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Sample records for lhcb rich photon

  1. An ASIC for fast single photon counting in the LHCb RICH upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotti, C.

    2017-03-01

    The LHCb experiment will be upgraded during the second LHC long shutdown (years 2019–2020) to operate at higher luminosity. The new triggerless architecture of LHCb requires data from the entire detector to be read out at 40 MHz. The basic element of the front-end electronics of the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector upgrade is the "Elementary Cell" (EC), a readout system for multianode photomultiplier tubes designed to minimise parasitic capacitance at the anodes, to obtain a fast readout with low noise and low crosstalk. At the heart of the EC is the CLARO, an 8 channel, low power and radiation hard front-end ASIC designed in 0.35 μm CMOS technology. Each channel compares the charge signals from the photomultiplier anodes with a programmable threshold, and gives a digital pulse at the output when the threshold is exceeded. Baseline recovery occurs in less than 25 ns for typical single photon signals. In the LHCb RICH upgrade environment, the chips will have to withstand radiation up to a total ionising dose of 2 kGy (200 krad) and neutron and hadron fluences up to 03×112 cm‑2 and following irradiation, the chips have been shown to tolerate such doses with a margin of safety.

  2. LHCb RICH Upgrade: an overview of the photon detector and electronic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassina, L.

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is one of the four large detectors operating at the LHC at CERN and it is mainly devoted to CP violation measurements and to the search for new physics in rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. The data from the two Ring Image Cherenkov (RICH-1 and RICH-2) detectors are essential to identify particles in a wide momentum range. From 2019 onwards 14 TeV collisions with luminosities reaching up to 2 × 1033 cm-2s-1 with 25 ns bunch spacing are planned, with the goal of collecting 5 fb-1 of data per year. In order to avoid degradation of the PID performance at such high rate (40 MHz), the RICH detector has to be upgraded. New photodetectors (Multi-anode photomultiplier tubes, MaPMTs) have been chosen and will be read out using an 8-channel chip, named CLARO, designed to sustain a photon counting rate up to 40 MHz, while minimizing the power consumption and the cross-talk. A 128-bit digital register allows selection of thresholds and attenuation values and provides features useful for testing and debugging. Photosensors and electronics are arranged in basic units, the first prototypes of which have been tested in charged particle beams in autumn 2014. An overview of the CLARO features and of the readout electronics is presented.

  3. Operating Hybrid Photon Detectors in the LHCb RICH counters at high occupancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhardt, Stephan

    2014-12-01

    We report about the experiences in the operation of the Hybrid Photon Detectors in the Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detectors of the LHCb experiment during the first run period, 2010-2012. Of particular interest is the ageing due to the deterioration of the vacuum quality of the tubes, leading to an increase of ion feedback.

  4. Test of the photon detection system for the LHCb RICH Upgrade in a charged particle beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baszczyk, M. K.; Benettoni, M.; Calabrese, R.; Cardinale, R.; Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Cavallero, G.; Cojocariu, L.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dorosz, P. A.; Easo, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Fiorini, M.; Frei, C.; Gambetta, S.; Gibson, V.; Gotti, C.; Harnew, N.; He, J.; Keizer, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Maciuc, F.; Maino, M.; Malaguti, R.; Matteuzzi, C.; McCann, M.; Morris, A.; Muheim, F.; Papanestis, A.; Pessina, G.; Petrolini, A.; Piedigrossi, D.; Pistone, A.; Placinta, V. M.; Sigurdsson, S.; Simi, G.; Smith, J.; Spradlin, P.; Tomassetti, L.; Wotton, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded to make more efficient use of the available luminosity at the LHC in Run III and extend its potential for discovery. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors are key components of the LHCb detector for particle identification. In this paper we describe the setup and the results of tests in a charged particle beam, carried out to assess prototypes of the upgraded opto-electronic chain from the Multi-Anode PMT photosensor to the readout and data acquisition system.

  5. Dark photons from charm mesons at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilten, Philip; Thaler, Jesse; Williams, Mike; Xue, Wei

    2015-12-01

    We propose a search for dark photons A' at the LHCb experiment using the charm meson decay D*(2007 )0→D0A'. At nominal luminosity, D*0→D0γ decays will be produced at about 700 kHz within the LHCb acceptance, yielding over 5 trillion such decays during Run 3 of the LHC. Replacing the photon with a kinetically mixed dark photon, LHCb is then sensitive to dark photons that decay as A'→e+e-. We pursue two search strategies in this paper. The displaced strategy takes advantage of the large Lorentz boost of the dark photon and the excellent vertex resolution of LHCb, yielding a nearly background-free search when the A' decay vertex is significantly displaced from the proton-proton primary vertex. The resonant strategy takes advantage of the large event rate for D*0→D0A' and the excellent invariant-mass resolution of LHCb, yielding a background-limited search that nevertheless covers a significant portion of the A' parameter space. Both search strategies rely on the planned upgrade to a triggerless-readout system at LHCb in Run 3, which will permit the identification of low-momentum electron-positron pairs online during data taking. For dark photon masses below about 100 MeV, LHCb can explore nearly all of the dark photon parameter space between existing prompt-A' and beam-dump limits.

