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Sample records for lhc injection tests

  1. Testing the Muon g-2 Anomaly at the LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Freitas, Ayres; Lykken, Joseph; Kell, Stefan; ...

    2014-05-29

    The long-standing difference between the experimental measurement and the standard-model prediction for the muon's anomalous magnetic moment,more » $$a_{\\mu} = (g_{\\mu}-2)/2$$, may be explained by the presence of new weakly interacting particles with masses of a few 100 GeV. Particles of this kind can generally be directly produced at the LHC, and thus they may already be constrained by existing data. In this work, we investigate this connection between $$a_{\\mu}$$ and the LHC in a model-independent approach, by introducing one or two new fields beyond the standard model with spin and weak isospin up to one. For each case, we identify the preferred parameter space for explaining the discrepancy of a_mu and derive bounds using data from LEP and the 8-TeV LHC run. Furthermore, we estimate how these limits could be improved with the 14-TeV LHC. We find that the 8-TeV results already rule out a subset of our simplified models, while almost all viable scenarios can be tested conclusively with 14-TeV data.« less

  2. Testing the Muon g-2 Anomaly at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, Ayres; Lykken, Joseph; Kell, Stefan; Westhoff, Susanne

    2014-05-29

    The long-standing difference between the experimental measurement and the standard-model prediction for the muon's anomalous magnetic moment, $a_{\\mu} = (g_{\\mu}-2)/2$, may be explained by the presence of new weakly interacting particles with masses of a few 100 GeV. Particles of this kind can generally be directly produced at the LHC, and thus they may already be constrained by existing data. In this work, we investigate this connection between $a_{\\mu}$ and the LHC in a model-independent approach, by introducing one or two new fields beyond the standard model with spin and weak isospin up to one. For each case, we identify the preferred parameter space for explaining the discrepancy of a_mu and derive bounds using data from LEP and the 8-TeV LHC run. Furthermore, we estimate how these limits could be improved with the 14-TeV LHC. We find that the 8-TeV results already rule out a subset of our simplified models, while almost all viable scenarios can be tested conclusively with 14-TeV data.

  3. Test results of LHC interaction regions quadrupoles produced by Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, R.; Carson, J.; Chichili, D.R.; Feher, S.; Kerby, J.; Lamm, M.J.; Nobrega, A.; Nicol, T.; Ogitsu, T.; Orris, D.; Page, T.; Peterson, T.; Rabehl, R.; Robotham, W.; Scanlan, R.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Strait, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.C.; Velev, G.; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    The US-LHC Accelerator Project is responsible for the production of the Q2 optical elements of the final focus triplets in the LHC interaction regions. As part of this program Fermilab is in the process of manufacturing and testing cryostat assemblies (LQXB) containing two identical quadrupoles (MQXB) with a dipole corrector between them. The 5.5 m long Fermilab designed MQXB have a 70 mm aperture and operate in superfluid helium at 1.9 K with a peak field gradient of 215 T/m. This paper summarizes the test results of several production MQXB quadrupoles with emphasis on quench performance and alignment studies. Quench localization studies using quench antenna signals are also presented.

  4. Design and prototyping of HL-LHC double quarter wave crab cavities for SPS test

    SciTech Connect

    Verdu-Andres, S.; Skaritka, J.; Wu, Q.; Xiao, B.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Alberty, L.; Artoos, K.; Calaga, R.; Capatina, O.; Capelli, T.; Carra, F.; Leuxe, R.; Kuder, N.; Zanoni, C.; Li, Z.; Ratti, A.

    2015-05-03

    The LHC high luminosity project envisages the use of the crabbing technique for increasing and levelling the LHC luminosity. Double Quarter Wave (DQW) resonators are compact cavities especially designed to meet the technical and performance requirements for LHC beam crabbing. Two DQW crab cavities are under fabrication and will be tested with beam in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN by 2017. This paper describes the design and prototyping of the DQW crab cavities for the SPS test.

  5. Hydrogeology and results of injection tests at waste-injection test sites in Pinellas County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, John J.

    1982-01-01

    Potential benefits or hazards to freshwater resources could result from subsurface injection of treated wastewater. Recognizing this, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Pinellas County and the city of St. Petersburg, undertook an evaluation of the hydrogeology and injection of wastewater at proposed test sites on the Pinellas peninsula. The injection sites are underlain by sedimentary rocks ranging in age from Cretaceous to Pleistocene. Lower Eocene carbonate rocks were penetrated to a maximum depth of 3,504 feet and were found to have relatively low water yields. The most permeable part of the investigated section was in rocks of middle Eocene age within the Floridan aquifer. At the injection sites, the Floridan aquifer was subdivided into four permeable zones and three semiconfining beds. The test injection zone is within the Avon Park Limestone, the most productive of the identified permeable zones, with a transmissivity of about 1,000,000 feet squared per day. Two semiconfining beds are above the injection zone in the Suwannee Limestone and Ocala Limestone and have vertical hydraulic conductivities estimated to range from about 0.1 to 1 foot per day where these beds do not contain clay. Limited fresh ground-water supplies exist in the Floridan aquifer within the Pinellas peninsula. At all test sites, chloride concentration in the injection zone ranged from 19,000 to 20,000 milligrams per liter. Injection tests ranging in duration from 3 to 91.1 days were run at three different sites. Pressure buildup occurred in permeable zones above and below the injection zone during these tests. Calculated pressure buildup in observation wells close to and at some distance from the test wells was typically less than 1 pound per square inch. Injection and formation water will probably move slowly through the semiconfining bed overlying the injection zone, and long-term injection tests will be needed to determine the effectiveness of these beds to retard flow. The

  6. Lightning Pin Injection Testing on MOSFETS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Szatkowski, George N.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Mielnik, John J.; Vaughan, Roger K.; Wysocki, Philip F.; Celaya, Jose R.; Saha, Sankalita

    2009-01-01

    Lightning transients were pin-injected into metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) to induce fault modes. This report documents the test process and results, and provides a basis for subsequent lightning tests. MOSFETs may be present in DC-DC power supplies and electromechanical actuator circuits that may be used on board aircraft. Results show that unprotected MOSFET Gates are susceptible to failure, even when installed in systems in well-shielded and partial-shielded locations. MOSFET Drains and Sources are significantly less susceptible. Device impedance decreased (current increased) after every failure. Such a failure mode may lead to cascading failures, as the damaged MOSFET may allow excessive current to flow through other circuitry. Preliminary assessments on a MOSFET subjected to 20-stroke pin-injection testing demonstrate that Breakdown Voltage, Leakage Current and Threshold Voltage characteristics show damage, while the device continues to meet manufacturer performance specifications. The purpose of this research is to develop validated tools, technologies, and techniques for automated detection, diagnosis and prognosis that enable mitigation of adverse events during flight, such as from lightning transients; and to understand the interplay between lightning-induced surges and aging (i.e. humidity, vibration thermal stress, etc.) on component degradation.

  7. First Test Results of the 150 mm Aperture IR Quadrupole Models for the High Luminosity LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosio, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Wanderer, P.; Ferracin, P.; Sabbi, G.

    2016-10-06

    The High Luminosity upgrade of the LHC at CERN will use large aperture (150 mm) quadrupole magnets to focus the beams at the interaction points. The high field in the coils requires Nb3Sn superconductor technology, which has been brought to maturity by the LHC Accelerator Re-search Program (LARP) over the last 10 years. The key design targets for the new IR quadrupoles were established in 2012, and fabrication of model magnets started in 2014. This paper discusses the results from the first single short coil test and from the first short quadrupole model test. Remaining challenges and plans to address them are also presented and discussed.

  8. Non-linear advanced control of the LHC inner triplet heat exchanger test unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viñuela, E. Blanco; Cubillos, J. Casas; de Prada Moraga, C.; Cristea, S.

    2002-05-01

    The future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will include eight interaction region final focus magnet systems, the so-called "Inner Triplet," one on each side of the four beam collision points. The Inner Triplets will be cooled in a static bath of pressurized He II nominally at 1.9 K. This temperature is a control parameter and has very severe constraints in order to avoid the transition from the superconducting to normal resistive state. The main difference in these special zones with respect to a regular LHC cell is higher dynamic heat load unevenly distributed which modifies largely the process characteristics and hence the controller performance. Several control strategies have already been tested at CERN in a pilot plant (LHC String Test) which reproduced a LHC half-cell. In order to validate a common control structure along the whole LHC ring, a Nonlinear Model Predictive Control (NMPC) has been developed and implemented in the Inner Triplet Heat Exchanger Unit (IT-HXTU) at CERN. Automation of the Inner Triplet setup and the advanced control techniques deployed based on the Model Based Predictive Control (MBPC) principle are presented.

  9. FDDI network test adaptor error injection circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckenrode, Thomas (Inventor); Stauffer, David R. (Inventor); Stempski, Rebecca (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for injecting errors into a FDDI token ring network is disclosed. The error injection scheme operates by fooling a FORMAC into thinking it sent a real frame of data. This is done by using two RAM buffers. The RAM buffer normally accessed by the RBC/DPC becomes a SHADOW RAM during error injection operation. A dummy frame is loaded into the shadow RAM in order to fool the FORMAC. This data is just like the data that would be used if sending a normal frame, with the restriction that it must be shorter than the error injection data. The other buffer, the error injection RAM, contains the error injection frame. The error injection data is sent out to the media by switching a multiplexor. When the FORMAC is done transmitting the data, the multiplexor is switched back to the normal mode. Thus, the FORMAC is unaware of what happened and the token ring remains operational.

  10. Injecting Errors for Testing Built-In Test Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gender, Thomas K.; Chow, James

    2010-01-01

    Two algorithms have been conceived to enable automated, thorough testing of Built-in test (BIT) software. The first algorithm applies to BIT routines that define pass/fail criteria based on values of data read from such hardware devices as memories, input ports, or registers. This algorithm simulates effects of errors in a device under test by (1) intercepting data from the device and (2) performing AND operations between the data and the data mask specific to the device. This operation yields values not expected by the BIT routine. This algorithm entails very small, permanent instrumentation of the software under test (SUT) for performing the AND operations. The second algorithm applies to BIT programs that provide services to users application programs via commands or callable interfaces and requires a capability for test-driver software to read and write the memory used in execution of the SUT. This algorithm identifies all SUT code execution addresses where errors are to be injected, then temporarily replaces the code at those addresses with small test code sequences to inject latent severe errors, then determines whether, as desired, the SUT detects the errors and recovers

  11. Testing the Technicolor Interpretation of CDF's Dijet Excess at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Eichten, Estia; Lane, Kenneth; Martin, Adam; Pilon, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Under the assumption that the dijet excess seen by the CDF Collaboration near 150 Gev in Wjj production is due to the lightest technipion of the low-scale technicolor process $\\rho_T \\rightarrow W \\pi_T$, we study its observability in LHC detectors with 1--20 inverse femtobarns of data. We describe interesting new kinematic tests that can provide independent confirmation of this LSTC hypothesis. We find that cuts similar to those employed by CDF, and recently by ATLAS, cannot confirm the dijet signal. We propose cuts tailored to the LSTC hypothesis and its backgrounds at the LHC that may reveal $\\rho_T \\rightarrow \\ell\

  12. Prototype Testing for a Copper Rotatable Collimator for the LHC Collimation Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Anzalone, Gene; Doyle, Eric; Keller, Lewis; Lundgren, Steven; Markiewicz, Thomas Walter; Rogers, Reggie; /SLAC

    2009-01-20

    The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the robust Phase I graphite collimators with high Z Phase II collimators. The design for the collimation upgrade has not been finalized. One option is to use metallic rotatable collimators and testing of this design will be discussed here. The Phase II collimators must be robust in various operating conditions and accident scenarios. A prototype collimator jaw referred to as RC0 has been tested for both mechanical and thermal compliance with the design goals. Thermal expansion bench-top tests are compared to ANSYS simulation results. The prototype has also been tested in vacuum bake-out to confirm compliance with the LHC vacuum spec. CMM equipment has been used to verify the flatness of the jaw surface after heat tests and bake-out.

  13. Cryogenic test of double quarter wave crab cavity for the LHC High luminosity upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, B.; Alberty, L.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Calaga, R.; Cullen, C.; Capatina, O.; Hammons, L.; Li, Z.; Marques, C.; Skaritka, J.; Verdu-Andres, S.; Wu, Q.

    2015-05-03

    A Proof-of-Principle (PoP) Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity (DQWCC) was designed and fabricated for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. A vertical cryogenic test has been done at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). The cavity achieved 4.5 MV deflecting voltage with a quality factor above 3×109. We report the test results of this design.

  14. Decisive test of color coherence in proton-nucleus collisions at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Bzdak, Adam; Skokov, Vladimir

    2013-11-01

    Proton-nucleus collisions (p+A) at LHC energies provide a rigorous test of color glass condensate (CGC), a model proposed to describe the high energy limit of quantum chromodynamics. In the CGC the average multiplicity of charged particles at midrapidity in p+A collisions depends logarithmically on the number of participants, N(part). In contrast, the wounded nucleon model of independent nucleon-nucleon scatterings, verified at RHIC energies, predicts that multiplicity in p+A depends linearly on N(part). We argue that the dependence of mean multiplicity on N(part) in p+A collisions at LHC energies can single out a model of particle production, thus offering a stringent test of the CGC and the wounded nucleon model. Based on this observation we propose a novel experimental test of color coherence in p+A collisions.

  15. Test monitoring of prototype injection well, Waiale, Maui, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soroos, Ronald L.

    1979-01-01

    A high-capacity prototype injection well was tested in the isthmus area of Maui, Hawaii. Pumping tests were made on April 14 and 15, 1978, and 10 injection tests were made between May 12 and June 30, 1978. Selected tests were monitored in order to obtain data which could be used to assess the effects of subsurface disposal on the ground water in the basal aquifer. Pumping and injection rates were measured. Basal-water head responses to pumping and injection were observed at the prototype well and at two observation wells located 435 and 6 ,100 feet from the prototype well. Water-quality samples were collected at the prototype well and the nearest observation well prior to testing. Samples of the injection water, as well as samples from the observation wells, were collected prior to and after the final test. The head data and water-quality data are presented in this report. (USGS)

  16. Microseismic Monitoring of the Mounds Drill Cuttings Injection Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Branagan, P.T.; Mahrer, K.D.; Moschovidis, Z.A.; Warpinski, N.R.; Wolhart, S.L.

    1999-01-25

    This paper describes the microseismic mapping of repeated injections of drill cuttings into two separate formations at a test site near Mounds, OK. Injections were performed in sandstone and shale formations at depths of 830 and 595 m, respectively. Typical injection disposal was simulated using multiple small-volume injections over a three-day period, with long shut-in periods interspersed between the injections. Microseismic monitoring was achieved using a 5-level array of wireline-run, triaxial- accelerometer receivers in a monitor well 76 m from the disposed well. Results of the mapped microseismic locations showed that the disposal domti W= generally aligns with the major horizontal stress with some variations in azimuth and that wide variations in height and length growth occurred with continued injections. These experiments show that the cuttings injection process cm be adequately monitored from a downhole, wireline-run receiver array, thus providing process control and environmental assurance.

  17. Mechanical and Thermal Prototype Testing for a Rotatable Collimator for the LHC Phase II Collimation Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Doyle, Eric; Keller, Lewis; Lundgren, Steven; Markiewicz, Thomas Walter; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the robust Phase I graphite collimators with high Z, low impedance Phase II collimators. The design for the collimation upgrade has not been finalized. One option is to use metallic rotatable collimators and testing of this design will be discussed here. The Phase II collimators must be robust in various operating conditions and accident scenarios. A prototype collimator jaw has been tested for both mechanical and thermal compliance with the design goals. Thermal expansion bench-top tests are compared to ANSYS simulation results.

  18. Testing the littlest Higgs model with T-parity at the LHC Run-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qing-Hong; Chen, Chuan-Ren; Liu, Yandong

    2016-09-01

    We study the littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT) in the process of p p →WH+WH-→W+W-AHAH at the 14 TeV LHC. With the W -jet tagging technique, we demonstrate that the bulk of the model parameter space can be probed at the level of more than 5 σ in the signature of two fat W jets plus large missing energy. Furthermore, we propose a novel strategy of measuring the principle parameter f that is crucial to test the LHT model and to fix mass spectrum, including the dark matter particle. Our proposal can be easily incorporated into the current experimental program of diboson searches at the LHC Run-II.

  19. Testing the Technicolor Interpretation of the CDF Dijet Excess at the 8-TeV LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Eichten, Estia; Lane, Kenneth; Martin, Adam; Pilon, Eric

    2012-10-01

    Under the assumption that the dijet excess seen by the CDF Collaboration near 150 Gev in Wjj production is due to the lightest technipion of the low-scale technicolor process $\\rho_T \\rightarrow W \\pi_T$, we study its observability in LHC detectors for 8 TeV collisions and 20 inverse femtobarns of integrated luminosity. We describe interesting new kinematic tests that can provide independent confirmation of this LSTC hypothesis. We show that cuts similar to those employed by CDF, and recently by ATLAS, cannot confirm the dijet signal. We propose cuts tailored to the LSTC hypothesis and its backgrounds at the LHC that may reveal $\\rho_T \\rightarrow \\ell\

  20. Test Beam Results for The Fast Interaction Trigger Detector of ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Calvin; Harton, Austin; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo; Alice-Fit Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    CERN (European Center for Nuclear Research) is a global laboratory that studies proton and heavy ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is one of four large experiments at the LHC. ALICE is dedicated to the study of the transition of matter to Quark-Gluon Plasma in heavy ion collisions. In the present ALICE detector, there are two sub-detectors, (the T0 and V0), that provide minimum bias trigger, multiplicity trigger, beam-gas event rejection, collision time for other sub-detectors, online multiplicity and event plane determination. In order to adapt these functionalities to the collision rates expected for the LHC upgrade after 2020, it is planned to replace these systems with a single system, called the Fast Interaction Trigger (FIT). In this poster we describe the FIT upgrade; show the proposed characteristics of the FIT detectors and present test beam performance results that support the current design parameters. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants NSF-PHY-1407051 and NSF-PHY-1305280.

  1. Universality test of the charged Higgs boson couplings at the LHC and at B factories

    SciTech Connect

    Cornell, Alan S.; Deandrea, Aldo; Gaur, Naveen; Itoh, Hideo; Klasen, Michael; Okada, Yasuhiro

    2010-06-01

    Many extensions of the standard model of particle physics predict the existence of charged Higgs bosons with substantial couplings to standard model particles, which would render them observable both directly at the LHC and indirectly at B-factories. For example, the charged Higgs boson couplings to fermions in two Higgs doublet models of type II are proportional to the ratio of the two Higgs doublet vacuum expectation values (tan{beta}) and fermionic mass factors and could thus be substantial at large tan{beta} and/or for heavy fermions. In this work we perform a model-independent study of the charged Higgs boson couplings at the LHC and at B-factories for large values of tan{beta}. We have shown that at high luminosity it is possible to measure the couplings of a charged Higgs boson to the third generation of quarks up to an accuracy of 10%. We further argue that by combining the possible measurements of the LHC and the B-factories, it is possible to perform a universality test of charged Higgs boson couplings to quarks.

  2. Design and testing of a four rod crab cavity for High Luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, B.; Burt, G.; Apsimon, R.; Lingwood, C. J.; Tutte, A.; Grudiev, A.; Macpherson, A.; Navarro-Tapia, M.; Calaga, R.; Hernández-Chahín, K. G.; Appleby, R. B.; Goudket, P.

    2017-01-01

    A 4-rod deflecting structure is proposed as a possible crab cavity design for the LHC high luminosity upgrade. Crab cavities are required for the LHC luminosity upgrade to provide a greater bunch overlap in the presence of a crossing angle, but must fit in the existing limited space. The structure has two parallel sections consisting of two longitudinally opposing quarter-wave rods, where each rod has the opposite charge from each of its nearest neighbors. The structure is transversely compact because the frequency is dependent on the rod lengths rather than the cavity radius. Simulations were undertaken to investigate the effect of rod shape on surface fields, higher order multipole terms and induced wakefields in order to obtain the optimal rod shape. The simulation results presented show that the addition of focus electrodes or by shaping the rods the sextupole contribution of the cavity voltage can be negated; the sextupole contribution is 321.57 mTm /m2 , Epeak=27.7 MV /m , and Bpeak=63.9 mT at the design voltage of 3 MV. The damping requirements for the LHC are critical and suitable couplers to damp all modes but the operating mode are presented. The results of various testing cycles of the first SRF 4 rod prototype cavity are presented and show that the cavity has reached the required transverse voltage of 3 MV.

  3. Results of deep-well injection testing at Mulberry, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, John J.; Wilson, W.E.

    1982-01-01

    At the Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical Corporation plant, Mulberry, Fla., high-chloride, acidic liquid wastes are injected into a dolomite section at depths below about 4,000 feet below land surface. In 1975, a satellite monitor well was drilled 2,291 feet from the injection well and a series of three injection tests were performed. Duration of the tests ranged from 240 to 10,020 minutes and injection rates ranged from 110 to 230 gallons per minute. Based on an evaluation of factors that affect hydraulic response, water-level data suitable for interpretation of hydraulic characteristics of the injection zone were identified to occur from 200 to 1,000 minutes during the 10,020-minute test. Transmissivity of the injection zone was computed to be within the range from 700 to 1,000 feet squared per day and storage coefficient of the injection zone was computed to be within the range from .00001 to .00005. The confining bed accepting most of the leakage appears to be the underlying bed. Also, it appears that the overlying beds are probably relatively impermeable and significantly retard the vertical movement of neutralized waste effluent. (USGS)

  4. Design and Testing of Trace Contaminant Injection and Monitoring Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broerman, Craig D.; Sweterlitsch, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    In support of the Carbon dioxide And Moisture Removal Amine Swing-bed (CAMRAS) testing, a contaminant injection system as well as a contaminant monitoring system has been developed by the Johnson Space Center Air Revitalization Systems (JSC-ARS) team. The contaminant injection system has been designed to provide trace level concentrations of contaminants generated by humans in a closed environment during space flight missions. The contaminant injection system continuously injects contaminants from three gas cylinders, two liquid reservoirs and three permeation ovens. The contaminant monitoring system has been designed to provide real time gas analysis with accurate flow, humidity and gas concentration measurements for collection during test. The contaminant monitoring system consists of an analytical real time gas analyzer, a carbon monoxide sensor, and an analyzer for ammonia and water vapor.

  5. DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

    2012-09-20

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected

  6. EZVI Injection Field Test Leads to Pilot-Scale Application

    EPA Science Inventory

    Testing and monitoring of emulsified zero-valent ironTM (EZVI) injections was conducted at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Launch Complex 34, FL, in 2002 to 2005 to evaluate the technology’s efficacy in enhancing in situ dehalogenation of dense nonaqueous-phase liquid (DNAPL) ...

  7. Lightning Pin Injection Test: MOSFETS in "ON" State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Szatkowski, George N.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Mielnik, John J.; Vaughan, Roger K.; Saha, Sankalita; Wysocki, Philip F.; Celaya, Jose R.

    2011-01-01

    The test objective was to evaluate MOSFETs for induced fault modes caused by pin-injecting a standard lightning waveform into them while operating. Lightning Pin-Injection testing was performed at NASA LaRC. Subsequent fault-mode and aging studies were performed by NASA ARC researchers using the Aging and Characterization Platform for semiconductor components. This report documents the test process and results, to provide a basis for subsequent lightning tests. The ultimate IVHM goal is to apply prognostic and health management algorithms using the features extracted during aging to allow calculation of expected remaining useful life. A survey of damage assessment techniques based upon inspection is provided, and includes data for optical microscope and X-ray inspection. Preliminary damage assessments based upon electrical parameters are also provided.

  8. Common origin of fermion mixing and geometrical CP violation, and its test through Higgs physics at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Gautam; Varzielas, Ivo de Medeiros; Leser, Philipp

    2012-12-14

    We construct for the first time a flavor model, based on the smallest discrete symmetry Δ(27) that implements spontaneous CP violation with a complex phase of geometric origin, which can actually reproduce all quark masses and mixing data. We show that its scalar sector has exotic properties that can be tested at the LHC.

  9. TRACKING TESTS FOR THE SNS FAST INJECTION BUMP POWER SUPPLY

    SciTech Connect

    ENG,W.CUTLER,R.DEWAN,S.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    The tracking requirement of the SNS Fast Injection Bump power supplies is described. In addition to the usual tracking between the load current and the input reference of a power supply, these power supplies must also track between pairs of units under slightly different loads. This paper describes the use of a current-null test to measure tracking performances. For the actual tests, a single dummy magnet load was used to measure the tracking between the first two production units at the manufacturer's facility. Using the Yokogawa WE7000 waveform. PC-based measurement instrument, input and output waveforms are digitized and stored in data files. A program written for this application is then used to extract data from these files to construct, analyze the waveforms and characterize the power supply performance. Results of the measurements of two SNS Fast Injection Bump power supplies will be presented in this paper.

  10. Results of FE65-P2 Stability Tests for the High Luminosity LHC Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Katherine; Atlas Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The high luminosity upgrade of the LHC sets an imperative for readout technology capable of handling the consequences of higher particle interaction rates. Increased luminosity exists hand-in-hand with unprecedented levels of radiation and the need for exceptional logic density to store hit information during a trigger latency period on the order of 10 μs. The RD53 collaboration has developed specifications for the new generation of hybrid pixel readout chips to be included in the ATLAS and CMS Phase 2 upgrades. The FE65-P2 is a test readout chip fabricated on 65 nm CMOS technology that prototypes these design variants. Objectives of FE65-P2 include demonstrating the novel process of isolated analog front ends embedded in a digital design, known as ``analog islands in a digital sea.'' In addition, the innermost layer of the pixel detector in the upgraded ATLAS experiment will reach doses approaching 1 Mrad per run, and a single FE65-P2 should be tolerant to a lifetime dose near 500 Mrad. This talk will cover the test results of FE65-P2 calibration and stability. The experience gained from such tests will advise the development of RD53A, a large format readout chip to be fabricated in early 2017.

  11. Air injection test on a Kaplan turbine: prototype - model comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo, M.; Rivetti, A.; Díaz, L.; Liscia, S.

    2016-11-01

    Air injection is a very well-known resource to reduce pressure pulsation magnitude in turbines, especially on Francis type. In the case of large Kaplan designs, even when not so usual, it could be a solution to mitigate vibrations arising when tip vortex cavitation phenomenon becomes erosive and induces structural vibrations. In order to study this alternative, aeration tests were performed on a Kaplan turbine at model and prototype scales. The research was focused on efficiency of different air flow rates injected in reducing vibrations, especially at the draft tube and the discharge ring and also in the efficiency drop magnitude. It was found that results on both scales presents the same trend in particular for vibration levels at the discharge ring. The efficiency drop was overestimated on model tests while on prototype were less than 0.2 % for all power output. On prototype, air has a beneficial effect in reducing pressure fluctuations up to 0.2 ‰ of air flow rate. On model high speed image computing helped to quantify the volume of tip vortex cavitation that is strongly correlated with the vibration level. The hydrophone measurements did not capture the cavitation intensity when air is injected, however on prototype, it was detected by a sonometer installed at the draft tube access gallery.

  12. ASSEMBLY AND TEST OF A 120 MM BORE 15 T NB3SN QUADRUPOLE FOR THE LHC UPGRADE

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, H.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D.; Ferracin, P.; Hafalia, R.; Joseph, J.; Lizarazo, J.; Sabbi, G. L.; Wang, X.; Anerella, M.; Ghosh, A. K.; Schmalzle, J.; Wanderer, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Bossert, R.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2010-05-23

    In support of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade, the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) has been developing a 1-meter long, 120 mm bore Nb{sub 3}Sn IR quadrupole magnet (HQ). With a design short sample gradient of 219 T/m at 1.9 K and a peak field approaching 15 T, one of the main challenges of this magnet is to provide appropriate mechanical support to the coils. Compared to the previous LARP Technology Quadrupole and Long Quadrupole magnets, the purpose of HQ is also to demonstrate accelerator quality features such as alignment and cooling. So far, 8 HQ coils have been fabricated and 4 of them have been assembled and tested in HQ01a. This paper presents the mechanical assembly and test results of HQ01a.

  13. Proton Injection into the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Prebys, Eric; Antipov, Sergey; Piekarz, Henryk; Valishev, A.

    2015-06-01

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is an experimental synchrotron being built at Fermilab to test the concept of non-linear "integrable optics". These optics are based on a lattice including non-linear elements that satisfies particular conditions on the Hamiltonian. The resulting particle motion is predicted to be stable but without a unique tune. The system is therefore insensitive to resonant instabilities and can in principle store very intense beams, with space charge tune shifts larger than those which are possible in conventional linear synchrotrons. The ring will initially be tested with pencil electron beams, but this poster describes the ultimate plan to install a 2.5 MeV RFQ to inject protons, which will produce tune shifts on the order of unity. Technical details will be presented, as well as simulations of protons in the ring.

  14. EMISSION TEST REPORT- FIELD TEST OF CARBON INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL, CAMDEN COUNTY MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of parametric test to evaluate the injection powdered activated carbon to control volatile pollutants in municipal waste combustor (MWC) flue gas. he tests were conducted at a spray dryer absorber/electrostatic precipitator (SD/ESP)-equipped MWC in Camden...

  15. SRS supplemental safety system injection (gas pressurizer) test

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, W.L.; Dimenna, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation and validation of an existing version of the RELAP5 thermal hydraulics computer code was undertaken for the purpose of certification for use in the new production reactor - heavy water reactor (NPR-HWR) program. This version of the code was RELAP5/MOD3 Version 5q, designated for the purposes of the NPR-HWR program as RELAP5/NPR Version 0. As part of the evaluation and assessment, test data from theSRS Supplemental Safety System Injection (Gas Pressurizer) was used to verify and assess the ability of RELAP5/NPR Version 0 to perform thermal-hydraulic model analysis using the test data. Specifically, the assessment determines RELAP5/NPR Version 0 capability in modeling sudden depressurization phenomena. Two RELAP5/NPR Version 0 components (pipe and accumulator) were used to compare calculated pressure and temperature against test data. The code deficiencies are a temperature clamp in the accumulator component prevents the gas temperature from going below [minus]9[degrees]F, and RELAP5 accumulator and pipe components wall-to-fluid heat transfer correlation and interfacial vapor heat transfer correlation need substantial improvement. Only the code pipe component calculated pressures and temperatures within the specified 10 percent accuracy.

  16. SRS supplemental safety system injection (gas pressurizer) test

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, W.L.; Dimenna, R.A.

    1992-12-31

    An evaluation and validation of an existing version of the RELAP5 thermal hydraulics computer code was undertaken for the purpose of certification for use in the new production reactor - heavy water reactor (NPR-HWR) program. This version of the code was RELAP5/MOD3 Version 5q, designated for the purposes of the NPR-HWR program as RELAP5/NPR Version 0. As part of the evaluation and assessment, test data from theSRS Supplemental Safety System Injection (Gas Pressurizer) was used to verify and assess the ability of RELAP5/NPR Version 0 to perform thermal-hydraulic model analysis using the test data. Specifically, the assessment determines RELAP5/NPR Version 0 capability in modeling sudden depressurization phenomena. Two RELAP5/NPR Version 0 components (pipe and accumulator) were used to compare calculated pressure and temperature against test data. The code deficiencies are a temperature clamp in the accumulator component prevents the gas temperature from going below {minus}9{degrees}F, and RELAP5 accumulator and pipe components wall-to-fluid heat transfer correlation and interfacial vapor heat transfer correlation need substantial improvement. Only the code pipe component calculated pressures and temperatures within the specified 10 percent accuracy.

  17. Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology

    SciTech Connect

    Gooch, J.P.; Dismukes, E.B.; Dahlin, R.S.; Faulkner, M.G. ); Klett, M.G.; Buchanan, T.L.; Hunt, J.E. )

    1989-05-01

    Gilbert Commonwealth, Southern Research Institute and the American Electric Power Service Corporation have embarked on a program to convert DOE's Duct Injection Test Facility located at the Muskingum River Power Plant of Ohio Power Company to test alternate duct injection technologies. The technologies to be tested include slurry sorbent injection of hydrated lime using dual fluid nozzles, or a rotary atomizer and pneumatic injection of hydrated lime, with flue gas humidification before or after sorbent injection. The literature review and analysis contained in this report is a part of the preparatory effort for the test program.

  18. Testing the CP-violating MSSM in stau decays at the LHC and ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreiner, Herbi; Kittel, Olaf; Kulkarni, Suchita; Marold, Anja

    2011-05-01

    We study CP violation in the two-body decay of a scalar tau into a neutralino and a tau, which should be probed at the LHC and ILC. From the normal tau polarization, a CP asymmetry is defined which is sensitive to the CP phases of the trilinear scalar coupling parameter Aτ, the gaugino mass parameter M1, and the Higgsino mass parameter μ, in the stau-neutralino sector of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. Asymmetries of more than 70% are obtained in scenarios with strong stau mixing. As a result, detectable CP asymmetries in stau decays at the LHC are found, motivating further detailed experimental studies for probing the supersymmetry CP phases.

  19. Injection molding lens metrology using software configurable optical test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Cheng; Cheng, Dewen; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Yongtian

    2016-10-01

    Optical plastic lens produced by injection molding machine possesses numerous advantages of light quality, impact resistance, low cost, etc. The measuring methods in the optical shop are mainly interferometry, profile meter. However, these instruments are not only expensive, but also difficult to alignment. The software configurable optical test system (SCOTS) is based on the geometry of the fringe refection and phase measuring deflectometry method (PMD), which can be used to measure large diameter mirror, aspheric and freeform surface rapidly, robustly, and accurately. In addition to the conventional phase shifting method, we propose another data collection method called as dots matrix projection. We also use the Zernike polynomials to correct the camera distortion. This polynomials fitting mapping distortion method has not only simple operation, but also high conversion precision. We simulate this test system to measure the concave surface using CODE V and MATLAB. The simulation results show that the dots matrix projection method has high accuracy and SCOTS has important significance for on-line detection in optical shop.

  20. Commissioning the cryogenic system of the first LHC sector

    SciTech Connect

    Millet, F.; Claudet, S.; Ferlin, G.; Perin, A.; Riddone, G.; Serio, L.; Soubiran, M.; Tavian, L.; Ronayette, L.; Rabehl, R.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    The LHC machine, composed of eight sectors with superconducting magnets and accelerating cavities, requires a complex cryogenic system providing high cooling capacities (18 kW equivalent at 4.5 K and 2.4 W at 1.8 K per sector produced in large cold boxes and distributed via 3.3-km cryogenic transfer lines). After individual reception tests of the cryogenic subsystems (cryogen storages, refrigerators, cryogenic transfer lines and distribution boxes) performed since 2000, the commissioning of the cryogenic system of the first LHC sector has been under way since November 2006. After a brief introduction to the LHC cryogenic system and its specificities, the commissioning is reported detailing the preparation phase (pressure and leak tests, circuit conditioning and flushing), the cool-down sequences including the handling of cryogenic fluids, the magnet powering phase and finally the warm-up. Preliminary conclusions on the commissioning of the first LHC sector will be drawn with the review of the critical points already solved or still pending. The last part of the paper reports on the first operational experience of the LHC cryogenic system in the perspective of the commissioning of the remaining LHC sectors and the beam injection test.

  1. Modulus-dominated SUSY-breaking soft terms in F-theory and their test at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, L.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Ibáñez, L. E.

    2008-07-01

    We study the general patterns of SUSY-breaking soft terms arising under the assumption of Kahler moduli dominated SUSY-breaking in string theory models. Insisting that all MSSM gauginos get masses at leading order and that the top Yukawa coupling is of order the gauge coupling constant identifies the class of viable models. These are models in which the SM fields live either in the bulk or at the intersection of local sets of Type IIB D7-branes or their F-theory relatives. General arguments allow us to compute the dependence of the Kahler metrics of MSSM fields on the local Kahler modulus of the brane configuration in the large moduli approximation. We illustrate this study in the case of toroidal/orbifold orientifolds but discuss how the findings generalize to the F-theory case which is more naturally compatible with coupling unification. Only three types of 7-brane configurations are possible, leading each of them to very constrained patterns of soft terms for the MSSM. We study their consistency with radiative electroweak symmetry breaking and other phenomenological constraints. We find that essentially only the configuration corresponding to intersecting 7-branes is compatible with all present experimental constraints and the desired abundance of neutralino dark matter. The obtained MSSM spectrum is very characteristic and could be tested at LHC. We also study the LHC reach for the discovery of this type of SUSY particle spectra.

  2. Assembly Tests of the First Nb 3 Sn Low-Beta Quadrupole Short Model for the Hi-Lumi LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, H.; Felice, H.; Cheng, D. W.; ...

    2016-01-18

    In preparation for the high-luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) in collaboration with CERN is pursuing the development of MQXF: a 150-mm-aperture high-field Nb3Sn quadrupole magnet. Moreover, the development phase starts with the fabrication and test of several short models (1.2-m magnetic length) and will continue with the development of several long prototypes. All of them are mechanically supported using a shell-based support structure, which has been extensively demonstrated on several R&D models within LARP. The first short model MQXFS-AT has been assembled at LBNL with coils fabricated by LARP and CERN.more » In our paper, we summarize the assembly process and show how it relies strongly on experience acquired during the LARP 120-mm-aperture HQ magnet series. We also present comparison between strain gauges data and finite-element model analysis. Finally, we present the implication of the MQXFS-AT experience on the design of the long prototype support structure.« less

  3. Design and test of the benches for the magnetic measurement of the LHC dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billan, J.; Buckley, J.; Saban, R.; Sievers, P.; Walckiers, L.

    1994-07-01

    The magnetic measurement of more than 1300 LHC dipoles comprises the content of higher harmonic field components, field direction and field integrals. The measurements will be carried out along a warm bore installed inside the magnet cold bore, thus allowing the use of rotating coils at room temperature. This coil, together with Hall and NMR detectors is mounted at one end of a 12.5 m long shaft which is specially designed for very high rotational stiffness and which is controlled from its far end by a motor, an angular encoder and a level meter, all standard components placed outside the magnetic field without space restrictions. Particular emphasis has been put on the user-friendliness of the bench and its automated, computer-controlled operation requiring a minimum of staff, an important issue during production measurements of large series of magnets. The bench and its performance and precision achieved during its commissioning are described.

  4. Hydrologic data for the southwest subsurface-injection test site, St. Petersburg, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, John J.; Spechler, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    Three injection wells and nine observation wells were constructed at the Southwest St. Petersburg, Fla., site to determine feasibility of injecting wastewater treatment plant effluent into permeable zones containing saline water. Two withdrawal tests and one injection test were performed. Both withdrawal tests ran for about 3 days; one discharging 650 gallons per minute, and the other discharging 6,490 gallons per minute. The injection test was run in one well for 91.1 days at an average rate of 2,830 gallons per minute. Injection well pressure reached a maximum of 48.1 pounds per square inch near the end of the test. Rhodamine WT was used as a tracer during the injection test and was identified in three wells. Before the injection test, chloride concentration in a well 35 feet from the injection well, and in a well 733 feet distant, ranged from 19,000 to 21,000 milligrams per liter. At the end of the test, chloride concentration in one well was 1,800 milligrams per liter and 5,400 milligrams per liter in another. Eleven wells near the site were sampled before the test for water-quality analyses and chlorides ranged from 18 to 1,400 milligrams per liter. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Curative resection of multiple gastrinomas aided by selective arterial secretin injection test and intraoperative secretin test.

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, M; Takahashi, K; Isobe, Y; Hattori, Y; Satomura, K; Tobe, T

    1989-01-01

    Recently a number of surgeons have recommended radical resection of gastrinomas in Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES). We have developed a useful technique for preoperative localization of gastrinomas--the selective arterial secretin injection test (SASI)--and we recommend an intraoperative secretin test (IOS) for deciding the radicality of resection of gastrinomas. Here the results of SASI and IOS tests in 11 patients with ZES are examined and compared with the results of other techniques. The SASI test localized gastrinomas in all of the patients, while the sensitivity of ultrasonography, computed tomography, arteriography, or portal venous blood samplings was between 1/11 and 5/11. On the basis of the results of the SASI test, radical resection of gastrinoma was performed in four patients (three pancreatoduodenectomies and one extirpation). After pancreatoduodenectomy, immunohistologic study of the specimen revealed multiple microgastrinomas and lymph node metastases in two patients and the coexistence of a microgastrinoma and a gastinoma in one patient. The IOS test was useful in the estimation of the advisability of radicality, and in two patients total gastrectomy was not performed because of the results of the IOS test. These four patients are well and have returned to work, and their serum gastrin levels are below 35 pg/mL. Thus we believe SASI and IOS tests are helpful for planning curative resection of gastrinomas. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 7. PMID:2589884

  6. Angled Injection: Turbulent Flow Hybrid Bearings Comparison to Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanAndres, Luis; Childs, Dara

    1997-01-01

    Hydrostatic/hydrodynamic (hybrid) journal bearings handling process liquids have limited dynamic stability characteristics and their application as support elements to high speed flexible rotating systems is severely restricted. Measurements on water hybrid bearings with angled orifice injection have demonstrated improved rotordynamic performance with virtual elimination of cross-coupled stiffness coefficients and null or negative whirl frequency ratios. A bulk-flow model for prediction of the static performance and force coefficients of hybrid bearings with angled orifice injection is advanced. The analysis reveals that the fluid momentum exchange at the orifice discharge produces a pressure rise in the hydrostatic recess retards the shear flow induced by journal rotation, and thus, reduces cross-coupling forces. The predictions from the model are compared with experimental measurements for a 45 deg. angled orifice injection, 5 recess water hybrid bearing operating at 10.2, 17.4, and 24.6 krpm and with supply pressures of 4, 5.5, and 7 MPa. The correlations include recess pressures, flow rates, and rotordynamic force coefficients at the journal centered position.

  7. TRACER STABILITY AND CHEMICAL CHANGES IN AN INJECTED GEOTHERMAL FLUID DURING INJECTION-BACKFLOW TESTING AT THE EAST MESA GEOTHERMAL FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.C.

    1985-01-22

    The stabilities of several tracers were tested under geothermal conditions while injection-backflow tests were conducted at East Mesa. The tracers I and Br were injected continuously while SCN (thiocyanate), B, and disodium fluorescein were each injected as a point source (slug). The tracers were shown to be stable, except where the high concentrations used during slug injection induced adsorption of the slug tracers. However, adsorption of the slug tracers appeared to ''armor'' the formation against adsorption during subsequent tests. Precipitation behavior of calcite and silica as well as Na/K shifts during injection are also discussed.

  8. Data acquisition system for sorbent injection test program at Virginia Power Yorktown Power Station Unit 2

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, C.; Scharpf, G.H. Jr.

    1995-06-01

    Virginia Power has installed an ABB Boiler Performance Optimization System (BPOS) at their Yorktown Power Station Unit 2, in conjunction with an in-furnace, sorbent injection, sulfur dioxide emissions reduction test program., This system was selected as offering lower cost and long-term benefits to the station than using dedicated test equipment and personnel for the test program. In addition to providing data acquisition and storage functions for characterization of the effect of sorbent injection on boiler performance, sorbent injection equipment performance, and emissions reduction, the system performs on-line plant heat rate and controllable losses calculations. The BPOS included the following advanced features: (1) Access to test and operating results for station operators, station engineering staff and sorbent injection project staff at their own work spaces at the station and at remote locations. (2) Boiler section surface cleanliness models to aid the boiler operators with soot blowing and to assess the impact of sorbent injection on individual boiler surfaces. (3) Interfaces to the station`s distributed control system (DCS), the sorbent injection system`s programmable logic controller (PLC), and to a data logger used for test instrumentation. (4) Model-based calculations for sorbent injection system control setpoints implemented in BPOS computer system. (5) On-line continuous calculation of sorbent injection system performance indices.

  9. A simple constant-head injection test for streambed hydraulic conductivity estimation.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, M Bayani; Zlotnik, Vitaly A

    2003-01-01

    A fast, efficient constant-head injection test (CHIT) for in situ estimation of hydraulic conductivity (K) of sandy streambeds is presented. This test uses constant-head hydraulic injection through a manually driven piezometer. Results from CHIT compare favorably to estimates from slug testing and grain-size analysis. The CHIT combines simplicity of field performance, data interpretation, and accuracy of K estimation in flowing streams.

  10. Effectiveness of Shield Termination Techniques Tested with TEM Cell and Bulk Current Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T.; Hare, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results of the effectiveness of various shield termination techniques. Each termination technique is evaluated by two independent noise injection methods; transverse electromagnetic (TEM) cell operated from 3 MHz 400 MHz, and bulk current injection (BCI) operated from 50 kHz 400 MHz. Both single carrier and broadband injection tests were investigated. Recommendations as to how to achieve the best shield transfer impedance (i.e. reduced coupled noise) are made based on the empirical data. Finally, the noise injection techniques themselves are indirectly evaluated by comparing the results obtained from the TEM Cell to those from BCI.

  11. Tests for injecting, storing, and recovering freshwater in a saline artesian aquifer, Lee County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzpatrick, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation was made of the suitability of a saline, artesian limestone aquifer for the injection, storage, and recovery of freshwater from the Caloosahatchee River. The tests were conducted on a well tapping a leaky artesian system that has a transmissivity of 800 square feet per day, a storage of 1 x 10-4, and a leakance of 0.01 per day. The specific capacity of the injection well was increased through acidizing and was decreased as a result of well clogging during injection. Three injection tests were made wherein the amounts of freshwater injected, the storage duration, and the quality of water injected varied. Analysis of the test data showed that freshwater recoverability ranged from 9.7 to 38.7 percent of the total injected. Differences were attributed principally to differences in the quality of water injected and storage duration. Repeated injection-recovery cycles probably would result in greater recoverability. Head buildup, nearly 200 feet in one test, was a prime problem related chiefly to clogging from suspended material in the injected water and to bacterial growth at the wellbore-limestone interface. Regular backflushing was required. Total head buildup decreased as a result of acidizing the injection well. No coliforms or fecal streptococcus were noted in the recovered water. Growth of anaerobic bacteria occurred. Changes in the quality of the recovered water included decreases in concentration of dissolved organic carbon by as much as 15 mg/L (milligrams per liter), organic nitrogen by as much as 0.80 mg/L, and nitrate by as much as 0.50 mg/L. Increases were noted in ammonia by 0.40 mg/L, and iron by as much as 0.60 mg/L. These changes are consistent with the presence of an anaerobic bacterial ecosystem.

  12. Testing the Injection of the LISA Pathfinder Test Mass into Geodesic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanoni, C.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Conklin, J. W.; Koker, I.; Marirrodriga, C. G.; Nellen, P. M.; Vitale, S.

    2013-09-01

    LISA Pathfinder is a technology demonstration mission aimed at testing the free-fall purity level of a reference mass (or test mass, TM). Such an object can be used as a geodesic tracker for the detection of gravitational waves and is the core of the Gravitational Reference Sensor (GRS). The low acceleration noise level pursued for the tracker sets tight design constraints on the GRS. Any non-gravitational force has to be reduced to the level of 10 fN in the measurement bandwidth (1-30 mHz).The TM is firmly constrained by the Caging and Venting Mechanism (CVM) during the spacecraft launch and is then handed over to the Grabbing Positioning and Release Mechanism (GPRM). This mechanism is designed to handle the TM during in-orbit operations and inject it into the geodesic trajectory (or free-fall condition) by means of a quick retraction of two release tips on two opposed sides of the TM. After these operations, the TM residual velocity must be below 5 μm/s, otherwise the GRS capacitive position control is not able to capture and centre the TM in its electrode housing. Due to this criticality, the requirement on the maximum release velocity is verified on-ground both by means of an experimental apparatus (the Transferred Momentum Measurement Facility, TMMF) and by means of simulations. The TMMF is specifically designed to assess the contribution of adhesion between TM and release tips to the total TM momentum. On top of this contribution, any deviation from a symmetrical action of the two opposed release mechanisms determines an extra transferred momentum. Great care must be taken to correlate the experimental results with the in-flight conditions, where a different actuator is used to perform the TM injection. The extrapolation of the experimental results to in-flight conditions and the Montecarlo simulation of the GPRM-TM combined dynamics show the presence of a 2.4 margin factor with respect to the 5 μm/s requirement.The on-ground measured and simulated

  13. Test results for rotordynamic coefficients of anti-swirl self-injection seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, C. H.; Lee, Y. B.

    1994-01-01

    Test results are presented for rotordynamic coefficients and leakage for three annular seals which use anti-swirl self-injection concept to yield significant improvement in whirl frequency ratios as compared to smooth and damper seals. A new anti-swirl self-inection mechanism is achieved by deliberately machining self-injection holes inside the seal stator mechanism which is used to achieve effective reduction of the tangential flow which is considered as a prime cause of rotor instability in high performance turbomachinery. Test results show that the self-injection mechanism significantly improves whirl frequency ratios; however, the leakage performance degrades due to the introduction of the self-injection mechanism. Through a series of the test program, an optimum anti-swirl self-injection seal which uses a labyrinth stator surface with anti-axial flow injections is selected to obtain a significant improvement in the whirl frequency ratio as compared to a damper seal, while showing moderate leakage performance. Best whirl frequency ratio is achieved by an anti-swirl self-injection seal of 12 holes anti-swirl and 6 degree anti-leakage injection with a labyrinth surface configuration. When compared to a damper seal, the optimum configuration outperforms the whirl frequency ratio by a factor of 2.

  14. Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology

    SciTech Connect

    Felix, L.G.; Gooch, J.P.; Merritt, R.L. ); Klett, M.G.; Demian, A.G.; Hunt, J.E. )

    1992-10-30

    DOE's Duct Injection Test Facility at Ohio Power Company's Muskingum River Plant was modified to enable performance of a comprehensive test program concerning duct injection of sorbents for SO[sub 2] control. Injection of slaked lime slurries and injection of dry calcium hydroxide powder with humidification were carried out under a variety of process conditions. Slaked lime slurry injection as found to be superior in both operational reliability and S0[sub 2] removal capability compared with dry hydrated lime injection with humidification. Calcium utilization of 50% was achieved with 50% S0[sub 2] removal at the ESP outlet with recycle of unreacted sorbent collected in the precipitatorhoppers. Electrostatic precipitator collection performance was found to be highly variable with sorbent injection, especially with close approach to saturation temperatures and high inlet mass loadings. Small-scale tests with a fabric filter in parallel with the precipitator indicated 5 to 10% more S0[sub 2] removal could be obtained across the fabric filter than the ESP for all test conditions. Over 95% S0[sub 2] removal was achieved with the fabric filter using a two stage cooling process in which the filter was cooled below the operating temperature ofthe duct spray dryer.

  15. [A novel method for testing sterility of injections based on biothermodynamics].

    PubMed

    Gao, Dan; Gao, Dan; Ren, Yong-Shen; Yan, Dan; Zhang, Cong-En; Yan, Zhu-Yun; Xiong, Yin; Ma, Li-Na; Zhang, Le-Le; Xiao, Xiao-He

    2014-03-01

    This study aims at trying to establish a novel method of sterility test for injections based on biothermodynamics, in order to overcome the deficiencies of routine sterility tests such as long detecting cycle, low sensitivity and prone to misjudgments. A biothermodynamics method was adopted to rapidly detect the microorganism contamination of injections by monitoring the heat metabolism during the growth of microbe. The growth rate equal to or greater than zero and the heat power difference of P(i) and P(0) with three folds higher than the noise of baseline were chosen as indexes to study the heat change rule of microbe. In this way, the effectiveness of the new method to detect strains required by conventional sterility test or in injection samples was also investigated. Results showed that the Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi demanded by sterility testing methodology could be detected by biothermodynamics method within 10 hours, with the sensitivity lower than 100 CFU x mL(-1). Meanwhile, this method was successfully applied to the sterility test of Compound Yinchen injection (FFYC), Shuanghuanglian powder injection (SHL) and Compound Triamcinolone injection (TAND) which were sterilized with different degrees. Therefore, the biothermodynamics method, with advantages of fast detection and high sensitivity, could be a complementary solution for conventional sterility tests.

  16. Mechanical instability induced by water weakening in laboratory fluid injection tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, C.; Dautriat, J.; Sarout, J.; Delle Piane, C.; Menéndez, B.; Macault, R.; Bertauld, D.

