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Sample records for lhc synchrotron light

  1. First Beam Measurements with the LHC Synchrotron Light Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Lefevre, Thibaut; Bravin, Enrico; Burtin, Gerard; Guerrero, Ana; Jeff, Adam; Rabiller, Aurelie; Roncarolo, Federico; Fisher, Alan; /SLAC

    2012-07-13

    The continuous monitoring of the transverse sizes of the beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) relies on the use of synchrotron radiation and intensified video cameras. Depending on the beam energy, different synchrotron light sources must be used. A dedicated superconducting undulator has been built for low beam energies (450 GeV to 1.5 TeV), while edge and centre radiation from a beam-separation dipole magnet are used respectively for intermediate and high energies (up to 7 TeV). The emitted visible photons are collected using a retractable mirror, which sends the light into an optical system adapted for acquisition using intensified CCD cameras. This paper presents the design of the imaging system, and compares the expected light intensity with measurements and the calculated spatial resolution with a cross calibration performed with the wire scanners. Upgrades and future plans are also discussed.

  2. Spatial and temporal beam profiles for the LHC using synchrotron light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeff, A.; Bart Pedersen, S.; Boccardi, A.; Bravin, E.; Fisher, A. S.; Guerrero Ollacarizqueta, A.; Lefevre, T.; Rabiller, A.; Welsch, C. P.

    2010-04-01

    Synchrotron radiation is emitted whenever a beam of charged particles passes though a magnetic field. The power emitted is strongly dependent on the relativistic Lorentz factor of the particles, which itself is proportional to the beam energy and inversely proportional to the particle rest mass. Thus, synchrotron radiation is usually associated with electron accelerators, which are commonly used as light sources. However the largest proton machines reach sufficiently high energies to make synchrotron light useful for diagnostic purposes. The Large Hadron Collider at CERN will accelerate protons up to an energy of 7TeV. An optical arrangement has been made which focuses synchrotron light from two LHC magnets to image the cross-section of the beam. It is also planned to use this setup to produce a longitudinal profile of the beam by use of fast Single Photon Counting. This is complicated by the bunched nature of the beam which needs to be measured with a very large dynamic range. In this contribution we present early experimental data of the transverse LHC beam profile together with a scheme for measuring the longitudinal profile with a time resolution of 50 ps. It includes the use of a gating regime to increase the dynamic range of the photon counter and a three-stage correction algorithm to compensate for the detector's deadtime, afterpulsing and pile-up effects.

  3. Expected Performance of the LHC Synchrotron-Light Telescope (BSRT) and Abort-Gap Monitor (BSRA)

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Alan; /SLAC

    2010-06-07

    This Report presents calculations of the synchrotron light from proton and lead-ion beams in the LHC at all energies from 0.45 to 7 TeV. It computes the emission from three sources: the uniform-field region of the D3 dipole, the dipole's edge field, and the short undulator just upstream. Light emitted at or near visible wavelengths is assessed for making optical measurements of transverse beam profiles and for monitoring the emptiness of the abort gap in the fill pattern. There is sufficient light for both applications, although both species pass through energy ranges in the ramp with small photon counts. Effects limiting image resolution are examined, including geometric optics, depth of field, and diffraction. The Report also considers recent suggestions that the undulator, intended to supplement the dipole for low energies, should not be ramped off at high energies and perhaps should not be used at all. We conclude that the undulator is essential at low energy for both species, but that it is possible to leave the undulator on at the cost of some blurring at intermediate energies.

  4. National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-10

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

  5. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

  6. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema

    BNL

    2016-07-12

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), hosted by Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, Stephen Dierker. The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray light for basic and applied research in physics, chemistry, medicine, geophysics, environmental, and materials sciences.

  7. Synchrotron light source data book

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.

    1989-01-01

    The ''Synchrotron Light Source Data Book'' is as its name implies a collection of data on existing and planned synchrotron light sources. The intention was to provide a compendium of tools for the design of electron storage rings as synchrotron radiation sources. The slant is toward the accelerator physicist as other booklets such as the X-ray Data Booklet, edited by D. Vaughan (LBL PUB-490), address the 'use' of synchrotron radiation. It is hoped that the booklet serves as a pocket sized reference to facilitate back of the envelope type calculations. It contains some useful formulae in 'practical units' and a brief description of many of the existing and planned light source lattices.

  8. The DELTA Synchrotron Light Interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.

    2004-05-12

    Synchrotron radiation sources like DELTA, the Dortmund Electron Accelerator, a third generation synchrotron light source, need an optical monitoring system to measure the beam size at different points of the ring with high resolution and accuracy. These measurements also allow an investigation of the emittance of the storage ring, an important working parameter for the efficiency of working beamlines with experiments using the synchrotron radiation. The resolution limits of the different types of optical synchrotron light monitors at DELTA are investigated. The minimum measurable beamsize with the normal synchrotron light monitor using visible light at DELTA is about 80 {mu}m. Due to this a synchrotron light interferometer was built up and tested at DELTA. The interferometer uses the same beamline in the visible range. The minimum measurable beamsize is with about 8 {mu}m one order of magnitude smaller. This resolution is sufficient for the expected small vertical beamsizes at DELTA. The electron beamsize and emittance were measured with both systems at different electron beam energies of the storage ring. The theoretical values of the present optics are smaller than the measured emittance. So possible reasons for beam movements are investigated.

  9. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    ScienceCinema

    Steve Dierker

    2016-07-12

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  10. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Dierker

    2008-03-12

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  11. The Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Brum, J. A.; Tavares, P. F.

    2007-01-19

    The Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory has been operating the only light source in the southern hemisphere since July 1997. During this period, approximately 28000 hours of beam time were delivered reaching more than 1000 users per year from all over Brazil as well as from 10 other countries. In this paper, we briefly recall the history of the project and describe the present configuration of the machine and associated instrumentation, focusing on improvements and upgrades of the various light source subsystems and beamlines implemented in recent years. Finally, we report on the use of the facility by the national and international scientific communities, its impact on the scientific and technological scene in Brazil and present perspectives for future improvements of the machine.

  12. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hulbert, S.; Lazarz, N.; Williams, G.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the experiment done at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Most experiments discussed involves the use of the x-ray beams to study physical properties of solid materials. (LSP)

  13. Remote Synchrotron Light Instrumentation Using Optical Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    De Santis, S.; Yin, Y.

    2009-05-04

    By coupling the emitted synchrotron light into an optical fiber, it is possible to transmit the signal at substantial distances from the light port, without the need to use expensive beamlines. This would be especially beneficial in all those cases when the synchrotron is situated in areas not easily access because of their location, or due to high radiation levels. Furthermore, the fiber output can be easily switched, or even shared, between different diagnostic instruments. We present the latest results on the coupling and dispersion measurements performed at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley. In several cases, coupling synchrotron light into optical fibers can substantially facilitate the use of beam diagnostic instrumentation that measures longitudinal beam properties by detecting synchrotron radiation. It has been discussed in with some detail, how fiberoptics can bring the light at relatively large distances from the accelerator, where a variety of devices can be used to measure beam properties and parameters. Light carried on a fiber can be easily switched between instruments so that each one of them has 100% of the photons available, rather than just a fraction, when simultaneous measurements are not indispensable. From a more general point of view, once synchrotron light is coupled into the fiber, the vast array of techniques and optoelectronic devices, developed by the telecommunication industry becomes available. In this paper we present the results of our experiments at the Advanced Light Source, where we tried to assess the challenges and limitations of the coupling process and determine what level of efficiency one can typically expect to achieve.

  14. Ideas for future synchrotron light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, A.; Hassenzahl, W.; Meddahi, M.

    1992-03-01

    Synchrotron light sources have advanced in the past two-to-three decades through three ``generations,`` from irritating parasitic sources on high-energy physics accelerators to dedicated electron and position storage rings of unprecedented low emittance, utilizing undulator and wiggler magnets. The evolution through these three generations followed a predicable, science-driven, course towards brighter beams of VUV- and x-radiation. The requirements of future light sources is not so clear. The limit on how emittance has certainly not been reached, and diffraction-limited sources at shorter wavelengths would be the natural progression from previous generations. However, scientists are now looking at other radiation characteristics that might better serve their needs, for example, more coherent power, fast switching polarization, ultra-short (sub-picosecond) time structure, and synchronized beams for pump-probe experiments. This paper discusses some current ideas that might drive the fourth-generation synchrotron light source.

  15. Ideas for future synchrotron light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, A.; Hassenzahl, W.; Meddahi, M.

    1992-03-01

    Synchrotron light sources have advanced in the past two-to-three decades through three generations,'' from irritating parasitic sources on high-energy physics accelerators to dedicated electron and position storage rings of unprecedented low emittance, utilizing undulator and wiggler magnets. The evolution through these three generations followed a predicable, science-driven, course towards brighter beams of VUV- and x-radiation. The requirements of future light sources is not so clear. The limit on how emittance has certainly not been reached, and diffraction-limited sources at shorter wavelengths would be the natural progression from previous generations. However, scientists are now looking at other radiation characteristics that might better serve their needs, for example, more coherent power, fast switching polarization, ultra-short (sub-picosecond) time structure, and synchronized beams for pump-probe experiments. This paper discusses some current ideas that might drive the fourth-generation synchrotron light source.

  16. The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, 20 years of synchrotron light

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, K.

    1993-08-01

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is now operating as a fully dedicated light source with low emittance electron optics, delivering high brightness photon beams to 25 experimental stations six to seven months per year. On October 1, 1993 SSRL became a Division of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, rather than an Independent Laboratory of Stanford University, so that high energy physics and synchrotron radiation now function under a single DOE contract. The SSRL division of SLAC has responsibility for operating, maintaining and improving the SPEAR accelerator complex, which includes the storage ring and a 3 GeV injector. SSRL has thirteen x-ray stations and twelve VUV/Soft x-ray stations serving its 600 users. Recently opened to users is a new spherical grating monochromator (SGM) and a multiundulator beam line. Circularly polarized capabilities are being exploited on a second SGM line. New YB{sub 66} crystals installed in a vacuum double-crystal monochromator line have sparked new interest for Al and Mg edge studies. One of the most heavily subscribed stations is the rotation camera, which has been recently enhanced with a MAR imaging plate detector system for protein crystallography on a multipole wiggler. Under construction is a new wiggler-based structural molecular biology beam line with experimental stations for crystallography, small angle scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Plans for new developments include wiggler beam lines and associated facilities specialized for environmental research and materials processing.

  17. Status of the Synchrotron Light Source DELTA

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.; Sternemann, C.; Tolan, M.; Westphal, C.; Weis, T.; Wille, K.

    2007-01-19

    The Dortmund Electron Accelerator DELTA, a 1.5 GeV synchrotron light source located at University of Dortmund, is operated for 3000 h per year including 2000 h beam time for synchrotron radiation use and 1000 h for machine physics, optimisation and maintenance. The status of the synchrotron light source is presented with emphasis on the operation, commissioning and installation of beamlines and insertion devices. The soft X-ray undulator beamlines provide photon energies between 5 to 400 eV (U250) and 55 and 1500 eV (U55), respectively. One dipole beamline covers soft X-rays between 6 to 200 eV, and a second dipole beamline is used without a monochromator at 2.2 keV critical energy of the dipole spectrum. For photons in the hard X-ray regime, a superconducting asymmetric wiggler (SAW) with a field of 5.3 T and 7.9 keV critical energy was installed, providing circularly polarized X-rays in the range of 2 to 30 keV. Due to its broad radiation fan, three beamlines are simultaneously served. The first SAW-beamline with an energy range between 4 to 30 keV is in full operation, the second is under commissioning, serving the energy range between 2 to 30 keV. The third SAW beamline is near completion, additional dipole beamlines are under construction.

  18. Status Of The Synchrotron Light Source DELTA

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.; Friedl, J.; Hartmann, P.; Schirmer, D.; Schmidt, G.; Sternemann, C.; Tolan, M.; Weis, T.; Westphal, C.; Wille, K.

    2004-05-12

    The Dortmund Electron Accelerator DELTA, located at the University of Dortmund, changed its scope during the last years into a 1.5 GeV synchrotron light source. DELTA is now operated for 3000 h per year including 2000 h dedicated beam time for synchrotron radiation use and 1000 h for machine physics, optimization and maintenance. The status of the accelerator complex is presented together with the beam operation, the installation and commissioning of beamlines and insertion devices. To serve user demands of photon energies up to more than 10 keV a 5.3 T superconducting asymmetric multipole wiggler (SAW) with a critical energy of 7.9 keV has been installed serving three beamlines in the hard X-ray regime with also circular polarization. Two undulator beamlines for photon energies between 5 and 400 eV (U250) and between 55 and 1500 eV (U55) and several dipole beamlines up to 200 eV are under operation. The construction and operation of the different beamlines is done by various universities and laboratories in Nordrhein-Westfalen.

  19. Status of the National Synchrotron Light Source project

    SciTech Connect

    Heese, R.N.

    1981-01-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source is in its final stages of construction, and as the turn-on time for the 700 MeV vuv storage ring draws near, an overview of the project is presented. Emphasis is placed on the linac and booster synchrotron performance and the status of major subsystems.

  20. National Synchrotron Light Source 2008 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nasta,K.

    2009-05-01

    Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a national user facility that operates two electron storage rings: X-Ray (2.8 GeV, 300 mA) and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) (800 mev, 1.0A). These two rings provide intense light spanning the electromagnetic spectrum -- from very long infrared rays to ultraviolet light and super-short x-rays -- to analyze very small or highly dilute samples. The properties of this light, and the specially designed experimental stations, called beamlines, allow scientists in many diverse disciplines of research to perform experiments not possible at their own laboratories. Each year, about 2,200 scientists from more than 400 universities and companies use the NSLS for research in such diverse fields as biology, physics, chemistry, geology, medicine, and environmental and materials sciences. For example, researchers have used the NSLS to examine the minute details of computer chips, decipher the structures of viruses, probe the density of bone, determine the chemical composition of moon rocks, and reveal countless other mysteries of science. The facility has 65 operating beamlines, with 51 beamlines on the X-Ray Ring and 14 beamlines on the VUV-Infrared Ring. It runs seven days a week, 24 hours a day throughout the year, except during periods of maintenance and studies. Researchers are not charged for beam time, provided that the research results are published in open literature. Proprietary research is conducted on a full-cost-recovery basis. With close to 1,000 publications per year, the NSLS is one of the most prolific scientific facilities in the world. Among the many accolades given to its users and staff, the NSLS has won nine R&D 100 Awards for innovations ranging from a closed orbit feedback system to the first device able to focus a large spread of high-energy x-rays. In addition, a visiting NSLS researcher shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for work

  1. Computerized microtomography using synchrotron radiation from the NSLS (National Synchrotron Light Source)

    SciTech Connect

    Spanne, P.; Rivers, M.L.

    1986-09-01

    Results of microtomography experiments that employ filtered radiation from the National Synchrotron Light Source X-26 Microprobe beam line are presented. These experiments have yielded images of a freeze-dried caterpillar with a spatial resolution of the order of 30 ..mu..m and show that the limit on the spatial resolution with the present apparatus will be 1 to 10 ..mu..m. Directions for improvement in synchrotron microtomography techniques and some possible applications are discussed. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  2. National Synchrotron Light Source 2010 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, M.; Snyder, K. J.

    2010-12-29

    This is a very exciting period for photon sciences at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is also a time of unprecedented growth for the Photon Sciences Directorate, which operates the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and is constructing NSLS-II, both funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Science. Reflecting the quick pace of our activities, we chose the theme 'Discovery at Light Speed' for the directorate's 2010 annual report, a fiscal year bookended by October 2009 and September 2010. The year began with the news that NSLS users Venki Ramakrishnan of Cambridge University (also a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department) and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University were sharing the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science. Every research project has the potential for accolades. In 2010, NSLS users and staff published close to 900 papers, with about 170 appearing in premiere journals. Those are impressive stats for a facility nearly three decades old, testament to the highly dedicated team keeping NSLS at peak performance and the high quality of its user community. Our NSLS users come from a worldwide community of scientists using photons, or light, to carry out research in energy and environmental sciences, physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and medicine. All are looking forward to the new capabilities enabled by NSLS-II, which will offer unprecedented resolution at the nanoscale. The new facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than the current NSLS and host a suite of sophisticated instruments for cutting-edge science. Some of the scientific discoveries we anticipate at NSLS-II will lead to major advances in alternative energy technologies, such as hydrogen and solar. These discoveries could pave the way to: (1) catalysts that split water with sunlight for hydrogen production; (2) materials that can reversibly store large quantities of electricity or hydrogen; (3

  3. Research by industry at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The world`s foremost facility for research using x-rays and ultraviolet and infrared radiation, is operated by the National Synchrotron Light Source dept. This pamphlet described the participating research teams that built most of the beam lines, various techniques for studying materials, treatment of materials, and various industrial research (catalysis, pharmaceuticals, etc.).

  4. Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source: current results and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roque da Silva, Antonio Jose

    2013-03-01

    The application of synchrotron radiation in a great variety of fields in general, and condensed matter in particular, has increased steadily worldwide. This, to a large extent, is a result of the availability of the much brighter third-generation light sources, which opened up new experimental techniques. Brazil gave an important contribution to science in Latin America through the development of the necessary technology and the construction of the first synchrotron in the southern hemisphere, still the only one in Latin America. The Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron - LNLS, operates this installation as an open facility since 1997, having today more than 1300 users yearly. Despite all this success, the current Brazilian light source is a second-generation machine, with relatively low electron energy, high emittance and few straight sections for insertion devices. LNLS is currently engaged in the design and construction of a new, third-generation synchrotron light source. It is being planned to be a state of the art machine, providing tools for cutting edge research that are non existent today in Brazil. In this talk an overview of the status of the current Brazilian light source will be provided, illustrated with some experimental results from users, as well as the future perspectives of the new synchrotron source.

  5. A POSSIBLE SYNCHROTRON LIGHT BEAM PROFILE MONITOR IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    TRBOJEVIC, D.

    1998-06-26

    This report examines the possibility of observing transverse beam profiles by using synchrotron light emission from the 100 GeV/nucleon heavy-ion gold beam in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Synchrotron radiation experiences a shift towards higher photon energy when the magnetic field at the end of a dipole varies rapidly over a short distance. Synchrotron light signals from high energy (larger than 400 GeV) proton beams have already been routinely used to observe the transverse beam profiles at the SPS in CERN and at the TEVATRON at Fermilab. Because of the modest relativistic factor of the fully stripped stored gold ions in RHIC this ''push'' towards higher critical energy is not large enough to place the synchrotron light within the visible region of the spectrum. The critical wavelength remains within the infrared region. A 77K cooled infrared array detector with 160 elements, made of PbSe (Lead salt) could be used for beam profile detection. It would cover the wavelength range between 1 and 6 microns, with maximum sensitivity at a wavelength of 4.5 microns.

  6. Chemical Imaging of Biological Tissue with Synchrotron Infrared Light

    SciTech Connect

    Miller,L.; Dumas, P.

    2006-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (FTIRM) and imaging (FTIRI) have become valuable techniques for examining the chemical makeup of biological materials by probing their vibrational motions on a microscopic scale. Synchrotron infrared (S-IR) light is an ideal source for FTIRM and FTIRI due to the combination of its high brightness (i.e., flux density), also called brilliance, and broadband nature. Through a 10-{mu}m pinhole, the brightness of a synchrotron source is 100-1000 times higher than a conventional thermal (globar) source. Accordingly, the improvement in spatial resolution and in spectral quality to the diffraction limit has led to a plethora of applications that is just being realized. In this review, we describe the development of synchrotron-based FTIRM, illustrate its advantages in many applications to biological systems, and propose some potential future directions for the technique.

  7. DAFNE-Light INFN-LNF Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Balerna, A.; Cestelli-Guidi, M.; Cimino, R.; Commisso, M.; Grilli, A.; Pietropaoli, M.; Raco, A.; Sciarra, V.; Tullio, V.; Viviani, G.; De Sio, A.; Gambicorti, L.; Hampai, D.; Pace, E.

    2010-06-23

    DAFNE-Light is the Synchrotron Radiation Facility at the INFN-Frascati National Laboratory (Rome, Italy). Three beamlines are operational, using in parasitic and dedicated mode the intense photon emission of DAFNE, a 0.51 GeV storage ring with a routinely circulating electron current higher than 1 Ampere. Two of these beamlines--the soft x-ray (DXR1) and UV (DXR2)--use one of the DAFNE wiggler magnets as synchrotron radiation source, while the third beamline SINBAD (Synchrotron Infrared Beamline At DAFNE) collects the radiation from a bending magnet. New XUV bending magnet beamlines are nowadays under construction and the low energy one (35-200 eV) will be ready for commissioning by the end of 2009. A presentation of the facility will be given together with some recent scientific results achieved at SINBAD and DXR1 beamlines.

  8. NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE MEDICAL PERSONNEL PROTECTION INTERLOCK

    SciTech Connect

    BUDA,S.; GMUR,N.F.; LARSON,R.; THOMLINSON,W.

    1998-11-03

    This report is founded on reports written in April 1987 by Robert Hettel for angiography operations at the Stanford Synchrotron Research Laboratory (SSRL) and a subsequent report covering angiography operations at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS); BNL Informal Report 47681, June 1992. The latter report has now been rewritten in order to accurately reflect the design and installation of a new medical safety system at the NSLS X17B2 beamline Synchrotron Medical Research Facility (SMERF). Known originally as the Angiography Personnel Protection Interlock (APPI), this system has been modified to incorporate other medical imaging research programs on the same beamline and thus the name has been changed to the more generic Medical Personnel Protection Interlock (MPPI). This report will deal almost exclusively with the human imaging (angiography, bronchography, mammography) aspects of the safety system, but will briefly explain the modular aspects of the system allowing other medical experiments to be incorporated.

  9. Light stop in the MSSM after LHC Run 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bélanger, Geneviève; Ghosh, Diptimoy; Godbole, Rohini; Kulkarni, Suchita

    2015-09-01

    The discovery of a Higgs boson with a mass of 126 GeV at the LHC when combined with the non-observation of new physics both in direct and indirect searches imposes strong constraints on supersymmetric models and in particular on the top squark sector. The experiments for direct detection of dark matter have provided with yet more constraints on the neutralino LSP mass and its interactions. After imposing limits from the Higgs, flavour and dark matter sectors, we examine the feasibility for a light stop in the context of the pMSSM, in light of current results for stop and other SUSY searches at the LHC. We only require that the neutralino dark matter explains a fraction of the cosmologically measured dark matter abundance. We find that a stop with mass below ˜ 500 GeV is still allowed. We further study various probes of the light stop scenario that could be performed at the LHC Run-II either through direct searches for the light and heavy stop, or SUSY searches not currently available in simplified model results. Moreover we study the characteristics of heavy Higgs for the points in the parameter space allowed by all the available constraints and illustrate the region with large cross sections to fermionic or electroweakino channels. Finally we show that nearly all scenarios with a small stop-LSP mass difference will be tested by Xenon1T provided the NLSP is a chargino, thus probing a region hard to access at the LHC.

  10. NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    ROTHMAN,E.

    1999-05-01

    thereafter for half of the running time in FY 1998. In combination with the development of narrow gap undulators this mode opens the possibility of new undulators which could produce hard X-rays in the fundamental, perhaps up to 10 keV. On 27 September 1998, a low horizontal emittance lattice became operational at 2.584 GeV. This results in approximately a 50% decrease in the horizontal beam-size on dipole bending magnet beamlines, and somewhat less of a decrease on the insertion device lines. The beam lifetime is not degraded by the low emittance lattice. This represents an important achievement, enhancing for all users the x-ray ring brightness. The reduced horizontal emittance electron beam will produce brighter x-ray beams for all the beamlines, both bending magnets and insertion devices, adding to other recent increases in the X-Ray ring brightness. During FY 1999 users will gain experience of the new running mode and plans are in place to do the same at 2.8GeV during further studies sessions. Independent evidence of the reduced emittance is shown in Figure 2. This is a pinhole camera scan showing the X-ray beam profile, obtained on the diagnostic beamline X28. Finally, work has begun to update and refine the proposal of the Phase III upgrade endorsed by the Birgeneau panel and BESAC last year. With the whole NSLS facility in teenage years and with many demonstrated enhancements available, the time has come to herald in the next stage of life at the Light Source.

  11. Synchrotron light sources: A powerful tool for science and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, F.; Robinson, A.

    1996-01-01

    A new generation of synchrotron light sources is producing extremely bright beams of vacuum-ultraviolet and x-ray radiation, powerful new tools for research in a wide variety of basic and applied sciences. Spectromicroscopy using high spectral and spatial resolution is a new way of seeing, offering many opportunities in the study of matter. Development of a new light source provides the country or region of the world in which the light source is located many new opportunities: a focal point for research in many scientific and technological areas, a means of upgrading the technology infrastructure of the country, a means of training students, and a potential service to industry. A light source for Southeast Asia would thus be a major resource for many years. Scientists and engineers from light sources around the world look forward to providing assistance to make this a reality in Southeast Asia.

  12. Light nondegenerate squarks at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Mahbubani, Rakhi; Papucci, Michele; Perez, Gilad; Ruderman, Joshua T; Weiler, Andreas

    2013-04-12

    Experimental bounds on squarks of the first two generations assume their masses to be eightfold degenerate and consequently constrain them to be heavier than ∼1.4  TeV when the gluino is lighter than 2.5 TeV. The assumption of squark-mass universality is neither a direct consequence of minimal flavor violation (MFV), which allows for splittings within squark generations, nor a prediction of supersymmetric alignment models, which allow for splittings between generations. We reinterpret a recent CMS multijet plus missing energy search allowing for deviations from U(2) universality and find significantly weakened squark bounds: A 400 GeV second-generation squark singlet is allowed, even with exclusive decays to a massless neutralino, and, in an MFV scenario, the down-type squark singlets can be as light as 600 GeV, provided the up-type singlets are pushed up to 1.8 TeV, for a 1.5 TeV gluino and decoupled doublet squarks.

  13. Mechanical Design of the HER Synchrotron Light Monitor Primary Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Edward F.; Fisher, Alan S.; Kurita, Nadine R.; Langton, J.

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design of the primary mirror that images the synchrotron light extracted from the High Energy Ring of the PEP-II B Factory. During operation, the water-cooled GlidCop mirror is subjected to a heat flux in excess of 2000 W/cm^2, and the imaging surface is plated with Electroless Nickel to improve its optical characteristics. Calculated mechanical distortions and stresses experienced by the mirror during off-axis and normal operation will be presented.

  14. Producing terahertz coherent synchrotron radiation at the Hefei Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, De-Rong; Xu, Hong-Liang; Shao, Yan

    2015-07-01

    This paper theoretically proves that an electron storage ring can generate coherent radiation in the THz region using a quick kicker magnet and an AC sextupole magnet. When the vertical chromaticity is modulated by the AC sextupole magnet, the vertical beam collective motion excited by the kicker produces a wavy spatial structure after a number of longitudinal oscillation periods. The radiation spectral distribution was calculated from the wavy bunch parameters at the Hefei Light Source (HLS). When the electron energy is reduced to 400 MeV, extremely strong coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) at 0.115 THz should be produced. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375176)

  15. A light NMSSM pseudoscalar Higgs boson at the LHC redux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomark, N.-E.; Moretti, S.; Munir, S.; Roszkowski, L.

    2015-02-01

    The Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) contains a singlet-like pseudoscalar Higgs boson in addition to the doublet-like pseudoscalar of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. This new pseudoscalar can have a very low mass without violating the LEP exclusion constraints and it can potentially provide a hallmark signature of non-minimal supersymmetry at the LHC. In this analysis we revisit the light pseudoscalar in the NMSSM with partial universality at some high unification scale. We delineate the regions of the model's parameter space that are consistent with the up-to-date theoretical and experimental constraints, from both Higgs boson searches and elsewhere (most notably b-physics), and examine to what extent they can be probed by the LHC. To this end we review the most important production channels of such a Higgs state and assess the scope of its observation at the forthcoming Run-2 of the LHC. We conclude that the -associated production of the pseudoscalar, which has been emphasised in previous studies, does not carry much promise anymore, given the measured mass of the Higgs boson at the LHC. However, the decays of one of the heavier scalar Higgs bosons of the NMSSM can potentially lead to the discovery of its light pseudoscalar. Especially promising are the decays of one or both of the two lightest scalar states into a pseudoscalar pair and of the heaviest scalar into a pseudoscalar and a Z boson. Since the latter channel has not been explored in detail in the literature so far, we provide details of some benchmark points which can be probed for establishing its signature.

  16. Condenser for illuminating a ringfield camera with synchrotron emission light

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to the field of condensers for collecting light from a synchrotron radiation source and directing the light into a ringfield of a lithography camera. The present invention discloses a condenser comprising collecting, processing, and imaging optics. The collecting optics are comprised of concave and convex spherical mirrors that collect the light beams. The processing optics, which receive the light beams, are comprised of flat mirrors that converge and direct the light beams into a real entrance pupil of the camera in a symmetrical pattern. In the real entrance pupil are located flat mirrors, common to the beams emitted from the preceding mirrors, for generating substantially parallel light beams and for directing the beams toward the ringfield of a camera. Finally, the imaging optics are comprised of a spherical mirror, also common to the beams emitted from the preceding mirrors, images the real entrance pupil through the resistive mask and into the virtual entrance pupil of the camera. Thus, the condenser is comprised of a plurality of beams with four mirrors corresponding to a single beam plus two common mirrors.

  17. Condenser for illuminating a ringfield camera with synchrotron emission light

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, W.C.

    1996-04-30

    The present invention relates generally to the field of condensers for collecting light from a synchrotron radiation source and directing the light into a ringfield of a lithography camera. The present invention discloses a condenser comprising collecting, processing, and imaging optics. The collecting optics are comprised of concave and convex spherical mirrors that collect the light beams. The processing optics, which receive the light beams, are comprised of flat mirrors that converge and direct the light beams into a real entrance pupil of the camera in a symmetrical pattern. In the real entrance pupil are located flat mirrors, common to the beams emitted from the preceding mirrors, for generating substantially parallel light beams and for directing the beams toward the ringfield of a camera. Finally, the imaging optics are comprised of a spherical mirror, also common to the beams emitted from the preceding mirrors, images the real entrance pupil through the resistive mask and into the virtual entrance pupil of the camera. Thus, the condenser is comprised of a plurality of beams with four mirrors corresponding to a single beam plus two common mirrors. 9 figs.

  18. National Synchrotron Light Source medical personnel protection interlock

    SciTech Connect

    Buda, S.; Gmuer, N.F.; Larson, R.; Thomlinson, W.

    1998-11-01

    This report is founded on reports written in April 1987 by Robert Hettel for angiography operations at the Stanford Synchrotron Research Laboratory (SSRL) and a subsequent report covering angiography operations at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS); BNL Informal Report 47681, June 1992. The latter report has now been rewritten in order to accurately reflect the design and installation of a new medical safety system at the NSLS X17B2 beamline Synchrotron Medical Research Facility (SMERF). Known originally as the Angiography Personnel Protection Interlock (APPI), this system has been modified to incorporate other medical imaging research programs on the same beamline and thus the name has been changed to the more generic Medical Personnel Protection Interlock (MPPI). This report will deal almost exclusively with the human imaging (angiography, bronchography, mammography) aspects of the safety system, but will briefly explain the modular aspects of the system allowing other medical experiments to be incorporated. This MPPI report is organized such that the level of detail changes from a general overview to detailed engineering drawings of the hardware system. The general overview is presented in Section 1.0, MPPI Operational Mode and Procedures. The various MPPI components are described in detail in Section 2.0. Section 3.0 presents some simplified logic diagrams and accompanying text. This section was written to allow readers to become familiar with the logic system without having to work through the entire set of detailed engineering drawings listed in the Appendix. Detailed logic specifications are given in Section 4.0. The Appendix also contains copies of the current MPPI interlock test procedures for Setup and Patient Modes.

  19. LHC constraints on light neutralino dark matter in the MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bélanger, Geneviève; Drieu La Rochelle, Guillaume; Dumont, Béranger; Godbole, Rohini M.; Kraml, Sabine; Kulkarni, Suchita

    2013-11-01

    Light neutralino dark matter can be achieved in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model if staus are rather light, with mass around 100 GeV. We perform a detailed analysis of the relevant supersymmetric parameter space, including also the possibility of light selectons and smuons, and of light higgsino- or wino-like charginos. In addition to the latest limits from direct and indirect detection of dark matter, ATLAS and CMS constraints on electroweak-inos and on sleptons are taken into account using a “simplified models” framework. Measurements of the properties of the Higgs boson at 125 GeV, which constrain amongst others the invisible decay of the Higgs boson into a pair of neutralinos, are also implemented in the analysis. We show that viable neutralino dark matter can be achieved for masses as low as 15 GeV. In this case, light charginos close to the LEP bound are required in addition to light right-chiral staus. Significant deviations are observed in the couplings of the 125 GeV Higgs boson. These constitute a promising way to probe the light neutralino dark matter scenario in the next run of the LHC.

  20. Very light Higgs bosons in extended models at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Alexander; Guedes, Renato; Santos, Rui; Moretti, Stefano

    2010-05-01

    The Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider experiments have constrained the mass of the standard model (SM) Higgs boson to be above 114.4 GeV. This bound applies to all extensions of the SM where the coupling of a Higgs boson to the Z boson and also the Higgs decay profile do not differ much from the SM one. However, in scenarios with extended Higgs sectors, this coupling can be made very small by a suitable choice of the parameters of the model. In such cases, the lightest CP-even Higgs boson mass can in turn be made very small. Such a very light Higgs state, with a mass of the order of the Z boson one or even smaller, could have escaped detection at LEP. In this work we perform a detailed parton level study on the feasibility of the detection of such a very light Higgs particle at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the production process pp{yields}hj{yields}{tau}{sup +{tau}-}j, where j is a resolved jet. We conclude that there are several models where such a Higgs state could be detected at the LHC with early data.

  1. DEVELOPMENTS IN SYNCHROTRON X-RAY COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY AT THE NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    DOWD,B.A.

    1999-07-23

    Last year, the X27A beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) became dedicated solely to X-Ray Computed Microtomography (XCMT). This is a third-generation instrument capable of producing tomographic volumes of 1-2 micron resolution over a 2-3mm field of view. Recent enhancements will be discussed. These have focused on two issues: the desire for real-time data acquisition and processing and the need for highly monochromatic beam (.1 % energy bandpass). The latter will permit k-edge subtraction studies and will provide improved image contrast from below the Cr (6 keV) up to the Cs (36 keV) k-edge. A range of applications that benefit from these improvements will be discussed as well. These two goals are somewhat counterproductive, however; higher monochromaticity yields a lower flux forcing longer data acquisition times. To balance the two, a more efficient scintillator for X-ray conversion is being developed. Some testing of a prototype scintillator has been performed; preliminary results will be presented here. In the meantime, data reconstruction times have been reduced, and the entire tomographic acquisition, reconstruction and volume rendering process streamlined to make efficient use of synchrotron beam time. A Fast Filtered Back Transform (FFBT) reconstruction program recently developed helped to reduce the time to reconstruct a volume of 150 x 150 x 250 pixels{sup 3} (over 5 million voxels) from the raw camera data to 1.5 minutes on a dual R10,000 CPU. With these improvements, one can now obtain a ''quick look'' of a small tomographic volume ({approximately}10{sup 6}voxels) in just over 15 minutes from the start of data acquisition.

  2. Laue diffraction protein crystallography at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Getzoff, E.D.; McRee, D. ); Jones, K.W.; Spanne, P.; Sweet, R.M. ); Moffat, K.; Ng, K.; Rivers, M.L.; Schildkamp, W.; Teng, T.Y. ); Singer, P.T.; Westbrook, E.M. )

    1992-01-01

    A new facility for the study of protein crystal structure using Laue diffraction has been established at the X26 beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The characteristics of the beam line and diffraction apparatus are described. Selected results of some of the initial experiments are discussed briefly by beam line users to illustrate the scope of the experimental program. Because the Laue method permits the recording of large data sets in a single shot, one goal in establishing this facility has been to develop the means to study time-resolved structures within protein crystals. Systems being studied include: the reactions catalyzed by trypsin; photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin; and the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein.

  3. Laue diffraction protein crystallography at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Getzoff, E.D.; McRee, D.; Jones, K.W.; Spanne, P.; Sweet, R.M.; Moffat, K.; Ng, K.; Rivers, M.L.; Schildkamp, W.; Teng, T.Y.; Singer, P.T.; Westbrook, E.M.

    1992-12-31

    A new facility for the study of protein crystal structure using Laue diffraction has been established at the X26 beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The characteristics of the beam line and diffraction apparatus are described. Selected results of some of the initial experiments are discussed briefly by beam line users to illustrate the scope of the experimental program. Because the Laue method permits the recording of large data sets in a single shot, one goal in establishing this facility has been to develop the means to study time-resolved structures within protein crystals. Systems being studied include: the reactions catalyzed by trypsin; photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin; and the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein.

  4. Light flavour hadron production in the ALICE experiment at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badalà, Angela

    2016-05-01

    Unique among the LHC experiments, ALICE has excellent particle identification capabilities for the measurement of light-flavour hadrons. A large number of hadron species from pions to multi-strange baryons and light nuclei have been measured over a large transverse momentum region. The measurement of the production of these particles is a valuable tool to study the properties of the medium formed in heavy-ion collisions. In particular they give information on the collective phenomena of the fireball, on the parton energy loss in the hot QCD medium and on the hadronization mechanisms such as recombination and statistical hadronization. The measurements in pp and in p-nucleus collisions provide the necessary baseline for heavy-ion data and help to investigate the effects of the ordinary nuclear matter. In this paper some of the main ALICE results on identified light-flavour hadron production in Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV and p-Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV will be presented.

  5. Parametric Modeling of Electron Beam Loss in Synchrotron Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sayyar-Rodsari, B.; Schweiger, C.; Hartman, E.; Corbett, J.; Lee, M.; Lui, P.; Paterson, E.; /SLAC

    2007-11-28

    Synchrotron light is used for a wide variety of scientific disciplines ranging from physical chemistry to molecular biology and industrial applications. As the electron beam circulates, random single-particle collisional processes lead to decay of the beam current in time. We report a simulation study in which a combined neural network (NN) and first-principles (FP) model is used to capture the decay in beam current due to Touschek, Bremsstrahlung, and Coulomb effects. The FP block in the combined model is a parametric description of the beam current decay where model parameters vary as a function of beam operating conditions (e.g. vertical scraper position, RF voltage, number of the bunches, and total beam current). The NN block provides the parameters of the FP model and is trained (through constrained nonlinear optimization) to capture the variation in model parameters as operating condition of the beam changes. Simulation results will be presented to demonstrate that the proposed combined framework accurately models beam decay as well as variation to model parameters without direct access to parameter values in the model.

  6. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1992-01-01

    The overriding features of the synchrotron beams which make them applicable to medical research are their extremely high intensity and broadband energy spectrum. Several orders of magnitude separate the smooth, continuous spectrum of the synchrotron from the sharply peaked characteristic emission spectrum of a conventional source. Basically, the high intensity and tunability allow monochromatic beams to be generated at virtually any energy. The standard problem of beam hardening in both medical imaging and therapy is eliminated by the monochromatic beams since the energy spectrum does not change with passage through tissue. The tunable spectrum allows enhancement of images and therapeutic dose by selection of the most effective energy for a given procedure.

  7. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1992-10-01

    The overriding features of the synchrotron beams which make them applicable to medical research are their extremely high intensity and broadband energy spectrum. Several orders of magnitude separate the smooth, continuous spectrum of the synchrotron from the sharply peaked characteristic emission spectrum of a conventional source. Basically, the high intensity and tunability allow monochromatic beams to be generated at virtually any energy. The standard problem of beam hardening in both medical imaging and therapy is eliminated by the monochromatic beams since the energy spectrum does not change with passage through tissue. The tunable spectrum allows enhancement of images and therapeutic dose by selection of the most effective energy for a given procedure.

  8. National synchrotron light source. [Annual report], October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1994-04-01

    This report contains brief discussions on the research being conducted at the National Synchrotron Light source. Some of the topics covered are: X-ray spectroscopy; nuclear physics; atomic and molecular science; meetings and workshops; operations; and facility improvements.

  9. Shedding Synchrotron Light on a Puzzle of Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Chumakov, Aleksandr

    2007-12-05

    Vibrational dynamics of glasses remains a point of controversial discussions. In particular, the density of vibrational states (DOS) reveals an excess of states above the Debye model called "boson peak." Despite the fact that this universal feature for all glasses has been known for more than 35 years, the nature of the boson peak is still not understood. The application of nuclear inelastic scattering via synchrotron radiation perhaps provides a clearer, more consistent picture of the subject. The distinguishing features of nuclear inelastic scattering relative to, e.g., neutron inelastic scattering, are ideal momentum integration and exact scaling of the DOS in absolute units. This allows for reliable comparison to data from other techniques such as Brillouin light scattering. Another strong point is ideal isotope selectivity: the DOS is measured for a single isotope with a specific low-energy nuclear transition. This allows for special "design" of an experiment to study, for instance, the dynamics of only center-of-mass motions. Recently, we have investigated the transformation of the DOS as a function of several key parameters such as temperature, cooling rate, and density. In all cases the transformation of the DOS is sufficiently well described by a transformation of the continuous medium, in particular, by changes of the macroscopic density and the sound velocity. These results suggest a collective sound-like nature of vibrational dynamics in glasses and cast doubts on microscopic models of glass dynamics. Further insight can be obtained in combined studies of glass with nuclear inelastic and inelastic neutron scattering. Applying two techniques, we have measured the energy dependence of the characteristic correlation length of atomic motions. The data do not reveal localization of atomic vibrations at the energy of the boson peak. Once again, the results suggest that special features of glass dynamics are related to extended motions and not to local models.

  10. Shedding Synchrotron Light on a Puzzle of Glasses

    ScienceCinema

    Chumakov, Aleksandr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France

    2016-07-12

    Vibrational dynamics of glasses remains a point of controversial discussions. In particular, the density of vibrational states (DOS) reveals an excess of states above the Debye model called "boson peak." Despite the fact that this universal feature for all glasses has been known for more than 35 years, the nature of the boson peak is still not understood. The application of nuclear inelastic scattering via synchrotron radiation perhaps provides a clearer, more consistent picture of the subject. The distinguishing features of nuclear inelastic scattering relative to, e.g., neutron inelastic scattering, are ideal momentum integration and exact scaling of the DOS in absolute units. This allows for reliable comparison to data from other techniques such as Brillouin light scattering. Another strong point is ideal isotope selectivity: the DOS is measured for a single isotope with a specific low-energy nuclear transition. This allows for special "design" of an experiment to study, for instance, the dynamics of only center-of-mass motions. Recently, we have investigated the transformation of the DOS as a function of several key parameters such as temperature, cooling rate, and density. In all cases the transformation of the DOS is sufficiently well described by a transformation of the continuous medium, in particular, by changes of the macroscopic density and the sound velocity. These results suggest a collective sound-like nature of vibrational dynamics in glasses and cast doubts on microscopic models of glass dynamics. Further insight can be obtained in combined studies of glass with nuclear inelastic and inelastic neutron scattering. Applying two techniques, we have measured the energy dependence of the characteristic correlation length of atomic motions. The data do not reveal localization of atomic vibrations at the energy of the boson peak. Once again, the results suggest that special features of glass dynamics are related to extended motions and not to local models.

  11. Synchrotron light source data book: Version 4, Revision 05/96

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.B.

    1996-05-01

    This book is as its name implies a collection of data on existing and planned synchrotron light sources. The intention was to provide a compendium of tools for the design of electron storage rings as synchrotron radiation sources. The slant is toward the accelerator physicist as other booklets such as the X-Ray Data Booklet address the use of synchrotron radiation. It is hoped that the booklet serves as a pocket sized reference to facilitate back of the envelope type calculations. It contains some useful formulae in practical units and a brief description of many of the existing and planned light source lattices.

  12. Future Synchrotron Light Sources Based on Ultimate Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

    2012-04-09

    The main purpose of this talk is to describe how far one might push the state of the art in storage ring design. The talk will start with an overview of the latest developments and advances in the design of synchrotron light sources based on the concept of an 'ultimate' storage ring. The review will establish how bright a ring based light source might be, where the frontier of technological challenges are, and what the limits of accelerator physics are. Emphasis will be given to possible improvements in accelerator design and developments in technology toward the goal of achieving an ultimate storage ring. An ultimate storage ring (USR), defined as an electron ring-based light source having an emittance in both transverse planes at the diffraction limit for the range of X-ray wavelengths of interest for a scientific community, would provide very high brightness photons having high transverse coherence that would extend the capabilities of X-ray imaging and probe techniques beyond today's performance. It would be a cost-effective, high-coherence 4th generation light source, competitive with one based on energy recovery linac (ERL) technology, serving a large number of users studying material, chemical, and biological sciences. Furthermore, because of the experience accumulated over many decades of ring operation, it would have the great advantage of stability and reliability. In this paper we consider the design of an USR having 10-pm-rad emittance. It is a tremendous challenge to design a storage ring having such an extremely low emittance, a factor of 100 smaller than those in existing light sources, especially such that it has adequate dynamic aperture and beam lifetime. In many ultra-low emittance designs, the injection acceptances are not large enough for accumulation of the electron beam, necessitating on-axis injection where stored electron bunches are completely replaced with newly injected ones. Recently, starting with the MAX-IV 7-bend achromatic cell, we

  13. Light-induced biogenesis of light-harvesting complex I (LHC I) during chloroplast development in barley (hordeum vulgare). Studies using cDNA clones of the 21- and 20-kilodalton LHC I apoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Anandan, S; Morishige, D T; Thornber, J P

    1993-01-01

    The light-harvesting complex (LHC) Ib pigment-proteins form the major component of the LHC I complex in higher plants. They comprise chlorophylls a and b, xanthophylls, and at least two polypeptide subunits of 21 and 20 kD in barley (Hordeum vulgare). We have identified two cDNA clones, LHC Ib-21 and LHC Ib-20, encoding the 21- and 20-kD LHC Ib apoproteins, respectively. N-terminal protein sequences of the purified LHC Ib polypeptides were used for the unequivocal correlation of these clones to their respective apoproteins. The cDNA clones encode two proteins that have strong sequence similarity to other LHC I and LHC II pigment-binding polypeptides of photosystems I and II. The 21-kD polypeptide contains 201 amino acid residues (22.14 kD), and the 20-kD polypeptide contains 200 amino acid residues (22.18 kD). The biogenesis of the LHC Ib apoproteins and the pigmented LHC I during the light-induced development of the chloroplast was studied. Accumulation of the two LHC Ib mRNAs is induced by light, and their amount is regulated by phytochrome. LHC Ib polypeptide accumulation in the thylakoid membrane temporally lags behind transcript accumulation. The rates of accumulation of LHC Ib transcripts and of their apoproteins lag behind those of the major LHC II component, LHC IIb. Complete assembly of the LHC Ib pigment-protein, as observed by low-temperature fluorescence spectroscopy, requires exposure of dark-grown seedlings to 72 h or more of light. PMID:8278496

  14. Status of compact synchrotron light source work at TAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, C. A.; Huson, F. R.; Rocha, R.; Huang, Yunxiang

    A compact electron synchrotron for x ray lithography is a design project at the Texas Accelerator Center. The design is a four super-period symmetric cell lattice that is 18.8 meters in circumference. Numerical tracking results including edge fields affect the theoretical and mechanical design of the machine. An integrated magnet and lattice design algorithm is discussed. Structural design and measurement system parameters for a prototype superferric 3 Tesla 90 degs dipole are discussed. The prototype dipole magnet is currently under construction.

  15. Advanced Materials Research with 3RD Generation Synchrotron Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukiassian, P.; D'angelo, M.; Enriquez, H.; Aristov, V. Yu.

    H and D surface nanochemistry on an advanced wide band gap semiconductor, silicon carbide is investigated by synchrotron radiation-based core level and valence band photoemission, infrared absorption and scanning tunneling spectroscopy, showing the 1st example of H/D-induced semiconductor surface metallization, that also occurs on a pre-oxidized surface. These results are compared to recent state-of-the-art ab-initio total energy calculations. Most interestingly, an amazing isotopic behavior is observed with a smaller charge transfer from D atoms suggesting the role of dynamical effects. Such findings are especially exciting in semiconductor physics and in interface with biology.

  16. Mechanical Design of the HER Synchrotron Light Monitor Primary Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Edward F.; Fisher, Alan S.; Kurita, Nadine R.; Langton, J.; /SLAC

    2011-09-14

    This paper describes the mechanical design of the primary mirror that images the visible portion of the synchrotron radiation (SR) extracted from the High Energy Ring (HER) of the PEP-II B-Factory. During off-axis operation, the water-cooled GlidCop mirror is subjected to a heat flux in excess of 2000 W/cm2. When on-axis imaging occurs, the heat flux due to scattered SR, resistive wall losses and Higher-Order-Mode (HOM) heating is estimated at 1 W/cm2. The imaging surface is plated with Electroless Nickel to improve its optical characteristics. The design requirements for the primary mirror are listed and discussed. Calculated mechanical distortions and stresses experienced by the mirror during on-axis and off-axis operation will be presented.

  17. Midinfrared beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source port U2B

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, G.L. ); Hanfland, M. ); Williams, G.P. )

    1995-02-01

    A new infrared beamline has been developed on a conventional dipole bending magnet port of the vacuum ultraviolet ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The port provides approximately 12 mrad horizontal and 8 mrad vertical aperture, which limits the useful spectral range to wavelengths less than 20 [mu]m. Though the total flux across the midinfrared is less than that from a globar source, the calculated brightness is at least two orders of magnitude greater. Also, the synchrotron source delivers light in subnanosecond pulses. The developing experimental programs include studies of hydrogen and other materials at extremely high pressures, and time-resolved studies of infrared sensor materials. The measurement results presented here, characterizing the actual brightness advantage and spectroscopic performance, demonstrate the synchrotron's remarkable advantage for microspectroscopic studies.

  18. National Synchrotron Light Source angiography personnel protection interlock

    SciTech Connect

    Gmuer, N.; Larson, R.; Thomlinson, W.

    1992-06-01

    This document has been written to describe the safety system operation at the NSLS X17B2 beamline Synchrotron Medical Research Facility (SMERF). The angiography exposure process involves scanning a patient up and down through dual fixed-position x-ray beams; exposure is controlled by opening and closing a fast-acting Safety Shutter mechanism at precise times in relation to the up and down motion of the scan chair. The fast-acting Safety Shutter mechanism is the primary radiation-stopping element protecting the patient while the chair is at rest and while it is reversing directions during the scan. Its fail-safe and fast operation is essential for the safety of the patient. Operation of X17B2 as a human subject angiography station necessitates the implementation of a personnel protection interlock system that, in conjunction with the Safety Shutters: permits safe access to the patient exposure area while the synchrotron radiation beam is illuminating the upstream dual energy monochromator; allows a patient to be imaged by the monochromatized beam under the supervision of a Responsible Physician, with scan chair motion and precision shutter actuation regulated by an angiography control computer, while providing a suitable number of safeguards against accidental radiation exposure; has different modes of operation to accommodate equipment set-up, test, and calibration; and patient exposure; and ensures the quick extinction of the beam if a potentially unsafe condition is detected. The interlock system which performs these safety functions is called the Angiography Personnel Protection Interlock (APPI). The APPI Document is organized such that the level of detail changes from a general overview to detailed engineering drawings of the hardware system.

  19. 1994 Activity Report, National Synchrotron Light Source. Annual report, October 1, 1993-September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, E.Z.

    1995-05-01

    This report is a summary of activities carried out at the National Synchrotron Light Source during 1994. It consists of sections which summarize the work carried out in differing scientific disciplines, meetings and workshops, operations experience of the facility, projects undertaken for upgrades, administrative reports, and collections of abstracts and publications generated from work done at the facility.

  20. SUNY beamline facilities at the National Synchrotron Light Source (Final Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Coppens, Philip

    2003-06-22

    The DOE sponsored SUNY synchrotron project has involved close cooperation among faculty at several SUNY campuses. A large number of students and postdoctoral associates have participated in its operation which was centered at the X3 beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Four stations with capabilities for Small Angle Scattering, Single Crystal and Powder and Surface diffraction and EXAFS were designed and operated with capability to perform experiments at very low as well as elevated temperatures and under high vacuum. A large amount of cutting-edge science was performed at the facility, which in addition provided excellent training for students and postdoctoral scientists in the field.

  1. Measurements of a prototype synchrotron radiation pumped absorber for future light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.S.; Foerster, C.L.; Halama, H.; Lanni, C.

    1988-01-01

    In the new generation of advanced synchrotron light sources, the conventional concept of distributed pumping is no longer suitable for removing the gas load caused by photon stimulated desorption (PSD). A new concept using a combination of photon absorber and pumping station has been designed, constructed, and installed in the U1OB beam line at the VUV ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source. The system consists of an electrically insulated water cooled copper block, a titanium sublimation pump, calibrated BA gauges, a calibrated RGA, and a known conductance. A photon beam 10 milliradian wide and 3.26 milliradian high, having critical energy of 500 eV, is directed on the absorber. PSD yield is studied as a function of total beam dose and absorber surface preparation. The results from this experiment, pump characteristics, design of an absorber pump for future light sources, and the pressure improvement factors will be presented. 5 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Conceptual design of the Argonne 6-GeV synchrotron light source

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.; Crosbie, E.; Khoe, T.; Knott, M.; Kramer, S.; Kustom, R.; Lari, R.; Martin, R.; Mavrogenes, G.; Moenich, J.

    1985-01-01

    The Argonne National Laboratory Synchrotron Light Source Storage Ring is designed to have a natural emittance of 6.5 x 10/sup -9/ m for circulating 6-GeV positrons. Thirty of the 32 long straight sections, each 6.5-m long, will be available for synchrotron light insertion devices. A circulating positron current of 300 mA can be injected in about 8 min. from a booster synchrotron operating with a repetition time of 1.2 sec. The booster synchrotron will contain two different rf systems. The lower frequency system (38.97 MHz) will accept positrons from a 360-MeV linac and will accelerate them to 2.25 GeV. The higher frequency system (350.76 MHz) will accelerate the positrons to 6 GeV. The positrons will be produced from a 300-MeV electron beam on a tungsten target. A conceptual layout is shown. 5 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Common characteristics of synchrotron radiation and light leaking from a bent optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artru, X.; Ray, C.

    2016-07-01

    Light leaking from a bent optical fiber shares many properties with synchrotron radiation : in ray optics, both lights are emitted tangentially to a light cylinder; in wave optics, the emission mechanism involves a tunnel effect. The angular distributions of these two radiations are studied in parallel and found to be similar. The same is done for the impact parameter distributions. The latter show interference fringes of the Airy function type. The far field escaped from the fiber is calculated with the Volume Current Method. An optical system observing the impact parameter profile is proposed.

  4. Fringe Pattern of the PEP-II Synchrotron-Light Interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Alan; /SLAC

    2005-09-19

    Synchrotron-light interferometry is used to measure the vertical beam sizes in the high-energy and low-energy rings (HER and LER) of the PEP-II B Factory at SLAC. Light from a point in a dipole magnet is diffracted by two slits and then imaged onto a CCD camera. A curve fitting algorithm matches the measured interference fringes to a calculated pattern that includes the effect on the modulation depth of the fringes due to both the small but nonzero source size and the narrow bandpass of the optical filter. These formulas are derived here. Next, an additional focusing term from the primary mirror in the vacuum chamber is considered. The mirror needs extensive cooling due to the intense fan of synchrotron x-rays and is likely to have a slight stress-induced curvature, which must be considered to determine the true source size.

