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Sample records for level isotope ratio

  1. Zinc Isotope Ratios as Indicators of Diet and Trophic Level in Arctic Marine Mammals.

    PubMed

    Jaouen, Klervia; Szpak, Paul; Richards, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of bone collagen are an established method for dietary reconstruction, but this method is limited by the protein preservation. Zinc (Zn) is found in bioapatite and the isotopic compositions of this element constitute a very promising dietary indicator. The extent of fractionation of Zn isotopes in marine environments, however, remains unknown. We report here on the measurement of zinc, carbon and nitrogen isotopes in 47 marine mammals from the archaeological site of Arvik in the Canadian Arctic. We undertook this study to test and demonstrate the utility of Zn isotopes in recent mammal bone minerals as a dietary indicator by comparing them to other isotopic dietary tracers. We found a correlation between δ66Zn values and trophic level for most species, with the exception of walruses, which may be caused by their large seasonal movements. δ6Zn values can therefore be used as a dietary indicator in marine ecosystems for both modern and recent mammals.

  2. SPATIAL VARIABILITY IN MUSSELS USED TO ASSESS BASE LEVEL NITROGEN ISOTOPE RATIO IN FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater mussels have been used to establish base level nitrogen isotope ratio values ( 15N) used in trophic position and food web studies in freshwater ecosystems. In this study, we assess the variability introduced when using unionid mussels in this manner by investigating th...

  3. SPATIAL VARIABILITY IN MUSSELS USED TO ASSESS BASE LEVEL NITROGEN ISOTOPE RATIO IN FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater mussels have been used to establish base level nitrogen isotope ratio values ( 15N) used in trophic position and food web studies in freshwater ecosystems. In this study, we assess the variability introduced when using unionid mussels in this manner by investigating th...

  4. Fast Scanning Single Collector ICP-MS for Low Level Isotope Ratio Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, K.; Georg, B.

    2010-12-01

    Multiple collector (MC)-ICP-MS is recognized as a workhorse in the field of isotope ratio measurements. With its unrivalled precision, high sample throughput and multi-element coverage, MC-ICPMS has opened up new areas of study in earth, environmental and biological sciences. However, SC-ICP-MS is fit for purpose for many applications where sample amount is limited and fractionations are relatively large. To compensate for the inherent ion beam instability associated with the ICP ion source, fast scanning magnetic sector instruments are used. Here, we describe and discuss the use of the Nu Attom SC-ICP-MS for low level isotope ratio measurements. The Nu Attom is a double focusing magnetic sector mass spectrometer with unique fast scanning capabilities. Deflectors located at the entrance and exit of the flight tube are used to alter the effective magnet radius by changing the ion trajectory. This enables a fast electrostatic scan over a mass range of approximately 40%. In contrast to other fast scanning magnetic sector instruments, there is no change in the ion energy which may introduce additional mass bias effects. The Nu Attom also has fully adjustable source and collector slits. This facilitates measurements in medium mass resolution (R=1500-2500), whilst maintaining a flat topped peak necessary for precise isotope ratio measurements. The potential applications of the Nu Attom in isotope ratio measurements will be explored.

  5. Zinc Isotope Ratios as Indicators of Diet and Trophic Level in Arctic Marine Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Jaouen, Klervia; Szpak, Paul; Richards, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of bone collagen are an established method for dietary reconstruction, but this method is limited by the protein preservation. Zinc (Zn) is found in bioapatite and the isotopic compositions of this element constitute a very promising dietary indicator. The extent of fractionation of Zn isotopes in marine environments, however, remains unknown. We report here on the measurement of zinc, carbon and nitrogen isotopes in 47 marine mammals from the archaeological site of Arvik in the Canadian Arctic. We undertook this study to test and demonstrate the utility of Zn isotopes in recent mammal bone minerals as a dietary indicator by comparing them to other isotopic dietary tracers. We found a correlation between δ66Zn values and trophic level for most species, with the exception of walruses, which may be caused by their large seasonal movements. δ6Zn values can therefore be used as a dietary indicator in marine ecosystems for both modern and recent mammals. PMID:27010907

  6. Perfluorinated chemicals infiltrate ocean waters: link between exposure levels and stable isotope ratios in marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Van de Vijver, Kristin Inneke; Hoff, Philippe Tony; Das, Krishna; Van Dongen, Walter; Esmans, Eddy Louis; Jauniaux, Thierry; Bouquegneau, Jean-Marie; Blust, Ronny; de Coen, Wim

    2003-12-15

    This is the first study to report on concentrations of perfluorinated organochemicals (FOCs) in marine mammals stranded along the southern North Sea coast in relation to stable nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios (delta15N and delta13C). The presence of FOCs in top predators such as marine mammals would indicate a potential biomagnification of these compounds and their widespread occurrence. Liver and kidney tissues of nine marine mammal species have been sampled. Among all the measured FOCs compounds, PFOS (perfluorooctane sulfonate) was predominant in terms of concentration. The highest PFOS concentrations were found in the liver of harbor seal compared to white-beaked dolphin, harbor porpoise, gray seal, sperm whale, white-sided dolphin, striped dolphin, fin whale, and hooded seal. PFOS concentrations differed significantly between sexes and age classes in harbor porpoises. Stable isotope measurements (delta13C and delta15N) were used in this study to describe the behavior of contaminants in food webs. We found a significant (p < 0.05) linear relationship between PFOS concentrations in livers of harbor porpoises and both muscle delta13C and delta15N measurements. Harbor and gray seals and white-beaked dolphin, which displayed the highest trophic position, contained the highest PFOS levels, while offshore feeders such as sperm whales, fin whales, striped dolphin, and white-sided dolphin showed lower PFOS concentrations than inshore species.

  7. Determination of Plutonium Isotope Ratios at Very Low Levels by ICP-MS using On-Line Electrochemically Modulated Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Liezers, Martin; Lehn, Scott A; Olsen, Khris B; Farmer, Orville T; Duckworth, Douglas C

    2009-10-01

    Electrochemically modulated separations (EMS) are shown to be a rapid and selective means of extracting and concentrating Pu from complex solutions prior to isotopic analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). This separation is performed in a flow injection mode, on-line with the ICP-MS. A three-electrode, flow-by electrochemical cell is used to accumulate Pu at an anodized glassy carbon electrode by redox conversion of Pu(III) to Pu (IV&VI). The entire process takes place in 2% v/v (0.46M) HNO3. No redox chemicals or acid concentration changes are required. Plutonium accumulation and release is redox dependent and controlled by the applied cell potential. Thus large transient volumetric concentration enhancements can be achieved. Based on more negative U(IV) potentials relative to Pu(IV), separation of Pu from uranium is efficient, thereby eliminating uranium hydride interferences. EMS-ICP-MS isotope ratio measurement performance will be presented for femtogram to attogram level plutonium concentrations.

  8. Isotopic ratios in planetary atmospheres.

    PubMed

    de Bergh, C

    1995-03-01

    Recent progress on measurements of isotopic ratios in planetary or satellite atmospheres include measurements of the D/H ratio in the methane of Uranus, Neptune and Titan and in the water of Mars and Venus. Implications of these measurements on our understanding of the formation and evolution of the planets and satellite are discussed. Our current knowledge of the carbon, nitrogen and oxygen isotopic ratios in the atmospheres of these planets, as well as on Jupiter and Saturn, is also reviewed. We finally show what progress can be expected in the very near future due to some new ground-based instrumentation particularly well suited to such studies, and to forthcoming space missions.

  9. Stable isotope ratios in swale sequences of Lake Superior as indicators of climate and lake level fluctuations during the Late Holocene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharma, Shruti; Mora, G.; Johnston, J.W.; Thompson, T.A.

    2005-01-01

    Beach ridges along the coastline of Lake Superior provide a long-term and detailed record of lake level fluctuations for the past 4000 cal BP. Although climate change has been invoked to explain these fluctuations, its role is still in debate. Here, we reconstruct water balance by employing peat samples collected from swale deposits present between beach ridge sequences at two locations along the coastline of Lake Superior. Carbon isotope ratios for Sphagnum remains from these peat deposits are used as a proxy for water balance because the presence or absence of water films on Sphagnum controls the overall isotope discrimination effects. Consequently, increased average water content in Sphagnum produces elevated ??13C values. Two maxima of Sphagnum ??13C values interpreted to reflect wetter conditions prevailed from 3400 to 2400 cal BP and from about 1900 to 1400 cal BP. There are two relatively short drier periods as inferred from low Sphagnum ??13C values: one is centered at about 2300 cal BP, and one begins at 1400 cal BP. A good covariance was found between Sphagnum ??13C values and reconstructed lake-levels for Lake Michigan in which elevated carbon isotope values correlate well with higher lake levels. Based on this covariance, we conclude that climate exerts a strong influence on lake levels in Lake Superior for the past 4000 cal BP. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Isotope ratio determination in boron analysis.

    PubMed

    Sah, R N; Brown, P H

    1998-01-01

    Traditionally, boron (B) isotope ratios have been determined using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) and, to some extent, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Both TIMS and SIMS use a high-resolution mass analyzer, but differ in analyte ionization methods. TIMS uses electrons from a hot filament, whereas SIMS employs an energetic primary ion beam of Ga+, Cs+, or O- for analyte ionization. TIMS can be used in negative or positive ion modes with high sensitivity and precision of B isotope ratio determination. However, isobaric interferences may be a problem, if the sample is not well purified and/or memory of the previous sample is not removed. Time-consuming sample preparation, analyte (B) purification, and sample determination processes limit the applications of TIMS for routine analyses. SIMS can determine B and its isotope ratio in intact solid samples without destroying them, but has poorer resolution and sensitivity than TIMS, and is difficult to standardize for biological samples. Development of plasma-source mass spectrometry (MS) enabled the determination of B concentration and isotope ratio without requiring sample purification. Commonly used plasma-source MS uses an Ar inductively coupled plasma (ICP) as an ionization device interfaced to a low-resolution quadrupole mass analyzer. The quadrupole ICP-MS is less precise than TIMS and SIMS, but is a popular method for B isotope ratio determination because of its speed and convenience. B determination by ICP-MS suffers no spectroscopic interferences. However, sample matrices, memory effects, and some instrument parameters may affect the accuracy and precision of B isotope ratio determination if adequate precautions are not taken. New generations of plasma-source MS instruments using high-resolution mass analyzers provide better sensitivity and precision than the currently used quadrupole ICP-MS. Because of the convenience and high sample throughput, the high-resolution ICP-MS is expected to be the

  11. Isotope ratio analysis by Orbitrap mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiler, J. M.; Chimiak, L. M.; Dallas, B.; Griep-Raming, J.; Juchelka, D.; Makarov, A.; Schwieters, J. B.

    2016-12-01

    Several technologies are being developed to examine the intramolecular isotopic structures of molecules (i.e., site-specific and multiple substitution), but various limitations in sample size and type or (for IRMS) resolution have so far prevented the creation of a truly general technique. We will discuss the initial findings of a technique based on Fourier transform mass spectrometry, using the Thermo Scientific Q Exactive GC — an instrument that contains an Orbitrap mass analyzer. Fourier transform mass spectrometry is marked by exceptionally high mass resolutions (the Orbitrap reaches M/∆M in the range 250,000-1M in the mass range of greatest interest, 50-200 amu). This allows for resolution of a large range of nearly isobaric interferences for isotopologues of volatile and semi-volatile compounds (i.e., involving isotopes of H, C, N, O and S). It also provides potential to solve very challenging mass resolution problems for isotopic analysis of other, heavier elements. Both internal and external experimental reproducibilities of isotope ratio analyses using the Orbitrap typically conform to shot-noise limits down to levels of 0.2 ‰ (1SE), and routinely in the range 0.5-1.0 ‰, with similar accuracy when standardized to concurrently run reference materials. Such measurements can be made without modifications to the ion optics of the Q Exactive GC, but do require specially designed sample introduction devices to permit sample/standard comparison and long integration times. The sensitivity of the Q Exactive GC permits analysis of sub-nanomolar samples and quantification of multiply-substituted species. The site-specific capability of this instrument arises from the fact that mass spectra of molecular analytes commonly contain diverse fragment ion species, each of which samples a specific sub-set of molecular sites. We will present applications of this technique to the biological and abiological chemistry of amino acids, forensic identification of

  12. Laser spectroscopic measurement of helium isotope ratios.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.-B.; Mueller, P.; Holt, R. J.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Sano, Y.; Sturchio, N.; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Tokyo; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2003-06-13

    A sensitive laser spectroscopic method has been applied to the quantitative determination of the isotope ratio of helium at the level of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He = 10{sup -7}--10{sup -5}. The resonant absorption of 1083 nm laser light by the metastable {sup 3}He atoms in a discharge cell was measured with the frequency modulation saturation spectroscopy technique while the abundance of {sup 4}He was measured by a direct absorption technique. The results on three different samples extracted from the atmosphere and commercial helium gas were in good agreement with values obtained with mass spectrometry. The achieved 3{sigma} detection limit of {sup 3}He in helium is 4 x 10{sup -9}. This demonstration required a 200 {mu}L STP sample of He. The sensitivity can be further improved, and the required sample size reduced, by several orders of magnitude with the addition of cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  13. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry in nutrition research

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, A.H.

    1994-12-31

    Many of the biochemical pathways and processes that form the foundation of modern nutrition research was elucidated using stable isotopes as physiological tracers. Since the discovery of stable isotopes, improvements and innovations in mass spectrometry and chromatography have led to greatly expanded applications. This research project was designed to evaluate gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) as a tool for isotopic tracer studies and to delineate the operational parameters for the analysis of {sup 13}C-labeled cholesterol, leucine and {alpha}-ketoisocaproate. The same isotope ratio mass spectrometer was then used as the base instrument for the ratio mass spectrometer was then used as the base instrument for the development of two additional inlet systems: a continuous-flow inlet for the analyses of {sup 13}C and {sup 18}O as CO{sub 2} and a filament inlet for on-line combustion and isotopic analysis of non-volatile organic compounds. Each of these three inlets was evaluated and their utility in nutrition research illustrated. GC/C/IRMS was used to analyze cholesterol, leucine and {alpha}-ketoisocaproate with good accuracy, precision and little isotopic memory. For all three compounds the detection limits achieved well surpassed currently used technologies. For compounds that can be well separated by GC, GC/C/IRMS is a valuable analytical tool. The continuous-flow inlet provided good accuracy and precision for measurements of {sup 13}CO{sub 2} from breath tests and {sup 18}O as CO{sub 2} from total energy expenditure tests. Most importantly, the continuous-flow inlet increased sample throughput by at least a factor of three over conventional analytical techniques. The filament inlet provided accurate and precise {sup 13}C ratio measurements of both natural abundance and enriched standards of non-volatile organic compounds of physiological interest.

  14. Nicotine, acetanilide and urea multi-level 2H-, 13C- and 15N-abundance reference materials for continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schimmelmann, Arndt; Albertino, Andrea; Sauer, Peter E; Qi, Haiping; Molinie, Roland; Mesnard, François

    2009-11-01

    Accurate determinations of stable isotope ratios require a calibration using at least two reference materials with different isotopic compositions to anchor the isotopic scale and compensate for differences in machine slope. Ideally, the delta values of these reference materials should bracket the isotopic range of samples with unknown delta values. While the practice of analyzing two isotopically distinct reference materials is common for water (VSMOW-SLAP) and carbonates (NBS 19 and L-SVEC), the lack of widely available organic reference materials with distinct isotopic composition has hindered the practice when analyzing organic materials by elemental analysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). At present only L-glutamic acids USGS40 and USGS41 satisfy these requirements for delta13C and delta15N, with the limitation that L-glutamic acid is not suitable for analysis by gas chromatography (GC). We describe the development and quality testing of (i) four nicotine laboratory reference materials for on-line (i.e. continuous flow) hydrogen reductive gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-IRMS), (ii) five nicotines for oxidative C, N gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS, or GC-IRMS), and (iii) also three acetanilide and three urea reference materials for on-line oxidative EA-IRMS for C and N. Isotopic off-line calibration against international stable isotope measurement standards at Indiana University adhered to the 'principle of identical treatment'. The new reference materials cover the following isotopic ranges: delta2H(nicotine) -162 to -45 per thousand, delta13C(nicotine) -30.05 to +7.72 per thousand, delta15N(nicotine) -6.03 to +33.62 per thousand; delta15N(acetanilide) +1.18 to +40.57 per thousand; delta13C(urea) -34.13 to +11.71 per thousand, delta15N(urea) +0.26 to +40.61 per thousand (recommended delta values refer to calibration with NBS 19, L-SVEC, IAEA-N-1, and IAEA-N-2). Nicotines fill a gap as

  15. Nicotine, acetanilide and urea multi-level2H-,13C- and15N-abundance reference materials for continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schimmelmann, A.; Albertino, A.; Sauer, P.E.; Qi, H.; Molinie, R.; Mesnard, F.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate determinations of stable isotope ratios require a calibration using at least two reference materials with different isotopic compositions to anchor the isotopic scale and compensate for differences in machine slope. Ideally, the S values of these reference materials should bracket the isotopic range of samples with unknown S values. While the practice of analyzing two isotopically distinct reference materials is common for water (VSMOW-SLAP) and carbonates (NBS 19 and L-SVEC), the lack of widely available organic reference materials with distinct isotopic composition has hindered the practice when analyzing organic materials by elemental analysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). At present only L-glutamic acids USGS40 and USGS41 satisfy these requirements for ??13C and ??13N, with the limitation that L-glutamic acid is not suitable for analysis by gas chromatography (GC). We describe the development and quality testing of (i) four nicotine laboratory reference materials for on-line (i.e. continuous flow) hydrogen reductive gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-IRMS), (ii) five nicotines for oxidative C, N gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS, or GC-IRMS), and (iii) also three acetanilide and three urea reference materials for on-line oxidative EA-IRMS for C and N. Isotopic off-line calibration against international stable isotope measurement standards at Indiana University adhered to the 'principle of identical treatment'. The new reference materials cover the following isotopic ranges: ??2Hnicotine -162 to -45%o, ??13Cnicotine -30.05 to +7.72%, ?? 15Nnicotine -6.03 to +33.62%; ??15N acetanilide +1-18 to +40.57%; ??13Curea -34.13 to +11.71%, ??15Nurea +0.26 to +40.61% (recommended ?? values refer to calibration with NBS 19, L-SVEC, IAEA-N-1, and IAEA-N-2). Nicotines fill a gap as the first organic nitrogen stable isotope reference materials for GC-IRMS that are available with different ??13N

  16. Helium isotope ratios in Easter microplate basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poreda, R. J.; Schilling, J. G.; Craig, H.

    1993-09-01

    He-3/He-4 ratios in Easter Microplate basalt glasses show clear evidence of the effects of a mantle plume. The East Rift of the microplate between 26 and 28 deg S, identified by La/Sm, Sr and Pb isotopes and ridge crest elevation as the region of maximum plume influence, has He-3/He-4 ratios spanning the entire range from 7.5 to 11.7 R(sub A). The Easter Microplate is the only section of the entire East Pacific Rise that is associated with a known `hotspot' track (mantle plume) and has elevated He-3/He-4 ratios. Although most of the West Rift basalts contain MORB helium (8.0 - 8.7 (R sub A)), the basalt closest to the East Rift has an elevated He-3/He-4 ratio (11.3 R(sub A)), consistent with a significant plume component. The diversity in isotopic signatures also indicates that homogenization of isotopic anomalies does not occur, even in this region of `super-fast' spreading. The overall He-3/He-4-Pb-206/Pb-204 and He-3/He-4-Sr-87/Sr-86 trends have positive correlations, although the high between the He and Sr isotope distribution is modeled in the context of a plume source-migrating ridge sink. During channeling of the plume toward the ridge, helium if preferentially lost from the center of the channeled plume, resulting in lower He/Pb and He/Sr concentration ratios in the high He-3/He-4 component. Mixing trajectories in He-Sr isotopic space between a LILE depleted asthenosphere and a variably degassed plume component provide a reasonably good fit to the data and may explain the isotope systematics of plume-ridge interactions in the context of modern theories of plume dynamics.

  17. Feasibility of Isotopic Measurements: Graphite Isotopic Ratio Method

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Thomas W.; Gerlach, David C.; Reid, Bruce D.; Morgan, W. C.

    2001-04-30

    This report addresses the feasibility of the laboratory measurements of isotopic ratios for selected trace constituents in irradiated nuclear-grade graphite, based on the results of a proof-of-principal experiment completed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 1994. The estimation of graphite fluence through measurement of isotopic ratio changes in the impurity elements in the nuclear-grade graphite is referred to as the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). Combined with reactor core and fuel information, GIRM measurements can be employed to estimate cumulative materials production in graphite moderated reactors. This report documents the laboratory procedures and results from the initial measurements of irradiated graphite samples. The irradiated graphite samples were obtained from the C Reactor (one of several production reactors at Hanford) and from the French G-2 Reactor located at Marcoule. Analysis of the irradiated graphite samples indicated that replicable measurements of isotope ratios could be obtained from the fluence sensitive elements of Ti, Ca, Sr, and Ba. While these impurity elements are present in the nuclear-grade graphite in very low concentrations, measurement precision was typically on the order of a few tenths of a percent to just over 1 percent. Replicability of the measurements was also very good with measured values differing by less than 0.5 percent. The overall results of this initial proof-of-principal experiment are sufficiently encouraging that a demonstration of GIRM on a reactor scale basis is planned for FY-95.

  18. Helium isotope ratios in Ethiopian Rift basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarsi, P.; Craig, H.

    1996-11-01

    Helium isotope ratios were measured in olivine and pyroxene phenocrysts from basalts of the Ethiopian Rift Valley and Afar Depression between 6° and 15°N and 37° and 43°E. 3He/4He ratios range from 6 to 17 times the atmospheric value (RA = 1.4 × 10-6), that is, from ratios less than typical MORB (depleted mantle) helium (R/RA= 8 ± 1) to ratios similar to high-3He hotspots and to the Yellowstone hotspot (R/RA= 16.5). The high 3He/4He ratios occur all along the Ethiopian Rift and well up into the Afar Depression, with a maximum value of 17.0 RA at 8°N in the Rift Axis and a high value of 14.2 RA in the central Tat'Ali sector of the Afar Depression. The ratios decrease to MORB-like values near the edge of the Red Sea, and to sub-MORB ratios (5-6 RA) at the northern end of the Rift (Zula Peninsula) and at the southern end, at lakes Abaya and Chamo. The Ethiopian Rift provides the only continental hotspot terrain in which helium isotope ratios can be compared in detail between volcanic lavas and associated geothermal and volcanic gases, a primary motivation for this work. Comparison with our previously measured ratios in fluids and gases (range 2-15 RA) shows excellent agreement in the areas sampled for both lavas and fluids, and indicates that high-temperature volcanic fluids can be used for establishing helium isotope signatures in such terrains. The high-3He values in both fluids and basalts show that a Primitive Mantle (PM) component is required and that a Lower Mantle High-3He plume is strongly involved as a driving force in the rifting process of the East African Rift System.

  19. Isotope Ratios of Cellulose from Plants Having Different Photosynthetic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Leonel O.; Deniro, Michael J.; Johnson, Hyrum B.

    1984-01-01

    Hydrogen and carbon isotope ratios of cellulose nitrate and oxygen isotope ratios of cellulose from C3, C4, and Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants were determined for plants growing within a small area in Val Verde County, Texas. Plants having CAM had distinctly higher deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratios than plants having C3 and C4 metabolism. When hydrogen isotope ratios are plotted against carbon isotope ratios, each photosynthetic mode separates into a distinct cluster of points. C4 plants had many D/H ratios similar to those of C3 plants, so that hydrogen isotope ratios cannot be used to distinguish between these two photosynthetic modes. Portulaca mundula, which may have a modified photosynthetic mode between C4 and CAM, had a hydrogen isotope ratio between those of the C4 and CAM plants. When oxygen isotope ratios are plotted against carbon isotope ratios, no distinct clustering of the C4 and CAM plants occurs. Thus, oxygen isotope ratios are not useful in distinguishing between these metabolic modes. A plot of hydrogen isotope ratios versus oxygen isotope ratios for this sample set shows considerable overlap between oxygen isotope ratios of the different photosynthetic modes without a concomitant overlap in the hydrogen isotope ratios of CAM and the other two photosynthetic modes. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that higher D/H ratios in CAM plants relative to C3 and C4 plants are due to isotopic fractionations occurring during biochemical reactions. PMID:16663460

  20. Isotopic ratio measurements with ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, G.P. III; Bazan, J.M.

    1986-06-03

    An inductively-coupled-plasma source mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) has been used to measure the isotopic composition of U, Pb, Os, and B standards. Particular emphasis has been placed on uranium because of its nuclear and environmental interest and because of the availability of a well-characterized set of standards with a wide range of isotopic compositions. The precision and accuracy obtainable in isotope ratio measurements by ICP-MS depend on many factors including background, interferences, dead time, mass fractionation (bias), abundance sensitivity, and counting statistics. Which, if any, of these factors controls accuracy and precision depends on the type of sample being analyzed and the characteristics of the mass spectrometer. These issues are discussed in detail.

  1. Measuring Isotope Ratios Across the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Chris R.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios in C, H, N, O and S are powerful indicators of a wide variety of planetary geophysical processes that can identify origin, transport, temperature history, radiation exposure, atmospheric escape, environmental habitability and biology [1]. For the Allan Hills 84001 meteorite, for example, the (sup 1)(sup 3)C/(sup 1)(sup 2)C ratio identifies it as a Mars (SNC) meteorite; the ??K/??Ar ratio tells us the last time the rock cooled to solid, namely 4 Gya; isotope ratios in (sup 3)He, (sup 2)(sup 1)Ne and (sup 3)?Ar show it was in space (cosmic ray exposure) for 10-20 million years; (sup 1)?C dating that it sat in Antarctica for 13,000 years before discovery; and clumped isotope analysis of (sup 1)?O(sup 1)(sup 3)C(sup 1)?O in its carbonate that it was formed at 18+/-4 ?C in a near-surface aqueous environment [2]. Solar System Formation

  2. Measuring Isotope Ratios Across the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Chris R.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios in C, H, N, O and S are powerful indicators of a wide variety of planetary geophysical processes that can identify origin, transport, temperature history, radiation exposure, atmospheric escape, environmental habitability and biology [1]. For the Allan Hills 84001 meteorite, for example, the (sup 1)(sup 3)C/(sup 1)(sup 2)C ratio identifies it as a Mars (SNC) meteorite; the ??K/??Ar ratio tells us the last time the rock cooled to solid, namely 4 Gya; isotope ratios in (sup 3)He, (sup 2)(sup 1)Ne and (sup 3)?Ar show it was in space (cosmic ray exposure) for 10-20 million years; (sup 1)?C dating that it sat in Antarctica for 13,000 years before discovery; and clumped isotope analysis of (sup 1)?O(sup 1)(sup 3)C(sup 1)?O in its carbonate that it was formed at 18+/-4 ?C in a near-surface aqueous environment [2]. Solar System Formation

  3. Stable isotope ratios and mercury levels in red meat products from baleen whales sold in Japanese markets.

    PubMed

    Endo, Tetsuya; Hotta, Yohei; Hisamichi, Yohsuke; Kimura, Osamu; Sato, Rie; Haraguchi, Koichi; Funahashi, Naoko; Baker, C Scott

    2012-05-01

    We analyzed the δ(13)C, δ(15)N and δ(18)O values and Hg concentration in red meat products originating from the predominant types sold in Japan for human consumption: two populations of common minke (J- and O-types), Bryde's and sei whales in the western North Pacific Ocean, and fin and Antarctic minke whales in the Southern Ocean. The order of the trophic positions, evaluated by δ(15)N values and Hg concentrations, coincided with their known feeding habits: common minke (J-type)=common minke (O-type)> Bryde's ≥ sei ≥ Antarctic minke ≥ fin. The Hg concentrations in the combined samples from the six samples were significantly correlated with their δ(15)N values (γ=0.455, n=66, p<0.05), reflecting overall differences in the trophic level. This correlation was not significant for within-species comparison for the common minke (J- and O-types) or the Bryde's whale, probably reflecting the higher δ(15)N value and lower Hg concentration in the North Pacific Ocean around Japan. Determination of δ(13)C, δ(15)N and δ(18)O could be used to discriminate between the red meat products originating from the whale species in the North Pacific and Southern Oceans. However, the four whale species or populations in the Pacific Ocean could not be discriminated on basis of these values, nor could the two species in the Southern Ocean. Positive correlations between the δ(13)C and δ(15)N values and negative correlations between the δ(15)N and δ(18)O values and the δ(13)C and δ(18)O values, probably reflecting migration patterns, were found in some whale species in the North Pacific and Southern Oceans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Copper and zinc isotope ratios in human bone and enamel.

    PubMed

    Jaouen, Klervia; Herrscher, Estelle; Balter, Vincent

    2017-03-01

    are needed to understand the relationships between trophic level and Zn isotope ratios of human remains. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Calcium isotope ratios in animal and human bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynard, L. M.; Henderson, G. M.; Hedges, R. E. M.

    2010-07-01

    Calcium isotopes in tissues are thought to be influenced by an individual's diet, reflecting parameters such as trophic level and dairy consumption, but this has not been carefully assessed. We report the calcium isotope ratios (δ 44/42Ca) of modern and archaeological animal and human bone ( n = 216). Modern sheep raised at the same location show 0.14 ± 0.08‰ higher δ 44/42Ca in females than in males, which we attribute to lactation by the ewes. In the archaeological bone samples the calcium isotope ratios of the herbivorous fauna vary by location. At a single site, the archaeological fauna do not show a trophic level effect. Humans have lower δ 44/42Ca than the mean site fauna by 0.22 ± 0.22‰, and the humans have a greater δ 44/42Ca range than the animals. No effect of sex or age on the calcium isotope ratios was found, and intra-individual skeletal δ 44/42Ca variability is negligible. We rule out dairy consumption as the main cause of the lower human δ 44/42Ca, based on results from sites pre-dating animal domestication and dairy availability, and suggest instead that individual physiology and calcium intake may be important in determining bone calcium isotope ratios.

  6. Raman scattering method and apparatus for measuring isotope ratios and isotopic abundances

    DOEpatents

    Harney, Robert C.; Bloom, Stewart D.

    1978-01-01

    Raman scattering is used to measure isotope ratios and/or isotopic abundances. A beam of quasi-monochromatic photons is directed onto the sample to be analyzed, and the resulting Raman-scattered photons are detected and counted for each isotopic species of interest. These photon counts are treated mathematically to yield the desired isotope ratios or isotopic abundances.

  7. Final Report on Isotope Ratio Techniques for Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gerlach, David C.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Meriwether, George H.; Reid, Bruce D.

    2009-07-01

    The Isotope Ratio Method (IRM) is a technique for estimating the energy or plutonium production in a fission reactor by measuring isotope ratios in non-fuel reactor components. The isotope ratios in these components can then be directly related to the cumulative energy production with standard reactor modeling methods.

  8. Isotopic ratio method for determining uranium contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, R.E.; Sieben, A.K.

    1994-02-03

    The presence of high concentrations of uranium in the subsurface can be attributed either to contamination from uranium processing activities or to naturally occurring uranium. A mathematical method has been employed to evaluate the isotope ratios from subsurface soils at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant (RFP) and demonstrates conclusively that the soil contains uranium from a natural source and has not been contaminated with enriched uranium resulting from RFP releases. This paper describes the method used in this determination which has widespread application in site characterizations and can be adapted to other radioisotopes used in manufacturing industries. The determination of radioisotope source can lead to a reduction of the remediation effort.

  9. How the oxygen isotope ratio of rain water influences the isotope ratio of chicken eggshell carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Gregory; Grimes, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    The stable oxygen isotope ratio of chicken eggshell carbonate was analysed from chicken eggs laid under free range, and organic farming regimes from across the UK. The eggshell carbonate oxygen isotope data shows a clear depletion in delta18O distribution from the southwest to the northeast. Although consistently offset by around 1 permil, the same isotopic distribution as that seen in eggshell carbonate is observed in the delta18O ratio of rainfall and groundwater from across the UK. This distribution is related to the Rayleigh distillation of rainfall driven by westerly winds across the UK landmass. The clear relationship observed between eggshell delta18O values and that of rainwater presumably reflects the nature of free range chickens which must be drinking locally derived rainwater and supplementing their diet and water intake with locally derived food. These results suggest that the oxygen isotope value of chicken eggshells can be used as a forensic tool to identify the locality that free range and organic eggs were laid within the UK. Furthermore, if suitable material is preserved in the archaeological and geological record then such a relationship can potentially be used to establish the oxygen isotope value of rainwater from which ancient and / or ancestral birds lived.

  10. Extreme oxygen isotope ratios in the early Solar System.

    PubMed

    Aléon, Jérôme; Robert, François; Duprat, Jean; Derenne, Sylvie

    2005-09-15

    The origins of the building blocks of the Solar System can be studied using the isotopic composition of early planetary and meteoritic material. Oxygen isotopes in planetary materials show variations at the per cent level that are not related to the mass of the isotopes; rather, they result from the mixture of components having different nucleosynthetic or chemical origins. Isotopic variations reaching orders of magnitude in minute meteoritic grains are usually attributed to stellar nucleosynthesis before the birth of the Solar System, whereby different grains were contributed by different stars. Here we report the discovery of abundant silica-rich grains embedded in meteoritic organic matter, having the most extreme 18O/16O and 17O/16O ratios observed (both approximately 10(-1)) together with a solar silicon isotopic composition. Both O and Si isotopes indicate a single nucleosynthetic process. These compositions can be accounted for by one of two processes: a single exotic evolved star seeding the young Solar System, or irradiation of the circumsolar gas by high energy particles accelerated during an active phase of the young Sun. We favour the latter interpretation, because the observed compositions are usually not expected from nucleosynthetic processes in evolved stars, whereas they are predicted by the selective trapping of irradiation products.

  11. Uniform Silicon Isotope Ratios Across the Milky Way Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monson, Nathaniel N.; Morris, Mark R.; Young, Edward D.

    2017-04-01

    We report the relative abundances of the three stable isotopes of silicon, 28Si, 29Si, and 30Si, across the Galaxy using the v=0,J=1\\to 0 transition of silicon monoxide. The chosen sources represent a range in Galactocentric radii ({R}{GC}) from 0 to 9.8 kpc. The high spectral resolution and sensitivity afforded by the Green Bank Telescope permit isotope ratios to be corrected for optical depths. The optical-depth-corrected data indicate that the secondary-to-primary silicon isotope ratios {}29{Si}{/}28{Si} and {}30{Si}{/}28{Si} vary much less than predicted on the basis of other stable isotope ratio gradients across the Galaxy. Indeed, there is no detectable variation in Si isotope ratios with {R}{GC}. This lack of an isotope ratio gradient stands in stark contrast to the monotonically decreasing trend with {R}{GC} exhibited by published secondary-to-primary oxygen isotope ratios. These results, when considered in the context of the expectations for chemical evolution, suggest that the reported oxygen isotope ratio trends, and perhaps those for carbon as well, require further investigation. The methods developed in this study for SiO isotopologue ratio measurements are equally applicable to Galactic oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen isotope ratio measurements, and should prove useful for future observations of these isotope systems.

  12. ICP-MS for isotope ratio measurement

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The use of stable isotopes in mineral nutrition research has become a fundamental aspect of conducting this research. A gradual transition has occurred, now virtually complete, from radioactive isotope studies to those using stable isotopes. Although primarily used in human research, mineral stable ...

  13. System and method for high precision isotope ratio destructive analysis

    DOEpatents

    Bushaw, Bruce A; Anheier, Norman C; Phillips, Jon R

    2013-07-02

    A system and process are disclosed that provide high accuracy and high precision destructive analysis measurements for isotope ratio determination of relative isotope abundance distributions in liquids, solids, and particulate samples. The invention utilizes a collinear probe beam to interrogate a laser ablated plume. This invention provides enhanced single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range, and isotope ratios that can be determined at approximately 1% or better precision and accuracy (relative standard deviation).

  14. Flame ionization mass spectrometry--Isotope ratio determinations for potassium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Howard E.; Garbarino, John R.; Koirtyohann, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    The air/acetylene flame provides a convenient ion source for the determination of potassium isotopic ratios by mass spectrometry. Unlike the argon inductively coupled plasma (ICP), the flame provides low background in the mass region of interest. Ion production is quite satisfactory for isotope ratio measurements at the micrograms per milliliter (μg/mL) level and slightly below, with 1 μg/mL potassium giving about 105counts/second at a nominal mass-to-charge ratio of 39. The detection limit for potassium was 2-3 nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL). The ratio of 41K/39K was measured with 0.5-1% relative standard deviation, and a 41K spike representing 0.2% of the total potassium was readily detected. Both signal levels and signal stability were improved by adding a second easily ionized element such as cesium to samples and standards. Alternatively, a cesium solution could be aspirated for about 1 minute between sample measurements to ensure signal stability.

  15. Towards absolute laser spectroscopic CO2 isotope ratio measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anyangwe Nwaboh, Javis; Werhahn, Olav; Ebert, Volker

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of isotope composition of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere is necessary to identify sources and sinks of this key greenhouse gas. In the last years, laser spectroscopic techniques such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) have been shown to perform accurate isotope ratio measurements for CO2 and other gases like water vapour (H2O) [1,2]. Typically, isotope ratios are reported in literature referring to reference materials provided by e.g. the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). However, there could be some benefit if field deployable absolute isotope ratio measurement methods were developed to address issues such as exhausted reference material like the Pee Dee Belemnite (PDB) standard. Absolute isotope ratio measurements would be particularly important for situations where reference materials do not even exist. Here, we present CRDS and TDLAS-based absolute isotope ratios (13C/12C ) in atmospheric CO2. We demonstrate the capabilities of the used methods by measuring CO2 isotope ratios in gas standards. We compare our results to values reported for the isotope certified gas standards. Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM) compliant uncertainty budgets on the CRDS and TDLAS absolute isotope ratio measurements are presented, and traceability is addressed. We outline the current impediments in realizing high accuracy absolute isotope ratio measurements using laser spectroscopic methods, propose solutions and the way forward. Acknowledgement Parts of this work have been carried out within the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP) ENV52 project-HIGHGAS. The EMRP is jointly funded by the EMRP participating countries within EURAMET and the European Union. References [1] B. Kühnreich, S. Wagner, J. C. Habig,·O. Möhler, H. Saathoff, V. Ebert, Appl. Phys. B 119:177-187 (2015). [2] E. Kerstel, L. Gianfrani, Appl. Phys. B 92, 439-449 (2008).

  16. THE ATOMIC WEIGHTS COMMISSION AND ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCE RATIO DETERMINATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-08-07

    Following Thomson's discovery of stable isotopes in non-radioactive chemical elements, the derivation of atomic weight values from mass spectrometric measurements of isotopic abundance ratios moved very slowly. Forty years later, only 3 1/2 % of the recommended values were based on mass spectrometric measurements and only 38% in the first half century. It might be noted that two chemical elements (tellurium and mercury) are still based on chemical measurements, where the atomic weight value calculated from the relative isotopic abundance measurement either agrees with the value from the chemical measurement or the atomic weight value calculated from the relative isotopic abundance measurement falls within the uncertainty of the chemical measurement of the atomic weight. Of the 19 chemical elements, whose atomic weight is based on non-corrected relative isotopic abundance measurements, five of these are two isotope systems (indium, iridium, lanthanum, lutetium and tantalum) and one is a three-isotope system (oxygen).

  17. Isotope ratios in Geochemistry - highest sensitivity and scan speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemnitzer, Rene; Hamester, Meike

    2013-04-01

    The applications for trace elemental analysis are steadily increasing: beside the classical fields such as environmental and semiconductor analysis more and more interest for trace elemental analysis in food, geochemical analysis and material characterization can be observed, not to forget hot topics such as analysis of isotope ratios and nanoparticles. At the same time the requirements for lower detection limits, sample throughput, matrix robustness, and easy to use instruments are increasing. An important performance characteristic for ICP-MS is the sensitivity. The Bruker aurora Elite achieves a sensitivity of 1.5 GHz/ppm, which directly translates to smaller spot sizes when doing laser ablation in geochemical analyses, and with that avoiding counting statistical limitations in the single digit µm spot size range. In combination with shortest integration times of 0.1ms it comes close to an almost simultaneous measurement with a single-collector ICP-MS. At the same time, other important parameters such as low oxide ratios and abundance sensitivity are maintained, at the typical low levels of a quadrupole ICP-MS. The presentation will describe the layout of an ICP-MS designed for highest sensitivity and show by means of application examples like laser ablation ICP-MS and liquid analysis the performance for isotope ratio analyses.

  18. Symbiodinium Clade Affects Coral Skeletal Isotopic Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carilli, J.; Charles, C. D.; Garren, M.; McField, M.; Norris, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    The influence of different physiologies of Symbiodinium dinoflagellate symbiont clades on the skeletal chemistry of associated coral hosts has not previously been investigated. This is an important issue because coral skeletons are routinely used for tropical paleoclimatic reconstructions. We analyzed coral skeletal samples collected simultaneously from neighboring colonies off Belize and found that those harboring different clades of Symbiodinium displayed significantly different skeletal oxygen isotopic compositions. We also found evidence for mean shifts in skeletal oxygen isotopic composition after coral bleaching (the loss and potential exchange of symbionts) in two of four longer coral cores from the Mesoamerican Reef, though all experienced similar climatic conditions. Thus, we suggest that symbiont clade identity leaves a signature in the coral skeletal archive and that this influence must be considered for quantitative environmental reconstruction. In addition, we suggest that the skeletal isotopic signature may be used to identify changes in the dominant symbiont clade that have occurred in the past, to identify how common and widespread this phenomenon is--a potential adaptation to climate change.

  19. MIR hollow waveguide (HWG) isotope ratio analyzer for environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenyou; Zhuang, Yan; Deev, Andrei; Wu, Sheng

    2017-05-01

    An advanced commercial Mid-InfraRed Isotope Ratio (IR2) analyzer was developed in Arrow Grand Technologies based on hollow waveguide (HWG) as the sample tube. The stable carbon isotope ratio, i.e. δ13C, was obtained by measuring the selected CO2 absorption peaks in the MIR. Combined with a GC and a combustor, it has been successfully employed to measure compound specific δ13C isotope ratios in the field. By using both the 1- pass HWG and 5-path HWG, we are able to measure δ13C isotope ratio at a broad CO2 concentration of 300 ppm-37,500 ppm. Here, we demonstrate its applications in environmental studies. The δ13C isotope ratio and concentration of CO2 exhaled by soil samples was measured in real time with the isotope analyzer. The concentration was found to change with the time. We also convert the Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (DIC) into CO2, and then measure the δ13C isotope ratio with an accuracy of better than 0.3 ‰ (1 σ) with a 6 min test time and 1 ml sample usage. Tap water, NaHCO3 solvent, coca, and even beer were tested. Lastly, the 13C isotope ratio of CO2 exhaled by human beings was obtained <10 seconds after simply blowing the exhaled CO2 into a tube with an accuracy of 0.5‰ (1 σ) without sample preconditioning. In summary, a commercial HWG isotope analyzer was demonstrated to be able to perform environmental and health studies with a high accuracy ( 0.3 ‰/Hz1/2 1 σ), fast sampling rate (up to 10 Hz), low sample consumption ( 1 ml), and broad CO2 concentration range (300 ppm-37,500 ppm).

  20. Stable carbon isotope ratios of ambient aromatic volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilova, Anna; Huang, Lin; Saccon, Marina; Rudolph, Jochen

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of mixing ratios and stable carbon isotope ratios of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the atmosphere were made in Toronto (Canada) in 2009 and 2010. Consistent with the kinetic isotope effect for reactions of aromatic VOC with the OH radical the observed stable carbon isotope ratios are on average significantly heavier than the isotope ratios of their emissions. The change of carbon isotope ratio between emission and observation is used to determine the extent of photochemical processing (photochemical age, [OH]dt) of the different VOC. It is found that [OH]dt of different VOC depends strongly on the VOC reactivity. This demonstrates that for this set of observations the assumption of a uniform [OH]dt for VOC with different reactivity is not justified and that the observed values for [OH]dt are the result of mixing of VOC from air masses with different values for [OH]dt. Based on comparison between carbon isotope ratios and VOC concentration ratios it is also found that the varying influence of sources with different VOC emission ratios has a larger impact on VOC concentration ratios than photochemical processing. It is concluded that for this data set the use of VOC concentration ratios to determine [OH]dt would result in values for [OH]dt inconsistent with carbon isotope ratios and that the concept of a uniform [OH]dt for an air mass has to be replaced by the concept of individual values of an average [OH]dt for VOC with different reactivity.

  1. Utilizing Isotopic Uranium Ratios in Groundwater Evaluations at NFSS

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.C.; Keil, K.G.; Frederick, W.T.; Papura, T.R.; Leithner, J.S.; Peterson, J.M.; MacDonell, M.M.

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Buffalo District is currently evaluating environmental contamination at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) as part of its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The NFSS is located in the Town of Lewiston in western New York and has been used to store uranium-contaminated materials since 1944. Most of the radioactive materials are currently contained in an on-site structure, but past contamination remains in soil and groundwater. As a naturally occurring radionuclide, uranium is present in all groundwater. Because contamination levels at the site are quite low, it can be difficult to distinguish zones that have been impacted by the past releases from those at the high end of the natural background range. The differences in the isotopic ratio of uranium-234 (U-234) to uranium-238 (U-238) between natural groundwater systems and affected areas are being used in an innovative way to better define the nature and extent of groundwater contamination at NFSS. In natural groundwater, the ratio of U-234 to U-238 exceeds 1 due to the alpha particle recoil effect, in which U-234 is preferentially mobilized to groundwater from adjacent rock or soil. This process is very slow, and it can be hundreds to thousands of years before a measurable impact is seen in the isotopic ratio. Thus, as a result of the recoil effect, the ratio of U-234 to U-238 will be higher in natural groundwater than in contaminated groundwater. This means that if site releases were the source of the uranium being measured in groundwater at NFSS, the ratio of U-234 to U-238 would be expected to be very close to 1 (the same ratio that exists in wastes and soil at the site), because not enough time has elapsed for the alpha particle recoil effect to have significantly altered that ratio. From an evaluation of site and regional groundwater data, an isotopic ratio

  2. Cesium isotope ratios as indicators of nuclear power plant operations.

    PubMed

    Delmore, James E; Snyder, Darin C; Tranter, Troy; Mann, Nick R

    2011-11-01

    There are multiple paths by which radioactive cesium can reach the effluent from reactor operations. The radioactive (135)Cs/(137)Cs ratios are controlled by these paths. In an effort to better understand the origin of this radiation, these (135)Cs/(137)Cs ratios in effluents from three power reactor sites have been measured in offsite samples. These ratios are different from global fallout by up to six fold and as such cannot have a significant component from this source. A cesium ratio for a sample collected outside of the plant boundary provides integration over the operating life of the reactor. A sample collected inside the plant at any given time can be much different from this lifetime ratio. The measured cesium ratios vary significantly for the three reactors and indicate that the multiple paths have widely varying levels of contributions. There are too many ways these isotopes can fractionate to be useful for quantitative evaluations of operating parameters in an offsite sample, although it may be possible to obtain limited qualitative information for an onsite sample.

  3. Cesium Isotope Ratios as Indicators of Nuclear Power Plant Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Darin Snyder; James Delmore; Troy Tranter; Nick Mann; Michael Abbott; John Olson

    2011-11-01

    There are multiple paths by which radioactive cesium can reach the effluent from reactor operations. The radioactive 135Cs/137Cs ratios are controlled by these paths. In an effort to better understand the origin of this radiation, these 135Cs/137Cs ratios in effluents from three power reactor sites have been measured in offsite samples. These ratios are different from global fallout by up to six fold and as such cannot have a significant component from this source. A cesium ratio for a sample collected outside of the plant boundary provides integration over the operating life of the reactor. A sample collected inside the plant at any given time can be much different from this lifetime ratio. The measured cesium ratios vary significantly for the three reactors and indicate that the multiple paths have widely varying levels of contributions. There are too many ways these isotopes can fractionate to be useful for quantitative evaluations of operating parameters in an offsite sample, although it may be possible to obtain limited qualitative information for an onsite sample.

  4. Temperature Dependence of Isotope Ratios in Tree Rings

    PubMed Central

    Libby, L. M.; Pandolfi, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    The stable isotope ratios of carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen have been measured for a German oak in wood samples of roughly three years each, for the years 1712-1954 A.D., and correlated with the existing weather records from England, Basel, and Geneva to evaluate the empirical temperature coefficients. Isotope ratios in a second official oak, measured for the years 1530-1800 A.D., show the cold temperatures of the Little Ice Age interspersed with warm intervals. PMID:16592163

  5. Oxygen isotope ratios in eclogites from kimberlites.

    PubMed

    Garlick, G D; Macgregor, I D; Vogel, D E

    1971-06-04

    The oxygen isotope compositions (delta(18)O) of eclogitic xenoliths from the Roberts Victor kimberlite range from 2 to 8 per mil relative to SMOW (standard mean ocean water). This surprising variation appears to be due to fractional crystallization: the eclogites rich in oxygen-18 represent early crystal accumulates; the eclogites poor in oxygen-18 represent residual liquids. Crystal-melt partitioning probably exceeded 3 per mil and is interpreted to be pressure-dependent. Anomalous enrichment of oxygen-18 in cumulate eclogites relative to ultramafic xenoliths suggests that crystal-melt partitioning increased after melt-formation but prior to crystallization.

  6. Synthetic isotope mixtures for the calibration of isotope amount ratio measurements of carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russe, K.; Valkiers, S.; Taylor, P. D. P.

    2004-07-01

    Synthetic isotope mixtures for the calibration of carbon isotope amount ratio measurements have been prepared by mixing carbon tetrafluoride highly enriched in 13C with carbon tetrafluoride depleted in 13C. Mixing procedures based on volumetry and gravimetry are described. The mixtures served as primary measurement standards for the calibration of isotope amount ratio measurements of the Isotopic Reference Materials PEF1, NBS22 and USGS24. Thus SI-traceable measurements of absolute carbon isotope amount ratios have been performed for the first time without any hypothesis needed for a correction of oxygen isotope abundances, such as is the case for measurements on carbon dioxide. As a result, "absolute" carbon isotope amount ratios determined via carbon tetrafluoride have smaller uncertainties than those published for carbon dioxide. From the measurements of the Reference Materials concerned, the absolute carbon isotope amount ratio of Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite (VPDB)--the hypothetical material upon which the scale for relative carbon isotope ratio measurements is based--was calculated to be R13(VPDB) = (11 101 +/- 16) × 10-6.

  7. Plutonium isotope ratio variations in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Robert E; La Mont, Stephen P; Eisele, William F; Fresquez, Philip R; Mc Naughton, Michael; Whicker, Jeffrey J

    2010-12-14

    Historically, approximately 12,000 TBq of plutonium was distributed throughout the global biosphere by thermo nuclear weapons testing. The resultant global plutonium fallout is a complex mixture whose {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio is a function of the design and yield of the devices tested. The average {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio in global fallout is 0.176 + 014. However, the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio at any location may differ significantly from 0.176. Plutonium has also been released by discharges and accidents associated with the commercial and weapons related nuclear industries. At many locations contributions from this plutonium significantly alters the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios from those observed in global fallout. We have measured the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios in environmental samples collected from many locations in North America. This presentation will summarize the analytical results from these measurements. Special emphasis will be placed on interpretation of the significance of the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios measured in environmental samples collected in the Arctic and in the western portions of the United States.

  8. LITERATURE SURVEY ON ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCE RATIO MEASUREMENTS - 2001-2005

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-08-13

    Along with my usual weekly review of the published literature for new nuclear data, I also search for new candidates for best measurements of isotopic abundances from a single source. Most of the published articles, that I previously had found in the Research Library at the Brookhaven Lab, have already been sent to the members of the Atomic Weights Commission, by either Michael Berglund or Thomas Walczyk. In the last few days, I checked the published literature for any other articles in the areas of natural variations in isotopic abundance ratios, measurements of isotopic abundance ratios on samples of extra-terrestrial material and isotopic abundance ratio measurements performed using ICPMS instruments. Hopefully this information will be of interest to members of the Commission, the sub-committee on isotopic abundance measurements (SIAM), members of the former sub-committee on natural isotopic fractionation (SNIF), the sub-committee on extra-terrestrial isotope ratios (SETIR), the RTCE Task Group and the Guidelines Task Group, who are dealing with ICPMS and TIMS comparisons. In the following report, I categorize the publications in one of four areas. Measurements performed using either positive or negative ions with Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer, TIMS, instruments; measurements performed on Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer, ICPMS, instruments; measurements of natural variations of the isotopic abundance ratios; and finally measurements on extra-terrestrial samples with instrumentation of either type. There is overlap in these areas. I selected out variations and ET results first and then categorized the rest of the papers by TIMS and ICPMS.

  9. Stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of bottled waters of the world.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Gabriel J; Winter, David A; Spero, Howard J; Zierenberg, Robert A; Reeder, Mathew D; Cerling, Thure E; Ehleringer, James R

    2005-01-01

    Bottled and packaged waters are an increasingly significant component of the human diet. These products are regulated at the regional, national, and international levels, and determining the authenticity of marketing and labeling claims represents a challenge to regulatory agencies. Here, we present a dataset of stable isotope ratios for bottled waters sampled worldwide, and consider potential applications of such data for regulatory, forensic and geochemical standardization applications. The hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of 234 samples of bottled water range from -147 per thousand to +15 per thousand and from -19.1 per thousand to +3.0 per thousand, respectively. These values fall within and span most of the normal range for meteoric waters, indicating that these commercially available products represent a source of waters for use as laboratory working standards in applications requiring standardization over a large range of isotope ratios. The measured values of bottled water samples cluster along the global meteoric water line, suggesting that bottled water isotope ratios preserve information about the water sources from which they were derived. Using the dataset, we demonstrate how bottled water isotope ratios provide evidence for substantial evaporative enrichment of water sources prior to bottling and for the marketing of waters derived from mountain and lowland sources under the same name. Comparison of bottled water isotope ratios with natural environmental water isotope ratios demonstrates that on average the isotopic composition of bottled water tends to be similar to the composition of naturally available local water sources, suggesting that in many cases bottled water need not be considered as an isotopically distinct component of the human diet. Our findings suggest that stable isotope ratios of bottled water have the power to distinguish ultimate (e.g., recharge) and proximal (e.g., reservoir) sources of bottled water and constitute a potential

  10. Understanding radioxenon isotopical ratios originating from radiopharmaceutical facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saey, P. R. J.; Ringbom, A.; Bowyer, T. W.; Becker, A.; de Geer, L.-E.; Nikkinen, M.; Payne, R. F.

    2009-04-01

    It was recently shown that radiopharmaceutical facilities (RPF) are major contributors to the general background of 133Xe and other xenon isotopes both in the northern and southern hemisphere. To distinguish a nuclear explosion signal from releases from civil nuclear facilities, not only the activity concentrations but also the ratios of the four different CTBT relevant radioxenon isotopes (131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe and 135Xe) have to be well understood. First measurements taken recently in and around two of the world's largest RPF's: NTP at Pelindaba, South Africa and IRE at Fleurus, Belgium have been presented. At both sites, also stack samples were taken in close cooperation with the facility operators. The radioxenon in Belgium could be classified in four classes: the normal European background (133Xe activity between 0 - 5 mBq/m3) on one hand and then the samples where all four isotopes were detected with 133mXe/131mXe > 1. In northern South Africa the Pelindaba RPF is in practice the sole source of radioxenon. It generated a background of 133Xe at the measurement site some 230 km to the west of the RPF of 0 - 5 mBq/m3. In the cases where the air from the Pelindaba facility reached the measurement site directly and in a short time period, the 133Xe was higher, also 135Xe was present and in some samples 133mXe as well. The ratios of the activity concentrations of 135Xe/133Xe vs. 133mXe/131mXe (Multiple Isotope Ratio Plot - MIRC) have been analysed. For both facilities, the possible theoretical ratio's for different scenarios were calculated with the information available and compared with the measurements. It was found that there is an excess of 131mXe present in the European samples compared to theoretical calculations. A similar excess has also been seen in samples measured in northern America. In South Africa, neither the environmental samples nor the stack ones contained 131mXe at measurable levels. This can probably be explained by different processes and

  11. Stable Isotope Ratios as Biomarkers of Diet for Health Research

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Diane M.

    2016-01-01

    Diet is a leading modifiable risk factor for chronic disease, but it remains difficult to measure accurately due to the error and bias inherent in self-reported methods of diet assessment. Consequently there is a pressing need for more objective biomarkers of diet for use in health research. The stable isotope ratios of light elements are a promising set of candidate biomarkers because they vary naturally and reproducibly among foods, and those variations are captured in molecules and tissues with high fidelity. Recent studies have identified valid isotopic measures of short and long-term sugar intake, meat intake, and fish intake in specific populations. These studies provide a strong foundation for validating stable isotopic biomarkers in the general United States population. Approaches to improve specificity for specific foods are needed, for example, by modeling intake using multiple stable isotope ratios, or by isolating and measuring specific molecules linked to foods of interest. PMID:26048703

  12. Stable Isotope Ratios as Biomarkers of Diet for Health Research.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Diane M

    2015-01-01

    Diet is a leading modifiable risk factor for chronic disease, but it remains difficult to measure accurately due to the error and bias inherent in self-reported methods of diet assessment. Consequently, there is a pressing need for more objective biomarkers of diet for use in health research. The stable isotope ratios of light elements are a promising set of candidate biomarkers because they vary naturally and reproducibly among foods, and those variations are captured in molecules and tissues with high fidelity. Recent studies have identified valid isotopic measures of short- and long-term sugar intake, meat intake, and fish intake in specific populations. These studies provide a strong foundation for validating stable isotopic biomarkers in the general US population. Approaches to improve specificity for specific foods are needed; for example, by modeling intake using multiple stable isotope ratios or by isolating and measuring specific molecules linked to foods of interest.

  13. Isotope Ratio Monitoring Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (IRM-GCMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, K. H.; Ricci, S. A.; Studley, A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    On Earth, the C-13 content of organic compounds is depleted by roughly 13 to 23 permil from atmospheric carbon dioxide. This difference is largely due to isotope effects associated with the fixation of inorganic carbon by photosynthetic organisms. If life once existed on Mars, then it is reasonable to expect to observe a similar fractionation. Although the strongly oxidizing conditions on the surface of Mars make preservation of ancient organic material unlikely, carbon-isotope evidence for the existence of life on Mars may still be preserved. Carbon depleted in C-13 could be preserved either in organic compounds within buried sediments, or in carbonate minerals produced by the oxidation of organic material. A technique is introduced for rapid and precise measurement of the C-13 contents of individual organic compounds. A gas chromatograph is coupled to an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer through a combustion interface, enabling on-line isotopic analysis of isolated compounds. The isotope ratios are determined by integration of ion currents over the course of each chromatographic peak. Software incorporates automatic peak determination, corrections for background, and deconvolution of overlapped peaks. Overall performance of the instrument was evaluated by the analysis of a mixture of high purity n-alkanes of know isotopic composition. Isotopic values measured via IRM-GCMS averaged withing 0.55 permil of their conventionally measured values.

  14. Stable Isotope Ratios and the Forensic Analysis of Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Jarman, Kristin H.

    2007-06-01

    In the aftermath of the anthrax letters of 2001, researchers have been exploring various analytical signatures for the purpose of characterizing the production environment of microorganisms. One such signature is stable isotope ratios, which in heterotrophs are a function of nutrient and water sources. Here we discuss the use of stable isotope ratios in microbe forensics, using as a database the carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope ratios of 247 separate cultures of B. subtilis 6051 spores produced on a total of 32 different culture media. In the context of using stable isotope ratios as a signature for sample matching, we present an analysis of variation between individual samples, between cultures produced in tandem, and between cultures produced in the same medium but at different times. Additionally, we correlate the stable isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrogen for growth medium nutrients or water with those of spores and show examples of how these relationships can be used to exclude nutrient or water samples as possible growth substrates for specific cultures.

  15. Stable Isotope Ratios and Forensic Analysis of Microorganisms▿

    PubMed Central

    Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Jarman, Kristin H.

    2007-01-01

    In the aftermath of the anthrax letters of 2001, researchers have been exploring various analytical signatures for the purpose of characterizing the production environment of microorganisms. One such signature is stable isotope ratios, which in heterotrophs, are a function of nutrient and water sources. Here we discuss the use of stable isotope ratios in microbial forensics, using as a database the carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrogen stable isotope ratios of 247 separate cultures of Bacillus subtilis 6051 spores produced on a total of 32 different culture media. In the context of using stable isotope ratios as a signature for sample matching, we present an analysis of variations between individual samples, between cultures produced in tandem, and between cultures produced in the same medium but at different times. Additionally, we correlate the stable isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrogen for growth medium nutrients or water with those of spores and show examples of how these relationships can be used to exclude nutrient or water samples as possible growth substrates for specific cultures. PMID:17468274

  16. High Resolution Double-Focusing Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radke, J.; Deerberg, M.; Hilkert, A.; Schlüter, H.-J.; Schwieters, J.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years isotope ratio mass spectrometry has extended to the capability of quantifying very small isotope signatures related with low abundances and simultaneously detecting molecular masses such as isotopomers and isotopologues containing clumped isotopes. Some of those applications are limited by molecular interferences like different gas molecules with the same nominal mass, e.g. Ar/O2, adducts of the same molecule or of different molecules, and very small isotope abundances. The Thermo Scientific MAT 253 ULTRA is the next generation of high precision gas isotope ratio mass spectrometry, which combines a 10 KV gas ionization source (Thermo Scientific MAT 253) with a double focusing multi-collector mass analyzer (Thermo Scientific Neptune) and reduces those limitations by measuring isotope ratios on a larger dynamic range with high precision. Small ion beam requirements and high sensitivity are achieved by signal-to-noise improvements through enhanced ion beam amplification in faraday cups and ion counters. Interfering backgrounds, e.g. interfering isotopologues or isobaric ions of contaminants, are dramatically decreased by a dynamic range increase combined with high evacuation leading to undisturbed ion transmission through the double-focusing analyser. Furthermore, automated gain calibration for mathematical baseline corrections, switchable detector arrays, ion source control, analyser focusing and full data export is controlled under Isodat data control. New reference/sample strategies are under investigation besides incorporation of the continuous-flow technique and its versatile inlet devices. We are presenting first results and applications of the MAT 253 Ultra.

  17. Nitrogen isotopic analyses by isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, D. A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Amino acids containing natural-abundance levels of 15N were derivatized and analyzed isotopically using a technique in which individual compounds are separated by gas chromatography, combusted on-line, and the product stream sent directly to an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer. For samples of N2 gas, standard deviations of ratio measurement were better than 0.1% (Units for delta are parts per thousand or per million (%).) for samples larger than 400 pmol and better than 0.5% for samples larger than 25 pmol (0.1% 15N is equivalent to 0.00004 atom % 15N). Results duplicated those of conventional, batchwise analyses to within 0.05%. For combustion of organic compounds yielding CO2/N2 ratios between 14 and 28, in particular for N-acetyl n-propyl derivatives of amino acids, delta values were within 0.25% of results obtained using conventional techniques and standard deviations were better than 0.35%. Pooled data for measurements of all amino acids produced an accuracy and precision of 0.04 and 0.23%, respectively, when 2 nmol of each amino acid was injected on column and 20% of the stream of combustion products was delivered to the mass spectrometer.

  18. Radioactive halos and ion microprobe measurement of Pb isotope ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, R. V.

    1974-01-01

    This investigation was to obtain, if possible, the Pb isotope ratios of both lunar and meteoritic troilite grains by utilizing ion microprobe techniques. Such direct in situ measurement of Pb isotope ratios would eliminate contamination problems inherent in wet chemistry separation procedures, and conceivably determine whether lunar troilite grains were of meteoritic origin. For comparison purposes two samples of meteoritic troilite were selected (one from Canyon Diablo) for analysis along with two very small lunar troilite grains (approximately 50-100 microns). It was concluded that the ion microprobe as presently operating, does not permit the in situ measurement of Pb isotope ratios in lunar or meteoritic troilite. On the basis of these experiments no conclusions could be drawn as to the origin of the lunar troilite grains.

  19. Using isotopic ratios for discrimination of environmental anthropogenic radioactivity.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Robert B; Akbarzadeh, Mansour

    2014-10-01

    When air is pulled into the WIPP repository for ventilation purposes, this air is unfiltered and contains all the components of ubiquitous anthropogenic radionuclides from global nuclear fallout (including Cs and Pu isotopes). Although the NORM in aeolian sand and dust contribute to the gross alpha beta activity on effluent air filters, there remains a need to discriminate effluent TRU generated in the disposal process at WIPP from TRU being pulled into the repository with the unfiltered surface air. This is only evaluated using ratios of Cs and Pu activity found through radioassay of air filters taken from the mine effluent. By characterizing both the credible range of Cs/Pu ratios from the environment and those known to exist in the waste, a rigorous test criteria is attained. The use of HPGE to assay Cs in the intake dust plated out in the mine allowed a gross assay of total TRU radioactivity pulled into the mine over time from global fallout. Radiochemistry of samples from deposition in the mine's air intake shaft was also carried out. The use of net activity ratios at background levels is also shown to follow a Cauchy distribution in terms of their expected statistical distributions.

  20. Heavy element stable isotope ratios: analytical approaches and applications.

    PubMed

    Tanimizu, Masaharu; Sohrin, Yoshiki; Hirata, Takafumi

    2013-03-01

    Continuous developments in inorganic mass spectrometry techniques, including a combination of an inductively coupled plasma ion source and a magnetic sector-based mass spectrometer equipped with a multiple-collector array, have revolutionized the precision of isotope ratio measurements, and applications of inorganic mass spectrometry for biochemistry, geochemistry, and marine chemistry are beginning to appear on the horizon. Series of pioneering studies have revealed that natural stable isotope fractionations of many elements heavier than S (e.g., Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Ce, Nd, Mo, Cd, W, Tl, and U) are common on Earth, and it had been widely recognized that most physicochemical reactions or biochemical processes induce mass-dependent isotope fractionation. The variations in isotope ratios of the heavy elements can provide new insights into past and present biochemical and geochemical processes. To achieve this, the analytical community is actively solving problems such as spectral interference, mass discrimination drift, chemical separation and purification, and reduction of the contamination of analytes. This article describes data calibration and standardization protocols to allow interlaboratory comparisons or to maintain traceability of data, and basic principles of isotope fractionation in nature, together with high-selectivity and high-yield chemical separation and purification techniques for stable isotope studies.

  1. Seawater calcium isotopic ratios across the Eocene-Oligocene Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, E. M.; Paytan, A.

    2009-12-01

    We reconstructed the evolution of the seawater calcium (Ca) isotopic ratio from marine (pelagic) barite and bulk calcium carbonate over the Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT), a period of extreme and rapid change in the global calcite compensation depth (CCD) (Lyle et al., 2008). The CCD is controlled by the balance between calcium carbonate deposition and dissolution in deep sea sediments. Large fluctuations in the CCD may cause changes in the concentration of dissolved Ca in seawater and its isotopic composition if accompanied by imbalances in marine Ca sources and sinks (De La Rocha and DePaolo, 2000). Our results show that the permanent deepening of the CCD during the EOT, which coincided with the major Cenozoic glaciation around 34 million years ago (Zachos et al., 2001), was not accompanied by a significant long-term change in the isotopic ratio of Ca in seawater or its sink (calcium carbonate). A simple isotopic mass balance model is constructed to compare predicted and observed isotopic fluctuations. References: Lyle, M. et al. Pacific Ocean and Cenozoic evolution of climate. Rev. Geophys. 46, 1-47 (2008). De La Rocha, C. L. & DePaolo, D. J. Isotopic evidence for variations in the marine calcium cycle over the Cenozoic. Science 289, 1176-1178 (2000). Zachos, J., Pagani, M., Sloan, L., Thomas, E. & Billups, K. Trends, rhythms, and aberrations in global climate 65 ma to present. Science 292, 686-693 (2001).

  2. Water isotopic ratios from a continuously melted ice core sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkinis, V.; Popp, T. J.; Blunier, T.; Bigler, M.; Schüpbach, S.; Johnsen, S. J.

