond pulses is different. The simulation of the ionisation yield of the objects under study has shown that the multiphoton ionisation is the key mechanism in the case of free molecules, while the field ionisation may play a significant role for clusters, in particular, in the case of ionisation at the wavelength of λ = 800 nm. (interaction of radiation with matter)

  14. Teaching about Radioactivity and Ionising Radiation: An Alternative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millar, Robin; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Children's ideas about radiation and radioactivity are reviewed and several common areas of misunderstanding are identified. An approach to teaching the topic at the secondary school level which seeks to specifically address known difficulties is outlined. (CW)

  15. Multidisciplinary approach to assess the sensitivity of dwarf tomato plants to low-LET ionising radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Micco, Veronica; De Pascale, Stefania; Aronne, Giovanna; Paradiso, Roberta; Vitaglione, Paola; Turano, Mimmo; Arena, Carmen

    Ionising radiation, acting alone or in interaction with microgravity and other environmental constraints, may affect plant at molecular, morpho-structural and physiological level. The intensity of the plant’s response depends on the properties of radiation and on the features of the plant itself. Indeed, different species are characterised by different susceptibility to radiation which may change during the life course. The aim of this research was to study the radiosensitivity to low-LET ionising radiation of plants of dwarf tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. ‘Microtom’) at two phenological phases (vegetative and reproductive), within the purpose of analysing plants for consideration as candidates for Bioregenerative Life Support Systems (BLSS) in Space. To pursue this objective, plants of the cultivar Microtom were irradiated with different doses of X-rays either at the stage of the second true leaf (VP - vegetative phase) or when at least one flower was blossomed (RP - reproductive phase). Plant’s response to ionising radiation was assessed through a multidisciplinary approach combining genetic analyses, ecophysiological measurements, morpho-anatomical characterisation of leaves and fruits, nutritional analyses of fruits. Growth, molecular and morpho-functional traits were measured during plant development up to fruiting in both VP and RP plant groups, and compared with non-irradiated control plants. Plant growth was monitored weekly recording parameters such as plant height, number of leaves, leaf area, flowering and fruiting rate. Potential DNA alterations were explored through Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. The efficiency of the photosynthetic apparatus was evaluated by determining photosynthetic pigment composition, photochemistry and leaf gas exchanges. Leaf and fruit structure were analysed through light and epi-fluorescence microscopy. Leaf anatomical traits related to photosynthetic efficiency, and to structural radioprotection

  16. Genotoxicity in earthworm after combined treatment of ionising radiation and mercury.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Tae Ho; An, Kwang-Guk; Kim, Jin Kyu

    2014-06-01

    This study was performed to investigate the acute genotoxic effects of mercury and radiation on earthworms (Eisenia fetida). The levels of DNA damage and the repair kinetics in the coelomocytes of E. fetida treated with mercuric chloride (HgCl₂) and ionising radiation (gamma rays) were analysed by means of the comet assay. For detection of DNA damage and repair, E. fetida was exposed to HgCl₂ (0-160 mg kg(-1)) and irradiated with gamma rays (0-50 Gy) in vivo. The increase in DNA damage depended on the concentration of mercury or dose of radiation. The results showed that the more the oxidative stress induced by mercury and radiation the longer the repair time that was required. When a combination of HgCl₂ and gamma rays was applied, the cell damage was much higher than those treated with HgCl₂ or radiation alone, which indicated that the genotoxic effects were increased after the combined treatment of mercury and radiation. PMID:24870361

  17. Destruction of Raman biosignatures by ionising radiation and the implications for life detection on Mars.

    PubMed

    Dartnell, Lewis R; Page, Kristian; Jorge-Villar, Susana E; Wright, Gary; Munshi, Tasnim; Scowen, Ian J; Ward, John M; Edwards, Howell G M

    2012-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy has proven to be a very effective approach for the detection of microorganisms colonising hostile environments on Earth. The ExoMars rover, due for launch in 2018, will carry a Raman laser spectrometer to analyse samples of the martian subsurface collected by the probe's 2-m drill in a search for similar biosignatures. The martian surface is unprotected from the flux of cosmic rays, an ionising radiation field that will degrade organic molecules and so diminish and distort the detectable Raman signature of potential martian microbial life. This study employs Raman spectroscopy to analyse samples of two model organisms, the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and the extremely radiation resistant polyextremophile Deinococcus radiodurans, that have been exposed to increasing doses of ionising radiation. The three most prominent peaks in the Raman spectra are from cellular carotenoids: deinoxanthin in D. radiodurans and β-carotene in Synechocystis. The degradative effect of ionising radiation is clearly seen, with significant diminishment of carotenoid spectral peak heights after 15 kGy and complete erasure of Raman biosignatures by 150 kGy of ionising radiation. The Raman signal of carotenoid in D. radiodurans diminishes more rapidly than that of Synechocystis, believed to be due to deinoxanthin acting as a superior scavenger of radiolytically produced reactive oxygen species, and so being destroyed more quickly than the less efficient antioxidant β-carotene. This study highlights the necessity for further experimental work on the manner and rate of degradation of Raman biosignatures by ionising radiation, as this is of prime importance for the successful detection of microbial life in the martian near subsurface.

  18. Growth alteration and leaf biochemical responses in Phaseolus vulgaris exposed to different doses of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Arena, C; De Micco, V; De Maio, A

    2014-01-01

    Ionising radiation may have different effects on plant metabolism, growth and reproduction, depending on radiation dose, plant species, developmental stage and physiological traits. In this study, exposure of dwarf bean plants to different doses of X-rays (0.3, 10, 50, 100 Gy) was investigated with a multidisciplinary approach consisting of morphological, ecophysiological and biochemical analysis. Both mature and young leaves still growing during the X-rays exposure were compared with non-irradiated control leaves. In particular, leaf expansion, leaf anatomy and functional traits, as well as photosynthetic pigment content and Rubisco expression were analysed. Moreover, the activity of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) was also measured as an indicator of radiation-induced DNA damage. Our data showed that leaf growth is affected by high levels of radiation and demonstrate that mature leaves are more radio-resistant than young leaves, which experience severe dose-dependent changes in leaf functional traits. In particular, young leaves exhibited a reduction of area and an increase in specific mass and dry matter content, as well as a decline in Rubisco activity. Moreover, they showed elevated PARP activity and an increase in phenolic compounds in wall cells if compared with mature leaves. Both of these strategies have been interpreted as a way to help developing leaves withstand irradiation.

  19. Field calibration studies for ionisation chambers in mixed high-energy radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Theis, C; Forkel-Wirth, D; Fuerstner, M; Mayer, S; Otto, Th; Roesler, S; Vincke, H

    2007-01-01

    The monitoring of ambient doses at work places around high-energy accelerators is a challenging task due the complexity of the mixed stray radiation fields encountered. At CERN, mainly Centronics IG5 high-pressure ionisation chambers are used to monitor radiation exposure in mixed fields. The monitors are calibrated in the operational quantity ambient dose equivalent H*(10) using standard, source-generated photon- and neutron fields. However, the relationship between ionisation chamber reading and ambient dose equivalent in a mixed high-energy radiation field can only be assessed if the spectral response to every component and the field composition is known. Therefore, comprehensive studies were performed at the CERN-EU high-energy reference field facility where the spectral fluence for each particle type has been assessed with Monte Carlo simulations. Moreover, studies have been performed in an accessible controlled radiation area in the vicinity of a beam loss point of CERN's proton synchrotron. The comparison of measurements and calculations has shown reasonable agreement for most exposure conditions. The results indicate that conventionally calibrated ionisation chambers can give satisfactory response in terms of ambient dose equivalent in stray radiation fields at high-energy accelerators in many cases. These studies are one step towards establishing a method of 'field calibration' of radiation protection instruments in which Monte Carlo simulations will be used to establish a correct correlation between the response of specific detectors to a given high-energy radiation field.

  20. Leaf Anatomy and Photochemical Behaviour of Solanum lycopersicum L. Plants from Seeds Irradiated with Low-LET Ionising Radiation

    PubMed Central

    De Micco, V.; Paradiso, R.; Aronne, G.; De Pascale, S.; Quarto, M.; Arena, C.

    2014-01-01

    Plants can be exposed to ionising radiation not only in Space but also on Earth, due to specific technological applications or after nuclear disasters. The response of plants to ionising radiation depends on radiation quality/quantity and/or plant characteristics. In this paper, we analyse some growth traits, leaf anatomy, and ecophysiological features of plants of Solanum lycopersicum L. “Microtom” grown from seeds irradiated with increasing doses of X-rays (0.3, 10, 20, 50, and 100 Gy). Both juvenile and compound leaves from plants developed from irradiated and control seeds were analysed through light and epifluorescence microscopy. Digital image analysis allowed quantifying anatomical parameters to detect the occurrence of signs of structural damage. Fluorescence parameters and total photosynthetic pigment content were analysed to evaluate the functioning of the photosynthetic machinery. Radiation did not affect percentage and rate of seed germination. Plants from irradiated seeds accomplished the crop cycle and showed a more compact habitus. Dose-depended tendencies of variations occurred in phenolic content, while other leaf anatomical parameters did not show distinct trends after irradiation. The sporadic perturbations of leaf structure, observed during the vegetative phase, after high levels of radiation were not so severe as to induce any significant alterations in photosynthetic efficiency. PMID:24883400

  1. EURADOS strategic research agenda: vision for dosimetry of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Rühm, W; Fantuzzi, E; Harrison, R; Schuhmacher, H; Vanhavere, F; Alves, J; Bottollier Depois, J F; Fattibene, P; Knežević, Ž; Lopez, M A; Mayer, S; Miljanić, S; Neumaier, S; Olko, P; Stadtmann, H; Tanner, R; Woda, C

    2016-02-01

    Since autumn 2012, the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) has been developing its Strategic Research Agenda (SRA), which is intended to contribute to the identification of future research needs in radiation dosimetry in Europe. The present article summarises-based on input from EURADOS Working Groups (WGs) and Voting Members-five visions in dosimetry and defines key issues in dosimetry research that are considered important for the next decades. The five visions include scientific developments required towards (a) updated fundamental dose concepts and quantities, (b) improved radiation risk estimates deduced from epidemiological cohorts, (c) efficient dose assessment for radiological emergencies, (d) integrated personalised dosimetry in medical applications and (e) improved radiation protection of workers and the public. The SRA of EURADOS will be used as a guideline for future activities of the EURADOS WGs. A detailed version of the SRA can be downloaded as a EURADOS report from the EURADOS website (www.eurados.org). PMID:25752758

  2. Predicting the effects of ionising radiation on ecosystems by a generic model based on the Lotka-Volterra equations.

    PubMed

    Monte, Luigi

    2009-06-01

    The present work describes a model for predicting the population dynamics of the main components (resources and consumers) of terrestrial ecosystems exposed to ionising radiation. The ecosystem is modelled by the Lotka-Volterra equations with consumer competition. Linear dose-response relationships without threshold are assumed to relate the values of the model parameters to the dose rates. The model accounts for the migration of consumers from areas characterised by different levels of radionuclide contamination. The criteria to select the model parameter values are motivated by accounting for the results of the empirical studies of past decades. Examples of predictions for long-term chronic exposure are reported and discussed.

  3. EVOLUTION OF THE IEC AND EN STANDARDS FOR INDIVIDUAL MONITORING OF IONISING RADIATION.

    PubMed

    Voytchev, M; Behrens, R; Ambrosi, P; Radev, R; Chiaro, P

    2016-09-01

    This article presents the evolution of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and the European standards for individual monitoring of ionising radiation issued, respectively, from the committees IEC/Sub Committee 45B and European Committee for Electro-technical Standardization/Technical Committee 45B 'Radiation protection instrumentation'. Standards for passive individual photon and beta dosimetry systems as well as those for active individual monitors are discussed. A neutron ambient dose equivalent (rate) meter standard and a technical report concerning the determination of uncertainty in measurement are also covered. PMID:26443545

  4. Internet-based ICRP resource for healthcare providers on the risks and benefits of medical imaging that uses ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Demeter, S; Applegate, K E; Perez, M

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Committee 3 Working Party was to update the 2001 web-based module 'Radiation and your patient: a guide for medical practitioners' from ICRP. The key elements of this task were: to clearly identify the target audience (such as healthcare providers with an emphasis on primary care); to review other reputable sources of information; and to succinctly publish the contribution made by ICRP to the various topics. A 'question-and-answer' format addressing practical topics was adopted. These topics included benefits and risks of imaging using ionising radiation in common medical situations, as well as pertaining to specific populations such as pregnant, breast-feeding, and paediatric patients. In general, the benefits of medical imaging and related procedures far outweigh the potential risks associated with ionising radiation exposure. However, it is still important to ensure that the examinations are clinically justified, that the procedure is optimised to deliver the lowest dose commensurate with the medical purpose, and that consideration is given to diagnostic reference levels for particular classes of examinations.

  5. Exploring Learners' Conceptual Resources: Singapore a Level Students' Explanations in the Topic of Ionisation Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Keith S.; Tan, Kim Chwee Daniel

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes findings from a study to explore Singapore A-level (Grades 11 and 12, 16-19 yr old) students' understanding of ionisation energy, an abstract and complex topic that is featured in school chemistry courses. Previous research had reported that students in the United Kingdom commonly use alternative notions based on the perceived…

  6. Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) enhances the oncogenic characteristics of prostate carcinoma cells and reduces sensitivity to ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Perera, Omesha; Evans, Angharad; Pertziger, Mikhail; MacDonald, Christa; Chen, Helen; Liu, Dong-Xu; Lobie, Peter E; Perry, Jo K

    2015-05-28

    Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) is a secreted protein which functions in mucosal repair of the gastrointestinal tract. This is achieved through the combined stimulation of cell migration and prevention of apoptosis and anoikis, thus facilitating repair. Deregulated TFF3 expression at the gene and protein level is implicated in numerous cancers. In prostate cancer TFF3 has previously been reported as a potential biomarker, overexpressed in a subset of primary and metastatic cases. Here we investigated the effect of increased TFF3 expression on prostate cancer cell behaviour. Oncomine analysis demonstrated that TFF3 mRNA expression was upregulated in prostate cancer compared to normal tissue. Forced-expression models were established in the prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and PC3, by stable transfection of an expression vector containing the TFF3 cDNA. Forced expression of TFF3 significantly increased total cell number and cell viability, cell proliferation and cell survival. In addition, TFF3 enhanced anchorage independent growth, 3-dimensional colony formation, wound healing and cell migration compared to control transfected cell lines. We also observed reduced sensitivity to ionising radiation in stably transfected cell lines. In dose response experiments, forced expression of TFF3 significantly enhanced the regrowth of PC3 cells following ionising radiation compared with control transfected cells. In addition, TFF3 enhanced clonogenic survival of DU145 and PC3 cells. These studies indicate that targeting TFF3 for the treatment of prostate cancer warrants further investigation.

  7. The effect of non ionising electromagnetic radiation on RAAF personnel during World War II.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, J A

    1994-05-01

    Did exposure to non ionising electromagnetic radiation during World War II in the short term have a stimulating effect on the anterior pituitary gland, and in turn on the gonads of both sexes, since the figures obtained appeared to affect the sexes equally? Is it that the long-term effect of microwave radiation on personnel is to cause adenoma and carcinoma? Is this long-term effect similar to the long-term effect of X-rays on infants, children and adolescents? According to Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine 1980 (page 1710): "X-rays to the head and neck in infancy, childhood or adolescence is associated with a high incidence of thyroid disease later in life. Nodular disease is found to be particularly common on 20% of patients at risk, and may not be apparent until 30 years or more after exposure. One-third of the nodular type are found to be carcinomatous." The effect of non ionising electromagnetic and microwave radiation on those who work in these fields certainly needs much more investigation. What will be the long-term effect of using micro-ovens on the rising generation?

  8. Glioblastoma stem cells: radiobiological response to ionising radiations of different qualities.

    PubMed

    Pecchia, I; Dini, V; Ricci-Vitiani, L; Biffoni, M; Balduzzi, M; Fratini, E; Belli, M; Campa, A; Esposito, G; Cirrone, G; Romano, F; Stancampiano, C; Pelacchi, F; Pallini, R; Tabocchini, M A

    2015-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant primary brain tumour, with very poor prognosis. The high recurrence rate and failure of conventional treatments are expected to be related to the presence of radio-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) inside the tumour mass. CSCs can both self-renew and differentiate into the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells. Recent evidence showed a higher effectiveness of C-ions and protons in inactivating CSCs, suggesting a potential advantage of Hadrontherapy compared with conventional radiotherapy for GBM treatment. To investigate the mechanisms involved in the molecular and cellular responses of CSCs to ionising radiations, two GBM stem cell (GSC) lines, named lines 1 and 83, which were derived from patients with different clinical outcomes and having different metabolic profiles (as shown by NMR spectroscopy), were irradiated with (137)Cs photons and with protons or C-ions of 62 MeV u(-1) in the dose range of 5-40 Gy. The biological effects investigated were: cell death, cell cycle progression, and DNA damage induction and repair. Preliminary results show a different response to ionising radiation between the two GSC lines for the different end points investigated. Further experiments are in progress to consolidate the data and to get more insights on the influence of radiation quality.

  9. Age at exposure to ionising radiation and cancer mortality among Hanford workers: follow up through 1994

    PubMed Central

    Wing, S; Richardson, D

    2005-01-01

    Background: Studies of workers at the plutonium production factory in Hanford, WA have led to conflicting conclusions about the role of age at exposure as a modifier of associations between ionising radiation and cancer. Aims: To evaluate the influence of age at exposure on radiation risk estimates in an updated follow up of Hanford workers. Methods: A cohort of 26 389 workers hired between 1944 and 1978 was followed through 1994 to ascertain vital status and causes of death. External radiation dose estimates were derived from personal dosimeters. Poisson regression was used to estimate associations between mortality and cumulative external radiation dose at all ages, and in specific age ranges. Results: A total of 8153 deaths were identified, 2265 of which included cancer as an underlying or contributory cause. Estimates of the excess relative risk per Sievert (ERR/Sv) for cumulative radiation doses at all ages combined were negative for all cause and leukaemia and positive for all cancer and lung cancer. Cumulative doses accrued at ages below 35, 35–44, and 45–54 showed little association with mortality. For cumulative dose accrued at ages 55 and above (10 year lag), the estimated ERR/Sv for all cancers was 3.24 (90% CI: 0.80 to 6.17), primarily due to an association with lung cancer (ERR/Sv: 9.05, 90% CI: 2.96 to 17.92). Conclusions: Associations between radiation and cancer mortality in this cohort are primarily a function of doses at older ages and deaths from lung cancer. The association of older age radiation exposures and cancer mortality is similar to observations from several other occupational studies. PMID:15961623

  10. Low-dose ionising radiation and cardiovascular diseases--Strategies for molecular epidemiological studies in Europe.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Michaela; Auvinen, Anssi; Cardis, Elisabeth; Hall, Janet; Jourdain, Jean-Rene; Laurier, Dominique; Little, Mark P; Peters, Annette; Raj, Ken; Russell, Nicola S; Tapio, Soile; Zhang, Wei; Gomolka, Maria

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that high-dose ionising radiation causes cardiovascular diseases. In contrast, the evidence for a causal relationship between long-term risk of cardiovascular diseases after moderate doses (0.5-5 Gy) is suggestive and weak after low doses (<0.5 Gy). However, evidence is emerging that doses under 0.5 Gy may also increase long-term risk of cardiovascular disease. This would have major implications for radiation protection with respect to medical use of radiation for diagnostic purposes and occupational or environmental radiation exposure. Therefore, it is of great importance to gain information about the presence and possible magnitude of radiation-related cardiovascular disease risk at doses of less than 0.5 Gy. The biological mechanisms implicated in any such effects are unclear and results from epidemiological studies are inconsistent. Molecular epidemiological studies can improve the understanding of the pathogenesis and the risk estimation of radiation-induced circulatory disease at low doses. Within the European DoReMi (Low Dose Research towards Multidisciplinary Integration) project, strategies to conduct molecular epidemiological studies in this field have been developed and evaluated. Key potentially useful European cohorts are the Mayak workers, other nuclear workers, uranium miners, Chernobyl liquidators, the Techa river residents and several diagnostic or low-dose radiotherapy patient cohorts. Criteria for informative studies are given and biomarkers to be investigated suggested. A close collaboration between epidemiology, biology and dosimetry is recommended, not only among experts in the radiation field, but also those in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26041268

  11. An isotopic analysis of ionising radiation as a source of sulphuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enghoff, M. B.; Bork, N.; Hattori, S.; Meusinger, C.; Nakagawa, M.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Danielache, S.; Ueno, Y.; Johnson, M. S.; Yoshida, N.; Svensmark, H.

    2012-06-01

    Sulphuric acid is an important factor in aerosol nucleation and growth. It has been shown that ions enhance the formation of sulphuric acid aerosols, but the exact mechanism has remained undetermined. Furthermore some studies have found a deficiency in the sulphuric acid budget, suggesting a missing source. In this study the production of sulphuric acid from SO2 through a number of different pathways is investigated. The production methods are standard gas phase oxidation by OH radicals produced by ozone photolysis with UV light, liquid phase oxidation by ozone, and gas phase oxidation initiated by gamma rays. The distributions of stable sulphur isotopes in the products and substrate were measured using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. All methods produced sulphate enriched in 34S and we find an enrichment factor (δ34S) of 8.7 ± 0.4‰ (1 standard deviation) for the UV-initiated OH reaction. Only UV light (Hg emission at 253.65 nm) produced a clear non-mass-dependent excess of 33S. The pattern of isotopic enrichment produced by gamma rays is similar, but not equal, to that produced by aqueous oxidation of SO2 by ozone. This, combined with the relative yields of the experiments, suggests a mechanism in which ionising radiation may lead to hydrated ion clusters that serve as nanoreactors for S(IV) to S(VI) conversion.

  12. An isotope view on ionising radiation as a source of sulphuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enghoff, M. B.; Bork, N.; Hattori, S.; Meusinger, C.; Nakagawa, M.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Danielache, S.; Ueno, Y.; Johnson, M. S.; Yoshida, N.; Svensmark, H.

    2012-02-01

    Sulphuric acid is an important factor in aerosol nucleation and growth. It has been shown that ions enhance the formation of sulphuric acid aerosols, but the exact mechanism has remained undetermined. Furthermore some studies have found a deficiency in the sulphuric acid budget, suggesting a missing source. In this study the production of sulphuric acid from SO2 through a number of different pathways is investigated. The production methods are standard gas phase oxidation by OH radicals produced by ozone photolysis with UV light, liquid phase oxidation by ozone, and gas phase oxidation initiated by gamma rays. The distributions of stable sulphur isotopes in the products and substrate were measured using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. All methods produced sulphate enriched in 34S and we find a δ34S value of 8.7 ± 0.4‰ (1 standard deviation) for the UV-initiated OH reaction. Only UV light (Hg emission at 253.65 nm) produced a clear non-mass-dependent excess of 33S. The pattern of isotopic enrichment produced by gamma rays is similar, but not equal, to that produced by aqueous oxidation of SO2 by ozone. This, combined with the relative yields of the experiments, suggests a mechanism in which ionising radiation may lead to hydrated ion clusters that serve as nanoreactors for S(IV) to S(VI) conversion.

  13. An isotopic view of ionising radiation as a source of sulphuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enghoff, M. B.; Bork, N.; Hattori, S.; Meusinger, C.; Nakagawa, M.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Danielache, S. O.; Ueno, Y.; Johnson, M. S.; Yoshida, N.; Svensmark, H.

    2012-04-01

    Sulphuric acid is an important factor in aerosol nucleation and growth. It has been shown that ions enhance the formation of sulphuric acid aerosols, but the exact mechanism remains undetermined. Furthermore some studies have found a deficiency in the sulphuric acid budget, suggesting a missing source. In this study the production of sulphuric acid from SO2 through a number of different pathways is investigated. The production methods are standard gas phase oxidation by OH radicals produced by ozone photolysis with UV light, liquid phase oxidation by ozone, and gas phase oxidation initiated by gamma rays. The distributions of stable sulphur isotopes in the products and substrate were measured using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. All methods produced sulphate enriched in 34S and we find a d34S value of 8.7 ± 0.4 ‰ (1 standard deviation) for the UV-initiated OH reaction. Only UV light (Hg emission at 253.65 nm) produced a clear non-mass-dependent excess of 33S. The pattern of isotopic enrichment produced by gamma rays is similar, but not equal, to that produced by aqueous oxidation of SO2 by ozone. This, combined with the relative yields of the experiments, suggests a mechanism in which ionising radiation may lead to hydrated ion clusters that serve as nanoreactors for S(IV) to S(VI) conversion.

  14. Probing Radiation Damage at the Molecular Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, N. J.; Smialek, M. A.; Moore, S. A.; Folkard, M.; Hoffmann, S. V.

    2006-12-01

    Radiation damage of DNA and other cellular components has traditionally been attributed to ionisation via direct impact of high-energy quanta or by complex radical chemistry. However recent research has shown that strand breaks in DNA may be initiated by secondary electrons and is strongly dependent upon the target DNA base identity. Such research provides the fascinating perspective that it is possible that radiation damage may be described and understood at an individual molecular level introducing new possibilites for therapy and perhaps providing an insight into the origins of life.

  15. Laser ablation and ionisation by laser plasma radiation in the atmospheric-pressure mass spectrometry of organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Pento, A V; Nikiforov, S M; Simanovsky, Ya O; Grechnikov, A A; Alimpiev, S S

    2013-01-31

    A new method was developed for the mass spectrometric analysis of organic and bioorganic compounds, which involves laser ablation with the ionisation of its products by laser-plasma radiation and enables analysing gaseous, liquid, and solid substances at atmospheric pressure without sample preparation. The capabilities of this method were demonstrated by the examples of fast pharmaceutical composition screening, real-time atmosphere composition analysis, and construction of the mass spectrometric images of organic compound distributions in biological materials. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  16. γH2AX Foci Form Preferentially in Euchromatin after Ionising-Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Cowell, Ian G.; Sunter, Nicola J.; Singh, Prim B.; Austin, Caroline A.; Durkacz, Barbara W.; Tilby, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Background The histone variant histone H2A.X comprises up to 25% of the H2A complement in mammalian cells. It is rapidly phosphorylated following exposure of cells to double-strand break (DSB) inducing agents such as ionising radiation. Within minutes of DSB generation, H2AX molecules are phosphorylated in large chromatin domains flanking DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs); these domains can be observed by immunofluorescence microscopy and are termed γH2AX foci. H2AX phosphorylation is believed to have a role mounting an efficient cellular response to DNA damage. Theoretical considerations suggest an essentially random chromosomal distribution of X-ray induced DSBs, and experimental evidence does not consistently indicate otherwise. However, we observed an apparently uneven distribution of γH2AX foci following X-irradiation with regions of the nucleus devoid of foci. Methodology/Principle Findings Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we show that focal phosphorylation of histone H2AX occurs preferentially in euchromatic regions of the genome following X-irradiation. H2AX phosphorylation has also been demonstrated previously to occur at stalled replication forks induced by UV radiation or exposure to agents such as hydroxyurea. In this study, treatment of S-phase cells with hydroxyurea lead to efficient H2AX phosphorylation in both euchromatin and heterochromatin at times when these chromatin compartments were undergoing replication. This suggests a block to H2AX phosphorylation in heterochromatin that is at least partially relieved by ongoing DNA replication. Conclusions/Significance We discus a number of possible mechanisms that could account for the observed pattern of H2AX phosphorylation. Since γH2AX is regarded as forming a platform for the recruitment or retention of other DNA repair and signaling molecules, these findings imply that the processing of DSBs in heterochromatin differs from that in euchromatic regions. The differential responses of

  17. Inter-comparison of safety culture within selected practices in Ghana utilising ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Faanu, A; Schandorf, C; Darko, E O; Boadu, M; Emi-Reynolds, G; Awudu, A R; Gyekye, P K; Kpeglo, D O

    2010-12-01

    The safety culture of selected practices and facilities in Ghana utilising radiation sources or radiation emitting devices has been assessed using a performance indicator, which provided status information on management and operating staff commitment to safety. The questionnaire was based on the following broad areas: general safety considerations, safety policy at the facility level, safety practices at the facility level, definition of responsibility, staff training, safety of the physical structure of the facility and the emergency plans. The analysis showed that the percentage levels of commitment to safety for the respective practices are as follows: conventional radiography, 23.3-90.0%; research reactor, 73.3%; gamma irradiation facility, 53.3%; radiotherapy, 76.7%; X-ray scanner, 80.0%; gamma scanner, 76.7%; industrial radiography 86.7% and nuclear density practice, 78%. None of the practices or facilities was able to satisfy all the requirements that will ensure a 100% level of safety culture.

  18. Implications for human and environmental health of low doses of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin

    2014-07-01

    The last 20 years have seen a major paradigm shift in radiation biology. Several discoveries challenge the DNA centric view which holds that DNA damage is the critical effect of radiation irrespective of dose. This theory leads to the assumption that dose and effect are simply linked - the more energy deposition, the more DNA damage and the greater the biological effect. This is embodied in radiation protection (RP) regulations as the linear-non-threshold (LNT) model. However the science underlying the LNT model is being challenged particularly in relation to the environment because it is now clear that at low doses of concern in RP, cells, tissues and organisms respond to radiation by inducing responses which are not readily predictable by dose. These include adaptive responses, bystander effects, genomic instability and low dose hypersensitivity, and are commonly described as stress responses, while recognizing that "stress" can be good as well as bad. The phenomena contribute to observed radiation responses and appear to be influenced by genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors, meaning that dose and response are not simply related. The question is whether our discovery of these phenomena means that we need to re-evaluate RP approaches. The so-called "non-targeted" mechanisms mean that low dose radiobiology is very complex and supra linear or sub-linear (even hormetic) responses are possible but their occurrence is unpredictable for any given system level. Issues which may need consideration are synergistic or antagonistic effects of other pollutants. RP, at present, only looks at radiation dose but the new (NTE) radiobiology means that chemical or physical agents, which interfere with tissue responses to low doses of radiation, could critically modulate the predicted risk. Similarly, the "health" of the organism could determine the effect of a given low dose by enabling or disabling a critical response. These issues will be discussed.

  19. Implications for human and environmental health of low doses of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin

    2014-07-01

    The last 20 years have seen a major paradigm shift in radiation biology. Several discoveries challenge the DNA centric view which holds that DNA damage is the critical effect of radiation irrespective of dose. This theory leads to the assumption that dose and effect are simply linked - the more energy deposition, the more DNA damage and the greater the biological effect. This is embodied in radiation protection (RP) regulations as the linear-non-threshold (LNT) model. However the science underlying the LNT model is being challenged particularly in relation to the environment because it is now clear that at low doses of concern in RP, cells, tissues and organisms respond to radiation by inducing responses which are not readily predictable by dose. These include adaptive responses, bystander effects, genomic instability and low dose hypersensitivity, and are commonly described as stress responses, while recognizing that "stress" can be good as well as bad. The phenomena contribute to observed radiation responses and appear to be influenced by genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors, meaning that dose and response are not simply related. The question is whether our discovery of these phenomena means that we need to re-evaluate RP approaches. The so-called "non-targeted" mechanisms mean that low dose radiobiology is very complex and supra linear or sub-linear (even hormetic) responses are possible but their occurrence is unpredictable for any given system level. Issues which may need consideration are synergistic or antagonistic effects of other pollutants. RP, at present, only looks at radiation dose but the new (NTE) radiobiology means that chemical or physical agents, which interfere with tissue responses to low doses of radiation, could critically modulate the predicted risk. Similarly, the "health" of the organism could determine the effect of a given low dose by enabling or disabling a critical response. These issues will be discussed. PMID:23664231

  20. Non-equilibrium calcium ionisation in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedemeyer-Böhm, S.; Carlsson, M.

    2011-04-01

    Context. The chromosphere of the Sun is a temporally and spatially very varying medium for which the assumption of ionisation equilibrium is questionable. Aims: Our aim is to determine the dominant processes and timescales for the ionisation equilibrium of calcium under solar chromospheric conditions. Methods: The study is based on numerical simulations with the RADYN code, which combines hydrodynamics with a detailed solution of the radiative transfer equation. The calculations include a detailed non-equilibrium treatment of hydrogen, calcium, and helium. Next to an hour long simulation sequence, additional simulations are produced, for which the stratification is slightly perturbed so that a ionisation relaxation timescale can be determined. The simulations are characterised by upwards propagating shock waves, which cause strong temperature fluctuations and variations of the (non-equilibrium) ionisation degree of calcium. Results: The passage of a hot shock front leads to a strong net ionisation of Ca II, rapidly followed by net recombination. The relaxation timescale of the calcium ionisation state is found to be of the order of a few seconds at the top of the photosphere and 10 to 30 s in the upper chromosphere. At heights around 1 Mm, we find typical values around 60 s and in extreme cases up to ~150 s. Generally, the timescales are significantly reduced in the wakes of ubiquitous hot shock fronts. The timescales can be reliably determined from a simple analysis of the eigenvalues of the transition rate matrix. The timescales are dominated by the radiative recombination from Ca III into the metastable Ca II energy levels of the 4d 2D term. These transitions depend strongly on the density of free electrons and therefore on the (non-equilibrium) ionisation degree of hydrogen, which is the main electron donor. Conclusions: The ionisation/recombination timescales derived here are too long for the assumption of an instantaneous ionisation equilibrium to be valid

  1. Determination of relevant parameters for the use of electronic dosemeters in pulsed fields of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Zutz, H; Hupe, O; Ambrosi, P; Klammer, J

    2012-09-01

    Active electronic dosemeters using counting techniques are used for radioprotection purposes in pulsed radiation fields in X-ray diagnostics or therapy. The disadvantage of the limited maximum measurable dose rate becomes significant in these radiation fields and leads to some negative effects. In this study, a set of relevant parameters for a dosemeter is described, which can be used to decide whether it is applicable in a given radiation field or not. The determination of these relevant parameters-maximum measurable dose rate in the radiation pulse, dead time of the dosemeter, indication per counting event and measurement cycle time-is specified. The results of the first measurements on the determination of these parameters for an electronic personal dosemeter of the type Thermo Fisher Scientific EPD Mk2 are shown.

  2. Kinetic transcriptomic approach revealed metabolic pathways and genotoxic-related changes implied in the Arabidopsis response to ionising radiations.

    PubMed

    Gicquel, Morgane; Taconnat, Ludivine; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Esnault, Marie-Andrée; Cabello-Hurtado, Francisco

    2012-10-01

    Plants exposed to ionising radiation (IR) have to face direct and indirect (oxidative stress) deleterious effects whose intensity depends on the dose applied and led to differential genome regulation. Transcriptomic analyses were conducted with CATMA microarray technology on Arabidopsis thaliana plantlets, 2 and 26h after exposure to the IR doses 10Gy and 40Gy. 10Gy treatment seemed to enhance antioxidative compound biosynthetic pathways whereas the 40Gy dose up-regulated ROS-scavenging enzyme genes. Transcriptomic data also highlighted a differential regulation of chloroplast constituent genes depending on the IR dose, 10Gy stimulating and 40Gy down-regulating. This probable 40Gy decrease of photosynthesis could help for the limitation of ROS production and may be coupled with programmed cell death (PCD)/senescence phenomena. Comparisons with previous transcriptomic studies on plants exposed to a 100Gy dose revealed 60 dose-dependent up-regulated genes, including notably cell cycle checkpoints to allow DNA repairing phenomena. Furthermore, the alteration of some cellular structure related gene expression corroborated a probable mitotic arrest after 40Gy. Finally, numerous heat-shock protein and chaperonin genes, known to protect proteins against stress-dependent dysfunction, were up-regulated after IR exposure.

  3. Effect of ionising radiation on polyphenolic content and antioxidant potential of parathion-treated sage (Salvia officinalis) leaves.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Issam; Fekih, Sana; Sghaier, Haitham; Bousselmi, Mehrez; Saidi, Mouldi; Landoulsi, Ahmed; Fattouch, Sami

    2013-11-15

    The γ-irradiation effects on polyphenolic content and antioxidant capacity of parathion-pretreated leaves of Salvia officinalis plant were investigated. The analysis of phenolic extracts of sage without parathion showed that irradiation decreased polyphenolic content significantly (p<0.05) by 30% and 45% at 2 and 4kGy, respectively, compared to non-irradiated samples. The same trend was observed for the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), as assessed by the anionic DPPH and cationic ABTS radical-scavenging assays. The antioxidant potential decreased significantly (p<0.01) at 2 and 4kGy, by 11-20% and 40-44%, respectively. The results obtained with a pure chlorogenic acid solution confirmed the degradation of phenols; however, its TEAC was significantly (p<0.01) increased following irradiation. Degradation products of parathion formed by irradiation seem to protect against a decline of antioxidant capacity and reduce polyphenolic loss. Ionising radiation was found to be useful in breaking down pesticide residues without inducing significant losses in polyphenols.

  4. Pre-Service Teachers' Subject Knowledge of and Attitudes about Radioactivity and Ionising Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colclough, Nicholas Denys; Lock, Roger; Soares, Allan

    2011-01-01

    This study focussed on secondary school (11-18 years) pre-service teachers' (n = 73) knowledge of and attitudes towards risks associated with alpha, beta, and gamma radiations. A multi-method approach was used with physics, chemistry, biology, and history graduates undertaking the one-year initial teacher training, Post Graduate Certificate in…

  5. Uncertainties in estimating health risks associated with exposure to ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Preston, R Julian; Boice, John D; Brill, A Bertrand; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Conolly, Rory; Hoffman, F Owen; Hornung, Richard W; Kocher, David C; Land, Charles E; Shore, Roy E; Woloschak, Gayle E

    2013-09-01

    The information for the present discussion on the uncertainties associated with estimation of radiation risks and probability of disease causation was assembled for the recently published NCRP Report No. 171 on this topic. This memorandum provides a timely overview of the topic, given that quantitative uncertainty analysis is the state of the art in health risk assessment and given its potential importance to developments in radiation protection. Over the past decade the increasing volume of epidemiology data and the supporting radiobiology findings have aided in the reduction of uncertainty in the risk estimates derived. However, it is equally apparent that there remain significant uncertainties related to dose assessment, low dose and low dose-rate extrapolation approaches (e.g. the selection of an appropriate dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor), the biological effectiveness where considerations of the health effects of high-LET and lower-energy low-LET radiations are required and the transfer of risks from a population for which health effects data are available to one for which such data are not available. The impact of radiation on human health has focused in recent years on cancer, although there has been a decided increase in the data for noncancer effects together with more reliable estimates of the risk following radiation exposure, even at relatively low doses (notably for cataracts and cardiovascular disease). New approaches for the estimation of hereditary risk have been developed with the use of human data whenever feasible, although the current estimates of heritable radiation effects still are based on mouse data because of an absence of effects in human studies. Uncertainties associated with estimation of these different types of health effects are discussed in a qualitative and semi-quantitative manner as appropriate. The way forward would seem to require additional epidemiological studies, especially studies of low dose and low dose

  6. Uncertainties in estimating health risks associated with exposure to ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Preston, R Julian; Boice, John D; Brill, A Bertrand; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Conolly, Rory; Hoffman, F Owen; Hornung, Richard W; Kocher, David C; Land, Charles E; Shore, Roy E; Woloschak, Gayle E

    2013-09-01

    The information for the present discussion on the uncertainties associated with estimation of radiation risks and probability of disease causation was assembled for the recently published NCRP Report No. 171 on this topic. This memorandum provides a timely overview of the topic, given that quantitative uncertainty analysis is the state of the art in health risk assessment and given its potential importance to developments in radiation protection. Over the past decade the increasing volume of epidemiology data and the supporting radiobiology findings have aided in the reduction of uncertainty in the risk estimates derived. However, it is equally apparent that there remain significant uncertainties related to dose assessment, low dose and low dose-rate extrapolation approaches (e.g. the selection of an appropriate dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor), the biological effectiveness where considerations of the health effects of high-LET and lower-energy low-LET radiations are required and the transfer of risks from a population for which health effects data are available to one for which such data are not available. The impact of radiation on human health has focused in recent years on cancer, although there has been a decided increase in the data for noncancer effects together with more reliable estimates of the risk following radiation exposure, even at relatively low doses (notably for cataracts and cardiovascular disease). New approaches for the estimation of hereditary risk have been developed with the use of human data whenever feasible, although the current estimates of heritable radiation effects still are based on mouse data because of an absence of effects in human studies. Uncertainties associated with estimation of these different types of health effects are discussed in a qualitative and semi-quantitative manner as appropriate. The way forward would seem to require additional epidemiological studies, especially studies of low dose and low dose

  7. Non-fluoroscopic navigation systems for radiofrequency catheter ablation for supraventricular tachycardia reduce ionising radiation exposure

    PubMed Central

    See, Jason; Amora, Jonah L; Lee, Sheldon; Lim, Paul; Teo, Wee Siong; Tan, Boon Yew; Ho, Kah Leng; Lee, Chee Wan; Ching, Chi Keong

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The use of non-fluoroscopic systems (NFS) to guide radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) for the treatment of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) is associated with lower radiation exposure. This study aimed to determine if NFS reduces fluoroscopy time, radiation dose and procedure time. METHODS We prospectively enrolled patients undergoing RFCA for SVT. NFS included EnSite™ NavX™ or CARTO® mapping. We compared procedure and fluoroscopy times, and radiation exposure between NFS and conventional fluoroscopy (CF) cohorts. Procedural success, complications and one-year success rates were reported. RESULTS A total of 200 patients over 27 months were included and RFCA was guided by NFS for 79 patients; those with atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT), left-sided atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia (AVRT) and right-sided AVRT were included (n = 101, 63 and 36, respectively). Fluoroscopy times were significantly lower with NFS than with CF (10.8 ± 11.1 minutes vs. 32.0 ± 27.5 minutes; p < 0.001). The mean fluoroscopic dose area product was also significantly reduced with NFS (NSF: 5,382 ± 5,768 mGy*cm2 vs. CF: 21,070 ± 23,311 mGy*cm2; p < 0.001); for all SVT subtypes. There was no significant reduction in procedure time, except for left-sided AVRT ablation (NFS: 79.2 minutes vs. CF: 116.4 minutes; p = 0.001). Procedural success rates were comparable (NFS: 97.5% vs. CF: 98.3%) and at one-year follow-up, there was no significant difference in the recurrence rates (NFS: 5.2% vs. CF: 4.2%). No clinically significant complications were observed in both groups. CONCLUSION The use of NFS for RFCA for SVT is safe, with significantly reduced radiation dose and fluoroscopy time. PMID:26805664

  8. Follow-up of children exposed to ionising radiation from cardiac catheterisation: the Coccinelle study

    PubMed Central

    Baysson, H.; Nkoumazok, B.; Barnaoui, S.; Réhel, J. L.; Girodon, B.; Milani, G.; Boudjemline, Y.; Bonnet, D.; Laurier, D.; Bernier, M. O.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac catheterisation has become an essential tool in the diagnosis and treatment of children with a wide variety of congenital and acquired forms of cardiovascular disease. Despite the clear clinical benefit to the patient, radiation exposure from paediatric cardiac catheterisation procedures (CCPs) may be substantial. Given children's greater sensitivity to radiation and the longer life span during which radiation health effects can develop, an epidemiological cohort study, named Coccinelle or ‘Ladybird’ (French acronym for ‘Cohorte sur le risque de cancer après cardiologie interventionnelle pédiatrique’), is carried out in France to evaluate the risks of leukaemia and solid cancers in this population. A total number of 8000 included children are expected. Individual CCP-related doses will be assessed for each child included in the cohort. For each CCP performed, dosimetric parameters (dose–area product, fluoroscopy time and total number of cine frames) are retrieved retrospectively. Organ doses, especially to the lung, the oesophagus and the thyroid, are calculated with PCXMC software. The cohort will be followed up through linkage with French paediatric cancer registries. PMID:25833897

  9. [Individual response to ionising radiation: What predictive assay(s) to choose?].

    PubMed

    Granzotto, Adeline; Joubert, Aurélie; Viau, Muriel; Devic, Clément; Maalouf, Mira; Thomas, Charles; Vogin, Guillaume; Malek, Karim; Colin, Catherine; Balosso, Jacques; Foray, Nicolas

    2011-02-01

    Individual response to ionizing radiation is an important information required to apply an efficient radiotherapy treatment against tumour and to avoid any adverse effects in normal tissues. In 1981, Fertil and Malaise have demonstrated that the post-irradiation local tumor control determined in vivo is correlated with clonogenic cell survival assessed in vitro. Furthermore, these authors have reminded the relevance of the concept of intrinsic radiosensitivity that is specific to each individual organ (Fertil and Malaise, 1981) [1]. To date, since clonogenicity assays are too time-consuming and do not provide any other molecular information, a plethora of research groups have attempted to determine the molecular bases of intrinsic radiosensitivity in order to propose reliable and faster predictive assays. To this aim, several approaches have been developed. Notably, the recent revolution in genomic and proteomic technologies is providing a considerable number of data but their link with radiosensitivity still remains to be elucidated. On another hand, the systematic screening of some candidate genes potentially involved in the radiation response is highlighting the complexity of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of DNA damage sensoring and signalling and shows that an abnormal radiation response is not necessarily due to the impairment of one single protein. Finally, more modest approaches consisting in focusing some specific functions of DNA repair seem to provide more reliable clues to predict over-acute reactions caused by radiotherapy. In this review, we endeavoured to analyse the contributions of these major approaches to predict human radiosensitivity. PMID:21333944

  10. Deterministic effect of lens at leukergy of patients who received low doses of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Yeltokova, M; Zharliganova, D; Shaidarov, M; Bakhtin, M; Kazymbet, P; Tel, L; Dossakhanov, A; Kozhakbayeva, M; Hoshi, M

    2015-09-01

    To explore the possibility to use the lens extract as an in vitro stimulator to conduct a test of stimulated leukergy in liquidators of the accident consequences (LAC) on Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) with a cataract in the long-term period. The study sample included 72 men-LAC on CNPP, at the age from 42 to 65 y, who have a cataract. The comparison group consisted of 60 men, with a cataract, of the same age, and who were not exposed to radiation. The control group was composed of 60 men, at the age of 42-58 y without lens pathology. Phenomenon of the stimulated leukergy was revealed in persons who had been exposed to radiation in the dose of 18.2 ± 0.58 cGy and was observed in 5.7-8.05 % (P < 0.001), suggesting a continued high auto-aggression to the lens antigens, and the strength of cell-mediated immunity.

  11. Deterministic effect of lens at leukergy of patients who received low doses of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Yeltokova, M; Zharliganova, D; Shaidarov, M; Bakhtin, M; Kazymbet, P; Tel, L; Dossakhanov, A; Kozhakbayeva, M; Hoshi, M

    2015-09-01

    To explore the possibility to use the lens extract as an in vitro stimulator to conduct a test of stimulated leukergy in liquidators of the accident consequences (LAC) on Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) with a cataract in the long-term period. The study sample included 72 men-LAC on CNPP, at the age from 42 to 65 y, who have a cataract. The comparison group consisted of 60 men, with a cataract, of the same age, and who were not exposed to radiation. The control group was composed of 60 men, at the age of 42-58 y without lens pathology. Phenomenon of the stimulated leukergy was revealed in persons who had been exposed to radiation in the dose of 18.2 ± 0.58 cGy and was observed in 5.7-8.05 % (P < 0.001), suggesting a continued high auto-aggression to the lens antigens, and the strength of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:25969524

  12. The long-term effects of acute exposure to ionising radiation on survival and fertility in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Sarapultseva, Elena I; Dubrova, Yuri E

    2016-10-01

    The results of recent studies have provided strong evidence for the transgenerational effects of parental exposure to ionising radiation and chemical mutagens. However, the transgenerational effects of parental exposure on survival and fertility remain poorly understood. To establish whether parental irradiation can affect the survival and fertility of directly exposed organisms and their offspring, crustacean Daphnia magna were given 10, 100, 1000 and 10,000mGy of acute γ-rays. Exposure to 1000 and 10,000mGy significantly compromised the viability of irradiated Daphnia and their first-generation progeny, but did not affect the second-generation progeny. The fertility of F0 and F1Daphnia gradually declined with the dose of parental exposure and significantly decreased at dose of 100mGy and at higher doses. The effects of parental irradiation on the number of broods were only observed among the F0Daphnia exposed to 1000 and 10,000mGy, whereas the brood size was equally affected in the two consecutive generations. In contrast, the F2 total fertility was compromised only among progeny of parents that received the highest dose of 10,000mGy. We propose that the decreased fertility observed among the F2 progeny of parents exposed to 10,000mGy is attributed to transgenerational effects of parental irradiation. Our results also indicate a substantial recovery of the F2 progeny of irradiated F0Daphnia exposed to the lower doses of acute γ-rays.

  13. Risk of leukaemia mortality from exposure to ionising radiation in US nuclear workers: a pooled case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Robert D; Bertke, Stephen; Waters, Kathleen M; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K

    2015-01-01

    Objective To follow-up on earlier studies of the leukaemogenicity of occupational ionising radiation exposure. Methods We conducted a nested case-control analysis of leukaemia mortality in a pooled cohort of US nuclear workers followed through 2005. Each case was matched to four controls on attained age. Exposures were estimated from available records. General relative risk models were used to estimate the excess relative risk (ERR) of leukaemia, excluding chronic lymphocytic (CLL), acute myeloid leukaemia, chronic myeloid leukaemia and CLL while controlling for potential confounders. Preferred exposure lags and time-windows of risks were calculated using joint maximum likelihood. Dose-response was also examined using linear, linear-quadratic, categorical and restricted cubic spline models. Results There were 369 leukaemia deaths in 105 245 US nuclear workers. The adjusted ERR for non-CLL leukaemia was 0.09 (95% CI −0.17 to 0.65) per 100 mGy. Elevated non-CLL risks were observed from exposures occurring 6–14 years prior to attained age of cases (ERR per 100 mGy=1.9; 95% CI <0 to 8.0). Lagged models indicated non-linearity of risk at very low (<10 mGy) and high (>100 mGy) doses, which contributed to the imprecision of results in linear models. Similar risk attenuation was not evident in time-windows-based models. Conclusions Risk estimates were in reasonable agreement with previous estimates, with the temporality of non-CLL leukaemia risk as a dominant factor in dose-response analyses. Future research should focus on methods that improve evaluations of the dose-response, particularly in the low-dose range. PMID:23000827

  14. The long-term effects of acute exposure to ionising radiation on survival and fertility in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Sarapultseva, Elena I; Dubrova, Yuri E

    2016-10-01

    The results of recent studies have provided strong evidence for the transgenerational effects of parental exposure to ionising radiation and chemical mutagens. However, the transgenerational effects of parental exposure on survival and fertility remain poorly understood. To establish whether parental irradiation can affect the survival and fertility of directly exposed organisms and their offspring, crustacean Daphnia magna were given 10, 100, 1000 and 10,000mGy of acute γ-rays. Exposure to 1000 and 10,000mGy significantly compromised the viability of irradiated Daphnia and their first-generation progeny, but did not affect the second-generation progeny. The fertility of F0 and F1Daphnia gradually declined with the dose of parental exposure and significantly decreased at dose of 100mGy and at higher doses. The effects of parental irradiation on the number of broods were only observed among the F0Daphnia exposed to 1000 and 10,000mGy, whereas the brood size was equally affected in the two consecutive generations. In contrast, the F2 total fertility was compromised only among progeny of parents that received the highest dose of 10,000mGy. We propose that the decreased fertility observed among the F2 progeny of parents exposed to 10,000mGy is attributed to transgenerational effects of parental irradiation. Our results also indicate a substantial recovery of the F2 progeny of irradiated F0Daphnia exposed to the lower doses of acute γ-rays. PMID:27288911

  15. Chromosome instability of HPRT-mutant subclones induced by ionising radiation of various let

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govorun, R. D.; Koshlan, I. V.; Koshlan, N. A.; Krasavin, E. A.; Shmakova, N. L.

    The induction of HPRT-mutations and survival of Chinese hamster cells (line B11ii-FAF28, clone 431) were studied after irradiation by 4He and 12C-ions of various LET (20 - 360 keV/μm), produced by the U-200 heavy ion accelerator. The RBE increases with LET up to the maximum at 100-200 keV/μm and then decreases. Cytogenetic analysis was performed on the HPRT-mutant subclones selected from unirradiated Chinese hamster V-79 cells and from HPRT- mutant subclones that arose after exposure to γ-rays, 1GeV protons and 14N-ions (LET - 77 keV/μm), produced by the synchrophasotron and the U-400M heavy ion accelerator. Slow growing mutant subclones were observed. The cytogenetic properties of individual clones were highly heterogeneous and chromosome instability was observed in both spontaneous and radiation-induced mutants. Chromosome instability was highest among spontaneous mutants and decreased with increasing LET.

  16. Determination of methemoglobin in human blood after ionising radiation by EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polakovs, M.; Mironova-Ulmane, N.; Pavlenko, A.; Aboltins, A.

    2015-03-01

    In the present work presents results of investigations of radiation influence on blood of patients examined by radio-isotopes diagnosis (Tc99m), blood of Chernobyl clean-up workers and human blood irradiated by LINAC using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). The EPR spectroscopy reveals information on electronic states of transition metal ions, particularly Fe3+ in different spin states. It is shown that EPR spectra of blood of patients before examination has signal from metal-protein transferrin (g=4.3) and after administration of radioisotope proves signal of Fe3+ (methemaglobin) in the high spin state (g=6.0). The EPR spectra of Chernobyl liquidator display number of signals including low and high state of ion Fe3+ (g = 2.0 and g=6.0), and transferrin (g=4.3). The EPR spectra of irradiated human blood by LINAC (linear accelerator) have only signal Fe3+ (methemaglobin) in low-spin state with g = 2.0.

  17. The assessment of ionising radiation impact on the cooling pond freshwater ecosystem non-human biota from the Ignalina NPP operation beginning to shut down and initial decommissioning.

    PubMed

    Mazeika, J; Marciulioniene, D; Nedveckaite, T; Jefanova, O

    2016-01-01

    The radiological doses to non-human biota of freshwater ecosystem in the Ignalina NPP cooling pond - Lake Druksiai were evaluated for several cases including the plant's operation period and initial decommissioning activities, using the ERICA 1.2 code with IAEA SRS-19 models integrated approach and tool. Among the Lake Druksiai freshwater ecosystem reference organisms investigated the highest exposure dose rate was determined for bottom fauna - benthic organisms (mollusc-bivalves, crustaceans, mollusc-gastropods, insect larvae), and among the other reference organisms - for vascular plants. The mean and maximum total dose rate values due to anthropogenic radionuclide ionising radiation impact in all investigated cases were lower than the ERICA screening dose rate value of 10 μGy/h. The main exposure of reference organisms as a result of Ignalina NPP former effluent to Lake Druksiai is due to ionizing radiation of radionuclides (60)Co and (137)Cs, of predicted releases to Lake Druksiai during initial decommissioning period - due to radionuclides (60)Co, (134)Cs and (137)Cs, and as a result of predicted releases to Lake Druksiai from low- and intermediate-level short-lived radioactive waste disposal site in 30-100 year period - due to radionuclides (99)Tc and (3)H. The risk quotient expected values in all investigated cases were <1, and therefore the risk to non-human biota can be considered negligible with the exception of a conservative risk quotient for insect larvae. Radiological protection of non-human biota in Lake Druksiai, the Ignalina NPP cooling pond, is both feasible and acceptable. PMID:26397747

  18. Risk of cancer from occupational exposure to ionising radiation: retrospective cohort study of workers in France, the United Kingdom, and the United States (INWORKS)

    PubMed Central

    Cardis, Elisabeth; Daniels, Robert D; Gillies, Michael; O’Hagan, Jacqueline A; Hamra, Ghassan B; Haylock, Richard; Laurier, Dominique; Leuraud, Klervi; Moissonnier, Monika; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Kesminiene, Ausrele

    2015-01-01

    Study question Is protracted exposure to low doses of ionising radiation associated with an increased risk of solid cancer? Methods In this cohort study, 308 297 workers in the nuclear industry from France, the United Kingdom, and the United States with detailed monitoring data for external exposure to ionising radiation were linked to death registries. Excess relative rate per Gy of radiation dose for mortality from cancer was estimated. Follow-up encompassed 8.2 million person years. Of 66 632 known deaths by the end of follow-up, 17 957 were due to solid cancers. Study answer and limitations Results suggest a linear increase in the rate of cancer with increasing radiation exposure. The average cumulative colon dose estimated among exposed workers was 20.9 mGy (median 4.1 mGy). The estimated rate of mortality from all cancers excluding leukaemia increased with cumulative dose by 48% per Gy (90% confidence interval 20% to 79%), lagged by 10 years. Similar associations were seen for mortality from all solid cancers (47% (18% to 79%)), and within each country. The estimated association over the dose range of 0-100 mGy was similar in magnitude to that obtained over the entire dose range but less precise. Smoking and occupational asbestos exposure are potential confounders; however, exclusion of deaths from lung cancer and pleural cancer did not affect the estimated association. Despite substantial efforts to characterise the performance of the radiation dosimeters used, the possibility of measurement error remains. What this study adds The study provides a direct estimate of the association between protracted low dose exposure to ionising radiation and solid cancer mortality. Although high dose rate exposures are thought to be more dangerous than low dose rate exposures, the risk per unit of radiation dose for cancer among radiation workers was similar to estimates derived from studies of Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Quantifying the cancer risks associated

  19. Ionising radiation and risk of death from leukaemia and lymphoma in radiation-monitored workers (INWORKS): an international cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Leuraud, Klervi; Richardson, David B; Cardis, Elisabeth; Daniels, Robert D; Gillies, Michael; O'Hagan, Jacqueline A; Hamra, Ghassan B; Haylock, Richard; Laurier, Dominique; Moissonnier, Monika; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Kesminiene, Ausrele

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background There is much uncertainty about the risks of leukaemia and lymphoma after repeated or protracted low-dose radiation exposure typical of occupational, environmental, and diagnostic medical settings. We quantified associations between protracted low-dose radiation exposures and leukaemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma mortality among radiation-monitored adults employed in France, the UK, and the USA. Methods We assembled a cohort of 308 297 radiation-monitored workers employed for at least 1 year by the Atomic Energy Commission, AREVA Nuclear Cycle, or the National Electricity Company in France, the Departments of Energy and Defence in the USA, and nuclear industry employers included in the National Registry for Radiation Workers in the UK. The cohort was followed up for a total of 8·22 million person-years. We ascertained deaths caused by leukaemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. We used Poisson regression to quantify associations between estimated red bone marrow absorbed dose and leukaemia and lymphoma mortality. Findings Doses were accrued at very low rates (mean 1·1 mGy per year, SD 2·6). The excess relative risk of leukaemia mortality (excluding chronic lymphocytic leukaemia) was 2·96 per Gy (90% CI 1·17–5·21; lagged 2 years), most notably because of an association between radiation dose and mortality from chronic myeloid leukaemia (excess relative risk per Gy 10·45, 90% CI 4·48–19·65). Interpretation This study provides strong evidence of positive associations between protracted low-dose radiation exposure and leukaemia. Funding Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan, Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, AREVA, Electricité de France, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, US Department of Energy, US Department of Health and Human Services, University of North Carolina, Public Health England. PMID:26436129

  20. On the mechanism of populating 3p levels of neon under pumping by a hard ioniser

    SciTech Connect

    Khasenov, M U

    2011-03-31

    The effect of quenching additives on the luminescence properties of helium - neon mixtures under pumping by {alpha} particles emitted from {sup 210}Po atoms is considered. It is concluded that, under excitation by a heavy charged particle, the population of the 3p'[1/2]{sub 0} level of neon is not related to the dissociative recombination of molecular ions. It is suggested that the most likely channels for populating the 3p level are the excitation transfer from metastable helium atoms to neon atoms and direct excitation of neon by nuclear particles and secondary electrons. (lasers and active media)

  1. Electron-impact excited term ionisation along the Boron isonuclear sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballance, C. P.; Lee, T.; Ludlow, J. A.; Loch, S. D.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2010-03-01

    Non-perturbative theoretical methods over the last decade have mainly focused on electron-impact ionization of the ground and first metastable states for light fusion related species [1]. However, collisional-radiative models predict that effective ionisation rates, which include the ionisation from excited levels of an atom, can be an order of magnitude greater greater than those which include the groundstate alone. For example, this stepwise ionisation has been experimentally confirmed by measurements taken at the DIII-D facility as part of a Li transport study, where excited state ionisation was found to be essential in describing Li transport [2]. We shall present in our poster an overview of excited state ionisation along the boron ionisation sequence. Using boron as a test case, we focus on the most appropriate use of computationally non-perturbative methods and simpler non-pertubative/semi-empirical methods to account for excited ionisation along other iso-nuclear sequences.[4pt] [1] Griffin D C and Pindzola M S, Adv. Atm. Mol. Opt. Phys. 54, 203 (2006)[0pt] [2] Allain J P, Whyte D G and Brooks J N, Nucl. Fusion 44 655 (2004)

  2. System-Level Radiation Hardening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladbury, Ray

    2014-01-01

    Although system-level radiation hardening can enable the use of high-performance components and enhance the capabilities of a spacecraft, hardening techniques can be costly and can compromise the very performance designers sought from the high-performance components. Moreover, such techniques often result in a complicated design, especially if several complex commercial microcircuits are used, each posing its own hardening challenges. The latter risk is particularly acute for Commercial-Off-The-Shelf components since high-performance parts (e.g. double-data-rate synchronous dynamic random access memories - DDR SDRAMs) may require other high-performance commercial parts (e.g. processors) to support their operation. For these reasons, it is essential that system-level radiation hardening be a coordinated effort, from setting requirements through testing up to and including validation.

  3. Introduction, audit and review of guidelines for delegated authorization of nuclear medicine investigations in compliance with the Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations 2000.

    PubMed

    Harris, A M; Greaves, C D; Taylor, C M; Taylor, C; Segasby, C A; Tindale, W B

    2003-08-01

    The introduction of the Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations 2000 in Great Britain required every nuclear medicine investigation to be justified by a practitioner holding an appropriate Administration of Radioactive Substances Committee (ARSAC) certificate. The task of authorizing the radiation exposure may be performed by the practitioner (direct authorization) or delegated to an appropriately trained operator working to written guidelines approved by the practitioner (delegated authorization). In this study, we look at the process of implementation, audit and review of a set of Delegated Authorization Guidelines (DAG). The process of drafting the DAG is outlined. Following the introduction of the DAG, an audit of nuclear medicine referrals was performed at two sites for a period of 3 months. Each referral was compared with the DAG to determine whether it matched the criteria set out. If it did not match, it was further categorized as being due to: (1) insufficient referral information; or (2) clinical indication not included in the DAG. All non-matching requests were reviewed by the practitioner. Four hundred and thirty-seven of 632 (69%) referrals fitted the DAG, 12% (n=75) required clarification from the referrer before fitting with the criteria and 19% (n=120) were directly authorized by the practitioner. From those referrals that were directly authorized, some additional indications were identified and the DAG were subsequently revised. In conclusion, a delegated authorization procedure for nuclear medicine investigations can be implemented successfully. Regular audit is essential. This study identified the need to improve the format of the request card and to obtain additional referral information from the referrer.

  4. A new approach to studying the effects of ionising radiation on single cells using FTIR synchrotron microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipiec, E.; Birarda, G.; Kowalska, J.; Lekki, J.; Vaccari, L.; Wiecheć, A.; Wood, B. R.; Kwiatek, W. M.

    2013-12-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on single cells using a proton source was investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy. The prostate cancer cells (DU-145) were irradiated by a specific number (50, 200, 400, 2000 and 4000) of protons per cell. Next after fixing the cells with 70% ethanol micro-FTIR spectra were obtained using both: (a) the synchrotron radiation source with a Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride (MCT) detector and (b) a globar source with a focal plane array (FPA) detector. FTIR spectra obtained from both instrumental configurations were analyzed independently to investigate the changes in the DNA phosphodiester region (1150-950 cm-1) of irradiated and control (untreated by ionizing radiation) cells. A Principal Component Analysis (PCA) scores plot revealed distinct clusters for all groups of irradiated cells, even for those irradiated by the smallest dose of protons. The dose-dependent changes in the relative intensities of DNA peak at 970 cm-1 (ribose-phosphate skeletal motions), along with a shift of the O-P-O band corresponding to the symmetric phosphodiester stretching mode at 1090 cm-1 were observed. The results demonstrate that FTIR spectroscopy is a promising tool to investigate DNA damage in single cells and may become an important tool in assessing cell damage following radiotherapy.

  5. Assessing the performance under ionising radiation of lead tungstate scintillators for EM calorimetry in the CLAS12 Forward Tagger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fegan, S.; Auffray, E.; Battaglieri, M.; Buchanan, E.; Caiffi, B.; Celentano, A.; Colaneri, L.; D`Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; Dormenev, V.; Fanchini, E.; Lanza, L.; Novotny, R. W.; Parodi, F.; Rizzo, A.; Sokhan, D.; Tarasov, I.; Zonta, I.

    2015-07-01

    The well-established technology of electromagnetic calorimetry using Lead Tungstate crystals has recently seen an upheaval, with the closure of one of the most experienced large-scale suppliers of such crystals, the Bogoroditsk Technical Chemical Plant (BTCP), which was instrumental in the development of mass production procedures for PWO-II, the current benchmark for this scintillator. Obtaining alternative supplies of Lead Tungstate crystals matching the demanding specifications of contemporary calorimeter devices now presents a significant challenge to detector research and development programmes. In this paper we describe a programme of assessment carried out for the selection, based upon the performance under irradiation, of Lead Tungstate crystals for use in the Forward Tagger device, part of the CLAS12 detector in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The crystals tested were acquired from SICCAS, the Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The tests performed are intended to maximise the performance of the detector within the practicalities of the crystal manufacturing process. Results of light transmission, before and after gamma ray irradiation, are presented and used to calculate dk, the induced radiation absorption coefficient, at 420 nm, the peak of the Lead Tungstate emission spectrum. Results for the SICCAS crystals are compared with identical measurements carried out on Bogoroditsk samples, which were acquired for the Forward Tagger development program before the closure of the facility. Also presented are a series of tests performed to determine the feasibility of recovering radiation damage to the crystals using illumination from an LED, with such illumination available in the Forward Tagger from a light monitoring system integral to the detector.

