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Sample records for lhc injection tests

  1. Estimates of HE-LHC beam parameters at different injection energies

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab

    2010-11-01

    A future upgrade to the LHC envisions increasing the top energy to 16.5 TeV and upgrading the injectors. There are two proposals to replace the SPS as the injector to the LHC. One calls for a superconducting ring in the SPS tunnel while the other calls for an injector (LER) in the LHC tunnel. In both scenarios, the injection energy to the LHC will increase. In this note we look at some of the consequences of increased injection energy to the beam dynamics in the LHC.

  2. Testing beam-induced quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchmann, B.; Baer, T.; Bednarek, M.; Bellodi, G.; Bracco, C.; Bruce, R.; Cerutti, F.; Chetvertkova, V.; Dehning, B.; Granieri, P. P.; Hofle, W.; Holzer, E. B.; Lechner, A.; Nebot Del Busto, E.; Priebe, A.; Redaelli, S.; Salvachua, B.; Sapinski, M.; Schmidt, R.; Shetty, N.; Skordis, E.; Solfaroli, M.; Steckert, J.; Valuch, D.; Verweij, A.; Wenninger, J.; Wollmann, D.; Zerlauth, M.

    2015-06-01

    In the years 2009-2013 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been operated with the top beam energies of 3.5 and 4 TeV per proton (from 2012) instead of the nominal 7 TeV. The currents in the superconducting magnets were reduced accordingly. To date only seventeen beam-induced quenches have occurred; eight of them during specially designed quench tests, the others during injection. There has not been a single beam-induced quench during normal collider operation with stored beam. The conditions, however, are expected to become much more challenging after the long LHC shutdown. The magnets will be operating at near nominal currents, and in the presence of high energy and high intensity beams with a stored energy of up to 362 MJ per beam. In this paper we summarize our efforts to understand the quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets. We describe beam-loss events and dedicated experiments with beam, as well as the simulation methods used to reproduce the observable signals. The simulated energy deposition in the coils is compared to the quench levels predicted by electrothermal models, thus allowing one to validate and improve the models which are used to set beam-dump thresholds on beam-loss monitors for run 2.

  3. Testing spontaneous parity violation at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chin-Aik; Shafi, Qaisar

    2008-03-01

    We construct a supersymmetric SU(2)L × SU(2)R × U(1) B - L model in which a discrete symmetry (C-parity) implements strict left-right symmetry in the scalar (Higgs) sector. Although two electroweak bidoublets are introduced to accommodate the observed fermion masses and mixings, a natural missing partner mechanism insures that a single pair of MSSM Higgs doublets survives below the left-right symmetry breaking scale. If this scale happens to lie in the TeV range, several new particles potentially much lighter than the SU(2)R charged gauge bosons WR± will be accessible at the LHC.

  4. Test Results of the Luminosity Monitors for the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Beche, J.F.; Byrd, J. M.; Doolittle, L.; Manfredi, P. F.; Matis, H. S.; Monroy, M.; Ratti, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stiller, J.; Turner, W.; Yaver, H.; Drees, A.; Bravin, E.

    2009-05-04

    The Luminosity Monitor for the LHC has been built at LBNL and will be operational in the LHC during the upcoming run. The device, a gas ionization chamber, is installed in the high luminosity regions (those dedicated to the ATLAS and CMS experiments) and capable to resolve bunch-by-bunch luminosity as well as survive extreme levels of radiation. During the experimental R&D phase of its design, a prototype of this detector has been tested extensively at the ALS, in RHIC as well as in the SPS. Results of these experiments are presented here.

  5. Testing the Muon g-2 Anomaly at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, Ayres; Lykken, Joseph; Kell, Stefan; Westhoff, Susanne

    2014-05-29

    The long-standing difference between the experimental measurement and the standard-model prediction for the muon's anomalous magnetic moment, $a_{\\mu} = (g_{\\mu}-2)/2$, may be explained by the presence of new weakly interacting particles with masses of a few 100 GeV. Particles of this kind can generally be directly produced at the LHC, and thus they may already be constrained by existing data. In this work, we investigate this connection between $a_{\\mu}$ and the LHC in a model-independent approach, by introducing one or two new fields beyond the standard model with spin and weak isospin up to one. For each case, we identify the preferred parameter space for explaining the discrepancy of a_mu and derive bounds using data from LEP and the 8-TeV LHC run. Furthermore, we estimate how these limits could be improved with the 14-TeV LHC. We find that the 8-TeV results already rule out a subset of our simplified models, while almost all viable scenarios can be tested conclusively with 14-TeV data.

  6. Testing the Muon g-2 Anomaly at the LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Freitas, Ayres; Lykken, Joseph; Kell, Stefan; Westhoff, Susanne

    2014-05-29

    The long-standing difference between the experimental measurement and the standard-model prediction for the muon's anomalous magnetic moment,more » $$a_{\\mu} = (g_{\\mu}-2)/2$$, may be explained by the presence of new weakly interacting particles with masses of a few 100 GeV. Particles of this kind can generally be directly produced at the LHC, and thus they may already be constrained by existing data. In this work, we investigate this connection between $$a_{\\mu}$$ and the LHC in a model-independent approach, by introducing one or two new fields beyond the standard model with spin and weak isospin up to one. For each case, we identify the preferred parameter space for explaining the discrepancy of a_mu and derive bounds using data from LEP and the 8-TeV LHC run. Furthermore, we estimate how these limits could be improved with the 14-TeV LHC. We find that the 8-TeV results already rule out a subset of our simplified models, while almost all viable scenarios can be tested conclusively with 14-TeV data.« less

  7. Injectivity Testing for Vapour Dominated Feed Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Clotworthy, A.W.; Hingoyon, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    Wells with vapor dominated feed zones yield abnormal pressure data. This is caused by the condensation of vapor during water injection. A revised injectivity test procedure currently applied by PNOC at the Leyte Geothermal Power Project has improved the injectivity test results.

  8. Testing the OPERA Superluminal Neutrino Anomaly at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2012-03-15

    The OPERA collaboration has reported the observation of superluminal muon neutrinos, whose speed v{sub {nu}} exceeds that of light c, with (v{sub {nu}}-c)/c {approx_equal} 2.5 x 10{sup -5}. In a recent work, Cohen and Glashow (CG) have refuted this claim by noting that such neutrinos will lose energy, by pair-emission of particles, at unacceptable rates. Following the CG arguments, we point out that pair-emissions consistent with the OPERA anomaly can lead to detectable signals for neutrinos originating from decays of highly boosted top quarks at the LHC, allowing an independent test of the superluminal neutrino hypothesis.

  9. Design and prototyping of HL-LHC double quarter wave crab cavities for SPS test

    SciTech Connect

    Verdu-Andres, S.; Skaritka, J.; Wu, Q.; Xiao, B.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Alberty, L.; Artoos, K.; Calaga, R.; Capatina, O.; Capelli, T.; Carra, F.; Leuxe, R.; Kuder, N.; Zanoni, C.; Li, Z.; Ratti, A.

    2015-05-03

    The LHC high luminosity project envisages the use of the crabbing technique for increasing and levelling the LHC luminosity. Double Quarter Wave (DQW) resonators are compact cavities especially designed to meet the technical and performance requirements for LHC beam crabbing. Two DQW crab cavities are under fabrication and will be tested with beam in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN by 2017. This paper describes the design and prototyping of the DQW crab cavities for the SPS test.

  10. Testing Gaugino Universality in Minimal Supergravity at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krislock, Abram; Arnowitt, Richard; Dutta, Bhaskar; Gurrola, Alfredo; Kamon, Teruki; Kolev, Nikolay; Simeon, Paul

    2006-10-01

    SUSY is a leading theory to uniquely open the possibility of unification of fundamental forces. As a result, the well motivated minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) models predict a particular mass relation among the three kinds of supersymmetric gauge bosons (gluino, next-to-lightest neutralino, and the lightest neutralino). The relation, originated by gaugino mass universality, will give an insight of Grand Unified Theories. The previous study showed that we will have to identify the tau lepton with a transverse energy above 20 GeV to probe the cosmologically allowed mSUGRA parameter space at the LHC. We extend the study by investigating a methodology of testing the mass universality hypothesis as well as the maximum reach of the gaugino masses.

  11. Test results of Fermilab-built quadrupoles for the LHC interaction regions

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, M.J.; Bossert, R.; DiMarco, J.; Feher, S.; Hocker, J.A.; Kerby, J.; Nobrega, F.; Novitski, I.; Rabehl, R.; Schlabach, P.; Strait, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    As part of the US LHC Accelerator Project, Fermilab is nearing the completion of the Q2 optical elements for the LHC interaction region final focus. Each Q2 element (LQXB) consists of two identical high gradient quadrupoles (MQXB) with a dipole orbit corrector (MCBX). This paper summarizes the test results for the LQXB/MQXB program including quench performance, magnetic measurements and alignment, and gives the status of production and delivery of the LQXB magnets to the LHC.

  12. GEANT4 Hadronic Physics Validation with Lhc Test-Beam Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexa, Călin

    2005-02-01

    In the framework of the LHC Computing Grid (LCG) Simulation Physics Validation Project, we present first conclusions about the validation of the Geant4 hadronic physics lists based on comparisons with test-beam data collected with three LHC calorimeters: the ATLAS Tilecal, the ATLAS HEC and the CMS HCAL.

  13. Hydrogeology and results of injection tests at waste-injection test sites in Pinellas County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, John J.

    1982-01-01

    Potential benefits or hazards to freshwater resources could result from subsurface injection of treated wastewater. Recognizing this, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Pinellas County and the city of St. Petersburg, undertook an evaluation of the hydrogeology and injection of wastewater at proposed test sites on the Pinellas peninsula. The injection sites are underlain by sedimentary rocks ranging in age from Cretaceous to Pleistocene. Lower Eocene carbonate rocks were penetrated to a maximum depth of 3,504 feet and were found to have relatively low water yields. The most permeable part of the investigated section was in rocks of middle Eocene age within the Floridan aquifer. At the injection sites, the Floridan aquifer was subdivided into four permeable zones and three semiconfining beds. The test injection zone is within the Avon Park Limestone, the most productive of the identified permeable zones, with a transmissivity of about 1,000,000 feet squared per day. Two semiconfining beds are above the injection zone in the Suwannee Limestone and Ocala Limestone and have vertical hydraulic conductivities estimated to range from about 0.1 to 1 foot per day where these beds do not contain clay. Limited fresh ground-water supplies exist in the Floridan aquifer within the Pinellas peninsula. At all test sites, chloride concentration in the injection zone ranged from 19,000 to 20,000 milligrams per liter. Injection tests ranging in duration from 3 to 91.1 days were run at three different sites. Pressure buildup occurred in permeable zones above and below the injection zone during these tests. Calculated pressure buildup in observation wells close to and at some distance from the test wells was typically less than 1 pound per square inch. Injection and formation water will probably move slowly through the semiconfining bed overlying the injection zone, and long-term injection tests will be needed to determine the effectiveness of these beds to retard flow. The

  14. Testing ATLAS Z+MET excess with LHC Run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Shirai, Satoshi; Terada, Takahiro

    2016-05-01

    The ATLAS collaboration reported a 3σ excess in the search of events containing on- Z dilepton, jets, and large missing momentum (MET) in the 8 TeV LHC run. Motivated by this excess, many models of new physics have been proposed. Recently, the ATLAS and CMS collaborations reported new results for similar Z+MET channels in the 13 TeV run. In this paper, we comprehensively discuss the consistency between the proposed models and the LHC results of Run 1 and Run 2. We find that in models with heavy gluino production, there is generically some tension between the 8 TeV and 13 TeV results. On the other hand, models with light squark production provide relatively better fitting to both results.

  15. Lightning Pin Injection Testing on MOSFETS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Szatkowski, George N.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Mielnik, John J.; Vaughan, Roger K.; Wysocki, Philip F.; Celaya, Jose R.; Saha, Sankalita

    2009-01-01

    Lightning transients were pin-injected into metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) to induce fault modes. This report documents the test process and results, and provides a basis for subsequent lightning tests. MOSFETs may be present in DC-DC power supplies and electromechanical actuator circuits that may be used on board aircraft. Results show that unprotected MOSFET Gates are susceptible to failure, even when installed in systems in well-shielded and partial-shielded locations. MOSFET Drains and Sources are significantly less susceptible. Device impedance decreased (current increased) after every failure. Such a failure mode may lead to cascading failures, as the damaged MOSFET may allow excessive current to flow through other circuitry. Preliminary assessments on a MOSFET subjected to 20-stroke pin-injection testing demonstrate that Breakdown Voltage, Leakage Current and Threshold Voltage characteristics show damage, while the device continues to meet manufacturer performance specifications. The purpose of this research is to develop validated tools, technologies, and techniques for automated detection, diagnosis and prognosis that enable mitigation of adverse events during flight, such as from lightning transients; and to understand the interplay between lightning-induced surges and aging (i.e. humidity, vibration thermal stress, etc.) on component degradation.

  16. NMSSM with gravitino dark matter to be tested at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenkamp, Jasper; Winkler, Martin Wolfgang

    2013-12-01

    We present a solution to the gravitino problem, which arises in the NMSSM, allowing for sparticle spectra from ordinary gravity-mediated supersymmetry breaking with weak-scale gravitino dark matter. The coupling, which links the singlet to the MSSM sector, enhances the tree-level Higgs mass, providing an attractive explanation why the observed Higgs boson is so heavy. The same coupling induces very efficient pair-annihilation processes of the neutralino NLSP. Its relic abundance can be sufficiently suppressed to satisfy the strong constraints on late decaying relics from primordial nucleosynthesis - even for very long neutralino lifetimes. The striking prediction of this scenario is the detection of a pseudoscalar Higgs boson in the search for top-top resonances at LHC-14, rendering it completely testable.

  17. FDDI network test adaptor error injection circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckenrode, Thomas (Inventor); Stauffer, David R. (Inventor); Stempski, Rebecca (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for injecting errors into a FDDI token ring network is disclosed. The error injection scheme operates by fooling a FORMAC into thinking it sent a real frame of data. This is done by using two RAM buffers. The RAM buffer normally accessed by the RBC/DPC becomes a SHADOW RAM during error injection operation. A dummy frame is loaded into the shadow RAM in order to fool the FORMAC. This data is just like the data that would be used if sending a normal frame, with the restriction that it must be shorter than the error injection data. The other buffer, the error injection RAM, contains the error injection frame. The error injection data is sent out to the media by switching a multiplexor. When the FORMAC is done transmitting the data, the multiplexor is switched back to the normal mode. Thus, the FORMAC is unaware of what happened and the token ring remains operational.

  18. Injecting Errors for Testing Built-In Test Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gender, Thomas K.; Chow, James

    2010-01-01

    Two algorithms have been conceived to enable automated, thorough testing of Built-in test (BIT) software. The first algorithm applies to BIT routines that define pass/fail criteria based on values of data read from such hardware devices as memories, input ports, or registers. This algorithm simulates effects of errors in a device under test by (1) intercepting data from the device and (2) performing AND operations between the data and the data mask specific to the device. This operation yields values not expected by the BIT routine. This algorithm entails very small, permanent instrumentation of the software under test (SUT) for performing the AND operations. The second algorithm applies to BIT programs that provide services to users application programs via commands or callable interfaces and requires a capability for test-driver software to read and write the memory used in execution of the SUT. This algorithm identifies all SUT code execution addresses where errors are to be injected, then temporarily replaces the code at those addresses with small test code sequences to inject latent severe errors, then determines whether, as desired, the SUT detects the errors and recovers

  19. Testing the Technicolor Interpretation of CDF's Dijet Excess at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Eichten, Estia; Lane, Kenneth; Martin, Adam; Pilon, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Under the assumption that the dijet excess seen by the CDF Collaboration near 150 Gev in Wjj production is due to the lightest technipion of the low-scale technicolor process $\\rho_T \\rightarrow W \\pi_T$, we study its observability in LHC detectors with 1--20 inverse femtobarns of data. We describe interesting new kinematic tests that can provide independent confirmation of this LSTC hypothesis. We find that cuts similar to those employed by CDF, and recently by ATLAS, cannot confirm the dijet signal. We propose cuts tailored to the LSTC hypothesis and its backgrounds at the LHC that may reveal $\\rho_T \\rightarrow \\ell\

  20. Controlled Cold Helium Spill Test in the LHC Tunnel at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koettig, T.; Casas-Cubillos, J.; Chorowski, M.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Grabowski, M.; Jedrusyna, A.; Lindell, G.; Nonis, M.; Vauthier, N.; van Weelderen, R.; Winkler, T.; Bremer, J.

    The helium cooled magnets of the LHC particle accelerator are installed in a confined space, formed by a 27 km circumference 3.8 m diameter underground tunnel. The vacuum enclosures of the superconducting LHC magnets are protected by a lift plate against excessive overpressure created by eventual leaks from the magnet helium bath, or from the helium supply headers. A three-meter long no stay zone has been defined centered to these plates, based on earlier scale model studies, to protect the personnel against the consequences of an eventual opening of such a lift plate. More recently several simulation studies have been carried out modelling the propagation of the resulting helium/air mixture along the tunnel in case of such a cold helium release at a rate in the range of 1 kg/s. To validate the different scale models and simulation studies, real life mock-up tests have been performed in the LHC, releasing about 1000 liter of liquid helium under standard operational tunnel conditions. Data recorded during these tests include oxygen level, temperature and flow speed as well as video recordings, taken up- and downstream of the spill point (-100 m to +200 m) with respect to the ventilation direction in the LHC tunnel. The experimental set-up and measurement results are presented. Generic effects found during the tests will be discussed to allow the transposal to possible cold helium release cases in similar facilities.

  1. Prototype Testing for a Copper Rotatable Collimator for the LHC Collimation Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Anzalone, Gene; Doyle, Eric; Keller, Lewis; Lundgren, Steven; Markiewicz, Thomas Walter; Rogers, Reggie; /SLAC

    2009-01-20

    The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the robust Phase I graphite collimators with high Z Phase II collimators. The design for the collimation upgrade has not been finalized. One option is to use metallic rotatable collimators and testing of this design will be discussed here. The Phase II collimators must be robust in various operating conditions and accident scenarios. A prototype collimator jaw referred to as RC0 has been tested for both mechanical and thermal compliance with the design goals. Thermal expansion bench-top tests are compared to ANSYS simulation results. The prototype has also been tested in vacuum bake-out to confirm compliance with the LHC vacuum spec. CMM equipment has been used to verify the flatness of the jaw surface after heat tests and bake-out.

  2. Cryogenic test of double quarter wave crab cavity for the LHC High luminosity upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, B.; Alberty, L.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Calaga, R.; Cullen, C.; Capatina, O.; Hammons, L.; Li, Z.; Marques, C.; Skaritka, J.; Verdu-Andres, S.; Wu, Q.

    2015-05-03

    A Proof-of-Principle (PoP) Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity (DQWCC) was designed and fabricated for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. A vertical cryogenic test has been done at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). The cavity achieved 4.5 MV deflecting voltage with a quality factor above 3×109. We report the test results of this design.

  3. Decisive test of color coherence in proton-nucleus collisions at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Bzdak, Adam; Skokov, Vladimir

    2013-11-01

    Proton-nucleus collisions (p+A) at LHC energies provide a rigorous test of color glass condensate (CGC), a model proposed to describe the high energy limit of quantum chromodynamics. In the CGC the average multiplicity of charged particles at midrapidity in p+A collisions depends logarithmically on the number of participants, N(part). In contrast, the wounded nucleon model of independent nucleon-nucleon scatterings, verified at RHIC energies, predicts that multiplicity in p+A depends linearly on N(part). We argue that the dependence of mean multiplicity on N(part) in p+A collisions at LHC energies can single out a model of particle production, thus offering a stringent test of the CGC and the wounded nucleon model. Based on this observation we propose a novel experimental test of color coherence in p+A collisions.

  4. Testing Distributed ABS System with Fault Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trawczyński, Dawid; Sosnowski, Janusz; Gawkowski, Piotr

    The paper deals with the problem of adapting software implemented fault injection technique (SWIFI) to evaluate dependability of reactive microcontroller systems. We present an original methodology of disturbing controller operation and analyzing fault effects taking into account reactions of the controlled object and the impact of the system environment. Faults can be injected randomly (in space and time) or targeted at the most sensitive elements of the controller to check it at high stresses. This approach allows identifying rarely encountered problems, usually missed in classical approaches. The developed methodology has been used successfully to verify dependability of ABS system. Experimental results are commented in the paper.

  5. Test monitoring of prototype injection well, Waiale, Maui, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soroos, Ronald L.

    1979-01-01

    A high-capacity prototype injection well was tested in the isthmus area of Maui, Hawaii. Pumping tests were made on April 14 and 15, 1978, and 10 injection tests were made between May 12 and June 30, 1978. Selected tests were monitored in order to obtain data which could be used to assess the effects of subsurface disposal on the ground water in the basal aquifer. Pumping and injection rates were measured. Basal-water head responses to pumping and injection were observed at the prototype well and at two observation wells located 435 and 6 ,100 feet from the prototype well. Water-quality samples were collected at the prototype well and the nearest observation well prior to testing. Samples of the injection water, as well as samples from the observation wells, were collected prior to and after the final test. The head data and water-quality data are presented in this report. (USGS)

  6. Final report on the Controlled Cold Helium Spill Test in the LHC tunnel at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufay-Chanat, L.; Bremer, J.; Casas-Cubillos, J.; Chorowski, M.; Grabowski, M.; Jedrusyna, A.; Lindell, G.; Nonis, M.; Koettig, T.; Vauthier, N.; van Weelderen, R.; Winkler, T.

    2015-12-01

    The 27 km circumference LHC underground tunnel is a space in which the helium cooled LHC magnets are installed. The vacuum enclosures of the superconducting magnets are protected by over-pressure safety relief devices that open whenever cold helium escapes either from the magnet cold enclosure or from the helium supply headers, into this vacuum enclosure. A 3-m long no stay zone around these devices is defined based on scale model studies, protecting the personnel against cold burns or asphyxia caused by such a helium release event. Recently, several simulation studies have been carried out modelling the propagation of the helium/air mixture, resulting from the opening of such a safety device, along the tunnel. The released helium flows vary in the range between 1 kg/s and 0.1 kg/s. To validate these different simulation studies, real life mock-up tests have been performed inside the LHC tunnel, releasing helium flow rates of 1 kg/s, 0.3 kg/s and 0.1 kg/s. For each test, up to 1000 liters of liquid helium were released under standard operational tunnel conditions. The data recorded include oxygen concentration, temperature and flow speed measurements, and video footage used to assess qualitatively the visibility. These measurements have been made in the up- and downstream directions, with respect to the air ventilation flow, of the spill point. This paper presents the experimental set-up under which these release tests were made, the effects of these releases on the atmospheric tunnel condition as a function of the release flow rate. We discuss the modification to the personnel access conditions to the LHC tunnel that are presently implemented as a result of these tests.

  7. Microseismic Monitoring of the Mounds Drill Cuttings Injection Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Branagan, P.T.; Mahrer, K.D.; Moschovidis, Z.A.; Warpinski, N.R.; Wolhart, S.L.

    1999-01-25

    This paper describes the microseismic mapping of repeated injections of drill cuttings into two separate formations at a test site near Mounds, OK. Injections were performed in sandstone and shale formations at depths of 830 and 595 m, respectively. Typical injection disposal was simulated using multiple small-volume injections over a three-day period, with long shut-in periods interspersed between the injections. Microseismic monitoring was achieved using a 5-level array of wireline-run, triaxial- accelerometer receivers in a monitor well 76 m from the disposed well. Results of the mapped microseismic locations showed that the disposal domti W= generally aligns with the major horizontal stress with some variations in azimuth and that wide variations in height and length growth occurred with continued injections. These experiments show that the cuttings injection process cm be adequately monitored from a downhole, wireline-run receiver array, thus providing process control and environmental assurance.

  8. Testing the littlest Higgs model with T-parity at the LHC Run-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qing-Hong; Chen, Chuan-Ren; Liu, Yandong

    2016-09-01

    We study the littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT) in the process of p p →WH+WH-→W+W-AHAH at the 14 TeV LHC. With the W -jet tagging technique, we demonstrate that the bulk of the model parameter space can be probed at the level of more than 5 σ in the signature of two fat W jets plus large missing energy. Furthermore, we propose a novel strategy of measuring the principle parameter f that is crucial to test the LHT model and to fix mass spectrum, including the dark matter particle. Our proposal can be easily incorporated into the current experimental program of diboson searches at the LHC Run-II.

  9. Testing the Technicolor Interpretation of the CDF Dijet Excess at the 8-TeV LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Eichten, Estia; Lane, Kenneth; Martin, Adam; Pilon, Eric

    2012-10-01

    Under the assumption that the dijet excess seen by the CDF Collaboration near 150 Gev in Wjj production is due to the lightest technipion of the low-scale technicolor process $\\rho_T \\rightarrow W \\pi_T$, we study its observability in LHC detectors for 8 TeV collisions and 20 inverse femtobarns of integrated luminosity. We describe interesting new kinematic tests that can provide independent confirmation of this LSTC hypothesis. We show that cuts similar to those employed by CDF, and recently by ATLAS, cannot confirm the dijet signal. We propose cuts tailored to the LSTC hypothesis and its backgrounds at the LHC that may reveal $\\rho_T \\rightarrow \\ell\

  10. Universality test of the charged Higgs boson couplings at the LHC and at B factories

    SciTech Connect

    Cornell, Alan S.; Deandrea, Aldo; Gaur, Naveen; Itoh, Hideo; Klasen, Michael; Okada, Yasuhiro

    2010-06-01

    Many extensions of the standard model of particle physics predict the existence of charged Higgs bosons with substantial couplings to standard model particles, which would render them observable both directly at the LHC and indirectly at B-factories. For example, the charged Higgs boson couplings to fermions in two Higgs doublet models of type II are proportional to the ratio of the two Higgs doublet vacuum expectation values (tan{beta}) and fermionic mass factors and could thus be substantial at large tan{beta} and/or for heavy fermions. In this work we perform a model-independent study of the charged Higgs boson couplings at the LHC and at B-factories for large values of tan{beta}. We have shown that at high luminosity it is possible to measure the couplings of a charged Higgs boson to the third generation of quarks up to an accuracy of 10%. We further argue that by combining the possible measurements of the LHC and the B-factories, it is possible to perform a universality test of charged Higgs boson couplings to quarks.

  11. Results of deep-well injection testing at Mulberry, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, John J.; Wilson, W.E.

    1982-01-01

    At the Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical Corporation plant, Mulberry, Fla., high-chloride, acidic liquid wastes are injected into a dolomite section at depths below about 4,000 feet below land surface. In 1975, a satellite monitor well was drilled 2,291 feet from the injection well and a series of three injection tests were performed. Duration of the tests ranged from 240 to 10,020 minutes and injection rates ranged from 110 to 230 gallons per minute. Based on an evaluation of factors that affect hydraulic response, water-level data suitable for interpretation of hydraulic characteristics of the injection zone were identified to occur from 200 to 1,000 minutes during the 10,020-minute test. Transmissivity of the injection zone was computed to be within the range from 700 to 1,000 feet squared per day and storage coefficient of the injection zone was computed to be within the range from .00001 to .00005. The confining bed accepting most of the leakage appears to be the underlying bed. Also, it appears that the overlying beds are probably relatively impermeable and significantly retard the vertical movement of neutralized waste effluent. (USGS)

  12. Construction and Bench Testing of a Rotatable Collimator for the LHC Collimation Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Keller, Lewis; Lundgren, Steven; Markiewicz, Thomas; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the 30 high robust Phase I graphite secondary collimators with 30 high Z Phase II collimators. The Phase II collimators must be robust in various operating conditions and accident scenarios. This paper reports on the final construction and testing of the prototype collimator to be installed in the SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) at CERN. Bench-top measurements will demonstrate that the device is fully operational and has the mechanical and vacuum characteristics acceptable for installation in the SPS.

  13. Mechanical integrity test methods for Class 2 injection wells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.P.

    1991-03-01

    Mechanical integrity testing of injection wells to ensure that they do not threaten an underground source of drinking water (USDW) is a key component of the Underground Injection Control (UIC) program of the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974. Approximately 55% of all active injection wells are classified as Class II wells. These wells are used by the oil and gas industry primarily to dispose of waste fluids or to enhance production of hydrocarbons. Mechanical integrity is defined as the absence of significant leaks in the casing, tubing, or packers (internal integrity); and the absence of significant fluid movement into a USDW through cement channels behind the casing (external integrity). A wide variety of mechanical integrity test (MIT) methods have been developed to meet federal and primacy state program requirements. The internal mechanical integrity of standard injection wells can be evaluated by radioactive tracer surveys, standard annular pressure tests, annulus pressure monitoring, and continuous injection pressure versus injection rate monitoring. These tests are listed in order of decreasing reliability and increasing detection limits. 28 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Modelling of helium-mediated quench propagation in the LHC prototype test string-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorowski, M.; Grzegory, P.; Serio, L.; van Weelderen, R.

    2000-08-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) prototype test string-1, hereafter referred to as the string, is composed of three 10-m long prototype dipole magnets and one 6-m long prototype quadrupole magnet. The magnets are immersed in a pressurized static bath of superfluid helium that is maintained at a pressure of about 1 bar and at a temperature of about 1.9 K. This helium bath constitutes one single hydraulic unit, extending along 42.5 m of the string length. We have measured the triggering of quenches of the string magnets due to the quenching of a single dipole magnet located at the string's extremity, i.e., "quench propagation". Previously reported measurements enabled to establish that in this configuration the quench propagation is mediated by the helium and not by the inter-magnet bus bar connections [L. Coull, D. Hagedorn, G. Krainz, F. Rodriguez-Mateos, R. Schmidt, Quench propagation tests on the LHC superconducting magnet string, in: S. Myers, A. Pacheco, R. Pascual, C. Petit-Jean-Genaz, J. Poole (Eds.), Fifth European Particle Accelerator Conference - EPAC '96, Sitges, Barcelona, Spain, 10-14 June 1996, IOP, Bristol, 1996; F. Rodriguez-Mateos, R. Schmidt, L. Serio, Thermo-hydraulic quench propagation at the LHC superconducting magnet string, in: D. Dew-Hughes, R.G. Scurlock, J.H.P. Watson (Eds), 17th International Cryogenic Engineering Conference (ICEC-17), Bournemouth, UK, 14-17 July 1998, IOP, Bristol, 1998]. We present a model of helium-mediated quench propagation based on the qualitative conclusions of these two previous papers, and on additional information gained from a dedicated series of quench propagation measurements that were not previously reported. We will discuss the specific mechanisms and their main parameters involved at different timescales of the propagation process, and apply the model to make quantitative predictions.

  15. Design and Testing of Trace Contaminant Injection and Monitoring Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broerman, Craig D.; Sweterlitsch, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    In support of the Carbon dioxide And Moisture Removal Amine Swing-bed (CAMRAS) testing, a contaminant injection system as well as a contaminant monitoring system has been developed by the Johnson Space Center Air Revitalization Systems (JSC-ARS) team. The contaminant injection system has been designed to provide trace level concentrations of contaminants generated by humans in a closed environment during space flight missions. The contaminant injection system continuously injects contaminants from three gas cylinders, two liquid reservoirs and three permeation ovens. The contaminant monitoring system has been designed to provide real time gas analysis with accurate flow, humidity and gas concentration measurements for collection during test. The contaminant monitoring system consists of an analytical real time gas analyzer, a carbon monoxide sensor, and an analyzer for ammonia and water vapor.

  16. Interpretation of nonisothermal step-rate injection tests

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.

    1982-01-01

    Recent studies of single rate nonisothermal injection have shown that the pressure transients can be classified by one of two cases: (1) a moving thermal front dominated problem or (2) a composite reservoir problem. Analysis methods to determine the permeability thickness of a reservoir and the skin factor have been developed for both of these cases by Benson and Bodvarsson. Here, the extension of these methods to step-rate injection tests is discussed and a new method for tracking thermal fronts in injection wells is proposed.

  17. DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

    2012-09-20

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected

  18. Analysis of injection tests in liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.M.

    1984-12-01

    The objective was to develop procedures for analyzing nonisothermal injection test data during the early phases of injection. In particular, methods for determining the permeability-thickness of the formation, skin factor of the well and tracking the movement of the thermal front have been developed. The techniques developed for interpreting injection pressure transients are closely akin to conventional groundwater and petroleum techniques for evaluating these parameters. The approach taken was to numerically simulate injection with a variety of temperatures, reservoir parameters and flowrates, in order to determine the characteristic responses due to nonisothermal injection. Two characteristic responses were identified: moving front dominated behavior and composite reservoir behavior. Analysis procedures for calculating the permeability-thickness of the formation and the skin factor of the well have been developed for each of these cases. In order to interpret the composite reservior behavior, a new concept has been developed; that of a ''fluid skin factor'', which accounts for the steady-state pressure buildup due to the region inside the thermal front. Based on this same concept, a procedure for tracking the movement of the thermal front has been established. The results also identify the dangers of not accounting the nonisothermal effects when analyzing injection test data. Both the permeability-thickness and skin factor of the well can be grossly miscalculated if the effects of the cold-region around the well are not taken into consideration. 47 refs., 30 figs., 14 tabs.

  19. EZVI Injection Field Test Leads to Pilot-Scale Application

    EPA Science Inventory

    Testing and monitoring of emulsified zero-valent ironTM (EZVI) injections was conducted at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Launch Complex 34, FL, in 2002 to 2005 to evaluate the technology’s efficacy in enhancing in situ dehalogenation of dense nonaqueous-phase liquid (DNAPL) ...

  20. Lightning Pin Injection Test: MOSFETS in "ON" State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Szatkowski, George N.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Mielnik, John J.; Vaughan, Roger K.; Saha, Sankalita; Wysocki, Philip F.; Celaya, Jose R.

    2011-01-01

    The test objective was to evaluate MOSFETs for induced fault modes caused by pin-injecting a standard lightning waveform into them while operating. Lightning Pin-Injection testing was performed at NASA LaRC. Subsequent fault-mode and aging studies were performed by NASA ARC researchers using the Aging and Characterization Platform for semiconductor components. This report documents the test process and results, to provide a basis for subsequent lightning tests. The ultimate IVHM goal is to apply prognostic and health management algorithms using the features extracted during aging to allow calculation of expected remaining useful life. A survey of damage assessment techniques based upon inspection is provided, and includes data for optical microscope and X-ray inspection. Preliminary damage assessments based upon electrical parameters are also provided.

  1. Lepton flavour violating slepton decays to test type-I and II seesaw at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Villanova del Moral, Albert

    2010-02-10

    Searches at the LHC of lepton flavour violation (LFV) in slepton decays can indirectly test both type-I and II seesaw mechanisms. Assuming universal flavour-blind boundary conditions, LFV in the neutrino sector is related to LFV in the slepton sector by means of the renormalization group equations. Ratios of LFV slepton decay rates result to be a very effective way to extract the imprint left by the neutrino sector. Some neutrino scenarios within the type-I seesaw mechanism are studied. Moreover, for both type-I and II seesaw mechanisms, a scan over the minimal super-gravity parameter space is performed to estimate how large LFV slepton decay rates can be, while respecting current low-energy constraints.

  2. Common origin of fermion mixing and geometrical CP violation, and its test through Higgs physics at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Gautam; Varzielas, Ivo de Medeiros; Leser, Philipp

    2012-12-14

    We construct for the first time a flavor model, based on the smallest discrete symmetry Δ(27) that implements spontaneous CP violation with a complex phase of geometric origin, which can actually reproduce all quark masses and mixing data. We show that its scalar sector has exotic properties that can be tested at the LHC.

  3. Supersymmetry explanation of the Fermi Galactic Center excess and its test at LHC run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Junjie; Shang, Liangliang; Wu, Peiwen; Yang, Jin Min; Zhang, Yang

    2015-03-01

    We explore the explanation of the Fermi Galactic Center excess (GCE) in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. We systematically consider various experimental constraints including the dark matter (DM) relic density, DM direct detection results, and indirect searches from dwarf galaxies. We find that, for DM with mass ranging from 30 to 40 GeV, the GCE can be explained by the annihilation χ χ →a*→b b ¯ only when the C P -odd scalar satisfies ma≃2 mχ , and in order to obtain the measured DM relic density, a sizable Z -mediated contribution to DM annihilation must intervene in the early universe. As a result, the Higgsino mass μ is upper bounded by about 350 GeV. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations on the 3 ℓ+ETmiss signal from neutralino/chargino associated production at 14-TeV LHC indicate that the explanation can be mostly (completely) excluded at 95% C.L. with an integrated luminosity of 100 (200 ) fb-1 . We also discuss the implication of possible large Z coupling to DM for the DM-nucleon spin dependent (SD) scattering cross section, and find that although the current experimental bounds on σpSD is less stringent than the spin independent results, the future XENON-1T and LZ data may be capable of testing most parts of the GCE-favored parameter region.

  4. Proton Injection into the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Prebys, Eric; Antipov, Sergey; Piekarz, Henryk; Valishev, A.

    2015-06-01

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is an experimental synchrotron being built at Fermilab to test the concept of non-linear "integrable optics". These optics are based on a lattice including non-linear elements that satisfies particular conditions on the Hamiltonian. The resulting particle motion is predicted to be stable but without a unique tune. The system is therefore insensitive to resonant instabilities and can in principle store very intense beams, with space charge tune shifts larger than those which are possible in conventional linear synchrotrons. The ring will initially be tested with pencil electron beams, but this poster describes the ultimate plan to install a 2.5 MeV RFQ to inject protons, which will produce tune shifts on the order of unity. Technical details will be presented, as well as simulations of protons in the ring.

  5. ASSEMBLY AND TEST OF A 120 MM BORE 15 T NB3SN QUADRUPOLE FOR THE LHC UPGRADE

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, H.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D.; Ferracin, P.; Hafalia, R.; Joseph, J.; Lizarazo, J.; Sabbi, G. L.; Wang, X.; Anerella, M.; Ghosh, A. K.; Schmalzle, J.; Wanderer, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Bossert, R.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2010-05-23

    In support of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade, the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) has been developing a 1-meter long, 120 mm bore Nb{sub 3}Sn IR quadrupole magnet (HQ). With a design short sample gradient of 219 T/m at 1.9 K and a peak field approaching 15 T, one of the main challenges of this magnet is to provide appropriate mechanical support to the coils. Compared to the previous LARP Technology Quadrupole and Long Quadrupole magnets, the purpose of HQ is also to demonstrate accelerator quality features such as alignment and cooling. So far, 8 HQ coils have been fabricated and 4 of them have been assembled and tested in HQ01a. This paper presents the mechanical assembly and test results of HQ01a.

  6. EMISSION TEST REPORT- FIELD TEST OF CARBON INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL, CAMDEN COUNTY MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of parametric test to evaluate the injection powdered activated carbon to control volatile pollutants in municipal waste combustor (MWC) flue gas. he tests were conducted at a spray dryer absorber/electrostatic precipitator (SD/ESP)-equipped MWC in Camden...

  7. Testing SUSY models for the muon g-2 anomaly via chargino-neutralino pair production at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Siba Prasad; Guchait, Monoranjan; Roy, D. P.

    2014-09-01

    Nonuniversal gaugino mass models can naturally account for the dark matter relic density via the bulk annihilation process with relatively light bino LSP and right sleptons in the mass range of ˜100 GeV, while accommodating the observed Higgs boson mass of ˜125 GeV with TeV scale squark/gluino masses. A class of these models can also account for the observed muon g-2 anomaly via SUSY loops with wino and left sleptons in the mass range of 400-700 GeV. These models can be tested at LHC via electroweak production of charged and neutral wino pair, leading to robust trilepton and same sign dilepton signals. We investigate these signals along with the standard model background for both 8 and 13 TeV LHC runs.

  8. Testing the Higgs triplet model with the mass difference at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Mayumi; Kanemura, Shinya; Yagyu, Kei

    2012-03-01

    In general, there can be mass differences among scalar bosons of the Higgs triplet field with the hypercharge of Y=1. In the Higgs triplet model, when the vacuum expectation value vΔ of the triplet field is much smaller than that v (≃246GeV) of the Higgs doublet field as required by the electroweak precision data, a characteristic mass spectrum mH++2-mH+2≃mH+2-mϕ02(≡ξ) appears, where mH++, mH+, mϕ0 are the masses of the doubly-charged (H++), the singly-charged (H+), and the neutral (ϕ0=H0 or A0) scalar bosons, respectively. It should be emphasized that phenomenology with ξ≠0 is drastically different from that in the case with ξ=0 where the doubly-charged scalar boson decays into the same-sign dilepton ℓ+ℓ+ or the diboson W+W+ depending on the size of vΔ. We find that, in the case of ξ>0, where H++ is the heaviest, H++ can be identified via the cascade decays such as H++→H+W+(*)→ϕ0W+(*)W+(*)→bb¯ℓ+νℓ+ν. We outline how the Higgs triplet model can be explored in such a case at the LHC. By the determination of the mass spectrum, the model can be tested and further distinguished from the other models with doubly-charged scalar bosons.

  9. TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) neutral beam injected power measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Grisham, L.R.; Dudek, L.E.; Gammel, G.M.; Johnson, G.A.; Kugel, H.W.; Lagin, L.; O'Connor, T.E.; Shah, P.A.; Sichta, P.

    1989-05-01

    Energy flow within TFTR neutral beamlines is measured with a waterfall calorimetry system capable of simultaneously measuring the energy deposited within four heating beamlines (three ion sources each), or of measuring the energy deposited in a separate neutral beam test stand. Of the energy extracted from the ion source in the well instrumented test stand, 99.5 +- 3.5% can be accounted for. When the ion deflection magnet is energized, however, 6.5% of the extracted energy is lost. This loss is attributed to a spray of devious particles onto unmonitored surfaces. A 30% discrepancy is also observed between energy measurements on the internal beamline calorimeter and energy measurements on a calorimeter located in the test stand target chamber. Particle reflection from the flat plate calorimeter in the target chamber, which the incident beam strikes at a near-grazing angle of 12/degree/, is the primary loss of this energy. A slight improvement in energy accountability is observed as the beam pulse length is increased. This improvement is attributed to systematic error in the sensitivity of the energy measurement to small fluctuations on the supply water temperature. An overall accuracy of 15% is estimated for the total power injected into TFTR. Contributions to this error are uncertainties in the beam neutralization efficiency, reionization and beam scrape-off in the drift duct, and fluctuations in the temperature of the supply water. 28 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology

    SciTech Connect

    Gooch, J.P.; Dismukes, E.B.; Dahlin, R.S.; Faulkner, M.G. ); Klett, M.G.; Buchanan, T.L.; Hunt, J.E. )

    1989-05-01

    Gilbert Commonwealth, Southern Research Institute and the American Electric Power Service Corporation have embarked on a program to convert DOE's Duct Injection Test Facility located at the Muskingum River Power Plant of Ohio Power Company to test alternate duct injection technologies. The technologies to be tested include slurry sorbent injection of hydrated lime using dual fluid nozzles, or a rotary atomizer and pneumatic injection of hydrated lime, with flue gas humidification before or after sorbent injection. The literature review and analysis contained in this report is a part of the preparatory effort for the test program.

  11. Vertex displacements for acausal particles: testing the Lee-Wick standard model at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Ezequiel; Da Rold, Leandro; Schat, Carlos; Szynkman, Alejandro

    2009-10-01

    We propose to search for wrong displaced vertices, where decay products of the secondary vertex move towards the primary vertex instead of away from it, as a signature for microscopic violation of causality. We analyze in detail the leptonic sector of the recently proposed Lee-Wick Standard Model, which provides a well motivated framework to study acausal effects. We find that, assuming Minimal Flavor Violation, the Lee-Wick partners of the electron, tilde le and tilde e, can produce measurable wrong vertices at the LHC, the most promising channel being qbar qlongrightarrowblte_ltelongrightarrowe+e-jjjj. A Monte-Carlo simulation using MadGraph/MadEvent suggests that for Mllesssim450 GeV the measurement of these acausal vertex displacements should be accessible in the LHC era.

  12. Testing the CP-violating MSSM in stau decays at the LHC and ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Dreiner, Herbi; Kulkarni, Suchita; Marold, Anja; Kittel, Olaf

    2011-05-01

    We study CP violation in the two-body decay of a scalar tau into a neutralino and a tau, which should be probed at the LHC and ILC. From the normal tau polarization, a CP asymmetry is defined which is sensitive to the CP phases of the trilinear scalar coupling parameter A{sub {tau}}, the gaugino mass parameter M{sub 1}, and the Higgsino mass parameter {mu}, in the stau-neutralino sector of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. Asymmetries of more than 70% are obtained in scenarios with strong stau mixing. As a result, detectable CP asymmetries in stau decays at the LHC are found, motivating further detailed experimental studies for probing the supersymmetry CP phases.

  13. Assembly and Test of SQ01b, a Nb3Sn Quadrupole Magnet for the LHC Accelerator Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ferracin, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Bartlett, S. E.; Bordini, B.; Carcagno, R.H.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D.R.; Feher, S.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hafalia, A.R.; Lamm, M.J.; Lietzke, A.F.; Mattafirri, S.; McInturff, A.D.; Orris, D.F.; Pischalnikov, Y.M.; Sabbi, G.L.; Sylvester, C.D.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Velev, G.V.; Zlobin, A.V.; Kashikhin, V.V.

    2006-06-01

    The US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) consists of four US laboratories (BNL, FNAL, LBNL, and SLAC) collaborating with CERN to achieve a successful commissioning of the LHC and to develop the next generation of Interaction Region magnets. In 2004, a large aperture Nb{sub 3}Sn racetrack quadrupole magnet (SQ01) has been fabricated and tested at LBNL. The magnet utilized four subscale racetrack coils and was instrumented with strain gauges on the support structure and directly over the coil's turns. SQ01 exhibited training quenches in two of the four coils and reached a peak field in the conductor of 10.4 T at a current of 10.6 kA. After the test, the magnet was disassembled, inspected with pressure indicating films, and reassembled with minor modifications. A second test (SQ01b) was performed at FNAL and included training studies, strain gauge measurements and magnetic measurements. Magnet inspection, test results, and magnetic measurements are reported and discussed, and a comparison between strain gauge measurements and 3D finite element computations is presented

  14. Research on the test method of using injection as an equivalent substitute for electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, X. D.; Wei, G. H.; Lu, X. F.; Li, K.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a method to carry out high intensity radiated field (HIRF) effect experiments by using injection as an equivalent substitute for electromagnetic radiation. In allusion to typical interconnected system, the equal response voltage on the equipment cable port is regarded as an equivalent basis of injection and radiation methods. The equivalent relation formula between injected voltage and radiated field is derived theoretically. The conditions needed for extrapolating injected voltage in HIRF are confirmed, and the extrapolation method is proposed. On the basis of the above research, the electromagnetic environment effect test new method combined injection with radiation for interconnected system is summarized. The typical nonlinear interconnected system is selected as equipment under test, and the single frequency continuous wave radiation and injection effect experiments are carried out separately. The test results indicate that the relation between radiated field and injected voltage is linear, and the equivalent injected voltage used to substitute HIRF can be obtained by linear extrapolation.

  15. Planck-scale induced left-right gauge theory at LHC and experimental tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parida, M. K.; Sahoo, Biswonath

    2016-05-01

    Recent measurements at LHC have inspired searches for TeV scale left-right gauge theory originating from grand unified theories. We show that inclusion of Planck-scale induced effects due to dim . 5 operator not only does away with all the additional intermediate symmetries, but also it predicts the minimal set of light Higgs scalars tailored after neutrino masses and dilepton, or trilepton signals. The heavy-light neutrino mixings are predicted from charged fermion mass fits in SO (10) and LFV constraints which lead to new predictions for dilepton or trilepton production signals. Including fine-structure constant matching and two-loop, and threshold effects predict MWR =g2R10 4.3 ± 1.5 ± 0.2 GeV and proton lifetime τp =10 36.15 ± 5.8 ± 0.2 yrs with WR gauge boson coupling g2R = 0.56- 0.57. Predictions on lepton flavour and lepton number violations are accessible to ongoing experiments. Current CMS data on di-electron excess at √{ s} = 8 TeV are found to be consistent with WR gauge boson mass MWR ≥ 1.9- 2.2 TeV which also agrees with the values obtained from dijet resonance production data. We also discuss plausible explanations for diboson production excesses observed at LHC and make predictions expected at √{ s} = 14 TeV.

  16. Assembly Tests of the First Nb 3 Sn Low-Beta Quadrupole Short Model for the Hi-Lumi LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pan, H.; Felice, H.; Cheng, D. W.; Anderssen, E.; Ambrosio, G.; Perez, J. C.; Juchno, M.; Ferracin, P.; Prestemon, S. O.

    2016-01-18

    In preparation for the high-luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) in collaboration with CERN is pursuing the development of MQXF: a 150-mm-aperture high-field Nb3Sn quadrupole magnet. Moreover, the development phase starts with the fabrication and test of several short models (1.2-m magnetic length) and will continue with the development of several long prototypes. All of them are mechanically supported using a shell-based support structure, which has been extensively demonstrated on several R&D models within LARP. The first short model MQXFS-AT has been assembled at LBNL with coils fabricated by LARP and CERN.more » In our paper, we summarize the assembly process and show how it relies strongly on experience acquired during the LARP 120-mm-aperture HQ magnet series. We also present comparison between strain gauges data and finite-element model analysis. Finally, we present the implication of the MQXFS-AT experience on the design of the long prototype support structure.« less

  17. Hydrologic data for the southwest subsurface-injection test site, St. Petersburg, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, John J.; Spechler, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    Three injection wells and nine observation wells were constructed at the Southwest St. Petersburg, Fla., site to determine feasibility of injecting wastewater treatment plant effluent into permeable zones containing saline water. Two withdrawal tests and one injection test were performed. Both withdrawal tests ran for about 3 days; one discharging 650 gallons per minute, and the other discharging 6,490 gallons per minute. The injection test was run in one well for 91.1 days at an average rate of 2,830 gallons per minute. Injection well pressure reached a maximum of 48.1 pounds per square inch near the end of the test. Rhodamine WT was used as a tracer during the injection test and was identified in three wells. Before the injection test, chloride concentration in a well 35 feet from the injection well, and in a well 733 feet distant, ranged from 19,000 to 21,000 milligrams per liter. At the end of the test, chloride concentration in one well was 1,800 milligrams per liter and 5,400 milligrams per liter in another. Eleven wells near the site were sampled before the test for water-quality analyses and chlorides ranged from 18 to 1,400 milligrams per liter. (Woodard-USGS)

  18. Testing the higgsino-singlino sector of the NMSSM with trileptons at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellwanger, Ulrich

    2013-11-01

    We propose a simplified light higgsino-singlino scenario in the NMSSM, in which the masses of the chargino and the lightest neutralino determine the masses and couplings of all 3 lightest neutralinos. This scenario is complementary to the simplified wino-like chargino/neutralino scenario used conventionally for the interpretation of results from trilepton searches, and motivated by lower bounds on the gluino mass in the case of GUT relations between the wino and gluino masses. We present all masses and mixing angles necessary for the determination of production cross sections of the chargino and the 3 neutralinos in the form of tables in the plane, assuming Higgs mass motivated values for tan β = 2 and λ = 0 .6. We show that this scenario leads to considerable signal rates, and present constraints in this plane from recent searches for trileptons at the LHC.

  19. Focused fault injection testing of software implemented fault tolerance mechanisms of Voltan TMR nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, S.; Ezhilchelvan, P. D.; Shrivastava, S. K.

    1995-03-01

    One way of gaining confidence in the adequacy of fault tolerance mechanisms of a system is to test the system by injecting faults and see how the system performs under faulty conditions. This paper presents an application of the focused fault injection method that has been developed for testing software implemented fault tolerance mechanisms of distributed systems. The method exploits the object oriented approach of software implementation to support the injection of specific classes of faults. With the focused fault injection method, the system tester is able to inject specific classes of faults (including malicious ones) such that the fault tolerance mechanisms of a target system can be tested adequately. The method has been applied to test the design and implementation of voting, clock synchronization, and ordering modules of the Voltan TMR (triple modular redundant) node. The tests performed uncovered three flaws in the system software.

  20. Hydrogeologic data for the South Cross Bayou test injection site, Pinellas County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, John J.

    1978-01-01

    One exploratory hole, a test injection well, and nine monitor wells were constructed at the South Cross Bayou test-injection site between January 1973 and October 1975. At the test site, the first 125 feet below land surface is predominantly limestone and clay; from 125 to 3,280 feet it is mostly limestone and dolomite. Gypsum is also present below 1,260 feet. Wells within about a 1-mi radius of the test injection site were sampled and analyzed to provide water-quality background data prior to anticipated long-term injection at the test site. Locations of the wells sampled are shown, reported construction data are given, and the chemical analyses of water from these wells are tabulated. Chloride concentration of water from the wells near the test site ranged between 9.8 to 290 mg/L. Reported depth of these wells ranged from 25 to 302 ft. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Effectiveness of Shield Termination Techniques Tested with TEM Cell and Bulk Current Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T.; Hare, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results of the effectiveness of various shield termination techniques. Each termination technique is evaluated by two independent noise injection methods; transverse electromagnetic (TEM) cell operated from 3 MHz 400 MHz, and bulk current injection (BCI) operated from 50 kHz 400 MHz. Both single carrier and broadband injection tests were investigated. Recommendations as to how to achieve the best shield transfer impedance (i.e. reduced coupled noise) are made based on the empirical data. Finally, the noise injection techniques themselves are indirectly evaluated by comparing the results obtained from the TEM Cell to those from BCI.

  2. Tests for injecting, storing, and recovering freshwater in a saline artesian aquifer, Lee County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzpatrick, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation was made of the suitability of a saline, artesian limestone aquifer for the injection, storage, and recovery of freshwater from the Caloosahatchee River. The tests were conducted on a well tapping a leaky artesian system that has a transmissivity of 800 square feet per day, a storage of 1 x 10-4, and a leakance of 0.01 per day. The specific capacity of the injection well was increased through acidizing and was decreased as a result of well clogging during injection. Three injection tests were made wherein the amounts of freshwater injected, the storage duration, and the quality of water injected varied. Analysis of the test data showed that freshwater recoverability ranged from 9.7 to 38.7 percent of the total injected. Differences were attributed principally to differences in the quality of water injected and storage duration. Repeated injection-recovery cycles probably would result in greater recoverability. Head buildup, nearly 200 feet in one test, was a prime problem related chiefly to clogging from suspended material in the injected water and to bacterial growth at the wellbore-limestone interface. Regular backflushing was required. Total head buildup decreased as a result of acidizing the injection well. No coliforms or fecal streptococcus were noted in the recovered water. Growth of anaerobic bacteria occurred. Changes in the quality of the recovered water included decreases in concentration of dissolved organic carbon by as much as 15 mg/L (milligrams per liter), organic nitrogen by as much as 0.80 mg/L, and nitrate by as much as 0.50 mg/L. Increases were noted in ammonia by 0.40 mg/L, and iron by as much as 0.60 mg/L. These changes are consistent with the presence of an anaerobic bacterial ecosystem.