  6. Proposed Inclusive Dark Photon Search at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilten, Philip; Soreq, Yotam; Thaler, Jesse; Williams, Mike; Xue, Wei

    2016-06-01

    We propose an inclusive search for dark photons A' at the LHCb experiment based on both prompt and displaced dimuon resonances. Because the couplings of the dark photon are inherited from the photon via kinetic mixing, the dark photon A'→μ+μ- rate can be directly inferred from the off-shell photon γ*→μ+μ- rate, making this a fully data-driven search. For run 3 of the LHC, we estimate that LHCb will have sensitivity to large regions of the unexplored dark-photon parameter space, especially in the 210-520 MeV and 10-40 GeV mass ranges. This search leverages the excellent invariant-mass and vertex resolution of LHCb, along with its unique particle-identification and real-time data-analysis capabilities.

  7. Performance of the LHCb RICH detector at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Adinolfi, M; Aglieri Rinella, G; Albrecht, E; Bellunato, T; Benson, S; Blake, T; Blanks, C; Brisbane, S; Brook, N H; Calvi, M; Cameron, B; Cardinale, R; Carson, L; Contu, A; Coombes, M; D'Ambrosio, C; Easo, S; Egede, U; Eisenhardt, S; Fanchini, E; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Frei, C; Gandini, P; Gao, R; Garra Tico, J; Giachero, A; Gibson, V; Gotti, C; Gregson, S; Gys, T; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Harnew, N; Hill, D; Hunt, P; John, M; Jones, C R; Johnson, D; Kanaya, N; Katvars, S; Kerzel, U; Kim, Y M; Koblitz, S; Kucharczyk, M; Lambert, D; Main, A; Maino, M; Malde, S; Mangiafave, N; Matteuzzi, C; Mini', G; Mollen, A; Morant, J; Mountain, R; Morris, J V; Muheim, F; Muresan, R; Nardulli, J; Owen, P; Papanestis, A; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Perego, D L; Pessina, G; Petrolini, A; Piedigrossi, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Powell, A; Rademacker, J H; Ricciardi, S; Rogers, G J; Sail, P; Sannino, M; Savidge, T; Sepp, I; Sigurdsson, S; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Storaci, B; Thomas, C; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Ullaland, O; Vervink, K; Voong, D; Websdale, D; Wilkinson, G; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xing, F; Young, R

    The LHCb experiment has been taking data at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN since the end of 2009. One of its key detector components is the Ring-Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) system. This provides charged particle identification over a wide momentum range, from 2-100 GeV/c. The operation and control, software, and online monitoring of the RICH system are described. The particle identification performance is presented, as measured using data from the LHC. Excellent separation of hadronic particle types (π, K, p) is achieved.

  8. Novel Photon Detectors for RICH Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, Jaroslav

    2003-01-08

    The paper describes recent developments in Photon Detectors useful for the Cherenkov Ring Imaging Applications (RICH). We discuss the Multi-anode PMTs, HPDs with PIN and APD diode readout, APDs working in a Geiger mode, and the gaseous multi-pattern detectors. The paper emphasizes their timing properties. We give equal chance to fragile, not yet entirely proven ideas.

  9. The COMPASS RICH-1 fast photon detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbon, P.; Alexeev, M.; Angerer, H.; Birsa, R.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Colantoni, M. L.; Dafni, T.; Dalla Torre, S.; Delagnes, E.; Denisov, O.; Deschamps, H.; Diaz, V.; Dibiase, N.; Duic, V.; Eyrich, W.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fischer, H.; Gerassimov, S.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Hagemann, R.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F. H.; Joosten, R.; Ketzer, B.; Kolosov, V. N.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Kramer, D.; Kunne, F.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Mann, A.; Martin, A.; Menon, G.; Mutter, A.; Nähle, O.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Panzieri, D.; Paul, S.; Pesaro, G.; Pizzolotto, C.; Polak, J.; Rebourgeard, P.; Robinet, F.; Rocco, E.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schoenmeier, P.; Schröder, W.; Silva, L.; Slunecka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Steiger, L.; Sulc, M.; Svec, M.; Takekawa, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Wollny, H.