  6. Adsorption of ionisable pesticides in soils.

    PubMed

    Kah, M; Brown, C D

    2006-01-01

    different proportion of ionic and neutral forms of the pesticide present at each pH level but also from the presence of surfaces with pH-dependent charges in soils. Soil organic matter generally promotes adsorption, although a negative influence has sometimes been reported. Clay and oxides can also play a significant role in some cases. So far, no modelling approach has been applied successfully to a range of ionisable pesticides to predict their adsorption in soils. The standardization of experimental settings and the application of approaches specific to a particular class of pesticide or different type of soil might be necessary to describe the complexity of interactions among ionisable molecules. Degradation of ionisable pesticides is influenced by soil pH in a particular way that relates to changes in sorption, changes in composition and activity of the microbial community, and to shifts in the balance between different degradative mechanisms. PMID:17016919

  7. Concerns with low-level ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yalow, R.S.

    1994-12-31

    Populations have been studied in geographic areas of increased natural radiation, in radiation-exposed workers, in patients medically exposed, and in accidental exposures. No reproducible evidence exists of harmful effects from increases in background radiation three to ten times the usual levels. There is no increase in leukemia or other cancers among American military participants in nuclear testing, no increase in leukemia or thyroid cancer among medical patients receiving {sup 131}I for diagnosis or treatment of hypothyroidism, and no increase in lung cancer among nonsmokers exposed to increased radon in the home. The association of radiation with the atomic bomb and with excessive regulatory and health physics as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) radiation levels practices has created a climate of fear about the dangers of radiation at any level. However, there is no evidence that radiation exposures at the levels equivalent to medical usage are harmful. The unjustified excessive concern with radiation at any level, however, precludes beneficial uses of radiation and radioactivity in medicine, science, and industry.

  8. Outdoor radiofrequency radiation levels in the West Bank-Palestine.

    PubMed

    Lahham, Adnan; Hammash, Alaa

    2012-05-01

    This work presents the results of exposure levels to radio frequency (RF) emission from different sources in the environment of the West Bank-Palestine. These RF emitters include FM and TV broadcasting stations and mobile phone base stations. Power densities were measured at 65 locations distributed over the West Bank area. These locations include mainly centres of the major cities. Also a 24 h activity level was investigated for a mobile phone base station to determine the maximum activity level for this kind of RF emitters. All measurements were conducted at a height of 1.7 m above ground level using hand held Narda SRM 3000 spectrum analyzer with isotropic antenna capable of collecting RF signals in the frequency band from 75 MHz to 3 GHz. The average value of power density resulted from FM radio broadcasting in all investigated locations was 0.148 μW cm(-2), from TV broadcasting was 0.007 μW cm(-2) and from mobile phone base station was 0.089 μW cm(-2). The maximum total exposure evaluated at any location was 3.86 μW cm(-2). The corresponding exposure quotient calculated for this site was 0.02. This value is well below unity indicating compliance with the International Commission on non-ionising Radiation protection guidelines. Contributions from all relevant RF sources to the total exposure were evaluated and found to be ~62 % from FM radio, 3 % for TV broadcasting and 35 % from mobile phone base stations. The average total exposure from all investigated RF sources was 0.37 μW cm(-2).

  9. Outdoor radiofrequency radiation levels in the West Bank-Palestine.

    PubMed

    Lahham, Adnan; Hammash, Alaa

    2012-05-01

    This work presents the results of exposure levels to radio frequency (RF) emission from different sources in the environment of the West Bank-Palestine. These RF emitters include FM and TV broadcasting stations and mobile phone base stations. Power densities were measured at 65 locations distributed over the West Bank area. These locations include mainly centres of the major cities. Also a 24 h activity level was investigated for a mobile phone base station to determine the maximum activity level for this kind of RF emitters. All measurements were conducted at a height of 1.7 m above ground level using hand held Narda SRM 3000 spectrum analyzer with isotropic antenna capable of collecting RF signals in the frequency band from 75 MHz to 3 GHz. The average value of power density resulted from FM radio broadcasting in all investigated locations was 0.148 μW cm(-2), from TV broadcasting was 0.007 μW cm(-2) and from mobile phone base station was 0.089 μW cm(-2). The maximum total exposure evaluated at any location was 3.86 μW cm(-2). The corresponding exposure quotient calculated for this site was 0.02. This value is well below unity indicating compliance with the International Commission on non-ionising Radiation protection guidelines. Contributions from all relevant RF sources to the total exposure were evaluated and found to be ~62 % from FM radio, 3 % for TV broadcasting and 35 % from mobile phone base stations. The average total exposure from all investigated RF sources was 0.37 μW cm(-2). PMID:21835841

  10. Assessment of RF radiation levels in the vicinity of 60 GSM mobile phone base stations in Iran.

    PubMed

    Nayyeri, Vahid; Hashemi, Seyed Mohammad; Borna, Maryam; Jalilian, Hamid-Reza; Soleimani, Mohammad

    2013-07-01

    Increasing development of mobile communication infrastructure while enhancing availability of the technology raises concerns among the public, who see more cell towers erected each day, about possible health effects of electromagnetic radiations. Thereon, a survey of radio-frequency radiation from 60 GSM base stations was carried out in Tehran, Iran at several places mostly located in major medical and educational centres. Measurements were performed at 15 locations near each base station site, i.e. 900 locations in total. Since there are other RF radiation sources such as broadcasting services whose carrier frequencies are <3 GHz, the whole band of 27 MHz to 3 GHz has been assessed for hazardous exposures as well. The results were compared with the relevant guideline of International Commission on Non-Ionising Radiation Protection and that of Iran, confirming radiation exposure levels being satisfactorily below defined limits and non-detrimental.

  11. Positron impact ionisation phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moxom, J.

    A magnetically guided beam of nearly-monoenergetic slow positrons has been used to study positron impact ionisation phenomena in gases. A novel hemispherical scattering cell incorporating an efficient ion extraction and detection system has been developed and has been utilised throughout this work. The energy spectra for the electrons ejected around 0° relative to the incident beam, following positron impact ionisation of Ar, have been measured by a time-of-flight method and a retarding electric field analyzer. The angular acceptance of the electron detection system has been estimated and used to compare the measured spectra with the double differential cross-sections calculated by Mandal et al (1986), Sil et al (1991) and Schultz and Reinhold (1990). The importance of the electron-capture-to-the-continuum process is discussed in this context and found to be minor at small forward angles, in contrast to the case of heavy positively charged projectiles. The apparatus was modified to produce a pulsed beam of slow positrons and utilised to measure in detail the total ionisation cross-section (Qt+) for a variety of atomic and molecular targets. For Ar, He and H2, Qt+ which includes contributions from Ps formation, has been subtracted from corresponding total cross-sections, in order to deduce the behaviour of the elastic scattering cross-section (Qel) in the vicinity of the Ps formation threshold (Eps). Here a small change in the gradient of Qel, has been found. The energy dependencies of the Qt+ for He, Ne and Ar, close to Eps have been interpreted in terms of threshold theory. In the case of Ar the outgoing Ps appears to be predominantly s-wave in character. For He and Ne the analysis suggests that the Ps contains significant contributions from a number of partial waves. In the case of O 2, structure in Qt+ has been found, which is attributed to coupling between two inelastic channels, namely Ps formation and excitation to the Schuman-Runge continuum.

  12. Ultraviolet radiation levels during the Antarctic spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, John E.; Snell, Hilary E.

    1988-01-01

    The decrease in atmospheric ozone over Antarctica during spring implies enhanced levels of ultraviolet (UV) radiation received at the earth's surface. Model calculations show that UV irradiances encountered during the occurrence of an Antarctic 'ozone hole' remain less than those typical of a summer solstice at low to middle latitudes. However, the low ozone amounts observed in October 1987 imply biologically effective irradiances for McMurdo Station, Antarctica, that are comparable to or greater than those for the same location at December solstice. Life indigenous to Antarctica thereby experiences a greatly extended period of summerlike UV radiation levels.

  13. Background compensation for a radiation level monitor

    DOEpatents

    Keefe, D.J.

    1975-12-01

    Background compensation in a device such as a hand and foot monitor is provided by digital means using a scaler. With no radiation level test initiated, a scaler is down-counted from zero according to the background measured. With a radiation level test initiated, the scaler is up-counted from the previous down-count position according to the radiation emitted from the monitored object and an alarm is generated if, with the scaler having crossed zero in the positive going direction, a particular number is exceeded in a specific time period after initiation of the test. If the test is initiated while the scale is down-counting, the background count from the previous down- count stored in a memory is used as the initial starting point for the up-count.

  14. Optimisation of radiolysis of Reactive Red 120 dye in aqueous solution using ionising (60)Co gamma radiation by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Padmanaban, V C; Giri Nandagopal, M S; Achary, Anant; Vasudevan, V N; Selvaraju, N

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, employing radiation technology is gaining great interest in degradation of industrial effluents. In this work the possibility of using gamma irradiation to degrade Reactive Red 120 (C.I.292775) was explored. The effects of pH, dose of gamma irradiation and concentration of dye were examined and their interaction were also established based on their response. For the analysis and optimisation of variables, three factor three level Box-Wilson face centred central composite design (CCF) was used. Analysis of variance with R(2) = 0.9988, adjusted R(2) = 0.9981 and the adequate precision value of 122.303 indicates that the CCF model can be used. The coefficient of variation (0.54%) indicates the reliability of the model. The dose of gamma irradiation (kGy) and the concentration of dye (mg/L) showed significant effects on the degradation of RR 120, while a difference of 6 to 10% degradation was observed in extending the pH towards the acid or alkali range from pH 7.00. The maximum concentration of dye degraded was observed as 347.509 mg/L at initial pH: 7.0, dose of gamma irradiation: 5.94 kGy and initial concentration of dye: 500 mg/L. This predicted value was found to be in agreement with the experimental value on the optimised conditions. PMID:27332851

  15. Ionised Iron Lines in X-ray Reflection Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, D. R.; Ross, R. R.; Fabian, A. C.

    2000-10-01

    We present results from new calculations of the reflected X-ray spectrum from ionised accretion disks in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). These calculations improve on our previous models by including the condition of hydrostatic balance in the vertical direction, following the work of Nayakshin, Kazanas & Kallman (2000). Our results show that, for gas pressure dominated accretion discs, ionised iron features are found in the reflection spectrum over a range of conditions. We also explore extending our results into radiation pressure dominated discs, and discuss the limitations of the current models.

  16. Epidemiological investigations of aircrew: an occupational group with low-level cosmic radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Zeeb, Hajo; Hammer, Gaël P; Blettner, Maria

    2012-03-01

    Aircrew and passengers are exposed to low-level cosmic ionising radiation. Annual effective doses for flight crew have been estimated to be in the order of 2-5 mSv and can attain 75 mSv at career end. Epidemiological studies in this occupational group have been conducted over the last 15-20 years, usually with a focus on radiation-associated cancer. These studies are summarised in this note. Overall cancer risk was not elevated in most studies and subpopulations analysed, while malignant melanoma, other skin cancers and breast cancer in female aircrew have shown elevated incidence, with lesser risk elevations in terms of mortality. In some studies, including the large German cohort, brain cancer risk appears elevated. Cardiovascular mortality risks were generally very low. Dose information for pilots was usually derived from calculation procedures based on routine licence information, types of aircraft and routes/hours flown, but not on direct measurements. However, dose estimates have shown high validity when compared with measured values. No clear-cut dose-response patterns pointing to a higher risk for those with higher cumulative doses were found. Studies on other health outcomes have shown mixed results. Overall, aircrew are a highly selected group with many specific characteristics and exposures that might also influence cancers or other health outcomes. Radiation-associated health effects have not been clearly established in the studies available so far.

  17. Epidemiological investigations of aircrew: an occupational group with low-level cosmic radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Zeeb, Hajo; Hammer, Gaël P; Blettner, Maria

    2012-03-01

    Aircrew and passengers are exposed to low-level cosmic ionising radiation. Annual effective doses for flight crew have been estimated to be in the order of 2-5 mSv and can attain 75 mSv at career end. Epidemiological studies in this occupational group have been conducted over the last 15-20 years, usually with a focus on radiation-associated cancer. These studies are summarised in this note. Overall cancer risk was not elevated in most studies and subpopulations analysed, while malignant melanoma, other skin cancers and breast cancer in female aircrew have shown elevated incidence, with lesser risk elevations in terms of mortality. In some studies, including the large German cohort, brain cancer risk appears elevated. Cardiovascular mortality risks were generally very low. Dose information for pilots was usually derived from calculation procedures based on routine licence information, types of aircraft and routes/hours flown, but not on direct measurements. However, dose estimates have shown high validity when compared with measured values. No clear-cut dose-response patterns pointing to a higher risk for those with higher cumulative doses were found. Studies on other health outcomes have shown mixed results. Overall, aircrew are a highly selected group with many specific characteristics and exposures that might also influence cancers or other health outcomes. Radiation-associated health effects have not been clearly established in the studies available so far. PMID:22395103

  18. Comprehensive data on ionising radiation from Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in the town of Miharu, Fukushima Prefecture: The Misho Project.

    PubMed

    Koike, T; Suzuki, Y; Genyu, S; Kobayashi, I; Komori, H; Otsu, H; Sakuma, H; Sakuma, K; Sarausad, E M; Shimada, K; Shinozuka, T; Tamura, H; Tsukada, K; Ukai, M; Yamamoto, T O

    2014-09-01

    Data related to radioactivity released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident on 15 March 2011 gathered by residents of Miharu, Fukushima Prefecture, and by Tohoku University are presented. These data sets consist of (1) the earliest radiation monitoring by a Geiger counter in the town, (2) ratios of radioactivity between (132)Te and (137)Cs for a wide area between Fukushima and Tokyo, (3) radiation measurement of soil samples collected from 18 school grounds, and (4) external radiation exposure of 1400 students using OSL badges. By combining and analysing these various data sets, a curve for the cumulative total external exposure as a function of time, with 16 : 00 h on 15 March 2011 being time zero, is obtained. The average cumulative external dosage is estimated to be 10 mSv (σ = 4.2 mSv) over 10 years. In addition, the initiative that the residents of Miharu took in response to the FDNPP accident, which became known as The Misho Project (MP), is documented; in particular, the time at which the municipality instructed the immediate ingestion of iodine tablets by those under the age of 40, 13 : 00 h on 15 March 2011, is assessed.

  19. Comprehensive data on ionising radiation from Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in the town of Miharu, Fukushima Prefecture: The Misho Project.

    PubMed

    Koike, T; Suzuki, Y; Genyu, S; Kobayashi, I; Komori, H; Otsu, H; Sakuma, H; Sakuma, K; Sarausad, E M; Shimada, K; Shinozuka, T; Tamura, H; Tsukada, K; Ukai, M; Yamamoto, T O

    2014-09-01

    Data related to radioactivity released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident on 15 March 2011 gathered by residents of Miharu, Fukushima Prefecture, and by Tohoku University are presented. These data sets consist of (1) the earliest radiation monitoring by a Geiger counter in the town, (2) ratios of radioactivity between (132)Te and (137)Cs for a wide area between Fukushima and Tokyo, (3) radiation measurement of soil samples collected from 18 school grounds, and (4) external radiation exposure of 1400 students using OSL badges. By combining and analysing these various data sets, a curve for the cumulative total external exposure as a function of time, with 16 : 00 h on 15 March 2011 being time zero, is obtained. The average cumulative external dosage is estimated to be 10 mSv (σ = 4.2 mSv) over 10 years. In addition, the initiative that the residents of Miharu took in response to the FDNPP accident, which became known as The Misho Project (MP), is documented; in particular, the time at which the municipality instructed the immediate ingestion of iodine tablets by those under the age of 40, 13 : 00 h on 15 March 2011, is assessed. PMID:25125455

  20. Epidemiological studies of Fukushima residents exposed to ionising radiation from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant prefecture--a preliminary review of current plans.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Suminori

    2012-03-01

    It is now more than six months since the beginning of the accident on 11 March 2011 at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan. The Japanese government and local health authorities have started to collect the information necessary to estimate radiation doses received by those living in the area around the plant, drafted plans for the health care of residents, and started to implement some of them. This paper reviews and discusses the studies necessary for risk evaluation of cancer and non-cancer diseases, including those already planned, mainly from the view point of evaluating health risk using epidemiological approaches. In the long run, it is important to establish a cohort with a control group. Even if the cumulative doses are estimated to be so low that it is difficult to evaluate the risk of cancer and non-cancer diseases, it is necessary to conduct such a study to reassure residents. The health care programme of the Fukushima Prefecture government, including health check-ups of residents, will help to assess indirect effects of radiation exposure, including psychological problems. The success of any studies of radiation epidemiology depends on the collection of accurate information on radiation doses received by the study subjects. However, some of the dosimetry surveys were not conducted in a timely manner. (It should be recognised, though, that such a problem might have been inevitable, considering the chaotic condition after the nuclear accident.) Accurate estimation of the radiation dose received by each resident is not only important for scientific risk evaluation but also to inform each resident about his or her potential risk. Otherwise, residents will bear an undue psychological burden from uncertainties regarding their radiation exposure and its health consequences. One of other important tasks in Fukushima is the improvement of the quality of the regional cancer registry in this prefecture. It is also important to start thyroid cancer

  1. Monitoring radiation belt particle precipitation - automatic detection of enhanced transient ionisation in the lower plasmasphere using subionospheric narrow band VLF signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, P.; Lichtenberger, J.; Ferencz, Cs.

    2009-04-01

    Signals of naval VLF transmitters, propagating long distances along the Earth-ionosphere waveguide (EIWG) have been widely applied as effective tools for monitoring transient ionization at mesospheric altitudes. Perturbations in recorded amplitude and/or phase data series of stable frequency signals may refer to the effect of transient enhanced ionization in the EIWG, due to e.g. loss-cone precipitation of trapped energetic electrons (Carpenter et al., 1984, Dowden and Adams, 1990), burst of solar plasma particles (Clilverd et al., 2001). The contribution of precipitating particles are thought to be substantial in certain Sun-to-Earth energy flow processes in the upper atmosphere (Rodger et al., 2005). Narrow band VLF measuring network has been set up, developed and operated in Hungary, running in the last decade almost continuously, dedicated to monitor ionization enhancement regions along numerous transmitter-receiver paths. This setup is based on Omnipal and Ultra-MSK equipment, logging amplitude and phase data of received signals, sampled at frequencies of selected VLF transmitters. Signal trajectories, selected for recording represent proper configuration to survey transient ionization caused by energetic particles in the sub-polar region, such as effect of scattered particles of the inner radiation belt. Reprocessing of the mass archived recordings has been started using a newly developed signal processing code, detecting and classifying different sort of perturbations automatically on narrow band VLF series. Occurrence rates, daily and seasonal variation, statistics of transient ionization enhancements, their geographic distribution within the surveyed range and time period, and correlation with intense geomagnetic and/or Solar event is yielded by this analysis. References: Carpenter, D.L., Inan, U.S., Trimpi, M.L., Helliwell, R.A., and Katsufrakis, J.P.: Perturbations of subionospheric LF and MF signals due to whistler-induced electron precipitation burst

  2. Analysis of intact bacteria using rapid evaporative ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Strittmatter, Nicole; Jones, Emrys A; Veselkov, Kirill A; Rebec, Monica; Bundy, Jacob G; Takats, Zoltan

    2013-07-14

    An identification system for microorganisms based on recently developed rapid evaporative ionisation mass spectrometry (REIMS) is presented. Nine bacterial species cultured on various growth media were correctly identified to family-, genus-, and species-level based on their different mass spectral fingerprints using a cross-validated maximum margin criterion model.

  3. Ionisers in the management of bronchial asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Nogrady, S G; Furnass, S B

    1983-01-01

    Because of recent interest in the possible benefits to asthmatic patients of negative ion generators and the largely uncontrolled and inconclusive nature of earlier studies a double blind crossover study of this treatment was carried out in 20 subjects with stable asthma over six months. After an initial two week period without an ioniser, active or placebo ionisers were installed in subjects' bedrooms for two eight week periods separated by a four week "washout" period when no ioniser was present. The study was completed by a final four week period when no ioniser was present. Subjects were randomly allocated to receive an active or a placebo ioniser first. Subjects recorded their peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) twice daily, completed a daily symptom score questionnaire, and noted any treatment they took on a diary card. Recordings were completed throughout the trial. Ion counts and dust concentrations were measured in subjects' bedrooms during the study. Mean ion counts rose considerably when ionisers were activated (p less than 0.001). There were no significant differences in PEFR, symptom score, or consumption of medication between the periods that active ionisers and either no ionisers or placebo ionisers were in operation. This study has failed to show a statistically significant benefit in asthmatic subjects from the use of negative ion generators. PMID:6364442

  4. Characterisation of ship diesel primary particulate matter at the molecular level by means of ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry coupled to laser desorption ionisation--comparison of feed fuel, filter extracts and direct particle measurements.

    PubMed

    Rüger, Christopher P; Sklorz, Martin; Schwemer, Theo; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    In this study, positive-mode laser desorption-ionisation ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry (LDI-FT-ICR-MS) was applied to study combustion aerosol samples obtained from a ship diesel engine as well as the feed fuel, used to operate the engine. Furthermore, particulate matter was sampled from the exhaust tube using an impactor and analysed directly from the impaction foil without sample treatment. From the high percentage of shared sum formula as well as similarities in the chemical spread of aerosol and heavy fuel oil, results indicate that the primary aerosol mainly consists of survived, unburned species from the feed fuel. The effect of pyrosynthesis could be observed and was slightly more pronounced for the CH-class compared to other compound classes, but in summary not dominant. Alkylation pattern as well as the aromaticity distribution, using the double bond equivalent, revealed a shift towards lower alkylation state for the aerosol. The alkylation pattern of the most dominant series revealed a higher correlation between different aerosol samples than between aerosol and feed samples. This was confirmed by cluster analysis. Overall, this study shows that LDI-FT-ICR-MS can be successfully applied for the analysis of combustion aerosol at the molecular level and that sum formula information can be used to identify chemical differences between aerosol and fuel as well as between different size fractions of the particulate matter.

  5. Ionisation Equilibrium for the Non-Maxwellian Electron n-Distributions in Solar Flares: Updated Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzifčáková, Elena; Dudík, Jaroslav

    2015-12-01

    We use the latest available atomic data to calculate the ionisation and recombination rates for the non-Maxwellian n-distributions, which were shown previously to provide a good fit to the enhanced intensities of dielectronic satellite lines during solar flares. The ionisation and recombination coefficients are subsequently used to derive the ionisation equilibrium. To do so, we consider odd values of n ranging from 1 to 19, i.e., from Maxwellian to strongly non-Maxwellian cases. These calculations involve all elements with proton number up to 30, i.e., H to Zn. The n-distributions modify both the ionisation and the recombination rates. The ionisation rates decrease more steeply at lower pseudo-temperatures, while the radiative recombination rate is reduced due to a lower number of low-energy electrons. The peaks of the dielectronic recombination rates become narrower. These changes are reflected in the ionisation equilibrium. Ion abundance peaks become narrower and can also be shifted, mostly towards higher temperatures. The He-like ions are an important exception, as they are formed in a larger temperature range than that for the Maxwellian distribution. The ions Si xiii - xiv used previously for the diagnostics of the n-distributions are affected only weakly, confirming the determination of n. The ionisation equilibria are available as the electronic supplementary material in a format compatible with the CHIANTI database.

  6. Galactic cosmic ray radiation levels in spacecraft on interplanetary missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, J. L.; Nealy, J. E.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Wood, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    Using the Langley Research Center Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) transport computer code (HZETRN) and the Computerized Anatomical Man (CAM) model, crew radiation levels inside manned spacecraft on interplanetary missions are estimated. These radiation-level estimates include particle fluxes, LET (Linear Energy Transfer) spectra, absorbed dose, and dose equivalent within various organs of interest in GCR protection studies. Changes in these radiation levels resulting from the use of various different types of shield materials are presented.

  7. Vertical profile measurements of lower troposphere ionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R. G.; Nicoll, K. A.; Aplin, K. L.

    2014-11-01

    Vertical soundings of the atmospheric ion production rate have been obtained from Geiger counters integrated with conventional meteorological radiosondes. In launches made from Reading (UK) during 2013-2014, the Regener-Pfotzer ionisation maximum was at an altitude equivalent to a pressure of (63.1±2.4) hPa, or, expressed in terms of the local air density, (0.101±0.005) kg m-3. The measured ionisation profiles have been evaluated against the Usoskin-Kovaltsov model and, separately, surface neutron monitor data from Oulu. Model ionisation rates agree well with the observed cosmic ray ionisation below 20 km altitude. Above 10 km, the measured ionisation rates also correlate well with simultaneous neutron monitor data, although, consistently with previous work, measured variability at the ionisation maximum is greater than that found by the neutron monitor. However, in the lower atmosphere (below 5 km altitude), agreement between the measurements and simultaneous neutron monitor data is poor. For studies of transient lower atmosphere phenomena associated with cosmic ray ionisation, this indicates the need for in situ ionisation measurements and improved lower atmosphere parameterisations.

  8. Responses to the low-level-radiation controversy

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.

    1981-10-07

    Some data sets dealing with the hazards of low-level radiation are discussed. It is concluded that none of these reports, individually or collectively, changes appreciably or even significantly the evaluations of possible low-level radiation effects that have been made by several authoritative national and international groups. (ACR)

  9. Physical models implemented in the GEANT4-DNA extension of the GEANT-4 toolkit for calculating initial radiation damage at the molecular level.

    PubMed

    Villagrasa, C; Francis, Z; Incerti, S

    2011-02-01

    The ROSIRIS project aims to study the radiobiology of integrated systems for medical treatment optimisation using ionising radiations and evaluate the associated risk. In the framework of this project, one research focus is the interpretation of the initial radio-induced damage in DNA created by ionising radiation (and detected by γ-H2AX foci analysis) from the track structure of the incident particles. In order to calculate the track structure of ionising particles at a nanometric level, the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit was used. Geant4 (Object Oriented Programming Architecture in C++) offers a common platform, available free to all users and relatively easy to use. Nevertheless, the current low-energy threshold for electromagnetic processes in GEANT4 is set to 1 keV (250 eV using the Livermore processes), which is an unsuitable value for nanometric applications. To lower this energy threshold, the necessary interaction processes and models were identified, and the corresponding available cross sections collected from the literature. They are mostly based on the plane-wave Born approximation (first Born approximation, or FBA) for inelastic interactions and on semi-empirical models for energies where the FBA fails (at low energies). In this paper, the extensions that have been introduced into the 9.3 release of the Geant4 toolkit are described, the so-called Geant4-DNA extension, including a set of processes and models adapted in this study and permitting the simulation of electron (8 eV-1 MeV), proton (100 eV-100 MeV) and alpha particle (1 keV-10 MeV) interactions in liquid water. PMID:21186212

  10. Blood lead levels in radiator repair workers in Colorado.

    PubMed

    Dalton, C B; McCammon, J B; Hoffman, R E; Baron, R C

    1997-01-01

    A laboratory-based blood lead surveillance system in Colorado identified radiator repair workers as having the highest blood lead levels of all worker groups reported. A survey of 42 radiator repair shops in ten locales throughout Colorado was undertaken to estimate the prevalence of workers with elevated blood lead levels > 25 micrograms/dL. The survey was designed to test the sensitivity of the surveillance system and to assess working conditions and practices in the radiator repair industry in Colorado. Of 63 workers, 39 (62%) had blood lead levels > 25 micrograms/dL. The sensitivity of the surveillance system for detecting radiator repair workers with elevated blood lead levels was estimated at 11%. None of the radiator repair shops had adequate local exhaust ventilation. Work practice and engineering modifications are needed to reduce lead exposure in this industry.

  11. Radiation levels on empty cylinders containing heel material

    SciTech Connect

    Shockley, C.W.

    1991-12-31

    Empty UF{sub 6} cylinders containing heel material were found to emit radiation levels in excess of 200 mr/hr, the maximum amount stated in ORO-651. The radiation levels were as high as 335 mr/hr for thick wall (48X and 48Y) cylinders and 1050 mr/hr for thin wall (48G and 48H) cylinders. The high readings were found only on the bottom of the cylinders. These radiation levels exceeded the maximum levels established in DOT 49 CFR, Part 173.441 for shipment of cylinders. Holding periods of four weeks for thick-wall cylinders and ten weeks for thin-wall cylinders were established to allow the radiation levels to decay prior to shipment.

  12. Radiation levels in the SSC interaction regions

    SciTech Connect

    Groom, D.E.

    1988-06-10

    The radiation environment in a typical SSC detector has been evaluated using the best available particle production models coupled with Monte Carlo simulations of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades. The problems studied include direct charged particle dose, dose inside a calorimeter from the cascades produced by incident photons and hadrons, the flux of neutrons and photons backscattered from the calorimeter into a central cavity, and neutron flux in the calorimeter. The luminosity lifetime at the SSC is dominated by collision losses in the interaction regions, where the luminosity is equivalent to losing an entire full-energy proton beam into the apparatus every six days. The result of an average p-p collision can be described quite simply. The mean charged multiplicity is about 110, and the particles are distributed nearly uniformly in pseudorapidity ({eta}) over all the angles of interest. The transverse momentum distribution is independent of angle, and for our purposes may be written as p{perpendicular}exp(-p{perpendicular}/{beta}). The mean value of p{perpendicular} may be as high as 0.6 GeV/c. Most of the radiation is produced by the very abundant low-p{perpendicular} particles. The dose or neutron fluence produced by individual particles in this energy region are simulated over a wide variety of conditions, and several measurements serve to confirm the simulation results. In general, the response (a dose, fluence, the number of backscattered neutrons, etc.) for an incident particle of momentum p can be parameterized in the form Np{sup {alpha}}, where 0.5 < {alpha}< 1.0. The authors believe most of their results to be accurate to within a factor of two or three, sufficiently precise to serve as the basis for detailed designs.

  13. Effects of low levels of radiation on humans

    SciTech Connect

    Auxier, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    The state of knowledge on effects of low-level ionizing radiations on humans is reviewed. Several problems relating to dose thresholds or lack of thresholds for several types of cancer and high LET radiations and the effects of fractionation and dose protection are discussed. (ACR)

  14. Examining a link between SPEs and ground level radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overholt, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Researchers have previously found a correlation between solar proton events (SPEs) and congenital malformations (CMs). A similar correlation has also been found between long term solar variability and CMs. We examine the ionizing radiation dose from these events as well as the largest events on record to determine whether these events are capable of producing these effects. We show that the total ionizing radiation dose (consisting of neutrons and muons) at ground level is insufficient for production of the observed increases in CM rate under the current paradigm regarding ionizing radiation from muons and neutrons. Current research on the subject shows that our assumptions regarding muonic ionizing radiation may be underestimating their biologic effect. We recommend further experimentation regarding the radiation dose due to muons, as this may prove to be a more substantial contribution to our radiation environment than previously assumed.

  15. Network-level fallout radiation effects assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    National Security calls for the ability to maintain communication capabilities in times of national disaster, which could include a nuclear attack. Nuclear detonation has two basic by-products for which telecommunication equipments are susceptible to damage. These are electromagnetic pulse (EMP) and fallout radiation. The purposes of the EMP Mitigation Program are to analyze and to lessen the effects of EMP and fallout radiation on national telecommunications resources. Fallout radiation occurs after the initial intense high-frequency EMP, and is the subject of this analysis. Fallout radiation is the residual radiation that remains in the atmosphere after a nuclear blast, and which can be carried by weather conditions to locations far from the detonation point. This analysis focuses on the effects of fallout radiation on the telecommunications network of the American Telephone and Telegraph Co. (AT and T). This assessment of AT and T-network's communications-capabilities uses a network-level approach to assess fallout-radiation effects on the network's performance. The approach used was developed for assessing network-level EMP effects on Public Switched Network communication capabilities. Details are given on how EMP assessments utilize this method. Equipment-level fallout-radiation survivability data is also required.

  16. Effects of high vs low-level radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.

    1983-01-01

    In order to appreciate adequately the various possible effects of radiation, particularly from high-level vs low-level radiation exposure (HLRE, vs LLRE), it is necessary to understand the substantial differences between (a) exposure as used in exposure-incidence curves, which are always initially linear and without threshold, and (b) dose as used in dose-response curves, which always have a threshold, above which the function is curvilinear with increasing slope. The differences are discussed first in terms of generally familiar nonradiation situations involving dose vs exposure, and then specifically in terms of exposure to radiation, vs a dose of radiation. Examples are given of relevant biomedical findings illustrating that, while dose can be used with HLRE, it is inappropriate and misleading the LLRE where exposure is the conceptually correct measure of the amount of radiation involved.

  17. Biophysical modelling of early and delayed radiation damage at chromosome level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, S.; Eidelman, Y.

    Exposure by ionising radiation increases cancer risk in human population Cancer is thought to originate from an altered expression of certain number of specific genes It is now widely recognised that chromosome aberrations CA are involved in stable change in expression of genes by gain or loss of their functions Thus CA can contribute to initiation or progression of cancer Therefore understanding mechanisms of CA formation in the course of cancer development might be valuable tool for quantification and prognosis of different stages of radiation carcinogenesis Early CA are defined as aberrations induced in first post-irradiation mitotic cycle The present work describes the original biophysical technique for early CA modelling It includes the following simulation steps the ionising particle track structure the structural organisation of all chromosomes in G 0 G 1 cell nucleus spatial distribution of radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks dsb within chromosomes dsb rejoining and misrejoining modelling cell cycle taking into account mitotic delay which results in complex time dependence of aberrant cells in first mitosis The results on prediction of dose-response curves for simple and complex CA measured in cells undergoing first division cycle are presented in comparison with recent experimental data There is increasing evidence that CA are also observed in descendents of irradiated cells many generations after direct DNA damage These delayed CA or chromosome instability CI are thought to be a manifestation of genome

  18. Predicted levels of human radiation tolerance extrapolated from clinical studies of radiation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lushbaugh, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    Results of clinical studies of radiation effects on man are used to evaluate space radiation hazards encountered during manned space travel. Considered are effects of photons as well as of mixed fission neutrons and gamma irradiations in establishing body radiosensitivity and tolerance levels. Upper and lower dose-response-time relations for acute radiation syndromes in patients indicate that man is more than sufficiently radioresistant to make the risks of an early radiation effect during one short space mission intangibly small in relation to the other nonradiation risks involved.

  19. Characterizing dose response relationships: Chronic gamma radiation in Lemna minor induces oxidative stress and altered polyploidy level.

    PubMed

    Van Hoeck, Arne; Horemans, Nele; Van Hees, May; Nauts, Robin; Knapen, Dries; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Blust, Ronny

    2015-12-01

    The biological effects and interactions of different radiation types in plants are still far from understood. Among different radiation types, external gamma radiation treatments have been mostly studied to assess the biological impact of radiation toxicity in organisms. Upon exposure of plants to gamma radiation, ionisation events can cause, either directly or indirectly, severe biological damage to DNA and other biomolecules. However, the biological responses and oxidative stress related mechanisms under chronic radiation conditions are poorly understood in plant systems. In the following study, it was questioned if the Lemna minor growth inhibition test is a suitable approach to also assess the radiotoxicity of this freshwater plant. Therefore, L. minor plants were continuously exposed for seven days to 12 different dose rate levels covering almost six orders of magnitude starting from 80 μGy h(-1) up to 1.5 Gy h(-1). Subsequently, growth, antioxidative defence system and genomic responses of L. minor plants were evaluated. Although L. minor plants could survive the exposure treatment at environmental relevant exposure conditions, higher dose rate levels induced dose dependent growth inhibitions starting from approximately 27 mGy h(-1). A ten-percentage growth inhibition of frond area Effective Dose Rate (EDR10) was estimated at 95 ± 7 mGy h(-1), followed by 153 ± 13 mGy h(-1) and 169 ± 12 mGy h(-1) on fresh weight and frond number, respectively. Up to a dose rate of approximately 5 mGy h(-1), antioxidative enzymes and metabolites remained unaffected in plants. A significant change in catalase enzyme activity was found at 27 mGy h(-1) which was accompanied with significant increases of other antioxidative enzyme activities and shifts in ascorbate and glutathione content at higher dose rate levels, indicating an increase in oxidative stress in plants. Recent plant research hypothesized that environmental genotoxic stress conditions

  20. Characterizing dose response relationships: Chronic gamma radiation in Lemna minor induces oxidative stress and altered polyploidy level.

    PubMed

    Van Hoeck, Arne; Horemans, Nele; Van Hees, May; Nauts, Robin; Knapen, Dries; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Blust, Ronny

    2015-12-01

    The biological effects and interactions of different radiation types in plants are still far from understood. Among different radiation types, external gamma radiation treatments have been mostly studied to assess the biological impact of radiation toxicity in organisms. Upon exposure of plants to gamma radiation, ionisation events can cause, either directly or indirectly, severe biological damage to DNA and other biomolecules. However, the biological responses and oxidative stress related mechanisms under chronic radiation conditions are poorly understood in plant systems. In the following study, it was questioned if the Lemna minor growth inhibition test is a suitable approach to also assess the radiotoxicity of this freshwater plant. Therefore, L. minor plants were continuously exposed for seven days to 12 different dose rate levels covering almost six orders of magnitude starting from 80 μGy h(-1) up to 1.5 Gy h(-1). Subsequently, growth, antioxidative defence system and genomic responses of L. minor plants were evaluated. Although L. minor plants could survive the exposure treatment at environmental relevant exposure conditions, higher dose rate levels induced dose dependent growth inhibitions starting from approximately 27 mGy h(-1). A ten-percentage growth inhibition of frond area Effective Dose Rate (EDR10) was estimated at 95 ± 7 mGy h(-1), followed by 153 ± 13 mGy h(-1) and 169 ± 12 mGy h(-1) on fresh weight and frond number, respectively. Up to a dose rate of approximately 5 mGy h(-1), antioxidative enzymes and metabolites remained unaffected in plants. A significant change in catalase enzyme activity was found at 27 mGy h(-1) which was accompanied with significant increases of other antioxidative enzyme activities and shifts in ascorbate and glutathione content at higher dose rate levels, indicating an increase in oxidative stress in plants. Recent plant research hypothesized that environmental genotoxic stress conditions

  1. Cloud Induced Enhancement of Ground Level Solar Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inman, R.; Chu, Y.; Coimbra, C.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol and cloud cover are typically associated with long and short-term variability of all three solar radiation components at the ground level. Although aerosol attenuation can be a substantial factor for Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) in some microclimates, the strongest factor for ground level irradiance attenuation is cloud cover which acts on time-scales associated with strong solar power generation fluctuations. Furthermore, the driving effects of clouds on radiative energy budgets include shortwave cooling, as a result of absorption of incoming solar radiation, and longwave heating, due to reduced emission of thermal radiation by relatively cool cloud tops. Under special circumstances, the presence of clouds in the circumsolar region may lead to the reverse; a local increase in the diffuse downwelling solar radiation due to directional scattering from clouds. This solar beam effect exceed the losses resulting from the backscattering of radiation into space. Such conditions result in radiation levels that temporarily exceed the localized clear sky values. These phenomena are referred to as Cloud Enhancement Events (CEEs). There are currently two fundamental CEE mechanisms discussed in the literature. The first involves well-defined, and optically thick cloud edges close to, but not obscuring, the solar disk. The effect here is of producing little or no change in the normal beam radiation. In this case, cloud edges in the vicinity of the sun create a non-isotropic increase in the local diffuse radiation field with respect to the isotropic scattering of a clear-sky atmosphere. The second type of CEE allows for partial or full obstruction of the solar disk by an optically thin diffuser such as fine clouds, haze or fog; which results in an enhanced but still nearly isotropic diffuse radiation field. In this study, an entire year of solar radiation data and total sky images taken at 30 second resolution at the University of California, Merced (UCM

  2. Commentary on the Appropriate Radiation Level for Evacuations1

    PubMed Central

    Cuttler, Jerry M.

    2012-01-01

    This commentary reviews the international radiation protection policy that resulted in the evacuation of more than 90,000 residents from areas near the Fukushima Daiichi NPS and the enormous expenditures to protect them against a hypothetical risk of cancer. The basis for the precautionary measures is shown to be invalid; the radiation level chosen for evacuation is not conservative. The actions caused unnecessary fear and suffering. An appropriate level for evacuation is recommended. Radical changes to the ICRP recommendations are long overdue. PMID:23304099

  3. The effects of radiative transfer on low-level cyclogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, M.J.; Raman, S.

    1995-04-01

    Many investigators have documented the role that thermodynamic forcing due to radiative flux divergence plays in the enhancement or generation of circulation. Most of these studies involve large-scale systems, small-scale systems such as thunderstorms, and squall lines. The generation of circulation on large scales results from the creation of divergence in the upper troposphere and the maintenance of low-level potentially unstable air, and the maintenance of baroclinicity throughout the atmosphere. On smaller scales, radiative flux divergence acts similarly. In the thunderstorms and squall lines, the radiative forcing acts as a pump, increasing the divergence at the top of the storm systems and increasing the updraft velocity and the intensity of inflow at mid-levels in the storm systems. Other researchers have examined the role of surface processes and low-level baroclinicity in east coast cyclogenesis. In this paper, we examine the interactive role that radiative flux divergence, clouds, and surface processes play in low-level cyclogenesis and the creation or maintenance of the boundary layer baroclinicity.

  4. Radiation efficiency of earthquake sources at different hierarchical levels

    SciTech Connect

    Kocharyan, G. G.

    2015-10-27

    Such factors as earthquake size and its mechanism define common trends in alteration of radiation efficiency. The macroscopic parameter that controls the efficiency of a seismic source is stiffness of fault or fracture. The regularities of this parameter alteration with scale define several hierarchical levels, within which earthquake characteristics obey different laws. Small variations of physical and mechanical properties of the fault principal slip zone can lead to dramatic differences both in the amplitude of released stress and in the amount of radiated energy.

  5. Equipment level fallout radiation-effects approach. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-10

    National Security Decision Directive (NSDD) 97 and Executive Order (EO) 12472 call for the ability to maintain National Security Emergency Preparedness (NSEP) communication capabilities in times of national disaster, which includes a nuclear attack. The Office of the Manager, National Communications System (OMNCS) sponsors the Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Mitigation Program to evaluate and, where possible, mitigate the effects of the nuclear attack. Fallout radiation has been identified as an environment that may effect the performance of the regional and national telecommunication system. This report presents the investigations in the network-level fallout radiation methodology used to determine the effects of this environment. Alternative techniques are presented to improve the methodology.

  6. Melatonin protection from chronic, low-level ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Russel J; Korkmaz, Ahmet; Ma, Shuran; Rosales-Corral, Sergio; Tan, Dun-Xian

    2011-12-15

    In the current survey, we summarize the published literature which supports the use of melatonin, an endogenously produced molecule, as a protective agent against chronic, low-level ionizing radiation. Under in vitro conditions, melatonin uniformly was found to protect cellular DNA and plasmid super coiled DNA from ionizing radiation damage due to Cs(137) or X-radiation exposure. Likewise, in an in vivo/in vitro study in which humans were given melatonin orally and then their blood lymphocytes were collected and exposed to Cs(137) ionizing radiation, nuclear DNA from the cells of those individuals who consumed melatonin (and had elevated blood levels) was less damaged than that from control individuals. In in vivo studies as well, melatonin given to animals prevented DNA and lipid damage (including limiting membrane rigidity) and reduced the percentage of animals that died when they had been exposed to Cs(137) or Co(60) radiation. Melatonin's ability to protect macromolecules from the damage inflicted by ionizing radiation likely stems from its high efficacy as a direct free radical scavenger and possibly also due to its ability to stimulate antioxidative enzymes. Melatonin is readily absorbed when taken orally or via any other route. Melatonin's ease of self administration and its virtual absence of toxicity or side effects, even when consumed over very long periods of time, are essential when large populations are exposed to lingering radioactive contamination such as occurs as a result of an inadvertent nuclear accident, an intentional nuclear explosion or the detonation of a radiological dispersion device, i.e., a "dirty" bomb. PMID:22185900

  7. The contribution of interventional cardiology procedures to the population radiation dose in a 'health-care level I' representative region.

    PubMed

    Peruzzo Cornetto, Andrea; Aimonetto, Stefania; Pisano, Francesco; Giudice, Marcello; Sicuro, Marco; Meloni, Teodoro; Tofani, Santi

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluates per-procedure, collective and per capita effective dose to the population by interventional cardiology (IC) procedures performed during 2002-11 at the main hospital of Aosta Valley Region that can be considered as representative of the health-care level I countries, as defined by the UNSCEAR, based on its socio-demographic characteristics. IC procedures investigated were often multiple procedures in patients older than 60 y. The median extreme dose-area product values of 300 and 22 908 cGycm(2) were found for standard pacemaker implantation and coronary angioplasty, respectively, while the relative mean per-procedure effective dose ranged from 0.7 to 47 mSv. A 3-fold increase in frequency has been observed together with a correlated increase in the delivered per capita dose (0.05-0.27 mSv y(-1)) and the collective dose (5.8-35 man Sv y(-1)). Doses increased particularly from 2008 onwards mainly because of the introduction of coronary angioplasty procedures in the authors' institution. IC practice contributed remarkably in terms of effective dose to the population, delivering ∼10% of the total dose by medical ionising radiation examination categories.

  8. Cosmic ray induced ionisation of a molecular cloud shocked by the W28 supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaupré, S.; Hily-Blant, P.; Ceccarelli, C.; Dubus, G.; Gabici, S.; Montmerle, T.

    2014-08-01

    Cosmic rays are an essential ingredient in the evolution of the interstellar medium, as they dominate the ionisation of the dense molecular gas, where stars and planets form. However, since they are efficiently scattered by the galactic magnetic fields, many questions remain open, such as where exactly they are accelerated, what is their original energy spectrum, and how they propagate into molecular clouds. In this work we present new observations and discuss in detail a method that allows us to measure the cosmic ray ionisation rate towards the molecular clouds close to the W28 supernova remnant. To perform these measurements, we use CO, HCO+, and DCO+ millimetre line observations and compare them with the predictions of radiative transfer and chemical models away from thermodynamical equilibrium. The CO observations allow us to constrain the density, temperature, and column density towards each observed position, while the DCO+/HCO+ abundance ratios provide us with constraints on the electron fraction and, consequently, on the cosmic ray ionisation rate. Towards positions located close to the supernova remnant, we find cosmic ray ionisation rates much larger (≳100) than those in standard galactic clouds. Conversely, towards one position situated at a larger distance, we derive a standard cosmic ray ionisation rate. Overall, these observations support the hypothesis that the γ rays observed in the region have a hadronic origin. In addition, based on CR diffusion estimates, we find that the ionisation of the gas is likely due to 0.1-1 GeV cosmic rays. Finally, these observations are also in agreement with the global picture of cosmic ray diffusion, in which the low-energy tail of the cosmic ray population diffuses at smaller distances than the high-energy counterpart.

  9. Cosmic-ray ionisation in collapsing clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovani, M.; Hennebelle, P.; Galli, D.

    2013-12-01

    Context. Cosmic rays play an important role in dense molecular cores, affecting their thermal and dynamical evolution and initiating the chemistry. Several studies have shown that the formation of protostellar discs in collapsing clouds is severely hampered by the braking torque exerted by the entrained magnetic field on the infalling gas, as long as the field remains frozen to the gas. Aims: In this paper we examine the possibility that the concentration and twisting of the field lines in the inner region of collapse can produce a significant reduction of the ionisation fraction. Methods: To check whether the cosmic-ray ionisation rate can fall below the critical value required to maintain good coupling, we first study the propagation of cosmic rays in a model of a static magnetised cloud varying the relative strength of the toroidal/poloidal components and the mass-to-flux ratio. We then follow the path of cosmic rays using realistic magnetic field configurations generated by numerical simulations of a rotating collapsing core with different initial conditions. Results: We find that an increment of the toroidal component of the magnetic field, or, in general, a more twisted configuration of the field lines, results in a decrease in the cosmic-ray flux. This is mainly due to the magnetic mirroring effect that is stronger where larger variations in the field direction are present. In particular, we find a decrease of the cosmic-ray ionisation rate below 10-18 s-1 in the central 300-400 AU, where density is higher than about 109 cm-3. This very low value of the ionisation rate is attained in the cases of intermediate and low magnetisation (mass-to-flux ratio λ = 5 and 17, respectively) and for toroidal fields larger than about 40% of the total field. Conclusions: Magnetic field effects can significantly reduce the ionisation fraction in collapsing clouds. We provide a handy fitting formula to compute approximately the attenuation of the cosmic-ray ionisation rate

  10. Radiative lifetimes of odd-parity levels in Nb I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukund, Sheo; Bhattacharyya, Soumen; Yarlagadda, Suresh; Nakhate, S. G.

    2015-11-01

    Radiative lifetimes are reported for 37 odd-parity energy levels of neutral niobium (Nb I), out of which 33 have been measured for the first time. The levels belong to electronic configurations 4d35s5p and 4d45p between 18,790 and 35,730 cm-1. The time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique was employed. The Nb atoms were generated in a free-jet by laser vaporization of niobium metal. Lifetime values reported in this work fall in the range 12-340 ns and are accurate to ±10%.

  11. Levels of naturally occurring gamma radiation measured in British homes and their prediction in particular residences.

    PubMed

    Kendall, G M; Wakeford, R; Athanson, M; Vincent, T J; Carter, E J; McColl, N P; Little, M P

    2016-03-01

    Gamma radiation from natural sources (including directly ionising cosmic rays) is an important component of background radiation. In the present paper, indoor measurements of naturally occurring gamma rays that were undertaken as part of the UK Childhood Cancer Study are summarised, and it is shown that these are broadly compatible with an earlier UK National Survey. The distribution of indoor gamma-ray dose rates in Great Britain is approximately normal with mean 96 nGy/h and standard deviation 23 nGy/h. Directly ionising cosmic rays contribute about one-third of the total. The expanded dataset allows a more detailed description than previously of indoor gamma-ray exposures and in particular their geographical variation. Various strategies for predicting indoor natural background gamma-ray dose rates were explored. In the first of these, a geostatistical model was fitted, which assumes an underlying geologically determined spatial variation, superimposed on which is a Gaussian stochastic process with Matérn correlation structure that models the observed tendency of dose rates in neighbouring houses to correlate. In the second approach, a number of dose-rate interpolation measures were first derived, based on averages over geologically or administratively defined areas or using distance-weighted averages of measurements at nearest-neighbour points. Linear regression was then used to derive an optimal linear combination of these interpolation measures. The predictive performances of the two models were compared via cross-validation, using a randomly selected 70 % of the data to fit the models and the remaining 30 % to test them. The mean square error (MSE) of the linear-regression model was lower than that of the Gaussian-Matérn model (MSE 378 and 411, respectively). The predictive performance of the two candidate models was also evaluated via simulation; the OLS model performs significantly better than the Gaussian-Matérn model.

  12. Levels of naturally occurring gamma radiation measured in British homes and their prediction in particular residences.

    PubMed

    Kendall, G M; Wakeford, R; Athanson, M; Vincent, T J; Carter, E J; McColl, N P; Little, M P

    2016-03-01

    Gamma radiation from natural sources (including directly ionising cosmic rays) is an important component of background radiation. In the present paper, indoor measurements of naturally occurring gamma rays that were undertaken as part of the UK Childhood Cancer Study are summarised, and it is shown that these are broadly compatible with an earlier UK National Survey. The distribution of indoor gamma-ray dose rates in Great Britain is approximately normal with mean 96 nGy/h and standard deviation 23 nGy/h. Directly ionising cosmic rays contribute about one-third of the total. The expanded dataset allows a more detailed description than previously of indoor gamma-ray exposures and in particular their geographical variation. Various strategies for predicting indoor natural background gamma-ray dose rates were explored. In the first of these, a geostatistical model was fitted, which assumes an underlying geologically determined spatial variation, superimposed on which is a Gaussian stochastic process with Matérn correlation structure that models the observed tendency of dose rates in neighbouring houses to correlate. In the second approach, a number of dose-rate interpolation measures were first derived, based on averages over geologically or administratively defined areas or using distance-weighted averages of measurements at nearest-neighbour points. Linear regression was then used to derive an optimal linear combination of these interpolation measures. The predictive performances of the two models were compared via cross-validation, using a randomly selected 70 % of the data to fit the models and the remaining 30 % to test them. The mean square error (MSE) of the linear-regression model was lower than that of the Gaussian-Matérn model (MSE 378 and 411, respectively). The predictive performance of the two candidate models was also evaluated via simulation; the OLS model performs significantly better than the Gaussian-Matérn model. PMID:26880257

  13. Radiative Lifetimes for High Levels of Neutral Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, James E.; Den Hartog, E.; Guzman, A.

    2013-01-01

    New radiative lifetime measurements for ~ 50 high lying levels of Fe I are reported. Laboratory astrophysics faces a challenge to provide basic spectroscopic data, especially reliable atomic transition probabilities, in the IR region for abundance studies. The availability of HgCdTe (HAWAII) detector arrays has opened IR spectral regions for extensive new spectroscopic studies. The SDSS III APOGEE project in the H-Band is an important example which will penetrate the dust obscuring the Galactic bulge. APOGEE will survey elemental abundances of 100,000 red giant stars in the bulge, bar, disk, and halo of the Milky Way. Many stellar spectra in the H-Band are, as expected, dominated by transitions of Fe I. Most of these IR transitions connect high levels of Fe. Our program has started an effort to meet this challenge with new radiative lifetime measurements on high lying levels of Fe I using time resolved laser induced fluorescence (TRLIF). The TRLIF method is typically accurate to 5% and is efficient. Our goal is to combine these accurate, absolute radiative lifetimes with emission branching fractions [1] to determine log(gf) values of the highest quality for Fe I lines in the UV, visible, and IR. This method was used very successfully by O’Brian et al. [2] on lower levels of Fe I. This method is still the best available for all but very simple spectra for which ab-initio theory is more accurate. Supported by NSF grant AST-0907732. [1] Branching fractions are being measured by M. Ruffoni and J. C. Pickering at Imperial College London. [2] O'Brian, T. R., Wickliffe, M. E., Lawler, J. E., Whaling, W., & Brault, J. W. 1991, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 8, 1185

  14. Ultrasound Thermometry for Therapy-level Radiation Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Courtney

    2010-03-01

    Radiation oncology is the process of administering a specified dose of radiation to a patient currently receiving treatment for a form of cancer. In this process, it is vital to know the delivered dose for a given radiation beam to correctly treat a patient. The primary reference standard for absorbed dose is established using water calorimetry. The absorbed dose, typically of order 1 Gy (J/kg) at therapy levels, is realized by measuring sub-millikelvin temperature changes using a thermistor in a sensitive Wheatstone bridge. Ultrasound technology has been investigated as an alternative to thermistor measurements since the speed of sound propagation in water varies with temperature. With ultrasonic time-of-flight and highly sensitive phase detection techniques, temperature sensitivity comparable to that of the thermistor bridge has been achieved without introducing non-water materials into the test area. A single ultrasound transducer transmitting and receiving at 5.0 MHz throughout the length of the water phantom, and the phase change of the sound wave was used to determine temperature increase from an irradiative source at specified depths of the phantom. In this experiment, the exposure period was varied from 15s to 160s cyclically by modulating a heat lamp, and a profile of the measured temperature response as a function of the period was obtained using Fourier analysis. Due to the large temperature gradient in the water phantom, measurements are prone to convection which was indeed observed and will be discussed.

  15. 41 CFR 50-204.35 - Application for variations from radiation levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... variations from radiation levels. 50-204.35 Section 50-204.35 Public Contracts and Property Management Other... FOR FEDERAL SUPPLY CONTRACTS Radiation Standards § 50-204.35 Application for variations from radiation levels. (a) In accordance with policy expressed in the Federal Radiation Council's memorandum...

  16. 41 CFR 50-204.35 - Application for variations from radiation levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... variations from radiation levels. 50-204.35 Section 50-204.35 Public Contracts and Property Management Other... FOR FEDERAL SUPPLY CONTRACTS Radiation Standards § 50-204.35 Application for variations from radiation levels. (a) In accordance with policy expressed in the Federal Radiation Council's memorandum...

  17. 41 CFR 50-204.35 - Application for variations from radiation levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... variations from radiation levels. 50-204.35 Section 50-204.35 Public Contracts and Property Management Other... FOR FEDERAL SUPPLY CONTRACTS Radiation Standards § 50-204.35 Application for variations from radiation levels. (a) In accordance with policy expressed in the Federal Radiation Council's memorandum...

  18. 41 CFR 50-204.35 - Application for variations from radiation levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... variations from radiation levels. 50-204.35 Section 50-204.35 Public Contracts and Property Management Other... FOR FEDERAL SUPPLY CONTRACTS Radiation Standards § 50-204.35 Application for variations from radiation levels. (a) In accordance with policy expressed in the Federal Radiation Council's memorandum...

  19. 41 CFR 50-204.35 - Application for variations from radiation levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... variations from radiation levels. 50-204.35 Section 50-204.35 Public Contracts and Property Management Other... FOR FEDERAL SUPPLY CONTRACTS Radiation Standards § 50-204.35 Application for variations from radiation levels. (a) In accordance with policy expressed in the Federal Radiation Council's memorandum...

  20. Ionisation induced collapse of minihaloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, Trevor

    2013-08-01

    In order to analyse the turbine blade life, the damage due to the combined thermal and mechanical loads should be adequately accounted for. This is more challenging when detailed component geometry is limited. Therefore, a compromise between the level of geometric detail and the complexity of the lifing method to be implemented would be necessary. This research focuses on how the life assessment of aero engine turbine blades can be done, considering the balance between available design inputs and adequate level of fidelity. Accordingly, the thesis contributes to developing a generic turbine blade lifing method that is based on the engine thermodynamic cycle; as well as integrating critical design/technological factors and operational parameters that influence the aero engine blade life. To this end, thermo-mechanical fatigue was identified as the critical damage phenomenon driving the life of the turbine blade.. The developed approach integrates software tools and numerical models created using the minimum design information typically available at the early design stages. Using finite element analysis of an idealised blade geometry, the approach captures relevant impacts of thermal gradients and thermal stresses that contribute to the thermo-mechanical fatigue damage on the gas turbine blade. The blade life is evaluated using the Neu/Sehitoglu thermo-mechanical fatigue model that considers damage accumulation due to fatigue, oxidation, and creep. The leading edge is examined as a critical part of the blade to estimate the damage severity for different design factors and operational parameters. The outputs of the research can be used to better understand how the environment and the operating conditions of the aircraft affect the

  1. Predicted ionisation in mitochondria and observed acute changes in the mitochondrial transcriptome after gamma irradiation: a Monte Carlo simulation and quantitative PCR study.

    PubMed

    Kam, Winnie Wai-Ying; McNamara, Aimee L; Lake, Vanessa; Banos, Connie; Davies, Justin B; Kuncic, Zdenka; Banati, Richard B

    2013-11-01

    It is a widely accepted that the cell nucleus is the primary site of radiation damage while extra-nuclear radiation effects are not yet systematically included into models of radiation damage. We performed Monte Carlo simulations assuming a spherical cell (diameter 11.5 μm) modelled after JURKAT cells with the inclusion of realistic elemental composition data based on published literature. The cell model consists of cytoplasm (density 1g/cm(3)), nucleus (diameter 8.5 μm; 40% of cell volume) as well as cylindrical mitochondria (diameter 1 μm; volume 0.5 μm(3)) of three different densities (1, 2 and 10 g/cm(3)) and total mitochondrial volume relative to the cell volume (10, 20, 30%). Our simulation predicts that if mitochondria take up more than 20% of a cell's volume, ionisation events will be the preferentially located in mitochondria rather than in the cell nucleus. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we substantiate in JURKAT cells that human mitochondria respond to gamma radiation with early (within 30 min) differential changes in the expression levels of 18 mitochondrially encoded genes, whereby the number of regulated genes varies in a dose-dependent but non-linear pattern (10 Gy: 1 gene; 50 Gy: 5 genes; 100 Gy: 12 genes). The simulation data as well as the experimental observations suggest that current models of acute radiation effects, which largely focus on nuclear effects, might benefit from more systematic considerations of the early mitochondrial responses and how these may subsequently determine cell response to ionising radiation.

  2. Energy levels, lifetimes and radiative data of Ba XXVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A. K.; Goyal, Arun; Khatri, Indu; Aggarwal, Sunny; Sharma, Rinku; Mohan, Man

    2016-05-01

    We report an extensive and an elaborate theoretical study of atomic data for Ba XXVI by considering Singlet, Doublet and Triplet (SDT) electron excitations within N-shell and single excitations from N-shell to O-shell. We have calculated energy levels and lifetimes for lowest 110 fine structure levels by using Multi-configuration Dirac-Fock method (MCDF). We have also considered Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) and Breit corrections in our calculations. We have presented the radiative data for electric and magnetic dipole (E1, M1) and quadrupole (E2, M2) transitions among lowest 110 levels. We have made comparisons of our calculated excitation energies and EUV (Extreme Ultraviolet) transition wavelengths with experimentally observed energy levels and wavelengths and achieved good agreement. We have also computed energy levels by performing similar relativistic distorted wave calculations using Flexible Atomic Code (FAC). Additionally, we have provided new atomic data for Ba XXVI which are not published elsewhere in the literature. We believe that our results may be beneficial in fusion plasma research and astrophysical investigations and applications.

  3. Elevated blood lead levels from exposure via a radiator workshop.

    PubMed

    Treble, R G; Thompson, T S; Morton, D N

    1998-04-01

    Elevated lead levels were discovered in blood samples collected from family members where both the father and the mother worked in a radiator repair workshop. The father and mother were found to have blood lead levels of 2.0 and 0.5 mumol/L (41.7 and 10.4 micrograms/dL), respectively. The father's blood lead level was just below the Canadian occupational health and safety intervention level (2.5 mumol/L or 52.1 micrograms/dL). The two children had blood lead levels of 1.0 and 0.8 mumol/L (20.8 and 16.7 micrograms/dL), both of which are in excess of the recommended guideline for intervention in the case of children (0.5 mumol/L or 10.4 micrograms/dL). The exposure of the two children was possibly due to a combination of pathways including exposure at the workshop itself during visits and also the transportation of lead-containing dust to the home environment.

  4. Low Level Laser Therapy: laser radiation absorption in biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Giacomo, Paola; Orlando, Stefano; Dell'Ariccia, Marco; Brandimarte, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we report the results of an experimental study in which we have measured the transmitted laser radiation through dead biological tissues of various animals (chicken, adult and young bovine, pig) in order to evaluate the maximum thickness through which the power density could still produce a reparative cellular effect. In our experiments we have utilized a pulsed laser IRL1 ISO model (based on an infrared diode GaAs, λ=904 nm) produced by BIOMEDICA s.r.l. commonly used in Low Level Laser Therapy. Some of the laser characteristics have been accurately studied and reported in this paper. The transmission results suggest that even with tissue thicknesses of several centimeters the power density is still sufficient to produce a cell reparative effect.

  5. Deep levels and radiation effects in p-InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. A.; Singh, A.; Jiao, K.; Lee, B.

    1989-01-01

    A survey was conducted on past studies of hole traps in InP. An experiment was designed to evaluate hole traps in Zn-doped InP after fabrication, after electron irradiation and after annealing using deep level transient spectroscopy. Data similar to that of Yamaguchi was seen with observation of both radiation-induced hole and electron traps at E sub A=0.45 eV and 0.03 eV, respectively. Both traps are altered by annealing. It is also shown that trap parameters for surface-barrier devices are influenced by many factors such as bias voltage, which probes traps at different depths below the surface. These devices require great care in data evaluation.

  6. Radiation-induced taste aversion: effects of radiation exposure level and the exposure-taste interval

    SciTech Connect

    Spector, A.C.; Smith, J.C.; Hollander, G.R.

    1986-05-01

    Radiation-induced taste aversion has been suggested to possibly play a role in the dietary difficulties observed in some radiotherapy patients. In rats, these aversions can still be formed even when the radiation exposure precedes the taste experience by several hours. This study was conducted to examine whether increasing the radiation exposure level could extend the range of the exposure-taste interval that would still support the formation of a taste aversion. Separate groups of rats received either a 100 or 300 R gamma-ray exposure followed 1, 3, 6, or 24 h later by a 10-min saccharin (0.1% w/v) presentation. A control group received a sham exposure followed 1 h later by a 10-min saccharin presentation. Twenty-four hours following the saccharin presentation all rats received a series of twelve 23-h two-bottle preference tests between saccharin and water. The results indicated that the duration of the exposure-taste interval plays an increasingly more important role in determining the initial extent of the aversion as the dose decreases. The course of recovery from taste aversion seems more affected by dose than by the temporal parameters of the conditioning trial.

  7. 10 CFR 34.21 - Limits on external radiation levels from storage containers and source changers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limits on external radiation levels from storage... INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Equipment § 34.21 Limits on external radiation levels from storage containers and source changers. The...

  8. 49 CFR 173.441 - Radiation level limitations and exclusive use provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radiation level limitations and exclusive use... Radiation level limitations and exclusive use provisions. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this... prepared for shipment, so that under conditions normally incident to transportation, the radiation...

  9. 10 CFR 34.21 - Limits on external radiation levels from storage containers and source changers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limits on external radiation levels from storage... INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Equipment § 34.21 Limits on external radiation levels from storage containers and source changers. The...

  10. 49 CFR 173.441 - Radiation level limitations and exclusive use provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radiation level limitations and exclusive use... Radiation level limitations and exclusive use provisions. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this... prepared for shipment, so that under conditions normally incident to transportation, the radiation...