    2011-06-01

    A new technique for on-line high resolution isotopic analysis of liquid water, tailored for ice core studies is presented. We build an interface between an Infra Red Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (IR-CRDS) and a Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) system. The system offers the possibility to perform simultaneuous water isotopic analysis of δ18O and δD on a continuous stream of liquid water as generated from a continuously melted ice rod. Injection of sub μl amounts of liquid water is achieved by pumping sample through a fused silica capillary and instantaneously vaporizing it with 100 % efficiency in a home made oven at a temperature of 170 °C. A calibration procedure allows for proper reporting of the data on the VSMOW scale. We apply the necessary corrections based on the assessed performance of the system regarding instrumental drifts and dependance on humidity levels. The melt rates are monitored in order to assign a depth scale to the measured isotopic profiles. Application of spectral methods yields the combined uncertainty of the system at below 0.1 ‰ and 0.5 ‰ for δ18O and δD, respectively. This performance is comparable to that achieved with mass spectrometry. Dispersion of the sample in the transfer lines limits the resolution of the technique. In this work we investigate and assess these dispersion effects. By using an optimal filtering method we show how the measured profiles can be corrected for the smoothing effects resulting from the sample dispersion. Considering the significant advantages the technique offers, i.e. simultaneuous measurement of δ18O and δD, potentially in combination with chemical components that are traditionally measured on CFA systems, notable reduction on analysis time and power consumption, we consider it as an alternative to traditional isotope ratio mass spectrometry with the possibility to be deployed for field ice core studies. We present data acquired in the framework of the NEEM deep ice core drilling project in

  3. The use of carbon stable isotope ratios in drugs characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Magdas, D. A. Cristea, G. Bot, A. Mirel, V.

    2013-11-13

    Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is an effective toll to be used for drug product authentication. The isotopic composition could be used to assist in the differentiation between batches of drugs and assist in the identification of counterfeit materials on the market. Only two factors affect the isotopic ratios in pharmaceutical components: the isotopic composition of the raw materials and the synthetic processes performed upon them. Counterfeiting of pharmaceutical drugs threatens consumer confidence in drug products companies' economical well-being. In this preliminary study, the analyzed samples consist in two types of commercially available analgesics, which were purchases from Romanian pharmacies. Differences in δ{sup 13}C between batches from −29.7 to −31.6% were observed, demonstrating that this method can be used to differentiate among individual drug batches and subsequently identify counterfeits on the market. On the other hand, carbon isotopic ratios differences among producers were recorded, the variations being between −31.3 to −34.9% for the same type of analgesic, but from different manufactures.

  4. The use of carbon stable isotope ratios in drugs characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdas, D. A.; Cristea, G.; Bot, A.; Mirel, V.

    2013-11-01

    Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is an effective toll to be used for drug product authentication. The isotopic composition could be used to assist in the differentiation between batches of drugs and assist in the identification of counterfeit materials on the market. Only two factors affect the isotopic ratios in pharmaceutical components: the isotopic composition of the raw materials and the synthetic processes performed upon them. Counterfeiting of pharmaceutical drugs threatens consumer confidence in drug products companies' economical well-being. In this preliminary study, the analyzed samples consist in two types of commercially available analgesics, which were purchases from Romanian pharmacies. Differences in δ13C between batches from -29.7 to -31.6% were observed, demonstrating that this method can be used to differentiate among individual drug batches and subsequently identify counterfeits on the market. On the other hand, carbon isotopic ratios differences among producers were recorded, the variations being between -31.3 to -34.9% for the same type of analgesic, but from different manufactures.

  5. Detection of adulterated honey produced by honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies fed with different levels of commercial industrial sugar (C₃ and C₄ plants) syrups by the carbon isotope ratio analysis.

    PubMed

    Guler, Ahmet; Kocaokutgen, Hasan; Garipoglu, Ali V; Onder, Hasan; Ekinci, Deniz; Biyik, Selim

    2014-07-15

    In the present study, one hundred pure and adulterated honey samples obtained from feeding honeybee colonies with different levels (5, 20 and 100 L/colony) of various commercial sugar syrups including High Fructose Corn Syrup 85 (HFCS-85), High Fructose Corn Syrup 55 (HFCS-55), Bee Feeding Syrup (BFS), Glucose Monohydrate Sugar (GMS) and Sucrose Sugar (SS) were evaluated in terms of the δ(13)C value of honey and its protein, difference between the δ(13)C value of protein and honey (Δδ(13)C), and C4% sugar ratio. Sugar type, sugar level and the sugar type*sugar level interaction were found to be significant (P<0.001) regarding the evaluated characteristics. Adulterations could not be detected in the 5L/colony syrup level of all sugar types when the δ(13)C value of honey, Δδ(13)C (protein-honey), and C4% sugar ratio were used as criteria according to the AOAC standards. However, it was possible to detect the adulteration by using the same criteria in the honeys taken from the 20 and 100 L/colony of HFCS-85 and the 100L/colony of HFCS-55. Adulteration at low syrup level (20 L/colony) was more easily detected when the fructose content of HFCS syrup increased. As a result, the official methods (AOAC, 978.17, 1995; AOAC, 991.41, 1995; AOAC 998.12, 2005) and Internal Standard Carbon Isotope Ratio Analysis could not efficiently detect the indirect adulteration of honey obtained by feeding the bee colonies with the syrups produced from C3 plants such as sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) and wheat (Triticium vulgare). For this reason, it is strongly needed to develop novel methods and standards that can detect the presence and the level of indirect adulterations.

  6. Stable isotope ratio method for the characterisation of the poultry house environment.

    PubMed

    Skipitytė, Raminta; Mašalaitė, Agnė; Garbaras, Andrius; Mickienė, Rūta; Ragažinskienė, Ona; Baliukonienė, Violeta; Bakutis, Bronius; Šiugždaitė, Jūratė; Petkevičius, Saulius; Maruška, Audrius Sigitas; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2017-06-01

    Stable isotope analysis was applied to describe the poultry house environment. The poultry house indoor environment was selected for this study due to the relevant health problems in animals and their caretakers. Air quality parameters including temperature, relative humidity, airflow rate, NH3, CO2 and total suspended particles, as well as mean levels of total airborne bacteria and fungi count, were measured. Carbon isotope ratios ((13)C/(12)C) were obtained in size-segregated aerosol particles. The carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) isotope ratios were measured in feed, litter, scrapings from the ventilation system, feathers and eggs. Additionally, the distribution of δ(13)C and δ(15)N values in different tissues of the chicken was examined. The airborne bacteria and fungi extracted from the air filters collected from poultry farms were grown in the laboratory in media with known isotope values and measured for stable isotope ratios. Analysis of isotope fractionation between microorganisms and their media indicated the applicability of stable isotope analysis in bulk samples for the identification of source material. The analysed examples imply that stable isotope analysis can be used to examine the indoor environment along with its biology and ecology, and serve as an informative bioanalytical tool.

  7. Uranium Isotope Ratios in Modern and Precambrian Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCorte, B.; Planavsky, N.; Wang, X.; Auerbach, D. J.; Knudsen, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Uranium isotopes (δ238U values) are an emerging paleoredox proxy that can help to better understand the redox evolution of Earth's surface environment. Recently, uranium isotopes have been used to reconstruct ocean and atmospheric redox conditions (Montoya-Pino et al., 2010; Brennecka et al., 2011; Kendall et al., 2013; Dahl et al., 2014). However, to date, there have not been studies on paleosols, despite that paleosols are, arguably better suited to directly tracking the redox conditions of the atmosphere. Sedimentary δ238U variability requires the formation of the soluble, oxidized form of U, U(VI). The formation of U(VI) is generally thought to require oxygen levels orders of magnitude higher than prebiotic levels. Without significant U mobility, it would have been impossible to develop isotopically distinct pools of uranium in ancient Earth environments. Conversely, an active U redox cycle leads to significant variability in δ238U values. Here we present a temporally and geographically expansive uranium isotope record from paleosols and modern soils to better constrain atmospheric oxygen levels during the Precambrian. Preliminary U isotope measurements of paleosols are unfractionated (relative to igneous rocks), possibly because of limited fractionation during oxidation (e.g., {Wang, 2015 #478}) or insufficient atmospheric oxygen levels to oxidize U(IV)-bearing minerals in the bedrock. Further U isotope measurements of paleosols with comparison to modern soils will resolve this issue.

  8. Isotope Ratios Reveal Trickery in the Produce Aisle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    A new technique for the proper checking and banning of organic food items is proposed. The analysis of the nitrogen isotope ratio present in the food is found to be a perfect standard for the organic checking of the food products.

  9. Isotope Ratios Reveal Trickery in the Produce Aisle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    A new technique for the proper checking and banning of organic food items is proposed. The analysis of the nitrogen isotope ratio present in the food is found to be a perfect standard for the organic checking of the food products.

  10. Seawater calcium isotope ratios across the Eocene-Oligocene transition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffith, E.M.; Paytan, A.; Eisenhauer, A.; Bullen, T.D.; Thomas, E.

    2011-01-01

    During the Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT, ca. 34 Ma), Earth's climate cooled significantly from a greenhouse to an icehouse climate, while the calcite (CaCO3) compensation depth (CCD) in the Pacific Ocean increased rapidly. Fluctuations in the CCD could result from various processes that create an imbalance between calcium (Ca) sources to, and sinks from, the ocean (e.g., weathering and CaCO3 deposition), with different effects on the isotopic composition of dissolved Ca in the oceans due to differences in the Ca isotopic composition of various inputs and outputs. We used Ca isotope ratios (??44/40Ca) of coeval pelagic marine barite and bulk carbonate to evaluate changes in the marine Ca cycle across the EOT. We show that the permanent deepening of the CCD was not accompanied by a pronounced change in seawater ??44/40Ca, whereas time intervals in the Neogene with smaller carbonate depositional changes are characterized by seawater ??44/40Ca shifts. This suggests that the response of seawater ??44/40Ca to changes in weathering fluxes and to imbalances in the oceanic alkalinity budget depends on the chemical composition of seawater. A minor and transient fluctuation in the Ca isotope ratio of bulk carbonate may reflect a change in isotopic fractionation associated with CaCO3 precipitation from seawater due to a combination of factors, including changes in temperature and/or in the assemblages of calcifying organisms. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  11. Stable isotope ratios in hair and teeth reflect biologic rhythms.

    PubMed

    Appenzeller, Otto; Qualls, Clifford; Barbic, Franca; Furlan, Raffaello; Porta, Alberto

    2007-07-25

    Biologic rhythms give insight into normal physiology and disease. They can be used as biomarkers for neuronal degenerations. We present a diverse data set to show that hair and teeth contain an extended record of biologic rhythms, and that analysis of these tissues could yield signals of neurodegenerations. We examined hair from mummified humans from South America, extinct mammals and modern animals and people, both healthy and diseased, and teeth of hominins. We also monitored heart-rate variability, a measure of a biologic rhythm, in some living subjects and analyzed it using power spectra. The samples were examined to determine variations in stable isotope ratios along the length of the hair and across growth-lines of the enamel in teeth. We found recurring circa-annual periods of slow and fast rhythms in hydrogen isotope ratios in hair and carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in teeth. The power spectra contained slow and fast frequency power, matching, in terms of normalized frequency, the spectra of heart rate variability found in our living subjects. Analysis of the power spectra of hydrogen isotope ratios in hair from a patient with neurodegeneration revealed the same spectral features seen in the patient's heart-rate variability. Our study shows that spectral analysis of stable isotope ratios in readily available tissues such as hair could become a powerful diagnostic tool when effective treatments and neuroprotective drugs for neurodegenerative diseases become available. It also suggests that similar analyses of archaeological specimens could give insight into the physiology of ancient people and animals.

  12. On-line measurement of intramolecular carbon isotope distribution of acetic acid by continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Keita; Tanaka, Misato; Nakagawa, Fumiko; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2002-01-01

    Molecular and intramolecular carbon isotope measurements of acetic acid present in natural environments have been performed by off-line procedures. The off-line method is complicated and time-consuming and requires micromolar to millimolar amounts of sample. This limits geochemical isotopic studies, especially at the intramolecular level, on acetic acid present in natural samples. Here, we examine an on-line measurement of intramolecular carbon isotope distribution of acetic acid using continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS) coupled with an on-line pyrolysis system. This is achieved by measurement of the respective carbon isotope ratios of CH4 and CO2 produced by on-line pyrolysis of acetic acid. Results for authentic standards of pure acetic acid demonstrated the practicality of this on-line method, although the carbon isotope ratio of the methyl group could not be determined directly. The precision of the carbon isotope measurements was 0.4 per thousand (1sigma). The carbon isotope distribution determined by the on-line method was identical to that determined by the conventional off-line method within analytical error. The advantages of the on-line method compared with the conventional off-line method are that it is less laborious, requires less analytical time (less than one hour per sample) and, most importantly, uses smaller sample sizes (ca. 10 nanomole). An application of this on-line method to natural geochemical samples will provide an insight into the geochemical cycle of acetic acid. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Finite mixture models for the computation of isotope ratios in mixed isotopic samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koffler, Daniel; Laaha, Gregor; Leisch, Friedrich; Kappel, Stefanie; Prohaska, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Finite mixture models have been used for more than 100 years, but have seen a real boost in popularity over the last two decades due to the tremendous increase in available computing power. The areas of application of mixture models range from biology and medicine to physics, economics and marketing. These models can be applied to data where observations originate from various groups and where group affiliations are not known, as is the case for multiple isotope ratios present in mixed isotopic samples. Recently, the potential of finite mixture models for the computation of 235U/238U isotope ratios from transient signals measured in individual (sub-)µm-sized particles by laser ablation - multi-collector - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICPMS) was demonstrated by Kappel et al. [1]. The particles, which were deposited on the same substrate, were certified with respect to their isotopic compositions. Here, we focus on the statistical model and its application to isotope data in ecogeochemistry. Commonly applied evaluation approaches for mixed isotopic samples are time-consuming and are dependent on the judgement of the analyst. Thus, isotopic compositions may be overlooked due to the presence of more dominant constituents. Evaluation using finite mixture models can be accomplished unsupervised and automatically. The models try to fit several linear models (regression lines) to subgroups of data taking the respective slope as estimation for the isotope ratio. The finite mixture models are parameterised by: • The number of different ratios. • Number of points belonging to each ratio-group. • The ratios (i.e. slopes) of each group. Fitting of the parameters is done by maximising the log-likelihood function using an iterative expectation-maximisation (EM) algorithm. In each iteration step, groups of size smaller than a control parameter are dropped; thereby the number of different ratios is determined. The analyst only influences some control

  14. Sample matrix effects on measured carbon and oxygen isotope ratios during continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Levitt, Nicholas Paul

    2014-11-15

    Continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS) is frequently used to analyze CO2 found in media such as air, breath, and soil pore space gas with the aid of a sample preparation and transfer device such as a Gasbench II. This study investigated the effect that matrices other than helium (He) have on the measured δ(13)C and δ(18)O isotope ratios of CO2. Identical CO2 was added to sample vials with matrices of pure He, pure N2, or a 21:79 mixture of O2/N2 and analyzed by a ThermoFinnigan Delta(Plus) XP isotope-ratio mass spectrometer coupled to a ThermoFinnigan Gasbench II. Variables such as CO2 concentration, sample analysis sequence, and sample matrix removal ('blanking') through manipulation of an injection and dilution open split were tested to identify systematic isotope ratio offsets between the different matrix types. The process of blanking induced a δ(13)C and δ(18)O offset of ≤0.2‰ between otherwise identical populations of CO2 samples in He. The (13)C/(12)C and (18)O/(16)O isotope ratios of CO2 sampled from pure N2 or a mixture of O2/N2 were found to be within 0.1 to 0.2‰ of those of an identical CO2 sampled from a He matrix when N2 or O2/N2 was removed prior to transport to the mass spectrometer. The measured oxygen isotope ratios of CO2 sampled from N2 and O2/N2 varied by as much as 0.6‰ and 4‰, respectively, if matrix gas was not removed prior to ionization. Sampling CO2 from matrices similar to air does not significantly affect the measured (13)C/(12)C and (18)O/(16)O isotope ratios of CO2 when a gas-handling procedure that includes the removal of matrix gas is utilized. This procedure is much preferable to introducing matrix gas and potentially isobaric interference to the ion source. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Lignin methoxyl hydrogen isotope ratios in a coastal ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feakins, Sarah J.; Ellsworth, Patricia V.; Sternberg, Leonel da Silveira Lobo

    2013-11-01

    Stable hydrogen isotope ratios of plant lignin methoxyl groups have recently been shown to record the hydrogen isotopic composition of meteoric water. Here we extend this technique towards tracing water source variations across a saltwater to freshwater gradient in a coastal, subtropical forest ecosystem. We measure the hydrogen isotopic composition of xylem water (δDxw) and methoxyl hydrogen (δDmethoxyl) to calculate fractionations for coastal mangrove, buttonwood and hammock tree species in Sugarloaf Key, as well as buttonwoods from Miami, both in Florida, USA. Prior studies of the isotopic composition of cellulose and plant leaf waxes in coastal ecosystems have yielded only a weak correlation to source waters, attributed to leaf water effects. Here we find δDmethoxyl values range from -230‰ to -130‰, across a 40‰ range in δDxw with a regression equation of δDmethoxyl ‰ = 1.8 * δDxw - 178‰ (R2 = 0.48, p < 0.0001, n = 74). This is comparable within error to the earlier published relationship for terrestrial trees which was defined across a much larger 125‰ isotopic range in precipitation. Analytical precision for measurements of δD values of pure CH3I by gas chromatography-pyrolysis-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-P-IRMS) is σ = 6‰ (n = 31), which is considerably better than for CH3I liberated through cleavage with HI from lignin with σ = 18‰ (n = 26). Our results establish that δDmethoxyl can record water sources and salinity incursion in coastal ecosystems, where variations sufficiently exceed method uncertainties (i.e., applications with δD excursions >50‰). For the first time, we also report yields of propyl iodide, which may indicate lignin synthesis of propoxyl groups under salt-stress.

  16. NUSIMEP-7: uranium isotope amount ratios in uranium particles.

    PubMed

    Truyens, J; Stefaniak, E A; Aregbe, Y

    2013-11-01

    The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) has extensive experience in the development of isotopic reference materials and the organization of interlaboratory comparisons (ILC) for nuclear measurements in compliance with the respective international guidelines (ISO Guide 34:2009 and ISO/IEC 17043:2010). The IRMM Nuclear Signatures Interlaboratory Measurement Evaluation Program (NUSIMEP) is an external quality control program with the objective of providing materials for measurements of trace amounts of nuclear materials in environmental matrices. Measurements of the isotopic ratios of the elements uranium and plutonium in small amounts, typical of those found in environmental samples, are required for nuclear safeguards and security, for the control of environmental contamination and for the detection of nuclear proliferation. The measurement results of participants in NUSIMEP are evaluated according to international guidelines in comparison to independent external certified reference values with demonstrated metrological traceability and uncertainty. NUSIMEP-7 focused on measurements of uranium isotope amount ratios in uranium particles aiming to support European Safeguards Directorate General for Energy (DG ENER), the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) network of analytical laboratories for environmental sampling (NWAL) and laboratories in the field of particle analysis. Each participant was provided two certified test samples: one with single and one with double isotopic enrichment. These NUSIMEP test samples were prepared by controlled hydrolysis of certified uranium hexafluoride in a specially designed aerosol deposition chamber at IRMM. Laboratories participating in NUSIMEP-7 received the test samples of uranium particles on two graphite disks with undisclosed isotopic ratio values n((234)U)/n((238)U), n((235)U)/n((238)U) and n((236)U)/n((238)U). The uranium isotope ratios had to be measured using their routine analytical

  17. Si Isotopic Ratios in Mainstream Presolar SIC Grains Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugaro, Maria; Zinner, Ernst; Gallino, Roberto; Amari, Sachiko

    1999-12-01

    Although mainstream SiC grains, the major group of presolar SiC grains found in meteorites, are believed to have originated in the expanding envelope of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars during their late carbon-rich phases, their Si isotopic ratios show a distribution that cannot be explained by nucleosynthesis in this kind of star. Previously, this distribution has been interpreted to be the result of contributions from many AGB stars of different ages whose initial Si isotopic ratios vary owing to the Galactic chemical evolution of the Si isotopes. This paper presents a new interpretation based on local heterogeneities of the Si isotopes in the interstellar medium at the time the parent stars of the mainstream grains were born. Recently, several authors have presented inhomogeneous chemical evolution models of the Galactic disk in order to account for the well-known evidence that F and G dwarfs of similar age show an intrinsic scatter in their elemental abundances. First we report new calculations of the s-process nucleosynthesis of the Si and Ti isotopes in four AGB models (1.5, 3, and 5 Msolar with Z=0.02; 3 Msolar with Z=0.006). These calculations are based on the release of neutrons in the He intershell by the 13C source during the interpulse periods followed by a second small burst of neutrons released in the convective thermal pulse by the marginal activation of the 22Ne source. In the 1.5 and 3 Msolar models with solar metallicity the predicted shifts of the Si isotopic ratios in the stars' envelope are much smaller (<30‰ for the 29Si/28Si ratio and <40‰ for the 30Si/28Si ratio; the two ratios are normalized to solar) than the range observed in the mainstream grains (up to 180‰). Isotopic shifts are of the same order as in the SiC grains for the 5 Msolar and Z=0.006 models, but the slope of the 29Si/28Si versus 30Si/28Si correlation line is much smaller than that of the grains. We also show that none of the models can reproduce the correlations

  18. MAGNESIUM ISOTOPE RATIOS IN {omega} CENTAURI RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Da Costa, G. S.; Norris, John E.; Yong, David

    2013-05-20

    We have used the high-resolution observations obtained at the Anglo-Australian Telescope with Ultra-High Resolution Facility (R {approx} 100,000) and at Gemini-S with b-HROS (R {approx} 150,000) to determine magnesium isotope ratios for seven {omega} Cen red giants that cover a range in iron abundance from [Fe/H] = -1.78 to -0.78 dex, and for two red giants in M4 (NGC 6121). The {omega} Cen stars sample both the ''primordial'' (i.e., O-rich, Na- and Al-poor) and the ''extreme'' (O-depleted, Na- and Al-rich) populations in the cluster. The primordial population stars in both {omega} Cen and M4 show ({sup 25}Mg, {sup 26}Mg)/{sup 24}Mg isotopic ratios that are consistent with those found for the primordial population in other globular clusters with similar [Fe/H] values. The isotopic ratios for the {omega} Cen extreme stars are also consistent with those for extreme population stars in other clusters. The results for the extreme population stars studied indicate that the {sup 26}Mg/{sup 24}Mg ratio is highest at intermediate metallicities ([Fe/H] < -1.4 dex), and for the highest [Al/Fe] values. Further, the relative abundance of {sup 26}Mg in the extreme population stars is notably higher than that of {sup 25}Mg, in contrast to model predictions. The {sup 25}Mg/{sup 24}Mg isotopic ratio in fact does not show any obvious dependence on either [Fe/H] or [Al/Fe] nor, intriguingly, any obvious difference between the primordial and extreme population stars.

  19. Comparison of gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry for carbon stable-isotope analysis of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Moerdijk-Poortvliet, Tanja C W; Schierbeek, Henk; Houtekamer, Marco; van Engeland, Tom; Derrien, Delphine; Stal, Lucas J; Boschker, Henricus T S

    2015-07-15

    We compared gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) and liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) for the measurement of δ(13)C values in carbohydrates. Contrary to GC/IRMS, no derivatisation is needed for LC/IRMS analysis of carbohydrates. Hence, although LC/IRMS is expected to be more accurate and precise, no direct comparison has been reported. GC/IRMS with the aldonitrile penta-acetate (ANPA) derivatisation method was compared with LC/IRMS without derivatisation. A large number of glucose standards and a variety of natural samples were analysed for five neutral carbohydrates at natural abundance as well as at (13)C-enriched levels. Gas chromatography/chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (GC/CIMS) was applied to check for incomplete derivatisation of the carbohydrate, which would impair the accuracy of the GC/IRMS method. The LC/IRMS technique provided excellent precision (±0.08‰ and ±3.1‰ at natural abundance and enrichment levels, respectively) for the glucose standards and this technique proved to be superior to GC/IRMS (±0.62‰ and ±19.8‰ at natural abundance and enrichment levels, respectively). For GC/IRMS measurements the derivatisation correction and the conversion of carbohydrates into CO2 had a considerable effect on the measured δ(13)C values. However, we did not find any significant differences in the accuracy of the two techniques over the full range of natural δ(13)C abundances and (13)C-labelled glucose. The difference in the performance of GC/IRMS and LC/IRMS diminished when the δ(13)C values were measured in natural samples, because the chromatographic performance and background correction became critical factors, particularly for LC/IRMS. The derivatisation of carbohydrates for the GC/IRMS method was complete. Although both LC/IRMS and GC/IRMS are reliable techniques for compound-specific stable carbon isotope analysis of carbohydrates (provided that derivatisation is complete and the

  20. Accurate and precise zinc isotope ratio measurements in urban aerosols.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Simone; Weiss, Dominik; Coles, Barry; Arnold, Tim; Babinski, Marly

    2008-12-15

    We developed an analytical method and constrained procedural boundary conditions that enable accurate and precise Zn isotope ratio measurements in urban aerosols. We also demonstrate the potential of this new isotope system for air pollutant source tracing. The procedural blank is around 5 ng and significantly lower than published methods due to a tailored ion chromatographic separation. Accurate mass bias correction using external correction with Cu is limited to Zn sample content of approximately 50 ng due to the combined effect of blank contribution of Cu and Zn from the ion exchange procedure and the need to maintain a Cu/Zn ratio of approximately 1. Mass bias is corrected for by applying the common analyte internal standardization method approach. Comparison with other mass bias correction methods demonstrates the accuracy of the method. The average precision of delta(66)Zn determinations in aerosols is around 0.05 per thousand per atomic mass unit. The method was tested on aerosols collected in Sao Paulo City, Brazil. The measurements reveal significant variations in delta(66)Zn(Imperial) ranging between -0.96 and -0.37 per thousand in coarse and between -1.04 and 0.02 per thousand in fine particular matter. This variability suggests that Zn isotopic compositions distinguish atmospheric sources. The isotopic light signature suggests traffic as the main source. We present further delta(66)Zn(Imperial) data for the standard reference material NIST SRM 2783 (delta(66)Zn(Imperial) = 0.26 +/- 0.10 per thousand).

  1. Carbon isotopic analysis of atmospheric methane by isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, Dawn A.; Hayes, J. M.; Des Marais, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Less than 15 min are required for the determination of delta C(sub PDB)-13 with a precision of 0.2 ppt(1 sigma, single measurement) in 5-mL samples of air containing CH4 at natural levels (1.7 ppm). An analytical system including a sample-introduction unit incorporating a preparative gas chromatograph (GC) column for separation of CH4 from N2, O2, and Ar is described. The 15-min procedure includes time for operation of that system, high-resolution chromatographic separation of the CH4, on-line combustion and purification of the products, and isotopic calibration. Analyses of standards demonstrate that systematic errors are absent and that there is no dependence of observed values of delta on sample size. For samples containing 100 ppm or more CH4, preconcentration is not required and the analysis time is less than 5 min. The system utilizes a commercially available, high-sensitivity isotope-ratio mass spectrometer. For optimal conditions of smaple handling and combustion, performance of the system is within a factor of 2 of the shot-noise limit. The potential exists therefore for analysis of samples as small as 15 pmol CH4 with a standard deviation of less than 1 ppt.

  2. Carbon isotopic analysis of atmospheric methane by isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, Dawn A.; Hayes, J. M.; Des Marais, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Less than 15 min are required for the determination of delta C(sub PDB)-13 with a precision of 0.2 ppt(1 sigma, single measurement) in 5-mL samples of air containing CH4 at natural levels (1.7 ppm). An analytical system including a sample-introduction unit incorporating a preparative gas chromatograph (GC) column for separation of CH4 from N2, O2, and Ar is described. The 15-min procedure includes time for operation of that system, high-resolution chromatographic separation of the CH4, on-line combustion and purification of the products, and isotopic calibration. Analyses of standards demonstrate that systematic errors are absent and that there is no dependence of observed values of delta on sample size. For samples containing 100 ppm or more CH4, preconcentration is not required and the analysis time is less than 5 min. The system utilizes a commercially available, high-sensitivity isotope-ratio mass spectrometer. For optimal conditions of smaple handling and combustion, performance of the system is within a factor of 2 of the shot-noise limit. The potential exists therefore for analysis of samples as small as 15 pmol CH4 with a standard deviation of less than 1 ppt.

  3. Carbon isotopic analysis of atmospheric methane by isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Dawn A.; Hayes, J. M.; Marais, David J. Des

    1995-01-01

    Less than 15 min are required for the determination of δ13CPDB with a precision of 0.2‰ (1σ, single measurement) in 5-mL samples of air containing CH4 at natural levels (1.7 ppm). An analytical system including a sample-introduction unit incorporating a preparative gas chromatograph (GC) column for separation of CH4 from N2, O2, and Ar is described. The 15-min procedure includes time for operation of that system, high-resolution chromatographic separation of the CH4, on-line combustion and purification of the products, and isotopic calibration. Analyses of standards demonstrate that systematic errors are absent and that there is no dependence of observed values of δ on sample size. For samples containing 100 ppm or more CH4, preconcentration is not required and the analysis time is less than 5 min. The system utilizes a commercially available, high-sensitivity isotope-ratio mass spectrometer. For optimal conditions of sample handling and combustion, performance of the system is within a factor of 2 of the shot-noise limit. The potential exists therefore for analysis of samples as small as 15 pmol CH4 with a standard deviation of <1‰.

  4. Isotopic Ratios in Titan's Methane: Measurements and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, C. A.; Temelso, B.; Vinatier, S.; Teanby, N. A.; Bezard, B.; Achterberg, R. K.; Mandt, K. E.; Sherrill, C. D.; Irwin, P. G.; Jennings, D. E.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The existence of methane in Titan's atmosphere (approx. 6% level at the surface) presents a unique enigma, as photochemical models predict that the current inventory will be entirely depleted by photochemistry in a timescale of approx 20 Myr. In this paper, we examine the clues available from isotopic ratios (C-12/C-13 and D/H) in Titan's methane as to the past atmosphere history of this species. We first analyze recent infrared spectra of CH4 collected by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer, measuring simultaneously for the first time the abundances of all three detected minor isotopologues: (13)CH4, (12)CH3D, and (13)CH3D. From these we compute estimates of C-12/C-13 = 86.5 +/- 8.2 and D/H = (1.59 +/- 0.33) x 10(exp -4) , in agreement with recent results from the Huygens GCMS and Cassini INMS instruments. We also use the transition state theory to estimate the fractionation that occurs in carbon and hydrogen during a critical reaction that plays a key role in the chemical depletion of Titan's methane: CH4 + C2H yields CH3 + C2H2. Using these new measurements and predictions we proceed to model the time evolution of C-12/C-13 and D/H in Titan's methane under several prototypical replenishment scenarios. In our Model 1 (no resupply of CH4), we find that the present-day C-12/C-13 implies that the CH4 entered the atmosphere 60-1600 Myr ago if methane is depleted by chemistry and photolysis alone, but much more recently-most likely less than 10 Myr ago-if hydrodynamic escape is also occurring. On the other hand, if methane has been continuously supplied at the replenishment rate then the isotopic ratios provide no constraints, and likewise for the case where atmospheric methane is increasing, We conclude by discussing how these findings may be combined with other evidence to constrain the overall history of the atmospheric methane.

  5. ISOTOPIC RATIOS IN TITAN's METHANE: MEASUREMENTS AND MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Temelso, B.; Vinatier, S.; Bezard, B.; Coustenis, A.; Teanby, N. A.; Mandt, K. E.; Sherrill, C. D.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Jennings, D. E.; Romani, P. N.; Flasar, F. M.

    2012-04-20

    The existence of methane in Titan's atmosphere ({approx}6% level at the surface) presents a unique enigma, as photochemical models predict that the current inventory will be entirely depleted by photochemistry in a timescale of {approx}20 Myr. In this paper, we examine the clues available from isotopic ratios ({sup 12}C/{sup 13}C and D/H) in Titan's methane as to the past atmosphere history of this species. We first analyze recent infrared spectra of CH{sub 4} collected by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer, measuring simultaneously for the first time the abundances of all three detected minor isotopologues: {sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 12}CH{sub 3}D, and {sup 13}CH{sub 3}D. From these we compute estimates of {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C = 86.5 {+-} 8.2 and D/H = (1.59 {+-} 0.33) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, in agreement with recent results from the Huygens GCMS and Cassini INMS instruments. We also use the transition state theory to estimate the fractionation that occurs in carbon and hydrogen during a critical reaction that plays a key role in the chemical depletion of Titan's methane: CH{sub 4} + C{sub 2}H {yields} CH{sub 3} + C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. Using these new measurements and predictions we proceed to model the time evolution of {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C and D/H in Titan's methane under several prototypical replenishment scenarios. In our Model 1 (no resupply of CH{sub 4}), we find that the present-day {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C implies that the CH{sub 4} entered the atmosphere 60-1600 Myr ago if methane is depleted by chemistry and photolysis alone, but much more recently-most likely less than 10 Myr ago-if hydrodynamic escape is also occurring. On the other hand, if methane has been continuously supplied at the replenishment rate then the isotopic ratios provide no constraints, and likewise for the case where atmospheric methane is increasing. We conclude by discussing how these findings may be combined with other evidence to constrain the overall history of the atmospheric

  6. Isotopic Ratios in Titan's Methane: Measurements and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, C. A.; Temelso, B.; Vinatier, S.; Teanby, N. A.; Bezard, B.; Achterberg, R. K.; Mandt, K. E.; Sherrill, C. D.; Irwin, P. G.; Jennings, D. E.; Romani, P. N.; Coustenis, A.; Flasar, F. M.

    2012-01-01

    The existence of methane in Titan's atmosphere (approx. 6% level at the surface) presents a unique enigma, as photochemical models predict that the current inventory will be entirely depleted by photochemistry in a timescale of approx 20 Myr. In this paper, we examine the clues available from isotopic ratios (C-12/C-13 and D/H) in Titan's methane as to the past atmosphere history of this species. We first analyze recent infrared spectra of CH4 collected by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer, measuring simultaneously for the first time the abundances of all three detected minor isotopologues: (13)CH4, (12)CH3D, and (13)CH3D. From these we compute estimates of C-12/C-13 = 86.5 +/- 8.2 and D/H = (1.59 +/- 0.33) x 10(exp -4) , in agreement with recent results from the Huygens GCMS and Cassini INMS instruments. We also use the transition state theory to estimate the fractionation that occurs in carbon and hydrogen during a critical reaction that plays a key role in the chemical depletion of Titan's methane: CH4 + C2H yields CH3 + C2H2. Using these new measurements and predictions we proceed to model the time evolution of C-12/C-13 and D/H in Titan's methane under several prototypical replenishment scenarios. In our Model 1 (no resupply of CH4), we find that the present-day C-12/C-13 implies that the CH4 entered the atmosphere 60-1600 Myr ago if methane is depleted by chemistry and photolysis alone, but much more recently-most likely less than 10 Myr ago-if hydrodynamic escape is also occurring. On the other hand, if methane has been continuously supplied at the replenishment rate then the isotopic ratios provide no constraints, and likewise for the case where atmospheric methane is increasing, We conclude by discussing how these findings may be combined with other evidence to constrain the overall history of the atmospheric methane.

  7. Site-specific carbon isotope analysis of aromatic carboxylic acids by elemental analysis/pyrolysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Naraoka, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    Site-specific carbon isotope composition of organic compounds can provide useful information on their origin and history in natural environments. Site-specific isotope analyses of small amounts of organic compounds (sub-nanomolar level), such as short-chain carboxylic acids and amino acid analogues, have been performed using gas chromatography/pyrolysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/pyrolysis/IRMS). These analyses were previously limited to volatile compounds. In this study, site-specific carbon isotope analysis has been developed for non-volatile aromatic carboxylic acids at sub-micromolar level by decarboxylation using a continuous flow elemental analysis (EA)/pyrolysis/IRMS technique. Benzoic acid, 2-naphthylacetic acid and 1-pyrenecarboxylic acid were pyrolyzed at 500-1000 degrees C by EA/pyrolysis/IRMS to produce CO2 for delta13C measurement of the carboxyl group. These three aromatic acids were most efficiently pyrolyzed at 750 degrees C. Conventional sealed-tube pyrolysis was also conducted for comparison. The delta13C values of CO2 generated by the continuous flow technique were within 1.0 per thousand of those performed by the conventional technique, indicating that the new continuous flow technique can accurately analyze the carbon isotopic composition of the carboxyl group in aromatic carboxylic acids. The new continuous flow technique is simple, rapid and uses small sample sizes, so this technique will be useful for characterizing the isotopic signature of carboxyl groups in organic compounds. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Utilizing Isotopic Uranium Ratios in Groundwater Evaluations at FUSRAP Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, W.T.; Keil, K.G.; Rhodes, M.C.; Peterson, J.M.; MacDonell, M.M.

    2007-07-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District is evaluating environmental radioactive contamination at several Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites throughout New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana. The investigations follow the process defined in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). Groundwater data from the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) in Lewiston, New York were evaluated for isotopic uranium ratios, specifically uranium-234 versus uranium-238 (U- 234 and U-238, respectively), and the results were presented at Waste Management 2006. Since uranium naturally occurs in all groundwater, it can be difficult to distinguish where low-concentration impacts from past releases differ from the high end of a site-specific natural background range. In natural groundwater, the ratio of U-234 to U-238 exceeds 1 (unity) due to the alpha particle recoil effect, in which U-234 is preferentially mobilized to groundwater from adjacent rock or soil. This process is very slow and may take hundreds to thousands of years before a measurable increase is seen in the natural isotopic ratio. If site releases are the source of uranium being measured in groundwater, the U-234 to U-238 ratio is commonly closer to 1, which normally reflects FUSRAP-related, uranium-contaminated wastes and soils. This lower ratio occurs because not enough residence time has elapsed since the 1940's and 1950's for the alpha particle recoil effect to have significantly altered the contamination-derived ratio. An evaluation of NFSS-specific and regional groundwater data indicate that an isotopic ratio of 1.2 has been identified as a signature value to help distinguish natural groundwater, which may have a broad background range, from zones impacted by past releases. (authors)

  9. Invited review article: Recent developments in isotope-ratio mass spectrometry for geochemistry and cosmochemistry.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Trevor R

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is fundamental to measurements of isotope ratios for applications in isotope geochemistry, geochronology, and cosmochemistry. Magnetic-sector mass spectrometers are most common because these provide the best precision in isotope ratio measurements. Where the highest precision is desired, chemical separation followed by mass spectrometric analysis is carried out with gas (noble gas and stable isotope mass spectrometry), liquid (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry), or solid (thermal ionization mass spectrometry) samples. Developments in in situ analysis, including ion microprobes and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, have opened up issues concerning homogeneity according to domain size, and allow ever smaller amounts of material to be analyzed. While mass spectrometry is built solidly on developments in the 20th century, there are new technologies that will push the limits in terms of precision, accuracy, and sample efficiency. Developments of new instruments based on time-of-flight mass spectrometers could open up the ultimate levels of sensitivity per sample atom.

  10. CCQM-K140: carbon stable isotope ratio delta values in honey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, P. J. H.; Goenaga-Infante, H.; Goren, A. C.; Şimşek, A.; Bilsel, M.; Ogrinc, N.; Armishaw, P.; Hai, L.

    2017-01-01

    As there can be small but measureable differences in isotope ratios between different sources of the same element/compound/material, isotope ratio measurements are applied in a number of different fields including archaeology, environmental science, geochemistry, forensic science and ecology. Isotope ratios for the light elements (H, C, N, O and S) are typically reported as δ-values which are isotope ratios expressed relative to an internationally agreed standard (this standard is the zero-point on the scale), although absolute isotope ratios which are traceable to the SI have also been reported. The IAWG has been granted a traceability exception for the use of arbitrary delta scales until SI traceability can be established at the required level of uncertainty but this goal is some years away. While the CCQM IAWG has previously organised several pilot studies on isotope ratio determination (CCQM-P75: Stable isotope delta values in methionine, 2006; CCQM-P105: Sr isotope ratios in wine, 2008; CCQM-K98: Pb isotope ratios in bronze with additional delta values in CCQM-P134, 2011), it has been a number of years since delta values of light elements have been considered and there has been no key comparison (KC). Therefore, the IAWG has included the need for a KC (CCQM-K140) based on an arbitrary delta scale in its program to support ongoing requirements to demonstrate core capabilities as well as specific claims of measurement capability (CMCs) in this area. The performance of all five of the CCQM-K140 participants was very good, illustrating their ability to obtain accurate results for carbon isotope ratios, within the calibration range afforded by internationally agreed reference materials (δ13CVPDB-LSVEC between -47.32 % and +535.3 %) with measurement uncertainties of between 0.08 and 0.28 %. This was despite the fact that no two participants used exactly the same approach in terms of instrumentation or data treatment. Main text To reach the main text of this paper

  11. High-level direct-dynamics variational transition state theory calculations including multidimensional tunneling of the thermal rate constants, branching ratios, and kinetic isotope effects of the hydrogen abstraction reactions from methanol by atomic hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Meana-Pañeda, Rubén; Truhlar, Donald G; Fernández-Ramos, Antonio

    2011-03-07

    We report a detailed theoretical study of the hydrogen abstraction reaction from methanol by atomic hydrogen. The study includes the analysis of thermal rate constants, branching ratios, and kinetic isotope effects. Specifically, we have performed high-level computations at the MC3BB level together with direct dynamics calculations by canonical variational transition state theory (CVT) with the microcanonically optimized multidimensional tunneling (μOMT) transmission coefficient (CVT/μOMT) to study both the CH(3)OH+H→CH(2)OH+H(2) (R1) reaction and the CH(3)OH+H→CH(3)O+H(2) (R2) reaction. The CVT/μOMT calculations show that reaction R1 dominates in the whole range 298≤T (K)≤2500 and that anharmonic effects on the torsional mode about the C-O bond are important, mainly at high temperatures. The activation energy for the total reaction sum of R1 and R2 reactions changes substantially with temperature and, therefore, the use of straight-line Arrhenius plots is not valid. We recommend the use of new expressions for the total R1 + R2 reaction and for the R1 and R2 individual reactions. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  12. Isotopic ratio of nitrogen on Titan: Photochemical interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen isotope fractionation in predissociation of N2 (Liang et al., 2007) is combined with production of N(4S), N(2D), and N+ in dissociation and dissociative ionization by the solar EUV photons, photoelectrons, magnetospheric electrons and protons, and cosmic rays from the photochemical model. The calculated 14N/15N ratio in nitriles is 57, in excellent agreement with the observed ratio in HCN. Loss of nitrogen in condensation and polymerization of nitriles is 392 g cm-2 Byr-1 with nitrogen isotope fractionation factor of 2.8. Loss of nitrogen by sputtering is 57 g cm-2 Byr-1 (De La Haye et al., 2007) with fractionation factor of 0.73 (Mandt et al., 2014). If the current loss was constant throughout the age of the Solar System, then the initial 14N/15N ratio on Titan is 129, similar to 127±32 for ammonia in comets (Rousselot et al., 2014). However, the solar EUV and wind were stronger from the young Sun, and this tends to further reduce the initial 14N/15N ratio. Nevertheless uncertainties of the problem and of the ratio in comets support the idea that nitrogen on Titan appeared as ammonia ice with 14N/15N similar to that in comets.

  13. Extending the Boundaries of Isotope Ratio MS - Latest Technological Improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilkert, A.

    2016-12-01

    Isotope ratio mass spectrometry has a long history, which started with the analysis of the isotopes of CO2. Over several decades a broad range of IRMS techniques has been derived like multi-collector high resolution ICP-MS, TIMS, noble gas static MS and gas IRMS. These different flavors of IRMS are now building a technology tool box, which allows to derive new applications build on new capabilities by combination of specific features of these sister technologies. In the 90's inductive coupled plasma ionization was added for the high precision analysis of rare elements. In 2000 extended multicollection opened the way into clumped isotopes. In 2008 the concept of a high resolution gas source IRMS was layed out to revolutionize stable gas IRMS recently followed by the combination of this static multicollection mode with fast mass scans of the single collector double focusing high resolution GCMS. Recently new technologies were created, like the mid infrared analyzers (IRIS) based on difference frequency generation lasers, the combination of a collision cell with HR MC ICPMS as well as the use of a high resolution electrostatic ion trap for extended stable isotope analysis on individual compounds. All these building blocks for IRMS address selected requirements of sample preparation, sample introduction, referencing, ionization, mass separation, ion detection or signal amplification. Along these lines new technological improvements and applications will be shown and discussed.

  14. Carbon isotopic ratio analysis by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the detection of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) administration to humans.

    PubMed

    Saudan, Christophe; Augsburger, Marc; Mangin, Patrice; Saugy, Martial

    2007-01-01

    Since GHB (gamma-hydroxybutyric acid) is naturally produced in the human body, clinical and forensic toxicologists must be able to discriminate between endogenous levels and a concentration resulting from exposure. To suggest an alternative to the use of interpretative concentration cut-offs, the detection of exogenous GHB in urine specimens was investigated by means of gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). GHB was isolated from urinary matrix by successive purification on Oasis MCX and Bond Elute SAX solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges prior to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractioning using an Atlantis dC18 column eluted with a mixture of formic acid and methanol. Subsequent intramolecular esterification of GHB leading to the formation of gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) was carried out to avoid introduction of additional carbon atoms for carbon isotopic ratio analysis. A precision of 0.3 per thousand was determined using this IRMS method for samples at GHB concentrations of 10 mg/L. The (13)C/(12)C ratios of GHB in samples of subjects exposed to the drug ranged from -32.1 to -42.1 per thousand, whereas the results obtained for samples containing GHB of endogenous origin at concentration levels less than 10 mg/L were in the range -23.5 to -27.0 per thousand. Therefore, these preliminary results show that a possible discrimination between endogenous and exogenous GHB can be made using carbon isotopic ratio analyses.

  15. Measurement of stable carbon isotope ratios of non-methane hydrocarbons and halocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuiderweg, A. T.

    2012-09-01

    Within the realm of volatile organic compounds, hydrocarbons and halocarbons form a sizable proportion of carbon input to the atmosphere. Within these compound categories, the light non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC, two to seven carbon atoms) and monocarbon halocarbons have a special place as these have strong, if not exclusive, anthropogenic (human-caused) sources. With common atmospheric molar mixing ratios in the parts-per-trillion (10-12 mole/mole) to parts-per-billion (10-9 mole/mole) range, these trace gases, though decidedly minor constituants of the atmosphere, have diverse consequences due to their atmospheric presence and their removal processes. Effects range from causing ground level air pollution and resulting hazards to health, to contributing to anthropogenic climate change and the destruction of the ozone layer in the stratosphere, among many others. The existance of stable isotopes (otherwise identical atoms with varying amounts of neutrons that do not spontaneously disintegrate) in several elements relevant to atmospheric chemistry and physics is a boon to research. Their presence in molecules is detectable by mass and cause small intra- and intermolecular property changes. These changes range from the physical (e.g. boiling point variation) to the chemical (reaction rate variation) and can influence external interactions as well. The measurement of the ratio of a minor stable isotope of an element to the major one (the stable isotope ratio) can be used to establish source fingerprints, trace the interaction dynamics, and refine the understanding of the relative contribution of sources and sinks to the atmosphere as a whole. The stable minor stable isotope of carbon, 13C, has a natural abundance of approximately 1.1 %. It has a sufficient fractional mass difference from its major isotope as to cause significant effects, making it ideal for measuring the ratios and properties of hydro- and halocarbons. In order to enable a better understanding of the

  16. Determination of the sulfur isotope ratio in carbonyl sulfide using gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry on fragment ions 32S+, 33S+, and 34S+.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Shohei; Toyoda, Akari; Toyoda, Sakae; Ishino, Sakiko; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2015-01-06

    Little is known about the sulfur isotopic composition of carbonyl sulfide (OCS), the most abundant atmospheric sulfur species. We present a promising new analytical method for measuring the stable sulfur isotopic compositions (δ(33)S, δ(34)S, and Δ(33)S) of OCS using nanomole level samples. The direct isotopic analytical technique consists of two parts: a concentration line and online gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) using fragmentation ions (32)S(+), (33)S(+), and (34)S(+). The current levels of measurement precision for OCS samples greater than 8 nmol are 0.42‰, 0.62‰, and 0.23‰ for δ(33)S, δ(34)S, and Δ(33)S, respectively. These δ and Δ values show a slight dependence on the amount of injected OCS for volumes smaller than 8 nmol. The isotope values obtained from the GC-IRMS method were calibrated against those measured by a conventional SF6 method. We report the first measurement of the sulfur isotopic composition of OCS in air collected at Kawasaki, Kanagawa, Japan. The δ(34)S value obtained for OCS (4.9 ± 0.3‰) was lower than the previous estimate of 11‰. When the δ(34)S value for OCS from the atmospheric sample is postulated as the global signal, this finding, coupled with isotopic fractionation for OCS sink reactions in the stratosphere, explains the reported δ(34)S for background stratospheric sulfate. This suggests that OCS is a potentially important source for background (nonepisodic or nonvolcanic) stratospheric sulfate aerosols.

  17. TOWARD A UNIQUE NITROGEN ISOTOPIC RATIO IN COMETARY ICES

    SciTech Connect

    Rousselot, Philippe; Cordier, Daniel; Mousis, Olivier; Pirali, Olivier; Vervloet, Michel; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Gruet, Sébastien; Jehin, Emmanuël; Hutsemékers, Damien; Manfroid, Jean; Arpigny, Claude; Decock, Alice

    2014-01-10

    Determination of the nitrogen isotopic ratios in different bodies of the solar system provides important information regarding the solar system's origin. We unambiguously identified emission lines in comets due to the {sup 15}NH{sub 2} radical produced by the photodissociation of {sup 15}NH{sub 3}. Analysis of our data has permitted us to measure the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N isotopic ratio in comets for a molecule carrying the amine (-NH) functional group. This ratio, within the error, appears similar to that measured in comets in the HCN molecule and the CN radical, and lower than the protosolar value, suggesting that N{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} result from the separation of nitrogen into two distinct reservoirs in the solar nebula. This ratio also appears similar to that measured in Titan's atmospheric N{sub 2}, supporting the hypothesis that, if the latter is representative of its primordial value in NH{sub 3}, these bodies were assembled from building blocks sharing a common formation location.

  18. Isotope Flows and Flux Ratios in Biological Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Kedem, Ora; Essig, Alvin

    1965-01-01

    Precise evaluation of permeability of biological tissues is often prevented by imprecise knowledge of operative forces. This problem has been approached by analysis of fluxes of isotopic species applied to opposite surfaces of a membrane. A simple and rather general flux ratio equation has been derived which may permit evaluation of membrane permeability, even without knowledge of forces, or of the nature of active transport processes. Permeability as thus defined should be insensitive to coupled flows, either of other species or of metabolism. In appropriate circumstances application of the equation may permit evaluation of the contributions of the various processes to the transport of the examined species. Composite series membranes would be expected to obey the unmodified general equation. Heterogeneous parallel pathways would alter the relation in a predictable manner. The effect of isotope interaction is specifically incorporated. The formulation is applied to consideration of energetics of active transport. PMID:5855508

  19. USE OF FATTY ACID STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIO TO INDICATE MICROBIAL CARBON SOURCE IN TROPICAL SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory


    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotope ratio of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils as indicators of live microbial biomass levels, broad microbial community structure, and microbial carbon source. For studies of soil o...

  20. USE OF FATTY ACID STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIO TO INDICATE MICROBIAL CARBON SOURCE IN TROPICAL SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory


    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotope ratio of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils as indicators of live microbial biomass levels, broad microbial community structure, and microbial carbon source. For studies of soil o...

  1. Carbon isotope ratios and isotopic correlations between components in fruit juices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzchnicki, Ryszard

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays food products are defined by geographical origin, method of production and by some regulations concerning terms of their authenticity. Important data for confirm the authenticity of product are providing by isotopic methods of food control. The method checks crucial criteria which characterize the authenticity of inspected product. The European Union Regulations clearly show the tendency for application of the isotopic methods for food authenticity control (wine, honey, juice). The aim of the legislation steps is the protection of European market from possibility of the commercial frauds. Method of isotope ratio mass spectrometry is very effective tool for the use distinguishably the food products of various geographical origin. The basic problem for identification of the sample origin is the lack of databases of isotopic composition of components and information about the correlations of the data. The subject of the work was study the isotopic correlations existing between components of fruits. The chemical and instrumental methods of separation: water, sugars, organic acids and pulp from fruit were implemented. IRMS technique was used to measure isotopic composition of samples. The final results for original samples of fruits (apple, strawberry etc.) will be presented and discussed. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education under grant NR12-0043-10/2010.

  2. Variation in strontium isotope ratios of archaeological fauna in the Midwestern United States: a preliminary study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedman, Kristin M.; Curry, B. Brandon; Johnson, Thomas M.; Fullagar, Paul D.; Emerson, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    Strontium isotope values (87Sr/86Sr) in bone and tooth enamel have been used increasingly to identify non-local individuals within prehistoric human populations worldwide. Archaeological research in the Midwestern United States has increasingly highlighted the role of population movement in affecting interregional cultural change. However, the comparatively low level of geologic variation in the Midwestern United States might suggest a corresponding low level of strontium variation, and calls into question the sensitivity of strontium isotopes to identify non-local individuals in this region. Using strontium isotopes of archaeological fauna, we explore the degree of variability in strontium ratios across this region. Our results demonstrate measurable variation in strontium ratios and indicate the potential of strontium analysis for addressing questions of origin and population movement in the Midwestern United States.

  3. Isotope ratio monitoring gas chromatography/Mass spectrometry of D/H by high temperature conversion isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hilkert; Douthitt; Schlüter; Brand

    1999-07-01

    Of all the elements, hydrogen has the largest naturally occurring variations in the ratio of its stable isotopes (D/H). It is for this reason that there has been a strong desire to add hydrogen to the list of elements amenable to isotope ratio monitoring gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (irm-GC/MS). In irm-GC/MS the sample is entrained in helium as the carrier gas, which is also ionized and separated in the isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). Because of the low abundance of deuterium in nature, precise and accurate on-line monitoring of D/H ratios with an IRMS requires that low energy helium ions be kept out of the m/z 3 collector, which requires the use of an energy filter. A clean mass 3 (HD(+.)) signal which is independent of a large helium load in the electron impact ion source is essential in order to reach the sensitivity required for D/H analysis of capillary GC peaks. A new IRMS system, the DELTA(plus)XL(trade mark), has been designed for high precision, high accuracy measurements of transient signals of hydrogen gas. It incorporates a retardation lens integrated into the m/z 3 Faraday cup collector. Following GC separation, the hydrogen bound in organic compounds must be quantitatively converted into H(2) gas prior to analysis in the IRMS. Quantitative conversion is achieved by high temperature conversion (TC) at temperatures >1400 degrees C. Measurements of D/H ratios of individual organic compounds in complicated natural mixtures can now be made to a precision of 2 per thousand (delta notation) or, better, with typical sample amounts of approximately 200 ng per compound. Initial applications have focused on compounds of interest to petroleum research (biomarkers and natural gas components), food and flavor control (vanillin and ethanol), and metabolic studies (fatty acids and steroids). Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Isotopic Ratios in Nitrile Species on Titan using ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molter, Edward; Nixon, Conor; Cordiner, Martin; Serigano, Joseph; Irwin, Patrick; Teanby, Nicholas; Charnley, Steven; Lindeberg, Johan

    2016-06-01

    The atmosphere of Titan is primarily composed of molecular nitrogen (N2, ˜98%) and methane (CH4, ˜2%), but also hosts a myriad of trace organic species. Two of the simplest and most abundant of these are hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and cyanoacetylene (HC3N). The advent of ALMA provides the opportunity to observe rotational transitions in these molecules and their isotopologues with unprecendented sensitivity and spatial resolution. We searched through the ALMA archive for publicly available high-resolution observations of Titan as a flux calibrator source taken between April and July 2014; each integration lasted around 160 seconds. Using spectra of HCN and HC3N isotopologues found in these data, we derive vertical abundance profiles and determine the isotopic ratios 14N/15N and 12C/13C in these molecules. We also report the detection of a new HCN isotopologue on Titan, H13C6 15N, and use a high signal-to-noise spectrum of DCN to determine the D/H ratio in HCN on Titan for the first time. These isotopic ratios are leveraged to constrain the physical and chemical processes occurring in Titan's atmosphere.

  5. Isotope ratios of lead in Japanese women's hair of the twentieth century.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Megumi; Yoshinaga, Jun

    2010-03-01

    Isotope ratios of lead ((207)Pb/(206)Pb and (208)Pb/(206)Pb) in Japanese women's hair of the twentieth century were measured to evaluate lead contamination of human proximate environment of those days. The historic hair samples (n = 40) were collected in 1980s by staffs of Department of Human Ecology, University of Tokyo, from Japanese women who cut their hair in 1910s to 1968 by themselves for hair piece or needle pad and who had stored it by the time of collection. Additional five contemporary hair samples (one from male and four from females) were also included. The hair samples were digested with HNO(3), diluted with water to Pb concentration of 10 microg/kg, and isotope ratios were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Isotope ratios as well as Pb concentration in the hair samples of the twentieth century varied to a considerable extent depending on the period of hair cut. The oldest hair samples (1910-1920s) had the highest concentration and the most distinct isotope ratios from those of Japanese domestic Pb indicating serious contamination of proximate environment of people of those days with Pb originated from mines in other regions of the world, probably through the usage of Pb-containing face powder. The concentration and isotope ratios of Pb decreased thereafter indicating less serious contamination of proximate environment of Japanese which, in turn, should have affected by environmental contamination of mid-twentieth century due to industrial activities and leaded gasoline. Contemporary Pb level was quite low (<1 mg/kg); however, isotope ratios were close to those in 1960s when hair concentration was assumed to be strongly affected by leaded gasoline.

  6. Progress in AMS measurement of U isotope ratios in nanogram U samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kejun; He, Ming; Wang, Chen; Zhao, Xinhong; Li, Lili; Zhao, Yonggang; Wang, Xianggao; Shen, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaoming; Pang, Fangfang; Xu, Yongning; Zhao, Qingzhang; Dou, Liang; Yang, Xuran; Wu, Shaoyong; Lin, Deyu; Li, Kangning; You, Qubo; Bao, Yiwen; Hu, Yueming; Xia, Qingliang; Yin, Xinyi; Jiang, Shan

    2015-10-01

    The determination of uranium isotopic composition in ultra-trace U samples is very important in different fields, especially for the nuclear forensics. A new Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) technique has been developed for the measurement of uranium isotopic ratios in ng level uranium samples at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). Recently, the method was further optimized and developed by using a series of blank and standard samples. The results show that the 236U at the femtogram level can be determined in nanogram U samples by the newly developed AMS technique at CIAE. The experimental setup, performances and results will be detailed in this contribution.

  7. Isotopic ratio outlier analysis global metabolomics of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Stupp, Gregory S; Clendinen, Chaevien S; Ajredini, Ramadan; Szewc, Mark A; Garrett, Timothy; Menger, Robert F; Yost, Richard A; Beecher, Chris; Edison, Arthur S

    2013-12-17

    We demonstrate the global metabolic analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans stress responses using a mass-spectrometry-based technique called isotopic ratio outlier analysis (IROA). In an IROA protocol, control and experimental samples are isotopically labeled with 95 and 5% (13)C, and the two sample populations are mixed together for uniform extraction, sample preparation, and LC-MS analysis. This labeling strategy provides several advantages over conventional approaches: (1) compounds arising from biosynthesis are easily distinguished from artifacts, (2) errors from sample extraction and preparation are minimized because the control and experiment are combined into a single sample, (3) measurement of both the molecular weight and the exact number of carbon atoms in each molecule provides extremely accurate molecular formulas, and (4) relative concentrations of all metabolites are easily determined. A heat-shock perturbation was conducted on C. elegans to demonstrate this approach. We identified many compounds that significantly changed upon heat shock, including several from the purine metabolism pathway. The metabolomic response information by IROA may be interpreted in the context of a wealth of genetic and proteomic information available for C. elegans . Furthermore, the IROA protocol can be applied to any organism that can be isotopically labeled, making it a powerful new tool in a global metabolomics pipeline.

  8. Isotopic Ratio Outlier Analysis Global Metabolomics of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Szewc, Mark A.; Garrett, Timothy; Menger, Robert F.; Yost, Richard A.; Beecher, Chris; Edison, Arthur S.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the global metabolic analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans stress responses using a mass spectrometry-based technique called Isotopic Ratio Outlier Analysis (IROA). In an IROA protocol, control and experimental samples are isotopically labeled with 95% and 5% 13C, and the two sample populations are mixed together for uniform extraction, sample preparation, and LC-MS analysis. This labeling strategy provides several advantages over conventional approaches: 1) compounds arising from biosynthesis are easily distinguished from artifacts, 2) errors from sample extraction and preparation are minimized because the control and experiment are combined into a single sample, 3) measurement of both the molecular weight and the exact number of carbon atoms in each molecule provides extremely accurate molecular formulae, and 4) relative concentrations of all metabolites are easily determined. A heat shock perturbation was conducted on C. elegans to demonstrate this approach. We identified many compounds that significantly changed upon heat shock, including several from the purine metabolism pathway, which we use to demonstrate the approach. The metabolomic response information by IROA may be interpreted in the context of a wealth of genetic and proteomic information available for C. elegans. Furthermore, the IROA protocol can be applied to any organism that can be isotopically labeled, making it a powerful new tool in a global metabolomics pipeline. PMID:24274725

  9. Oxygen-18 Carbon Dioxide Isotope Ratio in Mars Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostiuk, T.; Livengood, T. A.; Hewagama, T.; Smith, R.; Fast, K. E.; Annen, J.; Sonnabend, G.; Sornig, M.

    2012-09-01

    The determination of isotopic ratios on Mars is important to the study of atmospheric evolution [1]. The relative abundance of isotopes of CO2 provides insight into the loss of Mars' primordial atmosphere. Isotopic ratios also provide markers in the study of geochemistry of Mars meteorites and future returned samples formed in equilibrium with ambient atmosphere, and are probes of biogenic and abiotic chemistry, which differ in isotope fractionation. Due to its lesser gravity and relatively thin residual atmosphere, Mars' atmosphere should be enriched in heavy isotopes [1]. However Viking [2] results indicated an Earth-like singly substituted oxygen-18 CO2 isotopic ratio, 18OCO/OCO, with δ18O = 0±50‰ relative to Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water (VSMOW). By comparison, isotopic ratios in Earth atmospheric CO2 are not uniquely defined due to seasonal and biotic variability, but have a range 0-41‰ relative to VSMOW [3, 4]. Phoenix lander TEGA [3] measurements found a modest enrichment of δ18O = 31.0±5.7‰. Only the Viking and Phoenix landers have carried a mass spectrometer to Mars, so far, until the arrival of Mars Science Laboratory in August 2012. Using ground-based spectroscopic techniques Krasnopolsky et al. [5] also found modest enrichment δ18O = 18±18‰. We present results from fully resolved spectroscopic measurements near 10.6 μm of both the normal and singly substituted oxygen- 18 CO2 lines, taken with the Goddard Space Flight Center Heterodyne Instrument for Planetary Winds And Composition (HIPWAC) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Measurements with spectral resolving power λ/Δλ=107 were obtained in October 2007 with an instantaneous field-of-view on the planet of ~1 arcsec, at the locations shown in Fig. 1 as open squares. The solid and broken line tracks show Mars SPICAM measurements of ozone corresponding to ozone measurements also obtained with HIPWAC and shown as hatched and solid regions [6]. Figure 1

  10. Carbon isotope ratios and impurities in diamonds from Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidane, Abiel; Koch-Müller, Monika; Morales, Luiz; Wiedenbeck, Michael; De Wit, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    We are investigating the sources of diamonds from southern Africa by studying both their carbon isotopic composition and chemical impurities. Our samples include macro-sized diamonds from River Ranch kimberlite in Zimbabwe and the Helam and Klipspringer kimberlitic deposits from South Africa, as well as micro-sized diamonds from Klipspringer and Premier kimberlites in South Africa. We have characterized the samples for their structurally bounded nitrogen, hydrogen and platelets defect using a Fourier Transmission Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Using the DiaMap routine, open source software (Howell et al., 2012), IR spectra were deconvulated and quantified for their nitrogen (A, B and D components) and hydrogen contents. High to moderate nitrogen concentrations (1810 to 400 µg/g; 400 to 50 µg/g respectively) were found in diamonds from Klipspringer and Helam. Moderate to low (<50 µg/g) nitrogen concentrations were observed in diamonds from Premier and River Ranch. Type II diamonds, i.e. diamonds with no N impurities, which are presumed to have been derived from ultramafic sources, are found in the River Ranch deposit. The macro- and micro-size diamonds from the Klipspringer deposit display similar nitrogen defects, with higher nitrogen concentration and more frequent D components found in the macro-size diamonds. One of the first steps towards reliable carbon isotope studies is the development of calibration materials for SIMS carbon isotopic analyses. We have investigated candidate materials both from a polycrystalline synthetic diamond sheet and two natural gem quality diamonds from Juina (Brazil). Electron-based images of the synthetic diamond sheet, obtained using GFZ Potsdam's dual beam FIB instrument, show many diamond grains with diameters greater than 35 µm. SIMS testing of the isotopic homogeneity of the back and front sides of the synthetic sheets reveal similar 13C/12C ratio within a RSD of <1 ‰ . SIMS isotopic analyses of the two natural diamond RMs

  11. The lithium isotopic ratio in very metal-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, K.; Melendez, J.; Asplund, M.; Collet, R.; Magic, Z.

    2013-06-01

    Context. Un-evolved, very metal-poor stars are the most important tracers of the cosmic abundance of lithium in the early universe. Combining the standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis model with Galactic production through cosmic ray spallation, these stars at [Fe / H] < - 2 are expected to show an undetectably small 6Li / 7Li isotopic signature. Evidence to the contrary may necessitate an additional pre-galactic production source or a revision of the standard model of Big Bang nucleosynthesis. It would also cast doubts on Li depletion from stellar atmospheres as an explanation for the factor 3-5 discrepancy between the predicted primordial 7Li from the Big Bang and the observed value in metal-poor dwarf/turn-off stars. Aims: We revisit the isotopic analysis of four halo stars, two with claimed 6Li-detections in the literature, to investigate the influence of improved model atmospheres and line formation treatment. Methods: For the first time, a combined 3D, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) modelling technique for Li, Na, and Ca lines is utilised to constrain the intrinsic line-broadening and to determine the Li isotopic ratio. We discuss the influence of 3D NLTE effects on line profile shapes and assess the realism of our modelling using the Ca excitation and ionisation balance. Results: By accounting for NLTE line formation in realistic 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres, we can model the Li resonance line and other neutral lines with a consistency that is superior to LTE, with no need for additional line asymmetry caused by the presence of 6Li. Contrary to the results from 1D and 3D LTE modelling, no star in our sample has a significant (2σ) detection of the lighter isotope in NLTE. Over a large parameter space, NLTE modelling systematically reduces the best-fit Li isotopic ratios by up to five percentage points. As a bi-product, we also present the first ever 3D NLTE Ca and Na abundances of halo stars, which reveal significant departures from LTE

  12. Last Glacial Maximum and deglacial abyssal seawater oxygen isotopic ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunsch, Carl

    2016-06-01

    An earlier analysis of pore-water salinity (chlorinity) in two deep-sea cores, using terminal constraint methods of control theory, concluded that although a salinity amplification in the abyss was possible during the LGM, it was not required by the data. Here the same methodology is applied to δ18Ow in the upper 100 m of four deep-sea cores. An ice volume amplification to the isotopic ratio is, again, consistent with the data but not required by it. In particular, results are very sensitive, with conventional diffusion values, to the assumed initial conditions at -100 ky and a long list of noise (uncertainty) assumptions. If the calcite values of δ18O are fully reliable, then published enriched values of the ratio in seawater are necessary to preclude sub-freezing temperatures, but the seawater δ18O in pore fluids does not independently require the conclusion.