  5. National Synchrotron Light Source users manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beam lines

    SciTech Connect

    Gmuer, N.F.; White-DePace, S.M.

    1987-08-01

    The success of the National Synchrotron Light Source in the years to come will be based, in large part, on the size of the users community and the diversity of the scientific disciplines represented by these users. In order to promote this philosophy, this National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) Users Manual: Guide to the VUV and X-Ray Beam Lines, has been published. This manual serves a number of purposes. In an effort to attract new research, it will present to the scientific community-at-large the current and projected architecture and capabilities of the various VUV and x-ray beam lines and storage rings. We anticipate that this publication will be updated periodically in order to keep pace with the constant changes at the NSLS.

  6. Low-Level Radio Frequency System Development for the National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Ma,H.; Rose, J.

    2009-05-04

    The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) is a new ultra-bright 3GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. The position and timing specifications of the ultra-bright photon beam imposes a set of stringent requirements on the performance of radio frequency (RF) control. In addition, commissioning and staged installation of damping wigglers and insertion devices requires the flexibility of handling varying beam conditions. To meet these requirements, a digital implementation of the LLRF is chosen, and digital serial links are planned for the system integration. The first prototype of the controller front-end hardware has been built, and is currently being tested.

  7. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.

    2016-08-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. This shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.

  8. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Michael E; Chapman, David J; White, Thomas G; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E

    2016-05-01

    The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits).

  9. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; White, Thomas G.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits). PMID:27140147

  10. Light stop searches at the LHC in events with two b jets and missing energy

    SciTech Connect

    Bornhauser, S.; Drees, M.; Grab, S.; Kim, J. S.

    2011-02-01

    We propose a new method to discover light top squarks (stops) in the co-annihilation region at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The bino-like neutralino is the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) and the lighter stop is the next-to-LSP. Such scenarios can be consistent with electroweak baryogenesis and also with dark matter constraints. We consider the production of two stops in association with two b-quarks, including pure QCD as well as mixed electroweak-QCD contributions. The stops decay into a charm quark and the LSP. For a higgsino-like light chargino, the electroweak contributions can exceed the pure QCD prediction. We show the size of the electroweak contributions as a function of the stop mass and present the LHC discovery reach in the stop-neutralino mass plane.

  11. Operating synchrotron light sources with a high gain free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mitri, S.; Cornacchia, M.

    2015-11-01

    Since the 1980s synchrotron light sources have been considered as drivers of a high repetition rate (RR), high gain free electron laser (FEL) inserted in a by-pass line or in the ring itself. As of today, the high peak current required by the laser is not deemed to be compatible with the standard multi-bunch filling pattern of synchrotrons, and in particular with the operation of insertion device (ID) beamlines. We show that this problem can be overcome by virtue of magnetic bunch length compression in a ring section, and that, after lasing, the beam returns to equilibrium conditions without beam quality disruption. Bunch length compression brings a double advantage: the high peak current stimulates a high gain FEL emission, while the large energy spread makes the beam less sensitive to the FEL heating and to the microwave instability in the ring. The beam’s large energy spread at the undulator is matched to the FEL energy bandwidth through a transverse gradient undulator. Feasibility of lasing at 25 nm is shown for the Elettra synchrotron light source at 1 GeV, and scaling to shorter wavelengths as a function of momentum compaction, beam energy and transverse emittance in higher energy, larger rings is discussed. For the Elettra case study, a low (100 Hz) and a high (463 kHz) FEL RR are considered, corresponding to an average FEL output power at the level of ∼1 W (∼1013 photons per pulse) and ∼300 W (∼1011 photons per pulse), respectively. We also find that, as a by-product of compression, the ∼5 W Renieri’s limit on the average FEL power can be overcome. Our conclusion is that existing and planned synchrotron light sources may be made compatible with this new hybrid IDs-plus-FEL operational mode, with little impact on the standard beamlines functionality.

  12. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION, FREE ELECTRON LASER, APPLICATION OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY, ETC.: Study on the characteristics of linac based THz light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiong-Wei; Wang, Shu-Hong; Chen, Sen-Yu

    2009-10-01

    There are many methods based on linac for THz radiation production. As one of the options for the Beijing Advanced Light, an ERL test facility is proposed for THz radiation. In this test facility, there are 4 kinds of methods to produce THz radiation: coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR), synchrotron radiation (SR), low gain FEL oscillator, and high gain SASE FEL. In this paper, we study the characteristics of the 4 kinds of THz light sources.

  13. Vacuum and magnetic field constraints in a H -/light ion synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arduini, G.; Martin, R. L.; Rossi, S.; Silari, M.

    1994-08-01

    Acceleration of H - ions in a synchrotron imposes severe restrictions on the level of residual pressure in the vacuum chamber and the maximum magnetic field in the magnets of the ring. Significant vacuum requirements are also imposed by the acceleration of ions. This paper discusses these two aspects of the design of a combined H -/light ion synchrotron for radiation therapy. The fractional loss of the accelerated beam induced by the two processes is evaluated on the basis of a general treatment of the physics of these phenomena. The values of the vacuum and magnetic field necessary for normal operation of the machine are specified and a discussion is given of the behaviour of the above quantities as a function of several parameters such as beam energy, composition and pressure of the residual gas in the vacuum chamber and beam extraction time.

  14. Magnetic properties of the ALS (Advanced Light Source) booster synchrotron engineering model magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, R.; Green, M.I.; Hoyer, E.; Koo, Y.M.; Luchini, K.; Marks, S.; Milburn, J.; Nelson, D.H.

    1989-03-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is designed to be a third-generation electron storage ring producing high-brightness VUV and X-ray radiation from wiggler and undulator insertion devices. Engineering models of all lattice magnets that are to be installed in the storage ring and its booster synchrotron have been built and are being tested to verify their performance. This paper is concerned with the magnets that form the booster lattice: dipoles, quadrupoles, sextupoles, and corrector dipoles (steerers). After a brief outline of measurement techniques and equipment, the major design parameters of these magnets are listed. Measured effective lengths and multipole field errors are then given for each type. All engineering models meet the specifications, and tracking studies including the measured systematic field errors show acceptable performance of the booster synchrotron; hence the designs are qualified for production. 3 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Synchrotron Vacuum Ultraviolet Light and Soft X-Ray Radiation Effects on Aluminized Teflon FEP Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Gaier, James R.; Jalics, Alice I.

    1999-01-01

    Since the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was deployed in low Earth orbit in April 1990, two servicing missions have been conducted to upgrade its scientific capabilities. Minor cracking of second-surface metalized Teflon FEP (DuPont; fluorinated ethylene propylene) surfaces from multilayer insulation (MLI) was first observed upon close examination of samples with high solar exposure retrieved during the first servicing mission, which was conducted 3.6 years after deployment. During the second HST servicing mission, 6.8 years after deployment, astronaut observations and photographic documentation revealed significant cracks in the Teflon FEP layer of the MLI on both the solar- and anti-solar-facing surfaces of the telescope. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center directed the efforts of the Hubble Space Telescope MLI Failure Review Board, whose goals included identifying the low-Earth-orbit environmental constituent(s) responsible for the cracking and embrittling of Teflon FEP which was observed during the second servicing mission. The NASA Lewis Research Center provided significant support to this effort. Because soft x-ray radiation from solar flares had been considered as a possible cause for the degradation of the mechanical properties of Teflon FEP (ref. 1), the effects of soft xray radiation and vacuum ultraviolet light on Teflon FEP were investigated. In this Lewisled effort, samples of Teflon FEP with a 100-nm layer of vapor-deposited aluminum (VDA) on the backside were exposed to synchrotron radiation of various vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray wavelengths between 18 nm (69 eV) and 0.65 nm (1900 eV). Synchrotron radiation exposures were conducted using the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Samples of FEP/VDA were exposed with the FEP surface facing the synchrotron beam. Doses and fluences were compared with those estimated for the 20-yr Hubble Space Telescope mission.

  16. SESAME-A 3rd Generation Synchrotron Light Source for the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, Herman

    2010-02-01

    Developed under the auspices of UNESCO and modeled on CERN, SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East) is an international research center in construction in Jordan. It will enable world class research by scientists from the region, reversing the brain drain. It will also build bridges between diverse societies, contributing to a culture of peace through international cooperation in science. The centerpiece is a synchrotron light source originating from BESSY I, a gift by Germany. The upgraded machine, a 2.5 GeV 3rd Generation Light Source (133m circumference, 26nm-rad emittance and 12 places for insertion devices), will provide light from infra-red to hard X-rays, offering excellent opportunities to train local scientists and attract those working abroad to return. The SESAME Council meets twice each year and presently has nine Members (Bahrain, Cyprus, Egypt, Iran, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, Palestinian Authority, Turkey). Members have responsibility for the project and provide the annual operations budget (1.5M US dollars in 2009, expected to rise to about 5M when operation starts in 2012-13). Jordan provided the site, building, and infrastructure. A staff of 20 is installing the 0.8 GeV BESSY I injection system. The facility will have the capacity to serve 30 or more experiments operating simultaneously. See www.sesame.org.jo )

  17. SESAME - A 3rd Generation Synchrotron Light Source for the Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    Ulkue, Dincer; Rahighi, Javad; Winick, Herman

    2007-01-19

    SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East) will be the Middle East's first international research center. It is a cooperative venture by the scientists and governments of the region with founding members Bahrain, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, Palestine Authority, and Turkey. Iran is in the process of finalizing its formal membership. Other countries (Cyprus, Morocco, and the United Arab Emirates) are also expected to join. The permanent Council of member states has full responsibility for the project. Members provide the annual operating budget. Observer countries are Germany, Greece, Italy, Kuwait, Portugal, Russian Federation, Sweden, the UK, and the US. SESAME is being developed under the umbrella of UNESCO. Jordan was selected as the building site. SESAME will offer excellent opportunities for training of Middle East scientists and attract those working abroad to consider returning. SESAME will be a 2.5GeV 3rd Generation light source (emittance 26nm-rad, circumference {approx}133m), providing excellent performance for structural molecular biology, molecular environmental science, surface and interface science, microelectromechanical devices, x-ray imaging, archaeological microanalysis, and materials characterization. It will cover a broad spectral range from the infrared to hard x-rays and will have 12 straight sections for insertion devices (average length 2.75m). The injector will be the BESSY I 0.8 GeV booster synchrotron which has been given as a gift from Germany. Four committees advise the Council and assist in developing the technical design, beam lines, user community, and scientific Program. The SESAME building, now in construction with funds and a site provided by Jordan, is scheduled for completion in late 2006 after which the BESSY I injector will be installed. First stored beam in the new 2.5 GeV ring is planned for 2009 with six initial beamlines planned. Some beamlines will be built by member

  18. Same-Sign Diboson Signature from Supersymmetry Models with Light Higgsinos at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Howard; Barger, Vernon; Huang, Peisi; Mickelson, Dan; Mustafayev, Azar; Sreethawong, Warintorn; Tata, Xerxes

    2013-04-01

    In supersymmetric models with light Higgsinos (which are motivated by electroweak naturalness arguments), the direct production of Higgsino pairs may be difficult to search for at the LHC due to the low visible energy release from their decays. However, the wino pair production reaction W˜2±Z˜4→(W±Z˜1,2)+(W±W˜1∓) also occurs at substantial rates and leads to final states including equally opposite-sign and same-sign diboson production. We propose a novel search channel for LHC14 based on the same-sign diboson plus missing ET final state which contains only modest jet activity. Assuming gaugino mass unification, and an integrated luminosity ≳100fb-1, this search channel provides a reach for supersymmetry well beyond that from usual gluino pair production.

  19. Same-sign diboson signature from supersymmetry models with light Higgsinos at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Baer, Howard; Barger, Vernon; Huang, Peisi; Mickelson, Dan; Mustafayev, Azar; Sreethawong, Warintorn; Tata, Xerxes

    2013-04-12

    In supersymmetric models with light Higgsinos (which are motivated by electroweak naturalness arguments), the direct production of Higgsino pairs may be difficult to search for at the LHC due to the low visible energy release from their decays. However, the wino pair production reaction W2(±)Z4→(W(±)Z1,2)+(W(±)W1(∓)) also occurs at substantial rates and leads to final states including equally opposite-sign and same-sign diboson production. We propose a novel search channel for LHC14 based on the same-sign diboson plus missing ET final state which contains only modest jet activity. Assuming gaugino mass unification, and an integrated luminosity ≳100  fb(-1), this search channel provides a reach for supersymmetry well beyond that from usual gluino pair production.

  20. Radiological implications of top-off operation at national synchrotron light source-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Job, P. K.; Casey, W. R.

    2011-08-01

    High current and low emittance have been specified to achieve ultra high brightness in the third generation medium energy Synchrotron Radiation Sources. This leads to the electron beam lifetime limited by Touschek scattering, and after commissioning may settle in at as low as ∼3 h. It may well be less in the early days of operation. At the same time, the intensity stability specified by the user community for the synchrotron beam is 1% or better. Given the anticipated lifetime of the beam, incremental filling called top-off injection at intervals on the order of ∼1 min will be required to maintain this beam stability. It is judged to be impractical to make these incremental fills by closing the beam shutters at each injection. In addition, closing the front end beam shutters during each injection will adversely affect the stability of beamline optics due to thermal cycling. Hence the radiological consequences of injection with front end beam shutters open must be evaluated. This paper summarizes results of radiological analysis carried out for the proposed top-off injection at National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) with beam shutters open.

  1. The role of iron in neurodegenerative disorders: insights and opportunities with synchrotron light

    PubMed Central

    Collingwood, Joanna F.; Davidson, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence for iron dysregulation in many forms of disease, including a broad spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders. In order to advance our understanding of the pathophysiological role of iron, it is helpful to be able to determine in detail the distribution of iron as it relates to metabolites, proteins, cells, and tissues, the chemical state and local environment of iron, and its relationship with other metal elements. Synchrotron light sources, providing primarily X-ray beams accompanied by access to longer wavelengths such as infra-red, are an outstanding tool for multi-modal non-destructive analysis of iron in these systems. The micro- and nano-focused X-ray beams that are generated at synchrotron facilities enable measurement of iron and other transition metal elements to be performed with outstanding analytic sensitivity and specificity. Recent developments have increased the scope for methods such as X-ray fluorescence mapping to be used quantitatively rather than semi-quantitatively. Burgeoning interest, coupled with technical advances and beamline development at synchrotron facilities, has led to substantial improvements in resources and methodologies in the field over the past decade. In this paper we will consider how the field has evolved with regard to the study of iron in proteins, cells, and brain tissue, and identify challenges in sample preparation and analysis. Selected examples will be used to illustrate the contribution, and future potential, of synchrotron X-ray analysis for the characterization of iron in model systems exhibiting iron dysregulation, and for human cases of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Friedreich’s ataxia, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:25191270

  2. Omega Dante soft x-ray power diagnostic component calibration at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, K. M.; Weber, F. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Landen, O. L.; Turner, R. E.; Waide, P. A.

    2004-10-01

    The Dante soft x-ray spectrometer, installed on the Omega laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, is a 12-channel filter-edge defined soft x-ray power diagnostic. It is used to measure the spectrally resolved, absolute flux from direct drive, indirect drive (hohlraums) and other plasma sources. Dante component calibration efforts using two beam lines, U3C (50 eV-1 keV) and X8A (1-6 keV) at the National Synchrotron Light Source have been implemented to improve the accuracy of these measurements. We have calibrated metallic vacuum x-ray diodes, mirrors and filters.

  3. The Advanced Light Source: A third-generation Synchrotron Radiation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    2002-08-14

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) of the University of California is a ''third-generation'' synchrotron radiation source optimized for highest brightness at ultraviolet and soft x-ray photon energies. It also provides world-class performance at hard x-ray photon energies. Berkeley Lab operates the ALS for the United States Department of Energy as a national user facility that is available 24 hours/day around the year for research by scientists from industrial, academic, and government laboratories primarily from the United States but also from abroad.

  4. Omega Dante Soft X-Ray Power Diagnostic Component Calibration at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, K; Weber, F; Dewald, E; Glenzer, S; Landen, O; Turner, R; Waide, P

    2004-04-15

    The Dante soft x-ray spectrometer installed on the Omega laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester is a twelve-channel filter-edge defined x-ray power diagnostic. It is used to measure the absolute flux from direct drive, indirect drive (hohlraums) and other plasma sources. Calibration efforts using two beam lines, U3C (50eV-1keV) and X8A (1keV-6keV) at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) have been implemented to insure the accuracy of these measurements. We have calibrated vacuum x-ray diodes, mirrors and filters.

  5. Light doubly charged Higgs boson via the WW^* channel at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhaofeng; Li, Jinmian; Li, Tianjun; Liu, Yandong; Ning, Guo-Zhu

    2015-12-01

    The doubly charged Higgs bosons H^{± ± } searches at the large hadron collider (LHC) have been studied extensively and strong bound is available for H^{± ± } dominantly decaying into a pair of same-sign di-leptons. In this paper we point out that there is a large cavity in the light H^{± ± } mass region left unexcluded. In particular, H^{± ± } can dominantly decay into WW or WW^* (For instance, in the type-II seesaw mechanism the triplet acquires a vacuum expectation value around 1 GeV), and then it is found that H^{± ± } with mass even below 2m_W remains untouched by the current collider searches. Searching for such a H^{± ± } at the LHC is the topic of this paper. We perform detailed signal and background simulation, especially including the non-prompt tbar{t} background which is the dominant one nevertheless ignored before. We show that such H^{± ± } should be observable at the 14 TeV LHC with 10-30 fb^{-1} integrated luminosity.

  6. Probing a light CP-odd scalar in di-top-associated production at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Farooque, Trisha; Juste, Aurelio; Liu, Tao; Spannowsky, Michael

    2015-10-01

    CP-odd scalars are an integral part of many extensions of the Standard Model. Recently, electroweak-scale pseudoscalars have received increased attention in explaining the diffuse gamma-ray excess from the Galactic Centre. Elusive due to absence of direct couplings to gauge bosons, these particles receive only weak constraints from direct searches at LEP or searches performed during the first LHC runs. We investigate the LHC's sensitivity in probing a CP-odd scalar in the mass range 20 ≤ m_A ≤ 100 GeV via di-top-associated production using jet-substructure-based reconstruction techniques. We parameterise the scalar's interactions using a simplified model approach and relate the obtained upper limits to couplings within type-I and type-II 2HDMs as well as the NMSSM. We find that in di-top-associated production, experiments at the LHC can set tight limits on CP-odd scalars that fit the Galactic Centre excess. However, direct sensitivity to light CP-odd scalars from the NMSSM remains challenging.

  7. Extending LHC coverage to light pseudoscalar mediators and coy dark sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozaczuk, Jonathan; Martin, Travis A. W.

    2015-04-01

    Many dark matter models involving weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) feature new, relatively light pseudoscalars that mediate dark matter pair annihilation into Standard Model fermions. In particular, simple models of this type can explain the gamma ray excess originating in the Galactic Center as observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. In many cases the pseudoscalar's branching ratio into WIMPs is suppressed, making these states challenging to detect at colliders through standard dark matter searches. Here, we study the prospects for observing these light mediator states at the LHC without exploiting missing energy techniques. While existing searches effectively probe pseudoscalars with masses between 5-14 GeV and above 90 GeV, the LHC reach can be extended to cover much of the interesting parameter space in the intermediate 20-80 GeV mass range in which the mediator can have appreciable Yukawa-like couplings to Standard Model fermions but would have escaped detection by LEP and other experiments. Models explaining the Galactic Center excess via a light pseudoscalar mediator can give rise to a promising signal in this regime through the associated production of the mediator with bottom quarks while satisfying all other existing constraints. We perform an analysis of the backgrounds and trigger efficiencies, detailing the cuts that can be used to extract the signal. A significant portion of the otherwise unconstrained parameter space of these models can be conclusively tested at the 13 TeV LHC with 100 fb-1, and we encourage the ATLAS and CMS collaborations to extend their existing searches to this mass range.

  8. Mixed sneutrino dark matter in light of the 2011 XENON and LHC results

    SciTech Connect

    Dumont, Béranger; Kraml, Sabine; Fichet, Sylvain; Schwetz, Thomas E-mail: belanger@lapp.in2p3.fr E-mail: sabine.kraml@lpsc.in2p3.fr

    2012-09-01

    In the context of supersymmetric models in which small Dirac neutrino masses are generated by supersymmetry breaking, a mainly right-handed (RH) mixed sneutrino can be an excellent cold dark matter (DM) candidate. We perform a global analysis of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM)+RH neutrino parameter space by means of Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling. We include all relevant constraints from collider and dark matter searches, paying particular attention to nuclear and astrophysical uncertainties. Two distinct cases can satisfy all constraints: heavy sneutrino DM with mass of order 100 GeV, as well as light sneutrino DM with mass of about 3–6 GeV. We discuss the implications for direct and indirect dark matter searches, as well as for SUSY and Higgs searches at the LHC for both, the light and the heavy sneutrino dark matter case. The light sneutrino case is excluded by the 125–126 GeV Higgs signal.

  9. ALICE results on the production of the light-flavor hadrons at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otwinowski, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    Production of light-flavor hadrons in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC has been measured by ALICE. The light-flavor hadrons (π±, K±, Ks0, p, p bar, Λ, Λ bar, ϕ) are identified in the various momentum ranges by using specific energy loss (dE / dx), time-of-flight, Cherenkov radiation, and via decay topology and invariant mass analysis for decayed particles. In these proceedings, the pT spectra, yields and ratios of light-flavor hadrons measured in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions in multiplicity (centrality) intervals are presented. The hadron production in different collision systems is compared and confronted with theoretical models.

  10. Ne, Ar, Fe, and Cu Auger-electron production at National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.H.; Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Guardala, N.A.; Price, J.L.; Stumborg, M.F.; Glass, G.A.

    1992-09-26

    Energetic K and L Auger electrons produced by focussed, filtered, broad-band synchrotron radiation have been measured at the x-ray ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The x-ray beam was used to study inner-shell photoionization of Ne and Ar gas and Fe and Cu solid film targets. The Auger electrons were analyzed by means of a semi-hemispherical electrostatic electron spectrometer at the energy resolution of {approximately} 3 %. The electrons were detected at both 90{degree} and 0{degree} with respect to the photon beam direction. Broad distributions of the inner-shell photoelectrons were also observed, reflecting the incoming photon flux distribution. The Fe and Cu K Auger electron spectra were found to be very similar to the Ar K Auger electron spectra. This was expected, since deep inner-shell Auger processes are not affected by the outer valence electrons. Above 3 keV in electron energy, there have been few previous Auger electron measurements. 2 figs., 13 refs.

  11. Ne, Ar, Fe, and Cu Auger-electron production at National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.H.; Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W. ); Guardala, N.A.; Price, J.L.; Stumborg, M.F. . White Oak Lab.); Glass, G.A. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-09-26

    Energetic K and L Auger electrons produced by focussed, filtered, broad-band synchrotron radiation have been measured at the x-ray ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The x-ray beam was used to study inner-shell photoionization of Ne and Ar gas and Fe and Cu solid film targets. The Auger electrons were analyzed by means of a semi-hemispherical electrostatic electron spectrometer at the energy resolution of [approximately] 3 %. The electrons were detected at both 90[degree] and 0[degree] with respect to the photon beam direction. Broad distributions of the inner-shell photoelectrons were also observed, reflecting the incoming photon flux distribution. The Fe and Cu K Auger electron spectra were found to be very similar to the Ar K Auger electron spectra. This was expected, since deep inner-shell Auger processes are not affected by the outer valence electrons. Above 3 keV in electron energy, there have been few previous Auger electron measurements. 2 figs., 13 refs.

  12. Analysis of Old Copper Synchrotron Light Absorbers from the Stanford Positron Electron Accelerating Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, S.R.; Scott, B.; /SLAC

    2005-12-15

    Synchrotron light absorbers intercept synchrotron radiation to protect chamber walls from excessive heat. When subjected to the high temperature of the beam, these absorbers undergo thermal stress. If the stress is too great or fatigues the material, the absorbers may fail. These absorbers are designed to last the lifetime of the machine. Any premature cracking could result in a leak and, consequently, loss of the ultra high vacuum environment. Using secondary and backscattered electron techniques, several sections of a used copper absorber were analyzed for material damage. Chemical analyses were performed on these samples as well. Comparing the unexposed sections to the sections exposed to the electron beam, few cracks were seen in the copper. However, the exposed samples showed heavy surface damage, in addition to crevices that could eventually result in material failure. Significant corrosion was also evident along the water cooling passage of the samples. These findings suggest that further investigation and periodic inspection of absorbers in SPEAR3 are necessary to control corrosion of the copper.

  13. Nondestructive Characterization by Advanced Synchrotron Light Techniques: Spectromicroscopy and Coherent Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Margaritondo, Giorgio; Hwu, Yeukuang; Je, Jung Ho

    2008-01-01

    The advanced characteristics of synchrotron light has led in recent years to the development of a series of new experimental techniques to investigate chemical and physical properties on a microscopic scale. Although originally developed for materials science and biomedical research, such techniques find increasing applications in other domains – and could be quite useful for the study and conservation of cultural heritage. Specifically, they can nondestructively provide detailed chemical composition information that can be useful for the identification of specimens, for the discovery of historical links based on the sources of chemical raw materials and on chemical processes, for the analysis of damage, their causes and remedies and for many other issues. Likewise, morphological and structural information on a microscopic scale is useful for the identification, study and preservation of many different cultural and historical specimens. We concentrate here on two classes of techniques: in the first case, photoemission spectromicroscopy. This is the result of the advanced evolution of photoemission techniques like ESCA (Electron Microscopy for Chemical Analysis). By combining high lateral resolution to spectroscopy, photoemission spectromicroscopy can deliver fine chemical information on a microscopic scale in a nondestructive fashion. The second class of techniques exploits the high lateral coherence of modern synchrotron sources, a byproduct of the quest for high brightness or brilliance. We will see that such techniques now push radiology into the submicron scale and the submillisecond time domain. Furthermore, they can be implemented in a tomographic mode, increasing the information and becoming potentially quite useful for the analysis of cultural heritage specimens.

  14. Synchrotrons: Taiwan unveils new synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Noriaki

    2015-05-01

    Competitive activities around the globe to develop the world's brightest synchrotron light source have accelerated in recent years. Taiwanese scientists now aspire to be at the top of the list with the recently constructed Taiwan Photon Source.

  15. (Multi-)strange hadron and light (anti-)nuclei production with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, Ramona

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to its excellent tracking performance and particle identification capabilities, the ALICE detector allows for the identification of light (anti-)(hyper)nuclei and for the measurement of (multi-)strange particles over a wide range of transverse momentum. Deuterons, 3He and 4He and their corresponding anti-nuclei are identified via their specific energy loss in the Time Projection Chamber and the velocity measurement provided by the Time-Of-Flight detector. Strange and multi-strange baryons and mesons as well as (anti-)hypertritons are reconstructed via their topological decays. Detailed measurements of (multi-)strange hadron production in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collision and of light (anti-)nuclei and (anti-)hypertritons in Pb-Pb collisions with ALICE at the LHC are presented. The experimental results will be compared with the predictions of both statistical hadronization and coalescence models.

  16. In-situ shearing interferometry of National Synchrotron Light Source mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, S.N.; Rarback, H.; Shu, D.; Takacs, P.Z.

    1987-01-01

    In situ mirror distortion measurements were made with a lateral shearing interferometer on three mirrors in beam line X17T at the National Syn203hrotron Light Source. Lateral shearing interference is insensitive to vibrational motion in five of the six degrees of freedom, so it is well-suited for investigations in the synchrotron radiation (SR) environment. No distortion was seen in an uncooled silicon carbide mirror and in a colled copper alloy mirror on X17TB, but a change in the radius of an uncooled electroless nickel-plated aluminium cylinder mirror of about 6.2% was observed on X17TA. Angular vibrations in the 2 to 3 arc second range were easily observed on one of the beam lines, as was an overall mirror rotation in the arc second range.

  17. National synchrotron light source. Activity report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hastings, J.

    1996-05-01

    This report discusses research conducted at the National Synchrotron Light Source in the following areas: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy, and tomography; nuclear physics; scattering and crystallography studies of biological materials; time resolved spectroscopy; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; the 1995 NSLS annual users` meeting; 17th international free electron laser conference; micro bunches workshop; VUV machine; VUV storage ring parameters; beamline technical improvements; x-ray beamlines; x-ray storage ring parameters; the NSLS source development laboratory; the accelerator test facility (ATF); NSLS facility improvements; NSLS advisory committees; NSLS staff; VUV beamline guide; and x-ray beamline guide.

  18. Storage Rings for Science with: Electron-Positron Collisions, Hadron Collisions and Synchrotron Light

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki,S.

    2009-05-04

    The author is honored to receive the 2009 Robert Wilson Prize and the recognition that comes with it. The citation for the prize reads, 'For his outstanding contribution to the design and construction of accelerators that has led to the realization of major machines for fundamental science on two continents and his promotion of international collaboration.' In this article, he will discuss the two construction projects, which he led, one (TRISTAN e{sup +}e{sup -} Collider at KEK) in Japan and the other (RHIC at BNL) in the USA, covering project issues and lessons learned from these projects. Although both of them were built on separate continents, it is interesting to note that they are both built on long off-shore islands. He will also add comments on his recent engagement in the development of the Conceptual Design for the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II).

  19. Environmental Remediation Science at Beamline X26A at the National Synchrotron Light Source- Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsch, Paul

    2013-11-07

    The goal of this project was to provide support for an advanced X-ray microspectroscopy facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. This facility is operated by the University of Chicago and the University of Kentucky. The facility is available to researchers at both institutions as well as researchers around the globe through the general user program. This facility was successfully supported during the project period. It provided access to advanced X-ray microanalysis techniques which lead to fundamental advances in understanding the behavior of contaminants and geochemistry that is applicable to environmental remediation of DOE legacy sites as well as contaminated sites around the United States and beyond.

  20. Light flux density threshold at which protein denaturation is induced by synchrotron radiation circular dichroism beamlines.

    PubMed

    Miles, A J; Janes, Robert W; Brown, A; Clarke, D T; Sutherland, J C; Tao, Y; Wallace, B A; Hoffmann, S V

    2008-07-01

    New high-flux synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) beamlines are providing important information for structural biology, but can potentially cause denaturation of the protein samples under investigation. This effect has been studied at the new CD1 dedicated SRCD beamline at ISA in Denmark, where radiation-induced thermal damage effects were observed, depending not only on the radiation flux but also on the focal spot size of the light. Comparisons with similar studies at other SRCD facilities worldwide has lead to the estimation of a flux density threshold under which SRCD beamlines should be operated when samples are to be exposed to low-wavelength vacuum ultraviolet radiation for extended periods of time.

  1. A microprobe-XRF Beamline on Indus-2 Synchrotron Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, M. K.; Kane, S. R.; Sinha, A. K.; Garg, C. K.; Singh, A. K.; Gupta, P.; Garg, S. R.; Lodha, G. S.; Deb, S. K.

    2013-03-01

    A microfocus x-ray fluorescence (XRF) beamline has been setup on Indus-2 synchrotron light source. The beamline works in the x-ray energy range of 4-20 keV. The optics of the beamline comprises of a Si(111) double crystal monochromator for energy tunability and a Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) based grazing incidence focusing optics. Microprobe XRF scanning over a region of the sample is possible using a 5-axis sample scanning stage. The beamline provides an energy resolution ~ 10-3 -10-4 with a photon flux density of the order of ~ 108 ph/sec./mm2/100mA for the collimated unfocused beam. Measured performance, various attractive features and some initial commissioning results are presented.

  2. Synchrotron X-Ray Microdiffraction Studies of Electromigration in Interconnect lines at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai; Kunz, Martin

    2009-12-01

    Synchrotron polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction is a particularly suitable technique to study in situ the effect of electromigration in metal interconnects as add spatial resolution to grain orientation and strain sensitivity. This technique has been extensively used at the Advanced Light Source to monitor changes in aluminum and copper interconnect test structures while high-density current is passed into them during accelerated tests at elevated temperature. One of the principal findings is the observation of electromigration-induced plasticity in the metal lines that appear during the very early stages of electromigration. In some of the lines, high density of geometrically necessary dislocation are formed leading to additional diffusion paths causing an enhancement of electromigration effect at test temperature.

  3. Synchrotron radiation shielding design for the Brockhouse sector at the Canadian light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassey, Bassey; Moreno, Beatriz; Gomez, Ariel; Ahmed, Asm Sabbir; Ullrich, Doug; Chapman, Dean

    2014-05-01

    At the Canadian Light Source (CLS), the plans for the construction of three beamlines under the Brockhouse Project are underway. The beamlines, to be classified under the CLS Phase III beamlines, will comprise of a wiggler and an undulator, and will be dedicated to x-ray diffraction and scattering experiments. The energy range of these beamlines will be 7-22 keV (low energy wiggler beamline), 20-94 keV (high energy wiggler beamline), and 5-21 keV (undulator beamline). The beamlines will have a total of five hutches. Presented is the shielding design against target scattered white and monochromatic synchrotron radiations for these beamlines. The shielding design is based on: scatter target material-water, dose object-anthropomorphic phantom of the adult human (anteroposterior-AP geometry), and shielding thicknesses of steel and lead that will drop the radiation leakage from the hutches to below 0.5 μSv/h.

  4. Hidden Higgs boson at the LHC and light dark matter searches

    SciTech Connect

    He Xiaogang; Tandean, Jusak

    2011-10-01

    Recent LHC searches have not found a clear signal of the Higgs boson h of the standard model (SM) with three or four families in the mass range m{sub h}=120-600 GeV. If the Higgs had an unexpectedly large invisible branching ratio, the excluded m{sub h} regions would shrink. This can be realized in the simplest weakly interacting massive particle dark matter (DM) model, which is the SM plus a real gauge-singlet scalar field D as the DM, via the invisible mode h{yields}DD. Current data allow this decay to occur for D-mass values near, but below, m{sub h}/2 and those compatible with the light DM hypothesis. For such D masses, h{yields}DD can dominate the Higgs width depending on m{sub h}, and thus sizable portions of the m{sub h} exclusion zones in the SM with three or four families may be recovered. Increased luminosity at the LHC may even reveal a Higgs having SM-like visible decays still hiding in the presently disallowed regions. The model also accommodates well the new possible DM hints from CRESST-II and will be further tested by improved data from future DM direct searches.

  5. Grand unification and light color-octet scalars at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Pavel Fileviez; Gavin, Ryan; McElmurry, Thomas; Petriello, Frank

    2008-12-01

    We study the properties and production mechanisms of color-octet scalars at the Large Hadron Collider. We focus on the single production of both charged and neutral members of an (8,2)1/2 doublet through bottom-quark initial states. These channels provide a window to the underlying Yukawa structure of the scalar sector. Color-octet scalars naturally appear in grand unified theories based on the SU(5) gauge symmetry. In the context of adjoint SU(5) these fields are expected to be light to satisfy constraints coming from unification and proton decay, and may have TeV-scale masses. One combination of their couplings is defined by the relation between the down-quark and charged-lepton Yukawa couplings. Observation of these states at the LHC gives an upper bound on the proton lifetime if they truly arise from this grand unified theory. We demonstrate that TeV-mass scalars can be observed over background at the LHC using boosted top-quark final states, and study how well the scalar Yukawa parameters can be measured.

  6. Grand unification and light color-octet scalars at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Pavel Fileviez; Gavin, Ryan; McElmurry, Thomas; Petriello, Frank

    2008-12-01

    We study the properties and production mechanisms of color-octet scalars at the Large Hadron Collider. We focus on the single production of both charged and neutral members of an (8,2){sub 1/2} doublet through bottom-quark initial states. These channels provide a window to the underlying Yukawa structure of the scalar sector. Color-octet scalars naturally appear in grand unified theories based on the SU(5) gauge symmetry. In the context of adjoint SU(5) these fields are expected to be light to satisfy constraints coming from unification and proton decay, and may have TeV-scale masses. One combination of their couplings is defined by the relation between the down-quark and charged-lepton Yukawa couplings. Observation of these states at the LHC gives an upper bound on the proton lifetime if they truly arise from this grand unified theory. We demonstrate that TeV-mass scalars can be observed over background at the LHC using boosted top-quark final states, and study how well the scalar Yukawa parameters can be measured.

  7. A MODEL STUDY OF TRANSVERSE MODE COUPLING INSTABILITY AT NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE-II (NSLS-II).

    SciTech Connect

    BLEDNYKH, A.; WANG, J.M.

    2005-05-15

    The vertical impedances of the preliminary designs of National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Mini Gap Undulators (MGU) are calculated by means of GdfidL code. The Transverse Mode Coupling Instability (TMCI) thresholds corresponding to these impedances are estimated using an analytically solvable model.

  8. Measurement of the intensity of the beam in the abort gap at the Tevatron utilizing synchrotron light

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Lorman, E.; Meyer, T.; Pordes, S.; De Santis, S.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2005-05-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of abort gap beam intensity monitoring at the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. There are two somewhat independent monitors which measure the intensity of the synchrotron light emitted by particles in the abort gaps. One system uses a gated Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) to measure the light intensity, and the other system uses a single lens telescope, gated image intensifier, and Charge Injection Device (CID) camera to image the beam.

  9. National synchrotron light source. Activity report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hastings, J.B.

    1997-05-01

    The hard work done by the synchrotron radiation community, in collaboration with all those using large-scale central facilities during 1995, paid off in FY 1996 through the DOE`s Presidential Scientific Facilities Initiative. In comparison with the other DOE synchrotron radiation facilities, the National Synchrotron Light Source benefited least in operating budgets because it was unable to increase running time beyond 100%-nevertheless, the number of station hours was maintained. The major thrust at Brookhaven came from a 15% increase in budget which allowed the recruitment of seven staff in the beamlines support group and permitted a step increment in the funding of the extremely long list of upgrades; both to the sources and to the beamlines. During the December 1995 shutdown, the VUV Ring quadrant around U10-U12 was totally reconstructed. New front ends, enabling apertures up to 90 mrad on U10 and U12, were installed. During the year new PRTs were in formation for the infrared beamlines, encouraged by the investment the lab was able to commit from the initiative funds and by awards from the Scientific Facilities Initiative. A new PRT, specifically for small and wide angle x-ray scattering from polymers, will start work on X27C in FY 1997 and existing PRTs on X26C and X9B working on macromolecular crystallography will be joined by new members. Plans to replace aging radio frequency cavities by an improved design, originally a painfully slow six or eight year project, were brought forward so that the first pair of cavities (half of the project for the X-Ray Ring) will now be installed in FY 1997. Current upgrades to 350 mA initially and to 438 mA later in the X-Ray Ring were set aside due to lack of funds for the necessary thermally robust beryllium windows. The Scientific Facilities Initiative allowed purchase of all 34 windows in FY 1996 so that the power upgrade will be achieved in FY 1997.

  10. Design of a multi-bend achromat lattice for 3 GeV synchrotron light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun-San

    2016-03-01

    We present a lattice design for a low-emittance and high-brilliance 3 GeV synchrotron light source that has been widely investigated in the world. We show the design results for a MBA (Multi-Bend Achromat) lattice with an emittance of 1.3 nm and 282.4 m circumference. Each cell has 5 bending magnets that consist of outer two with bending angle of 4.5° and inner three with bending angle of 7°. The lattice is designed to be flexible and consists of 12 straight sections in which one straight section has a length of 5.9 m. We have studied the dynamic aperture in the lattice with machine errors. It is shown that the designed low-emittance lattice provides sufficient dynamic aperture after COD correction. We present the results of variations of emittance, energy spread and dynamic aperture due to in-vacuum undulators in the straight sections. We performed particle tracking after the beam injection to investigate the efficiency of the injection scheme. We show the designed results of an injection scheme that shows the space allocation in injection section and the particle motions of injected beam. Our designed lattice provides a good optimization in terms of the emittance and brilliance as a light source for 3 GeV energy and circumference of 28 m.

  11. SESAME -- A third generation synchrotron light source for the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, Herman

    2012-03-01

    Developed under the auspices of UNESCO and modeled on CERN, SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East) is an international research centre in construction in Jordan, enabling world-class research while promoting peace through scientific cooperation. Its centerpiece, a new 2.5 GeV 3rd Generation Electron Storage Ring (133m circumference, 26nm-rad emittance, 12 places for insertion devices), will provide intense light from infra-red to hard X-rays. Members of the Council (Bahrain, Cyprus, Egypt, Iran, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, Palestinian Authority,Turkey) provide the operations budget. Voluntary contributions by several Council Members that could amount to over 20 million over 5 years are now being finalized. This, plus funds from other sources, will enable acquisition of the technical components of the new ring and the upgrading of beamline equipment donated by several European and US labs. All concrete shielding is complete. The 0.8 GeV BESSY I injector system, a gift from Germany, is now being installed. A training program has been underway since 2000. SESAME is on track to start operation with four day-one beam lines in 2015.

  12. Direct production of a light CP-odd Higgs boson at the Tevatron and LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Dermisek, Radovan; Gunion, John F.

    2010-03-01

    We show that the existing CDF L=630 pb{sup -1} Tevatron data on pp{yields}{mu}{sup +{mu}-}X places substantial limits on a light CP-odd Higgs boson a with m{sub a}<2m{sub B} produced via gg{yields}a, even for m{sub a}>2m{sub {tau}}for which BR(a{yields}{mu}{sup +{mu}-}) is relatively small. Extrapolation of this existing CDF analysis to L=10 fb{sup -1} suggests that Tevatron limits on the abb coupling strength in the region m{sub a}>8 GeV could be comparable to or better than limits from Upsilon decays in the m{sub a}<7 GeV region. We also give rough estimates of future prospects at the LHC, demonstrating that early running will substantially improve limits on a light a (or perhaps discover a signal). In particular, outside the Upsilon peak region, integrated luminosity of only 5 fb{sup -1}-20 fb{sup -1} (depending on m{sub a} and {radical}(s)) could reveal a peak in M{sub {mu}}{sup +}{sub {mu}}{sup -} and will certainly place important new limits on a light a. The importance of such limits in the context of next-to-minimal supersymmetric model Higgs discovery and (g-2){sub {mu}}are outlined.

  13. Two photon absorption energy transfer in the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHC-II) modified with organic boron dye.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Liu, Cheng; Hu, Rui; Feng, Jiao; Wang, Shuangqing; Li, Shayu; Yang, Chunhong; Yang, Guoqiang

    2014-07-15

    The plant light-harvesting complexes of photosystem II (LHC-II) play important roles in collecting solar energy and transferring the energy to the reaction centers of photosystems I and II. A two photon absorption compound, 4-(bromomethyl)-N-(4-(dimesitylboryl)phenyl)-N-phenylaniline (DMDP-CH2Br), was synthesized and covalently linked to the LHC-II in formation of a LHC-II-dye complex, which still maintained the biological activity of LHC-II system. Under irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses at 754 nm, the LHC-II-dye complex can absorb two photons of the laser light effectively compared with the wild type LHC-II. The absorbed excitation energy is then transferred to chlorophyll a with an obvious fluorescence enhancement. The results may be interesting and give potentials for developing hybrid photosystems.

  14. Two photon absorption energy transfer in the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHC-II) modified with organic boron dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li; Liu, Cheng; Hu, Rui; Feng, Jiao; Wang, Shuangqing; Li, Shayu; Yang, Chunhong; Yang, Guoqiang

    2014-07-01

    The plant light-harvesting complexes of photosystem II (LHC-II) play important roles in collecting solar energy and transferring the energy to the reaction centers of photosystems I and II. A two photon absorption compound, 4-(bromomethyl)-N-(4-(dimesitylboryl)phenyl)-N-phenylaniline (DMDP-CH2Br), was synthesized and covalently linked to the LHC-II in formation of a LHC-II-dye complex, which still maintained the biological activity of LHC-II system. Under irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses at 754 nm, the LHC-II-dye complex can absorb two photons of the laser light effectively compared with the wild type LHC-II. The absorbed excitation energy is then transferred to chlorophyll a with an obvious fluorescence enhancement. The results may be interesting and give potentials for developing hybrid photosystems.

  15. Gravitino decays and the cosmological lithium problem in light of the LHC Higgs and supersymmetry searches

    SciTech Connect

    Cyburt, Richard H.; Ellis, John; Luo, Feng; Fields, Brian D.; Olive, Keith A.; Spanos, Vassilis C. E-mail: John.Ellis@cern.ch E-mail: fluo@physics.umn.edu E-mail: spanos@inp.demokritos.gr

    2013-05-01

    We studied previously the impact on light-element abundances of gravitinos decaying during or after Big-Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). We found regions of the gravitino mass m{sub 3/2} and abundance ζ{sub 3/2} plane where its decays could reconcile the calculated abundance of {sup 7}Li with observation without perturbing the other light-element abundances unacceptably. Here we revisit this issue in light of LHC measurements of the Higgs mass and constraints on supersymmetric model parameters, as well as updates in the astrophysical measurements of light-element abundances. In addition to the constrained minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model with universal soft supersymmetry-breaking masses at the GUT scale (the CMSSM) studied previously, we also study models with universality imposed below the GUT scale and models with non-universal Higgs masses (NUHM1). We calculate the total likelihood function for the light-element abundances, taking into account the observational uncertainties. We find that gravitino decays provide a robust solution to the cosmological {sup 7}Li problem along strips in the (m{sub 3/2},ζ{sub 3/2}) plane along which the abundances of deuterium, {sup 4}He and {sup 7}Li may be fit with χ{sup 2}{sub min}∼<3, compared with χ{sup 2} ∼ 34 if the effects of gravitino decays are unimportant. The minimum of the likelihood function is reduced to χ{sup 2} < 2 when the uncertainty on D/H is relaxed and < 1 when the lithium abundance is taken from globular cluster data.

  16. Vibrational dynamics of plant light-harvesting complex LHC II investigated by quasi- and inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, Maksym; Irrgang, Klaus-Dieter; Rusevich, Leonid; Pieper, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Vibrational dynamics of the light-harvesting complex II (LHC II) from spinach was investigated by quasi- and inelastic neutron scattering (QENS and INS) at three different temperatures of 80, 160, and 285 K. QENS/INS spectra of solubilised LHC II and of the corresponding buffer solution were obtained separately and exhibit characteristic inelastic features. After subtraction of the buffer contribution, the INS spectrum of LHC II reveals a distinct Boson peak at ˜ 2.5 meV at 80 K that shifts towards lower energies if the temperature is increased to 285 K. This effect is interpreted in terms of a "softening" of the protein matrix along with the dynamical transition at ˜ 240 K. Our findings indicate that INS is a valuable method to obtain the density of vibrational states not only at cryogenic, but also at physiological temperatures.

  17. Synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Knotek, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation has had a revolutionary effect on a broad range of scientific studies, from physics, chemistry and metallurgy to biology, medicine and geoscience. The situation during the last decade has been one of very rapid growth, there is a great vitality to the field and a capability has been given to a very broad range of scientific disciplines which was undreamed of just a decade or so ago. Here we will discuss some of the properties of synchrotron radiation that makes it so interesting and something of the sources in existence today including the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the new facilities built specifically for synchrotron radiation research and the model that was developed there for involvement of the scientific community is a good one which provides some good lessons for these facilities and others.

  18. New Perspectives for Advanced Science at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Tolentino, Helio C.N.

    2003-01-24

    The LNLS (Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron) is a national laboratory in Brazil that operates a 1.37 GeV storage ring for synchrotron light users since July 1997. Eleven bending magnet beamlines are open to a wide range of possibilities for research in ultra-violet and X-ray spectroscopy, single crystal and powder diffraction, magnetic and anomalous scattering, protein crystallography, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray lithography and small angle X-ray scattering. The recent conclusion of the booster injector opened the way for insertion devices to be accommodated in the four straight sections available. A multipolar wiggler, for protein crystallography using the MAD technique, is the first planned to be installed during 2003. The construction of the first LNLS undulator, for the vaccum ultra-violet and soft X-ray domain, has already started and will expand the possibilities in atomic, molecular and surface physics, as well as in catalysis and magnetism. LNLS has expanded its infra-structure as an open multidisciplinary research laboratory into complementary areas, such as electron and scanning probe microscopy, nanostructure synthesis and molecular biology. Many technological and scientific achievements have been attained in these last five years. Some of them will be highlighted here, with emphasis in the area of nanostructured and magnetic materials.

  19. Operation of general purpose stepping motor controllers at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stubblefield, F.W.

    1986-10-01

    A prototype and four copies of a general purpose subsystem for mechanical positioning of detectors, samples, and beam line optical elements which constitute experiments at the National Synchrotron Light Source facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory have been constructed and placed into operation. Construction of a sixth subsystem is nearing completion. The subsystems effect mechanical positioning by controlling a set of stepping motors and their associated position encoders. The units are general purpose in the sense that they receive commands over a standard 9600 baud asynchronous serial line compatible with the RS-232-C electrical signal standard, generate TTL-compatible streams of stepping pulses which can be used with a wide variety of stepping motors, and read back position values from a number of different types and models of position encoder. The basic structure of the motor controller subsystem will be briefly reviewed. Short descriptions of the positioning apparatus actuated at each of the test and experiment stations employing a motor control unit are given. Additions and enhancements to the subsystem made in response to problems indicated by actual operation of the four installed units are described in more detail.

  20. Operation of general purpose stepping motor controllers at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stubblefield, F.W.

    1987-02-01

    A prototype and four copies of a general purpose subsystem for mechanical positioning of detectors, samples, and beam line optical elements which constitute experiments at the National Synchrotron Light Source facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory have been constructed and placed into operation. Construction of a sixth subsystem is nearing completion. The subsystems effect mechanical positioning by controlling a set of stepping motors and their associated position encoders. The units are general purpose in the sense that they receive commands over a standard 9600 baud asynchronous serial line compatible with the RS-232-C electrical signal standard, generate TTL-compatible streams of stepping pulses which can be used with a wide variety of stepping motors, and read back position values from a number of different types and models of position encoder. The basic structure of the motor controller subsystem is briefly reviewed. Short descriptions of the positioning apparatus actuated at each of the test and experiment stations employing a motor control unit are given. Additions and enhancements to the sub-system made in response to problems indicated by actual operation of the four installed units are described in more detail.

  1. National Synchrotron Light Source Facility Manual Maintenance Management Program. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Fewell, N.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this program s to meet the policy and objectives for the management and performance of cost-effective maintenance and repair of the National Synchrotron Light Source, as required by the US Department of Energy order DOE 433O.4A. It is the DOE`s policy that: The maintenance management program for the NSLS be consistent with this Order and that NSLS property is maintained in a manner which promotes operational safety, worker health, environmental protection and compliance, property preservation, and cost-effectiveness while meeting the NSLS`s programmatic mission. Structures, components and systems (active and passive) that are imporant to safe operation of the NSLS shall be subject to a maintenance program to ensure that they meet or exceed their design requirements throughout the life of the NSLS. Periodic examination of structures, systems components and equipment be performed to determine deterioration or technical obsolescence which may threaten performance and/or safety. Primary responsibility, authority, and accountability for the direction and management of the maintenance program at the NSLS reside with the line management assigned direct programmatic responsibility. Budgeting and accounting for maintenance programs are consistent with DOE Orders guidance.

  2. Synchrotron X-Ray Microdiffraction Studies of Electromigration in Interconnect lines at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai; Kunz, Martin

    2009-05-01

    Synchrotron polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction is a particularly suitable technique to study in situ the effect of electromigration in metal interconnects as add spatial resolution to grain orientation and strain sensitivity. This technique has been extensively used at the Advanced Light Source to monitor changes in aluminum and copper interconnect test structures while high-density current is passed into them during accelerated tests at elevated temperature. One of the principal findings is the observation of electromigration-induced plasticity in the metal lines that appear during the very early stages of electromigration. In some of the lines, high density of geometrically necessary dislocation are formed leading to additional diffusion paths causing an enhancement of electromigration effect at test temperature. This paper presents an overview of the principal results obtained from X-ray microdiffraction studies of electromigration effects on aluminum and copper interconnects at the ALS throughout continuous efforts that spanned over a decade (1998-2008) from approximately 40 weeks of combined beamtime.

  3. A scanning photoelectron microscope (SPEM) at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS)

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, H.; Kirz, J.; Hulbert, S.; Johnson, E.; Anderson, E.; Kern, D. . Dept. of Physics; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA; International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY . Thomas J. Watson Research Center)

    1989-01-01

    We are in the process of developing and commissioning a scanning photoelectron microscope (SPEM) at the X1A beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). It is designed to make use of the Soft X-ray Undulator (SXU) at the NSLS. This high brightness source illuminates a Fresnel zone plate, which forms a focused probe, {<=} 0.2{mu}m in size, on the specimen surface. A grating monochromator selects the photon energy in the 400-800 eV range with an energy resolution of better than 1 eV. The expected flux in the focus is in the 5 {times} 10{sup 7} {minus} 10{sup 9} photons/s range. A single pass Cylindrical Mirror Analyzer (CMA) is used to record photoemission spectra, or to form an image within a fixed electron energy bandwidth as the specimen is mechanically scanned. As a first test, a 1000 mesh Au grid was successfully imaged with a resolution of about 1{mu}m and the CMA tuned to the Au 4 f photoelectron peak. Once it is commissioned, a program is planned which will utilize the microscope to study beam sensitive systems, such as thin oxide/sub-oxide films of alumina and silica, and ultimately various adsorbates on these films. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Is photocleavage of DNA by YOYO-1 using a synchrotron radiation light source sequence dependent?

    PubMed

    Gilroy, Emma L; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Jones, Nykola C; Rodger, Alison

    2011-10-01

    The photocleavage of double-stranded and single-stranded DNA by the fluorescent dye YOYO-1 was investigated in real time by using the synchrotron radiation light source ASTRID (ISA, Denmark) both to initiate the reaction and to monitor its progress using Couette flow linear dichroism (LD) throughout the irradiation period. The dependence of LD signals on DNA sequences and on time in the intense light beam was explored and quantified for single-stranded poly(dA), poly[(dA-dT)(2)], calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) and Micrococcus luteus DNA (mlDNA). The DNA and ligand regions of the spectrum showed different LD kinetic behaviors, and there was significant sequence dependence of the kinetics. However, in contrast to expectations from the literature, we found that poly(dA), mlDNA, low salt ctDNA and low salt poly[(dA-dT)(2)] all had significant populations of groove-bound YOYO. It seems that this mode was predominantly responsible for the catalysis of DNA cleavage. In homopolymeric DNAs, intercalated YOYO was unable to cleave DNA. In mixed-sequence DNAs the data suggest that YOYO in some but not all intercalated binding sites can cause cleavage. It is also likely that cleavage occurs at transient single-stranded regions. The reaction rates for a 100 mA beam current of 0.5-μW power varied from 0.6 h(-1) for single-stranded poly(dA) to essentially zero for low salt poly[(dG-dC)(2)] and high salt poly[(dA-dT)(2)]. At the conclusion of the experiments with each kind of DNA, uncleaved DNA with intercalated YOYO remained. PMID:21931957

  5. NSLS 2007 Activity Report (National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller ,L.; Nasta, K.

    2008-05-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source is one of the world's most productive and cost-effective user facilities. With 2,219 individual users, about 100 more than last year, and a record-high 985 publications, 2007 was no exception. In addition to producing an impressive array of science highlights, which are included in this Activity Report, many NSLS users were honored this year for their scientific accomplishments. Throughout the year, there were major strides in the development of the scientific programs by strengthening strategic partnerships with major research resources and with the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN). Of particular note, the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences (COMPRES) received renewed funding for the next five years through the National Science Foundation. COMPRES operates four high-pressure NSLS beamlines--X17B2, X17B3, X17C, and U2A--and serves the earth science community as well as the rapidly expanding segment of researchers using high-pressure techniques in materials, chemical, and energy-related sciences. A joint appointment was made between the NSLS and Stony Brook University to further enhance interactions with COMPRES. There was major progress on two key beamline projects outlined in the Five-Year Strategic Plan: the X25 beamline upgrade and the construction of the X9 small angle scattering (SAXS) beamline. The X25 overhaul, which began with the installation of the in-vacuum mini-gap undulator (MGU) in January 2006, is now complete. X25 is once again the brightest beamline for macromolecular crystallography at the NSLS, and in tandem with the X29 undulator beamline, it will keep the NSLS at the cutting edge in this important area of research. Upgrade work associated with the new MGU and the front end for the X9 SAXS beamline--jointly developed by the NSLS and the CFN--also was completed. Beamline X9 will host the SAXS program that currently exists at beamline X21 and will provide new microbeam SAXS

  6. Support for the Advanced Polymers Beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Benjamin S

    2008-10-01

    The primary focus of the X27C beamline is to investigate frontier polymer science and engineering problems with emphasis on real-time studies of structures, morphologies and dynamics from atomic, nanoscopic, microscopic to mesoscopic scales using simultaneous small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) techniques. The scientific merit of this project is as follows. Currently, many unique sample chambers for in-situ synchrotron studies, developed by the PI (B. Hsiao) and Co-PI (B. Chu), are available for general users of X27C at NSLS. These instruments include a gel/melt spinning apparatus, a continuous fiber drawing apparatus, a tensile stretching apparatus, a high pressure X-ray cell using supercritical carbon dioxide, a parallel plate strain-controlled shear stage and a dynamic rheometer for small-strain oscillatory deformation study. Based on the use of these instruments in combination with synchrotron X-rays, many new insights into the relationships between processing and structure have been obtained in recent years. The broader impact of this project is as follows. The X27C beamline is the first synchrotron facility in the United States dedicated to chemistry/materials research (with emphasis on polymers). The major benefit of this facility to the materials community is that no extensive synchrotron experience and equipment preparation are required from general users to carry out cutting-edge experiments.