  3. Test results for rotordynamic coefficients of anti-swirl self-injection seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, C. H.; Lee, Y. B.

    1994-01-01

    Test results are presented for rotordynamic coefficients and leakage for three annular seals which use anti-swirl self-injection concept to yield significant improvement in whirl frequency ratios as compared to smooth and damper seals. A new anti-swirl self-inection mechanism is achieved by deliberately machining self-injection holes inside the seal stator mechanism which is used to achieve effective reduction of the tangential flow which is considered as a prime cause of rotor instability in high performance turbomachinery. Test results show that the self-injection mechanism significantly improves whirl frequency ratios; however, the leakage performance degrades due to the introduction of the self-injection mechanism. Through a series of the test program, an optimum anti-swirl self-injection seal which uses a labyrinth stator surface with anti-axial flow injections is selected to obtain a significant improvement in the whirl frequency ratio as compared to a damper seal, while showing moderate leakage performance. Best whirl frequency ratio is achieved by an anti-swirl self-injection seal of 12 holes anti-swirl and 6 degree anti-leakage injection with a labyrinth surface configuration. When compared to a damper seal, the optimum configuration outperforms the whirl frequency ratio by a factor of 2.

  4. Mechanical instability induced by water weakening in laboratory fluid injection tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, C.; Dautriat, J.; Sarout, J.; Delle Piane, C.; Menéndez, B.; Macault, R.; Bertauld, D.

    2015-06-01

    To assess water-weakening effects in reservoir rocks, previous experimental studies have focused on changes in the failure envelopes derived from mechanical tests conducted on rocks fully saturated either with water or with inert fluids. So far, little attention has been paid to the mechanical behavior during fluid injection under conditions similar to enhanced oil recovery operations. We studied the effect of fluid injection on the mechanical behavior of the weakly consolidated Sherwood sandstone in laboratory experiments. Our specimens were instrumented with 16 ultrasonic P wave transducers for both passive and active acoustic monitoring during loading and fluid injection to record the acoustic signature of fluid migration in the pore space and the development of damage. Calibration triaxial tests were conducted on three samples saturated with air, water, or oil. In a second series of experiments, water and inert oil were injected into samples critically loaded up to 80% or 70% of the dry or oil-saturated compressive strength, respectively, to assess the impact of fluid migration on mechanical strength and elastic properties. The fluids were injected with a low back pressure to minimize effective stress variations during injection. Our observations show that creep takes place with a much higher strain rate for water injection compared to oil injection. The most remarkable difference is that water injection in both dry and oil-saturated samples triggers mechanical instability (macroscopic failure) within half an hour whereas oil injection does not after several hours. The analysis of X-ray computed tomography images of postmortem samples revealed that the mechanical instability was probably linked to loss of cohesion in the water-invaded region.

  5. Results of injection and tracer tests in Olkaria East Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Ambusso, Willis J.

    1994-01-20

    This paper presents results of a six month Injection and Tracer test done in Olkaria East Geothermal Field The Injection tests show that commencement of injection prior to onset of large drawdown in the reservoir leads to greater sustenance of well production and can reduce well cycling which is a common feature of wells in Olkaria East Field. For cases where injection is started after some drawdown has occurred in the reservoir, injection while leading to improvement of well output can also lead to increase in well cycling which is a non desirable side effect. Tracer tests reveal slow rate of fluid migration (< 5 m/hr). However estimates of the cumulative tracer returns over the period of injection is at least 31% which is large and reveals the danger of late time thermal drawdown and possible loss of production. It is shown in the discussion that the two sets of results are consistent with a reservoir where high permeability occurs along contact surfaces which act as horizontal "fractures" while the formations between the "fractures" have low permeability. This type of fracture system will lead to channeled flow of injected fluid and therefore greater thermal depletion along the fractures while formations further from the fracture would still be at higher temperature. In an attempt to try and achieve a more uniform thermal depletion in the reservoir, it is proposed that continuous injection be done for short periods (~2 years) and this be followed by recovery periods of the nearly the same length of time before resumption of injection again.

  6. Design and Construction of a 500 KW CW, 400 MHZ Klystron To Be Used As RF Power Source For LHC/RF Component Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Chris

    2003-05-05

    A 500 kW cw klystron operating at 400 MHz was developed and constructed jointly by CERN and SLAC for use as a high-power source at CERN for testing LHC/RF components such as circulators, RF absorbers and superconducting cavities with their input couplers. The design is a modification of the 353 MHz SLAC PEP-I klystron. More than 80% of the original PEP-I tube parts could thus be incorporated in the LHC test klystron which resulted in lower engineering costs as well as reduced development and construction time. The physical length between cathode plane and upper pole plate was kept unchanged so that a PEP-I tube focusing solenoid, available at CERN, could be re-used. With the aid of the klystron simulation codes JPNDISK and CONDOR, the design of the LHC tube was accomplished, which resulted in a tube with noticeably higher efficiency than its predecessor, the PEP-I klystron. The integrated cavities were redesigned using SUPERFISH and the output coupling circuit, which also required redesigning, was done with the aid of MAFIA. Details of the tube development and test results are presented.

  7. Ethanol injection of ornamental trees facilitates testing insecticide efficacy against ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    PubMed

    Reding, Michael E; Oliver, Jason B; Schultz, Peter B; Ranger, Christopher M; Youssef, Nadeer N

    2013-02-01

    Exotic ambrosia beetles are damaging pests in ornamental tree nurseries in North America. The species Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motshulsky) and Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford) are especially problematic. Management of these pests relies on preventive treatments of insecticides. However, field tests of recommended materials on nursery trees have been limited because of unreliable attacks by ambrosia beetles on experimental trees. Ethanol-injection of trees was used to induce colonization by ambrosia beetles to evaluate insecticides and botanical formulations for preventing attacks by ambrosia beetles. Experiments were conducted in Ohio, Tennessee, and Virginia. Experimental trees injected with ethanol had more attacks by ambrosia beetles than uninjected control trees in all but one experiment. Xylosandrus crassiusculus and X. germanus colonized trees injected with ethanol. In most experiments, attack rates declined 8 d after ethanol-injection. Ethanol-injection induced sufficient pressure from ambrosia beetles to evaluate the efficacy of insecticides for preventing attacks. Trunk sprays of permethrin suppressed cumulative total attacks by ambrosia beetles in most tests. Trunk sprays of the botanical formulations Armorex and Veggie Pharm suppressed cumulative total attacks in Ohio. Armorex, Armorex + Permethrin, and Veggie Pharm + Permethrin suppressed attacks in Tennessee. The bifenthrin product Onyx suppressed establishment of X. germanus in one Ohio experiment, and cumulative total ambrosia beetle attacks in Virginia. Substrate drenches and trunk sprays of neonicotinoids, or trunk sprays of anthranilic diamides or tolfenpyrad were not effective. Ethanol-injection is effective for inducing attacks and ensuring pressure by ambrosia beetles for testing insecticide efficacy on ornamental trees.

  8. Ambiguity in measuring matrix diffusion with single-well injection/recovery tracer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lessoff, S.C.; Konikow, L.F.

    1997-01-01

    Single-well injection/recovery tracer tests are considered for use in characterizing and quantifying matrix diffusion in dual-porosity aquifers. Numerical modeling indicates that neither regional drift in homogeneous aquifers, nor heterogeneity in aquifers having no regional drift, nor hydrodynamic dispersion significantly affects these tests. However, when drift is coupled simultaneously with heterogeneity, they can have significant confounding effects on tracer return. This synergistic effect of drift and heterogeneity may help explain irreversible flow and inconsistent results sometimes encountered in previous single-well injection/recovery tracer tests. Numerical results indicate that in a hypothetical single-well injection/recovery tracer test designed to demonstrate and measure dual-porosity characteristics in a fractured dolomite, the simultaneous effects of drift and heterogeneity sometimes yields responses similar to those anticipated in a homogeneous dual-porosity formation. In these cases, tracer recovery could provide a false indication of the occurrence of matrix diffusion. Shortening the shut-in period between injection and recovery periods may make the test less sensitive to drift. Using multiple tracers having different diffusion characteristics, multiple tests having different pumping schedules, and testing the formation at more than one location would decrease the ambiguity in the interpretation of test data.

  9. Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology. Topical report No. 1, Literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Gooch, J.P.; Dismukes, E.B.; Dahlin, R.S.; Faulkner, M.G.; Klett, M.G.; Buchanan, T.L.; Hunt, J.E.

    1989-05-01

    Gilbert Commonwealth, Southern Research Institute and the American Electric Power Service Corporation have embarked on a program to convert DOE`s Duct Injection Test Facility located at the Muskingum River Power Plant of Ohio Power Company to test alternate duct injection technologies. The technologies to be tested include slurry sorbent injection of hydrated lime using dual fluid nozzles, or a rotary atomizer and pneumatic injection of hydrated lime, with flue gas humidification before or after sorbent injection. The literature review and analysis contained in this report is a part of the preparatory effort for the test program.

  10. Field Testing of Activated Carbon Injection Options for Mercury Control at TXU's Big Brown Station

    SciTech Connect

    John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Christopher Martin; Mark Musich; Lucinda Hamre

    2009-01-07

    The primary objective of the project was to evaluate the long-term feasibility of using activated carbon injection (ACI) options to effectively reduce mercury emissions from Texas electric generation plants in which a blend of lignite and subbituminous coal is fired. Field testing of ACI options was performed on one-quarter of Unit 2 at TXU's Big Brown Steam Electric Station. Unit 2 has a design output of 600 MW and burns a blend of 70% Texas Gulf Coast lignite and 30% subbituminous Powder River Basin coal. Big Brown employs a COHPAC configuration, i.e., high air-to-cloth baghouses following cold-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), for particulate control. When sorbent injection is added between the ESP and the baghouse, the combined technology is referred to as TOXECON{trademark} and is patented by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States. Key benefits of the TOXECON configuration include better mass transfer characteristics of a fabric filter compared to an ESP for mercury capture and contamination of only a small percentage of the fly ash with AC. The field testing consisted of a baseline sampling period, a parametric screening of three sorbent injection options, and a month long test with a single mercury control technology. During the baseline sampling, native mercury removal was observed to be less than 10%. Parametric testing was conducted for three sorbent injection options: injection of standard AC alone; injection of an EERC sorbent enhancement additive, SEA4, with ACI; and injection of an EERC enhanced AC. Injection rates were determined for all of the options to achieve the minimum target of 55% mercury removal as well as for higher removals approaching 90%. Some of the higher injection rates were not sustainable because of increased differential pressure across the test baghouse module. After completion of the parametric testing, a month long test was conducted using the enhanced AC at a nominal rate of 1.5 lb/Macf. During the

  11. Analysis of the response of the Raft River monitor wells to the 1979 injection tests

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, S.G.; Callan, D.M.

    1980-09-01

    The geothermal resource for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Raft River Geothermal 5 MWe Power Project is located in a closed ground water basin in southcentral Idaho. Chemical analyses indicate the existence of natural communication along fractures between the geothermal reservoir and the shallower aquifers developed for irrigation. Much of the ground water that is presently used for irrigation is of poor quality. Injection of geothermal fluids at intermediate depths may increase communication between the reservoir and the aquifer, resulting in further degradation of shallow ground water quality over time. Seven monitor wells, ranging in depth from 150 m to 400 m, were drilled to evaluate the potential for this degradation. Monitoring of these wells during two 21-day injection tests at the Raft River Geothermal Injection Well-6 (RRGI-6) indicates two types of response in the shallow aquifer system. First, the water level in Monitor Well-4 (MW-4) increased an average of 0.4 m/week during injection, indicating direct fracture connection between the injection zone and the aquifer penetrated by MW-4. Second, water levels in MW-5, MW-6, and MW-7 showed a step function decrease which coincided with the period of the injection tests. Analyses indicate that this response may be caused by elastic deformation in the aquifer matrix.

  12. Field pilot tests for tertiary recovery using butane and propane injection

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco, E.F.; Garcia, A.I.

    1981-01-01

    This work describes a pilot project for tertiary recovery of liquid hydrocarbons through LPG injection in water-out sections of the Bolivar reservoir in La Pena Field, Santa Cruz, Boliva. The promising results obtained in the initial field miscibility tests, as well as the results from a mathematical model built to stimulate and evaluate the tertiary recovery project, directed subsequent work into a cyclic scheme for enhanced recovery. This scheme is explained and injection production data is presented. Field facilities built to handle both the injected LPG and the produced oil-LPG mixture are described. The oil/LPG ratio and the LPG recovered/injected fraction are the main factors measured in this to make further considerations for a full scale project.

  13. Leak injection/detection input for B and W prototype steam generator test request

    SciTech Connect

    1980-11-18

    The goal of the leak injection/detection phase of the test program on the prototype steam generator is to obtain data that can be used to specify the leak protection system for the plant unit steam generators. Both chemical and two acoustic leak detection methods (by GE and Rockwell International) are to be considered. The chemical system has been selected as the reference based on its more developed state. The acoustic methods have potential both as small leak detection systems and as intermediate leak protection/automatic shutdown systems. Simulated leak injections will be made at various locations within the steam generator to determine the performance of the chemical system as specifically applied to the B and W helical coil steam generator geometry. Acoustic tests will be made to characterize the various steam generator background noise sources and to record acoustic signals during smulated leak injections, in order to predict the performance of both systems.

  14. Treatability Test Plan for 300 Area Uranium Stabilization through Polyphosphate Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Williams, Mark D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Williams, Bruce A.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2007-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has initiated a study into possible options for stabilizing uranium at the 300 Area using polyphosphate injection. As part of this effort, PNNL will perform bench- and field-scale treatability testing designed to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to reduced uranium concentrations in the groundwater to meet drinking water standards (30 ug/L) in situ. This technology works by forming phosphate minerals (autunite and apatite) in the aquifer that directly sequester the existing aqueous uranium in autunite minerals and precipitates apatite minerals for sorption and long term treatment of uranium migrating into the treatment zone, thus reducing current and future aqueous uranium concentrations. Polyphosphate injection was selected for testing based on technology screening as part of the 300-FF-5 Phase III Feasibility Study for treatment of uranium in the 300-Area.

  15. Test beam results with a sampling calorimeter of cerium fluoride scintillating crystals and tungsten absorber plates for calorimetry at the HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, R.; Dissertori, G.; Djambazov, L.; Donegà, M.; Dröge, M.; Haller, C.; Horisberger, U.; Lustermann, W.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Quittnat, M.; Pandolfi, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Cavallari, F.; Dafinei, I.; Diemoz, M.; D`Imperio, G.; del Re, D.; Gelli, S.; Jorda Lope, C.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nuccetelli, M.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Pellegrino, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Martelli, A.; Monti, V.; Pastrone, N.; Trapani, P. P.; Candelise, V.; Della Ricca, G.

    2016-07-01

    A sampling calorimeter using cerium fluoride scintillating crystals as active material, interleaved with absorber plates made of tungsten, and read out by wavelength-shifting fibres has been tested with high-energy electron beams at the CERN SPS H4 beam line, as well as with lower-energy beams at the INFN Frascati Beam Test Facility in Italy. Energy resolution studies revealed a low stochastic term (< 10 % /√{ E }). This result, combined with high radiation hardness of the material used, marks this sampling calorimeter as a good candidate for the detectors' forward regions during the high luminosity phase of LHC.

  16. LHC Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-07-28

    The LHC is the world’s highest energy particle accelerator and scientists use it to record an unprecedented amount of data. This data is recorded in electronic format and it requires an enormous computational infrastructure to convert the raw data into conclusions about the fundamental rules that govern matter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln gives us a sense of just how much data is involved and the incredible computer resources that makes it all possible.

  17. Results of injection and tracer tests in Olkaria north east field in Kenya

    SciTech Connect

    Karingithi, C.W.

    1995-12-31

    Tracer and injection tests were performed in the Olkaria North East Field with the objective to reduce uncertainty in the engineering design and to determine the suitability of well OW-704 as a re-injection well for the waste brine from the steam field during production. An organic dye (sodium fluorescein) was injected into well OW-704 as a slug. The tracer returns were observed in well OW-M2 which is 580 m deep, 620 m from well OW-704 and well OW-716 which is 900 m from well OW-704. The other wells on discharge, OW-714, and OW-725 did not show any tracer returns. However, other chemical constituents suggested., that well OW-716 experienced a chemical breakthrough earlier than OW-M2. Tracer return velocities of 0.31 m/hr and 1.3 m/hr were observed. Results of the tracer and injection tests indicate that OW-704 may be used as a re-injection well provided a close monitoring program is put in place.

  18. TEST DESIGN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) OF ADD-ON NOX CONTROL UTILIZING OZONE INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the test design for environmental technology verification (ETV) of add-0n nitrogen oxides (NOx) control utilizing ozone injection. (NOTE: ETV is an EPA-established program to enhance domestic and international market acceptance of new or improved commercially...

  19. Normative data for a brief neuropsychologic test battery in a cohort of injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Concha, M; Selnes, O A; McArthur, J C; Nance-Sproson, T; Updike, M L; Royal, W; Solomon, L; Vlahov, D

    1995-05-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies of the cognitive performance of injecting drug users have demonstrated the need to establish appropriate test norms for this population. This report provides normative data from a group of 150 injecting drug users on a battery of standardized tests of cognitive performance stratified by age group (range 20 to 49 years) and educational level (mean 11.6, standard deviation 2.0). The analysis also includes estimation of partial correlations between neuropsychologic test scores and age and education. The analysis demonstrates that age and education are important determinants of performance for several of these tests, and provides norms that may be of use as a reference for clinical evaluation and research in drug user populations. PMID:7558472

  20. Variable ptosis after botulinum toxin type a injection with positive ice test mimicking ocular myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Alaraj, Ahmad M; Oystreck, Darren T; Bosley, Thomas M

    2013-06-01

    We describe a patient who received cosmetic botulinum toxin type A injections to the brow and subsequently developed unilateral ptosis that was variable during examination and was transiently improved after the ice pack test. Ptosis gradually resolved spontaneously over approximately 3 months. This is the third patient to have variable ptosis documented after botulinum toxin type A injection to the brow and the second to have a positive ice test. The ice test is not completely specific for myasthenia gravis but may, at times, improve ptosis resulting from other defects at the neuromuscular junction. Wound botulism now is much more common because of illicit drug use, and the ice test also might be positive in this setting.

  1. Flow in a discrete slotted nozzle with massive injection. [water table tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine the effect of massive wall injection on the flow characteristics in a slotted nozzle. Some of the experiments were performed on a water table with a slotted-nozzle test section. This has 45 deg and 15 deg half angles of convergence and divergence, respectively, throat radius of 2.5 inches, and throat width of 3 inches. The hydraulic analogy was employed to qualitatively extend the results to a compressible gas flow through the nozzle. Experimental results from the water table include contours of constant Froude and Mach number with and without injection. Photographic results are also presented for the injection through slots of CO2 and Freon-12 into a main-stream air flow in a convergent-divergent nozzle in a wind tunnel. Schlieren photographs were used to visualize the flow, and qualititative agreement between the results from the gas tunnel and water table is good.

  2. In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Serrato, M. G.

    2013-09-27

    located at the Florida International University Applied Research Center, Miami, FL (FIU-ARC). A follow-on fluid injection test was developed to detect fluid and ion migration in a cementitious material/grouted test cube using a limited number of existing embedded sensor systems. This In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed (ISDSN-MSTB) - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report summarizes the test implementation, acquired and processed data, and results from the activated embedded sensor systems used during the fluid injection test. The ISDSN-MSTB Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test was conducted from August 27 through September 6, 2013 at the FIU-ARC ISDSN-MSTB test cube. The fluid injection test activated a portion of the existing embedded sensor systems in the ISDSN-MSTB test cube: Electrical Resistivity Tomography-Thermocouple Sensor Arrays, Advance Tensiometer Sensors, and Fiber Loop Ringdown Optical Sensors. These embedded sensor systems were activated 15 months after initial placement. All sensor systems were remotely operated and data acquisition was completed through the established Sensor Remote Access System (SRAS) hosted on the DOE D&D Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D DKM-IT) server. The ISDN Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test successfully demonstrated the feasibility of embedding sensor systems to assess moisture-fluid flow and resulting transport potential for contaminate mobility through a cementitious material/grout monolith. The ISDSN embedded sensor systems activated for the fluid injection test highlighted the robustness of the sensor systems and the importance of configuring systems in-depth (i.e., complementary sensors and measurements) to alleviate data acquisition gaps.

  3. Design, testing, and evaluation of an air injection grouting system for geothermal bores. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this research was to examine the feasibility of an air injection grouting system for geothermal bores. The system that was researched used a pressurized blow tank and a small diameter hose (3/4 or 1 inch) to pneumatically transport dry bentonite granules into a wet bore. Upon contact with the annular fluid in the bore, water or drilling mud, the particles hydrated and formed a grout. A valve on the bottom of the tank allowed the feed rate of particles into the hose to be adjusted. Granular bentonites that were tested ranged in particle size from four to fifty mesh. The pneumatic conveying properties of granular bentonites were studied in dry injection tests. For a fifty-foot length of three quarter inch hose, mass flow rates up to 50 lb/min were found at a tank pressure of 25 psi with air flow rates ranging from 8 to 17 scfm for pressures of 15 to 25 psi. Mass flow rates of over 100 lb/min at a pressure of 25 psi were reached with a one inch hose. Air flow rates ranged 27 to 50 scfm for pressures of 15 to 25 psi for the one inch hose. Testing simulating wet bore conditions were also performed. A method of removing the injection hose at a constant rate was found to produce a uniform, high solids content grout. A relationship between mass flow rate and the percent solids of the resulting grout was discovered in test with drilling mud as an annular fluid. The mass flow rate and percent solids relationship for tests in water was influenced by the type of granular bentonite. Permeability coefficients of air injected grouts were found to be similar to those of slurry bentonite grouts. Tests with a sand and bentonite mixture had flow rates similar to those found for straight granular bentonites, although the number of possible valve settings was reduced. The sand/bentonite mixture produced an acceptable grout in wet injection tests once the reduced yield of the mixture, due to the sand, was taken into account. A field trial conducted with the Solinst

  4. A HWIL test facility of infrared imaging laser radar using direct signal injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Lu, Wei; Wang, Chunhui; Wang, Qi

    2005-01-01

    Laser radar has been widely used these years and the hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing of laser radar become important because of its low cost and high fidelity compare with On-the-Fly testing and whole digital simulation separately. Scene generation and projection two key technologies of hardware-in-the-loop testing of laser radar and is a complicated problem because the 3D images result from time delay. The scene generation process begins with the definition of the target geometry and reflectivity and range. The real-time 3D scene generation computer is a PC based hardware and the 3D target models were modeled using 3dsMAX. The scene generation software was written in C and OpenGL and is executed to extract the Z-buffer from the bit planes to main memory as range image. These pixels contain each target position x, y, z and its respective intensity and range value. Expensive optical injection technologies of scene projection such as LDP array, VCSEL array, DMD and associated scene generation is ongoing. But the optical scene projection is complicated and always unaffordable. In this paper a cheaper test facility was described that uses direct electronic injection to provide rang images for laser radar testing. The electronic delay and pulse shaping circuits inject the scenes directly into the seeker's signal processing unit.

  5. Hydrogeologic data for the Bear Creek subsurface-injection test site, St. Petersburg, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, John J.

    1978-01-01

    Lithologic, hydraulic, geophysical, and water-quality data were collected at the Bear Creek subsurface-injection test site at St. Petersburg, FL. The data were collected to determine the feasibility of subsurface injection of storm runoff. An exploratory hole and five observation wells were constructed between October 1974 and April 1976. The lithology of the upper 185 feet at the test site is predominantly sand and marl. From 185 feet to 3,504 feet, limestone and dolomite predominate. Also , gypsum is present below 1.290 feet. Vertical intrinsic permeability, porosity, and compressibility of cores are reported. A 73-hour withdrawal test discharging 3,450 gallons per minute was run in the test injection well. At the site, chloride concentration in water from 192 to 340 feet, ranged from 150 to 680 milligrams per liter, and from 500 to 1,267 feet ranged from 16,000 to 20,000 milligrams per liter. Eleven additional wells near the test site were sampled for water quality. (Woodard-USGS)

  6. [Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) testing among injecting drug users].

    PubMed

    Gyarmathy, V Anna; Rácz, József

    2011-01-23

    In Hungary, there is a need for widely accessible HIV and HCV testing and counseling for injecting drug users. Theoretically, free and confidential rapid HIV and HCV testing would be the most suitable for this purpose. Low threshold agencies, such as needle and syringe programs, would provide ideal premises for such a testing system, Here, participants would be able to undergo regular testing every six months. Making rapid testing widely available raises the following three main issues: 1. validity of the testing results (or: the verification of positive rapid test results), 2. circumstances of taking blood (or: legislation regarding drawing blood), and 3. cost effectiveness (or: how important is it to prevent an HIV epidemic). The authors propose the establishment of a system that offers screening using rapid tests and which would be an expansion of a currently existing system of HIV and HCV testing based on finger prick blood. The current system would thus serve as a means to verify the results of the rapid tests. At the same time, there is a need to obtain permission from a public health body to enable in needle and syringe programs the provision of rapid testing and testing of blood using finger pricks. In many countries, test results are given to injecting drug users not by doctors but by trained social workers - such a system could also be established in Hungary. If preventing an HIV epidemic in Hungary is a priority, then wide access to rapid HIV testing is justified. Widely accessible free and confidential rapid HIV and HCV testing and counseling - combined with screening and verification using finger prick blood - may function not only as a testing and counseling service but also as a good quality public health monitoring system. Such a system, however, requires regular financial support from the government. PMID:21224188

  7. LHC Computing

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The LHC is the world’s highest energy particle accelerator and scientists use it to record an unprecedented amount of data. This data is recorded in electronic format and it requires an enormous computational infrastructure to convert the raw data into conclusions about the fundamental rules that govern matter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln gives us a sense of just how much data is involved and the incredible computer resources that makes it all possible.

  8. Planning and Analysis of Fractured Rock Injection Tests in the Cerro Brillador Underground Laboratory, Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairley, J. P., Jr.; Oyarzún L, R.; Villegas, G.

    2015-12-01

    Early theories of fluid migration in unsaturated fractured rock hypothesized that matrix suction would dominate flow up to the point of matrix saturation. However, experiments in underground laboratories such as the ESF (Yucca Mountain, NV) have demonstrated that liquid water can migrate significant distances through fractures in an unsaturated porous medium, suggesting limited interaction between fractures and unsaturated matrix blocks and potentially rapid transmission of recharge to the sat- urated zone. Determining the conditions under which this rapid recharge may take place is an important factor in understanding deep percolation processes in arid areas with thick unsaturated zones. As part of an on-going, Fondecyt-funded project (award 11150587) to study mountain block hydrological processes in arid regions, we are plan- ning a series of in-situ fracture flow injection tests in the Cerro Brillador/Mina Escuela, an underground laboratory and teaching facility belonging to the Universidad la Serena, Chile. Planning for the tests is based on an analytical model and curve-matching method, originally developed to evaluate data from injection tests at Yucca Mountain (Fairley, J.P., 2010, WRR 46:W08542), that uses a known rate of liquid injection to a fracture (for example, from a packed-off section of borehole) and the observed rate of seepage discharging from the fracture to estimate effective fracture aperture, matrix sorptivity, fracture/matrix flow partitioning, and the wetted fracture/matrix interac- tion area between the injection and recovery points. We briefly review the analytical approach and its application to test planning and analysis, and describe the proposed tests and their goals.

  9. Flow Simulation of Solid Rocket Motors. 1; Injection Induced Water-Flow Tests from Porous Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Yeh, Y. P.; Smith, A. W.; Heaman, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    Prior to selecting a proper porous material for use in simulating the internal port flow of a solid rocket motor (SRM), in cold-flow testing, the flow emerging from porous materials is experimentally investigated. The injection-flow emerging from a porous matrix always exhibits a lumpy velocity profile that is spatially stable and affects the development of the longitudinal port flow. This flow instability, termed pseudoturbulence, is an inherent signature of the porous matrix and is found to generally increase with the wall porosity and with the injection flow rate. Visualization studies further show that the flow from porous walls made from shaving-type material (sintered stainless-steel) exhibits strong recirculation zones that are conspicuously absent in walls made from nodular or spherical material (sintered bronze). Detailed flow visualization observations and hot-film measurements are reported from tests of injection-flow and a coupled cross-flow from different porous wall materials. Based on the experimental data, discussion is provided on the choice of suitable material for SRM model testing while addressing the consequences and shortcomings from such a test.

  10. Testing the electroweak phase transition and electroweak baryogenesis at the LHC and a circular electron-positron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fa Peng; Gu, Pei-Hong; Yin, Peng-Fei; Yu, Zhao-Huan; Zhang, Xinmin

    2016-05-01

    We study the collider phenomenology of the electroweak phase transition and electroweak baryogenesis in the framework of the effective field theory. Our study shows that the effective theory using the dimension-6 operators can enforce strong first order phase transition and provide sizable C P violation to realize a successful electroweak baryogenesis. Such dimension-6 operators can induce interesting Higgs phenomenology that can be verified at colliders such as the LHC and the planning CEPC. We then demonstrate that this effective theory can originate from vectorlike quarks and the triplet Higgs.

  11. On the Design and Test of a Liquid Injection Electric Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Kenney, J. T.; Youmans, E. H.

    1973-01-01

    A liquid injection electric thruster (LINJET) was designed and tested. The results of the tests were very encouraging with thruster performance levels well in excess of design goals. Supporting activities to the engine design and test included a five-million pulse life test on the main capacitor, a 46-million pulse test on the trigger electronics, design and fabrication of a zero resistance torque connector for use with the torsional pendulum thrust stand, design and fabrication of a logic box for control of engine firing, and a physical and chemical properties characterization of the perfluorocarbon propellant. While the results were encouraging, testing was limited, as many problems existed with the design. The most significant problem was involved with excessive propellant flow which contributed to false triggering and shorting. Low power active thermal control of the propellant storage cavity, coupled with a re-evaluation of the injection ring pore size and area exposed to the main capacitor discharge are areas that should be investigated should this design be carried forward.

  12. In Situ Redox Manipulation Field Injection Test Report - Hanford 100-H Area

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchter, J.S.; Amonette, J.E.; Cole, C.R.

    1996-11-01

    This report presents results of an In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Field Injection Withdrawal Test performed at the 100-H Area of the US. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site in Washington State in Fiscal Year 1996 by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The test is part of the overall ISRM project, the purpose of which is to determine the potential for remediating contaminated groundwater with a technology based on in situ manipulation of subsurface reduction-oxidation (redox) conditions. The ISRM technology would be used to treat subsurface contaminants in groundwater zones at DOE sites.

  13. LHC crab-cavity aspects and strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Zimmermann, F.

    2010-05-23

    The 3rd LHC Crab Cavity workshop (LHC-CC09) took place at CERN in October 2009. It reviewed the current status and identified a clear strategy towards a future crab-cavity implementation. Following the success of crab cavities in KEK-B and the strong potential for luminosity gain and leveling, CERN will pursue crab crossing for the LHC upgrade. We present a summary and outcome of the variousworkshop sessions which have led to the LHC crab-cavity strategy, covering topics like layout, cavity design, integration, machine protection, and a potential validation test in the SPS.

  14. Re-evaluation of a subsurface injection experiment for testing flow and transport models

    SciTech Connect

    Fayer, M.J.; Lewis, R.E.; Engelman, R.E.; Pearson, A.L.; Murray, C.J.; Smoot, J.L. Lu, A.H.; Randall, P.R.; Wegener, W.H.

    1995-12-01

    The current preferred method for disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Hanford Site is to vitrify the wastes so they can be stored in a near-surface, shallow-land burial facility (Shord 1995). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) managed the PNL Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to assist Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in designing and assessing the performance of a disposal facility for the vitrified LLW. Vadose zone flow and transport models are recognized as necessary tools for baseline risk assessments of stored waste forms. The objective of the Controlled Field Testing task of the PVTD Project is to perform and analyze field experiments to demonstrate the appropriateness of conceptual models for the performance assessment. The most convincing way to demonstrate appropriateness is to show that the model can reproduce the movement of water and contaminants in the field. Before expensive new experiments are initiated, an injection experiment conducted at the Hanford Site in 1980 (designated the ``Sisson and the Lu experiment``) should be completely analyzed and understood. Briefly, in that test, a solution containing multiple tracers was injected at a single point into the subsurface sediments. The resulting spread of the water and tracers was monitored in wells surrounding the injection point. Given the advances in knowledge, computational capabilities, and models over the last 15 years, it is important to re-analyze the data before proceeding to other experiments and history-matching exercises.

  15. WFC3/UVIS Charge Injection Behavior: Results of an Initial Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushouse, H.; Baggett, S.; Gilliland, R.; Noeske, K.; Petro, L.

    2011-01-01

    The WFC3 CCD Charge Injection (CI) capability has been tested on-orbit in Cycle18 calibration program 12348. Bias, dark, and science exposures of star cluster NGC 104 have been obtained in all commandable CI modes. Super-bias images were constructed for each CI mode and used to calibrate the NGC 104 exposures. Analysis has shown that the CI mode is working as expected, producing injected signals of ~15000 e-/pix. The CI signal is stable and repeatable to a level of a few e-/pix. CI rows in calibrated science images have mean residual signals of a few e-/pix with 1-sigma noise of ~18 e-/pix. Noise in science images in the rows in between CI varies from 3.5-6.5 e-/pix, compared to ~3.4 e-/pix in non-CI images.

  16. Toxicological investigations on silicon carbide. 2. In vitro cell tests and long term injection tests.

    PubMed Central

    Bruch, J; Rehn, B; Song, W; Gono, E; Malkusch, W

    1993-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) dust and other dusts for comparison were injected intratracheally at a high dose (50 mg) into rats and the response of the lungs and the lymph nodes was studied after an appropriate experimental period. The indices studied were: histological changes in the lung and lymph nodes, organ weights, the formation of collagenous fibres, and the appearance of quartz typical areas. According to several epidemiological investigations and previous experimental animal studies, SiC produces silicogenic (fibrogenic) effects. No changes in the tissues studied in terms of damaging fibrogenic effects could be found after eight months (first series) and three and 12 months (second series). In particular, the histological findings and the absence of quartz typical areas as well as the quantitative determination of collagen fibres show that SiC had no harmful effects on tissues. Based on these results, the extent to which other exposures during the production of SiC can be responsible for the established radiological alterations is discussed. Without doubt the following may be confounders: SiC fibres, crystalline SiO2 (quartz, cristobalite, tridymite), and possibly gaslike emissions (SO2). From the hygienic medical point of view the workplaces during SiC manufacture should be examined carefully. The substance SiC dust as such can be considered as inert from the experimental results based on qualitative and extremely sensitive procedures. A revision of the present threshold value for SiC in ther German MAK list is called for. Images PMID:8398874

  17. Design, simulation, fabrication, and preliminary tests of 3D CMS pixel detectors for the super-LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Koybasi, Ozhan; Bortoletto, Daniela; Hansen, Thor-Erik; Kok, Angela; Hansen, Trond Andreas; Lietaer, Nicolas; Jensen, Geir Uri; Summanwar, Anand; Bolla, Gino; Kwan, Simon Wing Lok; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The Super-LHC upgrade puts strong demands on the radiation hardness of the innermost tracking detectors of the CMS, which cannot be fulfilled with any conventional planar detector design. The so-called 3D detector architectures, which feature columnar electrodes passing through the substrate thickness, are under investigation as a potential solution for the closest operation points to the beams, where the radiation fluence is estimated to reach 10{sup 16} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}. Two different 3D detector designs with CMS pixel readout electronics are being developed and evaluated for their advantages and drawbacks. The fabrication of full-3D active edge CMS pixel devices with p-type substrate has been successfully completed at SINTEF. In this paper, we study the expected post-irradiation behaviors of these devices with simulations and, after a brief description of their fabrication, we report the first leakage current measurement results as performed on wafer.

  18. Halo-independent tests of dark matter direct detection signals: local DM density, LHC, and thermal freeze-out

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Herrero-Garcia, Juan; Schwetz, Thomas; Vogl, Stefan

    2015-08-19

    From an assumed signal in a Dark Matter (DM) direct detection experiment a lower bound on the product of the DM-nucleon scattering cross section and the local DM density is derived, which is independent of the local DM velocity distribution. This can be combined with astrophysical determinations of the local DM density. Within a given particle physics model the bound also allows a robust comparison of a direct detection signal with limits from the LHC. Furthermore, the bound can be used to formulate a condition which has to be fulfilled if the particle responsible for the direct detection signal is a thermal relic, regardless of whether it constitutes all DM or only part of it. We illustrate the arguments by adopting a simplified DM model with a Z{sup ′} mediator and assuming a signal in a future xenon direct detection experiment.

  19. Forecast of thermal-hydrological conditions and air injection test results of the single heater test at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Birkholzer, J.T.; Tsang, Y.W.

    1996-12-01

    The heater in the Single Heater Test (SHT) in alcove 5 of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) was turned on August 26, 1996. A large number of sensors are installed in the various instrumented boreholes to monitor the coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical responses of the rock mass to the heat generated in the single heater. In this report the authors present the results of the modeling of both the heating and cooling phases of the Single Heater Test (SHT), with focus on the thermal-hydrological aspect of the coupled processes. Also in this report, the authors present simulations of air injection tests will be performed at different stages of the heating and cooling phase of the SHT.

  20. The dependence of permeability on effective stress for an injection test in the Higashi-Hachimantai Geothermal Field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, M.

    2000-01-01

    A simple inverse-power relation for the influence of effective stress on permeability is used to explain the flow behavior during an injection test at the Higashi-Hachimantai geothermal field, Japan. The new analytical expression successfully models data from the experiment involving high-pressure injection and monitoring at an observation well.

  1. EMISSION TEST REPORT, OMSS FIELD TEST ON CARBON INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses results of a parametric evaluation of powdered activated carbon for control of mercury (Hg) emission from a municipal waste cornbustor (MWC) equipped with a lime spray dryer absorber/fabric filter (SD/FF). The primary test objectives were to evaluate the effe...

  2. Hydrogeologic data for the McKay Creek subsurface waste-injection test site, Pinellas County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, John D.

    1977-01-01

    Lithologic, hydraulic, geophysical, and water-quality data collected at the McKay Creek subsurface waste-injection test site in Pinellas County, Florida, are reported. Data were collected to determine the possibility of subsurface injection of waste-treatment plant effluent. One exploratory hole, one test injection well, and eight observation wells were constructed between May 1973 and February 1976. The exploratory hole was drilled to a depth of 1,750 feet below land surface; the test injection well is open in dolomite between 952 and 1 ,040 feet; and the observation wells are open to intervals above , in, and below the test injection zone. The lithology of the upper 100 feet is predominantly clay. From 100 to 1,750 feet below land surface, limestone and dolomite predominate. Gypsum is present 1,210 feet below land surface. Laboratory analyses of cores taken during drilling are given for vertical intrinsic permeability, porosity, interval transit time, and compressibility. Specific capacities tested during drilling range from 4 to 2,500 gallons per minute per foot of drawdown. An 83-hour withdrawal test at 4,180 gallons per minute and a 2-month injection test at 650 gallons per minute were run. Small water-quality changes were observed in one observation well immediately above the test injection zone during and after the injection test. Formation water in all of the wells with the exception of the shallowest observation wells is saline. The vertical position of saltwater is estimated to be at about 280 feet below land surface. Thirteen wells within a 1-mile radius of the test site were located and sampled for water quality. (USGS)

  3. FIELD TEST PROGRAM FOR EVALUATION OF SORBENT INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Sharon Sjostrom

    2004-02-12

    The power industry in the U.S. is faced with meeting new regulations to reduce the emissions of mercury compounds from coal-fired plants. These regulations are directed at the existing fleet of nearly 1,100 boilers. These plants are relatively old with an average age of over 40 years. Although most of these units are capable of operating for many additional years, there is a desire to minimize large capital expenditures because of the reduced (and unknown) remaining life of the plant to amortize the project. Injecting a sorbent such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. The overall objective of this test program described in this quarterly report is to evaluate the capabilities of activated carbon injection at four plants with configurations that together represent 78% of the existing coal-fired generation plants. This technology was successfully evaluated in NETL's Phase I tests at scales up to 150 MW, on plants burning subbituminous and bituminous coals and with ESPs and fabric filters. The tests also identified issues that still need to be addressed, such as evaluating performance on other configurations, optimizing sorbent usage (costs), and gathering longer term operating data to address concerns about the impact of activated carbon on plant equipment and operations. The four sites identified for testing are Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station, AmerenUE's Meramec Station, AEP's Conesville Station, and Ontario Power Generation's Nanticoke Station. This is the first quarterly report for this project. This report includes an overview of the plans for the project. Field testing is scheduled to begin next quarter. In general, quarterly reports will be used to provide project overviews, project status, and technology transfer information. Topical reports will be prepared to present detailed technical information.

  4. Testing the color charge and mass dependence of parton energy loss with heavy-to-light ratios at BNL RHIC and CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Armesto, Nestor; Dainese, Andrea; Salgado, Carlos A.; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2005-03-01

    The ratio of nuclear modification factors of high-p{sub T} heavy-flavored mesons to light-flavored hadrons ('heavy-to-light ratio') in nucleus-nucleus collisions tests the partonic mechanism expected to underlie jet quenching. Heavy-to-light ratios are mainly sensitive to the mass and color-charge dependences of medium-induced parton energy loss. Here, we assess the potential for identifying these two effects in D and B meson production at RHIC and at the LHC. To this end, we supplement the perturbative QCD factorized formalism for leading hadron production with radiative parton energy loss. For D meson spectra at high but experimentally accessible transverse momentum (10 < or approx. p{sub T} < or approx. 20 GeV) in Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC, we find that charm quarks behave essentially like light quarks. However, since light-flavored hadron yields are dominated by gluon parents, the heavy-to-light ratio of D mesons is a sensitive probe of the color-charge dependence of parton energy loss. In contrast, due to the larger b quark mass, the medium modification of B mesons in the same kinematical regime provides a sensitive test of the mass dependence of parton energy loss. At RHIC energies, the strategies for identifying and disentangling the color charge and mass dependence of parton energy loss are more involved because of the smaller kinematical range accessible. We argue that at RHIC, the kinematical regime best suited for such an analysis of D mesons is 7 < or approx. p{sub T} < or approx. 12 GeV, whereas the study of lower transverse momenta is further complicated due to the known dominant contribution of additional, particle species dependent, nonperturbative effects.

  5. Hydrological and chemical monitoring during Fluid Injection Test in Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, M.; Tanaka, H.; Kuo, T.; Tsao, C.; Giletycz, S.; Chen, W.; Wang, C.; Chen, C.; Yang, T.; Ma, K.

    2007-12-01

    Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project drilled two research boreholes (Hole A and B; approximately 40 m of their distance) through the Chelungpu Fault in Da-Keng, which ruptured in the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake, in 2004. A branched borehole was drilled from Hole B in 2005 (Hole C), and then both Hole A and Hole C were perforated at the depth of the fault zone. The depth of perforation is 1111 m in Hole A and 1137 m in Hole C. Between the two boreholes, Fluid Injection Test (FIT) was performed on from November 2006 to March 2007 to estimate permeability and to understand hydrological and chemical properties along Chelungpu fault. Water was injected four times from Hole C at constant pressure during this FIT (4 MPa on November 2006 and January 2007, 3 and 5 MPa on March 2007). The arrival of injected water was monitored by seismometers, manometers, a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry and chemical sensors at Hole A. In this present, we will report the results of water quality, gas and water pressure monitoring at Hole A. During FIT, tap water was used for injected water, which was characterized by high Oxidation Reduction Potential (ORP; 250 mV) and high Dissolved Oxygen (DO; 5.6 mg/L). Because both ORP and DO of the well water at Hole A kept low (ORP; -350 - -150, DO; <0.5 mg/L) before FIT, the arrival of injected water can be found by rise of these values. 1st FIT was performed for approximately 100 hours from 22:00 on 7th to 8:30 on 12th November. As a result, the values of ORP and DO increased on 10th November, which is 3 days after the start of 1st FIT. Then, the flow rate at Hole A suddenly increased 7 days after the first chemical reaction on 10th, that is, 10 days after the start of 1st FIT. This suggests that the permeability is 10-16 m2 assuming that the width of a permeable zone is 1 m by the preliminary estimation of the permeability based on the model of Kitagawa et al. (2002).

  6. Test results of a steam injected gas turbine to increase power and thermal efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Messerlie, R.L.; Tischler, A.O.

    1983-08-01

    The desire to increase both power and thermal efficiency of the gas turbine (Brayton cycle) engine has been pursued for a number of years and has involved many approaches. The use of steam in the cycle to improve performance has been proposed by various investigators. This was most recently proposed by International Power Technology, Inc. (IPT) and has been tested by Detroit Diesel Allison (DDA), Division of General Motors. This approach, identified as the Cheng dual-fluid cycle (Cheng/DFC), includes the generation of steam using heat from the exhaust, and injecting this steam into the engine combustion chamber. Test results on an Allison 501-KB engine have demonstrated that use of this concept will increase the thermal efficiency of the engine by 30% and the output power by 60% with no increase in turbine inlet temperature. These results will be discussed, as will the impact of steam rate, location of steam injection, turbine temperature, and engine operational characteristics on the performance of the Cheng/DFC.

  7. Seismic monitoring of the June, 1988 Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program flow/injection test

    SciTech Connect

    Jarpe, S.P.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Hutchings, L.J.; Hauk, T.F.

    1988-10-04

    The purpose of the seismic monitoring project was to characterize in detail the micro-seismic activity related to the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program (SSSDP) flow-injection test in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. Our goal was to determine if any sources of seismic energy related to the test were observable at the surface. We deployed our recording stations so that we could detect and locate both impulsive microearthquakes and continuous seismic noise energy. Our network, which was sensitive enough to be triggered by magnitude 0.0 or larger events, found no impulsive microearthquakes in the vicinity of the flow test in the 8 month period before the test and only one event during the flow test. This event has provided the opportunity to compare the detection and location capabilities of small networks and arrays in a geothermal environment. At present, we are carefully scanning all of the data that we collected during the flow test for evidence of anomalous seismic noise sources and for impulsive events smaller than the network detection threshold (magnitude 0.0). 8 refs., 4 figs.

  8. A longitudinal study of hepatitis C virus testing and infection status notification on behaviour change in people who inject drugs

    PubMed Central

    Spelman, T; Morris, MD; Zang, G; Rice, T; Page, K; Maher, L; Lloyd, A; Grebely, J; Dore, GJ; Kim, AY; Shoukry, NH; Hellard, M; Bruneau, J

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) testing and counseling have the potential for impacting individual behaviour and transmission dynamics at the population level. Evidence of the impact of HCV-positive status notification on injection risk reduction is limited. The objective of our study was to (1) assess drug and alcohol use and injection risk behaviors following notification; (2) to compare behaviour change in people who inject drugs (PWID) who received a positive test result and those who remained negative; and (3) to assess the effect of age on risk behavior. Methods Data from the InC3 Study were analyzed. Participants initially HCV seronegative were followed prospectively with periodic HCV blood testing and post-test disclosure and interview-administered questionnaires assessing drug use and injection behaviours. Multivariable generalized estimating equations were used to assess behavioral changes over time. Results Notification of a HCV positive test was independently associated with a small increase in alcohol use relative to notification of a negative test. No significant differences in post-notification injection drug use, receptive sharing of ancillary injecting equipment and syringe borrowing post-notification were observed between diagnosis groups. Younger PWID receiving a positive HCV test notification demonstrated a significant increase in subsequent alcohol use compared with younger HCV negative. Conclusion PWID receiving a HCV positive notification increased frequency of alcohol use post-notification, whilst no reduction in injection drug use behaviors was observed between notification groups. These findings underscore the need to develop novel communication strategies during post-test notification to improve their impact on subsequent alcohol use and risk behaviors. PMID:25814695

  9. Types of secondary porosity of carbonate rocks in injection and test wells in southern peninsular Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duerr, A.D.

    1995-01-01

    The types of secondary porosity present in carbonate injection intervals and in the overlying carbonate rocks were determined at 11 injection well sites and 3 test well sites in southern peninsular Florida. The hydrogeologic system consists of a thick sequence of carbonate rocks overlain by clastic deposits. Principal hydrogeologic units are the surficial aquifer system, the intermediate aquifer system or the intermediate confining unit,the Floridan aquifer system, and the sub-Floridan confining unit.The concept of apparent secondary porosity was used in this study because the secondary porosity features observed in a borehole television survey could have been caused by geologic processes as well as by drilling activities. The secondary porosity features identified in a television survey were evaluated using driller's comments and caliper, flowmeter, and temperature logs. Borehole intervals that produced or received detectable amounts of flow, as shown by flowmeter and temperature logs, provided evidence that the secondary porosity of the interval was spatially distributed and interconnected beyond the immediate vicinity of a borehole and, thus, was related to geologic processes. Features associated with interconnected secondary porosity were identified as effective secondary porosity. Fracture porosity was identified as the most common type of effective secondary porosity and was observed predominantly in dolomite and dolomitic limestone. Cavity porosity was the least common type of effective secondary porosity at the study sites. In fact, of the more than 17,500 feet of borehole studied a total of only three cavities constituting effective secondary porosity were identified at only two sites. These cavities were detected in dolomite rocks. Most apparent cavities were caused by drilling-induced collapse of naturally fractured borehole walls. Also, fractures usually were observed above and below cavities. The majority of vugs observed in the television surveys did

  10. Analysis of tests of subsurface injection, storage, and recovery of freshwater in the lower Floridan aquifer, Okeechobee County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinones-Aponte, Vicente; Kotun, Kevin; Whitley, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    A series of freshwater subsurface injection, storage, and recovery tests were conducted at an injection-well site near Lake Okeechobee in Okeechobee County, Florida, to assess the recoverability of injected canal water from the Lower Floridan aquifer. At the study site, the Lower Floridan aquifer is characterized as having four local, relatively independent, high-permeability flow zones (389 to 398 meters, 419 to 424 meters, 456 to 462 meters, and 472 to 476 meters below sea level). Four subsurface injection, storage, and recovery cycles were performed at the Lake Okeechobee injection-well site in which volumes of water injected ranged from about 387,275 to 1,343,675 cubic meters for all the cycles, and volumes of water recovered ranged from about 106,200 to 484,400 cubic meters for cycles 1, 2, and 3. The recovery efficiency for successive cycles 2 and 3 increased from 22 to 36 percent and is expected to continue increasing with additional cycles. A comparison of chloride concentration breakthrough curves at the deep monitor well (located about 171 meters from the injection well) for cycles 1, 4, and test no. 4 (from a previous study) revealed unexpected finings. One significant result was that the concentration asymptote, expected to be reached at concentration levels equivalent or close to the injected water concentration, was instead reached at higher concentration levels. The injection to recovery rate ratio might affect the chloride concentration breakthrough curve at the deep monitor well, which could explain this unexpected behavior. Because there are four high-permeability zones, if the rate of injection is smaller than the rate of recovery (natural artesian flow), the head differential might not be transmitted through the entire open wellbore, and injected water would probably flow only through the upper high- permeability zones. Therefore, observed chloride concentration values at the deep monitor well would be higher than the concentration of the

  11. Real Time Monitoring of an Injection Test for an Enhanced Geothermal Reservoir, Paralana, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, J.; Thiel, S.; Heinson, G. S.; Reid, P.

    2011-12-01

    Real-time monitoring of changes in subsurface material properties proves valuable in many geophysical aplications where fluids are present, including ground water, geothermal, CO2 sequestration, unconventional gas, and more. Reservoir stimulation typically includes pumping high pressure fluids into tight lithology with the intention of creating or extending the reservior. Unfortunately, the fracturing process and reservoir extension is not always predictable. Therefore, real time monitoring needs to be employed to better understand the system. Electromagnetic methods can exploit the large dynamic range of electrical conductivity from the surface, specifically the magnetotelluric (MT) can measure conductivity contrasts as a function of depth and time. Presented is an example of real-time monitoring of an enhanced geothermal system injection test at around 4~km depth using 11 MT stations with a remote reference. Its found that changes in the MT response are small, on the order of a few percent, but correlate with earthquake clusters measured by a micro-seismic array.

  12. In-Situ Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection: Pilot-Scale Treatability Test at the 300 Area, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeul, V.R.; Fruchter, J.S.; Fritz, B.G.; Mackley, R.D.; Wellman, D.M.; Williams, M.D.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the pilot-scale treatability test that was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of using a polyphosphate injection approach to treat uranium-contaminated groundwater in situ within the 300 Area aquifer at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. Primary test objectives were to assess 1) direct treatment of available uranium contributing to the groundwater plume through precipitation of the uranyl-phosphate mineral autunite, and 2) emplacement of secondary-treatment capacity via precipitation of the calcium-phosphate mineral apatite, which acts as a long-term sorbent for uranium. Based on an injection design analysis that incorporated results from both bench-scale testing and site-specific characterization activities, a three-phase injection approach was selected for field-scale testing. This approach consisted of 1) an initial polyphosphate injection to facilitate direct treatment of aqueous uranium in the pore space, 2) a second phase consisting of a calcium chloride injection to provide an available calcium source for the creation of apatite, and 3) a subsequent polyphosphate injection to supply a phosphate source for the formation of apatite. The total-solution volume injected during this field test was approximately 3.8 million L (1 million gal). Results from this investigation will be used to identify implementation challenges and investigate the technology's ability to meet remedial objectives. In addition, data from this test will provide valuable information for designing a full-scale remedial action for uranium in groundwater beneath the 300 Area of the Hanford Site, and a detailed understanding of the fundamental underpinnings necessary to evaluate the efficacy and potential for utilization of the polyphosphate technology at other sites with varying geochemical and hydrodynamic conditions. (authors)

  13. LHC - a "Why" Facility

    ScienceCinema

    Gordon Kane

    2016-07-12

    The Standard Models of particle physics and cosmology describe the world we see, and how it works, very well. But we want to understand (not just accommodate) much more – how does the Higgs mechanism work, what is the dark matter, why is the universe matter and not antimatter, why is parity violated, why are the particles (quarks and leptons) what they are, and why are the forces that act on them to make our world what they are, and more. Today is an exciting time to be doing particle physics – on the experimental side we have data coming from LHC and dark matter experiments that will provide clues to these questions, and on the theoretical side we have a framework (string theory) that addresses all these “why” questions. LHC data will not qualitatively improve our description – rather, it may provide the data that will allow us to learn about the dark matter, the Higgs physics, the matter asymmetry, etc, to test underlying theories such as string theory, and begin to answer the “why” questions. Supersymmetry is the best motivated discovery, and it would also open a window to the underlying theory near the Planck scale.