  13. Carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of juvenile winter flounder ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios were measured in the muscle tissues of young-of-the-year (YOY) winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, collected from several estuarine systems along the coast of Rhode Island, USA. These systems included three coastal lagoons (Ninigret Pond, Green Hill Pond and Point Judith Pond), an estuarine river (Narrow River) and Narragansett Bay. Results from sampling over a three-year period showed some year-to-year variability for 13C within waterbodies; however, 15N values were not significantly different (P > 0.05) within systems among the three years studied. he 13C trends observed along transects in Narrow River and Narragansett Bay showed isotopically depleted terrestrial signals in the upper reaches of the estuaries and more positive values indicative of marine organic material in the lower regions of these systems. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in 15N were observed among estuarine systems. Fish from the coastal lagoons had the lowest 15N values followed by those from Narrow River and then Narragansett Bay. Some unexpected trends in 15N were observed within Narragansett Bay. The Bay has a strong north-south gradient in nutrient concentrations due to large sewage inputs in the upper Bay which was not reflected in flounder 15N values. As expected, YOY flounder from stations in the lower-Bay had depleted 15N values compared to those from the other locations. However, the 15N ratios o

  14. Stable isotope analysis of white paints and likelihood ratios.

    PubMed

    Farmer, N; Meier-Augenstein, W; Lucy, D

    2009-06-01

    Architectural paints are commonly found as trace evidence at scenes of crime. Currently the most widely used technique for the analysis of architectural paints is Fourier Transformed Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FTIR). There are, however, limitations to the forensic analysis of white paints, and the ability to discriminate between samples. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has been investigated as a potential tool for the analysis of architectural white paints, where no preparation of samples prior to analysis is required. When stable isotope profiles (SIPs) are compared, there appears to be no relationship between paints from the same manufacturer, or between paints of the same type. Unlike existing techniques, IRMS does not differentiate resin samples solely on the basis of modifier or oil-type, but exploits additional factors linked to samples such as geo-location where oils added to alkyd formulations were grown. In combination with the use of likelihood ratios, IRMS shows potential, with a false positive rate of 2.6% from a total of 1275 comparisons.

  15. Activities of Pu and Am isotopes and isotopic ratios in a soil contaminated by weapons-grade plutonium.

    PubMed

    Lee, M H; Clark, S B

    2005-08-01

    An accident and fire at the former McGuire Air Force Base and Boeing Michigan Aeronautical Research Center (BOMARC) site in New Jersey resulted in dispersion of weapons-grade plutonium in particulate form to the local environment. Soil samples collected at the BOMARC site were measured for their activities and isotopic ratios of Pu and Am isotopes by radioanalytical techniques. The activities of the Pu and Am isotopes in the BOMARC soil were markedly higher than fallout levels, and they decreased nearly exponentially with increasing particle size of the soil. The measured (241)Am activity was compared to calculated values based on decay of (241)Pu. The activity ratios of (238)Pu/(239,240)Pu, (241)Pu/(239,240)Pu, and (241)Am/(239,240)Pu observed in the BOMARC soil were much lower than those attributed to nuclear reprocessing plants and Chernobyl fallout. From the activity ratios of (241)Pu/(239,240)Pu and (241)Am/(239,240)Pu, the origin of the Pu isotopes was identified as weapons-grade and the time since production of the material was estimated. Furthermore, the atomic ratio of (240)Pu/(239)Pu in the BOMARC soil was remarkably lower than the fallout value influenced by nuclear weapons testing and the Chernobyl accident. The atomic ratio of (240)Pu/(239)Pu was very close to the value of the weapons-grade Pu detected from the Thule accident in Greenland. This work demonstrates the utility of radioanalytical measurements and decay calculations for defining characteristics of the source term and discriminating multiple processes that contribute to a source. Such an approach would also be needed to respond to a terrorist event involving an improvised nuclear device or radiological dispersal device.

  16. Childhood lead exposure in an industrial town in China: coupling stable isotope ratios with bioaccessible lead.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Bo; Chen, Kai; Juhasz, Albert L; Huang, Lei; Ma, Lena Q

    2015-04-21

    Fingerprinting based on stable isotopes of lead (Pb) in blood and environmental media helps to identify Pb exposure pathways in children. However, previous studies used stable isotopes of total Pb in media. In this study, a wire rope production town in China (Zhuhang) was selected for investigating the effectiveness of using isotope ratios in bioaccessible Pb to identify childhood Pb exposure pathways. Blood Pb levels of 115 children in Zhuhang were 1.7-20.4 μg dL(-1), averaging 6.1 ± 3.2 μg dL(-1) (mean ± standard deviation), and were ∼1.6 times the national average in China (3.9 ± 1.8 μg dL(-1)). Among different environmental media (housedust, soil, PM10, vegetables, rice, and drinking water), housedust (695 ± 495 mg kg(-1)) and vegetables [0.36 ± 0.40 mg (kg of fresh weight)(-1)] contained elevated Pb concentrations. The isotope ratios ((207)Pb/(206)Pb and (208)Pb/(206)Pb) of total Pb were the highest in housedust (0.8587 ± 0.0039 and 2.1049 ± 0.0087) but lower than blood Pb ratios (0.8634 ± 0.0027 and 2.1244 ± 0.0061). When using bioaccessible Pb in housedust (0.8639 ± 0.0018 and 2.1171 ± 0.0036), the isotope ratios overlapped with blood Pb ratios, suggesting that incidental ingestion of housedust was the predominant contributor to children's blood Pb. Coupling the stable isotope technique with bioaccessible Pb is more reliable for identifying Pb exposure pathways than total Pb determinations.

  17. Examining Changes in Radioxenon Isotope Activity Ratios during Subsurface Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annewandter, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE) has demonstrated and modelled the usefulness of barometric pumping induced soil gas sampling during On-Site inspections. Gas transport has been widely studied with different numerical codes. However, gas transport of all radioxenons in the post-detonation regime and their possible fractionation is still neglected in the open literature. Atmospheric concentrations of the radioxenons Xe-135, Xe-133m, Xe-133 and Xe-131m can be used to discriminate between civilian releases (nuclear power plants or medical isotope facilities), and nuclear explosion sources. It is based on the isotopic activity ratio method. Yet it is not clear whether subsurface migration of the radioxenons, with eventual release into the atmosphere, can affect the activity ratios due to fractionation. Fractionation can be caused by different diffusivities due to mass differences between the radioxenons. A previous study showed surface arrival time of a chemically inert gaseous tracer is affected by its diffusivity. They observed detectable amount for SF6 50 days after detonation and 375 days for He-3. They predict 50 and 80 days for Xe-133 and Ar-37 respectively. Cyclical changes in atmospheric pressure can drive subsurface gas transport. This barometric pumping phenomenon causes an oscillatoric flow in upward trending fractures which, combined with diffusion into the porous matrix, leads to a net transport of gaseous components - a ratcheting effect. We use a general purpose reservoir simulator (Complex System Modelling Platform, CSMP++) which has been applied in a range of fields such as deep geothermal systems, three-phase black oil simulations , fracture propagation in fractured, porous media, Navier-Stokes pore-scale modelling among others. It is specifically designed to account for structurally complex geologic situation of fractured, porous media. Parabolic differential equations are solved by a continuous Galerkin finite-element method, hyperbolic

  18. Measurement of isotope ratio of Ca{sup +} ions in a linear Paul Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Y.; Minamino, K.; Nagamoto, D.; Hasegawa, S.

    2009-03-17

    Measurement of isotope ratios of Calcium is very useful in many fields. So we demonstrated the measurement of isotope ratios of {sup 40}Ca{sup +}(abundance 96.4%) to {sup 44}Ca{sup +}(2.09%) ions in a linear Paul trap with several laser lights tuning to the isotope shifts. And we found that the experimental parameters had large influences on the measurement of the isotope ratios.

  19. Isotopic ratio correlation for the isotopic composition analysis of plutonium in Am-Pu mixed samples having high americium content.

    PubMed

    Patra, Sabyasachi; Agarwal, Chhavi; Chaudhury, Sanhita; Newton Nathaniel, T; Gathibandhe, M; Goswami, A

    2013-08-01

    Interference of high amount of americium in the plutonium isotopic composition analysis has been studied by simulating gamma-ray spectra for Am-Pu samples over a wide composition range (5-97% (241)Am) for both power and research reactor grade plutonium. An alternate way for isotopic composition analysis has been proposed by correlating the isotopic ratios available in our old database with the experimentally obtained (241)Pu/(239)Pu isotopic ratio. The proposed method has been validated using simulated spectra of known isotopic compositions.

  20. Tracing contamination sources in soils with Cu and Zn isotopic ratios.

    PubMed

    Fekiacova, Z; Cornu, S; Pichat, S

    2015-06-01

    Copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) are naturally present and ubiquitous in soils and are important micronutrients. Human activities contribute to the input of these metals to soils in different chemical forms, which can sometimes reach a toxic level for soil organisms and plants. Isotopic signatures could be used to trace sources of anthropogenic Cu and Zn pollution. The aim of this paper is to determine whether it is possible to identify (i) Cu and Zn contamination in soils and their sources, on the basis of their isotopic signatures, and (ii) situations that are a priori favorable or not for tracing Cu and Zn pollution using the isotopic approach. Therefore, we compiled data from the literature on Cu and Zn isotopes in soils, rocks and pollutants and added to this database the results of our own research. As only a few studies have dealt with agricultural contamination, we also studied a soil toposequence from Brittany, France, that experienced spreading of pig slurry for tens of years. In the surface horizons of the natural soils, the δ(65)Cu values vary from -0.15 to 0.44‰ and the δ(66)Zn from -0.03 to 0.43‰. Furthermore, vertical variations along soil profiles range from -0.95 to 0.44‰ for δ(65)Cu and from -0.53 to 0.64‰ for δ(66)Zn values. We concluded that pedogenetic processes can produce isotopic fractionation, yet, it is not always discernible and can be overprinted by an exogenous isotopic signature. Furthermore, some contaminants are enriched in heavy Cu or in light Zn compared to the rock or soil, but no generalization can be made. The anthropogenic inputs can be identified based on stable Cu and Zn isotope ratios if the isotope ratios of the sources are different from those of the soil, which needs to be tested for each individual case. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mathematical modeling of stable carbon isotope ratios in natural gases^@?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y.; Perry, J. K.; Jenden, P. D.; Schoell, M.

    2000-08-01

    A new approach is presented for mathematical modeling of stable carbon isotope ratios in hydrocarbon gases based on both theoretical and experimental data. The kinetic model uses a set of parallel first-order gas generation reactions in which the relative cracking rates of isotopically substituted (k∗) and unsubstituted (k) bonds are represented by the equation k∗/k=(Af∗/Af) exp(-ΔEa/RT), where R is the gas constant and T is temperature. Quantum chemistry calculations have been used to estimate the entropic (A f∗/A f) and enthalpic (ΔEa) terms for homolytic bond cleavage in a variety of simple molecules. For loss of a methyl group from a short-chain n-alkane (≤ C 6), for example, we obtain an average ΔEa of 42.0 cal/mol and an average A f∗/A f of 1.021. Expressed differently, 13C-methane generation is predicted to be 2.4% (24‰) slower than 12C-methane generation (from a short-chain n-alkane) in a sedimentary basin at 200°C but only 0.7% (7‰) slower in a laboratory heating experiment at 500°C. Similar calculations carried out for homolytic bond cleavage in other molecules show that with few exceptions, ΔEa varies between 0 and 60 cal/mol and A f∗/A f between 1.00 and 1.04. Examination of this larger data set reveals: (1) a weak sigmoid relationship between ΔEa and bond dissociation energy; and (2) a strong positive correlation between ΔEa and A f∗/A f. The significance of these findings is illustrated by fitting a kinetic model to chemical and isotopic data for the generation of methane from n-octadecane under isothermal closed-system conditions. For a specific temperature history, the fitted model provides quantitative relationships among methane carbon isotope composition, total methane yield and methane generation rate which may have relevance to the cracking of oil-prone kerogens and crude oil. The observed variability of the kinetic reactivity of various methane source rocks highlights the need to apply and adequately calibrate such

  2. Stable isotope methods: The effect of gut contents on isotopic ratios of zooplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, J. M.; McQuaid, C. D.

    2011-05-01

    In the past decade there has been an increased awareness of the potential for methodological bias resulting from multiple pre-analytical procedures in foodweb interpretations based on stable isotope techniques. In the case of small organisms, this includes the effect of gut contents on whole body signatures. Although gut contents may not reflect actual assimilation, their carbon and nitrogen values will be isotopically lighter than after the same material has been assimilated. The potential skewing of isotopic ratios in whole organism samples is especially important for aquatic environments as many studies involve trophic relationships among small zooplankton. This is particularly important in pelagic waters, where herbivorous zooplankton comprise small taxa. Hence this study investigated the effect of gut contents on the δ13C and δ15N ratios of three size classes of zooplankton (1.0-2.0, 2.0-4.0 and >4.0 mm) collected using bongo net tows in the tropical waters of the south-west Indian Ocean. Animals were collected at night, when they were likely to be feeding, sieved into size classes and separated into genera. We focused on Euphausia spp which dominated zooplankton biomass. Three treatment types were processed: bulk animals, bulk animals without guts and tail muscle from each size class at 10 bongo stations. The δ15N ratios were influenced by zooplankton size class, presumably reflecting ontogenetic changes in diet. ANOVA post hoc results and correlations in δ15N signatures among treatments suggest that gut contents may not affect overall nitrogen signatures of Euphausia spp., but that δ13C signatures may be significantly altered by their presence. Carbon interpretations however, were complicated by potential effects of variation in chitin, lipids and metabolism among tissues and the possibility of opportunistic omnivory. Consequently we advocate gut evacuation before sacrifice in euphausiids if specific tissue dissection is impractical and recommend

  3. Determination of nitrogen-15 isotope fractionation in tropine: evaluation of extraction protocols for isotope ratio measurement by isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Molinié, Roland; Kwiecień, Renata A; Silvestre, Virginie; Robins, Richard J

    2009-12-01

    N-Demethylation of tropine is an important step in the degradation of this compound and related metabolites. With the purpose of understanding the reaction mechanism(s) involved, it is desirable to measure the 15N kinetic isotope effects (KIEs), which can be accessed through the 15N isotope shift (Deltadelta15N) during the reaction. To measure the isotope fractionation in 15N during tropine degradation necessitates the extraction of the residual substrate from dilute aqueous solution without introducing artefactual isotope fractionation. Three protocols have been compared for the extraction and measurement of the 15N/14N ratio of tropine from aqueous medium, involving liquid-liquid phase partitioning or silica-C18 solid-phase extraction. Quantification was by gas chromatography (GC) on the recovered organic phase and delta15N values were obtained by isotope ratio measurement mass spectrometry (irm-MS). Although all the protocols used can provide satisfactory data and both irm-EA-MS and irm-GC-MS can be used to obtain the delta15N values, the most convenient method is liquid-liquid extraction from a reduced aqueous volume combined with irm-GC-MS. The protocols are applied to the measurement of 15N isotope shifts during growth of a Pseudomonas strain that uses tropane alkaloids as sole source of carbon and nitrogen. The accuracy of the determination of the 15N/14N ratio is sufficient to be used for the determination of 15N-KIEs. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Forensic applications of light-element stable isotope ratios of Ricinus communis seeds and ricin preparations.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Helen W; West, Jason B; Ehleringer, James R

    2013-01-01

    Seeds of the castor plant Ricinus communis are of forensic interest because they are the source of the poison ricin. We tested whether stable isotope ratios of castor seeds and ricin preparations can be used as a forensic signature. We collected over 300 castor seed samples worldwide and measured the C, N, O, and H isotope ratios of the whole seeds and oil. We prepared ricin by three different procedures, acetone extraction, salt precipitation, and affinity chromatography, and compared their isotope ratios to those of the source seeds. The N isotope ratios of the ricin samples and source seeds were virtually identical. Therefore, N isotope ratios can be used to correlate ricin prepared by any of these methods to source seeds. Further, stable isotope ratios distinguished >99% of crude and purified ricin protein samples in pairwise comparison tests. Stable isotope ratios therefore constitute a valuable forensic signature for ricin preparations. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  5. Towards a better understanding of magnesium-isotope ratios from marine skeletal carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippler, Dorothee; Buhl, Dieter; Witbaard, Rob; Richter, Detlev K.; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2009-10-01

    This study presents magnesium stable-isotope compositions of various biogenic carbonates of several marine calcifying organisms and an algae species, seawater samples collected from the western Dutch Wadden Sea, and reference materials. The aim of this study is to explore the influence of mineralogy, taxonomy and environmental factors (e.g., seawater isotopic composition, temperature, salinity) on magnesium-isotopic (δ 26Mg) ratios of skeletal carbonates. Using high-precision multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, we observed that the magnesium-isotopic composition of seawater from the semi-enclosed Dutch Wadden Sea is identical to that of open marine seawater. We further found that a considerable component of the observed variability in δ 26Mg values of marine skeletal carbonates can be attributed to differences in mineralogy. Furthermore, magnesium-isotope fractionation is species-dependent, with all skeletal carbonates being isotopically lighter than seawater. While δ 26Mg values of skeletal aragonite and high-magnesium calcite of coralline red algae indicate the absence or negligibility of metabolic influences, the δ 26Mg values of echinoids, brachiopods and bivalves likely result from a taxon-specific level of control on Mg-isotope incorporation during biocalcification. Moreover, no resolvable salinity and temperature effect were observed for coralline red algae and echinoids. In contrast, Mg-isotope data of bivalves yield ambiguous results, which require further validation. The data presented here, point to a limited use of Mg isotopes as temperature proxy, but highlight the method's potential as tracer of seawater chemistry through Earth's history.

  6. Sulfur isotopic ratio of DMS and DMSP from Lake Kinneret

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sela-Adler, Michal; Said-Ahmad, Ward; Eckert, Werner; Kamyshny, Alexey; Sivan, Orit; Amrani, Alon

    2014-05-01

    Volatile Organic sulfur compounds (VOSC) such as dimethylsulfide (DMS) are an important source of biogenic sulfur to the atmosphere. The main precursor of DMS is dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), a common osmolyte in marine algae. Atmospheric release of VOS compounds contributes to the formation of sulfate aerosols. The latter are of global importance due to their role as cloud-condensation nuclei. VOSC are abundant in terrestrial environments as well and may be involved in important biogeochemical cycles. In lake sediments, another mechanism for the formation of DMS by H2S methylation may be important. The 34S/32S ratio (d34S values) of DMSP of marine surface water around the globe is very homogeneous ranging between +18.9 o to +20.3 o and the fractionation between DMSP and DMS is < +1 o (Amrani et al. 2013). The δ34S values of DMS and other VOSC in sediments should be 34S depleted, similar to its H2S precursor (Oduro et al., 2011). Our goal was to quantify the benthic DMS and DMSP emissions from the sediments of warm monomictic Lake Kinneret relative to their formation by surface water algae by using sulfur isotope ratios. Water column samples and sediment samples from Lake Kinneret were purged and trap in order to extract the VOSC and then introduced to a GC/MC-ICPMS for isotopic measurements (Amrani et al. 2013). The δ34S of DMSP in the water and sediment columns of Lake Kinneret a mesotrophic monomictic lake were measured. Our preliminary results show δ34S values for DMSP ranged between +10.3 o and +13.4 o in the water column. The sulfate δ34S values ranged between +12.6 o to +14.9 o. δ34S -DMSP in the sediment column showed similar values between +9.4 o and +13.0 o, indicating a similar sulfur source. Similar δ34S values obtain for other VOSC such as ethanethiol that contributes significantly to the VOSC of Lake Kinneret sediments. Amrani, A., W. Said-Ahmad,Y. Shaked, and R. P. Kiene. 2013. Sulfur isotopes homogeneity of oceanic DMSP and DMS. PNAS 110

  7. Stable lead isotope ratios in Alaskan arctic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturges, W. T.; Hopper, J. F.; Barrie, L. A.; Schnell, R. C.

    Aerosol samples collected at Barrow, Alaska, during February and March 1990 were found to have uniform stable lead isotope compositions. The mean 208Pb/ 207Pb ratio was 2.423±0.009 and the mean 206Pb/ 207Pb ratio was 1.161±0.014. The latter ratio is essentially the same as that obtained from an earlier study of aerosols at two Canadian stations in the High Arctic and is typical of, but not unique to, Eurasian sources of atmospheric lead. Further discriminating power was available in this study through the inclusion of 208Pb/ 207Pb ratios, which provided additional evidence that the former Soviet Union and eastern Europe are major contributors to atmospheric particulate lead in the Alaskan Arctic, accounting for around two-thirds of the particulate lead measured at Barrow. The remaining third of the lead is attributed to west European sources. There was no evidence for a substantial North American component, other than local contamination.

  8. Investigation of mass dependence effects for the accurate determination of molybdenum isotope amount ratios by MC-ICP-MS using synthetic isotope mixtures.

    PubMed

    Malinovsky, Dmitry; Dunn, Philip J H; Petrov, Panayot; Goenaga-Infante, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    Methodology for absolute Mo isotope amount ratio measurements by multicollector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) using calibration with synthetic isotope mixtures (SIMs) is presented. For the first time, synthetic isotope mixtures prepared from seven commercially available isotopically enriched molybdenum metal powders ((92)Mo, (94)Mo, (95)Mo, (96)Mo, (97)Mo, (98)Mo, and (100)Mo) are used to investigate whether instrumental mass discrimination of Mo isotopes in MC-ICP-MS is consistent with mass-dependent isotope distribution. The parent materials were dissolved and mixed as solutions to obtain mixtures with accurately known isotope amount ratios. The level of elemental impurities in the isotopically enriched molybdenum metal powders was quantified by ICP-MS by using both high-resolution and reaction cell instruments to completely resolve spectral interferences. The Mo isotope amount ratio values with expanded uncertainty (k = 2), determined by MC-ICP-MS for a high-purity Mo rod from Johnson Matthey, were as follows: (92)Mo/(95)Mo = 0.9235(9), (94)Mo/(95)Mo = 0.5785(8), (96)Mo/(95)Mo = 1.0503(9), (97)Mo/(95)Mo = 0.6033(6), (98)Mo/(95)Mo = 1.5291(20), and (100)Mo/(95)Mo = 0.6130(7). A full uncertainty budget for the measurements is presented which shows that the largest contribution to the uncertainty budget comes from correction for elemental impurities (∼51%), followed by the contribution from weighing operations (∼26 %). The atomic weight of molybdenum was calculated to be 95.947(2); the uncertainty in parentheses is expanded uncertainty with the coverage factor of 2. A particular advantage of the developed method is that calibration factors for all six Mo isotope amount ratios, involving the (95)Mo isotope, were experimentally determined. This allows avoiding any assumption on mass-dependent isotope fractions in MC-ICP-MS, inherent to the method of double spike previously used for Mo isotope amount ratio

  9. Tunable Diode Laser Measurements of Leaf-scale Carbon Isotope Discrimination and Ecosystem Respired Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios in a Semi-arid Woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, N.; Chris, B.; Hanson, D.; Kern, S.; Meyer, C.; Pockman, W.; Powers, H.

    2005-12-01

    We present results and speculative interpretation of leaf-level carbon isotope discrimination and ecosystem respired carbon and oxygen isotope ratios from a semi-arid, C3/C4 woodland located in northern New Mexico, USA. Overstory leaf area index (LAI) is dominated by live juniper (Juniperus monosperma) trees with an LAI value of approximately 1.0 m2 per m2 ground area, and has a seasonally dynamic understory of mixed C3 forbs and C4 grasses and cacti, with a maximum LAI of 0.30 m2 per m2 ground area. Ecosystem respired carbon isotope ratios showed values characteristic of C3 dominated photosynthesis (Keeling plot intercepts of -35 to -22 per mil). Seasonal variation was typical of that found in wetter, C3 dominated forests, as was the dependence on climate (e.g. relationships with vapor pressure deficit, soil water content, and canopy conductance). Leaf-level carbon isotope discrimination of the junipers, measured by coupling a Li-Cor 6400 photosynthesis system to the TDL, provided discrimination-Ci and discrimination-vpd relationships consistent with measured ecosystem respired carbon isotope ratios. The oxygen isotope ratio of ecosystem respiration was dependent on rain water isotope composition, but was correlated with soil water content during rain-free periods. The cumulative effect of vapor pressure deficit after a rain event was tightly correlated with the oxygen isotope ratio of ecosystem respiration, suggesting the primary drivers are evaporative enrichment of soil water and perhaps nocturnal leaf enrichment. Instrument precision for carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of carbon dioxide is 0.06 to 0.18 per mil; however, overall precision is somewhat lower due to pressure and sampling effects.

  10. Examining Changes in Radioxenon Isotope Activity Ratios during Subsurface Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annewandter, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE) has demonstrated and modelled the usefulness of barometric pumping induced gas transport and subsequent soil gas sampling during On-Site inspections. Generally, gas transport has been widely studied with different numerical codes. However, gas transport of radioxenons and radioiodines in the post-detonation regime and their possible fractionation is still neglected in the open peer-reviewed literature. Atmospheric concentrations of the radioxenons Xe-135, Xe-133m, Xe-133 and Xe-131m can be used to discriminate between civilian releases (nuclear power plants or medical isotope facilities), and nuclear explosion sources. It is based on the multiple isotopic activity ratio method. Yet it is not clear whether subsurface migration of the radionuclides, with eventual release into the atmosphere, can affect the activity ratios due to fractionation. Fractionation can be caused by different mass diffusivities due to mass differences between the radionuclides. Cyclical changes in atmospheric pressure can drive subsurface gas transport. This barometric pumping phenomenon causes an oscillatoric flow in upward trending fractures or highly conductive faults which, combined with diffusion into the porous matrix, leads to a net transport of gaseous components - a so-called ratcheting effect. We use a general purpose reservoir simulator (Complex System Modelling Platform, CSMP++) which is recognized by the oil industry as leading in Discrete Fracture-Matrix (DFM) simulations. It has been applied in a range of fields such as deep geothermal systems, three-phase black oil simulations, fracture propagation in fractured, porous media, and Navier-Stokes pore-scale modelling among others. It is specifically designed to account for structurally complex geologic situation of fractured, porous media. Parabolic differential equations are solved by a continuous Galerkin finite-element method, hyperbolic differential equations by a complementary finite

  11. Nitrogen isotopic ratios in fecal pellets produced by marine zooplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Altabet, M.A. ); Small, L.F. )

    1990-01-01

    At each site and in every season studied, zooplankton in the upper ocean produced fecal pellets that were 1.3% lower in {delta}{sup 15}N than their body tissue but 2.2% higher than their apparent food source. {sup 14}N-containing molecules are evidently preferentially assimilated in zooplankton intestinal tracts, though other isotopic effects must account for the enrichment in {sup 15}N of these organisms relative to their food. These results also show zooplankton to be important modifiers of nitrogen isotopic ratios for marine particulate matter. {delta}{sup 15}N values for sinking particles and fecal pellets are similar, supporting the perspective that macrozooplankton are important factors in producing and processing particles that sink into the ocean's interior and sediments. In contrast, the relationship in {delta}{sup 15}N between fecal pellets and suspended particles in the euphotic zone is more variable. It appears that zooplankton select food particles of varying {delta}{sup 15}N from the suspended particle pool. These results suggest that both zooplankton feeding behavior and their digestive chemistry are important in determining the composition of sinking particulate matter in the ocean with respect to the suspended particle source in the euphotic zone.

  12. Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Ratios for Nearby Miras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Lebzelter, Thomas; Straniero, Oscar

    2016-07-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios are reported for a sample of 46 Mira and SRa-type variable asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Vibration-rotation first and second-overtone CO lines in 1.5-2.5 μm spectra were measured to derive isotopic ratios for 12C/13C, 16O/17O, and 16O/18O. Comparisons with previous measurements for individual stars and with various samples of evolved stars, as available in the extant literature, are discussed. Models for solar composition AGB stars of different initial masses are used to interpret our results. We find that the majority of M-stars have main sequence masses ≤2 M ⊙ and have not experienced sizable third dredge-up (TDU) episodes. The progenitors of the four S-type stars in our sample are slightly more massive. Of the six C-stars in the sample three have clear evidence relating their origin to the occurrence of TDU. Comparisons with O-rich presolar grains from AGB stars that lived before the formation of the solar system reveal variations in the interstellar medium chemical composition. The present generation of low-mass AGB stars, as represented by our sample of long period variables (LPVs), shows a large spread of 16O/17O ratios, similar to that of group 1 presolar grains and in agreement with theoretical expectations for the composition of mass 1.2-2 M ⊙ stars after the first dredge-up. In contrast, the 16O/18O ratios of present-day LPVs are definitely smaller than those of group 1 grains. This is most probably a consequence of the the decrease with time of the 16O/18O ratio in the interstellar medium due to the chemical evolution of the Milky Way. One star in our sample has an O composition similar to that of group 2 presolar grains originating in an AGB star undergoing extra-mixing. This may indicate that the extra-mixing process is hampered at high metallicity, or, equivalently, favored at low metallicity. Similarly to O-rich grains, no star in our sample shows evidence of hot bottom burning, which is expected for

  13. Water isotopic ratios from a continuously melted ice core sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkinis, V.; Popp, T. J.; Blunier, T.; Bigler, M.; Schüpbach, S.; Kettner, E.; Johnsen, S. J.

    2011-11-01

    A new technique for on-line high resolution isotopic analysis of liquid water, tailored for ice core studies is presented. We built an interface between a Wavelength Scanned Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (WS-CRDS) purchased from Picarro Inc. and a Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) system. The system offers the possibility to perform simultaneuous water isotopic analysis of δ18O and δD on a continuous stream of liquid water as generated from a continuously melted ice rod. Injection of sub μl amounts of liquid water is achieved by pumping sample through a fused silica capillary and instantaneously vaporizing it with 100% efficiency in a~home made oven at a temperature of 170 °C. A calibration procedure allows for proper reporting of the data on the VSMOW-SLAP scale. We apply the necessary corrections based on the assessed performance of the system regarding instrumental drifts and dependance on the water concentration in the optical cavity. The melt rates are monitored in order to assign a depth scale to the measured isotopic profiles. Application of spectral methods yields the combined uncertainty of the system at below 0.1‰ and 0.5‰ for δ18O and δD, respectively. This performance is comparable to that achieved with mass spectrometry. Dispersion of the sample in the transfer lines limits the temporal resolution of the technique. In this work we investigate and assess these dispersion effects. By using an optimal filtering method we show how the measured profiles can be corrected for the smoothing effects resulting from the sample dispersion. Considering the significant advantages the technique offers, i.e. simultaneuous measurement of δ18O and δD, potentially in combination with chemical components that are traditionally measured on CFA systems, notable reduction on analysis time and power consumption, we consider it as an alternative to traditional isotope ratio mass spectrometry with the possibility to be deployed for field ice core studies. We present

  14. Demonstration of compound-specific isotope analysis of hydrogen isotope ratios in chlorinated ethenes.

    PubMed

    Kuder, Tomasz; Philp, Paul

    2013-02-05

    High-temperature pyrolysis conversion of organic analytes to H(2) in hydrogen isotope ratio compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) is unsuitable for chlorinated compounds such as trichloroethene (TCE) and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (DCE), due to competition from HCl formation. For this reason, the information potential of hydrogen isotope ratios of chlorinated ethenes remains untapped. We present a demonstration of an alternative approach where chlorinated analytes reacted with chromium metal to form H(2) and minor amounts of HCl. The values of δ(2)H were obtained at satisfactory precision (± 10 to 15 per thousand), however the raw data required daily calibration by TCE and/or DCE standards to correct for analytical bias that varies over time. The chromium reactor has been incorporated into a purge and trap-CSIA method that is suitable for CSIA of aqueous environmental samples. A sample data set was obtained for six specimens of commercial product TCE. The resulting values of δ(2)H were between -184 and +682 ‰, which significantly widened the range of manufactured TCE δ(2)H signatures identified by past work. The implications of this finding to the assessment of TCE contamination are discussed.

  15. Nitrate input/output budget and nitrate isotope ratio in forest ecosystems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobari, Y.; Koba, K.; Fukushima, K.; Tokuchi, N.; Tateno, R.; Ohte, N.; Suzuki, N.; Toyoda, S.; Yoshida, N.

    2006-12-01

    isotope ratio resemble to that of rain. 2) Streamwater from aged forests has rather lower oxygen isotope ratio than young. 3) Nitrogen isotope ratio is affected by many parameter, groundwater level, angle of dip, watershed area, soil composition, and so on. In this study site, we can comparable of the difference of the nitrogen circulation when "year after re- foretasting" is assumed to be the main parameter under almost the same environmental condition. Therefore, it is thought that "year " is an element that rules the nitrogen circulation if a significant difference is seen on this site compared with the nitrate isotope ratios. In this research, it is assumed to be a purpose to analyze how the nitrogen circulation in the forest ecosystem is characterized by 100-year-timescale. We inspect this hypothesis and make first step of forest assessment by nitrate stable isotope ratios.

  16. High-Precision (MC-ICPMS) Isotope Ratio Analysis Reveals Contrasting Sources of Elevated Blood Lead Levels of an Adult with Retained Bullet Fragments, and of His Child, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kate E; Shafer, Martin M; Weiss, Debora; Anderson, Henry A; Gorski, Patrick R

    2017-05-01

    Exposure to the neurotoxic element lead (Pb) continues to be a major human health concern, particularly for children in US urban settings, and the need for robust tools for assessment of exposure sources has never been greater. The latest generation of multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) instrumentation offers the capability of using Pb isotopic signatures as a tool for environmental source tracking in public health. We present a case where MC-ICPMS was applied to isotopically resolve Pb sources in human clinical samples. An adult male and his child residing in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, presented to care in August 2015 with elevated blood lead levels (BLLs) (>200 μg/dL for the adult and 10 μg/dL for the child). The adult subject is a gunshot victim who had multiple bullet fragments embedded in soft tissue of his thigh for approximately 10 years. This study compared the high-precision isotopic fingerprints (<1 ‰ 2σ external precision) of Pb in the adult's and child's whole blood (WB) to the following possible Pb sources: a surgically extracted bullet fragment, household paint samples and tap water, and a Pb water-distribution pipe removed from servicing a house in the same neighborhood. Pb in the bullet and adult WB were nearly isotopically indistinguishable (matching within 0.05-0.56 ‰), indicating that bullet fragments embedded in soft tissue could be the cause of both acute and chronic elevated blood Pb levels. Among other sources investigated, no single source dominated the child's exposure profile as reflected in the elevated BLL.

  17. Determination of triple oxygen isotopic compositions of nitrate by using continuous-flow isotope ratio MS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, D. D.; Ohkubo, S.; Ishimura, T.; Nakagawa, F.; Tsunogai, U.

    2006-12-01

    The triple oxygen isotopic compositions (18O/16O and 17O/16O) of nitrate in natural waters can be a useful tracer to clarify the sources. The triple oxygen isotopic compositions of nitrate have been usually determined by using conventional IRMS system using O2 molecule converted from nitrate through multiple reaction/purification steps. The traditional methods, however, required at least 1-100 μmol quantities of nitrate so that applications of the methods to various environmental nitrate samples were difficult. Thus, we developed a rapid and sensitive analytical system to determine the triple oxygen isotopic compositions of nitrate in nmol quantities using continuous-flow IRMS (CF-IRMS) without the cumbersome and time-consuming pretreatments. Our method is based on the isotopic analysis of N2O quantitatively converted from nitrate based on the simple reactions using spongy cadmium and sodium azide in an acetic acid buffer. However, we cannot determine 17O/16O ratio of N2O directly by measuring the masses 44, 45, and 46 of N2O introduced to IRMS, because the measured output of mass 45 from IRMS consists of 14N15N16O, 15N14N16O, and 14N14N17O. Thus, addition to the N2O isotopic analysis at the masses 44, 45, and 46, the 15N/14N ratio is determined separately for the same sample N2O. To attain this purpose, two instrumental approaches were done. In the first system, the N2+ fragment ion beams of N2O at masses 28 and 29 were used to determine the 15N/14N ratio of N2O. While the analytical precisions better than 0.5 ‰ for 20 nmol N2O injections and better than 1.0 ‰ for 7 nmol N2O injections were obtained for 15N/14N ratio, we found that the accuracy strongly depended on the quantities introduced. In the second system, the N2 molecules, converted from N2O using an on line Cu reduction furnace (720 degree) was used to determine the 15N/14N ratio of N2O. The analytical precisions better than 0.1 ‰ for 5 nmol N2O injections and better than 0.4 ‰ for 1 nmol N2O

  18. HIGHLY VARIABLE HELIUM ISOTOPE RATIOS IN THE VANUATU VOLCANIC ARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Baptiste, P.; Allard, P.; Bani, P.; Garaebiti, E.; Pelletier, B.; Fourré, E.; Metrich, N.

    2009-12-01

    The Vanuatu (former New Hebrides) island arc results from the eastward subduction of the Australian plate beneath the North Fiji back-arc basin. Whereas its southern part is characterized by a single chain of volcanic islands parallel to a well-defined trench, the structure of its central part is strongly modified by the collision-subduction of the d’Entrecasteaux Zone, lacking a deep trench and consisting of three N-S chains of volcanic islands. In order to get further insight into the source of volcanism in this complex tectonic setting, we have analysed helium isotopes in groundwaters and hot springs (37°-90°C) from both the southern (Tanna and Efate) and central (Ambrym, Ambae and Pentecost) volcanic islands. Additional data were also acquired on bubbling gases and olivine phenocrysts from the islands of Ambrym and Ambae, respectively. Most waters show substantial helium enrichment (between 1.3 and 24.3 times the atmospheric solubility). 3He/4He ratios vary over a wide range, going from low (crustal He-influenced) 4.4 - 4.6 Ra and 4.8 -5.6 Ra in Efate and Pentecost respectively, to 6.3 - 7.0 Ra in Tanna, 6.8 - 8.2 Ra in Ambae, and up to 10.05 Ra in Ambrym (measured in both waters and bubbling gases). This latter value is similar to those measured in the nearby north Fiji basin (9-10 Ra - Ishibashi et al., EPSL, 1994) and approaches those, further north, of Manus basin glasses (12.2±1 Ra - Macpherson et al., Geology, 1998), suggesting a possible plume (or hotspot) influence. In Ambrym, this influence is confined to the north of the central rift zone - coincident with a major volcano-tectonic fault structure, since fluids in the southwest part of the island (a few kilometres apart) display typical arc-type ratios of 7 Ra. Interestingly, the analysis of tremor activity from the two large active cones located at the centre of the island, the Marum and Benbow volcanos, also suggest two distinct magmatic sources beneath Ambrym (Legrand et al., GRL 2005). Clearly

  19. On-site isotopic analysis of dissolved inorganic carbon using an isotope ratio infrared spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltmann, Tim; Mandic, Magda; Stöbener, Nils; Wapelhorst, Eric; Aepfler, Rebecca; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Taubner, Heidi; Jost, Hj; Elvert, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    An Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectrometer (IRIS) has been adapted to perform measurements of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in marine pore waters. The resulting prototype allowed highly automated analysis of δ13C isotopic ratios and CO2 concentration. We achieved a throughput of up to 70 samples per day with DIC contents as low as 1.7 μmol C. We achieved an internal precision of 0.066 ‰ and an external precision of 0.16 ‰, which is comparable to values given for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometers (IRMS). The prototype instrument is field deployable, suitable for shipboard analysis of deep sea core pore waters. However, the validation of the prototype was centered around a field campaign in Eckernförde Bay, NW- Baltic Sea. As a proof of concept, a shallow site within an area of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) and a site outside this area was investigated. We present profiles of δ13C of DIC over 50 cm exhibiting well understood methane turnover processes (anaerobic oxidation of methane). At the lowest point below the seafloor, microbial reduction of CO2 to CH4 dominates. 12CO2 is reduced preferentially over 13CO2, leading to more positive δ13C values in the remaining DIC pool; in layers closer to the surface, the oxidation of CH4 to CO2 becomes more prominent. Since the CH4 pool is enriched in 12C a shift to more negative δ13C can be observed in the DIC pool. In the upper 15 cm, the pore water DIC mixes with the sea water DIC, increasing δ13C again. Finally, we will present recent developments to further improve performance and future plans for deployments on research cruises.

  20. On-site isotopic analysis of dissolved inorganic carbon using an isotope ratio infrared spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jost, H. J. H.; Stoltmann, T.; Stöbener, N.; Wapelhorst, E.; Mandic, M.; Aepfler, R.; Hinrichs, K. U.; Taubner, H.; Elvert, M.

    2015-12-01

    An Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectrometer (IRIS) has been adapted to perform measurements of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in marine pore waters. The resulting prototype allowed highly automated analysis of δ13C isotopic ratios and CO2 concentration. We achieved a throughput of up to 70 samples per day with DIC contents as low as 1.7 μmol C. We achieved an internal precision of 0.066 ‰ and an external precision of 0.16 ‰, which is comparable to values given for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometers (IRMS). The prototype instrument is field deployable, suitable for shipboard analysis of deep sea core pore waters. However, the validation of the prototype was centered around a field campaign in Eckernförde Bay, NW- Baltic Sea. As a proof of concept, a shallow site within an area of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) and a site outside this area was investigated. We present profiles of δ13C of DIC over 50 cm exhibiting well understood methane turnover processes (anaerobic oxidation of methane). At the lowest point below the seafloor, microbial reduction of CO2 to CH4 dominates. 12CO2 is reduced preferentially over 13CO2, leading to more positive δ13C values in the remaining DIC pool; in layers closer to the surface, the oxidation of CH4 to CO2 becomes more prominent. Since the CH4 pool is enriched in 12C a shift to more negative δ13C can be observed in the DIC pool. In the upper 15 cm, the pore water DIC mixes with the sea water DIC, increasing δ13C again. Finally, we will present recent developments to further improve performance and future plans for deployments on research cruises.

  1. 2H/(1)H and (13)C/(12)C isotope ratios of trans-anethole using gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bilke, Steffi; Mosandl, Armin

    2002-07-03

    Authenticity assessment of trans-anethole is deduced from (2)H/(1)H and (13)C/(12)C isotope ratios, determined by gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS). For that purpose, self-prepared anise and fennel oils, and synthetic and "natural" samples of trans-anethole, as well as commercially available anise and fennel oils have been investigated. Authenticity ranges of (2)H/(1)H and (13)C/(12)C isotope ratios of trans-anethole were defined. Scope and limitations of the applied online GC-IRMS techniques are discussed.

  2. Hepatoblastoma Biology Using Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry: Utility of a Unique Technique for the Analysis of Oncological Specimens.

    PubMed

    Taran, Katarzyna; Frączek, Tomasz; Sitkiewicz, Anna; Sikora-Szubert, Anita; Kobos, Józef; Paneth, Piotr

    2016-07-07

    Hepatoblastoma is the most common primary liver tumor in children. However, it occurs rarely, with an incidence of 0.5-1.5 cases per million children. There is no clear explanation of the relationship between clinicopathologic features, therapy, and outcome in hepatoblastoma cases, so far. One of the most widely accepted prognostic factors in hepatoblastoma is histology of the tumor. The aim of the study was to determine the potential differences in biology of hepatoblastoma histological subtypes at the atomic level using the unique method of isotope ratio mass spectrometry, which is especially valuable in examination of small groups of biological samples. Twenty-four measurements of nitrogen stable isotope ratio, carbon stable isotope ratio and total carbon to nitrogen mass ratio in fetal and embryonal hepatoblastoma tissue were performed using a Sercon 20-22 Continuous Flow Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer (CF-IRMS) coupled with a Sercon SL elemental analyzer for simultaneous carbon-nitrogen-sulfur (NCS) analysis. A difference of about 1.781‰ in stable nitrogen isotope 15N/14N ratio was found between examined hepatoblastoma histological subtypes. The prognosis in liver tumors cases in children may be challenging particularly because of the lack of versatile methods of its evaluation. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry allows one to determine the difference between hepatoblastoma histological subtypes and clearly indicates the cases with the best outcome.

  3. Carbon, Hydrogen, and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Cellulose from Plants Having Intermediary Photosynthetic Modes 1

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Leonel O'Reilly; Deniro, Michael J.; Ting, Irwin P.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of cellulose nitrate and oxygen isotope ratios of cellulose from species of greenhouse plants having different photosynthetic modes were determined. When hydrogen isotope ratios are plotted against carbon isotope ratios, four clusters of points are discernible, each representing different photosynthetic modes: C3 plants, C4 plants, CAM plants, and C3 plants that can shift to CAM or show the phenomenon referred to as CAM-cycling. The combination of oxygen and carbon isotope ratios does not distinguish among the different photosynthetic modes. Analysis of the carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of cellulose nitrate should prove useful for screening different photosynthetic modes in field specimens that grew near one another. This method will be particularly useful for detection of plants which show CAM-cycling. PMID:16663360

  4. Frontiers of QC Laser spectroscopy for high precision isotope ratio analysis of greenhouse gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmenegger, Lukas; Mohn, Joachim; Harris, Eliza; Eyer, Simon; Ibraim, Erkan; Tuzson, Béla

    2016-04-01

    An important milestone for laser spectroscopy was achieved when isotope ratios of greenhouse gases were reported at precision levels that allow addressing research questions in environmental sciences. Real-time data with high temporal resolution at moderate cost and instrument size make the optical approach highly attractive, complementary to the well-established isotope-ratio mass-spectrometry (IRMS) method. Especially appealing, in comparison to IRMS, is the inherent specificity to structural isomers having the same molecular mass. Direct absorption in the MIR in single or dual QCL configuration has proven highly reliable for the sta-ble isotopes of CO2, N2O and CH4. The longest time series of real-time measurements is currently available for δ13C and δ18O in CO2 at the high-alpine station Jung-fraujoch. At this well-equipped site, QCL based direct absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS) measurements are ongoing since 2008 1,2. Applications of QCLAS for N2O and CH4 stable isotopes are considerably more challenging because of the lower atmospheric mixing ratios, especially for the less abundant species, such as N218O and CH3D. For high precision (< 0.1 ‰) measurements in ambient air, QCLAS may be combined with a fully automated preconcentration unit yielding an up to 500 times concentration increase and the capability to separate the target gas from spectral interferants by se-quential desorption 3. Here, we review our recent developments on high precision isotope ratio analysis of greenhouse gases, with special focus on the isotopic species of N2O and CH4. Furthermore, we show environ-mental applications illustrating the highly valuable information that isotope ratios of atmospheric trace gases can carry. For example, the intramolecular distribution of 15N in N2O gives important information on the geochemical cycle of N2O4-6, while the analysis of δ13C and δ D in CH4 may be applied to disentangle microbial, fossil and landfill sources 7. 1 Sturm, P., Tuzson, B

  5. Determination of Forest Canopy Carbon Respiration From FTIR Measurements of Carbon Dioxide Isotopic Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambaliza, M. O.; Mount, G.; Lamb, B.; Westberg, H.

    2004-12-01

    Isotopic analysis of atmospheric carbon dioxide provides a means to understand the complex carbon exchange between the biosphere and the atmosphere. Measurements of isotopic concentrations have traditionally been done by laboratory mass spectrometry analysis of grab samples taken from distant field sites with consequent limits on the number and frequency of measurements. In this work, we describe the development of an insitu carbon dioxide isotope analysis method based on Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Using molecular absorption in a 4-pass 1-meter length cell in the 2100 to 2600 cm-1 region of the 12CO2 and 13CO2 isotopic vibration-rotation bands, concentrations of both isotopes are measured, and from their ratio, \\delta13CO2 is determined. Coupled with the disjunct eddy covariance technique, CO2 fluxes can also be measured. We demonstrate the capabilities of this technique using measurements in a poplar forest plantation near Boardman, Oregon. Beer's law and a nonlinear least squares analysis algorithm were used to analyze the data. Careful attention was paid to avoid analysis in spectral regions of nonlinear absorption. Sequential measurements were made at seven levels on a 25-meter tower erected in an 11-m canopy. Carbon dioxide concentrations are calculated to a precision of about 0.5 ppmv, and \\delta13CO2 to about 0.2‰ precision. In this work, we present initial results of temporal and vertical variations of CO2 concentrations and \\delta13CO2 in this forest.

  6. Late Miocene evolution of the Black Sea: insights from palynology and strontium isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grothe, Arjen; van Baak, Christiaan; Vasiliev, Iuliana; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Stoica, Marius; Krijgsman, Wout

    2016-04-01

    During the late Miocene, the connection(s) between the Mediterranean Basin and the Atlantic Ocean deteriorated, which ultimately culminated in thick evaporite deposits and a water level drop in the Mediterranean Basin during the so-called Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC, 5.97 - 5.33 Ma). It has been claimed that Black Sea, in response to the MSC, also desiccated but these claims have been proven incorrectly. Here we present palynological (dinoflagellate cysts and pollen) and strontium isotope ratios from two Black Sea records: the Zheleznyi Rog outcrop section and Deep Sea Drilling Project Hole 380A. Organic walled cyst-producing dinoflagellates are highly sensitive to even small changes in surface waters and strontium isotope ratios are excellent recorders of changing connectivity. Our records provide therefore more insights in the sensitivity of the Black Sea to Messinian Salinity Crisis and the general evolution of the late Miocene Black Sea.

  7. Maintaining high precision of isotope ratio analysis over extended periods of time.

    PubMed

    Brand, Willi A

    2009-06-01

    Stable isotope ratios are reliable and long lasting process tracers. In order to compare data from different locations or different sampling times at a high level of precision, a measurement strategy must include reliable traceability to an international stable isotope scale via a reference material (RM). Since these international RMs are available in low quantities only, we have developed our own analysis schemes involving laboratory working RM. In addition, quality assurance RMs are used to control the long-term performance of the delta-value assignments. The analysis schemes allow the construction of quality assurance performance charts over years of operation. In this contribution, the performance of three typical techniques established in IsoLab at the MPI-BGC in Jena is discussed. The techniques are (1) isotope ratio mass spectrometry with an elemental analyser for delta(15)N and delta(13)C analysis of bulk (organic) material, (2) high precision delta(13)C and delta(18)O analysis of CO(2) in clean-air samples, and (3) stable isotope analysis of water samples using a high-temperature reaction with carbon. In addition, reference strategies on a laser ablation system for high spatial resolution delta(13)C analysis in tree rings is exemplified briefly.

  8. Detection of adulteration in Australian orange juices by stable carbon isotope ratio analysis (SCIRA).

    PubMed

    Antolovich, M; Li, X; Robards, K

    2001-05-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratio analysis (SCIRA) was used to determine the authenticity of commercial Australian orange juices. Thirty-five samples of Valencia (delta(13)C values from -23.8 to -24.7 ppt) and eight samples of Navel juices (delta(13)C values from -24.1 to -24.5 ppt) of known origin were used to establish a decision level before analysis. No significant seasonal variations in (13)C/(12)C ratio were observed. Variations in combustion temperature in the method were also found to be insignificant.

  9. Examining Earthquake Scaling Via Event Ratio Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, W. R.; Yoo, S.; Mayeda, K. M.; Gok, R.

    2013-12-01

    A challenge with using corner frequency to interpret stress parameter scaling is that stress drop and apparent stress are related to the cube of the corner frequency. In practice this leads to high levels of uncertainty in measured stress from since the uncertainty in measuring the corner frequency is cubed to determine uncertainty in the stress parameters. We develop a new approach using the low and high frequency levels of spectral ratios between two closely located events recorded at the same stations. This approach has a number of advantages over more traditional corner frequency fitting, either in spectral ratios or individual spectra. First, if the bandwidth of the spectral ratio is sufficient, the levels can be measured at many individual frequency points and averaged, reducing the measurement error. Second the apparent stress (and stress drop) are related to the high frequency level to the 3/2 power so the measurement uncertainty is not as amplified as when using the corner frequency. Finally, if the bandwidth is sufficiently broad to determine both the spectral ratio low and high frequency levels, the apparent stress (or stress drop) ratio can be determined without the need to use any other measurements (e.g., moment, fault area), which of course have their own measurement uncertainties. We will show a number examples taken from a wide variety of crustal earthquake sequences. Example of the sigmoid formed by a spectral ratio between two hypothetical events for two different cases of stress scaling using the models described in this paper. Event 1 is Mw 6.0 event and event 2 is an Mw 4.0 event. In the self-similar case both have an apparent stress of 3 MPa, in the non-self-similar case the large event apparent stress is 3 MPA and the smaller one is 1 MPa. Note that ratio reaches different constant levels. The low frequency level (LVL) is the ratio of the moments and high frequency level (HFL) depends on the stress parameters. In this paper we derive the

  10. Forensic applications of isotope ratio mass spectrometry--a review.

    PubMed

    Benson, Sarah; Lennard, Chris; Maynard, Philip; Roux, Claude

    2006-02-10

    The key role of a forensic scientist is to assist in determining whether a crime has been committed, and if so, assist in the identification of the offender. Many people hold the belief that a particular item can be conclusively linked to a specific person, place or object. Unfortunately, this is often not achievable in forensic science. In performing their role, scientists develop and test hypotheses. The significance of those hypotheses that cannot be rejected upon completion of all available examinations/analyses is then evaluated. Although one can generally identify the substances present using available techniques, it is generally not possible to distinguish one source of the same substance from another. In such circumstances, although a particular hypothesis cannot be rejected, it cannot be conclusively proven, i.e. the samples could still have originated from different sources. This limitation of not being able to distinguish between sources currently extends to the analysis of other forensic samples including, but not limited to, ignitable liquids, paints, adhesives, textile fibres, plastics, and illicit drugs. Stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) is an additional technique that can be utilised to test a given hypothesis. This technique shows the potential to be able to individualise a range of materials of forensic interest. This paper provides a brief description of the technique, followed by a review of the various applications of IRMS in different scientific fields. The focus of this summary is on forensic applications of IRMS, in particular the analysis of explosives, ignitable liquids and illicit drugs.

  11. Effects of carbonate leaching on foraminifer stable isotopes ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrochta, S.; Yokoyama, Y.; Sakai, S.; Ishimura, T.

    2011-12-01

    Stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios were measured on 125 individual epifaunal and infaunal benthic foraminifers from two discrete Holocene intervals in a shallow-water sediment core (~ 450 m) from the Timor Sea. Methane seeps are common in the area, resulting in significant precipitation of secondary calcite that is confirmed by SEM photomicrographs and has likely resulted in inconsistent downcore results. To assess the degree of removal of contaminants, individual Uvigerina peregrina were subjected to varying degrees of pretreatment prior to analysis. All foraminifers received standard cleaning with ethanol and brief sonication. A subset were further cleaned and sonicated in a dilute HCl solution (~ 0.003 M). Foraminifer tests were photographed using both reflected light and scanning electron microscopes during the course of treatment to monitor the changing degree of contaminant removal as increasingly aggressive cleaning methods were employed. Visible contamination remained on individuals not subjected to HCl treatment. The leached individuals exhibit a lower overall relative standard deviation and consistent results within morphotype groups. Based on these results, a 2% value is expected to be typical of the Holocene, though further downcore analyses are pending restoration of equipment adversely effected by the Eastern Japan 3/11 earthquake.

  12. Environmental controls on stable isotope ratios in New Zealand Podocarpaceae: Implications for palaeoclimate reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brett, Marianne J.; Baldini, James U. L.; Gröcke, Darren R.

    2014-09-01

    Stable isotope ratios of various proxies are widely used for palaeoclimate reconstruction, and it is often assumed that isotope ratios reflect vegetation abundance or type. However, very little research exists on the isotopic equilibration of extant biomes under variable environmental conditions. In this study, carbon and oxygen isotope ratios from leaves of various Podocarpaceae genera, endemic to New Zealand, are linked to environmental parameters from the Land Environments New Zealand model. The dominant influence on stable isotope ratios within the majority of Podocarpaceae studied here is vapour pressure deficit (VPD). A simple latitudinal trend does not exist, and neither temperature nor rainfall (decoupled from VPD) controls the stable isotope ratios. The results suggest that modern spatial heterogeneity in VPD affects the stable isotope values of vegetation, and that historic VPD variability would change the stable isotope ratios of Podocarpaceae without necessitating a change in vegetation type, density, or productivity. This represents an alternative model for temporal isotope change within geochemical proxies and reinforces the need for increased stable isotopic research in modern plant ecosystems to better understand modern, and eventually palaeoclimatic processes affecting the terrestrial biosphere.

  13. A sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) mutant with altered carbon isotope ratio.

    PubMed

    Rizal, Govinda; Karki, Shanta; Thakur, Vivek; Wanchana, Samart; Alonso-Cantabrana, Hugo; Dionora, Jacque; Sheehy, John E; Furbank, Robert; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Quick, William Paul

    2017-01-01

    Recent efforts to engineer C4 photosynthetic traits into C3 plants such as rice demand an understanding of the genetic elements that enable C4 plants to outperform C3 plants. As a part of the C4 Rice Consortium's efforts to identify genes needed to support C4 photosynthesis, EMS mutagenized sorghum populations were generated and screened to identify genes that cause a loss of C4 function. Stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) of leaf dry matter has been used to distinguishspecies with C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathways. Here, we report the identification of a sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) mutant with a low δ13C characteristic. A mutant (named Mut33) with a pale phenotype and stunted growth was identified from an EMS treated sorghum M2 population. The stable carbon isotope analysis of the mutants showed a decrease of 13C uptake capacity. The noise of random mutation was reduced by crossing the mutant and its wildtype (WT). The back-cross (BC1F1) progenies were like the WT parent in terms of 13C values and plant phenotypes. All the BC1F2 plants with low δ13C died before they produced their 6th leaf. Gas exchange measurements of the low δ13C sorghum mutants showed a higher CO2 compensation point (25.24 μmol CO2.mol-1air) and the maximum rate of photosynthesis was less than 5μmol.m-2.s-1. To identify the genetic determinant of this trait, four DNA pools were isolated; two each from normal and low δ13C BC1F2 mutant plants. These were sequenced using an Illumina platform. Comparison of allele frequency of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the pools with contrasting phenotype showed that a locus in Chromosome 10 between 57,941,104 and 59,985,708 bps had an allele frequency of 1. There were 211 mutations and 37 genes in the locus, out of which mutations in 9 genes showed non-synonymous changes. This finding is expected to contribute to future research on the identification of the causal factor differentiating C4 from C3 species that can be used in the

  14. Carbon isotope ratios of human tooth enamel record the evidence of terrestrial resource consumption during the Jomon period, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kusaka, Soichiro; Uno, Kevin T; Nakano, Takanori; Nakatsukasa, Masato; Cerling, Thure E

    2015-08-17

    Archaeological remains strongly suggest that the Holocene Japanese hunter-gatherers, the Jomon people, utilized terrestrial plants as their primary food source. However, carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of bone collagen indicates that they primarily exploited marine resources. We hypothesize that this inconsistency stems from the route of protein synthesis and the different proportions of protein-derived carbon in tooth enamel versus bone collagen. Carbon isotope ratios from bone collagen reflect that of dietary protein and may provide a biased signal of diet, whereas isotope ratios from tooth enamel reflect the integrated diet from all macronutrients (carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins). In order to evaluate the differences in inferred diet between the archaeological evidence and bone collagen isotope data, this study investigated carbon isotopes in Jomon tooth enamel from four coastal sites of the Middle to Late-Final Jomon period (5,000-2,300 years BP). Carbon isotope ratios of human teeth are as depleted as coeval terrestrial mammals, suggesting that C3 plants and terrestrial mammals were major dietary resources for the Jomon people. Dietary dependence on marine resources calculated from enamel was significantly lower than that calculated from bone collagen. The discrepancy in isotopic ratios between enamel and collagen and the nitrogen isotope ratio in collagen shows a negative correlation on individual and population levels, suggesting diets with variable proportions of terrestrial and marine resources. This study highlights the usefulness of coupling tooth enamel and bone collagen in carbon isotopic studies to reconstruct prehistoric human diet. Am J Phys Anthropol, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Stable carbon and oxygen isotopic analysis of atmospheric carbon monoxide using continuous-flow isotope ratio MS by isotope ratio monitoring of CO.

    PubMed

    Tsunogai, Urumu; Nakagawa, Fumiko; Komatsu, Daisuke D; Gamo, Toshitaka

    2002-11-15

    We have developed a rapid and simple measurement system for both content and stable isotopic compositions (13C and 18O) of atmospheric CO, using continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry by simultaneously monitoring the CO+ ion currents at masses 28, 29, and 30. The analytical system consisted sequentially of a sample trapping port (liquid nitrogen temperature silica gel and molecular sieve 5A), a gas dryer, a CO purification column (molecular sieve 5A), a cryofocusing unit, and a final purification column using a GC capillary. Analytical precision of 0.2 per thousand for 13C and 0.4 per thousand for 18O can be realized for samples that contain as little as 300 pmol of CO within 40 min for one sample analysis. Analytical blanks associated with the method are less than 1 pmol. The extent of analytical error in delta13C due to mass-independent fractionation of oxygen in natural CO is estimated to be less than 0.3 per thousand. Based on this system, we report herein a kinetic isotopic effect during CO consumption in soil.

  16. Liquid and gas chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the determination of 13C-valine isotopic ratios in complex biological samples.

    PubMed

    Godin, Jean-Philippe; Breuillé, Denis; Obled, Christiane; Papet, Isabelle; Schierbeek, Henk; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Fay, Laurent-Bernard

    2008-10-01

    On-line gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) is commonly used to measure isotopic ratios at natural abundance as well as for tracer studies in nutritional and medical research. However, high-precision (13)C isotopic enrichment can also be measured by liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS). Indeed, LC-IRMS can be used, as shown by the new method reported here, to obtain a baseline separation and to measure (13)C isotopic enrichment of underivatised amino acids (Asp, Thr-Ser, Glu, Pro, Gly, Ala, Cys and Val). In case of Val, at natural abundance, the SD(delta(13)C) reported with this method was found to be below 1 per thousand . Another key feature of the new LC-IRMS method reported in this paper is the comparison of the LC-IRMS approach with the conventional GC-C-IRMS determination. To perform this comparative study, isotopic enrichments were measured from underivatised Val and its N(O, S)-ethoxycarbonyl ethyl ester derivative. Between 0.0 and 1.0 molar percent excess (MPE) (delta(13)C= -12.3 to 150.8 per thousand), the calculated root-mean-square (rms) of SD was 0.38 and 0.46 per thousand and the calculated rms of accuracy was 0.023 and 0.005 MPE, respectively, for GC-C-IRMS and LC-IRMS. Both systems measured accurately low isotopic enrichments (0.002 atom percent excess (APE)) with an SD (APE) of 0.0004. To correlate the relative (delta(13)C) and absolute (atom%, APE and MPE) isotopic enrichment of Val measured by the GC-C-IRMS and LC-IRMS devices, mathematical equations showing the slope and intercept of the curves were established and validated with experimental data between 0.0 to 2.3 MPE. Finally, both GC-C-IRMS and LC-IRMS instruments were also used to assess isotopic enrichment of protein-bound (13)C-Val in tibial epiphysis in a tracer study performed in rats. Isotopic enrichments measured by LC-IRMS and GC-C-IRMS were not statistically different (p>0.05). The results of this work indicate that

  17. Spatial and Temporal Trends in Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Juvenile Winter Flounder

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isotopic ratios of fish otoliths have been used in numerous studies as natural tags or markers to aid the study of connectivity among fish populations. We investigated the use of spatial and temporal changes in the stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of otoliths to different...

  18. Heterogeneity of Mg Isotopes and Variable ^26Al/^27Al Ratio in FUN CAIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C.; Nagashima, K.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Davis, A. M.; Huss, G. R.; Krot, A. N.

    2013-09-01

    We report high-precision Mg-isotope data of individual minerals from the Axtell 2271, BG82DH8, EK1-4-1, C1, TE, and CG14 FUN CAIs, which shows variations in both Mg-isotope ratio and ^26Al/^27Al ratio.

  19. Spatial and Temporal Trends in Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Juvenile Winter Flounder

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isotopic ratios of fish otoliths have been used in numerous studies as natural tags or markers to aid the study of connectivity among fish populations. We investigated the use of spatial and temporal changes in the stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of otoliths to different...

  20. Forensic Applications of Light-Element Stable Isotope Ratios of Ricinus communis Seeds and Ricin Preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; West, Jason B.; Ehleringer, James

    2013-01-01

    Seeds of the castor plant Ricinus communis, also known as castor beans, are of forensic interest because they are the source of the poison ricin. We have tested whether stable isotope ratios of castor seeds and ricin prepared by various methods can be used as a forensic signature. We collected over 300 castor seed samples from locations around the world and measured the C, N, O, and H stable isotope ratios of the whole seeds, oil, and three types of ricin preparations. Our results demonstrate that N isotope ratios can be used to correlate ricin prepared by any of these methods to source seeds. Further, stable isotope ratios distinguished >99% of crude and purified ricin protein samples in pair-wise comparison tests. Stable isotope ratios therefore constitute a valuable forensic signature for ricin preparations.

  1. Calibration strategies for the determination of stable carbon absolute isotope ratios in a glycine candidate reference material by elemental analyser-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Philip J H; Malinovsky, Dmitry; Goenaga-Infante, Heidi

    2015-04-01

    We report a methodology for the determination of the stable carbon absolute isotope ratio of a glycine candidate reference material with natural carbon isotopic composition using EA-IRMS. For the first time, stable carbon absolute isotope ratios have been reported using continuous flow rather than dual inlet isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Also for the first time, a calibration strategy based on the use of synthetic mixtures gravimetrically prepared from well characterised, highly (13)C-enriched and (13)C-depleted glycines was developed for EA-IRMS calibration and generation of absolute carbon isotope ratio values traceable to the SI through calibration standards of known purity. A second calibration strategy based on converting the more typically determined delta values on the Vienna PeeDee Belemnite (VPDB) scale using literature values for the absolute carbon isotope ratio of VPDB itself was used for comparison. Both calibration approaches provided results consistent with those previously reported for the same natural glycine using MC-ICP-MS; absolute carbon ratios of 10,649 × 10(-6) with an expanded uncertainty (k = 2) of 24 × 10(-6) and 10,646 × 10(-6) with an expanded uncertainty (k = 2) of 88 × 10(-6) were obtained, respectively. The absolute carbon isotope ratio of the VPDB standard was found to be 11,115 × 10(-6) with an expanded uncertainty (k = 2) of 27 × 10(-6), which is in excellent agreement with previously published values.

  2. Stable Isotope Ratios as a Biomarker on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zuilen, Mark

    2008-03-01

    As both Earth and Mars have had similar environmental conditions at least for some extended time early in their history (Jakosky and Phillips in Nature 412:237-244, 2001), the intriguing question arises whether life originated and evolved on Mars as it did on Earth (McKay and Stoker in Rev. Geophys. 27:189-214, 1989). Conceivably, early autotrophic life on Mars, like early life on Earth, used irreversible enzymatically enhanced metabolic processes that would have fractionated stable isotopes of the elements C, N, S, and Fe. Several important assumptions are made when such isotope fractionations are used as a biomarker. The purpose of this article is two-fold: (1) to discuss these assumptions for the case of carbon and to summarize new insights in abiologic reactions, and (2) to discuss the use of other stable isotope systems as a potential biomarker. It is concluded that isotopic biomarker studies on Mars will encounter several important obstacles. In the case of carbon isotopes, the most important obstacle is the absence of a contemporary abiologic carbon reservoir (such as carbonate deposits on Earth) to act as isotopic standard. The presence of a contemporary abiologic sulfate reservoir (evaporite deposits) suggests that sulfur isotopes can be used as a potential biomarker for sulfate-reducing bacteria. The best approach for tracing ancient life on Mars will be to combine several biomarker approaches; to search for complexity, and to combine small-scale isotopic variations with chemical, mineralogical, and morphological observations. An example of such a study can be a layer-specific correlation between δ 13C and δ 34S within an ancient Martian evaporite, which morphologically resembles the typical setting of a shallow marine microbial mat.