  7. Atomic physics with hard X-rays from high brilliance synchrotron light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, S.; Gemmell, D.

    1996-08-01

    A century after the discovery of x rays, the experimental capability for studying atomic structure and dynamics with hard, bright synchrotron radiation is increasing remarkably. Tempting opportunities arise for experiments on many-body effects, aspects of fundamental photon-atom interaction processes, and relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic phenomena. Some of these possibilities are surveyed in general terms.

  8. Bringing Physics, Synchrotron Light and Probing Neutrons to the Public: A Collaborative Outreach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micklavzina, Stanley; Almqvist, Monica; Sörensen, Stacey L.

    2014-01-01

    Stanley Micklavzina, a US physics educator on sabbatical, teams up with a Swedish national research laboratory, a synchrotron radiation experimental group and a university science centre to develop and create educational and public outreach projects. Descriptions of the physics, science centre displays and public demonstrations covering the…

  9. Light sfermion interplay in the 125 GeV MSSM Higgs production and decay at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, A.; Khalil, S.; Moretti, S.; Thomas, M. C.

    2014-05-01

    We study the effects from light sfermions on the lightest Higgs boson production and decay at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) within the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). We find that the scenario with light coloured sfermions — stops or sbottoms — has the potential to explain a non-universal alteration, as hinted by LHC data, of the gluon-gluon Fusion ( μ ggF ) with respect to the Vector Boson Fusion ( μ VBF) event rates and, in particular, can predict > 1 for all Higgs boson decay channels in ggF large areas of the parameter space. We also find that the scenario with a light stop/sbottom can be complemented by the scenario in which the total Higgs width, Γtot, is reduced due to a suppressed Yukawa coupling Y b . In this case, the reduction of the Higgs production rates in the ggF process which occurs in the maximal mixing scenario is compensated by the reduction of the H → partial decay width, the largest component of Γtot. Furthermore, we highlight the fact that, in the light stop/sbottom scenario, event rates with the Higgs boson decaying to a final state are predicted to be essentially below unity, especially in case of ggF, which is doubly suppressed, at production, due to the negative interference from stop/sbottom loops, as well at decay level, due to the Y b suppression. Therefore, during the future LHC runs, the measurement of h → final states is a matter of special importance, which will offer additional handles to pin down the possible MSSM structure of the Higgs sector. Amongst all viable MSSM configurations that we study (including revisiting a light stau solution), we emphasise most the scenario with a light stop, as the latter is also motivated by Dark Matter and Electro-Weak baryogenesis. We also perform fits of the MSSM against the LHC data for all scenarios which we introduce, emphasising the fact that in most cases these are better than for the SM.

  10. NSLS 2005 ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2005).

    SciTech Connect

    MILLER, L.

    2006-05-01

    efforts on NSLS-II, the world-leading third-generation synchrotron planned for construction at BNL. NSLS-II passed a critical milestone in 2005 with the approval by the Department of Energy of CD-0. BNL has established the NSLS-II Project Organization within the Light Sources Directorate to put in place the management systems and infrastructure necessary to execute this complex undertaking. I will serve as NSLS-II Project Director and also retain my position as Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, with the NSLS reporting to me. Another exciting development is the planned establishment of the Joint Photon Sciences Institute (JPSI). JPSI will be devoted to cultivating and fostering collaborative, interdisciplinary R&D in areas of the physical sciences, engineering, and the life sciences that are united in employing synchrotron-based methods. JPSI will also develop new methods and applications that exploit the unique capabilities of NSLS-II and will serve as a gateway for NSLS-II users. JPSI will be a partnership between the Department of Energy and New York State, and I am delighted that New York State Governor George Pataki has pledged $30 million for the construction of the JPSI building. The building will be located adjacent to NSLS-II and will contain offices, meeting rooms, and specialized laboratories. The operating expenses of JPSI and funding for its research programs will be provided by the federal government. Until a permanent NSLS Director is selected, NSLS User Science Division Associate Chair Chi-Chang Kao will serve as the Interim NSLS Director. I couldn't be leaving the facility in more capable hands. Chi-Chang will lead NSLS staff and users this year in the development of a five-year strategic plan for the NSLS, scheduled for completion by the end of summer 2006. The plan will outline the course for the future operation and development of the NSLS, and will help ensure that the future of the NSLS remains as bright as its past.

  11. ZAP AND ITS APPLICATION TO THE OPTIMIZATION OF SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, M.S.

    1987-10-01

    A new computer code, ZAP, has been written to study the influence of various collective effects on the performance of electron storage rings. In particular, the code can evaluate the equilibrium emittance of a ring including the effects of intrabeam scattering. Examples are presented of utilizing the code to optimize the design of storage rings for the purposes of a third-generation synchrotron radiation source and a high-gain free-electron laser. In addition, the importance of the intrabeam scattering emittance blowup to the issue of low energy injection is discussed. Such considerations will be necessary to optimize the design of compact synchrotrons now being studied for use in x-ray lithography. To verify predictions of the code, comparisons are made with experimental measurements of low energy beam emittance taken from the Aladdin storage ring; reasonable agreement is obtained.

  12. Diffraction-Enhanced Computed Tomographic Imaging of Growing Piglet Joints by Using a Synchrotron Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, Glendon W; Belev, George S; Chapman, L Dean; Wiebe, Sheldon P; Cooper, David M; Wong, Adelaine TF; Rosenberg, Alan M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and test a new technology for imaging growing joints by means of diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) combined with CT and using a synchrotron radiation source. DEI–CT images of an explanted 4-wk-old piglet stifle joint were acquired by using a 40-keV beam. The series of scanned slices was later ‘stitched’ together, forming a 3D dataset. High-resolution DEI-CT images demonstrated fine detail within all joint structures and tissues. Striking detail of vasculature traversing between bone and cartilage, a characteristic of growing but not mature joints, was demonstrated. This report documents for the first time that DEI combined with CT and a synchrotron radiation source can generate more detailed images of intact, growing joints than can currently available conventional imaging modalities. PMID:26310464

  13. THE WISE LIGHT CURVES OF Z CAMELOPARDALIS DURING OUTBURST: EVIDENCE FOR SYNCHROTRON EMISSION?

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Thomas E.

    2014-08-10

    The WISE mission happened to observe the cataclysmic variable Z Cam at the peak of an outburst. The WISE single exposure data shows that Z Cam was highly variable at 12 μm, but only marginally so at shorter wavelengths. The rapid variability at 12 μm, and the fact that these observations occurred close to visual maximum suggests that, like SS Cyg, Z Cam is a synchrotron source.

  14. Light stop searches at the LHC in events with one hard photon or jet and missing energy.

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, M.; Freitas, A.; Wagner, C.E.M.

    2008-10-01

    Low energy supersymmetric models provide a solution to the hierarchy problem and also have the necessary ingredients to solve two of the most outstanding issues in cosmology: the origin of the baryon asymmetry and the source of dark matter. In the MSSM, weak scale generation of the baryon asymmetry may be achieved in the presence of light stops, with masses lower than about 130 GeV. Moreover, the proper dark matter density may be obtained in the stop-neutralino co-annihilation region, where the stop-neutralino mass difference is smaller than a few tens of GeV. Searches for scalar top quarks (stops) in pair production processes at the Tevatron and at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) become very challenging in this region of parameters. At the LHC, however, light stops proceeding from the decay of gluino pairs may be identified, provided the gluino mass is smaller than about 900 GeV. In this article we propose an alternative method for stop searches in the co-annihilation region, based on the search for these particles in events with missing energy plus one hard photon or jet. We show that this method is quite efficient and, when complemented with ongoing Tevatron searches, allows to probe stop masses up to about 160 GeV, fully probing the region of parameters consistent with electroweak baryogenesis in the MSSM.

  15. Realizing dark matter and Higgs inflation in light of LHC diphoton excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Shao-Feng; He, Hong-Jian; Ren, Jing; Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi

    2016-06-01

    LHC Run-2 has provided intriguing di-photon signals of a new resonance around 750GeV, which, if not due to statistical fluctuations, must call for new physics beyond the standard model (SM) at TeV scale. We propose a minimal extension of the SM with a complex singlet scalar S and a doublet of vector-like quarks. The scalar sector respects CP symmetry, with its CP-odd imaginary component χ providing a natural dark matter (DM) candidate. The real component of S serves as the new resonance (750GeV) and explains the diphoton excess of the LHC Run-2. The new scalar degrees of freedom of S help to stabilize the Higgs vacuum, and can realize the Higgs inflation around GUT scale, consistent with the current cosmological observations. We construct two representative samples A and B of our model for demonstration. We study the mono-jet signals of DM production from invisible decays Re (S) → χχ at the LHC Run-2. We further derive the DM relic density bound, and analyze constraints from the direct and indirect DM detections.

  16. Study for a proposed Phase I Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) Synchrotron Light Source at Cornell University

    SciTech Connect

    Sol M. Gruner and Maury Tigner, eds.; Ivan Bazarov; Sergey Belomestnykh; Don Bilderback; Ken Finkelstein; Ernie Fontes; Steve Gray; Sol M. Gruner; Geoff Krafft; Lia Merminga; Hasan Padamsee; Ray Helmke; Qun Shen; Joe Rogers; Charles Sinclair; Richard Talman; Maury Tigner

    2001-07-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) has become an essential and rapidly growing tool across the sciences and engineering. World-wide, about 70 SR sources are in various stages of operation, construction, or planning, representing a cumulative investment on many billions of dollars and serving a growing research community well in excess of 10,000 scientists. To date, all major SR x-ray facilities are based on electron (or positron) storage rings. Given the expected continued growth, importance and expense of SR sources, it is important to ask if there are alternatives to the storage ring SR source which offer advantages of capability or cost. A step in this direction is being taken by the SR community with the proposed developments of linac-based x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) utilizing the self-amplified spontaneous emission process (SASE). However, the versatility of modern developments in accelerator physics, as applied to synchrotron radiation, is not limited to storage rings or XFELs. New developments in laser driven photoinjectors and superconducting linac technology open new and exciting possibilities for novel SR-generating machines which offer extraordinary capabilities and promise to catalyze whole new areas of SR-based science.

  17. First Results of the LHC Longitudinal Density Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff, A.; Boccardi, A.; Bravin, E.; Fisher, A.S.; Lefevre, T.; Rabiller, A.; Roncarolo, F.; Welsch, C.P.; /Liverpool U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.

    2012-04-19

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is the world's largest particle accelerator. It is designed to accelerate and collide protons or heavy ions up to the center-of-mass energies of 14 TeV. Knowledge of the longitudinal distribution of particles is important for various aspects of accelerator operation, in particular to check the injection quality and to measure the proportion of charge outside the nominally filled bunches during the physics periods. In order to study this so-called ghost charge at levels very much smaller than the main bunches, a longitudinal profile measurement with a very high dynamic range is needed. A new detector, the LHC Longitudinal Density Monitor (LDM) is a single-photon counting system measuring synchrotron light by means of an avalanche photodiode detector. The unprecedented energies reached in the LHC allow synchrotron light diagnostics to be used with both protons and heavy ions. A prototype was installed during the 2010 LHC run and was able to longitudinally profile the whole ring with a resolution close to the target of 50 ps. On-line correction for the effects of the detector deadtime, pile-up and afterpulsing allow a dynamic range of 105 to be achieved. First measurements with the LDM are presented here along with an analysis of its performance and an outlook for future upgrades.

  18. Light top squarks in a U (1 )R lepton number model with a right handed neutrino and the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Sabyasachi; Datta, AseshKrishna; Huitu, Katri; Roy, Sourov; Waltari, Harri

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the phenomenology of top squarks at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in a supersymmetric model where lepton number is identified with an approximate U (1 )R symmetry in such a way that one of the left-chiral sneutrinos can acquire a large vacuum expectation value and can play the role of the down-type Higgs. This R symmetry allows a subset of trilinear R -parity violating interactions, which determine the collider phenomenology of this model in a significant way. The gauginos are Dirac particles and gluinos are relatively heavy in this class of models. The model contains a right handed neutrino superfield, which gives a tree level mass to one of the active neutrinos. An order one neutrino Yukawa coupling also helps enhance the Higgs boson mass at the tree level and results in a very light bino-like neutralino (χ˜2 0 ) with mass around a few hundred MeV, which is a carrier of missing (transverse) energy (ET ). The model can accommodate two rather light top squarks, compatible with the observed mass of the Higgs boson. The lighter top squark (t˜1) can decay into t χ˜20, and thus the signal would be similar to the signal of top quark pair production at the LHC. In addition, fully visible decays such as t˜2→b e+ can give rise to interesting final states. Such signals at the LHC combined with other features like a heavy gluino could provide strong evidence for this kind of a model. Our analysis shows that mt˜1≲575 (750 ) GeV and mt˜2≲1.2 (1.4 ) TeV can be probed with 5 σ statistical significance at the 13 TeV LHC with 300 (3000 ) fb-1 of integrated luminosity. Finally, we observe that in the presence of superlight carriers of ET, the so-called "stealth" top squark scenario may naturally appear in our model.

  19. Development of soft X-ray polarized light beamline on Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source

    SciTech Connect

    Phase, D. M. Gupta, Mukul Potdar, S. Behera, L. Sah, R. Gupta, Ajay

    2014-04-24

    This article describes the development of a soft x-ray beamline on a bending magnet source of Indus-2 storage ring (2.5 GeV) and some preliminary results of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements using the same. The beamline layout is based on a spherical grating monochromator. The beamline is able to accept synchrotron radiation from the bending magnet port BL-1 of the Indus-2 ring with a wide solid angle. The large horizontal and vertical angular acceptance contributes to high photon flux and selective polarization respectively. The complete beamline is tested for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) ∼ 10{sup −10} mbar. First absorption spectrum was obtained on HOPG graphite foil. Our performance test indicates that modest resolving power has been achieved with adequate photon flux to carry out various absorption experiments.

  20. Initial feasibility study of a dedicated synchrotron radiation light source for ultrafast X-ray science

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, John N.; DeSantis, S.; Hartman, N.; Heimann, P.; LaFever, R.; Li, D.; Padmore, H.; Rimmer, R.; Robinson, K.; Schoenlein, R.; Tanabe, J.; Wang, S.; Zholents, A.; Kairan, D.

    2001-10-26

    We present an initial feasibility summary of a femtosecond synchrotron radiation x-ray source based on a flat-beam rf gun and a recirculating superconducting linac that provides beam to an array of undulators and bend magnets. Optical pulse durations of < 100 fs are obtained by a combination of electron pulse compression, transverse temporal correlation of the electrons, and x-ray pulse compression. After an introduction and initial scientific motivation, we cover the following aspects of the design: layout and lattice, ultra-fast x-ray pulse production, flat electron-beam production, the rf gun, rf systems, cryogenic systems, collective effects, photon production, and synchronization of x-ray and laser pulses. We conclude with a summary of issues and areas of development that remain to be addressed.

  1. Operation of a general purpose stepping motor-encoder positioning subsystem at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stubblefield, F.W.

    1985-11-01

    Four copies of a general purpose subsystem for mechanical positioning of detectors, samples, and beam line optical elements which constitute experiments at the National Synchrotron Light Source facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory have been constructed and placed into operation. Construction of a fifth subsystem unit is nearing completion. The subsystems affect mechanical positioning by controlling a set of stepping motor-encoder pairs. The units are general purpose in the sense that they receive commands over a 9600 baud asynchronous serial line compatible with the RS-232-C electrical signal standard, generate TTL-compatible streams of stepping pulses which can be used with a wide variety of stepping motors, and read back position values from a number of different types and models of position encoder. The basic structure of the motor controller subsystem is briefly reviewed. Additions to the subsystem made in response to problems indicated by actual operation of the four installed units are described in more detail.

  2. LPE grown LSO:Tb scintillator films for high-resolution X-ray imaging applications at synchrotron light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecilia, A.; Rack, A.; Douissard, P.-A.; Martin, T.; Dos Santos Rolo, T.; Vagovič, P.; Hamann, E.; van de Kamp, T.; Riedel, A.; Fiederle, M.; Baumbach, T.

    2011-08-01

    Within the project ScinTAX of the 6th framework program (FP6) of the European Commission (SCINTAX—STRP 033 427) we have developed a new thin single crystal scintillator for high-resolution X-ray imaging. The scintillator is based on a Tb-doped Lu2SiO5 (LSO) film epitaxially grown on an adapted substrate. The high density, effective atomic number and light yield of the scintillating LSO significantly improves the efficiency of the X-ray imaging detectors currently used in synchrotron micro-imaging applications. In this work we present the characterization of the scintillating LSO films in terms of their spatial resolution performance and we provide two examples of high spatial and high temporal resolution applications.

  3. National Synchrotron Light Source user`s manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beamlines. Fifth edition

    SciTech Connect

    Gmuer, N.F.

    1993-04-01

    The success of the National Synchrotron Light Source is based, in large part, on the size of the user community and the diversity of the scientific and technical disciplines represented by these users. As evidence of this success, the VUV Ring has just celebrated its 10th anniversary and the X-ray Ring will do the same in 1995. In order to enhance this success, the NSLS User`s Manual: Guide to the VUV and X-Ray Beamlines - Fifth Edition, is being published. This Manual presents to the scientific community-at-large the current and projected architecture, capabilities and research programs of the various VUV and X-ray beamlines. Also detailed is the research and computer equipment a General User can expect to find and use at each beamline when working at the NSLS. The Manual is updated periodically in order to keep pace with the constant changes on these beamlines.

  4. Measurements and modeling of coherent synchrotron radiation and its impact on the Linac Coherent Light Source electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bane, K. L. F.; Decker, F.-J.; Ding, Y.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Loos, H.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Ratner, D.; Stupakov, G.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Wu, J.

    2009-03-01

    In order to reach the high peak current required for an x-ray free electron laser, two separate magnetic dipole chicanes are used in the Linac Coherent Light Source accelerator to compress the electron bunch length in stages. In these bunch compressors, coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) can be emitted either by a short electron bunch or by any longitudinal density modulation that may be on the bunch. In this paper, we report detailed measurements of the CSR-induced energy loss and transverse emittance growth in these compressors. Good agreement is found between the experimental results and multiparticle tracking studies. We also describe direct observations of CSR at optical wavelengths and compare with analytical models based on beam microbunching.

  5. R -parity violation and light neutralinos at SHiP and the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Jordy; Dreiner, Herbi K.; Schmeier, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    We study the sensitivity of the proposed SHiP experiment to the L Q D operator in R -parity violating supersymmetric theories. We focus on single neutralino production via rare meson decays and the observation of downstream neutralino decays into charged mesons inside the SHiP decay chamber. We provide a generic list of effective operators and decay width formulas for any λ' coupling and show the resulting expected SHiP sensitivity for a widespread list of benchmark scenarios via numerical simulations. We compare this sensitivity to expected limits from testing the same decay topology at the LHC with ATLAS.

  6. Visualization and measurement of multiphase flow in porous media using light transmission and synchrotron x-rays.

    PubMed

    Darnault, Christophe J G; Dicarlo, David A; Bauters, Tim W J; Steenhuis, Tammo S; Parlange, J-Yves; Montemagno, Carlo D; Baveye, Philippe

    2002-10-01

    Non-aqueous phase liquids enter the vadose zone as a result of spills or leaking underground storage facilities, thus contaminating groundwater resources. Measuring the contaminant concentrations is important in assessing the risk to human health and the environment and to develop effective remediation. This research presents the development and application of the light transmission method (LTM) for three-phase flow systems, aimed at investigating unstable fingered flow in a soil-air-oil-water system. The LTM uses the hue and intensity of light transmitted through a slab chamber to measure fluid content, since total liquid content is a function of both hue and light intensity. Evaluation of the LTM is obtained by comparing experiments with LTM and synchrotron X-rays. The LTM captures the spatial resolution of the fluid contents and can provide new insights into rapidly changing, two-phase and three-phase flow systems. Application of the LTM as a visualization technique for environmental and physical phenomena is noted. Visualization by LTM of groundwater remediation by surfactants as well as visualization of model cluster growth and fractal dimensions was also explored.

  7. Singlets in composite Higgs models in light of the LHC 750 GeV diphoton excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Alexander; Cacciapaglia, Giacomo; Cai, Haiying; Flacke, Thomas; Parolini, Alberto; Serôdio, Hugo

    2016-07-01

    Models of compositeness can successfully address the origin of the Higgs boson, as a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson (pNGB) of a spontaneously broken global symmetry, and flavor physics via the partial compositeness mechanism. If the dynamics is generated by a confining gauge group with fermionic matter content, there exists only a finite set of models that have the correct properties to account for the Higgs and top partners at the same time. In this paper, we explore the theory space of this class of models; remarkably, all of them contain—beyond the pNGB Higgs—a pNGB singlet, a , which couples to Standard Model gauge bosons via Wess-Zumino-Witten interactions, thus providing naturally a resonance in the diboson at the LHC. With the assumption that the recently reported diphoton excess at 750 GeV at the LHC arises from the a resonance, we propose a generic approach on how to delineate the best candidate for composite Higgs models with top partners. We find that constraints from other diboson searches severely reduce the theory space of the models under consideration. For the models which can explain the diphoton excess, we make precise and testable predictions for the width and other diboson resonance searches.

  8. Elucidation of structure-function relationships in plant major light-harvesting complex (LHC II) by nonlinear spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lokstein, Heiko; Betke, Alexander; Krikunova, Maria; Teuchner, Klaus; Voigt, Bernd

    2012-03-01

    Conventional linear and time-resolved spectroscopic techniques are often not appropriate to elucidate specific pigment-pigment interactions in light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes (LHCs). Nonlinear (laser-) spectroscopic techniques, including nonlinear polarization spectroscopy in the frequency domain (NLPF) as well as step-wise (resonant) and simultaneous (non-resonant) two-photon excitation spectroscopies may be advantageous in this regard. Nonlinear spectroscopies have been used to elucidate substructure(s) of very complex spectra, including analyses of strong excitonic couplings between chlorophylls and of interactions between (bacterio)chlorophylls and "optically dark" states of carotenoids in LHCs, including the major antenna complex of higher plants, LHC II. This article shortly reviews our previous study and outlines perspectives regarding the application of selected nonlinear laser-spectroscopic techniques to disentangle structure-function relationships in LHCs and other pigment-protein complexes.

  9. Operational Radiation Protection in Synchrotron Light and Free Electron Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed H.; Vylet, Vaclav; /Jefferson Lab

    2009-12-11

    The 3rd generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities are storage ring based facilities with many insertion devices and photon beamlines, and have low injection beam power (< few tens of watts), but extremely high stored beam power ({approx} 1 GW). The 4th generation x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facilities are based on an electron Linac with a long undulator and have high injection beam power (a few kW). Due to its electron and photon beam characteristics and modes of operation, storage ring and photon beamlines have unique safety aspects, which are the main subjects of this paper. The shielding design limits, operational modes, and beam losses are first reviewed. Shielding analysis (source terms and methodologies) and interlocked safety systems for storage ring and photon beamlines (including SR and gas bremsstrahlung) are described. Specific safety issues for storage ring top-off injection operation and FEL facilities are discussed. The operational safety program, e.g., operation authorization, commissioning, training, and radiation measurements, for SR facilities is also presented.

  10. Developing EnviroSuite Resources at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Northrup; Jeffrey Fitts; Mark Fuhrmann; Paul Kalb

    2006-06-01

    The objective of Brookhaven National Laboratory's EnviroSuite Initiative is to develop the facilities, user support infrastructure, and techniques necessary to conduct world-class molecular environmental science research at the NSLS. This is intended to benefit the research of ERSD-supported scientists, both through direct access and assistance and through the indirect benefits of a broader network of environmental scientists as collaborators and users. Much of the EnviroSuite research involves close collaboration with members of the Center for Environmental Molecular Science (CEMS), an EMSI based at BNL and nearby Stony Brook University and jointly supported by ERSD (Project 1023761, P. Kalb) and NSF. This offers unique opportunities to benefit from both national laboratory facilities and university resources. Other collaborators, from around the US and the world, investigate various aspects of the underlying molecular-scale processes in complex natural systems. In general, synchrotron techniques are ideal for studying the molecular-scale structures, chemical/physical interactions, and transformations that govern the macroscopic properties and processes (e.g. transport, bioavailability) of contaminants in the environment. These techniques are element-specific, non-destructive, and sensitive to the very low concentrations found in real-world samples.

  11. Nuclear waste viewed in a new light; a synchrotron study of uranium encapsulated in grout.

    PubMed

    Stitt, C A; Hart, M; Harker, N J; Hallam, K R; MacFarlane, J; Banos, A; Paraskevoulakos, C; Butcher, E; Padovani, C; Scott, T B

    2015-03-21

    How do you characterise the contents of a sealed nuclear waste package without breaking it open? This question is important when the contained corrosion products are potentially reactive with air and radioactive. Synchrotron X-rays have been used to perform micro-scale in-situ observation and characterisation of uranium encapsulated in grout; a simulation for a typical intermediate level waste storage packet. X-ray tomography and X-ray powder diffraction generated both qualitative and quantitative data from a grout-encapsulated uranium sample before, and after, deliberately constrained H2 corrosion. Tomographic reconstructions provided a means of assessing the extent, rates and character of the corrosion reactions by comparing the relative densities between the materials and the volume of reaction products. The oxidation of uranium in grout was found to follow the anoxic U+H2O oxidation regime, and the pore network within the grout was observed to influence the growth of uranium hydride sites across the metal surface. Powder diffraction analysis identified the corrosion products as UO2 and UH3, and permitted measurement of corrosion-induced strain. Together, X-ray tomography and diffraction provide means of accurately determining the types and extent of uranium corrosion occurring, thereby offering a future tool for isolating and studying the reactions occurring in real full-scale waste package systems.

  12. X-ray photonic microsystems for the manipulation of synchrotron light

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, D.; Walko, D. A.; Jung, I. W.; Schwartz, C. P.; Wang, Jin; López, D.; Shenoy, G. K.

    2015-01-01

    Photonic microsystems played an essential role in the development of integrated photonic devices, thanks to their unique spatiotemporal control and spectral shaping capabilities. Similar capabilities to markedly control and manipulate X-ray radiation are highly desirable but practically impossible due to the massive size of the silicon single-crystal optics currently used. Here we show that micromechanical systems can be used as X-ray optics to create and preserve the spatial, temporal and spectral correlation of the X-rays. We demonstrate that, as X-ray reflective optics they can maintain the wavefront properties with nearly 100% reflectivity, and as a dynamic diffractive optics they can generate nanosecond time windows with over 100-kHz repetition rates. Since X-ray photonic microsystems can be easily incorporated into lab-based and next-generation synchrotron X-ray sources, they bring unprecedented design flexibility for future dynamic and miniature X-ray optics for focusing, wavefront manipulation, multicolour dispersion, and pulse slicing. PMID:25940542

  13. Nuclear waste viewed in a new light; a synchrotron study of uranium encapsulated in grout.

    PubMed

    Stitt, C A; Hart, M; Harker, N J; Hallam, K R; MacFarlane, J; Banos, A; Paraskevoulakos, C; Butcher, E; Padovani, C; Scott, T B

    2015-03-21

    How do you characterise the contents of a sealed nuclear waste package without breaking it open? This question is important when the contained corrosion products are potentially reactive with air and radioactive. Synchrotron X-rays have been used to perform micro-scale in-situ observation and characterisation of uranium encapsulated in grout; a simulation for a typical intermediate level waste storage packet. X-ray tomography and X-ray powder diffraction generated both qualitative and quantitative data from a grout-encapsulated uranium sample before, and after, deliberately constrained H2 corrosion. Tomographic reconstructions provided a means of assessing the extent, rates and character of the corrosion reactions by comparing the relative densities between the materials and the volume of reaction products. The oxidation of uranium in grout was found to follow the anoxic U+H2O oxidation regime, and the pore network within the grout was observed to influence the growth of uranium hydride sites across the metal surface. Powder diffraction analysis identified the corrosion products as UO2 and UH3, and permitted measurement of corrosion-induced strain. Together, X-ray tomography and diffraction provide means of accurately determining the types and extent of uranium corrosion occurring, thereby offering a future tool for isolating and studying the reactions occurring in real full-scale waste package systems. PMID:25497037

  14. X-ray photonic microsystems for the manipulation of synchrotron light

    DOE PAGES

    Mukhopadhyay, D.; Walko, D. A.; Jung, I. W.; Schwartz, C. P.; Wang, Jin; López, D.; Shenoy, G. K.

    2015-05-05

    In this study, photonic microsystems played an essential role in the development of integrated photonic devices, thanks to their unique spatiotemporal control and spectral shaping capabilities. Similar capabilities to markedly control and manipulate X-ray radiation are highly desirable but practically impossible due to the massive size of the silicon single-crystal optics currently used. Here we show that micromechanical systems can be used as X-ray optics to create and preserve the spatial, temporal and spectral correlation of the X-rays. We demonstrate that, as X-ray reflective optics they can maintain the wavefront properties with nearly 100% reflectivity, and as a dynamic diffractivemore » optics they can generate nanosecond time windows with over 100-kHz repetition rates. Since X-ray photonic microsystems can be easily incorporated into lab-based and next-generation synchrotron X-ray sources, they bring unprecedented design flexibility for future dynamic and miniature X-ray optics for focusing, wavefront manipulation, multicolour dispersion, and pulse slicing.« less

  15. Assessment of murine bone ultrastructure using synchrotron light: towards nano-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Philipp; Voide, Romain; Stauber, Martin; Stampanoni, Marco; Donahue, Leah Rae; Wyss, Peter; Sennhauser, Urs; Müller, Ralph

    2006-08-01

    To describe the different aspects of bone quality, we follow a hierarchical approach and assess bone tissue properties in different regimes of spatial resolution, beginning at the organ level and going down to cellular dimensions. For these purposes we developed different synchrotron radiation (SR) based computed-tomography (CT) methods to assess murine bone ultrastructure. In a first step, a tubular system and the osteocyte lacunar system within murine cortical bone have been established as novel ultrastructural quantitative traits. Results in two mouse strains showed that morphometry of these quantitative traits was dependent on strain and partially on gender, and that their scaling behavior with bone size was fundamentally different. In a second step, we explored bone competence on an ultrastructural level and related our findings to the two ultrastructural quantitative traits introduced before. We showed that SR CT imaging is a powerful tool to investigate the initiation and propagation of microcracks, which may alter bone quality and may lead to increased fracture risk by means of microdamage accumulation. In summary, investigation of ultrastructural bone tissue properties will eventually lead to a better understanding of bone quality and its relative contribution to bone competence.

  16. X-ray photonic microsystems for the manipulation of synchrotron light

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, D.; Walko, D. A.; Jung, I. W.; Schwartz, C. P.; Wang, Jin; López, D.; Shenoy, G. K.

    2015-05-05

    In this study, photonic microsystems played an essential role in the development of integrated photonic devices, thanks to their unique spatiotemporal control and spectral shaping capabilities. Similar capabilities to markedly control and manipulate X-ray radiation are highly desirable but practically impossible due to the massive size of the silicon single-crystal optics currently used. Here we show that micromechanical systems can be used as X-ray optics to create and preserve the spatial, temporal and spectral correlation of the X-rays. We demonstrate that, as X-ray reflective optics they can maintain the wavefront properties with nearly 100% reflectivity, and as a dynamic diffractive optics they can generate nanosecond time windows with over 100-kHz repetition rates. Since X-ray photonic microsystems can be easily incorporated into lab-based and next-generation synchrotron X-ray sources, they bring unprecedented design flexibility for future dynamic and miniature X-ray optics for focusing, wavefront manipulation, multicolour dispersion, and pulse slicing.

  17. Preliminary studies of enhanced contrast radiography in anatomy and embryology of insects with Elettra synchrotron light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hönnicke, M. G.; Foerster, L. A.; Navarro-Silva, M. A.; Menk, R.-H.; Rigon, L.; Cusatis, C.

    2005-08-01

    Enhanced contrast X-ray imaging is achieved by exploiting the real part of the refraction index, which is responsible for the phase shifts, in addition to the imaginary part, which is responsible for the absorption. Such techniques are called X-ray phase contrast imaging. An analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging set-up with Diffraction Enhanced Imaging processing (DEI) were used for preliminary studies in anatomy and embryology of insects. Parasitized stinkbug and moth eggs used as control agents of pests in vegetables and adult stinkbugs and mosquitoes ( Aedes aegypti) were used as samples. The experimental setup was mounted in the SYRMEP beamline at ELETTRA. Images were obtained using a high spatial resolution CCD detector (pixel size 14×14 μm 2) coupled with magnifying optics. Analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast images (PCI) and edge detection images show contrast and details not observed with conventional synchrotron radiography and open the possibility for future study in the embryonic development of insects.

  18. Dynamical Electroweak Symmetry Breaking with a Heavy Fermion in Light of Recent LHC Results

    DOE PAGES

    Hung, Pham Q.

    2013-01-01

    The recent announcement of a discovery of a possible Higgs-like particle—its spin and parity are yet to be determined—at the LHC with a mass of 126 GeV necessitates a fresh look at the nature of the electroweak symmetry breaking, in particular if this newly-discovered particle will turn out to have the quantum numbers of a Standard Model Higgs boson. Even if it were a 0 + scalar with the properties expected for a SM Higgs boson, there is still the quintessential hierarchy problem that one has to deal with and which, by itself, suggests a new physics energy scale aroundmore » 1 TeV. This paper presents a minireview of one possible scenario: the formation of a fermion-antifermion condensate coming from a very heavy fourth generation, carrying the quantum number of the SM Higgs field, and thus breaking the electroweak symmetry.« less

  19. THE Low-level Radio Frequency System for the superconducting cavities of National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, H.; Rose, J.; Holub, B.; Cupolo, J.; Oliva, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    A digital low-level radio frequency (LLRF) field controller has been developed for the storage ring of The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II). The primary performance goal for the LLRF is to support the required RF operation of the superconducting cavities with a beam current of 500mA and a 0.14 degree or better RF phase stability. The digital field controller is FPGA-based, in a standard format 19-inch/I-U chassis. It has an option of high-level control support with MATLAB running on a local host computer through a USB2.0 port. The field controller has been field tested with the high-power superconducting RF (SRF) at Canadian light Source, and successfully stored a high beam current of 250 mA. The test results show that required specifications for the cavity RF field stability are met. This digital field controller is also currently being used as a development platform for other functional modules in the NSLS-II RF systems.

  20. The MoEDAL Experiment at the LHC - a New Light on the Terascale Frontier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinfold, J. L.

    2015-07-01

    MoEDAL is a pioneering experiment designed to search for highly ionizing avatars of new physics such as magnetic monopoles or massive (pseudo-)stable charged particles. Its groundbreaking physics program defines a number of scenarios that yield potentially revolutionary insights into such foundational questions as: are there extra dimensions or new symmetries; what is the mechanism for the generation of mass; does magnetic charge exist; what is the nature of dark matter; and, how did the big-bang develop. MoEDAL's purpose is to meet such far-reaching challenges at the frontier of the field. The innovative MoEDAL detector employs unconventional methodologies tuned to the prospect of discovery physics. The largely passive MoEDAL detector, deployed at Point 8 on the LHC ring, has a dual nature. First, it acts like a giant camera, comprised of nuclear track detectors - analyzed offline by ultra fast scanning microscopes - sensitive only to new physics. Second, it is uniquely able to trap the particle messengers of physics beyond the Standard Model for further study. MoEDAL's radiation environment is monitored by a state-of-the-art real-time TimePix pixel detector array. A new MoEDAL sub-detector to extend MoEDAL's reach to millicharged, minimally ionizing, particles (MMIPs) is under study.

  1. NSLS 2006 ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2006)

    SciTech Connect

    MILLER, L.

    2006-12-31

    This past year has seen both challenges and fantastic new opportunities for the user community at the NSLS. The fantastic new opportunities are clear and abundant. We now have a five-year strategic plan for new development and continued operation of the NSLS. The NSLS continues to be an extremely productive facility, and the UEC is delighted at how NSLS Chair Chi-Chang Kao has consulted widely within the user community to develop a five-year plan for strategic upgrades and continued operation of the facility. The NSLS-II project, led by Associate Lab Director Steve Dierker, has done very well in its Department of Energy (DOE) reviews and will hopefully soon receive Critical Decision-1 (CD-1) approval, which in DOE lingo gives a go-ahead to launch the detailed design of the facility. We also held the first joint user meeting between the NSLS and Brookhaven's Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN), for which the building is near completion. The joint user meeting is an important step toward the close collaboration of the two facilities. The CFN, led by Emilio Mendez, promises to provide capabilities and research foci that are complementary to those at the NSLS. Together, all of these developments give a clear path to an exciting future of synchrotron radiation research at Brookhaven! However, with opportunities come challenges! One of the largest of these faced in the past year involved congressional support for scientific research in general, and DOE user facilities in particular. As you likely know, Congress did not complete its usual budget process in 2006, with the exceptions of the departments of Defense and Homeland Security. This left science funding at the budget levels enacted in late 2005 for FY2006, and unfortunately, FY2006 was not a particularly memorable vintage for science support. The good news is that you, the user community, have spoken up with unprecedented vigor about this, and Congress appears to be listening. As we look at the FY2007 budget

  2. Synchrotron radiation from protons

    SciTech Connect

    Dutt, S.K.

    1992-12-01

    Synchrotron radiation from protons, though described by the same equations as the radiation from electrons, exhibits a number of interesting features on account of the parameters reached in praxis. In this presentation, we shall point out some of the features relating to (i) normal synchrotron radiation from dipoles in proton machines such as the High Energy Booster and the Superconducting Super Collider; (ii) synchrotron radiation from short dipoles, and its application to light monitors for proton machines, and (iii) synchrotron radiation from undulators in the limit when, the deflection parameter is much smaller than unity. The material for this presentation is taken largely from the work of Hofmann, Coisson, Bossart, and their collaborators, and from a paper by Kim. We shall emphasize the qualitative aspects of synchrotron radiation in the cases mentioned above, making, when possible, simple arguments for estimating the spectral and angular properties of the radiation. Detailed analyses can be found in the literature.

  3. Synchrotron Radiation Sheds Fresh Light on Plant Research: The Use of Powerful Techniques to Probe Structure and Composition of Plants.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Permual; Willick, Ian R; Lahlali, Rachid; Karunakaran, Chithra; Tanino, Karen K

    2015-07-01

    While synchrotron radiation is a powerful tool in material and biomedical sciences, it is still underutilized in plant research. This mini review attempts to introduce the potential of synchrotron-based spectroscopic and imaging methods and their applications to plant sciences. Synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray absorption and fluorescence techniques, and two- and three-dimensional imaging techniques are examined. We also discuss the limitations of synchrotron-based research in plant sciences, specifically the types of plant samples that can be used. Despite limitations, the unique features of synchrotron radiation such as high brightness, polarization and pulse properties offer great advantages over conventional spectroscopic and imaging tools and enable the correlation of the structure and chemical composition of plants with biochemical function. Modern detector technologies and experimental methodologies are thus enabling plant scientists to investigate aspects of plant sciences such as ultrafast kinetics of biochemical reactions, mineral uptake, transport and accumulation, and dynamics of cell wall structure and composition during environmental stress in unprecedented ways using synchrotron beamlines. The potential for the automation of some of these synchrotron technologies and their application to plant phenotyping is also discussed.

  4. Soft-x-ray and vacuum-ultraviolet beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source 700-MeV storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G.P.; Howells, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    We summarize the characteristics of the first beamlines which are being installed and commissioned at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) 700 MeV storage ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory. We also give a progress report as of July 1982 on the early stages of beamline alignment and operation in which particular attention is paid to the 5 beamlines which NSLS has developed. The report describes in detail a novel method for beamline alignment which is of general application.

  5. Production and decays of the light pseudoscalar boson {eta} at the CERN LHC in the simplest little Higgs model

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung Kingman; Yan Qishu; Song, Jeonghyeon; Tseng Poyan

    2008-09-01

    In many extensions of the standard model, the Higgs sector often contains an additional pseudoscalar boson. A good example is the SU(3) simplest little Higgs model, which accommodates a light pseudoscalar boson {eta} with quite different characteristics from those in other multi-Higgs-doublet models. We study various phenomenological signatures of the {eta} at the CERN LHC. In particular, we calculate in details both production and decays in the Drell-Yan type channel qq{yields}Z/Z{sup '}{yields}h{eta}, and in the associated production with a tt pair, gg(qq){yields}tt{eta}. We emphasize the {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} decay mode of the {eta} boson when its mass is below the bb threshold. We show that tt{eta} production is in fact large enough to give a sizable number of events while suppressing the backgrounds. We also comment on the direct gluon fusion process and the indirect decay from the heavy T quark (T{yields}t{eta})

  6. A composite light scalar, electro-weak symmetry breaking and the recent LHC searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elander, Daniel; Piai, Maurizio

    2012-11-01

    We construct a model in which electro-weak symmetry breaking is induced by a strongly coupled sector, which is described in terms of a five-dimensional model in the spirit of the bottom-up approach to holography. We compute the precision electro-weak parameters, and identify regions of parameter space allowed by indirect tests. We compute the spectrum of scalar and vector resonances, which contains a set of parametrically light states that can be identified with the electro-weak gauge bosons and a light dilaton. There is then a little desert, up to 2-3 TeV, where towers of resonances of the vector, axial-vector and scalar particles appear.

  7. An updated analysis of Inert Higgs Doublet Model in light of the recent results from LUX, PLANCK, AMS-02 and LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang; Yuan, Qiang E-mail: yue-lin.tsai@ipmu.jp E-mail: tcyuan@phys.sinica.edu.tw

    2014-06-01

    In light of the recent discovery by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of a Higgs-like particle with a narrow mass range of 125–126 GeV, we perform an updated analysis on one of the popular scalar dark matter models, the Inert Higgs Doublet Model (IHDM). We take into account in our likelihood analysis of various experimental constraints, including recent relic density measurement, dark matter direct and indirect detection constraints as well as the latest collider constraints on the invisible decay width of the Higgs boson and monojet search at the LHC. It is shown that if the invisible decay of the standard model Higgs boson is open, LHC as well as direct detection experiments like LUX and XENON100 could put stringent limits on the Higgs boson couplings to dark matter. We find that the most favoured parameter space for IHDM corresponds to dark matter with a mass less than 100 GeV or so. In particular, the best-fit points are at the dark matter mass around 70 GeV where the invisible Higgs decay to dark matter is closed. Scalar dark matter in the higher mass range of 0.5–4 TeV is also explored in our study. Projected sensitivities for the future experiments of monojet at LHC-14, XENON1T and AMS-02 one year antiproton flux are shown to put further constraints on the existing parameter space of IHDM.

  8. The Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory: A high-brightness soft x-ray synchrotron-radiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A.S.; Robinson, A.L.

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Light Source, a third-generation national synchrotron-radiation facility now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is scheduled to begin serving qualified users across a broad spectrum of research areas in the spring of 1993. Based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized to operate at 1.5 GeV, the ALS will have 10 long straight sections available for insertion devices (undulators and wigglers) and 24 high-quality bend-magnet ports. The short pulse width (30--50 ns) will be ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will generate high-brightness soft x-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from below 20 eV to above 2 keV. Wigglers and bend magnets will extend the spectrum by generating high fluxes of hard x-rays to photon energies above 10 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in which XUV radiation is used to study matter in all its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy). Biological applications will include x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity in the water window of the spectrum where water is much more transparent than protein. The ALS will be an excellent research tool for atomic physics and chemistry because the high flux will allow measurements to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Development of an x-ray fluorescence microprobe at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory: Early results: Comparison with data from other techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.V.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.; Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.; Gordon, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical predictions for the detection levels in x-ray fluorescence analysis with a synchrotron storage ring are being achieved experimentally at several laboratories. This paper is deliberately restricted to the state of development of the Brookhaven National Laboratory/University of Chicago instruments. Analyses at the parts per million (ppM) level are being made using white light apertured to 20 ..mu..m and an energy dispersive system. This system is particularly useful for elements with Z > 20 in materials dominated by elements with Z < 20. Diffraction causes an interference for crystalline materials. Development of a focusing microprobe for tunable monochromatic x-rays and a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) is delayed by problems in shaping an 8:1 focusing mirror to the required accuracy. Reconnaissance analyses with a wiggler source on the CHESS synchrotron have been made in the K spectrum up to Z = 80.

  10. Polyclonal antibodies to light-harvesting CHL-protein of PSII (LHC II) in marine green algae Bryopsis corticulans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaonan; Zhou, Baicheng; Tseng, C. K.

    1992-06-01

    Polyc·lonal antibodies raised against LHC II isolated from SDS-solubilized Bryopsis corticulans thylakiod membranes by SDS-PAGE, were characterised by double immunodiffusion, Rocket immunoelectrophoresis and antigen-antibody crossed immunoelectro-phoresis assays showed the antibodies had strong cross-reaction with all B. corticulans LHC II components (even with those which were incubated in boiling water) and showed immunological cross-reactivity with LHC II polypeptides of spinach and the marine green alga Codium fragile. The results suggested that LHC II of different species had similar antigenic determinants and also conservation of amino acid sequences of the polypeptides during evolution, and that the antibodies could cross react with apoproteins of D2 proteins (which contain P680) from B. corticulans, spinach and C. fragile, but not with apoproteins of P700 Chl-proteins. Our results indicated some similarities in primary structure between LHC II of different species, and between LHC II and D2 proteins of marine green algae and spinach. Our finding that D2 and P700 Chl-proteins are not immunologically related suggested that P700 Chl-proteins and D2 proteins pass through independent evolutionary pathways.

  11. Synchrotron polarization in blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haocheng; Böttcher, Markus; Chen, Xuhui

    2014-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of time- and energy-dependent synchrotron polarization signatures in a shock-in-jet model for γ-ray blazars. Our calculations employ a full three-dimensional radiation transfer code, assuming a helical magnetic field throughout the jet. The code considers synchrotron emission from an ordered magnetic field, and takes into account all light-travel-time and other relevant geometric effects, while the relevant synchrotron self-Compton and external Compton effects are handled with the two-dimensional Monte-Carlo/Fokker-Planck (MCFP) code. We consider several possible mechanisms through which a relativistic shock propagating through the jet may affect the jet plasma to produce a synchrotron and high-energy flare. Most plausibly, the shock is expected to lead to a compression of the magnetic field, increasing the toroidal field component and thereby changing the direction of the magnetic field in the region affected by the shock. We find that such a scenario leads to correlated synchrotron + synchrotron-self-Compton flaring, associated with substantial variability in the synchrotron polarization percentage and position angle. Most importantly, this scenario naturally explains large polarization angle rotations by ≳ 180°, as observed in connection with γ-ray flares in several blazars, without the need for bent or helical jet trajectories or other nonaxisymmetric jet features.

  12. Analysis of peripheral thermal damage after laser irradiation of dentin using polarized light microscopy and synchrotron radiation infrared spectromicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dela Rosa, Alfredo; Sarma, Anupama V.; Le, Charles Q.; Jones, Robert S.; Fried, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    It is necessary to minimize peripheral thermal damage during laser irradiation, since thermal damage to collagen and mineral compromises the bond strength to restorative materials in dentin and inhibits healing and osteointegration in bone. The overall objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that lasers resonant to the specific absorption of water, collagen, and hydroxyapatite with pulse durations less than the thermal relaxation times at each respective laser wavelength will efficiently remove dentin with minimal peripheral thermal damage. Precise incisions were produced in 3 x 3 mm2 blocks of human dentin using CO2 (9.6 μm), Er:YSGG (2.79 μm), and Nd:YAG (355 nm) lasers with and without a computer controlled water spray. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography was used to obtain optical cross-sections of each incision to determine the rate and efficiency of ablation. The peripheral thermal damage zone around each incision was analyzed using polarized light microscopy (PLM) and Synchrotron-Radiation Fourier Transform Infrared Spectro-microscopy (SR-FTIR). Thermally induced chemical changes to both mineral and the collagen matrix was observed with SR-FTIR with a 10-μm spatial resolution and those changes were correlated with optical changes observed with PLM. Minimal (<10-μm) thermal damage was observed for pulse durations less than the thermal relaxation time (Tr ) of the deposited laser energy, with and without applied water at 9.6 um and only with applied water at 2.79 μm. For pulse durations greater than Tr, significantly greater peripheral thermal damage was observed for both IR laser wavelengths with and without the water spray. There was minimal thermal damage for 355-nm laser pulses, however extensive mechanical damage (cracks) was observed. High resolution SR-FTIR is well suited for characterization of the chemical changes that occur due to thermal damage peripheral to laser incisions in proteinaceous hard tissues. Sub

  13. Beam Instrumentation and Diagnostics for the LHC Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravin, E.; Dehning, B.; Jones, R.; Lefevre, T.

    The extensive array of beam instrumentation with which the LHC is equipped, has played a major role in its commissioning, rapid intensity ramp-up and safe and reliable operation. High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) brings with it a number of new challenges in terms of beam instrumentation that will be discussed in this chapter. The beam loss system will need significant upgrades in order to be able to cope with the demands of HL-LHC, with cryogenic beam loss monitors under investigation for deployment in the new inner triplet magnets to distinguish between primary beam losses and collision debris. Radiation tolerant integrated circuits are also being developed to allow the front-end electronics to sit much closer to the detector. Upgrades to other existing systems are also envisaged; including the beam position measurement system in the interaction regions and the addition of a halo measurement capability to synchrotron light diagnostics. Additionally, several new diagnostic systems are under investigation, such as very high bandwidth pick-ups and a streak camera installation, both able to perform intra-bunch measurements of transverse position on a turn by turn basis.

  14. Introducing Synchrotrons Into the Classroom

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Brookhaven's Introducing Synchrotrons Into the Classroom (InSynC) program gives teachers and their students access to the National Synchrotron Light Source through a competitive proposal process. The first batch of InSynC participants included a group of students from Islip Middle School, who used the massive machine to study the effectiveness of different what filters.

  15. Introducing Synchrotrons Into the Classroom

    SciTech Connect

    2011-05-20

    Brookhaven's Introducing Synchrotrons Into the Classroom (InSynC) program gives teachers and their students access to the National Synchrotron Light Source through a competitive proposal process. The first batch of InSynC participants included a group of students from Islip Middle School, who used the massive machine to study the effectiveness of different what filters.

  16. Low mass neutralino dark matter in minimal supergravity and more general models in the light of LHC data

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, Nabanita; Choudhury, Arghya; Datta, Amitava

    2011-11-01

    The b{tau}jEeT signal at the ongoing LHC experiments is simulated with Pythia in the minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) and other models of supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking. Special attention is given to the compatibility of this signature with the low mass neutralino dark matter (LMNDM) scenario consistent with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data. In the mSUGRA model the above signal as well as the LMNDM scenario are strongly disfavored due to the constraints from the ongoing SUSY searches at the LHC. This tension, however, originates from the model dependent correlations among the parameters in the strong and electroweak sectors of mSUGRA. That there is no serious conflict between the LMNDM scenario and the LHC data is demonstrated by constructing generic phenomenological models such that the strong sector is unconstrained or mildly constrained by the existing LHC data and parameters in the electroweak sector, unrelated to the strong sector, yield dark matter relic density consistent with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data. The proposed models, fairly insensitive to the conventional SUSY searches in the jets+Ee{sub T} and other channels, yield observable signal in the suggested channel for L > or approx. 1 fb{sup -1} of data. They are also consistent with the LMNDM scenario and can be tested by the direct dark matter search experiments in the near future. Some of these models can be realized by nonuniversal scalar and gaugino masses at the grand unified theory scale.

  17. Testing the color charge and mass dependence of parton energy loss with heavy-to-light ratios at BNL RHIC and CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Armesto, Nestor; Dainese, Andrea; Salgado, Carlos A.; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2005-03-01

    The ratio of nuclear modification factors of high-p{sub T} heavy-flavored mesons to light-flavored hadrons ('heavy-to-light ratio') in nucleus-nucleus collisions tests the partonic mechanism expected to underlie jet quenching. Heavy-to-light ratios are mainly sensitive to the mass and color-charge dependences of medium-induced parton energy loss. Here, we assess the potential for identifying these two effects in D and B meson production at RHIC and at the LHC. To this end, we supplement the perturbative QCD factorized formalism for leading hadron production with radiative parton energy loss. For D meson spectra at high but experimentally accessible transverse momentum (10 < or approx. p{sub T} < or approx. 20 GeV) in Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC, we find that charm quarks behave essentially like light quarks. However, since light-flavored hadron yields are dominated by gluon parents, the heavy-to-light ratio of D mesons is a sensitive probe of the color-charge dependence of parton energy loss. In contrast, due to the larger b quark mass, the medium modification of B mesons in the same kinematical regime provides a sensitive test of the mass dependence of parton energy loss. At RHIC energies, the strategies for identifying and disentangling the color charge and mass dependence of parton energy loss are more involved because of the smaller kinematical range accessible. We argue that at RHIC, the kinematical regime best suited for such an analysis of D mesons is 7 < or approx. p{sub T} < or approx. 12 GeV, whereas the study of lower transverse momenta is further complicated due to the known dominant contribution of additional, particle species dependent, nonperturbative effects.

  18. Design for a Longitudinal Density Monitor for the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff, Adam; Bart Pedersen, Stephane; Boccardi, Andrea; Bravin, Enrico; Lefevre, Thibaut; Rabiller, Aurelie; Roncarolo, Federico; Fisher, Alan; Welsch, Carsten; /Liverpool U.