    2015-06-01

    To assess water-weakening effects in reservoir rocks, previous experimental studies have focused on changes in the failure envelopes derived from mechanical tests conducted on rocks fully saturated either with water or with inert fluids. So far, little attention has been paid to the mechanical behavior during fluid injection under conditions similar to enhanced oil recovery operations. We studied the effect of fluid injection on the mechanical behavior of the weakly consolidated Sherwood sandstone in laboratory experiments. Our specimens were instrumented with 16 ultrasonic P wave transducers for both passive and active acoustic monitoring during loading and fluid injection to record the acoustic signature of fluid migration in the pore space and the development of damage. Calibration triaxial tests were conducted on three samples saturated with air, water, or oil. In a second series of experiments, water and inert oil were injected into samples critically loaded up to 80% or 70% of the dry or oil-saturated compressive strength, respectively, to assess the impact of fluid migration on mechanical strength and elastic properties. The fluids were injected with a low back pressure to minimize effective stress variations during injection. Our observations show that creep takes place with a much higher strain rate for water injection compared to oil injection. The most remarkable difference is that water injection in both dry and oil-saturated samples triggers mechanical instability (macroscopic failure) within half an hour whereas oil injection does not after several hours. The analysis of X-ray computed tomography images of postmortem samples revealed that the mechanical instability was probably linked to loss of cohesion in the water-invaded region.

  17. Design and Construction of a 500 KW CW, 400 MHZ Klystron To Be Used As RF Power Source For LHC/RF Component Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Chris

    2003-05-05

    A 500 kW cw klystron operating at 400 MHz was developed and constructed jointly by CERN and SLAC for use as a high-power source at CERN for testing LHC/RF components such as circulators, RF absorbers and superconducting cavities with their input couplers. The design is a modification of the 353 MHz SLAC PEP-I klystron. More than 80% of the original PEP-I tube parts could thus be incorporated in the LHC test klystron which resulted in lower engineering costs as well as reduced development and construction time. The physical length between cathode plane and upper pole plate was kept unchanged so that a PEP-I tube focusing solenoid, available at CERN, could be re-used. With the aid of the klystron simulation codes JPNDISK and CONDOR, the design of the LHC tube was accomplished, which resulted in a tube with noticeably higher efficiency than its predecessor, the PEP-I klystron. The integrated cavities were redesigned using SUPERFISH and the output coupling circuit, which also required redesigning, was done with the aid of MAFIA. Details of the tube development and test results are presented.

  18. Ethanol injection of ornamental trees facilitates testing insecticide efficacy against ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    PubMed

    Reding, Michael E; Oliver, Jason B; Schultz, Peter B; Ranger, Christopher M; Youssef, Nadeer N

    2013-02-01

    Exotic ambrosia beetles are damaging pests in ornamental tree nurseries in North America. The species Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motshulsky) and Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford) are especially problematic. Management of these pests relies on preventive treatments of insecticides. However, field tests of recommended materials on nursery trees have been limited because of unreliable attacks by ambrosia beetles on experimental trees. Ethanol-injection of trees was used to induce colonization by ambrosia beetles to evaluate insecticides and botanical formulations for preventing attacks by ambrosia beetles. Experiments were conducted in Ohio, Tennessee, and Virginia. Experimental trees injected with ethanol had more attacks by ambrosia beetles than uninjected control trees in all but one experiment. Xylosandrus crassiusculus and X. germanus colonized trees injected with ethanol. In most experiments, attack rates declined 8 d after ethanol-injection. Ethanol-injection induced sufficient pressure from ambrosia beetles to evaluate the efficacy of insecticides for preventing attacks. Trunk sprays of permethrin suppressed cumulative total attacks by ambrosia beetles in most tests. Trunk sprays of the botanical formulations Armorex and Veggie Pharm suppressed cumulative total attacks in Ohio. Armorex, Armorex + Permethrin, and Veggie Pharm + Permethrin suppressed attacks in Tennessee. The bifenthrin product Onyx suppressed establishment of X. germanus in one Ohio experiment, and cumulative total ambrosia beetle attacks in Virginia. Substrate drenches and trunk sprays of neonicotinoids, or trunk sprays of anthranilic diamides or tolfenpyrad were not effective. Ethanol-injection is effective for inducing attacks and ensuring pressure by ambrosia beetles for testing insecticide efficacy on ornamental trees.

  19. Ambiguity in measuring matrix diffusion with single-well injection/recovery tracer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lessoff, S.C.; Konikow, L.F.

    1997-01-01

    Single-well injection/recovery tracer tests are considered for use in characterizing and quantifying matrix diffusion in dual-porosity aquifers. Numerical modeling indicates that neither regional drift in homogeneous aquifers, nor heterogeneity in aquifers having no regional drift, nor hydrodynamic dispersion significantly affects these tests. However, when drift is coupled simultaneously with heterogeneity, they can have significant confounding effects on tracer return. This synergistic effect of drift and heterogeneity may help explain irreversible flow and inconsistent results sometimes encountered in previous single-well injection/recovery tracer tests. Numerical results indicate that in a hypothetical single-well injection/recovery tracer test designed to demonstrate and measure dual-porosity characteristics in a fractured dolomite, the simultaneous effects of drift and heterogeneity sometimes yields responses similar to those anticipated in a homogeneous dual-porosity formation. In these cases, tracer recovery could provide a false indication of the occurrence of matrix diffusion. Shortening the shut-in period between injection and recovery periods may make the test less sensitive to drift. Using multiple tracers having different diffusion characteristics, multiple tests having different pumping schedules, and testing the formation at more than one location would decrease the ambiguity in the interpretation of test data.

  20. Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology. Topical report No. 1, Literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Gooch, J.P.; Dismukes, E.B.; Dahlin, R.S.; Faulkner, M.G.; Klett, M.G.; Buchanan, T.L.; Hunt, J.E.

    1989-05-01

    Gilbert Commonwealth, Southern Research Institute and the American Electric Power Service Corporation have embarked on a program to convert DOE`s Duct Injection Test Facility located at the Muskingum River Power Plant of Ohio Power Company to test alternate duct injection technologies. The technologies to be tested include slurry sorbent injection of hydrated lime using dual fluid nozzles, or a rotary atomizer and pneumatic injection of hydrated lime, with flue gas humidification before or after sorbent injection. The literature review and analysis contained in this report is a part of the preparatory effort for the test program.

  1. Test Results of 15 T Nb3Sn Quadrupole Magnet HQ01 with a 120 mm Bore for the LHC Luminosity Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Schmalzle, J.; Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; Barzi, E.; Bingham, B.; Bossert, R.; Cheng, D.W.; Chlachidze, G.; Dietderich, D.R.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Ghosh, A.; Hafalia, A.R.; Hannaford, C.R.; Joseph, J.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Sabbi, G.L.; Schmalzle, J.; Wanderer,; P.l Xiaorong, W.; Zlobin, A.V.

    2011-08-03

    In support of the luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) has been developing a 1-meter long, 120 mm bore Nb{sub 3}Sn IR quadrupole magnet (HQ). With a short sample gradient of 219 T/m at 1.9 K and a conductor peak field of 15 T, the magnet will operate under higher forces and stored-energy levels than that of any previous LARP magnet models. In addition, HQ has been designed to incorporate accelerator quality features such as precise coil alignment and adequate cooling. The first 6 coils (out of the 8 fabricated so far) have been assembled and used in two separate tests-HQ01a and HQ01b. This paper presents design parameters, summary of the assemblies, the mechanical behavior as well as the performance of HQ01a and HQ01b.

  2. Test Results of 15 T Nb{sub 3}Sn Quadrupole Magnet HQ01 with a 120 mm Bore for the LHC Luminosity Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; Barzi, E.; Bingham, B.; Bossert, R.; Cheng, D. W.; Chlachidze, G.; Dietderich, D. R.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Ghosh, A.; Hafalia, A. R.; Hannaford, C. R.; Joseph, J.; Kashikhin, V. V.; Sabbi, G. L.; Schmalzle, J.; Wang, X.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2010-08-01

    In support of the luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) has been developing a 1-meter long, 120 mm bore Nb3 Sn IR quadrupole magnet (HQ). With a short sample gradient of 219 T/m at 1.9 K and a conductor peak field of 15 T, the magnet will operate under higher forces and stored-energy levels than that of any previous LARP magnet models. In addition, HQ has been designed to incorporate accelerator quality features such as precise coil alignment and adequate cooling. The first 6 coils (out of the 8 fabricated so far) have been assembled and used in two separate tests-HQ01a and HQ01b. This paper presents design parameters, summary of the assemblies, the mechanical behavior as well as the performance of HQ01a and HQ01b.

  3. Field Testing of Activated Carbon Injection Options for Mercury Control at TXU's Big Brown Station

    SciTech Connect

    John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Christopher Martin; Mark Musich; Lucinda Hamre

    2009-01-07

    The primary objective of the project was to evaluate the long-term feasibility of using activated carbon injection (ACI) options to effectively reduce mercury emissions from Texas electric generation plants in which a blend of lignite and subbituminous coal is fired. Field testing of ACI options was performed on one-quarter of Unit 2 at TXU's Big Brown Steam Electric Station. Unit 2 has a design output of 600 MW and burns a blend of 70% Texas Gulf Coast lignite and 30% subbituminous Powder River Basin coal. Big Brown employs a COHPAC configuration, i.e., high air-to-cloth baghouses following cold-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), for particulate control. When sorbent injection is added between the ESP and the baghouse, the combined technology is referred to as TOXECON{trademark} and is patented by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States. Key benefits of the TOXECON configuration include better mass transfer characteristics of a fabric filter compared to an ESP for mercury capture and contamination of only a small percentage of the fly ash with AC. The field testing consisted of a baseline sampling period, a parametric screening of three sorbent injection options, and a month long test with a single mercury control technology. During the baseline sampling, native mercury removal was observed to be less than 10%. Parametric testing was conducted for three sorbent injection options: injection of standard AC alone; injection of an EERC sorbent enhancement additive, SEA4, with ACI; and injection of an EERC enhanced AC. Injection rates were determined for all of the options to achieve the minimum target of 55% mercury removal as well as for higher removals approaching 90%. Some of the higher injection rates were not sustainable because of increased differential pressure across the test baghouse module. After completion of the parametric testing, a month long test was conducted using the enhanced AC at a nominal rate of 1.5 lb/Macf. During the

  4. Estimating properties of unsaturated fractured formations from injection and falloff tests

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Attanayake, M.P.

    1987-12-01

    A new technique for calculating hydraulic properties of unsaturated fractured formations is proposed as an alternative to the common approach involving steady-state analysis of multi-rate gas injection tests. This method is based on graphical analysis of unsteady-state pressure-time data from an injection-falloff test sequence. Both gas and water injection testing are considered. Flow in a horizontal fracture of limited lateral extent, bounded above and below by an impermeable matrix, and intersected by a cylindrical borehole is described by two analytical models developed in this study. The first model corresponds to the early-time infinite acting radial flow period, and the second to the late-time linear flow period. Interpretive equations are derived for computing fracture conductivity and volumetric aperture from early-time pressure data, and fracture width from late-time pressure data. Effects of fracture inclination and gravity are studied numerically and found to be practically negligible for gas as well as water injection. Two simulated injection-falloff tests are analyzed using the suggested procedure. Results are found to be in good agreement with simulator input values. 13 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Biliary reconstruction in living donor liver transplantation with dye injection leakage test and without stent use.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, T; Nishizaki, T; Kishikawa, K; Nomoto, K; Uchiyama, H; Ohta, R; Hiroshige, S; Sugimachi, K

    2001-01-01

    Biliary complication remains a significant source of morbidity and mortality in living donor liver transplantation. From October 1996 to December 1999, 34 patients underwent 35 living donor liver transplantations at Kyushu University Hospital. In the initial twenty cases, anastomotic internal stents were placed. In the most recent fifteen cases, no internal stent was inserted and routine postreconstruction dye injection leakage tests were administered. In recipient biliary reconstruction, hepaticojejunostomy was performed using interrupted sutures without an anastomotic stent. After an intestinal clamp was applied at the anal side of the hepaticojejunostomy, leakage test was done using diluted indigocarmine solution injected into the jejunal loop lumen. Two (13%) of the fifteen recent patients suffered from biliary complications, whereas eight patients (40%) from the former twenty patients suffered from biliary complications. We conclude that the use of the stent was not useful, but the application of the dye injection leakage test was useful.

  6. Analysis of the response of the Raft River monitor wells to the 1979 injection tests

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, S.G.; Callan, D.M.

    1980-09-01

    The geothermal resource for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Raft River Geothermal 5 MWe Power Project is located in a closed ground water basin in southcentral Idaho. Chemical analyses indicate the existence of natural communication along fractures between the geothermal reservoir and the shallower aquifers developed for irrigation. Much of the ground water that is presently used for irrigation is of poor quality. Injection of geothermal fluids at intermediate depths may increase communication between the reservoir and the aquifer, resulting in further degradation of shallow ground water quality over time. Seven monitor wells, ranging in depth from 150 m to 400 m, were drilled to evaluate the potential for this degradation. Monitoring of these wells during two 21-day injection tests at the Raft River Geothermal Injection Well-6 (RRGI-6) indicates two types of response in the shallow aquifer system. First, the water level in Monitor Well-4 (MW-4) increased an average of 0.4 m/week during injection, indicating direct fracture connection between the injection zone and the aquifer penetrated by MW-4. Second, water levels in MW-5, MW-6, and MW-7 showed a step function decrease which coincided with the period of the injection tests. Analyses indicate that this response may be caused by elastic deformation in the aquifer matrix.

  7. Dexamethasone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Dexamethasone injection is used to treat severe allergic reactions. It is used in the management of certain types of ... gastrointestinal disease, and certain types of arthritis. Dexamethasone injection is also used for diagnostic testing. Dexamethasone injection ...

  8. Internal Technical Report, Hydrothermal Injection Program - East Mesa 1983-84 Test Data

    SciTech Connect

    Freiburger, R.M.

    1984-09-01

    This report presents a test data index and a data plots for a series of 12 drawdown and tracer injection-withdrawal tests in porous-media aquifers at the East Mesa Geothermal Field located in the Imperial Valley near El Centro, California. Test and instrumentation summaries are also provided. The first 10 of these tests were completed during July and August 1983. The remaining 2 tests were completed in February 1984, after a 6-month quiescent period, in which tracers were left in the reservoir. The test wells used were 56-30 and 56-19, with 38-30 supplying water for the injection phase and 52-29 used as a disposal well during the backflowing of the test wells. Six other wells in the surrounding area were measured periodically for possible hydrologic effects during testing. It is not the intent of this report to supply analyzed data, but to list the uninterpreted computer stored data available for analysis. The data have been examined only to the extent to ensure that they are reasonable and internally consistent. This data is stored on permanent files at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Cyber Computer Complex. The main processors for this complex are located at the Computer Science Center (CSC) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The Hydrothermal Injection Test program, funded by the Department of Energy, was a joint effort between EG and G Idaho, Inc., the University of Utah Research Institute (UURI) and Republic Geothermal, Inc. (RGI) of Santa Fe Springs, California.

  9. Test beam results with a sampling calorimeter of cerium fluoride scintillating crystals and tungsten absorber plates for calorimetry at the HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, R.; Dissertori, G.; Djambazov, L.; Donegà, M.; Dröge, M.; Haller, C.; Horisberger, U.; Lustermann, W.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Quittnat, M.; Pandolfi, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Cavallari, F.; Dafinei, I.; Diemoz, M.; D`Imperio, G.; del Re, D.; Gelli, S.; Jorda Lope, C.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nuccetelli, M.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Pellegrino, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Martelli, A.; Monti, V.; Pastrone, N.; Trapani, P. P.; Candelise, V.; Della Ricca, G.

    2016-07-01

    A sampling calorimeter using cerium fluoride scintillating crystals as active material, interleaved with absorber plates made of tungsten, and read out by wavelength-shifting fibres has been tested with high-energy electron beams at the CERN SPS H4 beam line, as well as with lower-energy beams at the INFN Frascati Beam Test Facility in Italy. Energy resolution studies revealed a low stochastic term (< 10 % /√{ E }). This result, combined with high radiation hardness of the material used, marks this sampling calorimeter as a good candidate for the detectors' forward regions during the high luminosity phase of LHC.

  10. LHC Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-07-28

    The LHC is the world’s highest energy particle accelerator and scientists use it to record an unprecedented amount of data. This data is recorded in electronic format and it requires an enormous computational infrastructure to convert the raw data into conclusions about the fundamental rules that govern matter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln gives us a sense of just how much data is involved and the incredible computer resources that makes it all possible.

  11. Treatability Test Plan for 300 Area Uranium Stabilization through Polyphosphate Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Williams, Mark D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Williams, Bruce A.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2007-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has initiated a study into possible options for stabilizing uranium at the 300 Area using polyphosphate injection. As part of this effort, PNNL will perform bench- and field-scale treatability testing designed to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to reduced uranium concentrations in the groundwater to meet drinking water standards (30 ug/L) in situ. This technology works by forming phosphate minerals (autunite and apatite) in the aquifer that directly sequester the existing aqueous uranium in autunite minerals and precipitates apatite minerals for sorption and long term treatment of uranium migrating into the treatment zone, thus reducing current and future aqueous uranium concentrations. Polyphosphate injection was selected for testing based on technology screening as part of the 300-FF-5 Phase III Feasibility Study for treatment of uranium in the 300-Area.

  12. Leak injection/detection input for B and W prototype steam generator test request

    SciTech Connect

    1980-11-18

    The goal of the leak injection/detection phase of the test program on the prototype steam generator is to obtain data that can be used to specify the leak protection system for the plant unit steam generators. Both chemical and two acoustic leak detection methods (by GE and Rockwell International) are to be considered. The chemical system has been selected as the reference based on its more developed state. The acoustic methods have potential both as small leak detection systems and as intermediate leak protection/automatic shutdown systems. Simulated leak injections will be made at various locations within the steam generator to determine the performance of the chemical system as specifically applied to the B and W helical coil steam generator geometry. Acoustic tests will be made to characterize the various steam generator background noise sources and to record acoustic signals during smulated leak injections, in order to predict the performance of both systems.

  13. A field test of a waste containment technology using a new generation of injectable barrier liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.; Apps, J.; Persoff, P.; Myer, L.; Muller, S.; Pruess, K.; Yen, P.

    1996-08-01

    A first stage field injection of a new generation of barrier liquids was successfully completed. Two types of barrier liquids, colloidal silica (CS) and polysiloxane (PSX), were injected into heterogeneous unsaturated deposits of sand, silt, and gravel typical of many of the arid DOE cleanup sites and particularly analogous to the conditions of the Hanford Site. Successful injection by commercially available chemical grouting equipment and the tube-a-manchette technique was demonstrated. Excavation of the grout bulbs permitted visual evaluation of the soil permeation by the grout, as well as sample collection. Both grouts effectively permeated all of the formation. The PSX visually appeared to perform better, producing a more uniform and symmetric permeation regardless of heterogeneity, filling large as well as small pores and providing more structural strength than the CS. Numerical simulation of the injection tests incorporated a stochastic field to represent site heterogeneity and was able to replicate the general test behavior. Tiltmeters were used successfully to monitor surface displacements during grout injection.

  14. TEST DESIGN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) OF ADD-ON NOX CONTROL UTILIZING OZONE INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the test design for environmental technology verification (ETV) of add-0n nitrogen oxides (NOx) control utilizing ozone injection. (NOTE: ETV is an EPA-established program to enhance domestic and international market acceptance of new or improved commercially...

  15. Somatosensory temporal discrimination tested in patients receiving botulinum toxin injection for cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Scontrini, Alessandra; Conte, Antonella; Fabbrini, Giovanni; Colosimo, Carlo; Di Stasio, Flavio; Ferrazzano, Gina; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2011-03-01

    We designed this study to find out more about the relationship between the sensory effects of Botulinum toxin type A (BTX) and the clinical benefits of BTX therapy in patients with cervical dystonia (CD). In 24 patients with CD, we tested sensory temporal discrimination (STD) in the affected and two unaffected body regions (neck, hand, and eye) before and 1 month after BTX injection. In 8 out of the 24 patients with CD, STDT values were tested bilaterally in the three body regions before, 1 and 2 months after BTX injection. As expected, STD testing disclosed altered STD threshold values in all three body regions tested (affected and unaffected by dystonic spasms) in patients with CD. STD threshold values remained unchanged at all time points of the follow-up in all CD patients. The lack of BTX-induced effects on STD thresholds suggests that STD recruits neural structures uninvolved in muscle spindle afferent activation.

  16. CO2 Injection Test in a Shallow Aquifer: Monitoring via Use of Different Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamert, H.; Dietrich, P.; Werban, U.; Steinbrueckner, D.; Schulz, A.; Peter, A.; Grossmann, J.; Beyer, M.

    2011-12-01

    A promising tool for the reduction of CO2 emissions into the atmosphere is CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage). However, the availability of efficient methods for the detection and monitoring of potential CO2 degassing is a prerequisite for CO2 sequestration as well as for the public acceptance of this controversially discussed technology in general. Before implementing the CCS technology, a sound risk assessment and monitoring strategy is absolutely necessary. The aim of the project is to emulate a CO2 leakage scenario by injecting gaseous CO2 into a shallow aquifer. This field study was performed at a former military air field over a period of ten days in March and April 2011. One of the main objectives is to develop and test different monitoring methods applied to controlled CO2 intrusion in a shallow groundwater system. Thirty-four installed monitoring wells, predominantly oriented to the main groundwater flow direction, allow the sampling of groundwater during the injection test. Gaseous CO2 injection into the groundwater causes increasing electric resistivity. The subsequent dissolution and dissociation processes lead, in general, to decreasing pH and increasing electric conductivity. Installed wells were equipped with electrodes at different depths to detect changes in electric resistivity in the underground. Initial results show significant breakthrough curves of the electric resistivity signal affected by the injected CO2. Groundwater samples were taken before, during and after the injection test to validate these data. Field parameters (pH, electric conductivity) and stable isotope data were compared with the measured geoelectric data. Thus, the electric resistivity changes can be clearly related to the geochemically changed groundwater caused by the injected CO2.

  17. Superposition well-test method for reservoir characterization and pressure management during CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    As a significant fraction of a carbon storage project's budget is devoted to site characterization and monitoring, there has been an intense drive in recent years to both lower cost and improve the quality of data obtained. Two data streams that are cheap and always available are pressure and flow rate measurements from the injection well. Falloff testing, in which the well is shut-in for some period of time and the pressure decline curve measured, is often used to probe the storage zone and look for indications of hydraulic barriers, fracture-dominated flow, and other reservoir characteristics. These tests can be used to monitor many hydromechanical processes of interest, including hydraulic fracturing and fault reactivation. Unfortunately, the length of the shut-in period controls how far away from the injector information may be obtained. For operational reasons these tests are typically kept short and infrequent, limiting their usefulness. In this work, we present a new analysis method in which ongoing injection data is used to reconstruct an equivalent falloff test, without shutting in the well. The entire history of injection may therefore be used as a stand in for a very long test. The method relies upon a simple superposition principle to transform a multi-rate injection sequence into an equivalent single-rate process. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method using injection data from the Snøhvit storage project. We also explore its utility in an active pressure management scenario. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Flow in a discrete slotted nozzle with massive injection. [water table tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine the effect of massive wall injection on the flow characteristics in a slotted nozzle. Some of the experiments were performed on a water table with a slotted-nozzle test section. This has 45 deg and 15 deg half angles of convergence and divergence, respectively, throat radius of 2.5 inches, and throat width of 3 inches. The hydraulic analogy was employed to qualitatively extend the results to a compressible gas flow through the nozzle. Experimental results from the water table include contours of constant Froude and Mach number with and without injection. Photographic results are also presented for the injection through slots of CO2 and Freon-12 into a main-stream air flow in a convergent-divergent nozzle in a wind tunnel. Schlieren photographs were used to visualize the flow, and qualititative agreement between the results from the gas tunnel and water table is good.

  19. Solute transport characterization in karst aquifers by tracer injection tests for a sustainable water resource management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, T.; Angulo, B.; Uriarte, J. A.; Olazar, M.; Arandes, J. M.; Antiguedad, I.

    2017-04-01

    Protection of water resources is a major challenge today, given that territory occupation and land use are continuously increasing. In the case of karst aquifers, its dynamic complexity requires the use of specific methodologies that allow establishing local and regional flow and transport patterns. This information is particularly necessary when springs and wells harnessed for water supply are concerned. In view of the present state of the art, this work shows a new approach based on the use of a LiCl based tracer injection test through a borehole for transport characterization from a local to a regional scale. Thus a long term tracer injection test was conducted in a particularly sensitive sector of the Egino karst massif (Basque Country, Spain). The initial displacement of tracer in the vicinity of the injection was monitored in a second borehole at a radial distance of 10.24 m. This first information, assessed by a radial divergent model, allows obtaining transport characteristic parameters in this immediate vicinity during injection. At a larger (regional) scale, the tracer reaches a highly transmissive network with mean traveling velocities to the main springs being from 4.3 to 13.7 m/h. The responses obtained, particularly clear in the main spring used for water supply, and the persistence of part of the tracer in the injection zone, pose reconsidering the need for their protection. Thus, although the test allows establishing the 24-h isochrone, which is the ceiling value in present European vulnerability approaches, the results obtained advise widening the zone to protect in order to guarantee water quality in the springs. Overall, this stimulus-response test allows furthering the knowledge on the dynamics of solute transport in karst aquifers and is a particularly useful tool in studies related to source vulnerability and protection in such a complex medium.

  20. Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology

    SciTech Connect

    Felix, L.G.; Dismukes, E.B.; Gooch, J.P. ); Klett, M.G.; Demian, A.G. )

    1992-04-20

    This Topical Report No. 2 is an interim report on the Duct Injection Test Facility being operated for the Department of Energy at Beverly, Ohio. Either dry calcium hydroxide or an aqueous slurry of calcium hydroxide (prepared by slaking quicklime) is injected into a slipstream of flue gas to achieve partial removal of SO{sub 2} from a coal-burning power station. Water injected with the slurry or injected separately from the dry sorbents cools the flue gas and increases the water vapor content of the gas. The addition of water, either in the slurry or in a separate spray, makes the extent of reaction between the sorbent and the SO{sub 2} more complete; the presumption is that water is effective in the liquid state, when it is able to wet the sorbent particles physically, and not especially effective in the vapor state. An electrostatic precipitator collects the combination of suspended solids (fly ash from the boiler and sorbent from the duct injection process). All of the operations are being carried out on the scale of approximately 50,000 acfm of flue gas.

  1. LHC Computing

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The LHC is the world’s highest energy particle accelerator and scientists use it to record an unprecedented amount of data. This data is recorded in electronic format and it requires an enormous computational infrastructure to convert the raw data into conclusions about the fundamental rules that govern matter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln gives us a sense of just how much data is involved and the incredible computer resources that makes it all possible.

  2. In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Serrato, M. G.

    2013-09-27

    located at the Florida International University Applied Research Center, Miami, FL (FIU-ARC). A follow-on fluid injection test was developed to detect fluid and ion migration in a cementitious material/grouted test cube using a limited number of existing embedded sensor systems. This In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed (ISDSN-MSTB) - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report summarizes the test implementation, acquired and processed data, and results from the activated embedded sensor systems used during the fluid injection test. The ISDSN-MSTB Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test was conducted from August 27 through September 6, 2013 at the FIU-ARC ISDSN-MSTB test cube. The fluid injection test activated a portion of the existing embedded sensor systems in the ISDSN-MSTB test cube: Electrical Resistivity Tomography-Thermocouple Sensor Arrays, Advance Tensiometer Sensors, and Fiber Loop Ringdown Optical Sensors. These embedded sensor systems were activated 15 months after initial placement. All sensor systems were remotely operated and data acquisition was completed through the established Sensor Remote Access System (SRAS) hosted on the DOE D&D Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D DKM-IT) server. The ISDN Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test successfully demonstrated the feasibility of embedding sensor systems to assess moisture-fluid flow and resulting transport potential for contaminate mobility through a cementitious material/grout monolith. The ISDSN embedded sensor systems activated for the fluid injection test highlighted the robustness of the sensor systems and the importance of configuring systems in-depth (i.e., complementary sensors and measurements) to alleviate data acquisition gaps.

  3. Development of batch injection analysis for electrochemical measurements of trace metal ions in ecotoxicological test media.

    PubMed

    Brett, C M; Morgado, J M

    2000-01-01

    Batch injection analysis with square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry has been developed as a powerful and rapid technique for obtaining data on the concentration of the fraction of labile metal ions present in media used in ecotoxicological tests. Microlitre samples of solution, without pretreatment, are injected directly over a detector electrode, the surface of which is protected by a thin Nafion polymer coating against irreversible adsorption by organic components. Examples are given showing the effect of adding vitamins and organic extract, singly and together, to the ASTM medium employed for tests using Daphnia magna and with lead and cadmium test ions. Such a methodology can be extended to other electroactive species present in these and similar media.

  4. Planning and Analysis of Fractured Rock Injection Tests in the Cerro Brillador Underground Laboratory, Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairley, J. P., Jr.; Oyarzún L, R.; Villegas, G.

    2015-12-01

    Early theories of fluid migration in unsaturated fractured rock hypothesized that matrix suction would dominate flow up to the point of matrix saturation. However, experiments in underground laboratories such as the ESF (Yucca Mountain, NV) have demonstrated that liquid water can migrate significant distances through fractures in an unsaturated porous medium, suggesting limited interaction between fractures and unsaturated matrix blocks and potentially rapid transmission of recharge to the sat- urated zone. Determining the conditions under which this rapid recharge may take place is an important factor in understanding deep percolation processes in arid areas with thick unsaturated zones. As part of an on-going, Fondecyt-funded project (award 11150587) to study mountain block hydrological processes in arid regions, we are plan- ning a series of in-situ fracture flow injection tests in the Cerro Brillador/Mina Escuela, an underground laboratory and teaching facility belonging to the Universidad la Serena, Chile. Planning for the tests is based on an analytical model and curve-matching method, originally developed to evaluate data from injection tests at Yucca Mountain (Fairley, J.P., 2010, WRR 46:W08542), that uses a known rate of liquid injection to a fracture (for example, from a packed-off section of borehole) and the observed rate of seepage discharging from the fracture to estimate effective fracture aperture, matrix sorptivity, fracture/matrix flow partitioning, and the wetted fracture/matrix interac- tion area between the injection and recovery points. We briefly review the analytical approach and its application to test planning and analysis, and describe the proposed tests and their goals.

  5. Flow Simulation of Solid Rocket Motors. 1; Injection Induced Water-Flow Tests from Porous Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Yeh, Y. P.; Smith, A. W.; Heaman, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    Prior to selecting a proper porous material for use in simulating the internal port flow of a solid rocket motor (SRM), in cold-flow testing, the flow emerging from porous materials is experimentally investigated. The injection-flow emerging from a porous matrix always exhibits a lumpy velocity profile that is spatially stable and affects the development of the longitudinal port flow. This flow instability, termed pseudoturbulence, is an inherent signature of the porous matrix and is found to generally increase with the wall porosity and with the injection flow rate. Visualization studies further show that the flow from porous walls made from shaving-type material (sintered stainless-steel) exhibits strong recirculation zones that are conspicuously absent in walls made from nodular or spherical material (sintered bronze). Detailed flow visualization observations and hot-film measurements are reported from tests of injection-flow and a coupled cross-flow from different porous wall materials. Based on the experimental data, discussion is provided on the choice of suitable material for SRM model testing while addressing the consequences and shortcomings from such a test.

  6. On the Design and Test of a Liquid Injection Electric Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Kenney, J. T.; Youmans, E. H.

    1973-01-01

    A liquid injection electric thruster (LINJET) was designed and tested. The results of the tests were very encouraging with thruster performance levels well in excess of design goals. Supporting activities to the engine design and test included a five-million pulse life test on the main capacitor, a 46-million pulse test on the trigger electronics, design and fabrication of a zero resistance torque connector for use with the torsional pendulum thrust stand, design and fabrication of a logic box for control of engine firing, and a physical and chemical properties characterization of the perfluorocarbon propellant. While the results were encouraging, testing was limited, as many problems existed with the design. The most significant problem was involved with excessive propellant flow which contributed to false triggering and shorting. Low power active thermal control of the propellant storage cavity, coupled with a re-evaluation of the injection ring pore size and area exposed to the main capacitor discharge are areas that should be investigated should this design be carried forward.

  7. LHC crab-cavity aspects and strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Zimmermann, F.

    2010-05-23

    The 3rd LHC Crab Cavity workshop (LHC-CC09) took place at CERN in October 2009. It reviewed the current status and identified a clear strategy towards a future crab-cavity implementation. Following the success of crab cavities in KEK-B and the strong potential for luminosity gain and leveling, CERN will pursue crab crossing for the LHC upgrade. We present a summary and outcome of the variousworkshop sessions which have led to the LHC crab-cavity strategy, covering topics like layout, cavity design, integration, machine protection, and a potential validation test in the SPS.

  8. In Situ Redox Manipulation Field Injection Test Report - Hanford 100-H Area

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchter, J.S.; Amonette, J.E.; Cole, C.R.

    1996-11-01

    This report presents results of an In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Field Injection Withdrawal Test performed at the 100-H Area of the US. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site in Washington State in Fiscal Year 1996 by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The test is part of the overall ISRM project, the purpose of which is to determine the potential for remediating contaminated groundwater with a technology based on in situ manipulation of subsurface reduction-oxidation (redox) conditions. The ISRM technology would be used to treat subsurface contaminants in groundwater zones at DOE sites.

  9. EXPERIMENTAL TARGET INJECTION AND TRACKING SYSTEM CONSTRUCTION AND SINGLE SHOT TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    PETZOLDT,R.W; ALEXANDER,N.B; DRAKE,T.J; GOODIN,D.T; JONESTRACK,K; VERMILLION,B.A

    2003-09-01

    Targets must be injected into an IFE power plant at a rate of approximately 5 to 10 Hz. Targets must be tracked very accurately to allow driver beams to be aligned with defined points on the targets with accuracy {+-} 150 {micro}m for indirect drive and {+-} 20 {micro}m for direct drive. An experimental target injection and tracking system has been constructed at General Atomics. The injector system will be used as a tool for testing the survivability of various target designs and provide feedback to the target designers. Helium gas propels the targets down an 8 m gun barrel up to 400 m/s. Direct-drive targets are protected in the barrel by sabots that are spring loaded to separate into two halves after acceleration. A sabot deflector directs the sabot halves away from the target injection path. Targets will be optically tracked with laser beams and line-scan cameras. Target position and arrival time will be predicted in real time based on early target position measurements. The system installation will be described. System testing to overcome excessive projectile wear and debris in the gun barrel is presented.

  10. People who Inject Drugs, HIV Risk, and HIV Testing Uptake in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Asher, Alice K.; Hahn, Judith A.; Couture, Marie-Claude; Maher, Kelsey; Page, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    Dramatic rises in injection drug use (IDU) in sub-Saharan Africa account for increasingly more infections in a region already overwhelmed by the HIV epidemic. There is no known estimate of the number of people who inject drugs (PWID) in the region, or the associated HIV prevalence in PWID. We reviewed literature with the goal of describing high-risk practices and exposures in PWID in sub-Saharan Africa, as well as current HIV prevention activities aimed at drug use. The literature search looked for articles related to HIV risk, injection drug users, stigma, and HIV testing in sub-Saharan Africa. This review found evidence demonstrating high rates of HIV in IDU populations in sub-Saharan Africa, high-risk behaviors of the populations, lack of knowledge regarding HIV, and low HIV testing uptake. There is an urgent need for action to address IDU in order to maintain recent decreases in the spread of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:23164598

  11. Re-evaluation of a subsurface injection experiment for testing flow and transport models

    SciTech Connect

    Fayer, M.J.; Lewis, R.E.; Engelman, R.E.; Pearson, A.L.; Murray, C.J.; Smoot, J.L. Lu, A.H.; Randall, P.R.; Wegener, W.H.

    1995-12-01

    The current preferred method for disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Hanford Site is to vitrify the wastes so they can be stored in a near-surface, shallow-land burial facility (Shord 1995). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) managed the PNL Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to assist Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in designing and assessing the performance of a disposal facility for the vitrified LLW. Vadose zone flow and transport models are recognized as necessary tools for baseline risk assessments of stored waste forms. The objective of the Controlled Field Testing task of the PVTD Project is to perform and analyze field experiments to demonstrate the appropriateness of conceptual models for the performance assessment. The most convincing way to demonstrate appropriateness is to show that the model can reproduce the movement of water and contaminants in the field. Before expensive new experiments are initiated, an injection experiment conducted at the Hanford Site in 1980 (designated the ``Sisson and the Lu experiment``) should be completely analyzed and understood. Briefly, in that test, a solution containing multiple tracers was injected at a single point into the subsurface sediments. The resulting spread of the water and tracers was monitored in wells surrounding the injection point. Given the advances in knowledge, computational capabilities, and models over the last 15 years, it is important to re-analyze the data before proceeding to other experiments and history-matching exercises.

  12. Assembly Tests of the First Nb 3 Sn Low-Beta Quadrupole Short Model for the Hi-Lumi LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, H.; Felice, H.; Cheng, D. W.; Anderssen, E.; Ambrosio, G.; Perez, J. C.; Juchno, M.; Ferracin, P.; Prestemon, S. O.

    2016-01-18

    In preparation for the high-luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) in collaboration with CERN is pursuing the development of MQXF: a 150-mm-aperture high-field Nb3Sn quadrupole magnet. Moreover, the development phase starts with the fabrication and test of several short models (1.2-m magnetic length) and will continue with the development of several long prototypes. All of them are mechanically supported using a shell-based support structure, which has been extensively demonstrated on several R&D models within LARP. The first short model MQXFS-AT has been assembled at LBNL with coils fabricated by LARP and CERN. In our paper, we summarize the assembly process and show how it relies strongly on experience acquired during the LARP 120-mm-aperture HQ magnet series. We also present comparison between strain gauges data and finite-element model analysis. Finally, we present the implication of the MQXFS-AT experience on the design of the long prototype support structure.

  13. Design, simulation, fabrication, and preliminary tests of 3D CMS pixel detectors for the super-LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Koybasi, Ozhan; Bortoletto, Daniela; Hansen, Thor-Erik; Kok, Angela; Hansen, Trond Andreas; Lietaer, Nicolas; Jensen, Geir Uri; Summanwar, Anand; Bolla, Gino; Kwan, Simon Wing Lok; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The Super-LHC upgrade puts strong demands on the radiation hardness of the innermost tracking detectors of the CMS, which cannot be fulfilled with any conventional planar detector design. The so-called 3D detector architectures, which feature columnar electrodes passing through the substrate thickness, are under investigation as a potential solution for the closest operation points to the beams, where the radiation fluence is estimated to reach 10{sup 16} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}. Two different 3D detector designs with CMS pixel readout electronics are being developed and evaluated for their advantages and drawbacks. The fabrication of full-3D active edge CMS pixel devices with p-type substrate has been successfully completed at SINTEF. In this paper, we study the expected post-irradiation behaviors of these devices with simulations and, after a brief description of their fabrication, we report the first leakage current measurement results as performed on wafer.

  14. Halo-independent tests of dark matter direct detection signals: local DM density, LHC, and thermal freeze-out

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Herrero-Garcia, Juan; Schwetz, Thomas; Vogl, Stefan E-mail: juhg@kth.se E-mail: stefan.vogl@fysik.su.se

    2015-08-01

    From an assumed signal in a Dark Matter (DM) direct detection experiment a lower bound on the product of the DM-nucleon scattering cross section and the local DM density is derived, which is independent of the local DM velocity distribution. This can be combined with astrophysical determinations of the local DM density. Within a given particle physics model the bound also allows a robust comparison of a direct detection signal with limits from the LHC. Furthermore, the bound can be used to formulate a condition which has to be fulfilled if the particle responsible for the direct detection signal is a thermal relic, regardless of whether it constitutes all DM or only part of it. We illustrate the arguments by adopting a simplified DM model with a Z' mediator and assuming a signal in a future xenon direct detection experiment.

  15. Halo-independent tests of dark matter direct detection signals: local DM density, LHC, and thermal freeze-out

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Herrero-Garcia, Juan; Schwetz, Thomas; Vogl, Stefan

    2015-08-19

    From an assumed signal in a Dark Matter (DM) direct detection experiment a lower bound on the product of the DM-nucleon scattering cross section and the local DM density is derived, which is independent of the local DM velocity distribution. This can be combined with astrophysical determinations of the local DM density. Within a given particle physics model the bound also allows a robust comparison of a direct detection signal with limits from the LHC. Furthermore, the bound can be used to formulate a condition which has to be fulfilled if the particle responsible for the direct detection signal is a thermal relic, regardless of whether it constitutes all DM or only part of it. We illustrate the arguments by adopting a simplified DM model with a Z{sup ′} mediator and assuming a signal in a future xenon direct detection experiment.

  16. Cyanocobalamin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Cyanocobalamin injection is used to treat and prevent a lack of vitamin B12 that may be caused by any ... organs) and permanent damage to the nerves. Cyanocobalamin injection also may be given as a test to ...

  17. Methylprednisolone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... allergic reactions. Methylprednisolone injection is used in the management of multiple sclerosis (a disease in which the ... laboratory test, tell your doctor and the laboratory personnel that you are using methylprednisolone injection.If you ...

  18. EMISSION TEST REPORT, OMSS FIELD TEST ON CARBON INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses results of a parametric evaluation of powdered activated carbon for control of mercury (Hg) emission from a municipal waste cornbustor (MWC) equipped with a lime spray dryer absorber/fabric filter (SD/FF). The primary test objectives were to evaluate the effe...

  19. The dependence of permeability on effective stress for an injection test in the Higashi-Hachimantai Geothermal Field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, M.

    2000-01-01

    A simple inverse-power relation for the influence of effective stress on permeability is used to explain the flow behavior during an injection test at the Higashi-Hachimantai geothermal field, Japan. The new analytical expression successfully models data from the experiment involving high-pressure injection and monitoring at an observation well.

  20. Theory - LHC Phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, Stefania

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider marks the culmination of a decades-long hunt for the last ingredient of the Standard Model. At the same time, there are still many puzzles in particle physics, foremost the existence of a relatively light Higgs boson, seemingly without any extra weak scale particles that would stabilize the Higgs mass against quantum corrections, and the existence of Dark Matter. This talk will give an overview of the most interesting theories that address these problems and how to test these theories at the LHC.

  1. Use of the injection test to indicate the oesophageal balloon position in patients without spontaneous breathing: a clinical feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han; Yang, Yan-Lin; Xu, Ming; Shi, Zhong-Hua; He, Xuan; Sun, Xiu-Mei; Luo, Xu-Ying; Chen, Guang-Qiang; Zhou, Jian-Xin

    2017-02-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical feasibility of the injection test for balloon placement during oesophageal pressure measurement in patients without spontaneous breathing. Methods The injection test was performed in 12 mechanically ventilated patients under deep sedation and paralysis. During withdrawal of the balloon from the stomach and air injection into the gastric lumen of the catheter, the presence of the injection test wave in the balloon pressure tracing indicated that the whole balloon was positioned above the lower oesophageal sphincter (LES). The positive pressure occlusion test was performed at different balloon positions. Results In each patient, the injection test wave appeared at a distinct balloon depth, with a mean ± standard deviation of 41.9 ± 3.3 cm and range from 37 cm to 47 cm. The optimal ratio of changes in the balloon and airway pressure (0.8-1.2) during the positive pressure occlusion test was obtained when the balloon was located 5 cm and 10 cm above the LES in nine (75%) and three (25%) patients, respectively. Conclusions The injection test is feasible for identification of the whole balloon position above the LES during passive ventilation. The middle third of the oesophagus might be the optimal balloon position.

  2. FIELD TEST PROGRAM FOR EVALUATION OF SORBENT INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Sharon Sjostrom

    2004-02-12

    The power industry in the U.S. is faced with meeting new regulations to reduce the emissions of mercury compounds from coal-fired plants. These regulations are directed at the existing fleet of nearly 1,100 boilers. These plants are relatively old with an average age of over 40 years. Although most of these units are capable of operating for many additional years, there is a desire to minimize large capital expenditures because of the reduced (and unknown) remaining life of the plant to amortize the project. Injecting a sorbent such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. The overall objective of this test program described in this quarterly report is to evaluate the capabilities of activated carbon injection at four plants with configurations that together represent 78% of the existing coal-fired generation plants. This technology was successfully evaluated in NETL's Phase I tests at scales up to 150 MW, on plants burning subbituminous and bituminous coals and with ESPs and fabric filters. The tests also identified issues that still need to be addressed, such as evaluating performance on other configurations, optimizing sorbent usage (costs), and gathering longer term operating data to address concerns about the impact of activated carbon on plant equipment and operations. The four sites identified for testing are Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station, AmerenUE's Meramec Station, AEP's Conesville Station, and Ontario Power Generation's Nanticoke Station. This is the first quarterly report for this project. This report includes an overview of the plans for the project. Field testing is scheduled to begin next quarter. In general, quarterly reports will be used to provide project overviews, project status, and technology transfer information. Topical reports will be prepared to present detailed technical information.

  3. Test results of a steam injected gas turbine to increase power and thermal efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Messerlie, R.L.; Tischler, A.O.

    1983-08-01

    The desire to increase both power and thermal efficiency of the gas turbine (Brayton cycle) engine has been pursued for a number of years and has involved many approaches. The use of steam in the cycle to improve performance has been proposed by various investigators. This was most recently proposed by International Power Technology, Inc. (IPT) and has been tested by Detroit Diesel Allison (DDA), Division of General Motors. This approach, identified as the Cheng dual-fluid cycle (Cheng/DFC), includes the generation of steam using heat from the exhaust, and injecting this steam into the engine combustion chamber. Test results on an Allison 501-KB engine have demonstrated that use of this concept will increase the thermal efficiency of the engine by 30% and the output power by 60% with no increase in turbine inlet temperature. These results will be discussed, as will the impact of steam rate, location of steam injection, turbine temperature, and engine operational characteristics on the performance of the Cheng/DFC.

  4. Injectable Chitosan/β-Glycerophosphate System for Sustained Release: Gelation Study, Structural Investigation, and Erosion Tests.

    PubMed

    Dalmoro, Annalisa; Abrami, Michela; Galzerano, Barbara; Bochicchio, Sabrina; Barba, Anna Angela; Grassi, Mario; Larobina, Domenico

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogels can constitute reliable delivery systems of drugs, including those based on nucleic acids (NABDs) such as small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA). Their nature, structure, and response to physiological or external stimuli strongly influence the delivery mechanisms of entrapped active molecules, and, in turn, their possible uses in pharmacological and biomedical applications. In this study, a thermo-gelling chitosan/β-glycero-phosphate system has been optimized in order to assess its use as injectable system able to: i) gelling at physiological pH and temperature, and ii) modulate the release of included active ingredients. To this aim, we first analyzed the effect of acetic acid concentration on the gelation temperature. We then found the "optimized composition", namely, the one in which the Tgel is equal to the physiological temperature. The resulting gel was tested, by low field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR), to evaluate its average mesh-size, which can affect release kinetics of loaded drug. Finally, films of gelled chitosan, loaded with a model drug, have been tested in vitro to monitor their characteristic times, i.e. diffusion and erosion time, when they are exposed to a medium mimicking a physiological environment (buffer solution at pH 7.4). Results display that the optimized system is deemed to be an ideal candidate as injectable gelling material for a sustained release.

  5. Seismic monitoring of the June, 1988 Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program flow/injection test

    SciTech Connect

    Jarpe, S.P.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Hutchings, L.J.; Hauk, T.F.

    1988-10-04

    The purpose of the seismic monitoring project was to characterize in detail the micro-seismic activity related to the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program (SSSDP) flow-injection test in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. Our goal was to determine if any sources of seismic energy related to the test were observable at the surface. We deployed our recording stations so that we could detect and locate both impulsive microearthquakes and continuous seismic noise energy. Our network, which was sensitive enough to be triggered by magnitude 0.0 or larger events, found no impulsive microearthquakes in the vicinity of the flow test in the 8 month period before the test and only one event during the flow test. This event has provided the opportunity to compare the detection and location capabilities of small networks and arrays in a geothermal environment. At present, we are carefully scanning all of the data that we collected during the flow test for evidence of anomalous seismic noise sources and for impulsive events smaller than the network detection threshold (magnitude 0.0). 8 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology. Final report, Task 4.5

    SciTech Connect

    Felix, L.G.; Gooch, J.P.; Merritt, R.L.; Klett, M.G.; Demian, A.G.; Hunt, J.E.

    1992-10-30

    DOE`s Duct Injection Test Facility at Ohio Power Company`s Muskingum River Plant was modified to enable performance of a comprehensive test program concerning duct injection of sorbents for SO{sub 2} control. Injection of slaked lime slurries and injection of dry calcium hydroxide powder with humidification were carried out under a variety of process conditions. Slaked lime slurry injection as found to be superior in both operational reliability and S0{sub 2} removal capability compared with dry hydrated lime injection with humidification. Calcium utilization of 50% was achieved with 50% S0{sub 2} removal at the ESP outlet with recycle of unreacted sorbent collected in the precipitatorhoppers. Electrostatic precipitator collection performance was found to be highly variable with sorbent injection, especially with close approach to saturation temperatures and high inlet mass loadings. Small-scale tests with a fabric filter in parallel with the precipitator indicated 5 to 10% more S0{sub 2} removal could be obtained across the fabric filter than the ESP for all test conditions. Over 95% S0{sub 2} removal was achieved with the fabric filter using a two stage cooling process in which the filter was cooled below the operating temperature ofthe duct spray dryer.

  7. Application of the BacT/ALERTR 3D system for sterility testing of injectable products.

    PubMed

    Bugno, Adriana; Lira, Rodolfo Santos; Oliveira, Wesley Anderson; Almodovar, Adriana Aparecida Buzzo; Saes, Deborah Pita Sanches; Pinto, Terezinha de Jesus Andreoli

    2015-01-01

    Sterility testing as described in the pharmacopoeia compendia requires a 14-day incubation period to obtain an analytical result. Alternative methods that could be applied to evaluating product sterility are especially interesting due to the possibility of reducing this incubation period and thus the associated costs. The aims of this study were to evaluate the performance of the BacT/ALERT(R) 3D system in detecting microorganisms in large-volume parenteral solutions that were intentionally contaminated and to compare this system to pharmacopoeia sterility testing using the membrane filtration method. The results indicated that there were no significant differences between the methods regarding the ability to detect microbial contamination; however, detection with the BacT/ALERT(R) 3D system was faster compared to the pharmacopoeia method. Therefore, the BacT/ALERT(R) 3D system is a viable alternative for assessing the sterility of injectable products.

  8. Application of the BacT/ALERTR 3D system for sterility testing of injectable products

    PubMed Central

    Bugno, Adriana; Lira, Rodolfo Santos; Oliveira, Wesley Anderson; Almodovar, Adriana Aparecida Buzzo; Saes, Deborah Pita Sanches; de Jesus Andreoli Pinto, Terezinha

    2015-01-01

    Sterility testing as described in the pharmacopoeia compendia requires a 14-day incubation period to obtain an analytical result. Alternative methods that could be applied to evaluating product sterility are especially interesting due to the possibility of reducing this incubation period and thus the associated costs. The aims of this study were to evaluate the performance of the BacT/ALERTR 3D system in detecting microorganisms in large-volume parenteral solutions that were intentionally contaminated and to compare this system to pharmacopoeia sterility testing using the membrane filtration method. The results indicated that there were no significant differences between the methods regarding the ability to detect microbial contamination; however, detection with the BacT/ALERTR 3D system was faster compared to the pharmacopoeia method. Therefore, the BacT/ALERTR 3D system is a viable alternative for assessing the sterility of injectable products. PMID:26413055

  9. A self-injection acceleration test experiment for the FLAME laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labate, L.; Anelli, F.; Bacci, A.; Batani, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Benedetti, C.; Benocci, R.; Cacciotti, L.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Ciricosta, O.; Clozza, A.; Cultrera, L.; Di Pirro, G.; Drenska, N.; Faccini, R.; Ferrario, M.; Filippetto, D.; Gallo, S.; Fioravanti, S.; Gamucci, A.; Gatti, G.; Ghigo, A.; Giulietti, A.; Giulietti, D.; Köster, P.; Levato, T.; Lollo, V.; Pace, E.; Pathak, N.; Rossi, A.; Serafini, L.; Turchetti, G.; Vaccarezza, C.; Valente, P.; Vicario, C.; Gizzi, L. A.

    2010-10-01

    A 250-TW laser system (FLAME - Frascati laser for acceleration and multidisciplinary experiments) is now in its commissioning phase in a new laboratory at LNF-INFN in the framework of the PLASMONX (Plasma acceleration and monochromatic X-ray generation) project. The laser will deliver<25 fs duration pulses with an energy up to 6 J, at a 10 Hz repetition rate. An ad hoc target area has also been designed and is currently being set up, allowing the first test experiments of electron laser wakefield acceleration to be carried out over the next few months in a safe, radiation-protected environment. An overview of the main features of the laser system and target area is given, along with a survey of the design and set-up of the self-injection test experiment, which is expected to reach the production of sub-GeV electron bunches.

  10. Types of secondary porosity of carbonate rocks in injection and test wells in southern peninsular Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duerr, A.D.