  3. Stable Isotope Ratios as a Biomarker on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zuilen, Mark

    As both Earth and Mars have had similar environmental conditions at least for some extended time early in their history (Jakosky and Phillips in Nature 412:237-244, 2001), the intriguing question arises whether life originated and evolved on Mars as it did on Earth (McKay and Stoker in Rev. Geophys. 27:189-214, 1989). Conceivably, early autotrophic life on Mars, like early life on Earth, used irreversible enzymatically enhanced metabolic processes that would have fractionated stable isotopes of the elements C, N, S, and Fe. Several important assumptions are made when such isotope fractionations are used as a biomarker. The purpose of this article is two-fold: (1) to discuss these assumptions for the case of carbon and to summarize new insights in abiologic reactions, and (2) to discuss the use of other stable isotope systems as a potential biomarker. It is concluded that isotopic biomarker studies on Mars will encounter several important obstacles. In the case of carbon isotopes, the most important obstacle is the absence of a contemporary abiologic carbon reservoir (such as carbonate deposits on Earth) to act as isotopic standard. The presence of a contemporary abiologic sulfate reservoir (evaporite deposits) suggests that sulfur isotopes can be used as a potential biomarker for sulfate-reducing bacteria. The best approach for tracing ancient life on Mars will be to combine several biomarker approaches; to search for complexity, and to combine small-scale isotopic variations with chemical, mineralogical, and morphological observations. An example of such a study can be a layer-specific correlation between δ 13C and δ 34S within an ancient Martian evaporite, which morphologically resembles the typical setting of a shallow marine microbial mat.

  4. Zn/Cd ratios and cadmium isotope evidence for the classification of lead-zinc deposits.

    PubMed

    Wen, Hanjie; Zhu, Chuanwei; Zhang, Yuxu; Cloquet, Christophe; Fan, Haifeng; Fu, Shaohong

    2016-04-28

    Lead-zinc deposits are often difficult to classify because clear criteria are lacking. In recent years, new tools, such as Cd and Zn isotopes, have been used to better understand the ore-formation processes and to classify Pb-Zn deposits. Herein, we investigate Cd concentrations, Cd isotope systematics and Zn/Cd ratios in sphalerite from nine Pb-Zn deposits divided into high-temperature systems (e.g., porphyry), low-temperature systems (e.g., Mississippi Valley type [MVT]) and exhalative systems (e.g., sedimentary exhalative [SEDEX]). Our results showed little evidence of fractionation in the high-temperature systems. In the low-temperature systems, Cd concentrations were the highest, but were also highly variable, a result consistent with the higher fractionation of Cd at low temperatures. The δ(114/110)Cd values in low-temperature systems were enriched in heavier isotopes (mean of 0.32 ± 0.31‰). Exhalative systems had the lowest Cd concentrations, with a mean δ(114/110)Cd value of 0.12 ± 0.50‰. We thus conclude that different ore-formation systems result in different characteristic Cd concentrations and fraction levels and that low-temperature processes lead to the most significant fractionation of Cd. Therefore, Cd distribution and isotopic studies can support better understanding of the geochemistry of ore-formation processes and the classification of Pb-Zn deposits.

  5. Concentrations and activity ratios of uranium isotopes in groundwater from Donana National Park, South of Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Bolivar, J. P.; Olias, M.; Gonzalez-Garcia, F.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

    2008-08-07

    The levels and distribution of natural radionuclides in groundwaters from the unconfined Almonte-Marismas aquifer, upon which Donana National Park is located, have been analysed. Most sampled points were multiple piezometers trying to study the vertical distribution of the hydrogeochemical characteristics in the aquifer. Temperature, pH, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen and redox potential were determined in the field. A large number of parameters, physico-chemical properties, major and minor ions, trace elements and natural radionuclides (U-isotopes, Th-isotopes, Ra-isotopes and {sup 210}Po), were also analysed. In the southern zone, where aeolian sands crop out, water composition is of the sodium chloride type, and the lower U-isotopes concentrations have been obtained. As water circulates through the aquifer, bicarbonate and calcium concentrations increase slightly, and higher radionuclides concentrations were measured. Finally, we have demonstrated that {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios can be used as markers of the type of groundwater and bedrock, as it has been the case for old waters with marine origin confined by a marsh in the south-east part of aquifer.

  6. Zn/Cd ratios and cadmium isotope evidence for the classification of lead-zinc deposits

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Hanjie; Zhu, Chuanwei; Zhang, Yuxu; Cloquet, Christophe; Fan, Haifeng; Fu, Shaohong

    2016-01-01

    Lead-zinc deposits are often difficult to classify because clear criteria are lacking. In recent years, new tools, such as Cd and Zn isotopes, have been used to better understand the ore-formation processes and to classify Pb-Zn deposits. Herein, we investigate Cd concentrations, Cd isotope systematics and Zn/Cd ratios in sphalerite from nine Pb-Zn deposits divided into high-temperature systems (e.g., porphyry), low-temperature systems (e.g., Mississippi Valley type [MVT]) and exhalative systems (e.g., sedimentary exhalative [SEDEX]). Our results showed little evidence of fractionation in the high-temperature systems. In the low-temperature systems, Cd concentrations were the highest, but were also highly variable, a result consistent with the higher fractionation of Cd at low temperatures. The δ114/110Cd values in low-temperature systems were enriched in heavier isotopes (mean of 0.32 ± 0.31‰). Exhalative systems had the lowest Cd concentrations, with a mean δ114/110Cd value of 0.12 ± 0.50‰. We thus conclude that different ore-formation systems result in different characteristic Cd concentrations and fraction levels and that low-temperature processes lead to the most significant fractionation of Cd. Therefore, Cd distribution and isotopic studies can support better understanding of the geochemistry of ore-formation processes and the classification of Pb-Zn deposits. PMID:27121538

  7. Zn/Cd ratios and cadmium isotope evidence for the classification of lead-zinc deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Hanjie; Zhu, Chuanwei; Zhang, Yuxu; Cloquet, Christophe; Fan, Haifeng; Fu, Shaohong

    2016-04-01

    Lead-zinc deposits are often difficult to classify because clear criteria are lacking. In recent years, new tools, such as Cd and Zn isotopes, have been used to better understand the ore-formation processes and to classify Pb-Zn deposits. Herein, we investigate Cd concentrations, Cd isotope systematics and Zn/Cd ratios in sphalerite from nine Pb-Zn deposits divided into high-temperature systems (e.g., porphyry), low-temperature systems (e.g., Mississippi Valley type [MVT]) and exhalative systems (e.g., sedimentary exhalative [SEDEX]). Our results showed little evidence of fractionation in the high-temperature systems. In the low-temperature systems, Cd concentrations were the highest, but were also highly variable, a result consistent with the higher fractionation of Cd at low temperatures. The δ114/110Cd values in low-temperature systems were enriched in heavier isotopes (mean of 0.32 ± 0.31‰). Exhalative systems had the lowest Cd concentrations, with a mean δ114/110Cd value of 0.12 ± 0.50‰. We thus conclude that different ore-formation systems result in different characteristic Cd concentrations and fraction levels and that low-temperature processes lead to the most significant fractionation of Cd. Therefore, Cd distribution and isotopic studies can support better understanding of the geochemistry of ore-formation processes and the classification of Pb-Zn deposits.

  8. MS fragment isotope ratio analysis for evaluation of citrus essential oils by HRGC-MS.

    PubMed

    Satake, Atsushi; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Ueno, Takao; Ukeda, Hiroyuki; Sawamura, Masayoshi

    2004-02-01

    To evaluate the origin of citrus essential oils, the isotope ratio of fragment peaks on HRGC-MS of the volatile compounds from various citrus oils was measured. The MS fragment ratio was found by the ratio of fragment peak intensity, m+1/m (m/z). This ratio reflects the isotope effect of volatile compounds, that is, it provides information about locality, quality, and species for essential oils. Multivariate analysis based on the MS fragment ratio of monoterpene hydrocarbons clearly distinguished three citrus species, yuzu, lemon, and lime. The carbonyl fractions were also extracted from citrus essential oils by the sodium hydrogensulfite method. The isotope ratio of MS fragments of octanal, nonanal, and decanal was also examined. The results suggest that there was no significant difference in the individual fragment isotope ratios of the three aldehydes.

  9. Equations for Lipid Normalization of Carbon Stable Isotope Ratios in Aquatic Bird Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Kyle H.; Davis, Mikaela; Elliott, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios are biogeochemical tracers that can be used to determine the source of nutrients and contaminants in avian eggs. However, the interpretation of stable carbon ratios in lipid-rich eggs is complicated because 13C is depleted in lipids. Variation in 13C abundance can therefore be obscured by variation in percent lipids. Past attempts to establish an algebraic equation to correct carbon isotope ratios for lipid content in eggs have been unsuccessful, possibly because they relied partly on data from coastal or migratory species that may obtain egg lipids from different habitats than egg protein. We measured carbon, nitrogen and sulphur stable isotope ratios in 175 eggs from eight species of aquatic birds. Carbon, nitrogen and sulphur isotopes were enriched in lipid-extracted egg samples compared with non extracted egg samples. A logarithmic equation using the C∶N ratio and carbon isotope ratio from the non extracted egg tissue calculated 90% of the lipid-extracted carbon isotope ratios within ±0.5‰. Calculating separate equations for eggs laid by species in different habitats (pelagic, offshore and terrestrial-influenced) improved the fit. A logarithmic equation, rather than a linear equation as often used for muscle, was necessary to accurately correct for lipid content because the relatively high lipid content of eggs compared with muscle meant that a linear relationship did not accurately approximate the relationship between percent lipids and the C∶N ratio. Because lipid extraction alters sulphur and nitrogen isotope ratios (and cannot be corrected algebraically), we suggest that isotopic measurement on bulk tissue followed by algebraic lipid normalization of carbon stable isotope ratio is often a good solution for homogenated eggs, at least when it is not possible to complete separate chemical analyses for each isotope. PMID:24465384

  10. Simulating Stable Isotope Ratios in Plumes of Groundwater Pollutants with BIOSCREEN-AT-ISO.

    PubMed

    Höhener, Patrick; Li, Zhi M; Julien, Maxime; Nun, Pierrick; Robins, Richard J; Remaud, Gérald S

    2017-03-01

    BIOSCREEN is a well-known simple tool for evaluating the transport of dissolved contaminants in groundwater, ideal for rapid screening and teaching. This work extends the BIOSCREEN model for the calculation of stable isotope ratios in contaminants. A three-dimensional exact solution of the reactive transport from a patch source, accounting for fractionation by first-order decay and/or sorption, is used. The results match those from a previously published isotope model but are much simpler to obtain. Two different isotopes may be computed, and dual isotope plots can be viewed. The dual isotope assessment is a rapidly emerging new approach for identifying process mechanisms in aquifers. Furthermore, deviations of isotope ratios at specific reactive positions with respect to "bulk" ratios in the whole compound can be simulated. This model is named BIOSCREEN-AT-ISO and will be downloadable from the journal homepage.

  11. Stable isotope ratio determination of the origin of vanillin in vanilla extracts and its relationship to vanillin/potassium ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, G.E.; Alfonso, F.C.; Figert, D.M.; Burggraff, J.M.

    1981-09-01

    A method is described for isolating vanillin from vanilla extract, followed by stable isotope ratio analysis to determine the amount of natural vanillin contained in adulterated vanilla extracts. After the potassium content is determined, the percent Madagascar and/or Java vanilla beans incorporated into the extract may then be approximated from the vanillin/potassium ratio.

  12. Broadband non-selective excitation of plutonium isotopes for isotope ratio measurements in resonance ionization mass spectrometry: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Sankari, M

    2012-10-15

    Making isotope ratio measurements with minimum isotope bias has always been a challenging task to mass spectrometrists, especially for the specific case of plutonium, owing to the strategic importance of the element. In order to use resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) as a tool for isotope ratio measurements, optimization of the various laser parameters and other atomic and system parameters is critical to minimize isotopic biases. Broadband simultaneous non-selective excitation of the isotopes of plutonium in the triple resonance excitation scheme with λ(1) = 420.77 nm, λ(2) = 847.28 nm, and λ(3) = 767.53 nm based on density matrix formalism has been theoretically computed for the determination of isotope ratios. The effects of the various laser parameters and other factors such as the atomization temperature and the dimensions of the atomic beam on the estimation of isotope ratios were studied. The effects of Doppler broadening, and time-dependent excitation parameters such as Rabi frequencies, ionization rate and the effect of non-Lorenztian lineshape have all been incorporated. The average laser powers and bandwidths for the three-excitation steps were evaluated for non-selective excitation. The laser intensity required to saturate the three-excitation steps were studied. The two-dimensional lineshape contour and its features were investigated, while the reversal of peak asymmetry of two-step and two-photon excitation peaks under these conditions is discussed. Optimized powers for the non-selective ionization of the three transitions were calculated as 545 mW, 150 mW and 545 mW and the laser bandwidth for all the three steps was ~20 GHz. The isotopic bias between the resonant and off-resonant isotope under the optimized conditions was no more than 9%, which is better than an earlier reported value. These optimized laser power and bandwidth conditions are better than in the earlier experimental work since these comprehensive calculations yield

  13. Guidelines and recommended terms for expression of stable-isotope-ratio and gas-ratio measurement results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.

    2011-01-01

    To minimize confusion in the expression of measurement results of stable isotope and gas-ratio measurements, recommendations based on publications of the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) are presented. Whenever feasible, entries are consistent with the Système International d'Unités, the SI (known in English as the International System of Units), and the third edition of the International Vocabulary of Basic and General Terms in Metrology (VIM, 3rd edition). The recommendations presented herein are approved by the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights and are designed to clarify expression of quantities related to measurement of isotope and gas ratios to ensure that quantity equations instead of numerical value equations are used for quantity definitions. Examples of column headings consistent with quantity calculus (also called the algebra of quantities) and examples of various deprecated usages connected with the terms recommended are presented.

  14. Relationship between carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios for lower trophic ecosystem in marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aita, M. N.; Ishii, R.; Tadokoro, K.; Smith, S. L.; Wada, E.

    2012-12-01

    To examine the relationship between carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ13C and δ15N) along food chains, we analyzed using the data from the Oyashio waters at the western North Pacific (samples collected from March to October 2009), the warm-core ring 86-B derived from the Kuroshio extension region (preserved samples), and previously published data from the Gulf of Alaska and Antarctic Ocean. The statistical analysis suggested a common slope of δ15N versus δ13C (Δδ15N/Δδ13C) among regions. We attribute this similarity to common physiological aspects of feeding processes (e.g., kinetic isotope effects inherent in the processes of amino acid synthesis). We also compared seasonal differences seasonal in Δδ15N/Δδ13C for the euphotic layers of the Oyashio waters. The Δδ15N/Δδ13C slope of the food chain during the spring bloom differs from its common value in other seasons. If we could better understand both carbon and nitrogen trophic fractionation within ecosystems, the stable isotope ratios may help to elucidate migratory behavior of higher trophic levels such as fishes in marine ecosystems as well as frame work of biogeochemical cycles in question.

  15. The isotope systematics of a juvenile intraplate volcano: Pb, Nd, and Sr isotope ratios of basalts from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staudigel, H.; Zindler, A.; Hart, S.R.; Leslie, T.; Chen, C.-Y.; Clague, D.

    1984-01-01

    Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope ratios for a representative suite of 15 basanites, alkali basalts, transitional basalts and tholeiites from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii, display unusually large variations for a single volcano, but lie within known ranges for Hawaiian basalts. Nd isotope ratios in alkali basalts show the largest relative variation (0.51291-0.51305), and include the nearly constant tholeiite value ( ??? 0.51297). Pb isotope ratios show similarly large ranges for tholeiites and alkali basalts and continue Tatsumoto's [31] "Loa" trend towards higher 206Pb 204Pb ratios, resulting in a substantial overlap with the "Kea" trend. 206Pb 204Pb ratios for Loihi and other volcanoes along the Loa and Kea trends [31] are observed to correlate with the age of the underlying lithosphere suggesting lithosphere involvement in the formation of Hawaiian tholeiites. Loihi lavas display no correlation of Nd, Sr, or Pb isotope ratios with major element compositions or eruptive age, in contrast with observations of some other Hawaiian volcanoes [38]. Isotope data for Loihi, as well as average values for Hawaiian volcanoes, are not adequately explained by previously proposed two-end-member models; new models for the origin and the development of Hawaiian volcanoes must include mixing of at least three geochemically distinct source regions and allow for the involvement of heterogeneous oceanic lithosphere. ?? 1984.

  16. The IRHUM (Isotopic Reconstruction of Human Migration) database - bioavailable strontium isotope ratios for geochemical fingerprinting in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmes, M.; McMorrow, L.; Kinsley, L.; Armstrong, R.; Aubert, M.; Eggins, S.; Falguères, C.; Maureille, B.; Moffat, I.; Grün, R.

    2014-03-01

    Strontium isotope ratios (87Sr / 86Sr) are a key geochemical tracer used in a wide range of fields including archaeology, ecology, food and forensic sciences. These applications are based on the principle that the Sr isotopic ratios of natural materials reflect the sources of strontium available during their formation. A major constraint for current studies is the lack of robust reference maps to evaluate the source of strontium isotope ratios measured in the samples. Here we provide a new data set of bioavailable Sr isotope ratios for the major geologic units of France, based on plant and soil samples (Pangaea data repository doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.819142). The IRHUM (Isotopic Reconstruction of Human Migration) database is a web platform to access, explore and map our data set. The database provides the spatial context and metadata for each sample, allowing the user to evaluate the suitability of the sample for their specific study. In addition, it allows users to upload and share their own data sets and data products, which will enhance collaboration across the different research fields. This article describes the sampling and analytical methods used to generate the data set and how to use and access the data set through the IRHUM database. Any interpretation of the isotope data set is outside the scope of this publication.

  17. The IRHUM (Isotopic Reconstruction of Human Migration) database - bioavailable strontium isotope ratios for geochemical fingerprinting in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmes, M.; McMorrow, L.; Kinsley, L.; Armstrong, R.; Aubert, M.; Eggins, S.; Falguères, C.; Maureille, B.; Moffat, I.; Grün, R.

    2013-11-01

    Strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) are a key geochemical tracer used in a wide range of fields including archaeology, ecology, food and forensic sciences. These applications are based on the principle that the Sr isotopic ratios of natural materials reflect the sources of strontium available during their formation. A major constraint for current studies is the lack of robust reference maps to evaluate the source of strontium isotope ratios measured in the samples. Here we provide a new dataset of bioavailable Sr isotope ratios for the major geologic units of France, based on plant and soil samples (Pangaea data repository doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.819142). The IRHUM (Isotopic Reconstruction of Human Migration) database is a web platform to access, explore and map our dataset. The database provides the spatial context and metadata for each sample, allowing the user to evaluate the suitability of the sample for their specific study. In addition, it allows users to upload and share their own datasets and data products, which will enhance collaboration across the different research fields. This article describes the sampling and analytical methods used to generate the dataset and how to use and access of the dataset through the IRHUM database. Any interpretation of the isotope dataset is outside the scope of this publication.

  18. High-precision (143)Nd/(144)Nd ratios from NdO(+) data corrected with in-run measured oxygen isotope ratios.

    PubMed

    Chu, Zhu-Yin; Li, Chao-Feng; Hegner, Ernst; Chen, Zhi; Yan, Yan; Guo, Jing-Hui

    2014-11-18

    The NdO(+) technique has been considerably refined in recent years for high-precision measurement of Nd isotope ratios in low-level samples (1-5 ng Nd). As oxygen isotopic compositions may vary significantly with experimental conditions such as filament material, ionization enhancer and the ambient oxygen in the ion source, great "care" should be taken for using correct oxygen isotopic compositions to do the isobaric oxide corrections for the "conventional" NdO(+) method. Our method presented here for NdO(+) data reduction and PrO(+) interference corrections uses the oxygen isotope composition determined in each cycle of the NdO(+) measurements. For that purpose, we measured the small ion signals of (150)Nd(17)O(+) and (150)Nd(18)O(+) with amplifiers equipped with 10(12) Ω feedback resistors, and those of Nd(16)O(+) ion beams with 10(11) Ω amplifiers. Using 10(12) Ω amplifiers facilitates a precise measurement of the very small (150)Nd(17)O(+) and (150)Nd(18)O(+) ion signals and calculation of highly accurate and precise (143)Nd/(144)Nd isotope ratios. The (143)Nd/(144)Nd ratios for JNdi-1 standards and several whole-rock reference materials determined with the method on 4 ng of Nd loads are consistent with previously reported values within analytical error, with internal and external precision (2 RSE and 2 RSD) of better than 20 and 30 ppm, respectively.

  19. Non-chondritic iron isotope ratios in planetary mantles as a result of core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elardo, Stephen M.; Shahar, Anat

    2017-02-01

    Information about the materials and conditions involved in planetary formation and differentiation in the early Solar System is recorded in iron isotope ratios. Samples from Earth, the Moon, Mars and the asteroid Vesta reveal significant variations in iron isotope ratios, but the sources of these variations remain uncertain. Here we present experiments that demonstrate that under the conditions of planetary core formation expected for the Moon, Mars and Vesta, iron isotopes fractionate between metal and silicate due to the presence of nickel, and enrich the bodies' mantles in isotopically light iron. However, the effect of nickel diminishes at higher temperatures: under conditions expected for Earth's core formation, we infer little fractionation of iron isotopes. From our experimental results and existing conceptual models of magma ocean crystallization and mantle partial melting, we find that nickel-induced fractionation can explain iron isotope variability found in planetary samples without invoking nebular or accretionary processes. We suggest that near-chondritic iron isotope ratios of basalts from Mars and Vesta, as well as the most primitive lunar basalts, were achieved by melting of isotopically light mantles, whereas the heavy iron isotope ratios of terrestrial ocean floor basalts are the result of melting of near-chondritic Earth mantle.

  20. GUM Analysis for SIMS Isotopic Ratios in BEP0 Graphite Qualification Samples, Round 2

    SciTech Connect

    Gerlach, David C.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Reid, Bruce D.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes GUM calculations for TIMS and SIMS isotopic ratio measurements of reactor graphite samples. These isotopic ratios are used to estimate reactor burn-up, and currently consist of various ratios of U, Pu, and Boron impurities in the graphite samples. The GUM calculation is a propagation of error methodology that assigns uncertainties (in the form of standard error and confidence bound) to the final estimates.

  1. BOREAS TE-5 Tree Ring and Carbon Isotope Ratio Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Ehleriinger, Jim; Brooks, J. Renee; Flanagan, Larry

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-5 team collected several data sets to investigate the vegetation-atmosphere CO2 and H2O exchange processes. These data include tree ring widths and cellulose carbon isotope data from coniferous trees collected at the BOREAS NSA and SSA in 1993 and 1994 by the BOREAS TE-5 team. Ring width data are provided for both Picea mariana and Pinus banksiana. The carbon isotope data are provided only for Pinus banksiana. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  2. Biometrics from the carbon isotope ratio analysis of amino acids in human hair.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Glen P; An, Yan; Konstantynova, Kateryna I; Rashaid, Ayat H B

    2015-01-01

    This study compares and contrasts the ability to classify individuals into different grouping factors through either bulk isotope ratio analysis or amino-acid-specific isotope ratio analysis of human hair. Using LC-IRMS, we measured the isotope ratios of 14 amino acids in hair proteins independently, and leucine/isoleucine as a co-eluting pair, to provide 15 variables for classification. Multivariate analysis confirmed that the essential amino acids and non-essential amino acids were mostly independent variables in the classification rules, thereby enabling the separation of dietary factors of isotope intake from intrinsic or phenotypic factors of isotope fractionation. Multivariate analysis revealed at least two potential sources of non-dietary factors influencing the carbon isotope ratio values of the amino acids in human hair: body mass index (BMI) and age. These results provide evidence that compound-specific isotope ratio analysis has the potential to go beyond region-of-origin or geospatial movements of individuals-obtainable through bulk isotope measurements-to the provision of physical and characteristic traits about the individuals, such as age and BMI. Further development and refinement, for example to genetic, metabolic, disease and hormonal factors could ultimately be of great assistance in forensic and clinical casework.

  3. Influence of isotopic re-equilibration on speleothem and fluid inclusion isotope ratios after primary calcite precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, Tobias; Haderlein, Astrid; Weißbach, Therese

    2016-04-01

    Oxygen isotope ratios in speleothems (notably stalagmites) have been used since decades to successfully infer paleotemperatures and deduce paleo-environmental information. In addition, recent technical developments allow to increasingly use fluid inclusions as an archive for drip-water and together with the surrounding calcite as paleothermometer. A basic requirement for isotope data interpretation is the complete knowledge of the fractionation between calcite and fluid. Most laboratory and in-situ cave experiments focus on calcite growth and the isotope fractionation between calcite and feed solution. Potential isotope exchange and re-equilibration processes after the initial deposition have mostly been neglected. However, experiments of Oelkers et al. (2015) showed that the isotope exchange between minerals and fluid can proceed rapidly (within days), even at chemical equilibrium. In hydrous Mg carbonates a similar process of continuous isotope exchange between carbonate and fluid was observed after the carbonate precipitation was completed (Mavromatis et al., 2015). These observations suggest that the isotope ratios of speleothem calcite may be affected by this continuous exchange, likely driving the isotope composition continuously towards equilibrium at the respective cave conditions. In addition, fluid inclusions are suspected to be sensitive to an isotope exchange with the surrounding carbonate highlighting the need to precisely understand and quantify this effect. We assessed the oxygen isotope exchange between calcite and solution at chemical equilibrium conditions with theoretical estimates and laboratory experiments over an intermediate time scale (hours-weeks). A large isotope gradient (~20 ‰)) between solution and calcite was prepared in the experiment to investigate the dynamics of this re-equilibration process. We used a theoretical model based on a Rayleigh fractionation approach and the direct comparison with the experiment to determine

  4. Acquisition and processing of data for isotope-ratio-monitoring mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricci, M. P.; Merritt, D. A.; Freeman, K. H.; Hayes, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Methods are described for continuous monitoring of signals required for precise analyses of 13C, 18O, and 15N in gas streams containing varying quantities of CO2 and N2. The quantitative resolution (i.e. maximum performance in the absence of random errors) of these methods is adequate for determination of isotope ratios with an uncertainty of one part in 10(5); the precision actually obtained is often better than one part in 10(4). This report describes data-processing operations including definition of beginning and ending points of chromatographic peaks and quantitation of background levels, allowance for effects of chromatographic separation of isotopically substituted species, integration of signals related to specific masses, correction for effects of mass discrimination, recognition of drifts in mass spectrometer performance, and calculation of isotopic delta values. Characteristics of a system allowing off-line revision of parameters used in data reduction are described and an algorithm for identification of background levels in complex chromatograms is outlined. Effects of imperfect chromatographic resolution are demonstrated and discussed and an approach to deconvolution of signals from coeluting substances described.

  5. Strontium isotope ratios and the origin of anorthosites

    SciTech Connect

    Vinogradov, V.I.

    1986-01-01

    Anorthosites are rocks consisting almost completely of calcic plagioclase, usually from andesine to labradorite. They are not widespread, and until recently were of no economic interest. However, with the advance of the new global tectonics, which has excited considerable interest in the structure and composition of upper-mantle rocks, interest in the anorthosites has grown. This has particularly been the case since the discovery of anorthosites on the moon, where they appear to be more widespread than on the earth. Data have recently been obtained on the strontium isotope compositions of anorthosite intrusions in the Dzhugdzhur-Stanovoy zone and in the rocks surrounding them, which have revealed some unexpected features. The paper describes the geological features of anorthosites, initial concepts on strontium isotope geochemistry, strontium isotope compositions of this region, and discusses some genetic consequences from the isotope data. Although the data of this study are insufficient to determine the origin of anorthosites, the data indicate several points which should be considered in following studies. 11 references, 1 figure.

  6. In-Vivo Zinc Metabolism by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The purpose of this chapter is to highlight some of the methodological and technical issues surrounding the in vivo use of stable isotopes and to provide examples of how such studies have advanced our knowledge of human zinc metabolism. The advantages and disadvantages of the currently available in...

  7. Improved isotope ratio measurement performance in liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry by removing excess oxygen.

    PubMed

    Hettmann, Elena; Brand, Willi A; Gleixner, Gerd

    2007-01-01

    A low dead volume oxygen scrubbing system was introduced in a commercially available liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) interface to enhance the analytical capability of the system. In the LC/IRMS interface carbon from organic samples is converted into CO(2) inside the mobile phase by wet chemical oxidation using peroxodisulfate (Na(2)S(2)O(8)). After passing the hot reaction zone, surplus oxygen (O(2)) remains dissolved in the liquid phase. Both CO(2) and O(2) diffuse through a transfer membrane into the helium carrier and are transferred to the mass spectrometer. The presence of O(2) in the ion source may have detrimental effects on measurement accuracy and precision as well as on filament lifetime. As a remedy, a new on-line O(2)-removing device has been incorporated into the system. The new O(2) scrubber consists of two parallel hot copper reduction reactors (0.8 mm i.d., active length 120 mm) and a switch-over valve between them. One reactor is regenerated using He/H(2) while the other is actively scavenging O(2) from the gas stream. The capacity of each reduction reactor, expressed as usage time, is between 40 and 50 min. This is sufficient for a single LC run for sugars and organic acids. A further increase of the reduction capacity is accompanied by a peak broadening of about 100%. After switching to a freshly reduced reactor the oxygen background and the delta(13)C values of the reference gas need up to 500 s to stabilize. For repeated injections the delta(13)C values of sucrose remain constant (+/-0.1 per thousand) for about 3000 s. The long-term stability for measurements of sucrose was 0.11 per thousand without the reduction oven and improved slightly to 0.08 per thousand with the reduction oven. The filament lifetime improved by more than 600%, thereby improving the long-term system stability and analytical efficiency. In addition the costs per analysis were reduced considerably.

  8. Selenium isotope ratios as indicators of selenium sources and oxyanion reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, T.M.; Herbel, M.J.; Bullen, T.D.; Zawislanski, P.T.

    1999-01-01

    Selenium stable isotope ratio measurements should serve as indicators of sources and biogeochemical transformations of Se. We report measurements of Se isotope fractionation during selenate reduction, selenite sorption, oxidation of reduced Se in soils, and Se volatilization by algae and soil samples. These results, combined with previous work with Se isotopes, indicate that reduction of soluble oxyanions is the dominant cause of Se isotope fractionation. Accordingly, Se isotope ratios should be useful as indicators of oxyanion reduction, which can transform mobile species to forms that are less mobile and less bioavailable. Additional investigations of Se isotope fractionation are needed to confirm this preliminary assessment. We have developed a new method for measurement of natural Se isotope ratio variation which requires less than 500 ng Se per analysis and yields ??0.2??? precision on 80Se/76Se. A double isotope spike technique corrects for isotopic fractionation during sample preparation and mass spectrometry. The small minimum sample size is important, as Se concentrations are often below 1 ppm in solids and 1 ??g/L in fluids. The Se purification process is rapid and compatible with various sample matrices, including acidic rock or sediment digests.

  9. Tracing lead pollution sources in abandoned mine areas using stable Pb isotope ratios.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Eun-Jin; Lee, Jung-A; Park, Jae-Seon; Lee, Khanghyun; Lee, Won-Seok; Han, Jin-Seok; Choi, Jong-Woo

    2014-02-01

    This study focused on Pb isotope ratios of sediments in areas around an abandoned mine to determine if the ratios can be used as a source tracer. For pretreatment, sediment samples were dissolved with mixed acids, and a multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS, Nu plasma II) was used to investigate the Pb isotopic composition of the samples. The measured isotope ratios were then corrected for instrumental mass fractionation by measuring the (203)Tl/(205)Tl ratio. Repeated measurements with the NIST SRM 981 reference material showed that the precision of all ratios was below 104 ppm (±2σ) for 50 ng/g. The isotope ratios ((207)Pb/(206)Pb) found were 0.85073 ± 0.0004~0.85373 ± 0.0003 for the main stream, while they were 0.83736 ± 0.0010 for the tributary and 0.84393 ± 0.0002 for the confluence. A binary mixing equation for isotope ratios showed that the contributions of mine lead to neighboring areas were up to 60%. Therefore, Pb isotope ratios can be a good source tracer for areas around abandoned mines.

  10. Stable carbon isotope ratios of toluene in the boundary layer and the lower free troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintel, J.; Hösen, E.; Koppmann, R.; Krebsbach, M.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Rohrer, F.

    2013-11-01

    During the field campaign ZEPTER-2 in autumn 2008 whole air samples were collected on board a Zeppelin NT airship in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and the lower free troposphere (LFT) over south-west Germany using the ZEppelin Based Isotope Sampler (ZEBIS). These samples were analysed with respect to volatile organic compound (VOC) mixing ratios and stable carbon isotope ratios using a gas chromatograph combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC-C-IRMS). In this study we present results for toluene, one of the major anthropogenic pollutants, which emphasise the viability of isotope ratio measurements in VOC for atmospheric research, especially to study VOC sources or to track both dynamical and chemical processes. In situ measurements of CO mixing ratios on board the Zeppelin NT were used to allocate the air samples either to the PBL or the LFT. In the PBL we observed rather fresh emissions mixing into the background air. We estimated a toluene source isotope ratio of δ13C = -28.2 ± 0.5‰. Samples from the PBL and the LFT were clearly distinguishable by means of their mixing ratio and isotope ratio signatures. Using the concept of the effective kinetic isotope effect, we were able to separate the effects of dilution processes and photochemical degradation in the free troposphere. We calculated the photochemical age of toluene in the atmosphere in two different ways using isotope ratios and mixing ratios. The results differ strongly in the PBL, probably due to mixing processes, but are compatible with each other in the LFT. Here, they correlate with a slope of 0.90±0.31.

  11. Uranium and Calcium Isotope Ratio Measurements using the Modified Total Evaporation Method in TIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, S.; Kuehn, H.; Berglund, M.; Hennessy, C.

    2010-12-01

    A new version of the "modified total evaporation" (MTE) method for isotopic analysis by multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), with high analytical performance and designed in a more user-friendly and routinely applicable way, is described in detail. It is mainly being used for nuclear safeguards measurements of U and Pu and nuclear metrology, but can readily be applied to other scientific tasks in geochemistry, e.g. for Sr, Nd and Ca, as well. The development of the MTE method was organized in collaboration of several "key nuclear mass spectrometry laboratories", namely the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL), the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), the Safeguards Analytical Laboratory (now Safeguards Analytical Services, SGAS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), with IRMM taking the leading role. The manufacturer of the TRITON TIMS instrument, Thermo Fisher Scientific, integrated this method into the software of the instrument. The development has now reached its goal to become a user-friendly and routinely useable method for uranium isotope ratio measurements with high precision and accuracy. Due to the use of the “total evaporation” (TE) method the measurement of the "major" uranium isotope ratio 235U/238U is routinely being performed with a precision of 0.01% to 0.02%. The use of a (certified) reference material measured under comparable conditions is emphasized to achieve an accuracy at a level of 0.02% - depending on the stated uncertainty of the certified value of the reference material. In contrast to the total evaporation method (TE), in the MTE method the total evaporation sequence is interrupted on a regular basis to allow for correction for background from peak tailing, internal calibration of a secondary electron multiplier (SEM) detector versus the Faraday cups, and ion source re-focusing. Therefore, the most significant improvement using the

  12. USE OF THE COMPOSITION AND STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIO OF MICROBIAL FATTY ACIDS TO STUDY CARBON CYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotopic ratio (Gamma 13C) of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAS) in soils and sediments as indicators of live microbial biomass levels and microbial carbon source. For studies of soil organic matter (SO...

  13. USE OF THE COMPOSITION AND STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIO OF MICROBIAL FATTY ACIDS TO STUDY CARBON CYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotopic ratio (Gamma 13C) of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAS) in soils and sediments as indicators of live microbial biomass levels and microbial carbon source. For studies of soil organic matter (SO...

  14. USE OF STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS OF FATTY ACIDS TO EVALUATE MICROBIAL CARBON SOURCES IN TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotopic ratio (D 13C) of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils as indicators of live microbial biomass levels and microbial carbon source. We found that intensive sugar cane cultivation leads to ...

  15. COMPARISON OF STABLE-NITROGEN (15N/14N) ISOTOPE RATIOS IN LARGE MOUTH BASS SCALES AND MUSCLE TISSUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable-nitrogen (15N/14N) isotope ratios of fish tissue are currently used to determine trophic structure, contaminant bioaccumulation, and the level of anthropogenic nitrogen enrichment in aquatic systems. The most common tissue used for these measurements is fileted dorsal musc...

  16. A new isotopic reference material for stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope-ratio measurements of water—USGS50 Lake Kyoga Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Mukwaya, Christine; Qi, Haiping; Lorenz, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    This isotopic reference material, designated as USGS50, is intended as one of two reference waters for daily normalization of stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic analysis of water with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer or a laser absorption spectrometer, of use especially for isotope-hydrology laboratories analyzing freshwater samples from equatorial and tropical regions.

  17. Stable isotope ratios and reforestation potential in Acacia koa populations on Hawai'i

    Treesearch

    Shaneka Lawson; Carrie Pike

    2017-01-01

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes can be influenced by a multitude of factors including elevation, precipitation rate, season, and temperature. This work examined variability in foliar stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope ratios of koa (Acacia koa) across 17 sites on Hawai'i Island, delineated by elevation and precipitation...

  18. USING MUSSEL ISOTOPE RATIOS TO ASSESS ANTHROPOGEN NITROGEN INPUTS TO COASTAL ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The stable nitrogen isotope ratio in ribbed mussel (Geukensia demissus) tissue was investigated as an indicator of the source of nitrogen inputs to coastal salt marshes. Mussels fed a diet of 15N enriched algae in the laboratory showed an increase in tissue nitrogen isotope rati...

  19. Insights into Wilson's Warbler migration from analyses of hydrogen stable-isotope ratios

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey F. Kelly; Viorel Atudorei; Zachary D. Sharp; Deborah M. Finch

    2002-01-01

    Our ability to link the breeding locations of individual passerines to migration stopover sites and wintering locations is limited. Stable isotopes of hydrogen contained in bird feathers have recently shown potential in this regard. We measured hydrogen stable-isotope ratios (deltaD) of feathers from breeding, migrating, and wintering Wilson's Warblers. Analyses...

  20. Methods and limitations of 'clumped' CO2 isotope (Delta47) analysis by gas-source isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huntington, K W; Eiler, J M; Affek, H P; Guo, W; Bonifacie, M; Yeung, L Y; Thiagarajan, N; Passey, B; Tripati, A; Daëron, M; Came, R

    2009-09-01

    The geochemistry of multiply substituted isotopologues ('clumped-isotope' geochemistry) examines the abundances in natural materials of molecules, formula units or moieties that contain more than one rare isotope (e.g. (13)C(18)O(16)O, (18)O(18)O, (15)N(2), (13)C(18)O(16)O(2) (2-)). Such species form the basis of carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry and undergo distinctive fractionations during a variety of natural processes, but initial reports have provided few details of their analysis. In this study, we present detailed data and arguments regarding the theoretical and practical limits of precision, methods of standardization, instrument linearity and related issues for clumped-isotope analysis by dual-inlet gas-source isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We demonstrate long-term stability and subtenth per mil precision in 47/44 ratios for counting systems consisting of a Faraday cup registered through a 10(12) ohm resistor on three Thermo-Finnigan 253 IRMS systems. Based on the analyses of heated CO(2) gases, which have a stochastic distribution of isotopes among possible isotopologues, we document and correct for (1) isotopic exchange among analyte CO(2) molecules and (2) subtle nonlinearity in the relationship between actual and measured 47/44 ratios. External precisions of approximately 0.01 per thousand are routinely achieved for measurements of the mass-47 anomaly (a measure mostly of the abundance anomaly of (13)C-(18)O bonds) and follow counting statistics. The present technical limit to precision intrinsic to our methods and instrumentation is approximately 5 parts per million (ppm), whereas precisions of measurements of heterogeneous natural materials are more typically approximately 10 ppm (both 1 s.e.). These correspond to errors in carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry of +/-1.2 degrees C and +/-2.4 degrees C, respectively. 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Lead isotope ratios for bullets, forensic evaluation in a Bayesian paradigm.

    PubMed

    Sjåstad, Knut-Endre; Lucy, David; Andersen, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Forensic science is a discipline concerned with collection, examination and evaluation of physical evidence related to criminal cases. The results from the activities of the forensic scientist may ultimately be presented to the court in such a way that the triers of fact understand the implications of the data. Forensic science has been, and still is, driven by development of new technology, and in the last two decades evaluation of evidence based on logical reasoning and Bayesian statistic has reached some level of general acceptance within the forensic community. Tracing of lead fragments of unknown origin to a given source of ammunition is a task that might be of interest for the Court. Use of data from lead isotope ratios analysis interpreted within a Bayesian framework has shown to be suitable method to guide the Court to draw their conclusion for such task. In this work we have used isotopic composition of lead from small arms projectiles (cal. .22) and developed an approach based on Bayesian statistics and likelihood ratio calculation. The likelihood ratio is a single quantity that provides a measure of the value of evidence that can be used in the deliberation of the court.

  2. Multi-collector Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer -- Operational Performance Report

    SciTech Connect

    Appelhans, Anthony D; Olson, John E; Watrous, Matthew G; Ward, Michael B.; Dahl, David A.

    2010-12-01

    This report describes the operational testing of a new magnetic sector mass spectrometer that utilizes seven full-sized discrete dynode electron multipliers operating simultaneously. The instrument includes a newly developed ion dispersion lens that enables the mass dispersed individual isotope beams to be separated sufficiently to allow a full-sized discrete dynode pulse counting multiplier to be used to measure each isotope beam. The performance of the instrument was measured using SRM 996 (244Pu spike) at loadings of 2.4 and 12 fg on resin beads and with SRM 4350B Columbia River Sediment samples. The measured limit of detection (3s) for 240Pu was 3.4 attograms for SRM 996. The limit of quantitation (LOQ), defined as 10 s, was 11.2 attograms. The measured concentration of 239Pu in the CRS standard was 152 ± 6 fg/g.

  3. Stable carbon isotope ratios of toluene in the boundary layer and the lower free troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintel, J.; Hösen, E.; Koppmann, R.; Krebsbach, M.

    2013-04-01

    Measurements of stable carbon isotope ratios in VOC are a powerful tool to identify sources or to track both dynamical and chemical processes. During the field campaign ZEPTER-2 in autumn 2008 whole air samples were collected on board a Zeppelin NT airship in the planetary boundary layer and the lower free troposphere over south-west Germany. These samples were analysed with respect to VOC mixing ratios and stable carbon isotope ratios using a gas chromatograph combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometer. In this study we present the results for toluene, one of the major anthropogenic pollutants. In the boundary layer we observed rather fresh emissions mixing into the background and derived a toluene source isotope ratio of δ13C = -28.2 ± 0.5 ‰. Using the concept of the effective kinetic isotope effect, we were able to separate the effects of dilution processes and photochemical degradation in the free troposphere. We estimated the photochemical age of toluene in the atmosphere in two different ways (using isotope ratios and mixing ratios, respectively). The results differ strongly in the planetary boundary layer, probably due to mixing processes, but are compatible with each other in the free troposphere.

  4. Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio.

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, B D; Ognibene, T; Vogel, J S

    2010-02-05

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of {sup 14}C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of {sup 14}C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the {sup 14}C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with {sup 14}C corresponds to 30 fg

  5. Factors controlling precision and accuracy in isotope-ratio-monitoring mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, D. A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The performance of systems in which picomole quantities of sample are mixed with a carrier gas and passed through an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer system was examined experimentally and theoretically. Two different mass spectrometers were used, both having electron-impact ion sources and Faraday cup collector systems. One had an accelerating potential of 10kV and accepted 0.2 mL of He/min, producing, under those conditions, a maximum efficiency of 1 CO2 molecular ion collected per 700 molecules introduced. Comparable figures for the second instrument were 3 kV, 0.5 mL of He/min, and 14000 molecules/ion. Signal pathways were adjusted so that response times were <200 ms. Sample-related ion currents appeared as peaks with widths of 3-30 s. Isotope ratios were determined by comparison to signals produced by standard gases. In spite of rapid variations in signals, observed levels of performance were within a factor of 2 of shot-noise limits. For the 10-kV instrument, sample requirements for standard deviations of 0.1 and 0.5% were 45 and 1.7 pmol, respectively. Comparable requirements for the 3-kV instrument were 900 and 36 pmol. Drifts in instrumental characteristics were adequately neutralized when standards were observed at 20-min intervals. For the 10-kV instrument, computed isotopic compositions were independent of sample size and signal strength over the ranges examined. Nonlinearities of <0.04%/V were observed for the 3-kV system. Procedures for observation and subtraction of background ion currents were examined experimentally and theoretically. For sample/ background ratios varying from >10 to 0.3, precision is expected and observed to decrease approximately 2-fold and to depend only weakly on the precision with which background ion currents have been measured.

  6. Historical variations of mercury stable isotope ratios in Arctic glacier firn and ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdanowicz, C. M.; Krümmel, E. M.; Poulain, A. J.; Yumvihoze, E.; Chen, J.; Å trok, M.; Scheer, M.; Hintelmann, H.

    2016-09-01

    The concentration and isotopic composition of mercury (Hg) were determined in glacier core samples from Canadian Arctic ice caps dating from preindustrial to recent time (early 21st century). Mean Hg levels increased from ≤ 0.2 ng L-1 in preindustrial time to ~0.8-1.2 ng L-1 in the modern industrial era (last ~200 years). Hg accumulated on Arctic ice caps has Δ199Hg and Δ201Hg that are higher (~ -1 to 2.9‰) than previously reported for Arctic snow impacted by atmospheric Hg depletion events (mostly < -1‰), suggesting that these events contribute little to Hg accumulation on ice caps. The range of δ202Hg, Δ199Hg, and Δ201Hg in glacier cores overlaps with that of Arctic Hg0(g) and of seawater in Baffin Bay and also with that of midlatitude precipitation and industrial Hg sources, including coal and Hg ores. A core from Agassiz ice cap (80.7°N) shows a ~ +1‰ shift in δ202Hg over the nineteenth to twentieth centuries that could reflect changes in the isotopic composition of the atmospheric Hg pool in the High Arctic in response to growing industrial emissions at lower latitudes. This study is the first ever to report on historical variations of Hg stable isotope ratios in Arctic ice cores. Results could help constrain future modeling efforts of the global Hg biogeochemical cycle and the atmosphere's response to changing Hg emissions, past and future.

  7. Temporal trends in nitrogen isotope ratios of winter flounder collected from Rhode Island coastal systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen isotope ratios (15N) were measured in muscle tissue of juvenile winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, collected from several estuarine systems along the coast of Rhode Island, USA, including Narragansett Bay, Narrow River and three coastal lagoons. Fish collect...

  8. Temporal trends in nitrogen isotope ratios of winter flounder collected from Rhode Island coastal systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen isotope ratios (15N) were measured in muscle tissue of juvenile winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, collected from several estuarine systems along the coast of Rhode Island, USA, including Narragansett Bay, Narrow River and three coastal lagoons. Fish collect...

  9. Longitudinal profiling of urinary steroids by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry: diet change may result in carbon isotopic variations.

    PubMed

    Saudan, Christophe; Kamber, Matthias; Barbati, Giulia; Robinson, Neil; Desmarchelier, Aurélien; Mangin, Patrice; Saugy, Martial

    2006-02-02

    Longitudinal profiling of urinary steroids was investigated by using a gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) method. The carbon isotope ratio of three urinary testosterone (T) metabolites: androsterone, etiocholanolone, 5beta-androstane-3alpha,17beta-diol (5beta-androstanediol) together with 16(5alpha)-androsten-3alpha-ol (androstenol) and 5beta-pregnane-3alpha,20alpha-diol (5beta-pregnanediol) were measured in urine samples collected from three top-level athletes over 2 years. Throughout the study, the subjects were living in Switzerland and were residing every year for a month or two in an African country. (13)C-enrichment larger than 2.5 per thousand was observed for one subject after a 2-month stay in Africa. Our findings reveal that (13)C-enrichment caused by a diet change might be reduced if the stay in Africa was shorter or if the urine sample was not collected within the days after return to Switzerland. The steroids of interest in each sample did not show significant isotopic fractionation that could lead to false positive results in anti-doping testing. In contrast to the results obtained with the carbon isotopic ratio, profiling of urinary testosterone/epitestosterone (T/E) ratios was found to be unaffected by a diet change.

  10. Classification of nine malathion emulsion samples by using carbon isotope ratios and the ratio of organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Suto, Nana; Kawashima, Hiroto

    2017-01-01

    The compound specific isotope analysis is nowadays an important and powerful tool in geochemical, environmental and forensics field. On November 2013, Aqli Foods Corporation in Japan dealt with complaints about stench from frozen foods produced. Subsequently, very high concentrations of organophosphorus pesticide as malathion, ethylbenzene and xylene were detected in recovered frozen foods. In particular case, we present the method to measure the stable carbon isotope ratio (δ(13)C) of nine malathion emulsion pesticides using gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) to identify the source. The δ(13)C values of malathion ranged from -30.6‰ to -29.5‰. Because malathion used in all malathion emulsions sold in Japan is imported from the same overseas company, Cheminova, Denmark. The δ(13)C values of ethylbenzene ranged from -28.2‰ to -20.8‰ and those of m,p-xylene from -28.7‰ to -25.2‰. The differences in the δ(13)C values may be because of the material itself and chemical processing. We also determined the ratio of ethylbenzene to m,p-xylene and finally categorized the nine malathion samples into five groups on the basis of this ratio and the δ(13)C values of ethylbenzene and m,p-xylene. The results of isotopic fractionation during volatilization (refrigerate, room temperature and incubator) was negligible small. Copyright © 2016 The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The identification of lead ammunition as a source of lead exposure in First Nations: the use of lead isotope ratios.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Leonard J S; Wainman, Bruce C; Martin, Ian D; Sutherland, Celine; Weber, Jean-Philippe; Dumas, Pierre; Nieboer, Evert

    2008-04-15

    The use of lead shotshell to hunt water birds has been associated with lead-contamination in game meat. However, evidence illustrating that lead shotshell is a source of lead exposure in subsistence hunting groups cannot be deemed definitive. This study seeks to determine whether lead shotshell constitutes a source of lead exposure using lead isotope ratios. We examined stable lead isotope ratios for lichens, lead shotshell and bullets, and blood from residents of Fort Albany and Kashechewan First Nations, and the City of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and regression analyses. ANOVA of isotope ratios for blood revealed significant differences with respect to location, but not sex. Hamilton differed from both Kashechewan and Fort Albany; however, the First Nations did not differ from each other. ANOVA of the isotope ratios for lead ammunition and lichens revealed no significant differences between lichen groups (north and south) and for the lead ammunition sources (pellets and bullets). A plot of (206)Pb/(204)Pb and (206)Pb/(207)Pb values illustrated that lichens and lead ammunition were distinct groupings and only the 95% confidence ellipse of the First Nations group overlapped that of lead ammunition. In addition, partial correlations between blood-lead levels (adjusted for age) and isotope ratios revealed significant (p<0.05) positive correlations for (206)Pb/(204)Pb and (206)Pb/(207)Pb, and a significant negative correlation for (208)Pb/(206)Pb, as predicted if leaded ammunition were the source of lead exposure. In conclusion, lead ammunition was identified as a source of lead exposure for First Nations people; however, the isotope ratios for lead shotshell pellets and bullets were indistinguishable. Thus, lead-contaminated meat from game harvested with lead bullets may also be contributing to the lead body burden.

  12. Graphite Isotope Ratio Method Development Report: Irradiation Test Demonstration of Uranium as a Low Fluence Indicator

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, B.D.; Gerlach, D.C.; Love, E.F.; McNeece, J.P.; Livingston, J.V.; Greenwood, L.R.; Petersen, S.L.; Morgan, W.C.

    1999-10-20

    This report describes an irradiation test designed to investigate the suitability of uranium as a graphite isotope ratio method (GIRM) low fluence indicator. GIRM is a demonstrated concept that gives a graphite-moderated reactor's lifetime production based on measuring changes in the isotopic ratio of elements known to exist in trace quantities within reactor-grade graphite. Appendix I of this report provides a tutorial on the GIRM concept.

  13. High precision determination of bromine isotope ratio by GC-MC-ICPMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, Faina; Halicz, Ludwik

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a new methodology for the precise determination of bromine isotope ratio in individual organic compounds based on the simultaneous introduction of brominated organic compounds and strontium as an external spike into MC-ICPMS. Using the proposed methodology, an external precision (2[sigma]) up to 0.1[per mille sign] has been attained. The new approach for the bromine isotope ratio analysis could be applied for the investigating the fate of the organobromine compounds in the environment.

  14. Isolation of strontium pools and isotope ratios in modern human hair.

    PubMed

    Tipple, Brett J; Chau, Thuan; Chesson, Lesley A; Fernandez, Diego P; Ehleringer, James R

    2013-10-10

    The elements of human hair record specific information about an individual's health, diet, and surrounding environment. Strontium isotope ratios of human hair have attracted interest as they potentially record an individual's environment. Yet, separating the external environmental signals from the internal dietary indicators has remained a challenge. Here, we examined the effects of five different hair-cleaning methodologies to determine the extent that internal and external strontium signals can be isolated from human hair. In the first study of its kind, we employed an in-line strontium purification methodology and a multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer to obtain high-precision strontium isotope ratio of human hair and of leachates of the different washing treatments. We found that the different applications of an individual treatment removed a consistent amount of strontium from hair and that replicate analyses showed each treatment altered the strontium isotope ratios of hair consistently. A mass-balance approach was applied to demonstrate that strontium was quantitatively removed and was accounted for in either the treated hair or the leachate. We observed that strontium isotope ratio varied as a function of treatment aggressiveness so as to suggest that there was a fine-scale structuring of strontium within hair (transverse cross-sectional variations); these variations existed as differences in strontium concentrations and isotope ratios. As a result, the Sr isotope ratio of hair and hair leachates treated with the most aggressive cleaning methods reflected the isotope ratios of the interior and total exterior strontium signatures, respectively. The results of this study indicate that external environmental strontium signals can be distinguished from the internal signals and therefore permit the application of strontium isotope ratios of modern human hair for geospatial applications.

  15. Preliminary results of oxygen isotope ratio measurement with a particle-gamma coincidence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borysiuk, Maciek; Kristiansson, Per; Ros, Linus; Abdel, Nassem S.; Elfman, Mikael; Nilsson, Charlotta; Pallon, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The possibility to study variations in the oxygen isotopic ratio with photon tagged nuclear reaction analysis (pNRA) is evaluated in the current work. The experiment described in the article was performed at Lund Ion Beam Analysis Facility (LIBAF) with a 2 MeV deuteron beam. Isotopic fractionation of light elements such as carbon, oxygen and nitrogen is the basis of many analytical tools in hydrology, geology, paleobiology and paleogeology. IBA methods provide one possible tool for measurement of isotopic content. During this experimental run we focused on measurement of the oxygen isotopic ratio. The measurement of stable isotopes of oxygen has a number of applications; the particular one driving the current investigation belongs to the field of astrogeology and specifically evaluation of fossil extraterrestrial material. There are three stable isotopes of oxygen: 16O, 17O and 18O. We procured samples highly enriched with all three isotopes. Isotopes 16O and 18O were easily detected in the enriched samples, but no significant signal from 17O was detected in the same samples. The measured yield was too low to detect 18O in a sample with natural abundances of oxygen isotopes, at least in the current experimental setup, but the spectral line from the reaction with 16O was clearly visible.

  16. Accuracy of delta 18O isotope ratio measurements on the same sample by continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The doubly labeled water method is considered the reference method to measure energy expenditure. Conventional mass spectrometry requires a separate aliquot of the same sample to be prepared and analyzed separately. With continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry, the same sample could be analy...

  17. Measurement of labile Cu in soil using stable isotope dilution and isotope ratio analysis by ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Annette L; Ma, Yibing; Lombi, Enzo; McLaughlin, Mike J

    2004-11-01

    Isotope dilution is a useful technique to measure the labile metal pool, which is the amount of metal in soil in rapid equilibrium (<7 days) with the soil solution. This is normally performed by equilibrating soil with a metal isotope, and sampling the labile metal pool by using an extraction (E value), or by growing plants (L value). For Cu, this procedure is problematic for E values, and impossible for L values, due to the short half-life of the 64Cu radioisotope (12.4 h), which makes access and handling very difficult. We therefore developed a technique using enriched 65Cu stable isotope and measurement of 63Cu/65Cu ratios by quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to measure labile pools of Cu in soils using E value techniques. Mass spectral interferences in detection of 63Cu/65Cu ratios in soil extracts were found to be minimal. Isotope ratios determined by quadrupole ICP-MS compared well to those determined by high-resolution (magnetic sector) ICP-MS. E values determined using the stable isotope technique compared well to those determined using the radioisotope for both uncontaminated and Cu-contaminated soils.

  18. Observations and sources of carbon and nitrogen isotope ratio variation of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN).

    PubMed

    Howa, John D; Lott, Michael J; Ehleringer, James R

    2014-11-01

    Isotope ratio analysis allows forensic investigators to discriminate materials that are chemically identical but differ in their isotope ratios. Here we focused on the discrimination of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), an explosive with military and civilian applications, using carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) isotope ratios. Our goal was to understand some of the factors influencing the isotope ratios of commercially manufactured PETN. PETN was isolated from bulk explosives using preparative HPLC, which reduced chemical and isotopic within-sample variability. We observed isotope ratio variation in a survey of 175 PETN samples from 22 manufacturing facilities, with δ(13)C values ranging from -49.7‰ to -28.0‰ and δ(15)N values ranging from -48.6‰ to +6.2‰. Both within-sample variability and variation of PETN within an explosive block were much smaller than between-sample variations. Isotopic ratios of PETN were shown to discriminate explosive blocks from the same manufacturer, whereas explosive component composition measurements by HPLC were not able to do so. Using samples collected from three industrial PETN manufacturers, we investigated the isotopic relationship between PETN and its reactants, pentaerythritol (PE) and nitric acid. Our observations showed that δ(13)C values of PETN were indistinguishable from that of the reactant pentaerythritol. Isotopic separation between nitric acid and PETN was consistent within each sampled manufacturer but differed among manufacturers, and was likely dependent upon reaction conditions. These data indicate that δ(13)C variation in PETN is dependent on δ(13)C variation of PE supplies, while δ(15)N variation in PETN is due to both nitric acid δ(15)N and reaction conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Sodium and Potassium Cyanide as a Forensic Signature

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; Horita, Juske; Moran, James J.; Tomkins, Bruce; Janszen, Derek B.; Carman, April J.

    2012-01-03

    Sodium and potassium cyanide are highly toxic, produced in large amounts by the chemical industry, and linked to numerous high-profile crimes. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified cyanide as one of the most probable agents to be used in a future chemical terrorism event. We investigated whether stable C and N isotopic content of sodium and potassium cyanide could serve as a forensic signature for sample matching, using a collection of 65 cyanide samples. A few of these samples displayed non-homogeneous isotopic content associated with degradation to a carbonate salt and loss of hydrogen cyanide. Most samples had highly reproducible isotope content. Of these, >95% could be properly matched based on C and N isotope ratios, with a false match rate <3%. These results suggest that stable C and N isotope ratios are a useful forensic signature for matching cyanide samples.

  20. Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Sodium and Potassium Cyanide as a Forensic Signature

    SciTech Connect

    Kruzer, Helen W; Horita, Juske; Moran, James J; Tomkins, Bruce A; Janszen, Derek B; Carman, April

    2012-01-01

    Sodium and potassium cyanide are highly toxic, produced in large amounts by the chemical industry, and linked to numerous high-profile crimes. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified cyanide as one of the most probable agents to be used in a future chemical terrorism event. We investigated whether stable C and N isotopic content of sodium and potassium cyanide could serve as a forensic signature for sample matching, using a collection of 65 cyanide samples. A few of these samples displayed non-homogeneous isotopic content associated with degradation to a carbonate salt and loss of hydrogen cyanide. Most samples had highly reproducible isotope content. Of these, >95% could be properly matched based on C and N isotope ratios, with a false match rate <3%. These results suggest that stable C and N isotope ratios are a useful forensic signature for matching cyanide samples.

  1. Ratios for light-element isotopes standardized for better interlaboratory comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coplen, T. B.; De Bièvre, P.; Krouse, H. R.; Vocke, R. D., Jr.; Gröning, M.; Rozanski, K.

    Stable isotope-ratio measurements of the light elements have been used in increasingly important ways to understand processes in geochemistry, hydrology, oceanography, atmospheric sciences, environmental studies, and many other fields. Progress in these fields requires better precision and reproducibility of stable isotope-ratio measurements. Some laboratories are claiming accuracies of 0.02‰ or better for δ13C and δ180. However, δ13C and δ180 analyses of the same sample by different laboratories can differ by more than 0.3‰. Recognizing that isotopic analyses of the same homogeneous material reported from different credible laboratories should yield the same isotopic composition within the uncertainty of the measurements, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held an Advisory Group Meeting on stable isotope reference and intercomparison materials for light elements in Vienna from December 11 to 14, 1995.

  2. Mare basalt genesis - Modeling trace elements and isotopic ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, A. B.

    1985-01-01

    Various types of mare basalt data have been synthesized, leading to the production of an internally consistent model of the mare basalt source region and mare basalt genesis. The model accounts for the mineralogical, major oxide, compatible siderophile trace element, incompatible trace element, and isotopic characteristics of most of the mare basalt units and of all the pyroclastic glass units for which reliable data are available. Initial tests of the model show that it also reproduces the mineralogy and incompatible trace element characteristics of the complementary highland anorthosite suite of rocks and, in a general way, those of the lunar granite suite of rocks.

  3. Implications of the Nitrogen Isotope Ratio in Titan's Atmosphere for the Nitrogen Ratio in Ammonia in Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandt, K.; Mousis, O.

    2013-12-01

    The D/H ratio of water measured in solar system bodies has been established as a tool for determining the conditions under which bodies such as comets or icy moons formed. This ratio varies significantly and indicates complex thermal and chemical evolution of the solar nebula during solar system and planetary formation. Nitrogen isotope ratios also vary significantly, and in some but not all cases correlate to D/H ratios, but are poorly understood. Nitrogen in the solar nebula was primarily in the form of atomic and molecular nitrogen. The isotope ratio (14N/15N) of this reservoir is expected to be ~435 based on the ratio measured in Jupiter's atmosphere, because the atmosphere of Jupiter is made up of gas captured from the solar nebula (Owen et al., 2001). The terrestrial atmospheric ratio is 272, which is close to the ratio measured in the Earth's mantle. This may be the primordial ratio for nitrogen delivered to Earth depending on the amount of exchange between the atmosphere and the mantle and any atmospheric fractionation processes that may have influenced the ratio over time. Comets are a possible source of nitrogen in the Earth's atmosphere (Hutsmekers et al., 2009), although chondrites have also been suggested as a source (Marty, 2012). In the case of comets, nitrogen would have been essentially retained in the form of ammonia (Mousis et al., 2012), which is the most abundant form of nitrogen in comets. The nitrogen in Titan's atmosphere is expected to have originated as ammonia hydrates and converted to N2 early in Titan's history (Atreya et al., 1978). The nitrogen ratio in Titan's atmosphere is ~170, which is significantly enriched in the heavy isotope compared to the terrestrial value. We will discuss the evolution of the nitrogen ratio in Titan's atmosphere (Mandt et al., 2009), the limits of the primordial ratio in ammonia, and the implications for this ratio for the isotope ratio in ammonia in comets that should be measured by the ROSINA instrument

  4. When other separation techniques fail: compound-specific carbon isotope ratio analysis of sulfonamide containing pharmaceuticals by high-temperature-liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kujawinski, Dorothea M; Zhang, Lijun; Schmidt, Torsten C; Jochmann, Maik A

    2012-09-18

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CISA) of nonvolatile analytes has been enabled by the introduction of the first commercial interface to hyphenate liquid chromatography with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (LC-IRMS) in 2004, yet carbon isotope analysis of unpolar and moderately polar compounds is still a challenging task since only water as the eluent and no organic modifiers can be used to drive the separation in LC. The only way to increase the elution strength of aqueous eluents in reversed phase LC is the application of high temperatures to the mobile and stationary phases (HT-LC-IRMS). In this context we present the first method to determine carbon isotope ratios of pharmaceuticals that cannot be separated by already existing separation techniques for LC-IRMS, such as reversed phase chromatography at normal temperatures, ion-chromatography, and mixed mode chomatography. The pharmaceutical group of sulfonamides, which is generally mixed with trimethoprim in pharmaceutical products, has been chosen as probe compounds. Substance amounts as low as 0.3 μg are sufficient to perform a precise analysis. The successful applicability and reproducibility of this method is shown by the analysis of real pharmaceutical samples. The method provides the first tool to study the pharmaceutical authenticity as well as degradation and mobility of such substances in the environment by using the stable isotopic signature of these compounds.

  5. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios in body water and hair: modeling isotope dynamics in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, Shannon P; Valenzuela, Luciano O; Remien, Christopher H; Enright, Lindsey E; Jorgensen, Matthew J; Kaplan, Jay R; Wagner, Janice D; Cerling, Thure E; Ehleringer, James R

    2012-07-01

    The stable isotopic composition of drinking water, diet, and atmospheric oxygen influence the isotopic composition of body water ((2)H/(1)H, (18)O/(16)O expressed as δ(2) H and δ(18)O). In turn, body water influences the isotopic composition of organic matter in tissues, such as hair and teeth, which are often used to reconstruct historical dietary and movement patterns of animals and humans. Here, we used a nonhuman primate system (Macaca fascicularis) to test the robustness of two different mechanistic stable isotope models: a model to predict the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of body water and a second model to predict the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of hair. In contrast to previous human-based studies, use of nonhuman primates fed controlled diets allowed us to further constrain model parameter values and evaluate model predictions. Both models reliably predicted the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of body water and of hair. Moreover, the isotope data allowed us to better quantify values for two critical variables in the models: the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of gut water and the (18)O isotope fractionation associated with a carbonyl oxygen-water interaction in the gut (α(ow)). Our modeling efforts indicated that better predictions for body water and hair isotope values were achieved by making the isotopic composition of gut water approached that of body water. Additionally, the value of α(ow) was 1.0164, in close agreement with the only other previously measured observation (microbial spore cell walls), suggesting robustness of this fractionation factor across different biological systems.

  6. Hydrogen and Oxygen Isotope Ratios in Body Water and Hair: Modeling Isotope Dynamics in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    O’Grady, Shannon P.; Valenzuela, Luciano O.; Remien, Christopher H.; Enright, Lindsey E.; Jorgensen, Matthew J.; Kaplan, Jay R.; Wagner, Janice D.; Cerling, Thure E.; Ehleringer, James R.

    2012-01-01

    The stable isotopic composition of drinking water, diet, and atmospheric oxygen influence the isotopic composition of body water (2H/1H, 18O/16O expressed as δ2H and δ18O). In turn, body water influences the isotopic composition of organic matter in tissues, such as hair and teeth, which are often used to reconstruct historical dietary and movement patterns of animals and humans. Here, we used a nonhuman primate system (Macaca fascicularis) to test the robustness of two different mechanistic stable isotope models: a model to predict the δ2H and δ18O values of body water and a second model to predict the δ2H and δ18O values of hair. In contrast to previous human-based studies, use of nonhuman primates fed controlled diets allowed us to further constrain model parameter values and evaluate model predictions. Both models reliably predicted the δ2H and δ18O values of body water and of hair. Moreover, the isotope data allowed us to better quantify values for two critical variables in the models: the δ2H and δ18O values of gut water and the 18O isotope fractionation associated with a carbonyl oxygen-water interaction in the gut (αow). Our modeling efforts indicated that better predictions for body water and hair isotope values were achieved by making the isotopic composition of gut water approached that of body water. Additionally, the value of αow was 1.0164, in close agreement with the only other previously measured observation (microbial spore cell walls), suggesting robustness of this fractionation factor across different biological systems. PMID:22553163

  7. Lead exposure in raptors from Japan and source identification using Pb stable isotope ratios.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Chihiro; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Nakata, Hokuto; Saito, Keisuke; Watanabe, Yukiko; Mizukawa, Hazuki; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Nomiyama, Kei; Hayashi, Terutake; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2017-11-01

    Lead (Pb) poisoning is widespread among raptors and water birds. In Japan, fragments of Pb ammunition are still found in endangered eagles although more than 10 years have passed since legislation regarding use of Pb ammunition was introduced. This study was performed to investigate Pb exposure in raptors from various locations in Japan. We measured hepatic and renal Pb concentrations and hepatic Pb isotope ratios of Steller's sea eagles (Haliaeetus pelagicus), white-tailed sea eagles (Haliaeetus albicilla), golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), and 13 other species (total 177 individuals) that were found dead, as well as blood samples from three eagles found in a weakened state during 1993-2015 from Hokkaido (northern part), Honshu (the main island), and Shikoku (a southern island) of Japan. In the present study in Hokkaido, one quarter of the sea eagles showed a high Pb concentration, suggesting exposure to abnormally high Pb levels and Pb poisoning. Pb isotope ratios indicated that endangered Steller's sea eagle and white-tailed sea eagle were poisoned by Pb ammunition that was used illegally in Hokkaido. In other areas of Japan, both surveillance and regulations were less extensive than in Hokkaido, but Pb poisoning in raptors was also noted. Therefore, Pb poisoning is still a serious problem in raptors in various areas of Japan due to accidental ingestion of materials containing Pb, especially Pb ammunition. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Are sulfur isotope ratios sufficient to determine the antiquity of sulfate reduction. [implications for chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashendorf, D.

