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  1. Expression of functional leptin receptors in rodent Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Caprio, M; Isidori, A M; Carta, A R; Moretti, C; Dufau, M L; Fabbri, A

    1999-11-01

    Several studies indicate that the size of body fat stores and the circulating levels of the adipocyte-derived hormone leptin are able to influence the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The leptin-hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal interactions have been mainly studied at the level of the central nervous system. In this study, we investigated the possibility that leptin may have direct effects on the rodent Leydig cell function. To probe this hypothesis, we first analyzed the expression of leptin receptors (OB-R) in rodent Leydig cells in culture. RT-PCR studies showed that rat Leydig cells express both the long (OB-Rb) and short isoform (OB-Ra) of leptin receptor, whereas MLTC-1 cells (a murine Leydig tumor cell line) express only the long isoform. Short-term (30-90 min) incubation of rat Leydig cells with increasing concentrations ofleptin (2-500 ng/ml) led to a significant and dose-dependent inhibition of human (h)CG-stimulated testosterone (T) production (approximately 60% reduction, IC50 = 20 ng/ml) but no change in basal androgen release. Also, leptin (150 ng/ml) amplified hCG-induced intracellular cAMP formation (1- to 2-fold) without modifying basal cAMP levels. Subsequent experiments showed that leptin inhibited 8Br-cAMP-stimulated T production, indicating that leptin's effect is exerted beyond cAMP. The inhibitory effect of leptin on hCG-induced T secretion was accompanied by a significant reduction of androstenedione and a concomitant rise of the precursor metabolites pregnenolone, progesterone, and 17-OH-progesterone, conceivable with a leptin-induced lesion of 17,20 lyase activity. Separate experiments performed with the MLTC-1 cells (not expressing cytochrome P450-17alpha) showed that leptin, though amplifying hCG-stimulated cAMP production, did not modify hCG-stimulated pregnenolone and progesterone release. These results further indicate that leptin action on steroidogenesis occurs downstream of progesterone synthesis. Northern Blot

  2. Farnesoid X receptor, through the binding with steroidogenic factor 1-responsive element, inhibits aromatase expression in tumor Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Stefania; Malivindi, Rocco; Giordano, Cinzia; Gu, Guowei; Panza, Salvatore; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Lanzino, Marilena; Sisci, Diego; Panno, Maria Luisa; Andò, Sebastiano

    2010-02-19

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that regulates bile acid homeostasis. It is expressed in the liver and the gastrointestinal tract, but also in several non-enterohepatic tissues including testis. Recently, FXR was identified as a negative modulator of the androgen-estrogen-converting aromatase enzyme in human breast cancer cells. In the present study we detected the expression of FXR in Leydig normal and tumor cell lines and in rat testes tissue. We found, in rat Leydig tumor cells, R2C, that FXR activation by the primary bile acid chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) or a synthetic agonist GW4064, through a SHP-independent mechanism, down-regulates aromatase expression in terms of mRNA, protein levels, and its enzymatic activity. Transient transfection experiments, using vector containing rat aromatase promoter PII, evidenced that CDCA reduces basal aromatase promoter activity. Mutagenesis studies, electrophoretic mobility shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis reveal that FXR is able to compete with steroidogenic factor 1 in binding to a common sequence present in the aromatase promoter region interfering negatively with its activity. Finally, the FXR-mediated anti-proliferative effects exerted by CDCA on tumor Leydig cells are at least in part due to an inhibition of estrogen-dependent cell growth. In conclusion our findings identify for the first time the activators of FXR as negative modulators of the aromatase enzyme in Leydig tumor cell lines.

  3. The expression of the RLF/INSL3 gene is reduced in Leydig cells of the aging rat testis.

    PubMed

    Paust, H J; Wessels, J; Ivell, R; Mukhopadhyay, A K

    2002-12-01

    The relaxin-like factor (RLF), which is the product of the INSL3 gene, is highly expressed in the fetal and adult-type Leydig cells of all species so far examined. In adult testes it is upregulated at puberty but appears subsequently to be expressed in a constitutive manner, independently of acute changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Functional hypogonadism with decreased testosterone is prevalent in the aging male. In order to test whether this is a property of the HPG axis, or of the Leydig cells themselves, RLF/INSL3 was used as an independent marker to assess rat Leydig cell differentiation status. Hybridization analysis showed that in the testes of old (2 years) rats, RLF/INSL3 mRNA expression was dramatically reduced, compared to young (3 months) animals. This was also evident at the protein level using immunohistochemistry. The results suggest that increasing functional hypogonadism in older male mammals is likely caused by a dedifferentiation of the Leydig cells themselves.

  4. Prolactin (PRL) induction of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) expression and prostaglandin (PG) production in hamster Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Matzkin, María Eugenia; Ambao, Verónica; Carino, Mónica Herminia; Rossi, Soledad Paola; González, Lorena; Turyn, Daniel; Campo, Stella; Calandra, Ricardo Saúl; Frungieri, Mónica Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Serum prolactin (PRL) variations play a crucial role in the photoperiodic-induced testicular regression-recrudescence transition in hamsters. We have previously shown that cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins (PGs), is expressed mostly in Leydig cells of reproductively active hamsters with considerable circulating and pituitary levels of PRL. In this study, we describe a stimulatory effect of PRL on COX2/PGs in hamster Leydig cells, which is mediated by IL-1β and prevented by P38-MAPK and JAK2 inhibitors. Furthermore, by preparative isoelectric focusing (IEF), we isolated PRL charge analogues from pituitaries of active [isoelectric points (pI): 5.16, 4.61, and 4.34] and regressed (pI: 5.44) hamsters. More acidic PRL charge analogues strongly induced COX2 expression, while less acidic ones had no effect. Our studies suggest that PRL induces COX2/PGs in hamster Leydig cells through IL-1β and activation of P38-MAPK and JAK2. PRL microheterogeneity detected in active/inactive hamsters may be responsible for the photoperiodic variations of COX2 expression in Leydig cells.

  5. Leydig cell tumours in childhood.

    PubMed

    Mengel, W; Knorr, D

    1983-01-01

    Two cases of Leydig cell tumours in childhood are presented. In one case, delayed diagnosis and operation led to pubertas praecox vera whereas in the other case normal growth and development occurred after early diagnosis and operation. PMID:6878724

  6. Chrysin, a natural flavonoid enhances steroidogenesis and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein gene expression in mouse Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Jana, Kuladip; Yin, Xiangling; Schiffer, Randolph B; Chen, Jau-Jiin; Pandey, Akhilesh K; Stocco, Douglas M; Grammas, Paula; Wang, Xingjia

    2008-05-01

    During the aging process of males, testosterone biosynthesis declines in testicular Leydig cells resulting in decreases in various physiological functions. To explore the possibility of delaying the decline using food supplements, we have studied steroidogenic effects of a natural flavonoid, chrysin, in mouse Leydig cells. Chrysin dramatically increased cyclic AMP (cAMP)-induced steroidogenesis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. This result was confirmed using Leydig cells isolated from mouse testes. The steroidogenic effect of chrysin is not associated with an increase in expression of the P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme, required for the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone. In addition, when 22(R)hydroxylcholesterol was used as a substrate, chrysin induced a non-significant increase in steroid hormone, suggesting that the majority of the observed increase in steroidogenesis was due to the increased supply of substrate cholesterol. These observations were corroborated by showing that chrysin induced a marked increase in the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein, the factor that controls mitochondrial cholesterol transfer. Also, chrysin significantly increased StAR promoter activity and StAR mRNA level. Further studies indicated that this compound depressed expression of DAX-1, a repressor in StAR gene transcription. In the absence of cAMP, chrysin did not increase steroidogenesis. However, when a sub-threshold level of cAMP was used, StAR protein and steroid hormone were increased by chrysin to the levels seen with maximal stimulation of cAMP. These results suggest that while chrysin itself is unable to induce StAR gene expression and steroidogenesis, it appears to function by increasing the sensitivity of Leydig cells to cAMP stimulation. PMID:18434361

  7. NGF induces adult stem Leydig cells to proliferate and differentiate during Leydig cell regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Huaxi; Yang, Yan; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Qihao; Xiang, Qi; Ge, Renshan; Su, Zhijian; Huang, Yadong

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Nerve growth factor has shown significant changes on mRNA levels during Adult Leydig cells regeneration. •We established the organ culture model of rat seminiferous tubules with ethane dimethyl sulphonate (EDS) treatment. •Nerve growth factor has shown proliferation and differentiation-promoting effects on Adult stem Leydig cells. •Nerve growth factor induces progenitor Leydig cells to proliferate and differentiate and immature Leydig cells to proliferate. -- Abstract: Nerve growth factor (NGF) has been reported to be involved in male reproductive physiology. However, few reports have described the activity of NGF during Leydig cell development. The objective of the present study was to examine the role of NGF during stem-Leydig-cell (SLC) regeneration. We investigated the effects of NGF on Leydig-cell (LC) regeneration by measuring mRNA levels in the adult rat testis after ethane dimethanesulfonate (EDS) treatment. Furthermore, we used the established organ culture model of rat seminiferous tubules to examine the regulation of NGF during SLC proliferation and differentiation using EdU staining, real-time PCR and western blotting. Progenitor Leydig cells (PLCs) and immature Leydig cells (ILCs) were also used to investigate the effects of NGF on LCs at different developmental stages. NGF mRNA levels changed significantly during Leydig-cell regeneration in vivo. In vitro, NGF significantly promoted the proliferation of stem Leydig cells and also induced steroidogenic enzyme gene expression and 3β-HSD protein expression. The data from PLCs and ILCs showed that NGF could increase Cyclin D1 and Hsd 17b3 mRNA levels in PLCs and Cyclin D1 mRNA levels in ILCs. These results indicate that NGF may play an important role during LC regeneration by regulating the proliferation and differentiation of LCs at different developmental stages, from SLCs to PLCs and from PLCs to ILCs. The discovery of this effect of NGF on Leydig cells will provide useful

  8. Time-Course Changes of Steroidogenic Gene Expression and Steroidogenesis of Rat Leydig Cells after Acute Immobilization Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Han; Yuan, Kai-ming; Zhou, Hong-yu; Bu, Tiao; Su, Huina; Liu, Shiwen; Zhu, Qiqi; Wang, Yiyan; Hu, Yuanyuan; Shan, Yuanyuan; Lian, Qing-quan; Wu, Xiao-yun; Ge, Ren-shan

    2014-01-01

    Leydig cells secrete testosterone, which is essential for male fertility and reproductive health. Stress increases the secretion of glucocorticoid (corticosterone, CORT; in rats), which decreases circulating testosterone levels in part through a direct action by binding to the glucocorticoid receptors (NR3C1) in Leydig cells. The intratesticular CORT level is dependent on oxidative inactivation of glucocorticoid by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (HSD11B1) in Leydig cells. In the present study, we investigated the time-course changes of steroidogenic gene expression levels after acute immobilization stress in rats. The plasma CORT levels were significantly increased 0.5, 1, 3 and 6 h after immobilization stress, while plasma testosterone levels were significantly reduced 3 and 6 h, after stress and luteinizing hormone (LH) did not change. Immobilization stress caused the down-regulation of Scarb1, Star and Cyp17a1 expression levels in the rat testis starting at the first hour of stress, ahead of the significant decreases of plasma testosterone levels. Other mRNA levels, including Cyp11a1, Hsd3b1 and Hsd17b3, began to decline after 3 h. Hsd11b1 and Nos2 mRNA levels did not change during the course of stress. Administration of glucocorticoid antagonist RU486 significantly restored plasma testosterone levels. In conclusion, Scarb1, Star and Cyp17a1 expression levels are more sensitive to acute stress, and acute immobilization stress causes the decline of the steroidogenic pathway via elevating the levels of glucocorticoid, which binds to NR3C1 in Leydig cells to inhibit steroidogenic gene expression. PMID:25405735

  9. T-2 toxin inhibits gene expression and activity of key steroidogenesis enzymes in mouse Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian Ying; Zhang, Yong Fa; Meng, Xiang Ping; Li, Yuan Xiao; Ma, Kai Wang; Bai, Xue Fei

    2015-08-01

    T-2 toxin is one of the mycotoxins, a group of type A trichothecenes produced by several fungal genera including Fusarium species, which may lead to the decrease of the testosterone secretion in the primary Leydig cells derived from the mouse testis. The previous study demonstrated the effects of T-2 toxin through direct decrease of the testosterone biosynthesis in the primary Leydig cells derived from the mouse testis. In this study, we further examined the direct biological effects of T-2 toxin on steroidogenesis production, primarily in Leydig cells of mice. Mature mouse Leydig cells were purified by Percoll gradient centrifugation and the cell purity was determined by 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) staining. To examine T-2 toxin-induced testosterone secretion decrease, we measured the transcription levels of 3 key steroidogenic enzymes and 5 enzyme activities including 3β-HSD-1, P450scc, StAR, CYP17A1, and 17β-HSD in T-2 toxin/human chorionicgonadotropin (hCG) co-treated cells. Our previous study showed that T-2 toxin (10(-7) M, 10(-8) M and 10(-9) M) significantly suppressed hCG (10 ng/ml)-induced testosterone secretion. The studies demonstrated that the suppressive effect is correlated with the decreases in the levels of transcription of 3β-HSD-1, P450scc, and StAR (P<0.05) and also in enzyme activities of 3β-HSD-1, P450scc, StAR, CYP17A1, and 17β-HSD (P<0.05).

  10. Basic fibroblast growth factor promotes stem Leydig cell development and inhibits LH-stimulated androgen production by regulating microRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Yang, Yan; Zhang, Lei; Liang, Rui; Ge, Ren-Shan; Zhang, Yufei; Zhang, Qihao; Xiang, Qi; Huang, Yadong; Su, Zhijian

    2014-10-01

    Leydig cells are the primary source of testosterone in the testes, and their steroidogenic function is strictly controlled by the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad axis. Emerging evidence has indicated that fibroblast growth factors play a role in regulating stem Leydig cell development and steroidogenesis, but little is known about the regulatory mechanism. Using a seminiferous tubule culture system, we demonstrated that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) can promote stem Leydig cell proliferation and commitment toward differentiation in testosterone-producing Leydig cells. However, these promoting effects decreased with an increase in the bFGF dose. Previous studies have reported that bFGF inhibits luteinizing hormone (LH)-stimulated androgen production by downregulating the mRNA expression of steroidogenic genes in immature Leydig cells. However, the expression levels of 677 microRNAs did not change significantly during the LH-mediated process of testosterone synthesis. Five microRNAs (miR-29a, -29c, -142-3p, -451 and -335) were identified, and their expression in immature Leydig cells was regulated simultaneously by bFGF and LH. These results suggested that the inhibition of LH-stimulated androgen production may be modulated by a change in bFGF-mediated microRNA expression, which further impacts the signaling pathway of testosterone biosynthesis and steroidogenic gene expression.

  11. Leydig cell aging and hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Beattie, M C; Adekola, L; Papadopoulos, V; Chen, H; Zirkin, B R

    2015-08-01

    Leydig cell testosterone (T) production is reduced with age, resulting in reduced serum T levels (hypogonadism). A number of cellular changes have been identified in the steroidogenic pathway of aged Leydig cells that are associated with reduced T formation, including reductions in luteinizing hormone (LH)-stimulated cAMP production, the cholesterol transport proteins steroidogenic acute regulatory (STAR) protein and translocator protein (TSPO), and downstream steroidogenic enzymes of the mitochondria and smooth endoplasmic reticulum. Many of the changes in steroid formation that characterize aged Leydig cells can be elicited by the experimental alteration of the redox environment of young cells, suggesting that changes in the intracellular redox balance may cause reduced T production. Hypogonadism is estimated to affect about 5 million American men, including both aged and young. This condition has been linked to mood changes, worsening cognition, fatigue, depression, decreased lean body mass, reduced bone mineral density, increased visceral fat, metabolic syndrome, decreased libido, and sexual dysfunction. Exogenous T administration is now used widely to elevate serum T levels in hypogonadal men and thus to treat symptoms of hypogonadism. However, recent evidence suggests that men who take exogenous T may face increased risk of stroke, heart attack, and prostate tumorigenesis. Moreover, it is well established that administered T can have suppressive effects on LH, resulting in lower Leydig cell T production, reduced intratesticular T concentration, and reduced spermatogenesis. This makes exogenous T administration inappropriate for men who wish to father children. There are promising new approaches to increase serum T by directly stimulating Leydig cell T production rather than by exogenous T therapy, thus potentially avoiding some of its negative consequences. PMID:25700847

  12. Expression of Dominant-Negative Thyroid Hormone Receptor Alpha1 in Leydig and Sertoli Cells Demonstrates No Additional Defect Compared with Expression in Sertoli Cells Only

    PubMed Central

    Fumel, Betty; Froment, Pascal; Holzenberger, Martin; Livera, Gabriel; Monget, Philippe; Fouchécourt, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Background In the testis, thyroid hormone (T3) regulates the number of gametes produced through its action on Sertoli cell proliferation. However, the role of T3 in the regulation of steroidogenesis is still controversial. Methods The TRαAMI knock-in allele allows the generation of transgenic mice expressing a dominant-negative TRα1 (thyroid receptor α1) isoform restricted to specific target cells after Cre-loxP recombination. Here, we introduced this mutant allele in both Sertoli and Leydig cells using a novel aromatase-iCre (ARO-iCre) line that expresses Cre recombinase under control of the human Cyp19(IIa)/aromatase promoter. Findings We showed that loxP recombination induced by this ARO-iCre is restricted to male and female gonads, and is effective in Sertoli and Leydig cells, but not in germ cells. We compared this model with the previous introduction of TRαAMI specifically in Sertoli cells in order to investigate T3 regulation of steroidogenesis. We demonstrated that TRαAMI-ARO males exhibited increased testis weight, increased sperm reserve in adulthood correlated to an increased proliferative index at P3 in vivo, and a loss of T3-response in vitro. Nevertheless, TRαAMI-ARO males showed normal fertility. This phenotype is similar to TRαAMI-SC males. Importantly, plasma testosterone and luteinizing hormone levels, as well as mRNA levels of steroidogenesis enzymes StAR, Cyp11a1 and Cyp17a1 were not affected in TRαAMI-ARO. Conclusions/Significance We concluded that the presence of a mutant TRαAMI allele in both Leydig and Sertoli cells does not accentuate the phenotype in comparison with its presence in Sertoli cells only. This suggests that direct T3 regulation of steroidogenesis through TRα1 is moderate in Leydig cells, and that Sertoli cells are the main target of T3 action in the testis. PMID:25793522

  13. Cell context-specific expression of primary cilia in the human testis and ciliary coordination of Hedgehog signalling in mouse Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Marie Berg; Almstrup, Kristian; Lindbæk, Louise; Christensen, Søren Tvorup; Svingen, Terje

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are sensory organelles that coordinate numerous cellular signalling pathways during development and adulthood. Defects in ciliary assembly or function lead to a series of developmental disorders and diseases commonly referred to as ciliopathies. Still, little is known about the formation and function of primary cilia in the mammalian testis. Here, we characterized primary cilia in adult human testis and report a constitutive expression of cilia in peritubular myoid cells and a dynamic expression of cilia in differentiating Leydig cells. Primary cilia are generally absent from cells of mature seminiferous epithelium, but present in Sertoli cell-only tubules in Klinefelter syndrome testis. Peritubular cells in atrophic testis produce overly long cilia. Furthermore cultures of growth-arrested immature mouse Leydig cells express primary cilia that are enriched in components of Hedgehog signalling, including Smoothened, Patched-1, and GLI2, which are involved in regulating Leydig cell differentiation. Stimulation of Hedgehog signalling increases the localization of Smoothened to the cilium, which is followed by transactivation of the Hedgehog target genes, Gli1 and Ptch1. Our findings provide new information on the spatiotemporal formation of primary cilia in the testis and show that primary cilia in immature Leydig cells mediate Hedgehog signalling. PMID:25992706

  14. Cell context-specific expression of primary cilia in the human testis and ciliary coordination of Hedgehog signalling in mouse Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Marie Berg; Almstrup, Kristian; Lindbæk, Louise; Christensen, Søren Tvorup; Svingen, Terje

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are sensory organelles that coordinate numerous cellular signalling pathways during development and adulthood. Defects in ciliary assembly or function lead to a series of developmental disorders and diseases commonly referred to as ciliopathies. Still, little is known about the formation and function of primary cilia in the mammalian testis. Here, we characterized primary cilia in adult human testis and report a constitutive expression of cilia in peritubular myoid cells and a dynamic expression of cilia in differentiating Leydig cells. Primary cilia are generally absent from cells of mature seminiferous epithelium, but present in Sertoli cell-only tubules in Klinefelter syndrome testis. Peritubular cells in atrophic testis produce overly long cilia. Furthermore cultures of growth-arrested immature mouse Leydig cells express primary cilia that are enriched in components of Hedgehog signalling, including Smoothened, Patched-1, and GLI2, which are involved in regulating Leydig cell differentiation. Stimulation of Hedgehog signalling increases the localization of Smoothened to the cilium, which is followed by transactivation of the Hedgehog target genes, Gli1 and Ptch1. Our findings provide new information on the spatiotemporal formation of primary cilia in the testis and show that primary cilia in immature Leydig cells mediate Hedgehog signalling.

  15. Contribution of Leydig and Sertoli cells to testosterone production in mouse fetal testes.

    PubMed

    Shima, Yuichi; Miyabayashi, Kanako; Haraguchi, Shogo; Arakawa, Tatsuhiko; Otake, Hiroyuki; Baba, Takashi; Matsuzaki, Sawako; Shishido, Yurina; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Tachibana, Taro; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Morohashi, Ken-ichirou

    2013-01-01

    Testosterone is a final product of androgenic hormone biosynthesis, and Leydig cells are known to be the primary source of androgens. In the mammalian testis, two distinct populations of Leydig cells, the fetal and the adult Leydig cells, develop sequentially, and these two cell types differ both morphologically and functionally. It is well known that the adult Leydig cells maintain male reproductive function by producing testosterone. However, it has been controversial whether fetal Leydig cells can produce testosterone, and the synthetic pathway of testosterone in the fetal testis is not fully understood. In the present study, we generated transgenic mice in which enhanced green fluorescence protein was expressed under the control of a fetal Leydig cell-specific enhancer of the Ad4BP/SF-1 (Nr5a1) gene. The transgene construct was prepared by mutating the LIM homeodomain transcription factor (LHX9)-binding sequence in the promoter, which abolished promoter activity in the undifferentiated testicular cells. These transgenic mice were used to collect highly pure fetal Leydig cells. Gene expression and steroidogenic enzyme activities in the fetal Leydig cells as well as in the fetal Sertoli cells and adult Leydig cells were analyzed. Our results revealed that the fetal Leydig cells synthesize only androstenedione because they lack expression of Hsd17b3, and fetal Sertoli cells convert androstenedione to testosterone, whereas adult Leydig cells synthesize testosterone by themselves. The current study demonstrated that both Leydig and Sertoli cells are required for testosterone synthesis in the mouse fetal testis. PMID:23125070

  16. Immature rat Leydig cells are intrinsically less sensitive than adult Leydig cells to ethane dimethanesulfonate.

    PubMed

    Kelce, W R; Zirkin, B R; Ewing, L L

    1991-11-01

    Leydig cells from immature rat testes appear to be insensitive to doses of ethane-1,2-dimethanesulfonate (EDS) which eliminate Leydig cells from adult rat testes. We sought to determine whether this differential response to EDS is intrinsic to the Leydig cell or mediated by other intra- or extratesticular differences between adult and immature rats. To differentiate among these possibilities, Leydig cells were exposed to EDS (1) in vivo, (2) through in vitro testicular perfusion, or (3) in highly purified Leydig cell primary cultures. Four days after ip injections of 85 mg EDS/kg body wt Leydig cells were eliminated from testes of adult, but not immature rats. Total androgen production by testes perfused in vitro with 94 micrograms EDS/ml was dramatically reduced in adult, but not immature rats. Highly purified adult, but not immature, rat Leydig cells were far more sensitive to the effects of EDS on luteinizing hormone-stimulated androgen production (functional effects; apparent EC50 = 94 for adult and 407 micrograms/ml for immature rat Leydig cells) and on [35S]methionine incorporation (cytotoxic effects; apparent EC50 = 140 for adult and 1000 micrograms/ml for immature rat Leydig cells). Finally, the in vitro effects of EDS were both cell type and chemical specific. Since the differential response of adult and immature rat Leydig cells to EDS was manifest in vivo, during in vitro testicular perfusion, and in highly purified Leydig cell primary cultures, we conclude that immature rat Leydig cells are intrinsically less sensitive to the specific cytotoxic effects of EDS than adult rat Leydig cells.

  17. The nuclear receptor NR2F2 activates star expression and steroidogenesis in mouse MA-10 and MLTC-1 Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Villarroel, Raifish E; Robert, Nicholas M; Martin, Luc J; Brousseau, Catherine; Tremblay, Jacques J

    2014-07-01

    Testosterone production is dependent on cholesterol transport within the mitochondrial matrix, an essential step mediated by a protein complex containing the steroidogenic acute regulatory (STAR) protein. In steroidogenic Leydig cells, Star expression is hormonally regulated and involves several transcription factors. NR2F2 (COUP-TFII) is an orphan nuclear receptor that plays critical roles in cell differentiation and lineage determination. Conditional NR2F2 knockout prior to puberty leads to male infertility due to insufficient testosterone production, suggesting that NR2F2 could positively regulate steroidogenesis and Star expression. In this study we found that NR2F2 is expressed in the nucleus of some peritubular myoid cells and in interstitial cells, mainly in steroidogenically active adult Leydig cells. In MA-10 and MLTC-1 Leydig cells, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated NR2F2 knockdown reduces basal steroid production without affecting hormone responsiveness. Consistent with this, we found that STAR mRNA and protein levels were reduced in NR2F2-depleted MA-10 and MLTC-1 cells. Transient transfections of Leydig cells revealed that a -986 bp mouse Star promoter construct was activated 3-fold by NR2F2. Using 5' progressive deletion constructs, we mapped the NR2F2-responsive element between -131 and -95 bp. This proximal promoter region contains a previously uncharacterized direct repeat 1 (DR1)-like element to which NR2F2 is recruited and directly binds. Mutations in the DR1-like element that prevent NR2F2 binding severely blunted NR2F2-mediated Star promoter activation. These data identify an essential role for the nuclear receptor NR2F2 as a direct activator of Star gene expression in Leydig cells, and thus in the control of steroid hormone biosynthesis.

  18. A role for kit receptor signaling in Leydig cell steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Gerson; Sottas, Chantal M; Kissel, Holger; Agosti, Valter; Manova, Katia; Hardy, Matthew P; Besmer, Peter

    2003-09-01

    Kit and its ligand, Kitl, function in hematopoiesis, melanogenesis, and gametogenesis. In the testis, Kitl is expressed by Sertoli cells and Kit is expressed by spermatogonia and Leydig cells. Kit functions are mediated by receptor autophosphorylation and subsequent association with signaling molecules, including phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinase. We previously characterized the reproductive consequences of blocking Kit-mediated PI 3-kinase activation in KitY(719F)/Kit(Y719F) knockin mutant male mice. Only gametogenesis was affected in these mice, and males are sterile because of a block in spermatogenesis during the spermatogonial stages. In the present study, we investigated effects of the Kit(Y719F) mutation on Leydig cell development and steroidogenic function. Although the seminiferous tubules in testes of mutant animals are depleted of germ cells, the testes contain normal numbers of Leydig cells and the Leydig cells in these animals appear to have undergone normal differentiation. Evaluation of steroidogenesis in mutant animals indicates that testosterone levels are not significantly reduced in the periphery but that LH levels are increased 5-fold, implying an impairment of steroidogenesis in the mutant animals. Therefore, a role for Kit signaling in steroidogenesis in Leydig cells was sought in vitro. Purified Leydig cells from C57Bl6/J male mice were incubated with Kitl, and testosterone production was measured. Kitl-stimulated testosterone production was 2-fold higher than that in untreated controls. The Kitl-mediated testosterone biosynthesis in Leydig cells is PI 3-kinase dependent. In vitro, Leydig cells from mutant mice were steroidogenically more competent in response to LH than were normal Leydig cells. In contrast, Kitl-mediated testosterone production in these cells was comparable to that in normal cells. Because LH levels in mutant males are elevated and LH is known to stimulate testosterone biosynthesis, we proposed a model in which serum

  19. Hormone-dependent expression of a steroidogenic acute regulatory protein natural antisense transcript in MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol transport is essential for many physiological processes, including steroidogenesis. In steroidogenic cells hormone-induced cholesterol transport is controlled by a protein complex that includes steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Star is expressed as 3.5-, 2.8-, and 1.6-kb transcripts that differ only in their 3'-untranslated regions. Because these transcripts share the same promoter, mRNA stability may be involved in their differential regulation and expression. Recently, the identification of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) has added another level of regulation to eukaryotic gene expression. Here we identified a new NAT that is complementary to the spliced Star mRNA sequence. Using 5' and 3' RACE, strand-specific RT-PCR, and ribonuclease protection assays, we demonstrated that Star NAT is expressed in MA-10 Leydig cells and steroidogenic murine tissues. Furthermore, we established that human chorionic gonadotropin stimulates Star NAT expression via cAMP. Our results show that sense-antisense Star RNAs may be coordinately regulated since they are co-expressed in MA-10 cells. Overexpression of Star NAT had a differential effect on the expression of the different Star sense transcripts following cAMP stimulation. Meanwhile, the levels of StAR protein and progesterone production were downregulated in the presence of Star NAT. Our data identify antisense transcription as an additional mechanism involved in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis.

  20. Repeated immobilization stress disturbed steroidogenic machinery and stimulated the expression of cAMP signaling elements and adrenergic receptors in Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Stojkov, Natasa J; Janjic, Marija M; Bjelic, Maja M; Mihajlovic, Aleksandar I; Kostic, Tatjana S; Andric, Silvana A

    2012-05-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of acute (2 h daily) and repeated (2 h daily for 2 or 10 consecutive days) immobilization stress (IMO) on: 1) the steroidogenic machinery homeostasis; 2) cAMP signaling; and the expression of receptors for main markers of 3) adrenergic and 4) glucocorticoid signaling in Leydig cells of adult rats. The results showed that acute IMO inhibited steroidogenic machinery in Leydig cells by downregulation of Scarb1 (scavenger receptor class B), Cyp11a1 (cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme), Cyp17a1 (17α-hydroxylase/17,20 lyase), and Hsd17b3 (17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase) expression. In addition to acute IMO effects, repeated IMO increased transcription of Star (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein) and Arr19 (androgen receptor corepressor 19 kDa) in Leydig cells. In the same cells, the transcription of adenylyl cyclases (Adcy7, Adcy9, Adcy10) and cAMP-specific phosphodiesterases (Pde4a, Pde4b, Pde4d, Pde7a, Pde8a) was stimulated, whereas the expression of the genes encoding protein kinase A subunits were unaffected. Ten times repeated IMO increased the levels of all adrenergic receptors and β-adrenergic receptor kinase (Adrbk1) in Leydig cells. The transcription analysis was supported by cAMP/testosterone production. In this signaling scenario, partial recovery of testosterone production in medium/content was detected. The physiological significance of the present results was proven by ex vivo application of epinephrine, which increased cAMP/testosterone production by Leydig cells from control rats in greater fashion than from stressed. IMO did not affect the expression of transcripts for Crhr1/Crhr2 (corticotropin releasing hormone receptors), Acthr (adrenocorticotropin releasing hormone receptor), Gr (glucocorticoid receptor), and Hsd11b1 [hydroxysteroid (11-β) dehydrogenase 1], while all types of IMO stimulated the expression of Hsd11b2, the unidirectional oxidase with high affinity to inactivate

  1. A comprehensive survey of the laminins and collagens type IV expressed in mouse Leydig cells and their regulation by LH/hCG.

    PubMed

    Mazaud Guittot, Séverine; Vérot, Adélie; Odet, Fanny; Chauvin, Marie-Agnès; le Magueresse-Battistoni, Brigitte

    2008-04-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins have been shown to alter Leydig cell steroidogenesis in vitro, substantiating the hypothesis that Leydig cell steroidogenic activity and matrix environment are interdependent events. However, the nature of the ECM components synthesized by Leydig cells and their regulation by LH/human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) remain unknown. Here, we examine the occurrence of the 11 laminin subunits and the 6 alpha chains of collagen IV (COL4A1-6) by RT-PCR in Leydig cells cultured with or without LH/hCG. Leydig cells were a tumor Leydig cell line (mLTC-1) or 8-week-old mice Leydig cells. Based on PCR data, it is suggested that normal Leydig cells may synthesize a maximum of 11 laminin heterotrimers and the 6 alpha chains of collagen IV. They also may synthesize various proteases and inhibitors of the metzincin family. The mLTC-1 cells have a limited repertoire as compared with normal Leydig cells. Interestingly, none of the ten proteases and inhibitors monitored is under LH-hCG regulation whereas every protease and inhibitor of the serine protease family yet identified in Leydig cells is under gonadotropin regulation. In addition, a few laminin and collagen subunit genes are regulated by LH/hCG. These are laminins alpha3 and gamma3 (Lama3 and Lamc3), Col4a3, and Col4a6, which are negatively regulated by LH/hCG in both Leydig cell types, and Col4a4, which was downregulated in primary cultures but not in mLTC-1 cells. Collectively, the present study suggests that Leydig cells modulate in a selective fashion their matrix environment in response to their trophic hormone. This may alter the steroidogenic outcome of Leydig cells. PMID:18367508

  2. MEF2 Cooperates With Forskolin/cAMP and GATA4 to Regulate Star Gene Expression in Mouse MA-10 Leydig Cells.

    PubMed

    Daems, Caroline; Di-Luoffo, Mickaël; Paradis, Élise; Tremblay, Jacques J

    2015-07-01

    In Leydig cells, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR) participates in cholesterol shuttling from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane, the rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis. Steroid hormone biosynthesis and steroidogenic gene expression are regulated by LH, which activates various signaling pathways and transcription factors, including cAMP/Ca(2+)/CAMK (Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase)-myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2). The 4 MEF2 transcription factors are essential regulators of cell differentiation and organogenesis in numerous tissues. Recently, MEF2 was identified in Sertoli and Leydig cells of the testis. Here, we report that MEF2 regulates steroidogenesis in mouse MA-10 Leydig cells by acting on the Star gene. In MA-10 cells depleted of MEF2 using siRNAs (small interfering RNAs), STAR protein levels, Star mRNA levels, and promoter activity were significantly decreased. On its own, MEF2 did not activate the mouse Star promoter but was found to cooperate with forskolin/cAMP. By chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA precipitation assays, we confirmed MEF2 binding to a consensus element located at -232 bp of the Star promoter. Mutation or deletion of the MEF2 element reduced but did not abrogate the MEF2/cAMP cooperation, indicating that MEF2 cooperates with other DNA-bound transcription factor(s). We identified GATA4 (GATA binding protein 4) as a partner for MEF2 in Leydig cells, because mutation of the GATA element abrogated the MEF2/cAMP cooperation on a reporter lacking a MEF2 element. MEF2 and GATA4 interact as revealed by coimmunoprecipitation, and MEF2 and GATA4 transcriptionally cooperate on the Star promoter. Altogether, our results define MEF2 as a novel regulator of steroidogenesis and Star transcription in Leydig cells and identify GATA4 as a key partner for MEF2-mediated action.

  3. A specific role for PRND in goat foetal Leydig cells is suggested by prion family gene expression during gonad development in goats and mice.

    PubMed

    Allais-Bonnet, Aurélie; Castille, Johan; Pannetier, Maëlle; Passet, Bruno; Elzaïat, Maëva; André, Marjolaine; Montazer-Torbati, Fatemeh; Moazami-Goudarzi, Katayoun; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Pailhoux, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Three genes of the prion protein gene family are expressed in gonads. Comparative analyses of their expression patterns in mice and goats revealed constant expression of PRNP and SPRN in both species and in both male and female gonads, but with a weaker expression of SPRN. By contrast, expression of PRND was found to be sex-dimorphic, in agreement with its role in spermatogenesis. More importantly, our study revealed that PRND seems to be a key marker of foetal Leydig cells specifically in goats, suggesting a yet unknown role for its encoded protein Doppel during gonadal differentiation in nonrodent mammals.

  4. The peroxisome proliferator perfluorodecanoic acid inhibits the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) expression and hormone-stimulated mitochondrial cholesterol transport and steroid formation in Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Boujrad, N; Vidic, B; Gazouli, M; Culty, M; Papadopoulos, V

    2000-09-01

    The peroxisome proliferator perfluordecanoic acid (PFDA) has been shown to exert an antiandrogenic effect in vivo by acting directly on the interstitial Leydig cells of the testis. The objective of this study was to examine the in vitro effects of PFDA and identify its site of action in steroidogenesis using as model systems the mouse tumor MA-10 and isolated rat Leydig cells. PFDA inhibited in a time- and dose-dependent manner the hCG-stimulated Leydig cell steroidogenesis. This effect was localized at the level of cholesterol transport into the mitochondria. PFDA did not affect either the total cell protein synthesis or the mitochondrial integrity. Moreover, it did not induce any DNA damage. Morphological studies indicated that PFDA induced lipid accumulation in the cells, probably due to the fact that cholesterol mobilized by hCG did not enter the mitochondria to be used for steroidogenesis. In search of the target of PFDA, we examined its effect on key regulatory mechanisms of steroidogenesis. PFDA did not affect the hCG-induced steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) levels. However, it was found to inhibit the mitochondrial peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) ligand binding capacity, 18-kDa protein, and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels. Further studies indicated that PFDA did not affect PBR transcription, but it rather accelerated PBR mRNA decay. Taken together, these data suggest that PFDA inhibits the Leydig cell steroidogenesis by affecting PBR mRNA stability, thus inhibiting PBR expression, cholesterol transport into the mitochondria, and the subsequent steroid formation. Moreover, this action of PFDA on PBR mRNA stability indicates a new mechanism of action of peroxisome proliferators distinct from the classic transcription-mediated regulation of target genes.

  5. Steroidogenesis in amlodipine treated purified Leydig cells

    SciTech Connect

    Latif, Rabia; Lodhi, Ghulam Mustafa; Hameed, Waqas; Aslam, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    Drugs have been shown to adversely affect male fertility and recently anti-hypertensive drugs were added to the list. The anti-fertility effects of amlodipine, a calcium channel blocker, are well-illustrated in in vivo experiments but lack an in vitro proof. The present study was designed to experimentally elucidate the effects of amlodipine on Leydig cell steroidogenesis and intracellular calcium in vitro. Leydig cells of Sprague–Dawley rats were isolated and purified by Percoll. Cells were incubated for 3 h with/without amlodipine in the presence/absence of LH, dbcAMP, Pregnenolone and 25-Hydroxycholesterol. Cytosolic calcium was measured in purified Leydig cells by fluorometric technique. The results showed significantly reduced (P < 0.05) steroidogenesis and intracellular calcium in amlodipine exposed rats. The site of amlodipine induced steroidogenic inhibition seems to be prior to the formation of Pregnenolone at the level of StAR protein. -- Highlights: ► Inhibition of steroidogenesis in isolated and purified Leydig cells by amlodipine. ► Site of inhibition was before Pregnenolone formation, at the level of StAR protein. ► Inhibition of LH stimulated rise in cytosolic calcium by amlodipine.

  6. Directed Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells into Leydig-Like Cells Rescue Testosterone-Deficient Male Rats In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan; Su, Zhijian; Xu, Wenting; Luo, Jiao; Liang, Rui; Xiang, Qi; Zhang, Qihao; Ge, Ren-shan

    2015-01-01

    The primary function of Leydig cells is to secrete testosterone, which is critical in the regulation of male reproduction and development. Low levels of testosterone will lead to male hypogonadism. Stem cell-derived Leydig cell transplantation may be a promising alternative therapy for male hypogonadism. Thus far, others have reported that Leydig-like cells can be derived from mesenchymal stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells. However, the efficiency of the differentiating Leydig cells remains low, and progress toward generating functional adult Leydig cells (ALCs) is limited. Herein, we describe a robust method of directing differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) into Leydig-like cells in vitro by overexpression of the transcription factor steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1) and treatment with a combination of 8-Bromoadenosine-3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate and forskolin. These differentiated cells express mRNA encoding the steroidogenic enzymes and produce progesterone and testosterone. Importantly, when transplanted into male rats that had their original Leydig cells selectively eliminated by ethylene dimethanesulfonate, these in vitro-derived Leydig-like cells further developed into functional ALCs that rescued serum testosterone levels. These data provide evidence that mESCs can be induced to differentiate into Leydig-like cells in vitro, which can develop in the in vivo microenvironment. PMID:25340537

  7. Establishment and evaluation of a stable steroidogenic goat Leydig cell line.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinhua; Dai, Rui; Lei, Lanjie; Lin, Pengfei; Lu, Xiaolong; Wang, Xiangguo; Tang, Keqiong; Wang, Aihua; Jin, Yaping

    2016-04-01

    Leydig cells play a key role in synthesizing androgen and regulating spermatogenesis. The dysfunction of Leydig cells may lead to various male diseases. Although primary Leydig cell cultures have been used, their finite lifespan hinders the assessment of long-term effects. In the present study, primary goat Leydig cells (GLCs) were immortalized via the transfection of a plasmid containing the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene. The expressions of hTERT and telomerase activity were evaluated in transduced GLCs (hTERT-GLCs). These cells steadily expressed the hTERT gene and exhibited longer telomere lengths at passage 55 that were similar to those of HeLa cells. The hTERT-GLCs at passages 30 and 50 expressed genes that encoded key proteins, enzymes and receptors that are inherent to normal Leydig cells, for example, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) and LH-receptor (LH-R). Additionally, the immortalized goat Leydig cells secreted detectable quantities of testosterone in response to hCG stimulation. Furthermore, this cell line appeared to proliferate more quickly than the control cells, although no neoplastic transformation occurred in vitro. We concluded that the GLCs immortalized with hTERT retained their original characteristics and might provide a useful model for the study of Leydig cell function. PMID:26462462

  8. Establishment and evaluation of a stable steroidogenic goat Leydig cell line.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinhua; Dai, Rui; Lei, Lanjie; Lin, Pengfei; Lu, Xiaolong; Wang, Xiangguo; Tang, Keqiong; Wang, Aihua; Jin, Yaping

    2016-04-01

    Leydig cells play a key role in synthesizing androgen and regulating spermatogenesis. The dysfunction of Leydig cells may lead to various male diseases. Although primary Leydig cell cultures have been used, their finite lifespan hinders the assessment of long-term effects. In the present study, primary goat Leydig cells (GLCs) were immortalized via the transfection of a plasmid containing the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene. The expressions of hTERT and telomerase activity were evaluated in transduced GLCs (hTERT-GLCs). These cells steadily expressed the hTERT gene and exhibited longer telomere lengths at passage 55 that were similar to those of HeLa cells. The hTERT-GLCs at passages 30 and 50 expressed genes that encoded key proteins, enzymes and receptors that are inherent to normal Leydig cells, for example, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) and LH-receptor (LH-R). Additionally, the immortalized goat Leydig cells secreted detectable quantities of testosterone in response to hCG stimulation. Furthermore, this cell line appeared to proliferate more quickly than the control cells, although no neoplastic transformation occurred in vitro. We concluded that the GLCs immortalized with hTERT retained their original characteristics and might provide a useful model for the study of Leydig cell function.

  9. Steroidogenic factor 1 differentially regulates fetal and adult leydig cell development in male mice.

    PubMed

    Karpova, Tatiana; Ravichandiran, Kumarasamy; Insisienmay, Lovella; Rice, Daren; Agbor, Valentine; Heckert, Leslie L

    2015-10-01

    The nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1, AD4BP, NR5A1) is a key regulator of the endocrine axes and is essential for adrenal and gonad development. Partial rescue of Nr5a1(-/-) mice with an SF-1-expressing transgene caused a hypomorphic phenotype that revealed its roles in Leydig cell development. In contrast to controls, all male rescue mice (Nr5a1(-/-);tg(+/0)) showed varying signs of androgen deficiency, including spermatogenic arrest, cryptorchidism, and poor virilization. Expression of various Leydig cell markers measured by immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and RT-PCR indicated fetal and adult Leydig cell development were differentially impaired. Whereas fetal Leydig cell development was delayed in Nr5a1(-/-);tg(+/0) embryos, it recovered to control levels by birth. In contrast, Sult1e1, Vcam1, and Hsd3b6 transcript levels in adult rescue testes indicated complete blockage in adult Leydig cell development. In addition, between Postnatal Days 8 and 12, peritubular cells expressing PTCH1, SF-1, and CYP11A1 were observed in control testes but not in rescue testes, indicating SF-1 is needed for either survival or differentiation of adult Leydig cell progenitors. Cultured prepubertal rat peritubular cells also expressed SF-1 and PTCH1, but Cyp11a1 was expressed only after treatment with cAMP and retinoic acid. Together, data show SF-1 is needed for proper development of fetal and adult Leydig cells but with distinct primary functions; in fetal Leydig cells, it regulates differentiation, whereas in adult Leydig cells it regulates progenitor cell formation and/or survival. PMID:26269506

  10. Steroidogenic factor 1 differentially regulates fetal and adult leydig cell development in male mice.

    PubMed

    Karpova, Tatiana; Ravichandiran, Kumarasamy; Insisienmay, Lovella; Rice, Daren; Agbor, Valentine; Heckert, Leslie L

    2015-10-01

    The nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1, AD4BP, NR5A1) is a key regulator of the endocrine axes and is essential for adrenal and gonad development. Partial rescue of Nr5a1(-/-) mice with an SF-1-expressing transgene caused a hypomorphic phenotype that revealed its roles in Leydig cell development. In contrast to controls, all male rescue mice (Nr5a1(-/-);tg(+/0)) showed varying signs of androgen deficiency, including spermatogenic arrest, cryptorchidism, and poor virilization. Expression of various Leydig cell markers measured by immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and RT-PCR indicated fetal and adult Leydig cell development were differentially impaired. Whereas fetal Leydig cell development was delayed in Nr5a1(-/-);tg(+/0) embryos, it recovered to control levels by birth. In contrast, Sult1e1, Vcam1, and Hsd3b6 transcript levels in adult rescue testes indicated complete blockage in adult Leydig cell development. In addition, between Postnatal Days 8 and 12, peritubular cells expressing PTCH1, SF-1, and CYP11A1 were observed in control testes but not in rescue testes, indicating SF-1 is needed for either survival or differentiation of adult Leydig cell progenitors. Cultured prepubertal rat peritubular cells also expressed SF-1 and PTCH1, but Cyp11a1 was expressed only after treatment with cAMP and retinoic acid. Together, data show SF-1 is needed for proper development of fetal and adult Leydig cells but with distinct primary functions; in fetal Leydig cells, it regulates differentiation, whereas in adult Leydig cells it regulates progenitor cell formation and/or survival.

  11. Do testicular opiates regulate Leydig cell function?

    PubMed

    Gerendai, I; Shaha, C; Thau, R; Bardin, C W

    1984-10-01

    beta-Endorphin is believed to be synthesized in testicular Leydig cells. To gain more information about the role of this and other endogenous opioid peptides in the testis, opiate antagonists (naloxone and nalmefene, 100 micrograms/testis) were administered intratesticularly to hemicastrated adult rats. Leydig cell function was evaluated by measurement of serum testosterone and testosterone production in vitro. Estimation of androgen binding protein (rABP) was used as an index of Sertoli cell function. Serum testosterone was reduced significantly by intratesticular administration of naloxone and nalmefene in treated animals. Systemic administration of these antagonists had no effect at the doses used. Testes from treated animals incubated in vitro with or without hCG produced significantly less testosterone than vehicle-treated control testes. Hemicastration reduced rABP synthesis and secretion; however, treatment with opiate antagonists did not alter the amount of this protein in the serum or epididymides of these rats. These observations suggest that endogenous testicular opiates modulate testosterone secretion by Leydig cells. PMID:6541122

  12. Cellular Microenvironment Dictates Androgen Production by Murine Fetal Leydig Cells in Primary Culture1

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Colleen M.; Muszynski, Jessica L.; Strotman, Lindsay N.; Lewis, Samantha R.; O'Connell, Rachel L.; Beebe, David J.; Theberge, Ashleigh B.; Jorgensen, Joan S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the fact that fetal Leydig cells are recognized as the primary source of androgens in male embryos, the mechanisms by which steroidogenesis occurs within the developing testis remain unclear. A genetic approach was used to visualize and isolate fetal Leydig cells from remaining cells within developing mouse testes. Cyp11a1-Cre mice were bred to mT/mG dual reporter mice to target membrane-tagged enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) within steroidogenic cells, whereas other cells expressed membrane-tagged tandem-dimer tomato red. Fetal Leydig cell identity was validated using double-labeled immunohistochemistry against GFP and the steroidogenic enzyme 3beta-HSD, and cells were successfully isolated as indicated by qPCR results from sorted cell populations. Because fetal Leydig cells must collaborate with neighboring cells to synthesize testosterone, we hypothesized that the fetal Leydig cell microenvironment defined their capacity for androgen production. Microfluidic culture devices were used to measure androstenedione and testosterone production of fetal Leydig cells that were cultured in cell-cell contact within a mixed population, were isolated but remained in medium contact via compartmentalized co-culture with other testicular cells, or were isolated and cultured alone. Results showed that fetal Leydig cells maintained their identity and steroidogenic activity for 3–5 days in primary culture. Microenvironment dictated proficiency of testosterone production. As expected, fetal Leydig cells produced androstenedione but not testosterone when cultured in isolation. More testosterone accumulated in medium from mixed cultures than from compartmentalized co-cultures initially; however, co-cultures maintained testosterone synthesis for a longer time. These data suggest that a combination of cell-cell contact and soluble factors constitute the ideal microenvironment for fetal Leydig cell activity in primary culture. PMID:25143354

  13. Cellular microenvironment dictates androgen production by murine fetal Leydig cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Carney, Colleen M; Muszynski, Jessica L; Strotman, Lindsay N; Lewis, Samantha R; O'Connell, Rachel L; Beebe, David J; Theberge, Ashleigh B; Jorgensen, Joan S

    2014-10-01

    Despite the fact that fetal Leydig cells are recognized as the primary source of androgens in male embryos, the mechanisms by which steroidogenesis occurs within the developing testis remain unclear. A genetic approach was used to visualize and isolate fetal Leydig cells from remaining cells within developing mouse testes. Cyp11a1-Cre mice were bred to mT/mG dual reporter mice to target membrane-tagged enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) within steroidogenic cells, whereas other cells expressed membrane-tagged tandem-dimer tomato red. Fetal Leydig cell identity was validated using double-labeled immunohistochemistry against GFP and the steroidogenic enzyme 3beta-HSD, and cells were successfully isolated as indicated by qPCR results from sorted cell populations. Because fetal Leydig cells must collaborate with neighboring cells to synthesize testosterone, we hypothesized that the fetal Leydig cell microenvironment defined their capacity for androgen production. Microfluidic culture devices were used to measure androstenedione and testosterone production of fetal Leydig cells that were cultured in cell-cell contact within a mixed population, were isolated but remained in medium contact via compartmentalized co-culture with other testicular cells, or were isolated and cultured alone. Results showed that fetal Leydig cells maintained their identity and steroidogenic activity for 3-5 days in primary culture. Microenvironment dictated proficiency of testosterone production. As expected, fetal Leydig cells produced androstenedione but not testosterone when cultured in isolation. More testosterone accumulated in medium from mixed cultures than from compartmentalized co-cultures initially; however, co-cultures maintained testosterone synthesis for a longer time. These data suggest that a combination of cell-cell contact and soluble factors constitute the ideal microenvironment for fetal Leydig cell activity in primary culture. PMID:25143354

  14. Ultrastructure of Leydig cells in human ageing testes.

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua, R; Amat, P; Nistal, M; Martin, A

    1986-01-01

    Ultrastructural study of Leydig cells in elderly men revealed the following Leydig cell types: (1) ultrastructurally normal Leydig cells (46.2%); (2) Leydig cells either with multiple cytoplasmic or intranuclear Reinke crystals or with numerous para-crystalline inclusions (6.1%); (3) multivacuolated Leydig cells with the cytoplasm almost filled by lipid droplets (16.7%; (4) dedifferentiated Leydig cells with poor development of agranular endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, and increased amounts of lipofuscin granules (22.3%); and (5) bi- or trinucleate Leydig cells (8.7%) showing either a normal (2.8%) or dedifferentiated (5.9%) cytoplasm. These results suggest an involution of Leydig cells with advancing age. A correlation between the proportion of altered Leydig cells and the decrease in testosterone and increase in luteinising hormone levels could be observed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Figs. 6-7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 PMID:3693056

  15. Intratesticular delivery of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and ceramide directly abrogates steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression and Leydig cell steroidogenesis in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Morales, Victoria; Santana, Pino; Díaz, Raquel; Tabraue, Carlos; Gallardo, Germán; López Blanco, Félix; Hernández, Inmaculada; Fanjul, Luisa F; Ruiz de Galarreta, Carlos M

    2003-11-01

    Systemic or intratesticular release of TNF alpha and IL1 beta have been implicated in the reduced testosterone biosynthesis and impaired production of competent spermatozoa found in human patients suffering from sepsis or chronic inflammation. Although in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that TNF alpha and IL1 beta intercept the hypothalamic-pituitary testis axis at different levels, the site(s) of action and relative contribution of each cytokine to the overall testicular failure associated to systemic inflammatory processes remains poorly defined. In this study we show that intratesticular delivery of TNF alpha induced a rapid (4 h) and sustained (up to 24 h) reduction in steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein expression and testosterone biosynthesis in nonstimulated or human chorionic gonadotropin-treated intact or hypophysectomized rats. Bilateral treatment with cell-permeant short-chain ceramides (C2-cer or C6-cer) reproduced the early (4 h) inhibitory action of TNFalpha on testosterone biosynthesis and testicular StAR expression. The inhibitory action of C2-cer or C6-cer was not observed in animals treated with inactive analogs (dihydroceramide), phosphorylcholine, sphingosine, or sphingosine-1P. In sharp contrast to the previously described ability of IL1 beta to prevent human chorionic gonadotropin-stimulated Leydig cell steroidogenesis in vitro, serum testosterone and testicular StAR protein expression remained unchanged in animals bilaterally injected with this cytokine. These data support the concept that TNF alpha triggers different effector mechanisms to directly inhibit Leydig cell StAR expression and steroidogenesis, which ultimately contribute to the global reproductive failure associated with chronic inflammation and sepsis.

  16. INSL3 as a biomarker of Leydig cell functionality.

    PubMed

    Ivell, Richard; Wade, John D; Anand-Ivell, Ravinder

    2013-06-01

    Insulin-like factor 3 (INSL3) is a small peptide hormone made and secreted uniquely by mature Leydig cells in the testes of all mammals. Importantly, this expression and secretion appears to be constitutive and therefore reflects the differentiation status and number of the Leydig cells present, differing thereby from testosterone, which is acutely and homeostatically regulated by the hormones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. As a consequence, the measurement of INSL3 either as mRNA in the testis or as secreted peptide circulating in the blood provides an excellent assessment of Leydig cell differentiation, for example, during fetal development, puberty, or aging or following exposure to endocrine-disrupting agents. Whereas INSL3 is proving increasingly useful as a biomarker for testis status, less is known about its functions, particularly in the adult male. Current evidence points to autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine roles, acting through the G-protein-coupled receptor called RXFP2, although more research is required to characterize these functions in detail.

  17. Effects of estradiol and methoxychlor on Leydig cell regeneration in the adult rat testis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bingbing; Chen, Dongxin; Jiang, Zheli; Li, Jingyang; Liu, Shiwen; Dong, Yaoyao; Yao, Wenwen; Akingbemi, Benson; Ge, Renshan; Li, Xiaokun

    2014-05-06

    The objective of the present study is to determine whether methoxychlor (MXC) exposure in adulthood affects rat Leydig cell regeneration and to compare its effects with estradiol (E2). Adult 90-day-old male Sprague-Dawley rats received ethane dimethane sulfonate (EDS) to eliminate the adult Leydig cell population. Subsequently, rats were randomly assigned to four groups and gavaged with corn oil (control), 0.25 mg/kg E2 and 10 or 100 mg/kg MXC daily from days 5 to 30 post-EDS treatment. The results showed that MXC and E2 reduced serum testosterone levels on day 58 post-EDS treatment. qPCR showed Hsd17b3 mRNA levels were downregulated 7-15 fold by E2 and MXC, indicating that development of the new population of Leydig cells was arrested at the earlier stage. This observation was supported by the results of histochemical staining, which demonstrated that Leydig cells in MXC-treated testis on day 58 post-EDS treatment were mostly progenitor Leydig cells. However, Pdgfb mRNA levels were downregulated, while Lif transcript levels were increased by MXC. In contrast, E2 did not affect gene expression for these growth factors. In conclusion, our findings indicated that both MXC and E2 delayed rat Leydig cell regeneration in the EDS-treated model, presumably acting by different mechanisms.

  18. Effects of Estradiol and Methoxychlor on Leydig Cell Regeneration in the Adult Rat Testis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bingbing; Chen, Dongxin; Jiang, Zheli; Li, Jingyang; Liu, Shiwen; Dong, Yaoyao; Yao, Wenwen; Akingbemi, Benson; Ge, Renshan; Li, Xiaokun

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to determine whether methoxychlor (MXC) exposure in adulthood affects rat Leydig cell regeneration and to compare its effects with estradiol (E2). Adult 90-day-old male Sprague-Dawley rats received ethane dimethane sulfonate (EDS) to eliminate the adult Leydig cell population. Subsequently, rats were randomly assigned to four groups and gavaged with corn oil (control), 0.25 mg/kg E2 and 10 or 100 mg/kg MXC daily from days 5 to 30 post-EDS treatment. The results showed that MXC and E2 reduced serum testosterone levels on day 58 post-EDS treatment. qPCR showed Hsd17b3 mRNA levels were downregulated 7–15 fold by E2 and MXC, indicating that development of the new population of Leydig cells was arrested at the earlier stage. This observation was supported by the results of histochemical staining, which demonstrated that Leydig cells in MXC-treated testis on day 58 post-EDS treatment were mostly progenitor Leydig cells. However, Pdgfb mRNA levels were downregulated, while Lif transcript levels were increased by MXC. In contrast, E2 did not affect gene expression for these growth factors. In conclusion, our findings indicated that both MXC and E2 delayed rat Leydig cell regeneration in the EDS-treated model, presumably acting by different mechanisms. PMID:24806340

  19. The functional development of Leydig cells in a marsupial

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Christopher M; Shaw, Geoff; Clark, Joan; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2008-01-01

    Leydig cells are the major source of androgen in the male mammal. We describe here for the first time the development of the Leydig cell in a macropodid marsupial, the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii. Leydig cells are first recognized morphologically 2 days after birth with the appearance of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm of certain interstitial cells. Lipid content closely matches the steroid content of the developing testis and marks the maturation of the steroid synthesis pathway in the tammar testis. Morphologically mature Leydig cells, marked by distinct mitochondria with tubular cristae and an extensive anastomosing network of smooth endoplasmic reticulum, are developed by day 10 after birth – the time of peak testosterone content in perinatal tammar testes. The volume percentage of each cell type in the testis does not change over time so the growth of each cellular component keeps pace with growth of the whole testis. There was no morphological or quantitative evidence of a change from one population of Leydig cells to another in the tammar testis as has been reported in several other species including the rat, mouse and human. Maturation of the testis is also marked by the development of tight junctions between the cell membranes of adjacent Sertoli cells. These appear around day 30 after birth and coincide with the onset of mitotic arrest in male germ cells. Overall, the development of the Leydig cell in the tammar wallaby follows a similar pattern to that seen in other mammals, although the start of Leydig cell differentiation is, like many other organ systems in marsupials, post natal, not fetal and there appears to be only a single population of Leydig cells. PMID:18069991

  20. The functional development of Leydig cells in a marsupial.

    PubMed

    Butler, Christopher M; Shaw, Geoff; Clark, Joan; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2008-01-01

    Leydig cells are the major source of androgen in the male mammal. We describe here for the first time the development of the Leydig cell in a macropodid marsupial, the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii. Leydig cells are first recognized morphologically 2 days after birth with the appearance of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm of certain interstitial cells. Lipid content closely matches the steroid content of the developing testis and marks the maturation of the steroid synthesis pathway in the tammar testis. Morphologically mature Leydig cells, marked by distinct mitochondria with tubular cristae and an extensive anastomosing network of smooth endoplasmic reticulum, are developed by day 10 after birth - the time of peak testosterone content in perinatal tammar testes. The volume percentage of each cell type in the testis does not change over time so the growth of each cellular component keeps pace with growth of the whole testis. There was no morphological or quantitative evidence of a change from one population of Leydig cells to another in the tammar testis as has been reported in several other species including the rat, mouse and human. Maturation of the testis is also marked by the development of tight junctions between the cell membranes of adjacent Sertoli cells. These appear around day 30 after birth and coincide with the onset of mitotic arrest in male germ cells. Overall, the development of the Leydig cell in the tammar wallaby follows a similar pattern to that seen in other mammals, although the start of Leydig cell differentiation is, like many other organ systems in marsupials, post natal, not fetal and there appears to be only a single population of Leydig cells.

  1. Effects of Neuroendocrine CB1 Activity on Adult Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cobellis, Gilda; Meccariello, Rosaria; Chianese, Rosanna; Chioccarelli, Teresa; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids control male reproduction acting at central and local level via cannabinoid receptors. The cannabinoid receptor CB1 has been characterized in the testis, in somatic and germ cells of mammalian and non-mammalian animal models, and its activity related to Leydig cell differentiation, steroidogenesis, spermiogenesis, sperm quality, and maturation. In this short review, we provide a summary of the insights concerning neuroendocrine CB1 activity in male reproduction focusing on adult Leydig cell ontogenesis and steroid biosynthesis. PMID:27375550

  2. Novel Targets for the Transcription Factors MEF2 in MA-10 Leydig Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Di-Luoffo, Mickaël; Daems, Caroline; Bergeron, Francis; Tremblay, Jacques J.

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone production by Leydig cells is a tightly regulated process requiring synchronized expression of several steroidogenic genes by numerous transcription factors. Myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) are transcription factors recently identified in somatic cells of the male gonad. In other tissues, MEF2 factors are essential regulators of organogenesis and cell differentiation. So far in the testis, MEF2 factors were found to regulate Leydig cell steroidogenesis by controlling Nr4a1 and Star gene expression. To expand our understanding of the role of MEF2 in Leydig cells, we performed microarray analyses of MEF2-depleted MA-10 Leydig cells, and the results were analyzed using Partek and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. Several genes were differentially expressed in MEF2-depleted Leydig cells, and 16 were validated by quantitative RT-PCR. A large number of these genes are known to be involved in fertility, gonad morphology, and steroidogenesis. These include Ahr, Bmal1, Cyp1b1, Hsd3b1, Hsd17b7, Map2k1, Nr0b2, Pde8a, Por, Smad4, Star, and Tsc22d3, which were all downregulated in the absence of MEF2. In silico analyses revealed the presence of MEF2-binding sites within the first 2 kb upstream of the transcription start site of the Por, Bmal1, and Nr0b2 promoters, suggesting direct regulation by MEF2. Using transient transfections in MA-10 Leydig cells, small interfering RNA knockdown, and a MEF2-Engrailed dominant negative, we found that MEF2 activates the Por, Bmal1, and Nr0b2 promoters and that this requires an intact MEF2 element. Our results identify novel target genes for MEF2 and define MEF2 as an important regulator of Leydig cell function and male reproduction. PMID:26019261

  3. The effects of nanoparticles on mouse testis Leydig cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Tomoko; Tabata, Masako; Kubo-Irie, Miyoko; Shimizu, Takahisa; Suzuki, Ken-Ichiro; Nihei, Yoshimasa; Takeda, Ken

    2008-12-01

    We have indicated the possibility that nanoparticles such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP) and titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) may impair the male mouse reproductive system. In this study, to evaluate the direct effect of nanoparticles on testis-constituent cells, we examined the effect of DEP, TiO(2) and carbon black (CB) on mouse Leydig TM3 cells, the testosterone-producing cells of the testis. The uptake of three nanoparticles into Leydig cells was detected using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or field emission type scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (FE-SEM/EDS). We examined the cytotoxicity and the effect on gene expression by treatment with nanoparticles. TiO(2) was more cytotoxic to Leydig cells than other nanoparticles. The proliferation of Leydig cells was suppressed transiently by treatment with TiO(2) or DEP. The expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a sensitive marker for oxidative stress, was induced remarkably by treatment with DEP. Furthermore, CB and DEP slightly increased the gene expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein, the factor that controls mitochondrial cholesterol transfer. In this study, we found that DEPs, TiO(2) and CB nanoparticles were taken up by Leydig cells, and affected the viability, proliferation and gene expression. The patterns were unique for each nanoparticle. PMID:18805477

  4. 1,3-Dichloro-2-propanol inhibits progesterone production through the expression of steroidogenic enzymes and cAMP concentration in Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianxia; Bai, Shun; Bai, Weibin; Zou, Feiyan; Zhang, Lei; Li, Guoqiang; Hu, Yunfeng; Li, Mingwei; Yan, Rian; Su, Zhijian; Huang, Yadong

    2014-07-01

    1,3-Dichloro-2-propanol (1,3-DCP) is a well-known food processing contaminant that has been shown to impede male reproductive function. However, its mechanism of action remains elusive. In this study, the effects of 1,3-DCP on progesterone production were investigated using the R2C Leydig cell model. 1,3-DCP significantly reduced cell viability from 7.48% to 97.4% at doses comprised between 0.5 and 6mM. Single cell gel/comet assays and atomic force microscopy assays showed that 1,3-DCP induced early phase cell apoptosis. In addition, 1,3-DCP significantly reduced progesterone production detected by radioimmunoassay (RIA). The results from quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting demonstrated that the mRNA expression levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase were significantly down-regulated in R2C cells. Particularly, the change rhythm of Star expression was highly consistent with progesterone production. Furthermore, the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and the mitochondrial membrane potential mediated by ROS, which are involved in regulating progesterone synthesis were also decreased in response to the 1,3-DCP treatment. Overall, the data presented here suggested that 1,3-DCP interferes with the male steroidogenic capacity mainly by down-regulating the level of cAMP and the key enzymes involved in the androgen synthesis pathway. PMID:24518350

  5. Genetic ablation of androgen receptor signaling in fetal Leydig cell lineage affects Leydig cell functions in adult testis.

    PubMed

    Kaftanovskaya, Elena M; Lopez, Carolina; Ferguson, Lydia; Myhr, Courtney; Agoulnik, Alexander I

    2015-06-01

    It is commonly accepted that androgen-producing fetal Leydig cells (FLC) are substituted by adult Leydig cells (ALC) during perinatal testis development. The mechanisms influencing this process are unclear. We used mice with a retinoid acid receptor 2 promoter-Cre recombinase transgene (Rarb-cre) expressed in embryonic FLC precursors, but not in postnatal testis, and a dual fluorescent Cre recombinase reporter to label FLC and ALC in vivo. All FLC in newborn testis had the recombinant, whereas the majority of LC in adult testis had the nonrecombinant reporter. Primary LC cultures from adult testis had either recombinant (20%) or nonrecombinant (80%) cells, demonstrating that the FLC survive in adult testis and their ontogeny is distinct from ALC. Conditional inactivation of androgen receptor (AR) allele using the Rarb-cre transgene resulted in a 50% increase of AR-negative LC in adult testis. The mutant males became infertile with age, with all LC in older testis showing signs of incomplete differentiation, such as a large number of big lipid droplets, an increase of finger-like protrusions, and a misexpression of steroidogenic or FLC- and ALC-specific genes. We propose that the antiandrogenic exposure during early development may similarly result in an increase of FLC in adult testis, leading to abnormal LC differentiation.

  6. Autocrine androgen action is essential for Leydig cell maturation and function, and protects against late-onset Leydig cell apoptosis in both mice and men

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Laura; McInnes, Kerry; Simitsidellis, Ioannis; Morgan, Stephanie; Atanassova, Nina; Slowikowska-Hilczer, Jolanta; Kula, Krzysztof; Szarras-Czapnik, Maria; Milne, Laura; Mitchell, Rod T.; Smith, Lee B.

    2015-01-01

    Leydig cell number and function decline as men age, and low testosterone is associated with all “Western” cardio-metabolic disorders. However, whether perturbed androgen action within the adult Leydig cell lineage predisposes individuals to this late-onset degeneration remains unknown. To address this, we generated a novel mouse model in which androgen receptor (AR) is ablated from ∼75% of adult Leydig stem cell/cell progenitors, from fetal life onward (Leydig cell AR knockout mice), permitting interrogation of the specific roles of autocrine Leydig cell AR signaling through comparison to adjacent AR-retaining Leydig cells, testes from littermate controls, and to human testes, including from patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS). This revealed that autocrine AR signaling is dispensable for the attainment of final Leydig cell number but is essential for Leydig cell maturation and regulation of steroidogenic enzymes in adulthood. Furthermore, these studies reveal that autocrine AR signaling in Leydig cells protects against late-onset degeneration of the seminiferous epithelium in mice and inhibits Leydig cell apoptosis in both adult mice and patients with CAIS, possibly via opposing aberrant estrogen signaling. We conclude that autocrine androgen action within Leydig cells is essential for the lifelong support of spermatogenesis and the development and lifelong health of Leydig cells.—O’Hara, L., McInnes, K., Simitsidellis, I., Morgan, S., Atanassova, N., Slowikowska-Hilczer, J., Kula, K., Szarras-Czapnik, M., Milne, L., Mitchell, R. T., Smith, L. B. Autocrine androgen action is essential for Leydig cell maturation and function, and protects against late-onset Leydig cell apoptosis in both mice and men. PMID:25404712

  7. Pubertal and adult Leydig cell function in Mullerian inhibiting substance-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiufeng; Arumugam, Ramamani; Baker, Stephen P; Lee, Mary M

    2005-02-01

    Mullerian inhibiting substance (MIS) causes Mullerian duct regression during sexual differentiation and regulates postnatal Leydig cell development. MIS knockout (MIS-KO) mice with targeted deletions of MIS develop Leydig cell hyperplasia, but their circulating androgen concentrations are reportedly unaltered. We compared reproductive hormone profiles, androgen biosynthesis, and the expression of key steroidogenic and metabolic enzymes in MIS-KO and wild-type (WT) mice at puberty (36 d) and sexual maturity (60 d). In pubertal animals, basal testosterone and LH concentrations in plasma were lower in MIS-KO than WT mice, whereas human chorionic gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone concentrations were similar. In adults, basal LH, and both basal and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-stimulated testosterone concentrations were similar. Purified Leydig cells from pubertal MIS-KO mice had lower testosterone but higher androstanediol and androstenedione production rates. In contrast, testosterone, androstanediol, and androstenedione production rates were all lower in adult MIS-KO Leydig cells. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression was lower in pubertal MIS-KO mice compared with WT, whereas 17beta-hydroxy-steroid dehydrogenase and 5alpha-reductase were greater, and P450c17 and P450scc were similar. The expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase was lower in adult MIS-KO mice, whereas that of 5alpha-reductase, P450c17, and P450scc was similar. Collectively, these results suggest that in the absence of MIS, Leydig cells remain less differentiated, causing an altered intratesticular androgen milieu that may contribute to the infertility of MIS-KO mice. In immature mice, this deficit in steroidogenic capacity appears to be mediated by a direct loss of MIS action in Leydig cells as well as by indirect effects via the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  8. Modulatory effects of leptin on leydig cell function of normal and hyperleptinemic rats.