    2008-09-01

    A fast photon detection system has been built as a part of the upgrade of the COMPASS RICH-1 detector: it is based on 576 multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMTs) coupled to individual fused silica lens telescopes and fast readout electronics. This system has replaced the MWPCs with CsI photo-cathodes in the central region (1.3m, 25% of the total area) of the COMPASS RICH-1 photon detectors and has successfully been operated during the data taking in 2006 and 2007. We report about the fast photon detection system design, construction and commissioning, in particular about the design optimization and the validation tests of the lens telescopes. Preliminary values for the increased performances of COMPASS RICH-1 after the upgrade are also presented.

  10. Fast photon-detection for COMPASS RICH-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbon, P.; Alexeev, M.; Angerer, H.; Birsa, R.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Colantoni, M. L.; Dafni, T.; Dalla Torre, S.; Delagnes, E.; Denisov, O.; Deschamps, H.; Diaz, V.; Dibiase, N.; Duic, V.; Eyrich, W.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fisher, H.; Gerassimov, S.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Hagemann, R.; Vonharrac, D.; Heinsius, F. H.; Joosten, R.; Ketzer, B.; Königsmann, K.; Kolosov, V. N.; Konorov, I.; Kramer, D.; Kunne, F.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Mann, A.; Martin, A.; Menon, G.; Mutter, A.; Nähle, O.; Neyret, D.; Nerling, F.; Panebianco, S.; Panzieri, D.; Paul, S.; Pesaro, G.; Pizzolotto, C.; Polak, J.; Rebourgeard, P.; Robinet, F.; Rocco, E.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schoenmeier, W.; Schröder, W.; Silva, L.; Sluneckai, M.; Sozzi, F.; Steiger, L.; Sulc, M.; Svec, M.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Wollny, H.

    2008-06-01

    A fast photon-detection system for the detector RICH-1 of the COMPASS Experiment at CERN SPS is in operation since the 2006 run. It is based on the use of Multi-Anode Photomultipliers (MAPMTs) coupled to individual fused silica lens telescopes and fast read-out electronics. It has been designed taking into account the high photon flux in the central region of the detector and the high rate requirements of the COMPASS Experiment. We present the photon-detection design and construction, together with its characterization and measured performances based on the data collected in 2006.

  11. Radiative decays at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giubega, L. E.

    2016-12-01

    Precise measurements on rare radiative B decays are performed with the LHCb experiment at LHC. The LHCb results regarding the ratio of branching fractions for two radiative decays, B 0 → K *0 γ and B s → ϕ γ, the direct CP asymmetry in B 0 → K *0 γ decay channel and the observation of the photon polarization in the B ± → K ±π∓π± γ decay, are included. The first two measurements were performed in 1 fb-1 of pp collisions data and the third one in 3 fb-1 of data, respectively.

  12. MPGD-based photon detector upgrade for COMPASS RICH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamar, G.; Dalla Torre, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Levorato, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Azevedo, C. D. R.

    2017-07-01

    The RICH detector of the COMPASS Experiment at CERN SPS is undergoing an important upgrade: the central MWPC-based photon detectors have been replaced with novel Micropattern detectors, to cope with the challenging efficiency and stability requirements of the new COMPASS measurements. The new hybrid MPGD detector consists of two layers of ThickGEMs and a capacitive bulk Micromegas. Photoconversion takes place on the CsI layer deposited onto the first ThickGEM, while position information and signals are read out from the pad-segmented anode via capacitive coupling by analog front-end electronics based on APV25 chips. The paper focuses on the main issues of production, detailed quality assessment technique, and the commissioning status of the first in-experiment MPGD-based photon detectors for RICH application.

  13. Fast photon detection for the COMPASS RICH detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbon, P.; Alekseev, M.; Angerer, H.; Apollonio, M.; Birsa, R.; Bordalo, P.; Bradainante, F.; Bressan, A.; Busso, L.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Colantoni, M. L.; Costa, S.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dafni, T.; Delagnes, E.; Deschamps, H.; Diaz, V.; Dibiase, N.; Duic, V.; Eyrich, W.; Faso, D.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Gerassimov, S.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Hagemann, R.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F. H.; Joosten, R.; Ketzer, B.; Königsmann, K.; Kolosov, V. N.; Konorov, I.; Kramer, D.; Kunne, F.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Mann, A.; Martin, A.; Menon, G.; Mutter, A.; Nähle, O.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Pagano, P.; Panebianco, S.; Panzieri, D.; Paul, S.; Pesaro, G.; Polak, J.; Rebourgeard, P.; Robinet, F.; Rocco, E.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schröder, W.; Silva, L.; Slunecka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Steiger, L.; Sulc, M.; Svec, M.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Wollny, H.