  14. LHC - a "Why" Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon Kane

    2009-01-14

    The Standard Models of particle physics and cosmology describe the world we see, and how it works, very well. But we want to understand (not just accommodate) much more – how does the Higgs mechanism work, what is the dark matter, why is the universe matter and not antimatter, why is parity violated, why are the particles (quarks and leptons) what they are, and why are the forces that act on them to make our world what they are, and more. Today is an exciting time to be doing particle physics – on the experimental side we have data coming from LHC and dark matter experiments that will provide clues to these questions, and on the theoretical side we have a framework (string theory) that addresses all these “why” questions. LHC data will not qualitatively improve our description – rather, it may provide the data that will allow us to learn about the dark matter, the Higgs physics, the matter asymmetry, etc, to test underlying theories such as string theory, and begin to answer the “why” questions. Supersymmetry is the best motivated discovery, and it would also open a window to the underlying theory near the Planck scale.

  15. Measurement of distribution coefficients using a radial injection dual-tracer test

    SciTech Connect

    Pickens, J.F.; Jackson, R.E.; Inch, K.J.; Merritt, W.F.

    1981-06-01

    The dispersive and adsorptive properties of a sandy aquifer were evaluated by using a radial injection dual-tracer test with /sup 131/I as the nonreactive tracer and /sup 85/Sr as the reactive tracer. The tracer migration was monitored by using multilevel point-sampling devices located at various radial distances and depths. Nonequilibrium physical and chemical adsorption effects for /sup 85/Sr were treated as a spreading or dispersion mechanism in the breakthrough curve analysis. The resulting effective dispersivity values for /sup 85/Sr were typically a factor of 2 to 5 larger than those obtained for /sup 131/I. The distribution coefficient (K/sub d//sup Sr/) values obtained from analysis of the breakthrough curves at three depths and two radial distances ranged from 2.6 to 4.5 ml/g. These compare favorably with values obtained by separation of fluids from solids in sediment cores, by batch experiments on core sediments and by analysis of a 25-year-old radioactive waste plume in another part of the same aquifer. Correlations of adsorbed /sup 85/Sr radioactivity with grain size fractions demonstrated preferential adsorption to the coarsest fraction and to the finest fraction. The relative amounts of electrostatically and specifically adsorbed /sup 85/Sr on the aquifer sediments were determined with desorption experiments on core sediments using selective chemical extractants. The withdrawal phase breakthrough curves for the well, obtained immediately following the injection phase, showed essentially full tracer recoveries for both /sup 131/I and /sup 85/Sr. Relatively slow desorption of /sup 85/Sr provided further indication of the nonequilibrium nature of the adsorption-desorption phenomena.

  16. Could sperm aneuploidy rate determination be used as a predictive test before intracytoplasmic sperm injection?

    PubMed

    Petit, François M; Frydman, Nelly; Benkhalifa, Moncef; Le Du, Anne; Aboura, Azzedine; Fanchin, Renato; Frydman, Rene; Tachdjian, Gerard

    2005-01-01

    Chromosome abnormalities in embryos are a major cause of implantation and development failures. Some couples with normal karyotypes have repeated implantation failures after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). In order to value patients at risk for genetic ICSI failures and the validity of sperm aneuploidy analysis, we have studied cytogenetic abnormalities in sperm from ICSI patients. Twenty-nine patients with normal karyotypes were included. Ten patients had at least 4 ICSI treatments without pregnancy (group A). Nine patients had a pregnancy after 1 to 3 ICSI treatments (group B). Ten fertile men with normal semen parameters were studied as controls (group C). Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used for sperm nucleus cytogenetic analysis using chromosomes 8, 9, 13, 18, 21, X, and Y specific probes. Aneuploidy for each chromosome and diploidy rates were significantly higher in group A than in group B and in group B than in group C (P < .05). Considering each patient in groups A and B, aneuploidy rate for each chromosome was too variable to be considered as a significant test. We proposed analysis of the total sperm aneuploidy. Chromosomal sperm nuclei profile could be used as a predictive biological test before ICSI in order to improve genetic counseling for oligoasthenoteratozoospermia patients.

  17. Field test of single well DNAPL characterization using alcohol injection/extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Jerome, K.M.; Looney, B.B.; Rhoden, M.L.; Riha, B.; Burdick, S.

    1996-10-29

    Soils and groundwater beneath an abandoned process sewer line in the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) contain elevated levels of volatile organic compounds, specifically trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), two common chlorinated solvents. These compounds have low aqueous solubilities, thus when released to the subsurface in sufficient quantity, tend to exist as immiscible fluids or nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Because chlorinated solvents are also denser than water, they are referred to by the acronym DNAPLs, or dense non-aqueous phase liquids. Technologies targeted at efficient characterization or removal of DNAPL are not currently proven. The authors performed injection/extraction characterization tests in six existing wells in A/M Area. Water concentrations for TCE and/or PCE in these wells ranged from 0% to 100% of solubility. For each test, small amounts of solubilizing solution were used to try to confirm or deny the presence or absence of DNAPL in the immediate vicinity of the well screen.

  18. Overview of the International Space Station System Level Trace Contaminant Injection Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatara, James D.; Perry, Jay L.; Franks, Gerald D.

    1997-01-01

    Trace contaminant control onboard the International Space Station will be accomplished not only by the Trace Contaminant Control Subassembly but also by other Environmental Control and Life Support System subassemblies. These additional removal routes include absorption by humidity condensate in the Temperature and Humidity Control Condensing Heat Exchanger and adsorption by the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly. The Trace Contaminant Injection Test, which was performed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, investigated the system-level removal of trace contaminants by the International Space Station Atmosphere Revitalization, and Temperature/Humidity Control Subsystems, (November-December 1997). It is a follow-on to the Integrated Atmosphere Revitalization Test conducted in 1996. An estimate for the magnitude of the assisting role provided by the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly and the Temperature and Humidity Control unit was obtained. In addition, data on the purity of Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly carbon dioxide product were obtained to support Environmental Control and Life Support System Air Revitalization Subsystem loop closure.

  19. Pilot plant testing of Illinois coal for blast furnace injection. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Crelling, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    A new use for Illinois coal is as fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as first step in steel production. Because of cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. Purpose of this study is to evaluate combustion of Illinois coal in the blast furnace injection process in a pilot plant test facility. (Limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high S and Cl contents are suitable for blast furnace injection.) This proposal is intended to complete the study under way with Armco and Inland and to demonstrate quantitatively the suitability of Herrin No. 6 and Springfield No. 5 coals for injection. Main feature of current work is testing of Illinois coals at CANMET`s pilot plant coal combustion facility. During this quarter, two additional 300-pound samples of coal (IBCSP-110 Springfield No. 5 and an Appalachian coal) were delivered. Six Illinois Basin coals were analyzed with the CANMET model and compared with other bituminous coals from the Appalachians, France, Poland, South Africa, and Colombia. Based on computer modeling, lower rank bituminous coals, including coal from the Illinois Basin, compare well in injection with a variety of other bituminous coals.

  20. Modeling Single Well Injection-Withdrawal (SWIW) Tests for Characterization of Complex Fracture-Matrix Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cotte, F.P.; Doughty, C.; Birkholzer, J.

    2010-11-01

    The ability to reliably predict flow and transport in fractured porous rock is an essential condition for performance evaluation of geologic (underground) nuclear waste repositories. In this report, a suite of programs (TRIPOLY code) for calculating and analyzing flow and transport in two-dimensional fracture-matrix systems is used to model single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests. The SWIW test, a tracer test using one well, is proposed as a useful means of collecting data for site characterization, as well as estimating parameters relevant to tracer diffusion and sorption. After some specific code adaptations, we numerically generated a complex fracture-matrix system for computation of steady-state flow and tracer advection and dispersion in the fracture network, along with solute exchange processes between the fractures and the porous matrix. We then conducted simulations for a hypothetical but workable SWIW test design and completed parameter sensitivity studies on three physical parameters of the rock matrix - namely porosity, diffusion coefficient, and retardation coefficient - in order to investigate their impact on the fracture-matrix solute exchange process. Hydraulic fracturing, or hydrofracking, is also modeled in this study, in two different ways: (1) by increasing the hydraulic aperture for flow in existing fractures and (2) by adding a new set of fractures to the field. The results of all these different tests are analyzed by studying the population of matrix blocks, the tracer spatial distribution, and the breakthrough curves (BTCs) obtained, while performing mass-balance checks and being careful to avoid some numerical mistakes that could occur. This study clearly demonstrates the importance of matrix effects in the solute transport process, with the sensitivity studies illustrating the increased importance of the matrix in providing a retardation mechanism for radionuclides as matrix porosity, diffusion coefficient, or retardation

  1. Connecting LHC, ILC, and quintessence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Everett, Lisa L.; Kong, Kyoungchul; Matchev, Konstantin T.

    2007-10-01

    If the cold dark matter consists of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), anticipated measurements of the WIMP properties at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC) will provide an unprecedented experimental probe of cosmology at temperatures of order 1 GeV. It is worth emphasizing that the expected outcome of these tests may or may not be consistent with the picture of standard cosmology. For example, in kination-dominated quintessence models of dark energy, the dark matter relic abundance can be significantly enhanced compared to that obtained from freeze out in a radiation-dominated universe. Collider measurements then will simultaneously probe both dark matter and dark energy. In this article, we investigate the precision to which the LHC and ILC can determine the dark matter and dark energy parameters under those circumstances. We use an illustrative set of four benchmark points in minimal supergravity in analogy with the four LCC benchmark points. The precision achievable together at the LHC and ILC is sufficient to discover kination-dominated quintessence, under the assumption that the WIMPs are the only dark matter component. The LHC and ILC can thus play important roles as alternative probes of both dark matter and dark energy.

  2. Thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests for determining fracture-matrix heat transfer area

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.; Doughty, C.

    2010-01-15

    Single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests involve injection of traced fluid and subsequent tracer recovery from the same well, usually with some quiescent time between the injection and withdrawal periods. SWIW are insensitive to variations in advective processes that arise from formation heterogeneities, because upon withdrawal, fluid parcels tend to retrace the paths taken during injection. However, SWIW are sensitive to diffusive processes, such as diffusive exchange of conservative or reactive solutes between fractures and rock matrix. This paper focuses on SWIW tests in which temperature itself is used as a tracer. Numerical simulations demonstrate the sensitivity of temperature returns to fracture-matrix interaction. We consider thermal SWIW response to the two primary reservoir improvements targeted with stimulation, (1) making additional fractures accessible to injected fluids, and (2) increasing the aperture and permeability of pre-existing fractures. It is found that temperature returns in SWIW tests are insensitive to (2), while providing a strong signal of more rapid temperature recovery during the withdrawal phase for (1).

  3. Reactivity of Hontomín carbonate rocks to acidic solution injection: reactive "push-pull" tracer tests results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gaspari, Francesca; Cabeza, Yoar; Luquot, Linda; Rötting, Tobias; Saaltink, Maarten W.; Carrera, Jesus

    2014-05-01

    Several field tests will be carried out in order to characterize the reservoir for CO2 injection in Hontomín (Burgos, Spain) as part of the Compostilla project of "Fundación Ciudad de la Energía" (CIUDEN). Once injected, the dissolution of the CO2 in the resident brine will increase the acidity of the water and lead to the dissolution of the rocks, constituted mainly by carbonates. This mechanism will cause changes in the aquifer properties such as porosity and permeability. To reproduce the effect of the CO2 injection, a reactive solution with 2% of acetic acid is going to be injected in the reservoir and extracted from the same well (reactive "push-pull" tracer tests) to identify and quantify the geochemical reactions occurring into the aquifer. The reactivity of the rock will allow us also to evaluate the changes of its properties. Previously, theoretical calculations of Damkhöler numbers were done to determine the acid concentrations and injection flow rates needed to generate ramified-wormholes patterns, during theses "push-pull" experiments. The aim of this work is to present the results and a preliminary interpretation of the field tests.

  4. Microbial Stimulation and Succession following a Test Well Injection Simulating CO₂ Leakage into a Shallow Newark Basin Aquifer

    PubMed Central

    O’Mullan, Gregory; Dueker, M. Elias; Clauson, Kale; Yang, Qiang; Umemoto, Kelsey; Zakharova, Natalia; Matter, Juerg; Stute, Martin; Takahashi, Taro; Goldberg, David

    2015-01-01

    In addition to efforts aimed at reducing anthropogenic production of greenhouse gases, geological storage of CO2 is being explored as a strategy to reduce atmospheric greenhouse gas emission and mitigate climate change. Previous studies of the deep subsurface in North America have not fully considered the potential negative effects of CO2 leakage into shallow drinking water aquifers, especially from a microbiological perspective. A test well in the Newark Rift Basin was utilized in two field experiments to investigate patterns of microbial succession following injection of CO2-saturated water into an isolated aquifer interval, simulating a CO2 leakage scenario. A decrease in pH following injection of CO2 saturated aquifer water was accompanied by mobilization of trace elements (e.g. Fe and Mn), and increased bacterial cell concentrations in the recovered water. 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence libraries from samples collected before and after the test well injection were compared to link variability in geochemistry to changes in aquifer microbiology. Significant changes in microbial composition, compared to background conditions, were found following the test well injections, including a decrease in Proteobacteria, and an increased presence of Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia and microbial taxa often noted to be associated with iron and sulfate reduction. The concurrence of increased microbial cell concentrations and rapid microbial community succession indicate significant changes in aquifer microbial communities immediately following the experimental CO2 leakage event. Samples collected one year post-injection were similar in cell number to the original background condition and community composition, although not identical, began to revert toward the pre-injection condition, indicating microbial resilience following a leakage disturbance. This study provides a first glimpse into the in situ successional response of microbial communities to CO2 leakage after subsurface

  5. Field test of a cross-injection scheme for stimulating in situ denitrification near a municipal water supply well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierczak, R.; Devlin, J. F.; Rudolph, D. L.

    2007-01-01

    A pilot-scale test of an in situ denitrification scheme was undertaken to assess an adaptation of the nutrient injection wall (NIW) technology for treating a deep (30-40 m) nitrate contamination problem (N-NO 3- ˜ 10-12 mg/L). The adaptation is called the Cross-Injection Scheme (CIS). It duplicates the NIW method without a wall; wells are installed and operated directly in the aquifer and high-flux zones of the aquifer are preferentially targeted for treatment. The test was conducted on the site of a municipal water supply well field, with the supply well pumping between 15-80 m 3/h. Acetate was periodically injected into the aquifer between an injection-extraction well pair positioned across the normal direction of flow. The injected pulses were then permitted to move with the water toward the municipal wells, providing a carbon supply to drive the desired denitrification. The fate of nitrate, nitrite, acetate and sulphate were monitored at multilevel wells located between the injection location and the municipal wells. The acetate pulsing interval was approximately weekly (9 h injections), so that the system was operating passively 95% of the time. Previous work on the site has established that the highest solute fluxes were associated with a 1-3 m thick zone about 35 m below surface. This zone was found to respond to the acetate additions as a function of the municipal pumping rate and the carbon-to-nitrogen ratio (i.e., determined by the injected acetate concentration). Initially, acetate was injected just below the theoretical stoichiometric requirement for complete denitrification and nitrate disappearance was accompanied by nitrite production. Increasing the C:N ratio (doubling the acetate injection concentration) increased the removal of nitrate and diminished the occurrence of nitrite. Slowing the municipal pumping rate, with a C:N ratio of 1.2-1.6, resulted in complete nitrate attenuation with no nitrite production and no sulfate reduction. The

  6. Optics of a 1.5 TeV injector for the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, John A.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01

    A concept is being developed to install a second, low energy ring (LER) above the LHC to accelerate protons from 450 GeV to 1.5 TeV prior to injection into the LHC. The arc and dispersion suppresser optics of the LHC would be replicated in the LER using combined function ''transmission line'' magnets originally proposed for the VLHC. To avoid costly civil construction, in the straight sections housing detectors at least, the LER and LHC must share beampipes and some magnets through the detector portion of the straights. Creating the appropriate optics for these LER-LHC transition regions is very challenging: In addition to matching to the nominal LHC lattice functions at these locations the changes in altitude of 1.35 m separating the LER and LHC must be performed achromatically to avoid emittance blowup arising from vertical dispersion when the beams are transferred to the LHC.

  7. Facilitating outpatient treatment entry following detoxification for injection drug use: a multisite test of three interventions.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Barbara K; Fuller, Bret E; Lee, Eun Sul; Tillotson, Carrie; Woelfel, Tiffany; Jenkins, Lindsay; Robinson, James; Booth, Robert E; McCarty, Dennis

    2009-06-01

    A multisite, randomized trial within the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) was conducted to test 3 interventions to enhance treatment initiation following detoxification: (a) a single session, therapeutic alliance intervention (TA) added to usual treatment; (b) a 2-session, counseling and education, HIV/HCV risk reduction intervention (C&E), added to usual treatment; and (c) treatment as usual (TAU) only. Injection drug users (n=632) enrolled in residential detoxification at 8 community treatment programs were randomized to 1 of the 3 study conditions. TA participants reported entering outpatient treatment sooner and in greater numbers than TAU participants. Reported treatment entry for C&E fell between TA and TAU with no significant differences between C&E and the other conditions. There were no differences among the interventions in retention, as measured by weeks of outpatient treatment for all participants who reported treatment entry. Alliance building interventions appear to be effective in facilitating transfer from detoxification to outpatient treatment, but additional treatment engagement interventions may be necessary to improve retention. PMID:19586142

  8. HCV Treatment as Prevention in People Who Inject Drugs – testing the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Matthew; De Angelis, Daniela; Vickerman, Peter; Hutchinson, Sharon; Martin, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review The majority of HCV infections in UK and many developing countries were acquired through injecting. New clinical guidance suggests that HCV treatment should be offered to people with a transmission risk – such as people who inject drugs (PWID) – irrespective of severity of liver disease. We consider the strength of the evidence base and potential problems in evaluating HCV treatment as prevention among PWID. Recent Findings There is good theoretical evidence from dynamic models that HCV treatment for PWID could reduce HCV chronic prevalence and incidence among PWID. Economic evaluations from high-income settings have suggested HCV treatment for PWID is cost-effective, and that in many settings HCV treatment of PWID could be more cost-effective than treating those at an equivalent stage with no ongoing transmission risk. Epidemiological studies of older interferon treatments have suggested that PWID can achieve similar treatment outcomes to other patient groups treated for chronic HCV. Impact and cost-effectiveness of HCV treatment is driven by the potential “prevention benefit” of treating PWID. Model projections suggest that more future infections, End Stage Liver Disease, and HCV related deaths will be averted than lost through re-infection of PWID treated successfully for HCV. However, there is to date no empirical evidence from trials or observational studies that test the model projections and “prevention benefit” hypothesis. In part this also is because of uncertainty in the evidence base but also because PWID HCV treatment rates historically in most sites have been low, and any scale-up and switch to the new DAA has not yet occurred. There are a number of key uncertainties in the data available on PWID that need to be improved and addressed in order to evaluate treatment as prevention. These include estimates of the prevalence of PWID, measurements of HCV chronic prevalence and incidence among PWID, and how to interpret re

  9. Testing the Injectivity of CO2 in a Sub-surface Heterogeneous Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundal, A.; Nystuen, J.; Dypvik, H.; Aagaard, P.

    2011-12-01

    additional data from side wall cores and cuttings. From this we evaluate facies dependence related to observed diagenetic features and compositional variations due to burial depth (2-4km), mainly considering chlorite coatings (preserving porosity) and cementation (calcite and quartz). Using Schlumberger soft-wares; Petrel (reservoir) and Eclipse (fluid flow), we are testing injection scenarios (one point, several points, bleeding wells) in several intra-formational geological settings. These results will be evaluated relative to the distribution of facies and heterogeneities in the reservoir, considering multiphase flow given the local pressure regime.

  10. Intermediate Scale Laboratory Testing to Understand Mechanisms of Capillary and Dissolution Trapping during Injection and Post-Injection of CO2 in Heterogeneous Geological Formations

    SciTech Connect

    Illangasekare, Tissa; Trevisan, Luca; Agartan, Elif; Mori, Hiroko; Vargas-Johnson, Javier; Gonzalez-Nicolas, Ana; Cihan, Abdullah; Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin

    2015-03-31

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) represents a technology aimed to reduce atmospheric loading of CO2 from power plants and heavy industries by injecting it into deep geological formations, such as saline aquifers. A number of trapping mechanisms contribute to effective and secure storage of the injected CO2 in supercritical fluid phase (scCO2) in the formation over the long term. The primary trapping mechanisms are structural, residual, dissolution and mineralization. Knowledge gaps exist on how the heterogeneity of the formation manifested at all scales from the pore to the site scales affects trapping and parameterization of contributing mechanisms in models. An experimental and modeling study was conducted to fill these knowledge gaps. Experimental investigation of fundamental processes and mechanisms in field settings is not possible as it is not feasible to fully characterize the geologic heterogeneity at all relevant scales and gathering data on migration, trapping and dissolution of scCO2. Laboratory experiments using scCO2 under ambient conditions are also not feasible as it is technically challenging and cost prohibitive to develop large, two- or three-dimensional test systems with controlled high pressures to keep the scCO2 as a liquid. Hence, an innovative approach that used surrogate fluids in place of scCO2 and formation brine in multi-scale, synthetic aquifers test systems ranging in scales from centimeter to meter scale developed used. New modeling algorithms were developed to capture the processes controlled by the formation heterogeneity, and they were tested using the data from the laboratory test systems. The results and findings are expected to contribute toward better conceptual models, future improvements to DOE numerical codes, more accurate assessment of storage capacities, and optimized placement strategies. This report presents the experimental and modeling methods

  11. Reduction in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) fusion reaction rate by unbalanced beam injection and rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Hendel, H.W.; Jassby, D.L.; Bitter, M.L.; Taylor, G.

    1987-06-01

    In TFTR plasmas at low to moderate density, the highest fusion energy gain Q/sub dd/ (D-D fusion power/injected power P/sub b/) is obtained with nearly balanced co- and counter-injection of neutral beams. For a given beam power, significantly unbalanced injection reduces Q/sub dd/ because the accompanying plasma rotation reduces the beam-target fusion reactivity, the fast-ion slowing-down time, and the beam-beam reaction rate, while and decrease from their maximum values. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. LHC and Flavour Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, T.

    2009-12-17

    The large centre of mass energy of the LHC will provide a huge cross-section for heavy flavour production making the LHC a powerful laboratory for studying the indirect effects of new physics. The prospects for four key measurements at LHCb and the central detectors (ATLAS and CMS) are presented.

  13. Acceptability of Rapid Point-of-Care Hepatitis C Tests Among People Who Inject Drugs and Utilize Syringe-Exchange Programs.

    PubMed

    Barocas, Joshua A; Linas, Benjamin P; Kim, Arthur Y; Fangman, John; Westergaard, Ryan P

    2016-03-01

    People who inject drugs may benefit from point-of-care hepatitis C virus (HCV) testing offered at syringe exchanges. We sought to understand whether this population would be willing to undergo rapid HCV testing. We found that there was broad support for rapid HCV testing, especially among younger people who inject drugs with high perceived risk. PMID:27191007

  14. Acceptability of Rapid Point-of-Care Hepatitis C Tests Among People Who Inject Drugs and Utilize Syringe-Exchange Programs

    PubMed Central

    Barocas, Joshua A.; Linas, Benjamin P.; Kim, Arthur Y.; Fangman, John; Westergaard, Ryan P.

    2016-01-01

    People who inject drugs may benefit from point-of-care hepatitis C virus (HCV) testing offered at syringe exchanges. We sought to understand whether this population would be willing to undergo rapid HCV testing. We found that there was broad support for rapid HCV testing, especially among younger people who inject drugs with high perceived risk. PMID:27191007

  15. Analysis of Tests of Subsurface Injection, Storage, and Recovery of Freshwater in Lancaster, Antelope Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, Steven P.; Carlson, Carl S.; Metzger, Loren F.; Howle, James F.; Galloway, Devin L.; Sneed, Michelle; Ikehara, Marti E.; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; King, Nancy E.

    2003-01-01

    Ground-water levels in Lancaster, California, declined more than 200 feet during the 20th century, resulting in reduced ground-water supplies and more than 6 feet of land subsidence. Facing continuing population growth, water managers are seeking solutions to these problems. Injection of imported, treated fresh water into the aquifer system when it is most available and least expensive, for later use during high-demand periods, is being evaluated as part of a management solution. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works and the Antelope Valley-East Kern Water Agency, monitored a pilot injection program, analyzed the hydraulic and subsidence-related effects of injection, and developed a simulation/optimization model to help evaluate the effectiveness of using existing and proposed wells in an injection program for halting the decline of ground-water levels and avoiding future land subsidence while meeting increasing ground-water demand. A variety of methods were used to measure aquifer-system response to injection. Water levels were measured continuously in nested (multi-depth) piezometers and monitoring wells and periodically in other wells that were within several miles of the injection site. Microgravity surveys were done to estimate changes in the elevation of the water table in the absence of wells and to estimate specific yield. Aquifer-system deformation was measured directly and continuously using a dual borehole extensometer and indirectly using continuous Global Positioning System (GPS), first-order spirit leveling, and an array of tiltmeters. The injected water and extracted water were sampled periodically and analyzed for constituents, including chloride and trihalomethanes. Measured injection rates of about 750 gallons per minute (gal/min) per well at the injection site during a 5-month period showed that injection at or above the average extraction rates at that site (about 800 gal/min) was

  16. Design, testing, and evaluation of a water injection grouting system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    The necessity of grouting vertical ground heat exchanger boreholes is well established. The use of chip bentonite was investigated as an alternative to slurry grouting methods for backfilling geothermal bores. Grouting a geothermal bore with chip bentonite has many potential benefits if the bore can be completely grouted from bottom to top. High solids content grouts that are possible with chip bentonite could increase the thermal conductivity of the grout and make it less susceptible to performance reductions associated with drying of the grout. The lower price of chip bentonite compared to powder bentonite grouts would reduce the cost of grouting. Chip bentonites would also have an advantage over powder bentonite grouts by reducing the amount of dust created during the grouting process. The proposed grouting system would use water to transport chip bentonite through a tremie pipe into the bore. The properties of chip bentonite grouts were first examined by pouring chip bentonite into a standing column of water. Chip bentonite grouts had percent solids ranging from 50% to 60% and thermal conductivity from 0.46 to 0.52 Btu/hr ft F. Tests were also performed with a thermal additive mixed with the bentonite chips. Additives tested included pea rock, masonry sand, and crushed quartzite. The additive in the wet grout accumulated in pockets, creating possible avenues for hydraulic movement. Total percent solids of bentonite and additive mixtures ranged from 60% to 80%. Thermal conductivity results were varied, but generally increased with increasing percentages of additive. The feasibility of transporting bentonite chips with water through a tremie pipe was studied with two types of water injection systems. Both systems incorporated a pressurized solids tank to keep water from hydrating the chips prior to entering the water stream. A low pressure system was able to transfer pea rock successfully through a short length of tremie pipe. The use of bentonite chips caused

  17. Status of LHC crab activity simulations and beam studies

    SciTech Connect

    Calaga,R.; Assman, R.; Barranco, J.; Barranco, J.; Calaga, R.; Caspers, F.; Ciapala, E.; De-Maria, R.; Koutchouk, J. P.; Linnecar, T.; Metral, E.; Morita, A.; Solyak, N.; Sun, Y.; Tomas, R.; Tuckmantel, J.; Weiler, T.; Zimmermann, F.

    2009-05-04

    The LHC crab cavity program is advancing rapidly towards a first prototype which is anticipated to be tested during the early stages of the LHC phase I upgrade and commissioning. The general project status and some aspects related to crab optics, collimation, aperture constraints, impedances, noise effects. beam transparency and machine protection critical for a safe and robust operation of LHC beams with crab cavities are addressed here.

  18. A new test for evaluating Eighth Amendment challenges to lethal injections.

    PubMed

    2007-03-01

    An explosion of Eighth Amendment challenges to lethal injection protocols has struck the federal courts. The Supreme Court's recent decision in Hill v. McDonough,1 which empowered prisoners to bring challenges to lethal injection procedures under 42 U.S.C. para. 1983, has facilitated a flood of new lethal injection cases. In response, several courts have ordered states to alter their protocols, spurring other capital inmates to litigate such challenges. Distressingly, the courts evaluating these claims have almost no law to guide them. The last Supreme Court decision applying the Eighth Amendment to a method of execution was written in 1947; that case, Louisiana ex rel. Francis v. Resweber,2 occurred before the Eighth Amendment was applied to the states and resulted in a 4-1-4 split. Although lower courts have heard numerous challenges to execution methods, few have analyzed the constitutional validity of a method of execution in detail. Making matters worse, courts that find Eighth Amendment violations must craft equitable remedies that often amount to entirely new execution protocols. No clear precedent exists to guide courts in formulating such remedies. This Note proposes a legal standard for the administration of Eighth Amendment method-of-execution claims, focusing on lethal injection cases. Part I describes lethal injection procedures and summarizes recent litigation. Part II discusses the difficulty of evaluating lethal injection claims, analyzing both general difficulties in interpreting the Eighth Amendment and specific difficulties associated with lethal injection cases. Part III proposes a standard for addressing method-of-execution claims that attempts to balance a prisoner's interest in a painless execution with a state's interest in conducting executions efficiently. Part IV discusses remedies for unconstitutional procedures. Part V concludes.

  19. BNL-BUILT LHC MAGNET ERROR IMPACT ANALYSIS AND COMPENSATION.

    SciTech Connect

    PTITSIN,V.; TEPIKIAN,S.; WEI,J.

    1999-03-29

    Superconducting magnets built at the Brookhaven National Laboratory will be installed in both the Insertion Region IP2 and IP8, and the RF Region of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In particular, field quality of these IR dipoles will become important during LHC heavy-ion operation when the {beta}* at IP2 is reduced to 0.5 meters. This paper studies the impact of the magnetic errors in BNL-built magnets on LHC performance at injection and collision, both for proton and heavy-ion operation. Methods and schemes for error compensation are considered including optimization of magnet orientation and compensation using local IR correctors.

  20. Design and development of a helium injection system to improve external leakage detection during liquid nitrogen immersion tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Andrew; Mishra, Rakesh

    2016-10-01

    The testing of assemblies for use in cryogenic systems commonly includes evaluation at or near operating (therefore cryogenic) temperature. Typical assemblies include valves and pumps for use in liquid oxygen-liquid hydrogen rocket engines. One frequently specified method of cryogenic external leakage testing requires the assembly, pressurized with gaseous helium (GHe), be immersed in a bath of liquid nitrogen (LN2) and allowed to thermally stabilize. Component interfaces are then visually inspected for leakage (bubbles). Unfortunately the liquid nitrogen will be boiling under normal, bench-top, test conditions. This boiling tends to mask even significant leakage. One little known and perhaps under-utilized property of helium is the seemingly counter-intuitive thermodynamic property that when ambient temperature helium is bubbled through boiling LN2 at a temperature of -195.8 °C, the temperature of the liquid nitrogen will reduce. This paper reports on the design and testing of a novel proof-of-concept helium injection control system confirming that it is possible to reduce the temperature of an LN2 bath below boiling point through the controlled injection of ambient temperature gaseous helium and then to efficiently maintain a reduced helium flow rate to maintain a stabilized liquid temperature, enabling clear visual observation of components immersed within the LN2. Helium saturation testing is performed and injection system sizing is discussed.

  1. Hanford 100-D Area Biostimulation Soluble Substrate Field Test: Interim Data Summary for the Substrate Injection and Process Monitoring Phases of the Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Mackley, Rob D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Johnson, Christian D.; Elmore, Rebecca P.; Brockman, Fred J.; Bilskis, Christina L.

    2008-06-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is conducting a treatability test designed to demonstrate that in situ biostimulation can be applied to help meet cleanup goals in the Hanford Site 100-D Area. The in situ biostimulation technology is intended to provide supplemental treatment upgradient of the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) barrier by reducing the concentration of the primary oxidizing species in groundwater (i.e., nitrate and dissolved oxygen) and chromate, and thereby increasing the longevity of the ISRM barrier. This report summarizes the initial results from field testing of an in situ biological treatment zone implemented through injection of a soluble substrate. The field test is divided into operational phases that include substrate injection, process monitoring, and performance monitoring. The results summarized herein are for the substrate injection and process monitoring phase encompassing the first approximately three months of field testing. Performance monitoring is ongoing at the time this report was prepared and is planned to extend over approximately 18 months. As such, this report is an interim data summary report for the field test. The treatability testing has multiple objectives focused on evaluating the performance of biostimulation as a reducing barrier for nitrate, oxygen, and chromate. The following conclusions related to these objectives are supported by the data provided in this report. Substrate was successfully distributed to a radius of about 15 m (50 ft) from the injection well. Monitoring data indicate that microbial growth initiated rapidly, and this rapid growth would limit the ability to inject substrate to significantly larger zones from a single injection well. As would be expected, the uniformity of substrate distribution was impacted by subsurface heterogeneity. However, subsequent microbial activity and ability to reduce the targeted species was observed throughout the monitored zone during the process monitoring

  2. Bulk Current Injection Testing of Cable Noise Reduction Techniques, 50 kHz to 400 MHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T.; Hare, Richard J.; Singh, Manisha

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents empirical results of cable noise reduction techniques as demonstrated using bulk current injection (BCI) techniques with radiated fields from 50 kHz - 400 MHz. It is a follow up to the two-part paper series presented at the Asia Pacific EMC Conference that focused on TEM cell signal injection. This paper discusses the effects of cable types, shield connections, and chassis connections on cable noise. For each topic, well established theories are compared with data from a real-world physical system.

  3. Optimization of parameters for the inline-injection system at Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.; Ko, S.K.

    1995-10-01

    We present some of our parameter optimization results utilizing code PARMLEA, for the ATF Inline-Injection System. The new solenoid-Gun-Solenoid -- Drift-Linac Scheme would improve the beam quality needed for FEL and other experiments at ATF as compared to the beam quality of the original design injection system. To optimize the gain in the beam quality we have considered various parameters including the accelerating field gradient on the photoathode, the Solenoid field strengths, separation between the gun and entrance to the linac as well as the (type size) initial charge distributions. The effect of the changes in the parameters on the beam emittance is also given.

  4. Supersymmetry At LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Shaaban

    2008-04-21

    One of the main motivation of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), scheduled to start around 2006, is to search for supersymmetric particles. The region of the parameter space of the minimal supersymmetric standard model, where supersymmetry can be discovered is investigated. We show that if supersymmetry exists at electroweak scale, it would be easy to find signals for it at the LHC. If the LHC does find supersymmetry, this would be one of the greatest achievements in the history of theoretical physics.

  5. Cryogenics for HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavian, L.; Brodzinski, K.; Claudet, S.; Ferlin, G.; Wagner, U.; van Weelderen, R.

    The discovery of a Higgs boson at CERN in 2012 is the start of a major program of work to measure this particle's properties with the highest possible precision for testing the validity of the Standard Model and to search for further new physics at the energy frontier. The LHC is in a unique position to pursue this program. Europe's top priority is the exploitation of the full potential of the LHC, including the high-luminosity upgrade of the machine and detectors with an objective to collect ten times more data than in the initial design, by around 2030. To reach this objective, the LHC cryogenic system must be upgraded to withstand higher beam current and higher luminosity at top energy while keeping the same operation availability by improving the collimation system and the protection of electronics sensitive to radiation. This chapter will present the conceptual design of the cryogenic system upgrade with recent updates in performance requirements, the corresponding layout and architecture of the system as well as the main technical challenges which have to be met in the coming years.

  6. Hydrogeochemical alteration of groundwater due to a CO2 injection test into a shallow aquifer in Northeast Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dethlefsen, Frank; Peter, Anita; Hornbruch, Götz; Lamert, Hendrik; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; Beyer, Matthias; Dietrich, Peter; Dahmke, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    The accidental release of CO2 into potable aquifers, for instance as a consequence of a leakage out of a CO2 store site, can endanger drinking water resources due to the induced geochemical processes. A 10-day CO2 injection experiment into a shallow aquifer was carried out in Wittstock (Northeast Germany) in order to investigate the geochemical impact of a CO2 influx into such an aquifer and to test different monitoring methods. Information regarding the site investigation, the injection procedure monitoring setup, and first geochemical monitoring results are described in [1]. Apart from the utilization of the test results to evaluate monitoring approaches [2], further findings are presented on the evaluation of the geophysical monitoring [3], and the monitoring of stable carbon isotopes [4]. This part of the study focuses of the hydrogeochemical alteration of groundwater due to the CO2 injection test. As a consequence of the CO2 injection, major cations were released, i.e. concentrations increased, whereas major anion concentrations - beside bicarbonate - decreased, probably due to increased anion sorption capacity at variably charged exchange sites of minerals. Trace element concentrations increased as well significantly, whereas the relative concentration increase was far larger than the relative concentration increase of major cations. Furthermore, geochemical reactions show significant spatial heterogeneity, i.e. some elements such as Cr, Cu, Pb either increased in concentration or remained at stable concentrations with increasing TIC at different wells. Statistical analyses of regression coefficients confirm the different spatial reaction patterns at different wells. Concentration time series at single wells give evidence, that the trace element release is pH dependent, i.e. trace elements such as Zn, Ni, Co are released at pH of around 6.2-6.6, whereas other trace elements like As, Cd, Cu are released at pH of 5.6-6.4. [1] Peter, A., et al., Investigation of

  7. Multigap Diffraction at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2005-10-06

    The large rapidity interval available at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) offers an arena in which the QCD aspects of diffraction may be explored in an environment free of gap survival complications using events with multiple rapidity gaps.

  8. Investigation of Microseismicity Triggered by Raised Pore Pressure through Laboratory CO2 Injection Tests in Berea Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Chang, C.

    2014-12-01

    One of the critical problems for carbon dioxide capture and storage projects is the occurrence of microseismicity due to increased pore pressure during CO2 injection. The mechanism of microseismicity can be explained by the notion that the injection-induced pore pressure increase can potentially alter the reservoir rock in the form of either creating fractures or triggering slip on pre-existing discontinuities by reducing the effective normal stress. Therefore, it is important to estimate the critical pore pressure (Pcr) to prevent excessive seismicity. The purpose of this study is to attempt to simulate the microseismicity induced from increased pore pressure by CO2 injection into Berea sandstone. Cylindrical specimens were saw-cut at 30° from the specimen axis. Specimens were either dry or saturated by tap water. The frictional coefficients of the fractures were determined from triaxial shear tests to be 0.71 (dry) and 0.65 (water-saturated). With the frictional coefficients known, we then injected CO2 (either gaseous of liquid state) into the specimens (either dry or water-saturated) subjected to triaxial stress conditions. Under the conditions of constant confining pressures and axial stresses, we increased pore pressure in steps by injecting CO2 using a syringe pump. We monitored shear slip along the fracture using axial LVDTs and microseismicity using an acoustic emission sensor. The critical pore pressure that would initiate shear slip along the fracture was calculated from the Coulomb friction law. When CO2 was injected into dry specimens, shear slip and associated microseismicity started to occur at the pore pressure levels exactly estimated from the Coulomb theory. However, when CO2 (both gaseous and liquid states) was injected into water-saturated specimens, the same were initiated at pore pressures slightly higher (by 1.2-3.7 MPa) than that estimated from the Coulomb friction law. These results suggest that the presence of water and associated water

  9. The LHC Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-03-11

    The Large Hadron Collider or LHC is the world’s biggest particle accelerator, but it can only get particles moving very quickly. To make measurements, scientists must employ particle detectors. There are four big detectors at the LHC: ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln introduces us to these detectors and gives us an idea of each one’s capabilities.

  10. The LHC Experiments

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The Large Hadron Collider or LHC is the world’s biggest particle accelerator, but it can only get particles moving very quickly. To make measurements, scientists must employ particle detectors. There are four big detectors at the LHC: ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln introduces us to these detectors and gives us an idea of each one’s capabilities.

  11. Testing and comparison of four ionic tracers to measure stream flow loss by multiple tracer injection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zellweger, G.W.

    1994-01-01

    An injectate containing lithium, sodium, chloride and bromide was added continuously at five sites along a 507 m study reach of St Kevin Gulch, Lake County, Colorado to determine which sections of the stream were losing water to the stream bed and to ascertain how well the four tracers performed. The acidity of the stream (pH 3.6) made it possible for lithium and sodium, which are normally absorbed by ion exchange with stream bed sediment, to be used as conservative tracers. Net flow losses as low as 0.81 s-1, or 8% of flow, were calculated between measuring sites. By comparing the results of simultaneous injection it was determined whether subsections of the study reach were influent or effluent. Evaluation of tracer concentrations along 116 m of stream indicated that all four tracers behaved conservatively. Discharges measured by Parshall flumes were 4-18% greater than discharges measured by tracer dilution. -from Author

  12. A modular injection system, multilevel sampler, and manifold for tracer tests.

    PubMed

    Mailloux, Brian J; Fuller, Mark E; Rose, George F; Onstott, Tullis C; DeFlaun, Mary F; Alvarez, Enrique; Hemingway, Chris; Hallet, R Bruce; Phelps, Tommy J; Griffin, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    Ground water injection and sampling systems were developed for bacterial transport experiments in both homogenous and heterogeneous unconsolidated, surficial aquifers. Two types of injection systems, a large single tank and a dynamic mixing tank, were designed to deliver more than 800 L of amended ground water to the aquifer over 12 hours, without altering the ground water temperature, pH, Eh, or dissolved gas composition. Two types of multilevel samplers (MLSs) were designed and installed. Permanent MLSs performed well for the homogenous surficial aquifer, but their installation procedure promoted vertical mixing, which could obfuscate experimental data obtained from vertically stratified, heterogeneous aquifers. A novel, removable MLS was designed to fit in 2- and 4-inch wells. Expandable O-rings between each sampling port hydraulically isolated each port for sample collection when a nut was tightened at the land surface. A low-cost vacuum manifold system designed to work with both MLS designs used 50 mL centrifuge tubes to efficiently sample 12 MLS ports with one peristaltic pump head. The integrated system was developed and used during four field campaigns over a period of three years. During each campaign, more than 3000 ground water samples were collected in less than one week. This system should prove particularly useful for ground water tracer, injection, and push-pull experiments that require high-frequency and/or high-density sampling. PMID:14649864

  13. In-Situ Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection: Pilot-Scale Treatability Test at the 300 Area, Hanford Site - 8187

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeul, Vince R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Williams, Mark D.

    2008-06-02

    This paper describes the pilot-scale treatability test that was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of using a polyphosphate injection approach to treat uranium-contaminated groundwater in situ within the 300 Area aquifer at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. Primary test objectives were to assess 1) direct treatment of available uranium contributing to the groundwater plume through precipitation of the uranyl phosphate mineral autunite, and 2) emplacement of secondary-treatment capacity via precipitation of the calcium phosphate mineral apatite, which acts as a long-term sorbent for uranium.

  14. Barriers and missed opportunities to HIV testing among injection drug users in two Mexico – US border cities

    PubMed Central

    MOYER, L. B.; BROUWER, K. C.; BRODINE, S. K.; RAMOS, R.; LOZADA, R.; CRUZ, M. FIRESTONE; MAGIS-RODRIGUEZ, C.; STRATHDEE, S. A.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction and Aims Despite increasing HIV prevalence in cities along the Mexico – US border, HIV testing among high-risk populations remains low. We sought to identify barriers associated with HIV testing among injection drug users (IDUs) in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, the two largest Mexican border cities located across from San Diego, California and El Paso, Texas, respectively. Design and Methods In 2005, 222 IDUs in Tijuana and 205 IDUs in Ciudad Juarez were recruited by respondent-driven sampling and administered a questionnaire to collect socio-demographic, behavioural and HIV testing history data. Blood samples were provided for serological testing of HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV) and syphilis. Results Only 38% and 30% of respondents in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, respectively, had ever had an HIV test. The factors associated independently with never having been tested for HIV differed between the two sites, except for lack of knowledge on HIV transmission, which was associated independently in both locales. Importantly, 65% of those who had never been tested for HIV in both cities experienced at least one missed opportunity for voluntary testing, including medical visits, drug treatment and spending time in jail. Discussion and Conclusions Among this high-risk IDU population we found HIV testing to be low, with voluntary testing in public and private settings utilised inadequately. These findings underscore the need to expand voluntary HIV education and testing and to integrate it into services and locales frequented by IDUs in these Mexico –US border cities. PMID:18034380

  15. Data from pumping and injection tests and chemical sampling in the geothermal aquifer at Klamath Falls, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, S.M.; Janik, C.J.; Long, D.C.; Solbau, R.D.; Lienau, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    A seven-week pumping and injection tests in the geothermal aquifer at Klamath Falls, Oregon, in 1983 provided new information on hydraulic properties of the aquifer. The Open-File Data Report on the tests includes graphs of water levels measured in 50 wells, temperature measurement in 17 wells , daily air-temperatures in relation to discharge of thermal water from more than 70 pumped and artesian wells, tables of monthly mean air temperatures and estimates of discharges of thermal water during a normal year, and tables of chemical and isotopic analyses on samples from 12 wells. The water-level measurements reflect the effects of pumping, injection, and recovery over about 1.7 square miles of the hot-well area of Klamath Falls. The pumped well, City Well No 1, and the injection well at the Klamath County Museum are components of a proposed District Heating Plan. The study was funded principally under contracts from the U.S. Department of Energy to the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Stanford University, and the Oregon Institute of Technology, with coordination and chemical sampling provided under the Geothermal Research Program, U.S. Geological Survey. Support was received from the City of Klamath Falls, Klamath County Chamber of Commerce, Citizens for Responsible Geothermal Development, and many citizen volunteers. (USGS)

  16. Insight from simulations of single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests on simple and complex fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, C.-F.; Doughty, C.

    2009-08-06

    The single-well injection withdrawal (SWIW) test, a tracer test utilizing only one well, is proposed as a useful contribution to site characterization of fractured rock, as well as providing parameters relevant to tracer diffusion and sorption. The usual conceptual model of flow and solute transport through fractured rock with low matrix permeability involves solute advection and dispersion through a fracture network coupled with diffusion and sorption into the surrounding rock matrix. Unlike two-well tracer tests, results of SWIW tests are ideally independent of advective heterogeneity, channeling and flow dimension, and, instead, focus on diffusive and sorptive characteristics of tracer (solute) transport. Thus, they can be used specifically to study such characteristics and evaluate the diffusive parameters associated with tracer transport through fractured media. We conduct simulations of SWIW tests on simple and complex fracture models, the latter being defined as having two subfractures with altered rock blocks in between and gouge material in their apertures. Using parameters from the Aspo site in Sweden, we calculate and study SWIW tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs) from a test involving four days of injection and then withdrawal. By examining the peak concentration C{sub pk} of the SWIW BTCs for a variety of parameters, we confirm that C{sub pk} is largely insensitive to the fracture advective flow properties, in particular to permeability heterogeneity over the fracture plane or to subdividing the flow into two subfractures in the third dimension orthogonal to the fracture plane. The peak arrival time t{sub pk} is not a function of fracture or rock properties, but is controlled by the time schedule of the SWIW test. The study shows that the SWIW test is useful for the study of tracer diffusion-sorption processes, including the effect of the so-called flow-wetted surface (FWS) of the fracture. Calculations with schematic models with different FWS values are

  17. Laboratory endurance test of sunflower methyl esters for direct injected diesel engine fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, K.; Ziejewski, M.

    1983-12-01

    A methyl ester of sunflower oil was durability tested using the test cycle recommended by the Alternate Fuels Committee of the Engine Manufacturer's Association. The results are compared to a baseline test using diesel fuel. Based on the results, the methyl ester fuel successfully completed the 200-hour durability test.

  18. Acceptability of rapid oral fluid HIV testing among male injection drug users in Taiwan, 1997 and 2007.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Shu-Yu; Morisky, Donald E; Yeh, Ching-Ying; Twu, Shiing-Jer; Peng, Eugene Yu-Chang; Malow, Robert M

    2011-04-01

    Rapid oral fluid HIV testing (rapid oral testing) is in the process of being adapted in Taiwan and elsewhere given its advantages over prior HIV testing methods. To guide this process, we examined the acceptability of rapid oral testing at two time points (i.e., 1997 and 2007) among one of the highest risk populations, male injection drug users (IDUs). For this purpose, an anonymous self-administered survey was completed by HIV-negative IDUs involved in the criminal justice system in 1997 (N (1)=137 parolees) and 2007 (N (2)=106 prisoners). A social marketing model helped guide the design of our questionnaire to assess the acceptability of rapid oral testing. This included assessing a new product, across four marketing dimensions: product, price, promotion, and place. Results revealed that in both 1997 and 2007, over 90% indicated that rapid oral testing would be highly acceptable, particularly if the cost was under US$6, and that a pharmacy would be the most appropriate and accessible venue for selling the rapid oral testing kits. The vast majority of survey respondents believed that the cost of rapid oral testing should be federally subsidized and that television and newspaper advertisements would be the most effective media to advertise for rapid oral testing. Both the 1997 and 2007 surveys suggested that rapid oral HIV testing would be particularly accepted in Taiwan by IDUs after release from the criminal justice system. PMID:21271392

  19. Predictive modelling of NAPL injection tests in variable aperture spatially correlated fractures.

    PubMed

    Steele, A; Lerner, D N

    2001-06-01

    In preparation for a field experiment where a NAPL will be injected into a fractured sandstone aquifer, a 2D invasion percolation model of DNAPL migration in a single horizontal fracture with varying aperture has been developed. This simulation investigated the effect of spatially correlated fracture aperture fields on pressure-saturation relationships as a function of variable aperture mean, standard deviation, and spatial correlation statistics under hydrostatic conditions. Results from spatially correlated variable aperture fields can be significantly different from random fields. Longer ranges decreased entry pressures and higher standard deviations decreased nonwetting phase saturations. Mean aperture is the major control on displacement pressure, entry pressure and the form of the pressure-saturation curve. Simulation results using statistical parameters for a variable aperture natural sandstone fracture as described by Yeo et al. [International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences 35 (1998) 1051] closely resemble a Brooks-Corey pressure-saturation function, and exhibit a distinct entry pressure followed by a rapid increase in nonwetting phase saturation. Graphical estimates of entry pressure provide a good approximation of the critical aperture controlling the formation of a continuous nonwetting phase pathway in a variable aperture fracture. Consequently, we show that multiphase flow concepts developed for porous media can successfully be applied to variable aperture fractures. Entry pressure correlates well to the mean aperture in these simulations when using a Gaussian distribution of fracture aperture. Interpreted aperture distributions from NAPL injection experiments do not fit the true distribution well at low nonwetting phase saturations, but do at higher saturations above the entry pressure. Consequently, true, mechanical aperture variation within a fracture plane cannot be determined from NAPL injection experiments either in the field or

  20. Radio observations of GRB 100418a: Test of an energy injection model explaining long-lasting GRB afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Moin, A.; Wang, Z.; Chandra, P.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Tingay, S. J.; Reynolds, C.; Taylor, G. B.; Frail, D. A.; Phillips, C. J.

    2013-12-20

    We present the results of our radio observational campaign of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 100418a, for which we used the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the Very Large Array, and the Very Long Baseline Array. GRB 100418a was a peculiar GRB with unusual X-ray and optical afterglow profiles featuring a plateau phase with a very shallow rise. This observed plateau phase was believed to be due to a continued energy injection mechanism that powered the forward shock, giving rise to an unusual and long-lasting afterglow. The radio afterglow of GRB 100418a was detectable several weeks after the prompt emission. We conducted long-term monitoring observations of the afterglow and attempted to test the energy injection model advocating that the continuous energy injection is due to shells of material moving at a wide range of Lorentz factors. We obtained an upper limit of γ < 7 for the expansion rate of the GRB 100418a radio afterglow, indicating that the range-of-Lorentz factor model could only be applicable for relatively slow-moving ejecta. A preferred explanation could be that continued activity of the central engine may have powered the long-lasting afterglow.

  1. Estimation of αL, velocity, Kd and confidence limits from tracer injection test data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broermann, James; Bassett, R.L.; Weeks, Edwin P.; Borgstrom, Mark

    1997-01-01

    Bromide and boron were used as tracers during an injection experiment conducted at an artificial recharge facility near Stanton, Texas. The Ogallala aquifer at the Stanton site represents a heterogeneous alluvial environment and provides the opportunity to report scale dependent dispersivities at observation distances of 2 to 15 m in this setting. Values of longitudinal dispersivities are compared with other published values. Water samples were collected at selected depths both from piezometers and from fully screened observation wells at radii of 2, 5, 10 and 15 m. An exact analytical solution is used to simulate the concentration breakthrough curves and estimate longitudinal dispersivities and velocity parameters. Greater confidence can be placed on these data because the estimated parameters are error bounded using the bootstrap method. The non-conservative behavior of boron transport in clay rich sections of the aquifer were quantified with distribution coefficients by using bromide as a conservative reference tracer.

  2. Sector Tests of a Low-NO(sub x), Lean, Direct- Injection, Multipoint Integrated Module Combustor Concept Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacina, Robert R.; Wey, Chang-Lie; Laing, Peter; Mansour, Adel

    2002-01-01

    The low-emissions combustor development described is directed toward advanced high pressure aircraft gas-turbine applications. The emphasis of this research is to reduce nitrogen oxides (NOx) at high-power conditions and to maintain carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons at their current low levels at low power conditions. Low-NOx combustors can be classified into rich-burn and lean-burn concepts. Lean-burn combustors can be further classified into lean-premixed-prevaporized (LPP) and lean direct injection (LDI) concepts. In both concepts, all the combustor air, except for liner cooling flow, enters through the combustor dome so that the combustion occurs at the lowest possible flame temperature. The LPP concept has been shown to have the lowest NOx emissions, but for advanced high-pressure-ratio engines, the possibility of autoignition or flashback precludes its use. LDI differs from LPP in that the fuel is injected directly into the flame zone, and thus, it does not have the potential for autoignition or flashback and should have greater stability. However, since it is not premixed and prevaporized, good atomization is necessary and the fuel must be mixed quickly and uniformly so that flame temperatures are low and NOx formation levels are comparable to those of LPP. The LDI concept described is a multipoint fuel injection/multiburning zone concept. Each of the multiple fuel injectors has an air swirler associated with it to provide quick mixing and a small recirculation zone for burning. The multipoint fuel injection provides quick, uniform mixing and the small multiburning zones provide for reduced burning residence time, resulting in low NOx formation. An integrated-module approach was used for the construction where chemically etched laminates, diffusion bonded together, combine the fuel injectors, air swirlers, and fuel manifold into a single element. The multipoint concept combustor was demonstrated in a 15 sector test. The configuration tested had 36

  3. Exploring the Pomeron structure at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royon, Christophe; Saimpert, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    We present some physics topics that will allow us to constrain the Pomeron structure at the LHC in terms of gluon and quark densities using the dijet and γ+jet events and tagged protons in AFP (ATLAS) and CMS-TOTEM. We also discuss the possibility to test the BFKL dynamics using jet-gap-jet events.