  11. 10 CFR 34.21 - Limits on external radiation levels from storage containers and source changers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Limits on external radiation levels from storage... INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Equipment § 34.21 Limits on external radiation levels from storage containers and source changers. The...

  12. 10 CFR 34.21 - Limits on external radiation levels from storage containers and source changers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limits on external radiation levels from storage... INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Equipment § 34.21 Limits on external radiation levels from storage containers and source changers. The...

  13. 49 CFR 173.441 - Radiation level limitations and exclusive use provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radiation level limitations and exclusive use... Radiation level limitations and exclusive use provisions. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this... prepared for shipment, so that under conditions normally incident to transportation, the radiation...

  14. 49 CFR 173.441 - Radiation level limitations and exclusive use provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radiation level limitations and exclusive use... Radiation level limitations and exclusive use provisions. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this... prepared for shipment, so that under conditions normally incident to transportation, the radiation...

  15. 10 CFR 34.21 - Limits on external radiation levels from storage containers and source changers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Limits on external radiation levels from storage... INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Equipment § 34.21 Limits on external radiation levels from storage containers and source changers. The...

  16. 49 CFR 173.441 - Radiation level limitations and exclusive use provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radiation level limitations and exclusive use... Radiation level limitations and exclusive use provisions. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this... prepared for shipment, so that under conditions normally incident to transportation, the radiation...

  17. Ionisation and discharge in cloud-forming atmospheres of brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helling, Ch; Rimmer, P. B.; Rodriguez-Barrera, I. M.; Wood, Kenneth; Robertson, G. B.; Stark, C. R.

    2016-07-01

    Brown dwarfs and giant gas extrasolar planets have cold atmospheres with rich chemical compositions from which mineral cloud particles form. Their properties, like particle sizes and material composition, vary with height, and the mineral cloud particles are charged due to triboelectric processes in such dynamic atmospheres. The dynamics of the atmospheric gas is driven by the irradiating host star and/or by the rotation of the objects that changes during its lifetime. Thermal gas ionisation in these ultra-cool but dense atmospheres allows electrostatic interactions and magnetic coupling of a substantial atmosphere volume. Combined with a strong magnetic field \\gg {{B}\\text{Earth}} , a chromosphere and aurorae might form as suggested by radio and x-ray observations of brown dwarfs. Non-equilibrium processes like cosmic ray ionisation and discharge processes in clouds will increase the local pool of free electrons in the gas. Cosmic rays and lighting discharges also alter the composition of the local atmospheric gas such that tracer molecules might be identified. Cosmic rays affect the atmosphere through air showers in a certain volume which was modelled with a 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code to be able to visualise their spacial extent. Given a certain degree of thermal ionisation of the atmospheric gas, we suggest that electron attachment to charge mineral cloud particles is too inefficient to cause an electrostatic disruption of the cloud particles. Cloud particles will therefore not be destroyed by Coulomb explosion for the local temperature in the collisional dominated brown dwarf and giant gas planet atmospheres. However, the cloud particles are destroyed electrostatically in regions with strong gas ionisation. The potential size of such cloud holes would, however, be too small and might occur too far inside the cloud to mimic the effect of, e.g. magnetic field induced star spots.

  18. 28 CFR 79.44 - Proof of working level month exposure to radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... radiation. 79.44 Section 79.44 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CLAIMS UNDER THE RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Miners § 79.44 Proof of working level month exposure to radiation. (a) If one or more of the sources in § 79.43(a) contain...

  19. New techniques of low level environmental radiation monitoring at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    P. Degtiarenko, V. Popov

    2010-07-01

    We present the first long-term environmental radiation monitoring results obtained using the technique of pulse mode readout for the industry-standard Reuter-Stokes RSS-1013 argon-filled high pressure ionization chambers (HPIC). With novel designs for the front-end electronics readout and customized signal processing algorithms, we are capable of detecting individual events of gas ionization in the HPIC, caused by interactions of gammas and charged particles in the gas. The technique provides enough spectroscopic information to distinguish between several different types of environmental and man-made radiation. The technique also achieves a high degree of sensitivity and stability of the data, allowing long-term environmental radiation monitoring with unprecedented precision.

  20. Classification of the Spectra of Highly Ionised Atoms During the Last Seven Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawcett, B. C.

    1981-10-01

    This review of recent contributions to the classification of the spectra of highly ionised atoms emphasises how major research projects have influenced progress. These projects include experiments on board orbiting space satellites and SKYLAB, those of fusion research (notably involving TOKAMAK devices), studies with giant pulse laser-produced-plasmas and beam-foil spectroscopy. In addition, the large volume of data gathered through the application of traditional methods and the impact of theoretical calculations are discussed. A comprehensive reference list of papers reporting emission line identifications for elements lighter than nickel and ionisation stages higher than the fourth is included, along with references to other bibliographies and compilations of energy levels, or wavelengths and identifications.

  1. Radiation levels in cyclotron-radiochemistry facility measured by a novel comprehensive computerized monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishani, E.; Lifshits, N.; Osavistky, A.; Kaufman, J.; Ankry, N.; Tal, N.; Chisin, R.

    1999-04-01

    Radiation levels in a cyclotron-radiochemistry facility were measured during the production of commonly used PET radiopharmaceuticals by a comprehensive computerized monitoring system. The system consists of three major components: on-line radiation monitoring channels, an area control unit, and a gas waste management unit. During production the radiation levels were measured in the cyclotron vault, inside automatic chemistry production and research shielded cells, in the radiochemistry room, in the gas waste decay tank, in the chimney filters, and at the top of the cells chimney. Each detector was calibrated in a known radiation field, and a special detector dead time correction was performed in order to achieve detected signal-to-radiation linearity for the Geiger tubes located in the radiochemistry production and research cells. During production of C-11 and O-15 PET radiopharmaceuticals, high radiation levels were measured in the gas waste decay tank (240 and 80 mR/h, respectively). In contrast, the radiation levels at the chimney filters and at the top of the cells chimney did not exceed the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Drive Air Concentration (DAC) recommended for C-11 or O-15. During production of FDG, high radiation levels were measured at the chimney filters, however the radiation level at the top of the chimney (3.7 μCi/m 3) did not exceed the F-18 DAC recommendation (27 μCi/m 3). Low radiation levels of approximately 0.5-1 mR/h were measured in the radiochemistry room during production of PET radiopharmaceuticals. In the cyclotron vault, 2 min after bombardment the radiation levels at 2 m from the cyclotron decreased to 1-2 mR/h. The addition of a gas waste decay system to computerized monitoring channels located near each strategic point of the site allows for a comprehensive survey of the radiochemical processes.

  2. Radiation protection aspects of the cosmic radiation exposure of aircraft crew.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, D T

    2004-01-01

    Aircraft crew and frequent flyers are exposed to elevated levels of cosmic radiation of galactic and solar origin and secondary radiation produced in the atmosphere, the aircraft structure and its contents. Following recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection in Publication 60, the European Union introduced a revised Basic Safety Standards Directive, which included exposure to natural sources of ionising radiation, including cosmic radiation, as occupational exposure. The revised Directive has been incorporated into laws and regulations in the European Union Member States. Where the assessment of the occupational exposure of aircraft crew is necessary, the preferred approach to monitoring is by the recording of staff flying times and calculated route doses. Route doses are to be validated by measurements. This paper gives the general background, and considers the radiation protection aspects of the cosmic radiation exposure of aircraft crew, with the focus on the situation in Europe.

  3. A theoretical concept of low level/low LET radiation carcinogenic risk (LLCR) projection

    SciTech Connect

    Filyushkin, I.V.

    1992-06-01

    Carcinogenic risk to humans resulting from low level/low LET radiation exposure (LLLCR) has not been observed directly because epidemiological observations have not yet provided statistically significant data on risk values. However, these values are of great interest for radiation health science and radiation protection practice under both normal conditions and emergency situations. This report presents a theoretical contribution to the validation of dose and dose rate efficiency factors (DDREF) transforming cocinogenic risk coefficients from those revealed in A-bomb survivors to factors appropriate for the projection of the risk resulting from very low levels of low LET radiation.

  4. Resistance of Feather-Associated Bacteria to Intermediate Levels of Ionizing Radiation near Chernobyl.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-González, Mario Xavier; Czirják, Gábor Árpád; Genevaux, Pierre; Møller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy Alexander; Heeb, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has been shown to produce negative effects on organisms, although little is known about its ecological and evolutionary effects. As a study model, we isolated bacteria associated with feathers from barn swallows Hirundo rustica from three study areas around Chernobyl differing in background ionizing radiation levels and one control study site in Denmark. Each bacterial community was exposed to four different γ radiation doses ranging from 0.46 to 3.96 kGy to test whether chronic exposure to radiation had selected for resistant bacterial strains. Experimental radiation duration had an increasingly overall negative effect on the survival of all bacterial communities. After exposure to γ radiation, bacteria isolated from the site with intermediate background radiation levels survived better and produced more colonies than the bacterial communities from other study sites with higher or lower background radiation levels. Long-term effects of radiation in natural populations might be an important selective pressure on traits of bacteria that facilitate survival in certain environments. Our findings indicate the importance of further studies to understand the proximate mechanisms acting to buffer the negative effects of ionizing radiation in natural populations. PMID:26976674

  5. Resistance of Feather-Associated Bacteria to Intermediate Levels of Ionizing Radiation near Chernobyl.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-González, Mario Xavier; Czirják, Gábor Árpád; Genevaux, Pierre; Møller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy Alexander; Heeb, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has been shown to produce negative effects on organisms, although little is known about its ecological and evolutionary effects. As a study model, we isolated bacteria associated with feathers from barn swallows Hirundo rustica from three study areas around Chernobyl differing in background ionizing radiation levels and one control study site in Denmark. Each bacterial community was exposed to four different γ radiation doses ranging from 0.46 to 3.96 kGy to test whether chronic exposure to radiation had selected for resistant bacterial strains. Experimental radiation duration had an increasingly overall negative effect on the survival of all bacterial communities. After exposure to γ radiation, bacteria isolated from the site with intermediate background radiation levels survived better and produced more colonies than the bacterial communities from other study sites with higher or lower background radiation levels. Long-term effects of radiation in natural populations might be an important selective pressure on traits of bacteria that facilitate survival in certain environments. Our findings indicate the importance of further studies to understand the proximate mechanisms acting to buffer the negative effects of ionizing radiation in natural populations.

  6. Resistance of Feather-Associated Bacteria to Intermediate Levels of Ionizing Radiation near Chernobyl

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-González, Mario Xavier; Czirják, Gábor Árpád; Genevaux, Pierre; Møller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy Alexander; Heeb, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has been shown to produce negative effects on organisms, although little is known about its ecological and evolutionary effects. As a study model, we isolated bacteria associated with feathers from barn swallows Hirundo rustica from three study areas around Chernobyl differing in background ionizing radiation levels and one control study site in Denmark. Each bacterial community was exposed to four different γ radiation doses ranging from 0.46 to 3.96 kGy to test whether chronic exposure to radiation had selected for resistant bacterial strains. Experimental radiation duration had an increasingly overall negative effect on the survival of all bacterial communities. After exposure to γ radiation, bacteria isolated from the site with intermediate background radiation levels survived better and produced more colonies than the bacterial communities from other study sites with higher or lower background radiation levels. Long-term effects of radiation in natural populations might be an important selective pressure on traits of bacteria that facilitate survival in certain environments. Our findings indicate the importance of further studies to understand the proximate mechanisms acting to buffer the negative effects of ionizing radiation in natural populations. PMID:26976674

  7. Cosmic radiation in commercial aviation.

    PubMed

    Bagshaw, Michael

    2008-05-01

    This paper reviews the current knowledge of cosmic radiation and its applicability to commercial aviation. Galactic cosmic radiation emanates from outside the solar system, while occasionally a disturbance in the suns' atmosphere leads to a surge in radiation particles. Protection is provided by the suns' magnetic field, the earths' magnetic field, and the earths' atmosphere. Dose rates are dependent on the altitude, the geomagnetic latitude and the solar cycle. For occupational exposure to ionising radiation, which includes aircrew, the International Commission on Radiological Protection recommends maximum mean body effective dose limits of 20mSv/yr (averaged over 5 years, with a maximum in any 1 year of 50mSv). Radiation doses can be measured during flight or may be calculated using a computer-modelling program such as CARI, EPCARD, SIEVERT or PCAIRE. Mean ambient equivalent dose rates are consistently reported in the region of 4-5microSv/h for long-haul pilots and 1-3microSv/h for short-haul, giving an annual mean effective exposure of the order 2-3mSv for long-haul and 1-2mSv for short-haul pilots. Epidemiological studies of flight crew have not shown conclusive evidence for any increase in cancer mortality or cancer incidence directly attributable to ionising radiation exposure. Whilst there is no level of radiation exposure below which effects do not occur, current evidence indicates that the probability of airline crew or passengers suffering adverse health effects as a result of exposure to cosmic radiation is very low. PMID:18486066

  8. Cosmic radiation in commercial aviation.

    PubMed

    Bagshaw, Michael

    2008-05-01

    This paper reviews the current knowledge of cosmic radiation and its applicability to commercial aviation. Galactic cosmic radiation emanates from outside the solar system, while occasionally a disturbance in the suns' atmosphere leads to a surge in radiation particles. Protection is provided by the suns' magnetic field, the earths' magnetic field, and the earths' atmosphere. Dose rates are dependent on the altitude, the geomagnetic latitude and the solar cycle. For occupational exposure to ionising radiation, which includes aircrew, the International Commission on Radiological Protection recommends maximum mean body effective dose limits of 20mSv/yr (averaged over 5 years, with a maximum in any 1 year of 50mSv). Radiation doses can be measured during flight or may be calculated using a computer-modelling program such as CARI, EPCARD, SIEVERT or PCAIRE. Mean ambient equivalent dose rates are consistently reported in the region of 4-5microSv/h for long-haul pilots and 1-3microSv/h for short-haul, giving an annual mean effective exposure of the order 2-3mSv for long-haul and 1-2mSv for short-haul pilots. Epidemiological studies of flight crew have not shown conclusive evidence for any increase in cancer mortality or cancer incidence directly attributable to ionising radiation exposure. Whilst there is no level of radiation exposure below which effects do not occur, current evidence indicates that the probability of airline crew or passengers suffering adverse health effects as a result of exposure to cosmic radiation is very low.

  9. Surface solar ultraviolet radiation for paleoatmospheric levels of oxygen and ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Many investigators have concluded that the level of solar ultraviolet radiation (200-300 nm) reaching the surface was a key parameter in the origin and evolution of life on earth. The level of solar ultraviolet radiation between 200 and 300 nm is controlled primarily by molecular absorption by ozone, whose presence is strongly coupled to the level of molecular oxygen. In this paper, a series of calculations is presented of the solar ultraviolet radiation reaching the surface for oxygen levels ranging from 0.0001 the present atmospheric level to the present level. The solar spectrum between 200 and 300 nm has been divided into 34 spectral intervals. For each spectral interval, the solar ultraviolet radiation reaching the earth's surface has been calculated by considering the attenuation of the incoming beam due to ozone and oxygen absorption. A one-dimensional photochemical model of the atmosphere was used for these calculations.

  10. Cosmic-ray ionisation of dense molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaupre, Solenn

    2015-07-01

    Cosmic rays (CR) are of tremendous importance in the dynamical and chemical evolution of interstellar molecular clouds, where stars and planets form. CRs are likely accelerated in the shells of supernova remnants (SNR), thus molecular clouds nearby can be irradiated by intense fluxes of CRs. CR protons have two major effects on dense molecular clouds: 1) when they encounter the dense medium, high-energy protons (>280 MeV) create pions that decay into gamma-rays. This process makes SNR-molecular cloud associations intense GeV and/or TeV sources whose spectra mimic the CR spectrum. 2) at lower energies, CRs penetrate the cloud and ionise the gas, leading to the formation of molecular species characteristic of the presence of CRs, called tracers of the ionisation. Studying these tracers gives information on low-energy CRs that are unaccessible to any other observations. I studied the CR ionisation of molecular clouds next to three SNRs: W28, W51C and W44. These SNRs are known to be interacting with the nearby clouds, from the presence of shocked gas, OH masers and pion-decay induced gamma-ray emission. My work includes millimeter observations and chemical modeling of tracers of the ionisation in these dense molecular clouds. In these three regions, we determined an enhanced CR ionisation rate, supporting the hypothesis of an origin of the CRs in the SNR nearby. The evolution of the CR ionisation rate with the distance to the SNR brings valuable constraints on the propagation properties of low-energy CRs. The method used relies on observations of the molecular ions HCO+ and DCO+, which shows crucial limitations at high ionisation. Therefore, I investigated, both through modeling and observations, the chemical abundances of several other species to try and identity alternative tracers of the ionisation. In particular, in the W44 region, observations of N2H+ bring additional constraints on the physical conditions, volatile abundances in the cloud, and the ionisation

  11. Generation of GW-Level, Sub-Angstrom Radiation in the LCLS Using a Second-Harmonic Radiator

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z

    2004-09-14

    Electron beams are strongly microbunched near the high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) saturation with a rich harmonic content in the beam current. While the coherent harmonic emission is possible in a planar undulator, the third-harmonic radiation typically dominates with about 1% of the fundamental power at saturation. In this paper, we discuss the second-harmonic radiation in the Linac Coherent Light Source. We show that by a suitable design of an second-stage undulator with its fundamental frequency tuned to the second harmonic of the first undulator, coherent second-harmonic radiation much more intense than the third-harmonic is emitted. Numerical simulations predict that GW-level, sub-Angstrom x-ray pulses can be generated in a relatively short second-harmonic radiator.

  12. Radiation reaction at the level of the action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnholtz, Ofek; Hadar, Shahar; Kol, Barak

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to highlight a recently proposed method for the treatment of classical radiative effects, in particular radiation reaction, via effective field theory methods. We emphasize important features of the method and in particular the doubling of fields. We apply the method to two simple systems: a mass-rope system and an electromagnetic charge-field system. For the mass-rope system in 1 + 1 dimensions we derive a double-field effective action for the mass which describes a damped harmonic oscillator. For the EM charge-field system, i.e. the system of an accelerating electric charge in 3 + 1 dimensions, we show a reduction to a 1 + 1 dimensions radial system of an electric dipole source coupled to an electric dipole field (analogous to the mass coupled to the rope). For this system we derive a double-field effective action and reproduce in an analogous way the leading part of the Abraham-Lorentz-Dirac force.

  13. Health effects of low-level radiation in shipyard workers. Final report: [Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Matanoski, G.M.

    1991-06-01

    The Nuclear Shipyard Workers Study (NSWS) was designed to determine whether there is an excess risk of leukemia or other cancers associated with exposure to low levels of gamma radiation. The study compares the mortality experience of shipyard workers who qualified to work in radiation areas to the mortality of similar workers who hold the same types of jobs but who are not authorized to work in radiation areas. The population consists of workers from six government and two private shipyards.

  14. Ambient radiation levels in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging center

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Priscila do Carmo; de Oliveira, Paulo Marcio Campos; Mamede, Marcelo; Silveira, Mariana de Castro; Aguiar, Polyanna; Real, Raphaela Vila; da Silva, Teógenes Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the level of ambient radiation in a PET/CT center. Materials and Methods Previously selected and calibrated TLD-100H thermoluminescent dosimeters were utilized to measure room radiation levels. During 32 days, the detectors were placed in several strategically selected points inside the PET/CT center and in adjacent buildings. After the exposure period the dosimeters were collected and processed to determine the radiation level. Results In none of the points selected for measurements the values exceeded the radiation dose threshold for controlled area (5 mSv/year) or free area (0.5 mSv/year) as recommended by the Brazilian regulations. Conclusion In the present study the authors demonstrated that the whole shielding system is appropriate and, consequently, the workers are exposed to doses below the threshold established by Brazilian standards, provided the radiation protection standards are followed. PMID:25798004

  15. Effects of water turbidity and salt concentration levels on penetration of solar radiation under water

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Seyed-Yagoobi, J. )

    1994-05-01

    Two large, outdoor tanks were constructed in order to investigate the effects of water turbidity and salt concentration levels at various depths of water on penetration of solar radiation. These experiments were followed by a laboratory investigation that measured spectral transmittance and the extinction coefficient of water at different salt concentrations and turbidity levels. Both the outdoor and laboratory results indicate that the salt concentration level does not significantly affect solar radiation penetration. However, water clarity, quantified in terms of the turbidity level, plays a critical role on the magnitude of the solar radiation penetration, with the effect of turbidity on penetration increasing with the depth of water. A best-fit model is developed that gives the solar radiation penetration as a function of turbidity level and depth of water.

  16. Radiation properties and emissivity parameterization of high level thin clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, M.-L. C.

    1984-01-01

    To parameterize emissivity of clouds at 11 microns, a study has been made in an effort to understand the radiation field of thin clouds. The contributions to the intensity and flux from different sources and through different physical processes are calculated by using the method of successive orders of scattering. The effective emissivity of thin clouds is decomposed into the effective absorption emissivity, effective scattering emissivity, and effective reflection emissivity. The effective absorption emissivity depends on the absorption and emission of the cloud; it is parameterized in terms of optical thickness. The effective scattering emissivity depends on the scattering properties of the cloud; it is parameterized in terms of optical thickness and single scattering albedo. The effective reflection emissivity follows the similarity relation as in the near infrared cases. This is parameterized in terms of the similarity parameter and optical thickness, as well as the temperature difference between the cloud and ground.

  17. The ST environment: Expected charged particle radiation levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1978-01-01

    The external (surface incident) charged particle radiation, predicted for the ST satellite at the three different mission altitudes, was determined in two ways: (1) by orbital flux-integration and (2) by geographical instantaneous flux-mapping. The latest standard models of the environment were used in this effort. Magnetic field definitions for three nominal circular trajectories and for the geographic mapping positions were obtained from a current field model. Spatial and temporal variations or conditions affecting the static environment models were considered and accounted for, wherever possible. Limited shielding and dose evaluations were performed for a simple geometry. Results, given in tabular and graphical form, are analyzed, explained, and discussed. Conclusions are included.

  18. Network-level fallout radiation-effects assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-05-12

    The EMP Mitigation Program analyzes, and where feasible, lessens the degradation effects of EMP on national telecommunication resources. The program focuses on the resources of the public switched network (PSN) because the PSN comprises the largest, most diverse set of telecommunication assets in the United States and is the focus of National Security Emergency Preparedness (NSEP) telecommunication enhancement activities. Additionally, the majority of various organizations rely on the PSN to conduct their NSEP telecommunications responsibilities. Telecommunication equipment is most susceptible to high altitude EMP (HEMP) which occurs when a nuclear weapon is detonated at an altitude greater that 50 km above the earth's surface. In addition to studying the effects of EMP, the program has expanded to address the effects of fallout radiation and serve traffic congestion on the PSN.

  19. The assessment of risks from exposure to low-levels of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1992-06-01

    This report is concerned with risk assessments for human populations receiving low level radiation doses; workers routinely exposed to radiation, Japanese victims of nuclear bombs, and the general public are all considered. Topics covered include risk estimates for cancer, mortality rates, risk estimates for nuclear site workers, and dosimetry.

  20. 10 CFR 20.2203 - Reports of exposures, radiation levels, and concentrations of radioactive material exceeding the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... environmental radiation standards in 40 CFR part 190, levels of radiation or releases of radioactive material in... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reports of exposures, radiation levels, and concentrations... REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Reports § 20.2203 Reports of...

  1. 10 CFR 20.2203 - Reports of exposures, radiation levels, and concentrations of radioactive material exceeding the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... environmental radiation standards in 40 CFR part 190, levels of radiation or releases of radioactive material in... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reports of exposures, radiation levels, and concentrations... REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Reports § 20.2203 Reports of...

  2. 10 CFR 20.2203 - Reports of exposures, radiation levels, and concentrations of radioactive material exceeding the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... environmental radiation standards in 40 CFR part 190, levels of radiation or releases of radioactive material in... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reports of exposures, radiation levels, and concentrations... REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Reports § 20.2203 Reports of...

  3. 10 CFR 20.2203 - Reports of exposures, radiation levels, and concentrations of radioactive material exceeding the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... environmental radiation standards in 40 CFR part 190, levels of radiation or releases of radioactive material in... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reports of exposures, radiation levels, and concentrations... REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Reports § 20.2203 Reports of...

  4. 10 CFR 20.2203 - Reports of exposures, radiation levels, and concentrations of radioactive material exceeding the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... environmental radiation standards in 40 CFR part 190, levels of radiation or releases of radioactive material in... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reports of exposures, radiation levels, and concentrations... REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Reports § 20.2203 Reports of...

  5. Gravitational radiation as radiation same level of electromagnetic and its generation in pulsed high-current discharge. Theory and experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisenko, Stanislav; Fisenko, Igor

    2015-04-01

    The notion of gravitational radiation as a radiation of the same level as the electromagnetic radiation is based on theoretically proved and experimentally confirmed fact of existence of stationary states of an electron in its gravitational field characterized by the gravitational constant K = 1042 G (G is the Newtonian gravitational constant) and unrecoverable space-time curvature Λ. This paper gives an overview of the authors' works, which set out the relevant results. Additionally, data is provided on the broadening of the spectra characteristic radiation. The data show that this broadening can be explained only by the presence of excited states of electrons in their gravitational field. What is more, the interpretation of the new line of X-ray emission spectrum according to the results of observation of MOS-camera of XMM-Newton observatory is of interest. The given work contributes into further elaboration of the findings considering their application to dense high-temperature plasma of multiple-charge ions. This is due to quantitative character of electron gravitational radiation spectrum such that amplification of gravitational radiation may take place only in multiple-charge ion high-temperature plasma.

  6. The effectiveness of photocatalytic ionisation disinfection of filter materials.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Katarzyna; Gutarowska, Beata

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of photocatalytic ionisation as a disinfection method for filter materials contaminated by microorganisms, and to assess how air relative humidity (RH), time and microbe type influence the effectiveness of this disinfection. In the quantitative analysis of a used car air filter, bacterial contamination equalled 1.2 x 10(5) cfu/cm2, fungal contamination was 3.8 x 10(6) cfu/cm2, and the isolated microorganisms were Aspergillus niger, Bacillus megaterium, Cladosporium herbarum, Cryptococcus laurenti, Micrococcus sp., Rhodotorula glutinis and Staphylococcus cohnii. In the model experiment, three isolates (C. herbarum, R. glutinis, S. cohnii) and 3 ATCC species (A. niger, E. coli, S. aureus) were used for photocatalytic ionisation disinfection. The conditions of effective photocatalytic ionisation disinfection (R > or = 99.9%) were established as 2-3 h at RH = 77% (bacteria) and 6-24 h at RH = 53% (fungi). RH has an influence on the effectiveness of the photocatalytic disinfection process; the highest effectiveness was obtained for bacteria at RH = 77%, with results 5% higher than for RH = 49%. The studies show that the sensitivity of microorganisms to photocatalytic ionisation disinfection is ordered as follows: Gram-positive bacteria (S. cohnii, S. aureus), Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli), yeasts (R. glutinis), and moulds (C. herbarum, A. niger). Of all the mathematical models used for the description of death dynamics after photocatalytic ionisation disinfection, the Chick-Watson model is the most useful, but for more resistant microorganisms, the delayed Chick-Watson model is highly recommended. It therefore seems, that the presented disinfection method of photocatalytic ionisation can be successfully used to clean filtration materials.

  7. Infrared radiation and inversion population of CO2 laser levels in Venusian and Martian atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordiyets, B. F.; Panchenko, V. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Formation mechanisms of nonequilibrium 10 micron CO2 molecule radiation and the possible existence of a natural laser effect in the upper atmospheres of Venus and Mars are theoretically studied. An analysis is made of the excitation process of CO2 molecule vibrational-band levels (with natural isotropic content) induced by direct solar radiation in bands 10.6, 9.4, 4.3, 2.7 and 2.0 microns. The model of partial vibrational-band temperatures was used in the case. The problem of IR radiation transfer in vibrational-rotational bands was solved in the radiation escape approximation.

  8. Laser-modified electron scattering from a slowly ionising atom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiordilino, E.; Mittleman, M. H.

    1983-01-01

    When an electron scatters from an atom in the presence of a laser field which is resonant with an atomic transition, off-shell effects enter into the cross section. These only become significant at higher laser intensities where the atom may also be ionised by the laser. Cross-sections are obtained for electron-atom scattering in which these off-shell effects appear and in which the slow ionisation of the atom by the laser is included. Experiments are suggested in which simplifications can occur and which still retain these 'exotic' effects.

  9. Effects of combined radiofrequency radiation exposure on levels of reactive oxygen species in neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Lee, Hyung Chul; Lee, Je-Jung; Hong, Mi-Na; Park, Myung-Jin; Lee, Yun-Sil; Choi, Hyung-Do; Kim, Nam; Ko, Young-Gyu; Lee, Jae-Seon

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of the combined RF radiation (837 MHz CDMA plus 1950 MHz WCDMA) signal on levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in neuronal cells. Exposure of the combined RF signal was conducted at specific absorption rate values of 2 W/kg of CDMA plus 2 W/kg of WCDMA for 2 h. Co-exposure to combined RF radiation with either H2O2 or menadione was also performed. The experimental exposure groups were incubator control, sham-exposed, combined RF radiation-exposed with or without either H2O2 or menadione groups. The intracellular ROS level was measured by flow cytometry using the fluorescent probe dichlorofluorescein diacetate. Intracellular ROS levels were not consistently affected by combined RF radiation exposure alone in a time-dependent manner in U87, PC12 or SH-SY5Y cells. In neuronal cells exposed to combined RF radiation with either H2O2 or menadione, intracellular ROS levels showed no statically significant alteration compared with exposure to menadione or H2O2 alone. These findings indicate that neither combined RF radiation alone nor combined RF radiation with menadione or H2O2 influences the intracellular ROS level in neuronal cells such as U87, PC12 or SH-SY5Y. PMID:24105709

  10. Energy levels and radiative rates for transitions in Ga XXIV

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sayed, Fatma

    2012-07-15

    Energy levels, transition probabilities, oscillator strengths, line strengths, and lifetimes have been calculated for Oxygen-like Gallium, Ga XXIV. The configurations 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 4}, 2s2p{sup 5}, 2p{sup 6}, 2s2p{sup 4}3 Script-Small-L , 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 3}3 Script-Small-L , and 2p{sup 5}3 Script-Small-L were used in calculations and 226 fine-structure levels were obtained. The fully relativistic GRASP code has been adopted, and results are reported for all electric dipole (E1), electric quadrupole (E2), magnetic dipole (M1), and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transitions among the lowest 226 levels of Ga XXIV, belonging to the n{<=}3 configurations. Comparisons have been made with earlier available theoretical and experimental results.

  11. Base-level management of radio-frequency radiation-protection program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rademacher, S.E.; Montgomery, N.D.

    1989-04-01

    AFOEHL developed this report to assist the base-level aerospace medical team manage their radio-frequency radiation-protection program. This report supersedes USAFOEHL Report 80-42, 'A Practical R-F Guide for BEES.'

  12. Base-level management of radio-frequency radiation-protection program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rademacher, S.E.; Montgomery, N.D.

    1989-04-01

    AFOEHL developed this report to assist the base-level aerospace medical team manage their radio-frequency radiation protection program. This report supersedes USAFOEHL Report 80-42, 'A practical R-F Guide for BEES.'

  13. Alternative interpretations of statistics on health effects of low-level radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.D.

    1983-11-01

    Four examples of the interpretation of statistics of data on low-level radiation are reviewed: (a) genetic effects of the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, (b) cancer at Rocky Flats, (c) childhood leukemia and fallout in Utah, and (d) cancer among workers at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. Aggregation of data, adjustment for age, and other problems related to the determination of health effects of low-level radiation are discussed. Troublesome issues related to post hoc analysis are considered.

  14. Highly ionised absorbers at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Jacqueline; Herbert-Fort, Stéphane

    2005-03-01

    We build a sample of O VI absorption systems in the redshift range 2.0 ≲ z ≲ 2.6 using high spectral resolution data of ten quasars from the VLT-UVES large programme. We investigate the existence of a metal-rich O VI population and define observational criteria for this class of absorbers under the assumption of photoionisation. The low temperatures of nearly half of all O VI absorbers, implied by their line widths, are too low for collisional ionisation to be a dominant process. We estimate the oxygen abundance under the assumption of photoionisation; a striking result is the bimodal distribution of [o/h] with median values close to 0.01 and 0.5 solar for the metal-poor and metal-rich populations, respectively. Using the line widths to fix the temperature or assuming a constant, low gas density does not drastically change the metallicities of the metal-rich population. We present the first estimate of the O VI column density distribution. Assuming a single power-law distribution, f(n) ∝ n-α, yields α ˜ 1.7 and a normalisation of f(n) =2.3× 10-13 at log n(O VI) ˜ 13.5, both with a ˜30% uncertainty. The value of α is similar to that found for C IV surveys, whereas the normalisation factor is about ten times higher. We use f(n) to derive the number density per unit z and cosmic density ωb(O VI), selecting a limited column density range not strongly affected by incompleteness or sample variance. Comparing our results with those obtained at z˜0.1 for a similar range of column densities implies some decline of dn/dz with z. The cosmic O VI density derived from f(n), ωb(O VI)≈ (3.5± 3.20.9) × 10-7, is 2.3 times higher than the value estimated using the observed O VI sample (of which the metal-rich population contributes ˜35%), easing the problem of missing metals at high z (˜ 1/4 of the produced metals) but not solving it. We find that the majori ty of the metal-rich absorbers are located within ˜ 450 km s-1 of strong Ly-α lines and show that

  15. Detection of ultraviolet radiation using tissue equivalent radiochromic gel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bero, M. A.; Abukassem, I.

    2009-05-01

    Ferrous Xylenol-orange Gelatin gel (FXG) is known to be sensitive to ionising radiation such as γ and X-rays. The effect of ionising radiation is to produce an increase in the absorption over a wide region of the visible spectrum, which is proportional to the absorbed dose. This study demonstrates that FXG gel is sensitive to ultraviolet radiation and therefore it could functions as UV detector. Short exposure to UV radiation produces linear increase in absorption measured at 550nm, however high doses of UV cause the ion indicator colour to fad away in a manner proportional to the incident UV energy. Light absorbance increase at the rate of 1.1% per minute of irradiation was monitored. The exposure level at which the detector has linear response is comparable to the natural summer UV radiation. Evaluating the UV ability to pass through tissue equivalent gel materials shows that most of the UV gets absorbed in the first 5mm of the gel materials, which demonstrate the damaging effects of this radiation type on human skin and eyes. It was concluded that FXG gel dosimeter has the potential to offer a simple, passive ultraviolet radiation detector with sensitivity suitable to measure and visualises the natural sunlight UV exposure directly by watching the materials colour changes.

  16. Defining Top-of-Atmosphere Flux Reference Level for Earth Radiation Budget Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeb, N. G.; Kato, S.; Wielicki, B. A.

    2002-01-01

    To estimate the earth's radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) from satellite-measured radiances, it is necessary to account for the finite geometry of the earth and recognize that the earth is a solid body surrounded by a translucent atmosphere of finite thickness that attenuates solar radiation differently at different heights. As a result, in order to account for all of the reflected solar and emitted thermal radiation from the planet by direct integration of satellite-measured radiances, the measurement viewing geometry must be defined at a reference level well above the earth s surface (e.g., 100 km). This ensures that all radiation contributions, including radiation escaping the planet along slant paths above the earth s tangent point, are accounted for. By using a field-of- view (FOV) reference level that is too low (such as the surface reference level), TOA fluxes for most scene types are systematically underestimated by 1-2 W/sq m. In addition, since TOA flux represents a flow of radiant energy per unit area, and varies with distance from the earth according to the inverse-square law, a reference level is also needed to define satellite-based TOA fluxes. From theoretical radiative transfer calculations using a model that accounts for spherical geometry, the optimal reference level for defining TOA fluxes in radiation budget studies for the earth is estimated to be approximately 20 km. At this reference level, there is no need to explicitly account for horizontal transmission of solar radiation through the atmosphere in the earth radiation budget calculation. In this context, therefore, the 20-km reference level corresponds to the effective radiative top of atmosphere for the planet. Although the optimal flux reference level depends slightly on scene type due to differences in effective transmission of solar radiation with cloud height, the difference in flux caused by neglecting the scene-type dependence is less than 0.1%. If an inappropriate

  17. 10 CFR 140.84 - Criterion I-Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels offsite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... § 140.84 Criterion I—Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels... radioactive material offsite, or that there have been substantial levels of radiation offsite, when, as a... facility and such contamination is characterized by levels of radiation in excess of one of the...

  18. 10 CFR 140.84 - Criterion I-Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels offsite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... § 140.84 Criterion I—Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels... radioactive material offsite, or that there have been substantial levels of radiation offsite, when, as a... facility and such contamination is characterized by levels of radiation in excess of one of the...

  19. 10 CFR 140.84 - Criterion I-Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels offsite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... § 140.84 Criterion I—Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels... radioactive material offsite, or that there have been substantial levels of radiation offsite, when, as a... facility and such contamination is characterized by levels of radiation in excess of one of the...

  20. 10 CFR 140.84 - Criterion I-Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels offsite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... § 140.84 Criterion I—Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels... radioactive material offsite, or that there have been substantial levels of radiation offsite, when, as a... facility and such contamination is characterized by levels of radiation in excess of one of the...

  1. 10 CFR 840.4 - Criterion I-Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels offsite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... dispersal of radioactive material offsite, or that there have been substantial levels of radiation offsite... facility or device and such contamination is characterized by levels of radiation in excess of one of the... and such contamination is characterized by levels of radiation in excess of one of the values...

  2. How much can be learned from populations exposed to low levels of radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1984-05-01

    The assessment of health effects from low-level exposure to radiation is a matter of considerable controversy. Many of the problems in analyzing and interpreting data on populations exposed to low levels of radiation are well illustrated by a current study of the effects on mortality of occupational exposure to radiation at the Hanford plant. The conclusion drawn is that the amount that can be learned from the Hanford population, and other populations exposed to low levels of radiation, is extremely limited. The data are not adequate to determine reliable estimates of risks, or to investigate the appropriateness of various models. Although there are problems in using data from populations exposed at high levels to estimate risks of low level exposure to radiation, the problems in obtaining such estimates directly are even more severe. Thus data from populations such as the Japanese A-bomb survivors and the British ankylosing spondylitis patients must continue to serve as our primary source of information on radiation effects. 27 references, 3 tables. (ACR)

  3. BEIR-III report and the health effects of low-level radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1980-01-01

    The present BEIR-III Committee has not highlighted any controversy over the health effects of low-level radiation. In its evaluation of the experimental data and epidemiological surveys, the Committee has carefully reviewed and assessed the value of all the available scientific evidence for estimating numerical risk coefficients for the health hazards to human populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. Responsible public awareness of the possible health effects of ionizing radiations from medical and industrial radiation exposure, centers on three important matters of societal concern: (1) to place into perspective the extent of harm to the health of man and his descendants to be expected in the present and in the future from those societal activities involving ionizing radiation; (2) to develop quantitative indices of harm based on dose-effect relationships; such indices could then be used with prudent caution to introduce concepts of the regulation of population doses on the basis of somatic and genetic risks; and (3) to identify the magnitude and extent of radiation activities which could cause harm, to assess their relative significance, and to provide a framework for recommendations on how to reduce unnecessary radiation exposure to human populations. The main difference of the BEIR Committee Report is not so much from new data or new interpretations of existing data, but rather from a philosophical approach and appraisal of existing and future radiation protection resulting from an atmosphere of constantly changing societal conditions and public attitudes. (PCS)

  4. X-33 XRS-2200 Linear Aerospike Engine Sea Level Plume Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DAgostino, Mark G.; Lee, Young C.; Wang, Ten-See; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Wide band plume radiation data were collected during ten sea level tests of a single XRS-2200 engine at the NASA Stennis Space Center in 1999 and 2000. The XRS-2200 is a liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen fueled, gas generator cycle linear aerospike engine which develops 204,420 lbf thrust at sea level. Instrumentation consisted of six hemispherical radiometers and one narrow view radiometer. Test conditions varied from 100% to 57% power level (PL) and 6.0 to 4.5 oxidizer to fuel (O/F) ratio. Measured radiation rates generally increased with engine chamber pressure and mixture ratio. One hundred percent power level radiation data were compared to predictions made with the FDNS and GASRAD codes. Predicted levels ranged from 42% over to 7% under average test values.

  5. Potential for radiation damage to carbon steel storage tanks for high level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.; Sindelar, R.L.; Thomas, J.K.

    1993-07-30

    A low intensity radiation field is generated by the high level waste that is stored within carbon steel lined tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The highest level of radiation damage to the tank walls from gamma and spontaneous neutron emissions is estimated to be less than 1.0E-6 displacements per atom (DPA) for a 100 year exposure to fresh, ``high heat`` SRS waste assuming continuous replenishment of the radionuclides. This damage level is below the limit for measurable radiation damage to the mechanical properties of carbon steel. Structural assessment of tanks for storage of high level waste may be based on nominal or code values of the mechanical properties of the steels from which the tanks were constructed.

  6. Radiation exposure in the young level 1 trauma patient: a retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Michael B; Bellaire, Laura L; Moore, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has become an increasingly popular and powerful tool for clinicians managing trauma patients with life-threatening injuries, but the ramifications of increasing radiation burden on individual patients are not insignificant. This study examines a continuous series of 337 patients less than 40 years old admitted to a level 1 trauma center during a 4-month period. Primary outcome measures included number of scans; effective dose of radiation from radiographs and CT scans, respectively; and total effective dose from both sources over patients' hospital stays. Several variables, including hospital length of stay, initial Glasgow Coma Scale score, and Injury Severity Score, correlated with greater radiation exposure. Blunt trauma victims were more prone to higher doses than those with penetrating or combined penetrating and blunt trauma. Location and mechanism of injury were also found to correlate with radiation exposure. Trauma patients as a group are exposed to high levels of radiation from X-rays and CT scans, and CT scans contribute a very high proportion (91.3% ± 11.7%) of that radiation. Certain subgroups of patients are at a particularly high risk of exposure, and greater attention to cumulative radiation dose should be paid to patients with the above mentioned risk factors.

  7. Energy levels and radiative rates for Cr-like Cu VI and Zn VII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, K. M.; Bogdanovich, P.; Keenan, F. P.; Kisielius, R.

    2016-09-01

    Energy levels and radiative rates (A-values) for transitions in Cr-like Cu VI and Zn VII are reported. These data are determined in the quasi-relativistic approach (QR), by employing a very large configuration interaction (CI) expansion which is highly important for these ions. No radiative rates are available in the literature to compare with our results, but our calculated energies are in close agreement with those compiled by NIST and other available theoretical data, for a majority of the levels. The A-values (and resultant lifetimes) are listed for all significantly contributing E1, E2 and M1 radiative transitions among the energetically lowest 322 levels of each ion.

  8. Energy levels and radiative rates for Cr-like Cu VI and Zn VII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, K. M.; Bogdanovich, P.; Keenan, F. P.; Kisielius, R.

    2016-09-01

    Energy levels and radiative rates (A-values) for transitions in Cr-like Cu VI and Zn VII are reported. These data are determined in the quasi-relativistic approach (QR), by employing a very large configuration interaction (CI) expansion which is highly important for these ions. No radiative rates are available in the literature to compare with our results, but our calculated energies are in close agreement with those compiled by NIST and other available theoretical data, for a majority of the levels. The A-values (and resultant lifetimes) are listed for all significantly contributing E1, E2 and M1 radiative transitions among the energetically lowest 322 levels of each ion.

  9. [Ionising rays and laryngeal carcinomas (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Martin, G; Glanz, H; Kleinsasser, O

    1979-03-01

    Review of the literature and report of a new care of laryngeal cancer after irradiation of a benign lesion of the neck. These cases obviously become rare since benign lesions are no longer irradiated. Today the risk of inducing a second carcinoma by a successful irradiation of the first tumor becomes more important. A study of 109 patients, irradiated for laryngeal carcinoma and surviving with no evidence of disease for a period of at least 5 years has been performed. 8 of these patients developed a second primary in the previously irradiated area after 7-15 years. These second carcinomas are not rare if one considers that most patients with laryngeal carcinoma are 60-70 years old and therefore the life expectance on an average is low. These facts should be taken into consideration when deciding between surgical or radiation therapy in younger patients with high life expectance.

  10. Increased Artemis levels confer radioresistance to both high and low LET radiation exposures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Artemis has a defined role in V(D)J recombination and has been implicated in the repair of radiation induced double-strand breaks. However the exact function(s) of Artemis in DNA repair and its preferred substrate(s) in vivo remain undefined. Our previous work suggests that Artemis is important for the repair of complex DNA damage like that inflicted by high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation. To establish the contribution of Artemis in repairing DNA damage caused by various radiation qualities, we evaluated the effect of over-expressing Artemis on cell survival, DNA repair, and cell cycle arrest after exposure to high and low LET radiation. Results Our data reveal that Artemis over-expression confers marked radioprotection against both types of radiation, although the radioprotective effect was greater following high LET radiation. Inhibitor studies reveal that the radioprotection imparted by Artemis is primarily dependent on DNA-PK activity, and to a lesser extent on ATM kinase activity. Together, these data suggest a DNA-PK dependent role for Artemis in the repair of complex DNA damage. Conclusions These findings indicate that Artemis levels significantly influence radiation toxicity in human cells and suggest that Artemis inhibition could be a practical target for adjuvant cancer therapies. PMID:22713703

  11. Airborne laser-spark for ambient desorption/ionisation.

    PubMed

    Bierstedt, Andreas; Riedel, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A novel direct sampling ionisation scheme for ambient mass spectrometry is presented. Desorption and ionisation are achieved by a quasi-continuous laser induced plasma in air. Since there are no solid or liquid electrodes involved the ion source does not suffer from chemical interferences or fatigue originating from erosive burning or from electrode consumption. The overall plasma maintains electro-neutrality, minimising charge effects and accompanying long term drift of the charged particles trajectories. In the airborne plasma approach the ambient air not only serves as the plasma medium but at the same time also slows down the nascent ions via collisional cooling. Ionisation of the analyte molecules does not occur in the plasma itself but is induced by interaction with nascent ionic fragments, electrons and/or far ultraviolet photons in the plasma vicinity. At each individual air-spark an audible shockwave is formed, providing new reactive species, which expands concentrically and, thus, prevents direct contact of the analyte with the hot region inside the plasma itself. As a consequence the interaction volume between plasma and analyte does not exceed the threshold temperature for thermal dissociation or fragmentation. Experimentally this indirect ionisation scheme is demonstrated to be widely unspecific to the chemical nature of the analyte and to hardly result in any fragmentation of the studied molecules. A vast ensemble of different test analytes including polar and non-polar hydrocarbons, sugars, low mass active ingredients of pharmaceuticals as well as natural biomolecules in food samples directly out of their complex matrices could be shown to yield easily accessible yet meaningful spectra. Since the plasma medium is humid air, the chemical reaction mechanism of the ionisation is likely to be similar to other ambient ionisation techniques. Wir stellen hier eine neue Ionisationsmethode für die Umgebungsionisation (ambient ionisation) vor. Sowohl die

  12. THE INFLUENCE OF SALTS UPON THE IONISATION OF EGG ALBUMIN

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, S. P. L.; Linderstrøm-Lang, K.; Lund, Ellen

    1927-01-01

    Introduction. A description is given of the principle followed in the experimental determination of the ionisation of egg albumin, its capacity to combine with acids and bases. Egg albumin is regarded as an ampholyte, and in accordance with J. N. Brønsted's definition of acids and bases, ampholytes are considered as substances capable of both taking up and giving off hydrogen ions. The theoretical treatment of the capacity of ampholytes to combine with acids (and bases) has been carried out on this basis. Section A. Several experimental series are noted, comprising the determination of the activity coefficient of the hydrogen ion (fH) in ammonium chloride solutions of different concentration. Section B. The general method of experimental determination of the ionisation (capacity to combine with adds and bases) of egg albumin in ammonium chloride and potassium chloride solutions is briefly described, and the results of the experiments are compared. Section C. 1). In a brief theoretical survey we have suggested that distinction should be made between isoelectric and isoionic reaction of an ampholyte, the former defined as the hydrogen ion activity (value of paH) at which the mean valency of the ampholyte is 0, the latter as the hydrogen ion activity at which the quantity of acid or base combined with the ampholyte is 0; or, as we prefer to express it, the hydrogen ion activity at which the specific hydrogen ionisation of the ampholyte is 0. If the ampholyte does not combine with other ions than the hydrogen ion, then isoelectric and isoionic reaction coincide. Isoionic reaction is determined by acid-combining experiments. The principle of this determination is briefly described. A theoretical investigation of the alteration with salt concentration of both isoelectric (isoionic) reaction and the shape and direction of the ionisation curves is made, with regard to ampholytes capable only of combining with hydrogen ions, on the basis of the Debye-Hückel formulæ and

  13. High ionisation absorption in low mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponti, G.; Bianchi, S.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; De, K.; Fender, R.; Merloni, A.

    2016-05-01

    The advent of the new generation of X-ray telescopes yielded a significant step forward in our understanding of ionised absorption generated in the accretion discs of X-ray binaries. It has become evident that these relatively weak and narrow absorption features, sporadically present in the X-ray spectra of some systems, are actually the signature of equatorial outflows, which might carry away more matter than that being accreted. Therefore, they play a major role in the accretion phenomenon. These outflows (or ionised atmospheres) are ubiquitous during the softer states but absent during the power-law dominated, hard states, suggesting a strong link with the state of the inner accretion disc, presence of the radio-jet and the properties of the central source. Here, we discuss the current understanding of this field.

  14. Airborne laser-spark for ambient desorption/ionisation.

    PubMed

    Bierstedt, Andreas; Riedel, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A novel direct sampling ionisation scheme for ambient mass spectrometry is presented. Desorption and ionisation are achieved by a quasi-continuous laser induced plasma in air. Since there are no solid or liquid electrodes involved the ion source does not suffer from chemical interferences or fatigue originating from erosive burning or from electrode consumption. The overall plasma maintains electro-neutrality, minimising charge effects and accompanying long term drift of the charged particles trajectories. In the airborne plasma approach the ambient air not only serves as the plasma medium but at the same time also slows down the nascent ions via collisional cooling. Ionisation of the analyte molecules does not occur in the plasma itself but is induced by interaction with nascent ionic fragments, electrons and/or far ultraviolet photons in the plasma vicinity. At each individual air-spark an audible shockwave is formed, providing new reactive species, which expands concentrically and, thus, prevents direct contact of the analyte with the hot region inside the plasma itself. As a consequence the interaction volume between plasma and analyte does not exceed the threshold temperature for thermal dissociation or fragmentation. Experimentally this indirect ionisation scheme is demonstrated to be widely unspecific to the chemical nature of the analyte and to hardly result in any fragmentation of the studied molecules. A vast ensemble of different test analytes including polar and non-polar hydrocarbons, sugars, low mass active ingredients of pharmaceuticals as well as natural biomolecules in food samples directly out of their complex matrices could be shown to yield easily accessible yet meaningful spectra. Since the plasma medium is humid air, the chemical reaction mechanism of the ionisation is likely to be similar to other ambient ionisation techniques. Wir stellen hier eine neue Ionisationsmethode für die Umgebungsionisation (ambient ionisation) vor. Sowohl die

  15. Effect of radiation and age on immunoglobulin levels in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, W. H.; Saphire, D. G.; Hackleman, S. M.; Braun, A. M.; Pennington, P.; Scheffler, J.; Wigle, J. C.; Cox, A. B.

    1994-01-01

    We report the results of a study on the immunoglobulin levels of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) in a colony consisting of the survivors of monkeys that received a single whole-body exposure to protons, electrons or X rays between 1964 and 1969. This colony has been maintained to assess the long-term effects of ionizing radiation on astronauts and high-flying pilots. Of the original 358 monkeys that were retained for lifetime studies, 129 (97 irradiated and 32 controls) were available for our study. We found no significant difference between the irradiated and control monkeys in mean levels of IgA, IgG and IgM, irrespective of the radiation treatment. The availability of these aged monkeys provided a unique opportunity to compare their immunoglobulin levels to those of other monkeys of various ages, and thus assess the effect of age on immunoglobulin levels. We found that only the IgA levels increase with age.

  16. Diffuse radiation increases global ecosystem-level water-use efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, A. M.; Reichstein, M.; Cescatti, A.; Knohl, A.; Zaehle, S.

    2012-12-01

    Current environmental changes lead not only to rising atmospheric CO2 levels and air temperature but also to changes in air pollution and thus the light quality of the solar radiation reaching the land-surface. While rising CO2 levels are thought to enhance photosynthesis and closure of stomata, thus leading to relative water savings, the effect of diffuse radiation on transpiration by plants is less clear. It has been speculated that the stimulation of photosynthesis by increased levels of diffuse light may be counteracted by higher transpiration and consequently water depletion and drought stress. Ultimately, in water co-limited systems, the overall effect of diffuse radiation will depend on the sensitivity of canopy transpiration versus photosynthesis to diffuse light, i.e. whether water-use efficiency changes with relative levels of diffuse light. Our study shows that water-use efficiency increases significantly with higher fractions of diffuse light. It uses the ecosystem-atmosphere gas-exchange observations obtained with the eddy covariance method at 29 flux tower sites. In contrast to previous global studies, the analysis is based directly on measurements of diffuse radiation. Its effect on water-use efficiency was derived by analyzing the multivariate response of carbon and water fluxes to radiation and air humidity using a purely empirical approach based on artificial neural networks. We infer that per unit change of diffuse fraction the water-use efficiency increases up to 40% depending on diffuse fraction levels and ecosystem type. Hence, in regions with increasing diffuse radiation positive effects on primary production are expected even under conditions where water is co-limiting productivity.

  17. Effet galvanique et spectroscopie d'ionisation multiphotonique à large bande : application à l'uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagné, Jean-Marie; Babin, François

    1992-04-01

    The uranium single colour multiphoton ionization spectrum, with high laser bandwidth excitation, was measured, in the spectral range of R6G, using the fast pulsed (sim 10^{-9} s) optogalvanic signal generated by photoionization in the dark space of a hollow cathode discharge. Results indicate that this spectrum is dense in the 570 to 610 nm spectral range. A list of the 74 most intense lines is given. The results of a try at explaining these lines by a three photon resonant or quasi-resonant scheme, using know levels of uranium, are presented. The multiphoton ionization line at 591.54 nm is a special case which is discussed more thoroughly. Grâce à l'effet optogalvanique pulsé rapide (sim 10^{-9} s) généré par la photoionisation dans l'espace sombre d'une décharge en régime cathode creuse, le spectre d'ionisation multiphotonique à large bande de l'uranium, dans le domaine spectral de la rhodamine 6G, a été mesuré. Les résultats indiquent que pour cette bande spectrale du laser, comprise entre 570 et 610 nm, ce spectre optogalvanique d'ionisation multiphotonique est très riche. Une liste de 74 raies photoioniques les plus significatives est présentée. Les résultats préliminaires d'une étude pour expliquer la présence de ces raies, en utilisant des schémas d'ionisation à trois photons résonnants ou quasi-résonnants, à partir d'une liste de niveaux publiés, sont également présentés. La raie d'ionisation associée à la longueur d'oride 591,54 nm est un cas spécial qui est discuté plus longuement.

  18. Electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry: principles and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Ho, C S; Lam, C W K; Chan, M H M; Cheung, R C K; Law, L K; Lit, L C W; Ng, K F; Suen, M W M; Tai, H L

    2003-01-01

    This mini-review provides a general understanding of electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) which has become an increasingly important technique in the clinical laboratory for structural study or quantitative measurement of metabolites in a complex biological sample. The first part of the review explains the electrospray ionisation process, design of mass spectrometers with separation capability, characteristics of the mass spectrum, and practical considerations in quantitative analysis. The second part then focuses on some clinical applications. The capability of ESI-tandem-MS in measuring bio-molecules sharing similar molecular structures makes it particularly useful in screening for inborn errors of amino acid, fatty acid, purine, pyrimidine metabolism and diagnosis of galactosaemia and peroxisomal disorders. Electrospray ionisation is also efficient in generating cluster ions for structural elucidation of macromolecules. This has fostered a new and improved approach (vs electrophoresis) for identification and quantification of haemoglobin variants. With the understanding of glycohaemoglobin structure, an IFCC reference method for glycohaemoglobin assay has been established using ESI-MS. It represents a significant advancement for the standardisation of HbA1c in diabetic monitoring. With its other applications such as in therapeutic drug monitoring, ESI-MS will continue to exert an important influence in the future development and organisation of the clinical laboratory service.

  19. Radiation induced deep level defects in bipolar junction transistors under various bias conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chaoming; Yang, Jianqun; Li, Xingji; Ma, Guoliang; Xiao, Liyi; Bollmann, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Bipolar junction transistor (BJT) is sensitive to ionization and displacement radiation effects in space. In this paper, 35 MeV Si ions were used as irradiation source to research the radiation damage on NPN and PNP bipolar transistors. The changing of electrical parameters of transistors was in situ measured with increasing irradiation fluence of 35 MeV Si ions. Using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), defects in the bipolar junction transistors under various bias conditions are measured after irradiation. Based on the in situ electrical measurement and DLTS spectra, it is clearly that the bias conditions can affect the concentration of deep level defects, and the radiation damage induced by heavy ions.

  20. Economic impact and effectiveness of radiation protection measures in aviation during a ground level enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthiä, Daniel; Schaefer, Martin; Meier, Matthias M.

    2015-06-01

    In addition to the omnipresent irradiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and their secondary products, passengers and aircraft crew may be exposed to radiation from solar cosmic rays during ground level enhancements (GLE). In general, lowering the flight altitude and changing the flight route to lower latitudes are procedures applicable to immediately reduce the radiation exposure at aviation altitudes. In practice, however, taking such action necessarily leads to modifications in the flight plan and the consequential, additional fuel consumption constrains the mitigating measures. In this work we investigate in a case study of the ground level event of December 13th 2006 how potential mitigation procedures affect the total radiation exposure during a transatlantic flight from Seattle to Cologne taking into account constraints concerning fuel consumption and range.

  1. Sunlight-Exposed Biofilm Microbial Communities Are Naturally Resistant to Chernobyl Ionizing-Radiation Levels

    PubMed Central

    Ragon, Marie; Restoux, Gwendal; Moreira, David; Møller, Anders Pape; López-García, Purificación

    2011-01-01

    Background The Chernobyl accident represents a long-term experiment on the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation at the ecosystem level. Though studies of these effects on plants and animals are abundant, the study of how Chernobyl radiation levels affect prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities is practically non-existent, except for a few reports on human pathogens or soil microorganisms. Environments enduring extreme desiccation and UV radiation, such as sunlight exposed biofilms could in principle select for organisms highly resistant to ionizing radiation as well. Methodology/Principal Findings To test this hypothesis, we explored the diversity of microorganisms belonging to the three domains of life by cultivation-independent approaches in biofilms developing on concrete walls or pillars in the Chernobyl area exposed to different levels of radiation, and we compared them with a similar biofilm from a non-irradiated site in Northern Ireland. Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria and Deinococcales were the most consistently detected bacterial groups, whereas green algae (Chlorophyta) and ascomycete fungi (Ascomycota) dominated within the eukaryotes. Close relatives to the most radio-resistant organisms known, including Rubrobacter species, Deinococcales and melanized ascomycete fungi were always detected. The diversity of bacteria and eukaryotes found in the most highly irradiated samples was comparable to that of less irradiated Chernobyl sites and Northern Ireland. However, the study of mutation frequencies in non-coding ITS regions versus SSU rRNA genes in members of a same actinobacterial operational taxonomic unit (OTU) present in Chernobyl samples and Northern Ireland showed a positive correlation between increased radiation and mutation rates. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that biofilm microbial communities in the most irradiated samples are comparable to non-irradiated samples in terms of general

  2. Determining the Knowledge Level of Pre-Service Teachers' on Radioactivity and Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ergul, N. Remziye

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the basic knowledge levels of teacher candidates' from different branches regarding the subjects of radiation and radioactivity. 42 variables were determined in relation to the specified titles. In the preparation stage of determining the variables, all the related programs were examined, and attention was paid to include…

  3. Determining the Knowledge Level of Pre-Service Teachers' on Radioactivity and Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ergul, N. Remziye

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the basic knowledge levels of teacher candidates from different branches regarding the subjects of radiation and radioactivity. 42 variables were determined in relation to the specified titles. In the preparation stage of determining the variables, all the related programs were examined, and attention was paid to include…

  4. Effect of moderate level x-radiation to brain on cerebral glucose utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, M.; Patronas, N.J.; Di Chiro, G.; Mansi, L.; Kennedy, C.

    1986-07-01

    The effect of x-radiation in doses used in treatment of brain malignancies has previously been established largely by histologic examination of the tissue or by observation of a deficit in function. At moderate dose levels such effects are usually delayed and are vascular in origin. We have used the 2-(/sup 14/C)deoxyglucose method for the quantitative measurement of local cerebral glucose utilization to learn whether x-radiation administered to rat brain in a dose below that which is known to result in any histologic change may nevertheless affect the brain's local rates of glucose utilization. Measurements were made 4 days and 4 weeks after exposure of groups of rats to 1500 rad. Rates of glucose utilization in 54 gray and eight white matter structures in both groups were compared with rates in sham-irradiated controls. Statistically significantly lower rates were found in 16 structures in rats 4 days after radiation and in 25 structures 4 weeks after radiation exposure. A weighted average rate for the brain as a whole was approximately 15% below that of the controls for both radiated groups, but this difference was short of being of statistical significance. It is clear from this study that the metabolic rates of some brain structures are reduced following moderate doses of x-radiation.

  5. Autocorrelation in ultraviolet radiation measured at ground level using detrended fluctuation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Filho, Paulo Cavalcante; da Silva, Francisco Raimundo; Corso, Gilberto

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we analyzed the autocorrelation among four ultraviolet (UV) radiation data sets obtained at 305 nm, 320 nm, 340 nm, and 380 nm. The data were recorded at ground level at the INPE climate station in Natal, RN, Brazil, which is a site close to the equator. The autocorrelations were computed by detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to estimate the index α. We found that the ​fluctuations in the UV radiation data were fractal, with scale-free behavior at a DFA index α ≃ 0.7. In addition, we performed a power law spectral analysis, which showed that the power spectrum exhibited a power law behavior with an exponent of β ≃ 0.45. Given that the theoretical result is β = 2 α - 1, these two results are in good agreement. Moreover, the application of the DFA ​method to the UV radiation data required detrending using a polynomial with an order of at least eight, which was related to the complex daily solar radiation curve obtained at ground level in a tropical region. The results indicated that the α exponent of UV radiation is similar to other climatic records such as air temperature, wind, or rain, but not solar activity.

  6. Level of radiation dose in university hospital non-insured private health screening programs in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to evaluate radiation exposure resulting from the comprehensive health examinations of selected university hospital programs and to present basic data for research and management strategies on the health effects of medical radiation exposure. Methods Radiation-based diagnostic studies of the comprehensive health examination programs of ten university hospitals in Seoul, Korea, as introduced in their websites, were analyzed. The medical radiation studies of the programs were reviewed by radiologists. Only the effective doses of the basic studies were included in the analysis. The optional studies of the programs were excluded. Results Among the 190 comprehensive health examination programs, 132 programs (69.5%) included computed tomography studies, with an average of 1.4 scans. The average effective dose of radiation by program was 3.62 mSv for an intensive program for specific diseases; 11.12 mSv for an intensive program for cancer; 18.14 mSv for a premium program; and 24.08 mSv for an overnight program. A higher cost of a programs was linked to a higher effective dose (r=0.812). The effective doses of the examination programs for the same purposes differed by as much as 2.1 times by hospital. Inclusion of positron emission tomography–computed tomography was the most critical factor in determining the level of effective dose. Conclusions It was found that radiation exposure dose from comprehensive health exam programs targeted for an asymptomatic, healthy public reached between 3.6 and 24 times the annual dose limit for the general public. Relevant management policies at the national level should be provided to minimize medical radiation exposure. PMID:27032387

  7. Lower prevalence but similar fitness in a parasitic fungus at higher radiation levels near Chernobyl.

    PubMed

    Aguileta, Gabriela; Badouin, Helene; Hood, Michael E; Møller, Anders P; Le Prieur, Stephanie; Snirc, Alodie; Siguenza, Sophie; Mousseau, Timothy A; Shykoff, Jacqui A; Cuomo, Christina A; Giraud, Tatiana

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear disasters at Chernobyl and Fukushima provide examples of effects of acute ionizing radiation on mutations that can affect the fitness and distribution of species. Here, we investigated the prevalence of Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae, a pollinator-transmitted fungal pathogen of plants causing anther-smut disease in Chernobyl, its viability, fertility and karyotype variation, and the accumulation of nonsynonymous mutations in its genome. We collected diseased flowers of Silene latifolia from locations ranging by more than two orders of magnitude in background radiation, from 0.05 to 21.03 μGy/h. Disease prevalence decreased significantly with increasing radiation level, possibly due to lower pollinator abundance and altered pollinator behaviour. Viability and fertility, measured as the budding rate of haploid sporidia following meiosis from the diploid teliospores, did not vary with increasing radiation levels and neither did karyotype overall structure and level of chromosomal size heterozygosity. We sequenced the genomes of twelve samples from Chernobyl and of four samples collected from uncontaminated areas and analysed alignments of 6068 predicted genes, corresponding to 1.04 × 10(7)  base pairs. We found no dose-dependent differences in substitution rates (neither dN, dS, nor dN/dS). Thus, we found no significant evidence of increased deleterious mutation rates at higher levels of background radiation in this plant pathogen. We even found lower levels of nonsynonymous substitution rates in contaminated areas compared to control regions, suggesting that purifying selection was stronger in contaminated than uncontaminated areas. We briefly discuss the possibilities for a mechanistic basis of radio resistance in this nonmelanized fungus. PMID:27136128

  8. Lower prevalence but similar fitness in a parasitic fungus at higher radiation levels near Chernobyl.

    PubMed

    Aguileta, Gabriela; Badouin, Helene; Hood, Michael E; Møller, Anders P; Le Prieur, Stephanie; Snirc, Alodie; Siguenza, Sophie; Mousseau, Timothy A; Shykoff, Jacqui A; Cuomo, Christina A; Giraud, Tatiana

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear disasters at Chernobyl and Fukushima provide examples of effects of acute ionizing radiation on mutations that can affect the fitness and distribution of species. Here, we investigated the prevalence of Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae, a pollinator-transmitted fungal pathogen of plants causing anther-smut disease in Chernobyl, its viability, fertility and karyotype variation, and the accumulation of nonsynonymous mutations in its genome. We collected diseased flowers of Silene latifolia from locations ranging by more than two orders of magnitude in background radiation, from 0.05 to 21.03 μGy/h. Disease prevalence decreased significantly with increasing radiation level, possibly due to lower pollinator abundance and altered pollinator behaviour. Viability and fertility, measured as the budding rate of haploid sporidia following meiosis from the diploid teliospores, did not vary with increasing radiation levels and neither did karyotype overall structure and level of chromosomal size heterozygosity. We sequenced the genomes of twelve samples from Chernobyl and of four samples collected from uncontaminated areas and analysed alignments of 6068 predicted genes, corresponding to 1.04 × 10(7)  base pairs. We found no dose-dependent differences in substitution rates (neither dN, dS, nor dN/dS). Thus, we found no significant evidence of increased deleterious mutation rates at higher levels of background radiation in this plant pathogen. We even found lower levels of nonsynonymous substitution rates in contaminated areas compared to control regions, suggesting that purifying selection was stronger in contaminated than uncontaminated areas. We briefly discuss the possibilities for a mechanistic basis of radio resistance in this nonmelanized fungus.