    2007-10-01

    Particle identification at high rates is a central aspect of many present and future experiments in high-energy particle physics. The COMPASS experiment at the SPS accelerator at CERN uses a large scale Ring Imaging CHerenkov detector (RICH) to identify pions, kaons and protons in a wide momentum range. For the data taking in 2006, the COMPASS RICH has been upgraded in the central photon detection area (25% of the surface) with a new technology to detect Cherenkov photons at very high count rates of several 10s per channel and a new dead-time free read-out system, which allows trigger rates up to 100 kHz. The Cherenkov photons are detected by an array of 576 visible and ultra-violet sensitive multi-anode photomultipliers with 16 channels each. Lens telescopes of fused silica lenses have been designed and built to focus the Cherenkov photons onto the individual photomultipliers. The read-out electronics of the PMTs is based on the MAD4 amplifier-discriminator chip and the dead-time free high resolution F1-TDC. The 120 ps time resolution of the digital card guarantees negligible background from uncorrelated physical events. In the outer part of the detector, where the particle rates are lower, the present multi-wire proportional chambers (MWPC) with Cesium Iodide photo-cathodes have been upgraded with a new read-out electronic system based on the APV preamplifier and shaper ASIC with analog pipeline and sampling ADCs. The project was fully designed and implemented in the period November 2004 until May 2006. The upgraded detector showed an excellent performance during the 2006 data taking: the number of detected Cherenkov photons per ring was increased from 14 to above 60 at saturation. The time resolution was improved from about 3 microseconds to about one nanosecond which allows an excellent suppression of the background photons from uncorrelated events.

  14. Fast photon detection for particle identification with COMPASS RICH-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbon, P.; Alekseev, M.; Angerer, H.; Apollonio, M.; Birsa, R.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Busso, L.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Colantoni, M. L.; Costa, S.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dafni, T.; Delagnes, E.; Deschamps, H.; Diaz, V.; Dibiase, N.; Duic, V.; Eyrich, W.; Faso, D.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fischer, H.; Gerassimov, S.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Hagemann, R.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F. H.; Horikawa, S.; Joosten, R.; Ketzer, B.; Königsmann, K.; Kolosov, V. N.; Konorov, I.; Kramer, D.; Kunne, F.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Mann, A.; Martin, A.; Menon, G.; Mutter, A.; Nähle, O.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Pagano, P.; Panebianco, S.; Panzieri, D.; Paul, S.; Pesaro, G.; Polak, J.; Rebourgeard, P.; Robinet, F.; Rocco, E.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schröder, W.; Silva, L.; Slunecka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Steiger, L.; Sulc, M.; Svec, M.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Wollny, H.

    2007-10-01

    Particle identification (PID) at high rates is an important challenge for many current and future high-energy physics experiments. The upgrade of the COMPASS RICH-1 detector requires a new technique for Cherenkov photon detection at count rates of several 106 per channel in the central detector region, and a read-out system allowing for trigger rates of up to 100 kHz. To cope with these requirements, the photon detectors in the central region have been replaced with the detection system described in this paper. In the peripheral regions, the existing multi-wire proportional chambers with CsI photocathode are now read out via a new system employing APV pre-amplifiers and flash ADC chips. The new detection system consists of multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMT) and fast read-out electronics based on the MAD4 discriminator and the F1-TDC chip. The RICH-1 is in operation in its upgraded version for the 2006 CERN SPS run. We present the photon detection design, constructive aspects and the first Cherenkov light in the detector.

  15. Photonic crystal waveguides on silicon rich nitride platform.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Kapil; Bucio, Thalia Dominguez; Al-Attili, Abdelrahman; Khokhar, Ali Z; Saito, Shinichi; Gardes, Frederic Y

    2017-02-20

    We demonstrate design, fabrication, and characterization of two-dimensional photonic crystal (PhC) waveguides on a suspended silicon rich nitride (SRN) platform for applications at telecom wavelengths. Simulation results suggest that a 210 nm photonic band gap can be achieved in such PhC structures. We also developed a fabrication process to realize suspended PhC waveguides with a transmission bandwidth of 20 nm for a W1 PhC waveguide and over 70 nm for a W0.7 PhC waveguide. Using the Fabry-Pérot oscillations of the transmission spectrum we estimated a group index of over 110 for W1 PhC waveguides. For a W1 waveguide we estimated a propagation loss of 53 dB/cm for a group index of 37 and for a W0.7 waveguide the lowest propagation was 4.6 dB/cm.

  16. Radiative decays at LHCb

    SciTech Connect

    Giubega, L. E.; Collaboration: LHCb Collaboration

    2016-12-15

    Precise measurements on rare radiative B decays are performed with the LHCb experiment at LHC. The LHCb results regarding the ratio of branching fractions for two radiative decays, B{sup 0} → K{sup *0}γ and B{sub s} → ϕγ, the direct CP asymmetry in B{sup 0} → K{sup *0}γ decay channel and the observation of the photon polarization in the B{sup ±} → K{sup ±}π{sup ∓}π{sup ±}γ decay, are included. The first two measurements were performed in 1 fb{sup –1} of pp collisions data and the third one in 3 fb{sup –1} of data, respectively.