  4. The LHCb Detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LHCb Collaboration; Alves, A. Augusto, Jr.; Filho, L. M. Andrade; Barbosa, A. F.; Bediaga, I.; Cernicchiaro, G.; Guerrer, G.; Lima, H. P., Jr.; Machado, A. A.; Magnin, J.; Marujo, F.; de Miranda, J. M.; Reis, A.; Santos, A.; Toledo, A.; Akiba, K.; Amato, S.; de Paula, B.; de Paula, L.; da Silva, T.; Gandelman, M.; Lopes, J. H.; Maréchal, B.; Moraes, D.; Polycarpo, E.; Rodrigues, F.; Ballansat, J.; Bastian, Y.; Boget, D.; DeBonis, I.; Coco, V.; David, P. Y.; Decamp, D.; Delebecque, P.; Drancourt, C.; Dumont-Dayot, N.; Girard, C.; Lieunard, B.; Minard, M. N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Rambure, T.; Rospabe, G.; T'Jampens, S.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bohner, G.; Bonnefoy, R.; Borras, D.; Carloganu, C.; Chanal, H.; Conte, E.; Cornat, R.; Crouau, M.; Delage, E.; Deschamps, O.; Henrard, P.; Jacquet, P.; Lacan, C.; Laubser, J.; Lecoq, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Magne, M.; Martemiyanov, M.; Mercier, M.-L.; Monteil, S.; Niess, V.; Perret, P.; Reinmuth, G.; Robert, A.; Suchorski, S.; Arnaud, K.; Aslanides, E.; Babel, J.; Benchouk, C.; Cachemiche, J.-P.; Cogan, J.; Derue, F.; Dinkespiler, B.; Duval, P.-Y.; Garonne, V.; Favard, S.; LeGac, R.; Leon, F.; Leroy, O.; Liotard, P.-L.; Marin, F.; Menouni, M.; Ollive, P.; Poss, S.; Roche, A.; Sapunov, M.; Tocco, L.; Viaud, B.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Amhis, Y.; Barrand, G.; Barsuk, S.; Beigbeder, C.; Beneyton, R.; Breton, D.; Callot, O.; Charlet, D.; D'Almagne, B.; Duarte, O.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jean-Marie, B.; Lefrancois, J.; Machefert, F.; Robbe, P.; Schune, M.-H.; Tocut, V.; Videau, I.; Benayoun, M.; David, P.; DelBuono, L.; Gilles, G.; Domke, M.; Futterschneider, H.; Ilgner, Ch; Kapusta, P.; Kolander, M.; Krause, R.; Lieng, M.; Nedos, M.; Rudloff, K.; Schleich, S.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Warda, K.; Agari, M.; Bauer, C.; Baumeister, D.; Bulian, N.; Fuchs, H. P.; Fallot-Burghardt, W.; Glebe, T.; Hofmann, W.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Löchner, S.; Ludwig, A.; Maciuc, F.; Sanchez Nieto, F.; Schmelling, M.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Sexauer, E.; Smale, N. J.; Trunk, U.; Voss, H.; Albrecht, J.; Bachmann, S.; Blouw, J.; Deissenroth, M.; Deppe, H.; Dreis, H. B.; Eisele, F.; Haas, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Hennenberger, S.; Knopf, J.; Moch, M.; Perieanu, A.; Rabenecker, S.; Rausch, A.; Rummel, C.; Rusnyak, R.; Schiller, M.; Stange, U.; Uwer, U.; Walter, M.; Ziegler, R.; Avoni, G.; Balbi, G.; Bonifazi, F.; Bortolotti, D.; Carbone, A.; D'Antone, I.; Galli, D.; Gregori, D.; Lax, I.; Marconi, U.; Peco, G.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vecchi, S.; Bonivento, W.; Cardini, A.; Cadeddu, S.; DeLeo, V.; Deplano, C.; Furcas, S.; Lai, A.; Oldeman, R.; Raspino, D.; Saitta, B.; Serra, N.; Baldini, W.; Brusa, S.; Chiozzi, S.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Evangelisti, F.; Franconieri, A.; Germani, S.; Gianoli, A.; Guoming, L.; Landi, L.; Malaguti, R.; Padoan, C.; Pennini, C.; Savriè, M.; Squerzanti, S.; Zhao, T.; Zhu, M.; Bizzeti, A.; Graziani, G.; Lenti, M.; Lenzi, M.; Maletta, F.; Pennazzi, S.; Passaleva, G.; Veltri, M.; Alfonsi, M.; Anelli, M.; Balla, A.; Battisti, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Campana, P.; Carletti, M.; Ciambrone, P.; Corradi, G.; Dané, E.; Di Virgilio, A.; DeSimone, P.; Felici, G.; Forti, C.; Gatta, M.; Lanfranchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Pistilli, M.; Poli Lener, M.; Rosellini, R.; Santoni, M.; Saputi, A.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Zossi, A.; Ameri, M.; Cuneo, S.; Fontanelli, F.; Gracco, V.; Miní, G.; Parodi, M.; Petrolini, A.; Sannino, M.; Vinci, A.; Alemi, M.; Arnaboldi, C.; Bellunato, T.; Calvi, M.; Chignoli, F.; DeLucia, A.; Galotta, G.; Mazza, R.; Matteuzzi, C.; Musy, M.; Negri, P.; Perego, D.; Pessina, G.; Auriemma, G.; Bocci, V.; Buccheri, A.; Chiodi, G.; Di Marco, S.; Iacoangeli, F.; Martellotti, G.; Nobrega, R.; Pelosi, A.; Penso, G.; Pinci, D.; Rinaldi, W.; Rossi, A.; Santacesaria, R.; Satriano, C.; Carboni, G.; Iannilli, M.; Massafferri Rodrigues, A.; Messi, R.; Paoluzzi, G.; Sabatino, G.; Santovetti, E.; Satta, A.; Amoraal, J.; van Apeldoorn, G.; Arink, R.; van Bakel, N.; Band, H.; Bauer, Th; Berkien, A.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bos, E.; Bron, Ch; Ceelie, L.; Doets, M.; van der Eijk, R.; Fransen, J.-P.; de Groen, P.; Gromov, V.; Hierck, R.; Homma, J.; Hommels, B.; Hoogland, W.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Jansen, L.; Jaspers, M.; Kaan, B.; Koene, B.; Koopstra, J.; Kroes, F.; Kraan, M.; Langedijk, J.; Merk, M.; Mos, S.; Munneke, B.; Palacios, J.; Papadelis, A.; Pellegrino, A.; van Petten, O.; du Pree, T.; Roeland, E.; Ruckstuhl, W.; Schimmel, A.; Schuijlenburg, H.; Sluijk, T.; Spelt, J.; Stolte, J.; Terrier, H.; Tuning, N.; Van Lysebetten, A.; Vankov, P.; Verkooijen, J.; Verlaat, B.; Vink, W.; de Vries, H.; Wiggers, L.; Ybeles Smit, G.; Zaitsev, N.; Zupan, M.; Zwart, A.; van den Brand, J.; Bulten, H. J.; de Jong, M.; Ketel, T.; Klous, S.; Kos, J.; M'charek, B.; Mul, F.; Raven, G.; Simioni, E.; Cheng, J.; Dai, G.; Deng, Z.; Gao, Y.; Gong, G.; Gong, H.; He, J.; Hou, L.; Li, J.; Qian, W.; Shao, B.; Xue, T.; Yang, Z.; Zeng, M.; Muryn, B.; Ciba, K.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Blocki, J.; Galuszka, K.; Hajduk, L.; Michalowski, J.; Natkaniec, Z.; Polok, G.; Stodulski, M.; Witek, M.; Brzozowski, K.; Chlopik, A.; Gawor, P.; Guzik, Z.; Nawrot, A.; Srednicki, A.; Syryczynski, K.; Szczekowski, M.; Anghel, D. V.; Cimpean, A.; Coca, C.; Constantin, F.; Cristian, P.; Dumitru, D. D.; Dumitru, D. T.; Giolu, G.; Kusko, C.; Magureanu, C.; Mihon, Gh; Orlandea, M.; Pavel, C.; Petrescu, R.; Popescu, S.; Preda, T.; Rosca, A.; Rusu, V. L.; Stoica, R.; Stoica, S.; Tarta, P. D.; Filippov, S.; Gavrilov, Yu; Golyshkin, L.; Gushchin, E.; Karavichev, O.; Klubakov, V.; Kravchuk, L.; Kutuzov, V.; Laptev, S.; Popov, S.; Aref'ev, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Dolgoshein, V.; Egorychev, V.; Golutvin, A.; Gushchin, O.; Konoplyannikov, A.; Korolko, I.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Machikhiliyan, I.; Malyshev, S.; Mayatskaya, E.; Prokudin, M.; Rusinov, D.; Rusinov, V.; Shatalov, P.; Shchutska, L.; Tarkovskiy, E.; Tayduganov, A.; Voronchev, K.; Zhiryakova, O.; Bobrov, A.; Bondar, A.; Eidelman, S.; Kozlinsky, A.; Shekhtman, L.; Beloous, K. S.; Dzhelyadin, R. I.; Gelitsky, Yu V.; Gouz, Yu P.; Kachnov, K. G.; Kobelev, A. S.; Matveev, V. D.; Novikov, V. P.; Obraztsov, V. F.; Ostankov, A. P.; Romanovsky, V. I.; Rykalin, V. I.; Soldatov, A. P.; Soldatov, M. M.; Tchernov, E. N.; Yushchenko, O. P.; Bochin, B.; Bondar, N.; Fedorov, O.; Golovtsov, V.; Guets, S.; Kashchuk, A.; Lazarev, V.; Maev, O.; Neustroev, P.; Sagidova, N.; Spiridenkov, E.; Volkov, S.; Vorobyev, An; Vorobyov, A.; Aguilo, E.; Bota, S.; Calvo, M.; Comerma, A.; Cano, X.; Dieguez, A.; Herms, A.; Lopez, E.; Luengo, S.; Garra, J.; Garrido, Ll; Gascon, D.; Gaspar de Valenzuela, A.; Gonzalez, C.; Graciani, R.; Grauges, E.; Perez Calero, A.; Picatoste, E.; Riera, J.; Rosello, M.; Ruiz, H.; Vilasis, X.; Xirgu, X.; Adeva, B.; Cid Vidal, X.; MartÉnez Santos, D.; Esperante Pereira, D.; Fungueiriño Pazos, J. L.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Gómez, C. Lois; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pérez Trigo, E.; Pló Casasús, M.; Rodriguez Cobo, C.; Rodríguez Pérez, P.; Saborido, J. J.; Seco, M.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Bartalini, P.; Bay, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; Blanc, F.; Borel, J.; Carron, B.; Currat, C.; Conti, G.; Dormond, O.; Ermoline, Y.; Fauland, P.; Fernandez, L.; Frei, R.; Gagliardi, G.; Gueissaz, N.; Haefeli, G.; Hicheur, A.; Jacoby, C.; Jalocha, P.; Jimenez-Otero, S.; Hertig, J.-P.; Knecht, M.; Legger, F.; Locatelli, L.; Moser, J.-R.; Needham, M.; Nicolas, L.; Perrin-Giacomin, A.; Perroud, J.-P.; Potterat, C.; Ronga, F.; Schneider, O.; Schietinger, T.; Steele, D.; Studer, L.; Tareb, M.; Tran, M. T.; van Hunen, J.; Vervink, K.; Villa, S.; Zwahlen, N.; Bernet, R.; Büchler, A.; Gassner, J.; Lehner, F.; Sakhelashvili, T.; Salzmann, C.; Sievers, P.; Steiner, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Straumann, U.; van Tilburg, J.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Ziegler, M.; Dovbnya, A.; Ranyuk, Yu; Shapoval, I.; Borisova, M.; Iakovenko, V.; Kyva, V.; Kovalchuk, O.; Okhrimenko, O.; Pugatch, V.; Pylypchenko, Yu; Adinolfi, M.; Brook, N. H.; Head, R. D.; Imong, J. P.; Lessnoff, K. A.; Metlica, F. C. D.; Muir, A. J.; Rademacker, J. H.; Solomin, A.; Szczypka, P. M.; Barham, C.; Buszello, C.; Dickens, J.; Gibson, V.; Haines, S.; Harrison, K.; Jones, C. R.; Katvars, S.; Kerzel, U.; Lazzeroni, C.; Li, Y. Y.; Rogers, G.; Storey, J.; Skottowe, H.; Wotton, S. A.; Adye, T. J.; Densham, C. J.; Easo, S.; Franek, B.; Loveridge, P.; Morrow, D.; Morris, J. V.; Nandakumar, R.; Nardulli, J.; Papanestis, A.; Patrick, G. N.; Ricciardi, S.; Woodward, M. L.; Zhang, Z.; Chamonal, R. J. U.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, P.; Eisenhardt, S.; Gilardi, N.; Khan, A.; Kim, Y. M.; Lambert, R.; Lawrence, J.; Main, A.; McCarron, J.; Mclean, C.; Muheim, F.; Osorio-Oliveros, A. F.; Playfer, S.; Styles, N.; Xie, Y.; Bates, A.; Carson, L.; da Cunha Marinho, F.; Doherty, F.; Eklund, L.; Gersabeck, M.; Haddad, L.; Macgregor, A. A.; Melone, J.; McEwan, F.; Petrie, D. M.; Paterson, S. K.; Parkes, C.; Pickford, A.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rodrigues, E.; Saavedra, A. F.; Soler, F. J. P.; Szumlak, T.; Viret, S.; Allebone, L.; Awunor, O.; Back, J.; Barber, G.; Barnes, C.; Cameron, B.; Clark, D.; Clark, I.; Dornan, P.; Duane, A.; Eames, C.; Egede, U.; Girone, M.; Greenwood, S.; Hallam, R.; Hare, R.; Howard, A.; Jolly, S.; Kasey, V.; Khaleeq, M.; Koppenburg, P.; Miller, D.; Plackett, R.; Price, D.; Reece, W.; Savage, P.; Savidge, T.; Simmons, B.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Websdale, D.; Affolder, A.; Anderson, J. S.; Biagi, S. F.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Carroll, J. L.; Casse, G.; Cooke, P.; Donleavy, S.; Dwyer, L.; Hennessy, K.; Huse, T.; Hutchcroft, D.; Jones, D.; Lockwood, M.; McCubbin, M.; McNulty, R.; Muskett, D.; Noor, A.; Patel, G. D.; Rinnert, K.; Shears, T.; Smith, N. A.; Southern, G.; Stavitski, I.; Sutcliffe, P.; Tobin, M.; Traynor, S. M.; Turner, P.; Whitley, M.; Wormald, M.; Wright, V.; Bibby, J. H.; Brisbane, S.; Brock, M.; Charles, M.; Cioffi, C.; Gligorov, V. V.; Handford, T.; Harnew, N.; Harris, F.; John, M. J. J.; Jones, M.; Libby, J.; Martin, L.; McArthur, I. A.; Muresan, R.; Newby, C.; Ottewell, B.; Powell, A.; Rotolo, N.; Senanayake, R. S.; Somerville, L.; Soroko, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sullivan, P.; Stokes-Rees, I.; Topp-Jorgensen, S.; Xing, F.; Wilkinson, G.; Artuso, M.; Belyaev, I.; Blusk, S.; Lefeuvre, G.; Menaa, N.; Menaa-Sia, R.; Mountain, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Wang, J. C.; Abadie, L.; Aglieri-Rinella, G.; Albrecht, E.; André, J.; Anelli, G.; Arnaud, N.; Augustinus, A.; Bal, F.; Barandela Pazos, M. C.; Barczyk, A.; Bargiotti, M.; Batista Lopes, J.; Behrendt, O.; Berni, S.; Binko, P.; Bobillier, V.; Braem, A.; Brarda, L.; Buytaert, J.; Camilleri, L.; Cambpell, M.; Castellani, G.; Cataneo, F.; Cattaneo, M.; Chadaj, B.; Charpentier, P.; Cherukuwada, S.; Chesi, E.; Christiansen, J.; Chytracek, R.; Clemencic, M.; Closier, J.; Collins, P.; Colrain, P.; Cooke, O.; Corajod, B.; Corti, G.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Damodaran, B.; David, C.; de Capua, S.; Decreuse, G.; Degaudenzi, H.; Dijkstra, H.; Droulez, J.-P.; Duarte Ramos, D.; Dufey, J. P.; Dumps, R.; Eckstein, D.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Flegel, W.; Forty, R.; Fournier, C.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Gaidioz, B.; Gaspar, C.; Gayde, J.-C.; Gavillet, P.; Go, A.; Gracia Abril, G.; Graulich, J.-S.; Giudici, P.-A.; Guirao Elias, A.; Guglielmini, P.; Gys, T.; Hahn, F.; Haider, S.; Harvey, J.; Hay, B.; Hernando Morata, J.-A.; Herranz Alvarez, J.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hilke, H. J.; von Holtey, G.; Hulsbergen, W.; Jacobsson, R.; Jamet, O.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Kanaya, N.; Knaster Refolio, J.; Koestner, S.; Koratzinos, M.; Kristic, R.; Lacarrère, D.; Lasseur, C.; Lastovicka, T.; Laub, M.; Liko, D.; Lippmann, C.; Lindner, R.; Losasso, M.; Maier, A.; Mair, K.; Maley, P.; Mato Vila, P.; Moine, G.; Morant, J.; Moritz, M.; Moscicki, J.; Muecke, M.; Mueller, H.; Nakada, T.; Neufeld, N.; Ocariz, J.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Parzefall, U.; Patel, M.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Piedigrossi, D.; Pivk, M.; Pokorski, W.; Ponce, S.; Ranjard, F.; Riegler, W.; Renaud, J.; Roiser, S.; Rossi, A.; Roy, L.; Ruf, T.; Ruffinoni, D.; Saladino, S.; Sambade Varela, A.; Santinelli, R.; Schmelling, S.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, T.; Schöning, A.; Schopper, A.; Seguinot, J.; Snoeys, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, A. C.; Somogyi, P.; Stoica, R.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; Toledo Alarcon, J.; Ullaland, O.; Valassi, A.; Vannerem, P.; Veness, R.; Wicht, P.; Wiedner, D.; Witzeling, W.; Wright, A.; Wyllie, K.; Ypsilantis, T.

    2008-08-01

    The LHCb experiment is dedicated to precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of B hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva). The initial configuration and expected performance of the detector and associated systems, as established by test beam measurements and simulation studies, is described.

  5. Beam Injection into RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mackay, W. W.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-05-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. We describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks, the application program to steer the beam and the injection kickers. We report on the commissioning of the injection systems and on measurements of the kickers.

  6. Injection of CO2-saturated water through a siliceous sandstone plug from the Hontomin test site (Spain): experiment and modeling.

    PubMed

    Canal, J; Delgado, J; Falcón, I; Yang, Q; Juncosa, R; Barrientos, V

    2013-01-01

    Massive chemical reactions are not expected when injecting CO(2) in siliceous sandstone reservoirs, but their performance can be challenged by small-scale reactions and other processes affecting their transport properties. We have conducted a core flooding test with a quartzarenite plug of Lower Cretaceous age representative of the secondary reservoir of the Hontomín test site. The sample, confined at high pressure, was successively injected with DIW and CO(2)-saturated DIW for 49 days while monitoring geophysical, chemical, and hydrodynamic parameters. The plug experienced little change, without evidence of secondary carbonation. However, permeability increased by a factor of 4 (0.022-0.085 mD), and the V(P)/V(S) ratio, whose change is related with microcracking, rose from ~1.68 to ~1.8. Porosity also increased (7.33-8.1%) from the beginning to the end of the experiment. Fluid/rock reactions were modeled with PHREEQC-2, and they are dominated by the dissolution of Mg-calcite. Mass balances show that ~4% of the initial carbonate was consumed. The results suggest that mineral dissolution and microcracking may have acted in a synergistic way at the beginning of the acidic flooding. However, dissolution processes concentrated in pore throats can better explain the permeability enhancement observed over longer periods of time.

  7. Introduction to LHC physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polesello, Giacomo

    2006-11-01

    An elementary introduction to the basic features of experimentation at the LHC is given, with some emphasis on the detector requirements and on some basic experimental techniques. The experimental program is briefly introduced, and bibliographical indications are provided for a detailed study of the key physics topics.

  8. Eribulin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests to check your body's response to eribulin injection.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  9. Use of data obtained from core tests in the design and operation of spent brine injection wells in geopressured or geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jorda, R.M.

    1980-03-01

    The effects of formation characteristics on injection well performance are reviewed. Use of data acquired from cores taken from injection horizons to predict injectivity is described. And methods for utilizing data from bench scale testing of brine and core samples to optimize injection well design are presented. Currently available methods and equipment provide data which enable the optimum design of injection wells through analysis of cores taken from injection zones. These methods also provide a means of identifying and correcting well injection problems. Methods described in this report are: bulk density measurement; porosity measurement; pore size distribution analysis; permeability measurement; formation grain size distribution analysis; core description (lithology) and composition; amount, type and distribution of clays and shales; connate water analysis; consolidatability of friable reservoir rocks; grain and pore characterization by scanning electron microscopy; grain and pore characterization by thin section analysis; permeability damage and enhancement tests; distribution of water-borne particles in porous media; and reservoir matrix acidizing effectiveness. The precise methods of obtaining this information are described, and their use in the engineering of injection wells is illustrated by examples, where applicable. (MHR)

  10. Tests of ionospheric control of young injection events identified from magnetometer observations at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelson, M.; Jia, X.

    2015-12-01

    Kennelly et al. (2013) reported that young plasma injection events observed in Saturn's nightside magnetosphere and identified from plasma wave signatures are modulated at the period associated with the winter hemisphere. In a system unstable to interchange, radial motion of flux tubes is constrained by the "line-tying" effect of high ionospheric conductance (Southwood and Kivelson, 1989). Slippage of a flux tube would then occur initially in the hemisphere in which the ionospheric conductance is lowest. Saturn's ionospheric conductances vary not only with season, but also with rotation phase because of the presence of a pattern of rotating field-aligned currents that drive "planetary period oscillations" (Jia and Kivelson, 2012). The conductance should minimize near the center of the downward current region and, at this rotation phase in the winter hemisphere, the growth rate of the instability would be largest, accounting for control by the northern period. With motion starting in the winter hemisphere, the flux tube would develop a tilt of predictable sense and the initial inward motion of the interchanging flux tube would occur at a specific rotation phase of the winter ionosphere. For a subset of the Kennelly events, we found that the tilt and phase are consistent with expectations based on the control of displacement by ionospheric conductance. Many additional young interchange events have been identified by K. K. Khurana [personal communication, 2015] whom we thank for making the list available. We examine this more extensive set of events and use them to investigate the proposed mechanism more fully. __________ Jia, X., and M. G. Kivelson (2012), J. Geophys. Res., 117, A11219. Kennelly, T. J., J. S. Leisner, G. B. Hospodarsky, and D. A. Gurnett (2013), J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 118, 832-838. Kivelson, M., and X. Jia (2014), , AGU Fall meeting, 2014, SM51E-4295. Southwood, D. J., and M. G. Kivelson (1989), J. Geophys. Res., 94, 299-308.

  11. A Qualitative Study Among Injection Drug Using Women in Rhode Island: Attitudes Toward Testing, Treatment, and Vaccination for Hepatitis and HIV

    PubMed Central

    LALLY, MICHELLE A.; MONTSTREAM-QUAS, SYDNEY A.; TANAKA, SARA; TEDESCHI, SARA K.; MORROW, KATHLEEN M.

    2012-01-01

    HIV and hepatitis C virus infection are serious and prevalent health conditions among many women who inject drugs. Qualitative interviews with 20 injection drug using women at a short term drug treatment center in Rhode Island revealed six primary barriers and facilitators for testing and receiving results and treatment for hepatitis and HIV, as well as for hepatitis vaccination. The primary barriers were prioritization of drug use; low level of diseases-pecific knowledge; stigmatization; accessibility of testing, results and treatment; and psychological factors. The primary facilitator was interest in promoting one’s health. Our findings indicate that injection drug using women experience multiple barriers to HIV and hepatitis testing, results, treatment and vaccination. Methods for improving the motivators for health, facilitating infectious disease prevention, and decreasing unnecessary disease complications of injection drug using women need to be utilized. These methods should include strategies that minimize stigma and facilitate accessibility of health care. PMID:18095839

  12. Clomiphene citrate challenge test in the assessment of ovarian reserve before controlled ovarian hyperstimulation for intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Kahraman, S; Vicdan, K; Işik, A Z; Ozgün, O D; Alaybeyoğlu, L; Polat, G; Biberoğlu, K

    1997-06-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the performance of clomiphene citrate (CC) challenge test to predict diminished ovarian reserve before controlled ovarian hyperstimulation for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). The 198 women who underwent the CC challenge test fulfilled the following criteria; over 35 years of age, removal of one ovary or previous ovarian surgery, the presence of ovarian endometrioma or previous poor response to ovarian hyperstimulation. Of the patients tested, 141 were found to have a normal CC challenge test while 57 had an abnormal result. The cancellation rate of the cycle with a poor response was significantly higher in women with an abnormal test (36.8%) than in those with a normal test (19.8%) (P < 0.05). The sensitivity of CC test for cycle cancellation was found to be 43% with a specificity of 76%, positive and negative predictive values of 37 and 80%, respectively. The estradiol values on hCG day, the number of retrieved oocytes and metaphase II oocytes and the rate of transfer cycles were significantly lower in females with an abnormal test. Women with normal test results had higher pregnancy rates per embryo transfer than those with abnormal test results (21.5 vs. 13.3%) and the predictive value of an abnormal test for failing to conceive was 93% (53/57) with a sensitivity of 31%, specificity of 84% and negative predictive value of 15.6%. Of 57 women with an abnormal test result, 25 (43.8%) were abnormal due only to an elevated day 10 or 11 value of FSH, which could not be detected using only basal FSH screening. In this group, the cancellation rate (48 vs. 19.8%, P < 0.01), the rate of transfer cycles (48 vs. 72.3%, P < 0.05) and the mean number of retrieved oocytes (4.9 +/- 2.5 vs. 6.4 +/- 3.1, P < 0.01) were all significantly different from normal test group. Although the rate of pregnancies per started cycle (8 vs. 15.6%) did not show a statistically significant difference, this is most probably due to the low number

  13. Microinjection Manipulation Resulted in the Increased Apoptosis of Spermatocytes in Testes from Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI) Derived Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Zhuo; Chen, Wen; Tong, Man; Guo, Xuejiang; Wang, Liu; Liu, Jiayin; Zhou, Zuomin; Zhu, Hui; Zhou, Qi; Sha, Jiahao

    2011-01-01

    The invention of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has possibly been the most important development in reproductive medicine, one that has given hope to thousands of infertile couples worldwide. However, concerns remain regarding the safety of this method since it is a more invasive procedure than in vitro fertilization (IVF), since a spermatozoon is injected into the oocyte cytoplasm. Using mice derived from IVF technology as a control, we assessed the influence of invasive microinjection in the process of transferring sperm into oocyte cytoplasm in ICSI procedure on the development and physiologic function of resultant offspring. Our results demonstrated that mice produced from ICSI and IVF had no significant difference in phenotypic indices including body weight, forelimb physiology, and learning and memory ability. However, increased spermatocyte apoptosis was observed in the testis of adult ICSI mice, when compared with IVF mice. And, decreased testis weight and marked damage of spermatogenic epithelia were found in aged ICSI mice. Furthermore, proteomic analysis verified that most of the differentiated proteins in testes between adult ICSI and IVF mice were those involved in regulation of apoptosis pathways. Our results demonstrated that the microinjection manipulation used in the ICSI procedure might pose potential risks to the fertility of male offspring. The changed expression of a series of proteins relating to apoptosis or proliferation might contribute to it. Further studies are necessary to better understand all the risks of ICSI. PMID:21799787

  14. Scenarios for sLHC and vLHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandale, W.; Zimmermann, F.

    2008-03-01

    The projected lifetime of the LHC low-beta quadrupoles and evolution of the statistical error halving time call for an LHC luminosity upgrade by the middle of the coming decade. In the framework of the EU CARE-HHH network, two scenarios have been developed for increasing the LHC peak luminosity by a factor 10, to 10 cms ("sLHC"). Both scenarios imply a rebuilding of the high-luminosity interaction regions (IRs) in combination with a consistent change of beam parameters. However, their respective features, bunch structures, IR layouts, merits and challenges differ substantially. In either scenario luminosity leveling during a store would be advantageous for the physics experiments. Longer-term R&D efforts are devoted to a higher-energy hadron collider ("vLHC"), which could be realized on a green field or as a later and more radical LHC upgrade.

  15. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, a great discovery emerged at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. A plethora of new precision data had already by then been collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC, providing further extensive support for the validity of the Standard Model of particle physics. But what now appeared was the first evidence for what was not only the last unverified prediction of the Standard Model, but also perhaps the most decisive one: the prediction made already in 1964 of a unique scalar boson required by the theory of François Englert and Peter Higgs on how fundamental particles acquire mass. At that moment in 2012, it seemed particularly appropriate to start planning a gathering of world experts in particle physics to take stock of the situation and try to answer the challenging question: what next? By May 2013, when the LHC Nobel Symposium was held at the Krusenberg Mansion outside Uppsala in Sweden, the first signs of a great discovery had already turned into fully convincing experimental evidence for the existence of a scalar boson of mass about 125 GeV, having properties compatible with the 50-year-old prediction. And in October 2013, the evidence was deemed so convincing that the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics to Englert and Higgs for their pioneering work. At the same time the search at the LHC for other particles, beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, with heavier masses up to—and in some cases beyond—1 TeV, had provided no positive result. The triumph of the Standard Model seems resounding, in particular because the mass of the discovered scalar boson is such that, when identified with the Higgs boson, the Standard Model is able to provide predictions at energies as high as the Planck mass, although at the price of accepting that the vacuum would be metastable. However, even if there were some feelings of triumph, the ambience at the LHC Nobel Symposium was more one of

  16. LHC forward physics

    SciTech Connect

    Cartiglia, N.; Royon, C.

    2015-10-02

    The goal of this report is to give a comprehensive overview of the rich field of forward physics, with a special attention to the topics that can be studied at the LHC. The report starts presenting a selection of the Monte Carlo simulation tools currently available, chapter 2, then enters the rich phenomenology of QCD at low, chapter 3, and high, chapter 4, momentum transfer, while the unique scattering conditions of central exclusive production are analyzed in chapter 5. The last two experimental topics, Cosmic Ray and Heavy Ion physics are presented in the chapter 6 and 7 respectively. Chapter 8 is dedicated to the BFKL dynamics, multiparton interactions, and saturation. The report ends with an overview of the forward detectors at LHC. Each chapter is correlated with a comprehensive bibliography, attempting to provide to the interested reader with a wide opportunity for further studies.

  17. Access to syringes for HIV prevention for injection drug users in St. Petersburg, Russia: syringe purchase test study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The HIV epidemic in Russia is concentrated among injection drug users (IDUs). This is especially true for St. Petersburg where high HIV incidence persists among the city’s estimated 80,000 IDUs. Although sterile syringes are legally available, access for IDUs may be hampered. To explore the feasibility of using pharmacies to expand syringe access and provide other prevention services to IDUs, we investigated the current access to sterile syringes at the pharmacies and the correlation between pharmacy density and HIV prevalence in St. Petersburg. Methods 965 pharmacies citywide were mapped, classified by ownership type, and the association between pharmacy density and HIV prevalence at the district level was tested. We selected two districts among the 18 districts – one central and one peripheral – that represented two major types of city districts and contacted all operating pharmacies by phone to inquire if they stocked syringes and obtained details about their stock. Qualitative interviews with 26 IDUs provided data regarding syringe access in pharmacies and were used to formulate hypotheses for the pharmacy syringe purchase test wherein research staff attempted to purchase syringes in all pharmacies in the two districts. Results No correlation was found between the density of pharmacies and HIV prevalence at the district level. Of 108 operating pharmacies, 38 (35%) did not sell syringes of the types used by IDUs; of these, half stocked but refused to sell syringes to research staff, and the other half did not stock syringes at all. Overall 70 (65%) of the pharmacies did sell syringes; of these, 49 pharmacies sold single syringes without any restrictions and 21 offered packages of ten. Conclusions Trainings for pharmacists need to be conducted to reduce negative attitudes towards IDUs and increase pharmacists’ willingness to sell syringes. At a structural level, access to safe injection supplies for IDUs could be increased by including syringes

  18. LHCb Vertex Locator: Performance and radiation damage in LHC Run 1 and preparation for Run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szumlak, T.; Obła˛kowska-Mucha, A.

    2016-07-01

    LHCb is a dedicated experiment to study New Physics in the decays of heavy hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Heavy hadrons are identified through their flight distance in the Vertex Locator (VELO). The VELO comprises 42 modules made of two n+-on-n 300 μm thick half-disc silicon sensors with R- and Φ-measuring micro-strips. In order to allow retracting the detector, the VELO is installed as two movable halves containing 21 modules each. The detectors are operated in a secondary vacuum and are cooled by a bi-phase CO2 cooling system. During data taking in LHC Run 1 the LHCb VELO has operated with an extremely high efficiency and excellent performance. The track finding efficiency is typically greater than 98%. An impact parameter resolution of less than 35 μm is achieved for particles with transverse momentum greater than 1 GeV/c. An overview of all important performance parameters will be given. The VELO sensors have received a large and non-uniform radiation dose of up to 1.2 ×1014 1 MeV neutron equivalent cm-2 during the first LHC run. Silicon type-inversion has been observed in regions close to the interaction point. The preparations for LHC Run 2 are well under way and the VELO has already recorded tracks from injection line tests. The current status and plans for new operational procedures addressing the non-uniform radiation damage are shortly discussed.

  19. Displacement and sweep efficiencies in a DNAPL recovery test using micellar and polymer solutions injected in a five-spot pattern.

    PubMed

    Martel, Richard; Hébert, Alain; Lefebvre, René; Gélinas, Pierre; Gabriel, Uta

    2004-11-01

    Soil washing with micellar solutions is a promising alternative for the remediation of DNAPL source zones. As with any flushing technology, the success of soil washing with micellar solutions depends in a very large part on the ability of the solution to contact the contaminant (sweep efficiency) and then on the efficiency of contaminant removal once this contact is made (displacement efficiency). We report here on a field test where a micellar solution was used to recover a DNAPL in an open five-spot pattern in which polymer solutions were also injected before and after the washing solution to improve sweep efficiency. The washing solution formulation was optimised in the laboratory prior to the test to obtain good dissolution capacity. For a high-concentration and low-volume soil flushing remediation test such as the one performed (0.8 pore volumes of actual washing solution injected), slug sizing of the washing solution is critical. It was evaluated by an analytical solution. In a five-spot pattern, the displacement efficiency of the washing solution was observed to vary in the porous medium as a function of the radial distance from the injection well because: (1) the volume of the washing solution flowing through a section of the test cell changes (maximum close to the injection well and minimal at the pumping wells); (2) the in situ velocity changes (maximum at the wells and minimum between the wells) and; (3) the contact time of the washing solution with the NAPL changes as a function of the distance from the injection well. The relative importance of the recovery mechanisms, mobilisation and dissolution, was also observed to vary in the test cell. The reduced velocity increased the contact time of the washing solution with the DNAPL enhancing its dissolution, but the decrease of the capillary number caused less mobilisation. The washing process is much more extensive around the injection well. The use of an injection-pumping pattern allowing a complete sweep

  20. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Emergency Firewater Injection System Replacement Project

    SciTech Connect

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  1. Test plan for single well injection/extraction characterization of DNAPL

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, B.B.; Jerome, K.M.; Burdick, S.; Rossabi, J.; Jarosch, T.R.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.

    1995-12-01

    Soils and groundwater beneath an abandoned Process sewer line in the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) contain elevated levels of volatile organic compounds, specifically trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), two common chlorinated solvents. These compounds have low aqueous solubilities, thus when released to the subsurface in sufficient quantity, tend to exist as immiscible fluids or nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Because chlorinated solvents are also denser than water, they are referred to by the acronym DNAPLS, or dense non aqueous Phase liquids. Technologies targeted at the efficient characterization or removal of DNAPL are not currently proven. For example, most DNAPL studies rely on traditional soil and water sampling and the fortuitous observation of immiscible solvent. Once DNAPL is identified, soil excavation (which is only applicable to small contained spill sites) is the only ``proven`` cleanup method. New cleanup approaches based on enhanced removal by surfactants and/or alcohols have been proposed and tested at the pilot scale. As described below, carefully designed experiments similar to the enhanced removal methods may provide important characterization information on DNAPLs.

  2. Thermal efficiency of a steam injection test well with insulated tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Meldau, R.F.; Noble, N.J.

    1983-01-01

    A field test of bare 2.375-in. and insulated 4.500-in. tubulars has been conducted using heat flux sensors and thermocouples to evaluate bare and insulated tubular performance, annulus heat transfer, and overall wellbore heat loss in a cooperative effort between Sandia National Laboratories and Husky Oil Operations, Ltd. The well is part of a steam flood pilot in the Aberfeldy Field near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan. Insulation thermal conductivity was observed to vary by a factor of four between competing designs. Couplings and internal structures (e.g., centralizers) were seen to account for up to half the string heat loss with the annulus dry. For a wet annulus, the typical field case, steam generated at the ot couplings refluxes in the vented annulus and maintained the caisng temperature constant at 212F at all points. Thus wellbore heat loss was 3 to 6 times higher than expected, the same opposite the highest and lowest quality insulated tubing, and the only 30 to 40% less than bare tubing. Insulated couplings or techniques to eliminate annulus steam refluxing are needed to achieve the potential of insulated tubing.

  3. Processes Affecting the Trihalomethane Concentrations Associated with the Third Injection, Storage, and Recovery Test at Lancaster, Antelope Valley, California, March 1998 through April 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fram, Miranda S.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Goodwin, Kelly D.; Fujii, Roger; Clark, Jordan F.

    2003-01-01

    The formation and fate of trihalomethanes (THM) during the third injection, storage, and recovery test at Lancaster, Antelope Valley, California, were investigated as part of a program to assess the long-term feasibility of using injection, storage, and recovery as a water-supply method and as a way to reduce water-level declines and land-subsidence in the Antelope Valley. The program was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works and the Antelope Valley-East Kern Water Agency. The water used for injection, storage, and recovery must be disinfected before injection and thus contains THMs and other disinfection by-products. THMs (chloroform, CHCl3, bromodichloromethane, CHCl2Br, dibromochloromethane, CHClBr2, and bromoform, CHBr3) are formed by reaction between natural dissolved organic carbon that is present in water and chlorine that is added during the disinfection step of the drinking water treatment process. THMs are carcinogenic compounds, and their concentrations in drinking water are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. During previous cycles of the Lancaster program, extracted water still contained measurable concentrations of THMs long after continuous pumping had extracted a greater volume of water than had been injected. This raised concerns about the potential long-term effect of injection, storage, and recovery cycles on ground-water quality in Antelope Valley aquifers. The primary objectives of this investigation were to determine (1) what controlled continued THM formation in the aquifer after injection, (2) what caused of the persistence of THMs in the extracted water, even after long periods of pumping, (3) what controlled the decrease of THM concentrations during the extraction period, and (4) the potential for natural attenuation of THMs in the aquifer. Laboratory experiments on biodegradation of THMs in microcosms of aquifer materials indicate that aquifer

  4. Integrated dry NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} emissions control systems: Advanced retractable injection lance SNCR test report. NOELL ARIL test period: April 20, 1995--December 21, 1995; DPSC test period: August 16--26, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Muzio, L.J.; Smith, R.A.; Hunt, T.

    1997-04-01

    The test site is Arapahoe Generating Station Unit 4, a 100 MWe down-fired utility boiler burning a low-sulfur western coal. The project goal is to demonstrate up to 70% reductions in NOx and SO{sub 2} emission through the integration of: (1) down-fired low-NOx burners with overfire air; (2) Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) for additional NOx removal; and (3) dry sorbent injection and duct humidification for SO{sub 2} removal. This report documents the third phase of SNCR tests, where an additional injection location was installed to increase the low-load NOx removal performance. The new injectors consist of a pair of retractable in-furnace lances which were designed to provide a high degree of load following flexibility through on-line adjustments of the injection angle. With the new lances, NOx removals in excess of 35% are achievable at the same load and HN{sub 3} slip limit. At loads of 43 to 60 MWe, NOx removals with the lances range from 37--52%. At loads greater than 60 MWe, the wall-injection location is more efficient, and at loads of 70 to 100 MWe, NOx removals range from 37--41%. The coal mill-in-service pattern was found to have a large effect on both NOx removal and NH{sub 3} slip for injection at the new lance location. At 60 MWe, the NOx removal at the 10 ppm NH{sub 3} slip limit ranges from 28--52% depending on the mill-in-service pattern. Biasing the coal mills to provide uniform combustion conditions ahead of the injection location was found to be the best option for improving SNCR system performance under these conditions.

  5. Corrective Action Investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit 546: Injection Well and Surface Releases, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Alfred Wickline

    2008-03-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 546 is located in Areas 6 and 9 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 546 is comprised of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: •06-23-02, U-6a/Russet Testing Area •09-20-01, Injection Well These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on November 8, 2007, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process has been used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 546.

  6. Higgs Boson Search at LHC (and LHC/CMS status)

    SciTech Connect

    Korytov, Andrey

    2008-11-23

    Presented are the results of the most recent studies by the CMS and ATLAS collaborations on the expected sensitivity of their detectors to observing a Higgs boson at LHC. The overview is preceded with a brief summary of the LHC and the CMS Experiment status.

  7. Beam injection into RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, W.

    1997-07-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. The authors describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks. They report on the commissioning of the injection system, on beam based measurements of the kickers and the application program to steer the beam.

  8. Gap between jets at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royon, Christophe

    2013-04-01

    We describe a NLL BFKL calculation implemented in the HERWIG MC of the gap between jets cross section, that represent a test of BFKL dynamics. We compare the predictions with recent measurements at the Tevatron and present predictions for the LHC. We also discuss the interesting process of looking for gap between jets in diffractive events when protons are detected in the ATLAS Forward Physics (AFP) detectors.

  9. LNV Higgses at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiezza, Alessio; Nemevšek, Miha; Nesti, Fabrizio

    2016-06-01

    Lepton number is a fundamental symmetry that can be probed at the LHC. Here, we study the Higgs sector of theories responsible for neutrino mass generation. After a brief discussion of simple see-saw scenarios, we turn to theories where heavy Majorana neutrino mass is protected by a gauge symmetry and focus on the Left-Right symmetric theory. There, the SM-like Higgs boson can decay to a pair of heavy neutrinos and provide enough information to establish the origin of neutrino mass.

  10. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, a great discovery emerged at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. A plethora of new precision data had already by then been collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC, providing further extensive support for the validity of the Standard Model of particle physics. But what now appeared was the first evidence for what was not only the last unverified prediction of the Standard Model, but also perhaps the most decisive one: the prediction made already in 1964 of a unique scalar boson required by the theory of François Englert and Peter Higgs on how fundamental particles acquire mass. At that moment in 2012, it seemed particularly appropriate to start planning a gathering of world experts in particle physics to take stock of the situation and try to answer the challenging question: what next? By May 2013, when the LHC Nobel Symposium was held at the Krusenberg Mansion outside Uppsala in Sweden, the first signs of a great discovery had already turned into fully convincing experimental evidence for the existence of a scalar boson of mass about 125 GeV, having properties compatible with the 50-year-old prediction. And in October 2013, the evidence was deemed so convincing that the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics to Englert and Higgs for their pioneering work. At the same time the search at the LHC for other particles, beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, with heavier masses up to—and in some cases beyond—1 TeV, had provided no positive result. The triumph of the Standard Model seems resounding, in particular because the mass of the discovered scalar boson is such that, when identified with the Higgs boson, the Standard Model is able to provide predictions at energies as high as the Planck mass, although at the price of accepting that the vacuum would be metastable. However, even if there were some feelings of triumph, the ambience at the LHC Nobel Symposium was more one of

  11. Monotops at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Andrea, J.; Fuks, B.

    2011-10-01

    We explore scenarios where top quarks may be produced singly in association with missing energy, a very distinctive signature, which, in analogy with monojets, we dub monotops. We find that monotops can be produced in a variety of modes, typically characterized by baryon number-violating or flavorchanging neutral interactions. We build a simplified model that encompasses all the possible (tree-level) production mechanisms and study the LHC sensitiveness to a few representative scenarios by considering fully hadronic top decays. We find that constraints on such exotic models can already be set with 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected at {radical}(s)=7 TeV.

  12. Operating the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid: current and future challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flix Molina, J.; Forti, A.; Girone, M.; Sciaba, A.

    2014-06-01

    The Wordwide LHC Computing Grid project (WLCG) provides the computing and storage resources required by the LHC collaborations to store, process and analyse their data. It includes almost 200,000 CPU cores, 200 PB of disk storage and 200 PB of tape storage distributed among more than 150 sites. The WLCG operations team is responsible for several essential tasks, such as the coordination of testing and deployment of Grid middleware and services, communication with the experiments and the sites, followup and resolution of operational issues and medium/long term planning. In 2012 WLCG critically reviewed all operational procedures and restructured the organisation of the operations team as a more coherent effort in order to improve its efficiency. In this paper we describe how the new organisation works, its recent successes and the changes to be implemented during the long LHC shutdown in preparation for the LHC Run 2.

  13. Southeast Geyers Cooperative Tracer Evaluation and Testing Program for the Purpose of Estimating The Efficiency of Injection

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Smith

    2001-02-12

    The Southeast Geysers Cooperative Tracer Evaluation Program has been a joint project located in the SE part of the Geysers geothermal field, in Lake and Sonoma Counties, California. A new generation of environmentally benign vapor-phase tracers has been used to estimate the varying degrees to which injectate is being recovered following the significant increase of injected volumes within the Southeast Geysers.

  14. Application of tracer injection tests to characterize rock matrix block size distribution and dispersivity in fractured aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi Haddad, Amin; Hassanzadeh, Hassan; Abedi, Jalal; Chen, Zhangxin

    2014-03-01

    The complexity of mass transfer processes between the mobile and immobile zones in geohydrologic settings and the limitations that currently exist in the characterization of contaminated sites demand the development of improved models. In this work, we present a model that describes the mass transfer in structured porous media. This model considers divergent radial advective-dispersive transport in fractures and diffusive mass transfer inside rock matrix blocks. The heterogeneous nature of fractured formations is included with the integration of various distributions of rock matrix block sizes into the transport model. Breakthrough curves generated based on the developed model are analyzed to investigate the effects of the rate of injection, dispersivity and the immobile to mobile porosity ratio on mass transfer between mobile and immobile zones. It is shown that the developed model, in conjunction with tracer data collected from a monitoring well, can be used to estimate the dispersivity and fracture intensity. Results reveal that the dispersivity is independent of the rock matrix block size distribution for dispersion-dominant transport in fractures. These findings are used to develop a methodology to characterize rock matrix block size distribution in fractured aquifers and to estimate dispersivity based on a tracer test, which will improve our decisions concerning the remediation of contaminated sites.

  15. DOE/NETL's phase II mercury control technology field testing program: preliminary economic analysis of activated carbon injection.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew P; Hoffmann, Jeffrey W; Smith, Dennis N; Feeley, Thomas J; Murphy, James T

    2007-02-15

    Based on results of field testing conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), this article provides preliminary costs for mercury control via conventional activated carbon injection (ACI), brominated ACI, and conventional ACI coupled with the application of a sorbent enhancement additive (SEA) to coal prior to combustion. The economic analyses are reported on a plant-specific basis in terms of the cost required to achieve low (50%), mid (70%), and high (90%) levels of mercury removal "above and beyond" the baseline mercury removal achieved by existing emission control equipment. In other words, the levels of mercury control are directly attributable to ACI. Mercury control costs via ACI have been amortized on a current dollar basis. Using a 20-year book life, levelized costs for the incremental increase in cost of electricity (COE), expressed in mills per kilowatt-hour (mills/kWh), and the incremental cost of mercury control, expressed in dollars per pound of mercury removed ($/lb Hg removed), have been calculated for each level of ACI mercury control. For this analysis, the increase in COE varied from 0.14 mills/kWh to 3.92 mills/kWh. Meanwhile, the incremental cost of mercury control ranged from $3810/lb Hg removed to $166000/lb Hg removed.

  16. DOE/NETL's phase II mercury control technology field testing program: preliminary economic analysis of activated carbon injection.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew P; Hoffmann, Jeffrey W; Smith, Dennis N; Feeley, Thomas J; Murphy, James T

    2007-02-15

    Based on results of field testing conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), this article provides preliminary costs for mercury control via conventional activated carbon injection (ACI), brominated ACI, and conventional ACI coupled with the application of a sorbent enhancement additive (SEA) to coal prior to combustion. The economic analyses are reported on a plant-specific basis in terms of the cost required to achieve low (50%), mid (70%), and high (90%) levels of mercury removal "above and beyond" the baseline mercury removal achieved by existing emission control equipment. In other words, the levels of mercury control are directly attributable to ACI. Mercury control costs via ACI have been amortized on a current dollar basis. Using a 20-year book life, levelized costs for the incremental increase in cost of electricity (COE), expressed in mills per kilowatt-hour (mills/kWh), and the incremental cost of mercury control, expressed in dollars per pound of mercury removed ($/lb Hg removed), have been calculated for each level of ACI mercury control. For this analysis, the increase in COE varied from 0.14 mills/kWh to 3.92 mills/kWh. Meanwhile, the incremental cost of mercury control ranged from $3810/lb Hg removed to $166000/lb Hg removed. PMID:17593743

  17. Supersymmetry at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Bartl, A.; Soederqvist, J.; Paige, F.

    1996-11-22

    Supersymmetry (SUSY) is an appealing concept which provides a plausible solution to the fine tuning problem, while leaving the phenomenological success of the Standard Model (SM) unchanged. Moreover, some SUSY models allow for the unification of gauge couplings at a scale of M{sub GUT} {approx} 10{sup 16} GeV. A further attractive feature is the possibility of radiative breaking of the electro-weak symmetry group SU(2) {times} U(1). The masses of the SUSY partners of the SM particles are expected to be in the range 100 GeV to 1 TeV. One of the main goals of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be either to discover weak-scale SUSY or to exclude it over the entire theoretically allowed parameter space. The authors have developed a strategy for the analysis of experimental data at LHC which will allow them to determine the scale for supersymmetry, to limit the model parameter space, and to make precision measurements of model parameters.

  18. Proof of concept testing of an integrated dry injection system for SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} control. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Helfritch, D.J.; Bortz, S.J.; Beittel, R.

    1994-03-01

    The integrated Dry Injection Process (IDIP) consists of combustion modification using low NO{sub x} burners to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, dry injection of hydrated line at economizer temperatures for primary capture of SO{sub 2}, dry injection of a commercial grade sodium bicarbonate at the air heater exit for additional SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal, and humidification for precipitator conditioning. IDIP offers the potential for simultaneously achieving 90% SO{sub 2} removal, and 65% NO{sub x} removal from a high sulfur flue gas. The process is well suited for new or retrofit applications since it can be incorporated within existing economizer and downstream ductwork. Subscale tests were performed in order to identify the best calcium and sodium sorbents. These tests involved the injection of calcium hydroxide and sodium sorbents at various points of the flue gas system downstream of a 0.25 MM BTU/hr. coal fired combustor, and the gas residence times, cooling rates and temperatures were comparable to those found for full-scale utility boilers. These tests verified that a high surface area hydrated lime provides maximum sorbent utilization and identified an alcohol-water hydrated lime as yielding the highest surface area and the best SO{sub 2} removal capability. The tests also identified sodium bicarbonate to be somewhat more effective than sodium sesquicarbonate for SO{sub 2} removal. The proof of concept demonstration was conducted on the large combustor at the Riley Stoker Research Facility in Worcester, MA. When economically compared to conventional limestone slurry scrubbing on a 300 MW plant, the dry injection process shows lower capital cost but higher operating cost. Hydrated lime injection can be less costly than limestone scrubbing when two or more of the following conditions exist: plant is small (less than 100MW); yearly operating hours are small (less than 3000); and the remaining plant lifetime is small (less than 10 years).

  19. Design, fabrication and test of a pneumatically controlled, renewable, microfluidic bead trapping device for sequential injection analysis applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Guocheng; Lu, Donglai; Fu, Zhifeng; Du, Dan; Ozanich, Richard M.; Wang, Wanjun; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of a pneumatically controlled,renewable, microfluidic device for conducting bead-based assays in an automated sequential injection analysis system. The device used a “brick wall”-like pillar array (pillar size: 20 μm length X 50 μm width X 45 μm height) with 5 μm gaps between the pillars serving as the micro filter. The flow channel where bead trapping occurred is 500 μm wide X 75 μm deep. An elastomeric membrane and an air chamber were located underneath the flow channel. By applying pressure to the air chamber, the membrane is deformed and pushed upward against the filter structure. This effectively traps beads larger than 5 μm and creates a “bed” or micro column of beads that can be perfused and washed with liquid samples and reagents. Upon completion of the assay process, the pressure is released and the beads are flushed out from underneath the filter structure to renew the device. Mouse IgG was used as a model analyte to test the feasibility of using the proposed device for immunoassay applications. Resulting microbeads from an on-chip fluorescent immunoassay were individually examined using flow cytometry. The results show that the fluorescence signal intensity distribution is fairly narrow indicating high chemical reaction uniformity among the beads population. Electrochemical onchip assay was also conducted. A detection limit of 0.1 ng/mL1 ppb was achieved and good device reliability and repeatability were demonstrated. The novel microfluidic-based beadstrapping device thus opens up a new pathway to design micro-bead based biosensor immunoassays for clinical and othervarious applications.

  20. Design, fabrication and test of a pneumatically controlled, renewable, microfluidic bead trapping device for sequential injection analysis applications.

    PubMed

    Shao, Guocheng; Lu, Donglai; Fu, Zhifeng; Du, Dan; Ozanich, Richard M; Wang, Wanjun; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of a pneumatically controlled, renewable, microfluidic device for conducting bead-based assays in an automated sequential injection analysis system. The device used a "brick wall"-like pillar array (pillar size: 20 μm length × 50 μm width × 45 μm height) with 5 μm gaps between the pillars serving as the micro filter. The flow channel where bead trapping occurred is 500 μm wide × 75 μm deep. An elastomeric membrane and an air chamber were located underneath the flow channel. By applying pressure to the air chamber, the membrane is deformed and pushed upward against the filter structure. This effectively traps beads larger than 5 μm and creates a "bed" or micro column of beads that can be perfused and washed with liquid samples and reagents. Upon completion of the assay process, the pressure is released and the beads are flushed out from underneath the filter structure to renew the device. Mouse IgG was used as a model analyte to test the feasibility of using the proposed device for immunoassay applications. Resulting microbeads from an on-chip fluorescent immunoassay were individually examined using flow cytometry. The results show that the fluorescence signal intensity distribution is fairly narrow indicating high chemical reaction uniformity among the beads population. Electrochemical on-chip assay was also conducted. A detection limit of 1 ppb was achieved and good device reliability and repeatability were demonstrated. The novel microfluidic-based beads-trapping device thus opens up a new pathway to design micro-bead based immunoassays for various applications.