    1980-01-01

    Possible limitations on the use of sulfur isotope ratios in sedimentary sulfides to infer the evolution of microbial sulfate reduction are discussed. Current knowledge of the ways in which stable sulfur isotope ratios are altered by chemical and biological processes is examined, with attention given to the marine sulfur cycle involving various microbial populations, and sulfur reduction processes, and it is noted that satisfactory explanations of sulfur isotope ratios observed in live organisms and in sediments are not yet available. It is furthermore pointed out that all members of the same genus of sulfate reducing bacteria do not always fractionate sulfur to the same extent, that the extent of sulfur fractionation by many sulfate-reducing organisms has not yet been determined, and that inorganic processes can also affect sulfur isotope fractionation values. The information currently available is thus concluded to be insufficient to determine the time of initial appearance of biological sulfate reduction.

  9. Isotope ratio analysis by HRGC-MS of monoterpene hydrocarbons from citrus essential oils.

    PubMed

    Satake, Atsushi; Une, Akitoshi; Ueno, Takao; Ukeda, Hiroyuki; Sawamura, Masayoshi

    2003-03-01

    The isotope ratio of monoterpene hydrocarbons in citrus essential oils of different origins was measured by ordinary high-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HRGC-MS). The isotope ratio (Ir) was determined by the ratio of the isotope peak intensity (m/z 137) to the molecular mass peak intensity (m/z 136) of the monoterpene hydrocarbons. The accuracy of Ir was examined by measuring monoterpene hydrocarbon standards and 13C-labeled compounds. The isotope fingerprints based on the values of monoterpene hydrocarbons from lemon, lime and yuzu essential oils were determined. These citrus essential oils were also discriminated by a principal component analysis of their Ir data. The characteristic vectors showed that alpha-terpinene, beta-pinene and beta-phellandrene were important components for distinguishing between the citrus species. It is suggested that this technique will be applicable to evaluate the quality, genuineness and origin of citrus fruits and their products.

  10. Bayesian Integration of Isotope Ratios for Geographic Sourcing of Castor Beans

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Hart, Garret L.; Ehleringer, James; West, Jason B.; Gill, Gary A.; Duckworth, Douglas C.

    2012-08-15

    Recent years have seen an increase in the forensic interest associated with the poison ricin, which is extracted from the seeds of the Ricinus communis plant. Both light element (C, N, O, and H) and strontium (Sr) isotope ratios have previously been used to associate organic material with geographic regions of origin. We present a Bayesian integration methodology that can more accurately predict the region of origin for a castor bean than individual models developed independently for light element stable isotopes or Sr isotope ratios. Our results demonstrate a clear improvement in the ability to correctly classify regions based on the integrated model with a class accuracy of 6 0 . 9 {+-} 2 . 1 % versus 5 5 . 9 {+-} 2 . 1 % and 4 0 . 2 {+-} 1 . 8 % for the light element and strontium (Sr) isotope ratios, respectively. In addition, we show graphically the strengths and weaknesses of each dataset in respect to class prediction and how the integration of these datasets strengthens the overall model.

  11. Are sulfur isotope ratios sufficient to determine the antiquity of sulfate reduction. [implications for chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashendorf, D.

    1980-01-01

    Possible limitations on the use of sulfur isotope ratios in sedimentary sulfides to infer the evolution of microbial sulfate reduction are discussed. Current knowledge of the ways in which stable sulfur isotope ratios are altered by chemical and biological processes is examined, with attention given to the marine sulfur cycle involving various microbial populations, and sulfur reduction processes, and it is noted that satisfactory explanations of sulfur isotope ratios observed in live organisms and in sediments are not yet available. It is furthermore pointed out that all members of the same genus of sulfate reducing bacteria do not always fractionate sulfur to the same extent, that the extent of sulfur fractionation by many sulfate-reducing organisms has not yet been determined, and that inorganic processes can also affect sulfur isotope fractionation values. The information currently available is thus concluded to be insufficient to determine the time of initial appearance of biological sulfate reduction.

  12. Evaluation of the 34S/32S ratio of Soufre de Lacq elemental sulfur isotopic reference material by continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, H.P.; Coplen, T.B.

    2003-01-01

    Soufre de Lacq elemental sulfur reference material (IAEA-S-4) isotopically is homogeneous in amounts as small as 41 ??g as determined by continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. The ??34S value for this reference material is +16.90 ?? 0.12??? (1??) on a scale (Vienna Can??on Diablo troilite, VCDT) where IAEA-S-1 Ag2S is -0.3??? and IAEA-S-2 Ag2S is +22.67???. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  13. Investigating controls on boron isotope ratios in shallow marine carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuang; Henehan, Michael J.; Hull, Pincelli M.; Reid, R. Pamela; Hardisty, Dalton S.; Hood, Ashleigh v. S.; Planavsky, Noah J.

    2017-01-01

    The boron isotope-pH proxy has been widely used to reconstruct past ocean pH values. In both planktic foraminifera and corals, species-specific calibrations are required in order to reconstruct absolute values of pH, due to the prevalence of so-called vital effects - physiological modification of the primary environmental signals by the calcifying organisms. Shallow marine abiotic carbonate (e.g. ooids and cements) could conceivably avoid any such calibration requirement, and therefore provide a potentially useful archive for reconstructions in deep (pre-Cenozoic) time. However, shallow marine abiotic carbonates could also be affected by local shifts in pH caused by microbial photosynthesis and respiration, something that has up to now not been fully tested. In this study, we present boron isotope measurements from shallow modern marine carbonates, from the Bahama Bank and Belize to investigate the potential of using shallow water carbonates as pH archives, and to explore the role of microbial processes in driving nominally 'abiogenic' carbonate deposition. For Bahama bank samples, our boron-based pH estimates derived from a range of carbonate types (i.e. ooids, peloids, hardground cements, carbonate mud, stromatolitic micrite and calcified filament micrite) are higher than the estimated modern mean-annual seawater pH values for this region. Furthermore, the majority (73%) of our marine carbonate-based pH estimates fall out of the range of the estimated pre-industrial seawater pH values for this region. In shallow sediment cores, we did not observe a correlation between measured pore water pH and boron-derived pH estimates, suggesting boron isotope variability is a depositional rather than early diagenetic signal. For Belize reef cements, conversely, the pH estimates are lower than likely in situ seawater pH at the time of cement formation. This study indicates the potential for complications when using shallow marine non-skeletal carbonates as marine pH archives

  14. Application of lead and strontium isotope ratio measurements for the origin assessment of uranium ore concentrates.

    PubMed

    Varga, Zsolt; Wallenius, Maria; Mayer, Klaus; Keegan, Elizabeth; Millet, Sylvain

    2009-10-15

    Lead and strontium isotope ratios were used for the origin assessment of uranium ore concentrates (yellow cakes) for nuclear forensic purposes. A simple and low-background sample preparation method was developed for the simultaneous separation of the analytes followed by the measurement of the isotope ratios by multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). The lead isotopic composition of the ore concentrates suggests applicability for the verification of the source of the nuclear material and by the use of the radiogenic (207)Pb/(206)Pb ratio the age of the raw ore material can be calculated. However, during data interpretation, the relatively high variation of the lead isotopic composition within the mine site and the generally high contribution of natural lead as technological contamination have to be carefully taken into account. The (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotope ratio is less prone to the variation within one mine site and less affected by the production process, thus it was found to be a more purposeful indicator for the origin assessment and source verification than the lead. The lead and strontium isotope ratios measured and the methodology developed provide information on the initial raw uranium ore used, and thus they can be used for source attribution of the uranium ore concentrates.

  15. Do Strontium Isotope Ratios of Animal Bone and Teeth Really Reflect the Isotope Ratios of its birth- and growth-places?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, M.; Goto, A.; Suzuki, K.; Kato, T.; Watanabe, K.; Hasegawa, T.

    2007-12-01

    Strontium enters the human body through the food chain as nutrients pass from bedrock through soil and water to plants and animals. Strontium substitutes for calcium in the hydroxyapatite mineral of skeletal tissue, and is stored there. 87Sr/86Sr ratios in an individual's bone and teeth could directly reflect the isotopic ratios found in the plants and animals that she or he consumed, which reflect the isotope ratios found in the soil and bedrock of that geologic region. Therefore, 87Sr/86Sr ratios of human skeletons could be useful tools for assessing human residential mobility in prehistory, and many studies on them have been often made. In this study, to evaluate whether the 87Sr/86Sr ratio of a bone or teeth really reflects the isotopic ratios of its birth and growth places, several bone and teeth samples were measured for 87Sr/86Sr ratios, compared with 87Sr/86Sr ratios of geological samples in their growth-places. Bone and teeth samples were leached with 5% acetic acid. After drying, samples were ashed in a muffle furnace at 825°C for 8h, and then digested in nitric acid, followed by cation exchange chromatography with 2.4M hydrochloric acid. 87Sr/86Sr ratios were measured using a thermal ionization mass Spectrometer (VG Sector 54) or an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (Finnigan ELEMENT2). A modern boar bone collected at Asuke, Toyota City, Aichi prefecture, Japan showed a 87Sr/86Sr of 0.71001±0.00002 (2 σ), while stream sediments in the Asuke area showed around 0.710 (Asahara et al., 2006). The 87Sr/86Sr ratio of a modern black bass bone collected from Lake Biwa, Shiga prefecture, Japan was 0.71215±0.00002, while those of surface water in Lake Biwa was 0.71233±0.00002. The similar 87Sr/86Sr ratios between bone and its provenance geology could indicate that the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of bones reflect the isotopic ratios of the birth- and growth-places. The more results of modern and fossil skeletons will be shown in our presentation.

  16. Seven Channel Multi-collector Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony D. Appelhans

    2008-07-01

    A new magnetic sector mass spectrometer that utilizes seven full-sized discrete dynode electron multipliers operating simultaneously has been designed, constructed and is in preliminary testing. The instrument utilizes a newly developed ion dispersion lens that enables the mass dispersed individual isotope beams to be separated sufficiently (35 mm) to allow a full-sized discrete dynode pulse counting multiplier to be used for each beam. The ion dispersion lens is a two element electrostatic 90 degree sector device that causes the beam-to-beam dispersion to increase faster than the intra-beam dispersion. Each multiplier is contained in an isolated case with a deflector/condenser lens at the entrance. A 9-sample filament cartridge is mounted on a micro-manipulator two-axis stage that enables adjustment of the filament position with 10 micron resolution within the ion lens. Results of initial testing with actinides will be presented.

  17. Sulphur isotope ratios in the Canyon Diablo metallic spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwing, C. E.; Rees, C. E.; Thode, H. G.

    1983-09-01

    Nininger (1956) has discovered metallic spheroids in the soil surrounding Meteor Crater in Arizona. Nininger suggested that the spheroids condensed from the center of a homogeneous explosion-produced metallic vapor cloud. The present investigation is concerned with measurements of sulfur contents and delta S-34 values of metallic spheroids from the vicinity of Meteor Crater. It is found that the small metallic spheroids have lower sulfur contents and higher delta S-34 values than do the large spheroids. It is concluded that the observed isotopic patterns are unlikely to have arisen during desulfurization of the metallic liquid from which the spheroids were formed or during high temperature oxidation or the spheroids. The most likely process for the production of the observed delta S-34 values and sulfur contents is low temperature oxidation reactions experienced by the spheroids during their surface exposure following formation.

  18. Intracellular metabolite levels shape sulfur isotope fractionation during microbial sulfate respiration

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Boswell A.; Halevy, Itay

    2014-01-01

    We present a quantitative model for sulfur isotope fractionation accompanying bacterial and archaeal dissimilatory sulfate respiration. By incorporating independently available biochemical data, the model can reproduce a large number of recent experimental fractionation measurements with only three free parameters: (i) the sulfur isotope selectivity of sulfate uptake into the cytoplasm, (ii) the ratio of reduced to oxidized electron carriers supporting the respiration pathway, and (iii) the ratio of in vitro to in vivo levels of respiratory enzyme activity. Fractionation is influenced by all steps in the dissimilatory pathway, which means that environmental sulfate and sulfide levels control sulfur isotope fractionation through the proximate influence of intracellular metabolites. Although sulfur isotope fractionation is a phenotypic trait that appears to be strain specific, we show that it converges on near-thermodynamic behavior, even at micromolar sulfate levels, as long as intracellular sulfate reduction rates are low enough (<<1 fmol H2S⋅cell−1⋅d−1). PMID:25362045

  19. Intracellular metabolite levels shape sulfur isotope fractionation during microbial sulfate respiration.

    PubMed

    Wing, Boswell A; Halevy, Itay

    2014-12-23

    We present a quantitative model for sulfur isotope fractionation accompanying bacterial and archaeal dissimilatory sulfate respiration. By incorporating independently available biochemical data, the model can reproduce a large number of recent experimental fractionation measurements with only three free parameters: (i) the sulfur isotope selectivity of sulfate uptake into the cytoplasm, (ii) the ratio of reduced to oxidized electron carriers supporting the respiration pathway, and (iii) the ratio of in vitro to in vivo levels of respiratory enzyme activity. Fractionation is influenced by all steps in the dissimilatory pathway, which means that environmental sulfate and sulfide levels control sulfur isotope fractionation through the proximate influence of intracellular metabolites. Although sulfur isotope fractionation is a phenotypic trait that appears to be strain specific, we show that it converges on near-thermodynamic behavior, even at micromolar sulfate levels, as long as intracellular sulfate reduction rates are low enough (<1 fmol H2S⋅cell(-1)⋅d(-1)).

  20. Intracellular metabolite levels shape sulfur isotope fractionation during microbial sulfate respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, Boswell A.; Halevy, Itay

    2014-12-01

    We present a quantitative model for sulfur isotope fractionation accompanying bacterial and archaeal dissimilatory sulfate respiration. By incorporating independently available biochemical data, the model can reproduce a large number of recent experimental fractionation measurements with only three free parameters: (i) the sulfur isotope selectivity of sulfate uptake into the cytoplasm, (ii) the ratio of reduced to oxidized electron carriers supporting the respiration pathway, and (iii) the ratio of in vitro to in vivo levels of respiratory enzyme activity. Fractionation is influenced by all steps in the dissimilatory pathway, which means that environmental sulfate and sulfide levels control sulfur isotope fractionation through the proximate influence of intracellular metabolites. Although sulfur isotope fractionation is a phenotypic trait that appears to be strain specific, we show that it converges on near-thermodynamic behavior, even at micromolar sulfate levels, as long as intracellular sulfate reduction rates are low enough (<<1 fmol H2Sṡcell-1ṡd-1).

  1. Atmospheric helium isotope ratio: Possible temporal and spatial variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yuji; Furukawa, Yukiko; Takahata, Naoto

    2010-09-01

    The atmospheric 3He/ 4He ratio has been considered to be constant on a global scale, because the residence time of helium is significantly longer than the mixing time in the atmosphere. However, this ratio may be decreasing with time owing to the anthropogenic release of crustal helium from oil and natural gas wells, although this observation has been disputed. Here, we present the 3He/ 4He ratios of old air trapped in historical slags in Japan and of modern surface air samples collected at various sites around the world, measured with a newly developed analytical system. In air helium extracted from metallurgical slag found at refineries in operation between AD 1603 and 1907 in Japan, we determined a mean 3He/ 4He ratio of (5106 ± 108) × 10 -5 R HESJ (where R HESJ is the 3He/ 4He ratio of the Helium Standard of Japan), which is consistent with the previously reported value of (5077 ± 59) × 10 -5 R HESJ for historical slags in France and United Arab Emirates and about 4% higher than that of average modern air, (4901 ± 4) × 10 -5 R HESJ. This result implies that the air 3He/ 4He ratio has decreased with time as expected by anthropogenic causes. Our modern surface air samples revealed that the 3He/ 4He ratio increases from north to south at a rate of (0.16 ± 0.08) × 10 -5 R HESJ/degree of latitude, suggesting that the low 3He/ 4He ratio originates in high-latitude regions of the northern hemisphere, which is consistent with the fact that most fossil fuel is extracted and consumed in the northern hemisphere.

  2. D/H Isotope Ratio Measurements of Atmospheric Volatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisehen, Thomas; Bühler, Fred; Koppmann, Ralf; Krebsbach, Marc

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of isotope ratios in atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOC) is a reliable method to allocate their sources, to estimate atmospheric residence times and investigate physical and chemical processes on various temporal and spatial scales. Most investigations yet focus on carbon isotope ratios. Certainly more detailed information can be gained by the ratio of deuterium (D) to hydrogen (H) in VOC, especially due to the high mass ratio. Combining measurements of carbon and hydrogen isotopes could lead to considerable improvement in our understanding of atmospheric processes. For this purpose we set up and thoroughly characterised a gas chromatograph pyrolysis isotope ratio mass spectrometer to measure the D/H ratio in atmospheric VOC. From a custom-made gas standard mixture VOC were adsorbed on Tenax®TA which has the advantage that CO2 is not preconcentrated when measuring ambient air samples. Our results show that the pyrolysis method has significant impact on the D/H ratios. A pyrolysis temperature of at least 1723 K and conditioning of the ceramic tube on a regular basis is essential to obtain reproducible D/H isotope ratios. For an independent comparison D/H ratios of the pure VOC used in the gas standard were determined using elemental analysis by Agroisolab (Jülich, Germany). Comparisons of 10 VOC show perfect agreement within the standard deviations of our measurements and the errors given by Agroisolab, e.g. for n-pentane, toluene, 4-methyl-2-pentanone and n-octane. A slight mean difference of 5.1 o was obtained for n-heptane while significant mean differences of 15.5 o and 20.3 o arose for 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene and isoprene, respectively. We further demonstrate the stability of our system and show that the sample preparation does not affect the isotope ratios. Moreover the applicability of our system to ambient air samples is demonstrated.

  3. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios in human hair are related to geography

    PubMed Central

    Ehleringer, James R.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; West, Adam G.; Podlesak, David W.; Cerling, Thure E.

    2008-01-01

    We develop and test a model to predict the geographic region-of-origin of humans based on the stable isotope composition of their scalp hair. This model incorporates exchangeable and nonexchangeable hydrogen and oxygen atoms in amino acids to predict the δ2H and δ18O values of scalp hair (primarily keratin). We evaluated model predictions with stable isotope analyses of human hair from 65 cities across the United States. The model, which predicts hair isotopic composition as a function of drinking water, bulk diet, and dietary protein isotope ratios, explains >85% of the observed variation and reproduces the observed slopes relating the isotopic composition of hair samples to that of local drinking water. Based on the geographical distributions of the isotope ratios of tap waters and the assumption of a “continental supermarket” dietary input, we constructed maps of the expected average H and O isotope ratios in human hair across the contiguous 48 states. Applications of this model and these observations are extensive and include detection of dietary information, reconstruction of historic movements of individuals, and provision of region-of-origin information for unidentified human remains. PMID:18299562

  4. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios in human hair are related to geography.

    PubMed

    Ehleringer, James R; Bowen, Gabriel J; Chesson, Lesley A; West, Adam G; Podlesak, David W; Cerling, Thure E

    2008-02-26

    We develop and test a model to predict the geographic region-of-origin of humans based on the stable isotope composition of their scalp hair. This model incorporates exchangeable and nonexchangeable hydrogen and oxygen atoms in amino acids to predict the delta(2)H and delta(18)O values of scalp hair (primarily keratin). We evaluated model predictions with stable isotope analyses of human hair from 65 cities across the United States. The model, which predicts hair isotopic composition as a function of drinking water, bulk diet, and dietary protein isotope ratios, explains >85% of the observed variation and reproduces the observed slopes relating the isotopic composition of hair samples to that of local drinking water. Based on the geographical distributions of the isotope ratios of tap waters and the assumption of a "continental supermarket" dietary input, we constructed maps of the expected average H and O isotope ratios in human hair across the contiguous 48 states. Applications of this model and these observations are extensive and include detection of dietary information, reconstruction of historic movements of individuals, and provision of region-of-origin information for unidentified human remains.

  5. Silicon isotope ratio measurements by inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry for alteration studies of nuclear waste glasses.

    PubMed

    Gourgiotis, Alkiviadis; Ducasse, Thomas; Barker, Evelyne; Jollivet, Patrick; Gin, Stéphane; Bassot, Sylvain; Cazala, Charlotte

    2017-02-15

    High-level, long-lived nuclear waste arising from spent fuel reprocessing is vitrified in silicate glasses for final disposal in deep geologic formations. In order to better understand the mechanisms driving glass dissolution, glass alteration studies, based on silicon isotope ratio monitoring of (29)Si-doped aqueous solutions, were carried out in laboratories. This work explores the capabilities of the new type of quadrupole-based ICP-MS, the Agilent 8800 tandem quadrupole ICP-MS/MS, for accurate silicon isotope ratio determination for alteration studies of nuclear waste glasses. In order to avoid silicon polyatomic interferences, a new analytical method was developed using O2 as the reaction gas in the Octopole Reaction System (ORS), and silicon isotopes were measured in mass-shift mode. A careful analysis of the potential polyatomic interferences on SiO(+) and SiO2(+) ion species was performed, and we found that SiO(+) ion species suffer from important polyatomic interferences coming from the matrix of sample and standard solutions (0.5M HNO3). For SiO2(+), no interferences were detected, and thus, these ion species were chosen for silicon isotope ratio determination. A number of key settings for accurate isotope ratio analysis like, detector dead time, integration time, number of sweeps, wait time offset, memory blank and instrumental mass fractionation, were considered and optimized. Particular attention was paid to the optimization of abundance sensitivity of the quadrupole mass filter before the ORS. We showed that poor abundance sensitivity leads to a significant shift of the data away from the Exponential Mass Fractionation Law (EMFL) due to the spectral overlaps of silicon isotopes combined with different oxygen isotopes (i.e. (28)Si(16)O(18)O(+), (30)Si(16)O(16)O(+)). The developed method was validated by measuring a series of reference solutions with different (29)Si enrichment. Isotope ratio trueness, uncertainty and repeatability were found to be <0

  6. Final report of the key comparison CCQM-K98: Pb isotope amount ratios in bronze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogl, Jochen; Yim, Yong-Hyeon; Lee, Kyoung-Seok; Goenaga-Infante, Heidi; Malinowskiy, Dmitriy; Ren, Tongxiang; Wang, Jun; Vocke, Robert D., Jr.; Murphy, Karen; Nonose, Naoko; Rienitz, Olaf; Noordmann, Janine; Näykki, Teemu; Sara-Aho, Timo; Ari, Betül; Cankur, Oktay

    2014-01-01

    Isotope amount ratios are proving useful in an ever increasing array of applications that range from studies unravelling transport processes, to pinpointing the provenance of specific samples as well as trace element quantification by using isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). These expanding applications encompass fields as diverse as archaeology, food chemistry, forensic science, geochemistry, medicine and metrology. However, to be effective tools, the isotope ratio data must be reliable and traceable to enable the comparability of measurement results. The importance of traceability and comparability in isotope ratio analysis has already been recognized by the Inorganic Analysis Working Group (IAWG) within the CCQM. While the requirements for isotope ratio accuracy and precision in the case of IDMS are generally quite modest, 'absolute' Pb isotope ratio measurements for geochemical applications as well as forensic provenance studies require Pb isotope ratio measurements of the highest quality. To support present and future CMCs on isotope ratio determinations, a key comparison was urgently needed and therefore initiated at the IAWG meeting in Paris in April 2011. The analytical task within such a comparison was decided to be the measurement of Pb isotope amount ratios in water and bronze. Measuring Pb isotope amount ratios in an aqueous Pb solution tested the ability of analysts to correct for any instrumental effects on the measured ratios, while the measurement of Pb isotope amount ratios in a metal matrix sample provided a real world test of the whole chemical and instrumental procedure. A suitable bronze material with a Pb mass fraction between 10 and 100 mg•kg-1 and a high purity solution of Pb with a mass fraction of approximately 100 mg•kg-1 was available at the pilot laboratory (BAM), both offering a natural-like Pb isotopic composition. The mandatory measurands, the isotope amount ratios n(206Pb)/n(204Pb), n(207Pb)/n(204Pb) and n(208Pb)/n(204Pb

  7. Direct uranium isotope ratio analysis of single micrometer-sized glass particles

    PubMed Central

    Kappel, Stefanie; Boulyga, Sergei F.; Prohaska, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present the application of nanosecond laser ablation (LA) coupled to a ‘Nu Plasma HR’ multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) for the direct analysis of U isotope ratios in single, 10–20 μm-sized, U-doped glass particles. Method development included studies with respect to (1) external correction of the measured U isotope ratios in glass particles, (2) the applied laser ablation carrier gas (i.e. Ar versus He) and (3) the accurate determination of lower abundant 236U/238U isotope ratios (i.e. 10−5). In addition, a data processing procedure was developed for evaluation of transient signals, which is of potential use for routine application of the developed method. We demonstrate that the developed method is reliable and well suited for determining U isotope ratios of individual particles. Analyses of twenty-eight S1 glass particles, measured under optimized conditions, yielded average biases of less than 0.6% from the certified values for 234U/238U and 235U/238U ratios. Experimental results obtained for 236U/238U isotope ratios deviated by less than −2.5% from the certified values. Expanded relative total combined standard uncertainties Uc (k = 2) of 2.6%, 1.4% and 5.8% were calculated for 234U/238U, 235U/238U and 236U/238U, respectively. PMID:22595724

  8. Direct uranium isotope ratio analysis of single micrometer-sized glass particles.

    PubMed

    Kappel, Stefanie; Boulyga, Sergei F; Prohaska, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    We present the application of nanosecond laser ablation (LA) coupled to a 'Nu Plasma HR' multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) for the direct analysis of U isotope ratios in single, 10-20 μm-sized, U-doped glass particles. Method development included studies with respect to (1) external correction of the measured U isotope ratios in glass particles, (2) the applied laser ablation carrier gas (i.e. Ar versus He) and (3) the accurate determination of lower abundant (236)U/(238)U isotope ratios (i.e. 10(-5)). In addition, a data processing procedure was developed for evaluation of transient signals, which is of potential use for routine application of the developed method. We demonstrate that the developed method is reliable and well suited for determining U isotope ratios of individual particles. Analyses of twenty-eight S1 glass particles, measured under optimized conditions, yielded average biases of less than 0.6% from the certified values for (234)U/(238)U and (235)U/(238)U ratios. Experimental results obtained for (236)U/(238)U isotope ratios deviated by less than -2.5% from the certified values. Expanded relative total combined standard uncertainties U(c) (k = 2) of 2.6%, 1.4% and 5.8% were calculated for (234)U/(238)U, (235)U/(238)U and (236)U/(238)U, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Isotopic ratios at z = 0.68 from molecular absorption lines toward B 0218+357

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallström, S. H. J.; Muller, S.; Guélin, M.

    2016-11-01

    Isotopic ratios of heavy elements are a key signature of the nucleosynthesis processes in stellar interiors. The contribution of successive generations of stars to the metal enrichment of the Universe is imprinted on the evolution of isotopic ratios over time. We investigate the isotopic ratios of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur through millimeter molecular absorption lines arising in the z = 0.68 absorber toward the blazar B 0218+357. We find that these ratios differ from those observed in the Galactic interstellar medium, but are remarkably close to those in the only other source at intermediate redshift for which isotopic ratios have been measured to date, the z = 0.89 absorber in front of PKS 1830-211. The isotopic ratios in these two absorbers should reflect enrichment mostly from massive stars, and they are indeed close to the values observed toward local starburst galaxies. Our measurements set constraints on nucleosynthesis and chemical evolution models. The reduced spectra are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/595/A96

  10. Unusually low carbon isotope ratios in plants from hanging gardens in southern Utah.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Lawrence B; Cook, Craig S; Ehleringer, James R

    1997-08-01

    Leaf carbon isotope ratios (δ(13)C) and photosynthetic gas exchange were measured on plants growing in hanging garden communities in southern Utah, USA. Hanging gardens are unusual, mesic cliff communities occurring where water seeps from the sandstone bedrock in an otherwise extremely arid region; there is very limited overlap in species distributions inside and outside these gardens. Solar exposure in hanging gardens varied with orientation and one of the gardens (Ribbon Garden) was shaded throughout the day. The leaf δ(13)C values of plants in hanging gardens were significantly more negative than for plants from either nearby ephemeral wash or riparian communities. In Ribbon Garden, the observed δ(13)C values were as low as -34.8‰, placing them among the most negative values reported for any terrestrial plant species growing in a natural environment. Hanging garden plants were exposed to normal atmospheric CO2 with an average δ(13)C value of -7.9‰ and so the low leaf δ(13)C values could not be attributed to exposure to a CO2 source with low (13)C content. There was a seasonal change toward more negative leaf δ(13)C values at the end of the growing season. The observed leaf δ(13)C values were consistent with photosynthetic gas exchange measurements that indicated unusually high leaf intercellular CO2 concentrations associated with the relatively low light levels in hanging gardens. Thus, extremely negative leaf δ(13)C values would be expected if significant amounts of the seasonal carbon gain occur at light levels low enough to be near the light compensation point. Maximum observed photosynthetic rates varied with light levels at each of the gardens, with maximum rates averaging 20.3, 14.6, and 3.1 μmol m(-2 )s(-1) at Double Garden, Lost Garden, and Ribbon Garden, respectively. Leaf nitrogen contents averaged 18.5 mg g(-1) in species from the more shaded hanging gardens (Lost and Ribbon). When expressed on a leaf area basis, nitrogen contents

  11. A Plant-Based Proxy for the Oxygen Isotope Ratio of Atmospheric Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helliker, B.

    2007-12-01

    Atmospheric water vapor is a major component of the global hydrological cycle, but the isotopic balance of vapor is largely unknown. It is shown here that the oxygen isotope ratio of leaf water in the epiphytic Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant Tillandsia usneoides (Spanish Moss) is controlled by the oxygen isotope ratio of atmospheric water vapor in both field and lab studies. Assuming that the leaf-water isotopic signature (and hence the atmospheric water vapor signature) is recorded in plant organic material, the atmospheric water vapor oxygen isotope ratios for Miami, Florida (USA) were reconstructed for several years from 1878 to 2005 using contemporary and herbarium specimens. T. usneoides ranges from Virginia, USA southwards through the tropics to Argentina, and the CAM epiphytic lifeform is widespread in other species. Therefore, epiphytes may be used to reconstruct the isotope ratio of atmospheric water for spatial scales that span over 60° of latitude and temporal scales that cover the last century of global temperature increase.

  12. Global spatial distributions of nitrogen and carbon stable isotope ratios of modern human hair.

    PubMed

    Hülsemann, Frank; Lehn, Christine; Schneider, Sabine; Jackson, Glen; Hill, Sarah; Rossmann, Andreas; Scheid, Nicole; Dunn, Philip J H; Flenker, Ulrich; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2015-11-30

    Natural stable carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen isotope ratios (δ(15)N) of humans are related to individual dietary habits and environmental and physiological factors. In forensic science the stable isotope ratios of human remains such as hair and nail are used for geographical allocation. Thus, knowledge of the global spatial distribution of human δ(13)C and δ(15)N values is an essential component in the interpretation of stable isotope analytical results. No substantial global datasets of human stable isotope ratios are currently available, although the amount of available (published) data has increased within recent years. We have herein summarised the published data on human global δ(13)C andδ(15)N values (around 3600 samples) and added experimental values of more than 400 additional worldwide human hair and nail samples. In order to summarise isotope ratios for hair and nail samples correction factors were determined. The current available dataset of human stable isotope ratios is biased towards Europe and North America with only limited data for countries in Africa, Central and South America and Southeast Asia. The global spatial distribution of carbon isotopes is related to latitude and supports the fact that human δ(13)C values are dominated by the amount of C4 plants in the diet, either due to direct ingestion as plant food, or by its use as animal feed. In contrast, the global spatial distribution of human δ(15)N values is apparently not exclusively related to the amount of fish or meat ingested, but also to environmental factors that influence agricultural production. There are still a large proportion of countries, especially in Africa, where there are no available data for human carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios. Although the interpretation of modern human carbon isotope ratios at the global scale is quite possible, and correlates with the latitude, the potential influences of extrinsic and/or intrinsic factors on human nitrogen isotope ratios

  13. Guidelines and recommended terms for expression of stable-isotope-ratio and gas-ratio measurement results.

    PubMed

    Coplen, Tyler B

    2011-09-15

    To minimize confusion in the expression of measurement results of stable isotope and gas-ratio measurements, recommendations based on publications of the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) are presented. Whenever feasible, entries are consistent with the Système International d'Unités, the SI (known in English as the International System of Units), and the third edition of the International Vocabulary of Basic and General Terms in Metrology (VIM, 3rd edition). The recommendations presented herein are approved by the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights and are designed to clarify expression of quantities related to measurement of isotope and gas ratios to ensure that quantity equations instead of numerical value equations are used for quantity definitions. Examples of column headings consistent with quantity calculus (also called the algebra of quantities) and examples of various deprecated usages connected with the terms recommended are presented. Published in 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Relation between hydrogen isotopic ratios of bone collagen and rain

    SciTech Connect

    Cormie, A.B.; Schwarcz, H.P. ); Gray, J. )

    1994-01-01

    The hydrogen isotopic value ([delta]D) of deer bone collagen is related to both [delta]D of rain during the growing season and growing season relative humidity (RH). With correction for the effects of RH, bone [delta]D is related to growing season rain [delta]D in a simple manner with a slope of 1.0. This indicates that, with RH correction, there are no additional sources of bias in the [delta]D of bone due to unaccounted for biologic or climatic effects. Due to a low sensitivity of bone [delta]D to RH effects, both yearly and growing season rain [delta]D can be estimated with considerable accuracy (R = 0.97 and R = 0.96) from bone collagen [delta]D and [delta][sup 15]N. Here, [delta][sup 15]N is used to correct bone [delta]D for the effects of RH. From these estimates of rain [delta]D, it may then be possible to evaluate temperature since the [delta]D of rain primarily reflects local temperature. Therefore, the measurement of bone collagen [delta]D has good potential for evaluating paleoclimates.

  15. Analysis of the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios of beverage waters without prior water extraction using isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chesson, Lesley A; Bowen, Gabriel J; Ehleringer, James R

    2010-11-15

    Hydrogen (δ(2)H) and oxygen (δ(18)O) stable isotope analysis is useful when tracing the origin of water in beverages, but traditional analytical techniques are limited to pure or extracted waters. We measured the isotopic composition of extracted beverage water using both isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS; specifically, wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We also analyzed beer, sodas, juices, and milk 'as is' using IRIS. For IRIS analysis, four sequential injections of each sample were measured and data were corrected for sample-to-sample memory using injections (a) 1-4, (b) 2-4, and (c) 3-4. The variation between δ(2)H and δ(18)O values calculated using the three correction methods was larger for unextracted (i.e., complex) beverages than for waters. The memory correction was smallest when using injections 3-4. Beverage water δ(2)H and δ(18)O values generally fit the Global Meteoric Water Line, with the exception of water from fruit juices. The beverage water stable isotope ratios measured using IRIS agreed well with the IRMS data and fit 1:1 lines, with the exception of sodas and juices (δ(2)H values) and beers (δ(18)O values). The δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of waters extracted from beer, soda, juice, and milk were correlated with complex beverage δ(2)H and δ(18)O values (r = 0.998 and 0.997, respectively) and generally fit 1:1 lines. We conclude that it is possible to analyze complex beverages, without water extraction, using IRIS although caution is needed when analyzing beverages containing sugars, which can clog the syringe and increase memory, or alcohol, a known spectral interference. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Application of stable isotope ratio analysis for biodegradation monitoring in groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatzinger, Paul B.; Böhlke, John Karl; Sturchio, Neil C.

    2013-01-01

    Stable isotope ratio analysis is increasingly being applied as a tool to detect, understand, and quantify biodegradation of organic and inorganic contaminants in groundwater. An important feature of this approach is that it allows degradative losses of contaminants to be distinguished from those caused by non-destructive processes such as dilution, dispersion, and sorption. Recent advances in analytical techniques, and new approaches for interpreting stable isotope data, have expanded the utility of this method while also exposing complications and ambiguities that must be considered in data interpretations. Isotopic analyses of multiple elements in a compound, and multiple compounds in the environment, are being used to distinguish biodegradative pathways by their characteristic isotope effects. Numerical models of contaminant transport, degradation pathways, and isotopic composition are improving quantitative estimates of in situ contaminant degradation rates under realistic environmental conditions.

  17. STABLE ISOTOPE RATIOS IN ARCHIVED STRIPED BASS SCALES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years fishermen and scientists have noted that striped bass caught along the East Coast of the United States have reduced weight to length ratios with many of the fish caught in Chesapeake Bay exhibiting skin lesions. Several theories have been suggested to explain thes...

  18. A hydrogen gas-water equilibration method produces accurate and precise stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements in nutrition studies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stable hydrogen isotope methodology is used in nutrition studies to measure growth, breast milk intake, and energy requirement. Isotope ratio MS is the best instrumentation to measure the stable hydrogen isotope ratios in physiological fluids. Conventional methods to convert physiological fluids to ...

  19. Calculation of equilibrium stable isotope partition function ratios for aqueous zinc complexes and metallic zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Jay R.; Kavner, Abby; Schauble, Edwin A.

    2011-02-01

    The goal of this study is to determine reduced partition function ratios for a variety of species of zinc, both as a metal and in aqueous solutions in order to calculate equilibrium stable isotope partitioning. We present calculations of the magnitude of Zn stable-isotope fractionation ( 66,67,68Zn/ 64Zn) between aqueous species and metallic zinc using measured vibrational spectra (fit from neutron scattering studies of metallic zinc) and a variety of electronic structure models. The results show that the reduced metal, Zn(0), will be light in equilibrium with oxidized Zn(II) aqueous species, with the best estimates for the Zn(II)-Zn(0) fractionation between hexaquo species and metallic zinc being Δ 66/64Zn aq-metal ˜ 1.6‰ at 25 °C, and Δ 66/64Zn aq-metal ˜ 0.8‰ between the tetrachloro zinc complex and metallic zinc at 25 °C using B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory and basis set. To examine the behavior of zinc in various aqueous solution chemistries, models for Zn(II) complex speciation were used to determine which species are thermodynamically favorable and abundant under a variety of different conditions relevant to natural waters, experimental and industrial solutions. The optimal molecular geometries for [Zn(H 2O) 6] 2+, [Zn(H 2O) 6]·SO 4, [ZnCl 4] 2- and [Zn(H 2O) 3(C 3H 5O(COO) 3)] - complexes in various states of solvation, protonation and coordination were calculated at various levels of electronic structure theory and basis set size. Isotopic reduced partition function ratios were calculated from frequency analyses of these optimized structures. Increasing the basis set size typically led to a decrease in the calculated reduced partition function ratios of ˜0.5‰ with values approaching a plateau using the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set or larger. The widest range of species were studied at the B3LYP/LAN2DZ/6-31G ∗ level of theory and basis-set size for comparison. Aqueous zinc complexes where oxygen is bound to the metal center tended to have the

  20. Determination of carbon isotopic measurement conditions for ceramide in skin using gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Keita; Miyashita, Rumiko; Aida, Kazuhiko; Ohnishi, Masao; Gilbert, Alexis; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2014-01-01

    The ceramide (Cer) content of skin and glucosylceramide (GlcCer) intake affect skin moisture conditions, but their mutual relation in skin remains unclear. For clarification of that mutual relation, carbon stable isotopes ((12)C and (13)C) are useful as a tracer. However, carbon isotopic measurement has not been applied to the study of clarifying their skin moisturizing effects. Therefore, we used gas chromatography / combustion / isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) to ascertain the appropriate conditions for carbon isotopic measurements using synthesized Cer (SCer) in substitution for very low concentrations of Cer in skin. SCer was derivatized to trimethylsilylated SCer (TMS-SCer) quantitatively using N-trimethylsilylimidazole (TMSI) depending on the amount of SCer. The derivatization rates were 75-85%. Excess TMSI was removed using three cycles of hexane-water distribution. Under these conditions, carbon isotopic measurements of TMS-SCer conducted using GC-C-IRMS showed high repeatability and good inter-day variation (S.D. < 0.3‰). The carbon stable isotope ratio value (δ(13)C) of SCer calculated using a mass balance equation was compared with δ(13)C of underivatized SCer, which was regarded as the actual δ(13)C of SCer obtained using sealed tube combustion method. The difference between the calculated δ(13)C of SCer and δ(13)C of the underivatized SCer depended on the TMSI reagent supplier and on the number of hydroxyl groups to be derivatized in SCer. For accurate δ(13)C of Cer in skin using GC-C-IRMS, the measured δ(13)C of a target TMS-Cer must be calculated using a correction factor representing the difference in δ(13)C of underivatized standard SCer from that of TMS-standard SCer having a structure resembling that of the target Cer in skin. In addition, we show that the same lot of TMSI reagent from a specific supplier must be used throughout the experiments.

  1. The influence of mixing on stable isotope ratios in porous media: A revised Rayleigh model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druhan, Jennifer L.; Maher, Kate

    2017-02-01

    For an irreversible reaction, the Rayleigh or distillation-type relationship between stable isotope enrichment and reactant concentration is compromised if fluid samples are characterized by a range of water ages or different extents of reaction progress. Such mixed samples are rarely avoided in the standard methods of sampling fluid from natural porous media. As a result, application of a Rayleigh model to stable isotope ratios measured in aquifers commonly requires a diminished or effective fractionation factor relative to the intrinsic value obtained in the absence of transport effects. Thus, quantitative application of intrinsic parameter values to a fractionating reaction occurring in porous media flow requires revision to the functional form of the relationship between reactant concentration and isotope fractionation. Here we derive a series of analytical solutions for the relationship between fractionation and flow subject to nonuniform fluid travel time distributions. These solutions are unique from previous approaches in that they avoid the use of a dispersion coefficient. The results are demonstrated against multicomponent reactive transport simulations of stable isotope fractionation in homogeneous and spatially correlated heterogeneous flow fields, and applied to a data set of stable chromium (Cr) isotope enrichment obtained from a contaminated aquifer. We show that the flux-weighted isotope ratio of a solute is more sensitive to the effects of physical heterogeneity than solute concentrations. Our results support an updated functional form of the traditional Rayleigh model that describes the relationship between reactant concentration and isotope fractionation and is valid for a mixed-fluid sample.

  2. Elemental concentrations and inorganic isotopic ratios in surface snow along the route to Dome Fuji, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, M.; Nakazawa, F.; Azuma, K. G.; Motoyama, H.

    2015-12-01

    Snow ice sample in Antarctica contains particulate matter. Particulates originate from continent, volcano, sea, space, and organism. The particulate matter of continental origin contains many elements from minerals and rocks. The isotopic ratio of an element reflects the origin and the history of the particle. Since the isotopic ratio of inorganic species depends on the source, the information about the source contribution of particulate matter can be estimated by analyzing the isotopic ratios of inorganic species. In this research, concentrations of inorganic species and isotopic ratios of inorganic species (Ca, Sr, Nd) in snow collected on the route form coastal area to Dome Fuji station in Antarctica were analyzed. The snow samples were collected along ca. 1000 km traverse route from Mikaeridai (S16; 69°01'S, 40°03'E, 590 m) to Dome Fuji station (77°19'S, 39°42'E, 3810 m) by the Japan Antarctica research expedition. Those samples were collected in the 2007/2008 and 2009/2010 austral summer. The samples were transported to Japan without thawing. The quantitative analyses of inorganic species were measured using ICP quadrupole type mass spectrometer. The isotopic ratios of isolated inorganic species were measured using ICP magnetic field type mass spectrometer. Further results and discussion about the behavior and origin of sulfur species in snow will be presented.

  3. Isotope ratio analysis of individual sub-micrometer plutonium particles with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Magara, Masaaki; Suzuki, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Yutaka; Lee, Chi-Gyu; Kimura, Takaumi

    2010-12-15

    Information on plutonium isotope ratios in individual particles is of great importance for nuclear safeguards, nuclear forensics and so on. Although secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is successfully utilized for the analysis of individual uranium particles, the isobaric interference of americium-241 to plutonium-241 makes difficult to obtain accurate isotope ratios in individual plutonium particles. In the present work, an analytical technique by a combination of chemical separation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is developed and applied to isotope ratio analysis of individual sub-micrometer plutonium particles. The ICP-MS results for individual plutonium particles prepared from a standard reference material (NBL SRM-947) indicate that the use of a desolvation system for sample introduction improves the precision of isotope ratios. In addition, the accuracy of the (241)Pu/(239)Pu isotope ratio is much improved, owing to the chemical separation of plutonium and americium. In conclusion, the performance of the proposed ICP-MS technique is sufficient for the analysis of individual plutonium particles.

  4. Diffusion as a Rate Limiting Factor on the Evolution of Strontium Isotope Ratios in Fractured Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, E. G.; Holt, R. M.; McLing, T. L.

    2002-12-01

    In recent years, several approaches have been developed to model the evolution of strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) in porous media. In fractured rock, however, diffusion limits the rates of reaction between mobile water and mineral surfaces inside fracture-bounded blocks. Diffusion can limit transfer of fluids with differing isotopic ratios between the mobile and immobile zones leading to longer equilibration times. We develop a diffusion-based mathematical approach for modeling the evolution of ratios that includes sorption, ion exchange, and dissolution in fracture bounded blocks of multiple sizes. Traditional models employing isotopic ratios with the advection-dispersion equation are unable to incorporate diffusion because they are limited by the structure of their equation. Modeling the individual isotopic species separately accounts for the effects of diffusion. The general governing equation is robust in that it does not assume chemical equilibrium reactions. Special cases show the importance of diffusion-limited mass transfer on the evolution of isotopes ratios in fractured rock.

  5. Analysis of the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane by gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, Alison; Sessions, Alex; Lawson, Michael; Ferreira, A. A.; Neto, E. V. Santos; Eiler, John M.

    2016-09-01

    Site-specific isotope ratio measurements potentially provide valuable information about the formation and degradation of complex molecules-information that is lost in conventional bulk isotopic measurements. Here we discuss the background and possible applications of such measurements, and present a technique for studying the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane at natural abundance based on mass spectrometric analysis of the intact propane molecule and its fragment ions. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach through measurements of mixtures of natural propane and propane synthesized with site-specific 13C enrichment, and we document the limits of precision of our technique. We show that mass balance calculations of the bulk δ13C of propane based on our site-specific measurements is generally consistent with independent constraints on bulk δ13C. We further demonstrate the accuracy of the technique, and illustrate one of its simpler applications by documenting the site-specific carbon isotope signature associated with gas phase diffusion of propane, confirming that our measurements conform to the predictions of the kinetic theory of gases. This method can be applied to propane samples of moderate size (tens of micromoles) isolated from natural gases. Thus, it provides a means of studying the site-specific stable isotope systematics of propane at natural isotope abundances on sample sizes that are readily recovered from many natural environments. This method may also serve as a model for future techniques that apply high-resolution mass spectrometry to study the site-specific isotopic distributions of larger organic molecules, with potential applications to biosynthesis, forensics and other geochemical subjects.

  6. Carbon Isotope Measurements of Experimentally-Derived Hydrothermal Mineral-Catalyzed Organic Products by Pyrolysis-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Fu, Qi; Niles, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    We report results of experiments to measure the C isotope composition of mineral catalyzed organic compounds derived from high temperature and high pressure synthesis. These experiments make use of an innovative pyrolysis technique designed to extract and measure C isotopes. To date, our experiments have focused on the pyrolysis and C isotope ratio measurements of low-molecular weight intermediary hydrocarbons (organic acids and alcohols) and serve as a proof of concept for making C and H isotope measurements on more complicated mixtures of solid-phase hydrocarbons and intermediary products produced during high temperature and high pressure synthesis on mineral-catalyzed surfaces. The impetus for this work stems from recently reported observations of methane detected within the Martian atmosphere [1-4], coupled with evidence showing extensive water-rock interaction during Martian history [5-7]. Methane production on Mars could be the result of synthesis by mineral surface-catalyzed reduction of CO2 and/or CO by Fischer-Tropsch Type (FTT) reactions during serpentization reactions [8,9]. Others have conducted experimental studies to show that FTT reactions are plausible mechanisms for low-molecular weight hydrocarbon formation in hydrothermal systems at mid-ocean ridges [10-12]. Further, recent experiments by Fu et al. [13] focus on examining detailed C isotope measurements of hydrocarbons produced by surface-catalyzed mineral reactions. Work described in this paper details the experimental techniques used to measure intermediary organic reaction products (alcohols and organic acids).

  7. Caution on the use of liquid nitrogen traps in stable hydrogen isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.; Qi, H.

    2010-01-01

    An anomalous stable hydrogen isotopic fractionation of 4 ??? in gaseous hydrogen has been correlated with the process of adding liquid nitrogen (LN2) to top off the dewar of a stainless-steel water trap on a gaseous hydrogen-water platinum equilibration system. Although the cause of this isotopic fractionation is unknown, its effect can be mitigated by (1) increasing the capacity of any dewars so that they do not need to be filled during a daily analytic run, (2) interspersing isotopic reference waters among unknowns, and (3) applying a linear drift correction and linear normalization to isotopic results with a program such as Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Light Stable Isotopes. With adoption of the above guidelines, measurement uncertainty can be substantially improved. For example, the long-term (months to years) ??2H reproducibility (1?? standard deviation) of nine local isotopic reference waters analyzed daily improved substantially from about 1 ??? to 0.58 ???. This isotopically fractionating mechanism might affect other isotope-ratio mass spectrometers in which LN2 is used as a moisture trap for gaseous hydrogen. ?? This article not subject to U.S. Copyright. Published 2010 by the American Chemical Society.

  8. Caution on the use of liquid nitrogen traps in stable hydrogen isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping

    2010-01-01

    An anomalous stable hydrogen isotopic fractionation of 4 ‰ in gaseous hydrogen has been correlated with the process of adding liquid nitrogen (LN2) to top off the dewar of a stainless-steel water trap on a gaseous hydrogen-water platinum equilibration system. Although the cause of this isotopic fractionation is unknown, its effect can be mitigated by (1) increasing the capacity of any dewars so that they do not need to be filled during a daily analytic run, (2) interspersing isotopic reference waters among unknowns, and (3) applying a linear drift correction and linear normalization to isotopic results with a program such as Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Light Stable Isotopes. With adoption of the above guidelines, measurement uncertainty can be substantially improved. For example, the long-term (months to years) δ2H reproducibility (1& sigma; standard deviation) of nine local isotopic reference waters analyzed daily improved substantially from about 1‰ to 0.58 ‰. This isotopically fractionating mechanism might affect other isotope-ratio mass spectrometers in which LN2 is used as a moisture trap for gaseous hydrogen

  9. Improved analysis of micro- and nanomole-scale sulfur multi-isotope compositions by gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Au Yang, David; Landais, Guillaume; Assayag, Nelly; Widory, David; Cartigny, Pierre

    2016-04-15

    Multiple sulfur isotope compositions are usually measured on relatively large samples (in the range of micromoles); however, sometimes only small amounts are available and thus it is necessary to analyze small (sub-micromole) samples. We report an improved method to measure multiple sulfur isotope compositions: δ(33) S, δ(34) S and δ(36) S values on the SF6 molecule (m/z 127, 128, 129, 131) for quantities down to 0.1 micromole, and δ(33) S and δ(34) S values for quantities down to 20 nanomoles. Multiple sulfur isotope analyses including fluorination and purification of two international Ag2 S standards, IAEA-S1 and IAEA-S3, were carried out at various low concentrations on a dual-inlet isotope ratio mass spectrometer using a microvolume and modified resistor capacities. The analyses yielded a narrow range of δ(34) S values vs CDT (the international standard), with an overall standard deviation of ±0.2 ‰, which was within the range of certified values. This demonstrates the feasibility of determining both Δ(33) S and Δ(36) S values on the sub-micromole scale, and Δ(33) S values on the nanomole scale with similar accuracy to conventional dual-inlet analyses. The analysis of the three S-isotope ratios on the SF6 molecule using the so-called conventional fluorination method and dual-inlet ion ratio mass spectrometry is reliable for sample sizes down to ~20 nanomoles. Despite being close to the theoretical limits for maintaining the viscous flow regime of gas in the capillary, errors were not limited by counting statistics, but probably relate to sample gas purification. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Helium Isotopic Ratios of Core Samples from IODP Exp. 319 (NanTroSEIZE Stage 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiguchi, K.; Matsuda, J.; Wiersberg, T.; Shimo, Y.; Tamura, H.; Kumagai, H.; Suzuki, K.; Saito, S.; Kinoshita, M.; Araki, E.; Byrne, T.; McNeill, L. C.; Saffer, D.; Takahashi, K.; Eguchi, N. O.; Toczko, S.

    2009-12-01

    IODP Exp.319 of Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Drilling Program Stage 2 started at May 2009. Various advanced technologies including first riser-based scientific ocean drilling were carried out at this cruise. The Hole C0009A (Site C0009/ Hole A) recovered cutting and partly core samples from 703.9-1604 mbsf by riser-drilling. The core samples were collected between the depth of 1510.5 and 1593.9 mbsf. Here we report preliminary helium isotopic ratios of these cores. We collected three types of samples for our study: (1) gas of cores, (2) whole round cores (100 cc) and (3) small whole round cores (10 cc). The gas samples were taken immediately after the core recovery. The gas samples were collected from each core section by using a syringe, and it was transferred to the glass bottle using the water displacement method. The glass bottle was made by Pyrex glass with vacuum valve at each end. We collected two sizes of whole round core samples (100 cc and 10 cc) The 100 cc cores were collected from the bottom and top sections of coring. The 10 cc cores were taken from the other sections. The outer parts of these samples were carefully removed to avoid contaminations from drilling fluid. After the removal of contamination, we immediately stored the 100 cc samples into vacuum container and 10 cc samples into plastic bag under a dry condition, respectively. The gas samples were measured for helium isotopic ratios. The noble gas measurement was carried out at Osaka University by using VG5400 mass spectrometer. We measured helium isotopic ratio and 4He/20Ne ratio. The latter is useful for making correction of the air contamination. The obtained result of helium isotopic ratios shows that the radiogenic helium is prominent in all samples. In addition, the helium isotope ratios show a trend that the ratio at shallower part is slightly higher than that at deeper part. It is conceivable that this trend is due to the larger radiogenic ingrowths at the deeper part. However, the

  11. Line shift, line asymmetry, and the ^6Li/^7Li isotopic ratio determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayrel, R.; Steffen, M.; Chand, H.; Bonifacio, P.; Spite, M.; Spite, F.; Petitjean, P.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Caffau, E.

    2007-10-01

    Context: Line asymmetries are generated by convective Doppler shifts in stellar atmospheres, especially in metal-poor stars, where convective motions penetrate to higher atmospheric levels. Such asymmetries are usually neglected in abundance analyses. The determination of the ^6Li/^7Li isotopic ratio is prone to suffering from such asymmetries, as the contribution of ^6Li is a slight blending reinforcement of the red wing of each component of the corresponding ^7Li line, with respect to its blue wing. Aims: The present paper studies the halo star HD 74000 and estimates the impact of convection-related asymmetries on the Li isotopic ratio determination. Methods: Two methods are used to meet this aim. The first, which is purely empirical, consists in deriving a template profile from another element that can be assumed to originate in the same stellar atmospheric layers as Li I, producing absorption lines of approximately the same equivalent width as individual components of the ^7Li I resonance line. The second method consists in conducting the abundance analysis based on NLTE line formation in a 3D hydrodynamical model atmosphere, taking into account the effects of photospheric convection. Results: The results of the first method show that the convective asymmetry generates an excess absorption in the red wing of the ^7Li absorption feature that mimics the presence of ^6Li at a level comparable to the hitherto published values. This opens the possibility that only an upper limit on ^6Li/^7Li has thus far been derived. The second method confirms these findings. Conclusions: From this work, it appears that a systematic reappraisal of former determinations of ^6Li abundances in halo stars is warranted. Based on observations carried out at the European Southern Observatory (ESO), under prog. ID 75.D-0600. Tables 1-3, and additional references are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Use of isotope ratios to identify sources contributing to pediatric lead poisoning in Peru.

    PubMed

    Naeher, Luke P; Rubin, Carol S; Hernandez-Avila, Mauricio; Noonan, Gary P; Paschal, Dan; Narciso, Juan; Lain, Rocio Espinoza; Gastanaga, Carmen; Almeyda, Rosa; Jarrett, Jeff; Caldwell, Kathleen L; McGeehin, Michael

    2003-09-01

    In 1998, a school-based blood lead level (BLL) survey of 2,510 children, conducted in Lima and Callao, Peru, revealed elevated BLLs in children from 2 Callao schools (mean BLL = 25.6 microg/dl; n = 314) and in children from Callao overall (mean BLL = 15.2 microg/dl; n = 898), compared with children from Lima (mean BLL = 7.1 microg/dl; n = 1,612). Public health officials at Peru's Direccion General de Salud Ambiental (DIGESA) hypothesized that a possible source of the elevated pediatric BLLs observed in Callao was a large depository near the port where mineral concentrates are stored prior to shipment. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention worked with DIGESA to identify source(s) that contributed to the pediatric lead poisonings by comparing isotopic profiles of lead in blood, mineral, gasoline, and air filter samples. The lead isotope ratio (IR) observed in mineral samples from the depository in Callao differed from those in gasoline samples from Lima and Callao. The blood lead IRs of children living near the depository were similar to the IRs of the mineral samples and different from the IRs of the gasoline samples, suggesting that lead from the depository-and not gasoline-was the primary source of lead in these children. Lead IR analysis of regional air filter samples supported these findings.

  13. Forensic analysis of explosives using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS)--preliminary study on TATP and PETN.

    PubMed

    Benson, Sarah J; Lennard, Christopher J; Maynard, Philip; Hill, David M; Andrew, Anita S; Roux, Claude

    2009-06-01

    The application of isotopic techniques to investigations requiring the provision of evidence to a Court is limited. The objective of this research was to investigate the application of light stable isotopes and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) to solve complex forensic cases by providing a level of discrimination not achievable utilising traditional forensic techniques. Due to the current threat of organic peroxide explosives, such as triacetone triperoxide (TATP), research was undertaken to determine the potential of IRMS to differentiate samples of TATP that had been manufactured utilising different starting materials and/or manufacturing processes. In addition, due to the prevalence of pentaerythritoltetranitrate (PETN) in detonators, detonating cord, and boosters, the potential of the IRMS technique to differentiate PETN samples from different sources was also investigated. Carbon isotope values were measured in fourteen TATP samples, with three definite groups appearing in the initial sample set based on the carbon data alone. Four additional TATP samples (in a second set of samples) were distinguishable utilising the carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions individually, and also in combination with the oxygen isotope values. The 3D plot of the carbon, oxygen and hydrogen data demonstrated the clear discrimination of the four samples of TATP. The carbon and nitrogen isotope values measured from fifteen PETN samples, allowed samples from different sources to be readily discriminated. This paper demonstrates the successful application of IRMS to the analysis of explosives of forensic interest to assist in discriminating samples from different sources. This research represents a preliminary evaluation of the IRMS technique for the measurement of stable isotope values in TATP and PETN samples, and supports the dedication of resources for a full evaluation of this application in order to achieve Court reportable IRMS results.

  14. Determination of the geographical origin of Chinese teas based on stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Long; Pan, Jia-rong; Zhu, Cheng

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the geographical origin of Chinese teas using carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratio technology. The results showed that inter-provincial dispersion of teas in Guangdong (GD), Guangxi (GX), Hainan (HA), Fujian (FJ), Shandong (SD), Sichuan (SC), Chongqing (CQ), and Henan (HN) provinces was high, while in Zhejiang (ZJ), Hubei (HB), Yunnan (YN), and Anhui (AH) provinces, it was low. Tea samples from GD, GX, HA, and FJ provinces were clustered in one group and separated from those from AH and HB provinces. Thus, carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratio technology could discriminate teas from among some provinces of China, but not from among others. Better separation might be obtained with a combination of isotopic ratios and other indexes, such as elemental data and organic components. PMID:23024049

  15. The interstellar Li-7/Li-6 isotope ratio toward Zeta Ophiuchi and Zeta Persei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, David M.; Hawkins, Isabel; Wright, Edward L.

    1993-01-01

    High S/N, high-resolution observations of the interstellar Li absorption lines toward the stars Zeta Ophiuchi and Zeta Persei are reported. Li I line profiles indicate the presence of both the Li-7 and Li-6 doublets in these two sightlines. Best-fit values for the interstellar Li-7/Li-6 isotope ratio are 6.8 (+1.4/-1.7) towards Zeta Ophiuchi and 5.5 (+ 1.3/-1.1) toward Zeta Persei. Measurement of 6.8 (+1.4/-1.7) for the interstellar Li-7/Li-6 isotope ratio towards Zeta Ophiuchi does not support the lower limit of 25 determined by Ferlet and Dennefeld (1984). The current value of the interstellar Li-7/Li-6 isotope ratio is the result of various lithium production and destruction processes involving stars, cosmic rays, and the big bang.

  16. A 40-year record of Northern Hemisphere atmospheric carbon monoxide concentration and isotope ratios from the firn at Greenland Summit.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Place, P., Jr.; Petrenko, V. V.; Vimont, I.; Buizert, C.; Lang, P. M.; Edwards, J.; Harth, C. M.; Hmiel, B.; Mak, J. E.; Novelli, P. C.; Brook, E.; Weiss, R. F.; Vaughn, B. H.; White, J. W. C.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon Monoxide (CO) is an important atmospheric trace gas that affects the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere and contributes indirectly to climate forcing by being a major sink of tropospheric OH. A good understanding of the past atmospheric CO budget is therefore important for climate models attempting to characterize recent changes in the atmosphere. Previous work at NEEM, Greenland provided the first reconstructions of Arctic atmospheric history of CO concentration and stable isotope ratios (δC18O and δ13CO) from firn air, dating to the 1950s. In this new study, firn air was sampled from eighteen depth levels through the firn column at Summit, Greenland (in May 2013), yielding a second, independent record of Arctic CO concentration and isotopic ratios. Carbon monoxide stable isotope ratios were analyzed on replicate samples and using a newly developed system with improved precision allowing for a more robust reconstruction. The new CO concentration and stable isotope results overall confirm the earlier findings from NEEM, with a CO concentration peak around the 1970s and higher δC18O and δ13CO values associated with peak CO. Modeling and interpretation of the data are in progress.

  17. Tracing sewage and natural freshwater input in a northwest Mediterranean Bay: evidence obtained from isotopic ratios in marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Lassauque, J; Lepoint, G; Thibaut, T; Francour, P; Meinesz, A

    2010-06-01

    Elemental carbon and nitrogen levels and isotope ratios were assessed in different biological compartments of a Northwest (NW) Mediterranean bay to trace the various sources of nutrient input from natural (river runoffs) and anthropogenic (harbor outflows, fish farms and urban sewage outfall) sources. Samples from transplanted mussels and natural sea grass communities (Posidonia oceanica leaves and epiphytes) were harvested from different locations throughout the bay during the touristic summer and rainy seasons. The results from the nitrogen analysis revealed that sewage and harbor outflow promote higher nitrogen levels, enrichment of (15)N in the tissues, and a higher seasonal variability in sea grass and epiphytes. In mussel tissues, the delta(15)N was also influenced by sewage and harbor outflow, whereas delta(13)C was influenced by terrestrial inputs. These results suggest that natural and anthropogenic nutrient inputs have a temporary and localized influence and affect the sensitivity of natural isotopic ratios to changes in hydrologic conditions, especially to rain and tourism.

  18. The puzzle of the CNO isotope ratios in asymptotic giant branch carbon stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abia, C.; Hedrosa, R. P.; Domínguez, I.; Straniero, O.

    2017-03-01

    Context. The abundance ratios of the main isotopes of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen are modified by the CNO-cycle in the stellar interiors. When the different dredge-up events mix the burning material with the envelope, valuable information on the nucleosynthesis and mixing processes can be extracted by measuring these isotope ratios. Aims: Previous determinations of the oxygen isotopic ratios in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) carbon stars were at odds with the existing theoretical predictions. We aim to redetermine the oxygen ratios in these stars using new spectral analysis tools and further develop discussions on the carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios in order to elucidate this problem. Methods: Oxygen isotopic ratios were derived from spectra in the K-band in a sample of galactic AGB carbon stars of different spectral types and near solar metallicity. Synthetic spectra calculated in local thermodynamic equillibrium (LTE) with spherical carbon-rich atmosphere models and updated molecular line lists were used. The CNO isotope ratios derived in a homogeneous way, were compared with theoretical predictions for low-mass (1.5-3 M⊙) AGB stars computed with the FUNS code assuming extra mixing both during the RGB and AGB phases. Results: For most of the stars the 16O/17O/18O ratios derived are in good agreement with theoretical predictions confirming that, for AGB stars, are established using the values reached after the first dredge-up (FDU) according to the initial stellar mass. This fact, as far as the oxygen isotopic ratios are concerned, leaves little space for the operation of any extra mixing mechanism during the AGB phase. Nevertheless, for a few stars with large 16O/17O/18O, the operation of such a mechanism might be required, although their observed 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios would be difficult to reconcile within this scenario. Furthermore, J-type stars tend to have lower 16O/17O ratios than the normal carbon stars, as already indicated in previous studies

  19. Application of neodymium isotope ratio measurements for the origin assessment of uranium ore concentrates.

    PubMed

    Krajkó, Judit; Varga, Zsolt; Yalcintas, Ezgi; Wallenius, Maria; Mayer, Klaus

    2014-11-01

    A novel procedure has been developed for the measurement of (143)Nd/(144)Nd isotope ratio in various uranium-bearing materials, such as uranium ores and ore concentrates (UOC) in order to evaluate the usefulness and applicability of variations of (143)Nd/(144)Nd isotope ratio for provenance assessment in nuclear forensics. Neodymium was separated and pre-concentrated by extraction chromatography and then the isotope ratios were measured by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). The method was validated by the measurement of standard reference materials (La Jolla, JB-2 and BCR-2) and the applicability of the procedure was demonstrated by the analysis of uranium samples of world-wide origin. The investigated samples show distinct (143)Nd/(144)Nd ratio depending on the ore type, deposit age and Sm/Nd ratio. Together with other characteristics of the material in question, the Nd isotope ratio is a promising signature for nuclear forensics and suggests being indicative of the source material, the uranium ore.