    1995-01-01

    The types of secondary porosity present in carbonate injection intervals and in the overlying carbonate rocks were determined at 11 injection well sites and 3 test well sites in southern peninsular Florida. The hydrogeologic system consists of a thick sequence of carbonate rocks overlain by clastic deposits. Principal hydrogeologic units are the surficial aquifer system, the intermediate aquifer system or the intermediate confining unit,the Floridan aquifer system, and the sub-Floridan confining unit.The concept of apparent secondary porosity was used in this study because the secondary porosity features observed in a borehole television survey could have been caused by geologic processes as well as by drilling activities. The secondary porosity features identified in a television survey were evaluated using driller's comments and caliper, flowmeter, and temperature logs. Borehole intervals that produced or received detectable amounts of flow, as shown by flowmeter and temperature logs, provided evidence that the secondary porosity of the interval was spatially distributed and interconnected beyond the immediate vicinity of a borehole and, thus, was related to geologic processes. Features associated with interconnected secondary porosity were identified as effective secondary porosity. Fracture porosity was identified as the most common type of effective secondary porosity and was observed predominantly in dolomite and dolomitic limestone. Cavity porosity was the least common type of effective secondary porosity at the study sites. In fact, of the more than 17,500 feet of borehole studied a total of only three cavities constituting effective secondary porosity were identified at only two sites. These cavities were detected in dolomite rocks. Most apparent cavities were caused by drilling-induced collapse of naturally fractured borehole walls. Also, fractures usually were observed above and below cavities. The majority of vugs observed in the television surveys did

  11. Construction and first beam-tests of silicon-tungsten prototype modules for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter for HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, S.

    2017-03-01

    The High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL) is the technology choice of the CMS collaboration for the endcap calorimetry upgrade planned to cope with the harsh radiation and pileup environment at the High Luminosity-LHC . The HGCAL is realized as a sampling calorimeter, including an electromagnetic compartment comprising 28 layers of silicon pad detectors with pad areas of 0.5–01. cm2 interspersed with absorbers made from tungsten and copper to form a highly compact and granular device. Prototype modules, based on hexagonal silicon pad sensors, with 128 channels, have been constructed and tested in beams at FNAL and at CERN. The modules include many of the features required for this challenging detector, including a PCB glued directly to the sensor, using through-hole wire-bonding for signal readout and 5 mm spacing between layers—including the front-end electronics and all services. Tests in 2016 have used an existing front-end chip —Skiroc2 (designed for the CALICE experiment for ILC). We present results from first tests of these modules both in the laboratory and with beams of electrons, pions and protons, including noise performance, calibration with mips and electron signals.

  12. Analysis of tests of subsurface injection, storage, and recovery of freshwater in the lower Floridan aquifer, Okeechobee County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinones-Aponte, Vicente; Kotun, Kevin; Whitley, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    A series of freshwater subsurface injection, storage, and recovery tests were conducted at an injection-well site near Lake Okeechobee in Okeechobee County, Florida, to assess the recoverability of injected canal water from the Lower Floridan aquifer. At the study site, the Lower Floridan aquifer is characterized as having four local, relatively independent, high-permeability flow zones (389 to 398 meters, 419 to 424 meters, 456 to 462 meters, and 472 to 476 meters below sea level). Four subsurface injection, storage, and recovery cycles were performed at the Lake Okeechobee injection-well site in which volumes of water injected ranged from about 387,275 to 1,343,675 cubic meters for all the cycles, and volumes of water recovered ranged from about 106,200 to 484,400 cubic meters for cycles 1, 2, and 3. The recovery efficiency for successive cycles 2 and 3 increased from 22 to 36 percent and is expected to continue increasing with additional cycles. A comparison of chloride concentration breakthrough curves at the deep monitor well (located about 171 meters from the injection well) for cycles 1, 4, and test no. 4 (from a previous study) revealed unexpected finings. One significant result was that the concentration asymptote, expected to be reached at concentration levels equivalent or close to the injected water concentration, was instead reached at higher concentration levels. The injection to recovery rate ratio might affect the chloride concentration breakthrough curve at the deep monitor well, which could explain this unexpected behavior. Because there are four high-permeability zones, if the rate of injection is smaller than the rate of recovery (natural artesian flow), the head differential might not be transmitted through the entire open wellbore, and injected water would probably flow only through the upper high- permeability zones. Therefore, observed chloride concentration values at the deep monitor well would be higher than the concentration of the

  13. Tracer Tests in a Fractured Dolomite: 3. Analysis of Mass Transfer in Single-Well Injection-Withdrawal Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Haggerty, R.; Fleming, S.W.; Meigs, L.C.; McKenna, S.A.

    1999-03-04

    We investigated multiple-rate diffusion as a possible explanation for observed behavior in a suite of single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tests conducted in a fractured dolomite. We first investigated the ability of a conventional double-porosity model and a multirate diffusion model to explain the data. This revealed that the multirate diffusion hypothesis/model is most consistent with all available data, and is the only model to date that is capable of matching each of the recovery curves entirely. Second, we studied the sensitivity of the SWIW recovery curves to the distribution of diffusion rate coefficients and other parameters. We concluded that the SWIW test is very sensitive to the distribution of rate coefficients, but is relatively insensitive to other flow and transport parameters such as advective porosity and dispersivity. Third, we examined the significance of the constant double-log late-time slopes ({minus}2. 1 to {minus}2.8), which are present in several data sets. The observed late-time slopes are significantly different than would be predicted by either conventional double-porosity or single-porosity media, and are found to be a distinctive feature of multirate diffusion under SWIW test conditions. Fourth, we found that the estimated distributions of diffusion rate coefficients are very broad, with the distributions spanning a range of at least 3.6 to 5.7 orders of magnitude.

  14. LHC - a "Why" Facility

    ScienceCinema

    Gordon Kane

    2016-07-12

    The Standard Models of particle physics and cosmology describe the world we see, and how it works, very well. But we want to understand (not just accommodate) much more – how does the Higgs mechanism work, what is the dark matter, why is the universe matter and not antimatter, why is parity violated, why are the particles (quarks and leptons) what they are, and why are the forces that act on them to make our world what they are, and more. Today is an exciting time to be doing particle physics – on the experimental side we have data coming from LHC and dark matter experiments that will provide clues to these questions, and on the theoretical side we have a framework (string theory) that addresses all these “why” questions. LHC data will not qualitatively improve our description – rather, it may provide the data that will allow us to learn about the dark matter, the Higgs physics, the matter asymmetry, etc, to test underlying theories such as string theory, and begin to answer the “why” questions. Supersymmetry is the best motivated discovery, and it would also open a window to the underlying theory near the Planck scale.

  15. Test results of the first 3D-IC prototype chip developed in the framework of HL-LHC/ATLAS hybrid pixel upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pangaud, P.; Arutinov, D.; Barbero, M.; Bompard, F.; Breugnon, P.; Clemens, J.-C.; Fougeron, D.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Godiot, S.; Hemperek, T.; Krüger, H.; Obermann, T.; Rozanov, S.; Wermes, N.

    2014-02-01

    To face new challenges brought by the upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and of the ATLAS pixels detector, for which high spatial resolution, very good signal to noise ratio and high radiation hardness is needed, 3D integrated technologies are investigated. In the years to come, the Large Hadron Collider will be upgraded to Higher Luminosity (HL-LHC). The ATLAS pixel detector needs to handle this new challenging environment. As a consequence, 3D integrated technologies are pursued with the target of offering higher spatial resolution, very good signal to noise ratio and unprecedented radiation hardness. We present here the test results of the first 3D prototype chip developed in the GlobalFoundries 130 nm technology processed by the Tezzaron Company, submitted within the 3D-IC consortium for which a qualification program was developed. Reliability and influence on the behavior of the integrated devices due to the presence of the Bond Interface (BI) and of the Through Silicon Via (TSV) connections, both needed for the 3D integration process, have also been addressed by the tests.

  16. Results of on-line tests of the ENABLE prototype, a 2nd level trigger processor for the TRT of ATLAS/LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Noffz, K.H.; Kugel, A.; Klefenz, F.; Zoz, R.; Maenner, R.

    1994-12-31

    The Enable Machine is a systolic 2nd level trigger processor for the transition radiation tracker (TRT) of ATLAS/LHC. The task of the processor is to find the best candidate for a lepton track in a high background of pions according to the EAST benchmark algorithm in less than 10 {mu}s. As described earlier, this is done in three steps. First all interesting tracks are histogrammed by accumulating for each track the coincidences between the track mask and the region-of-interest (RoI). Next the best defined track is identified. Eventually this track is classified as e or {pi}. A prototype has been developed and tested within the EAST/RD-11 collaboration at CERN. It operates at 50 MHz and finds up to 400 tracks in less than 10 {mu}s. It is assembled of an interface board and one or more histogrammer boards. The modular design makes the Enable Machine easily scalable. The histogrammer units are systolic arrays consisting of a matrix of 36 field programmable gate arrays. Through this it is possible to optimize the trigger algorithm, to adapt it to a changed detector setup, and even to implement completely new algorithms. For the beam tests in autumn 1993 at CERN the overall functionality within the detector environment could be shown. The authors were able to link successfully the Enable prototype to the detector raw data stream as well as to the data acquisition.

  17. A mixed methods approach to identifying factors related to voluntary HIV testing among injection drug users in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jiang; Lombardi, Christina; Evans, Elizabeth; Jiang, Haifeng; Zhao, Min; Meng, Ying-Ying

    2012-01-01

    Summary Objectives Injection drug use is a major route of HIV transmission in China, yet relatively little is known about why so few injection drug users utilize free HIV testing services. This study aimed to examine barriers to HIV testing and voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) service utilization among injection drug users in Shanghai, China. Methods Utilizing mixed methods, we analyzed data from a survey of 540 compulsory drug abuse treatment patients and data from focus groups with 70 service providers and patients. Results Only 24.4% of patients expressed willingness to be tested for HIV. Willingness to be tested was associated with younger age and more positive attitudes towards condom use. Patients reported several barriers to utilization of voluntary HIV testing services, including lack of information about these services, perceptions of no risk or low-risk for HIV infection, fear of positive results, and the stigma or discrimination that may be experienced by the patient or their family. Having limited skills related to HIV counseling was reported by service providers as the primary barrier to encouraging patients to utilize HIV testing/VCT services. Conclusions Special intervention programs targeting injection drug users, their family members, and service providers may increase HIV testing in China. PMID:22534473

  18. Reproducing system-level bulk current injection test in direct power injection setup for multiple-port DUTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miropolsky, S.; Frei, S.

    2013-07-01

    Many investigations have been published on the transferability of RF immunity test results between system and IC-levels. The RF signal level at DUT (Device under Test) inputs, i.e. either RF voltage amplitude or RF input current, is used as a reference value for the load on the DUT. Existing approaches analyze the DUT response as a function of the RF signal level at a single input pin, e.g. supply voltage. Sufficient accuracy of such an approach could be shown in several cases, but results are not sufficient as a general solution for complex DUT. This paper proposes both theoretical analysis and practical implementation of a DPI setup, where a disturbance, equivalent to system-level BCI setup, can be delivered to multiple DUT input ports.

  19. Effects of intramuscular injection of glycopyrrolate on Schirmer tear test I results in dogs.

    PubMed

    Doering, Clinton J; Lukasik, Victoria M; Merideth, Reuben E

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine effects of glycopyrrolate administered IM on Schirmer tear test I (STT I) measurements in dogs. DESIGN Prospective clinical study. ANIMALS 13 client- and staff-owned dogs. PROCEDURES For both eyes of each dog, STT I measurements were recorded twice 20 minutes apart (at T1 and T2) and 2 to 4 hours later (at T3). Glycopyrrolate (0.01 mg/kg [0.005 mg/lb]) was administered IM to all dogs (3 dogs received an injection of saline [0.9% NaCl] solution on an earlier occasion), and final STT I measurements were recorded 20 minutes later (at T4). Intraocular pressures, heart rate, and respiratory rate were also recorded at each time point. RESULTS Ophthalmic variables did not differ between right and left eyes. In all dogs, variables at T1, T2, or T3 (measurements before glycopyrrolate administration) did not differ; baseline values were therefore defined at T3. At T4, STT I measurements were significantly decreased (mean ± SD decrease, 67.4 ± 15.4% [mean actual decrease, 15.8 mm/min]). During the same period, mean heart rate increased by 26.5 ± 12.0% (mean actual increase, 30.2 beats/min). Glycopyrrolate had no effect on intraocular pressure or respiratory rate. In 5 dogs at 24 hours after glycopyrrolate treatment, STT I measurement in each eye had returned to baseline value. Saline solution treatment (3 dogs) had no effect on any variables. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In dogs, IM injection of glycopyrrolate resulted in a clinically relevant transient decrease in aqueous tear production. Application of lacrimomimetics beginning at the time of or within 20 minutes after glycopyrrolate premedication is recommended until STT I measurements return to baseline.

  20. Modeling Single Well Injection-Withdrawal (SWIW) Tests for Characterization of Complex Fracture-Matrix Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotte, F.; Doughty, C.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2010-12-01

    An essential condition for performance evaluation of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) resides in the ability to reliably predict fluid flow and heat transport in fractured porous rocks, where fast convection-dispersive transport through the fracture network can be strongly affected by heat conduction into the adjacent rock matrix. SWIW tests are single-well tracer tests that involve an initial period of fluid and tracer injection followed by a period of fluid withdrawal. As a result of the flow field reversal, the measured breakthrough curves tend to be less sensitive to advective heterogeneities and more sensitive to matrix diffusion and sorption, making this method very valuable in characterizing fracture-matrix interaction and evaluating matrix properties. In particular, we propose using SWIW tests before and after hydrofracking operations, to help assess the means by which hydrofracking increases permeability and enhances fracture-matrix interaction. In the present study, we have modeled single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tests for non-sorbing and sorbing tracers, using the mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian transport simulator TRIPOLY, which solves tracer advection and dispersion in fracture networks together with solute exchange processes between the fractures and the porous matrix. Our simulations were conducted for hypothetical but workable SWIW test designs considering a variety of statistically generated 2D fracture-matrix systems. Parameter sensitivity studies were completed on three physical parameters of the rock matrix, namely porosity, diffusion coefficient and retardation coefficient, in order to investigate their impact on the fracture-matrix solute exchange process. Hydraulic fracturing, or hydrofracking, was modeled in two different ways, one by increasing the fracture aperture for flow and the other one by adding a new set of fractures to the fracture network. The results of all these different tests were analyzed by studying the population of

  1. Field test of single well DNAPL characterization using alcohol injection/extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Jerome, K.M.; Looney, B.B.; Rhoden, M.L.; Riha, B.; Burdick, S.

    1996-10-29

    Soils and groundwater beneath an abandoned process sewer line in the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) contain elevated levels of volatile organic compounds, specifically trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), two common chlorinated solvents. These compounds have low aqueous solubilities, thus when released to the subsurface in sufficient quantity, tend to exist as immiscible fluids or nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Because chlorinated solvents are also denser than water, they are referred to by the acronym DNAPLs, or dense non-aqueous phase liquids. Technologies targeted at efficient characterization or removal of DNAPL are not currently proven. The authors performed injection/extraction characterization tests in six existing wells in A/M Area. Water concentrations for TCE and/or PCE in these wells ranged from 0% to 100% of solubility. For each test, small amounts of solubilizing solution were used to try to confirm or deny the presence or absence of DNAPL in the immediate vicinity of the well screen.

  2. Overview of the International Space Station System Level Trace Contaminant Injection Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatara, James D.; Perry, Jay L.; Franks, Gerald D.

    1997-01-01

    Trace contaminant control onboard the International Space Station will be accomplished not only by the Trace Contaminant Control Subassembly but also by other Environmental Control and Life Support System subassemblies. These additional removal routes include absorption by humidity condensate in the Temperature and Humidity Control Condensing Heat Exchanger and adsorption by the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly. The Trace Contaminant Injection Test, which was performed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, investigated the system-level removal of trace contaminants by the International Space Station Atmosphere Revitalization, and Temperature/Humidity Control Subsystems, (November-December 1997). It is a follow-on to the Integrated Atmosphere Revitalization Test conducted in 1996. An estimate for the magnitude of the assisting role provided by the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly and the Temperature and Humidity Control unit was obtained. In addition, data on the purity of Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly carbon dioxide product were obtained to support Environmental Control and Life Support System Air Revitalization Subsystem loop closure.

  3. Summary of air permeability data from single-hole injection tests in unsaturated fractured tuffs at the Apache Leap Research Site: Results of steady-state test interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, A.G.; Geddis, A.M.; Henrich, M.J.; Lohrstorfer, C.F.; Neuman, S.P.

    1996-03-01

    This document summarizes air permeability estimates obtained from single hole pneumatic injection tests in unsaturated fractured tuffs at the Covered Borehole Site (CBS) within the larger apache Leap Research Site (ALRS). Only permeability estimates obtained from a steady state interpretation of relatively stable pressure and flow rate data are included. Tests were conducted in five boreholes inclined at 45{degree} to the horizontal, and one vertical borehole. Over 180 borehole segments were tested by setting the packers 1 m apart. Additional tests were conducted in segments of lengths 0.5, 2.0, and 3.0 m in one borehole, and 2.0 m in another borehole, bringing the total number of tests to over 270. Tests were conducted by maintaining a constant injection rate until air pressure became relatively stable and remained so for some time. The injection rate was then incremented by a constant value and the procedure repeated. The air injection rate, pressure, temperature, and relative humidity were recorded. For each relatively stable period of injection rate and pressure, air permeability was estimated by treating the rock around each test interval as a uniform, isotropic porous medium within which air flows as a single phase under steady state, in a pressure field exhibiting prolate spheroidal symmetry. For each permeability estimate the authors list the corresponding injection rate, pressure, temperature and relative humidity. They also present selected graphs which show how the latter quantities vary with time; logarithmic plots of pressure versus time which demonstrate the importance of borehole storage effects during the early transient portion of each incremental test period; and semilogarithmic plots of pressure versus recovery time at the end of each test sequence.

  4. Pilot plant testing of Illinois coal for blast furnace injection. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Crelling, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    A new use for Illinois coal is as fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as first step in steel production. Because of cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. Purpose of this study is to evaluate combustion of Illinois coal in the blast furnace injection process in a pilot plant test facility. (Limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high S and Cl contents are suitable for blast furnace injection.) This proposal is intended to complete the study under way with Armco and Inland and to demonstrate quantitatively the suitability of Herrin No. 6 and Springfield No. 5 coals for injection. Main feature of current work is testing of Illinois coals at CANMET`s pilot plant coal combustion facility. During this quarter, two additional 300-pound samples of coal (IBCSP-110 Springfield No. 5 and an Appalachian coal) were delivered. Six Illinois Basin coals were analyzed with the CANMET model and compared with other bituminous coals from the Appalachians, France, Poland, South Africa, and Colombia. Based on computer modeling, lower rank bituminous coals, including coal from the Illinois Basin, compare well in injection with a variety of other bituminous coals.

  5. Modeling Single Well Injection-Withdrawal (SWIW) Tests for Characterization of Complex Fracture-Matrix Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cotte, F.P.; Doughty, C.; Birkholzer, J.

    2010-11-01

    The ability to reliably predict flow and transport in fractured porous rock is an essential condition for performance evaluation of geologic (underground) nuclear waste repositories. In this report, a suite of programs (TRIPOLY code) for calculating and analyzing flow and transport in two-dimensional fracture-matrix systems is used to model single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests. The SWIW test, a tracer test using one well, is proposed as a useful means of collecting data for site characterization, as well as estimating parameters relevant to tracer diffusion and sorption. After some specific code adaptations, we numerically generated a complex fracture-matrix system for computation of steady-state flow and tracer advection and dispersion in the fracture network, along with solute exchange processes between the fractures and the porous matrix. We then conducted simulations for a hypothetical but workable SWIW test design and completed parameter sensitivity studies on three physical parameters of the rock matrix - namely porosity, diffusion coefficient, and retardation coefficient - in order to investigate their impact on the fracture-matrix solute exchange process. Hydraulic fracturing, or hydrofracking, is also modeled in this study, in two different ways: (1) by increasing the hydraulic aperture for flow in existing fractures and (2) by adding a new set of fractures to the field. The results of all these different tests are analyzed by studying the population of matrix blocks, the tracer spatial distribution, and the breakthrough curves (BTCs) obtained, while performing mass-balance checks and being careful to avoid some numerical mistakes that could occur. This study clearly demonstrates the importance of matrix effects in the solute transport process, with the sensitivity studies illustrating the increased importance of the matrix in providing a retardation mechanism for radionuclides as matrix porosity, diffusion coefficient, or retardation

  6. Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Appalachian Basin Test Site: Developing a Sequestration Site from Concept through Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerst, J. L.; Place, M.; Sminchak, J.; Gupta, N.; Sullivan, C.

    2008-12-01

    The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Appalachian Basin Field Test is located at the First Energy Generation Corp. RE Burger Power Plant in Belmont County, Ohio. The goal at this site is to injection up to 3000 tonnes of carbon dioxide in up to three separate geologic formations. We present the development of this injection plan as more data was collected and added to the system. In addition, we present initial injection results. Site characterization consisted of a regional geological assessment and a 2D seismic survey. A test injection well (FEGENCO 1) was completed in early 2007 and data collected from this well, included geophysical wireline logs and core samples, were used to develop an injection plan. Two previously identified injection targets were analyzed, the Devonian Oriskany Sandstone and the Silurian Clinton Sandstone. Both of these sandstones are regional sequestration targets across the Midwestern United States. In addition to these, a third injection target was identified after drilling. The Silurian Salina Group is regionally extensive throughout most of the Midwest and consists of carbonate and evaporate layers. In the FEGENCO 1 well, one of the subgroups was found to have higher porosity dolomitic stringers sandwiched between anhydrite layers. Wireline data and field samples were used to better understand the geologic model and predict the porosity and permeability distribution of the interval. Injection is expected to be completed by Fall 2008. This work was done as part of the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP); DOE/NETL Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-05NT42589

  7. Estimation of unsaturated hydraulic parameters in sandstone using electrical resistivity tomography under a water injection test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzamian, Mohammad; Monteiro Santos, Fernando A.; Khalil, Mohamed A.

    2015-10-01

    Hydraulic conductivity is an important soil property when determining the potential for water movement in topsoil and in spite of its importance; soil hydraulic conductivity remains one of the most difficult of soil properties to assess. Laboratory methods have limitations due to the size of the samples and taking undisturbed soil samples is usually difficult in sandy soil and in-situ methods are required to estimate hydraulic conductivity. This study was conducted to estimate saturated hydraulic conductivity in unsaturated sandstone using the ground surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). The site is characterized by a deep Arenosol soil with high permeability and a low water retention capacity located at the Semora-Correia, the east of Lisbon. Eight ERT snapshots were collected during a water injection test to produce a sequence of 2D resistivity images. Time-lapse ERT data were inverted using independent data inversion, the difference inversion and simultaneous space-time inversion methods. Afterward, using an in-situ approach resistivity variation models were converted to water content images. By comparing first and second spatial moments of water movement images inferred from the ERT method with unsaturated flow simulation predicted from a numerical solution of Richards' equation, the range of saturated hydraulic conductivity is estimated to be in 0.5-0.7 (cm/min). The evaluation of ERT approach was made using a synthetic test. The results of synthetic test showed that the estimated parameters were significantly influenced by the ERT inversion method and an overprediction of spatial moments and consequently saturated hydraulic conductivity was observed in all inversion methods; however the resistivity models obtained by simultaneous space-time inversion method was more successful in water movement monitoring.

  8. Optics of a 1.5 TeV injector for the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, John A.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01

    A concept is being developed to install a second, low energy ring (LER) above the LHC to accelerate protons from 450 GeV to 1.5 TeV prior to injection into the LHC. The arc and dispersion suppresser optics of the LHC would be replicated in the LER using combined function ''transmission line'' magnets originally proposed for the VLHC. To avoid costly civil construction, in the straight sections housing detectors at least, the LER and LHC must share beampipes and some magnets through the detector portion of the straights. Creating the appropriate optics for these LER-LHC transition regions is very challenging: In addition to matching to the nominal LHC lattice functions at these locations the changes in altitude of 1.35 m separating the LER and LHC must be performed achromatically to avoid emittance blowup arising from vertical dispersion when the beams are transferred to the LHC.

  9. Thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests for determining fracture-matrix heat transfer area

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.; Doughty, C.

    2010-01-15

    Single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests involve injection of traced fluid and subsequent tracer recovery from the same well, usually with some quiescent time between the injection and withdrawal periods. SWIW are insensitive to variations in advective processes that arise from formation heterogeneities, because upon withdrawal, fluid parcels tend to retrace the paths taken during injection. However, SWIW are sensitive to diffusive processes, such as diffusive exchange of conservative or reactive solutes between fractures and rock matrix. This paper focuses on SWIW tests in which temperature itself is used as a tracer. Numerical simulations demonstrate the sensitivity of temperature returns to fracture-matrix interaction. We consider thermal SWIW response to the two primary reservoir improvements targeted with stimulation, (1) making additional fractures accessible to injected fluids, and (2) increasing the aperture and permeability of pre-existing fractures. It is found that temperature returns in SWIW tests are insensitive to (2), while providing a strong signal of more rapid temperature recovery during the withdrawal phase for (1).

  10. Microbial Stimulation and Succession following a Test Well Injection Simulating CO₂ Leakage into a Shallow Newark Basin Aquifer

    PubMed Central

    O’Mullan, Gregory; Dueker, M. Elias; Clauson, Kale; Yang, Qiang; Umemoto, Kelsey; Zakharova, Natalia; Matter, Juerg; Stute, Martin; Takahashi, Taro; Goldberg, David

    2015-01-01

    In addition to efforts aimed at reducing anthropogenic production of greenhouse gases, geological storage of CO2 is being explored as a strategy to reduce atmospheric greenhouse gas emission and mitigate climate change. Previous studies of the deep subsurface in North America have not fully considered the potential negative effects of CO2 leakage into shallow drinking water aquifers, especially from a microbiological perspective. A test well in the Newark Rift Basin was utilized in two field experiments to investigate patterns of microbial succession following injection of CO2-saturated water into an isolated aquifer interval, simulating a CO2 leakage scenario. A decrease in pH following injection of CO2 saturated aquifer water was accompanied by mobilization of trace elements (e.g. Fe and Mn), and increased bacterial cell concentrations in the recovered water. 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence libraries from samples collected before and after the test well injection were compared to link variability in geochemistry to changes in aquifer microbiology. Significant changes in microbial composition, compared to background conditions, were found following the test well injections, including a decrease in Proteobacteria, and an increased presence of Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia and microbial taxa often noted to be associated with iron and sulfate reduction. The concurrence of increased microbial cell concentrations and rapid microbial community succession indicate significant changes in aquifer microbial communities immediately following the experimental CO2 leakage event. Samples collected one year post-injection were similar in cell number to the original background condition and community composition, although not identical, began to revert toward the pre-injection condition, indicating microbial resilience following a leakage disturbance. This study provides a first glimpse into the in situ successional response of microbial communities to CO2 leakage after subsurface

  11. Microbial stimulation and succession following a test well injection simulating CO2 leakage into a shallow Newark basin aquifer.

    PubMed

    O'Mullan, Gregory; Dueker, M Elias; Clauson, Kale; Yang, Qiang; Umemoto, Kelsey; Zakharova, Natalia; Matter, Juerg; Stute, Martin; Takahashi, Taro; Goldberg, David

    2015-01-01

    In addition to efforts aimed at reducing anthropogenic production of greenhouse gases, geological storage of CO2 is being explored as a strategy to reduce atmospheric greenhouse gas emission and mitigate climate change. Previous studies of the deep subsurface in North America have not fully considered the potential negative effects of CO2 leakage into shallow drinking water aquifers, especially from a microbiological perspective. A test well in the Newark Rift Basin was utilized in two field experiments to investigate patterns of microbial succession following injection of CO2-saturated water into an isolated aquifer interval, simulating a CO2 leakage scenario. A decrease in pH following injection of CO2 saturated aquifer water was accompanied by mobilization of trace elements (e.g. Fe and Mn), and increased bacterial cell concentrations in the recovered water. 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence libraries from samples collected before and after the test well injection were compared to link variability in geochemistry to changes in aquifer microbiology. Significant changes in microbial composition, compared to background conditions, were found following the test well injections, including a decrease in Proteobacteria, and an increased presence of Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia and microbial taxa often noted to be associated with iron and sulfate reduction. The concurrence of increased microbial cell concentrations and rapid microbial community succession indicate significant changes in aquifer microbial communities immediately following the experimental CO2 leakage event. Samples collected one year post-injection were similar in cell number to the original background condition and community composition, although not identical, began to revert toward the pre-injection condition, indicating microbial resilience following a leakage disturbance. This study provides a first glimpse into the in situ successional response of microbial communities to CO2 leakage after subsurface

  12. Development of an analytical solution for thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tests in horizontally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yoojin

    2013-02-20

    In this study, we have developed an analytical solution for thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tests in horizontally fractured reservoirs where fluid flow through the fracture is radial. The dimensionless forms of the governing equations and the initial and boundary conditions in the radial flow system can be written in a form identical to those in the linear flow system developed by Jung and Pruess [Jung, Y., and K. Pruess (2012), A Closed-Form Analytical Solution for Thermal Single-Well Injection-Withdrawal Tests, Water Resour. Res., 48, W03504, doi:10.1029/2011WR010979], and therefore the analytical solutions developed in Jung and Pruess (2012) can be applied to compute the time dependence of temperature recovery at the injection/withdrawal well in a horizontally oriented fracture with radial flow.

  13. Testing the Injectivity of CO2 in a Sub-surface Heterogeneous Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundal, A.; Nystuen, J.; Dypvik, H.; Aagaard, P.

    2011-12-01

    additional data from side wall cores and cuttings. From this we evaluate facies dependence related to observed diagenetic features and compositional variations due to burial depth (2-4km), mainly considering chlorite coatings (preserving porosity) and cementation (calcite and quartz). Using Schlumberger soft-wares; Petrel (reservoir) and Eclipse (fluid flow), we are testing injection scenarios (one point, several points, bleeding wells) in several intra-formational geological settings. These results will be evaluated relative to the distribution of facies and heterogeneities in the reservoir, considering multiphase flow given the local pressure regime.

  14. Pilot plant testing of Illinois coal for blast furnace injection. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Crelling, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    A potentially new use for Illinois coal is its use as a fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as the first step in steel production. Because of its increasing cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is now being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of Illinois coal in the blast furnace injection process in a new and unique pilot plant test facility. This investigation is significant to the use of Illinois coal in that the limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high sulfur and chlorine contents are suitable feedstocks for blast furnace injection. This study is unique in that it is the first North American effort to directly determine the nature of the combustion of coal injected into a blast furnace. This proposal is a follow-up to one funded for the 1993--94 period. It is intended to complete the study already underway with the Armco and Inland steel companies and to demonstrate quantitatively the suitability of both the Herrin No. 6 and Springfield No. 5 coals for blast furnace injection. The main feature of the current work is the testing of Illinois coals at CANMET`s (Canadian Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology) pilot plant coal combustion facility. This facility simulates blowpipe-tuyere conditions in an operating blast furnace, including blast temperature (900{degrees}C), flow pattern (hot velocity 200 m/s), geometry, gas composition, coal injection velocity (34 m/s) and residence time (20 ms). The facility is fully instrumented to measure air flow rate, air temperature, temperature in the reactor, wall temperature, preheater coil temperature and flue gas analysis. During this quarter there were two major accomplishments.

  15. Intermediate Scale Laboratory Testing to Understand Mechanisms of Capillary and Dissolution Trapping during Injection and Post-Injection of CO2 in Heterogeneous Geological Formations

    SciTech Connect

    Illangasekare, Tissa; Trevisan, Luca; Agartan, Elif; Mori, Hiroko; Vargas-Johnson, Javier; Gonzalez-Nicolas, Ana; Cihan, Abdullah; Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin

    2015-03-31

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) represents a technology aimed to reduce atmospheric loading of CO2 from power plants and heavy industries by injecting it into deep geological formations, such as saline aquifers. A number of trapping mechanisms contribute to effective and secure storage of the injected CO2 in supercritical fluid phase (scCO2) in the formation over the long term. The primary trapping mechanisms are structural, residual, dissolution and mineralization. Knowledge gaps exist on how the heterogeneity of the formation manifested at all scales from the pore to the site scales affects trapping and parameterization of contributing mechanisms in models. An experimental and modeling study was conducted to fill these knowledge gaps. Experimental investigation of fundamental processes and mechanisms in field settings is not possible as it is not feasible to fully characterize the geologic heterogeneity at all relevant scales and gathering data on migration, trapping and dissolution of scCO2. Laboratory experiments using scCO2 under ambient conditions are also not feasible as it is technically challenging and cost prohibitive to develop large, two- or three-dimensional test systems with controlled high pressures to keep the scCO2 as a liquid. Hence, an innovative approach that used surrogate fluids in place of scCO2 and formation brine in multi-scale, synthetic aquifers test systems ranging in scales from centimeter to meter scale developed used. New modeling algorithms were developed to capture the processes controlled by the formation heterogeneity, and they were tested using the data from the laboratory test systems. The results and findings are expected to contribute toward better conceptual models, future improvements to DOE numerical codes, more accurate assessment of storage capacities, and optimized placement strategies. This report presents the experimental and modeling methods

  16. Investigations on the Use of a Stripline Injection Prob for BCI-Like Tests on Multiconductor Transmission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrieu, Guillaume; Reineix, Alain

    2016-05-01

    This paper shows encouraging experimental and numerical results on the possibility to use a Stripline injection probe for BCI-like tests on multiconductor transmission lines. The aim of these results is to prove that larger apertures made on both sides of the cell in order to let more wires cross the structure does not question the functioning of the probe itself.

  17. Injection overview

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, S.

    1983-12-01

    The test program was initiated at the Raft River Geothermal Field in southern Idaho in September 1982. A series of eight short-term injection and backflow tests, followed by a long-term injection test, were conducted on one well in the field. Tracers were added during injection and monitored during backflow as well. The principal objective was to determine if tracers could be effectively used as a means to assess reservoir characteristics in a one-well test. The test program resulted in a unique data set which shows promise as a means to improve understanding of the reservoir characteristics. In December 1982, an RFP was issued to obtain an industrial partner to obtain follow-on data on the injection/backflow technique in a second field, and to study any alternate advanced concepts for injection testing which the industrial community might recommend. The East Mesa Geothermal Field was selected for the second test series. Two wells were utilized for testing, and a series of ten tests were conducted in July and August 1983, aimed principally at further evaluation of the injection/backflow technique.

  18. Pilot plant testing of Illinois coal for blast furnace injection. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Crelling, J.C.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of Illinois coal in the blast furnace injection process in a new and unique pilot plant test facility. This investigation is significant to the use of Illinois coal in that the limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high sulfur and chlorine contents are suitable feedstocks for blast furnace injection. This study is unique in that it is the first North American effort to directly determine the nature of the combustion of coal injected into a blast furnace. It is intended to complete the study already underway with the Armco and Inland steel companies and to demonstrate quantitatively the suitability of both the Herrin No. 6 and Springfield No. 5 coals for blast furnace injection. The main feature of the current work is the testing of Illinois coals at CANMET`s (Canadian Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology) pilot plant coal combustion facility. This facility simulates blowpipe-tuyere conditions in an operating blast furnace, including blast temperature (900 C), flow pattern (hot velocity 200 m/s), geometry, gas composition, coal injection velocity (34 m/s) and residence time (20 ms). The facility is fully instrumented to measure air flow rate, air temperature, temperature in the reactor, wall temperature, preheater coil temperature and flue gas analysis. During this quarter a sample of the Herrin No. 6 coal (IBCSP 112) was delivered to the CANMET facility and testing is scheduled for the week of 11 December 1994. Also at this time, all of the IBCSP samples are being evaluated for blast furnace injection using the CANMET computer model.

  19. Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology. Topical report No. 2, Task 3.1: Evaluation of system performance, Duct Injection Test Facility, Muskingum River Power Plant, Beverly, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Felix, L.G.; Dismukes, E.B.; Gooch, J.P.; Klett, M.G.; Demian, A.G.

    1992-04-20

    This Topical Report No. 2 is an interim report on the Duct Injection Test Facility being operated for the Department of Energy at Beverly, Ohio. Either dry calcium hydroxide or an aqueous slurry of calcium hydroxide (prepared by slaking quicklime) is injected into a slipstream of flue gas to achieve partial removal of SO{sub 2} from a coal-burning power station. Water injected with the slurry or injected separately from the dry sorbents cools the flue gas and increases the water vapor content of the gas. The addition of water, either in the slurry or in a separate spray, makes the extent of reaction between the sorbent and the SO{sub 2} more complete; the presumption is that water is effective in the liquid state, when it is able to wet the sorbent particles physically, and not especially effective in the vapor state. An electrostatic precipitator collects the combination of suspended solids (fly ash from the boiler and sorbent from the duct injection process). All of the operations are being carried out on the scale of approximately 50,000 acfm of flue gas.

  20. Analysis of Tests of Subsurface Injection, Storage, and Recovery of Freshwater in Lancaster, Antelope Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, Steven P.; Carlson, Carl S.; Metzger, Loren F.; Howle, James F.; Galloway, Devin L.; Sneed, Michelle; Ikehara, Marti E.; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; King, Nancy E.

    2003-01-01

    Ground-water levels in Lancaster, California, declined more than 200 feet during the 20th century, resulting in reduced ground-water supplies and more than 6 feet of land subsidence. Facing continuing population growth, water managers are seeking solutions to these problems. Injection of imported, treated fresh water into the aquifer system when it is most available and least expensive, for later use during high-demand periods, is being evaluated as part of a management solution. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works and the Antelope Valley-East Kern Water Agency, monitored a pilot injection program, analyzed the hydraulic and subsidence-related effects of injection, and developed a simulation/optimization model to help evaluate the effectiveness of using existing and proposed wells in an injection program for halting the decline of ground-water levels and avoiding future land subsidence while meeting increasing ground-water demand. A variety of methods were used to measure aquifer-system response to injection. Water levels were measured continuously in nested (multi-depth) piezometers and monitoring wells and periodically in other wells that were within several miles of the injection site. Microgravity surveys were done to estimate changes in the elevation of the water table in the absence of wells and to estimate specific yield. Aquifer-system deformation was measured directly and continuously using a dual borehole extensometer and indirectly using continuous Global Positioning System (GPS), first-order spirit leveling, and an array of tiltmeters. The injected water and extracted water were sampled periodically and analyzed for constituents, including chloride and trihalomethanes. Measured injection rates of about 750 gallons per minute (gal/min) per well at the injection site during a 5-month period showed that injection at or above the average extraction rates at that site (about 800 gal/min) was

  1. Status of LHC crab activity simulations and beam studies

    SciTech Connect

    Calaga,R.; Assman, R.; Barranco, J.; Barranco, J.; Calaga, R.; Caspers, F.; Ciapala, E.; De-Maria, R.; Koutchouk, J. P.; Linnecar, T.; Metral, E.; Morita, A.; Solyak, N.; Sun, Y.; Tomas, R.; Tuckmantel, J.; Weiler, T.; Zimmermann, F.

    2009-05-04

    The LHC crab cavity program is advancing rapidly towards a first prototype which is anticipated to be tested during the early stages of the LHC phase I upgrade and commissioning. The general project status and some aspects related to crab optics, collimation, aperture constraints, impedances, noise effects. beam transparency and machine protection critical for a safe and robust operation of LHC beams with crab cavities are addressed here.

  2. Design, testing, and evaluation of a water injection grouting system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    The necessity of grouting vertical ground heat exchanger boreholes is well established. The use of chip bentonite was investigated as an alternative to slurry grouting methods for backfilling geothermal bores. Grouting a geothermal bore with chip bentonite has many potential benefits if the bore can be completely grouted from bottom to top. High solids content grouts that are possible with chip bentonite could increase the thermal conductivity of the grout and make it less susceptible to performance reductions associated with drying of the grout. The lower price of chip bentonite compared to powder bentonite grouts would reduce the cost of grouting. Chip bentonites would also have an advantage over powder bentonite grouts by reducing the amount of dust created during the grouting process. The proposed grouting system would use water to transport chip bentonite through a tremie pipe into the bore. The properties of chip bentonite grouts were first examined by pouring chip bentonite into a standing column of water. Chip bentonite grouts had percent solids ranging from 50% to 60% and thermal conductivity from 0.46 to 0.52 Btu/hr ft F. Tests were also performed with a thermal additive mixed with the bentonite chips. Additives tested included pea rock, masonry sand, and crushed quartzite. The additive in the wet grout accumulated in pockets, creating possible avenues for hydraulic movement. Total percent solids of bentonite and additive mixtures ranged from 60% to 80%. Thermal conductivity results were varied, but generally increased with increasing percentages of additive. The feasibility of transporting bentonite chips with water through a tremie pipe was studied with two types of water injection systems. Both systems incorporated a pressurized solids tank to keep water from hydrating the chips prior to entering the water stream. A low pressure system was able to transfer pea rock successfully through a short length of tremie pipe. The use of bentonite chips caused

  3. A new test for evaluating Eighth Amendment challenges to lethal injections.

    PubMed

    2007-03-01

    An explosion of Eighth Amendment challenges to lethal injection protocols has struck the federal courts. The Supreme Court's recent decision in Hill v. McDonough,1 which empowered prisoners to bring challenges to lethal injection procedures under 42 U.S.C. para. 1983, has facilitated a flood of new lethal injection cases. In response, several courts have ordered states to alter their protocols, spurring other capital inmates to litigate such challenges. Distressingly, the courts evaluating these claims have almost no law to guide them. The last Supreme Court decision applying the Eighth Amendment to a method of execution was written in 1947; that case, Louisiana ex rel. Francis v. Resweber,2 occurred before the Eighth Amendment was applied to the states and resulted in a 4-1-4 split. Although lower courts have heard numerous challenges to execution methods, few have analyzed the constitutional validity of a method of execution in detail. Making matters worse, courts that find Eighth Amendment violations must craft equitable remedies that often amount to entirely new execution protocols. No clear precedent exists to guide courts in formulating such remedies. This Note proposes a legal standard for the administration of Eighth Amendment method-of-execution claims, focusing on lethal injection cases. Part I describes lethal injection procedures and summarizes recent litigation. Part II discusses the difficulty of evaluating lethal injection claims, analyzing both general difficulties in interpreting the Eighth Amendment and specific difficulties associated with lethal injection cases. Part III proposes a standard for addressing method-of-execution claims that attempts to balance a prisoner's interest in a painless execution with a state's interest in conducting executions efficiently. Part IV discusses remedies for unconstitutional procedures. Part V concludes.

  4. Pegloticase Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor if you have glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency (an inherited blood disease). Your doctor may test you for G6PD deficiency before you start to receive pegloticase injection. If ...

  5. Omacetaxine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cannot take these medications due to side effects. Omacetaxine injection is in a class of medications ... a treatment cycle if you experience serious side effects of the medication or if blood tests show ...

  6. Design and development of a helium injection system to improve external leakage detection during liquid nitrogen immersion tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Andrew; Mishra, Rakesh

    2016-10-01

    The testing of assemblies for use in cryogenic systems commonly includes evaluation at or near operating (therefore cryogenic) temperature. Typical assemblies include valves and pumps for use in liquid oxygen-liquid hydrogen rocket engines. One frequently specified method of cryogenic external leakage testing requires the assembly, pressurized with gaseous helium (GHe), be immersed in a bath of liquid nitrogen (LN2) and allowed to thermally stabilize. Component interfaces are then visually inspected for leakage (bubbles). Unfortunately the liquid nitrogen will be boiling under normal, bench-top, test conditions. This boiling tends to mask even significant leakage. One little known and perhaps under-utilized property of helium is the seemingly counter-intuitive thermodynamic property that when ambient temperature helium is bubbled through boiling LN2 at a temperature of -195.8 °C, the temperature of the liquid nitrogen will reduce. This paper reports on the design and testing of a novel proof-of-concept helium injection control system confirming that it is possible to reduce the temperature of an LN2 bath below boiling point through the controlled injection of ambient temperature gaseous helium and then to efficiently maintain a reduced helium flow rate to maintain a stabilized liquid temperature, enabling clear visual observation of components immersed within the LN2. Helium saturation testing is performed and injection system sizing is discussed.

  7. Hanford 100-D Area Biostimulation Soluble Substrate Field Test: Interim Data Summary for the Substrate Injection and Process Monitoring Phases of the Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Mackley, Rob D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Johnson, Christian D.; Elmore, Rebecca P.; Brockman, Fred J.; Bilskis, Christina L.

    2008-06-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is conducting a treatability test designed to demonstrate that in situ biostimulation can be applied to help meet cleanup goals in the Hanford Site 100-D Area. The in situ biostimulation technology is intended to provide supplemental treatment upgradient of the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) barrier by reducing the concentration of the primary oxidizing species in groundwater (i.e., nitrate and dissolved oxygen) and chromate, and thereby increasing the longevity of the ISRM barrier. This report summarizes the initial results from field testing of an in situ biological treatment zone implemented through injection of a soluble substrate. The field test is divided into operational phases that include substrate injection, process monitoring, and performance monitoring. The results summarized herein are for the substrate injection and process monitoring phase encompassing the first approximately three months of field testing. Performance monitoring is ongoing at the time this report was prepared and is planned to extend over approximately 18 months. As such, this report is an interim data summary report for the field test. The treatability testing has multiple objectives focused on evaluating the performance of biostimulation as a reducing barrier for nitrate, oxygen, and chromate. The following conclusions related to these objectives are supported by the data provided in this report. Substrate was successfully distributed to a radius of about 15 m (50 ft) from the injection well. Monitoring data indicate that microbial growth initiated rapidly, and this rapid growth would limit the ability to inject substrate to significantly larger zones from a single injection well. As would be expected, the uniformity of substrate distribution was impacted by subsurface heterogeneity. However, subsequent microbial activity and ability to reduce the targeted species was observed throughout the monitored zone during the process monitoring

  8. Single-pass beam measurements for the verification of the LHC magnetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Calaga, R.; Giovannozzi, M.; Redaelli, S.; Sun, Y.; Tomas, R.; Venturini-Delsolaro, W.; Zimmermann, F.

    2010-05-23

    During the 2009 LHC injection tests, the polarities and effects of specific quadrupole and higher-order magnetic circuits were investigated. A set of magnet circuits had been selected for detailed investigation based on a number of criteria. On or off-momentum difference trajectories launched via appropriate orbit correctors for varying strength settings of the magnet circuits under study - e.g. main, trim and skew quadrupoles; sextupole families and spool piece correctors; skew sextupoles, octupoles - were compared with predictions from various optics models. These comparisons allowed confirming or updating the relative polarity conventions used in the optics model and the accelerator control system, as well as verifying the correct powering and assignment of magnet families. Results from measurements in several LHC sectors are presented.

  9. Characterization of the first prototype of the ALICE SAMPA ASIC for LHC Run 3 and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambave, G.; Engeseth, K. P.; Velure, A.

    2017-03-01

    A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is planing to upgrade its Time Projection Chamber (TPC) due to the expected higher Pb-Pb collision-rates in the next running period (Run 3) of the LHC starting in 2020. In the upgraded TPC, Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) chambers and continuous readout system will replace Multi-Wire Proportional (MWP) chambers and conventional triggered readout. In the continuous readout, GEM signals will be processed using a 32 channel SAMPA ASIC. The first version of the SAMPA (MPW1) was delivered in 2014 and the production of final version is in progress. In this paper, the test results obtained for charge injection to the device using pulse generator as well as GEM detector prototype are reported.

  10. Supersymmetry At LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Shaaban

    2008-04-21

    One of the main motivation of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), scheduled to start around 2006, is to search for supersymmetric particles. The region of the parameter space of the minimal supersymmetric standard model, where supersymmetry can be discovered is investigated. We show that if supersymmetry exists at electroweak scale, it would be easy to find signals for it at the LHC. If the LHC does find supersymmetry, this would be one of the greatest achievements in the history of theoretical physics.

  11. Injection molded nanofluidic chips: fabrication method and functional tests using single-molecule DNA experiments.

    PubMed

    Utko, Pawel; Persson, Fredrik; Kristensen, Anders; Larsen, Niels B

    2011-01-21

    We demonstrate that fabrication of well-defined nanofluidic systems can be greatly simplified by injection molding of thermoplastic polymers. Chips featuring nanochannel arrays, microchannels and integrated interconnects are produced in a single processing step by injection molding. The resulting open channel structures are subsequently sealed by facile plasma-enhanced thermal bonding of a polymer film. This fast, inexpensive and industry-compatible method thus provides a single-use all-polymer platform for nanofluidic lab-on-a-chip applications. Its applicability for nanofluidics is demonstrated by DNA stretching experiments performed on individual double-stranded DNA molecules confined in the injection molded nanochannels. The obtained results are consistent with measurements performed in costly state-of-the-art silica nanochannels, for both straight and tapered channel geometries.

  12. Microbial succession and stimulation following a test well injection simulating CO2 leakage into shallow Newark Basin aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueker, M.; Clauson, K.; Yang, Q.; Umemoto, K.; Seltzer, A. M.; Zakharova, N. V.; Matter, J. M.; Stute, M.; Takahashi, T.; Goldberg, D.; O'Mullan, G. D.

    2012-12-01

    Despite growing appreciation for the importance of microbes in altering geochemical reactions in the subsurface, the microbial response to geological carbon sequestration injections and the role of microbes in altering metal mobilization following leakage scenarios in shallow aquifers remain poorly constrained. A Newark Basin test well was utilized in field experiments to investigate patterns of microbial succession following injection of CO2 saturated water into isolated aquifer intervals. Additionally, laboratory mesocosm experiments, including microbially-active and inactive (autoclave sterilized) treatments, were used to constrain the microbial role in mineral dissolution, trace metal release, and gas production (e.g. hydrogen and methane). Hydrogen production was detected in both sterilized and unsterilized laboratory mesocosm treatments, indicating abiotic hydrogen production may occur following CO2 leakage, and methane production was detected in unsterilized, microbially active mesocosms. In field experiments, a decrease in pH following injection of CO2 saturated aquifer water was accompanied by mobilization of trace elements (e.g. Fe and Mn), the production of hydrogen gas, and increased bacterial cell concentrations. 16S ribosomal RNA clone libraries, from samples collected before and after the test well injection, were compared in an attempt to link variability in geochemistry to changes in aquifer microbiology. Significant changes in microbial composition, compared to background conditions, were found following the test well injection, including a decrease in Proteobacteria, and an increased presence of Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia, Acidobacteria and other microbes associated with iron reducing and syntrophic metabolism. The concurrence of increased microbial cell concentration, and rapid microbial community succession, with increased concentrations of hydrogen gas suggests that abiotically produced hydrogen may serve as an ecologically-relevant energy

  13. Bulk Current Injection Testing of Cable Noise Reduction Techniques, 50 kHz to 400 MHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T.; Hare, Richard J.; Singh, Manisha

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents empirical results of cable noise reduction techniques as demonstrated using bulk current injection (BCI) techniques with radiated fields from 50 kHz - 400 MHz. It is a follow up to the two-part paper series presented at the Asia Pacific EMC Conference that focused on TEM cell signal injection. This paper discusses the effects of cable types, shield connections, and chassis connections on cable noise. For each topic, well established theories are compared with data from a real-world physical system.

  14. 40 CFR 146.87 - Logging, sampling, and testing prior to injection well operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... any other logs the Director requires for the given geology before the casing is installed; and (ii) A... Director. (b) The owner or operator must take whole cores or sidewall cores of the injection zone and... detailed report prepared by a log analyst that includes: Well log analyses (including well logs),...

  15. The LHC Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-03-11

    The Large Hadron Collider or LHC is the world’s biggest particle accelerator, but it can only get particles moving very quickly. To make measurements, scientists must employ particle detectors. There are four big detectors at the LHC: ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln introduces us to these detectors and gives us an idea of each one’s capabilities.

  16. The LHC Experiments

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The Large Hadron Collider or LHC is the world’s biggest particle accelerator, but it can only get particles moving very quickly. To make measurements, scientists must employ particle detectors. There are four big detectors at the LHC: ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln introduces us to these detectors and gives us an idea of each one’s capabilities.