    PubMed

    Giovambattista, Andrés; Suescun, María O; Nessralla, Claudio C D L; França, Luiz R; Spinedi, Eduardo; Calandra, Ricardo S

    2003-11-01

    Neonatal L-monosodium glutamate (MSG) administration in rats induces several neuroendocrine and metabolic disruptions. Leptin, the adipocyte product, modulates several neuroendocrine systems including the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in mammals. The aim of the present study was to determine whether MSG-induced chronic hyperleptinemia could play any relevant role in the hypogonadism developed by male rats when examined in adulthood. We found that 120-day-old MSG male rats displayed significant hyperleptinemia, hypogonadism, and undisturbed basic testis structure and spermatogenesis. In vitro studies in purified Leydig cells from normal (CTR) and MSG-damaged rats revealed that basal and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-stimulated 17-hydroxy-progesterone (17-HO-P(4)), Delta(4)-androstenedione (Delta(4)A) and testosterone (T) secretions were significantly lower in MSG than in CTR cells. Exposure to murine leptin (Mleptin, 10(-8)M) significantly inhibited hCG-elicited T secretion by CTR cells after 180 min incubation. While Mleptin significantly inhibited hCG-stimulated Delta(4)A output and the Delta(4)A:17-OH-P(4) ratio of secretion, conversely, it failed to modify the ratio T:Delta(4)A release by CTR Leydig cells. Interestingly, the effects of Mleptin found on CTR Leydig cells were absent in MSG Leydig cells. Finally, endogenous hyperleptinemia was associated with a significant decrease in Leydig cell expression of Ob-Rb mRNA in MSG rats. In summary, this study demonstrates that: (1) Mleptin inhibited testicular steroidogenesis in CTR rats; (2) MSG-treated rats showed lower in vitro 17-OH-P(4), Delta(4)A and T production under basal and post-hCG stimulation conditions; (3) purified Leydig cells from MSG-treated rats displayed resistance to the inhibitory action of Mleptin on T release, and (4) endogenous leptin exerts a modulatory effect on Leydig cell Ob-Rb mRNA expression. The inhibitory effect of leptin on testicular function is thus abrogated in MSG

  9. Autoantibodies against Leydig cells in patients after spermatic cord torsion.

    PubMed Central

    Zanchetta, R; Mastrogiacomo, I; Graziotti, P; Foresta, C; Betterle, C

    1984-01-01

    This study is aimed at searching for the presence of circulating antibodies against frozen sections of human testis, ovary and trophoblast in patients that had spermatic cord torsion. Sixty-eight sera samples were studied. Nine patients (13.2%) were positive for organ specific anti-testis autoantibodies. Six patients were positive for antibodies against Leydig cells: five were positive only with the indirect immunofluorescence technique of complement fixing (ITT/CF), the sixth patient was positive only with the indirect immunofluorescence technique (ITT). The other three patients were positive for antibodies against germ line cells: two patients were positive with both techniques, the third was positive only with indirect immunofluorescence technique. Eight of these patients were negative for antibodies against adrenal cortex while only one case was positive with indirect immunofluorescence technique both on adrenal cortex and Leydig cells. Human lyophilized testis absorbed the reactive antibodies against Leydig cells and germ line cells, while adrenal cortex and lyophilized testosterone were ineffective. This study shows the identification of a specific antibody against Leydig cells and germ line cells in patients after spermatic cord torsion. PMID:6362937

  10. Circadian rhythm of the Leydig cells endocrine function is attenuated during aging.

    PubMed

    Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Sokanovic, Srdjan J; Bjelic, Maja M; Radovic, Sava M; Andric, Silvana A; Kostic, Tatjana S

    2016-01-01

    Although age-related hypofunction of Leydig cells is well illustrated across species, its circadian nature has not been analyzed. Here we describe changes in circadian behavior in Leydig cells isolated from adult (3-month) and aged (18- and 24-month) rats. The results showed reduced circadian pattern of testosterone secretion in both groups of aged rats despite unchanged LH circadian secretion. Although arrhythmic, the expression of Insl3, another secretory product of Leydig cells, was decreased in both groups. Intracellular cAMP and most important steroidogenic genes (Star, Cyp11a1 and Cyp17a1), together with positive steroidogenic regulator (Nur77), showed preserved circadian rhythm in aging although rhythm robustness and expression level were attenuated in both aged groups. Aging compromised cholesterol mobilization and uptake by Leydig cells: the oscillatory transcription pattern of genes encoding HDL-receptor (Scarb1), hormone sensitive lipase (Lipe, enzyme that converts cholesterol esters from lipid droplets into free cholesterol) and protein responsible for forming the cholesterol esters (Soat2) were flattened in 24-month group. The majority of examined clock genes displayed circadian behavior in expression but only a few of them (Bmal1, Per1, Per2, Per3 and Rev-Erba) were reduced in 24-month-old group. Furthermore, aging reduced oscillatory expression pattern of Sirt1 and Nampt, genes encoding key enzymes that connect cellular metabolism and circadian network. Altogether circadian amplitude of Leydig cell's endocrine function decreased during aging. The results suggest that clock genes are more resistant to aging than genes involved in steroidogenesis supporting the hypothesis about peripheral clock involvement in rhythm maintenance during aging.

  11. Antiviral responses of human Leydig cells to mumps virus infection or poly I:C stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Le Tortorec, A.; Denis, H.; Satie, A-P.; Patard, J-J.; Ruffault, A.; Jégou, B.; Dejucq-Rainsford, N.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND The immuno-privileged status of the testis is essential to the maintenance of its functions, and innate immunity is likely to play a key role in limiting harmful viral infections, as demonstrated in the rat. In men mumps virus infects Leydig cells and has deleterious effects on testosterone production and spermatogenesis. The aim of this study was to test whether mumps virus infection of isolated human Leydig cells was associated with an inhibition of their innate antiviral defences. METHODS Leydig cell production of mRNA and protein for interferons (IFNs) and of three antiviral proteins—2′5′ oligoadenylate synthetase (2′5′OAS), double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) and MxA—was investigated, in the absence or presence of mumps virus or viral stimuli including poly I:C, a mimetic of RNA viruses replication product. RESULTS Stimulated or not, human Leydig cells appeared unable to produce routinely detectable IFNs α, β and γ. Although the level of PKR remained unchanged after stimulation, the expression of 2′5′OAS and MxA was enhanced following either mumps virus or poly I:C exposure (P < 0.05 versus control). CONCLUSIONS Overall, our results demonstrate that mumps virus replication in human Leydig cells is not associated with a specific inhibition of IFNs or 2′5′OAS, MxA and PKR production and that these cells display relatively weak endogenous antiviral abilities, as opposed to their rat counterparts. PMID:18567898

  12. Estrogen promotes Leydig cell engulfment by macrophages in male infertility.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wanpeng; Zheng, Han; Lin, Wei; Tajima, Astushi; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Hongwen; Wu, Jihua; Han, Daishu; Rahman, Nafis A; Korach, Kenneth S; Gao, George Fu; Inoue, Ituro; Li, Xiangdong

    2014-06-01

    Male infertility accounts for almost half of infertility cases worldwide. A subset of infertile men exhibit reduced testosterone and enhanced levels of estradiol (E2), though it is unclear how increased E2 promotes deterioration of male fertility. Here, we utilized a transgenic mouse strain that overexpresses human CYP19, which encodes aromatase (AROM+ mice), and mice with knockout of Esr1, encoding estrogen receptor α (ERαKO mice), to analyze interactions between viable Leydig cells (LCs) and testicular macrophages that may lead to male infertility. In AROM+ males, enhanced E2 promoted LC hyperplasia and macrophage activation via ERα signaling. E2 stimulated LCs to produce growth arrest-specific 6 (GAS6), which mediates phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by bridging cells with surface exposed phosphatidylserine (PS) to macrophage receptors, including the tyrosine kinases TYRO3, AXL, and MER. Overproduction of E2 increased apoptosis-independent extrusion of PS on LCs, which in turn promoted engulfment by E2/ERα-activated macrophages that was mediated by AXL-GAS6-PS interaction. We further confirmed E2-dependant engulfment of LCs by real-time 3D imaging. Furthermore, evaluation of molecular markers in the testes of patients with nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA) revealed enhanced expression of CYP19, GAS6, and AXL, which suggests that the AROM+ mouse model reflects human infertility. Together, these results suggest that GAS6 has a potential as a clinical biomarker and therapeutic target for male infertility.

  13. Oncostatin-M inhibits luteinizing hormone stimulated Leydig cell progenitor formation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Teerds, Katja J; van Dissel-Emiliani, Federica MF; De Miguel, Maria P; de Boer-Brouwer, Mieke; Körting, Lina M; Rijntjes, Eddy

    2007-01-01

    Background The initial steps of stem Leydig cell differentiation into steroid producing progenitor cells are thought to take place independent of luteinizing hormone (LH), under the influence of locally produced factors such as leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF), platelet derived growth factor A and stem cell factor. For the formation of a normal sized Leydig cell population in the adult testis, the presence of LH appears to be essential. Oncostatin M (OSM) is a multifunctional cytokine and member of the interleukin (IL)-6 family that also includes other cytokines such as LIF. In the rat OSM is highly expressed in the late fetal and neonatal testis, and may thus be a candidate factor involved in Leydig cell progenitor formation. Methods Interstitial cells were isolated from 13-day-old rat testes and cultured for 1, 3 or 8 days in the presence of different doses of OSM (range: 0.01 to 10 ng/ml) alone or in combination with LH (1 ng/ml). The effects of OSM and LH on cell proliferation were determined by incubating the cultures with [3H]thymidine or bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Developing progenitor cells were identified histochemically by the presence of the marker enzyme 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD). Results OSM, when added at a dose of 10 ng/ml, caused a nearly 2-fold increase in the percentage of Leydig cell progenitors after 8 days of culture. Immunohistochemical double labelling experiments with 3beta-HSD and BrdU antibodies showed that this increase was the result of differentiation of stem Leydig cells/precursor cells and not caused by proliferation of progenitor cells themselves. The addition of LH to the cultures consistently resulted in an increase in progenitor formation throughout the culture period. Surprisingly, when OSM and LH were added together, the LH induced rise in progenitor cells was significantly inhibited after 3 and 8 days of culture. Conclusion Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that locally produced OSM

  14. Leydig cell damage after testicular irradiation for lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Shalet, S.M.; Horner, A.; Ahmed, S.R.; Morris-Jones, P.H.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of testicular irradiation on Leydig cell function has been studied in a group of boys irradiated between 1 and 5 years earlier for a testicular relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Six of the seven boys irradiated during prepubertal life had an absent testosterone response to HCG stimulation. Two of the four boys irradiated during puberty had an appropriate basal testosterone level, but the testosterone response to HCG stimulation was subnormal in three of the four. Abnormalities in gonadotropin secretion consistent with testicular damage were noted in nine of the 11 boys. Evidence of severe Leydig cell damage was present irrespective of whether the boys were studied within 1 year or between 3 and 5 years after irradiation, suggesting that recovery is unlikely. Androgen replacement therapy has been started in four boys and will be required by the majority of the remainder to undergo normal pubertal development.

  15. Hepatocyte growth factor is a mouse fetal Leydig cell terminal differentiation factor.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Giulia; Guglielmo, Maria Cristina; Caruso, Maria; Ferranti, Francesca; Canipari, Rita; Galdieri, Michela; Catizone, Angela

    2012-06-01

    The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a pleiotropic cytokine and a well-known regulator of mouse embryonic organogenesis. In previous papers, we have shown the expression pattern of HGF and its receptor, C-MET, during the different stages of testis prenatal development. We demonstrated that C-MET is expressed in fetal Leydig cells (FLCs) and that HGF stimulates testosterone secretion in organ culture of late fetal testes. In the present study, we analyzed the proliferation rate, apoptotic index, and differentiation of FLCs in testicular organ culture of 17.5 days postcoitum (17.5 dpc) embryos to clarify the physiological role of HGF in late testis organogenesis. Based on our data, we conclude the following: 1) HGF acts as an antiapoptotic factor that is able to reduce the number of apoptotic FLCs and testicular caspase-3 active fragment; 2) HGF does not affect FLC proliferation; 3) HGF significantly increases expression of insulin-like 3 (INSL3), a marker of Leydig cell terminal differentiation, without affecting 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3betaHSD) expression; 4) HGF significantly decreases the expression of nestin, a marker of Leydig cell progenitors; and 5) HGF significantly increases the number of fully developed FLCs. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that HGF is able to act in vitro as a survival and differentiation factor in FLC population.

  16. 4-Nitrophenol induces Leydig cells hyperplasia, which may contribute to the differential modulation of the androgen receptor and estrogen receptor-α and -β expression in male rat testes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonghui; Piao, Yuanguo; Li, Yansen; Song, Meiyan; Tang, Pingli; Li, Chunmei

    2013-11-25

    4-Nitrophenol (PNP) is generally regarded as an environmental endocrine disruptor capable of estrogenic and anti-androgenic activities. To investigate PNP-induced reproductive effects, immature male rats were injected subcutaneously with PNP (0.1, 1, 10mg/kg body weight or vehicle) daily for 4 weeks. We assessed reproductive tract alterations, sex hormone balance in the serum and estrogen receptor (ER)-α, -β and androgen receptor (AR) expression in testes. Although no significant difference was observed in body weight or testes weights of PNP-treated rats compared with the controls, the serum concentrations of testosterone in the 10mg/kg PNP-treated group were significantly elevated. This effect was accompanied by Leydig cells hyperplasia in the testes. Conversely, there was a significant decrease in estradiol concentration and aromatase expression in the testes of the 10mg/kg PNP-treated group. Furthermore, we observed a significant increase in ERα expression in the testes of the 10mg/kg PNP-treated group compared with the control group. Conversely, ERβ expression displayed a significant reduction. Moreover, AR expression was significantly increased in the 10mg/kg PNP-treated group compared with the control group. The existence of AR, ER-α and -β in the testes suggests that estradiol and testosterone directly affect germ cells and that differential modulation of AR, ER-α and -β in the testis may be involved in the direct effects of PNP or either the indirect effects of PNP-induced disruption of the estradiol-to-testosterone balance or the Leydig cells hyperplasia. Thus, the measurement of many endpoints is necessary for good risk assessment.

  17. Pdgfr-α mediates testis cord organization and fetal Leydig cell development in the XY gonad

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Jennifer; Tilmann, Christopher; Capel, Blanche

    2003-01-01

    During testis development, the rapid morphological changes initiated by Sry require the coordinate integration of many signaling pathways. Based on the established role of the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) family of ligands and receptors in migration, proliferation, and differentiation of cells in various organ systems, we have investigated the role of PDGF in testis organogenesis. Analysis of expression patterns and characterization of the gonad phenotype in Pdgfr-α−/− embryos identified PDGFR-α as a critical mediator of signaling in the early testis at multiple steps of testis development. Pdgfr-α−/− XY gonads displayed disruptions in the organization of the vasculature and in the partitioning of interstitial and testis cord compartments. Closer examination revealed severe reductions in characteristic XY proliferation, mesonephric cell migration, and fetal Leydig cell differentiation. This work identifies PDGF signaling through the α receptor as an important event downstream of Sry in testis organogenesis and Leydig cell differentiation. PMID:12651897

  18. Annexin V-induced rat Leydig cell proliferation involves Ect2 via RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Jing, Jun; Chen, Li; Fu, Hai-Yan; Fan, Kai; Yao, Qi; Ge, Yi-Feng; Lu, Jin-Chun; Yao, Bing

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of annexin V on the proliferation of primary rat Leydig cells and the potential mechanism. Our results showed that annexin V promoted rat Leydig cell proliferation and cell cycle progression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Increased level of annexin V also enhanced Ect2 protein expression. However, siRNA knockdown of Ect2 attenuated annexin V-induced proliferation of rat Leydig cells. Taken together, these data suggest that increased level of annexin V induced rat Leydig cell proliferation and cell cycle progression via Ect2. Since RhoA activity was increased following Ect2 activation, we further investigated whether Ect2 was involved in annexin V-induced proliferation via the RhoA/ROCK pathway, and the results showed that annexin V increased RhoA activity too, and this effect was abolished by the knockdown of Ect2. Moreover, inhibition of the RhoA/ROCK pathway by a ROCK inhibitor, Y27632, also attenuated annexin V-induced proliferation and cell cycle progression. We thus conclude that Ect2 is involved in annexin V-induced rat Leydig cell proliferation through the RhoA/ROCK pathway. PMID:25807302

  19. Annexin V-induced rat Leydig cell proliferation involves Ect2 via RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Jing, Jun; Chen, Li; Fu, Hai-Yan; Fan, Kai; Yao, Qi; Ge, Yi-Feng; Lu, Jin-Chun; Yao, Bing

    2015-03-24

    This study investigated the effect of annexin V on the proliferation of primary rat Leydig cells and the potential mechanism. Our results showed that annexin V promoted rat Leydig cell proliferation and cell cycle progression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Increased level of annexin V also enhanced Ect2 protein expression. However, siRNA knockdown of Ect2 attenuated annexin V-induced proliferation of rat Leydig cells. Taken together, these data suggest that increased level of annexin V induced rat Leydig cell proliferation and cell cycle progression via Ect2. Since RhoA activity was increased following Ect2 activation, we further investigated whether Ect2 was involved in annexin V-induced proliferation via the RhoA/ROCK pathway, and the results showed that annexin V increased RhoA activity too, and this effect was abolished by the knockdown of Ect2. Moreover, inhibition of the RhoA/ROCK pathway by a ROCK inhibitor, Y27632, also attenuated annexin V-induced proliferation and cell cycle progression. We thus conclude that Ect2 is involved in annexin V-induced rat Leydig cell proliferation through the RhoA/ROCK pathway.

  20. Regulation of seminiferous tubule-associated stem Leydig cells in adult rat testes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoheng; Wang, Zhao; Jiang, Zhenming; Guo, Jingjing; Zhang, Yuxi; Li, Chenhao; Chung, Jinyong; Folmer, Janet; Liu, June; Lian, Qingquan; Ge, Renshan; Zirkin, Barry R; Chen, Haolin

    2016-03-01

    Testicular Leydig cells are the primary source of testosterone in males. Adult Leydig cells have been shown to arise from stem cells present in the neonatal testis. Once established, adult Leydig cells turn over only slowly during adult life, but when these cells are eliminated experimentally from the adult testis, new Leydig cells rapidly reappear. As in the neonatal testis, stem cells in the adult testis are presumed to be the source of the new Leydig cells. As yet, the mechanisms involved in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of these stem cells remain unknown. We developed a unique in vitro system of cultured seminiferous tubules to assess the ability of factors from the seminiferous tubules to regulate the proliferation of the tubule-associated stem cells, and their subsequent entry into the Leydig cell lineage. The proliferation of the stem Leydig cells was stimulated by paracrine factors including Desert hedgehog (DHH), basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and activin. Suppression of proliferation occurred with transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). The differentiation of the stem cells was regulated positively by DHH, lithium- induced signaling, and activin, and negatively by TGF-β, PDGFBB, and FGF2. DHH functioned as a commitment factor, inducing the transition of stem cells to the progenitor stage and thus into the Leydig cell lineage. Additionally, CD90 (Thy1) was found to be a unique stem cell surface marker that was used to obtain purified stem cells by flow cytometry.

  1. Regulation of seminiferous tubule-associated stem Leydig cells in adult rat testes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoheng; Wang, Zhao; Jiang, Zhenming; Guo, Jingjing; Zhang, Yuxi; Li, Chenhao; Chung, Jinyong; Folmer, Janet; Liu, June; Lian, Qingquan; Ge, Renshan; Zirkin, Barry R.; Chen, Haolin

    2016-01-01

    Testicular Leydig cells are the primary source of testosterone in males. Adult Leydig cells have been shown to arise from stem cells present in the neonatal testis. Once established, adult Leydig cells turn over only slowly during adult life, but when these cells are eliminated experimentally from the adult testis, new Leydig cells rapidly reappear. As in the neonatal testis, stem cells in the adult testis are presumed to be the source of the new Leydig cells. As yet, the mechanisms involved in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of these stem cells remain unknown. We developed a unique in vitro system of cultured seminiferous tubules to assess the ability of factors from the seminiferous tubules to regulate the proliferation of the tubule-associated stem cells, and their subsequent entry into the Leydig cell lineage. The proliferation of the stem Leydig cells was stimulated by paracrine factors including Desert hedgehog (DHH), basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and activin. Suppression of proliferation occurred with transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). The differentiation of the stem cells was regulated positively by DHH, lithium- induced signaling, and activin, and negatively by TGF-β, PDGFBB, and FGF2. DHH functioned as a commitment factor, inducing the transition of stem cells to the progenitor stage and thus into the Leydig cell lineage. Additionally, CD90 (Thy1) was found to be a unique stem cell surface marker that was used to obtain purified stem cells by flow cytometry. PMID:26929346

  2. Acute effects of hexabromocyclododecane on Leydig cell cyclic nucleotide signaling and steroidogenesis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Fa, Svetlana; Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Dakic, Vanja; Kaisarevic, Sonja; Hrubik, Jelena; Andric, Nebojsa; Stojilkovic, Stanko S.; Kovacevic, Radmila

    2013-01-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), an additive brominated flame retardant routinely added to various consumer products, was reported to have toxic effects upon biota, including endocrine disruption. In this study, the potential toxicity of HBCDD was tested in peripubertal rat Leydig cells in vitro during 6 h exposure. HBCDD inhibited human chorionic gonadotropin- and forskolin-supported cAMP accumulation and steroidogenesis. It also inhibited basal cAMP production, but elevated basal steroidogenesis. The expression of several cAMP-dependent genes, including steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, cholesterol side chain cleavage enzyme, and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, was also inhibited by HBCDD treatment. Nevertheless, this was not accompanied by a decrease in steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression, as documented by western blot analysis, and activity of steroidogenic enzymes, as documented by unaffected steroidogenesis in the presence of permeable 22(R)-hydroxycholesterol. However, HBCDD caused significant decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential in untreated and human chorionic gonadotropin-treated cells. This indicates that HBCDD acute toxicity in Leydig cells reflects changes in mitochondrial membrane potential-dependent cAMP production and basal and cAMP-regulated cholesterol transport. This in turn facilitates basal but inhibits cAMP-dependent steroidogenesis. Acute effects of HBCDD treatment on transcription are also indicative of its sustained effects on Leydig cell function. PMID:23347875

  3. Differential effects of the persistent DDT metabolite methylsulfonyl-DDE in nonstimulated and LH-stimulated neonatal porcine Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Cesilie Granum; Sørvik, Irene Beate; Tanum, Marte Bruu; Verhaegen, Steven; Brandt, Ingvar; Ropstad, Erik

    2013-03-15

    3-Methylsulfonyl-DDE (MeSO₂-DDE) is a potent adrenal toxicant formed from the persistent insecticide DDT. MeSO₂-DDE is widely present in human plasma, milk and fat, and in tissues of marine mammals. In the present study, we investigated endocrine-disrupting properties of MeSO₂-DDE in primary neonatal porcine Leydig cells. Unstimulated and LH-stimulated cells were exposed to MeSO₂-DDE at concentrations ranging from 0.6 to 20 μM for 48 h. Cell viability, hormone secretion and expression of steroidogenesis related genes were recorded. Secretion of testosterone and estradiol was increased in a concentration-dependent fashion in unstimulated Leydig cells, while in LH-stimulated cells, secretion of testosterone, estradiol and progesterone was decreased. The expression of important steroidogenic genes was down-regulated both in unstimulated and LH-stimulated cells. Notably, no significant impairment of cell viability occurred at any exposure except the highest concentration (20 μM) in LH-stimulated cells. This indicated that the effects on hormone secretion and gene expression were not caused by cytotoxicity. We conclude that the adrenal toxicant MeSO₂-DDE disrupts hormone secretion in a complex fashion in neonatal porcine Leydig cells. The different endocrine responses in unstimulated and LH-stimulated cells imply that the endocrine disruptive activity of MeSO₂-DDE is determined by the physiological status of the Leydig cells.

  4. Androgens inhibit aromatase expression through DAX-1: insights into the molecular link between hormone balance and Leydig cancer development.

    PubMed

    Maris, Pamela; Campana, Antonella; Barone, Ines; Giordano, Cinzia; Morelli, Catia; Malivindi, Rocco; Sisci, Diego; Aquila, Saveria; Rago, Vittoria; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Catalano, Stefania; Lanzino, Marilena; Andò, Sebastiano

    2015-04-01

    Leydig cell tumors (LCTs) of the testis are steroid-secreting tumors associated with various steroid biosynthetic abnormalities and endocrine dysfunctions. Despite their overall rarity, LCTs are still of substantial interest owing to the paucity of information regarding their exact nature and malignant potential. In the present study, we disclose the ability of androgens to inhibit Leydig tumor cell proliferation by opposing to self-sufficient in situ estrogen production. In rat Leydig tumor cells, R2C, androgen treatment significantly decreases the expression and the enzymatic activity of cytocrome P450 aromatase, responsible for the local conversion of androgens into estrogens. This inhibitory effect relies on androgen receptor (AR) activation and involves negative regulation of the CYP19 gene transcriptional activity through the nuclear orphan receptor DAX-1 (dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region, on chromosome X, gene 1). Ligand-activated AR up-regulates the expression of DAX-1 and promotes its increased recruitment within the steroidogenic factor-1 site-containing region of the aromatase proximal promoter II in association with the nuclear receptor corepressor. The biological relevance in LCTs of the newly highlighted functional interplay between AR, DAX-1, and aromatase is underlined by our in vivo observations, revealing a marked down-regulation of AR and DAX-1 expression and a strong increase in aromatase levels in testes tissues from old Fischer rats with spontaneously developed Leydig cell neoplasia, compared with normal testes tissues from younger animals. In elucidating a mechanism by which androgens modulate the growth of Leydig tumor cells, our finding support the hypothesis that maintaining the adequate balance between androgen and estrogens may represent the key for blocking estrogen-secreting Leydigioma development, opening new prospects for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25603045

  5. RODENT LEYDIG CELL TUMORIGENESIS: A REVIEW OF THE PHYSIOLOGY, PATHOLOGY, MECHANISMS, AND RELEVANCE TO HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Leydig cells (LCs) are the cells of the testis that have as their primary function the production of testosterone. LCs are a common target of compounds tested in rodent carcinogenicity bioassays. The number of reviews on Leydig cell tumors (LCTs) has increased in recent years bec...

  6. Apoptosome activation, an important molecular instigator in 6-mercaptopurine induced Leydig cell death

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jessica A.; Lynch, John; Panetta, John C.; Wang, Yao; Frase, Sharon; Bao, Ju; Zheng, Jie; Opferman, Joseph T.; Janke, Laura; Green, Daniel M.; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Schuetz, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Leydig cells are crucial to the production of testosterone in males. It is unknown if the cancer chemotherapeutic drug, 6-mercaptopurine (6 MP), produces Leydig cell failure among adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Moreover, it is not known whether Leydig cell failure is due to either a loss of cells or an impairment in their function. Herein, we show, in a subset of childhood cancer survivors, that Leydig cell failure is related to the dose of 6 MP. This was extended, in a murine model, to demonstrate that 6 MP exposure induced caspase 3 activation, and the loss of Leydig cells was independent of Bak and Bax activation. The death of these non-proliferating cells was triggered by 6 MP metabolism, requiring formation of both cytosolic reactive oxygen species and thiopurine nucleotide triphosphates. The thiopurine nucleotide triphosphates (with physiological amounts of dATP) uniquely activated the apoptosome. An ABC transporter (Abcc4/Mrp4) reduced the amount of thiopurines, thereby providing protection for Leydig cells. The studies reported here demonstrate that the apoptosome is uniquely activated by thiopurine nucleotides and suggest that 6 MP induced Leydig cell death is likely a cause of Leydig cell failure in some survivors of childhood cancer. PMID:26576726

  7. Effects of Etomidate on the Steroidogenesis of Rat Immature Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua-Cheng; Zhu, Danyan; Wang, Chan; Guan, Hongguo; Li, Senlin; Hu, Cong; Chen, Zhichuan; Hu, Yuanyuan; Lin, Han; Lian, Qing-Quan; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Background Etomidate is a rapid hypnotic intravenous anesthetic agent. The major side effect of etomidate is the reduced plasma concentration of corticosteroids, leading to the abnormal reaction of adrenals. Cortisol and testosterone biosynthesis has similar biosynthetic pathway, and shares several common steroidogenic enzymes, such as P450 side chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11A1) and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (HSD3B1). The effect of etomidate on Leydig cell steroidogenesis during the cell maturation process is not well established. Methodology Immature Leydig cells isolated from 35 day-old rats were cultured with 30 μM etomidate for 3 hours in combination with LH, 8Br-cAMP, 25R-OH-cholesterol, pregnenolone, progesterone, androstenedione, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone, respectively. The concentrations of 5α-androstanediol and testosterone in the media were measured by radioimmunoassay. Leydig cells were cultured with various concentrations of etomidate (0.3–30 μM) for 3 hours, and total RNAs were extracted. Q-PCR was used to measure the mRNA levels of following genes: Lhcgr, Scarb1, Star, Cyp11a1, Hsd3b1, Cyp17a1, Hsd17b3, Srd5a1, and Akr1c14. The testis mitochondria and microsomes from 35-day-old rat testes were prepared and used to detect the direct action of etomidate on CYP11A1 and HSD3B1 activity. Results and Conclusions In intact Leydig cells, 30 μM etomidate significantly inhibited androgen synthesis. Further studies showed that etomidate also inhibited the LH- stimulated androgen production. On purified testicular mitochondria and ER fractions, etomidate competitively inhibited both CYP11A1 and HSD3B1 activities, with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 12.62 and 2.75 μM, respectively. In addition, etomidate inhibited steroidogenesis-related gene expression. At about 0.3 μM, etomidate significantly inhibited the expression of Akr1C14. At the higher concentration (30 μM), it also reduced the expression levels of

  8. Overexpression of PRL7D1 in Leydig Cells Causes Male Reproductive Dysfunction in Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaping; Su, Xingyu; Hao, Jie; Chen, Maoxin; Liu, Weijia; Liao, Xiaogang; Li, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Prolactin family 7, subfamily d, member 1 (PRL7D1) is found in mouse placenta. Our recent work showed that PRL7D1 is also present in mouse testis Leydig cells, and the expression of PRL7D1 in the testis exhibits an age-related increase. In the present study, we generated transgenic mice with Leydig cell-specific PRL7D1 overexpression to explore its function during male reproduction. Prl7d1 male mice exhibited subfertility as reflected by reduced sperm counts and litter sizes. The testes from Prl7d1 transgenic mice appeared histologically normal, but the frequency of apoptotic germ cells was increased. Prl7d1 transgenic mice also had lower testosterone concentrations than wild-type mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that Prl7d1 transgenic mice have defects in the testicular expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR) and hydroxy-delta-5-steroid dehydrogenase, 3 beta- and steroid delta-isomerase cluster (HSD3B). Further studies revealed that PRL7D1 overexpression affected the expression of transferrin (TF) in Sertoli cells. These results suggest that PRL7D1 overexpression could lead to increased germ cell apoptosis and exert an inhibitory effect on testosterone production in Leydig cells by reducing the expression of certain steroidogenic-related genes. In addition, PRL7D1 appears to have important roles in the function of Sertoli cells, which, in turn, affects male fertility. We conclude that the expression level of PRL7D1 is associated with the reproductive function of male mice. PMID:26771609

  9. Overexpression of PRL7D1 in Leydig Cells Causes Male Reproductive Dysfunction in Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaping; Su, Xingyu; Hao, Jie; Chen, Maoxin; Liu, Weijia; Liao, Xiaogang; Li, Gang

    2016-01-13

    Prolactin family 7, subfamily d, member 1 (PRL7D1) is found in mouse placenta. Our recent work showed that PRL7D1 is also present in mouse testis Leydig cells, and the expression of PRL7D1 in the testis exhibits an age-related increase. In the present study, we generated transgenic mice with Leydig cell-specific PRL7D1 overexpression to explore its function during male reproduction. Prl7d1 male mice exhibited subfertility as reflected by reduced sperm counts and litter sizes. The testes from Prl7d1 transgenic mice appeared histologically normal, but the frequency of apoptotic germ cells was increased. Prl7d1 transgenic mice also had lower testosterone concentrations than wild-type mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that Prl7d1 transgenic mice have defects in the testicular expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR) and hydroxy-delta-5-steroid dehydrogenase, 3 beta- and steroid delta-isomerase cluster (HSD3B). Further studies revealed that PRL7D1 overexpression affected the expression of transferrin (TF) in Sertoli cells. These results suggest that PRL7D1 overexpression could lead to increased germ cell apoptosis and exert an inhibitory effect on testosterone production in Leydig cells by reducing the expression of certain steroidogenic-related genes. In addition, PRL7D1 appears to have important roles in the function of Sertoli cells, which, in turn, affects male fertility. We conclude that the expression level of PRL7D1 is associated with the reproductive function of male mice.

  10. Glucocorticoids antagonize cAMP-induced Star transcription in Leydig cells through the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1.

    PubMed

    Martin, Luc J; Tremblay, Jacques J

    2008-09-01

    It is well established that stress, either physical or psychosocial, causes a decrease in testosterone production by Leydig cells. Glucocorticoids (Gc) are the main mediators of stress response and they convey their repressive effect on Leydig cells through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). So far, various mechanisms have been proposed to explain the mechanism of action of Gc on Leydig cell steroidogenesis including repression of genes involved in testosterone biosynthesis. Several steroidogenic genes, including steroidogenic acute regulatory (STAR) protein, have been shown to be repressed by Gc in a GR-dependent manner but the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we found that dexamethasone (Dex), a potent synthetic Gc, partly antagonizes the cAMP-dependent stimulation of the mouse Star promoter in MA-10 Leydig cells as revealed by transient transfection assays. This repression requires an element located at -95 bp previously implicated in the activation of the Star promoter by the nuclear receptors, NR4A1 and NR5A1. Dex was found to inhibit NR4A1-dependent transactivation of the Star promoter in Leydig cells by decreasing NR4A1, but not NR5A1, recruitment to the proximal Star promoter as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Western blots revealed that Dex did not affect NR4A1 or NR5A1 expression in response to cAMP. These data suggest that NR4A1 would be associated with the GR in a transcriptionally inactive complex as previously demonstrated in pituitary corticotrope cells. Thus, our data provide new molecular insights into the stress-mediated suppression of testosterone production in testicular Leydig cells.

  11. The Stimulative Effect of Yangjing Capsule on Testosterone Synthesis through Nur77 Pathway in Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yalong; Zhang, Xindong; Sun, Dalin; Zhao, Hongle; Cai, Bin; Gao, Chao; Gao, Li; Cui, Yugui; Tang, Zhian; Jin, Baofang

    2015-01-01

    Yangjing Capsule (YC), an innovative Chinese medicine based on traditional prescription, promotes testosterone synthesis by upregulating the expression of steroidogenic enzymes. Nur77 as a nuclear receptor is known to regulate the expression of many steroid synthetases. This study aimed to explore the potential mechanisms by which YC regulates testosterone synthesis in Leydig cells. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis were employed to assess the expressions of steroidogenic enzymes and Nur77 after treating MLTC-1 cells with YC. The luciferase reporter gene assay was performed to detect the activity of Nur77 gene promoter. Also, the expressions of steroid synthases were detected after Nur77 gene was knocked down. YC significantly stimulated Nur77 production and upregulated StAR and HSD3B expression, and this agrees with the activity of Nur77 gene promoter that was significantly enhanced by YC. Interestingly, knockdown of Nur77 blocked the above YC's effects and consequently inhibited testosterone synthesis in MLTC-1 cells. YC promotes StAR and HSD3B expression and upregulates testosterone synthesis in Leydig cells, which is mediated by Nur77 pathway. PMID:26413123

  12. Anabolic-androgenic steroids induce apoptosis and NOS2 (nitric-oxide synthase 2) in adult rat Leydig cells following in vivo exposure.

    PubMed

    Janjic, Marija M; Stojkov, Natasa J; Andric, Silvana A; Kostic, Tatjana S

    2012-12-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of testosterone (T) predominantly taken as drugs of abuse. Using in vivo treatment of adult male rats we investigated the effects of testosterone enanthate (TE) a widely abused AAS, on apoptosis of Leydig cells. Increased T and decreased luteinizing hormone levels in serum and decreased intra-testicular T values were found in 2 and 10 weeks treated groups. Two weeks of TE-treatment stimulated the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) followed by increased NO production, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased prevalence of Leydig cell apoptosis. This was prevented by in vivo administration of androgen receptor blocker. The induced NOS2 level and apoptosis returned to control levels after 10 weeks of TE-treatment but testes contained fewer Leydig cells. Overall, AAS in addition to reduced steroidogenesis induce transient increase of Leydig cells apoptotic rate through mechanism associated with androgen receptor, most likely involving NOS2 induction. PMID:23085480

  13. The orphan nuclear receptor NUR77 regulates hormone-induced StAR transcription in Leydig cells through cooperation with Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I.

    PubMed

    Martin, Luc J; Boucher, Nicolas; Brousseau, Catherine; Tremblay, Jacques J

    2008-09-01

    Cholesterol transport in the mitochondrial membrane, an essential step of steroid biosynthesis, is mediated by a protein complex containing the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein. The importance of this transporter is underscored by mutations in the human StAR gene that cause lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia, male pseudohermaphroditism, and adrenal insufficiency. StAR transcription in steroidogenic cells is hormonally regulated and involves several transcription factors. The nuclear receptor NUR77 is present in steroidogenic cells, and its expression is induced by hormones known to activate StAR expression. We have now established that StAR transcription in cAMP-stimulated Leydig cells requires de novo protein synthesis and involves NUR77. We found that cAMP-induced NUR77 expression precedes that of StAR both at the mRNA and protein levels in Leydig cells. In these cells, small interfering RNA-mediated NUR77 knockdown reduces cAMP-induced StAR expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed a cAMP-dependent increase in NUR77 recruitment to the proximal StAR promoter, whereas transient transfections in MA-10 Leydig cells confirmed that NUR77 can activate the StAR promoter and that this requires an element located at -95 bp. cAMP-induced StAR and NUR77 expression in Leydig cells was found to require a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK)-dependent signaling pathway. Consistent with this, we show that within the testis, CaMKI is specifically expressed in Leydig cells. Finally, we report that CaMKI transcriptionally cooperates with NUR77, but not steroidogenic factor 1, to further enhance StAR promoter activity in Leydig cells. All together, our results implicate NUR77 as a mediator of cAMP action on StAR transcription in steroidogenic Leydig cells and identify a role for CaMKI in this process.

  14. A potential role for zinc transporter 7 in testosterone synthesis in mouse Leydig tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Qingqing; Chi, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Xiuli; Liang, Dan; Wang, Xuemei; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Ping

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that zinc (Zn) is an essential trace element which is involved in male reproduction. The zinc transporter (ZnT) family, SLC30a, is involved in the maintenance of Zn homeostasis and in mediating intracellular signaling events; however, relatively little is known regarding the effect of ZnTs on testosterone synthesis. Thus, in the present study, we aimed to determine the effect of Zn transporter 7 (ZnT7) on testosterone synthesis in male CD-1 mice and mouse Leydig cells. The findings of the present study revealed that the concentrations of Zn in the testes and Leydig cells were significantly lower in mice fed a Zn-deficient diet compared with the control mice fed a Zn-adequate diet. In addition, ZnT7 was principally expressed and colocalized with steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in the Leydig cells of male CD-1 mice. ZnT7 expression was downregulated in the mice fed a Zn-deficient diet, which led to decreases in the expression of the enzymes involved in testosterone synthesis namely cholesterol side‑chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/D5-D4 isomerase (3β-HSD) as well as decreased serum testosterone levels. These results suggested that Znt7 may be involved in testosterone synthesis in the mouse testes. To examine this hypothesis, we used the mouse Leydig tumor cell line (MLTC-1 cell line) in which the ZnT7 gene had been silenced, in order to gauge the impact of changes in ZnT7 expression on testosterone secretion and the enzymes involved in testosterone synthesis. The results demonstrated that ZnT7 gene silencing downregulated the expression of StAR, P450scc and 3β-HSD as well as progesterone concentrations in the human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG)-stimulated MLTC-1 cells. Taken together, these findings reveal that ZnT7 may play an important role in the regulation of testosterone synthesis by modulating steroidogenic enzymes, and may represent a therapeutic target in

  15. Molecular Mechanisms Elicited by d-Aspartate in Leydig Cells and Spermatogonia

    PubMed Central

    Di Fiore, Maria Maddalena; Santillo, Alessandra; Falvo, Sara; Longobardi, Salvatore; Chieffi Baccari, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    A bulk of evidence suggests that d-aspartate (d-Asp) regulates steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in vertebrate testes. This review article focuses on intracellular signaling mechanisms elicited by d-Asp possibly via binding to the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in both Leydig cells, and spermatogonia. In Leydig cells, the amino acid upregulates androgen production by eliciting the adenylate cyclase-cAMP and/or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. d-Asp treatment enhances gene and protein expression of enzymes involved in the steroidogenic cascade. d-Asp also directly affects spermatogonial mitotic activity. In spermatogonial GC-1 cells, d-Asp induces phosphorylation of MAPK and AKT serine-threonine kinase proteins, and stimulates expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and aurora kinase B (AURKB). Further stimulation of spermatogonial GC-1 cell proliferation might come from estradiol/estrogen receptor β (ESR2) interaction. d-Asp modulates androgen and estrogen levels as well as the expression of their receptors in the rat epididymis by acting on mRNA levels of Srd5a1 and Cyp19a1 enzymes, hence suggesting involvement in spermatozoa maturation. PMID:27428949

  16. Protective Effect of Adrenomedullin on Rat Leydig Cells from Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation and Apoptosis via the PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway ADM on Rat Leydig Cells from Inflammation and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Pang-Hu; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Li-Jun

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate whether ADM can modulate LPS-induced inflammation and apoptosis in rat Leydig cells. Leydig cells were treated with ADM before LPS-induced cytotoxicity. We determined the concentrations of ROS, MDA, GSH, LDH, and testosterone and the MMP. The mRNA levels of IL-1, IL-6, iNOS, and COX-2 were obtained, and the concentrations of IL-1, IL-6, NO, and PGE2 were determined. Apoptosis was assessed by TUNEL and detection of DNA fragmentation. The levels of mRNA and protein were determined for Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3, and PARP. The protein contents for total and p-Akt were measured. ADM pretreatment significantly elevated the MMP and testosterone concentration and reduced the levels of ROS, MDA, GSH, and LDH. ADM pretreatment significantly decreased the mRNA levels of IL-1, IL-6, iNOS, and COX-2 and the concentrations of IL-1, IL-6, NO, and PGE2. LPS-induced TUNEL-positive Leydig cells were significantly decreased by ADM pretreatment, a result further confirmed by decreased DNA fragmentation. ADM pretreatment decreased apoptosis by significantly promoting Bcl-2 and inhibiting Bax, caspase-3, and PARP expressions. The LPS activity that reduced p-Akt level was significantly inhibited by ADM pretreatment. ADM protected rat Leydig cells from LPS-induced inflammation and apoptosis, which might be associated with PI3K/Akt mitochondrial signaling pathway. PMID:27212810

  17. Pro-opiomelanocortin-derived peptides in the testis: evidence for a possible role in Leydig and Sertoli cell function.

    PubMed

    Boitani, C; Chen, C L; Margioris, A N; Gerendai, I; Morris, P L; Bardin, C W

    1986-01-01

    Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived peptides such as beta-endorphin, ACTH, and MSHs were identified in the testis where they were exclusively localized in Leydig cells. Examination of testicular extracts by a variety of physicochemical and immunological techniques indicates that the processing of the POMC in the testis is very similar to that in the brain. By using a cDNA probe, the POMC-like mRNA present in total testis and cultured Leydig cells was 150-200 bases shorter than that in the hypothalamus and pituitary. In addition, POMC mRNA was localized to Leydig cells using in situ hybridization. The expression of the POMC-like gene and the accumulation of POMC-derived peptides in Leydig cell were shown to be under the control of gonadotropin. As the testis contains low concentrations of POMC-derived peptides, we suggested that they may be implicated in local regulatory events within this organ. This postulate was supported by results from in vivo and in vitro experiments suggesting that different portions of the POMC-molecule may have opposite effects on Sertoli cell functions. For example, MSHs increased cAMP accumulation and aromatase activity in these cells, while opioids inhibited Sertoli cell proliferation and androgen binding protein (ABP) secretion. Furthermore, following intratesticular administration of opiate antagonists, testosterone production was reduced, suggesting that Leydig cell function may be also modulated by beta-endorphin and/or other related peptides. Taken together, these studies support the hypothesis of a possible role of POMC-derived peptides in testicular function. PMID:2939305

  18. Depletion and repopulation of Leydig cells in the testes of aging brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Huhtaniemi, I; Zirkin, B R

    1996-08-01

    The capacity of Brown Norway rat Leydig cells to produce testosterone has been shown to decrease with aging. Our objectives herein were to determine 1) whether ethane dimethanesulfonate (EDS) administration would eliminate the hypofunctional Leydig cells of the aged Brown Norway rat testis; 2) if so, whether a new generation of Leydig cells subsequently would appear; and 3) if so, whether the steroidogenic capacity of the new Leydig cells would be at the relatively low level of the cells they replaced or at the high level of young adult Leydig cells. Young (3-month-old) and aged (18-month-old) rats received an injection of EDS (8.5 mg/100 g BW). One, 5, and 10 weeks thereafter, the serum testosterone concentration and the capacity of the testes and of isolated Leydig cells to produce testosterone were determined. One week after EDS treatment, Leydig cells were not seen in the testes of young or aged rats, and the serum testosterone concentration and testicular testosterone production were reduced to undetectable levels. Five weeks after EDS treatment, serum testosterone levels at both ages were restored to those in age-matched controls, and the capacity of the testes to produce testosterone was restored partially (young rats) or completely (aged rats). By 10 weeks after EDS treatment, the serum testosterone concentration in young rats and the ability of their testes to produce testosterone were at the levels of age-matched controls. In aged rats, however, serum testosterone and testicular testosterone production were at levels that significantly exceeded those of aged-matched controls and, indeed, were not significantly different from those of young control or EDS-treated rats. Consistent with this, the ability of Leydig cells isolated from the testes of young rats and that of cells from aged rats to produce testosterone 10 weeks after the rats were treated with EDS were equivalent. The enhanced ability of the Leydig cells restored to the aged testes to produce

  19. Molecular characterization of a Leydig cell tumor presenting as congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Solish, S B; Goldsmith, M A; Voutilainen, R; Miller, W L

    1989-12-01

    We present an unusual patient with a Leydig cell tumor to show that greatly elevated serum concentrations of 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP) may not be diagnostic of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). A 3.5-yr-old boy had a small testicular mass and plasma 17OHP concentrations of 147-333 nmol/L (4,850-11,000 ng/dL), suggesting CAH with adrenal rests. However, normal plasma cortisol values and the unresponsiveness of the 17OHP concentration to dexamethasone suppression or ACTH stimulation suggested a diagnosis of Leydig cell tumor. A 4-fold elevation in plasma 21-deoxycortisol compared with a 200-fold elevation in 17OHP suggested that the elevated 17OHP derived from the normal pathway of testosterone synthesis in the testis. This was proven by normalization of all hormonal values after tumor resection. Compared to the abundance of mRNA for P450c17, the tumor contained unusually large amounts of mRNA for P450scc, the cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme, which is the rate-limiting step in steroid hormone synthesis. Increased P450scc activity, which increased the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone, apparently permitted the 17,20-lyase activity of P450c17 to become rate limiting, thus accounting for the increased secretion of 17OHP. Thus, Leydig cell tumors can produce quantities of 17OHP previously reported only in CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency. The molecular characterization of steroidogenic mRNAs in this tumor indicates an unusual ratio in the expression of the genes for the steroidogenic enzymes, probably accounting for the unusual pattern of serum steroids.

  20. Primary Leydig cell tumour of epididymis: a rare case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Song, J; Xu, M; Zan, Q

    2013-12-01

    Leydig cell tumour (LCT) is an uncommon tumour that typically occurs in the testis. Primary epididymal LCT is extremely rare. To the best of our knowledge, only two cases have been reported in the world literature. Herein, we report a case of primary epididymal LCT in a 41-year-old Chinese male. The patient presented with right epididymal swelling for 3 months without endocrine manifestations, including gynaecomastia and decreased libido. Scrotal ultrasound demonstrated a mass about 1.5 cm in diameter entirely in the cephalic region of right epididymis. No abnormality was found in his bilateral testes. The patient underwent total mass resection without post-operative therapy. Histological examination revealed that the well-circumscribed tumour was separated by conspicuous hyalinised fibrous stroma; the tumour cells were large and polygonal with round nuclei and abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunophenotypically, the tumour cells expressed four markers of sex cord differentiation (calretinin, melanA, CD99 and inhibin). There was no recurrence at 2-year follow-up. Our observation once again confirms that LCT could primarily occur in the epididymis, and we suppose that it probably originates from the ectopic Leydig cells. As little is known about the pathogenesis and prognosis for such a rare disease, accumulation of more pathological and clinical data can help to better interpret this tumour.

  1. Inhibition of steroidogenesis in Leydig cells by Müllerian-inhibiting substance.

    PubMed

    Fynn-Thompson, Eric; Cheng, Henry; Teixeira, Jose

    2003-12-15

    Müllerian-inhibiting substance (MIS), a member of the transforming growth factor-beta family of cytokines that signal through a heteromeric complex of single-transmembrane serine/threonine kinase receptors, is required for Müllerian duct regression and normal reproductive tract development in the male embryo. However, the continued expression of MIS at high levels in males until puberty and its induction in females after birth suggested other roles for MIS. Additionally, Leydig cell development and steroidogenic capacity and ovarian follicle recruitment were abnormal in MIS-knockout or MIS-overexpressing mice. We have shown that MIS inhibits the cAMP-induced expression of cytochrome P450 C17alpha-hydroxylase/C17-20 lyase (Cyp17) mRNA both in vitro and in vivo. Our current efforts are to understand the molecular mechanisms regulating both MIS type II receptor (MISRII) expression and its signaling in rodent Leydig cell lines. MISRII expression in R2C cells requires both steroidogenic factor-1 and an unknown protein to bind to its proximal promoter in the context of 1.6 kb 5'-flanking DNA. When bound by MIS, signaling by the receptor in MA-10 cells blocks the protein kinase A-mediated induction of Cyp17 expression by a cAMP regulatory element-binding protein independent mechanism. We continue to investigate the molecular mechanisms of MISRII expression and possible interactions between MIS-regulated SMAD activation and cAMP signaling. These studies will provide a better understanding of the role played by MIS during postnatal life.

  2. Mechanisms of Action of Hormone-sensitive Lipase in Mouse Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Pulak R.; Cohen-Tannoudji, Joëlle; Counis, Raymond; Garner, Charles W.; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Kraemer, Fredric B.; Stocco, Douglas M.

    2013-01-01

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyzes the hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters in steroidogenic tissues and, thus, facilitates cholesterol availability for steroidogenesis. The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) controls the rate-limiting step in steroid biosynthesis. However, the modes of action of HSL in the regulation of StAR expression remain obscure. We demonstrate in MA-10 mouse Leydig cells that activation of the protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, by a cAMP analog Bt2cAMP, enhanced expression of HSL and its phosphorylation (P) at Ser-660 and Ser-563, but not at Ser-565, concomitant with increased HSL activity. Phosphorylation and activation of HSL coincided with increases in StAR, P-StAR (Ser-194), and progesterone levels. Inhibition of HSL activity by CAY10499 effectively suppressed Bt2cAMP-induced StAR expression and progesterone synthesis. Targeted silencing of endogenous HSL, with siRNAs, resulted in increased cholesteryl ester levels and decreased cholesterol content in MA-10 cells. Depletion of HSL affected lipoprotein-derived cellular cholesterol influx, diminished the supply of cholesterol to the mitochondria, and resulted in the repression of StAR and P-StAR levels. Cells overexpressing HSL increased the efficacy of liver X receptor (LXR) ligands on StAR expression and steroid synthesis, suggesting HSL-mediated steroidogenesis entails enhanced oxysterol production. Conversely, cells deficient in LXRs exhibited decreased HSL responsiveness. Furthermore, an increase in HSL was correlated with the LXR target genes, steroid receptor element-binding protein 1c and ATP binding cassette transporter A1, demonstrating HSL-dependent regulation of steroidogenesis predominantly involves LXR signaling. LXRs interact/cooperate with RXRs and result in the activation of StAR gene transcription. These findings provide novel insight and demonstrate the molecular events by which HSL acts to drive cAMP/PKA-mediated regulation of StAR expression and

  3. Effects of Nandrolone Stimulation on Testosterone Biosynthesis in Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Rosario; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Sangiorgi, Claudia; Barone, Fulvio; Pitruzzella, Alessandro; Locorotondo, Nicola; Di Gaudio, Francesca; Salerno, Monica; Maglietta, Francesca; Sarni, Antonio Luciano; Di Felice, Valentina; Cappello, Francesco; Turillazzi, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are among the drugs most used by athletes for improving physical performance, as well as for aesthetic purposes. A number of papers have showed the side effects of AAS in different organs and tissues. For example, AAS are known to suppress gonadotropin‐releasing hormone, luteinizing hormone, and follicle‐stimulating hormone. This study investigates the effects of nandrolone on testosterone biosynthesis in Leydig cells using various methods, including mass spectrometry, western blotting, confocal microscopy and quantitative real‐time PCR. The results obtained show that testosterone levels increase at a 3.9 μM concentration of nandrolone and return to the basal level a 15.6 μM dose of nandrolone. Nandrolone‐induced testosterone increment was associated with upregulation of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and downregulation of 17a‐hydroxylase/17, 20 lyase (CYP17A1). Instead, a 15.6 µM dose of nandrolone induced a down‐regulation of CYP17A1. Further in vivo studies based on these data are needed to better understand the relationship between disturbed testosterone homeostasis and reproductive system impairment in male subjects. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1385–1391, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26626779

  4. Combined steroidogenic characters of fetal adrenal and Leydig cells in childhood adrenocortical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Yasuko; Sakaguchi, Kimiyoshi; Ono, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Rie; Kato, Fumiko; Kagami, Masayo; Fukami, Maki; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2016-05-01

    Although childhood adrenocortical carcinomas (c-ACCs) with a TP53 mutation are known to produce androgens, detailed steroidogenic characters have not been clarified. Here, we examined steroid metabolite profiles and expression patterns of steroidogenic genes in a c-ACC removed from the left adrenal position of a 2-year-old Brazilian boy with precocious puberty, using an atrophic left adrenal gland removed at the time of tumorectomy as a control. The c-ACC produced not only abundant dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate but also a large amount of testosterone via the Δ5 pathway with Δ5-androstenediol rather than Δ4-androstenedione as the primary intermediate metabolite. Furthermore, the c-ACC was associated with elevated expressions of CYP11A1, CYP17A1, POR, HSD17B3, and SULT2A1, a low but similar expression of CYB5A, and reduced expressions of AKR1C3 (HSD17B5) and HSD3B2. Notably, a Leydig cell marker INSL3 was expressed at a low but detectable level in the c-ACC. Furthermore, molecular studies revealed a maternally inherited heterozygous germline TP53 mutation, and several post-zygotic genetic aberrations in the c-ACC including loss of paternally derived chromosome 17 with a wildtype TP53 and loss of maternally inherited chromosome 11 and resultant marked hyperexpression of paternally expressed growth promoting gene IGF2 and drastic hypoexpression of maternally expressed growth suppressing gene CDKN1C. These results imply the presence of combined steroidogenic properties of fetal adrenal and Leydig cells in this patient's c-ACC with a germline TP53 mutation and several postzygotic carcinogenic events.

  5. Disturbance in Testosterone Production in Leydig Cells by Polycyclic Aromatic Hydevrepocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seunghoon

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydevrepocarbons (PAHs), which are ubiquitous in the air, are present as volatile and particulate pollutants that result from incomplete combustion. Most PAHs have toxic, mutagenic, and/or carcinogenic properties. Among PAHs, benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) are suspected endocrine disruptors. The testis is an important target for PAHs, yet effects on steroidogenesis in Leydig cells are yet to be ascertained. Particularly, disruption of testosterone production by these chemicals can result in serious defects in male reproduction. Exposure to B[a]P reduced serum and intratesticular fluid testosterone levels in rats. Of note, the testosterone level reductions were accompanied by decreased steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and 3β-hydevrepoxysteroid dehydevrepogenase isomerase (3β-HSD) expression in Leydig cells. B[a]P exposure can decrease epididymal sperm quality, possibly by disturbing the testosterone level. StAR may be a key steroidogenic protein that is targeted by B[a]P or other PAHs. PMID:25949189

  6. The opposite roles of glucocorticoid and α1-adrenergic receptors in stress triggered apoptosis of rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Andric, Silvana A; Kojic, Zvezdana; Bjelic, Maja M; Mihajlovic, Aleksandar I; Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Sokanovic, Srdjan J; Janjic, Marija M; Stojkov, Natasa J; Stojilkovic, Stanko S; Kostic, Tatjana S

    2013-01-01

    The stress-induced initiation of proapoptotic signaling in Leydig cells is relatively well defined, but the duration of this signaling and the mechanism(s) involved in opposing the stress responses have not been addressed. In this study, immobilization stress (IMO) was applied for 2 h daily, and animals were euthanized immediately after the first (IMO1), second (IMO2), and 10th (IMO10) sessions. In IMO1 and IMO2 rats, serum corticosterone and adrenaline were elevated, whereas serum androgens and mRNA transcription of insulin-like factor-3 in Leydig cells were inhibited. Reduced oxygen consumption and the mitochondrial membrane potential coupled with a leak of cytochrome c from mitochondria and increased caspase-9 expression, caspase-3 activity, and number of apoptotic Leydig cells was also observed. Corticosterone and adrenaline were also elevated in IMO10 rats but were accompanied with a partial recovery of androgen secretion and normalization of insulin-like factor-3 transcription coupled with increased cytochrome c expression, abolition of proapoptotic signaling, and normalization of the apoptotic events. Blockade of intratesticular glucocorticoid receptors diminished proapoptotic effects without affecting antiapoptotic effects, whereas blockade of intratesticular α(1)-adrenergic receptors diminished the antiapoptotic effects without affecting proapoptotic effects. These results confirmed a critical role of glucocorticoids in mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and showed for the first time the relevance of stress-induced upregulation of α(1)-adrenergic receptor expression in cell apoptotic resistance to repetitive IMOs. The opposite role of two hormones in control of the apoptotic rate in Leydig cells also provides a rationale for a partial recovery of androgen production in chronically stressed animals.

  7. Effects of Nandrolone Stimulation on Testosterone Biosynthesis in Leydig Cells.

    PubMed

    Pomara, Cristoforo; Barone, Rosario; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Sangiorgi, Claudia; Barone, Fulvio; Pitruzzella, Alessandro; Locorotondo, Nicola; Di Gaudio, Francesca; Salerno, Monica; Maglietta, Francesca; Sarni, Antonio Luciano; Di Felice, Valentina; Cappello, Francesco; Turillazzi, Emanuela

    2016-06-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are among the drugs most used by athletes for improving physical performance, as well as for aesthetic purposes. A number of papers have showed the side effects of AAS in different organs and tissues. For example, AAS are known to suppress gonadotropin-releasing hormone, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone. This study investigates the effects of nandrolone on testosterone biosynthesis in Leydig cells using various methods, including mass spectrometry, western blotting, confocal microscopy and quantitative real-time PCR. The results obtained show that testosterone levels increase at a 3.9 μM concentration of nandrolone and return to the basal level a 15.6 μM dose of nandrolone. Nandrolone-induced testosterone increment was associated with upregulation of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and downregulation of 17a-hydroxylase/17, 20 lyase (CYP17A1). Instead, a 15.6 µM dose of nandrolone induced a down-regulation of CYP17A1. Further in vivo studies based on these data are needed to better understand the relationship between disturbed testosterone homeostasis and reproductive system impairment in male subjects. PMID:26626779

  8. Effects of Nandrolone Stimulation on Testosterone Biosynthesis in Leydig Cells.

    PubMed

    Pomara, Cristoforo; Barone, Rosario; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Sangiorgi, Claudia; Barone, Fulvio; Pitruzzella, Alessandro; Locorotondo, Nicola; Di Gaudio, Francesca; Salerno, Monica; Maglietta, Francesca; Sarni, Antonio Luciano; Di Felice, Valentina; Cappello, Francesco; Turillazzi, Emanuela

    2016-06-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are among the drugs most used by athletes for improving physical performance, as well as for aesthetic purposes. A number of papers have showed the side effects of AAS in different organs and tissues. For example, AAS are known to suppress gonadotropin-releasing hormone, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone. This study investigates the effects of nandrolone on testosterone biosynthesis in Leydig cells using various methods, including mass spectrometry, western blotting, confocal microscopy and quantitative real-time PCR. The results obtained show that testosterone levels increase at a 3.9 μM concentration of nandrolone and return to the basal level a 15.6 μM dose of nandrolone. Nandrolone-induced testosterone increment was associated with upregulation of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and downregulation of 17a-hydroxylase/17, 20 lyase (CYP17A1). Instead, a 15.6 µM dose of nandrolone induced a down-regulation of CYP17A1. Further in vivo studies based on these data are needed to better understand the relationship between disturbed testosterone homeostasis and reproductive system impairment in male subjects.

  9. Comparison of the Effects of Dibutyl and Monobutyl Phthalates on the Steroidogenesis of Rat Immature Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linxi; Chen, Xiaomin; Hu, Guoxin; Wang, Sicong; Xu, Renai; Zhu, Qiqi; Li, Xiaoheng; Wang, Mingcang; Lian, Qing-Quan; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) is a widely used synthetic phthalic diester and monobutyl phthalate (MBP) is its main metabolite. DBP can be released into the environment and potentially disrupting mammalian male reproductive endocrine system. However, the potencies of DBP and MBP to inhibit Leydig cell steroidogenesis and their possible mechanisms are not clear. Immature Leydig cells isolated from rats were cultured with 0.05–50 μM DBP or MBP for 3 h in combination with testosterone synthesis regulator or intermediate. The concentrations of 5α-androstanediol and testosterone in the media were measured, and the mRNA levels of the androgen biosynthetic genes were detected by qPCR. The direct actions of DBP or MBP on CYP11A1, CYP17A1, SRD5A1, and AKR1C14 activities were measured. MBP inhibited androgen production by the immature Leydig cell at as low as 50 nM, while 50 μM was required for DBP to suppress its androgen production. MBP mainly downregulated Cyp11a1 and Hsd3b1 expression levels at 50 nM. However, 50 μM DBP downregulated Star, Hsd3b1, and Hsd17b3 expression levels and directly inhibited CYP11A1 and CYP17A1 activities. In conclusion, DBP is metabolized to more potent inhibitor MBP that downregulated the expression levels of some androgen biosynthetic enzymes. PMID:27148549

  10. Comparison of the Effects of Dibutyl and Monobutyl Phthalates on the Steroidogenesis of Rat Immature Leydig Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Linxi; Chen, Xiaomin; Hu, Guoxin; Wang, Sicong; Xu, Renai; Zhu, Qiqi; Li, Xiaoheng; Wang, Mingcang; Lian, Qing-Quan; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) is a widely used synthetic phthalic diester and monobutyl phthalate (MBP) is its main metabolite. DBP can be released into the environment and potentially disrupting mammalian male reproductive endocrine system. However, the potencies of DBP and MBP to inhibit Leydig cell steroidogenesis and their possible mechanisms are not clear. Immature Leydig cells isolated from rats were cultured with 0.05-50 μM DBP or MBP for 3 h in combination with testosterone synthesis regulator or intermediate. The concentrations of 5α-androstanediol and testosterone in the media were measured, and the mRNA levels of the androgen biosynthetic genes were detected by qPCR. The direct actions of DBP or MBP on CYP11A1, CYP17A1, SRD5A1, and AKR1C14 activities were measured. MBP inhibited androgen production by the immature Leydig cell at as low as 50 nM, while 50 μM was required for DBP to suppress its androgen production. MBP mainly downregulated Cyp11a1 and Hsd3b1 expression levels at 50 nM. However, 50 μM DBP downregulated Star, Hsd3b1, and Hsd17b3 expression levels and directly inhibited CYP11A1 and CYP17A1 activities. In conclusion, DBP is metabolized to more potent inhibitor MBP that downregulated the expression levels of some androgen biosynthetic enzymes. PMID:27148549

  11. HBCDD-induced sustained reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP and steroidogenesis in peripubertal rat Leydig cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fa, Svetlana; Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Samardzija, Dragana; Hrubik, Jelena; Glisic, Branka; Kovacevic, Radmila; Andric, Nebojsa

    2015-01-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), a brominated flame retardant added to various consumer products, is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant. We have previously shown that 6-hour exposure to HBCDD disturbs basal and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-induced steroidogenesis in rat Leydig cells. Reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and cAMP production was also observed. Here, we further expanded research on the effect of HBCDD on Leydig cells by using a prolonged exposure scenario. Cells were incubated in the presence of HBCDD during 24 h and then treated with HBCDD + hCG for additional 2 h. Results showed that HBCDD caused a sustained reduction in ATP level after 24 h of exposure, which persisted after additional 2-hour treatment with HBCDD + hCG. cAMP and androgen accumulations measured after 2 h of HBCDD + hCG treatment were also inhibited. Real-time PCR analysis showed significant inhibition in the expression of genes for steroidogenic enzymes, luteinizing hormone receptor, regulatory and transport proteins, and several transcription factors under both treatment conditions. Western blot analysis revealed a decreased level of 30 kDa steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) after HBCDD + hCG treatment. In addition, HBCDD decreased the conversion of 22-OH cholesterol to pregnenolone and androstenedione to testosterone, indicating loss of the activity of cytochrome P450C11A1 (CYP11A1) and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD17β). Cell survival was not affected, as confirmed by cytotoxicity and trypan blue tests or DNA fragmentation analysis. In summary, our data showed that HBCDD inhibits ATP supply, most likely through a decrease in ΔΨm, and targets multiple sites in the steroidogenic pathway in Leydig cells. - Highlights: • HBCDD causes a sustained reduction in ΔΨm and ATP level in Leydig cells. • Prolonged HBCDD exposure decreases hCG-supported steroidogenesis in Leydig cells. • HBCDD targets StAR, HSD17β and CYP11A1 in Leydig

  12. Organophosphate Flame Retardants Act as Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals in MA-10 Mouse Tumor Leydig Cells.

    PubMed

    Schang, Gauthier; Robaire, Bernard; Hales, Barbara F

    2016-04-01

    The organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) have emerged as alternatives to banned brominated flame retardants but little is known about their possible activity as endocrine disruptors. Our goal was to compare the effects of 7 commonly used OPFRsin vitroon MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells to those of a major brominated flame retardant, 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47). The effects of OPFRs and BDE-47 on mitochondrial activity, cell counts, oxidative stress, steroid secretion and gene expression were investigated. BDE-47 and all 7 OPFRs tested significantly reduced MA-10 cell mitochondrial activity (concentrations ≥50 μM) and cell number (concentrations ≥10 μM). All of the OPFRs significantly increased (10 μM, 1.7-4.4-fold) superoxide production whereas BDE-47 had no significant effect. Basal progesterone production was significantly increased (10 μM, 1.5 to 3-fold) by 2-ethylhexyl diphenyl phosphate, isodecyl diphenyl phosphate, isopropylated triphenyl phosphate, tert-butylphenyl diphenyl phosphate, and tricresyl phosphate, while BDE-47, triphenyl phosphate and tri-o-cresyl phosphate had no effect. Interestingly, isopropylated triphenyl phosphate enhanced dbcAMP-stimulated steroid production (∼2-fold), while tri-o-cresyl phosphate decreased (∼2/3) LH-stimulated steroid production. Several OPFRs affected the expression of genes involved in the biosynthesis of progesterone. In conclusion, all the OPFRs tested affected mitochondrial activity, cell survival, and superoxide production. Basal or stimulated steroid secretion was affected by all of the OPFRs except triphenyl phosphate; BDE-47 had no effect. Hence, the OPFRs currently used as alternatives affect Leydig cells to a greater extent than the brominated flame retardants that they have replaced.

  13. Evidence for Leydig cell dysfunction in rats with seminiferous tubule damage.

    PubMed

    Rich, K A; Kerr, J B; de Kretser, D M

    1979-02-01

    To study the effects of seminiferous tubule damage on Leydig cell function and morphology, rats were treated by fetal irradiation (to induce Sertoli cell-only syndrome, SCO), 3 months administration of hydroxyurea (HU), or chronic feeding of a vitamin A-deficient diet (VAD). Leydig cell function was assessed by the measurement of serum LH and testosterone and the response of serum testosterone to hCG stimulation, while morphology was studied by electron microscopy after perfusion fixation. Serum LH was significantly elevated in each experimental group, while basal serum testosterone was significantly lower only in SCO rats. In all treatment groups, the serum testosterone response to hCG was significantly decreased when measureed as the area under the response curve. Despite a decreased response to hCG, the Leydig cells were larger than normal and showed striking increases in quantities of smooth endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and Golgi complex. Leydig cell dysfunction has been demonstrated in animals with varying degrees of seminiferous tubule damage, but paradoxically the cytological features of the Leydig cells were indicative of hypertrophy. PMID:446879

  14. Effects of the Yangjing Capsule Extract on Steroidogenesis and Apoptosis in Mouse Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dalin; Cui, Yugui; Jin, Baofang; Zhang, Xindong; Yang, Xiaoyu; Gao, Chao

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to explore the effect and mechanism of Yangjing capsule on testosterone secretion in mouse Leydig tumor cells (MLTC-1). Methods. MLTC-1 cells were treated with the Yangjing capsule extract for 24 h. The testosterone level in medium was measured by radioimmunoassay. The expression of steroidogenic enzymes (StAR, CYP11A1, and HSD3B) in the cells was examined using real-time RT-PCR and immunoblotting. Additionally, MLTC-1 cells were treated for 48 h in a serum-free medium. The cell viability was measured by MTT assay. The cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed using flow cytometry. The expression of activated caspase-3 was analyzed using RT-PCR and a colorimetric protease assay. Results. The Yangjing capsule extract increased testosterone production and the expression of StAR, CYP11A1, and HSD3B mRNAs and proteins compared with the control. H89 significantly inhibited these effects. The medicine improved the viability of MLTC-1 cells, decreased the number of cells in G0/G1 phase, and increased the number of cells in S-phase, as well as prevented cell apoptosis by inhibiting caspase-3. Conclusion. The Yangjing capsule can stimulate MLTC-1 cells to secrete testosterone and may be an alternative treatment for diseases characterized by insufficient testosterone production. PMID:23259004

  15. Fetal programming of adult Leydig cell function by androgenic effects on stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Kilcoyne, Karen R.; Smith, Lee B.; Atanassova, Nina; Macpherson, Sheila; McKinnell, Chris; van den Driesche, Sander; Jobling, Matthew S.; Chambers, Thomas J. G.; De Gendt, Karel; Verhoeven, Guido; O’Hara, Laura; Platts, Sophie; Renato de Franca, Luiz; Lara, Nathália L. M.; Anderson, Richard A.; Sharpe, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Fetal growth plays a role in programming of adult cardiometabolic disorders, which in men, are associated with lowered testosterone levels. Fetal growth and fetal androgen exposure can also predetermine testosterone levels in men, although how is unknown, because the adult Leydig cells (ALCs) that produce testosterone do not differentiate until puberty. To explain this conundrum, we hypothesized that stem cells for ALCs must be present in the fetal testis and might be susceptible to programming by fetal androgen exposure during masculinization. To address this hypothesis, we used ALC ablation/regeneration to identify that, in rats, ALCs derive from stem/progenitor cells that express chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II. These stem cells are abundant in the fetal testis of humans and rodents, and lineage tracing in mice shows that they develop into ALCs. The stem cells also express androgen receptors (ARs). Reduction in fetal androgen action through AR KO in mice or dibutyl phthalate (DBP) -induced reduction in intratesticular testosterone in rats reduced ALC stem cell number by ∼40% at birth to adulthood and induced compensated ALC failure (low/normal testosterone and elevated luteinizing hormone). In DBP-exposed males, this failure was probably explained by reduced testicular steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression, which is associated with increased histone methylation (H3K27me3) in the proximal promoter. Accordingly, ALCs and ALC stem cells immunoexpressed increased H3K27me3, a change that was also evident in ALC stem cells in fetal testes. These studies highlight how a key component of male reproductive development can fundamentally reprogram adult hormone production (through an epigenetic change), which might affect lifetime disease risk. PMID:24753613

  16. The triphasic nature of Leydig cell development in humans, and comments on nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Prince, F P

    2001-02-01

    Leydig cell development in humans, although for years described as being biphasic, with fetal and adult phases of maturation, is better considered as a triphasic developmental phenomenon. The morphological literature is summarized in this commentary. Although the majority of studies are of a qualitative nature and many questions remain as to the relative and absolute numbers of cells involved in these developmental phases, this literature is more consistent with a triphasic developmental pattern. This view of Leydig cell development is in accord with the well-known triphasic history of testosterone production, i.e. peaks at 14-18 weeks of fetal life, 2-3 months after birth, and from puberty throughout adult life. It is also significant that the neonatal phase of testosterone production is dependent upon reactivation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis (HPT). The current interest in the functional implications of the neonatal period will be better served by considering human Leydig cell development as triphasic.