  1. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic testing of marbofloxacin administered as a single injection for the treatment of bovine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Vallé, M; Schneider, M; Galland, D; Giboin, H; Woehrlé, F

    2012-12-01

    New approaches in Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) integration suggested that marbofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone already licensed for the treatment of bovine respiratory disease at a daily dosage of 2 mg/kg for 3-5 days, would be equally clinically effective at 10 mg/kg once (Forcyl(®)), whilst also reducing the risk of resistance. This marbofloxacin dosage regimen was studied using mutant prevention concentration (MPC), PK simulation, PK/PD integration and an in vitro dynamic system. This system simulated the concentration-time profile of marbofloxacin in bovine plasma established in vivo after a single 10 mg/kg intramuscular dose and killing curves of field isolated Pasteurellaceae strains of high (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) MIC ≤ 0.03 μg/mL), average (MIC of 0.12-0.25 μg/mL) and low (MIC of 1 μg/mL) susceptibility to marbofloxacin. The marbofloxacin MPC values were 2- to 4-fold the MIC values for all Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida tested. Marbofloxacin demonstrated a concentration-dependent killing profile with bactericidal activity observed within 1 h for most strains. No resistance development (MIC ≥ 4 μg/mL) was detected in the dynamic tests. Target values for risk of resistance PK/PD surrogates (area under the curve (AUC) AUC(24 h) /MPC and T(>MPC) /T(MSW) ratio) were achieved for all clinically susceptible pathogens. The new proposed dosing regimen was validated in vitro and by PK/PD integration confirming the single-injection short-acting antibiotic concept.

  2. Cornering diphoton resonance models at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backović, Mihailo; Kulkarni, Suchita; Mariotti, Alberto; Sessolo, Enrico Maria; Spannowsky, Michael

    2016-08-01

    We explore the ability of the high luminosity LHC to test models which can explain the 750 GeV diphoton excess. We focus on a wide class of models where a 750 GeV singlet scalar couples to Standard Model gauge bosons and quarks, as well as dark matter. Including both gluon and photon fusion production mechanisms, we show that LHC searches in channels correlated with the diphoton signal will be able to probe wide classes of diphoton models with L ˜ 3000 fb-1 of data. Furthermore, models in which the scalar is a portal to the dark sector can be cornered with as little as L ˜ 30 fb-1.

  3. Pegfilgrastim Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... a pre-filled automatic injection device (On-body Injector) to inject subcutaneously (under the skin). If you ... a pre-filled automatic injection device (On-body Injector), the device will usually be applied to your ...

  4. Cabazitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used along with prednisone to treat prostate cancer (cancer of a male reproductive organ) that has ... cabazitaxel injection is usually used in men with prostate cancer. If used by pregnant women, cabazitaxel injection can ...

  5. Morphine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Morphine injection is used to relieve moderate to severe pain. Morphine is in a class of medications called opiate ( ... Morphine injection comes as a solution (liquid) to inject intramuscularly (into a muscle) or intravenously (into a ...

  6. Romidepsin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Romidepsin injection is used to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL; a group of cancers of the ... other medication given by mouth or by injection. Romidepsin injection is in a class of medications called ...

  7. Integrated dry NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} emissions control system calcium-based dry sorbent injection. Test report, April 30--November 2, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Shiomoto, G.H.; Smith, R.A.; Muzio, L.J.; Hunt, T.

    1994-12-01

    The DOE sponsored Integrated Dry NO{sub x}SO{sub 2} Emissions Control System program, which is a Clean Coal Technology III demonstration, is being conducted by Public Service Company of Colorado. The test site is Arapahoe Generating Station Unit 4, which is a 100 MWe, down-fired utility boiler burning a low sulfur Western coal. The project goal is to demonstrate up to 70 percent reductions in NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} emissions through the integration of: (1) down-fired low-NO{sub x} burners with overfire air; (2) Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) for additional NO{sub x} removal; and (3) dry sorbent injection and duct humidification for SO{sub 2} removal. The effectiveness of the integrated system on a high-sulfur coal will also be investigated. This report documents the fifth phase of the test program, where the performance of the dry sorbent injection of calcium was evaluated as an SO{sub 2} removal technique. Dry sorbent injection with humidification was performed downstream of the air heater (in-duct). Calcium injection before the economizer was also investigated. The in-duct calcium sorbent and humidification retrofit resulted in SO{sub 2} reductions of 28 to 40 percent, with a Ca/S of 2, and a 25 to 30{degrees}F approach to adiabatic saturation temperature. The results of the economizer calcium injection tests were disappointing with less than 10 percent SO{sub 2} removal at a Ca/S of 2. Poor sorbent distribution due to limited access into the injection cavity was partially responsible for the low overall removals. However, even in areas of high sorbent concentration (local Ca/S ratios of approximately 6), SO{sub 2} removals were limited to 30 percent. It is suspected that other factors (sorbent properties and limited residence times) also contributed to the poor performance.

  8. Dynamic aperture studies for the LHC high luminosity lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Maria, R. de; Giovannozzi, M.; McIntosh, E.; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Cai, Y.; Wang, M. -H.

    2015-07-14

    Since quite some time, dynamic aperture studies have been undertaken with the aim of specifying the required field quality of the new magnets that will be installed in the LHC ring in the framework of the high-luminosity upgrade. In this paper the latest results concerning the specification work will be presented, taking into account both injection and collision energies and the field quality contribution from all the magnets in the newly designed interaction regions.

  9. LHC Abort Gap Cleaning Studies During Luminosity Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Bartmann, W.; Boccardi, A.; Bracco, C.; Bravin, E.; Goddard, B.; Hofle, W.; Jacquet, D.; Jeff, A.; Kain, V.; Meddahi, M.; /CERN

    2012-05-11

    The presence of significant intensities of un-bunched beam is a potentially serious issue in the LHC. Procedures using damper kickers for cleaning both the Abort Gap (AG) and the buckets targeted for injection, are currently in operation at flat bottom. Recent observations of relatively high population of the AG during physics runs brought up the need for AG cleaning during luminosity operation. In this paper the results of experimental studies performed in October 2011 are presented.

  10. Mechanical characterization of a CO2 fractured reservoir by means of microseismicity induced by high pressure injection tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Simone, Silvia; Soler, Joaquim; Carrera, Jesus; Slooten, Luit Jan; Ortiz, Gema

    2014-05-01

    Reservoir characterization is an essential issue in geological storage of CO2 in Technological Development Plant (TDP). In particular, hydromechanical characterization of the caprock-reservoir system is crucial, in order to define the maximum suitable injection pressure and the in-situ mechanical properties. Thus, it is possible to conjecture the hydromechanical behavior of the system during CO2 injection. Microseismicity induced by fluid injection may be used as instruments to find out fractured reservoir properties. Indeed, the hydromechanical response is controlled by permeability (k), Young modulus (E) and Poisson ratio (ν). In caprock-reservoir systems, reservoir stiffness controls the stress transfer towards the caprock, where failure may occur. Therefore, the location of the microseismic hypocenters could give information on the reservoir stiffness. In this work we propose a simulation and calibration method of the microseismicity induced by high pressure fluid injection in a fractured reservoir. Coupled hydromechanical models are peformed. The methology is applied to a particular case study.

  11. PDF4LHC recommendations for LHC Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, Jon; Carrazza, Stefano; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; De Roeck, Albert; Feltesse, Joël; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Glazov, Sasha; Huston, Joey; Kassabov, Zahari; McNulty, Ronan; Morsch, Andreas; Nadolsky, Pavel; Radescu, Voica; Rojo, Juan; Thorne, Robert

    2016-02-01

    We provide an updated recommendation for the usage of sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs) and the assessment of PDF and PDF+{α }s uncertainties suitable for applications at the LHC Run II. We review developments since the previous PDF4LHC recommendation, and discuss and compare the new generation of PDFs, which include substantial information from experimental data from the Run I of the LHC. We then propose a new prescription for the combination of a suitable subset of the available PDF sets, which is presented in terms of a single combined PDF set. We finally discuss tools which allow for the delivery of this combined set in terms of optimized sets of Hessian eigenvectors or Monte Carlo replicas, and their usage, and provide some examples of their application to LHC phenomenology. This paper is dedicated to the memory of Guido Altarelli (1941-2015), whose seminal work made possible the quantitative study of PDFs.

  12. PDF4LHC recommendations for LHC Run II

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Butterworth, Jon; Carrazza, Stefano; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Roeck, Albert De; Feltesse, Joel; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Glazov, Sasha; Huston, Joey; Kassabov, Zahari; et al

    2016-01-06

    We provide an updated recommendation for the usage of sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs) and the assessment of PDF and PDF+αs uncertainties suitable for applications at the LHC Run II. We review developments since the previous PDF4LHC recommendation, and discuss and compare the new generation of PDFs, which include substantial information from experimental data from the Run I of the LHC. We then propose a new prescription for the combination of a suitable subset of the available PDF sets, which is presented in terms of a single combined PDF set. Lastly, we finally discuss tools which allow for themore » delivery of this combined set in terms of optimized sets of Hessian eigenvectors or Monte Carlo replicas, and their usage, and provide some examples of their application to LHC phenomenology.« less

  13. Assessment of the Efficiency of Consolidation Treatment through Injections of Expanding Resins by Geotechnical Tests and 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Apuani, T.; Giani, G. P.; d'Attoli, M.; Fischanger, F.; Morelli, G.; Ranieri, G.; Santarato, G.

    2015-01-01

    The design and execution of consolidation treatment of settled foundations by means of injection of polyurethane expanding resins require a proper investigation of the state of the foundation soil, in order to better identify anomalies responsible for the instability. To monitor the injection process, a procedure has been developed, which involves, in combination with traditional geotechnical tests, the application of a noninvasive, geophysical technique based on the electrical resistivity, which is strongly sensitive to presence of water or voids. Three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography is a useful tool to produce effective 3D images of the foundation soils before, during, and after the injections. The achieved information allows designing the consolidation scheme and monitoring its effects on the treated volumes in real time. To better understand the complex processes induced by the treatment and to learn how variations of resistivity accompany increase of stiffness, an experiment was carried out in a full-scale test site. Injections of polyurethane expanding resin were performed as in real worksite conditions. Results confirm that the experimented approach by means of 3D resistivity imaging allows a reliable procedure of consolidation, and geotechnical tests demonstrate the increase of mechanical stiffness. PMID:26167521

  14. Assessment of the Efficiency of Consolidation Treatment through Injections of Expanding Resins by Geotechnical Tests and 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography.

    PubMed

    Apuani, T; Giani, G P; d'Attoli, M; Fischanger, F; Morelli, G; Ranieri, G; Santarato, G

    2015-01-01

    The design and execution of consolidation treatment of settled foundations by means of injection of polyurethane expanding resins require a proper investigation of the state of the foundation soil, in order to better identify anomalies responsible for the instability. To monitor the injection process, a procedure has been developed, which involves, in combination with traditional geotechnical tests, the application of a noninvasive, geophysical technique based on the electrical resistivity, which is strongly sensitive to presence of water or voids. Three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography is a useful tool to produce effective 3D images of the foundation soils before, during, and after the injections. The achieved information allows designing the consolidation scheme and monitoring its effects on the treated volumes in real time. To better understand the complex processes induced by the treatment and to learn how variations of resistivity accompany increase of stiffness, an experiment was carried out in a full-scale test site. Injections of polyurethane expanding resin were performed as in real worksite conditions. Results confirm that the experimented approach by means of 3D resistivity imaging allows a reliable procedure of consolidation, and geotechnical tests demonstrate the increase of mechanical stiffness. PMID:26167521

  15. Jet charge at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Krohn, David; Schwartz, Matthew D; Lin, Tongyan; Waalewijn, Wouter J

    2013-05-24

    Knowing the charge of the parton initiating a light-quark jet could be extremely useful both for testing aspects of the standard model and for characterizing potential beyond-the-standard-model signals. We show that despite the complications of hadronization and out-of-jet radiation such as pileup, a weighted sum of the charges of a jet's constituents can be used at the LHC to distinguish among jets with different charges. Potential applications include measuring electroweak quantum numbers of hadronically decaying resonances or supersymmetric particles, as well as standard model tests, such as jet charge in dijet events or in hadronically decaying W bosons in tt[over ¯] events. We develop a systematically improvable method to calculate moments of these charge distributions by combining multihadron fragmentation functions with perturbative jet functions and pertubative evolution equations. We show that the dependence on energy and jet size for the average and width of the jet charge can be calculated despite the large experimental uncertainty on fragmentation functions. These calculations can provide a validation tool for data independent of Monte Carlo fragmentation models.

  16. Status of 11 T 2-in-1 Nb$_3$Sn Dipole Development for LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Zlobin, Alexander; Andreev, Nicolai; Apollinari, Giorgio; Barzi, Emanuela; Bossert, Rodger; Buehler, Marc; Chlachidze, Guram; DiMarco, Joseph; Nobrega, Alfred; Novitski, Igor; Turrioni, Daniele; Velev, Gueorgui; Auchmann, Bernhard; Karppinen, Mikko; Rossi, Lucio; Smekens, David

    2014-07-01

    The LHC upgrade plans foresee installation of additional collimators in the LHC lattice. To provide the necessary longitudinal space for these collimators, shorter and stronger Nb3Sn dipoles compatible with the LHC lattice and main systems could be used. This paper describes the design and status of the twin-aperture Nb3Sn dipole being developed by FNAL and CERN for the LHC, and reports test results of two collared coils to be used in the first 1 m long twin-aperture dipole model.

  17. Side benefits of the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, David J.

    2009-12-01

    Paul Michael Grant's article on a proposed hydrogen-cooled electric "Supergrid" ("Extreme energy makeover" October pp37-39) provides an answer to an oft-posed question about CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As a particle physicist, I am frequently asked by well-informed non-physicists why it is worth pouring more money into repairing the LHC if it costs so much and CERN cannot yet make it work. My first answer is that the fundamental physics that the LHC will do is worthwhile in its own right. But I also add that the LHC and Fermilab's Tevatron are great demonstrators for the superconducting transmission of large electric currents over tens of kilometres.

  18. Hydrogen no-vent fill testing in a 5 cubic foot (142 liter) tank using spray nozzle and spray bar liquid injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Nyland, Ted W.

    1992-01-01

    A total of 38 hydrogen no-vent fill tests were performed in this test series using various size spray nozzles and a spray bar with different hole sizes in a 5 cubic foot receiver tank. Fill levels of 90 percent by volume or greater were achieved in 26 of the tests while maintaining a receiver tank pressure below 30 psia. Spray nozzles were mounted at the top of the tank, whereas, the spray bar was centered in the tank axially. The spray nozzle no-vent fills demonstrated tank pressure and temperature responses comparable to previous test series. Receiver tank pressure responses for the spray bar configuration were similar to the spray nozzle tests with the pressure initially rising rapidly, then leveling off as vapor condenses onto the discharging liquid streams, and finally ramping up near the end of the test due to ullage compression. Both liquid injection techniques tested were capable of filling the receiver tank to 90 percent under variable test conditions. Comparisons between the spray nozzle and spray bar configurations for well matched test conditions indicate the spray nozzle injection technique is more effective in minimizing the receiving tank pressure throughout a no-vent fill compared to the spray bar under normal gravity conditions.

  19. Injectable contraception.

    PubMed

    Kaunitz, A M

    1989-06-01

    The most effective, convenient, reversible method of birth control is considered to be long-acting progestogen injections. Used by over 90 countries, Depot medroxy-progesterone acetate (DMPA, Depo-Provera, Upjohn) has yet to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The reluctance of the FDA to approve DMPA and much of the controversy surrounding this method revolve around the results of testing done on animals who were given large doses of the progestogen over a long period of time and developed tumors. However, the large body of research and records on this method that have been compiled over the past 30 years is positive. The injectable method works like oral contraceptives, inhibiting ovulation. Changes in menstruation have been the chief complaint of women who use this method; however, the duration and frequency of spotting and bleeding diminish over time. Other side effects of DMPA and Norethindrone enanthate (NET EN, Noristerat, Schering) are discussed. Also discussed is the history of development and testing for the 2 methods and subdermal implants, specifically Norplant.

  20. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-10-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 335, Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996). This CAP provides the methodology for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as listed in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD). However, there is one modification to the selected alternative. Due to the large area that would require fencing, it is proposed that instead of fencing, an appropriate number of warning signs attached to tee posts be used to delineate the use restriction area. CAU 335 is located in Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 335 is located in the Area 6 Well 3 Yard approximately 39 km (24 mi) north of Mercury, on the Mercury Highway and several hundred feet (ft) west along Road 6-06. CAU 335 consists of the following three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-20-01, Drums, Oil Waste, Spill; CAS 06-20-02, 20-inch Cased Hole; CAS 06-23-03, Drain Pit. The site history for CAU 335 is provided in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (DOE/NV, 2000). Briefly, CAS 06-20-01, was used for storing material that was pumped out of CAS 06-20-02 and placed into four 208-liter (L) (55-gall [gal]) drums. The drums were taken to the NTS Area 5 Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site in 1991. CAS 06-20-01 will be closed with no further action required. Any spills associated with CAS 06-20-01 are addressed and considered part of CAS 06-20-02. CAS 06-20-02 was used for disposal of used motor oil, wastewater, and debris for an undetermined amount of time. In 1991, the casing was emptied of its contents, excavated, and backfilled. CAS 06-23-03 was used as a depository for effluent waste from truck-washing activities from 1960-1991.

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    DOE /NV

    2000-12-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 335, Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 335 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs). The CAU is located in the Well 3 Yard in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site. Historical records indicate that the Drain Pit (CAS 06-23-03) received effluent from truck-washing; the Drums/Oil Waste/Spill (CAS 06-20-01) consisted of four 55-gallon drums containing material removed from the Cased Hole; and the Cased Hole (CAS 06-20-02) was used for disposal of used motor oil, wastewater, and debris. These drums were transported to the Area 5 Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site in July 1991; therefore, they are no longer on site and further investigation or remediation efforts are not required. Consequently, CAS 06-20-01 will be closed with no further action and details of this decision will be described in the Closure Report for this CAU. Any spills that may have been associated with this CAS will be investigated and addressed under CAS 06-20-02. Field investigation efforts will be focused on the two remaining CASs. The scope of the investigation will center around identifying any contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) and, if present, determining the vertical and lateral extent of contamination. The COPCs for the Drain Pit include: total volatile/ semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (gasoline-and diesel-range organics), ethylene glycol monobutyl ether, polychlorinated biphenyls, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and radionuclides. The COPCs for the Cased Hole include: total volatile/ semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel-range organics only), and total Resource Conservation an d

  2. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

    2003-06-01

    This Closure Report documents the activities undertaken to close Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, according to the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 335 was closed in accordance with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection-approved Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335.

  3. Single well field injection test of humate to enhance attenuation of uranium and other radionuclides in an acidic plume

    SciTech Connect

    Denham, M.

    2014-09-30

    This report documents the impact of the injected humate on targeted contaminants over a period of 4 months and suggests it is a viable attenuation-based remedy for uranium, potentially for I-129, but not for Sr-90. Future activities will focus on issues pertinent to scaling the technology to full deployment.

  4. Tevatron-for-LHC Report of the QCD Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, Michael G.; Begel, M.; Bourilkov, D.; Campanelli, M.; Chlebana, F.; De Roeck, A.; Dittmann, J.R.; Ellis, S.D.; Field, B.; Field, R.; Gallinaro, M.; /Fermilab /Rochester U. /Florida U. /Geneva U. /CERN /Baylor U. /Washington U., Seattle /Florida State U. /Rockefeller U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Michigan State U.

    2006-10-01

    The experiments at Run 2 of the Tevatron have each accumulated over 1 fb{sup -1} of high-transverse momentum data. Such a dataset allows for the first precision (i.e. comparisons between theory and experiment at the few percent level) tests of QCD at a hadron collider. While the Large Hadron Collider has been designed as a discovery machine, basic QCD analyses will still need to be performed to understand the working environment. The Tevatron-for-LHC workshop was conceived as a communication link to pass on the expertise of the Tevatron and to test new analysis ideas coming from the LHC community. The TeV4LHC QCD Working Group focused on important aspects of QCD at hadron colliders: jet definitions, extraction and use of Parton Distribution Functions, the underlying event, Monte Carlo tunes, and diffractive physics. This report summarizes some of the results achieved during this workshop.

  5. First Results of the LHC Longitudinal Density Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff, A.; Boccardi, A.; Bravin, E.; Fisher, A.S.; Lefevre, T.; Rabiller, A.; Roncarolo, F.; Welsch, C.P.; /Liverpool U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.

    2012-04-19

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is the world's largest particle accelerator. It is designed to accelerate and collide protons or heavy ions up to the center-of-mass energies of 14 TeV. Knowledge of the longitudinal distribution of particles is important for various aspects of accelerator operation, in particular to check the injection quality and to measure the proportion of charge outside the nominally filled bunches during the physics periods. In order to study this so-called ghost charge at levels very much smaller than the main bunches, a longitudinal profile measurement with a very high dynamic range is needed. A new detector, the LHC Longitudinal Density Monitor (LDM) is a single-photon counting system measuring synchrotron light by means of an avalanche photodiode detector. The unprecedented energies reached in the LHC allow synchrotron light diagnostics to be used with both protons and heavy ions. A prototype was installed during the 2010 LHC run and was able to longitudinally profile the whole ring with a resolution close to the target of 50 ps. On-line correction for the effects of the detector deadtime, pile-up and afterpulsing allow a dynamic range of 105 to be achieved. First measurements with the LDM are presented here along with an analysis of its performance and an outlook for future upgrades.

  6. Gas migration in fractured rock: results and modelling of a helium gas injection experiment at the Reskajeage farm test site, SW England, United Kingdom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lineham, T. R.; Nash, P. J.; Rodwell, W. R.; Bolt, J.; Watkins, V. M. B.; Grainger, P.; Heath, M. J.; Merefield, J. R.

    1996-02-01

    It is anticipated that the U.K. radioactive waste repository will be sited in a saturated low-permeability fractured geology. The repository will contain material that will give rise to the generation of significant quantities of gas over an extended period of time. It is important to understand the mechanisms whereby these gases are released from the repository and migrate away. If the gases were to be localised at surface they could potentially pose radiological, toxicological or flammability risks to man. This paper discusses experimental and modelling studies of gas migration in water-saturated fractured rock. A field-scale helium gas injection experiment has been undertaken at a test site in a disused quarry. The aims of the experiment were to establish whether gas injected at depth was localised on release at the land surface, and to contribute to building confidence in the models being developed to describe gas migration processes. Gas was injected for nine days and throughout this period and the subsequent twelve months soil-gas surveying was used to establish release locations. Data from the experiment have been modelled using a number of approaches ranging from analytical scoping calculations to numerical simulations of two-phase flow in a porous medium. These approaches have proved useful in modelling gas injection experiments.

  7. Adalimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... not improved when treated with other medications, ulcerative colitis (a condition which causes swelling and sores in ... adalimumab injection to treat Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, your doctor may tell you to inject the ...

  8. Denosumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Denosumab injection (Prolia) is also used to treat bone loss in men with prostate cancer and in women with breast cancer who are receiving certain treatments that increase their risk for fractures. Denosumab injection ( ...

  9. Diphenhydramine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the nervous system that causes difficulties with movement, muscle control, and balance). Diphenhydramine injection should not be ... solution (liquid) to be injected intramuscularly (into a muscle) or intravenously (into a vein). Your dosing schedule ...

  10. Leucovorin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... red blood cells) caused by low levels of folic acid in the body. Leucovorin injection is also used ... injection is in a class of medications called folic acid analogs. It treats people who are receiving methotrexate ...

  11. Glatiramer Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which ... to inject glatiramer, inject it around the same time every day. Follow the directions on your prescription ...

  12. Naltrexone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Naltrexone injection is used along with counseling and social support to help people who have stopped drinking large ... injection is also used along with counseling and social support to help people who have stopped abusing opiate ...

  13. Estrogen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... forms of estrogen injection are used to treat hot flushes (hot flashes; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) ... If you are using estrogen injection to treat hot flushes, your symptoms should improve within 1 to ...

  14. Cefazolin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Cefazolin injection is also sometimes used for certain penicillin allergic patients who have a heart condition and ... injection is also sometimes used to treat certain penicillin allergic women who are in labor in order ...

  15. Paclitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... with other medications. Paclitaxel injection manufactured with polyoxyethylated castor oil is used to treat ovarian cancer (cancer that ... cancer, and lung cancer. Paclitaxel injection with polyoxyethylated castor oil is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma (a ...

  16. Aripiprazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... aripiprazole injection and aripiprazole extended-release injection developed gambling problems or other intense urges or behaviors that ... even if you do not realize that your gambling or any other intense urges or unusual behaviors ...

  17. Testosterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testopel) are also used to stimulate puberty in males with delayed puberty. Testosterone enanthate (Delatestryl) injection may ... to the growth, development, and functioning of the male sexual organs and typical male characteristics. Testosterone injection ...

  18. Degarelix Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Degarelix injection is used to treat advanced prostate cancer (cancer that begins in the prostate [a male reproductive gland]). Degarelix injection is in a class of medications called gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) ...

  19. Naloxone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection device.The automatic injection device has an electronic voice system that provides step by step directions ... of opiate withdrawal such as body aches, diarrhea, fast heart beat, fever, runny nose, sneezing, sweating, yawning, ...

  20. Cefoxitin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to treat infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) ... medications called cephamycin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefoxitin injection will not work ...

  1. Doripenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... tract, kidney, and abdomen that are caused by bacteria. Doripenem injection is not approved by the Food ... medications called carbapenem antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as doripenem injection will not work ...

  2. Chloramphenicol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain types of serious infections caused by bacteria when other antibiotics cannot be used. Chloramphenicol injection ... antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria..Antibiotics such as chloramphenicol injection will not work ...

  3. Medroxyprogesterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medroxyprogesterone subcutaneous injection is also used to treat endometriosis (a condition in which the type of tissue ... parts of the body in women who have endometriosis. Medroxyprogesterone injection is a very effective method of ...

  4. Levoleucovorin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to prevent harmful effects of methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall) when methotrexate is used to to treat certain types of ... people who have accidentally received an overdose of methotrexate or similar medications. Levoleucovorin injection is in a ...

  5. Vancomycin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Vancomycin injection is used alone or in combination with other medications to treat certain serious infections such ... infections of the lungs, skin, blood, and bones. Vancomycin injection is in a class of medications called ...

  6. The New Transfer Line Collimation System for the LHC High Luminosity Era

    SciTech Connect

    Kain, Verena; Bracco, Chiara; Goddard, Brennan; Maciariello, Fausto; Meddahi, Malika; Mereghetti, Alessio; Steele, Genevieve; Velotti, Francesco; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana

    2014-07-01

    A set of passive absorbers is located at the end of each of the 3 km long injection lines to protect the LHC in case of failures during the extraction process from the LHC’s last pre-injector or the beam transfer itself. In case of an erroneous extraction, the absorbers have to attenuate the beam to a safe level and be robust enough themselves to survive the impact. These requirements are difficult to fulfil with the very bright and intense beams produced by the LHC injectors for the high luminosity era. This paper revisits the requirements for the SPS-to-LHC transfer line collimation system and the adapted strategy to fulfill these for the LHC high luminosity operation. A possible solution for the new transfer line collimation system is presented.

  7. Increased Uptake of HCV Testing through a Community-Based Educational Intervention in Difficult-to-Reach People Who Inject Drugs: Results from the ANRS-AERLI Study

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Perrine; Rojas Castro, Daniela; Ndiaye, Khadim; Debrus, Marie; Protopopescu, Camélia; Le Gall, Jean-Marie; Haas, Aurélie; Mora, Marion; Spire, Bruno; Suzan-Monti, Marie; Carrieri, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Aims The community-based AERLI intervention provided training and education to people who inject drugs (PWID) about HIV and HCV transmission risk reduction, with a focus on drug injecting practices, other injection-related complications, and access to HIV and HCV testing and care. We hypothesized that in such a population where HCV prevalence is very high and where few know their HCV serostatus, AERLI would lead to increased HCV testing. Methods The national multisite intervention study ANRS-AERLI consisted in assessing the impact of an injection-centered face-to-face educational session offered in volunteer harm reduction (HR) centers (“with intervention”) compared with standard HR centers (“without intervention”). The study included 271 PWID interviewed on three occasions: enrolment, 6 and 12 months. Participants in the intervention group received at least one face-to-face educational session during the first 6 months. Measurements The primary outcome of this analysis was reporting to have been tested for HCV during the previous 6 months. Statistical analyses used a two-step Heckman approach to account for bias arising from the non-randomized clustering design. This approach identified factors associated with HCV testing during the previous 6 months. Findings Of the 271 participants, 127 and 144 were enrolled in the control and intervention groups, respectively. Of the latter, 113 received at least one educational session. For the present analysis, we selected 114 and 88 participants eligible for HCV testing in the control and intervention groups, respectively. In the intervention group, 44% of participants reported having being tested for HCV during the previous 6 months at enrolment and 85% at 6 months or 12 months. In the control group, these percentages were 51% at enrolment and 78% at 12 months. Multivariable analyses showed that participants who received at least one educational session during follow-up were more likely to report HCV testing

  8. Integrated dry NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} emissions control system sodium-based dry sorbent injection test report. Test period: August 4, 1993--July 29, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.A.; Shimoto, G.H.; Muzio, L.J.; Hunt, T.

    1997-04-01

    The project goal is to demonstrate up to 70% reductions in NOx and SO{sub 2} emissions through the integration of: (1) down-fired low-NOx burners with overfire air; (2) Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) for additional NOx removal; and (3) dry sorbent injection and duct humidification for SO{sub 2} removal. This report documents the sixth phase of the test program, where the performance of dry sorbent injection with sodium compounds was evaluated as a SO{sub 2} removal technique. Dry sorbent injection was performed in-duct downstream of the air heater (ahead of the fabric filter), as well as at a higher temperature location between the economizer and air heater. Two sodium compounds were evaluated during this phase of testing: sodium sesquicarbonate and sodium bicarbonate. In-duct sodium injection with low levels of humidification was also investigated. This sixth test phase was primarily focused on a parametric investigation of sorbent type and feed rate, although boiler load and sorbent preparation parameters were also varied.

  9. Dashboard for the LHC experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, J.; Belov, S.; Berejnoj, A.; Cirstoiu, C.; Chen, Y.; Chen, T.; Chiu, S.; Miguel, M. D. F. D.; Ivanchenko, A.; Gaidioz, B.; Herrala, J.; Janulis, M.; Kodolova, O.; Maier, G.; Maguire, E. J.; Munro, C.; Rivera, R. P.; Rocha, R.; Saiz, P.; Sidorova, I.; Tsai, F.; Tikhonenko, E.; Urbah, E.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we present the Experiment Dashboard monitoring system, which is currently in use by four Large Hadron Collider (LHC)[1] experiments. The goal of the Experiment Dashboard is to monitor the activities of the LHC experiments on the distributed infrastructure, providing monitoring data from the virtual organization (VO) and user perspectives. The LHC experiments are using various Grid infrastructures (LCG[2]/EGEE[3], OSG[4], NDGF[5]) with correspondingly various middleware flavors and job submission methods. Providing a uniform and complete view of various activities like job processing, data movement and publishing, access to distributed databases regardless of the underlying Grid flavor is the challenging task. In this paper we will describe the Experiment Dashboard concept, its framework and main monitoring applications.

  10. Le LHC, un tunnel cosmique

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-17

    Et si la lumière au bout du tunnel du LHC était cosmique ? En d’autres termes, qu’est-ce que le LHC peut nous apporter dans la connaissance de l’Univers ? Car la montée en énergie des accélérateurs de particules nous permet de mieux appréhender l’univers primordial, chaud et dense. Mais dans quel sens dit-on que le LHC reproduit des conditions proches du Big bang ? Quelles informations nous apporte-t-il sur le contenu de l’Univers ? La matière noire est-elle détectable au LHC ? L’énergie noire ? Pourquoi l’antimatière accumulée au CERN est-elle si rare dans l’Univers ? Et si le CERN a bâti sa réputation sur l’exploration des forces faibles et fortes qui opèrent au sein des atomes et de leurs noyaux, est-ce que le LHC peut nous apporter des informations sur la force gravitationnelle qui gouverne l’évolution cosmique ? Depuis une trentaine d’années, notre compréhension de l’univers dans ses plus grandes dimensions et l’appréhension de son comportement aux plus petites distances sont intimement liées : en quoi le LHC va-t-il tester expérimentalement cette vision unifiée ? Tout public, entrée libre / Réservations au +41 (0)22 767 76 76

  11. Model discrimination at the LHC: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Hallenbeck, Gregory; Perelstein, Maxim; Spethmann, Christian; Thom, Julia; Vaughan, Jennifer

    2009-04-01

    We investigate the potential of the compact muon solenoid detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to discriminate between two theoretical models predicting anomalous events with jets and large missing transverse energy, minimal supersymmetry, and little Higgs with T parity. We focus on a simple test-case scenario, in which the only exotic particles produced at the LHC are heavy color-triplet states (squarks or T quarks), and the only open decay channel for these particles is into the stable missing-energy particle (neutralino or heavy photon) plus a quark. We find that in this scenario, the angular and momentum distributions of the observed jets are sufficient to discriminate between the two models with a few inverse femtobarns of the LHC data, provided that these distributions for both models and the dominant standard model backgrounds can be reliably predicted by Monte Carlo simulations.

  12. LHC: The Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-03-04

    The Large Hadron Collider (or LHC) is the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. In 2012, scientists used data taken by it to discover the Higgs boson, before pausing operations for upgrades and improvements. In the spring of 2015, the LHC will return to operations with 163% the energy it had before and with three times as many collisions per second. It’s essentially a new and improved version of itself. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains both some of the absolutely amazing scientific and engineering properties of this modern scientific wonder.

  13. LHC: The Large Hadron Collider

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The Large Hadron Collider (or LHC) is the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. In 2012, scientists used data taken by it to discover the Higgs boson, before pausing operations for upgrades and improvements. In the spring of 2015, the LHC will return to operations with 163% the energy it had before and with three times as many collisions per second. It’s essentially a new and improved version of itself. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains both some of the absolutely amazing scientific and engineering properties of this modern scientific wonder.

  14. B Physics at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Gersabeck, Marco

    2010-02-10

    The LHC is scheduled to start its first physics data taking period later in 2009. Primarily LHCb but also ATLAS and CMS will start a rich B physics programme with the potential of revealing New Physics in the heavy flavour sector. This contribution will cover the prospects for B physics at the LHC with particular emphasis to early measurements. This includes CP violation measurements in B{sub d}{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0} decays, searches for rare decays such as B{sub s}{sup 0}->{mu}{mu}, as well as semileptonic and radiative channels.

  15. L'Aventure du LHC

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-11

    Cette présentation s’adressera principalement aux personnes qui ont construit le LHC. La construction du LHC fut longue et difficile. De nombreux problèmes sont apparus en cours de route. Tous ont été résolus grâce au dévouement et à l’engagement du personnel et des collaborateurs. Je reviendrai sur les coups durs et les réussites qui ont marqués ces 15 dernières années et je vous montrerai combien cette machine, le fruit de vos efforts, est extraordinaire.

  16. Factors Influencing the Mobility of Microorganisms in a Small-Scale Injection and Recovery Test Performed in a Sandy Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metge, D. W.; Harvey, R. W.; Rogers, J. R.

    2001-12-01

    The effect of motility and physical characteristics upon the relative transport behaviors of three bacterial strains (groundwater isolates) and a virus (H40, a 150 nm marine bacteriophage) were assessed in July 2001 in a small-scale, natural-gradient injection and recovery study involving an array of multilevel samplers (MLS) installed in a sandy aquifer in Cape Cod, MA. The bacteria included a motile Pseudomonas sp. (1.5-2.2 μ m long, 1.07 g/cm3), a non-motile mutant of the same species; and a Staphylococcus sp. (0.5-0.8 μ m diameter, 1.08 g/cm3). The virus, three bacteria strains, and conservative tracer (bromide) were introduced to the aquifer as a 107-L pulse injection into two conductive layers that differed in terms of groundwater velocity. For the faster layer, peak breakthroughs for all three bacterial strains at 1 m downgradient from the point of injection were coincident with that of the bromide tracer, although the magnitudes of breakthrough varied up to 10-fold. In contrast, the tailed bacteriophage (H40) was retarded by a factor of ~3. For the slower layer, the motile Pseudomonas sp. exhibited substantial longitudinal spreading and two distinct breakthrough peaks. The first peak arrived before that of bromide. However, the second peak was retarded by a factor of 2. Peak concentrations of its non-motile mutant and the Staphylococcus sp. arrived coincidently with that of bromide. As was the case for the faster layer, breakthrough of the virus in the slower layer was significantly retarded. The data suggest that a microorganism's motility and physical characteristics can substantively affect its transport behavior in aquifer sediments, although the relative degrees of influence for these factors may be modified by aquifer heterogeneities.

  17. Mode-particle resonances during near-tangential neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaita, R.; White, R. B.; Morris, A. W.; Fredrickson, E. D.; McGuire, K. M.; Medley, S. S.; Murphy, T. J.; Scott, S. D.

    1990-07-01

    Coherent magnetohydrodynamic modes have been observed previously during neutral beam injection in the PDX tokamak [Phys. Rev. Lett. 50, 891 (1983)] and they have now been seen in the TFTR tokamak [Phys. Fluids 26, 2958 (1983)]. Periodic bursts of oscillations were detected with several plasma diagnostics, and Fokker-Planck calculations show that the populations of trapped particles in both tokamaks are sufficient to account for fishbone destabilization if a resonant interaction, between the mode and the beam ions, is assumed. Estimates of mode parameters are in reasonable agreement with the experiments, and they indicate that the fishbone mode may continue to affect the performance of intensely heated tokamaks.

  18. Torsion phenomenology at the CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, A. S.; Shapiro, I. L.; Vale, M. A. B. do

    2007-02-01

    We explore the potential of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to test the dynamical torsion parameters. The form of the torsion action can be established from the requirements of consistency of effective quantum field theory. The most phenomenologically relevant part of the torsion tensor is dual to a massive axial vector field. This axial vector has geometric nature, that means it does not belong to any representation of the gauge group of the SM extension or GUT theory. At the same time, torsion should interact with all fermions, that opens the way for the phenomenological applications. We demonstrate that LHC collider can establish unique constraints on the interactions between fermions and torsion field considerably exceeding present experimental lower bounds on the torsion couplings and its mass. It is also shown how possible nonuniversal nature of torsion couplings due to the renormalization group running between the Planck and TeV energy scales can be tested via the combined analysis of Drell-Yan and tt production processes.

  19. Plans for Deployment of Hollow Electron Lenses at the LHC for Enhanced Beam Collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Redaelli, S.; Bertarelli, A.; Bruce, R.; Perini, D.; Rossi, A.; Salvachua, B.; Stancari, G.; Valishev, A.

    2015-06-01

    Hollow electron lenses are considered as a possible means to improve the LHC beam collimation system, providing active control of halo diffusion rates and suppressing the population of transverse halos. After a very successful experience at the Tevatron, a conceptual design of a hollow e-lens optimized for the LHC was produced. Recent further studies have led to a mature preliminary technical design. In this paper, possible scenarios for the deployment of this technology at the LHC are elaborated in the context of the scheduled LHC long shutdowns until the full implementation of the HL-LHC upgrade in 2023. Possible setups of electron beam test stands at CERN and synergies with other relevant electron beam programmes are also discussed.

  20. THE RHIC INJECTION SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; GLENN,J.W.; MACKAY,W.W.; PTITSIN,V.; ROBINSON,T.G.; TSOUPAS,N.

    1999-03-29

    The RHIC injection system has to transport beam from the AGS-to-RHIC transfer line onto the closed orbits of the RHIC Blue and Yellow rings. This task can be divided into three problems. First, the beam has to be injected into either ring. Second, once injected the beam needs to be transported around the ring for one turn. Third, the orbit must be closed and coherent beam oscillations around the closed orbit should be minimized. We describe our solutions for these problems and report on system tests conducted during the RHIC Sextant test performed in 1997. The system will be fully commissioned in 1999.

  1. String Physics at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.

    2008-11-23

    The LHC program will include the identification of events with single high-k{sub T} photons as probes of new physics. We show that this channel is uniquely suited to search for experimental evidence of TeV-scale open string theory.

  2. Heavy Quark Photoproduction at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Goncalves, V. P.; Meneses, A. R.; Machado, M. V.

    2010-11-12

    In this work we calculate the inclusive and difractive photoproduction of heavy quarks in proton-proton collisions at LHC energies within the color dipole picture employing three phenomenological saturation models based on the color glass condensate formalism. Our results demonstrate that the experimental analyzes of these reactions is feasible and that the cross sections are sensitive to the underlying parton dynamics.

  3. The history of the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    2010-05-11

    Abstract: From the civil engineering, to the manufacturing of the various magnet types, each building block of this extraordinary machine required ambitious leaps in innovation. This lecture will review the history of the LHC project, focusing on the many challenges -- scientific, technological, managerial -- that had to be met during the various phases of R&D;, industrialization, construction, installation and commissioning.

  4. PHOBOS in the LHC era

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Peter

    2015-01-15

    The PHOBOS experiment ran at the RHIC collider from 2000 to 2005, under the leadership of Wit Busza. These proceedings summarize selected PHOBOS results, highlighting their continuing relevance amidst the wealth of new results from the lead–lead program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

  5. ELECTRONICS FOR CALORIMETERS AT LHC.

    SciTech Connect

    RADEKA,V.

    2001-09-11

    Some principal design features of front-end electronics for calorimeters in experiments at the LHC will be highlighted. Some concerns arising in the transition from the research and development and design phase to the construction will be discussed. Future challenges will be indicated.

  6. The history of the LHC

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Abstract: From the civil engineering, to the manufacturing of the various magnet types, each building block of this extraordinary machine required ambitious leaps in innovation. This lecture will review the history of the LHC project, focusing on the many challenges -- scientific, technological, managerial -- that had to be met during the various phases of R&D;, industrialization, construction, installation and commissioning.

  7. Shock Absorbing Function Study on Denucleated Intervertebral Disc with or without Hydrogel Injection through Static and Dynamic Biomechanical Tests In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhiyu; Wei, Fuxin; Liang, Jiabi; Deng, Wenbin; Dai, Xuejun; Zhou, Guangqian

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogel injection has been recently proposed as a novel therapy for disc degenerative diseases, with the potential to restore the spine motion and the intervertebral disc height. However, it remains unknown whether the new technique could also maintain the shock absorbing property of the treated intervertebral disc. In this study, 18 porcine lumbar bone-disc-bone specimens were collected and randomly divided into three groups: the normal with intact intervertebral discs, the mimic for the injection of disulfide cross-linked hyaluronan hydrogels following discectomy, and the control disc with discectomy only. In the static compression test, specimens in the mimic group exhibited displacements similar to those in the normal discs, whereas the control group showed a significantly larger displacement range in the first two steps (P < 0.05). With the frequency increasing, all specimens generally displayed an increasing storage modulus, decreasing loss modulus, and tanδ. At any frequency point, the control group exhibited the largest value in all the three parameters among three groups while the normal group was the lowest, with the mimic group being mostly close to the normal group. Therefore, the hydrogel injection into the intervertebral discs greatly restored their shock absorbing function, suggesting that the technique could serve as an effective approach to maintaining biomechanical properties of the degenerative intervertebral disc. PMID:25045680

  8. Strontium isotopes test long-term zonal isolation of injected and Marcellus formation water after hydraulic fracturing.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Courtney A Kolesar; Capo, Rosemary C; Stewart, Brian W; Wall, Andrew J; Schroeder, Karl T; Hammack, Richard W; Guthrie, George D

    2014-08-19

    One concern regarding unconventional hydrocarbon production from organic-rich shale is that hydraulic fracture stimulation could create pathways that allow injected fluids and deep brines from the target formation or adjacent units to migrate upward into shallow drinking water aquifers. This study presents Sr isotope and geochemical data from a well-constrained site in Greene County, Pennsylvania, in which samples were collected before and after hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale. Results spanning a 15-month period indicated no significant migration of Marcellus-derived fluids into Upper Devonian/Lower Mississippian units located 900-1200 m above the lateral Marcellus boreholes or into groundwater sampled at a spring near the site. Monitoring the Sr isotope ratio of water from legacy oil and gas wells or drinking water wells can provide a sensitive early warning of upward brine migration for many years after well stimulation. PMID:25024106

  9. Strontium isotopes test long-term zonal isolation of injected and Marcellus formation water after hydraulic fracturing.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Courtney A Kolesar; Capo, Rosemary C; Stewart, Brian W; Wall, Andrew J; Schroeder, Karl T; Hammack, Richard W; Guthrie, George D

    2014-08-19

    One concern regarding unconventional hydrocarbon production from organic-rich shale is that hydraulic fracture stimulation could create pathways that allow injected fluids and deep brines from the target formation or adjacent units to migrate upward into shallow drinking water aquifers. This study presents Sr isotope and geochemical data from a well-constrained site in Greene County, Pennsylvania, in which samples were collected before and after hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale. Results spanning a 15-month period indicated no significant migration of Marcellus-derived fluids into Upper Devonian/Lower Mississippian units located 900-1200 m above the lateral Marcellus boreholes or into groundwater sampled at a spring near the site. Monitoring the Sr isotope ratio of water from legacy oil and gas wells or drinking water wells can provide a sensitive early warning of upward brine migration for many years after well stimulation.

  10. Practical experience applied to the design of injection and sample manifolds to perform in-place surveillance tests according to ANSI/ASME N-510

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, E.M.; Wikoff, W.O.; Shaffer, L.L.

    1997-08-01

    At the current level of maturity and experience in the nuclear industry, regarding testing of air treatment systems, it is now possible to design and qualify injection and sample manifolds for most applications. While the qualification of sample manifolds is still in its infancy, injection manifolds have reached a mature stage that helps to eliminate the {open_quotes}hit or miss{close_quotes} type of design. During the design phase, manifolds can be adjusted to compensate for poor airflow distribution, laminar flow conditions, and to take advantage of any system attributes. Experience has shown that knowing the system attributes before the design phase begins is an essential element to a successful manifold design. The use of a spreadsheet type program commonly found on most personal computers can afford a greater flexibility and a reduction in time spent in the design phase. The experience gained from several generations of manifold design has culminated in a set of general design guidelines. Use of these guidelines, along with a good understanding of the type of testing (theoretical and practical), can result in a good manifold design requiring little or no field modification. The requirements for manifolds came about because of the use of multiple banks of components and unconventional housing inlet configurations. Multiple banks of adsorbers and pre and post HEPA`s required that each bank be tested to insure that each one does not exceed a specific allowable leakage criterion. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Expanding access to HIV testing and counseling and exploring vulnerabilities among spouses of HIV-positive men who inject drugs in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Salman; Majeed, Mohammad Faisal; Awaan, Ahmad Bakhsh; Mirza, Humayun; Sarfraz, Nasir; Veronese, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore the utility of home and community-based HIV testing and counseling (HTC) to increase detection of undiagnosed HIV among female spouses and children of HIV-positive PWID in Punjab province, Pakistan. Design Between March 2014 and March 2015, home-based HTC was provided by a local NGO to spouses of HIV-positive PWID in Lahore, Faisalabad, and Sargodha. Convenience sampling was used to identify 2400 married, HIV-positive men who inject drugs and who were currently registered and receiving harm reduction services from the NGO ‘Roshan Rasta’ and seek consent to approach their wives. Method Trained outreach teams conducted HTC and administered a short sociodemographic and behavioral questionnaire to consenting spouses in their homes. HIV-exposed children were also tested with parental consent. Results of the 2400 married HIV positive male-injecting drug users, only 1959 spouses were approached and 1896 agreed to HTC (96.8%). HIV prevalence was 5.3% (n = 101) among spouses and they had very low level of HIV-related knowledge and protective behaviors Conclusion Home and community-based HTC was effective in identifying undiagnosed HIV among spouses of PWID, the majority of whom reported low rates of prior HIV testing and low HIV-related knowledge. Expansion of HIV prevention services and linkages to treatment and care including PMTCT are urgently needed for this group. PMID:26945140

  12. Hydrogeological site characterization for the implementation of a pilot test of in-situ groundwater treatment using dual-phase slurry injection in fractured bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghiu, F.; Venkatakrishnan, R.; Glazier, R.; Walata, L.; Nash, R.; Zhang, W.

    2003-04-01

    The study area is located in the Durham sub-basin of the Deep River Basin, one of the Triassic Basins that occur along the eastern seaboard of the North American Continent. The site is underlain by interbedded siltstone and sandstone sequences. Groundwater underlying portions of the site has been impacted by chlorinated volatile organic compounds. Golder conducted an initial review of potentially applicable remediation technologies and retained the Bimetallic Nanoscale Particle (BNP) technology (Wei-xian Zhang, 1997, 1999, 2000) for further evaluation at the field pilot test scale. This study presents the results of the detailed hydrogeologic studies conducted for the BNP pilot test design and implementation monitoring, and specifically looks at the changes in hydrogeological properties of the fractured bedrock aquifer as a result of injecting the BNP dual phase slurry (water and BNP solids). This study also presents the interpretation of borehole drilling, downhole televiewer logging, and hydrogeologic testing as the basis for understanding the dual phase slurry migration in the subsurface. Continuous multi-parameter monitoring was conducted during the BNP slurry injection and also was used as the basis for field estimation of fractured bedrock effective porosity. In addition, this study provides the basis for the hydrogeologic design of the full scale BNP treatment system that is expected to be more cost effective than typical pump-and-treat remedies.

  13. Triptorelin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... response to triptorelin injection. Your blood sugar and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) should be checked regularly.Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about triptorelin injection.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and ...

  14. Leuprolide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... response to leuprolide injection. Your blood sugar and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) should be checked regularly.Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about leuprolide injection.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and ...

  15. Evaluation of penicillin G residues by kidney inhibition swab tests in sow body fluids and tissues following intramuscular injection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2011, the USDA-Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) changed the method used for screening swine tissues for antimicrobial residues from the Fast Antimicrobial Screen Test to the Kidney Inhibition Swab (KIS(TM)). Here, we describe the use of KIS(TM) test for the detection of penicillin G res...

  16. Musculoskeletal Injection

    PubMed Central

    Wittich, Christopher M.; Ficalora, Robert D.; Mason, Thomas G.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Patients commonly present to primary care physicians with musculoskeletal symptoms. Clinicians certified in internal medicine must be knowledgeable about the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal diseases, yet they often receive inadequate postgraduate training on this topic. The musculoskeletal problems most frequently encountered in our busy injection practice involve, in decreasing order, the knees, trochanteric bursae, and glenohumeral joints. This article reviews the clinical presentations of these problems. It also discusses musculoskeletal injections for these problems in terms of medications, indications, injection technique, and supporting evidence from the literature. Experience with joint injection and the pharmacological principles described in this article should allow primary care physicians to become comfortable and proficient with musculoskeletal injections. PMID:19720781

  17. On dilatons and the LHC diphoton excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megías, Eugenio; Pujolàs, Oriol; Quirós, Mariano

    2016-05-01

    We study soft wall models that can embed the Standard Model and a naturally light dilaton. Exploiting the full capabilities of these models we identify the parameter space that allows to pass Electroweak Precision Tests with a moderate Kaluza-Klein scale, around 2 TeV. We analyze the coupling of the dilaton with Standard Model (SM) fields in the bulk, and discuss two applications: i) Models with a light dilaton as the first particle beyond the SM pass quite easily all observational tests even with a dilaton lighter than the Higgs. However the possibility of a 125 GeV dilaton as a Higgs impostor is essentially disfavored; ii) We show how to extend the soft wall models to realize a 750 GeV dilaton that could explain the recently reported diphoton excess at the LHC.

  18. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Boehlecke

    2004-12-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 322 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 01-25-01 - AST Release Site; (2) 03-25-03 - Mud Plant and AST Diesel Release; and (3) 03-20-05 - Injection Wells and BOP Shop. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 322. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from April 2004 through September 2004, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: (1) Determine if contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to recommend appropriate corrective actions for the CASs. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against appropriate preliminary action levels to identify contaminants of concern for each corrective action site. Radiological field measurements were compared to unrestricted release criteria. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities revealed the following: (1) CAS 01-25-01 contains an AST berm contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) diesel-range organics (DRO). (2) CAS 03-25-03 includes two distinct areas: Area A where no contamination remains from a potential spill associated with an AST, and Area B where TPH-DRO contamination associated with various activities at the mud plant was identified. The Area B contamination was found at various locations and depths. (3) CAS 03-25-03 Area B contains TPH-DRO contamination at various locations and

  19. Direct injection LC-MS/MS method for identification and quantification of amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine in urine drug testing.

    PubMed

    Andersson, M; Gustavsson, E; Stephanson, N; Beck, O

    2008-01-01

    A method based on direct injection of diluted urine for the identification and quantification of amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymetamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine in human urine by electrospray ionisation liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was validated for use as a confirmation procedure in urine drug testing. Two deuterium labelled analogues, amphetamine-D5 and 3,4-methylenedioxymetamphetamine-D5, were used as internal standards. Twenty microliter aliquots of urine were mixed with 80 microL internal standard solution in autosampler vials and 10 microL was injected. The chromatographic system consisted of a 2.0 mmx100 mm C18 column and the gradient elution buffers used acetonitrile and 25 mmol/L formic acid. Two product ions produced from the protonated molecules were monitored in the selected reaction monitoring mode. The intra- and inter-assay variability (coefficient of variation) was between 5 and 16% for all analytes at 200 and 6000 ng/mL levels. Ion suppression occurred early after injection but did not affect the identification and quantification of the analytes in authentic urine samples. The method was further validated by comparison with a reference gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method using 479 authentic urine samples. The two methods agreed almost completely (99.8%) regarding identified analytes when applying a 150 ng/mL reporting limit. Four deviating results were observed for 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine and this was due to uncertainty in quantification around the reporting limit. For the quantitative results the slope of the regression lines were between 0.9769 and 1.0146, with correlation coefficients>0.9339. We conclude that the presented liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric method is robust and reliable, and suitable for use as a confirmation method in urine drug testing for amphetamines.

  20. Harm reduction measures and injecting inside prison versus mandatory drugs testing: results of a cross sectional anonymous questionnaire survey. The European Commission Network on HIV Infection and Hepatitis in Prison.