  17. Hydrogeochemical alteration of groundwater due to a CO2 injection test into a shallow aquifer in Northeast Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dethlefsen, Frank; Peter, Anita; Hornbruch, Götz; Lamert, Hendrik; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; Beyer, Matthias; Dietrich, Peter; Dahmke, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    The accidental release of CO2 into potable aquifers, for instance as a consequence of a leakage out of a CO2 store site, can endanger drinking water resources due to the induced geochemical processes. A 10-day CO2 injection experiment into a shallow aquifer was carried out in Wittstock (Northeast Germany) in order to investigate the geochemical impact of a CO2 influx into such an aquifer and to test different monitoring methods. Information regarding the site investigation, the injection procedure monitoring setup, and first geochemical monitoring results are described in [1]. Apart from the utilization of the test results to evaluate monitoring approaches [2], further findings are presented on the evaluation of the geophysical monitoring [3], and the monitoring of stable carbon isotopes [4]. This part of the study focuses of the hydrogeochemical alteration of groundwater due to the CO2 injection test. As a consequence of the CO2 injection, major cations were released, i.e. concentrations increased, whereas major anion concentrations - beside bicarbonate - decreased, probably due to increased anion sorption capacity at variably charged exchange sites of minerals. Trace element concentrations increased as well significantly, whereas the relative concentration increase was far larger than the relative concentration increase of major cations. Furthermore, geochemical reactions show significant spatial heterogeneity, i.e. some elements such as Cr, Cu, Pb either increased in concentration or remained at stable concentrations with increasing TIC at different wells. Statistical analyses of regression coefficients confirm the different spatial reaction patterns at different wells. Concentration time series at single wells give evidence, that the trace element release is pH dependent, i.e. trace elements such as Zn, Ni, Co are released at pH of around 6.2-6.6, whereas other trace elements like As, Cd, Cu are released at pH of 5.6-6.4. [1] Peter, A., et al., Investigation of

  18. Investigation of Microseismicity Triggered by Raised Pore Pressure through Laboratory CO2 Injection Tests in Berea Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Chang, C.

    2014-12-01

    One of the critical problems for carbon dioxide capture and storage projects is the occurrence of microseismicity due to increased pore pressure during CO2 injection. The mechanism of microseismicity can be explained by the notion that the injection-induced pore pressure increase can potentially alter the reservoir rock in the form of either creating fractures or triggering slip on pre-existing discontinuities by reducing the effective normal stress. Therefore, it is important to estimate the critical pore pressure (Pcr) to prevent excessive seismicity. The purpose of this study is to attempt to simulate the microseismicity induced from increased pore pressure by CO2 injection into Berea sandstone. Cylindrical specimens were saw-cut at 30° from the specimen axis. Specimens were either dry or saturated by tap water. The frictional coefficients of the fractures were determined from triaxial shear tests to be 0.71 (dry) and 0.65 (water-saturated). With the frictional coefficients known, we then injected CO2 (either gaseous of liquid state) into the specimens (either dry or water-saturated) subjected to triaxial stress conditions. Under the conditions of constant confining pressures and axial stresses, we increased pore pressure in steps by injecting CO2 using a syringe pump. We monitored shear slip along the fracture using axial LVDTs and microseismicity using an acoustic emission sensor. The critical pore pressure that would initiate shear slip along the fracture was calculated from the Coulomb friction law. When CO2 was injected into dry specimens, shear slip and associated microseismicity started to occur at the pore pressure levels exactly estimated from the Coulomb theory. However, when CO2 (both gaseous and liquid states) was injected into water-saturated specimens, the same were initiated at pore pressures slightly higher (by 1.2-3.7 MPa) than that estimated from the Coulomb friction law. These results suggest that the presence of water and associated water

  19. Four tops for LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Ezequiel; Faroughy, Darius A.; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Morales, Roberto; Szynkman, Alejandro

    2017-02-01

    We design a search strategy for the Standard Model t t bar t t bar production at the LHC in the same-sign dilepton and trilepton channels. We study different signal features and, given the small expected number of signal events, we scrutinize in detail all reducible and irreducible backgrounds. Our analysis shows that by imposing a basic set of jet and lepton selection criteria, the SM pp → t t bar t t bar process could be evidenced in the near future, within Run-II, when combining both multi-lepton search channels. We argue that this search strategy should also be used as a guideline to test New Physics coupling predominantly to top-quarks. In particular, we show that a non-resonant New Physics enhancement in the four-top final state would be detectable through this search strategy. We study two top-philic simplified models of this kind, a neutral scalar boson and a Z‧, and present current and future exclusion limits on their mass and couplings.

  20. Low HIV testing among persons who inject drugs—National HIV Behavioral Surveillance, 20 U.S. cities, 2012✩

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Laura A.; Wejnert, Cyprian; Spiller, Michael W.; Broz, Dita; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Persons who inject drugs (PWID) continue to be disproportionately affected by HIV. HIV testing is key to reducing HIV transmission by increasing awareness of HIV status and linking HIV-positive persons to care. Using data from PWID participating in CDC’s National HIV Behavioral Surveillance (NHBS) system, we examined prevalence of recent HIV testing among PWID by certain characteristics to guide interventions to increase HIV testing. Methods We analyzed NHBS data from PWID 18 years or older recruited via respondent-driven sampling in 20 US cities in 2012. We examined demographic and behavioral factors associated with recent HIV testing (within 12 months before interview) using a Poisson model to calculate adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs). Results Of 9555 PWID, 53% had recently tested for HIV. In multivariable analysis, HIV testing was more frequent among participants who visited a healthcare provider (aPR 1.50, P < 0.001), participated in alcohol or drug treatment (aPR 1.21, P < 0.001), or received an HIV prevention intervention (aPR 1.26, P < 0.001). HIV testing was also more frequent among participants who received free sterile syringes (aPR 1.12, P < 0.001). Discussion Only half of PWID participating in NHBS in 2012 reported recent HIV testing. HIV testing was more frequent among participants who accessed health and HIV prevention services. To increase HIV testing among PWID, it is important for providers in healthcare and HIV prevention settings to proactively assess risk factors for HIV, including injection drug use, and offer a wide range of appropriate interventions, such as HIV testing. PMID:27323649

  1. Testing and comparison of four ionic tracers to measure stream flow loss by multiple tracer injection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zellweger, G.W.

    1994-01-01

    An injectate containing lithium, sodium, chloride and bromide was added continuously at five sites along a 507 m study reach of St Kevin Gulch, Lake County, Colorado to determine which sections of the stream were losing water to the stream bed and to ascertain how well the four tracers performed. The acidity of the stream (pH 3.6) made it possible for lithium and sodium, which are normally absorbed by ion exchange with stream bed sediment, to be used as conservative tracers. Net flow losses as low as 0.81 s-1, or 8% of flow, were calculated between measuring sites. By comparing the results of simultaneous injection it was determined whether subsections of the study reach were influent or effluent. Evaluation of tracer concentrations along 116 m of stream indicated that all four tracers behaved conservatively. Discharges measured by Parshall flumes were 4-18% greater than discharges measured by tracer dilution. -from Author

  2. The Safety of Aircraft Exposed to Electromagnetic Fields: HIRF Testing of Aircraft Using Direct Current Injection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    divides the current modes into two types; a capacitive type which flows between charge concentrations and an inductive type which flows in closed loops...Airframe resonances will be clearly shown to exist in the capacitive type modes and circulating type modes will be shown to occur at low and uniform...variety of DCI topologies. • Section 6 takes a promising DCI topology, and the capacitive mode currents are used to control the direct injected

  3. Barriers and missed opportunities to HIV testing among injection drug users in two Mexico – US border cities

    PubMed Central

    MOYER, L. B.; BROUWER, K. C.; BRODINE, S. K.; RAMOS, R.; LOZADA, R.; CRUZ, M. FIRESTONE; MAGIS-RODRIGUEZ, C.; STRATHDEE, S. A.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction and Aims Despite increasing HIV prevalence in cities along the Mexico – US border, HIV testing among high-risk populations remains low. We sought to identify barriers associated with HIV testing among injection drug users (IDUs) in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, the two largest Mexican border cities located across from San Diego, California and El Paso, Texas, respectively. Design and Methods In 2005, 222 IDUs in Tijuana and 205 IDUs in Ciudad Juarez were recruited by respondent-driven sampling and administered a questionnaire to collect socio-demographic, behavioural and HIV testing history data. Blood samples were provided for serological testing of HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV) and syphilis. Results Only 38% and 30% of respondents in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, respectively, had ever had an HIV test. The factors associated independently with never having been tested for HIV differed between the two sites, except for lack of knowledge on HIV transmission, which was associated independently in both locales. Importantly, 65% of those who had never been tested for HIV in both cities experienced at least one missed opportunity for voluntary testing, including medical visits, drug treatment and spending time in jail. Discussion and Conclusions Among this high-risk IDU population we found HIV testing to be low, with voluntary testing in public and private settings utilised inadequately. These findings underscore the need to expand voluntary HIV education and testing and to integrate it into services and locales frequented by IDUs in these Mexico –US border cities. PMID:18034380

  4. Data from pumping and injection tests and chemical sampling in the geothermal aquifer at Klamath Falls, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, S.M.; Janik, C.J.; Long, D.C.; Solbau, R.D.; Lienau, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    A seven-week pumping and injection tests in the geothermal aquifer at Klamath Falls, Oregon, in 1983 provided new information on hydraulic properties of the aquifer. The Open-File Data Report on the tests includes graphs of water levels measured in 50 wells, temperature measurement in 17 wells , daily air-temperatures in relation to discharge of thermal water from more than 70 pumped and artesian wells, tables of monthly mean air temperatures and estimates of discharges of thermal water during a normal year, and tables of chemical and isotopic analyses on samples from 12 wells. The water-level measurements reflect the effects of pumping, injection, and recovery over about 1.7 square miles of the hot-well area of Klamath Falls. The pumped well, City Well No 1, and the injection well at the Klamath County Museum are components of a proposed District Heating Plan. The study was funded principally under contracts from the U.S. Department of Energy to the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Stanford University, and the Oregon Institute of Technology, with coordination and chemical sampling provided under the Geothermal Research Program, U.S. Geological Survey. Support was received from the City of Klamath Falls, Klamath County Chamber of Commerce, Citizens for Responsible Geothermal Development, and many citizen volunteers. (USGS)

  5. Laboratory endurance test of sunflower methyl esters for direct injected diesel engine fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, K.; Ziejewski, M.

    1983-12-01

    A methyl ester of sunflower oil was durability tested using the test cycle recommended by the Alternate Fuels Committee of the Engine Manufacturer's Association. The results are compared to a baseline test using diesel fuel. Based on the results, the methyl ester fuel successfully completed the 200-hour durability test.

  6. Radiation hard electronics for LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, M.; Millmore, M.; Hall, G.; Sachdeva, R.; French, M.; Nygård, E.; Yoshioka, K.

    1995-02-01

    A CMOS front end electronics chain is being developed by the RD20 collaboration for microstrip detector readout at LHC. It is based on a preamplifier and CR-RC filter, analogue pipeline and an analogue signal processor. Amplifiers and transistor test structures have been constructed and evaluated in detail using a Harris 1.2 μm radiation hardened CMOS process. Progress with larger scale elements, including 32 channel front end chips, is described. A radiation hard 128 channel chip, with a 40 MHz analogue multiplexer, is to be submitted for fabrication in July 1994 which will form the basis of the readout of the tracking system of the CMS experiment.

  7. Acceptability of rapid oral fluid HIV testing among male injection drug users in Taiwan, 1997 and 2007.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Shu-Yu; Morisky, Donald E; Yeh, Ching-Ying; Twu, Shiing-Jer; Peng, Eugene Yu-Chang; Malow, Robert M

    2011-04-01

    Rapid oral fluid HIV testing (rapid oral testing) is in the process of being adapted in Taiwan and elsewhere given its advantages over prior HIV testing methods. To guide this process, we examined the acceptability of rapid oral testing at two time points (i.e., 1997 and 2007) among one of the highest risk populations, male injection drug users (IDUs). For this purpose, an anonymous self-administered survey was completed by HIV-negative IDUs involved in the criminal justice system in 1997 (N (1)=137 parolees) and 2007 (N (2)=106 prisoners). A social marketing model helped guide the design of our questionnaire to assess the acceptability of rapid oral testing. This included assessing a new product, across four marketing dimensions: product, price, promotion, and place. Results revealed that in both 1997 and 2007, over 90% indicated that rapid oral testing would be highly acceptable, particularly if the cost was under US$6, and that a pharmacy would be the most appropriate and accessible venue for selling the rapid oral testing kits. The vast majority of survey respondents believed that the cost of rapid oral testing should be federally subsidized and that television and newspaper advertisements would be the most effective media to advertise for rapid oral testing. Both the 1997 and 2007 surveys suggested that rapid oral HIV testing would be particularly accepted in Taiwan by IDUs after release from the criminal justice system.

  8. LHC Olympics: Advanced Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armour, Kyle; Larkoski, Andrew; Gray, Amanda; Ventura, Dan; Walsh, Jon; Schabinger, Rob

    2006-05-01

    The LHC Olympics is a series of workshop aimed at encouraging theorists and experimentalists to prepare for the soon-to-be-online Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland. One aspect of the LHC Olympics program consists of the study of simulated data sets which represent various possible new physics signals as they would be seen in LHC detectors. Through this exercise, LHC Olympians learn the phenomenology of possible new physics models and gain experience in analyzing LHC data. Additionally, the LHC Olympics encourages discussion between theorists and experimentalists, and through this collaboration new techniques could be developed. The University of Washington LHC Olympics group consists of several first-year graduate and senior undergraduate students, in both theoretical and experimental particle physics. Presented here is a discussion of some of the more advanced techniques used and the recent results of one such LHC Olympics study.

  9. Radio Observations Of GRB 100418a: Test Of An Energy Injection Model Explaining Long-Lasting GRB Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moin, Aquib; Chandra, P.; Miller-Jones, J.; Tingay, S.; Taylor, G. B.; Frail, D. A.; Wang, Z.; Reynolds, C.; Phillips, C.

    2014-01-01

    I will highlight the results of our radio observational campaign on GRB 100418a, for which the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), Very Large Array (VLA) and the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) were used. GRB 100418a was a peculiar GRB with unusual X-ray and optical afterglow profiles featuring a plateau phase with a very shallow rise. This observed plateau phase was believed to be due to a continued energy injection mechanism, which powered the forward shock, giving rise to an unusual and long-lasting afterglow. The radio afterglow of GRB 100418a was detectable several weeks after the prompt emission. We conducted long-term monitoring observations of the afterglow and attempted to test the energy injection model advocating that the continuous energy injection is due to shells of material moving at a wide range of Lorentz factors. We obtained an upper limit of γ < 7 for the expansion rate of the GRB 100418a radio afterglow, indicating that the range-of-Lorentz factor model could only be applicable for relatively slow moving ejecta. A preferred explanation could be that continued activity of the central engine may have powered the long-lasting afterglow.

  10. Radio observations of GRB 100418a: Test of an energy injection model explaining long-lasting GRB afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Moin, A.; Wang, Z.; Chandra, P.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Tingay, S. J.; Reynolds, C.; Taylor, G. B.; Frail, D. A.; Phillips, C. J.

    2013-12-20

    We present the results of our radio observational campaign of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 100418a, for which we used the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the Very Large Array, and the Very Long Baseline Array. GRB 100418a was a peculiar GRB with unusual X-ray and optical afterglow profiles featuring a plateau phase with a very shallow rise. This observed plateau phase was believed to be due to a continued energy injection mechanism that powered the forward shock, giving rise to an unusual and long-lasting afterglow. The radio afterglow of GRB 100418a was detectable several weeks after the prompt emission. We conducted long-term monitoring observations of the afterglow and attempted to test the energy injection model advocating that the continuous energy injection is due to shells of material moving at a wide range of Lorentz factors. We obtained an upper limit of γ < 7 for the expansion rate of the GRB 100418a radio afterglow, indicating that the range-of-Lorentz factor model could only be applicable for relatively slow-moving ejecta. A preferred explanation could be that continued activity of the central engine may have powered the long-lasting afterglow.

  11. Estimation of αL, velocity, Kd and confidence limits from tracer injection test data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broermann, James; Bassett, R.L.; Weeks, Edwin P.; Borgstrom, Mark

    1997-01-01

    Bromide and boron were used as tracers during an injection experiment conducted at an artificial recharge facility near Stanton, Texas. The Ogallala aquifer at the Stanton site represents a heterogeneous alluvial environment and provides the opportunity to report scale dependent dispersivities at observation distances of 2 to 15 m in this setting. Values of longitudinal dispersivities are compared with other published values. Water samples were collected at selected depths both from piezometers and from fully screened observation wells at radii of 2, 5, 10 and 15 m. An exact analytical solution is used to simulate the concentration breakthrough curves and estimate longitudinal dispersivities and velocity parameters. Greater confidence can be placed on these data because the estimated parameters are error bounded using the bootstrap method. The non-conservative behavior of boron transport in clay rich sections of the aquifer were quantified with distribution coefficients by using bromide as a conservative reference tracer.

  12. Injecting drugs of abuse and immunity: implications for HIV vaccine testing and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Ugen, Kenneth E; Nyland, Susan B

    2006-11-01

    The recreational use of legal and illegal drugs has significant effects on immune responses and can potentially modulate susceptibility to infection by a number of pathogens. A number of agents including cannabinoids (marijuana), cocaine opiates, amphetamines, nicotine and alcohol were demonstrated to have potentially adverse effects on the susceptibility to infections, mediated most likely, by adverse effects on immunity. As such, these drugs of abuse could have significant and potentially adverse effects on the vaccination efficacy of a number of vaccines currently on the market and on potential experimental vaccines currently in the pipeline. This review will present an overview on how drugs of abuse potentially impacts immune responses and vaccination efficacy. The emphasis of this review will be the effects of opiate abuse, as exemplified by injecting/intravenous drug users (IDU), on HIV/AIDS and its potential impact on vaccine efficacy trials against this devastating infection/syndrome.

  13. The LHCb Detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LHCb Collaboration; Alves, A. Augusto, Jr.; Filho, L. M. Andrade; Barbosa, A. F.; Bediaga, I.; Cernicchiaro, G.; Guerrer, G.; Lima, H. P., Jr.; Machado, A. A.; Magnin, J.; Marujo, F.; de Miranda, J. M.; Reis, A.; Santos, A.; Toledo, A.; Akiba, K.; Amato, S.; de Paula, B.; de Paula, L.; da Silva, T.; Gandelman, M.; Lopes, J. H.; Maréchal, B.; Moraes, D.; Polycarpo, E.; Rodrigues, F.; Ballansat, J.; Bastian, Y.; Boget, D.; DeBonis, I.; Coco, V.; David, P. Y.; Decamp, D.; Delebecque, P.; Drancourt, C.; Dumont-Dayot, N.; Girard, C.; Lieunard, B.; Minard, M. N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Rambure, T.; Rospabe, G.; T'Jampens, S.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bohner, G.; Bonnefoy, R.; Borras, D.; Carloganu, C.; Chanal, H.; Conte, E.; Cornat, R.; Crouau, M.; Delage, E.; Deschamps, O.; Henrard, P.; Jacquet, P.; Lacan, C.; Laubser, J.; Lecoq, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Magne, M.; Martemiyanov, M.; Mercier, M.-L.; Monteil, S.; Niess, V.; Perret, P.; Reinmuth, G.; Robert, A.; Suchorski, S.; Arnaud, K.; Aslanides, E.; Babel, J.; Benchouk, C.; Cachemiche, J.-P.; Cogan, J.; Derue, F.; Dinkespiler, B.; Duval, P.-Y.; Garonne, V.; Favard, S.; LeGac, R.; Leon, F.; Leroy, O.; Liotard, P.-L.; Marin, F.; Menouni, M.; Ollive, P.; Poss, S.; Roche, A.; Sapunov, M.; Tocco, L.; Viaud, B.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Amhis, Y.; Barrand, G.; Barsuk, S.; Beigbeder, C.; Beneyton, R.; Breton, D.; Callot, O.; Charlet, D.; D'Almagne, B.; Duarte, O.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jean-Marie, B.; Lefrancois, J.; Machefert, F.; Robbe, P.; Schune, M.-H.; Tocut, V.; Videau, I.; Benayoun, M.; David, P.; DelBuono, L.; Gilles, G.; Domke, M.; Futterschneider, H.; Ilgner, Ch; Kapusta, P.; Kolander, M.; Krause, R.; Lieng, M.; Nedos, M.; Rudloff, K.; Schleich, S.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Warda, K.; Agari, M.; Bauer, C.; Baumeister, D.; Bulian, N.; Fuchs, H. P.; Fallot-Burghardt, W.; Glebe, T.; Hofmann, W.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Löchner, S.; Ludwig, A.; Maciuc, F.; Sanchez Nieto, F.; Schmelling, M.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Sexauer, E.; Smale, N. J.; Trunk, U.; Voss, H.; Albrecht, J.; Bachmann, S.; Blouw, J.; Deissenroth, M.; Deppe, H.; Dreis, H. B.; Eisele, F.; Haas, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Hennenberger, S.; Knopf, J.; Moch, M.; Perieanu, A.; Rabenecker, S.; Rausch, A.; Rummel, C.; Rusnyak, R.; Schiller, M.; Stange, U.; Uwer, U.; Walter, M.; Ziegler, R.; Avoni, G.; Balbi, G.; Bonifazi, F.; Bortolotti, D.; Carbone, A.; D'Antone, I.; Galli, D.; Gregori, D.; Lax, I.; Marconi, U.; Peco, G.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vecchi, S.; Bonivento, W.; Cardini, A.; Cadeddu, S.; DeLeo, V.; Deplano, C.; Furcas, S.; Lai, A.; Oldeman, R.; Raspino, D.; Saitta, B.; Serra, N.; Baldini, W.; Brusa, S.; Chiozzi, S.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Evangelisti, F.; Franconieri, A.; Germani, S.; Gianoli, A.; Guoming, L.; Landi, L.; Malaguti, R.; Padoan, C.; Pennini, C.; Savriè, M.; Squerzanti, S.; Zhao, T.; Zhu, M.; Bizzeti, A.; Graziani, G.; Lenti, M.; Lenzi, M.; Maletta, F.; Pennazzi, S.; Passaleva, G.; Veltri, M.; Alfonsi, M.; Anelli, M.; Balla, A.; Battisti, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Campana, P.; Carletti, M.; Ciambrone, P.; Corradi, G.; Dané, E.; Di Virgilio, A.; DeSimone, P.; Felici, G.; Forti, C.; Gatta, M.; Lanfranchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Pistilli, M.; Poli Lener, M.; Rosellini, R.; Santoni, M.; Saputi, A.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Zossi, A.; Ameri, M.; Cuneo, S.; Fontanelli, F.; Gracco, V.; Miní, G.; Parodi, M.; Petrolini, A.; Sannino, M.; Vinci, A.; Alemi, M.; Arnaboldi, C.; Bellunato, T.; Calvi, M.; Chignoli, F.; DeLucia, A.; Galotta, G.; Mazza, R.; Matteuzzi, C.; Musy, M.; Negri, P.; Perego, D.; Pessina, G.; Auriemma, G.; Bocci, V.; Buccheri, A.; Chiodi, G.; Di Marco, S.; Iacoangeli, F.; Martellotti, G.; Nobrega, R.; Pelosi, A.; Penso, G.; Pinci, D.; Rinaldi, W.; Rossi, A.; Santacesaria, R.; Satriano, C.; Carboni, G.; Iannilli, M.; Massafferri Rodrigues, A.; Messi, R.; Paoluzzi, G.; Sabatino, G.; Santovetti, E.; Satta, A.; Amoraal, J.; van Apeldoorn, G.; Arink, R.; van Bakel, N.; Band, H.; Bauer, Th; Berkien, A.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bos, E.; Bron, Ch; Ceelie, L.; Doets, M.; van der Eijk, R.; Fransen, J.-P.; de Groen, P.; Gromov, V.; Hierck, R.; Homma, J.; Hommels, B.; Hoogland, W.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Jansen, L.; Jaspers, M.; Kaan, B.; Koene, B.; Koopstra, J.; Kroes, F.; Kraan, M.; Langedijk, J.; Merk, M.; Mos, S.; Munneke, B.; Palacios, J.; Papadelis, A.; Pellegrino, A.; van Petten, O.; du Pree, T.; Roeland, E.; Ruckstuhl, W.; Schimmel, A.; Schuijlenburg, H.; Sluijk, T.; Spelt, J.; Stolte, J.; Terrier, H.; Tuning, N.; Van Lysebetten, A.; Vankov, P.; Verkooijen, J.; Verlaat, B.; Vink, W.; de Vries, H.; Wiggers, L.; Ybeles Smit, G.; Zaitsev, N.; Zupan, M.; Zwart, A.; van den Brand, J.; Bulten, H. J.; de Jong, M.; Ketel, T.; Klous, S.; Kos, J.; M'charek, B.; Mul, F.; Raven, G.; Simioni, E.; Cheng, J.; Dai, G.; Deng, Z.; Gao, Y.; Gong, G.; Gong, H.; He, J.; Hou, L.; Li, J.; Qian, W.; Shao, B.; Xue, T.; Yang, Z.; Zeng, M.; Muryn, B.; Ciba, K.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Blocki, J.; Galuszka, K.; Hajduk, L.; Michalowski, J.; Natkaniec, Z.; Polok, G.; Stodulski, M.; Witek, M.; Brzozowski, K.; Chlopik, A.; Gawor, P.; Guzik, Z.; Nawrot, A.; Srednicki, A.; Syryczynski, K.; Szczekowski, M.; Anghel, D. V.; Cimpean, A.; Coca, C.; Constantin, F.; Cristian, P.; Dumitru, D. D.; Dumitru, D. T.; Giolu, G.; Kusko, C.; Magureanu, C.; Mihon, Gh; Orlandea, M.; Pavel, C.; Petrescu, R.; Popescu, S.; Preda, T.; Rosca, A.; Rusu, V. L.; Stoica, R.; Stoica, S.; Tarta, P. D.; Filippov, S.; Gavrilov, Yu; Golyshkin, L.; Gushchin, E.; Karavichev, O.; Klubakov, V.; Kravchuk, L.; Kutuzov, V.; Laptev, S.; Popov, S.; Aref'ev, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Dolgoshein, V.; Egorychev, V.; Golutvin, A.; Gushchin, O.; Konoplyannikov, A.; Korolko, I.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Machikhiliyan, I.; Malyshev, S.; Mayatskaya, E.; Prokudin, M.; Rusinov, D.; Rusinov, V.; Shatalov, P.; Shchutska, L.; Tarkovskiy, E.; Tayduganov, A.; Voronchev, K.; Zhiryakova, O.; Bobrov, A.; Bondar, A.; Eidelman, S.; Kozlinsky, A.; Shekhtman, L.; Beloous, K. S.; Dzhelyadin, R. I.; Gelitsky, Yu V.; Gouz, Yu P.; Kachnov, K. G.; Kobelev, A. S.; Matveev, V. D.; Novikov, V. P.; Obraztsov, V. F.; Ostankov, A. P.; Romanovsky, V. I.; Rykalin, V. I.; Soldatov, A. P.; Soldatov, M. M.; Tchernov, E. N.; Yushchenko, O. P.; Bochin, B.; Bondar, N.; Fedorov, O.; Golovtsov, V.; Guets, S.; Kashchuk, A.; Lazarev, V.; Maev, O.; Neustroev, P.; Sagidova, N.; Spiridenkov, E.; Volkov, S.; Vorobyev, An; Vorobyov, A.; Aguilo, E.; Bota, S.; Calvo, M.; Comerma, A.; Cano, X.; Dieguez, A.; Herms, A.; Lopez, E.; Luengo, S.; Garra, J.; Garrido, Ll; Gascon, D.; Gaspar de Valenzuela, A.; Gonzalez, C.; Graciani, R.; Grauges, E.; Perez Calero, A.; Picatoste, E.; Riera, J.; Rosello, M.; Ruiz, H.; Vilasis, X.; Xirgu, X.; Adeva, B.; Cid Vidal, X.; MartÉnez Santos, D.; Esperante Pereira, D.; Fungueiriño Pazos, J. L.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Gómez, C. Lois; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pérez Trigo, E.; Pló Casasús, M.; Rodriguez Cobo, C.; Rodríguez Pérez, P.; Saborido, J. J.; Seco, M.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Bartalini, P.; Bay, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; Blanc, F.; Borel, J.; Carron, B.; Currat, C.; Conti, G.; Dormond, O.; Ermoline, Y.; Fauland, P.; Fernandez, L.; Frei, R.; Gagliardi, G.; Gueissaz, N.; Haefeli, G.; Hicheur, A.; Jacoby, C.; Jalocha, P.; Jimenez-Otero, S.; Hertig, J.-P.; Knecht, M.; Legger, F.; Locatelli, L.; Moser, J.-R.; Needham, M.; Nicolas, L.; Perrin-Giacomin, A.; Perroud, J.-P.; Potterat, C.; Ronga, F.; Schneider, O.; Schietinger, T.; Steele, D.; Studer, L.; Tareb, M.; Tran, M. T.; van Hunen, J.; Vervink, K.; Villa, S.; Zwahlen, N.; Bernet, R.; Büchler, A.; Gassner, J.; Lehner, F.; Sakhelashvili, T.; Salzmann, C.; Sievers, P.; Steiner, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Straumann, U.; van Tilburg, J.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Ziegler, M.; Dovbnya, A.; Ranyuk, Yu; Shapoval, I.; Borisova, M.; Iakovenko, V.; Kyva, V.; Kovalchuk, O.; Okhrimenko, O.; Pugatch, V.; Pylypchenko, Yu; Adinolfi, M.; Brook, N. H.; Head, R. D.; Imong, J. P.; Lessnoff, K. A.; Metlica, F. C. D.; Muir, A. J.; Rademacker, J. H.; Solomin, A.; Szczypka, P. M.; Barham, C.; Buszello, C.; Dickens, J.; Gibson, V.; Haines, S.; Harrison, K.; Jones, C. R.; Katvars, S.; Kerzel, U.; Lazzeroni, C.; Li, Y. Y.; Rogers, G.; Storey, J.; Skottowe, H.; Wotton, S. A.; Adye, T. J.; Densham, C. J.; Easo, S.; Franek, B.; Loveridge, P.; Morrow, D.; Morris, J. V.; Nandakumar, R.; Nardulli, J.; Papanestis, A.; Patrick, G. N.; Ricciardi, S.; Woodward, M. L.; Zhang, Z.; Chamonal, R. J. U.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, P.; Eisenhardt, S.; Gilardi, N.; Khan, A.; Kim, Y. M.; Lambert, R.; Lawrence, J.; Main, A.; McCarron, J.; Mclean, C.; Muheim, F.; Osorio-Oliveros, A. F.; Playfer, S.; Styles, N.; Xie, Y.; Bates, A.; Carson, L.; da Cunha Marinho, F.; Doherty, F.; Eklund, L.; Gersabeck, M.; Haddad, L.; Macgregor, A. A.; Melone, J.; McEwan, F.; Petrie, D. M.; Paterson, S. K.; Parkes, C.; Pickford, A.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rodrigues, E.; Saavedra, A. F.; Soler, F. J. P.; Szumlak, T.; Viret, S.; Allebone, L.; Awunor, O.; Back, J.; Barber, G.; Barnes, C.; Cameron, B.; Clark, D.; Clark, I.; Dornan, P.; Duane, A.; Eames, C.; Egede, U.; Girone, M.; Greenwood, S.; Hallam, R.; Hare, R.; Howard, A.; Jolly, S.; Kasey, V.; Khaleeq, M.; Koppenburg, P.; Miller, D.; Plackett, R.; Price, D.; Reece, W.; Savage, P.; Savidge, T.; Simmons, B.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Websdale, D.; Affolder, A.; Anderson, J. S.; Biagi, S. F.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Carroll, J. L.; Casse, G.; Cooke, P.; Donleavy, S.; Dwyer, L.; Hennessy, K.; Huse, T.; Hutchcroft, D.; Jones, D.; Lockwood, M.; McCubbin, M.; McNulty, R.; Muskett, D.; Noor, A.; Patel, G. D.; Rinnert, K.; Shears, T.; Smith, N. A.; Southern, G.; Stavitski, I.; Sutcliffe, P.; Tobin, M.; Traynor, S. M.; Turner, P.; Whitley, M.; Wormald, M.; Wright, V.; Bibby, J. H.; Brisbane, S.; Brock, M.; Charles, M.; Cioffi, C.; Gligorov, V. V.; Handford, T.; Harnew, N.; Harris, F.; John, M. J. J.; Jones, M.; Libby, J.; Martin, L.; McArthur, I. A.; Muresan, R.; Newby, C.; Ottewell, B.; Powell, A.; Rotolo, N.; Senanayake, R. S.; Somerville, L.; Soroko, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sullivan, P.; Stokes-Rees, I.; Topp-Jorgensen, S.; Xing, F.; Wilkinson, G.; Artuso, M.; Belyaev, I.; Blusk, S.; Lefeuvre, G.; Menaa, N.; Menaa-Sia, R.; Mountain, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Wang, J. C.; Abadie, L.; Aglieri-Rinella, G.; Albrecht, E.; André, J.; Anelli, G.; Arnaud, N.; Augustinus, A.; Bal, F.; Barandela Pazos, M. C.; Barczyk, A.; Bargiotti, M.; Batista Lopes, J.; Behrendt, O.; Berni, S.; Binko, P.; Bobillier, V.; Braem, A.; Brarda, L.; Buytaert, J.; Camilleri, L.; Cambpell, M.; Castellani, G.; Cataneo, F.; Cattaneo, M.; Chadaj, B.; Charpentier, P.; Cherukuwada, S.; Chesi, E.; Christiansen, J.; Chytracek, R.; Clemencic, M.; Closier, J.; Collins, P.; Colrain, P.; Cooke, O.; Corajod, B.; Corti, G.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Damodaran, B.; David, C.; de Capua, S.; Decreuse, G.; Degaudenzi, H.; Dijkstra, H.; Droulez, J.-P.; Duarte Ramos, D.; Dufey, J. P.; Dumps, R.; Eckstein, D.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Flegel, W.; Forty, R.; Fournier, C.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Gaidioz, B.; Gaspar, C.; Gayde, J.-C.; Gavillet, P.; Go, A.; Gracia Abril, G.; Graulich, J.-S.; Giudici, P.-A.; Guirao Elias, A.; Guglielmini, P.; Gys, T.; Hahn, F.; Haider, S.; Harvey, J.; Hay, B.; Hernando Morata, J.-A.; Herranz Alvarez, J.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hilke, H. J.; von Holtey, G.; Hulsbergen, W.; Jacobsson, R.; Jamet, O.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Kanaya, N.; Knaster Refolio, J.; Koestner, S.; Koratzinos, M.; Kristic, R.; Lacarrère, D.; Lasseur, C.; Lastovicka, T.; Laub, M.; Liko, D.; Lippmann, C.; Lindner, R.; Losasso, M.; Maier, A.; Mair, K.; Maley, P.; Mato Vila, P.; Moine, G.; Morant, J.; Moritz, M.; Moscicki, J.; Muecke, M.; Mueller, H.; Nakada, T.; Neufeld, N.; Ocariz, J.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Parzefall, U.; Patel, M.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Piedigrossi, D.; Pivk, M.; Pokorski, W.; Ponce, S.; Ranjard, F.; Riegler, W.; Renaud, J.; Roiser, S.; Rossi, A.; Roy, L.; Ruf, T.; Ruffinoni, D.; Saladino, S.; Sambade Varela, A.; Santinelli, R.; Schmelling, S.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, T.; Schöning, A.; Schopper, A.; Seguinot, J.; Snoeys, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, A. C.; Somogyi, P.; Stoica, R.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; Toledo Alarcon, J.; Ullaland, O.; Valassi, A.; Vannerem, P.; Veness, R.; Wicht, P.; Wiedner, D.; Witzeling, W.; Wright, A.; Wyllie, K.; Ypsilantis, T.

    2008-08-01

    The LHCb experiment is dedicated to precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of B hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva). The initial configuration and expected performance of the detector and associated systems, as established by test beam measurements and simulation studies, is described.

  14. Sector Tests of a Low-NO(sub x), Lean, Direct- Injection, Multipoint Integrated Module Combustor Concept Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacina, Robert R.; Wey, Chang-Lie; Laing, Peter; Mansour, Adel

    2002-01-01

    The low-emissions combustor development described is directed toward advanced high pressure aircraft gas-turbine applications. The emphasis of this research is to reduce nitrogen oxides (NOx) at high-power conditions and to maintain carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons at their current low levels at low power conditions. Low-NOx combustors can be classified into rich-burn and lean-burn concepts. Lean-burn combustors can be further classified into lean-premixed-prevaporized (LPP) and lean direct injection (LDI) concepts. In both concepts, all the combustor air, except for liner cooling flow, enters through the combustor dome so that the combustion occurs at the lowest possible flame temperature. The LPP concept has been shown to have the lowest NOx emissions, but for advanced high-pressure-ratio engines, the possibility of autoignition or flashback precludes its use. LDI differs from LPP in that the fuel is injected directly into the flame zone, and thus, it does not have the potential for autoignition or flashback and should have greater stability. However, since it is not premixed and prevaporized, good atomization is necessary and the fuel must be mixed quickly and uniformly so that flame temperatures are low and NOx formation levels are comparable to those of LPP. The LDI concept described is a multipoint fuel injection/multiburning zone concept. Each of the multiple fuel injectors has an air swirler associated with it to provide quick mixing and a small recirculation zone for burning. The multipoint fuel injection provides quick, uniform mixing and the small multiburning zones provide for reduced burning residence time, resulting in low NOx formation. An integrated-module approach was used for the construction where chemically etched laminates, diffusion bonded together, combine the fuel injectors, air swirlers, and fuel manifold into a single element. The multipoint concept combustor was demonstrated in a 15 sector test. The configuration tested had 36

  15. Cyclic CO sub 2 injection for light oil recovery: Performance of a cost shared field test in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Bassiouni, Z.A.

    1990-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this research is to provide a base of knowledge on the CO{sub 2} huff n' puff process for the enhanced recovery of Louisiana crude oil. Project goals include laboratory process, and numerical simulation to interpret coreflood results. Additional activities include construction and analysis of a field test data to facilitate target reservoir screening, and to identify sensitive operational parameters. Coreflood experiments were initiated during this reporting period to examine the influence of CO{sub 2} injection rate on process performance. Experiments designed to determine the benefits of using a drive gas (N{sub 2}) have been completed. 2 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. Ineffectiveness of AIDS education and HIV antibody testing in reducing high-risk behaviors among injection drug users.

    PubMed Central

    Calsyn, D A; Saxon, A J; Freeman, G; Whittaker, S

    1992-01-01

    The effectiveness of education in reducing high-risk human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission behaviors was examined in 313 injection drug users. Involvement in high-risk behaviors was assessed via structured interview at study entry and 4 months following the intervention. Subjects were randomly assigned to (1) AIDS education, (2) AIDS education with optional HIV antibody testing, or (3) a wait list. The sample as a whole decreased its involvement in high-risk behaviors, but there were no significant differences as a function of experimental group assignment. PMID:1546776

  17. Beam Injection into RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mackay, W. W.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-05-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. We describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks, the application program to steer the beam and the injection kickers. We report on the commissioning of the injection systems and on measurements of the kickers.

  18. Injection of CO2-saturated water through a siliceous sandstone plug from the Hontomin test site (Spain): experiment and modeling.

    PubMed

    Canal, J; Delgado, J; Falcón, I; Yang, Q; Juncosa, R; Barrientos, V

    2013-01-02

    Massive chemical reactions are not expected when injecting CO(2) in siliceous sandstone reservoirs, but their performance can be challenged by small-scale reactions and other processes affecting their transport properties. We have conducted a core flooding test with a quartzarenite plug of Lower Cretaceous age representative of the secondary reservoir of the Hontomín test site. The sample, confined at high pressure, was successively injected with DIW and CO(2)-saturated DIW for 49 days while monitoring geophysical, chemical, and hydrodynamic parameters. The plug experienced little change, without evidence of secondary carbonation. However, permeability increased by a factor of 4 (0.022-0.085 mD), and the V(P)/V(S) ratio, whose change is related with microcracking, rose from ~1.68 to ~1.8. Porosity also increased (7.33-8.1%) from the beginning to the end of the experiment. Fluid/rock reactions were modeled with PHREEQC-2, and they are dominated by the dissolution of Mg-calcite. Mass balances show that ~4% of the initial carbonate was consumed. The results suggest that mineral dissolution and microcracking may have acted in a synergistic way at the beginning of the acidic flooding. However, dissolution processes concentrated in pore throats can better explain the permeability enhancement observed over longer periods of time.

  19. Nondestructive Tests for the Evaluation of Railroad Track Foundations and Lime Slurry Pressure Injection Stabilization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    1110-2-1802. ,4. R. F. Ballard, " Method for Crosshole Seismic Testing," American Society of Civil Engineers , Journal of the Geotechnical Engineering ...PROGRAM ELEMENT, PROJECT, TASK US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station AREAS WORK UNIT NUMBERS Geotechnical Laboratory PO Box 631, Vicksburg...sensitivity and repeatability, on the need for geotechnical engineering data, and most importantly on the length of testing time (in order to minimize the

  20. Status of superconducting magnet development (SSC, RHIC, LHC)

    SciTech Connect

    Wanderer, P.

    1993-12-31

    This paper summarize recent superconducting accelerator magnet construction and test activities at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSC), the Large Hadron Collider at CERN (LHC), and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven (RHIC). Future plan are also presented.

  1. Tests of ionospheric control of young injection events identified from magnetometer observations at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelson, M.; Jia, X.

    2015-12-01

    Kennelly et al. (2013) reported that young plasma injection events observed in Saturn's nightside magnetosphere and identified from plasma wave signatures are modulated at the period associated with the winter hemisphere. In a system unstable to interchange, radial motion of flux tubes is constrained by the "line-tying" effect of high ionospheric conductance (Southwood and Kivelson, 1989). Slippage of a flux tube would then occur initially in the hemisphere in which the ionospheric conductance is lowest. Saturn's ionospheric conductances vary not only with season, but also with rotation phase because of the presence of a pattern of rotating field-aligned currents that drive "planetary period oscillations" (Jia and Kivelson, 2012). The conductance should minimize near the center of the downward current region and, at this rotation phase in the winter hemisphere, the growth rate of the instability would be largest, accounting for control by the northern period. With motion starting in the winter hemisphere, the flux tube would develop a tilt of predictable sense and the initial inward motion of the interchanging flux tube would occur at a specific rotation phase of the winter ionosphere. For a subset of the Kennelly events, we found that the tilt and phase are consistent with expectations based on the control of displacement by ionospheric conductance. Many additional young interchange events have been identified by K. K. Khurana [personal communication, 2015] whom we thank for making the list available. We examine this more extensive set of events and use them to investigate the proposed mechanism more fully. __________ Jia, X., and M. G. Kivelson (2012), J. Geophys. Res., 117, A11219. Kennelly, T. J., J. S. Leisner, G. B. Hospodarsky, and D. A. Gurnett (2013), J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 118, 832-838. Kivelson, M., and X. Jia (2014), , AGU Fall meeting, 2014, SM51E-4295. Southwood, D. J., and M. G. Kivelson (1989), J. Geophys. Res., 94, 299-308.

  2. Use of data obtained from core tests in the design and operation of spent brine injection wells in geopressured or geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jorda, R.M.

    1980-03-01

    The effects of formation characteristics on injection well performance are reviewed. Use of data acquired from cores taken from injection horizons to predict injectivity is described. And methods for utilizing data from bench scale testing of brine and core samples to optimize injection well design are presented. Currently available methods and equipment provide data which enable the optimum design of injection wells through analysis of cores taken from injection zones. These methods also provide a means of identifying and correcting well injection problems. Methods described in this report are: bulk density measurement; porosity measurement; pore size distribution analysis; permeability measurement; formation grain size distribution analysis; core description (lithology) and composition; amount, type and distribution of clays and shales; connate water analysis; consolidatability of friable reservoir rocks; grain and pore characterization by scanning electron microscopy; grain and pore characterization by thin section analysis; permeability damage and enhancement tests; distribution of water-borne particles in porous media; and reservoir matrix acidizing effectiveness. The precise methods of obtaining this information are described, and their use in the engineering of injection wells is illustrated by examples, where applicable. (MHR)

  3. Voltage injection and readout method for PCB (printed circuit board) testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zentai, G.

    2006-03-01

    The main objectives of PCB (Printed Circuit Board) testing are to find short and open circuits before attaching components to the PCB. An electrostatic imaging technique was described earlier by Zentai at al. in the SPIE-NDE 2003 conference and has been accepted as a US patent. The main goal of that application was to test the PCBs quickly and efficiently without attaching test probes to each of the traces. It was achieved with the proposed technique. However, we still had to use test probe matrix for generating test signals in the traces and the detected signal was greatly reduced in reference to the test signal because of capacitive sharing of charges caused by the insulator layer placed between the PCB and the TFT sensor array. A new idea has been developed for applying voltages to the traces with an addressing matrix, different from the pin addressing one. This matrix is similar to the readout matrix that the previous method referenced to, but instead of readout circuits, driver circuits are connected to the pixels to apply voltages to them. The printed circuit board is laid on top of the array, but rather than using an insulator foil, a directional conducting foam (rubber) layer can be applied between the excitation matrix (array) and the PCB. We get direct coupling of the matrix pixels to the PCB traces and no connection between neighboring pixels (traces) using the directional conductive layer, which conducts only in z direction and not in x (and y) direction. Therefore, by addressing each pixel separately, which is easy to do by software, we get an addressable voltage (pulse) injector matrix. The same directional conducting foam coupling can also be used for reading out the image of traces. Because the capacitive coupling is eliminated, the detected signal increases and so the sensitivity.

  4. Single-dose Intramuscular-injection Toxicology Test of Water-soluble Carthami-flos and Cervi cornu parvum Pharmacopuncture in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sunju; Sun, Seung-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study is to investigate both the single-dose intramuscular injection toxicity and the approximate lethal dose of water-soluble Carthami-flos and Cervi cornu parvum pharmacopuncture (WCFC) in male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Methods: The study was conducted at Biotoxtech Co. according to the Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulation and the toxicity test guidelines of the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (MFDS) after approval of the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Dosages for the control, high dose, middle dose and low dose groups were 0.5 mL/animal of saline and 0.5, 0.25 and 0.125 mL/animal of WCFC, respectively. WCFC was injected into the muscle of the left femoral region by using a disposable syringe (1 mL, 26 gauge). The general symptoms and mortality were observed 30 minutes, 1, 2, 4, and 6 hours after the first injection and then daily for 14 days after the injection. The body weights of the SD rats were measured on the day of the injection (before injection) and on the third, seventh, and fourteenth days after the injection. Serum biochemical and hematologic tests, necropsy examinations, and histopathologic examinations at the injection site were performed after the observation period. Results: No deaths, abnormal clinical symptoms, or significant weight changes were observed in either male or female SD rats in the control or the test (0.125, 0.25, and 0.5 mL/animal) groups during the observation period. No significant differences in hematology and serum biochemistry and no macroscopic abnormalities at necropsy were found. No abnormal reactions at injection sites were noted on the topical tolerance tests. Conclusion: The results of this single-dose toxicity study show that WCFC is safe, its lethal doses in male and female SD rats being estimated to be higher than 0.5 mL/animal. PMID:26392912

  5. The IsoDAR high intensity H2+ transport and injection tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, J.; Axani, S.; Calabretta, L.; Campo, D.; Celona, L.; Conrad, J. M.; Day, A.; Castro, G.; Labrecque, F.; Winklehner, D.

    2015-10-01

    This technical report reviews the tests performed at the Best Cyclotron Systems, Inc. facility in regards to developing a cost effective ion source, beam line transport system, and acceleration system capable of high H2+ current output for the IsoDAR (Isotope Decay At Rest) experiment. We begin by outlining the requirements for the IsoDAR experiment then provide overviews of the Versatile Ion Source (VIS), Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) system, spiral inflector, and cyclotron. The experimental measurements are then discussed and the results are compared with a thorough set of simulation studies. Of particular importance we note that the VIS proved to be a reliable ion source capable of generating a large amount of H2+ current. The results suggest that with further upgrades, the VIS could potentially be a suitable candidate for IsoDAR. The conclusion outlines the key results from our tests and introduces the forthcoming work this technical report has motivated.

  6. Scenarios for sLHC and vLHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandale, W.; Zimmermann, F.

    2008-03-01

    The projected lifetime of the LHC low-beta quadrupoles and evolution of the statistical error halving time call for an LHC luminosity upgrade by the middle of the coming decade. In the framework of the EU CARE-HHH network, two scenarios have been developed for increasing the LHC peak luminosity by a factor 10, to 10 cms ("sLHC"). Both scenarios imply a rebuilding of the high-luminosity interaction regions (IRs) in combination with a consistent change of beam parameters. However, their respective features, bunch structures, IR layouts, merits and challenges differ substantially. In either scenario luminosity leveling during a store would be advantageous for the physics experiments. Longer-term R&D efforts are devoted to a higher-energy hadron collider ("vLHC"), which could be realized on a green field or as a later and more radical LHC upgrade.

  7. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, a great discovery emerged at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. A plethora of new precision data had already by then been collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC, providing further extensive support for the validity of the Standard Model of particle physics. But what now appeared was the first evidence for what was not only the last unverified prediction of the Standard Model, but also perhaps the most decisive one: the prediction made already in 1964 of a unique scalar boson required by the theory of François Englert and Peter Higgs on how fundamental particles acquire mass. At that moment in 2012, it seemed particularly appropriate to start planning a gathering of world experts in particle physics to take stock of the situation and try to answer the challenging question: what next? By May 2013, when the LHC Nobel Symposium was held at the Krusenberg Mansion outside Uppsala in Sweden, the first signs of a great discovery had already turned into fully convincing experimental evidence for the existence of a scalar boson of mass about 125 GeV, having properties compatible with the 50-year-old prediction. And in October 2013, the evidence was deemed so convincing that the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics to Englert and Higgs for their pioneering work. At the same time the search at the LHC for other particles, beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, with heavier masses up to—and in some cases beyond—1 TeV, had provided no positive result. The triumph of the Standard Model seems resounding, in particular because the mass of the discovered scalar boson is such that, when identified with the Higgs boson, the Standard Model is able to provide predictions at energies as high as the Planck mass, although at the price of accepting that the vacuum would be metastable. However, even if there were some feelings of triumph, the ambience at the LHC Nobel Symposium was more one of

  8. Antigen injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Leprosy is caused by the organism Mycobacterium leprae . The leprosy test involves injection of an antigen just under ... if your body has a current or recent leprosy infection. The injection site is labeled and examined ...

  9. LHC forward physics

    SciTech Connect

    Akiba, K.; Akbiyik, M.; Albrow, M.; Arneodo, M.; Avati, V.; Baechler, J.; Baillie, O. Villalobos; Bartalini, P.; Bartels, J.; Baur, S.; Baus, C.; Beaumont, W.; Behrens, U.; Berge, D.; Berretti, M.; Bossini, E.; Boussarie, R.; Brodsky, S.; Broz, M.; Bruschi, M.; Bussey, P.; Byczynski, W.; Noris, J. C. Cabanillas; Villar, E. Calvo; Campbell, A.; Caporale, F.; Carvalho, W.; Chachamis, G.; Chapon, E.; Cheshkov, C.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Chinellato, D.; Cisek, A.; Coco, V.; Collins, P.; Contreras, J. G.; Cox, B.; Damiao, D. de Jesus; Davis, P.; Deile, M.; D’Enterria, D.; Druzhkin, D.; Ducloué, B.; Dumps, R.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurdzia, P.; Eliachevitch, M.; Fassnacht, P.; Ferro, F.; Fichet, S.; Figueiredo, D.; Field, B.; Finogeev, D.; Fiore, R.; Forshaw, J.; Medina, A. Gago; Gallinaro, M.; Granik, A.; Gersdorff, G. von; Giani, S.; Golec-Biernat, K.; Goncalves, V. P.; Göttlicher, P.; Goulianos, K.; Grosslord, J-Y; Harland-Lang, L. A.; Haevermaet, H. Van; Hentschinski, M.; Engel, R.; Corral, G. Herrera; Hollar, J.; Huertas, L.; Johnson, D.; Katkov, I.; Kepka, O.; Khakzad, M.; Kheyn, L.; Khachatryan, V.; Khoze, V. A.; Klein, S.; Klundert, M. van; Krauss, F.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, N.; Kutak, K.; Kuznetsova, E.; Latino, G.; Lebiedowicz, P.; Lenzi, B.; Lewandowska, E.; Liu, S.; Luszczak, A.; Luszczak, M.; Madrigal, J. D.; Mangano, M.; Marcone, Z.; Marquet, C.; Martin, A. D.; Martin, T.; Hernandez, M. I. Martinez; Martins, C.; Mayer, C.; Nulty, R. Mc; Mechelen, P. Van; Macula, R.; Costa, E. Melo da; Mertzimekis, T.; Mesropian, C.; Mieskolainen, M.; Minafra, N.; Monzon, I. L.; Mundim, L.; Murdaca, B.; Murray, M.; Niewiadowski, H.; Nystrand, J.; Oliveira, E. G. de; Orava, R.; Ostapchenko, S.; Osterberg, K.; Panagiotou, A.; Papa, A.; Pasechnik, R.; Peitzmann, T.; Moreno, L. A. Perez; Pierog, T.; Pinfold, J.; Poghosyan, M.; Pol, M. E.; Prado, W.; Popov, V.; Rangel, M.; Reshetin, A.; Revol, J-P; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rodriguez, M.; Roland, B.; Royon, C.; Ruspa, M.; Ryskin, M.; Vera, A. Sabio; Safronov, G.; Sako, T.; Schindler, H.; Salek, D.; Safarik, K.; Saimpert, M.; Santoro, A.; Schicker, R.; Seger, J.; Sen, S.; Shabanov, A.; Schafer, W.; Silveira, G. Gil Da; Skands, P.; Soluk, R.; Spilbeeck, A. van; Staszewski, R.; Stevenson, S.; Stirling, W. J.; Strikman, M.; Szczurek, A.; Szymanowski, L.; Takaki, J. D. Tapia; Tasevsky, M.; Taesoo, K.; Thomas, C.; Torres, S. R.; Tricomi, A.; Trzebinski, M.; Tsybychev, D.; Turini, N.; Ulrich, R.; Usenko, E.; Varela, J.; Vetere, M. Lo; Tello, A. Villatoro; Pereira, A. Vilela; Volyanskyy, D.; Wallon, S.; Wilkinson, G.; Wöhrmann, H.; Zapp, K. C.; Zoccarato, Y.