  17. The mechanism for lindane-induced inhibition of steroidogenesis in cultured rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Ronco, A M; Valdés, K; Marcus, D; Llanos, M

    2001-02-21

    The in vitro effect of the gamma-isomer of hexachlorocyclohexane, lindane, on rat Leydig cell steroidogenesis was studied. Leydig cells from mature male rats were incubated with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG, 1 IU) for 3 h at 34 degrees C in the presence of different doses of lindane (2-200 microg/ml; 2-200 ppm). Results demonstrate that lindane produces a dose-dependent inhibition of testosterone production in hCG-stimulated Leydig cells. The decreased testosterone synthesis was accompanied with a half-reduced LH/hCG receptor number without any modification in the K(d) value. In addition, lindane also decreased cAMP production. These effects were not due to a detrimental action of lindane on cell viability. Results of this study demonstrate a direct inhibitory action of lindane on testicular steroidogenesis, at least in part, through a reduction in the classical second messenger production involved in this pathway.

  18. Benign Leydig cell tumour and germ cell carcinoma in situ in a young man with gynaecomastia.

    PubMed Central

    Fink, R. S.; Mann, M. S.; Hopewell, J. P.; Ginsburg, J.

    1984-01-01

    A 21-year-old man presented with a 16-year history of recurrent pyrexial episodes and a 5-year history of gynaecomastia. Blood and urinary oestrogen levels were elevated and a mass was found in the upper pole of a retractile right testis. After orchidectomy, oestrogen levels fell, gynaecomastia regressed and the pyrexial episodes ceased. Histological examination of the right testis showed a benign Leydig cell tumour in the upper pole and a germinal cell carcinoma in situ in the remaining part of the testis. Thus a potentially lethal condition was detected at an early pre-malignant phase by virtue of a benign, endocrinologically active tumour. This would seem to be the first report of the co-existence of a Leydig cell tumour and germ cell carcinoma in the same testis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6694953

  19. Ascorbic acid supplementation enhances recovery from ethanol induced inhibition of Leydig cell steroidogenesis than abstention in male guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnakartha, Harikrishnan; Appu, Abhilash Puthuvelvippel; Indira, Madambath

    2014-01-15

    The impact of ascorbic acid supplementation against ethanol induced Leydig cell toxicity was studied in guinea pigs. Male guinea pigs were exposed to ethanol (4g/kgb.wt.) for 90 days. After 90 days, ethanol administration was completely stopped and animals in the ethanol group were divided into abstention group and ascorbic acid supplemented group (25mg/100gb.wt.) and those in control group were maintained as control and control+ascorbic acid group. Ethanol administration reduced the serum testosterone and LH (luteinising hormone) levels and elevated estradiol levels. Cholesterol levels in Leydig cell were increased whereas the mRNA and protein expressions of StAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory) protein, cytochrome P450scc (cytochrome p450side chain cleavage enzyme), 3β-HSD (3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase), 17β-HSD (17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase) and LH receptor were drastically reduced. Administration of ascorbic acid resulted in alteration of all these parameters indicating enhanced recovery from ethanol induced inhibition of Leydig cell steroidogenesis. Although abstention could also reduce the inhibition of steroidogenesis, this was lesser in comparison with ascorbic acid supplemented group.

  20. Leukemia inhibitory factor antagonizes gonadotropin induced-testosterone synthesis in cultured porcine leydig cells: sites of action.

    PubMed

    Mauduit, C; Goddard, I; Besset, V; Tabone, E; Rey, C; Gasnier, F; Dacheux, F; Benahmed, M

    2001-06-01

    /hCG-induced steroidogenic acute regulatory protein messenger RNA levels. The maximal inhibitory effect was obtained with 6.6 ng/ml of LIF after 48 h of treatment. In contrast, LIF had no effect on PBR messenger RNA expression or PBR binding. This inhibitory effect of LIF on Leydig cell steroidogenesis is probably exerted via an auto/paracrine action of the cytokine. Indeed, by immunohistochemistry, LIF and LIF receptor proteins were identified in Leydig and Sertoli cells but not in other testicular cell types, except for LIF receptor in spermatogonia. Furthermore, the presence of LIF and its receptor in Leydig cells at the neonatal and adult periods suggests that the inhibitory effect of LIF on androgen formation reported here probably occurs in both the fetal and the adult Leydig cell populations during testicular development.

  1. The total Leydig cell volume of the testis in some common mammals.

    PubMed

    Kothari, L K; Patni, M K; Jain, M L

    1978-01-01

    Total Leydig cell volume has been quantitatively determined by a histometric point-counting method in six common mammals, including man. Although the size of the testis has increased from 1.3 +/- 0.1 ml in the rat to 19.8 +/- 6.9 ml in the buffalo, the composition has remained fairly constant with the Leydig cells making up 9--16% of the testicular volume. In absolute terms, the Total Leydig Volume has increased progressively with body size, from 0.11 +/- 0.02 ml/testis in rat to 2.44 +/- 0.64 ml/testis in buffalo, the value for man being 2.21 +/- 0.40 ml/testis. The significance of these findings, from the point of view of the comparative physiology of male reproduction, has been discussed. PMID:686402

  2. Leydig cells contribute to the inhibition of spermatogonial differentiation after irradiation of the rat.

    PubMed

    Shetty, G; Zhou, W; Weng, C C Y; Shao, S H; Meistrich, M L

    2016-05-01

    Irradiation with 6 Gy produces a complete block of spermatogonial differentiation in LBNF1 rats that would be permanent without treatment. Subsequent suppression of gonadotropins and testosterone (T) restores differentiation to the spermatocyte stage; however, this process requires 6 weeks. We evaluated the role of Leydig cells (LCs) in maintenance of the block in spermatogonial differentiation after exposure to radiation by specifically eliminating functional LCs with ethane dimethane sulfonate (EDS). EDS (but not another alkylating agent), given at 10 weeks after irradiation, induced spermatogonial differentiation in 24% of seminiferous tubules 2 weeks later. However, differentiation became blocked again at 4 weeks as LCs recovered. When EDS was followed by treatment with GnRH antagonist and flutamide, sustained spermatogonial differentiation was induced in >70% of tubules within 2 weeks. When EDS was followed by GnRH antagonist plus exogenous T, which also inhibits LC recovery but restores follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels, the spermatogonial differentiation was again rapid but transient. These results confirm that the factors that block spermatogonial differentiation are indirectly regulated by T, and probably FSH, and that adult and possibly immature LCs contribute to the production of such inhibitory factors. We tested whether insulin-like 3 (INSL3), a LC-produced protein whose expression correlated with the block in spermatogonial differentiation, was indeed responsible for the block by injecting synthetic INSL3 into the testes and knocking down its expression in vivo with siRNA. Neither treatment had any effect on spermatogonial differentiation. The Leydig cell products that contribute to the inhibition of spermatogonial differentiation in irradiated rats remain to be elucidated. PMID:26991593

  3. Involvement of KLF14 and egr-1 in the TGF-beta1 action on Leydig cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, C R; Vallcaneras, S S; Calandra, R S; Gonzalez Calvar, S I

    2013-02-01

    Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) is a pleiotropic cytokine that modulates cell homeostasis. In Leydig cells, TGF-β1 exerts stimulatory and inhibitory effect depending on the type I receptor involved in the signaling pathway. The aim of the present work was to study the signaling mechanisms and the intermediates involved in the action of TGF-β1 on TM3 Leydig cell proliferation in the presence or absence of progesterone. The MTT assay showed that the presence of progesterone in the culture media lead to a proliferative effect that was blocked by Ru 486, an inhibitor of progesterone receptor; and ALK-5 did not participate in this effect. TGF-β1 (1 ng/ml) increased the expression of p15 (an inhibitor of cell cycle) in TM3 Leydig cells, and this effect was blocked by progesterone (1μM). The expression of PCNA presented a higher increase in the cell cultured with TGF-β1 plus progesterone than in cells cultured only with TGF-β1. Progesterone induced the gene expression of endoglin, a cofactor of TGF-β1 receptor that leads to a stimulatory signaling pathway, despite of the absence of progesterone response element in endoglin gene. In addition, the presence of progesterone induced the gene expression of egr-1 and also KLF14, indicating that this steroid channels the signaling pathway into a non-canonical mechanism. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the proliferative action of TGF-β1 involves endoglin. This co-receptor might be induced by KLF14 which is probably activated by progesterone. PMID:23317878

  4. Cadmium-induced damage to primary cultures of rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian-Ming; Arnush, Marc; Chen, Qiong-Yu; Wu, Xiang-Dong; Pang, Bing; Jiang, Xue-Zhi

    2003-01-01

    The mechanism of testicular toxicity of cadmium is poorly understood. Previous studies focusing on cadmium-related changes in testicular histopathology have implicated testicular blood vessel damage as the main cause of cadmium toxicity. To further explore the toxic effects of cadmium on testis, we isolated and cultured rat Leydig cells, exposed to 10, 20, and 40 microM of cadmium chloride (base doses). After 24 h of exposure, cells and supernatants were harvested to examine cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of cadmium. The results show that both cell viability and concentration of testosterone excretion in primary Leydig cells are significantly lower in cadmium-exposed groups compared to the controls. Changes in testosterone excretion with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) stimulation is especially profound. The contents of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in exposed groups are significantly higher than those in the control group, but the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) is lower. The number of cells with DNA single strand breaks and the levels of cellular DNA damage in all three exposure groups are significantly higher than in controls. These results indicate that cadmium is directly toxic to primary Leydig cells, and that the decreased percentage of normal cells and the increased level of DNA damage in cadmium-exposed Leydig cells may be responsible for decreased testosterone secretion. PMID:14555193

  5. Wt1 dictates the fate of fetal and adult Leydig cells during development in the mouse testis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qing; Zheng, Qiao-Song; Li, Xi-Xia; Hu, Zhao-Yuan; Gao, Fei; Cheng, C Yan; Liu, Yi-Xun

    2014-12-15

    Wilms' tumor 1 (Wt1) is a tumor suppressor gene encoding ∼24 zinc finger transcription factors. In the mammalian testis, Wt1 is expressed mostly by Sertoli cells (SCs) involved in testis development, spermatogenesis, and adult Leydig cell (ALC) steroidogenesis. Global knockout (KO) of Wt1 is lethal in mice due to defects in embryogenesis. Herein, we showed that Wt1 is involved in regulating fetal Leydig cell (FLC) degeneration and ALC differentiation during testicular development. Using Wt1(-/flox);Amh-Cre mice that specifically deleted Wt1 in the SC vs. age-matched wild-type (WT) controls, FLC-like-clusters were found in Wt1-deficient testes that remained mitotically active from postnatal day 1 (P1) to P56, and no ALC was detected at these ages. Leydig cells in mutant adult testes displayed morphological features of FLC. Also, FLC-like cells in adult mutant testes had reduced expression in ALC-associated genes Ptgds, Sult1e1, Vcam1, Hsd11b1, Hsd3b6, and Hsd17b3 but high expression of FLC-associated genes Thbs2 and Hsd3b1. Whereas serum LH and testosterone level in mutant mice were not different from controls, intratesticular testosterone level was significantly reduced. Deletion of Wt1 gene also perturbed the expression of steroidogenic enzymes Star, P450c17, Hsd3b6, Hsd3b1, Hsd17b1, and Hsd17b3. FLCs in adult mutant testes failed to convert androstenedione to testosterone due to a lack of Hsd17b3, and this defect was rescued by coculturing with fetal SCs. In summary, FLC-like cells in mutant testes are putative FLCs that remain mitotically active in adult mice, illustrating that Wt1 dictates the fate of FLC and ALC during postnatal testis development.

  6. Effects of T-2 toxin on the regulation of steroidogenesis in mouse Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian Ying; Zhang, Yong Fa; Li, Yuan Xiao; Guan, Gui Ping; Kong, Xiang Feng; Liang, Ai Min; Ma, Kai Wang; Da Li, Guang; Bai, Xue Fei

    2016-10-01

    T-2 toxin is one of the mycotoxins, a group of type A trichothecenes produced by several fungal genera including Fusarium species, which may lead to the decrease of testosterone secretion in primary Leydig cells derived from mouse testis. The previous study demonstrated T-2 toxin decrease the testosterone biosynthesis in the primary Leydig cells derived from the mouse testis directly. In this study, we further examined the direct biological effects of T-2 toxin on the process of steroidogenesis, primarily in Leydig cells of mice. Leydig cells of mature mouse were purified by Percoll gradient centrifugation and the cell purity was determined by 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) staining. To examine the decrease in T-2 toxin-induced testosterone secretion, we measured the transcription level of three key steroidogenic enzymes including 3β-HSD-1, cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (P450scc) enzyme, and steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein in T-2 toxin/human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) co-treated cells. Our previous study showed that T-2 toxin (10(-7), 10(-8), and 10(-9) M) significantly suppressed hCG (10 ng/ml)-induced testosterone secretion. The studies demonstrated that the suppressive effect is correlated with a decrease in the level of transcription of 3β-HSD-1, P450scc, and StAR (p < 0.05).

  7. Dehydroepiandrosterone inhibits cell proliferation and improves viability by regulating S phase and mitochondrial permeability in primary rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Wang, Dian; Li, Longlong; Ding, Xiao; Ma, Haitian

    2016-07-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is widely used as a nutritional supplement and exhibits putative anti‑aging properties. However, the molecular basis of the actions of DHEA, particularly on the biological characteristics of target cells, remain unclear. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of DHEA on cell viability, cell proliferation, cell cycle and mitochondrial function in primary rat Leydig cells. Adult Leydig cells were purified by Percoll gradient centrifugation, and cell proliferation was detected using a Click-iT® EdU Assay kit and cell cycle assessment performed using flow cytometry. Mitochondrial membrane potential was detected using JC-1 staining assay. The results of the current study demonstrate that DHEA decreased cell proliferation in a dose‑dependent manner, whereas it improved cell viability in a time‑dependent and dose‑dependent manner. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that DHEA treatment increased the S phase cell population and decreased the G2/M cell population. Cyclin A and CDK2 mRNA levels were decreased in primary rat Leydig cells following DHEA treatment. DHEA treatment decreased the transmembrane electrical gradient in primary Leydig cells, whereas treatment significantly increased succinate dehydrogenase activity. These results indicated that DHEA inhibits primary rat Leydig cell proliferation by decreasing cyclin mRNA level, whereas it improves cells viability by modulating the permeability of the mitochondrial membrane and succinate dehydrogenase activity. These findings may demonstrate an important molecular mechanism by which DHEA activity is mediated. PMID:27220727

  8. Dehydroepiandrosterone inhibits cell proliferation and improves viability by regulating S phase and mitochondrial permeability in primary rat Leydig cells

    PubMed Central

    LIU, LIN; WANG, DIAN; LI, LONGLONG; DING, XIAO; MA, HAITIAN

    2016-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is widely used as a nutritional supplement and exhibits putative anti-aging properties. However, the molecular basis of the actions of DHEA, particularly on the biological characteristics of target cells, remain unclear. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of DHEA on cell viability, cell proliferation, cell cycle and mitochondrial function in primary rat Leydig cells. Adult Leydig cells were purified by Percoll gradient centrifugation, and cell proliferation was detected using a Click-iT® EdU Assay kit and cell cycle assessment performed using flow cytometry. Mitochondrial membrane potential was detected using JC-1 staining assay. The results of the current study demonstrate that DHEA decreased cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, whereas it improved cell viability in a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that DHEA treatment increased the S phase cell population and decreased the G2/M cell population. Cyclin A and CDK2 mRNA levels were decreased in primary rat Leydig cells following DHEA treatment. DHEA treatment decreased the transmembrane electrical gradient in primary Leydig cells, whereas treatment significantly increased succinate dehydrogenase activity. These results indicated that DHEA inhibits primary rat Leydig cell proliferation by decreasing cyclin mRNA level, whereas it improves cells viability by modulating the permeability of the mitochondrial membrane and succinate dehydrogenase activity. These findings may demonstrate an important molecular mechanism by which DHEA activity is mediated. PMID:27220727

  9. Modulation of mouse Leydig cell steroidogenesis through a specific arginine-vasopressin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Tahri-Joutei, A.; Pointis, G.

    1988-01-01

    Characterization of specific vasopressin binding sites was investigated in purified mouse Leydig cells using tritiated arginine-vasopressin. Binding of radioligand was saturable, time- and temperature-dependent and reversible. (/sup 3/H)-AVP was found to bind to a single class of sites with high affinity and low capacity. Binding displacements with specific selection analogs of AVP indicated the presence of V/sub 1/ subtype receptors on Leydig cells. The ability of AVP to displace (/sup 3/H)-AVP binding was greater than LVP and oxytocin. The unrelated peptides, somatostatin and substance P, were less potent, while neurotensin and LHRH did not displace (/sup 3/H)-AVP binding. The time-course effects of AVP-pretreatment on basal and hCG-stimulated testosterone and cAMP accumulations were studied in primary culture of Leydig cells. Basal testosterone accumulation was significantly increased by a 24 h AVP-pretreatment of Leydig cells. This effect was potentiated by the phosphodiesterase inhibitor (MIX) and was concomitantly accompanied by a slight but significant increase in cAMP accumulation. AVP-pretreatment of the cells for 72 h had no effect on basal testosterone accumulation, but exerted a marked inhibitory effect on the hCG-stimulated testosterone accumulation. This reduction of testosterone accumulation occurred even in the presence of MIX and was not accompanied by any significant change of cAMP levels.

  10. Sustained in vivo blockade of α₁-adrenergic receptors prevented some of stress-triggered effects on steroidogenic machinery in Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Stojkov, Natasa J; Janjic, Marija M; Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Mihajlovic, Aleksandar I; Drljaca, Dragana M; Sokanovic, Srdjan J; Bjelic, Maja M; Kostic, Tatjana S; Andric, Silvana A

    2013-07-15

    This study was designed to systematically analyze and evaluate the effects of in vivo blockade of α₁-adrenergic receptors (α₁-ADRs) on the stress-induced disturbance of steroidogenic machinery in Leydig cells. Parameters followed 1) steroidogenic enzymes/proteins, transcription factors, and cAMP/testosterone production; 2) the main hallmarks of stress (epinephrine, glucocorticoids); and 3) transcription profiles of ADRs and oxidases with high affinity to inactivate glucocorticoids. Results showed that sustained blockade of α₁-ADRs prevented stress-induced 1) decrease of the transcripts/proteins for main steroidogenic CYPs (CYP11A1, CYP17A1); 2) decrease of Scarb1 and Hsd3b1 transcripts; 3) decrease of transcript for Nur77, one of the main activator of the steroidogenic expression; and 4) increase of Dax1 and Arr19, the main steroidogenic repressors in Leydig cells. In the same cells, the expression of steroidogenic stimulatory factor Creb1, StAR, and androgen receptor increased. In this signaling scenario, stress-induced stimulation of Adra1a/Adra1b/Adrbk1 and Hsd11b2 (the unidirectional oxidase with high affinity to inactivate glucocorticoids) was not changed. Blockade additionally stimulated stress-increased transcription of the most abundantly expressed ADRs Adra1d/Adrb1/Adrb2 in Leydig cells. In the same cells, stress-decreased testosterone production, the main marker of Leydig cells functionality, was completely prevented, while reduction of cAMP, the main regulator of androgenesis, was partially prevented. Accordingly, the presented data provide a new molecular/transcriptional base for "fight/adaptation" of steroidogenic cells and new molecular insights into the role of α₁-ADRs in stress-impaired Leydig cell steroidogenesis. The results are important in term of wide use of α₁-ADR selective antagonists, alone/in combination, to treat high blood pressure, nightmares associated with posttraumatic stress disorder, and disrupted sexual health.

  11. MODULATION OF RAT LEYDIG CELL STEROIDOGENIC FUNCTION BY DI(2-ETHYLHEXYL)PHTHALATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modulation of rat Leydig cell steroidogenic function by di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate.

    Akingbemi BT, Youker RT, Sottas CM, Ge R, Katz E, Klinefelter GR, Zirkin BR, Hardy MP.

    Center for Biomedical Research, Population Council, New York, New York 10021, USA. benson@popcbr...

  12. True Precocious Puberty Following Treatment of a Leydig Cell Tumor: Two Case Reports and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Verrotti, Alberto; Penta, Laura; Zenzeri, Letizia; Lucchetti, Laura; Giovenali, Paolo; De Feo, Pierpaolo

    2015-01-01

    Leydig cell testicular tumors are a rare cause of precocious pseudopuberty in boys. Surgery is the main therapy and shows good overall prognosis. The physical signs of precocious puberty are expected to disappear shortly after surgical removal of the mass. We report two children, 7.5 and 7.7 year-old boys, who underwent testis-sparing surgery for a Leydig cell testicular tumor causing precocious pseudopuberty. During follow-up, after an immediate clinical and laboratory regression, both boys presented signs of precocious puberty and ultimately developed central precocious puberty. They were successfully treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs. Only six other cases have been described regarding the development of central precocious puberty after successful treatment of a Leydig cell tumor causing precocious pseudopuberty. Gonadotropin-dependent precocious puberty should be considered in children treated for a Leydig cell tumor presenting persistent or recurrent physical signs of puberty activation. In such cases, therapy with GnRH analogs appears to be the most effective medical treatment. PMID:26579503

  13. Melatonin replacement restores the circadian behavior in adult rat Leydig cells after pinealectomy.

    PubMed

    Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Sokanovic, Srdjan J; Janjic, Marija M; Stojkov-Mimic, Natasa J; Bjelic, Maja M; Andric, Silvana A; Kostic, Tatjana S

    2015-09-15

    Melatonin actions on oscillators in reproductive organs are poorly understood. Here we analyzed melatonin effects on rhythmic expression of clock and steroidogenesis-related genes in adult rat Leydig cells (LCs). The effect of melatonin was tested both in vivo using pinealectomized and melatonin-substituted rats and in vitro on isolated LCs. Data revealed 24-h-rhythmic expression of clock genes (Bmal1, Per1,2,3, Rev-erba,b, Rorb), steroidogenic genes (Star, Cyp11a1, Cyp17a1), and genes of steroidogenic regulators (positive-Nur77, negative-Arr19). Pinealectomy increased 24-h-oscillations of serum testosterone and LC's cAMP levels, expression of Insl3, Per1, Star/StAR, Hsd3b1/2, Nur77, decreased Arr19 and canceled Per2 oscillatory expression pattern. At hypothalamic-pituitary level, pinealectomy increased mesor of Gnrh, Lhb and rhythm robustness of Mntr1a expression. All parameters disturbed were restored by melatonin-replacement. In vitro studies did not confirm direct melatonin effects on neither clock nor steroidogenic genes. Accordingly, melatonin influence 24-h-rhythmic LC-function likely through hypothalamic-pituitary axis and consequently cAMP-signaling in LCs.

  14. Growth suppression of Leydig TM3 cells mediated by aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Iseki, Minoru; Ikuta, Togo; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Kawajiri, Kaname . E-mail: kawajiri@cancer-c.pref.saitama.jp

    2005-06-17

    Exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin induces developmental toxicity in reproductive organs. To elucidate the function of AhR, we generated stable transformants of TM3 cells overexpressing wild-type aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) or its mutants which carried mutations in nuclear localization signal or nuclear export signal. In the presence of 3-methylcholanthrene (MC), proliferation of the cells transfected with wild-type AhR was completely suppressed, whereas cells expressing AhR mutants proliferated in a manner equivalent to control TM3 cells, suggesting AhR-dependent growth inhibition. The suppression was associated with up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21{sup Cip1}, which was abolished by pretreatment with actinomycin D. A p38 MAPK specific inhibitor, SB203580, blocked the increase of p21{sup Cip1} mRNA in response to MC. Treatment with indigo, another AhR ligand, failed to increase of p21{sup Cip1} mRNA, although up-regulation of mRNA for CYP1A1 was observed. These data suggest AhR in Leydig cells mediates growth inhibition by inducing p21{sup Cip1}.

  15. Fine structure of the epidermal Leydig cells in the axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum in relation to their function.

    PubMed

    Jarial, M S

    1989-12-01

    The fine structure of the Leydig cells in the epidermis of the strictly aquatic adult axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum resembles that of similar cells in larval salamanders. The major finding of this study is that the mucous secretion of the Leydig cells is released into the intercellular spaces from which it is discharged through pores onto the surface of the epidermis where it forms a mucous layer to protect the skin.

  16. HBCDD-induced sustained reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP and steroidogenesis in peripubertal rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Fa, Svetlana; Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Samardzija, Dragana; Hrubik, Jelena; Glisic, Branka; Kovacevic, Radmila; Andric, Nebojsa

    2015-01-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), a brominated flame retardant added to various consumer products, is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant. We have previously shown that 6-hour exposure to HBCDD disturbs basal and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-induced steroidogenesis in rat Leydig cells. Reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and cAMP production was also observed. Here, we further expanded research on the effect of HBCDD on Leydig cells by using a prolonged exposure scenario. Cells were incubated in the presence of HBCDD during 24h and then treated with HBCDD+hCG for additional 2h. Results showed that HBCDD caused a sustained reduction in ATP level after 24h of exposure, which persisted after additional 2-hour treatment with HBCDD+hCG. cAMP and androgen accumulations measured after 2h of HBCDD+hCG treatment were also inhibited. Real-time PCR analysis showed significant inhibition in the expression of genes for steroidogenic enzymes, luteinizing hormone receptor, regulatory and transport proteins, and several transcription factors under both treatment conditions. Western blot analysis revealed a decreased level of 30kDa steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) after HBCDD+hCG treatment. In addition, HBCDD decreased the conversion of 22-OH cholesterol to pregnenolone and androstenedione to testosterone, indicating loss of the activity of cytochrome P450C11A1 (CYP11A1) and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD17β). Cell survival was not affected, as confirmed by cytotoxicity and trypan blue tests or DNA fragmentation analysis. In summary, our data showed that HBCDD inhibits ATP supply, most likely through a decrease in ΔΨm, and targets multiple sites in the steroidogenic pathway in Leydig cells. PMID:25447410

  17. HBCDD-induced sustained reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP and steroidogenesis in peripubertal rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Fa, Svetlana; Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Samardzija, Dragana; Hrubik, Jelena; Glisic, Branka; Kovacevic, Radmila; Andric, Nebojsa

    2015-01-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), a brominated flame retardant added to various consumer products, is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant. We have previously shown that 6-hour exposure to HBCDD disturbs basal and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-induced steroidogenesis in rat Leydig cells. Reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and cAMP production was also observed. Here, we further expanded research on the effect of HBCDD on Leydig cells by using a prolonged exposure scenario. Cells were incubated in the presence of HBCDD during 24h and then treated with HBCDD+hCG for additional 2h. Results showed that HBCDD caused a sustained reduction in ATP level after 24h of exposure, which persisted after additional 2-hour treatment with HBCDD+hCG. cAMP and androgen accumulations measured after 2h of HBCDD+hCG treatment were also inhibited. Real-time PCR analysis showed significant inhibition in the expression of genes for steroidogenic enzymes, luteinizing hormone receptor, regulatory and transport proteins, and several transcription factors under both treatment conditions. Western blot analysis revealed a decreased level of 30kDa steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) after HBCDD+hCG treatment. In addition, HBCDD decreased the conversion of 22-OH cholesterol to pregnenolone and androstenedione to testosterone, indicating loss of the activity of cytochrome P450C11A1 (CYP11A1) and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD17β). Cell survival was not affected, as confirmed by cytotoxicity and trypan blue tests or DNA fragmentation analysis. In summary, our data showed that HBCDD inhibits ATP supply, most likely through a decrease in ΔΨm, and targets multiple sites in the steroidogenic pathway in Leydig cells.

  18. Midazolam regulated caspase pathway, endoplasmic reticulum stress, autophagy, and cell cycle to induce apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    So, Edmund Cheung; Chen, Yung-Chia; Wang, Shu-Chun; Wu, Chia-Ching; Huang, Man-Chi; Lai, Meng-Shao; Pan, Bo-Syong; Kang, Fu-Chi; Huang, Bu-Miin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Midazolam is widely used as a sedative and anesthetic induction agent by modulating the different GABA receptors in the central nervous system. Studies have also shown that midazolam has an anticancer effect on various tumors. In a previous study, we found that midazolam could induce MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cell apoptosis by activating caspase cascade. However, the detailed mechanism related to the upstream and downstream pathways of the caspase cascade, such as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, autophagy, and p53 pathways plus cell cycle regulation in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells, remains elusive. Methods Flow cytometry assay and Western blot analyses were exploited. Results Midazolam significantly decreased cell viability but increased sub-G1 phase cell numbers in MA-10 cells (P<0.05). Annexin V/propidium iodide double staining further confirmed that midazolam induced apoptosis. In addition, expressions of Fas and Fas ligand could be detected in MA-10 cells with midazolam treatments, and Bax translocation and cytochrome c release were also involved in midazolam-induced MA-10 cell apoptosis. Moreover, the staining and expression of LC3-II proteins could be observed with midazolam treatment, implying midazolam could induce autophagy to control MA-10 cell apoptosis. Furthermore, the expressions of p-EIF2α, ATF4, ATF3, and CHOP could be induced by midazolam, indicating that midazolam could stimulate apoptosis through ER stress in MA-10 cells. Additionally, the expressions of cyclin A, cyclin B, and CDK1 could be inhibited by midazolam, and the phosphorylation of p53, P27, and P21 could be adjusted by midazolam, suggesting that midazolam could manage cell cycle through the regulation of p53 pathway to induce apoptosis in MA-10 cells. Conclusion Midazolam could induce cell apoptosis through the activation of ER stress and the regulation of cell cycle through p53 pathway with the involvement of autophagy in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. PMID:27175086

  19. Fine needle aspiration cytology of Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors of ovary masquerading as dysgerminoma.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sandeep Kumar; Dey, Pranab

    2013-07-01

    Herein, we described a case of a 29-year-old female with a large ovarian mass. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of the mass showed discrete round to oval cells in a fatty vacuolated background. FNAC diagnosis of dysgerminoma was suggested. The histology of the tumors showed features of poorly differentiated Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors. We discussed the diagnostic pitfalls of this case on FNAC.

  20. In vivo blockade of α1-adrenergic receptors mitigates stress-disturbed cAMP and cGMP signaling in Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Stojkov, Natasa J; Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Bjelic, Maja M; Sokanovic, Srdjan J; Mihajlovic, Aleksandar I; Drljaca, Dragana M; Janjic, Marija M; Kostic, Tatjana S; Andric, Silvana A

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of stress-associated reproductive dysfunction is complex and largely unknown. This study was designed to systematically analyze molecular effects of systemic in vivo blockade of α1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ADRs) on stress-induced disturbance of cAMP/cGMP signaling in testosterone-producing Leydig cells using the following parameters (i) level of circulating stress hormones, LH and testosterone; (ii) level of main molecular markers of Leydig cell functionality (testosterone, Insl3, cAMP); (iii) expression of cAMP signaling (cAMP 'producers'/'effectors'/'removers') and (iv) expression of NO-cGMP signaling (NO-cGMP 'producers'/'effectors'/'removers'). The results showed that oral administration of α1-ADR blocker before stress increased cGMP and diminished stress-reduced cAMP production in Leydig cells. In the same cells, stress-induced effects on cAMP/cGMP signaling pathways elements were changed. Sustained in vivo α1-ADR blockade completely abolished stress-increased transcription of most abundantly expressed phosphodiesterase that remove cAMP (Pde4b) and potentiated stress-increased expression of PRKA, the main stimulator of Leydig cell steroidogenesis. In the same Leydig cells, stress-decreased NOS3 expression was abolished, while stress-increased GUCY1 (cGMP 'producer') and PRKG1 (cGMP 'effector') were potentiated. It is possible that all molecules mentioned could contribute, at least in part, in recovery of Leydig cell testosterone production. Presented data provide new role of α1-ADRs in stress-triggered disturbance of cAMP/cGMP signaling, and new molecular insights into the relationship between stress and mammalian reproduction. Regardless of whether the effects of α1-blocker + stress are direct or indirect, the results are important in terms of human reproductive health and the wide use of α1-ADR antagonists, alone or in combination, to treat post-traumatic stress disorders, hypertension, benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms and

  1. Leydig-cell function in children after direct testicular irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Brauner, R.; Czernichow, P.; Cramer, P.; Schaison, G.; Rappaport, R.

    1983-07-07

    To assess the effect of testicular irradiation on testicular endocrine function, we studied 12 boys with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who had been treated with direct testicular irradiation 10 months to 8 1/2 years earlier. Insufficient Leydig-cell function, manifested by a low response of plasma testosterone to chorionic gonadotropin or an increased basal level of plasma luteinizing hormone (or both), was observed in 10 patients, 7 of whom were pubertal. Two of these patients had a compensated testicular endocrine insufficiency with only high plasma concentrations of luteinizing hormone. Testosterone secretion was severely impaired in three pubertal boys studied more than four years after testicular irradiation. A diminished testicular volume indicating tubular atrophy was found in all pubertal patients, including three who had not received cyclophosphamide or cytarabine. These data indicate that testosterone insufficiency is a frequent complication of testicular irradiation, although some patients continue to have Leydig-cell activity for several years after therapy.

  2. Protection of Quercetin against Triptolide-induced apoptosis by suppressing oxidative stress in rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie; Yu, Qinwei; Zhao, Fang; Ji, Jinzi; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Chen, Xin; Gao, Peng; Ren, Yuran; Shao, Shuai; Zhang, Luyong; Yan, Ming

    2015-10-01

    Triptolide (TP) is a diterpene triepoxide with variety biological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, anti-cancerogenic, immunomodulatory and pro-apoptotic activities. However, its clinical application was limited by potential toxicity. Quercetin (Que) is a member of flavonoids with anti-oxidant effects. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the protective effect of Que in TP-induced oxidative stress and decrease of testosterone generation in reproductive damage. Leydig cells were treated with TP (20, 40 and 60 nM), which caused obvious oxidative stress increasing intracellular ROS, decreasing activities and expressions of GPx and SOD. Apoptosis was resulted from depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and release of cytochrome C (Cyt-C) showing increase of BAX/Bcl-2 ratio, caspase-3 and caspase-9. Treatment of Que (5 μM) prior to triptolide could restore all the TP-induced alteration in a certain dose range indicating that the oxidative stress might be one reason of TP-induced reproductive toxic effect. These results suggest that the compatibility with Que might reduce the TP-induced reproductive toxicity, which provide a probability to extend the usage of TP. PMID:26277538

  3. PURIFICATION OF RAT LEYDIG CELLS: INCREASED YIELDS AFTER UNIT-GRAVITY SEDIMENTATION OF COLLAGENASE-DISPERSED INTERSTITIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Procedures for purification of Leydig cells have facilitated studies of their regulatory biology. A multistep procedure, that includes a filtration with nylon mesh (100 micron pore size) to separate interstitial cells from the seminiferous tubules, combining centr...

  4. A METABOLITE OF METHOXYCHLOR,2,2-BIS(P-HYDOXYPHENYL)-1,1,1- TRICHLOROETHANE REDUCES TESTOSTERONE BIOSYNTHESIS IN RAT LEYDIG CELLS THROUGH SUPPRESSION OF STEADY-STATE MESSENGER RIBONUCLEIC ACID LEVELS OF THE CHOLESTEROL SIDE-CHAIN CLEAVAGE ENZYME

    EPA Science Inventory

    Postnatal development of Leydig cells involves transformation through three stages: progenitor, immature, and adult Leydig cells. The process of differentiation is accompanied by a progressive increase in the capacity of Leydig cells to produce testosterone (T). T promotes the ma...

  5. [Characteristics of Leydig cells in the newborn posterity of female rats with chronic injury of the hepatobiliary system of various genesis].

    PubMed

    Bryukhin, G V; Sizonenko, M L

    2015-01-01

    Morphological and functional features of interstitial endocrine cells (Leydig cells) in the posterity of female rats with experimental liver injury of various genesis in the neonatal period were analized. Found that in experimental rats are a reduction in the number of Leydig cells, the ratio between active and inactive endocrinocytes and as a consequence, reduction of its cell activity index.

  6. Histological and stereological studies on Leydig cells in the testes of Gallus domesticus from pre-hatching to sexual maturity.

    PubMed

    González-Morán, María Genoveva; Soria-Castro, Elizabeth

    2010-07-01

    The present study was aimed at evaluating the sequence of the histological and quantitative changes that occur in diverse components of the interstitial tissue, as well as the variations in the number and volume of Leydig cells of the testes of Gallus domesticus from 8-day-old embryo to 28-week-old chickens. Results indicate an increase in total volume of all components of the interstitial tissue: Leydig cells, blood vessels, and interstitium of chicken testes with advancing development. The proportion of each component differs markedly according to the age of the animal. Data indicate that Leydig cells are present in the chicken testes from pre-hatching to sexual maturity, and show an increase in the total volume, number per testis, and individual cell volume along the age of the animal. Values of P<0.05 were considered statistically significant. The results indicate that the total volume of Leydig cells is the dominant component of the interstitial tissue in the testes of 6-week-old chickens, but in testes of chicken embryos correspond to the lowest percentage of interstitial tissue. Results also reveal that hyperplasia is more important than cell hypertrophy in the increase of the total volume of Leydig cells during advancing development.

  7. Activation of GPER-1 Estradiol Receptor Downregulates Production of Testosterone in Isolated Rat Leydig Cells and Adult Human Testis

    PubMed Central

    Vaucher, Laurent; Funaro, Michael G.; Mehta, Akanksha; Mielnik, Anna; Bolyakov, Alexander; Prossnitz, Eric R.; Schlegel, Peter N.; Paduch, Darius A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Estradiol (E2) modulates testicular functions including steroidogenesis, but the mechanisms of E2 signaling in human testis are poorly understood. GPER-1 (GPR30), a G protein-coupled membrane receptor, mediates rapid genomic and non-genomic response to estrogens. The aim of this study was to evaluate GPER-1 expression in the testis, and its role in estradiol dependent regulation of steroidogenesis in isolated rat Leydig cells and human testis. Materials and Methods Isolated Leydig cells (LC) from adult rats and human testicular tissue were used in this study. Expression and localization studies of GPER-1 were performed with qRT-PCR, immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry and Western Blot. Luteinizing Hormone (LH) -stimulated, isolated LC were incubated with estradiol, G-1 (GPER-1-selective agonist), and estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780. Testosterone production was measured with radioimmunoassay. LC viability after incubation with G-1 was measured using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt (MTS) assay. Results GPER-1 mRNA is abundantly expressed in rat LC and human testis. Co-localization experiments showed high expression levels of GPER-1 protein in LC. E2-dependent activation of GPER-1 lowers testosterone production in isolated rats LCs and in human testis, with statistically and clinically significant drops in testosterone production by 20–30% as compared to estradiol-naïve LC. The exposure to G-1 does not affect viability of isolated LCs. Conclusions Our results indicate that activation of GPER-1 lowers testosterone levels in the rat and human testis. The expression of GPER-1 in human testis, which lack ERα, makes it an exciting target for developing new agents affecting testosterone production in men. PMID:24736568

  8. Long duration exposure to cadmium leads to increased cell survival, decreased DNA repair capacity, and genomic instability in mouse testicular Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kamaleshwar P; Kumari, Ragini; Pevey, Christina; Jackson, Desiree; DuMond, James W

    2009-06-28

    Epidemiological and experimental studies have shown that cadmium is carcinogenic to human and experimental animals, however, the mechanism of cadmium-induced carcinogenesis is not clear. The aberrant expression of cell cycle and DNA repair genes resulting in increased cell proliferation and genomic instability are the characteristic features of cancer cells. The purpose of this study was to determine if exposure to cadmium can perturb cell proliferation/survival and causes genomic instability in TM3 cells, a mouse testicular Leydig cell line. The results of this study revealed that short-duration exposure to lower doses of cadmium significantly increase the growth of TM3 cells, whereas, higher doses are toxic and cause cell death. The long duration exposure to higher doses of cadmium, however, results in increased cell survival and acquisition of apoptotic resistance. Gene expression analysis by real-time PCR revealed increased expression of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2, whereas decreased expression of pro-apoptotic gene Bax. Decreased expression of genes for maintenance of DNA methylation, DNMT1, and DNA repair, OGG1 and MYH, was also observed in cells exposed to cadmium for 24h. The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay revealed genomic instability in cells with chronic exposure to cadmium. The findings of this study indicate that mouse testicular Leydig cells adapt to chronic cadmium exposure by increasing cell survival through increased expression of Bcl-2, and decreased expression of Bax. The increased proliferation of cells with genomic instability may result in malignant transformation, and therefore, could be a viable mechanism for cadmium-induced cancers. PMID:19232459

  9. The Impact of 4-Nonylphenol on the Viability and Hormone Production of Mouse Leydig Cells.

    PubMed

    Jambor, T; Lukáčová, J; Tvrdá, E; Kňažická, Z; Forgács, Z; Lukáč, N

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous substances altering the function of the endocrine system and exhibiting adverse health effects on the organism are defined as endocrine disruptors. Nonylphenol is one of the most abundant alkylphenol ethoxylate derivatives, being detected in food products. Diverse studies have classified nonylphenol as hazardous to the health, especially to male reproduction. This in vitro study aimed to examine the effects of 4-nonylphenol on androstenedione and testosterone production as well as on the viability of Leydig cells of NMRI mice. The cells were cultured for 44 h with addition of 0.04; 0.2; 1.0; 2.5 and 5.0 μg/ml of 4-nonylphenol and compared to the control. Quantification of testosterone and androstenedione directly from aliquots of the medium was performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cell viability was measured by the metabolic activity assay for mitochondrial functional activity. Androstenedione production significantly (P < 0.001) increased with 1.0; 2.5 and 5.0 μg/ml 4-nonylphenol. Although cAMP-stimulated testosterone production was not significantly affected by 4-nonylphenol, a tendency to attenuate the level of testosterone in the Leydig cells treated with 2.5 and 5.0 μg/ml 4-nonylphenol was observed. The viability of mouse Leydig cells was slightly increased at the lowest doses of 4-nonylphenol (0.04 and 0.2 μg/ml). We also observed an increase at higher concentrations of the substance (1.0; 2.5 and 5.0 μg/ml), but this increase was not significant. Further investigations are required to establish the biological significance and possible reproductive implications. PMID:27085008

  10. Prenatal exposure to dexamethasone alters Leydig cell steroidogenic capacity in immature and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Page, K C; Sottas, C M; Hardy, M P

    2001-01-01

    This study examines the effects of prenatal exposure to dexamethasone (DEX) on postnatal testosterone production in male rats. Pregnant female rats were treated on gestation days 14-19 with DEX (100 microg/kg body weight per day; n = 9) or vehicle (n = 9). Results show that 35-day-old male offspring from DEX-treated pregnant females (n = 42) had decreased levels of serum testosterone (45.6% lower, P < .05) compared with control offspring (n = 43), although serum luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were not significantly altered. These findings suggest that a direct programming of developing gonadal cells occurs in response to high levels of maternal glucocorticoid. Indeed, testosterone production was significantly reduced in Leydig cells isolated from immature offspring of DEX-treated pregnant females compared with controls (48.3%, P < .001), and LH stimulation of these cells did not compensate for the lowered steroidogenic capacity. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis was also affected, because significant reductions in both serum adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH; 26.2%, P < .001) and corticosterone (CORT; 32.3%, P < .001) were measured in DEX-exposed immature male offspring. In contrast, adult male offspring from DEX-treated dams had significantly higher levels of serum ACTH (39.2%, P <. 001) and CORT (37.8%, P < .001). These same animals had higher serum testosterone (31.6%, P < or = .05) and a significant reduction in serum LH (30.8%, P < .001). Moreover, Leydig cells isolated from these adult offspring exhibited an increased capacity for testosterone biosynthesis under basal (38.6%, P < .001) and LH-stimulated conditions (33.5%, P < .001). In summary, sustained changes in steroidogenic capacity were observed in male rats exposed to high levels of glucocorticoid during prenatal development. More specifically, DEX exposure in utero perturbed Leydig cell testosterone production in both pubertal and adult rats.

  11. Involvement of nitric oxide synthase in the mechanism of histamine-induced inhibition of Leydig cell steroidogenesis via histamine receptor subtypes in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Mondillo, Carolina; Pagotto, Romina María; Piotrkowski, Bárbara; Reche, Cecilia Gabriela; Patrignani, Zoraida Judith; Cymeryng, Cora Beatriz; Pignataro, Omar Pedro

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to shed light on the so far unexplored intracellular mechanisms underlying negative modulation of Leydig cell steroidogenesis by histamine (HA). Using the MA-10 cell line and highly purified rat Leydig cells as experimental models, we examined the effect of the amine on biochemical steps known to be modulated by HA or involved in LH/hCG action. In agreement with previous findings, HA at 10 microM showed a potent inhibitory effect on hCG-stimulated steroid synthesis, regardless of the gonadotropin concentration used. Moreover, HA decreased not only LH/hCG-induced cAMP production but also steroid synthesis stimulated by the permeable cAMP analog dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP). Considering the post-cAMP sites of HA action, it is shown herein that HA markedly inhibited db-cAMP-stimulated steroidogenic acute regulatory (STAR) protein expression, as well as steps catalyzed by P450-dependent enzymes, mainly the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone by cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11A). The antisteroidogenic action of HA was blocked by addition of the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122, and HA significantly augmented inositol triphosphate (IP3) production, suggesting a major role for the PLC/IP3 pathway in HA-induced inhibition of Leydig cell function. Finally, HA increased nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, and the NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) markedly attenuated the effect of the amine on steroid synthesis. On the basis of our findings, HA antagonizes the gonadotropin action in Leydig cells at steps before and after cAMP formation. NOS activation is the main intracellular mechanism by which HA exerts its antisteroidogenic effects. PMID:18768916

  12. Investigation of a mechanism for Leydig cell tumorigenesis by linuron in rats.

    PubMed

    Cook, J C; Mullin, L S; Frame, S R; Biegel, L B

    1993-04-01

    In a previously conducted 2-year study, a concentration-dependent increase in Leydig cell adenomas was observed in Crl:CD BR(CD) rats fed diets containing the herbicide linuron. Linuron has been shown to be negative in a battery of six tests for genotoxicity; therefore, a nongenotoxic mechanism of tumorgenesis was investigated. Linuron is structurally related to the nonsteroidal antiandrogen, flutamide. Flutamide has also been shown to produce Leydig cell tumors within 1 year, presumably due to sustained hypersecretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) which occurs following disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPT) axis. To investigate whether linuron possesses antiandrogenic activity, sexually immature and mature CD rats were administered either 200 mg/kg linuron or 10 mg/kg flutamide (positive control) for 2 weeks. Accessory sex organs were weighed and serum hormone levels were measured to assess androgen status and alterations in the HPT axis. Serum from a multigeneration reproduction study with linuron was also analyzed for serum hormone levels. In addition, competitive receptor binding studies were conducted to evaluate the ability of linuron to bind to the androgen receptor. Linuron decreased accessory sex organ weights in sexually immature and mature linuron-treated rats. Increased serum estradiol and LH levels were observed in sexually mature linuron-treated rats. Serum estradiol and LH levels were also elevated in P1 and F1 male rats from the multigeneration reproduction study. These accessory sex organ and hormonal changes are consistent with those seen with the antiandrogen flutamide, the only exception being serum testosterone, which was elevated following exposure to flutamide but not to linuron. The inability of linuron to increase testosterone levels may reflect the lower potency of linuron as an antiandrogen compared with that of flutamide, which is a potent antiandrogen. Additionally, linuron competed with [3H]testosterone for binding to

  13. Increasing insulin resistance is associated with a decrease in Leydig cell testosterone secretion in men.

    PubMed

    Pitteloud, Nelly; Hardin, Megan; Dwyer, Andrew A; Valassi, Elena; Yialamas, Maria; Elahi, Dariush; Hayes, Frances J

    2005-05-01

    Insulin resistance is associated with low testosterone (T) levels in men, the mechanism of which is unclear. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in men with a spectrum of insulin sensitivity. Twenty-one men (aged 25-65 yr) had a glucose tolerance test and assessment of insulin sensitivity using a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Insulin sensitivity, expressed as the M value (milligrams per kilograms(-1) per minute(-1)), was calculated from the glucose disposal rate during the final 30 min of the clamp. Eighteen subjects had blood sampling every 10 min for 12 h to assess LH pulsatility. Hypogonadism was then induced with a GnRH antagonist, followed by sequential stimulation testing with GnRH (750 ng/kg, iv) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG; 1000 IU, im) to assess pituitary and testicular responsiveness, respectively. Nine subjects had normal glucose tolerance, nine had impaired glucose tolerance, and three had diabetes mellitus. There was a positive relationship between M and T levels (r = 0.46; P < 0.05). No relationship was seen between M and parameters of LH secretion, including mean LH levels, LH pulse amplitude, LH pulse frequency, and LH response to exogenous GnRH administration. In contrast, a strong correlation was observed between M and the T response to hCG (r = 0.73; P < 0.005). Baseline T levels correlated with the increase in T after hCG administration (r = 0.47; P < 0.05). During the clamp, T levels increased from a baseline level of 367 +/- 30 to 419 +/- 38 ng/dl during the last 30 min (P < 0.05). From these data we conclude that insulin resistance is associated with a decrease in Leydig cell T secretion in men. Additional studies are required to determine the mechanism of this effect.

  14. In vivo exposure of young adult male rats to methoxychlor reduces serum testosterone levels and ex vivo Leydig cell testosterone formation and cholesterol side-chain cleavage activity.

    PubMed

    Murono, Eisuke P; Derk, Raymond C; Akgul, Yucel

    2006-02-01

    Methoxychlor (MC) was developed as a replacement for the banned pesticide DDT. After in vivo administration, it is metabolized in the liver to 2,2-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (HPTE), which is proposed to be the active agent. Both MC and HPTE have been shown to exhibit weak estrogenic and antiandrogenic activities, and they are thought to exert their effects through estrogen and androgen receptors, respectively. Although in vitro studies using cultured rat Leydig cells have reported that HPTE inhibits both basal and hCG-stimulated testosterone formation, the response of circulating testosterone levels to in vivo MC has been more variable. Therefore, the current studies evaluated whether the daily in vivo administration of MC (0, 5, 40 and 200 mg/kg body weight) for a short duration (days 54-60 of age) by gavage altered serum testosterone levels and ex vivo Leydig cell testosterone formation in young adult male rats. These results demonstrate that both fluid-retained and fluid-expressed seminal vesicle weights declined to 44 and 60% of control, respectively, in the 200 mg/kg MC-exposed animals. Similarly, serum testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone levels declined to 41 and 45% of control, respectively, in the 200 mg/kg MC-exposed animals; however, serum LH and FSH levels were unaffected. Ex vivo Leydig cell basal testosterone formation over 4h declined to 49% of control in animals exposed to 200 mg/kg MC, and ex vivo Leydig cell P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage activity declined to 79 and 50% of control in animals exposed to 40 and 200 mg/kg of MC, respectively, supporting previous in vitro studies which demonstrated the sensitivity of this step to MC.

  15. The co-occurrence of an ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor with a thyroid carcinoma is highly suggestive of a DICER1 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Durieux, Emeline; Descotes, Françoise; Mauduit, Claire; Decaussin, Myriam; Guyetant, Serge; Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan

    2016-05-01

    The DICER1 gene encodes an endoribonuclease involved in the production of mature microRNAs which regulates gene expression through several mechanisms. Carriers of germline DICER1 mutations are predisposed to a rare cancer syndrome, the DICER1 syndrome. Pleuropulmonary blastoma is the most frequent lesion seen in this syndrome. Thyroid abnormalities are also a common finding, essentially concerning multinodular goiter. However, differentiated thyroid carcinoma is infrequently seen in such pedigrees. In addition to germline DICER1 mutations, specific somatic mutations have been identified in the DICER1 RNase IIIb catalytic domain in several tumor types, including ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors. We report two cases of differentiated thyroid carcinoma associated with ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor and with a heterozygous DICER1 gene mutation, occurring in two unrelated young girls without pleuropulmonary blastoma. Both thyroid carcinomas showed an E1813 mutation in exon 25 while the ovarian tumors harboured a somatic mutation in E1705 in exon 24 and a D1709 mutation in exon 25. Our observations confirm that the occurrence of an ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor with a thyroid carcinoma is highly suggestive of a DICER1 syndrome. We contend that the possibility of a relationship between sporadic thyroid carcinoma in young patients and somatic DICER1 gene mutation needs further investigation. PMID:26983701

  16. The total number of Leydig and Sertoli cells in the testes of men across various age groups - a stereological study.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Peter M; Seierøe, Karina; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the total number of Sertoli and Leydig cells in testes from male subjects across the human lifespan, using an optimized stereological method for cell-counting. In comparison with many other organs, estimation of the total cell numbers in the testes is particularly sensitive to methodological problems. Therefore, using the optical fractionator technique and a sampling design specifically optimized for human testes, we estimated the total number of Sertoli and Leydig cells in the testes from 26 post mortem male subjects ranging in age from 16 to 80 years. The mean unilateral total number of Sertoli cells was 407 × 10(6) [range: 86 × 10(6) to 665 × 10(6) , coefficient of variation (CV) = 0.33], and the mean unilateral total number of Leydig cells was 99 × 10(6) (range: 47 × 10(6) to 245 × 10(6) , CV = 0.48). There was a significant decline in the number of Sertoli cells with age; no such decline was found for Leydig cells. Quantitative stereological analysis of post mortem tissue may help understand the influence of age or disease on the number of human testicular cells.

  17. Proliferative effect of histamine on MA-10 Leydig tumor cells mediated through HRH2 activation, transient elevation in cAMP production, and increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation levels.

    PubMed

    Pagotto, Romina María; Monzón, Casandra; Moreno, Marcos Besio; Pignataro, Omar Pedro; Mondillo, Carolina

    2012-06-01

    Mast cells (MC) occur normally in the testis with a species-specific distribution, yet their precise role remains unclear. Testicular MC express histidine decarboxylase (HDC), the unique enzyme responsible for histamine (HA) generation. Evidence to date supports a role for HA as a local regulator of steroidogenesis via functional H₁ and H₂ receptor subtypes (HRH1 and HRH2, respectively) present in Leydig cells. Given that HA is a well-known modulator of physiological and pathological proliferation in many different cell types, we aimed in the present study to evaluate whether HA might contribute to the regulation of Leydig cell number as well as to the control of androgen production. Herein, we demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, that MA-10 Leydig tumor cells, but not normal immature Leydig cells (ILC), exhibit a proliferative response upon stimulation with HA that involves HRH2 activation, transient elevation of cAMP levels, and increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. Our results also reveal that MA-10 cells show significantly heightened HDC expression compared to normal ILC or whole-testicular lysate and that inhibition of HDC activity decreases MA-10 cell proliferation, suggesting a possible correlation between autocrine overproduction of HA and abnormally increased proliferation in Leydig cells. The facts that germ cells are also both source and target of HA and that multiple testicular cells are susceptible to HA action underline the importance of the present study, which we hope will serve as a first step for further research into regulation of non-MC-related HDC expression within the testis and its significance for testicular function.

  18. Effects of acute and chronic immobilization stress on rat Leydig cell steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Marić, D; Kostić, T; Kovacević, R

    1996-06-01

    In rats, acute immobilization (IMO) stress (2 h) induced a fall in the serum androgen concentrations (T+DHT) without detectable changes in serum luteinizing hormone (LH) values. In vitro studies, using a suspension of Leydig cells from adult rat testis, demonstrated that acute stress inhibited conversion of progesterone (P) or 17hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP) to T while conversion of androstendione (delta 4 A) was not affected. Acute IMO reduced activity of 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3 beta-HSD) and decreased basal and hCG-stimulated progesterone and androgen production. Chronic IMO stress (2 h daily for 10 days) induced a decrease in serum androgen level with decline in serum LH values. In vitro, hCG-stimulated progesterone and androgen production by suspension of Leydig cells, as well as conversion of P and 17OHP to T were not significantly altered. Our data demonstrates that acute IMO stress impaired testicular steroidogenesis primarily at the testicular level (decreasing the activity of certain enzymes), while chronic IMO stress exerts the effect mainly on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis; reduced serum LH levels elicit a decrease in serum androgen levels.

  19. cAMP increases mitochondrial cholesterol transport through the induction of arachidonic acid release inside this organelle in Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Castilla, Rocío; Duarte, Alejandra; Maloberti, Paula; Paz, Cristina; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated the direct effect of arachidonic acid on cholesterol transport in intact cells or isolated mitochondria from steroidogenic cells and the effect of cyclic-AMP on the specific release of this fatty acid inside the mitochondria. We show for the first time that cyclic-AMP can regulate the release of arachidonic acid in a specialized compartment of MA-10 Leydig cells, e.g. the mitochondria, and that the fatty acid induces cholesterol transport through a mechanism different from the classical pathway. Arachidonic acid and arachidonoyl-CoA can stimulate cholesterol transport in isolated mitochondria from nonstimulated cells. The effect of arachidonoyl-CoA is inhibited by the reduction in the expression or in the activity of a mitochondrial thioesterase that uses arachidonoyl-CoA as a substrate to release arachidonic acid. cAMP-induced arachidonic acid accumulation into the mitochondria is also reduced when the mitochondrial thioesterase activity or expression is blocked. This new feature in the regulation of cholesterol transport by arachidonic acid and the release of arachidonic acid in specialized compartment of the cells could offer novel means for understanding the regulation of steroid synthesis but also would be important in other situations such as neuropathological disorders or oncology disorders, where cholesterol transport plays an important role.

  20. Drug Ligand-Induced Activation of Translocator Protein (TSPO) Stimulates Steroid Production by Aged Brown Norway Rat Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chung, J.-Y.; Chen, H.; Midzak, A.; Burnett, A. L.; Papadopoulos, V.

    2013-01-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO; 18 kDA) is a high-affinity cholesterol-binding protein that is integrally involved in cholesterol transfer from intracellular stores into mitochondria, the rate-determining step in steroid formation. Previous studies have shown that TSPO drug ligands are able to activate steroid production by MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells and by mitochondria isolated from steroidogenic cells. We hypothesized herein that the direct, pharmacological activation of TSPO might induce aged Leydig cells, which are characterized by reduced T production, to produce significantly higher levels of T both in vitro and in vivo. To test this, we first examined the in vitro effects of the TSPO selective and structurally distinct drug ligands N,N-dihexyl-2-(4-fluorophenyl)indole-3-acetamide (FGIN-1-27) and benzodiazepine 4′-chlorodiazepam (Ro5-4864) on steroidogenesis by Leydig cells isolated from aged (21-24 months old) and young adult (3-6 months old) Brown Norway rats. The ligands stimulated Leydig cell T production significantly, and equivalently, in cells of both ages, an effect that was significantly inhibited by the specific TSPO inhibitor 5-androsten-3,17,19-triol (19-Atriol). Additionally, we examined the in vivo effects of administering FGIN-1-27 to young and aged rats. In both cases, serum T levels increased significantly, consistent with the in vitro results. Indeed, serum T levels in aged rats administered FGIN-1-27 were equivalent to T levels in the serum of control young rats. Taken together, these results indicate that although there are reduced amounts of TSPO in aged Leydig cells, its direct activation is able to increase T production. We suggest that this approach might serve as a therapeutic means to increase steroid levels in vivo in cases of primary hypogonadism. PMID:23525219

  1. Estrogenic compounds inhibit gap junctional intercellular communication in mouse Leydig TM3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iwase, Yumiko . E-mail: Iwase.Yumiko@mg.m-pharma.co.jp; Fukata, Hideki . E-mail: fukata@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Mori, Chisato . E-mail: cmori@faculty.chiba-u.jp

    2006-05-01

    Some estrogenic compounds are reported to cause testicular disorders in humans and/or experimental animals by direct action on Leydig cells. In carcinogenesis and normal development, gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) plays an essential role in maintaining homeostasis. In this study, we examine the effects of diethylstilbestrol (DES, a synthetic estrogen), 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}, a natural estrogen), and genistein (GEN, a phytoestrogen) on GJIC between mouse Leydig TM3 cells using Lucifer yellow microinjection. The three compounds tested produced GJIC inhibition in the TM3 cells after 24 h. Gradually, 10 {mu}M DES began to inhibit GJIC for 24 h and this effect was observed until 72 h. On the other hand, both 20 {mu}M E{sub 2} and 25 {mu}M GEN rapidly inhibited GJIC in 6 h and 2 h, respectively. The effects continued until 24 h, but weakened by 72 h. Furthermore, a combined effect at {mu}M level between DES and E{sub 2} on GJIC inhibition was observed, but not between GEN and E{sub 2}. DES and E{sub 2} showed GJIC inhibition at low dose levels (nearly physiological estrogen levels) after 72 h, but GEN did not. DES-induced GJIC inhibition at 10 pM and 10 {mu}M was completely counteracted by ICI 182,780 (ICl), an estrogen receptor antagonist. On the other hand, the inhibitory effects on GJIC with E{sub 2} (10 pM and 20 {mu}M) and GEN (25 {mu}M) were partially blocked by ICI or calphostin C, a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, and were completely blocked by the combination of ICI and calphostin C. These results demonstrate that DES inhibits GJIC between Leydig cells via the estrogen receptor (ER), and that E{sub 2} and GEN inhibit GJIC via ER and PKC. These estrogenic compounds may have different individual nongenotoxic mechanism including PKC pathway on testicular carcinogenesis or development.

  2. Toxic mechanisms of 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol on progesterone production in R2C rat leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianxia; Bai, Shun; Bai, Weibin; Zou, Feiyan; Zhang, Lei; Su, Zhijian; Zhang, Qihao; Ou, Shiyi; Huang, Yadong

    2013-10-16

    3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) is a well-known food processing contaminant that has been shown to impede the male reproductive function. However, its mechanism of action remains to be elucidated. In this study, the effects of 3-MCPD on progesterone production were investigated using R2C Leydig cells. 3-MCPD caused concentration-dependent inhibition of cell viability at the IC25, IC50, and IC75 levels of 1.027, 1.802, and 3.160 mM, respectively. Single cell gel/comet assay and atomic force microscopy assay showed that 3-MCPD significantly induced early apoptosis. In addition, 3-MCPD significantly reduced progesterone production by reducing the expression of cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in R2C cells. The change in steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression was highly consistent with progesterone production. Furthermore, the mitochondrial membrane potential and cAMP significantly decreased. PMID:24040863

  3. Ultrastructural Studies of Germ Cell Development and the Functions of Leydig Cells and Sertoli Cells associated with Spermatogenesis in Kareius bicoloratus (Teleostei, Pleuronectiformes, Pleuronectidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hee-Woong; Kim, Sung Hwan; Chung, Jae Seung

    2016-01-01

    The ultrastructures of germ cells and the functions of Leydig cells and Sertoli cells during spermatogenesis inmale Kareius bicoloratus (Pleuronectidae) were investigated by electron microscope observation. Each of the well-developed Leydig cells during active maturation division and before spermiation contained an ovoid vesicular nucleus, a number of smooth endoplasmic reticula, well-developed tubular or vesicular mitochondrial cristae, and several lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. It is assumed that Leydig cells are typical steroidogenic cells showing cytological characteristics associated with male steroidogenesis. No cyclic structural changes in the Leydig cells were observed through the year. However, although no clear evidence of steroidogenesis or of any transfer of nutrients from the Sertoli cells to spermatogenic cells was observed, cyclic structural changes in the Sertoli cells were observed over the year. During the period of undischarged germ cell degeneration after spermiation, the Sertoli cells evidenced a lysosomal system associated with phagocytic function in the seminiferous lobules. In this study, the Sertoli cells function in phagocytosis and the resorption of products originating from degenerating spermatids and spermatozoa after spermiation. The spermatozoon lacks an acrosome, as have been shown in all teleost fish spermatozoa. The flagellum or sperm tail of this species evidences the typical 9+2 array of microtubules. PMID:27294207

  4. Prolonged in vivo administration of testosterone-enanthate, the widely used and abused anabolic androgenic steroid, disturbs prolactin and cAMP signaling in Leydig cells of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Bjelic, Maja M; Stojkov, Natasa J; Radovic, Sava M; Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Janjic, Marija M; Kostic, Tatjana S; Andric, Silvana A

    2015-05-01

    This study was designed to systematically analyze and define the effects of 1-day, 2-weeks, 10-weeks intramuscular administration of testosterone-enanthate, widely used and abused anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS), on main regulators of steroidogenesis and steroidogenic genes expression in testosterone-producing Leydig cells of adult rats. The results showed that prolonged (10-weeks) intramuscular administration of testosterone-enanthate, in clinically relevant dose, significantly increased prolactin, but decreased Prlr2 and Gnrhr in pituitary of adult rat. The levels of testosterone, Insl3, cAMP and mitochondrial membrane potential of Leydig cells were significantly reduced. This was followed by decreased expression of some steroidogenic enzymes and regulatory proteins such as Lhcgr, Prlr1/2, Tspo, Star, Cyp11a1, Cyp17a1, Dax1. Oppositely, Hsd3b1/2, Hsd3b5, Hsd17b4, Ar, Arr19 increased. In the same cells, transcriptional milieu of cAMP signaling elements was disturbed with remarkable up-regulation of PRKA (the main regulator of steroidogenesis). Increased prolactin together with stimulated transcription of Jak2/Jak3 could account for increased Hsd3b1/2 and Hsd3b5 in Leydig cells following 10-weeks in vivo treatment with testosterone-enanthate. In vitro studies revealed that testosterone is capable to increase level of Prlr1, Prlr2, Hsd3b1/2, Hsd3b5 in Leydig cells. Accordingly, testosterone-induced changes in prolactin receptor signaling together with up-regulation of PRKA, Hsd3b1/2, Hsd3b5, Ar in Leydig cells, could be the possible mechanism that contribute to the establishment of a new adaptive response to maintain homeostasis and prevent loss of steroidogenic function. Presented data provide new molecular insights into the relationship between disturbed testosterone homeostasis and mammalian reproduction and are important in terms of wide use and abuse of AASs and human reproductive health.

  5. Ovarian Leydig cell tumor in a peri-menopausal woman with severe hyperandrogenism and virilization.

    PubMed

    Nardo, L G; Ray, D W; Laing, I; Williams, C; McVey, R J; Seif, M W

    2005-10-01

    The authors report a case of Leydig cell tumor in a 46-year-old woman who first presented with severe clinical hyperandrogenism and associated complex medical history. Investigations revealed markedly raised serum concentrations of testosterone (28.3 nmol/l) and free androgen index (54.4), whereas sex hormone binding globulin, random cortisol, androstenedione, 17-hydroxyprogesterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate concentrations were all within the normal range. Transabdominal ultrasound and computed tomography scan of the pelvis and abdomen showed a slightly bulky right ovary, but no other abnormalities. An ovarian source of androgens was suspected and surgery was arranged. Following a three-year history of defaulting appointments due to agoraphobia, she underwent total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and intraoperative selective ovarian venous sampling. Histopathological examination revealed a 2 cm Leydig cell tumor within the right ovary. Successful intraoperative ovarian venous sampling demonstrated significantly elevated testosterone levels (>260 nmol/l) from the right ovarian vein. Hyperandrogenaemia normalized post-operatively. The patient showed significant regression of clinical signs and symptoms, including the anxiety disorder. Clinical presentation, biochemistry and imaging modalities should allow to detect androgen-secreting ovarian tumors, while selective venous sampling should be reserved for patients whom uncertainty remains. The present case confirms that androgen-secreting ovarian tumors represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. They have to be considered in the differential diagnosis of severe hyperandrogenism even in peri-menopausal women. Although selective venous sampling is of diagnostic value, however, its impact on future management should be considered on individual basis.

  6. Impaired 17,20-Lyase Activity in Male Mice Lacking Cytochrome b5 in Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sondhi, Varun; Owen, Bryn M.; Liu, Jiayan; Chomic, Robert; Kliewer, Steven A.; Hughes, Beverly A.; Arlt, Wiebke; Mangelsdorf, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Androgen and estrogen biosynthesis in mammals requires the 17,20-lyase activity of cytochrome P450 17A1 (steroid 17-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase). Maximal 17,20-lyase activity in vitro requires the presence of cytochrome b5 (b5), and rare cases of b5 deficiency in human beings causes isolated 17,20-lyase deficiency. To study the consequences of conditional b5 removal from testicular Leydig cells in an animal model, we generated Cyb5flox/flox:Sf1-Cre (LeyKO) mice. The LeyKO male mice had normal body weights, testis and sex organ weights, and fertility compared with littermates. Basal serum and urine steroid profiles of LeyKO males were not significantly different than littermates. In contrast, marked 17-hydroxyprogesterone accumulation (100-fold basal) and reduced testosterone synthesis (27% of littermates) were observed after human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation in LeyKO animals. Testis homogenates from LeyKO mice showed reduced 17,20-lyase activity and a 3-fold increased 17-hydroxylase to 17,20-lyase activity ratio, which were restored to normal upon addition of recombinant b5. We conclude that Leydig cell b5 is required for maximal androgen synthesis and to prevent 17-hydroxyprogesterone accumulation in the mouse testis; however, the b5-independent 17,20-lyase activity of mouse steroid 17-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase is sufficient for normal male genital development and fertility. LeyKO male mice are a good model for the biochemistry but not the physiology of isolated 17,20-lyase deficiency in human beings. PMID:26974035

  7. Regulation of steroid hormone biosynthesis in R2C and MA-10 Leydig tumor cells: role of the cholesterol transfer proteins StAR and PBR.

    PubMed

    Rao, Rekha M; Jo, Youngah; Babb-Tarbox, Michelle; Syapin, Peter J; Stocco, Douglas M

    2002-11-01

    The MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cell line produces large amounts of steroids only in response to hormonal stimulation while the R2C rat Leydig tumor cell line is constitutively steroidogenic in nature. In an effort to uncover the potential reasons for constitutive steroidogenesis in R2C cells, we have recently shown that compared to MA-10 cells, R2C cells express much higher levels of the Scavenger Receptor Class B type 1 which results in a higher capacity for cholesteryl ester uptake through the selective uptake pathway. We also found an enhanced expression of Hormone Sensitive Lipase and the Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory protein in these cells and reasoned that they may further facilitate the conversion of cholesteryl esters to free cholesterol and its mobilization to the inner mitochondrial membrane, thus rendering them constitutively steroidogenic. Given the proposed role of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) in conferring a constitutively steroidogenic phenotype to the R2C cells, the current study was conducted to investigate the relationship between its expression in MA-10 and R2C cells and correlate it with the constitutive nature of R2C cell steroidogenesis. Our studies show that PBR expression as measured by PK 11195 ligand binding and Western analysis is much higher in MA-10 cells than R2C cells. We also determined that the affinity of ligand binding to the PBR is comparable in the two cell lines, suggesting that PBR is unlikely to be solely responsible for the constitutive nature of R2C cell steroidogenesis.