  17. TCPD: A micropattern photon detector hybrid for RICH applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamar, G.; Varga, D.

    2017-03-01

    A micropattern and wire chamber hybrid has been constructed for UV photon detection, and its performance evaluated. It is revealed that such combination retains some key advantages of both the Thick-GEM primary and CCC secondary amplification stages, and results in a high gain gaseous photon detector with outstanding stability. Key features such as MIP suppression, detection efficiency and photon cluster size are discussed. The capability of the detector for UV photon detection has been established and proven with Cherenkov photons in particle beam tests.

  18. Distributed analysis at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mike; Egede, Ulrik; Paterson, Stuart; LHCb Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The distributed analysis experience to date at LHCb has been positive: job success rates are high and wait times for high-priority jobs are low. LHCb users access the grid using the GANGA job-management package, while the LHCb virtual organization manages its resources using the DIRAC package. This clear division of labor has benefitted LHCb and its users greatly; it is a major reason why distributed analysis at LHCb has been so successful. The newly formed LHCb distributed analysis support team has also proved to be a success.

  19. LHCbDirac: distributed computing in LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagni, F.; Charpentier, P.; Graciani, R.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Closier, J.; Mathe, Z.; Ubeda, M.; Zhelezov, A.; Lanciotti, E.; Romanovskiy, V.; Ciba, K. D.; Casajus, A.; Roiser, S.; Sapunov, M.; Remenska, D.; Bernardoff, V.; Santana, R.; Nandakumar, R.

    2012-12-01

    We present LHCbDirac, an extension of the DIRAC community Grid solution that handles LHCb specificities. The DIRAC software has been developed for many years within LHCb only. Nowadays it is a generic software, used by many scientific communities worldwide. Each community wanting to take advantage of DIRAC has to develop an extension, containing all the necessary code for handling their specific cases. LHCbDirac is an actively developed extension, implementing the LHCb computing model and workflows handling all the distributed computing activities of LHCb. Such activities include real data processing (reconstruction, stripping and streaming), Monte-Carlo simulation and data replication. Other activities are groups and user analysis, data management, resources management and monitoring, data provenance, accounting for user and production jobs. LHCbDirac also provides extensions of the DIRAC interfaces, including a secure web client, python APIs and CLIs. Before putting in production a new release, a number of certification tests are run in a dedicated setup. This contribution highlights the versatility of the system, also presenting the experience with real data processing, data and resources management, monitoring for activities and resources.

  20. Calibration of the LHCb calorimetric system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereima, D.

    2017-06-01

    The calorimeter system of LHCb provides information for the hardware Level-0 trigger for selection of events with high transverse energy electrons, hadrons and photons and also participates in offline particle identification and reconstruction. The main instruments and methods developed for monitoring and calibration of electromagnetic and hadron calorimeters are presented.

  1. THGEM-based photon detectors for the upgrade of COMPASS RICH-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, M.; Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O.; Duic, V.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Gregori, M.; Herrmann, F.; Königsmann, K.; Levorato, S.; Maggiora, A.; Martin, A.; Menon, G.; Nerling, F.; Novakova, K.; Novy, J.; Panzieri, D.; Pereira, F. A.; Santos, C. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schopferer, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Steiger, L.; Sulc, M.; Takekawa, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2013-12-01

    New Cherenkov photon detectors are being developed for the upgrade of COMPASS RICH-1. The detectors are based on THGEMs, arranged in a three layer architecture, with a CsI film on the first layer acting as a reflective photocathode. The response of THGEMs with various geometries under different conditions has been studied and photon detector prototypes have been built, tested in laboratory and operated during test beam runs providing a typical gain of 105 and a time resolution of better than 10 ns. A photon detector prototype with 300×300 mm2 active area, operated at the CERN PS T10 test beam in November 2012, has confirmed the validity of this novel technology and has allowed further studies of the detector response.

  2. RICH upgrade: Current status and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistone, A.; LHCb RICH Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is dedicated to precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of B hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva). The second long shutdown of the LHC is currently scheduled to begin in 2018. During this period the LHCb experiment with all its sub-detectors will be upgraded in order to run at an instantaneous luminosity of 2 × 10^{33} cm-2s-1 and to read out data at a rate of 40MHz into a flexible software-based trigger. The Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) system will require new photon detectors and modifications of the optics of the upstream detector. Tests of the prototype of the smallest constituent of the new RICH system have been performed during testbeam sessions at the Test Beam Facility SPS North Area (CERN) in Autumn 2014.

  3. Enhanced optical nonlinearities in CMOS-compatible ultra-silicon-rich nitride photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, E.; Ooi, K. J. A.; Chen, G. F. R.; Ng, D. K. T.; Png, C. E.; Tan, D. T. H.