    2016-10-17

    The goal of this report is to give a comprehensive overview of the rich field of forward physics, with a special attention to the topics that can be studied at the LHC. The report starts presenting a selection of the Monte Carlo simulation tools currently available, chapter 2, then enters the rich phenomenology of QCD at low, chapter 3, and high, chapter 4, momentum transfer, while the unique scattering conditions of central exclusive production are analyzed in chapter 5. The last two experimental topics, Cosmic Ray and Heavy Ion physics are presented in the chapter 6 and 7 respectively. Chapter 8 is dedicated to the BFKL dynamics, multiparton interactions, and saturation. Here, the report ends with an overview of the forward detectors at LHC. Each chapter is correlated with a comprehensive bibliography, attempting to provide to the interested reader with a wide opportunity for further studies.

  10. LHC forward physics

    DOE PAGES

    Akiba, K.; Akbiyik, M.; Albrow, M.; ...

    2016-10-17

    The goal of this report is to give a comprehensive overview of the rich field of forward physics, with a special attention to the topics that can be studied at the LHC. The report starts presenting a selection of the Monte Carlo simulation tools currently available, chapter 2, then enters the rich phenomenology of QCD at low, chapter 3, and high, chapter 4, momentum transfer, while the unique scattering conditions of central exclusive production are analyzed in chapter 5. The last two experimental topics, Cosmic Ray and Heavy Ion physics are presented in the chapter 6 and 7 respectively. Chaptermore » 8 is dedicated to the BFKL dynamics, multiparton interactions, and saturation. Here, the report ends with an overview of the forward detectors at LHC. Each chapter is correlated with a comprehensive bibliography, attempting to provide to the interested reader with a wide opportunity for further studies.« less

  11. LHC forward physics

    SciTech Connect

    Cartiglia, N.; Royon, C.

    2015-10-02

    The goal of this report is to give a comprehensive overview of the rich field of forward physics, with a special attention to the topics that can be studied at the LHC. The report starts presenting a selection of the Monte Carlo simulation tools currently available, chapter 2, then enters the rich phenomenology of QCD at low, chapter 3, and high, chapter 4, momentum transfer, while the unique scattering conditions of central exclusive production are analyzed in chapter 5. The last two experimental topics, Cosmic Ray and Heavy Ion physics are presented in the chapter 6 and 7 respectively. Chapter 8 is dedicated to the BFKL dynamics, multiparton interactions, and saturation. The report ends with an overview of the forward detectors at LHC. Each chapter is correlated with a comprehensive bibliography, attempting to provide to the interested reader with a wide opportunity for further studies.

  12. Access to syringes for HIV prevention for injection drug users in St. Petersburg, Russia: syringe purchase test study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The HIV epidemic in Russia is concentrated among injection drug users (IDUs). This is especially true for St. Petersburg where high HIV incidence persists among the city’s estimated 80,000 IDUs. Although sterile syringes are legally available, access for IDUs may be hampered. To explore the feasibility of using pharmacies to expand syringe access and provide other prevention services to IDUs, we investigated the current access to sterile syringes at the pharmacies and the correlation between pharmacy density and HIV prevalence in St. Petersburg. Methods 965 pharmacies citywide were mapped, classified by ownership type, and the association between pharmacy density and HIV prevalence at the district level was tested. We selected two districts among the 18 districts – one central and one peripheral – that represented two major types of city districts and contacted all operating pharmacies by phone to inquire if they stocked syringes and obtained details about their stock. Qualitative interviews with 26 IDUs provided data regarding syringe access in pharmacies and were used to formulate hypotheses for the pharmacy syringe purchase test wherein research staff attempted to purchase syringes in all pharmacies in the two districts. Results No correlation was found between the density of pharmacies and HIV prevalence at the district level. Of 108 operating pharmacies, 38 (35%) did not sell syringes of the types used by IDUs; of these, half stocked but refused to sell syringes to research staff, and the other half did not stock syringes at all. Overall 70 (65%) of the pharmacies did sell syringes; of these, 49 pharmacies sold single syringes without any restrictions and 21 offered packages of ten. Conclusions Trainings for pharmacists need to be conducted to reduce negative attitudes towards IDUs and increase pharmacists’ willingness to sell syringes. At a structural level, access to safe injection supplies for IDUs could be increased by including syringes

  13. Test plan for single well injection/extraction characterization of DNAPL

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, B.B.; Jerome, K.M.; Burdick, S.; Rossabi, J.; Jarosch, T.R.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.

    1995-12-01

    Soils and groundwater beneath an abandoned Process sewer line in the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) contain elevated levels of volatile organic compounds, specifically trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), two common chlorinated solvents. These compounds have low aqueous solubilities, thus when released to the subsurface in sufficient quantity, tend to exist as immiscible fluids or nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Because chlorinated solvents are also denser than water, they are referred to by the acronym DNAPLS, or dense non aqueous Phase liquids. Technologies targeted at the efficient characterization or removal of DNAPL are not currently proven. For example, most DNAPL studies rely on traditional soil and water sampling and the fortuitous observation of immiscible solvent. Once DNAPL is identified, soil excavation (which is only applicable to small contained spill sites) is the only ``proven`` cleanup method. New cleanup approaches based on enhanced removal by surfactants and/or alcohols have been proposed and tested at the pilot scale. As described below, carefully designed experiments similar to the enhanced removal methods may provide important characterization information on DNAPLs.

  14. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Emergency Firewater Injection System Replacement Project

    SciTech Connect

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  15. Displacement and sweep efficiencies in a DNAPL recovery test using micellar and polymer solutions injected in a five-spot pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Richard; Hébert, Alain; Lefebvre, René; Gélinas, Pierre; Gabriel, Uta

    2004-11-01

    Soil washing with micellar solutions is a promising alternative for the remediation of DNAPL source zones. As with any flushing technology, the success of soil washing with micellar solutions depends in a very large part on the ability of the solution to contact the contaminant (sweep efficiency) and then on the efficiency of contaminant removal once this contact is made (displacement efficiency). We report here on a field test where a micellar solution was used to recover a DNAPL in an open five-spot pattern in which polymer solutions were also injected before and after the washing solution to improve sweep efficiency. The washing solution formulation was optimised in the laboratory prior to the test to obtain good dissolution capacity. For a high-concentration and low-volume soil flushing remediation test such as the one performed (0.8 pore volumes of actual washing solution injected), slug sizing of the washing solution is critical. It was evaluated by an analytical solution. In a five-spot pattern, the displacement efficiency of the washing solution was observed to vary in the porous medium as a function of the radial distance from the injection well because: (1) the volume of the washing solution flowing through a section of the test cell changes (maximum close to the injection well and minimal at the pumping wells); (2) the in situ velocity changes (maximum at the wells and minimum between the wells) and; (3) the contact time of the washing solution with the NAPL changes as a function of the distance from the injection well. The relative importance of the recovery mechanisms, mobilisation and dissolution, was also observed to vary in the test cell. The reduced velocity increased the contact time of the washing solution with the DNAPL enhancing its dissolution, but the decrease of the capillary number caused less mobilisation. The washing process is much more extensive around the injection well. The use of an injection-pumping pattern allowing a complete sweep

  16. Comparison of LFM-test particle simulations and radial diffusion models of radiation belt electron injection into the slot region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, F.; Hudson, M.; Kress, B.

    2008-12-01

    The physics-based Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) code simulates Earth's magnetospheric topology and dynamics by solving the equations of ideal MHD using input solar wind parameters at the upstream boundary. Comparison with electron phase space density evolution during storms using a radial diffusion code, as well as spacecraft measurements where available, will tell us when diffusion is insufficiently accurate for radiation belt simulation, for example, during CME-shock injection events like March 24, 1991, which occurred on MeV electron drift time scales of minutes (Li et al., 1993). The 2004 July and 2004 November storms, comparable in depth of penetration into the slot region to the Halloween 2003 storm, have been modeled with both approaches. The November 8, 2004 storm was preceded by a Storm Sudden Commencement produced by a CME-shock followed by minimum Dst = -373 nT, while the July 23 to July 28 storm interval had milder consecutive drops in Dst, corresponding to multiple CME shocks and southward IMF Bz turnings. We have run the November and July storms with LFM using ACE data as upstream input, running the July storm with lower temporal resolution over a longer time interval. The November storm was different because the SCC shock was unusually intense, therefore the possibility of drift time scale acceleration by the associated magnetosonic impulse produced by the shock exists, as in March 1991 and also Halloween 2003 events (Kress et al., 2007). It can then take a short time (minutes) for electrons to be transported to low L shell while conserving their first invariant, resulting in a peak in energy and phase space density in the slot region. Radial diffusion suffices for some storm periods like the July 2004 sequence of three storms, while the guiding center test particle simulation in MHD fields is necessary to describe prompt injections which occur faster than diffusive time scales, for which November 2004 is a likely candidate. Earlier examples have been

  17. Processes Affecting the Trihalomethane Concentrations Associated with the Third Injection, Storage, and Recovery Test at Lancaster, Antelope Valley, California, March 1998 through April 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fram, Miranda S.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Goodwin, Kelly D.; Fujii, Roger; Clark, Jordan F.

    2003-01-01

    The formation and fate of trihalomethanes (THM) during the third injection, storage, and recovery test at Lancaster, Antelope Valley, California, were investigated as part of a program to assess the long-term feasibility of using injection, storage, and recovery as a water-supply method and as a way to reduce water-level declines and land-subsidence in the Antelope Valley. The program was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works and the Antelope Valley-East Kern Water Agency. The water used for injection, storage, and recovery must be disinfected before injection and thus contains THMs and other disinfection by-products. THMs (chloroform, CHCl3, bromodichloromethane, CHCl2Br, dibromochloromethane, CHClBr2, and bromoform, CHBr3) are formed by reaction between natural dissolved organic carbon that is present in water and chlorine that is added during the disinfection step of the drinking water treatment process. THMs are carcinogenic compounds, and their concentrations in drinking water are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. During previous cycles of the Lancaster program, extracted water still contained measurable concentrations of THMs long after continuous pumping had extracted a greater volume of water than had been injected. This raised concerns about the potential long-term effect of injection, storage, and recovery cycles on ground-water quality in Antelope Valley aquifers. The primary objectives of this investigation were to determine (1) what controlled continued THM formation in the aquifer after injection, (2) what caused of the persistence of THMs in the extracted water, even after long periods of pumping, (3) what controlled the decrease of THM concentrations during the extraction period, and (4) the potential for natural attenuation of THMs in the aquifer. Laboratory experiments on biodegradation of THMs in microcosms of aquifer materials indicate that aquifer

  18. An Experiment to Test Geophysical Methods For Monitoring Fluid Re-Injection at the Wairakei Geothermal Field, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiracek, G. R.; Bowles-Martinez, E.; Feucht, D. W.; Ryan, J.; Caldwell, T. G.; Bannister, S. C.; Bertrand, T.; Bennie, S.; Bourguignon, S.

    2010-12-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) is supporting US students to participate in GNS Science’s geothermal research program supported by the New Zealand Government. The NSF international program aims to quick-start a new generation of geothermal-oriented US geophysics students who will be poised to be active participants and leaders in US geothermal energy development. This year’s project evaluated joint passive seismic and magnetotelluric (MT) field measurements to determine three-dimensional (3-D) reservoir characteristics during fluid withdrawal and re-injection. A preliminary test of the ability to achieve repeatable MT data in high noise locations was carried out in the Wairakei geothermal field using a 14-site base-line MT survey and repeat occupations at four sites. Different data processing schemes identified MT frequency bands where impedance phase tensor data were most sensitive to known variables such as daily solar source variations, wind, and drilling operations. Other frequency bands were identified where good MT repeatability will allow further tests. A streamlined method was developed for visualizing 3-D earthquake focal mechanisms resulting from production changes in geothermal reservoirs. The computer program allows spatial sorting of seismic events and thus subsurface fracture identification.

  19. Corrective Action Investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit 546: Injection Well and Surface Releases, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Alfred Wickline

    2008-03-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 546 is located in Areas 6 and 9 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 546 is comprised of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: •06-23-02, U-6a/Russet Testing Area •09-20-01, Injection Well These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on November 8, 2007, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process has been used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 546.

  20. Monotops at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Andrea, J.; Fuks, B.

    2011-10-01

    We explore scenarios where top quarks may be produced singly in association with missing energy, a very distinctive signature, which, in analogy with monojets, we dub monotops. We find that monotops can be produced in a variety of modes, typically characterized by baryon number-violating or flavorchanging neutral interactions. We build a simplified model that encompasses all the possible (tree-level) production mechanisms and study the LHC sensitiveness to a few representative scenarios by considering fully hadronic top decays. We find that constraints on such exotic models can already be set with 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected at {radical}(s)=7 TeV.

  1. LNV Higgses at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiezza, Alessio; Nemevšek, Miha; Nesti, Fabrizio

    2016-06-01

    Lepton number is a fundamental symmetry that can be probed at the LHC. Here, we study the Higgs sector of theories responsible for neutrino mass generation. After a brief discussion of simple see-saw scenarios, we turn to theories where heavy Majorana neutrino mass is protected by a gauge symmetry and focus on the Left-Right symmetric theory. There, the SM-like Higgs boson can decay to a pair of heavy neutrinos and provide enough information to establish the origin of neutrino mass.

  2. Beam injection into RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, W.

    1997-07-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. The authors describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks. They report on the commissioning of the injection system, on beam based measurements of the kickers and the application program to steer the beam.

  3. Operating the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid: current and future challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flix Molina, J.; Forti, A.; Girone, M.; Sciaba, A.

    2014-06-01

    The Wordwide LHC Computing Grid project (WLCG) provides the computing and storage resources required by the LHC collaborations to store, process and analyse their data. It includes almost 200,000 CPU cores, 200 PB of disk storage and 200 PB of tape storage distributed among more than 150 sites. The WLCG operations team is responsible for several essential tasks, such as the coordination of testing and deployment of Grid middleware and services, communication with the experiments and the sites, followup and resolution of operational issues and medium/long term planning. In 2012 WLCG critically reviewed all operational procedures and restructured the organisation of the operations team as a more coherent effort in order to improve its efficiency. In this paper we describe how the new organisation works, its recent successes and the changes to be implemented during the long LHC shutdown in preparation for the LHC Run 2.

  4. Supersymmetry at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Bartl, A.; Soederqvist, J.; Paige, F.

    1996-11-22

    Supersymmetry (SUSY) is an appealing concept which provides a plausible solution to the fine tuning problem, while leaving the phenomenological success of the Standard Model (SM) unchanged. Moreover, some SUSY models allow for the unification of gauge couplings at a scale of M{sub GUT} {approx} 10{sup 16} GeV. A further attractive feature is the possibility of radiative breaking of the electro-weak symmetry group SU(2) {times} U(1). The masses of the SUSY partners of the SM particles are expected to be in the range 100 GeV to 1 TeV. One of the main goals of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be either to discover weak-scale SUSY or to exclude it over the entire theoretically allowed parameter space. The authors have developed a strategy for the analysis of experimental data at LHC which will allow them to determine the scale for supersymmetry, to limit the model parameter space, and to make precision measurements of model parameters.

  5. Southeast Geyers Cooperative Tracer Evaluation and Testing Program for the Purpose of Estimating The Efficiency of Injection

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Smith

    2001-02-12

    The Southeast Geysers Cooperative Tracer Evaluation Program has been a joint project located in the SE part of the Geysers geothermal field, in Lake and Sonoma Counties, California. A new generation of environmentally benign vapor-phase tracers has been used to estimate the varying degrees to which injectate is being recovered following the significant increase of injected volumes within the Southeast Geysers.

  6. DOE/NETL's phase II mercury control technology field testing program: preliminary economic analysis of activated carbon injection.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew P; Hoffmann, Jeffrey W; Smith, Dennis N; Feeley, Thomas J; Murphy, James T

    2007-02-15

    Based on results of field testing conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), this article provides preliminary costs for mercury control via conventional activated carbon injection (ACI), brominated ACI, and conventional ACI coupled with the application of a sorbent enhancement additive (SEA) to coal prior to combustion. The economic analyses are reported on a plant-specific basis in terms of the cost required to achieve low (50%), mid (70%), and high (90%) levels of mercury removal "above and beyond" the baseline mercury removal achieved by existing emission control equipment. In other words, the levels of mercury control are directly attributable to ACI. Mercury control costs via ACI have been amortized on a current dollar basis. Using a 20-year book life, levelized costs for the incremental increase in cost of electricity (COE), expressed in mills per kilowatt-hour (mills/kWh), and the incremental cost of mercury control, expressed in dollars per pound of mercury removed ($/lb Hg removed), have been calculated for each level of ACI mercury control. For this analysis, the increase in COE varied from 0.14 mills/kWh to 3.92 mills/kWh. Meanwhile, the incremental cost of mercury control ranged from $3810/lb Hg removed to $166000/lb Hg removed.

  7. Design, fabrication and test of a pneumatically controlled, renewable, microfluidic bead trapping device for sequential injection analysis applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Guocheng; Lu, Donglai; Fu, Zhifeng; Du, Dan; Ozanich, Richard M.; Wang, Wanjun; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of a pneumatically controlled,renewable, microfluidic device for conducting bead-based assays in an automated sequential injection analysis system. The device used a “brick wall”-like pillar array (pillar size: 20 μm length X 50 μm width X 45 μm height) with 5 μm gaps between the pillars serving as the micro filter. The flow channel where bead trapping occurred is 500 μm wide X 75 μm deep. An elastomeric membrane and an air chamber were located underneath the flow channel. By applying pressure to the air chamber, the membrane is deformed and pushed upward against the filter structure. This effectively traps beads larger than 5 μm and creates a “bed” or micro column of beads that can be perfused and washed with liquid samples and reagents. Upon completion of the assay process, the pressure is released and the beads are flushed out from underneath the filter structure to renew the device. Mouse IgG was used as a model analyte to test the feasibility of using the proposed device for immunoassay applications. Resulting microbeads from an on-chip fluorescent immunoassay were individually examined using flow cytometry. The results show that the fluorescence signal intensity distribution is fairly narrow indicating high chemical reaction uniformity among the beads population. Electrochemical onchip assay was also conducted. A detection limit of 0.1 ng/mL1 ppb was achieved and good device reliability and repeatability were demonstrated. The novel microfluidic-based beadstrapping device thus opens up a new pathway to design micro-bead based biosensor immunoassays for clinical and othervarious applications.

  8. Proof of concept testing of an integrated dry injection system for SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} control. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Helfritch, D.J.; Bortz, S.J.; Beittel, R.

    1994-03-01

    The integrated Dry Injection Process (IDIP) consists of combustion modification using low NO{sub x} burners to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, dry injection of hydrated line at economizer temperatures for primary capture of SO{sub 2}, dry injection of a commercial grade sodium bicarbonate at the air heater exit for additional SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal, and humidification for precipitator conditioning. IDIP offers the potential for simultaneously achieving 90% SO{sub 2} removal, and 65% NO{sub x} removal from a high sulfur flue gas. The process is well suited for new or retrofit applications since it can be incorporated within existing economizer and downstream ductwork. Subscale tests were performed in order to identify the best calcium and sodium sorbents. These tests involved the injection of calcium hydroxide and sodium sorbents at various points of the flue gas system downstream of a 0.25 MM BTU/hr. coal fired combustor, and the gas residence times, cooling rates and temperatures were comparable to those found for full-scale utility boilers. These tests verified that a high surface area hydrated lime provides maximum sorbent utilization and identified an alcohol-water hydrated lime as yielding the highest surface area and the best SO{sub 2} removal capability. The tests also identified sodium bicarbonate to be somewhat more effective than sodium sesquicarbonate for SO{sub 2} removal. The proof of concept demonstration was conducted on the large combustor at the Riley Stoker Research Facility in Worcester, MA. When economically compared to conventional limestone slurry scrubbing on a 300 MW plant, the dry injection process shows lower capital cost but higher operating cost. Hydrated lime injection can be less costly than limestone scrubbing when two or more of the following conditions exist: plant is small (less than 100MW); yearly operating hours are small (less than 3000); and the remaining plant lifetime is small (less than 10 years).

  9. Cabazitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used along with prednisone to treat prostate cancer (cancer of a male reproductive organ) that has ... cabazitaxel injection is usually used in men with prostate cancer. If used by pregnant women, cabazitaxel injection can ...

  10. Fondaparinux Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... fondaparinux injection.Talk to your doctor about the risk of using fondaparinux injection. ... Fondaparinux injection is used to prevent deep vein thrombosis (DVT; a blood ... Xa inhibitors. It works by decreasing the clotting ability of the blood.

  11. Morphine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Morphine injection is used to relieve moderate to severe pain. Morphine is in a class of medications called opiate ( ... Morphine injection comes as a solution (liquid) to inject intramuscularly (into a muscle) or intravenously (into a ...

  12. Romidepsin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Romidepsin injection is used to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL; a group of cancers of the immune system ... one other medication given by mouth or by injection. Romidepsin injection is in a class of medications ...

  13. Ondansetron Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Zofran® Injection ... Ondansetron injection is used to prevent nausea and vomiting caused by cancer chemotherapy and surgery. Ondansetron is in a ... medications: or any of the ingredients in ondansetron injection. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the ...

  14. The BRAN luminosity detectors for the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matis, H. S.; Placidi, M.; Ratti, A.; Turner, W. C.; Bravin, E.; Miyamoto, R.

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes the several phases which led, from the conceptual design, prototyping, construction and tests with beam, to the installation and operation of the BRAN (Beam RAte of Neutrals) relative luminosity monitors for the LHC. The detectors have been operating since 2009 to contribute, optimize and maintain the accelerator performance in the two high luminosity interaction regions (IR), the IR1 (ATLAS) and the IR5 (CMS). The devices are gas ionization chambers installed inside a neutral particle absorber 140 m away from the Interaction Points in IR1 and IR5 and monitor the energy deposited by electromagnetic showers produced by high-energy neutral particles from the collisions. The detectors have the capability to resolve the bunch-by-bunch luminosity at the 40 MHz bunch rate, as well as to survive the extreme level of radiation during the nominal LHC operation. The devices have operated since the early commissioning phase of the accelerator over a broad range of luminosities reaching 1.4×1034 cm-2 s-1 with a peak pileup of 45 events per bunch crossing. Even though the nominal design luminosity of the LHC has been exceeded, the BRAN is operating well. After describing how the BRAN can be used to monitor the luminosity of the collider, we discuss the technical choices that led to its construction and the different tests performed prior to the installation in two IRs of the LHC. Performance simulations are presented together with operational results obtained during p-p operations, including runs at 40 MHz bunch rate, Pb-Pb operations and p-Pb operations.

  15. Dynamic aperture studies for the LHC high luminosity lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Maria, R. de; Giovannozzi, M.; McIntosh, E.; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Cai, Y.; Wang, M. -H.

    2015-07-14

    Since quite some time, dynamic aperture studies have been undertaken with the aim of specifying the required field quality of the new magnets that will be installed in the LHC ring in the framework of the high-luminosity upgrade. In this paper the latest results concerning the specification work will be presented, taking into account both injection and collision energies and the field quality contribution from all the magnets in the newly designed interaction regions.

  16. LHC Abort Gap Cleaning Studies During Luminosity Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Bartmann, W.; Boccardi, A.; Bracco, C.; Bravin, E.; Goddard, B.; Hofle, W.; Jacquet, D.; Jeff, A.; Kain, V.; Meddahi, M.; /CERN

    2012-05-11

    The presence of significant intensities of un-bunched beam is a potentially serious issue in the LHC. Procedures using damper kickers for cleaning both the Abort Gap (AG) and the buckets targeted for injection, are currently in operation at flat bottom. Recent observations of relatively high population of the AG during physics runs brought up the need for AG cleaning during luminosity operation. In this paper the results of experimental studies performed in October 2011 are presented.

  17. PDF4LHC recommendations for LHC Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, Jon; Carrazza, Stefano; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; De Roeck, Albert; Feltesse, Joël; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Glazov, Sasha; Huston, Joey; Kassabov, Zahari; McNulty, Ronan; Morsch, Andreas; Nadolsky, Pavel; Radescu, Voica; Rojo, Juan; Thorne, Robert

    2016-02-01

    We provide an updated recommendation for the usage of sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs) and the assessment of PDF and PDF+{α }s uncertainties suitable for applications at the LHC Run II. We review developments since the previous PDF4LHC recommendation, and discuss and compare the new generation of PDFs, which include substantial information from experimental data from the Run I of the LHC. We then propose a new prescription for the combination of a suitable subset of the available PDF sets, which is presented in terms of a single combined PDF set. We finally discuss tools which allow for the delivery of this combined set in terms of optimized sets of Hessian eigenvectors or Monte Carlo replicas, and their usage, and provide some examples of their application to LHC phenomenology. This paper is dedicated to the memory of Guido Altarelli (1941-2015), whose seminal work made possible the quantitative study of PDFs.

  18. PDF4LHC recommendations for LHC Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, Jon; Carrazza, Stefano; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Roeck, Albert De; Feltesse, Joel; Gao, Jun; Glazov, Sasha; Huston, Joey; Kassabov, Zahari; McNulty, Ronan; Morsch, Andreas; Nadolsky, Pavel; Radescu, Voica; Rojo, Juan; Thorne, Robert

    2016-01-06

    We provide an updated recommendation for the usage of sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs) and the assessment of PDF and PDF+αs uncertainties suitable for applications at the LHC Run II. We review developments since the previous PDF4LHC recommendation, and discuss and compare the new generation of PDFs, which include substantial information from experimental data from the Run I of the LHC. We then propose a new prescription for the combination of a suitable subset of the available PDF sets, which is presented in terms of a single combined PDF set. Lastly, we finally discuss tools which allow for the delivery of this combined set in terms of optimized sets of Hessian eigenvectors or Monte Carlo replicas, and their usage, and provide some examples of their application to LHC phenomenology.

  19. PDF4LHC recommendations for LHC Run II

    DOE PAGES

    Butterworth, Jon; Carrazza, Stefano; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; ...

    2016-01-06

    We provide an updated recommendation for the usage of sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs) and the assessment of PDF and PDF+αs uncertainties suitable for applications at the LHC Run II. We review developments since the previous PDF4LHC recommendation, and discuss and compare the new generation of PDFs, which include substantial information from experimental data from the Run I of the LHC. We then propose a new prescription for the combination of a suitable subset of the available PDF sets, which is presented in terms of a single combined PDF set. Lastly, we finally discuss tools which allow for themore » delivery of this combined set in terms of optimized sets of Hessian eigenvectors or Monte Carlo replicas, and their usage, and provide some examples of their application to LHC phenomenology.« less

  20. Jet charge at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Krohn, David; Schwartz, Matthew D; Lin, Tongyan; Waalewijn, Wouter J

    2013-05-24

    Knowing the charge of the parton initiating a light-quark jet could be extremely useful both for testing aspects of the standard model and for characterizing potential beyond-the-standard-model signals. We show that despite the complications of hadronization and out-of-jet radiation such as pileup, a weighted sum of the charges of a jet's constituents can be used at the LHC to distinguish among jets with different charges. Potential applications include measuring electroweak quantum numbers of hadronically decaying resonances or supersymmetric particles, as well as standard model tests, such as jet charge in dijet events or in hadronically decaying W bosons in tt[over ¯] events. We develop a systematically improvable method to calculate moments of these charge distributions by combining multihadron fragmentation functions with perturbative jet functions and pertubative evolution equations. We show that the dependence on energy and jet size for the average and width of the jet charge can be calculated despite the large experimental uncertainty on fragmentation functions. These calculations can provide a validation tool for data independent of Monte Carlo fragmentation models.

  1. Status of 11 T 2-in-1 Nb$_3$Sn Dipole Development for LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Zlobin, Alexander; Andreev, Nicolai; Apollinari, Giorgio; Barzi, Emanuela; Bossert, Rodger; Buehler, Marc; Chlachidze, Guram; DiMarco, Joseph; Nobrega, Alfred; Novitski, Igor; Turrioni, Daniele; Velev, Gueorgui; Auchmann, Bernhard; Karppinen, Mikko; Rossi, Lucio; Smekens, David

    2014-07-01

    The LHC upgrade plans foresee installation of additional collimators in the LHC lattice. To provide the necessary longitudinal space for these collimators, shorter and stronger Nb3Sn dipoles compatible with the LHC lattice and main systems could be used. This paper describes the design and status of the twin-aperture Nb3Sn dipole being developed by FNAL and CERN for the LHC, and reports test results of two collared coils to be used in the first 1 m long twin-aperture dipole model.

  2. Assessment of the Efficiency of Consolidation Treatment through Injections of Expanding Resins by Geotechnical Tests and 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography.

    PubMed

    Apuani, T; Giani, G P; d'Attoli, M; Fischanger, F; Morelli, G; Ranieri, G; Santarato, G

    2015-01-01

    The design and execution of consolidation treatment of settled foundations by means of injection of polyurethane expanding resins require a proper investigation of the state of the foundation soil, in order to better identify anomalies responsible for the instability. To monitor the injection process, a procedure has been developed, which involves, in combination with traditional geotechnical tests, the application of a noninvasive, geophysical technique based on the electrical resistivity, which is strongly sensitive to presence of water or voids. Three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography is a useful tool to produce effective 3D images of the foundation soils before, during, and after the injections. The achieved information allows designing the consolidation scheme and monitoring its effects on the treated volumes in real time. To better understand the complex processes induced by the treatment and to learn how variations of resistivity accompany increase of stiffness, an experiment was carried out in a full-scale test site. Injections of polyurethane expanding resin were performed as in real worksite conditions. Results confirm that the experimented approach by means of 3D resistivity imaging allows a reliable procedure of consolidation, and geotechnical tests demonstrate the increase of mechanical stiffness.

  3. Assessment of the Efficiency of Consolidation Treatment through Injections of Expanding Resins by Geotechnical Tests and 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Apuani, T.; Giani, G. P.; d'Attoli, M.; Fischanger, F.; Morelli, G.; Ranieri, G.; Santarato, G.

    2015-01-01

    The design and execution of consolidation treatment of settled foundations by means of injection of polyurethane expanding resins require a proper investigation of the state of the foundation soil, in order to better identify anomalies responsible for the instability. To monitor the injection process, a procedure has been developed, which involves, in combination with traditional geotechnical tests, the application of a noninvasive, geophysical technique based on the electrical resistivity, which is strongly sensitive to presence of water or voids. Three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography is a useful tool to produce effective 3D images of the foundation soils before, during, and after the injections. The achieved information allows designing the consolidation scheme and monitoring its effects on the treated volumes in real time. To better understand the complex processes induced by the treatment and to learn how variations of resistivity accompany increase of stiffness, an experiment was carried out in a full-scale test site. Injections of polyurethane expanding resin were performed as in real worksite conditions. Results confirm that the experimented approach by means of 3D resistivity imaging allows a reliable procedure of consolidation, and geotechnical tests demonstrate the increase of mechanical stiffness. PMID:26167521

  4. LHC signatures of WIMP-triggered baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yanou; Okui, Takemichi; Yunesi, Arash

    2016-12-01

    A robust mechanism was recently proposed in which thermal freeze-out of WIMPs can provide a unified origin of dark matter and baryon abundances in our universe. We point out that this WIMP-triggered baryogenesis mechanism can exhibit a rich collider phenomenology and be tested at the current and near-future experiments at LHC, even in the case where the WIMPs are completely devoid of SM gauge and Higgs portal interactions, as may be motivated by the persistent null results of WIMP dark matter searches. We catalog a rich array of LHC signatures robustly present in such a scenario. In particular, the simplest such implementation can already offer a very clean signal of a TeV-scale resonance that decays to diphotons with a cross section that can easily be within the reach of the current and near-future LHC runs in the region of parameter space that leads to a successful baryogenesis. Other characteristic signatures include the production of multiple bottom and/or multiple top quarks, promptly or displaced. An even more exotic possibility is the production of two separate sets of isolated emerging jets connected by a charged track, which may require new dedicated studies. Finally, dinucleon decay can also provide a powerful probe of the mechanism.

  5. Beam Loss Monitoring for LHC Machine Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, Eva Barbara; Dehning, Bernd; Effnger, Ewald; Emery, Jonathan; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Hajdu, Csaba; Jackson, Stephen; Kurfuerst, Christoph; Marsili, Aurelien; Misiowiec, Marek; Nagel, Markus; Busto, Eduardo Nebot Del; Nordt, Annika; Roderick, Chris; Sapinski, Mariusz; Zamantzas, Christos

    The energy stored in the nominal LHC beams is two times 362 MJ, 100 times the energy of the Tevatron. As little as 1 mJ/cm3 deposited energy quenches a magnet at 7 TeV and 1 J/cm3 causes magnet damage. The beam dumps are the only places to safely dispose of this beam. One of the key systems for machine protection is the beam loss monitoring (BLM) system. About 3600 ionization chambers are installed at likely or critical loss locations around the LHC ring. The losses are integrated in 12 time intervals ranging from 40 μs to 84 s and compared to threshold values defined in 32 energy ranges. A beam abort is requested when potentially dangerous losses are detected or when any of the numerous internal system validation tests fails. In addition, loss data are used for machine set-up and operational verifications. The collimation system for example uses the loss data for set-up and regular performance verification. Commissioning and operational experience of the BLM are presented: The machine protection functionality of the BLM system has been fully reliable; the LHC availability has not been compromised by false beam aborts.

  6. Ibandronate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Boniva® Injection ... Ibandronate injection is used to treat osteoporosis (a condition in which the bones become thin and weak and break ... Ibandronate injection comes as a solution (liquid) to be injected into a vein by a doctor or nurse in ...

  7. Leuprolide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Leuprolide injection comes as a long-acting suspension (Lupron) that is injected intramuscularly (into a muscle) by a doctor or nurse in a medical ... Depot-4 month, Lupron Depot-6 Month). Leuprolide injection also comes as a long-acting suspension (Eligard) that is injected subcutaneously (just under ...

  8. Technicolor walks at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Alexander; Foadi, Roshan; Frandsen, Mads T.; Jaervinen, Matti; Sannino, Francesco; Pukhov, Alexander

    2009-02-01

    We analyze the potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to observe signatures of phenomenologically viable walking technicolor models. We study and compare the Drell-Yan and vector boson fusion mechanisms for the production of composite heavy vectors. We find that the heavy vectors are most easily produced and detected via the Drell-Yan processes. The composite Higgs phenomenology is also studied. If technicolor walks at the LHC, its footprints will be visible and our analysis will help in uncovering them.

  9. Hydrogeological characterization of shallow-depth zone for CO2 injection and leak test at a CO2 environmental monitoring site in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. S.; Kim, T. W.; Kim, H. H.; Ha, S. W.; Jeon, W. T.; Lee, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    The main goal of the this study is to evaluate the importance of heterogeneities in controlling the field-scale transport of CO2 are originated from the CO2 injected at saturated zone below the water table for monitoring and prediction of CO2 leakage from a reservoir. Hydrogeological and geophysical data are collected to characterize the site, prior to conducting CO2 injection experiment at the CO2 environmental monitoring site at Eumseong, Korea. The geophysical data were acquired from borehole electromagnetic flowmeter tests, while the hydraulic data were obtained from pumping tests, slug tests, and falling head permeability tests. Total of 13 wells to perform hydraulic and geophysical test are established along groundwater flow direction in regular sequence, revealed by the results of borehole electromagnetic flowmeter test. The results of geophysical tests indicated that hydraulic gradient is not identical with the topographic gradient. Groundwater flows toward the uphill direction in the study area. Then, the hydraulic tests were conducted to identify the hydraulic properties of the study site. According to the results of pumping and slug tests at the study site, the hydraulic conductivity values show ranges between 4.75 x 10-5 cm/day and 9.74 x 10-5 cm/day. In addition, a portable multi-level sampling and monitoring packer device which remains inflated condition for a long period developed and used to isolate designated depths to identify vertical distribution of hydrogeological characteristics. Hydrogeological information obtained from this study will be used to decide the injection test interval of CO2-infused water and gaseous CO2. Acknowledgement: Financial support was provided by "R&D Project on Environmental Mangement of Geologic CO2 Storage" from the KEITI (Project Number: 2014001810003).

  10. Hydrogen no-vent fill testing in a 5 cubic foot (142 liter) tank using spray nozzle and spray bar liquid injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Nyland, Ted W.

    1992-01-01

    A total of 38 hydrogen no-vent fill tests were performed in this test series using various size spray nozzles and a spray bar with different hole sizes in a 5 cubic foot receiver tank. Fill levels of 90 percent by volume or greater were achieved in 26 of the tests while maintaining a receiver tank pressure below 30 psia. Spray nozzles were mounted at the top of the tank, whereas, the spray bar was centered in the tank axially. The spray nozzle no-vent fills demonstrated tank pressure and temperature responses comparable to previous test series. Receiver tank pressure responses for the spray bar configuration were similar to the spray nozzle tests with the pressure initially rising rapidly, then leveling off as vapor condenses onto the discharging liquid streams, and finally ramping up near the end of the test due to ullage compression. Both liquid injection techniques tested were capable of filling the receiver tank to 90 percent under variable test conditions. Comparisons between the spray nozzle and spray bar configurations for well matched test conditions indicate the spray nozzle injection technique is more effective in minimizing the receiving tank pressure throughout a no-vent fill compared to the spray bar under normal gravity conditions.

  11. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-10-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 335, Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996). This CAP provides the methodology for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as listed in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD). However, there is one modification to the selected alternative. Due to the large area that would require fencing, it is proposed that instead of fencing, an appropriate number of warning signs attached to tee posts be used to delineate the use restriction area. CAU 335 is located in Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 335 is located in the Area 6 Well 3 Yard approximately 39 km (24 mi) north of Mercury, on the Mercury Highway and several hundred feet (ft) west along Road 6-06. CAU 335 consists of the following three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-20-01, Drums, Oil Waste, Spill; CAS 06-20-02, 20-inch Cased Hole; CAS 06-23-03, Drain Pit. The site history for CAU 335 is provided in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (DOE/NV, 2000). Briefly, CAS 06-20-01, was used for storing material that was pumped out of CAS 06-20-02 and placed into four 208-liter (L) (55-gall [gal]) drums. The drums were taken to the NTS Area 5 Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site in 1991. CAS 06-20-01 will be closed with no further action required. Any spills associated with CAS 06-20-01 are addressed and considered part of CAS 06-20-02. CAS 06-20-02 was used for disposal of used motor oil, wastewater, and debris for an undetermined amount of time. In 1991, the casing was emptied of its contents, excavated, and backfilled. CAS 06-23-03 was used as a depository for effluent waste from truck-washing activities from 1960-1991.

  12. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    DOE /NV

    2000-12-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 335, Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 335 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs). The CAU is located in the Well 3 Yard in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site. Historical records indicate that the Drain Pit (CAS 06-23-03) received effluent from truck-washing; the Drums/Oil Waste/Spill (CAS 06-20-01) consisted of four 55-gallon drums containing material removed from the Cased Hole; and the Cased Hole (CAS 06-20-02) was used for disposal of used motor oil, wastewater, and debris. These drums were transported to the Area 5 Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site in July 1991; therefore, they are no longer on site and further investigation or remediation efforts are not required. Consequently, CAS 06-20-01 will be closed with no further action and details of this decision will be described in the Closure Report for this CAU. Any spills that may have been associated with this CAS will be investigated and addressed under CAS 06-20-02. Field investigation efforts will be focused on the two remaining CASs. The scope of the investigation will center around identifying any contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) and, if present, determining the vertical and lateral extent of contamination. The COPCs for the Drain Pit include: total volatile/ semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (gasoline-and diesel-range organics), ethylene glycol monobutyl ether, polychlorinated biphenyls, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and radionuclides. The COPCs for the Cased Hole include: total volatile/ semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel-range organics only), and total Resource Conservation an d

  13. Design and preliminary tests of a blade tip air mass injection system for vortex modification and possible noise reduction on a full-scale helicopter rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pegg, R. J.; Hosier, R. N.; Balcerak, J. C.; Johnson, H. K.

    1975-01-01

    Full-scale tests were conducted on the Langley helicopter rotor test facility as part of a study to evaluate the effectiveness of a turbulent blade tip air mass injection system in alleviating the impulsive noise (blade slap) caused by blade-vortex interaction. Although blade-slap conditions could not be induced during these tests, qualitative results from flow visualization studies using smoke showed that the differential velocity between the jet velocity and the rotor tip speed was a primary parameter controlling the vortex modification.

  14. Tevatron-for-LHC Report of the QCD Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, Michael G.; Begel, M.; Bourilkov, D.; Campanelli, M.; Chlebana, F.; De Roeck, A.; Dittmann, J.R.; Ellis, S.D.; Field, B.; Field, R.; Gallinaro, M.; /Fermilab /Rochester U. /Florida U. /Geneva U. /CERN /Baylor U. /Washington U., Seattle /Florida State U. /Rockefeller U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Michigan State U.

    2006-10-01

    The experiments at Run 2 of the Tevatron have each accumulated over 1 fb{sup -1} of high-transverse momentum data. Such a dataset allows for the first precision (i.e. comparisons between theory and experiment at the few percent level) tests of QCD at a hadron collider. While the Large Hadron Collider has been designed as a discovery machine, basic QCD analyses will still need to be performed to understand the working environment. The Tevatron-for-LHC workshop was conceived as a communication link to pass on the expertise of the Tevatron and to test new analysis ideas coming from the LHC community. The TeV4LHC QCD Working Group focused on important aspects of QCD at hadron colliders: jet definitions, extraction and use of Parton Distribution Functions, the underlying event, Monte Carlo tunes, and diffractive physics. This report summarizes some of the results achieved during this workshop.

  15. Hadronic and electromagnetic fragmentation of ultrarelativistic heavy ions at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, H. H.; Fassò, A.; Ferrari, A.; Jowett, J. M.; Sala, P. R.; Smirnov, G. I.

    2014-02-01

    Reliable predictions of yields of nuclear fragments produced in electromagnetic dissociation and hadronic fragmentation of ion beams are of great practical importance in analyzing beam losses and interactions with the beam environment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN as well as for estimating radiation effects of galactic cosmic rays on the spacecraft crew and electronic equipment. The model for predicting the fragmentation of relativistic heavy ions is briefly described, and then applied to problems of relevance for LHC. The results are based on the fluka code, which includes electromagnetic dissociation physics and dpmjet-iii as hadronic event generator. We consider the interaction of fully stripped lead ions with nuclei in the energy range from about one hundred MeV to ultrarelativistic energies. The yields of fragments close in the mass and charge to initial ions are calculated. The approach under discussion provides a good overall description of Pb fragmentation data at 30 and 158A GeV as well as recent LHC data for √sNN =2.76 TeV Pb-Pb interactions. Good agreement with the calculations in the framework of different models is found. This justifies application of the developed simulation technique both at the LHC injection energy of 177A GeV and at its collision energies of 1.38, 1.58, and 2.75A TeV, and gives confidence in the results obtained.

  16. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

    2003-06-01

    This Closure Report documents the activities undertaken to close Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, according to the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 335 was closed in accordance with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection-approved Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335.

  17. Single well field injection test of humate to enhance attenuation of uranium and other radionuclides in an acidic plume

    SciTech Connect

    Denham, M.

    2014-09-30

    This report documents the impact of the injected humate on targeted contaminants over a period of 4 months and suggests it is a viable attenuation-based remedy for uranium, potentially for I-129, but not for Sr-90. Future activities will focus on issues pertinent to scaling the technology to full deployment.

  18. [Stability of liensinine injection].

    PubMed

    Hu, X M; Zhou, B H; Luo, S D

    1993-06-01

    The stability of liensinine injection was studied by accelarating test with classical isothermal method. Results of the study showed that the decomposition of the injection was found to be a first-order reaction. The activation energy was 75030 J.mol-1. The shelf life at 10 degrees C and 25 degrees C was predicted to be about 15 months and 3 months respectively. This experiment provides a reference for the storage of the injection.

  19. Golimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... body and causes pain, swelling, and damage) including: rheumatoid arthritis (condition in which the body attacks its own ... doctor.If golimumab injection is used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, it may also be injected intravenously (into a ...

  20. Adalimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes pain, swelling, and damage) including the following: rheumatoid arthritis (a condition in which the body attacks its ... If you are using adalimumab injection to treat rheumatoid arthritis, your doctor may tell you to inject the ...

  1. Aripiprazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... aripiprazole injection and aripiprazole extended-release injection developed gambling problems or other intense urges or behaviors that ... even if you do not realize that your gambling or any other intense urges or unusual behaviors ...

  2. Teduglutide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... mix and inject it.Teduglutide comes as a kit containing vials of teduglutide powder for injection, prefilled syringes containing diluent (liquid to be mixed with teduglutide powder), needles to attach to the diluent syringe, dosing syringes ...

  3. Degarelix Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Degarelix injection is used to treat advanced prostate cancer (cancer that begins in the prostate [a male reproductive gland]). Degarelix injection is in a class of medications called gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) ...

  4. Cyclosporine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used with other medications to prevent transplant rejection (attack of the transplanted organ by the ... people who have received kidney, liver, and heart transplants. Cyclosporine injection should only be used to treat ...

  5. Colistimethate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria. Colistimethate injection is in a class of medications called antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as colistimethate injection will not work ...

  6. Chloramphenicol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain types of serious infections caused by bacteria when other antibiotics cannot be used. Chloramphenicol injection ... antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria..Antibiotics such as chloramphenicol injection will not work ...

  7. Estrogen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... forms of estrogen injection are used to treat hot flushes (hot flashes; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) ... If you are using estrogen injection to treat hot flushes, your symptoms should improve within 1 to ...

  8. Medroxyprogesterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medroxyprogesterone injection is a very effective method of birth control but does not prevent the spread of human ... you have been using a different method of birth control and are switching to medroxyprogesterone injection, your doctor ...

  9. Etanercept Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... areas causing pain and joint damage), chronic plaque psoriasis (a skin disease in which red, scaly patches ... etanercept injection is used to treat chronic plaque psoriasis, it may be injected twice a week during ...

  10. Levoleucovorin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Levoleucovorin injection is used to prevent harmful effects of methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall) when methotrexate is used to to treat certain types of cancer. Levoleucovorin injection is also used to treat people ...

  11. Leucovorin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Leucovorin injection is used to prevent harmful effects of methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall; cancer chemotherapy medication) when methotrexate is used to to treat certain types of cancer. Leucovorin injection is used to ...

  12. Teniposide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... in men. You should not become pregnant or breast-feed while you are receiving teniposide injection. If you or your partner become pregnant while receiving teniposide injection, call your doctor. Teniposide may harm the fetus.

  13. Ipilimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while receiving ipilimumab injection, call your doctor. Ipilimumab injection may cause your baby to be born too early or to die before birth.

  14. Pralatrexate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Pralatrexate injection is used to treat peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL; a form of cancer that begins in a ... come back after treatment with other medications. Pralatrexate injection has not been shown to help people who ...

  15. Paclitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Paclitaxel injection manufactured with human albumin is used to treat breast cancer that has not improved or that has come back after treatment with other medications. Paclitaxel injection manufactured with polyoxyethylated castor oil is used to ...

  16. Diphenhydramine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Diphenhydramine injection is used to treat allergic reactions, especially for people who are unable to take diphenhydramine by mouth. ... is used also to treat motion sickness. Diphenhydramine injection is also used alone or along with other ...

  17. Peramivir Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Peramivir injection is used to treat some types of influenza infection ('flu') in people who have had symptoms of ... flu for no longer than 2 days. Peramivir injection is in a class of medications called neuraminidase ...

  18. Cefotetan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Cefotetan injection is used to treat infections of the lungs, skin, bones, joints, stomach area, blood, female reproductive organs, and urinary tract. Cefotetan injection is also used before surgery to prevent infections. ...

  19. Mipomersen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Mipomersen injection is used to decrease levels of cholesterol and other fatty substances in the blood in people who ... that removes LDL from the blood), but mipomersen injection should not be used along with this treatment. ...

  20. Romiplostim Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Romiplostim injection is used to increase the number of platelets (cells that help the blood to clot) in order ... low number of platelets in the blood). Romiplostim injection should only be used in people who cannot ...

  1. Hydrocortisone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrocortisone injection is used to treat symptoms of low corticosteroid levels (lack of certain substances that are usually produced ... also used to treat severe allergic reactions. Hydrocortisone injection is used in the management of multiple sclerosis ( ...

  2. Palivizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Palivizumab injection is used to help prevent respiratory syncytial virus (RSV; common virus that can cause serious lung infections) ... or have certain heart or lung diseases. Palivizumab injection is not used to treat the symptoms of ...

  3. Naltrexone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Naltrexone injection is used along with counseling and social support to help people who have stopped drinking large amounts of alcohol to avoid drinking again. Naltrexone injection is also used along with counseling and social ...

  4. Tesamorelin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Tesamorelin injection is used to decrease the amount of extra fat in the stomach area in adults with human ... fat in certain areas of the body). Tesamorelin injection is not used to help with weight loss. ...

  5. Testosterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... and testosterone pellet (Testopel) are forms of testosterone injection used to treat symptoms of low testosterone in ... are low before you begin to use testosterone injection. Testosterone enanthate (Delatestryl) and testosterone pellet (Testopel) are ...

  6. Tigecycline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Tigecycline injection used to treat certain serious infections including community acquired pneumonia (a lung infection that developed in a ... area between the chest and the waist). Tigecycline injection should not be used to treat pneumonia that ...

  7. Eculizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Eculizumab injection is used to treat paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH: a type of anemia in which too many red ... oxygen to all parts of the body). Eculizumab injection is also used to treat atypical hemolytic uremic ...

  8. Pembrolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Pembrolizumab injection is used to treat melanoma (a type of skin cancer) that cannot be treated with surgery or ... spread to other parts of the body. Pembrolizumab injection is also used to treat a certain type ...

  9. Obinutuzumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Obinutuzumab injection is used with chlorambucil (Leukeran) to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL; a type of cancer of the white blood cells). Obinutuzumab injection is in a class of medications called ...

  10. Parton distributions with LHC data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Richard D.; Bertone, Valerio; Carrazza, Stefano; Deans, Christopher S.; Del Debbio, Luigi; Forte, Stefano; Guffanti, Alberto; Hartland, Nathan P.; Latorre, José I.; Rojo, Juan; Ubiali, Maria; Nnpdf Collaboration

    2013-02-01

    We present the first determination of parton distributions of the nucleon at NLO and NNLO based on a global data set which includes LHC data: NNPDF2.3. Our data set includes, besides the deep inelastic, Drell-Yan, gauge boson production and jet data already used in previous global PDF determinations, all the relevant LHC data for which experimental systematic uncertainties are currently available: ATLAS and LHCb W and Z rapidity distributions from the 2010 run, CMS W electron asymmetry data from the 2011 run, and ATLAS inclusive jet cross-sections from the 2010 run. We introduce an improved implementation of the FastKernel method which allows us to fit to this extended data set, and also to adopt a more effective minimization methodology. We present the NNPDF2.3 PDF sets, and compare them to the NNPDF2.1 sets to assess the impact of the LHC data. We find that all the LHC data are broadly consistent with each other and with all the older data sets included in the fit. We present predictions for various standard candle cross-sections, and compare them to those obtained previously using NNPDF2.1, and specifically discuss the impact of ATLAS electroweak data on the determination of the strangeness fraction of the proton. We also present collider PDF sets, constructed using only data from HERA, the Tevatron and the LHC, but find that this data set is neither precise nor complete enough for a competitive PDF determination.