  8. Orally applied doxazosin disturbed testosterone homeostasis and changed the transcriptional profile of steroidogenic machinery, cAMP/cGMP signalling and adrenergic receptors in Leydig cells of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Stojkov, N J; Janjic, M M; Kostic, T S; Andric, S A

    2013-03-01

    Doxazosin (Doxa) is an α1-selective adrenergic receptor (ADR) antagonist widely used, alone or in combination, to treat high blood pressure, benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms, and recently has been suggested as a potential drug for prostate cancer prevention/treatment. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of in vivo Doxa po-application, in clinically relevant dose, on: (i) steroidogenic machinery homeostasis; (ii) cAMP/cGMP signalling; (iii) transcription profile of ADR in Leydig cells of adult rats. The results showed that po-application of Doxa for once (1×Doxa), or for two (2×Doxa) or 10 (10×Doxa) consecutive days significantly disturbed steroidogenic machinery homeostasis in Leydig cells. Doxa po-application significantly decreased circulating luteinizing hormone and androgens levels. The level of androgens in testicular interstitial fluid and that extracted from testes obtained from 1×Doxa/2×Doxa rats decreased, although it remained unchanged in 10×Doxa rats. Similarly, the ex vivo basal androgen production followed in testes isolated from 1×Doxa/2×Doxa rats decreased, while remained unchanged in 10×Doxa rats. Differently, ex vivo testosterone production and steroidogenic capacity of Leydig cells isolated from 1×Doxa/2×Doxa rats was stimulated, while 10×Doxa had opposite effect. In the same cells, cAMP content/release showed similar stimulatory effect, but back to control level in Leydig cells of 10×Doxa. 1×Doxa/2×Doxa decreased transcripts for cAMP specific phosphodiesterases Pde7b/Pde8b, whereas 10×Doxa increased Pde4d. All types of treatment reduced the expression of genes encoding protein kinase A (PRKA) regulatory subunit (Prkar2b), whereas only 10×Doxa stimulated catalytic subunit (Prkaca). Doxa application more affected cGMP signalling: stimulated transcription of constitutive nitric oxide synthases (Nos1, Nos3) in time-dependent manner, whereas reduced inducible Nos2. 10×Doxa increased guanylyl cyclase 1 transcript and

  9. Orally applied doxazosin disturbed testosterone homeostasis and changed the transcriptional profile of steroidogenic machinery, cAMP/cGMP signalling and adrenergic receptors in Leydig cells of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Stojkov, N J; Janjic, M M; Kostic, T S; Andric, S A

    2013-03-01

    Doxazosin (Doxa) is an α1-selective adrenergic receptor (ADR) antagonist widely used, alone or in combination, to treat high blood pressure, benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms, and recently has been suggested as a potential drug for prostate cancer prevention/treatment. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of in vivo Doxa po-application, in clinically relevant dose, on: (i) steroidogenic machinery homeostasis; (ii) cAMP/cGMP signalling; (iii) transcription profile of ADR in Leydig cells of adult rats. The results showed that po-application of Doxa for once (1×Doxa), or for two (2×Doxa) or 10 (10×Doxa) consecutive days significantly disturbed steroidogenic machinery homeostasis in Leydig cells. Doxa po-application significantly decreased circulating luteinizing hormone and androgens levels. The level of androgens in testicular interstitial fluid and that extracted from testes obtained from 1×Doxa/2×Doxa rats decreased, although it remained unchanged in 10×Doxa rats. Similarly, the ex vivo basal androgen production followed in testes isolated from 1×Doxa/2×Doxa rats decreased, while remained unchanged in 10×Doxa rats. Differently, ex vivo testosterone production and steroidogenic capacity of Leydig cells isolated from 1×Doxa/2×Doxa rats was stimulated, while 10×Doxa had opposite effect. In the same cells, cAMP content/release showed similar stimulatory effect, but back to control level in Leydig cells of 10×Doxa. 1×Doxa/2×Doxa decreased transcripts for cAMP specific phosphodiesterases Pde7b/Pde8b, whereas 10×Doxa increased Pde4d. All types of treatment reduced the expression of genes encoding protein kinase A (PRKA) regulatory subunit (Prkar2b), whereas only 10×Doxa stimulated catalytic subunit (Prkaca). Doxa application more affected cGMP signalling: stimulated transcription of constitutive nitric oxide synthases (Nos1, Nos3) in time-dependent manner, whereas reduced inducible Nos2. 10×Doxa increased guanylyl cyclase 1 transcript and

  10. Feeding hydroalcoholic extract powder of Lepidium meyenii (maca) increases serum testosterone concentration and enhances steroidogenic ability of Leydig cells in male rats.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Y; Yoshida, K; Kamiya, S; Kawate, N; Takahashi, M; Inaba, T; Hatoya, S; Morii, H; Takahashi, K; Ito, M; Ogawa, H; Tamada, H

    2016-04-01

    Although Lepidium meyenii (maca), a plant growing in Peru's central Andes, has been traditionally used for enhancing fertility and reproductive performance in domestic animals and human beings, effects of maca on reproductive organs are still unclear. This study examined whether feeding the hydroalcoholic extract powder of maca for 6 weeks affects weight of the reproductive organs, serum concentrations of testosterone and luteinising hormone (LH), number and cytoplasmic area of immunohistochemically stained Leydig cells, and steroidogenesis of cultured Leydig cells in 8-week-old male rats. Feeding the extract powder increased weight of seminal vesicles, serum testosterone level and cytoplasmic area of Leydig cells when compared with controls. Weight of prostate gland, serum LH concentration and number of Leydig cells were not affected by the maca treatment. The testosterone production by Leydig cells significantly increased when cultured with 22R-hydroxycholesterol or pregnenolone and tended to increase when cultured with hCG by feeding the extract powder. The results show that feeding the hydroalcoholic extract powder of maca for 6 weeks increases serum testosterone concentration associated with seminal vesicle stimulation in male rats, and this increase in testosterone level may be related to the enhanced ability of testosterone production by Leydig cells especially in the metabolic process following cholesterol. PMID:26174043

  11. New enzymes involved in the mechanism of action of epidermal growth factor in a clonal strain of Leydig tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Rocío; Gadaleta, Mariana; Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Duarte, Alejandra; Neuman, Isabel; Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2008-07-01

    The studies presented herein were designed to investigate the effect of mouse epidermal growth factor (mEGF) on arachidonic acid (AA) release in a clonal strain of cultured murine Leydig cells (designed MA-10). In MA-10 cells, mEGF promotes AA release and metabolism to lipoxygenated products to induce the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein. However, the mechanism by which mEGF releases AA in these cells is not totally elucidated. We show that mEGF produces an increment in the mitochondrial AA content in a short-term incubation (30 min). This AA is released by the action of a mitochondrial acyl-CoA thioesterase (Acot2), as demonstrated in experiments in which Acot2 was down or overexpressed. This AA in turn regulates the StAR protein expression, indirect evidence of its metabolism to lipoxygenated products. We also show that mEGF induces the expression (mRNA and protein) of Acot2 and an acyl-CoA synthetase that provides the substrate, arachidonyl-CoA, to Acot2. This effect is also observed in another steroidogenic cell line, the adrenocortical Y1 cells. Taken together, our results show that: 1) mEGF can induce the generation of AA in a specific compartment of the cells, i.e. the mitochondria; 2) mEGF can up-regulate acyl-CoA synthetase and Acot2 mRNA and protein levels; and 3) mEGF-stimulated intramitochondrial AA release leads to StAR protein induction.

  12. Gonadotropin-dependent precocious puberty in an 8-year-old boy with leydig cell testicular tumor.

    PubMed

    Santos-Silva, Rita; Bonito-Vítor, Artur; Campos, Miguel; Fontoura, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Leydig cell testicular tumors are very rare in children. They can present as gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty due to excess androgen secretion. We report the case of an 8-year-old boy with isosexual precocity whose hormonal investigation showed luteinizing hormone-independent testosterone hypersecretion. Although no palpable mass was present, scrotal ultrasound revealed a testicular tumor. Testis-sparing tumor resection was performed and the histopathology analysis showed a Leydig cell tumor. After surgery the testosterone levels remained high and further examination showed gonadotropin-dependent precocious puberty, which is believed to be likely caused by the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis due to a long-term exposition to sex steroids. He is currently being treated with a long-acting gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog and the process of sexual precocity has until now been suppressed.

  13. Roles of leptin, adiponectin and resistin in the transcriptional regulation of steroidogenic genes contributing to decreased Leydig cells function in obesity.

    PubMed

    Roumaud, Pauline; Martin, Luc J

    2015-10-01

    The increase in obesity rate is a major public health issue associated with increased pathological conditions such as type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular diseases. Obesity also contributes to decreased testosterone levels in men. Indeed, the adipose tissue is an endocrine organ which produces hormones such as leptin, adiponectin and resistin. Obesity results in pathological accumulations of leptin and resistin, whereas adiponectin plasma levels are markedly reduced, all having a negative impact on testosterone synthesis. This review focuses on current knowledge related to transcriptional regulation of Leydig cells' steroidogenesis by leptin, adiponectin and resistin. We show that there are crosstalks between the regulatory mechanisms of these hormones and androgen production which may result in a dramatic negative influence on testosterone plasma levels. Indeed leptin, adiponectin and resistin can impact expression of different steroidogenic genes such as Star, Cyp11a1 or Sf1. Further investigations will be required to better define the implications of adipose derived hormones on regulation of steroidogenic genes expression within Leydig cells under physiological as well as pathological conditions.

  14. Label-free based quantitative proteomics analysis of primary neonatal porcine Leydig cells exposed to the persistent contaminant 3-methylsulfonyl-DDE.

    PubMed

    Kalayou, Shewit; Granum, Cesilie; Berntsen, Hanne Friis; Groseth, Per Kristian; Verhaegen, Steven; Connolly, Lisa; Brandt, Ingvar; de Souza, Gustavo Antonio; Ropstad, Erik

    2016-03-30

    Evidence that persistent environmental pollutants may target the male reproductive system is increasing. The male reproductive system is regulated by secretion of testosterone by testicular Leydig cells, and perturbation of Leydig cell function may have ultimate consequences. 3-Methylsulfonyl-DDE (3-MeSO2-DDE) is a potent adrenal toxicants formed from the persistent insecticide DDT. Although studies have revealed the endocrine disruptive effect of 3-MeSO2-DDE, the underlying mechanisms at cellular level in steroidogenic Leydig cells remains to be established. The current study addresses the effect of 3-MeSO2-DDE on viability, hormone production and proteome response of primary neonatal porcine Leydig cells. The AlamarBlue™ assay was used to evaluate cell viability. Solid phase radioimmunoassay was used to measure concentration of hormones produced by both unstimulated and Luteinizing hormone (LH)-stimulated Leydig cells following 48h exposure. Protein samples from Leydig cells exposed to a non-cytotoxic concentration of 3-MeSO2-DDE (10 μM) were subjected to nano-LC-MS/MS and analyzed on a Q Exactive mass spectrometer and quantified using label-free quantitative algorithm. Gene Ontology (GO) and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) were carried out for functional annotation and identification of protein interaction networks. 3-MeSO2-DDE regulated Leydig cell steroidogenesis differentially depending on cell culture condition. Whereas its effect on testosterone secretion at basal condition was stimulatory, the effect on LH-stimulated cells was inhibitory. From triplicate experiments, a total of 6804 proteins were identified in which the abundance of 86 proteins in unstimulated Leydig cells and 145 proteins in LH-stimulated Leydig cells was found to be significantly regulated in response to 3-MeSO2-DDE exposure. These proteins not only are the first reported in relation to 3-MeSO2-DDE exposure, but also display small number of proteins shared between culture conditions

  15. Mechanisms of action of hormone-sensitive lipase in mouse Leydig cells: its role in the regulation of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Manna, Pulak R; Cohen-Tannoudji, Joëlle; Counis, Raymond; Garner, Charles W; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Kraemer, Fredric B; Stocco, Douglas M

    2013-03-22

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyzes the hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters in steroidogenic tissues and, thus, facilitates cholesterol availability for steroidogenesis. The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) controls the rate-limiting step in steroid biosynthesis. However, the modes of action of HSL in the regulation of StAR expression remain obscure. We demonstrate in MA-10 mouse Leydig cells that activation of the protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, by a cAMP analog Bt2cAMP, enhanced expression of HSL and its phosphorylation (P) at Ser-660 and Ser-563, but not at Ser-565, concomitant with increased HSL activity. Phosphorylation and activation of HSL coincided with increases in StAR, P-StAR (Ser-194), and progesterone levels. Inhibition of HSL activity by CAY10499 effectively suppressed Bt2cAMP-induced StAR expression and progesterone synthesis. Targeted silencing of endogenous HSL, with siRNAs, resulted in increased cholesteryl ester levels and decreased cholesterol content in MA-10 cells. Depletion of HSL affected lipoprotein-derived cellular cholesterol influx, diminished the supply of cholesterol to the mitochondria, and resulted in the repression of StAR and P-StAR levels. Cells overexpressing HSL increased the efficacy of liver X receptor (LXR) ligands on StAR expression and steroid synthesis, suggesting HSL-mediated steroidogenesis entails enhanced oxysterol production. Conversely, cells deficient in LXRs exhibited decreased HSL responsiveness. Furthermore, an increase in HSL was correlated with the LXR target genes, steroid receptor element-binding protein 1c and ATP binding cassette transporter A1, demonstrating HSL-dependent regulation of steroidogenesis predominantly involves LXR signaling. LXRs interact/cooperate with RXRs and result in the activation of StAR gene transcription. These findings provide novel insight and demonstrate the molecular events by which HSL acts to drive cAMP/PKA-mediated regulation of StAR expression and

  16. Dehydroepiandrosterone ameliorates H2O2-induced Leydig cells oxidation damage and apoptosis through inhibition of ROS production and activation of PI3K/Akt pathways.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiao; Wang, Dian; Li, Longlong; Ma, Haitian

    2016-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is widely used as a nutritional supplement, and administration of DHEA produces a number of beneficial effects in the elderly. Many researchers have suggested that DHEA exerts it function after conversion into more biologically active hormones in peripheral target cells. The actions of DHEA in Leydig cells, a major target cell of DHEA biotransformation in males, are not clear. The present study found that DHEA increased cell viability and decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde contents in H2O2-induced Leydig cells. DHEA significantly increased the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase, and decreased the DNA damage in H2O2-induced Leydig cells. Apoptosis was significant decreased in H2O2-induced Leydig cells after DHEA treatment. DHEA inhibited the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and the upregulation of the caspase-3 protein level induced by H2O2 in Leydig cells. DHEA also reversed the decrease in PI3K and p-Akt protein levels induced by H2O2. These data showed that DHEA could ameliorate H2O2-induced oxidative damage by increasing anti-oxidative enzyme activities, which resulted in reduced ROS content, and decreased apoptosis, mainly by preventing the loss of ΔΨm and inhibiting caspase-3 protein levels via activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. These results increase our understanding of the molecular mechanism of the anti-ageing effect of DHEA.

  17. Combined Leydig cell and Sertoli cell dysfunction in 46,XX males lacking the sex determining region Y gene

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, B.; Vordermark, J.S.; Fechner, P.Y.

    1995-07-03

    We have evaluated 3 individuals with a rare form of 46,XX sex reversal. All of them had ambiguous external genitalia and mixed wolffian and muellerian structures, indicating both Leydig cell and Sertoli cell dysfunction, similar to that of patients with true hermaphroditism. However, gonadal tissue was not ovotesticular but testicular with varying degrees of dysgenesis. SRY sequences were absent in genomic DNA from peripheral leukocytes in all 3 subjects. Y centromere sequences were also absent, indicating that testis development did not occur because of a low level mosaicism of Y-bearing cells. The subjects in this report demonstrate that there is a continuum in the extent of the testis determination in SRY-negative 46,XX sex reversal, ranging from nearly normal to minimal testicular development. 20 refs.

  18. Male pseudohermaphoditism with Leydig cell agenesis and persistent muellerian ducts associated with partial deletion of chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Potocki, L.; Oyer, C.E.; Tantravahi, U.

    1994-09-01

    Two chromosomally male infants with partial monosomy 13q were found to have Leydig cell agenesis (LCA) and persistent muellerian ducts (PMD). Post mortem examination in each case revealed cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, musculoskeletal, and central nervous system abnormalities, characteristic of monosomy 13q. Histologic examination confirmed the presence of muellerian derivatives within the pelvis, and the absence of Leydig cells within the testes. Sertoli cells were present. Karyotypes revealed partial monosomy 13q secondary to an unbalanced translocation, der(13)t(1;13)(q43;q21), in one infant, and to a ring chromosome 13 involving a deletion of 13q31-qter, in the other. The etiology of male pseudohermaphroditism is heterogeneous and included PMD due to absence of antimuellerian hormone (AMH) and LCA. Genitourinary abnormalities such as undescended testicles, hypospadias and micropenis have been described in monosomy 13q; however, testicular pathology in these cases has not been described. The cases presented here are the first reported cases in which male pseudohermaphroditism due to LCA and PMD is associated with monosomy 13q. This suggests the genetic locus involved in Leydig cell development may be located on the long arm of chromosome 13. The gene for AMH has been mapped to 19p13.3-13.2. The presence of muellerian structures and Sertoli cells, in the absence of abnormalities of chromosome 19p. suggests there may be genes on 13q coding for an enzyme in the pathway of AMH synthesis or for the AMH receptor. Based on these two cases, the critical region could possibly involve 13q13-qter.

  19. Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor with heterologous element: a case report and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Longwen; Tunnell, Cairo Dana; Petris, Giovanni De

    2014-01-01

    The patient was a 19-year-old female who presented with a chief complaint of progressive pelvic pain. Preoperative ultrasound of the right ovary revealed an ovarian torsion as the cause of the patient’s progressive pain. Laparoscopy confirmed the torsion and revealed a right ovary measuring 10 cm in greatest diameter. Intraoperative incision into the ovary revealed a simple ovarian cystic mass measuring 3.0 x 1.5 x 0.8 cm. A solid component within the cyst was identified. Histological sections of the cystic mass demonstrated mononuclear and hyperchromatic Sertoli cells with a trabecular growth pattern. Clusters of medium-sized epithelioid cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm consistent with Leydig cells were also identified between the trabeculae of Sertoli cells. In addition, focal areas of intestinal type mucinous epithelium were identified embedded within the trabeculae of Sertoli cells. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that the Sertoli cells were positive for calretinin (bright) while the Leydig cells were positive for calretinin (dim), inhibin, CAM5.2 and AE1&3. CEA showed positivity mainly of the intraluminal contents of the mucinous type intestinal epithelium. The patient had an uneventful post-operative course and was disease-free for 3 years. PMID:24696734

  20. Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor with heterologous element: a case report and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Longwen; Tunnell, Cairo Dana; De Petris, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    The patient was a 19-year-old female who presented with a chief complaint of progressive pelvic pain. Preoperative ultrasound of the right ovary revealed an ovarian torsion as the cause of the patient's progressive pain. Laparoscopy confirmed the torsion and revealed a right ovary measuring 10 cm in greatest diameter. Intraoperative incision into the ovary revealed a simple ovarian cystic mass measuring 3.0 x 1.5 x 0.8 cm. A solid component within the cyst was identified. Histological sections of the cystic mass demonstrated mononuclear and hyperchromatic Sertoli cells with a trabecular growth pattern. Clusters of medium-sized epithelioid cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm consistent with Leydig cells were also identified between the trabeculae of Sertoli cells. In addition, focal areas of intestinal type mucinous epithelium were identified embedded within the trabeculae of Sertoli cells. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that the Sertoli cells were positive for calretinin (bright) while the Leydig cells were positive for calretinin (dim), inhibin, CAM5.2 and AE1&3. CEA showed positivity mainly of the intraluminal contents of the mucinous type intestinal epithelium. The patient had an uneventful post-operative course and was disease-free for 3 years. PMID:24696734

  1. The effects of opioid receptor antagonists suggest that testicular opiates regulate Sertoli and Leydig cell function in the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Gerendai, I; Shaha, C; Gunsalus, G L; Bardin, C W

    1986-05-01

    beta-Endorphin and other peptides derived from proopiomelanocortin are synthesized in testicular Leydig cells. To better understand the possible function of these and other endogenous opioid peptides in the testis, the opioid antagonists naloxone and nalmefene were administered intratesticularly to hemicastrated 5-day-old rats. Both naloxone and nalmefene potentiated testicular hypertrophy induced by unilateral orchidectomy at 11 days of age. Unexpectedly, at least a 100-fold lower dose of nalmefene was required to produce maximal hypertrophy than that previously reported for naloxone. Leydig and Sertoli cell functions were evaluated, respectively, by measurement of basal testosterone production in vitro and rat androgen-binding protein (rABP) in serum. The optimal dose of naloxone for hypertrophy (1 microgram/testis) suppressed testosterone production and had a nonuniform effect on rABP secretion (either had no effect or produced a slight increase). By contrast, the optimal dose of nalmefene for hypertrophy (0.01 microgram/testis) not only suppressed basal testosterone secretion, but also uniformly increased rABP levels in serum. Larger doses of this opioid antagonist, up to 1 microgram/testis, were not as effective on the three parameters measured (hypertrophy, testosterone secretion, and rABP levels). These results suggest that this agent has both antagonistic and agonistic activities in the testis. At the doses that produced optimal effects on hypertrophy, systemic administration of these antagonists produced no effects. The results of these studies suggest that intratesticular opiates exert a suppressive effect on Sertoli cell growth and rABP secretion. In addition, these peptides may modulate testosterone secretion by Leydig cells. PMID:3698906

  2. Blockade of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis with a GnRH antagonist in the neonatal marmoset monkey: changes in Leydig cell ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Prince, F P; Mann, D R; Fraser, H M

    1998-12-01

    Little is known of the cell biology of Leydig cells during the neonatal activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPT) axis. The current study examined the effect of blockade of the HPT axis with a GnRH antagonist (antide) on the neonatal population of Leydig cells in the new world primate, the common marmoset. Three sets of twins, age 7 weeks, were studied: in each pair one twin was used as a control, while the other received treatment with GnRH antagonist from the day of birth to suppress pituitary gonadotrophin secretion. Leydig cells of treated animals were dramatically different from those of controls. The cells were atrophic and exhibited very irregular nuclei. The organelles involved in steroid synthesis were reduced to the extent to being barely evident. The smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) was greatly diminished in quantity and distribution. The usual form of the SER (anastomosing tubules) was not evident, but, instead, the SER was relatively unbranched. Peroxisomes, organelles involved in transfer of cholesterol to the mitochondria, were greatly reduced in number. Mitochondria were relatively sparse and exhibited a non-typical morphology, as tubular elements of the cristae were rarely evident. Thus, the central apparatus in steroid production, the SER, mitochondria and peroxisomes, was essentially shut down in the GnRH-antagonist-treated animals. Storage of cholesterol, the precursor of steroid biosynthesis, was also not in evidence, as lipid droplets were extremely rare. Two prominent features of control in neonatal marmoset Leydig cells, the membranofibrillar inclusion (MFI) and basal laminae, remain prominent in the Leydig cells of treated animals. Evidence of apoptosis was not observed. These results provide strong support that the gonadotrophic hormones are the primary regulator of neonatal Leydig cell development in primates, and also suggest cell regression, rather than apoptosis, being the mechanism of this inhibition.

  3. Atrazine-Mediated Disruption of Steroidogenesis in BLTK1 Murine Leydig Cells.

    PubMed

    Karmaus, Agnes L; Zacharewski, Timothy R

    2015-12-01

    Atrazine (ATR) is a broad-spectrum triazine herbicide that disrupts steroidogenesis resulting in reproductive and developmental toxicity at high doses. Mouse BLTK1 Leydig cells were used as a steroidogenic model to investigate the effects of ATR on testosterone (T) biosynthesis. Induction of steroidogenesis by 3 ng/ml recombinant human chorionic gonadotropin (rhCG) induced intracellular 3',5' cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) approximately 20-fold and T approximately 3-fold at 4 h. Co-treatment with 300 μM ATR super-induced cAMP levels 100-fold yet antagonized rhCG-mediated induction of T approximately 20% at 4 h. ATR inhibited cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (cPDE) with an IC50 of ≥98 μM, suggesting cPDE inhibition contributes to the super-induction of cAMP. However, concentrations of up to 3 mM db-cAMP did not antagonize rhCG induction of T levels, suggesting cAMP super-induction alone does not decrease T biosynthesis. Western analysis of cAMP-activated protein kinase A (PKA) target proteins identified ATR-mediated concentration-dependent alterations in phosphorylation including phospho-CREB. These results suggest the cPDE inhibition by ATR and super-induction of cAMP are independent of effects on T levels, and that altered phosphorylation of key steroidogenic regulatory proteins may underlie ATR-mediated disruption of steroidogenesis. PMID:26377646

  4. Atrazine-Mediated Disruption of Steroidogenesis in BLTK1 Murine Leydig Cells.

    PubMed

    Karmaus, Agnes L; Zacharewski, Timothy R

    2015-12-01

    Atrazine (ATR) is a broad-spectrum triazine herbicide that disrupts steroidogenesis resulting in reproductive and developmental toxicity at high doses. Mouse BLTK1 Leydig cells were used as a steroidogenic model to investigate the effects of ATR on testosterone (T) biosynthesis. Induction of steroidogenesis by 3 ng/ml recombinant human chorionic gonadotropin (rhCG) induced intracellular 3',5' cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) approximately 20-fold and T approximately 3-fold at 4 h. Co-treatment with 300 μM ATR super-induced cAMP levels 100-fold yet antagonized rhCG-mediated induction of T approximately 20% at 4 h. ATR inhibited cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (cPDE) with an IC50 of ≥98 μM, suggesting cPDE inhibition contributes to the super-induction of cAMP. However, concentrations of up to 3 mM db-cAMP did not antagonize rhCG induction of T levels, suggesting cAMP super-induction alone does not decrease T biosynthesis. Western analysis of cAMP-activated protein kinase A (PKA) target proteins identified ATR-mediated concentration-dependent alterations in phosphorylation including phospho-CREB. These results suggest the cPDE inhibition by ATR and super-induction of cAMP are independent of effects on T levels, and that altered phosphorylation of key steroidogenic regulatory proteins may underlie ATR-mediated disruption of steroidogenesis.

  5. [INVESTIGATIONS OF SUBMICROSCOPIC ARCHITECTONICS SERTOLI AND LEYDIG CELLS AFTER HYDROCHLORIDE SEROTONIN DESTRUCTIVE IMPACT AND THE POSSIBILITY OF CORRECTION BY STIMULANTS OF METABOLIC PROCESSES].

    PubMed

    Brechka, N; Nevzorov, V; Bondarenko, V; Malova, N; Selyukova, N

    2015-01-01

    The results of study of ultrastructural changes in the Sertoli cells and Leydig's cells organelles after destructive influence of the serotonin hydrochloride and under influence bioglobin-U have been presented. It was shown that serotonin hydrochloride causes mitochondrial dysfunction and activates intracellular catabolic processes on the intracellular level. Bioglobin-U increases the activity and reparative synthetic reactions, reduced the degree of mitochondrial dysfunction and catabolic processes and activate the Leydig cell metabolism, and significantly reduces the number of foci destruction membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondrial, and membranes of nucleus on the background of serotonin hydrochloride. PMID:26552310

  6. Treatment of High Risk Sertoli–Leydig Cell Tumors of the Ovary Using a Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Analog

    PubMed Central

    Lashkari, Harsha Prasada; Nash, Ruth; Albanese, Assunta; Okoye, Bruce; Millar, Robert; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Sertoli–Leydig cell tumors are rare ovarian neoplasms. We report two unusual cases with bilateral SLCTs suggesting evidence of genetic predisposition and at high risk of recurrence. To reduce this risk, we exploited the use of GnRH analog to lower gondadotropin and potentially directly inhibit the tumors through expressed GnRH receptors. We used it as maintenance antitumor therapy for 2 years after completion of chemotherapy, to cover the period of risk for recurrence. Both patients remain in complete remission at >2 years after completing leuprorelin therapy. Of note, both patients carry DICER1 mutations, frequently found in pleuropulmonary blastoma syndrome. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2013; 60: E16–E18. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23193086

  7. Intracellular redistribution of SCP2 in Leydig cells after hormonal stimulation may contribute to increased pregnenolone production.

    PubMed

    van Noort, M; Rommerts, F F; van Amerongen, A; Wirtz, K W

    1988-07-15

    Sterol carrier protein2 (SCP2) also designated non specific lipid transfer protein (nsL-TP), added to tumour Leydig cell mitochondria as a pure compound or in cytosolic preparations, stimulates pregnenolone production two- to three-fold. This stimulation can be abolished by addition of anti rat SCP2 but not by preimmune IgG-antibodies. SCP2- levels in the cytosol are increased in less than two minutes after addition of lutropin (LH). This increased SCP2 level may contribute to stimulation of steroid production in intact cells. After hormonal stimulation the subcellular distribution of SCP2 changes. A two-fold increase of SCP2- levels in the supernatant fraction and four-fold decrease in extracts of the particulate fraction was observed 30 min after stimulation of tumour Leydig cells with LH and subsequent fractionation. This apparent shift of SCP2 can be explained by an altered association with membranes or a true relocation of the protein from the particulate to the supernatant fractions under the influence of the hormone. PMID:3395346

  8. Functional cooperation between GATA factors and cJUN on the star promoter in MA-10 Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Martin, Luc J; Bergeron, Francis; Viger, Robert S; Tremblay, Jacques J

    2012-01-01

    Steroid hormone biosynthesis requires the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR). STAR is part of a protein complex that transports cholesterol through the mitochondrial membrane where steroidogenesis begins. Several transcription factors participate to direct the proper spatiotemporal and hormonal regulation of the Star gene in Leydig cells. Mechanistically, this is believed to involve the functional interplay between many of these factors. Here we report a novel transcriptional cooperation between GATA factors and cJUN on the mouse Star and human STAR promoters in MA-10 Leydig cells. This cooperation was observed with different GATA members (GATA1, 4, and 6), whereas only cJUN could cooperate with GATA factors. GATA/cJUN transcriptional cooperation on the Star promoter is mediated via closely juxtaposed GATA and AP-1 binding motifs. Mutation of all functional GATA and cJUN elements abolished GATA/cJUN cooperation, which is in agreement with previous data reporting a direct interaction between GATA4 and cJUN in a heterologous system. These data add valuable new insights that further define the molecular mechanisms that govern Star transcription in steroidogenic cells of the testis.

  9. Influence of long-term dietary administration of procymidone, a fungicide with anti-androgenic effects, or the phytoestrogen genistein to rats on the pituitary-gonadal axis and Leydig cell steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Svechnikov, K; Supornsilchai, V; Strand, M-L; Wahlgren, A; Seidlova-Wuttke, D; Wuttke, W; Söder, O

    2005-10-01

    Procymidone is a fungicide with anti-androgenic properties, widely used to protect fruits from fungal infection. Thereby it contaminates fruit products prepared for human consumption. Genistein-containing soy products are increasingly used as food additives with health-promoting properties. Therefore we examined the effects of long-term dietary administration (3 months) of the anti-androgen procymidone (26.4 mg/animal per day) or the phytoestrogen genistein (21.1 mg/animal per day) to rats on the pituitary-gonadal axis in vivo, as well as on Leydig cell steroidogenesis and on spermatogenesis ex vivo. The procymidone-containing diet elevated serum levels of LH and testosterone and, furthermore, Leydig cells isolated from procymidone-treated animals displayed an enhanced capacity for producing testosterone in response to stimulation by hCG or dibutyryl cAMP, as well as elevated expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (P450 scc) and cytochrome P450 17alpha (P450c17). In contrast, the rate of DNA synthesis during stages VIII and IX of spermatogenesis in segments of seminiferous tubules isolated from genistein-treated rats was decreased without accompanying changes in the serum level of either LH or testosterone. Nonetheless, genistein did suppress the ex vivo steroidogenic response of Leydig cells to hCG or dibutyryl cAMP by down-regulating their expression of P450 scc. Considered together, our present findings demonstrate that long-term dietary administration of procymidone or genistein to rats exerts different effects on the pituitary-gonadal axis in vivo and on Leydig cell steroidogenesis ex vivo. Possibly as a result of disruption of hormonal feedback control due to its anti-androgenic action, procymidone activates this endocrine axis, thereby causing hyper-gonadotropic activation of testicular steroidogenesis. In contrast, genistein influences spermatogenesis and significantly inhibits Leydig cell

  10. Arachidonic acid is involved in the regulation of hCG induced steroidogenesis in rat Leydig cells

    SciTech Connect

    Didolkar, A.K.; Sundaram, K.

    1987-07-27

    Phospholipase C (PLC), an enzyme involved in the hydrolysis of membrane phospholipid- phosphatidylinositol-bisphosphate to insositol triphosphate and diacylglycerol, and Phorbol 12, myristate 13, acetate (PMA) could significantly stimulate testosterone (T) secretion from Leydig cells. Arachidonic acid (AA) stimulated T secretion by about 2 fold. The steroidogenic effect of PLC and AA was biphasic. At low concentrations both PLC and AA augmented hCG induced T secretion, while at higher concentrations they inhibited steroid production. AA also had a biphasic effect on hCG induced cyclic AMP secretion. 5,8,11,14 Eicosatetrayenoic acid, a general inhibitor of AA metabolism, and Nordihydroguaiaretic acid, an inhibitor of the lipoxygenase pathway of AA metabolism, inhibited hCG induced T secretion while indomethacin, an inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase pathway, had no effect on hCG induced T secretion. The authors conclude from these data that AA plays a role in the regulation of hCG induced steroidogenic responses in rat Leydig cells and that the metabolite(s) of AA that are involved are not cyclo-oxygenase products. 28 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Impact level of dihydrotestosterone on the hypothalamic-pituitary-leydig cell axis in men.

    PubMed

    Cailleux-Bounacer, Anne; Rohmer, Vincent; Lahlou, Najiba; Lefebvre, Hervé; Roger, Marc; Kuhn, Jean Marc

    2009-02-01

    on Leydig cells steroidogenesis. Administered at therapeutic doses, DHT directly reduces testicular aromatase activity that combined with its antigonadotropic effect leads to the gain in the symptomatic treatment of gynaecomastia.

  12. Increased steroid hormone secretion in mouse Leydig tumor cells after induction of cholesterol translocation by sphingomyelin degradation.

    PubMed

    Pörn, M I; Tenhunen, J; Slotte, J P

    1991-06-01

    The effects of sphingomyelin degradation on [3H]cholesterol transfer from the cell surface to mitochondria were examined in mouse Leydig tumor cells. These cells were used since they utilize cholesterol for steroid hormone synthesis in the mitochondria, and also possess acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyl transferase (ACAT) activity in the endoplasmic reticulum. Exposure of glutaraldehyde-fixed mouse Leydig tumor cells to sphingomyelinase (50 mU/ml, 60 min) resulted in the degradation of about 50% of cell sphingomyelin, suggesting that only half of the sphingomyelin mass in these cells was located in the exoleaflet of the plasma membrane. The partial sphingomyelin degradation resulted in the translocation of cellular unesterified [3H]cholesterol from plasma membranes (cholesterol oxidase-susceptible) to intracellular compartments (oxidase-resistant). The fraction of [3H]cholesterol that was translocated, i.e., between 20 and 50%, varied with different [3H]cholesterol-labeling methods. Cholesterol translocation induced by sphingomyelin degradation subsequently led to the stimulation of ACAT activity, suggesting that a fraction of cell surface cholesterol was transported to the endoplasmic reticulum. The sphingomyelinase-induced [3H]cholesterol flow from the cell surface to the cell interior was also in part directed to the mitochondria, as evidenced by the increased secretion of [3H]steroid hormones. In addition, the cyclic AMP-induced activation of steroidogenesis was further enhanced by the sphingomyelinase-induced cholesterol translocation. Based on the current results, it seems evident that a significant portion of the translocated [3H]cholesterol made its way from plasma membranes into the mitochondria for steroidogenesis.

  13. Steroidogenic differential effects in neonatal porcine Leydig cells exposed to persistent organic pollutants derived from cod liver oil.

    PubMed

    Granum, Cesilie; Anchersen, Sara; Karlsson, Camilla; Berg, Vidar; Olsaker, Ingrid; Verhaegen, Steven; Ropstad, Erik

    2015-11-01

    Seafood products, including fish and fish oils, are major sources of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) which may cause endocrine disruption related to reproductive dysfunction in males. Primary porcine neonatal Leydig cells were exposed to three extracts of POPs obtained from different stages in production of cod liver oil dietary supplement, in the absence and presence of luteinizing hormone (LH). No reduced viability was observed and all POP extracts showed increased testosterone and estradiol levels in unstimulated cells and decreased testosterone and estradiol secretion in LH-stimulated cells. A decrease in central steriodogenic genes including STAR, CYP11A1, HSD3B and CYP17A1 was obtained in both culture conditions with all POP extracts. We implicate both small differences in composition and concentration of compounds as well as "old" POPs to be important for the observed steroidogenic effects. PMID:26055946

  14. Histone H3 lysine 27 and 9 hypermethylation within the Bad promoter region mediates 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine-induced Leydig cell apoptosis: implications of 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine toxicity to male reproduction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji-Young; Lee, Sangmi; Hwang, Soojin; Jo, Sangmee Ahn; Kim, Miji; Kim, Young Ju; Pang, Myung-Geol; Jo, Inho

    2013-01-01

    5-Aza-2'-deoxycitidine (5-Aza), an anticancer agent, results in substantial toxicity to male reproduction, causing a decline in sperm quality associated with reduced testosterone. Here, we report that 5-Aza increased the apoptotic protein Bad epigenetically in the testosterone-producing mouse TM3 Leydig cell line. 5-Aza decreased cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner with concomitant increase in Bad protein. This increase is accompanied by increased cleavages of both poly ADP ribose polymerase and caspase-3. Flow cytometric analysis further supported 5-Aza-derived apoptosis in TM3 cells. Bisulfite sequencing analysis failed to identify putative methylcytosine site(s) in CpG islands of the Bad promoter. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed decreased levels of trimethylation at lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27-3me) and H3K9-3me in the Bad promoter region in response to 5-Aza treatment. Knock-down by siRNA of enhancer of zeste homologue 2 (EZH2), a histone methyltransferase responsible for H3K27-3me, or demethylation of H3K9-3me by BIX-01294 showed significantly increased levels in Bad expression and consequent Leydig cell apoptosis. In conclusion, our results demonstrate for the first time that Bad expression is regulated at least by EZH2-mediated H3K27-3me or G9a-like protein/euchromatic histone methyltransferase 1 (GLP/Eu-HMTase1)-mediated H3K9-3me in mouse TM3 Leydig cells, which may be implicated in 5-Aza-derived toxicity to male reproduction.

  15. Structural bisphenol analogues differentially target steroidogenesis in murine MA-10 Leydig cells as well as the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Roelofs, Maarke J E; van den Berg, Martin; Bovee, Toine F H; Piersma, Aldert H; van Duursen, Majorie B M

    2015-03-01

    Although much information on the endocrine activity of bisphenol A (BPA) is available, a proper human hazard assessment of analogues that are believed to have a less harmful toxicity profile is lacking. Here the possible effects of BPA, bisphenol F (BPF), bisphenol S (BPS), as well as the brominated structural analogue and widely used flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) on human glucocorticoid and androgen receptor (GR and AR) activation were assessed. BPA, BPF, and TBBPA showed clear GR and AR antagonism with IC50 values of 67 μM, 60 μM, and 22 nM for GR, and 39 μM, 20 μM, and 982 nM for AR, respectively, whereas BPS did not affect receptor activity. In addition, murine MA-10 Leydig cells exposed to the bisphenol analogues were assessed for changes in secreted steroid hormone levels. Testicular steroidogenesis was altered by all bisphenol analogues tested. TBBPA effects were more directed towards the male end products and induced testosterone synthesis, while BPF and BPS predominantly increased the levels of progestagens that are formed in the beginning of the steroidogenic pathway. The MA-10 Leydig cell assay shows added value over the widely used H295R steroidogenesis assay because of its fetal-like characteristics and specificity for the physiologically more relevant testicular Δ4 steroidogenic pathway. Therefore, adding an in vitro assay covering fetal testicular steroidogenesis, such as the MA-10 cell line, to the panel of tests used to screen potential endocrine disruptors, is highly recommendable. PMID:25576683

  16. Structural bisphenol analogues differentially target steroidogenesis in murine MA-10 Leydig cells as well as the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Roelofs, Maarke J E; van den Berg, Martin; Bovee, Toine F H; Piersma, Aldert H; van Duursen, Majorie B M

    2015-03-01

    Although much information on the endocrine activity of bisphenol A (BPA) is available, a proper human hazard assessment of analogues that are believed to have a less harmful toxicity profile is lacking. Here the possible effects of BPA, bisphenol F (BPF), bisphenol S (BPS), as well as the brominated structural analogue and widely used flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) on human glucocorticoid and androgen receptor (GR and AR) activation were assessed. BPA, BPF, and TBBPA showed clear GR and AR antagonism with IC50 values of 67 μM, 60 μM, and 22 nM for GR, and 39 μM, 20 μM, and 982 nM for AR, respectively, whereas BPS did not affect receptor activity. In addition, murine MA-10 Leydig cells exposed to the bisphenol analogues were assessed for changes in secreted steroid hormone levels. Testicular steroidogenesis was altered by all bisphenol analogues tested. TBBPA effects were more directed towards the male end products and induced testosterone synthesis, while BPF and BPS predominantly increased the levels of progestagens that are formed in the beginning of the steroidogenic pathway. The MA-10 Leydig cell assay shows added value over the widely used H295R steroidogenesis assay because of its fetal-like characteristics and specificity for the physiologically more relevant testicular Δ4 steroidogenic pathway. Therefore, adding an in vitro assay covering fetal testicular steroidogenesis, such as the MA-10 cell line, to the panel of tests used to screen potential endocrine disruptors, is highly recommendable.

  17. Leydig cell hypoplasia due to inactivation of luteinizing hormone receptor by a novel homozygous nonsense truncation mutation in the seventh transmembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Salameh, W; Choucair, M; Guo, T B; Zahed, L; Wu, S-M; Leung, M Y-K; Rennert, O M; Chan, W-Y

    2005-01-14

    Inactivating mutations in the LH receptor are the predominant cause for male pseudohermaphroditism in subjects with Leydig cell hypoplasia (LCH). The severity of the mutations, correlates with residual receptor activities. Here, we detail the clinical presentation of one subject with complete male pseudohermaphroditism and LCH. We identify within the proband and her similarly afflicted sibling a homozygous T to G transversion at nucleotide 1836 in exon 11 of the LH/CGR gene. This causes conversion of a tyrosine codon into a stop codon at codon 612 in the seventh transmembrane domain, resulting in a truncated receptor that lacks a cytoplasmic tail. In vitro, in contrast to cells expressing a normal LHR, cells transfected with the mutant cDNA exhibit neither surface binding of radiolabeled hCG nor cAMP generation. In vitro expression under the control of the LHR signal peptide of either a wild type or mutant LHR-GFP fusion protein shows no differences in receptor cellular localization. In conclusion, the in vitro studies suggest that residues in the seventh transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail are important for receptor binding and activation without playing a major role in receptor cellular trafficking.

  18. Leydig cell hypoplasia due to inactivation of luteinizing hormone receptor by a novel homozygous nonsense truncation mutation in the seventh transmembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Salameh, W; Choucair, M; Guo, T B; Zahed, L; Wu, S-M; Leung, M Y-K; Rennert, O M; Chan, W-Y

    2005-01-14

    Inactivating mutations in the LH receptor are the predominant cause for male pseudohermaphroditism in subjects with Leydig cell hypoplasia (LCH). The severity of the mutations, correlates with residual receptor activities. Here, we detail the clinical presentation of one subject with complete male pseudohermaphroditism and LCH. We identify within the proband and her similarly afflicted sibling a homozygous T to G transversion at nucleotide 1836 in exon 11 of the LH/CGR gene. This causes conversion of a tyrosine codon into a stop codon at codon 612 in the seventh transmembrane domain, resulting in a truncated receptor that lacks a cytoplasmic tail. In vitro, in contrast to cells expressing a normal LHR, cells transfected with the mutant cDNA exhibit neither surface binding of radiolabeled hCG nor cAMP generation. In vitro expression under the control of the LHR signal peptide of either a wild type or mutant LHR-GFP fusion protein shows no differences in receptor cellular localization. In conclusion, the in vitro studies suggest that residues in the seventh transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail are important for receptor binding and activation without playing a major role in receptor cellular trafficking. PMID:15607529

  19. Arachidonic acid release from rat Leydig cells: the involvement of G protein, phospholipase A2 and regulation of cAMP production.

    PubMed

    Ronco, A M; Moraga, P F; Llanos, M N

    2002-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the release of arachidonic acid (AA) from human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-stimulated Leydig cells occurs in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, the amount of AA released was dependent on the hormone-receptor interaction and the concentration of LH-hCG binding sites on the cell surface. The present study was conducted to evaluate the involvement of phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) and G proteins in AA release from hormonally stimulated rat Leydig cells, and the possible role of this fatty acid in cAMP production. Cells were first prelabelled with [(14)C]AA to incorporate the fatty acid into cell phospholipids, and then treated in different ways to evaluate AA release. hCG (25 mIU) increased the release of AA to 180+/-12% when compared with AA released from control cells, arbitrarily set as 100%. Mepacrine and parabromophenacyl bromide (pBpB), two PLA(2) inhibitors, decreased the hormone-stimulated AA release to 85+/-9 and 70+/-24% respectively. Conversely, melittin, a PLA(2) stimulator, increased the release of AA up to 200% over control. The inhibitory effect of mepacrine on the release of AA was evident in hCG-treated Leydig cells, but not in the melittin-treated cells. To determine if the release of AA was also mediated through a G protein, cells were first permeabilized and subsequently treated with pertussis toxin or GTPgammaS, a non-hydrolyzable analog of GTP. Results demonstrate that GTPgammaS was able to induce a similar level of the release of AA as hCG. In addition, pertussis toxin completely abolished the stimulatory effect of hCG on the release of AA, indicating that a member of the G(i) family was involved in the hCG-dependent release of AA. Cells treated with PLA(2) inhibitors did not modify cAMP production, but exogenously added AA significantly reduced cAMP production from hCG-treated Leydig cells, in a manner dependent on the concentration of AA and hCG. Results presented here suggest an involvement of

  20. The reported active metabolite of methoxychlor, 2,2-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane, inhibits testosterone formation by cultured Leydig cells from neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Murono, Eisuke P; Derk, Raymond C

    2005-01-01

    Methoxychlor (MC) is an insecticide that is presently used on agricultural crops, especially after the ban on the use of 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (DDT) in the United States. Following administration in vivo, MC is converted to 2,2-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (HPTE), which is thought to be the active agent. However, both MC and HPTE have been reported to have weak estrogenic and antiandrogenic activities, and they are thought to exert their potential adverse (endocrine disruptive) effects through the estrogen and androgen receptors, respectively. In a recent study, HPTE was shown to inhibit both basal and hCG-stimulated testosterone production by cultured Leydig cells from immature and adult rats, and these effects were reported to be mediated through the estrogen receptor. Because fetal Leydig cells represent a separate population from adult Leydig cells and many of the reported adverse actions of endocrine disruptors are thought to have their effects during gestational exposure, the present studies examined the effects of HPTE on testosterone formation by cultured fetal Leydig cells from neonatal rats to determine whether these cells are sensitive to HPTE. Our studies demonstrated that HPTE inhibited both basal and hCG-stimulated testosterone formation in a dose-dependent manner. Significant declines in testosterone were observed at about 100nM HPTE, and this effect was detected as early as 1h after exposure. The main effects of HPTE appeared to be localized to the cholesterol side-chain cleavage step which converts cholesterol to pregnenolone. In addition, this effect did not appear to be mediated through the estrogen receptor as a weak estrogen or the androgen receptor as an antiandrogen, which are the currently proposed modes of action of MC and HPTE.

  1. Tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloids mimic direct but not receptor-mediated inhibitory effects of estrogens and phytoestrogens on testicular endocrine function. Possible significance for Leydig cell insufficiency in alcohol addiction

    SciTech Connect

    Stammel, W.; Thomas, H. ); Staib, W.; Kuehn-Velten, W.K. )

    1991-01-01

    Possible effects of various tetrahydroisoquinolines (TIQs) on rat testicular endocrine function were tested in vitro in order to prove whether these compounds may be mediators of the development of Leydig cell insufficiency. TIQ effects on different levels of regulation of testis function were compared in vitro with estrogen effects, since both classes of compounds have structural similarities. Gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone production by testicular Leydig cells was inhibited by tetrahydropapaveroline and isosalsoline, the IC{sub 50} values being comparable to those of estradiol, 2-hydroxyestradiol, and the phytoestrogens, coumestrol and genistein; salsolinol and salsoline were less effective, and salsolidine was ineffective. None of these TIQs interacted significantly with testicular estrogen receptor as analyzed by estradiol displacement. However, tetrahydropapaveroline, isosalsoline and salsolinol competitively inhibited substrate binding to cytochrome P45OXVII, with similar efficiency as the estrogens did; salsoline and salsolidine were again much less effective.

  2. Reduced testosterone production in TM3 Leydig cells treated with Aspalathus linearis (Rooibos) or Camellia sinensis (tea).

    PubMed

    Opuwari, C S; Monsees, T K

    2015-02-01

    Flavonoids are major compounds of Aspalathus linearis and Camellia sinensis. They are classified as endocrine disruptors and some have been shown to inhibit testosterone production. TM3 Leydig cell cultures were treated with 250-5000 μg mL(-1) A. linearis (unfermented or fermented rooibos) or Camellia sinensis (green or black tea) for 24 h in the absence or presence of 6 mIU/200 μl human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Under nonstimulated conditions, all teas tend to decrease testosterone production (3.9-31.8%). However, under hCG-stimulation, a significant reduction in testosterone production was observed at all concentrations by both rooibos and tea (16.3-37.9%). MTT assay and phase contrast microscopy, revealed that at 250-1000 μg ml(-1) , both plants maintained the viability, proliferation and morphology of the cells, while 5000 μg ml(-1) was cytotoxic to the cells (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the results here demonstrate the anti-androgenic property of A. linearis and C. sinensis.

  3. Cinacalcet attenuates hypercalcemia observed in mice bearing either Rice H-500 Leydig cell or C26-DCT colon tumors.

    PubMed

    Colloton, Matthew; Shatzen, Edward; Wiemann, Bernadette; Starnes, Charlie; Scully, Sheila; Henley, Charles; Martin, David

    2013-07-15

    Excessive secretion of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) by tumors stimulates bone resorption and increases renal tubular reabsorption of calcium, resulting in hypercalcemia of malignancy. We investigated the ability of cinacalcet, an allosteric modulator of the calcium-sensing receptor, to attenuate hypercalcemia by assessing its effects on blood ionized calcium, serum PTHrP, and calcium-sensing receptor mRNA in mice bearing either Rice H-500 Leydig cell or C26-DCT colon tumors. Cinacalcet effectively decreased hypercalcemia in a dose- and enantiomer-dependent manner; furthermore, cinacalcet normalized phosphorus levels, but did not affect serum PTHrP. Ribonuclease protection assay results demonstrated presence of PTHrP receptor, but not calcium-sensing receptor mRNA in C26-DCT tumors. The mechanism by which cinacalcet lowered serum calcium was investigated in parathyroidectomized rats (i.e., without PTH) made hypercalcemic by PTHrP. Cinacalcet attenuated PTHrP-mediated elevations in blood ionized calcium, which were accompanied by increased plasma calcitonin. Taken together these results suggest that the cinacalcet-mediated decrease in serum calcium is not the result of a direct effect on tumor cells, but rather is the result of increased calcitonin release. In summary, cinacalcet effectively reduced tumor-mediated hypercalcemia and corrected hypophosphatemia in mice. Further investigation of cinacalcet for treatment of hypercalcemia of malignancy is warranted.

  4. Steroidogenesis in MA-10 Mouse Leydig Cells Is Altered via Fatty Acid Import into the Mitochondria1

    PubMed Central

    Rone, Malena B.; Midzak, Andrew S.; Martinez-Arguelles, Daniel B.; Fan, Jinjiang; Ye, Xiaoying; Blonder, Josip; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondria are home to many cellular processes, including oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid metabolism, and in steroid-synthesizing cells, they are involved in cholesterol import and metabolism, which is the initiating step in steroidogenesis. The formation of macromolecular protein complexes aids in the regulation and efficiency of these mitochondrial functions, though because of their dynamic nature, they are hard to identify. To overcome this problem, we used Blue-Native PAGE with whole-gel mass spectrometry on isolated mitochondria from control and hormone-treated MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells. The presence of multiple mitochondrial protein complexes was shown. Although these were qualitatively similar under control and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-stimulated conditions, quantitative differences in the components of the complexes emerged after hCG treatment. A prominent decrease was observed with proteins involved in fatty acid import into the mitochondria, implying that mitochondrial beta-oxidation is not essential for steroidogenesis. To confirm this observation, we inhibited fatty acid import utilizing the CPT1a inhibitor etomoxir, resulting in increased steroid production. Conversely, stimulation of mitochondrial beta-oxidation with metformin resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in steroidogenesis. These changes were accompanied by changes in mitochondrial respiration and in the lactic acid formed during glycolysis. Taken together, these results suggest that upon hormonal stimulation, mitochondria efficiently import cholesterol for steroid production at the expense of other lipids necessary for energy production, specifically fatty acids required for beta-oxidation. PMID:25210128

  5. Nuclear Morphometric Analysis of Leydig Cells of Male Pubertal Rats Exposed In Utero to Di(n-butyl) Phthalate

    PubMed Central

    Wakui, Shin; Motohashi, Masaya; Satoh, Takemi; Shirai, Masaru; Mutou, Tomoko; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Wempe, Michael F.; Endou, Hitoshi; Inomata, Tomoo; Asari, Masao

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported that prenatal rat exposure to di(n-butyl) phthalate (DBP) induced Leydig cell (LC) hyperplasia after nine weeks (wks) of age, yet the number of LCs was similar to that of the vehicle group until seven weeks. Nuclear pleomorphism of hyperplastic LCs is common and is considered to be continuous progressive degeneration. Thus, computer-assisted image cell nuclear analysis of LCs was performed on 5- and 7-wk-old Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats whose dams had been administered DBP (i.g.) at 100 mg/kg/day or vehicle (corn oil) on gestation day 12 to 21. The results of the 5-wk-old DBP group were similar to those of the vehicle group; LC nuclei of the 7-wk-old DBP group showed normal ploidy and similar amounts of DNA. However, the size, elongation and peripheral chromatin aggregation parameters were significantly higher, and the reticular chromatin distribution and isolated chromatin aggregation parameters were significantly lower compared with the vehicle group. The present study quantitatively demonstrated nuclear morphological alterations in rat LCs at 7 wks old (puberty) due to the prenatal DBP administration before apparent LC hyperplasia developed. PMID:24526819

  6. Structural organization of the porcine and human genes coding for a leydig cell-specific insulin-like peptide (LEY I-L) and chromosomal localization of the human gene (INSL3)

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhardt E.; Adham, I.M.; Brosig, B.; Gastmann, A.; Engel, W. ); Mattei, M.G. )

    1994-03-01

    Leydig insulin-like protein (LEY I-L) is a member of the insulin-like hormone superfamily. The LEY I-L gene (designated INSL3) is expressed exclusively in prenatal and postnatal Leydig cells. The authors report here the cloning and nucleotide sequence of porcine and human LEY I-L genes including the 5[prime] regions. Both genes consist of two exons and one intron. The organization of the LEY I-L gene is similar to that of insulin and relaxin. The transcription start site in the porcine and human LEY I-L gene is localized 13 and 14 bp upstream of the translation start site, respectively. Alignment of the 5[prime] flanking regions of both genes reveals that the first 107 nucleotides upstream of the transcription start site exhibit an overall sequence similarity of 80%. This conserved region contains a consensus TATAA box, a CAAT-like element (GAAT), and a consensus SP1 sequence (GGGCGG) at equivalent positions in both genes and therefore may play a role in regulation of expression of the LEY I-L gene. The porcine and human genome contains a single copy of the LEY I-L gene. By in situ hybridization, the human gene was assigned to bands p13.2-p12 of the short arm of chromosome 19. 25 refs., 6 figs.

  7. A biomathematical model of time-delayed feedback in the human male hypothalamic-pituitary-Leydig cell axis.

    PubMed

    Keenan, D M; Veldhuis, J D

    1998-07-01

    We develop, implement, and test a feedback and feedforward biomathematical construct of the male hypothalamic [gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)]-pituitary [luteinizing hormone (LH)]-gonadal [testosterone (Te)] axis. This stochastic differential equation formulation consists of a nonstationary stochastic point process responsible for generating episodic release of GnRH, which is modulated negatively by short-loop (GnRH) and long-loop (Te) feedback. Pulsatile GnRH release in turn drives bursts of LH secretion via an agonistic dose-response curve that is partially damped by Te negative feedback. Circulating LH stimulates (feedforward) Te synthesis and release by a second dose response. Te acts via negative dose-responsive feedback on GnRH and LH output, thus fulfilling conditions of a closed-loop control system. Four computer simulations document expected feedback performance, as published earlier for the human male GnRH-LH-Te axis. Six other simulations test distinct within-model coupling mechanisms to link a circadian modulatory input to a pulsatile control node so as to explicate the known 24-h variations in Te and, to a lesser extent, LH. We conclude that relevant dynamic function, internodal dose-dependent regulatory connections, and within-system time-delayed coupling together provide a biomathematical basis for a nonlinear feedback-feedforward control model with combined pulsatile and circadian features that closely emulate the measurable output activities of the male hypothalamic-pituitary-Leydig cell axis.

  8. Leydig cell number and sperm production decrease induced by chronic ametryn exposure: a negative impact on animal reproductive health.

    PubMed

    Dantas, T A; Cancian, G; Neodini, D N R; Mano, D R S; Capucho, C; Predes, F S; Pulz, R Barbieri; Pigoso, A A; Dolder, H; Severi-Aguiar, G D C

    2015-06-01

    Ametryn is an herbicide used to control broadleaf and grass weeds and its acute and chronic toxicity is expected to be low. Since toxicological data on ametryn is scarce, the aim of this study was to evaluate rat reproductive toxicity. Thirty-six adult male Wistar rats (90 days) were divided into three groups: Co (control) and T1 and T2 exposed to 15 and 30 mg/kg/day of ametryn, respectively, for 56 days. Testicular analysis demonstrated that ametryn decreased sperm number per testis, daily sperm production, and Leydig cell number in both treated groups, although little perceptible morphological change has been observed in seminiferous tubule structure. Lipid peroxidation was higher in group T2, catalase activity decreased in T1 group, superoxide dismutase activity diminished, and a smaller number of sulphydryl groups of total proteins were verified in both exposed groups, suggesting oxidative stress. These results showed negative ametryn influence on the testes and can compromise animal reproductive performance and survival.

  9. A new variant in signal peptide of the human luteinizing hormone receptor (LHCGR) affects receptor biogenesis causing leydig cell hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Vezzoli, Valeria; Duminuco, Paolo; Vottero, Alessandra; Kleinau, Gunnar; Schülein, Ralf; Minari, Roberta; Bassi, Ivan; Bernasconi, Sergio; Persani, Luca; Bonomi, Marco

    2015-11-01

    The human luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) plays a fundamental role in male and female reproduction. In males, loss-of-function mutations in LHCGR have been associated with distinct degrees of impairment in pre- and postnatal testosterone secretion resulting in a variable phenotypic spectrum, classified as Leydig cell hypoplasia (LCH) type 1 (complete LH resistance and disorder of sex differentiation) and type 2 (partial LH resistance with impaired masculinization and fertility). Here, we report the case of an adolescent who came to the pediatric endocrinologist at the age of 12 years old for micropenis and cryptorchidism. Testis biopsy showed profound LCH and absent germinal line elements (Sertoli-only syndrome). The sequence analysis of the LHCGR gene showed the presence of a compound heterozygosity, being one variation, c.1847C>A p.S616Y, already described in association to Hypergonadotropic Hypogonadism, and the other, c.29 C>T p.L10P, a new identified variant in the putative signal peptide (SP) of LHCGR. Functional and structural studies provide first evidence that LHCGR have a functional and cleavable SP required for receptor biogenesis. Moreover, we demonstrate the pathogenic role of the novel p.L10P allelic variant, which has to be considered a loss-of-function mutation significantly contributing, in compound heterozygosity with p.S616Y, to the LCH type 2 observed in our patient.

  10. Gonadotropin-regulated Testicular RNA Helicase (GRTH/DDX25), a Negative Regulator of Luteinizing/Chorionic Gonadotropin Hormone-induced Steroidogenesis in Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Masato; Villar, Joaquin; Tsai-Morris, Chon-Hwa; Dufau, Maria L.

    2011-01-01

    Gonadotropin-regulated testicular RNA helicase (GRTH/DDX25) is a testis-specific gonadotropin-regulated RNA helicase that is present in Leydig cells (LCs) and germ cells and is essential for spermatid development and completion of spermatogenesis. Normal basal levels of testosterone in serum and LCs were observed in GRTH null (GRTH−/−) mice. However, testosterone production was enhanced in LCs of GRTH−/− mice compared with WT mice by both in vivo and in vitro human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation. LCs of GRTH−/− mice had swollen mitochondria with a significantly increased cholesterol content in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Basal protein levels of SREBP2, HMG-CoA reductase, and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR; a protein that transports cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane) were markedly increased in LCs of GRTH−/− mice compared with WT mice. Gonadotropin stimulation caused an increase in StAR mRNA levels and protein expression in GRTH−/− mice versus WT mice, with no further increase in SREBP2 and down-regulation of HMG-CoA reductase protein. The half-life of StAR mRNA was significantly increased in GRTH−/− mice. Moreover, association of StAR mRNA with GRTH protein was observed in WT mice. Human chorionic gonadotropin increased GRTH gene expression and its associated StAR protein at cytoplasmic sites. Taken together, these findings indicate that, through its negative role in StAR message stability, GRTH regulates cholesterol availability at the mitochondrial level. The finding of an inhibitory action of GRTH associated with gonadotropin-mediated steroidogenesis has provided insights into a novel negative autocrine molecular control mechanism of this helicase in the regulation of steroid production in the male. PMID:21719703

  11. Intratesticular alpha1-adrenergic receptors mediate stress-disturbed transcription of steroidogenic stimulator NUR77 as well as steroidogenic repressors DAX1 and ARR19 in Leydig cells of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Stojkov-Mimic, Natasa J; Bjelic, Maja M; Radovic, Sava M; Mihajlovic, Aleksandar I; Sokanovic, Srdjan J; Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Janjic, Marija M; Kostic, Tatjana S; Andric, Silvana A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to define the role of testicular α1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ADRs) in stress-triggered adaptation of testosterone-producing Leydig cells of adult rats. Results showed that in vivo blockade of testicular α1-ADRs prevented partial recovery of circulating androgen levels registered after 10× repeated immobilization stress (10 × IMO). Moreover, α1-ADR-blockade diminished 10 × IMO-triggered recovery of Leydig cell androgen production, and abolished mitochondrial membrane potential recovery. In the same cells, 10 × IMO-induced increase in Star transcript was abolished, Lhcgr transcript decreased, while transcription of other steroidogenic proteins was not changed. α1-ADR-blockade recovered stress-induced decrease of Nur77, one of the main steroidogenic stimulator, while significantly reduced 10 × IMO-increased in the transcription of the main steroidogenic repressors, Arr19 and Dax1. In vitro experiments revealed an adrenaline-induced α1-ADR-mediated decrease in Nur77 transcription in Leydig cells. Adrenaline-induced increase of repressor Dax1 also involves ADRs in Leydig cells. Accordingly, α1-ADRs participate in some of the stress-triggered effects on the steroidogenic machinery of Leydig cells. PMID:26003139

  12. Sterol Carrier Protein-2, a Nonspecific Lipid-Transfer Protein, in Intracellular Cholesterol Trafficking in Testicular Leydig Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Nancy C; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2016-01-01

    Sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP2), also called nonspecific lipid-transfer protein, is thought to play a major role in intracellular lipid transport and metabolism, and it has been associated with diseases involving abnormalities in lipid trafficking, such as Zellweger syndrome. The Scp2 gene encodes the 58 kDa sterol carrier protein-x (SCPX) and 15 kDa pro-SCP2 proteins, both of which contain a 13 kDa SCP2 domain in their C-termini. We found that 22-NBD-cholesterol, a fluorescent analog of cholesterol and a preferred SCP2 ligands, was not localized in the peroxisomes. This raises questions about previous reports on the localization of the SCPX and SCP2 proteins and their relationship to peroxisomes and mitochondria in intracellular cholesterol transport. Immunofluorescent staining of cryosections of mouse testis and of MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells showed that SCPX and SCP2 are present in both mouse testicular interstitial tissue and in MA-10 cells. Fluorescent fusion proteins of SCPX and SCP2, as well as confocal live-cell imaging, were used to investigate the subcellular targeting of these proteins and the function of the putative mitochondrial targeting sequence. The results showed that SCPX and SCP2 are targeted to the peroxisomes by the C-terminal PTS1 domain, but the putative N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence alone is not potent enough to localize SCPX and SCP2 to the mitochondria. Homology modeling and molecular docking studies indicated that the SCP2 domain binds cholesterol, but lacks specificity of the binding and/or transport. These findings further our understanding of the role of SCPX and SCP2 in intracellular cholesterol transport, and present a new point of view on the role of these proteins in cholesterol trafficking.

  13. Sterol Carrier Protein-2, a Nonspecific Lipid-Transfer Protein, in Intracellular Cholesterol Trafficking in Testicular Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nancy C.; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2016-01-01

    Sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP2), also called nonspecific lipid-transfer protein, is thought to play a major role in intracellular lipid transport and metabolism, and it has been associated with diseases involving abnormalities in lipid trafficking, such as Zellweger syndrome. The Scp2 gene encodes the 58 kDa sterol carrier protein-x (SCPX) and 15 kDa pro-SCP2 proteins, both of which contain a 13 kDa SCP2 domain in their C-termini. We found that 22-NBD-cholesterol, a fluorescent analog of cholesterol and a preferred SCP2 ligands, was not localized in the peroxisomes. This raises questions about previous reports on the localization of the SCPX and SCP2 proteins and their relationship to peroxisomes and mitochondria in intracellular cholesterol transport. Immunofluorescent staining of cryosections of mouse testis and of MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells showed that SCPX and SCP2 are present in both mouse testicular interstitial tissue and in MA-10 cells. Fluorescent fusion proteins of SCPX and SCP2, as well as confocal live-cell imaging, were used to investigate the subcellular targeting of these proteins and the function of the putative mitochondrial targeting sequence. The results showed that SCPX and SCP2 are targeted to the peroxisomes by the C-terminal PTS1 domain, but the putative N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence alone is not potent enough to localize SCPX and SCP2 to the mitochondria. Homology modeling and molecular docking studies indicated that the SCP2 domain binds cholesterol, but lacks specificity of the binding and/or transport. These findings further our understanding of the role of SCPX and SCP2 in intracellular cholesterol transport, and present a new point of view on the role of these proteins in cholesterol trafficking. PMID:26901662

  14. Sterol Carrier Protein-2, a Nonspecific Lipid-Transfer Protein, in Intracellular Cholesterol Trafficking in Testicular Leydig Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Nancy C; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2016-01-01

    Sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP2), also called nonspecific lipid-transfer protein, is thought to play a major role in intracellular lipid transport and metabolism, and it has been associated with diseases involving abnormalities in lipid trafficking, such as Zellweger syndrome. The Scp2 gene encodes the 58 kDa sterol carrier protein-x (SCPX) and 15 kDa pro-SCP2 proteins, both of which contain a 13 kDa SCP2 domain in their C-termini. We found that 22-NBD-cholesterol, a fluorescent analog of cholesterol and a preferred SCP2 ligands, was not localized in the peroxisomes. This raises questions about previous reports on the localization of the SCPX and SCP2 proteins and their relationship to peroxisomes and mitochondria in intracellular cholesterol transport. Immunofluorescent staining of cryosections of mouse testis and of MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells showed that SCPX and SCP2 are present in both mouse testicular interstitial tissue and in MA-10 cells. Fluorescent fusion proteins of SCPX and SCP2, as well as confocal live-cell imaging, were used to investigate the subcellular targeting of these proteins and the function of the putative mitochondrial targeting sequence. The results showed that SCPX and SCP2 are targeted to the peroxisomes by the C-terminal PTS1 domain, but the putative N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence alone is not potent enough to localize SCPX and SCP2 to the mitochondria. Homology modeling and molecular docking studies indicated that the SCP2 domain binds cholesterol, but lacks specificity of the binding and/or transport. These findings further our understanding of the role of SCPX and SCP2 in intracellular cholesterol transport, and present a new point of view on the role of these proteins in cholesterol trafficking. PMID:26901662

  15. Subcellular distribution of ( sup 3 H)-dexamethasone mesylate binding sites in Leydig cells using electron microscope radioautography

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.; Hermo, L.; Antakly, T. )

    1991-01-01

    The present view is that glucocorticoid hormones bind to their cytoplasmic receptors before reaching their nuclear target sites, which include specific DNA sequences. Although it is believed that cytoplasmic sequestration of steroid receptors and other transcription factors (such as NFKB) may regulate the overall activity of these factors, there is little information on the exact subcellular sites of steroid receptors or even of any other transcription factors. Tritiated (3H)-dexamethasone 21-mesylate (DM) is an affinity label that binds covalently to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), thereby allowing morphological localization of the receptor at the light and electron microscope levels as well as for quantitative radioautographic (RAG) analysis. After injection of 3H-DM into the testis, a specific radioautographic signal was observed in Leydig cells, which correlated with a high level of immunocytochemically demonstrable GR in these cells at the light-microscope level. To localize the 3H-DM binding sites at the electron microscope (EM) level, the testes of 5 experimental and 3 control adrenalectomized rats were injected directly with 20 microCi 3H-DM; control rats received simultaneously a 25-fold excess of unlabeled dexamethasone; 15 min later, rats were fixed with glutaraldehyde and the tissue was processed for EM RAG analysis combined with quantitative morphometry. The radioautographs showed that the cytosol, nucleus, smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER), and mitochondria were labeled. Since the cytosol was always adjacent to tubules of the sER, the term sER-rich cytosol was used to represent label over sER networks, which may also represent cytosol labeling due to the limited resolution of the radioautographic technique. Labeling was highest in sER-rich cytosol and mitochondria, at 53% and 31% of the total, respectively.

  16. Mutation Analysis of the LH Receptor Gene in Leydig Cell Adenoma and Hyperplasia and Functional and Biochemical Studies of Activating Mutations of the LH Receptor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Lumbroso, Serge; Verhoef-Post, Miriam; Richter-Unruh, Annette; Looijenga, Leendert H. J.; Funaro, Ada; Beishuizen, Auke; van Marle, André; Drop, Stenvert L. S.; Themmen, Axel P. N.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Germline and somatic activating mutations in the LH receptor (LHR) gene have been reported. Objective: Our objective was to perform mutation analysis of the LHR gene of patients with Leydig cell adenoma or hyperplasia. Functional studies were conducted to compare the D578H-LHR mutant with the wild-type (WT)-LHR and the D578G-LHR mutant, a classic cause of testotoxicosis. The three main signal transduction pathways in which LHR is involved were studied. Patients: We describe eight male patients with gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty due to Leydig cell adenoma or hyperplasia. Results: The D578H-LHR mutation was found in the adenoma or nodule with hyperplasia in all but two patients. D578H-LHR displayed a constitutively increased but noninducible production of cAMP, led to a very high production of inositol phosphates, and induced a slight phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK in the absence of human chorionic gonadotropin. The D578G-LHR showed a response intermediate between WT-LHR and the D578H-LHR. Subcellular localization studies showed that the WT-LHR was almost exclusively located at the cell membrane, whereas the D578H-LHR showed signs of internalization. D578H-LHR was the only receptor to colocalize with early endosomes in the absence of human chorionic gonadotropin. Conclusions: Although several LHR mutations have been reported in testotoxicosis, the D578H-LHR mutation, which has been found only as a somatic mutation, appears up until now to be specifically responsible for Leydig cell adenomas. This is reflected by the different activation of the signal transduction pathways, when compared with the WT-LHR or D578G-LHR, which may explain the tumorigenesis in the D578H mutant. PMID:21490077

  17. Lansoprazole increases testosterone metabolism and clearance in male Sprague-Dawley rats: implications for Leydig cell carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Coulson, Michelle; Gibson, G Gordon; Plant, Nick; Hammond, Tim; Graham, Mark

    2003-10-15

    Leydig cell tumours (LCTs) are frequently observed during rodent carcinogenicity studies, however, the significance of this effect to humans remains a matter of debate. Many chemicals that produce LCTs also induce hepatic cytochromes P450 (CYPs), but it is unknown whether these two phenomena are causally related. Our aim was to investigate the existence of a liver-testis axis wherein microsomal enzyme inducers enhance testosterone metabolic clearance, resulting in a drop in circulating hormone levels and a consequent hypertrophic response from the hypothalamic-pituitary-testis axis. Lansoprazole was selected as the model compound as it induces hepatic CYPs and produces LCTs in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed with lansoprazole (150 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 14 days. Lansoprazole treatment produced effects on the liver consistent with an enhanced metabolic capacity, including significant increases in relative liver weights, total microsomal CYP content, individual CYP protein levels, and enhanced CYP-dependent testosterone metabolism in vitro. Following intravenous administration of [14C]testosterone, lansoprazole-treated rats exhibited a significantly smaller area under the curve and significantly higher plasma clearance. Significant reductions in plasma and testicular testosterone levels were observed, confirming the ability of this compound to perturb androgen homeostasis. No significant changes in plasma LH, FSH, or prolactin levels were detected under our experimental conditions. Lansoprazole treatment exerted no marked effects on testicular testosterone metabolism. In summary, lansoprazole treatment induced hepatic CYP-dependent testosterone metabolism in vitro and enhanced plasma clearance of radiolabelled testosterone in vivo. These effects may contribute to depletion of circulating testosterone levels and hence play a role in the mode of LCT induction in lansoprazole-treated rats.