    PubMed Central

    Bird, A. G.; Gore, S. M.; Hutchinson, S. J.; Lewis, S. C.; Cameron, S.; Burns, S.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: (a) To determine both the frequency of injecting inside prison and use of sterilising tablets to clean needles in the previous four weeks; (b) to assess the efficiency of random mandatory drugs testing at detecting prisoners who inject heroin inside prison; (c) to determine the percentage of prisoners who had been offered vaccination against hepatitis B. DESIGN: Cross sectional willing anonymous salivary HIV surveillance linked to a self completion risk factor questionnaire. SETTING: Lowmoss prison, Glasgow, and Aberdeen prison on 11 and 30 October 1996. SUBJECTS: 293 (94%) of all 312 inmates at Lowmoss and 146 (93%) of all 157 at Aberdeen, resulting in 286 and 143 valid questionnaires. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Frequency of injecting inside prison in the previous four weeks by injector inmates who had been in prison for at least four weeks. RESULTS: 116 (41%) Lowmoss and 53 (37%) Aberdeen prisoners had a history of injecting drug use but only 4% of inmates (17/395; 95% confidence interval 2% to 6%) had ever been offered vaccination against hepatitis B. 42 Lowmoss prisoners (estimated 207 injections and 258 uses of sterilising tablets) and 31 Aberdeen prisoners (229 injections, 221 uses) had injected inside prison in the previous four weeks. The prisons together held 112 injector inmates who had been in prison for more than four weeks, of whom 57 (51%; 42% to 60%) had injected in prison in the past four weeks; their estimated mean number of injections was 6.0 (SD 5.7). Prisoners injecting heroin six times in four weeks will test positive in random mandatory drugs testing on at most 18 days out of 28. CONCLUSIONS: Sterilising tablets and hepatitis B vaccination should be offered to all prisoners. Random mandatory drugs testing seriously underestimates injector inmates' harm reduction needs. PMID:9233321

  1. Le LHC, un tunnel cosmique

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Et si la lumière au bout du tunnel du LHC était cosmique ? En d’autres termes, qu’est-ce que le LHC peut nous apporter dans la connaissance de l’Univers ? Car la montée en énergie des accélérateurs de particules nous permet de mieux appréhender l’univers primordial, chaud et dense. Mais dans quel sens dit-on que le LHC reproduit des conditions proches du Big bang ? Quelles informations nous apporte-t-il sur le contenu de l’Univers ? La matière noire est-elle détectable au LHC ? L’énergie noire ? Pourquoi l’antimatière accumulée au CERN est-elle si rare dans l’Univers ? Et si le CERN a bâti sa réputation sur l’exploration des forces faibles et fortes qui opèrent au sein des atomes et de leurs noyaux, est-ce que le LHC peut nous apporter des informations sur la force gravitationnelle qui gouverne l’évolution cosmique ? Depuis une trentaine d’années, notre compréhension de l’univers dans ses plus grandes dimensions et l’appréhension de son comportement aux plus petites distances sont intimement liées : en quoi le LHC va-t-il tester expérimentalement cette vision unifiée ? Tout public, entrée libre / Réservations au +41 (0)22 767 76 76

  2. Interim Report: 100-NR-2 Apatite Treatability Test: Low Concentration Calcium Citrate-Phosphate Solution Injection for In Situ Strontium-90 Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Mark D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Thorne, Paul D.; Xie, YuLong; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Mackley, Rob D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Szecsody, James E.; Vermeul, Vincent R.

    2008-07-11

    Following an evaluation of potential Sr-90 treatment technologies and their applicability under 100-NR-2 hydrogeologic conditions, U.S. Department of Energy, Fluor Hanford, Inc., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the Washington Department of Ecology agreed that the long-term strategy for groundwater remediation at 100-N Area will include apatite sequestration as the primary treatment, followed by a secondary treatment if necessary (most likely phytoremediation). Since then, the agencies have worked together to agree on which apatite sequestration technology has the greatest chance of reducing Sr-90 flux to the river at a reasonable cost. In July 2005, aqueous injection, (i.e., the introduction of apatite-forming chemicals into the subsurface) was endorsed as the interim remedy and selected for field testing. Studies are in progress to assess the efficacy of in situ apatite formation by aqueous solution injection to address both the vadose zone and the shallow aquifer along the 300 ft of shoreline where Sr-90 concentrations are highest. This report describes the field testing of the shallow aquifer treatment.

  3. Pre-Test CFD for the Design and Execution of the Enhanced Injection and Mixing Project at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drozda, Tomasz G.; Axdahl, Erik L.; Cabell, Karen F.

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing costs of physics experiments and simultaneous increase in availability and maturity of computational tools it is not surprising that computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is playing an increasingly important role, not only in post-test investigations, but also in the early stages of experimental planning. This paper describes a CFD-based effort executed in close collaboration between computational fluid dynamicists and experimentalists to develop a virtual experiment during the early planning stages of the Enhanced Injection and Mixing project at NASA Langley Research Center. This projects aims to investigate supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) fuel injection and mixing physics, improve the understanding of underlying physical processes, and develop enhancement strategies and functional relationships relevant to flight Mach numbers greater than 8. The purpose of the virtual experiment was to provide flow field data to aid in the design of the experimental apparatus and the in-stream rake probes, to verify the nonintrusive measurements based on NO-PLIF, and to perform pre-test analysis of quantities obtainable from the experiment and CFD. The approach also allowed for the joint team to develop common data processing and analysis tools, and to test research ideas. The virtual experiment consisted of a series of Reynolds-averaged simulations (RAS). These simulations included the facility nozzle, the experimental apparatus with a baseline strut injector, and the test cabin. Pure helium and helium-air mixtures were used to determine the efficacy of different inert gases to model hydrogen injection. The results of the simulations were analyzed by computing mixing efficiency, total pressure recovery, and stream thrust potential. As the experimental effort progresses, the simulation results will be compared with the experimental data to calibrate the modeling constants present in the CFD and validate simulation fidelity. CFD will also be used to

  4. Long-Term Carbon Injection Field Test for 90% Mercury Removal for a PRB Unit a Spray Dryer and Fabric Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Sjostrom, Sharon; Amrhein, Jerry

    2009-04-30

    The power industry in the U.S. is faced with meeting regulations to reduce the emissions of mercury compounds from coal-fired plants. Injecting a sorbent such as powdered activated carbon (PAC) into the flue gas represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. The purpose of this test program was to evaluate the long-term mercury removal capability, long-term mercury emissions variability, and operating and maintenance (O&M) costs associated with sorbent injection on a configuration being considered for many new plants. Testing was conducted by ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA) at Rocky Mountain Power’s (RMP) Hardin Station through funding provided by DOE/NETL, RMP, and other industry partners. The Hardin Station is a new plant rated at 121 MW gross that was first brought online in April of 2006. Hardin fires a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and is configured with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NOx control, a spray dryer absorber (SDA) for SO2 control, and a fabric filter (FF) for particulate control. Based upon previous testing at PRB sites with SCRs, very little additional mercury oxidation from the SCR was expected at Hardin. In addition, based upon results from DOE/NETL Phase II Round I testing at Holcomb Station and results from similarly configured sites, low native mercury removal was expected across the SDA and FF. The main goal of this project was met—sorbent injection was used to economically and effectively achieve 90% mercury control as measured from the air heater (AH) outlet to the stack for a period of ten months. This goal was achieved with DARCO® Hg-LH, Calgon FLUEPAC®-MC PLUS and ADA Power PAC PREMIUM brominated activated carbons at nominal loadings of 1.5–2.5 lb/MMacf. An economic analysis determined the twenty-year levelized cost to be 0.87 mills/kW-hr, or $15,000/lb Hg removed. No detrimental effects on other equipment or plant operations were observed. The

  5. An LHCb general-purpose acquisition board for beam and background monitoring at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessio, F.; Guzik, Z.; Jacobsson, R.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we will present an LHCb custom-made acquisition board which was developed for a continuous beam and background monitoring during LHC operations at CERN. The paper describes both the conceptual design and its performance, and concludes with results from the first period of beam operations at the LHC. The main purpose of the acquisition board is to process signals from a pair of beam pickups to continuously monitor the intensity of each bunch, and to monitor the phase of the arrival time of each proton bunch with respect to the LHC bunch clock. The extreme versatility of the board also allowed the LHCb experiment to build a high-speed and high-sensitivity readout system for a fast background monitor based on a pair of plastic scintillators. The board has demonstrated very good performance and proved to be conceptually valid during the first months of operations at the LHC. Connected to the beam pickups, it provides the LHCb experiment with a real-time measurement of the total intensity of each beam and of the arrival time of each beam at the LHCb Interaction Point. It also monitors the LHC filling scheme and the beam current per bunch at a continuous rate of 40 MHz, and assures a proper global timing of LHCb. The continuous readout of the scintillators at bunch clock speed provides the LHCb experiment with high-resolution information about the beam halo and fast losses during both injection and circulating beam. It has also provided valuable information to the LHC during machine commissioning with beam. Recent results also shows that it could contribute as a luminosity monitor independent from the LHCb experiment readout system. Beam, background and luminosity measurements are continuously fed back to the LHC in the data exchange framework between the experiments and the LHC machine aimed at improving efficiently the experimental conditions real-time.

  6. L'Aventure du LHC

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Cette présentation s’adressera principalement aux personnes qui ont construit le LHC. La construction du LHC fut longue et difficile. De nombreux problèmes sont apparus en cours de route. Tous ont été résolus grâce au dévouement et à l’engagement du personnel et des collaborateurs. Je reviendrai sur les coups durs et les réussites qui ont marqués ces 15 dernières années et je vous montrerai combien cette machine, le fruit de vos efforts, est extraordinaire.

  7. Beautiful mirrors at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Kunal; Shepherd, William; Tait, Tim M. P.; Vega-Morales, Roberto

    2010-08-01

    We explore the “Beautiful Mirrors” model, which aims to explain the measured value of A b FB , discrepant at the 2.9σ level. This scenario introduces vector-like quarks which mix with the bottom, subtly affecting its coupling to the Z. The spectrum of the new particles consists of two bottom-like quarks and a charge -4/3 quark, all of which have electroweak interactions with the third generation. We explore the phenomenology and discovery reach for these new particles at the LHC, exploring single mirror quark production modes whose rates are proportional to the same mixing parameters which resolve the A b FB anomaly. We find that for mirror quark masses ≲ 500 GeV, a 14 TeV LHC with 300 fb-1 is required to reasonably establish the scenario and extract the relevant mixing parameters.

  8. Proposed Objectives and Tentative Schedule for Surface Circulation and Injection Testing of the Phase II Reservoir Test Facility – Nov. 20 to 25, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Dreesen, Donald S.; Ponden, Raymond F.

    1991-11-19

    The following are proposed for the initial Test Facility commissioning and training operations. 1. Set up and test alarm modes on FIXDMACS program with an alarm print out to the guard shack. (automatic shut down is not installed). 2. Set up and test the control loop for fluid level control in the Production Separator using the feed pumps for circulation and using the 125 psig air system for a vapor supply. The list continues on in the document.

  9. LHC magnet quench protection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coull, L.; Hagedorn, D.; Remondino, V.; Rodriguez-Mateos, F.

    1994-07-01

    The quench protection system for the superconducting magnets of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is described. The system is based on the so called 'cold diode' concept. In a group of series connected magnets if one magnet quenches then the magnetic energy of all the magnets will be dissipated in the quenched magnet so destroying it. This is avoided by by-passing the quenched magnet and then rapidly de-exciting the unquenched magnets. For the LHC machine it is foreseen to use silicon diodes situated inside the cryostat as by-pass elements - so called 'cold diodes'. The diodes are exposed to some 50 kGray of radiation during a 10 year operation life-time. The high energy density of the LHC magnets (500 kJ/m) coupled with the relatively slow propagation speed of a 'natural' quench (10 to 20 m/s) can lead to excessive heating of the zone where the quench started and to high internal voltages. It is therefore necessary to detect quickly the incipient quench and fire strip heaters which spread the quench out more quickly over a large volume of the magnet. After a quench the magnet chain must be de-excited rapidly to avoid spreading the quench to other magnets and over-heating the by-pass diode. This is done by switching high-power energy-dump resistors in series with the magnets. The LHC main ring magnet will be divided into 16 electrically separated units which has important advantages.

  10. Catching Collisions in the LHC

    ScienceCinema

    Fruguiele, Claudia; Hirschauer, Jim

    2016-07-12

    Now that the Large Hadron Collider has officially turned back on for its second run, within every proton collision could emerge the next new discovery in particle physics. Learn how the detectors on the Compact Muon Solenoid, or CMS, experiment capture and track particles as they are expelled from a collision. Talking us through these collisions are Claudia Fruguiele and Jim Hirschauer of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the largest U.S. institution collaborating on the LHC.

  11. Catching Collisions in the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Fruguiele, Claudia; Hirschauer, Jim

    2015-06-16

    Now that the Large Hadron Collider has officially turned back on for its second run, within every proton collision could emerge the next new discovery in particle physics. Learn how the detectors on the Compact Muon Solenoid, or CMS, experiment capture and track particles as they are expelled from a collision. Talking us through these collisions are Claudia Fruguiele and Jim Hirschauer of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the largest U.S. institution collaborating on the LHC.

  12. Strong dynamics at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ittisamai, Pawin

    The limitations of the Standard Model of particle physics, despite its being a well-established theory, have prompted various proposals for new physics capable of addressing its shortcomings. The particular issue to be explored here is the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking, the probing of which lies within the TeV-scale physics accessible to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This thesis focuses on the phenomenology of a class of models featuring a dynamical breaking of the electroweak symmetry via strong dynamics. Consequences of recent experiments and aspects of near-future experiments are presented. We study the implications of the LHC Higgs searches available at the time the related journal article was written for technicolor models that feature colored technifermions. Then we discuss the properties of a technicolor model featuring strong-top dynamics that is viable for explaining the recently discovered boson of mass 126 GeV. We introduce a novel method of characterizing the color structure of a new massive vector boson, often predicted in various new physics models, using information that will be promptly available if it is discovered in the near-future experiments at the LHC. We generalize the idea for more realistic models where a vector boson has flavor non-universal couplings to quarks. Finally, we discuss the possibilities of probing the chiral structure of a new color-octet vector boson.

  13. hhjj production at the LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dolan, Matthew J.; Englert, Christoph; Greiner, Nicolas; Nordstrom, Karl; Spannowsky, Michael

    2015-08-25

    The search for di-Higgs production at the LHC in order to set limits on the Higgs trilinear coupling and constraints on new physics is one of the main motivations for the LHC high-luminosity phase. Recent experimental analyses suggest that such analyses will only be successful if information from a range of channels is included. We therefore investigate di-Higgs production in association with two hadronic jets and give a detailed discussion of both the gluon- and the weak boson-fusion (WBF) contributions, with a particular emphasis on the phenomenology with modified Higgs trilinear and quartic gauge couplings. We perform a detailed investigationmore » of the full hadronic final state and find that hhjj production should add sensitivity to a di-Higgs search combination at the HL-LHC with 3 ab-1. Since the WBF and GF contributions are sensitive to different sources of physics beyond the Standard Model, we devise search strategies to disentangle and isolate these production modes. In addition, while gluon fusion remains non-negligible in WBF-type selections, sizeable new physics contributions to the latter can still be constrained. As an example of the latter point we investigate the sensitivity that can be obtained for a measurement of the quartic Higgs–gauge boson couplings.« less

  14. Mipomersen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the refrigerator at least 30 minutes before you plan to inject it to allow the medication to ... supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention the medications ...

  15. Ibritumomab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies with radioisotopes. It works by attaching to cancer ... you receive ibritumomab injection, your body may develop antibodies (substances in the blood that help the immune ...

  16. Romiplostim Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... including other medications or surgery to remove the spleen. Romiplostim injection should not be used to treat ... tell your doctor if you have had your spleen removed.tell your doctor if you are pregnant, ...

  17. Golimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... and swelling and scales on the skin). ulcerative colitis (a condition which causes swelling and sores in ... you are using golimumab injection to treat ulcerative colitis (a condition which causes swelling and sores in ...

  18. Colistimethate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria that cause infection.Antibiotics such as colistimethate injection will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. Taking or using antibiotics when they are not needed increases your risk ...

  19. Doxycycline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as doxycycline injection will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. Taking or using antibiotics when they are not needed increases your risk ...

  20. Tigecycline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a person who was not in the hospital), skin infections, and infections of the abdomen (area between the ... that developed in people who were in a hospital or foot infections in people who have diabetes. Tigecycline injection is ...

  1. Thiotepa Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... reproductive organs where eggs are formed), breast, and bladder cancer. It is also used to treat malignant effusions ( ... how you respond to thiotepa.When used for bladder cancer, thiotepa is infused (injected slowly) into your bladder ...

  2. Ferumoxytol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Ferumoxytol injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells due to too little iron) in adults with chronic kidney disease (damage to the kidneys which may worsen over ...

  3. Daclizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which ... injections. Before you use daclizumab yourself the first time, read the written instructions that come with it. ...

  4. Olanzapine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Olanzapine extended-release injection is used to treat schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual ... treat episodes of agitation in people who have schizophrenia or in people who have bipolar I disorder ( ...

  5. Risperidone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... release (long-acting) injection is used to treat schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual ... do not already have diabetes. If you have schizophrenia, you are more likely to develop diabetes than ...

  6. Acetaminophen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is also used in combination with opioid (narcotic) medications to relieve moderate to severe pain. Acetaminophen is in a class of medications called analgesics (pain relievers) and antipyretics (fever reducers). It works by changing ...

  7. Panitumumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a solution (liquid) to be given by infusion (injected into a vein). It is usually given ... doctor or nurse in a doctor's office or infusion center. Panitumumab is usually given once every 2 ...

  8. Dolasetron Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Dolasetron injection is used to prevent and treat nausea and vomiting that may occur after surgery. Dolasetron ... should not be used to prevent or treat nausea and vomiting in people receiving cancer chemotherapy medications. ...

  9. Teduglutide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome in people who need additional nutrition or fluids from intravenous (IV) therapy. Teduglutide injection is in ... analogs. It works by improving the absorption of fluids and nutrients in the intestines.

  10. Ampicillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ... and pharmacist if you are allergic to ampicillin; penicillins; cephalosporin antibiotics such as cefaclor, cefadroxil, cefazolin (Ancef, ...

  11. Nafcillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ... and pharmacist if you are allergic to nafcillin; penicillins; cephalosporin antibiotics such as cefaclor, cefadroxil, cefazolin, cefdinir, ...

  12. Oxacillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ... and pharmacist if you are allergic to oxacillin; penicillins; cephalosporin antibiotics such as cefaclor, cefadroxil, cefazolin, cefdinir, ...

  13. Lacosamide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... drowsiness uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body problems with coordination, balance, or walking weakness itching redness, irritation, pain, or discomfort at the injection spot Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of ...

  14. Epinephrine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... emergency medical treatment to treat life-threatening allergic reactions caused by insect bites or stings, foods, medications, ... at the first sign of a serious allergic reaction.Use epinephrine injection exactly as directed; do not ...

  15. Vedolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection may cause serious allergic reactions during an infusion and for several hours afterward. A doctor or ... of the following symptoms during or after your infusion: rash; itching; swelling of the face, eyes, mouth, ...

  16. Mitoxantrone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications to relieve pain in people with advanced prostate cancer who did not respond to other medications. Mitoxantrone ... doses). When mitoxantrone injection is used to treat prostate cancer, it is usually given once every 21 days. ...

  17. Bendamustine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... leukemia (CLL; a type of cancer of the white blood cells). Bendamustine injection is also used to treat a ... NHL: cancer that begins in a type of white blood cell that normally fights infection) that is slow spreading, ...

  18. Moxifloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria such as pneumonia; ; and , skin, and abdominal (stomach ... antibiotics called fluoroquinolones. It works by killing the bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as moxifloxacin injection ...

  19. Ceftazidime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ceftazidime injection will not work ...

  20. Gentamicin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... medications called aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as gentamicin injection will not work ...

  1. Meropenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin and abdominal (stomach area) infections caused by bacteria and meningitis (infection of the membranes that surround ... of medications called antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria that cause infection.Antibiotics such as meropenem injection ...

  2. Tobramycin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... medications called aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as tobramycin injection will not work ...

  3. Ceftaroline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections and pneumonia (lung infection) caused by certain bacteria. Ceftaroline is in a class of medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ceftaroline injection will not work ...

  4. Telavancin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious skin infections caused by certain types of bacteria. Telavancin injection is in a class of medications ... antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria. Antibiotics will not work for colds, flu, or ...

  5. Daptomycin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood infections or serious skin infections caused by bacteria. Daptomycin injection is in a class of medications called cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria. Antibiotics will not work for treating colds, flu, ...

  6. Aztreonam Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat certain infections that are caused by bacteria, including respiratory tract (including pneumonia and bronchitis), urinary ... abdominal (stomach area) infections, that are caused by bacteria. Aztreonam injection also may be used before, during, ...

  7. Cefepime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia, and skin, urinary tract, and kidney ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefepime injection will not work ...

  8. Amikacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... medications called aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as amikacin injection will not work ...

  9. Ertapenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... abdominal (stomach area) infections, that are caused by bacteria. It is also used for the prevention of ... medications called carbapenem antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ertapenem injection will not work ...

  10. Ciprofloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ciprofloxacin injection is also sometimes used to treat cat scratch disease (an infection that may develop after a person is bitten or scratched by a cat), Legionnaires' disease (type of lung infection), and infections of the ...

  11. Ganciclovir Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Ganciclovir injection is used to treat cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis (eye infection that can cause blindness) in people whose immune system is not working normally, including those people who have ...

  12. Levofloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections. Levofloxacin injection is also used to prevent anthrax (a serious infection that may be spread on ... in people who may have been exposed to anthrax germs in the air and treat and prevent ...

  13. Ibandronate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ibandronate is in a class of medications called bisphosphonates. It works by preventing bone breakdown and increasing ... while receiving this medication.Being treated with a bisphosphonate medication such as ibandronate injection for osteoporosis may ...

  14. Fondaparinux Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the leg), which can lead to pulmonary embolism (PE; a blood clot in the lung), in people ... with warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven) to treat DVT or PE. Fondaparinux injection is in a class of medications ...

  15. Pertuzumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... docetaxel (Taxotere) to treat a certain type of breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Pertuzumab injection is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies. It works by stopping the growth of cancer ...

  16. Octreotide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to decrease the amount of growth hormone (a natural substance) produced by people with acromegaly (condition in which the body produces too much growth hormone, causing enlargement of the hands, feet, and facial ...

  17. Haloperidol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... release injection are used to treat schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual thinking, loss of ... medications); medications for anxiety, depression, irritable bowel disease, mental illness, motion sickness, Parkinson's disease, seizures, ulcers, or urinary ...

  18. Sumatriptan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... accompanied by nausea and sensitivity to sound and light). Sumatriptan injection is also used to treat the ... children. Store it at room temperature, away from light, excess heat, and moisture (not in the bathroom). ...

  19. Topotecan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... organs where eggs are formed) and small cell lung cancer (a type of cancer that begins in the ... topotecan injection is used to treat ovarian or lung cancer, it is usually given once a day for ...

  20. Pembrolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat a certain type of non-small-cell lung cancer that has spread to nearby tissues or to ... successfully with other medications for non-small-cell lung cancer. Pembrolizumab injection is in a class of medications ...

  1. Oritavancin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... for at least 5 days after receiving oritavancin injection.tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking ...

  2. Cefuroxime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) infections; meningitis (infection of the membranes that surround the brain ... hearing loss, if you are being treated for meningitis Cefuroxime injection may cause other side effects. Call ...

  3. Alirocumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... further decrease the amount of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol ('bad cholesterol') in the blood. Alirocumab injection is ... antibodies. It works by blocking the production of LDL cholesterol in the body to decrease the amount of ...

  4. Secukinumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to see if you need to receive any vaccinations. It is important to have all vaccines appropriate ... treatment with secukinumab injection. Do not have any vaccinations during your treatment without talking to your doctor. ...

  5. Evaluation of penicillin G residues by kidney inhibition swab tests in sow body fluids and tissues following intramuscular injection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2011, the USDA-Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) changed the method used for screening swine tissues for antimicrobial residues to the Kidney Inhibition Swab (KIS(TM)) from the Fast Antimicrobial Screen Test. A high dose of penicillin G procaine relative to a label dose is commonly used ...

  6. Light stop in the MSSM after LHC Run 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bélanger, Geneviève; Ghosh, Diptimoy; Godbole, Rohini; Kulkarni, Suchita

    2015-09-01

    The discovery of a Higgs boson with a mass of 126 GeV at the LHC when combined with the non-observation of new physics both in direct and indirect searches imposes strong constraints on supersymmetric models and in particular on the top squark sector. The experiments for direct detection of dark matter have provided with yet more constraints on the neutralino LSP mass and its interactions. After imposing limits from the Higgs, flavour and dark matter sectors, we examine the feasibility for a light stop in the context of the pMSSM, in light of current results for stop and other SUSY searches at the LHC. We only require that the neutralino dark matter explains a fraction of the cosmologically measured dark matter abundance. We find that a stop with mass below ˜ 500 GeV is still allowed. We further study various probes of the light stop scenario that could be performed at the LHC Run-II either through direct searches for the light and heavy stop, or SUSY searches not currently available in simplified model results. Moreover we study the characteristics of heavy Higgs for the points in the parameter space allowed by all the available constraints and illustrate the region with large cross sections to fermionic or electroweakino channels. Finally we show that nearly all scenarios with a small stop-LSP mass difference will be tested by Xenon1T provided the NLSP is a chargino, thus probing a region hard to access at the LHC.

  7. Multicore job scheduling in the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forti, A.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Hartmann, T.; Alef, M.; Lahiff, A.; Templon, J.; Dal Pra, S.; Gila, M.; Skipsey, S.; Acosta-Silva, C.; Filipcic, A.; Walker, R.; Walker, C. J.; Traynor, D.; Gadrat, S.

    2015-12-01

    After the successful first run of the LHC, data taking is scheduled to restart in Summer 2015 with experimental conditions leading to increased data volumes and event complexity. In order to process the data generated in such scenario and exploit the multicore architectures of current CPUs, the LHC experiments have developed parallelized software for data reconstruction and simulation. However, a good fraction of their computing effort is still expected to be executed as single-core tasks. Therefore, jobs with diverse resources requirements will be distributed across the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG), making workload scheduling a complex problem in itself. In response to this challenge, the WLCG Multicore Deployment Task Force has been created in order to coordinate the joint effort from experiments and WLCG sites. The main objective is to ensure the convergence of approaches from the different LHC Virtual Organizations (VOs) to make the best use of the shared resources in order to satisfy their new computing needs, minimizing any inefficiency originated from the scheduling mechanisms, and without imposing unnecessary complexities in the way sites manage their resources. This paper describes the activities and progress of the Task Force related to the aforementioned topics, including experiences from key sites on how to best use different batch system technologies, the evolution of workload submission tools by the experiments and the knowledge gained from scale tests of the different proposed job submission strategies.

  8. Iron Dextran Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... called iron replacement products. It works by replenishing iron stores so that the body can make more red blood cells. ... and order certain lab tests to check your body's response to iron dextran injection.Before having any laboratory test, tell ...

  9. QCD and hard diffraction at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, Michael G.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    As an introduction to QCD at the LHC the author gives an overview of QCD at the Tevatron, emphasizing the high Q{sup 2} frontier which will be taken over by the LHC. After describing briefly the LHC detectors the author discusses high mass diffraction, in particular central exclusive production of Higgs and vector boson pairs. The author introduces the FP420 project to measure the scattered protons 420m downstream of ATLAS and CMS.

  10. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 546: Injection Well and Surface Releases Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Alfred Wickline

    2008-12-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 546, Injection Well and Surface Releases, at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 546 is comprised of two corrective action sites (CASs): • 06-23-02, U-6a/Russet Testing Area • 09-20-01, Injection Well The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 546. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from May 5 through May 28, 2008, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 546: Injection Well and Surface Releases, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NSO, 2008). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: • Determine whether a contaminant of concern is present at a given CAS. • Determine whether sufficient information is available to evaluate potential corrective action alternatives at each CAS. The CAU 546 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Because DQO data needs were met, and corrective actions have been implemented, it has been determined that no further corrective action (based on risk to human receptors) is necessary for the CAU 546 CASs. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective actions are needed for CAU 546 CASs. • No Corrective Action Plan is required. • A Notice of Completion to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site

  11. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 219: Septic Systems and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Strand

    2005-01-01

    The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 219, Septic Systems and Injection Wells, has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective actions. Corrective Action Unit 219 is located in Areas 3, 16, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 219 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-11-01, Steam Pipes and Asbestos Tiles; (2) 16-04-01, Septic Tanks (3); (3) 16-04-02, Distribution Box; (4) 16-04-03, Sewer Pipes; (5) 23-20-01, DNA Motor Pool Sewage and Waste System; and (6) 23-20-02, Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

  12. Novel QCD Phenomena at the LHC: The Ridge, Digluon-Initiated Subprocesses, Direct Reactions, Non-Universal Antishadowing, and Forward Higgs Production

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2014-10-03

    I discuss a number of novel tests of QCD at the LHC, measurements which can illuminate fundamental features of hadron physics. I also review the “Principle of Maximum Conformality” (PMC) which systematically sets the renormalization scale order-by-order in pQCD, eliminating an unnecessary theoretical uncertainty. The PMC allows LHC experiments to test QCD much more precisely, and the sensitivity of LHC measurements to physics beyond the Standard Model is increased.

  13. Abort Gap Cleaning for LHC Run 2

    SciTech Connect

    Uythoven, Jan; Boccardi, Andrea; Bravin, Enrico; Goddard, Brennan; Hemelsoet, Georges-Henry; Höfle, Wolfgang; Jacquet, Delphine; Kain, Verena; Mazzoni, Stefano; Meddahi, Malika; Valuch, Daniel; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana

    2014-07-01

    To minimize the beam losses at the moment of an LHC beam dump the 3 μs long abort gap should contain as few particles as possible. Its population can be minimised by abort gap cleaning using the LHC transverse damper system. The LHC Run 1 experience is briefly recalled; changes foreseen for the LHC Run 2 are presented. They include improvements in the observation of the abort gap population and the mechanism to decide if cleaning is required, changes to the hardware of the transverse dampers to reduce the detrimental effect on the luminosity lifetime and proposed changes to the applied cleaning algorithms.

  14. Distributed Russian Tier-2 - RDIG in Simulation and Analysis of Alice Data From LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, A.; Jancurova, L.; Kiryanov, A.; Kotlyar, V.; Mitsyn, V.; Lyublev, Y.; Ryabinkin, E.; Shabratova, G.; Smirnov, S.; Stepanova, L.; Urazmetov, W.; Zarochentsev, A.

    2011-12-01

    On the threshold of LHC data there were intensive test and upgrade of GRID application software for all LHC experiments at the top of the modern LCG middleware (gLite). The update of such software for ALICE experiment at LHC, AliEn[1] had provided stable and secure operation of sites developing LHC data. The activity of Russian RDIG (Russian Data Intensive GRID) computer federation which is the distributed Tier-2 centre are devoted to simulation and analysis of LHC data in accordance with the ALICE computing model [2]. Eight sites of this federation interesting in ALICE activity upgrade their middle ware in accordance with requirements of ALICE computing what ensured success of MC production and end-user analysis activity at all eight sites. The result of occupancy and efficiency of each site in the time of LHC operation will be presented in the report. The outline the results of CPU and disk space usage at RDIG sites for the data simulation and analysis of first LHC data from the exposition of ALICE detector [3] will be presented as well. There will be presented also the information about usage of parallel analysis facility based on PROOF [4].

  15. Development and testing of a novel lab-scale direct steam-injection apparatus to hydrolyse model and saline crop slurries.

    PubMed

    Santi, Guglielmo; Guglielmo, Santi; D'Annibale, Alessandro; Alessandro, D'Annibale; Petruccioli, Maurizio; Maurizio, Petruccioli; Crognale, Silvia; Silvia, Crognale; Ruzzi, Maurizio; Maurizio, Ruzzi; Valentini, Riccardo; Riccardo, Valentini; Moresi, Mauro; Moresi, Mauro

    2012-02-20

    In this work, a novel laboratory-scale direct steam-injection apparatus (DSIA) was developed to overcome the main drawback of the conventional batch-driven lab rigs, namely the long time needed to heat fiber slurry from room to reaction temperatures greater than 150 °C. The novel apparatus mainly consisted of three units: (i) a mechanically-stirred bioreactor where saturated steam at 5-30 bar can be injected; (ii) an automatic on-off valve to flash suddenly the reaction medium after a prefixed reaction time; (iii) a cyclone separator to recover the reacted slurry. This system was tested using 0.75 dm³ of an aqueous solution of H₂SO₄ (0.5%, v/v) enriched with 50 kg m⁻³ of either commercial particles of Avicel® and Larch xylan or 0.5 mm sieved particles of Tamarix jordanis. Each slurry was heated to about 200 °C by injecting steam at 28 bar for 90 s. The process efficiency was assessed by comparing the dissolution degree of suspended solid (Y(S)), as well as xylose (Y(X)), glucose (Y(G)), and furfural (Y(F)) yields, with those obtained in a conventional steam autoclave at 130 °C for 30 or 60 min. Treatment of T. jordanis particles in DSIA resulted in Y(S) and Y(G) values quite similar to those obtained in the steam autoclave at 130 °C for 60 min, but in a less efficient hemicellulose solubilization. A limited occurrence of pentose degradation products was observed in both equipments, suggesting that hydrolysis predominated over degradation reactions. The susceptibility of the residual solid fractions from DSIA treatment to a conventional 120 h long cellulolytic treatment using an enzyme loading of 5.4 FPU g⁻¹ was markedly higher than that of samples hydrolysed in the steam autoclave, their corresponding glucose yields being equal to 0.94 and 0.22 g per gram of initial cellulose, respectively. Thus, T. jordanis resulted to be a valuable source of sugars for bioethanol production as proved by preliminary tests in the novel lab rig developed here.

  16. Proton injector acceptance tests for a Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA):characterisation of Advanced Injection System of Light Ions (AISLI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, S. X.; Ren, H. T.; Xu, Y.; Zhang, T.; Zhao(赵捷), J.; Zhang, A. L.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2014-11-01

    To demonstrate the acceleration capability of a Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), a proton injector has been developed at Peking University (PKU). It is composed of a compact permanent magnet 2.45 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (PKU PMECRIS) associated with a LEBT of two electrostatic Einzel lenses [1]. This injector is named as Advanced Injector System of Light Ions (AISLI). The acceptance tests have been performed with a 40 keV-55 mA hydrogen beam successfully passing through a ϕ 10 mm aperture diaphragm. This diaphragm is located 200 mm downstream the plasma emission hole at the location of the future DWA entrance flange. The beam rms emittance reached about 0.10 π mm mrad in pulsed mode. This article describes the AISLI experimental setup, the measurement principle and the obtained beam characteristics.

  17. MSSM forecast for the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Maria Eugenia; Casas, J. Alberto; de Austri, Roberto Ruiz

    2010-05-01

    We perform a forecast of the MSSM with universal soft terms (CMSSM) for the LHC, based on an improved Bayesian analysis. We do not incorporate ad hoc measures of the fine-tuning to penalize unnatural possibilities: such penalization arises from the Bayesian analysis itself when the experimental value of M Z is considered. This allows to scan the whole parameter space, allowing arbitrarily large soft terms. Still the low-energy region is statistically favoured (even before including dark matter or g-2 constraints). Contrary to other studies, the results are almost unaffected by changing the upper limits taken for the soft terms. The results are also remarkable stable when using flat or logarithmic priors, a fact that arises from the larger statistical weight of the low-energy region in both cases. Then we incorporate all the important experimental constrains to the analysis, obtaining a map of the probability density of the MSSM parameter space, i.e. the forecast of the MSSM. Since not all the experimental information is equally robust, we perform separate analyses depending on the group of observables used. When only the most robust ones are used, the favoured region of the parameter space contains a significant portion outside the LHC reach. This effect gets reinforced if the Higgs mass is not close to its present experimental limit and persits when dark matter constraints are included. Only when the g-2 constraint (based on e + e - data) is considered, the preferred region (for μ > 0) is well inside the LHC scope. We also perform a Bayesian comparison of the positive- and negative- μ possibilities.

  18. US-LARP progress on LHC IR upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Tanaji; Johnstone, John; Mokhov, Nikolai; Fischer, Wolfram; Gupta, Ramesh; Qiang, Ji; /LBL, Berkeley

    2006-03-01

    We review the progress on LHC IR upgrades made by the US-LARP collaboration since the last CARE meeting in November 2004. We introduce a new optics design with doublet focusing, and discuss energy deposition calculations with an open mid-plane dipole. We present the results of a beam-beam experiment at RHIC. This experiment was the first phase of a planned test of the wire compensation principle at RHIC.

  19. Z' Phenomenology and the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2006-10-17

    A brief pedagogical overview of the phenomenology of Z{prime} gauge bosons is ILC in determining Z{prime} properties is also discussed. and explore in detail how the LHC may discover and help elucidate the models, review the current constraints on the possible properties of a Z{prime} nature of these new particles. We provide an overview of the Z{prime} studies presented. Such particles can arise in various electroweak extensions of that have been performed by both ATLAS and CMS. The role of the the Standard Model (SM). We provide a quick survey of a number of Z{prime}.

  20. Probing Metastability at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Clavelli, L.

    2010-02-10

    Current attempts to understand supersymmetry (susy) breaking are focused on the idea that we are not in the ground state of the universe but, instead, in a metastable state that will ultimately decay to an exactly susy ground state. It is interesting to ask how experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will shed light on the properties of this future supersymmetric universe. In particular we ask how we can determine whether this final state has the possibility of supporting atoms and molecules in a susy background.

  1. (SUSY) Higgs Search at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlleitner, M. Margarete

    2008-11-23

    The discovery of the Standard Model (SM) or supersymmetric (SUSY) Higgs bosons belongs to the main endeavors of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In this article the status of the signal and background calculations for Higgs boson production at the LHC is reviewed.

  2. Hydromorphone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body, vomiting, diarrhea, or failure to gain weight.tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding.if you ... Hydromorphone injection may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these ... vomiting constipation dry mouth lightheadedness dizziness drowsiness ...

  3. Eculizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... which too many red blood cells are broken down in the body, so there are not enough healthy cells to bring oxygen to all parts of the body). Eculizumab injection is also used to treat atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS; an inherited condition in which small blood ...

  4. Fluconazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to treat fungal infections, including yeast infections of the mouth, throat, esophagus (tube leading from the mouth to the stomach), abdomen (area between the chest and waist), lungs, blood, and ... to prevent yeast infections in patients who are likely to become infected ...

  5. Tositumomab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... has not improved or that had improved after treatment with other medications, but later returned. Tositumomab injection is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies with radioisotopes. It works by attaching to cancer cells and releasing radiation to damage the cancer ...

  6. Lanreotide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Lanreotide injection is used to treat people with acromegaly (condition in which the body produces too much growth hormone, causing enlargement of the hands, feet, and facial features; joint pain; and other symptoms) who have not successfully, or cannot be treated ...

  7. Pegaptanib Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 7 days after you receive each pegaptanib injection.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  8. Precision Drell-Yan measurements at the LHC and implications for the diphoton excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goertz, Florian; Katz, Andrey; Son, Minho; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-07-01

    Precision measurements of the Drell-Yan (DY) cross sections at the LHC constrain new physics scenarios that involve new states with electroweak (EW) charges. We analyze these constraints and apply them to models that can address the LHC diphoton excess at 750 GeV. We confront these findings with LEP EW precision tests and show that DY provides stronger constraints than the LEP data. While 8 TeV data can already probe some parts of the interesting region of parameter space, LHC14 results are expected to cover a substantial part of the relevant terrain. We derive the bounds from the existing data, estimate LHC14 reach and compare them to the bounds one gets from LEP and future FCC-ee precision measurements.

  9. Polyamines induce aggregation of LHC II and quenching of fluorescence in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tsiavos, Theodoros; Ioannidis, Nikolaos E; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2012-05-01

    Dissipation of excess excitation energy within the light-harvesting complex of Photosystem II (LHC II) is a main process in plants, which is measured as the non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence or qE. We showed in previous works that polyamines stimulate qE in higher plants in vivo and in eukaryotic algae in vitro. In the present contribution we have tested whether polyamines can stimulate quenching in trimeric LHC II and monomeric light-harvesting complex b proteins from higher plants. The tetramine spermine was the most potent quencher and induced aggregation of LHC II trimers, due to its highly cationic character. Two transients are evident at 100 μM and 350 μM for the fluorescence and absorbance signals of LHC II respectively. On the basis of observations within this work, some links between polyamines and the activation of qE in vivo is discussed.

  10. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0 with ROTC 1

    SciTech Connect

    Boehlecke, Robert

    2004-12-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 322 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 01-25-01 - AST Release Site; (2) 03-25-03 - Mud Plant and AST Diesel Release; and (3) 03-20-05 - Injection Wells and BOP Shop. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 322. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from April 2004 through September 2004, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: (1) Determine if contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to recommend appropriate corrective actions for the CASs. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against appropriate preliminary action levels to identify contaminants of concern for each corrective action site. Radiological field measurements were compared to unrestricted release criteria. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities revealed the following: (1) CAS 01-25-01 contains an AST berm contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) diesel-range organics (DRO). (2) CAS 03-25-03 includes two distinct areas: Area A where no contamination remains from a potential spill associated with an AST, and Area B where TPH-DRO contamination associated with various activities at the mud plant was identified. The Area B contamination was found at various locations and depths. (3) CAS 03-25-03 Area B contains TPH-DRO contamination at various locations and

  11. Remote Operations for LHC and CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschalk, E.E.; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    Commissioning the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its experiments will be a vital part of the worldwide high energy physics program beginning in 2007. A remote operations center has been built at Fermilab to contribute to commissioning and operations of the LHC and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, and to develop new capabilities for real-time data analysis and monitoring for LHC, CMS, and grid computing. Remote operations will also be essential to a future International Linear Collider with its multiple, internationally distributed control rooms. In this paper we present an overview of Fermilab's LHC@FNAL remote operations center for LHC and CMS, describe what led up to the development of the center, and describe noteworthy features of the center.

  12. Brain structures implicated in the four-plate test in naïve and experienced Swiss mice using injection of diazepam and the 5-HT2A agonist DOI.

    PubMed

    Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Massé, Fabienne; Cogrel, Nicolas; Hascoët, Martine; Bourin, Michel

    2009-12-01

    Four-plate test-retest (FPT-R) is a useful tool to study aversive memory and abolishment of benzodiazepine effects in experienced mice to four-plate test (FPT), namely one-trial tolerance. In the present study, we have used local injections paradigm, in order to localize structures implied in anxiolytic-like effects of two drugs in naïve and experienced mice: a benzodiazepine, diazepam that is only active in naïve mice; and a 5-HT(2A/2C) agonist, DOI that exert its anxiolytic-like effect both in naïve and experienced mice. Periacqueductal grey substance, three sub-regions of hippocampus (CA1, CA2 and CA3) and two nuclei of amygdala (BLA and LA) have been studied. Local injections did not cause any modifications of ambulatory activity. DOI injections elicit anxiolytic-like effects only when injected into CA2, in naïve and experienced mice. Diazepam had an anxiolytic-like effect in naïve mice, only when injected into lateral nucleus of amygdala; and in experienced mice when injected into PAG. These results help us to better understand the way of action of these two compounds and the structures functionally involved in their effects and in one-trial tolerance (OTT).

  13. Depleted CMOS pixels for LHC proton-proton experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wermes, N.

    2016-07-01

    While so far monolithic pixel detectors have remained in the realm of comparatively low rate and radiation applications outside LHC, new developments exploiting high resistivity substrates with three or four well CMOS process options allow reasonably large depletion depths and full CMOS circuitry in a monolithic structure. This opens up the possibility to target CMOS pixel detectors also for high radiation pp-experiments at the LHC upgrade, either in a hybrid-type fashion or even fully monolithic. Several pixel matrices have been prototyped with high ohmic substrates, high voltage options, and full CMOS electronics. They were characterized in the lab and in test beams. An overview of the necessary development steps and different approaches as well as prototype results are presented in this paper.

  14. LHC future prospects of the 750 GeV resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ryosuke; Tobioka, Kohsaku

    2016-09-01

    A quantitative discussion on the future prospects of the 750 GeV resonance at the LHC experiment is given using a simple effective field theory analysis. The relative size of two effective operators relevant to diphoton decays can be probed by ratios of diboson signals in a robust way. We obtain the future sensitivities of Zγ, ZZ and WW resonance searches at the high luminosity LHC, rescaling from the current sensitivities at √{ s} = 13 TeV. Then, we show that a large fraction of parameter space in the effective field theory will be covered with 300 fb-1 and almost the whole parameter space will be tested with 3000 fb-1. This discussion is independent of production processes, other decay modes and total decay width.

  15. High energy resummation in dihadron production at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celiberto, Francesco G.; Ivanov, Dmitry Yu.; Murdaca, Beatrice; Papa, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    We propose to study at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) the inclusive production of a pair of hadrons (a "dihadron" system) in a kinematics where two detected hadrons with high transverse momenta are separated by a large interval of rapidity. This process has much in common with the widely discussed Mueller-Navelet jet production and can also be used to access the dynamics of hard proton-parton interactions in the Regge limit. For both processes large contributions enhanced by logarithms of energy can be resummed in perturbation theory within the Balitsky-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov (BFKL) formalism with next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. The experimental study of dihadron production would provide an additional clear channel to test the BFKL dynamics. We present here the first theoretical predictions for cross sections and azimuthal angle correlations of the dihadrons produced with LHC kinematics.

  16. The Atlas Tracker Upgrade:. Short Strips Detectors for the sLHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldevila, Unnila; Miñano, M.; Garcia, C.; Lacasta, C.; Marti, S.

    2010-04-01

    It is foreseen to increase the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN around 20I8 by about an order of magnitude, with the upgraded machine dubbed Super-LHC or sLHC. The ATLAS experiment will require a new tracker for sLHC operation. In order to cope with the order of magnitude increase in pile-up backgrounds at the higher luminosity, an all silicon detector tracker is being designed. As the increased luminosity will mean a corresponding increase in radiation dose, a new generation of extremely radiation hard silicon detectors is required. A massive R&D program is underway to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation hardness. New front-end electronics and readout systems are being designed to cope with the higher data rates. The challenges of powering and cooling a very large strip detector will be discussed. Ideas on possible schemes for the layout and support mechanics will be shown. Planar detectors to be made on p-type wafers in a number of different designs have been developed. These prototype detectors were then produced by a leading manufacturers and irradiated to a set of fluences matched to sLHC expectations. The irradiated sensors were subsequently tested with LHC-readout-electronics in order to study the radiation-induced degradation, and determine their performance after serious hadron irradiation of up to 1015 neqcm-2. The signal suffers degradation as a function of irradiation. It is however evident that sufficient charge can still be recorded even at the highest fluence. We will give an overview of the ATLAS tracker upgrade, in particular focusing on innermost silicon strip layers. We will draw conclusions on what type and design of strip detectors to employ for the upgrades of the tracking layers in the sLHC upgrades of LHC experiments.

  17. Gluino polarization at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, M.; Popenda, E.; Spira, M.; Zerwas, P. M.

    2009-09-01

    Gluinos are produced pairwise at the LHC in quark-antiquark and gluon-gluon collisions: qq, gg{yields}g-tildeg-tilde. While the individual polarization of gluinos vanishes in the limit in which the small mass difference between L and R squarks of the first two generations is neglected, nonzero spin-spin correlations are predicted within gluino pairs. If the squark/quark charges in Majorana gluino decays are tagged, the spin correlations have an impact on the energy and angular distributions in reconstructed final states. On the other hand, the gluino polarization in single gluino production in the supersymmetric Compton process gq{yields}g-tildeq-tilde{sub R,L} is predicted to be nonzero, and the polarization affects the final-state distributions in super-Compton events.

  18. Overview of LHC physics results at ICHEP

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-25

     This month LHC physics day will review the physics results presented by the LHC experiments at the 2010 ICHEP in Paris. The experimental presentations will be preceeded by the bi-weekly LHC accelerator status report.The meeting will be broadcast via EVO (detailed info will appear at the time of the meeting in the "Video Services" item on the left menu bar)For those attending, information on accommodation, access to CERN and laptop registration is available from http://cern.ch/lpcc/visits

  19. Overview of LHC physics results at ICHEP

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

     This month LHC physics day will review the physics results presented by the LHC experiments at the 2010 ICHEP in Paris. The experimental presentations will be preceeded by the bi-weekly LHC accelerator status report.The meeting will be broadcast via EVO (detailed info will appear at the time of the meeting in the "Video Services" item on the left menu bar)For those attending, information on accommodation, access to CERN and laptop registration is available from http://cern.ch/lpcc/visits

  20. US accelerator contribution to the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, Michael J.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    In 1998, the United States entered into an agreement with CERN to help build the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with contributions to the accelerator and to the large HEP detectors. To accomplish this, the US LHC Accelerator Project was formed, encompassing expertise from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This report is a summary of these contributions including the progress towards project completion, as well as a discussion of future plans for continued US participation in the LHC accelerator.

  1. LER-LHC injector workshop summary and super-ferric fast cycling injector in the SPS tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosio, Giorgio; Hays, Steven; Huang, Yuenian; Johnstone, John; Kashikhin, Vadim; MacLachlan, James; Mokhov, Nikolai; Piekarz, Henryk; Sen, Tanaji; Shiltsev, Vladimir; de Rijk, Gijsbert; /CERN

    2007-03-01

    A Workshop on Low Energy Ring (LER) in the LHC tunnel as main injector was convened at CERN on October 11-12, 2006. We present the outline of the LER based on the presentations, and respond to the raised questions and discussions including the post-workshop studies. We also outline the possibility of using the LER accelerator technologies for the fast cycling injector accelerator in the SPS tunnel (SF-SPS). A primary goal for the LER (Low Energy Ring) injector accelerator is to inject 1.5 TeV proton beams into the LHC, instead of the current injection scheme with 0.45 TeV beams from the SPS. At this new energy, the field harmonics [1] of the LHC magnets are sufficiently satisfactory to prevent the luminosity losses expected to appear when applying the transfer of the 0.45 TeV SPS beams. In addition, a feasibility study of batch slip stacking in the LER has been undertaken with a goal of increasing in this way the LHC luminosity by up to a factor of 4. A combined luminosity increase may, therefore, be in the range of an order of magnitude. In the long term, the LER injector accelerator would greatly facilitate the implementation of a machine, which doubles the LHC energy (DLHC).

  2. Barriers to and facilitators of hepatitis C testing, management, and treatment among current and former injecting drug users: a qualitative exploration.

    PubMed

    Swan, Davina; Long, Jean; Carr, Olivia; Flanagan, Jean; Irish, Helena; Keating, Shay; Keaveney, Michelle; Lambert, John; McCormick, P Aiden; McKiernan, Susan; Moloney, John; Perry, Nicola; Cullen, Walter

    2010-12-01

    Hepatitis C (HCV) infection is common among injecting drug users (IDUs), yet accessing of HCV care, particularly HCV treatment, is suboptimal. There has been little in-depth study of IDUs experiences of what enables or prevents them engaging at every level of HCV care, including testing, follow-up, management and treatment processes. This qualitative study aimed to explore these issues with current and former IDUs in the greater Dublin area, Ireland. From September 2007 to September 2008 in-depth interviews were conducted with 36 service-users across a range of primary and secondary care services, including: two addiction clinics, a general practice, a community drop-in center, two hepatology clinics, and an infectious diseases clinic. Interviews were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Barriers to HCV care included perceptions of HCV infection as relatively benign, fear of investigations and treatment, and feeling well. Perceptions were shaped by the discourse about HCV and "horror stories" about the liver biopsy and treatment within their peer networks. Difficulties accessing HCV care included limited knowledge of testing sites, not being referred for specialist investigations and ineligibility for treatment. Employment, education, and addiction were priorities that competed with HCV care. Relationships with health care providers influenced engagement with care: Trust in providers, concern for the service-user, and continuity of care fostered engagement. Education on HCV infection, investigations, and treatment altered perceptions. Becoming symptomatic, responsibilities for children, and wanting to move on from drug use motivated HCV treatment. In conclusion, IDUs face multiple barriers to HCV care. A range of facilitators were identified that could inform future interventions. PMID:21138381

  3. LHC phenomenology of SO(10) models with Yukawa unification. II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandakrishnan, Archana; Bryant, B. Charles; Raby, Stuart

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we study Yukawa-unified SO(10) supersymmetric (SUSY) grand unified theories (GUTs) with two types of SO(10) boundary conditions: (i) universal gaugino masses and (ii) nonuniversal gaugino masses with effective "mirage" mediation. With these boundary conditions, we perform a global χ2 analysis to obtain the parameters consistent with 11 low energy observables, including the top, bottom, and tau masses. Both boundary conditions have universal scalar masses and "just so" splitting for the up- and down-type Higgs masses. In these models, the third family scalars are lighter than the first two families and the gauginos are lighter than all the scalars. We therefore focus on the gluino phenomenology in these models. In particular, we estimate the lowest allowed gluino mass in our models coming from the most recent LHC data and compare this to limits obtained using simplified models. We find that the lower bound on Mg ˜ in Yukawa-unified SO(10) SUSY GUTs is generically ˜1.2 TEV at the 1σ level unless there is considerable degeneracy between the gluino and the lightest supersymmetric particle, in which case the bounds are much weaker. Hence many of our benchmark points are not ruled out by the present LHC data and are still viable models which can be tested at LHC 14.

  4. Results from air-injection and tracer testing in the upper Tiva Canyon, Bow Ridge Fault, and upper Paintbrush contact alcoves of the Exploratory Studies Facility, August 1994 through July 1996, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeCain, Gary D.

    1998-01-01

    Air-injection and tracer testing were conducted in the upper Tiva Canyon, Bow Ridge Fault, and upper Paintbrush contact alcoves in the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, from August 1994 to July 1991. The study was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. Diffraction at the Tevatron and the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royon, C.

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, we present and discuss the most recent results on inclusive diffraction at the Tevatron collider and give the prospects at the LHC. We also describe the search for exclusive events at the Tevatron. Of special interest is the exclusive production of Higgs boson and heavy objects (W, top, stop pairs) at the LHC which will require precise measurements and analyses of inclusive and exclusive diffraction to constrain further the gluon density in the pomeron. At the end of the paper, we describe the projects to install forward detectors at the LHC to fulfil these measurements. We also describe the diffractive experiments accepted or in project at the LHC: TOTEM, ALFA in ATLAS, and the AFP/FP420 projects.