    2017-09-01

    We present the design, fabrication, and characterization of photonic crystal waveguides (PhCWs) on an ultra-silicon-rich nitride (USRN) platform, with the goal of augmenting the optical nonlinearities. The design goals are to achieve an optimized group index curve on the PhCW band edge with a non-membrane PhCW with symmetric SiO2 undercladding and overcladding, so as to maintain back-end CMOS compatibility and better structural robustness. Linear optical characterization, as well as nonlinear optical characterization of PhCWs on ultra-silicon-rich nitride is performed at the telecommunication wavelengths. USRN's negligible two-photon absorption and free carrier losses at the telecommunication wavelengths ensure that there is no scaling of two-photon related losses with the group index, thus maintaining a high nonlinear efficiency. Self-phase modulation experiments are performed using a 96.6 μm PhCW. A 1.5π phase shift is achieved with an input peak power of 2.5 W implying an effective nonlinear parameter of 1.97 × 104 (W m)-1. This nonlinear parameter represents a 49× enhancement in the nonlinear parameter from the slow light effect, in good agreement with expected scaling from the measured group index.

  4. The LHCb Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsson, Richard

    2013-11-01

    With the demonstration that LHCb can successfully perform forward precision measurements with event pileup, the operation and trigger strategy evolved significantly during the LHC Run 1 allowing LHCb to collect over 3fb-1 at centre-of-mass energies of 7TeV and 8TeV. Increased bandwidth opened the door for LHCb to extend the physics program. The additional statistics and well managed systematic effects together with the stable trigger and data taking conditions have led to a very large number of world-class measurements and dominance in heavy flavour physics [1], in addition to a reputation of an excellent forward general purpose detector at the LHC. Long Shutdown (LS) 1 (2013-2014) will allow LHCb to fully explore the large statistics collected and prepare LHCb for Run 2 (2015 - 2017). However, even after an additional expected integrated luminosity of 5-6 fb-1 in Run 2, many of the LHCb precision measurements will remain limited by statistics, and some exploratory physics modes will not even be accessible yet. With the need for reconstructing the event topology in order to efficiently trigger on the beauty and the charm hadrons decays, the current 1 MHz readout limit is the main bottle neck to run at higher luminosity and with higher trigger efficiencies. LHCb will therefore undergo a major upgrade in LS 2 ( 2018 - 2019) aimed at collecting an order of magnitude more data by 2028. The upgrade consists of a full readout at the LHC bunch crossing rate ( 40 MHz) with the ultimate flexibility of only a software trigger. In order to increase the instantaneous luminosity up to 2x1033cm-2s-1, several sub-detector upgrades are also underway to cope with the higher occupancies and radiation dose.

  5. The LHCb Silicon Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Mark

    2016-09-01

    The LHCb experiment is dedicated to the study of heavy flavour physics at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The primary goal of the experiment is to search for indirect evidence of new physics via measurements of CP violation and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. The LHCb detector has a large-area silicon micro-strip detector located upstream of a dipole magnet, and three tracking stations with silicon micro-strip detectors in the innermost region downstream of the magnet. These two sub-detectors form the LHCb Silicon Tracker (ST). This paper gives an overview of the performance and operation of the ST during LHC Run 1. Measurements of the observed radiation damage are shown and compared to the expectation from simulation.

  6. MPGD-based counters of single photons developed for COMPASS RICH-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, M.; Birsa, R.; Bodlak, M.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O.; Duic, V.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fischer, H.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Gregori, M.; Herrmann, F.; Königsmann, K.; Levorato, S.; Maggiora, A.; Martin, A.; Menon, G.; Novakova, K.; Novy, J.; Panzieri, D.; Pereira, F. A.; Santos, C. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schopferer, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Steiger, L.; Sulc, M.; Tessarotto, F.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2014-09-01

    In fundamental research, gas detectors of single photons are a must in the field of Cherenkov imaging techniques (RICH counters) for particle identification in large momentum ranges and with wide coverage of the phase space domain. These counters, already extensively used, are foreseen in the setups of future experiments in a large variety of fields in nuclear and particle physics. The quest of novel gaseous photon detector is dictated by the fact that the present generation of detectors has unique characteristics concerning operation in magnetic field, low material budget and cost, but it suffers of severe limitations in effective efficiency, rates, life time and stability, discouraging their use in high precision and high rate experiments. We are developing large size THick GEM (THGEM)-based detector of single photons. The R&D program includes the complete characterization of the THGEM electron multipliers, the study of the aspects related to the detection of single photons and the engineering towards large size detector prototype. Our most recent achievements include: dedicated studies concerning the ion back-flow to the photo-cathode; relevant progress in the engineering aspects, in particular related to the production of large-size THGEMs, where the strict correlation between the local gain-value and the local thickness-value has been demonstrated the operation of a 300 mm × 300 mm2 active area detector at the CERN PS T10 test beam; the introduction of a new hybrid detector architecture offering promising indication, which is formed by a THGEM layer which acts as CsI support and pre-amplification device followed by a MICROMEGAS multiplication stage. The general status of the R&D program and the recent progress are reported