  9. Revisiting radiative deep-level transitions in CuGaSe2 by photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spindler, Conrad; Regesch, David; Siebentritt, Susanne

    2016-07-01

    Recent defect calculations suggest that the open circuit voltage of CuGaSe2 solar cells can be limited by deep intrinsic electron traps by GaCu antisites and their complexes with Cu-vacancies. To gain experimental evidence, two radiative defect transitions at 1.10 eV and 1.24 eV are characterized by steady-state photoluminescence on epitaxial-grown CuGaSe2 thin films. Cu-rich samples are studied, since they show highest crystal quality, exciton luminescence, and no potential fluctuations. Variations of the laser intensity and temperature dependent measurements suggest that emission occurs from two deep donor-like levels into the same shallow acceptor. At 10 K, power-law exponents of 1 (low excitation regime) and 1/2 (high excitation regime) are observed identically for both transitions. The theory and a fitting function for the double power law is derived. It is concluded that the acceptor becomes saturated by excess carriers which changes the exponent of all transitions. Activation energies determined from the temperature quenching depend on the excitation level and show unexpected values of 600 meV and higher. The thermal activation of non-radiative processes can explain the distortion of the ionization energies. Both the deep levels play a major role as radiative and non-radiative recombination centers for electrons and can be detrimental for photovoltaic applications.

  10. Electron impact ionisation cross sections for atomic and molecular allotropes of phosphorous and arsenic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhutadia, Harshad; Chaudhari, Ashok; Vinodkumar, Minaxi

    2015-12-01

    We report electron impact total ionisation cross sections for phosphorous (P), arsenic (As), diphosphorous (P2), diarsenic (As2), tetra phosphorous (P4) and tetra arsenic (As4) from the threshold of the target to 2000 eV. We employed spherical complex optical potential to compute total inelastic cross sections (Qinel). The total ionisation cross section is extracted from the total inelastic cross section using the complex scattering potential-ionisation contribution method. The results of most of the targets studied here compare well with the measurements and the theoretical data wherever available. The correlation between the peak of ionisation cross sections with the number of target electrons and polarisability is also reported. It is observed that the maximum ionisation cross sections depend linearly on the number of target electrons and polarisability of the target. This linear correlation is used to predict the maximum ionisation cross sections for the targets (I2, HI and PF3) where no experimental data are available.

  11. Energy levels and radiative rates for transitions in Cr-like Co IV and Ni V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, K. M.; Bogdanovich, P.; Karpuškienė, R.; Keenan, F. P.; Kisielius, R.; Stancalie, V.

    2016-01-01

    We report calculations of energy levels and radiative rates (A-values) for transitions in Cr-like Co IV and Ni V. The quasi-relativistic Hartree-Fock (QRHF) code is adopted for calculating the data although GRASP (general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package) and flexible atomic code (FAC) have also been employed for comparison purposes. No radiative rates are available in the literature to compare with our results, but our calculated energies are in close agreement with those compiled by NIST for a majority of the levels. However, there are discrepancies for a few levels of up to 3%. The A-values are listed for all significantly contributing E1, E2 and M1 transitions, and the corresponding lifetimes reported, although unfortunately no previous theoretical or experimental results exist to compare with our data.

  12. Low-level red laser therapy alters effects of ultraviolet C radiation on Escherichia coli cells

    PubMed Central

    Canuto, K.S.; Sergio, L.P.S.; Guimarães, O.R.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Low-level lasers are used at low power densities and doses according to clinical protocols supplied with laser devices or based on professional practice. Although use of these lasers is increasing in many countries, the molecular mechanisms involved in effects of low-level lasers, mainly on DNA, are controversial. In this study, we evaluated the effects of low-level red lasers on survival, filamentation, and morphology of Escherichia colicells that were exposed to ultraviolet C (UVC) radiation. Exponential and stationary wild-type and uvrA-deficientE. coli cells were exposed to a low-level red laser and in sequence to UVC radiation. Bacterial survival was evaluated to determine the laser protection factor (ratio between the number of viable cells after exposure to the red laser and UVC and the number of viable cells after exposure to UVC). Bacterial filaments were counted to obtain the percentage of filamentation. Area-perimeter ratios were calculated for evaluation of cellular morphology. Experiments were carried out in duplicate and the results are reported as the means of three independent assays. Pre-exposure to a red laser protected wild-type and uvrA-deficient E. coli cells against the lethal effect of UVC radiation, and increased the percentage of filamentation and the area-perimeter ratio, depending on UVC fluence and physiological conditions in the cells. Therapeutic, low-level red laser radiation can induce DNA lesions at a sub-lethal level. Consequences to cells and tissues should be considered when clinical protocols based on this laser are carried out. PMID:26445338

  13. Low-level red laser therapy alters effects of ultraviolet C radiation on Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Canuto, K S; Sergio, L P S; Guimarães, O R; Geller, M; Paoli, F; Fonseca, A S

    2015-10-01

    Low-level lasers are used at low power densities and doses according to clinical protocols supplied with laser devices or based on professional practice. Although use of these lasers is increasing in many countries, the molecular mechanisms involved in effects of low-level lasers, mainly on DNA, are controversial. In this study, we evaluated the effects of low-level red lasers on survival, filamentation, and morphology of Escherichia colicells that were exposed to ultraviolet C (UVC) radiation. Exponential and stationary wild-type and uvrA-deficientE. coli cells were exposed to a low-level red laser and in sequence to UVC radiation. Bacterial survival was evaluated to determine the laser protection factor (ratio between the number of viable cells after exposure to the red laser and UVC and the number of viable cells after exposure to UVC). Bacterial filaments were counted to obtain the percentage of filamentation. Area-perimeter ratios were calculated for evaluation of cellular morphology. Experiments were carried out in duplicate and the results are reported as the means of three independent assays. Pre-exposure to a red laser protected wild-type and uvrA-deficient E. coli cells against the lethal effect of UVC radiation, and increased the percentage of filamentation and the area-perimeter ratio, depending on UVC fluence and physiological conditions in the cells. Therapeutic, low-level red laser radiation can induce DNA lesions at a sub-lethal level. Consequences to cells and tissues should be considered when clinical protocols based on this laser are carried out.

  14. Assessing risks from occupational exposure to low-level radiation: The statistician's role

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1989-06-01

    Currently, several epidemiological studies of workers who have been exposed occupationally to radiation are being conducted. These include workers in the United States, Great Britain, and Canada, involved in the production of both defense materials and nuclear power. A major reason for conducting these studies is to evaluate possible adverse health effects that may have resulted because of the radiation exposure received. The general subject of health effects resulting from low levels of radiation, including these worker studies, has attracted the attention of various news media, and has been the subject of considerable controversy. These studies provide a good illustration of certain other aspects of the statistician's role; namely, communication and adequate subject matter knowledge. A competent technical job is not sufficient if these other aspects are not fulfilled.

  15. Practical Applications of Radioactivity and Nuclear Radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowenthal, Gerhart; Airey, Peter

    2005-09-01

    1. Atoms, nuclides and radionuclides; 2. Units and standards for radioactivity and radiation dosimetry and rules for radiation protection; 3. Properties of radiations emitted from radionuclides; 4. Nuclear radiations from a user's perspective; 5. Ionising radiation detectors; 6. Radioactivity and countrate measurements and the presentation of results; 7. Industrial applications of radioisotopes and radiation; 8. Application of tracer technology to industry and the environment; 9. Radionuclides to protect the environment.

  16. Practical Applications of Radioactivity and Nuclear Radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowenthal, Gerhart; Airey, Peter

    2001-08-01

    1. Atoms, nuclides and radionuclides; 2. Units and standards for radioactivity and radiation dosimetry and rules for radiation protection; 3. Properties of radiations emitted from radionuclides; 4. Nuclear radiations from a user's perspective; 5. Ionising radiation detectors; 6. Radioactivity and countrate measurements and the presentation of results; 7. Industrial applications of radioisotopes and radiation; 8. Application of tracer technology to industry and the environment; 9. Radionuclides to protect the environment.

  17. Recommended Radiation Protection Practices for Low-Level Waste Disposal Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hadlock, D. E.; Hooker, C. D.; Herrington, W. N.; Gilchrist, R. L.

    1983-12-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to provide technical assistance in estsblishing operational guidelines, with respect to radiation control programs and methods of minimizing occupational radiation exposure, at Low-Level Waste (LLW) dis- posal sites. The PNL, through site visits, evaluated operations at LLW dis- posal sites to determine the adequacy of current practices in maintaining occupational exposures as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). The data sought included the specifics of: ALARA programs, training programs, external exposure control , internal exposure control , respiratory protection, survei 1 - lance, radioactive waste management, facilities and equipment, and external dose analysis. The results of the study indicated the following: The Radiation Protection and ALARA programs at the three commercial LLW disposal sites were observed to be adequate in scope and content compared to similar programs at other types of nuclear facilities. However, it should be noted that there were many areas that could be improved upon to help ensure the health and safety of the occupa- tionally exposed individuals. As a result, radiation protection practices were recommended with related rationales in order to reduce occupational exposures as far below specified radiation limits as is reasonably achievable. In addition, recommendations were developed for achieving occupational exposure ALARA under the Regulatory Requirements issued in 10 CFR Part 61.

  18. Energy levels, radiative rates, and lifetimes for transitions in W LVIII

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, Kanti M. Keenan, Francis P.

    2014-11-15

    Energy levels and radiative rates are reported for transitions in Cl-like W LVIII. Configuration interaction (CI) has been included among 44 configurations (generating 4978 levels) over a wide energy range up to 363 Ryd, and the general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package (GRASP) adopted for the calculations. Since no other results of comparable complexity are available, calculations have also been performed with the flexible atomic code (FAC), which help in assessing the accuracy of our results. Energies are listed for the lowest 400 levels (with energies up to ∼98 Ryd), which mainly belong to the 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 5}, 3s3p{sup 6}, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 4}3d, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}3d{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 4}3d{sup 2}, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}3d{sup 3}, and 3p{sup 6}3d configurations, and radiative rates are provided for four types of transitions, i.e. E1, E2, M1, and M2. Our energy levels are assessed to be accurate to better than 0.5%, whereas radiative rates (and lifetimes) should be accurate to better than 20% for a majority of the strong transitions.

  19. Effects of electromagnetic radiation from a cellular telephone on the oxidant and antioxidant levels in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Irmak, M Kemal; Fadillioğlu, Ersin; Güleç, Mukaddes; Erdoğan, Hasan; Yağmurca, Murat; Akyol, Omer

    2002-12-01

    The number of reports on the effects induced by electromagnetic radiation (EMR) in various cellular systems is still increasing. Until now no satisfactory mechanism has been proposed to explain the biological effects of this radiation. Oxygen free radicals may play a role in mechanisms of adverse effects of EMR. This study was undertaken to investigate the influence of electromagnetic radiation of a digital GSM mobile telephone (900 MHz) on oxidant and antioxidant levels in rabbits. Adenosine deaminase, xanthine oxidase, catalase, myeloperoxidase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase activities as well as nitric oxide (NO) and malondialdehyde levels were measured in sera and brains of EMR-exposed and sham-exposed rabbits. Serum SOD activity increased, and serum NO levels decreased in EMR-exposed animals compared to the sham group. Other parameters were not changed in either group. This finding may indicate the possible role of increased oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of adverse effect of EMR. Decreased NO levels may also suggest a probable role of NO in the adverse effect.

  20. The influence of stopping power on the ionisation quench factor.

    PubMed

    García, G; Grau, Malonda A

    2002-01-01

    Stopping power values for high energies have been computed applying the first Born approximation and the Bethe formula. However, this approximation tends to overestimate these cross sections at low energies, reaching discrepancies on the order of 50% at energies below 1 keV for most of the molecular targets of interest. In this paper we propose a method to obtain accurate low energy stopping powers of electrons by combining total cross section measurements with a theoretical treatment of the elastic process. We determine the optimum value of the kB parameter of ionisation quenching for the stopping power obtained in this paper.

  1. NICIL: Non-Ideal magnetohydrodynamics Coefficients and Ionisation Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, James

    2016-08-01

    NICIL (Non-Ideal magnetohydrodynamics Coefficients and Ionisation Library) calculates the ionization values and the coefficients of the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics terms of Ohmic resistivity, the Hall effect, and ambipolar diffusion. Written as a standalone Fortran90 module that can be implemented in existing codes, NICIL is fully parameterizable, allowing the user to choose which processes to include and decide the values of the free parameters. The module includes both cosmic ray and thermal ionization; the former includes two ion species and three species of dust grains (positively charged, negatively charged and neutral), and the latter includes five elements which can be doubly ionized.

  2. Estimation of radiofrequency power leakage from microwave ovens for dosimetric assessment at nonionizing radiation exposure levels.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Iturri, Peio; de Miguel-Bilbao, Silvia; Aguirre, Erik; Azpilicueta, Leire; Falcone, Francisco; Ramos, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    The electromagnetic field leakage levels of nonionizing radiation from a microwave oven have been estimated within a complex indoor scenario. By employing a hybrid simulation technique, based on coupling full wave simulation with an in-house developed deterministic 3D ray launching code, estimations of the observed electric field values can be obtained for the complete indoor scenario. The microwave oven can be modeled as a time- and frequency-dependent radiating source, in which leakage, basically from the microwave oven door, is propagated along the complete indoor scenario interacting with all of the elements present in it. This method can be of aid in order to assess the impact of such devices on expected exposure levels, allowing adequate minimization strategies such as optimal location to be applied.

  3. Estimation of Radiofrequency Power Leakage from Microwave Ovens for Dosimetric Assessment at Nonionizing Radiation Exposure Levels

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Iturri, Peio; de Miguel-Bilbao, Silvia; Aguirre, Erik; Azpilicueta, Leire; Falcone, Francisco; Ramos, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    The electromagnetic field leakage levels of nonionizing radiation from a microwave oven have been estimated within a complex indoor scenario. By employing a hybrid simulation technique, based on coupling full wave simulation with an in-house developed deterministic 3D ray launching code, estimations of the observed electric field values can be obtained for the complete indoor scenario. The microwave oven can be modeled as a time- and frequency-dependent radiating source, in which leakage, basically from the microwave oven door, is propagated along the complete indoor scenario interacting with all of the elements present in it. This method can be of aid in order to assess the impact of such devices on expected exposure levels, allowing adequate minimization strategies such as optimal location to be applied. PMID:25705676

  4. Ultraviolet B radiation was increased at ground level in scotland during a period of ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Moseley, H; Mackie, R M

    1997-07-01

    The potentially harmful effects associated with stratospheric ozone depletion are widely acknowledged. As the ozone layer principally absorbs ultraviolet (UV) radiation of wavelengths below 290 nm, reductions in stratospheric ozone levels are likely to result in increased UVB at the earth's surface, with the risk of increased incidence of skin cancer. Measuring the sun's spectrum at ground level requires sophisticated and reliable spectral instruments. Results are reported for this for the first time in the U.K. using spectral instruments, showing a significant increase in short wavelength UV radiation at a time of depleted stratospheric ozone. If this trend increases, future ozone depletion could contribute to known risks for cutaneous malignancies of all types.

  5. Possibilities of background-radiation-level reduction in proton-therapy rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, N. A.; Lebedeva, Zh. S.

    2014-08-01

    The system of proton-beam formation for proton ophthalmology has been numerically simulated using the Geant4 program package. Data on the efficiency of narrow- ("pencil") and wide proton-beam transport are presented. It is established that the use of a wide beam transport is advantageous, since it makes a significant decrease in the background-radiation level in a proton-therapy room possible and simplifies the beam-formation system.

  6. Fine-structure energy levels, radiative rates and lifetimes in Si-like nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, G. P.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2012-07-01

    Large scale CIV3 calculations of excitation energies from ground state as well as of oscillator strengths and radiative decay rates for all electric-dipole-allowed and intercombination transitions among the fine-structure levels of the terms belonging to the (1s22s22p6)3s23p2, 3s3p3, 3p4, 3s23p3d, 3s23p4s, 3s23p4p, 3s23p4d and 3s23p4f configurations of Ni XV, are performed using very extensive configuration-interaction wave functions. The relativistic effects in intermediate coupling are incorporated by means of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. In order to keep our calculated energy splittings as close as possible to the National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST) values, we have made small adjustments to the diagonal elements of the Hamiltonian matrices. Our calculated excitation energies, including their ordering, are in excellent agreement with the available NIST results. From our radiative decay rates we have also calculated radiative lifetimes of the fine-structure levels. It is noted that our calculated radiative rates show significant disagreement (23-30%) with those calculated by Ishikawa and Vilkas (2002 Phys. Scr. 65 219) for the transitions involving the 3s3p3(5S2) level. For this high spin level 3s3p3(5S2) our calculated lifetime is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental value of Träbert et al (1989 Z. Phys. D 11 207). In this calculation, we also predict many additional new and accurate data for various optically allowed and intercombination transitions to complete the void in the existing data.

  7. Tension between reducing sea-level rise and global warming through solar-radiation management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, P. J.; Sriver, R. L.; Keller, K.

    2012-02-01

    Geoengineering using solar-radiation management (SRM) is gaining interest as a potential strategy to reduce future climate change impacts. Basic physics and past observations suggest that reducing insolation will, on average, cool the Earth. It is uncertain, however, whether SRM can reduce climate change stressors such as sea-level rise or rates of surface air temperature change. Here we use an Earth system model of intermediate complexity to quantify the possible response of sea levels and surface air temperatures to projected climate forcings and SRM strategies. We find that SRM strategies introduce a potentially strong tension between the objectives to reduce (1) the rate of temperature change and (2) sea-level rise. This tension arises primarily because surface air temperatures respond faster to radiative forcings than sea levels. Our results show that the forcing required to stop sea-level rise could cause a rapid cooling with a rate similar to the peak business-as-usual warming rate. Furthermore, termination of SRM was found to produce warming rates up to five times greater than the maximum rates under the business-as-usual CO2 scenario, whereas sea-level rise rates were only 30% higher. Reducing these risks requires a slow phase-out of many decades and thus commits future generations.

  8. Case-control study of congenital malformations and occupational exposure to low-level ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sever, L.E.; Gilbert, E.S.; Hessol, N.A.; McIntyre, J.M.

    1988-02-01

    In a case-control study, the authors investigated the association of parental occupational exposure to low-level external whole-body penetrating ionizing radiation and risk of congenital malformations in their offspring. Cases and controls were ascertained from births in two counties in southeastern Washington State, where the Hanford Site has been a major employer. A unique feature of this study was the linking of quantitative individual measurement of external whole-body penetrating ionizing radiation exposure of employees at the Hanford Site, using personal dosimeters, and the disease outcome, congenital malformations. The study population included 672 malformation cases and 977 matched controls from births occurring from 1957 through 1980. Twelve specific malformation types were analyzed for evidence of association with employment of the parents at Hanford and with occupational exposure to ionizing radiation. Two defects, congenital dislocation of the hip and tracheoesophageal fistula, showed statistically significant associations with employment of the parents at Hanford, but not with parental radiation exposure. Neural tube defects showed a significant association with parental preconception exposure, on the basis of a small number of cases. Eleven other defects, including Down syndrome, for which an association with radiation was considered most likely, showed no evidence of such an association. When all malformations were analyzed as a group, there was no evidence of an association with employment of the parents at Hanford, but the relation of parental exposure to radiation before conception was in the positive direction (one-tailed p value between 0.05 and 0.10). Given the number of statistical tests conducted, some or all of the observed positive correlations are likely to represent false positive findings. 30 references.

  9. Non-uniform ionisation of the upper atmosphere due to the electromagnetic pulse from a horizontal lightning discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, M.; Rycroft, M. J.

    2001-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to model numerically the ionisation created in the mesosphere above a strong horizontal (cloud-to-cloud) lightning discharge, and thus to understand better the formation of elves and related columniform (spatially structured) sprites. Such ionisation depends upon height, via the ratio of the VLF//LF wave electric field (radiated by the current in the discharge) to the atmospheric neutral density. The simulation shows local maxima on the order of 10 km apart due to the interference between direct waves radiated by the discharge current, waves reflected by the ground and waves reflected by the ionosphere. Parametric studies are carried out varying the frequency, amplitude, height, length and duration of the current. For waves >=30kHz generated by a current >=50kA, localised peaks of electron density occur from 75 to 85km altitude, particularly for discharges longer than 15 km. From such peaks, time-varying ``stalactites'' on the bottom of the ionosphere, streamers could develop and propagate downwards. These could become columniform sprites in the presence of the quasi-electrostatic field due to the negative charge remaining in the thundercloud after a positive cloud-to-ground discharge.

  10. Aerosols attenuating the solar radiation collected by solar tower plants: The horizontal pathway at surface level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Thierry; Ramon, Didier; Dubus, Laurent; Bourdil, Charles; Cuevas-Agulló, Emilio; Zaidouni, Taoufik; Formenti, Paola

    2016-05-01

    Aerosols attenuate the solar radiation collected by solar tower plants (STP), along two pathways: 1) the atmospheric column pathway, between the top of the atmosphere and the heliostats, resulting in Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) changes; 2) the grazing pathway close to surface level, between the heliostats and the optical receiver. The attenuation along the surface-level grazing pathway has been less studied than the aerosol impact on changes of DNI, while it becomes significant in STP of 100 MW or more. Indeed aerosols mostly lay within the surface atmospheric layer, called the boundary layer, and the attenuation increases with the distance covered by the solar radiation in the boundary layer. In STP of 100 MW or more, the distance between the heliostats and the optical receiver becomes large enough to produce a significant attenuation by aerosols. We used measured aerosol optical thickness and computed boundary layer height to estimate the attenuation of the solar radiation at surface level at Ouarzazate (Morocco). High variabilities in aerosol amount and in vertical layering generated a significant magnitude in the annual cycle and significant inter-annual changes. Indeed the annual mean of the attenuation caused by aerosols over a 1-km heliostat-receiver distance was 3.7% in 2013, and 5.4% in 2014 because of a longest desert dust season. The monthly minimum attenuation of less than 3% was observed in winter and the maximum of more than 7% was observed in summer.

  11. Radiation exposure at sea level measurement between Rio de Janeiro and the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Freitas, A. C.; Alencar, A. S.; Coutinho, C. R.; Paschoa, A. S.

    2007-09-01

    A sea trip was made aboard the vessel NApOc Ary Rongel of the Brazilian Navy from Rio de Janeiro (Lat. 22°S) to Admiralty Bay (Lat. 62°S) in the King George Island in the Antarctic Peninsula. This trip was part of the Brazilian Antarctic Programme. Radiation measurements were carried out with a proportional counter along the ship round-trip route, which sailed partially under the South Atlantic Anomaly. Only those measurements, which were taken after the vessel was farther than one nautical mile offshore were used. This procedure minimizes radiation contributions from land. External radiation measurements made offshore give an indication of the secondary cosmic ray intensity at sea level. Barometric pressure measurements were registered along the round-trip route as well. Negative correlations between the measured external radiation and the barometric pressure on the vessel were observed in both ways of the round-trip. In latitudes above 42°S, the negative correlation became more prominent. In 1935 the variation of the secondary cosmic radiation with atmospheric pressure was known as the barometric paradox. Recently, an attempt was made to associate long-term variations of the surface pressure with solar activity and galactic cosmic rays. The results are discussed taking into account that as the barometric pressure increases the particle density in the atmosphere also increases. In such case, there are an increasing number of interactions with the particles produced in the hadronic showers, because of decreasing mean free path. Thus, the number of particles reaching a detector at the sea level decreases.

  12. The scientific jigsaw puzzle: Fitting the pieces of the low-level radiation debate

    SciTech Connect

    Beyea, Jan

    2012-05-01

    Quantitative risk estimates from exposure to ionizing radiation are dominated by analysis of the one-time exposures received by the Japanese survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Three recent epidemiologic studies suggest that the risk from protracted exposure is no lower, and in fact may be higher, than from single exposures. There is near-universal acceptance that epidemiologic data demonstrates an excess risk of delayed cancer incidence above a dose of 0.1 sievert (Sv), which, for the average American, is equivalent to 40 years of unavoidable exposure from natural background radiation. Model fits, both parametric and nonparametric, to the atomic-bomb data support a linear no-threshold model, below 0.1 Sv. On the basis of biologic arguments, the scientific establishment in the United States and many other countries accepts this dose-model down to zero-dose, but there is spirited dissent. The dissent may be irrelevant for developed countries, given the increase in medical diagnostic radiation that has occurred in recent decades; a sizeable percentage of this population will receive cumulative doses from the medical profession in excess of 0.1 Sv, making talk of a threshold or other sublinear response below that dose moot for future releases from nuclear facilities or a dirty bomb. The risks from both medical diagnostic doses and nuclear accident doses can be computed using the linear dose-response model, with uncertainties assigned below 0.1 Sv in a way that captures alternative scientific hypotheses. Then, the important debate over low-level radiation exposures, namely planning for accident response and weighing benefits and risks of technologies, can proceed with less distraction. One of the biggest paradoxes in the low-level radiation debate is that an individual risk can be a minor concern, while the societal risk-the total delayed cancers in an exposed population-can be of major concern.

  13. The radiative lifetime of the 5S(0)2 metastable level of O(2+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. C.; Smith, P. L.; Knight, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The radiative lifetime of the 5S(0)2 metastable level of O(2+) was measured as 1.22 + or - 0.08 ms at the 90 percent confidence level by observing the time dependence of the spontaneous emission from metastable ions created and stored in a cylindrical radio-frequency ion trap. The intersystem line emission 2s(2)2p(2) 3P - 2s2p(3) 5S(0) was observed at 1660.8 and 1666.2 A. Discrepancies between measured and calculated values indicate that certain calculated transition probabilities for intersystem lines may be less reliable than previously believed.

  14. Modelling and measurement of the absolute level of power radiated by antenna integrated THz UTC photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Natrella, Michele; Liu, Chin-Pang; Graham, Chris; van Dijk, Frederic; Liu, Huiyun; Renaud, Cyril C; Seeds, Alwyn J

    2016-05-30

    We determine the output impedance of uni-travelling carrier (UTC) photodiodes at frequencies up to 400 GHz by performing, for the first time, 3D full-wave modelling of detailed UTC photodiode structures. In addition, we demonstrate the importance of the UTC impedance evaluation, by using it in the prediction of the absolute power radiated by an antenna integrated UTC, over a broad frequency range and confirming the predictions by experimental measurements up to 185 GHz. This is done by means of 3D full-wave modelling and is only possible since the source (UTC) to antenna impedance match is properly taken into account. We also show that, when the UTC-to-antenna coupling efficiency is modelled using the classical junction-capacitance/series-resistance concept, calculated and measured levels of absolute radiated power are in substantial disagreement, and the maximum radiated power is overestimated by a factor of almost 7 dB. The ability to calculate the absolute emitted power correctly enables the radiated power to be maximised through optimisation of the UTC-to-antenna impedance match.

  15. Modelling and measurement of the absolute level of power radiated by antenna integrated THz UTC photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Natrella, Michele; Liu, Chin-Pang; Graham, Chris; van Dijk, Frederic; Liu, Huiyun; Renaud, Cyril C; Seeds, Alwyn J

    2016-05-30

    We determine the output impedance of uni-travelling carrier (UTC) photodiodes at frequencies up to 400 GHz by performing, for the first time, 3D full-wave modelling of detailed UTC photodiode structures. In addition, we demonstrate the importance of the UTC impedance evaluation, by using it in the prediction of the absolute power radiated by an antenna integrated UTC, over a broad frequency range and confirming the predictions by experimental measurements up to 185 GHz. This is done by means of 3D full-wave modelling and is only possible since the source (UTC) to antenna impedance match is properly taken into account. We also show that, when the UTC-to-antenna coupling efficiency is modelled using the classical junction-capacitance/series-resistance concept, calculated and measured levels of absolute radiated power are in substantial disagreement, and the maximum radiated power is overestimated by a factor of almost 7 dB. The ability to calculate the absolute emitted power correctly enables the radiated power to be maximised through optimisation of the UTC-to-antenna impedance match. PMID:27410104

  16. Ground-Level Ozone Following Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Events: An Additional Biological Hazard?

    PubMed

    Thomas, Brian C; Goracke, Byron D

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in solar UV radiation at Earth's surface and in the upper levels of the ocean. Other work has also considered the potential impact of nitric acid rainout, concluding that no significant threat is likely. Not yet studied to date is the potential impact of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere following an ionizing radiation event. Ozone is a known irritant to organisms on land and in water and therefore may be a significant additional hazard. Using previously completed atmospheric chemistry modeling, we examined the amount of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere for the case of a gamma-ray burst and found that the values are too small to pose a significant additional threat to the biosphere. These results may be extended to other ionizing radiation events, including supernovae and extreme solar proton events.

  17. Ground-Level Ozone Following Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Events: An Additional Biological Hazard?

    PubMed

    Thomas, Brian C; Goracke, Byron D

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in solar UV radiation at Earth's surface and in the upper levels of the ocean. Other work has also considered the potential impact of nitric acid rainout, concluding that no significant threat is likely. Not yet studied to date is the potential impact of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere following an ionizing radiation event. Ozone is a known irritant to organisms on land and in water and therefore may be a significant additional hazard. Using previously completed atmospheric chemistry modeling, we examined the amount of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere for the case of a gamma-ray burst and found that the values are too small to pose a significant additional threat to the biosphere. These results may be extended to other ionizing radiation events, including supernovae and extreme solar proton events. PMID:26745353

  18. Effect of radiation and age on immunoglobulin levels in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, W.H.; Hackleman, S.M.; Braun, A.M.; Pennington, P.; Saphire, D.G.; Scheffler, J.; Wigle, J.C.; Cox, A.B.

    1994-06-01

    We report the results of a study on the immunoglobulin levels of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) in a colony consisting of the survivors of monkeys that received a single whole-body exposure of protons, electrons or X rays between 1964 and 1969. This colony has been maintained to assess the long-term effects of ionizing radiation on astronauts and high-flying pilots. Of the original 358 monkeys that were retained for lifetime studies, 129 (97 irradiated and 32 controls) were available for our study. We found no significant difference between the irradiated and control monkeys in mean levels of IgA, IgG and IgM, irrespective of the radiation treatment. The availability of these aged monkeys provided a unique opportunity to compare their immunoglobulin levels to those of other monkeys of various ages, and thus assess the effect of age on immunoglobulin levels. We found that only the IgA levels increase with age. 48 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Diagnostic accuracy at several reduced radiation dose levels for CT imaging in the diagnosis of appendicitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Di; Khatonabadi, Maryam; Kim, Hyun; Jude, Matilda; Zaragoza, Edward; Lee, Margaret; Patel, Maitraya; Poon, Cheryce; Douek, Michael; Andrews-Tang, Denise; Doepke, Laura; McNitt-Gray, Shawn; Cagnon, Chris; DeMarco, John; McNitt-Gray, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: While several studies have investigated the tradeoffs between radiation dose and image quality (noise) in CT imaging, the purpose of this study was to take this analysis a step further by investigating the tradeoffs between patient radiation dose (including organ dose) and diagnostic accuracy in diagnosis of appendicitis using CT. Methods: This study was IRB approved and utilized data from 20 patients who underwent clinical CT exams for indications of appendicitis. Medical record review established true diagnosis of appendicitis, with 10 positives and 10 negatives. A validated software tool used raw projection data from each scan to create simulated images at lower dose levels (70%, 50%, 30%, 20% of original). An observer study was performed with 6 radiologists reviewing each case at each dose level in random order over several sessions. Readers assessed image quality and provided confidence in their diagnosis of appendicitis, each on a 5 point scale. Liver doses at each case and each dose level were estimated using Monte Carlo simulation based methods. Results: Overall diagnostic accuracy varies across dose levels: 92%, 93%, 91%, 90% and 90% across the 100%, 70%, 50%, 30% and 20% dose levels respectively. And it is 93%, 95%, 88%, 90% and 90% across the 13.5-22mGy, 9.6-13.5mGy, 6.4-9.6mGy, 4-6.4mGy, and 2-4mGy liver dose ranges respectively. Only 4 out of 600 observations were rated "unacceptable" for image quality. Conclusion: The results from this pilot study indicate that the diagnostic accuracy does not change dramatically even at significantly reduced radiation dose.

  20. Investigation of background radiation levels and geologic unit profiles in Durango, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Triplett, G.H. ); Foutz, W.L.; Lesperance, L.R. )

    1989-11-01

    As part of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has performed radiological surveys on 435 vicinity properties (VPs) in the Durango area. This study was undertaken to establish the background radiation levels and geologic unit profiles in the Durango VP area. During the months of May through June, 1986, extensive radiometric measurements and surface soil samples were collected in the Durango VP area by personnel from ORNL's Grand Junction Office. A majority of the Durango VP surveys were conducted at sites underlain by Quaternary alluvium, older Quaternary gravels, and Cretaceous Lewis and Mancos shales. These four geologic units were selected to be evaluated. The data indicated no formation anomalies and established regional background radiation levels. Durango background radionuclide concentrations in surface soil were determined to be 20.3 {plus minus} 3.4 pCi/g for {sup 40}K, 1.6 {plus minus} 0.5 pCi/g for {sup 226}Ra, and 1.2 {plus minus} 0.3 pCi/g for {sup 232}Th. The Durango background gamma exposure rate was found to be 16.5 {plus minus} 1.3 {mu}R/h. Average gamma spectral count rate measurements for {sup 40}K, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 232}Th were determined to be 553, 150, and 98 counts per minute (cpm), respectively. Geologic unit profiles and Durango background radiation measurements are presented and compared with other areas. 19 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Measurement of the solar ultraviolet radiation at ground level in Bangi, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljawi, Ohoud; Gopir, Geri; Duay, Abdul Basit

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the amount of ultraviolet (UV) radiation received by human, plant, and animal organisms near the earth's surface is important to a wide range of fields such as cancer research, agriculture and forestry. The solar ultraviolet spectral irradiance at ground level was measured using the Avantes spectrometer for the period of January to March 2014 at Bangi (2°55´N, 101°46´E, 50 m above sea level) in Malaysia. These data were used to estimate the diurnal variation of UV irradiance (300 - 400 nm). The maximum irradiance of UV radiation was 45 W m-2 on horizontal surface. The maximum irradiance of UV received in the local noon time, and the minimum values of UV irradiance was received in the local morning time. It is found a bigger value of UV radiation was observed on clear sky in January. The estimation of daily flux average of UV irradiance was (921± 91) kJ m-2.

  2. Grazing Rates of Calanus finmarchicus on Thalassiosira weissflogii Cultured under Different Levels of Ultraviolet Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Fields, David M.; Durif, Caroline M. F.; Bjelland, Reidun M.; Shema, Steven D.; Skiftesvik, Anne B.; Browman, Howard I.

    2011-01-01

    UVB alters photosynthetic rate, fatty acid profiles and morphological characteristics of phytoplankton. Copepods, important grazers of primary production, select algal cells based upon their size, morphological traits, nutritional status, and motility. We investigated the grazing rates of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus on the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii cultured under 3 levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR): photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) only (4 kJ-m−2/day), and PAR supplemented with UVR radiation at two intensities (24 kJ-m−2/day and 48 kJ-m−2/day). There was no significant difference in grazing rates between the PAR only treatment and the lower UVR treatment. However, grazing rates were significantly (∼66%) higher for copepods feeding on cells treated with the higher level of UVR. These results suggest that a short-term increase in UVR exposure results in a significant increase in the grazing rate of copepods and, thereby, potentially alters the flow rate of organic matter through this component of the ecosystem. PMID:22028858

  3. Measured Radiation and Background Levels During Transmission of Megawatt Electron Beams Through Millimeter Apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Alarcon, Ricardo; Balascuta, S.; Benson, Stephen V.; Bertozzi, William; Boyce, James R.; Cowan, Ray; Douglas, David R.; Evtushenko, Pavel; Fisher, P.; Ihloff, Ernest E.; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kelleher, Aidan Michael; Krossler, W. J.; Legg, Robert A.; Long, Elena; Milner, Richard; Neil, George R.; Ou, Longwu; Schmookler, Barack Abraham; Tennant, Christopher D.; Tschalar, C.; Williams, Gwyn P.; Zhang, Shukui

    2013-11-01

    We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-off, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW continuous-wave (CW) beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, multipactoring inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation when the machine is tuned for 130 MeV operation.

  4. Excitotoxic and Radiation Stress Increase TERT Levels in the Mitochondria and Cytosol of Cerebellar Purkinje Neurons.

    PubMed

    Eitan, Erez; Braverman, Carmel; Tichon, Ailone; Gitler, Daniel; Hutchison, Emmette R; Mattson, Mark P; Priel, Esther

    2016-08-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is the catalytic subunit of telomerase, an enzyme that elongates telomeres at the ends of chromosomes during DNA replication. Recently, it was shown that TERT has additional roles in cell survival, mitochondrial function, DNA repair, and Wnt signaling, all of which are unrelated to telomeres. Here, we demonstrate that TERT is enriched in Purkinje neurons, but not in the granule cells of the adult mouse cerebellum. TERT immunoreactivity in Purkinje neurons is present in the nucleus, mitochondria, and cytoplasm. Furthermore, TERT co-localizes with mitochondrial markers, and immunoblot analysis of protein extracts from isolated mitochondria and synaptosomes confirmed TERT localization in mitochondria. TERT expression in Purkinje neurons increased significantly in response to two stressors: a sub-lethal dose of X-ray radiation and exposure to a high glutamate concentration. While X-ray radiation increased TERT levels in the nucleus, glutamate exposure elevated TERT levels in mitochondria. Our findings suggest that in mature Purkinje neurons, TERT is present both in the nucleus and in mitochondria, where it may participate in adaptive responses of the neurons to excitotoxic and radiation stress. PMID:26374457

  5. Effect of low level microwave radiation exposure on cognitive function and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang; Megha, Kanu; Ahmed, Rafat Sultana; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar; Mediratta, Pramod Kumari

    2013-04-01

    Use of wireless communicating devices is increasing at an exponential rate in present time and is raising serious concerns about possible adverse effects of microwave (MW) radiation emitted from these devices on human health. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of 900 MHz MW radiation exposure on cognitive function and oxidative stress in blood of Fischer rats. Animals were divided into two groups (6 animals/group): Group I (MW-exposed) and Group II (Sham-exposed). Animals were subjected to MW exposure (Frequency 900 MHz; specific absorption rate 8.4738 x 10(-5) W/kg) in Gigahertz transverse electromagnetic cell (GTEM) for 30 days (2 h/day, 5 days/week). Subsequently, cognitive function and oxidative stress parameters were examined for each group. Results showed significant impairment in cognitive function and increase in oxidative stress, as evidenced by the increase in levels of MDA (a marker of lipid peroxidation) and protein carbonyl (a marker of protein oxidation) and unaltered GSH content in blood. Thus, the study demonstrated that low level MW radiation had significant effect on cognitive function and was also capable of leading to oxidative stress.

  6. Measurement of the solar ultraviolet radiation at ground level in Bangi, Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Aljawi, Ohoud; Gopir, Geri; Duay, Abdul Basit

    2015-04-24

    Understanding the amount of ultraviolet (UV) radiation received by human, plant, and animal organisms near the earth’s surface is important to a wide range of fields such as cancer research, agriculture and forestry. The solar ultraviolet spectral irradiance at ground level was measured using the Avantes spectrometer for the period of January to March 2014 at Bangi (2°55´N, 101°46´E, 50 m above sea level) in Malaysia. These data were used to estimate the diurnal variation of UV irradiance (300 – 400 nm). The maximum irradiance of UV radiation was 45 W m{sup −2} on horizontal surface. The maximum irradiance of UV received in the local noon time, and the minimum values of UV irradiance was received in the local morning time. It is found a bigger value of UV radiation was observed on clear sky in January. The estimation of daily flux average of UV irradiance was (921± 91) kJ m{sup −2}.

  7. Energy levels and radiative rates for transitions in Mg-like iron, cobalt and nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, K.M. . E-mail: k.aggarwal@qub.ac.uk; Tayal, Vikas; Gupta, G.P.; Keenan, F.P.

    2007-09-15

    Energy levels and radiative rates for electric dipole (E1) transitions among the lowest 141 levels of the (1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6}) 3l{sup 2}, 3l3l', and 3l4l configurations of Fe XV, Co XVI, and Ni XVII are calculated through the CIV3 code using extensive configuration-interaction (CI) wavefunctions. The important relativistic effects are included through the Breit-Pauli approximation. In order to keep the calculated energy splittings close to the experimental values, we have made small adjustments to the diagonal elements of the Hamiltonian matrices. The energy levels, including their orderings, are in excellent agreement with the available experimental results for all three ions. However, experimental energies are only available for a few levels. Since mixing among some levels is found to be very strong, it becomes difficult to identify these uniquely. Additionally, some discrepancies with other theoretical work (particularly for Ni XVII) are very large. Therefore, in order to confirm the level ordering as well as to assess the accuracy of energy levels and radiative rates, we have performed two other independent calculations using the GRASP and FAC codes. These codes are fully relativistic, but the CI in the calculations is limited to the basic (minimum) configurations only. This enables us to assess the importance of including elaborate CI for moderately charged ions. Additionally, we report results for electric quadrupole (E2), magnetic dipole (M1), and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transitions, and list lifetimes for all levels. Comparisons are made with other available experimental and theoretical results, and the accuracy of the present results is assessed.

  8. Les neuropeptides gastro-intestinaux cibles des effets des rayonnements ionisants : altérations fonctionnelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linard, C.; Esposito, V.; Wysocki, J.; Griffiths, N. M.

    1998-04-01

    The symptoms associated with exposure to ionizing radiation are nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea. The response of the gut is complex involving modifications of motility and fluid and electrolyte transport. Gastrointestinal regulatory peptides have an important role in these functions. This study showed that radiation-induced tissue variations of neuropeptides have some repercussions on intestinal biological activity of these peptides soon after irradiation. In addition such modifications are also seen a few years after irradiation. Les symptômes associés à l'exposition aux rayonnements ionisants sont des nausées, vomissements et diarrhées. La réponse du système digestif est complexe, impliquant des modifications de la motilité et du transport d'eau et d'électrolytes. les neuropeptides gastro-intestinaux ont un rôle important dans ces fonctions. Cette étude montre que les variations tissulaires de ces neuropeptides induites par l'irradiation ont des répercussions sur l'activité biologique intestinale pour des temps précoces mais que ces perturbations sont encore visibles quelques années après l'irradiation.

  9. Carcinogenesis and low-level ionizing radiation with special reference to lung cancer and exposure to radon daughters

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-04-01

    Of the important health effects of ionizing radiation, three important late effects - carcinogenesis, teratogenesis and mutagenesis are of greatest concern. This is because any exposure, even at low levels, carries some risk of such deleterious effects. As the dose of radiation increases above very low levels, the risk of health effects increases. Cancer-induction is the most important late somatic effect of low-dose ionizing radiation. Solid cancers, rather than leukemia, are principal late effects in exposed individuals. Tissues vary greatly in their susceptibility to radiation carcinogenesis. The most frequently occurring radiation-induced cancers in man include, in decreasing order of susceptibility: the female breast, the thyroid gland, the blood-forming tissues, the lung, certain organs of the gastrointestinal tract, and the bones. A number of biological and physical factors affect the cancer risk, such as age, sex, life-style, LET, and RBE. Despite uncertainty about low-level radiation risks, regulatory and advisory bodies must set standards for exposure, and individuals need information to be able to make informed judgments for themselves. From the point of view of the policy maker, the overriding concern is the fact that small doses of radiation can cause people to have more cancers than would otherwise be expected. While concern for all radiation effects exists, our human experience is limited to cancer-induction in exposed populations. This discussion is limited to cancer risk estimation and decision-making in relation to the health effects on populations of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. Here, low-level radiation will refer to yearly whole-body doses up to 5 rems or 0.05 Sv, or to cumulative doses up to 50 rems or 0.5 Sv from low-LET radiation and from high-LET radiation. (ERB)

  10. Microwave absorption by magnetite: a possible mechanism for coupling nonthermal levels of radiation to biological systems.

    PubMed

    Kirschvink, J L

    1996-01-01

    The presence of trace amounts of biogenic magnetite (Fe3O4) in animal and human tissues and the observation that ferromagnetic particles are ubiquitous in laboratory materials (including tissue culture media) provide a physical mechanism through which microwave radiation might produce or appear to produce biological effects. Magnetite is an excellent absorber of microwave radiation at frequencies between 0.5 and 10.0 GHz through the process of ferromagnetic resonance, where the magnetic vector of the incident field causes precession of Bohr magnetons around the internal demagnetizing field of the crystal. Energy absorbed by this process is first transduced into acoustic vibrations at the microwave carrier frequency within the crystal lattice via the magnetoacoustic effect; then, the energy should be dissipated in cellular structures in close proximity to the magnetite crystals. Several possible methods for testing this hypothesis experimentally are discussed. Studies of microwave dosimetry at the cellular level should consider effects of biogenic magnetite.

  11. Temperature rise, sea level rise and increased radiative forcing - an application of cointegration methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmith, Torben; Thejll, Peter; Johansen, Søren

    2016-04-01

    We analyse the statistical relationship between changes in global temperature, global steric sea level and radiative forcing in order to reveal causal relationships. There are in this, however, potential pitfalls due to the trending nature of the time series. We therefore apply a statistical method called cointegration analysis, originating from the field of econometrics, which is able to correctly handle the analysis of series with trends and other long-range dependencies. Further, we find a relationship between steric sea level and temperature and find that temperature causally depends on the steric sea level, which can be understood as a consequence of the large heat capacity of the ocean. This result is obtained both when analyzing observed data and data from a CMIP5 historical model run. Finally, we find that in the data from the historical run, the steric sea level, in turn, is driven by the external forcing. Finally, we demonstrate that combining these two results can lead to a novel estimate of radiative forcing back in time based on observations.

  12. Correlation between radiation dose and p53 protein expression levels in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Mariana B; Fernandes, Thiago S; Silva, Edvane B; Amaral, Ademir

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the relationship between p53 protein levels and absorbed doses from in vitro irradiated human lymphocytes. For this, samples of blood from 23 donors were irradiated with 0.5; 1; 2; and 4 Gy from a Cobalt-60 source, and the percentages of lymphocytes expressing p53 were scored using Flow Cytometry. The subjects were divided into 3 groups, in accordance with the p53 levels expressed per radiation dose: low (Group I), high (Group II), and excessive levels (Group III). For all groups, the analyses showed that the p53 expression levels increase with the absorbed dose. Particularly for groups I and II, the correlation between this protein expression and the dose follows the linear-quadratic model, such as for radioinduced chromosomal aberrations. In conclusion, our findings indicate possible applications of this approach in evaluating individual radiosensitivity prior to radiotherapeutical procedures as well as in medical surveillance of occupationally exposed workers. Furthermore, due to the rapidity of flow-cytometric analyses, the methodology here employed would play an important role in emergency responses to a large-scale radiation incident where many people may have been exposed. PMID:26312422

  13. Radiation environment at aviation altitudes and in space.

    PubMed

    Sihver, L; Ploc, O; Puchalska, M; Ambrožová, I; Kubančák, J; Kyselová, D; Shurshakov, V

    2015-06-01

    On the Earth, protection from cosmic radiation is provided by the magnetosphere and the atmosphere, but the radiation exposure increases with increasing altitude. Aircrew and especially space crew members are therefore exposed to an increased level of ionising radiation. Dosimetry onboard aircraft and spacecraft is however complicated by the presence of neutrons and high linear energy transfer particles. Film and thermoluminescent dosimeters, routinely used for ground-based personnel, do not reliably cover the range of particle types and energies found in cosmic radiation. Further, the radiation field onboard aircraft and spacecraft is not constant; its intensity and composition change mainly with altitude, geomagnetic position and solar activity (marginally also with the aircraft/spacecraft type, number of people aboard, amount of fuel etc.). The European Union Council directive 96/29/Euroatom of 1996 specifies that aircrews that could receive dose of >1 mSv y(-1) must be evaluated. The dose evaluation is routinely performed by computer programs, e.g. CARI-6, EPCARD, SIEVERT, PCAire, JISCARD and AVIDOS. Such calculations should however be carefully verified and validated. Measurements of the radiation field in aircraft are thus of a great importance. A promising option is the long-term deployment of active detectors, e.g. silicon spectrometer Liulin, TEPC Hawk and pixel detector Timepix. Outside the Earth's protective atmosphere and magnetosphere, the environment is much harsher than at aviation altitudes. In addition to the exposure to high energetic ionising cosmic radiation, there are microgravity, lack of atmosphere, psychological and psychosocial components etc. The milieu is therefore very unfriendly for any living organism. In case of solar flares, exposures of spacecraft crews may even be lethal. In this paper, long-term measurements of the radiation environment onboard Czech aircraft performed with the Liulin since 2001, as well as measurements and

  14. Radiation environment at aviation altitudes and in space.

    PubMed

    Sihver, L; Ploc, O; Puchalska, M; Ambrožová, I; Kubančák, J; Kyselová, D; Shurshakov, V

    2015-06-01

    On the Earth, protection from cosmic radiation is provided by the magnetosphere and the atmosphere, but the radiation exposure increases with increasing altitude. Aircrew and especially space crew members are therefore exposed to an increased level of ionising radiation. Dosimetry onboard aircraft and spacecraft is however complicated by the presence of neutrons and high linear energy transfer particles. Film and thermoluminescent dosimeters, routinely used for ground-based personnel, do not reliably cover the range of particle types and energies found in cosmic radiation. Further, the radiation field onboard aircraft and spacecraft is not constant; its intensity and composition change mainly with altitude, geomagnetic position and solar activity (marginally also with the aircraft/spacecraft type, number of people aboard, amount of fuel etc.). The European Union Council directive 96/29/Euroatom of 1996 specifies that aircrews that could receive dose of >1 mSv y(-1) must be evaluated. The dose evaluation is routinely performed by computer programs, e.g. CARI-6, EPCARD, SIEVERT, PCAire, JISCARD and AVIDOS. Such calculations should however be carefully verified and validated. Measurements of the radiation field in aircraft are thus of a great importance. A promising option is the long-term deployment of active detectors, e.g. silicon spectrometer Liulin, TEPC Hawk and pixel detector Timepix. Outside the Earth's protective atmosphere and magnetosphere, the environment is much harsher than at aviation altitudes. In addition to the exposure to high energetic ionising cosmic radiation, there are microgravity, lack of atmosphere, psychological and psychosocial components etc. The milieu is therefore very unfriendly for any living organism. In case of solar flares, exposures of spacecraft crews may even be lethal. In this paper, long-term measurements of the radiation environment onboard Czech aircraft performed with the Liulin since 2001, as well as measurements and

  15. Non-Radiative Carrier Recombination Enhanced by Two-Level Process: A First-Principles Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ji-Hui; Shi, Lin; Wang, Lin-Wang; Wei, Su-Huai

    2016-01-01

    Non-radiative recombination plays an important role in the performance of optoelectronic semiconductor devices such as solar cells and light-emitting diodes. Most textbook examples assume that the recombination process occurs through a single defect level, where one electron and one hole are captured and recombined. Based on this simple picture, conventional wisdom is that only defect levels near the center of the bandgap can be effective recombination centers. Here, we present a new two-level recombination mechanism: first, one type of carrier is captured through a defect level forming a metastable state; then the local defect configuration rapidly changes to a stable state, where the other type of carrier is captured and recombined through another defect level. This novel mechanism is applied to the recombination center in CdTe. We show that this two-level process can significantly increase the recombination rate (by three orders of magnitude) in agreement with experiments. We expect that this two-level recombination process can exist in a wide range of semiconductors, so its effect should be carefully examined in characterizing optoelectronic materials. PMID:26880667

  16. Non-radiative carrier recombination enhanced by two-level process: A first-principles study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Ji -Hui; Shi, Lin; Wang, Lin -Wang; Wei, Su -Huai

    2016-02-16

    In this study, non-radiative recombination plays an important role in the performance of optoelectronic semiconductor devices such as solar cells and light-emitting diodes. Most textbook examples assume that the recombination process occurs through a single defect level, where one electron and one hole are captured and recombined. Based on this simple picture, conventional wisdom is that only defect levels near the center of the bandgap can be effective recombination centers. Here, we present a new two-level recombination mechanism: first, one type of carrier is captured through a defect level forming a metastable state; then the local defect configuration rapidly changesmore » to a stable state, where the other type of carrier is captured and recombined through another defect level. This novel mechanism is applied to the recombination center Te2+cd in CdTe. We show that this two-level process can significantly increase the recombination rate (by three orders of magnitude) in agreement with experiments. We expect that this two-level recombination process can exist in a wide range of semiconductors, so its effect should be carefully examined in characterizing optoelectronic materials.« less

  17. Non-Radiative Carrier Recombination Enhanced by Two-Level Process: A First-Principles Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ji-Hui; Shi, Lin; Wang, Lin-Wang; Wei, Su-Huai

    2016-02-01

    Non-radiative recombination plays an important role in the performance of optoelectronic semiconductor devices such as solar cells and light-emitting diodes. Most textbook examples assume that the recombination process occurs through a single defect level, where one electron and one hole are captured and recombined. Based on this simple picture, conventional wisdom is that only defect levels near the center of the bandgap can be effective recombination centers. Here, we present a new two-level recombination mechanism: first, one type of carrier is captured through a defect level forming a metastable state; then the local defect configuration rapidly changes to a stable state, where the other type of carrier is captured and recombined through another defect level. This novel mechanism is applied to the recombination center in CdTe. We show that this two-level process can significantly increase the recombination rate (by three orders of magnitude) in agreement with experiments. We expect that this two-level recombination process can exist in a wide range of semiconductors, so its effect should be carefully examined in characterizing optoelectronic materials.

  18. Review of certain low-level ionizing radiation studies in mice and guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Congdon, C.C.

    1987-05-01

    Starting in the early 1940s, Egon Lorenz and collaborators at the National Cancer Institute began an extended study of chronic low-level ionizing radiation effects in what was then the tolerance range for man. Observations on life span, body weight and radiation carcinogenesis, among others, were made in mice, guinea pigs and rabbits. At the then-permissible exposure level, 0.1 R** per 8-h day until natural death, experimental mice and guinea pigs had a slightly greater mean life span compared to control animals. In addition, there was marked weight gain during the growth phase in both species. Increased tumor incidence was also observed at the 0.1-R level in mice. The primary hypothesis for increased median life span has been rebound regenerative hyperplasia during the early part of the exposure; in the presence of continuing injury, there is physiological enhancement of defense mechanisms against intercurrent infection. The body weight gain has not been explained. 32 references.

  19. Effects of cell phone radiation on lipid peroxidation, glutathione and nitric oxide levels in mouse brain during epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Esmekaya, Meric Arda; Tuysuz, Mehmet Zahid; Tomruk, Arın; Canseven, Ayse G; Yücel, Engin; Aktuna, Zuhal; Keskil, Semih; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the this study was to evaluate the effects of cellular phone radiation on oxidative stress parameters and oxide levels in mouse brain during pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced epileptic seizure. Eight weeks old mice were used in the study. Animals were distributed in the following groups: Group I: Control group treated with PTZ, Group II: 15min cellular phone radiation+PTZ treatment+30min cellular phone radiation, Group III: 30min cellular phone radiation+PTZ treatment+30min cellular phone radiation. The RF radiation was produced by a 900MHz cellular phone. Lipid peroxidation, which is the indicator of oxidative stress was quantified by measuring the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). The glutathione (GSH) levels were determined by the Ellman method. Tissue total nitric oxide (NOx) levels were obtained using the Griess assay. Lipid peroxidation and NOx levels of brain tissue increased significantly in group II and III compared to group I. On the contrary, GSH levels were significantly lower in group II and III than group I. However, no statistically significant alterations in any of the endpoints were noted between group II and Group III. Overall, the experimental findings demonstrated that cellular phone radiation may increase the oxidative damage and NOx level during epileptic activity in mouse brain.

  20. Effects of cell phone radiation on lipid peroxidation, glutathione and nitric oxide levels in mouse brain during epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Esmekaya, Meric Arda; Tuysuz, Mehmet Zahid; Tomruk, Arın; Canseven, Ayse G; Yücel, Engin; Aktuna, Zuhal; Keskil, Semih; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the this study was to evaluate the effects of cellular phone radiation on oxidative stress parameters and oxide levels in mouse brain during pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced epileptic seizure. Eight weeks old mice were used in the study. Animals were distributed in the following groups: Group I: Control group treated with PTZ, Group II: 15min cellular phone radiation+PTZ treatment+30min cellular phone radiation, Group III: 30min cellular phone radiation+PTZ treatment+30min cellular phone radiation. The RF radiation was produced by a 900MHz cellular phone. Lipid peroxidation, which is the indicator of oxidative stress was quantified by measuring the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). The glutathione (GSH) levels were determined by the Ellman method. Tissue total nitric oxide (NOx) levels were obtained using the Griess assay. Lipid peroxidation and NOx levels of brain tissue increased significantly in group II and III compared to group I. On the contrary, GSH levels were significantly lower in group II and III than group I. However, no statistically significant alterations in any of the endpoints were noted between group II and Group III. Overall, the experimental findings demonstrated that cellular phone radiation may increase the oxidative damage and NOx level during epileptic activity in mouse brain. PMID:26836107

  1. Radiation safety aspects of production of commercial levels of medical radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boothe, T. E.; McLeod, T. F.; Fernandez-Rubio, F.

    1993-06-01

    The first step toward efficient radiation safety in a facility that intends to produce commercial levels of radionuclides is to nticipate the scope of the facility during the design stages of the physical plant and during formulation of operating procedures. The design and operation must include flexibility to accommodate changing needs of production and research and development while providing radiation safety. A recently proposed licensing guide from the Bureau of Radiation Control, Texas Department of Health, while providing for safe operation, would severely limit flexibility and development. For example, engineering controls and procedures should be specified for generic systems as opposed to each specific radionuclide and by-products. Operator training is critical for reduced exposure and should be addressed, but requiring prior training for all operators is not reasonably achievable and would result in loss of proprietary information. Procedures to reduce exposure should include experimentally determined "cooldown" times, "problem indexes" for specific jobs related to particular cyclotrons, and proper management and administrative structures.

  2. Impact of the 1980 BEIR-III report on low-level radiation risk assessment, radiation protection guides, and public health policy

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1981-06-01

    The author deals with the scientific basis for establishing appropriate radiation protection guides, and this effect on evaluation of societal activities concerned with the health effects in human populations exposed to low-level radiation. Methodology is discussed for estimating risks of radio-induced cancer and genetically related ill-health in man, the sources of data, the dose-response models used, and the precision ascribed to the process. (PSB)

  3. Individual differences in attentional deficits and dopaminergic protein levels following exposure to proton radiation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Catherine M; DeCicco-Skinner, Kathleen L; Roma, Peter G; Hienz, Robert D

    2014-03-01

    To assess the possible neurobehavioral performance risks to astronauts from living in a space radiation environment during long-duration exploration missions, the effects of head-only proton irradiation (150 MeV/n) at low levels (25-50 cGy, approximating an astronaut's exposure during a 2-year planetary mission) were examined in adult male Long-Evans rats performing an analog of the human psychomotor vigilance test (PVT). The rodent version of PVT or rPVT tracks performance variables analogous to the human PVT, including selective attention/inattention, inhibitory control ("impulsivity") and psychomotor speed. Exposure to head-only proton radiation (25, 50, 100 or 200 cGy) disrupted rPVT performance (i.e., decreased accuracy, increased premature responding, elevated lapses in attention and slowed reaction times) over the 250 day testing period. However, the performance decrements only occurred in a subgroup of animals at each exposure level, that is, the severity of the rPVT performance deficit was unrelated to proton exposure level. Analysis of brain tissue from irradiated and control rats indicated that only rats with rPVT performance deficits displayed changes in the levels of the dopamine transporter and, to a lesser extent, the D₂ receptor. Additional animals trained to perform a line discrimination task measuring basic and reversal learning showed no behavioral effects over the same exposure levels, suggesting a specificity of the proton exposure effects to attentional deficits and supporting the rPVT as a sensitive neurobehavioral assay. PMID:24611657

  4. Electron impact ionisation cross sections of iron hydrogen clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Stefan E.; Sukuba, Ivan; Urban, Jan; Limtrakul, Jumras; Probst, Michael

    2016-09-01

    We computed electron impact ionisation cross sections (EICSs) of iron hydrogen clusters, FeH n with n = 1,2, ...,10, from the ionisation threshold to 10 keV using the Deutsch-Märk (DM) and the binary-encounter-Bethe (BEB) formalisms. The maxima of the cross sections for the iron hydrogen clusters range from 6.13 × 10-16 cm2 at 60 eV to 8.76 × 10-16 cm2 at 76 eV for BEB-AE (BEB method based on quantum-chemical data from all-electron basis sets) calculations, from 4.15 × 10-16 cm2 at 77 eV to 7.61 × 10-16 cm2 at 80 eV for BEB-ECP (BEB method based on quantum-chemical data from effective-core potentials for inner-core electrons) calculations and from 2.49 × 10-16 cm2 at 43.5 eV to 7.04 × 10-16 cm2 at 51 eV for the DM method. Cross sections calculated via the BEB method are substantially higher than the ones obtained via the DM method, up to a factor of about two for FeH and FeH2. The formation of Fe-H bonds depopulates the iron 4 s orbital, causing significantly lower cross sections for the small iron hydrides compared to atomic iron. Both the DM and BEB cross sections can be fitted perfectly against a simple expression used in modelling and simulation codes in the framework of nuclear fusion research. The energetics of the iron hydrogen clusters change substantially when exact exchange is present in the density functional, while the cluster geometries do not depend on this choice.

  5. Seasonal Variation in Exposure Level of Types A and B Ultraviolet Radiation: An Environmental Skin Carcinogen

    PubMed Central

    Rafieepour, A; Ghamari, F; Mohammadbeigi, A; Asghari, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: The main source of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the sun, affecting organs such as the skin, eyes, and immune system. According to American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienist (ACGIH) reports, the amount of UVR reaching the Earth's surface is increasing yearly and is responsible for an increase in solar radiation-related diseases. Aims: To investigate the amount of UVR reaching the Earth's surface and understand the risk of UVR on disease among outdoor laborers in one of the central provinces of Iran. Materials and Methods: Arak city was divided into two geographic areas, and the weekly measurement of UVR was done in three locations) asphalt, grass and rooftop). To measure UVR, Hanger UV spectrometer, standard deviation (SD8-A), and SD8-B detectors were used. Amounts of UVR for a consecutive year and varying weather conditions were measured. Finally, values obtained were compared to ACGIH standards. Results: The minimum and maximum levels of UV type A radiation occurred in April 1.27 (0.724) W/m2 and September 7.147 (4.128) W/m2, these figures for UV type B were in March–April 0.005 (0.003) and September 0.083 (0.077). The maximum UVR is received between 11 and 15 o’clock. Conclusions: In the central cities of Iran, the minimum and maximum UV type A and B is received in March–April and in September, respectively. Based on the results, the angular position of the sun in the sky, cloud cover, and height from ground level affected the amount of UVR received, but the geographic locations studied did not. PMID:25861533

  6. Non Invasive Water Level Monitoring on Boiling Water Reactors Using Internal Gamma Radiation: Application of Soft Computing Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, Sebastian; Hampel, Rainer

    2006-07-01

    To provide best knowledge about safety-related water level values in boiling water reactors (BWR) is essentially for operational regime. For the water level determination hydrostatic level measurement systems are almost exclusively applied, because they stand the test over many decades in conventional and nuclear power plants (NPP). Due to the steam generation especially in BWR a specific phenomenon occurs which leads to a water-steam mixture level in the reactor annular space and reactor plenum. The mixture level is a high transient non-measurable value concerning the hydrostatic water level measuring system and it significantly differs from the measured collapsed water level. In particular, during operational and accidental transient processes like fast negative pressure transients, the monitoring of these water levels is very important. In addition to the hydrostatic water level measurement system a diverse water level measurement system for BWR should be used. A real physical diversity is given by gamma radiation distribution inside and outside the reactor pressure vessel correlating with the water level. The vertical gamma radiation distribution depends on the water level, but it is also a function of the neutron flux and the coolant recirculation pump speed. For the water level monitoring, special algorithms are required. An analytical determination of the gamma radiation distribution outside the reactor pressure vessel is impossible due to the multitude of radiation of physical processes, complicated non-stationary radiation source distribution and complex geometry of fixtures. For creating suited algorithms Soft Computing methods (Fuzzy Sets Theory, Artificial Neural Networks, etc.) will be used. Therefore, a database containing input values (gamma radiation distribution) and output values (water levels) had to be built. Here, the database was established by experiments (data from BWR and from a test setup) and simulation with the authorised thermo

  7. Modulation of DNA methylation levels sensitizes doxorubicin-resistant breast adenocarcinoma cells to radiation-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Luzhna, Lidia; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2010-02-05

    Chemoresistant tumors often fail to respond to other cytotoxic treatments such as radiation therapy. The mechanisms of chemo- and radiotherapy cross resistance are not fully understood and are believed to be epigenetic in nature. We hypothesize that MCF-7 cells and their doxorubicin-resistant variant MCF-7/DOX cells may exhibit different responses to ionizing radiation due to their dissimilar epigenetic status. Similar to previous studies, we found that MCF-7/DOX cells harbor much lower levels of global DNA methylation than MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, we found that MCF-7/DOX cells had lower background apoptosis levels and were less responsive to radiation than MCF-7 cells. Decreased radiation responsiveness correlated to significant global DNA hypomethylation in MCF-7/DOX cells. Here, for the first time, we show that the radiation resistance of MCF-7/DOX cells can be reversed by an epigenetic treatment - the application of methyl-donor SAM. SAM-mediated reversal of DNA methylation led to elevated radiation sensitivity in MCF-7/DOX cells. Contrarily, application of SAM on the radiation sensitive and higher methylated MCF-7 cells resulted in a decrease in their radiation responsiveness. This data suggests that a fine balance of DNA methylation is needed to insure proper radiation and drug responsiveness.