    2012-07-13

    Synchrotron radiation is currently used on the LHC for beam imaging and for monitoring the proton population in the 3 microsecond abort gap. In addition to these existing detectors, a study has been initiated to provide longitudinal density profiles of the LHC beams with a high dynamic range and a 50ps time resolution. This would allow for the precise measurement both of the bunch shape and the number of particles in the bunch tail or drifting into ghost bunches. A solution is proposed based on counting synchrotron light photons with two fast avalanche photo-diodes (APD) operated in Geiger mode. One is free-running but heavily attenuated and can be used to measure the core of the bunch. The other is much more sensitive, for measurement of the bunch tails, but must be gated off during the passage of the bunch to prevent the detector from being swamped. An algorithm is then applied to combine the two measurements and correct for the detector dead-time, afterpulsing and pile-up effects. Initial results from laboratory testing of this system are described here.

  19. Transverse damping systems in modern synchrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhabitsky, V. M.

    2006-12-01

    Transverse feedback systems for suppression of transverse coherent beam oscillations are used in modern synchrotrons for preventing the development of transverse instabilities and damping residual beam oscillations after injection. Information on damper systems for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC; CERN, Geneva) and the accelerator complex FAIR (GSI, Darmstadt) is presented. The project for the LHC is being performed at the Laboratory of Particle Physics of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in collaboration with CERN. The information concerning the state of the project and the plans of its completion at the LHC is given. The results of the first design activity on transverse damping systems at the SIS100 and SIS300 synchrotrons, to be created in the framework of the new international project FAIR, are presented.

  20. Ultrafast excitation energy transfer and exciton-exciton annihilation processes in isolated light harvesting complexes of photosystem II (LHC II) from spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Bittner, T.; Wasielewski, M.R. ); Irrgang, K.D.; Renger, G. )

    1994-11-17

    Excitation energy transfer and exciton-exciton annihilation in the isolated light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein complex of spinach photosystem II (LHC II) has been studied by two-color absorption difference spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution. After selectively exciting Chl b at 645 nm, the transient absorption changes were monitored at wavelengths where either Chl b (655 nm) or Chl a (680 nm) dominates the absorption of LHC II. From the good correspondence of the lifetimes obtained from a numerical analysis of the very fast relaxation in the Chl b absorption band (160 [+-] 20 fs) and the rise kinetics in the Chl a absorption band (145 [+-] 20 fs), it is suggested that the Chl b [yields] Chl a excitation energy transfer occurs on a time scale of about 150 fs. In addition, at both probe wavelengths (655 and 680 nm) lifetimes of 3-7 ps were observed which likely arise from excitation energy transfer processes connected with spectral shifting. The kinetic curves of the transient absorption changes at 680 nm show a remarkable intensity dependence which is ascribed to exciton-exciton annihilation. Since at a probe wavelength of 655 nm no intensity effect on the kinetics was observed, it is concluded that annihilation processes preferably occur among excited singlet states of Chl a molecules. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Excluding the light dark matter window of a 331 model using LHC and direct dark matter detection data

    SciTech Connect

    Cogollo, D.; Gonzalez-Morales, Alma X.; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Teles, P. Rebello E-mail: alxogonz@ucsc.edu E-mail: patricia.rebello.teles@cern.ch

    2014-11-01

    We sift the impact of the recent Higgs precise measurements, and recent dark matter direct detection results, on the dark sector of an electroweak extension of the Standard Model that has a complex scalar as dark matter. We find that in this model the Higgs decays with a large branching ratio into dark matter particles, and charged scalars when these are kinematically available, for any coupling strength differently from the so called Higgs portal. Moreover, we compute the abundance and spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section, which are driven by the Higgs and Z{sup '} boson processes. We decisively exclude the 1–500 GeV dark matter window and find the most stringent lower bound in the literature on the scale of symmetry breaking of the model namely 10 TeV, after applying the LUX-2013 limit. Interestingly, the projected XENON1T constraint will be able to rule out the entire 1 GeV–1000 GeV dark matter mass range. Lastly, for completeness, we compute the charged scalar production cross section at the LHC and comment on the possibility of detection at current and future LHC runnings.

  2. Photon reflectivity distributions from the LHC beam screen and their implications on the arc beam vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahne, N.; Baglin, V.; Collins, I. R.; Giglia, A.; Pasquali, L.; Pedio, M.; Nannarone, S.; Cimino, R.

    2004-07-01

    In particle accelerators with intense positively charged bunched beams, an electron cloud may induce beam instabilities and the related beam induced electron multipacting (BIEM) can result in an undesired pressure rise. In a cryogenic machine such as the large hadron collider (LHC), the BIEM will introduce additional heat load. When present, synchrotron radiation (SR) may generate a significant number of photoelectrons, that may play a role in determining the onset and the detailed properties of the electron cloud related instability. Since electrons are constrained to move along field lines, those created on the accelerator equator in a strong vertical (dipole) field cannot participate in the e-cloud build-up. Therefore, for the LHC there has been a continuous effort to find solutions to absorb the photons on the equator. The solution adopted for the LHC dipole beam screens is a saw-tooth structure on the illuminated equator. SR from a bending magnet beamline at ELETTRA, Italy (BEAR) has been used to measure the reflectivities (forward, back-scattered and diffuse), for a flat and a saw-tooth structured Cu co-laminated surface using both white light SR, similar to the one emitted by LHC, and monochromatic light. Our data show that the saw-tooth structure does reduce the total reflectivity and modifies the photon energy distribution of the reflected photons. The implications of these results on the LHC arc vacuum system are discussed.

  3. Proton synchrotron radiation at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman-Keup, Randy; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    While protons are not generally associated with synchrotron radiation, they do emit visible light at high enough energies. This paper presents an overview of the use of synchrotron radiation in the Tevatron to measure transverse emittances and to monitor the amount of beam in the abort gap. The latter is necessary to ensure a clean abort and prevent quenches of the superconducting magnets and damage to the silicon detectors of the collider experiments.

  4. Synchrotron radiation in biosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinkovic, Nebojsa S.; Gupta, Sayan; Zhan, Chenyang; Chance, Mark R.

    2005-12-01

    The Center for Synchrotron Biosciences (CSB) operates five beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Infrared (IR) micro-spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, structural proteomics and macromolecular footprinting are among the major technologies available through the Center. IR micro-spectroscopy is used to examine protein-folding in the microsecond time regime, image bone, neurons, seeds and other biological tissues, as well as image samples of interest in the chemical and environmental sciences. Structural proteomics research of New York Structural Genomics Research Consortium (NYSGRC) is steadily increasing the number of solved protein structures, with a goal to solve 100-200 structures per year. To speed up the research, a high-throughput method called 'metallomics' was implemented for NYSGRC crystallographers to detect intrinsic anomalous scatterers using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Hydroxyl radical mediated X-ray footprinting is capable of resolving folding events of RNA, at single base resolution on millisecond timescales using a synchrotron white beam. The high brightness of synchrotron source is essential for CSB projects as it permits the use of smaller sample sizes and/or concentration, and allows studies of more complicated biological systems than with conventional sources.

  5. LHC Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-07-28

    The LHC is the world’s highest energy particle accelerator and scientists use it to record an unprecedented amount of data. This data is recorded in electronic format and it requires an enormous computational infrastructure to convert the raw data into conclusions about the fundamental rules that govern matter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln gives us a sense of just how much data is involved and the incredible computer resources that makes it all possible.

  6. Kinetic freeze-out temperature and flow velocity extracted from transverse momentum spectra of final-state light flavor particles produced in collisions at RHIC and LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hua-Rong; Liu, Fu-Hu; Lacey, Roy A.

    2016-04-01

    The transverse momentum spectra of final-state light flavor particles produced in proton-proton ( p - p , copper-copper (Cu-Cu), gold-gold (Au-Au), lead-lead (Pb-Pb), and proton-lead ( p -Pb) collisions for different centralities at relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and large hadron collider (LHC) energies are studied in the framework of a multisource thermal model. The experimental data measured by the STAR, CMS, and ALICE Collaborations are consistent with the results calculated by the multi-component Erlang distribution and Tsallis Statistics. The effective temperature and real temperature (kinetic freeze-out temperature) of the interacting system at the stage of kinetic freeze-out, the mean transverse flow velocity and mean flow velocity of particles, and the relationships between them are extracted. The dependences of effective temperature and mean (transverse) momentum on rest mass, moving mass, centrality, and center-of-mass energy, and the dependences of kinetic freeze-out temperature and mean (transverse) flow velocity on centrality, center-of-mass energy, and system size are obtained.

  7. Complexation of copper and zinc ions with proteins of a light-harvesting complex (LHC-II) of chloroplast thylakoid membranes studied by FT-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajmir-Riahi, H. A.; Ahmed, A.

    1993-08-01

    The interaction of Zn(II) and Cu(II) ions with the light-harvesting proteins (LHC-II) of chloroplast thylakoid membranes was studied in aqueous solution with metal ion concentrations of 0.01 to 20mM, using Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Analyses of the metal ion binding mode and protein conformational variations were carried out and correlations between spectral changes and metal—protein complexation were established. Infrared difference spectroscopic results revealed the presence of a strong metal—protein interaction at high metal ion concentrations, while at low concentrations complexation was negligible. The binding of Zn and Cu ions was found to be with the protein carbonyl groups at low metal ion concentrations, whereas CO and CN groups were the main coordination sites at higher concentrations. A major conformational variation from α-helix to β-sheet and turn structures was observed in the presence of a concentrated metal ion solution.

  8. Probing the μνSSM with light scalars, pseudoscalars and neutralinos from the decay of a SM-like Higgs boson at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pradipta; López-Fogliani, Daniel E.; Mitsou, Vasiliki A.; Muñoz, Carlos; de Austri, Roberto Ruiz

    2014-11-01

    The " μ from ν" supersymmetric standard model ( μνSSM) can accommodate the newly discovered Higgs-like scalar boson with a mass around 125 GeV. This model provides a solution to the μ-problem and simultaneously reproduces correct neutrino physics by the simple use of right-handed neutrino superfields. These new superfields together with the introduced R-parity violation can produce novel and characteristic signatures of the μνSSM at the LHC. We explore the signatures produced through two-body Higgs decays into the new states, provided that these states lie below in the mass spectrum. For example, a pair produced light neutralinos depending on the associated decay length can give rise to displaced multi-leptons/taus/jets/photons with small/moderate missing transverse energy. In the same spirit, a Higgs-like scalar decaying to a pair of scalars/pseudoscalars can produce final states with prompt multi-leptons/taus/jets/photons.

  9. Molecular Chemical Structure of Barley Proteins Revealed by Ultra-Spatially Resolved Synchrotron Light Sourced FTIR Microspectroscopy: Comparison of Barley Varieties

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,P.

    2007-01-01

    Barley protein structure affects the barley quality, fermentation, and degradation behavior in both humans and animals among other factors such as protein matrix. Publications show various biological differences among barley varieties such as Valier and Harrington, which have significantly different degradation behaviors. The objectives of this study were to reveal the molecular structure of barley protein, comparing various varieties (Dolly, Valier, Harrington, LP955, AC Metcalfe, and Sisler), and quantify protein structure profiles using Gaussian and Lorentzian methods of multi-component peak modeling by using the ultra-spatially resolved synchrotron light sourced Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (SFTIRM). The items of the protein molecular structure revealed included protein structure {alpha}-helices, {beta}-sheets, and others such as {beta}-turns and random coils. The experiment was performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source in Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL, US Department of Energy, NY). The results showed that with the SFTIRM, the molecular structure of barley protein could be revealed. Barley protein structures exhibited significant differences among the varieties in terms of proportion and ratio of model-fitted {alpha}-helices, {beta}-sheets, and others. By using multi-component peaks modeling at protein amide I region of 1710-1576 cm{sup -1}, the results show that barley protein consisted of approximately 18-34% of {alpha}-helices, 14-25% of {beta}-sheets, and 44-69% others. AC Metcalfe, Sisler, and LP955 consisted of higher (P < 0.05) proportions of {alpha}-helices (30-34%) than Dolly and Valier ({alpha}-helices 18-23%). Harrington was in between which was 25%. For protein {beta}-sheets, AC Metcalfe, and LP955 consisted of higher proportions (22-25%) than Dolly and Valier (13-17%). Different barley varieties contained different {alpha}-helix to {beta}-sheet ratios, ranging from 1.4 to 2.0, although the difference were

  10. Synchrotron radiation and biomedical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio, A.

    1986-08-01

    In this lecture we describe the characteristics of Synchrotron radiation as a source of X rays. We discuss the properties of SR arc sources, wigglers, undulators and the use of backscattering of laser light. Applications to angiography, X ray microscopy and tomography are reviewed. 16 refs., 23 figs.

  11. LHC Computing

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The LHC is the world’s highest energy particle accelerator and scientists use it to record an unprecedented amount of data. This data is recorded in electronic format and it requires an enormous computational infrastructure to convert the raw data into conclusions about the fundamental rules that govern matter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln gives us a sense of just how much data is involved and the incredible computer resources that makes it all possible.

  12. Design and prototyping of HL-LHC double quarter wave crab cavities for SPS test

    SciTech Connect

    Verdu-Andres, S.; Skaritka, J.; Wu, Q.; Xiao, B.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Alberty, L.; Artoos, K.; Calaga, R.; Capatina, O.; Capelli, T.; Carra, F.; Leuxe, R.; Kuder, N.; Zanoni, C.; Li, Z.; Ratti, A.

    2015-05-03

    The LHC high luminosity project envisages the use of the crabbing technique for increasing and levelling the LHC luminosity. Double Quarter Wave (DQW) resonators are compact cavities especially designed to meet the technical and performance requirements for LHC beam crabbing. Two DQW crab cavities are under fabrication and will be tested with beam in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN by 2017. This paper describes the design and prototyping of the DQW crab cavities for the SPS test.

  13. Mircobeam X-ray total scattering experiments at the high-pressure beamline X17B3 at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, X.; Ehm, L.; Duffy, T. S.; Weidner, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Structure of minerals under extreme conditions of high pressure and temperature is very important in Geosciences. The total scattering pair distribution function (PDF) technique using high energy X-ray microbeam to access a large range of scattering vector, e.g. 20Å-1-40Å-1, is an emerging structural analysis method in high pressure research, which allows simultaneous probing of local, intermediate and long-range structure in crystalline, amorphous or complex materials[1-3]. Using high-energy X-rays of 80 keV at X17B3 beamline, National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory, PDF measurements has been carried out by users from multiple disciplines [4]. At this AGU meeting, we will present the current status of high-pressure total scattering pair distribution function (PDF) measurements and recent achievements on the availability of high energy X-ray microbeam at X17B3 beamline, NSLS. Accurate X-ray energy calibration is indispensable for X-ray energy-sensitive scattering and diffraction experiments, but there is still a lack of effective methods to precisely calibrate the high energy X-ray beam, because precise energy calibration XAS is problematic due to the lack of suitable X-ray absorption edges at the desired high energy. We have recently proposed an iterative method [5] for a precise and fast X-ray energy calibration over a wide range, including high energy X-ray beam for PDF measurements. Some PDF measurements on the geophysical important materials, such as GeO2 and SiO2 materials, under ambient and high-pressure using diamond anvil cell will be presented. References: 1. Billinge, S.J.L., The atomic pair distribution function: past and present. Zeitschrift für Kristallographie, 2004. 219(3-2004): p. 117-121. 2. Billinge, S.J. and I. Levin, The problem with determining atomic structure at the nanoscale. Science, 2007. 316(5824): p. 561-5. 3. Billinge, S.J.L., et al., Characterisation of amorphous and nanocrystalline molecular

  14. Future Synchrotron Radiation Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Winick, Herman

    2003-07-09

    Sources of synchrotron radiation (also called synchrotron light) and their associated research facilities have experienced a spectacular growth in number, performance, and breadth of application in the past two to three decades. In 1978 there were eleven electron storage rings used as light sources. Three of these were small rings, all below 500 mega-electron volts (MeV), dedicated to this purpose; the others, with energy up to 5 giga-electron volts (GeV), were used parasitically during the operation of the ring for high energy physics research. In addition, at that time synchrotron radiation from nine cyclic electron synchrotrons, with energy up to 5 GeV, was also used parasitically. At present no cyclic synchrotrons are used, while about 50 electron storage rings are in operation around the world as fully dedicated light sources for basic and applied research in a wide variety of fields. Among these fields are structural molecular biology, molecular environmental science, materials, analytic chemistry, microfabrication, archaeometry and medical diagnostics. These rings span electron energies from a few hundred MeV to 8 GeV. Several facilities serve 2000 or more users on 30-60 simultaneously operational experimental stations. The largest rings are more than 1 km in circumference, cost about US$1B to build and have annual budgets of about US$100M. This growth is due to the remarkable properties of synchrotron radiation, including its high intensity, brightness and stability; wide spectral range extending from the infra-red to hard x-rays; variable polarization; pulsed time structure; and high vacuum environment. The ever-expanding user community and the increasing number of applications are fueling a continued growth in the number of facilities around the world. In the past few years new types of light sources have been proposed based on linear accelerators. Linac-based sources now being pursued include the free-electron laser (FEL) and energy recovery linac (ERL

  15. Report of the Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, R.T.

    1984-06-01

    The Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop was held to consider two vacuum-related problems that bear on the design of storage rings and beam lines for synchrotron radiation facilities. These problems are gas desorption from the vacuum chamber walls and carbon deposition on optical components. Participants surveyed existing knowledge on these topics and recommended studies that should be performed as soon as possible to provide more definitive experimental data on these topics. This data will permit optimization of the final design of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and its associated beam lines. It also should prove useful for other synchrotron radiation facilities as well.

  16. Synchrotron radiation as an infrared source.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, J R; Ellis, H; Bartlett, R

    1973-12-01

    The increasing availability of synchrotron radiation sources in a number of geographical regions of the world has motivated an evaluation of the radiation from electron accelerators and storage rings as a possible source for ir spectroscopy. As synchrotron radiation can be analytically described, a direct comparison is made with blackbody radiation for typical solid state spectroscopy. Both existing and proposed synchrotron radiation sources are found to be attractive in the ir. The ultrahigh vacuum environment of the source is compatible with clean surface investigations, the analytical description of the radiation is appropriate for calibration studies, and the continuous nature is suitable for Fourier spectroscopy or whenever a white light source is desirable.

  17. COMPRES X-ray beamlines (X17B3 and X17C) for the diamond anvil cell at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, X.; Chen, Z.; Sengupta, A.; Goncharov, A. F.; Ehm, L.; Duffy, T. S.; Weidner, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    The laser heated diamond anvil cell technique can readily achieve the pressure and temperature domain of Earth from upper mantle to outer core. The laser heating diamond anvil cell X-ray facilities (X17-DAC), consists of X17B3 and X17C stations on a superconducting wiggler beamline and a sample preparation/spectroscopy laboratory at the National Synchrotron Light Source). As the first dedicated high-pressure (HP) beamline in the world, X17-DAC has been a workhorse for HP research for two decades, and has led the way in many developments, Here we report current capabilities and recent developments at X17-DAC beamlines including a new double-side laser heating system . At the X17B3 station, high-temperature high-pressure X-ray diffraction experiments can be carried out either with monochromatic beam (~30 keV or ~80 keV), or with white beam for energy dispersive x-ray diffraction. In-situ laser heating system will be available for users in Geosciences starting from September, 2011. With a monochromatic beam at 30 keV, the X-ray beam can be focused to a beam size of ~10 μm. By combing with the laser heating technique, we can support in-situ X-ray diffraction experiments at the domain of temperature and pressure up to Earth's outer core. With high energy at 80 keV, total scattering pair distribution function (PDF) measurements are performed. Originally, this method was used to study amorphous and highly disordered materials, but more recently, it has been used for the analysis of crystalline and nanostructured materials. This novel technique provides useful information about the long- and short-range ordering of the atoms in the materials. It is promising to combine laser heating and total scattering PDF measurements so as to probe phase transitions and phase relations for geophysical important materials at X17B3 station. At X17C, we conduct angle and energy dispersive x-ray diffraction on polycrystalline samples in either axial or radial geometry. Energy dispersive

  18. Infrared microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, G.L.; Williams, G.P.

    1997-09-01

    Infrared microspectroscopy with a high brightness synchrotron source can achieve a spatial resolution approaching the diffraction limit. However, in order to realize this intrinsic source brightness at the specimen location, some care must be taken in designing the optical system. Also, when operating in diffraction limited conditions, the effective spatial resolution is no longer controlled by the apertures typically used for a conventional (geometrically defined) measurement. Instead, the spatial resolution depends on the wavelength of light and the effective apertures of the microscope`s Schwarzchild objectives. The authors have modeled the optical system from the synchrotron source up to the sample location and determined the diffraction-limited spatial distribution of light. Effects due to the dependence of the synchrotron source`s numerical aperture on wavelength, as well as the difference between transmission and reflection measurement modes, are also addressed. Lastly, they examine the benefits (when using a high brightness source) of an extrinsic germanium photoconductive detector with cone optics as a replacement for the standard MCT detector.

  19. Time resolved spectroscopy using synchrotron infrared pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, G.L.; Lobo, R.P.S.M. |; Hirschmugl, C.J.; LaVeigne, J.; Reitze, D.H.; Tanner, D.B.

    1997-09-01

    Electron synchrotron storage rings, such as the VUV ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), produce short pulses of infrared (IR) radiation suitable for investigating the time-dependent phenomena in a variety of interesting experimental systems. In contrast to other pulses sources of IR, the synchrotron produces a continuum spectral output over the entire IR (and beyond), though at power levels typically below those obtained from laser systems. The infrared synchrotron radiation (IRSR) source is therefore well-suited as a probe using standard FTIR spectroscopic techniques. Here the authors describe the pump-probe spectroscopy facility being established at the NSLS and demonstrate the technique by measuring the photocarrier decay in a semiconductor.

  20. Symmetry and light stuffing of H o2T i2O7 , E r2T i2O7 , and Y b2T i2O7 characterized by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroudi, Kristen; Gaulin, Bruce D.; Lapidus, Saul H.; Gaudet, Jonathan; Cava, R. J.

    2015-07-01

    The H o2T i2O7 , E r2T i2O7 , and Y b2T i2O7 pyrochlores were studied by synchrotron x-ray diffraction to determine whether the (002) peak, forbidden in the pyrochlore space group F d -3 m but observed in single crystal neutron scattering measurements, is present due to a deviation of their pyrochlore structure from F d -3 m symmetry. Synchrotron diffraction measurements on precisely synthesized stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric powders and a crushed floating zone crystal of H o2T i2O7 revealed that the (002) reflection is absent in all cases to a sensitivity of approximately one part in 30 000 of the strongest x-ray diffraction peak. This indicates to high sensitivity that the space group of the crystal structure of these rare earth titanate pyrochlores is F d -3 m , and that, thus, the (002) peak observed in the neutron scattering experiments has a nonstructural origin. The cell parameters and internal strain for lightly stuffed H o2 +xT i2 -xO7 are also presented.

  1. The LHC Confronts the pMSSM

    DOE PAGES

    Cahill-Rowley, Matthew

    2016-05-31

    Here we explore the impact of current (7+8 TeV) and future (14 TeV) LHC searches on the range of viable sparticle spectra within the 19/20 – dimensional phenomenological MSSM (pMSSM). Considering both neutralino and gravitino LSPs, we compare our results with simplified model exclusion limits and describe important cases where the pMSSM results differ significantly from the simplified model descriptions. We also consider models that are poorly constrained by LHC data because of unusual decay topologies and/or displaced decays, and discuss ways to improve the LHC sensitivity in these scenarios. Finally, motivated by naturalness, we examine the sensitivity of currentmore » searches to models with light stops and to a specialized set of models with fine-tuning better than 1%. We show that the 14 TeV LHC will be a very powerful probe of natural pMSSM models.« less

  2. R-axion detection at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Goh, Hock-Seng; Ibe, Masahiro; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    Supersymmetric models with spontaneously broken approximate R-symmetry contains a light spin 0 particle, the R-axion. The properties of the particle can be a powerful probe of the structure of the new physics. In this paper, we discuss the possibilities of the R-axion detection at the LHC experiments. It is challenge to observe this light particle in the LHC environment. However, for typical values in which the mass of the R-axion is a few hundred MeV, we show that those particles can be detected by searching for displaced vertices from R-axion decay.

  3. 3 GeV Booster Synchrotron Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedemann, Helmut

    2009-06-02

    Synchrotron light cna be produced from a relativistic particle beam circulating in a storage ring at extremely high intensity and brilliance over a large spectral region reaching from the far infrared regime to hard x-rays. The particles, either electrons or positrons, radiate as they are deflected in the fields of the storage ring bending magnets or of magnets specially optimized for the production of synchrotron light. The synchrotron light being very intense and well collimated in the forward direction has become a major tool in a large variety of research fields in physics, chemistry, material science, biology, and medicine.

  4. New theoretical results in synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagrov, V. G.; Gitman, D. M.; Tlyachev, V. B.; Jarovoi, A. T.

    2005-11-01

    One of the remarkable features of the relativistic electron synchrotron radiation is its concentration in small angle Δ ≈ 1/γ (here γ-relativistic factor: γ = E/mc2, E energy, m electron rest mass, c light velocity) near rotation orbit plane [V.G. Bagrov, V.A. Bordovitsyn, V.G. Bulenok, V. Ya. Epp, Kinematical projection of pulsar synchrotron radiation profiles, in: Proceedings of IV ISTC Scientific Advisory Commitee Seminar on Basic Science in ISTC Aktivities, Akademgorodok, Novosibirsk, April 23 27, 2001, p. 293 300]. This theoretically predicted and experimentally confirmed feature is peculiar to total (spectrum summarized) radiating intensity. This angular distribution property has been supposed to be (at least qualitatively) conserved and for separate spectrum synchrotron radiation components. In the work of V.G. Bagrov, V.A. Bordovitsyn, V. Ch. Zhukovskii, Development of the theory of synchrotron radiation and related processes. Synchrotron source of JINR: the perspective of research, in: The Materials of the Second International Work Conference, Dubna, April 2 6, 2001, pp. 15 30 and in Angular dependence of synchrotron radiation intensity. http://lanl.arXiv.org/abs/physics/0209097, it is shown that the angular distribution of separate synchrotron radiation spectrum components demonstrates directly inverse tendency the angular distribution deconcentration relatively the orbit plane takes place with electron energy growth. The present work is devoted to detailed investigation of this situation. For exact quantitative estimation of angular concentration degree of synchrotron radiation the definition of radiation effective angle and deviation angle is proposed. For different polarization components of radiation the dependence of introduced characteristics was investigated as a functions of electron energy and number of spectrum component.

  5. Shedding new light on the molecular architecture of oocytes using a combination of synchrotron Fourier transform-infrared and Raman spectroscopic mapping.

    PubMed

    Wood, Bayden R; Chernenko, Tatyana; Matthäus, Christian; Diem, Max; Chong, Connie; Bernhard, Uditha; Jene, Cassandra; Brandli, Alice A; McNaughton, Don; Tobin, Mark J; Trounson, Alan; Lacham-Kaplan, Orly

    2008-12-01

    Synchrotron Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) and Raman microspectroscopy were applied to investigate changes in the molecular architecture of mouse oocytes and demonstrate the overall morphology of the maturing oocyte. Here we show that differences were identified between immature mouse oocytes at the germinal vesicle (GV) and mature metaphase II (MII) stage when using this technology, without the introduction of any extrinsic markers, labels, or dyes. GV mouse oocytes were found to have a small, centrally located lipid deposit and another larger polar deposit of similar composition. MII oocytes have very large, centrally located lipid deposits. Each lipid deposit for both cell types contains an inner and outer lipid environment that differs in composition. To assess interoocyte variability, line scans were recorded across the diameter of the oocytes and compared from three independent trials (GV, n = 91; MII, n = 172), and the data were analyzed with principal component analysis (PCA). The average spectra and PCA loading plots show distinct and reproducible changes in the CH stretching region that can be used as molecular maturation markers. The method paves the way for developing an independent assay to assess oocyte status during maturation providing new insights into lipid distribution at the single cell level.

  6. Measurement methods for surface oxides on SUS 316L in simulated light water reactor coolant environments using synchrotron XRD and XRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masashi; Yonezawa, Toshio; Shobu, Takahisa; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2013-03-01

    Synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescent (XRF) measurement techniques have been used for non-destructive characterization of surface oxide films on Type 316L austenitic stainless steels that were exposed to simulated primary water environments of pressurized water reactors (PWR) and boiling water reactors (BWR). The layer structures of the surface spinel oxides were revealed ex situ after oxidation by measurements made as a function of depth. The layer structure of spinel oxides formed in simulated PWR primary water should normally be different from that formed in simulated BWR water. After oxidation in the simulated BWR environment, the spinel oxide was observed to contain NiFe2O4 at shallow depths, and FeCr2O4 and Fe3O4 at deeper depths. By contrast, after oxidation in the simulated PWR primary water environment, a Fe3O4 type spinel was observed near the surface and FeCr2O4 type spinel near the interface with the metal substrate. Furthermore, by in situ measurements during oxidation in the simulated BWR environment, it was also demonstrated that the ratio between spinel and hematite Fe2O3 can be changed depending on the water condition such as BWR normal water chemistry or BWR hydrogen water chemistry.

  7. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION MONITOR FOR NSLS BOOSTER.

    SciTech Connect

    PINAYEV, I.; SHAFTAN, T.

    2005-11-04

    NSLS booster diagnostics consisted of tune measurement system, system for turn-by-turn measurement on the electron beam, and beam intensity monitor, which is not absolutely calibrated. We present design and implementation of synchrotron light monitor for the booster, which expands diagnostics capabilities. The system allows to measure an orbit, beam sizes and coupling of the electron beam along the ramp.

  8. Overview of United States synchrotron radiation facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    There has been considerable activity within the past year involving the creation of new and the improvement of existing capabilities for research with synchrotron light. The purpose of this review is to summarize what has happened within the United States. Being a status report, some of the information necessarily has a date attached to it - the date, in this case, being early September 1983.

  9. LHC and Flavour Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, T.

    2009-12-17

    The large centre of mass energy of the LHC will provide a huge cross-section for heavy flavour production making the LHC a powerful laboratory for studying the indirect effects of new physics. The prospects for four key measurements at LHCb and the central detectors (ATLAS and CMS) are presented.

  10. A mechanism for regulation of chloroplast LHC II kinase by plastoquinol and thioredoxin.

    PubMed

    Puthiyaveetil, Sujith

    2011-06-23

    State transitions are acclimatory responses to changes in light quality in photosynthesis. They involve the redistribution of absorbed excitation energy between photosystems I and II. In plants and green algae, this redistribution is produced by reversible phosphorylation of the chloroplast light harvesting complex II (LHC II). The LHC II kinase is activated by reduced plastoquinone (PQ) in photosystem II-specific low light. In high light, when PQ is also reduced, LHC II kinase becomes inactivated by thioredoxin. Based on newly identified amino acid sequence features of LHC II kinase and other considerations, a mechanism is suggested for its redox regulation.

  11. Probing Metastability at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Clavelli, L.

    2010-02-10

    Current attempts to understand supersymmetry (susy) breaking are focused on the idea that we are not in the ground state of the universe but, instead, in a metastable state that will ultimately decay to an exactly susy ground state. It is interesting to ask how experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will shed light on the properties of this future supersymmetric universe. In particular we ask how we can determine whether this final state has the possibility of supporting atoms and molecules in a susy background.

  12. Action spectrum for expression of the high intensity light-inducible Lhc-like gene Lhl4 in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Haruhiko; Ishii, Asako; Kimura, Yukihiro; Hasegawa, Koji; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Nakamura, Takanori; Higashi, Sho-ichi; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Ono, Taka-aki

    2006-03-01

    Lhl4 encodes a distant relative of light-harvesting Chl-a/b proteins in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Lhl4 mRNA markedly accumulated within 30 min after illumination and in proportion to the light intensity up to a fluence rate much higher than that required for photosynthesis. The high intensity light (HL)-induced accumulation of Lhl4 mRNA required continuous illumination, and the mRNA level rapidly decreased when the cells were placed in the dark. HL only slightly stabilized the mRNA, suggesting that the HL-induced expression of the Lhl4 gene is primarily regulated at the level of transcription. Blue light was more effective for inducing Lhl4 gene expression than green or red light, and far-red light had no effect. The action spectrum for Lhl4 gene expression was examined at wavelengths between 325 and 775 nm using the Okazaki Large Spectrograph. The obtained spectrum showed a distinct peak in the blue region (450 nm) and a shoulder in the UV-A region (375 nm). The curve in the spectrum rose steeply in the short wavelength UV region. In addition, we observed two minor peaks in the green (575 nm) and the red (675 nm) regions. The action spectrum suggests that a blue/UV-A light photoreceptor with a flavin-based chromophore participates in the HL response of Lhl4 gene expression. However, the hypersensitivity to near UV-B light suggests the involvement of an unidentified UV light perception system in the expression of the Lhl4 gene.

  13. Lessons from LHC elastic and diffractive data

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, A.D.; Khoze, V.A.; Ryskin, M.G.

    2015-04-10

    In the light of LHC data, we discuss the global description of all high-energy elastic and diffractive data, using a one-pomeron model, but including multi-pomeron interactions. The LHC data indicate the need of a k{sub t}(s) behaviour, where k{sub t} is the gluon transverse momentum along the partonic ladder structure which describes the pomeron. We also discuss tensions in the data, as well as the t dependence of the slope of dσ{sub el}/dt in the small t domain.

  14. LHC II system sensitivity to magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotae, Vlad; Creanga, Ioan

    2005-03-01

    Experiments have been designed to reveal the influences of ferrofluid treatment and static magnetic field exposure on the photosynthetic system II, where the light harvesting complex (LHC II) controls the ratio chlorophyll a/ chlorophyll b (revealing, indirectly, the photosynthesis rate). Spectrophotometric measurement of chlorophyll content revealed different influences for relatively low ferrofluid concentrations (10-30 μl/l) in comparison to higher concentrations (70-100 μl/l). The overlapped effect of the static magnetic field shaped better the stimulatory ferrofluid action on LHC II system in young poppy plantlets.

  15. Supersymmetry At LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Shaaban

    2008-04-21

    One of the main motivation of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), scheduled to start around 2006, is to search for supersymmetric particles. The region of the parameter space of the minimal supersymmetric standard model, where supersymmetry can be discovered is investigated. We show that if supersymmetry exists at electroweak scale, it would be easy to find signals for it at the LHC. If the LHC does find supersymmetry, this would be one of the greatest achievements in the history of theoretical physics.

  16. Lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  17. The ISAS Synchrotron Microprobe at DELTA

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlen, Alex von; Kraemer, Markus; Hergenroeder, Roland; Berges, Ulf

    2007-01-19

    Since 2004 ISAS operates a dipole beamline at the synchrotron radiation facility DELTA at University of Dortmund. Synchrotron radiation is used at this beamline as an excellent excitation source for X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF). Among others, the high brilliance of the synchrotron radiation in contrast to conventional X-ray tubes, the strong polarization of the synchrotron radiation and the low divergence of the electron beam can be applied to XRF offering several advantages for spectroscopy. These outstanding features encouraged us to develop and operate a synchrotron radiation induced X-ray micro fluorescence probe connected to a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (SR-WDXRF). A relevant characteristic of such a device, namely, good lateral resolution at high spectral resolution can be applied for single spot-, line-scan and area map analyses of a variety of objects. The instrumentation of the SR-WDXRF and the performed experiments will be presented. Main task is the detection of light elements by their fluorescence K-lines and the specification of element compounds.

  18. Multigap Diffraction at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2005-10-06

    The large rapidity interval available at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) offers an arena in which the QCD aspects of diffraction may be explored in an environment free of gap survival complications using events with multiple rapidity gaps.

  19. The LHC Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-03-11

    The Large Hadron Collider or LHC is the world’s biggest particle accelerator, but it can only get particles moving very quickly. To make measurements, scientists must employ particle detectors. There are four big detectors at the LHC: ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln introduces us to these detectors and gives us an idea of each one’s capabilities.

  20. The LHC Experiments

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The Large Hadron Collider or LHC is the world’s biggest particle accelerator, but it can only get particles moving very quickly. To make measurements, scientists must employ particle detectors. There are four big detectors at the LHC: ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln introduces us to these detectors and gives us an idea of each one’s capabilities.

  1. Precision synchrotron radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, M.; Rouse, F.; Butler, J.; Jung, C.K.; Lateur, M.; Nash, J.; Tinsman, J.; Wormser, G.; Gomez, J.J.; Kent, J.

    1989-03-01

    Precision detectors to measure synchrotron radiation beam positions have been designed and installed as part of beam energy spectrometers at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The distance between pairs of synchrotron radiation beams is measured absolutely to better than 28 /mu/m on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This contributes less than 5 MeV to the error in the measurement of SLC beam energies (approximately 50 GeV). A system of high-resolution video cameras viewing precisely-aligned fiducial wire arrays overlaying phosphorescent screens has achieved this accuracy. Also, detectors of synchrotron radiation using the charge developed by the ejection of Compton-recoil electrons from an array of fine wires are being developed. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. 6 GeV synchrotron x-ray source: Conceptual design report. Supplement B - conceptual design of proposed beam lines for the 6 GeV light source

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    In this document, preliminary conceptual designs are presented for ten sample beamlines for the 6 GeV Light Source. These beamlines will accommodate investigations in solid-state physics, materials science, materials technology, chemical technology, and biological and medical sciences. In future, the designs will be altered to include new developments in x-ray optics and hardware technologies. The research areas addressed by the samples beamlines are as follows: Topography and Radiography/Tomography (section 2); Inelastic Scattering with Ultrahigh Energy Resolution (Section 3); Surface and Bulk Studies Using High Momentum Resolution (Section 4); Inelastic Scattering from Charge and Spin (Section 5); Advanced X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies (Section 6); Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Studies (Section 7); General Purpose Scattering for Materials Studies (Section 8); Multiple-Energy Anomalous-Dispersion Studies of Proteins (Section 9); Protein Crystallography (Section 10); Time- and Space-resolved X-Ray Spectroscopy (Section 11); Medical Diagnostic Facility (Section 12); and Transuranium Research Facility (Section 13). The computer systems to be used on the beamlines are also discussed in Section 14 of this document.

  3. Analysis of stray radiation produced by the advanced light source (1.9 GeV synchrotron radiation source) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ajemian, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    The yearly environmental dose equivalent likely to result at the closest site boundary from the Advanced Light Source was determined by generating multiple linear regressions. The independent variables comprised quantified accelerator operating parameters and measurements from synchronized, in-close (outside shielding prior to significant atmospheric scattering), state-of-the-art neutron remmeters and photon G-M tubes. Neutron regression models were more successful than photon models due to lower relative background radiation and redundant detectors at the site boundary. As expected, Storage Ring Beam Fill and Beam Crashes produced radiation at a higher rate than gradual Beam Decay; however, only the latter did not include zero in its 95% confidence interval. By summing for all three accelerator operating modes, a combined yearly DE of 4.3 mRem/yr with a 90% CI of (0.04-8.63) was obtained. These results fall below the DOE reporting level of 10 mRem/yr and suggest repeating the study with improved experimental conditions.

  4. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation: Theory and Simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2012-03-29

    achievable emittance in the synchrotron light sources for short bunches.

  5. Synchrotron Radiation II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is a unique form of radiation that spans the electro-magnetic spectrum from X-rays through the ultraviolet and visible into the infrared. Tunable monochromators enable scientists to select a narrow band of wavelengths at any point in the spectrum. (Author/BB)

  6. CMS ECAL electronics developments for HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, M.

    2015-03-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will provide unprecedented instantaneous and integrated luminosities. The CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) will face a challenging environment at the HL-LHC: higher event pileup, higher radiation levels for the crystals and photo-detectors, and a higher rate of anomalous signals from the Avalanche Photodiodes (APDs) used for the light readout in the ECAL Barrel. A redesign of the ECAL electronics (including an increase in trigger rate and latency) is planned in order to mitigate these challenges and to maintain the excellent physics performance of the detector.

  7. Sbottoms of natural NMSSM at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuria, Jyotiranjan; Chatterjee, Arindam; Datta, AseshKrishna

    2016-08-01

    Search for the bottom squarks (sbottoms) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has recently assumed a heightened focus in the hunt for Supersymmetry (SUSY). The popular framework of the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) could conceive a naturally light sbottom which can easily be consistent with available constraints from the experiments at the LHC. Phenomenology of such sbottoms could in principle be as striking as that for a light top squark (stop) thanks to a rather nontrivial neutralino sector (with appreciable mixing among the neutral higgsinos and the singlino) that the scenario gives rise to. Nonetheless, finding such sbottoms would require a moderately large volume of data (˜300 fb-1) at the 13 TeV run of the LHC. A multi-channel analysis establishing a generic depletion of events in the usual 2 b- jets + [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] T final state while registering, in conjunction, characteristically significant rates in various multi-lepton final states accompanied by b- jets might point not only to the presence of light sbottom(s) but could also shed crucial light on their compositions and the (singlino) nature of the lightest SUSY particle (LSP).

  8. SPS Beam Steering for LHC Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana; Bartosik, Hannes; Cornelis, Karel; Norderhaug Drøsdal, Lene; Goddard, Brennan; Kain, Verena; Meddahi, Malika; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Wenninger, Jorg

    2014-07-01

    The CERN Super Proton Synchrotron accelerates beams for the Large Hadron Collider to 450 GeV. In addition it produces beams for fixed target facilities which adds complexity to the SPS operation. During the run 2012-2013 drifts of the extracted beam trajectories have been observed and lengthy optimizations in the transfer lines were performed to reduce particle losses in the LHC. The observed trajectory drifts are consistent with the measured SPS orbit drifts at extraction. While extensive studies are going on to understand, and possibly suppress, the source of such SPS orbit drifts the feasibility of an automatic beam steering towards a “golden” orbit at the extraction septa, by means of the interlocked correctors, is also being investigated. The challenges and constraints related to the implementation of such a correction in the SPS are described. Simulation results are presented and a possible operational steering strategy is proposed.

  9. Synchrotron radiation sources and research

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1995-12-31

    This is an introduction and a review of Synchrotron Radiation sources and the research performed using synchrotron radiation. I will begin with a brief discussion of the two principal uses of particle storage rings: for colliding beams (Collider) and for synchrotron radiation (Radiator). Then I will concentrate on discussions of synchrotron radiation topics, starting with a historical account, followed by descriptions of the features of the storage ring and the features of the radiation from the simplest source -- the bending magnet. I will then discuss the special insertion device sources -- wigglers and undulators -- and their radiations, and end with a brief general account of the research and other applications of synchrotron radiation.

  10. Synchrotron X-ray footprinting on tour

    PubMed Central

    Bohon, Jen; D’Mello, Rhijuta; Ralston, Corie; Gupta, Sayan; Chance, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Synchrotron footprinting is a valuable technique in structural biology for understanding macromolecular solution-state structure and dynamics of proteins and nucleic acids. Although an extremely powerful tool, there is currently only a single facility in the USA, the X28C beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), dedicated to providing infrastructure, technology development and support for these studies. The high flux density of the focused white beam and variety of specialized exposure environments available at X28C enables footprinting of highly complex biological systems; however, it is likely that a significant fraction of interesting experiments could be performed at unspecialized facilities. In an effort to investigate the viability of a beamline-flexible footprinting program, a standard sample was taken on tour around the nation to be exposed at several US synchrotrons. This work describes how a relatively simple and transportable apparatus can allow beamlines at the NSLS, CHESS, APS and ALS to be used for synchrotron footprinting in a general user mode that can provide useful results. PMID:24365913

  11. Assessing noise sources at synchrotron infrared ports

    PubMed Central

    Lerch, Ph.; Dumas, P.; Schilcher, T.; Nadji, A.; Luedeke, A.; Hubert, N.; Cassinari, L.; Boege, M.; Denard, J.-C.; Stingelin, L.; Nadolski, L.; Garvey, T.; Albert, S.; Gough, Ch.; Quack, M.; Wambach, J.; Dehler, M.; Filhol, J.-M.

    2012-01-01

    Today, the vast majority of electron storage rings delivering synchrotron radiation for general user operation offer a dedicated infrared port. There is growing interest expressed by various scientific communities to exploit the mid-IR emission in microspectroscopy, as well as the far infrared (also called THz) range for spectroscopy. Compared with a thermal (laboratory-based source), IR synchrotron radiation sources offer enhanced brilliance of about two to three orders of magnitude in the mid-IR energy range, and enhanced flux and brilliance in the far-IR energy range. Synchrotron radiation also has a unique combination of a broad wavelength band together with a well defined time structure. Thermal sources (globar, mercury filament) have excellent stability. Because the sampling rate of a typical IR Fourier-transform spectroscopy experiment is in the kHz range (depending on the bandwidth of the detector), instabilities of various origins present in synchrotron radiation sources play a crucial role. Noise recordings at two different IR ports located at the Swiss Light Source and SOLEIL (France), under conditions relevant to real experiments, are discussed. The lowest electron beam fluctuations detectable in IR spectra have been quantified and are shown to be much smaller than what is routinely recorded by beam-position monitors. PMID:22186638

  12. Assessing noise sources at synchrotron infrared ports.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Ph; Dumas, P; Schilcher, T; Nadji, A; Luedeke, A; Hubert, N; Cassinari, L; Boege, M; Denard, J-C; Stingelin, L; Nadolski, L; Garvey, T; Albert, S; Gough, Ch; Quack, M; Wambach, J; Dehler, M; Filhol, J-M

    2012-01-01

    Today, the vast majority of electron storage rings delivering synchrotron radiation for general user operation offer a dedicated infrared port. There is growing interest expressed by various scientific communities to exploit the mid-IR emission in microspectroscopy, as well as the far infrared (also called THz) range for spectroscopy. Compared with a thermal (laboratory-based source), IR synchrotron radiation sources offer enhanced brilliance of about two to three orders of magnitude in the mid-IR energy range, and enhanced flux and brilliance in the far-IR energy range. Synchrotron radiation also has a unique combination of a broad wavelength band together with a well defined time structure. Thermal sources (globar, mercury filament) have excellent stability. Because the sampling rate of a typical IR Fourier-transform spectroscopy experiment is in the kHz range (depending on the bandwidth of the detector), instabilities of various origins present in synchrotron radiation sources play a crucial role. Noise recordings at two different IR ports located at the Swiss Light Source and SOLEIL (France), under conditions relevant to real experiments, are discussed. The lowest electron beam fluctuations detectable in IR spectra have been quantified and are shown to be much smaller than what is routinely recorded by beam-position monitors.

  13. Transverse beam coupling impedance of the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persichelli, S.; Migliorati, M.; Biancacci, N.; Gilardoni, S.; Metral, E.; Salvant, B.

    2016-04-01

    Beam coupling impedance is a fundamental parameter to characterize the electromagnetic interaction of a particle beam with the surrounding environment. Synchrotron machine performances are critically affected by instabilities and collective effects triggered by beam coupling impedance. In particular, transverse beam coupling impedance is expected to impact beam dynamics of the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS), since a significant increase in beam intensity is foreseen within the framework of the LHC Injectors Upgrade (LIU) project. In this paper we describe the study of the transverse beam coupling impedance of the PS, taking into account the main sources of geometrical impedance and the contribution of indirect space charge at different energies. The total machine impedance budget, determined from beam-based dedicated machine measurement sessions, is also discussed and compared with the theoretical model.

  14. A Proposal to the Department of Energy for The Fabrication of a Very High Energy Polarized Gama Ray Beam Facility and A Program of Medium Energy Physics Research at The National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Sandorfi, A.M.; LeVine, M.J.; Thorn, C.E.; Giordano, G.; Matone, G.

    1982-09-01

    This proposal requests support for the fabrication and operation of a modest facility that would provide relatively intense beams of monochromatic and polarized photons with energies in the range of several hundreds of MeV. These {gamma} rays would be produced by Compton backscattering laser light from the electrons circulating in the 2.5-3.0 GeV 'X-RAY' storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The excellent emittance, phase space, and high current of this state-of-the-art storage ring will allow the production of 2 x 10{sup 7} {gamma} rays per second. These photons would be tagged by detecting the scattered electrons, thereby determining the energy to 2.7 MeV for all {gamma}-ray energies. The efficiency of this tagging procedure is 100% and the {gamma}-ray beam would be essentially background free. Tagging will also allow the flexibility of operating with a dynamic range as large as 200 MeV in photon energy while still preserving high resolution and polarization. These beams will permit a fruitful study of important questions in medium-energy nuclear physics. The initial goals of this program are to reach reliable operation with photon energies up to 300 MeV and to develop {gamma}-ray beams with energies up to about 500 MeV. To demonstrate reliable operation, a modest physics program is planned that, for the most part, utilizes existing magnets and detector systems but nonetheless addresses several important outstanding problems. Gamma ray beams of the versatility, intensity, energy, and resolution that can be achieved at this facility are not currently available at any other world facility either existing or under construction. Furthermore, the proposed program would produce the first intense source of medium-energy {gamma} rays that are polarized. Because of the difficulties in producing such polarized beams, it is very unlikely that viable alternate sources can be developed in the near future; at present

  15. Phenomenology of flavon fields at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Tsumura, Koji; Velasco-Sevilla, Liliana

    2010-02-01

    We study low energy constraints from flavor violating processes, production, and decay at the LHC of a scalar field {phi} (flavon) associated to the breaking of a nonsupersymmetric Abelian family symmetry at the TeV scale. This symmetry is constrained to reproduce fermion masses and mixing, up to O(1) coefficients. The nonsupersymmetric gauged U(1) models considered are severely restricted by cancellation of anomalies and LEP bounds on contact interactions; consequently its phenomenology is out of the LHC reach. We therefore introduce an effective U(1) which is not gauged and is broken explicitly by a CP-odd term at the TeV scale. This helps us to explore flavor violating processes, production, and decay at the LHC for these kind of light scalars. In this context we first study the constraints on the flavon mass and its vacuum expectation value from low energy flavor changing processes such as {mu}{yields}e{gamma}. We find that a flavon of about m{sub {phi}}< or approx. 150 GeV could be experimentally allowed. These kinds of flavons could be significantly generated at the LHC via the gluon fusion mechanism and the single top production channel gu{yields}t{phi}. The produced flavons can have characteristic decay modes such as tc for m{sub {phi}}> or approx. m{sub t}, and {tau}{mu} for m{sub {phi}}< or approx. m{sub t}, which could be effectively useful to detect flavons.

  16. Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW)

    2013-03-01

    "Synchrotron Radiation Workshop" (SRW) is a physical optics computer code for calculation of detailed characteristics of Synchrotron Radiation (SR) generated by relativistic electrons in magnetic fields of arbitrary configuration and for simulation of the radiation wavefront propagation through optical systems of beamlines. Frequency-domain near-field methods are used for the SR calculation, and the Fourier-optics based approach is generally used for the wavefront propagation simulation. The code enables both fully- and partially-coherent radiation propagation simulations inmore » steady-state and in frequency-/time-dependent regimes. With these features, the code has already proven its utility for a large number of applications in infrared, UV, soft and hard X-ray spectral range, in such important areas as analysis of spectral performances of new synchrotron radiation sources, optimization of user beamlines, development of new optical elements, source and beamline diagnostics, and even complete simulation of SR based experiments. Besides the SR applications, the code can be efficiently used for various simulations involving conventional lasers and other sources. SRW versions interfaced to Python and to IGOR Pro (WaveMetrics), as well as cross-platform library with C API, are available.« less

  17. Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW)

    SciTech Connect

    Chubar, O.; Elleaume, P.

    2013-03-01

    "Synchrotron Radiation Workshop" (SRW) is a physical optics computer code for calculation of detailed characteristics of Synchrotron Radiation (SR) generated by relativistic electrons in magnetic fields of arbitrary configuration and for simulation of the radiation wavefront propagation through optical systems of beamlines. Frequency-domain near-field methods are used for the SR calculation, and the Fourier-optics based approach is generally used for the wavefront propagation simulation. The code enables both fully- and partially-coherent radiation propagation simulations in steady-state and in frequency-/time-dependent regimes. With these features, the code has already proven its utility for a large number of applications in infrared, UV, soft and hard X-ray spectral range, in such important areas as analysis of spectral performances of new synchrotron radiation sources, optimization of user beamlines, development of new optical elements, source and beamline diagnostics, and even complete simulation of SR based experiments. Besides the SR applications, the code can be efficiently used for various simulations involving conventional lasers and other sources. SRW versions interfaced to Python and to IGOR Pro (WaveMetrics), as well as cross-platform library with C API, are available.

  18. Introduction to LHC physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polesello, Giacomo

    2006-11-01

    An elementary introduction to the basic features of experimentation at the LHC is given, with some emphasis on the detector requirements and on some basic experimental techniques. The experimental program is briefly introduced, and bibliographical indications are provided for a detailed study of the key physics topics.

  19. National Synchrotron Light Source. Annual report 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1993-04-01

    This report contains seven sections discussing the following: (1) scientific research at the NSLS; (2) symposia and workshops held at the NSLS; (3) a facility report; (4) NSLS projects; (5) NSLS operational highlights; (6) informational guides to the VUV and X-ray beamlines; and (7) appendices which include abstracts on projects carried out at the VUV and X-ray beamlines.

  20. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.

  1. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-03-14

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  2. On the implementation of computed laminography using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Helfen, L.; Pernot, P.; Elyyan, M.; Myagotin, A.; Mikulik, P.; Voropaev, A.; Di Michiel, M.; Baruchel, J.; Baumbach, T.

    2011-06-15

    Hard x rays from a synchrotron source are used in this implementation of computed laminography for three-dimensional (3D) imaging of flat, laterally extended objects. Due to outstanding properties of synchrotron light, high spatial resolution down to the micrometer scale can be attained, even for specimens having lateral dimensions of several decimeters. Operating either with a monochromatic or with a white synchrotron beam, the method can be optimized to attain high sensitivity or considerable inspection throughput in synchrotron user and small-batch industrial experiments. The article describes the details of experimental setups, alignment procedures, and the underlying reconstruction principles. Imaging of interconnections in flip-chip and wire-bonded devices illustrates the peculiarities of the method compared to its alternatives and demonstrates the wide application potential for the 3D inspection and quality assessment in microsystem technology.

  3. Synchrotron based proton drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou

    2002-09-19

    Proton drivers are the proton sources that produce intense short proton bunches. They have a wide range of applications. This paper discusses the proton drivers based on high-intensity proton synchrotrons. It gives a review of the high-intensity proton sources over the world and a brief report on recent developments in this field in the U.S. high-energy physics (HEP) community. The Fermilab Proton Driver is used as a case study for a number of challenging technical design issues.

  4. Scenarios for sLHC and vLHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandale, W.; Zimmermann, F.

    2008-03-01

    The projected lifetime of the LHC low-beta quadrupoles and evolution of the statistical error halving time call for an LHC luminosity upgrade by the middle of the coming decade. In the framework of the EU CARE-HHH network, two scenarios have been developed for increasing the LHC peak luminosity by a factor 10, to 10 cms ("sLHC"). Both scenarios imply a rebuilding of the high-luminosity interaction regions (IRs) in combination with a consistent change of beam parameters. However, their respective features, bunch structures, IR layouts, merits and challenges differ substantially. In either scenario luminosity leveling during a store would be advantageous for the physics experiments. Longer-term R&D efforts are devoted to a higher-energy hadron collider ("vLHC"), which could be realized on a green field or as a later and more radical LHC upgrade.