  11. Busulfan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Busulfex® Injection ... Busulfan injection is used to treat a certain type of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML; a type of cancer of ... of 16 doses) before bone marrow transplant.Busulfan injection may cause seizures during therapy with the medication. ...

  12. Session 20: Injection Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, Susan

    1983-12-01

    The test program was initiated at the Raft River Geothermal Field in southern Idaho in September 1982. A series of eight short-term injection and backflow tests, followed by a long-term injection test, were conducted on one well in the field. Tracers were added during injection and monitored during backflow as well. The principal objective was to determine if tracers could be effectively used as a means to assess reservoir characteristics in a one-well test. The test program resulted in a unique data set which shows promise as a means to improve understanding of the reservoir characteristics. In December 1982, an RFP was issued to obtain an industrial partner to obtain follow-on data on the injection/backflow technique in a second field, and to study any alternate advanced concepts for injection testing which the industrial community might recommend. The East Mesa Geothermal Field was selected for the second test series. Two wells were utilized for testing, and a series of ten tests were conducted in July and August 1983, aimed principally at further evaluation of the injection/backflow technique.

  13. An Introduction to the LHC Olympics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkoski, Andrew; Armour, Kyle; Gray, Amanda; Ventura, Dan; Walsh, Jon; Schabinger, Rob

    2006-05-01

    The LHC Olympics is a series of workshop aimed at encouraging theorists and experimentalists to prepare for the soon-to-be-online Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland. One aspect of the LHC Olympics program consists of the study of simulated data sets which represent various possible new physics signals as they would be seen in LHC detectors. Through this exercise, LHC Olympians learn the phenomenology of possible new physics models and gain experience in analyzing LHC data. Additionally, the LHC Olympics encourages discussion between theorists and experimentalists, and through this collaboration new techniques could be developed. The University of Washington LHC Olympics group consists of several first-year graduate and senior undergraduate students, in both theoretical and experimental particle physics. Presented here is an introduction to how such an LHC Olympics study is done. Various basic analysis tools and techniques are discussed.

  14. Increased Uptake of HCV Testing through a Community-Based Educational Intervention in Difficult-to-Reach People Who Inject Drugs: Results from the ANRS-AERLI Study

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Perrine; Rojas Castro, Daniela; Ndiaye, Khadim; Debrus, Marie; Protopopescu, Camélia; Le Gall, Jean-Marie; Haas, Aurélie; Mora, Marion; Spire, Bruno; Suzan-Monti, Marie; Carrieri, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Aims The community-based AERLI intervention provided training and education to people who inject drugs (PWID) about HIV and HCV transmission risk reduction, with a focus on drug injecting practices, other injection-related complications, and access to HIV and HCV testing and care. We hypothesized that in such a population where HCV prevalence is very high and where few know their HCV serostatus, AERLI would lead to increased HCV testing. Methods The national multisite intervention study ANRS-AERLI consisted in assessing the impact of an injection-centered face-to-face educational session offered in volunteer harm reduction (HR) centers (“with intervention”) compared with standard HR centers (“without intervention”). The study included 271 PWID interviewed on three occasions: enrolment, 6 and 12 months. Participants in the intervention group received at least one face-to-face educational session during the first 6 months. Measurements The primary outcome of this analysis was reporting to have been tested for HCV during the previous 6 months. Statistical analyses used a two-step Heckman approach to account for bias arising from the non-randomized clustering design. This approach identified factors associated with HCV testing during the previous 6 months. Findings Of the 271 participants, 127 and 144 were enrolled in the control and intervention groups, respectively. Of the latter, 113 received at least one educational session. For the present analysis, we selected 114 and 88 participants eligible for HCV testing in the control and intervention groups, respectively. In the intervention group, 44% of participants reported having being tested for HCV during the previous 6 months at enrolment and 85% at 6 months or 12 months. In the control group, these percentages were 51% at enrolment and 78% at 12 months. Multivariable analyses showed that participants who received at least one educational session during follow-up were more likely to report HCV testing

  15. Hints for a nonstandard Higgs boson from the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Raidal, Martti; Strumia, Alessandro

    2011-10-01

    We reconsider Higgs boson invisible decays into Dark Matter in the light of recent Higgs searches at the LHC. Present hints in the Compact Muon Solenoid and ATLAS data favor a nonstandard Higgs boson with approximately 50% invisible branching ratio, and mass around 143 GeV. This situation can be realized within the simplest thermal scalar singlet Dark Matter model, predicting a Dark Matter mass around 50 GeV and direct detection cross section just below present bound. The present runs of the Xenon100 and LHC experiments can test this possibility.

  16. First Attempts at using Active Halo Control at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Joschka; Bruce, Roderik; Garcia Morales, Hector; Höfle, Wolfgang; Kotzian, Gerd; Kwee-Hinzmann, Regina; Langner, Andy; Mereghetti, Alessio; Quaranta, Elena; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Salvachua, Belen; Stancari, Giulio; Tomás, Rogelio; Valentino, Gianluca; Valuch, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    The beam halo population is a non-negligible factor for the performance of the LHC collimation system and the machine protection. In particular this could become crucial for aiming at stored beam energies of 700 MJ in the High Luminosity (HL-LHC) project, in order to avoid beam dumps caused by orbit jitter and to ensure safety during a crab cavity failure. Therefore several techniques to safely deplete the halo, i.e. active halo control, are under development. In a first attempt a novel way for safe halo depletion was tested with particle narrow-band excitation employing the LHC Transverse Damper (ADT). At an energy of 450 GeV a bunch selective beam tail scraping without affecting the core distribution was attempted. This paper presents the first measurement results, as well as a simple simulation to model the underlying dynamics.

  17. L'Aventure du LHC

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-11

    Cette présentation s’adressera principalement aux personnes qui ont construit le LHC. La construction du LHC fut longue et difficile. De nombreux problèmes sont apparus en cours de route. Tous ont été résolus grâce au dévouement et à l’engagement du personnel et des collaborateurs. Je reviendrai sur les coups durs et les réussites qui ont marqués ces 15 dernières années et je vous montrerai combien cette machine, le fruit de vos efforts, est extraordinaire.

  18. Electroweak physics at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berryhill, J.; Oh, A.

    2017-02-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has completed in 2012 its first running phase and the experiments have collected data sets of proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV with an integrated luminosity of about 5 and 20 {{fb}}-1, respectively. Analyses of these data sets have produced a rich set of results in the electroweak sector of the standard model. This article reviews the status of electroweak measurements of the ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments at the LHC.

  19. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkovszky, Laszlo; Orava, Risto; Salii, Andrii

    2013-04-15

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  20. LHC: The Large Hadron Collider

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The Large Hadron Collider (or LHC) is the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. In 2012, scientists used data taken by it to discover the Higgs boson, before pausing operations for upgrades and improvements. In the spring of 2015, the LHC will return to operations with 163% the energy it had before and with three times as many collisions per second. It’s essentially a new and improved version of itself. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains both some of the absolutely amazing scientific and engineering properties of this modern scientific wonder.

  1. LHC Symposium 2003: Summary Talk

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey A. Appel

    2003-08-12

    This summary talk reviews the LHC 2003 Symposium, focusing on expectations as we prepare to leap over the current energy frontier into new territory. We may learn from what happened in the two most recent examples of leaping into new energy territory. Quite different scenarios appeared in those two cases. In addition, they review the status of the machine and experiments as reported at the Symposium. Finally, I suggest an attitude which may be most appropriate as they look forward to the opportunities anticipated for the first data from the LHC.

  2. LHC: The Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-03-04

    The Large Hadron Collider (or LHC) is the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. In 2012, scientists used data taken by it to discover the Higgs boson, before pausing operations for upgrades and improvements. In the spring of 2015, the LHC will return to operations with 163% the energy it had before and with three times as many collisions per second. It’s essentially a new and improved version of itself. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains both some of the absolutely amazing scientific and engineering properties of this modern scientific wonder.

  3. Taxonomic distribution and origins of the extended LHC (light-harvesting complex) antenna protein superfamily

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The extended light-harvesting complex (LHC) protein superfamily is a centerpiece of eukaryotic photosynthesis, comprising the LHC family and several families involved in photoprotection, like the LHC-like and the photosystem II subunit S (PSBS). The evolution of this complex superfamily has long remained elusive, partially due to previously missing families. Results In this study we present a meticulous search for LHC-like sequences in public genome and expressed sequence tag databases covering twelve representative photosynthetic eukaryotes from the three primary lineages of plants (Plantae): glaucophytes, red algae and green plants (Viridiplantae). By introducing a coherent classification of the different protein families based on both, hidden Markov model analyses and structural predictions, numerous new LHC-like sequences were identified and several new families were described, including the red lineage chlorophyll a/b-binding-like protein (RedCAP) family from red algae and diatoms. The test of alternative topologies of sequences of the highly conserved chlorophyll-binding core structure of LHC and PSBS proteins significantly supports the independent origins of LHC and PSBS families via two unrelated internal gene duplication events. This result was confirmed by the application of cluster likelihood mapping. Conclusions The independent evolution of LHC and PSBS families is supported by strong phylogenetic evidence. In addition, a possible origin of LHC and PSBS families from different homologous members of the stress-enhanced protein subfamily, a diverse and anciently paralogous group of two-helix proteins, seems likely. The new hypothesis for the evolution of the extended LHC protein superfamily proposed here is in agreement with the character evolution analysis that incorporates the distribution of families and subfamilies across taxonomic lineages. Intriguingly, stress-enhanced proteins, which are universally found in the genomes of green plants

  4. Factors Influencing the Mobility of Microorganisms in a Small-Scale Injection and Recovery Test Performed in a Sandy Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metge, D. W.; Harvey, R. W.; Rogers, J. R.

    2001-12-01

    The effect of motility and physical characteristics upon the relative transport behaviors of three bacterial strains (groundwater isolates) and a virus (H40, a 150 nm marine bacteriophage) were assessed in July 2001 in a small-scale, natural-gradient injection and recovery study involving an array of multilevel samplers (MLS) installed in a sandy aquifer in Cape Cod, MA. The bacteria included a motile Pseudomonas sp. (1.5-2.2 μ m long, 1.07 g/cm3), a non-motile mutant of the same species; and a Staphylococcus sp. (0.5-0.8 μ m diameter, 1.08 g/cm3). The virus, three bacteria strains, and conservative tracer (bromide) were introduced to the aquifer as a 107-L pulse injection into two conductive layers that differed in terms of groundwater velocity. For the faster layer, peak breakthroughs for all three bacterial strains at 1 m downgradient from the point of injection were coincident with that of the bromide tracer, although the magnitudes of breakthrough varied up to 10-fold. In contrast, the tailed bacteriophage (H40) was retarded by a factor of ~3. For the slower layer, the motile Pseudomonas sp. exhibited substantial longitudinal spreading and two distinct breakthrough peaks. The first peak arrived before that of bromide. However, the second peak was retarded by a factor of 2. Peak concentrations of its non-motile mutant and the Staphylococcus sp. arrived coincidently with that of bromide. As was the case for the faster layer, breakthrough of the virus in the slower layer was significantly retarded. The data suggest that a microorganism's motility and physical characteristics can substantively affect its transport behavior in aquifer sediments, although the relative degrees of influence for these factors may be modified by aquifer heterogeneities.

  5. Mode--particle resonances during near-tangential neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R.; White, R.B.; Morris, A.W.; Fredrickson, E.D.; McGuire, K.M.; Medley, S.S.; Murphy, T.J.; Scott, S.D. )

    1990-07-01

    Coherent magnetohydrodynamic modes have been observed previously during neutral beam injection in the PDX tokamak (Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 50}, 891 (1983)) and they have now been seen in the TFTR tokamak (Phys. Fluids {bold 26}, 2958 (1983)). Periodic bursts of oscillations were detected with several plasma diagnostics, and Fokker--Planck calculations show that the populations of trapped particles in both tokamaks are sufficient to account for fishbone destabilization if a resonant interaction, between the mode and the beam ions, is assumed. Estimates of mode parameters are in reasonable agreement with the experiments, and they indicate that the fishbone mode may continue to affect the performance of intensely heated tokamaks.

  6. Radiation Hard Silicon Particle Detectors for Phase-II LHC Trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oblakowska-Mucha, A.

    2017-02-01

    The major LHC upgrade is planned after ten years of accelerator operation. It is foreseen to significantly increase the luminosity of the current machine up to 1035 cm‑2s‑1 and operate as the upcoming High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) . The major detectors upgrade, called the Phase-II Upgrade, is also planned, a main reason being the aging processes caused by severe particle radiation. Within the RD50 Collaboration, a large Research and Development program has been underway to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation tolerance for HL-LHC trackers. In this summary, several results obtained during the testing of the devices after irradiation to HL-LHC levels are presented. Among the studied structures, one can find advanced sensors types like 3D silicon detectors, High-Voltage CMOS technologies, or sensors with intrinsic gain (LGAD). Based on these results, the RD50 Collaboration gives recommendation for the silicon detectors to be used in the detector upgrade.

  7. Plans for Deployment of Hollow Electron Lenses at the LHC for Enhanced Beam Collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Redaelli, S.; Bertarelli, A.; Bruce, R.; Perini, D.; Rossi, A.; Salvachua, B.; Stancari, G.; Valishev, A.

    2015-06-01

    Hollow electron lenses are considered as a possible means to improve the LHC beam collimation system, providing active control of halo diffusion rates and suppressing the population of transverse halos. After a very successful experience at the Tevatron, a conceptual design of a hollow e-lens optimized for the LHC was produced. Recent further studies have led to a mature preliminary technical design. In this paper, possible scenarios for the deployment of this technology at the LHC are elaborated in the context of the scheduled LHC long shutdowns until the full implementation of the HL-LHC upgrade in 2023. Possible setups of electron beam test stands at CERN and synergies with other relevant electron beam programmes are also discussed.

  8. Albumin injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a nuclear scan test that is performed to measure the supply of blood through the lungs. After the injection, the lungs are scanned to detect the location of the radioactive particles as blood flows through the lungs.

  9. PHOBOS in the LHC era

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Peter

    2015-01-15

    The PHOBOS experiment ran at the RHIC collider from 2000 to 2005, under the leadership of Wit Busza. These proceedings summarize selected PHOBOS results, highlighting their continuing relevance amidst the wealth of new results from the lead–lead program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

  10. Heavy Quark Photoproduction at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, V. P.; Meneses, A. R.; Machado, M. V.

    2010-11-01

    In this work we calculate the inclusive and difractive photoproduction of heavy quarks in proton-proton collisions at LHC energies within the color dipole picture employing three phenomenological saturation models based on the color glass condensate formalism. Our results demonstrate that the experimental analyzes of these reactions is feasible and that the cross sections are sensitive to the underlying parton dynamics.

  11. Inelastic diffraction at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshin, S. M.; Tyurin, N. E.

    2017-03-01

    The relativistic scattering was one of the scientific fields where Academician V.G. Kadyshevsky has made an important and highly cited contribution [1]. In this paper we discuss the high-energy dependencies of diffractive and non-diffractive inelastic cross-sections in view of the recent LHC data which reveal a presence of the reflective scattering mode.

  12. The history of the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    2010-05-11

    Abstract: From the civil engineering, to the manufacturing of the various magnet types, each building block of this extraordinary machine required ambitious leaps in innovation. This lecture will review the history of the LHC project, focusing on the many challenges -- scientific, technological, managerial -- that had to be met during the various phases of R&D;, industrialization, construction, installation and commissioning.

  13. The history of the LHC

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Abstract: From the civil engineering, to the manufacturing of the various magnet types, each building block of this extraordinary machine required ambitious leaps in innovation. This lecture will review the history of the LHC project, focusing on the many challenges -- scientific, technological, managerial -- that had to be met during the various phases of R&D;, industrialization, construction, installation and commissioning.

  14. Post-LHC accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Gourlay, Stephen A.

    2001-06-10

    The design and practicality of future accelerators, such as hadron colliders and neutrino factories being considered to supercede the LHC, will depend greatly on the choice of superconducting magnets. Various possibilities will be reviewed and discussed, taking into account recent progress and projected improvements in magnet design and conductor development along with the recommendations from the 2001 Snowmass workshop.

  15. THE RHIC INJECTION SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; GLENN,J.W.; MACKAY,W.W.; PTITSIN,V.; ROBINSON,T.G.; TSOUPAS,N.

    1999-03-29

    The RHIC injection system has to transport beam from the AGS-to-RHIC transfer line onto the closed orbits of the RHIC Blue and Yellow rings. This task can be divided into three problems. First, the beam has to be injected into either ring. Second, once injected the beam needs to be transported around the ring for one turn. Third, the orbit must be closed and coherent beam oscillations around the closed orbit should be minimized. We describe our solutions for these problems and report on system tests conducted during the RHIC Sextant test performed in 1997. The system will be fully commissioned in 1999.

  16. Strontium isotopes test long-term zonal isolation of injected and Marcellus formation water after hydraulic fracturing.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Courtney A Kolesar; Capo, Rosemary C; Stewart, Brian W; Wall, Andrew J; Schroeder, Karl T; Hammack, Richard W; Guthrie, George D

    2014-08-19

    One concern regarding unconventional hydrocarbon production from organic-rich shale is that hydraulic fracture stimulation could create pathways that allow injected fluids and deep brines from the target formation or adjacent units to migrate upward into shallow drinking water aquifers. This study presents Sr isotope and geochemical data from a well-constrained site in Greene County, Pennsylvania, in which samples were collected before and after hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale. Results spanning a 15-month period indicated no significant migration of Marcellus-derived fluids into Upper Devonian/Lower Mississippian units located 900-1200 m above the lateral Marcellus boreholes or into groundwater sampled at a spring near the site. Monitoring the Sr isotope ratio of water from legacy oil and gas wells or drinking water wells can provide a sensitive early warning of upward brine migration for many years after well stimulation.

  17. Return to post-test counselling by out-of-treatment injecting drug users participating in a cross-sectional survey in north Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Bergenstrom, A; Go, V; Nam, L V; Thuy, B T; Celentano, D D; Frangakis, C; Quan, V M

    2007-08-01

    Return to post-test counselling is essential for optimal individual and public health impact of voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) services. Our study assessed factors associated with return to post-test counselling among 309 out-of-treatment injecting drug users who underwent VCT as part of a cross-sectional survey in Bac Ninh, Vietnam during August and September 2003. The overall return rate to post-test counselling was 54% (n=167). While participants in the rural study district were significantly less likely (chi2=5.8; p<0.05) to return compared with participants in the town centre (42.7 versus 58.1%), return rates did not significantly vary by age, perception of personal HIV risk, HIV serostatus diagnosed by the study, counsellor, history of HIV testing or prior knowledge of HIV status. In a multivariate analysis, higher return rate was associated with residence in Bac Ninh town centre (adjusted OR=1.9; CI=1.1-3.1). Of HIV-positive participants (n=131), 45% (n=59) did not return to collect test results. In view of the findings it is crucial to address risk perception and benefits of collecting test results during pre-test counselling sessions in order to maximize the desired impact of community-based VCT services targeting IDUs in Vietnam.

  18. Sterility Testing of Injectable Products: Evaluation of the Growth-based BacT/ALERT® 3D™ Dual T Culture System.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Stefan J; Mutters, Nico T; Backhaus, Jürgen; Frank, Uwe; Günther, Frank

    Sterility testing as described in the European Pharmacopoeia Chapter 2.6.1 as well as the United States Pharmacopeia Chapter 71 requires a 14 day incubation period of the test product in two different media and at two different temperatures. Because of extensive personnel requirements for test performance and quality assurance, alternative and partially automated methods for product sterility testing are of interest. The study objective was to evaluate the applicability of the BacT/ALERT® 3D™ Dual T system (Biomérieux, Nürtingen, Germany) for detection of microbial contaminants according to current pharmacopoeia standards. In addition, we compared the BacT/ALERT® 3D™ Dual T system to conventional pharmacopoeia sterility testing using the direct inoculation method. The results showed no significant disadvantages of sterility testing by BacT/ALERT® 3D™ Dual T compared to the direct inoculation method regarding the ability to detect microbial contamination. Furthermore, product testing using the BacT/ALERT® 3D™ Dual T system met the compendia requirements for method qualification. Altogether, our data provide evidence that the BacT/ALERT® 3D™ Dual T system is a promising alternative for sterility testing of injectable products of sample volume below 10 mL and without antimicrobial activity.

  19. Practical experience applied to the design of injection and sample manifolds to perform in-place surveillance tests according to ANSI/ASME N-510

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, E.M.; Wikoff, W.O.; Shaffer, L.L.

    1997-08-01

    At the current level of maturity and experience in the nuclear industry, regarding testing of air treatment systems, it is now possible to design and qualify injection and sample manifolds for most applications. While the qualification of sample manifolds is still in its infancy, injection manifolds have reached a mature stage that helps to eliminate the {open_quotes}hit or miss{close_quotes} type of design. During the design phase, manifolds can be adjusted to compensate for poor airflow distribution, laminar flow conditions, and to take advantage of any system attributes. Experience has shown that knowing the system attributes before the design phase begins is an essential element to a successful manifold design. The use of a spreadsheet type program commonly found on most personal computers can afford a greater flexibility and a reduction in time spent in the design phase. The experience gained from several generations of manifold design has culminated in a set of general design guidelines. Use of these guidelines, along with a good understanding of the type of testing (theoretical and practical), can result in a good manifold design requiring little or no field modification. The requirements for manifolds came about because of the use of multiple banks of components and unconventional housing inlet configurations. Multiple banks of adsorbers and pre and post HEPA`s required that each bank be tested to insure that each one does not exceed a specific allowable leakage criterion. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Evaluation of penicillin G residues by kidney inhibition swab tests in sow body fluids and tissues following intramuscular injection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2011, the USDA-Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) changed the method used for screening swine tissues for antimicrobial residues from the Fast Antimicrobial Screen Test to the Kidney Inhibition Swab (KIS(TM)). Here, we describe the use of KIS(TM) test for the detection of penicillin G res...

  1. Musculoskeletal Injection

    PubMed Central

    Wittich, Christopher M.; Ficalora, Robert D.; Mason, Thomas G.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Patients commonly present to primary care physicians with musculoskeletal symptoms. Clinicians certified in internal medicine must be knowledgeable about the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal diseases, yet they often receive inadequate postgraduate training on this topic. The musculoskeletal problems most frequently encountered in our busy injection practice involve, in decreasing order, the knees, trochanteric bursae, and glenohumeral joints. This article reviews the clinical presentations of these problems. It also discusses musculoskeletal injections for these problems in terms of medications, indications, injection technique, and supporting evidence from the literature. Experience with joint injection and the pharmacological principles described in this article should allow primary care physicians to become comfortable and proficient with musculoskeletal injections. PMID:19720781

  2. Le LHC, un tunnel cosmique

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Et si la lumière au bout du tunnel du LHC était cosmique ? En d’autres termes, qu’est-ce que le LHC peut nous apporter dans la connaissance de l’Univers ? Car la montée en énergie des accélérateurs de particules nous permet de mieux appréhender l’univers primordial, chaud et dense. Mais dans quel sens dit-on que le LHC reproduit des conditions proches du Big bang ? Quelles informations nous apporte-t-il sur le contenu de l’Univers ? La matière noire est-elle détectable au LHC ? L’énergie noire ? Pourquoi l’antimatière accumulée au CERN est-elle si rare dans l’Univers ? Et si le CERN a bâti sa réputation sur l’exploration des forces faibles et fortes qui opèrent au sein des atomes et de leurs noyaux, est-ce que le LHC peut nous apporter des informations sur la force gravitationnelle qui gouverne l’évolution cosmique ? Depuis une trentaine d’années, notre compréhension de l’univers dans ses plus grandes dimensions et l’appréhension de son comportement aux plus petites distances sont intimement liées : en quoi le LHC va-t-il tester expérimentalement cette vision unifiée ? Tout public, entrée libre / Réservations au +41 (0)22 767 76 76

  3. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Boehlecke

    2004-12-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 322 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 01-25-01 - AST Release Site; (2) 03-25-03 - Mud Plant and AST Diesel Release; and (3) 03-20-05 - Injection Wells and BOP Shop. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 322. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from April 2004 through September 2004, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: (1) Determine if contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to recommend appropriate corrective actions for the CASs. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against appropriate preliminary action levels to identify contaminants of concern for each corrective action site. Radiological field measurements were compared to unrestricted release criteria. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities revealed the following: (1) CAS 01-25-01 contains an AST berm contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) diesel-range organics (DRO). (2) CAS 03-25-03 includes two distinct areas: Area A where no contamination remains from a potential spill associated with an AST, and Area B where TPH-DRO contamination associated with various activities at the mud plant was identified. The Area B contamination was found at various locations and depths. (3) CAS 03-25-03 Area B contains TPH-DRO contamination at various locations and

  4. Status of the 11 T Nb$_{3}$Sn Dipole Project for the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Savary, F.; et al.

    2015-01-01

    The planned upgrade of the LHC collimation system includes additional collimators in the LHC lattice. The longitudinal space for the collimators could be obtained by replacing some LHC main dipoles with shorter but stronger dipoles compatible with the LHC lattice and main systems. A joint development program with the goal of building a 5.5 m long two-in-one aperture Nb_3Sn dipole prototype suitable for installation in the LHC is being conducted by FNAL and CERN magnet groups. As part of the first phase of the program, 1 m long and 2 m long single aperture models are being built and tested, and the collared coils from these magnets will be assembled and tested in two-in-one configuration in both laboratories. In parallel with the short model magnet activities, the work has started on the production line in view of the scale-up to 5.5 m long prototype magnet. The development of the final cryo-assembly comprising two 5.5 m long 11 T dipole cold masses and the warm collimator in the middle, fully compatible with the LHC main systems and the existing machine interfaces, has also started at CERN. This paper summarizes the progress made at CERN and FNAL towards the construction of 5.5 m long 11 T Nb_3Sn dipole prototype and the present status of the activities related to the integration of the 11 T dipole and collimator in the LHC.

  5. Harm reduction measures and injecting inside prison versus mandatory drugs testing: results of a cross sectional anonymous questionnaire survey. The European Commission Network on HIV Infection and Hepatitis in Prison.

    PubMed Central

    Bird, A. G.; Gore, S. M.; Hutchinson, S. J.; Lewis, S. C.; Cameron, S.; Burns, S.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: (a) To determine both the frequency of injecting inside prison and use of sterilising tablets to clean needles in the previous four weeks; (b) to assess the efficiency of random mandatory drugs testing at detecting prisoners who inject heroin inside prison; (c) to determine the percentage of prisoners who had been offered vaccination against hepatitis B. DESIGN: Cross sectional willing anonymous salivary HIV surveillance linked to a self completion risk factor questionnaire. SETTING: Lowmoss prison, Glasgow, and Aberdeen prison on 11 and 30 October 1996. SUBJECTS: 293 (94%) of all 312 inmates at Lowmoss and 146 (93%) of all 157 at Aberdeen, resulting in 286 and 143 valid questionnaires. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Frequency of injecting inside prison in the previous four weeks by injector inmates who had been in prison for at least four weeks. RESULTS: 116 (41%) Lowmoss and 53 (37%) Aberdeen prisoners had a history of injecting drug use but only 4% of inmates (17/395; 95% confidence interval 2% to 6%) had ever been offered vaccination against hepatitis B. 42 Lowmoss prisoners (estimated 207 injections and 258 uses of sterilising tablets) and 31 Aberdeen prisoners (229 injections, 221 uses) had injected inside prison in the previous four weeks. The prisons together held 112 injector inmates who had been in prison for more than four weeks, of whom 57 (51%; 42% to 60%) had injected in prison in the past four weeks; their estimated mean number of injections was 6.0 (SD 5.7). Prisoners injecting heroin six times in four weeks will test positive in random mandatory drugs testing on at most 18 days out of 28. CONCLUSIONS: Sterilising tablets and hepatitis B vaccination should be offered to all prisoners. Random mandatory drugs testing seriously underestimates injector inmates' harm reduction needs. PMID:9233321

  6. Enhanced Absorption of Insulin Aspart as the Result of a Dispersed Injection Strategy Tested in a Randomized Trial in Type 1 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mader, Julia K.; Birngruber, Thomas; Korsatko, Stefan; Deller, Sigrid; Köhler, Gerd; Boysen, Susanne; Augustin, Thomas; Mautner, Selma I.; Sinner, Frank; Pieber, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We investigated the impact of two different injection strategies on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of insulin aspart in vivo in an open-label, two-period crossover study and verified changes in the surface-to-volume ratio ex vivo. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Before the clinical trial, insulin aspart was injected ex vivo into explanted human abdominal skin flaps. The surface-to-volume ratio of the subcutaneous insulin depot was assessed by microfocus computed tomography that compared 1 bolus of 18 IU with 9 dispersed boluses of 2 IU. These two injection strategies were then tested in vivo, in 12 C-peptide–negative type 1 diabetic patients in a euglycemic glucose clamp (glucose target 5.5 ± 1.1 mmol/L) for 8 h after the first insulin administration. RESULTS The ex vivo experiment showed a 1.8-fold higher mean surface-to-volume ratio for the dispersed injection strategy. The maximum glucose infusion rates (GIR) were similar for the two strategies (10 ± 4 vs. 9 ± 4; P = 0.5); however, times to reach maximum GIR and 50% and 10% of the maximum GIR were significantly reduced by using the 9 × 2 IU strategy (68 ± 33 vs. 127 ± 93 min; P = 0.01; 38 ± 9 vs. 49 ± 16 min; P < 0.01; 23 ± 6 vs. 30 ± 10 min; P < 0.05). For 9 × 2 IU, the area under the GIR curve was greater during the first 60 min (219 ± 89 vs. 137 ± 75; P < 0.01) and halved until maximum GIR (242 ± 183 vs. 501 ± 396; P < 0.01); however, it was similar across the whole study period (1,361 ± 469 vs. 1,565 ± 527; P = 0.08). CONCLUSIONS A dispersed insulin injection strategy enhanced the effect of a fast-acting insulin analog. The increased surface-to-volume ratio of the subcutaneous insulin depot can facilitate insulin absorption into the vascular system. PMID:23193211

  7. Interim Report: 100-NR-2 Apatite Treatability Test: Low Concentration Calcium Citrate-Phosphate Solution Injection for In Situ Strontium-90 Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Mark D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Thorne, Paul D.; Xie, YuLong; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Mackley, Rob D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Szecsody, James E.; Vermeul, Vincent R.

    2008-07-11

    Following an evaluation of potential Sr-90 treatment technologies and their applicability under 100-NR-2 hydrogeologic conditions, U.S. Department of Energy, Fluor Hanford, Inc., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the Washington Department of Ecology agreed that the long-term strategy for groundwater remediation at 100-N Area will include apatite sequestration as the primary treatment, followed by a secondary treatment if necessary (most likely phytoremediation). Since then, the agencies have worked together to agree on which apatite sequestration technology has the greatest chance of reducing Sr-90 flux to the river at a reasonable cost. In July 2005, aqueous injection, (i.e., the introduction of apatite-forming chemicals into the subsurface) was endorsed as the interim remedy and selected for field testing. Studies are in progress to assess the efficacy of in situ apatite formation by aqueous solution injection to address both the vadose zone and the shallow aquifer along the 300 ft of shoreline where Sr-90 concentrations are highest. This report describes the field testing of the shallow aquifer treatment.

  8. Fibrinogen α-chain-derived peptide is upregulated in hippocampus of rats exposed to acute morphine injection and spontaneous alternation testing.

    PubMed

    Maki, Agatha E; Morris, Kenneth A; Catherman, Kasia; Chen, Xian; Hatcher, Nathan G; Gold, Paul E; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2014-06-01

    Fibrinogen is a secreted glycoprotein that is synthesized in the liver, although recent in situ hybridization data support its expression in the brain. It is involved in blood clotting and is released in the brain upon injury. Here, we report changes in the extracellular levels of fibrinogen α-chain-derived peptides in the brain after injections of saline and morphine. More specifically, in order to assess hippocampus-related working memory, an approach pairing in vivo microdialysis with mass spectrometry was used to characterize extracellular peptide release from the hippocampus of rats in response to saline or morphine injection coupled with a spontaneous alternation task. Two fibrinopeptide A-related peptides derived from the fibrinogen α-chain-fibrinopeptide A (ADTGTTSEFIEAGGDIR) and a fibrinopeptide A-derived peptide (DTGTTSEFIEAGGDIR)-were shown to be consistently elevated in the hippocampal microdialysate. Fibrinopeptide A was significantly upregulated in rats exposed to morphine and spontaneous alternation testing compared with rats exposed to saline and spontaneous alternation testing (P < 0.001), morphine alone (P < 0.01), or saline alone (P < 0.01), respectively. The increase in fibrinopeptide A in rats subjected to morphine and a memory task suggests that a complex interaction between fibrinogen and morphine takes place in the hippocampus.

  9. Pre-Test CFD for the Design and Execution of the Enhanced Injection and Mixing Project at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drozda, Tomasz G.; Axdahl, Erik L.; Cabell, Karen F.

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing costs of physics experiments and simultaneous increase in availability and maturity of computational tools it is not surprising that computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is playing an increasingly important role, not only in post-test investigations, but also in the early stages of experimental planning. This paper describes a CFD-based effort executed in close collaboration between computational fluid dynamicists and experimentalists to develop a virtual experiment during the early planning stages of the Enhanced Injection and Mixing project at NASA Langley Research Center. This projects aims to investigate supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) fuel injection and mixing physics, improve the understanding of underlying physical processes, and develop enhancement strategies and functional relationships relevant to flight Mach numbers greater than 8. The purpose of the virtual experiment was to provide flow field data to aid in the design of the experimental apparatus and the in-stream rake probes, to verify the nonintrusive measurements based on NO-PLIF, and to perform pre-test analysis of quantities obtainable from the experiment and CFD. The approach also allowed for the joint team to develop common data processing and analysis tools, and to test research ideas. The virtual experiment consisted of a series of Reynolds-averaged simulations (RAS). These simulations included the facility nozzle, the experimental apparatus with a baseline strut injector, and the test cabin. Pure helium and helium-air mixtures were used to determine the efficacy of different inert gases to model hydrogen injection. The results of the simulations were analyzed by computing mixing efficiency, total pressure recovery, and stream thrust potential. As the experimental effort progresses, the simulation results will be compared with the experimental data to calibrate the modeling constants present in the CFD and validate simulation fidelity. CFD will also be used to

  10. Long-Term Carbon Injection Field Test for 90% Mercury Removal for a PRB Unit a Spray Dryer and Fabric Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Sjostrom, Sharon; Amrhein, Jerry

    2009-04-30

    The power industry in the U.S. is faced with meeting regulations to reduce the emissions of mercury compounds from coal-fired plants. Injecting a sorbent such as powdered activated carbon (PAC) into the flue gas represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. The purpose of this test program was to evaluate the long-term mercury removal capability, long-term mercury emissions variability, and operating and maintenance (O&M) costs associated with sorbent injection on a configuration being considered for many new plants. Testing was conducted by ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA) at Rocky Mountain Power’s (RMP) Hardin Station through funding provided by DOE/NETL, RMP, and other industry partners. The Hardin Station is a new plant rated at 121 MW gross that was first brought online in April of 2006. Hardin fires a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and is configured with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NOx control, a spray dryer absorber (SDA) for SO2 control, and a fabric filter (FF) for particulate control. Based upon previous testing at PRB sites with SCRs, very little additional mercury oxidation from the SCR was expected at Hardin. In addition, based upon results from DOE/NETL Phase II Round I testing at Holcomb Station and results from similarly configured sites, low native mercury removal was expected across the SDA and FF. The main goal of this project was met—sorbent injection was used to economically and effectively achieve 90% mercury control as measured from the air heater (AH) outlet to the stack for a period of ten months. This goal was achieved with DARCO® Hg-LH, Calgon FLUEPAC®-MC PLUS and ADA Power PAC PREMIUM brominated activated carbons at nominal loadings of 1.5–2.5 lb/MMacf. An economic analysis determined the twenty-year levelized cost to be 0.87 mills/kW-hr, or $15,000/lb Hg removed. No detrimental effects on other equipment or plant operations were observed. The

  11. L'Aventure du LHC

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Cette présentation s’adressera principalement aux personnes qui ont construit le LHC. La construction du LHC fut longue et difficile. De nombreux problèmes sont apparus en cours de route. Tous ont été résolus grâce au dévouement et à l’engagement du personnel et des collaborateurs. Je reviendrai sur les coups durs et les réussites qui ont marqués ces 15 dernières années et je vous montrerai combien cette machine, le fruit de vos efforts, est extraordinaire.

  12. Catching Collisions in the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Fruguiele, Claudia; Hirschauer, Jim

    2015-06-16

    Now that the Large Hadron Collider has officially turned back on for its second run, within every proton collision could emerge the next new discovery in particle physics. Learn how the detectors on the Compact Muon Solenoid, or CMS, experiment capture and track particles as they are expelled from a collision. Talking us through these collisions are Claudia Fruguiele and Jim Hirschauer of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the largest U.S. institution collaborating on the LHC.

  13. Catching Collisions in the LHC

    ScienceCinema

    Fruguiele, Claudia; Hirschauer, Jim

    2016-07-12

    Now that the Large Hadron Collider has officially turned back on for its second run, within every proton collision could emerge the next new discovery in particle physics. Learn how the detectors on the Compact Muon Solenoid, or CMS, experiment capture and track particles as they are expelled from a collision. Talking us through these collisions are Claudia Fruguiele and Jim Hirschauer of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the largest U.S. institution collaborating on the LHC.

  14. Field tests of surface seals and soil treatments to reduce fumigant emissions from shank injection of Telone C35.

    PubMed

    Gao, Suduan; Qin, Ruijun; McDonald, Jason A; Hanson, Bradley D; Trout, Thomas J

    2008-11-01

    A mixture of 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) and chloropicrin (CP) (Telone C35) is an increasingly used fumigant product for pre-plant soil fumigation in California, USA. Atmospheric emissions of volatile organic compounds, including these important pesticides, is more heavily regulated in an effort to improve air-quality. Research has identified various methods of reducing fumigant emissions but effective and economically feasible field methods are still needed. The objective of this field study was to determine the effectiveness of several surface seal and soil treatment methods on emissions of 1,3-D and CP from shank-injected Telone C35. Treatments included control (bare surface), pre-irrigation (irrigation prior to fumigation), post-fumigation water seals with or without potassium thiosulfate (KTS) amendment, and standard high density polyethylene (HDPE) tarp over soils amended with either KTS or composted manure. The two KTS treatments resulted in the lowest fumigant emissions; but the soil surface in the treatments developed a reddish-orange color and an unpleasant odor that lasted for a few months. The pre-irrigation reduced emissions more than post-application water seals. An application of composted manure at 12.4 Mg ha(- 1) spread over the soil surface followed by HDPE tarp did not reduce 1,3-D emissions compared to the bare soils in this trial, indicating that a better understanding of processes is required in order to effectively use organic amendments for minimizing fumigant emissions. Chloropicrin emissions were generally lower than 1,3-D for all treatments.

  15. hhjj production at the LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Dolan, Matthew J.; Englert, Christoph; Greiner, Nicolas; ...

    2015-08-25

    The search for di-Higgs production at the LHC in order to set limits on the Higgs trilinear coupling and constraints on new physics is one of the main motivations for the LHC high-luminosity phase. Recent experimental analyses suggest that such analyses will only be successful if information from a range of channels is included. We therefore investigate di-Higgs production in association with two hadronic jets and give a detailed discussion of both the gluon- and the weak boson-fusion (WBF) contributions, with a particular emphasis on the phenomenology with modified Higgs trilinear and quartic gauge couplings. We perform a detailed investigationmore » of the full hadronic final state and find that hhjj production should add sensitivity to a di-Higgs search combination at the HL-LHC with 3 ab-1. Since the WBF and GF contributions are sensitive to different sources of physics beyond the Standard Model, we devise search strategies to disentangle and isolate these production modes. In addition, while gluon fusion remains non-negligible in WBF-type selections, sizeable new physics contributions to the latter can still be constrained. As an example of the latter point we investigate the sensitivity that can be obtained for a measurement of the quartic Higgs–gauge boson couplings.« less

  16. Strong dynamics at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ittisamai, Pawin

    The limitations of the Standard Model of particle physics, despite its being a well-established theory, have prompted various proposals for new physics capable of addressing its shortcomings. The particular issue to be explored here is the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking, the probing of which lies within the TeV-scale physics accessible to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This thesis focuses on the phenomenology of a class of models featuring a dynamical breaking of the electroweak symmetry via strong dynamics. Consequences of recent experiments and aspects of near-future experiments are presented. We study the implications of the LHC Higgs searches available at the time the related journal article was written for technicolor models that feature colored technifermions. Then we discuss the properties of a technicolor model featuring strong-top dynamics that is viable for explaining the recently discovered boson of mass 126 GeV. We introduce a novel method of characterizing the color structure of a new massive vector boson, often predicted in various new physics models, using information that will be promptly available if it is discovered in the near-future experiments at the LHC. We generalize the idea for more realistic models where a vector boson has flavor non-universal couplings to quarks. Finally, we discuss the possibilities of probing the chiral structure of a new color-octet vector boson.

  17. Proposed Objectives and Tentative Schedule for Surface Circulation and Injection Testing of the Phase II Reservoir Test Facility – Nov. 20 to 25, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Dreesen, Donald S.; Ponden, Raymond F.

    1991-11-19

    The following are proposed for the initial Test Facility commissioning and training operations. 1. Set up and test alarm modes on FIXDMACS program with an alarm print out to the guard shack. (automatic shut down is not installed). 2. Set up and test the control loop for fluid level control in the Production Separator using the feed pumps for circulation and using the 125 psig air system for a vapor supply. The list continues on in the document.

  18. Cyclic CO sub 2 injection for light oil recovery: Performance of a cost shared field test in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Bassiouni, Z.A.; Groves, F.R. Jr.; Wolcott, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this research is to provide a base of knowledge on the CO{sub 2} huff n' puff process for the enhanced recovery of Louisiana crude oil. Project goals include laboratory corefloods to investigate several parameters important to the process, and numerical simulation to interpret coreflood results. Additional activities include construction and analysis of a field test data base to facilitate target reservoir screening, and to identify sensitive operational parameters. The information from laboratory corefloods and data base evaluations will be used in the design and implementation of a Department of Energy sponsored field test. 1 ref.

  19. High Speed Measurements of the LHC Luminosity Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beche, J. F.; Byrd, J. M.; Monroy, M.; Ratti, A.; Turner, W.; Bravin, E.

    2006-11-01

    The LHC luminosity monitor is a gas ionization chamber designed to operate in the high radiation environment present in the TAN neutral absorbers at the LHC. One of the challenges is to measure the luminosity of individual bunch crossings with a minimum separation of 25 nsec. To test the time response and other aspects of a prototype chamber, we have performed a test using an x-ray beam of 40-60 keV with pulse spacing of 26 nsec as an ionizing beam. The tests were made at BL 8.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  20. Multicore job scheduling in the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forti, A.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Hartmann, T.; Alef, M.; Lahiff, A.; Templon, J.; Dal Pra, S.; Gila, M.; Skipsey, S.; Acosta-Silva, C.; Filipcic, A.; Walker, R.; Walker, C. J.; Traynor, D.; Gadrat, S.

    2015-12-01

    After the successful first run of the LHC, data taking is scheduled to restart in Summer 2015 with experimental conditions leading to increased data volumes and event complexity. In order to process the data generated in such scenario and exploit the multicore architectures of current CPUs, the LHC experiments have developed parallelized software for data reconstruction and simulation. However, a good fraction of their computing effort is still expected to be executed as single-core tasks. Therefore, jobs with diverse resources requirements will be distributed across the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG), making workload scheduling a complex problem in itself. In response to this challenge, the WLCG Multicore Deployment Task Force has been created in order to coordinate the joint effort from experiments and WLCG sites. The main objective is to ensure the convergence of approaches from the different LHC Virtual Organizations (VOs) to make the best use of the shared resources in order to satisfy their new computing needs, minimizing any inefficiency originated from the scheduling mechanisms, and without imposing unnecessary complexities in the way sites manage their resources. This paper describes the activities and progress of the Task Force related to the aforementioned topics, including experiences from key sites on how to best use different batch system technologies, the evolution of workload submission tools by the experiments and the knowledge gained from scale tests of the different proposed job submission strategies.

  1. Certolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... has not improved when treated with other medications, rheumatoid arthritis (a condition in which the body attacks its ... continues. When certolizumab injection is used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, it is usually given every other week and ...

  2. Natalizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevent episodes of symptoms in people who have Crohn's disease (a condition in which the body attacks the ... If you are receiving natalizumab injection to treat Crohn's disease, your symptoms should improve during the first few ...

  3. Vedolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection may cause serious allergic reactions during an infusion and for several hours afterward. A doctor or ... of the following symptoms during or after your infusion: rash; itching; swelling of the face, eyes, mouth, ...

  4. Panitumumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a solution (liquid) to be given by infusion (injected into a vein). It is usually given ... doctor or nurse in a doctor's office or infusion center. Panitumumab is usually given once every 2 ...

  5. Methotrexate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... woman's uterus while she is pregnant), breast cancer, lung cancer, certain cancers of the head and neck; certain ... Methotrexate injection is also used along with rest, physical therapy and ... treat rheumatoid arthritis by decreasing the activity of the immune system.

  6. Alirocumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used along with diet and certain cholesterol-lowering medications (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors [statins]) in ... familial heterozygous hypercholesterolemia (an inherited condition in which cholesterol cannot be removed from the body normally) or ...

  7. Evolocumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used along with diet and certain cholesterol-lowering medications, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), in ... heterozygous hypercholesterolemia (HeFH; an inherited condition in which cholesterol cannot be removed from the body normally) or ...

  8. Pentamidine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Pentamidine injection is used to treat pneumonia caused by a fungus called Pneumocystis carinii. It is in a class of medications called antiprotozoals. It works by stopping the growth of protozoa that can cause pneumonia.

  9. Oxytocin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Oxytocin injection is used to begin or improve contractions during labor. Oxytocin also is used to reduce bleeding after childbirth. ... other medications or procedures to end a pregnancy. Oxytocin is in a class of medications called oxytocic ...

  10. Ibritumomab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies with radioisotopes. It works by attaching to cancer ... you receive ibritumomab injection, your body may develop antibodies (substances in the blood that help the immune ...

  11. Ganciclovir Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems, eye problems other than CMV retinitis, or kidney disease.tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Ganciclovir injection may cause infertility (difficulty becoming pregnant). However, if you are a ...

  12. Bendamustine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... a type of cancer of the white blood cells). Bendamustine injection is also used to treat a ... that begins in a type of white blood cell that normally fights infection) that is slow spreading, ...

  13. Vancomycin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications called glycopeptide antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as vancomycin injection ... infection may not be completely treated and the bacteria may become resistant to antibiotics.

  14. Levofloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as levofloxacin injection ... infection may not be completely treated and the bacteria may become resistant to antibiotics.

  15. Doxycycline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications called tetracycline antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as doxycycline injection ... infection may not be completely treated and the bacteria may become resistant to antibiotics.

  16. Sumatriptan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... accompanied by nausea and sensitivity to sound and light). Sumatriptan injection is also used to treat the ... children. Store it at room temperature, away from light, excess heat, and moisture (not in the bathroom). ...

  17. Alemtuzumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection, the medication is usually given three times weekly on alternate days (usually Monday, Wednesday, and Friday) ... that you eat foods that are rich in iron such as meats, leafy green vegetables, and fortified ...

  18. Epinephrine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Epinephrine injection is used along with emergency medical treatment to treat life-threatening allergic reactions caused by ... or stings, foods, medications, latex, and other causes. Epinephrine is in a class of medications called alpha- ...

  19. Mitoxantrone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications to relieve pain in people with advanced prostate cancer who did not respond to other medications. Mitoxantrone ... doses). When mitoxantrone injection is used to treat prostate cancer, it is usually given once every 21 days. ...

  20. Trastuzumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... with other medications to treat certain types of stomach cancer that have spread to other parts of the ... weeks. When trastuzumab injection is used to treat stomach cancer, it is usually given once every 3 weeks. ...

  1. Topotecan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... organs where eggs are formed) and small cell lung cancer (a type of cancer that begins in the ... topotecan injection is used to treat ovarian or lung cancer, it is usually given once a day for ...

  2. Palonosetron Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... that may occur several days after receiving certain chemotherapy medications. Palonosetron injection is in a class of medications called 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. It works by blocking the action of serotonin, a natural ...

  3. Meropenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin and abdominal (stomach area) infections caused by bacteria and meningitis (infection of the membranes that surround ... of medications called antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria that cause infection.Antibiotics such as meropenem injection ...

  4. Amikacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... medications called aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as amikacin injection will not work ...

  5. Ertapenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... abdominal (stomach area) infections, that are caused by bacteria. It is also used for the prevention of ... medications called carbapenem antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ertapenem injection will not work ...

  6. Moxifloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria such as pneumonia; ; and , skin, and abdominal (stomach ... antibiotics called fluoroquinolones. It works by killing the bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as moxifloxacin injection ...

  7. Cefepime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia, and skin, urinary tract, and kidney ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefepime injection will not work ...

  8. Cefazolin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including skin, bone, joint, genital, blood, heart valve, ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefazolin injection will not work ...

  9. Daptomycin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood infections or serious skin infections caused by bacteria. Daptomycin injection is in a class of medications called cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria. Antibiotics will not work for treating colds, flu, ...

  10. Aztreonam Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat certain infections that are caused by bacteria, including respiratory tract (including pneumonia and bronchitis), urinary ... abdominal (stomach area) infections, that are caused by bacteria. Aztreonam injection also may be used before, during, ...

  11. Ceftazidime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ceftazidime injection will not work ...

  12. Tobramycin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... medications called aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as tobramycin injection will not work ...

  13. Ciprofloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria such as pneumonia; and infections of the skin, ... of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin injection ...

  14. Gentamicin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... medications called aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as gentamicin injection will not work ...

  15. Ceftaroline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections and pneumonia (lung infection) caused by certain bacteria. Ceftaroline is in a class of medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ceftaroline injection will not work ...

  16. Daclizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which ... injections. Before you use daclizumab yourself the first time, read the written instructions that come with it. ...

  17. Risperidone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... release (long-acting) injection is used to treat schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual ... do not already have diabetes. If you have schizophrenia, you are more likely to develop diabetes than ...

  18. Acyclovir Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... chickenpox in the past) in people with weak immune systems. It is also used to treat first-time ... from time to time) in people with normal immune systems. Acyclovir injection is used to treat herpes simplex ...

  19. Omalizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... steroids. Omalizumab is also used to treat chronic hives without a known cause that cannot successfully be ... is not used to treat other forms of hives or allergic conditions. Omalizumab injection is in a ...

  20. Lacosamide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... with other medications to control certain types of seizures in people who cannot take oral medications. Lacosamide ... If you suddenly stop using lacosamide injection, your seizures may happen more often. Your doctor will probably ...

  1. Oxacillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ... and pharmacist if you are allergic to oxacillin; penicillins; cephalosporin antibiotics such as cefaclor, cefadroxil, cefazolin, cefdinir, ...

  2. Nafcillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ... and pharmacist if you are allergic to nafcillin; penicillins; cephalosporin antibiotics such as cefaclor, cefadroxil, cefazolin, cefdinir, ...

  3. Ampicillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ... and pharmacist if you are allergic to ampicillin; penicillins; cephalosporin antibiotics such as cefaclor, cefadroxil, cefazolin (Ancef, ...

  4. Naloxone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... emergency medical treatment to reverse the life-threatening effects of a known or suspected opiate (narcotic) overdose. ... is also used after surgery to reverse the effects of opiates given during surgery. Naloxone injection is ...

  5. Methylnaltrexone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to treat constipation caused by opioid (narcotic) pain medications in patients with chronic (on-going) pain that is not caused by ... by protecting the bowel from the effects of opioid (narcotic) medications.

  6. Denosumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... menstrual periods), who have an increased risk for fractures (broken bones) or who cannot take or did ... receiving certain treatments that increase their risk for fractures. Denosumab injection (Xgeva) is used to reduce fractures ...

  7. Rasburicase Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... break down) in people with certain types of cancer who are being treated with chemotherapy medications. Rasburicase injection is in a class of medications called enzymes. It works by breaking down uric acid so that the body can eliminate it.

  8. Gemcitabine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... with surgery. Gemcitabine is also used to treat cancer of the pancreas that has spread to other parts of the ... 4 weeks. When gemcitabine is used to treat cancer of pancreas it may be injected once every week. The ...

  9. Doxercalciferol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Doxercalciferol injection is used to treat secondary hyperparathyroidism (a condition in which the body produces too much parathyroid hormone [PTH; a natural substance needed to control the amount of calcium in ...