  8. Underwater radiated noise levels of a research icebreaker in the central Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Roth, Ethan H; Schmidt, Val; Hildebrand, John A; Wiggins, Sean M

    2013-04-01

    U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy's underwater radiated noise signature was characterized in the central Arctic Ocean during different types of ice-breaking operations. Propulsion modes included transit in variable ice cover, breaking heavy ice with backing-and-ramming maneuvers, and dynamic positioning with the bow thruster in operation. Compared to open-water transit, Healy's noise signature increased approximately 10 dB between 20 Hz and 2 kHz when breaking ice. The highest noise levels resulted while the ship was engaged in backing-and-ramming maneuvers, owing to cavitation when operating the propellers astern or in opposing directions. In frequency bands centered near 10, 50, and 100 Hz, source levels reached 190-200 dB re: 1 μPa at 1 m (full octave band) during ice-breaking operations.

  9. Radiative lifetimes, branching fractions, transition probabilities and oscillator strengths of some levels for neutral yttrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xue; Wang, Qian; Tian, Yanshan; Wang, Chong; Dai, Zhenwen

    2015-04-01

    The radiative lifetime measurements using the time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF) technique are reported for 34 levels of Y I between 27 824.50 and 50 254.0 cm-1, among which 27 lifetimes are reported for the first time. The branching fraction (BF) measurements based on the emission spectrum of a hollow cathode lamp (HCL) were performed for 12 of these levels, and the results of 64 lines between 274.250 and 670.063 nm were obtained. By combining them with lifetime values, the transition probabilities and absolute oscillator strengths of these lines were determined. The lifetime and oscillator strength results are in general good agreement with the data by Hannaford et al (Hannaford et al 1982 ApJ 261 736).

  10. Underwater radiated noise levels of a research icebreaker in the central Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Roth, Ethan H; Schmidt, Val; Hildebrand, John A; Wiggins, Sean M

    2013-04-01

    U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy's underwater radiated noise signature was characterized in the central Arctic Ocean during different types of ice-breaking operations. Propulsion modes included transit in variable ice cover, breaking heavy ice with backing-and-ramming maneuvers, and dynamic positioning with the bow thruster in operation. Compared to open-water transit, Healy's noise signature increased approximately 10 dB between 20 Hz and 2 kHz when breaking ice. The highest noise levels resulted while the ship was engaged in backing-and-ramming maneuvers, owing to cavitation when operating the propellers astern or in opposing directions. In frequency bands centered near 10, 50, and 100 Hz, source levels reached 190-200 dB re: 1 μPa at 1 m (full octave band) during ice-breaking operations. PMID:23556567

  11. Measurement of soil radioactivity levels and radiation hazard assessment in southern Rechna interfluvial region, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Jabbar, Abdul; Arshed, Waheed; Bhatti, Arshad Saleem; Ahmad, Syed Salman; Akhter, Perveen; Rehman, Saeed-Ur; Anjum, Muhammad Iftikhar

    2010-10-01

    Rechna interfluvial region is one of the main regions of Punjab, Pakistan. It is the area which is lying between River Ravi and River Chenab, alluvial-filled. Radioactivity levels in soil samples, collected from southern Rechna interfluvial region, Pakistan, have been estimated by using gamma-ray spectrometric technique. (226)Ra, (232)Th, the primordial radionuclide (40)K, and the artificial radionuclide (137)Cs have been measured in the soil of the study area. The mean radioactivity levels of (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, and (137)Cs were found to be 50.6 +/- 1.7, 62.3 +/- 3.2, 662.2 +/- 32.1, and 3.1 +/- 0.3 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The mean radium equivalent activity (Ra(eq)), outdoor radiation hazard index (H(out)), indoor radiation hazard index (H(in)), and terrestrial absorbed dose rate for the area under study were determined as 190.8 +/- 8.7 Bq kg(-1), 0.52, 0.65, and 69.8 nGy h(-1), respectively. The annual effective dose to the general public was found to be 0.43 mSv. This value lies well below the limit of 1 mSv for general public as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The measured values are comparable with other global radioactivity measurements and are found to be safe for the public and the environment.

  12. Environmental radiation monitoring of low-level wastes by the State of Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Conklin, A.W.; Mooney, R.R.; Erickson, J.L.

    1989-11-01

    The Washington State Department of Health, as the state`s regulatory agency for radiation, monitors several forms of low-level radioactive wastes. The monitoring is done to assess the potential impact on the environment and on public health. The emphasis of the monitoring program is placed on the solid and liquid wastes from defense activities on the Hanford Reservation, commercial wastes at the site located on leased land at Hanford and uranium mill tailings in Northeastern Washington. Although not classified as low-level waste, monitoring is also periodically conducted at selected landfills and sewage treatment facilities and other licensees, where radioactive wastes are known or suspected to be present. Environmental pathways associated with waste disposal are monitored independently, and/or in conjunction with the waste site operators to verify their results and evaluate their programs. The Department also participates in many site investigations conducted by site operators and other agencies, and conducts it`s own special investigations when deemed necessary. Past investigations and special projects have included allegations of adverse environmental impact of I-129, uranium in ground water, impacts of wastes on the agricultural industry, radioactivity in seeps into the Columbia River from waste sites, identifying lost waste sites at Hanford, differentiating groundwater contamination from defense versus commercial sources, and radioactivity in municipal landfills and sewers. The state`s environmental radiation monitoring program has identified and verified a number of environmental problems associated with radioactive waste disposal, but has, to date, identified no adverse offsite impacts to public health.

  13. Improving the Fermilab Booster Notching Efficiency, Beam Losses and Radiation Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, I.L.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Mokhov, N.V.; Sidorov, V.I.; Tropin, I.S.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-14

    A fast vertical 1.08-m long kicker (notcher) located in the Fermilab Booster Long-05 straight section is currently used to remove 3 out of 84 circulating bunches after injection to generate an abort gap. With the maximum magnetic field of 72.5 Gauss, it removes only 87% of the 3-bunch intensity at 400 MeV, with 75% loss on pole tips of the focusing Booster magnets, 11% on the Long-06 collimators, and 1% in the rest of the ring. We propose to improve the notching efficiency and reduce beam loss in the Booster by using three horizontal kickers in the Long-12 section. STRUCT calculations show that using horizontal notchers, one can remove up to 96% of the 3-bunch intensity at 400-700 MeV, directing 95% of it to a new beam dump at the Long-13 section. This fully decouples notching and collimation. The beam dump absorbs most of the impinging proton energy in its jaws. The latter are encapsulated into an appropriate radiation shielding that reduces impact on the machine components, personnel and environment to the tolerable levels. MARS simulations show that corresponding prompt and residual radiation levels can be reduced ten times compared to the current ones.

  14. A large-scale measurement, analysis and modelling of electromagnetic radiation levels in the vicinity of GSM/UMTS base stations in an urban area.

    PubMed

    Karadağ, Teoman; Yüceer, Mehmet; Abbasov, Teymuraz

    2016-01-01

    The present study analyses the electric field radiating from the GSM/UMTS base stations located in central Malatya, a densely populated urban area in Turkey. The authors have conducted both instant and continuous measurements of high-frequency electromagnetic fields throughout their research by using non-ionising radiation-monitoring networks. Over 15,000 instant and 13,000,000 continuous measurements were taken throughout the process. The authors have found that the normal electric field radiation can increase ∼25% during daytime, depending on mobile communication traffic. The authors' research work has also demonstrated the fact that the electric field intensity values can be modelled for each hour, day or week with the results obtained from continuous measurements. The authors have developed an estimation model based on these values, including mobile communication traffic (Erlang) values obtained from mobile phone base stations and the temperature and humidity values in the environment. The authors believe that their proposed artificial neural network model and multivariable least-squares regression analysis will help predict the electric field intensity in an environment in advance.

  15. Energy levels, radiative rates, and lifetimes for transitions in W XL

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, Kanti M. Keenan, Francis P.

    2014-11-15

    Energy levels and radiative rates are reported for transitions in Br-like tungsten, W XL, calculated with the general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package (GRASP). Configuration interaction (CI) has been included among 46 configurations (generating 4215 levels) over a wide energy range up to 213 Ryd. However, for conciseness results are only listed for the lowest 360 levels (with energies up to ∼43 Ryd), which mainly belong to the 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 5},4s{sup 2}4p{sup 4}4d,4s{sup 2}4p{sup 4}4f,4s4p{sup 6},4p{sup 6}4d,4s4p{sup 5}4d,4s{sup 2}4p{sup 3}4d{sup 2}, and 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 3}4d4f configurations, and provided for four types of transitions, E1, E2, M1, and M2. Comparisons are made with existing (but limited) results. However, to fully assess the accuracy of our data, analogous calculations have been performed with the flexible atomic code, including an even larger CI than in GRASP. Our energy levels are estimated to be accurate to better than 0.02 Ryd, whereas results for radiative rates (and lifetimes) should be accurate to better than 20% for a majority of the strong transitions.

  16. Photo-ionisation mass spectrometry as detection method for gas chromatography. Optical selectivity and multidimensional comprehensive separations.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Ralf; Welthagen, Werner; Gröger, Thomas

    2008-03-14

    Mass spectrometry (MS) with soft ionisation techniques (i.e. ionisation without fragmentation of the analyte molecules) for gaseous samples exhibits interesting analytical properties for direct analysis applications (i.e. direct inlet mass spectrometric on-line monitoring) as well as mass spectrometric detection method for gas chromatography (GC-MS). Commonly either chemical ionisation (CI) or field ionisation (FI) is applied as soft ionisation technology for GC-MS. An interesting alternative to the CI and FI technologies methods are photo-ionisation (PI) methods. PI overcomes some of the limitations of CI and FI and furthermore add some unique analytical properties. The resonance enhanced multi-photon ionisation (REMPI) method uses intense UV-laser pulses (wavelength range approximately 350-193 nm) for highly selective, sensitive and soft ionisation of predominately aromatic compounds. The single photon ionisation (SPI) method utilises VUV light (from lamps or laser sources, wavelengths range approximately 150-110 nm) can be used for a universal soft ionisation of organic molecules. In this article the historical development as well as the current status and concepts of gas chromatography hyphenated to photo-ionisation mass spectrometry are reviewed. PMID:17915237

  17. A miniaturised laser ablation/ionisation analyser for investigation of elemental/isotopic composition with the sub-ppm detection sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulej, M.; Riedo, A.; Meyer, S.; Iakovleva, M.; Neuland, M.; Wurz, P.

    2012-04-01

    analysis of solid materials on the planetary surfaces (Rohner et al., 2003). Initial laboratory tests that were conducted with an IR laser radiation for the ablation, atomisation and ionisation of the material, indicated a high performance of the instrument in terms of sensitivity, dynamic range and mass resolution (Tulej et al., 2011). After some technical improvements and implementation of a computer-controlled performance optimiser we have achieved further improvements of both, the instrumental sensitivity down to sub-ppm level and reproducibility of the measurements. We will demonstrate the potential of the mass analyser to perform the quantitative elemental analysis of solids with a spatial (vertical, lateral) resolution commensurate with typical grain sizes, and its capabilities for investigation of isotopic patterns with accuracy and precision comparable to that of large analytical laboratory instruments, e.g., TIMS, SIMS, LA-ICP-MS. The results can be of considerable interest for in situ dating or investigation of other fine isotopic fractionation effects including studies of bio-markers.

  18. Measurement of the Radiative Decay of the Longest-Lived Level in the Fe XVII Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Gregory V.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Träbert, Elmar

    2014-08-01

    The Fe XVII emission spectrum comprises several very prominent X-ray lines that play an important role in the study of many astrophysical objects. Among the Fe XVII X-ray lines, those emanating from a 3s level, i.e., lines 3F, 3G, and M2, invariably appear too strong compared to the lines emanating from a 3d level, i.e., lines 3C and 3D, when compared to theory. Two of the four 3s levels are metastable, which means they have a rather long radiative decay time compared to collisional processes. The decay rate of the 2p^53s J=2 level has recently been measured at the Livermore EBIT facility [J. R. Crespo López-Urrutia and P. Beiersdorfer, ApJ 721, 576 (2010)], and the scatter of predictions by a factor of 1.7 has been reduced to a measurement uncertainty of merely a few percent. Even longer-lived is the J=0 level of the same 2p^53s configuration. Theory predicts an exclusive magnetic dipole decay to the lowest J=1 level of the same 2p^53s configuration, i.e. to the upper level of line 3G. There appear to be fewer predictions for this rate than for the rates associated with the other Fe XVII levels. Various calculations yield a decay rate near 16 000 s-1 for this level (or a level lifetime near 63 µs). If this value is correct, electron-impact collisions affect line ratios tied to this level at densities between about 10^10 cm-3 and 10^13 cm-3, that is, exactly at many coronal densities of present interest. We have used the Livermore EBIT facility to measure the M1 decay rate of the 2p^53s J=0 level. We find a value commensurate with the value predicted by the Flexible Atomic Code.Work performed under auspices of U.S. D.o.E. by DE-AC52-07NA27344 and supported by NASA's APRA progam under Interagency Agreement NNG13WF991.

  19. MO-C-18C-01: Radiation Risks at Level of Few CT Scans: How Real?- Science to Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Rehani, M; Samei, E; Morgan, W; Goske, M; Shore, R

    2014-06-15

    There are controversies surrounding radiation effects in human population in the range of radiation doses encountered by patients resulting from one to several CT scans. While it is understandable why the effects from low levels of diagnostic radiation are controversial, the situation is complicated by the media which may distort the known facts. There is need to understand the state of science regarding low-level radiation effects and also to understand how to communicate the potential risk with patients, the public and media. This session will seek to come to a consensus in order to speak with one voice to the media and the public. This session will review radiation effects known so far from a variety of exposed groups since the nuclear holocaust, provide clarification where effects are certain and where they are not, at what level extrapolation is the only way and at what level there is weak but agreeable acceptance. We will depict where and why there is agreement among organizations responsible for studying radiation effects, and how to deal with situations where effects are uncertain. Specific focus on radiation effects in children will be provided.Finally, the session will attempt to bridge the communication gap from the science to how to be an effective communicator with patients, parents, and media about ionizing radiation. Learning Objectives: To have a clear understanding about certainties and uncertainties of radiation effects at the level of a few CT scans To understand the results and limitations from 3 major pediatric CT scientific studies on childhood exposures published recently. To understand successful strategies used in risk communication.

  20. Estimates of cosmic radiation exposure on Tunisian passenger aircraft.

    PubMed

    Zarrouk, Neïla; Bennaceur, Raouf

    2008-01-01

    Radiation field produced by cosmic radiations in the earth's atmosphere is very complex and is significantly different from that found in the nuclear industry and other environments at ground level. Aircraft crew and frequent flyers are exposed to high levels of cosmic radiations of galactic and solar origin and to secondary radiation produced in the atmosphere. Following recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection in publication 60, the European Union introduced a revised Basic Safety Standard Directive, which included exposure to natural sources of ionising radiations, including cosmic radiation, as occupational exposure. We computed the dose received by some Tunisian flights, using CARI-6, EPCARD, PCAIRE, and SIEVERT codes. Calculations performed during the year 2007, on mostly regular passenger flights of the Nouvelair Tunisian Company, indicate a mean effective dose rate ranging between 3 and 4 microSv/h. We give the general background and details, focusing on the situation in Tunisia with respect to radiation protection aspects of the cosmic radiation exposure. As far as we know, such a study has not previously been carried out.

  1. A gas ionisation Direct-STIM detector for MeV ion microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norarat, Rattanaporn; Guibert, Edouard; Jeanneret, Patrick; Dellea, Mario; Jenni, Josef; Roux, Adrien; Stoppini, Luc; Whitlow, Harry J.

    2015-04-01

    Direct-Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (Direct-STIM) is a powerful technique that yields structural information in sub-cellular whole cell imaging. Usually, a Si p-i-n diode is used in Direct-STIM measurements as a detector. In order to overcome the detrimental effects of radiation damage which appears as a broadening in the energy resolution, we have developed a gas ionisation detector for use with a focused ion beam. The design is based on the ETH Frisch grid-less off-axis Geiger-Müller geometry. It is developed for use in a MeV ion microscope with a standard Oxford Microbeams triplet lens and scanning system. The design has a large available solid angle for other detectors (e.g. proton induced fluorescence). Here we report the performance for imaging ReNcells VM with μm resolution where energy resolutions of <24 keV fwhm could be achieved for 1 MeV protons using isobutane gas.

  2. Phytochemical changes induced by different nitrogen supply forms and radiation levels in two leafy Brassica species.

    PubMed

    Fallovo, Carlo; Schreiner, Monika; Schwarz, Dietmar; Colla, Giuseppe; Krumbein, Angelika

    2011-04-27

    The effect of three different nitrogen (N) supply forms differing in their ammonium-to-nitrate (NH(4):NO(3)) ratio (100% NH(4), 50% NH(4) + 50% NO(3), 100% NO(3)) under three different levels of daily photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) (low, 5.0; medium, 6.8; high, 9.0 mol m(-2) day(-1)) on a range of desirable health-promoting phytochemicals in Brassica rapa subsp. nipposinica var. chinoleifera and Brassica juncea was determined. The 100% NH(4) supply under medium PAR levels led to the highest concentration of glucosinolates based on a low nitrogen/sulfur ratio as well as high levels of carotenoids in the leaves of both Brassica species. However, the 100% NH(4) supply under low and medium PAR levels resulted in low concentrations of flavonoids based on high N concentration in the leaves. Thus, the data provided here have strong implications for crop management strategies aimed at optimizing both the concentration and composition of a range of phytochemicals.

  3. Parameterization of the level-resolved radiative recombination rate coefficients for the SPEX code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Junjie; Kaastra, Jelle

    2016-03-01

    The level-resolved radiative recombination (RR) rate coefficients for H-like to Na-like ions from H (Z = 1) up to and including Zn (Z = 30) are studied here. For H-like ions, the quantum-mechanical exact photoionization cross sections for nonrelativistic hydrogenic systems are usedto calculate the RR rate coefficients under the principle of detailed balance, while for He-like to Na-like ions, the archival data on ADAS are adopted. Parameterizations are made for the direct capture rates in a wide temperature range. The fitting accuracies are better than 5% for about 99% of the ~3 × 104 levels considered here. The ~1% exceptions include levels from low-charged many-electron ions, and/or high-shell (n ≳ 4) levels are less important in terms of interpreting X-ray emitting astrophysical plasmas. The RR data will be incorporated into the high-resolution spectral analysis package SPEX. Results of the parameterizations are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/A84

  4. Cancer risks and low-level radiation in U.S. shipyard workers.

    PubMed

    Matanoski, Genevieve M; Tonascia, James A; Correa-Villaseñor, Adolfo; Yates, Katherine C; Fink, Nancy; Elliott, Elizabeth; Sanders, Bruce; Lantry, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    The risks for four cancers, leukemia, lymphopoietic cancers (LHC), lung cancer and mesothelioma, were studied in workers from shipyards involved in nuclear powered ship overhauls. The population represented a sample of all workers based on radiation dose at study termination. The final sample included 28,000 workers with > or = 5.0 mSv, 10,462 workers with < 5.0 mSv and 33,353 non-nuclear workers. Nuclear workers had lower mortality rates for leukemia and LHC than US white males but higher rates of lung cancer and a significant five-fold excess of mesothelioma. Dose-dependent analyses of risks in the high exposure group indicated that for each cancer the risk increased at exposures above 10.0 mSv. An internal comparison of workers with 50.0 mSv exposures to workers with exposures of 5.0-9.9 mSv indicated relative risks for leukemia of 2.41 (95% CI: 0.5, 23.8), for LHC, 2.94 (95% CI: 1.0,12.0), for lung cancer, 1.26 (95% CI: 0.9, 1.9) and for mesothelioma, 1.61 (95% CI: 0.4, 9.7) for the higher exposure group. Except for LHC, these risks are not significant. However, the increasing risk with increasing exposure for these cancers, some of which are known to be related to radiation, suggests that low-level protracted exposures to gamma rays may be associated with these cancers. Other agents such as asbestos, which are common to shipyard work, may play a role especially in the risk of mesothelioma. Future follow up of the population would identify bounds on radiation risks for this population for comparison with similar risks estimated from other populations.

  5. Trade Study of System Level Ranked Radiation Protection Concepts for Deep Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerro, Jeffrey A

    2013-01-01

    A strategic focus area for NASA is to pursue the development of technologies which support exploration in space beyond the current inhabited region of low earth orbit. An unresolved issue for crewed deep space exploration involves limiting crew radiation exposure to below acceptable levels, considering both solar particle events and galactic cosmic ray contributions to dosage. Galactic cosmic ray mitigation is not addressed in this paper, but by addressing credible, easily implemented, and mass efficient solutions for the possibility of solar particle events, additional margin is provided that can be used for cosmic ray dose accumulation. As a result, NASA s Advanced Engineering Systems project office initiated this Radiation Storm Shelter design activity. This paper reports on the first year results of an expected 3 year Storm Shelter study effort which will mature concepts and operational scenarios that protect exploration astronauts from solar particle radiation events. Large trade space definition, candidate concept ranking, and a planned demonstration comprised the majority of FY12 activities. A system key performance parameter is minimization of the required increase in mass needed to provide a safe environment. Total system mass along with operational assessments and other defined protection system metrics provide the guiding metrics to proceed with concept developments. After a downselect to four primary methods, the concepts were analyzed for dosage severity and the amount of shielding mass necessary to bring dosage to acceptable values. Besides analytical assessments, subscale models of several concepts and one full scale concept demonstrator were created. FY12 work terminated with a plan to demonstrate test articles of two selected approaches. The process of arriving at these selections and their current envisioned implementation are presented in this paper.

  6. Effects of low-level radiation upon the hematopoietic steam cell: implications for leukemogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkite, E.P.; Bond, V.P.; Carsten, A.L.; Miller, M.E.; Bullis, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    These studies have addressed firstly the effect of single small doses of x-ray upon murine hematopoietic stem cells to obtain a better estimate of the D/sub q/. It is small, of the order of 20 rads. Secondly, a dose fractionation schedule tht does not kill or perturb the kinetics of hemopoietic cell proliferation was sought in order to investigate the leukemogenic potential of low level radiation upon an unperturbed hemopoietic system. The studies reported herein show tht 1.25 rads every other day decrease the CFU-S content of bone marrow by the time 40 rads are accumulated. Studies on the effect of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 rads 3 times per week are under way. Two rads 3 times per week produced a modest decrease in CFU-S content of bone marrow after an accumulation of 68 rads. With 3.0 rads 3 times per week an accumulation of 102 rads produces a significant decrease in CFU-S content of bone marrow. Dose fractionation at 0.5 and 1.0 rad 3 times per week has not produced a CFU-S depression after accumulation of 17 and 34 rads. Radiation leukemogenesis studies published to date have utilized single doses and chronic exposure schedules that probably have significantly perturbed the kinetics of hematopoietic stem cells. Whether radiation will produce leukemia in animal models with dose schedules that do not perturb kinetics of hematopoietic stem cells remains to be seen.

  7. Creating a strategy for science-based national policy: Addressing conflicting views on the health risk of low-level ionizing radiation. Final report, Wingspread Conference

    SciTech Connect

    McClellan, Roger O.; Apple, Martin A.

    1998-03-03

    Significant cancer risk for adults exposed to more than 100 millisieverts (10 REM) of ionizing radiation. More research on low-level ionizing radiation is needed in molecular and cellular mechanisms of injury and ongoing exposed populations. Implementation costs should be considered in regulating low-level ionizing radiation. Comparative risk assessment is a powerful tool for risk-based policy formation, and conflicting legal statutes should become harmonized for radiation regulation. More public dialog on low-level radiation is needed. A high level commission should evaluate radiation hazard control practices.

  8. Electrochromic Radiator Coupon Level Testing and Full Scale Thermal Math Modeling for Use on Altair Lunar Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannon, Erika T.; Bower, Chad E.; Sheth, Rubik; Stephan, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    In order to control system and component temperatures, many spacecraft thermal control systems use a radiator coupled with a pumped fluid loop to reject waste heat from the vehicle. Since heat loads and radiation environments can vary considerably according to mission phase, the thermal control system must be able to vary the heat rejection. The ability to "turn down" the heat rejected from the thermal control system is critically important when designing the system. Electrochromic technology as a radiator coating is being investigated to vary the amount of heat rejected by a radiator. Coupon level tests were performed to test the feasibility of this technology. Furthermore, thermal math models were developed to better understand the turndown ratios required by full scale radiator architectures to handle the various operation scenarios encountered during a mission profile for the Altair Lunar Lander. This paper summarizes results from coupon level tests as well as the thermal math models developed to investigate how electrochromics can be used to increase turn down ratios for a radiator. Data from the various design concepts of radiators and their architectures are outlined. Recommendations are made on which electrochromic radiator concept should be carried further for future thermal vacuum testing.

  9. Electrochromic Radiator Coupon Level Testing and Full Scale Thermal Math Modeling for Use on Altair Lunar Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik; Bannon, Erika; Bower, Chad

    2009-01-01

    In order to control system and component temperatures, many spacecraft thermal control systems use a radiator coupled with a pumped fluid loop to reject waste heat from the vehicle. Since heat loads and radiation environments can vary considerably according to mission phase, the thermal control system must be able to vary the heat rejection. The ability to "turn down" the heat rejected from the thermal control system is critically important when designing the system.. Electrochromic technology as a radiator coating is being investigated to vary the amount of heat being rejected by a radiator. Coupon level tests were performed to test the feasibility of the technology. Furthermore, thermal math models were developed to better understand the turndown ratios required by full scale radiator architectures to handle the various operation scenarios during a mission profile for Altair Lunar Lander. This paper summarizes results from coupon level tests as well as thermal math models developed to investigate how electrochromics can be used to provide the largest turn down ratio for a radiator. Data from the various design concepts of radiators and their architectures are outlined. Recommendations are made on which electrochromic radiator concept should be carried further for future thermal vacuum testing.

  10. Secondary ionisations in a wall-less ion-counting nanodosimeter: quantitative analysis and the effect on the comparison of measured and simulated track structure parameters in nanometric volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgers, Gerhard; Bug, Marion U.; Gargioni, Elisabetta; Rabus, Hans

    2015-10-01

    The object of investigation in nanodosimetry is the physical characteristics of the microscopic structure of ionising particle tracks, i.e. the sequence of the interaction types and interaction sites of a primary particle and all its secondaries, which reflects the stochastic nature of the radiation interaction. In view of the upcoming radiation therapy with protons and carbon ions, the ionisation structure of the ion track is of particular interest. Owing to limitations in current detector technology, the only way to determine the ionisation cluster size distribution in a DNA segment is to simulate the particle track structure in condensed matter. This is done using dedicated computer programs based on Monte Carlo procedures simulating the interaction of the primary ions with the target. Hence, there is a need to benchmark these computer codes using suitable experimental data. Ionisation cluster size distributions produced in the nanodosimeter's sensitive volume by monoenergetic protons and alpha particles (with energies between 0.1 MeV and 20 MeV) were measured at the PTB ion accelerator facilities. C3H8 and N2 were alternately used as the working gas. The measured data were compared with the simulation results obtained with the PTB Monte-Carlo code PTra [B. Grosswendt, Radiat. Environ. Biophys. 41, 103 (2002); M.U. Bug, E. Gargioni, H. Nettelbeck, W.Y. Baek, G. Hilgers, A.B. Rosenfeld, H. Rabus, Phys. Rev. E 88, 043308 (2013)]. Measured and simulated characteristics of the particle track structure are generally in good agreement for protons over the entire energy range investigated. For alpha particles with energies higher than the Bragg peak energy, a good agreement can also be seen, whereas for energies lower than the Bragg peak energy differences of as much as 25% occur. Significant deviations are only observed for large ionisation cluster sizes. These deviations can be explained by a background consisting of secondary ions. These ions are produced in the

  11. Does short-term exposure to elevated levels of natural gamma radiation in Ramsar cause oxidative stress?

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, SMJ; Niroomand-Rad, A; Roshan-Shomal, P; Razavi-Toosi, SMT; Mossayeb-Zadeh, M; Moghadam, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ramsar, a city in northern Iran, has areas with some of the highest recorded levels of natural radiation among inhabited areas measured on the earth. Aims: To determine whether short-term exposure to extremely high levels of natural radiation induce oxidative stress. Materials and Methods: In this study, 53 Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups of 10-12 animals. Animals in the 1st group were kept for 7 days in an outdoor area with normal background radiation while the 2nd , 3rd , 4th and 5th groups were kept in four different outdoor areas with naturally elevated levels of gamma radiation in Ramsar. A calibrated RDS-110 survey meter, mounted on a tripod approximately 1 m above the ground, was used to measure exposure rate at each location. On days 7 and 9 blood sampling was performed to assess the serum levels of catalase (CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA). On day 8, all animals were exposed to a lethal dose of 8 Gy gamma radiations emitted by a Theratron Phoenix (Theratronics, Canada) Cobalt-60 (55 cGy/min) at Radiotherapy Department of Razi Hospital in Rasht, Iran. Results: Findings obtained in this study indicate that high levels of natural radiation cannot induce oxidative stress. CAT and MDA levels in almost all groups were not significantly different (P = 0.69 and P = 0.05, respectively). After exposure to the lethal dose, CAT and MDA levels in all groups were not significantly different (P = 0.054 and P = 0.163, respectively). Conclusions: These findings indicate that short-term exposure to extremely high levels of natural radiation (up to 196 times higher than the normal background) does not induce oxidative stress. PMID:25143879

  12. Measurements of gamma radiation levels and spectra in the San Francisco Bay Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, B. T.; Brozek, K. P.; Angell, C. T.; Norman, E. B.

    2011-10-01

    Much of the radiation received by an average person is emitted by naturally-occurring radioactive isotopes from the thorium, actinium, and uranium decay series, or potassium. In this study, we have measured gamma radiation levels at various locations in the San Francisco Bay Area and the UC Berkeley campus from spectra taken using an ORTEC NOMAD portable data acquisition system and a large-volume coaxial HPGe detector. We have identified a large number of gamma rays originating from natural sources. The most noticeable isotopes are 214Bi, 40K, and 208Tl. We have observed variations in counting rates by factors of two to five between different locations due to differences in local conditions - such as building, concrete, grass, and soil compositions. In addition, in a number of outdoor locations, we have observed 604-, 662-, and 795-keV gamma rays from 134,137Cs, which we attribute to fallout from the recent Fukushima reactor accident. The implications of these results will be discussed. This work was supported in part by a grant from the U. S. Dept. of Homeland Security.

  13. Conceptual basis for evaluating risk from low-level radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.

    1981-01-01

    Serious or lethal injuries that may result from the exposure of animals or human beings to ionizing radiations can be divided into two distinctly different categories, on the basis of whether the injury results only from failure of an entire vital organ, or stems from impairment of the function of a single cell. These two categories of injury are termed here organ effects, normally induced by non-stochastic processes, and single cell effects, normally induced by stochastic processes. This presentation is limited to low-level radiation exposure (LLR) since: (1) only with single hit kinetics does the average number of cell doses per cell in the exposed population essentially equal the number of cells dosed; (2) in excluding multihit all-or-none effects, the functions developed are essentially independent of the time rate at which the (instantaneously deposited) cell doses are laid down, and of considerations of repair of sub-effect injury; and (3) it makes little or no difference with LLR if the incidence of single cell effects is expressed in terms of exposed or surviving cells.

  14. Ground level photosynthetically active radiation dynamics in stands of Acacia mearnsii De Wild.

    PubMed

    Péllico Netto, Sylvio; Sanquetta, Carlos R; Caron, Braulio O; Behling, Alexandre; Simon, Augusto A; Corte, Ana Paula D; Bamberg, Rogério

    2015-09-01

    The objective is to study the dynamics of photosynthetic radiation reaching the soil surface in stands of Acacia mearnsii De Wild and its influence on height growth in stands. This fact gives rise to the formulation of the following hypothesis for this study: "The reduction of the incidence of light inside the stand of black wattle will cause the inflection point in its height growth when this reaches 4 to 5 m in height, i.e. when the stand is between 2 and 3 years of age". The study was conducted in stands in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, where diameters at breast height, total height and photosynthetically active radiation available at ground level were measured. The frequency tended to be more intense when the age of the stands increases. It was evident that a reduction of light incidence inside the forest occurred, caused by canopy closure. Consequently, closed canopy propitiated the competition of plants. This has affected the conditions for growth in diameter and height of this species, reason why it becomes possible to conceive the occurrence of an inflection point in the growth of these two variables, confirming the formulated hypothesis.

  15. Strong correlation between levels of tropospheric hydroxyl radicals and solar ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Rohrer, Franz; Berresheim, Harald

    2006-07-13

    The most important chemical cleaning agent of the atmosphere is the hydroxyl radical, OH. It determines the oxidizing power of the atmosphere, and thereby controls the removal of nearly all gaseous atmospheric pollutants. The atmospheric supply of OH is limited, however, and could be overcome by consumption due to increasing pollution and climate change, with detrimental feedback effects. To date, the high variability of OH concentrations has prevented the use of local observations to monitor possible trends in the concentration of this species. Here we present and analyse long-term measurements of atmospheric OH concentrations, which were taken between 1999 and 2003 at the Meteorological Observatory Hohenpeissenberg in southern Germany. We find that the concentration of OH can be described by a surprisingly linear dependence on solar ultraviolet radiation throughout the measurement period, despite the fact that OH concentrations are influenced by thousands of reactants. A detailed numerical model of atmospheric reactions and measured trace gas concentrations indicates that the observed correlation results from compensations between individual processes affecting OH, but that a full understanding of these interactions may not be possible on the basis of our current knowledge of atmospheric chemistry. As a consequence of the stable relationship between OH concentrations and ultraviolet radiation that we observe, we infer that there is no long-term trend in the level of OH in the Hohenpeissenberg data set. PMID:16838018

  16. Ground level photosynthetically active radiation dynamics in stands of Acacia mearnsii De Wild.

    PubMed

    Péllico Netto, Sylvio; Sanquetta, Carlos R; Caron, Braulio O; Behling, Alexandre; Simon, Augusto A; Corte, Ana Paula D; Bamberg, Rogério

    2015-09-01

    The objective is to study the dynamics of photosynthetic radiation reaching the soil surface in stands of Acacia mearnsii De Wild and its influence on height growth in stands. This fact gives rise to the formulation of the following hypothesis for this study: "The reduction of the incidence of light inside the stand of black wattle will cause the inflection point in its height growth when this reaches 4 to 5 m in height, i.e. when the stand is between 2 and 3 years of age". The study was conducted in stands in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, where diameters at breast height, total height and photosynthetically active radiation available at ground level were measured. The frequency tended to be more intense when the age of the stands increases. It was evident that a reduction of light incidence inside the forest occurred, caused by canopy closure. Consequently, closed canopy propitiated the competition of plants. This has affected the conditions for growth in diameter and height of this species, reason why it becomes possible to conceive the occurrence of an inflection point in the growth of these two variables, confirming the formulated hypothesis. PMID:26375018

  17. Electron impact ionisation cross sections of iron hydrogen clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Stefan E.; Sukuba, Ivan; Urban, Jan; Limtrakul, Jumras; Probst, Michael

    2016-09-01

    We computed electron impact ionisation cross sections (EICSs) of iron hydrogen clusters, FeHn with n = 1,2,...,10, from the ionisation threshold to 10 keV using the Deutsch-Märk (DM) and the binary-encounter-Bethe (BEB) formalisms. The maxima of the cross sections for the iron hydrogen clusters range from 6.13 × 10-16 cm2 at 60 eV to 8.76 × 10-16 cm2 at 76 eV for BEB-AE (BEB method based on quantum-chemical data from all-electron basis sets) calculations, from 4.15 × 10-16 cm2 at 77 eV to 7.61 × 10-16 cm2 at 80 eV for BEB-ECP (BEB method based on quantum-chemical data from effective-core potentials for inner-core electrons) calculations and from 2.49 × 10-16 cm2 at 43.5 eV to 7.04 × 10-16 cm2 at 51 eV for the DM method. Cross sections calculated via the BEB method are substantially higher than the ones obtained via the DM method, up to a factor of about two for FeH and FeH2. The formation of Fe-H bonds depopulates the iron 4s orbital, causing significantly lower cross sections for the small iron hydrides compared to atomic iron. Both the DM and BEB cross sections can be fitted perfectly against a simple expression used in modelling and simulation codes in the framework of nuclear fusion research. The energetics of the iron hydrogen clusters change substantially when exact exchange is present in the density functional, while the cluster geometries do not depend on this choice. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page athttp://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2016-70292-4

  18. Prediction of radiation pressure force exerted on moving particles by the two-level skeletonization.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiao-Min; Gou, Ming-Jiang; Sheng, Xin-Qing

    2014-04-21

    A fast full-wave method for computing radiation pressure force (RPF) exerted by shaped light beams on moving particles is presented. The problem of evaluating RPF exerted on a moving particle by a single excitation beam is converted into that of computing RPF's exerted on a static particle by multiple beams. The discretization of different beams leads to distinct right hand sides (RHS's) for the matrix system. To avoid solving each RHS by the brute-force manner, the algorithm conducts low-rank decomposition on the excitation matrix consisting of all RHS's to figure out the so-called skeleton light beams by interpolative decomposition (ID). The peak memory requirement of the skeletonization is a bottle-neck if the particle is large. A two-level skeletonization scheme is proposed to solve this problem. Some numerical experiments on arbitrarily shaped homogeneous particles are performed to illustrate the performance and capability of the developed method. PMID:24787885

  19. Observation of tree-level B decays with ss production from gluon radiation.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2008-05-01

    We report on our search for decays proceeding via a tree-level b-->c quark transition in which a gluon radiates into an ss[over ] pair. We present observations of the decays B;{-}-->D_{s};{+}K;{-}pi;{-} and B[over ];{0}-->D_{s};{+}K_{S};{0}pi;{-} and evidence for B;{-}-->D_{s};{+}K;{-}K;{-} and set upper limits on the branching fractions for B[over ];{0}-->D_{s};{+}K_{S};{0}pi;{-} and B;{-}-->D_{s};{+}K;{-}K;{-} using 383x10;{6} Upsilon(4S)-->BB[over ] events collected by the BABAR detector at SLAC. We present evidence that the invariant mass distributions of D_{s};{+}K;{-} pairs from B;{-}-->D_{s};{+}K;{-}pi;{-} decays are inconsistent with the phase-space model, suggesting the presence of charm resonances lying below the D_{s};{+}K;{-} threshold. PMID:18518280

  20. Misuse of statistics in the interpretation of data on low-level radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.D.

    1982-01-01

    Four misuses of statistics in the interpretation of data of low-level radiation are reviewed: (1) post-hoc analysis and aggregation of data leading to faulty conclusions in the reanalysis of genetic effects of the atomic bomb, and premature conclusions on the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard data; (2) inappropriate adjustment for age and ignoring differences between urban and rural areas leading to potentially spurious increase in incidence of cancer at Rocky Flats; (3) hazard of summary statistics based on ill-conditioned individual rates leading to spurious association between childhood leukemia and fallout in Utah; and (4) the danger of prematurely published preliminary work with inadequate consideration of epidemiological problems - censored data - leading to inappropriate conclusions, needless alarm at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, and diversion of scarce research funds.

  1. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  2. Radiation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  3. Polarisation dependences of harmonic generation in the plasma produced in the ionisation of excited-state hydrogen-like atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, Viktor P; Silin, Pavel V

    2005-02-28

    An analytic theory of harmonic generation in the plasma produced from the gas of hydrogen-like atoms in excited states is considered for relatively intense radiation. The consideration of l-degeneracy of the electrons in these excited states allowed deriving the dependence of generation efficiency on the principal quantum number. In the context of the Bethe model of gas ionisation, we revealed the threshold nonlinear dependence of the maximum generation efficiency on the degree of circular polarisation of the pump field for its given intensity. Analytic calculations were performed for the fifth and seventh harmonics. The results of these calculations allowed generalising to the case of excited atoms the previously obtained results for the third harmonic in the plasma arising from hydrogen-like atoms in the ground state. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  4. Radiative lifetime and energy of the low-energy isomeric level in 229Th

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkalya, E. V.; Schneider, Christian; Jeet, Justin; Hudson, Eric R.

    2015-11-01

    We estimate the range of the radiative lifetime and energy of the anomalous, low-energy 3 /2+(7.8 ±0.5 eV) state in the 229Th nucleus. Our phenomenological calculations are based on the available experimental data for the intensities of M 1 and E 2 transitions between excited levels of the 229Th nucleus in the Kπ[N nZΛ ] =5 /2+[633 ] and 3 /2+[631 ] rotational bands. We also discuss the influence of certain branching coefficients, which affect the currently accepted measured energy of the isomeric state. From this work, we establish a favored region, 0.66 ×106seV3/ω3≤τ ≤2.2 ×106seV3/ω3 , where the transition lifetime τ as a function of transition energy ω should lie at roughly the 95% confidence level. Together with the result of Beck et al. [LLNL-PROC-415170 (2009)], we establish a favored area where transition lifetime and energy should lie at roughly the 90% confidence level. We also suggest new nuclear physics measurements, which would significantly reduce the ambiguity in the present data.

  5. Site-specific changes in zinc levels in the epididymis of rats exposed to ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma-Takeda, S.; Nishimura, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Yukawa, M.

    2007-07-01

    The epididymis is an accessory sex organ that plays an important role in sperm maturation and storage. Trace elements, such as copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn) and selenium (Se), have a pivotal role in spermatogenesis. We studied the effects of radiation on trace element levels in the epididymis in male Wistar rats using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). We determined trace element concentration in segment-dissected specimens and used micro-PIXE analysis to determine Zn in epididymal sections in situ. Zn concentrations in the caput and cauda epididymis of control rats were 37.7 ± 6.5 μg/g wet weight and 18.7 ± 4.1 μg/g wet weight, respectively. At 6 h after irradiation at a single dose of 5Gy, the Zn level decreased by 33% in the caput epididymis, whereas the level did not change in the cauda segment. Similar results were obtained for Se, but not both Cu and Mn. PIXE spot analysis revealed that Zn in the lumen of the epididymal tubules decreased after irradiation.

  6. The association betweeen cancers and low level radiation: An evaluation of the epidemiological evidence at the Hanford Nuclear Weapons Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, J. |

    1993-05-01

    Cancer has traditionally been linked to exposure to high doses of radiation, but there is considerable controversy regarding the carcinogenicity of low doses of ionizing radiation in humans. Over the past 30 years there have been 14 studies conducted on employees at the Hanford nuclear weapons facility to investigate the relationship between exposure to low doses of radiation and mortality due to cancer (1-14). Interest in this issue was originally stimulated by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) which was trying to determine whether the linear extrapolation of health effects from high to low dose exposure was accurate. If the risk has been underestimated, then the maximum permissible occupational radiation exposure in the United States had been set too high. Because the health risk associated with low level radiation are unclear and controversial it seems appropriate to review the studies relating to Hanford at this time.

  7. C-Reactive Protein Levels and Radiation-Induced Mucositis in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Wontaek Nam, Jiho; Kim, Donghyun; Park, Dahl; Kim, Dongwon

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between C-reactive protein (CRP) levels or the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and the grade of acute radiation-induced mucositis in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: This study was performed in 40 patients who received intensity-modulated radiation therapy as a radical treatment of primary laryngo-pharyngeal cancer. Serum CRP level and ESR were initially checked on the day of radiotherapy simulation and were measured every week during the irradiation schedule and two times biweekly after radiotherapy. Mucosal reactions were evaluated by radiation oncologists on days of blood sampling. Results: The distribution of the most severe mucositis was Grade I mucositis in 10% of the patients, Grade II in 60% of the patients and Grade III in 30% of the patients. Statistical analysis indicated a significant rise in the CRP level (p < 0.001) according to radiation fraction number and grade of mucositis. A change of the mean CRP level was correlated with progression of mean grade of mucositis according to fraction number. The ESR did not show any statistically significant relationship with radiotherapy fraction number and grade of acute mucositis. Conclusions: There was a significant correlation between the presence of acute mucositis and CRP level in this study. The CRP level could be conveniently determined along with evaluation of mucosal reactions during or after radiotherapy to provide further information on radiation-induced mucositis.

  8. Radiative Heating of the ISCCP Upper Level Cloud Regimes and its Impact on the Large-scale Tropical Circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Schumacher, Courtney; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2013-01-31

    Radiative heating profiles of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud regimes (or weather states) were estimated by matching ISCCP observations with radiative properties derived from cloud radar and lidar measurements from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites at Manus, Papua New Guinea, and Darwin, Australia. Focus was placed on the ISCCP cloud regimes containing the majority of upper level clouds in the tropics, i.e., mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), deep cumulonimbus with cirrus, mixed shallow and deep convection, and thin cirrus. At upper levels, these regimes have average maximum cloud occurrences ranging from 30% to 55% near 12 km with variations depending on the location and cloud regime. The resulting radiative heating profiles have maxima of approximately 1 K/day near 12 km, with equal heating contributions from the longwave and shortwave components. Upper level minima occur near 15 km, with the MCS regime showing the strongest cooling of 0.2 K/day and the thin cirrus showing no cooling. The gradient of upper level heating ranges from 0.2 to 0.4 K/(day∙km), with the most convectively active regimes (i.e., MCSs and deep cumulonimbus with cirrus) having the largest gradient. When the above heating profiles were applied to the 25-year ISCCP data set, the tropics-wide average profile has a radiative heating maximum of 0.45Kday-1 near 250 hPa. Column-integrated radiative heating of upper level cloud accounts for about 20% of the latent heating estimated by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR). The ISCCP radiative heating of tropical upper level cloud only slightly modifies the response of an idealized primitive equation model forced with the tropics-wide TRMM PR latent heating, which suggests that the impact of upper level cloud is more important to large-scale tropical circulation variations because of convective feedbacks rather than direct forcing by

  9. Ion-pair states of the ClO radical observed by multiphoton ionisation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Martin J.; Diez-Rojo, Trinidad; Rogers, Leon J.; Western, Colin M.; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Hudgens, Jeffrey W.

    1997-06-01

    We present isotopically selected multiphoton ionisation spectra of the CIO radical following excitation in the wavelength range 276-261 nm, obtained using both a room-temperature sample and under the rotationally cold conditions in a pulsed molecular beam. In both cases high-resolution rotationally resolved spectra were obtained, with the 'cold' spectra showing discrete rovibrational bands. Analysis of the rotational structure leads to the identification of excited levels of ClO of 2Π symmetry resonant at the two-photon energy (72200-76200 cm -1). These we deduce to possess extended equilibrium bond lengths ( R ≈ 2.4 Å), and thus associate with one or more ion-pair states. Full interpretation of the observed spectra is complicated by the effects of additional wavelength-dependent intensity enhancements due to predissociated levels of the A 2Π state accidentally resonant at the energy of one absorbed photon. We report an isotopically resolved room-temperature 2 + 1 REMPI spectrum, involving a progression of vibrational levels of the previously documented C 2ɛ state of ClO. The observed CX two-photon transitions are well reproduced using known spectroscopic constants.

  10. Recombination in liquid filled ionisation chambers with multiple charge carrier species: Theoretical and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, P.; González-Castaño, D. M.; Gómez, F.; Pardo-Montero, J.

    2014-10-01

    Liquid-filled ionisation chambers (LICs) are used in radiotherapy for dosimetry and quality assurance. Volume recombination can be quite important in LICs for moderate dose rates, causing non-linearities in the dose rate response of these detectors, and needs to be corrected for. This effect is usually described with Greening and Boag models for continuous and pulsed radiation respectively. Such models assume that the charge is carried by two different species, positive and negative ions, each of those species with a given mobility. However, LICs operating in non-ultrapure mode can contain different types of electronegative impurities with different mobilities, thus increasing the number of different charge carriers. If this is the case, Greening and Boag models can be no longer valid and need to be reformulated. In this work we present a theoretical and numerical study of volume recombination in parallel-plate LICs with multiple charge carrier species, extending Boag and Greening models. Results from a recent publication that reported three different mobilities in an isooctane-filled LIC have been used to study the effect of extra carrier species on recombination. We have found that in pulsed beams the inclusion of extra mobilities does not affect volume recombination much, a behaviour that was expected because Boag formula for charge collection efficiency does not depend on the mobilities of the charge carriers if the Debye relationship between mobilities and recombination constant holds. This is not the case in continuous radiation, where the presence of extra charge carrier species significantly affects the amount of volume recombination.

  11. Current state of radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikaev, Alexei K.

    1995-06-01

    A review of common trends in the development of modern radiation processing is presented. The sources of ionising radiation and the most important processes practically induced under the influence of this radiation are discussed. It is shown that radiation methods can be used successfully for the modification of materials, for the sterilisation of medical articles, for the solution of ecological problems, for treatment of food products, in radiation engineering, etc. Special attention is paid to processes at the pilot plant and industrial scales. The bibliography includes 548 references.

  12. [Levels of radiation exposure and radiation risk in flights aboard the orbital complex "Mir" and the International space station].

    PubMed

    Shafirkin, A V; Kolomenskiĭ, A V; Petrov, V M

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents results of calculating mean daily values of absorbed and equivalent doses from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and Earth's radiation belts (ERB) to crew members on orbital missions aboard Mir and the International space station during solar minimum and maximum. Calculated doses were corrected in accordance with the dosimetric and spectrometric data from Mir missions 18 through to 23 that took place in the period of solar minimum. Contribution of local and albedo neutrons to equivalent dose was also taken into account. Presented are calculated total radiation risk and tumor risk over life time for Mir and ISS crews following missions of varying duration, and predictions for reduction in life span in view of recent dosimetric data. PMID:11840866

  13. Cytomorphological changes in buccal mucosa of patients treated with low-level 1,064-nm laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Sezer, Ufuk; Aras, Mutan Hamdi; Aktan, Ali Murat; Cengiz, Beyhan; Ozkul, Nadide; Ay, Sinan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the cytomorphological changes occurring in the buccal mucosa in patients treated with low-level 1,064-nm laser radiation. Seventeen individuals (12 males, five females) 18-24 years of age were included in the study. Low-level 1,064-nm laser radiation was applied to the right buccal mucosa near the premolar region; this therapy was repeated for 10 days. Buccal epithelial cells were collected from the right and left premolar regions of the individuals with a brush before and after therapy. The specimens collected from the left side were measured cytomorphometrically and used for the control group. Student's t test was used for statistical comparison of the values of the buccal epithelial cells collected from individuals; a p value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. None of the patients showed any adverse reactions to the low-level 1,064-nm laser radiation therapy during application. There was no cytogenetic damage to the therapied or non-therapied regions in the buccal mucosa cells, as determined cytomorphologically. The results suggest that low-level 1,064-nm laser radiation therapy has no genotoxic potential. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that low-level 1,064-nm laser radiation therapy may be used safely in dental treatments.

  14. Effectiveness of ionizing radiation in reducing furan and acrylamide levels in foods.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xuetong; Mastovska, Katerina

    2006-10-18

    Furan and acrylamide are two possible carcinogens commonly found in many thermally processed foods. The possibility of using ionizing radiation to reduce the levels of thermally induced furan and acrylamide in water and selected foods was investigated. Aqueous furan solutions, and foods (frankfurters, sausages, infant sweet potatoes) that contained furan were irradiated to various doses of gamma-rays. Water and oil spiked with acrylamide and potato chips (a known acrylamide-containing food) were also irradiated. In addition, possible irradiation-induced formation of acrylamide in glucose and asparagine solutions was analyzed. Results showed that irradiation at 1.0 kGy destroyed almost all furan in water. In frankfurters, sausages, and infant sweet potatoes, the rate of irradiation-induced destruction of furan was much lower than the rate in water, although significant reductions in furan levels were observed in all foods. Irradiation at 2.5-3.5 kGy, doses that can inactivate 5-log of most common pathogens, reduced furan levels in the food samples by 25-40%. Similarly to furan, acrylamide in water was also sensitive to irradiation. After 1.5 kGy of irradiation, most of the acrylamide was degraded. Irradiation, however, had a very limited effect on acrylamide levels in oil and in potato chips, even at a dose of 10 kGy. No detectable acrylamide was formed in the mixture of asparagine and glucose upon irradiation. These results suggest that a low dose of irradiation easily destroys furan and acrylamide in water. In real foods, however, the reduction of furan was less effective than in water, whereas the reduction in acrylamide was minimal.

  15. Effects of radiation dose level on calcification visibility in cone beam breast CT: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chao-Jen; Shaw, Chris C.; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Meng, Yang; Chen, Lingyun; Tu, Shu-Ju; Wang, Tianpeng; Liu, Xinming; Yang, Wei T.; Whitman, Gary J.

    2006-03-01

    To investigate how the radiation dose level affects the detection of microcalcifications (MCs) in cone beam breast CT (CBCT), simulated MCs were embedded in simulated breast tissue and imaged with an experimental CBCT system. The system employs a 30 x 40 cm2 a-Si/CsI based flat panel detector with a pixel size of 194 microns. Three 5 x 5 clusters of simulated calcifications (212-224, 250-280, and 300-355 μm) were embedded in a stack of 11 cm diameter lunch meat and positioned at the center of each slice of lunch meat. 300 projection images over 360 degrees were acquired in the non-binning mode at various dose levels (4.2, 6, 12, 18, and 24 mGy) three times, and were reconstructed with the Feldkamp algorithm. After that, 767 x 767 x 9 volume data were extracted from the fifteen reconstructed images for each size group, resulting in 45 CBCT MC phantom images. An observer experiment was performed by counting the number of visible MCs for each MC phantom image. The phantom images were displayed on a review workstation with a 1600 x 1200 CRT monitor and reviewed by six readers independently. The order of the images was randomized for each reader. The ratios of the visible MCs were averaged over all readers and plotted as a function of the dose level. The CNR was calculated for each MC size and each doe level as well. The results showed that the performance of the reconstructed images acquired with 4.2 mGy was similar to the images acquired with 6 mGy, and the images acquired with 18 mGy performed similarly to those acquired with 24 mGy.

  16. Level crossing analysis of cosmic microwave background radiation: a method for detecting cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Movahed, M. Sadegh; Khosravi, Shahram E-mail: khosravi@ipm.ir

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we study the footprint of cosmic string as the topological defects in the very early universe on the cosmic microwave background radiation. We develop the method of level crossing analysis in the context of the well-known Kaiser-Stebbins phenomenon for exploring the signature of cosmic strings. We simulate a Gaussian map by using the best fit parameter given by WMAP-7 and then superimpose cosmic strings effects on it as an incoherent and active fluctuations. In order to investigate the capability of our method to detect the cosmic strings for the various values of tension, Gμ, a simulated pure Gaussian map is compared with that of including cosmic strings. Based on the level crossing analysis, the superimposed cosmic string with Gμ∼>4 × 10{sup −9} in the simulated map without instrumental noise and the resolution R = 1' could be detected. In the presence of anticipated instrumental noise the lower bound increases just up to Gμ∼>5.8 × 10{sup −9}.

  17. Survey of studies of occupational populations exposed to low-level radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, S.

    1980-04-01

    Studies of occupational populations exposed to large doses of radiation, principally from the ingestion of radium by dial painters and inhalation of radon and its daughters by miners, have provided important information on the health effects of those radioisotopes. Studies of medical radiologists, military personnel exposed to nuclear tests, and factory workers exposed to thorium are in progress. Employees of DOE-contractor facilities and of naval shipyards are also under study. Personnel dosimetry data are generally available for the latter category of occupational populations. Reasons for conducting the studies include interest in exploring the verification at low exposure levels of results of studies of heavily exposed populations and the responsibility of the employer to maintain adequate surveillance of the health of his workers by conducting appropriate epidemiologic studies. The low level of exposure of workers in facilities where adequate personnel dosimetry records are available make it unlikely that the results of such studies can be used to provide health risk estimates in the near future.

  18. Effect of gamma radiation on the ripening and levels of bioactive amines in bananas cv. Prata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloria, Maria Beatriz A.; Adão, Regina C.

    2013-06-01

    Green Prata bananas at the full three-quarter stage were exposed to gamma radiation at doses of 0.0 (control), 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 kGy and stored at 16±1 °C and 85% relative humidity. Samples were collected periodically and analyzed for peel color, pulp-to-peel ratio and levels of starch, soluble sugars and bioactive amines. Degradation of starch and formation of fructose and glucose followed first- and zero-order kinetics, respectively. Higher irradiation doses caused increased inhibitory effect on starch degradation and glucose formation. However, doses of 1.5 and 2.0 kGy caused browning of the peel, making the fruit unacceptable. Irradiation at 1.0 kGy was the most promising dose: it did not affect peel color, the pulp-to-peel ratio or the levels of the amines spermidine, serotonin and putrescine. However, it slowed down starch degradation and the formation and accumulation of fructose and glucose, delaying the ripening of the fruit for 7 days.

  19. Theoretical oscillator strengths, transition probabilities, and radiative lifetimes of levels in Pb V

    SciTech Connect

    Colón, C.; Alonso-Medina, A.; Porcher, P.

    2014-01-15

    Theoretical values of oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for 306 spectral lines arising from the 5d{sup 9}ns(n=7,8,9),5d{sup 9}np(n=6,7),5d{sup 9}6d, and 5d{sup 9} 5f configurations, and radiative lifetimes of 9 levels, of Pb V have been obtained. These values were obtained in intermediate coupling (IC) and using ab initio relativistic Hartree–Fock calculations including core-polarization effects. We use for the IC calculations the standard method of least squares fitting of experimental energy levels by means of computer codes from Cowan. We included in these calculations the 5d{sup 8}6s6p and 5d{sup 8}6s{sup 2} configurations. These calculations have facilitated the identification of the 214.25, 216.79, and 227.66 nm spectral lines of Pb V. In the absence of experimental results of oscillator strengths and transition probabilities, we could not make a direct comparison with our results. However, the Stark broadening parameters calculated from these values are in excellent agreement with experimental widening found in the literature. -- Highlights: •Theoretical values of transition probabilities of Pb V have been obtained. •We use for the IC calculations the standard method of least square. •The parameters calculated from these values are in agreement with the experimental values.

  20. BOREAS RSS-14 Level-2 GOES-7 Shortwave and Longwave Radiation Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Gu, Jiujing; Smith, Eric A.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-14 team collected and processed several GOES-7 and GOES-8 image data sets that covered the BOREAS study region. This data set contains images of shortwave and longwave radiation at the surface and top of the atmosphere derived from collected GOES-7 data. The data cover the time period of 05-Feb-1994 to 20-Sep-1994. The images missing from the temporal series were zero-filled to create a consistent sequence of files. The data are stored in binary image format files. Due to the large size of the images, the level-1a GOES-7 data are not contained on the BOREAS CD-ROM set. An inventory listing file is supplied on the CD-ROM to inform users of what data were collected. The level-1a GOES-7 image data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). See sections 15 and 16 for more information. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  1. Association between sperm DNA integrity and seminal plasma antioxidant levels in health workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Dayanidhi; Salian, Sujith Raj; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Uppangala, Shubhashree; Kumari, Sandhya; Challapalli, Srinivas; Chandraguthi, Shrinidhi Gururajarao; Jain, Navya; Krishnamurthy, Hanumanthappa; Kumar, Pratap; Adiga, Satish Kumar

    2014-07-15

    There is a paucity of data regarding the association between occupational radiation exposure and risk to human fertility. Recently, we provided the first evidence on altered sperm functional characteristics, DNA damage and hypermethylation in radiation health workers. However, there is no report elucidating the association between seminal plasma antioxidants and sperm chromatin integrity in occupationally exposed subjects. Here, we assessed the seminal plasma antioxidants and lipid peroxidation level in 83 men who were occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation and then correlated with the sperm chromatin integrity. Flow cytometry based sperm chromatin integrity assay revealed a significant decline in αt value in the exposed group in comparison to the non-exposed group (P<0.0001). Similarly, both total and reduced glutathione levels and total antioxidant capacity in the seminal plasma were significantly higher in exposed group than the non-exposed group (P<0.01, 0.001 and 0.0001, respectively). However, superoxide dismutase level and malondialdehyde level, which is an indicator of lipid peroxidation in the seminal plasma, did not differ significantly between two groups. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and GSH level exhibited a positive correlation with sperm DNA integrity in exposed subjects. To conclude, this study distinctly shows that altered sperm chromatin integrity in radiation health workers is associated with increase in seminal plasma antioxidant level. Further, the increased seminal plasma GSH and TAC could be an adaptive measure to tackle the oxidative stress to protect genetic and functional sperm deformities in radiation health workers. - Highlights: • Seminal plasma antioxidants were measured in men occupationally exposed to radiation. • Sperm chromatin integrity was significantly affected in the exposed group. • Glutathione and total antioxidant capacity was significantly higher in exposed group. • Sperm DNA damage in exposed subjects

  2. Potential interactions between different levels of cosmic radiation and their influence on the assessment of radiation risk during a manned deep space mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, S.

    Despite the fact that galactic cosmic rays is believed to be isotropic throughout interstellar space, solar flares and coronal mass ejections can produce sudden and dramatic increase in flux of particles and expose the astronauts to transient high levels of ionizing radiation Furthermore, astronauts receive extra doses in the course of their extravehicular activities. It has been estimated that exposure to unpredictable extremely large solar particle events would kill the astronauts without massive shielding in interplanetary space. It is also generally believed that the biological effects of small doses of ionizing radiation may lie below the detection limits. However, potential interactions between a small dose and a subsequent high dose are still a black box that its output may be much different from the effect of a high dose alone. Potential interactions from low and high doses can either be a simple additivity, adaptive responses or synergistic effects. Significant adaptive response has been demonstrated in humans after exposure to high levels of natural radiation. Furthermore, non-linear behavior has been observed for cosmic radiation. Recent long-term follow-up studies as well as studies performed on twins show that in contrast to early reports, the type of interaction is determined by intrinsic factors such as genetic constitution of each individual. Despite that these responses for low- LET radiations (mainly photons and beta particles) are documented to some extent, there are no data on possible interactions of high-energy protons or high-LET heavy ions. The assessment of potential interactions between chronic low doses and acute high doses of high energy protons and heavy ions will be of importance in practical radiation protection of cosmonauts during a deep space mission.