  5. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, a great discovery emerged at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. A plethora of new precision data had already by then been collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC, providing further extensive support for the validity of the Standard Model of particle physics. But what now appeared was the first evidence for what was not only the last unverified prediction of the Standard Model, but also perhaps the most decisive one: the prediction made already in 1964 of a unique scalar boson required by the theory of François Englert and Peter Higgs on how fundamental particles acquire mass. At that moment in 2012, it seemed particularly appropriate to start planning a gathering of world experts in particle physics to take stock of the situation and try to answer the challenging question: what next? By May 2013, when the LHC Nobel Symposium was held at the Krusenberg Mansion outside Uppsala in Sweden, the first signs of a great discovery had already turned into fully convincing experimental evidence for the existence of a scalar boson of mass about 125 GeV, having properties compatible with the 50-year-old prediction. And in October 2013, the evidence was deemed so convincing that the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics to Englert and Higgs for their pioneering work. At the same time the search at the LHC for other particles, beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, with heavier masses up to—and in some cases beyond—1 TeV, had provided no positive result. The triumph of the Standard Model seems resounding, in particular because the mass of the discovered scalar boson is such that, when identified with the Higgs boson, the Standard Model is able to provide predictions at energies as high as the Planck mass, although at the price of accepting that the vacuum would be metastable. However, even if there were some feelings of triumph, the ambience at the LHC Nobel Symposium was more one of

  6. LHC forward physics

    SciTech Connect

    Cartiglia, N.; Royon, C.

    2015-10-02

    The goal of this report is to give a comprehensive overview of the rich field of forward physics, with a special attention to the topics that can be studied at the LHC. The report starts presenting a selection of the Monte Carlo simulation tools currently available, chapter 2, then enters the rich phenomenology of QCD at low, chapter 3, and high, chapter 4, momentum transfer, while the unique scattering conditions of central exclusive production are analyzed in chapter 5. The last two experimental topics, Cosmic Ray and Heavy Ion physics are presented in the chapter 6 and 7 respectively. Chapter 8 is dedicated to the BFKL dynamics, multiparton interactions, and saturation. The report ends with an overview of the forward detectors at LHC. Each chapter is correlated with a comprehensive bibliography, attempting to provide to the interested reader with a wide opportunity for further studies.

  7. Nonthermal Synchrotron and Synchrotron Self-Compton Emission from GRBs: Predictions for Swift and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Finke, Justin D.; Boettcher, Markus

    2008-05-22

    Results of a leptonic jet model for the prompt emission and early afterglows of GRBs are presented. The synchrotron component is modeled with the canonical Band spectrum and the synchrotron self-Compton component is calculated from the implied synchrotron-emitting electron spectrum in a relativistic plasma blob. In the comoving frame the magnetic field is assumed to be tangled and the electron and photon distributions are assumed to be isotropic. The Compton-scattered spectrum is calculated using the full Compton cross-section in the Thomson through Klein-Nishina using the Jones formula. Pair production photoabsorption, both from ambient radiation in the jet and from the extragalactic background light (EBL), is taken into account. Results are presented as a function of a small set of parameters: the Doppler factor, the observed variability timescale, the comoving magnetic field, the peak synchrotron flux, and the redshift of the burst. Model predictions will be tested by multiwavelength observations, including the Swift and GLAST satellites, which will provide unprecedented coverage of GRBs.

  8. Microwave Schottky diagnostic systems for the Fermilab Tevatron, Recycler, and CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; Jansson, Andreas; /ESS, Lund

    2011-02-01

    A means for non-invasive measurement of transverse and longitudinal characteristics of bunched beams in synchrotrons has been developed based on high sensitivity slotted waveguide pickups. The pickups allow for bandwidths exceeding hundreds of MHz while maintaining good beam sensitivity characteristics. Wide bandwidth is essential to allow bunch-by-bunch measurements by means of a fast gating system. The Schottky detector system is installed and successfully commissioned in the Fermilab Tevatron and Recycler and CERN LHC synchrotrons. Measurement capabilities include tune, chromaticity, and momentum spread of single or multiple beam bunches in any combination. With appropriate calibrations, emittance can also be measured by integrating the area under the incoherent tune sidebands.

  9. Wakefields in Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billinghurst, Brant E.; Bergstrom, J. C.; Baribeau, C.; Batten, T.; Dallin, L.; May, Tim E.; Vogt, J. M.; Wurtz, Ward A.; Warnock, Robert L.; Bizzozero, D. A.; Kramer, S.; Michaelian, K. H.

    2016-06-01

    When the electron bunches in a storage ring are sufficiently short the electrons act coherently producing radiation several orders of magnitude more intense than normal synchrotron radiation. This is referred to as Coherent Syncrotron Radiation (CSR). Due to the potential of CSR to provide a good source of Terahertz radiation for our users, the Canadian Light Source (CLS) has been researching the production and application of CSR. CSR has been produced at the CLS for many years, and has been used for a number of applications. However, resonances that permeate the spectrum at wavenumber intervals of 0.074 cm-1, and are highly stable under changes in the machine setup, have hampered some experiments. Analogous resonances were predicted long ago in an idealized theory. Through experiments and further calculations we elucidate the resonance and wakefield mechanisms in the CLS vacuum chamber. The wakefield is observed directly in the 30-110 GHz range by rf diodes. These results are consistent with observations made by the interferometer in the THz range. Also discussed will be some practical examples of the application of CSR for the study of condensed phase samples using both transmission and Photoacoustic techniques.

  10. Higgs Boson Search at LHC (and LHC/CMS status)

    SciTech Connect

    Korytov, Andrey

    2008-11-23

    Presented are the results of the most recent studies by the CMS and ATLAS collaborations on the expected sensitivity of their detectors to observing a Higgs boson at LHC. The overview is preceded with a brief summary of the LHC and the CMS Experiment status.

  11. X-ray microscopy using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Pounds, J.G.; Rivers, M.L.; Schidlovsky, G.; Smith, J.V.; Spanne, P.; Sutton, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    The system for x-ray microscopy now being developed at the X-26 beam line of the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is described here. Examples of the use of x-ray microscopy for trace element geochemistry, biology and medicine, and materials investigations are given to emphasize the scientific applications of the technique. Future directions for the improvement and further development of the X-26 microscope and of the x-ray microscopy field in general are discussed. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  12. LNV Higgses at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiezza, Alessio; Nemevšek, Miha; Nesti, Fabrizio

    2016-06-01

    Lepton number is a fundamental symmetry that can be probed at the LHC. Here, we study the Higgs sector of theories responsible for neutrino mass generation. After a brief discussion of simple see-saw scenarios, we turn to theories where heavy Majorana neutrino mass is protected by a gauge symmetry and focus on the Left-Right symmetric theory. There, the SM-like Higgs boson can decay to a pair of heavy neutrinos and provide enough information to establish the origin of neutrino mass.

  13. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, a great discovery emerged at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. A plethora of new precision data had already by then been collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC, providing further extensive support for the validity of the Standard Model of particle physics. But what now appeared was the first evidence for what was not only the last unverified prediction of the Standard Model, but also perhaps the most decisive one: the prediction made already in 1964 of a unique scalar boson required by the theory of François Englert and Peter Higgs on how fundamental particles acquire mass. At that moment in 2012, it seemed particularly appropriate to start planning a gathering of world experts in particle physics to take stock of the situation and try to answer the challenging question: what next? By May 2013, when the LHC Nobel Symposium was held at the Krusenberg Mansion outside Uppsala in Sweden, the first signs of a great discovery had already turned into fully convincing experimental evidence for the existence of a scalar boson of mass about 125 GeV, having properties compatible with the 50-year-old prediction. And in October 2013, the evidence was deemed so convincing that the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics to Englert and Higgs for their pioneering work. At the same time the search at the LHC for other particles, beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, with heavier masses up to—and in some cases beyond—1 TeV, had provided no positive result. The triumph of the Standard Model seems resounding, in particular because the mass of the discovered scalar boson is such that, when identified with the Higgs boson, the Standard Model is able to provide predictions at energies as high as the Planck mass, although at the price of accepting that the vacuum would be metastable. However, even if there were some feelings of triumph, the ambience at the LHC Nobel Symposium was more one of

  14. Monotops at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Andrea, J.; Fuks, B.

    2011-10-01

    We explore scenarios where top quarks may be produced singly in association with missing energy, a very distinctive signature, which, in analogy with monojets, we dub monotops. We find that monotops can be produced in a variety of modes, typically characterized by baryon number-violating or flavorchanging neutral interactions. We build a simplified model that encompasses all the possible (tree-level) production mechanisms and study the LHC sensitiveness to a few representative scenarios by considering fully hadronic top decays. We find that constraints on such exotic models can already be set with 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected at {radical}(s)=7 TeV.

  15. Pigment-dependence of LHC assembly, structure, and function

    SciTech Connect

    Plumley, F.G.; Weston, B.; Stafford, R.A. ); Schmidt, G.W. )

    1993-05-01

    The role of pigments in the assembly and function of light-harvesting complexes in incompletely understood. A Chl b- and neoxanthin-deficient Chlamydomonas mutant (GE2.27) was isolated. Surprisingly, the rate of PSII-dependent O[sub 2] evolution at light-limiting conditions in mutant GE2.27 is reduced to the same extent as in another Chlamydomonas mutant completely devoid of LHC apoproteins. Thus, the partially assembled LHCs of GE2,27 do not functionally interact with PSII. Protease treatments of thylakoids reveal that the LHC proteins of GE2.27 are both hypersensitive and digested at unique sites indicating that the partially assembled LHC proteins of GE2.27 have an altered topological organization. Because thylakoid proteins from both PSI- and PSII-deficient mutants do not exhibit alterations in their susceptibility to exogenous proteases, the topological changes observed in GE2.27 LHC proteins are not a result of their propensity to associate with PSI or their apparent inability to functionally associate with PSII.Partially assembled LHCs, containing only Chl a, lutein, loroxanthin and violaxanthin were purified from GE2.27 thylakoids. the data indicate the altered topology as assessed by protease digestion assays are not simply due to the absence of Chl b and/or neoxanthin as proteolytic shields. We suggest that assembly of Chl b is required for proper folding of LHC proteins in thylakoid membranes and the conformational changes facilitate assembly and, therefore, accumulation of neoxanthin. Finally, neither Chl b nor neoxanthin is required for LHC association with PSI but one or more of these pigments is necessary to promote LHC association with PSII reaction centers. This is the first demonstration of pigment-dependent modulation of thylakoid protein conformation and function.

  16. Supersymmetry at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Bartl, A.; Soederqvist, J.; Paige, F.

    1996-11-22

    Supersymmetry (SUSY) is an appealing concept which provides a plausible solution to the fine tuning problem, while leaving the phenomenological success of the Standard Model (SM) unchanged. Moreover, some SUSY models allow for the unification of gauge couplings at a scale of M{sub GUT} {approx} 10{sup 16} GeV. A further attractive feature is the possibility of radiative breaking of the electro-weak symmetry group SU(2) {times} U(1). The masses of the SUSY partners of the SM particles are expected to be in the range 100 GeV to 1 TeV. One of the main goals of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be either to discover weak-scale SUSY or to exclude it over the entire theoretically allowed parameter space. The authors have developed a strategy for the analysis of experimental data at LHC which will allow them to determine the scale for supersymmetry, to limit the model parameter space, and to make precision measurements of model parameters.

  17. LHC - a "Why" Facility

    ScienceCinema

    Gordon Kane

    2016-07-12

    The Standard Models of particle physics and cosmology describe the world we see, and how it works, very well. But we want to understand (not just accommodate) much more – how does the Higgs mechanism work, what is the dark matter, why is the universe matter and not antimatter, why is parity violated, why are the particles (quarks and leptons) what they are, and why are the forces that act on them to make our world what they are, and more. Today is an exciting time to be doing particle physics – on the experimental side we have data coming from LHC and dark matter experiments that will provide clues to these questions, and on the theoretical side we have a framework (string theory) that addresses all these “why” questions. LHC data will not qualitatively improve our description – rather, it may provide the data that will allow us to learn about the dark matter, the Higgs physics, the matter asymmetry, etc, to test underlying theories such as string theory, and begin to answer the “why” questions. Supersymmetry is the best motivated discovery, and it would also open a window to the underlying theory near the Planck scale.

  18. LHC - a "Why" Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon Kane

    2009-01-14

    The Standard Models of particle physics and cosmology describe the world we see, and how it works, very well. But we want to understand (not just accommodate) much more – how does the Higgs mechanism work, what is the dark matter, why is the universe matter and not antimatter, why is parity violated, why are the particles (quarks and leptons) what they are, and why are the forces that act on them to make our world what they are, and more. Today is an exciting time to be doing particle physics – on the experimental side we have data coming from LHC and dark matter experiments that will provide clues to these questions, and on the theoretical side we have a framework (string theory) that addresses all these “why” questions. LHC data will not qualitatively improve our description – rather, it may provide the data that will allow us to learn about the dark matter, the Higgs physics, the matter asymmetry, etc, to test underlying theories such as string theory, and begin to answer the “why” questions. Supersymmetry is the best motivated discovery, and it would also open a window to the underlying theory near the Planck scale.

  19. A vacuum ultraviolet filtering monochromator for synchrotron-based spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, Ireneusz; Marin, Timothy W.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the design, characterization, and implementation of a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) monochromator for use in filtering stray and scattered light from the principal monochromator output of the Stainless Steel Seya VUV synchrotron beam line at the Synchrotron Radiation Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison. We demonstrate a reduction of three orders of magnitude of stray and scattered light over the wavelength range 1400-2000 Å with minimal loss of light intensity, allowing for over six orders of magnitude of dynamic range in light detection. We suggest that a similar filtering scheme can be utilized in any variety of spectroscopic applications where a large dynamic range and low amount of background signal are of import, such as in transmittance experiments with very high optical density.

  20. Synchrotron Radiation Research--An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bienenstock, Arthur; Winick, Herman

    1983-01-01

    Discusses expanding user community seeking access to synchrotron radiation sources, properties/sources of synchrotron radiation, permanent-magnet technology and its impact on synchrotron radiation research, factors limiting power, the density of synchrotron radiation, and research results illustrating benefit of higher flux and brightness. Also…

  1. Jet charge at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Krohn, David; Schwartz, Matthew D; Lin, Tongyan; Waalewijn, Wouter J

    2013-05-24

    Knowing the charge of the parton initiating a light-quark jet could be extremely useful both for testing aspects of the standard model and for characterizing potential beyond-the-standard-model signals. We show that despite the complications of hadronization and out-of-jet radiation such as pileup, a weighted sum of the charges of a jet's constituents can be used at the LHC to distinguish among jets with different charges. Potential applications include measuring electroweak quantum numbers of hadronically decaying resonances or supersymmetric particles, as well as standard model tests, such as jet charge in dijet events or in hadronically decaying W bosons in tt[over ¯] events. We develop a systematically improvable method to calculate moments of these charge distributions by combining multihadron fragmentation functions with perturbative jet functions and pertubative evolution equations. We show that the dependence on energy and jet size for the average and width of the jet charge can be calculated despite the large experimental uncertainty on fragmentation functions. These calculations can provide a validation tool for data independent of Monte Carlo fragmentation models.

  2. Mossbauer spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Alp, E.E.; Mooney, T.M.; Toellner, T.; Sturhahn, W.

    1993-07-01

    The principles underlying observation of the Mossbauer effect with synchrotron radiation are explained. The current status of the field is reviewed, and prospects for dedicated experimental stations on third generation machines are discussed.

  3. Single-bunch synchrotron shutter

    DOEpatents

    Norris, James R.; Tang, Jau-Huei; Chen, Lin; Thurnauer, Marion

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for selecting a single synchrotron pulse from the millions of pulses provided per second from a synchrotron source includes a rotating spindle located in the path of the synchrotron pulses. The spindle has multiple faces of a highly reflective surface, and having a frequency of rotation f. A shutter is spaced from the spindle by a radius r, and has an open position and a closed position. The pulses from the synchrotron are reflected off the spindle to the shutter such that the speed s of the pulses at the shutter is governed by: s=4.times..pi..times.r.times.f. such that a single pulse is selected for transmission through an open position of the shutter.

  4. Single-bunch synchrotron shutter

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, J.R.; Tang, Jau-Huei; Chen, Lin; Thurnauer, M.

    1991-12-31

    An apparatus for selecting a single synchrotron pulse from the millions of pulses provided per second from a synchrotron source includes a rotating spindle located in the path of the synchrotron pulses. The spindle has multiple faces of a highly reflective surface, and having a frequency of rotation f. A shutter is spaced from the spindle by a radius r, and has an open position and a closed position. The pulses from the synchrotron are reflected off the spindle to the shutter such that the speed s of the pulses at the shutter is governed by: s=4 {times} {pi} {times} r {times} such that a single pulse is selected for transmission through an open position of the shutter.

  5. New Detector Technologies for the LHC Experiments: Prospects, Strategies and Technologies for the HL-LHC Upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Mannelli, Marcello

    2013-03-06

    We review the prospects, strategies and technologies for the High Luminosity (HL-LHC) upgrades of the ATLAS and CMS detectors, in the light of a very successful two year-long first physics run, and the discovery of a new 126 GeV boson with properties consistent with those of the Standard Model Higgs boson.

  6. Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Audin, L.

    1994-12-31

    EPAct covers a vast territory beyond lighting and, like all legislation, also contains numerous {open_quotes}favors,{close_quotes} compromises, and even some sleight-of-hand. Tucked away under Title XIX, for example, is an increase from 20% to 28% tax on gambling winnings, effective January 1, 1993 - apparently as a way to help pay for new spending listed elsewhere in the bill. Overall, it is a landmark piece of legislation, about a decade overdue. It remains to be seen how the Federal Government will enforce upgrading of state (or even their own) energy codes. There is no mention of funding for {open_quotes}energy police{close_quotes} in EPAct. Merely creating such a national standard, however, provides a target for those who sincerely wish to create an energy-efficient future.

  7. Potential applications of synchrotron computed microtomography to soil science

    SciTech Connect

    Spanne, P.; Jones, K.W. ); Prunty, L.D. ); Anderson, S.H. )

    1993-01-01

    Synchrotron x-ray computed microtomography (CMT) can be used to make non-destructive tomographic sections with spatial resolutions of a few [mu]m. This resolution presents possibilities for study of soil-fluid interactions on a spatial scale hitherto unreachable. Details of a CMT apparatus in operation at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source X26 beam line are presented and prospects for future investigations of test systems have been made and results for wet and dry samples of glass beads and sand samples are given to show the power of the system.

  8. Potential applications of synchrotron computed microtomography to soil science

    SciTech Connect

    Spanne, P.; Jones, K.W.; Prunty, L.D.; Anderson, S.H.

    1993-01-01

    Synchrotron x-ray computed microtomography (CMT) can be used to make non-destructive tomographic sections with spatial resolutions of a few {mu}m. This resolution presents possibilities for study of soil-fluid interactions on a spatial scale hitherto unreachable. Details of a CMT apparatus in operation at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source X26 beam line are presented and prospects for future investigations of test systems have been made and results for wet and dry samples of glass beads and sand samples are given to show the power of the system.

  9. High intensity proton synchrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craddock, M. K.

    1986-10-01

    Strong initiatives are being pursued in a number of countries for the construction of ``kaon factory'' synchrotrons capable of producing 100 times more intense proton beams than those available now from machines such as the Brookhaven AGS and CERN PS. Such machines would yield equivalent increases in the fluxes of secondary particles (kaons, pions, muons, antiprotons, hyperons and neutrinos of all varieties)—or cleaner beams for a smaller increase in flux—opening new avenues to various fundamental questions in both particle and nuclear physics. Major areas of investigation would be rare decay modes, CP violation, meson and hadron spectroscopy, antinucleon interactions, neutrino scattering and oscillations, and hypernuclear properties. Experience with the pion factories has already shown how high beam intensities make it possible to explore the ``precision frontier'' with results complementary to those achievable at the ``energy frontier''. This paper will describe proposals for upgrading and AGS and for building kaon factories in Canada, Europe, Japan and the United States, emphasizing the novel aspects of accelerator design required to achieve the desired performance (typically 100 μA at 30 GeV).

  10. Angiography by Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubenstein, E.; Brown, G. S.; Giacomini, J. C.; Gordon, H. J.; Hofstadter, R.; Kernoff, R. S.; Otis, J. N.; Thomlinson, W.; Thompson, A. C.; Zeman, H. D.

    1987-01-01

    Because coronary disease represents the principal health problem in the Western, industrialized world, and because of the risks and costs associated with conventional methods of visualizing the coronary arteries, an effort has been underway at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory to develop a less invasive coronary imaging procedure based on iodine K-edge dichromography. A pair of line images, recorded within a few milliseconds of each other, is taken with two monochromatic X-ray beams whose energy closely brackets the K-edge of iodine, 33.17 keV. The logarithmic subtraction of the images produced by these beams results in an image which greatly enhances signals arising from attenuation by iodine and almost totally suppresses signals arising from attenuation by soft tissue and bone. The high sensitivity to iodine allows the visualization of arterial structures after an intravenous injection of contrast agent and its subsequent 20-30 fold dilution. The experiments began in 1979, with initial studies done on phantoms and excised pig hearts. The first images of anesthetized dogs were taken in 1982. The results of experiments on dogs will be reviewed, showing the stepwise evolution of the imaging system, leading to the use of the system on human subjects in 1986. The images recorded on human subjects will be described and the remaining problems discussed.

  11. Laser-synchrotron hybrid experiments: A photon to tickle, a photon to poke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ederer, D. L.; Rubensson, J. E.; Mueller, D. R.; Shuker, R.; Obrien, W. L.; Jai, J.; Dong, Q. Y.; Callcott, T. A.; Carr, G. L.; Williams, G. P.

    1991-07-01

    In this paper we present the preliminary results from a new experimental technique to synchronize the pulses from a mode-locked NdYAG laser to the light pulses in the VUV storage ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). We describe a method to electronically change the delay time between the laser pulses and the synchrotron pulses. We also illustrate a method to overlap the synchrotron pulses with the laser pulses in space and time. Preliminary results will be presented for two experiments.

  12. Laser-synchrotron hybrid experiments A photon to tickle - A photon to poke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ederer, D. L.; Rubensson, J. E.; Mueller, D. R.; Shuker, R.; O'Brien, W. L.; Jai, J.; Dong, Q. Y.; Callcott, T. A.; Carr, G. L.; Williams, G. P.; Hirschmugl, C. J.; Etemad, S.; Inam, A.; Tanner, D. B.

    1992-08-01

    In this paper we present the preliminary results from a new experimental technique to synchronize the pulses from a mode-locked Nd-YAG laser to the light pulses in the VUV storage ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). We describe a method to electronically change the delay time between the laser pulses and the synchrotron pulses. We also illustrate a method to overlap the synchrotron pulses with the laser pulses in space and time. Preliminary results will be presented for two experiments.

  13. Laser-synchrotron hybrid experiments: A photon to tickle, a photon to poke''

    SciTech Connect

    Ederer, D.L.; Rubensson, J.E.; Mueller, D.R. ); Shuker, R. ); O'Brien, W.L.; Jai, J.; Dong, Q.Y.; Callcott, T.A. ); Carr, G.L. . Corporate Research Center); Williams, G.P.; Hirschmugl, C.J

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we present the preliminary results from a new experimental technique to synchronize the pulses from a mode-locked NdYAG laser to the light pulses in the VUV storage ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). We describe a method to electronically change the delay time between the laser pulses and the synchrotron pulses. We also illustrate a method to overlap the synchrotron pulses with the laser pulses in space and time. Preliminary results will be presented for two experiments.

  14. Laser-synchrotron hybrid experiments: ``A photon to tickle, a photon to poke``

    SciTech Connect

    Ederer, D.L.; Rubensson, J.E.; Mueller, D.R.; Shuker, R.; O`Brien, W.L.; Jai, J.; Dong, Q.Y.; Callcott, T.A.; Carr, G.L.; Williams, G.P.; Hirschmugl, C.J.; Etemad, S.; Inam, A.; Tanner, D.B.

    1991-12-31

    In this paper we present the preliminary results from a new experimental technique to synchronize the pulses from a mode-locked NdYAG laser to the light pulses in the VUV storage ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). We describe a method to electronically change the delay time between the laser pulses and the synchrotron pulses. We also illustrate a method to overlap the synchrotron pulses with the laser pulses in space and time. Preliminary results will be presented for two experiments.

  15. Manufacturability of compact synchrotron mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Gary M.

    1997-11-01

    While many of the government funded research communities over the years have put their faith and money into increasingly larger synchrotrons, such as Spring8 in Japan, and the APS in the United States, a viable market appears to exist for smaller scale, research and commercial grade, compact synchrotrons. These smaller, and less expensive machines, provide the research and industrial communities with synchrotron radiation beamline access at a portion of the cost of their larger and more powerful counterparts. A compact synchrotron, such as the Aurora-2D, designed and built by Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. of japan (SHI), is a small footprint synchrotron capable of sustaining 20 beamlines. Coupled with a Microtron injector, with 150 MeV of injection energy, an entire facility fits within a 27 meter [88.5 ft] square floorplan. The system, controlled by 2 personal computers, is capable of producing 700 MeV electron energy and 300 mA stored current. Recently, an Aurora-2D synchrotron was purchased from SHI by the University of Hiroshima. The Rocketdyne Albuquerque Operations Beamline Optics Group was approached by SHI with a request to supply a group of 16 beamline mirrors for this machine. These mirrors were sufficient to supply 3 beamlines for the Hiroshima machine. This paper will address engineering issues which arose during the design and manufacturing of these mirrors.

  16. Top channel for early supersymmetry discovery at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, Gordon L.; Kuflik, Eric; Lu, Ran; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2011-11-01

    Arguably the best-motivated channel for early LHC discovery is events including a high multiplicity of third generation quarks, such as four top quarks. For example generic string theories compactified to four dimensions with stabilized moduli typically have light gluinos with large branching ratios to t- and b-quarks. We analyze signals and background at 7 TeV LHC energy for 1 fb{sup -1} integrated luminosity, suggesting a reach for gluinos of about 650 GeV. A non-standard model signal from counting b-jets and leptons is robust, and provides information on the gluino mass, cross section, and spin.

  17. Close vicinity of Lhc b1 and Lhc b4 in Photosystem II--membrane fragments as verified by chemical cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Miao, J; Irrgang, K D; Salnikow, J; Franke, P; Vater, J

    1998-11-01

    The nearest neighbourhood of pigment-protein complexes within Photosystem II (PSII) membrane fragments has been studied by means of chemical cross-linking with o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) in conjunction with protein-chemical techniques. By means of OPA-induced cross-linking a major conjugate of about 60 kDa has been identified. This conjugate was shown to consist of two pigment-protein complexes of light-harvesting complex II (LHC II), Lhc b1 (CP27) and Lhc b4 (CP29) by means of SDS/PAGE in combination with an immunological analysis using mAbs directed against Lhc b4 and by matrix-assisted-laser-desorption-ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) and sequence analysis of peptides derived from a proteolytic digest of the conjugate. Domains of Lhc bl and Lhc b4 have been localized to a distance of not more than 5 A within LHC II. Our results are discussed in the light of recent models on the topography of the two subunits within the antenna system of Photosystem II.

  18. PDF4LHC recommendations for LHC Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, Jon; Carrazza, Stefano; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; De Roeck, Albert; Feltesse, Joël; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Glazov, Sasha; Huston, Joey; Kassabov, Zahari; McNulty, Ronan; Morsch, Andreas; Nadolsky, Pavel; Radescu, Voica; Rojo, Juan; Thorne, Robert

    2016-02-01

    We provide an updated recommendation for the usage of sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs) and the assessment of PDF and PDF+{α }s uncertainties suitable for applications at the LHC Run II. We review developments since the previous PDF4LHC recommendation, and discuss and compare the new generation of PDFs, which include substantial information from experimental data from the Run I of the LHC. We then propose a new prescription for the combination of a suitable subset of the available PDF sets, which is presented in terms of a single combined PDF set. We finally discuss tools which allow for the delivery of this combined set in terms of optimized sets of Hessian eigenvectors or Monte Carlo replicas, and their usage, and provide some examples of their application to LHC phenomenology. This paper is dedicated to the memory of Guido Altarelli (1941-2015), whose seminal work made possible the quantitative study of PDFs.

  19. PDF4LHC recommendations for LHC Run II

    DOE PAGES

    Butterworth, Jon; Carrazza, Stefano; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Roeck, Albert De; Feltesse, Joel; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Glazov, Sasha; Huston, Joey; Kassabov, Zahari; et al

    2016-01-06

    We provide an updated recommendation for the usage of sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs) and the assessment of PDF and PDF+αs uncertainties suitable for applications at the LHC Run II. We review developments since the previous PDF4LHC recommendation, and discuss and compare the new generation of PDFs, which include substantial information from experimental data from the Run I of the LHC. We then propose a new prescription for the combination of a suitable subset of the available PDF sets, which is presented in terms of a single combined PDF set. Lastly, we finally discuss tools which allow for themore » delivery of this combined set in terms of optimized sets of Hessian eigenvectors or Monte Carlo replicas, and their usage, and provide some examples of their application to LHC phenomenology.« less

  20. Transvenous coronary angiography in humans with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1994-10-01

    The transvenous coronary angiography project at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is presently undergoing a significant upgrade to the hardware and software in the synchrotron medical facility. When completed, the project will have reached a level of maturity in the imaging technology which will allow the research team to begin to concentrate on medical research programs. This paper will review the status of the project and imaging technology and will discuss the current upgrades and future advanced technology initiatives. The advantages of using the radiation from a synchrotron, over that from a standard x-ray source, were the motivation for the project. A total of 23 human imaging sessions have been carried out with in the project. The primary goals have been to establish the imaging parameters and protocol necessary to obtain clinically useful images.

  1. A novel molecular synchrotron for cold collision and EDM experiments.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shunyong; Wei, Bin; Deng, Lianzhong; Yin, Jianping

    2016-09-07

    Limited by the construction demands, the state-of-the-art molecular synchrotrons consist of only 40 segments that hardly make a good circle. Imperfections in the circular structure will lead to the appearance of unstable velocity regions (i.e. stopbands), where molecules of certain forward velocity will be lost from the structure. In this paper, we propose a stopband-free molecular synchrotron. It contains 1570 ring electrodes, which nearly make a perfect circle, capable of confining both light and heavy polar molecules in the low-field-seeking states. Molecular packets can be conveniently manipulated with this synchrotron by various means, like acceleration, deceleration or even trapping. Trajectory calculations are carried out using a pulsed (88)SrF molecular beam with a forward velocity of 50 m/s. The results show that the molecular beam can make more than 500 round trips inside the synchrotron with a 1/e lifetime of 6.2 s. The synchrotron can find potential applications in low-energy collision and reaction experiments or in the field of precision measurements, such as the searches for electric dipole moment of elementary particles.

  2. A novel molecular synchrotron for cold collision and EDM experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Shunyong; Wei, Bin; Deng, Lianzhong; Yin, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    Limited by the construction demands, the state-of-the-art molecular synchrotrons consist of only 40 segments that hardly make a good circle. Imperfections in the circular structure will lead to the appearance of unstable velocity regions (i.e. stopbands), where molecules of certain forward velocity will be lost from the structure. In this paper, we propose a stopband-free molecular synchrotron. It contains 1570 ring electrodes, which nearly make a perfect circle, capable of confining both light and heavy polar molecules in the low-field-seeking states. Molecular packets can be conveniently manipulated with this synchrotron by various means, like acceleration, deceleration or even trapping. Trajectory calculations are carried out using a pulsed 88SrF molecular beam with a forward velocity of 50 m/s. The results show that the molecular beam can make more than 500 round trips inside the synchrotron with a 1/e lifetime of 6.2 s. The synchrotron can find potential applications in low-energy collision and reaction experiments or in the field of precision measurements, such as the searches for electric dipole moment of elementary particles.

  3. A novel molecular synchrotron for cold collision and EDM experiments

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shunyong; Wei, Bin; Deng, Lianzhong; Yin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Limited by the construction demands, the state-of-the-art molecular synchrotrons consist of only 40 segments that hardly make a good circle. Imperfections in the circular structure will lead to the appearance of unstable velocity regions (i.e. stopbands), where molecules of certain forward velocity will be lost from the structure. In this paper, we propose a stopband-free molecular synchrotron. It contains 1570 ring electrodes, which nearly make a perfect circle, capable of confining both light and heavy polar molecules in the low-field-seeking states. Molecular packets can be conveniently manipulated with this synchrotron by various means, like acceleration, deceleration or even trapping. Trajectory calculations are carried out using a pulsed 88SrF molecular beam with a forward velocity of 50 m/s. The results show that the molecular beam can make more than 500 round trips inside the synchrotron with a 1/e lifetime of 6.2 s. The synchrotron can find potential applications in low-energy collision and reaction experiments or in the field of precision measurements, such as the searches for electric dipole moment of elementary particles. PMID:27600539

  4. A novel molecular synchrotron for cold collision and EDM experiments.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shunyong; Wei, Bin; Deng, Lianzhong; Yin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Limited by the construction demands, the state-of-the-art molecular synchrotrons consist of only 40 segments that hardly make a good circle. Imperfections in the circular structure will lead to the appearance of unstable velocity regions (i.e. stopbands), where molecules of certain forward velocity will be lost from the structure. In this paper, we propose a stopband-free molecular synchrotron. It contains 1570 ring electrodes, which nearly make a perfect circle, capable of confining both light and heavy polar molecules in the low-field-seeking states. Molecular packets can be conveniently manipulated with this synchrotron by various means, like acceleration, deceleration or even trapping. Trajectory calculations are carried out using a pulsed (88)SrF molecular beam with a forward velocity of 50 m/s. The results show that the molecular beam can make more than 500 round trips inside the synchrotron with a 1/e lifetime of 6.2 s. The synchrotron can find potential applications in low-energy collision and reaction experiments or in the field of precision measurements, such as the searches for electric dipole moment of elementary particles. PMID:27600539

  5. MSSM Electroweak Baryogenesis and LHC Data

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela; Nardini, Germano; Quiros, Mariano; Wagner, Carlos E.M.

    2013-02-01

    Electroweak baryogenesis is an attractive scenario for the generation of the baryon asymmetry of the universe as its realization depends on the presence at the weak scale of new particles which may be searched for at high energy colliders. In the MSSM it may only be realized in the presence of light stops, and with moderate or small mixing between the left- and right-handed components. Consistency with the observed Higgs mass around 125 GeV demands the heavier stop mass to be much larger than the weak scale. Moreover the lighter stop leads to an increase of the gluon-gluon fusion Higgs production cross section which seems to be in contradiction with indications from current LHC data. We show that this tension may be considerably relaxed in the presence of a light neutralino with a mass lower than about 60 GeV, satisfying all present experimental constraints. In such a case the Higgs may have a significant invisible decay width and the stop decays through a three or four body decay channel, including a bottom quark and the lightest neutralino in the final state. All these properties make this scenario testable at a high luminosity LHC.

  6. Side benefits of the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, David J.

    2009-12-01

    Paul Michael Grant's article on a proposed hydrogen-cooled electric "Supergrid" ("Extreme energy makeover" October pp37-39) provides an answer to an oft-posed question about CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As a particle physicist, I am frequently asked by well-informed non-physicists why it is worth pouring more money into repairing the LHC if it costs so much and CERN cannot yet make it work. My first answer is that the fundamental physics that the LHC will do is worthwhile in its own right. But I also add that the LHC and Fermilab's Tevatron are great demonstrators for the superconducting transmission of large electric currents over tens of kilometres.

  7. Bystander Effects During Synchrotron Imaging Procedures?

    SciTech Connect

    Schueltke, Elisabeth; Nikkhah, Guido; Bewer, Brian; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Chapman, Dean

    2010-07-23

    Using monochromatic beam and synchrotron phase-contrast technique at the biomedical beamline of the Italian synchrotron facility Elettra (SYRMEP), we have shown in a small animal model of malignant brain tumor that it is possible to obtain high-resolution images of very small tumors when they have developed from implanted tumor cells loaded with colloidal gold nanoparticles (GNP). All previous experiments were conducted in post-mortem samples. We have now designed a cell culture experiment to investigate the effects of synchrotron radiation with an energy and dose profile similar to that expected in our first in vivo imaging studies according to the protocol developed at SYRMEP.Materials and Methods: Culture flasks containing either gold-loaded or naieve C6 glioma cells were exposed to a dose of 0.5 Gy at 24 keV. The irradiated medium was aspirated and replaced with fresh growth medium. Twenty-four hours later this non-irradiated medium exposed to irradiated cells was aspirated, then added to non-irradiated C6 cells in order to investigate whether bystander effects are seen under the conditions of our image acquisition protocol. The irradiated medium was added to a number of other non-irradiated cell cultures. Cell counts were followed until 72 hrs after irradiation. Western blots were conducted with H2AX antibodies. This experiment was one of the first biomedical experiments conducted at BMIT, the new biomedical imaging and therapy beamline of the Canadian Light Source.Results: No significant differences in proliferation were seen between cells that were directly irradiated, exposed to irradiated medium or exposed to the non-irradiated 24-hr-medium from the irradiated cells. However, there was a tendency towards a higher number of double strand breaks in previously irradiated cells when they were exposed to non-irradiated medium that had been in contact with irradiated cells for 24 hrs.

  8. Bystander Effects During Synchrotron Imaging Procedures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schültke, Elisabeth; Bewer, Brian; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Chapman, Dean; Nikkhah, Guido

    2010-07-01

    Using monochromatic beam and synchrotron phase-contrast technique at the biomedical beamline of the Italian synchrotron facility Elettra (SYRMEP), we have shown in a small animal model of malignant brain tumor that it is possible to obtain high-resolution images of very small tumors when they have developed from implanted tumor cells loaded with colloidal gold nanoparticles (GNP). All previous experiments were conducted in post-mortem samples. We have now designed a cell culture experiment to investigate the effects of synchrotron radiation with an energy and dose profile similar to that expected in our first in vivo imaging studies according to the protocol developed at SYRMEP. Materials and Methods: Culture flasks containing either gold-loaded or naïve C6 glioma cells were exposed to a dose of 0.5 Gy at 24 keV. The irradiated medium was aspirated and replaced with fresh growth medium. Twenty-four hours later this non-irradiated medium exposed to irradiated cells was aspirated, then added to non-irradiated C6 cells in order to investigate whether bystander effects are seen under the conditions of our image acquisition protocol. The irradiated medium was added to a number of other non-irradiated cell cultures. Cell counts were followed until 72 hrs after irradiation. Western blots were conducted with H2AX antibodies. This experiment was one of the first biomedical experiments conducted at BMIT, the new biomedical imaging and therapy beamline of the Canadian Light Source. Results: No significant differences in proliferation were seen between cells that were directly irradiated, exposed to irradiated medium or exposed to the non-irradiated 24-hr-medium from the irradiated cells. However, there was a tendency towards a higher number of double strand breaks in previously irradiated cells when they were exposed to non-irradiated medium that had been in contact with irradiated cells for 24 hrs.

  9. On dilatons and the LHC diphoton excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megías, Eugenio; Pujolàs, Oriol; Quirós, Mariano

    2016-05-01

    We study soft wall models that can embed the Standard Model and a naturally light dilaton. Exploiting the full capabilities of these models we identify the parameter space that allows to pass Electroweak Precision Tests with a moderate Kaluza-Klein scale, around 2 TeV. We analyze the coupling of the dilaton with Standard Model (SM) fields in the bulk, and discuss two applications: i) Models with a light dilaton as the first particle beyond the SM pass quite easily all observational tests even with a dilaton lighter than the Higgs. However the possibility of a 125 GeV dilaton as a Higgs impostor is essentially disfavored; ii) We show how to extend the soft wall models to realize a 750 GeV dilaton that could explain the recently reported diphoton excess at the LHC.

  10. Particle Physics on the Eve of Lhc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studenikin, Alexander I.

    2009-01-01

    a lattice / O. V. Pavlovsky. String-like electrostatic interaction from QED with infinite magnetic field / A. E. Shabad, V. V. Usov. QFT systems with 2D spatial defects / I. V. Fialkovsky, V. N. Markov, Yu. M. Pismak. Bound state problems and radiative effects in extended electrodynamics with Lorentz violation / I. E. Frolov, O. G. Kharlanov, V. Ch. Zhukovsky. Particles with low binding energy in a strong stationary magnetic field / E. V. Arbuzova, G. A. Kravtsova, V. N. Rodionov. Triangle anomaly and radiatively induced Lorentz and CPT violation in electrodynamics / A. E. Lobanov, A. P. Venediktov. The comparative analysis of the angular distribution of synchrotron radiation for a spinless particle in classic and quantum theories / V. G. Bagrov, A. N. Burimova, A. A. Gusev. Problem of the spin light identification / V. A. Bordovitsyn, V. V. Telushkin. Simulation the nuclear interaction / T. F. Kamalov. Unstable leptons and (u - e - [symbol])-universality / O. Kosmachev. Generalized Dirac equation describing the quark structure of nucleons / A. Rabinowitch. Unique geometrization of material and electromagnetic wave fields / O. Olkhov -- Problems of intelligentsia. The conscience of the intelligentsia / J. K. Bleimaier.

  11. Spin Echo in Synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alexander W.; Courant, Ernest D.; /Brookhaven

    2006-12-01

    As a polarized beam is accelerated through a depolarization resonance, its polarization is reduced by a well-defined calculable reduction factor. When the beam subsequently crosses a second resonance, the final beam polarization is considered to be reduced by the product of the two reduction factors corresponding to the two crossings, each calculated independently of the other. This is a good approximation when the spread of spin precession frequency {Delta}{nu}{sub spin} of the beam (particularly due to its energy spread) is sufficiently large that the spin precession phases of individual particles smear out completely during the time {tau} between the two crossings. This approximate picture, however, ignores two spin dynamics effects: an interference effect and a spin echo effect. This paper is to address these two effects. The interference effect occurs when {Delta}{nu}{sub spin} is too small, or when {tau} is too short, to complete the smearing process. In this case, the two resonance crossings interfere with each other, and the final polarization exhibits constructive or destructive patterns depending on the exact value of {tau}. Typically, the beam's energy spread is large and this interference effect does not occur. To study this effect, therefore, it is necessary to reduce the beam energy spread and to consider two resonance crossings very close to each other. The other mechanism, also due to the interplay between two resonance crossings, is spin echo. It turns out that even when the precession phases appear to be completely smeared between the two crossings, there will still be a sudden and short-lived echo signal of beam polarization at a time {tau} after the second crossing; the magnitude of which can be as large as 57%. This echo signal exists even when the beam has a sizable energy spread and when {tau} is very large, and could be a sensitive (albeit challenging) way to experimentally test the intricate spin dynamics in a synchrotron. After giving an

  12. Summary of the Mini BNL/LARP/CARE-HHH Workshop on Crab Cavities for the LHC (LHC-CC08)

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi,I.; Calaga, R.; Zimmermann, F.

    2008-05-01

    The first mini-workshop on crab compensation for the LHC luminosity upgrade (LHC-CC08) was held February 24-25, 2008 at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. A total of 35 participants from 3 continents and 15 institutions from around the world participated to discuss the exciting prospect of a crab scheme for the LHC. If realized it will be the first demonstration in hadron colliders. The workshop is organized by joint collaboration of BNL, US-LARP and CARE-HHH. The enormous interest in the subject of crab cavities for the international linear collider and future light sources has resulted in a large international collaboration to exchange aspects of synergy and expertise. A central repository for this exchange of information documenting the latest design effort for LHC crab cavities is consolidated in a wiki page: https://twiki.cern.ch/twiki/bin/view/Main/LHCCrabCavities. The main goal of this workshop was to define a road-map for a prototype crab cavity to be installed in the LHC and to discuss the associated R&D and beam dynamics challenges. The diverse subject of implementing the crab scheme resulted in a scientific program with a wide range of subtopics which were divided into 8 sessions. Each session was given a list of fundamental questions to be addressed and used as a guideline to steer the discussions.

  13. Cloning and expression analysis of two different LhcSR genes involved in stress adaptation in an Antarctic microalga, Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L.

    PubMed

    Mou, Shanli; Zhang, Xiaowen; Ye, Naihao; Dong, Meitao; Liang, Chengwei; Liang, Qiang; Miao, Jinlai; Xu, Dong; Zheng, Zhou

    2012-03-01

    Light-harvesting complexes (LHCs) play essential roles in light capture and photoprotection. Although the functional diversity of individual LHCs in many plants has been well described, knowledge regarding the extent of this family in the majority of green algal groups is still limited. In this study, two different LhcSR genes, LhcSR1 and LhcSR2 from Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L, were cloned from the total cDNA and characterized in response to high light (HL), low light (LL), UV-B radiation and high salinity. The lower F (v)/F (m) as well as the associated induction of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), observed under those conditions, indicated that Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L was under stress. Under HL stress, the expression of LhcSR1 and LhcSR2 increased rapidly from 0.5 h HL and reached a maximum after 3 h. In LL, LhcSR2 expression was up-regulated during the first 0.5 h after which it decreased, while the expression of LhcSR1 decreased gradually from the beginning of the experiment. In addition, the transcript levels of LhcSR1 and LhcSR2 increased under UV-B radiation and high salinity. These results showed that both genes were inducible and up-regulated under stress conditions. A higher NPQ was accompanied by the up-regulated LhcSR genes, suggesting that LhcSR plays a role in thermal energy dissipation. Overall, the results presented here suggest that LhcSR1 and LhcSR2 play a primary role in photoprotection in Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L under stress conditions and provide an important basis for investigation of the adaptation mechanism of LhcSR in Antarctic green algae.

  14. Contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Panessa-Warren, B.J.

    1985-10-01

    Soft x-ray contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation offers the biologist and especially the microscopist, a way to morphologically study specimens that could not be imaged by conventional TEM, STEM or SEM methods (i.e. hydrated samples, samples easily damaged by an electron beam, electron dense samples, thick specimens, unstained low contrast specimens) at spatial resolutions approaching those of the TEM, with the additional possibility to obtain compositional (elemental) information about the sample as well. Although flash x-ray sources offer faster exposure times, synchrotron radiation provides a highly collimated, intense radiation that can be tuned to select specific discrete ranges of x-ray wavelengths or specific individual wavelengths which optimize imaging or microanalysis of a specific sample. This paper presents an overview of the applications of x-ray contact microscopy to biological research and some current research results using monochromatic synchrotron radiation to image biological samples. 24 refs., 10 figs.

  15. Impact system for ultrafast synchrotron experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, B. J.; Owens, C. T.; Ramos, K. J.; Yeager, J. D.; Saavedra, R. A.; Luo, S. N.; Hooks, D. E.; Iverson, A. J.; Fezzaa, K.

    2013-01-15

    The impact system for ultrafast synchrotron experiments, or IMPULSE, is a 12.6-mm bore light-gas gun (<1 km/s projectile velocity) designed specifically for performing dynamic compression experiments using the advanced imaging and X-ray diffraction methods available at synchrotron sources. The gun system, capable of reaching projectile velocities up to 1 km/s, was designed to be portable for quick insertion/removal in the experimental hutch at Sector 32 ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne, IL) while allowing the target chamber to rotate for sample alignment with the beam. A key challenge in using the gun system to acquire dynamic data on the nanosecond time scale was synchronization (or bracketing) of the impact event with the incident X-ray pulses (80 ps width). A description of the basic gun system used in previous work is provided along with details of an improved launch initiation system designed to significantly reduce the total system time from launch initiation to impact. Experiments were performed to directly measure the gun system time and to determine the gun performance curve for projectile velocities ranging from 0.3 to 0.9 km/s. All results show an average system time of 21.6 {+-} 4.5 ms, making it possible to better synchronize the gun system and detectors to the X-ray beam.

  16. Three energy computed tomography with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Menk, R.H.; Thomlinson, W.; Zhong, Z.; Charvet, A.M.; Arfelli, F. |; Chapman, L.

    1997-09-01

    Preliminary experiments for digital subtraction computed tomography (CT) at the K-edge of iodine (33.1 keV) were carried out at SMERF (Synchrotron Medical Research Facility X17B2) at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The major goal was to evaluate the availability of this kind of imaging for in vivo neurological studies. Using the transvenous coronary angiography system, CT images of various samples and phantoms were taken simultaneously at two slightly different energies bracketing the K-absorption edge of iodine. The logarithmic subtraction of the two images resulted in the contrast enhancement of iodine filled structures. An additional CT image was taken at 99.57 keV (second harmonic of the fundamental wave). The third energy allowed the calculation of absolute iodine, tissue and bone images by means of a matrix inversion. A spatial resolution of 0.8 LP/mm was measured in single energy images and iodine concentrations down to 0.082 mg/ml in a 1/4 diameter detail were visible in the reconstructed subtraction image.

  17. Shining light on the differences in molecular structural chemical makeup and the cause of distinct degradation behavior between malting- and feed-type barley using synchrotron FTIR microspectroscopy: a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peiqiang; Doiron, Kevin; Liu, Dasen

    2008-05-14

    The objective of this study was to use advanced synchrotron-sourced FTIR microspectroscopy (SFTIRM) as a novel approach to identify the differences in protein and carbohydrate molecular structure (chemical makeup) between these two varieties of barley and illustrate the exact causes for their significantly different degradation kinetics. Items assessed included (1) molecular structural differences in protein amide I to amide II intensities and their ratio within cellular dimensions, (2) molecular structural differences in protein secondary structure profile and their ratios, and (3) molecular structural differences in carbohydrate component peak profile. Our hypothesis was that molecular structure (chemical makeup) affects barley quality, fermentation, and degradation behavior in both humans and animals. Using SFTIRM, the protein and carbohydrate molecular structural chemical makeup of barley was revealed and identified. The protein molecular structural chemical makeup differed significantly between the two varieties of barleys. No difference in carbohydrate molecular structural chemical makeup was detected. Harrington was lower than Valier in protein amide I, amide II, and protein amide I to amide II ratio, while Harrington was relatively higher in model-fitted protein alpha-helix and beta-sheet, but lower in the others (beta-turn and random coil). These results indicated that it is the molecular structure of protein (chemical makeup) that may play a major role in the different degradation kinetics between the two varieties of barleys (not the molecular structure of carbohydrate). It is believed that use of the advanced synchrotron technology will make a significant step and an important contribution to research in examining the molecular structure (chemical makeup) of plant, feed, and seeds.

  18. Supersymmetric dark matter after LHC run 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnaschi, E. A.; Buchmueller, O.; Cavanaugh, R.; Citron, M.; De Roeck, A.; Dolan, M. J.; Ellis, J. R.; Flächer, H.; Heinemeyer, S.; Isidori, G.; Malik, S.; Martínez Santos, D.; Olive, K. A.; Sakurai, K.; de Vries, K. J.; Weiglein, G.

    2015-10-01

    Different mechanisms operate in various regions of the MSSM parameter space to bring the relic density of the lightest neutralino, tilde{χ }^01, assumed here to be the lightest SUSY particle (LSP) and thus the dark matter (DM) particle, into the range allowed by astrophysics and cosmology. These mechanisms include coannihilation with some nearly degenerate next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle such as the lighter stau tilde{τ }1, stop tilde{t}1 or chargino tilde{χ }^± 1, resonant annihilation via direct-channel heavy Higgs bosons H / A, the light Higgs boson h or the Z boson, and enhanced annihilation via a larger Higgsino component of the LSP in the focus-point region. These mechanisms typically select lower-dimensional subspaces in MSSM scenarios such as the CMSSM, NUHM1, NUHM2, and pMSSM10. We analyze how future LHC and direct DM searches can complement each other in the exploration of the different DM mechanisms within these scenarios. We find that the {tilde{τ }_1} coannihilation regions of the CMSSM, NUHM1, NUHM2 can largely be explored at the LHC via searches for / E_T events and long-lived charged particles, whereas their H / A funnel, focus-point and tilde{χ }^± 1 coannihilation regions can largely be explored by the LZ and Darwin DM direct detection experiments. We find that the dominant DM mechanism in our pMSSM10 analysis is tilde{χ }^± 1 coannihilation: parts of its parameter space can be explored by the LHC, and a larger portion by future direct DM searches.

  19. Supersymmetric Dark Matter after LHC Run 1

    DOE PAGES

    Bagnaschi, E. A.; Buchmueller, O.; Cavanaugh, R.; Citron, M.; De Roeck, A.; Dolan, M. J.; Ellis, J. R.; Flacher, H.; Heinemeyer, S.; Isidori, G.; et al

    2015-10-23

    Different mechanisms operate in various regions of the MSSM parameter space to bring the relic density of the lightest neutralino, χ~01, assumed here to be the lightest SUSY particle (LSP) and thus the dark matter (DM) particle, into the range allowed by astrophysics and cosmology. These mechanisms include coannihilation with some nearly degenerate next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle such as the lighter stau τ~1, stop t~1 or chargino χ~±1, resonant annihilation via direct-channel heavy Higgs bosons H / A, the light Higgs boson h or the Z boson, and enhanced annihilation via a larger Higgsino component of the LSP in the focus-pointmore » region. These mechanisms typically select lower-dimensional subspaces in MSSM scenarios such as the CMSSM, NUHM1, NUHM2, and pMSSM10. We analyze how future LHC and direct DM searches can complement each other in the exploration of the different DM mechanisms within these scenarios. We find that the τ~1 coannihilation regions of the CMSSM, NUHM1, NUHM2 can largely be explored at the LHC via searches for /ET events and long-lived charged particles, whereas theirH / A funnel, focus-point and χ~±1 coannihilation regions can largely be explored by the LZ and Darwin DM direct detection experiments. Furthermore, we find that the dominant DM mechanism in our pMSSM10 analysis is χ~±1 coannihilation: parts of its parameter space can be explored by the LHC, and a larger portion by future direct DM searches.« less

  20. Supersymmetric Dark Matter after LHC Run 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bagnaschi, E. A.; Buchmueller, O.; Cavanaugh, R.; Citron, M.; De Roeck, A.; Dolan, M. J.; Ellis, J. R.; Flacher, H.; Heinemeyer, S.; Isidori, G.; Malik, S.; Santos, D. Martinez; Olive, K. A.; Sakurai, K.; de Vries, K. J.; Weiglein, G.

    2015-10-23

    Different mechanisms operate in various regions of the MSSM parameter space to bring the relic density of the lightest neutralino, χ~01, assumed here to be the lightest SUSY particle (LSP) and thus the dark matter (DM) particle, into the range allowed by astrophysics and cosmology. These mechanisms include coannihilation with some nearly degenerate next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle such as the lighter stau τ~1, stop t~1 or chargino χ1, resonant annihilation via direct-channel heavy Higgs bosons H / A, the light Higgs boson h or the Z boson, and enhanced annihilation via a larger Higgsino component of the LSP in the focus-point region. These mechanisms typically select lower-dimensional subspaces in MSSM scenarios such as the CMSSM, NUHM1, NUHM2, and pMSSM10. We analyze how future LHC and direct DM searches can complement each other in the exploration of the different DM mechanisms within these scenarios. We find that the τ~1 coannihilation regions of the CMSSM, NUHM1, NUHM2 can largely be explored at the LHC via searches for /ET events and long-lived charged particles, whereas theirH / A funnel, focus-point and χ1 coannihilation regions can largely be explored by the LZ and Darwin DM direct detection experiments. Furthermore, we find that the dominant DM mechanism in our pMSSM10 analysis is χ~±1 coannihilation: parts of its parameter space can be explored by the LHC, and a larger portion by future direct DM searches.

  1. A Synchrotron Radiation Research Facility for Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, Herman

    2015-03-01

    Africa is the only habitable continent without a synchrotron light source. Dozens of African scientists use facilities abroad. Although South Africa has become a member of ESRF, the number of users is limited by distance and travel cost. A light source in Africa would give thousands of African scientists access to this tool. Momentum is now building for an African light source, as a collaboration involving several sub-Saharan African countries. An interim Steering Committee has been formed. SESAME, now nearing completion in Jordan as a collaboration of 9 countries in the Middle East (www.sesame.org.jo) may be the example followed. UNESCO became the umbrella organization for SESAME at its Executive Board 164th session, May 2002, as it did in the case of CERN in the 1950s. UNESCO's Executive Board described SESAME as ``a quintessential UNESCO project combining capacity building with vital peace-building through science'' and ``a model project for other regions''. It is likely that UNESCO, if asked, would play a similar role as a facilitator for an African light source.