  18. Evaluation of cytotoxicity and oxidative DNA damaging effects of di(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP) and mono(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (MEHP) on MA-10 Leydig cells and protection by selenium

    SciTech Connect

    Erkekoglu, Pinar; Rachidi, Walid; Giray, Belma; Favier, Alain; Hincal, Filiz

    2010-10-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP) is the most abundantly used phthalate derivative, inevitable environmental exposure of which is suspected to contribute to the increasing incidence of testicular dysgenesis syndrome in humans. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in germ cells are suggested to contribute to phthalate-induced disruption of spermatogenesis in rodents, and Leydig cells are one of the main targets of phthalates' testicular toxicity. Selenium is known to be involved in the modulation of intracellular redox equilibrium, and plays a critical role in testis, sperm, and reproduction. This study was aimed to investigate the oxidative stress potential of DEHP and its consequences in testicular cells, and examine the possible protective effects of selenium using the MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cell line as a model. In the presence and absence of selenium compounds [30 nM sodium selenite (SS), and 10 {mu}M selenomethionine (SM)], the effects of exposure to DEHP and its main metabolite mono(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (MEHP) on the cell viability, enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant status, ROS production, p53 expression, and DNA damage by alkaline Comet assay were investigated. The overall results of this study demonstrated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity potential of DEHP, where MEHP was found to be more potent than the parent compound. SS and SM produced almost the same level of protection against antioxidant status modifying effects, ROS and p53 inducing potentials, and DNA damaging effects of the two phthalate derivatives. It was thus shown that DEHP produced oxidative stress in MA-10 cells, and selenium supplementation appeared to be an effective redox regulator in the experimental conditions used in this study, emphasizing the critical importance of the appropriate selenium status.

  19. Naltrexone normalizes the suppression but not the surge of delta 5-3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in Leydig cells of stressed rat fetuses.

    PubMed

    Ward, I L; Ward, O B; Hayden, T; Weisz, J; Orth, J M

    1990-07-01

    Rat fetuses from mothers stressed chronically by immobilization and high intensity illumination beginning on day 14 of gestation have higher than normal levels of delta 5-3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3 beta HSD) activity in Leydig cells on day 17 of gestation and lower than normal levels on days 18 and 19. Plasma testosterone titers in normal and stressed male fetuses closely parallel the activity of 3 beta HSD in fetal Leydig cells. In the present study quantitative cytochemistry was used to determine whether the stress-induced alterations in 3 beta HSD activity could be prevented by treating the mother with naltrexone, an opioid receptor blocker, before each stress session. Naltrexone normalized 3 beta HSD activity on days 18 and 19 of gestation, suggesting that the stress-induced suppression involves the endogenous opioid system. In contrast, naltrexone did not prevent the elevation in enzyme activity seen on day 17 in stressed fetuses. The persistence of a stress-induced surge on day 17, in spite of naltrexone therapy, suggests that some nonopioid mechanism is operational at that time. PMID:2361487

  20. Stimulation of cholesterol side-chain cleavage by a luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone (luliberin) agonist (ICI 118630) in rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, M H; Cooke, B A

    1983-01-01

    The action of a luliberin (luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone) agonist (ICI 118630) and lutropin (luteinizing hormone) on the activity of the cytochrome P-450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme in rat Leydig cells has been investigated. This has been carried out by studying the metabolism of exogenous (22R)-22- and 25-hydroxycholesterol to testosterone. It was found that both hydroxycholesterols increased testosterone production to higher levels than achieved by lutropin alone. Addition of luliberin agonist but not lutropin was found to increase further the metabolism of the hydroxycholesterol to testosterone; this occurred in the presence of saturating and subsaturating levels of the hydroxycholesterols. This effect of luliberin agonist was potentiated in the presence of lutropin. The protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, inhibited the luliberin agonist-induced stimulation of the hydroxycholesterol metabolism. At low calcium levels (1.1 microM), testosterone production was increased by addition of (22R)-22-hydroxycholesterol but the luliberin agonist effect was negated. The calmodulin inhibitor trifluoperazine inhibited (22R)-22-hydroxycholesterol-stimulated steroidogenesis and negated the luliberin agonist effect. These results indicate that luliberin agonist specifically increases the synthesis of the cytochrome P-450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme in rat testis Leydig cells. PMID:6230077

  1. Woman with virilizing congenital adrenal hyperplasia and Leydig cell tumor of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Fernández-García Salazar, Rosario; Muñoz-Darias, Carmen; Haro-Mora, Juan Jesús; Almaraz, M Cruz; Audí, Laura; Martínez-Tudela, Juana; Yahyaoui, Raquel; Esteva, Isabel

    2014-08-01

    We report the case of a 36-year-old woman with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency, and corticosteroid replacement therapy since birth. She manifested persistent virilization and high testosterone levels that were attributed to nonadherence to medical treatment. The patient was referred to our gender unit for genitoplastic surgery. We recommended the patient for left oophorectomy after detecting an ovarian mass. Pathologic findings confirmed an ovarian hilus cell tumor. Testosterone levels fell back to normal and masculinization disappeared but ACTH remained elevated. This case represents a very rare type of primary ovarian tumor that must be considered in persistent virilizing symptoms in women with CAH.

  2. Leydig cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... health care provider if you have symptoms of testicular cancer. Prevention Performing testicular self-examination (TSE) each month may help detect testicular cancer at an early stage, before it spreads. Finding ...

  3. Age and markers of Leydig cell function, but not of Sertoli cell function predict the success of sperm retrieval in adolescents and adults with Klinefelter's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rohayem, J; Fricke, R; Czeloth, K; Mallidis, C; Wistuba, J; Krallmann, C; Zitzmann, M; Kliesch, S

    2015-09-01

    Microsurgical testicular sperm extraction (mTESE), combined with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) represents a chance for azoospermic men with Klinefelter's syndrome (KS) to father children. The objective of this study was to identify predictive factors for the success of mTESE from adolescents and adults with KS. The clinical data of 50 late pubertal adolescents (13-19 years) and 85 adult patients (20-61 years) with non-mosaic KS, who underwent mTESE, were analysed with respect to factors, potentially predictive of active spermatogenesis; specifically a history of cryptorchidism, age, testicular volumes, serum levels of LH, FSH, testosterone (T) and estradiol at the time of surgery. Inhibin B, AMH and INSL3 were additionally analysed in the adolescents. A younger age and a near-compensated Leydig cell function were associated with higher success of sperm retrieval via mTESE: In adolescents ≥15-19 years, spermatozoa were retrieved in 45%, compared to 31% in adults; in adolescents aged 13-14 years, spermatozoa were collected in only 10%. Adolescents with an LH ≤17.5 U/L, along with a T level ≥7.5 nmol/L had the best success rate (54%), which fell to 44% with higher LH, whereas those with low T (<7.5 nmol/L), irrespective of LH had no sperm retrieval. In adults with T levels above and LH below these thresholds, the success rate was 51%, falling to 19%, if LH was higher. When T was lower than threshold, the rate was 17%. No association between testicular volumes, serum levels of FSH, Inhibin B, AMH, estradiol and mTESE success was found. A history of cryptorchidism was associated with lower retrieval rates. A window of opportunity for an approximate 50% chance to retrieve spermatozoa via mTESE exists for young, late pubertal KS patients between age 15 and young adulthood, when Leydig cell function is at its best. In these cases, referral to a centre of expertise should be considered.

  4. A Yeast-Based Chemical Screen Identifies a PDE Inhibitor That Elevates Steroidogenesis in Mouse Leydig Cells via PDE8 and PDE4 Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Demirbas, Didem; Wyman, Arlene R.; Shimizu-Albergine, Masami; Cakici, Ozgur; Beavo, Joseph A.; Hoffman, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    A cell-based high-throughput screen (HTS) was developed to detect phosphodiesterase 8 (PDE8) and PDE4/8 combination inhibitors. By replacing the Schizosaccharomyces pombe PDE gene with the murine PDE8A1 gene in strains lacking adenylyl cyclase, we generated strains whose protein kinase A (PKA)-stimulated growth in 5-fluoro orotic acid (5FOA) medium reflects PDE8 activity. From our previously-identified PDE4 and PDE7 inhibitors, we identified a PDE4/8 inhibitor that allowed us to optimize screening conditions. Of 222,711 compounds screened, ∼0.2% displayed composite Z scores of >20. Additional yeast-based assays using the most effective 367 compounds identified 30 candidates for further characterization. Among these, compound BC8-15 displayed the lowest IC50 value for both PDE4 and PDE8 inhibition in in vitro enzyme assays. This compound also displays significant activity against PDE10A and PDE11A. BC8-15 elevates steroidogenesis in mouse Leydig cells as a single pharmacological agent. Assays using BC8-15 and two structural derivatives support a model in which PDE8 is a primary regulator of testosterone production by Leydig cells, with an additional role for PDE4 in this process. BC8-15, BC8-15A, and BC8-15C, which are commercially available compounds, display distinct patterns of activity against PDE4, PDE8, PDE10A, and PDE11A, representing a chemical toolkit that could be used to examine the biological roles of these enzymes in cell culture systems. PMID:23967182

  5. Malformations of the epididymis, incomplete regression of the mesonephric tubules and hyperplasia of Leydig cells in canine persistence of Müllerian duct syndrome.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Ana; Monteagudo, Luis V; Díaz-Otero, Angel; Lebrero, M Eugenia; Tejedor, M Teresa; Falceto, M Victoria; Whyte, Jaime; Gallego, Margarita

    2009-10-01

    Persistence of the Müllerian duct syndrome (PMDS) is a rare form of pseudohermaphroditism characterized by the presence of uterus and oviducts in otherwise normally differentiated SRY-positive 78 XY canine males. Undescended testicles are also common. We report a case of a male PMDS dog with a uterus and bilateral cryptorchidism. The dog had an incomplete regression of the mesonephric tubules. As a consequence of this an abnormally enlarged head of the epididymis was observed. In addition, an extreme reduction in size of both the body and the tail was found. Microscopic examination of both testicles revealed bilateral hyperplasia of Leydig cells. The progesterone blood level was measured by ELISA and was found to be abnormally high (3.18 ng/ml) compared to that of normal male dogs (lower than 1 ng/ml). Three months after surgical removal of the internal genitalia, the serum progesterone, testosterone and oestradiol levels were normal for a castrated male dog.

  6. Perfluorooctane Sulfonate Concentrations in Amniotic Fluid, Biomarkers of Fetal Leydig Cell Function, and Cryptorchidism and Hypospadias in Danish Boys (1980–1996)

    PubMed Central

    Toft, Gunnar; Jönsson, Bo A.G.; Bonde, Jens Peter; Nørgaard-Pedersen, Bent; Hougaard, David M.; Cohen, Arieh; Lindh, Christian H.; Ivell, Richard; Anand-Ivell, Ravinder; Lindhard, Morten S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) may potentially disturb fetal Leydig cell hormone production and male genital development. Objectives We aimed to study the associations between levels of amniotic fluid PFOS, fetal steroid hormone, and insulin-like factor 3 (INSL3) and the prevalence of cryptorchidism and hypospadias. Methods Using the Danish National Patient Registry, we selected 270 cryptorchidism cases, 75 hypospadias cases, and 300 controls with stored maternal amniotic fluid samples available in a Danish pregnancy-screening biobank (1980–1996). We used mass spectrometry to measure PFOS in amniotic fluid from 645 persons and steroid hormones in samples from 545 persons. INSL3 was measured by immunoassay from 475 persons. Associations between PFOS concentration in amniotic fluid, hormone levels, and genital malformations were assessed by confounder-adjusted linear and logistic regression. Results The highest tertile of PFOS exposure (> 1.4 ng/mL) in amniotic fluid was associated with a 40% (95% CI: –69, –11%) lower INSL3 level and an 18% (95% CI: 7, 29%) higher testosterone level compared with the lowest tertile (< 0.8 ng/mL). Amniotic fluid PFOS concentration was not associated with cryptorchidism or hypospadias. Conclusions Environmental PFOS exposure was associated with steroid hormone and INSL3 concentrations in amniotic fluid, but was not associated with cryptorchidism or hypospadias in our study population. Additional studies are needed to determine whether associations with fetal hormone levels may have long-term implications for reproductive health. Citation Toft G, Jönsson BA, Bonde JP, Nørgaard-Pedersen B, Hougaard DM, Cohen A, Lindh CH, Ivell R, Anand-Ivell R, Lindhard MS. 2016. Perfluorooctane sulfonate concentrations in amniotic fluid, biomarkers of fetal Leydig cell function, and cryptorchidism and hypospadias in Danish boys (1980–1996). Environ Health Perspect 124:151–156; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409288

  7. Male rats exposed in utero to di(n-butyl) phthalate: Age-related changes in Leydig cell smooth endoplasmic reticulum and testicular testosterone-biosynthesis enzymes/proteins.

    PubMed

    Motohashi, Masaya; Wempe, Michael F; Mutou, Tomoko; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Kansaku, Norio; Ikegami, Masahiro; Inomata, Tomo; Asari, Masao; Wakui, Shin

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the age-related (i.e., weeks 5, 7, 9, 14 and 17) morphological changes of Leydig cell smooth endoplasmic reticulum (LCs-ER) and testicular testosterone biosynthesis/protein expression in rats in utero exposed to di(n-butyl) phthalate (DBP) (intragastrically; 100mg/kg/day) on days 12-21 post-conception. Ultrastructural observations revealed the LCs-ER of the DBP group were non-dilated until peri-puberty, and thereafter decreased and disappeared. RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses revealed that StAR and P450scc levels in the DBP group were significantly lower at 5 and 7 weeks compared with the vehicle group but became similar during weeks 9-17. Although 3β-HSD, P450c17, and 17β-HSD levels of mRNA and protein in the DBP group were similar to the vehicle control group at 5 and 7 weeks of age, they were significantly lower during weeks 9-17. In utero DBP exposure results in age-related LCs-ER changes corresponding to reduction of testicular testosterone biosynthesis enzymes/associated proteins.

  8. Male Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to in utero di(n-butyl) phthalate: dose dependent and age-related morphological changes in Leydig cell smooth endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Masaru; Wakui, Shin; Wempe, Michael F; Mutou, Tomoko; Oyama, Noriko; Motohashi, Masaya; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Kansaku, Norio; Asari, Masao; Hano, Hiroshi; Endou, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    When 100 mg/kg/day of di(n-butyl) phthalate (DBP) was intragastrically administered to pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats throughout gestation days 12 to 21, the male pups had similar body weights with no apparent physical differences (e.g., litter size, sex ratio) compared to that of the vehicle group. However, prominent age-related morphological alterations in the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER) of testicular Leydig cells (LCs) were observed once these animals reached puberty. At weeks 5 to 7, the abundant sER with non-dilated cisternae was distributed in LCs. Subsequently, although the number of LCs significantly increased, the amount of sER was significantly decreased at 9 to 14 weeks of age and had disappeared at 17 weeks. In contrast, the number of LCs and the amount of sER in LCs of the lower dose groups (10, 30, and 50 mg/kg/day) were similar to those of the vehicle group. Further, serum testosterone levels in the 100 mg/kg dose group were significantly lower during 5 to 17 weeks of age. While their luteinizing hormone (LH) level was significantly lower at 5 to 7 weeks of age, it became significantly higher during 9 to 17 weeks. The amount of sER in LCs decreased with age with the increase in LCs proliferation and serum LH levels in rat exposed in utero to DBP in a dose-dependent manner.

  9. Virilizing Leydig-Sertoli Cell Ovarian Tumor Associated with Endometrioid Carcinoma of the Endometrium in a Postmenopausal Patient: Case Report and General Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Di Giacinto, Paola; Chioma, Laura; Vancieri, Giuseppe; Guccione, Laura; Cicerone, Elena; Ulisse, Salvatore; Mariani, Stefania; Autore, Camillo; Fabbri, Andrea; Gnessi, Lucio; Moretti, Costanzo

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors (SLCTs) are rare tumors mostly occurring in young women. Here we report an unusual case of a SLCT with simultaneous occurrence of endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the endometrium in a woman in menopause. Case report A 67-year-old woman presented with progressive signs of virilization. Blood tests showed increased levels of testosterone, delta-4-androstenedione, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). DHEA-sulphate, 17β-estradiol, estrone, and sex-hormone binding globulin serum levels were within the normal range. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a solid mass of 2.7 × 2.9 cm in the right ovary set against the background of the uterus. The patient underwent bilateral salpingo-oophoretomy with hysterectomy. The mass in the right ovary was a differentiated SLCT. Incidentally, the endometrium revealed an endometrioid adenocacinoma. Following surgical treatment the plasma androgens dropped to normal levels, and signs and symptoms of virilization improved. Conclusion SLCT should be suspected in postmenopausal women who present rapid progressive androgen excess symptoms with hyperandrogenemia. PMID:23133317

  10. Gonadotropin-regulated testicular RNA helicase (GRTH/DDX25), a negative regulator of luteinizing/chorionic gonadotropin hormone-induced steroidogenesis in Leydig cells: central role of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR).

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Masato; Villar, Joaquin; Tsai-Morris, Chon-Hwa; Dufau, Maria L

    2011-08-26

    Gonadotropin-regulated testicular RNA helicase (GRTH/DDX25) is a testis-specific gonadotropin-regulated RNA helicase that is present in Leydig cells (LCs) and germ cells and is essential for spermatid development and completion of spermatogenesis. Normal basal levels of testosterone in serum and LCs were observed in GRTH null (GRTH(-/-)) mice. However, testosterone production was enhanced in LCs of GRTH(-/-) mice compared with WT mice by both in vivo and in vitro human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation. LCs of GRTH(-/-) mice had swollen mitochondria with a significantly increased cholesterol content in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Basal protein levels of SREBP2, HMG-CoA reductase, and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR; a protein that transports cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane) were markedly increased in LCs of GRTH(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. Gonadotropin stimulation caused an increase in StAR mRNA levels and protein expression in GRTH(-/-) mice versus WT mice, with no further increase in SREBP2 and down-regulation of HMG-CoA reductase protein. The half-life of StAR mRNA was significantly increased in GRTH(-/-) mice. Moreover, association of StAR mRNA with GRTH protein was observed in WT mice. Human chorionic gonadotropin increased GRTH gene expression and its associated StAR protein at cytoplasmic sites. Taken together, these findings indicate that, through its negative role in StAR message stability, GRTH regulates cholesterol availability at the mitochondrial level. The finding of an inhibitory action of GRTH associated with gonadotropin-mediated steroidogenesis has provided insights into a novel negative autocrine molecular control mechanism of this helicase in the regulation of steroid production in the male.

  11. The effects of the reported active metabolite of methoxychlor, 2,2-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane, on testosterone formation by cultured Leydig cells from young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Murono, Eisuke P; Derk, Raymond C

    2004-11-01

    Methoxychlor (MC) is an insecticide that is currently used on a variety of agricultural crops, especially following the ban of 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (DDT) use in the United States. Following in vivo administration, MC is converted to 2,2-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (HPTE), which is proposed to be the active agent. Both MC and HPTE have been demonstrated to exhibit weak estrogenic and antiandrogenic activities, and they are thought to exert their effects through estrogen or androgen receptors, respectively. A recent study reported that HPTE inhibited both basal and hCG-stimulated testosterone formation by immature and adult cultured rat Leydig cells and that this effect was mediated through the estrogen receptor. In the current studies, we examined the effects of HPTE on basal and hCG-stimulated testosterone formation by cultured Leydig cells from young adult rats. In addition, we evaluated whether the effects of HPTE on rat Leydig cell testosterone biosynthesis were mediated through the estrogen receptor as an estrogen agonist or the androgen receptor as an antiandrogen. The current studies demonstrated that HPTE inhibited both basal and hCG-stimulated testosterone formation in a dose-dependent manner with significant declines in testosterone being observed at approximately 100 nM. The effects of HPTE were localized to the cholesterol side-chain cleavage step; however, these effects were not mediated through the classic estrogen receptor or by its acting as an antiandrogen, the currently recognized modes of action of MC and HPTE.

  12. Inhibition of Leydig tumor growth by farnesoid X receptor activation: the in vitro and in vivo basis for a novel therapeutic strategy.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Stefania; Panza, Salvatore; Malivindi, Rocco; Giordano, Cinzia; Barone, Ines; Bossi, Gianluca; Lanzino, Marilena; Sirianni, Rosa; Mauro, Loredana; Sisci, Diego; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Andò, Sebastiano

    2013-05-15

    Leydig cell tumors (LCTs) are the most common tumors of the gonadal stroma and represent about 3% of all testicular neoplasms. In most cases, LCTs are benign; however, if the tumor is malignant, no effective treatments are currently available. We have recently reported that farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is expressed in R2C Leydig tumor cells, and it reduces the estrogen-dependent cell proliferation by negatively regulating aromatase expression. Here, we demonstrated that treatment with GW4064, a specific FXR agonist, markedly reduced Leydig tumor growth in vivo by inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis. Indeed, the tumors from GW4064-treated mice exhibited a decrease in the expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67 and aromatase along with an increase in the apoptotic nuclei. FXR activation induced an enhanced poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, a marked DNA fragmentation and a strong increase in TUNEL-positive R2C cells also in vitro. Moreover, in both in vivo and in vitro models, FXR ligands upregulated mRNA and protein levels of p53 and of its downstream effector p21(WAF1/Cip1) . Functional experiments showed that FXR ligands upregulated p53 promoter activity and this occurred through an increased binding of FXR/nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) complex to the NF-kB site located within p53 promoter region as revealed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. Taken together, results from our study show, for the first time, that treatment with FXR ligands induces Leydig tumor regression in vivo, suggesting that activation of FXR may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for LCTs.

  13. Role of 11β-OH-C(19) and C(21) steroids in the coupling of 11β-HSD1 and 17β-HSD3 in regulation of testosterone biosynthesis in rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Latif, Syed A; Shen, Mae; Ge, Ren-Shan; Sottas, Chantal M; Hardy, Matthew P; Morris, David J

    2011-06-01

    Here we describe further experiments to support our hypothesis that bidirectional 11β-HSD1-dehydrogenase in Leydig cells is a NADP(H) regenerating system. In the absence of androstenedione (AD), substrate for 17β-HSD3, incubation of Leydig cells with corticosterone (B) or several C(19)- and C(21)-11β-OH-steroids, in the presence of [(3)H]-11-dehydro-corticosterone (A), stimulated 11β-HSD1-reductase activity. However, in presence of 30 μM AD, testosterone (Teso) synthesis is stimulated from 4 to 197 picomole/25,000 cells/30 min and concomitantly inhibited 11β-HSD1-reductase activity, due to competition for the common cofactor NADPH needed for both reactions. Testo production was further significantly increased (p<0.05) to 224-267 picomole/25,000 cells/30 min when 10 μM 11β-OH-steroids (in addition to 30 μM AD) were also included. Similar results were obtained in experiments conducted with lower concentrations of AD (5 μM), and B or A (500 nM). Incubations of 0.3-6.0 μM of corticosterone (plus or minus 30 μM AD) were then performed to test the effectiveness of 17β-HSD3 as a possible NADP(+) regenerating system. In the absence of AD, increasing amounts (3-44 pmol/25,000 cells/30 min) of 11-dehydro-corticosterone were produced with increasing concentrations of corticosterone in the medium. When 30 μM AD was included, the rate of 11-dehydro-corticosterone formation dramatically increased 1.3-5-fold producing 4-210 pmol/25,000 cells/30 min of 11-dehydro-corticosterone. We conclude that 11β-HSD1 is enzymatically coupled to 17β-HSD3, utilizing NADPH and NADP in intermeshed regeneration systems.

  14. Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... voice Enlarged clitoris Facial hair Loss in breast size Stopping of menstrual periods Pain in the lower belly (pelvic area) is another symptom. It is usually due to the tumor pressing on nearby structures

  15. Comments on Li et al. Effects of in Utero Exposure to Dicyclohexyl Phthalate on Rat Fetal Leydig Cells. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 246

    PubMed Central

    Svingen, Terje

    2016-01-01

    Profiling the expression levels of genes or proteins in tissues comprising two or more cell types is commonplace in biological sciences. Such analyses present particular challenges, however, for example a potential shift in cellular composition, or ‘cellularity’, between specimens. That is, does an observed change in expression level represent what occurs within individual cells, or does it represent a shift in the ratio of different cell types within the tissue? This commentary attempts to highlight the importance of considering cellularity when interpreting quantitative expression data, using the mammalian testis and a recent study on the effects of phthalate exposure on testis function as an example. PMID:27231928

  16. Franz von Leydig (1821-1908), pioneer of comparative histology.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Marlon R

    2012-05-01

    Franz von Leydig, a German histologist and zoologist, is known to every student of human or animal anatomy because of the testicular testosterone-producing cells carrying his name. However, he made many contributions to our knowledge of the fine structure of animal tissues, including more than 200 scientific articles and several books. His most important work, the book Lehrbuch der Histologie des Menschen und der Thiere, established him as a pioneer if not the founder of comparative histology. Leydig taught at three different universities (Würzburg, Tübingen and Bonn) and received many honours from scientific organizations worldwide, including the Royal Society. He died in Rothenburg ob der Tauber, the town of his birth, aged 86 years.

  17. Regulation of Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO) Expression in Rat and Human Male Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Manku, Gurpreet; Culty, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) is a high affinity cholesterol- and drug-binding protein highly expressed in steroidogenic cells, such as Leydig cells, where it plays a role in cholesterol mitochondrial transport. We have previously shown that TSPO is expressed in postnatal day 3 rat gonocytes, precursors of spermatogonial stem cells. Gonocytes undergo regulated phases of proliferation and migration, followed by retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation. Understanding these processes is important since their disruption may lead to the formation of carcinoma in situ, a precursor of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). Previously, we showed that TSPO ligands do not regulate gonocyte proliferation. In the present study, we found that TSPO expression is downregulated in differentiating gonocytes. Similarly, in F9 embryonal carcinoma cells, a mouse TGCT cell line with embryonic stem cell properties, there is a significant decrease in TSPO expression during RA-induced differentiation. Silencing TSPO expression in gonocytes increased the stimulatory effect of RA on the expression of the differentiation marker Stra8, suggesting that TSPO exerts a repressive role on differentiation. Furthermore, in normal human testes, TSPO was located not only in Leydig cells, but also in discrete spermatogenic phases such as the forming acrosome of round spermatids. By contrast, seminomas, the most common type of TGCT, presented high levels of TSPO mRNA. TSPO protein was expressed in the cytoplasmic compartment of seminoma cells, identified by their nuclear expression of the transcription factors OCT4 and AP2G. Thus, TSPO appears to be tightly regulated during germ cell differentiation, and to be deregulated in seminomas, suggesting a role in germ cell development and pathology. PMID:27608010

  18. Regulation of Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO) Expression in Rat and Human Male Germ Cells.

    PubMed

    Manku, Gurpreet; Culty, Martine

    2016-09-06

    Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) is a high affinity cholesterol- and drug-binding protein highly expressed in steroidogenic cells, such as Leydig cells, where it plays a role in cholesterol mitochondrial transport. We have previously shown that TSPO is expressed in postnatal day 3 rat gonocytes, precursors of spermatogonial stem cells. Gonocytes undergo regulated phases of proliferation and migration, followed by retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation. Understanding these processes is important since their disruption may lead to the formation of carcinoma in situ, a precursor of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). Previously, we showed that TSPO ligands do not regulate gonocyte proliferation. In the present study, we found that TSPO expression is downregulated in differentiating gonocytes. Similarly, in F9 embryonal carcinoma cells, a mouse TGCT cell line with embryonic stem cell properties, there is a significant decrease in TSPO expression during RA-induced differentiation. Silencing TSPO expression in gonocytes increased the stimulatory effect of RA on the expression of the differentiation marker Stra8, suggesting that TSPO exerts a repressive role on differentiation. Furthermore, in normal human testes, TSPO was located not only in Leydig cells, but also in discrete spermatogenic phases such as the forming acrosome of round spermatids. By contrast, seminomas, the most common type of TGCT, presented high levels of TSPO mRNA. TSPO protein was expressed in the cytoplasmic compartment of seminoma cells, identified by their nuclear expression of the transcription factors OCT4 and AP2G. Thus, TSPO appears to be tightly regulated during germ cell differentiation, and to be deregulated in seminomas, suggesting a role in germ cell development and pathology.

  19. Regulation of Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO) Expression in Rat and Human Male Germ Cells.

    PubMed

    Manku, Gurpreet; Culty, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) is a high affinity cholesterol- and drug-binding protein highly expressed in steroidogenic cells, such as Leydig cells, where it plays a role in cholesterol mitochondrial transport. We have previously shown that TSPO is expressed in postnatal day 3 rat gonocytes, precursors of spermatogonial stem cells. Gonocytes undergo regulated phases of proliferation and migration, followed by retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation. Understanding these processes is important since their disruption may lead to the formation of carcinoma in situ, a precursor of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). Previously, we showed that TSPO ligands do not regulate gonocyte proliferation. In the present study, we found that TSPO expression is downregulated in differentiating gonocytes. Similarly, in F9 embryonal carcinoma cells, a mouse TGCT cell line with embryonic stem cell properties, there is a significant decrease in TSPO expression during RA-induced differentiation. Silencing TSPO expression in gonocytes increased the stimulatory effect of RA on the expression of the differentiation marker Stra8, suggesting that TSPO exerts a repressive role on differentiation. Furthermore, in normal human testes, TSPO was located not only in Leydig cells, but also in discrete spermatogenic phases such as the forming acrosome of round spermatids. By contrast, seminomas, the most common type of TGCT, presented high levels of TSPO mRNA. TSPO protein was expressed in the cytoplasmic compartment of seminoma cells, identified by their nuclear expression of the transcription factors OCT4 and AP2G. Thus, TSPO appears to be tightly regulated during germ cell differentiation, and to be deregulated in seminomas, suggesting a role in germ cell development and pathology. PMID:27608010

  20. Fertility-sparing management and obstetric outcomes in a 20-year-old patient with a Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor of the ovary: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Stavrakis, Thomas; Kalogiannidis, Ioannis; Petousis, Stamatios; Tsompanidou, Chrisoula; Delkos, Dimitris; Prapas, Nikolaos; Rousso, David

    2016-01-01

    Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors (SLCTs) are an uncommon subtype of sex-cord stromal tumors of the ovary, which most commonly arise in women of reproductive age, creating an issue with regard to the preservation of fertility. The clinical manifestation of SLCTs varies widely, ranging from an asymptomatic clinical profile to extreme virilization. Correct diagnosis of SLCT is crucial and is primarily based on histopathological results. The current study presents the case of a 20-year-old woman who underwent unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy due to the diagnosis of an SLCT of the left ovary. Almost 2 years after the initial surgery, during the follow-up period, the patient conceived normally. Pregnancy was uneventful and the patient vaginally delivered a healthy infant at 38 weeks of gestation. A total of 1 year after delivery (3 years after the initial diagnosis), follow-up of the patient did not reveal any disease recurrence. In conclusion, SLCTs may be adequately treated by fertility-sparing surgery and chemotherapy in young women who wish to preserve their fertility. Natural conception, an uncomplicated pregnancy and a vaginal delivery are possible. PMID:27446397

  1. Hormonal and developmental regulation of DAX-1 expression in Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Tamai, K T; Monaco, L; Alastalo, T P; Lalli, E; Parvinen, M; Sassone-Corsi, P

    1996-12-01

    Mutations in the human DAX-1 gene lead to X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. DAX-1 has been proposed to play a role in steroidogenesis because it is highly expressed in adrenocortical and testicular Leydig cells and because loss-of-function mutations lead to low serum levels of steroid hormones. Recent reports of DAX-1 expression in hypothalamus and pituitary, however, suggest additional functions for this protein. Here we demonstrate that DAX-1 is expressed in Sertoli cells of rat testis. This expression is regulated during spermatogenesis and peaks during the androgen-sensitive phase of the spermatogenic cycle. In addition, we show that DAX-1 expression in Sertoli cells is regulated developmentally. Maximum levels are present in the rat between postnatal days 20 and 30, during the first spermatogenic wave. Moreover, we show that activation of the cAMP-signaling pathway by the pituitary hormone FSH leads to a potent down-regulation of DAX-1 expression in cultured Sertoli cells. This down-regulation requires transcription and de novo protein synthesis. Taken together, these data indicate that DAX-1 expression in Sertoli cells may influence the development of spermatogenic cells in response to steroid and pituitary hormones. PMID:8961266

  2. Seasonal Expression of Androgen Receptor, Aromatase, and Estrogen Receptor Alpha and Beta in the Testis of the Wild Ground Squirrel (Citellus Dauricus Brandt)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Q.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, S.; Sheng, X.; Han, Y.; Yuan, Z.; Weng, Q.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the seasonal expression of androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ) and aromatase cytochrome P450 (P450arom) mRNA and protein by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry in the wild ground squirrel (WGS) testes. Histologically, all types of spermatogenic cells including mature spermatozoa were identified in the breeding season (April), while spermatogonia and primary spermatocytes were observed in the nonbreeding season (June), and spermatogonia, primary spermatocytes and secondary spermatocytes were found in pre-hibernation (September). AR was present in Leydig cells, peritubular myoid cells and Sertoli cells in the breeding season and pre-hibernation with more intense staining in the breeding season, whereas AR was only found in Leydig cells in the nonbreeding season; P450arom was expressed in Leydig cells, Sertoli cells and germ cells during the breeding season, whereas P450arom was found in Leydig cells and Sertoli cells during pre-hibernation, but P450arom was not present in the nonbreeding season; Stronger immunohistochemical signal for ERα was present in Sertoli cells and Leydig cells during the breeding season; ERβ was only expressed in Leydig cells of the breeding season. Consistent with the immunohistochemical results, the mean mRNA level of AR, P450arom, ERα and ERβ were higher in the testes of the breeding season when compared to pre-hibernation and the nonbreeding season. These results suggested that the seasonal changes in spermatogenesis and testicular recrudescence and regression process in WGSs might be correlated with expression levels of AR, P450arom and ERs, and that estrogen and androgen may play an important autocrine/paracrine role to regulate seasonal testicular function. PMID:25820559

  3. Seasonal expression of androgen receptor, aromatase, and estrogen receptor alpha and beta in the testis of the wild ground squirrel (Citellus dauricus Brandt).

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Zhang, F; Zhang, S; Sheng, X; Han, X; Weng, Q; Yuan, Z

    2015-02-17

    The aim of this study was to investigate the seasonal expression of androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ) and aromatase cytochrome P450 (P450arom) mRNA and protein by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry in the wild ground squirrel (WGS) testes. Histologically, all types of spermatogenic cells including mature spermatozoa were identified in the breeding season (April), while spermatogonia and primary spermatocytes were observed in the nonbreeding season (June), and spermatogonia, primary spermatocytes and secondary spermatocytes were found in pre-hibernation (September). AR was present in Leydig cells, peritubular myoid cells and Sertoli cells in the breeding season and pre-hibernation with more intense staining in the breeding season, whereas AR was only found in Leydig cells in the nonbreeding season; P450arom was expressed in Leydig cells, Sertoli cells and germ cells during the breeding season, whereas P450arom was found in Leydig cells and Sertoli cells during pre-hibernation, but P450arom was not present in the nonbreeding season; stronger immunohistochemical signal for ERα was present in Sertoli cells and Leydig cells during the breeding season; ERβ was only expressed in Leydig cells of the breeding season. Consistent with the immunohistochemical results, the mean mRNA level of AR, P450arom, ERα and ERβ were higher in the testes of the breeding season when compared to pre-hibernation and the nonbreeding season. These results suggested that the seasonal changes in spermatogenesis and testicular recrudescence and regression process in WGSs might be correlated with expression levels of AR, P450arom and ERs, and that estrogen and androgen may play an important autocrine/paracrine role to regulate seasonal testicular function.

  4. Heat shock protein 27 expression in the human testis showing normal and abnormal spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Adly, Mohamed A; Assaf, Hanan A; Hussein, Mahmoud Rezk A

    2008-10-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones involved in protein folding, assembly and transport, and which play critical roles in the regulation of cell growth, survival and differentiation. We set out to test the hypothesis that HSP27 protein is expressed in the human testes and its expression varies with the state of spermatogenesis. HSP27 expression was examined in 30 human testicular biopsy specimens (normal spermatogenesis, maturation arrest and Sertoli cell only syndrome, 10 cases each) using immunofluorescent methods. The biopsies were obtained from patients undergoing investigations for infertility. The seminiferous epithelium of the human testes showing normal spermatogenesis had a cell type-specific expression of HSP27. HSP27 expression was strong in the cytoplasm of the Sertoli cells, spermatogonia, and Leydig cells. Alternatively, the expression was moderate in the spermatocytes, weak in the spermatids and absent in the spermatozoa. In testes showing maturation arrest, HSP27 expression was strong in the Sertoli cells, weak in the spermatogonia, and spermatocytes. It was absent in the spermatids and Leydig cells. In Sertoli cell only syndrome, HSP27 expression was strong in the Sertoli cells and absent in the Leydig cells. We report for the first time the expression patterns of HSP27 in the human testes and show differential expression during normal spermatogenesis, indicating a possible role in this process. The altered expression of this protein in testes showing abnormal spermatogenesis may be related to the pathogenesis of male infertility.

  5. Sensitivity to cadmium-induced genotoxicity in rat testicular cells is associated with minimal expression of the metallothionein gene.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, N; Hochadel, J F; Coogan, T P; Koropatnick, J; Waalkes, M P

    1995-02-01

    Cadmium is a carcinogenic metal. Although the mechanism of tumor induction is unknown, DNA/metal interactions may be involved. Metallothionein can protect against cadmium toxicity in our previous work it was shown to reduce cadmium genotoxicity in cultured cells. To extend these results, the genotoxicity of cadmium was studied in R2C cells, a rat testicular Leydig cell line. The R2C cells were very sensitive to cadmium-induced single-strand DNA damage (SSD), as measured by alkaline elution. SSD occurred in R2C cells after treatment with 25 and 50 microM CdCl2 for 2 hr. Prior work showed other cells required much higher levels of cadmium (approximately 500 microM) to induce genotoxicity. The genotoxic levels of cadmium (25-50 microM) were not cytotoxic in R2C cells as assessed by a metabolic activity (MTT) assay. Pretreatment of R2C cells with a low cadmium dose (2 microM, 24 hr) had no effect on cadmium-induced SSD, in contrast to prior work in other cells where such pretreatments reduced SSD through metallothionein gene activation. In fact, cadmium or zinc treatments resulted in little or no increase in metallothionein gene expression in R2C cells as determined by Northern blot analysis for metallothionein mRNA using cDNA or oligonucleotide probes and radioimmunoassay for metallothionein protein production. Basal metallothionein mRNA was essentially nondetectable. Induction of a cadmium-binding protein in R2C cells did occur, as determined by Cd-heme assay, but did not induce tolerance to SSD. In vivo, the Leydig cell is a target for cadmium carcinogenicity and its cadmium-binding protein is thought not to be a true metallothionein. These results indicate that R2C cells are sensitive to cadmium-induced genotoxicity and that this sensitivity is associated with minimal expression of the metallothionein gene. PMID:7871536

  6. 2-Phenylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-containing ligands of the 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO) behave as agonists and antagonists of steroidogenesis in a mouse leydig tumor cell line.

    PubMed

    Midzak, Andrew; Denora, Nunzio; Laquintana, Valentino; Cutrignelli, Annalisa; Lopedota, Angela; Franco, Massimo; Altomare, Cosimo D; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-08-30

    Ligands of 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO) are known for their ability to potently and dose-dependently stimulate steroid biosynthesis in steroidogenic cells. In this study, we investigated a number of 2-phenyl-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine acetamide derivatives, analogs of alpidem, for their ability to bind TSPO and to affect steroidogenesis in a mouse Leydig tumor cell line. We observed that not only some compounds behaved as agonists, stimulating steroidogenesis (e.g., 3 and 4) with EC50 values (15.9 and 6.99μM) close to that determined for FGIN-1-27 used as positive control (7.24μM), but two compounds, namely 5 and 6, which on the other hand are the most lipophilic ones in the investigated series, behaved as antagonists, by significantly inhibiting steroid production at concentrations at least twenty times lower than the cytotoxic ones. To our surprise, the newly synthesized compound 3, which is a strict analog of alpidem bearing at the para position of the 2-phenyl group a methoxy group instead of chlorine, achieved a ten-fold stimulation of the steroid production (for comparison FGIN-1-27 achieved 1.6-fold stimulation). Within the limits of the examined property space, some unprecedented SARs were unveiled, which can help in understanding the key molecular factors underlying the transition from agonism to antagonism in the steroidogenesis process. Besides the substitution pattern and the physicochemical features (mainly hydrogen bonding potential) of the substituents at the positions C(6) and C(8) of the imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine nucleus, and at the para position of the 2-phenyl group, the structure-activity relationship analysis suggested lipophilicity, whose increase seems to be generally related to steroidogenesis inhibition, and steric hindrance, which appeared as a stimulation-limiting factor, as two main properties to control in the design or optimization of novel imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-based TSPO ligands endowed with potential in modulating the

  7. Expression of CD1d protein in human testis showing normal and abnormal spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Adly, Mohamed A; Abdelwahed Hussein, Mahmoud-Rezk

    2011-05-01

    CD1d is a member of CD1 family of transmembrane glycoproteins, which represent antigen-presenting molecules. Immunofluorescent staining methods were utilized to examine expression pattern of CD1d in human testicular specimens. In testis showing normal spermatogenesis, a strong CD1d cytoplasmic expression was seen the Sertoli cells, spermatogonia, and Leydig cells. A moderate expression was observed in the spermatocytes. In testes showing maturation arrest, CD1d expression was strong in the Sertoli cells and weak in spermatogonia and spermatocytes compared to testis with normal spermatogenesis. In Sertoli cell only syndrome, CD1d expression was strong in the Sertoli and Leydig cells. This preliminary study displayed testicular infertility-related changes in CD1d expression. The ultrastructural changes associated with with normal and abnormal spermatogenesis are open for further investigations.

  8. Expression of steroidogenesis-related genes in murine male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Culty, Martine; Liu, Ying; Manku, Gurpreet; Chan, Wai-Yee; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-11-01

    For decades, only few tissues and cell types were defined as steroidogenic, capable of de novo steroid synthesis from cholesterol. However, with the refinement of detection methods, several tissues have now been added to the list of steroidogenic tissues. Besides their critical role as long-range acting hormones, steroids are also playing more discreet roles as local mediators and signaling molecules within the tissues they are produced. In testis, steroidogenesis is carried out by the Leydig cells through a broad network of proteins, mediating cholesterol delivery to CYP11A1, the first cytochrome of the steroidogenic cascade, and the sequential action of enzymes insuring the production of active steroids, the main one being testosterone. The knowledge that male germ cells can be directly regulated by steroids and that they express several steroidogenesis-related proteins led us to hypothesize that germ cells could produce steroids, acting as autocrine, intracrine and juxtacrine modulators, as a way to insure synchronized progression within spermatogenic cycles, and preventing inappropriate cell behaviors between neighboring cells. Gene expression and protein analyses of mouse and rat germ cells from neonatal gonocytes to spermatozoa showed that most steroidogenesis-associated genes are expressed in germ cells, showing cell type-, spermatogenic cycle-, and age-specific expression profiles. Highly expressed genes included genes involved in steroidogenesis and other cell functions, such as Acbd1 and 3, Tspo and Vdac1-3, and genes involved in fatty acids metabolism or synthesis, including Hsb17b4 10 and 12, implying broader roles than steroid synthesis in germ cells. These results support the possibility of an additional level of regulation of spermatogenesis exerted between adjacent germ cells.

  9. High expression of NPY receptors in the human testis.

    PubMed

    Körner, Meike; Waser, Beatriche; Thalmann, George N; Reubii, Jean Claude

    2011-04-30

    NPY receptors represent novel molecular therapeutic targets in cancer and obesity. However, the extent of NPY receptor expression in normal human tissues is poorly investigated. Based on the role of NPY in reproductive functions, the NPY receptor expression was studied in 25 normal human testes and, additionally, 24 testicular tumors using NPY receptor autoradiography. In the normal testis, Leydig cells strongly expressed NPY receptor subtype Y2, and small arterial blood vessels Y1. Y2 receptors were found to be functional with agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding autoradiography. Full functional integrity of the NPY system was further suggested by the immunohistochemical detection of NPY peptide in nerve fibers directly adjacent to Leydig cells and arteries. Germ cell tumors expressed Y1 and Y2 on tumor cells in 33% and Y1 on intratumoral blood vessels in 50%. Based on its strong NPY receptor expression in Leydig cells and blood vessels, the normal human testis represents a potentially important physiological and pharmalogical NPY target.

  10. Simvastatin and Dipentyl Phthalate Lower Ex vivo Testicular Testosterone Production and Exhibit Additive Effects on Testicular Testosterone and Gene Expression Via Distinct Mechanistic Pathways in the Fetal Rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sex differentiation of the male reproductive tract in mammals is driven, in part, by fetal androgen production. In utero, some phthalate esters (PEs) alter fetal Leydig cell differentiation, reducing the expression of several genes associated with steroid synthesis/transport, and...

  11. Expression of insulin-like factor 3 hormone-receptor system in the reproductive organs of male goats.

    PubMed

    Pitia, Ali Mohammed; Minagawa, Itaru; Uera, Naoto; Hamano, Koh-Ichi; Sugawara, Yasushi; Nagura, Yoshio; Hasegawa, Yoshihisa; Oyamada, Toshifumi; Sasada, Hiroshi; Kohsaka, Tetsuya

    2015-11-01

    Relaxin-like factor (RLF), generally known as insulin-like factor 3 (INSL3), is essential for testis descent during fetal development. However, its role in adult males is not fully understood. We investigate the function of INSL3 in male Saanen goats by identifying cell types expressing its receptor, relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor (RXFP)2 and by characterizing the developmental expression pattern of INSL3 and RXFP2 and the binding of INSL3 to target cells in the male reproductive system. A highly specific RXFP2 antibody that co-localizes with an anti-FLAG antibody in HEK-293 cells recognizes RXFP2-transcript-expressing cells in the testis. INSL3 and RXFP2 mRNA expression is upregulated in the testis, starting from puberty. INSL3 mRNA and protein expression has been detected in Leydig cells, whereas RXFP2 mRNA and protein localize to Leydig cells, to meiotic and post-meiotic germ cells and to the epithelium and smooth muscle of the cauda epididymis and vas deferens. INSL3 binds to all of these tissues and cell types, with the exception of Leydig cells, in a hormone-specific and saturable manner. These results provide evidence for a functional intra- and extra-testicular INSL3 ligand-receptor system in adult male goats.

  12. ERα/E2 signaling suppresses the expression of steroidogenic enzyme genes via cross-talk with orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 in the testes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Yon; Park, Eunsook; Kim, Seung-Chang; Ahn, Ryun-Sup; Ko, CheMyong; Lee, Keesook

    2012-10-15

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) has been reported to affect steroidogenesis in testicular Leydig cells, but its molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here, we investigate the effect of estrogen and ERα on Nur77, a major transcription factor that regulates the expression of steroidogenic enzyme genes. In MA-10 Leydig cells, estradiol (E2) treatment, and interestingly ERα overexpression, suppressed the cAMP-induced and Nur77-activated promoter activity of steroidogenic enzyme genes via the suppression of Nur77 transactivation. ERα physically interacted with Nur77 and inhibited its DNA binding activity. In addition, ERα/E2 signaling decreased Nur77 protein levels. Consistent with the above results, the testicular testosterone level was higher in Leydig cell-specific ERα knock-out mice (ERα(flox/flox)Cyp17iCre) than in wild-type mice (ERα(flox/flox)). Taken together, these results suggest that ERα/E2 signaling controls the Nur77-mediated expression of steroidogenic enzyme genes in Leydig cells. These findings may provide a mechanistic explanation for the local regulation of testicular steroidogenesis by estrogenic compounds and ERα.

  13. Expression of androgen receptor, estrogen receptors alpha and beta and aromatase in the fetal, perinatal, prepubertal and adult testes of the South American plains Vizcacha, Lagostomus maximus (Mammalia, Rodentia).

    PubMed

    González, Candela Rocío; Muscarsel Isla, María Laura; Leopardo, Noelia Paola; Willis, Miguel Alfredo; Dorfman, Verónica Berta; Vitullo, Alfredo Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Androgens and androgen receptor play a critical role in spermatogenesis and fertility in mammals, and estrogens and their receptors contribute to regulation of testicular function through initiation and maintenance of spermatogenesis and germ cell division and survival. However, results from different species are still far from establishing a clear understanding of these receptors in the different cell types from the testis. We analyzed the expression of androgen receptor, estrogen receptors α and β and aromatase protein by immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR, in relation to proliferation followed by the expression of proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and germinal identity by VASA protein, in fetal, perinatal, prepubertal and adult testes of Lagostomus maximus, a rodent with sustained germ cell proliferation and an increasing number of OCT-4-expressing gonocytes in the developing ovary. AR expression was restricted to Leydig cells and peritubular cells before sexual maturity, at which point it also became expressed in Sertoli cells. ERα and ERβ were expressed in seminiferous tubules and the interstitium, respectively, in both fetal and prepubertal testes. In adult testes, both ERα and ERβ co-localized in Leydig and peritubular cells. The aromatase enzyme, which converts androgenic precursors into estrogens, was detectable in all developmental stages analyzed and was restricted to Leydig cells. PCNA remained high until sexual maturity. ERα nuclear detection in germ cells and AR in Leydig cells in PCNA-positive cells suggest the possibility of a stimulatory effect of estrogens on spermatogonia proliferation. This effect might explain the increase found in VASA-expressing cells in the adult testis.

  14. Strategies for multigene expression in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Maysam; Berger, Philipp

    2014-09-01

    Multigene delivery systems for heterologous multiprotein expression in mammalian cells are a key technology in contemporary biological research. Multiprotein expression is essential for a variety of applications, including multiparameter analysis of living cells in vitro, changing the fate of stem cells, or production of multiprotein complexes for structural biology. Depending on the application, these expression systems have to fulfill different requirements. For some applications, homogenous expression in all cells with defined stoichiometry is necessary, whereas other applications need long term expression or require that the proteins are not modified at the N- and C-terminus. Here we summarize available multiprotein expression systems and discuss their advantages and disadvantages.

  15. Strategies for multigene expression in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Maysam; Berger, Philipp

    2014-09-01

    Multigene delivery systems for heterologous multiprotein expression in mammalian cells are a key technology in contemporary biological research. Multiprotein expression is essential for a variety of applications, including multiparameter analysis of living cells in vitro, changing the fate of stem cells, or production of multiprotein complexes for structural biology. Depending on the application, these expression systems have to fulfill different requirements. For some applications, homogenous expression in all cells with defined stoichiometry is necessary, whereas other applications need long term expression or require that the proteins are not modified at the N- and C-terminus. Here we summarize available multiprotein expression systems and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. PMID:25034976

  16. Metachronous Bilateral Testicular Leydig-Like Tumors Leading to the Diagnosis of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (Adrenogenital Syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Vukina, Josip; Chism, David D.; Sharpless, Julie L.; Raynor, Mathew C.; Milowsky, Matthew I.; Funkhouser, William K.

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old male with a history of left testis Leydig cell tumor (LCT), 3-month status after left radical orchiectomy, presented with a rapidly enlarging (0.6 cm to 3.7 cm) right testicular mass. He underwent a right radical orchiectomy, sections interpreted as showing a similar Leydig cell-like oncocytic proliferation, with a differential diagnosis including metachronous bilateral LCT and metachronous bilateral testicular tumors associated with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (a.k.a. “testicular adrenal rest tumors” (TARTs) and “testicular tumors of the adrenogenital syndrome” (TTAGS)). Additional workup demonstrated a markedly elevated serum adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and elevated adrenal precursor steroid levels. He was diagnosed with congenital adrenal hyperplasia, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency (3BHSD) type, and started on treatment. Metachronous bilateral testicular masses in adults should prompt consideration of adult presentation of CAH. Since all untreated CAH patients are expected to have elevated serum ACTH, formal exclusion of CAH prior to surgical resection of a testicular Leydig-like proliferation could be accomplished by screening for elevated serum ACTH. PMID:26351608

  17. Connexin expression in renin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Lisa; Janssen-Bienhold, Ulrike; Kurtz, Armin; Wagner, Charlotte

    2009-03-01

    Absence of connexin 40 (Cx40) leads to ectopic juxtaglomerular renin expression and abrogates recruitment of renin-expressing cells in the adult kidney but does not disturb renin expression during kidney development. To find an explanation for these observations, we aimed to analyze the expression pattern of major vascular Cxs in normal juxtaglomerular epithelioid cells, in recruited renin-expressing cells, and in fetal renin-expressing cells. We found that during kidney development, the appearance of renin-producing cells paralleled the expression of Cx40 and, to a lesser extent, Cx45 but not other Cxs. In the adult kidney, juxtaglomerular epithelioid cells expressed Cx40 and lesser amounts of Cx37 and Cx43 but not Cx45, which localized to arteriolar smooth muscle cells. Recruitment of renin-producing cells in adult kidneys in response to long-term salt deprivation of mice correlated with the reappearance of only Cx40. Cx40-null renin-producing cells did not express Cx37, Cx43, or Cx45. These findings suggest that Cx40 expression is a characteristic of renin-producing cells in the kidney, and it seems to be essential in the recruitment of renin-producing cells in the adult but not the fetal kidney. PMID:19073828

  18. Photoreceptor cells constitutively express functional TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Zhidan; Portillo, Jose-Andres; Howell, Scott; Bu, Hong; Subauste, Carlos S.; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R; Pearlman, Eric; Lin, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is expressed on a number of cells including neurons in the brain. However, it has yet to be determined if TLR4 is expressed on photoreceptor cells in the retina. In this report, we examined primary photoreceptor cells and an established photoreceptor cell line (661W). We found that functional TLR4 is constitutively expressed on photoreceptor cells, and can be activated by LPS. We conclude that TLR4 on photoreceptor cells could directly contribute to retinal inflammatory diseases and photoreceptor cell survival. PMID:20801528

  19. INHIBITION OF TESTICULAR STEROIDOGENESIS BY THE XENOESTROGEN BISPHENOL A IS ASSOCIATED WITH REDUCED PITUITARY LH SECRETION AND DECREASED STEROIDOGENIC ENZYME GENE EXPRESSION IN RAT LEYDIG CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of humans to bisphenol A (BPA), a monomer in polycarbonate plastics and constituent of resins used in food packaging and denistry, is significant. In this report, exposure of rats to 2.4 ug/kg/day (a dose that approximates BPA levels in the environment) from postnatal da...

  20. Immunohistochemical Study of Expression of Sohlh1 and Sohlh2 in Normal Adult Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Liu, Ruihua; Su, Zhongxue; Zhang, Yuecun; Zhang, Wenfang; Liu, Xinyu; Wang, Fuwu; Guo, Yuji; Li, Chuangang; Hao, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The expression pattern of Sohlh1 (spermatogenesis and oogenesis specific basic helix-loop-helix 1) and Sohlh2 in mice has been reported in previous studies. Sohlh1 and Sohlh2 are specifically expressed in spermatogonia, prespermatogonia in male mice and oocytes of primordial and primary follicles in female mice. In this report, we studied the expression pattern of Sohlh1 and Sohlh2 in human adult tissues. Immunohistochemical staining of Sohlh1 and Sohlh2 was performed in 5 samples of normal ovaries and testes, respectively. The results revealed that Sohlh genes are not only expressed in oocytes and spermatogonia, but also in granular cells, theca cells, Sertoli cells and Leydig cells, and in smooth muscles of blood vessel walls. To further investigate the expression of Sohlh genes in other adult human tissues, we collected representative normal adult tissues developed from three embryonic germ layers. Compared with the expression in mice, Sohlhs exhibited a much more extensive expression pattern in human tissues. Sohlhs were detected in testis, ovary and epithelia developed from embryonic endoderm, ectoderm and tissues developed from embryonic mesoderm. Sohlh signals were found in spermatogonia, Sertoli cells and also Leydig cells in testis, while in ovary, the expression was mainly in oocytes of primordial and primary follicles, granular cells and theca cells of secondary follicles. Compared with Sohlh2, the expression of Sohlh1 was stronger and more extensive. Our study explored the expression of Sohlh genes in human tissues and might provide insights for functional studies of Sohlh genes. PMID:26375665

  1. Cyclooxygenase and prostaglandins in somatic cell populations of the testis.

    PubMed

    Frungieri, Mónica B; Calandra, Ricardo S; Mayerhofer, Artur; Matzkin, María E

    2015-04-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) are synthesized through the action of the rate-limiting enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX) and further specific enzymes. The development of Cox-deficient mice in the 1990s gave insights into the reproductive roles of PGs. Female Cox-knockout mice were subfertile or infertile. Interestingly, fertility was not affected in male mice deficient in Cox, suggesting that PGs may not be critical for the functioning of the testis. However, this conclusion has recently been challenged by observations of important roles for PGs in both physiological and pathological processes in the testis. The two key somatic cell types in the testis, Leydig and Sertoli cells, express the inducible isoenzyme COX2 and produce PGs. Testicular COX2 expression in these somatic cells is regulated by hormonal input (FSH, prolactin (PRL), and testosterone) as well as by IL1β. PGs modulate steroidogenesis in Leydig cells and glucose uptake in Sertoli cells. Hence, the COX2/PG system in Leydig and Sertoli cells acts as a local modulator of testicular activity, and consequently may regulate spermatogenic efficiency. In addition to its expression in Leydig and Sertoli cells, COX2 has been detected in the seminiferous tubule wall, and in testicular macrophages and mast cells of infertile patients. These observations highlight the possible relevance of PGs in testicular inflammation associated with idiopathic infertility. Collectively, these data indicate that the COX2/PG system plays crucial roles not only in testicular physiology (i.e., development, steroidogenesis, and spermatogenesis), but more importantly in the pathogenesis or maintenance of infertility status in the male gonad. Further studies of these actions could lead to new therapeutic approaches to idiopathic male infertility.

  2. Mammalian 43-kD acetylcholine receptor-associated protein (RAPsyn) is expressed in some nonmuscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Musil, L.S.; Frail, D.E.; Merlie, J.P. )

    1989-05-01

    Torpedo electric organ and vertebrate neuromuscular junctions contain the receptor-associated protein of the synapse (RAPsyn) (previously referred to as the 43K protein), a nonactin, 43,000-Mr peripheral membrane protein associated with the cytoplasmic face of postsynaptic membranes at areas of high nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) density. Although not directly demonstrated, several lines of evidence suggest that RAPsyn is involved in the synthesis and/or maintenance of such AChR clusters. Microscopic and biochemical studies had previously indicated that RAPsyn expression is restricted to differentiated, AChR-synthesizing cells. Our recent finding that RAPsyn is also produced in undifferentiated myocytes led to to examine whether RAPsyn is synthesized in cell types that never express AChR (i.e., cells of other than skeletal muscle origin). Various primary and established rodent cell lines were metabolically labeled with (35S)methionine, and extracts were immunoprecipitated with a monospecific anti-RAPsyn serum. Analysis of these immunoprecipitates by SDS-PAGE revealed detectable RAPsyn synthesis in some (notably fibroblast and Leydig tumor cell lines and primary cardiac cells) but not all (hepatocyte- and lymphocyte-derived) cell types. These results were further substantiated by peptide mapping studies of RAPsyn immunoprecipitated from different cells and quantitation of RAPsyn-encoding mRNA levels in mouse tissues. RAPsyn synthesized in both muscle and nonmuscle cells was shown to be tightly associated with membranes. These findings demonstrate that RAPsyn is not specific to skeletal muscle-derived cells and imply that it may function in a capacity either in addition to or instead of AChR clustering.

  3. HLA expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wadee, A A; Paterson, A; Coplan, K A; Reddy, S G

    1994-08-01

    The present study undertook to investigate the biological significance of human leucocyte antigen expression in hepatocellular carcinoma and to elucidate the role of potential modulating agents on human leucocyte antigen expression. These studies used several hepatic tumour-derived cell lines as in vitro model systems. The cell lines included PLC/PRF/5 (Alexander cell line), Hep3B, HepG2, TONG PHC, HA22T/VGH, HA59T/VGH and Mahlavu. The cell lines K562 and Raji were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. K562, a B lymphoid-derived cell line, was shown to express negligible amounts of human leucocyte antigens, while Raji, an erythromyeloid-derived cell line, expressed both class I and class II human leucocyte antigens as well as their respective invariant chains, beta 2-microglobulin and Ii. Using an ELISA, experiments performed on these cell lines confirmed the natural expression of class I and class II antigens by the HA22T/VGH and HA59T/VGH cell lines, whereas PLC/PRF/5 displayed class II surface antigens only. The effects of modulating agents such as interferon-gamma sodium butyrate and clofazimine on human leucocyte antigen expression were investigated using the HA22T/VGH, HA59T/VGH and TONG PHC cell lines. These agents increased class II and class II human leucocyte antigen expression on HA22T/VGH and TONG PHC cells, but had no effect on the HA59T/VGH cell line. The results suggest a potential use for these agents as modulators of human leucocyte antigen expression by human heptocellular cell lines.

  4. Identification of the Functions of Liver X Receptor-β in Sertoli Cells Using a Targeted Expression-Rescue Model.

    PubMed

    Maqdasy, Salwan; El Hajjaji, Fatim-Zohra; Baptissart, Marine; Viennois, Emilie; Oumeddour, Abdelkader; Brugnon, Florence; Trousson, Amalia; Tauveron, Igor; Volle, David; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc A; Baron, Silvère

    2015-12-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) are key regulators of lipid homeostasis and are involved in multiple testicular functions. The Lxrα(-/-);Lxrβ(-/-) mice have illuminated the roles of both isoforms in maintenance of the epithelium in the seminiferous tubules, spermatogenesis, and T production. The requirement for LXRβ in Sertoli cells have been emphasized by early abnormal cholesteryl ester accumulation in the Lxrβ(-/-) and Lxrα(-/-);Lxrβ(-/-) mice. Other phenotypes, such as germ cell loss and hypogonadism, occur later in life in the Lxrα(-/-);Lxrβ(-/-) mice. Thus, LXRβ expression in Sertoli cells seems to be essential for normal testicular physiology. To decipher the roles of LXRβ within the Sertoli cells, we generated Lxrα(-/-);Lxrβ(-/-):AMH-Lxrβ transgenic mice, which reexpress Lxrβ in Sertoli cells in the context of Lxrα(-/-);Lxrβ(-/-) mice. In addition to lipid homeostasis, LXRβ is necessary for maintaining the blood-testis barrier and the integrity of the germ cell epithelium. LXRβ is also implicated in the paracrine action of Sertoli cells on Leydig cells to modulate T synthesis. The Lxrα(-/-);Lxrβ(-/-) and Lxrα(-/-);Lxrβ(-/-):AMH-Lxrβ mice exhibit lipid accumulation in germ cells after the Abcg8 down-regulation, suggesting an intricate LXRβ-dependent cooperation between the Sertoli cells and germ cells to ensure spermiogenesis. Further analysis revealed also peritubular smooth muscle defects (abnormal lipid accumulation and disorganized smooth muscle actin) and spermatozoa stagnation in the seminiferous tubules. Together the present work elucidates specific roles of LXRβ in Sertoli cell physiology in vivo beyond lipid homeostasis. PMID:26402841

  5. Second and third malignant solid tumor in a girl with ovarian Sertoli-Leydig tumor.

    PubMed

    Panagiotou, John P; Polychronopoulou, Sophia; Sofou, Kalliopi; Vanvliet-Constantinidou, Catherine; Papandreou, Evangelos; Haidas, Stavros

    2006-05-01

    We report a Sertoli-Leydig cell (SLC) tumor of the right ovary in a 10-year-old girl, which was dealt with surgical removal. Three months after resection, she presented with a new episode of acute abdomen because of an abdominal mass, which histologically was compatible with an undifferentiated embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. Chemotherapy, according to SIOP-??? 89 protocol, was administered additionally to radiotherapy (3,960 cGy). Three years after completing treatment, the patient developed a painful swelling at her left upper arm. The diagnosis was Ewing sarcoma of the humerus, which was confirmed by identification of the typical 11; 22 translocation on cytogenetic and molecular analysis of the tumor tissue. The patient died 14 months from Ewing diagnosis due to progressive disease.

  6. Decorin expression in quiescent myogenic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Takanori Nozu, Kenjiro; Kishioka, Yasuhiro; Wakamatsu, Jun-ichi; Hattori, Akihito

    2008-06-06

    Satellite cells are quiescent muscle stem cells that promote postnatal muscle growth and repair. When satellite cells are activated by myotrauma, they proliferate, migrate, differentiate, and ultimately fuse to existing myofibers. The remainder of these cells do not differentiate, but instead return to quiescence and remain in a quiescent state until activation begins the process again. This ability to maintain their own population is important for skeletal muscle to maintain the capability to repair during postnatal life. However, the mechanisms by which satellite cells return to quiescence and maintain the quiescent state are still unclear. Here, we demonstrated that decorin mRNA expression was high in cell cultures containing a higher ratio of quiescent satellite cells when satellite cells were stimulated with various concentrations of hepatocyte growth factor. This result suggests that quiescent satellite cells express decorin at a high level compared to activated satellite cells. Furthermore, we examined the expression of decorin in reserve cells, which were undifferentiated myoblasts remaining after induction of differentiation by serum-deprivation. Decorin mRNA levels in reserve cells were higher than those in differentiated myotubes and growing myoblasts. These results suggest that decorin participates in the quiescence of myogenic cells.

  7. Vertebrate Cells Express Protozoan Antigen after Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Mark St. J.; Dvorak, James A.

    1980-04-01

    Epimastigotes, the invertebrate host stage of Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite causing Chagas' disease in man, were fused with vertebrate cells by using polyethylene glycol. Hybrid cells were selected on the basis of T. cruzi DNA complementation of biochemical deficiencies in the vertebrate cells. Some clones of the hybrid cells expressed T. cruzi-specific antigen. It might be possible to use selected antigens obtained from the hybrids as vaccines for immunodiagnosis or for elucidation of the pathogenesis of Chagas' disease.

  8. Imaging gene expression in single living cells

    PubMed Central

    Shav-Tal, Yaron; Singer, Robert H.; Darzacq, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Technical advances in the field of live-cell imaging have introduced the cell biologist to a new, dynamic, subcellular world. The static world of molecules in fixed cells has now been extended to the time dimension. This allows the visualization and quantification of gene expression and intracellular trafficking events of the studied molecules and the associated enzymatic processes in individual cells, in real time. PMID:15459666

  9. Fundamentals of Expression in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Expression of proteins in mammalian cells is a key technology important for many functional studies on human and higher eukaryotic genes. Studies include the mapping of protein interactions, solving protein structure by crystallization and X-ray diffraction or solution phase NMR and the generation of antibodies to enable a range of studies to be performed including protein detection in vivo. In addition the production of therapeutic proteins and antibodies, now a multi billion dollar industry, has driven major advances in cell line engineering for the production of grams per liter of active proteins and antibodies. Here the key factors that need to be considered for successful expression in HEK293 and CHO cells are reviewed including host cells, expression vector design, transient transfection methods, stable cell line generation and cultivation conditions. PMID:27165328

  10. Expression cloning of human B cell immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Wardemann, Hedda; Kofer, Juliane

    2013-01-01

    The majority of lymphomas originate from B cells at the germinal center stage or beyond. Preferential selection of B cell clones by a limited set of antigens has been suggested to drive lymphoma development. However, little is known about the specificity of the antibodies expressed by lymphoma cells, and the role of antibody-specificity in lymphomagenesis remains elusive. Here, we describe a strategy to characterize the antibody reactivity of human B cells. The approach allows the unbiased characterization of the human antibody repertoire on a single cell level through the generation of recombinant monoclonal antibodies from single primary human B cells of defined origin. This protocol offers a detailed description of the method starting from the flow cytometric isolation of single human B cells, to the RT-PCR-based amplification of the expressed Igh, Igκ, and Igλ chain genes, and Ig gene expression vector cloning for the in vitro production of monoclonal antibodies. The strategy may be used to obtain information on the clonal evolution of B cell lymphomas by single cell Ig gene sequencing and on the antibody reactivity of human lymphoma B cells.

  11. Pitx2 expression promotes p21 expression and cell cycle exit in neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Heldring, Nina; Joseph, Bertrand; Hermanson, Ola; Kioussi, Chrissa

    2012-11-01

    Cortical development is a complex process that involves many events including proliferation, cell cycle exit and differentiation that need to be appropriately synchronized. Neural stem cells (NSCs) isolated from embryonic cortex are characterized by their ability of self-renewal under continued maintenance of multipotency. Cell cycle progression and arrest during development is regulated by numerous factors, including cyclins, cyclin dependent kinases and their inhibitors. In this study, we exogenously expressed the homeodomain transcription factor Pitx2, usually expressed in postmitotic progenitors and neurons of the embryonic cortex, in NSCs with low expression of endogenous Pitx2. We found that Pitx2 expression induced a rapid decrease in proliferation associated with an accumulation of NSCs in G1 phase. A search for potential cell cycle inhibitors responsible for such cell cycle exit of NSCs revealed that Pitx2 expression caused a rapid and dramatic (≉20-fold) increase in expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 (WAF1/Cip1). In addition, Pitx2 bound directly to the p21 promoter as assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in NSCs. Surprisingly, Pitx2 expression was not associated with an increase in differentiation markers, but instead the expression of nestin, associated with undifferentiated NSCs, was maintained. Our results suggest that Pitx2 promotes p21 expression and induces cell cycle exit in neural progenitors.

  12. Expression sequences of cell adhesion molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Crossin, K L; Chuong, C M; Edelman, G M

    1985-01-01

    A reexamination of the expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) during the development of the chicken embryo was carried out using more sensitive immunocytochemical techniques than had been used previously. While the previously determined sequence of CAM expression was confirmed, neural CAM (N-CAM) was also detected on endodermal structures such as the lung epithelium, gut epithelium, and pancreas and on budding structures such as the pancreatic duct and gall bladder. It was also found on ectodermal derivatives of the skin. In most of these sites, N-CAM expression was transient, but in the chicken embryo lung, the epithelium remained positive for N-CAM and liver CAM (L-CAM) into adult life. Thus, at one time or another, both of these primary CAMs can be expressed on derivatives of all three germ layers. At sites of embryonic induction, epithelial cells expressing both L-CAM and N-CAM, or L-CAM only, were apposed to mesenchymal cells expressing N-CAM. Examples included epiblast (NL) and notochord (N); endodermal epithelium (NL) and lung mesenchyme (N); Wolffian duct (NL) and mesonephric mesenchyme (N); apical ectodermal ridge (NL) and limb mesenchyme (N); and feather placode (L) and dermal condensation (N). The cumulative observations indicate that cell surface modulation of the primary CAMs at induction sites can be classified into two modes. In mode I, expression of N-CAM (or both CAMs) in mesenchyme decreases to low amounts at the cell surface, and then N-CAM is reexpressed. In mode II, one or the other CAM disappears from epithelia expressing both CAMs. As a result of the primary processes of development, collectives of cells linked by N-CAM and undergoing modulation mode I are brought into the proximity of collectives of cells linked by L-CAM plus N-CAM or by L-CAM undergoing modulation mode II. Such adjoining cell collectives or CAM couples were found at all sites of embryonic induction examined. Images PMID:3863135

  13. A Cell-Autonomous Molecular Cascade Initiated by AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Represses Steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abdou, Houssein S.; Bergeron, Francis

    2014-01-01

    Steroid hormones regulate essential physiological processes, and inadequate levels are associated with various pathological conditions. In testosterone-producing Leydig cells, steroidogenesis is strongly stimulated by luteinizing hormone (LH) via its receptor leading to increased cyclic AMP (cAMP) production and expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (STAR) protein, which is essential for the initiation of steroidogenesis. Steroidogenesis then passively decreases with the degradation of cAMP into AMP by phosphodiesterases. In this study, we show that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated following cAMP-to-AMP breakdown in MA-10 and MLTC-1 Leydig cells. Activated AMPK then actively inhibits cAMP-induced steroidogenesis by repressing the expression of key regulators of steroidogenesis, including Star and Nr4a1. Similar results were obtained in Y-1 adrenal cells and in the constitutively steroidogenic R2C cells. We have also determined that maximum AMPK activation following stimulation of steroidogenesis in MA-10 Leydig cells occurs when steroid hormone production has reached a plateau. Our data identify AMPK as a molecular rheostat that actively represses steroid hormone biosynthesis to preserve cellular energy homeostasis and prevent excess steroid production. PMID:25225331

  14. Expressions of Sox9, Sox5, and Sox13 transcription factors in mice testis during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Daigle, Mikella; Roumaud, Pauline; Martin, Luc J

    2015-09-01

    SRY-related box (Sox) transcription factors are conserved among vertebrate species. These proteins regulate multiple processes including sex determination and testis differentiation of the male embryo. Although members of the Sox family have been identified in pre- and postnatal Sertoli cells, they have never been characterized in adult Leydig cells. The objectives of this research were to identify expressions of Sox9, Sox5, and Sox13 in mice Leydig cell cultures and to establish their expression profiles in postnatal mice testes at different developmental stages. Methods used include Western blots and qPCR of stimulated MA-10 cell cultures and whole mice testes. Sox9, Sox5, and Sox13 proteins were detected in MA-10 cells as well as whole mouse testis. Although Sox9, Sox5, and Sox13 mRNA levels from whole mice testes tended to increase according to postnatal development, these results were not significant. Sox members were also detected in whole mice testis by Western Blot. However, Sox9, Sox5, and Sox13 protein expressions remained relatively constant during postnatal development from postnatal (P) day 60 to P365. Being newly characterized in the mouse testis, Sox13 was mainly localized by immunofluorescence within the nuclei of cells from seminiferous tubules, possibly spermatocytes and Sertoli cells. In addition, Sox9, Sox5, and Sox13 proteins were characterized in the nuclei of MA-10 Leydig cell cultures. Their expressions and transcriptional activities remained unaffected by activators of the cAMP/PKA pathway. Thus, Sox9, Sox5, and Sox13 transcription factors are expressed in postnatal testis and may regulate multiple functions such as steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis.