  20. On the cross-sensitivity between water vapor mixing ratio and stable isotope measurements of in-situ analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, Stephen; Wang, Lixin; McCabe, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing amount of water vapor stable isotope data collected using in-situ instrumentation. A number of papers have characterized the performance of these in-situ analyzers and suggested methods for calibrating raw measurements. The cross-sensitivity of the isotopic measurements on the mixing ratio has been shown to be a major uncertainty and a variety of techniques have been suggested to characterize this inaccuracy. However, most of these are based on relating isotopic ratios to water vapor mixing ratios from in-situ analyzers when the mixing ratio is varied and the isotopic composition kept constant. An additional correction for the span of the isotopic ratio scale is then applied by measuring different isotopic standards. Here we argue that the water vapor cross-sensitivity arises from different instrument responses (span and offset) of the parent H2O isotope and the heavier isotopes, rather than spectral overlap that could cause a true variation in the isotopic ratio with mixing ratio. This is especially relevant for commercial laser optical instruments where absorption lines are well resolved. Thus, the cross-sensitivity determined using more conventional techniques is dependent on the isotopic ratio of the standard used for the characterization, although errors are expected to be small. Consequently, the cross-sensitivity should be determined by characterizing the span and zero offset of each isotope mixing ratio. In fact, this technique makes the span correction for the isotopic ratio redundant. In this work we model the impact of changes in the span and offset of the heavy and light isotopes and illustrate the impact on the cross-sensitivity of the isotopic ratios on water vapor. This clearly shows the importance of determining the zero offset for the two isotopes. The cross-sensitivity of the isotopic ratios on water vapor is then characterized by determining the instrument response for the individual isotopes for a

  1. Correlation between multielement stable isotope ratio and geographical origin in Peretta cows' milk cheese.

    PubMed

    Manca, G; Franco, M A; Versini, G; Camin, F; Rossmann, A; Tola, A

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the isotopic composition and protect "Peretta" cows' milk cheese, a typical product of Sardinia, against other cheeses of the same appearance sold under the same name, but made of raw materials from northern Europe. The study was concerned with 3 types of cheese: those produced in local dairies from milk from free-grazing or pasture-grazing cows in Sardinia (local dairy product), cheeses made on an industrial scale from milk produced by intensive farming in Sardinia (factory cheese), and cheeses made with raw materials imported from other countries (imported product). To distinguish the Sardinian cheeses from the imported product, the stable isotope ratios 13C/12C, 15N/14N, D/H, 34S/32S, and (18)O/(16)O were used. Determination of the isotopic data delta13C, delta15N, delta2H, and delta34S was performed in the casein fraction, whereas delta(18)O and delta13C were determined in the glycerol fraction. Measurements were performed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. A comparison between mean values of the isotope ratios by statistical analysis (ANOVA and Tukey's test) showed that the greatest difference between the 3 types of cheese (local dairy, factory, and imported products) was in the 13C/12C, 34S/32S, and (18)O/(16)O isotope ratios. In the other parameters, either no differences (delta15N) or minimal differences (delta2H) were found. Evaluation of the data by multivariate statistical analysis (principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis) revealed that the isotope characteristics of the factory products were similar to those of the cheeses produced from imported raw materials, whereas a difference was found between the local dairy-produced cheeses and the products in the other 2 categories.

  2. Evaluation strategies for isotope ratio measurements of single particles by LA-MC-ICPMS.

    PubMed

    Kappel, S; Boulyga, S F; Dorta, L; Günther, D; Hattendorf, B; Koffler, D; Laaha, G; Leisch, F; Prohaska, T

    2013-03-01

    Data evaluation is a crucial step when it comes to the determination of accurate and precise isotope ratios computed from transient signals measured by multi-collector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) coupled to, for example, laser ablation (LA). In the present study, the applicability of different data evaluation strategies (i.e. 'point-by-point', 'integration' and 'linear regression slope' method) for the computation of (235)U/(238)U isotope ratios measured in single particles by LA-MC-ICPMS was investigated. The analyzed uranium oxide particles (i.e. 9073-01-B, CRM U010 and NUSIMEP-7 test samples), having sizes down to the sub-micrometre range, are certified with respect to their (235)U/(238)U isotopic signature, which enabled evaluation of the applied strategies with respect to precision and accuracy. The different strategies were also compared with respect to their expanded uncertainties. Even though the 'point-by-point' method proved to be superior, the other methods are advantageous, as they take weighted signal intensities into account. For the first time, the use of a 'finite mixture model' is presented for the determination of an unknown number of different U isotopic compositions of single particles present on the same planchet. The model uses an algorithm that determines the number of isotopic signatures by attributing individual data points to computed clusters. The (235)U/(238)U isotope ratios are then determined by means of the slopes of linear regressions estimated for each cluster. The model was successfully applied for the accurate determination of different (235)U/(238)U isotope ratios of particles deposited on the NUSIMEP-7 test samples.

  3. Carbon Isotopic Ratios of Amino Acids in Stardust-Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned to Earth samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 in January 2006. Preliminary examinations revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds could not be identified. Here. we present the carbon isotopic ratios of glycine and E-aminocaproic acid (EACH), the two most abundant amino acids observed, in Stardust-returned foil samples measured by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio crass spectrometry coupled with quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-QMS/IRMS).

  4. Carbon Isotopic Ratios of Amino Acids in Stardust-Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned to Earth samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 in January 2006. Preliminary examinations revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds could not be identified. Here. we present the carbon isotopic ratios of glycine and E-aminocaproic acid (EACH), the two most abundant amino acids observed, in Stardust-returned foil samples measured by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio crass spectrometry coupled with quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-QMS/IRMS).

  5. Stable hydrogen and carbon isotope ratios of extractable hydrocarbons in the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, R. V.; Epstein, S.; Pizzarello, S.; Cronin, J. R.; Yuen, G. U.

    1991-01-01

    A fairly fool-proof method to ensure that the compounds isolated from meteorites are truly part of the meteorites and not an artifact introduced by exposure to the terrestrial environment, storage, or handling is presented. The stable carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios in several of the chemical compounds extracted from the Murchison meteorite were measured. The results obtained by studying the amino acids in this meteorite gave very unusual hydrogen and carbon isotope ratios. The technique was extended to the different classes of hydrocarbons and the hydrocarbons were isolated using a variety of separation techniques. The results and methods used in this investigation are described in this two page paper.

  6. Spectral analysis software improves confidence in plant and soil water stable isotope analyses performed by isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS).

    PubMed

    West, A G; Goldsmith, G R; Matimati, I; Dawson, T E

    2011-08-30

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for large errors to occur when analyzing waters containing organic contaminants using isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS). In an attempt to address this problem, IRIS manufacturers now provide post-processing spectral analysis software capable of identifying samples with the types of spectral interference that compromises their stable isotope analysis. Here we report two independent tests of this post-processing spectral analysis software on two IRIS systems, OA-ICOS (Los Gatos Research Inc.) and WS-CRDS (Picarro Inc.). Following a similar methodology to a previous study, we cryogenically extracted plant leaf water and soil water and measured the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of identical samples by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and IRIS. As an additional test, we analyzed plant stem waters and tap waters by IRMS and IRIS in an independent laboratory. For all tests we assumed that the IRMS value represented the "true" value against which we could compare the stable isotope results from the IRIS methods. Samples showing significant deviations from the IRMS value (>2σ) were considered to be contaminated and representative of spectral interference in the IRIS measurement. Over the two studies, 83% of plant species were considered contaminated on OA-ICOS and 58% on WS-CRDS. Post-analysis, spectra were analyzed using the manufacturer's spectral analysis software, in order to see if the software correctly identified contaminated samples. In our tests the software performed well, identifying all the samples with major errors. However, some false negatives indicate that user evaluation and testing of the software are necessary. Repeat sampling of plants showed considerable variation in the discrepancies between IRIS and IRMS. As such, we recommend that spectral analysis of IRIS data must be incorporated into standard post-processing routines. Furthermore, we suggest that the results from spectral analysis be

  7. Absolute Isotopic Abundance Ratios and Atomic Weight of a Reference Sample of Nickel

    PubMed Central

    Gramlich, J. W.; Machlan, L. A.; Barnes, I. L.; Paulsen, P. J.

    1989-01-01

    Absolute values have been obtained for the isotopic abundance ratios of a reference sample of nickel (Standard Reference Material 986), using thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Samples of known isotopic composition, prepared from nearly isotopically pure separated nickel isotopes, were used to calibrate the mass spectrometers. The resulting absolute isotopic ratios are: 58Ni/60Ni=2.596061±0.000728, 61Ni/60Ni=0.043469±0.000015,62Ni/60Ni=0.138600±0.000045, and 64Ni/60Ni=0.035295±0.000024, which yield atom percents of 58Ni=68.076886 ±0.005919, 60Ni = 26.223146±0.005144,61Ni=1.139894±0.000433, 62Ni =3.634528±0.001142, and 64Ni =0.925546±0.000599. The atomic weight calculated from this isotopic composition is 58.693353 ±0.000147. The indicated uncertainties are overall limits of error based on two standard deviations of the mean and allowances for the effects of known sources of possible systematic error. PMID:28053421

  8. Mechanistic studies of sesquiterpene cyclases based on their carbon isotope ratios at natural abundance.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wenhua; Bartram, Stefan; Boland, Wilhelm

    2017-01-03

    During the process of terpene biosynthesis, C-C bond breaking and forming steps are subjected to kinetic carbon isotope effects, leading to distinct carbon isotopic signatures of the products. Accordingly, carbon isotopic signatures could be used to reveal the 'biosynthetic history' of the produced terpenoids. Five known sesquiterpene cyclases, regulating three different pathways, representing simple to complex biosynthetic sequences, were heterologously expressed and used for in vitro assays with farnesyl diphosphate as substrate. Compound specific isotope ratio mass spectrometry measurements of the enzyme substrate farnesyl diphosphate (FDP) and the products of all the five cyclases were performed. The calculated δ(13) C value for FDP, based on δ(13) C values and relative amounts of the products, was identical with its measured δ(13) C value, confirming the reliability of the approach and the precision of measurements. The different carbon isotope ratios of the products reflect the complexity of their structure and are correlated with the frequency of carbon-carbon bond forming and breaking steps on their individual biosynthetic pathways. Thus, the analysis of carbon isotopic signatures of terpenes at natural abundance can be used as a powerful tool in elucidation of associated biosynthetic mechanisms of terpene synthases and in future in vivo studies even without 'touching' the plant. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Measurement of the stable carbon isotope ratio of atmospheric volatile organic compounds using chromatography, combustion, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled with thermal desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Hiroto; Murakami, Mai

    2014-06-01

    The isotopic analysis of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and in particular of their stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C), could potentially be used as an effective tool for identifying the sources of VOCs. However, to date, there have been very few such analyses. In this work, we analyze the δ13C values of VOCs using thermal desorption coupled with chromatography, combustion, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (TD-GC/C/IRMS). The measured peak shapes were of high quality and 36 compounds in a standard gas containing 58 VOCs (C5-C11) were detected. The measured δ13C varied widely, from -49.7‰ to -22.9‰, while the standard deviation of the δ13C values varied from 0.07‰ to 0.85‰ (n = 5). We then measured samples from two passenger cars in hot and cold modes, three gas stations, roadside air, and ambient air. In comparison with existing studies, the analytical precision for the 36 compounds in this study was reasonable. By comparing the δ13C values obtained from the cars and gas stations, we could identify some degree of the sources of VOCs in the roadside and ambient air samples.

  10. Stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry of nanogram quantities of boron and sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieser, Michael Eugene

    1998-09-01

    Instrumentation and analytical techniques were developed to measure isotope abundances from nanograms of sulfur and boron. Sulfur isotope compositions were determined employing continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectroscopy (CF-IRMS) procedures and AsS+ thermal ionization mass spectrometry techniques (AsS+-TIMS). Boron isotope abundances were determined by BO2/sp--TIMS. CF-IRMS measurements realized δ34S values from 10 μg sulfur with precisions of ±0.3/perthous. To extend sulfur isotope measurements to much smaller samples, a TIMS procedure was developed to measure 75As32S+ and 75As34S+ at masses 108 and 109 from 200 ng S on a Finnigan MAT 262 with an ion counter. This is possibly the smallest amount of sulfur which has been successfully analyzed isotopically. The internal precision of 32S/34S ratios measured by AsS+-TIMS was better than ±0.15 percent. δ34S-values calculated relative to the measured 32S/34S value of an IAEA AG2S standard (S-1) agreed with those determined by CF-IRMS to within ±3/perthous. The increasing sensitivity of S-isotope analyses permits hiterto impossible investigations e.g. sulfur in tree rings and ice cores. Boron isotope abundances were measured as BO2/sp- from 50 ng B using an older thermal ionization mass spectrometer which had been extensively upgraded including the addition of computer control electronics, sensitive ion current amplification and fiber optic data bus. The internal precisions of the measured 11B/10B ratios were ±0.15 percent and the precisions of δ11B values calculated relative to the accepted international standard (SRM-951) were ±3/perthous. Two applications of boron isotope abundance variations were initiated (1) ground waters of Northern Alberta and (2) coffee beans in different regions of the world. In the first it was demonstrated that boron isotopes could be used to trace boron released during steam injection of oil sands into the surrounding environment. Data from the second study suggest that boron

  11. Absolute Isotopic Abundance Ratios and the Accuracy of Δ47 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daeron, M.; Blamart, D.; Peral, M.; Affek, H. P.

    2016-12-01

    Conversion from raw IRMS data to clumped isotope anomalies in CO2 (Δ47) relies on four external parameters: the (13C/12C) ratio of VPDB, the (17O/16O) and (18O/16O) ratios of VSMOW (or VPDB-CO2), and the slope of the triple oxygen isotope line (λ). Here we investigate the influence that these isotopic parameters exert on measured Δ47 values, using real-world data corresponding to 7 months of measurements; simulations based on randomly generated data; precise comparisons between water-equilibrated CO2 samples and between carbonate standards believed to share quasi-identical Δ47 values; reprocessing of two carbonate calibration data sets with different slopes of Δ47 versus T. Using different sets of isotopic parameters generally produces systematic offsets as large as 0.04 ‰ in final Δ47 values. What's more, even using a single set of isotopic parameters can produce intra- and inter-laboratory discrepancies in final Δ47 values, if some of these parameters are inaccurate. Depending on the isotopic compositions of the standards used for conversion to "absolute" values, these errors should correlate strongly with either δ13C or δ18O, or more weakly with both. Based on measurements of samples expected to display identical Δ47 values, such as 25°C water-equilibrated CO2 with different carbon and oxygen isotope compositions, or high-temperature standards ETH-1 and ETH-2, we conclude that the isotopic parameters used so far in most clumped isotope studies produces large, systematic errors controlled by the relative bulk isotopic compositions of samples and standards, which should be one of the key factors responsible for current inter-laboratory discrepancies. By contrast, the isotopic parameters of Brand et al. [2010] appear to yield accurate Δ47 values regardless of bulk isotopic composition. References:Brand, Assonov and Coplen [2010] http://dx.doi.org/10.1351/PAC-REP-09-01-05

  12. Novel Apparatus for the Real-Time Quantification of Dissolved Gas Concentrations and Isotope Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, M.; Leen, J.; Baer, D. S.; Owano, T. G.; Liem, J.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of dissolved gases and their isotopic composition are critical in studying a variety of phenomena, including underwater greenhouse gas generation, air-surface exchange, and pollution migration. These studies typically involve obtaining water samples from streams, lakes, or ocean water and transporting them to a laboratory, where they are degased. The gases obtained are then generally measured using gas chromatography and isotope ratio mass spectrometry for concentrations and isotope ratios, respectively. This conventional, off-line methodology is time consuming, significantly limits the number of the samples that can be measured and thus severely inhibits detailed spatial and temporal mapping of gas concentrations and isotope ratios. In this work, we describe the development of a new membrane-based degassing device that interfaces directly to Los Gatos Research (cavity enhanced laser absorption or Off-Axis ICOS) gas analyzers (cavity enhanced laser absorption or Off-Axis ICOS analyzers) to create an autonomous system that can continuously and quickly measure concentrations and isotope ratios of dissolved gases in real time in the field. By accurately controlling the water flow rate through the membrane degasser, gas pressure on the outside of the membrane, and water pressure on the inside of the membrane, the system is able to generate precise and highly reproducible results. Moreover, by accurately measuring the gas flow rates in and out of the degasser, the gas-phase concentrations (ppm) could be converted into dissolved gas concentrations (nM). We will present detailed laboratory test data that quantifies the linearity, precision, and dynamic range of the system for the concentrations and isotope ratios of dissolved methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrous oxide. By interfacing the degassing device to a novel cavity-enhanced spectrometer (developed by LGR), preliminary data will also be presented for dissolved volatile organics (VOC) and other

  13. Disentangling effects of growth and nutritional status on seabird stable isotope ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sears, J.; Hatch, Shyla A.; O'Brien, D. M.

    2009-01-01

    A growing number of studies suggest that an individual's physiology affects its carbon and nitrogen stable isotope signatures, obscuring a signal often assumed to be only a reflection of diet and foraging location. We examined effects of growth and moderate food restriction on red blood cell (RBC) and feather ??15N and ??13C in rhinoceros auklet chicks (Cerorhinca monocerata), a piscivorous seabird. Chicks were reared in captivity and fed either control (75 g/day; n = 7) or ~40% restricted (40 g/day; n = 6) amounts of high quality forage fish. We quantified effects of growth on isotopic fractionation by comparing ??15N and ??13C in control chicks to those of captive, non-growing subadult auklets (n = 11) fed the same diet. To estimate natural levels of isotopic variation, we also collected blood from a random sample of free-living rhinoceros auklet adults and chicks in the Gulf of Alaska (n = 15 for each), as well as adult feather samples (n = 13). In the captive experiment, moderate food restriction caused significant depletion in ??15N of both RBCs and feathers in treatment chicks compared to control chicks. Growth also induced depletion in RBC ??15N, with chicks exhibiting lower ??15N when they were growing the fastest. As growth slowed, ??15N increased, resulting in an overall pattern of enrichment over the course of the nestling period. Combined effects of growth and restriction depleted ??15N in chick RBCs by 0.92???. We propose that increased nitrogen-use efficiency is responsible for 15N depletion in both growing and food-restricted chicks. ??15N values in RBCs of free-ranging auklets fell within a range of only 1.03???, while feather ??15N varied widely. Together, our captive and field results suggest that both growth and moderate food restriction can affect stable isotope ratios in an ecologically meaningful way in RBCs although not feathers due to greater natural variability in this tissue. ?? 2008 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Worldwide isotope ratios of the Fukushima release and early-phase external dose reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chaisan, Kittisak; Smith, Jim T.; Bossew, Peter; Kirchner, Gerald; Laptev, Gennady V.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of radionuclides (RNs) in air made worldwide following the Fukushima accident are quantitatively compared with air and soil measurements made in Japan. Isotopic ratios RN:137Cs of 131I, 132Te, 134,136Cs, are correlated with distance from release. It is shown, for the first time, that both within Japan and globally, ratios RN:137Cs in air were relatively constant for primarily particle associated radionuclides (134,136Cs; 132Te) but that 131I shows much lower local (<80 km) isotope ratios in soils relative to 137Cs. Derived isotope ratios are used to reconstruct external dose rate during the early phase post-accident. Model “blind” tests show more than 95% of predictions within a factor of two of measurements from 15 sites to the north, northwest and west of the power station. It is demonstrated that generic isotope ratios provide a sound basis for reconstruction of early-phase external dose rates in these most contaminated areas. PMID:24018776

  15. The CN/C15N isotopic ratio towards dark clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hily-Blant, P.; Pineau des Forêts, G.; Faure, A.; Le Gal, R.; Padovani, M.

    2013-09-01

    Understanding the origin of the composition of solar system cosmomaterials is a central question, not only in the cosmochemistry and astrochemistry fields, and requires various approaches to be combined. Measurements of isotopic ratios in cometary materials provide strong constraints on the content of the protosolar nebula. Their relation with the composition of the parental dark clouds is, however, still very elusive. In this paper, we bring new constraints based on the isotopic composition of nitrogen in dark clouds, with the aim of understanding the chemical processes that are responsible for the observed isotopic ratios. We have observed and detected the fundamental rotational transition of C15N towards two starless dark clouds, L1544 and L1498. We were able to derive the column density ratio of C15N over 13CN towards the same clouds and obtain the CN/C15N isotopic ratios, which were found to be 500 ± 75 for both L1544 and L1498. These values are therefore marginally consistent with the protosolar value of 441. Moreover, this ratio is larger than the isotopic ratio of nitrogen measured in HCN. In addition, we present model calculations of the chemical fractionation of nitrogen in dark clouds, which make it possible to understand how CN can be deprived of 15N and HCN can simultaneously be enriched in heavy nitrogen. The non-fractionation of N2H+, however, remains an open issue, and we propose some chemical way of alleviating the discrepancy between model predictions and the observed ratios. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe reduced spectra (in FITS format) are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/557/A65

  16. Uranium Isotopic Ratio Measurements of U3O8 Reference Materials by Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Fahey, Albert J.; Perea, Daniel E.; Bartrand, Jonah AG; Arey, Bruce W.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2016-01-01

    We report results of measurements of isotopic ratios obtained with atom probe tomography on U3O8 reference materials certified for their isotopic abundances of uranium. The results show good agreement with the certified values. High backgrounds due to tails from adjacent peaks complicate the measurement of the integrated peak areas as well as the fact that only oxides of uranium appear in the spectrum, the most intense of which is doubly charged. In addition, lack of knowledge of other instrumental parameters, such as the dead time, may bias the results. Isotopic ratio measurements can be performed at the nanometer-scale with the expectation of sensible results. The abundance sensitivity and mass resolving power of the mass spectrometer are not sufficient to compete with magnetic-sector instruments but are not far from measurements made by ToF-SIMS of other isotopic systems. The agreement of the major isotope ratios is more than sufficient to distinguish most anthropogenic compositions from natural.

  17. Stable lead isotopic ratios trace thermohaline circulation in the subarctic North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Véron, A. J.; Church, T. M.; Rivera-Duarte, I.; Flegal, A. R.

    Vertical profiles of lead concentrations in the subarctic North Atlantic attest to the predominance of anthropogenic lead inputs to those waters, while variations in their lead isotopic ratios ( 204Pb : 206Pb : 207Pb : 208Pb) show the multiplicity of those industrial lead inputs. Spatial gradients in the isotopic ratios are consistent with the thermohaline circulation of different water masses, which seemingly have relatively discrete isotopic signatures. These include characteristic 206Pb/ 207Pb ratios of the North Atlantic Drift (1.183-1.187), Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water (1.173-1.176), Denmark Straits Overflow Water (1.179-1.182), and Labrador Sea Water (1.190-1.120). Based on parallels between these initial isotopic data and T- S measurements, it is proposed that stable lead isotopic compositions may be employed as complementary tracers of the mixing of source waters in the Nordic seas, as they overflow the Iceland-Scotland Ridge and Denmark Strait, mixing into the Labrador Sea to form North Atlantic Deep Water.

  18. Deuterium stable isotope ratios as tracers of water resource use: an experimental test with rock doves.

    PubMed

    McKechnie, Andrew E; Wolf, Blair O; Martínez del Rio, Carlos

    2004-07-01

    Naturally-occurring deuterium stable isotope ratios can potentially be used to trace water resource use by animals, but estimating the contribution of isotopically distinct water sources requires the accurate prediction of isotopic discrimination factors between water inputs and an animal's body water pool. We examined the feasibility of using estimates of water fluxes between a bird and its environment with a mass-balance model for the deuterium stable isotope ratio of avian body water (deltaDbody) to predict isotopic discrimination factors. Apparent fractionation and thus discrimination factors were predicted to vary with the proportion of an animal's total water losses than could be attributed to evaporative processes. To test our ability to predict isotopic discrimination, we manipulated water intake and evaporative water loss in rock doves (Columba livia) by providing them with fresh water or 0.15 M NaCl solution in thermoneutral or hot environments. After we switched the birds from drinking water with deltaD=-95 per thousand VSMOW (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water) to enriched drinking water with deltaD=+52 per thousand VSMOW, steady-state deltaDbody was approached asymptotically. The equilibrium deltaDbody was enriched by 10-50 per thousand relative to water inputs. After isotopic equilibrium was reached, the degree of enrichment was positively related (r2=0.34) to the fraction of total water loss that occurred by evaporation (revap/rH2O)supporting the major prediction of the model. The variation we observed in discrimination factors suggests that the apparent fractionation of deuterium will be difficult to predict accurately under natural conditions. Our results show that accurate estimates of the contribution of different water sources to a bird's body water pool require large deuterium isotopic differences between the sources.

  19. Intercolony variability of skeletal oxygen and carbon isotope ratios of corals: temperature-controlled tank experiment and field observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, A.; Omata, T.; Kawahata, H.

    2005-12-01

    We conducted tank experiments in which we grew Porites spp. colonies in thermostated seawater at five temperature settings under moderate light intensity. A skeletal isotope microprofiling technique applied along the major growth axis of each colony revealed that the oxygen isotope ratios of newly deposited skeleton in most colonies remained almost constant during tank incubation. However, the oxygen isotope ratios displayed a surprisingly large intercolony variability (~1‰ at each temperature setting) although the mean slope obtained for the temperature - skeletal oxygen isotope ratio relationship was close to previous results. The variations in the oxygen isotope ratios were apparently caused by kinetic isotope effects related to variations in the skeletal growth rate rather than by species-specific variability or genetic differences within species. Carbon isotope ratios showed significantly inverse correlation with linear growth rates, suggesting a kinetic isotope control at low growth rates. We also examined oxygen and carbon isotope ratios of Porites corals collected from coral reefs of southern Ryukyu Islands, Japan. In shallow faster-growing corals, oxygen and carbon isotope ratios showed out-of-phase annual fluctuations. In contrast, in deep slower growing corals (mean annual linear extension < 4.8 mm yr1), oxygen and carbon isotope fluctuations were in phase, which has been identified as a pattern influenced by kinetic isotope effects. The slower growing corals were strongly influenced, and the faster growing corals weakly influenced, by kinetic isotope effects over metabolic isotope effects. Growth-rate-related kinetic isotope effects found in both the cultured corals and the deep slower-growing corals may be, at least partly, attributed to low light condition.

  20. Assessing connectivity of estuarine fishes based on stable isotope ratio analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzka, Sharon Z.

    2005-07-01

    Assessing connectivity is fundamental to understanding the population dynamics of fishes. I propose that isotopic analyses can greatly contribute to studies of connectivity in estuarine fishes due to the high diversity of isotopic signatures found among estuarine habitats and the fact that variations in isotopic composition at the base of a food web are reflected in the tissues of consumers. Isotopic analysis can be used for identifying nursery habitats and estimating their contribution to adult populations. If movement to a new habitat is accompanied by a shift to foods of distinct isotopic composition, recent immigrants and residents can be distinguished based on their isotopic ratios. Movement patterns thus can be reconstructed based on information obtained from individuals. A key consideration is the rate of isotopic turnover, which determines the length of time that an immigrant to a given habitat will be distinguishable from a longtime resident. A literature survey indicated that few studies have measured turnover rates in fishes and that these have focused on larvae and juveniles. These studies reveal that biomass gain is the primary process driving turnover rates, while metabolic turnover is either minimal or undetectable. Using a simple dilution model and biomass-specific growth rates, I estimated that young fishes with fast growth rates will reflect the isotopic composition of a new diet within days or weeks. Older or slower-growing individuals may take years or never fully equilibrate. Future studies should evaluate the factors that influence turnover rates in fishes during various stages of the life cycle and in different tissues, as well as explore the potential for combining stable isotope and otolith microstructure analyses to examine the relationship between demographic parameters, movement and connectivity.

  1. Improved precision and accuracy in quantifying plutonium isotope ratios by RIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Isselhardt, B. H.; Savina, M. R.; Kucher, A.; Gates, S. D.; Knight, K. B.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2015-09-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) holds the promise of rapid, isobar-free quantification of actinide isotope ratios in as-received materials (i.e. not chemically purified). Recent progress in achieving this potential using two Pu test materials is presented. RIMS measurements were conducted multiple times over a period of two months on two different Pu solutions deposited on metal surfaces. Measurements were bracketed with a Pu isotopic standard, and yielded absolute accuracies of the measured 240Pu/239Pu ratios of 0.7% and 0.58%, with precisions (95% confidence intervals) of 1.49% and 0.91%. In conclusion, the minor isotope 238Pu was also quantified despite the presence of a significant quantity of 238U in the samples.

  2. Improved precision and accuracy in quantifying plutonium isotope ratios by RIMS

    DOE PAGES

    Isselhardt, B. H.; Savina, M. R.; Kucher, A.; ...

    2015-09-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) holds the promise of rapid, isobar-free quantification of actinide isotope ratios in as-received materials (i.e. not chemically purified). Recent progress in achieving this potential using two Pu test materials is presented. RIMS measurements were conducted multiple times over a period of two months on two different Pu solutions deposited on metal surfaces. Measurements were bracketed with a Pu isotopic standard, and yielded absolute accuracies of the measured 240Pu/239Pu ratios of 0.7% and 0.58%, with precisions (95% confidence intervals) of 1.49% and 0.91%. In conclusion, the minor isotope 238Pu was also quantified despite the presence ofmore » a significant quantity of 238U in the samples.« less

  3. Improved precision and accuracy in quantifying plutonium isotope ratios by RIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Isselhardt, B. H.; Savina, M. R.; Kucher, A.; Gates, S. D.; Knight, K. B.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2015-09-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) holds the promise of rapid, isobar-free quantification of actinide isotope ratios in as-received materials (i.e. not chemically purified). Recent progress in achieving this potential using two Pu test materials is presented. RIMS measurements were conducted multiple times over a period of two months on two different Pu solutions deposited on metal surfaces. Measurements were bracketed with a Pu isotopic standard, and yielded absolute accuracies of the measured Pu-240/Pu-239 ratios of 0.7 and 0.58 %, with precisions (95 % confidence intervals) of 1.49 and 0.91 %. The minor isotope Pu-238 was also quantified despite the presence of a significant quantity of U-238 in the samples.

  4. Locally Grown, Natural Ingredients? The Isotope Ratio Can Reveal a Lot!

    PubMed

    Rossier, Joël S; Maury, Valérie; Pfammatter, Elmar

    2016-01-01

    This communication gives an overview of selected isotope analyses applied to food authenticity assessment. Different isotope ratio detection technologies such as isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) are briefly described. It will be explained how δ(18)O of water contained in fruits and vegetables can be used to assess their country of production. It will be explained why asparagus grown in Valais, in the centre of the Alps carries much less heavy water than asparagus grown closer to the sea coast. On the other hand, the use of δ(13)C can reveal whether a product is natural or adulterated. Applications including honey or sparkling wine adulteration detection will be briefly presented.

  5. Oxygen isotope ratio measurements on carbon dioxide generated by reaction of microliter quantities of biological fluids with guanidine hydrochloride

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, W.W.; Lee, L.S.; Klein, P.D.

    1987-03-01

    Guanidine hydrochloride was used to convert water in biological fluids to carbon dioxide for oxygen isotope ratio measurements. Five 10-..mu..L aliquots each of five different saliva, urine, plasma, and human milk samples were allowed to react with 100 mg of guanidine hydrochloride at 260/sup 0/C to produce ammonia and carbon dioxide. Ammonia was removed with 100% phosphoric acid and carbon dioxide was cryogenically purified before isotope ratio measurement. At natural abundances, the delta/sup 18/O values of the biological fluids were reproducible to within 0.16% (standard deviation) and accurate to within 0.11 +/- 0.73% (x vector +/- SD) of the H/sub 2/O-CO/sub 2/ equilibration values. At a 250% enrichment level of /sup 18/O, the delta/sup 18/O values of the biological fluids were reproducible to within 0.95% and accurate to -1.27 +/- 2.25%.

  6. Stable Cl And O Isotope Ratios Of Anthropogenic And Natural Perchlorates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloso, A.; Sturchio, N. C.; Böhlke, J.; Gu, B.; Horita, J.; Brown, G.; Hatzinger, P.

    2004-12-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) in aqueous systems, even in low concentrations, is recognized to have potential human health risks. The drinking and irrigation water supplies of millions of people in the U.S. have recently been found to be contaminated with perchlorate, and this problem continues to become even more widespread. Perchlorate, as a highly soluble and relatively inert anion, tends to persist over long time periods and its removal by conventional water treatment technologies is difficult and expensive. Many known sources of perchlorate contamination are anthropogenic, resulting from its extensive use as an oxidizer component in solid propellants for missiles, rockets, and fireworks. However, certain fertilizers derived from Chilean nitrate evaporate deposits are known to contain a low percentage of perchlorate (<0.5%) that may contaminate groundwater. New isotopic evidence provides insights on the possible natural sources of perchlorate in surface and ground waters. Stable isotope ratios of Cl and O can now be used to determine whether the source of perchlorates in a given area is natural or anthropogenic. Microbial perchlorate reduction has a large (˜15 per mil) kinetic isotope effect, and this may be used to identify whether natural attenuation of perchlorate is occurring. Anthropogenic perchlorate salts in milligram amounts are readily analyzed for 37Cl and 18O isotopes. Extracting an isotopically measurable amount of perchlorate from natural waters, which are usually within ppb range of concentrations, is a challenge. But with the use of a new class of highly-selective bifunctional anion exchange resins, recovery of trace amounts of perchlorate for accurate isotopic analysis has been demonstrated. Isotopic characterization is being conducted on anthropogenic perchlorate reagents, natural perchlorate-bearing salt deposits, and perchlorate-bearing groundwaters. Significant and consistent isotopic differences in both the Cl and O isotope ratios between

  7. Detecting shifts in tropical moisture imbalances with satellite-derived isotope ratios in water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, A.; Blossey, P. N.; Noone, D.; Nusbaumer, J.; Wood, R.

    2017-06-01

    As global temperatures rise, regional differences in evaporation (E) and precipitation (P) are likely to become more disparate, causing the drier E-dominated regions of the tropics to become drier and the wetter P-dominated regions to become wetter. Models suggest that such intensification of the water cycle should already be taking place; however, quantitatively verifying these changes is complicated by inherent difficulties in measuring E and P with sufficient spatial coverage and resolution. This paper presents a new metric for tracking changes in regional moisture imbalances (e.g., E-P) by defining δDq—the isotope ratio normalized to a reference water vapor concentration of 4 mmol mol-1—and evaluates its efficacy using both remote sensing retrievals and climate model simulations in the tropics. By normalizing the isotope ratio with respect to water vapor concentration, δDq isolates the portion of isotopic variability most closely associated with shifts between E- and P-dominated regimes. Composite differences in δDq between cold and warm phases of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) verify that δDq effectively tracks changes in the hydrological cycle when large-scale convective reorganization takes place. Simulated δDq also demonstrates sensitivity to shorter-term variability in E-P at most tropical locations. Since the isotopic signal of E-P in free tropospheric water vapor transfers to the isotope ratios of precipitation, multidecadal observations of both water vapor and precipitation isotope ratios should provide key evidence of changes in regional moisture imbalances now and in the future.

  8. Effects of caloric restriction on nitrogen and carbon stable isotope ratios in adult rat bone.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Kimberly L; Rowland, Neil E; Krigbaum, John

    2014-10-15

    Stable isotope analysis is a valuable technique for dietary estimation in ecological and archaeological research, yet many variables can potentially affect tissue stable isotope signatures. Controlled feeding studies across a range of species have consistently demonstrated impacts of caloric restriction on tissue stable isotope ratios, but most have focused on juvenile, fasting, and/or starving individuals, and most have utilized soft tissues despite the importance of bone for paleodietary analyses. The goal of this study was to determine whether temporally defined, moderate food restriction could affect stable carbon and/or nitrogen isotope ratios in adult mammalian bone - a tissue that arguably reflects long-term dietary signals. Adult rats fed a standard laboratory diet were restricted to 45% of ad libitum intakes for 3 or 6 months. Relevant anatomical and physiological parameters were measured to confirm that the restriction protocol resulted in significant nutritional stress and to provide independent data to facilitate interpretation of stable isotope ratios. Femoral bone δ(13)Ccollagen, δ(15)Ncollagen, and δ(13)Capatite values were determined by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Calorie-restricted animals exhibited a small, yet significant enrichment in (15)Ncollagen compared with control animals, reflecting protein-calorie stress. While the δ(13)Ccollagen values did not differ, the δ(13)Capatite values revealed less enrichment in (13)C than in controls, reflecting catabolism of body fat. Independent anatomical and physiological data from these same individuals support these interpretations. Results indicate that moderate caloric restriction does not appreciably undermine broad interpretations of dietary signals in adult mammalian bone. Significant variability among individuals or groups, however, is best explained by marked differences in energy intake over variable timescales. An inverse relationship between the δ(13)Capatite and δ(15)Ncollagen

  9. Lead concentrations and isotope ratios in street dust determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nageotte, S M; Day, J P

    1998-01-01

    A major source of environmental lead, particularly in urban areas, has been from the combustion of leaded petrol. Street dust has previously been used to assess urban lead contamination, and the dust itself can also be a potential source of lead ingestion, particularly to children. The progressive reduction of lead in petrol, in recent years, would be expected to have been reflected in a reduction of lead in urban dust. We have tested this hypothesis by repeating an earlier survey of Manchester street dust and carrying out a comparable survey in Paris. Samples were collected from streets and parks, lead was extracted by digestion with concentrated nitric acid and determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Lead isotope ratios were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results for Manchester show that lead concentrations have fallen by about 40% (street dust averages, 941 micrograms g-1 (ppm) in 1975 down to 569 ppm in 1997). In Paris, the lead levels in street dust are much higher and significant differences were observed between types of street (not seen in Manchester). Additionally, lead levels in parks were much lower than in Manchester. Samples collected under the Eiffel Tower had very high concentrations and lead isotope ratios showed that this was unlikely to be fallout from motor vehicles but could be due to the paint used on the tower. Isotope ratios measurements also revealed that lead additives used in France and the UK come from different sources.

  10. Breath carbon stable isotope ratios identify changes in energy balance and substrate utilization in humans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rapid detection of shifts in substrate utilization and energy balance would provide a compelling biofeedback tool to enable individuals to lose weight. In a pilot study, we tested whether the natural abundance of exhaled carbon stable isotope ratios (breath d13C values) reflects shifts between negat...

  11. Homogeneous diet of contemporary Japanese inferred from stable isotope ratios of hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusaka, Soichiro; Ishimaru, Eriko; Hyodo, Fujio; Gakuhari, Takashi; Yoneda, Minoru; Yumoto, Takakazu; Tayasu, Ichiro

    2016-09-01

    The globalization of food production and distribution has homogenized human dietary patterns irrespective of geography, but it is uncertain how far this homogenization has progressed. This study investigated the carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in the scalp hair of 1305 contemporary Japanese and found values of -19.4 ± 0.6‰ and 9.4 ± 0.6‰ (mean ± SD), respectively. Within Japan, the inter-regional differences for both isotope ratios was less than 1‰, which indicates low dietary heterogeneity among prefectural divisions. The carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of the hair showed a significant correlation with the results of questionnaires on self-reported dietary habits. The carbon isotope ratios from Japan were lower than those in samples from the USA but higher than those in samples from Europe. These differences stem from the varying dietary proportions of food products originally derived from C3 and C4 plants. The dietary variation of Japan is as small as those of Europe and USA and smaller than those of some Asian countries. These results indicate that dietary homogeneity has progressed in Japan, which may indicate the influence from the spread of the Western-style diet and food globalization, although dietary heterogeneity among countries is still preserved.

  12. Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Otoliths Differentiate Winter Flounder (Pseudopleuonectes americanus) Habitats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable carbon (13C) and oxygen (18O) isotope ratios were measured in otoliths of juvenile winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus) collected from 18 nursery areas along the coast of Rhode Island, USA. Samples were obtained during June and July of 2002 from locations tha...

  13. Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Otoliths Differentiate Winter Flounder (Pseudopleuonectes americanus) Habitats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable carbon (13C) and oxygen (18O) isotope ratios were measured in otoliths of juvenile winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus) collected from 18 nursery areas along the coast of Rhode Island, USA. Samples were obtained during June and July of 2002 from locations tha...

  14. Stabel Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Otoliths from Juvenile and Adult Winter Flounder

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was designed to determine if stable carbon (13C) and oxygen (18O) isotope ratios in otoliths could be used to differentiate the locations that serve as important nursery areas for winter flounder along the Rhode Island, USA coastline. In recent years the populations ...

  15. Stabel Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Otoliths from Juvenile and Adult Winter Flounder

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was designed to determine if stable carbon (13C) and oxygen (18O) isotope ratios in otoliths could be used to differentiate the locations that serve as important nursery areas for winter flounder along the Rhode Island, USA coastline. In recent years the populations ...

  16. Carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of juvenile winter flounder as indicators of inputs to estuarine systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios were measured in the muscle tissues of young-of-the-year (YOY) winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, collected from several estuarine systems along the coast of Rhode Island, USA. These systems included three coastal lagoons (Ni...

  17. PHYLOGENETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES ON NITROGEN STABLE ISOTOPE RATIOS IN SPOROCARPS OF ECTOMYCORRHIZAL FUNGI

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been suggested that nitrogen stable isotope ratios (expressed as d15N) of fungus sporocarps, in conjunction with d15N data from other ecosystem compartments, can be used to elucidate key processes in forest N-cycling. Although results of previous studies generally support ...

  18. Influence of forest disturbance on stable nitrogen isotope ratios in soil and vegetation profiles

    Treesearch

    Jennifer D. Knoepp; Scott R. Taylor; Lindsay R. Boring; Chelcy F. Miniat

    2015-01-01

    Soil and plant stable nitrogen isotope ratios (15 N) are influenced by atmospheric nitrogen (N) inputs and processes that regulate organic matter (OM) transformation and N cycling. The resulting 15N patterns may be useful for discerning ecosystem differences in N cycling. We studied two ecosystems; longleaf pine wiregrass (...

  19. Carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of juvenile winter flounder as indicators of inputs to estuarine systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios were measured in the muscle tissues of young-of-the-year (YOY) winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, collected from several estuarine systems along the coast of Rhode Island, USA. These systems included three coastal lagoons (Ni...

  20. Correlation of carbon isotope ratios in the cellulose and wood extractives of Douglas-fir

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cellulose is usually isolated from the other components of plant material for analysis of carbon stable isotope ratios (δ13C). However, many studies have shown a strong correlation between whole-wood and cellulose δ13C values, prompting debate about the necessity of cellulose ext...

  1. Isotopic-ratio mass spectrometers for the analysis of uranium hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Sulfridge, C.; Jones, H.C.

    1981-05-06

    Descriptions, including photographs, are presented of the two isotopic-ratio mass spectrometers which have been developed for the analysis of uranium hexafluoride. The objectives were to have these spectrometers meet the sensitivity and precision requirements of development and improvement programs at uranium enrichment facilities, and for universal application to on-stream monitoring of UF/sub 4/ in enrichment facilities.

  2. Homogeneous diet of contemporary Japanese inferred from stable isotope ratios of hair

    PubMed Central

    Kusaka, Soichiro; Ishimaru, Eriko; Hyodo, Fujio; Gakuhari, Takashi; Yoneda, Minoru; Yumoto, Takakazu; Tayasu, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    The globalization of food production and distribution has homogenized human dietary patterns irrespective of geography, but it is uncertain how far this homogenization has progressed. This study investigated the carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in the scalp hair of 1305 contemporary Japanese and found values of −19.4 ± 0.6‰ and 9.4 ± 0.6‰ (mean ± SD), respectively. Within Japan, the inter-regional differences for both isotope ratios was less than 1‰, which indicates low dietary heterogeneity among prefectural divisions. The carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of the hair showed a significant correlation with the results of questionnaires on self-reported dietary habits. The carbon isotope ratios from Japan were lower than those in samples from the USA but higher than those in samples from Europe. These differences stem from the varying dietary proportions of food products originally derived from C3 and C4 plants. The dietary variation of Japan is as small as those of Europe and USA and smaller than those of some Asian countries. These results indicate that dietary homogeneity has progressed in Japan, which may indicate the influence from the spread of the Western-style diet and food globalization, although dietary heterogeneity among countries is still preserved. PMID:27616586

  3. Correlation of carbon isotope ratios in the cellulose and wood extractives of Douglas-fir

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cellulose is usually isolated from the other components of plant material for analysis of carbon stable isotope ratios (δ13C). However, many studies have shown a strong correlation between whole-wood and cellulose δ13C values, prompting debate about the necessity of cellulose ext...

  4. The IRHUM database - bioavailable strontium isotope ratios of France for geochemical fingerprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmes, Malte; Moffat, Ian; Grün, Rainer; Armstrong, Richard; Kinsley, Les; McMorrow, Linda

    2013-04-01

    Strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) are used as a geochemical tracer in a wide range of fields including archaeology, ecology, soil, food and forensic sciences. These applications are based on the principle that strontium isotopic ratios of materials reflect the geological sources of the strontium, which were available during its formation. Geologic regions with distinct strontium isotope ranges, which depend on their age and composition, can be differentiated. A major constraint for current studies is the lack of robust reference maps to evaluate the strontium isotope ratios measured in the samples. The aim of the IRHUM (isotopic reconstruction of human migration) database is to provide a reference map of bioavailable strontium isotope ratios for continental France. The current dataset contains 400 sample locations covering the major geologic units of the Paris and Aquitaine Basin, the Massif Central, and the Pyrenees. At each site soil and plant samples have been collected to cover the whole range of strontium ratios at a specific location. The database is available online at www.rses.anu.edu.au/research-areas/archaeogeochemistry and contains the bioavailable strontium isotope data as well as major and trace element concentrations for soil and plant samples. Strontium isotopes were analysed using a Neptune multi-collector inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) and elemental concentrations with a Varian Vista Pro Axial ICP-AES (inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer). In addition, IRHUM provides spatial context for each sample, including background geology, field observations and soil descriptions. This metadata allows users to evaluate the suitability of a specific data point for their study. The IRHUM database fills an important gap between high resolution studies from specific sites (e.g. archaeological sites), to the very broad geochemical mapping of Europe. Thus it provides an excellent tool to evaluate the regional context

  5. Stable nitrogen isotope ratios and accumulation of various HOCs in northern Baltic aquatic food chains

    SciTech Connect

    Broman, D.; Axelman, J.; Bergqvist, P.A.; Naef, C.; Rolff, C.; Zebuehr, Y.

    1995-12-31

    Ratios of naturally occurring stable isotopes of nitrogen ({delta}{sup 15}N) can be used to numerically classify trophic levels of organisms in food chains. By combining analyses results of various HOCs (e.g. PCDD/Fs, PCBs, DDTs, HCHs and some other pesticides) the biomagnification of these substances can be quantitatively estimated. In this paper different pelagic and benthic northern Baltic food chains were studied. The {delta}{sup 15}N-data gave food chain descriptions qualitatively consistent with previous conceptions of trophic arrangements in the food chains. The different HOCs concentrations were plotted versus the {delta}{sup 15}N-values for the different trophic levels and an exponential model of the form e{sup (A+B*{delta}N)} was fitted to the data. The estimates of the constant B in the model allows for an estimation of a biomagnification power (B) of different singular, or groups of, contaminants. A B-value around zero indicates that a substance is flowing through the food chain without being magnified, whereas a value > 0 indicates that a substance is biomagnified. Negative B-values indicate that a substance is not taken up or is metabolized. The A-term of the expression is only a scaling factor depending on the background level of the contaminant.

  6. Simulating oxygen isotope ratios in tree ring cellulose using a dynamic global vegetation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keel, Sonja G.; Joos, Fortunat; Spahni, Renato; Saurer, Matthias; Weigt, Rosemarie B.; Klesse, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Records of stable oxygen isotope ratios in tree rings are valuable tools to reconstruct past climatic conditions and investigate the response of trees to those conditions. So far the use of stable oxygen isotope signatures of tree rings has not been systematically evaluated in dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). DGVMs integrate many hydrological and physiological processes and their application could improve proxy-model comparisons and the interpretation of oxygen isotope records. Here we present an approach to simulate leaf water and stem cellulose δ18O of trees using the LPX-Bern DGVM (LPX-Bern). Our results lie within a few per mil of measured tree ring δ18O of 31 different forest stands mainly located in Europe. Temporal means over the last 5 decades as well as interannual variations for a subset of sites in Switzerland are captured. A sensitivity analysis reveals that relative humidity, temperature, and the water isotope boundary conditions have the largest influence on simulated stem cellulose δ18O, followed by all climatic factors combined, whereas increasing atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen deposition exert no impact. We conclude that simulations with LPX-Bern are useful for investigating large-scale oxygen isotope patterns of tree ring cellulose to elucidate the importance of different environmental factors on isotope variations and therefore help to reduce uncertainties in the interpretation of δ18O of tree rings.

  7. Simulating stable carbon and chlorine isotope ratios in dissolved chlorinated groundwater pollutants with BIOCHLOR-ISO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhener, Patrick

    2016-12-01

    BIOCHLOR is a well-known simple tool for evaluating the transport of dissolved chlorinated solvents in groundwater, ideal for rapid screening and teaching. This work extends the BIOCHLOR model for the calculation of stable isotope ratios of carbon and chlorine isotopes in chloroethenes. An exact solution for the three-dimensional reactive transport of a chain of degrading compounds including sorption is provided in a spreadsheet and applied for modeling the transport of individual isotopes 12C, 13C, 35Cl, 37Cl from a constant source. The model can consider secondary isotope effects that can occur in the breaking of Csbnd Cl bonds. The model is correctly reproducing results for δ13C and δ37Cl modeled by a previously published 1-D numerical model without secondary isotope effects, and is also reproducing results from a microcosm experiment with secondary chlorine isotope effects. Two applications of the model using field data from literature are further given and discussed. The new BIOCHLOR-ISO model is distributed as a spreadsheet (MS EXCEL) along with this publication.

  8. Simulating stable carbon and chlorine isotope ratios in dissolved chlorinated groundwater pollutants with BIOCHLOR-ISO.

    PubMed

    Höhener, Patrick

    2016-12-01

    BIOCHLOR is a well-known simple tool for evaluating the transport of dissolved chlorinated solvents in groundwater, ideal for rapid screening and teaching. This work extends the BIOCHLOR model for the calculation of stable isotope ratios of carbon and chlorine isotopes in chloroethenes. An exact solution for the three-dimensional reactive transport of a chain of degrading compounds including sorption is provided in a spreadsheet and applied for modeling the transport of individual isotopes (12)C, (13)C, (35)Cl, (37)Cl from a constant source. The model can consider secondary isotope effects that can occur in the breaking of CCl bonds. The model is correctly reproducing results for δ(13)C and δ(37)Cl modeled by a previously published 1-D numerical model without secondary isotope effects, and is also reproducing results from a microcosm experiment with secondary chlorine isotope effects. Two applications of the model using field data from literature are further given and discussed. The new BIOCHLOR-ISO model is distributed as a spreadsheet (MS EXCEL) along with this publication.

  9. On-line determination of oxygen isotope ratios of water or ice by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Leuenberger, M; Huber, C

    2002-09-15

    Oxygen isotope ratio determination on any of the water phases (water vapor, water, ice) is of great relevance in different research fields such as climate and paleoclimate studies, geological surveys, and hydrological studies. The conventional technique for oxygen isotope measurement involves equilibration with carbon dioxide gas for a given time with a subsequent isotope determination. The equilibration technique is available in different layouts, but all of them are rather time-consuming. Here we report a new on-line technique that processes water samples as well as ice samples. The same principal, CO2 hydration, is used but speeded up by (i) a direct injection and full dissolution of CO2 in the water, (ii) an increased isotope exchange temperature at 50 degrees C, and (iii) a rapid gas extraction by means of an air-permeable membrane into a continuous helium flux supplying the isotope ratio mass spectrometer with the sample gas. The precision is better than 0.1/1000 which is only slightly larger than with the conventional equilibration technique. This on-line technique allows analysis of 1 m of ice with a resolution of 1-3 cm, depending on the meltwater flux, within 1 h. Similarly, continuous and fast analysis can be performed for aqueous samples for hydrological, geological, and perhaps medical applications.

  10. Traceability of different apple varieties by multivariate analysis of isotope ratio mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Mimmo, Tanja; Camin, Federica; Bontempo, Luana; Capici, Calogero; Tagliavini, Massimo; Cesco, Stefano; Scampicchio, Matteo

    2015-11-15

    The awareness of customers of the origin of foods has become an important issue. The growing demand for foods that are healthy, safe and of high quality has increased the need for traceability and clear labelling. Thus, this study investigates the capability of C and N stable isotope ratios to determine the geographical origin of several apple varieties grown in northern Italy. Four apple varieties (Cripps Pink, Gala, Golden Delicious, Granny Smith) have been sampled in orchards located in the Districts of Bolzano, Ferrara, Verona and Udine (northern Italy). Carbon (δ(13) C) and nitrogen (δ(15) N) isotope values of the whole apple fruits and three sub-fractions (peel, pulp and seed) have been determined simultaneously by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The δ(13) C and δ(15) N values of apples and apple sub-fractions, such as peel, seed and pulp, were significantly affected by the geographical origin and the fruit variety. The four varieties could be distinguished to a certain extent only within each district. A 99% correct identification of the samples according to their origin was, however, achieved by cross validation with the 'leave-one-out' method. This study proves the potential of stable isotopes to discriminate the geographical origin of apples grown in orchards located only a few hundreds of kilometres apart. Stable isotopes were also able to discriminate different apple varieties, although only within small geographical areas. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Forensic utility of the carbon isotope ratio of PVC tape backings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, L. A.; Thompson, A. H.; Mehltretter, A. H.; McLaskey, V.; Parish, A.; Aranda, R.

    2008-12-01

    Forensic interest in adhesive tapes with PVC-backings (polyvinyl chloride, electrical tapes) derives from their use in construction of improvised explosive devices, drug packaging and in a variety of other illicit activities. Due to the range of physical characteristics and chemical compositions of such tapes, traditional microscopic and chemical analysis of the tape backings and adhesives offer a high degree of discrimination between tapes from different manufacturers and products. To evaluate whether carbon isotope ratios may be able to increase discrimination of electrical tapes, particularly with regards to different tapes of the same product, we assessed the PVC-backings of 87 rolls of black electrical tape for their δ13C values. The adhesive on these tapes was physically removed with hexane, and plasticizers within the PVC tape backings were removed by three-20 minute extractions with chloroform. The δ13C values of the PVC tape backings ranged between -23.8 and -41.5 (‰ V-PDB). The carbon isotopic variation within a product (identical brand and product identification) is significant, based on five products with at least 3 rolls (ranges of 7.4‰ (n=3), 10.0‰ (n=6), 4.2‰ (n=16), 3.8‰ (n=6), and 11.5‰ (n=8), respectively). There was no measurable carbon isotope variation in regards to the following: a) along the length of a roll (4 samples from 1 roll); b) between the center and edge of a strip of tape (1 pair); c) between rolls assumed to be from the same lot of tape (2 pairs); d) between different rolls from the same batch of tape (same product purchased at the same time and place; 5 pairs); and e) between samples of a tape at room temperature, heated to 50° C and 80° C for 1 week. For each sample within the population of 87 tapes, carbon isotopes alone exclude 80 to 100% of the tapes as a potential match, with an average exclusion power of 92.5%, using a window of ± 0.4‰. Carbon isotope variations originate from variations in starting

  12. Selenium stable isotope ratios in California agricultural drainage water management systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herbel, M.J.; Johnson, T.M.; Tanji, K.K.; Gao, S.; Bullen, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    Selenium stable isotope ratios are known to shift in predictable ways during various microbial, chemical, and biological processes, and can be used to better understand Se cycling in contaminated environments. In this study we used Se stable isotopes to discern the mechanisms controlling the transformation of oxidized, aqueous forms of Se to reduced, insoluble forms in sediments of Se-affected environments. We measured 80Se/76Se in surface waters, shallow ground waters, evaporites, digested plants and sediments, and sequential extracts from several sites where agricultural drainage water is processed in the San Joaquin Valley of California. Selenium isotope analyses of samples obtained from the Tulare Lake Drainage District flow-through wetland reveal small isotopic contrasts (mean difference 0.7%o) between surface water and reduced Se species in the underlying sediments. Selenium in aquatic macrophytes was very similar isotopically to the NaOH and Na2SO3 sediment extracts designed to recover soluble organic Se and Se(O), respectively. For the integrated on-farm drainage management sites, evaporite salts were slightly (approximately 0.6%o) enriched in the heavier isotope relative to the inferred parent waters, whereas surface soils were slightly (approximately 1.4%o) depleted. Bacterial or chemical reduction of Se(VI) or Se(IV) may be occurring at these sites, but the small isotopic contrasts suggest that other, less isotopically fractionating mechanisms are responsible for accumulation of reduced forms in the sediments. These findings provide evidence that Se assimilation by plants and algae followed by deposition and mineralization is the dominant transformation pathway responsible for accumulation of reduced forms of Se in the wetland sediments.

  13. Selenium stable isotope ratios in California agricultural drainage water management systems.

    PubMed

    Herbel, Mitchell J; Johnson, Thomas M; Tanji, Kenneth K; Gao, Suduan; Bullen, Thomas D

    2002-01-01

    Selenium stable isotope ratios are known to shift in predictable ways during various microbial, chemical, and biological processes, and can be used to better understand Se cycling in contaminated environments. In this study we used Se stable isotopes to discern the mechanisms controlling the transformation of oxidized, aqueous forms of Se to reduced, insoluble forms in sediments of Se-affected environments. We measured 80Se/76Se in surface waters, shallow ground waters, evaporites, digested plants and sediments, and sequential extracts from several sites where agricultural drainage water is processed in the San Joaquin Valley of California. Selenium isotope analyses of samples obtained from the Tulare Lake Drainage District flow-through wetland reveal small isotopic contrasts (mean difference 0.7%) between surface water and reduced Se species in the underlying sediments. Selenium in aquatic macrophytes was very similar isotopically to the NaOH and Na2SO3 sediment extracts designed to recover soluble organic Se and Se(0), respectively. For the integrated on-farm drainage management sites, evaporite salts were slightly (approximately 0.6%) enriched in the heavier isotope relative to the inferred parent waters, whereas surface soils were slightly (approximately 1.4%) depleted. Bacterial or chemical reduction of Se(VI) or Se(IV) may be occurring at these sites, but the small isotopic contrasts suggest that other, less isotopically fractionating mechanisms are responsible for accumulation of reduced forms in the sediments. These findings provide evidence that Se assimilation by plants and algae followed by deposition and mineralization is the dominant transformation pathway responsible for accumulation of reduced forms of Se in the wetland sediments.

  14. Dietary Heterogeneity among Western Industrialized Countries Reflected in the Stable Isotope Ratios of Human Hair

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Luciano O.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Cerling, Thure E.; Ehleringer, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Although the globalization of food production is often assumed to result in a homogenization of consumption patterns with a convergence towards a Western style diet, the resources used to make global food products may still be locally produced (glocalization). Stable isotope ratios of human hair can quantify the extent to which residents of industrialized nations have converged on a standardized diet or whether there is persistent heterogeneity and glocalization among countries as a result of different dietary patterns and the use of local food products. Here we report isotopic differences among carbon, nitrogen and sulfur isotope ratios of human hair collected in thirteen Western European countries and in the USA. European hair samples had significantly lower δ13C values (−22.7 to −18.3‰), and significantly higher δ15N (7.8 to 10.3‰) and δ34S (4.8 to 8.3‰) values than samples from the USA (δ13C: −21.9 to −15.0‰, δ15N: 6.7 to 9.9‰, δ34S: −1.2 to 9.9‰). Within Europe, we detected differences in hair δ13C and δ34S values among countries and covariation of isotope ratios with latitude and longitude. This geographic structuring of isotopic data suggests heterogeneity in the food resources used by citizens of industrialized nations and supports the presence of different dietary patterns within Western Europe despite globalization trends. Here we showed the potential of stable isotope analysis as a population-wide tool for dietary screening, particularly as a complement of dietary surveys, that can provide additional information on assimilated macronutrients and independent verification of data obtained by those self-reporting instruments. PMID:22479574

  15. Identifying the change in atmospheric sulfur sources in China using isotopic ratios in mosses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hua-Yun; Tang, Cong-Guo; Xiao, Hong-Wei; Liu, Xue-Yan; Liu, Cong-Qiang

    2009-08-01

    A considerable number of studies on rainwater sulfur isotopic ratios (δ34Srain) have been conducted to trace sulfur sources at a large number of sites in the past. If longitudinal studies on the isotope composition of precipitation sulfate were conducted, it is possible to relate that to changes in sulfur emissions. But direct measurement needs considerable labor and time. So, in this study, sulfur isotopic ratios in rainwater and mosses were analyzed at Guiyang and Nanchang to evaluate the possibility of using mosses as a substitute for rainwater. We found that present moss sulfur isotopic ratios were comparable to those of present rainwater. Additionally, we investigated the changes of atmospheric sulfur sources and sulfur concentrations using an isotopic graphic analysis at five industrial cities, two forested areas, and two remote areas in China. Mosses in industrial cities show a wide range of δ34S values, with the highest occurring at Chongqing (+3.9‰) and the lowest at Guiyang (-3.1‰). But as compared to those in forested and remote areas, δ34S values of mosses in all the five industrial cities are lower. On the basis of isotopic comparisons between past rainwater (reported in the literature) and present mosses, in the plot of δ34Smoss versus δ34Srain, six zones indicating different atmospheric sulfur change are separated by the 1:1 line and δ34S values of potential sulfur sources. Our results indicate that atmospheric sulfur pollution in most of the industrial cities decreased, while at the two forested areas, no significant changes were observed, and a new anxiousness coming from new energy sources (e.g., oil) appeared in some cities. Studies on the change of ambient SO2 concentrations support these results.

  16. Coupling groundwater residence time and 234U/238U isotopic ratios in a granitic catchment (Vosges, Eastern France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viville, Daniel; Aquilina, Luc; Ackerer, Julien; Chatton, Eliot; Labasque, Thierry; Pierret, Marie-Claire; Granet, Mathieu; Perrone, Thierry; Chabaux, François

    2016-04-01

    Weathering processes are active in surface waters but groundwater also represents no neglectable chemical fluxes. As residence-time in groundwater are high, silicate weathering might take place and control Si, Ca and C fluxes. Weathering processes can be deduced from U isotopic ratios but the kinetics of these processes remain relatively poorly constrained. In order to better characterize these processes, we have coupled residence-times deduced from anthropogenic gases (CFC and SF6) analysis and 234U/238U isotopic ratios determination. Samples were collected in the Strengbach catchment (Hydro-geochemical Observatory OHGE, Vosges, eastern France). Two campaigns were carried out in May and August 2015 during two highly contrasted hydro-climatic periods. Both springs and boreholes down to 80 m depth have been sampled. A very clear geochemical distinction is observed between groundwater from surface springs and deeper groundwater from boreholes. Springs show much lower residence-time (few years) and specific chemical composition. Deeper groundwater have residence-time of several decades and different geochemical composition. A clear SF6 production is observed with increasing SF6 concentrations with residence-time. The campaign of May is characterized by highly groundwater levels and spring fluxes. All groundwater show very low residence time, except in the boreholes at depth greater than 40 m. Conversely, during low groundwater-level period in August, the residence times are much higher and CFC concentrations indicate a large mixing process between surface groundwater and deeper levels. The 234U/238U isotopic ratios confirm this vertical zonation in the boreholes, with much higher activity ratios in the deep ground-waters from borehole than in the surface and spring waters; Such high U activity ratios are indicative of long water-rock interactions, which is consistent with the long residence times deducted from the CFC and SF6 data.

  17. Secular variation in carbon isotope ratios from Upper Proterozoic successions of Svalbard and East Greenland.

    PubMed

    Knoll, A H; Hayes, J M; Kaufman, A J; Swett, K; Lambert, I B

    1986-06-26

    Analyses of stratigraphically continuous suites of samples from Upper Proterozoic sedimentary successions of East Greenland, Spitsbergen and Nordaustlandet (Svalbard) provide an approximation to the secular variation in carbon isotope ratios during a geologically and biologically important period of change from around 900 million years ago to the beginning of the Cambrian period. Late Riphean carbonates and organic material show a stratigraphically useful pattern of enrichment in 13C relative to Phanerozoic or earlier Proterozoic samples. Isotopic compositions of isolated samples from other localities are consistent with a worldwide extended interval of enhanced organic burial and consequent net survival of oxidized material, probably O2, just before the initial radiation of metazoans.

  18. Improving precision in resonance ionization mass spectrometry : influence of laser bandwidth in uranium isotope ratio measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Isselhardt, B. H.; Savina, M. R.; Knight, K. B.; Pellin, M. J.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Prussin, S. G.

    2011-03-01

    The use of broad bandwidth lasers with automated feedback control of wavelength was applied to the measurement of {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U ratios by resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) to decrease laser-induced isotopic fractionation. By broadening the bandwidth of the first laser in a three-color, three-photon ionization process from a bandwidth of 1.8 GHz to about 10 GHz, the variation in sequential relative isotope abundance measurements decreased from 10% to less than 0.5%. This procedure was demonstrated for the direct interrogation of uranium oxide targets with essentially no sample preparation.

  19. Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry and Shale Gas - What Is Possible with Current Technology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrie, C. D.; Kasson, A.

    2014-12-01

    With ever increasing exploration and exploitation of 'unconventional' hydrocarbon resources, the drive to understand the origins, history and importance of these resources and their effects on the surrounding environment (i.e. ground waters) has never been more important. High-throughput, high-precision isotopic measurements are therefore a key tool in this industry to both understand the gas generated and monitor the development and stability of wells through time. With the advent of cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) instrumentation, there has been a push in some applications - environmental & atmospheric - to gather more and more data directly at the location of collection or at dedicated field stations. Furthermore, CRDS has resulted in users seeking greater autonomy of instrumentation and so-called black box technology. Traditionally IRMS technology has not met any of these demands, requiring very specific and extensive footprint, power and environmental requirements. This has meant that the 'Oil & Gas' sector, which for natural gases measurements requires GC-IRMS technology - not possible via CRDS - loses time, money and manpower as samples get sent to central facility or contract labs with potentially long lee times. However, recent developments in technology mean that IRMS systems exist which are benchtop, have much lower power requirements, standard power connections and as long as housed in a temperature controlled field stations can be deployed anywhere. Furthermore, with advances in electronics and software IRMS systems are approaching the black box level of newer instrumentation while maintaining the flexibility and abilities of isotope ratio mass spectrometry. This presentation will outline changes in IRMS technology applicable to the Oil & Gas industry, discuss the feasibility of true 'field' deployability and present results from a range of Oil & Gas samples.

  20. Organic carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of Arctic Amerasian Continental shelf sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidu, A. S.; Cooper, L. W.; Finney, B. P.; Macdonald, R. W.; Alexander, C.; Semiletov, I. P.

    2000-09-01

    Organic matter origins are inferred from carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in recent continental shelf sediments and major rivers from 465 locations from the north Bering-Chukchi-East Siberian-Beaufort Sea, Arctic Amerasia. Generally, there is a cross-shelf increase in δ13C, which is due to progressive increased contribution seaward of marine-derived organic carbon to surface sediments. This conclusion is supported by the correlations between sediment δ13C, OC/N, and δ15N. The sources of total organic carbon (TOC) to the Amerasian margin sediments are primarily from marine water-column phytoplankton and terrigenous C3 plants constituted of tundra taiga and angiosperms. In contrast to more temperate regions, the source of TOC from terrigenous C4 and CAM plants to the study area is probably insignificant because these plants do not exist in the northern high latitudes. The input of carbon to the northern Alaskan shelf sediments from nearshore kelp community (Laminaria solidungula) is generally insignificant as indicated by the absence of high sediment δ13C values (-16.5 to -13.6‰) which are typical of the macrophytes. Our study suggests that the isotopic composition of sediment TOC has potential application in reconstructing temporal changes in delivery and accumulation of organic matter resulting from glacial-interglacial changes in sea level and environments. Furthermore, recycling and advection of the extensive deposits of terrestrially derived organic matter from land, or the wide Amerasian margin, could be a mechanism for elevating total CO2 and pCO2 in the Arctic Basin halocline.

  1. Bayesian Integration of Isotope Ratio for Geographic Sourcing of Castor Beans

    DOE PAGES

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Kreuzer, Helen; Hart, Garret; ...