  3. Estimated Risk Level of Unified Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Dose Tolerance Limits for Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Jimm; Sahgal, Arjun; Soltys, Scott G; Luxton, Gary; Patel, Ashish; Herbert, Scott; Xue, Jinyu; Ma, Lijun; Yorke, Ellen; Adler, John R; Gibbs, Iris C

    2016-04-01

    A literature review of more than 200 stereotactic body radiation therapy spine articles from the past 20 years found only a single article that provided dose-volume data and outcomes for each spinal cord of a clinical dataset: the Gibbs 2007 article (Gibbs et al, 2007(1)), which essentially contains the first 100 stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) spine treatments from Stanford University Medical Center. The dataset is modeled and compared in detail to the rest of the literature review, which found 59 dose tolerance limits for the spinal cord in 1-5 fractions. We partitioned these limits into a unified format of high-risk and low-risk dose tolerance limits. To estimate the corresponding risk level of each limit we used the Gibbs 2007 clinical spinal cord dose-volume data for 102 spinal metastases in 74 patients treated by spinal radiosurgery. In all, 50 of the patients were previously irradiated to a median dose of 40Gy in 2-3Gy fractions and 3 patients developed treatment-related myelopathy. These dose-volume data were digitized into the dose-volume histogram (DVH) Evaluator software tool where parameters of the probit dose-response model were fitted using the maximum likelihood approach (Jackson et al, 1995(3)). Based on this limited dataset, for de novo cases the unified low-risk dose tolerance limits yielded an estimated risk of spinal cord injury of ≤1% in 1-5 fractions, and the high-risk limits yielded an estimated risk of ≤3%. The QUANTEC Dmax limits of 13Gy in a single fraction and 20Gy in 3 fractions had less than 1% risk estimated from this dataset, so we consider these among the low-risk limits. In the previously irradiated cohort, the estimated risk levels for 10 and 14Gy maximum cord dose limits in 5 fractions are 0.4% and 0.6%, respectively. Longer follow-up and more patients are required to improve the risk estimates and provide more complete validation. PMID:27000514

  4. Estimated Risk Level of Unified Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Dose Tolerance Limits for Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Jimm; Sahgal, Arjun; Soltys, Scott G; Luxton, Gary; Patel, Ashish; Herbert, Scott; Xue, Jinyu; Ma, Lijun; Yorke, Ellen; Adler, John R; Gibbs, Iris C

    2016-04-01

    A literature review of more than 200 stereotactic body radiation therapy spine articles from the past 20 years found only a single article that provided dose-volume data and outcomes for each spinal cord of a clinical dataset: the Gibbs 2007 article (Gibbs et al, 2007(1)), which essentially contains the first 100 stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) spine treatments from Stanford University Medical Center. The dataset is modeled and compared in detail to the rest of the literature review, which found 59 dose tolerance limits for the spinal cord in 1-5 fractions. We partitioned these limits into a unified format of high-risk and low-risk dose tolerance limits. To estimate the corresponding risk level of each limit we used the Gibbs 2007 clinical spinal cord dose-volume data for 102 spinal metastases in 74 patients treated by spinal radiosurgery. In all, 50 of the patients were previously irradiated to a median dose of 40Gy in 2-3Gy fractions and 3 patients developed treatment-related myelopathy. These dose-volume data were digitized into the dose-volume histogram (DVH) Evaluator software tool where parameters of the probit dose-response model were fitted using the maximum likelihood approach (Jackson et al, 1995(3)). Based on this limited dataset, for de novo cases the unified low-risk dose tolerance limits yielded an estimated risk of spinal cord injury of ≤1% in 1-5 fractions, and the high-risk limits yielded an estimated risk of ≤3%. The QUANTEC Dmax limits of 13Gy in a single fraction and 20Gy in 3 fractions had less than 1% risk estimated from this dataset, so we consider these among the low-risk limits. In the previously irradiated cohort, the estimated risk levels for 10 and 14Gy maximum cord dose limits in 5 fractions are 0.4% and 0.6%, respectively. Longer follow-up and more patients are required to improve the risk estimates and provide more complete validation.

  5. Radiographer Delivered Fluoroscopy Reduces Radiation Exposure During Endoscopic Urological Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Hennessey, DB; Young, M; Pahuja, A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The 1999 Ionising Radiation Regulations recommend that medical professionals using ionising radiation should aim to keep exposure as ‘low as reasonably practicable’. Urologists regularly use fluoroscopy during endoscopic surgical procedures. In some institutions, this is delivered by a radiographer whereas in others, it is delivered by the urological surgeon. Objectives To determine if radiographer-delivered fluoroscopy can reduce the exposure to ionising radiation during urological procedures. Methods An analysis of 395 consecutive patients, who underwent endoscopic urological procedures requiring fluoroscopy, was performed simultaneously across two institutions, over a 4 month period. 321 patients were matched and included in the analysis. Results Radiographer delivered fluoroscopy was associated with reduced ionising radiation exposure for retrograde pyelography procedures ED 0.09626 vs. 1.323 mSev, p= 0.0003, and endoscopic stone surgeries ED 0.3066 Vs. 0.5416 mSev, p=0.0039, but not for ureterorenoscopic stone surgeries 0.4880 vs. 0.2213 mSev, p=0.8292. Conclusion Radiographer delivered fluoroscopy could reduce the patient’s exposure to ionising radiation for some urological procedures. PMID:27158158

  6. Excitation and Ionisation dynamics in high-frequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, D.

    2008-07-01

    Non-thermal low temperature plasmas are widely used for technological applications. Increased demands on plasma technology have resulted in the development of various discharge concepts based on different power coupling mechanisms. Despite this, power dissipation mechanisms in these discharges are not yet fully understood. Of particular interest are low pressure radio-frequency (rf) discharges. The limited understanding of these discharges is predominantly due to the complexity of the underlying mechanisms and difficult diagnostic access to important parameters. Optical measurements are a powerful diagnostic tool offering high spatial and temporal resolution. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) provides non-intrusive access, to the physics of the plasma, with comparatively simple experimental requirements. Improved advances in technology and modern diagnostics now allow deeper insight into fundamental mechanisms. In low pressure rf discharges insight into the electron dynamics within the rf cycle can yield vital information. This requires high temporal resolution on a nano-second time scale. The optical emission from rf discharges exhibits temporal variations within the rf cycle. These variations are particularly strong, in for example capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs), but also easily observable in inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs), and can be exploited for insight into power dissipation. Interesting kinetic and non-linear coupling effects are revealed in capacitive systems. The electron dynamics exhibits a complex spatio-temporal structure. Excitation and ionisation, and, therefore, plasma sustainment is dominated through directed energetic electrons created through the dynamics of the plasma boundary sheath. In the relatively simple case of an asymmetric capacitively coupled rf plasma the complexity of the power dissipation is exposed and various mode transitions can be clearly observed and investigated. At higher pressure secondary electrons dominate the

  7. Use of gamma radiation on control of Clostridium botulinum in mortadella formulated with different nitrite levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, Monalisa Pereira; Aleixo, Glécia de Cássia; Ramos, Alcinéia de Lemos Souza; Silva, Maurício Henriques Louzada; Pereira, Marcio Tadeu; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf; Ramos, Eduardo Mendes

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of applying different doses of gamma radiation (0, 10 and 20 kGy) on Clostridium botulinum spores (107 spores/g) inoculated into mortadellas with different nitrite contents (0, 150 and 300 ppm). We also evaluated the order of application of heat (cooking) and irradiation processing. The products were evaluated for survival of C. botulinum, pH, water activity (Aw), redox potential (Eh) and residual nitrite content. In the non-irradiated raw batters, almost all spores could be recovered when no nitrite was added and only half was recovered with the addition of 150 ppm of nitrite. The use of 150 ppm of nitrite was able to inhibit the germination or growth of C. botulinum in non-irradiated cooked mortadellas after 48 h of processing. However, after 30 days of chilling storage (4 °C), it was possible to recover 105 UFC/g of this microorganism. The gamma irradiation (>10 kGy) had a positive effect on the inactivation of C. botulinum in mortadellas, independent of the sodium nitrite level used and the cooking/irradiation processing order.

  8. Ab initio calculations of non-radiative carrier trapping due to deep impurity levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Shi, Lin

    2013-03-01

    Non-radiative carrier decay due to deep impurity levels in semiconductors is an important process which affects the efficiencies of devices from solar cells to light emitting diode. This process is due to multiple phonon emission. Despite of the fact the analytical formalisms have been derived long time ago, so far there is no direct ab initio calculations due to the high cost of calculating all the electron-phonon coupling constants. Here we introduce an algorithm which calculates all the electron-phonon coupling constants at once, hence allows the ab initio calculations of such processes. Another approximation is introduced to calculate the phonon modes of a given impurity system. We use a ZnGa-VN paired defect in GaN as an example to study this process. We found that while most of the promoting phonon modes (used to promote the transition with the electron-phonon coupling) come from the optical modes, the accepting phonon modes (used to satisfy the energy conservation) come mostly from the acoustic phonons. This work is supported by SC/BES/MSED of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, and by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (863 Program) (No. 2011AA03A103)

  9. Regular and Chaotic Quantum Dynamics of Two-Level Atoms in a Selfconsistent Radiation Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konkov, L. E.; Prants, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    Dynamics of two-level atoms interacting with their own radiation field in a single-mode high-quality resonator is considered. The dynamical system consists of two second-order differential equations, one for the atomic SU(2) dynamical-group parameter and another for the field strength. With the help of the maximal Lyapunov exponent for this set, we numerically investigate transitions from regularity to deterministic quantum chaos in such a simple model. Increasing the collective coupling constant b is identical with 8(pi)N(sub 0)(d(exp 2))/hw, we observed for initially unexcited atoms a usual sharp transition to chaos at b(sub c) approx. equal to 1. If we take the dimensionless individual Rabi frequency a = Omega/2w as a control parameter, then a sequence of order-to-chaos transitions has been observed starting with the critical value a(sub c) approx. equal to 0.25 at the same initial conditions.

  10. State background-radiation levels: results of measurements taken during 1975-1979

    SciTech Connect

    Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Haywood, F.F.

    1981-11-01

    Background radiation levels across the United States have been measured by the Off-Site Pollutant Measurements Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These measurements have been conducted as part of the ORNL program of radiological surveillance at inactive uranium mills and sites formerly utilized during Manhattan Engineer District and early Atomic Energy Commission projects. The measurements included determination of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U concentrations in surface soil samples and measurement of external gamma-ray exposure rates at 1 m above the ground surface at the location of soil sampling. This information is being utilized for comparative purposes to determine the extent of contamination present at the survey sites and surrounding off-site areas. The sampling program to date has provided background information at 356 locations in 33 states. External gamma-ray exposure rates were found to range from less than 1 to 34 ..mu..R/h, with an US average of 8.5 ..mu..R/h. The nationwide average concentrations of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U in surface soil were determined to be 1.1, 0.98, and 1.0 pCi/g, respectively.

  11. Soybean fruit development and set at the node level under combined photoperiod and radiation conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nico, Magalí; Mantese, Anita I.; Miralles, Daniel J.; Kantolic, Adriana G.

    2016-01-01

    In soybean, long days during post-flowering increase seed number. This positive photoperiodic effect on seed number has been previously associated with increments in the amount of radiation accumulated during the crop cycle because long days extend the duration of the crop cycle. However, evidence of intra-nodal processes independent of the availability of assimilates suggests that photoperiodic effects at the node level might also contribute to pod set. This work aims to identify the main mechanisms responsible for the increase in pod number per node in response to long days; including the dynamics of flowering, pod development, growth and set at the node level. Long days increased pods per node on the main stems, by increasing pods on lateral racemes (usually dominated positions) at some main stem nodes. Long days lengthened the flowering period and thereby increased the number of opened flowers on lateral racemes. The flowering period was prolonged under long days because effective seed filling was delayed on primary racemes (dominant positions). Long days also delayed the development of flowers into pods with filling seeds, delaying the initiation of pod elongation without modifying pod elongation rate. The embryo development matched the external pod length irrespective of the pod’s chronological age. These results suggest that long days during post-flowering enhance pod number per node through a relief of the competition between pods of different hierarchy within the node. The photoperiodic effect on the development of dominant pods, delaying their elongation and therefore postponing their active growth, extends flowering and allows pod set at positions that are usually dominated. PMID:26512057

  12. Tritium: a model for low level long-term ionizing radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Carsten, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    The somatic, cytogenetic and genetic effects of single and chronic tritiated water (HTO) ingestion in mice was investigated. This study serves not only as an evaluation of tritium toxicity (TRITOX) but due to its design involving long-term low concentration ingestion of HTO may serve as a model for low level long-term ionizing radiation exposure in general. Long-term studies involved animals maintained on HTO at concentrations of 0.3 ..mu..Ci/ml, 1.0 ..mu..Ci/ml, 3.0 ..mu..Ci/ml or depth dose equivalent chronic external exposures to /sup 137/Cs gamma rays. Maintenance on 3.0 ..mu..Ci/ml resulted in no effect on growth, life-time shortening or bone marrow cellularity, but did result in a reduction of bone marrow stem cells, an increase in DLM's in second generation animals maintained on this regimen and cytogenetic effects as indicated by increased sister chromatid exchanges (SCE's) in bone marrow cells, increased chromosome aberrations in the regenerating liver and an increase in micronuclei in red blood cells. Biochemical and microdosimetry studies showed that animals placed on the HTO regimen reached tritium equilibrium in the body water in approximately 17 to 21 days with a more gradual increase in bound tritium. When animals maintained for 180 days on 3.0 ..mu..Ci/ml HTO were placed on a tap water regimen, the tritium level in tissue dropped from the equilibrium value of 2.02 ..mu..Ci/ml before withdrawal to 0.001 ..mu..Ci/ml at 28 days. 18 references.

  13. Haemopoietic cell renewal in radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fliedner, T. M.; Nothdurft, W.; Tibken, B.; Hofer, E.; Weiss, M.; Kindler, H.

    1994-10-01

    Space flight activities are inevitably associated with a chronic exposure of astronauts to a complex mixture of ionising radiation. Although no acute radiation consequences are to be expected as a rule, the possibility of Solar Particle Events (SPE) associated with relatively high doses of radiation (1 or more Gray) cannot be excluded. It is the responsibility of physicians in charge of the health of astronauts to evaluate before, during and after space flight activities the functional status of haemopoietic cell renewal. Chronic low level exposure of dogs indicate that daily gamma-exposure doses below about 2 cGy are tolerated for several years as far as blood cell concentrations are concerned. However, the stem cell pool may be severely affected. The maintenance of sufficient blood cell counts is possible only through increased cell production to compensate for the radiation inflicted excess cell loss. This behaviour of haemopoietic cell renewal during chronic low level exposure can be simulated by bioengineering models of granulocytopoiesis. It is possible to define a ``turbulence region'' for cell loss rates, below which an prolonged adaptation to increased radiation fields can be expected to be tolerated. On the basis of these experimental results, it is recommended to develop new biological indicators to monitor haemopoietic cell renewal at the level of the stem cell pool using blood stem cells in addition to the determination of cytokine concentrations in the serum (and other novel approaches). To prepare for unexpected haemopoietic effects during prolonged space missions, research should be increased to modify the radiation sensitivity of haemopoietic stem cells (for instance by the application of certain regulatory molecules). In addition, a ``blood stem cell bank'' might be established for the autologous storage of stem cells and for use in space activities keeping them in a radiation protected container.

  14. Haemopoietic cell renewal in radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Fliedner, T M; Nothdurft, W; Tibken, B; Hofer, E; Weiss, M; Kindler, H

    1994-10-01

    Space flight activities are inevitably associated with a chronic exposure of astronauts to a complex mixture of ionising radiation. Although no acute radiation consequences are to be expected as a rule, the possibility of Solar Particle Events (SPE) associated with relatively high doses of radiation (1 or more Gray) cannot be excluded. It is the responsibility of physicians in charge of the health of astronauts to evaluate before, during and after space flight activities the functional status of haemopoietic cell renewal. Chronic low level exposure of dogs indicate that daily gamma-exposure doses below about 2 cGy are tolerated for several years as far as blood cell concentrations are concerned. However, the stem cell pool may be severely affected. The maintenance of sufficient blood cell counts is possible only through increased cell production to compensate for the radiation inflicted excess cell loss. This behaviour of haemopoietic cell renewal during chronic low level exposure can be simulated by bioengineering models of granulocytopoiesis. It is possible to define a "turbulence region" for cell loss rates, below which an prolonged adaptation to increased radiation fields can be expected to be tolerated. On the basis of these experimental results, it is recommended to develop new biological indicators to monitor haemopoietic cell renewal at the level of the stem cell pool using blood stem cells in addition to the determination of cytokine concentrations in the serum (and other novel approaches). To prepare for unexpected haemopoietic effects during prolonged space missions, research should be increased to modify the radiation sensitivity of haemopoietic stem cells (for instance by the application of certain regulatory molecules). In addition, a "blood stem cell bank" might be established for the autologous storage of stem cells and for use in space activities keeping them in a radiation protected container. PMID:11539991

  15. Quantitative analysis of clenbuterol in meat products using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guy, P A; Savoy, M C; Stadler, R H

    1999-12-24

    A method is presented that allows quantitation of clenbuterol in meat and liver products at the ng/kg level by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESIMS-MS) using a stable isotopically labeled internal standard. The practical procedure involves acid extraction followed by two solid-phase clean-up steps with C18 and strong cation-exchange (SCX) resins. The typical recovery of the analyte spiked at 0.4 microg/kg in meat and liver samples was at 63+/-7%. Mass spectral acquisition was done in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) to provide a high degree of sensitivity, achieving a limit of detection and quantitation at 10 and 15 ng/kg, respectively. Two precursor ions at m/z 277 and 279, corresponding to the characteristic isotopic cluster of the two chlorine atoms of clenbuterol, were monitored by LC-ESIMS-MS to provide unambiguous identity of the analyte. Samples of meat and liver of various origins with either incurred residues or spiked with known amounts of clenbuterol were used to validate the method.

  16. Fifth Warren K. Sinclair Keynote Address: Issues in quantifying the effects of low-level radiation.

    PubMed

    Goodhead, Dudley T

    2009-11-01

    Health risks from exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation are well characterized from epidemiological studies. Uncertainty and controversy remain for extension of these risks to the low doses and low dose rates of particular relevance in the workplace, in medical diagnostics and screening, and from background radiations. In order to make such extrapolations, a number of concepts have been developed for radiation protection, partly on the basis of assumed processes in the mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis. Included amongst these are the assumptions of a linear no-threshold dose response and simple scaling factors for dose rate and radiation quality. With a progressive reduction in recommended dose limits over the past half century, these approaches have had considerable success in protecting humans. But do they go far enough or, conversely, are they overprotective? Four selected underlying aspects are considered. It is concluded that (1) even the lowest dose of radiation has the capability to cause complex DNA damage that can lead to a variety of permanent cellular changes; (2) the unique clustered characteristics of radiation damage, even at very low doses, enable it to stand out above the much larger quantity of endogenous DNA damage; (3) although a chromosome aberration may represent the rate-limiting initiating event for carcinogenesis, as is often assumed, direct evidence is still lacking; and (4) the extensive influence that dicentric aberrations have had on guiding extrapolations for radiation protection may be substantially misleading. Finally, some comments are offered on aspects that lie outside the current paradigm. PMID:19820449

  17. Cancer Mortality Among People Living in Areas With Various Levels of Natural Background Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Fornalski, Krzysztof W.; Feinendegen, Ludwig E.

    2015-01-01

    There are many places on the earth, where natural background radiation exposures are elevated significantly above about 2.5 mSv/year. The studies of health effects on populations living in such places are crucially important for understanding the impact of low doses of ionizing radiation. This article critically reviews some recent representative literature that addresses the likelihood of radiation-induced cancer and early childhood death in regions with high natural background radiation. The comparative and Bayesian analysis of the published data shows that the linear no-threshold hypothesis does not likely explain the results of these recent studies, whereas they favor the model of threshold or hormesis. Neither cancers nor early childhood deaths positively correlate with dose rates in regions with elevated natural background radiation. PMID:26674931

  18. [Nonionizing radiation and electromagnetic fields].

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, J H

    1991-01-01

    Nonionising radiation comprises all kinds of radiation and fields of the electromagnetic spectrum where biological matter is not ionised, as well as mechanical waves such as infrasound and ultrasound. The electromagnetic spectrum is subdivided into individual sections and includes: Static and low-frequency electric and magnetic fields including technical applications of energy with mains frequency, radio frequency fields, microwaves and optic radiation (infrared, visible light, ultraviolet radiation including laser). The following categories of persons can be affected by emissions by non-ionising radiation: Persons in the environment and in the household, workers, patients undergoing medical diagnosis or treatment. If the radiation is sufficiently intense, or if the fields are of appropriate strength, a multitude of effects can occur (depending on the type of radiation), such as heat and stimulating or irritating action, inflammations of the skin or eyes, changes in the blood picture, burns or in some cases cancer as a late sequel. The ability of radiation to penetrate into the human body, as well as the types of interaction with biological tissue, with organs and organisms, differs significantly for the various kinds of nonionising radiation. The following aspects of nonionising radiation are discussed: protection of humans against excessive sunlight rays when sunbathing and when exposed to UV radiation (e.g. in solaria); health risks of radio and microwaves (safety of microwave cookers and mobile radio units); effects on human health by electric and magnetic fields in everyday life.

  19. [Nonionizing radiation and electromagnetic fields].

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, J H

    1991-01-01

    Nonionising radiation comprises all kinds of radiation and fields of the electromagnetic spectrum where biological matter is not ionised, as well as mechanical waves such as infrasound and ultrasound. The electromagnetic spectrum is subdivided into individual sections and includes: Static and low-frequency electric and magnetic fields including technical applications of energy with mains frequency, radio frequency fields, microwaves and optic radiation (infrared, visible light, ultraviolet radiation including laser). The following categories of persons can be affected by emissions by non-ionising radiation: Persons in the environment and in the household, workers, patients undergoing medical diagnosis or treatment. If the radiation is sufficiently intense, or if the fields are of appropriate strength, a multitude of effects can occur (depending on the type of radiation), such as heat and stimulating or irritating action, inflammations of the skin or eyes, changes in the blood picture, burns or in some cases cancer as a late sequel. The ability of radiation to penetrate into the human body, as well as the types of interaction with biological tissue, with organs and organisms, differs significantly for the various kinds of nonionising radiation. The following aspects of nonionising radiation are discussed: protection of humans against excessive sunlight rays when sunbathing and when exposed to UV radiation (e.g. in solaria); health risks of radio and microwaves (safety of microwave cookers and mobile radio units); effects on human health by electric and magnetic fields in everyday life. PMID:1837859

  20. Ionising irradiation alters the dynamics of human long interspersed nuclear elements 1 (LINE1) retrotransposon.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Nakatani, Youko; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Shimizu, Nobuaki; Wada, Seiichi; Funayama, Tomoo; Mori, Takahisa; Islam, Salequl; Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Shinagawa, Masahiko; Ohtsuki, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2012-09-01

    It is important to identify the mechanism by which ionising irradiation induces various genomic alterations in the progeny of surviving cells. Ionising irradiation activates mobile elements like retrotransposons, although the mechanism of its phenomena consisting of transcriptions and insertions of the products into new sites of the genome remains unclear. In this study, we analysed the effects of sparsely ionising X-rays and densely ionising carbon-ion beams on the activities of a family of active retrotransposons, long interspersed nuclear elements 1 (L1). We used the L1/reporter knock-in human glioma cell line, NP-2/L1RP-enhanced GFP (EGFP), that harbours full-length L1 tagged with EGFP retrotransposition detection cassette (L1RP-EGFP) in the chromosomal DNA. X-rays and carbon-ion beams similarly increased frequencies the transcription from L1RP-EGFP and its retrotransposition. Short-sized de novo L1RP-EGFP insertions with 5'-truncation were induced by X-rays, while full-length or long-sized insertions (>5 kb, containing ORF1 and ORF2) were found only in cell clones irradiated by the carbon-ion beams. These data suggest that X-rays and carbon-ion beams induce different length of de novo L1 insertions, respectively. Our findings thus highlight the necessity to investigate the mechanisms of mutations caused by transposable elements by ionising irradiation.

  1. Total ionisation cross sections for chlorofluoromethanes and CClx radicals by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Dhanoj; Antony, Bobby

    2014-07-01

    We report here the total ionisation cross section for chlorofluoromethanes, namely CCl3F (Freon 11), CCl2F2 (Freon 12), CClF3 (Freon 13), CHCl2F (Freon 21), CHClF2 (Freon 22), CH2ClF (Freon 31), CCl4 and CClx (x = 1-3), radicals by electron impact from ionisation threshold to 2 keV. The total inelastic cross section is obtained employing a complex optical potential formalism and solving the Schrödinger equation through partial wave analysis. Using the complex scattering potential-ionisation contribution method, the total ionisation cross section is derived from the inelastic cross section for these targets. The results obtained are then compared with the existing experimental and theoretical data, wherever available. The present result shows reasonable agreement with previous data. For the CClx radicals, the ionisation cross section is predicted for the first time. The data reported here have immense interest to atmospheric and technological plasma modelling.

  2. 10 CFR 140.84 - Criterion I-Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels offsite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) Radioactive material that may be taken into the body from its occurrence in air or water; and (3) Radioactive... Commission finds that: (1) Surface contamination of at least a total of any 100 square meters of offsite... facility and such contamination is characterized by levels of radiation in excess of one of the...

  3. 10 CFR 840.4 - Criterion I-Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels offsite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Criterion I-Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels offsite. 840.4 Section 840.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EXTRAORDINARY NUCLEAR OCCURRENCES § 840.4 Criterion I—Substantial discharge of radioactive material...

  4. 10 CFR 840.4 - Criterion I-Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels offsite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criterion I-Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels offsite. 840.4 Section 840.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EXTRAORDINARY NUCLEAR OCCURRENCES § 840.4 Criterion I—Substantial discharge of radioactive material...

  5. 10 CFR 840.4 - Criterion I-Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels offsite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Criterion I-Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels offsite. 840.4 Section 840.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EXTRAORDINARY NUCLEAR OCCURRENCES § 840.4 Criterion I—Substantial discharge of radioactive material...

  6. 10 CFR 840.4 - Criterion I-Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels offsite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Criterion I-Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels offsite. 840.4 Section 840.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EXTRAORDINARY NUCLEAR OCCURRENCES § 840.4 Criterion I—Substantial discharge of radioactive material...

  7. Low level radiation and chromosome aberrations. January, 1970-May, 1981 (citations from Pollution Abstracts). Report, for January 1970-May 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    This retrospective bibliography contains citations concerning low level radiation and the incidence of chromosome aberration. Many types of chromosome abnormalities are covered and include aneuploidy and nondisjunction. Hematopoietic pathology and the increased risk of cancer are noted. The cytological methods available to study chromosomes are mentioned. (Contains 61 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  8. [Substantiation of a complex of radiation-hygienic approaches to the management of very low-level waste].

    PubMed

    Korenkov, I P; Lashchenova, T N; Shandala, N K

    2015-01-01

    In the article there are presented materials on radiation-hygienic approaches to the treatment of very low level radioactive waste (VLLW) and industrial waste containing radionuclides. There is done detailed information on radiation-hygienic principles and criteria for the assurance ofradiation safety in the collection, transportation, storage and processing of VLLW as a category of radioactive waste.. Particular attention is paid to the problem of designing VLLW landfill site choice, system of radiation monitoring in operation and decommissioning of the landfill. There are presented data about the criteria for the release of VLLW buried at the site, from regulatory control. Also there are considered in detail the radiation-hygienic requirements for radiation safety of industrial waste containing radionuclides for which there is assumed unlimited and limited use of solid materials in economic activity, based on the requirements ofthe revised Basic Sanitary Rules for Radiation Safety - 99/2010. There are considered basic requirements for the organization of industrial waste landfill. As an example, there-are presented the hygiene requirements for industrial waste management and results of waste categorization in Northern Federal Enterprise for Radioactive Waste Management. PMID:26031036

  9. Surgeons' Exposure to Radiation in Single- and Multi-Level Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion; A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Funao, Haruki; Ishii, Ken; Momoshima, Suketaka; Iwanami, Akio; Hosogane, Naobumi; Watanabe, Kota; Nakamura, Masaya; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Morio

    2014-01-01

    Although minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) has widely been developed in patients with lumbar diseases, surgeons risk exposure to fluoroscopic radiation. However, to date, there is no studies quantifying the effective dose during MIS-TLIF procedure, and the radiation dose distribution is still unclear. In this study, the surgeons' radiation doses at 5 places on the bodies were measured and the effective doses were assessed during 31 consecutive 1- to 3-level MIS-TLIF surgeries. The operating surgeon, assisting surgeon, and radiological technologist wore thermoluminescent dosimeter on the unshielded thyroid, chest, genitals, right middle finger, and on the chest beneath a lead apron. The doses at the lens and the effective doses were also calculated. Mean fluoroscopy times were 38.7, 53.1, and 58.5 seconds for 1, 2, or 3 fusion levels, respectively. The operating surgeon's mean exposures at the lens, thyroid, chest, genitals, finger, and the chest beneath the shield, respectively, were 0.07, 0.07, 0.09, 0.14, 0.32, and 0.05 mSv in 1-level MIS-TLIF; 0.07, 0.08, 0.09, 0.18, 0.34, and 0.05 mSv in 2-level; 0.08, 0.09, 0.14, 0.15, 0.36, and 0.06 mSv in 3-level; and 0.07, 0.08, 0.10, 0.15, 0.33, and 0.05 mSv in all cases. Mean dose at the operating surgeon's right finger was significantly higher than other measurements parts (P<0.001). The operating surgeon's effective doses (0.06, 0.06, and 0.07 mSv for 1, 2, and 3 fusion levels) were low, and didn't differ significantly from those of the assisting surgeon or radiological technologist. Revision MIS-TLIF was not associated with higher surgeons' radiation doses compared to primary MIS-TLIF. There were significantly higher surgeons' radiation doses in over-weight than in normal-weight patients. The surgeons' radiation exposure during MIS-TLIF was within the safe level by the International Commission on Radiological Protection's guidelines. The accumulated radiation exposure, especially to

  10. Identifying and quantifying radiation damage at the atomic level

    PubMed Central

    Gerstel, Markus; Deane, Charlotte M.; Garman, Elspeth F.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation damage impedes macromolecular diffraction experiments. Alongside the well known effects of global radiation damage, site-specific radiation damage affects data quality and the veracity of biological conclusions on protein mechanism and function. Site-specific radiation damage follows a relatively predetermined pattern, in that different structural motifs are affected at different dose regimes: in metal-free proteins, disulfide bonds tend to break first followed by the decarboxylation of aspartic and glutamic acids. Even within these damage motifs the decay does not progress uniformly at equal rates. Within the same protein, radiation-induced electron density decay of a particular chemical group is faster than for the same group elsewhere in the protein: an effect known as preferential specific damage. Here, B Damage, a new atomic metric, is defined and validated to recognize protein regions susceptible to specific damage and to quantify the damage at these sites. By applying B Damage to a large set of known protein structures in a statistical survey, correlations between the rates of damage and various physicochemical parameters were identified. Results indicate that specific radiation damage is independent of secondary protein structure. Different disulfide bond groups (spiral, hook, and staple) show dissimilar radiation damage susceptibility. There is a consistent positive correlation between specific damage and solvent accessibility. PMID:25723922

  11. Photooxidation and antioxidant responses in the earthworm Amynthas gracilis exposed to environmental levels of ultraviolet B radiation.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Shu-Chun; Chen, Jiun-Hong

    2013-03-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation leads to photooxidation in various organisms. Our previous study demonstrated that ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation is lethal for particular species of earthworms, but the mechanisms responsible for the lethality are unclear. In our current study, we investigated that ultraviolet light causes photooxidative damage and reduces antioxidant responses in the earthworm Amynthas gracilis. Intact earthworms and skin/muscle tissue extracts were exposed to UV-B radiation for in vivo and in vitro studies. Both in vitro and in vivo results showed that the products of photooxidative damage, MDA and H(2)O(2), increased after UV-B exposure. Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase were inhibited immediately after exposure to high doses (3000J/m(2)) of UV-B radiation in vivo. Catalase activity was increased following a low UV-B dose (500J/m(2)) in vivo, but decreased in response to all dosage levels in vitro. These data indicate that a relationship exists between UV-B induced damage and photooxidation and also that catalase and GPx act as important antioxidants to prevent photooxidation. According to these data, A. gracilis exhibits high sensitivity to environmental levels of UV-B. Therefore, A. gracilis represents a sensitive and cost-effective model organism for investigations of UV-radiation damage and environmental UV stress.

  12. Health effects in women exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-06-01

    There are three delayed health effects of radiation which appear at the present time to have importance to women in radiation protection. These are: (1) the probability of cancer-induction at low doses and low-dose rates; (2) the consideration of those cancers in women, notably the breast and the thyroid, attributable to radiation exposure; and (3) the probability of induction of developmental abnormalities in the newborn following low-dose exposure in utero. The bases for the concern over these effects are discussed. (ACR)

  13. Report on policy and activities concerning public awareness of health effects of low-level radiation

    SciTech Connect

    1986-11-01

    In the summer of 1986, the Executive Committee authorized a study limited to determining policy and practices relevant to dissemination of information to the public on radiation health effects in three federal agencies. This report summarizes findings on two broad questions related to the communication issue: What, if any, are the policies under which federal agencies operate in disseminating information on health effects of radiation and what are the current programs and activities designed to provide the public information on health effects of radiation.

  14. Impact ionisation mass spectrometry of polypyrrole-coated pyrrhotite microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, Jon K.; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Armes, Steven P.; Fielding, Lee A.; Postberg, Frank; Bugiel, Sebastian; Drake, Keith; Srama, Ralf; Kearsley, Anton T.; Trieloff, Mario

    2014-07-01

    Cation and anion impact ionization mass spectra of polypyrrole-coated pyrrhotite cosmic dust analogue particles are analysed over a range of cosmically relevant impact speeds. Spectra with mass resolutions of 150-300 were generated by hypervelocity impacts of charged particles, accelerated to up to 37 km s-1 in a Van de Graaff electrostatic accelerator, onto a silver target plate in the Large Area Mass Analyzer (LAMA) spectrometer. Ions clearly indicative of the polypyrrole overlayer are identified at masses of 93, 105, 117, 128 and 141 u. Organic species, predominantly derived from the thin (20 nm) polypyrrole layer on the surface of the particles, dominate the anion spectra even at high (>20 km s-1) impact velocities and contribute significantly to the cation spectra at velocities lower than this. Atomic species from the pyrrhotite core (Fe and S) are visible in all spectra at impact velocities above 6 km s-1 for 56Fe+, 9 km s-1 for 32S+ and 16 km s-1 for 32S- ions. Species from the pyrrhotite core are also frequently visible in cation spectra at impact speeds at which surface ionisation is believed to dominate (<10 km s-1), although the large number of organic peaks complicates the identification of characteristic molecular species. A thin oxidised surface layer on the pyrrhotite particles is indicated by weak spectral features assigned to iron oxides and iron oxy-hydroxides, although the definitive identification of sulfates and hydrated sulfates from the oxidation process was not possible. Silver was confirmed as an excellent choice for the target plate of an impact ionization mass spectrometer, as it provided a unique isotope signature for many target-projectile cluster peaks at masses above 107-109 u. The affinity of Ag towards a dominant organic fragment ion (CN-) derived from fragmentation of the polypyrrole component led to molecular cluster formation. This resulted in an enhanced sensitivity to a particular particle component, which may be of great use

  15. Deep level defects in proton radiated GaAs grown on metamorphic SiGe/Si substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, M.; Andre, C. L.; Walters, R. J.; Messenger, S. R.; Warner, J. H.; Lorentzen, J. R.; Pitera, A. J.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Ringel, S. A.

    2006-08-01

    The effect of 2 MeV proton radiation on the introduction of deep levels in GaAs grown on compositionally graded SiGe/Si substrates was investigated using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). Systematic comparisons were made with identical layers grown on both GaAs and Ge substrates to directly assess the influence of threading dislocations on radiation-related deep levels for both n-type and p-type GaAs. DLTS revealed that for p{sup +}n structures, proton irradiation generates electron traps at E{sub c}-0.14 eV, E{sub c}-0.25 eV, E{sub c}-0.54 eV, and E{sub c}-0.72 eV in the n-GaAs base, and, for n{sup +}p structures, radiation-induced hole traps appear at E{sub v}+0.18 eV, E{sub v}+0.23 eV, E{sub v}+0.27 eV, and E{sub v}+0.77 eV in the p-type GaAs base, irrespective of substrate choice for both polarities. The primary influence of substituting SiGe/Si substrates for conventional GaAs and Ge substrates is on the introduction rates of the individual traps as a function of proton radiation fluence. Substantially reduced concentrations are found for each radiation-induced hole trap observed in p-type GaAs, as well as for the E{sub c}-0.54 eV trap in n-GaAs for samples on SiGe/Si, as a function of proton fluence. Calculated trap introduction rates reveal reductions by as much as {approx}40% for certain hole traps in p-GaAs grown on SiGe/Si. This increased radiation tolerance for GaAs grown on SiGe/Si is attributed to interactions between the low density ({approx}10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}) of residual dislocations within the metamorphic GaAs/SiGe/Si structure and the radiation-induced point defects. Nevertheless, the fact that the impact of dislocations on radiation tolerance is far more dramatic for n{sup +}p GaAs structures compared to p{sup +}n structures, may have implications on future III-V/Si space solar cell design optimization, since end-of-life versus beginning-of-life differences are critical factors for power profiling in high radiation environments.

  16. Statistical properties of radiation power levels from a high-gain free-electron laser at and beyond saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Fawley, William M.; Esarey, Eric

    2002-09-24

    We investigate the statistical properties (e.g., shot-to-shot power fluctuations) of the radiation from a high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) operating in the nonlinear regime. We consider the case of an FEL amplifier reaching saturation whose shot-to-shot fluctuations in input radiation power follow a gamma distribution. We analyze the corresponding output power fluctuations at and beyond first saturation, including beam energy spread effects, and find that there are well-characterized values of undulator length for which the fluctuation level reaches a minimum.

  17. Single-stage accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon-interference identification and positive-ionisation characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcken, K. M.; Freeman, S. P. H. T.; Xu, S.; Dougans, A.

    2013-01-01

    A single-stage accelerator mass spectrometer (SSAMS) is a good alternative to conventional spectrometers based on tandem electrostatic acceleration for radiocarbon measurement and permits experimentation with both negative and positive carbon ions. However, such 14C AMS of either polarity ions is limited by an interference. In the case of anion acceleration we have newly determined this to be summed 13C and 16O by improvising an additional Wien filter on our SSAMS deck. Also, 14C AMS might be improved by removing its dependency on negative-ionisation in a sputter ion source. This requires negative-ionisation of sample atoms elsewhere to suppress the 14N interference, which we accomplish by transmitting initially positive ions through a thin membrane. The ionisation dependence on ion-energy is found to be consistent with previous experimentation with vapours and thicker foils.

  18. Radiation tolerant fiber Bragg gratings for high temperature monitoring at MGy dose levels.

    PubMed

    Morana, A; Girard, S; Marin, E; Marcandella, C; Paillet, P; Périsse, J; Macé, J-R; Boukenter, A; Cannas, M; Ouerdane, Y

    2014-09-15

    We report a method for fabricating fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) resistant to very severe environments mixing high radiation doses (up to 3 MGy) and high temperatures (up to 230°C). Such FBGs have been written in two types of radiation resistant optical fibers (pure-silica and fluorine-doped cores) by exposures to a 800 nm femtosecond IR laser at power exceeding 500 mW and then subjected to a thermal annealing treatment of 15 min at 750°C. Under radiation, our study reveals that the radiation induced Bragg wavelength shift (BWS) at a 3 MGy dose is strongly reduced compared to responses of FBGs written with nonoptimized conditions. The BWS remains lower than 10 pm for temperatures of irradiation ranging from 25°C to 230°C without noticeable decrease of the FBG peak amplitude. For an applicative point of view, this radiation induced BWS corresponds to an additional error on the temperature measurements lower than 1.5°C, opening the way to the development of radiation-tolerant multi-point temperature sensors for nuclear industry. PMID:26466259

  19. Molybdic acid ionisation under hydrothermal conditions to 300 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minubayeva, Z.; Seward, T. M.

    2010-08-01

    This UV spectrophotometric study was aimed at providing precise, experimentally derived thermodynamic data for the ionisation of molybdic acid (H 2MoO 4) from 30 to 300 °C and at equilibrium saturated vapour pressures. The determination of the equilibrium constants and associated thermodynamic parameters were facilitated by spectrophotometric measurements using a specially designed high temperature optical Ti-Pd flow-through cell with silica glass windows. The following van't Hoff isochore equations describe the temperature dependence of the first and second ionisation constants of molybdic acid up to 300 °C:

  20. Dynamics of ionisation and entanglement in the 'atom + quantum electromagnetic field' system

    SciTech Connect

    Sharapova, P R; Tikhonova, O V

    2012-03-31

    The dynamics of a model Rydberg atom in a strong nonclassical electromagnetic field is investigated. The field-induced transitions to the continuum involving different numbers of photons (with intermediate states in the discrete spectrum) are taken into account and the specific features of ionisation in 'squeezed' field states are considered in comparison with the case of classical light. A significant decrease in the ionisation rate is found, which is caused by the interference stabilisation of the atomic system. The entanglement of the atomic and field subsystems, the temporal dynamics of the correlations found, and the possibility of measuring them are analysed.

  1. Elevation of serum carcinoembryonic antigen level in a patient with hypothyroidism after radiation therapy for cervical esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Gen; Abe, Eisuke; Sasamoto, Ryuta; Sasai, Keisuke

    2010-02-01

    We report the case of a 51-year-old woman who showed elevation of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level 14 months after chemoradiation therapy for her cervical esophageal cancer. Close examination demonstrated that the patient was suffering from hypothyroidism probably due to the chemoradiation therapy. The serum CEA level decreased after starting supplementary treatment with oral levothyroxine. The exact mechanism underlying the elevated level of CEA observed in a patient with hypothyroidism is unclear. However, we should be aware of the possibility of transient elevation of CEA affected by thyroid function in patients after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer.

  2. Reference levels in the context of Fukushima - lessons learned and a challenge for the radiation protection system.

    PubMed

    Sakai, K

    2012-01-01

    A number of dose criteria were set after the accident in Fukushima, including a criterion regarding the use of school playgrounds in Fukushima. Considering the band of 1-20 mSv/year recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for public exposure under existing exposure situations, Japanese authorities set 20 mSv/year as a 'start line' for reducing the dose to school children. However, this led to considerable confusion among the general public and some experts. They thought that the dose limit was increased to 20 mSv/year (20 times as high as before), and that school children could be exposed to 20 mSv in 1 year. This is just an example of confusion caused by inadequate comprehension of radiation effects, misunderstanding of radiation protection concepts, or both. Another issue was raised regarding the higher radiosensitivity of children compared with adults. In the 2007 ICRP Recommendations, a higher risk coefficient is given to the whole population than the adult population, because the whole population includes children; a subpopulation with higher radiosensitivity and a longer life span. The point of argument was whether a lower reference level should be set for children alone. Radiation protection experts should continue to collect scientific information to improve the radiation protection system. In addition, it is the role of these experts to explain the framework of radiation protection to the general public in plain language. PMID:23089027

  3. Reference levels in the context of Fukushima - lessons learned and a challenge for the radiation protection system.

    PubMed

    Sakai, K

    2012-01-01

    A number of dose criteria were set after the accident in Fukushima, including a criterion regarding the use of school playgrounds in Fukushima. Considering the band of 1-20 mSv/year recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for public exposure under existing exposure situations, Japanese authorities set 20 mSv/year as a 'start line' for reducing the dose to school children. However, this led to considerable confusion among the general public and some experts. They thought that the dose limit was increased to 20 mSv/year (20 times as high as before), and that school children could be exposed to 20 mSv in 1 year. This is just an example of confusion caused by inadequate comprehension of radiation effects, misunderstanding of radiation protection concepts, or both. Another issue was raised regarding the higher radiosensitivity of children compared with adults. In the 2007 ICRP Recommendations, a higher risk coefficient is given to the whole population than the adult population, because the whole population includes children; a subpopulation with higher radiosensitivity and a longer life span. The point of argument was whether a lower reference level should be set for children alone. Radiation protection experts should continue to collect scientific information to improve the radiation protection system. In addition, it is the role of these experts to explain the framework of radiation protection to the general public in plain language.

  4. Low-level X-radiation effects on functional vascular changes in Syrian hamster cheek pouch epithelium during hydrocarbon carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lurie, A.G.; Coghill, J.E.; Rippey, R.M.

    1985-07-01

    Effects of repeated low-level X radiation on functional microvascular changes in hamster cheek pouch epithelium during and following carcinogenesis by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) were studied. Hamsters were treated with either radiation, DMBA, radiation + DMBA, or no treatment. Animals were sacrificed at 3-week intervals from 0 to 39 weeks after treatments began. Pouch vascular volume and permeability changes were studied by fractional distributions of radiotracers and were analyzed by a variety of statistical methods which explored the vascular parameters, treatment types, elapsed time, presence of the carcinogen, and histopathologic changes. All treatments resulted in significant changes in vascular volume with time, while only DMBA treatments alone resulted in significant changes in vascular permeability with time. As in prior studies, there were significant vascular volume differences between DMBA and DMBA + radiation groups of tumor-bearing cheek pouches. Radiation significantly affected DMBA-associated vascular volume and permeability changes during carcinogenesis. Several possible explanations for the relationship of these changes to the enhancement of DMBA carcinogenesis are discussed.

  5. Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Adrie J. J.

    2011-05-01

    The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

  6. Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bos, Adrie J. J.

    2011-05-05

    The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

  7. BOREAS RSS-14 Level -3 Gridded Radiometer and Satellite Surface Radiation Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Hodges, Gary; Smith, Eric A.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-14 team collected and processed GOES-7 and -8 images of the BOREAS region as part of its effort to characterize the incoming, reflected, and emitted radiation at regional scales. This data set contains surface radiation parameters, such as net radiation and net solar radiation, that have been interpolated from GOES-7 images and AMS data onto the standard BOREAS mapping grid at a resolution of 5 km N-S and E-W. While some parameters are taken directly from the AMS data set, others have been corrected according to calibrations carried out during IFC-2 in 1994. The corrected values as well as the uncorrected values are included. For example, two values of net radiation are provided: an uncorrected value (Rn), and a value that has been corrected according to the calibrations (Rn-COR). The data are provided in binary image format data files. Some of the data files on the BOREAS CD-ROMs have been compressed using the Gzip program. See section 8.2 for details. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  8. On the bifurcation of the circular polarisation of the fifth and seventh pump-field harmonics generated in the plasma produced by the ionisation of a gas of excited hydrogen-like atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, Viktor P; Silin, Pavel V

    2006-05-31

    Within the framework of the Bethe ionisation model we considered theoretically the dependences of the degree of circular polarisation of the fifth and seventh pump-field harmonics, which are generated due to bremsstrahlung, on the electric intensity of the pump field, the degree of its circular polarisation, and the principal quantum number of the excited states of hydrogen-like atoms of a gas ionised by the pump field. A bifurcation of the circular polarisation of these harmonics was discovered, which confirms our previous hypothesis that this effect is common for harmonics generated due to the bremsstrahlung in the pump field when the plasma electrons oscillate in this field. We determined how the relationships under consideration are scaled with V{sub E}n/V{sub Z}, the product of electron oscillation velocity and the principal quantum number of the excited electron divided by the Coulomb velocity. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  9. Signals at ground level of relativistic solar particles associated with a radiation storm on 2014 April 18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augusto, Carlos; Navia, Carlos; de Oliveira, Marcel N.; Fauth, Anderson; Nepomuceno, André

    2016-02-01

    Active region NOAA AR2036, located at S20W34 at the Sun disk, produced a moderately strong (GOES class M7.3) flare on 2014 April 18. The flare itself was long in duration, and a halo coronal mass ejection (CME) was emitted. In addition, a radiation storm, that is, solar energetic particles (SEP), began to reach the Earth at 13:30 UT in the aftermath of the solar blast, meeting the condition of an S1 (minor) radiation storm level. In temporal coincidence with the onset of the S1 radiation storm, the Tupi telescopes located within the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) detected a fast rise in the muon counting rate, caused by relativistic protons from this solar blast, with a confidence of up to 3.5% at peak. At the time of the solar blast, of all ground-based detectors, the Tupi telescopes had the best geoeffective location. Indeed, in association with the radiation storm, a gradual increase in the particle intensity was found in some neutron monitors (NMs), all of them in the west region relative to the Sun-Earth line, yet within the geoeffective region. However, their confidence levels are smaller: up to 3%. The fast rising observed at Tupi suggests possible detection of solar particles emitted during the impulsive phase, following by a gradual phase observed also at NMs. Details of these observations, including the expected energy spectrum, are reported.

  10. System level latchup mitigation for single event and transient radiation effects on electronics

    DOEpatents

    Kimbrough, Joseph Robert; Colella, Nicholas John

    1997-01-01

    A "blink" technique, analogous to a person blinking at a flash of bright light, is provided for mitigating the effects of single event current latchup and prompt pulse destructive radiation on a micro-electronic circuit. The system includes event detection circuitry, power dump logic circuitry, and energy limiting measures with autonomous recovery. The event detection circuitry includes ionizing radiation pulse detection means for detecting a pulse of ionizing radiation and for providing at an output terminal thereof a detection signal indicative of the detection of a pulse of ionizing radiation. The current sensing circuitry is coupled to the power bus for determining an occurrence of excess current through the power bus caused by ionizing radiation or by ion-induced destructive latchup of a semiconductor device. The power dump circuitry includes power dump logic circuitry having a first input terminal connected to the output terminal of the ionizing radiation pulse detection circuitry and having a second input terminal connected to the output terminal of the current sensing circuitry. The power dump logic circuitry provides an output signal to the input terminal of the circuitry for opening the power bus and the circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential to remove power from the power bus. The energy limiting circuitry with autonomous recovery includes circuitry for opening the power bus and circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential. The circuitry for opening the power bus and circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential includes a series FET and a shunt FET. The invention provides for self-contained sensing for latchup, first removal of power to protect latched components, and autonomous recovery to enable transparent operation of other system elements.

  11. System level latchup mitigation for single event and transient radiation effects on electronics

    DOEpatents

    Kimbrough, J.R.; Colella, N.J.

    1997-09-30

    A ``blink`` technique, analogous to a person blinking at a flash of bright light, is provided for mitigating the effects of single event current latchup and prompt pulse destructive radiation on a micro-electronic circuit. The system includes event detection circuitry, power dump logic circuitry, and energy limiting measures with autonomous recovery. The event detection circuitry includes ionizing radiation pulse detection means for detecting a pulse of ionizing radiation and for providing at an output terminal thereof a detection signal indicative of the detection of a pulse of ionizing radiation. The current sensing circuitry is coupled to the power bus for determining an occurrence of excess current through the power bus caused by ionizing radiation or by ion-induced destructive latchup of a semiconductor device. The power dump circuitry includes power dump logic circuitry having a first input terminal connected to the output terminal of the ionizing radiation pulse detection circuitry and having a second input terminal connected to the output terminal of the current sensing circuitry. The power dump logic circuitry provides an output signal to the input terminal of the circuitry for opening the power bus and the circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential to remove power from the power bus. The energy limiting circuitry with autonomous recovery includes circuitry for opening the power bus and circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential. The circuitry for opening the power bus and circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential includes a series FET and a shunt FET. The invention provides for self-contained sensing for latchup, first removal of power to protect latched components, and autonomous recovery to enable transparent operation of other system elements. 18 figs.

  12. System level latchup mitigation for single event and transient radiation effects on electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Kimbrough, J.R.; Colella, N.J.

    1994-12-31

    A `blink` technique, analogous to a person blinking at a flash of bright light, is provided for mitigating the effects of single event current latchup and prompt pulse destructive radiation on a micro-electronic circuit. The system includes event detection means, power dump logic means, and energy limiting measures with autonomous recovery. The event detection means includes ionizing radiation pulse detection means for detecting a pulse of ionizing radiation and for providing at an output terminal thereof a detection signal indicative of the detection of a pulse of ionizing radiation or by ion-induced destructive latchup of a semiconductor device. The current sensing means is coupled to the power bus for determining an occurrence of excess current through the power bus caused by ionizing radiation. The power dump means includes power dump logic means having a first input terminal connected to the output terminal of the ionizing radiation pulse detection means and having a second input terminal connected to the output terminal of the current sensing means. The power dump logic means provides an output signal to the input terminal of the means for opening the power bus and the means for shorting the power bus to a ground potential to remove power from the power bus. The energy limiting mean with autonomous recovery includes means for opening the power bus and means for shorting the power bus to a ground potential. The means for opening the power bus and means for shorting the power bus to a ground potential includes a series FET and a shunt FET. The invention provides for self-contained sensing for latchup, first removal of power to protect latched components, and autonomous recovery to enable transparent operation of other system elements.

  13. Formulas for estimating stray-radiation levels in well-baffled optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greynolds, A. W.

    1981-03-01

    The determination of the stray radiation in a well-baffled optical system reduces to the calculation of the scattered energy propagated along a few distinct paths. Approximate formulas are derived that estimate the amount of unwanted energy reaching a focal plane detector from these paths. In order to simplify the calculations, single edge scatter, double internal scatter, and diffraction from any vane structure on the main baffle tube of the system is treated as a macroscopic process with a single effective BRDF. The predictions made by the formulas for a typical system compare favorably with more extensive calculations made by the APART stray radiation analysis computer program.

  14. A screening assessment of external radiation levels on the shore of Lake Issyk-Kyol in the Kyrghyz Republic.

    PubMed

    Hamby, D M; Tynybekov, A K

    1999-10-01

    The Kyrghyz Republic, located in the southeastern region of the former Soviet Union, holds a long history of atomic weapons development activities. Historical surveys, conducted primarily for geological exploration, have indicated that areas of shoreline on Lake Issyk-Kyol in the Kyrghyz Republic have relative radiation levels in excess of background by as much as a factor of ten. Nuclear testing in China and uranium mining operations in the mountains surrounding the lake may have resulted in the contamination of a number of areas on the lake's southern shore. The valley region maintains a population of more than one-half-million persons and is heavily dependent on the lake to draw tourists to the area and its utilization by some as a food and recreation source. In this note, we show the results of a screening assessment of relative radiation levels along the shoreline of Lake Issyk-Kyol to pin-point areas of relatively high exposure rates.

  15. A screening assessment of external radiation levels on the shore of Lake Issyk-Kyol in the Kyrghyz Republic

    SciTech Connect

    Hamby, D.M.; Tynybekov, A.K.

    1999-10-01

    The Kyrghyz Republic, located in the southeastern region of the former Soviet Union, holds a long history of atomic weapons development activities. Historical surveys, conducted primarily for geological exploration, have indicated that areas of shoreline on Lake Issyk-Kyol in the Kyrghyz Republic have relative radiation levels in excess of background by as much as a factor of ten. Nuclear testing in China and uranium mining operations in the mountains surrounding the lake may have resulted in the contamination of a number of areas on the lake's southern shore. The valley region maintains a population of more than one-half-million persons and is heavily dependent on the lake to draw tourists to the area and its utilization by some as a food and recreation source. In this paper, the authors show the results of a screening assessment of relative radiation levels along the shoreline of Lake Issyk-Kyol to pin-point areas of relatively high exposure rates.

  16. Natural gamma radiation map (MARNA) and indoor radon levels in Spain.

    PubMed

    Quindós Poncela, L S; Fernández, P L; Gómez Arozamena, J; Sainz, C; Fernández, J A; Suarez Mahou, E; Martin Matarranz, J L; Cascón, M C

    2004-02-01

    During the last decade, the Department of Applied and Medical Physics has been involved in the development of a radiation protection programme. In the framework of this programme, measurements of indoor radon, principally, have been carried out nationwide. Geometric mean radon concentrations of 45 Bq m(-3) in the whole country and 130 Bq m(-3) in the high natural radiation area have been estimated. On the other hand, the so-called MARNA Project is developed into the framework of an agreement subscribed between the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council (CSN) and the National Uranium (ENUSA), the first phase of which has been the elaboration of the Natural Gamma Radiation Map of Spain on the scale of 1:1,000,000 using radiometric data generated in the 30 years of the lifetime of the ancient National Uranium Exploration and Investigation Plan mainly through airborne, carborne, and by foot surveys, within the MARNA Project itself. The lowest averaged dose rate from external gamma radiation (19.3 nGyh(-1)) was found in carbonate bedrock and the highest (87.7 nGyh(-1)) was found in granite and clay bedrock. This paper summarizes the main results obtained from the measurements performed in both projects, with special interest in those concerning the correlation between the data reported in order to conclude about the potential benefit of the MARNA maps in the definition of affected areas in the country.

  17. 28 CFR 79.44 - Proof of working level month exposure to radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Miners § 79.44 Proof of...; (2) Certified copies of records of the owner or operator of a uranium mine in the specified states... employment in a uranium mine that a claimant establishes under § 79.43(c) as to which paragraph (d) of...

  18. 28 CFR 79.44 - Proof of working level month exposure to radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Miners § 79.44 Proof of...; (2) Certified copies of records of the owner or operator of a uranium mine in the specified states... employment in a uranium mine that a claimant establishes under § 79.43(c) as to which paragraph (d) of...

  19. 28 CFR 79.44 - Proof of working level month exposure to radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Miners § 79.44 Proof of...; (2) Certified copies of records of the owner or operator of a uranium mine in the specified states... employment in a uranium mine that a claimant establishes under § 79.43(c) as to which paragraph (d) of...

  20. 28 CFR 79.44 - Proof of working level month exposure to radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Miners § 79.44 Proof of...; (2) Certified copies of records of the owner or operator of a uranium mine in the specified states... employment in a uranium mine that a claimant establishes under § 79.43(c) as to which paragraph (d) of...

  1. Multi-level effects of low dose rate ionizing radiation on southern toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stark, Karolina; Scott, David E.; Tsyusko, Olga; Coughlin, Daniel P.; Hinton, Thomas G.; Amendola, Roberto

    2015-04-30

    Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris) during its pre-terrestrial stages of development –embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later), to four low dose rates of ¹³⁷Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d⁻¹, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did notmore » affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay) in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21mGy d⁻¹ and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae.« less

  2. Multi-Level Effects of Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation on Southern Toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris.

    PubMed

    Stark, Karolina; Scott, David E; Tsyusko, Olga; Coughlin, Daniel P; Hinton, Thomas G

    2015-01-01

    Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris) during its pre-terrestrial stages of development -embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later), to four low dose rates of 137Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d-1, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did not affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay) in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21 mGy d-1 and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae.

  3. Multi-Level Effects of Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation on Southern Toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Karolina; Scott, David E.; Tsyusko, Olga; Coughlin, Daniel P.; Hinton, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris) during its pre-terrestrial stages of development –embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later), to four low dose rates of 137Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d-1, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did not affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay) in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21 mGy d-1 and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae. PMID:25927361

  4. [The role of transcription factors in the response of mouse lymphocytes to low-level electromagnetic and laser radiations].

    PubMed

    Khrenov, M O; Cherenkov, D A; Glushkova, O V; Novoselova, T V; Lunin, S M; Parfeniuk, S B; Lysenko, E A; Novoselova, E G; Fesenko, E E

    2007-01-01

    The effects of low-intensity laser radiation (LILR, 632.8 nm, 0.2 mW/cm2) and low-intensity electromagnetic waves (LIEW, 8.15 - 18 GHz, 1 MW/cm2) on the production of transcription factors in lymphocytes from NMRI male mice were examined. The total level of NF-KB and its phosphorylated metabolite Phospho-NF-kappaB, as well as the regulatory protein IkappaB-alpha were determined in spleen lymphocytes subjected to laser or microwave radiations. The proteins were determined by immunoblotting. Laser light induced a lowering in the level of NF-kappaB and IkappaB-alpha. By contrast, irradiation with electromagnetic waves resulted in a significant increase in the amount of NF-kappaB and IkappaB-alpha. The phosphorylated form of NF-kappaB did not noticeably change under either of the two kinds of radiation. The results showed that electromagnetic waves activate the production of both NF-kappaB and the regulatory protein IkappaB-alpha and these data confirm the stress character of the response of spleen lymphocytes to low-level microwaves of the centimeter range. PMID:17969924

  5. Radiation dose assessments to support evaluations of radiological control levels for recycling or reuse of materials and equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, R.L.; Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

    1995-07-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is providing Environmental Protection Support and Assistance to the USDOE, Office of Environmental Guidance. Air, Water, and Radiation Division. As part of this effort, PNL is collecting data and conducting technical evaluations to support DOE analyses of the feasibility of developing radiological control levels for recycling or reuse of metals, concrete, or equipment containing residual radioactive contamination from DOE operations. The radiological control levels will be risk-based, as developed through a radiation exposure scenario and pathway analysis. The analysis will include evaluation of relevant radionuclides, potential mechanisms of exposure, and both health and non-health-related impacts. The main objective of this report is to develop a methodology for establishing radiological control levels for recycle or reuse. This report provides the results of the radiation exposure scenario and pathway analyses for 42 key radionuclides generated during DOE operations that may be contained in metals or equipment considered for either recycling or reuse. The scenarios and information developed by the IAEA. Application of Exemption Principles to the Recycle and Reuse of Materials from Nuclear Facilities, are used as the initial basis for this study. The analyses were performed for both selected worker populations at metal smelters and for the public downwind of a smelter facility. Doses to the public downwind were estimated using the US (EPA) CAP88-PC computer code with generic data on atmospheric dispersion and population density. Potential non-health-related effects of residual activity on electronics and on film were also analyzed.

  6. Identification of carbohydrates by matrix-free material-enhanced laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hashir, Muhammad Ahsan; Stecher, Guenther; Bakry, Rania; Kasemsook, Saowapak; Blassnig, Bernhard; Feuerstein, Isabel; Abel, Gudrun; Popp, Michael; Bobleter, Ortwin; Bonn, Guenther K

    2007-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) is a sensitive mass spectrometric technique which utilises acidic materials as matrices for laser energy absorption, desorption and ionisation of analytes. These matrix materials produce background signals particularly in the low-mass range and make the detection and identification of small molecules difficult and nearly impossible. To overcome this problem this paper introduces matrix-free material-enhanced laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (mf-MELDI-MS) for the screening and analysis of small molecules such as carbohydrates. For this purpose, 4,4'-azo-dianiline was immobilised on silica gel enabling the absorption of laser energy sufficient for successful desorption and ionisation of low molecular weight compounds. The particle and pore sizes, the solvent system for suspension and the sample preparation procedures have been optimised. The newly synthesised MELDI material delivered excellent spectra with regard to signal-to-noise ratio and detection sensitivity. Finally, wheat straw degradation products and Salix alba L. plant extracts were analysed proving the high performance and excellent behaviour of the introduced material.

  7. Examining Pre-Service Teachers' Use of Atomic Models in Explaining Subsequent Ionisation Energy Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeldon, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Chemistry students' explanations of ionisation energy phenomena often involve a number of non-scientific or inappropriate ideas being used to form causality arguments. Research has attributed this to many science teachers using these ideas themselves (Tan and Taber, in "J Chem Educ" 86(5):623-629, 2009). This research extends this work by…

  8. Calculations of electron-impact ionisation of {{Fe}}^{25+} and {{Fe}}^{24+}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bostock, Christopher J.; Bray, Igor; Fontes, Christopher J.

    2016-09-01

    Electron-impact ionisation cross sections for the hydrogen- and helium-like ions of iron are calculated. The convergent close-coupling and distorted-wave methods in the relativistic and nonrelativistic formulations are used. The cross sections are in very good agreement with the results of the corresponding methods, with the relativistic formulation establishing the benchmarks to few percent accuracy.

  9. Statistical fluctuations of the ionisation yield of low-energy electrons in He, Ne and Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosswendt, B.

    1984-04-01

    Using the Monte-Carlo method, the statistical fluctuations of the ionisation yield produced during the degradation of low energy electrons in the three noble gases He, Ne and Ar were studied. To do this, the probability P(T(0),j) for exact j ionisations generated upon the complete slowing down of electrons of initial energy T(0) was calculated in the energy range from 20 eV to 5 keV. The probability distributions in the number of ionisations produced were then used to determine moments M(v) and central moments m(v) up to the order v = 5 which is related to such well known quantities as the mean energy expended/ion pair formed, the Fano factor, and the generalised Fano factors introduced by Inokuti et al (1980), all of which are able to characterise a special property of the ionisation number distribution, as for instance its variance, its asymmetry, and its flatness near the center.

  10. Study of the dosimetric characteristics of cosmic radiation at civil aviation altitudes.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, A; Pellicioni, M; Rancati, T

    2002-01-01

    The dependence of the doses on solar activity for intermediate levels of the solar modulation parameter has been studied by means of simulations carried out by the Monte Carlo transport code FLUKA. The vertical cut-off rigidities investigated lie between 0.4 and 6.1 GV. The calculated results show that the linear dependence proposed in a previous work, for the effective dose rate as a function of the solar modulation parameter, can be considered as an acceptable approximation. In addition, some dosimetric characteristics of cosmic radiation and some properties of the dosemeters in use for monitoring in the cosmic ray environment have been analysed with a view to simplifying measurements. The depth-dose curves in the ICRU sphere and the response of a tissue-equivalent ionisation chamber have been determined by the FLUKA code for a number of cosmic ray spectra On the basis of the calculated results, it is concluded that a value of the depth. d, which would make the ambient dose equivalent a conservative predictor of the effective dose, cannot be specified for cosmic radiation. However, the operational quantity can be useful in order to verify the predictions of Monte Carlo calculations. It is demonstrated that a crude approximation of the ambient dose equivalent could be obtained by multiplying by 2 the absorbed dose measured by a tissue-equivalent ionisation chamber with wall thickness of 10 mm.

  11. Spectral Analyses and Radiation Exposures from Several Ground-Level Enhancement (GLE) Solar Proton Events: A Comparison of Methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwell, William; Tylka, Allan; Dietrich, William; Badavi, Francis; Rojdev, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    Several methods for analyzing the particle spectra from extremely large solar proton events, called Ground-Level Enhancements (GLEs), have been developed and utilized by the scientific community to describe the solar proton energy spectra and have been further applied to ascertain the radiation exposures to humans and radio-sensitive systems, namely electronics. In this paper 12 GLEs dating back to 1956 are discussed, and the three methods for describing the solar proton energy spectra are reviewed. The three spectral fitting methodologies are EXP [an exponential in proton rigidity (R)], WEIB [Weibull fit: an exponential in proton energy], and the Band function (BAND) [a double power law in proton rigidity]. The EXP and WEIB methods use low energy (MeV) GLE solar proton data and make extrapolations out to approx.1 GeV. On the other hand, the BAND method utilizes low- and medium-energy satellite solar proton data combined with high-energy solar proton data deduced from high-latitude neutron monitoring stations. Thus, the BAND method completely describes the entire proton energy spectrum based on actual solar proton observations out to 10 GeV. Using the differential spectra produced from each of the 12 selected GLEs for each of the three methods, radiation exposures are presented and discussed in detail. These radiation exposures are then compared with the current 30-day and annual crew exposure limits and the radiation effects to electronics.