  15. B cell receptor accessory molecule CD79α: characterisation and expression analysis in a cartilaginous fish, the spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias).

    PubMed

    Li, Ronggai; Wang, Tiehui; Bird, Steve; Zou, Jun; Dooley, Helen; Secombes, Christopher J

    2013-06-01

    CD79α (also known as Igα) is a component of the B cell antigen receptor complex and plays an important role in B cell signalling. The CD79α protein is present on the surface of B cells throughout their life cycle, and is absent on all other healthy cells, making it a highly reliable marker for B cells in mammals. In this study the spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) CD79α (SaCD79α) is described and its expression studied under constitutive and stimulated conditions. The spiny dogfish CD79α cDNA contains an open reading frame of 618 bp, encoding a protein of 205 amino acids. Comparison of the SaCD79α gene with that of other species shows that the gross structure (number of exons, exon/intron boundaries, etc.) is highly conserved across phylogeny. Additionally, analysis of the 5' flanking region shows SaCD79α lacks a TATA box and possesses binding sites for multiple transcription factors implicated in its B cell-specific gene transcription in other species. Spiny dogfish CD79α is most highly expressed in immune tissues, such as spleen, epigonal and Leydig organ, and its transcript level significantly correlates with those of spiny dogfish immunoglobulin heavy chains. Additionally, CD79α transcription is up-regulated, to a small but significant degree, in peripheral blood cells following stimulation with pokeweed mitogen. These results strongly indicate that, as in mammals, spiny dogfish CD79α is expressed by shark B cells where it associates with surface-bound immunoglobulin to form a fully functional BCR, and thus may serve as a pan-B cell marker in future shark immunological studies. PMID:23454429

  16. Dental enamel cells express functional SOCE channels.

    PubMed

    Nurbaeva, Meerim K; Eckstein, Miriam; Concepcion, Axel R; Smith, Charles E; Srikanth, Sonal; Paine, Michael L; Gwack, Yousang; Hubbard, Michael J; Feske, Stefan; Lacruz, Rodrigo S

    2015-10-30

    Dental enamel formation requires large quantities of Ca(2+) yet the mechanisms mediating Ca(2+) dynamics in enamel cells are unclear. Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) channels are important Ca(2+) influx mechanisms in many cells. SOCE involves release of Ca(2+) from intracellular pools followed by Ca(2+) entry. The best-characterized SOCE channels are the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels. As patients with mutations in the CRAC channel genes STIM1 and ORAI1 show abnormal enamel mineralization, we hypothesized that CRAC channels might be an important Ca(2+) uptake mechanism in enamel cells. Investigating primary murine enamel cells, we found that key components of CRAC channels (ORAI1, ORAI2, ORAI3, STIM1, STIM2) were expressed and most abundant during the maturation stage of enamel development. Furthermore, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) but not ryanodine receptor (RyR) expression was high in enamel cells suggesting that IP3Rs are the main ER Ca(2+) release mechanism. Passive depletion of ER Ca(2+) stores with thapsigargin resulted in a significant raise in [Ca(2+)]i consistent with SOCE. In cells pre-treated with the CRAC channel blocker Synta-66 Ca(2+) entry was significantly inhibited. These data demonstrate that enamel cells have SOCE mediated by CRAC channels and implicate them as a mechanism for Ca(2+) uptake in enamel formation.

  17. Dental enamel cells express functional SOCE channels

    PubMed Central

    Nurbaeva, Meerim K.; Eckstein, Miriam; Concepcion, Axel R.; Smith, Charles E.; Srikanth, Sonal; Paine, Michael L.; Gwack, Yousang; Hubbard, Michael J.; Feske, Stefan; Lacruz, Rodrigo S.

    2015-01-01

    Dental enamel formation requires large quantities of Ca2+ yet the mechanisms mediating Ca2+ dynamics in enamel cells are unclear. Store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) channels are important Ca2+ influx mechanisms in many cells. SOCE involves release of Ca2+ from intracellular pools followed by Ca2+ entry. The best-characterized SOCE channels are the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels. As patients with mutations in the CRAC channel genes STIM1 and ORAI1 show abnormal enamel mineralization, we hypothesized that CRAC channels might be an important Ca2+ uptake mechanism in enamel cells. Investigating primary murine enamel cells, we found that key components of CRAC channels (ORAI1, ORAI2, ORAI3, STIM1, STIM2) were expressed and most abundant during the maturation stage of enamel development. Furthermore, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) but not ryanodine receptor (RyR) expression was high in enamel cells suggesting that IP3Rs are the main ER Ca2+ release mechanism. Passive depletion of ER Ca2+ stores with thapsigargin resulted in a significant raise in [Ca2+]i consistent with SOCE. In cells pre-treated with the CRAC channel blocker Synta-66 Ca2+ entry was significantly inhibited. These data demonstrate that enamel cells have SOCE mediated by CRAC channels and implicate them as a mechanism for Ca2+ uptake in enamel formation. PMID:26515404

  18. Cell cycle gene expression under clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemenko, Olga

    2016-07-01

    Cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) are main regulators of the cell cycle of eukaryotes. It's assumes a significant change of their level in cells under microgravity conditions and by other physical factors actions. The clinorotation use enables to determine the influence of gravity on simulated events in the cell during the cell cycle - exit from the state of quiet stage and promotion presynthetic phase (G1) and DNA synthesis phase (S) of the cell cycle. For the clinorotation effect study on cell proliferation activity is the necessary studies of molecular mechanisms of cell cycle regulation and development of plants under altered gravity condition. The activity of cyclin D, which is responsible for the events of the cell cycle in presynthetic phase can be controlled by the action of endogenous as well as exogenous factors, but clinorotation is one of the factors that influence on genes expression that regulate the cell cycle.These data can be used as a model for further research of cyclin - CDK complex for study of molecular mechanisms regulation of growth and proliferation. In this investigation we tried to summarize and analyze known literature and own data we obtained relatively the main regulators of the cell cycle in altered gravity condition.

  19. Optogenetics for gene expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, Konrad; Naumann, Sebastian; Weber, Wilfried; Zurbriggen, Matias D

    2015-02-01

    Molecular switches that are controlled by chemicals have evolved as central research instruments in mammalian cell biology. However, these tools are limited in terms of their spatiotemporal resolution due to freely diffusing inducers. These limitations have recently been addressed by the development of optogenetic, genetically encoded, and light-responsive tools that can be controlled with the unprecedented spatiotemporal precision of light. In this article, we first provide a brief overview of currently available optogenetic tools that have been designed to control diverse cellular processes. Then, we focus on recent developments in light-controlled gene expression technologies and provide the reader with a guideline for choosing the most suitable gene expression system.

  20. Colony stimulating factor 1 is an extrinsic stimulator of mouse spermatogonial stem cell self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Oatley, Jon M.; Oatley, Melissa J.; Avarbock, Mary R.; Tobias, John W.; Brinster, Ralph L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Self-renewal and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) provide the foundation for testis homeostasis, yet mechanisms that control their functions in mammals are poorly defined. We used microarray transcript profiling to identify specific genes whose expressions are augmented in the SSC-enriched Thy1+ germ cell fraction of mouse pup testes. Comparisons of gene expression in the Thy1+ germ cell fraction with the Thy1-depleted testis cell population identified 202 genes that are expressed 10-fold or higher in Thy1+ cells. This database provided a mining tool to investigate specific characteristics of SSCs and identify novel mechanisms that potentially influence their functions. These analyses revealed that colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (Csf1r) gene expression is enriched in Thy1+ germ cells. Addition of recombinant colony stimulating factor 1 (Csf1), the specific ligand for Csf1r, to culture media significantly enhanced the self-renewal of SSCs in heterogeneous Thy1+ spermatogonial cultures over a 63-day period without affecting total germ cell expansion. In vivo, expression of Csf1 in both pre-pubertal and adult testes was localized to clusters of Leydig cells and select peritubular myoid cells. Collectively, these results identify Csf1 as an extrinsic stimulator of SSC self-renewal and implicate Leydig and myoid cells as contributors of the testicular stem cell niche in mammals. PMID:19270176

  1. Complex expression patterns of lymphocyte-specific genes during the development of cartilaginous fish implicate unique lymphoid tissues in generating an immune repertoire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miracle, A. L.; Anderson, M. K.; Litman, R. T.; Walsh, C. J.; Luer, C. A.; Rothenberg, E. V.; Litman, G. W.

    2001-01-01

    Cartilaginous fish express canonical B and T cell recognition genes, but their lymphoid organs and lymphocyte development have been poorly defined. Here, the expression of Ig, TCR, recombination-activating gene (Rag)-1 and terminal deoxynucleosidase (TdT) genes has been used to identify roles of various lymphoid tissues throughout development in the cartilaginous fish, Raja eglanteria (clearnose skate). In embryogenesis, Ig and TCR genes are sharply up-regulated at 8 weeks of development. At this stage TCR and TdT expression is limited to the thymus; later, TCR gene expression appears in peripheral sites in hatchlings and adults, suggesting that the thymus is a source of T cells as in mammals. B cell gene expression indicates more complex roles for the spleen and two special organs of cartilaginous fish-the Leydig and epigonal (gonad-associated) organs. In the adult, the Leydig organ is the site of the highest IgM and IgX expression. However, the spleen is the first site of IgM expression, while IgX is expressed first in gonad, liver, Leydig and even thymus. Distinctive spatiotemporal patterns of Ig light chain gene expression also are seen. A subset of Ig genes is pre-rearranged in the germline of the cartilaginous fish, making expression possible without rearrangement. To assess whether this allows differential developmental regulation, IgM and IgX heavy chain cDNA sequences from specific tissues and developmental stages have been compared with known germline-joined genomic sequences. Both non-productively rearranged genes and germline-joined genes are transcribed in the embryo and hatchling, but not in the adult.

  2. Amplification of mouse mammary tumor virus genomes in non-mammary tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Racevskis, J; Beyer, H

    1989-01-01

    Extra proviral copies of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) are known to be present in the genomes of certain T-cell lymphomas of mice. Analysis of additional non-mammary tumor cell types known to express MMTV transcripts and antigens revealed the presence of extra acquired MMTV proviruses in a pituitary tumor cell line, a macrophage line, and Leydig testicular tumor cells. The nature of the amplified MMTV proviruses in these various tumor cell types differed with regard to copy number and presence of alterations in the long terminal repeat region. Images PMID:2535749

  3. Expression of bacterial genes in plant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fraley, R T; Rogers, S G; Horsch, R B; Sanders, P R; Flick, J S; Adams, S P; Bittner, M L; Brand, L A; Fink, C L; Fry, J S; Galluppi, G R; Goldberg, S B; Hoffmann, N L; Woo, S C

    1983-01-01

    Chimeric bacterial genes conferring resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics have been inserted into the Agrobacterium tumefaciens tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid and introduced into plant cells by in vitro transformation techniques. The chimeric genes contain the nopaline synthase 5' and 3' regulatory regions joined to the genes for neomycin phosphotransferase type I or type II. The chimeric genes were cloned into an intermediate vector, pMON120, and inserted into pTiB6S3 by recombination and then introduced into petunia and tobacco cells by cocultivating A. tumefaciens cells with protoplast-derived cells. Southern hybridization was used to confirm the presence of the chimeric genes in the transformed plant tissues. Expression of the chimeric genes was determined by the ability of the transformed cells to proliferate on medium containing normally inhibitory levels of kanamycin (50 micrograms/ml) or other aminoglycoside antibiotics. Plant cells transformed by wild-type pTiB6S3 or derivatives carrying the bacterial neomycin phosphotransferase genes with their own promoters failed to grow under these conditions. The significance of these results for plant genetic engineering is discussed. Images PMID:6308651

  4. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2013-07-01

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  5. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2013-07-26

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  6. Cytotoxic effect of nanosilver particles on testicular tissue: Evidence for biochemical stress and Hsp70-2 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Rezazadeh-Reyhani, Zari; Razi, Mazdak; Malekinejad, Hassan; Sadrkhanlou, Rajabali

    2015-09-01

    Lastly, there are growing evidences that nanosilver (NS) particles highly induce cytotoxic impacts in vitro and in vivo. Here, we analyzed the dose dependent effect of NS on histological changes, biochemical alterations and endocrine statuses, sperm parameters as well as chaperone Hsp70-2 expression. NS particles (50-60nm) were administrated in 3 doses of 0.5, 1 and 5mg/kg, intraperitoneally, for 35 days. The 0.3mL normal saline was administrated in control-sham group. Histological alterations, sperm parameters, serum levels of LH, FSH and testosterone were evaluated. Germinal and Leydig cells RNA damage, Leydig cells steroidogenic foci, the testicular and sperm total antioxidant capacity (TAC), malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) levels, immunohistochemical (IHC) expression and mRNA level of Hsp70-2 were analyzed. The NS, dose dependently, resulted in enhanced germinal cells degeneration, necrosis, seminiferous tubules atrophy and decreased serum levels of LH, FSH and testosterone. Elevated germinal and Leydig cells RNA damage associated with increased sperm abnormalities were observed in NS-treated groups. Expression of Hsp70-2 was up-regulated in 0.5mg/kg, while its expression was decreased in 1 and 5mg/kg NS-treated groups. Testicular and sperm TAC levels reduced. However, the MDA and NO levels significantly (P<0.05) increased in all NS-treated groups. No histological and biochemical changes were detected in control-sham group. In conclusion, the NS particles exert their pathological impact via affecting testicular antioxidant and endocrine statuses, which in turn lead to diminished expression of Hsp70-2. Ultimately, by this mechanism NS particles adversely impact the cellular RNA, DNA and protein contents.

  7. Cytotoxic effect of nanosilver particles on testicular tissue: Evidence for biochemical stress and Hsp70-2 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Rezazadeh-Reyhani, Zari; Razi, Mazdak; Malekinejad, Hassan; Sadrkhanlou, Rajabali

    2015-09-01

    Lastly, there are growing evidences that nanosilver (NS) particles highly induce cytotoxic impacts in vitro and in vivo. Here, we analyzed the dose dependent effect of NS on histological changes, biochemical alterations and endocrine statuses, sperm parameters as well as chaperone Hsp70-2 expression. NS particles (50-60nm) were administrated in 3 doses of 0.5, 1 and 5mg/kg, intraperitoneally, for 35 days. The 0.3mL normal saline was administrated in control-sham group. Histological alterations, sperm parameters, serum levels of LH, FSH and testosterone were evaluated. Germinal and Leydig cells RNA damage, Leydig cells steroidogenic foci, the testicular and sperm total antioxidant capacity (TAC), malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) levels, immunohistochemical (IHC) expression and mRNA level of Hsp70-2 were analyzed. The NS, dose dependently, resulted in enhanced germinal cells degeneration, necrosis, seminiferous tubules atrophy and decreased serum levels of LH, FSH and testosterone. Elevated germinal and Leydig cells RNA damage associated with increased sperm abnormalities were observed in NS-treated groups. Expression of Hsp70-2 was up-regulated in 0.5mg/kg, while its expression was decreased in 1 and 5mg/kg NS-treated groups. Testicular and sperm TAC levels reduced. However, the MDA and NO levels significantly (P<0.05) increased in all NS-treated groups. No histological and biochemical changes were detected in control-sham group. In conclusion, the NS particles exert their pathological impact via affecting testicular antioxidant and endocrine statuses, which in turn lead to diminished expression of Hsp70-2. Ultimately, by this mechanism NS particles adversely impact the cellular RNA, DNA and protein contents. PMID:26363132

  8. Expression of growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9), ALK5, and claudin-11 in adult alpaca testis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qing Yun; Gao, Zhen Zhen; Zhao, Li; He, Jun Ping; Dong, Cheng Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) is an oocyte-derived factor critical for folliculogenesis. Recently, in vitro data showed that GDF9 inhibited the localization of tight junction (TJ) proteins, suggesting that GDF9 could potentially regulate spermatogenesis in vivo, via inhibition of Sertoli cell TJ function. The purpose of the present study was to determine the expression and localization of GDF9, its receptor, ALK5, and its latent target protein, claudin-11 (one of TJ proteins) in adult alpaca testis using Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Western blotting results demonstrated that GDF9, ALK5 and claudin-11 were expressed in the adult alpaca testis. Immunohistochemistry revealed that GDF9 was expressed stage-specifically in the cytoplasm of pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids of the adult alpaca seminiferous epithelium. Type I receptor, ALK5 was mainly localized in the cytoplasm of round spermatids and Leydig cells, and to a lesser extent in the cytoplasm of pachytene spermatocytes and Sertoli cells. Its latent target protein, claudin-11, was perpendicular or parallel to the basal lamina in the basal part of Sertoli cells. These results indicated that GDF9, as a paracrine and autocrine growth factor derived from round spermatids and pachytene spermatocytes, is involved in regulating spermatogenesis via action on germ cells or somatic cells (i.e. Leydig cells, Sertoli cells).

  9. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) in human breast cancer: correlation of breast cancer cell aggressive phenotype with PBR expression, nuclear localization, and PBR-mediated cell proliferation and nuclear transport of cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, M; Fertikh, D; Culty, M; Li, H; Vidic, B; Papadopoulos, V

    1999-02-15

    Aberrant cell proliferation and increased invasive and metastatic behavior are hallmarks of the advancement of breast cancer. Numerous studies implicate a role for cholesterol in the mechanisms underlying cell proliferation and cancer progression. The peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) is an Mr 18,000 protein primarily localized to the mitochondria. PBR mediates cholesterol transport across the mitochondrial membranes in steroidogenic cells. A role for PBR in the regulation of tumor cell proliferation has also been shown. In this study, we examined the expression, characteristics, localization, and function of PBR in a battery of human breast cancer cell lines differing in their invasive and chemotactic potential as well as in several human tissue biopsies. Expression of PBR ligand binding and mRNA was dramatically increased in the highly aggressive cell lines, such as MDA-231, relative to nonaggressive cell lines, such as MCF-7. PBR was also found to be expressed at high levels in aggressive metastatic human breast tumor biopsies compared with normal breast tissues. Subcellular localization with both antibodies and a fluorescent PBR drug ligand revealed that PBR from the MDA-231 cell line as well as from aggressive metastatic human breast tumor biopsies localized primarily in and around the nucleus. This localization is in direct contrast to the largely cytoplasmic localization seen in MCF-7 cells, normal breast tissue, and to the typical mitochondrial localization seen in mouse tumor Leydig cells. Pharmacological characterization of the receptor and partial nucleotide sequencing of PBR cDNA revealed that the MDA-231 PBR is similar, although not identical, to previously described PBR. Addition of high affinity PBR drug ligands to MDA-231 cells increased the incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine into the cells in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting a role for PBR in the regulation of MDA-231 cell proliferation. Cholesterol uptake into isolated MDA-231

  10. Notch signaling represses GATA4-induced expression of genes involved in steroid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    George, Rajani M.; Hahn, Katherine L.; Rawls, Alan; Viger, Robert S.; Wilson-Rawls, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    Notch2 and Notch3 and genes of the Notch signaling network are dynamically expressed in developing follicles, where they are essential for granulosa cell proliferation and meiotic maturation. Notch receptors, ligands, and downstream effector genes are also expressed in testicular Leydig cells, predicting a potential role in regulating steroidogenesis. In this study, we sought to determine if Notch signaling in small follicles regulates the proliferation response of granulosa cells to follicle stimulating hormone and represses the up-regulation steroidogenic gene expression that occurs in response to FSH as the follicle grows. Inhibition of Notch signaling in small preantral follicles led to the up-regulation of the expression of genes in the steroid biosynthetic pathway. Similarly, progesterone secretion by MA-10 Leydig cells was significantly inhibited by constitutively active Notch. Together, these data indicated that Notch signaling inhibits steroidogenesis. GATA4 has been shown to be a positive regulator of steroidogenic genes, including steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, P450 aromatase, and 3B-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. We observed that Notch downstream effectors HEY1, HEY2, and HEYL are able to differentially regulate these GATA4-dependent promoters. These data are supported by the presence of HEY/HES binding sites in these promoters. These studies indicate that Notch signaling has a role in the complex regulation of the steroidogenic pathway. PMID:26183893

  11. Gene Expression by Mouse Inner Ear Hair Cells during Development

    PubMed Central

    Scheffer, Déborah I.; Shen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear are essential for hearing and balance. As a consequence, pathogenic variants in genes specifically expressed in hair cells often cause hereditary deafness. Hair cells are few in number and not easily isolated from the adjacent supporting cells, so the biochemistry and molecular biology of hair cells can be difficult to study. To study gene expression in hair cells, we developed a protocol for hair cell isolation by FACS. With nearly pure hair cells and surrounding cells, from cochlea and utricle and from E16 to P7, we performed a comprehensive cell type-specific RNA-Seq study of gene expression during mouse inner ear development. Expression profiling revealed new hair cell genes with distinct expression patterns: some are specific for vestibular hair cells, others for cochlear hair cells, and some are expressed just before or after maturation of mechanosensitivity. We found that many of the known hereditary deafness genes are much more highly expressed in hair cells than surrounding cells, suggesting that genes preferentially expressed in hair cells are good candidates for unknown deafness genes. PMID:25904789

  12. T cells stimulate catabolic gene expression by the stromal cells from giant cell tumor of bone

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Robert W.; Ghert, Michelle; Singh, Gurmit

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two T cell lines stimulate PTHrP, RANKL, MMP13 gene expression in GCT cell cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD40 expressed by stromal cells; CD40L detected in whole tumor but not cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of CD40L treatment on GCT cells increased PTHrP and MMP13 gene expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTHrP treatment increased MMP13 expression, while inhibition decreased expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells may stimulate GCT stromal cells and promote the osteolysis of the tumor. -- Abstract: The factors that promote the localized bone resorption by giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) are not fully understood. We investigated whether T cells could contribute to bone resorption by stimulating expression of genes for parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, and the receptor activator of nuclear-factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL). Two cell lines, Jurkat clone E6-1 and D1.1, were co-cultured with isolated GCT stromal cells. Real-time PCR analyses demonstrated a significant increase of all three genes following 48 h incubation, and PTHrP and MMP-13 gene expression was also increased at 24 h. Further, we examined the expression of CD40 ligand (CD40L), a protein expressed by activated T cells, and its receptor, CD40, in GCT. Immunohistochemistry results revealed expression of the CD40 receptor in both the stromal cells and giant cells of the tumor. RNA collected from whole GCT tissues showed expression of CD40LG, which was absent in cultured stromal cells, and suggests that CD40L is expressed within GCT. Stimulation of GCT stromal cells with CD40L significantly increased expression of the PTHrP and MMP-13 genes. Moreover, we show that inhibition of PTHrP with neutralizing antibodies significantly decreased MMP13 expression by the stromal cells compared to IgG-matched controls, whereas stimulation with PTHrP (1-34) increased MMP-13 gene expression. These

  13. Murine somatic cell nuclear transfer using reprogrammed donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hoin; Park, Jong Im; Roh, Sangho

    2016-01-01

    In vivo-matured mouse oocytes were enucleated, and a single murine embryonic fibroblast (control or reprogrammed by introducing extracts from murine testis tissue, which showed expression of male germ cell-specific genes) was injected into the cytoplasm of the oocytes. The rate of blastocyst development and expression levels of Oct-4, Eomes and Cdx-2 were not significantly different in both experimental groups. However, the expression levels of Nanog, Sox9 and Glut-1 were significantly increased when reprogrammed cells were used as donor nuclei. Increased expression of Nanog can be supportive of complete reprogramming of somatic cell nuclear transfer murine embryos. The present study suggested that donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes can be reconstructed and can develop into embryos with normal high expression of developmentally essential genes. PMID:26369430

  14. CSD mRNA expression in rat testis and the effect of taurine on testosterone secretion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiancheng; Wu, Gaofeng; Feng, Ying; Sun, Changmian; Lin, Shumei; Hu, Jianmin

    2010-06-01

    In the present study, the cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase (CSD) mRNA expression was detected in rat testis by RT-PCR. The results showed that CSD mRNA was expressed in rat testis, and the putative encoded-amino acid sequence was exactly the same as that in rat liver which was already known. At the same time, the effects of taurine on testosterone secretion were investigated both in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, taurine were administered to male rats by tap water. The results showed that taurine obviously stimulated the secretion of FSH, LH and testosterone in serum, but showed no significant effect on the secretion of estradiol. Taurine administered in water could significantly increase the concentration of taurine in the blood and testis of rats. In vitro, cultured Leydig cells were treated with taurine independently or incubated with human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) and progesterone. The results showed that taurine had biphasic effects on basal testosterone secretion in cultured Leydig cells. Low concentrations of taurine (0.1-100 microg/ml) could stimulate testosterone secretion, whereas high concentration of taurine (400 microg/ml) could inhibit testosterone secretion. Testosterone secretion stimulated by HCG was significantly increased by 10 and 100 microg/ml of taurine administration, and obviously decreased by treating with 400 microg/ml of taurine. Testosterone secretion induced by progesterone was significantly stimulated by treating with 1.0 and 10 microg/ml of taurine, however, it was significantly inhibited when treated with 400 microg/ml of taurine. Meanwhile, the effect of silencing CSD mRNA by siRNA on testosterone secretion was analyzed. The results showed that testosterone secretion was obviously decreased after the inhibition of CSD mRNA expression in cultured Leydig cells. These results indicated that taurine can be synthesized in rat testis by CSD pathway, and it plays important roles in testosterone secretion both in vivo and in vitro which

  15. Probing cell-free gene expression noise in femtoliter volumes.

    PubMed

    Karig, David K; Jung, Seung-Yong; Srijanto, Bernadeta; Collier, C Patrick; Simpson, Michael L

    2013-09-20

    Cell-free systems offer a simplified and flexible context that enables important biological reactions while removing complicating factors such as fitness, division, and mutation that are associated with living cells. However, cell-free expression in unconfined spaces is missing important elements of expression in living cells. In particular, the small volume of living cells can give rise to significant stochastic effects, which are negligible in bulk cell-free reactions. Here, we confine cell-free gene expression reactions to cell-relevant 20 fL volumes (between the volumes of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae ), in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) containers. We demonstrate that expression efficiency varies widely among different containers, likely due to non-Poisson distribution of expression machinery at the observed scale. Previously, this phenomenon has been observed only in liposomes. In addition, we analyze gene expression noise. This analysis is facilitated by our use of cell-free systems, which allow the mapping of the measured noise properties to intrinsic noise models. In contrast, previous live cell noise analysis efforts have been complicated by multiple noise sources. Noise analysis reveals signatures of translational bursting, while noise dynamics suggest that overall cell-free expression is limited by a diminishing translation rate. In addition to offering a unique approach to understanding noise in gene circuits, our work contributes to a deeper understanding of the biophysical properties of cell-free expression systems, thus aiding efforts to harness cell-free systems for synthetic biology applications.

  16. Expression of bone morphogenetic proteins of human neoplastic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, S; Gao, Y H; Ohara-Nemoto, Y; Kataoka, H; Satoh, M

    1997-07-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are crucial factors of osteogenesis. We investigated the expressions of BMP subtypes in human salivary adenocarcinoma cell line (HSG-S8), tongue squamous cell (HSC-4) and gingival squamous cell (Ca9-22) carcinoma cell lines, gastric poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma cell (MNK45) and signet ring cell (KATOIII) carcinoma cell lines, rectal adenocarcinoma (RCM-1, RCM-2, and RCM-3), and thyroid (8505C) and bladder (T24) carcinoma cell lines by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RT-PCR disclosed that BMP-1 was expressed in all cell lines examined, and BMP-2 was amplified in almost all cells except MKN45. Two squamous cell carcinomas, HSC-4 and Ca9-22, and KATOIII expressed only BMP-1 and BMP-2. MKN45 did not express BMP-2, but expressed BMP-7 and weakly BMP-4 and BMP-5. In addition to the expression BMP-7, and HSG-S8 expressed BMP-6. These findings indicated that the neoplastic epithelial cells possessed a rather great potency to express BMP mRNAs. On the other hand, among these carcinoma cells, HSG-S8 solely induced bone in nude mouse tumors, and HSC-4 and KATOIII contained many calcified masses in tumors while the rest did not induce either. PMID:9247707

  17. INSL-3 is expressed in human hyperplastic and neoplastic thyrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Hoang-Vu, Cuong; Kehlen, Astrid; Hinze, Raoul; Holzhausen, Hans-Jürgen; Weber, Ekkehard; Fischer, Bernd; Dralle, Henning; Klonisch, Thomas

    2003-05-01

    The insulin-like hormone INSL-3, also named relaxin-like factor (RLF) or Leydig-derived insulin-like peptide (LEY-IL), is expressed in various reproductive tissues and is regarded a marker of differentiation in human testicular Leydig cells. Recently, we have identified differential expression of human INSL-3 in neoplastic Leydig cells and mammary epithelial cells suggesting an involvement of INSL-3 in tumor biology. Here we have investigated the expression of INSL-3 in human thyroid carcinoma cell lines and in the human thyroid gland which has been shown to express transcripts for the G protein coupled INSL-3 receptor LGR8. When we determined the expression of INSL-3 in eight human thyroid carcinoma cell lines, a novel INSL-3 splice variant containing a 95 bp out-of-frame insertion at the beginning of exon II of the INSL-3 gene was discovered. Treatment of the human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell line 8505C with diethylstilbestrol (DES) caused a significant dose-dependent transcriptional down-regulation of INSL-3 and a marked up-regulation of LGR8. Employing in situ hybridization to detect INSL-3 transcripts and specific rabbit antisera against the INSL-3 proteins, both INSL-3 isoforms were detected in patients with Graves' disease (n=10), follicular carcinomas (FTC; n=12), papillary carcinomas (PTC; n=9) and undifferentiated anaplastic carcinomas (UTC; n=15). By contrast, thyrocytes of all 15 benign goiter tissues studied were devoid of both INSL-3 isoforms, mRNA and protein. Our data indicate that INSL-3 hormone is up-regulated in hyperplastic and neoplastic human thyrocytes suggesting that the INSL-3 isoforms may serve as additional markers for hyperplastic and neoplastic human thyrocytes. In the anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell line 8505C, the regulation of both INSL-3 and LGR8 by estrogen may be the first indication of a novel hormonally responsive, auto-/paracrine INSL-3 LGR8 ligand receptor system active in human thyroid carcinoma cells.

  18. P450-aromatase activity and expression in human testicular tissues with severe spermatogenic failure.

    PubMed

    Lardone, M C; Castillo, P; Valdevenito, R; Ebensperger, M; Ronco, A M; Pommer, R; Piottante, A; Castro, A

    2010-08-01

    There is evidence that impaired spermatogenesis is associated with an imbalance in the oestradiol/testosterone ratio and with Leydig cell (LC) dysfunction. In testis, P450-aromatase, encoded by CYP19, is responsible for the conversion of testosterone to oestradiol. The aims of this study were to quantify CYP19 mRNA expression, aromatase activity and protein localization, and to measure the oestradiol to testosterone ratio in testicular tissues of men with spermatogenic impairment. Twenty-four men with complete Sertoli cell-only syndrome (SCOS), 14 with focal SCOS, 14 with maturation arrest (MA), 8 with mixed atrophy and 30 controls with normal spermatogenesis were subjected to testicular biopsy. All subjects underwent a physical examination, cytogenetic and serum hormonal studies. Testicular CYP19 mRNA was quantified using real time RT-PCR. Testicular aromatase activity was measured using the (3)H(2)0 assay and protein expression was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. In cases, serum testosterone and oestradiol were normal, but the testosterone/LH ratio was lower compared with controls (p < 0.05). Aromatase was localized in the Leydig, Sertoli and germ cells of all tissues, although stronger intensity was observed in LC. Aromatase mRNA and activity were not altered in cases and correlated positively with LC number (r = 0.516 and r = 0.369; p < 0.008). The intratesticular oestradiol/testosterone ratio was elevated (p = 0.005) in complete SCOS patients compared with controls. In conclusion, testicular aromatase seems to be normal in most subjects with impaired spermatogenesis. However, an altered intratesticular oestradiol/testosterone ratio in some patients with complete SCOS suggests that aromatase is increased, which might contribute to Leydig cell dysfunction.

  19. Hemoglobin enhances tissue factor expression on human malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, F A; Amirkhosravi, A; Amaya, M; Meyer, T; Biggerstaff, J; Desai, H; Francis, J L

    2001-04-01

    Tissue Factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that complexes with factor VII/activated factor VII to initiate blood coagulation. TF may be expressed on the surface of various cells including monocytes and endothelial cells. Over-expression of TF in human tumor cell lines promotes metastasis. We recently showed that hemoglobin (Hb) forms a specific complex with TF purified from human malignant melanoma cells and enhances its procoagulant activity (PCA). To further study this interaction, we examined the effect of Hb on the expression of TF on human malignant (TF+) cells and KG1 myeloid leukemia (TF-) cells. Human melanoma A375 and J82 bladder carcinoma cells, which express TF at moderate and relatively high levels, respectively, were incubated with varying concentrations (0-1.5 mg/ml) of Hb. After washing, cells were analyzed for Hb binding and TF expression using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Hb bound to the cells in a concentration-dependent manner, and increased both TF expression and PCA. The human A375 malignant melanoma cells incubated with Hb (1 mg/ml) expressed up to six times more TF antigen than cells without Hb. This increase in TF expression and PCA of intact cells incubated with Hb was significantly inhibited by cycloheximide at a concentration of 10 microg/ml (P < 0.01). An increase in total cellular TF antigen content was demonstrated by specific immunoassay. In contrast, Hb (5 mg/ml) did not induce TF expression and PCA on KG1 cells as determined by flow cytometry and TF (FXAA) activity. We conclude that Hb specifically binds to TF-bearing malignant cells and increases their PCA. This effect seems to be at least partly due to de novo synthesis of TF and increased surface expression. However, the exact mechanism by which Hb binds and upregulates TF expression remains to be determined.

  20. Hemoglobin enhances tissue factor expression on human malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, F A; Amirkhosravi, A; Amaya, M; Meyer, T; Biggerstaff, J; Desai, H; Francis, J L

    2001-04-01

    Tissue Factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that complexes with factor VII/activated factor VII to initiate blood coagulation. TF may be expressed on the surface of various cells including monocytes and endothelial cells. Over-expression of TF in human tumor cell lines promotes metastasis. We recently showed that hemoglobin (Hb) forms a specific complex with TF purified from human malignant melanoma cells and enhances its procoagulant activity (PCA). To further study this interaction, we examined the effect of Hb on the expression of TF on human malignant (TF+) cells and KG1 myeloid leukemia (TF-) cells. Human melanoma A375 and J82 bladder carcinoma cells, which express TF at moderate and relatively high levels, respectively, were incubated with varying concentrations (0-1.5 mg/ml) of Hb. After washing, cells were analyzed for Hb binding and TF expression using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Hb bound to the cells in a concentration-dependent manner, and increased both TF expression and PCA. The human A375 malignant melanoma cells incubated with Hb (1 mg/ml) expressed up to six times more TF antigen than cells without Hb. This increase in TF expression and PCA of intact cells incubated with Hb was significantly inhibited by cycloheximide at a concentration of 10 microg/ml (P < 0.01). An increase in total cellular TF antigen content was demonstrated by specific immunoassay. In contrast, Hb (5 mg/ml) did not induce TF expression and PCA on KG1 cells as determined by flow cytometry and TF (FXAA) activity. We conclude that Hb specifically binds to TF-bearing malignant cells and increases their PCA. This effect seems to be at least partly due to de novo synthesis of TF and increased surface expression. However, the exact mechanism by which Hb binds and upregulates TF expression remains to be determined. PMID:11414630

  1. Expression of Steroidogenic Factor 1 in the Testis Requires an Interactive Array of Elements Within Its Proximal Promoter1

    PubMed Central

    Scherrer, Serge P.; Rice, Daren A.; Heckert, Leslie L.

    2006-01-01

    Steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) is an orphan nuclear receptor that is important for expression of genes involved in sexual differentiation, testicular and adrenal development, and hormone synthesis and regulation. To better understand the mechanisms required for SF-1 production, we employed transient transfec-tion analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays to characterize the elements and proteins required for transcriptional activity of the SF-1 proximal promoter in testicular Sertoli and Leydig cells and adrenocortical cells. Direct comparison of SF-1-promoter activity in testis and adrenal cell types established that a similar set of regulatory elements (an E box, CCAAT box, and Sp1-binding sites) is required for proximal promoter activity in these cells. Further evaluation of the E box and CCAAT box revealed a novel synergism between the two elements and iden-tified functionally important bases within the elements. Importantly, DNA/protein-binding studies uncovered new proteins interacting with the E box and CCAAT box. Thus, in addition to the previously identified USF and NF-Y proteins, newly described complexes, having migration properties that differed between Sertoli and Leydig cells, were observed bound to the E box and CCAAT box. Transient transfection analysis also identified several Sp1/Sp3-binding elements important for expression of SF-1 in the testis, one of which was previously described for expression in the adrenal gland whereas the other two were newly disclosed elements. PMID:12390883

  2. Calreticulin modulates cell adhesiveness via regulation of vinculin expression

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Calreticulin is an ubiquitous and highly conserved high capacity Ca(2+)- binding protein that plays a major role in Ca2+ storage within the lumen of the ER. Here, using L fibroblast cell lines expressing different levels of calreticulin, we show that calreticulin plays a role in the control of cell adhesiveness via regulation of expression of vinculin, a cytoskeletal protein essential for cell-substratum and cell-cell attachments. Both vinculin protein and mRNA levels are increased in cells overexpressing calreticulin and are downregulated in cells expressing reduced level of calreticulin. Abundance of actin, talin, alpha 5 and beta 1 integrins, pp125 focal adhesion kinase, and alpha-catenin is not affected by the differential calreticulin expression. Overexpression of calreticulin increases both cell- substratum and cell-cell adhesiveness of L fibroblasts that, most surprisingly, establish vinculin-rich cell-cell junctions. Upregulation of calreticulin also affects adhesion-dependent phenomena such as cell motility (which decreases) and cell spreading (which increases). Downregulation of calreticulin brings about inverse effects. Cell adhesiveness is Ca2+ regulated. The level of calreticulin expression, however, has no effect on either the resting cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration or the magnitude of FGF-induced Ca2+ transients. Calreticulin, however, participates in Ca2+ homeostasis as its level of expression affects cell viability at low concentrations of extracellular Ca2+. Consequently, we infer that it is not the Ca2+ storage function of calreticulin that affects cell adhesiveness. Neither endogenous calreticulin nor overexpressed green fluorescent protein-calreticulin construct can be detected outside of the ER. Since all of the adhesion-related effects of differential calreticulin expression can be explained by its regulation of vinculin expression, we conclude that it is the ER-resident calreticulin that affects cellular adhesiveness. PMID:8991101

  3. Probing cell-free gene expression noise in femtoliter volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Karig, David K; Jung, Seung-Yong; Srijanto, Bernadeta R; Collier, Pat; Simpson, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    Cell-free systems offer a simplified and flexible context that enables important biological reactions while removing complicating factors such as fitness, division, and mutation that are associated with living cells. However, cell-free expression in unconfined spaces is missing important elements of expression in living cells. In particular, the small volume of living cells can give rise to significant stochastic effects, which are negligible in bulk cell-free reactions. Here, we confine cell-free gene expression reactions to cell relevant 20 fL volumes (between the volumes of E. coli and S. cerevisiae), in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) containers. We demonstrate that expression efficiency varies widely at this volume, and we analyze gene expression noise. Noise analysis reveals signatures of translational bursting while noise dynamics suggest that overall cell-free expression is limited by a diminishing translation rate. In addition to offering a unique approach to understanding noise in gene circuits, our work contributes to a deeper understanding of the biophysical properties of cell-free expression systems, thus aiding efforts to harness cell-free systems for synthetic biology applications.

  4. Expression of HOX C homeobox genes in lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, H J; Stage, K M; Mathews, C H; Detmer, K; Scibienski, R; MacKenzie, M; Migliaccio, E; Boncinelli, E; Largman, C

    1993-08-01

    The class I homeobox genes located in four clusters in mammalian genomes (HOX A, HOX B, HOX C, and HOX D) appear to play a major role in fetal development. Previous surveys of homeobox gene expression in human leukemic cell lines have shown that certain HOX A genes are expressed only in myeloid cell lines, whereas HOX B gene expression is largely restricted to cells with erythroid potential. We now report a survey of the expression patterns of 9 homeobox genes from the HOX C locus in a panel of 24 human and 7 murine leukemic cell lines. The most striking observation is the lymphoid-specific pattern of expression of HOX C4, located at the 3' end of the locus. A major transcript of 1.9 kilobases is observed in both T-cell and B-cell lines. HOX C4 expression is also detected in normal human marrow and peripheral blood lymphocytes, but not in mature granulocytes or monocytes. HOX C8 is also expressed in human lymphoid cells but is expressed in other blood cell types as well. However, the HOX C8 transcript pattern is lineage specific. These data, in conjunction with earlier findings, suggest that homeobox gene expression influences lineage determination during hematopoiesis.

  5. Freedom of expression: cell-type-specific gene profiling.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Leo; Cheetham, Seth W; Brand, Andrea H

    2014-01-01

    Cell fate and behavior are results of differential gene regulation, making techniques to profile gene expression in specific cell types highly desirable. Many methods now enable investigation at the DNA, RNA and protein level. This review introduces the most recent and popular techniques, and discusses key issues influencing the choice between these such as ease, cost and applicability of information gained. Interdisciplinary collaborations will no doubt contribute further advances, including not just in single cell type but single-cell expression profiling.

  6. Nestin-expressing cells in the human hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kruglyakova, E P; Khovryakov, A V; Shikhanov, N P; Maccann, G M; Vael', Ikhsan; Kruglyakov, P P; Sosunov, A A

    2005-11-01

    Nestin, a protein of the intermediate filament family, is typical of undifferentiated neural stem and progenitor cells. The present report describes studies of nestin expression in the hippocampus of patients with epilepsy and identifies five types of nestin-immunopositive cells differing in terms of their morphological phenotype and immunological characteristics. These were cells with the phenotype of radial glial cells, bipolar cells, small dendritic cells, cells of the subependymal zone, and astrocyte-like cells. Two types of cell - radial gliocytes of the dentate fascia and NG2-immunopositive bipolar cells - can be regarded as neural precursors of different levels of commitment.

  7. Characteristics and EGFP expression of goat mammary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y-M; He, X-Y; Zhang, Y

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to establish a goat mammary gland epithelial (GMGE) cell line, and (ii) to determine if these GMGE cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing following transfection with a reporter gene, enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Primary culture of GMGE cells was achieved by outgrowth of migrating cells from the fragments of the mammary gland tissue of a lactating goat. The passage 16 GMGE cells were transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. The expression of Cell keratins of epithelial cells in GMGE cells was test by immunofluorescence. Βeta-Casein gene mRNA was test for GMGE cells by RT-PCR. The results showed that when grown at low density on a plastic substratum, the GMGE cells formed islands, and when grown to confluency, the cells formed a monolayer and aggregated with the characteristic cobble-stone morphology of epithelial cells. GMGE cells could form dome-like structure which looked like nipple, and the lumen-like structures formed among the cells. Several blister-like structures appeared in the appearance of the cells. The GMGE cells contained different cell types, majority of the cells were short shuttle-like or polygon which were beehive-like. A part of cells were round and flat, a small number of cells were elongated. Some of the GMGE cells contained milk drops. The cell nuclei were round which had 2-4 obvious cores. The expression of Cell keratins demonstrated the property of epithelial cells in GMGE cells by immunofluorescence. The GMGE cells could express transcript encoding a Βeta-Casein protein. EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the GMGE cells, and the transfected cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. In conclusion, we have established a EGFP gene transfected GMGE (ET-GMGE) cell line and maintained it long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. PMID:20113446

  8. Characteristics and EGFP expression of goat mammary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y-M; He, X-Y; Zhang, Y

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to establish a goat mammary gland epithelial (GMGE) cell line, and (ii) to determine if these GMGE cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing following transfection with a reporter gene, enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Primary culture of GMGE cells was achieved by outgrowth of migrating cells from the fragments of the mammary gland tissue of a lactating goat. The passage 16 GMGE cells were transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. The expression of Cell keratins of epithelial cells in GMGE cells was test by immunofluorescence. Βeta-Casein gene mRNA was test for GMGE cells by RT-PCR. The results showed that when grown at low density on a plastic substratum, the GMGE cells formed islands, and when grown to confluency, the cells formed a monolayer and aggregated with the characteristic cobble-stone morphology of epithelial cells. GMGE cells could form dome-like structure which looked like nipple, and the lumen-like structures formed among the cells. Several blister-like structures appeared in the appearance of the cells. The GMGE cells contained different cell types, majority of the cells were short shuttle-like or polygon which were beehive-like. A part of cells were round and flat, a small number of cells were elongated. Some of the GMGE cells contained milk drops. The cell nuclei were round which had 2-4 obvious cores. The expression of Cell keratins demonstrated the property of epithelial cells in GMGE cells by immunofluorescence. The GMGE cells could express transcript encoding a Βeta-Casein protein. EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the GMGE cells, and the transfected cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. In conclusion, we have established a EGFP gene transfected GMGE (ET-GMGE) cell line and maintained it long-term in culture by continuous subculturing.

  9. Robust Inference of Cell-to-Cell Expression Variations from Single- and K-Cell Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Manikandan; Martins, Andrew J.; Tsang, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying heterogeneity in gene expression among single cells can reveal information inaccessible to cell-population averaged measurements. However, the expression level of many genes in single cells fall below the detection limit of even the most sensitive technologies currently available. One proposed approach to overcome this challenge is to measure random pools of k cells (e.g., 10) to increase sensitivity, followed by computational “deconvolution” of cellular heterogeneity parameters (CHPs), such as the biological variance of single-cell expression levels. Existing approaches infer CHPs using either single-cell or k-cell data alone, and typically within a single population of cells. However, integrating both single- and k-cell data may reap additional benefits, and quantifying differences in CHPs across cell populations or conditions could reveal novel biological information. Here we present a Bayesian approach that can utilize single-cell, k-cell, or both simultaneously to infer CHPs within a single condition or their differences across two conditions. Using simulated as well as experimentally generated single- and k-cell data, we found situations where each data type would offer advantages, but using both together can improve precision and better reconcile CHP information contained in single- and k-cell data. We illustrate the utility of our approach by applying it to jointly generated single- and k-cell data to reveal CHP differences in several key inflammatory genes between resting and inflammatory cytokine-activated human macrophages, delineating differences in the distribution of ‘ON’ versus ‘OFF’ cells and in continuous variation of expression level among cells. Our approach thus offers a practical and robust framework to assess and compare cellular heterogeneity within and across biological conditions using modern multiplexed technologies. PMID:27438699

  10. Advantages and applications of CAR-expressing natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Glienke, Wolfgang; Esser, Ruth; Priesner, Christoph; Suerth, Julia D.; Schambach, Axel; Wels, Winfried S.; Grez, Manuel; Kloess, Stephan; Arseniev, Lubomir; Koehl, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to donor T cells, natural killer (NK) cells are known to mediate anti-cancer effects without the risk of inducing graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). In order to improve cytotoxicity against resistant cancer cells, auspicious efforts have been made with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) expressing T- and NK cells. These CAR-modified cells express antigen receptors against tumor-associated surface antigens, thus redirecting the effector cells and enhancing tumor-specific immunosurveillance. However, many cancer antigens are also expressed on healthy tissues, potentially leading to off tumor/on target toxicity by CAR-engineered cells. In order to control such potentially severe side effects, the insertion of suicide genes into CAR-modified effectors can provide a means for efficient depletion of these cells. While CAR-expressing T cells have entered successfully clinical trials, experience with CAR-engineered NK cells is mainly restricted to pre-clinical investigations and predominantly to NK cell lines. In this review we summarize the data on CAR expressing NK cells focusing on the possible advantage using these short-lived effector cells and discuss the necessity of suicide switches. Furthermore, we address the compliance of such modified NK cells with regulatory requirements as a new field in cellular immunotherapy. PMID:25729364

  11. Transferrin receptor expression by stimulated cells in mixed lymphocyte culture.

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, M; Bacon, P A; Symmons, D P; Walton, K W

    1985-01-01

    Transferrin receptor (TRFr) expression by cells in mixed lymphocyte culture increases steadily for the first 5 days, but then reaches a plateau. By the sixth day in culture, about 20% of viable cells express TRFr in two-way mixed lymphocyte reactions. This subpopulation of TRFr-positive cells represents the proliferating population; it is heterogeneous, containing T-cell blasts and smaller cells which are a mixture of T and non-T cells. A small group of non-T cells have phenotypic similarity to natural killer (NK) cells. T cells appear to divide earlier in the course of the response than non-T cells. The biphasic nature of this response and the slower non-T reactivity may be due to a secondary stimulation of non-T cells by factors released from activated T cells (such as interleukin-2). PMID:2982734

  12. The regulation of gene expression in hair cells.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Allen F; Ikeda, Ryoukichi; Masuda, Masatsugu

    2015-11-01

    No genes have been discovered for which expression is limited only to inner ear hair cells. This is hardly surprising, since the number of mammalian genes is estimated to be 20-25,000, and each gene typically performs many tasks in various locations. Many genes are expressed in inner ear sensory cells and not in other cells of the labyrinth. However, these genes are also expressed in other locations, often in other sensory or neuronal cell types. How gene transcription is directed specifically to hair cells is unclear. Key transcription factors that act during development can specify cell phenotypes, and the hair cell is no exception. The transcription factor ATOH1 is well known for its ability to transform nonsensory cells of the developing inner ear into hair cells. And yet, ATOH1 also specifies different sensory cells at other locations, neuronal phenotypes in the brain, and epithelial cells in the gut. How it specifies hair cells in the inner ear, but alternate cell types in other locations, is not known. Studies of regulatory DNA and transcription factors are revealing mechanisms that direct gene expression to hair cells, and that determine the hair cell identity. The purpose of this review is to summarize what is known about such gene regulation in this key auditory and vestibular cell type.

  13. Chemokine receptor expression by inflammatory T cells in EAE.

    PubMed

    Mony, Jyothi Thyagabhavan; Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines direct cellular infiltration to tissues, and their receptors and signaling pathways represent targets for therapy in diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The chemokine CCL20 is expressed in choroid plexus, a site of entry of T cells to the central nervous system (CNS). The CCL20 receptor CCR6 has been reported to be selectively expressed by CD4(+) T cells that produce the cytokine IL-17 (Th17 cells). Th17 cells and interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-producing Th1 cells are implicated in induction of MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We have assessed whether CCR6 identifies specific inflammatory T cell subsets in EAE. Our approach was to induce EAE, and then examine chemokine receptor expression by cytokine-producing T cells sorted from CNS at peak disease. About 7% of CNS-infiltrating CD4(+) T cells produced IFNγ in flow cytometric cytokine assays, whereas less than 1% produced IL-17. About 1% of CD4(+) T cells produced both cytokines. CCR6 was expressed by Th1, Th1+17 and by Th17 cells, but not by CD8(+) T cells. CD8(+) T cells expressed CXCR3, which was also expressed by CD4(+) T cells, with no correlation to cytokine profile. Messenger RNA for IFNγ, IL-17A, and the Th1 and Th17-associated transcription factors T-bet and RORγt was detected in both CCR6(+) and CXCR3(+) CD4(+) T cells. IFNγ, but not IL-17A mRNA expression was detected in CD8(+) T cells in CNS. CCR6 and CD4 were co-localized in spinal cord infiltrates by double immunofluorescence. Consistent with flow cytometry data some but not all CD4(+) T cells expressed CCR6 within infiltrates. CD4-negative CCR6(+) cells included macrophage/microglial cells. Thus we have for the first time directly studied CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the CNS of mice with peak EAE, and determined IFNγ and IL17 expression by cells expressing CCR6 and CXCR3. We show that neither CCR6 or CXCR3 align with CD4 T cell subsets, and Th1 or mixed Th1+17 predominate in EAE.

  14. Geometry of the Gene Expression Space of Individual Cells.

    PubMed

    Korem, Yael; Szekely, Pablo; Hart, Yuval; Sheftel, Hila; Hausser, Jean; Mayo, Avi; Rothenberg, Michael E; Kalisky, Tomer; Alon, Uri

    2015-07-01

    There is a revolution in the ability to analyze gene expression of single cells in a tissue. To understand this data we must comprehend how cells are distributed in a high-dimensional gene expression space. One open question is whether cell types form discrete clusters or whether gene expression forms a continuum of states. If such a continuum exists, what is its geometry? Recent theory on evolutionary trade-offs suggests that cells that need to perform multiple tasks are arranged in a polygon or polyhedron (line, triangle, tetrahedron and so on, generally called polytopes) in gene expression space, whose vertices are the expression profiles optimal for each task. Here, we analyze single-cell data from human and mouse tissues profiled using a variety of single-cell technologies. We fit the data to shapes with different numbers of vertices, compute their statistical significance, and infer their tasks. We find cases in which single cells fill out a continuum of expression states within a polyhedron. This occurs in intestinal progenitor cells, which fill out a tetrahedron in gene expression space. The four vertices of this tetrahedron are each enriched with genes for a specific task related to stemness and early differentiation. A polyhedral continuum of states is also found in spleen dendritic cells, known to perform multiple immune tasks: cells fill out a tetrahedron whose vertices correspond to key tasks related to maturation, pathogen sensing and communication with lymphocytes. A mixture of continuum-like distributions and discrete clusters is found in other cell types, including bone marrow and differentiated intestinal crypt cells. This approach can be used to understand the geometry and biological tasks of a wide range of single-cell datasets. The present results suggest that the concept of cell type may be expanded. In addition to discreet clusters in gene-expression space, we suggest a new possibility: a continuum of states within a polyhedron, in which the

  15. Geometry of the Gene Expression Space of Individual Cells

    PubMed Central

    Korem, Yael; Szekely, Pablo; Hart, Yuval; Sheftel, Hila; Hausser, Jean; Mayo, Avi; Rothenberg, Michael E.; Kalisky, Tomer; Alon, Uri

    2015-01-01

    There is a revolution in the ability to analyze gene expression of single cells in a tissue. To understand this data we must comprehend how cells are distributed in a high-dimensional gene expression space. One open question is whether cell types form discrete clusters or whether gene expression forms a continuum of states. If such a continuum exists, what is its geometry? Recent theory on evolutionary trade-offs suggests that cells that need to perform multiple tasks are arranged in a polygon or polyhedron (line, triangle, tetrahedron and so on, generally called polytopes) in gene expression space, whose vertices are the expression profiles optimal for each task. Here, we analyze single-cell data from human and mouse tissues profiled using a variety of single-cell technologies. We fit the data to shapes with different numbers of vertices, compute their statistical significance, and infer their tasks. We find cases in which single cells fill out a continuum of expression states within a polyhedron. This occurs in intestinal progenitor cells, which fill out a tetrahedron in gene expression space. The four vertices of this tetrahedron are each enriched with genes for a specific task related to stemness and early differentiation. A polyhedral continuum of states is also found in spleen dendritic cells, known to perform multiple immune tasks: cells fill out a tetrahedron whose vertices correspond to key tasks related to maturation, pathogen sensing and communication with lymphocytes. A mixture of continuum-like distributions and discrete clusters is found in other cell types, including bone marrow and differentiated intestinal crypt cells. This approach can be used to understand the geometry and biological tasks of a wide range of single-cell datasets. The present results suggest that the concept of cell type may be expanded. In addition to discreet clusters in gene-expression space, we suggest a new possibility: a continuum of states within a polyhedron, in which the

  16. Characteristics and EGFP expression of porcine mammary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue-Mao; He, Xiao-Ying

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were to establish a porcine mammary gland epithelial (PMGE) cell line, and to determine if these PMGE cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing following transfection with a reporter gene, enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Primary culture of PMGE cells was achieved by outgrowth of migrating cells from the fragments of the mammary gland tissue of a lactating pig. The passage sixteen PMGE cells were transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. The expression of Cell keratins of epithelial cells in PMGE cells was tested by immunofluorescence. Βeta-Casein gene mRNA was tested for PMGE cells by RT-PCR. The results showed that PMGE cells could form dome-like structure which looked like nipple, and the cells contained different cell types. The expression of Cell keratins demonstrated the property of epithelial cells, and the PMGE cells could express transcript encoding a Βeta-Casein protein. EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the PMGE cells, and the transfected cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. In conclusion, we have established a EGFP gene transfected porcine mammary gland epithelial (ET-PMGE) cell line. PMID:20400167

  17. Characteristics and EGFP expression of porcine mammary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue-Mao; He, Xiao-Ying

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were to establish a porcine mammary gland epithelial (PMGE) cell line, and to determine if these PMGE cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing following transfection with a reporter gene, enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Primary culture of PMGE cells was achieved by outgrowth of migrating cells from the fragments of the mammary gland tissue of a lactating pig. The passage sixteen PMGE cells were transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. The expression of Cell keratins of epithelial cells in PMGE cells was tested by immunofluorescence. Βeta-Casein gene mRNA was tested for PMGE cells by RT-PCR. The results showed that PMGE cells could form dome-like structure which looked like nipple, and the cells contained different cell types. The expression of Cell keratins demonstrated the property of epithelial cells, and the PMGE cells could express transcript encoding a Βeta-Casein protein. EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the PMGE cells, and the transfected cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. In conclusion, we have established a EGFP gene transfected porcine mammary gland epithelial (ET-PMGE) cell line.

  18. Etoposide sensitizes neuroblastoma cells expressing caspase 8 to TRAIL.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Ryung; Lee, Myoung Woo; Kim, Dae Seong; Jo, Ha Yeong; Lee, Soo Hyun; Chueh, Hee Won; Jung, Hye Lim; Yoo, Keon Hee; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe

    2012-01-01

    TRAIL [TNF (tumour necrosis factor)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand] is a promising agent for clinical use since it kills a wide range of tumour cells without affecting normal cells. We provide evidence that pretreatment with etoposide significantly enhanced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis via up-regulation of DR5 (death receptor 5 or TRAIL-R2) expression in the caspase 8 expressing neuroblastoma cell line, SK-N-MC. In addition, sequential treatment with etoposide and TRAIL increased caspases 8, 9 and 3 activation, Mcl-1 cleavage and Bid truncation, which suggests that the ability of etoposide and TRAIL to induce apoptosis is mediated through activation of an intrinsic signalling pathway. Although TRAIL-R2 expression increased in IMR-32 cells in response to etoposide treatment, cell death was not increased by concurrent treatment with TRAIL compared with etoposide alone, because the cells lacked caspase 8 expression. Restoration of caspase 8 expression by exposure to IFNγ (interferon γ) sensitizes IMR-32 cells to TRAIL. Moreover, pretreatment with etoposide increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis in caspase 8 restored IMR-32 cells through activation of a caspase cascade that included caspases 8, 9 and 3. These results indicate that the etoposide-mediated sensitization of neuroblastoma cells to TRAIL is associated with an increase in TRAIL-R2 expression and requires caspase 8 expression. These observations support the potential use of a combination of etoposide and TRAIL in future clinical trials. PMID:23124518

  19. Identifying gene expression modules that define human cell fates.

    PubMed

    Germanguz, I; Listgarten, J; Cinkornpumin, J; Solomon, A; Gaeta, X; Lowry, W E

    2016-05-01

    Using a compendium of cell-state-specific gene expression data, we identified genes that uniquely define cell states, including those thought to represent various developmental stages. Our analysis sheds light on human cell fate through the identification of core genes that are altered over several developmental milestones, and across regional specification. Here we present cell-type specific gene expression data for 17 distinct cell states and demonstrate that these modules of genes can in fact define cell fate. Lastly, we introduce a web-based database to disseminate the results.

  20. Differential expression and function of CD27 in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells expressing ZAP-70.

    PubMed

    Lafarge, Sandrine T; Hou, Sen; Pauls, Samantha D; Johnston, James B; Gibson, Spencer B; Marshall, Aaron J

    2015-07-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a malignancy driven by abberant B cell signaling and survival. Leukemic B cells accumulate in the peripheral blood and the lymphoid organs where contact with stromal cells and T cells provide critical survival signals. Clinical severity of CLL is associated with several prognostic markers including expression of the kinase ZAP-70. ZAP-70 expression enhances signaling via the B cell antigen receptor and is associated with increased cell adhesion and migration capacity. Here we report that ZAP-70-positive CLL patients display significantly higher expression of the TNF superfamily receptor and memory marker CD27 than do ZAP-70 negative patients. CD27 expression by CLL was acutely elevated upon BCR cross-linking, or upon ectopic expression of ZAP-70. CD27 expression correlated with functional capacity to adhere to stromal cells and antibody blockade of CD27 impaired CLL binding to stroma. These results provide the first evidence for differential expression of CD27 among CLL prognostic groups, suggest a role for ZAP-70 dependent signaling in CD27 induction and implicate CD27 in cell-cell interactions with the lymphoid tissue microenvironment.

  1. Expression of the rhesus glycoproteins, ammonia transporter family members, RHCG and RHBG in male reproductive organs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Verlander, Jill W; Handlogten, Mary E; Han, Ki-Hwan; Cooke, Paul S; Weiner, I David

    2013-09-01

    The rhesus glycoproteins, Rh B glycoprotein (RHBG) and Rh C glycoprotein (RHCG), are recently identified ammonia transporters. Rhcg expression is necessary for normal male fertility, but its specific cellular expression is unknown, and Rhbg has not been reported to be expressed in the male reproductive tract. This study sought to determine the specific cellular expression of Rhcg, to determine whether Rhbg is expressed in the male reproductive tract, and, if so, to determine which cells express Rhbg using real-time RT-PCR, immunoblot analysis, and immunohistochemistry. Both Rhbg and Rhcg were expressed throughout the male reproductive tract. In the testis, high levels of Rhbg were expressed in Leydig cells, and Rhcg was expressed in spermatids during the later stages of their maturation (steps 13-16) in stages I-VIII of the seminiferous epithelium cycle. In the epididymis, basolateral Rhbg was present in narrow cells in the initial segment, in principal cells in the upper corpus, and in clear cells throughout the epididymis. Apical Rhcg immunolabel was present in principal cells in the caput and upper corpus epididymidis and in clear cells in the middle and lower corpus and cauda epididymidis. In the vas deferens, apical Rhcg immunolabel and basolateral Rhbg immunolabel were present in some principal cells and colocalized with H(+)-ATPase immunolabel. We conclude that both Rhbg and Rhcg are highly expressed in specific cells in the male reproductive tract where they can contribute to multiple components of male fertility.

  2. Effects of acrylamide exposure on serum hormones, gene expression, cell proliferation, and histopathology in male reproductive tissues of Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Camacho, L; Latendresse, J R; Muskhelishvili, L; Patton, R; Bowyer, J F; Thomas, M; Doerge, D R

    2012-06-01

    Acrylamide (AA) is a reactive monomer used in many technological applications, but it is the incidental formation during cooking of common starchy foods that leads to pervasive human exposure, typically in the range of 1 μg/kg body weight (bw)/day (d). AA is carcinogenic in multiple organs from both sexes of several rodent models and a consistent body of evidence points to a genotoxic mechanism based on metabolism to a DNA-reactive epoxide, glycidamide (GA). In F344 rats, tumorigenesis occurs in several hormonally regulated tissues (thyroid, mammary gland, and peri-testicular mesothelium), which has prompted speculation about endocrine dysregulation as a possible mechanism. The present study evaluated the effects of a 14 d exposure to AA administered through the drinking water on reproductive tissues and the hypothalamic-pituitary-testes (HPG) axis in male F344 rats. The doses selected encompass a range from approximately 2.5 mg/kg bw/d, which is carcinogenic after lifetime exposure, to 50 mg/kg bw/d, a maximally tolerable dose that causes hind limb paralysis. AA caused significant changes in serum hormones, histopathology, testicular gene expression, and cell proliferation, especially at the highest dose. Despite strong evidence for activation of the HPG axis subsequent to decreases in testosterone levels, and histopathological changes associated with significant effects on Leydig and germ cells, with concomitant mRNA expression changes, the precise mechanism(s) for AA-induced testicular toxicity remains unclear; however, the absence of evidence for increased proliferation of the peri-testicular mesothelium (Ki-67 immunoreactivity) does not support hormonal dysregulation as a contributing factor to the predisposition of this tissue to the carcinogenic effects of AA.

  3. Mechanism of Testosterone Deficiency in the Transgenic Sickle Cell Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Musicki, Biljana; Zhang, Yuxi; Chen, Haolin; Brown, Terry R.; Zirkin, Barry R.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency is associated with sickle cell disease (SCD), but its underlying mechanism is not known. We investigated the possible occurrence and mechanism of testosterone deficiency in a mouse model of human SCD. Transgenic sickle male mice (Sickle) exhibited decreased serum and intratesticular testosterone and increased luteinizing hormone (LH) levels compared with wild type (WT) mice, indicating primary hypogonadism in Sickle mice. LH-, dbcAMP-, and pregnenolone- (but not 22-hydroxycholesterol)- stimulated testosterone production by Leydig cells isolated from the Sickle mouse testis was decreased compared to that of WT mice, implying defective Leydig cell steroidogenesis. There also was reduced protein expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), but not cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), in the Sickle mouse testis. These data suggest that the capacity of P450scc to support testosterone production may be limited by the supply of cholesterol to the mitochondria in Sickle mice. The sickle mouse testis exhibited upregulated NADPH oxidase subunit gp91phox and increased oxidative stress, measured as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and unchanged protein expression of an antioxidant glutathione peroxidase-1. Mice heterozygous for the human sickle globin (Hemi) exhibited intermediate hypogonadal changes between those of WT and Sickle mice. These results demonstrate that testosterone deficiency occurs in Sickle mice, mimicking the human condition. The defects in the Leydig cell steroidogenic pathway in Sickle mice, mainly due to reduced availability of cholesterol for testosterone production, may be related to NADPH oxidase-derived oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that targeting testicular oxidative stress or steroidogenesis mechanisms in SCD offers a potential treatment for improving phenotypic changes associated with testosterone deficiency in this disease. PMID:26023917

  4. Determining Physical Mechanisms of Gene Expression Regulation from Single Cell Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Moignard, Victoria; Göttgens, Berthold; Adryan, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Many genes are expressed in bursts, which can contribute to cell-to-cell heterogeneity. It is now possible to measure this heterogeneity with high throughput single cell gene expression assays (single cell qPCR and RNA-seq). These experimental approaches generate gene expression distributions which can be used to estimate the kinetic parameters of gene expression bursting, namely the rate that genes turn on, the rate that genes turn off, and the rate of transcription. We construct a complete pipeline for the analysis of single cell qPCR data that uses the mathematics behind bursty expression to develop more accurate and robust algorithms for analyzing the origin of heterogeneity in experimental samples, specifically an algorithm for clustering cells by their bursting behavior (Simulated Annealing for Bursty Expression Clustering, SABEC) and a statistical tool for comparing the kinetic parameters of bursty expression across populations of cells (Estimation of Parameter changes in Kinetics, EPiK). We applied these methods to hematopoiesis, including a new single cell dataset in which transcription factors (TFs) involved in the earliest branchpoint of blood differentiation were individually up- and down-regulated. We could identify two unique sub-populations within a seemingly homogenous group of hematopoietic stem cells. In addition, we could predict regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression levels of eighteen key hematopoietic transcription factors throughout differentiation. Detailed information about gene regulatory mechanisms can therefore be obtained simply from high throughput single cell gene expression data, which should be widely applicable given the rapid expansion of single cell genomics. PMID:27551778

  5. Expression, regulation, and function of B cell-expressed CD154 in germinal centers.

    PubMed

    Grammer, A C; McFarland, R D; Heaney, J; Darnell, B F; Lipsky, P E

    1999-10-15

    Activated B cells and T cells express CD154/CD40 ligand in vitro. The in vivo expression and function of B cell CD154 remain unclear and therefore were examined. Tonsillar B and T cells expressed CD154 at a similar density both in situ and immediately ex vivo, whereas a significantly higher percentage of the former expressed CD154. CD154-expressing B cells were most frequent in the CD38positiveIgD+ pre-germinal center (GC)/GC founder, CD38positive GC and CD38-IgD- memory populations, and were also found in the CD38-IgD+ naive and CD38brightIgD+ plasmablast subsets, but not in the CD38brightIgD- plasma cell subset. B cell expression of CD154 was induced by engaging surface Ig or CD40 by signals that predominantly involved activation of AP-1/NF-AT and NF-kappaB, respectively. The functional importance of CD154-mediated homotypic B cell interactions in vivo was indicated by the finding that mAb to CD154 inhibited differentiation of CD38positiveIgD- GC B cells to CD38-IgD- memory cells. In addition, mAb to CD154 inhibited proliferation induced by engaging sIg or CD40, indicating the role of up-regulation of this molecule in facilitating B cell responsiveness. Of note, CD154 itself not only functioned as a ligand but also as a direct signaling molecule as anti-CD154-conjugated Sepharose beads costimulated B cell responses induced by engaging surface Ig. These results indicate that CD154 is expressed by human B cells in vivo and plays an important role in mediating B cell responses.

  6. Fibronectin induces MMP2 expression in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Andrei; Delella, Flávia K; Lacorte, Lívia M; Deffune, Elenice; Felisbino, Sérgio L

    2013-01-25

    High-grade prostate cancers express high levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), major enzymes involved in tumor invasion and metastasis. However, the tumor cell lines commonly employed for prostate cancer research express only small amounts of MMPs when cultivated as monolayer cultures, in common culture media. The present study was conducted to ascertain whether culture conditions that include fibronectin can alter MMP2 and MMP9 expression by the human prostatic epithelial cell lines RWPE-1, LNCaP and PC-3. These cells were individually seeded at 2×10(4) cells/cm(2), cultivated until they reached 80% confluence, and then exposed for 4h to fibronectin, after which the conditioned medium was analyzed by gelatin zymography. Untreated cells were given common medium. Only RWPE-1 cells express detectable amounts of MMP9 when cultivated in common medium, whereas the addition of fibronectin induced high expression levels of pro and active forms of MMP2 in all tested cell lines. Our findings demonstrate that normal and tumor prostate cell lines express MMP2 activity when in contact with extracellular matrix components or blood plasma proteins such as fibronectin. Future studies of transcriptomes and proteomes in prostate cancer research using these cell lines should not neglect these important conclusions.