  6. The LHC Confronts the pMSSM

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cahill-Rowley, Matthew

    2016-05-31

    Here we explore the impact of current (7+8 TeV) and future (14 TeV) LHC searches on the range of viable sparticle spectra within the 19/20 – dimensional phenomenological MSSM (pMSSM). Considering both neutralino and gravitino LSPs, we compare our results with simplified model exclusion limits and describe important cases where the pMSSM results differ significantly from the simplified model descriptions. We also consider models that are poorly constrained by LHC data because of unusual decay topologies and/or displaced decays, and discuss ways to improve the LHC sensitivity in these scenarios. Finally, motivated by naturalness, we examine the sensitivity of currentmore » searches to models with light stops and to a specialized set of models with fine-tuning better than 1%. We show that the 14 TeV LHC will be a very powerful probe of natural pMSSM models.« less

  7. Tension in the LHC diffractive data?

    SciTech Connect

    Gotsman, Errol

    2015-04-10

    I discuss the LHC diffractive data, and compare it to predicted energy behaviour of various models. I suggest that the so called 'tension' between the experimental results, maybe due to the different Monte Carlo programs used.

  8. Supersymmetry Breaking, Gauge Mediation, and the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, David

    2015-04-14

    Gauge mediated SUSY breaking (GMSB) is a promising class of supersymmetric models that automatically satisfies the precision constraints. Prior work of Meade, Seiberg and Shih in 2008 established the full, model-independent parameter space of GMSB, which they called "General Gauge Mediation" (GGM). During the first half of 2010-2015, Shih and his collaborators thoroughly explored the parameter space of GGM and established many well-motivated benchmark models for use by the experimentalists at the LHC. Through their work, the current constraints on GGM from LEP, the Tevatron and the LHC were fully elucidated, together with the possible collider signatures of GMSB at the LHC. This ensured that the full discovery potential for GGM could be completely realized at the LHC.

  9. First Months of Data Taking at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Parodi, Fabrizio

    2005-10-12

    The ATLAS and CMS detector will start taking data at the LHC collider (proton-proton collider working at a center of mass energy of 14 TeV) in summer 2007. In this article I will review the commissioning of the two detectors before the starting of LHC and the analysis of the first pp collisions data (10 pb-1) devoted, mainly, to calibration purposes. I will also briefly review the first physics measurements aiming at the understanding of the detectors performance.

  10. Monte Carlo Generators for the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worek, M.

    2007-11-01

    The status of two Monte Carlo generators, HELAC-PHEGAS, a program for multi-jet processes and VBFNLO, a parton level program for vector boson fusion processes at NLO QCD, is briefly presented. The aim of these tools is the simulation of events within the Standard Model at current and future high energy experiments, in particular the LHC. Some results related to the production of multi-jet final states at the LHC are also shown.

  11. From the LHC to future colliders

    SciTech Connect

    De Roeck, A.; Assamagan, K.; Ellis, J.; Grojean, C.; Heinemeyer, S.; Jakobs, K.; Weiglien, G.; Well, J.; Azuelos, G.; Dawson, S.; Gripaios, B.; Han, T.; Hewett, J.; Lancaster, M.; Mariotti, C.; Moortgat, F.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Polesello, G.; Riemann, S.; Schumacher, M.; Bechtle, P.; Carena, M.; Chachamis, G.; Chen, K.F.; De Curtis, S.; Desch, K.; Dittmar, M.; Dreiner, H.; Duhrssen, M.; Foster, B.; Frandsen, M.T.; Giammanco, A.; Godbole, R.; Gopalakrishna, S.; Govoni, P.; Gunion, J.; Hollik, W.; Hou, W.S.; Isidori, G.; Juste, A.; Kalinowski, J.; Korytov, A.; Kou, E.; Kraml, S.; Krawczyk, M.; Martin, A.; Milstead, D.; Morton-Thurtle, V.; Moenig, K.; Mele, B.; Ozcan, E.; Pieri, M.; Plehn, T.; Reina, L.; Richter-Was, E.; Rizzo, T.; Rolbiecki, K.; Sannino, F.; Schram, M.; Smillie, J.; Sultansoy, S.; Tattersall, J.; Uwer, P., Webber, B.; and Wienemann, P.

    2010-03-02

    Discoveries at the LHC will soon set the physics agenda for future colliders. This report of a CERN Theory Institute includes the summaries of Working Groups that reviewed the physics goals and prospects of LHC running with 10 to 300 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, of the proposed sLHC luminosity upgrade, of the ILC, of CLIC, of the LHeC and of a muon collider. The four Working Groups considered possible scenarios for the first 10 fb{sup -1} of data at the LHC in which (i) a state with properties that are compatible with a Higgs boson is discovered, (ii) no such state is discovered either because the Higgs properties are such that it is difficult to detect or because no Higgs boson exists, (iii) a missing-energy signal beyond the Standard Model is discovered as in some supersymmetric models, and (iv) some other exotic signature of new physics is discovered. In the contexts of these scenarios, the Working Groups reviewed the capabilities of the future colliders to study in more detail whatever new physics may be discovered by the LHC. Their reports provide the particle physics community with some tools for reviewing the scientific priorities for future colliders after the LHC produces its first harvest of new physics from multi-TeV collisions.

  12. From the LHC to Future Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    De Roeck, A.; Ellis, J.; Grojean, C.; Heinemeyer, S.; Jakobs, K.; Weiglein, G.; Azuelos, G.; Dawson, S.; Gripaios, B.; Han, T.; Hewett, J.; Lancaster, M.; Mariotti, C.; Moortgat, F.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Polesello, G.; Riemann, S.; Assamagan, K.; Bechtle, P.; Carena, M.; Chachamis, G.; /more authors..

    2010-06-11

    Discoveries at the LHC will soon set the physics agenda for future colliders. This report of a CERN Theory Institute includes the summaries of Working Groups that reviewed the physics goals and prospects of LHC running with 10 to 300 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, of the proposed sLHC luminosity upgrade, of the ILC, of CLIC, of the LHeC and of a muon collider. The four Working Groups considered possible scenarios for the first 10 fb{sup -1} of data at the LHC in which (i) a state with properties that are compatible with a Higgs boson is discovered, (ii) no such state is discovered either because the Higgs properties are such that it is difficult to detect or because no Higgs boson exists, (iii) a missing-energy signal beyond the Standard Model is discovered as in some supersymmetric models, and (iv) some other exotic signature of new physics is discovered. In the contexts of these scenarios, theWorking Groups reviewed the capabilities of the future colliders to study in more detail whatever new physics may be discovered by the LHC. Their reports provide the particle physics community with some tools for reviewing the scientific priorities for future colliders after the LHC produces its first harvest of new physics from multi-TeV collisions.

  13. The N.A.C.A. Photographic Apparatus for Studying Fuel Sprays from Oil Engine Injection Valves and Test Results from Several Researches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beardsley, Edward G

    1928-01-01

    Apparatus for recording photographically the start, growth, and cut-off of oil sprays from injection valves has been developed at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory. The apparatus consists of a high-tension transformer by means of which a bank of condensers is charged to a high voltage. The controlled discharge of these condensers in sequence, at a rate of several thousand per second, produces electric sparks of sufficient intensity to illuminate the moving spray for photographing. The sprays are injected from various types of valves into a chamber containing gases at pressures up to 600 pounds per square inch. Several series of pictures are shown. The results give the effects of injection pressure, chamber pressure, specific gravity of the fuel oil used, and injection-valve design, upon spray characteristics.

  14. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 219: Septic Systems and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    David Strand

    2006-05-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 219, Septic Systems and Injection Wells, in Areas 3, 16, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 219 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 03-11-01, Steam Pipes and Asbestos Tiles; (2) 16-04-01, Septic Tanks (3); (3) 16-04-02, Distribution Box; (4) 16-04-03, Sewer Pipes; (5) 23-20-01, DNA Motor Pool Sewage and Waste System; and (6) 23-20-02, Injection Well. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 219 with no further corrective action beyond the application of a use restriction at CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from June 20 through October 12, 2005, as set forth in the CAU 219 Corrective Action Investigation Plan and Record of Technical Change No. 1. A best management practice was implemented at CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03, and corrective action was performed at CAS 23-20-01 between January and April 2006. In addition, a use restriction will be applied to CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03 to provide additional protection to Nevada Test Site personnel. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: (1) Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. (3) Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 219 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs

  15. Epidural Steroid Injections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Assessment Tools Injection Treatments for Spinal Pain Epidural Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysial (Facet) Joint Injections Surgical Options Nonsurgical Treatments Alternative Medicine Epidural Steroid Injections General Information Why Get an Epidural Steroid ...

  16. The LHCf experiment at the LHC accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bonechi, L.; Adriani, O.; Bongi, M.; D'Alessandro, R.; Papini, P.; Castellini, G.; Faus, A.; Velasco, J.; Haguenauer, M.; Itow, Y.; Mase, T.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Matsumoto, H.; Menjo, H.; Muraki, Y.; Sako, T.; Tanaka, K.; Watanabe, H.; Kasahara, K.

    2006-10-27

    The claimed discovery of atmospheric shower induced by cosmic-ray with energy beyond the GZK cutoff by the AGASA experiment in 1994-1995, although not confirmed by other important experiments like Fly's Eye and Hi-Res, together with the poor knowledge of the composition of cosmic rays around and beyond the Knee region, have highlighted the necessity of new experiments that should increase our present knowledge of HECR and UHECR. For this reason big efforts have been addressed to the development of new experiments, like Auger, TA and EUSO, for a systematic study of the UHE atmospheric showers with increased capabilities with respect to the previous experiments. Moreover complementary experiments should allow a precise calibration of the methods used for the reconstruction of cosmic-ray showers in atmosphere. Their aim is the measurement of quantities that are used in these procedures and that are not yet precisely known. Under this perspective the LHCf experiment is a compact experiment which has been proposed for the study of neutral pion and gamma production at high energy in proton-proton interaction in the very forward region of the LHC accelerator. It will help calibrating the algorithms that are used to reconstruct the atmospheric shower events for energy beyond the Knee. The LHCf apparatus and the results of the first beam test, held in 2004, are shortly discussed in this work.

  17. Results from Geothermal Logging, Air and Core-Water Chemistry Sampling, Air Injection Testing and Tracer Testing in the Northern Ghost Dance Fault, YUCCA Mountain, Nevada, November 1996 to August 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Lecain, G.D.; Anna, L.O.; Fahy, M.F.

    1998-08-01

    Geothermal logging, air and core-water chemistry sampling, air-injection testing, and tracer testing were done in the northern Ghost Dance Fault at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, from November 1996 to August 1998. The study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. The fault-testing drill room and test boreholes were located in the crystal-poor, middle nonlithophysal zone of the Topopah Spring Tuff, a tuff deposit of Miocene age. The drill room is located off the Yucca Mountain underground Exploratory Studies Facility at about 230 meters below ground surface. Borehole geothermal logging identified a temperature decrease of 0.1 degree Celsius near the Ghost Dance Fault. The temperature decrease could indicate movement of cooler air or water, or both, down the fault, or it may be due to drilling-induced evaporative or adiabatic cooling. In-situ pneumatic pressure monitoring indicated that barometric pressure changes were transmitted from the ground surface to depth through the Ghost Dance Fault. Values of carbon dioxide and delta carbon-13 from gas samples indicated that air from the underground drill room had penetrated the tuff, supporting the concept of a well-developed fracture system. Uncorrected carbon-14-age estimates from gas samples ranged from 2,400 to 4,500 years. Tritium levels in borehole core water indicated that the fault may have been a conduit for the transport of water from the ground surface to depth during the last 100 years.

  18. Hadron colliders (SSC/LHC)

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.; Palmer, R.B. |; Evans, L.; Gareyte, J.; Siemann, R.H.

    1992-12-31

    The nominal SSC and LHC designs should operate conservatively at luminosities up to 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. This luminosity is dictated by the event rates that can be handled by the detectors. However, this limit is event dependent (e.g. it does not take much of a detector to detect the event pp {yields} elephant; all one needs is extremely high luminosity). As such, it is useful to explore the possibility of going beyond the 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} level. Such exploration will also improve the accelerator physics understanding of pp collider designs. If the detector limitations are removed, the first accelerator limits occur when the luminosity is at the level of 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. These accelerator limits will first be reviewed. The authors will then continue on to explore even higher luminosity as the ultimate limit of pp colliders. Accelerator technologies needed to achieve this ultimate luminosity as well as the R and D needed to reach it are discussed.

  19. Spear 3 Injection Kicker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebek, J.; Arnett, D.; Langton, J.; Pappas, C.

    2002-08-01

    The design of the SPEAR 3 injection kicker system is presented. This system will include three kicker magnets and their associated pulsers. The magnet design is based on the DELTA kicker magnets, which present a low RF impedance to the beam, and are relatively straightforward to construct. The pulsers use cascaded IGBT stages that are based on the modulator pulsers developed by a SLAC/LLNL collaboration for the NLC. Design considerations and the results of prototype tests will be discussed.

  20. Torsemide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... effectiveness and side effects of your treatment using laboratory tests and physical examinations. It is important to keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. The length of treatment depends on how you ...

  1. Palivizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... effectiveness and side effects of this treatment using laboratory tests and physical examinations. It is important to ... all appointments with your child's doctor and the laboratory. The length of treatment will be determined by ...

  2. Statistics and Discoveries at the LHC (3/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The lectures will give an introduction to statistics as applied in particle physics and will provide all the necessary basics for data analysis at the LHC. Special emphasis will be placed on the the problems and questions that arise when searching for new phenomena, including p-values, discovery significance, limit setting procedures, treatment of small signals in the presence of large backgrounds. Specific issues that will be addressed include the advantages and drawbacks of different statistical test procedures (cut-based, likelihood-ratio, etc.), the look-elsewhere effect and treatment of systematic uncertainties.

  3. Statistics and Discoveries at the LHC (4/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The lectures will give an introduction to statistics as applied in particle physics and will provide all the necessary basics for data analysis at the LHC. Special emphasis will be placed on the the problems and questions that arise when searching for new phenomena, including p-values, discovery significance, limit setting procedures, treatment of small signals in the presence of large backgrounds. Specific issues that will be addressed include the advantages and drawbacks of different statistical test procedures (cut-based, likelihood-ratio, etc.), the look-elsewhere effect and treatment of systematic uncertainties.

  4. Statistics and Discoveries at the LHC (2/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The lectures will give an introduction to statistics as applied in particle physics and will provide all the necessary basics for data analysis at the LHC. Special emphasis will be placed on the the problems and questions that arise when searching for new phenomena, including p-values, discovery significance, limit setting procedures, treatment of small signals in the presence of large backgrounds. Specific issues that will be addressed include the advantages and drawbacks of different statistical test procedures (cut-based, likelihood-ratio, etc.), the look-elsewhere effect and treatment of systematic uncertainties.

  5. Statistics and Discoveries at the LHC (1/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The lectures will give an introduction to statistics as applied in particle physics and will provide all the necessary basics for data analysis at the LHC. Special emphasis will be placed on the the problems and questions that arise when searching for new phenomena, including p-values, discovery significance, limit setting procedures, treatment of small signals in the presence of large backgrounds. Specific issues that will be addressed include the advantages and drawbacks of different statistical test procedures (cut-based, likelihood-ratio, etc.), the look-elsewhere effect and treatment of systematic uncertainties.

  6. $A^t_{FB}$ Meets LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, JoAnne L.; Shelton, Jessie; Spannowsky, Michael; Tait, Tim M.P.; Takeuchi, Michihisa; /Heidelberg U.

    2012-02-14

    The recent Tevatron measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry of the top quark shows an intriguing discrepancy with Standard Model expectations, particularly at large t{bar t} invariant masses. Measurements of this quantity are subtle at the LHC, due to its pp initial state, however, one can define a forward-central-charge asymmetry which captures the physics. We study the capability of the LHC to measure this asymmetry and find that within the SM a measurement at the 5{sigma} level is possible with roughly 60 fb{sup -1} at {radical}s = 14 TeV. If nature realizes a model which enhances the asymmetry (as is necessary to explain the Tevatron measurements), a significant difference from zero can be observed much earlier, perhaps even during early LHC running at {radical}s = 7 TeV. We further explore the capabilities of the 7 TeV LHC to discover resonances or contact interactions which modify the t{bar t} invariant mass distribution using recent boosted top tagging techniques. We find that TeV-scale color octet resonances can be discovered, even with small coupling strengths and that contact interactions can be probed at scales exceeding 6 TeV. Overall, the LHC has good potential to clarify the situation with regards to the Tevatron forward-backward measurement.

  7. Silicon microstrip detectors in 3D technology for the sLHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parzefall, Ulrich; Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; Eckert, Simon; Eklund, Lars; Fleta, Celeste; Jakobs, Karl; Kühn, Susanne; Pahn, Gregor; Parkes, Chris; Pennicard, David; Ronchin, Sabina; Zoboli, Andrea; Zorzi, Nicola

    2009-08-01

    The projected luminosity upgrade of the large hadron collider (LHC), the sLHC, will constitute a challenging radiation environment for tracking detectors. Massive improvements in radiation hardness are required with respect to the LHC. In the layout for the new ATLAS tracker, silicon strip detectors (SSDs) with short strips cover the region from 28 to 60 cm distance to the beam. These SSDs will be exposed to fluences up to 1015 Neq/cm2, hence radiation resistance is the major concern. It is advantageous to fuse the superior radiation hardness of the 3D design originally conceived for pixel-style applications with the benefits of the well-known planar technology for strip detectors. This is achieved by ganging rows of 3D columns together to form strips. Several prototype sLHC detector modules using 3D SSD with short strips, processed on p-type silicon, and LHC-speed front-end electronics from the present ATLAS semi-conductor tracker (SCT) were built. The modules were tested before and after irradiation to fluences of 1015 Neq/cm2. The tests were performed with three systems: a highly focused IR-laser with 5 μm spot size to make position-resolved scans of the charge collection efficiency (CCE), a Sr90β-source set-up to measure the signal levels for a minimum ionizing particles (MIPs), and a beam test with 180 GeV pions at CERN. This article gives a brief overview of the performance of these 3D modules, and draws conclusions about options for using 3D strip sensors as tracking detectors at the sLHC.

  8. Cyclic injection, storage, and withdrawal of heated water in a sandstone aquifer at St. Paul, Minnesota--Analysis of thermal data and nonisothermal modeling of short-term test cycles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Robert T.; Delin, G.N.

    2002-01-01

    In May 1980, the University of Minnesota began a project to evaluate the feasibility of storing heated water (150 degrees Celsius) in the Franconia-Ironton Galesville aquifer (183 to 245 meters below land surface) and later recovering it for space heating. The University's steam-generation facilities supplied high-temperature water for injection. The Aquifer Thermal-Energy Storage system is a doublet-well design in which the injection-withdrawal wells are spaced approximately 250 meters apart. Water was pumped from one of the wells through a heat exchanger, where heat was added or removed. This water was then injected back into the aquifer through the other well. Four short-term test cycles were completed. Each cycle consisted of approximately equal durations of injection and withdrawal ranging from 5.25 to 8.01 days. Equal rates of injection and withdrawal, ranging from 17.4 to 18.6 liters per second, were maintained for each short-term test cycle. Average injection temperatures ranged from 88.5 to 117.9 degrees Celsius. Temperature graphs for selected depths at individual observation wells indicate that the Ironton and Galesville Sandstones received and stored more thermal energy than the upper part of the Franconia Formation. Clogging of the Ironton Sandstone was possibly due to precipitation of calcium carbonate or movement of fine-grain material or both. Vertical-profile plots indicate that the effects of buoyancy flow were small within the aquifer. A three-dimensional, anisotropic, nonisothermal, ground-water-flow, and thermal-energy-transport model was constructed to simulate the four short-term test cycles. The model was used to simulate the entire short-term testing period of approximately 400 days. The only model properties varied during model calibration were longitudinal and transverse thermal dispersivities, which, for final calibration, were simulated as 3.3 and 0.33 meters, respectively. The model was calibrated by comparing model-computed results to

  9. Machine optics studies for the LHC measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzebiński, Maciej

    2014-11-01

    In this work the properties of scattered protons in the vicinity of the ATLAS Interaction Point (IP1) for various LHC optics settings are discussed. Firstly, the beam elements installed around IP1 are presented. Then the ATLAS forward detector systems: Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS (ALFA) and ATLAS Forward Protons (AFP) are described and their similarities and differences are discussed. Next, the various optics used at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are described and the beam divergence and width at the Interaction Point as well as at the ATLAS forward detectors locations are calculated. Finally, the geometric acceptance of the ATLAS forward detectors is shown and the impact of the LHC collimators on it is discussed.

  10. Higgs coupling measurements at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, Christoph; Kogler, Roman; Schulz, Holger; Spannowsky, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Due to the absence of tantalising hints for new physics during the LHC's Run 1, the extension of the Higgs sector by dimension-six operators will provide the new phenomenological standard for searches of non-resonant extensions of the Standard Model. Using all dominant and subdominant Higgs production mechanisms at the LHC, we compute the constraints on Higgs physics-relevant dimension-six operators in a global and correlated fit. We show in how far these constraints can be improved by new Higgs channels becoming accessible at higher energy and luminosity, both through inclusive cross sections as well as through highly sensitive differential distributions. This allows us to discuss the sensitivity to new effects in the Higgs sector that can be reached at the LHC if direct hints for physics beyond the SM remain elusive. We discuss the impact of these constraints on well-motivated BSM scenarios.

  11. LHC RF System Time-Domain Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.; /SLAC

    2010-09-14

    Non-linear time-domain simulations have been developed for the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These simulations capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction and are structured to reproduce the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They are also a valuable tool for the study of diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Results from these studies and related measurements from PEP-II and LHC have been presented in multiple places. This report presents an example of the time-domain simulation implementation for the LHC.

  12. MicroTCA and AdvancedTCA equipment evaluation and developments for LHC experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobillier, V.; Haas, S.; Joos, M.; Mendez, J.; Mico, S.; Vasey, F.

    2016-02-01

    The MicroTCA (MTCA) and AdvancedTCA (ATCA) industry standards have been selected as the platform for many of the current and planned upgrades of the off-detector electronic systems of two of the LHC experiments at CERN. We present a status update from an ongoing project to evaluate commercial MTCA and ATCA components with particular emphasis on infrastructure equipment such as shelves and power-supplies. Shelves customized for use in the existing LHC rack infrastructure have been tested, and electrical and cooling measurements and simulations were performed. In-house developments for hardware platform management will also be shown.

  13. The 4.8 GHz LHC Schottky pick-up system

    SciTech Connect

    Caspers, Fritz; Jimenez, Jose Miguel; Jones, Rhodri Owain; Kroyer, Tom; Vuitton, Christophe; Hamerla, Timothy W.; Jansson, Andreas; Misek, Joel; Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; Seifrid, Peter; Sun, Ding; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The LHC Schottky observation system is based on traveling wave type high sensitivity pickup structures operating at 4.8 GHz. The choice of the structure and operating frequency is driven by the demanding LHC impedance requirements, where very low impedance is required below 2 GHz, and good sensitivity at the selected band at 4.8 GHz. A sophisticated filtering and triple down -mixing signal processing chain has been designed and implemented in order to achieve the specified 100 dB instantaneous dynamic range without range switching. Detailed design aspects for the complete systems and test results without beam are presented and discussed.

  14. Dilepton constraints in the inert doublet model from Run 1 of the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bélanger, Geneviève; Dumont, Béranger; Goudelis, Andreas; Herrmann, Björn; Kraml, Sabine; Sengupta, Dipan

    2015-06-01

    Searches in final states with two leptons plus missing transverse energy, targeting supersymmetric particles or invisible decays of the Higgs boson, were performed during Run 1 of the LHC. Recasting the results of these analyses in the context of the inert doublet model (IDM) using MadAnalysis 5, we show that they provide constraints on inert scalars that significantly extend previous limits from LEP. Moreover, these LHC constraints allow us to test the IDM in the limit of very small Higgs-inert scalar coupling, where the constraints from direct detection of dark matter and the invisible Higgs width vanish.

  15. The CMS Tier0 goes cloud and grid for LHC Run 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hufnagel, Dirk

    2015-12-23

    In 2015, CMS will embark on a new era of collecting LHC collisions at unprecedented rates and complexity. This will put a tremendous stress on our computing systems. Prompt Processing of the raw data by the Tier-0 infrastructure will no longer be constrained to CERN alone due to the significantly increased resource requirements. In LHC Run 2, we will need to operate it as a distributed system utilizing both the CERN Cloud-based Agile Infrastructure and a significant fraction of the CMS Tier-1 Grid resources. In another big change for LHC Run 2, we will process all data using the multi-threaded framework to deal with the increased event complexity and to ensure efficient use of the resources. Furthermore, this contribution will cover the evolution of the Tier-0 infrastructure and present scale testing results and experiences from the first data taking in 2015.

  16. The CMS Tier0 goes cloud and grid for LHC Run 2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hufnagel, Dirk

    2015-12-23

    In 2015, CMS will embark on a new era of collecting LHC collisions at unprecedented rates and complexity. This will put a tremendous stress on our computing systems. Prompt Processing of the raw data by the Tier-0 infrastructure will no longer be constrained to CERN alone due to the significantly increased resource requirements. In LHC Run 2, we will need to operate it as a distributed system utilizing both the CERN Cloud-based Agile Infrastructure and a significant fraction of the CMS Tier-1 Grid resources. In another big change for LHC Run 2, we will process all data using the multi-threadedmore » framework to deal with the increased event complexity and to ensure efficient use of the resources. Furthermore, this contribution will cover the evolution of the Tier-0 infrastructure and present scale testing results and experiences from the first data taking in 2015.« less

  17. The CMS TierO goes Cloud and Grid for LHC Run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hufnagel, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    In 2015, CMS will embark on a new era of collecting LHC collisions at unprecedented rates and complexity. This will put a tremendous stress on our computing systems. Prompt Processing of the raw data by the Tier-0 infrastructure will no longer be constrained to CERN alone due to the significantly increased resource requirements. In LHC Run 2, we will need to operate it as a distributed system utilizing both the CERN Cloud-based Agile Infrastructure and a significant fraction of the CMS Tier-1 Grid resources. In another big change for LHC Run 2, we will process all data using the multi-threaded framework to deal with the increased event complexity and to ensure efficient use of the resources. This contribution will cover the evolution of the Tier-0 infrastructure and present scale testing results and experiences from the first data taking in 2015.

  18. Using tevatron magnets for HE-LHC or new ring in LHC tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, Henryk; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    Two injector accelerator options for HE-LHC of p{sup +} - p{sup +} collisions at 33 TeV cms energy are briefly outlined. One option is based on the Super-SPS (S-SPS) accelerator in the SPS tunnel, and the other one is based on the LER (Low-Energy-Ring) accelerator in the LHC tunnel. Expectations of performance of the main arc accelerator magnets considered for the construction of the S-SPS and of the LER accelerators are used to tentatively devise some selected properties of these accelerators as potential injectors to HE-LHC.

  19. Support Structure Design of the $$\\hbox{Nb}_{3}\\hbox{Sn}$$ Quadrupole for the High Luminosity LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Juchno, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; Cheng, D.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Perez, J. C.; Prin, H.; Schmalzle, J.

    2014-10-31

    New low-β quadrupole magnets are being developed within the scope of the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project in collaboration with the US LARP program. The aim of the HLLHC project is to study and implement machine upgrades necessary for increasing the luminosity of the LHC. The new quadrupoles, which are based on the Nb₃Sn superconducting technology, will be installed in the LHC Interaction Regions and will have to generate a gradient of 140 T/m in a coil aperture of 150 mm. In this paper, we describe the design of the short model magnet support structure and discuss results of themore » detailed 3D numerical analysis performed in preparation for the first short model test.« less

  20. Production of hhjj at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Matthew J; Englert, Christoph; Greiner, Nicolas; Spannowsky, Michael

    2014-03-14

    Until now, a phenomenologically complete analysis of the hh+2j channel at the LHC has been missing. This is mostly due to the high complexity of the involved one-loop gluon fusion contribution and the fact that a reliable estimate thereof cannot be obtained through simplified calculations in the mt→∞ limit. In this Letter, we report on the LHC's potential to access di-Higgs production in association with two jets in a fully showered hadron-level analysis. Our study includes the finite top and bottom mass dependencies for the gluon fusion contribution.

  1. Lessons from LHC elastic and diffractive data

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, A.D.; Khoze, V.A.; Ryskin, M.G.

    2015-04-10

    In the light of LHC data, we discuss the global description of all high-energy elastic and diffractive data, using a one-pomeron model, but including multi-pomeron interactions. The LHC data indicate the need of a k{sub t}(s) behaviour, where k{sub t} is the gluon transverse momentum along the partonic ladder structure which describes the pomeron. We also discuss tensions in the data, as well as the t dependence of the slope of dσ{sub el}/dt in the small t domain.

  2. Charged-particle multiplicity at LHC energies

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The talk presents the measurement of the pseudorapidity density and the multiplicity distribution with ALICE at the achieved LHC energies of 0.9 and 2.36 TeV.An overview about multiplicity measurements prior to LHC is given and the related theoretical concepts are briefly discussed.The analysis procedure is presented and the systematic uncertainties are detailed. The applied acceptance corrections and the treatment of diffraction are discussed.The results are compared with model predictions. The validity of KNO scaling in restricted phase space regions is revisited. 

  3. R-axion detection at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Goh, Hock-Seng; Ibe, Masahiro; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    Supersymmetric models with spontaneously broken approximate R-symmetry contains a light spin 0 particle, the R-axion. The properties of the particle can be a powerful probe of the structure of the new physics. In this paper, we discuss the possibilities of the R-axion detection at the LHC experiments. It is challenge to observe this light particle in the LHC environment. However, for typical values in which the mass of the R-axion is a few hundred MeV, we show that those particles can be detected by searching for displaced vertices from R-axion decay.

  4. Bigger, Better, Faster, More at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Izaguirre, Eder; Manhart, Michael; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    Multijet plus missing energy searches provide universal coverage for theories that have new colored particles that decay into a dark matter candidate and jets. These signals appear at the LHC further out on the missing energy tail than two-to-two scattering indicates. The simplicity of the searches at the LHC contrasts sharply with the Tevatron where more elaborate searches are necessary to separate signal from background. The searches presented in this article effectively distinguish signal from background for any theory where the LSP is a daughter or granddaughter of the pair-produced colored parent particle without ever having to consider missing energies less than 400 GeV.

  5. LHC II system sensitivity to magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotae, Vlad; Creanga, Ioan

    2005-03-01

    Experiments have been designed to reveal the influences of ferrofluid treatment and static magnetic field exposure on the photosynthetic system II, where the light harvesting complex (LHC II) controls the ratio chlorophyll a/ chlorophyll b (revealing, indirectly, the photosynthesis rate). Spectrophotometric measurement of chlorophyll content revealed different influences for relatively low ferrofluid concentrations (10-30 μl/l) in comparison to higher concentrations (70-100 μl/l). The overlapped effect of the static magnetic field shaped better the stimulatory ferrofluid action on LHC II system in young poppy plantlets.

  6. LHC: The Emptiest Space in the Solar System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cid-Vidal, Xabier; Cid, Ramon

    2011-01-01

    Proton beams have been colliding at 7 TeV in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) since 30 March 2010, meaning that the LHC research programme is underway. Particle physicists around the world are looking forward to using the data from these collisions, as the LHC is running at an energy three and a half times higher than previously achieved at any…

  7. Analysis of magnetic measurements of short model quadrupoles for the LHC low-b insertions

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, R.; and others

    1998-07-01

    The first two short models of the MQXB quadrupole magnets for the LHC interaction regions have been built and tested at Fermilab. In this paper we present the magnetic field measurement results and compare them with expectations based on as-built dimensional parameters and with a preliminary table of field quality requirements.

  8. Preparations for Physics Studies with ATLAS During the First Years of the LHC

    ScienceCinema

    Fabiola Gianotti

    2016-07-12

    I will review the status of the ATLAS detector installation and commissioning, and discuss the preparation for physics with test-beam studies, detailed simulations, and runs with cosmics. I will then show examples of physics opportunities with the first LHC data.   

  9. Vertical-deformation, water-level, microgravity, geodetic, water-chemistry, and flow-rate data collected during injection, storage, and recovery tests at Lancaster, Antelope Valley, California, September 1995 through September 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metzger, Loren F.; Ikehara, Marti E.; Howle, James F.

    2001-01-01

    A series of freshwater injection, storage, and recovery tests were conducted from September 1995 through September 1998 to evaluate the feasibility of artificially recharging ground water in the Lancaster area of the Antelope Valley, California. The tests used two production wells at a well field located in the southern part of the city of Lancaster. Monitoring networks were established at or in the vicinity of the test site to measure vertical deformation of the aquifer system, water-level fluctuations, land-surface deformation, water chemistry, and injection well flow rates during water injection and recovery. Data presented in this report were collected from a dual extensometer; 10 piezometers; 1 barometer; 27 active or abandoned production wells; 31 gravity stations; 124 bench marks; 1 permanent and 1 temporary continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) station; 3 tiltmeters; and 2 electromagnetic flowmeters from September 1995 through September 1998. This report discusses the location and design of the monitoring networks and the methods used to collect and process the data, and presents the data in tables and graphs.

  10. Supersymmetry without prejudice at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conley, John A.; Gainer, James S.; Hewett, JoAnne L.; Le, My Phuong; Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2011-07-01

    The discovery and exploration of Supersymmetry in a model-independent fashion will be a daunting task due to the large number of soft-breaking parameters in the MSSM. In this paper, we explore the capability of the ATLAS detector at the LHC (sqrt{s}=14 TeV, 1 fb-1) to find SUSY within the 19-dimensional pMSSM subspace of the MSSM using their standard transverse missing energy and long-lived particle searches that were essentially designed for mSUGRA. To this end, we employ a set of ˜71k previously generated model points in the 19-dimensional parameter space that satisfy all of the existing experimental and theoretical constraints. Employing ATLAS-generated SM backgrounds and following their approach in each of 11 missing energy analyses as closely as possible, we explore all of these 71k model points for a possible SUSY signal. To test our analysis procedure, we first verify that we faithfully reproduce the published ATLAS results for the signal distributions for their benchmark mSUGRA model points. We then show that, requiring all sparticle masses to lie below 1(3) TeV, almost all (two-thirds) of the pMSSM model points are discovered with a significance S>5 in at least one of these 11 analyses assuming a 50% systematic error on the SM background. If this systematic error can be reduced to only 20% then this parameter space coverage is increased. These results are indicative that the ATLAS SUSY search strategy is robust under a broad class of Supersymmetric models. We then explore in detail the properties of the kinematically accessible model points which remain unobservable by these search analyses in order to ascertain problematic cases which may arise in general SUSY searches.

  11. Supersymmetry Without Prejudice at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, John A.; Gainer, James S.; Hewett, JoAnne L.; Le, My Phuong; Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    The discovery and exploration of Supersymmetry in a model-independent fashion will be a daunting task due to the large number of soft-breaking parameters in the MSSM. In this paper, we explore the capability of the ATLAS detector at the LHC ({radical}s = 14 TeV, 1 fb{sup -1}) to find SUSY within the 19-dimensional pMSSM subspace of the MSSM using their standard transverse missing energy and long-lived particle searches that were essentially designed for mSUGRA. To this end, we employ a set of {approx} 71k previously generated model points in the 19-dimensional parameter space that satisfy all of the existing experimental and theoretical constraints. Employing ATLAS-generated SM backgrounds and following their approach in each of 11 missing energy analyses as closely as possible, we explore all of these 71k model points for a possible SUSY signal. To test our analysis procedure, we first verify that we faithfully reproduce the published ATLAS results for the signal distributions for their benchmark mSUGRA model points. We then show that, requiring all sparticle masses to lie below 1(3) TeV, almost all(two-thirds) of the pMSSM model points are discovered with a significance S > 5 in at least one of these 11 analyses assuming a 50% systematic error on the SM background. If this systematic error can be reduced to only 20% then this parameter space coverage is increased. These results are indicative that the ATLAS SUSY search strategy is robust under a broad class of Supersymmetric models. We then explore in detail the properties of the kinematically accessible model points which remain unobservable by these search analyses in order to ascertain problematic cases which may arise in general SUSY searches.

  12. Hip joint injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injected so the provider can see where to place the medicine. The steroid medicine is slowly injected into the joint. After the injection, you will remain on the table for another 5 to 10 minutes or so. ...

  13. Preliminary Reactive Geochemical Transport Modeling Study on Changes in Water Chemistry Induced by CO2 Injection at Frio Pilot Test Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, T.; Kharaka, Y.; Benson, S.

    2006-12-01

    A total of 1600 tons of CO2 were injected into the Frio ~{!0~}C~{!1~} sandstone layer at a depth of 1500 m over a period of 10 days. The pilot, located near Dayton, Texas, employed one injection well and one observation well, separated laterally by about 30 m. Each well was perforated over 6 m in the upper portion of the 23-m thick sandstone. Fluid samples were taken from both wells before, during, and after the injection. Following CO2 breakthrough, observations indicate drops in pH (6.5 to 5.7), pronounced increases in concentrations of HCO3- (100 to 3000 mg/L), in Fe (30 to 1100), and dissolved organic carbon. Numerical modeling was used in this study to understand changes of aqueous HCO3- and Fe caused by CO2 injection. The general multiphase reactive geochemical transport simulator TOUGHREACT was used, which includes new fluid property module ECO2N with an accurate description of the thermophysical properties of mixtures of water, brine, and CO2 at conditions of interest for CO2 storage. A calibrated 1-D radial well flow model was employed for the present reactive geochemical transport simulations. Mineral composition used was taken from literatures relevant to Frio sandstone. Increases in HCO3- concentration were well reproduced by an initial simulation. Several scenarios were used to capture increases in Fe concentration including (1) dissolution of carbonate minerals, (2) dissolution of iron oxyhydroxides, (3) de-sorption of previously coated Fe. Future modeling, laboratory and field investigations are proposed to better understand the CO2-brine-mineral interactions at the Frio site. Results from this study could have broad implication for subsurface storage of CO2 and potential water quality impacts.

  14. Test of simultaneous synthetic DNA tracer injections for the estimation of the englacial and subglacial drainage system structure of Storglaciären, northern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlke, H. E.; Leung, S.; Lyon, S. W.; Sharma, A. N.; Walter, M. T.; Williamson, A.

    2013-12-01

    Storglaciären glacier, located in the sub-arctic Tarfala catchment, in northern Sweden is one of the world's longest continuously monitored glaciers which provides a unique research platform for the long-term assessment of glacier and ice sheet processes. For example, small mountain glacier hydrological knowledge of the subglacial water distribution at the ice-bed interface has been applied to ice sheets to predict basal sliding processes. Basal sliding promoted by hydraulic jacking is an important glacial-velocity control that is dependent on the subglacial flow pathways' morphology. Thus, understanding subglacial water distribution and drainage system structure and morphology is crucial for modeling ice masses' flow. In order to estimate subglacial drainage system structure and morphology dye tracing experiments are widely employed. Tracer experiments provide quantitative parameters for any input location including tracer transit velocity, dispersivity, recovery and storage. However, spatial data coverage is limited by the finite number of tracers available for simultaneous tracing. In the presented study we test the use of synthetic DNA tracers for the assessment of the englacial and subglacial drainage system structure of Storglaciären. The synthetic DNA tracer is composed of polylactic acid (PLA) microspheres into which short strands of synthetic DNA and paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are incorporated (Sharma et al., 2012, Environmental Science & Technology). Because the DNA sequences can be randomly combined the synthetic DNA tracer provides an enormous number of unique tracers (approximately 1.61 x 1060). Thus, these synthetic tracers have the advantage that multiple (>10) experiments can be conducted simultaneously, allowing a greater information gain within a shorter measurement period. Quantities of a certain DNA strand can be detected using biotechnology tools such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and quantitative PCR (qPCR). During the 2013

  15. Long-lived staus and displaced leptons at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Jared A.; Shelton, Jessie

    2016-04-01

    As the majority of LHC searches are focused on prompt signatures, specific long-lived particles have the potential to be overlooked by the otherwise systematic new physics programs at ATLAS and CMS. While in many cases long-lived superparticles are now stringently constrained by existing exotic searches, we point out that the highly motivated model of gauge mediation with staus as the next-to-lightest superparticle (NLSP) is relatively far less tested. We recast LHC searches for heavy stable charged particles, disappearing tracks, and opposite-flavor leptons with large impact parameters to assess current constraints on a variety of spectra that contain an NLSP stau, and find that portions of the parameter space motivated by naturalness are still experimentally unexplored. We additionally note a gap in the current experimental search program: same-flavor leptons with large impact parameters evade the suite of existing searches for long-lived objects. This gap is especially noteworthy as vetoes on displaced leptons in prompt new physics searches could be systematically discarding such events. We discuss several motivated models that can exhibit same-flavor displaced leptons: gauge mediation with co-NLSP sleptons, extended gauge mediation, R-parity violation, and lepton-flavored dark matter that freezes in during a matter-dominated era of the early universe. To address this gap, we propose a straightforward extension of the CMS search for leptons with large impact parameters, and project sensitivity to these scenarios at 13 TeV. Throughout this analysis, we highlight several methods whereby LHC searches for exotic long-lived objects could potentially improve their sensitivity to the displaced leptons originating from gauge mediation and beyond.

  16. Continuing u.s. participation in the lhc accelerator program

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2005-12-01

    The U.S. LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) was established to enable U.S. accelerator specialists to take on active and important roles in the LHC accelerator project during its commissioning and early operations, and to be a major collaborator in future LHC performance upgrades. It is hoped that this follow-on effort to the U.S. contributions to the LHC accelerator project will improve the capabilities of the U.S. accelerator community in accelerator science and technology in order to more effectively use, develop, and preserve unique U.S. resources and capabilities during the LHC era.

  17. The Tsallis distribution at the LHC: Phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Cleymans, J.

    2014-11-11

    An overview is presented of transverse momentum distributions of particles at the LHC using the Tsallis distribution. The use of a thermodynamically consistent form of this distribution leads to an excellent description of charged and identified particles. The values of the Tsallis parameter q are truly remarkably consistent.

  18. RENORM predictions of diffraction at LHC confirmed

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2015-04-10

    The RENORM model predictions of diffractive, total, and total-inelastic cross sections at the LHC are confirmed by recent measurements. The predictions of several other available models are discussed, highlighting their differences from RENORM, mainly arising from the way rapidity gap formation, low- and high-mass diffraction, unitarization, and hadronization are implemented.

  19. Ground Vibration Measurements at LHC Point 4

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsche, Kirk; Gaddi, Andrea; /CERN

    2012-09-17

    Ground vibration was measured at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Point 4 during the winter shutdown in February 2012. This report contains the results, including power and coherence spectra. We plan to collect and analyze vibration data from representative collider halls to inform specifications for future linear colliders, such as ILC and CLIC. We are especially interested in vibration correlations between final focus lens locations.

  20. Phenomenology of flavon fields at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Tsumura, Koji; Velasco-Sevilla, Liliana

    2010-02-01

    We study low energy constraints from flavor violating processes, production, and decay at the LHC of a scalar field {phi} (flavon) associated to the breaking of a nonsupersymmetric Abelian family symmetry at the TeV scale. This symmetry is constrained to reproduce fermion masses and mixing, up to O(1) coefficients. The nonsupersymmetric gauged U(1) models considered are severely restricted by cancellation of anomalies and LEP bounds on contact interactions; consequently its phenomenology is out of the LHC reach. We therefore introduce an effective U(1) which is not gauged and is broken explicitly by a CP-odd term at the TeV scale. This helps us to explore flavor violating processes, production, and decay at the LHC for these kind of light scalars. In this context we first study the constraints on the flavon mass and its vacuum expectation value from low energy flavor changing processes such as {mu}{yields}e{gamma}. We find that a flavon of about m{sub {phi}}< or approx. 150 GeV could be experimentally allowed. These kinds of flavons could be significantly generated at the LHC via the gluon fusion mechanism and the single top production channel gu{yields}t{phi}. The produced flavons can have characteristic decay modes such as tc for m{sub {phi}}> or approx. m{sub t}, and {tau}{mu} for m{sub {phi}}< or approx. m{sub t}, which could be effectively useful to detect flavons.

  1. LHC Phenomenology and Lattice Strong Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, G. T.

    2013-03-01

    While the LHC experimentalists work to find evidence of physics beyond the standard model, lattice gauge theorists are working as well to characterize the range of possible phenomena in strongly-coupled models of electroweak symmetry breaking. I will summarize the current progress of the Lattice Strong Dynamics (LSD) collaboration on the flavor dependence of SU(3) gauge theories.

  2. US-LHC MAGNET DATABASE AND CONVENTIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; MCCHESNEY,D.; JAIN,A.; PEGGS,S.; PILAT,F.; BOTTURA,L.; SABBI,G.

    1999-03-29

    The US-LHC Magnet Database is designed for production-magnet quality assurance, field and alignment error impact analysis, cryostat assembly assistance, and ring installation assistance. The database consists of tables designed to store magnet field and alignment measurements data and quench data. This information will also be essential for future machine operations including local IR corrections.

  3. POTENTIAL FOR HIGGS PHYSICS AT THE LHC AND SUPER-LHC.

    SciTech Connect

    CRANMER, K.S.

    2005-12-12

    The expected sensitivity of the LHC experiments to the discovery of the Higgs boson and the measurement of its properties is presented in the context of both the standard model and the its minimal supersymmetric extension. Prospects for a luminosity-upgraded ''Super-LHC'' are also presented. If it exists, the LHC should discover standard model Higgs boson, measure its mass accurately, and make various measurements of its couplings, spin and CP properties. In the context of the CP-conserving MSSM, the LHC should be able to discover one or more Higgs bosons over the entire m{sub A}-tan {beta} plane, with two or more observable in many cases. The large number of channels available insure a robust discovery and offer many opportunities for additional measurements. Observation of H {yields} {mu}{mu}, measurement of the tri-linear Higgs self-coupling, and various search channels are statistics-limited, and only possible with a luminosity upgrade. A luminosity upgrade would substantially improve some of the coupling measurements and generally extend the sensitivity in the MSSM Higgs plane. Efforts are ongoing to understand the upgrade of the LHC to the Super-LHC.

  4. Determination of specific yield and water-table changes using temporal microgravity surveys collected during the second injection, storage, and recovery test at Lancaster, Antelope Valley, California, November 1996 through April 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howle, James F.; Phillips, Steven P.; Denlinger, Roger P.; Metzger, Loren F.

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of artificially recharging the ground-water system in the Lancaster area of the Antelope Valley, California, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works and the Antelope Valley-East Kern Water Agency, conducted a series of injection, storage, and recovery tests between September 1995 and September 1998. A key component of this study was to measure the response of the water table to injection, which was difficult because the water table averaged 300 feet below land surface. Rather than install many expensive piezometers, microgravity surveys were conducted to determine specific yield and to measure the development of a ground-water mound during the injection of about 1,050 acre-feet of fresh water into an alluvial-aquifer system. The surveys were done prior to, during, and near the end of a 5-month injection period (November 12, 1996, to April 17, 1997). Results of the surveys indicate increases in gravity of as much as 66 microgals between a bedrock reference station and 20 gravity stations within a 1-square-mile area surrounding the injection site. The changes were assumed to have been caused by changes in the ground-water elevation. Gravity and ground-water levels were measured simultaneously at an existing well (7N/12W-34B1). The coupled measurements were used to calculate a specific yield of 0.13 for the alluvial aquifer near the well. To determine the gravitational effect of the injection mound on the gravity measurements made near well 7N/12W-34B1, a two-dimensional gravity model was used. Results of the model simulation show that the effect on gravity associated with the mass of the injection mound was minor and thus had a negligible effect on the calculation of specific yield. The specific yield of 0.13, therefore, was used to infer water-level changes at other gravity stations within the study area. The gravity-derived water-level changes were compared with simulated water

  5. Water-quality monitoring and studies of the formation and fate of trihalomethanes during the third injection, storage and recovery test at Lancaster, Antelope Valley, California, March 1998 through April 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fram, Miranda S.; Berghouse, Joshua K.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Fujii, Roger; Goodwin, Kelly D.; Clark, Jordan F.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works and the Antelope Valley-East Kern Water Agency, conducted three cycles of injection, storage, and recovery tests to evaluate the feasibility of artificially recharging ground water in the Lancaster area of Antelope Valley, California. During the third cycle (March 1998 through April 1999), the tests included investigations of the formation and fate of trihalomethanes in the aquifer. Trihalomethanes are disinfection by-products formed by reaction between natural dissolved organic carbon that is present in water and chlorine that is added during the drinking-water-treatment process. This report includes a discussion of the design of the investigation; descriptions of the sampling, analytical, and experimental methods used in the investigation; and a presentation of the data collected. During the third cycle, 60 million gallons of chlorinated water was injected into the aquifer through well 7N/12W-27P2 in the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works well field in Lancaster between April 15 and June 16, 1998. One hundred fifty million gallons of water was extracted from the same well between June 30, 1998, and April 29, 1999. Water-quality samples were collected during the entire cycle from the well and from a nearby set of nested piezometers, and were analyzed for residual chlorine, dissolved organic carbon, trihalomethane, major anion, and dissolved solid concentrations; ultraviolet absorbance spectra; and a number of field water-quality parameters. A statistical analysis was done to evaluate the analytical precision of the residual chlorine, dissolved organic carbon, trihalomethane, and ultraviolet absorbance measurements on these samples. The formation of trihalomethanes in the injection water was examined in laboratory experiments: Trihalomethane concentrations in samples of injection water were monitored during a storage period, and trihalomethane formation

  6. The 11 T dipole for HL-LHC: Status and plan

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Savary, F.; Barzi, E.; Bordini, B.; Bottura, L.; Chlachidze, G.; Ramos, D.; Bermudez, S. Izquierdo; Karppinen, M.; Lackner, F.; Loffler, C. H.; et al

    2016-06-01

    The upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collimation system includes additional collimators in the LHC lattice. The longitudinal space for these collimators will be created by replacing some of the LHC main dipoles with shorter but stronger dipoles compatible with the LHC lattice and main systems. The project plan comprises the construction of two cryoassemblies containing each of the two 11-T dipoles of 5.5-m length for possible installation on either side of interaction point 2 of LHC in the years 2018-2019 for ion operation, and the installation of two cryoassemblies on either side of interaction point 7 of LHCmore » in the years 2023-2024 for proton operation. The development program conducted in conjunction between the Fermilab and CERN magnet groups is progressing well. The development activities carried out on the side of Fermilab were concluded in the middle of 2015 with the fabrication and test of a 1-m-long two-in-one model and those on the CERN side are ramping up with the construction of 2-m-long models and the preparation of the tooling for the fabrication of the first full-length prototype. The engineering design of the cryomagnet is well advanced, including the definition of the various interfaces, e.g., with the collimator, powering, protection, and vacuum systems. Several practice coils of 5.5-m length have been already fabricated. This paper describes the overall progress of the project, the final design of the cryomagnet, and the performance of the most recent models. Furthermore, the overall plan toward the fabrication of the series magnets for the two phases of the upgrade of the LHC collimation system is also presented.« less

  7. Searching for composite Higgs models at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flacke, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Composite Higgs models have the potential to provide a solution to the hierarchy problem and a dynamical explanation for the generation of the Higgs potential. They can be tested at the LHC as the new sector which underlies electroweak symmetry breaking must become strong in the TeV regime, which implies additional bound states beyond the Higgs. In this paper, we first discuss prospects and search strategies for top partners (and other quark partners) in the strongly coupled sector, which we study in an effective field theory setup. In the second part of the proceedings, we go beyond the effective field theory approach. We discuss potential UV embeddings for composite Higgs models which contain a Higgs as well as top partners. We show that in all of these models, additional pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons beyond the Higgs are present. In particular, all of the models contain a pseudoscalar which couples to the Standard Model gauge fields through Wess-Zumino-Witten terms, providing a prime candidate for a di-boson (including a di-photon) resonance. The models also contain colored pNGBs which can be searched for at the LHC.

  8. Strong tW scattering at the LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dror, Jeff Asaf; Farina, Marco; Salvioni, Ennio; Serra, Javi

    2016-01-13

    Deviations of the top electroweak couplings from their Standard Model values imply that certain amplitudes for the scattering of third generation fermions and longitudinally polarized vector bosons or Higgses diverge quadratically with momenta. This high-energy growth is a genuine signal of models where the top quark is strongly coupled to the sector responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. We propose to profit from the high energies accessible at the LHC to enhance the sensitivity to non-standard top-Z couplings, which are currently very weakly constrained. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach, we perform a detailed analysis of tW → tW scattering, which can be probed at the LHC via pp→more » $$t\\bar{t}$$Wj. By recasting a CMS analysis at 8 TeV, we derive the strongest direct bounds to date on the Ztt couplings. We also design a dedicated search at 13 TeV that exploits the distinctive features of the $$t\\bar{t}$$Wj signal. Lastly, we present other scattering processes in the same class that could provide further tests of the top-Higgs sector.« less

  9. Spectrum-doubled heavy vector bosons at the LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Appelquist, Thomas; Bai, Yang; Ingoldby, James; Piai, Maurizio

    2016-01-19

    We study a simple effective field theory incorporating six heavy vector bosons together with the standard-model field content. The new particles preserve custodial symmetry as well as an approximate left-right parity symmetry. The enhanced symmetry of the model allows it to satisfy precision electroweak constraints and bounds from Higgs physics in a regime where all the couplings are perturbative and where the amount of fine-tuning is comparable to that in the standard model itself. We find that the model could explain the recently observed excesses in di-boson processes at invariant mass close to 2TeV from LHC Run 1 for amore » range of allowed parameter space. The masses of all the particles differ by no more than roughly 10%. In a portion of the allowed parameter space only one of the new particles has a production cross section large enough to be detectable with the energy and luminosity of Run 1, both via its decay to WZ and to Wh, while the others have suppressed production rates. Furthermore, the model can be tested at the higher-energy and higher-luminosity run of the LHC even for an overall scale of the new particles higher than 3TeV.« less

  10. 2 TeV walking technirho at LHC?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukano, Hidenori S.; Kurachi, Masafumi; Matsuzaki, Shinya; Terashi, Koji; Yamawaki, Koichi

    2015-11-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has recently reported an excess of about 2.5 σ global significance at around 2 TeV in the diboson channel with the boson-tagged fat dijets, which may imply a new resonance beyond the standard model. We provide a possible explanation of the excess as the isospin-triplet technivector mesons (technirhos, denoted as ρΠ±,3) of the walking technicolor in the case of the one-family model as a benchmark. As the effective theory for the walking technicolor at the scales relevant to the LHC experiment, we take a scale-invariant version of the hidden local symmetry model so constructed as to accommodate technipions, technivector mesons, and the technidilaton in such a way that the model respects spontaneously broken chiral and scale symmetries of the underlying walking technicolor. In particular, the technidilaton, a (pseudo) Nambu-Goldstone boson of the (approximate) scale symmetry predicted in the walking technicolor, has been shown to be successfully identified with the 125 GeV Higgs. Currently available LHC limits on those technihadrons are used to fix the couplings of technivector mesons to the standard-model fermions and weak gauge bosons. We find that the technirhos are mainly produced through the Drell-Yan process and predominantly decay to the dibosons, which accounts for the currently reported excess at around 2 TeV. The consistency with the electroweak precision test and other possible discovery channels of the 2 TeV technirhos are also addressed.