  12. Levels of thoron and progeny in high background radiation area of southeastern coast of Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Ramola, R C; Gusain, G S; Rautela, B S; Sagar, D V; Prasad, G; Shahoo, S K; Ishikawa, T; Omori, Y; Janik, M; Sorimachi, A; Tokonami, S

    2012-11-01

    Exposure to radon, (222)Rn, is assumed to be the most significant source of natural radiation to human beings in most cases. It is thought that radon and its progeny are major factors that cause cancer. The presence of thoron, (220)Rn, was often neglected because it was considered that the quantity of thoron in the environment is less than that of radon. However, recent studies have shown that a high thoron concentration was found in some regions and the exposure to (220)Rn and its progeny can equal or several time exceed that of (220)Rn and its progeny. The results of thoron and its progeny measurements in the houses of high background radiation area (HBRA) of the southeastern coast of Odisha, India presented here. This area is one of the high background radiation areas in India with a large deposit of monazite sand which is the probable source of thoron. Both active and passive methods were employed for the measurement of thoron and its progeny in cement, brick and mud houses in the study area. Thoron concentration was measured using RAD-7 and Raduet. A CR-39 track detector was employed for the measurement of environmental thoron progeny, both in active and passive modes. Thoron and its progeny concentrations were found to be comparatively high in the area. A comparison between the results obtained with various techniques is presented in this paper.

  13. Resistance of human erythrocytes containing elevated levels of vitamin E to radiation-induced hemolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    Human erythrocytes were isolated from the blood of healthy donors and then incubated in the presence of suspensions of alpha-tocopherol for 30 min at 37 degrees C. Unabsorbed tocopherol was removed by centrifugation using several washes of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline. Washed erythrocytes were resuspended to 0.05%. Hct and exposed to hemolyzing doses of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation, and hemolysis was monitored continuously by light scattering at 700 nm in a recording spectrophotometer. The extent of hemolysis with time was sigmoid and data analysis was carried out on the time taken for 50% hemolysis to occur (t50%). The vitamin E content of erythrocytes was significantly elevated by the incubation procedure and resulted in the cells exhibiting a significantly increased resistance to hemolysis as reflected by the extended t50% values. Oral supplementation of 500 IU of vitamin E per day to eight normal human subjects for a period of 16 days also resulted in their washed erythrocytes exhibiting a significant increase in resistance to radiation-induced hemolysis. When comparing vitamin E incubated cells with control cells, both the dose-reducing factor (DRF) and the time for 50% hemolysis quotient (Qt50%) were observed to increase with increasing radiation dose.

  14. Resistance of human erythrocytes containing elevated levels of vitamin E to radiation-induced hemolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    Human erythrocytes were isolated from the blood of healthy donors and then incubated in the presence of suspensions of ..cap alpha..-tocopherol for 30 min at 37/sup 0/C. Unabsorbed tocopherol was removed by centrifugation using several washes of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline. Washed erythrocytes were resuspended to 0.05% Hct and exposed to hemolyzing doses of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation, and hemolysis was monitored continuously by light scattering at 700 nm in a recording spectrophotometer. The extent of hemolysis with time was sigmoid and data analysis was carried out on the time taken for 50% hemolysis to occur (t/sub 50%/). The vitamin E content of erythrocytes was significantly elevated by the incubation procedure and resulted in the cells exhibiting a significantly increased resistance to hemolysis as reflected by the extended t/sub 50%/ values. Oral supplementation of 500 IU of vitamin E per day to eight normal human subjects for a period of 16 days also resulted in their washed erythrocytes exhibiting a significant increase in resistance to radiation-induced hemolysis. When comparing vitamin E incubated cells with control cells, both the dose-reducing factor (DRF) and the time for 50% hemolysis quotient (Qt/sub 50%/) were observed to increase with increasing radiation dose.

  15. Progressive behavioral changes in rats after exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation in utero

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, S.; Kimler, B.F.; Mullenix, P.J. )

    1991-03-01

    The deleterious effects of ionizing radiation on the developing brain may be not only prolonged but progressive. Fetuses were exposed to 0.75 Gy of ionizing radiation on gestational day 15 through whole body exposure of the pregnant rat. Three behavioral tests (gait analysis, continuous corridor activity and photographic analysis of sequences of behavioral acts) were performed at 1 and 3 months, postnatally. Body weight and thickness of the cerebral cortex of irradiated rats were 10-15 percent below controls throughout the period of study. Behavior in all tests was more affected at 3 months than at 1 month of age. Gait of control rats, as measured by the angle of advanced of hind feet, widened about 20 percent for males and 40 percent for females from 1 to 3 months, as expected, while, in irradiated rats, the angle widened only about 10 percent. Continuous corridor activity increased less than 10 percent in controls and about 35 percent in irradiated rats over the same period. In photographic analysis of behavior, controls increased their time spent standing by about 50 percent in males and 20 percent in females from 1 to 3 months of age. Irradiated males increased time standing only about 10 percent and irradiated females decreased about 30 percent over the same period. The data obtained in these experiments support other evidence that some behavioral alterations from perinatal exposure to radiation become more marked with maturation.

  16. New laboratory atomic data for neutral, singly and doubly ionised iron group elements for astrophysics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, Juliet C.; Nave, Gillian; Liggins, Florence; Clear, Christian; Ruffoni, Matthew; Sansonetti, Craig

    2015-08-01

    We present new laboratory spectroscopic measurements to produce atomic data for astrophysically important species: neutral, singly and doubly ionised iron group elements.We use high resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometry (FTS) (resolving power up to 2x106 at 200nm) to measure atomic spectra, giving accurate line wavelengths (to a few parts in 108), atomic energy levels, hyperfine structure splitting and log gfs (accurate to a few %) (Ruffoni et al this meeting). These data are vital for astrophysical spectral analyses for: line identification, spectrum synthesis, elemental abundance determinations [eg 1], and disentangling of blends etc. It is not possible to theoretically calculate these atomic data to the accuracy needed for modern astrophysics applications.At Imperial College we have a unique visible-VUV FT spectrometer with short wavelength cut-off of 135nm. We supplement FTS data at shorter wavelengths with spectra recorded on the NIST 10.7m grating spectrograph (with phosphor image or photographic plates) and at longer wavelengths in the IR we use the NIST IR FT spectrometer.An elemental spectrum may contain thousands of spectral lines from the IR to VUV. We use these wavelengths to correct known atomic energy levels, and search for new atomic levels. The result is a classified linelist and accurate atomic energy levels.We present progress on iron group element atomic energy levels and wavelengths for V I and V II [2,3], Co III [4], Cr I, Mn I and Mn II, and Ni II.This work is supported by STFC(UK), The Leverhulme Trust, The Royal Society and NASA.References[1] Bergemann M, Pickering JC & Gehren T,“NLTE analysis of Co I/Co II lines in spectra of cool stars with new laboratory hyperfine splitting constants",MNRAS 401(2) 1334 (2010)[2] Thorne AP, Pickering JC & Semeniuk J,“The spectrum and term analysis of V II”, ApJS 207,13 (2013)[3] Thorne AP, Pickering JC & Semeniuk J,“The spectrum and term analysis of V I",ApJS 192,11 (2011)[4] Smillie DG

  17. Effects of radiation on the longitudinal trends of total serum cholesterol levels in the atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Wong, F L; Yamada, M; Sasaki, H; Kodama, K; Hosoda, Y

    1999-06-01

    The effects of radiation on the long-term trends of the total serum cholesterol levels of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors were examined using data collected in the Adult Health Study over a 28-year period (1958-1986). The growth-curve method was used to model the longitudinal age-dependent changes in cholesterol levels. For each sex, temporal trends of cholesterol levels were characterized with respect to age, body mass index, city and birth year. We then examined whether the temporal trends differed by radiation dose. We showed that the mean growth curve of cholesterol levels for the irradiated subjects were significantly higher than that for the unirradiated subjects, and that the increase was greater for women than for men. No difference in dose response was detected between Hiroshima and Nagasaki. An increased mean level of cholesterol was evident for irradiated women in general, but a notable increase was apparent in males only for the youngest birth cohort of 1935-1945. The difference in the mean cholesterol levels between the irradiated and unirradiated subjects diminished past 70 years of age. It is not known whether this is due to natural progression or is an artifact of nonrandom variation in the rate of participation in the examinations. The maximum predicted increase at 1 Gy for women occurred at age 52 years for the 1930 cohort: 2.5 mg/dl (95% CI 1.6-3.3 mg/dl) for Hiroshima and 2.3 mg/dl (95% CI 1.5-3.1 mg/dl) for Nagasaki. The corresponding increase for men occurred at age 29 years for the 1940 cohort: 1.6 mg/dl (95% CI 0.4-2.8) for Hiroshima and 1.4 mg/dl (95% CI 0.3-2.6) for Nagasaki. Controlling for cigarette smoking did not alter the dose-response relationship. Although the difference in the mean growth curves of the irradiated and unirradiated groups was statistically significant, there was a considerable overlap in the individual growth curves of the two groups. The significant sex difference and the greater magnitude of

  18. Integrated Radiation Transport and Nuclear Fuel Performance for Assembly-Level Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Steven P; Clarno, Kevin T; Philip, Bobby; Berrill, Mark A; Sampath, Rahul S; Allu, Srikanth

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Multi-Physics (AMP) Nuclear Fuel Performance code (AMPFuel) is focused on predicting the temperature and strain within a nuclear fuel assembly to evaluate the performance and safety of existing and advanced nuclear fuel bundles within existing and advanced nuclear reactors. AMPFuel was extended to include an integrated nuclear fuel assembly capability for (one-way) coupled radiation transport and nuclear fuel assembly thermo-mechanics. This capability is the initial step toward incorporating an improved predictive nuclear fuel assembly modeling capability to accurately account for source-terms, such as neutron flux distribution, coolant conditions and assembly mechanical stresses, of traditional (single-pin) nuclear fuel performance simulation. A novel scheme is introduced for transferring the power distribution from the Scale/Denovo (Denovo) radiation transport code (structured, Cartesian mesh with smeared materials within each cell) to AMPFuel (unstructured, hexagonal mesh with a single material within each cell), allowing the use of a relatively coarse spatial mesh (10 million elements) for the radiation transport and a fine spatial mesh (3.3 billion elements) for thermo-mechanics with very little loss of accuracy. With this novel capability, AMPFuel was used to model an entire 1717 pressurized water reactor fuel assembly with many of the features resolved in three dimensions (for thermo-mechanics and/or neutronics). A full assembly calculation was executed on Jaguar using 40,000 cores in under 10 hours to model over 160 billion degrees of freedom for 10 loading steps. The single radiation transport calculation required about 50% of the time required to solve the thermo-mechanics with a single loading step, which demonstrates that it is feasible to incorporate, in a single code, a high-fidelity radiation transport capability with a high-fidelity nuclear fuel thermo-mechanics capability and anticipate acceptable computational requirements. The

  19. Integrated Radiation Transport and Nuclear Fuel Performance for Assembly-Level Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Clarno, Kevin T; Hamilton, Steven P; Philip, Bobby; Berrill, Mark A; Sampath, Rahul S; Allu, Srikanth; Pugmire, Dave; Dilts, Gary; Banfield, James E

    2012-02-01

    The Advanced Multi-Physics (AMP) Nuclear Fuel Performance code (AMPFuel) is focused on predicting the temperature and strain within a nuclear fuel assembly to evaluate the performance and safety of existing and advanced nuclear fuel bundles within existing and advanced nuclear reactors. AMPFuel was extended to include an integrated nuclear fuel assembly capability for (one-way) coupled radiation transport and nuclear fuel assembly thermo-mechanics. This capability is the initial step toward incorporating an improved predictive nuclear fuel assembly modeling capability to accurately account for source-terms and boundary conditions of traditional (single-pin) nuclear fuel performance simulation, such as the neutron flux distribution, coolant conditions, and assembly mechanical stresses. A novel scheme is introduced for transferring the power distribution from the Scale/Denovo (Denovo) radiation transport code (structured, Cartesian mesh with smeared materials within each cell) to AMPFuel (unstructured, hexagonal mesh with a single material within each cell), allowing the use of a relatively coarse spatial mesh (10 million elements) for the radiation transport and a fine spatial mesh (3.3 billion elements) for thermo-mechanics with very little loss of accuracy. In addition, a new nuclear fuel-specific preconditioner was developed to account for the high aspect ratio of each fuel pin (12 feet axially, but 1 4 inches in diameter) with many individual fuel regions (pellets). With this novel capability, AMPFuel was used to model an entire 17 17 pressurized water reactor fuel assembly with many of the features resolved in three dimensions (for thermo-mechanics and/or neutronics), including the fuel, gap, and cladding of each of the 264 fuel pins; the 25 guide tubes; the top and bottom structural regions; and the upper and lower (neutron) reflector regions. The final, full assembly calculation was executed on Jaguar using 40,000 cores in under 10 hours to model over 162

  20. Performance study and influence of radiation emission energy and soil contamination level on γ-radiation shielding of stabilised/solidified radionuclide-polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Falciglia, Pietro P; Puccio, Valentina; Romano, Stefano; Vagliasindi, Federico G A

    2015-05-01

    This work focuses on the stabilisation/solidification (S/S) of radionuclide-polluted soils at different (232)Th levels using Portland cement alone and with barite aggregates. The potential of S/S was assessed applying a full testing protocol and calculating γ-radiation shielding (γRS) index, that included the measurement of soil radioactivity before and after the S/S as a function of the emission energy and soil contamination level. The results indicate that setting processes are strongly dependent on the contaminant concentration, and for contamination level higher than 5%, setting time values longer than 72 h. The addition of barite aggregates to the cement gout leads to a slight improvement of the S/S performance in terms of durability and contaminant leaching but reduces the mechanical resistance of the treated soils samples. Barite addition also causes an increase in the γ-rays shielding properties of the S/S treatment up to about 20%. Gamma-ray measurements show that γRS strongly depends on the energy, and that the radioactivity with the contamination level was governed by a linear trend, while, γRS index does not depend on the radionuclide concentration. Results allow the calculated γRS values and those available from other experiments to be applied to hazard radioactive soil contaminations. PMID:25710096

  1. Performance study and influence of radiation emission energy and soil contamination level on γ-radiation shielding of stabilised/solidified radionuclide-polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Falciglia, Pietro P; Puccio, Valentina; Romano, Stefano; Vagliasindi, Federico G A

    2015-05-01

    This work focuses on the stabilisation/solidification (S/S) of radionuclide-polluted soils at different (232)Th levels using Portland cement alone and with barite aggregates. The potential of S/S was assessed applying a full testing protocol and calculating γ-radiation shielding (γRS) index, that included the measurement of soil radioactivity before and after the S/S as a function of the emission energy and soil contamination level. The results indicate that setting processes are strongly dependent on the contaminant concentration, and for contamination level higher than 5%, setting time values longer than 72 h. The addition of barite aggregates to the cement gout leads to a slight improvement of the S/S performance in terms of durability and contaminant leaching but reduces the mechanical resistance of the treated soils samples. Barite addition also causes an increase in the γ-rays shielding properties of the S/S treatment up to about 20%. Gamma-ray measurements show that γRS strongly depends on the energy, and that the radioactivity with the contamination level was governed by a linear trend, while, γRS index does not depend on the radionuclide concentration. Results allow the calculated γRS values and those available from other experiments to be applied to hazard radioactive soil contaminations.

  2. Resonant electronic transport through a triple quantum-dot with Λ-type level structure under dual radiation fields

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Chun; Xing, Yunhui; Zhang, Chao; Ma, Zhongshui

    2014-08-14

    Due to quantum interference, light can transmit through dense atomic media, a phenomenon known as electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We propose that EIT is not limited to light transmission and there is an electronic analog where resonant transparency in charge transport in an opaque structure can be induced by electromagnetic radiation. A triple-quantum-dots system with Λ-type level structure is generally opaque due to the level in the center dot being significantly higher and therefore hopping from the left dot to the center dot is almost forbidden. We demonstrate that an electromagnetically induced electron transparency (EIET) in charge of transport can indeed occur in the Λ-type system. The direct evidence of EIET is that an electron can travel from the left dot to the right dot, while the center dot apparently becomes invisible. We analyze EIET and the related shot noise in both the zero and strong Coulomb blockade regimes. It is found that the EIET (position, height, and symmetry) can be tuned by several controllable parameters of the radiation fields, such as the Rabi frequencies and detuning frequencies. The result offers a transparency/opaque tuning technique in charge transport using interfering radiation fields.

  3. Dust Propagation and Radiation In the Presence of a Low-level Jet in Central China on March 17, 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, B. K.; Chen, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    Suspended dust in the air can directly change the energy budget in the atmosphere and at the surface through scattering and absorption of radiation. Thus, dust can potentially modify the development of weather systems. To explore the dust-radiation effects on weather systems, a dust model was developed based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The calculations of dust processes in the WRF dust model include emission, advection, boundary layer mixing, cumulus mixing, dust-radiation interaction, wet scavenging, and sedimentation. Due to a high vertical spatial resolution near the surface a time splitting method was applied to the calculation of dust sedimentation to relax the numerical time step. The "Hexi Corridor" is the historical name given to a string of oases along the northern slope of the Tibetan Plateau that formed a relatively easy transportation route between eastern China and central Asia. As trade developed over the centuries, this route became known as the Silk Road. This corridor also marks the transition from the relatively flat Gobi desert area in northern China to the elevated mountains of the Tibetan Plateau. These mountains present a southern barrier to the paths of dust storms that develop during spring outbreaks of the Mongolian Cyclone. In March of 2010, a series of dust storms developed in the Gobi Desert north of the Hexi Corridor that transported massive amounts of dust eastward to central and northeastern China, Korea and Japan. On March 17 during this event, a low-level jet developed along the northern perimeter of the Plateau, in alignment with upper level winds and the Hexi Corridor. Over the course of the day, a well-defined short-duration dust plume was emitted in the southern Gobi desert area and was transported over 1300 km in a southeast direction, over the Loess Plateau and into the Gansu Province. In this study, the interactions of synoptic conditions with regional topography that led to the development of the low-level

  4. HELLE: Health Effects of Low Level Exposures/ Gezondheidseffecten van lage blootstellingniveaus [International workshop: Influence of low level exposures to chemicals and radiation on human and ecological health

    SciTech Connect

    Schoten, Eert

    1998-11-26

    The Health Council is closely involved in establishing the scientific foundation of exposure limits for substances and radiation in order to protect public health. Through the years, the Council has contributed to the formulation of principles and procedures, both for carcinogenic and for noncarcinogenic agents. As a rule, the discussion with regard to the derivation of health-based recommended exposure limits centers around the appropriateness of extrapolation methods (What can be inferred from data on high exposure levels and on experimental animals?). Generally speaking, there is a lack of direct information on the health effects of low levels of exposure. Effects at these levels cannot usually be detected by means of traditional animal experiments or epidemiological research. The capacity of these analytical instruments to distinguish between ''signal'' and ''noise'' is inadequate in most cases. Annex B of this report contains a brief outline of the difficulties and the established methods for tackling this problem. In spite of this, the hope exists that the posited weak signals, if they are indeed present, can be detected by other means. The search will have to take place on a deeper level. In other words, effort must be made to discover what occurs at underlying levels of biological organization when organisms are exposed to low doses of radiation or substances. Molecular and cell biology provide various methods and techniques which give an insight into the processes within the cell. This results in an increase in the knowledge about the molecular and cellular effects of exposure to agents, or stated differently, the working mechanisms which form the basis of the health effects. Last year, the Health Council considered that the time was ripe to take stock of the state of knowledge in this field. To this end, an international working conference was held from 19 to 21 October 1997, entitled ''Health Effects of Low Level Exposures: Scientific Developments and

  5. Protective Effect of Nardostachys jatamansi Against Radiation-induced Damage at Biochemical and Chromosomal Levels in Swiss Albino Mice

    PubMed Central

    Madhu, L. N.; Kumari, N. Suchetha; Naveen, P.; Sanjeev, G.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of 100 mg of ethanol extract of Nardostachys jatamansi was studied on the mice exposed to 6 Gy electron beam radiation. Treatment of mice with 100 mg of Nardostachys jatamansi extract for 15 days before irradiation reduced the symptoms of radiation sickness when compared with the nondrug treated irradiated groups. The irradiation of animals resulted in an elevation in lipid peroxidation and reduction in glutathione, total antioxidants and antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities. Irradiated group had shown micronucleus in the bone marrow cells. Treatment of mice with Nardostachys jatamansi extract before irradiation caused a significant depletion in lipid peroxidation followed by significant elevation in reduced glutathione, total antioxidants, glutathione peroxidase and catalase activity. It also showed a reduction in the micronucleus formation in the bone marrow cells. Our results indicate that the radioprotective activity of Nardostachys jatamansi extract may be due to free radical scavenging and increased antioxidant level in mice. PMID:23716877

  6. Development of Diagnostic Reference Levels Using a Real-Time Radiation Dose Monitoring System at a Cardiovascular Center in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungsu; Seo, Deoknam; Choi, Inseok; Nam, Sora; Yoon, Yongsu; Kim, Hyunji; Her, Jae; Han, Seonggyu; Kwon, Soonmu; Park, Hunsik; Yang, Dongheon; Kim, Jungmin

    2015-12-01

    Digital cardiovascular angiography accounts for a major portion of the radiation dose among the examinations performed at cardiovascular centres. However, dose-related information is neither monitored nor recorded systemically. This report concerns the construction of a radiation dose monitoring system based on digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) data and its use at the cardiovascular centre of the University Hospitals in Korea. The dose information was analysed according to DICOM standards for a series of procedures, and the formulation of diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) at our cardiovascular centre represents the first of its kind in Korea. We determined a dose area product (DAP) DRL for coronary angiography of 75.6 Gy cm(2) and a fluoroscopic time DRL of 318.0 s. The DAP DRL for percutaneous transluminal coronary intervention was 213.3 Gy cm(2), and the DRL for fluoroscopic time was 1207.5 s.

  7. Development of Diagnostic Reference Levels Using a Real-Time Radiation Dose Monitoring System at a Cardiovascular Center in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungsu; Seo, Deoknam; Choi, Inseok; Nam, Sora; Yoon, Yongsu; Kim, Hyunji; Her, Jae; Han, Seonggyu; Kwon, Soonmu; Park, Hunsik; Yang, Dongheon; Kim, Jungmin

    2015-12-01

    Digital cardiovascular angiography accounts for a major portion of the radiation dose among the examinations performed at cardiovascular centres. However, dose-related information is neither monitored nor recorded systemically. This report concerns the construction of a radiation dose monitoring system based on digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) data and its use at the cardiovascular centre of the University Hospitals in Korea. The dose information was analysed according to DICOM standards for a series of procedures, and the formulation of diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) at our cardiovascular centre represents the first of its kind in Korea. We determined a dose area product (DAP) DRL for coronary angiography of 75.6 Gy cm(2) and a fluoroscopic time DRL of 318.0 s. The DAP DRL for percutaneous transluminal coronary intervention was 213.3 Gy cm(2), and the DRL for fluoroscopic time was 1207.5 s. PMID:25700616

  8. Site survey of former naval base in Andreyev Bay, northwest-Russia - Radiation levels and radionuclide concentrations on and below the surface level

    SciTech Connect

    Reistad, Ole; Dick, Oeystein B.; Grepstad, Gisle; Hustveit, Styrkaar; Amundsen, Ingar

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents the main results of the program to examine radiation levels and radionuclide concentrations on and below the surface level at the former Russian naval base in Andreyev Bay, Murmansk County. Presently, this base represents an exceptional case regarding future remediation and cleanup operations due to the accident risk (- max. fuel inventory of 100 submarine cores) and degree of contamination (over 25 years with continuous release - still ongoing - of radionuclides into the terrestrial and marine environment). The first part of the survey consists of about 1030 measurement points established as a grid with 10 m and 5 m mesh size for the measurement of dose rate in two heights above the ground level (0.1 m, 1 m), radionuclide concentrations, drilling of 50 boreholes for further examination of the radionuclide releases on site and the establishment of a 1:500 map of the area. These surveys were completed 2002-04. The results for dose rate measurements taken 1 m above the ground level varies between background levels and 3 mSv/h. Additional measurements were completed around the main building structures at the site and as part of a geological survey of the site. The activity concentration levels for Cs-137 and Sr-90 were measured in 250 points being part of the same measurement grid as above. The results for both isotopes range from normal fallout levels from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing to above 1 MBq/kg. The main conclusion is that continuous releases of fission products from spent nuclear fuel and fuel residues in defect storage pools have, together with inadequate storage facilities for large amounts of solid radioactive waste, led to heavy contamination of fission products in large areas. The 1:500 map is not public accessible. Thus, the second part of the survey was to analyse and document the results in adequate maps. These maps, geo-referenced to the UTM WGS84 system, have been established on the basis of commercial available satellite

  9. Kinetics of the nitrogen first negative system excitation by ionising radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Khasenov, M U

    2005-12-31

    The rate constants of N{sub 2}{sup +}(B) quenching by nitrogen and helium and of two- and three-body charge exchange of He{sub 2}{sup +} on H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and Kr are measured from luminescence at the 0-0 transition of the first negative system of nitrogen in mixtures of helium and nitrogen with hydrogen, krypton or deuterium excited by alpha particles emitted by {sup 210}Po . (active media)

  10. Migration and sensory changes of packaging materials caused by ionising radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welle, Frank; Mauer, Alexandra; Franz, Roland

    2002-03-01

    Irradiation of packaging materials—in most cases plastics—generally lead to a formation of free radicals and ions, with secondary effects such as cross-linking as well as oxidative chain scission. These effects result in a formation of volatile radiolysis products which may induce off-odours in the polymers and may change the migration characteristics of packaging materials. Irradiation affect also polymer additives which change the specific migration behaviour of polymer additives and additive related decomposition products. Migration and sensory changes of pre-sterilised packaging materials have consequences on the quality of packaged goods and consumer's safety. Therefore, migration and sensory properties of packaging materials have specific regulations. Within this paper the effects of the formation of radiolysis products on overall migration, specific migration of food additives or radiolysis products as well as on sensory changes are discussed in view of current European food law.

  11. Shielding NSLS-II light source: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.; Wahl, W.

    2016-11-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produces significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than a lower energy beam injection and ramped operations. Minimizing this dose will require adequate knowledge of where the miss-steered beam can occur and sufficient EM shielding close to the loss point, in order to attenuate the energy of the particles in the EM shower below the neutron production threshold (<10 MeV), which will spread the incident energy on the bulk shield walls and thereby the dose penetrating the shield walls. Designing supplemental shielding near the loss point using the analytic shielding model is shown to be inadequate because of its lack of geometry specification for the EM shower process. To predict the dose rates outside the tunnel requires detailed description of the geometry and materials that the beam losses will encounter inside the tunnel. Modern radiation shielding Monte-Carlo codes, like FLUKA, can handle this geometric description of the radiation transport process in sufficient detail, allowing accurate predictions of the dose rates expected and the ability to show weaknesses in the design before a high radiation incident occurs. The effort required to adequately define the accelerator geometry for these codes has been greatly reduced with the implementation of the graphical interface of FLAIR to FLUKA. This made the effective shielding process for NSLS-II quite accurate and reliable. The principles used to provide supplemental

  12. Radiation enhances the therapeutic effect of Banoxantrone in hypoxic tumour cells with elevated levels of nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    MEHIBEL, MANAL; SINGH, SIMENDRA; COWEN, RACHEL L.; WILLIAMS, KAYE J.; STRATFORD, IAN J.

    2016-01-01

    Banoxantrone (AQ4N) is a prototype hypoxia selective cytotoxin that is activated by haem containing reductases such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In the present study, we evaluate whether elevated levels of iNOS in human tumour cells will improve their sensitivity to AQ4N. Further, we examine the potential of radiation to increase cellular toxicity of AQ4N under normoxic (aerobic) and hypoxic conditions. We employed an expression vector containing the cDNA for human iNOS to transfect human fibrosarcoma HT1080 tumour cells. Alternatively, parental cells were exposed to a cytokine cocktail to induce iNOS gene expression and enzymatic activity. The cells were then treated with AQ4N alone and in combination with radiation in the presence or absence of the iNOS inhibitor N-methyl-L-arginine. In parental cells, AQ4N showed little difference in toxicity under hypoxic verses normoxic conditions. Notably, cells with upregulated iNOS activity showed a significant increase in sensitivity to AQ4N, but only under conditions of reduced oxygenation. When these cells were exposed to the combination of AQ4N and radiation, there was much greater cell killing than that observed with either modality alone. In the clinical development of hypoxia selective cytotoxins it is likely they will be used in combination with radiotherapy. In the present study, we demonstrated that AQ4N can selectively kill hypoxic cells via an iNOS-dependent mechanism. This hypoxia-selective effect can be augmented by combining AQ4N with radiation without increasing cytotoxicity to well-oxygenated tissues. Collectively, these results suggest that targeting hypoxic tumours with high levels of iNOS with a combination of AQ4N and radiotherapy could be a useful clinical therapeutic strategy. PMID:26782976

  13. HCO+ and N2H+ as ionisation tracers in the low-mass protostar IRAS16293-2422

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quénard, D.; Bottinelli, S.; Caux, E.

    2016-05-01

    Ionisation in the molecular environment of star-forming regions gives important clues on the chemical processes that take place in the environment of a young protostar. Ionisation can be traced with molecules like HCO+ and N2H+ and it regulates the formation of larger molecules such as complex organic molecules (COMs). The ionisation degree can also play an important role in the free-fall timescale of the protostar since it prevents the neutral material to collapse through collisions with ions and electrons bound to the magnetic field of the central protostar.

  14. Radiative accuracy assessment of CrIS upper level channels using COSMIC RO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, C.; Weng, F.; Han, Y.; Lin, L.; Chen, Y.; Wang, L.

    2012-12-01

    The Cross-track Infrared Sounder(CrIS) onboard Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership(NPP) satellite is designed to provide high vertical resolution information on the atmosphere's three-dimensional structure of temperature and water vapor. There are much work has been done to verify the observation accuracy of CrIS since its launch date of Oct. 28, 2011, such as SNO cross comparison with other hyper-spectral infrared instruments and forward simulation comparison using radiative transfer model based on numerical prediction background profiles. Radio occultation technique can provide profiles of the Earth's ionosphere and neutral atmosphere with high accuracy, high vertical resolution and global coverage. It has advantages of all-weather capability, low expense, long-term stability etc. Assessing CrIS radiative calibration accuracy was conducted by comparison between observation and Line-by-line simulation using COSMIC RO data. The main process technique include : (a) COSMIC RO data downloading and collocation with CrIS measurements through weighting function (wf) peak altitude dependent collocation method; (b) High spectral resolution of Line-by-line radiance simulation using collocated COSMIC RO profiles ; (c) Generation of CrIS channel radiance by FFT transform method; (d): Bias analysis . This absolute calibration accuracy assessing method verified a 0.3K around bias error of CrIS measurements.

  15. System for monitoring UV radiation level in phototherapy cabins in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Narbutt, Joanna; Pawlaczyk, Mariola; Sysa-Jędrzejowska, Anna; Sobolewski, Piotr; Rajewska-Więch, Bonawentura; Lesiak, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ultraviolet phototherapy (UVP) is widely used in dermatological practice for the treatment of various skin diseases. Numerous studies support its beneficial curing effectiveness; however, overexposure to ultraviolet radiation can cause adverse health effects, such as sunburn reaction, erythema response, cataract, skin aging, etc. For these reasons, it is of special importance to monitor performance of UVP cabins using a calibration system to evaluate the UV doses incident upon the patient. Material and methods A mechanized cabin control system (CCS) is proposed. It consists of radiometers with a wide and narrow field of view to estimate the body irradiation and to identify malfunctioning cabin tubes. Quality control and quality assurance procedures are developed to keep high accuracy of the calibration procedure. The CCS has been used in the examination of two different types of UVP cabins routinely working in Poland. Results It allows precise calculation of UV doses and spatial variability of UV radiance inside the cabin, thus providing uncertainties of the doses assigned by medical staff. The CCS could potentially serve as a primary standard for monitoring various UVP cabins working in Poland. Conclusions The methodology developed to quantify UV doses in UVP cabins may be easily extended to any UV radiation source. PMID:25624865

  16. Production of extended plasma channels in atmospheric air by amplitude-modulated UV radiation of GARPUN-MTW Ti : sapphire—KrF laser. Part 2. Accumulation of plasma electrons and electric discharge control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvorykin, V. D.; Ionin, Andrei A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Mesyats, Gennadii A.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Smetanin, Igor V.; Sunchugasheva, E. S.; Ustinovskii, N. N.; Shutov, A. V.

    2013-04-01

    The problem of the production of extended (~1 m) plasma channels is studied in atmospheric air by amplitude-modulated laser pulses of UV radiation, which are a superposition of a subpicosecond USP train amplified in a regenerative KrF amplifier with an unstable confocal resonator and a quasi-stationary lasing pulse. The USPs possess a high (0.2-0.3 TW) peak power and efficiently ionise oxygen molecules due to multiphoton ionisation, and the quasi-stationary lasing pulse, which has a relatively long duration (~100 ns), maintains the electron density at a level ne = (3-5) × 1014 cm—3 by suppressing electron attachment to oxygen. Experiments in laser triggering of high-voltage electric discharges suggest that the use of combined pulses results in a significant lowering of the breakdown threshold and enables controlling the discharge trajectory with a higher efficiency in comparison with smooth pulses. It was shown that controlled breakdowns may develop with a delay of tens of microseconds relative to the laser pulse, which is many orders of magnitude greater than the lifetime of free electrons in the laser-induced plasma. We propose a mechanism for this breakdown, which involves speeding-up of the avalanche ionisation of the air by negative molecular oxygen ions with a low electron binding energy (~0.5 eV) and a long lifetime (~1 ms), which are produced upon cessation of the laser pulse.

  17. Estimated association between dwelling soil contamination and internal radiation contamination levels after the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Tsubokura, Masaharu; Nomura, Shuhei; Sakaihara, Kikugoro; Kato, Shigeaki; Leppold, Claire; Furutani, Tomoyuki; Morita, Tomohiro; Oikawa, Tomoyoshi; Kanazawa, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Measurement of soil contamination levels has been considered a feasible method for dose estimation of internal radiation exposure following the Chernobyl disaster by means of aggregate transfer factors; however, it is still unclear whether the estimation of internal contamination based on soil contamination levels is universally valid or incident specific. Methods To address this issue, we evaluated relationships between in vivo and soil cesium-137 (Cs-137) contamination using data on internal contamination levels among Minamisoma (10–40 km north from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant), Fukushima residents 2–3 years following the disaster, and constructed three models for statistical analysis based on continuous and categorical (equal intervals and quantiles) soil contamination levels. Results A total of 7987 people with a mean age of 55.4 years underwent screening of in vivo Cs-137 whole-body counting. A statistically significant association was noted between internal and continuous Cs-137 soil contamination levels (model 1, p value <0.001), although the association was slight (relative risk (RR): 1.03 per 10 kBq/m2 increase in soil contamination). Analysis of categorical soil contamination levels showed statistical (but not clinical) significance only in relatively higher soil contamination levels (model 2: Cs-137 levels above 100 kBq/m2 compared to those <25 kBq/m2, RR=1.75, p value <0.01; model 3: levels above 63 kBq/m2 compared to those <11 kBq/m2, RR=1.45, p value <0.05). Conclusions Low levels of internal and soil contamination were not associated, and only loose/small associations were observed in areas with slightly higher levels of soil contamination in Fukushima, representing a clear difference from the strong associations found in post-disaster Chernobyl. These results indicate that soil contamination levels generally do not contribute to the internal contamination of residents in Fukushima; thus, individual

  18. Ionizing radiation induced changes in phenotype, photosynthetic pigments and free polyamine levels in Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Mandar; Chakraborty, Anindita; Raychaudhuri, Sarmistha Sen

    2013-05-01

    Effects of gamma rays on the free polyamine (PA) levels were studied in Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek. Seeds exposed to different doses of gamma rays were checked for damage on phenotype, germination frequency and alteration in photosynthetic pigments. Free polyamine levels were estimated from seeds irradiated in dry and water imbibed conditions. Polyamine levels of seedlings grown from irradiated seeds, and irradiated seedlings from unexposed seeds were also measured. Damage caused by gamma irradiation resulted in decrease in final germination percentage and seedling height. Photosynthetic pigments decreased in a dose dependent manner as marker of stress. Polyamines decreased in irradiated dry seeds and in seedlings grown from irradiated seeds. Radiation stress induced increase in free polyamines was seen in irradiated imbibed seeds and irradiated seedlings. Response of polyamines towards gamma rays is dependent on the stage of the life cycle of the plant.

  19. Study of radiation induced deep-level defects in proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation induced deep-level defects (both electron and hole traps) in proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs p-n junction solar cells are investigated along with the correlation between the measured defect parameters and the solar cell performance parameters. The range of proton energies studied was from 50 KeV to 10 MeV and the proton fluence was varied from 10 to the 10th power to 10 to the 13th power P/sq cm. Experimental tools employed include deep-level transient spectroscopy, capacitance-voltage, current voltage, and SEM-EBIC methods. Defect and recombination parameters such as defect density and energy level, capture cross section, carrier lifetimes and effective hole diffusion lengths in n-GaAs LPE layers were determined from these measurements.

  20. TERRA Expression Levels Do Not Correlate with Telomere Length and Radiation Sensitivity in Human Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Alexandra; Gamba, Riccardo; Khoriauli, Lela; Vitelli, Valerio; Nergadze, Solomon G; Giulotto, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian telomeres are transcribed into long non-coding telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA) molecules that seem to play a role in the maintenance of telomere stability. In human cells, CpG-island promoters drive TERRA transcription and are regulated by methylation. It was suggested that the amount of TERRA may be related to telomere length. To test this hypothesis we measured telomere length and TERRA levels in single clones isolated from five human cell lines: HeLa (cervical carcinoma), BRC-230 (breast cancer), AKG and GK2 (gastric cancers), and GM847 (SV40 immortalized skin fibroblasts). However, these two parameters did not correlate with each other. Moreover, cell survival to γ-rays did not show a significant variation among the clones, suggesting that, in this cellular system, the intra-population variability in telomere length and TERRA levels does not influence sensitivity to ionizing radiation. This conclusion was supported by the observation that in a cell line in which telomeres were greatly elongated by the ectopic expression of telomerase, TERRA expression levels and radiation sensitivity were similar to the parental HeLa cell line.

  1. Fragmentation, auto-modification and post ionisation proton bound dimer ion formation: the differential mobility spectrometry of low molecular weight alcohols.

    PubMed

    Ruszkiewicz, D M; Thomas, C L P; Eiceman, G A

    2016-08-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) is currently being used for environmental monitoring of space craft atmospheres and has been proposed for the rapid assessment of patients at accident and emergency receptions. Three studies investigated hitherto undescribed complexity in the DMS spectra of methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol and butan-1-ol product ions formed from a (63)Ni ionisation source. 54 000 DMS spectra obtained over a concentration range of 0.01 mg m(-3)(g) to 1.80 g m(-3)(g) revealed the phenomenon of auto-modification of the product ions. This occurred when the neutral vapour concentration exceeded the level required to induce a neutral-ion collision during the low field portion of the dispersion field waveform. Further, post-ionisation cluster-ion formation or protonated monomer/proton bound dimer inter-conversion within the ion-filter was indicated by apparent shifts in the values of the protonated monomer compensation field maximum; indicative of post-ionisation conversion of the protonated monomer to a proton-bound dimer. APCI-DMS-quadrupole mass spectrometry studies enabled the ion dissociation products from dispersion-field heating to be monitored and product ion fragmentation relationships to be proposed. Methanol was not observed to dissociate, while propan-1-ol and butan-1-ol underwent dissociation reactions consistent with dehydration processes that led ultimately to the generation of what is tentatively assigned as a cyclo-C3H3(+) ion (m/z 39) and hydrated protons. Studies of the interaction of ion filter temperature with dispersion-field heating of product ions isolated dissociation/fragmentation product ions that have not been previously described in DMS. The implications of these combined findings with regard to data sharing and data interpretation were highlighted. PMID:27227997

  2. Fragmentation, auto-modification and post ionisation proton bound dimer ion formation: the differential mobility spectrometry of low molecular weight alcohols.

    PubMed

    Ruszkiewicz, D M; Thomas, C L P; Eiceman, G A

    2016-08-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) is currently being used for environmental monitoring of space craft atmospheres and has been proposed for the rapid assessment of patients at accident and emergency receptions. Three studies investigated hitherto undescribed complexity in the DMS spectra of methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol and butan-1-ol product ions formed from a (63)Ni ionisation source. 54 000 DMS spectra obtained over a concentration range of 0.01 mg m(-3)(g) to 1.80 g m(-3)(g) revealed the phenomenon of auto-modification of the product ions. This occurred when the neutral vapour concentration exceeded the level required to induce a neutral-ion collision during the low field portion of the dispersion field waveform. Further, post-ionisation cluster-ion formation or protonated monomer/proton bound dimer inter-conversion within the ion-filter was indicated by apparent shifts in the values of the protonated monomer compensation field maximum; indicative of post-ionisation conversion of the protonated monomer to a proton-bound dimer. APCI-DMS-quadrupole mass spectrometry studies enabled the ion dissociation products from dispersion-field heating to be monitored and product ion fragmentation relationships to be proposed. Methanol was not observed to dissociate, while propan-1-ol and butan-1-ol underwent dissociation reactions consistent with dehydration processes that led ultimately to the generation of what is tentatively assigned as a cyclo-C3H3(+) ion (m/z 39) and hydrated protons. Studies of the interaction of ion filter temperature with dispersion-field heating of product ions isolated dissociation/fragmentation product ions that have not been previously described in DMS. The implications of these combined findings with regard to data sharing and data interpretation were highlighted.

  3. Core level photoionization on free sub-10-nm nanoparticles using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Meinen, Jan; Leisner, Thomas; Khasminskaya, Svetlana; Eritt, Markus; Antonsson, Egill; Langer, Burkhard; Ruehl, Eckart

    2010-08-15

    A novel instrument is presented, which permits studies on singly charged free nanoparticles in the diameter range from 1 to 30 nm using synchrotron radiation in the soft x-ray regime. It consists of a high pressure nanoparticle source, a high efficiency nanoparticle beam inlet, and an electron time-of-flight spectrometer suitable for probing surface and bulk properties of free, levitated nanoparticles. We show results from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study near the Si L{sub 3,2}-edge on 8.2 nm SiO{sub 2} particles prepared in a nanoparticle beam. The possible use of this apparatus regarding chemical reactions on the surface of nanometer-sized particles is highlighted. This approach has the potential to be exploited for process studies on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry.

  4. Image quality and radiation levels in videofluoroscopy for swallowing studies: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, T.J.; Gayler, B.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Inexpensive video recording equipment coupled to conventional x-ray fluoroscopes is now in widespread use by clinicians for the evaluation of patients with swallowing disorders. The prevalence and simplicity of this apparatus have encouraged its use by clinical specialists who are often not specifically trained in the safe use of x-ray equipment, and this may not be in the best interest of either the patient or the examiner. This has prompted an overview of the operating principles of videofluorescopy equipment. The factors governing image quality are discussed as well as potential hazards and protective measures for both patients and operator. A method of estimating the radiation dose to sensitive tissues from a typical swallowing study is included. 6 references.

  5. Energy levels, Auger branching ratios, and radiative rates of the core-excited states of B-like carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yan; Gou Bingcong; Chen Feng

    2011-09-28

    Energy levels, Auger branching ratios, and radiative rates of the core-excited states of B-like carbon are calculated by the saddle-point variation and saddle-point complex-rotation methods. Relativistic and mass polarization corrections are included using first-order perturbation theory. Calculated Auger channel energies and branching ratios are used to identify high-resolution Auger spectrum in the 300-keV C{sup +}{yields} CH{sub 4} collision experiment. It is found that Auger decay of these five-electron core-excited states gives significant contributions to Auger spectrum in the range of 238-280 eV.

  6. 3D Multi-Level Non-LTE Radiative Transfer for the CO Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkner, A.; Schweitzer, A.; Hauschildt, P. H.

    2015-01-01

    The photospheres of cool stars are both rich in molecules and an environment where the assumption of LTE can not be upheld under all circumstances. Unfortunately, detailed 3D non-LTE calculations involving molecules are hardly feasible with current computers. For this reason, we present our implementation of the super level technique, in which molecular levels are combined into super levels, to reduce the number of unknowns in the rate equations and, thus, the computational effort and memory requirements involved, and show the results of our first tests against the 1D implementation of the same method.

  7. Health physics manual of good practices for reducing radiation exposure to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    SciTech Connect

    Herrington, W.N.; Higby, D.P.; Kathren,., R.L.; Merwin, S.E.; Stoetzel, G.A.

    1988-06-01

    A primary objective of the US Department of Energy (DOE) health physics and radiation protection program has been to limit radiation exposures to those levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). As a result, the ALARA concept developed into a program and a set of operational principles to ensure that the objective was consistently met. Implementation of these principles required that a guide be produced. The original ALARA guide was issued by DOE in 1980 to promote improved understanding of ALARA concepts within the DOE community and to assist those responsible for operational ALARA activities in attaining their goals. Since 1980, additional guidance has been published by national and international organizations to provide further definition and clarification to ALARA concepts. As basic ALARA experience increased, the value and role of the original guide prompted the DOE Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS) to support a current revision. The revised manual of good practices includes six sections: 1.0 Introduction, 2.0 Administration, 3.0 Optimization, 4.0 Setting and Evaluating ALARA Goals, 5.0 Radiological Design, and 6.0 Conduct of Operations. The manual is directed primarily to contractor and DOE staff who are responsible for conduct and overview of radiation protection and ALARA programs at DOE facilities. The intent is to provide sufficient guidance such that the manual, if followed, will ensure that radiation exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable and will establish the basis for a formally structured and auditable program. 118 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Prediction of soot and thermal radiation in a model gas turbine combustor burning kerosene fuel spray at different swirl levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose, Prakash; Patra, Jitendra; Datta, Amitava; Mukhopadhyay, Achintya

    2016-05-01

    Combustion of kerosene fuel spray has been numerically simulated in a laboratory scale combustor geometry to predict soot and the effects of thermal radiation at different swirl levels of primary air flow. The two-phase motion in the combustor is simulated using an Eulerian-Lagragian formulation considering the stochastic separated flow model. The Favre-averaged governing equations are solved for the gas phase with the turbulent quantities simulated by realisable k-ɛ model. The injection of the fuel is considered through a pressure swirl atomiser and the combustion is simulated by a laminar flamelet model with detailed kinetics of kerosene combustion. Soot formation in the flame is predicted using an empirical model with the model parameters adjusted for kerosene fuel. Contributions of gas phase and soot towards thermal radiation have been considered to predict the incident heat flux on the combustor wall and fuel injector. Swirl in the primary flow significantly influences the flow and flame structures in the combustor. The stronger recirculation at high swirl draws more air into the flame region, reduces the flame length and peak flame temperature and also brings the soot laden zone closer to the inlet plane. As a result, the radiative heat flux on the peripheral wall decreases at high swirl and also shifts closer to the inlet plane. However, increased swirl increases the combustor wall temperature due to radial spreading of the flame. The high incident radiative heat flux and the high surface temperature make the fuel injector a critical item in the combustor. The injector peak temperature increases with the increase in swirl flow mainly because the flame is located closer to the inlet plane. On the other hand, a more uniform temperature distribution in the exhaust gas can be attained at the combustor exit at high swirl condition.

  9. Potentiometric titrations in acetonitrile-water mixtures: evaluation of aqueous ionisation constant of ketoprofen.

    PubMed

    Herrador, M Angeles; González, A Gustavo

    2002-03-11

    Non ideality of acetonitrile-water mixtures was studied from data on the excess of molar volumes and viscosities. pH and autoprotolisis constants were evaluated at the standard state of the mixed solvent from titrations of a strong acid with a strong base. In order to illustrate the evaluation of the aqueous ionisation constant of water insoluble compounds from pH titrations in ACN-water mixtures, a typical insoluble arylpropionic acid, ketoprofen, was chosen. Ketoprofen was titrated in mixtures from 10 to 70% w/w of acetonitrile against a strong base. From the titration data, the ionisation constant of ketoprofen was evaluated at the standard state of the solvent mixture (pK(a)(*)). Aqueous pK(a) was determined by extrapolation, as the intercept of the plot of pK(a)(*) versus ACN mole fraction.

  10. Exploring the Powerful Ionised Wind in the Seyfert Galaxy PG1211+143

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pounds, Ken

    2013-10-01

    Highly-ionised high-speed winds in AGN (UFOs) were first detected with XMM-Newton a decade ago, and are now established as a key factor in the study of SMBH accretion, and in the growth and metal enrichment of their host galaxies. However, information on the ionisation and dynamical structure, and the ultimate fate of UFOs remains very limited. We request a 600ks extended XMM-Newton study of the prototype UFO PG1211+143 in AO-13, to obtain high quality EPIC and RGS spectra, to map the flow structure and variability, while seeking evidence for the anticipated interaction with the ISM and possible conversion of the energetic wind to a momentum-driven flow.

  11. Analytical solutions of the time-dependent radiation force for a two-level atom interacting with a continuous-wave single-mode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, Heung-Ryoul; Jhe, Wonho

    2010-09-15

    This work presents an analytical calculation of the time-dependent radiation forces on a two-level atom interacting with a single-mode laser field. Such a closed and compact expression of the radiation forces is derived by solving the optical Bloch equations analytically. It is confirmed, in particular, that the radiation force consists of reactive as well as dissipative components, whose explicit analytical forms of the temporal solutions can be explicitly obtained. The succinct analytical solutions of the radiation forces may be helpful for a convenient and intuitive description of the complex atomic dynamics such as interaction with various laser fields.

  12. The effect of electrospray solvent composition on desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) efficiency and spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Green, F M; Salter, T L; Gilmore, I S; Stokes, P; O'Connor, G

    2010-04-01

    In desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) the interaction between the electrospray and the surface is key to two important analytical parameters, the spatial resolution and the sensitivity. We evaluate the effect of the electrospray solvent type, organic solvent fraction with water, analyte solubility and substrate wettability on DESI erosion diameter and material transferral into useful ion signal. To do this five amino acids, glycine, alanine, valine, leucine and phenylalanine are prepared as thin films on three substrates, UV/ozone treated glass, glass and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). Four different solvents, acetonitrile (ACN), methanol (MeOH), ethanol (EtOH) and propan-2-ol (IPA), are used with organic solvent fractions with water varying from 0.1 to 1. These model systems allow the solubility or wettability to be kept constant as other parameters are varied. Additionally, comparison with electrospray ionisation (ESI) allows effects of ionisation efficiency to be determined. It is shown that the DESI efficiency is linearly dependent on the solubility (for these materials at least) and for analytes with solubilities below 1.5 g kg(-1), additional strategies may be required for DESI to be effective. We show that the DESI erosion diameter improves linearly with organic solvent fraction, with an organic solvent fraction of 0.9 instead of 0.5 leading to a 2 fold improvement. Furthermore, this leads to a 35 fold increase in DESI efficiency, defined as the molecular ion yield per unit area. It is shown that these improvements correlate with smaller droplet sizes rather than surface wetting or ionisation. PMID:20349538

  13. Determination of sultopride and tiapride in serum by gas chromatography using a surface ionisation detector.

    PubMed

    Kamizono, A; Inotsume, N; Miyamoto, K; Ueda, K; Miyakawa, T; Arimoto, H; Nakano, M

    1991-06-14

    A sensitive and selective method has been developed for the determination of sultopride and tiapride in serum using gas chromatography with a surface ionisation detector. No interfering peaks from endogenous substances were observed. The method showed good reproducibility and accuracy, and the standard curve was linear up to 2 micrograms/ml with a correlation coefficient of 0.999. This method is applicable to pharmacokinetic studies and therapeutic drug monitoring of sultopride and tiapride.

  14. Measurements of radiation level in petroleum products and wastes in Riyadh City Refinery.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, F S; Al-Harshan, G A

    2008-07-01

    Recent concern has been devoted to the hazard arising from naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in oil and gas facilities. Twenty-seven petroleum samples were collected from Riyadh Refinery. Fourteen samples were products and 13 were waste samples; three of them were scale samples and 10 were sludge samples. The specific radioactivities of (238)U, (232)Th, (226)Ra, (224)Ra, (40)K, and (235)U for all samples were determined using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. The radium equivalent activity, radiation hazard indices and absorbed dose rate in air for all waste samples were estimated. The radon emanation coefficient of the waste samples was estimated. It ranged between 0.574 and 0.154. The age of two scale samples was determined and found to be 2.39 and 3.66 years. The chemical structure of the waste samples was investigated using X-ray florescence analysis (XRF) and Mg, Al, Si, S, Cl, Ca and Fe were found in all samples. From this study, it was noticed that the concentrations of the natural radionuclides in the petroleum wastes were higher than that of the petroleum products.

  15. Changes in c-Kit expression levels during the course of radiation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Feng; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Bicheng; Xu, Jing; Shui, Yongjie; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Ren, Xiaoqiu; Chen, Xiaozhong; Shen, Li; Wei, Qichun

    2016-01-01

    In the era of intensity-modulated radiotherapy, distant metastasis is currently the main cause of treatment failure for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Additional therapeutic strategies are required to control the metastasis and improve survival. One strategy is targeted therapy, for example against c-Kit. In the current study, the frequency of c-Kit expression was determined immunohistochemically in 106 NPC patients. c-Kit expression changes during the course of radiation therapy were detected in 41 cases via weekly biopsy. Twelve cases (11.3%) had c-Kit expression scores of 3+ and 16 (15.1%) had scores of 2+. Thus, c-Kit overexpression (2+ or 3+) was observed in 28 (26.4%) patients. There were 35 (33.0%) and 43 (40.6%) patients with c-Kit expression scores of 1+ and 0, respectively. Furthermore, a trend of decreased c-Kit expression was observed after commencing radiotherapy according to the 41 NPC patients who were biopsied weekly. Therefore, c-Kit overexpression was identified to be common in NPC, and evaluating c-Kit as a therapeutic target for metastatic NPC via c-Kit overexpression subsequent to first line treatment may be of interest. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate a trend of decreased c-Kit expression during the course of radiotherapy.

  16. Effects of increased shielding on gamma-radiation levels within spacecraft.

    PubMed

    Haskins, P S; McKisson, J E; Weisenberger, A G; Ely, D W; Ballard, T A; Dyer, C S; Truscott, P R; Piercey, R B; Ramayya, A V; Camp, D C

    1992-01-01

    The Shuttle Activation Monitor (SAM) experiment was flown on the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-28) from 8-13 August, 1989 in a 57 degrees, 300 km orbit. One objective of the SAM experiment was to determine the relative effect of different amounts of shielding on the gamma-ray backgrounds measured with similarly configured sodium iodide (NaI) and bismuth germante (BGO) detectors. To achieve this objective twenty-four hours of data were taken with each detector in the middeck of the Shuttle on the ceiling of the airlock (a high-shielding location) as well as on the sleep station wall (a low-shielding location). For the cosmic-ray induced background the results indicate an increased overall count rate in the 0.2 to 10 MeV energy range at the more highly shielded location, while in regions of trapped radiation the low shielding configuration gives higher rates at the low energy end of the spectrum.

  17. Evolution of solar radiative effects of Mount Pinatubo at ground level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alados-Arboledas, L.; Olmo, F. J.; Ohvril, H. O.; Teral, H.; Arak, M.; Teral, K.

    1997-04-01

    The field research reported here contributes to the documentation on the effect of stratospheric aerosols produced by the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo. Using ground-based data obtained at 2 radiometric stations, located at very different latitudes (Estonia and Spain), we have studied the evolution of the Pinatubo eruption effects. Following the eruption of Mount Pinatubo there is a significant reduction in direct solar radiation, of about 10% in Almeria (Spain) and 7% in Tiirikoja (Estonia). The maximum reduction, of about 15% and 9% respectively, is measured during the 1991-1992 winter. The aerosol optical depth in Almeria presents, aside from the seasonal dependence, evident influences due to the volcanic aerosol cloud. We have tried to isolate this last effect. As a result, we have found that the 1991/1992 winter presented the maximum volcanic effects, with a decay along 1992 and a recovery in the 1992/1993 winter. These results are in agreement with more sophisticated studies of the aerosol cloud effects. By the 1993-1994 winter, our analysis shows evidence of a recovery of pre-eruption conditions confirmed by the aerosol optical depth behaviour during 1994. The analysis of Tiirikoja data set using an atmospheric integral transparency coefficient leads to similar results. The volcanic aerosol effect shows an exponential decay in both locations estimated at 8.6±1.9months for Almeria and 8.9±3.5months for Tiirikoja.

  18. An in vitro study of the effects of low-level laser radiation on human blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siposan, Dan G.; Lukacs, Adalbert

    2003-12-01

    In the last time the study of the effects of LLLR on the blood is considered to be a subject of great importance in elucidating the mechanisms of action between LLLR and biologic tissues. Different methods of therapy by blood irradiation have been developed and used in clinical purposes with benefic effects. This study investigates some in vitro effects of LLLR on some selected rheologic indices of human blood. After establishing whether or not damaging effects could appear due to laser irradiation of the blood, we tried to find a new method for rejuvenating the blood preserved in MacoPharma-type bags. Blood samples were obtained from adult regular donors (volunteers). HeNe laser and laser diodes were used as radiation source, in a wide range of wavelengths, power densities, doses and other parameters of irradiation protocol. In the first series of experiments we established that LLLR does not alter the fresh blood from healthy donors, for doses between 0 and 10 J/cm3 and power densities between 30 and 180 mW/cm3. In the second series of experiments we established that LLLR does have, in some specific conditions, a revitalizing effect on the erythrocytes in preserved blood. We concluded that laser irradiation of the preserved blood, following a selected protocol of irradiation, could be used as a new method to improve the performances of preservation: prolonging the period of storage and blood rejuvenation before transfusion.

  19. Electron beam dynamics and self-cooling up to PeV level due to betatron radiation in plasma-based accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Aihua; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Liu, Jiansheng; Shen, Baifei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Yu, Yahong; Li, Wentao; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2012-08-01

    In plasma-based accelerators, electrons are accelerated by ultrahigh gradient of 1-100GV/m and undergo the focusing force with the same order as the accelerating force. Heated electrons are injected in a plasma wake and exhibit the betatron oscillation that generates synchrotron radiation. Intense betatron radiation from laser-plasma accelerators is attractive x-ray/gamma-ray sources, while it produces radiation loss and significant effects on energy spread and transverse emittance via the radiation reaction force. In this article, electron beam dynamics on transverse emittance and energy spread with considering radiation reaction effects are studied numerically. It is found that the emittance growth and the energy spread damping initially dominate and balance with radiative damping due to the betatron radiation. Afterward the emittance turns to decrease at a constant rate and leads to the equilibrium at a nanometer radian level with growth due to Coulomb scattering at PeV-level energies. A constant radiation loss rate RT=2/3 is found without regard to the electron beam and plasma conditions. Self-cooling of electron beams due to betatron radiation may guarantee TeV-range linear colliders and give hints on astrophysical ultrahigh-energy phenomena.

  20. The radiation characteristics of the transport packages with vitrified high-level waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogatov, S. A.; Mitenkova, E. F.; Novikov, N. V.

    2015-12-01

    The calculation method of neutron yield in the (α, n) reaction for a homogeneous material of arbitrary composition is represented. It is shown that the use of the ORIGEN 2 code excluding the real elemental composition of vitrified high-level waste leads to significant underestimation of the neutron yield in the (α, n) reaction. For vitrified high-level waste and spent nuclear fuel from VVER, the neutron fluxes are analyzed. The thickness of the protective materials for a transfer cask and a shipping cask with vitrified highlevel waste are estimated.

  1. The radiation characteristics of the transport packages with vitrified high-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bogatov, S. A.; Mitenkova, E. F. Novikov, N. V.

    2015-12-15

    The calculation method of neutron yield in the (α, n) reaction for a homogeneous material of arbitrary composition is represented. It is shown that the use of the ORIGEN 2 code excluding the real elemental composition of vitrified high-level waste leads to significant underestimation of the neutron yield in the (α, n) reaction. For vitrified high-level waste and spent nuclear fuel from VVER, the neutron fluxes are analyzed. The thickness of the protective materials for a transfer cask and a shipping cask with vitrified highlevel waste are estimated.

  2. Radiative lifetime measurements of some Tm I and Tm II levels by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yanshan; Wang, Xinghao; Yu, Qi; Li, Yongfan; Gao, Yang; Dai, Zhenwen

    2016-04-01

    Radiative lifetimes of 88 levels of Tm I in the energy range 22 791.176-48 547.98 cm-1 and 29 levels of Tm II in the range 27 294.79-65 612.85 cm-1 were measured by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in laser-ablation plasma. The lifetime values obtained are in the range from 15.4 to 7900 ns for Tm I and from 36.5 to 1000 ns for Tm II. To the best of our knowledge, 77 lifetimes of Tm I and 22 lifetimes of Tm II are reported for the first time. Good agreements between the present results and the previous experimental values were achieved for both Tm I and Tm II.

  3. Merkel cell polyomavirus small T antigen mRNA level is increased following in vivo UV-radiation.

    PubMed

    Mogha, Ariane; Fautrel, Alain; Mouchet, Nicolas; Guo, Na; Corre, Sébastien; Adamski, Henri; Watier, Eric; Misery, Laurent; Galibert, Marie-Dominique

    2010-07-02

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare but aggressive skin cancer involving Merkel cells. Recently, a new human polyomavirus was implicated in MCC, being present in 80% of the samples analyzed. In virus-positive MCC, the Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is clonally integrated into the patients DNA, and carries mutations in its large T antigen, leading to a truncated protein. In non-symptomatic tissue MCPyV can reside at very low levels. MCC is also associated with older age, immunosuppression and sun exposure. However, the link with solar exposure remains unknown, as the precise mechanism and steps involved between time of infection by MCPyV and the development of MCC. We thus investigated the potential impact of solar simulated radiation (SSR) on MCPyV transcriptional activity. We screened skin samples of 20 healthy patients enrolled in a photodermatological protocol based on in vivo-administered 2 and 4 J/cm(2) SSR. Two patients were infected with two new variants of MCPyV, present in their episomal form and RT-QPCR analyses on SSR-irradiated skin samples showed a specific and unique dose-dependent increase of MCPyV small t antigen transcript. A luciferase based in vitro assay confirmed that small t promoter is indeed UV-inducible. These findings demonstrate that solar radiation has an impact on MCPyV mRNA levels that may explain the association between MCC and solar exposure.

  4. Associations of Ionizing Radiation and Breast Cancer-Related Serum Hormone and Growth Factor Levels in Cancer-Free Female A-Bomb Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Eric J.; Neriishi, Kazuo; Cologne, John; Eguchi, Hidetaka; Hayashi, Tomonori; Geyer, Susan; Izumi, Shizue; Nishi, Nobuo; Land, Charles; Stevens, Richard G.; Sharp, Gerald B.; Nakachi, Kei

    2013-01-01

    Levels of exposure to ionizing radiation are increasing for women worldwide due to the widespread use of CT and other radiologic diagnostic modalities. Exposure to ionizing radiation as well as increased levels of estradiol and other sex hormones are acknowledged breast cancer risk factors, but the effects of whole-body radiation on serum hormone levels in cancer-free women are unknown. This study examined whether ionizing radiation exposure is associated with levels of serum hormones and other markers that may mediate radiation-associated breast cancer risk. Serum samples were measured from cancer-free women who attended biennial health examinations with a wide range of past radiation exposure levels (N = 412, ages 26–79). The women were selected as controls for separate case-control studies from a cohort of A-bomb survivors. Outcome measures included serum levels of total estradiol, bioavailable estradiol, testosterone, progesterone, prolactin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), and ferritin. Relationships were assessed using repeated-measures regression models fitted with generalized estimating equations. Geometric mean serum levels of total estradiol and bioavailable estradiol increased with 1 Gy of radiation dose among samples collected from postmenopausal women (17%1Gy, 95% CI: 1%–36% and 21%1Gy, 95% CI: 4%–40%, respectively), while they decreased in samples collected from premenopausal women (−11%1Gy, 95% CI: −20%–1% and −12%1Gy, 95% CI: −20%– −2%, respectively). Interactions by menopausal status were significant (P = 0.003 and P < 0.001, respectively). Testosterone levels increased with radiation dose in postmenopausal samples (30.0%1Gy, 95% CI: 13%–49%) while they marginally decreased in premenopausal samples (−10%1Gy, 95% CI: −19%–0%) and the interaction by menopausal status was significant (P < 0.001). Serum levels of IGF1 increased linearly with radiation dose (11%1Gy

  5. Ambient ionisation mass spectrometry for the characterisation of polymers and polymer additives: a review.

    PubMed

    Paine, Martin R L; Barker, Philip J; Blanksby, Stephen J

    2014-01-15

    The purpose of this review is to showcase the present capabilities of ambient sampling and ionisation technologies for the analysis of polymers and polymer additives by mass spectrometry (MS) while simultaneously highlighting their advantages and limitations in a critical fashion. To qualify as an ambient ionisation technique, the method must be able to probe the surface of solid or liquid samples while operating in an open environment, allowing a variety of sample sizes, shapes, and substrate materials to be analysed. The main sections of this review will be guided by the underlying principle governing the desorption/extraction step of the analysis; liquid extraction, laser ablation, or thermal desorption, and the major component investigated, either the polymer itself or exogenous compounds (additives and contaminants) present within or on the polymer substrate. The review will conclude by summarising some of the challenges these technologies still face and possible directions that would further enhance the utility of ambient ionisation mass spectrometry as a tool for polymer analysis.

  6. A Carbon Nano Tube electron impact ionisation source for low-power, compact spacecraft mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, S.; Bardwell, M. W.; Morse, A. D.; Morgan, G. H.