    2012-01-01

    Recenmore » t years have seen an increase in the forensic interest associated with the poison ricin, which is extracted from the seeds of the Ricinus communis plant. Both light element (C, N, O, and H) and strontium (Sr) isotope ratios have previously been used to associate organic material with geographic regions of origin. We present a Bayesian integration methodology that can more accurately predict the region of origin for a castor bean than individual models developed independently for light element stable isotopes or Sr isotope ratios. Our results demonstrate a clear improvement in the ability to correctly classify regions based on the integrated model with a class accuracy of 60.9 ± 2.1 % versus 55.9 ± 2.1 % and 40.2 ± 1.8 % for the light element and strontium (Sr) isotope ratios, respectively. In addition, we show graphically the strengths and weaknesses of each dataset in respect to class prediction and how the integration of these datasets strengthens the overall model.« less

  2. Bayesian Integration of Isotope Ratio for Geographic Sourcing of Castor Beans

    PubMed Central

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Kreuzer, Helen; Hart, Garret; Ehleringer, James; West, Jason; Gill, Gary; Duckworth, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increase in the forensic interest associated with the poison ricin, which is extracted from the seeds of the Ricinus communis plant. Both light element (C, N, O, and H) and strontium (Sr) isotope ratios have previously been used to associate organic material with geographic regions of origin. We present a Bayesian integration methodology that can more accurately predict the region of origin for a castor bean than individual models developed independently for light element stable isotopes or Sr isotope ratios. Our results demonstrate a clear improvement in the ability to correctly classify regions based on the integrated model with a class accuracy of 60.9 ± 2.1% versus 55.9 ± 2.1% and 40.2 ± 1.8% for the light element and strontium (Sr) isotope ratios, respectively. In addition, we show graphically the strengths and weaknesses of each dataset in respect to class prediction and how the integration of these datasets strengthens the overall model. PMID:22919270

  3. Bayesian integration of isotope ratio for geographic sourcing of castor beans.

    PubMed

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Kreuzer, Helen; Hart, Garret; Ehleringer, James; West, Jason; Gill, Gary; Duckworth, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increase in the forensic interest associated with the poison ricin, which is extracted from the seeds of the Ricinus communis plant. Both light element (C, N, O, and H) and strontium (Sr) isotope ratios have previously been used to associate organic material with geographic regions of origin. We present a Bayesian integration methodology that can more accurately predict the region of origin for a castor bean than individual models developed independently for light element stable isotopes or Sr isotope ratios. Our results demonstrate a clear improvement in the ability to correctly classify regions based on the integrated model with a class accuracy of 60.9 ± 2.1% versus 55.9 ± 2.1% and 40.2 ± 1.8% for the light element and strontium (Sr) isotope ratios, respectively. In addition, we show graphically the strengths and weaknesses of each dataset in respect to class prediction and how the integration of these datasets strengthens the overall model.

  4. Isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: methods for isotopic calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, D. A.; Brand, W. A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    In trial analyses of a series of n-alkanes, precise determinations of 13C contents were based on isotopic standards introduced by five different techniques and results were compared. Specifically, organic-compound standards were coinjected with the analytes and carried through chromatography and combustion with them; or CO2 was supplied from a conventional inlet and mixed with the analyte in the ion source, or CO2 was supplied from an auxiliary mixing volume and transmitted to the source without interruption of the analyte stream. Additionally, two techniques were investigated in which the analyte stream was diverted and CO2 standards were placed on a near-zero background. All methods provided accurate results. Where applicable, methods not involving interruption of the analyte stream provided the highest performance (sigma = 0.00006 at.% 13C or 0.06% for 250 pmol C as CO2 reaching the ion source), but great care was required. Techniques involving diversion of the analyte stream were immune to interference from coeluting sample components and still provided high precision (0.0001 < or = sigma < or = 0.0002 at.% or 0.1 < or = sigma < or = 0.2%).

  5. Determination of the Galaxy age by the method of uranium-thorium-plutonium isotopic ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, I. V.; Lutostansky, Yu. S.; Eichler, M.; Thielemann, F.-K.

    2017-07-01

    The dependence of the Galaxy age ( T G), as determined by the method of uranium-thorium isotopic ratios, on the parameters of the nucleosynthesis model is studied within the theory of galactic nucleosynthesis. It is shown that TG depends strongly both on the scenario of the production of nuclei in the r-process and those features of neutron-rich nuclei that are used in the respective analysis and on galactic-nucleosynthesis parameters. The effect of a sudden nucleosynthesis spike before the formation of a solar system on the Galaxy age is evaluated. The region of admissible values of the parameters of galacticnucleosynthesis theory is discussed. The method of uranium-thorium isotopic ratios is supplemented with the 244Pu/238U ratio for yet another cosmochronometer pair, and the Galaxy age is estimated on the basis of the model modified in this way.

  6. Canopy photosynthesis estimated from sapflux and stable carbon isotope ratios in northern Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. D.; Ubierna, N.; Kavanagh, K.; Pangle, R.; Powers, E.

    2008-12-01

    Canopy-scale estimates of photosynthesis have traditionally required either scaling up from a sample of leaf measurements or scaling down from eddy flux measurements contaminated by opposing carbon dioxide fluxes. We propose an alternative based on transpiration estimates using the well established Granier sapflux sensor and scaled by modifications of standard measurements of forest structure. The resulting sapflux estimates are converted to carbon uptake measurements by first estimating canopy conductance and then using stable carbon isotope ratios to estimate the ratio of carbon to water exchange. Carbon isotope ratios were measured on leaf bulk material, phloem contents, and the highly concentrated stem CO2 pool. As found elsewhere, leaves were highly depleted and did not provide adequate estimates. We used transfer conductances estimated in other work to adjust the carbon isotope ratios prior to estimating carbon-water exchange ratios. The resulting estimates were 11 Mg C ha-1 yr-1, well within the range to be expected based on net primar production (3.6 Mg C ha-1 yr-1) in these stands. We observed seasonal variation caused by both canopy conductance and changes in \\d13C. This method of estimating canopy photosynthesis provides an important test of one of the key, and hitherto poorly constrained, components of carbon budget analyses.

  7. Measurement of oxygen isotope ratios ((18)O/(16)O) of aqueous O2 in small samples by gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pati, Sarah G; Bolotin, Jakov; Brennwald, Matthias S; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Werner, Roland A; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2016-03-30

    Oxygen isotope fractionation of molecular O2 is an important process for the study of aerobic metabolism, photosynthesis, and formation of reactive oxygen species. The latter is of particular interest for investigating the mechanism of enzyme-catalyzed reactions, such as the oxygenation of organic pollutants, which is an important detoxification mechanism. We developed a simple method to measure the δ(18) O values of dissolved O2 in small samples using automated split injection for gas chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS). After creating a N2 headspace, the dissolved O2 partitions from aqueous solution to the headspace, from which it can be injected into the gas chromatograph. In aqueous samples of 10 mL and in diluted air samples, we quantified the δ(18) O values at O2 concentrations of 16 μM and 86 μM, respectively. The chromatographic separation of O2 and N2 with a molecular sieve column made it possible to use N2 as the headspace gas for the extraction of dissolved O2 from water. We were therefore able to apply a rigorous δ(18) O blank correction for the quantification of (18) O/(16) O ratios in 20 nmol of injected O2 . The successful quantification of (18) O-kinetic isotope effects associated with enzymatic and chemical reduction of dissolved O2 illustrates how the proposed method can be applied for studying enzymatic O2 activation mechanisms in a variety of (bio)chemical processes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Simultaneous measurement of CO2 concentration and isotopic ratios in gas samples using IRMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Eun-Ji; Lee, Dongho; Bong, Yeon-Sik; Lee, Kwang-Sik

    2014-05-01

    Isotopic methods are indispensable tools for studies on atmosphere-biosphere exchanges of CO2 and environmental monitoring such as CO2 leakage detection from subsurface carbon storages. CO2 concentration is an important variable in interpreting isotopic composition of CO2 especially in atmospheric applications (e.g., 'Keeling plot'). Optical methods such as CRDS (Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy) are gaining attention recently because of its capability to simultaneously measure CO2 concentration and isotopic ratios with a short measurement interval (up to 1 sec.). On the other hand, IRMS (Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer) has been used only for isotopic measurements. In this study, we propose a method to measure CO2 concentration from gas samples along with isotopic ratios using conventional IRMS system. The system consists of Delta V Plus IRMS interfaced with GasBench II (Thermo Scientific, Germany). 12-mL vials with open top screw cap and rubber septum were used for both gas sampling and analysis. For isotopic analysis, gases in the vials were transferred into GasBench II by He carrier flow and CO2 was trapped by a single cryotrap (-180 ºC) after passing a water trap (Mg(ClO4)2). Upon release of the cryotrap, liberated CO2 was separated from N2O using gas chromatography column inside the GasBench II and introduced online into the IRMS. Isotopic ratios were measured for the masses of 44, 45 and 46, and the peak intensity (mV of mass 44 and peak area) was recorded for the concentration calculation. For the determination of CO2 concentration, a calibration curve relating the peak intensity with molar concentration of CO2 was constructed. By dissolving NaHCO3 in de-ionized water, solutions containing 0.05, 0.1, 0.25 and 0.5 µmol of inorganic carbon were prepared in 12 mL vials. Phosphoric acid was injected through rubber septum of the vials to acidify the solution and released CO2 was analyzed for the isotopic ratios and the corresponding peak intensity was recorded

  9. Sulphur and oxygen isotope ratios in spruce needles as a tracer of atmospheric pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jędrysek, Mariusz Orion; Kalużny, Adam; Hoefs, Jochen

    2002-09-01

    The biospheric part of the anthropogenic sulphur cycle was investigated in a heavily polluted area at the northern slope of the Karkonosze Mountains, SW Poland. Norway spruce (Picea abies) needles, from a 900 m vertical transect (400 to 1300 m above sea level), were collected on two consecutive days of spring 1998 and one day of winter 1999. Concentrations of sulphate sulphur (SO42-), and organic sulphur (Sorg)n and isotope ratios of organic sulphur and sulphate from spruce needles have been analyzed. (SO42-)n and (Sorg)n were rather constant and δ34S(SO42-)n and δ34S(Sorg)n values increased with higher altitude. This is attributed to an increase in atmospheric SO2 concentration and light intensity, which enhance emission of 34S-depleted hydrogen sulphide (H2S) from needles. The δ18O(SO42-)n decreases with altitude due to the altitudinal 18O-depletion of atmospheric precipitation and increased formation of needle sulphate from atmospheric SO2. The isotope effect related to a reduction process during spring can also be seen at higher altitudes by a negative correlation between δ18O(SO42-)n versus (SO42-)n and δ34S(SO42-)n versus (SO42-)n of spring needles. Winter needles show an opposite trend of potential oxidation of the SO2 assimilated. The Δ34S(SO42- - Sorg)n value shows a very good correlation to the abundance of dust on needles. Higher abundances of dust may limit foliar gas exchange and thus higher Δ34S(SO42- - Sorg)n values reflect conditions which are closer to sulphur isotope equilibrium in the sulphate-organic sulphur system, whereas lower Δ34S(SO42- - Sorg)n values characterize a higher gas exchange rate and more dynamic conditions for the sulphur system in needles. Hydrogen sulphide emission is the most likely mechanism to control variations in the observed δ-values, and dust abundance may control variations in the Δ-values.

  10. Geospatial modeling of plant stable isotope ratios - the development of isoscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, J. B.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Hurley, J. M.; Cerling, T. E.

    2007-12-01

    Large-scale spatial variation in stable isotope ratios can yield critical insights into the spatio-temporal dynamics of biogeochemical cycles, animal movements, and shifts in climate, as well as anthropogenic activities such as commerce, resource utilization, and forensic investigation. Interpreting these signals requires that we understand and model the variation. We report progress in our development of plant stable isotope ratio landscapes (isoscapes). Our approach utilizes a GIS, gridded datasets, a range of modeling approaches, and spatially distributed observations. We synthesize findings from four studies to illustrate the general utility of the approach, its ability to represent observed spatio-temporal variability in plant stable isotope ratios, and also outline some specific areas of uncertainty. We also address two basic, but critical questions central to our ability to model plant stable isotope ratios using this approach: 1. Do the continuous precipitation isotope ratio grids represent reasonable proxies for plant source water?, and 2. Do continuous climate grids (as is or modified) represent a reasonable proxy for the climate experienced by plants? Plant components modeled include leaf water, grape water (extracted from wine), bulk leaf material ( Cannabis sativa; marijuana), and seed oil ( Ricinus communis; castor bean). Our approaches to modeling the isotope ratios of these components varied from highly sophisticated process models to simple one-step fractionation models to regression approaches. The leaf water isosocapes were produced using steady-state models of enrichment and continuous grids of annual average precipitation isotope ratios and climate. These were compared to other modeling efforts, as well as a relatively sparse, but geographically distributed dataset from the literature. The latitudinal distributions and global averages compared favorably to other modeling efforts and the observational data compared well to model predictions

  11. Along-strike magma mixing beneath mid-ocean ridges - Effects on isotopic ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenyon, P. M.; Turcotte, D. L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of mixing processes on the isotopic variability of midocean ridge basalts are studied. The processes considered are porous flow dispersion and convective mixing in magma chambers. Porous flow dispersion is capable of mixing magmas over distances of only a few tens of meters. Convective mixing, on the other hand, is found to produce continuous magma chambers, where mixing is limited by convective processes, and for discontinuous chambers, where mixing is limited by chamber size. Preliminary comparison of the calculations with observations along the midocean ridges shows that the calculations are consistent with the existence of a correlation between bathymetry and isotopic ratio at long, but not at short, wavelengths. They are also capable of explaining a decrease in isotopic variability with increasing spreading rate.

  12. Effects of distilled water rinsing on stable isotope ratios of acid-treated marine invertebrate (Paguridae) samples.

    PubMed

    Guerin, Andrew J; Jensen, Antony C; McGill, Rona A R

    2013-09-30

    Stable isotope ratios are widely used to infer trophic relationships, although a growing number of studies show that sample pre-treatments (such as acidification to remove carbonates) can cause changes in isotope ratios. Samples are often rinsed in distilled water after acidification, and we examine the effects of this step in particular on the isotope ratios of marine invertebrate samples. Samples of whole hermit crabs (Paguridae) were subjected to one of three treatments: acidification using dilute hydrochloric acid without subsequent distilled water rinsing; acidification with rinsing; and rinsing with no acidification. Continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry was used to compare the mean carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of treated and untreated material. Acidification (both with and without subsequent distilled water rinsing) resulted in reductions in mean δ(13)C values (1.939 and 3.146‰, respectively), while rinsing without prior acidification led to a smaller (but still significant) increase. Nitrogen isotope ratios were not affected by acidification, but subsequent rinsing with distilled water caused a decrease of approximately 1‰. Acidification of samples is clearly necessary in the presence of carbonates to obtain useful carbon isotope ratio data. However, post-acidification rinsing can result in further (potentially undesirable) changes to both carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios. Ideally, rinsing should be avoided, but the impacts are small enough to be of little concern in many studies. Rinsing (or not) should be considered carefully on the basis of the aims of a study. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Osmium-isotope ratios of platinum-group minerals associated with ultramafic intrusions: Os-isotopic evolution of the oceanic mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Keiko; Hart, Stanley R.

    1991-12-01

    Osmium-isotope ratios were determined by an ion microprobe on the individual platinum-group minerals (PGM) from placers, which are associated with ultramafic intrusions of late Precambrian to Tertiary age. Unlike Os-isotope ratios in large layered mafic intrusions, these 187Os/ 186Os ratios are low, and within a narrow range from 0.99 to 1.12, which is attributed to the occurrences of the intrusions. There was no opportunity to incorporate old crustal Os because of the small sizes of the intrusions and the mode of emplacement into the upper crustal level. In addition, the interaction with the host volcanic rocks of similar age, if any, would not have seriously affected the 187Os/ 86Os ratios of the peridotites. While different phases of PGM in one grain have similar 187Os/ 186Os ratios, there is a significant variation in a given district. The variation is attributed to a long-term heterogeneity in Re/Os ratios of the oceanic upper mantle. The lowest value in each area is lower than the value expected from the evolution of bulk Earth composition. The lowering may be due to primordially low Re/Os ratios in the mantle or preferential removal of Re by partial melting to form the continental crust. The former model is rejected because most chondrites have higher Re/Os ratios than type C1 and the core-mantle separation would not have lowered Re/Os ratios. The low 187Os/ 186Os ratios are, therefore attributed to the extraction of continental crust by preferential removal of Re from the mantle through partial melting. The model is consistent with the depleted nature of oceanic peridotites (positive ɛ Nd, negative ɛ Sr, and low Re/Os ratios). Calculations of 187Os/ 186Os ratios of the mantle residue suggest that the observed data are in accordance with a model involving the extraction of ˜ 2% melt by fractional fusion from the mantle of C1 chondritic composition at ˜ 2.0 Ga. If the bulk Earth has higher Re/Os ratios, as proposed by Martin [1], then the observed data

  14. Performance and limits of liquid chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry system for halogenated compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilevska, Tetyana; Gehre, Matthias; Richnow, Hans

    2014-05-01

    Compound Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA) has been an important step for the assessment of the origin and fate of compounds in environmental science.[1] Biologically or pharmaceutically important compounds often are not amenable for gas chromatographic separation because of high polarity and lacking volatility, thermostability. In 2004 liquid chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS) became commercially available. LC-IRMS system intent a quantitative conversion of analytes separation into CO2 via wet oxidation with sodium persulfate in the presence of phosphoric acid while analytes are still dissolved in the aqueous liquid phase.[2] The aim of this study is to analyze the oxidation capacity of the interface of the LC-IRMS system and determine which parameters could improve oxidation of compounds which are resistant to persulfate oxidation. Oxidation capacity of the liquid chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry system was tested with halogenated acetic acid and a set of aromatic compounds with different substitutes. Acetic acid (AA) was taken as a model compound for complete oxidation and compared to the oxidation of other analytes on a molar basis. Correct values were obtained for di- and mono chlorinated and fluorinated and also for tribrominated acetic acid and for all studied aromatic compounds. Incomplete oxidation for trichloroacetic (TCAA) and trifluoroacetic (TFAA) acid was revealed with lower recovery compared to acetic acid and isotope fractionation leading to depleted carbon isotope composition compared to values obtained with an elementary analyzer connected to an isotope mass spectrometer Several optimization steps were tried in order to improve the oxidation of TCAA and TFAA: (i) increasing the concentration of the oxidizing agent, (ii) variation of flow rate of the oxidizing and acid solution, (iii) variation of flow rate of liquid chromatography pump (iv) addition of a catalyzer. These modifications lead to longer reaction time

  15. The Effect of Aerosol Formation on Stable Isotopes Ratio in Titan's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Thomas; Trainer, Melissa G.; Sebree, Joshua; Wold, Allison; Stern, Jennifer

    2016-10-01

    The formation of large amounts of aerosol in Titan atmosphere induces a significant sink for carbon and nitrogen in the atmosphere. Due to the high complexity of the chemistry leading to aerosol formation, there may be isotopic fractionation along the formation pathways of the aerosol. So far several stable isotopes have been measured in Titan atmosphere including the 13C/12C, 15N/14N and D/H ratios for different gaseous species. However, the fractionation effect of the aerosol formation and its impact on atmospheric stable isotope ratios has yet to be fully understood. Two experimental studies were recently published on the stable carbon [1] and nitrogen [1,2] isotope fractionation during aerosol formation in N2-CH4 reactant mixture. To better constrain the fractionation effect of aerosol formation on the Titan atmosphere we have measured the isotopic fractionation induced in laboratory aerosol analogues produced exploring the space of parameters that are expected to have an effect on fractionation processes. Parameters studied include pressure and temperature of aerosol formation and the reactant gas phase composition, including the standard "Titan" mixture of CH4/N2 as well as other trace species such as benzene (C6H6).[1] Sebree, J.A., Stern, J.C., Mandt, K.E., Domagal-Goldman, S.D., and Trainer, M.G.: C and N Fractionation of CH /N Mixtures during Photochemical Aerosol Formation: Relevance to Titan, (2016) Icarus 270:421-428[2] Kuga, M., Carrasco, N., Marty, B., Marrochi, Y., Bernard, S., Rigaudier, T., Fleury, B., Tissandier, L.: Nitrogen isotopic fractionation during abiotic synthesis of organic solid particles, (2014) EPSL 393:2-13

  16. S Isotope Ratios of Central Italy Waters to Assess Their Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castorina, Francesca; Masi, Umberto

    2010-05-01

    Sr isotopes have so far applied only occasionally to the study of the waters from central Italy. Therefore, we have analyzed more than 30 water samples from thermal and cold springs, and from the lakes located in the Quaternary K-alkaline volcanic districts of Latium, aimed at providing significant information on the sources of Sr and the hydrologic circulation. The 87Sr/86Sr composition of the waters shows a general correlation with the aquifer rocks, resulting in the waters from older carbonatic rocks having a less radiogenic signature than those from younger K-alkaline volcanic rocks. The Sr-isotope ratios of most thermal waters range narrowly by 0.708, indicating a common source of Sr, likely represented by the Upper Triassic Burano Anhydrites, i.e. the lowermost permeable formation in the study area. Moreover, the positive correlation between Sr and Ca suggests that bulk Ca was also supplied from that source. A minor number of thermal waters as well as all the waters from the lakes and cold springs display a larger Sr isotopic range (0.7085-0.7115), suggesting a relative large spectrum of sources for Sr. In particular, some waters derive their Sr from a singular source, but the most show isotopic signatures suggestive of mixed contributions from different aquifers. As a whole, the results from this study confirm that Sr isotopes are a useful tool contributing to explain the geochemical characteristics of surficial and groundwaters.

  17. Measurement of Sulfur Isotope Ratios in Micrometer-Sized Aerosol Samples by NanoSIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterholler, B.; Hoppe, P.; Foley, S.; Andreae, M. O.

    2005-12-01

    The isotopic composition of sulfur in the atmosphere is highly variable and source dependent. Sulfur isotopic ratios are a well established tool for identifying sources of sulfur in the environment, estimating emission factors, and tracing the spread of sulfur from anthropogenic point sources in terrestrial ecosystems. Conventional mass spectrometry needs a minimum of 1 micromol of sulfur to perform one analysis. In the case of atmospheric aerosol particles the results of such an analysis averages the isotopic compositions of millions of aerosol particles, and thus normally includes several different types of sulfur aerosol. The new Cameca NanoSIMS 50 ion microprobe technique permits analysis of individual aerosol particles with volumes down to 0.3 cubic micron and a precision for delta34S of 3-10 (2 sigma). As a result, this technique is able to introduce a new scale into the study of the atmospheric sulfur cycle. Linking the chemical, mineralogical, morphological and isotopic information of individual particles will allow a better understanding of external and internal mixing states by analyzing more than one spot on coarse mode particles. Moreover it will improve source identification by complementing the chemical and isotopic information. First samples have been collected from the Sahara desert, an urban site in central Europe, and a costal site in Western Ireland and show the potentials of this new technique.

  18. Nitrogen-isotope ratios of nitrate in ground water under fertilized fields, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flipse, W.J.; Bonner, F.T.

    1985-01-01

    Ground-water samples from two heavily fertilized sites in Suffolk County, New York, were collected through the 1978 growing season and analyzed for nitrate-N concentrations and nitrogen-isotope ratios. Six wells were at a potato farm; six were on a golf course. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the 15N/14N ratios (??15N values) of fertilizer are increased during transit from land surface to ground water to an extent which would preclude use of this ratio to distinguish agricultural from animal sources of nitrate in ground water. Ground water at both sites contained a greater proportion of 15N than the fertilizers being applied. At the potato farm, the average ??15N value of the fertilizers was 0.2???; the average ??15N value of the ground-water nitrate was 6.2???. At the golf course, the average ??15N value of the fertilizers was -5.9???, and that of ground-water nitrate was 6.5???. The higher ??15N values of ground-water nitrate are probably caused by isotopic fractionation during the volatile loss of ammonia from nitrogen applied in reduced forms (NH4+ and organic-N). The ??15N values of most ground-water samples from both areas were less than 10???, the upper limit of the range characteristic of agricultural sources of nitrate; these sources include both fertilizer nitrate and nitrate derived from increased mineralization of soil nitrogen through cultivation. Previous studies have shown that the ??15N values of nitrate derived from human or animal waste generally exceed 10???. The nitrogen-isotope ratios of fertilizer-derived nitrate were not altered to an extent that would make them indistinguishable from animal-waste-derived nitrates in ground water.Ground-water samples from two heavily fertilized sites in Suffolk County, New York, were collected through the 1978 growing season and analyzed for nitrate-N concentrations and nitrogen-isotope ratios. Six wells were at a potato farm; six were on a golf course. The purpose of this study was to

  19. Forensic utility of carbon isotope ratio variations in PVC tape backings.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Marianne E; Stern, Libby A; Mehltretter, Andria Hobbs; Parish, Ashley; McLasky, Velvet; Aranda, Roman

    2012-03-01

    Forensic interest in adhesive tapes with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) backings (electrical tape) derives from their use in a variety of illicit activities. Due to the range of physical characteristics, chemical compositions, and homogeneity within a single roll of tape, traditional microscopic and chemical analyses can offer a high degree of discrimination between tapes, permitting the assessment of potential associations between evidentiary tape samples. The carbon isotope ratios of tapes could provide additional discrimination among tape samples. To evaluate whether carbon isotope ratios may be able to increase discrimination of electrical tapes, particularly with regards to different rolls of tape of the same product, we assessed the δ(13)C values of backings from 87 rolls of PVC-based black electrical tape (~20 brands, >60 products) Prior to analysis, adhesives were removed to prevent contamination by adhering debris, and plasticizers were extracted because of concern over their potential mobility. This result is consistent with each of these tapes having approximately the same plasticizer δ(13)C value and proportion of carbon in these plasticizers. The δ(13)C values of the 87 PVC tape backings ranged between -23.5 and -41.3 (‰, V-PDB), with negligible carbon isotopic variation within single rolls of tape, yet large variations among tape brands and tape products. Within this tape population, carbon isotope ratios permitted an average exclusion power of 93.7%, using a window of +/-0.3‰; the combination of carbon isotope ratio measurement with additional chemical and physical analyses raises the discrimination power to over 98.9%, with only 41 out of a possible 3741 pairs of tape samples being indistinguishable. There was a linear relationship between the δ(13)C value of tape backings and the change in δ(13)C value with the extraction of plasticizers. Analyses of pre- and post-blast tape sample pairs show that carbon isotope signatures are within 0.3‰ of

  20. The fractionation factors of stable carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios for VOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, H.

    2014-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are important precursors of ozone and secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere, some of which are carcinogenic, teratogenic, or mutagenic. VOCs in ambient air originate from many sources, including vehicle exhausts, gasoline evaporation, solvent use, natural gas emissions, and industrial processes, and undergo intricate chemical reactions in the atmosphere. To develop efficient air pollution remediation strategies, it is important to clearly identify the emission sources and elucidate the reaction mechanisms in the atmosphere. Recently, stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of VOCs in some sources and ambient air have been measured by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). In this study, we measured δ13C and stable hydrogen isotope ratios (δD) of atmospheric VOCs by using the gas chromatography/thermal conversion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled with a thermal desorption instrument (TD-GC/TC/IRMS). The wider δD differences between sources were found in comparison with the δ13C studies. Therefore, determining δD values of VOCs in ambient air is potentially useful in identifying VOC sources and their reactive behavior in the atmosphere. However, to elucidate the sources and behavior of atmospheric VOCs more accurately, isotopic fractionation during atmospheric reaction must be considered. In this study, we determined isotopic fractionation of the δ13C and δD values for the atmospheric some VOCs under irradiation conditions. As the results, δ13C for target all VOCs and δD for most VOCs were increasing after irradiation. But, the δD values for both benzene and toluene tended to decrease as irradiation time increased. We also estimated the fractionation factors for benzene and toluene, 1.27 and 1.05, respectively, which differed from values determined in previous studies. In summary, we were able to identify an inverse isotope effect for the δD values of benzene and toluene

  1. Boron abundances and isotopic ratios of olivine grains on Itokawa returned by the Hayabusa spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiya, Wataru; Hoppe, Peter; Ott, Ulrich

    2016-09-01

    We report the B abundances and isotopic ratios of two olivine grains from the S-type asteroid Itokawa sampled by the Hayabusa spacecraft. Olivine grains from the Dar al Gani (DaG) 989 LL6 chondrite were used as a reference. Since we analyzed polished thin sections in both cases, we expect the contribution from the solar wind B (rich in 10B) to be minimal because the solar wind was implanted only within very thin layers of the grain surface. The Itokawa and DaG 989 olivine grains have homogeneous B abundances (~400 ppb) and 11B/10B ratios compatible with the terrestrial standard and bulk chondrites. The observed homogeneous B abundances and isotopic ratios of the Itokawa olivine grains are likely the result of thermal metamorphism which occurred in the parent asteroid of Itokawa, which had a similar composition as LL chondrites. The chondritic B isotopic ratios of the Itokawa samples suggest that they contain little cosmogenic B (from cosmic-ray spallation reactions) rich in 10B. This observation is consistent with the short cosmic-ray exposure ages of Itokawa samples inferred from the small concentrations of cosmogenic 21Ne. If other Itokawa samples have little cosmogenic B as well, the enrichment in 10B found previously on the surface of another Itokawa particle (as opposed to the bulk grain study here) may be attributed to implanted solar wind B.

  2. Advances in Instrumentation for Quantification of Isotopic Nitrous Oxide from ppb levels to 100%

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, F.; Gupta, M.; Leen, J.; Provencal, R. A.; Owano, T. G.; Baer, D. S.

    2013-12-01

    The isotopic composition of trace gases provides information of their origin and fate that cannot be determined from their concentration measurements alone. Biological source and loss processes, like bacterial production of nitrous oxide, are typically accompanied by isotopic selectivity associated with the kinetics of bond formation and destruction. Of the three important biologically mediated greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4 and N2O), the understanding of nitrous oxide isotopic budget in air lags behind the other two gases primarily due to the relatively low concentration of N2O in ambient air (~320 ppb). Furthermore, the origin of nitrates in rivers, lakes, ocean and other water supplies may be determined from analyses of isotopic nitrous oxide produced via chemical reduction or biological conversion. These processes can produce nitrous oxide at levels considerably greater than those present in ambient air. To date, analyses of isotopic nitrous oxide requires either pre-concentration of samples containing low concentrations or dilution of samples with high concentrations. We report significant advances of instrumentation for real-time measurements of site-specific isotopic nitrogen (δ15Nα, δ15Nβ, δ15N, δ18O) and mixing ratio [N2O] of nitrous oxide over a very wide range of mole fractions in air. Specifically, LGR's Isotopic N2O Analyzer can report site-specific isotopic nitrogen and isotopic oxygen continuously in flows ranging from 0.2 to over 20 ppm (parts per million) nitrous oxide in air (with preconcentration or dilution). Furthermore, for samples of limited volume, a batch technique may be used for similar isotopic measurements in discrete samples containing 0.2 ppm to 100% nitrous oxide (e.g., sample volumes from bacterial digestion can be as little as 1-10 mL). This novel technology, which employs cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (Off-Axis ICOS) and a mid-infrared laser (4.56 microns) and does not require any cryogenic components, has been

  3. Concentrations of iodine isotopes ((129)I and (127)I) and their isotopic ratios in aerosol samples from Northern Germany.

    PubMed

    Daraoui, A; Riebe, B; Walther, C; Wershofen, H; Schlosser, C; Vockenhuber, C; Synal, H-A

    2016-04-01

    New data about (129)I, (127)I concentrations and their isotopic ratios in aerosol samples from the trace survey station of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig, Northern Germany, are presented and discussed in this paper. The investigated samples were collected on a weekly basis during the years 2011 to 2013. Iodine was extracted from aerosol filters using a strong basic solution and was separated from the matrix elements with chloroform and was analysed by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for (129)I and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for (127)I. The concentrations of (127)I and (129)I in aerosol filters ranged from 0.31 to 3.71 ng m(-3) and from 0.06 to 0.75 fg m(-3), respectively. The results of (129)I/(127)I isotopic ratios were in the order 10(-8) to 10(-7). The (129)I originated directly from gaseous emissions and indirectly from liquid emissions (via sea spray) from the reprocessing plants in Sellafield and La Hague. In comparison with the results of (131)I after the Fukushima accident, no contribution of (129)I from this accident was detectable in Central Europe due to the high background originating from the (129)I releases of the European reprocessing plants. (129)I atmospheric activity concentrations were compared with those of an anthropogenic radionuclide ((85)Kr). We did not find any correlation between (129)I and (85)Kr, both having nuclear reprocessing plant as the main source.

  4. Flow injection analysis-isotope ratio mass spectrometry for bulk carbon stable isotope analysis of alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Jochmann, Maik A; Steinmann, Dirk; Stephan, Manuel; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2009-11-25

    A new method for bulk carbon isotope ratio determination of water-soluble samples is presented that is based on flow injection analysis-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (FIA-IRMS) using an LC IsoLink interface. Advantages of the method are that (i) only very small amounts of sample are required (2-5 microL of the sample for up to 200 possible injections), (ii) it avoids complex sample preparation procedures such as needed for EA-IRMS analysis (only sample dilution and injection,) and (iii) high throughput due to short analysis times is possible (approximately 15 min for five replicates). The method was first tested and evaluated as a fast screening method with industrially produced ethanol samples, and additionally the applicability was tested by the measurement of 81 alcoholic beverages, for example, whiskey, brandy, vodka, tequila, and others. The minimal sample concentration required for precise and reproducible measurements was around 50 microL L(-1) ethanol/water (1.71 mM carbon). The limit of repeatability was determined to be r=0.49%. FIA-IRMS represents a fast screening method for beverage authenticity control. Due to this, samples can be prescreened as a decisive criterion for more detailed investigations by HPLC-IRMS or multielement GC-IRMS measurements for a verification of adulteration.

  5. Stable isotope ratios as indicators of trophic status: Uncertainties imposed by geographic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1995-12-31

    Isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen are often suggested as indicators to determine trophic status and carbon sources of marine organisms in explaining relative concentrations of pollutants. Whereas this technique is effective with organisms resident in ecosystems having homogeneous primary productivity regimes and uniform isotope ratios in the productivity base, it often is confounded by migratory movements by larger organisms across isotopic gradients. Tissues containing a temporal record such as baleen plates or whiskers show these effects clearly. Bowhead whales in Alaskan waters seasonally move across carbon isotope gradients of 5{per_thousand} in zooplankton and reflect these differences in the keratin of baleen plates and in overall body composition. However, no significant differences in {delta}{sup 15}N are evident regionally in northern Alaskan zooplankton. In contrast, the Southern Ocean is characterized by extreme latitudinal gradients in both {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 15}N with the most pronounced effects occurring at the subtropical convergence. Prey taken by marine mammals south of this zone are depleted in both {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C by up to 8{per_thousand}. Data on southern right whales (Eubalaena glacialis), Bryde`s whale (Balaenoptera edenl), pygmy right whales (Caperea marginate) and antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalos gazella) show the effects of migratory movements across the gradient in both carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios. Similar patterns in marine mammal tissues from Australia, South Africa and South America indicate that the observed patterns are circumpolar. Within a given region, trophic effects shift {delta}{sup 15}N values consistent with observed feeding habits.

  6. Identification of Marchfeld asparagus using Sr isotope ratio measurements by MC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Swoboda, S; Brunner, M; Boulyga, S F; Galler, P; Horacek, M; Prohaska, T

    2008-01-01

    This work focuses on testing and application of Sr isotope signatures for the fast and reliable authentication and traceability of Asparagus officinalis originating from Marchfeld, Austria, using multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after optimised Rb/Sr separation. The major sample pool comprises freeze-dried and microwave-digested asparagus samples from Hungary and Slovakia which are compared with Austrian asparagus originating from the Marchfeld region, which is a protected geographical indication. Additional samples from Peru, The Netherlands and Germany were limited in number and allowed therefore only restricted statistical evaluation. Asparagus samples from Marchfeld were harvested within two subsequent years in order to investigate the annual variation. The results show that the Sr isotope ratio is consistent within these 2 years of investigation. Moreover, the Sr isotope ratio of total Sr in soil was found to be significantly higher than in an NH4NO3 extract, reflecting the mobile (bioavailable) phase. The isotope composition in the latter extract corresponds well to the range found in the asparagus samples in Marchfeld, even though the concentration of Sr in asparagus shows no direct correlation to the concentration of Sr in the mobile phase of the soil. The major question was whether the 'Marchfelder Spargel' can be distinguished from samples from the neighbouring countries of Hungary and Slovakia. According to our findings, they can be clearly (100%) singled out from the Hungarian samples and can be distinguished from the Slovakian asparagus samples with a probability of more than 80%.

  7. Carbon isotope ratio monitoring-gas chromatography mass spectrometric measurements in the marine environment: biomarker sources and paleoclimate applications.

    PubMed

    Tolosa, I; Lopez, J F; Bentaleb, I; Fontugne, M; Grimalt, J O

    1999-09-30

    Some applications in the use of compound-specific isotopic analyses (CSIA) for biomarker source elucidation in the marine environment and its potential applications to paleoclimatology are evaluated in the present study. The potential use of the carbon isotope ratios of marine biomarkers as recorders of CO2 levels has been considered. A significant correlation between delta 13C cholesterol of suspended particulates and seawater CO2 concentrations from the south Indian Ocean has been found. delta 13C composition in biomarkers of different functionalities from three photosynthetic organisms has been examined. Small variations within and between biosynthetically related compound classes have been observed in cyanobacteria. In algae, e.g. diatoms and dinoflagellates, significant differences between the average delta 13C composition of fatty acids and sterols were observed (7.5/1000 and 2/1000, respectively). These differences can be attributed to diverse isotope effects associated with different biosynthetic reactions. Isotopic variations among homologues of the same lipid class have also been observed. In diatoms, variations were up to 5/1000 within each class of fatty acids and sterols and in the dinoflagellate species, these variations were lower than 3/1000. These differences, and particularly the intra-specific shifts in delta 13C lipid composition, must be considered for the correct interpretation of changes in delta 13C molecular signatures in the marine environment.

  8. Concentrations and activity ratios of uranium isotopes in groundwater from Doñana National Park, South of Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolívar, J. P.; Olías, M.; González-García, F.; García-Tenorio, R.

    2008-08-01

    The levels and distribution of natural radionuclides in groundwaters from the unconfined Almonte-Marismas aquifer, upon which Doñana National Park is located, have been analysed. Most sampled points were multiple piezometers trying to study the vertical distribution of the hydrogeochemical characteristics in the aquifer. Temperature, pH, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen and redox potential were determined in the field. A large number of parameters, physico-chemical properties, major and minor ions, trace elements and natural radionuclides (U-isotopes, Th-isotopes, Ra-isotopes and 210Po), were also analysed. In the southern zone, where aeolian sands crop out, water composition is of the sodium chloride type, and the lower U-isotopes concentrations have been obtained. As water circulates through the aquifer, bicarbonate and calcium concentrations increase slightly, and higher radionuclides concentrations were measured. Finally, we have demonstrated that 234U/238U activity ratios can be used as markers of the type of groundwater and bedrock, as it has been the case for old waters with marine origin confined by a marsh in the south-east part of aquifer.

  9. Potential uses of stable isotope ratios of Sr, Nd, and Pb in geological materials for environmental studies

    PubMed Central

    NAKANO, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    The ratios of stable isotopes of certain elements in rocks and minerals have strong regional characteristics that are reflected in atmospheric components, in water, and in the living organisms that form Earth’s surface environment as well as in agricultural and fishery products. Geologically derived stable isotope ratios can be used as a tracer for the source of many kinds of substances, with current geochemical techniques allowing the precise determination of numerous stable isotope ratios in both natural and manmade objects. This review presents examples of the use of stable isotopes as tracers within diverse dynamic ecosystems, focusing on Sr isotopes but also including examples of Nd and Pb isotopic analysis, and reviewing the potential of this technique for a wide range of environmental research, including determining the geographic origin of food and archeological materials. PMID:27302069

  10. Potential uses of stable isotope ratios of Sr, Nd, and Pb in geological materials for environmental studies.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    The ratios of stable isotopes of certain elements in rocks and minerals have strong regional characteristics that are reflected in atmospheric components, in water, and in the living organisms that form Earth's surface environment as well as in agricultural and fishery products. Geologically derived stable isotope ratios can be used as a tracer for the source of many kinds of substances, with current geochemical techniques allowing the precise determination of numerous stable isotope ratios in both natural and manmade objects. This review presents examples of the use of stable isotopes as tracers within diverse dynamic ecosystems, focusing on Sr isotopes but also including examples of Nd and Pb isotopic analysis, and reviewing the potential of this technique for a wide range of environmental research, including determining the geographic origin of food and archeological materials.

  11. A synthesis of isotope ratios in precipitation from an assimilation of GNIP observations in a climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noone, D.; Horlick, K. A.; Nusbaumer, J. M.; Anderson, D. M.; Emile-Geay, J.; Hakim, G. J.; Perkins, W. A.; Steig, E. J.; Tardif, R.

    2016-12-01

    The vast paucity of information on the hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios in precipitation continues to hinder progress on using isotopic methods in several related research areas. Despite continuous operation of the Global Network for Isotope Ratios in Precipitation (GNIP) for over half a century, substantial gaps in space and time that restrict hydrological, climatological and ecological research opportunities require more complete datasets. Previous efforts to spatially interpolate existing isotope ratio data has focused on geospatial methods that include some account of pertinent correlative features (including dependence on temperature, altitude and precipitation amount). These approaches have been successful to some degree, however simple interpolation methods (e.g., Kriging) broadly omit account of atmospheric circulation which is known to strongly influence isotope ratios at some locations. Further these mapping methods have focused on generating climatological maps rather than resolving temporal variability. Alternatively, climate models fitted with isotopic tracers produce a map of isotope ratios in precipitation that is consistent with the models' internal dynamics, but at the cost of being a simulation rather than observationally based. Here we use a data assimilation approach that was designed for paleoclimate reconstruction to produce a gridded and temporally complete analysis of the stable isotope ratios in precipitation spanning the 20th Century. The assimilation blends observed meteorology and isotope ratio data with output from the isotopic version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model. The success of the method is measured by comparison with existing GNIP station data. We discuss the quantitative advantages of the result in contrast to geospatial methods and the need for resumed and expanded effort in collecting isotope ratio data from precipitation samples to better constrain assimilated datasets.

  12. Determination of tin isotope ratios in cassiterite by femtosecond laser ablation multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Marie; Ziegerick, Marco; Horn, Ingo; Weyer, Stefan; Vogt, Carla

    2017-04-01

    In comparison to isotope analysis of dissolved samples femtosecond laser ablation multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (fs-LA-MC-ICP-MS) enables precise isotope ratio analyses consuming much less sample material and with a minimum effort in sample preparation. This is especially important for the investigation of valuable historical objects for which visual traces of sampling are unwanted. The present study provides a basis for tin isotope ratio measurements using LA-MC-ICP-MS technique. For this, in house isotope standards had to be defined. Investigations on interferences and matrix effects illustrate that beside Sb only high Te contents (with values above those to be expected in cassiterite) result in a significant shift of the measured tin isotope ratios. This effect can partly be corrected for using natural isotope abundances. However, a natural isotope fractionation of Te cannot be excluded. Tin beads reduced from cassiterite were analysed by laser ablation and after dissolution. It was shown that tin isotope ratios can be determined accurately by using fs-LA-MC-ICP-MS. Furthermore the homogeneity of tin isotope ratios in cassiterite was proven.

  13. Advancement and application of gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry techniques for atmospheric trace gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giebel, Brian M.

    2011-12-01

    The use of gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) for compound specific stable isotope analysis is an underutilized technique because of the complexity of the instrumentation and high analytical costs. However stable isotopic data, when coupled with concentration measurements, can provide additional information on a compounds production, transformation, loss, and cycling within the biosphere and atmosphere. A GC-IRMS system was developed to accurately and precisely measure delta13C values for numerous oxygenated volatile organic compounds having natural and anthropogenic sources. The OVOCs include methanol, ethanol, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, 2-pentanone, and 3-pentanone. Guided by the requirements for analysis of trace components in air, the GC-IRMS system was developed with the goals of increasing sensitivity, reducing dead-volume and peak band broadening, optimizing combustion and water removal, and decreasing the split ratio to the IRMS. The technique relied on a two-stage preconcentration system, a low-volume capillary reactor and water trap, and a balanced reference gas delivery system. Measurements were performed on samples collected from two distinct sources (i.e. biogenic and vehicle emissions) and ambient air collected from downtown Miami and Everglades National Park. However, the instrumentation and the method have the capability to analyze a variety of source and ambient samples. The measured isotopic signatures that were obtained from source and ambient samples provide a new isotopic constraint for atmospheric chemists and can serve as a new way to evaluate their models and budgets for many OVOCs. In almost all cases, OVOCs emitted from fuel combustion were enriched in 13C when compared to the natural emissions of plants. This was particularly true for ethanol gas emitted in vehicle exhaust, which was observed to have a uniquely enriched isotopic signature that was attributed to ethanol's corn origin and use as an alternative

  14. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurement of isotope ratios in depleted uranium contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, Michael D

    2003-09-01

    Laser ablation of pressed soil pellets was examined as a means of direct sample introduction to enable inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) screening of soils for residual depleted uranium (DU) contamination. Differentiation between depleted uranium, an anthropogenic contaminant, and naturally occurring uranium was accomplished on the basis of measured 235U/238U isotope ratios. The amount of sample preparation required for laser ablation is considerably less than that typically required for aqueous sample introduction. The amount of hazardous laboratory waste generated is diminished accordingly. During the present investigation, 235U/238U isotope ratios measured for field samples were in good agreement with those derived from gamma spectrometry measurements. However, substantial compensation was required to mitigate the effects of impaired pulse counting attributed to sample inhomogeneity and sporadic introduction of uranium analyte into the plasma.

  15. The jackknife as an approach for uncertainty assessment in gamma spectrometric measurements of uranium isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramebäck, H.; Vesterlund, A.; Tovedal, A.; Nygren, U.; Wallberg, L.; Holm, E.; Ekberg, C.; Skarnemark, G.

    2010-08-01

    The jackknife as an approach for uncertainty estimation in gamma spectrometric uranium isotope ratio measurements was evaluated. Five different materials ranging from depleted uranium (DU) to high enriched uranium (HEU) were measured using gamma spectrometry. High resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS) was used as a reference method for comparing the results obtained with the gamma spectrometric method. The relative combined uncertainty in the gamma spectrometric measurements of the 238U/ 235U isotope ratio using the jackknife was about 10-20% ( k = 2), which proved to be fit-for-purpose in order to distinguish between different uranium categories. Moreover, the enrichment of 235U in HEU could be measured with an uncertainty of 1-2%.

  16. Determination of the Geographical Origin of All Commercial Hake Species by Stable Isotope Ratio (SIR) Analysis.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Mónica; Gallardo, José M

    2017-02-08

    The determination of the geographical origin of food products is relevant to comply with the legal regulations of traceability, to avoid food fraud, and to guarantee food quality and safety to the consumers. For these reasons, stable isotope ratio (SIR) analysis using an isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) instrument is one of the most useful techniques for evaluating food traceability and authenticity. The present study was aimed to determine, for the first time, the geographical origin for all commercial fish species belonging to the Merlucciidae family using SIR analysis of carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N). The specific results enabled their clear classification according to the FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations) fishing areas, latitude, and geographical origin in the following six different clusters: European, North African, South African, North American, South American, and Australian hake species.

  17. Discrimination of Nuclear Explosions against Civilian Sources Based on Atmospheric Xenon Isotopic Activity Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinowski, Martin B.; Axelsson, Anders; Bean, Marc; Blanchard, Xavier; Bowyer, Theodore W.; Brachet, Guy; Hebel, Simon; McIntyre, Justin I.; Peters, Jana; Pistner, Christoph; Raith, Maria; Ringbom, Anders; Saey, Paul R. J.; Schlosser, Clemens; Stocki, Trevor J.; Taffary, Thomas; Kurt Ungar, R.

    2010-05-01

    A global monitoring system for atmospheric xenon radioactivity is being established as part of the International Monitoring System that will verify compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) once the treaty has entered into force. This paper studies isotopic activity ratios to support the interpretation of observed atmospheric concentrations of 135Xe, 133mXe, 133Xe and 131mXe. The goal is to distinguish nuclear explosion sources from civilian releases. Simulations of nuclear explosions and reactors, empirical data for both test and reactor releases as well as observations by measurement stations of the International Noble Gas Experiment (INGE) are used to provide a proof of concept for the isotopic ratio based method for source discrimination.

  18. A Widely Tunable Infrared Laser Spectrometer for Measurements of Isotopic Ratios of Carbon Cycle Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Joanne H. Shorter; J. Barry McManus; David D. Nelson; Charles E. Kolb; Mark S. Zahniser; Ray Bambha; Uwe Lehmann; Tomas Kulp; Stanley C. Tyler

    2005-01-31

    The atmospheric abundances of carbon dioxide and methane have increased dramatically during the industrial era. Measurements of the isotopic composition of these gases can provide a powerful tool for quantifying their sources and sinks. This report describes the development of a portable instrument for isotopic analysis CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} using tunable infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. This instrument combines novel optical design and signal processing methods with a widely tunable mid-infrared laser source based on difference frequency generation (DFG) which will can access spectral regions for all the isotopes of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} with a single instrument. The instrument design compensates for the large difference in concentration between major and minor isotopes by measuring them with path lengths which differ by a factor of 100 within the same multipass cell. During Phase I we demonstrated the basic optical design and signal processing by determining {sup 13}CO{sub 2} isotopic ratios with precisions as small as 0.2{per_thousand} using a conventional lead salt diode laser. During Phase II, the DFG laser source was coupled with the optical instrument and was demonstrated to detect {sup 13}CH{sub 4}/{sup 12}CH{sub 4} ratios with a precision of 0.5{per_thousand} and an averaging time of 20 s using concentrated methane in air with a mixing ratio of 2700 ppm. Methods for concentrating ambient air for isotopic analysis using this technique have been evaluated. Extensions of this instrument to other species such as {sup 13}CO{sub 2}, C{sup 18}OO, and CH{sub 3}D are possible by substituting lasers at other wavelengths in the DFG source module. The immediate commercial application of this instrument will be to compete with existing mass spectrometric isotope instruments which are expensive, large and relatively slow. The novel infrared source developed in this project can be applied to the measurement of many other gas species and will have wide

  19. Mixing ratio and carbon isotopic composition investigation of atmospheric CO2 in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, J.; Wen, X.; Sun, X.

    2016-12-01

    The stable isotope composition of atmospheric CO2 can be used as a tracer in the study of urban carbon cycles, which are affected by anthropogenic and biogenic CO2 components. Continuous measurements of the mixing ratio and δ13C of atmospheric CO2 were conducted in Beijing from Nov. 15, 2012 to Mar. 8, 2014 including two heating seasons and a vegetative season. Both δ13C and the isotopic composition of source CO2 (δ13CS) were depleted in the heating seasons and enriched in the vegetative season. The diurnal variations in the CO2 mixing ratio and δ13C contained two peaks in the heating season, which are due to the effects of morning rush hour traffic. Seasonal and diurnal patterns of the CO2 mixing ratio and δ13C were affected by anthropogenic emissions and biogenic activity. Assuming that the primary CO2 sources at night (22:00-04:00) were coal and natural gas combustion during heating seasons I and II, an isotopic mass balance analysis indicated that coal combustion had average contributions of 83.83 ± 14.11% and 86.84 ± 12.27% and that natural gas had average contributions of 16.17 ± 14.11% and 13.16 ± 12.27%, respectively. The δ13C of background CO2 in air was the main error source in the isotopic mass balance model. Both the mixing ratio and δ13C of atmospheric CO2 had significant linear relationships with the air quality index (AQI) and can be used to indicate local air pollution conditions. Energy structure optimization, for example, reducing coal consumption, will improve the local air conditions in Beijing.

  20. Variations in Sr and Nd isotopic ratios of mineral particles in cryoconite in western Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatsuka, Naoko; Takeuchi, Nozomu; Uetake, Jun; Shimada, Rigen; Onuma, Yukihiko; Tanaka, Sota; Nakano, Takanori

    2016-11-01

    In order to better understand the source of minerals on the dark-colored ice, located in the Greenland ice sheet ablation zone, we analyzed the Sr and Nd isotopic ratios of minerals in cryoconite, which were collected from glaciers in northwest and southwest Greenland. We focused on the following: (i) comparison of the isotopes of minerals in cyroconite with those in sediments from local and distant areas, (ii) regional variations in western Greenland, and (iii) spatial variations across an individual a glacier. The mineral components of the cryoconite showed variable Sr and Nd isotopic ratios (87Sr/86Sr: 0.711335 to 0.742406, ɛNd (0): -33.1 to -22.9), which corresponded to those of the englacial dust and moraine on and around the glaciers but were significantly different from those of the distant deserts that have been considered to be primary sources of mineral dust on the Greenland Ice Sheet. This suggests that the minerals within the cryoconites were mainly derived from local sediments, rather than from distant areas. The Sr ratios in the northwestern region were significantly higher than those in the southwestern region. This is probably due to geological differences in the source areas, such as the surrounding glaciers in each region. The isotopic ratios further varied spatially within a glacier (Qaanaaq and Kangerlussuaq areas), indicating that the silicate minerals on the glaciers were derived not from a single source but from multiple sources, such as englacial dust and wind-blown minerals from the moraine surrounding the glaciers.

  1. Isotope ratio measurements by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, Maria

    2005-04-01

    The basic principles of secondary ion mass spectrometry and glow discharge mass spectrometry have been shortly revisited. The applications of both techniques as exploited for the isotope ratio measurements in several matrices have been reviewed. Emphasis has been given to research fields in expansions such as solar system studies, medicine, biology, environment and nuclear forensic. The characteristics of the two techniques are discussed in terms of sensitivity and methodology of quantification. Considerations on the different detection possibilities in SIMS are also presented.

  2. Accurate and precise determination of isotopic ratios by MC-ICP-MS: a review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu

    2009-01-01

    For many decades the accurate and precise determination of isotope ratios has remained a very strong interest to many researchers due to its important applications in earth, environmental, biological, archeological, and medical sciences. Traditionally, thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) has been the technique of choice for achieving the highest accuracy and precision. However, recent developments in multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) have brought a new dimension to this field. In addition to its simple and robust sample introduction, high sample throughput, and high mass resolution, the flat-topped peaks generated by this technique provide for accurate and precise determination of isotope ratios with precision reaching 0.001%, comparable to that achieved with TIMS. These features, in combination with the ability of the ICP source to ionize nearly all elements in the periodic table, have resulted in an increased use of MC-ICP-MS for such measurements in various sample matrices. To determine accurate and precise isotope ratios with MC-ICP-MS, utmost care must be exercised during sample preparation, optimization of the instrument, and mass bias corrections. Unfortunately, there are inconsistencies and errors evident in many MC-ICP-MS publications, including errors in mass bias correction models. This review examines "state-of-the-art" methodologies presented in the literature for achievement of precise and accurate determinations of isotope ratios by MC-ICP-MS. Some general rules for such accurate and precise measurements are suggested, and calculations of combined uncertainty of the data using a few common mass bias correction models are outlined.

  3. Mixing ratio and carbon isotopic composition investigation of atmospheric CO2 in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jiaping; Wen, Xuefa; Sun, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    The stable isotope composition of atmospheric CO2 can be used as a tracer in the study of urban carbon cycles, which are affected by anthropogenic and biogenic CO2 components. Continuous measurements of the mixing ratio and δ(13)C of atmospheric CO2 were conducted in Beijing from Nov. 15, 2012 to Mar. 8, 2014 including two heating seasons and a vegetative season. Both δ(13)C and the isotopic composition of source CO2 (δ(13)CS) were depleted in the heating seasons and enriched in the vegetative season. The diurnal variations in the CO2 mixing ratio and δ(13)C contained two peaks in the heating season, which are due to the effects of morning rush hour traffic. Seasonal and diurnal patterns of the CO2 mixing ratio and δ(13)C were affected by anthropogenic emissions and biogenic activity. Assuming that the primary CO2 sources at night (22:00-04:00) were coal and natural gas combustion during heating seasons I and II, an isotopic mass balance analysis indicated that coal combustion had average contributions of 83.83±14.11% and 86.84±12.27% and that natural gas had average contributions of 16.17±14.11% and 13.16±12.27%, respectively. The δ(13)C of background CO2 in air was the main error source in the isotopic mass balance model. Both the mixing ratio and δ(13)C of atmospheric CO2 had significant linear relationships with the air quality index (AQI) and can be used to indicate local air pollution conditions. Energy structure optimization, for example, reducing coal consumption, will improve the local air conditions in Beijing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Emission ratio and isotopic signatures of molecular hydrogen emissions from tropical biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haumann, F. A.; Batenburg, A. M.; Pieterse, G.; Gerbig, C.; Krol, M. C.; Röckmann, T.

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we identify a biomass-burning signal in molecular hydrogen (H2) over the Amazonian tropical rainforest. To quantify this signal, we measure the mixing ratios of H2 and several other species as well as the H2 isotopic composition in air samples that were collected in the BARCA (Balanço Atmosférico Regional de Carbono na Amazônia) aircraft campaign during the dry season. We derive a relative H2 emission ratio with respect to carbon monoxide (CO) of 0.31 ± 0.04 ppb ppb-1 and an isotopic source signature of -280 ± 41‰ in the air masses influenced by tropical biomass burning. In order to retrieve a clear source signal that is not influenced by the soil uptake of H2, we exclude samples from the atmospheric boundary layer. This procedure is supported by data from a global chemistry transport model. The ΔH2 / ΔCO emission ratio is significantly lower than some earlier estimates for the tropical rainforest. In addition, our results confirm the lower values of the previously conflicting estimates of the H2 isotopic source signature from biomass burning. These values for the emission ratio and isotopic source signatures of H2 from tropical biomass burning can be used in future bottom-up and top-down approaches aiming to constrain the strength of the biomass-burning source for H2. Hitherto, these two quantities relied only on combustion experiments or on statistical relations, since no direct signal had been obtained from in-situ observations.

  5. Emission ratio and isotopic signatures of molecular hydrogen emissions from tropical biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haumann, F. A.; Batenburg, A. M.; Pieterse, G.; Gerbig, C.; Krol, M. C.; Röckmann, T.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we identify a biomass-burning signal in molecular hydrogen (H2) over the Amazonian tropical rainforest. To quantify this signal, we measure the mixing ratios of H2 and several other species as well as the H2 isotopic composition in air samples that were collected in the BARCA (Balanço Atmosférico Regional de Carbono na Amazônia) aircraft campaign during the dry season. We derive a relative H2 emission ratio with respect to carbon monoxide (CO) of 0.31 ± 0.04 ppb/ppb and an isotopic source signature of -280 ± 41‰ in the air masses influenced by tropical biomass burning. In order to retrieve a clear source signal that is not influenced by the soil uptake of H2, we exclude samples from the atmospheric boundary layer. This procedure is supported by data from a global chemistry transport model. The ΔH2/ΔCO emission ratio is significantly lower than some earlier estimates for the tropical rainforest. In addition, our results confirm the lower values of the previously conflicting estimates of the H2 isotopic source signature from biomass burning. These values for the emission ratio and isotopic source signatures of H2 from tropical biomass burning can be used in future bottom-up and top-down approaches aiming to constrain the strength of the biomass-burning source for H2. Hitherto, these two quantities relied only on combustion experiments or on statistical relations, since no direct signal had been obtained from in-situ observations.

  6. Evaluating the deep-ocean circulation of a global ocean model using carbon isotopic ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, André; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Gebbie, Jake; Losch, Martin; Marchal, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    We study the sensitivity of a global three-dimensional biotic ocean carbon-cycle model to the parameterizations of gas exchange and biological productivity as well as to deep-ocean circulation strength, and we employ the carbon isotopic ratios δ13C and Δ14C of dissolved inorganic carbon for a systematic evaluation against observations. Radiocarbon (Δ14C) in particular offers the means to assess the model skill on a time scale of 100 to 1000 years relevant to the deep-ocean circulation. The carbon isotope ratios are included as tracers in the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm). The implementation involves the fractionation processes during photosynthesis and air-sea gas exchange. We present the results of sixteen simulations combining two different parameterizations of the piston velocity, two different parameterizations of biological productivity (including the effect of iron fertilization) and four different overturning rates. These simulations were first spun up to equilibrium (more than 10,000 years of model simulation) and then continued from AD 1765 to AD 2002. For the model evaluation, we followed the OCMIP-2 (Ocean Carbon-Cycle Model Intercomparision Project phase two) protocol, comparing the results to GEOSECS (Geochemical Ocean Sections Survey) and WOCE (World Ocean Circulation Experiment) δ13C and natural Δ14C data in the world ocean. The range of deep natural Δ14C (below 1000 m) for our single model (MITgcm) was smaller than for the group of different OCMIP-2 models. Furthermore, differences between different model parameterizations were smaller than for different overturning rates. We conclude that carbon isotope ratios are a useful tool to evaluate the deep-ocean circulation. Since they are also available from deep-sea sediment records, we postulate that the simulation of carbon isotope ratios in a global ocean model will aid in estimating the deep-ocean circulation and climate during present and past.

  7. Stable isotope ratios in Cape gannets around the southern coasts of Africa reveal penetration of biogeographic patterns in oceanic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaquemet, Sébastien; McQuaid, Christopher

    2008-11-01

    The southern coasts of Africa are influenced by two major oceanic currents, leading to biogeographic patterns in inshore and offshore species assemblages, and in the stable isotope signatures of suspended particulate matter and filter-feeding mussels. We used the stable isotope ratios of carbon ( 13C/ 12C) and nitrogen ( 15N/ 14N) from the blood and feathers of adult and chick Cape gannets ( Morus capensis) to investigate whether the geographic differences observed at the lower levels in the marine communities are deep penetrating effects that reach top predators. Additionally, we evaluated whether trophic segregation occurs between adult and reared chick gannets, and whether a shift to wintering habitat occurs in adults. The study was conducted during the 2006 breeding season on Bird Island in the Agulhas system, and on Malgas and Ichaboe Islands, in the south and north Benguela respectively. Our results showed significant differences in the isotope ratios of members of different colonies, but no intra-colony differences between tissues or age groups. These results indicate that there is neither age-related nor temporal segregation in the diet of members of the same colony. Feather isotopic values suggest that adults remain all year round in the same habitats, and do not undertake long migration after reproduction. Since all gannets tend to target similar prey, we attributed among-colony differences in isotope signatures mostly to the oceanic conditions experienced by the main prey of birds rather than substantial differences in diet composition. Overall, isotopic signatures segregate the two current systems, with depleted carbon values in the Agulhas and enriched nitrogen values in the upwelled waters of the Benguela. Within the Benguela birds from Ichaboe in the north had higher δ 15N values than those from Malgas in the south, which we attributed to differences in the functioning of the upwelling cells in the vicinity of the two colonies. Finally, slight

  8. A capillary absorption spectrometer for stable carbon isotope ratio (13C/12C) analysis in very small samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, J. F.; Sams, R. L.; Blake, T. A.; Newburn, M.; Moran, J.; Alexander, M. L.; Kreuzer, H.

    2012-02-01

    A capillary absorption spectrometer (CAS) suitable for IR laser isotope analysis of small CO2 samples is presented. The system employs a continuous-wave (cw) quantum cascade laser to study nearly adjacent rovibrational transitions of different isotopologues of CO2 near 2307 cm-1 (4.34 μm). This initial CAS system can achieve relative isotopic precision of about 10 ppm 13C, or ˜1‰ (per mil in delta notation relative to Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite) with 20-100 picomoles of entrained sample within the hollow waveguide for CO2 concentrations ˜400-750 ppm. Isotopic analyses of such gas fills in a 1-mm ID hollow waveguide of 0.8 m overall physical path length can be carried out down to ˜2 Torr. Overall 13C/12C ratios can be calibrated to ˜2‰ accuracy with diluted CO2 standards. A novel, low-cost method to reduce cw-fringing noise resulting from multipath distortions in the hollow waveguide is presented, which allows weak absorbance features to be studied at the few ppm level (peak-to-rms) after 1000 scans are co-added in ˜10 s. The CAS is meant to work directly with converted CO2 samples from a laser ablation-catalytic combustion micro-sampler to provide 13C/12C ratios of small biological isolates currently operating with spatial resolutions ˜50 μm.

  9. Changes in hydrogen isotope ratios in sequential plumage stages: an implication for the creation of isotope-base maps for tracking migratory birds.

    PubMed

    Duxbury, J M; Holroyd, G L; Muehlenbachs, K

    2003-09-01

    Accurate reference maps are important in the use of stable-isotopes to track the movements of migratory birds. Reference maps created by the analysis of samples collected from young at the nest site are more accurate than simply referring to naturally occurring patterns of hydrogen isotope ratios created by precipitation cycles. Ratios of hydrogen isotopes in the nutrients incorporated early in the development of young birds can be derived from endogenous, maternal sources. Base-maps should be created with the analysis of tissue samples from hatchlings after local the isotopic signature of exogenous nutrients is dominant. Migratory species such as Peregrine Falcons are known to use endogenous sources in the creation of their eggs, therefore knowledge of what plumage stage best represents the local hydrogen ratios would assist in the planning of nest visits. We conducted diet manipulation experiments involving Japanese Quail and Peregrine Falcons to determine the plumage stage when hydrogen isotope ratios were indicative of a switch in their food source. The natal down of both the quail and falcons reflected the diet of breeding adult females. The hydrogen isotope ratios of a new food source were dominant in the juvenile down of the young falcons, although a further shift was detected in the final juvenile plumage. The juvenile plumage is grown during weeks 3-4 after hatch on Peregrine Falcons. Nest visits for the purpose of collecting feathers for isotope-base-map creation should be made around 4 weeks after the presumed hatch of the young falcons.

  10. Stable carbon isotope ratios in atmospheric methane and some of its sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyler, Stanley C.

    1986-01-01

    Ratios of C-13/C-12 have been measured in atmospheric methane and in methane collected from sites and biota that represent potentially large sources of atmospheric methane. These include temperate marshes (about -48 percent to about -54 percent), landfills (about -51 percent to about -55 percent), and the first reported values for any species of termite (-72.8 + or - 3.1 percent for Reticulitermes tibialis and -57.3 + or - 1.6 percent for Zootermopsis angusticollis). Numbers in parentheses are delta C-13 values with respect to PDB (Peedee belemnite) carbonate. Most methane sources reported thus far are depleted in C-13 with respect to atmospheric methane (-47.0 + or - 0.3 percent). Individual sources of methane should have C-13/C-12 ratios characteristic of mechanisms of CH4 formation and consumption prior to release to the atmosphere. The mass-weighted average isotopic composition of all sources should equal the mean C-13 of atmospheric methane, corrected for a kinetic isotope effect in the OH attack of CH4. Assuming the kinetic isotope effect to be small (about -3.0 percent correction to -47.0), as in the literature, the new values given here for termite methane do not help to explain the apparent discrepancy between C-13/C-12 ratios of the known CH4 sources and that of atmospheric CH4.

  11. Can amino acid carbon isotope ratios distinguish primary producers in a mangrove ecosystem?

    PubMed

    Larsen, Thomas; Wooller, Matthew J; Fogel, Marilyn L; O'Brien, Diane M

    2012-07-15

    The relative contribution of carbon from terrestrial vs. marine primary producers to mangrove-based food webs can be challenging to resolve with bulk carbon isotope ratios (δ(13)C). In this study we explore whether patterns of δ(13)C values among amino acids (AAs) can provide an additional tool for resolving terrestrial and marine origins of carbon. Amino acid carbon isotope ratios (δ(13)C(AA)) were measured for several terrestrial and marine primary producers in a mangrove ecosystem at Spanish Lookout Caye (SLC), Belize, using gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The δ(13)C values of essential amino acids (δ(13)C(EAA)) were measured to determine whether they could be used to differentiate terrestrial and marine producers using linear discriminant analysis. Marine and terrestrial producers had distinct patterns of δ(13)C(EAA) values in addition to their differences in bulk δ(13)C values. Microbial mat samples and consumers (Crassostrea rhizophorae, Aratus pisonii, Littoraria sp., Lutjanus griseus) were most similar to marine producers. Patterns of δ(13)C(EAA) values for terrestrial producers were very similar to those described for other terrestrial plants. The findings suggest that δ(13)C(EAA) values may provide another tool for estimating the contribution of terrestrial and marine sources to detrital foodwebs. Preliminary analyses of consumers indicate significant use of aquatic resources, consistent with other studies of mangrove foodwebs. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Isotope 18 O 16 O Ratio Measurements of Water Vapor by use of Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumi, Yutaka; Kishigami, Masahiro; Tanaka, Noriyuki; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Inoue, Gen

    1998-09-01

    We applied a photoacoustic spectroscopy technique to isotope ratio measurements of 16 O and 18 O in water-vapor samples, using a pulsed tunable dye laser pumped by a Nd:YAG laser. The fourth overtone bands (4 OH ) of water molecules near 720 nm were investigated. We identified the absorption lines of H 2 16 O and H 2 18 O in the photoacoustic spectra that we measured by using an 18 O-enriched water sample and the HITRAN database. We measured the difference in the 18 O 16 O isotope ratios for normal distilled water and Antarctic ice, using the photoacoustic method. The value obtained for the difference between the two samples is 18 O 32 16 , where the indicated deviation was a 1 value among 240-s measurements, whereas the value measured with a conventional isotope mass spectrometer was 18 O 28 2 . This method is demonstrated to have the potential of a transportable system for in situ and quick measurements of the H 2 18 O H 2 16 O ratio in the environment.