  7. LKB1 expression reverses the tumorigenicity of L02 cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Ge; Gao, Qing; Tao, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    The tumor-suppressor liver kinase B1 (LKB1), a highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed protein kinase, plays a critical role in tumorigenesis. In the present study, we revealed that human hepatic L02 cells had severely impaired endogenous LKB1 expression as gauged by western blot, northern blot and RT-PCR analyses. Stable ectopic expression of LKB1 in L02 cells resulted in decreased cell growth, hypophosphorylation of Rb, and marked attenuation of colony formation on soft agar. Inoculation of L02 cells into immunocompromised mice resulted in the development of subcutaneous tumors, which could be completely abrogated by ectopic LKB1 expression. The tumors that formed in the mouse model recapitulated the histopathological features of hepatocellular carcinoma under the microscope. Our results jointly suggest that severely compromised endogenous LKB1 expression in the L02 cell line may confer to L02 cells tumor-initiating capacities in vivo and in vitro, and ectopic LKB1 expression antagonizes the tumorigenic properties of L02 cells. Our findings imply that caution may be needed to interpret the results obtained on the widely used human hepatic L02 cell line. The L02 cell line may be a new model to define the cellular mechanisms of liver transformation, and to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the growth suppressive effect of LKB1. PMID:27349837

  8. LKB1 expression reverses the tumorigenicity of L02 cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Ge; Gao, Qing; Tao, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    The tumor-suppressor liver kinase B1 (LKB1), a highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed protein kinase, plays a critical role in tumorigenesis. In the present study, we revealed that human hepatic L02 cells had severely impaired endogenous LKB1 expression as gauged by western blot, northern blot and RT-PCR analyses. Stable ectopic expression of LKB1 in L02 cells resulted in decreased cell growth, hypophosphorylation of Rb, and marked attenuation of colony formation on soft agar. Inoculation of L02 cells into immunocompromised mice resulted in the development of subcutaneous tumors, which could be completely abrogated by ectopic LKB1 expression. The tumors that formed in the mouse model recapitulated the histopathological features of hepatocellular carcinoma under the microscope. Our results jointly suggest that severely compromised endogenous LKB1 expression in the L02 cell line may confer to L02 cells tumor-initiating capacities in vivo and in vitro, and ectopic LKB1 expression antagonizes the tumorigenic properties of L02 cells. Our findings imply that caution may be needed to interpret the results obtained on the widely used human hepatic L02 cell line. The L02 cell line may be a new model to define the cellular mechanisms of liver transformation, and to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the growth suppressive effect of LKB1.

  9. Phenotypic expression of marrow cells when grown on various substrata.

    PubMed

    Fried, A; Shamay, A; Wientroub, S; Benayahu, D

    1996-05-01

    Our aim was to study the role of various extracellular matrices (ECM) on growth and differentiation of marrow stromal cells in vitro. Morphology changes, gene expression, and enzymatic activities were monitored in stromal osteoblastic MBA-15 and adipocytic 14F1.1 cells. These stromal cells were plated on dishes precoated with different substrata, such as matrigel (basement membrane), collagen type I, and endothelial ECM, and compared with cells plated on protein-free dishes. Striking morphological differences were observed when the cells grew on these different substrata. Changes in cell shape and growth also led to differential mRNA expression and enzymatic activities. When MBA-15 cells were plated on collagen, there was a decrease in mRNA for alkaline phosphatase (ALK-P), osteopontin (OP), and osteonectin (ON), and an increase in mRNA for procollagen (I). A differential effect was noted on 14F1.1 cells, the mRNA for ALK-P increased, the expressions of OP and ON lowered, and no expression for procollagen (I) was monitored. MBA-15 cells cultured on matrigel had decreased mRNA for ALK-P and OP, while they had increased ON mRNA expression and remained unchanged for procollagen I. No change in mRNA expression by 14F1.1 cells was monitored when cultured on matrigel. Functional enzymatic activities of ALK-P markedly decreased in MBA-15 cells cultured on various substrata, and increased or were unchanged in 14F1.1 cells. An additional enzyme, neutral endopeptidase (CD10/NEP), altered differentially in both cell types; this enzymatic activity increased or was unchanged when cells were cultured on these matrices. The results indicate a specific role for different ECM on various stromal cell types and their function. PMID:9173088

  10. BAFF suppresses IL-15 expression in B cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ning; Xing, Chen; Xiao, He; He, Youdi; Han, Gencheng; Chen, Guojiang; Hou, Chunmei; Marrero, Bernadette; Wang, Yujuan; Zhang, Shengquan; Shen, Beifen; Li, Yan; Wang, Renxi

    2014-05-01

    Clinical trials have shown that BAFF inhibitors do not reduce memory B cell levels but can reduce the number of mature B cells. It remains uncertain whether BAFF affects memory-maintaining cytokines such as IL-15. We found that BAFF suppressed IL-15 expression in B cells from lupus-like or experimental allergic encephalomyelitis mice. When BAFF was blocked with atacicept-IgG, IL-15 expression was upregulated in lupus-like or experimental allergic encephalomyelitis mice. Finally, we showed that BAFF suppressed IL-15 expression in transitional 2 B cells by reducing Foxo1 expression and inducing Foxo1 phosphorylation. This study suggests that BAFF suppresses IL-15 expression in autoimmune diseases, and this opens up the possible opportunity for the clinical application of BAFF- and IL-15-specific therapeutic agents.

  11. Cyclin Dl expression in B-cell non Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Aref, Salah; Mossad, Y; El-Khodary, T; Awad, M; El-Shahat, E

    2006-10-01

    Disorders of the cell cycle regulatory machinery play a key role in the pathogenesis of cancer. Over-expression of cyclin D1 protein has been reported in several solid tumors and certain lymphoid malignancies, but little is known about the effect of its expression on clinical behavior and outcome in B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In this study, we investigated the expression of cyclin Dl in group of patients with NHL and correlated the results with the clinical and laboratory data. The degree of expression of cyclin Dl protein was evaluated by flow cytometry in a group of NHL patients (n = 46) and in normal control group (n = 10). Cyclin Dl over expression was detected in 10 out of 46 (21.7%) patients; they were 5/5-mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) (100%) and 5/28 large B-cell lymphoma (17.8%). All other NHL subtypes showed normal cyclin D1 expression. The clinical signs (hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and B-symptoms, clinical staging) and laboratory data (hemoglobin, white cell count (WBCs), platelet count, and bone marrow infiltration) were not significantly different between NHL subgroup with cyclin Dl over expression and that with normal cyclin Dl expression. Serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels and lymphadenopathy were significantly higher in NHL group with cyclin D1 over expression as compared to those without. Also, cyclin D1 over expression is associated with poor outcome of NHL patients. Cyclin Dl over expression was evident among all cases of MCL and few cases of large B-cell lymphoma. Cyclin Dl over expression might be used as adjuvant tool for diagnosis of MCL; has role in NHL biology and is bad prognostic index in NHL. PMID:17607588

  12. Hair cell damage recruited Lgr5-expressing cells are hair cell progenitors in neonatal mouse utricle.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jinchao; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wu, Fengfang; Lin, Weinian

    2015-01-01

    Damage-activated stem/progenitor cells play important roles in regenerating lost cells and in tissue repair. Previous studies reported that the mouse utricle has limited hair cell regeneration ability after hair cell ablation. However, the potential progenitor cell population regenerating new hair cells remains undiscovered. In this study, we first found that Lgr5, a Wnt target gene that is not usually expressed in the neonatal mouse utricle, can be activated by 24 h neomycin treatment in a sub-population of supporting cells in the striolar region of the neonatal mouse utricle. Lineage tracing demonstrated that these Lgr5-positive supporting cells could regenerate new hair cells in explant culture. We isolated the damage-activated Lgr5-positive cells with flow cytometry and found that these Lgr5-positive supporting cells could regenerate hair cells in vitro, and self-renew to form spheres, which maintained the capacity to differentiate into hair cells over seven generations of passages. Our results suggest that damage-activated Lgr5-positive supporting cells act as hair cell progenitors in the neonatal mouse utricle, which may help to uncover a potential route to regenerate hair cell in mammals.

  13. VISA is required for B cell expression of TLR7.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang-Guo; Jin, Lei; Zhang, Bi-Cheng; Akerlund, Linda J; Shu, Hong-Bing; Cambier, John C

    2012-01-01

    B cells play a critical role in the initialization and development of the systemic lupus erythematosus that is dependent on the expression of the endosomal ssRNA receptor TLR7. Previous studies have established that B cell expression of TLR7 is controlled by the type I IFN secreted by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. In this article, we report that VISA, also known as MAVS, IPS-1, and CardIf, essential for RIG-I/MDA5-mediated signaling following sensing of cytosolic RNA, regulate B cell expression of TLR7 and CD23. We found that B cells from a VISA(-/-) mouse express reduced TLR7 but normal basal levels of type I IFN. We also show that although IFN-β and TLR7 agonists synergize to promote TLR7 expression in VISA(-/-) B cells, they do not fully complement the defect seen in VISA(-/-) cells. Cell transfer experiments revealed that the observed effects of VISA(-/-) are B cell intrinsic. The reduced TLR7 expression in B cells is correlated with impaired TLR7 agonist-induced upregulation of activation markers CD69 and CD86, cell proliferation, production of IFN-α, TNF, and IL-12, and NF-κB activation. Finally, studies indicate that genetic background may influence the observed phenotype of our VISA(-/-) mice, because VISA(-/-) B cells differ in CD23 and TLR7 expression when on C57BL/6 versus 129Sv-C57BL/6 background. Thus, our findings suggest an unexpected link between VISA-mediated cytosolic RLR signaling and autoimmunity.

  14. Expression of MIF and CD74 in leukemic cell lines: correlation to DR expression destiny.

    PubMed

    Georgouli, Mirella; Papadimitriou, Lina; Glymenaki, Maria; Patsaki, Valia; Athanassakis, Irene

    2016-06-01

    Invariant chain (Ii) or CD74 is a non-polymorphic glycoprotein, which apart from its role as a chaperone dedicated to MHCII molecules, is known to be a high-affinity receptor for macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). The present study aimed to define the roles of CD74 and MIF in the immune surveillance escape process. Towards this direction, the cell lines HL-60, Raji, K562 and primary pre-B leukemic cells were examined for expression and secretion of MIF. Flow cytometry analysis detected high levels of MIF and intracellular/membrane CD74 expression in all leukemic cells tested, while MIF secretion was shown to be inversely proportional to intracellular HLA-DR (DR) expression. In the MHCII-negative cells, IFN-γ increased MIF expression and induced its secretion in HL-60 and K562 cells, respectively. In K562 cells, CD74 (Iip33Iip35) was shown to co-precipitate with HLA-DOβ (DOβ), inhibiting thus MIF or DR binding. Induced expression of DOα in K562 (DOα-DOβ+) cells in different transfection combinations decreased MIF expression and secretion, while increasing surface DR expression. Thus, MIF could indeed be part of the antigen presentation process.

  15. Biased Allelic Expression in Human Primary Fibroblast Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Christelle; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Santoni, Federico; Delaneau, Olivier; Fort, Alexandre; Popadin, Konstantin Y.; Garieri, Marco; Falconnet, Emilie; Ribaux, Pascale; Guipponi, Michel; Padioleau, Ismael; Carninci, Piero; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.

    2015-01-01

    The study of gene expression in mammalian single cells via genomic technologies now provides the possibility to investigate the patterns of allelic gene expression. We used single-cell RNA sequencing to detect the allele-specific mRNA level in 203 single human primary fibroblasts over 133,633 unique heterozygous single-nucleotide variants (hetSNVs). We observed that at the snapshot of analyses, each cell contained mostly transcripts from one allele from the majority of genes; indeed, 76.4% of the hetSNVs displayed stochastic monoallelic expression in single cells. Remarkably, adjacent hetSNVs exhibited a haplotype-consistent allelic ratio; in contrast, distant sites located in two different genes were independent of the haplotype structure. Moreover, the allele-specific expression in single cells correlated with the abundance of the cellular transcript. We observed that genes expressing both alleles in the majority of the single cells at a given time point were rare and enriched with highly expressed genes. The relative abundance of each allele in a cell was controlled by some regulatory mechanisms given that we observed related single-cell allelic profiles according to genes. Overall, these results have direct implications in cellular phenotypic variability. PMID:25557783

  16. Optimizing transient recombinant protein expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Ralph F; Wall, Vanessa E; Esposito, Dominic

    2012-01-01

    Transient gene expression (TGE) in mammalian cells has become a routine process for expressing recombinant proteins in cell lines such as human embryonic kidney 293 and Chinese hamster ovary cells. The rapidly increasing need for recombinant proteins requires further improvements in TGE technology. While a great deal of focus has been directed toward optimizing the secretion of antibodies and other naturally secreted targets, much less work has been done on ways to improve cytoplasmic expression in mammalian cells. The benefits to protein production in mammalian cells, particularly for eukaryotic proteins, should be very significant - glycosylation and other posttranslational modifications will likely be native or near-native, solubility and protein folding would likely improve overexpression in heterologous hosts, and expression of proteins in their proper intracellular compartments is much more likely to occur. Improvements in this area have been slow, however, due to limited development of the cell culture processes needed for low-cost, higher-throughput expression in mammalian cells, and the relatively low diversity of DNA vectors for protein production in these systems. Here, we describe how the use of recombinational cloning, coupled with improvements in transfection protocols which increase speed and lower cost, can be combined to make mammalian cells much more amenable for routine recombinant protein expression. PMID:21987258

  17. Regulated expression of erythropoietin by two human hepatoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, M.A.; Glass, G.A.; Cunningham, J.M.; Bunn, H.F.

    1987-11-01

    The development of a cell culture system that produces erythropoietin (Epo) in a regulated manner has been the focus of much effort. The authors have screened multiple renal and hepatic cell lines for either constitutive or regulated expression of Epo. Only the human hepatoma cell lines, Hep3B and HepG2, made significant amounts of Epo as measured both by radioimmunoassay and in vitro bioassay (as much as 330 milliunits per 10/sup 6/ cells in 24 hr). The constitutive production of Epo increased dramatically as a function of cell density in both cell lines. At cell densities < 3.3 x 10/sup 5/ cells per cm/sup 2/, there was little constitutive release of Epo in the medium. With Hep3B cells grown at low cell densities, a mean 18-fold increase in Epo expression was seen in response to hypoxia and a 6-fold increase was observed in response to incubation in medium containing 50 ..mu..M cobalt(II) chloride. At similar low cell densities, Epo production in HepG2 cells could be enhanced an average of about 3-fold by stimulation with either hypoxia or cobalt(II) chloride. Upon such stimulation, both cell lines demonstrated markedly elevated levels of Epo mRNA. Hence, both Hep3B and HepG2 cell lines provide an excellent in vitro system in which to study the physiological regulation of Epo expression.

  18. ALDH isozymes downregulation affects cell growth, cell motility and gene expression in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreb, Jan S; Baker, Henry V; Chang, Lung-Ji; Amaya, Maria; Lopez, M Cecilia; Ostmark, Blanca; Chou, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Background Aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 are highly expressed in non small cell lung cancer. Neither the mechanisms nor the biologic significance for such over expression have been studied. Methods We have employed oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze changes in gene profiles in A549 lung cancer cell line in which ALDH activity was reduced by up to 95% using lentiviral mediated expression of siRNA against both isozymes (Lenti 1+3). Stringent analysis methods were used to identify gene expression patterns that are specific to the knock down of ALDH activity and significantly different in comparison to wild type A549 cells (WT) or cells similarly transduced with green fluorescent protein (GFP) siRNA. Results We confirmed significant and specific down regulation of ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 in Lenti 1+3 cells and in comparison to 12 other ALDH genes detected. The results of the microarray analysis were validated by real time RT-PCR on RNA obtained from Lenti 1+3 or WT cells treated with ALDH activity inhibitors. Detailed functional analysis was performed on 101 genes that were significantly different (P < 0.001) and their expression changed by ≥ 2 folds in the Lenti 1+3 group versus the control groups. There were 75 down regulated and 26 up regulated genes. Protein binding, organ development, signal transduction, transcription, lipid metabolism, and cell migration and adhesion were among the most affected pathways. Conclusion These molecular effects of the ALDH knock-down are associated with in vitro functional changes in the proliferation and motility of these cells and demonstrate the significance of ALDH enzymes in cell homeostasis with a potentially significant impact on the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:19025616

  19. Bmi1 is expressed in vivo in intestinal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sangiorgi, Eugenio; Capecchi, Mario R

    2010-01-01

    Bmi1 plays an essential part in the self-renewal of hematopoietic and neural stem cells. To investigate its role in other adult stem cell populations, we generated a mouse expressing a tamoxifen-inducible Cre from the Bmi1 locus. We found that Bmi1 is expressed in discrete cells located near the bottom of crypts in the small intestine, predominantly four cells above the base of the crypt (+4 position). Over time, these cells proliferate, expand, self-renew and give rise to all the differentiated cell lineages of the small intestine epithelium. The induction of a stable form of b-catenin in these cells was sufficient to rapidly generate adenomas. Moreover, ablation of Bmi1+ cells using a Rosa26 conditional allele, expressing diphtheria toxin, led to crypt loss. These experiments identify Bmi1 as an intestinal stem cell marker in vivo. Unexpectedly, the distribution of Bmi1-expressing stem cells along the length of the small intestine suggested that mammals use more than one molecularly distinguishable adult stem cell subpopulation to maintain organ homeostasis. PMID:18536716

  20. Regulation of global gene expression and cell proliferation by APP

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yili; Zhang, Si; Xu, Qin; Zou, Haiyan; Zhou, Weihui; Cai, Fang; Li, Tingyu; Song, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), caused by trisomy of chromosome 21, is one of the most common genetic disorders. Patients with DS display growth retardation and inevitably develop characteristic Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathology, including neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques. The expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) is increased in both DS and AD patients. To reveal the function of APP and elucidate the pathogenic role of increased APP expression in DS and AD, we performed gene expression profiling using microarray method in human cells overexpressing APP. A set of genes are significantly altered, which are involved in cell cycle, cell proliferation and p53 signaling. We found that overexpression of APP inhibits cell proliferation. Furthermore, we confirmed that the downregulation of two validated genes, PSMA5 and PSMB7, inhibits cell proliferation, suggesting that the downregulation of PSMA5 and PSMB7 is involved in APP-induced cell proliferation impairment. Taken together, this study suggests that APP regulates global gene expression and increased APP expression inhibits cell proliferation. Our study provides a novel insight that APP overexpression may contribute to the growth impairment in DS patients and promote AD pathogenesis by inhibiting cell proliferation including neural stem cell proliferation and neurogenesis. PMID:26936520

  1. Expression of pleiotrophin in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, H Q; Wang, J

    2015-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a kind of heparin binding growth factor closely related to tumor progression. This study aimed to discuss the significance of the expression of PTN in benign and malignant lung cancer tissues, especially small cell lung cancer. Lung cancer samples were collected for study and lung tissue samples with benign lesions were taken as controls. The expression of PTN was detected using tissue chip combined with the immunohistochemical method, and the differences of small cell lung cancer with non-small cell lung cancer and benign lesion tissue were compared. It was found that PTN expression was mainly located in the cytoplasm and membrane of cells; PTN expression in the lung cancer group was higher than that in the control group (p < 0.01), and PTN expression in the small cell cancer group was higher than that in the squamous carcinoma group and glandular cancer group (p < 0.05). In addition, PTN expression quantity in patients with lung cancer were in close correlation with TNM staging, pathological type and tumor differentiation degree (p < 0.05). PTN was found to express abnormally high in lung cancer, especially small cell lung cancer tissue. PTN is most likely to be a new tumor marker for diagnosis and prognosis of lung cancer. PMID:25864755

  2. Effects of c-myc expression on cell cycle progression.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, K D; Shichiri, M; Follansbee, M R; Sedivy, J M

    1994-01-01

    We used targeted homologous recombination to disrupt one c-myc gene copy in a diploid fibroblast cell line and found that a twofold reduction in Myc expression resulted in lower exponential growth rates and a lengthening of the G0-to-S-phase transition (M. Shichiri, K. D. Hanson and J. M. Sedivy, Cell Growth Differ. 4:93-104, 1993). Myc is a transcription factor, and the number of target genes whose regulation could result in differential growth rates may be very large. We have approached this problem by examining effects of reduced c-myc expression in three broad areas: (i) secretion of growth factors, (ii) expression of growth factor receptors, and (iii) intracellular signal transduction between Myc and components of the intrinsic cell cycle clock. We have found no evidence that differential medium conditioning can account for the growth phenotypes. Likewise, the expression of receptors for platelet-derived growth factor, epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor I was the same in diploid and heterozygous cells (platelet-derived growth factor, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor are the sole growth factors required by these cells for growth in serum-free medium). In contrast, expression of cyclin E, cyclin A, and Rb phosphorylation were delayed when quiescent c-myc heterozygous cells were stimulated to enter the cell cycle. Expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D3, and Cdk2 was not affected. The timing of cyclin E induction was the earliest observable effect of reduced Myc expression. Our data indicate that Myc contributes to regulation of proliferation by a cell-autonomous mechanism that involves the modulation of cyclin E expression and, consequently, progression through the restriction point of the cell cycle. Images PMID:8065309

  3. Expression of heparanase in basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma*

    PubMed Central

    Pinhal, Maria Aparecida Silva; Almeida, Maria Carolina Leal; Costa, Alessandra Scorse; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell; Serrano, Rodrigo Lorenzetti; Machado Filho, Carlos D'Apparecida Santos

    2016-01-01

    Background Heparanase is an enzyme that cleaves heparan sulfate chains. Oligosaccharides generated by heparanase induce tumor progression. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma comprise types of nonmelanoma skin cancer. Objectives Evaluate the glycosaminoglycans profile and expression of heparanase in two human cell lines established in culture, immortalized skin keratinocyte (HaCaT) and squamous cell carcinoma (A431) and also investigate the expression of heparanase in basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and eyelid skin of individuals not affected by the disease (control). Methods Glycosaminoglycans were quantified by electrophoresis and indirect ELISA method. The heparanase expression was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR (qRTPCR). Results The A431 strain showed significant increase in the sulfated glycosaminoglycans, increased heparanase expression and decreased hyaluronic acid, comparing to the HaCaT lineage. The mRNA expression of heparanase was significantly higher in Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma compared with control skin samples. It was also observed increased heparanase expression in squamous cell carcinoma compared to the Basal cell carcinoma. Conclusion The glycosaminoglycans profile, as well as heparanase expression are different between HaCaT and A431 cell lines. The increased expression of heparanase in Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma suggests that this enzyme could be a marker for the diagnosis of such types of non-melanoma cancers, and may be useful as a target molecule for future alternative treatment.

  4. Cytoskeletal Expression and Remodeling in Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boraas, Liana C.; Guidry, Julia B.; Pineda, Emma T.; Ahsan, Tabassum

    2016-01-01

    Many emerging cell-based therapies are based on pluripotent stem cells, though complete understanding of the properties of these cells is lacking. In these cells, much is still unknown about the cytoskeletal network, which governs the mechanoresponse. The objective of this study was to determine the cytoskeletal state in undifferentiated pluripotent stem cells and remodeling with differentiation. Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), as well as the original un-reprogrammed embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), were evaluated for expression of cytoskeletal markers. We found that pluripotent stem cells overall have a less developed cytoskeleton compared to fibroblasts. Gene and protein expression of smooth muscle cell actin, vimentin, lamin A, and nestin were markedly lower for ESCs than MEFs. Whereas, iPSC samples were heterogeneous with most cells expressing patterns of cytoskeletal proteins similar to ESCs with a small subpopulation similar to MEFs. This indicates that dedifferentiation during reprogramming is associated with cytoskeletal remodeling to a less developed state. In differentiation studies, it was found that shear stress-mediated differentiation resulted in an increase in expression of cytoskeletal intermediate filaments in ESCs, but not in iPSC samples. In the embryoid body model of spontaneous differentiation of pluripotent stem cells, however, both ESCs and iPSCs had similar gene expression for cytoskeletal proteins during early differentiation. With further differentiation, however, gene levels were significantly higher for iPSCs compared to ESCs. These results indicate that reprogrammed iPSCs more readily reacquire cytoskeletal proteins compared to the ESCs that need to form the network de novo. The strategic selection of the parental phenotype is thus critical not only in the context of reprogramming but also the ultimate functionality of the iPSC-differentiated cell population. Overall, this

  5. Over-expression of secreted proteins from mammalian cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Annamarie C; Barton, William A

    2014-01-01

    Secreted mammalian proteins require the development of robust protein over-expression systems for crystallographic and biophysical studies of protein function. Due to complex disulfide bonds and distinct glycosylation patterns preventing folding and expression in prokaryotic expression hosts, many secreted proteins necessitate production in more complex eukaryotic expression systems. Here, we elaborate on the methods used to obtain high yields of purified secreted proteins from transiently or stably transfected mammalian cell lines. Among the issues discussed are the selection of appropriate expression vectors, choice of signal sequences for protein secretion, availability of fusion tags for enhancing protein stability and purification, choice of cell line, and the large-scale growth of cells in a variety of formats. PMID:24510886

  6. Salmonella induces PD-L1 expression in B cells.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Medina, Marcela; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2015-10-01

    Salmonella persists for a long time in B cells; however, the mechanism(s) through which infected B cells avoid effector CD8 T cell responses has not been characterized. In this study, we show that Salmonella infects and survives within all B1 and B2 cell subpopulations. B cells are infected with a Salmonella typhimurium strain expressing an ovalbumin (OVA) peptide (SIINFEKL) to evaluate whether B cells process and present Salmonella antigens in the context of MHC-I molecules. Our data showed that OVA peptides are presented by MHC class I K(b)-restricted molecules and the presented antigen is generated through proteasomal degradation and vacuolar processing. In addition, Salmonella-infected B cells express co-stimulatory molecules such as CD40, CD80, and CD86 as well as inhibitory molecules such as PD-L1. Thus, the cross-presentation of Salmonella antigens and the expression of activation molecules suggest that infected B cells are able to prime and activate specific CD8(+) T cells. However, the Salmonella infection-stimulated expression of PD-L1 suggests that the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may be involved in turning off the cytotoxic effector response during Salmonella persistent infection, thereby allowing B cells to become a reservoir for the bacteria.

  7. Bmi1 expression in long-term germ stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Komai, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Tokuyama, Yoko; Yanai, Hirotsugu; Ohe, Shuichi; Omachi, Taichi; Atsumi, Naho; Yoshida, Naoko; Kumano, Keiki; Hisha, Hiroko; Matsuda, Tadashi; Ueno, Hiroo

    2014-01-01

    Asingle cells in undifferentiated spermatogonia are considered to be the most primitive forms of germ stem cells (GSCs). Although GFRα1 is thought to be a marker of Asingle cells, we found that Bmi1High is more specific than GFRα1 for Asingle cells. Bmi1High expression in Asingle cells is correlated with seminiferous stages, and its expression was followed by the proliferative stage of Asingle GSCs. In contrast, GFRα1 expression was seminiferous stage-independent. Fate analyses of EdU-positive Bmi1High-positive cell-derived Asingle cells revealed that these cells self-renewed or generated transient amplifying Apaired cells. Bmi1High-positive cells were resistant to irradiation-induced injury, after which they regenerated. Elimination of Bmi1High-positive cells from seminiferous tubules resulted in the appearance of tubules with seminiferous stage mismatches. Thus, in this study, we found that Bmi1High is a seminiferous stage-dependent marker for long-term GSCs and that Bmi1High-positive cells play important roles in maintaining GSCs and in regenerating spermatogenic progenitors after injury. PMID:25146451

  8. Ectopic ERK Expression Induces Phenotypic Conversion of C10 Cells and Alters DNA Methyltransferase Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2012-05-04

    In some model systems constitutive extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) activation is sufficient to promote an oncogenic phenotype. Here we investigate whether constitutive ERK expression influences phenotypic conversion in murine C10 type II alveolar epithelial cells. C10 cells were stably transduced with an ERK1-green fluorescent protein (ERK1-GFP) chimera or empty vector and ectopic ERK expression was associated with the acquisition of soft agar focus-forming potential in late passage, but not early passage cells. Late passage ERK1-GFP cells exhibited a significant increase in the expression of DNA methyl transferases (DNMT1 and 3b) and a marked increase in sensitivity to 5-azacytidine (5-azaC)-mediated toxicity, relative to early passage ERK1-GFP cells and vector controls. The expression of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) were significantly increased in late passage cells, suggesting enhanced DNA damage recognition and repair activity which we interpret as a reflection of genomic instability. Phospho-ERK levels were dramatically decreased in late passage ERK1-GFP cells, relative to early passage and vector controls, and phospho-ERK levels were restored by treatment with sodium orthovanadate, indicating a role for phosphatase activity in this response. Collectively these observations suggest that ectopic ERK expression promotes phenotypic conversion of C10 cells that is associated with latent effects on epigenetic programming and phosphatase activities.

  9. An Exercise to Estimate Differential Gene Expression in Human Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaudhry, M. Ahmad

    2006-01-01

    The expression of genes in cells of various tissue types varies considerably and is correlated with the function of a particular organ. The pattern of gene expression changes in diseased tissues, in response to therapy or infection and exposure to environmental mutagens, chemicals, ultraviolet light, and ionizing radiation. To better understand…

  10. Neurogenin 3 Expressing Cells in the Human Exocrine Pancreas Have the Capacity for Endocrine Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Danielle L.; O’Driscoll, Marci; Sheets, Timothy P.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Oberholzer, Jose; McGarrigle, James J.; Shamblott, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenin 3 (NGN3) is necessary and sufficient for endocrine differentiation during pancreatic development and is expressed by a population of progenitor cells that give rise exclusively to hormone-secreting cells within islets. NGN3 protein can be detected in the adult rodent pancreas only following certain types of injury, when it is transiently expressed by exocrine cells undergoing reprogramming to an endocrine cell fate. Here, NGN3 protein can be detected in 2% of acinar and duct cells in living biopsies of histologically normal adult human pancreata and 10% in cadaveric biopsies of organ donor pancreata. The percentage and total number of NGN3+ cells increase during culture without evidence of proliferation or selective cell death. Isolation of highly purified and viable NGN3+ cell populations can be achieved based on coexpression of the cell surface glycoprotein CD133. Transcriptome and targeted expression analyses of isolated CD133+ / NGN3+ cells indicate that they are distinct from surrounding exocrine tissue with respect to expression phenotype and Notch signaling activity, but retain high level mRNA expression of genes indicative of acinar and duct cell function. NGN3+ cells have an mRNA expression profile that resembles that of mouse early endocrine progenitor cells. During in vitro differentiation, NGN3+ cells express genes in a pattern characteristic of endocrine development and result in cells that resemble beta cells on the basis of coexpression of insulin C-peptide, chromogranin A and pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1. NGN3 expression in the adult human exocrine pancreas marks a dedifferentiating cell population with the capacity to take on an endocrine cell fate. These cells represent a potential source for the treatment of diabetes either through ex vivo manipulation, or in vivo by targeting mechanisms controlling their population size and endocrine cell fate commitment. PMID:26288179

  11. Gene expression profiles of bronchoalveolar cells in Pulmonary TB

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Bindu; Hoshino, Yoshihiko; Belitskaya-Lévy, Ilana; Dawson, Rod; Ress, Stanley; Gold, Jeffrey A.; Condos, Rany; Pine, Richard; Brown, Stuart; Nolan, Anna; Rom, William N.; Weiden, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    The host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis includes macrophage activation, inflammation with increased immune effector cells, tissue necrosis and cavity formation, and fibrosis, distortion, and bronchiectasis. To evaluate the molecular basis of the immune response in the lungs of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), we used bronchoalveolar lavage to obtain cells at the site of infection. Affymetrix Genechip micro-arrays and cDNA nylon filter microarrays interrogated gene expression in BAL cells from 11 healthy controls and 17 patients with active pulmonary TB. We found altered gene expression for 69 genes in TB versus normal controls that included cell surface markers, cytokines, chemokines, receptors, transcription factors, and complement components. In addition, TB BAL cell gene expression patternssegregated into 2 groups: one suggestive of a T helper type 1 (Th1) cellular immune response with increased STAT-4, IFN-γ receptor, and MIG expression with increased IFN-γ protein levels in BAL fluid; the other group displayed characteristics of Th2 immunity with increased STAT-6, CD81, and IL-10 receptor expression. We were able to demonstrate that a Th2 presentation could change to a Th1 pattern after anti-tuberculous treatment in one TB patient studied serially. These gene expression data support the conclusion that pulmonary TB produces a global change in the BAL cell transcriptome with manifestations of either Th1 or Th2 immunity. PMID:17921069

  12. Expression of adiponectin receptors in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Kharroubi, Ilham; Rasschaert, Joanne; Eizirik, Décio L; Cnop, Miriam

    2003-12-26

    Pancreatic beta cell dysfunction is an early and crucial pathogenic factor in the development of type 2 diabetes. Free fatty acids (FFA) and adipokines released from adipose tissues lead to both the development of insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction. Adiponectin is a novel adipokine with antidiabetic properties. Its circulating concentrations are reduced in subjects with increased visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, or type 2 diabetes. Very recently, the cloning of two adiponectin receptors AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 was reported. AdipoR1 is abundantly expressed in muscle, while AdipoR2 is predominantly expressed in liver. Here we report the marked expression of mRNAs for the adiponectin receptors AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 in human and rat pancreatic beta cells, at levels similar to liver and greater than muscle. Adiponectin receptor expression is increased by beta cell exposure to the unsaturated FFA oleate, and treatment of insulin-producing cells with globular adiponectin induces lipoprotein lipase expression. Regulated adiponectin receptor expression on pancreatic beta cells might be a novel mechanism modulating the effects of circulating adiponectin. PMID:14651988

  13. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  14. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2000-08-22

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  15. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, L.O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, B.E.

    1998-10-13

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol. 13 figs.

  16. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous gene

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2007-03-20

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  17. Expression of baboon endogenous virus in exogenously infected baboon cells.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, G; Foote, L; Heberling, R L; Kalter, S S

    1979-04-01

    Strains of low-passage, fetal diploid, baboon (Papio cynocephalus) fibroblasts were susceptible to exogenous infection with three independent isolates of baboon endogenous virus, as measured by an immunofluorescence assay specific for viral p28. Infectivity of the M7 strain of baboon endogenous virus for baboon cells of fetal skin muscle origin was equivalent to that for human and dog cells in that similar, linear, single-hit titration patterns were obtained. The assay for supernatant RNA-dependent DNA polymerase, however, showed that baboon cells produced only low levels of virus after infection compared with the production by heterologous cells. The results showed that baboon endogenous virus was capable of penetrating baboon cells and that viral genes were expressed in infected cells. Replication of complete infectious virus was restricted, however, indicating that in this primate system homologous cells differentially regulated the expression of viral genes.

  18. UV-induced changes in cell cycle and gene expression within rabbit lens epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sidjanin, D.; Grdina, D.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-11-01

    Damage to lens epithelial cells is a probable initiation process in cataract formation induced by ultraviolet radiation. These experiments investigated the ability of 254 nm radiation on cell cycle progression and gene expression in rabbit lens epithelial cell line N/N1003A. No changes in expression of c-fos, c-jun, alpha- tubulin, or vimentin was observed following UV exposure. Using flow cytometry, an accumulation of cells in G1/S phase of the cell cycle 1 hr following exposure. The observed changes in gene expression, especially the decreased histone transcripts reported here may play a role in UV induced inhibition of cell cycle progression.

  19. Gene expression dynamics during cell differentiation: Cell fates as attractors and cell fate decisions as bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sui

    2006-03-01

    During development of multicellular organisms, multipotent stem and progenitor cells undergo a series of hierarchically organized ``somatic speciation'' processes consisting of binary branching events to achieve the diversity of discretely distinct differentiated cell types in the body. Current paradigms of genetic regulation of development do not explain this discreteness, nor the time-irreversibility of differentiation. Each cell contains the same genome with the same N (˜ 25,000) genes and each cell type k is characterized by a distinct stable gene activation pattern, expressed as the cell state vector Sk(t) = xk1(t) ,.. xki(t),.. xkN(t), where xki is the activation state of gene i in cell type k. Because genes are engaged in a network of mutual regulatory interactions, the movement of Sk(t) in the N-dimensional state space is highly constrained and the organism can only realize a tiny fraction of all possible configurations Sk. Then, the trajectories of Sk reflect the diversifying developmental paths and the mature cell types are high-dimensional attractor states. Experimental results based on gene expression profile measurements during blood cell differentiation using DNA microarrays are presented that support the old idea that cell types are attractors. This basic notion is extended to treat binary fate decisions as bifurcations in the dynamics of networks circuits. Specifically, during cell fate decision, the metastable progenitor attractor is destabilized, poising the cell on a `watershed state' so that it can stochastically or in response to deterministic perturbations enter either one of two alternative fates. Overall, the model and supporting experimental data provide an overarching conceptual framework that helps explain how the specifics of gene network architecture produces discreteness and robustness of cell types, allows for both stochastic and deterministic cell fate decision and ensures directionality of organismal development.

  20. Expression of homeobox genes in human erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, W F; Largman, C; Lowney, P; Hack, F M; Lawrence, H J

    1989-01-01

    Because homeobox-containing genes play a major role in embryogenesis and tissue identity in Drosophila and because similar genes encode tissue-specific transcription factors in mammalian cells, we hypothesized that homeobox genes might plan a role in hematopoietic differentiation and lineage commitment. We therefore surveyed a number of human leukemic cell lines for expression of homeobox-containing genes by Northern gel analysis with probes from the Hox 2 cluster of homeobox genes on chromosome 17. We observed transcripts for Hox 2.1, 2.2, 2.3 and 2.6 in the erythroid line HEL and for Hox 2.3 and 2.6 in the erythroid line K562. Using homeobox-specific probes we confirmed that the transcripts visualized contained the homeodomains for each gene as well as the flanking sequences. The myeloid lines HL60, KG1 and U937 did not express specific transcripts for any of the 4 genes studied. However, all these cell lines demonstrated bands when probed at low stringency with certain Hox 2 probes, indicating the expression of other homologous but as yet unidentified homeobox genes. Expression of Hox 2.3 and 2.6 was seen in some T and B lymphoid cell lines. Induction of differentiation in HEL cells resulted in complex modulation of expression of the Hox 2 genes. We have therefore observed erythroid-restricted expression of certain Hox 2 homeobox containing genes in human erythroid cell lines and modulation of that expression with differentiation, suggesting a role for these genes in the regulation of hematopoiesis. Different homeobox genes appear to be expressed in non-erythroid leukemic cell lines.

  1. Expression and purification of recombinant nattokinase in Spodoptera frugiperda cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxiang; Wang, Xiaoli; Xiong, Shaoling; Zhang, Jing; Cai, Litao; Yang, Yanyan

    2007-10-01

    A recombinant baculovirus, rv-egfp-NK, containing a reporter gene encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), was used to express nattokinase (NK), a fibrinolytic enzyme, in Spodoptera frugiperda (SF-9) cells. The recombinant protein also included a histidine tag for purification using Ni(2+) resins. The recombinant NK, approximately 30 kDa, retained fibrinolytic activity (60 U/ml). The integration of the EGFP expression cassette in the Bac-to-Bac system is thus an effective method for the expression and purification of recombinant NK protein in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells.

  2. Expression of stromelysin 3 in basal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Cribier, B; Noacco, G; Peltre, B; Grosshans, E

    2001-01-01

    Stromelysin 3 is a member of the metalloproteinase family, which is expressed in various remodelling processes. The prognosis of breast cancers and squamous cell carcinomas is correlated to the level of expression of this protein. The purpose of the present work was to evaluate the expression of stromelysin 3 in the major types of basal cell carcinomas. We selected cases of primary tumours that were fully excised, without previous biopsy: 40 Pinkus tumors, 40 superficial, 40 nodular, 38 morpheiform basal cell carcinomas and 10 cases showing deep subcutaneous or muscular invasion. Immunohistochemistry was carried out using monoclonal anti-ST3 antibodies (MC Rio, IGBMC Strasbourg), and evaluated on a semi-quantitative scale from 0 to 3. Positively stained cells were restricted to the periphery of the epithelial cells, which, by contrast, never expressed stromelysin 3. The global rate of expression was 27% in Pinkus tumors, 65% in superficial, 72.5% in nodular, 87% in morpheiform and 100% in deeply invasive carcinomas. The rates of tumours showing the highest number of positively stained cells (class 2 or 3) were respectively 7.5%, 20%, 45%, 63% and 100%. This systematic study of stromelysin3 expression in basal cell carcinomas confirms that it is a marker of poor prognosis, because the rate of positive tumours was much higher in aggressive carcinomas. Moreover, the majority of tumours showing an intense expression (i.e. the highest number of positively stained cells in their stroma) were of the morpheiform and deeply invasive types, which are of poor prognosis. Altogether, the studies performed on cutaneous tumours are consistent with the theory of stromelysin 3 playing an active role in tumour progression.

  3. Association between SET expression and glioblastoma cell apoptosis and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    He, Kunyan; Shi, Lihong; Jiang, Tingting; Li, Qiang; Chen, Yao; Meng, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was one of the first cancer types systematically studied at a genomic and transcriptomic level due to its high incidence and aggressivity; however, the detailed mechanism remains unclear, even though it is known that numerous cytokines are involved in the occurrence and development of GBM. The present study aimed to determine whether the SET gene has a role in human glioblastoma carcinogenesis. A total of 32 samples, including 18 cases of glioma, 2 cases of meningioma and 12 normal brain tissue samples, were detected using the streptavidin-peroxidase method through immunohistochemistry. To reduce SET gene expression in U251 and U87MG cell lines, the RNA interference technique was used and transfection with small interfering (si)RNA of the SET gene was performed. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry, cell migration was examined by Transwell migration assay and cell proliferation was determined by Cell Counting Kit-8. SET, Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3 mRNA and protein expression levels were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. Positive protein expression of SET was observed in the cell nucleus, with the expression level of SET significantly higher in glioma tissues compared with normal brain tissue (P=0.001). Elevated expression of SET was significantly associated with gender (P=0.002), tumors classified as World Health Organization grade II (P=0.031), III (P=0.003) or IV (P=0.001), and moderately (P=0.031) or poorly differentiated (P=0.001) tumors. Compared with the negative and non-treatment (blank) control cells, SET gene expression was significantly inhibited (P=0.006 and P<0.001), cell apoptosis was significantly increased (P=0.001 and P<0.001), cell proliferation was significantly inhibited (P=0.002 and P=0.015), and cell migration was significantly decreased (P=0.001 and P=0.001) in siRNA-transfected U87MG−SET and U251−SET cells, respectively. In

  4. Cell-specific expression of TLR9 isoforms in inflammation.

    PubMed

    McKelvey, Kelly J; Highton, John; Hessian, Paul A

    2011-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key pattern recognition receptors during an immune response. With five isoforms of human TLR9 described, we hypothesised that differential expression of TLR9 isoforms in different cell types would result in variable contributions to the overall input from TLR9 during inflammation. We assessed the molecular expression of the TLR9 isoforms, TLR9-A, -C and -D. In normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells, B-lymphocytes express ∼100-fold more TLR9-A transcript than monocytes or T-lymphocytes, which predominantly express the TLR9-C transcript. Switches in isoform predominance accompany B-lymphocyte development. TLR9 protein expression in rheumatoid inflammatory lesions reflected the TLR9 isoform expression by immune cells. Herein we suggest that B-lymphocytes and plasmacytoid dendritic cells contribute the ∼3-fold higher TLR9-A transcript levels observed in inflamed synovium when compared to subcutaneous rheumatoid nodules. In contrast, macrophages and T-lymphocytes contribute the ∼4-fold higher TLR9-C transcript levels seen in nodules, compared to synovia. From protein sequence, predictions of subcellular localisation suggest TLR9-B may locate to the mitochondria, whereas TLR9-D adopts an opposing orientation in the endoplasmic reticulum. Consistent with this, structure models raise the possibility of alternative ligands for the TLR9-B and TLR9-D variants. Our results highlight differences in the expression of human TLR9 isoforms in normal and inflamed tissues, with differing contributions to inflammation.

  5. Angiogenic sprouting is regulated by endothelial cell expression of Slug

    PubMed Central

    Welch-Reardon, Katrina M.; Ehsan, Seema M.; Wang, Kehui; Wu, Nan; Newman, Andrew C.; Romero-Lopez, Monica; Fong, Ashley H.; George, Steven C.; Edwards, Robert A.; Hughes, Christopher C. W.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Snail family of zinc-finger transcription factors are evolutionarily conserved proteins that control processes requiring cell movement. Specifically, they regulate epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMT) where an epithelial cell severs intercellular junctions, degrades basement membrane and becomes a migratory, mesenchymal-like cell. Interestingly, Slug expression has been observed in angiogenic endothelial cells (EC) in vivo, suggesting that angiogenic sprouting may share common attributes with EMT. Here, we demonstrate that sprouting EC in vitro express both Slug and Snail, and that siRNA-mediated knockdown of either inhibits sprouting and migration in multiple in vitro angiogenesis assays. We find that expression of MT1-MMP, but not of VE-Cadherin, is regulated by Slug and that loss of sprouting as a consequence of reduced Slug expression can be reversed by lentiviral-mediated re-expression of MT1-MMP. Activity of MMP2 and MMP9 are also affected by Slug expression, likely through MT1-MMP. Importantly, we find enhanced expression of Slug in EC in human colorectal cancer samples compared with normal colon tissue, suggesting a role for Slug in pathological angiogenesis. In summary, these data implicate Slug as an important regulator of sprouting angiogenesis, particularly in pathological settings. PMID:24554431

  6. Leukomogenic factors downregulate heparanase expression in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eshel, Rinat; Ben-Zaken, Olga; Vainas, Oded; Nadir, Yona; Minucci, Saverio; Polliack, Aaron; Naparstek, Ella; Vlodavsky, Israel; Katz, Ben-Zion; E-mail: bkatz@tasmc.healt.gov.il

    2005-10-07

    Heparanase is a heparan sulfate-degrading endoglycosidase expressed by mature monocytes and myeloid cells, but not by immature hematopoietic progenitors. Heparanase gene expression is upregulated during differentiation of immature myeloid cells. PML-RAR{alpha} and PLZF-RAR{alpha} fusion gene products associated with acute promyelocytic leukemia abrogate myeloid differentiation and heparanase expression. AML-Eto, a translocation product associated with AML FAB M2, also downregulates heparanase gene expression. The common mechanism that underlines the activity of these three fusion gene products involves the recruitment of histone deacetylase complexes to specific locations within the DNA. We found that retinoic acid that dissociates PML-RAR{alpha} from the DNA, and which is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia patients, restores heparanase expression to normal levels in an acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line. The retinoic acid effects were also observed in primary acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and in a retinoic acid-treated acute promyelocytic leukemia patient. Histone deacetylase inhibitor reverses the downregulation of heparanase expression induced by the AML-Eto fusion gene product in M2 type AML. In summary, we have characterized a link between leukomogenic factors and the downregulation of heparanase in myeloid leukemic cells.

  7. All-optical regulation of gene expression in targeted cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yisen; He, Hao; Li, Shiyang; Liu, Dayong; Lan, Bei; Hu, Minglie; Cao, Youjia; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-06-01

    Controllable gene expression is always a challenge and of great significance to biomedical research and clinical applications. Recently, various approaches based on extra-engineered light-sensitive proteins have been developed to provide optogenetic actuators for gene expression. Complicated biomedical techniques including exogenous genes engineering, transfection, and material delivery are needed. Here we present an all-optical method to regulate gene expression in targeted cells. Intrinsic or exogenous genes can be activated by a Ca2+-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) driven by a short flash of femtosecond-laser irradiation. When applied to mesenchymal stem cells, expression of a differentiation regulator Osterix can be activated by this method to potentially induce differentiation of them. A laser-induced ``Ca2+-comb'' (LiCCo) by multi-time laser exposure is further developed to enhance gene expression efficiency. This noninvasive method hence provides an encouraging advance of gene expression regulation, with promising potential of applying in cell biology and stem-cell science.

  8. Magnetic field-controlled gene expression in encapsulated cells

    PubMed Central

    Ortner, Viktoria; Kaspar, Cornelius; Halter, Christian; Töllner, Lars; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Walzer, Johann; Günzburg, Walter H.; Dangerfield, John A.; Hohenadl, Christine; Czerny, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Cell and gene therapies have an enormous range of potential applications, but as for most other therapies, dosing is a critical issue, which makes regulated gene expression a prerequisite for advanced strategies. Several inducible expression systems have been established, which mainly rely on small molecules as inducers, such as hormones or antibiotics. The application of these inducers is difficult to control and the effects on gene regulation are slow. Here we describe a novel system for induction of gene expression in encapsulated cells. This involves the modification of cells to express potential therapeutic genes under the control of a heat inducible promoter and the co-encapsulation of these cells with magnetic nanoparticles. These nanoparticles produce heat when subjected to an alternating magnetic field; the elevated temperatures in the capsules then induce gene expression. In the present study we define the parameters of such systems and provide proof-of-principle using reporter gene constructs. The fine-tuned heating of nanoparticles in the magnetic field allows regulation of gene expression from the outside over a broad range and within short time. Such a system has great potential for advancement of cell and gene therapy approaches. PMID:22197778

  9. Estradiol regulates MICA expression in human endometrial cells

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Satarupa; Pioli, Patricia A.; Conejo-Garcia, Jose; Wira, Charles R.; Sentman, Charles L.

    2008-01-01

    The human endometrium undergoes cyclical changes regulated by sex hormones. Evidence suggests sex hormones regulate NK cell recruitment into the uterus in large numbers. NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on human NK cells, γδ and CD8 T cells. NKG2D ligands are known to be sensors of cellular “stress”. In this study, we investigated whether sex hormones directly regulate expression of NKG2D ligands in the human uterus. Estradiol increased MICA expression on uterine epithelial cells; regulation was estrogen receptor-dependent. Real-time PCR analysis showed that NKG2D ligands MICA and MICB were expressed in the human endometrium. MICA protein was detected primarily on epithelial cells, and greater expression was observed in immunohistochemical analysis of tissues from patients in the secretory phase of the menstrual cycle. Thus, estrogens regulate expression of MICA. These data suggest hormonal regulation of innate immunity and NKG2D-mediated recognition in other tissues and diseases where estrogen may be involved. PMID:18728002

  10. CD44 variant expression in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Orteu, C H; Li, W; Allen, M H; Smith, N P; Barker, J N; Whittaker, S J

    1997-07-01

    Expression of the lymphocyte homing receptor CD44 and its splice variants have been linked to tumour dissemination and poor prognosis in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Specifically, the in vitro expression of variant exon V6 confers metastatic potential in rat pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. In this study, we investigated the expression of CD44 splice variants in cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, including patients with mycosis fungoides (MF), Sezary syndrome (SS), large-cell anaplastic lymphoma (LCAL) and HTLV1-associated cutaneous lymphoma. In addition, 4 involved lymph nodes from 2 patients with MF and 1 patient with SS were examined. Inflammatory dermatoses, lichen planus and psoriasis, and normal skin were also studied. Immunohistochemistry was performed using a panel of monoclonal antibodies, including those with specificity for CD44H (standard isoform) and variant exons V3, V6 and V8-9. Normal epidermal keratinocytes were consistently CD44H and CD44 V3, V6 and V8-9 positive. In all the different clinicopathological subtypes and stages of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, including involved lymph nodes, tumour cells consistently expressed CD44H, but were CD44 V3 and V6 negative. CD44 V8-9 was expressed on a majority of tumour cells in 2/5 LCAL and on occasional tumour cells in 2/5 LCAL. Occasional V8-9 positive tumour cells were also identified in 6/13 MF, 1/4 SS and 3/4 HTLV1. In 2/3 lymph node samples from 2 patients with tumour-stage MF, CD44 V8-9 expression was found on a small percentage of atypical mononuclear cells. Scattered V8-9 positive dermal mononuclear cells were present in sections of lichen planus and psoriasis. We have found no evidence to suggest that the metastasis-associated CD44 variant exon (V6) is expressed in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, or that CD44H expression is associated with an adverse prognostic group. It is not clear whether the strong expression of CD44 V8-9 in 2 patients with CD30 positive LCAL reflects activation status or metastatic potential.

  11. Development of neural crest cells expressing nerve growth factor receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    The present study examines the ontogeny of the nerve growth factor receptor of neural crest cells in vitro and the phenotypic nature of the neural crest cells expressing this receptor. /sup 125/I-NGF binding assays and autoradiographic and immunofluorescence techniques have demonstrated the presence of a subpopulation of quail neural crest cells that express specific NGF receptors after 3-4 days in vitro. This subpopulations represents approximately 28% of the cells in 5-day primary cultures and 30-35% of the cells in secondary cultures; these cells generally exhibited a flattened, phase-dark morphology. Approximately one-third of these cells also labeled with a 2 hr pulse of /sup 3/H thymidine. Catecholamine-containing neural crest cells generally lacked NGF receptors. NGF receptor-positive cells also failed to demonstrate somatostatin-, neuron-specific enolase-, or S-100-like immunoreactivity. Melanocytes do not appear to express NGF receptors. Exogenous nerve growth factor did not influence the morphology or mitotic status of the cells in culture.

  12. The CD40 ligand expressed by human B cells costimulates B cell responses.

    PubMed

    Grammer, A C; Bergman, M C; Miura, Y; Fujita, K; Davis, L S; Lipsky, P E

    1995-05-15

    The possibility that activated B cells might express a ligand for CD40 that was of functional importance for B cell responses was examined by using highly purified human peripheral blood B cells, as well as a variety of B lymphoblastoid cell lines and hybridomas. Following stimulation with the combination of a calcium ionophore and a phorbol ester, human B cells bound a soluble fusion protein containing the extracellular portion of CD40 and the Fc region of IgG1 (CD40.Ig). A variety of B cell lines and hybridomas also bound CD40.Ig, either constitutively or after activation. In addition, CD40.Ig specifically immunoprecipitated a 33-kDa glycoprotein from surface 125I-labeled activated B cells. The nucleotide sequence of the coding region of the CD40 ligand mRNA amplified by RT-PCR from activated T cells and B cell lines was identical. The CD40 ligand expressed on human B cells was important functionally because homotypic aggregation of CD40 ligand-expressing B cells was inhibited by the CD40.Ig construct. Additionally, RNA and DNA synthesis as well as Ig production by polyclonally activated, highly purified peripheral B cells and a variety of B cell lines were inhibited significantly by the CD40.Ig construct. Finally, B cell lines expressing the CD40 ligand induced Ig production from resting normal B cells in a CD40-dependent manner. These results indicate that human B cells express a ligand for CD40 that is identical with that expressed by activated T cells and that the B cell-expressed CD40 ligand plays an important role in facilitating responses of activated B cells.

  13. DIFFERENTIAL EXPRESSION IN CLEAR CELL RENAL CELL CARCINOMA IDENTIFIED BY GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Brian R.; Li, Jianbo; Zhou, Ming; Babineau, Denise; Faber, Pieter; Novick, Andrew C.; Williams, Bryan R.G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Gene expression profiling has been shown to provide prognostic information regarding patients with a solitary, sporadic RCC. There is no reliable way to differentiate synchronous renal metastases from bilateral primary tumors in patients with bilateral RCC. We present data using a custom kidney cancer cDNA array that can predict outcomes in patients with unilateral and bilateral RCC. Methods Fresh frozen tissue from 38 clear cell RCC (cRCC) was analyzed using a cancer cDNA array containing 3966 genes relevant to cancer or kidney development. Median follow-up was 5.3 years; cancer had recurred in 12 (43%) patients and 11 (39%) patients were deceased at last follow-up. Results Using a training dataset of 8 tumors, a 44-gene expression profile (GEP) distinguishing aggressive and indolent cRCC was identified. Of 29 single cRCC, 16 were predicted to be indolent and 13 aggressive by GEP. Recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 68% and 42% in these 2 groups (P=.032). cRCC classified as indolent or aggressive according to SSIGN score had 5-year recurrence-free survival of 78% and 42%, respectively (P=.021). In a cox proportional hazards analysis, GEP was not an independent predictor of recurrence-free survival after accounting for SSIGN score. GEP classification correlated with cancer-specific survival at 5 years in 4 of 4 patients with metachronous cRCC, but only 2 of 4 patients with bilateral synchronous cRCC. Conclusions GEP using a kidney cancer-relevant cDNA array can differentiate between aggressive and indolent cRCC. GEP results may be most useful in unilateral cRCC when results are discordant with predictions of tumor behavior based on standard clinicopathologic features. In addition, GEP can provide prognostic information that may help characterize tumors of unknown clinical stage, such as bilateral metachronous cRCC. PMID:19095258

  14. Cell-Free Expression of G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    PubMed

    Segers, Kenneth; Masure, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The large-scale production of recombinant G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is one of the major bottlenecks that hamper functional and structural studies of this important class of integral membrane proteins. Heterologous overexpression of GPCRs often results in low yields of active protein, usually due to a combination of several factors, such as low expression levels, protein insolubility, host cell toxicity, and the need to use harsh and often denaturing detergents (e.g., SDS, LDAO, OG, and DDM, among others) to extract the recombinant receptor from the host cell membrane. Many of these problematic issues are inherently linked to cell-based expression systems and can therefore be circumvented by the use of cell-free systems. In this unit, we provide a range of protocols for the production of GPCRs in a cell-free expression system. Using this system, we typically obtain GPCR expression levels of ∼1 mg per ml of reaction mixture in the continuous-exchange configuration. Although the protocols in this unit have been optimized for the cell-free expression of GPCRs, they should provide a good starting point for the production of other classes of membrane proteins, such as ion channels, aquaporins, carrier proteins, membrane-bound enzymes, and even large molecular complexes.

  15. Differential expression of estrogen receptor α and progesterone receptor in the normal and cryptorchid testis of a dog

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyo Young; Yoo, Dae Young; Jo, Young Kwang; Kim, Geon A; Chung, Jin Young; Choi, Jung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Descending of the testes is an important process for spermatogenesis and cryptorchidism is one of the most relevant genital defects in dogs. In a previous study, we observed abnormal morphology and proliferation of Sertoli cells in a cryptorchid testis. In the present study, we investigated the expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in the normal and cryptorchid testis of a dog. Elective orchidectomy was performed on the dog's abdominal right testis (undescended, cryptorchid) and scrotal left testis (descended, normal). In the normal testis, estrogen receptor α immunoreactivity was detected in Leydig cells alone, while estrogen receptor α immunoreactivity in the cryptorchid testis was significantly prominent in the Sertoli cells as well. In addition, progesterone receptor immunoreactivity in the control testis was detected in the spermatids, but was not detected in the cryptorchid testis. This result suggests that unilateral cryptorchidism causes increases of estrogen receptor α expression in Sertoli cells. PMID:27382382

  16. Differential expression of estrogen receptor α and progesterone receptor in the normal and cryptorchid testis of a dog.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyo Young; Yoo, Dae Young; Jo, Young Kwang; Kim, Geon A; Chung, Jin Young; Choi, Jung Hoon; Jang, Goo; Hwang, In Koo

    2016-06-01

    Descending of the testes is an important process for spermatogenesis and cryptorchidism is one of the most relevant genital defects in dogs. In a previous study, we observed abnormal morphology and proliferation of Sertoli cells in a cryptorchid testis. In the present study, we investigated the expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in the normal and cryptorchid testis of a dog. Elective orchidectomy was performed on the dog's abdominal right testis (undescended, cryptorchid) and scrotal left testis (descended, normal). In the normal testis, estrogen receptor α immunoreactivity was detected in Leydig cells alone, while estrogen receptor α immunoreactivity in the cryptorchid testis was significantly prominent in the Sertoli cells as well. In addition, progesterone receptor immunoreactivity in the control testis was detected in the spermatids, but was not detected in the cryptorchid testis. This result suggests that unilateral cryptorchidism causes increases of estrogen receptor α expression in Sertoli cells. PMID:27382382

  17. SPARC expression induces cell cycle arrest via STAT3 signaling pathway in medulloblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chetty, Chandramu; Dontula, Ranadheer; Gujrati, Meena; Lakka, Sajani S.

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ectopic expression of SPARC impaired cell proliferation in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression induces STAT3 mediated cell cycle arrest in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression significantly inhibited pre-established tumor growth in nude-mice. -- Abstract: Dynamic cell interaction with ECM components has profound influence in cancer progression. SPARC is a component of the ECM, impairs the proliferation of different cell types and modulates tumor cell aggressive features. We previously reported that SPARC expression significantly impairs medulloblastoma tumor growth in vivo. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of SPARC inhibits medulloblastoma cell proliferation. MTT assay indicated a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation in adenoviral mediated expression of SPARC full length cDNA (Ad-DsRed-SP) in D425 and UW228 cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed that Ad-DsRed-SP-infected cells accumulate in the G2/M phase of cell cycle. Further, immunoblot and immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that SPARC induced G2/M cell cycle arrest was mediated through inhibition of the Cyclin-B-regulated signaling pathway involving p21 and Cdc2 expression. Additionally, expression of SPARC decreased STAT3 phosphorylation at Tyr-705; constitutively active STAT3 expression reversed SPARC induced G2/M arrest. Ad-DsRed-SP significantly inhibited the pre-established orthotopic tumor growth and tumor volume in nude-mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor sections from mice treated with Ad-DsRed-SP showed decreased immunoreactivity for pSTAT3 and increased immunoreactivity for p21 compared to tumor section from mice treated with mock and Ad-DsRed. Taken together our studies further reveal that STAT3 plays a key role in SPARC induced G2/M arrest in medulloblastoma cells. These new findings provide a molecular basis for the mechanistic understanding of the

  18. 293 cells express both epithelial as well as mesenchymal cell adhesion molecules

    PubMed Central

    INADA, MASAKAZU; IZAWA, GENYA; KOBAYASHI, WAKAKO; OZAWA, MASAYUKI

    2016-01-01

    The 293 cell line, used extensively in various types of studies due to the ease with which these cells can be transfected, was thought to be derived by the transformation of primary cultures of human embryonic kidney cells with sheared adenovirus type 5 DNA. Although the 293 cells were assumed to originate from epithelial cells, the exact origin of these cells remains unknown. Previous attempts to characterize these cells combined immunostaining, immunoblot analysis and microarray analysis to demonstrate that 293 cells express neurofilament subunits, α-internexin, and several other proteins typically found in neurons. These findings raised the possibility that the 293 cell line may have originated from human neuronal lineage cells. Contrary to this suggestion, in this study, we found that the 293 cells expressed N-cadherin and vimentin, which are marker proteins expressed in mesenchymal cells. Furthermore, the 293 cells also expressed E-cadherin, cytokeratins 5/8 and desmoglein 2, which are epithelial cell markers. When the cells, primarily cultured from the kidneys of Clawn miniature swine and passaged 10–15 generations [termed porcine kidney epithelial (PKE) cells] were examined, they were found to be positive for the expression of both mesenchymal and epithelial markers. Thus, transformation by adenovirus was not necessary for the cells to express N-cadherin. Occludin and zonula occludens (ZO)-1, two components of tight junctions in epithelial and endothelial cells, were detected in the 293 and the PKE cells. Thus, the findings of the present study demonstrate that 293 cells retain several characteristics of epithelial cells. PMID:27121032

  19. Gene expression changes in BVDV2-infected MDBK cells.

    PubMed

    Neill, John D; Ridpath, Julia F

    2003-06-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is a ubiquitous viral pathogen of cattle. The virus exists as one of two biotypes, cytopathic and non-cytopathic, based on the ability to induce cytopathic effect in cell culture. The non-cytopathic biotypes are able to establish non-apparent, persistent infections in both cell culture and in bovine foetuses of fewer than 150 days gestation. The mechanism by which viral tolerance is established is unknown. To examine the changes in gene expression that occur following infection of host cells with BVDV, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), a global gene expression technology was used. SAGE, a sequence-based technology, allows quantification of virtually every transcript in a cell type without prior sequence information. Transcript expression levels and identities are determined by DNA sequencing of libraries composed of 14 base DNA fragments (tags) derived from the 3' end of each cellular mRNA transcript. Comparison of data obtained from non-infected and BVDV2-infected cell libraries revealed a number of changes in gene expression. Many of these transcriptional changes could be placed into distinct biochemical pathways or functions. Both alpha and beta tubulins were downregulated, indicating possible dysfunction in cell division and other functions where microtubules play a major role. Expression of several genes encoding proteins involved in energy metabolism were downregulated, indicating possible decreased ATP synthesis. Genes encoding proteins involved in protein translation and post-translational modifications were generally upregulated. These data indicate that following infection with BVDV, changes in gene expression occur that are beneficial for virus replication while placing the cell at a metabolic disadvantage.

  20. Significance of Parafibromin Expression in Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Inju; Lee, Mija; Lim, Sharon; Hong, Ran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Parafibromin is a product of the tumor suppressor gene that has been studied as a potential indicator of tumor aggressiveness in the parathyroid, breast, colorectum, and stomach. However, the clinical significance and potential function of parafibromin expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of parafibromin in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) and to verify its potential as a biomarker of tumor behavior. Methods: Parafibromin expression was evaluated in 30 cases of LSCC using immunohistochemistry. The correlations between parafibromin expression and clinicopathologic parameters were investigated. Results: Parafibromin expression was positive in 15 cases (50%) and negative in 15 cases (50%). Tumor size and T stage showed a statistically significant inverse relationship with parafibromin expression (p=.028 and p<.001, respectively). Parafibromin expression was not associated with age, sex, lymph node metastasis, tumor differentiation, or tumor location. There was no statistically significant relationship between parafibromin expression and progression-free survival in the patients (p>.05). Conclusions: Our results indicate that the downregulation or loss of parafibromin expression can be employed as a novel marker of tumor progression or aggressiveness in LSCC. PMID:27334641

  1. Long Noncoding RNA Expression during Human B-Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Petri, Andreas; Dybkær, Karen; Bøgsted, Martin; Thrue, Charlotte Albæk; Hagedorn, Peter H; Schmitz, Alexander; Bødker, Julie Støve; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Kauppinen, Sakari

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as important regulators of diverse cellular processes, but their roles in the developing immune system are poorly understood. In this study, we analysed lncRNA expression during human B-cell development by array-based expression profiling of eleven distinct flow-sorted B-cell subsets, comprising pre-B1, pre-B2, immature, naive, memory, and plasma cells from bone marrow biopsies (n = 7), and naive, centroblast, centrocyte, memory, and plasmablast cells from tonsil tissue samples (n = 6), respectively. A remapping strategy was used to assign the array probes to 37630 gene-level probe sets, reflecting recent updates in genomic and transcriptomic databases, which enabled expression profiling of 19579 long noncoding RNAs, comprising 3947 antisense RNAs, 5277 lincRNAs, 7625 pseudogenes, and 2730 additional lncRNAs. As a first step towards inferring the functions of the identified lncRNAs in developing B-cells, we analysed their co-expression with well-characterized protein-coding genes, a method known as "guilt by association". By using weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we identified 272 lincRNAs, 471 antisense RNAs, 376 pseudogene RNAs, and 64 lncRNAs within seven sub-networks associated with distinct stages of B-cell development, such as early B-cell development, B-cell proliferation, affinity maturation of antibody, and terminal differentiation. These data provide an important resource for future studies on the functions of lncRNAs in development of the adaptive immune response, and the pathogenesis of B-cell malignancies that originate from distinct B-cell subpopulations. PMID:26394393

  2. Reduced Ang2 expression in aging endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hohensinner, P J; Ebenbauer, B; Kaun, C; Maurer, G; Huber, K; Wojta, J

    2016-06-01

    Aging endothelial cells are characterized by increased cell size, reduced telomere length and increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, we describe here that aging reduces the migratory distance of endothelial cells. Furthermore, we observe an increase of the quiescence protein Ang1 and a decrease of the endothelial activation protein Ang2 upon aging. Supplementing Ang2 to aged endothelial cells restored their migratory capacity. We conclude that aging shifts the balance of the Ang1/Ang2 network favouring a quiescent state. Activation of endothelial cells in aging might be necessary to enhance wound healing capacities. PMID:27137842

  3. Variable CD52 Expression in Mature T Cell and NK Cell Malignancies: Implications for Alemtuzumab Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Liuyan; Yuan, Constance; Hubacheck, Julia; Janik, John E.; Wilson, Wyndham; Morris, John C.; Jasper, Gregory A; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice

    2012-01-01

    Summary The anti-CD52 antibody alemtuzumab has been explored as a novel targeted therapy in T-cell malignancies. To assess the suitability of alemtuzumab therapy we carried out a comprehensive study of CD52 expression using flow cytometry (FC) in 78 untreated patients diagnosed with mature T/NK cell neoplasms, including 34 adult T-cell leukemia /lymphomas (ATLL), two anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL), three angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphomas (AITL), 16 cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL), four extra-nodal T/NK cell lymphomas (ENT/NKCL), four hepatosplenic T-cell lymphomas (HSTCL), 13 peripheral T-cell lymphomas, unspecified (PTCL-NOS), and two T-prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL). The level of CD52 expression was quantitated using QuantiBRITE standard beads. The level of CD52 expression varied widely within each diagnostic category. All AITL, HSTCL, and T-PLL cases were CD52 positive and the frequency of CD52 expression was high in PTCL-NOS (92.3%), ATLL (94.1%) and CTCL (87.5%), implying a rational role for alemtuzumab in the treatment of these diseases; however, CD52 expression was low in ALCL (50%) and ENT/NKCL (25%). FC testing for cell surface expression of CD52 is indicated in patients with T/NK cell malignancies being considered for alemtuzumab therapy. Further studies are necessary to determine if the level of CD52 expression correlates with response to therapy. PMID:19236377

  4. Human respiratory epithelial cells from nasal turbinate expressed stem cell genes even after serial passaging.

    PubMed

    Ruszymah, B H I; Izham, B A Azrul; Heikal, M Y Mohd; Khor, S F; Fauzi, M B; Aminuddin, B S

    2011-12-01

    Current development in the field of tissue engineering led to the idea of repairing and regenerating the respiratory airway through in vitro reconstruction using autologous respiratory epithelial (RE). To ensure the capability of proliferation, the stem cell property of RE cells from the nasal turbinate should be evaluated. Respiratory epithelial cells from six human nasal turbinates were harvested and cultured in vitro. The gene expression of FZD-9 and BST-1 were expressed in passage 2 (P2) and passage 4 (P4). The levels of expression were not significant between both passages. The RE cells exhibit the stem cell properties, which remains even after serial passaging.