  2. A Synchrotron Radiation Research Facility for Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans-Lutterodt, Kenneth; Mtingwa, Sekazi; Wague, Ahmadou; Tessema, Guebre; Winick, Herman

    2015-04-01

    Africa is the only habitable continent without a synchrotron light source. Dozens of African scientists use facilities abroad. Even though South Africa has become a member of ESRF, the number of users is limited by distance and travel cost. A light source in Africa would give many more African scientists access to this tool. Momentum is now building for an African light source, as a collaboration involving several African countries. An interim Steering Committee has been formed, with a mandate to plan a conference. SESAME, now nearing completion in Jordan, is a collaboration of 9 countries in the Middle East (www.sesame.org.jo) is an example to follow. UNESCO became the umbrella organization for SESAME at its Executive Board 164th session, May 2002, as it did in the case of CERN in the 1950s. UNESCO's Executive Board described SESAME as ``a quintessential UNESCO project combining capacity building with vital peace-building through science'' and ``a model project for other regions.'' It is likely that UNESCO, if asked, would play a similar role as a facilitator for an African light source.

  3. Polyamines induce aggregation of LHC II and quenching of fluorescence in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tsiavos, Theodoros; Ioannidis, Nikolaos E; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2012-05-01

    Dissipation of excess excitation energy within the light-harvesting complex of Photosystem II (LHC II) is a main process in plants, which is measured as the non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence or qE. We showed in previous works that polyamines stimulate qE in higher plants in vivo and in eukaryotic algae in vitro. In the present contribution we have tested whether polyamines can stimulate quenching in trimeric LHC II and monomeric light-harvesting complex b proteins from higher plants. The tetramine spermine was the most potent quencher and induced aggregation of LHC II trimers, due to its highly cationic character. Two transients are evident at 100 μM and 350 μM for the fluorescence and absorbance signals of LHC II respectively. On the basis of observations within this work, some links between polyamines and the activation of qE in vivo is discussed.

  4. A case study of the sensitivity to LFV operators with precision measurements and the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yi; Schmidt, Michael A.

    2016-02-01

    We compare the sensitivity of precision measurements of lepton flavour observables to the reach of the LHC in a case study of lepton-flavour violating operators of dimension six with two leptons and two quarks. For light quarks precision measurements always yield the more stringent constraints. The LHC complements precision measurements for operators with heavier quarks. Competitive limits can already be set on the cutoff scale Λ > 600-800 GeV for operators with right-handed τ leptons using the LHC run 1 data.

  5. Medical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prezado, Yolanda; Martínez-Rovira, Immaculada

    This chapter describes the state-of-art of synchrotron radiation therapies in the treatment of radioresistant tumors. The tolerance of the surrounding healthy tissue severely limits the achievement of a curative treatment for some brain tumors, like gliomas. This restriction is especially important in children, due to the high risk of complications in the development of the central nervous system. In addition, the treatment of tumors close to an organ at risk, like the spinal cord, is also restrained. One possible solution is the development of new radiotherapy techniques would exploit radically different irradiation modes, as it is the case of synchrotron radiotherapies. Their distinct features allow to modify the biological equivalent doses. In this chapter the three new approaches under development at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), in Grenoble (France), will be described, namely: stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy, microbeam radiation therapy and minibeam radiation therapy. The promising results obtained in the treatment of high grade brain tumors in preclinical studies have paved the way to the forthcoming clinical trials, currently in preparation.

  6. Tandems as injectors for synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1992-08-01

    This is a review on the use of Tandem electrostatic accelerators for injection and filling of synchrotrons to accelerate intense beams of heavy-ions to relativistic energies. The paper emphasizes the need of operating the Tandems in pulsed mode for this application. It has been experimentally demonstrated that at the present this type of accelerators still provides the most reliable and best performance.

  7. Tandems as injectors for synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    This is a review on the use of Tandem electrostatic accelerators for injection and filling of synchrotrons to accelerate intense beams of heavy-ions to relativistic energies. The paper emphasizes the need of operating the Tandems in pulsed mode for this application. It has been experimentally demonstrated that at the present this type of accelerators still provides the most reliable and best performance.

  8. Optical systems for synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.

    1985-12-01

    Various fundamental topics which underlie the design and use of optical systems for synchrotron radiation are considered from the viewpoint of linear system theory. These topics include the damped harmonic oscillator, free space propagation of an optical field, electromagnetic theory of optical properties of materials, theory of dispersion, and the Kramers-Kronig relations. 32 refs., 5 figs. (LEW)

  9. First Operation of the Abort Gap Monitor for LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Lefevre, Thibaut; Bart Pedersen, Stephane; Boccardi, Andrea; Bravin, Enrico; Goldblatt, A.; Jeff, Adam; Roncarolo, Federico; Fisher, Alan; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) beam-dump system relies on extraction kickers that need 3 microseconds to rise to their nominal field. Since particles transiting the kickers during the rise will not be dumped properly, the proton population in this interval must always remain below quench and damage limits. A specific monitor to measure the particle population of this gap has been designed based on the detection of synchrotron radiation using a gated photomultiplier. Since the quench and damage limits change with the beam energy, the acceptable population in the abort gap and the settings of the monitor must adapt accordingly. This paper presents the design of the monitor, the calibration procedure and the detector performance with beam.

  10. Polymer research at synchrotron radiation sources: symposium proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, T.P.; Goland, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    The twenty-two papers are arranged into eleven sessions entitled: general overviews; time-resolved x-ray scattering; studies using fluorescence, ion-containing polymers; time-resolved x-ray scattering; novel applications of synchrotron radiation; phase transitions in polymers; x-ray diffraction on polymers; recent detector advances; complementary light, x-ray and neutron studies; and neutron scattering studies. Seven of the papers are processed separately; three of the remainder have been previously processed. (DLC)

  11. Putting synchrotron radiation to work for technology: Analytic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on: Advanced Light Source; Ultra-ESCA: Advanced Capabilities of XPS with High-Brightness Synchrotron Radiation; High-Resolution (20 nm) XPS and XANES with the ALS; Photoelectron Spectroscopy in Industry: Current Capabilities, Needs, and Possible Roles for the ALS; Materials Analysis by Photoemission: Is This Practical at ALS?; Applications of Long-Wavelength X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry and X-Ray Powder Diffractometry.

  12. Putting synchrotron radiation to work for technology: Analytic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on: Advanced Light Source; Ultra-ESCA: Advanced Capabilities of XPS with High-Brightness Synchrotron Radiation; High-Resolution (20 nm) XPS and XANES with the ALS; Photoelectron Spectroscopy in Industry: Current Capabilities, Needs, and Possible Roles for the ALS; Materials Analysis by Photoemission: Is This Practical at ALS ; Applications of Long-Wavelength X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry and X-Ray Powder Diffractometry.

  13. Dashboard for the LHC experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, J.; Belov, S.; Berejnoj, A.; Cirstoiu, C.; Chen, Y.; Chen, T.; Chiu, S.; Miguel, M. D. F. D.; Ivanchenko, A.; Gaidioz, B.; Herrala, J.; Janulis, M.; Kodolova, O.; Maier, G.; Maguire, E. J.; Munro, C.; Rivera, R. P.; Rocha, R.; Saiz, P.; Sidorova, I.; Tsai, F.; Tikhonenko, E.; Urbah, E.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we present the Experiment Dashboard monitoring system, which is currently in use by four Large Hadron Collider (LHC)[1] experiments. The goal of the Experiment Dashboard is to monitor the activities of the LHC experiments on the distributed infrastructure, providing monitoring data from the virtual organization (VO) and user perspectives. The LHC experiments are using various Grid infrastructures (LCG[2]/EGEE[3], OSG[4], NDGF[5]) with correspondingly various middleware flavors and job submission methods. Providing a uniform and complete view of various activities like job processing, data movement and publishing, access to distributed databases regardless of the underlying Grid flavor is the challenging task. In this paper we will describe the Experiment Dashboard concept, its framework and main monitoring applications.

  14. Le LHC, un tunnel cosmique

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-17

    Et si la lumière au bout du tunnel du LHC était cosmique ? En d’autres termes, qu’est-ce que le LHC peut nous apporter dans la connaissance de l’Univers ? Car la montée en énergie des accélérateurs de particules nous permet de mieux appréhender l’univers primordial, chaud et dense. Mais dans quel sens dit-on que le LHC reproduit des conditions proches du Big bang ? Quelles informations nous apporte-t-il sur le contenu de l’Univers ? La matière noire est-elle détectable au LHC ? L’énergie noire ? Pourquoi l’antimatière accumulée au CERN est-elle si rare dans l’Univers ? Et si le CERN a bâti sa réputation sur l’exploration des forces faibles et fortes qui opèrent au sein des atomes et de leurs noyaux, est-ce que le LHC peut nous apporter des informations sur la force gravitationnelle qui gouverne l’évolution cosmique ? Depuis une trentaine d’années, notre compréhension de l’univers dans ses plus grandes dimensions et l’appréhension de son comportement aux plus petites distances sont intimement liées : en quoi le LHC va-t-il tester expérimentalement cette vision unifiée ? Tout public, entrée libre / Réservations au +41 (0)22 767 76 76

  15. LHC diphoton Higgs signal predicted by little Higgs models

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Lei; Yang Jinmin

    2011-10-01

    Little Higgs theory naturally predicts a light Higgs boson whose most important discovery channel at the LHC is the diphoton signal pp{yields}h{yields}{gamma}{gamma}. In this work, we perform a comparative study for this signal in some typical little Higgs models, namely, the littlest Higgs model, two littlest Higgs models with T-parity (named LHT-I and LHT-II), and the simplest little Higgs models. We find that compared with the standard model prediction, the diphoton signal rate is always suppressed and the suppression extent can be quite different for different models. The suppression is mild (< or approx. 10%) in the littlest Higgs model but can be quite severe ({approx_equal}90%) in other three models. This means that discovering the light Higgs boson predicted by the little Higgs theory through the diphoton channel at the LHC will be more difficult than discovering the standard model Higgs boson.

  16. Charged Higgs Probes of Dark Bosons at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Lee, Hye-Sung; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-08-01

    A very light (GeV scale) dark gauge boson (Z') is a recently highlighted hypothetical particle that can address some astrophysical anomalies as well as the 3.6σ deviation in the muon g-2 measurement. We suggest top quark decays as a venue to search for light dark force carriers at the LHC. Such Z's can be easily boosted, and they can decay into highly collimated leptons (lepton-jet) with large branching ratio. We investigate a scenario where a top quark decays to bW accompanied by one or multiple dark force carriers and find that such a scenario could be easily probed at the early stage of LHC Run 2.

  17. A flippon related singlet at the LHC II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianjun; Maxin, James A.; Mayes, Van E.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.

    2016-06-01

    We consider the 750 GeV diphoton resonance at the 13 TeV LHC in the ℱ-SU(5) model with a Standard Model (SM) singlet field which couples to TeV-scale vector-like particles, dubbed flippons. This singlet field assumes the role of the 750 GeV resonance, with production via gluon fusion and subsequent decay to a diphoton via the vector-like particle loops. We present a numerical analysis showing that the observed 8 TeV and 13 TeV diphoton production cross-sections can be generated in the model space with realistic electric charges and Yukawa couplings for light vector-like masses. We further discuss the experimental viability of light vector-like masses in a General No-Scale ℱ-SU(5) model, offering a few benchmark scenarios in this consistent GUT that can satisfy all experimental constraints imposed by the LHC and other essential experiments.

  18. LHC: The Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-03-04

    The Large Hadron Collider (or LHC) is the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. In 2012, scientists used data taken by it to discover the Higgs boson, before pausing operations for upgrades and improvements. In the spring of 2015, the LHC will return to operations with 163% the energy it had before and with three times as many collisions per second. It’s essentially a new and improved version of itself. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains both some of the absolutely amazing scientific and engineering properties of this modern scientific wonder.

  19. LHC: The Large Hadron Collider

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The Large Hadron Collider (or LHC) is the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. In 2012, scientists used data taken by it to discover the Higgs boson, before pausing operations for upgrades and improvements. In the spring of 2015, the LHC will return to operations with 163% the energy it had before and with three times as many collisions per second. It’s essentially a new and improved version of itself. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains both some of the absolutely amazing scientific and engineering properties of this modern scientific wonder.

  20. B Physics at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Gersabeck, Marco

    2010-02-10

    The LHC is scheduled to start its first physics data taking period later in 2009. Primarily LHCb but also ATLAS and CMS will start a rich B physics programme with the potential of revealing New Physics in the heavy flavour sector. This contribution will cover the prospects for B physics at the LHC with particular emphasis to early measurements. This includes CP violation measurements in B{sub d}{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0} decays, searches for rare decays such as B{sub s}{sup 0}->{mu}{mu}, as well as semileptonic and radiative channels.

  1. L'Aventure du LHC

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-11

    Cette présentation s’adressera principalement aux personnes qui ont construit le LHC. La construction du LHC fut longue et difficile. De nombreux problèmes sont apparus en cours de route. Tous ont été résolus grâce au dévouement et à l’engagement du personnel et des collaborateurs. Je reviendrai sur les coups durs et les réussites qui ont marqués ces 15 dernières années et je vous montrerai combien cette machine, le fruit de vos efforts, est extraordinaire.

  2. Dynamic full-field infrared imaging with multiple synchrotron beams

    PubMed Central

    Stavitski, Eli; Smith, Randy J.; Bourassa, Megan W.; Acerbo, Alvin S.; Carr, G. L.; Miller, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Microspectroscopic imaging in the infrared (IR) spectral region allows for the examination of spatially resolved chemical composition on the microscale. More than a decade ago, it was demonstrated that diffraction limited spatial resolution can be achieved when an apertured, single pixel IR microscope is coupled to the high brightness of a synchrotron light source. Nowadays, many IR microscopes are equipped with multi-pixel Focal Plane Array (FPA) detectors, which dramatically improve data acquisition times for imaging large areas. Recently, progress been made toward efficiently coupling synchrotron IR beamlines to multi-pixel detectors, but they utilize expensive and highly customized optical schemes. Here we demonstrate the development and application of a simple optical configuration that can be implemented on most existing synchrotron IR beamlines in order to achieve full-field IR imaging with diffraction-limited spatial resolution. Specifically, the synchrotron radiation fan is extracted from the bending magnet and split into four beams that are combined on the sample, allowing it to fill a large section of the FPA. With this optical configuration, we are able to oversample an image by more than a factor of two, even at the shortest wavelengths, making image restoration through deconvolution algorithms possible. High chemical sensitivity, rapid acquisition times, and superior signal-to-noise characteristics of the instrument are demonstrated. The unique characteristics of this setup enabled the real time study of heterogeneous chemical dynamics with diffraction-limited spatial resolution for the first time. PMID:23458231

  3. Color changes in modern and fossil teeth induced by synchrotron microtomography.

    PubMed

    Richards, Gary D; Jabbour, Rebecca S; Horton, Caroline F; Ibarra, Caitlin L; MacDowell, Alastair A

    2012-10-01

    Studies using synchrotron microtomography have shown that this radiographic imaging technique provides highly informative microanatomical data from modern and fossil bones and teeth without the need for physical sectioning. The method is considered to be nondestructive; however, researchers using the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility have reported that color changes sometimes occur in teeth during submicron scanning. Using the Advanced Light Source, we tested for color changes during micron-level scanning and for postexposure effects of ultraviolet light. We exposed a 2.0-mm wide strip (band) to synchrotron light in 32 specimens, using multiple energy levels and scan durations. The sample included modern and fossilized teeth and bone. After scanning, the specimens were exposed to fluorescent and direct ultraviolet light. All teeth showed color changes caused by exposure to synchrotron radiation. The resulting color bands varied in intensity but were present even at the lowest energy and shortest duration of exposure. Color bands faded during subsequent exposure to fluorescent and ultraviolet light, but even after extensive ultraviolet exposure, 67% (8/12) of UV-exposed teeth retained some degree of induced color. We found that the hydroxyapatite crystals, rather than the organic component, are the targets of change, and that diagenesis appears to impact color retention. Color changes have significance beyond aesthetics. They are visible indicators of ionization (chemical change) and, therefore, of potential physical damage. It is important for researchers to recognize that synchrotron microtomography may damage specimens, but adopting suitable safeguards and procedures may moderate or eliminate this damage.

  4. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1992-08-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic X-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of X-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotheraphy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatc needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

  5. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

  6. Medical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

  7. Connecting LHC, ILC, and quintessence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Everett, Lisa L.; Kong, Kyoungchul; Matchev, Konstantin T.

    2007-10-01

    If the cold dark matter consists of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), anticipated measurements of the WIMP properties at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC) will provide an unprecedented experimental probe of cosmology at temperatures of order 1 GeV. It is worth emphasizing that the expected outcome of these tests may or may not be consistent with the picture of standard cosmology. For example, in kination-dominated quintessence models of dark energy, the dark matter relic abundance can be significantly enhanced compared to that obtained from freeze out in a radiation-dominated universe. Collider measurements then will simultaneously probe both dark matter and dark energy. In this article, we investigate the precision to which the LHC and ILC can determine the dark matter and dark energy parameters under those circumstances. We use an illustrative set of four benchmark points in minimal supergravity in analogy with the four LCC benchmark points. The precision achievable together at the LHC and ILC is sufficient to discover kination-dominated quintessence, under the assumption that the WIMPs are the only dark matter component. The LHC and ILC can thus play important roles as alternative probes of both dark matter and dark energy.

  8. String Physics at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.

    2008-11-23

    The LHC program will include the identification of events with single high-k{sub T} photons as probes of new physics. We show that this channel is uniquely suited to search for experimental evidence of TeV-scale open string theory.

  9. Heavy Quark Photoproduction at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Goncalves, V. P.; Meneses, A. R.; Machado, M. V.

    2010-11-12

    In this work we calculate the inclusive and difractive photoproduction of heavy quarks in proton-proton collisions at LHC energies within the color dipole picture employing three phenomenological saturation models based on the color glass condensate formalism. Our results demonstrate that the experimental analyzes of these reactions is feasible and that the cross sections are sensitive to the underlying parton dynamics.

  10. The history of the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    2010-05-11

    Abstract: From the civil engineering, to the manufacturing of the various magnet types, each building block of this extraordinary machine required ambitious leaps in innovation. This lecture will review the history of the LHC project, focusing on the many challenges -- scientific, technological, managerial -- that had to be met during the various phases of R&D;, industrialization, construction, installation and commissioning.

  11. PHOBOS in the LHC era

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Peter

    2015-01-15

    The PHOBOS experiment ran at the RHIC collider from 2000 to 2005, under the leadership of Wit Busza. These proceedings summarize selected PHOBOS results, highlighting their continuing relevance amidst the wealth of new results from the lead–lead program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

  12. ELECTRONICS FOR CALORIMETERS AT LHC.

    SciTech Connect

    RADEKA,V.

    2001-09-11

    Some principal design features of front-end electronics for calorimeters in experiments at the LHC will be highlighted. Some concerns arising in the transition from the research and development and design phase to the construction will be discussed. Future challenges will be indicated.

  13. The history of the LHC

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Abstract: From the civil engineering, to the manufacturing of the various magnet types, each building block of this extraordinary machine required ambitious leaps in innovation. This lecture will review the history of the LHC project, focusing on the many challenges -- scientific, technological, managerial -- that had to be met during the various phases of R&D;, industrialization, construction, installation and commissioning.

  14. Synchrotron Radiation in Life Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Stojanoff, Vivian; Northrup, Paul; Pietri, Ruth; Zhong, Zhong

    2012-05-01

    Synchrotron Radiation (SR) presents itself as a “play-ground” with a large range of methods and techniques suitable to unveil the mysteries of life. Here we attempt to present a few of these methods that complement those employed in the home laboratory. SR diffraction, spectroscopy and imaging methods relevant to the atomic structure determination and characterization of the properties and function of chemical compounds and macromolecules of biological relevance, are introduced.

  15. Breast tomography with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Silvia; Arfelli, Fulvia; Dreossi, Diego; Montanari, Francesco; Longo, Renata; Olivo, Alessandro; Poropat, Paolo; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Palma, Ludovico D.; Castelli, Edoardo

    2002-05-01

    A feasibility study of breast CT with synchrotron radiation is currently being carried on at Elettra, the Trieste synchrotron radiation facility. Breast CT cannot be implemented easily with conventional radiographic tubes, due to the high dose that would be delivered to the breast by a polychromatic X-ray spectrum. The possibility of tuning the beam energy, available at a synchrotron radiation beamline, allows a significant reduction in the delivered dose, and at the same time the use of monochromatic beams avoids beam hardening artifacts on the reconstructed image. Images of in vitro breast tissue samples have been acquired by means of a high efficiency linear array detector coupled to a VLSI single photon counting readout electronics. The pixel width, determining the pixel size of the reconstructed image, is 200 micrometers , while the pixel height, determining the CT slice thickness, is 300 micrometers . Tomograms have been reconstructed by means of standard filtered backprojection algorithms. Images of normal and pathologic breast tissue samples show a good visibility of glandular structure. The delivered dose was in all cases comparable to the one delivered in clinical planar mammography. Due to the promising results we obtained, in vivo studies are under evaluation.

  16. Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1997-08-01

    In the relatively short time that synchrotrons have been available to the scientific community, their characteristic beams of UV and X-ray radiation have been applied to virtually all areas of medical science which use ionizing radiation. The ability to tune intense monochromatic beams over wide energy ranges clearly differentiates these sources from standard clinical and research tools. The tunable spectrum, high intrinsic collimation of the beams, polarization and intensity of the beams make possible in-vitro and in-vivo research and therapeutic programs not otherwise possible. From the beginning of research operation at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), many programs have been carrying out basic biomedical research. At first, the research was limited to in-vitro programs such as the x-ray microscope, circular dichroism, XAFS, protein crystallography, micro-tomography and fluorescence analysis. Later, as the coronary angiography program made plans to move its experimental phase from SSRL to the NSLS, it became clear that other in-vivo projects could also be carried out at the synchrotron. The development of SMERF (Synchrotron Medical Research Facility) on beamline X17 became the home not only for angiography but also for the MECT (Multiple Energy Computed Tomography) project for cerebral and vascular imaging. The high energy spectrum on X17 is necessary for the MRT (Microplanar Radiation Therapy) experiments. Experience with these programs and the existence of the Medical Programs Group at the NSLS led to the development of a program in synchrotron based mammography. A recent adaptation of the angiography hardware has made it possible to image human lungs (bronchography). Fig. 1 schematically depicts the broad range of active programs at the NSLS.

  17. Scaling behavior of circular colliders dominated by synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talman, Richard

    2015-08-01

    RF cavities that restore the lost energy. To the contrary, until now, the large proton to electron mass ratio has caused synchrotron radiation to be negligible in proton accelerators. The LHC beam energy has still been low enough that synchrotron radiation has little effect on beam dynamics; but the thermodynamic penalty in cooling the superconducting magnets has still made it essential for the radiated power not to be dissipated at liquid helium temperatures. Achieving this has been a significant challenge. For the next generation p, p collider this will be even more true. Furthermore, the radiation will effect beam distributions on time scales measured in minutes, for example causing the beams to be flattened, wider than they are high. In this regime scaling relations previously valid only for electrons will be applicable also to protons.

  18. Charged Higgs pair production at the LHC as a probe of the top-seesaw assisted technicolor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guo-Li; Zhou, Ping; Guo, Xiao-Fei; Wu, Kun; Jiang, Ji

    2016-07-01

    The top-seesaw assisted technicolor (TC) model, which was proposed recently to accommodate the 126 GeV Higgs mass discovered by the Large Hadron Colliders (LHC), predicts light and heavy charged Higgs bosons in addition to the neutral Higgses. In this paper, we will study the pair productions of the charged Higgs, proceeding through gluon-gluon fusion and quark-antiquark annihilation, at the LHC in the frame of the top-seesaw assisted TC model. We find that in a large part of parameter space the production cross-sections of the light charged Higgs pair at the LHC can be quite large compared with the low standard model backgrounds, while it is impossible for the pair production of the heavy ones to be detected with the strong final mass suppression. Therefore, the light charged Higgs pair production may be served as a probe of this new TC model at the LHC.

  19. Successive approximation algorithm for beam-position-monitor-based LHC collimator alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentino, Gianluca; Nosych, Andriy A.; Bruce, Roderik; Gasior, Marek; Mirarchi, Daniele; Redaelli, Stefano; Salvachua, Belen; Wollmann, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Collimators with embedded beam position monitor (BPM) button electrodes will be installed in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during the current long shutdown period. For the subsequent operation, BPMs will allow the collimator jaws to be kept centered around the beam orbit. In this manner, a better beam cleaning efficiency and machine protection can be provided at unprecedented higher beam energies and intensities. A collimator alignment algorithm is proposed to center the jaws automatically around the beam. The algorithm is based on successive approximation and takes into account a correction of the nonlinear BPM sensitivity to beam displacement and an asymmetry of the electronic channels processing the BPM electrode signals. A software implementation was tested with a prototype collimator in the Super Proton Synchrotron. This paper presents results of the tests along with some considerations for eventual operation in the LHC.

  20. Synchrotron Environmental Science-I Workshop Report.

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-08

    Attendees of the Synchrotrons Environmental Science 1 (SES-1) workshop represented a broad spectrum of environmental science research areas and expertise in all of the current synchrotrons techniques (X-ray scattering and diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and two- and three-dimensional X-ray imaging). These individuals came together to discuss current measurement obstacles in environmental research and, more specifically, ways to overcome such obstacles by applying synchrotrons radiation techniques. Significant obstacles in measurement affect virtually all of the research issues described. Attendees identified synchrotrons approaches of potential value in their research. A number of the environmental research studies discussed are currently being addressed with some success by synchrotron-based approaches. Nevertheless, improvements in low-Z measurement capabilities are needed to facilitate the use of synchrotrons radiation methodologies in environmental research.

  1. Le LHC, un tunnel cosmique

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Et si la lumière au bout du tunnel du LHC était cosmique ? En d’autres termes, qu’est-ce que le LHC peut nous apporter dans la connaissance de l’Univers ? Car la montée en énergie des accélérateurs de particules nous permet de mieux appréhender l’univers primordial, chaud et dense. Mais dans quel sens dit-on que le LHC reproduit des conditions proches du Big bang ? Quelles informations nous apporte-t-il sur le contenu de l’Univers ? La matière noire est-elle détectable au LHC ? L’énergie noire ? Pourquoi l’antimatière accumulée au CERN est-elle si rare dans l’Univers ? Et si le CERN a bâti sa réputation sur l’exploration des forces faibles et fortes qui opèrent au sein des atomes et de leurs noyaux, est-ce que le LHC peut nous apporter des informations sur la force gravitationnelle qui gouverne l’évolution cosmique ? Depuis une trentaine d’années, notre compréhension de l’univers dans ses plus grandes dimensions et l’appréhension de son comportement aux plus petites distances sont intimement liées : en quoi le LHC va-t-il tester expérimentalement cette vision unifiée ? Tout public, entrée libre / Réservations au +41 (0)22 767 76 76

  2. Ultra-spatial synchrotron radiation for imaging molecular chemical structure: Applications in plant and animal studies

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Peiqiang

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (S-FTIR) has been developed as a rapid, direct, non-destructive, bioanalytical technique. This technique takes advantage of synchrotron light brightness and small effective source size and is capable of exploring the molecular chemical features and make-up within microstructures of a biological tissue without destruction of inherent structures at ultra-spatial resolutions within cellular dimension. To date there has been very little application of this advanced synchrotron technique to the study of plant and animal tissues' inherent structure at a cellular or subcellular level. In this article, a novel approach was introduced to show the potential of themore » newly developed, advanced synchrotron-based analytical technology, which can be used to reveal molecular structural-chemical features of various plant and animal tissues.« less

  3. FT-IR microscopical analysis with synchrotron radiation: The microscope optics and system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Reffner, J.A.; Martoglio, P.A.; Williams, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    When a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectrometer was first interfaced with the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in September 1993, there was an instant realization that the performance at the diffraction limit had increased 40-100 times. The synchrotron source transformed the IR microspectrometer into a true IR microprobe, providing high-quality IR spectra for probe diameters at the diffraction limit. The combination of IR microspectroscopy and synchrotron radiation provides a powerful new tool for molecular spectroscopy. The ability to perform IR microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation is still under development at Brookhaven National Laboratory, but several initial studies have been completed that demonstrate the broad-ranging applications of this technology and its potential for materials characterization.

  4. Application of X-ray synchrotron microscopy instrumentation in biology

    SciTech Connect

    Gasperini, F. M.; Pereira, G. R.; Granjeiro, J. M.; Calasans-Maia, M. D.; Rossi, A. M.; Perez, C. A.; Lopes, R. T.; Lima, I.

    2011-07-01

    X-ray micro-fluorescence imaging technique has been used as a significant tool in order to investigate minerals contents in some kinds of materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the elemental distribution of calcium and zinc in bone substitute materials (nano-hydroxyapatite spheres) and cortical bones through X-Ray Micro-fluorescence analysis with the increment of Synchrotron Radiation in order to evaluate the characteristics of the newly formed bone and its interface, the preexisting bone and biomaterials by the arrangement of collagen fibers and its birefringence. The elemental mapping was carried out at Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory, Campinas - Sao Paulo, Brazil working at D09-XRF beam line. Based on this study, the results suggest that hydroxyapatite-based biomaterials are biocompatible, promote osteo-conduction and favored bone repair. (authors)

  5. Optical Synchrotron Radiation Beam Imaging with a Digital Mask

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorito, R. B.; Zhang, H. D.; Corbett, W. J.; Fisher, A. S.; Mok, W. Y.; Tian, K.; Douglas, D.; Wilson, F. G.; Zhang, S.; Mitsuhashi, T. M.; Shkvarunets, A. G.

    2012-11-01

    We have applied a new imaging/optical masking technique, which employs a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) and optical synchrotron radiation (OSR), to perform high dynamic range (DR) beam imaging at the JLAB Energy Recovery Linac and the SLAC/SPEAR3 Synchrotron Light Source. The OSR from the beam is first focused onto the DMD to produce a primary image; selected areas of this image are spatially filtered by controlling the state of individual micro-mirrors; and finally, the filtered image is refocused onto a CCD camera. At JLAB this technique has been used successfully to view the beam halo with a DR ~ 105. At SPEAR3 the DMD was used to filter out the bright core of the stored beam to study the turn-by-turn dynamics of the 10-3 weaker injected beam. We describe the optical performance, present limitations and our plans to improve the DR of both experimental systems.

  6. Construction and Bench Testing of a Rotatable Collimator for the LHC Collimation Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Keller, Lewis; Lundgren, Steven; Markiewicz, Thomas; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the 30 high robust Phase I graphite secondary collimators with 30 high Z Phase II collimators. The Phase II collimators must be robust in various operating conditions and accident scenarios. This paper reports on the final construction and testing of the prototype collimator to be installed in the SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) at CERN. Bench-top measurements will demonstrate that the device is fully operational and has the mechanical and vacuum characteristics acceptable for installation in the SPS.

  7. L'Aventure du LHC

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Cette présentation s’adressera principalement aux personnes qui ont construit le LHC. La construction du LHC fut longue et difficile. De nombreux problèmes sont apparus en cours de route. Tous ont été résolus grâce au dévouement et à l’engagement du personnel et des collaborateurs. Je reviendrai sur les coups durs et les réussites qui ont marqués ces 15 dernières années et je vous montrerai combien cette machine, le fruit de vos efforts, est extraordinaire.

  8. Beautiful mirrors at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Kunal; Shepherd, William; Tait, Tim M. P.; Vega-Morales, Roberto

    2010-08-01

    We explore the “Beautiful Mirrors” model, which aims to explain the measured value of A b FB , discrepant at the 2.9σ level. This scenario introduces vector-like quarks which mix with the bottom, subtly affecting its coupling to the Z. The spectrum of the new particles consists of two bottom-like quarks and a charge -4/3 quark, all of which have electroweak interactions with the third generation. We explore the phenomenology and discovery reach for these new particles at the LHC, exploring single mirror quark production modes whose rates are proportional to the same mixing parameters which resolve the A b FB anomaly. We find that for mirror quark masses ≲ 500 GeV, a 14 TeV LHC with 300 fb-1 is required to reasonably establish the scenario and extract the relevant mixing parameters.

  9. Barrier rf systems in synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra M. Bhat

    2004-06-28

    Recently, many interesting applications of the barrier RF system in hadron synchrotrons have been realized. A remarkable example of this is the development of longitudinal momentum mining and implementation at the Fermilab Recycler for extraction of low emittance pbars for the Tevatron shots. At Fermilab, we have barrier RF systems in four different rings. In the case of Recycler Ring, all of the rf manipulations are carried out using a barrier RF system. Here, the author reviews various uses of barrier rf systems in particle accelerators including some new schemes for producing intense proton beam and possible new applications.

  10. Testing ATLAS Z+MET excess with LHC Run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Shirai, Satoshi; Terada, Takahiro

    2016-05-01

    The ATLAS collaboration reported a 3σ excess in the search of events containing on- Z dilepton, jets, and large missing momentum (MET) in the 8 TeV LHC run. Motivated by this excess, many models of new physics have been proposed. Recently, the ATLAS and CMS collaborations reported new results for similar Z+MET channels in the 13 TeV run. In this paper, we comprehensively discuss the consistency between the proposed models and the LHC results of Run 1 and Run 2. We find that in models with heavy gluino production, there is generically some tension between the 8 TeV and 13 TeV results. On the other hand, models with light squark production provide relatively better fitting to both results.

  11. Multichannel assault on natural supersymmetry at the high luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Howard; Barger, Vernon; Savoy, Michael; Tata, Xerxes

    2016-08-01

    Recent clarifications of naturalness in supersymmetry robustly require the presence of four light Higgsinos with mass ˜100 - 300 GeV while gluinos and (top) squarks may lie in the multi-TeV range, possibly out of LHC reach. We project the high-luminosity (300 - 3000 fb-1 ) reach of LHC14 via gluino cascade decays and via same-sign diboson production. We compare these to the reach for neutralino pair production Z˜1Z˜2 followed by Z˜2→Z˜1ℓ+ℓ- decay to soft dileptons which recoil against a hard jet. It appears that 3000 fb-1 is just about enough integrated luminosity to probe naturalness with up to 3% fine-tuning at the 5 σ level, thus either discovering natural supersymmetry or else ruling it out.

  12. Transverse beam size measurement system using visible synchrotron radiation at HLS II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Kai; Sun, Bao-Gen; Yang, Yong-Liang; Lu, Ping; Tang, Lei-Lei; Wu, Fang-Fang; Cheng, Chao-Cai; Zheng, Jia-Jun; Li, Hao

    2016-09-01

    An interferometer system and an imaging system using visible synchrotron radiation (SR) have been installed in the Hefei Light Source (HLS) II storage ring. Simulations of these two systems are given using Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW) code. With these two systems, the beam energy spread and the beam emittance can be measured. A detailed description of these two systems and the measurement method is given in this paper. The measurement results of beam size, emittance and energy spread are given at the end. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11105141, 11175173) and Upgrade Project of Hefei Light Source

  13. LHC magnet quench protection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coull, L.; Hagedorn, D.; Remondino, V.; Rodriguez-Mateos, F.

    1994-07-01

    The quench protection system for the superconducting magnets of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is described. The system is based on the so called 'cold diode' concept. In a group of series connected magnets if one magnet quenches then the magnetic energy of all the magnets will be dissipated in the quenched magnet so destroying it. This is avoided by by-passing the quenched magnet and then rapidly de-exciting the unquenched magnets. For the LHC machine it is foreseen to use silicon diodes situated inside the cryostat as by-pass elements - so called 'cold diodes'. The diodes are exposed to some 50 kGray of radiation during a 10 year operation life-time. The high energy density of the LHC magnets (500 kJ/m) coupled with the relatively slow propagation speed of a 'natural' quench (10 to 20 m/s) can lead to excessive heating of the zone where the quench started and to high internal voltages. It is therefore necessary to detect quickly the incipient quench and fire strip heaters which spread the quench out more quickly over a large volume of the magnet. After a quench the magnet chain must be de-excited rapidly to avoid spreading the quench to other magnets and over-heating the by-pass diode. This is done by switching high-power energy-dump resistors in series with the magnets. The LHC main ring magnet will be divided into 16 electrically separated units which has important advantages.

  14. Catching Collisions in the LHC

    ScienceCinema

    Fruguiele, Claudia; Hirschauer, Jim

    2016-07-12

    Now that the Large Hadron Collider has officially turned back on for its second run, within every proton collision could emerge the next new discovery in particle physics. Learn how the detectors on the Compact Muon Solenoid, or CMS, experiment capture and track particles as they are expelled from a collision. Talking us through these collisions are Claudia Fruguiele and Jim Hirschauer of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the largest U.S. institution collaborating on the LHC.

  15. Catching Collisions in the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Fruguiele, Claudia; Hirschauer, Jim

    2015-06-16

    Now that the Large Hadron Collider has officially turned back on for its second run, within every proton collision could emerge the next new discovery in particle physics. Learn how the detectors on the Compact Muon Solenoid, or CMS, experiment capture and track particles as they are expelled from a collision. Talking us through these collisions are Claudia Fruguiele and Jim Hirschauer of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the largest U.S. institution collaborating on the LHC.

  16. Cryogenics for HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavian, L.; Brodzinski, K.; Claudet, S.; Ferlin, G.; Wagner, U.; van Weelderen, R.

    The discovery of a Higgs boson at CERN in 2012 is the start of a major program of work to measure this particle's properties with the highest possible precision for testing the validity of the Standard Model and to search for further new physics at the energy frontier. The LHC is in a unique position to pursue this program. Europe's top priority is the exploitation of the full potential of the LHC, including the high-luminosity upgrade of the machine and detectors with an objective to collect ten times more data than in the initial design, by around 2030. To reach this objective, the LHC cryogenic system must be upgraded to withstand higher beam current and higher luminosity at top energy while keeping the same operation availability by improving the collimation system and the protection of electronics sensitive to radiation. This chapter will present the conceptual design of the cryogenic system upgrade with recent updates in performance requirements, the corresponding layout and architecture of the system as well as the main technical challenges which have to be met in the coming years.

  17. Strong dynamics at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ittisamai, Pawin

    The limitations of the Standard Model of particle physics, despite its being a well-established theory, have prompted various proposals for new physics capable of addressing its shortcomings. The particular issue to be explored here is the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking, the probing of which lies within the TeV-scale physics accessible to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This thesis focuses on the phenomenology of a class of models featuring a dynamical breaking of the electroweak symmetry via strong dynamics. Consequences of recent experiments and aspects of near-future experiments are presented. We study the implications of the LHC Higgs searches available at the time the related journal article was written for technicolor models that feature colored technifermions. Then we discuss the properties of a technicolor model featuring strong-top dynamics that is viable for explaining the recently discovered boson of mass 126 GeV. We introduce a novel method of characterizing the color structure of a new massive vector boson, often predicted in various new physics models, using information that will be promptly available if it is discovered in the near-future experiments at the LHC. We generalize the idea for more realistic models where a vector boson has flavor non-universal couplings to quarks. Finally, we discuss the possibilities of probing the chiral structure of a new color-octet vector boson.

  18. hhjj production at the LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Dolan, Matthew J.; Englert, Christoph; Greiner, Nicolas; Nordstrom, Karl; Spannowsky, Michael

    2015-08-25

    The search for di-Higgs production at the LHC in order to set limits on the Higgs trilinear coupling and constraints on new physics is one of the main motivations for the LHC high-luminosity phase. Recent experimental analyses suggest that such analyses will only be successful if information from a range of channels is included. We therefore investigate di-Higgs production in association with two hadronic jets and give a detailed discussion of both the gluon- and the weak boson-fusion (WBF) contributions, with a particular emphasis on the phenomenology with modified Higgs trilinear and quartic gauge couplings. We perform a detailed investigationmore » of the full hadronic final state and find that hhjj production should add sensitivity to a di-Higgs search combination at the HL-LHC with 3 ab-1. Since the WBF and GF contributions are sensitive to different sources of physics beyond the Standard Model, we devise search strategies to disentangle and isolate these production modes. In addition, while gluon fusion remains non-negligible in WBF-type selections, sizeable new physics contributions to the latter can still be constrained. As an example of the latter point we investigate the sensitivity that can be obtained for a measurement of the quartic Higgs–gauge boson couplings.« less

  19. QCD and hard diffraction at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, Michael G.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    As an introduction to QCD at the LHC the author gives an overview of QCD at the Tevatron, emphasizing the high Q{sup 2} frontier which will be taken over by the LHC. After describing briefly the LHC detectors the author discusses high mass diffraction, in particular central exclusive production of Higgs and vector boson pairs. The author introduces the FP420 project to measure the scattered protons 420m downstream of ATLAS and CMS.

  20. Computed tomography using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.C.; Llacer, J.; Finman, L.C.; Hughes, E.B.; Otis, J.N.; Wilson, S.; Zeman, H.D.

    1983-09-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a widely used method of obtaining cross-sectional views of objects. The high intensity, natural collimation, monochromaticity and energy tunability of synchrotron x-ray sources could potentially be used to provide CT images of improved quality. The advantages of these systems would be that images could be produced more rapidly with better spatial resolution and reduced beam artifacts. In addition, images, in some cases, could be acquired with elemental sensitivity. As a demonstration of the capability of such a system, CT images were obtained of four slices of an excised pig heart in which the arteries and the cardiac chambers were filled with an iodinated medium. Images were taken with incident x-rays tuned successively to energies just above and below the iodine K edge. Iodine specific images were obtained by logarithmically subtracting the low energy image data from the high energy data and then reconstructing the image. CT imaging using synchrotron radiation may become a convenient and non-destructive method of imaging samples difficult to study by other methods.

  1. LHC crab-cavity aspects and strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Zimmermann, F.

    2010-05-23

    The 3rd LHC Crab Cavity workshop (LHC-CC09) took place at CERN in October 2009. It reviewed the current status and identified a clear strategy towards a future crab-cavity implementation. Following the success of crab cavities in KEK-B and the strong potential for luminosity gain and leveling, CERN will pursue crab crossing for the LHC upgrade. We present a summary and outcome of the variousworkshop sessions which have led to the LHC crab-cavity strategy, covering topics like layout, cavity design, integration, machine protection, and a potential validation test in the SPS.

  2. Abort Gap Cleaning for LHC Run 2

    SciTech Connect

    Uythoven, Jan; Boccardi, Andrea; Bravin, Enrico; Goddard, Brennan; Hemelsoet, Georges-Henry; Höfle, Wolfgang; Jacquet, Delphine; Kain, Verena; Mazzoni, Stefano; Meddahi, Malika; Valuch, Daniel; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana

    2014-07-01

    To minimize the beam losses at the moment of an LHC beam dump the 3 μs long abort gap should contain as few particles as possible. Its population can be minimised by abort gap cleaning using the LHC transverse damper system. The LHC Run 1 experience is briefly recalled; changes foreseen for the LHC Run 2 are presented. They include improvements in the observation of the abort gap population and the mechanism to decide if cleaning is required, changes to the hardware of the transverse dampers to reduce the detrimental effect on the luminosity lifetime and proposed changes to the applied cleaning algorithms.

  3. Workshop on detectors for synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    2000-11-22

    Forefront experiments in many scientific areas for which synchrotron sources provide sufficient flux are nonetheless hindered because detectors cannot collect data fast enough, do not cover sufficiently solid angle, or do no have adequate resolution. Overall, the synchrotron facilities, each of which represents collective investments from funding agencies and user institutions ranging from many hundreds of millions to more than a billion dollars, are effectively significantly underutilized. While this chronic and growing problem plagues facilities around the world, it is particularly acute in the United States, where detector research often has to ride on the coat tails of explicitly science-oriented projects. As a first step toward moving out of this predicament, scientists from the U.S. synchrotron facilities held a national workshop in Washington, DC, on October 30-31, 2000. The Workshop on Detectors for Synchrotron Research aimed to create a national ''roadmap'' for development of synchrotron-radiation detectors.

  4. Far Infrared Synchrotron Spectrum of Trimethlyene Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahassneh, Omar; van Wijngaarden, Jennifer

    2016-06-01

    Rotationally-resolved vibrational spectra of trimethlyene oxide (c-C3H6O) from 650 through 1200 wn were recorded using far infrared synchrotron radiation at the Canadian Light Source with better than 0.001 wn resolution. The observed bands correspond to at least eight different fundamental vibrations in this region. Due to the low frequency ring puckering motion, the observed rovibrational pattern of each band is congested with hot-combination bands that originate in the first two excited ring puckering states (52.9 wn, 142.6 wn). The ongoing analysis of the strong b-type bands corresponding to asymmetric in-plane CO stretching (ν10:1008 wn) will be discussed along with the identification of allowed Coriolis interactions arising from nearby energy levels related to in-plane CC stretching (ν9: 940 wn, ν3: 1033 wn). G. Moruzzi et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc. 219, 152 (2003). Bánhegyi et al. Spectrochim. Acta. 39A, 761 (1983).

  5. Imaging using synchrotron radiation for forensic science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervelli, F.; Carrato, S.; Mattei, A.; Jerian, M.; Benevoli, L.; Mancini, L.; Zanini, F.; Vaccari, L.; Perucchi, A.; Aquilanti, G.

    2011-03-01

    Forensic science is already taking benefits from synchrotron radiation (SR) sources in trace evidence analysis. In this contribution we show a multi-technique approach to study fingerprints from the morphological and chemical point of view using SR based techniques such as Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRMS), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray absorption structure (XAS), and phase contrast microradiography. Both uncontaminated and gunshot residue contaminated human fingerprints were deposited on lightly doped silicon wafers and on poly-ethylene-terephthalate foils. For the uncontaminated fingerprints an univariate approach of functional groups mapping to model FT-IRMS data was used to get the morphology and the organic compounds map. For the gunshot residue contaminated fingerprints, after a preliminary elemental analysis using XRF, microradiography just below and above the absorption edge of the elements of interest has been used to map the contaminants within the fingerprint. Finally, XAS allowed us to determine the chemical state of the different elements. The next step will be fusing the above information in order to produce an exhaustive and easily understandable evidence.

  6. Longitudinal bunch dynamics study with coherent synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billinghurst, B. E.; Bergstrom, J. C.; Baribeau, C.; Batten, T.; May, T. E.; Vogt, J. M.; Wurtz, W. A.

    2016-02-01

    An electron bunch circulating in a storage ring constitutes a dynamical system with both longitudinal and transverse degrees of freedom. Through a self-interaction with the wakefields created by the bunch, certain of these degrees may get excited, defining a set of eigenmodes analogous to a spectroscopic series. The present study focuses on the longitudinal modes of a single bunch. The excitation of a mode appears as an amplitude modulation at the mode frequency of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted by the bunch. The modulations are superimposed on a much larger continuum from CSR emission in the continuous mode. A given eigenmode is classified by the integer m which is the ratio of the mode frequency to the synchrotron frequency. The present measurements extend up to m =8 and focus on the region near the instability thresholds. At threshold the modes are excited sequentially, resembling a staircase when the mode frequencies are plotted as a function of bunch length or synchrotron frequency. Adjacent modes are observed to coexist at the boundaries between the modes. An energy-independent correlation is observed between the threshold current for an instability and the corresponding zero-current bunch length. Measurements were made at five beam energies between 1.0 and 2.9 GeV at the Canadian Light Source. The CSR was measured in the time domain using an unbiased Schottky diode spanning 50-75 GHz.

  7. Real world issues for the new soft x-ray synchrotron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, B.M.

    1991-05-01

    A new generation of synchrotron radiation light sources covering the VUV, soft x-ray and hard x-ray spectral regions is under construction in several countries. They are designed specifically to use periodic magnetic undulators and low-emittance electron or positron beams to produce high-brightness near-diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation beams. An introduction to the properties of undulator radiation is followed by a discussion of some of the challenges to be faced at the new facilities. Examples of predicted undulator output from the Advanced Light Source, a third generation 1--2 GeV storage ring optimized for undulator use, are used to highlight differences from present synchrotron radiation sources, including high beam power, partial coherence, harmonics, and other unusual spectral and angular properties of undulator radiation. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Performance of the ALICE muon trigger system in pp and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fronzé, G. G.

    2016-06-01

    The ALICE muon spectrometer studies the production of quarkonia and open heavy-flavour particles. It is equipped with a trigger system composed of Resistive Plate Chambers which, by applying a transverse-momentum-based muon selection, minimises the background from light-hadron decays. The system has been continuously taking data throughout the LHC Run I; it has undergone maintenance and consolidation operations during the LHC shutdown period 1. In the first year of the LHC Run II, the system, fully recommissioned, has participated in data taking in pp and Pb-Pb collisions. The performance of the system throughout the last data-taking period is presented.

  9. Neutrino masses and heavy triplet leptons at the LHC: Testability of the type III seesaw mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tong; He, Xiao-Gang

    2009-11-01

    We study LHC signatures of the type III seesaw mechanism in which SU(2)L triplet leptons are introduced to supply the heavy seesaw masses. To detect the signals of these heavy triplet leptons, one needs to understand their decays to standard model particles which depend on how light and heavy leptons mix with each other. We concentrate on the usual solutions with small light and heavy lepton mixing of the order of the square root of the ratio of light and heavy masses, (mν/MνR)1/2. This class of solutions can lead to a visible displaced vertex detectable at the LHC which can be used to distinguish small mixing and large mixing between light and heavy leptons. We show that, in this case, the couplings of light and heavy triplet leptons to gauge and Higgs bosons, which determine the decay widths and branching ratios, can be expressed in terms of light neutrino masses and their mixing. Using these relations, we study heavy triplet lepton decay patterns and production cross section at the LHC. If these heavy triplet leptons are below a TeV or so, they can be easily produced at the LHC due to their gauge interactions from being nontrivial representations of SU(2)L. We consider two ideal production channels, (1) E+E-→ℓ+ℓ+ℓ-ℓ-jj (ℓ=e, μ, τ) and (2) E±N→ℓ±ℓ±jjjj in detail. For case 1, we find that with one or two of the light leptons being τ it can also be effectively studied. With judicious cuts at the LHC, the discovery of the heavy triplet leptons as high as a TeV can be achieved with 100fb-1 integrated luminosity.

  10. Radiatively-driven natural supersymmetry at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Howard; Barger, Vernon; Huang, Peisi; Mickelson, Dan; Mustafayev, Azar; Sreethawong, Warintorn; Tata, Xerxes

    2013-12-01

    Radiatively-driven natural supersymmetry (RNS) potentially reconciles the Z and Higgs boson masses close to ~100 GeV with gluinos and squarks lying beyond the TeV scale. Requiring no large cancellations at the electroweak scale in constructing M Z = 91 .2 GeV while maintaining a light Higgs scalar with m h ≃ 125 GeV implies a sparticle mass spectrum including light higgsinos with mass ~100 - 300 GeV, electroweak gauginos in the 300 - 1200 GeV range, gluinos at 1 - 4 TeV and top/bottom squarks in the 1-4 TeV range (probably beyond LHC reach), while first/second generation matter scalars can exist in the 5-30 TeV range (far beyond LHC reach). We investigate several characteristic signals for RNS at LHC14. Gluino pair production yields a reach up to ~ 1 .7 TeV for 300 fb-1. Wino pair production — pp → and — leads to a unique same-sign diboson (SSdB) signature accompanied by modest jet activity from daughter higgsino decays; this signature provides the best reach up to ~ 2 .1 TeV within this framework. Wino pair production also leads to final states with ( WZ → 3 ℓ)+ as well as 4 ℓ+ which give confirmatory signals up to ~ 1 .4 TeV. Directly produced light higgsinos yield a clean, soft trilepton signature (due to very low visible energy release) which can be visible, but only for a not-too-small a mass gap. The clean SSdB signal — as well as the distinctive mass shape of the dilepton mass distribution from decays if this is accessible — will mark the presence of light higgsinos which are necessary for natural SUSY. While an e + e - collider operating with ~ 600 GeV should unequivocally reveal the predicted light higgsinos, the RNS model with m 1/2 ≳ 1 TeV may elude all LHC14 search strategies even while maintaining a high degree of electroweak naturalness.

  11. Synchrotron IR microspectroscopy for protein structure analysis: Potential and questions

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Peiqiang

    2006-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (S-FTIR) has been developed as a rapid, direct, non-destructive, bioanalytical technique. This technique takes advantage of synchrotron light brightness and small effective source size and is capable of exploring the molecular chemical make-up within microstructures of a biological tissue without destruction of inherent structures at ultra-spatial resolutions within cellular dimension. To date there has been very little application of this advanced technique to the study of pure protein inherent structure at a cellular level in biological tissues. In this review, a novel approach was introduced to show the potential of the newly developed, advancedmore » synchrotron-based analytical technology, which can be used to localize relatively “pure“ protein in the plant tissues and relatively reveal protein inherent structure and protein molecular chemical make-up within intact tissue at cellular and subcellular levels. Several complex protein IR spectra data analytical techniques (Gaussian and Lorentzian multi-component peak modeling, univariate and multivariate analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) are employed to relatively reveal features of protein inherent structure and distinguish protein inherent structure differences between varieties/species and treatments in plant tissues. By using a multi-peak modeling procedure, RELATIVE estimates (but not EXACT determinations) for protein secondary structure analysis can be made for comparison purpose. The issues of pro- and anti-multi-peaking modeling/fitting procedure for relative estimation of protein structure were discussed. By using the PCA and CLA analyses, the plant molecular structure can be qualitatively separate one group from another, statistically, even though the spectral assignments are not known. The synchrotron-based technology provides a new approach for protein structure research in

  12. CCD sensors in synchrotron X-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, M. G.; Naday, I.; Sherman, I. S.; Kraimer, M. R.; Westbrook, E. M.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1988-04-01

    The intense photon flux from advanced synchrotron light sources, such as the 7-GeV synchrotron being designed at Argonne, require integrating-type detectors. Charge-coupled devices (CCDs) are well suited as synchrotron X-ray detectors. When irradiated indirectly via a phosphor followed by reducing optics, diffraction patterns of 100 cm 2 can be imaged on a 2 cm 2 CCD. With a conversion efficiency of ˜ 1 CCD electron/X-ray photon, a peak saturation capacity of > 10 6 X-rays can be obtained. A programmable CCD controller operating at a clock frequency of 20 MHz has been developed. The readout rate is 5 × 10 6 pixels/s and the shift rate in the parallel registers is 10 6 lines/s. The test detector was evaluated in two experiments. In protein crystallography diffraction patterns have been obtained from a lysozyme crystal using a conventional rotating anode X-ray generator. Based on these results we expect to obtain at a synchrotron diffraction images at a rate of ˜ 1 frame/s or a complete 3-dimensional data set from a single crystal in ˜ 2 min. In electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), the CCD was used in a parallel detection mode which is similar to the mode array detectors are used in dispersive EXAFS. With a beam current corresponding to 3 × 10 9 electron/s on the detector, a series of 64 spectra were recorded on the CCD in a continuous sequence without interruption due to readout. The frame-to-frame pixel signal fluctuations had σ = 0.4% from which DQE = 0.4 was obtained, where the detector conversion efficiency was 2.6 CCD electrons/X-ray photon. These multiple frame series also showed the time-resolved modulation of the electron microscope optics by stray magnetic fields.

  13. High heat load synchrotron optics

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, D.M.

    1992-08-01

    Third generation synchrotron radiation sources currently being constructed worldwide will produce x-ray beams of unparalleled power and power density these high heat fluxes coupled with the stringent dimensional requirements of the x-ray optical components pose a prodigious challenge to designers of x-ray optical elements, specifically x-ray mirrors and crystal monochromators. Although certain established techniques for the cooling of high heat flux components can be directly applied to this problem, the thermal management of high heat load x-ray optical components has several unusual aspects that may ultimately lead to unique solutions. This manuscript attempts to summarize the various approaches currently being applied to this undertaking and to point out the areas of research that require further development.