  7. The LHCb Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piucci, Alessio

    2017-07-01

    During the LHC Run 1 the LHCb experiment has successfully performed a large number of high precision measurements in heavy flavour physics using 3 fb-1 of data collected at centre-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV. In LHC Run 2 the LHCb is expected to integrate an additional 5 fb-1 data, however many of the measurements will remain limited by statistics. For this reason LHCb will undergo in 2020 a major upgrade during the Long Shutdown 2 of LHC, with the aim to collect 50 fb-1 of data by 2028. To achieve this goal the LHCb detector readout rate will be upgraded from the current 1 MHz to the LHC bunch crossing rate of 40 MHz. The luminosity delivered to the experiment will increase by a factor five, up to 2 ṡ 1033 cm-2 s-1. The online selection of events will be uniquely performed by a pure software trigger, improving the trigger efficiencies. In order to sustain the increased luminosity and readout rate, all the sub-detectors will be upgraded. The architecture of the upgraded DAQ system and trigger strategy will be presented, as well an overview of the sub-detector upgrades.

  8. The LHCb Turbo stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puig, A.

    2016-07-01

    The LHCb experiment will record an unprecedented dataset of beauty and charm hadron decays during Run II of the LHC, set to take place between 2015 and 2018. A key computing challenge is to store and process this data, which limits the maximum output rate of the LHCb trigger. So far, LHCb has written out a few kHz of events containing the full raw sub-detector data, which are passed through a full offline event reconstruction before being considered for physics analysis. Charm physics in particular is limited by trigger output rate constraints. A new streaming strategy includes the possibility to perform the physics analysis with candidates reconstructed in the trigger, thus bypassing the offline reconstruction. In the Turbo stream the trigger will write out a compact summary of physics objects containing all information necessary for analyses. This will allow an increased output rate and thus higher average efficiencies and smaller selection biases. This idea will be commissioned and developed during 2015 with a selection of physics analyses. It is anticipated that the turbo stream will be adopted by an increasing number of analyses during the remainder of LHC Run II (2015-2018) and ultimately in Run III (starting in 2020) with the upgraded LHCb detector.

  9. Electroweak penguins at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jibo; LHCb Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Electroweak penguin decays are flavour-changing neutral current processes, and are highly suppressed in the Standard Model. They can only proceed via loop diagrams. Such decays may receive contributions from New Physics and change their decay behaviours like decay rate and angular distribution. Studying the properties of these decays thus provides a powerful method to probe for New Physics. In this contribution the most recent LHCb results on electroweak penguin decays are reported.

  10. Charmonia Production at Lhcb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonov, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    In this article we present a short review on measurements of charmonia production at the LHCb experiment carried out during 2010, 2011 and 2012 data taking periods. The review covers the production of J/ψ, ψ(2S), χc, J/ψJ/ψ, as well as J/ψ in association with open charm. We also review the measurement of J/ψ polarization. The results are compared to theoretical predictions.

  11. LHCb calorimeters high voltage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilitsky, Yu.; Golutvin, A.; Konoplyannikov, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Perret, P.; Schopper, A.; Soldatov, M.; Yakimchuk, V.

    2007-02-01

    The calorimeter system in LHCb aims to identify electrons, photons and hadrons. All calorimeters are equipped with Hamamatsu photo tubes as devices for light to signal conversion. Eight thousand R7899-20 tubes are used for electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters and two hundred 64 channels multi-anode R7600-00-M64 for Scintillator-Pad/Preshower detectors. The calorimeter high voltage (HV) system is based on a Cockroft Walton (CW) voltage converter and a control board connected to the Experiment Control System (ECS) by serial bus. The base of each photomultiplier tube (PMT) is built with a high voltage converter and constructed on an individual printed circuit board, using compact surface mount components. The base is attached directly to the PMT. There are no HV cables in the system. A Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is used on the control board as an interface between the ECS and the 200 control channels. The FPGA includes also additional functionalities allowing automated monitoring and ramp up of the high voltage values. This paper describes the HV system architecture, some technical details of the electronics implementation and summarizes the system performance. This safe and low power consumption HV electronic system for the photomultiplier tubes can be used for various biomedical apparatus too.