  5. Phenotypic Expression of ADAMTS13 in Glomerular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tati, Ramesh; Kristoffersson, Ann-Charlotte; Ståhl, Anne-lie; Mörgelin, Matthias; Motto, David; Satchell, Simon; Mathieson, Peter; Manea-Hedström, Minola; Karpman, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Background ADAMTS13 is the physiological von Willebrand factor (VWF)-cleaving protease. The aim of this study was to examine ADAMTS13 expression in kidneys from ADAMTS13 wild-type (Adamts13+/+) and deficient (Adamts13−/−) mice and to investigate the expression pattern and bioactivity in human glomerular endothelial cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Immunohistochemistry was performed on kidney sections from ADAMTS13 wild-type and ADAMTS13-deficient mice. Phenotypic differences were examined by ultramorphology. ADAMTS13 expression in human glomerular endothelial cells and dermal microvascular endothelial cells was investigated by real-time PCR, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and immunoblotting. VWF cleavage was demonstrated by multimer structure analysis and immunoblotting. ADAMTS13 was demonstrated in glomerular endothelial cells in Adamts13+/+ mice but no staining was visible in tissue from Adamts13−/− mice. Thickening of glomerular capillaries with platelet deposition on the vessel wall was detected in Adamts13−/− mice. ADAMTS13 mRNA and protein were detected in both human endothelial cells and the protease was secreted. ADAMTS13 activity was demonstrated in glomerular endothelial cells as cleavage of VWF. Conclusions/Significance Glomerular endothelial cells express and secrete ADAMTS13. The proteolytic activity could have a protective effect preventing deposition of platelets along capillary lumina under the conditions of high shear stress present in glomerular capillaries. PMID:21720563

  6. Heterogeneity of single cell cytokine gene expression in clonal T cell populations.

    PubMed

    Bucy, R P; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, A; Huang, G Q; Li, J; Karr, L; Ross, M; Russell, J H; Murphy, K M; Weaver, C T

    1994-10-01

    T helper type 0 (Th0), Th1, and Th2 CD4+ T cell clones derived from a T cell receptor alpha/beta (TCR-alpha/beta) transgenic mouse were activated by antigen presented on "artificial" antigen-presenting cells that expressed or lacked the costimulatory molecule B7-1, and were analyzed for single cell cytokine mRNA expression by in situ hybridization. There was significant heterogeneity in the frequency of T cells that expressed individual cytokine mRNAs within each clonal population, suggesting that transcriptional control of each of the cytokine genes was not coordinate within an individual cell. The majority of antigen-stimulated Th1 cells expressed mRNA for interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), but far fewer cells in the same population expressed interleukin 2 (IL-2). Similarly, the frequency of IL-4-expressing cells was greater than that of IL-5- or IL-10-expressing cells in the same Th2 population, but the difference in expression frequencies was more variable between clones. The expression frequencies of each of the cytokines was quite heterogeneous in the antigen-activated Th0 population. The principal effect of increased antigen on the activation of individual cytokine genes in each of the clonal populations was to increase recruitment of mRNA-positive cells, with little or no effect on the level of cytokine mRNA expression in individual positive cells. The effects of B7 costimulation were variable depending on the cytokine gene analyzed. B7 costimulation markedly increased the frequency and the level of IL-2 mRNA expression in individual positive cells in the Th1 and Th0 populations, with less effect on the recruitment and single cell expression level of IFN-gamma. IL-4 frequencies were modestly increased by B7 costimulation of the Th2 clones, but there was no detectable increase in single cell IL-4 expression level. The observed patterns of cytokine mRNA expression favor a model of T cell activation in which all-or-none, rather than graded, responses of cytokine

  7. Sodium butyrate regulates androgen receptor expression and cell cycle arrest in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeonga; Park, Hyeyoung; Im, Ji Young; Choi, Wahn Soo; Kim, Hyung Sik

    2007-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been shown to modify the expression of a variety of genes related to cell cycle regulation and apoptosis in several cancer cells. However, the precise mode of action of HDAC inhibitors in prostate cancer cells is not completely understood. This study examined whether an HDAC inhibitor affects cell death in human prostate cancer cells through the epigenetic regulation of androgen receptor (AR) expression. The molecular mechanism of the HDAC inhibitor, sodium butyrate, on the epigenetic alterations of cell cycle regulators was evaluated in androgen-dependent human prostate cancer LNCaP cells. The expression levels of acetylated histone H3 and H4 increased significantly after 48 h treatment with sodium butyrate. Sodium butyrate induced the expression of AR after 48 h treatment. In addition, immunofluorescence assay revealed the nuclear localization of the AR after sodium butyrate treatment. Sodium butyrate also significantly decreased the expression of the cell cycle regulatory proteins (cyclin D1/cyclin dependent kinase (CDK)4, CDK6, and cyclin E/CDK2) in the LNCaP cells after 48 h treatment. Furthermore, p21Waf1/Cip1 and p27Kip1 were upregulated as a result of the sodium butyrate treatment. These results suggest that sodium butyrate effectively inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis of human prostate cancer cells by altering the expression of cell cycle regulators and AR. This study indicated that sodium butyrate may be a potential agent in prostate cancer treatment.

  8. Expression of tracheal antimicrobial peptide in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    López-Meza, Joel E; Gutiérrez-Barroso, Angelina; Ochoa-Zarzosa, Alejandra

    2009-08-01

    The production of antimicrobial peptides is an important key of innate immunity. Tracheal antimicrobial peptide (TAP) expression has been reported in bovine tracheal epithelial cells and it can be modulated by bacterial infection or bacterial components. In mammary gland TAP expression has been reported, but the cell type that produces it is unknown. The objective of this work was to evaluate if bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMEC) express TAP mRNA, and evaluate the regulation of its expression in response to Staphylococcus aureus infection, bovine prolactin (bPRL) or acetyl salicylic acid (ASA). By retrotranscription and PCR, we demonstrated that bMEC express TAP mRNA. bMEC infected with live S. aureus down-regulates TAP expression, whereas the challenge with gentamicin-killed S. aureus up-regulates it. Also, bPRL do not significantly modify TAP expression, but in the presence of 5 mM ASA it was down-regulated, suggesting that nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathway can be involved in its regulation. PMID:19181355

  9. Expression and stabilization of bacterial luciferase in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Stacey S.; Dionisi, Hebe M.; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2004-06-01

    Current mammalian bioreporters using either firefly luciferase (luc) or GFP constructs require lysis and/or exogenous excitation to evoke a measurable response. Consequently, these cells cannot serve as continuous, on-line monitoring devices for in vivo imaging. Bacterial luciferase, lux, produces a photonic reaction that is cyclic, resulting in autonomous signal generation without the requirement for exogenous substrates or external activation. Therefore, lux-based bioluminescent bioreporters are the only truly autonomous light-generating sensors in existence. Unfortunately, the bacterial lux system has not yet been efficiently expressed in mammalian cells. In this research, three approaches for optimal expression of the a and b subunits of the bacterial luciferase protein were compared and reporter signal stability was evaluated from stably transfected human embryonic kidney cells. Maximum light levels were obtained from cells expressing the luciferase subunits linked with an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). Cells harboring this construct produced bioluminescence equaling 2.6 X 106 photons/sec compared to 7.2 X 104 photons/sec obtained from cells expressing the luciferase from a dual promoter vector and 3.5 X 104 photons/sec from a Lux fusion protein. Furthermore, the bioluminescence levels remained stable for more than forty cell passages (5 months) in the absence of antibiotic selection. After this time, bioluminescence signals dropped at a rate of approximately 5% per cell passage. These data indicate that mammalian cell lines can be engineered to efficiently express the bacterial lux system, thus lending themselves to possible long-term continuous monitoring or imaging applications in vivo.

  10. Melatonin modulates aromatase activity and expression in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-García, Virginia; González, Alicia; Martínez-Campa, Carlos; Alonso-González, Carolina; Cos, Samuel

    2013-05-01

    Melatonin is known to suppress the development of endocrine-responsive breast cancers by interacting with the estrogen signaling pathways. Paracrine interactions between malignant epithelial cells and proximal stromal cells are responsible for local estrogen biosynthesis. In human breast cancer cells and peritumoral adipose tissue, melatonin downregulates aromatase, which transforms androgens into estrogens. The presence of aromatase on endothelial cells indicates that endothelial cells may contribute to tumor growth by producing estrogens. Since human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) express both aromatase and melatonin receptors, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the ability of melatonin to regulate the activity and expression of aromatase on endothelial cells, thus, modulating local estrogen biosynthesis. In the present study, we demonstrated that melatonin inhibits the growth of HUVECs and reduces the local biosynthesis of estrogens through the downregulation of aromatase. These results are supported by three lines of evidence. Firstly, 1 mM of melatonin counteracted the testosterone-induced cell proliferation of HUVECs, which is dependent on the local biosynthesis of estrogens from testosterone by the aromatase activity of the cells. Secondly, we found that 1 mM of melatonin reduced the aromatase activity of HUVECs. Finally, by real‑time RT-PCR, we demonstrated that melatonin significantly downregulated the expression of aromatase as well as its endothelial-specific aromatase promoter region I.7. We conclude that melatonin inhibits aromatase activity and expression in HUVECs by regulating gene expression of specific aromatase promoter regions, thereby reducing the local production of estrogens. PMID:23450505

  11. Engineering Receptor Expression on Natural Killer Cells Through Trogocytosis.

    PubMed

    Somanchi, Anitha; Lee, Dean A; Somanchi, Srinivas S

    2016-01-01

    Trogocytosis is a rapid contact-dependent process by which lymphocytes acquire membrane patches from the target cells ('donor' cells) with which they interact and this phenomenon has been shown to occur in various immune cells. The surface molecules acquired through trogocytosis are functionally incorporated in the 'acceptor' cells transiently. We had previously demonstrated that trogocytosis can be utilized in place of gene transfer to engineer surface receptor expression on NK cells for adoptive immunotherapy applications. In this chapter, we describe detailed protocol for trogocytosis-co-culture of NK cell with the donor cell line, phenotypic assessment of receptor uptake and persistence, and assessment of NK cell function (migration) following receptor acquisition. PMID:27177672

  12. Comprehensive Profiling of GPCR Expression in Ghrelin-Producing Cells.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Hiroyuki; Iwakura, Hiroshi; Dote, Katsuko; Bando, Mika; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Ariyasu, Hiroyuki; Kusakabe, Toru; Son, Choel; Hosoda, Kiminori; Akamizu, Takashi; Kangawa, Kenji; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2016-02-01

    To determine the comprehensive G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) expression profile in ghrelin-producing cells and to elucidate the role of GPCR-mediated signaling in the regulation of ghrelin secretion, we determined GPCR expression profiles by RNA sequencing in the ghrelin-producing cell line MGN3-1 and analyzed the effects of ligands for highly expressed receptors on intracellular signaling and ghrelin secretion. Expression of selected GPCRs was confirmed in fluorescence-activated cell-sorted fluorescently tagged ghrelin-producing cells from ghrelin-promoter CreERT2/Rosa-CAG-LSL-ZsGreen1 mice. Expression levels of GPCRs previously suggested to regulate ghrelin secretion including adrenergic-β1 receptor, GPR81, oxytocin receptor, GPR120, and somatostatin receptor 2 were high in MGN3-1 cells. Consistent with previous reports, isoproterenol and oxytocin stimulated the Gs and Gq pathways, respectively, whereas lactate, palmitate, and somatostatin stimulated the Gi pathway, confirming the reliability of current assays. Among other highly expressed GPCRs, prostaglandin E receptor 4 agonist prostaglandin E2 significantly stimulated the Gs pathway and ghrelin secretion. Muscarine, the canonical agonist of cholinergic receptor muscarinic 4, stimulated both the Gq and Gi pathways. Although muscarine treatment alone did not affect ghrelin secretion, it did suppress forskolin-induced ghrelin secretion, suggesting that the cholinergic pathway may play a role in counterbalancing the stimulation of ghrelin by Gs (eg, by adrenaline). In addition, GPR142 ligand tryptophan stimulated ghrelin secretion. In conclusion, we determined the comprehensive expression profile of GPCRs in ghrelin-producing cells and identified two novel ghrelin regulators, prostaglandin E2 and tryptophan. These results will lead to a greater understanding of the physiology of ghrelin and facilitate the development of ghrelin-modulating drugs.

  13. Immunologic ignorance of vascular endothelial cells expressing minor histocompatibility antigen.

    PubMed

    Bolinger, Beatrice; Krebs, Philippe; Tian, Yinghua; Engeler, Daniel; Scandella, Elke; Miller, Simone; Palmer, Douglas C; Restifo, Nicholas P; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2008-05-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) presenting minor histocompatibility antigen (mhAg) are major target cells for alloreactive effector CD8(+) T cells during chronic transplant rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The contribution of ECs to T-cell activation, however, is still a controversial issue. In this study, we have assessed the antigen-presenting capacity of ECs in vivo using a transgenic mouse model with beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) expression confined to the vascular endothelium (Tie2-LacZ mice). In a GVHD-like setting with adoptive transfer of beta-gal-specific T-cell receptor-transgenic T cells, beta-gal expression by ECs was not sufficient to either activate or tolerize CD8(+) T cells. Likewise, transplantation of fully vascularized heart or liver grafts from Tie2-LacZ mice into nontransgenic recipients did not suffice to activate beta-gal-specific CD8(+) T cells, indicating that CD8(+) T-cell responses against mhAg cannot be initiated by ECs. Moreover, we could show that spontaneous activation of beta-gal-specific CD8(+) T cells in Tie2-LacZ mice was exclusively dependent on CD11c(+) dendritic cells (DCs), demonstrating that mhAgs presented by ECs remain immunologically ignored unless presentation by DCs is granted.

  14. Transcriptional Regulation of Tlr11 Gene Expression in Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhenyu; Shi, Zhongcheng; Sanchez, Amir; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Mingyao; Yang, Jianghua; Wang, Fen; Zhang, Dekai

    2009-01-01

    As sensors of invading microorganisms, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are expressed not only on macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) but also on epithelial cells. In the TLR family, Tlr11 appears to have the unique feature in that it is expressed primarily on epithelial cells, although it is also expressed on DCs and macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that transcription of the Tlr11 gene is regulated through two cis-acting elements, one Ets-binding site and one interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-binding site. The Ets element interacts with the epithelium-specific transcription factors, ESE-1 and ESE-3, and the IRF motif interacts with IRF-8. Thus, Tlr11 expression on epithelial cells is regulated by the transcription factors that are presumably distinct from transcription factors that regulate the expression of TLRs in innate immune cells such as macrophages and DCs. Our results imply that the distinctive transcription regulatory machinery for TLRs on epithelium may represent a promising new avenue for the development of epithelia-specific therapeutic interventions. PMID:19801549

  15. Expression of apoptotic regulatory molecules in renal cell carcinoma: elevated expression of Fas ligand.

    PubMed

    Olive, C; Cheung, C; Nicol, D; Falk, M C

    1999-02-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common renal neoplasm. Despite being infiltrated by tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), these TIL are unable to control tumour growth in vivo, suggesting that the cytotoxic capacity of TIL against RCC is impaired, or that the tumour cells are resistant to killing and therefore escape detection by the immune system. It is postulated that the expression of apoptotic regulatory molecules in RCC favours tumour cell survival. The present study has therefore determined the expression of Fas (APO-1/CD95), Fas ligand (Fas L) and bcl-2 in these tumours. The expression of Fas, Fas L and bcl-2 mRNA transcripts was determined in RCC, normal kidney and peripheral blood by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), following RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis from tissues and cell samples. Transcript levels were measured by densitometry after Southern blot hybridization of PCR products with internal radio-labelled oligonucleotide probes; a densitometry score was assigned to each hybridizing DNA band and expressed as a ratio of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase content. In peripheral blood, the expression of Fas L and bcl-2 transcripts was similar between patients and normal healthy individuals; however, Fas transcript expression was significantly down-regulated in the patients' versus normal peripheral blood (P = 0.026). Most interestingly, significantly up-regulated Fas L expression was observed in RCC compared to normal kidney (P = 0.041). In contrast, bcl-2 transcripts were well represented in normal kidney but markedly decreased in RCC (P = 0.021). The expression of Fas transcripts in normal kidney and RCC was variable. These data demonstrate elevated expression of Fas L transcripts in RCC, but the functional relevance of this remains to be investigated. PMID:10101681

  16. Cell-Specific Expression of Mitochondrial Transcripts in Maize Seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Li, X. Q.; Zhang, M.; Brown, G. G.

    1996-01-01

    Although mitochondria are thought to assume crucial and possibly novel physiological functions during male gametogenesis, it is not known to what extent mitochondrial function is necessary for other aspects of plant development or to what degree the expression of plant mitochondrial genes is subject to cell-specific regulation, particularly during vegetative growth. We have used in situ hybridization to show that extensive differences exist in the levels of mitochondrial RNAs (mtRNAs) among different tissues and among different individual cell types within the same organ of maize seedlings. The expression of all examined mtRNAs is enhanced in vascular bundles, particularly in procambium- and xylem-forming cells. Mitochondrial transcript levels correlated highly with cell division activity. For example, in roots, the transcripts are abundant in the dividing cells of the meristem but drop to very low levels in the nondividing cells of the root cap and the meristem quiescent center. By comparison, levels of functional mitochondria, as assessed by rhodamine-123 fluorescence, did not vary greatly among the same group of cells. In shoots, in situ hybridization and blot hybridization revealed differences in the patterns of localization among different mtRNAs. The results indicate that during vegetative growth, mitochondrial gene expression at the transcript level is subject to an unexpected degree of cell-specific regulation and that different controls may operate on different trancripts. PMID:12239371

  17. Derivation of sperm from xenografted testis cells and tissues of the peccary (Tayassu tajacu).

    PubMed

    Campos-Junior, Paulo Henrique Almeida; Costa, Guilherme Mattos Jardim; Avelar, Gleide Fernandes; Lacerda, Samyra Maria Santos Nassif; da Costa, Nathália Nogueira; Ohashi, Otávio Mitio; Miranda, Moysés dos Santos; Barcelos, Lucíola Silva; Jorge, Erika Cristina; Guimarães, Diva Anelie; de França, Luiz Renato

    2014-03-01

    Because the collared peccary (Tayassu tajacu) has a peculiar Leydig cell cytoarchitecture, this species represents a unique mammalian model for investigating testis function. Taking advantage of the well-established and very useful testis xenograft technique, in the present study, testis tissue and testis cell suspensions from immature collared peccaries (n=4; 3 months old) were xenografted in SCID mice (n=48) and evaluated at 2, 4, 6, and 8 months after grafting. Complete spermatogenesis was observed at 6 and 8 months after testis tissue xenografting. However, probably due to de novo testis morphogenesis and low androgen secretion, functionally evaluated by the seminal vesicle weight, a delay in spermatogenesis progression was observed in the testis cell suspension xenografts, with the production of fertile sperm only at 8 months after grafting. Importantly, demonstrating that the peculiar testicular cytoarchitecture of the collared peccary is intrinsically programmed, the unique Leydig cell arrangement observed in this species was re-established after de novo testis morphogenesis. The sperm collected from the xenografts resulted in diploid embryos that expressed the paternally imprinted gene NNAT after ICSI. The present study is the first to demonstrate complete spermatogenesis with the production of fertile sperm from testis cell suspension xenografts in a wild mammalian species. Therefore, due to its unique testicular cytoarchitecture, xenograft techniques, particularly testis cell suspensions, may represent a new and very promising approach to evaluate testis morphogenesis and to investigate spermatogonial stem cell physiology and niche in the collared peccary.

  18. c-myc protooncogene expression in mouse erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lachman, H M

    1989-01-01

    Murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells are erythroid progenitors whose programs of erythroid differentiation has been interrupted by transformation with the Friend virus complex. As a result of the ability of certain chemicals such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) to induce terminal erythroid differentiation, the cells have been used as a model for understanding the molecular basis of cellular differentiation. Recent work on MEL cells as well as other differentiating systems indicates that expression of cellular protooncogenes is implicated in chemically mediated differentiation. In MEL cells the expression of the c-myc protooncogene undergoes unusual biphasic changes following inducer treatment. Levels of c-myc mRNA decrease 10- to 20-fold between 1 and 2 hr and are then reexpressed between 12 and 24 hr. These changes occur as a result of complex transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory events. Recent DNA transfection experiments, in which MEL cells were transfected with myc expression vectors, indicate that both the early decrease in c-myc expression and its subsequent reexpression are important events in the differentiation pathway. The work on MEL cells, as well as on other models of differentiation, is directed at understanding the molecular basis of leukemogenic transformation and cellular differentiation. The ability of c-myc, as well as other protooncogenes, to influence both of these events indicates that cellular protooncogenes play a central role in their regulation. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. PMID:2647476

  19. SNAP25 Expression in Mammalian Retinal Horizontal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Arlene A.; Brandstätter, Johann Helmut; Morgans, Catherine W.; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal cells mediate inhibitory feedforward and feedback lateral interactions in the outer retina at photoreceptor terminals and bipolar cell dendrites; however, the mechanisms that underlie synaptic transmission from mammalian horizontal cells are poorly understood. The localization of a vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter (VGAT) to horizontal cell processes in primate and rodent retinae suggested that mammalian horizontal cells release transmitter in a vesicular manner. Toward determining whether the molecular machinery for vesicular transmitter release is present in horizontal cells, we investigated the expression of SNAP25 (synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa), a key SNARE protein, by immunocytochemistry with cell type-specific markers in the retinae of mouse, rat, rabbit, and monkey. Different commercial antibodies to SNAP25 were tested on vertical sections of retina. We report the robust expression of SNAP25 in both plexiform layers. Double labeling with SNAP25 and calbindin antibodies demonstrated that horizontal cell processes and their endings in photoreceptor triad synapses were strongly labeled for both proteins in mouse, rat, rabbit, and monkey retinae. Double labeling with parvalbumin antibodies in monkey retina verified SNAP25 immunoreactivity in all horizontal cells. Pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy in rabbit retina confirmed expression of SNAP25 in lateral elements within photoreceptor triad synapses. The SNAP25 immunoreactivity in the plexiform layers and outer nuclear layer fell into at least three patterns depending on the antibody, suggesting a differential distribution of SNAP25 isoforms. The presence of SNAP25a and SNAP25b isoforms in mouse retina was established by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. SNAP25 expression in mammalian horizontal cells along with other SNARE proteins is consistent with vesicular exocytosis. PMID:21280047

  20. Relation of CD30 expression to survival and morphology in large cell B cell lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Noorduyn, L A; de Bruin, P C; van Heerde, P; van de Sandt, M M; Ossenkoppele, G J; Meijer, C J

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To investigate whether CD30 expression is correlated with anaplastic morphology, and whether this correlated with a better survival in large cell B cell lymphomas, as has been described for T cell lymphomas. METHODS--CD30 expression was investigated using frozen sections in a series of 146 large cell B cell lymphomas. Clinical data and follow up information were collected from 25 lymphomas with strong CD30 expression, 30 lymphomas with partial CD30 expression, and a control group of 25 lymphomas which did not express CD30. RESULTS--Morphological distinction between anaplastic and non-anaplastic tumours was difficult. Of the cases with an anaplastic morphology, 50% were CD30 positive, as were 24% of the polymorphic centroblastic B cell lymphomas. Only 65% of the morphologically non-anaplastic tumours were completely CD30 negative. There was no difference in survival among patients with lymphomas expressing CD30 and those that did not. Patients with morphologically anaplastic B cell lymphomas did not differ in their survivals from those with other high grade B cell lymphomas. Clinical stage at presentation was the only variable that was significantly associated with survival. CONCLUSIONS--CD30 expression occurs frequently in large cell B cell lymphomas and is poorly related to anaplastic morphology. Morphological distinction between anaplastic and non-anaplastic tumours is difficult. In contrast to T cell lymphomas, CD30 positive B cell lymphomas do not show a relatively favourable clinical course. The results presented here raise serious doubts as to whether large cell B cell lymphoma, based on the expression of CD30 or anaplastic morphology, can really be termed a separate entity. Images PMID:8132806

  1. Functional expression of a mouse H-2Kb gene isolated from non-expressing teratocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Daniel-Vedele, F; Morello, D; Benicourt, C; Transy, C; Le Bail, O; Plata, F; Kourilsky, P

    1984-01-01

    Embryonal carcinoma cells do not express H-2 antigens or beta 2-microglobulin. Recent studies have suggested that the expression of these antigens is likely to be controlled at the level of transcription. To study the precise organization of the corresponding genes and their possible expression in adult mouse cells, we have isolated H-2-related genes from a genomic cosmid library constructed with PCC4-aza-RI from DNA of EC cells. Clones isolated from the library after stringent hybridization with an H-2 cDNA probe were tested for their ability to direct H-2 antigen synthesis after DNA-mediated gene transfer in a fibroblastic L cell. Four clones have been found to code for the major transplantation antigen H-2Kb. Structural analysis showed that these clones contained the same entire H-2Kb gene, identical to the corresponding gene isolated from differentiated C57Bl/10 cells. Furthermore, the present studies showed that this embryonal carcinoma gene was expressed and was functional when transfected into a differentiated cell. PMID:6714227

  2. Baculovirus-mediated expression of GPCRs in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Saarenpää, Tuulia; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka; Goldman, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large family of seven transmembrane proteins that influence a considerable number of cellular events. For this reason, they are one of the most studied receptor types for their pharmacological and structural properties. Solving the structure of several GPCR receptor types has been possible using almost all expression systems, including Escherichia coli, yeast, mammalian, and insect cells. So far, however, most of the GPCR structures solved have been done using the baculovirus insect cell expression system. The reason for this is mainly due to cost-effectiveness, posttranslational modification efficiency, and overall effortless maintenance. The system has evolved so much that variables starting from vector type, purification tags, cell line, and growth conditions can be varied and optimized countless ways to suit the needs of new constructs. Here, we present the array of techniques that enable the rapid and efficient optimization of expression steps for maximal protein quality and quantity, including our emendations.

  3. Resistance of cyclooxygenase-2 expressing pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells against γδ T cell cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gonnermann, Daniel; Oberg, Hans-Heinrich; Kellner, Christian; Peipp, Matthias; Sebens, Susanne; Kabelitz, Dieter; Wesch, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The prostaglandin (PG) synthetase cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) promotes tumorigenesis, tumor progression, and metastasis in a variety of human cancer entities including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). In this study, we demonstrate that in PDAC cells such as Colo357 cells, enhanced Cox-2 expression and increased release of the Cox-2 metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) promotes resistance against γδ T cell-mediated lysis. Co-culture with activated γδ T cells induced an upregulation of Cox-2 expression in Colo357 cells, and thereby an enhanced PGE2 release, in response to tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) secretion from γδ T cells. The PGE2-mediated inhibition of γδ T cell cytotoxicity against Cox-2-expressing PDAC cells can be partially overcome by Cox-2 inhibitors. Our results show that differences between PDAC cells in regards to sensitivity to γδ T-cell cytotoxicity can be due to distinct levels of Cox-2 expression associated with varying amounts of PGE2 release. While γδ T cell cytotoxicity against PDAC cells expressing low levels of Cox-2 can be effectively enhanced by tribody [(Her2)2×Vγ9] with specificity for Vγ9 T cell receptor and HER-2/neu on PDAC cells, a combination of tribody [(Her2)2×Vγ9] and Cox-2 inhibitor is necessary to induce complete lysis of Cox-2 high expressing Colo357. In conclusion, our results suggest that the application of tribody [(Her2)2×Vγ9] that enhances γδ T-cell cytotoxicity and Cox-2 inhibitors that overcome PGE2-mediated resistance of PDAC cells to the cytotoxic activity of γδ T cells might offer a promising combined immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer. PMID:25949900

  4. Differential expression of Dickkopf-1 among non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xiao Jun; Liu, Ya Wen; Chen, Dian Dian; Yu, Shuang

    2015-08-01

    Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) is a negative regulator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, which is expressed in various human cancers. It was hypothesized that DKK1 was oncogenic and involved in invasive growth in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. The present study aimed to investigate whether DKK1 gene expression levels differ among various NSCLC cells. The DKK1 expression pattern was analyzed in various human NSCLC cell lines and tissues. The DKK1 protein and gene expression levels were quantified using immunoblotting, polymerase chain reaction analysis and immunohistochemistry. The majority of the lung cancer cell lines analyzed revealed increased expression levels of DKK1. Furthermore, DKK1 expression was highly transactivated in the majority of these cancer cell lines. Clinical samples were obtained from 98 NSCLC patients for immunohistochemical analysis. Of the 98 samples analyzed, 62 (63.3%) demonstrated positive staining for DKK1, whereas the remaining 36 (37%) exhibited negative staining. However, no immunohistopathological staining was detected in normal tissues. The relative effects of DKK1 were assessed in a high-expression cell line (LTEP-a-2) and a low-expression cell line (95D). The differential expression of genes involved in cell cycle, apoptosis, signaling pathway, invasion and metastasis were evaluated, relative to DKK1 levels. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that DKK1 functioned as a key regulator in the progression of NSCLC. The results confirmed the differential expression of DKK1 in NSCLC cells, which may present a potential therapeutic target for cancer prevention.

  5. Heparanase expression and glycosaminoglycans profile in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Batista, Lucas Teixeira E Aguiar; Matos, Leandro Luongo; Machado, Leopoldo Ruiz; Suarez, Eloah Rabello; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell; Martins, João Roberto Maciel; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Pompeo, Antonio Carlos Lima; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva

    2012-11-01

    A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of renal cell carcinogenesis could contribute to a decrease in the mortality rate of this disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the glycosaminoglycans profile and heparanase expression in renal cell carcinoma. The study included 24 patients submitted to nephrectomy with confirmed pathological diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma. The majority of the samples (87.5%) were classified in the initial stage of renal cell carcinoma (clinical stages I and II). Heparanase messenger ribonucleic acid expression was evaluated by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and sulfated glycosaminoglycans were identified and quantified by agarose gel electrophoresis of renal cell carcinoma samples or non-neoplastic tissues obtained from the same patients (control group). The sulfated glycosaminoglycans and hyaluronic acid were analyzed in urine samples of the patients before and after surgery. The data showed a significant statistical increase in chondroitin sulfate, and a decrease in heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate present in neoplastic tissues compared with non-neoplastic tissues. Higher heparanase messenger ribonucleic acid expression in the neoplastic tissues was also shown, compared with the non-neoplastic tissues. The urine glycosaminoglycans profile showed no significant difference between renal cell carcinoma and control samples. Extracellular matrix changes observed in the present study clarify that heparanase is possibly involved with heparan sulfate turnover, and that heparanase and the glycosaminoglycans can modulate initial events of renal cell carcinoma development.

  6. SATB2 expression increased anchorage-independent growth and cell migration in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng; Jordan, Ashley; Kluz, Thomas; Shen, Steven; Sun, Hong; Cartularo, Laura A; Costa, Max

    2016-02-15

    The special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 2 (SATB2) is a protein that binds to the nuclear matrix attachment region of the cell and regulates gene expression by altering chromatin structure. In our previous study, we reported that SATB2 gene expression was induced in human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells transformed by arsenic, chromium, nickel and vanadium. In this study, we show that ectopic expression of SATB2 in the normal human bronchial epithelial cell-line BEAS-2B increased anchorage-independent growth and cell migration, meanwhile, shRNA-mediated knockdown of SATB2 significantly decreased anchorage-independent growth in Ni transformed BEAS-2B cells. RNA sequencing analyses of SATB2 regulated genes revealed the enrichment of those involved in cytoskeleton, cell adhesion and cell-movement pathways. Our evidence supports the hypothesis that SATB2 plays an important role in BEAS-2B cell transformation. PMID:26780400

  7. Selective deletion of Smad4 in postnatal germ cells does not affect spermatogenesis or fertility in mice.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiao-Xia; Chen, Su-Ren; Tang, Ji-Xin; Li, Jian; Cheng, Jin-Mei; Jin, Cheng; Wang, Xiu-Xia; Liu, Yi-Xun

    2016-07-01

    SMAD4 is the central component of canonical signaling in the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) superfamily. Loss of Smad4 in Sertoli cells affects the expansion of the fetal testis cords, whereas selective deletion of Smad4 in Leydig cells alone does not appreciably alter fetal or adult testis development. Loss of Smad4 in Sertoli and Leydig cells, on the other hand, leads to testicular dysgenesis, and tumor formation in mice. Within the murine testes, Smad4 is also expressed in germ cells of the seminiferous tubules. We therefore, crossed Ngn3-Cre or Stra8-Cre transgenic mice with Smad4-flox mice to generate conditional knockout animals in which Smad4 was specifically deleted in postnatal germ cells to further uncover cell type-specific requirement of Smad4. Unexpectedly, these germ-cell-knockout mice were fertile and did not exhibit any detectable abnormalities in spermatogenesis, indicating that Smad4 is not required for the production of sperm; instead, these data indicate a cell type-specific requirement of Smad4 primarily during testis development. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 83: 615-623, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27265621

  8. Conserved Expression Signatures between Medaka and Human Pigment Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schartl, Manfred; Kneitz, Susanne; Wilde, Brigitta; Wagner, Toni; Henkel, Christiaan V.; Spaink, Herman P.; Meierjohann, Svenja

    2012-01-01

    Aberrations in gene expression are a hallmark of cancer cells. Differential tumor-specific transcript levels of single genes or whole sets of genes may be critical for the neoplastic phenotype and important for therapeutic considerations or useful as biomarkers. As an approach to filter out such relevant expression differences from the plethora of changes noted in global expression profiling studies, we searched for changes of gene expression levels that are conserved. Transcriptomes from massive parallel sequencing of different types of melanoma from medaka were generated and compared to microarray datasets from zebrafish and human melanoma. This revealed molecular conservation at various levels between fish models and human tumors providing a useful strategy for identifying expression signatures strongly associated with disease phenotypes and uncovering new melanoma molecules. PMID:22693581

  9. From single-cell to cell-pool transcriptomes: stochasticity in gene expression and RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; McCue, Ken; Schroth, Gary P; Gertz, Jason; Myers, Richard M; Wold, Barbara J

    2014-03-01

    Single-cell RNA-seq mammalian transcriptome studies are at an early stage in uncovering cell-to-cell variation in gene expression, transcript processing and editing, and regulatory module activity. Despite great progress recently, substantial challenges remain, including discriminating biological variation from technical noise. Here we apply the SMART-seq single-cell RNA-seq protocol to study the reference lymphoblastoid cell line GM12878. By using spike-in quantification standards, we estimate the absolute number of RNA molecules per cell for each gene and find significant variation in total mRNA content: between 50,000 and 300,000 transcripts per cell. We directly measure technical stochasticity by a pool/split design and find that there are significant differences in expression between individual cells, over and above technical variation. Specific gene coexpression modules were preferentially expressed in subsets of individual cells, including one enriched for mRNA processing and splicing factors. We assess cell-to-cell variation in alternative splicing and allelic bias and report evidence of significant differences in splice site usage that exceed splice variation in the pool/split comparison. Finally, we show that transcriptomes from small pools of 30-100 cells approach the information content and reproducibility of contemporary RNA-seq from large amounts of input material. Together, our results define an experimental and computational path forward for analyzing gene expression in rare cell types and cell states.

  10. Expression of heat shock protein 90 at the cell surface in human neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Cristina; Regidor, Ignacio; Poveda, Pedro D.

    2008-01-01

    In addition to the activity of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90/HSPC) as a chaperone, some recent studies have reported expression of Hsp90 at the cell surface in certain types of cancer and nervous system cells. We study the expression of Hsp90 at the cell surface in human neuroblastoma (NB69) cells. Immunofluorescence experiments labeling with anti-Hsp90 antibodies on both nonpermeabilized cells and live cells detected Hsp90 at the cell surface. Hsp90 was also identified in a membrane fraction from subcellular fractionation. Cell-surface Hsp90 was significantly more expressed in undifferentiated proliferative spherical neuroblastoma cells than in differentiated flattened cells. In addition, spherical cells were significantly more sensitive to Hsp90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin compared to flattened cells. This paper describes the first evidence of cell-surface Hsp90 expression in a cancer cell line from nervous tissue and may indicate a novel target for anti-tumoral agents. PMID:18800240

  11. From single-cell to cell-pool transcriptomes: stochasticity in gene expression and RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; McCue, Ken; Schroth, Gary P; Gertz, Jason; Myers, Richard M; Wold, Barbara J

    2014-03-01

    Single-cell RNA-seq mammalian transcriptome studies are at an early stage in uncovering cell-to-cell variation in gene expression, transcript processing and editing, and regulatory module activity. Despite great progress recently, substantial challenges remain, including discriminating biological variation from technical noise. Here we apply the SMART-seq single-cell RNA-seq protocol to study the reference lymphoblastoid cell line GM12878. By using spike-in quantification standards, we estimate the absolute number of RNA molecules per cell for each gene and find significant variation in total mRNA content: between 50,000 and 300,000 transcripts per cell. We directly measure technical stochasticity by a pool/split design and find that there are significant differences in expression between individual cells, over and above technical variation. Specific gene coexpression modules were preferentially expressed in subsets of individual cells, including one enriched for mRNA processing and splicing factors. We assess cell-to-cell variation in alternative splicing and allelic bias and report evidence of significant differences in splice site usage that exceed splice variation in the pool/split comparison. Finally, we show that transcriptomes from small pools of 30-100 cells approach the information content and reproducibility of contemporary RNA-seq from large amounts of input material. Together, our results define an experimental and computational path forward for analyzing gene expression in rare cell types and cell states. PMID:24299736

  12. s-SHIP expression identifies a subset of murine basal prostate cells as neonatal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Brocqueville, Guillaume; Chmelar, Renee S.; Bauderlique-Le Roy, Hélène; Deruy, Emeric; Tian, Lu; Vessella, Robert L.; Greenberg, Norman M.; Bourette, Roland P.

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of prostate stem cells (PSCs) is crucial for understanding their biology during normal development and tumorigenesis. In this aim, we used a transgenic mouse model expressing GFP from the stem cell-specific s-SHIP promoter to mark putative stem cells during postnatal prostate development. Here we show that cells identified by GFP expression are present transiently during early prostate development and localize to the basal cell layer of the epithelium. These prostate GFP+ cells are a subpopulation of the Lin− CD24+ Sca-1+ CD49f+ cells and are capable of self-renewal together with enhanced growth potential in sphere-forming assay in vitro, a phenotype consistent with that of a PSC population. Transplantation assays of prostate GFP+ cells demonstrate reconstitution of prostate ducts containing both basal and luminal cells in renal grafts. Altogether, these results demonstrate that s-SHIP promoter expression is a new marker for neonatal basal prostate cells exhibiting stem cell properties that enables PSCs in situ identification and isolation via a single consistent parameter. Transcriptional profiling of these GFP+ neonatal stem cells showed an increased expression of several components of the Wnt signaling pathway. It also identified stem cell regulators with potential applications for further analyses of normal and cancer stem cells. PMID:27081082

  13. Expression of stem cell pluripotency factors during regeneration in newts.

    PubMed

    Maki, Nobuyasu; Suetsugu-Maki, Rinako; Tarui, Hiroshi; Agata, Kiyokazu; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia; Tsonis, Panagiotis A

    2009-06-01

    In this study, we present data indicating that mammalian stem cell pluripotency-inducing factors are expressed during lens and limb regeneration in newts. The apparent expression even in intact tissues and the ensued regulation during regeneration raises the possibility that these factors might regulate tissue-specific reprogramming and regeneration. Furthermore, these factors should enable us to understand the similarities and differences between animal regeneration in the newt and stem cell strategies in mammals. Developmental Dynamics 238:1613-1616, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Neuropilin 1 expression correlates with differentiation status of epidermal cells and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Shahrabi-Farahani, Shokoufeh; Wang, Lili; Zwaans, Bernadette M. M.; Santana, Jeans M.; Shimizu, Akio; Takashima, Seiji; Kreuter, Michael; Coultas, Leigh; D'Amore, Patricia A.; Arbeit, Jeffrey M.; Akslen, Lars A.; Bielenberg, Diane R.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropilins (NRP) are cell surface receptors for VEGF and SEMA3 family members. The role of NRP in neurons and endothelial cells has been investigated, but the expression and role of NRP in epithelial cells is much less clear. Herein, the expression and localization of neuropilin 1 (NRP1) was investigated in human and mouse skin and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). Results indicated that NRP1 mRNA and protein was expressed in the suprabasal epithelial layers of skin sections. NRP1 staining did not overlap with that of keratin 14 (K14) or proliferating cell nuclear antigen, but did colocalize with staining for keratin 1, indicating that differentiated keratinocytes express NRP1. Similar to the expression of NRP1, VEGF-A was expressed in suprabasal epithelial cells, whereas Nrp2 and VEGFR2 were not detectable in the epidermis. The expression of NRP1 correlated with a high degree of differentiation in human SCC specimens, human SCC xenografts, and mouse K14-HPV16 transgenic SCC. UVB irradiation of mouse skin induced Nrp1 upregulation. In vitro, Nrp1 was upregulated in primary keratinocytes in response to differentiating media or EGF-family growth factors. In conclusion, the expression of NRP1 is regulated in the skin and is selectively produced in differentiated epithelial cells. NRP1 may function as a reservoir to sequester VEGF ligand within the epithelial compartment, thereby modulating its bioactivity. PMID:24791743

  15. Polyclonal T-Cells Express CD1a in Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) Lesions

    PubMed Central

    West, Jennifer A.; Olsen, Sharon L.; Mitchell, Jenée M.; Priddle, Ross E.; Luke, Jennifer M.; Åkefeldt, Selma Olsson; Henter, Jan-Inge; Turville, Christopher; Kannourakis, George

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a complex and poorly understood disorder that has characteristics of both inflammatory and neoplastic disease. By using eight-colour flow cytometry, we have identified a previously unreported population of CD1a+/CD3+ T-cells in LCH lesions. The expression of CD1a is regarded as a hallmark of this disease; however, it has always been presumed that it was only expressed by pathogenic Langerhans cells (LCs). We have now detected CD1a expression by a range of T-cell subsets within all of the LCH lesions that were examined, establishing that CD1a expression in these lesions is no longer restricted to pathogenic LCs. The presence of CD1a+ T-cells in all of the LCH lesions that we have studied to date warrants further investigation into their biological function to determine whether these cells are important in the pathogenesis of LCH. PMID:25343480

  16. Progesterone Upregulates Gene Expression in Normal Human Thyroid Follicular Cells.

    PubMed

    Bertoni, Ana Paula Santin; Brum, Ilma Simoni; Hillebrand, Ana Caroline; Furlanetto, Tania Weber

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer and thyroid nodules are more prevalent in women than men, so female sex hormones may have an etiological role in these conditions. There are no data about direct effects of progesterone on thyroid cells, so the aim of the present study was to evaluate progesterone effects in the sodium-iodide symporter NIS, thyroglobulin TG, thyroperoxidase TPO, and KI-67 genes expression, in normal thyroid follicular cells, derived from human tissue. NIS, TG, TPO, and KI-67 mRNA expression increased significantly after TSH 20 μUI/mL, respectively: 2.08 times, P < 0.0001; 2.39 times, P = 0.01; 1.58 times, P = 0.0003; and 1.87 times, P < 0.0001. In thyroid cells treated with 20 μUI/mL TSH plus 10 nM progesterone, RNA expression of NIS, TG, and KI-67 genes increased, respectively: 1.78 times, P < 0.0001; 1.75 times, P = 0.037; and 1.95 times, P < 0.0001, and TPO mRNA expression also increased, though not significantly (1.77 times, P = 0.069). These effects were abolished by mifepristone, an antagonist of progesterone receptor, suggesting that genes involved in thyroid cell function and proliferation are upregulated by progesterone. This work provides evidence that progesterone has a direct effect on thyroid cells, upregulating genes involved in thyroid function and growth. PMID:26089899

  17. Progesterone Upregulates Gene Expression in Normal Human Thyroid Follicular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bertoni, Ana Paula Santin; Brum, Ilma Simoni; Hillebrand, Ana Caroline; Furlanetto, Tania Weber

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer and thyroid nodules are more prevalent in women than men, so female sex hormones may have an etiological role in these conditions. There are no data about direct effects of progesterone on thyroid cells, so the aim of the present study was to evaluate progesterone effects in the sodium-iodide symporter NIS, thyroglobulin TG, thyroperoxidase TPO, and KI-67 genes expression, in normal thyroid follicular cells, derived from human tissue. NIS, TG, TPO, and KI-67 mRNA expression increased significantly after TSH 20 μUI/mL, respectively: 2.08 times, P < 0.0001; 2.39 times, P = 0.01; 1.58 times, P = 0.0003; and 1.87 times, P < 0.0001. In thyroid cells treated with 20 μUI/mL TSH plus 10 nM progesterone, RNA expression of NIS, TG, and KI-67 genes increased, respectively: 1.78 times, P < 0.0001; 1.75 times, P = 0.037; and 1.95 times, P < 0.0001, and TPO mRNA expression also increased, though not significantly (1.77 times, P = 0.069). These effects were abolished by mifepristone, an antagonist of progesterone receptor, suggesting that genes involved in thyroid cell function and proliferation are upregulated by progesterone. This work provides evidence that progesterone has a direct effect on thyroid cells, upregulating genes involved in thyroid function and growth. PMID:26089899

  18. Spatial reconstruction of single-cell gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Satija, Rahul; Farrell, Jeffrey A.; Gennert, David; Schier, Alexander F.; Regev, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Spatial localization is a key determinant of cellular fate and behavior, but spatial RNA assays traditionally rely on staining for a limited number of RNA species. In contrast, single-cell RNA-seq allows for deep profiling of cellular gene expression, but established methods separate cells from their native spatial context. Here we present Seurat, a computational strategy to infer cellular localization by integrating single-cell RNA-seq data with in situ RNA patterns. We applied Seurat to spatially map 851 single cells from dissociated zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos, inferring a transcriptome-wide map of spatial patterning. We confirmed Seurat’s accuracy using several experimental approaches, and used it to identify a set of archetypal expression patterns and spatial markers. Additionally, Seurat correctly localizes rare subpopulations, accurately mapping both spatially restricted and scattered groups. Seurat will be applicable to mapping cellular localization within complex patterned tissues in diverse systems. PMID:25867923

  19. Cxc Chemokine Receptor 5 Expression Defines Follicular Homing T Cells with B Cell Helper Function

    PubMed Central

    Schaerli, Patrick; Willimann, Katharina; Lang, Alois B.; Lipp, Martin; Loetscher, Pius; Moser, Bernhard

    2000-01-01

    Leukocyte traffic through secondary lymphoid tissues is finely tuned by chemokines. We have studied the functional properties of a human T cell subset marked by the expression of CXC chemokine receptor 5 (CXCR5). Memory but not naive T cells from tonsils are CXCR5+ and migrate in response to the B cell–attracting chemokine 1 (BCA-1), which is selectively expressed by reticular cells and blood vessels within B cell follicles. Tonsillar CXCR5+ T cells do not respond to other chemokines present in secondary lymphoid tissues, including secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine (SLC), EBV-induced molecule 1 ligand chemokine (ELC), and stromal cell–derived factor 1 (SDF-1). The involvement of tonsillar CXCR5+ T cells in humoral immune responses is suggested by their localization in the mantle and light zone germinal centers of B cell follicles and by the concomitant expression of activation and costimulatory markers, including CD69, HLA-DR, and inducible costimulator (ICOS). Peripheral blood CXCR5+ T cells also belong to the CD4+ memory T cell subset but, in contrast to tonsillar cells, are in a resting state and migrate weakly to chemokines. CXCR5+ T cells are very inefficient in the production of cytokines but potently induce antibody production during coculture with B cells. These properties portray CXCR5+ T cells as a distinct memory T cell subset with B cell helper function, designated here as follicular B helper T cells (TFH). PMID:11104798

  20. IL-35 over-expression increases apoptosis sensitivity and suppresses cell growth in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Long, Jun; Zhang, Xulong; Wen, Mingjie; Kong, Qingli; Lv, Zhe; An, Yunqing; Wei, Xiao-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-35 is a novel heterodimeric cytokine in the IL-12 family and is composed of two subunits: Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) and IL-12p35. IL-35 is expressed in T regulatory (Treg) cells and contributes to the immune suppression function of these cells. In contrast, we found that both IL-35 subunits were expressed concurrently in most human cancer cell lines compared to normal cell lines. In addition, we found that TNF-α and IFN-γ stimulation led to increased IL-35 expression in human cancer cells. Furthermore, over-expression of IL-35 in human cancer cells suppressed cell growth in vitro, induced cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, and mediated robust apoptosis induced by serum starvation, TNF-α, and IFN-γ stimulation through the up-regulation of Fas and concurrent down-regulation of cyclinD1, survivin, and Bcl-2 expression. In conclusion, our results reveal a novel functional role for IL-35 in suppressing cancer activity, inhibiting cancer cell growth, and increasing the apoptosis sensitivity of human cancer cells through the regulation of genes related to the cell cycle and apoptosis. Thus, this research provides new insights into IL-35 function and presents a possible target for the development of novel cancer therapies.

  1. TGF-beta signaling potentiates differentiation of embryonic stem cells to Pdx-1 expressing endodermal cells.

    PubMed

    Shiraki, Nobuaki; Lai, Cheng-Jung; Hishikari, Yosuke; Kume, Shoen

    2005-06-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells have the capacity to differentiate to every cell type that constitutes fetal or adult tissues. To trace and quantitatively assess the differentiation of ES cells into gut endodermal cells, we used an ES cell line with the lacZ gene inserted into the pdx-1 locus. Targeted mutations of pdx-1 in mice demonstrate that pdx-1 is required for pancreatic and rostral duodenal development; therefore, pdx-1 serves as an excellent early gut regional specific marker. When these ES cells were differentiated by removal of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), only fractional cells turned into lacZ positive, which indicates pancreatic-duodenal differentiation. Co-cultivation of ES cells with pancreatic rudiments induced a significant increase in the proportion of lacZ positive cell numbers and this increase was further enhanced by forced expression of a chick putative endoderm inducer gene, cmix. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta2 mimicked the effects of pancreatic rudiments and this effect was enhanced by cmix expression. Expression analysis showed over-expression of cmix induced endodermal marker genes. These data indicate that one can make use of this knowledge on molecular events of embryonic development to drive ES cells to differentiate into pdx-1 expressing endodermal cells in vitro.

  2. Transcriptional control of MHC class II gene expression during differentiation from B cells to plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Dellabona, P; Latron, F; Maffei, A; Scarpellino, L; Accolla, R S

    1989-04-15

    In this study we investigated the molecular mechanisms responsible for the extinction of the constitutive MHC class II gene expression of human B cells on somatic cell hybridization with murine plasmocytoma cells. We found that this event is due to trans-acting suppressor functions of mouse origin pre-existing in the plasmocytoma cells and acting at transcriptional level. Transcription of the entire family of human class II genes is suppressed, including genes as DO beta for which a distinct regulation of expression in B cells had been previously demonstrated. Suppression appears specific for class II genes because in the hybrids expression of MHC class I genes of mouse is unaffected and of human only partially reduced. Interestingly, also murine invariant chain gene is expressed in both parental plasmocytoma and hybrid cells although at reduced amounts as compared to a murine class II positive B cell line. The class II negative phenotype of hybrid cells and parental plasmocytoma cells is highly stable and unaffected by treatment with protein synthesis inhibitors, suggesting that the transcriptional suppressor function is not mediated by rapid, labile turning-over proteins. Possible mechanisms responsible for transcriptional regulation of MHC class II gene expression during terminal differentiation of B cells to plasma cells are discussed. PMID:2495328

  3. Robust enumeration of cell subsets from tissue expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Aaron M.; Liu, Chih Long; Green, Michael R.; Gentles, Andrew J.; Feng, Weiguo; Xu, Yue; Hoang, Chuong D.; Diehn, Maximilian; Alizadeh, Ash A.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce CIBERSORT, a method for characterizing cell composition of complex tissues from their gene expression profiles. When applied to enumeration of hematopoietic subsets in RNA mixtures from fresh, frozen, and fixed tissues, including solid tumors, CIBERSORT outperformed other methods with respect to noise, unknown mixture content, and closely related cell types. CIBERSORT should enable large-scale analysis of RNA mixtures for cellular biomarkers and therapeutic targets (http://cibersort.stanford.edu). PMID:25822800

  4. High-throughput insect cell protein expression applications.

    PubMed

    Buchs, Mirjam; Kim, Ernie; Pouliquen, Yann; Sachs, Michael; Geisse, Sabine; Mahnke, Marion; Hunt, Ian

    2009-01-01

    The Baculovirus Expression Vector System (BEVS) is one of the most efficient systems for production of recombinant proteins and consequently its application is wide-spread in industry as well as in academia. Since the early 1970s, when the first stable insect cell lines were established and the infectivity of bacu-lovirus in an in vitro culture system was demonstrated (1, 2), virtually thousands of reports have been published on the successful expression of proteins using this system as well as on method improvement. However, despite its popularity the system is labor intensive and time consuming. Moreover, adaptation of the system to multi-parallel (high-throughput) expression is much more difficult to achieve than with E. coli due to its far more complex nature. However, recent years have seen the development of strategies that have greatly enhanced the stream-lining and speed of baculovirus protein expression for increased throughput via use of automation and miniaturization. This chapter therefore tries to collate these developments in a series of protocols (which are modifications to standard procedure plus several new approaches) that will allow the user to expedite the speed and throughput of baculovirus-mediated protein expression and facilitate true multi-parallel, high-throughput protein expression profiling in insect cells. In addition we also provide a series of optimized protocols for small and large-scale transient insect cell expression that allow for both the rapid analysis of multiple constructs and the concomitant scale-up of those selected for on-going analysis. Since this approach is independent of viral propagation, the timelines for this approach are markedly shorter and offer a significant advantage over standard bacu-lovirus expression approach strategies in the context of HT applications.

  5. AIRE expressing marginal zone dendritic cells balances adaptive immunity and T-follicular helper cell recruitment.

    PubMed

    Lindmark, Evelina; Chen, Yunying; Georgoudaki, Anna-Maria; Dudziak, Diana; Lindh, Emma; Adams, William C; Loré, Karin; Winqvist, Ola; Chambers, Benedict J; Karlsson, Mikael C I

    2013-05-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome Type I (APS I) results in multiple endocrine organ destruction and is caused by mutations in the Autoimmune regulator gene (AIRE). In the thymic stroma, cells expressing the AIRE gene dictate T cell education and central tolerance. Although this function is the most studied, AIRE is also expressed in the periphery in DCs and stromal cells. Still, how AIRE regulated transcription modifies cell behaviour in the periphery is largely unknown. Here we show that AIRE is specifically expressed by 33D1(+) DCs and dictates the fate of antibody secreting cell movement within the spleen. We also found that AIRE expressing 33D1(+) DCs expresses self-antigens as exemplified by the hallmark gene insulin. Also, as evidence for a regulatory function, absence of Aire in 33D1(+) DCs led to reduced levels of the chemokine CXCL12 and increased co-stimulatory properties. This resulted in altered activation and recruitment of T-follicular helper cells and germinal centre B cells. The altered balance leads to a change of the early response to a T cell-dependent antigen in Aire(-/-) mice. These findings add to the understanding of how specific DC subtypes regulate the early responses during T cell-dependent antibody responses within the spleen and further define the role of AIRE in the periphery as regulator of self-antigen expression and lymphocyte migration.

  6. Exogenous expression of N-cadherin in breast cancer cells induces cell migration, invasion, and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hazan, R B; Phillips, G R; Qiao, R F; Norton, L; Aaronson, S A

    2000-02-21

    E- and N-cadherin are calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecules that mediate cell-cell adhesion and also modulate cell migration and tumor invasiveness. The loss of E-cadherin-mediated adhesion has been shown to play an important role in the transition of epithelial tumors from a benign to an invasive state. However, recent evidence indicates that another member of the cadherin family, N-cadherin, is expressed in highly invasive tumor cell lines that lacked E-cadherin expression. These findings have raised the possibility that N-cadherin contributes to the invasive phenotype. To determine whether N-cadherin promotes invasion and metastasis, we transfected a weakly metastatic and E-cadherin-expressing breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, with N-cadherin and analyzed the effects on cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Transfected cells expressed both E- and N-cadherin and exhibited homotypic cell adhesion from both molecules. In vitro, N-cadherin-expressing cells migrated more efficiently, showed an increased invasion of Matrigel, and adhered more efficiently to monolayers of endothelial cells. All cells produced low levels of the matrix metalloproteinase MMP-9, which was dramatically upregulated by treatment with FGF-2 only in N-cadherin-expressing cells. Migration and invasion of Matrigel were also greatly enhanced by this treatment. When injected into the mammary fat pad of nude mice, N-cadherin-expressing cells, but not control MCF-7 cells, metastasized widely to the liver, pancreas, salivary gland, omentum, lung, lymph nodes, and lumbar spinal muscle. The expression of both E- and N-cadherin was maintained both in the primary tumors and metastatic lesions. These results demonstrate that N-cadherin promotes motility, invasion, and metastasis even in the presence of the normally suppressive E-cadherin. The increase in MMP-9 production by N-cadherin-expressing cells in response to a growth factor may endow them with a greater ability to penetrate matrix protein

  7. Interleukin 21-induced granzyme B-expressing B cells infiltrate tumors and regulate T cells.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Stefanie; Dahlke, Karen; Sontheimer, Kai; Hagn, Magdalena; Kaltenmeier, Christof; Barth, Thomas F E; Beyer, Thamara; Reister, Frank; Fabricius, Dorit; Lotfi, Ramin; Lunov, Oleg; Nienhaus, G Ulrich; Simmet, Thomas; Kreienberg, Rolf; Möller, Peter; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Jahrsdörfer, Bernd

    2013-04-15

    The pathogenic impact of tumor-infiltrating B cells is unresolved at present, however, some studies suggest that they may have immune regulatory potential. Here, we report that the microenvironment of various solid tumors includes B cells that express granzyme B (GrB, GZMB), where these B cells can be found adjacent to interleukin (IL)-21-secreting regulatory T cells (Treg) that contribute to immune tolerance of tumor antigens. Because Tregs and plasmacytoid dendritic cells are known to modulate T-effector cells by a GrB-dependent mechanism, we hypothesized that a similar process may operate to modulate regulatory B cells (Breg). IL-21 induced outgrowth of B cells expressing high levels of GrB, which thereby limited T-cell proliferation by a GrB-dependent degradation of the T-cell receptor ζ-chain. Mechanistic investigations into how IL-21 induced GrB expression in B cells to confer Breg function revealed a CD19(+)CD38(+)CD1d(+)IgM(+)CD147(+) expression signature, along with expression of additional key regulatory molecules including IL-10, CD25, and indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase. Notably, induction of GrB by IL-21 integrated signals mediated by surface immunoglobulin M (B-cell receptor) and Toll-like receptors, each of which were enhanced with expression of the B-cell marker CD5. Our findings show for the first time that IL-21 induces GrB(+) human Bregs. They also establish the existence of human B cells with a regulatory phenotype in solid tumor infiltrates, where they may contribute to the suppression of antitumor immune responses. Together, these findings may stimulate novel diagnostic and cell therapeutic approaches to better manage human cancer as well as autoimmune and graft-versus-host pathologies. PMID:23384943

  8. Human clusterin gene expression is confined to surviving cells during in vitro programmed cell death.

    PubMed Central

    French, L E; Wohlwend, A; Sappino, A P; Tschopp, J; Schifferli, J A

    1994-01-01

    Clusterin is a serum glycoprotein endowed with cell aggregating, complement inhibitory, and lipid binding properties, and is also considered as a specific marker of dying cells, its expression being increased in various tissues undergoing programmed cell death (PCD). However, no study has so far directly shown that cells expressing clusterin in these tissues are actually apoptotic as defined by morphological and biochemical criteria. We have studied cellular clusterin gene expression in vitro using three different models of PCD: (a) ultraviolet B (UV-B) irradiation of human U937, HeLa, and A431 cell lines, (b) in vitro aging of human peripheral blood neutrophils (PMNs), and (c) dexamethasone-induced cell death of the human lymphoblastoid cell line CEM-C7. In all three models, the classical morphological and biochemical features of PCD observed did not correlate with an increase, but with either a marked decrease or an absence of clusterin gene expression as assessed by Northern blot analysis. In situ hybridization of U937 and A431 cells after UV-B irradiation revealed, in addition, that only morphologically normal cells that are surviving continue to express the clusterin gene. Our results demonstrate that in the human myeloid, lymphoid, and epithelial cell types studied, clusterin gene expression is not a prerequisite to their death by apoptosis. In addition, and most interestingly, in situ hybridization of U937 and A431 cells revealed that only surviving cells express the clusterin gene after the induction of PCD, thus providing novel evidence suggesting that clusterin may be associated with cell survival within tissues regressing as a consequence of PCD. Images PMID:8113419

  9. Fibronectin Expression Modulates Mammary Epithelial Cell Proliferation during Acinar Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Courtney M.; Engler, Adam J.; Slone, R. Daniel; Galante, Leontine L.; Schwarzbauer, Jean E.

    2009-01-01

    The mammary gland consists of a polarized epithelium surrounded by a basement membrane matrix that forms a series of branching ducts ending in hollow, sphere-like acini. Essential roles for the epithelial basement membrane during acinar differentiation, in particular laminin and its integrin receptors, have been identified using mammary epithelial cells cultured on a reconstituted basement membrane. Contributions from fibronectin, which is abundant in the mammary gland during development and tumorigenesis, have not been fully examined. Here, we show that fibronectin expression by mammary epithelial cells is dynamically regulated during the morphogenic process. Experiments with synthetic polyacrylamide gel substrates implicate both specific extracellular matrix components, including fibronectin itself, and matrix rigidity in this regulation. Alterations in fibronectin levels perturbed acinar organization. During acinar development, increased fibronectin levels resulted in overproliferation of mammary epithelial cells and increased acinar size. Addition of fibronectin to differentiated acini stimulated proliferation and reversed growth arrest of mammary epithelial cells negatively affecting maintenance of proper acinar morphology. These results show that expression of fibronectin creates a permissive environment for cell growth that antagonizes the differentiation signals from the basement membrane. These effects suggest a link between fibronectin expression and epithelial cell growth during development and oncogenesis in the mammary gland. PMID:18451144

  10. Global gene expression response to telomerase in bovine adrenocortical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Perrault, Steven D.; Hornsby, Peter J.; Betts, Dean H. . E-mail: bettsd@uoguelph.ca

    2005-09-30

    The infinite proliferative capability of most immortalized cells is dependent upon the presence of the enzyme telomerase and its ability to maintain telomere length and structure. However, telomerase may be involved in a greater system than telomere length regulation, as recent evidence has shown it capable of increasing wound healing in vivo, and improving cellular proliferation rate and survival from apoptosis in vitro. Here, we describe the global gene expression response to ectopic telomerase expression in an in vitro bovine adrenocortical cell model. Telomerase-immortalized cells showed an increased ability for proliferation and survival in minimal essential medium above cells transgenic for GFP. cDNA microarray analyses revealed an altered cell state indicative of increased adrenocortical cell proliferation regulated by the IGF2 pathway and alterations in members of the TGF-B family. As well, we identified alterations in genes associated with development and wound healing that support a model that high telomerase expression induces a highly adaptable, progenitor-like state.

  11. Beta-cell gene expression and functional characterisation of the human insulinoma cell line CM.

    PubMed

    Baroni, M G; Cavallo, M G; Mark, M; Monetini, L; Stoehrer, B; Pozzilli, P

    1999-04-01

    Animal insulinoma cell lines are widely used to study physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms involved in glucose metabolism and to establish in vitro models for studies on beta-cells. In contrast, human insulinoma cell lines are rarely used because of difficulties in obtaining and culturing them for long periods. The aim of our study was to investigate, under different experimental conditions, the capacity of the human insulinoma cell line CM to retain beta-cell function, particularly the expression of constitutive beta-cell genes (insulin, the glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT2, glucokinase), intracellular and secreted insulin, beta-cell granules, and cAMP content. Results showed that CM cells from an early-passage express specific beta-cell genes in response to glucose stimulation, in particular the insulin and GLUT genes. Such capacity is lost at later passages when cells are cultured at standard glucose concentrations. However, if cultured at lower glucose concentration (0.8 mM) for a longer time, CM cells re-acquire the capacity to respond to glucose stimulation, as shown by the increased expression of beta-cell genes (insulin, GLUT2, glucokinase). Nonetheless, insulin secretion could not be restored under such experimental conditions despite the presence of intracellular insulin, although cAMP response to a potent activator of adenylate cyclase, forskolin, was present indicating a viable system. In conclusion, these data show that the human insulinoma cell line CM, at both early-passage and late-passage, posseses a functional glucose-signalling pathway and insulin mRNA expression similar to normal beta-cells, representing, therefore, a good model for studies concerning the signalling and expression of beta-cells. Furthermore, we have previously shown that it is also a good model for immunological studies. In this respect it is important to note that the CM cell line is one of the very few existing human beta-cell lines in long-term culture.

  12. Improved Expression Systems for Regulated Expression in Salmonella Infecting Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Carlos; Camacho, Eva María; Flores, Amando; Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Santero, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    In this work we describe a series of improvements to the Salmonella-based salicylate-inducible cascade expression system comprised of a plasmid-borne expression module, where target gene expression is driven by the Pm promoter governed by the XylS2 regulator, and a genome-integrated regulatory module controlled by the nahR/Psal system. We have constructed a set of high and low-copy number plasmids bearing modified versions of the expression module with a more versatile multiple cloning site and different combinations of the following elements: (i) the nasF transcriptional attenuator, which reduces basal expression levels, (ii) a strong ribosome binding site, and (iii) the Type III Secretion System (TTSS) signal peptide from the effector protein SspH2 to deliver proteins directly to the eukaryotic cytosol following bacterial infection of animal cells. We show that different expression module versions can be used to direct a broad range of protein production levels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the efficient reduction of basal expression by the nasF attenuator allows the cloning of genes encoding highly cytotoxic proteins such as colicin E3 even in the absence of its immunity protein. Additionally, we show that the Salmonella TTSS is able to translocate most of the protein produced by this regulatory cascade to the cytoplasm of infected HeLa cells. Our results indicate that these vectors represent useful tools for the regulated overproduction of heterologous proteins in bacterial culture or in animal cells, for the cloning and expression of genes encoding toxic proteins and for pathogenesis studies. PMID:21829692

  13. Cell-cell contact regulates gene expression in CDK4-transformed mouse podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sakairi, Toru; Abe, Yoshifusa; Jat, Parmijit S.

    2010-01-01

    We transformed mouse podocytes by ectopic expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4). Compared with podocytes transformed with a thermo-sensitive SV40 large T antigen mutant tsA58U19 (tsT podocytes), podocytes transformed with CDK4 (CDK4 podocytes) exhibited significantly higher expression of nephrin mRNA. Synaptopodin mRNA expression was significantly lower in CDK4 podocytes and in tsT podocytes under growth-permissive conditions (33°C) compared with tsT podocytes under growth-restricted conditions (37°C), which suggests a role for cell cycle arrest in synaptopodin mRNA expression. Confluent CDK4 podocytes showed significantly higher mRNA expression levels for nephrin, synaptopodin, Wilms tumor 1, podocalyxin, and P-cadherin compared with subconfluent cultures. We carried out experiments to clarify roles of various factors in the confluent podocyte cultures; our findings indicate that cell-cell contact promotes expression of five podocyte marker genes studied, that cellular quiescence increases synaptopodin and podocalyxin mRNA expression, and that soluble factors play a role in nephrin mRNA expression. Our findings suggest that CDK4 podocytes are useful tools to study podocyte biology. Furthermore, the role of cell-cell contact in podocyte gene expression may have relevance for podocyte function in vivo. PMID:20668098

  14. Live-cell, temporal gene expression analysis of osteogenic differentiation in adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Desai, Hetal V; Voruganti, Indu S; Jayasuriya, Chathuraka; Chen, Qian; Darling, Eric M

    2014-03-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are a widely investigated type of mesenchymal stem cells with great potential for musculoskeletal regeneration. However, the use of ASCs is complicated by their cellular heterogeneity, which exists at both the population and single-cell levels. This study demonstrates a live-cell assay to investigate gene expression in ASCs undergoing osteogenesis using fluorescently tagged DNA hybridization probes called molecular beacons. A molecular beacon was designed to target the mRNA sequence for alkaline phosphatase (ALPL), a gene characteristically expressed during early osteogenesis. The percentage of cells expressing this gene in a population was monitored daily to quantify the uniformity of the differentiation process. Differentiating ASC populations were repeatedly measured in a nondestructive fashion over a 10-day period to obtain temporal gene expression data. Results showed consistent expression patterns for the investigated osteogenic genes in response to induction medium. Peak signal level, indicating when the most cells expressed ALPL at once, was observed on days 3-5. The differentiation response of sample populations was generally uniform when assessed on a well-by-well basis over time. The expression of alkaline phosphatase is consistent with previous studies of osteogenic differentiation, suggesting that molecular beacons are a viable means of monitoring the spatiotemporal gene expression of live, differentiating ASCs.

  15. Live-Cell, Temporal Gene Expression Analysis of Osteogenic Differentiation in Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Hetal V.; Voruganti, Indu S.; Jayasuriya, Chathuraka; Chen, Qian

    2014-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are a widely investigated type of mesenchymal stem cells with great potential for musculoskeletal regeneration. However, the use of ASCs is complicated by their cellular heterogeneity, which exists at both the population and single-cell levels. This study demonstrates a live-cell assay to investigate gene expression in ASCs undergoing osteogenesis using fluorescently tagged DNA hybridization probes called molecular beacons. A molecular beacon was designed to target the mRNA sequence for alkaline phosphatase (ALPL), a gene characteristically expressed during early osteogenesis. The percentage of cells expressing this gene in a population was monitored daily to quantify the uniformity of the differentiation process. Differentiating ASC populations were repeatedly measured in a nondestructive fashion over a 10-day period to obtain temporal gene expression data. Results showed consistent expression patterns for the investigated osteogenic genes in response to induction medium. Peak signal level, indicating when the most cells expressed ALPL at once, was observed on days 3–5. The differentiation response of sample populations was generally uniform when assessed on a well-by-well basis over time. The expression of alkaline phosphatase is consistent with previous studies of osteogenic differentiation, suggesting that molecular beacons are a viable means of monitoring the spatiotemporal gene expression of live, differentiating ASCs. PMID:24367991

  16. Endothelial cells downregulate apolipoprotein D expression in mural cells through paracrine secretion and Notch signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pajaniappan, Mohanasundari; Glober, Nancy K.; Kennard, Simone; Liu, Hua; Zhao, Ning

    2011-01-01

    Endothelial and mural cell interactions are vitally important for proper formation and function of blood vessels. These two cell types communicate to regulate multiple aspects of vessel function. In studying genes regulated by this interaction, we identified apolipoprotein D (APOD) as one gene that is downregulated in mural cells by coculture with endothelial cells. APOD is a secreted glycoprotein that has been implicated in governing stress response, lipid metabolism, and aging. Moreover, APOD is known to regulate smooth muscle cells and is found in abundance within atherosclerotic lesions. Our data show that the regulation of APOD in mural cells is bimodal. Paracrine secretion by endothelial cells causes partial downregulation of APOD expression. Additionally, cell contact-dependent Notch signaling plays a role. NOTCH3 on mural cells promotes the downregulation of APOD, possibly through interaction with the JAGGED-1 ligand on endothelial cells. Our results show that NOTCH3 contributes to the downregulation of APOD and by itself is sufficient to attenuate APOD transcript expression. In examining the consequence of decreased APOD expression in mural cells, we show that APOD negatively regulates cell adhesion. APOD attenuates adhesion by reducing focal contacts; however, it has no effect on stress fiber formation. These data reveal a novel mechanism in which endothelial cells control neighboring mural cells through the downregulation of APOD, which, in turn, influences mural cell function by modulating adhesion. PMID:21705670

  17. Endothelial cells downregulate apolipoprotein D expression in mural cells through paracrine secretion and Notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Pajaniappan, Mohanasundari; Glober, Nancy K; Kennard, Simone; Liu, Hua; Zhao, Ning; Lilly, Brenda

    2011-09-01

    Endothelial and mural cell interactions are vitally important for proper formation and function of blood vessels. These two cell types communicate to regulate multiple aspects of vessel function. In studying genes regulated by this interaction, we identified apolipoprotein D (APOD) as one gene that is downregulated in mural cells by coculture with endothelial cells. APOD is a secreted glycoprotein that has been implicated in governing stress response, lipid metabolism, and aging. Moreover, APOD is known to regulate smooth muscle cells and is found in abundance within atherosclerotic lesions. Our data show that the regulation of APOD in mural cells is bimodal. Paracrine secretion by endothelial cells causes partial downregulation of APOD expression. Additionally, cell contact-dependent Notch signaling plays a role. NOTCH3 on mural cells promotes the downregulation of APOD, possibly through interaction with the JAGGED-1 ligand on endothelial cells. Our results show that NOTCH3 contributes to the downregulation of APOD and by itself is sufficient to attenuate APOD transcript expression. In examining the consequence of decreased APOD expression in mural cells, we show that APOD negatively regulates cell adhesion. APOD attenuates adhesion by reducing focal contacts; however, it has no effect on stress fiber formation. These data reveal a novel mechanism in which endothelial cells control neighboring mural cells through the downregulation of APOD, which, in turn, influences mural cell function by modulating adhesion.

  18. Gene cataloging and expression profiling in human gastric cancer cells by expressed sequence tags.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam-Soon; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Lee, Ju-Yeon; Oh, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Jeong-Min; Park, Hong-Seog; Kim, Sangsoo; Song, Kyu-Sang; Rho, Seung-Moo; Yoo, Hyang-Sook; Kim, Yong Sung

    2004-06-01

    To understand the molecular mechanism associated with gastric carcinogenesis, we identified genes expressed in gastric cancer cell lines and tissues. Of 97,609 high-quality ESTs sequenced from 36 cDNA libraries, 92,545 were coalesced into 10,418 human Unigene clusters (Build 151). The gene expression profile was produced by counting the cluster frequencies in each library. Although the profiles of highly expressed genes varied greatly from library to library, those genes related to cell structure formation, heat shock proteins, the glycolysis pathway, and the signaling pathway were highly represented in human gastric cancer cell lines and in primary tumors. Conversely, the genes encoding immunoglobulins, ribosomal proteins, and digestive proteins were down-regulated in gastric cancer cell lines and tissues compared to normal tissues. The transcription levels of some of these genes were confirmed by RT-PCR. We found that genes related to cell adhesion, apoptosis, and cytoskeleton formation were particularly up-regulated in the gastric cancer cell lines established from malignant ascites compared to those from primary tumors. This comprehensive molecular profiling