  14. Synchrotron radiation and industrial research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Rodney P.

    1995-05-01

    Fundamental studies on the properties of many different materials are of prime importance to most industrial concerns. For Unilever, solids (crystalline and amorphous), soft solids and complex fluids are the materials of primary interest. Synchrotron radiation has proved of great value for the analysis of a variety of such materials, because the intense and highly collimated radiation source has enabled us to obtain structural information rapidly as well as in time-resolved mode. In this paper are outlined the types of materials problems faced, and how we use different techniques to elucidate structure (both short and long range order) in zeolites, amorphous solids, as well as in biomaterials such as skin and hair containing lipid phases. Both equilibrium and time-resolved studies are described.

  15. MSSM forecast for the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Maria Eugenia; Casas, J. Alberto; de Austri, Roberto Ruiz

    2010-05-01

    We perform a forecast of the MSSM with universal soft terms (CMSSM) for the LHC, based on an improved Bayesian analysis. We do not incorporate ad hoc measures of the fine-tuning to penalize unnatural possibilities: such penalization arises from the Bayesian analysis itself when the experimental value of M Z is considered. This allows to scan the whole parameter space, allowing arbitrarily large soft terms. Still the low-energy region is statistically favoured (even before including dark matter or g-2 constraints). Contrary to other studies, the results are almost unaffected by changing the upper limits taken for the soft terms. The results are also remarkable stable when using flat or logarithmic priors, a fact that arises from the larger statistical weight of the low-energy region in both cases. Then we incorporate all the important experimental constrains to the analysis, obtaining a map of the probability density of the MSSM parameter space, i.e. the forecast of the MSSM. Since not all the experimental information is equally robust, we perform separate analyses depending on the group of observables used. When only the most robust ones are used, the favoured region of the parameter space contains a significant portion outside the LHC reach. This effect gets reinforced if the Higgs mass is not close to its present experimental limit and persits when dark matter constraints are included. Only when the g-2 constraint (based on e + e - data) is considered, the preferred region (for μ > 0) is well inside the LHC scope. We also perform a Bayesian comparison of the positive- and negative- μ possibilities.

  16. Emittance Adapter for a Diffraction Limited Synchrotron Radiation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alexander Wu; Raimondi, Pantaleo; /Frascati

    2012-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of reaching very small horizontal and vertical emittances inside an undulator in a storage ring, by means of a local exchange of the apparent horizontal and vertical emittances, performed with a combination of skew quadrupoles and one solenoid in a dedicated insertion line in the storage ring. The insertion leaves the ring parameters and its optical properties unaffected. This scheme could greatly relax the emittance requirements for a diffraction limited synchrotron light source. The lattice derivation and design is described.

  17. a Far Infrared Synchrotron-Based Investigation of 3-OXETANONE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ziqiu; Wijngaarden, Jennifer Van

    2011-06-01

    The four membered ester ring 3-oxetanone is a precursor for adding oxetane subunits into pharmaceuticals which then block metabolically exposed sites in the bioactive molecule without increasing its lipophilicity. The high resolution (0.00096 cmCm-1) rovibrational spectrum of 3-oxetanone was recorded for the first time using far infrared radiation from the Canadian Light Source (CLS) synchrotron facility coupled to a Bruker IFS125HR FTIR spectrometer. A total of six rotationally-resolved vibrational bands were observed between 360 and 1150 cmCm-1 at room temperature. The assignment of the dense spectrum is currently underway and the progress will be discussed in this talk.

  18. 3D imaging of fetus vertebra by synchrotron radiation microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyrin, Francoise; Pateyron-Salome, Murielle; Denis, Frederic; Braillon, Pierre; Laval-Jeantet, Anne-Marie; Cloetens, Peter

    1997-10-01

    A synchrotron radiation computed microtomography system allowing high resolution 3D imaging of bone samples has been developed at ESRF. The system uses a high resolution 2D detector based on a CCd camera coupled to a fluorescent screen through light optics. The spatial resolution of the device is particularly well adapted to the imaging of bone structure. In view of studying growth, vertebra samples of fetus with differential gestational ages were imaged. The first results show that fetus vertebra is quite different from adult bone both in terms of density and organization.

  19. Electron correlation explored through electron spectrometry using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, C.D.; Whitfield, S.B.; Flemming, M.G. . Dept. of Physics); Krause, M.O. )

    1991-01-01

    The development of synchrotron radiation facilities as a research tool has made possible experiments which provide new insights into the role which correlation plays in electron dynamics and atomic and molecular structure. Features such as autoionizing resonances, normal and resonant Auger decay modes, and ionization threshold structure have become visible in a wealth of new detail. Some aspects of this information drawn from recent experiments on the alkaline earth metals and the rare gases are presented. The potential for increased flux and resolution inherent in insertion device-based facilities like the Advanced Light Source should advance this understanding even further, and some future directions are suggested. 8 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Mirage models confront the LHC. III. Deflected mirage mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Lisa L.; Garon, Todd; Kaufman, Bryan L.; Nelson, Brent D.

    2016-03-01

    We complete the study of a class of string-motivated effective supergravity theories in which modulus-induced soft supersymmetry breaking is sufficiently suppressed in the observable sector so as to be competitive with anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking. Here we consider deflected "mirage mediation" (DMM), where contributions from gauge mediation are added to those arising from gravity mediation and anomaly mediation. We update previous work that surveyed the rich parameter space of such theories, in light of data from the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and recent dark matter detection experiments. Constraints arising from LHC superpartner searches at √{s }=8 TeV are considered, and discovery prospects at √{s }=14 TeV are evaluated. We find that deflected mirage mediation generally allows for S U (3 )-charged superpartners of significantly lower mass (given current knowledge of the Higgs mass and neutralino relic density) than was found for the "pure" mirage mediation models of Kachru et al. [Phys. Rev. D 68, 046005 (2003)]. Consequently, discovery prospects are enhanced for many combinations of matter multiplet modular weights. We examine the experimental challenges that will arise due to the prospect of highly compressed spectra in DMM, and the correlation between accessibility at the LHC and discovery prospects at large-scale liquid xenon dark matter detectors.

  1. Z' Phenomenology and the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2006-10-17

    A brief pedagogical overview of the phenomenology of Z{prime} gauge bosons is ILC in determining Z{prime} properties is also discussed. and explore in detail how the LHC may discover and help elucidate the models, review the current constraints on the possible properties of a Z{prime} nature of these new particles. We provide an overview of the Z{prime} studies presented. Such particles can arise in various electroweak extensions of that have been performed by both ATLAS and CMS. The role of the the Standard Model (SM). We provide a quick survey of a number of Z{prime}.

  2. (SUSY) Higgs Search at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlleitner, M. Margarete

    2008-11-23

    The discovery of the Standard Model (SM) or supersymmetric (SUSY) Higgs bosons belongs to the main endeavors of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In this article the status of the signal and background calculations for Higgs boson production at the LHC is reviewed.

  3. New Perspectives for QCD Physics at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Stanford U. /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins

    2011-02-07

    I review a number of topics where conventional wisdom relevant to hadron physics at the LHC has been challenged. For example, the initial-state and final-state interactions of the quarks and gluons entering perturbative QCD hard-scattering subprocesses lead to the breakdown of traditional concepts of factorization and universality for transverse-momentum-dependent observables at leading twist. These soft-gluon rescattering effect produce single-spin asymmetries, the breakdown of the Lam-Tung relation in Drell-Yan reactions, as well as diffractive deep inelastic scattering, The antishadowing of nuclear structure functions is predicted to depend on the flavor quantum numbers of each quark and antiquark. Isolated hadrons can be produced at large transverse momentum directly within a hard higher-twist QCD subprocess, rather than from jet fragmentation, even at the LHC. Such 'direct' processes can explain the observed deviations from pQCD predictions of the power-law fall-off of inclusive hadron cross sections as well as the 'baryon anomaly' seen in high-centrality heavy-ion collisions at RHIC. The intrinsic charm contribution to the proton structure function at high x can explain the large rate for high p{sub T} photon plus charm-jet events observed at the Tevatron and imply a large production rate for charm and bottom jets at high p{sub T} at the LHC, as well as a novel mechanism for Higgs and Z{sup 0} production at high x{sub F}. The light-front wavefunctions derived in AdS/QCD can be used to calculate jet hadronization at the amplitude level. The elimination of the renormalization scale ambiguity for the QCD coupling using the scheme-independent BLM method will increase the sensitivity of searches for new physics at the LHC. The implications of 'in-hadron condensates' for the QCD contribution to the cosmological constant are also discussed.

  4. Remote Operations for LHC and CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschalk, E.E.; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    Commissioning the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its experiments will be a vital part of the worldwide high energy physics program beginning in 2007. A remote operations center has been built at Fermilab to contribute to commissioning and operations of the LHC and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, and to develop new capabilities for real-time data analysis and monitoring for LHC, CMS, and grid computing. Remote operations will also be essential to a future International Linear Collider with its multiple, internationally distributed control rooms. In this paper we present an overview of Fermilab's LHC@FNAL remote operations center for LHC and CMS, describe what led up to the development of the center, and describe noteworthy features of the center.

  5. Characterization of a Pt mirror to be used to deflect synchrotron radiation beam onto Langmuir monolayers.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Carlos E P; Gasperini, Antonio A M; Freitas, Pedro P S; Oliveira, Rafael G; Cavalcanti, Leide P

    2015-05-01

    A homemade mirror for X-rays has been built to prepare a diffraction beamline for liquid surface diffraction and scattering measurements. This simple approach is in operation at the XRD2 bending-magnet beamline at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory.

  6. Variable magnification with Kirkpatrick-Baez optics for synchrotron X-ray microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Jach, Terrence; Bakulin, Alex S.; Durbin, Stephen M.; Pedulla, Joseph; Macrander, Albert

    2006-05-01

    In this study, we describe the distinction between the operation of a short focal length x-ray microscope forming a real image with a laboratory source (convergent illumination) and with a highly collimated intense beam from a synchrotron light source (Kohler illumination).

  7. Jet substructure as a new Higgs search channel at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, Jonathan M.; Davison, Adam R.; Rubin, Mathieu; Salam, Gavin P.

    2008-11-23

    These proceedings discuss a possible new search strategy for a light Higgs boson at the LHC, in high-p{sub t} WH and ZH production where the Higgs boson decays to a single collimated bb-bar jet. Material is included that is complementary to what was shown in the original article, arXiv:0802.2470.

  8. Experimental Demonstration of the Induction Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Ken; Arakida, Yoshio; Dixit, Tanuja; Iwashita, Taiki; Kono, Tadaaki; Nakamura, Eiji; Otsuka, Kazunori; Shimosaki, Yoshito; Torikai, Kota; Wake, Masayoshi

    2007-02-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of the induction synchrotron, the concept of which has been proposed as a future accelerator for the second generation of neutrino factory or hadron collider. The induction synchrotron supports a superbunch and a superbunch permits more charge to be accelerated while observing the constraints of the transverse space-charge limit. By using a newly developed induction acceleration system instead of radio-wave acceleration devices, a single proton bunch injected from the 500 MeV booster ring and captured by the barrier bucket created by the induction step voltages was accelerated to 6 GeV in the KEK proton synchrotron.

  9. Experimental demonstration of the induction synchrotron.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Ken; Arakida, Yoshio; Dixit, Tanuja; Iwashita, Taiki; Kono, Tadaaki; Nakamura, Eiji; Otsuka, Kazunori; Shimosaki, Yoshito; Torikai, Kota; Wake, Masayoshi

    2007-02-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of the induction synchrotron, the concept of which has been proposed as a future accelerator for the second generation of neutrino factory or hadron collider. The induction synchrotron supports a superbunch and a superbunch permits more charge to be accelerated while observing the constraints of the transverse space-charge limit. By using a newly developed induction acceleration system instead of radio-wave acceleration devices, a single proton bunch injected from the 500 MeV booster ring and captured by the barrier bucket created by the induction step voltages was accelerated to 6 GeV in the KEK proton synchrotron.

  10. Testing the OPERA Superluminal Neutrino Anomaly at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2012-03-15

    The OPERA collaboration has reported the observation of superluminal muon neutrinos, whose speed v{sub {nu}} exceeds that of light c, with (v{sub {nu}}-c)/c {approx_equal} 2.5 x 10{sup -5}. In a recent work, Cohen and Glashow (CG) have refuted this claim by noting that such neutrinos will lose energy, by pair-emission of particles, at unacceptable rates. Following the CG arguments, we point out that pair-emissions consistent with the OPERA anomaly can lead to detectable signals for neutrinos originating from decays of highly boosted top quarks at the LHC, allowing an independent test of the superluminal neutrino hypothesis.

  11. First operation of SOLEIL, a third generation synchrotron radiation source in France and prospects for ARC-EN-CIEL, a LINAC based fourth generation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Filhol, J. M.; Benabderhammane, C.; Berteaud, P.; Besson, J. C.; Briquez, F.; Brunelle, P.; Bruni, C.; Chubar, O.; Denard, J. C.; Girault, M.; Godefroy, J. M.; Herbaux, C.; Lebasque, P.; Le Roux, V.; Level, M. P.; Lestrade, A.; Loulergue, A.; Marchand, P.; Marcouille, O.; Marteau, F.; Massal, M.; Nadji, A.; Nadolski, L.; Nagaoka, R.; Paulin, F.; Pottin, B.; Tordeux, M. A.; Valleau, M.; Vétéran, J.; Carré, B.; Garzella, D.; Labat, M.; Lambert, G.; Monot, P.; Jablonka, M.; Méot, F.; Mosnier, A.; Marquès, J. R.; Ortéga, J. M.

    2007-05-01

    The first results of commissioning for the French Synchrotron Radiation Facility SOLEIL at 2.75 GeV are presented. Perspectives for the fourth generation light source based on the ARC-EN-CIEL project are described.

  12. Molecular photoemission studies using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Truesdale, C.M.

    1983-04-01

    The angular distributions of photoelectrons and Auger electrons were measured by electron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations to interpret the electronic behavior of photoionization for molecular systems.

  13. Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1997-08-01

    Over the past two decades there has been a phenomenal growth in the number of dedicated synchrotron radiation facilities and a corresponding growth in the number of applications in both basic and applied sciences. The high flux and brightness, tunable beams, time structure and polarization of synchrotron radiation provide an ideal x- ray source for many applications in the medical sciences. There is a dual aspect to the field of medical applications of synchrotron radiation. First there are the important in-vitro programs such as structural biology, x-ray microscopy, and radiation cell biology. Second there are the programs that are ultimately targeted at in-vivo applications. The present status of synchrotron coronary angiography, bronchography, multiple energy computed tomography, mammography and radiation therapy programs at laboratories around the world is reviewed.

  14. Simulation of synchrotron motion with rf noise

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, B.T.; Forest, E.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    1986-08-01

    The theoretical formulation is described that is behind an algorithm for synchrotron phase-space tracking with rf noise and some preliminary simulation results of bunch diffusion under rf noise obtained by actual tracking.

  15. THE RAPID CYCLING MEDICAL SYNCHROTRON RCMS.

    SciTech Connect

    PEGGS,S.; BARTON,D.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; CARDONA,J.; BRENNAN,M.; FISCHER,W.; GARDNER,C.; GASSNER,D.; ET AL

    2002-06-02

    Thirteen hadron beam therapy facilities began operation between 1990 and 2001 - 5 in Europe, 4 in North America, 3 in Japan, and 1 in South Africa [l]. Ten of them irradiate tumors with protons, 2 with Carbon- 12 ions, and 1 with both protons and Carbon-12. The facility with the highest patient throughput - a total of 6 174 patients in 11 years and as many as 150 patient treatments per day -is the Loma Linda University Medical Center, which uses a weak focusing slow cycling synchrotron to accelerate beam for delivery to passive scattering nozzles at the end of rotatable gantries [2, 3,4]. The Rapid Cycling Medical Synchrotron (RCMS) is a second generation synchrotron that, by contrast with the Loma Linda synchrotron, is strong focusing and rapid cycling, with a repetition rate of 30 Hz. Primary parameters for the RCMS are listed in Table 1.

  16. Jets plus same-sign dileptons signatures from fermionic leptoquarks at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Alexandre; Barreto, E. Ramirez; Dias, A. G.

    2012-09-01

    Within the 3-3-1 model framework, we consider the production and decay of fermionic leptoquarks into a striking experimental signature at the LHC: a narrow resonance at the b jet plus same-sign dileptons channel. The data already accumulated by the LHC collaborations may hide a large number of events associated to the production and decay of such exotic quarks, allowing one to investigate large portions of the parameters space of the model. The observation or not of such events would shed light on the construction of models presenting heavy exotic quarks.

  17. Taming systematic uncertainties at the LHC with the central limit theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichet, Sylvain

    2016-10-01

    We study the simplifications occurring in any likelihood function in the presence of a large number of small systematic uncertainties. We find that the marginalisation of these uncertainties can be done analytically by means of second-order error propagation, error combination, the Lyapunov central limit theorem, and under mild approximations which are typically satisfied for LHC likelihoods. The outcomes of this analysis are i) a very light treatment of systematic uncertainties ii) a convenient way of reporting the main effects of systematic uncertainties, such as the detector effects occurring in LHC measurements.

  18. POLARIZATION STUDIES OF CdZnTe DETECTORS USING SYNCHROTRON X-RAY RADIATION.

    SciTech Connect

    CAMARDA,G.S.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CUI, Y.; HOSSAIN, A.; JAMES, R.B.

    2007-07-01

    New results on the effects of small-scale defects on the charge-carrier transport in single-crystal CdZnTe (CZT) material were produced. We conducted detailed studies of the role of Te inclusions in CZT by employing a highly collimated synchrotron x-ray radiation source available at Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). We were able to induce polarization effects by irradiating specific areas with the detector. These measurements allowed the first quantitative comparison between areas that are free of Te inclusions and those with a relatively high concentration of inclusions. The results of these polaration studies will be reported.

  19. Synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence activities at Indus-2: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, M. K.

    2014-04-24

    X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry is a powerful non-destructive technique for elemental analysis of materials at bulk and trace concentration levels. Taking into consideration several advantages of the synchrotron based XRF technique and to fulfill the requirements of Indian universities users we have setup a microfocus XRF beamline (BL-16) on Indus-2 synchrotron light source. The beamline offers a wide range of usages – both from research laboratories and industries; and for researchers working in diverse fields. A brief overview of the measured performance of the beamline, design specifications including various attractive features and recent research activities carried out on the BL-16 beamline are presented.

  20. National Institute of Standards and Technology Synchrotron Radiation Facilities for Materials Science

    PubMed Central

    Long, Gabrielle G.; Allen, Andrew J.; Black, David R.; Burdette, Harold E.; Fischer, Daniel A.; Spal, Richard D.; Woicik, Joseph C.

    2001-01-01

    Synchrotron Radiation Facilities, supported by the Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, include beam stations at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory and at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The emphasis is on materials characterization at the microstructural and at the atomic and molecular levels, where NIST scientists, and researchers from industry, universities and government laboratories perform state-of-the-art x-ray measurements on a broad range of materials. PMID:27500070

  1. Simulations of synchrotron loss in hotspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Alan P.

    Simulations of the radio emission and polarization of hot spots are presented in which synchrotron losses have been taken into account. The hot spots were modeled on the basis of simulations of an axisymetric nonrelativistic jet into which a passive, initial randomly oriented magnetic field is introduced. The magnetic field configuration is then distorted by the flow. The simulations illustrate that synchrotron loss takes its toll not only in old parts of a source, but also in regions of enhanced magnetic fields.

  2. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    DOEpatents

    Liu, H.; Neil, G.R.

    1998-09-08

    A focused optical has been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, collinear with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM{sub 10} mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron. 4 figs.

  3. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Hongxiu; Neil, George R.

    1998-01-01

    A focused optical is been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, colinearly with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM.sub.10 mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron.

  4. Synchrotron radiation in transactinium research report of the workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics. The advanced light source U8 undulator beamline, 20--300 eV; gas-phase actinide studies with synchrotron radiation; atomic structure calculations for heavy atoms; flux growth of single crystal uranium intermetallics: Extension to transuranics; x-ray absorption near-edge structure studies of actinide compounds; surface as a new stage for studying actinides: Theoretical study of the surface electronic structure of uranium; magnetic x-ray scattering experiments at resonant energies; beamline instruments for radioactive materials; the search for x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in actinide materials: preliminary experiments using UFe[sub 2] and U-S; the laser plasma laboratory light source: a source of preliminary transuranic data; electron spectroscopy of heavy fermion actinide materials; study of thin layers of actinides. Present status and future use of synchrotron radiation; electronic structure and correlated-electron theory for actinide materials; and heavy fermion and kondo phenomena in actinide materials.

  5. Synchrotron radiation in transactinium research report of the workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics. The advanced light source U8 undulator beamline, 20--300 eV; gas-phase actinide studies with synchrotron radiation; atomic structure calculations for heavy atoms; flux growth of single crystal uranium intermetallics: Extension to transuranics; x-ray absorption near-edge structure studies of actinide compounds; surface as a new stage for studying actinides: Theoretical study of the surface electronic structure of uranium; magnetic x-ray scattering experiments at resonant energies; beamline instruments for radioactive materials; the search for x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in actinide materials: preliminary experiments using UFe{sub 2} and U-S; the laser plasma laboratory light source: a source of preliminary transuranic data; electron spectroscopy of heavy fermion actinide materials; study of thin layers of actinides. Present status and future use of synchrotron radiation; electronic structure and correlated-electron theory for actinide materials; and heavy fermion and kondo phenomena in actinide materials.

  6. Search for new light gauge bosons in Higgs boson decays to four-lepton final states in p p collisions at √{s }=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; &Aaring; Kesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao de Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Childers, J. T.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; da Cunha Sargedas de Sousa, M. J.; da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; de, K.; de Asmundis, R.; de Castro, S.; de Cecco, S.; de Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; de la Torre, H.; de Lorenzi, F.; de Nooij, L.; de Pedis, D.; de Salvo, A.; de Sanctis, U.; de Santo, A.; de Vivie de Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; Della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; di Ciaccio, A.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Domenico, A.; di Donato, C.; di Girolamo, A.; di Girolamo, B.; di Mattia, A.; di Micco, B.; di Nardo, R.; di Simone, A.; di Sipio, R.; di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; Do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de La Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Gupta, S.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, D.; Hu, Q.; Hu, X.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. 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H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simoniello, R.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van den Wollenberg, W.; van der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, L.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a search for Higgs bosons decaying to four leptons, either electrons or muons, via one or two light exotic gauge bosons Zd, H →Z Zd→4 ℓ or H →ZdZd →4 ℓ . The search was performed using p p collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 20 fb-1 at the center-of-mass energy of √{s }=8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The observed data are well described by the Standard Model prediction. Upper bounds on the branching ratio of H →Z Zd→4 ℓ and on the kinetic mixing parameter between the Zd and the Standard Model hypercharge gauge boson are set in the range (1 - 9 )×1 0-5 and (4 - 17 )×1 0-2 respectively, at 95% confidence level assuming the Standard Model branching ratio of H →Z Z*→4 ℓ, for Zd masses between 15 and 55 GeV. Upper bounds on the effective mass mixing parameter between the Z and the Zd are also set using the branching ratio limits in the H →Z Zd→4 ℓ search, and are in the range (1.5 - 8.7 )×1 0-4 for 15

  7. Gluino polarization at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, M.; Popenda, E.; Spira, M.; Zerwas, P. M.

    2009-09-01

    Gluinos are produced pairwise at the LHC in quark-antiquark and gluon-gluon collisions: qq, gg{yields}g-tildeg-tilde. While the individual polarization of gluinos vanishes in the limit in which the small mass difference between L and R squarks of the first two generations is neglected, nonzero spin-spin correlations are predicted within gluino pairs. If the squark/quark charges in Majorana gluino decays are tagged, the spin correlations have an impact on the energy and angular distributions in reconstructed final states. On the other hand, the gluino polarization in single gluino production in the supersymmetric Compton process gq{yields}g-tildeq-tilde{sub R,L} is predicted to be nonzero, and the polarization affects the final-state distributions in super-Compton events.

  8. Overview of LHC physics results at ICHEP

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-25

     This month LHC physics day will review the physics results presented by the LHC experiments at the 2010 ICHEP in Paris. The experimental presentations will be preceeded by the bi-weekly LHC accelerator status report.The meeting will be broadcast via EVO (detailed info will appear at the time of the meeting in the "Video Services" item on the left menu bar)For those attending, information on accommodation, access to CERN and laptop registration is available from http://cern.ch/lpcc/visits

  9. Overview of LHC physics results at ICHEP

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

     This month LHC physics day will review the physics results presented by the LHC experiments at the 2010 ICHEP in Paris. The experimental presentations will be preceeded by the bi-weekly LHC accelerator status report.The meeting will be broadcast via EVO (detailed info will appear at the time of the meeting in the "Video Services" item on the left menu bar)For those attending, information on accommodation, access to CERN and laptop registration is available from http://cern.ch/lpcc/visits

  10. US accelerator contribution to the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, Michael J.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    In 1998, the United States entered into an agreement with CERN to help build the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with contributions to the accelerator and to the large HEP detectors. To accomplish this, the US LHC Accelerator Project was formed, encompassing expertise from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This report is a summary of these contributions including the progress towards project completion, as well as a discussion of future plans for continued US participation in the LHC accelerator.

  11. On-line control of the nonlinear dynamics for synchrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, J.; Martin, I. P. S.; Rowland, J. H.; Bartolini, R.

    2015-07-01

    We propose a simple approach to the on-line control of the nonlinear dynamics in storage rings, based on compensation of the nonlinear resonance driving terms using beam losses as the main indicator of the strength of a resonance. The correction scheme is built on the analysis of the resonance driving terms in first perturbative order and on the possibility of using independent power supplies in the sextupole magnets, which is nowadays present in many synchrotron light sources. Such freedom allows the definition of "smart sextupole knobs" attacking each resonance separately. The compensation scheme has been tested at the Diamond light source and proved to be effective in opening up the betatron tune space, resonance free, available to the electron beam and to improve the beam lifetime.

  12. A role for LHC1 in higher order structure and complement binding of the Cryptococcus neoformans capsule.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoon-Dong; Shin, Soowan; Panepinto, John; Ramos, Jeanie; Qiu, Jin; Frases, Susana; Albuquerque, Patricia; Cordero, Radames J B; Zhang, Nannan; Himmelreich, Uwe; Beenhouwer, David; Bennett, John E; Casadevall, Arturo; Williamson, Peter R

    2014-05-01

    Polysaccharide capsules are important virulence factors for many microbial pathogens including the opportunistic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans. In the present study, we demonstrate an unusual role for a secreted lactonohydrolase of C. neoformans, LHC1 in capsular higher order structure. Analysis of extracted capsular polysaccharide from wild-type and lhc1Δ strains by dynamic and static light scattering suggested a role for the LHC1 locus in altering the capsular polysaccharide, both reducing dimensions and altering its branching, density and solvation. These changes in the capsular structure resulted in LHC1-dependent alterations of antibody binding patterns, reductions in human and mouse complement binding and phagocytosis by the macrophage-like cell line J774, as well as increased virulence in mice. These findings identify a unique molecular mechanism for tertiary structural changes in a microbial capsule, facilitating immune evasion and virulence of a fungal pathogen.

  13. A Role for LHC1 in Higher Order Structure and Complement Binding of the Cryptococcus neoformans Capsule

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoon-Dong; Shin, Soowan; Panepinto, John; Ramos, Jeanie; Qiu, Jin; Frases, Susana; Albuquerque, Patricia; Cordero, Radames J. B.; Zhang, Nannan; Himmelreich, Uwe; Beenhouwer, David; Bennett, John E.; Casadevall, Arturo; Williamson, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Polysaccharide capsules are important virulence factors for many microbial pathogens including the opportunistic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans. In the present study, we demonstrate an unusual role for a secreted lactonohydrolase of C. neoformans, LHC1 in capsular higher order structure. Analysis of extracted capsular polysaccharide from wild-type and lhc1Δ strains by dynamic and static light scattering suggested a role for the LHC1 locus in altering the capsular polysaccharide, both reducing dimensions and altering its branching, density and solvation. These changes in the capsular structure resulted in LHC1-dependent alterations of antibody binding patterns, reductions in human and mouse complement binding and phagocytosis by the macrophage-like cell line J774, as well as increased virulence in mice. These findings identify a unique molecular mechanism for tertiary structural changes in a microbial capsule, facilitating immune evasion and virulence of a fungal pathogen. PMID:24789368

  14. A 1200 element detector system for synchrotron-based coronary angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.C.; Lavender, W.M.; Rubenstein, E.; Giacomini, J.C.; Rosso, V.; Schulze, C.; Chapman, D.; Thomlinson, W.

    1993-08-23

    A 1200 channel Si(Li) detector system has been developed for transvenous coronary angiography experiments using synchrotron radiation. It is part of the synchrotron medical imaging facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The detector is made from a single crystal of lithium-drifted silicon with an active area 150 mm long {times} 11 mm high {times} 5 mm thick. The elements are arranged in two parallel rows of 600 elements with a center-to-center spacing of 0.25 mm. All 1200 elements are read out simultaneously every 4 ms. A Intel 80486 based computer with a high speed digital signal processing interface is used to control the beamline hardware and to acquire a series of images. The signal-to-noise, linearity and resolution of the system have been measured. Human images have been taken with this system.

  15. Installation of a Synchrotron Radiation Beamline Facility at the J. Bennett Johnston Center. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gooden, R.

    2000-03-21

    The Johnston Center presents a unique opportunity for scientists and engineers at southern institutions to initiate and carry out original research using synchrotron radiation ranging from visible light to hard x-rays. The Science and Engineering Alliance proposes to carry out a comprehensive new synchrotron radiation research initiative at CAMD in carefully phased steps of increasing risks. (1) materials research on existing CAMD beam lines and end stations; (2) design, construction and installation of end stations on existing CAMD beam lines, and research with this new instrumentation; (3) design, construction and operation of dedicated synchrotron radiation beam lines that covers the full spectral range of the CAMD storage ring and expanded research in the new facility.

  16. Nitride-MBE system for in situ synchrotron X-ray measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Takuo; Ishikawa, Fumitaro; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Takahasi, Masamitu

    2016-05-01

    A molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) chamber dedicated to nitride growth was developed at the synchrotron radiation facility SPring-8. This chamber has two beryllium windows for incident and outgoing X-rays, and is directly connected to an X-ray diffractometer, enabling in situ synchrotron X-ray measurements during the nitride growth. Experimental results on initial growth dynamics in GaN/SiC, AlN/SiC, and InN/GaN heteroepitaxy were presented. We achieved high-speed and high-sensitivity reciprocal space mapping with a thickness resolution of atomic-layer scale. This in situ measurement using the high-brilliance synchrotron light source will be useful for evaluating structural variations in the initial growth stage of nitride semiconductors.

  17. Fullerene-Encapsulated Atoms in the Light of Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.; Esteves, D.; Habibi, M.; Phaneuf, R. A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Aguilar, A.; Dunsch, L.

    2009-12-03

    Mass-selected beams of endohedral fullerene Ce-C{sub 82}{sup +} ions, of atomic Ce{sup q+} ions (q = 2, 3, 4), and of empty fullerene-cage C{sub 82}{sup +} ions were employed to study photoionization of fullerene-encapsulated and free cerium atoms. The Ce 4d inner-shell contributions to single and double ionization of the endohedral Ce-C{sub 82}{sup +} fullerene have been extracted from the data and compared with expectations based on theory and the experiments with atomic Ce ions. Dramatic reduction and redistribution of the ionization contributions to Ce 4d photoabsorption is observed. More than half of the Ce 4d oscillator strength is apparently diverted to additional decay channels of the Ce-C{sub 82}{sup +} complex.

  18. Undulator based scanning microscope at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Rarback, H.; Shu, D.; Ade, H.; Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; McNulty, I.; Rosser, R.

    1986-01-01

    A second generation scanning soft x-ray microscope is under construction, designed to utilize the dramatic increase in source bightness available at the soft x-ray undulator. The new instrument is expected to reduce image acquisition time by a factor of about 100, and to improve resolution, stability, and reproducibility.

  19. SUNY beam line X3, National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses: beamline change and upgrades at NSLS; crystallography; surface structure; small angle scattering; EXAFS, glazing angle and fluorescence studies; and high temperature superconductors. (LSP).

  20. Fast ferrite tuner for the BNL synchrotron light source

    SciTech Connect

    Pivit, E. ); Hanna, S.M.; Keane, J. )

    1991-01-01

    A new type of ferrite tuner has been tested at the BNL. The ferrite tuner uses garnet slabs partially filling a stripline. One of the important features of the tuner is that the ferrite is perpendicularly biased for operation above FMR, thus reducing the magnetic losses. A unique design was adopted to achieve the efficient cooling. The principle of operation of the tuner as well as our preliminary results on tuning a 52 MHz cavity are reported. Optimized conditions under which we demonstrated linear tunability of 80 KHz are described. The tuner's losses and its effect on higher-order modes in the cavity are discussed. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  1. The tomography beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Dilmanian, F.A.; Wu, X.Y.; Parsons, E.C.

    1996-12-31

    We compared the image contrast of a monochromatic CT, Multiple Energy Computed Tomography (MECT), and conventional CT scanner using phantoms. The experimental results indicate that monochromatic CT, with beam energy tuned just above the iodine K-edge, has about a 3 fold advantage in iodine contrast over conventional CT with a 120 kVp beam. Modeling using the same beams at a 3 rad dose and 3 mm slice height on an 18 cm diameter acrylic phantom, the simulations show a noise of 1.2 HU for MECT and 1.9 HU for CCT. Furthermore, despite the Cupping-effect corrections the bone contrast is lower in CCT and varies by 24 HU moving from the phantom`s center to the edge; this indicates an advantage for MECT in detecting and quantifying lesions differing from surrounding tissue by their mean atomic number.

  2. BNL National Synchrotron Light Source activity report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    During FY 1997 Brookhaven National Laboratory celebrated its 50th Anniversary and 50 years of outstanding achievement under the management of Associated Universities, Inc. This progress report is divided into the following sections: (1) introduction; (2) science highlights; (3) meetings and workshops; (4) operations; (5) projects; (6) organization; and (7) abstracts and publications.

  3. Single production of an exotic bottom partner at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Ezequiel; Da Rold, Leandro; Sanchez Vietto, Juan Ignacio

    2014-02-01

    We study single production and detection at the LHC run II of exotic partners of the bottom quark. For masses larger than 1 TeV single production can dominate over pair production that is suppressed due to phase space. The presence of exotic partners of the bottom is motivated in models aiming to solve the anomaly measured at LEP and SLC. Minimal models of this type with partial compositeness predict, as the lightest bottom partner, a new fermion V of electric charge -4 /3, also called mirror. The relevant coupling for our study is a WVb vertex, which yields a signal that corresponds to a hard W, a hard b-jet and a forward light jet. We design a search strategy for the leptonic decay of the W, which avoids the large QCD multijet background and its large uncertainties. We find that the main backgrounds are W+ jets and , and the key variables to enhance the signal over them are a hard b-jet and the rapidity of the light jet. We determine the discovery reach for the LHC run II, in particular we predict that, for couplings of order ~ g/10, this signal could be detected at a 95% confidence level with a mass up to 2 .4TeV using the first 100 fb-1.

  4. The Properties of Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglund, Richard F.

    The mystery of light has formed the core of creation stories in every culture, and attracted the earnest attentions of philosophers since at least the fifth century BCE. Their questions have ranged from how and what we see, to the interaction of light with material bodies, and finally to the nature of light itself. This chapter begins with a brief intellectual history of light from ancient Greece to the end of the 19th century. After introducing the physical parameterization of light in terms of standard units, three concepts of light are introduced: light as a wave, light as a quantum particle, and light as a quantum field. After highlighting the distinctive characteristics of light beams from various sources - thermal radiation, luminescence from atoms and molecules, and synchrotron light sources - the distinctive physical characteristics of light beams are examined in some detail. The chapter concludes with a survey of the statistical and quantum-mechanical properties of light beams. In the appropriate limits, this treatment not only recovers the classical description of light waves and the semiclassical view of light as a stream of quanta, but also forms a consistent description of quantum phenomena - such as interference phenomena generated by single photons - that have no classical analogs.

  5. Diffraction at the Tevatron and the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royon, C.

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, we present and discuss the most recent results on inclusive diffraction at the Tevatron collider and give the prospects at the LHC. We also describe the search for exclusive events at the Tevatron. Of special interest is the exclusive production of Higgs boson and heavy objects (W, top, stop pairs) at the LHC which will require precise measurements and analyses of inclusive and exclusive diffraction to constrain further the gluon density in the pomeron. At the end of the paper, we describe the projects to install forward detectors at the LHC to fulfil these measurements. We also describe the diffractive experiments accepted or in project at the LHC: TOTEM, ALFA in ATLAS, and the AFP/FP420 projects.

  6. Tension in the LHC diffractive data?

    SciTech Connect

    Gotsman, Errol

    2015-04-10

    I discuss the LHC diffractive data, and compare it to predicted energy behaviour of various models. I suggest that the so called 'tension' between the experimental results, maybe due to the different Monte Carlo programs used.

  7. Supersymmetry Breaking, Gauge Mediation, and the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, David

    2015-04-14

    Gauge mediated SUSY breaking (GMSB) is a promising class of supersymmetric models that automatically satisfies the precision constraints. Prior work of Meade, Seiberg and Shih in 2008 established the full, model-independent parameter space of GMSB, which they called "General Gauge Mediation" (GGM). During the first half of 2010-2015, Shih and his collaborators thoroughly explored the parameter space of GGM and established many well-motivated benchmark models for use by the experimentalists at the LHC. Through their work, the current constraints on GGM from LEP, the Tevatron and the LHC were fully elucidated, together with the possible collider signatures of GMSB at the LHC. This ensured that the full discovery potential for GGM could be completely realized at the LHC.

  8. 3D-analysis of plant microstructures: advantages and limitations of synchrotron X-ray microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, U.; Graf, W.; Zabler, S.; Manke, I.; Dawson, M.; Choinka, G.; Hilger, A.; Herppich, W. B.

    2013-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray computer microtomography was used to analyze the microstructure of rose peduncles. Samples from three rose cultivars, differing in anatomy, were scanned to study the relation between tissue structure and peduncles mechanical strength. Additionally, chlorophyll fluorescence imaging and conventional light microscopy was applied to quantify possible irradiation-induced damage to plant physiology and tissue structure. The spatial resolution of synchrotron X-ray computer microtomography was sufficiently high to investigate the complex tissues of intact rose peduncles without the necessity of any preparation. However, synchrotron X-radiation induces two different types of damage on irradiated tissues. First, within a few hours after first X-ray exposure, there is a direct physical destruction of cell walls. In addition, a slow and delayed destruction of chlorophyll and, consequently, of photosynthetic activity occurred within hours/ days after the exposure. The results indicate that synchrotron X-ray computer microtomography is well suited for three-dimensional visualization of the microstructure of rose peduncles. However, in its current technique, synchrotron X-ray computer microtomography is not really non-destructive but induce tissue damage. Hence, this technique needs further optimization before it can be applied for time-series investigations of living plant materials

  9. First Months of Data Taking at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Parodi, Fabrizio

    2005-10-12

    The ATLAS and CMS detector will start taking data at the LHC collider (proton-proton collider working at a center of mass energy of 14 TeV) in summer 2007. In this article I will review the commissioning of the two detectors before the starting of LHC and the analysis of the first pp collisions data (10 pb-1) devoted, mainly, to calibration purposes. I will also briefly review the first physics measurements aiming at the understanding of the detectors performance.

  10. Monte Carlo Generators for the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worek, M.

    2007-11-01

    The status of two Monte Carlo generators, HELAC-PHEGAS, a program for multi-jet processes and VBFNLO, a parton level program for vector boson fusion processes at NLO QCD, is briefly presented. The aim of these tools is the simulation of events within the Standard Model at current and future high energy experiments, in particular the LHC. Some results related to the production of multi-jet final states at the LHC are also shown.

  11. From the LHC to future colliders

    SciTech Connect

    De Roeck, A.; Assamagan, K.; Ellis, J.; Grojean, C.; Heinemeyer, S.; Jakobs, K.; Weiglien, G.; Well, J.; Azuelos, G.; Dawson, S.; Gripaios, B.; Han, T.; Hewett, J.; Lancaster, M.; Mariotti, C.; Moortgat, F.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Polesello, G.; Riemann, S.; Schumacher, M.; Bechtle, P.; Carena, M.; Chachamis, G.; Chen, K.F.; De Curtis, S.; Desch, K.; Dittmar, M.; Dreiner, H.; Duhrssen, M.; Foster, B.; Frandsen, M.T.; Giammanco, A.; Godbole, R.; Gopalakrishna, S.; Govoni, P.; Gunion, J.; Hollik, W.; Hou, W.S.; Isidori, G.; Juste, A.; Kalinowski, J.; Korytov, A.; Kou, E.; Kraml, S.; Krawczyk, M.; Martin, A.; Milstead, D.; Morton-Thurtle, V.; Moenig, K.; Mele, B.; Ozcan, E.; Pieri, M.; Plehn, T.; Reina, L.; Richter-Was, E.; Rizzo, T.; Rolbiecki, K.; Sannino, F.; Schram, M.; Smillie, J.; Sultansoy, S.; Tattersall, J.; Uwer, P., Webber, B.; and Wienemann, P.

    2010-03-02

    Discoveries at the LHC will soon set the physics agenda for future colliders. This report of a CERN Theory Institute includes the summaries of Working Groups that reviewed the physics goals and prospects of LHC running with 10 to 300 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, of the proposed sLHC luminosity upgrade, of the ILC, of CLIC, of the LHeC and of a muon collider. The four Working Groups considered possible scenarios for the first 10 fb{sup -1} of data at the LHC in which (i) a state with properties that are compatible with a Higgs boson is discovered, (ii) no such state is discovered either because the Higgs properties are such that it is difficult to detect or because no Higgs boson exists, (iii) a missing-energy signal beyond the Standard Model is discovered as in some supersymmetric models, and (iv) some other exotic signature of new physics is discovered. In the contexts of these scenarios, the Working Groups reviewed the capabilities of the future colliders to study in more detail whatever new physics may be discovered by the LHC. Their reports provide the particle physics community with some tools for reviewing the scientific priorities for future colliders after the LHC produces its first harvest of new physics from multi-TeV collisions.

  12. From the LHC to Future Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    De Roeck, A.; Ellis, J.; Grojean, C.; Heinemeyer, S.; Jakobs, K.; Weiglein, G.; Azuelos, G.; Dawson, S.; Gripaios, B.; Han, T.; Hewett, J.; Lancaster, M.; Mariotti, C.; Moortgat, F.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Polesello, G.; Riemann, S.; Assamagan, K.; Bechtle, P.; Carena, M.; Chachamis, G.; /more authors..

    2010-06-11

    Discoveries at the LHC will soon set the physics agenda for future colliders. This report of a CERN Theory Institute includes the summaries of Working Groups that reviewed the physics goals and prospects of LHC running with 10 to 300 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, of the proposed sLHC luminosity upgrade, of the ILC, of CLIC, of the LHeC and of a muon collider. The four Working Groups considered possible scenarios for the first 10 fb{sup -1} of data at the LHC in which (i) a state with properties that are compatible with a Higgs boson is discovered, (ii) no such state is discovered either because the Higgs properties are such that it is difficult to detect or because no Higgs boson exists, (iii) a missing-energy signal beyond the Standard Model is discovered as in some supersymmetric models, and (iv) some other exotic signature of new physics is discovered. In the contexts of these scenarios, theWorking Groups reviewed the capabilities of the future colliders to study in more detail whatever new physics may be discovered by the LHC. Their reports provide the particle physics community with some tools for reviewing the scientific priorities for future colliders after the LHC produces its first harvest of new physics from multi-TeV collisions.

  13. Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1995-12-31

    The medical projects employing synchrotron radiation as discussed in this paper are, for the most part, still in their infancies and no one can predict the direction in which they will develop. Both the basic research and applied medical programs are sure to be advanced at the new facilities coming on line, especially the ESRF and Spring- 8. However, success is not guaranteed. There is a lot of competition from advances in conventional imaging with the development of digital angiography, computed tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound. The synchrotron programs will have to provide significant advantages over these modalities in order to be accepted by the medical profession. Advances in image processing and potentially the development of compact sources will be required in order to move the synchrotron developed imaging technologies into the clinical world. In any event, it can be expected that the images produced by the synchrotron technologies will establish ``gold standards`` to be targeted by conventional modalities. A lot more work needs to be done in order to bring synchrotron radiation therapy and surgery to the level of human studies and, subsequently, to clinical applications.

  14. Synchrotron based spallation neutron source concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.

    1998-07-01

    During the past 20 years, rapid-cycling synchrotrons (RCS) have been used very productively to generate short-pulse thermal neutron beams for neutron scattering research by materials science communities in Japan (KENS), the UK (ISIS) and the US (IPNS). The most powerful source in existence, ISIS in the UK, delivers a 160-kW proton beam to a neutron-generating target. Several recently proposed facilities require proton beams in the MW range to produce intense short-pulse neutron beams. In some proposals, a linear accelerator provides the beam power and an accumulator ring compresses the pulse length to the required {approx} 1 {micro}s. In others, RCS technology provides the bulk of the beam power and compresses the pulse length. Some synchrotron-based proposals achieve the desired beam power by combining two or more synchrotrons of the same energy, and others propose a combination of lower and higher energy synchrotrons. This paper presents the rationale for using RCS technology, and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of synchrotron-based spallation sources.

  15. Biogenesis of light harvesting proteins.

    PubMed

    Dall'Osto, Luca; Bressan, Mauro; Bassi, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    The LHC family includes nuclear-encoded, integral thylakoid membrane proteins, most of which coordinate chlorophyll and xanthophyll chromophores. By assembling with the core complexes of both photosystems, LHCs form a flexible peripheral moiety for enhancing light-harvesting cross-section, regulating its efficiency and providing protection against photo-oxidative stress. Upon its first appearance, LHC proteins underwent evolutionary diversification into a large protein family with a complex genetic redundancy. Such differentiation appears as a crucial event in the adaptation of photosynthetic organisms to changing environmental conditions and land colonization. The structure of photosystems, including nuclear- and chloroplast-encoded subunits, presented the cell with a number of challenges for the control of the light harvesting function. Indeed, LHC-encoding messages are translated in the cytosol, and pre-proteins imported into the chloroplast, processed to their mature size and targeted to the thylakoids where are assembled with chromophores. Thus, a tight coordination between nuclear and plastid gene expression, in response to environmental stimuli, is required to adjust LHC composition during photoacclimation. In recent years, remarkable progress has been achieved in elucidating structure, function and regulatory pathways involving LHCs; however, a number of molecular details still await elucidation. In this review, we will provide an overview on the current knowledge on LHC biogenesis, ranging from organization of pigment-protein complexes to the modulation of gene expression, import and targeting to the photosynthetic membranes, and regulation of LHC assembly and turnover. Genes controlling these events are potential candidate for biotechnological applications aimed at optimizing light use efficiency of photosynthetic organisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast biogenesis.

  16. Hadron colliders (SSC/LHC)

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.; Palmer, R.B. |; Evans, L.; Gareyte, J.; Siemann, R.H.

    1992-12-31

    The nominal SSC and LHC designs should operate conservatively at luminosities up to 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. This luminosity is dictated by the event rates that can be handled by the detectors. However, this limit is event dependent (e.g. it does not take much of a detector to detect the event pp {yields} elephant; all one needs is extremely high luminosity). As such, it is useful to explore the possibility of going beyond the 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} level. Such exploration will also improve the accelerator physics understanding of pp collider designs. If the detector limitations are removed, the first accelerator limits occur when the luminosity is at the level of 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. These accelerator limits will first be reviewed. The authors will then continue on to explore even higher luminosity as the ultimate limit of pp colliders. Accelerator technologies needed to achieve this ultimate luminosity as well as the R and D needed to reach it are discussed.

  17. Space-charge calculations in synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, S.

    1993-05-01

    One obvious bottleneck of achieving high luminosity in hadron colliders, such as the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), is the beam emittance growth, due to space-charge effects in low energy injector synchrotrons. Although space-charge effects have been recognized since the alternating-gradient synchrotron was invented, and the Laslett tune shift usually calculated to quantify these effects, our understanding of the effects is limited, especially when the Laslett tune shift becomes a large fraction of the integer. Using the Simpsons tracking code, which we developed to study emittance preservation issues in proton synchrotrons, we investigated space-charge effects in the SSC Low Energy Booster (LEB). We observed detailed dependence on parameters such as beam intensity, initial emittance, injection energy, lattice function, and longitudinal motion. A summary of those findings, as well as the tracking technique we developed for the study, are presented.

  18. Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  19. Dark Matter and Synchrotron Emission from Galactic Center Radio Filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, Tim; Hooper, Dan; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad

    2011-11-10

    The inner degrees of the Galactic center contain a large population of filamentary structures observed at radio frequencies. These so-called non-thermal radio filaments (NRFs) trace magnetic field lines and have attracted significant interest due to their hard (S_v ~ -0.1 +/- 0.4) synchrotron emission spectra. The origin of these filaments remains poorly understood. We show that the electrons and positrons created through the annihilations of a relatively light (~5-10 GeV) dark matter particle with the cross section predicted for a simple thermal relic can provide a compelling match to the intensity, spectral shape, and flux variation of the NRFs. Furthermore, the characteristics of the dark matter particle necessary to explain the synchrotron emission from the NRFs is consistent with those required to explain the excess gamma-ray emission observed from the Galactic center by the Fermi-LAT, as well as the direct detection signals observed by CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA.

  20. X-ray diffraction microtomography using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroso, R. C.; Lopes, R. T.; de Jesus, E. F. O.; Oliveira, L. F.

    2001-09-01

    The X-ray diffraction computed tomography technique is based on the interference phenomena of the coherent scatter. For low-momentum transfer, it is most probable that the scattering interaction will be coherent. A selective discrimination of a given element in a scanned specimen can be realized by fixing the Bragg angle which produces an interference peak and then, to carry out the computed tomography in the standard mode. The image reconstructed exalts the presence of this element with respect to other ones in a sample. This work reports the feasibility of a non-destructive synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction imaging technique. This research was performed at the X-ray Diffraction beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS) in Brazil. The coherent scattering properties of different tissue and bone substitute materials were evaluated. Furthermore, diffraction patterns of some polycrystalline solids were studied due to industrial and environmental human exposure to these metals. The obtained diffraction patterns form the basis of a selective tomography technique. Preliminary images are presented.

  1. Synchrotron radiation based beam diagnostics at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Hahn, A.; Hurh, P.; Lorman, E.; Lundberg, C.; Meyer, T.; Miller, D.; Pordes, S.; Valishev, A.

    2011-09-16

    Synchrotron radiation has been used for many years as a beam diagnostic at electron accelerators. It is not normally associated with proton accelerators as the intensity of the radiation is too weak to make detection practical. Therefore, if one utilizes the radiation originating near the edge of a bending magnet, or from a short magnet, the rapidly changing magnetic field serves to enhance the wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength, which for more recent high energy proton accelerators such as Fermilab's Tevatron, tends to be visible light. This paper discusses the implementation at the Tevatron of two devices. A transverse beam profile monitor images the synchrotron radiation coming from the proton and antiproton beams separately and provides profile data for each bunch. A second monitor measures the low-level intensity of beam in the abort gaps which poses a danger to both the accelerator's superconducting magnets and the silicon detectors of the high energy physics experiments. Comparisons of measurements from the profile monitor to measurements from the flying wire profile systems are presented as are a number of examples of the application of the profile and abort gap intensity measurements to the modelling of Tevatron beam dynamics.

  2. Synchrotron radiation based beam diagnostics at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE PAGES

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Hahn, A.; Hurh, P.; Lorman, E.; Lundberg, C.; Meyer, T.; Miller, D.; Pordes, S.; Valishev, A.

    2011-09-16

    Synchrotron radiation has been used for many years as a beam diagnostic at electron accelerators. It is not normally associated with proton accelerators as the intensity of the radiation is too weak to make detection practical. Therefore, if one utilizes the radiation originating near the edge of a bending magnet, or from a short magnet, the rapidly changing magnetic field serves to enhance the wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength, which for more recent high energy proton accelerators such as Fermilab's Tevatron, tends to be visible light. This paper discusses the implementation at the Tevatron of two devices. A transversemore » beam profile monitor images the synchrotron radiation coming from the proton and antiproton beams separately and provides profile data for each bunch. A second monitor measures the low-level intensity of beam in the abort gaps which poses a danger to both the accelerator's superconducting magnets and the silicon detectors of the high energy physics experiments. Comparisons of measurements from the profile monitor to measurements from the flying wire profile systems are presented as are a number of examples of the application of the profile and abort gap intensity measurements to the modelling of Tevatron beam dynamics.« less

  3. Light sparticles from a light singlet in gauge mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanach, Ben; Badziak, Marcin; Hugonie, Cyril; Ziegler, Robert

    2015-07-01

    We revisit a simple model that combines minimal gauge mediation and the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model. We show that one can obtain a 125 GeV Standard Model-like Higgs boson with top squarks as light as 1.1 TeV, thanks to the mixing of the Higgs with a singlet state at O (90 - 100 ) GeV . Sparticle searches at the LHC may come with additional b jets or taus and may involve displaced vertices. The sparticle production cross section at the 13 TeV LHC can be O (10 - 100 ) fb , leading to great prospects for discovery in the early phase of LHC run II.

  4. Synchrotron characterization of functional tin dioxide nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Domashevskaya, E. P. Chuvenkova, O. A.; Turishchev, S. Yu.

    2015-12-31

    Wire-like crystals of tin dioxide were synthesized by a gas-transport technique. The wires, of mainly nanometric diameters, were characterized by spectroscopy and microscopy techniques with the use of highly brilliant and intense synchrotron radiation. We studied the influence of the surface chemical state and the oxygen vacancies on the atomic and electronic structure of the nanowires. The surface of the nanowires is covered by a few nanometers of tin suboxides. The lack of oxygen over the surface layers leads to specific sub-zone formation in a gap, as shown by synchrotron studies.

  5. 12 Experimental Techniques at Synchrotron Lightsource Beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Peter L; Rhyne, James J

    2015-01-01

    The unique properties of synchrotron radiation are its continuous spectrum, high flux and brightness, and high coherence, which make it an indispensable tool in the exploration of matter. The wavelengths of the emitted photons span a range of dimensions from the atomic level to biological cells, thereby providing incisive probes for advanced research in materials science, physical and chemical sciences, metrology, geosciences, environmental sciences, biosciences, medical sciences, and pharmaceutical sciences. The features of synchrotron radiation are especially well matched to the needs of nanoscience.

  6. SYNCHROTRON RADIO FREQUENCY PHASE CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Plotkin, M.; Raka, E.C.; Snyder, H.S.

    1963-05-01

    A system for canceling varying phase changes introduced by connecting cables and control equipment in an alternating gradient synchrotron is presented. In a specific synchrotron embodiment twelve spaced accelerating stations for the proton bunches are utilized. In order to ensure that the protons receive their boost or kick at the exact instant necessary it is necessary to compensate for phase changes occurring in the r-f circuitry over the wide range of frequencies dictated by the accelerated velocities of the proton bunches. A constant beat frequency is utilized to transfer the r-f control signals through the cables and control equipment to render the phase shift constant and readily compensable. (AEC)

  7. High-energy thermal synchrotron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, J. N.; Epstein, R. I.; Petrosian, V.