  13. DoE optimization of a mercury isotope ratio determination method for environmental studies.

    PubMed

    Berni, Alex; Baschieri, Carlo; Covelli, Stefano; Emili, Andrea; Marchetti, Andrea; Manzini, Daniela; Berto, Daniela; Rampazzo, Federico

    2016-05-15

    By using the experimental design (DoE) technique, we optimized an analytical method for the determination of mercury isotope ratios by means of cold-vapor multicollector ICP-MS (CV-MC-ICP-MS) to provide absolute Hg isotopic ratio measurements with a suitable internal precision. By running 32 experiments, the influence of mercury and thallium internal standard concentrations, total measuring time and sample flow rate was evaluated. Method was optimized varying Hg concentration between 2 and 20 ng g(-1). The model finds out some correlations within the parameters affect the measurements precision and predicts suitable sample measurement precisions for Hg concentrations from 5 ng g(-1) Hg upwards. The method was successfully applied to samples of Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) coming from the Marano and Grado lagoon (NE Italy), a coastal environment affected by long term mercury contamination mainly due to mining activity. Results show different extents of both mass dependent fractionation (MDF) and mass independent fractionation (MIF) phenomena in clams according to their size and sampling sites in the lagoon. The method is fit for determinations on real samples, allowing for the use of Hg isotopic ratios to study mercury biogeochemical cycles in complex ecosystems.

  14. Stable carbon isotope ratio profiling of illicit testosterone preparations--domestic and international seizures.

    PubMed

    Brooker, Lance; Cawley, Adam; Drury, Jason; Edey, Claire; Hasick, Nicole; Goebel, Catrin

    2014-10-01

    Gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) is now established as a robust and mature analytical technique for the doping control of endogenous anabolic androgenic steroids in human sport. It relies on the assumption that the carbon isotope ratios of naturally produced steroids are significantly different to synthetically manufactured testosterone or testosterone prohormones used in commercial medical or dietary supplement products. Recent publications in this journal have highlighted the existence of black market testosterone preparations with carbon isotope ratios within the range reported for endogenous steroids (i.e. δ(13) C ≥ -25.8 ‰). In this study, we set out to profile domestic and international law enforcement seizures of illicit testosterone products to monitor the prevalence of 'enriched' substrates--which if administered to human subjects would be considered problematic for the use of current GC-C-IRMS methodologies for the doping control of testosterone in sport. The distribution of δ(13) C values for this illicit testosterone sample population (n = 283) ranged from -23.4 ‰ to -32.9 ‰ with mean and median of -28.6 ‰--comparable to previous work. However, only 13 out of 283 testosterone samples (4.6 %) were found to display δ(13) C values ≥ -25.8 ‰, confirming that in the vast majority of cases of illicit testosterone administration, current GC-C-IRMS doping control procedures would be capable of confirming misuse.

  15. He isotope ratios in the Nankai Trough and Costa Rica subduction zones - implications for volatile cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, M.; Hilton, D. R.; Jenkins, W. J.; Solomon, E. A.; Spivack, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    The noble gas 3He is a clear indicator of primordial volatile flux from the mantle, thus providing important insights on the interaction between Earth's interior and exterior reservoirs. Volatile cycling at ridge-crests and its impact on the evolution of seawater chemistry is rather well known as constrained by the 3He flux, whereas the impact of volatile cycling at subduction zones (SZs) on seawater chemistry is as yet poorly known. Constraining chemical and isotopic cycling at SZs is important for understanding the evolution of the mantle-crust and ocean-atmosphere systems. To gain insights on volatile cycling in SZs, pore fluids were sampled for He concentration and isotopic analyses at two tectonically contrasting SZs, Nankai Trough (offshore Japan, Muroto and Kumano transects), an accretionary SZ, and Costa Rica (Offshore Osa Peninsula), an erosional SZ. Sampling for He was achieved by rapidly subsampling core sediments, cleaning and transferring these samples into Ti squeezers in a glove bag, and storing the squeezed pore fluids in crimped Cu tubes for shore-based He concentration and isotope ratio analyses. At the Nankai Trough SZ there is a remarkable range of He isotopic values. The 3He/4He ratios relative to atmospheric ratio (RA) range from mostly crustal 0.47 RA to 4.30 RA which is ~55% of the MORB value of 8 RA. Whereas at the Costa Rica SZ, offshore Osa Peninsula, the ratios range from 0.86 to 1.14 RA, indicating the dominance of crustal radiogenic 4He that is from U and Th decay. The distribution of the He isotope values at Nankai Trough is most interesting, fluids that contain significant mantle 3He components (3He/4He >1) were sampled along and adjacent to fluid conduits that were identified by several chemical and isotopic data (i.e. Cl, B, and Li), including the presence of thermogenic hydrocarbons. Whereas the fluids dominated by 4He (3He/4He ≤1) were obtained from sediment sections that were between the fluid conduits. At Costa Rica, however

  16. Fukushima Daiichi reactor source term attribution using cesium isotope ratios from contaminated environmental samples

    DOE PAGES

    Snow, Mathew S.; Snyder, Darin C.; Delmore, James E.

    2016-01-18

    Source term attribution of environmental contamination following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) disaster is complicated by a large number of possible similar emission source terms (e.g. FDNPP reactor cores 1–3 and spent fuel ponds 1–4). Cesium isotopic analyses can be utilized to discriminate between environmental contamination from different FDNPP source terms and, if samples are sufficiently temporally resolved, potentially provide insights into the extent of reactor core damage at a given time. Rice, soil, mushroom, and soybean samples taken 100–250 km from the FDNPP site were dissolved using microwave digestion. Radiocesium was extracted and purified using two sequentialmore » ammonium molybdophosphate-polyacrylonitrile columns, following which 135Cs/137Cs isotope ratios were measured using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Results were compared with data reported previously from locations to the northwest of FDNPP and 30 km to the south of FDNPP. 135Cs/137Cs isotope ratios from samples 100–250 km to the southwest of the FDNPP site show a consistent value of 0.376 ± 0.008. 135Cs/137Cs versus 134Cs/137Cs correlation plots suggest that radiocesium to the southwest is derived from a mixture of FDNPP reactor cores 1, 2, and 3. Conclusions from the cesium isotopic data are in agreement with those derived independently based upon the event chronology combined with meteorological conditions at the time of the disaster. In conclusion, cesium isotopic analyses provide a powerful tool for source term discrimination of environmental radiocesium contamination at the FDNPP site. For higher precision source term attribution and forensic determination of the FDNPP core conditions based upon cesium, analyses of a larger number of samples from locations to the north and south of the FDNPP site (particularly time-resolved air filter samples) are needed. Published in 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain

  17. Variation in trophic shift for stable isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCutchan, J.H.; Lewis, W.M.; Kendall, C.; McGrath, C.C.

    2003-01-01

    Use of stable isotope ratios to trace pathways of organic matter among consumers requires knowledge of the isotopic shift between diet and consumer. Variation in trophic shift among consumers can be substantial. For data from the published literature and supplementary original data (excluding fluid-feeding consumers), the mean isotopic shift for C was +0.5 ?? 0.13??? rather than 0.0???, as commonly assumed. The shift for C was higher for consumers analyzed as muscle (+1.3 ?? 0.30???) than for consumers analyzed whole (+0.3 ?? 0.14???). Among consumers analyzed whole, the trophic shift for C was lower for consumers acidified prior to analysis (-0.2 ?? 0.21???) than for unacidified samples (+0.5 ?? 0.17???). For N, trophic shift was lower for consumers raised on invertebrate diets (+1.4 ?? 0.21???) than for consumers raised on other high-protein diets (+3.3 ?? 0.26???) and was intermediate for consumers raised on plant and algal diets (+2.2 ?? 0.30???). The trophic shift for S differed between high-protein (+2.0 ?? 0.65???) and low-protein diets (-0.5 ?? 0.56???). Thus, methods of analysis and dietary differences can affect trophic shift for consumers; the utility of stable isotope methods can be improved if this information is incorporated into studies of trophic relationships. Although few studies of stable isotope ratios have considered variation in the trophic shift, such variation is important because small errors in estimates of trophic shift can result in large errors in estimates of the contribution of sources to consumers or in estimates of trophic position.

  18. The stability and calibration of water vapor isotope ratio measurements during long-term deployments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, A.; Noone, D.; Berkelhammer, M.; Steen-Larsen, H. C.; Sato, P.

    2015-10-01

    With the recent advent of commercial laser absorption spectrometers, field studies measuring stable isotope ratios of hydrogen and oxygen in water vapor have proliferated. These pioneering analyses have provided invaluable feedback about best strategies for optimizing instrumental accuracy, yet questions still remain about instrument performance and calibration approaches for multi-year field deployments. With clear scientific potential for using these instruments to carry out monitoring of the hydrological cycle, this study examines the long-term stability of the isotopic biases associated with three cavity-enhanced laser absorption spectrometers - calibrated with different systems and approaches - at two remote field sites: Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, USA, and Greenland Environmental Observatory, Summit, Greenland. The analysis pays particular attention to the stability of measurement dependencies on water vapor concentration and also evaluates whether these so-called concentration dependences are sensitive to statistical curve-fitting choices or measurement hysteresis. The results suggest evidence of monthly-to-seasonal concentration-dependence variability - which likely stems from low signal-to-noise at the humidity-range extremes - but no long-term directional drift. At Mauna Loa, where the isotopic analyzer is calibrated by injection of liquid water standards into a vaporizer, the largest source of inaccuracy in characterizing the concentration dependence stems from an insufficient density of calibration points at low water vapor volume mixing ratios. In comparison, at Summit, the largest source of inaccuracy is measurement hysteresis associated with interactions between the reference vapor, generated by a custom dew point generator, and the sample tubing. Nevertheless, prediction errors associated with correcting the concentration dependence are small compared to total measurement uncertainty. At both sites, changes in measurement repeatability that are

  19. Precise carbon isotopic ratio analyses of micro amounts of carbonate and non-carbonate in basalt using continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS).

    PubMed

    Zha, Xiang-Ping; Gong, Bing; Zheng, Yong-Fei; Chen, Yi-Xiang

    2017-10-07

    Continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS) is a specialized technique used to quickly analyze very small amounts of sample. We have used CF-IRMS to assess the influences of sample weight and relative carbon content on the accuracy and precision of the δ(13) C values of micro amounts of carbonate and non-carbonate in silicate rocks. The analytical work was performed on a Gasbench II (GB) sample preparation device and on an Element Analyzer (EA), which were both interfaced to CF-IRMS instruments. Potential silicate matrix effects on the carbon isotopic analyses were investigated by measuring mixtures of calibrated carbon reference materials and quartz powder. The calibration lines, established by the measured raw values and the known values of three reference materials mixing with quartz powder, were used to calibrate the δ(13) C values of basalt samples from eastern China. The δ(13) C values measured by GB-CF-IRMS of one national carbonate reference material, GBW04416, deviate slightly from the known value for approximately 20~70 μg of carbonate contained in 4.5-mL vials; the smaller the sample size, the lower the measured δ(13) C values. External precision better than 0.1‰ (1σ, n=26) is achieved at a signal intensity for mass 44 of between 868 and 1614 mV, corresponding to a sample weight of 30.8~50.2 μg, whereas it is reduced to 0.27‰ (1σ, n=34) at a signal intensity between 519 and 1614 mV, corresponding to a sample weight of 21.1~50.2 μg. In the EA-CF-IRMS experiments non-carbonate carbon, at high carbon concentration (greater than 800 ppm) and at optimum sample weights, the accuracy and precision are both better than 0.2‰. For carbon concentrations less than 500 ppm, the measured δ(13) C values deviate from the average by up to -1.2‰ and the precision is 0.74‰. The measured δ(13) C values decrease substantially at lower carbon concentration and higher sample weights, and poorer precision is obtained. Suggestions are made to

  20. Environmental and biosynthetic influences on carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf wax n-alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInerney, F. A.; Freeman, K. H.; Polissar, P. J.; Feakins, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Both carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf-wax n-alkanes are influenced by the availability of water in a plant's growth environment. Carbon isotope ratios of bulk tissues in C3 plants demonstrate a strong inverse relationship with measures of available moisture (e.g. mean annual precipitation and precipitation/evaporation). Similarly, hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf wax n-alkanes (δDl) can be enriched relative to precipitation (δDw) by transpiration, which is related to relative humidity and the leaf-to-air vapor pressure deficit. Thus, D-enrichment of leaf-wax n-alkanes relative to precipitation, termed the apparent fractionation (2ɛl/w), becomes more positive with increasing aridity. In theory, more positive values of leaf-wax δ13C (δ13Cl) and 2ɛl/w of leaf-wax n-alkanes should both correspond to more arid conditions in C3 plants. Here we review published and unpublished data on over 100 plants to examine this relationship. Contrary to expectations, C3 dicots show no clear relationship between δ13Cl and 2ɛl/w. This global lack of correlation is surprising given our understanding of aridity related isotopic effects in C3 plants. One possibility is that the implicit assumption of constant fractionation between lipid and bulk tissue is flawed due to the effects of different biosynthetic carriers and reaction pathways. We explore this possibility by examining the offset of leaf-wax carbon isotopes from the bulk leaf tissue (13ɛl/bulk). Different offsets would indicate additional biosynthetic processes are affecting δ13Cl in addition to any direct effects from aridity. We find that 13ɛl/bulk is highly variable, ranging from -1 to -16‰, which could explain the lack of correlation between δ13Cl and 2ɛl/w. In addition, 13ɛl/bulk values for C3 and C4 monocots (averages of -10.6 and -11.4‰ respectively) represent significantly greater offset between leaf wax and bulk tissue than in C3 dicots (average of -4.3‰), which is consistent with previous

  1. Reformulated 17O correction of mass spectrometric stable isotope measurements in carbon dioxide and a critical appraisal of historic 'absolute' carbon and oxygen isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Jan

    2008-03-01

    Mass-spectrometric stable isotope measurements of CO 2 use molecular ion currents at mass-to-charge ratios m/ z 44, 45 and 46 to derive the elemental isotope ratios n( 13C)/ n( 12C) and n( 18O)/ n( 16O), abbreviated 13C/ 12C and 18O/ 16O, relative to a reference. The ion currents have to be corrected for the contribution of 17O-bearing isotopologues, the so-called ' 17O correction'. The magnitude of this correction depends on the calibrated isotope ratios of the reference. Isotope ratio calibrations are difficult and are therefore a matter of debate. Here, I provide a comprehensive evaluation of the existing 13C/ 12C ( 13R), 17O/ 16O ( 17R) and 18O/ 16O ( 18R) calibrations of the reference material Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water (VSMOW) and CO 2 generated from the reference material Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite (VPDB) by reaction with 100% H 3PO 4 at 25 °C (VPDB-CO 2). I find 17R/10-6=382.7-2.1+1.7, 18RVSMOW/10 -6 = 2005.20 ± 0.45, 13R/10-6= 11124 ± 45, 17R/10-6=391.1-2.1+1.7 and 18R/10-6=2088.37±0.90. I also rephrase the calculation scheme for the 17O correction completely in terms of relative isotope ratio differences ( δ values). This reveals that only ratios of isotope ratios (namely, 17R/ 13R and 13R17R/ 18R) are required for the 17O correction. These can be, and have been, measured on conventional stable isotope mass spectrometers. I then show that the remaining error for these ratios of isotope ratios can lead to significant uncertainty in the derived relative 13C/ 12C difference, but not for 18O/ 16O. Even though inter-laboratory differences can be corrected for by a common 'ratio assumption set' and/or normalisation, the ultimate accuracy of the 17O correction is hereby limited. Errors of similar magnitude can be introduced by the assumed mass-dependent relationship between 17O/ 16O and 18O/ 16O isotope ratios. For highest accuracy in the 13C/ 12C ratio, independent triple oxygen isotope measurements are required. Finally, I propose an experiment that

  2. A review on the determination of isotope ratios of boron with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Suresh Kumar; You, Chen-Feng

    2017-07-01

    The present review discusses different mass spectrometric techniques-viz, thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)-used to determine (11) B/(10) B isotope ratio, and concentration of boron required for various applications in earth sciences, marine geochemistry, nuclear technology, environmental, and agriculture sciences, etc. The details of the techniques-P-TIMS, which uses Cs2 BO2(+) , N-TIMS, which uses BO2(-) , and MC-ICPMS, which uses B(+) ions for bulk analysis or B(-) and B(+) ions for in situ micro-analysis with SIMS-are highlighted. The capabilities, advantages, limitations, and problems in each mass spectrometric technique are summarized. The results of international interlaboratory comparison experiments conducted at different times are summarized. The certified isotopic reference materials available for boron are also listed. Recent developments in laser ablation (LA) ICPMS and QQQ-ICPMS for solids analysis and MS/MS analysis, respectively, are included. The different aspects of sample preparation and analytical chemistry of boron are summarized. Finally, the future requirements of boron isotope ratios for future applications are also given. Presently, MC-ICPMS provides the best precision and accuracy (0.2-0.4‰) on isotope ratio measurements, whereas N-TIMS holds the potential to analyze smallest amount of boron, but has the issue of bias (+2‰ to 4‰) which needs further investigations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 36:499-519, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The oxygen isotope partition function ratio of water and the structure of liquid water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.; Adami, L.H.

    1969-01-01

    By means of the CO2-equilibration technique, the temperature dependence and absolute values of the oxygen isotope partition function ratio of liquid water have been determined, often at 1?? intervals, from -2 to 85??. A linear relationship between In (Q2/Q1) (H2O) and T-1 was obtained that is explicable in terms of the Bigeleisen-Mayer theory of isotopic fractionation. The data are incompatible with conventional, multicomponent mixture models of water because liquid water behaves isotopically as a singly structured homogeneous substance over the entire temperature range studied. A two-species model of water is proposed in which approximately 30% of the hydrogen bonds in ice are broken on melting at 0?? and in which this per cent of monomer changes by only a small amount over the entire liquid range. Because of the high precision and the fundamental property determined, the isotopic fractionation technique is particularly well suited to the detection of thermal anomalies. No anomalies were observed and those previously reported are ascribed to under-estimates of experimental error.

  4. Tap water isotope ratios reflect urban water system structure and dynamics across a semiarid metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameel, Yusuf; Brewer, Simon; Good, Stephen P.; Tipple, Brett J.; Ehleringer, James R.; Bowen, Gabriel J.

    2016-08-01

    Water extraction for anthropogenic use has become a major flux in the hydrological cycle. With increasing demand for water and challenges supplying it in the face of climate change, there is a pressing need to better understand connections between human populations, climate, water extraction, water use, and its impacts. To understand these connections, we collected and analyzed stable isotopic ratios of more than 800 urban tap water samples in a series of semiannual water surveys (spring and fall, 2013-2015) across the Salt Lake Valley (SLV) of northern Utah. Consistent with previous work, we found that mean tap water had a lower 2H and 18O concentration than local precipitation, highlighting the importance of nearby montane winter precipitation as source water for the region. However, we observed strong and structured spatiotemporal variation in tap water isotopic compositions across the region which we attribute to complex distribution systems, varying water management practices and multiple sources used across the valley. Water from different sources was not used uniformly throughout the area and we identified significant correlation between water source and demographic parameters including population and income. Isotopic mass balance indicated significant interannual and intra-annual variability in water losses within the distribution network due to evaporation from surface water resources supplying the SLV. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of isotopes as an indicator of water management strategies and climate impacts within regional urban water systems, with potential utility for monitoring, regulation, forensic, and a range of water resource research.

  5. An analytical approach to Sr isotope ratio determination in Lambrusco wines for geographical traceability purposes.

    PubMed

    Durante, Caterina; Baschieri, Carlo; Bertacchini, Lucia; Bertelli, Davide; Cocchi, Marina; Marchetti, Andrea; Manzini, Daniela; Papotti, Giulia; Sighinolfi, Simona

    2015-04-15

    Geographical origin and authenticity of food are topics of interest for both consumers and producers. Among the different indicators used for traceability studies, (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotopic ratio has provided excellent results. In this study, two analytical approaches for wine sample pre-treatment, microwave and low temperature mineralisation, were investigated to develop accurate and precise analytical method for (87)Sr/(86)Sr determination. The two procedures led to comparable results (paired t-test, with tisotopic values were compared with isotopic data coming from (i) soils of their territory of origin and (ii) wines obtained by same grape varieties cultivated in different districts. The obtained results have shown no significant variability among the different vintages of wines and a perfect agreement between the isotopic range of the soils and wines has been observed. Nevertheless, the investigated indicator was not enough powerful to discriminate between similar products. To this regard, it is worth to note that more soil samples as well as wines coming from different districts will be considered to obtain more trustworthy results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Variation in oxygen isotope ratio of dissolved orthophosphate induced by uptake process in natural coral holobionts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrera, Charissa M.; Miyajima, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Atsushi; Umezawa, Yu; Morimoto, Naoko; San Diego-McGlone, Maria Lourdes; Nadaoka, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    A model incubation experiment using natural zooxanthellate corals was conducted to evaluate the influence of phosphate uptake by coral holobionts on oxygen isotope ratio of dissolved PO4 3- (δ18Op). Live coral samples of Acropora digitifera, Porites cylindrica, and Heliopora coerulea were collected from coral reefs around Ishigaki Island (Okinawa, Japan) and Bolinao (northern Luzon, Philippines) and incubated for 3-5 d after acclimatization under natural light conditions with elevated concentrations of PO4 3-. Phosphate uptake by corals behaved linearly with incubation time, with uptake rate depending on temperature. δ18Op usually increased with time toward the equilibrium value with respect to oxygen isotope exchange with ambient seawater, but sometimes became higher than equilibrium value at the end of incubation. The magnitude of the isotope effect associated with uptake depended on coral species; the greatest effect was in A. digitifera and the smallest in H. coerulea. However, it varied even within samples of a single coral species, which suggests multiple uptake processes with different isotope effects operating simultaneously with varying relative contributions in the coral holobionts used. In natural environments where concentrations of PO4 3- are much lower than those used during incubation, PO4 3- is presumably turned over much faster and the δ18Op easily altered by corals and other major primary producers. This should be taken into consideration when using δ18Op as an indicator of external PO4 3- sources in coastal ecosystems.

  7. Calibration and Data Processing in Gas Chromatography Combustion Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Tobias, Herbert J.; Sacks, Gavin L.; Brenna, J. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) by gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GCC-IRMS) is a powerful technique for the sourcing of substances, such as determination of the geographic or chemical origin of drugs and food adulteration, and it is especially invaluable as a confirmatory tool for detection of the use of synthetic steroids in competitive sport. We review here principles and practices for data processing and calibration of GCC-IRMS data with consideration to anti-doping analyses, with a focus on carbon isotopic analysis (13C/12C). After a brief review of peak definition, the isotopologue signal reduction methods of summation, curve-fitting, and linear regression are described and reviewed. Principles for isotopic calibration are considered in the context of the Δ13C = δ13CM – δ13CE difference measurements required for establishing adverse analytical findings for metabolites relative to endogenous reference compounds. Considerations for the anti-doping analyst are reviewed. PMID:22362612

  8. Source Attribution of Cyanides Using Anionic Impurity Profiling, Stable Isotope Ratios, Trace Elemental Analysis and Chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Mirjankar, Nikhil S; Fraga, Carlos G; Carman, April J; Moran, James J

    2016-02-02

    Chemical attribution signatures (CAS) for chemical threat agents (CTAs), such as cyanides, are being investigated to provide an evidentiary link between CTAs and specific sources to support criminal investigations and prosecutions. Herein, stocks of KCN and NaCN were analyzed for trace anions by high performance ion chromatography (HPIC), carbon stable isotope ratio (δ(13)C) by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), and trace elements by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The collected analytical data were evaluated using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), Fisher-ratio (F-ratio), interval partial least-squares (iPLS), genetic algorithm-based partial least-squares (GAPLS), partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA), K nearest neighbors (KNN), and support vector machines discriminant analysis (SVMDA). HCA of anion impurity profiles from multiple cyanide stocks from six reported countries of origin resulted in cyanide samples clustering into three groups, independent of the associated alkali metal (K or Na). The three groups were independently corroborated by HCA of cyanide elemental profiles and corresponded to countries each having one known solid cyanide factory: Czech Republic, Germany, and United States. Carbon stable isotope measurements resulted in two clusters: Germany and United States (the single Czech stock grouped with United States stocks). Classification errors for two validation studies using anion impurity profiles collected over five years on different instruments were as low as zero for KNN and SVMDA, demonstrating the excellent reliability associated with using anion impurities for matching a cyanide sample to its factory using our current cyanide stocks. Variable selection methods reduced errors for those classification methods having errors greater than zero; iPLS-forward selection and F-ratio typically provided the lowest errors. Finally, using anion profiles to classify cyanides to a specific stock

  9. Very high precision and accuracy analysis of triple isotopic ratios of water. A critical instrumentation comparison study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkinis, Vasileios; Holme, Christian; Morris, Valerie; Thayer, Abigail Grace; Vaughn, Bruce; Kjaer, Helle Astrid; Vallelonga, Paul; Simonsen, Marius; Jensen, Camilla Marie; Svensson, Anders; Maffrezzoli, Niccolo; Vinther, Bo; Dallmayr, Remi

    2017-04-01

    We present a performance comparison study between two state of the art Cavity Ring Down Spectrometers (Picarro L2310-i, L2140-i). The comparison took place during the Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) campaign for the measurement of the Renland ice core, over a period of three months. Instant and complete vaporisation of the ice core melt stream, as well as of in-house water reference materials is achieved by accurate control of microflows of liquid into a homemade calibration system by following simple principles of the Hagen-Poiseuille law. Both instruments share the same vaporisation unit in a configuration that minimises sample preparation discrepancies between the two analyses. We describe our SMOW-SLAP calibration and measurement protocols for such a CFA application and present quality control metrics acquired during the full period of the campaign on a daily basis. The results indicate an unprecedented performance for all 3 isotopic ratios (δ2H, δ17O, δ18O ) in terms of precision, accuracy and resolution. We also comment on the precision and accuracy of the second order excess parameters of HD16O and H217O over H218O (Dxs, Δ17O ). To our knowledge these are the first reported CFA measurements at this level of precision and accuracy for all three isotopic ratios. Differences on the performance of the two instruments are carefully assessed during the measurement and reported here. Our quality control protocols extend to the area of low water mixing ratios, a regime in which often atmospheric vapour measurements take place and Cavity Ring Down Analysers show a poorer performance due to the lower signal to noise ratios. We address such issues and propose calibration protocols from which water vapour isotopic analyses can benefit from.

  10. [Sulfur isotopic ratios indicating sulfur cycling in slope soils of karst areas].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Cong-qiang; Li, Xiao-dong; Liu, Tao-ze; Zhang, Li-li

    2010-02-01

    Sequential extraction methods for soil sulfur were used to determine delta34 S ratios and sulfur contents of total sulfur, organic sulfur, SO4(21) and FeS2 in slope soils of karst areas. In general, FeS2 has the lowest delta34 S ratios, ranging from -6.86% per hundred to -4.229% per hundred, followed in ascending order by SO4(2-) (-2.64% per hundred - -1.34% per hundred), total sulfur (-3.25% per hundred - -1.03% per hundred) and organic sulfur (-1.63% per hundred -0.50% per hundred) in surface soils of profiles, and delta34 S ratios in different sulfur forms all show increasing trend with profiles deepening. Covariations of delta34 S ratios of SO4(2-) and FeS2 with increasing depth are related to SO4(2-) dissimilatory reduction, while the increase in parallel of delta34 S ratios of total sulfur and organic sulfur could be resulted from organic sulfur cycling. delta34 S ratios have been extensively used to indicate sulfur sources, moreover, SO4(2-) dissimilatory reduction and organic sulfur mineralization result in significant sulfur isotopic fractionation, and sulfides oxidation and SO4(2-) assimilation have no isotopic fractionation occurred, the vertical variations of delta34 S ratios in different sulfur forms can therefore be good records for depth-dependant sulfur cycling processes. Furthermore, by comparing depth distributions of sulfur contents and delta34 S ratios in different sulfur forms, it is easily to discuss the migration of SO4(-1) and organic sulfur fractions in soil profiles.

  11. Application of high-precision isotope ratio monitoring mass spectrometry to identify the biosynthetic origins of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Apostol, Izydor; Brooks, Paul D.; Mathews, Antony J.

    2001-01-01

    Isotope ratio monitoring (IRM) mass spectrometry was used to measure the relative abundance of stable isotopes in several samples of adult human hemoglobin expressed in E. coli, yeast, and human blood. The results showed significant differences in the distribution of 15N and 13C isotopes among hemoglobin samples produced in these organisms. This indicates that IRM mass spectrometry can be used in forensic protein chemistry to identify the origin of protein expression. PMID:11420448

  12. Level structures of neutron-rich Xe isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Lister, C.J.; Morss, L.R.

    1995-08-01

    The level structures of neutron-rich Xe isotopes were determined by observing prompt gamma-ray coincidences in {sup 248}Cm fission fragments. A 5-mg {sup 248}Cm, in the form of {sup 248}Cm-KCl pellet, was placed inside Eurogam array which consisted of 45 Compton-suppressed Ge detectors and 5 Low-Energy Photon Spectrometers. Transitions in Xe isotopes were identified by the appearance of new peaks in the {gamma}-ray spectra obtained by gating on the gamma peaks of the complementary Mo fragments.

  13. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry as a tool for source inference in forensic science: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Natacha; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Esseiva, Pierre; Doyle, Sean; Zollinger, Kurt; Delémont, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has been used in numerous fields of forensic science in a source inference perspective. This review compiles the studies published on the application of isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) to the traditional fields of forensic science so far. It completes the review of Benson et al. [1] and synthesises the extent of knowledge already gathered in the following fields: illicit drugs, flammable liquids, human provenancing, microtraces, explosives and other specific materials (packaging tapes, safety matches, plastics, etc.). For each field, a discussion assesses the state of science and highlights the relevance of the information in a forensic context. Through the different discussions which mark out the review, the potential and limitations of IRMS, as well as the needs and challenges of future studies are emphasized. The paper elicits the various dimensions of the source which can be obtained from the isotope information and demonstrates the transversal nature of IRMS as a tool for source inference. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Development and airborne operation of a compact water isotope ratio infrared spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Iannone, Rosario Q; Kassi, Samir; Jost, Hans-Jürg; Chenevier, Marc; Romanini, Daniele; Meijer, Harro A J; Dhaniyala, Suresh; Snels, Marcel; Kerstel, Erik R T

    2009-12-01

    A sensitive laser spectrometer, named IRIS (water isotope ratio infrared spectrometer), was developed for the in situ detection of the isotopic composition of water vapour in the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere. Isotope ratio measurements can be used to quantify troposphere-stratosphere exchange, and to study the water chemistry in the stratosphere. IRIS is based on the technique of optical feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy. It uses a room temperature near-infrared laser, and does not require cryogenic cooling of laser or detectors. The instrument weighs 51 kg including its support structure. Airborne operation was demonstrated during three flights aboard the European M55-Geophysica stratospheric research aircraft, as part of the AMMA/SCOUT-03 (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis/Stratospheric Climate links with emphasis on the Upper Troposphere and lower stratosphere) campaign in Burkina Faso in August 2006. One-second averaged, vertical profiles of delta(2)H, delta(17)O and delta(18)O in the upper troposphere are shown, as are the delta(17)O-delta(18)O and delta(2)H-delta(18)O relations. The data are discussed with reference to a Rayleigh distillation model. As expected, there is no indication of non-mass-dependent fractionation (also known as mass-independent fractionation) in the troposphere. Furthermore, improvements to the thermal management system and a move to a (cryogen-free) longer-wavelength laser source are discussed, which together should result in approximately two orders of magnitude improvement of the sensitivity.

  15. Development and Airborne Operation of a Compact Water Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iannone, Rosario Q.; Kassi, Samir; Jost, Hans-Juerg; Chenevier, Marc; Romanini, Daniele; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Dhaniyala, Suresh; Snels, Marcel; Kerstel, Erik R. T.

    2009-01-01

    A sensitive laser spectrometer, named IRIS (water isotope ratio infrared spectrometer), was developed for the in situ detection of the isotopic composition of water vapour in the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere. Isotope ratio measurements can be used to quantify troposphere stratosphere exchange, and to study the water chemistry in the stratosphere. IRIS is based on the technique of optical feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy. It uses a room temperature near-infrared laser, and does not require cryogenic cooling of laser or detectors. The instrument weighs 51 kg including its support structure. Airborne operation was demonstrated during three flights aboard the European M55-Geophysica stratospheric research aircraft, as part of the AMMA/SCOUT-03 (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis/Stratospheric Climate links with emphasis on the Upper Troposphere and lower stratosphere) campaign in Burkina Faso in August 2006. The data are discussed with reference to a Rayleigh distillation model. As expected, there is no indication of non-mass-dependent fractionation (also known as mass-independent fractionation) in the troposphere. Furthermore, improvements to the thermal management system and a move to a (cryogen-free) longer-wavelength laser source are discussed, which together should result in approximately two orders of magnitude improvement of the sensitivity

  16. Development and Airborne Operation of a Compact Water Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iannone, Rosario Q.; Kassi, Samir; Jost, Hans-Juerg; Chenevier, Marc; Romanini, Daniele; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Dhaniyala, Suresh; Snels, Marcel; Kerstel, Erik R. T.

    2009-01-01

    A sensitive laser spectrometer, named IRIS (water isotope ratio infrared spectrometer), was developed for the in situ detection of the isotopic composition of water vapour in the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere. Isotope ratio measurements can be used to quantify troposphere stratosphere exchange, and to study the water chemistry in the stratosphere. IRIS is based on the technique of optical feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy. It uses a room temperature near-infrared laser, and does not require cryogenic cooling of laser or detectors. The instrument weighs 51 kg including its support structure. Airborne operation was demonstrated during three flights aboard the European M55-Geophysica stratospheric research aircraft, as part of the AMMA/SCOUT-03 (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis/Stratospheric Climate links with emphasis on the Upper Troposphere and lower stratosphere) campaign in Burkina Faso in August 2006. The data are discussed with reference to a Rayleigh distillation model. As expected, there is no indication of non-mass-dependent fractionation (also known as mass-independent fractionation) in the troposphere. Furthermore, improvements to the thermal management system and a move to a (cryogen-free) longer-wavelength laser source are discussed, which together should result in approximately two orders of magnitude improvement of the sensitivity

  17. Carbon isotope ratio (13C/12C) of pine honey and detection of HFCS adulteration.

    PubMed

    Çinar, Serap B; Ekşi, Aziz; Coşkun, İlknur

    2014-08-15

    Carbon isotope ratio ((13)C/(12)C=δ(13)C) of 100 pine honey samples collected from 9 different localities by Mugla region (Turkey) in years 2006, 2007 and 2008 were investigated. The δ(13)Cprotein value of honey samples ranged between -23.7 and -26.6‰, while the δ(13)Choney value varied between -22.7 and -27‰. For 90% of the samples, the difference in the C isotope ratio of protein and honey fraction (δ(13)Cpro-δ(13)Chon) was -1.0‰ and/or higher. Therefore, it can be said that the generally anticipated minimum value of C isotope difference (-1.0‰) for honey is also valid for pine honey. On the other hand, C4 sugar value (%), which was calculated from the δ(13)Cpro-δ(13)Chon difference, was found to be linearly correlated with the amount of adulterant (HFCS) in pine honey. These results indicate that C4 sugar value is a powerful criteria for detecting HFCS adulteration in pine honey. The δ(13)Choney and δ(13)Cprotein-δ(13)Choney values of the samples did not show any significant differences in terms of both year and locality (P>0.05), while the δ(13)Cprotein values showed significant differences due to year (P<0.05) but not due to locality (P>0.05).

  18. Isotope-ratio infrared spectroscopy: a reliable tool for the investigation of plant-water sources?

    PubMed

    Martín-Gómez, Paula; Barbeta, Adrià; Voltas, Jordi; Peñuelas, Josep; Dennis, Kate; Palacio, Sara; Dawson, Todd E; Ferrio, Juan Pedro

    2015-08-01

    Stable isotopes are extensively used as tracers for the study of plant-water sources. Isotope-ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS) offers a cheaper alternative to isotope-ratio mass spectroscopy (IRMS), but its use in studying plant and soil water is limited by the spectral interference caused by organic contaminants. Here, we examine two approaches to cope with contaminated samples in IRIS: on-line oxidation of organic compounds (MCM) and post-processing correction. We assessed these methods compared to IRMS across 136 samples of xylem and soil water, and a set of ethanol- and methanol-water mixtures. A post-processing correction significantly improved IRIS accuracy in both natural samples and alcohol dilutions, being effective with concentrations up to 8% of ethanol and 0.4% of methanol. MCM outperformed the post-processing correction in removing methanol interference, but did not effectively remove interference for high concentrations of ethanol. By using both approaches, IRIS can overcome with reasonable accuracy the analytical uncertainties associated with most organic contaminants found in soil and xylem water. We recommend the post-processing correction as the first choice for analysis of samples of unknown contamination. Nevertheless, MCM can be more effective for evaluating samples containing contaminants responsible for strong spectral interferences at low concentrations, such as methanol. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. Application of LA-MC-ICP-MS for analysis of Sr isotope ratios in speleothems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Michael; Scholz, Denis; Wassenburg, Jasper A.; Jochum, Klaus Peter; Breitenbach, Sebastian

    2017-04-01

    Speleothems are well established climate archives. In order to reconstruct past climate variability, several geochemical proxies, such as δ13C and δ18O as well as trace elements are available. Since several factors influence each individual proxy, robust interpretation is often hampered. This calls for multi-proxy approaches involving additional isotope systems that can help to delineate the role of different sources of water within the epikarst and changes in soil composition. Sr isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) have been shown to provide useful information about water residence time and water mixing in the host rock. Furthermore, Sr isotopes are not fractionated during calcite precipitation, implying that the 87Sr/86Sr ratio of the speleothem provides a direct record of the drip water. While most speleothem studies applying Sr isotopes used the TIMS methodology, LA-MC-ICP-MS has been utilized for several other archives, such as otoliths and teeth. This method provides the advantage of faster data acquisition, higher spatial resolution, larger sample throughput and the absence of chemical treatment prior to analysis. Here we present the first LA-MC-ICP-MS Sr isotope data for speleothems. The analytical uncertainty of our LA-MC-ICP-MS Sr data is in a similar range as for other carbonate materials. The results of different ablation techniques (i.e. line scan and spots) are reproducible within error, implying that the application of this technique on speleothems is possible. In addition, several comparative measurements of different carbonate reference materials (i.e. MACS-3, JCt-1, JCp-1), such as tests with standard bracketing and comparison of the 87Sr/86Sr ratios with nanosecond laser ablation system and a state-of-the-art femtosecond laser ablation system, show the robustness of the method. We applied the method to samples from Morocco (Grotte de Piste) and India (Mawmluh Cave). Our results show only very small changes in the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of both speleothems

  20. Chemistry and isotope ratios of sulfur in basalts and volcanic gases at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sakai, H.; Casadevall, T.J.; Moore, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    Eighteen basalts and some volcanic gases from the submarine and subaerial parts of Kilauea volcano were analyzed for the concentration and isotope ratios of sulfur. By means of a newly developed technique, sulfide and sulfate sulfur in the basalts were separately but simultaneously determined. The submarine basalt has 700 ?? 100 ppm total sulfur with ??34S??s of 0.7 ?? 0.1 ???. The sulfate/sulfide molar ratio ranges from 0.15 to 0.56 and the fractionation factor between sulfate and sulfide is +7.5 ?? 1.5???. On the other hand, the concentration and ??34S??s values of the total sulfur in the subaerial basalt are reduced to 150 ?? 50 ppm and -0.8 ?? 0.2???, respectively. The sulfate to sulfide ratio and the fractionation factor between them are also smaller, 0.01 to 0.25 and +3.0???, respectively. Chemical and isotopic evidence strongly suggests that sulfate and sulfide in the submarine basalt are in chemical and isotopic equilibria with each other at magmatic conditions. Their relative abundance and the isotope fractionation factors may be used to estimate the f{hook}o2 and temperature of these basalts at the time of their extrusion onto the sea floor. The observed change in sulfur chemistry and isotopic ratios from the submarine to subaerial basalts can be interpreted as degassing of the SO2 from basalt thereby depleting sulfate and 34S in basalt. The volcanic sulfur gases, predominantly SO2, from the 1971 and 1974 fissures in Kilauea Crater have ??34S values of 0.8 to 0.9%., slightly heavier than the total sulfur in the submarine basalts and definitely heavier than the subaerial basalts, in accord with the above model. However, the ??34S value of sulfur gases (largely SO2) from Sulfur Bank is 8.0%., implying a secondary origin of the sulfur. The ??34S values of native sulfur deposits at various sites of Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanos, sulfate ions of four deep wells and hydrogen sulfide from a geothermal well along the east rift zone are also reported. The high

  1. Hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf wax n-alkanes in grasses are insensitive to transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInerney, Francesca A.; Helliker, Brent R.; Freeman, Katherine H.

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed hydrogen isotope ratios of high-molecular weight n-alkanes ( δD l) and oxygen isotope ratios of α-cellulose ( δ18O C) for C 3 and C 4 grasses grown in the field and in controlled-environment growth chambers. The relatively firm understanding of 18O-enrichment in leaf water and α-cellulose was used to elucidate fractionation patterns of δD l signatures. In the different relative humidity environments of the growth chambers, we observed clear and predictable effects of leaf-water enrichment on δ18O C values. Using a Craig-Gordon model, we demonstrate that leaf water in the growth chamber grasses should have experienced significant D-enriched due to transpiration. Nonetheless, we found no effect of transpirational D-enrichment on the δD l values. In field samples, we saw clear evidence of enrichment (correlating with relative humidity of the field sites) in both δ18O C and δD l. These seemingly contrasting results could be explained if leaf waxes are synthesized in an environment that is isotopically similar to water entering plant roots due to either temporal or spatial isolation from evaporatively enriched leaf waters. For grasses in the controlled environment, there was no enrichment of source water, whereas enrichment of grass source water via evaporation from soils and/or stems was likely for grass samples grown in the field. Based on these results, evaporation from soils and/or stems appears to affect δD l, but transpiration from leaves does not. Further evidence for this conclusion is found in modeling expected net evapotranspirational enrichment. A Craig-Gordon model applied to each of the field sites yields leaf water oxygen isotope ratios that can be used to accurately predict the observed δ18O C values. In contrast, the calculated leaf water hydrogen isotope ratios are more enriched than what is required to predict observed δD l values. These calculations lend support to the conclusion that while δ18O C reflects both soil

  2. Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope Ratios Predict Intake of Sweeteners in a Yup’ik Study Population12

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Sarah H.; Kristal, Alan R.; Bersamin, Andrea; Hopkins, Scarlett E.; Boyer, Bert B.; O’Brien, Diane M.

    2013-01-01

    The carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) is elevated in corn- and cane sugar-based foods and has recently shown associations with sweetener intake in multiple U.S. populations. However, a high carbon isotope ratio is not specific to corn- and sugar cane-based sweeteners, as other foods, including meats and fish, also have elevated δ13C. This study examines whether the inclusion of a second marker, the nitrogen isotope ratio (δ15N), can control for confounding dietary effects on δ13C and improve the validity of isotopic markers of sweetener intake. The study participants are from the Yup’ik population of southwest Alaska and consume large and variable amounts of fish and marine mammals known to have elevated carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios. Sixty-eight participants completed 4 weekly 24-h recalls followed by a blood draw. RBC δ13C and δ15N were used to predict sweetener intake, including total sugars, added sugars, and sugar-sweetened beverages. A model including both δ13C and δ15N explained more than 3 times as much of the variation in sweetener intake than did a model using only δ13C. Because carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios are simultaneously determined in a single, high-throughput analysis, this dual isotope marker provides a simple method to improve the validity of stable isotope markers of sweetener intake with no additional cost. We anticipate that this multi-isotope approach will have utility in any population where a stable isotope biomarker is elevated in several food groups and there are appropriate “covariate” isotopes to control for intake of foods not of research interest. PMID:23256142

  3. Determination of the (13)C/(12)C Carbon Isotope Ratio in Carbonates and Bicarbonates by (13)C NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pironti, Concetta; Cucciniello, Raffaele; Camin, Federica; Tonon, Agostino; Motta, Oriana; Proto, Antonio

    2017-10-09

    This paper is the first study focused on the innovative application of (13)C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy to determine the bulk (13)C/(12)C carbon isotope ratio, at natural abundance, in inorganic carbonates and bicarbonates. In the past, (13)C NMR spectroscopy (irm-(13)C NMR) was mainly used to measure isotope ratio monitoring with the potential of conducting (13)C position-specific isotope analysis of organic molecules with high precision. The reliability of the newly developed methodology for the determination of stable carbon isotope ratio was evaluated in comparison with the method chosen in the past for these measurements, i.e., isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), with very encouraging results. We determined the (13)C/(12)C ratio of carbonates and bicarbonates (∼50-100 mg) with a precision on the order of 1‰ in the presence of a relaxation agent, such as Cr(acac)3, and CH3(13)COONa as an internal standard. The method was first applied to soluble inorganic carbonates and bicarbonates and then extended to insoluble carbonates by converting them to Na2CO3, following a simple procedure and without observing isotopic fractionation. Here, we demonstrate that (13)C NMR spectroscopy can also be successfully adopted to characterize the (13)C/(12)C isotope ratio in inorganic carbonates and bicarbonates with applications in different fields, such as cultural heritage and geological studies.

  4. New developments in high-resolution gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clog, M. D.; Ellam, R. M.; Hilkert, A.; Schwieters, J. B.; Hamilton, D.

    2015-12-01

    Gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) is one of the main tools for the study of the isotopic compositions of light elements, extended in the last 10 years to the measurements of molecules bearing several rare isotopes (e.g., clumped isotopes of CO2) as well as position-specific isotopic substitutions in a few choice analytes (e.g., in N2O). Measuring those low-abundance species creates several technical challenges, with the main one being the presence of numerous isobaric interferences. Those can come either from contaminants (background gases present in the source of the instrument or impurities introduced with the analyte), or unwanted beams created by the analyte itself during the ionization process (for example adducts and fragments). In order to avoid those isobaric species, new high-resolution, double-focusing IRMS have been developed. We present here the capabilities of the production series version of the ThermoFisher Scientific 253 Ultra, which was installed at SUERC in July 2015. The instrument is capable of reaching high mass resolving power (above 40,000) and is similar in design to the Caltech 253 Ultra prototype. The collector array has 9 detector positions, 8 of which are movable. Faraday cups at each detector can be linked to amplifiers with gains ranging from 3.108 to 1012 Ohm (and 1013 Ohm amplifiers being currently developped). There are also 4 ion counters, one of which located behind a retardation lens (RPQ) to limit background noise and improve abundance sensitivity. Additionally, one of the Faraday cup in the new instrument has a very narrow entrance slit, allowing high mass resolving power and high resolution, with a complete separation of the ion beams instead of complex peak shapes corresponding to overlapping ion beams. This will potentially remove the need for adduct lines or peak stripping schemes for analytes like CH4.

  5. Microbial activities and phosphorus cycling: An application of oxygen isotope ratios in phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, Lisa M.; Joshi, Sunendra R.; Kana, Todd M.; Jaisi, Deb P.

    2014-08-01

    Microorganisms carry out biochemical transformations of nutrients that make up their cells. Therefore, understanding how these nutrients are transformed or cycled in natural environments requires knowledge of microbial activity. Commonly used indicators for microbial activity typically include determining microbial respiration by O2/CO2 measurements, cell counts, and measurement of enzyme activities. However, coupled studies on nutrient cycling and microbial activity are not given enough emphasis. Here we apply phosphate oxygen isotope ratios (δ18OP) as a tool for measurement of microbial activity and compare the rate of isotope exchange with methods of measuring microbial activities that are more commonly applied in environmental studies including respiration, dehydrogenase activity, alkaline phosphatase activity, and cell counts. Our results show that different bacteria may have different strategies for P uptake, storage and release, their respiration and consequently expression of DHA and APase activities, but in general the trend of their enzyme activities are comparable. Phosphate δ18OP values correlated well with these other parameters used to measure microbial activity with the strongest linear relationships between δ18OP and CO2 evolution (r = -0.99). Even though the rate of isotope exchange for each microorganism used in this study is different, the rate per unit CO2 respiration showed one general trend, where δ18OP values move towards equilibrium while CO2 is generated. While this suggests that P cycling among microorganisms used in this study can be generalized, further research is needed to determine whether the microorganism-specific isotope exchange trend may occur in natural environments. In summary, phosphate oxygen isotope measurements may offer an alternative for use as a tracer to measure microbial activity in soils, sediments, and many other natural environments.

  6. Stable-isotope ratios of hydrogen and oxygen in precipitation at Norman, Oklahoma, 1996-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaeschke, Jeanne B.; Scholl, Martha A.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Masoner, Jason R.; Christenson, Scott; Qi, Haiping

    2011-01-01

    Precipitation samples for measurement of stable-isotope ratios of hydrogen (delta2H) and oxygen (delta18O) were collected at the Norman Landfill Research Site in Norman, Oklahoma, from May 1996 to October 2008. Rainfall amounts also were measured at the site (U.S. Geological Survey gaging station 07229053) during the collection period. The delta2H of precipitation samples ranged from -121.9 to +8.3 per mil, and the delta18O of precipitation ranged from -16.96 to +0.50 per mil. The volume-weighted average values for delta2H and delta18O of precipitation over the 12-year measurement period were -31.13 per mil for delta2H and -5.57 per mil for delta18O. Average summer-season delta2H and delta18O values of precipitation usually were more positive (enriched in the heavier isotopes) than winter values.

  7. Sedimentary nitrogen isotopic ratio as a recorder for surface ocean nitrate utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Altabet, M.A.; Francois, R. )

    1994-03-01

    The availability of nutrients in the near surface ocean is an important control on primary production, whose variability over geologic time may have altered major biogeochemical cycles. Ocean models have suggested a specific link between glacial/interglacial variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations and changes in nutrient concentration at the surface of high latitude seas. Isotope ratios have been used to evaluate nutrients in the ocean surface. To test the fidelity with which surface generated isotopic signals are recorded in deep-sea sediments, this study focused on equatorial Pacific ocean and the southern ocean. In both regions large gradients in near surface NO3 concentration and depletion dominate any local temporal variation. Corresponding gradients were found in Nitrogen 15 and compared to sedimentary values. Results indicate that strong near surface N15 gradients are indeed recorded in underlying surface sediments. 55 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Isotopic abundance ratios for carbon and nitrogen in Nova Herculis 1934

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sneden, C.; Lambert, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Spectra of Nova Herculis 1934 taken during an episode of intense CN absorption are analyzed to determine the isotopic abundance ratios of C12/C13 and N14/N15. Synthetic spectrum analysis, based on the wavelengths, excitation potentials, and oscillator strengths for the CN lines, and radial velocity measurements indicate that C(12)N(14) was the dominant species in the Nova, and that the minimum abundance limit for C12/C13 is about 1.5, while the minimum for N14/N15 is about 2. The results are compared with predictions based on models of thermonuclear runaways in hydrogen-rich envelopes of white dwarfs. It is noted that the nova material may have been contaminated with C13-rich material prior to or during the eruption. Possible causes of this isotope enrichment are presented.

  9. The stable carbon isotope ratios in benthic food webs of the gulf of Calvi, Corsica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauby, Patrick

    1989-02-01

    The Gulf of Calvi, Corsica, presents a wide diversity of biocoenoses, amongst which the seagrass Posidonia meadow is prevalent. More than 100 plant, animal and sediment samples from various biotopes were analysed for their stable carbon isotope ratios, to assess carbon flows within the food chains. Marine plants display a wide range of δ 13C values, from -6 to -32‰ but with three relatively well distinct peaks for Posidonia, brown algae and phytoplankton (-9, -19 and -23‰, respectively), which are the main carbon sources. The range of isotopic values of animals is narrower, from -14 to -24‰, suggesting that they feed mainly on algae and plankton. Computations based on simple equations show the proportion of each carbon source in the diet of the animals. Posidonia, notwithstanding their important biomass, appear to be a minor food source; this is possibly because of the transfer of their dead leaves, towards the shorelines, in winter.

  10. Hydrogen-Isotopic Ratios of Lipids From Hydrogen-Consuming Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, B. J.; Fox, D. N.; Sessions, A. L.; Valentine, D. L.

    2005-12-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) plays several key roles in aquatic sediments. Metabolized by a wide variety of prokaryotes, it both serves a vehicle for interspecies electron transfer and exerts thermodynamic control over microbial metabolic processes. H2 is typically depleted in deuterium (D) by up to 600‰ relative to water, providing a potential isotopic marker for H2-consuming organisms. Preservation of that isotopic signal in sediments requires that molecular H2 can be an indirect source of carbon-bound hydrogen in microbial lipids, a question that is the target of our ongoing laboratory-based investigations. Here we report compound-specific H-isotopic analyses of lipids extracted from H2-consuming bacteria grown under defined isotopic conditions (δD-H2 and δD-H2O). Cupriavidus necator, an aerobe, is a facultatively lithoautotrophic "knallgas" bacterium. C. necator was grown on H2 + O2 + CO2 in liquid media with differing δD-H2O values. The results of compound-specific isotopic analysis show a strong correlation between the H-isotopic ratio of lipids and that of H2O in the growth medium. Cultures grown in media of δD-H2O = -24‰ produced lipids in which δD values were from -258‰ to -197‰. In media of δD-H2O = +527‰, δD-lipid values were from +117‰ to +228‰. In media of δD-H2O = +1115‰, δD-lipid values were from +514‰ to +675‰. Linear regression was performed on the data from each lipid compound (R2 > 0.9994 in all cases). Regression lines intercepted the δD-lipid axis between -966‰ ([D]/[H] = 5.23×10-6) and -827‰ ([D]/[H] = 1.60×10-5); slopes were between and 0.670 and 0.764. These results indicate that the isotopic composition of lipids is entirely controlled by that of water, i.e. that the isotopic depletion of H2 is not recorded in the lipids - in sharp contrast to previous results from another hydrogenotroph, Sporomusa sp., where part of lipid H is derived indirectly from H2. The results are consistent with two possibilities: 1

  11. Silicon isotope ratios affected by sodium-induced broadband interference in high resolution multicollector-ICPMS.

    PubMed

    Pramann, Axel; Rienitz, Olaf; Schiel, Detlef

    2012-12-04

    The measurement of isotope ratios of silicon highly enriched in (28)Si ("Si28", x((28)Si) > 99.99%) is influenced by a significant interference (20%) on the (30)Si(+) signal when using a cup configuration of C ((29)Si(+)) and H3 ((30)Si(+)) on a Neptune MC-ICPMS. This interference was observed in silicon solutions with aqueous NaOH (w(NaOH) > 0.001 g/g) and in highly concentrated aqueous NaOH blank solutions (e.g., w(NaOH) = 0.25 g/g) but never in KOH solutions. By redirecting the ions, the interference was detected with all other Faraday cups except the center cup. The interference can be explained by ion scattering induced by the presence of large amounts of sodium. Due to its shielded location, these stray ions were not detected in the center cup. This effect explains an anomalous increase of the abundance of the (30)Si(+) signal in (30)Si/(29)Si isotope ratio measurements made using aqueous NaOH blank solutions with w(NaOH) ≥ 0.001 g/g. For silicon isotopic measurements, it is recommended to use alkaline solutions for sample dissolution and dilution that do not contain sodium. The effects of this interference are extremely important for the experimental determination of the Avogadro constant N(A) using the "silicon sphere approach". It can also have a significant effect on Si isotope analyses in matrices with a naturally high concentration of sodium (e.g., seawater).

  12. Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios of hydrothermal minerals from Yellowstone drill cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sturchio, N.C.; Keith, T.E.C.; Muehlenbachs, K.

    1990-01-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios were measured for hydrothermal minerals (silica, clay and calcite) from fractures and vugs in altered rhyolite, located between 28 and 129 m below surface (in situ temperatures ranging from 81 to 199??C) in Yellowstone drill holes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of formation of these minerals. The ??18O values of the thirty-two analyzed silica samples (quartz, chalcedony, ??-cristobalite, and ??-cristobalite) range from -7.5 to +2.8???. About one third of the silica 7samples have ??18O values that are consistent with isotopic equilibrium with present thermal waters; most of the other silica samples appear to have precipitated from water enriched in 18O (up to 4.7???) relative to present thermal water, assuming precipitation at present in situ temperatures. Available data on fluid-inclusion homogenization temperatures in hydrothermal quartz indicate that silica precipitation occurred mostly at temperatures above those measured during drilling and imply that 15O enrichments in water during silica precipitation were generally larger than those estimated from present conditions. Similarly, clay minerals (celadonite and smectite) have ??18O values higher (by 3.5 to 7.9???) than equilibrium values under present conditions. In contrast, all eight analyzed calcite samples are close to isotopic equilibrium with present thermal waters. The frequent incidence of apparent 18O enrichment in thermal water from which the hydrothermal minerals precipitated may indicate that a higher proportion of strongly 18O-enriched deep hydrothermal fluid once circulated through shallow portions of the Yellowstone system, or that a recurring transient 18O-enrichment effect occurs at shallow depths and is caused either by sudden decompressional boiling or by isotopic exchange at low water/rock ratios in new fractures. The mineralogy and apparent 18O enrichments of hydrothermal fracture-filling minerals are consistent with deposition

  13. Ptolemy an Instrument to Measure Stable Isotopic Ratios of Key Volatiles on a Cometary Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, I. P.; Barber, S. J.; Morgan, G. H.; Morse, A. D.; Sheridan, S.; Andrews, D. J.; Maynard, J.; Yau, D.; Evans, S. T.; Leese, M. R.; Zarnecki, J. C.; Kent, B. J.; Waltham, N. R.; Whalley, M. S.; Heys, S.; Drummond, D. L.; Edeson, R. L.; Sawyer, E. C.; Turner, R. F.; Pillinger, C. T.

    2007-02-01

    A fundamental goal of cometary studies is to determine the exact relationship between these bodies and the Solar System the question(s) can be summarised as follows: did comets originate during the same events that spawned the Sun and planets, are they more primitive bodies that record a pre-solar history, or are they interstellar materials collected in relatively more recent times? Now, whatever the origin of comets, it is entirely possible that they could, in part, contain interstellar or pre-solar components indeed, it seems rather likely in light of the fact that primitive meteorites contain such entities. These particular components are likely to be refractory (dust, macromolecular organic complexes, etc.). Of more relevance to the issues above are the volatile constituents, which make up the bulk of a comet's mass. Since these materials, by their very nature, volatilise during perihelion passage of a comet they can, in some instances, be detected and measured spectroscopically. Perhaps the most useful species for isotopic investigations are C2, HCN and CN. Unfortunately, spectroscopic measurements can only currently be made with accuracies of ±10 to ±20%. As such it is very often not practical to conclude anything further than the fact that isotopic measurements are compatible with ‘`solar’' values, which tends to imply an origin from the margins of the solar accretion disk. But there is another problem with the spectroscopic measurements since these are made on gaseous species in the coma (and relatively minor species at that) it is impossible to be certain that these represent the true nuclear values. In other words, if the processes of sublimation, active jetting, and photochemistry in the coma impart isotopic fractionation, the spectroscopic measurements could give a false impression of the true isotope ratios. What is required is an experiment capable of measuring isotopic ratios at the very surface of a comet. Herein we describe the Ptolemy

  14. Method for ultra-trace cesium isotope ratio measurements from environmental samples using thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Mathew S.; Snyder, Darin C.; Mann, Nick R.; White, Byron M.

    2015-05-01

    135Cs/137Cs isotope ratios can provide the age, origin and history of environmental Cs contamination. Relatively high precision 135Cs/137Cs isotope ratio measurements from samples containing femtogram quantities of 137Cs are needed to accurately track contamination resuspension and redistribution following environmental 137Cs releases; however, mass spectrometric analyses of environmental samples are limited by the large quantities of ionization inhibitors and isobaric interferences which are present at relatively high concentrations in the environment. We report a new approach for Cs purification from environmental samples. An initial ammonium molybdophosphate-polyacrylonitrile (AMP-PAN) column provides a robust method for extracting Cs under a wide variety of sample matrices and mass loads. Cation exchange separations using a second AMP-PAN column result in more than two orders of magnitude greater Cs/Rb separation factors than commercially available strong cation exchangers. Coupling an AMP-PAN cation exchanging step to a microcation column (AG50W resin) enables consistent 2-4% (2σ) measurement errors for samples containing 3-6,000 fg 137Cs, representing the highest precision 135Cs/137Cs ratio measurements currently reported for soil samples at the femtogram level.

  15. Stable carbon isotope ratios of intact GDGTs indicate heterogeneous sources to marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Ann; Hurley, Sarah J.; Walter, Sunita R. Shah; Kusch, Stephanie; Lichtin, Samantha; Zhang, Yi Ge

    2016-05-01

    Thaumarchaeota, the major sources of marine glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether lipids (GDGTs), are believed to fix the majority of their carbon directly from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The δ13C values of GDGTs (δ13CGDGT) may be powerful tools for reconstructing variations in the ocean carbon cycle, including paleoproductivity and water mass circulation, if they can be related to values of δ13CDIC. To date, isotope measurements primarily are made on the C40 biphytane skeletons of GDGTs, rather than on complete tetraether structures. This approach erases information revealed by the isotopic heterogeneity of GDGTs within a sample and may impart an isotopic fractionation associated with the ether cleavage. To circumvent these issues, we present δ13C values for GDGTs from twelve recent sediments representing ten continental margin locations. Samples are purified by orthogonal dimensions of HPLC, followed by measurement of δ13C values by Spooling Wire Microcombustion (SWiM)-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) with 1σ precision and accuracy of ±0.25‰. Using this approach, we confirm that GDGTs, generally around -19‰, are isotopically ;heavy; compared to other marine lipids. However, measured δ13CGDGT values are inconsistent with predicted values based on the 13C content of DIC in the overlying water column and the previously-published biosynthetic isotope fractionation for a pure culture of an autotrophic marine thaumarchaeon. In some sediments, the isotopic composition of individual GDGTs differs, indicating multiple source inputs. The data appear to confirm that crenarchaeol primarily is a biomarker for Thaumarchaeota, but its δ13C values still cannot be explained solely by autotrophic carbon fixation. Overall the complexity of the results suggests that both organic carbon assimilation (ca. 25% of total carbon) and multiple source(s) of exogenous GDGTs (contributing generally <30% of input to sediments) are necessary to explain the observed

  16. Does transpiration matter to the hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf wax n-alkanes? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInerney, F. A.; Helliker, B. R.; Freeman, K. H.

    2010-12-01

    Transpiration and evaporation from soils both affect he hydrogen isotope composition of leaf water, but the extent to which they effect the hydrogen isotope ratio of leaf wax lipids is still under debate. To address this question, we analyzed hydrogen isotope ratios of high-molecular weight n-alkanes (δDl) and oxygen isotope ratios of α-cellulose (δ18OC) for C3 and C4 grasses grown in the field and in controlled-environment growth chambers. The relatively firm understanding of 18O-enrichment in leaf water and α-cellulose was used to elucidate fractionation patterns of δDl signatures. In the different relative humidity environments of the growth chambers, we observed clear and predictable effects of leaf-water enrichment on δ18OC values. Using a Craig-Gordon model, we demonstrate that leaf water in the growth chamber grasses should have experienced significant D-enriched due to transpiration. Nonetheless, we found no effect of transpirational D-enrichment on the δDl values. In field samples, we saw clear evidence of enrichment (correlating with relative humidity of the field sites) in both δ18OC and δDl. These seemingly contrasting results can be explained if leaf waxes are synthesized in an environment that is isotopically similar to water entering plant roots due to either temporal or spatial isolation from evaporatively enriched leaf waters. For grasses in the controlled environment, there was no enrichment of source water, whereas enrichment of grass source water via evaporation from soils and/or stems was likely for grass samples grown in the field. Based on these results, evaporation from soils and/or stems appears to affect δDl, but transpiration from leaves does not. Further evidence for this conclusion is found in modeling expected net evapotranspirational enrichment. A Craig-Gordon model applied to each of the field sites yields leaf water oxygen isotope ratios that can be used to accurately predict the observed δ18OC values. In contrast, the

  17. Lead isotope ratio measurements as indicators for the source of lead poisoning in Mute swans (Cygnus olor) wintering in Puck Bay (northern Poland).

    PubMed

    Binkowski, Łukasz J; Meissner, Włodzimierz; Trzeciak, Marta; Izevbekhai, Kelvin; Barker, James

    2016-12-01

    Lead (Pb) poisoning is most commonly linked amongst anthropogenically-caused deaths in waterfowl and this is often associated with hunting and fishing activities. However, the exact identification of the source may be difficult with commonly-used techniques. We have studied isotope ratios using Inductively-Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) to investigate the source of Pb in the blood of Mute swans (n = 49) wintering in northern Poland. We compared the values of isotopic ratios from blood and ammunition pellets available on the Polish market. The mean Pb concentrations found was 0.241 μg/g (w/w) and nearly half of the blood specimens had elevated Pb levels (higher than the cited 0.23 μg/g w/w threshold of poisoning). Only the mean 208/206 Pb isotope ratio was similar in blood and pellet samples. Mean ratios of isotopes 206/204, 206/207 and 208/207 in swans' blood and in pellets differed significantly. Moreover, coefficients of variation were higher in blood samples than in pellets. These discrepancies and significant differences in abundance of (204)Pb and (207)Pb isotopes in both materials indicated that pellets available today on the Polish market were not the source of Pb in the blood of Mute swans wintering in northern Poland.

  18. Acidification processes and soil leaching influenced by agricultural practices revealed by strontium isotopic ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierson-Wickmann, Anne-Catherine; Aquilina, Luc; Weyer, Christina; Molénat, Jérôme; Lischeid, Gunnar

    2009-08-01

    In natural river systems, the chemical and isotopic composition of stream- and ground waters are mainly controlled by the geology and water-rock interactions. The leaching of major cations from soils has been recognized as a possible consequence of acidic deposition from atmosphere for over 30 years. Moreover, in agricultural areas, the application of physiological acid fertilizers and nitrogen fertilizers in the ammonia form may enhance the cation leaching through the soil profile into ground- and surface waters. This origin of leached cations has been studied on two small and adjacent agricultural catchments in Brittany, western France. The study catchments are drained by two first-order streams, and mainly covered with cambisoils, issued from the alteration and weathering of a granodiorite basement. Precipitations, soil water- and NH 4 acetate-leachates, separated minerals, and stream waters have been investigated. Chemical element ratios, such as Ba/Sr, Na/Sr and Ca/Sr ratios, as well as Sr isotopic ratios are used to constrain the relative contribution from potential sources of stream water elements. Based on Sr isotopic ratio and element concentration, soil water- and NH 4 acetate leaching indicates (1) a dominant manure/slurry contribution in the top soil, representing a cation concentrated pool, with low 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios; (2) in subsoils, mineral dissolution is enhanced by fertilizer application, becoming the unique source of cations in the saprolite. The relatively high weathering rates encountered implies significant sources of cations which are not accessory minerals, but rather plagioclase and biotite dissolution. Stream water has a very different isotopic and chemical composition compared to soil water leaching suggesting that stream water chemistry is dominated by elements issued from mineral and rock weathering. Agriculture, by applications of chemical and organic fertilizers, can influence the export of major base cations, such as Na +. Plagioclase

  19. Metrology for laser spectroscopic concentration and isotope