  10. Granisetron Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... that may occur after surgery. Granisetron extended-release (long-acting) injection is used with other medications to prevent nausea and vomiting caused by cancer chemotherapy that may occur immediately ...

  11. Fluconazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to treat fungal infections, including yeast infections of the mouth, throat, esophagus (tube leading ... by fungus. Fluconazole is also used to prevent yeast infections in patients who are likely to become ...

  12. Docetaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... allergic to docetaxel injection or drugs made with polysorbate 80, an ingredient found in some medications. Ask ... if a medication you are allergic to contains polysorbate 80. If you experience any of the following ...

  13. Haloperidol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... emotions). Haloperidol injection is also used to control motor tics (uncontrollable need to repeat certain body movements) ... people who have Tourette's disorder (condition characterized by motor or verbal tics). Haloperidol is in a class ...

  14. Evaluation of penicillin G residues by kidney inhibition swab tests in sow body fluids and tissues following intramuscular injection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2011, the USDA-Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) changed the method used for screening swine tissues for antimicrobial residues to the Kidney Inhibition Swab (KIS(TM)) from the Fast Antimicrobial Screen Test. A high dose of penicillin G procaine relative to a label dose is commonly used ...

  15. Highlights from LHC experiments and future perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Campana, P.

    2016-01-22

    The experiments at LHC are collecting a large amount of data in a kinematic of the (x, Q{sup 2}) variables never accessed before. Boosted by LHC analyses, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is experiencing an impressive progress in the last few years, and even brighter perspectives can be foreseen for the future data taking. A subset of the most recent results from the LHC experiments in the area of QCD (both perturbative and soft) are reviewed.

  16. QCD and hard diffraction at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, Michael G.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    As an introduction to QCD at the LHC the author gives an overview of QCD at the Tevatron, emphasizing the high Q{sup 2} frontier which will be taken over by the LHC. After describing briefly the LHC detectors the author discusses high mass diffraction, in particular central exclusive production of Higgs and vector boson pairs. The author introduces the FP420 project to measure the scattered protons 420m downstream of ATLAS and CMS.

  17. Novel QCD Phenomena at the LHC: The Ridge, Digluon-Initiated Subprocesses, Direct Reactions, Non-Universal Antishadowing, and Forward Higgs Production

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2014-10-03

    I discuss a number of novel tests of QCD at the LHC, measurements which can illuminate fundamental features of hadron physics. I also review the “Principle of Maximum Conformality” (PMC) which systematically sets the renormalization scale order-by-order in pQCD, eliminating an unnecessary theoretical uncertainty. The PMC allows LHC experiments to test QCD much more precisely, and the sensitivity of LHC measurements to physics beyond the Standard Model is increased.

  18. Abort Gap Cleaning for LHC Run 2

    SciTech Connect

    Uythoven, Jan; Boccardi, Andrea; Bravin, Enrico; Goddard, Brennan; Hemelsoet, Georges-Henry; Höfle, Wolfgang; Jacquet, Delphine; Kain, Verena; Mazzoni, Stefano; Meddahi, Malika; Valuch, Daniel; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana

    2014-07-01

    To minimize the beam losses at the moment of an LHC beam dump the 3 μs long abort gap should contain as few particles as possible. Its population can be minimised by abort gap cleaning using the LHC transverse damper system. The LHC Run 1 experience is briefly recalled; changes foreseen for the LHC Run 2 are presented. They include improvements in the observation of the abort gap population and the mechanism to decide if cleaning is required, changes to the hardware of the transverse dampers to reduce the detrimental effect on the luminosity lifetime and proposed changes to the applied cleaning algorithms.

  19. Distributed Russian Tier-2 - RDIG in Simulation and Analysis of Alice Data From LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, A.; Jancurova, L.; Kiryanov, A.; Kotlyar, V.; Mitsyn, V.; Lyublev, Y.; Ryabinkin, E.; Shabratova, G.; Smirnov, S.; Stepanova, L.; Urazmetov, W.; Zarochentsev, A.

    2011-12-01

    On the threshold of LHC data there were intensive test and upgrade of GRID application software for all LHC experiments at the top of the modern LCG middleware (gLite). The update of such software for ALICE experiment at LHC, AliEn[1] had provided stable and secure operation of sites developing LHC data. The activity of Russian RDIG (Russian Data Intensive GRID) computer federation which is the distributed Tier-2 centre are devoted to simulation and analysis of LHC data in accordance with the ALICE computing model [2]. Eight sites of this federation interesting in ALICE activity upgrade their middle ware in accordance with requirements of ALICE computing what ensured success of MC production and end-user analysis activity at all eight sites. The result of occupancy and efficiency of each site in the time of LHC operation will be presented in the report. The outline the results of CPU and disk space usage at RDIG sites for the data simulation and analysis of first LHC data from the exposition of ALICE detector [3] will be presented as well. There will be presented also the information about usage of parallel analysis facility based on PROOF [4].

  20. Cyclic CO sub 2 injection for light oil recovery, performance of a cost shared field test in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Bassiouni, Z.A.

    1991-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this research is to provide a base of knowledge on the CO{sub 2} huff n' puff process for the enhanced recovery of Louisiana crude oil. Project goals include laboratory corefloods to investigate several parameters important to the process, and numerical simulation to interpret coreflood results. Additional activities include construction and analysis of a field test data base to facilitate target reservoir screening, and to identify sensitive operational parameters. The information from laboratory corefloods and data base evaluations will be used in the design and implementation of a Department of Energy sponsored field test. The results of all laboratory and field evaluations will be made available to the industry through workshops, periodic reports, and meetings. 1 ref., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Cyclic CO sub 2 injection for light oil recovery: Performance of a cost shared field test in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Bassiouni, Z.A.

    1991-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this research is to provide a base of knowledge on the CO{sub 2} huff n' puff process for the enhanced recovery of Louisiana crude oil. Project goals include laboratory corefloods to investigate several parameters important to the process, and numerical simulation to interpret coreflood results. Additional activities include construction and analysis of a field test data base to facilitate target reservoir screening, and to identify sensitive operational parameters. The information from laboratory corefloods and data base evaluations will be used in the design and implementation of a Department of Energy sponsored field test. The results of all laboratory and field evaluations will be transferred to the industry through workshops, periodic reports, and meetings. This report presents results from a series of corefloods and air quality monitoring. 5 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  2. Cyclic CO sub 2 injection for light oil recovery: Performance of a cost shared field test in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Bassiouni, Z.A.; Groves, F.R. Jr.; Wolcott, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this research is to provide a base of knowledge on the CO{sub 2} huff n' puff process for the enhanced recovery of Louisiana crude oil. Project goals include laboratory corefloods to investigate several parameters important to the process, and numerical simulation to interpret coreflood results. Additional activities include construction and analysis of a field test data base to facilitate target reservoir screening, and to identify sensitive operational parameters. The information from laboratory corefloods and data base evaluations will be used in the design and implementation of a Department of Energy sponsored field test. The results of all laboratory and field evaluations will be made available to the industry through workshops, periodic reports, and meetings. 2 tabs.

  3. Cyclic CO sub 2 injection for light oil recovery: Performance of a cost shared field test in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Bassiouni, Z.A.

    1990-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this research is to provide a base of knowledge on the CO{sub 2} huff n' puff process for the enhanced recovery of Louisiana crude oil. Project goals include laboratory corefloods to investigate several parameters important to the process, and numerical simulation to interpret coreflood results. Additional activities include construction and analysis of a field test data base to facilitate target reservoir screening, and to identify sensitive operational parameters. The information from laboratory corefloods and data base evaluations will be used in the design and implementation of a Department of Energy sponsored field tests. The results of all laboratory and field evaluations will be made available to the industry through workshops, periodic reports, and meetings. 2 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 546: Injection Well and Surface Releases Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Alfred Wickline

    2008-12-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 546, Injection Well and Surface Releases, at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 546 is comprised of two corrective action sites (CASs): • 06-23-02, U-6a/Russet Testing Area • 09-20-01, Injection Well The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 546. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from May 5 through May 28, 2008, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 546: Injection Well and Surface Releases, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NSO, 2008). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: • Determine whether a contaminant of concern is present at a given CAS. • Determine whether sufficient information is available to evaluate potential corrective action alternatives at each CAS. The CAU 546 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Because DQO data needs were met, and corrective actions have been implemented, it has been determined that no further corrective action (based on risk to human receptors) is necessary for the CAU 546 CASs. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective actions are needed for CAU 546 CASs. • No Corrective Action Plan is required. • A Notice of Completion to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site

  5. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 219: Septic Systems and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Strand

    2005-01-01

    The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 219, Septic Systems and Injection Wells, has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective actions. Corrective Action Unit 219 is located in Areas 3, 16, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 219 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-11-01, Steam Pipes and Asbestos Tiles; (2) 16-04-01, Septic Tanks (3); (3) 16-04-02, Distribution Box; (4) 16-04-03, Sewer Pipes; (5) 23-20-01, DNA Motor Pool Sewage and Waste System; and (6) 23-20-02, Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

  6. Cyclic CO sub 2 injection for light oil recovery: Performance of a cost shared field test in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Bassiouni, Z.A.

    1990-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this research is to provide a base of knowledge on the CO{sub 2} huff n' puff process for the enhanced recovery of Louisiana crude oil. Project goals include laboratory corefloods to investigate several parameters important to the process, and numerical simulation to interpret coreflood results. Additional activities include construction and analysis of a field test data base to facilitate target reservoir screening, and to identify sensitive operational parameters. This quarter, one final horizontal coreflood was performed to examine the influence of remaining oil saturation. An environmental assessment was performed in order to assess environmental impacts; and a numerical simulation was performed. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Preliminary reliability test of lateral-current-injection GaInAsP/InP membrane distributed feedback laser on Si substrate fabricated by adhesive wafer bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Kai; Inoue, Daisuke; Hiratani, Takuo; Amemiya, Tomohiro; Nishiyama, Nobuhiko; Arai, Shigehisa

    2017-02-01

    A preliminary reliability test was performed for lateral-current-injection GaInAsP/InP membrane Distributed Feedback (DFB) lasers fabricated by multi-regrowth and adhesive wafer bonding. The measurement was conducted for lasers with two different types of p-side electrode: Ti/Au and Au/Zn/Au. The device with the Au/Zn/Au electrode, which had better current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, showed no degradation of differential quantum efficiency and threshold current after continuous aging for 310 h at a bias current density of 5 kA/cm2. This result indicates that the multi-regrowth and bonding process for the GaInAsP/InP membrane DFB laser will not impact the initial reliability.

  8. Architecture, implementation, and testing of a multiple-shell gas injection system for high current implosions on the Z accelerator.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Elliott, Kristi Wilson; Madden, Robert E; Coleman, P L; Thompson, John R; Bixler, Alex; Lamppa, D C; McKenney, J L; Strizic, T; Johnson, D; Johns, O; Vigil, M P; Jones, B; Ampleford, D J; Savage, M E; Cuneo, M E; Jones, M C

    2013-06-01

    Tests are ongoing to conduct ~20 MA z-pinch implosions on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratory using Ar, Kr, and D2 gas puffs as the imploding loads. The relatively high cost of operations on a machine of this scale imposes stringent requirements on the functionality, reliability, and safety of gas puff hardware. Here we describe the development of a prototype gas puff system including the multiple-shell nozzles, electromagnetic drivers for each nozzle's valve, a UV pre-ionizer, and an inductive isolator to isolate the ~2.4 MV machine voltage pulse present at the gas load from the necessary electrical and fluid connections made to the puff system from outside the Z vacuum chamber. This paper shows how the assembly couples to the overall Z system and presents data taken to validate the functionality of the overall system.

  9. Architecture, implementation, and testing of a multiple-shell gas injection system for high current implosions on the Z accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Elliott, Kristi Wilson; Madden, Robert E.; Coleman, P. L.; Thompson, John R.; Bixler, Alex; Lamppa, D. C.; McKenney, J. L.; Strizic, T.; Johnson, D.; Johns, O.; Vigil, M. P.; Jones, B.; Ampleford, D. J.; Savage, M. E.; Cuneo, M. E.; Jones, M. C.

    2013-06-01

    Tests are ongoing to conduct ˜20 MA z-pinch implosions on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratory using Ar, Kr, and D2 gas puffs as the imploding loads. The relatively high cost of operations on a machine of this scale imposes stringent requirements on the functionality, reliability, and safety of gas puff hardware. Here we describe the development of a prototype gas puff system including the multiple-shell nozzles, electromagnetic drivers for each nozzle's valve, a UV pre-ionizer, and an inductive isolator to isolate the ˜2.4 MV machine voltage pulse present at the gas load from the necessary electrical and fluid connections made to the puff system from outside the Z vacuum chamber. This paper shows how the assembly couples to the overall Z system and presents data taken to validate the functionality of the overall system.

  10. Development and testing of a novel lab-scale direct steam-injection apparatus to hydrolyse model and saline crop slurries.

    PubMed

    Santi, Guglielmo; Guglielmo, Santi; D'Annibale, Alessandro; Alessandro, D'Annibale; Petruccioli, Maurizio; Maurizio, Petruccioli; Crognale, Silvia; Silvia, Crognale; Ruzzi, Maurizio; Maurizio, Ruzzi; Valentini, Riccardo; Riccardo, Valentini; Moresi, Mauro; Moresi, Mauro

    2012-02-20

    In this work, a novel laboratory-scale direct steam-injection apparatus (DSIA) was developed to overcome the main drawback of the conventional batch-driven lab rigs, namely the long time needed to heat fiber slurry from room to reaction temperatures greater than 150 °C. The novel apparatus mainly consisted of three units: (i) a mechanically-stirred bioreactor where saturated steam at 5-30 bar can be injected; (ii) an automatic on-off valve to flash suddenly the reaction medium after a prefixed reaction time; (iii) a cyclone separator to recover the reacted slurry. This system was tested using 0.75 dm³ of an aqueous solution of H₂SO₄ (0.5%, v/v) enriched with 50 kg m⁻³ of either commercial particles of Avicel® and Larch xylan or 0.5 mm sieved particles of Tamarix jordanis. Each slurry was heated to about 200 °C by injecting steam at 28 bar for 90 s. The process efficiency was assessed by comparing the dissolution degree of suspended solid (Y(S)), as well as xylose (Y(X)), glucose (Y(G)), and furfural (Y(F)) yields, with those obtained in a conventional steam autoclave at 130 °C for 30 or 60 min. Treatment of T. jordanis particles in DSIA resulted in Y(S) and Y(G) values quite similar to those obtained in the steam autoclave at 130 °C for 60 min, but in a less efficient hemicellulose solubilization. A limited occurrence of pentose degradation products was observed in both equipments, suggesting that hydrolysis predominated over degradation reactions. The susceptibility of the residual solid fractions from DSIA treatment to a conventional 120 h long cellulolytic treatment using an enzyme loading of 5.4 FPU g⁻¹ was markedly higher than that of samples hydrolysed in the steam autoclave, their corresponding glucose yields being equal to 0.94 and 0.22 g per gram of initial cellulose, respectively. Thus, T. jordanis resulted to be a valuable source of sugars for bioethanol production as proved by preliminary tests in the novel lab rig developed here.

  11. MSSM forecast for the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Maria Eugenia; Casas, J. Alberto; de Austri, Roberto Ruiz

    2010-05-01

    We perform a forecast of the MSSM with universal soft terms (CMSSM) for the LHC, based on an improved Bayesian analysis. We do not incorporate ad hoc measures of the fine-tuning to penalize unnatural possibilities: such penalization arises from the Bayesian analysis itself when the experimental value of M Z is considered. This allows to scan the whole parameter space, allowing arbitrarily large soft terms. Still the low-energy region is statistically favoured (even before including dark matter or g-2 constraints). Contrary to other studies, the results are almost unaffected by changing the upper limits taken for the soft terms. The results are also remarkable stable when using flat or logarithmic priors, a fact that arises from the larger statistical weight of the low-energy region in both cases. Then we incorporate all the important experimental constrains to the analysis, obtaining a map of the probability density of the MSSM parameter space, i.e. the forecast of the MSSM. Since not all the experimental information is equally robust, we perform separate analyses depending on the group of observables used. When only the most robust ones are used, the favoured region of the parameter space contains a significant portion outside the LHC reach. This effect gets reinforced if the Higgs mass is not close to its present experimental limit and persits when dark matter constraints are included. Only when the g-2 constraint (based on e + e - data) is considered, the preferred region (for μ > 0) is well inside the LHC scope. We also perform a Bayesian comparison of the positive- and negative- μ possibilities.

  12. US-LARP progress on LHC IR upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Tanaji; Johnstone, John; Mokhov, Nikolai; Fischer, Wolfram; Gupta, Ramesh; Qiang, Ji; /LBL, Berkeley

    2006-03-01

    We review the progress on LHC IR upgrades made by the US-LARP collaboration since the last CARE meeting in November 2004. We introduce a new optics design with doublet focusing, and discuss energy deposition calculations with an open mid-plane dipole. We present the results of a beam-beam experiment at RHIC. This experiment was the first phase of a planned test of the wire compensation principle at RHIC.

  13. LHC Status and Upgrade Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jeffrey

    2009-11-01

    The Large Hadron Collider has had a trying start-up and a challenging operational future lays ahead. Critical to the machine's performance is controlling a beam of particles whose stored energy is equivalent to 80 kg of TNT. Unavoidable beam losses result in energy deposition throughout the machine and without adequate protection this power would result in quenching of the superconducting magnets. A brief overview of the machine layout and principles of operation will be reviewed including a summary of the September 2008 accident. The current status of the LHC, startup schedule and upgrade options to achieve the target luminosity will be presented.

  14. Z' Phenomenology and the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2006-10-17

    A brief pedagogical overview of the phenomenology of Z{prime} gauge bosons is ILC in determining Z{prime} properties is also discussed. and explore in detail how the LHC may discover and help elucidate the models, review the current constraints on the possible properties of a Z{prime} nature of these new particles. We provide an overview of the Z{prime} studies presented. Such particles can arise in various electroweak extensions of that have been performed by both ATLAS and CMS. The role of the the Standard Model (SM). We provide a quick survey of a number of Z{prime}.

  15. First data from TOTEM experiment at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, F.

    2011-07-15

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC is mainly dedicated to the measurement of the total proton-proton cross section, elastic scattering and to the study of the diffractive processes. This contribution reviews the physics goals of the experiment, the status of the experimental apparatus and of the analysis of the first data from the LHC.

  16. Diffraction from HERA to the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Paul

    2011-07-15

    Following a 15 year programme of intensive research into diffractive electron-proton scattering at HERA, it is important to transfer the knowledge and experience gained into the LHC programme. This contribution raises some current issues in diffraction at the LHC and suggests ways in which they might be addressed using HERA results.

  17. Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology: Topical report No. 3, Task 3.2: Scale-up testing; Topical report No. 4, Task 3.3: Advanced configurations; Topical report No. 5, Task 3.4: Process controls; Topical report No. 6, Task 3.5: Failure modes; Task 3.6: Waste characterization, Duct Injection Test Facility, Muskingum River Power Plant, Beverly, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Felix, L.G.; Gooch, J.P.; Merritt, R.L.; Klett, M.G.; Demian, A.G.; Hunt, J.E.

    1992-08-01

    This document is the third interim report on tests that were conducted at the Duct Injection Test Facility (DITF) operated for the Department of Energy at Unit 5 of the Ohio Power Company`s Muskingum River station in Beverly, Ohio. At the DITF dry calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2), an aqueous slurry of Ca(OH){sub 2} (prepared by slaking quicklime), or a mixture of one of these sorbents with waste ash from earlier tests was injected into a slipstream of flue gas from the Unit 5 boiler to achieve partial removal of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas. Up to 50,000 acfm of flue gas was taken from the inlet to the Unit 5 electrostatic precipitator (ESP) for these tests. Water was injected separately with the dry sorbent or as part of the slurry to cool the flue gas and increase the water vapor content of the flue gas. The addition of water, either as a separate spray or in the slurry makes the reaction between the sorbent and the SO{sub 2} more complete; the presumption is that water is effective in the liquid state when it can physically wet the sorbent particles, and not especially effective in the vapor state. Higher values of calcium utilization were obtained with slurry injection than with dry sorbent injection and humidification. Slurries made from reagent slaked lime, mixtures of reagent slaked lime and recycle ash, and from recycle ash alone were injected through the same nozzles used for humidification. The focus of most of these tests was on the constant addition of recycle ash to reduce the amount of slaked lime required for SO{sub 2} removal (for best economics). Testing was continued until the amount of Ca(OH){sub 2} in the recycle ash equaled that predicted for equilibrium Two test cases were evaluated: a low Ca/S ratio (1.0 reagent, 44{degrees}/F approach) for 50% SO{sub 2} removal and a high Ca/S ratio (1.7 reagent, 24{degrees}F approach) for 88% SO{sub 2} removal.

  18. Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology: Topical report No. 3, Task 3. 2: Scale-up testing; Topical report No. 4, Task 3. 3: Advanced configurations; Topical report No. 5, Task 3. 4: Process controls; Topical report No. 6, Task 3. 5: Failure modes; Task 3. 6: Waste characterization, Duct Injection Test Facility, Muskingum River Power Plant, Beverly, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Felix, L.G.; Gooch, J.P.; Merritt, R.L. ); Klett, M.G.; Demian, A.G.; Hunt, J.E. )

    1992-08-01

    This document is the third interim report on tests that were conducted at the Duct Injection Test Facility (DITF) operated for the Department of Energy at Unit 5 of the Ohio Power Company's Muskingum River station in Beverly, Ohio. At the DITF dry calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2), an aqueous slurry of Ca(OH)[sub 2] (prepared by slaking quicklime), or a mixture of one of these sorbents with waste ash from earlier tests was injected into a slipstream of flue gas from the Unit 5 boiler to achieve partial removal of SO[sub 2] in the flue gas. Up to 50,000 acfm of flue gas was taken from the inlet to the Unit 5 electrostatic precipitator (ESP) for these tests. Water was injected separately with the dry sorbent or as part of the slurry to cool the flue gas and increase the water vapor content of the flue gas. The addition of water, either as a separate spray or in the slurry makes the reaction between the sorbent and the SO[sub 2] more complete; the presumption is that water is effective in the liquid state when it can physically wet the sorbent particles, and not especially effective in the vapor state. Higher values of calcium utilization were obtained with slurry injection than with dry sorbent injection and humidification. Slurries made from reagent slaked lime, mixtures of reagent slaked lime and recycle ash, and from recycle ash alone were injected through the same nozzles used for humidification. The focus of most of these tests was on the constant addition of recycle ash to reduce the amount of slaked lime required for SO[sub 2] removal (for best economics). Testing was continued until the amount of Ca(OH)[sub 2] in the recycle ash equaled that predicted for equilibrium Two test cases were evaluated: a low Ca/S ratio (1.0 reagent, 44[degrees]/F approach) for 50% SO[sub 2] removal and a high Ca/S ratio (1.7 reagent, 24[degrees]F approach) for 88% SO[sub 2] removal.

  19. Polyamines induce aggregation of LHC II and quenching of fluorescence in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tsiavos, Theodoros; Ioannidis, Nikolaos E; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2012-05-01

    Dissipation of excess excitation energy within the light-harvesting complex of Photosystem II (LHC II) is a main process in plants, which is measured as the non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence or qE. We showed in previous works that polyamines stimulate qE in higher plants in vivo and in eukaryotic algae in vitro. In the present contribution we have tested whether polyamines can stimulate quenching in trimeric LHC II and monomeric light-harvesting complex b proteins from higher plants. The tetramine spermine was the most potent quencher and induced aggregation of LHC II trimers, due to its highly cationic character. Two transients are evident at 100 μM and 350 μM for the fluorescence and absorbance signals of LHC II respectively. On the basis of observations within this work, some links between polyamines and the activation of qE in vivo is discussed.

  20. Pegaptanib Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... if you have or have ever had diabetes, high blood pressure, a heart attack, or a stroke.tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while using pegaptanib injection, ...

  1. Ramucirumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor if you have or have ever had high blood pressure, a wound that has not healed, or liver disease.tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. Ramucirumab injection may harm your unborn baby. You ...

  2. Reslizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the infusion or for a short period of time after the infusion has finished.You will receive each injection of reslizumab in a doctor's office or medical facility. You will stay in the office for some time after you receive the medication so your doctor ...

  3. Dexrazoxane Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... are used to treat or prevent certain side effects that may be caused by chemotherapy medications. Dexrazoxane ... Dexrazoxane injection may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: pain or swelling in the place ...

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0 with ROTC 1

    SciTech Connect

    Boehlecke, Robert

    2004-12-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 322 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 01-25-01 - AST Release Site; (2) 03-25-03 - Mud Plant and AST Diesel Release; and (3) 03-20-05 - Injection Wells and BOP Shop. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 322. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from April 2004 through September 2004, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: (1) Determine if contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to recommend appropriate corrective actions for the CASs. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against appropriate preliminary action levels to identify contaminants of concern for each corrective action site. Radiological field measurements were compared to unrestricted release criteria. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities revealed the following: (1) CAS 01-25-01 contains an AST berm contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) diesel-range organics (DRO). (2) CAS 03-25-03 includes two distinct areas: Area A where no contamination remains from a potential spill associated with an AST, and Area B where TPH-DRO contamination associated with various activities at the mud plant was identified. The Area B contamination was found at various locations and depths. (3) CAS 03-25-03 Area B contains TPH-DRO contamination at various locations and

  5. Testing of the front-end hybrid circuits for the CMS Tracker upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadek, T.; Blanchot, G.; Honma, A.; Kovacs, M.; Raymond, M.; Rose, P.

    2017-01-01

    The upgrade of the CMS Tracker for the HL-LHC requires the design of new double-sensor, silicon detector modules, which implement Level 1 trigger functionality in the increased luminosity environment. These new modules will contain two different, high-density front-end hybrid circuits, equipped with flip-chip ASICs, auxiliary electronic components and mechanical structures. The hybrids require qualification tests before they are assembled into modules. Test methods are proposed together with the corresponding test hardware and software. They include functional tests and signal injection in a cold environment to find possible failure modes of the hybrids under real operating conditions.

  6. LHC cryogenics – new experience of run with increased beam energy and intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodzinski, K.; Claudet, S.; Delikaris, D.; Delprat, L.; Ferlin, G.; Rogez, E.; Tavian, L.

    2017-03-01

    After the LHC first long shut down (LS1), when necessary consolidation and maintenance activities were performed on different technical systems, the Large Hadron Collider was progressively cooled down from ambient to operation temperatures from May of 2014. Prior to physics run with increased beam energy to 6.5 TeV/beam, increased beam intensity and modified beam injection scheme, several qualifications and tests affecting cryogenic system have been performed to ensure stable run of the accelerator. New beam parameters were gradually applied to the accelerator, reducing operational margins of cryogenic capacity from previous run. The process optimization and related updates in the control system were applied. This paper will briefly recall the main consolidations performed on the cryogenic system during LS1. The cool down process and behaviour of the cryogenic system during qualifications and tests will be presented. Difficulties and applied solutions during the run will be discussed. The availability and helium losses statistics for full year operation of 2015 will be given.

  7. Augmented reality aiding collimator exchange at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Héctor; Fabry, Thomas; Laukkanen, Seppo; Mattila, Jouni; Tabourot, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    Novel Augmented Reality techniques have the potential to have a large positive impact on the way remote maintenance operations are carried out in hazardous areas, e.g. areas where radiation doses that imply careful planning and optimization of maintenance operations are present. This paper describes an Augmented Reality strategy, system and implementation for aiding the remote collimator exchange in the LHC, currently the world's largest and highest-energy particle accelerator. The proposed system relies on marker detection and multi-modal augmentation in real-time. A database system has been used to ensure flexibility. The system has been tested in a mock-up facility, showing real time performance and great potential for future use in the LHC. The technical-scientific difficulties identified during the development of the system and the proposed solutions described in this paper may help the development of future Augmented Reality systems for remote handling in scientific facilities.

  8. LHC beam-beam compensation studies at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer,W.; Abreu, N.; Calaga, R.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Luo, Y.; Montag, C.

    2009-05-04

    Long-range and head-on beam-beam effects are expected to limit the LHC performance with design parameters. To mitigate long-range effects current carrying wires parallel to the beam were proposed. Two such wires are installed in RHIC where they allow studying the effect of strong long-range beam-beam effects, as well as the compensation of a single long-range interaction. The tests provide benchmark data for simulations and analytical treatments. To reduce the head-on beam-beam effect electron lenses were proposed for both the LHC and RHIC. We present the experimental long-range beam-beam program and report on head-on compensations studies at RHIC, which are based on simulations.

  9. Multi-Boson Interactions at the Run 1 LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Daniel R.; Meade, Patrick; Pleier, Marc-Andre

    2016-10-24

    This review article covers results on the production of all possible electroweak boson pairs and 2-to-1 vector boson fusion (VBF) at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 8 TeV. The data was taken between 2010 and 2012. Limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings (aTGCs) then follow. In addition, data on electroweak triple gauge boson production and 2-to-2 vector boson scattering (VBS) yield limits on anomalous quartic gauge boson couplings (aQGCs). The LHC hosts two general purpose experiments, ATLAS and CMS, which both have reported limits on aTGCs and aQGCs which are herein summarized. The interpretation of these limits in terms of an effective field theory (EFT) is reviewed, and recommendations are made for testing other types of new physics using multi-gauge boson production.

  10. Performance of the first short model 150 mm aperture Nb$_3$Sn Quadrupole MQXFS for the High- Luminosity LHC upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Chlachidze, G.; et al.

    2016-08-30

    The US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) and CERN combined their efforts in developing Nb3Sn magnets for the High-Luminosity LHC upgrade. The ultimate goal of this collaboration is to fabricate large aperture Nb3Sn quadrupoles for the LHC interaction regions (IR). These magnets will replace the present 70 mm aperture NbTi quadrupole triplets for expected increase of the LHC peak luminosity by a factor of 5. Over the past decade LARP successfully fabricated and tested short and long models of 90 mm and 120 mm aperture Nb3Sn quadrupoles. Recently the first short model of 150 mm diameter quadrupole MQXFS was built with coils fabricated both by the LARP and CERN. The magnet performance was tested at Fermilab’s vertical magnet test facility. This paper reports the test results, including the quench training at 1.9 K, ramp rate and temperature dependence studies.

  11. Private Higgs at the Lhc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentov, Yoni; Zee, A.

    2013-11-01

    We study the LHC phenomenology of a general class of "Private Higgs" (PH) models, in which fermions obtain their masses from their own Higgs doublets with {O}(1) Yukawa couplings, and the mass hierarchy is translated into a dynamical chain of vacuum expectation values. This is accomplished by introducing a number of light gauge-singlet scalars, the "darkons," some of which could play the role of dark matter. These models allow for substantial modifications to the decays of the lightest Higgs boson, for instance through mixing with TeV-scale PH fields and light darkons: in particular, one could accommodate {O}(10%) flavor-uncorrelated deviations from the SM hf\\bar f vertices with TeV-scale degrees of freedom. We also discuss a new implementation of the PH framework, in which the quark and neutrino mixing angles arise as one-loop corrections to the leading order picture.

  12. Gluino polarization at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, M.; Popenda, E.; Spira, M.; Zerwas, P. M.

    2009-09-01

    Gluinos are produced pairwise at the LHC in quark-antiquark and gluon-gluon collisions: qq, gg{yields}g-tildeg-tilde. While the individual polarization of gluinos vanishes in the limit in which the small mass difference between L and R squarks of the first two generations is neglected, nonzero spin-spin correlations are predicted within gluino pairs. If the squark/quark charges in Majorana gluino decays are tagged, the spin correlations have an impact on the energy and angular distributions in reconstructed final states. On the other hand, the gluino polarization in single gluino production in the supersymmetric Compton process gq{yields}g-tildeq-tilde{sub R,L} is predicted to be nonzero, and the polarization affects the final-state distributions in super-Compton events.

  13. Critical behavior of cross sections at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dremin, I. M.

    2016-07-01

    Recent experimental data on elastic scattering of high energy protons show that the critical regime has been reached at LHC energies. The approach to criticality is demonstrated by increase of the ratio of elastic to total cross sections from ISR to LHC energies. At LHC it reaches the value which can result in principal change of the character of proton interactions. The treatment of new physics of hollowed toroid-like hadrons requires usage of another branch of the unitarity condition. Its further fate is speculated and interpreted with the help of the unitarity condition in combination with present experimental data. The gedanken experiments to distinguish between different possibilities are proposed.

  14. Overview of LHC physics results at ICHEP

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

     This month LHC physics day will review the physics results presented by the LHC experiments at the 2010 ICHEP in Paris. The experimental presentations will be preceeded by the bi-weekly LHC accelerator status report.The meeting will be broadcast via EVO (detailed info will appear at the time of the meeting in the "Video Services" item on the left menu bar)For those attending, information on accommodation, access to CERN and laptop registration is available from http://cern.ch/lpcc/visits

  15. LER-LHC injector workshop summary and super-ferric fast cycling injector in the SPS tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosio, Giorgio; Hays, Steven; Huang, Yuenian; Johnstone, John; Kashikhin, Vadim; MacLachlan, James; Mokhov, Nikolai; Piekarz, Henryk; Sen, Tanaji; Shiltsev, Vladimir; de Rijk, Gijsbert; /CERN

    2007-03-01

    A Workshop on Low Energy Ring (LER) in the LHC tunnel as main injector was convened at CERN on October 11-12, 2006. We present the outline of the LER based on the presentations, and respond to the raised questions and discussions including the post-workshop studies. We also outline the possibility of using the LER accelerator technologies for the fast cycling injector accelerator in the SPS tunnel (SF-SPS). A primary goal for the LER (Low Energy Ring) injector accelerator is to inject 1.5 TeV proton beams into the LHC, instead of the current injection scheme with 0.45 TeV beams from the SPS. At this new energy, the field harmonics [1] of the LHC magnets are sufficiently satisfactory to prevent the luminosity losses expected to appear when applying the transfer of the 0.45 TeV SPS beams. In addition, a feasibility study of batch slip stacking in the LER has been undertaken with a goal of increasing in this way the LHC luminosity by up to a factor of 4. A combined luminosity increase may, therefore, be in the range of an order of magnitude. In the long term, the LER injector accelerator would greatly facilitate the implementation of a machine, which doubles the LHC energy (DLHC).

  16. HL-LHC and HE-LHC Upgrade Plans and Opportunities for US Participation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollinari, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    The US HEP community has identified the exploitation of physics opportunities at the High Luminosity-LHC (HL-LHC) as the highest near-term priority. Thanks to multi-year R&D programs, US National Laboratories and Universities have taken the leadership in the development of technical solutions to increase the LHC luminosity, enabling the HL-LHC Project and uniquely positioning this country to make critical contributions to the LHC luminosity upgrade. This talk will describe the shaping of the US Program to contribute in the next decade to HL-LHC through newly developed technologies such as Nb3Sn focusing magnets or superconducting crab cavities. The experience gained through the execution of the HL-LHC Project in the US will constitute a pool of knowledge and capabilities allowing further developments in the future. Opportunities for US participations in proposed hadron colliders, such as a possible High Energy-LHC (HE-LHC), will be described as well.

  17. LHC phenomenology of SO(10) models with Yukawa unification. II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandakrishnan, Archana; Bryant, B. Charles; Raby, Stuart

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we study Yukawa-unified SO(10) supersymmetric (SUSY) grand unified theories (GUTs) with two types of SO(10) boundary conditions: (i) universal gaugino masses and (ii) nonuniversal gaugino masses with effective "mirage" mediation. With these boundary conditions, we perform a global χ2 analysis to obtain the parameters consistent with 11 low energy observables, including the top, bottom, and tau masses. Both boundary conditions have universal scalar masses and "just so" splitting for the up- and down-type Higgs masses. In these models, the third family scalars are lighter than the first two families and the gauginos are lighter than all the scalars. We therefore focus on the gluino phenomenology in these models. In particular, we estimate the lowest allowed gluino mass in our models coming from the most recent LHC data and compare this to limits obtained using simplified models. We find that the lower bound on Mg ˜ in Yukawa-unified SO(10) SUSY GUTs is generically ˜1.2 TEV at the 1σ level unless there is considerable degeneracy between the gluino and the lightest supersymmetric particle, in which case the bounds are much weaker. Hence many of our benchmark points are not ruled out by the present LHC data and are still viable models which can be tested at LHC 14.

  18. The Fast Interaction Trigger Detector of ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Keenan; Brown, Shanice; Powell, Calvin; Harton, Austin; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo; Alice-Fit Team

    2017-01-01

    CERN (European Center for Nuclear Research) is a global laboratory that studies proton and heavy ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is one of four large experiments at the LHC. ALICE is dedicated to the study of the transition of matter to Quark-Gluon Plasma in heavy ion collisions. The experiment is preparing for the LHC upgrade after the second long shutdown (LS2) in 2019-20. To this end, ALICE is undertaking a major initiative to extend its physics capabilities. Among these improvements is a new Fast Interaction Trigger (FIT). The FIT will be replacing the current T0 and V0 trigger detectors. The purpose of the FIT will be to determine multiplicity, centrality, and reaction plane. The FIT will also serve as the primary forward trigger, luminosity, and collision time detector. This presentation will discuss the FIT upgrade and the results from the performance of the FIT detectors in simulations and test beams that support the current design parameters. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under grants NSF-PHY-1407051, NSF-PHY-1305280, NSF-PHY-1613118, and NSF-PHY-1625081.

  19. Hepatitis C Viremia Patterns in Incident Hepatitis C Infection and One Year Later in 150 Prospectively Tested Persons Who Inject Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Alanko Blomé, Marianne; Björkman, Per; Molnegren, Vilma; Höglund, Peter; Widell, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess HCV viremia levels just before, during and one year after anti-HCV seroconversion in people who inject drugs (PWID). Methods PWID enrolling into a needle exchange program in Malmö, Sweden, 1997–2005 constituted the source population. Sera were obtained at enrolment and at approximately 3–4 monthly intervals afterwards, and were initially tested for anti-HIV, HBsAg/anti-HBc and anti-HCV and thereafter for markers previously negative. Seroconversion to anti-HCV had occurred during the study period in 186 out of 332 seronegative subjects. In these anti-HCV seroconverters, quantitative HCV RNA PCR was retrospectively performed on frozen sera to determine viremia levels in the last anti-HCV negative, the first anti-HCV positive and in one year follow-up samples. Results Among 150 subjects seroconverting to anti-HCV with samples available from all three defined time-points, eight different patterns of viremia were observed. Spontaneous clearance at one year was noted in 48 cases (32%) and was associated with female gender (p = 0.03, CI 0.17–1.00). In 13 cases HCV-RNA was not detected in any study sample. Among 61 subjects with pre-seroconversion viremia, viral load was significantly higher in the pre-seroconversion samples compared to subsequent samples. For the whole group, viral load declined to undetectable levels at seroconversion in 28% of cases (but with recurrent viremia in 15%). Conclusions Different patterns of HCV RNA kinetics were observed among PWID with documented seroconversion to anti-HCV. The frequently observed absence of detectable HCV RNA in the first anti-HCV positive sample (irrespective of subsequent viremia) demonstrates the importance of repeated sampling and RNA testing for determination of the outcome of acute infection. PMID:24830647

  20. The LHC Confronts the pMSSM

    DOE PAGES

    Cahill-Rowley, Matthew

    2016-05-31

    Here we explore the impact of current (7+8 TeV) and future (14 TeV) LHC searches on the range of viable sparticle spectra within the 19/20 – dimensional phenomenological MSSM (pMSSM). Considering both neutralino and gravitino LSPs, we compare our results with simplified model exclusion limits and describe important cases where the pMSSM results differ significantly from the simplified model descriptions. We also consider models that are poorly constrained by LHC data because of unusual decay topologies and/or displaced decays, and discuss ways to improve the LHC sensitivity in these scenarios. Finally, motivated by naturalness, we examine the sensitivity of currentmore » searches to models with light stops and to a specialized set of models with fine-tuning better than 1%. We show that the 14 TeV LHC will be a very powerful probe of natural pMSSM models.« less

  1. The LHC Confronts the pMSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill-Rowley, Matthew

    2016-05-31

    Here we explore the impact of current (7+8 TeV) and future (14 TeV) LHC searches on the range of viable sparticle spectra within the 19/20 – dimensional phenomenological MSSM (pMSSM). Considering both neutralino and gravitino LSPs, we compare our results with simplified model exclusion limits and describe important cases where the pMSSM results differ significantly from the simplified model descriptions. We also consider models that are poorly constrained by LHC data because of unusual decay topologies and/or displaced decays, and discuss ways to improve the LHC sensitivity in these scenarios. Finally, motivated by naturalness, we examine the sensitivity of current searches to models with light stops and to a specialized set of models with fine-tuning better than 1%. We show that the 14 TeV LHC will be a very powerful probe of natural pMSSM models.

  2. Tension in the LHC diffractive data?

    SciTech Connect

    Gotsman, Errol

    2015-04-10

    I discuss the LHC diffractive data, and compare it to predicted energy behaviour of various models. I suggest that the so called 'tension' between the experimental results, maybe due to the different Monte Carlo programs used.

  3. Supersymmetry Breaking, Gauge Mediation, and the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, David

    2015-04-14

    Gauge mediated SUSY breaking (GMSB) is a promising class of supersymmetric models that automatically satisfies the precision constraints. Prior work of Meade, Seiberg and Shih in 2008 established the full, model-independent parameter space of GMSB, which they called "General Gauge Mediation" (GGM). During the first half of 2010-2015, Shih and his collaborators thoroughly explored the parameter space of GGM and established many well-motivated benchmark models for use by the experimentalists at the LHC. Through their work, the current constraints on GGM from LEP, the Tevatron and the LHC were fully elucidated, together with the possible collider signatures of GMSB at the LHC. This ensured that the full discovery potential for GGM could be completely realized at the LHC.

  4. Injectable barriers for waste isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Persoff, P.; Finsterle, S.; Moridis, G.J.; Apps, J.; Pruess, K.; Muller, S.J.

    1995-03-01

    In this paper the authors report laboratory work and numerical simulation done in support of development and demonstration of injectable barriers formed from either of two fluids: colloidal silica or polysiloxane. Two principal problems addressed here are control of gel time and control of plume emplacement in the vadose zone. Gel time must be controlled so that the viscosity of the barrier fluid remains low long enough to inject the barrier, but increases soon enough to gel the barrier in place. During injection, the viscosity must be low enough to avoid high injection pressures which could uplift or fracture the formation. To test the grout gel time in the soil, the injection pressure was monitored as grouts were injected into sandpacks. When grout is injected into the vadose zone, it slumps under the influence of gravity, and redistributes due to capillary forces as it gels. The authors have developed a new module for the reservoir simulator TOUGH2 to model grout injection into the vadose zone, taking into account the increase of liquid viscosity as a function of gel concentration and time. They have also developed a model to calculate soil properties after complete solidification of the grout. The numerical model has been used to design and analyze laboratory experiments and field pilot tests. The authors present the results of computer simulations of grout injection, redistribution, and solidification.

  5. From the LHC to Future Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    De Roeck, A.; Ellis, J.; Grojean, C.; Heinemeyer, S.; Jakobs, K.; Weiglein, G.; Azuelos, G.; Dawson, S.; Gripaios, B.; Han, T.; Hewett, J.; Lancaster, M.; Mariotti, C.; Moortgat, F.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Polesello, G.; Riemann, S.; Assamagan, K.; Bechtle, P.; Carena, M.; Chachamis, G.; /more authors..

    2010-06-11

    Discoveries at the LHC will soon set the physics agenda for future colliders. This report of a CERN Theory Institute includes the summaries of Working Groups that reviewed the physics goals and prospects of LHC running with 10 to 300 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, of the proposed sLHC luminosity upgrade, of the ILC, of CLIC, of the LHeC and of a muon collider. The four Working Groups considered possible scenarios for the first 10 fb{sup -1} of data at the LHC in which (i) a state with properties that are compatible with a Higgs boson is discovered, (ii) no such state is discovered either because the Higgs properties are such that it is difficult to detect or because no Higgs boson exists, (iii) a missing-energy signal beyond the Standard Model is discovered as in some supersymmetric models, and (iv) some other exotic signature of new physics is discovered. In the contexts of these scenarios, theWorking Groups reviewed the capabilities of the future colliders to study in more detail whatever new physics may be discovered by the LHC. Their reports provide the particle physics community with some tools for reviewing the scientific priorities for future colliders after the LHC produces its first harvest of new physics from multi-TeV collisions.

  6. Considerations on Energy Frontier Colliders after LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2016-11-15

    Since 1960’s, particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics, 29 total have been built and operated, 7 are in operation now. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). The future of the world-wide HEP community critically depends on the feasibility of possible post-LHC colliders. The concept of the feasibility is complex and includes at least three factors: feasibility of energy, feasibility of luminosity and feasibility of cost. Here we overview all current options for post-LHC colliders from such perspective (ILC, CLIC, Muon Collider, plasma colliders, CEPC, FCC, HE-LHC) and discuss major challenges and accelerator R&D required to demonstrate feasibility of an energy frontier accelerator facility following the LHC. We conclude by taking a look into ultimate energy reach accelerators based on plasmas and crystals, and discussion on the perspectives for the far future of the accelerator-based particle physics. This paper largely follows previous study [1] and the presenta ion given at the ICHEP’2016 conference in Chicago [2].

  7. The LHCf experiment at the LHC accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bonechi, L.; Adriani, O.; Bongi, M.; D'Alessandro, R.; Papini, P.; Castellini, G.; Faus, A.; Velasco, J.; Haguenauer, M.; Itow, Y.; Mase, T.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Matsumoto, H.; Menjo, H.; Muraki, Y.; Sako, T.; Tanaka, K.; Watanabe, H.; Kasahara, K.

    2006-10-27

    The claimed discovery of atmospheric shower induced by cosmic-ray with energy beyond the GZK cutoff by the AGASA experiment in 1994-1995, although not confirmed by other important experiments like Fly's Eye and Hi-Res, together with the poor knowledge of the composition of cosmic rays around and beyond the Knee region, have highlighted the necessity of new experiments that should increase our present knowledge of HECR and UHECR. For this reason big efforts have been addressed to the development of new experiments, like Auger, TA and EUSO, for a systematic study of the UHE atmospheric showers with increased capabilities with respect to the previous experiments. Moreover complementary experiments should allow a precise calibration of the methods used for the reconstruction of cosmic-ray showers in atmosphere. Their aim is the measurement of quantities that are used in these procedures and that are not yet precisely known. Under this perspective the LHCf experiment is a compact experiment which has been proposed for the study of neutral pion and gamma production at high energy in proton-proton interaction in the very forward region of the LHC accelerator. It will help calibrating the algorithms that are used to reconstruct the atmospheric shower events for energy beyond the Knee. The LHCf apparatus and the results of the first beam test, held in 2004, are shortly discussed in this work.

  8. The N.A.C.A. Photographic Apparatus for Studying Fuel Sprays from Oil Engine Injection Valves and Test Results from Several Researches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beardsley, Edward G

    1928-01-01

    Apparatus for recording photographically the start, growth, and cut-off of oil sprays from injection valves has been developed at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory. The apparatus consists of a high-tension transformer by means of which a bank of condensers is charged to a high voltage. The controlled discharge of these condensers in sequence, at a rate of several thousand per second, produces electric sparks of sufficient intensity to illuminate the moving spray for photographing. The sprays are injected from various types of valves into a chamber containing gases at pressures up to 600 pounds per square inch. Several series of pictures are shown. The results give the effects of injection pressure, chamber pressure, specific gravity of the fuel oil used, and injection-valve design, upon spray characteristics.

  9. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 219: Septic Systems and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    David Strand

    2006-05-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 219, Septic Systems and Injection Wells, in Areas 3, 16, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 219 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 03-11-01, Steam Pipes and Asbestos Tiles; (2) 16-04-01, Septic Tanks (3); (3) 16-04-02, Distribution Box; (4) 16-04-03, Sewer Pipes; (5) 23-20-01, DNA Motor Pool Sewage and Waste System; and (6) 23-20-02, Injection Well. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 219 with no further corrective action beyond the application of a use restriction at CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from June 20 through October 12, 2005, as set forth in the CAU 219 Corrective Action Investigation Plan and Record of Technical Change No. 1. A best management practice was implemented at CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03, and corrective action was performed at CAS 23-20-01 between January and April 2006. In addition, a use restriction will be applied to CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03 to provide additional protection to Nevada Test Site personnel. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: (1) Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. (3) Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 219 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs

  10. Revised LHC deal quiets congress

    SciTech Connect

    Lawler, A.

    1997-05-23

    The roughest part of the ride may be over for U.S. physicists who want to participate in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the $5 billion accelerator planned for CERN in Geneva. They have found themselves on a political roller coaster for the past few months. This week, U.S. and European negotiators were putting the final touches on a revamped agreement that should pave the way for the United States to help pay for construction of the accelerator and its two main detectors, and guarantee U.S. scientists a role in research on the machine. The trouble began in March, when Representative Joe Barton (R-TX) declared war on a proposed $530 million U.S. contribution to the new facility, slated for completion in 2005. Barton and many other members of Congress were still smarting from what they said was a lack of European support for the canceled Superconducting Super Collider that was being built in Barton`s backyard. Representative James Sensenbrenner (R-WI), who chairs the House Science Committee, led the charge to alter a draft agreement initialed this winter by Department of Energy (DOE) and CERN officials that spelled out the details of U.S. participation. After hurried negotiations, both sides have sharpened the agreement to address the lawmakers` concerns. The new deal, says Energy Secretary Federico Pena, {open_quotes}has made that project even better.{close_quotes}

  11. Design approach for the development of a cryomodule for compact crab cavities for Hi-Lumi LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattalwar, Shrikant; Jones, Thomas; Templeton, Niklas; Goudket, Philippe; McIntosh, Peter; Wheelhouse, Alan; Burt, Graeme; Hall, Ben; Wright, Loren; Peterson, Tom

    2014-01-01

    A prototype Superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule, comprising multiple compact crab cavities is foreseen to realise a local crab crossing scheme for the "Hi-Lumi LHC", a project launched by CERN to increase the luminosity performance of LHC. A cryomodule with two cavities will be initially installed and tested on the SPS drive accelerator at CERN to evaluate performance with high-intensity proton beams. A series of boundary conditions influence the design of the cryomodule prototype, arising from; the complexity of the cavity design, the requirement for multiple RF couplers, the close proximity to the second LHC beam pipe and the tight space constraints in the SPS and LHC tunnels. As a result, the design of the helium vessel and the cryomodule has become extremely challenging. This paper assesses some of the critical cryogenic and engineering design requirements and describes an optimised cryomodule solution for the evaluation tests on SPS.

  12. Annual Report RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspections for Corrective Action Unit 91: Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the Period October 2001 - October 2002

    SciTech Connect

    G. Richardson

    2003-02-01

    This annual monitoring and inspection report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the U-3fi Injection Well during the October 2001 to October 2002 period. The U-3fi Injection Well is located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. Inspections of the Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the concrete pad, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste disposal unit closure. The objective of the neutron logging is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along the 128-meter (m) (420-feet [ft]) ER3-3 monitoring well and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement in the regulated interval extending between 73 to 82 m (240 to 270 ft).

  13. Results from Geothermal Logging, Air and Core-Water Chemistry Sampling, Air Injection Testing and Tracer Testing in the Northern Ghost Dance Fault, YUCCA Mountain, Nevada, November 1996 to August 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Lecain, G.D.; Anna, L.O.; Fahy, M.F.

    1998-08-01

    Geothermal logging, air and core-water chemistry sampling, air-injection testing, and tracer testing were done in the northern Ghost Dance Fault at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, from November 1996 to August 1998. The study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. The fault-testing drill room and test boreholes were located in the crystal-poor, middle nonlithophysal zone of the Topopah Spring Tuff, a tuff deposit of Miocene age. The drill room is located off the Yucca Mountain underground Exploratory Studies Facility at about 230 meters below ground surface. Borehole geothermal logging identified a temperature decrease of 0.1 degree Celsius near the Ghost Dance Fault. The temperature decrease could indicate movement of cooler air or water, or both, down the fault, or it may be due to drilling-induced evaporative or adiabatic cooling. In-situ pneumatic pressure monitoring indicated that barometric pressure changes were transmitted from the ground surface to depth through the Ghost Dance Fault. Values of carbon dioxide and delta carbon-13 from gas samples indicated that air from the underground drill room had penetrated the tuff, supporting the concept of a well-developed fracture system. Uncorrected carbon-14-age estimates from gas samples ranged from 2,400 to 4,500 years. Tritium levels in borehole core water indicated that the fault may have been a conduit for the transport of water from the ground surface to depth during the last 100 years.