    1985-09-01

    The authors compute thermal synchrotron spectra for which the photon energy is comparable to the mean electron thermal energy. In this regime it is necessary to include the restriction that a photon receives no more energy than the kinetic energy of the radiating electron. The derived spectra fall off more rapidly at high energies than was previously estimated. It is found that the thermal synchrotron mechanism can still provide satisfactory fits to the very hard γ-ray burst spectra for sufficiently high temperatures and low magnetic fields. As example, data for the γ-ray burst of 1982 January 25 are discussed.

  8. Non-standard charged Higgs decay at the LHC in Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Priyotosh; Huitu, Katri; Niyogi, Saurabh

    2016-07-01

    We consider next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model (NMSSM) which has a gauge singlet superfield. In the scale invariant superpotential we do not have the mass terms and the whole Lagrangian has an additional Z 3 symmetry. This model can have light scalar and/or pseudoscalar allowed by the recent data from LHC and the old data from LEP. We investigate the situation where a relatively light charged Higgs can decay to such a singlet-like pseudoscalar and a W ± boson giving rise to a final state containing τ and/or b-jets and lepton(s). Such decays evade the recent bounds on charged Higgs from the LHC, and according to our PYTHIA-FastJet based simulation can be probed with 10 fb-1 at the LHC center of mass energy of 13 and 14 TeV.

  9. $A^t_{FB}$ Meets LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, JoAnne L.; Shelton, Jessie; Spannowsky, Michael; Tait, Tim M.P.; Takeuchi, Michihisa; /Heidelberg U.

    2012-02-14

    The recent Tevatron measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry of the top quark shows an intriguing discrepancy with Standard Model expectations, particularly at large t{bar t} invariant masses. Measurements of this quantity are subtle at the LHC, due to its pp initial state, however, one can define a forward-central-charge asymmetry which captures the physics. We study the capability of the LHC to measure this asymmetry and find that within the SM a measurement at the 5{sigma} level is possible with roughly 60 fb{sup -1} at {radical}s = 14 TeV. If nature realizes a model which enhances the asymmetry (as is necessary to explain the Tevatron measurements), a significant difference from zero can be observed much earlier, perhaps even during early LHC running at {radical}s = 7 TeV. We further explore the capabilities of the 7 TeV LHC to discover resonances or contact interactions which modify the t{bar t} invariant mass distribution using recent boosted top tagging techniques. We find that TeV-scale color octet resonances can be discovered, even with small coupling strengths and that contact interactions can be probed at scales exceeding 6 TeV. Overall, the LHC has good potential to clarify the situation with regards to the Tevatron forward-backward measurement.

  10. Gravitino LSP and leptogenesis after the first LHC results

    SciTech Connect

    Heisig, Jan

    2014-04-01

    Supersymmetric scenarios where the lightest superparticle (LSP) is the gravitino are an attractive alternative to the widely studied case of a neutralino LSP. A strong motivation for a gravitino LSP arises from the possibility of achieving higher reheating temperatures and thus potentially allow for thermal leptogenesis. The predictions for the primordial abundances of light elements in the presence of a late decaying next-to-LSP (NSLP) as well as the currently measured dark matter abundance allow us to probe the cosmological viability of such a scenario. Here we consider a gravitino-stau scenario. Utilizing a pMSSM scan we work out the implications of the 7 and 8 TeV LHC results as well as other experimental and theoretical constraints on the highest reheating temperatures that are cosmologically allowed. Our analysis shows that points with T{sub R}∼>10{sup 9} GeV survive only in a very particular corner of the SUSY parameter space. Those spectra feature a distinct signature at colliders that could be looked at in the upcoming LHC run.

  11. Flavor changing heavy Higgs interactions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Brent; Altunkaynak, Baris; Kao, Chung; Hou, Wei-Shou; Kohda, Masaya

    2016-03-01

    A general two Higgs doublet model (2HDM) is adopted to study the signature of flavor changing neutral Higgs (FCNH) decay ϕ0 --> t c + t c , where ϕ0 could be a CP-even scalar (H0) or a CP-odd pseudoscalar (A0). Measurement of the light 126 GeV neutral Higgs boson (h0) couplings at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) favor the decoupling limit or the alignment limit of a 2HDM, in which gauge boson and diagonal fermion couplings of h0 approach Standard Model values. In such a limit, FCNH couplings of h0 are naturally suppressed by a small mixing parameter cos (β - α) , while the off-diagonal couplings of heavier neutral scalars ϕ0 are sustained by sin (β - α) ~ 1 . We study physics background from dominant processes with realistic acceptance cuts and tagging efficiencies. Promising results are found for the LHC running at 13 or 14 TeV collision energies. Academia Sinica, National Taiwan University; OU Supercomputing Center for Education & Research; U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DEFG01-13ER41979; Academic Summit Grants: MOST 103-2745-M-002-001-ASP, NTU-EPR-103R8915, and NSC 102-2112-M-033-007-MY3.

  12. New Perspectives for QCD Physics at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, S. J.

    2011-04-01

    the implications for the QCD contribution to the cosmological constant. The light-front wavefunctions derived in AdS/QCD can be used to calculate jet hadronization at the amplitude level. I also note that the elimination of the renormalization scale ambiguity for the QCD coupling using the scheme-independent BLM method will greatly improve the precision of QCD predictions and thus greatly increase the sensitivity of searches for new physics at the LHC.

  13. Synchrotron-based highest resolution FTIR spectroscopy of chlorobenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Sieghard; Keppler, Karen; Lerch, Philippe; Quack, Martin; Wokaun, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    We report the Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrum of chlorobenzene (C6H5Cl) measured using synchrotron radiation and the ETH-SLS 2009 prototype spectrometer at the Swiss Light Source (SLS). The maximum optical path difference of these measurements was 11.8 m leading to a resolution of better than 0.0008 cm-1. The spectra were taken at room temperature in the range 600-900 cm-1. It was possible to analyze the in-plane mode ν12 of A1 symmetry (ν˜0 = 706.6686 cm-1) and the out-of-plane mode ν10b of B1 symmetry (ν˜0 = 741.2240 cm-1) of C6H535Cl. In addition, the ground state constant ΔK of C6H535Cl has been readjusted using combination differences (CD).

  14. Dynamics of synchrotron VUV-induced intracluster reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, J.R.

    1993-12-01

    Photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) using the tunable vacuum ultraviolet radiation available at the National Synchrotron Light Source is being exploited to study photoionization-induced reactions in small van der Waals mixed complexes. The information gained includes the observation and classification of reaction paths, the measurement of onsets, and the determination of relative yields of competing reactions. Additional information is obtained by comparison of the properties of different reacting systems. Special attention is given to finding unexpected features, and most of the reactions investigated to date display such features. However, understanding these reactions demands dynamical information, in addition to what is provided by PIMS. Therefore the program has been expanded to include the measurement of kinetic energy release distributions.

  15. High density terahertz frequency comb produced by coherent synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Tammaro, S; Pirali, O; Roy, P; Lampin, J-F; Ducournau, G; Cuisset, A; Hindle, F; Mouret, G

    2015-07-20

    Frequency combs have enabled significant progress in frequency metrology and high-resolution spectroscopy extending the achievable resolution while increasing the signal-to-noise ratio. In its coherent mode, synchrotron radiation is accepted to provide an intense terahertz continuum covering a wide spectral range from about 0.1 to 1 THz. Using a dedicated heterodyne receiver, we reveal the purely discrete nature of this emission. A phase relationship between the light pulses leads to a powerful frequency comb spanning over one decade in frequency. The comb has a mode spacing of 846 kHz, a linewidth of about 200 Hz, a fractional precision of about 2 × 10(-10) and no frequency offset. The unprecedented potential of the comb for high-resolution spectroscopy is demonstrated by the accurate determination of pure rotation transitions of acetonitrile.

  16. High density terahertz frequency comb produced by coherent synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Tammaro, S.; Pirali, O.; Roy, P.; Lampin, J.-F.; Ducournau, G.; Cuisset, A.; Hindle, F.; Mouret, G.

    2015-01-01

    Frequency combs have enabled significant progress in frequency metrology and high-resolution spectroscopy extending the achievable resolution while increasing the signal-to-noise ratio. In its coherent mode, synchrotron radiation is accepted to provide an intense terahertz continuum covering a wide spectral range from about 0.1 to 1 THz. Using a dedicated heterodyne receiver, we reveal the purely discrete nature of this emission. A phase relationship between the light pulses leads to a powerful frequency comb spanning over one decade in frequency. The comb has a mode spacing of 846 kHz, a linewidth of about 200 Hz, a fractional precision of about 2 × 10−10 and no frequency offset. The unprecedented potential of the comb for high-resolution spectroscopy is demonstrated by the accurate determination of pure rotation transitions of acetonitrile. PMID:26190043

  17. Synchrotron radiation in strongly coupled conformal field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Athanasiou, Christiana; Chesler, Paul M.; Liu, Hong; Rajagopal, Krishna; Nickel, Dominik

    2010-06-15

    Using gauge/gravity duality, we compute the energy density and angular distribution of the power radiated by a quark undergoing circular motion in strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. We compare the strong coupling results to those at weak coupling, finding them to be very similar. In both regimes, the angular distribution of the radiated power is in fact similar to that of synchrotron radiation produced by an electron in circular motion in classical electrodynamics: the quark emits radiation in a narrow beam along its velocity vector with a characteristic opening angle {alpha}{approx}1/{gamma}. To an observer far away from the quark, the emitted radiation appears as a short periodic burst, just like the light from a lighthouse does to a ship at sea. Our strong coupling results are valid for any strongly coupled conformal field theory with a dual classical gravity description.

  18. Survey of surface roughness properties of synchrotron radiation optics

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.; Colbert, J.; Church, E.L.

    1986-03-01

    Measurements of surface roughness were made on a large number of grazing incidence mirrors delivered for use at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The measurements were made with a WYKO optical profiler using a 2.5X and a 10X objective and analyzed with our PROFILE code to generate an average periodogram representation for each surface. The data is presented in the form of representative profiles with all of the periodogram curves arranged according to figure type. Analysis of the periodograms allows one to compute bandwidth-limited values for RMS roughness and slope, to provide valuable feedback information to manufacturers regarding compliance with specifications, and to predict the performance of the optic at x-ray wavelengths.

  19. Lipidic cubic phase serial millisecond crystallography using synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Nogly, Przemyslaw; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; White, Thomas A.; Zatsepin, Nadia; Shilova, Anastasya; Nelson, Garrett; Liu, Haiguang; Johansson, Linda; Heymann, Michael; Jaeger, Kathrin; Metz, Markus; Wickstrand, Cecilia; Wu, Wenting; Båth, Petra; Berntsen, Peter; Oberthuer, Dominik; Panneels, Valerie; Cherezov, Vadim; Chapman, Henry; Schertler, Gebhard; Neutze, Richard; Spence, John; Moraes, Isabel; Burghammer, Manfred; Standfuss, Joerg; Weierstall, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Lipidic cubic phases (LCPs) have emerged as successful matrixes for the crystallization of membrane proteins. Moreover, the viscous LCP also provides a highly effective delivery medium for serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs). Here, the adaptation of this technology to perform serial millisecond crystallography (SMX) at more widely available synchrotron microfocus beamlines is described. Compared with conventional microcrystallography, LCP-SMX eliminates the need for difficult handling of individual crystals and allows for data collection at room temperature. The technology is demonstrated by solving a structure of the light-driven proton-pump bacteriorhodopsin (bR) at a resolution of 2.4 Å. The room-temperature structure of bR is very similar to previous cryogenic structures but shows small yet distinct differences in the retinal ligand and proton-transfer pathway. PMID:25866654

  20. Error reduction techniques for measuring long synchrotron mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Irick, S.

    1998-07-01

    Many instruments and techniques are used for measuring long mirror surfaces. A Fizeau interferometer may be used to measure mirrors much longer than the interferometer aperture size by using grazing incidence at the mirror surface and analyzing the light reflected from a flat end mirror. Advantages of this technique are data acquisition speed and use of a common instrument. Disadvantages are reduced sampling interval, uncertainty of tangential position, and sagittal/tangential aspect ratio other than unity. Also, deep aspheric surfaces cannot be measured on a Fizeau interferometer without a specially made fringe nulling holographic plate. Other scanning instruments have been developed for measuring height, slope, or curvature profiles of the surface, but lack accuracy for very long scans required for X-ray synchrotron mirrors. The Long Trace Profiler (LTP) was developed specifically for long x-ray mirror measurement, and still outperforms other instruments, especially for aspheres. Thus, this paper focuses on error reduction techniques for the LTP.

  1. Experiments in atomic and applied physics using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.

    1987-01-01

    A diverse program in atomic and applied physics using x rays produced at the X-26 beam line at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source is in progress. The atomic physics program studies the properties of multiply-ionized atoms using the x rays for photo-excitation and ionization of neutral atoms and ion beams. The applied physics program builds on the techniques and results of the atomic physics work to develop new analytical techniques for elemental and chemical characterization of materials. The results are then used for a general experimental program in biomedical sciences, geo- and cosmochemistry, and materials sciences. The present status of the program is illustrated by describing selected experiments. Prospects for development of new experimental capabilities are discussed in terms of a heavy ion storage ring for atomic physics experiments and the feasibility of photoelectron microscopy for high spatial resolution analytical work. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Synchrotron IR spectromicroscopy: chemistry of living cells.

    PubMed

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N; Bechtel, Hans A; Hao, Zhao; Martin, Michael C

    2010-11-01

    Advanced analytical capabilities of synchrotron IR spectromicroscopy meet the demands of modern biological research for studying molecular reactions in individual living cells. (To listen to a podcast about this article, please go to the Analytical Chemistry multimedia page at pubs.acs.org/page/ancham/audio/index.html.).

  3. PRINCIPLES OF SYNCHROTRON TECHNIQUES, POTENTIAL AND LIMITATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Once environmental contaminants, such as arsenic, chromium, cadmium and lead, are detected, the problem becomes how to deal with them. For the past decade, researchers at the US EPA in Cincinnati have been employing synchrotron speciation methods to determine the exact chemical f...

  4. Synchrotron Emission from Chaotic Stellar Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    A model is presented for the radio emission from hot stars. Electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies by shocks in the wind near the star and emit radio radiation through the synchrotron mechanism. The particle spectrum and radio spectrum for this model are derived. The model accounts for many of the observed characteristics of some recently discovered stars which have peculiar radio emission.

  5. Molecular electronics studies by synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wee, Andrew T. S.; Chen Wei; Chi Dongchen; Chen Shi; Wang Li; Gao Xingyu

    2009-01-29

    In molecular electronics research, the molecule-metal interfacial properties crucially control the electronic properties of the devices fabricated. We use synchrotron radiation techniques of PES and NEXAFS, complemented by STM, to study the molecular orientation and interfacial charge transfer processes of model molecule-metal systems.

  6. SYNCHROTRON TECHNIQUES IN ENVIRONMENTAL AND FORSENIC SCIENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The application of synchrotron based research for understanding the fate of contaminants in water, soil, and atmosphere is proving to be beneficial for scientists and regulators. Drawing the connection of a contaminated site to knowledge of metal speciation provides direct eviden...

  7. Regulation of Light-Harvesting Chlorophyll Protein Biosynthesis in Greening Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, James N.; Burkey, Kent O.

    1987-01-01

    The biosynthesis of the chlorophyll a/b binding protein associated with photosystem II (LHC-II) was characterized during light-induced greening of etiolated barley (Hordeum vulgare [L.] cv Boone), maize (Zea mays [L.] Pioneer 3148), pea (Pisum sativum [L.] cv Progress 9), and soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Ransom 2). Northern blot analysis revealed that pea LHC-II mRNA was present in dark-grown seedlings and accumulated rapidly within 1 hour following illumination with white light. In contrast, the accumulation of LHC-II mRNA was delayed in barley and soybean until 2 to 4 hours after illumination began. Single radial immunodiffusion analysis revealed that LHC-II polypeptides began to accumulate in all species between 4 and 8 hours although the protein was present in detectable levels at earlier times in certain species. In a pattern similar to the LHC-II protein accumulation, chlorophyll accumulated at increased rates between 4 and 8 hours of greening in all species following an initial delay. The absence of coordination between LHC-II mRNA and LHC-II protein accumulation that was clearly observed in pea suggested that transcription is not the factor that limits LHC-II complex formation during chloroplast development. The accumulation of chlorophyll and LHC-II protein appeared to coincide suggesting that chlorophyll biosynthesis may be a factor that limits LHC-II complex formation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16665840

  8. BPM Design and Impedance Considerations for a Rotatable Collimator for the LHC Collimation Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Keller, Lewis; Lundgren, Steven; Markiewicz, Thomas; Young, Andrew; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the 30 high robust Phase I graphite secondary collimators with 30 high Z Phase II collimators. This paper reports on BPM and impedance considerations and measurements of the integrated BPMs in the prototype rotatable collimator to be installed in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN. The BPMs are necessary to align the jaws with the beam. Without careful design the beam impedance can result in unacceptable heating of the chamber wall or beam instabilities. The impedance measurements involve utilizing both a single displaced wire and two wires excited in opposite phase to disentangle the driving and detuning transverse impedances. Trapped mode resonances and longitudinal impedance are to also be measured and compared with simulations. These measurements, when completed, will demonstrate the device is fully operational and has the impedance characteristics and BPM performance acceptable for installation in the SPS.

  9. Baryon production and collective flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions in the AGS, SPS, RHIC, and LHC energy regions ({radical}(s{sub NN}){<=}5 GeV to 5.5 TeV)

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Shengqin; Zhong Yang

    2011-03-15

    The features of net-baryon productions and collective flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at energies reached at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), and BNL Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) with the model of nonuniform flow model (NUFM) are systematically studied in this paper. In particular we predict the feature of net-baryon productions and collective flow at LHC {radical}(s{sub NN})=5500 GeV based on the detailed study at RHIC {radical}(s{sub NN})=62.4 and 200 GeV. The dependencies of the features of baryon stopping and collective flow on the collision energies and centralities are investigated.

  10. Brookhaven Lecture Series: Using the light fantastic: Number 211

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G.

    1985-01-16

    The National Synchrotron Light Source is described, along with the principles of its operation, the properties of its radiation, and some perspective on what research can be done with the radiation. (LEW)

  11. High-energy synchrotron X-ray radiography of shock-compressed materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; Collinson, Mark A.; Jones, David R.; Music, Jasmina; Stafford, Samuel J. P.; Tear, Gareth R.; White, Thomas G.; Winters, John B. R.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2015-06-01

    This presentation will discuss the development and application of a high-energy (50 to 250 keV) synchrotron X-ray imaging method to study shock-compressed, high-Z samples at Beamline I12 at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron (Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, UK). Shock waves are driven into materials using a portable, single-stage gas gun designed by the Institute of Shock Physics. Following plate impact, material deformation is probed in-situ by white-beam X-ray radiography and complimentary velocimetry diagnostics. The high energies, large beam size (13 x 13 mm), and appreciable sample volumes (~ 1 cm3) viable for study at Beamline I12 compliment existing in-house pulsed X-ray capabilities and studies at the Dynamic Compression Sector. The authors gratefully acknowledge the ongoing support of Imperial College London, EPSRC, STFC and the Diamond Light Source, and AWE Plc.

  12. Picosecond pump-probe using an FEL and a synchrotron source

    SciTech Connect

    Denbeaux, G.; Straub, K.D.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    Two color pump-probe experiments using both the Duke Storage Ring as a synchrotron light source for visible light the Mark III FEL as a tunable, high peak power IR source are possible. The visible synchrotron source can be used as a probe of vibrational excitation from the FEL in an experiment using vibrationally-assisted fluorescence as an indicator of overlap of the IR and the visible pulses. An optical delay line in the FEL beam will allow adjustment of the arrival time of the IR pulse relative to the visible probe. The storage ring RF booster and the Mark III FEL RF sources will be both driven by the same master oscillator with a timing jitter between sources of less than 20 psec. Exploration of coupling between electronic excitation and lifetimes of vibrational excitation of fluorescent compounds in solution can be carried out with this configuration.

  13. Machine optics studies for the LHC measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzebiński, Maciej

    2014-11-01

    In this work the properties of scattered protons in the vicinity of the ATLAS Interaction Point (IP1) for various LHC optics settings are discussed. Firstly, the beam elements installed around IP1 are presented. Then the ATLAS forward detector systems: Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS (ALFA) and ATLAS Forward Protons (AFP) are described and their similarities and differences are discussed. Next, the various optics used at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are described and the beam divergence and width at the Interaction Point as well as at the ATLAS forward detectors locations are calculated. Finally, the geometric acceptance of the ATLAS forward detectors is shown and the impact of the LHC collimators on it is discussed.

  14. Higgs coupling measurements at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, Christoph; Kogler, Roman; Schulz, Holger; Spannowsky, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Due to the absence of tantalising hints for new physics during the LHC's Run 1, the extension of the Higgs sector by dimension-six operators will provide the new phenomenological standard for searches of non-resonant extensions of the Standard Model. Using all dominant and subdominant Higgs production mechanisms at the LHC, we compute the constraints on Higgs physics-relevant dimension-six operators in a global and correlated fit. We show in how far these constraints can be improved by new Higgs channels becoming accessible at higher energy and luminosity, both through inclusive cross sections as well as through highly sensitive differential distributions. This allows us to discuss the sensitivity to new effects in the Higgs sector that can be reached at the LHC if direct hints for physics beyond the SM remain elusive. We discuss the impact of these constraints on well-motivated BSM scenarios.

  15. LHC RF System Time-Domain Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.; /SLAC

    2010-09-14

    Non-linear time-domain simulations have been developed for the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These simulations capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction and are structured to reproduce the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They are also a valuable tool for the study of diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Results from these studies and related measurements from PEP-II and LHC have been presented in multiple places. This report presents an example of the time-domain simulation implementation for the LHC.

  16. Using tevatron magnets for HE-LHC or new ring in LHC tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, Henryk; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    Two injector accelerator options for HE-LHC of p{sup +} - p{sup +} collisions at 33 TeV cms energy are briefly outlined. One option is based on the Super-SPS (S-SPS) accelerator in the SPS tunnel, and the other one is based on the LER (Low-Energy-Ring) accelerator in the LHC tunnel. Expectations of performance of the main arc accelerator magnets considered for the construction of the S-SPS and of the LER accelerators are used to tentatively devise some selected properties of these accelerators as potential injectors to HE-LHC.

  17. Three-dimensional rendering of otolith growth using phase contrast synchrotron tomography.

    PubMed

    Mapp, J J I; Fisher, M H; Atwood, R C; Bell, G D; Greco, M K; Songer, S; Hunter, E

    2016-05-01

    A three-dimensional computer reconstruction of a plaice Pleuronectes platessa otolith is presented from data acquired by the Diamond Light synchrotron, beamline I12, X-ray source, a high energy (53-150 keV) source particularly well suited to the study of dense objects. The data allowed non-destructive rendering of otolith structure, and for the first time allows otolith annuli (internal ring structures) to be analysed in X-ray tomographic images. PMID:27071346

  18. New Setup To Study Trapped Nano-Particles Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, M.; Langer, B.; Schlemmer, S.; Lischke, T.; Becker, U.; Widdra, W.; Gerlich, D.; Ruehl, E.

    2004-05-12

    A novel setup is presented that is suitable to investigate the change of the properties of a single trapped nanoparticle by charging it with monochromatic synchrotron radiation. The particles are stored for long time periods that reach up to days without any contact to a substrate in the center of a three dimensional electrodynamic quadrupole trap. The accurate Q/M value is derived from the oscillatory motion of the particle in the trap recorded via scattering of visible light.

  19. Production of hhjj at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Matthew J; Englert, Christoph; Greiner, Nicolas; Spannowsky, Michael

    2014-03-14

    Until now, a phenomenologically complete analysis of the hh+2j channel at the LHC has been missing. This is mostly due to the high complexity of the involved one-loop gluon fusion contribution and the fact that a reliable estimate thereof cannot be obtained through simplified calculations in the mt→∞ limit. In this Letter, we report on the LHC's potential to access di-Higgs production in association with two jets in a fully showered hadron-level analysis. Our study includes the finite top and bottom mass dependencies for the gluon fusion contribution.

  20. Charged-particle multiplicity at LHC energies

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The talk presents the measurement of the pseudorapidity density and the multiplicity distribution with ALICE at the achieved LHC energies of 0.9 and 2.36 TeV.An overview about multiplicity measurements prior to LHC is given and the related theoretical concepts are briefly discussed.The analysis procedure is presented and the systematic uncertainties are detailed. The applied acceptance corrections and the treatment of diffraction are discussed.The results are compared with model predictions. The validity of KNO scaling in restricted phase space regions is revisited. 

  1. Bigger, Better, Faster, More at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Izaguirre, Eder; Manhart, Michael; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    Multijet plus missing energy searches provide universal coverage for theories that have new colored particles that decay into a dark matter candidate and jets. These signals appear at the LHC further out on the missing energy tail than two-to-two scattering indicates. The simplicity of the searches at the LHC contrasts sharply with the Tevatron where more elaborate searches are necessary to separate signal from background. The searches presented in this article effectively distinguish signal from background for any theory where the LSP is a daughter or granddaughter of the pair-produced colored parent particle without ever having to consider missing energies less than 400 GeV.

  2. LHC: The Emptiest Space in the Solar System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cid-Vidal, Xabier; Cid, Ramon

    2011-01-01

    Proton beams have been colliding at 7 TeV in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) since 30 March 2010, meaning that the LHC research programme is underway. Particle physicists around the world are looking forward to using the data from these collisions, as the LHC is running at an energy three and a half times higher than previously achieved at any…

  3. Search for Light New Physics at B Factories

    DOE PAGES

    Echenard, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    Many extensions of the Standard Model include the possibility of light new particles, such as light Higgs bosons or dark matter candidates. These scenarios can be probed using the large datasets collected by B factories, complementing measurements performed at the LHC. This paper summarizes recent searches for light new physics conducted by the BABAR and Belle experiments.

  4. Exclusive photoproduction of quarkonium at the LHC energies within the color dipole approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ducati, M. B. Gay; Griep, M. T.; Machado, M. V. T.

    2015-04-10

    The exclusive photoproduction of ψ(2S) meson was investigated and the coherent and the incoherent contributions were evaluated. The light-cone dipole formalism was considered in this analysis and predictions are done for PbPb collisions at the CERN-LHC energy of 2.76 TeV. A comparison is done to the recent ALICE Collaboration data for the ψ(1S) state photoproduction with good agreement.

  5. Neutrino mass and invisible Higgs decays at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, Cesar; Romão, Jorge C.; Valle, José W. F.

    2015-06-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson suggests that neutrinos also get their mass from spontaneous symmetry breaking. In the simplest ungauged lepton-number scheme, the Standard Model Higgs now has two other partners: a massive C P -even scalar, and the massless Nambu-Goldstone boson, called the Majoron. For weak-scale breaking of lepton number the invisible decays of the C P -even Higgs bosons to the Majoron lead to potentially copious sources of events with large missing energy. Using LHC results, we study how the constraints on invisible decays of the Higgs boson restrict the relevant parameters, substantially extending those previously derived from LEP and potentially shedding light on the scale of spontaneous lepton-number violation.

  6. Fracture mechanics by three-dimensional crack-tip synchrotron X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Withers, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the relationship between the nucleation and growth of defects and the local stresses and phase changes that cause them, we need both imaging and stress mapping. Here, we explore how this can be achieved by bringing together synchrotron X-ray diffraction and tomographic imaging. Conventionally, these are undertaken on separate synchrotron beamlines; however, instruments capable of both imaging and diffraction are beginning to emerge, such as ID15 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility and JEEP at the Diamond Light Source. This review explores the concept of three-dimensional crack-tip X-ray microscopy, bringing them together to probe the crack-tip behaviour under realistic environmental and loading conditions and to extract quantitative fracture mechanics information about the local crack-tip environment. X-ray diffraction provides information about the crack-tip stress field, phase transformations, plastic zone and crack-face tractions and forces. Time-lapse CT, besides providing information about the three-dimensional nature of the crack and its local growth rate, can also provide information as to the activation of extrinsic toughening mechanisms such as crack deflection, crack-tip zone shielding, crack bridging and crack closure. It is shown how crack-tip microscopy allows a quantitative measure of the crack-tip driving force via the stress intensity factor or the crack-tip opening displacement. Finally, further opportunities for synchrotron X-ray microscopy are explored. PMID:25624521

  7. Atomic physics and synchrotron radiation: The production and accumulation of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. M.; Meron, M.; Agagu, A.; Jones, K. W.

    1987-04-01

    Synchrotron radiation can be used to produce highly-charged ions, and to study photoexcitation and photoionization for ions of virtually any element in the periodic table. To date, with few exceptions, atomic physics studies have been limited to rare gases and a few metal vapors, and to photoexcitation energies in the VUV region of the electromagnetic spectrum. These limitations can now be overcome using photons produced by high-brightness synchrotron storage rings, such as the X-ray ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven. Furthermore, calculations indicate that irradiation of an ion trap with an intense energetic photon beam will result in a viable source of highly-charged ions that can be given the name PHOBIS: the photon beam ion source. Promising results, which encourage the wider systematic use of synchrotron radiation in atomic physics research, have been obtained in recent experiments on VUV photoemission and the production and storage of multiply-charged ions. An overview of the field, current plans, and future possibilities will be presented.

  8. INTERMEDIATE-ENERGY LIGHT SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, William

    2002-11-25

    Increasingly, atomic scale information underlies scientific and technological progress in disciplines ranging from pharmaceutical development to materials synthesis to environmental remediation. While a variety of research tools are used to provide atomic scale information, synchrotron radiation has proved invaluable in this quest. The rapid growth of soft- and hard X-ray synchrotron light sources stands as stark testimony to the importance and utility of synchrotron radiation. Starting from just a handful of synchrotron light sources in the early 1970s, this burgeoning field now includes over 70 proposed, in-construction, or operating facilities in 23 countries on five continents. Along the way, synchrotron light facilities have evolved from small laboratories extracting light parasitically from storage rings designed for high-energy physics research to large, dedicated sources using the latest technology to produce extraordinarily bright photon beams. The basic layout of a multi-GeV storage ring light source employs periodic bending magnets to guide a charged particle beam around the storage ring. As the charged beam is accelerated in an arc, it produces a sweeping fan of synchrotron radiation that extends from the infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum (<1 eV) to hard X rays (>20 keV). Quadrupole magnets keep the electrons tightly focused, and a radio-frequency acceleration system replenishes beam energy lost to radiation emission. To optimize the output radiation, a premium is placed on high current electron beams with small cross section and extreme position stability. Magnetic insertion devices are used to further enhance radiation output by a factor of 10 or more over bend magnet sources. The storage ring vacuum chamber includes exit ports to allow portions of the radiation fan to propagate down photon beam transport lines to optical systems and experimental stations. A typical storage ring features 10 or more such radiation ports. The photon beam

  9. Mirage models confront the LHC. II. Flux-stabilized type IIB string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Bryan L.; Nelson, Brent D.

    2014-04-01

    We continue the study of a class of string-motivated effective supergravity theories in light of current data from the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In this installment we consider type IIB string theory compactified on a Calabi-Yau orientifold in the presence of fluxes, in the manner originally formulated by Kachru et al. We allow for a variety of potential uplift mechanisms and embeddings of the Standard Model field content into D3-and D7-brane configurations. We find that an uplift sector independent of the Kähler moduli, as is the case with anti-D3-branes, is inconsistent with data unless the matter and Higgs sectors are localized on D7 branes exclusively, or are confined to twisted sectors between D3-and D7-branes. We identify regions of parameter space for all possible D-brane configurations that remain consistent with Planck observations on the dark matter relic density and measurements of the CP-even Higgs mass at the LHC. Constraints arising from LHC searches at √s =8 TeV and the LUX dark matter detection experiment are discussed. The discovery prospects for the remaining parameter space at dark matter direct-detection experiments are described, and signatures for detection of superpartners at the LHC with √s =14 TeV are analyzed.

  10. Continuing u.s. participation in the lhc accelerator program

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2005-12-01

    The U.S. LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) was established to enable U.S. accelerator specialists to take on active and important roles in the LHC accelerator project during its commissioning and early operations, and to be a major collaborator in future LHC performance upgrades. It is hoped that this follow-on effort to the U.S. contributions to the LHC accelerator project will improve the capabilities of the U.S. accelerator community in accelerator science and technology in order to more effectively use, develop, and preserve unique U.S. resources and capabilities during the LHC era.

  11. The Tsallis distribution at the LHC: Phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Cleymans, J.

    2014-11-11

    An overview is presented of transverse momentum distributions of particles at the LHC using the Tsallis distribution. The use of a thermodynamically consistent form of this distribution leads to an excellent description of charged and identified particles. The values of the Tsallis parameter q are truly remarkably consistent.

  12. Exploring the Pomeron structure at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royon, Christophe; Saimpert, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    We present some physics topics that will allow us to constrain the Pomeron structure at the LHC in terms of gluon and quark densities using the dijet and γ+jet events and tagged protons in AFP (ATLAS) and CMS-TOTEM. We also discuss the possibility to test the BFKL dynamics using jet-gap-jet events.

  13. RENORM predictions of diffraction at LHC confirmed

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2015-04-10

    The RENORM model predictions of diffractive, total, and total-inelastic cross sections at the LHC are confirmed by recent measurements. The predictions of several other available models are discussed, highlighting their differences from RENORM, mainly arising from the way rapidity gap formation, low- and high-mass diffraction, unitarization, and hadronization are implemented.

  14. Ground Vibration Measurements at LHC Point 4

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsche, Kirk; Gaddi, Andrea; /CERN

    2012-09-17

    Ground vibration was measured at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Point 4 during the winter shutdown in February 2012. This report contains the results, including power and coherence spectra. We plan to collect and analyze vibration data from representative collider halls to inform specifications for future linear colliders, such as ILC and CLIC. We are especially interested in vibration correlations between final focus lens locations.

  15. The LHCb Detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LHCb Collaboration; Alves, A. Augusto, Jr.; Filho, L. M. Andrade; Barbosa, A. F.; Bediaga, I.; Cernicchiaro, G.; Guerrer, G.; Lima, H. P., Jr.; Machado, A. A.; Magnin, J.; Marujo, F.; de Miranda, J. M.; Reis, A.; Santos, A.; Toledo, A.; Akiba, K.; Amato, S.; de Paula, B.; de Paula, L.; da Silva, T.; Gandelman, M.; Lopes, J. H.; Maréchal, B.; Moraes, D.; Polycarpo, E.; Rodrigues, F.; Ballansat, J.; Bastian, Y.; Boget, D.; DeBonis, I.; Coco, V.; David, P. Y.; Decamp, D.; Delebecque, P.; Drancourt, C.; Dumont-Dayot, N.; Girard, C.; Lieunard, B.; Minard, M. N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Rambure, T.; Rospabe, G.; T'Jampens, S.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bohner, G.; Bonnefoy, R.; Borras, D.; Carloganu, C.; Chanal, H.; Conte, E.; Cornat, R.; Crouau, M.; Delage, E.; Deschamps, O.; Henrard, P.; Jacquet, P.; Lacan, C.; Laubser, J.; Lecoq, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Magne, M.; Martemiyanov, M.; Mercier, M.-L.; Monteil, S.; Niess, V.; Perret, P.; Reinmuth, G.; Robert, A.; Suchorski, S.; Arnaud, K.; Aslanides, E.; Babel, J.; Benchouk, C.; Cachemiche, J.-P.; Cogan, J.; Derue, F.; Dinkespiler, B.; Duval, P.-Y.; Garonne, V.; Favard, S.; LeGac, R.; Leon, F.; Leroy, O.; Liotard, P.-L.; Marin, F.; Menouni, M.; Ollive, P.; Poss, S.; Roche, A.; Sapunov, M.; Tocco, L.; Viaud, B.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Amhis, Y.; Barrand, G.; Barsuk, S.; Beigbeder, C.; Beneyton, R.; Breton, D.; Callot, O.; Charlet, D.; D'Almagne, B.; Duarte, O.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jean-Marie, B.; Lefrancois, J.; Machefert, F.; Robbe, P.; Schune, M.-H.; Tocut, V.; Videau, I.; Benayoun, M.; David, P.; DelBuono, L.; Gilles, G.; Domke, M.; Futterschneider, H.; Ilgner, Ch; Kapusta, P.; Kolander, M.; Krause, R.; Lieng, M.; Nedos, M.; Rudloff, K.; Schleich, S.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Warda, K.; Agari, M.; Bauer, C.; Baumeister, D.; Bulian, N.; Fuchs, H. P.; Fallot-Burghardt, W.; Glebe, T.; Hofmann, W.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Löchner, S.; Ludwig, A.; Maciuc, F.; Sanchez Nieto, F.; Schmelling, M.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Sexauer, E.; Smale, N. J.; Trunk, U.; Voss, H.; Albrecht, J.; Bachmann, S.; Blouw, J.; Deissenroth, M.; Deppe, H.; Dreis, H. B.; Eisele, F.; Haas, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Hennenberger, S.; Knopf, J.; Moch, M.; Perieanu, A.; Rabenecker, S.; Rausch, A.; Rummel, C.; Rusnyak, R.; Schiller, M.; Stange, U.; Uwer, U.; Walter, M.; Ziegler, R.; Avoni, G.; Balbi, G.; Bonifazi, F.; Bortolotti, D.; Carbone, A.; D'Antone, I.; Galli, D.; Gregori, D.; Lax, I.; Marconi, U.; Peco, G.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vecchi, S.; Bonivento, W.; Cardini, A.; Cadeddu, S.; DeLeo, V.; Deplano, C.; Furcas, S.; Lai, A.; Oldeman, R.; Raspino, D.; Saitta, B.; Serra, N.; Baldini, W.; Brusa, S.; Chiozzi, S.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Evangelisti, F.; Franconieri, A.; Germani, S.; Gianoli, A.; Guoming, L.; Landi, L.; Malaguti, R.; Padoan, C.; Pennini, C.; Savriè, M.; Squerzanti, S.; Zhao, T.; Zhu, M.; Bizzeti, A.; Graziani, G.; Lenti, M.; Lenzi, M.; Maletta, F.; Pennazzi, S.; Passaleva, G.; Veltri, M.; Alfonsi, M.; Anelli, M.; Balla, A.; Battisti, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Campana, P.; Carletti, M.; Ciambrone, P.; Corradi, G.; Dané, E.; Di Virgilio, A.; DeSimone, P.; Felici, G.; Forti, C.; Gatta, M.; Lanfranchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Pistilli, M.; Poli Lener, M.; Rosellini, R.; Santoni, M.; Saputi, A.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Zossi, A.; Ameri, M.; Cuneo, S.; Fontanelli, F.; Gracco, V.; Miní, G.; Parodi, M.; Petrolini, A.; Sannino, M.; Vinci, A.; Alemi, M.; Arnaboldi, C.; Bellunato, T.; Calvi, M.; Chignoli, F.; DeLucia, A.; Galotta, G.; Mazza, R.; Matteuzzi, C.; Musy, M.; Negri, P.; Perego, D.; Pessina, G.; Auriemma, G.; Bocci, V.; Buccheri, A.; Chiodi, G.; Di Marco, S.; Iacoangeli, F.; Martellotti, G.; Nobrega, R.; Pelosi, A.; Penso, G.; Pinci, D.; Rinaldi, W.; Rossi, A.; Santacesaria, R.; Satriano, C.; Carboni, G.; Iannilli, M.; Massafferri Rodrigues, A.; Messi, R.; Paoluzzi, G.; Sabatino, G.; Santovetti, E.; Satta, A.; Amoraal, J.; van Apeldoorn, G.; Arink, R.; van Bakel, N.; Band, H.; Bauer, Th; Berkien, A.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bos, E.; Bron, Ch; Ceelie, L.; Doets, M.; van der Eijk, R.; Fransen, J.-P.; de Groen, P.; Gromov, V.; Hierck, R.; Homma, J.; Hommels, B.; Hoogland, W.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Jansen, L.; Jaspers, M.; Kaan, B.; Koene, B.; Koopstra, J.; Kroes, F.; Kraan, M.; Langedijk, J.; Merk, M.; Mos, S.; Munneke, B.; Palacios, J.; Papadelis, A.; Pellegrino, A.; van Petten, O.; du Pree, T.; Roeland, E.; Ruckstuhl, W.; Schimmel, A.; Schuijlenburg, H.; Sluijk, T.; Spelt, J.; Stolte, J.; Terrier, H.; Tuning, N.; Van Lysebetten, A.; Vankov, P.; Verkooijen, J.; Verlaat, B.; Vink, W.; de Vries, H.; Wiggers, L.; Ybeles Smit, G.; Zaitsev, N.; Zupan, M.; Zwart, A.; van den Brand, J.; Bulten, H. J.; de Jong, M.; Ketel, T.; Klous, S.; Kos, J.; M'charek, B.; Mul, F.; Raven, G.; Simioni, E.; Cheng, J.; Dai, G.; Deng, Z.; Gao, Y.; Gong, G.; Gong, H.; He, J.; Hou, L.; Li, J.; Qian, W.; Shao, B.; Xue, T.; Yang, Z.; Zeng, M.; Muryn, B.; Ciba, K.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Blocki, J.; Galuszka, K.; Hajduk, L.; Michalowski, J.; Natkaniec, Z.; Polok, G.; Stodulski, M.; Witek, M.; Brzozowski, K.; Chlopik, A.; Gawor, P.; Guzik, Z.; Nawrot, A.; Srednicki, A.; Syryczynski, K.; Szczekowski, M.; Anghel, D. V.; Cimpean, A.; Coca, C.; Constantin, F.; Cristian, P.; Dumitru, D. D.; Dumitru, D. T.; Giolu, G.; Kusko, C.; Magureanu, C.; Mihon, Gh; Orlandea, M.; Pavel, C.; Petrescu, R.; Popescu, S.; Preda, T.; Rosca, A.; Rusu, V. L.; Stoica, R.; Stoica, S.; Tarta, P. D.; Filippov, S.; Gavrilov, Yu; Golyshkin, L.; Gushchin, E.; Karavichev, O.; Klubakov, V.; Kravchuk, L.; Kutuzov, V.; Laptev, S.; Popov, S.; Aref'ev, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Dolgoshein, V.; Egorychev, V.; Golutvin, A.; Gushchin, O.; Konoplyannikov, A.; Korolko, I.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Machikhiliyan, I.; Malyshev, S.; Mayatskaya, E.; Prokudin, M.; Rusinov, D.; Rusinov, V.; Shatalov, P.; Shchutska, L.; Tarkovskiy, E.; Tayduganov, A.; Voronchev, K.; Zhiryakova, O.; Bobrov, A.; Bondar, A.; Eidelman, S.; Kozlinsky, A.; Shekhtman, L.; Beloous, K. S.; Dzhelyadin, R. I.; Gelitsky, Yu V.; Gouz, Yu P.; Kachnov, K. G.; Kobelev, A. S.; Matveev, V. D.; Novikov, V. P.; Obraztsov, V. F.; Ostankov, A. P.; Romanovsky, V. I.; Rykalin, V. I.; Soldatov, A. P.; Soldatov, M. M.; Tchernov, E. N.; Yushchenko, O. P.; Bochin, B.; Bondar, N.; Fedorov, O.; Golovtsov, V.; Guets, S.; Kashchuk, A.; Lazarev, V.; Maev, O.; Neustroev, P.; Sagidova, N.; Spiridenkov, E.; Volkov, S.; Vorobyev, An; Vorobyov, A.; Aguilo, E.; Bota, S.; Calvo, M.; Comerma, A.; Cano, X.; Dieguez, A.; Herms, A.; Lopez, E.; Luengo, S.; Garra, J.; Garrido, Ll; Gascon, D.; Gaspar de Valenzuela, A.; Gonzalez, C.; Graciani, R.; Grauges, E.; Perez Calero, A.; Picatoste, E.; Riera, J.; Rosello, M.; Ruiz, H.; Vilasis, X.; Xirgu, X.; Adeva, B.; Cid Vidal, X.; MartÉnez Santos, D.; Esperante Pereira, D.; Fungueiriño Pazos, J. L.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Gómez, C. Lois; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pérez Trigo, E.; Pló Casasús, M.; Rodriguez Cobo, C.; Rodríguez Pérez, P.; Saborido, J. J.; Seco, M.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Bartalini, P.; Bay, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; Blanc, F.; Borel, J.; Carron, B.; Currat, C.; Conti, G.; Dormond, O.; Ermoline, Y.; Fauland, P.; Fernandez, L.; Frei, R.; Gagliardi, G.; Gueissaz, N.; Haefeli, G.; Hicheur, A.; Jacoby, C.; Jalocha, P.; Jimenez-Otero, S.; Hertig, J.-P.; Knecht, M.; Legger, F.; Locatelli, L.; Moser, J.-R.; Needham, M.; Nicolas, L.; Perrin-Giacomin, A.; Perroud, J.-P.; Potterat, C.; Ronga, F.; Schneider, O.; Schietinger, T.; Steele, D.; Studer, L.; Tareb, M.; Tran, M. T.; van Hunen, J.; Vervink, K.; Villa, S.; Zwahlen, N.; Bernet, R.; Büchler, A.; Gassner, J.; Lehner, F.; Sakhelashvili, T.; Salzmann, C.; Sievers, P.; Steiner, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Straumann, U.; van Tilburg, J.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Ziegler, M.; Dovbnya, A.; Ranyuk, Yu; Shapoval, I.; Borisova, M.; Iakovenko, V.; Kyva, V.; Kovalchuk, O.; Okhrimenko, O.; Pugatch, V.; Pylypchenko, Yu; Adinolfi, M.; Brook, N. H.; Head, R. D.; Imong, J. P.; Lessnoff, K. A.; Metlica, F. C. D.; Muir, A. J.; Rademacker, J. H.; Solomin, A.; Szczypka, P. M.; Barham, C.; Buszello, C.; Dickens, J.; Gibson, V.; Haines, S.; Harrison, K.; Jones, C. R.; Katvars, S.; Kerzel, U.; Lazzeroni, C.; Li, Y. Y.; Rogers, G.; Storey, J.; Skottowe, H.; Wotton, S. A.; Adye, T. J.; Densham, C. J.; Easo, S.; Franek, B.; Loveridge, P.; Morrow, D.; Morris, J. V.; Nandakumar, R.; Nardulli, J.; Papanestis, A.; Patrick, G. N.; Ricciardi, S.; Woodward, M. L.; Zhang, Z.; Chamonal, R. J. U.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, P.; Eisenhardt, S.; Gilardi, N.; Khan, A.; Kim, Y. M.; Lambert, R.; Lawrence, J.; Main, A.; McCarron, J.; Mclean, C.; Muheim, F.; Osorio-Oliveros, A. F.; Playfer, S.; Styles, N.; Xie, Y.; Bates, A.; Carson, L.; da Cunha Marinho, F.; Doherty, F.; Eklund, L.; Gersabeck, M.; Haddad, L.; Macgregor, A. A.; Melone, J.; McEwan, F.; Petrie, D. M.; Paterson, S. K.; Parkes, C.; Pickford, A.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rodrigues, E.; Saavedra, A. F.; Soler, F. J. P.; Szumlak, T.; Viret, S.; Allebone, L.; Awunor, O.; Back, J.; Barber, G.; Barnes, C.; Cameron, B.; Clark, D.; Clark, I.; Dornan, P.; Duane, A.; Eames, C.; Egede, U.; Girone, M.; Greenwood, S.; Hallam, R.; Hare, R.; Howard, A.; Jolly, S.; Kasey, V.; Khaleeq, M.; Koppenburg, P.; Miller, D.; Plackett, R.; Price, D.; Reece, W.; Savage, P.; Savidge, T.; Simmons, B.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Websdale, D.; Affolder, A.; Anderson, J. S.; Biagi, S. F.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Carroll, J. L.; Casse, G.; Cooke, P.; Donleavy, S.; Dwyer, L.; Hennessy, K.; Huse, T.; Hutchcroft, D.; Jones, D.; Lockwood, M.; McCubbin, M.; McNulty, R.; Muskett, D.; Noor, A.; Patel, G. D.; Rinnert, K.; Shears, T.; Smith, N. A.; Southern, G.; Stavitski, I.; Sutcliffe, P.; Tobin, M.; Traynor, S. M.; Turner, P.; Whitley, M.; Wormald, M.; Wright, V.; Bibby, J. H.; Brisbane, S.; Brock, M.; Charles, M.; Cioffi, C.; Gligorov, V. V.; Handford, T.; Harnew, N.; Harris, F.; John, M. J. J.; Jones, M.; Libby, J.; Martin, L.; McArthur, I. A.; Muresan, R.; Newby, C.; Ottewell, B.; Powell, A.; Rotolo, N.; Senanayake, R. S.; Somerville, L.; Soroko, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sullivan, P.; Stokes-Rees, I.; Topp-Jorgensen, S.; Xing, F.; Wilkinson, G.; Artuso, M.; Belyaev, I.; Blusk, S.; Lefeuvre, G.; Menaa, N.; Menaa-Sia, R.; Mountain, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Wang, J. C.; Abadie, L.; Aglieri-Rinella, G.; Albrecht, E.; André, J.; Anelli, G.; Arnaud, N.; Augustinus, A.; Bal, F.; Barandela Pazos, M. C.; Barczyk, A.; Bargiotti, M.; Batista Lopes, J.; Behrendt, O.; Berni, S.; Binko, P.; Bobillier, V.; Braem, A.; Brarda, L.; Buytaert, J.; Camilleri, L.; Cambpell, M.; Castellani, G.; Cataneo, F.; Cattaneo, M.; Chadaj, B.; Charpentier, P.; Cherukuwada, S.; Chesi, E.; Christiansen, J.; Chytracek, R.; Clemencic, M.; Closier, J.; Collins, P.; Colrain, P.; Cooke, O.; Corajod, B.; Corti, G.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Damodaran, B.; David, C.; de Capua, S.; Decreuse, G.; Degaudenzi, H.; Dijkstra, H.; Droulez, J.-P.; Duarte Ramos, D.; Dufey, J. P.; Dumps, R.; Eckstein, D.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Flegel, W.; Forty, R.; Fournier, C.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Gaidioz, B.; Gaspar, C.; Gayde, J.-C.; Gavillet, P.; Go, A.; Gracia Abril, G.; Graulich, J.-S.; Giudici, P.-A.; Guirao Elias, A.; Guglielmini, P.; Gys, T.; Hahn, F.; Haider, S.; Harvey, J.; Hay, B.; Hernando Morata, J.-A.; Herranz Alvarez, J.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hilke, H. J.; von Holtey, G.; Hulsbergen, W.; Jacobsson, R.; Jamet, O.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Kanaya, N.; Knaster Refolio, J.; Koestner, S.; Koratzinos, M.; Kristic, R.; Lacarrère, D.; Lasseur, C.; Lastovicka, T.; Laub, M.; Liko, D.; Lippmann, C.; Lindner, R.; Losasso, M.; Maier, A.; Mair, K.; Maley, P.; Mato Vila, P.; Moine, G.; Morant, J.; Moritz, M.; Moscicki, J.; Muecke, M.; Mueller, H.; Nakada, T.; Neufeld, N.; Ocariz, J.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Parzefall, U.; Patel, M.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Piedigrossi, D.; Pivk, M.; Pokorski, W.; Ponce, S.; Ranjard, F.; Riegler, W.; Renaud, J.; Roiser, S.; Rossi, A.; Roy, L.; Ruf, T.; Ruffinoni, D.; Saladino, S.; Sambade Varela, A.; Santinelli, R.; Schmelling, S.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, T.; Schöning, A.; Schopper, A.; Seguinot, J.; Snoeys, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, A. C.; Somogyi, P.; Stoica, R.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; Toledo Alarcon, J.; Ullaland, O.; Valassi, A.; Vannerem, P.; Veness, R.; Wicht, P.; Wiedner, D.; Witzeling, W.; Wright, A.; Wyllie, K.; Ypsilantis, T.

    2008-08-01

    The LHCb experiment is dedicated to precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of B hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva). The initial configuration and expected performance of the detector and associated systems, as established by test beam measurements and simulation studies, is described.

  16. LHC Phenomenology and Lattice Strong Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, G. T.

    2013-03-01

    While the LHC experimentalists work to find evidence of physics beyond the standard model, lattice gauge theorists are working as well to characterize the range of possible phenomena in strongly-coupled models of electroweak symmetry breaking. I will summarize the current progress of the Lattice Strong Dynamics (LSD) collaboration on the flavor dependence of SU(3) gauge theories.

  17. US-LHC MAGNET DATABASE AND CONVENTIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; MCCHESNEY,D.; JAIN,A.; PEGGS,S.; PILAT,F.; BOTTURA,L.; SABBI,G.

    1999-03-29

    The US-LHC Magnet Database is designed for production-magnet quality assurance, field and alignment error impact analysis, cryostat assembly assistance, and ring installation assistance. The database consists of tables designed to store magnet field and alignment measurements data and quench data. This information will also be essential for future machine operations including local IR corrections.

  18. Mixing stops at the LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Agrawal, Prateek; Frugiuele, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    We study the phenomenology of a light stop NLSP in the presence of large mixing with either the first or the second generation. R-symmetric models provide a prime setting for this scenario, but our discussion also applies to the MSSM when a significant amount of mixing can be accommodated. In our framework the dominant stop decay is through the flavor violating mode into a light jet and the LSP in an extended region of parameter space. There are currently no limits from ATLAS and CMS in this region. We emulate shape-based hadronic SUSY searches for this topology, and find thatmore » they have potential sensitivity. If the extension of these analyses to this region is robust, we find that these searches can set strong exclusion limits on light stops. If not, then the flavor violating decay mode is challenging and may represent a blind spot in stop searches even at 13 TeV. Thus, an experimental investigation of this scenario is well motivated.« less

  19. Mixing stops at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Prateek; Frugiuele, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    We study the phenomenology of a light stop NLSP in the presence of large mixing with either the first or the second generation. R-symmetric models provide a prime setting for this scenario, but our discussion also applies to the MSSM when a significant amount of mixing can be accommodated. In our framework the dominant stop decay is through the flavor violating mode into a light jet and the LSP in an extended region of parameter space. There are currently no limits from ATLAS and CMS in this region. We emulate shape-based hadronic SUSY searches for this topology, and find that they have potential sensitivity. If the extension of these analyses to this region is robust, we find that these searches can set strong exclusion limits on light stops. If not, then the flavor violating decay mode is challenging and may represent a blind spot in stop searches even at 13 TeV. Thus, an experimental investigation of this scenario is well motivated.

  20. POTENTIAL FOR HIGGS PHYSICS AT THE LHC AND SUPER-LHC.

    SciTech Connect

    CRANMER, K.S.

    2005-12-12

    The expected sensitivity of the LHC experiments to the discovery of the Higgs boson and the measurement of its properties is presented in the context of both the standard model and the its minimal supersymmetric extension. Prospects for a luminosity-upgraded ''Super-LHC'' are also presented. If it exists, the LHC should discover standard model Higgs boson, measure its mass accurately, and make various measurements of its couplings, spin and CP properties. In the context of the CP-conserving MSSM, the LHC should be able to discover one or more Higgs bosons over the entire m{sub A}-tan {beta} plane, with two or more observable in many cases. The large number of channels available insure a robust discovery and offer many opportunities for additional measurements. Observation of H {yields} {mu}{mu}, measurement of the tri-linear Higgs self-coupling, and various search channels are statistics-limited, and only possible with a luminosity upgrade. A luminosity upgrade would substantially improve some of the coupling measurements and generally extend the sensitivity in the MSSM Higgs plane. Efforts are ongoing to understand the upgrade of the LHC to the Super-LHC.