  11. Design for a Longitudinal Density Monitor for the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff, Adam; Bart Pedersen, Stephane; Boccardi, Andrea; Bravin, Enrico; Lefevre, Thibaut; Rabiller, Aurelie; Roncarolo, Federico; Fisher, Alan; Welsch, Carsten; /Liverpool U.

    2012-07-13

    Synchrotron radiation is currently used on the LHC for beam imaging and for monitoring the proton population in the 3 microsecond abort gap. In addition to these existing detectors, a study has been initiated to provide longitudinal density profiles of the LHC beams with a high dynamic range and a 50ps time resolution. This would allow for the precise measurement both of the bunch shape and the number of particles in the bunch tail or drifting into ghost bunches. A solution is proposed based on counting synchrotron light photons with two fast avalanche photo-diodes (APD) operated in Geiger mode. One is free-running but heavily attenuated and can be used to measure the core of the bunch. The other is much more sensitive, for measurement of the bunch tails, but must be gated off during the passage of the bunch to prevent the detector from being swamped. An algorithm is then applied to combine the two measurements and correct for the detector dead-time, afterpulsing and pile-up effects. Initial results from laboratory testing of this system are described here.

  12. Strong tW scattering at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dror, Jeff Asaf; Farina, Marco; Salvioni, Ennio; Serra, Javi

    2016-01-01

    Deviations of the top electroweak couplings from their Standard Model values imply that certain amplitudes for the scattering of third generation fermions and longitudinally polarized vector bosons or Higgses diverge quadratically with momenta. This high-energy growth is a genuine signal of models where the top quark is strongly coupled to the sector responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. We propose to profit from the high energies accessible at the LHC to enhance the sensitivity to non-standard top- Z couplings, which are currently very weakly constrained. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach, we perform a detailed analysis of tW → tW scattering, which can be probed at the LHC via ppto toverline{t}Wj . By recasting a CMS analysis at 8 TeV, we derive the strongest direct bounds to date on the Ztt couplings. We also design a dedicated search at 13 TeV that exploits the distinctive features of the toverline{t}Wj signal. Finally, we present other scattering processes in the same class that could provide further tests of the top-Higgs sector.

  13. Performance of the cold powered diodes and diode leads in the main magnets of the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willering, G. P.; Giloux, C.; Bajko, M.; Bednarek, M.; Bottura, L.; Charifoulline, Z.; Dahlerup-Petersen, K.; Dib, G.; D'Angelo, G.; Gharib, A.; Grand-Clement, L.; Izquierdo Bermudez, S.; Prin, H.; Roger, V.; Rowan, S.; Savary, F.; Tock, J.-Ph; Verweij, A.

    2015-12-01

    During quench tests in 2011 variations in resistance of an order of magnitude were found in the diode by-pass circuit of the main LHC magnets. An investigation campaign was started to understand the source, the occurrence and the impact of the high resistances. Many tests were performed offline in the SM18 test facility with a focus on the contact resistance of the diode to heat sink contact and the diode wafer temperature. In 2014 the performance of the diodes and diode leads of the main dipole bypass systems in the LHC was assessed during a high current qualification test. In the test a current cycle similar to a magnet circuit discharge from 11 kA with a time constant of 100 s was performed. Resistances of up to 600 μΩ have been found in the diode leads at intermediate current, but in general the high resistances decrease at higher current levels and no sign of overheating of diodes has been seen and the bypass circuit passed the test. In this report the performance of the diodes and in particular the contact resistances in the diode leads are analysed with available data acquired over more than 10 years from acceptance test until the main dipole training campaign in the LHC in 2015.

  14. The ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALICE Collaboration; Aamodt, K.; Abrahantes Quintana, A.; Achenbach, R.; Acounis, S.; Adamová, D.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.; Agnese, F.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad, S.; Akindinov, A.; Akishin, P.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alfaro, R.; Alfarone, G.; Alici, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Amend, W.; Andrei, C.; Andres, Y.; Andronic, A.; Anelli, G.; Anfreville, M.; Angelov, V.; Anzo, A.; Anson, C.; Anticić, T.; Antonenko, V.; Antonczyk, D.; Antinori, F.; Antinori, S.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Aprodu, V.; Arba, M.; Arcelli, S.; Argentieri, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Arefiev, A.; Arsene, I.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Awes, T. C.; Äysto, J.; Danish Azmi, M.; Bablock, S.; Badalà, A.; Badyal, S. K.; Baechler, J.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldit, A.; Bán, J.; Barbera, R.; Barberis, P.-L.; Barbet, J. M.; Barnäfoldi, G.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Bartos, D.; Basile, M.; Basmanov, V.; Bastid, N.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Baudot, J.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I.; Becker, B.; Belikov, J.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belogianni, A.; Belyaev, S.; Benato, A.; Beney, J. L.; Benhabib, L.; Benotto, F.; Beolé, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdermann, E.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bernard, C.; Berny, R.; Berst, J. D.; Bertelsen, H.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Baskar, P.; Bhati, A.; Bianchi, N.; Bielčik, J.; Bielčiková, J.; Bimbot, L.; Blanchard, G.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Blyth, S.; Boccioli, M.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Bombonati, C.; Bondila, M.; Bonnet, D.; Bonvicini, V.; Borel, H.; Borotto, F.; Borshchov, V.; Bortoli, Y.; Borysov, O.; Bose, S.; Bosisio, L.; Botje, M.; Böttger, S.; Bourdaud, G.; Bourrion, O.; Bouvier, S.; Braem, A.; Braun, M.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bravina, L.; Bregant, M.; Bruckner, G.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Brunasso, O.; Bruno, G. E.; Bucher, D.; Budilov, V.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Buncic, P.; Burns, M.; Burachas, S.; Busch, O.; Bushop, J.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calaon, F.; Caldogno, M.; Cali, I.; Camerini, P.; Campagnolo, R.; Campbell, M.; Cao, X.; Capitani, G. P.; Romeo, G. Cara; Cardenas-Montes, M.; Carduner, H.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Cariola, P.; Carminati, F.; Casado, J.; Casanova Diaz, A.; Caselle, M.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castor, J.; Catanescu, V.; Cattaruzza, E.; Cavazza, D.; Cerello, P.; Ceresa, S.; Černý, V.; Chambert, V.; Chapeland, S.; Charpy, A.; Charrier, D.; Chartoire, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chepurnov, V.; Chernenko, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chochula, P.; Chiavassa, E.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Choi, J.; Christakoglou, P.; Christiansen, P.; Christensen, C.; Chykalov, O. A.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli-Strolin, L.; Ciobanu, M.; Cindolo, F.; Cirstoiu, C.; Clausse, O.; Cleymans, J.; Cobanoglu, O.; Coffin, J.-P.; Coli, S.; Colla, A.; Colledani, C.; Combaret, C.; Combet, M.; Comets, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J.; Cormier, T.; Corsi, F.; Cortese, P.; Costa, F.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cuautle, E.; Cussonneau, J.; Dahlinger, M.; Dainese, A.; Dalsgaard, H. H.; Daniel, L.; Das, I.; Das, T.; Dash, A.; Da Silva, R.; Davenport, M.; Daues, H.; DeCaro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; DeCuveland, J.; DeFalco, A.; de Gaspari, M.; de Girolamo, P.; de Groot, J.; DeGruttola, D.; DeHaas, A.; DeMarco, N.; DePasquale, S.; DeRemigis, P.; de Vaux, D.; Decock, G.; Delagrange, H.; DelFranco, M.; Dellacasa, G.; Dell'Olio, C.; Dell'Olio, D.; Deloff, A.; Demanov, V.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; Derkach, D.; Devaux, A.; Di Bari, D.; Di Bartelomen, A.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dialinas, M.; Diaz, L.; Díaz Valdes, R.; Dietel, T.; Dima, R.; Ding, H.; Dinca, C.; Divià, R.; Dobretsov, V.; Dobrin, A.; Doenigus, B.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domínguez, I.; Dorn, M.; Drouet, S.; Dubey, A. E.; Ducroux, L.; Dumitrache, F.; Dumonteil, E.; Dupieux, P.; Duta, V.; Dutta Majumdar, A.; Dutta Majumdar, M.; Dyhre, Th; Efimov, L.; Efremov, A.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engster, C.; Enokizono, A.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Evangelista, A.; Evans, D.; Evrard, S.; Fabjan, C. W.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Farano, R.; Fearick, R.; Fedorov, O.; Fekete, V.; Felea, D.; Feofilov, G.; Férnandez Téllez, A.; Ferretti, A.; Fichera, F.; Filchagin, S.; Filoni, E.; Finck, C.; Fini, R.; Fiore, E. M.; Flierl, D.; Floris, M.; Fodor, Z.; Foka, Y.; Fokin, S.; Force, P.; Formenti, F.; Fragiacomo, E.; Fragkiadakis, M.; Fraissard, D.; Franco, A.; Franco, M.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fratino, U.; Fresneau, S.; Frolov, A.; Fuchs, U.; Fujita, J.; Furget, C.; Furini, M.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J.-J.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadrat, S.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gaido, L.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Gallio, M.; Gandolfi, E.; Ganoti, P.; Ganti, M.; Garabatos, J.; Garcia Lopez, A.; Garizzo, L.; Gaudichet, L.; Gemme, R.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Giolu, G.; Giraudo, G.; Giubellino, P.; Glasow, R.; Glässel, P.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Gonzalez Gutierrez, C.; Gonzales-Trueba, L. H.; Gorbunov, S.; Gorbunov, Y.; Gos, H.; Gosset, J.; Gotovac, S.; Gottschlag, H.; Gottschalk, D.; Grabski, V.; Grassi, T.; Gray, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grebieszkow, K.; Gregory, C.; Grigoras, C.; Grion, N.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, C.; Grigoryan, S.; Grishuk, Y.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Grynyov, B.; Guarnaccia, C.; Guber, F.; Guerin, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, M.; Guichard, A.; Guida, M.; Guilloux, G.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, V.; Gustafsson, H.-A.; Gutbrod, H.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamar, G.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hansen, J. C.; Hardy, P.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Harris, J. W.; Hartig, M.; Harutyunyan, A.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Hasch, D.; Hasegan, D.; Hehner, J.; Heine, N.; Heinz, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herlant, S.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hetland, K.; Hille, P.; Hinke, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hoch, M.; Hoebbel, H.; Hoedlmoser, H.; Horaguchi, T.; Horner, M.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Hu, S.; Guo, C. Hu; Humanic, T.; Hurtado, A.; Hwang, D. S.; Ianigro, J. C.; Idzik, M.; Igolkin, S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Imhoff, M.; Innocenti, P. G.; Ionescu, E.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Insa, C.; Inuzuka, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jacobs, P.; Jacholkowski, A.; Jančurová, L.; Janik, R.; Jasper, M.; Jena, C.; Jirden, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jones, G. T.; Jorgensen, C.; Jouve, F.; Jovanović, P.; Junique, A.; Jusko, A.; Jung, H.; Jung, W.; Kadija, K.; Kamal, A.; Kamermans, R.; Kapusta, S.; Kaidalov, A.; Kakoyan, V.; Kalcher, S.; Kang, E.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplin, V.; Karadzhev, K.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Karpio, K.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Mohsin Khan, M.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kikola, D.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D.; Kim, D. S.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, H. N.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, S.; Kinson, J. B.; Kiprich, S. K.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, T.; Kiworra, V.; Klay, J.; Klein Bösing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Klimov, A.; Klovning, A.; Kluge, A.; Kluit, R.; Kniege, S.; Kolevatov, R.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kornas, E.; Koshurnikov, E.; Kotov, I.; Kour, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Kozlov, K.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kraus, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krawutschke, T.; Krivda, M.; Kryshen, E.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugler, A.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, N.; Kumpumaeki, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. N.; Kushpil, S.; Kushpil, V.; Kutovsky, M.; Kvaerno, H.; Kweon, M.; Labbé, J.-C.; Lackner, F.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lafage, V.; La Rocca, P.; Lamont, M.; Lara, C.; Larsen, D. T.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzeroni, C.; LeBornec, Y.; LeBris, N.; LeGailliard, C.; Lebedev, V.; Lecoq, J.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. C.; Lefévre, F.; Legrand, I.; Lehmann, T.; Leistam, L.; Lenoir, P.; Lenti, V.; Leon, H.; Monzon, I. Leon; Lévai, P.; Li, Q.; Li, X.; Librizzi, F.; Lietava, R.; Lindegaard, N.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M.; Listratenko, O. M.; Littel, F.; Liu, Y.; Lo, J.; Lobanov, V.; Loginov, V.; López Noriega, M.; López-Ramírez, R.; López Torres, E.; Lorenzo, P. M.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lu, S.; Ludolphs, W.; Lunardon, M.; Luquin, L.; Lusso, S.; Lutz, J.-R.; Luvisetto, M.; Lyapin, V.; Maevskaya, A.; Magureanu, C.; Mahajan, A.; Majahan, S.; Mahmoud, T.; Mairani, A.; Mahapatra, D.; Makarov, A.; Makhlyueva, I.; Malek, M.; Malkiewicz, T.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manea, C.; Mangotra, L. K.; Maniero, D.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marcel, A.; Marchini, S.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marin, A.; Marin, J.-C.; Marras, D.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Martínez Garcia, G.; Martini, S.; Marzari Chiesa, A.; Marzocca, C.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masetti, M.; Maslov, N. I.; Masoni, A.; Massera, F.; Mast, M.; Mastroserio, A.; Matthews, Z. L.; Mayer, B.; Mazza, G.; Mazzaro, M. D.; Mazzoni, A.; Meddi, F.; Meleshko, E.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meneghini, S.; Meoni, M.; Mercado Perez, J.; Mereu, P.; Meunier, O.; Miake, Y.; Michalon, A.; Michinelli, R.; Miftakhov, N.; Mignone, M.; Mikhailov, K.; Milosevic, J.; Minaev, Y.; Minafra, F.; Mischke, A.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitsyn, V.; Mitu, C.; Mohanty, B.; Moisa, D.; Molnar, L.; Mondal, M.; Mondal, N.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Morando, M.; Morel, M.; Moretto, S.; Morhardt, Th; Morsch, A.; Moukhanova, T.; Mucchi, M.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Müller, H.; Müller, W.; Munoz, J.; Mura, D.; Musa, L.; Muraz, J. F.; Musso, A.; Nania, R.; Nandi, B.; Nappi, E.; Navach, F.; Navin, S.; Nayak, T.; Nazarenko, S.; Nazarov, G.; Nellen, L.; Nendaz, F.; Nianine, A.; Nicassio, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B.; Nitti, M.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noto, F.; Nouais, D.; Nyiri, A.; Nystrand, J.; Odyniec, G.; Oeschler, H.; Oinonen, M.; Oldenburg, M.; Oleks, I.; Olsen, E. K.; Onuchin, V.; Oppedisano, C.; Orsini, F.; Ortiz-Velázquez, A.; Oskamp, C.; Oskarsson, A.; Osmic, F.; Österman, L.; Otterlund, I.; Ovrebekk, G.; Oyama, K.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S.; Pal, S.; Pálla, G.; Palmeri, A.; Pancaldi, G.; Panse, R.; Pantaleo, A.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pastirčák, B.; Pastore, C.; Patarakin, O.; Paticchio, V.; Patimo, G.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pénichot, Y.; Pepato, A.; Pereira, H.; Peresunko, D.; Perez, C.; Perez Griffo, J.; Perini, D.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Peters, A. J.; Petráček, V.; Petridis, A.; Petris, M.; Petrov, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Peyré, J.; Piano, S.; Piccotti, A.; Pichot, P.; Piemonte, C.; Pikna, M.; Pilastrini, R.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pini, B.; Pinsky, L.; Pinto Morais, V.; Pismennaya, V.; Piuz, F.; Platt, R.; Ploskon, M.; Plumeri, S.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Podesta, P.; Poggio, F.; Poghosyan, M.; Poghosyan, T.; Polák, K.; Polichtchouk, B.; Polozov, P.; Polyakov, V.; Pommeresch, B.; Pompei, F.; Pop, A.; Popescu, S.; Posa, F.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Pouthas, J.; Prasad, S.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Prodan, L.; Prono, G.; Protsenko, M. A.; Pruneau, C. A.; Przybyla, A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Pulvirenti, A.; Punin, A.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Quartieri, J.; Quercigh, E.; Rachevskaya, I.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Radomski, S.; Radu, A.; Rak, J.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Rasmussen, O. B.; Rasson, J.; Razin, V.; Read, K.; Real, J.; Redlich, K.; Reichling, C.; Renard, C.; Renault, G.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Ricaud, H.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Rigalleau, L. M.; Riggi, F.; Riegler, W.; Rindel, E.; Riso, J.; Rivetti, A.; Rizzi, M.; Rizzi, V.; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, M.; Røed, K.; Röhrich, D.; Román-López, S.; Romanato, M.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosinsky, P.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Rostchin, V.; Rotondo, F.; Roukoutakis, F.; Rousseau, S.; Roy, C.; Roy, D.; Roy, P.; Royer, L.; Rubin, G.; Rubio, A.; Rui, R.; Rusanov, I.; Russo, G.; Ruuskanen, V.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahoo, R.; Saini, J.; Saiz, P.; Salur, S.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sann, H.; Santiard, J.-C.; Santo, R.; Santoro, R.; Sargsyan, G.; Saturnini, P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Schackert, B.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schioler, T.; Schippers, J. D.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H.; Schneider, R.; Schossmaier, K.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Schyns, E.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Snow, H.; Sedykh, S.; Segato, G.; Sellitto, S.; Semeria, F.; Senyukov, S.; Seppänen, H.; Serci, S.; Serkin, L.; Serra, S.; Sesselmann, T.; Sevcenco, A.; Sgura, I.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharkov, E.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shileev, K.; Shukla, P.; Shurygin, A.; Shurygina, M.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddi, E.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Sigward, M. H.; Silenzi, A.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestri, R.; Simili, E.; Simion, V.; Simon, R.; Simonetti, L.; Singaraju, R.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B.; Sinha, T.; Siska, M.; Sitár, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, B.; Skowronski, P.; Slodkowski, M.; Smirnov, N.; Smykov, L.; Snellings, R.; Snoeys, W.; Soegaard, C.; Soerensen, J.; Sokolov, O.; Soldatov, A.; Soloviev, A.; Soltveit, H.; Soltz, R.; Sommer, W.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Soyk, D.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Stachel, J.; Staley, F.; Stan, I.; Stavinskiy, A.; Steckert, J.; Stefanini, G.; Stefanek, G.; Steinbeck, T.; Stelzer, H.; Stenlund, E.; Stocco, D.; Stockmeier, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolpovsky, P.; Strmeň, P.; Stutzmann, J. S.; Su, G.; Sugitate, T.; Šumbera, M.; Suire, C.; Susa, T.; Sushil Kumar, K.; Swoboda, D.; Symons, J.; Szarka, I.; Szostak, A.; Szuba, M.; Szymanski, P.; Tadel, M.; Tagridis, C.; Tan, L.; Tapia Takaki, D.; Taureg, H.; Tauro, A.; Tavlet, M.; Tejeda Munoz, G.; Thäder, J.; Tieulent, R.; Timmer, P.; Tolyhy, T.; Topilskaya, N.; Torcato de Matos, C.; Torii, H.; Toscano, L.; Tosello, F.; Tournaire, A.; Traczyk, T.; Tröger, G.; Tromeur, W.; Truesdale, D.; Trzaska, W.; Tsiledakis, G.; Tsilis, E.; Tsvetkov, A.; Turcato, M.; Turrisi, R.; Tuveri, M.; Tveter, T.; Tydesjo, H.; Tykarski, L.; Tywoniuk, K.; Ugolini, E.; Ullaland, K.; Urbán, J.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Usseglio, M.; Vacchi, A.; Vala, M.; Valiev, F.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Van Den Brink, A.; Van Eijndhoven, N.; Van Der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vannucci, L.; Vanzetto, S.; Vanuxem, J.-P.; Vargas, M. A.; Varma, R.; Vascotto, A.; Vasiliev, A.; Vassiliou, M.; Vasta, P.; Vechernin, V.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Verhoeven, W.; Veronese, F.; Vetlitskiy, I.; Vernet, R.; Victorov, V.; Vidak, L.; Viesti, G.; Vikhlyantsev, O.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y.; Vodopianov, A.; Volpe, G.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Wabnitz, C.; Wagner, V.; Wallet, L.; Wan, R.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wheadon, R.; Weis, R.; Wen, Q.; Wessels, J.; Westergaard, J.; Wiechula, J.; Wiesenaecker, A.; Wikne, J.; Wilk, A.; Wilk, G.; Williams, C.; Willis, N.; Windelband, B.; Witt, R.; Woehri, H.; Wyllie, K.; Xu, C.; Yang, C.; Yang, H.; Yermia, F.; Yin, Z.; Yin, Z.; Ky, B. Yun; Yushmanov, I.; Yuting, B.; Zabrodin, E.; Zagato, S.; Zagreev, B.; Zaharia, P.; Zalite, A.; Zampa, G.; Zampolli, C.; Zanevskiy, Y.; Zarochentsev, A.; Zaudtke, O.; Závada, P.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zepeda, A.; Zeter, V.; Zgura, I.; Zhalov, M.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, S.; Zhu, G.; Zichichi, A.; Zinchenko, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zubarev, A.; Zucchini, A.; Zuffa, M.

    2008-08-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a general-purpose, heavy-ion detector at the CERN LHC which focuses on QCD, the strong-interaction sector of the Standard Model. It is designed to address the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at extreme values of energy density and temperature in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Besides running with Pb ions, the physics programme includes collisions with lighter ions, lower energy running and dedicated proton-nucleus runs. ALICE will also take data with proton beams at the top LHC energy to collect reference data for the heavy-ion programme and to address several QCD topics for which ALICE is complementary to the other LHC detectors. The ALICE detector has been built by a collaboration including currently over 1000 physicists and engineers from 105 Institutes in 30 countries. Its overall dimensions are 16 × 16 × 26 m3 with a total weight of approximately 10 000 t. The experiment consists of 18 different detector systems each with its own specific technology choice and design constraints, driven both by the physics requirements and the experimental conditions expected at LHC. The most stringent design constraint is to cope with the extreme particle multiplicity anticipated in central Pb-Pb collisions. The different subsystems were optimized to provide high-momentum resolution as well as excellent Particle Identification (PID) over a broad range in momentum, up to the highest multiplicities predicted for LHC. This will allow for comprehensive studies of hadrons, electrons, muons, and photons produced in the collision of heavy nuclei. Most detector systems are scheduled to be installed and ready for data taking by mid-2008 when the LHC is scheduled to start operation, with the exception of parts of the Photon Spectrometer (PHOS), Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) and Electro Magnetic Calorimeter (EMCal). These detectors will be completed for the high-luminosity ion run expected in 2010. This

  15. Injection-Molding-Machine Tender (fabric-plastics prod.) 556.885--Technical Report on Standardization of the General Aptitude Test Battery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. U.S. Training and Employment Service.

    The United States Training and Employment Service General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB), first published in 1947, has been included in a continuing program of research to validate the tests against success in many different occupations. The GATB consists of 12 tests which measure nine aptitudes: General Learning Ability; Verbal Aptitude; Numerical…

  16. Annual Report RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspections for CAU 91: Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the period October 2000-October 2001

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Tobiason

    2002-02-01

    This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the U-3fi Injection Well during the October 2000 to October 2001 period. The U-3fi Injection Well is located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. Inspections of the Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the concrete pad, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste disposal unit closure. The objective of the neutron-logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along the 128-meter (m) (420-ft) ER3-3 monitoring well and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement in the regulated interval extending between 73 to 82 m (240 to 270 ft) or to detect changes that may be indicative of subsidence within the disposal unit itself.

  17. LHC benchmarks from flavored gauge mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ierushalmi, N.; Iwamoto, S.; Lee, G.; Nepomnyashy, V.; Shadmi, Y.

    2016-07-01

    We present benchmark points for LHC searches from flavored gauge mediation models, in which messenger-matter couplings give flavor-dependent squark masses. Our examples include spectra in which a single squark — stop, scharm, or sup — is much lighter than all other colored superpartners, motivating improved quark flavor tagging at the LHC. Many examples feature flavor mixing; in particular, large stop-scharm mixing is possible. The correct Higgs mass is obtained in some examples by virtue of the large stop A-term. We also revisit the general flavor and CP structure of the models. Even though the A-terms can be substantial, their contributions to EDM's are very suppressed, because of the particular dependence of the A-terms on the messenger coupling. This holds regardless of the messenger-coupling texture. More generally, the special structure of the soft terms often leads to stronger suppression of flavor- and CP-violating processes, compared to naive estimates.

  18. Jet energy calibration at the LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schwartzman, Ariel

    2015-11-10

    In this study, jets are one of the most prominent physics signatures of high energy proton–proton (p–p) collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). They are key physics objects for precision measurements and searches for new phenomena. This review provides an overview of the reconstruction and calibration of jets at the LHC during its first Run. ATLAS and CMS developed different approaches for the reconstruction of jets, but use similar methods for the energy calibration. ATLAS reconstructs jets utilizing input signals from their calorimeters and use charged particle tracks to refine their energy measurement and suppress the effects of multiplemore » p–p interactions (pileup). CMS, instead, combines calorimeter and tracking information to build jets from particle flow objects. Jets are calibrated using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and a residual in situ calibration derived from collision data is applied to correct for the differences in jet response between data and Monte Carlo.« less

  19. Jet energy calibration at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzman, Ariel

    2015-11-10

    In this study, jets are one of the most prominent physics signatures of high energy proton–proton (p–p) collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). They are key physics objects for precision measurements and searches for new phenomena. This review provides an overview of the reconstruction and calibration of jets at the LHC during its first Run. ATLAS and CMS developed different approaches for the reconstruction of jets, but use similar methods for the energy calibration. ATLAS reconstructs jets utilizing input signals from their calorimeters and use charged particle tracks to refine their energy measurement and suppress the effects of multiple p–p interactions (pileup). CMS, instead, combines calorimeter and tracking information to build jets from particle flow objects. Jets are calibrated using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and a residual in situ calibration derived from collision data is applied to correct for the differences in jet response between data and Monte Carlo.

  20. Automation of electroweak corrections for LHC processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiesa, Mauro; Greiner, Nicolas; Tramontano, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Next-to-leading order (NLO) electroweak corrections will play an important role in Run 2 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Even though they are typically moderate at the level of total cross sections, they can lead to substantial deviations in the shapes of distributions. In particular, for the search for new physics, but also for a precise determination of Standard Model observables, their inclusion in theoretical predictions is mandatory for a reliable estimation of the Standard Model contribution. In this article we review the status and recent developments in electroweak calculations and their automation for LHC processes. We discuss general issues and properties of NLO electroweak corrections and present some examples, including the full calculation of the NLO corrections to the production of a W-boson in association with two jets computed using GoSam interfaced to MadDipole.

  1. LHC prospects for minimal decaying dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Arcadi, Giorgio; Covi, Laura; Dradi, Federico E-mail: laura.covi@theorie.physik.uni-goettingen.de

    2014-10-01

    We study the possible signals at LHC of the minimal models of decaying dark matter. Those models are characterized by the fact that DM interacts with SM particles through renormalizable coupling with an additional heavier charged state. Such interaction allows to produce a substantial abundance of DM in the early Universe via the decay of the charged heavy state, either in- or out-of-equilibrium. Moreover additional couplings of the charged particle open up decay channels for the DM, which can nevertheless be sufficiently long-lived to be a good DM candidate and within reach of future Indirect Detection observations. We compare the cosmologically favored parameter regions to the LHC discovery reach and discuss the possibility of simultaneous detection of DM decay in Indirect Detection.

  2. Smashing Protons: First Physics at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David

    2010-11-30

    The Large Hadron Collider, at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, is the largest scientific instrument ever built. For nearly a year now, we have been smashing protons into each other with unprecedented energy, allowing us to peer into nature's most intimate depths. The world's largest and most complex cameras take snapshots of these collisions millions of times per second. These pictures reveal the smallest components of the universe - the quarks and gluons - and, someday, we hope, the elusive Higgs boson. Why do we need to build such an enormous machine in order to study particles more than a million times smaller than a speck of dust? This lecture will explain how the LHC and its detectors work, what the pictures from the LHC are telling us now, and how we will use this technology to explore the deepest secrets of the universe.

  3. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    B. Hall, G. Burt, C. Lingwood, R. Rimmer, H. Wang

    2010-05-23

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  4. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    B. Hall,G. Burt,C. Lingwood,Robert Rimmer,Haipeng Wang; Hall, B.; Burt, G.; Lingwood, C.; Rimmer, Robert; Wang, Haipeng

    2010-05-01

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  5. Scalar explanation of diphoton excess at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Huayong; Wang, Shaoming; Zheng, Sibo

    2016-06-01

    Inspired by the diphoton signal excess observed in the latest data of 13 TeV LHC, we consider either a 750 GeV real scalar or pseudo-scalar responsible for this anomaly. We propose a concrete vector-like quark model, in which the vector-like fermion pairs directly couple to this scalar via Yukawa interaction. For this setting the scalar is mainly produced via gluon fusion, then decays at the one-loop level to SM diboson channels gg , γγ , ZZ , WW. We show that for the vector-like fermion pairs with exotic electric charges, such model can account for the diphoton excess and is consistent with the data of 8 TeV LHC simultaneously in the context of perturbative analysis.

  6. CernVM-FS - beyond LHC computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condurache, C.; Collier, I.

    2014-06-01

    In the last three years the CernVM File System has transformed the distribution of experiment software to WLCG sites. CernVM-FS removes the need for local installations jobs and performant network fileservers at sites and it often improves performance at the same time. Now established and proven to work at scale, CernVM-FS is beginning to perform a similar role for non-LHC computing. The deployment of CernVM-FS service at RAL Tier-1 is presented, as well as the proposed development of a network of Stratum-0 and Stratum-1 replicas somewhat modelled upon the infrastructure developed to support the WLCG computing. A case study of one non-LHC Virtual Organization is also included, describing their use of the CernVM-FS Stratum-0 service, along with a web interface intended to be used as a tool to upload software at Stratum-0 sites.

  7. SUSY-Cosmology at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurrola, Alfredo; Arnowitt, Richard; Dutta, Bhaskar; Kamon, Teruki; Kolev, Nikolay; Krislock, Abram; Simeon, Paul

    2006-10-01

    Supersymmetry (SUSY) is a very attractive theory of particle physics that could connect to cosmology and explain the early universe. With an assumption of the lightest supersymmetric neutral gauge boson (neutralino) to be a dark matter (DM), the recent measurement of the amount of DM of the universe with other experimental results constrains a SUSY parameter space where a mass difference between the supersymmetric tau lepton (stau) and the neutralino is very small (5 to 15 GeV). The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will produce the SUSY events copiously and contain two or more tau leptons in the final state. We systematically study an experimental requirement of measuring the characteristic mass difference at the LHC. Within a benchmark framework of minimal supergravity, we confirm the conclusion in our previous publication that the tau lepton must be identified with a transverse energy above 20 GeV.

  8. LHC Computing: The First Run and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, Ian

    2012-10-10

    Even in between the last two generations of high energy physics detectors there has been a tremendous amount of progress in the area of computing. The distributed computing systems used in the LHC are composed of large-scale facilities on 5 continents, executing over a million processing requests a day, and moving peta-bytes of data a month. In this presentation I will discuss the operational experience of the LHC experiments and the challenges faced in the first run. I will discuss how the techniques have evolved and I will cover future projects to improve the distributed computing infrastructure and services. I will close by speaking of some potential new technologies being explored.

  9. Vibration of safety injection pump motors

    SciTech Connect

    Wattrelos, D.

    1996-12-01

    This paper covers a fault encountered in the safety injection pump motors of the French 900 MWe unit nuclear power stations. This fault was not revealed either during the low pressure safety injection and containment spray system pump qualification tests under accident conditions or during the special tests on a test bench carried out to attempt to replicate the fault and to identify ways of remedying it. This constitutes a potential common mode of failure of the safety injection system and the containment spray system pumps. The vibration phenomena illustrate the importance of carrying out tests in the plants under conditions as close as possible to those of actual accident situations.

  10. Measuring Higgs couplings from LHC data.

    PubMed

    Klute, Markus; Lafaye, Rémi; Plehn, Tilman; Rauch, Michael; Zerwas, Dirk

    2012-09-01

    Following recent ATLAS and CMS publications we interpret the results of their Higgs searches in terms of standard model operators. For a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV we determine several Higgs couplings from published 2011 data and extrapolate the results towards different scenarios of LHC running. Even though our analysis is limited by low statistics we already derive meaningful constraints on modified Higgs sectors.

  11. Calculation of water activation for the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollaire, Joachim; Brugger, Markus; Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Roesler, Stefan; Vojtyla, Pavol

    2006-06-01

    The management of activated water in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is a key concern for radiation protection. For this reason, the induced radioactivity of the different water circuits is calculated using the Monte-Carlo (MC) code FLUKA. The results lead to the definition of procedures to be taken into account during the repair and maintenance of the machine, as well as to measures being necessary for a release of water into the environment. In order to assess the validity of the applied methods, a benchmark experiment was carried out at the CERN-EU High Energy Reference Field (CERF) facility, where a hadron beam (120 GeV) is impinging on a copper target. Four samples of water, as used at the LHC, and different in their chemical compositions, were irradiated near the copper target. In addition to the tritium activity measured with a liquid scintillation counter, the samples were also analyzed using gamma spectroscopy in order to determine the activity of the gamma emitting isotopes such as Be7 and Na24. While for the latter an excellent agreement between simulation and measurement was found, for the calculation of tritium a correction factor is derived to be applied for future LHC calculations in which the activity is calculated by direct scoring of produced nuclei. A simplified geometry representing the LHC Arc sections is then used to evaluate the different calculation methods with FLUKA. By comparing these methods and by taking into account the benchmark results, a strategy for the environmental calculations can be defined.

  12. Dark Matter Jets at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Yang; Rajaraman, Arvind; /UC, Irvine

    2012-03-28

    We argue that dark matter particles which have strong interactions with the Standard Model particles are not excluded by current astrophysical constraints. These dark matter particles have unique signatures at colliders; instead of missing energy, the dark matter particles produce jets. We propose a new search strategy for such strongly interacting particles by looking for a signal of two trackless jets. We show that suitable cuts can plausibly allow us to find these signals at the LHC even in early data.

  13. Electron lenses for particle collimation in LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, v.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    Electron Lenses built and installed in Tevatron have proven themselves as safe and very reliable instruments which can be effectively used in hadron collider operation for a number of applications, including compensation of beam-beam effects [1], DC beam removal from abort gaps [2], as a diagnostic tool. In this presentation we - following original proposal [3] - consider in more detail a possibility of using electron lenses with hollow electron beam for ion and proton collimation in LHC.

  14. Multiple charm production at the LHC energy

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhnoy, A. V.; Likhoded, A. K. Luchinsky, A. V. Novoselov, A. A.

    2013-01-15

    Cross sections for J/{psi} mesons produced in association with open charm and two charmed hadrons from different cc-bar pairs under LHC conditions are predicted theoretically. The respective processes are considered both in single and in double parton interactions. Particular attention is given to kinematical limits of the LHCb detector, and a comparison with the most recent experimental data is performed for them.

  15. LHC INTERACTION REGION QUADRUPOLE ERROR IMPACT STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; PTITSIN,V.; WEI,J.

    1999-09-07

    The performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at collision energy is limited by the field quality of the interaction region (IR) quadrupoles and dipoles. In this paper the authors study the impact of the expected field errors of these magnets on the dynamic aperture. The authors investigate different magnet arrangements and error strength. Based on the results they propose and evaluate a corrector layout to meet the required dynamic aperture performance in a companion paper.

  16. Color Sextet Scalars in Early LHC Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Edmond L.; Cao Qinghong; Chen, Chuan-Ren; Shaughnessy, Gabe; Zhang Hao

    2010-10-29

    We explore the potential for discovery of an exotic color sextet scalar in same-sign top quark pair production in early running at the LHC. We present the first phenomenological analysis at colliders of color sextet scalars with full top quark spin correlations included. We demonstrate that one can measure the scalar mass, the top quark polarization, and confirm the scalar resonance with 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The top quark polarization can distinguish gauge triplet and singlet scalars.

  17. Processing LHC data in the UK.

    PubMed

    Colling, D; Britton, D; Gordon, J; Lloyd, S; Doyle, A; Gronbech, P; Coles, J; Sansum, A; Patrick, G; Jones, R; Middleton, R; Kelsey, D; Cass, A; Geddes, N; Clark, P; Barnby, L

    2013-01-28

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the greatest scientific endeavours to date. The construction of the collider itself and the experiments that collect data from it represent a huge investment, both financially and in terms of human effort, in our hope to understand the way the Universe works at a deeper level. Yet the volumes of data produced are so large that they cannot be analysed at any single computing centre. Instead, the experiments have all adopted distributed computing models based on the LHC Computing Grid. Without the correct functioning of this grid infrastructure the experiments would not be able to understand the data that they have collected. Within the UK, the Grid infrastructure needed by the experiments is provided by the GridPP project. We report on the operations, performance and contributions made to the experiments by the GridPP project during the years of 2010 and 2011--the first two significant years of the running of the LHC.

  18. Processing LHC data in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Colling, D.; Britton, D.; Gordon, J.; Lloyd, S.; Doyle, A.; Gronbech, P.; Coles, J.; Sansum, A.; Patrick, G.; Jones, R.; Middleton, R.; Kelsey, D.; Cass, A.; Geddes, N.; Clark, P.; Barnby, L.

    2013-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the greatest scientific endeavours to date. The construction of the collider itself and the experiments that collect data from it represent a huge investment, both financially and in terms of human effort, in our hope to understand the way the Universe works at a deeper level. Yet the volumes of data produced are so large that they cannot be analysed at any single computing centre. Instead, the experiments have all adopted distributed computing models based on the LHC Computing Grid. Without the correct functioning of this grid infrastructure the experiments would not be able to understand the data that they have collected. Within the UK, the Grid infrastructure needed by the experiments is provided by the GridPP project. We report on the operations, performance and contributions made to the experiments by the GridPP project during the years of 2010 and 2011—the first two significant years of the running of the LHC. PMID:23230163

  19. Sbottoms of natural NMSSM at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuria, Jyotiranjan; Chatterjee, Arindam; Datta, AseshKrishna

    2016-08-01

    Search for the bottom squarks (sbottoms) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has recently assumed a heightened focus in the hunt for Supersymmetry (SUSY). The popular framework of the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) could conceive a naturally light sbottom which can easily be consistent with available constraints from the experiments at the LHC. Phenomenology of such sbottoms could in principle be as striking as that for a light top squark (stop) thanks to a rather nontrivial neutralino sector (with appreciable mixing among the neutral higgsinos and the singlino) that the scenario gives rise to. Nonetheless, finding such sbottoms would require a moderately large volume of data (˜300 fb-1) at the 13 TeV run of the LHC. A multi-channel analysis establishing a generic depletion of events in the usual 2 b- jets + [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] T final state while registering, in conjunction, characteristically significant rates in various multi-lepton final states accompanied by b- jets might point not only to the presence of light sbottom(s) but could also shed crucial light on their compositions and the (singlino) nature of the lightest SUSY particle (LSP).

  20. Experiment Dashboard for Monitoring of the LHC Distributed Computing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, J.; Devesas Campos, M.; Tarragon Cros, J.; Gaidioz, B.; Karavakis, E.; Kokoszkiewicz, L.; Lanciotti, E.; Maier, G.; Ollivier, W.; Nowotka, M.; Rocha, R.; Sadykov, T.; Saiz, P.; Sargsyan, L.; Sidorova, I.; Tuckett, D.

    2011-12-01

    LHC experiments are currently taking collisions data. A distributed computing model chosen by the four main LHC experiments allows physicists to benefit from resources spread all over the world. The distributed model and the scale of LHC computing activities increase the level of complexity of middleware, and also the chances of possible failures or inefficiencies in involved components. In order to ensure the required performance and functionality of the LHC computing system, monitoring the status of the distributed sites and services as well as monitoring LHC computing activities are among the key factors. Over the last years, the Experiment Dashboard team has been working on a number of applications that facilitate the monitoring of different activities: including following up jobs, transfers, and also site and service availabilities. This presentation describes Experiment Dashboard applications used by the LHC experiments and experience gained during the first months of data taking.

  1. Volunteer Clouds and Citizen Cyberscience for LHC Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguado Sanchez, Carlos; Blomer, Jakob; Buncic, Predrag; Chen, Gang; Ellis, John; Garcia Quintas, David; Harutyunyan, Artem; Grey, Francois; Lombrana Gonzalez, Daniel; Marquina, Miguel; Mato, Pere; Rantala, Jarno; Schulz, Holger; Segal, Ben; Sharma, Archana; Skands, Peter; Weir, David; Wu, Jie; Wu, Wenjing; Yadav, Rohit

    2011-12-01

    Computing for the LHC, and for HEP more generally, is traditionally viewed as requiring specialized infrastructure and software environments, and therefore not compatible with the recent trend in "volunteer computing", where volunteers supply free processing time on ordinary PCs and laptops via standard Internet connections. In this paper, we demonstrate that with the use of virtual machine technology, at least some standard LHC computing tasks can be tackled with volunteer computing resources. Specifically, by presenting volunteer computing resources to HEP scientists as a "volunteer cloud", essentially identical to a Grid or dedicated cluster from a job submission perspective, LHC simulations can be processed effectively. This article outlines both the technical steps required for such a solution and the implications for LHC computing as well as for LHC public outreach and for participation by scientists from developing regions in LHC research.

  2. Compressor Stability Enhancement Using Discrete Tip Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Kenneth L.; Hathaway, Michael D.; Thorp, Scott A.; Strazisar, Anthony J.; Bright, Michelle B.

    2001-01-01

    Mass injection upstream of the tip of a high-speed axial compressor rotor is a stability enhancement approach known to be effective in suppressing small in tip-critical rotors. This process is examined in a transonic axial compressor rotor through experiments and time-averaged Navier-Stokes CFD simulations. Measurements and simulations for discrete injection are presented for a range of injection rates and distributions of injectors around the annulus. The simulations indicate that tip injection increases stability by unloading the rotor tip and that increasing injection velocity improves the effectiveness of tip injection. For the tested rotor, experimental results demonstrate that at 70 percent speed the stalling flow coefficient can be reduced by 30 percent using an injected mass- flow equivalent to 1 percent of the annulus flow. At design speed, the stalling flow coefficient was reduced by 6 percent using an injected mass-fiow equivalent to 2 percent of the annulus flow. The experiments show that stability enhancement is related to the mass-averaged axial velocity at the tip. For a given injected mass-flow, the mass-averaged axial velocity at the tip is increased by injecting flow over discrete portions of the circumference as opposed to full-annular injection. The implications of these results on the design of recirculating casing treatments and other methods to enhance stability will be discussed.

  3. The ATLAS tile calorimeter performance at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Calkins, R.

    2011-07-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal), the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment, is a key detector component to detect hadrons, jets and taus and to measure the missing transverse energy. Due to the very good muon signal to noise ratio it assists the spectrometer in the identification and reconstruction of muons. TileCal is built of steel and scintillating tiles coupled to optical fibers and read out by photomultipliers. The calorimeter is equipped with systems that allow to monitor and to calibrate each stage of the read out system exploiting different signal sources: laser light, charge injection and a radioactive source. The performance of the calorimeter has been measured and monitored using calibration data, random triggered data, cosmic muons and more importantly LHC collision events. The results presented here assess the absolute energy scale calibration precision, the energy and timing uniformity and the synchronization precision. The ensemble of the results demonstrates a very good understanding of the performance of the Tile Calorimeter that is proved to be well within the design expectations. (authors)

  4. High-field Magnet Development toward the High Luminosity LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, Giorgio

    2014-07-01

    The upcoming Luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) will rely on the use of Accelerator Quality Nb3Sn Magnets which have been the focus of an intense R&D effort in the last decade. This contribution will describe the R&D and results of Nb3Sn Accelerator Quality High Field Magnets development efforts, with emphasis on the activities considered for the HL-LHC upgrades.

  5. Design approach for the development of a cryomodule for compact crab cavities for Hi-Lumi LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Pattalwar, Shrikant; Goudket, Philippe; McIntosh, Peter; Wheelhouse, Alan; Jones, Thomas; Templeton, Niklas; Burt, Graeme; Hall, Ben; Wright, Loren; Peterson, Tom

    2014-01-29

    A prototype Superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule, comprising multiple compact crab cavities is foreseen to realise a local crab crossing scheme for the “Hi-Lumi LHC”, a project launched by CERN to increase the luminosity performance of LHC. A cryomodule with two cavities will be initially installed and tested on the SPS drive accelerator at CERN to evaluate performance with high-intensity proton beams. A series of boundary conditions influence the design of the cryomodule prototype, arising from; the complexity of the cavity design, the requirement for multiple RF couplers, the close proximity to the second LHC beam pipe and the tight space constraints in the SPS and LHC tunnels. As a result, the design of the helium vessel and the cryomodule has become extremely challenging. This paper assesses some of the critical cryogenic and engineering design requirements and describes an optimised cryomodule solution for the evaluation tests on SPS.

  6. The LHC magnet system and its status of development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bona, Maurizio; Perin, Romeo; Vlogaert, Jos

    1995-01-01

    CERN is preparing for the construction of a new high energy accelerator/collider, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This new facility will mainly consist of two superconducting magnetic beam channels, 27 km long, to be installed in the existing LEP tunnel. The magnetic system comprises about 1200 twin-aperture dipoles, 13.145 m long, with an operational field of 8.65 T, about 600 quadrupoles, 3 m long, and a very large number of other superconducting magnetic components. A general description of the system is given together with the main features of the design of the regular lattice magnets. The paper also describes the present state of the magnet R & D program. Results from short model work, as well as from full scale prototypes will be presented, including the recently tested 10 m long full-scale prototype dipole manufactured in industry.

  7. The ATLAS Diamond Beam Monitor: Luminosity detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    After the first three years of the LHC running, the ATLAS experiment extracted its pixel detector system to refurbish and re-position the optical readout drivers and install a new barrel layer of pixels. The experiment has also taken advantage of this access to install a set of beam monitoring telescopes with pixel sensors, four each in the forward and backward regions. These telescopes are based on chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond sensors to survive in this high radiation environment without needing extensive cooling. This paper describes the lessons learned in construction and commissioning of the ATLAS Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM). We show results from the construction quality assurance tests and commissioning performance, including results from cosmic ray running in early 2015.

  8. Slit injection device

    DOEpatents

    Alger, Terry W.; Schlitt, Leland G.; Bradley, Laird P.

    1976-06-15

    A laser cavity electron beam injection device provided with a single elongated slit window for passing a suitably shaped electron beam and means for varying the current density of the injected electron beam.

  9. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  10. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  11. Calcitonin Salmon Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Calcitonin salmon injection is used to treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Osteoporosis is a disease that causes bones to weaken and break more easily. Calcitonin salmon injection is also used to ...

  12. Sodium Ferric Gluconate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium ferric gluconate injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of ... are also receiving the medication epoetin (Epogen, Procrit). Sodium ferric gluconate injection is in a class of ...

  13. The application of ultrasonic seismic model experiment in quality test of cement mortar injection of Yongjiang river submarine tunnel tube foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Gang-Yu; Guo, Tie-Shuan; Li, Jin-Long; Yang, Dao-Sheng

    1996-11-01

    Ultrasonic seismic model experiment plays an important role in engineering multi-wave seismic prospecting (EM-SP), which has been used to do the complex engineering seismic exploration. It is introduced that the application of the technology in quality test of Yongjiang river submarine tunnel tube foundation in the paper. The material of the model was got from on-the-spot. The successful test has been made with results of the model experiment.

  14. Rich catalytic injection

    DOEpatents

    Veninger, Albert

    2008-12-30

    A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

  15. Relations between open-field, elevated plus-maze, and emergence tests in C57BL/6JIco and BALB/cAnN@Ico mice injected with ethanol.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, R; Strazielle, C

    2012-04-01

    The effects of ethanol were examined on three tests of exploratory activity in two mouse strains. Although ethanol reduced open-field rearing in both strains, it increased ambulation only in the less active BALB/cAnN@Ico strain, not in the C57BL/6JIco strain. Likewise, ethanol increased open and enclosed arm entries in the elevated plus-maze only in the more anxious BALB/cAnN@Ico strain. However, both strains injected with ethanol emerged faster than placebo from a small chamber at doses not affecting behaviors in the other two tests. Significant correlations were found between emergence latencies on one hand and either slow stereotyped movements or open and enclosed arm entries on the other. The strain-specific effects may be attributable to differences in GABA(A) -related receptor binding or catalase activity.

  16. Strong Coupling Gauge Theories in LHC ERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukaya, H.; Harada, M.; Tanabashi, M.; Yamawaki, K.

    2011-01-01

    Higgs, or techni-dilaton - composite Higgs near conformality / Koichi Yamawaki -- Phase diagram of strongly interacting theories / Francesco Sannino -- Resizing conformal windows / O. Antipin and K. Tuominen -- Nearly conformal gauge theories on the lattice / Zoltan Fodor ... [et al.] -- Going beyond QCD in lattice gauge theory / G. T. Fleming -- Phases of QCD from small to large N[symbol]: (some) lattice results / A. Deuzeman, E. Pallante and M. P. Lombardo -- Lattice gauge theory and (quasi)-conformal technicolor / D. K. Sinclair and J. B. Kogut -- Study of the running coupling constant in 10-flavor QCD with the Schrodinger functional method / N. Yamada ... [et al.] -- Study of the running coupling in twisted Polyakov scheme / T. Aoyama ... [et al.].Running coupling in strong gauge theories via the lattice / Zoltan Fodor ... [et al.] -- Higgsinoless supersymmetry and hidden gravity / Michael L. Graesser, Ryuichiro Kitano and Masafumi Kurachi -- The latest status of LHC and the EWSB physics / S. Asai -- Continuum superpartners from supersymmetric unparticles / Hsin-Chia Cheng -- Review of minimal flavor constraints for technicolor / Hidenori S. Fukano and Francesco Sannino -- Standard model and high energy Lorentz violation / Damiano Anselmi -- Dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking and fourth family / Michio Hashimoto -- Holmorphic supersymmetric Nambu-Jona-Lasino model and dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking / Dong-Won Jung, Otto C. W. Kong and Jae Sik Lee -- Ratchet model of Baryogenesis / Tatsu Takeuchi, Azusa Minamizaki and Akio Sugamoto -- Classical solutions of field equations in Einstein Gauss-Bonnet gravity / P. Suranyi, C. Vaz and L. C. R. Wijewardhana -- Black holes constitute all dark matter / Paul H. Frampton -- Electroweak precision test and Z [symbol] in the three site Higgsless model / Tomohiro Abe -- Chiral symmetry and BRST symmetry breaking, quaternion reality and the lattice simulation / Sadataka Furui -- Holographic techni-dilaton, or

  17. A prototype space flight intravenous injection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.

    1985-01-01

    Medical emergencies, especially those resulting from accidents, frequently require the administration of intravenous fluids to replace lost body liquids. The development of a prototype space flight intravenous injection system is presented. The definition of requirements, injectable concentrates development, water polisher, reconstitution hardware development, administration hardware development, and prototype fabrication and testing are discussed.

  18. Rapid response gas injection technique.

    PubMed

    Komar, J J

    1978-10-01

    A unique gas injection technique has been developed which has rapid response and is capable of supplying gas flowrates up to 5 kg/s at pressures of 3.45 x 10(6) N/m(2). Rise times to equilibrium pressure varied from 7 to 15 ms over the operating range. The reliability, excellent repeatibility, and uniform pressure have shown the system to be superior to previously utilized expansion tube gas injection techniques associated with very short duration impulse test facilities. The achievement of precise timing control of the valve opening permitted a complex electronic sequencing of facility events. An additional feature of automatic gas supply shut-off resulted in significant cost savings when rare gases were used as injectants. PMID:18698978

  19. LARP NB3SN QUADRUPOLE MAGNETS FOR THE LHC LUMINOSITY UPGRADE

    SciTech Connect

    Ferracin, P.

    2009-06-01

    The US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) is a collaboration between four US laboratories (BNL, FNAL, LBNL, and SLAC) aimed at contributing to the commissioning and operation of the LHC and conducting R&D on its luminosity upgrade. Within LARP, the Magnet Program's main goal is to demonstrate that Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting magnets are a viable option for a future upgrade of the LHC Interaction Regions. Over the past four years, LARP has successfully fabricated and tested several R&D magnets: (1) the subscale quadrupole magnet SQ, to perform technology studies with 300 mm long racetrack coils, (2) the technology quadrupole TQ, to investigate support structure behavior with 1 m long cos2{theta} coils, and (3) the long racetrack magnet LR, to test 3.6 m long racetrack coils. The next milestone consists in the fabrication and test of the 3.7 m long quadrupole magnet LQ, with the goal of demonstrating that ND{sub 3}Sn technology is mature for use in high energy accelerators. After an overview of design features and test results of the LARP magnets fabricated so far, this paper focuses on the status of the fabrication of LQ: we describe the production of the 3.4 m long cos2{theta} coils, and the qualification of the support structure. Finally, the status of the development of the next 1 m long model HQ, conceived to explore stress and field limits of Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting magnets, is presented.

  20. Collider search at the LHC for new physics in electroweak symmetry breaking sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guiyu

    The turn-on of the Large Hadron Collider this year provides great opportunities to explore physics beyond Standard Model. We examine a few scenarios in the electroweak sector and study their LHC phenomenologies. First we assess the prospect of observing neutral Higgs bosons of mass 90--130 GeV produced with W/Z in its decay to two spin-zero states, a, which cascades into bottom or tau pairs. We show that LHC observation is possible, especially in channel h → aa → bbb b with large statistical significance. Next we study signals for Kaluza-Klein excitations of electroweak gauge bosons where SM fields propagate in a warped extra dimension. Fermionic decays of these states are overwhelmed by KK gluons decays. We show that due to enhanced couplings to longitudinal W/Z and Higgs, bosonic final states can give significant sensitivity at the LHC to 3 TeV KK scale with projected LHC luminosity. Finally, we demonstrate how to systematically test Type-II seesaw mechanism for neutrino mass generation at the LHC, which introduces a Higgs triplet. For small Higgs triplet vacuum expectation value vDelta , one can look for clean signals of lepton number violation in decays of doubly and singly charged Higgs bosons, thus distinguishing different neutrino mass spectrum. For large vDelta, one needs to observe the decays H+ → W +H1 and H+ → tb to confirm the triplet-doublet mixing and the implied interaction between lepton doublet and Higgs triplet responsible for the neutrino mass generation.