    2012-04-01

    A novel ionisation source which uses commercially available Carbon Nano Tube devices is demonstrated as a replacement for a filament based ionisation source in an ion trap mass spectrometer. The carbon nanotube ion source electron emission was characterised and exhibited typical emission of 30 ± 1.7 μA with an applied voltage differential of 300 V between the carbon nanotube tips and the extraction grid. The ion source was tested for longevity and operated under a condition of continuous emission for a period of 44 h; there was an observed reduction in emission current of 26.5% during operation. Spectra were generated by installing the ion source into a Finnigan Mat ITD700 ion trap mass spectrometer; the spectra recorded showed all of the characteristic m/z peaks from m/z 69 to m/z 219. Perfluorotributylamine spectra were collected and averaged contiguously for a period of 48 h with no significant signal loss or peak mass allocation shift. The low power requirements and low mass of this novel ionisation source are considered be of great value to future space missions where mass spectrometric technology will be employed.

  7. Examining Pre-Service Teachers' Use of Atomic Models in Explaining Subsequent Ionisation Energy Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeldon, Ruth

    2012-06-01

    Chemistry students' explanations of ionisation energy phenomena often involve a number of non-scientific or inappropriate ideas being used to form causality arguments. Research has attributed this to many science teachers using these ideas themselves (Tan and Taber, in J Chem Educ 86(5):623-629, 2009). This research extends this work by considering which atomic models are used in pre-service teachers' explanations and how that relates to the causality ideas expressed. Thirty-one pre-service teachers were interviewed. Each was asked to describe and explain four different atomic representations (Rutherford, Electron cloud micrograph, Bohr and Schrödinger types) in as much detail as they could. They also provided an explanation for the subsequent ionisation energy values for an oxygen atom and identified which representations were helpful in explaining the values. Significantly, when pre-service teachers only used Bohr type representations, they did not use repelling electron ideas in their explanations. However, arguments that were based on electron-electron repulsion used features from Schrödinger type atoms. These findings suggest that many pre-service teachers need to develop their atomic modelling skills so that they select and use models more expertly and that subsequent ionisation explanations offer a context in which to explore different atomic models' limitations and their deployment as explanatory resources.

  8. Ionisation from the 3s sub-level of highly charged ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, L. B.; Sampson, D. H.; Omidvar, K.

    1978-01-01

    Scaled electron-impact cross sections are calculated for ionization from the 3s sublevel of hydrogenic ions with Z equal infinity by use of the Born exchange or the Coulomb-Born Oppenheimer approximation (which is exact, apart from relativistic corrections, in this limit). The results are fitted to an analytic expression which goes into the correct Bethe approximation result at high energies and which can readily be integrated over a Maxwellian electron velocity distribution to obtain collision rates. These results permit calculation of the approximate cross section and collision rate for ionization from the 3s sublevel of any highly charged ion with Z/N larger than approximately 2. Results obtained by the described procedure for Fe-14(+) and Fe-15(+) are compared with results obtained by other procedures.

  9. Record-breaking ozone losses matched by record increase in ultraviolet radiation levels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    For the fourth consecutive austral spring, the antarctic ozone hole broke existing records for decrease levels of ozone abundance. This article discusses the possible explainations including unusually low temperatures of the polar vortex, which may enhance ozone loss. UV increases at South Pole, McMurdo, and Palmer Stations were also discussed in conjunction with the Ozone hole.

  10. Recently revised diagnostic reference levels in nuclear medicine in Bulgaria and in Finland.

    PubMed

    Korpela, H; Bly, R; Vassileva, J; Ingilizova, K; Stoyanova, T; Kostadinova, I; Slavchev, A

    2010-01-01

    An EU twinning project entitled 'Strengthening of administrative structures for radiation protection and safe use of ionising radiation in diagnostics and therapy' was established between Bulgaria and Finland, lasting from June 2008 to May 2009. One component of the project was to improve the optimisation of patient protection in nuclear medicine (NM) through revising diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). The revised DRLs are based on national surveys on the numbers of NM procedures and activities given to the patients in different procedures. The survey in Bulgaria was carried out in 2008 and that in Finland in 2007. National DRLs were established for the most frequent and dose-relevant examinations. The proposed DRLs in both countries are in good agreement with other national recommendations in Europe.

  11. Biological Consequences and Health Risks Of Low-Level Exposure to Ionizing Radiation: Commentary on the Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Feinendegen, Ludwig E.; Brooks, Antone L.; Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    This paper provides an integration and discussion of the information presented at the workshop held from May 2 to 5, 2010, in Richland, WA, adjacent to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Consequently, this is commentary and not necessarily a consensus document. This workshop was in honor of Dr. Victor P. Bond in celebration of his numerous contributions to the radiation sciences. Internationally recognized experts in biophysics, experimental radiation biology, epidemiology, and risk assessment were invited to discuss all issues of low-dose risk. This included the physics of track structure and its consequences to dosimetry, primary and secondary responses at the molecular, cellular, and tissue biology levels, epidemiology, definitions of risk, and the practical and regulatory applications of these issues including their biomedical and social consequences. Of major concern was the present state of knowledge about cancer risk and other risks in humans following intentional or accidental exposures to low doses and low dose-rates of ionizing radiation (below about 100 mSv accumulated dose). This includes low dose exposures which occur during radiation therapy in tissues located outside of the irradiated volume. The interdisciplinary approach of this workshop featured discussions rather than formal presentations in ten separate consecutive sessions. Each session was led by chairpersons, listed in the opening of the workshop, which introduced topics, facts and posed relevant questions. The content of each session is given by a brief summary followed by the abstracts from the primary discussants in the session as has been presented in the previous section. This manuscript provides additional review and discussion of the sessions and tracks the topics and issues discussed as follows: • Energy deposition through particle tracks in tissues. • Energy deposition and primary effects in tissues. • Consequences of experimental advances in radiobiology • Non

  12. Human exposure to high natural background radiation: what can it teach us about radiation risks?

    PubMed Central

    Hendry, Jolyon H; Simon, Steven L; Wojcik, Andrzej; Sohrabi, Mehdi; Burkart, Werner; Cardis, Elisabeth; Laurier, Dominique; Tirmarche, Margot; Hayata, Isamu

    2014-01-01

    Natural radiation is the major source of human exposure to ionising radiation, and its largest contributing component to effective dose arises from inhalation of 222Rn and its radioactive progeny. However, despite extensive knowledge of radiation risks gained through epidemiologic investigations and mechanistic considerations, the health effects of chronic low-level radiation exposure are still poorly understood. The present paper reviews the possible contribution of studies of populations living in high natural background radiation (HNBR) areas (Guarapari, Brazil; Kerala, India; Ramsar, Iran; Yangjiang, China), including radon-prone areas, to low dose risk estimation. Much of the direct information about risk related to HNBR comes from case–control studies of radon and lung cancer, which provide convincing evidence of an association between long-term protracted radiation exposures in the general population and disease incidence. The success of these studies is mainly due to the careful organ dose reconstruction (with relatively high doses to the lung), and to the fact that large-scale collaborative studies have been conducted to maximise the statistical power and to ensure the systematic collection of information on potential confounding factors. In contrast, studies in other (non-radon) HNBR areas have provided little information, relying mainly on ecological designs and very rough effective dose categorisations. Recent steps taken in China and India to establish cohorts for follow-up and to conduct nested case–control studies may provide useful information about risks in the future, provided that careful organ dose reconstruction is possible and information is collected on potential confounding factors. PMID:19454802

  13. Energy levels and radiative data for Kr-like W38+ from MCDHF and RMBPT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, XueLing; Grumer, Jon; Brage, Tomas; Si, Ran; Chen, ChongYang; Jönsson, Per; Wang, Kai; Yan, Jun; Hutton, Roger; Zou, YaMing

    2016-07-01

    Energies, transition rates, line strengths and lifetimes have been computed for all levels of the 4p 6 and 4p 54d configurations of W38+ by using the multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock (MCDHF) method as well as relativistic many-body perturbation theory. We investigate systematically correlation, relativistic and quantum electro-dynamical (QED) effects of different properties, including excitation energies and transition rates. We demonstrate that it is important to include the core-valence correlation of rather deep subshells (including 3d and 3p) to reach close to spectroscopic accuracy for the transition energies. We also show that high-multipole transitions (E3, M2) are important for the lifetime of some metastable levels of 4p 54d ({}3{F}3,{}1{D}2,{}3{D}2). The present results are in good agreement with experiments and of considerably higher accuracy than those achieved in previous theoretical works.

  14. Search for tachyons associated with extensive air showers in the ground level cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masjed, H. F.; Ashton, F.

    1985-01-01

    Events detected in a shielded plastic scintillation counter occurring in the 26 microsec preceding the arrival of an extensive air shower at ground level with local electron density or = 20 m to the -2 power and the 240 microsec after its arrival have been studied. No significant excess of events (tachyons) arriving in the early time domain have been observed in a sample of 11,585 air shower triggers.

  15. Occupational radiation exposures associated with alternative methods of low-level waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Herrington, W.N.; Harty, R.; Merwin, S.E.

    1987-05-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments (LLRWPA) Act of 1985 assigns the responsibility for disposal of low-level radioactive wastes to individual states. The Act also mandates that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), in consultation with states and other interested parties, identify disposal methods other than shallow land burial (SLB), the method currently used at the three low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites operating in the United States. The NRC contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to compare projected occupational exposures associated with the SLB method and five alternative disposal methods, including below ground vaults (BGV), above ground vaults (AGV), earth mounded concrete bunkers (EMCB), augured holes (AH) and minded cavities (MC). This report is intended to inform state and local governments about these projected exposures in anticipation of their participation in siting new low-level waste disposal facilities. The results of this study suggest that, with the design and operation assumptions made in this study, occupational dose equivalents for the five methods examined in detail would be highest for the EMCB method (1.81 person-mrem/m/sup 3/ of waste disposed). The lowest occupational dose equivalents would occur for the AH method (1.29 person-mrem/m/sup 3/). Projected occupational dose equivalents for SLB, BGV, and AGV disposal methods are 1.38, 1.47, and 1.61 person-mrem/m/sup 3/, respectively. Based on simularities between the reference BGV and MC facilities, it was projected that the occupational dose equivalents for a MC facility would be 40% higher than for the reference BGV facility. 17 refs., 15 figs., 13 tabs.

  16. Experimental shielding evaluation of the radiation protection provided by the structurally significant components of residential structures.

    PubMed

    Dickson, E D; Hamby, D M

    2014-03-01

    The human health and environmental effects following a postulated accidental release of radioactive material to the environment have been a public and regulatory concern since the early development of nuclear technology. These postulated releases have been researched extensively to better understand the potential risks for accident mitigation and emergency planning purposes. The objective of this investigation is to provide an updated technical basis for contemporary building shielding factors for the US housing stock. Building shielding factors quantify the protection from ionising radiation provided by a certain building type. Much of the current data used to determine the quality of shielding around nuclear facilities and urban environments is based on simplistic point-kernel calculations for 1950s era suburbia and is no longer applicable to the densely populated urban environments realised today. To analyse a building's radiation shielding properties, the ideal approach would be to subject a variety of building types to various radioactive sources and measure the radiation levels in and around the building. While this is not entirely practicable, this research analyses the shielding effectiveness of ten structurally significant US housing-stock models (walls and roofs) important for shielding against ionising radiation. The experimental data are used to benchmark computational models to calculate the shielding effectiveness of various building configurations under investigation from two types of realistic environmental source terms. Various combinations of these ten shielding models can be used to develop full-scale computational housing-unit models for building shielding factor calculations representing 69.6 million housing units (61.3%) in the United States. Results produced in this investigation provide a comparison between theory and experiment behind building shielding factor methodology. PMID:24487195

  17. Measurement of gamma radiation levels in soil samples from Thanjavur using gamma-ray spectrometry and estimation of population exposure.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, B; Dhavamani, V; Ramkumar, S; Philominathan, P

    2010-01-01

    This study assesses the level of terrestrial gamma radiation and associated dose rates from the naturally occurring radionuclides (232)Th, (238)U and (40)K in 10 soil samples collected from Thanjavur (Tamil Nadu, India) using gamma-ray spectrometry. The activity profile of radionuclides has clearly showed the existence of low level activity in Thanjavur. The geometric mean activity concentrations of (232)Th, (238)U and (40)K is 42.9+/-9.4 Bq.kg(-1), 14.7+/-1.7 Bq.kg(-1) and 149.5+/-3.1 Bq.kg(-1) respectively are derived from all the soil samples studied. The activity concentration of (232)Th, (238)U and (40)K in soil is due to the presence of metamorphic rocks like shale, hornblende-biotite gneiss and quartzofeldspathic gneiss in these areas. Gamma absorbed dose rates in air outdoors were calculated to be in the range between 32 nGy.h(-1) and 59.1 nGy.h(-1) with an arithmetic mean of 43.3 +/-9 nGy.h(-1). This value is lesser than the population weighted world-averaged of 60 nGy.h(-1). Inhabitants of Thanjavur are subjected to external gamma radiation exposure (effective dose) ranging between 39.2 and 72.6 muSv.y(-1) with an arithmetic mean of 53.1+/-11 muSv.y(-1). The values of the external hazard index determined from the soil radioactivity of the study area are less than the recommended safe levels.

  18. The use of isodose levels to interpret radiation induced lung injury: a quantitative analysis of computed tomography changes

    PubMed Central

    Knoll, Miriam A.; Sheu, Ren Dih; Knoll, Abraham D.; Kerns, Sarah L.; Lo, Yeh-Chi; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer are often found to have radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) surrounding the treated tumor. We investigated whether treatment isodose levels could predict RILI. Methods Thirty-seven lung lesions in 32 patients were treated with SBRT and received post-treatment follow up (FU) computed tomography (CT). Each CT was fused with the original simulation CT and treatment isodose levels were overlaid. The RILI surrounding the treated lesion was contoured. The RILI extension index [fibrosis extension index (FEI)] was defined as the volume of RILI extending outside a given isodose level relative to the total volume of RILI and was expressed as a percentage. Results Univariate analysis revealed that the planning target volume (PTV) was positively correlated with RILI volume at FU: correlation coefficient (CC) =0.628 and P<0.0001 at 1st FU; CE =0.401 and P=0.021 at 2nd FU; CE =0.265 and P=0.306 at 3rd FU. FEI −40 Gy at 1st FU was significantly positively correlated with FEI −40 Gy at subsequent FU’s (CC =0.689 and P=6.5×10−5 comparing 1st and 2nd FU; 0.901 and P=0.020 comparing 2nd and 3rd FU. Ninety-six percent of the RILI was found within the 20 Gy isodose line. Sixty-five percent of patients were found to have a decrease in RILI on the second 2nd CT. Conclusions We have shown that RILI evolves over time and 1st CT correlates well with subsequent CTs. Ninety-six percent of the RILI can be found to occur within the 20 Gy isodose lines, which may prove beneficial to radiologists attempting to distinguish recurrence vs. RILI. PMID:26981453

  19. Measurement of gamma radiation levels in soil samples from Thanjavur using γ-ray spectrometry and estimation of population exposure

    PubMed Central

    Senthilkumar, B.; Dhavamani, V.; Ramkumar, S.; Philominathan, P.

    2010-01-01

    This study assesses the level of terrestrial gamma radiation and associated dose rates from the naturally occurring radionuclides 232Th, 238U and 40K in 10 soil samples collected from Thanjavur (Tamil Nadu, India) using γ-ray spectrometry. The activity profile of radionuclides has clearly showed the existence of low level activity in Thanjavur. The geometric mean activity concentrations of 232Th, 238U and 40K is 42.9±9.4 Bq.kg−1, 14.7±1.7 Bq.kg−1 and 149.5±3.1 Bq.kg−1 respectively are derived from all the soil samples studied. The activity concentration of 232Th, 238U and 40K in soil is due to the presence of metamorphic rocks like shale, hornblende-biotite gneiss and quartzofeldspathic gneiss in these areas. Gamma absorbed dose rates in air outdoors were calculated to be in the range between 32 nGy.h−1 and 59.1 nGy.h−1 with an arithmetic mean of 43.3 ±9 nGy.h−1. This value is lesser than the population weighted world-averaged of 60 nGy.h−1. Inhabitants of Thanjavur are subjected to external gamma radiation exposure (effective dose) ranging between 39.2 and 72.6 μSv.y−1 with an arithmetic mean of 53.1±11 μSv.y−1. The values of the external hazard index determined from the soil radioactivity of the study area are less than the recommended safe levels. PMID:20177570

  20. Secretory IgA, albumin level, and bone density as markers of biostimulatory effects of laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucerova, Hana; Dostalova, Tatjana; Himmlova, Lucia; Bartova, Jirina; Mazanek, Jiri

    1998-12-01

    The aim of contribution is to evaluate the effects of low- level laser radiation on healing process after human molars extraction in lower jaw using frequency 5 Hz, 292 Hz and 9000 Hz. Changes in bone density and monitoring of secretory IgA and albumin levels in saliva were used as a marker of biostimulatory effect. Bone density after extraction and 6 month after surgical treatment was examined using the dental digital radiography. Bone healing was followed by osseointegration of bone structure in extraction wound. Changes of bone density, secretory IgA and albumin levels were compared in groups of patients with laser therapy and control group without laser therapy. Differences in levels of the saliva markers (sIgA and albumin) were found to be significant comparing irradiated and non-irradiated groups, as well as comparing groups irradiated by various modulatory frequencies. Density of alveolar bone (histogram) was examined on five slices acquired from every RVG image. Histograms were evaluated with computer program for microscopic image analysis. Differences of density were verified in area of the whole slice. There were no significant differences found between the bone density in irradiated and non irradiated groups perhaps due to our used therapeutical diagram.

  1. Born total ionisation cross sections: An algebraic computing program using Maple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Philip L.; Stelbovics, Andris T.

    2003-08-01

    The software described in this paper uses the Maple algebraic computing environment to calculate an analytic form for the matrix element of the plane-wave Born approximation of the electron-impact ionisation of an atomic orbital, with arbitrary orbital and angular momentum quantum numbers. The atomic orbitals are approximated by Hartree-Fock Slater functions, and the ejected electron is modelled by a hydrogenic Coulomb wave, made orthogonal to all occupied orbitals of the target atom. Clenshaw-Curtis integration techniques are then used to calculate the total ionisation cross-section. For improved performance, the numerical integrations are performed using FORTRAN by automatically converting the analytic matrix element for each orbital into a FORTRAN subroutine. The results compare favourably with experimental data for a wide range of elements, including the transition metals, with excellent convergence at high energies. Program summaryTitle of program: BIX Catalogue identifier:ADRZ Program summary URL:http://www.cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/cpc/summaries/ADRZ Program obtainable from:CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computers: Platform independent Operating systems: Tested on DEC Alpha Unix, Windows NT 4.0 and Windows XP Professional Edition Programming language used: Maple V Release 5.1 and FORTRAN 90 Memory required: 256 MB No. of processors used: 1 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:61754 Distributed format:tar gzip file Keywords: Born approximation, electron-impact ionisation cross-section, Maple, Hartree-Fock Nature of physical problem: Calculates the total electron impact ionisation cross-section for neutral and ionised atomic species using the first-Born approximation. The scattered electron is modelled by a plane wave, and the ejected electron is modelled by a hydrogenic Coulomb wave, which is made orthogonal to all occupied atomic orbitals, and the atomic orbitals are approximated by Hartree-Fock Slater

  2. Two different strategies of Mediterranean macchia plants to avoid photoinhibitory damage by excessive radiation levels during summer drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Christiane; Correia, Otilia; Beyschlag, Wolfram

    1999-02-01

    The adaptive strategies to high radiation and water stress of the drought tolerant evergreen sclerophylls Quercus coccifera and Arbutus unedo are compared to those of the semi-deciduous Cistus spp. ( C. albidus and C. monspeliensis). Cistus spp. partially avoided drought by a marked reduction of their transpirational surface through leaf abscission during summer, when predawn water potential declined below -5.5 MPa. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements revealed a reversible diurnal decrease of maximum photochemical efficiency of PSII (F v/F m), which became more accentuated during summer drought in all species. An important strategy to avoid damage by excessive radiation levels in Cistus spp. was the structural regulation of light interception through leaf angle changes, from a more horizontal orientation in spring (< 35°) to a more vertical orientation in summer (> 70°). Horizontal orientated leaves were highly susceptible to photoinhibition, and excessive radiation often resulted in irreversible photodamage followed by leaf abscission during summer, whereas vertical leaf orientation appeared to protect the leaf from severe photoinhibition. Still, these mechanisms were not fully successful in avoiding chronic photoinhibition, and predawn F v/F m values remained low in Cistus spp. during summer (only exhibiting a partial overnight recovery). Evergreen sclerophylls were less susceptible to photoinhibition, and the diurnal decline in F v/F m remained fully reversible during drought. Structural regulation of light interception was not found to be an important strategy in these species, and only small, though significant changes in leaf angle occurred. The ecological importance of the adaptive strategies of each functional group is discussed.

  3. EXPERIENCE MONITORING FOR LOW LEVEL NEUTRON RADIATION AT THE H-CANYON AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    HOGUE, MARK

    2005-10-07

    Department of Energy contractors are required to monitor external occupational radiation exposure of an individual likely to receive an effective dose equivalent to the whole body of 0.1 rem (0.001sievert) or more in a year. For a working year of 2000 hours, this translates to a dose rate of 0.05 mrem/hr (0.5 {micro}Sv/hr). This can be a challenging requirement for neutron exposure because traditional surveys with shielded BF{sub 3} proportional counters are difficult to conduct, particularly at low dose rates. A modified survey method was used at the Savannah River Site to find low dose rates in excess of 0.05 mrem/hr. An unshielded He{sup 3} detector was used to find elevated gross slow neutron counts. Areas with high count rates on the unshielded He{sup 3} detector were further investigated with shielded BF{sub 3} proportional counters and thermoluminescent neutron dosimeters were placed in the area of interest. An office area was investigated with this method. The data initially suggested that whole body neutron dose rates to office workers could be occurring at levels significantly higher than 0.1 rem (0.001sievert). The final evaluation, however, showed that the office workers were exposed to less than 0.1 rem/yr (0.001sievert/yr) of neutron radiation.

  4. Cancer in the offspring of radiation workers: a record linkage study.

    PubMed Central

    Draper, G. J.; Little, M. P.; Sorahan, T.; Kinlen, L. J.; Bunch, K. J.; Conquest, A. J.; Kendall, G. M.; Kneale, G. W.; Lancashire, R. J.; Muirhead, C. R.; O'Connor, C. M.; Vincent, T. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test the "Gardner hypothesis" that childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma can be caused by fathers' exposure to ionising radiation before the conception of the child, and, more generally, to investigate whether such radiation exposure of either parent is a cause of childhood cancer. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: Great Britain. SUBJECTS: 35,949 children diagnosed as having cancer, together with matched controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Parental employment as radiation worker as defined by inclusion in the National Registry for Radiation Workers and being monitored for external radiation before conception of child; cumulative dose of external ionising radiation for various periods of employment before conception; dose during pregnancy. RESULTS: After cases studied by Gardner and colleagues were excluded, fathers of children with leukaemia or non-Hodgkin lymphoma were significantly more likely than fathers of controls to have been radiation workers (relative risk 1.77, 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 3.03) but there was no dose-response relation for any of the exposure periods studied; indeed, the association was greatest for those with doses below the level of detection. No increased risk was found for fathers with a lifetime preconception dose of 100 mSv or more, or with a dose in the 6 months before conception of 10 mSv or more. There was no increased risk for the group of other childhood cancers. Mothers' radiation work was associated with a significant increase of childhood cancer (relative risk 5.00, 1.42 to 26.94; based on 15 cases and 3 controls). Only four of the case mothers and no controls were radiation workers during pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: These results do not support the hypothesis that paternal preconception irradiation is a cause of childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma; the observed associations may be chance findings or results from exposure to infective or other agents. If there is any increased risk for the

  5. Rise to modern levels of ocean oxygenation coincided with the Cambrian radiation of animals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Ling, Hong-Fei; Vance, Derek; Shields-Zhou, Graham A.; Zhu, Maoyan; Poulton, Simon W.; Och, Lawrence M.; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Li, Da; Cremonese, Lorenzo; Archer, Corey

    2015-01-01

    The early diversification of animals (∼630 Ma), and their development into both motile and macroscopic forms (∼575–565 Ma), has been linked to stepwise increases in the oxygenation of Earth's surface environment. However, establishing such a linkage between oxygen and evolution for the later Cambrian ‘explosion' (540–520 Ma) of new, energy-sapping body plans and behaviours has proved more elusive. Here we present new molybdenum isotope data, which demonstrate that the areal extent of oxygenated bottom waters increased in step with the early Cambrian bioradiation of animals and eukaryotic phytoplankton. Modern-like oxygen levels characterized the ocean at ∼521 Ma for the first time in Earth history. This marks the first establishment of a key environmental factor in modern-like ecosystems, where animals benefit from, and also contribute to, the ‘homeostasis' of marine redox conditions. PMID:25980960

  6. Rise to modern levels of ocean oxygenation coincided with the Cambrian radiation of animals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Ling, Hong-Fei; Vance, Derek; Shields-Zhou, Graham A; Zhu, Maoyan; Poulton, Simon W; Och, Lawrence M; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Li, Da; Cremonese, Lorenzo; Archer, Corey

    2015-05-18

    The early diversification of animals (∼ 630 Ma), and their development into both motile and macroscopic forms (∼ 575-565 Ma), has been linked to stepwise increases in the oxygenation of Earth's surface environment. However, establishing such a linkage between oxygen and evolution for the later Cambrian 'explosion' (540-520 Ma) of new, energy-sapping body plans and behaviours has proved more elusive. Here we present new molybdenum isotope data, which demonstrate that the areal extent of oxygenated bottom waters increased in step with the early Cambrian bioradiation of animals and eukaryotic phytoplankton. Modern-like oxygen levels characterized the ocean at ∼ 521 Ma for the first time in Earth history. This marks the first establishment of a key environmental factor in modern-like ecosystems, where animals benefit from, and also contribute to, the 'homeostasis' of marine redox conditions.

  7. Interactions between 7, 12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and repeated low-level X radiation in hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis: dependence on the relative timing of DMBA and radiation treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Lurie, A.G.

    1982-04-01

    Low-level X radiation was shown to enhance Syrian hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) when radiation was administered concurrently with and following DMBA applications. We studied the effects of altering the timing of radiation and DMBA applications on this enhancement. DMBA in mineral oil was applied twice weekly for 10 weeks and 20 R head and neck X radiation once weekly for 17 weeks. In duplicate studies, animals received radiation, DMBA, or DMBA plus X radiation. In the DMBA plus X-ray group, there were 9 weeks of preirradiation and 7 weeks of concurrent treatments. Radiation alone did not result in any histologically detectable changes. In one study, preirradiation may have reduced the carcinogenic activity of DMBA, while in the second study there were no significant differences in tumor incidences between X radiation plus DMBA and DMBA only groups. Thus, while repeated 20-R-X-ray exposures during the following DMBA applications enhance DMBA carcinogenesis, identical X-ray exposures prior to and during DMBA applications appear either to slightly inhibit or to have no appreciable effect on DMBA carcinogenesis.

  8. Oncological aspects of the biological action of low-level laser radiation: I. Experimental foundation for LLLR use in oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Andrei V.

    1999-12-01

    In this paper the results of an experimental-clinical study substantiating the use of low level laser radiation (LLLR) at certain wavelengths for treatment of cancer patients are given. In the first part of this study, with animal experiments, laser action parameters providing reliable renewal and regeneration stimulation are selected. It is shown that, under the effect of LLLR, the speed and quality of regeneration in wounds after tumor removal are changed as well as the intensity of dissemination and tumor growth. A change also occurs in the functional properties of lymphocytes, which have immunological control in the organism. On the basis of the experimental data obtained, the contingent of cancer patients for whom LLLR can be recommended was determined.

  9. A preliminary area survey of neutron radiation levels associated with the NASA variable energy cyclotron horizontal neutron delivery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. K.; Leonard, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    The 25 MeV deuteron beam from the NASA variable energy cyclotron incident on a thick beryllium target will deliver a tissue neutron dose rate of 2.14 rad micron A-min at a source to skin distance of 125 cm. A neutron survey of the existing hallways with various shielding configurations made during operating of the horizontal neutron delivery system indicates that minimal amounts of additional neutron shielding material are required to provide a low level radiation environment within a self-contained neutron therapy control station. Measurements also indicate that the primary neutron distribution delivered by a planned vertical delivery system will be minimally perturbed by neutrons backscattered from the floor.

  10. Measuring method of undamaged samples for the radiation levels of decorative building materials.

    PubMed

    Yahong, Mao; Libin, Lin; Yigang, Liu

    2004-07-01

    When natural radionuclides are well distributed in materials, there is a fixed interrelationship between activities in any part of the material and the surface flux of alpha and beta rays. Placing an alpha detector on the surface can estimate radionuclide activities in the materials without damaging samples. This paper studied the relationship between gamma ray specific activities of natural radionuclides and alpha ray surface flux of decorative building materials. The results show that when the surface alpha ray activities of granite are less than 0.0052 Bq cm, or the surface alpha ray activities of polished tiles are less than 0.0082 Bq cm, their internal and external exposure indexes are in the range of "A" limits of national criteria of China, Limit of radionuclides in building materials. Because there is a great difference between the radioactive levels of the surface glaze and the matrix of color-glazed tiles, the natural radionuclides are not well distributed in color-glazed tiles, and the ratio between the alpha surface activity and the gamma ray activity in unit mass is not fixed. The surface alpha ray flux of materials cannot be used to estimate the internal and external exposure indexes of color-glazed tiles.

  11. RADIATIVE OPACITY OF IRON STUDIED USING A DETAILED LEVEL ACCOUNTING MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Fengtao; Zeng Jiaolong; Yuan Jianmin; Huang Tianxuan; Ding Yongkun; Zheng Zhijian

    2009-03-01

    The opacity of iron plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium is studied using an independently developed detailed level accounting model. Atomic data are generated by solving the full relativistic Dirac-Fock equations. State mixing within one electronic configuration is considered to include part of the correlations between electrons without configuration interaction matrices that are too large being involved. Simulations are carried out and compared with several recent experimental transmission spectra in the M- and L-shell absorption regions to reveal the high accuracy of the model. The present model is also compared with the OPAL, LEDCOP and OP models for two isothermal series at T = 20 eV and T = 19.3 eV. It is found that our model is in good agreement with OPAL and LEDCOP while it has discrepancies with OP at high densities. Systematic Rosseland and Planck mean opacities in the range 10-1000 eV for temperature and 10{sup -5}-10{sup -1} g cm{sup -3} for density are also presented and compared with LEDCOP results, finding good agreement at lower temperatures but apparent differences at high temperatures where the L- and K-shell absorptions are dominant.

  12. Effects of UV-B radiation and water stress on gas exchange of soybeans under two different nitrogen levels

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, L.M.; Forseth, I.N. )

    1993-06-01

    Due to anthropogenic destruction of stratospheric ozone, UV-B radiation is projected to increase in the near future. Other potential global climate changes in temperature and precipitation patterns raise the need for research into plant responses to multiple environmental stresses. The objective of this study was to document UV-B and water stress effects on gas exchange of soybean (Glycine max Merr.) under two nitrogen levels. Two soybean cultivars differing in sensitivity to UV-B were tested at fluence rates of 19.1 or 8.5 kJ m[sub [minus]2]day[sub [minus]1] (enhance and natural levels of UV-B, respectively). Measurements of photosaturated CO[sub 2] uptake at ambient CO[sub 2] (A). stomatal conductance. photosaturated O[sub 2] evolution at saturating CO[sub 2] (A[sub max]), long term water use efficiency (using [delta][sup 13]C), and nitrogen fixation (using [sup 15]N) were performed. No significant treatment effects on A could be detected. However A[sub max] was significantly increased, and stomatal conductance reduced (p<0.01) by increased UV-B at all levels of water and nitrogen for both cultivars, suggesting a stronger stomal limitation of photosynthesis under UV-B. Water and nitrogen use efficiency also decreased under increased UV-B in both cultivars (p<0.01).

  13. Natural radioactivity levels and radiation hazard indices in granite from Aswan to Wadi El-Allaqi southeastern desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Taher, A; Uosif, M A M; Orabi, A A

    2007-01-01

    Studies on radiation level and radionuclide distribution in granite from Aswan to Wadi El-Allaqi area that is located in southeastern desert of Egypt were undertaken. The samples collected from five locations: Gabal El Mesala, Umm Hibal, Abu Herigle, Abu Marw and Deneibit El Quleib. The purpose of this study is to provide a baseline map of radioactivity background levels in the investigated area environment, and this study will be used as reference information to assess any changes in the radioactive background level due to geological processes. The highest average values of 226Ra and 232Th concentrations (24.00 and 31.28 Bq kg(-1), respectively) were observed at Abu Herigle region, whereas the highest average value of 40K concentration, 589.95 Bq kg(-1), was detected in Umm Hibal. The absorbed dose rate in air was found to be in the range between 5.40 and 45.11 nGy h(-1), and radium equivalent activity concentration was found in the range between 29.57 and 71.85 Bq kg(-1). Also the representative external hazard index values for the corresponding samples were also estimated and given.

  14. The cytoplasm as a radiation target: an in silico study of microbeam cell irradiation.

    PubMed

    Byrne, H L; Domanova, W; McNamara, A L; Incerti, S; Kuncic, Z

    2015-03-21

    We performed in silico microbeam cell irradiation modelling to quantitatively investigate ionisations resulting from soft x-ray and alpha particle microbeams targeting the cytoplasm of a realistic cell model. Our results on the spatial distribution of ionisations show that as x-rays are susceptible to scatter within a cell that can lead to ionisations in the nucleus, soft x-ray microbeams may not be suitable for investigating the DNA damage response to radiation targeting the cytoplasm alone. In contrast, ionisations from an ideal alpha microbeam are tightly confined to the cytoplasm, but a realistic alpha microbeam degrades upon interaction with components upstream of the cellular target. Thus it is difficult to completely rule out a contribution from alpha particle hits to the nucleus when investigating DNA damage response to cytoplasmic irradiation. We find that although the cytoplasm targeting efficiency of an alpha microbeam is better than that of a soft x-ray microbeam (the probability of stray alphas hitting the nucleus is 0.2% compared to 3.6% for x-rays), stray alphas produce more ionisations in the nucleus and thus have greater potential for initiating damage responses therein. Our results suggest that observed biological responses to cytoplasmic irradiation include a small component that can be attributed to stray ionisations in the nucleus resulting from the stochastic nature of particle interactions that cause out-of-beam scatter. This contribution is difficult to isolate experimentally, thus demonstrating the value of the in silico approach.

  15. The cytoplasm as a radiation target: an in silico study of microbeam cell irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, H. L.; Domanova, W.; McNamara, A. L.; Incerti, S.; Kuncic, Z.

    2015-03-01

    We performed in silico microbeam cell irradiation modelling to quantitatively investigate ionisations resulting from soft x-ray and alpha particle microbeams targeting the cytoplasm of a realistic cell model. Our results on the spatial distribution of ionisations show that as x-rays are susceptible to scatter within a cell that can lead to ionisations in the nucleus, soft x-ray microbeams may not be suitable for investigating the DNA damage response to radiation targeting the cytoplasm alone. In contrast, ionisations from an ideal alpha microbeam are tightly confined to the cytoplasm, but a realistic alpha microbeam degrades upon interaction with components upstream of the cellular target. Thus it is difficult to completely rule out a contribution from alpha particle hits to the nucleus when investigating DNA damage response to cytoplasmic irradiation. We find that although the cytoplasm targeting efficiency of an alpha microbeam is better than that of a soft x-ray microbeam (the probability of stray alphas hitting the nucleus is 0.2% compared to 3.6% for x-rays), stray alphas produce more ionisations in the nucleus and thus have greater potential for initiating damage responses therein. Our results suggest that observed biological responses to cytoplasmic irradiation include a small component that can be attributed to stray ionisations in the nucleus resulting from the stochastic nature of particle interactions that cause out-of-beam scatter. This contribution is difficult to isolate experimentally, thus demonstrating the value of the in silico approach.

  16. Characterization of the deep levels responsible for non-radiative recombination in InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghini, M. La Grassa, M.; Vaccari, S.; Meneghesso, G.; Zanoni, E.

    2014-03-17

    This paper presents an extensive investigation of the deep levels related to non-radiative recombination in InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The study is based on combined optical and deep-level transient spectroscopy measurements, carried out on LEDs with identical structure and with different values of the non-radiative recombination coefficient. Experimental data lead to the following, relevant, results: (i) LEDs with a high non-radiative recombination coefficient have a higher concentration of a trap (labeled as “e{sub 2}”) with an activation energy of 0.7 eV, which is supposed to be located close to/within the active region; (ii) measurements carried out with varying filling pulse duration suggest that this deep level behaves as a point-defect/dislocation complex. The Arrhenius plot of this deep level is critically compared with the previous literature reports, to identify its physical origin.

  17. Evidence of children's vulnerability to radiation in the context of radiological/nuclear events and considerations for emergency response.

    PubMed

    Lane, Rachel; Reinhardt, Pascale; Thompson, Patsy

    2010-11-01

    International organisations, such as International Atomic Energy Agency, United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation and World Health Organisation, together with committees of experts such as Biological Effects of Ionising Radiation and Committee on Medical Aspects of Radiation in the Environment, have assessed the effects of radiation on large exposed populations (Chernobyl accident, and Hiroshima/Nagasaki atomic bombings) and on nuclear energy workers and people living near nuclear facilities. Childhood and in utero exposure to moderate and high levels of ionizing radiation, such as those experienced during the atomic bombings of Japan, or from radiotherapy, is an established cause of leukaemia and solid cancer. There is no evidence of increase in solid cancers (excluding thyroid cancer) or leukaemia in the children from Chernobyl, and no evident link between worker's exposure to radiation and leukaemia in their offspring or with the presence of leukaemia clusters around nuclear power plants. It has also not been possible to demonstrate the evidence of radiation hereditary effects in human populations. In accordance with international guidance, Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission recommends optimisation of protection strategies to reduce doses to children. The development of credible radiological/nuclear event scenarios would assist in identifying probable sources of radioactivity and pathways of exposure for children. Such scenarios should then be used to identify protection strategies appropriate for children. PMID:20959331

  18. Design and performance of an ionisation chamber for the measurement of low alpha-activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, A.; Hutsch, J.; Krüger, F.; Sobiella, M.; Wilsenach, H.; Zuber, K.

    2016-04-01

    A new ionisation chamber for alpha-spectroscopy has been built from radio-pure materials for the purpose of investigating long lived alpha-decays. The measurement makes use of pulse shape analysis to discriminate between signal and background events. The design and performance of the chamber is described in this paper. A background rate of (10.9 ± 0.6) counts per day in the energy region of 1-9 MeV was achieved with a run period of 30.8 days. The background is dominantly produced by radon daughters.

  19. Forensic applications of desorption electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (DESI-MS).

    PubMed

    Morelato, Marie; Beavis, Alison; Kirkbride, Paul; Roux, Claude

    2013-03-10

    Desorption electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is an emerging analytical technique that enables in situ mass spectrometric analysis of specimens under ambient conditions. It has been successfully applied to a large range of forensically relevant materials. This review assesses and highlights forensic applications of DESI-MS including the analysis and detection of illicit drugs, explosives, chemical warfare agents, inks and documents, fingermarks, gunshot residues and drugs of abuse in urine and plasma specimens. The minimal specimen preparation required for analysis and the sensitivity of detection achieved offer great advantages, especially in the field of forensic science.

  20. Characterisation of the muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, D.; Adey, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Back, J.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bertoni, R.; Blackmore, V. J.; Blondel, A.; Blot, S.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonesini, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bowring, D.; Boyd, S.; Bradshaw, T. W.; Bravar, U.; Bross, A. D.; Capponi, M.; Carlisle, T.; Cecchet, G.; Charnley, G.; Cobb, J. H.; Colling, D.; Collomb, N.; Coney, L.; Cooke, P.; Courthold, M.; Cremaldi, L. M.; DeMello, A.; Dick, A. J.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Fayer, S.; Filthaut, F.; Fish, A.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Fletcher, R.; Forrest, D.; Francis, V.; Freemire, B.; Fry, L.; Gallagher, A.; Gamet, R.; Gourlay, S.; Grant, A.; Graulich, J. S.; Griffiths, S.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, O. M.; Hanson, G. G.; Harrison, P.; Hart, T. L.; Hartnett, T.; Hayler, T.; Heidt, C.; Hills, M.; Hodgson, P.; Hunt, C.; Iaciofano, A.; Ishimoto, S.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D. M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Kolev, D.; Kuno, Y.; Kyberd, P.; Lau, W.; Leaver, J.; Leonova, M.; Li, D.; Lintern, A.; Littlefield, M.; Long, K.; Lucchini, G.; Luo, T.; Macwaters, C.; Martlew, B.; Martyniak, J.; Middleton, S.; Moretti, A.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Nebrensky, J. J.; Neuffer, D.; Nichols, A.; Nicholson, R.; Nugent, J. C.; Onel, Y.; Orestano, D.; Overton, E.; Owens, P.; Palladino, V.; Palmer, R. B.; Pasternak, J.; Pastore, F.; Pidcott, C.; Popovic, M.; Preece, R.; Prestemon, S.; Rajaram, D.; Ramberger, S.; Rayner, M. A.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Roberts, T. J.; Robinson, M.; Rogers, C.; Ronald, K.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, R.; Rusinov, I.; Sakamoto, H.; Sanders, D. A.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Smith, P. J.; Snopok, P.; Soler, F. J. P.; Stanley, T.; Summers, D. J.; Takahashi, M.; Tarrant, J.; Taylor, I.; Tortora, L.; Torun, Y.; Tsenov, R.; Tunnell, C. D.; Vankova, G.; Verguilov, V.; Virostek, S. P.; Vretenar, M.; Walaron, K.; Watson, S.; White, C.; Whyte, C. G.; Wilson, A.; Wisting, H.; Zisman, M. S.

    2013-10-01

    A novel single-particle technique to measure emittance has been developed and used to characterise seventeen different muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE). The muon beams, whose mean momenta vary from 171 to 281 MeV/ c, have emittances of approximately 1.2-2.3 π mm-rad horizontally and 0.6-1.0 π mm-rad vertically, a horizontal dispersion of 90-190 mm and momentum spreads of about 25 MeV/ c. There is reasonable agreement between the measured parameters of the beams and the results of simulations. The beams are found to meet the requirements of MICE.

  1. Characterisation of the muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.; et al.,

    2013-10-01

    A novel single-particle technique to measure emittance has been developed and used to characterise seventeen different muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE). The muon beams, whose mean momenta vary from 171 to 281 MeV/c, have emittances of approximately 1.5--2.3 \\pi mm-rad horizontally and 0.6--1.0 \\pi mm-rad vertically, a horizontal dispersion of 90--190 mm and momentum spreads of about 25 MeV/c. There is reasonable agreement between the measured parameters of the beams and the results of simulations. The beams are found to meet the requirements of MICE.

  2. A novel arsenical in clam kidney identified by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Francesconi, K A; Edmonds, J S

    2001-01-01

    Kidneys of clams of the genus Tridacna accumulate metabolic products from symbiotic unicellular algae that grow in the mantles of the clams. These metabolites include organoarsenic compounds that are biosynthesised by algae from arsenate in seawater. The arsenic compounds in aqueous extracts of the kidney of the giant clam T. derasa were investigated by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry. About 50% of the water-soluble arsenic was present as dimethylarsinoylribosides and dimethylarsinate which are common algal metabolites. The major compound in the kidney (50% of water-soluble arsenic) was identified as a 5-dimethylarsinoyl-2,3,4-trihydroxycarboxylic acid, a new natural product.

  3. Age determination of plutonium material in nuclear forensics by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wallenius, M; Mayer, K

    2000-02-01

    Age is a key parameter when deducing the history of plutonium material, i.e. the plutonium produced in the nuclear reactors. This is of vital importance, when a smuggled plutonium sample has been seized and the origin has to be determined. A methodology is described which allows accurately to determine the age of plutonium material by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry using independent parent/daughter relations. This has been demonstrated for Reference Materials of known ages as well as for real samples. The already established method using gamma spectrometry is compared to this.

  4. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and radiation: findings among workers at five US nuclear facilities and a review of the recent literature.

    PubMed

    Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K; Daniels, Robert D; Fleming, Donald A; Markey, Andrea M; Couch, James R; Ahrenholz, Steven H; Burphy, Jenneh S; Anderson, Jeri L; Tseng, Chih-Yu

    2007-12-01

    The aetiology of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is largely unknown. Despite compelling evidence for ionising radiation as a cause of most forms of leukaemia, CLL was not found to be radiogenic in early studies. Herein we describe the recent evidence for causation of CLL by ionising and non-ionising radiation, including a nested case-control study conducted within a cohort of 94 517 US workers at four nuclear weapons facilities and a nuclear naval shipyard. Forty-three cases of CLL deaths and 172 age-matched controls were identified with follow-up up to between 1990 and 1996. Radiation exposure from external sources and plutonium (lagged 10 years) was assessed for each worker, based on monitoring records. The excess relative rate (ERR) was estimated for workers receiving elevated doses compared to unexposed workers, controlling for possible risk factors. The ERR per 10 mSv was -0.020 (95% confidence interval: <0, 0.14) based on all exposed workers. However, for workers receiving <100 mSv, the ERR per 10 mSv was 0.20 (-0.035, 0.96). Recent studies of uranium miners and other populations have shown elevations of CLL possibly associated with ionising and non-ionising radiation. New studies should use incident cases and sufficient latency to account for the expected lengthy induction period for CLL.

  5. Injury to the blood-testis barrier after low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure in mice.

    PubMed

    Son, Y; Heo, K; Bae, M J; Lee, C G; Cho, W S; Kim, S D; Yang, K; Shin, I S; Lee, M Y; Kim, J S

    2015-11-01

    Exposure to ionising radiation induces male infertility, accompanied by increasing permeability of the blood-testis barrier. However, the effect on male fertility by low-dose-rate chronic radiation has not been investigated. In this study, the effects of low-dose-rate chronic radiation on male mice were investigated by measuring the levels of tight-junction-associated proteins (ZO-1 and occludin-1), Niemann-Pick disease type 2 protein (NPC-2) and antisperm antibody (AsAb) in serum. BALB/c mice were exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (3.49 mGy h(-1)) for total exposures of 0.02 (6 h), 0.17 (2 d) and 1.7 Gy (21 d). Based on histological examination, the diameter and epithelial depth of seminiferous tubules were significantly decreased in 1.7-Gy-irradiated mice. Compared with those of the non-irradiated group, 1.7-Gy-irradiated mice showed significantly decreased ZO-1, occludin-1 and NPC-2 protein levels, accompanied with increased serum AsAb levels. These results suggest potential blood-testis barrier injury and immune infertility in male mice exposed to low-dose-rate chronic radiation.

  6. Radiation carcinogenesis in man: influence of dose-response models and risk projection models in the estimation of risk coefficients following exposure to low-level radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-02-01

    The somatic effects of concern in human populations exposed to low doses and low dose rates of ionizing radiations are those that may be induced by mutation in individual cells, singly or in small numbers. The most important of these is considered to be cancer induction. Current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of radiation in man has been reviewed in two recent reports: the 1977 UNSCEAR Report; and the 1980 BEIR-III Report. Both reports emphasize that cancers of the breast, thyroid, hematopoietic tissues, lung, and bone can be induced by radiation. Other cancers, including the stomach, pancreas, pharynx, lymphatic, and perhaps all tissues of the body, may also be induced by radiation. Both reports calculate risk estimates in absolute and relative terms for low-dose, low-LET whole-body exposure, and for leukemia, breast cancer, thyroid cancer, lung cancer, and other cancers. These estimates derive from exposure and cancer incidence data at high doses and at high dose rates. There are no compelling scientific reasons to apply these values of risk to the very low doses and low dose rates of concern in human radiation protection. In the absence of reliable human data for calculating risk estimates, dose-response models have been constructed from extrapolations of animal data and high-dose-rate human data for projection of estimated risks at low doses and low dose rates. (ERB)

  7. Analysis of the effects of increasing doses of ionizing radiation to the exteriorized rat ovary on follicular development, atresia, and serum gonadotropin levels

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrell, J.; YoungLai, E.V.; Barr, R.; O'Connell, G.; Belbeck, L.; McMahon, A.

    1986-02-01

    There is increasing interest in the effects of environmental and therapeutic agents on the reproductive system, in particular, the ovary. To study the effects of controlled doses of ionizing radiation to the ovary, Sprague-Dawley rats had their ovaries exteriorized and subjected to increasing doses of radiation. There was a significant increase in ovarian follicular atresia, a significant increase in serum follicle-stimulating hormone levels, but no change in serum luteinizing hormone levels. This experimental protocol may facilitate the testing putative radioprotectants.

  8. High throughput volatile fatty acid skin metabolite profiling by thermal desorption secondary electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martin, Helen J; Reynolds, James C; Riazanskaia, Svetlana; Thomas, C L Paul

    2014-09-01

    The non-invasive nature of volatile organic compound (VOC) sampling from skin makes this a priority in the development of new screening and diagnostic assays. Evaluation of recent literature highlights the tension between the analytical utility of ambient ionisation approaches for skin profiling and the practicality of undertaking larger campaigns (higher statistical power), or undertaking research in remote locations. This study describes how VOC may be sampled from skin and recovered from a polydimethylsilicone sampling coupon and analysed by thermal desorption (TD) interfaced to secondary electrospray ionisation (SESI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) for the high throughput screening of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) from human skin. Analysis times were reduced by 79% compared to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods (GC-MS) and limits of detection in the range 300 to 900 pg cm(-2) for VFA skin concentrations were obtained. Using body odour as a surrogate model for clinical testing 10 Filipino participants, 5 high and 5 low odour, were sampled in Manilla and the samples returned to the UK and screened by TD-SESI-MS and TD-GC-MS for malodour precursors with greater than >95% agreement between the two analytical techniques. Eight additional VFAs were also identified by both techniques with chains 4 to 15 carbons long being observed. TD-SESI-MS appears to have significant potential for the high throughput targeted screening of volatile biomarkers in human skin.

  9. Studies on thermionic ionisation detection in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Danielle; Marriott, Philip

    2006-10-01

    This study explores the application of specific thermionic ionisation detection in comprehensive 2-D GC (GC x GC) and represents the first report of GC x GC with nitrogen phosphorus detection (GC x GC-NPD). Of particular interest is the performance of the NPD with respect to peak parameters of asymmetry and sensitivity. Since GC x GC produces much narrower peaks than obtained with fast GC (e.g. 100 ms vs. <1 s) the effect of detector response time and any lack of symmetry arising from the detection step is important if peak separation (resolution) is to be maintained. It was observed that detector gas flows had a significant impact on peak asymmetry and peak magnitude, and that optimisation of the detector was critical, particularly for complex sample analysis by GC x GC-NPD. Peak asymmetries ranging from As = 1.8 to 8.0 were observed under different conditions of detector gas flows. Comparison of GC x GC-NPD with GC x GC-flame ionisation detection (FID) showed the former to be approximately 20 times more sensitive for the detection of nitrogen-containing methoxypyrazines analytes, and GC x GC-NPD had a larger linear detection range compared to GC x GC-FID. Furthermore, comparison of GC x GC-NPD and GC x GC-TOFMS chromatograms for the analysis of coffee head-space demonstrated the benefits of selective detection, ultimately realised in a comparatively simplified contour plot.

  10. High-resolution laser spectroscopy with the Collinear Resonance Ionisation Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at CERN-ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocolios, T. E.; de Groote, R. P.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Budinčević, I.; Day Goodacre, T.; Farooq-Smith, G. J.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Flanagan, K. T.; Franchoo, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Gins, W.; Heylen, H.; Kron, T.; Li, R.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Neyens, G.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Smith, A. J.; Stroke, H. H.; Wendt, K. D. A.; Wilkins, S. G.; Yang, X.

    2016-06-01

    The Collinear Resonance Ionisation Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at CERN has achieved high-resolution resonance ionisation laser spectroscopy with a full width at half maximum linewidth of 20(1) MHz for 219,221 Fr, and has measured isotopes as short lived as 5 ms with 214 Fr. This development allows for greater precision in the study of hyperfine structures and isotope shifts, as well as a higher selectivity of single-isotope, even single-isomer, beams. These achievements are linked with the development of a new laser laboratory and new data-acquisition systems.

  11. Correlation of the ionisation response at selected points of IC sensitive regions with SEE sensitivity parameters under pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordienko, A V; Mavritskii, O B; Egorov, A N; Pechenkin, A A; Savchenkov, D V

    2014-12-31

    The statistics of the ionisation response amplitude measured at selected points and their surroundings within sensitive regions of integrated circuits (ICs) under focused femtosecond laser irradiation is obtained for samples chosen from large batches of two types of ICs. A correlation between these data and the results of full-chip scanning is found for each type. The criteria for express validation of IC single-event effect (SEE) hardness based on ionisation response measurements at selected points are discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  12. COOMET regional comparison of national measurement standards of air kerma for 137Cs γ radiation at protection level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büermann, L.; Oborin, A. V.; Milevsky, V. S.; Walwyn Salas, G.; Sukhishvili, S.; Ginga, I.; Ivanov, R.; Gudelis, A.; Gomola, I.

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented of the COOMET supplementary comparison of the national measurement standards for air kerma in 137Cs γ radiation at protection level (~10 mGy/h). Ten National Metrology Institutes from the COOMET organization and the International Atomic Energy Agency participated in this COOMET project no. 445. The PTB acted as pilot laboratory. Two of the participants, the SMU (Slovakia) and the NSC-'IM' (Ukraine) participated in the measurements but did not submit a valid report of results. The comparison reference value (CRV) was obtained as the mean result of the PTB and the VNIIM, both of which had previously taken part in the key comparison BIPM-RI(I)-K5. The degree of equivalence with the CRV was evaluated. The results were consistent within the relative standard uncertainties of the comparison ranging from 0.28% to 1.3% and deviated from the CRV by less than 1%. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  13. Deficits in Sustained Attention and Changes in Dopaminergic Protein Levels following Exposure to Proton Radiation Are Related to Basal Dopaminergic Function.

    PubMed

    Davis, Catherine M; DeCicco-Skinner, Kathleen L; Hienz, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    The current report assessed the effects of low-level proton irradiation in inbred adult male Fischer 344 and Lewis rats performing an analog of the human Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT), commonly utilized as an object risk assessment tool to quantify fatigue and sustained attention in laboratory, clinical, and operational settings. These strains were used to determine if genetic differences in dopaminergic function would impact radiation-induced deficits in sustained attention. Exposure to head-only proton irradiation (25 or 100 cGy) disrupted rPVT performance in a strain-specific manner, with 25 cGy-exposed Fischer 344 rats displaying the most severe deficits in sustained attention (i.e., decreased accuracy and increased premature responding); Lewis rats did not display behavioral deficits following radiation. Fischer 344 rats displayed greater tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter levels in the frontal cortex compared to the Lewis rats, even though radiation exposure increased both of these proteins in the Lewis rats only. Tyrosine hydroxylase was decreased in the parietal cortex of both rat strains following radiation exposure, regardless of proton dose. Strain-specific cytokine changes were also found in the frontal cortex, with the Lewis rats displaying increased levels of putative neurotrophic cytokines (e.g., CNTF). These data support the hypothesis that basal dopaminergic function impacts the severity of radiation-induced deficits in sustained attention.

  14. Deficits in Sustained Attention and Changes in Dopaminergic Protein Levels following Exposure to Proton Radiation Are Related to Basal Dopaminergic Function

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Catherine M.; DeCicco-Skinner, Kathleen L.; Hienz, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    The current report assessed the effects of low-level proton irradiation in inbred adult male Fischer 344 and Lewis rats performing an analog of the human Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT), commonly utilized as an object risk assessment tool to quantify fatigue and sustained attention in laboratory, clinical, and operational settings. These strains were used to determine if genetic differences in dopaminergic function would impact radiation-induced deficits in sustained attention. Exposure to head-only proton irradiation (25 or 100 cGy) disrupted rPVT performance in a strain-specific manner, with 25 cGy-exposed Fischer 344 rats displaying the most severe deficits in sustained attention (i.e., decreased accuracy and increased premature responding); Lewis rats did not display behavioral deficits following radiation. Fischer 344 rats displayed greater tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter levels in the frontal cortex compared to the Lewis rats, even though radiation exposure increased both of these proteins in the Lewis rats only. Tyrosine hydroxylase was decreased in the parietal cortex of both rat strains following radiation exposure, regardless of proton dose. Strain-specific cytokine changes were also found in the frontal cortex, with the Lewis rats displaying increased levels of putative neurotrophic cytokines (e.g., CNTF). These data support the hypothesis that basal dopaminergic function impacts the severity of radiation-induced deficits in sustained attention. PMID:26658810

  15. Method development for the determination of selected pesticides on tobacco by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Helm, Bernhard; Hofbauer, Ludwig; Müller, Jutta

    2008-02-15

    A method was developed for the quantitative determination of alachlor, benalaxyl, clomazone, diflubenzuron, dimethomorph, diphenamid, ethofumesate, metalaxyl, methoprene, metobromuron and piperonyl butoxide on tobacco. The pesticides were extracted with water and methanol from five different types of tobacco. The extracts were purified by partition on an extraction cartridge containing diatomaceous earth. The purified extracts were analysed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography connected to an atmospheric pressure ionisation-electrospray-triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in the positive ion mode. Two different transitions and their relative intensities were monitored for unambiguous identification. All pesticides presented overall recovery rates between 35% and 110%. The trueness is near 100% and the interday precision is below 15%. The limits of quantifications are equal or below the guidance residue levels proposed by the Agrochemical Advisory Committee of CORESTA, an association of organisations having scientific research relative to tobacco.

  16. Effects of ionised or chelated water-soluble mineral mixture supplementation on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, blood characteristics, meat quality and intestinal microbiota in broilers.

    PubMed

    Upadhaya, S D; Lee, B R; Kim, I H

    2016-04-01

    An experiment was conducted to study the effects of dietary supplementation of water-soluble ionised or chelated mineral mixture on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, blood characteristics, relative organ weight, meat quality and excreta microflora in broilers. A total of 408 Arbor Acres broilers (17 birds in 8 replicate pens) were randomly allocated into one of the following three treatments: (1) Control/basal diet (CON), (2) T1 (basal diet + 0.5% ionised mineral mixture solution, pH 3.0) and (3) T2 (basal diet + 0.5% chelated mineral mixture solution, pH 3.0). The body weight gain was greater and feed conversion ratio was lower in broilers supplemented with ionised or chelated mineral liquid complex compared to CON during the grower and overall phase of the experiment. No significant effect in the concentration of Ca and P in the blood was observed in birds supplemented with ionised or chelated mineral mixture solution. No adverse effects were observed in organ weight and meat quality with ionised or chelated mineral mixture supplementation. Regarding intestinal microbiota counts there was a reduction of Escherichia coli counts in the small intestine in ionised mineral supplemented birds. In the large intestine, E. coli as well as Salmonella populations were reduced in ionised mineral supplemented birds. In conclusion, ionised or chelated minerals have partial positive effects in improving growth performance and reducing pathogenic bacteria load in the gastro-intestinal tract. PMID:27088481

  17. SU-E-T-573: Normal Tissue Dose Effect of Prescription Isodose Level Selection in Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q; Lei, Y; Zheng, D; Zhu, X; Wahl, A; Lin, C; Zhou, S; Zhen, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate dose fall-off in normal tissue for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) cases planned with different prescription isodose levels (IDLs), by calculating the dose dropping speed (DDS) in normal tissue on plans computed with both Pencil Beam (PB) and Monte-Carlo (MC) algorithms. Methods: The DDS was calculated on 32 plans for 8 lung SBRT patients. For each patient, 4 dynamic conformal arc plans were individually optimized for prescription isodose levels (IDL) ranging from 60% to 90% of the maximum dose with 10% increments to conformally cover the PTV. Eighty non-overlapping rind structures each of 1mm thickness were created layer by layer from each PTV surface. The average dose in each rind was calculated and fitted with a double exponential function (DEF) of the distance from the PTV surface, which models the steep- and moderate-slope portions of the average dose curve in normal tissue. The parameter characterizing the steep portion of the average dose curve in the DEF quantifies the DDS in the immediate normal tissue receiving high dose. Provided that the prescription dose covers the whole PTV, a greater DDS indicates better normal tissue sparing. The DDS were compared among plans with different prescription IDLs, for plans computed with both PB and MC algorithms. Results: For all patients, the DDS was found to be the lowest for 90% prescription IDL and reached a highest plateau region for 60% or 70% prescription. The trend was the same for both PB and MC plans. Conclusion: Among the range of prescription IDLs accepted by lung SBRT RTOG protocols, prescriptions to 60% and 70% IDLs were found to provide best normal tissue sparing.

  18. The radiation-attenuated schistosome vaccine induces high levels of protective immunity in the absence of B cells

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, S; Coulson, P S; Ljubojevic, S; Mountford, A P; Wilson, R A

    1999-01-01

    Radiation-attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni elicit consistently high levels of protective immunity in mice. The cell-mediated pulmonary effector mechanisms have been well characterized but the role of B cells and antibodies remains ill defined. We have compared the immune responses of B-cell-deficient (μMT) mice and their wild-type (WT) counterparts following exposure to the attenuated vaccine. Both groups mounted a T helper type 1 (Th1)-biased response in the skin-draining lymph nodes after vaccination. Interferon-γ was the dominant cytokine secreted by airway leucocytes after challenge in both μMT and WT mice, but there was a somewhat greater Th2 component in the former animals. The cellular infiltrates observed in the airways, and the pulmonary effector foci, were of similar composition in the two groups although some large foci were present in the μMT mice. There was a marked dichotomy in the protection induced in μMT animals by a single vaccination, with two-thirds showing levels similar to their WT counterparts, demonstrating that cell-mediated mechanisms alone can provide adequate protection. The remaining μMT mice had a mean worm burden identical to that of their challenge controls. A possible explanation is that a proportion of the μMT animals have a genetic defect closely associated with the μ-heavy-chain locus on chromosome 12, which affects their ability to mount a protective cell-mediated response. Three vaccinations enhanced the immunity of WT animals, most likely by augmenting antibody-mediated mechanisms. In contrast, no enhancement was seen in μMT mice, suggesting that the cell-mediated response is not boosted by multiple exposures to attenuated larvae. PMID:10233674

  19. Personal radiation detector at a high technology readiness level that satisfies DARPA's SN-13-47 and SIGMA program requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, D.; Knafo, Y.; Manor, A.; Seif, R.; Ghelman, M.; Ellenbogen, M.; Pushkarsky, V.; Ifergan, Y.; Semyonov, N.; Wengrowicz, U.; Mazor, T.; Kadmon, Y.; Cohen, Y.; Osovizky, A.

    2015-06-01

    There is a need to develop new personal radiation detector (PRD) technologies that can be mass produced. On August 2013, DARPA released a request for information (RFI) seeking innovative radiation detection technologies. In addition, on December 2013, a Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) for the SIGMA program was released. The RFI requirements focused on a sensor that should possess three main properties: low cost, high compactness and radioisotope identification capabilities. The identification performances should facilitate the detection of a hidden threat, ranging from special nuclear materials (SNM) to commonly used radiological sources. Subsequently, the BAA presented the specific requirements at an instrument level and provided a comparison between the current market status (state-of-the-art) and the SIGMA program objectives. This work presents an optional alternative for both the detection technology (sensor with communication output and without user interface) for DARPA's initial RFI and for the PRD required by the SIGMA program. A broad discussion is dedicated to the method proposed to fulfill the program objectives and to the selected alternative that is based on the PDS-GO design and technology. The PDS-GO is the first commercially available PRD that is based on a scintillation crystal optically coupled with a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM), a solid-state light sensor. This work presents the current performance of the instrument and possible future upgrades based on recent technological improvements in the SiPM design. The approach of utilizing the SiPM with a commonly available CsI(Tl) crystal is the key for achieving the program objectives. This approach provides the appropriate performance, low cost, mass production and small dimensions; however, it requires a creative approach to overcome the obstacles of the solid-state detector dark current (noise) and gain stabilization over a wide temperature range. Based on the presented results, we presume that

  20. Multi-residue analysis of pesticides in traditional Chinese medicines using gas chromatography-negative chemical ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jing; Miao, Shui; Lehotay, Steven J; Li, Wen-Ting; Zhou, Heng; Mao, Xiu-Hong; Lu, Ji-Wei; Lan, Lan; Ji, Shen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a residue analysis method for the simultaneous determination of 107 pesticides in traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs), Angelica sinensis, A. dahurica, Leonurus heterophyllus Sweet, Pogostemon cablin and Lonicera japonica Thunb., was developed using gas chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry in negative chemical ionisation mode (GC-NCI-MS/MS). NCI has advantages of high sensitivity and selectivity to chemicals with electron-withdrawing groups, and yields low background interference. For sample preparation, QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe) was applied. Due to the unique characteristics of TCMs, the clean-up step was optimised by adjusting amounts of primary secondary amine, C18, graphitised carbon black and silica sorbents. Validation was mainly performed by determining analyte recoveries at four different spiking concentrations of 10, 50, 100 and 200 ng g(-1), with seven replicates at each concentration. Method trueness, precision, linearity of calibration curves, lowest calibrated levels (LCLs) and matrix effects were determined to demonstrate method and instrument performance. Among the 107 pesticides tested, approximately 80% gave recoveries from 80% to 110% and < 10% relative standard deviation (RSD). The LCLs for nearly all pesticides were 5 ng g(-1), and as low as 0.1 ng g(-1) for dichlofenthion, endosulfan sulphate, flumetralin, isofenphos-methyl, methyl-pentachlorophenyl sulphide and trifluralin. The results indicate that GC-NCI-MS/MS is an excellent technique for quantitative and qualitative analysis of targeted GC-amenable pesticides at ultra-trace levels, especially in complex matrices such as TCMs. PMID:26125677