  14. SPEAR 3 INJECTION KICKER

    SciTech Connect

    Armett, Donald W.

    2002-08-20

    The design of the SPEAR 3 injection kicker system is presented. This system will include three kicker magnets and their associated pulsers. The magnet design is based on the DELTA kicker magnets, which present a low RF impedance to the beam, and are relatively straight-forward to construct. The pulsers use cascaded IGBT stages that are based on the modulator pulsers developed by a SLAC/LLNL collaboration for the NLC. Design considerations and the results of prototype tests will be discussed.

  15. The 11 T dipole for HL-LHC: Status and plan

    SciTech Connect

    Savary, F.; Barzi, E.; Bordini, B.; Bottura, L.; Chlachidze, G.; Ramos, D.; Bermudez, S. Izquierdo; Karppinen, M.; Lackner, F.; Loffler, C. H.; Moron-Ballester, R.; Nobrega, A.; Perez, J. C.; Prin, H.; Smekens, D.; de Rijk, G.; Redaelli, S.; Rossi, L.; Willering, G.; Zlobin, A. V.; Giovannozzi, M.

    2016-06-01

    The upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collimation system includes additional collimators in the LHC lattice. The longitudinal space for these collimators will be created by replacing some of the LHC main dipoles with shorter but stronger dipoles compatible with the LHC lattice and main systems. The project plan comprises the construction of two cryoassemblies containing each of the two 11-T dipoles of 5.5-m length for possible installation on either side of interaction point 2 of LHC in the years 2018-2019 for ion operation, and the installation of two cryoassemblies on either side of interaction point 7 of LHC in the years 2023-2024 for proton operation. The development program conducted in conjunction between the Fermilab and CERN magnet groups is progressing well. The development activities carried out on the side of Fermilab were concluded in the middle of 2015 with the fabrication and test of a 1-m-long two-in-one model and those on the CERN side are ramping up with the construction of 2-m-long models and the preparation of the tooling for the fabrication of the first full-length prototype. The engineering design of the cryomagnet is well advanced, including the definition of the various interfaces, e.g., with the collimator, powering, protection, and vacuum systems. Several practice coils of 5.5-m length have been already fabricated. This paper describes the overall progress of the project, the final design of the cryomagnet, and the performance of the most recent models. Furthermore, the overall plan toward the fabrication of the series magnets for the two phases of the upgrade of the LHC collimation system is also presented.

  16. Statistics and Discoveries at the LHC (2/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The lectures will give an introduction to statistics as applied in particle physics and will provide all the necessary basics for data analysis at the LHC. Special emphasis will be placed on the the problems and questions that arise when searching for new phenomena, including p-values, discovery significance, limit setting procedures, treatment of small signals in the presence of large backgrounds. Specific issues that will be addressed include the advantages and drawbacks of different statistical test procedures (cut-based, likelihood-ratio, etc.), the look-elsewhere effect and treatment of systematic uncertainties.

  17. Statistics and Discoveries at the LHC (3/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The lectures will give an introduction to statistics as applied in particle physics and will provide all the necessary basics for data analysis at the LHC. Special emphasis will be placed on the the problems and questions that arise when searching for new phenomena, including p-values, discovery significance, limit setting procedures, treatment of small signals in the presence of large backgrounds. Specific issues that will be addressed include the advantages and drawbacks of different statistical test procedures (cut-based, likelihood-ratio, etc.), the look-elsewhere effect and treatment of systematic uncertainties.

  18. Statistics and Discoveries at the LHC (4/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The lectures will give an introduction to statistics as applied in particle physics and will provide all the necessary basics for data analysis at the LHC. Special emphasis will be placed on the the problems and questions that arise when searching for new phenomena, including p-values, discovery significance, limit setting procedures, treatment of small signals in the presence of large backgrounds. Specific issues that will be addressed include the advantages and drawbacks of different statistical test procedures (cut-based, likelihood-ratio, etc.), the look-elsewhere effect and treatment of systematic uncertainties.

  19. Statistics and Discoveries at the LHC (1/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The lectures will give an introduction to statistics as applied in particle physics and will provide all the necessary basics for data analysis at the LHC. Special emphasis will be placed on the the problems and questions that arise when searching for new phenomena, including p-values, discovery significance, limit setting procedures, treatment of small signals in the presence of large backgrounds. Specific issues that will be addressed include the advantages and drawbacks of different statistical test procedures (cut-based, likelihood-ratio, etc.), the look-elsewhere effect and treatment of systematic uncertainties.

  20. Torsemide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... or pharmacist) may measure the effectiveness and side effects of your treatment using laboratory tests and physical ... or skin). If you experience any of these effects near your intravenous catheter, tell your health care ...

  1. Cimetidine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... or pharmacist) may measure the effectiveness and side effects of your treatment using laboratory tests and physical ... or skin). If you experience any of these effects near your intravenous catheter, tell your health care ...

  2. High Luminosity LHC: Challenges and plans

    DOE PAGES

    Arduini, G.; Barranco, J.; Bertarelli, A.; ...

    2016-12-28

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will undergo a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its rate of collisions by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity by a factor ten. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), willmore » rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11–12 T superconducting magnets, including Nb3Sn-based magnets never used in accelerators before, compact superconducting cavities for longitudinal beam rotation, new technology and physical processes for beam collimation. As a result, the dynamics of the HL-LHC beams will be also particularly challenging and this aspect is the main focus of this paper.« less

  3. High Luminosity LHC: Challenges and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Arduini, G.; Barranco, J.; Bertarelli, A.; Biancacci, N.; Bruce, R.; Bruning, O.; Buffat, X.; Cai, Y.; Carver, L. R.; Fartoukh, S.; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Iadarola, G.; Li, K.; Lechner, A.; Medrano, L. Medina; Metral, E.; Nosochkov, Y.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pellegrini, D.; Pieloni, T.; Qiang, J.; Redaelli, S.; Romano, A.; Rossi, L.; Rumolo, G.; Salvant, B.; Schenk, M.; Tambasco, C.; Tomas, R.; Valishev, S.; Van der Veken, F. F.

    2016-12-28

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will undergo a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its rate of collisions by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity by a factor ten. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11–12 T superconducting magnets, including Nb3Sn-based magnets never used in accelerators before, compact superconducting cavities for longitudinal beam rotation, new technology and physical processes for beam collimation. As a result, the dynamics of the HL-LHC beams will be also particularly challenging and this aspect is the main focus of this paper.

  4. High Luminosity LHC: challenges and plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arduini, G.; Barranco, J.; Bertarelli, A.; Biancacci, N.; Bruce, R.; Brüning, O.; Buffat, X.; Cai, Y.; Carver, L. R.; Fartoukh, S.; Giovannozzi, M.; Iadarola, G.; Li, K.; Lechner, A.; Medina Medrano, L.; Métral, E.; Nosochkov, Y.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pellegrini, D.; Pieloni, T.; Qiang, J.; Redaelli, S.; Romano, A.; Rossi, L.; Rumolo, G.; Salvant, B.; Schenk, M.; Tambasco, C.; Tomás, R.; Valishev, S.; Van der Veken, F. F.

    2016-12-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will undergo a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its rate of collisions by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity by a factor ten. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11-12 T superconducting magnets, including Nb3Sn-based magnets never used in accelerators before, compact superconducting cavities for longitudinal beam rotation, new technology and physical processes for beam collimation. The dynamics of the HL-LHC beams will be also particularly challenging and this aspect is the main focus of this paper.

  5. Neutral beam injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Duesing, G.; Altmann, H.; Falter, H.; Goede, A.; Haange, R.; Hemsworth, R.S.; Kupschus, P.; Stork, D.; Thompson, E.

    1987-01-01

    The development of the neutral injection (NI) system for the Joint European Torus and its status in 1985 are reported. First the system parameters are discussed and the layout is described, followed by a summary of the physics design calculations, the development, production, and testing of the components and the subsystem assembly. The system commissioning is presented, including a description of the function and the realization of the NI test bed. A summary of performance predictions for 80-keV beam heating experiments, and of the experimental evidence on balanced versus coinjection, is presented. The operational experience with the first injector and the plasma physics results obtained so far are summarized.

  6. Parton distribution benchmarking with LHC data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Richard D.; Carrazza, Stefano; Del Debbio, Luigi; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Hartland, Nathan; Huston, Joey; Nadolsky, Pavel; Rojo, Juan; Stump, Daniel; Thorne, Robert S.; Yuan, C.-P.

    2013-04-01

    We present a detailed comparison of the most recent sets of NNLO PDFs from the ABM, CT, HERAPDF, MSTW and NNPDF collaborations. We compare parton distributions at low and high scales and parton luminosities relevant for LHC phenomenology. We study the PDF dependence of LHC benchmark inclusive cross sections and differential distributions for electroweak boson and jet production in the cases in which the experimental covariance matrix is available. We quantify the agreement between data and theory by computing the χ 2 for each data set with all the various PDFs. PDF comparisons are performed consistently for common values of the strong coupling. We also present a benchmark comparison of jet production at the LHC, comparing the results from various available codes and scale settings. Finally, we discuss the implications of the updated NNLO PDF sets for the combined PDF+ α s uncertainty in the gluon fusion Higgs production cross section.

  7. LHC RF System Time-Domain Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.; /SLAC

    2010-09-14

    Non-linear time-domain simulations have been developed for the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These simulations capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction and are structured to reproduce the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They are also a valuable tool for the study of diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Results from these studies and related measurements from PEP-II and LHC have been presented in multiple places. This report presents an example of the time-domain simulation implementation for the LHC.

  8. Cyclic injection, storage, and withdrawal of heated water in a sandstone aquifer at St. Paul, Minnesota--Analysis of thermal data and nonisothermal modeling of short-term test cycles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Robert T.; Delin, G.N.

    2002-01-01

    In May 1980, the University of Minnesota began a project to evaluate the feasibility of storing heated water (150 degrees Celsius) in the Franconia-Ironton Galesville aquifer (183 to 245 meters below land surface) and later recovering it for space heating. The University's steam-generation facilities supplied high-temperature water for injection. The Aquifer Thermal-Energy Storage system is a doublet-well design in which the injection-withdrawal wells are spaced approximately 250 meters apart. Water was pumped from one of the wells through a heat exchanger, where heat was added or removed. This water was then injected back into the aquifer through the other well. Four short-term test cycles were completed. Each cycle consisted of approximately equal durations of injection and withdrawal ranging from 5.25 to 8.01 days. Equal rates of injection and withdrawal, ranging from 17.4 to 18.6 liters per second, were maintained for each short-term test cycle. Average injection temperatures ranged from 88.5 to 117.9 degrees Celsius. Temperature graphs for selected depths at individual observation wells indicate that the Ironton and Galesville Sandstones received and stored more thermal energy than the upper part of the Franconia Formation. Clogging of the Ironton Sandstone was possibly due to precipitation of calcium carbonate or movement of fine-grain material or both. Vertical-profile plots indicate that the effects of buoyancy flow were small within the aquifer. A three-dimensional, anisotropic, nonisothermal, ground-water-flow, and thermal-energy-transport model was constructed to simulate the four short-term test cycles. The model was used to simulate the entire short-term testing period of approximately 400 days. The only model properties varied during model calibration were longitudinal and transverse thermal dispersivities, which, for final calibration, were simulated as 3.3 and 0.33 meters, respectively. The model was calibrated by comparing model-computed results to

  9. Alkaline flooding injection strategy

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to improved alkali-surfactant flooding methods, and this includes determining the proper design of injection strategy. Several different injection strategies have been used or suggested for recovering heavy oils with surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding methods. Oil recovery was compared for four different injection strategies: (1) surfactant followed by polymer, (2) surfactant followed by alkaline polymer, (3) alkaline surfactant followed by polymer, and (4) alkali, surfactant, and polymer mixed in a single formulation. The effect of alkaline preflush was also studied under two different conditions. All of the oil recovery experiments were conducted under optimal conditions with a viscous, non-acidic oil from Hepler (KS) oil field. The coreflood experiments were conducted with Berea sandstone cores since field core was not available in sufficient quantity for coreflood tests. The Tucker sand of Hepler field is a Class I fluvial dominated deltaic reservoir, as classified by the Department of Energy, which has been selected as the site of a DOE-sponsored field pilot test.

  10. STATISTICAL CHALLENGES FOR SEARCHES FOR NEW PHYSICS AT THE LHC.

    SciTech Connect

    CRANMER, K.

    2005-09-12

    Because the emphasis of the LHC is on 5{sigma} discoveries and the LHC environment induces high systematic errors, many of the common statistical procedures used in High Energy Physics are not adequate. I review the basic ingredients of LHC searches, the sources of systematics, and the performance of several methods. Finally, I indicate the methods that seem most promising for the LHC and areas that are in need of further study.

  11. Anomalous quartic and triple gauge couplings in {gamma}-induced processes at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Royon, Christophe; Chapon, Emilien

    2011-07-15

    We study the W/Z pair production via two-photon exchange at the LHC and give the sensitivities on trilinear and quartic gauge anomalous couplings between photons and W/Z bosons for an integrated luminosity of 30 and 200 fb{sup -1}. For simplicity and to obtain lower backgrounds, only the leptonic decays of the electroweak bosons are considered. The intact protons in the final states are detected in the ATLAS Forward Proton detectors. The high energy and luminosity of the LHC and the forward detectors allow to probe beyond standard model physics and to test the Higgsless and extra dimension models in an unprecedent way.

  12. New Physics Undercover at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Hou Keong

    With the completion of 7 TeV and 8 TeV data taking at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the physics community witnessed one of the great triumphs of modern physics: the completion of the Standard Model (SM) as an effective theory. The final missing particle, the Higgs boson, was observed and its mass was measured. However, many theoretical questions remain unanswered. What is the source of electroweak symmetry breaking? What is the nature of dark matter? How does gravity fit into the picture? With no definitive hints of new physics at the LHC, we must consider the possibility that our search strategies need to be expanded. Conventional LHC searches focus on theoretically motivated scenarios, such as the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Models and Little Higgs Theories. However, it is possible that new physics may be entirely different from what we might expect. In this thesis, we examine a variety of scenarios that lead to new physics undercover at the LHC. First we look at potential new physics hiding in Quantum Chromo-Dynamics backgrounds, which may be uncovered using jet substructure techniques in a data-driven way. Then we turn to new long-lived particles hiding in Higgs decay, which may lead to displaced vertices. Such a signal can be unearthed through a data-driven analysis. Then we turn to new physics with ``semi-visible jets'', which lead to missing momentum aligned with jet momentum. These events are vetoed in traditional searches and we demonstrate ways to uncover these signals. Lastly, we explore performance of future colliders in two case studies: Stops and Higgs Portal searches. We show that a 100 TeV collider will lead to significant improvements over 14 TeV LHC runs. Indeed, new physics may lie undercover at the LHC and future colliders, waiting to be discovered.

  13. The CMS Tier0 goes cloud and grid for LHC Run 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hufnagel, Dirk

    2015-12-23

    In 2015, CMS will embark on a new era of collecting LHC collisions at unprecedented rates and complexity. This will put a tremendous stress on our computing systems. Prompt Processing of the raw data by the Tier-0 infrastructure will no longer be constrained to CERN alone due to the significantly increased resource requirements. In LHC Run 2, we will need to operate it as a distributed system utilizing both the CERN Cloud-based Agile Infrastructure and a significant fraction of the CMS Tier-1 Grid resources. In another big change for LHC Run 2, we will process all data using the multi-threaded framework to deal with the increased event complexity and to ensure efficient use of the resources. Furthermore, this contribution will cover the evolution of the Tier-0 infrastructure and present scale testing results and experiences from the first data taking in 2015.

  14. The CMS Tier0 goes cloud and grid for LHC Run 2

    DOE PAGES

    Hufnagel, Dirk

    2015-12-23

    In 2015, CMS will embark on a new era of collecting LHC collisions at unprecedented rates and complexity. This will put a tremendous stress on our computing systems. Prompt Processing of the raw data by the Tier-0 infrastructure will no longer be constrained to CERN alone due to the significantly increased resource requirements. In LHC Run 2, we will need to operate it as a distributed system utilizing both the CERN Cloud-based Agile Infrastructure and a significant fraction of the CMS Tier-1 Grid resources. In another big change for LHC Run 2, we will process all data using the multi-threadedmore » framework to deal with the increased event complexity and to ensure efficient use of the resources. Furthermore, this contribution will cover the evolution of the Tier-0 infrastructure and present scale testing results and experiences from the first data taking in 2015.« less

  15. The CMS TierO goes Cloud and Grid for LHC Run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hufnagel, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    In 2015, CMS will embark on a new era of collecting LHC collisions at unprecedented rates and complexity. This will put a tremendous stress on our computing systems. Prompt Processing of the raw data by the Tier-0 infrastructure will no longer be constrained to CERN alone due to the significantly increased resource requirements. In LHC Run 2, we will need to operate it as a distributed system utilizing both the CERN Cloud-based Agile Infrastructure and a significant fraction of the CMS Tier-1 Grid resources. In another big change for LHC Run 2, we will process all data using the multi-threaded framework to deal with the increased event complexity and to ensure efficient use of the resources. This contribution will cover the evolution of the Tier-0 infrastructure and present scale testing results and experiences from the first data taking in 2015.

  16. Using tevatron magnets for HE-LHC or new ring in LHC tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, Henryk; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    Two injector accelerator options for HE-LHC of p{sup +} - p{sup +} collisions at 33 TeV cms energy are briefly outlined. One option is based on the Super-SPS (S-SPS) accelerator in the SPS tunnel, and the other one is based on the LER (Low-Energy-Ring) accelerator in the LHC tunnel. Expectations of performance of the main arc accelerator magnets considered for the construction of the S-SPS and of the LER accelerators are used to tentatively devise some selected properties of these accelerators as potential injectors to HE-LHC.

  17. Support Structure Design of the $$\\hbox{Nb}_{3}\\hbox{Sn}$$ Quadrupole for the High Luminosity LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Juchno, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; ...

    2014-10-31

    New low-β quadrupole magnets are being developed within the scope of the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project in collaboration with the US LARP program. The aim of the HLLHC project is to study and implement machine upgrades necessary for increasing the luminosity of the LHC. The new quadrupoles, which are based on the Nb₃Sn superconducting technology, will be installed in the LHC Interaction Regions and will have to generate a gradient of 140 T/m in a coil aperture of 150 mm. In this paper, we describe the design of the short model magnet support structure and discuss results of themore » detailed 3D numerical analysis performed in preparation for the first short model test.« less

  18. Calibration of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter with LHC collision data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obertino, M. M.; CMS Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    The CMS ECAL is a high resolution electromagnetic calorimeter which relies upon precision calibration in order to achieve and maintain its design performance. Variations in light collected from the lead tungstate crystals, due to intrinsic differences in crystals/photodetectors, as well as variations with time due to radiation damage for example, need to be taken into account. Sophisticated and effective methods of inter-crystal and absolute calibration have been devised, using collision data from the 2011 LHC run and a dedicated light injection system. For inter-calibration, low mass particle (π0 and η) decays to two photons are exploited, as well as the azimuthal symmetry of the average energy deposition at a given pseudorapidity. The light injection system monitors the channel response in real-time and enables the re-calibration of the measured energies over time. This is cross-checked by the comparison of E/p measurements of electrons from W decays (where the momentum is measured in the CMS tracker) with/without these re-calibrations applied. Absolute calibration has been performed using Z decays into electron-positron pairs.

  19. R-axion detection at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Goh, Hock-Seng; Ibe, Masahiro; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    Supersymmetric models with spontaneously broken approximate R-symmetry contains a light spin 0 particle, the R-axion. The properties of the particle can be a powerful probe of the structure of the new physics. In this paper, we discuss the possibilities of the R-axion detection at the LHC experiments. It is challenge to observe this light particle in the LHC environment. However, for typical values in which the mass of the R-axion is a few hundred MeV, we show that those particles can be detected by searching for displaced vertices from R-axion decay.

  20. Bigger, Better, Faster, More at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Izaguirre, Eder; Manhart, Michael; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    Multijet plus missing energy searches provide universal coverage for theories that have new colored particles that decay into a dark matter candidate and jets. These signals appear at the LHC further out on the missing energy tail than two-to-two scattering indicates. The simplicity of the searches at the LHC contrasts sharply with the Tevatron where more elaborate searches are necessary to separate signal from background. The searches presented in this article effectively distinguish signal from background for any theory where the LSP is a daughter or granddaughter of the pair-produced colored parent particle without ever having to consider missing energies less than 400 GeV.

  1. LHC II system sensitivity to magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotae, Vlad; Creanga, Ioan

    2005-03-01

    Experiments have been designed to reveal the influences of ferrofluid treatment and static magnetic field exposure on the photosynthetic system II, where the light harvesting complex (LHC II) controls the ratio chlorophyll a/ chlorophyll b (revealing, indirectly, the photosynthesis rate). Spectrophotometric measurement of chlorophyll content revealed different influences for relatively low ferrofluid concentrations (10-30 μl/l) in comparison to higher concentrations (70-100 μl/l). The overlapped effect of the static magnetic field shaped better the stimulatory ferrofluid action on LHC II system in young poppy plantlets.

  2. Production of hhjj at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Matthew J; Englert, Christoph; Greiner, Nicolas; Spannowsky, Michael

    2014-03-14

    Until now, a phenomenologically complete analysis of the hh+2j channel at the LHC has been missing. This is mostly due to the high complexity of the involved one-loop gluon fusion contribution and the fact that a reliable estimate thereof cannot be obtained through simplified calculations in the mt→∞ limit. In this Letter, we report on the LHC's potential to access di-Higgs production in association with two jets in a fully showered hadron-level analysis. Our study includes the finite top and bottom mass dependencies for the gluon fusion contribution.

  3. Charged-particle multiplicity at LHC energies

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The talk presents the measurement of the pseudorapidity density and the multiplicity distribution with ALICE at the achieved LHC energies of 0.9 and 2.36 TeV.An overview about multiplicity measurements prior to LHC is given and the related theoretical concepts are briefly discussed.The analysis procedure is presented and the systematic uncertainties are detailed. The applied acceptance corrections and the treatment of diffraction are discussed.The results are compared with model predictions. The validity of KNO scaling in restricted phase space regions is revisited. 

  4. Techni-Dilaton Signatures at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Shinya; Yamawaki, Koichi

    2013-03-01

    We explore LHC discovery signatures of techni-dilaton (TD) arising as a composite pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson (pNGB), associated with the spontaneous breaking of the approximate scale symmetry in the walking technicolor (WTC). We explicitly evaluate the TD 7 TeV LHC production cross sections times the branching ratios in terms of the TD mass MTD as an input parameter for the region 200 GeV < MTD < 1000 GeV in the typical WTC models. It turns out that the TD signatures are quite different from those of the standard model (SM) Higgs.

  5. Lessons from LHC elastic and diffractive data

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, A.D.; Khoze, V.A.; Ryskin, M.G.

    2015-04-10

    In the light of LHC data, we discuss the global description of all high-energy elastic and diffractive data, using a one-pomeron model, but including multi-pomeron interactions. The LHC data indicate the need of a k{sub t}(s) behaviour, where k{sub t} is the gluon transverse momentum along the partonic ladder structure which describes the pomeron. We also discuss tensions in the data, as well as the t dependence of the slope of dσ{sub el}/dt in the small t domain.

  6. LHC: The Emptiest Space in the Solar System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cid-Vidal, Xabier; Cid, Ramon

    2011-01-01

    Proton beams have been colliding at 7 TeV in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) since 30 March 2010, meaning that the LHC research programme is underway. Particle physicists around the world are looking forward to using the data from these collisions, as the LHC is running at an energy three and a half times higher than previously achieved at any…

  7. Preparations for Physics Studies with ATLAS During the First Years of the LHC

    ScienceCinema

    Fabiola Gianotti

    2016-07-12

    I will review the status of the ATLAS detector installation and commissioning, and discuss the preparation for physics with test-beam studies, detailed simulations, and runs with cosmics. I will then show examples of physics opportunities with the first LHC data.   

  8. Heavy quark quenching from RHIC to LHC and the consequences of gluon damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossiaux, P. B.; Nahrgang, M.; Bluhm, M.; Gousset, Th.; Aichelin, J.

    2013-05-01

    In this contribution to the Quark Matter 2012 conference, we study whether energy loss models established for RHIC energies to describe the quenching of heavy quarks can be applied at LHC with the same success. We also benefit from the larger pT-range accessible at this accelerator to test the impact of gluon damping on observables such as the nuclear modification factor.

  9. Supersymmetry without prejudice at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conley, John A.; Gainer, James S.; Hewett, JoAnne L.; Le, My Phuong; Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2011-07-01

    The discovery and exploration of Supersymmetry in a model-independent fashion will be a daunting task due to the large number of soft-breaking parameters in the MSSM. In this paper, we explore the capability of the ATLAS detector at the LHC (sqrt{s}=14 TeV, 1 fb-1) to find SUSY within the 19-dimensional pMSSM subspace of the MSSM using their standard transverse missing energy and long-lived particle searches that were essentially designed for mSUGRA. To this end, we employ a set of ˜71k previously generated model points in the 19-dimensional parameter space that satisfy all of the existing experimental and theoretical constraints. Employing ATLAS-generated SM backgrounds and following their approach in each of 11 missing energy analyses as closely as possible, we explore all of these 71k model points for a possible SUSY signal. To test our analysis procedure, we first verify that we faithfully reproduce the published ATLAS results for the signal distributions for their benchmark mSUGRA model points. We then show that, requiring all sparticle masses to lie below 1(3) TeV, almost all (two-thirds) of the pMSSM model points are discovered with a significance S>5 in at least one of these 11 analyses assuming a 50% systematic error on the SM background. If this systematic error can be reduced to only 20% then this parameter space coverage is increased. These results are indicative that the ATLAS SUSY search strategy is robust under a broad class of Supersymmetric models. We then explore in detail the properties of the kinematically accessible model points which remain unobservable by these search analyses in order to ascertain problematic cases which may arise in general SUSY searches.

  10. Supersymmetry Without Prejudice at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, John A.; Gainer, James S.; Hewett, JoAnne L.; Le, My Phuong; Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    The discovery and exploration of Supersymmetry in a model-independent fashion will be a daunting task due to the large number of soft-breaking parameters in the MSSM. In this paper, we explore the capability of the ATLAS detector at the LHC ({radical}s = 14 TeV, 1 fb{sup -1}) to find SUSY within the 19-dimensional pMSSM subspace of the MSSM using their standard transverse missing energy and long-lived particle searches that were essentially designed for mSUGRA. To this end, we employ a set of {approx} 71k previously generated model points in the 19-dimensional parameter space that satisfy all of the existing experimental and theoretical constraints. Employing ATLAS-generated SM backgrounds and following their approach in each of 11 missing energy analyses as closely as possible, we explore all of these 71k model points for a possible SUSY signal. To test our analysis procedure, we first verify that we faithfully reproduce the published ATLAS results for the signal distributions for their benchmark mSUGRA model points. We then show that, requiring all sparticle masses to lie below 1(3) TeV, almost all(two-thirds) of the pMSSM model points are discovered with a significance S > 5 in at least one of these 11 analyses assuming a 50% systematic error on the SM background. If this systematic error can be reduced to only 20% then this parameter space coverage is increased. These results are indicative that the ATLAS SUSY search strategy is robust under a broad class of Supersymmetric models. We then explore in detail the properties of the kinematically accessible model points which remain unobservable by these search analyses in order to ascertain problematic cases which may arise in general SUSY searches.

  11. Vertical-Deformation, Water-Level, Microgravity, Geodetic, Water-Chemistry, and Flow-Rate Data Collected During Injection, Storage, and Recovery Tests at Lancaster, Antelope Valley, California, September 1995 Through September 1998

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    REPORT DATE 2002 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Vertical-Deformation, Water-Level, Microgravity , Geodetic, Water...NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Department of the Interior 1849 C. Street, NW Washington, DC 20240 8. PERFORMING ...Level, Microgravity , Geodetic, Water-Chemistry, and Flow-Rate Data Collected During Injection, Storage, and Recovery Tests at Lancaster, Antelope

  12. Vertical-deformation, water-level, microgravity, geodetic, water-chemistry, and flow-rate data collected during injection, storage, and recovery tests at Lancaster, Antelope Valley, California, September 1995 through September 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metzger, Loren F.; Ikehara, Marti E.; Howle, James F.

    2001-01-01

    A series of freshwater injection, storage, and recovery tests were conducted from September 1995 through September 1998 to evaluate the feasibility of artificially recharging ground water in the Lancaster area of the Antelope Valley, California. The tests used two production wells at a well field located in the southern part of the city of Lancaster. Monitoring networks were established at or in the vicinity of the test site to measure vertical deformation of the aquifer system, water-level fluctuations, land-surface deformation, water chemistry, and injection well flow rates during water injection and recovery. Data presented in this report were collected from a dual extensometer; 10 piezometers; 1 barometer; 27 active or abandoned production wells; 31 gravity stations; 124 bench marks; 1 permanent and 1 temporary continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) station; 3 tiltmeters; and 2 electromagnetic flowmeters from September 1995 through September 1998. This report discusses the location and design of the monitoring networks and the methods used to collect and process the data, and presents the data in tables and graphs.

  13. Retraining of the 1232 Main Dipole Magnets in the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Verweij, A.; Auchmann, B.; Bednarek, M.; Bottura, L.; Charifoulline, Z.; Feher, S.; Hagen, P.; Modena, M.; Le Naour, S.; Romera, I.; Siemko, A.; Steckert, J.; Tock, J. Ph; Todesco, E.; Willering, G.; Wollmann, D.

    2016-01-05

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) contains eight main dipole circuits, each of them with 154 dipole magnets powered in series. These 15-m-long magnets are wound from Nb-Ti superconducting Rutherford cables, and have active quench detection triggering heaters to quickly force the transition of the coil to the normal conducting state in case of a quench, and hence reduce the hot spot temperature. During the reception tests in 2002-2007, all these magnets have been trained up to at least 12 kA, corresponding to a beam energy of 7.1 TeV. After installation in the accelerator, the circuits have been operated at reduced currents of up to 6.8 kA, from 2010 to 2013, corresponding to a beam energy of 4 TeV. After the first long shutdown of 2013-2014, the LHC runs at 6.5 TeV, requiring a dipole magnet current of 11.0 kA. A significant number of training quenches were needed to bring the 1232 magnets up to this current. In this paper, the circuit behavior in case of a quench is presented, as well as the quench training as compared to the initial training during the reception tests of the individual magnets.

  14. CMS Hadron Endcap Calorimeter Upgrade Studies for Super-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilki, Burak; CMS HCAL Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    When the Large Hadron Collider approaches Super-LHC conditions above a luminosity of 1034cm-2s-1, the scintillator tiles of the CMS Hadron Endcap calorimeters will lose their efficiencies. As a radiation hard solution, the scintillator tiles are planned to be replaced by quartz plates. In order to improve the efficiency of the photodetection, various methods were investigated including radiation hard wavelength shifters, p-terphenyl or 4% gallium doped zinc oxide. We constructed a 20 layer calorimeter prototype with pTp coated plates of size 20 cm × 20 cm, and tested the hadronic and the electromagnetic capabilities at the CERN H2 beam-line. The beam tests revealed a substantial light collection increase with pTp or ZnO:Ga deposited quartz plates. Here we report on the current R&D for a viable endcap calorimeter solution for CMS with beam tests and radiation damage studies.

  15. Problems and results in testing the possible mode of anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid action in carrageenin rat paw oedema: advantages of local substance injection.

    PubMed

    Hirschelmann, R; Bekemeier, H

    1984-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect of dexamethasone in carrageenin rat paw oedema was significantly reduced or abolished by local injection of 0.5-2.5 mg of the antiglucocorticoid progesterone, or of 5 micrograms cycloheximide, or of 2.5 micrograms actinomycin D, into the oedematous area. The results point to indirect dexamethasone action via receptor occupation and de novo protein synthesis, but this view could not be undoubtedly confirmed by systemic administration of essentially higher doses of the substances. The advantages of local low dose antagonist administration versus systemic injection of higher doses are mainly the production of effective tissue levels, as well as avoidance of toxic and other side-effects.

  16. Ground Vibration Measurements at LHC Point 4

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsche, Kirk; Gaddi, Andrea; /CERN

    2012-09-17

    Ground vibration was measured at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Point 4 during the winter shutdown in February 2012. This report contains the results, including power and coherence spectra. We plan to collect and analyze vibration data from representative collider halls to inform specifications for future linear colliders, such as ILC and CLIC. We are especially interested in vibration correlations between final focus lens locations.

  17. U.S. Involvement in the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The demise of the SSC in the U.S. created an upheaval in the U.S. High energy physics (HEP) community. The subsequent redirection of HEP efforts to the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) can perhaps be seen as informing on possible future paths for worldwide collaboration on future HEP megaprojects

  18. Top quark physics expectations at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    ATLAS Collaboration; CMS Collaboration; Gaponenko, Andrei

    2008-09-30

    The top quark will be produced copiously at the LHC. This will make possible detailed physics studies, and also the use of top quark decays for detector calibration. This talk reviews plans and prospects for top physics activities in ATLAS and CMS experiments.

  19. U.S. Involvement in the LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Green, Dan

    2016-12-14

    The demise of the SSC in the U.S. created an upheaval in the U.S. high energy physics (HEP) community. Here, the subsequent redirection of HEP efforts to the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) can perhaps be seen as informing on possible future paths for worldwide collaboration on future HEP megaprojects.

  20. U.S. Involvement in the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Dan

    2016-12-01

    The demise of the SSC in the U.S. created an upheaval in the U.S. high energy physics (HEP) community. The subsequent redirection of HEP efforts to the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) can perhaps be seen as informing on possible future paths for worldwide collaboration on future HEP megaprojects.

  1. The ALICE experiment at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crochet, P.

    2008-12-01

    After a general introduction on the Quark Gluon Plasma and a short overview of the experimental results obtained so far with heavy-ion collisions at the SPS and at the RHIC, the physics goals of the ALICE experiment at the LHC are presented.

  2. Discovering walking technirho mesons at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurachi, Masafumi; Matsuzaki, Shinya; Yamawaki, Koichi

    2014-09-01

    We formulate a scale-invariant hidden local symmetry (HLS) as a low-energy effective theory of walking technicolor (WTC) which includes the technidilaton, technipions, and technirho mesons as the low-lying spectra. As a benchmark for LHC phenomenology, we in particular focus on the one-family model of WTC having eight technifermion flavors, which can be—at energy scales relevant to the reach of the LHC—described by the scale-invariant HLS based on the manifold [SU(8)L×SU(8)R]global×SU(8)local/SU(8)V, where SU(8)local is the HLS and the global SU(8)L×SU(8)R symmetry is partially gauged by the SU(3)×SU(2)L×U(1)Y of the standard model. Based on the scale-invariant HLS, we evaluate the coupling properties of the technirho mesons and place limits on the masses from the current LHC data. Then, implications for future LHC phenomenology are discussed by focusing on the technirho mesons produced through the Drell-Yan process. We find that the color-octet technirho decaying to the technidilaton along with the gluon is of interest as the discovery channel at the LHC, which would provide a characteristic signature to probe the one-family WTC.

  3. Phenomenology of flavon fields at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Tsumura, Koji; Velasco-Sevilla, Liliana

    2010-02-01

    We study low energy constraints from flavor violating processes, production, and decay at the LHC of a scalar field {phi} (flavon) associated to the breaking of a nonsupersymmetric Abelian family symmetry at the TeV scale. This symmetry is constrained to reproduce fermion masses and mixing, up to O(1) coefficients. The nonsupersymmetric gauged U(1) models considered are severely restricted by cancellation of anomalies and LEP bounds on contact interactions; consequently its phenomenology is out of the LHC reach. We therefore introduce an effective U(1) which is not gauged and is broken explicitly by a CP-odd term at the TeV scale. This helps us to explore flavor violating processes, production, and decay at the LHC for these kind of light scalars. In this context we first study the constraints on the flavon mass and its vacuum expectation value from low energy flavor changing processes such as {mu}{yields}e{gamma}. We find that a flavon of about m{sub {phi}}< or approx. 150 GeV could be experimentally allowed. These kinds of flavons could be significantly generated at the LHC via the gluon fusion mechanism and the single top production channel gu{yields}t{phi}. The produced flavons can have characteristic decay modes such as tc for m{sub {phi}}> or approx. m{sub t}, and {tau}{mu} for m{sub {phi}}< or approx. m{sub t}, which could be effectively useful to detect flavons.

  4. RENORM predictions of diffraction at LHC confirmed

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2015-04-10

    The RENORM model predictions of diffractive, total, and total-inelastic cross sections at the LHC are confirmed by recent measurements. The predictions of several other available models are discussed, highlighting their differences from RENORM, mainly arising from the way rapidity gap formation, low- and high-mass diffraction, unitarization, and hadronization are implemented.

  5. Epidural Injections for Spinal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Epidural Injections An epidural injection provides temporary or prolonged relief ... limitations of Epidural Injection? What is an Epidural Injection? An epidural injection is an injection of medication ...

  6. Production of stoponium at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chul; Idilbi, Ahmad; Mehen, Thomas; Yoon, Yeo Woong

    2014-04-01

    Although the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has not observed supersymmetric (SUSY) partners of the Standard Model particles, their existence is not ruled out yet. One recently explored scenario in which there are light SUSY partners that have evaded current bounds from the LHC is that of a light long-lived stop quark. In this paper we consider light stop pair production at the LHC when the stop mass is between 200 and 400 GeV. If the stops are long-lived they can form a bound state, stoponium, which then undergoes two-body decays to Standard Model particles. By considering the near-threshold production of such a pair through the gluon-gluon fusion process and taking into account the strong Coulombic interactions responsible for the formation of this bound state, we obtain factorization theorems for the stop pair inclusive and differential production cross sections. We also perform a resummation of large threshold logarithms up to next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy using well-established renormalization group equations in an effective field theory methodology. These results are used to calculate the invariant mass distributions of two photons or two Z bosons coming from the decay of the stoponium at the LHC. For our choices of SUSY model parameters, the stoponium is not detectable above Standard Model backgrounds in γγ or ZZ at 8 TeV, but will be visible with 400 fb-1 of accumulated data if its mass is below 500 GeV when the LHC runs at 14 TeV.

  7. The 11 T dipole for HL-LHC: Status and plan

    DOE PAGES

    Savary, F.; Barzi, E.; Bordini, B.; ...

    2016-06-01

    The upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collimation system includes additional collimators in the LHC lattice. The longitudinal space for these collimators will be created by replacing some of the LHC main dipoles with shorter but stronger dipoles compatible with the LHC lattice and main systems. The project plan comprises the construction of two cryoassemblies containing each of the two 11-T dipoles of 5.5-m length for possible installation on either side of interaction point 2 of LHC in the years 2018-2019 for ion operation, and the installation of two cryoassemblies on either side of interaction point 7 of LHCmore » in the years 2023-2024 for proton operation. The development program conducted in conjunction between the Fermilab and CERN magnet groups is progressing well. The development activities carried out on the side of Fermilab were concluded in the middle of 2015 with the fabrication and test of a 1-m-long two-in-one model and those on the CERN side are ramping up with the construction of 2-m-long models and the preparation of the tooling for the fabrication of the first full-length prototype. The engineering design of the cryomagnet is well advanced, including the definition of the various interfaces, e.g., with the collimator, powering, protection, and vacuum systems. Several practice coils of 5.5-m length have been already fabricated. This paper describes the overall progress of the project, the final design of the cryomagnet, and the performance of the most recent models. Furthermore, the overall plan toward the fabrication of the series magnets for the two phases of the upgrade of the LHC collimation system is also presented.« less

  8. Determination of specific yield and water-table changes using temporal microgravity surveys collected during the second injection, storage, and recovery test at Lancaster, Antelope Valley, California, November 1996 through April 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howle, James F.; Phillips, Steven P.; Denlinger, Roger P.; Metzger, Loren F.

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of artificially recharging the ground-water system in the Lancaster area of the Antelope Valley, California, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works and the Antelope Valley-East Kern Water Agency, conducted a series of injection, storage, and recovery tests between September 1995 and September 1998. A key component of this study was to measure the response of the water table to injection, which was difficult because the water table averaged 300 feet below land surface. Rather than install many expensive piezometers, microgravity surveys were conducted to determine specific yield and to measure the development of a ground-water mound during the injection of about 1,050 acre-feet of fresh water into an alluvial-aquifer system. The surveys were done prior to, during, and near the end of a 5-month injection period (November 12, 1996, to April 17, 1997). Results of the surveys indicate increases in gravity of as much as 66 microgals between a bedrock reference station and 20 gravity stations within a 1-square-mile area surrounding the injection site. The changes were assumed to have been caused by changes in the ground-water elevation. Gravity and ground-water levels were measured simultaneously at an existing well (7N/12W-34B1). The coupled measurements were used to calculate a specific yield of 0.13 for the alluvial aquifer near the well. To determine the gravitational effect of the injection mound on the gravity measurements made near well 7N/12W-34B1, a two-dimensional gravity model was used. Results of the model simulation show that the effect on gravity associated with the mass of the injection mound was minor and thus had a negligible effect on the calculation of specific yield. The specific yield of 0.13, therefore, was used to infer water-level changes at other gravity stations within the study area. The gravity-derived water-level changes were compared with simulated water

  9. Magnetic Measurements of the First Nb$_3$Sn Model Quadrupole (MQXFS) for the High-Luminosity LHC

    SciTech Connect

    DiMarco, J.; Ambrosio, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Ferracin, P.; Holik, E.; Sabbi, G.; Stoynev, S.; Strauss, T.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; Todesco, E.; Velev, G.; Wang, X.

    2016-09-06

    The US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) and CERN are developing high-gradient Nb3Sn magnets for the High Luminosity LHC interaction regions. Magnetic measurements of the first 1.5 m long, 150 mm aperture model quadrupole, MQXFS1, were performed during magnet assembly at LBNL, as well as during cryogenic testing at Fermilab’s Vertical Magnet Test Facility. This paper reports on the results of these magnetic characterization measurements, as well as on the performance of new probes developed for the tests.

  10. Water-quality monitoring and studies of the formation and fate of trihalomethanes during the third injection, storage and recovery test at Lancaster, Antelope Valley, California, March 1998 through April 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fram, Miranda S.; Berghouse, Joshua K.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Fujii, Roger; Goodwin, Kelly D.; Clark, Jordan F.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works and the Antelope Valley-East Kern Water Agency, conducted three cycles of injection, storage, and recovery tests to evaluate the feasibility of artificially recharging ground water in the Lancaster area of Antelope Valley, California. During the third cycle (March 1998 through April 1999), the tests included investigations of the formation and fate of trihalomethanes in the aquifer. Trihalomethanes are disinfection by-products formed by reaction between natural dissolved organic carbon that is present in water and chlorine that is added during the drinking-water-treatment process. This report includes a discussion of the design of the investigation; descriptions of the sampling, analytical, and experimental methods used in the investigation; and a presentation of the data collected. During the third cycle, 60 million gallons of chlorinated water was injected into the aquifer through well 7N/12W-27P2 in the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works well field in Lancaster between April 15 and June 16, 1998. One hundred fifty million gallons of water was extracted from the same well between June 30, 1998, and April 29, 1999. Water-quality samples were collected during the entire cycle from the well and from a nearby set of nested piezometers, and were analyzed for residual chlorine, dissolved organic carbon, trihalomethane, major anion, and dissolved solid concentrations; ultraviolet absorbance spectra; and a number of field water-quality parameters. A statistical analysis was done to evaluate the analytical precision of the residual chlorine, dissolved organic carbon, trihalomethane, and ultraviolet absorbance measurements on these samples. The formation of trihalomethanes in the injection water was examined in laboratory experiments: Trihalomethane concentrations in samples of injection water were monitored during a storage period, and trihalomethane formation

  11. Spectrum-doubled heavy vector bosons at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Appelquist, Thomas; Bai, Yang; Ingoldby, James; Piai, Maurizio

    2016-01-19

    We study a simple effective field theory incorporating six heavy vector bosons together with the standard-model field content. The new particles preserve custodial symmetry as well as an approximate left-right parity symmetry. The enhanced symmetry of the model allows it to satisfy precision electroweak constraints and bounds from Higgs physics in a regime where all the couplings are perturbative and where the amount of fine-tuning is comparable to that in the standard model itself. We find that the model could explain the recently observed excesses in di-boson processes at invariant mass close to 2TeV from LHC Run 1 for a range of allowed parameter space. The masses of all the particles differ by no more than roughly 10%. In a portion of the allowed parameter space only one of the new particles has a production cross section large enough to be detectable with the energy and luminosity of Run 1, both via its decay to WZ and to Wh, while the others have suppressed production rates. Furthermore, the model can be tested at the higher-energy and higher-luminosity run of the LHC even for an overall scale of the new particles higher than 3TeV.

  12. Spectrum-doubled heavy vector bosons at the LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Appelquist, Thomas; Bai, Yang; Ingoldby, James; ...

    2016-01-19

    We study a simple effective field theory incorporating six heavy vector bosons together with the standard-model field content. The new particles preserve custodial symmetry as well as an approximate left-right parity symmetry. The enhanced symmetry of the model allows it to satisfy precision electroweak constraints and bounds from Higgs physics in a regime where all the couplings are perturbative and where the amount of fine-tuning is comparable to that in the standard model itself. We find that the model could explain the recently observed excesses in di-boson processes at invariant mass close to 2TeV from LHC Run 1 for amore » range of allowed parameter space. The masses of all the particles differ by no more than roughly 10%. In a portion of the allowed parameter space only one of the new particles has a production cross section large enough to be detectable with the energy and luminosity of Run 1, both via its decay to WZ and to Wh, while the others have suppressed production rates. Furthermore, the model can be tested at the higher-energy and higher-luminosity run of the LHC even for an overall scale of the new particles higher than 3TeV.« less

  13. Searching for composite Higgs models at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flacke, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Composite Higgs models have the potential to provide a solution to the hierarchy problem and a dynamical explanation for the generation of the Higgs potential. They can be tested at the LHC as the new sector which underlies electroweak symmetry breaking must become strong in the TeV regime, which implies additional bound states beyond the Higgs. In this paper, we first discuss prospects and search strategies for top partners (and other quark partners) in the strongly coupled sector, which we study in an effective field theory setup. In the second part of the proceedings, we go beyond the effective field theory approach. We discuss potential UV embeddings for composite Higgs models which contain a Higgs as well as top partners. We show that in all of these models, additional pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons beyond the Higgs are present. In particular, all of the models contain a pseudoscalar which couples to the Standard Model gauge fields through Wess-Zumino-Witten terms, providing a prime candidate for a di-boson (including a di-photon) resonance. The models also contain colored pNGBs which can be searched for at the LHC.

  14. Searching for Composite Higgs Models at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flacke, Thomas

    Composite Higgs models have the potential to provide a solution to the hierarchy problem and a dynamical explanation for the generation of the Higgs potential. They can be tested at the LHC as the new sector which underlies electroweak symmetry breaking must become strong in the TeV regime, which implies additional bound states beyond the Higgs. In this paper, we first discuss prospects and search strategies for top partners (and other quark partners) in the strongly coupled sector, which we study in an effective field theory setup. In the second part of the proceedings, we go beyond the effective field theory approach. We discuss potential UV embeddings for composite Higgs models which contain a Higgs as well as top partners. We show that in all of these models, additional pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons beyond the Higgs are present. In particular, all of the models contain a pseudoscalar which couples to the Standard Model gauge fields through Wess-Zumino-Witten terms, providing a prime candidate for a di-boson (including a di-photon) resonance. The models also contain colored pNGBs which can be searched for at the LHC.

  15. Design for a Longitudinal Density Monitor for the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff, Adam; Bart Pedersen, Stephane; Boccardi, Andrea; Bravin, Enrico; Lefevre, Thibaut; Rabiller, Aurelie; Roncarolo, Federico; Fisher, Alan; Welsch, Carsten; /Liverpool U.

    2012-07-13

    Synchrotron radiation is currently used on the LHC for beam imaging and for monitoring the proton population in the 3 microsecond abort gap. In addition to these existing detectors, a study has been initiated to provide longitudinal density profiles of the LHC beams with a high dynamic range and a 50ps time resolution. This would allow for the precise measurement both of the bunch shape and the number of particles in the bunch tail or drifting into ghost bunches. A solution is proposed based on counting synchrotron light photons with two fast avalanche photo-diodes (APD) operated in Geiger mode. One is free-running but heavily attenuated and can be used to measure the core of the bunch. The other is much more sensitive, for measurement of the bunch tails, but must be gated off during the passage of the bunch to prevent the detector from being swamped. An algorithm is then applied to combine the two measurements and correct for the detector dead-time, afterpulsing and pile-up effects. Initial results from laboratory testing of this system are described here.

  16. Strong tW scattering at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Dror, Jeff Asaf; Farina, Marco; Salvioni, Ennio; Serra, Javi

    2016-01-13

    Deviations of the top electroweak couplings from their Standard Model values imply that certain amplitudes for the scattering of third generation fermions and longitudinally polarized vector bosons or Higgses diverge quadratically with momenta. This high-energy growth is a genuine signal of models where the top quark is strongly coupled to the sector responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. We propose to profit from the high energies accessible at the LHC to enhance the sensitivity to non-standard top-Z couplings, which are currently very weakly constrained. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach, we perform a detailed analysis of tW → tW scattering, which can be probed at the LHC via pp→$t\\bar{t}$Wj. By recasting a CMS analysis at 8 TeV, we derive the strongest direct bounds to date on the Ztt couplings. We also design a dedicated search at 13 TeV that exploits the distinctive features of the $t\\bar{t}$Wj signal. Lastly, we present other scattering processes in the same class that could provide further tests of the top-Higgs sector.

  17. Strong tW scattering at the LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Dror, Jeff Asaf; Farina, Marco; Salvioni, Ennio; ...

    2016-01-13

    Deviations of the top electroweak couplings from their Standard Model values imply that certain amplitudes for the scattering of third generation fermions and longitudinally polarized vector bosons or Higgses diverge quadratically with momenta. This high-energy growth is a genuine signal of models where the top quark is strongly coupled to the sector responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. We propose to profit from the high energies accessible at the LHC to enhance the sensitivity to non-standard top-Z couplings, which are currently very weakly constrained. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach, we perform a detailed analysis of tW → tW scattering, which can be probed at the LHC via pp→more » $$t\\bar{t}$$Wj. By recasting a CMS analysis at 8 TeV, we derive the strongest direct bounds to date on the Ztt couplings. We also design a dedicated search at 13 TeV that exploits the distinctive features of the $$t\\bar{t}$$Wj signal. Lastly, we present other scattering processes in the same class that could provide further tests of the top-Higgs sector.« less

  18. Resin injection in clays with high plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowamooz, Hossein

    2016-11-01

    Regarding the injection process of polyurethane resins in clays with high plasticity, this paper presents the experimental results of the pressuremeter and cone penetration tests before and after injection. A very important increase in pressure limit or in soil resistance can be observed for all the studied depths close to the injection points. An analytical analysis for cylindrical pore cavity expansion in cohesive frictional soils obeying the Mohr-Coulomb criterion was then used to reproduce the pressuremeter tests before and after injection. The model parameters were calibrated by maintaining constant the elasticity parameters as well as the friction angel before and after injection. A significant increase in cohesion was observed because of soil densification after resin expansion. The estimated undrained cohesions, derived from the parameters of the Mohr-Coulomb criterion, were also compared with the cone penetration tests. Globally, the model predictions show the efficiency of resin injection in clay soils with high plasticity.

  19. Injection-Molding-Machine Tender (fabric-plastics prod.) 556.885--Technical Report on Standardization of the General Aptitude Test Battery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. U.S. Training and Employment Service.

    The United States Training and Employment Service General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB), first published in 1947, has been included in a continuing program of research to validate the tests against success in many different occupations. The GATB consists of 12 tests which measure nine aptitudes: General Learning Ability; Verbal Aptitude; Numerical…

  20. Field Quality Measurements in the FNAL Twin-Aperture 11 T Dipole for LHC Upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, T.; Apollinari, G.; Apollinari, G.; Barzi, E.; Chlachidze, G.; Di Marco, J.; Nobrega, F.; Novitski, I.; Stoynev, S.; Turrioni, D.; Velev, G.; Zlobin, A. V.; Auchmann, B.; Izquierdo Bermudez, S,; Karppinen, M.; Rossi, L.; Savary, F.; Smekens, D.

    2016-11-08

    FNAL and CERN are developing an 11 T Nb3Sn dipole suitable for installation in the LHC to provide room for additional collimators. Two 1 m long collared coils previously tested at FNAL in single-aperture dipole configuration were assembled into the twin-aperture configuration and tested including magnet quench performance and field quality. The results of magnetic measurements are reported and discussed in this paper.