  12. Comparison of yields of neutron-rich nuclei in proton- and photon-induced 238U fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, F. A.; Bhowmick, Debasis; Basu, D. N.; Farooq, M.; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2016-11-01

    A comparative study of fission of actinides, especially 238U, by proton and bremsstrahlung photon is performed. The relative mass distribution of 238U fission fragments has been explored theoretically for both proton- and photon-induced fission. The integrated yield along with charge distribution of the products are calculated to find the neutron richness in comparison with the nuclei produced by the r process in nucleosynthesis. Some r -process nuclei in the intermediate-mass range for symmetric fission mode are found to be produced almost two orders of magnitude more for proton-induced fission than for photofission, although the rest of the neutron-rich nuclei in the asymmetric mode are produced in comparable proportion for both processes.

  13. LHCb Topological Trigger Reoptimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Ilten, Philip; Khairullin, Egor; Rogozhnikov, Alex; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Williams, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The main b-physics trigger algorithm used by the LHCb experiment is the so- called topological trigger. The topological trigger selects vertices which are a) detached from the primary proton-proton collision and b) compatible with coming from the decay of a b-hadron. In the LHC Run 1, this trigger, which utilized a custom boosted decision tree algorithm, selected a nearly 100% pure sample of b-hadrons with a typical efficiency of 60-70%; its output was used in about 60% of LHCb papers. This talk presents studies carried out to optimize the topological trigger for LHC Run 2. In particular, we have carried out a detailed comparison of various machine learning classifier algorithms, e.g., AdaBoost, MatrixNet and neural networks. The topological trigger algorithm is designed to select all ’interesting” decays of b-hadrons, but cannot be trained on every such decay. Studies have therefore been performed to determine how to optimize the performance of the classification algorithm on decays not used in the training. Methods studied include cascading, ensembling and blending techniques. Furthermore, novel boosting techniques have been implemented that will help reduce systematic uncertainties in Run 2 measurements. We demonstrate that the reoptimized topological trigger is expected to significantly improve on the Run 1 performance for a wide range of b-hadron decays.

  14. LHCb experience with LFC replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifazi, F.; Carbone, A.; Perez, E. D.; D'Apice, A.; dell'Agnello, L.; Duellmann, D.; Girone, M.; Re, G. L.; Martelli, B.; Peco, G.; Ricci, P. P.; Sapunenko, V.; Vagnoni, V.; Vitlacil, D.

    2008-07-01

    Database replication is a key topic in the framework of the LHC Computing Grid to allow processing of data in a distributed environment. In particular, the LHCb computing model relies on the LHC File Catalog, i.e. a database which stores information about files spread across the GRID, their logical names and the physical locations of all the replicas. The LHCb computing model requires the LFC to be replicated at Tier-1s. The LCG 3D project deals with the database replication issue and provides a replication service based on Oracle Streams technology. This paper describes the deployment of the LHC File Catalog replication to the INFN National Center for Telematics and Informatics (CNAF) and to other LHCb Tier-1 sites. We performed stress tests designed to evaluate any delay in the propagation of the streams and the scalability of the system. The tests show the robustness of the replica implementation with performance going much beyond the LHCb requirements.

  15. LHCb Tag Collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuente Fernández, Paloma; Clemencic, Marco; Cousin, Nicolas; LHCb Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The LHCb physics software consists of hundreds of packages, each of which is developed by one or more physicists. When the developers have some code changes that they would like released, they commit them to the version control system, and enter the revision number into a database. These changes have to be integrated into a new release of each of the physics analysis applications. Tests are then performed by a nightly build system, which rebuilds various configurations of the whole software stack and executes a suite of run-time functionality tests. A Tag Collector system has been developed using solid standard technologies to cover both the use cases of developers and integration managers. A simple Web interface, based on an AJAX-like technology, is available. Integration with SVN and Nightly Build System, is possible via a Python API. Data are stored in a relational database with the help of an ORM (Object-Relational Mapping) library.

  16. LHCb VELO upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessy, Karol

    2017-02-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, scheduled for LHC Run-III, scheduled to start in 2021, will transform the experiment to a trigger-less system reading out the full detector at 40 MHz event rate. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm enabling the detector to run at luminosities of 2×1033 cm-2 s-1. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon vertex detector surrounding the interaction region. The current detector will be replaced with a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at 40 MHz. The upgraded VELO will provide fast pattern recognition and track reconstruction to the software trigger. The silicon pixel sensors have 55×55 μm2 pitch, and are read out by the VeloPix ASIC, from the Timepix/Medipix family. The hottest region will have pixel hit rates of 900 Mhits/s yielding a total data rate of more than 3 Tbit/s for the upgraded VELO. The detector modules are located in a separate vacuum, separated from the beam vacuum by a thin custom made foil. The foil will be manufactured through milling and possibly thinned further by chemical etching. The material budget will be minimised by the use of evaporative CO2 coolant circulating in microchannels within 400 μm thick silicon substrates. The current status of the VELO upgrade is described and latest results from operation of irradiated sensor assemblies are presented.

  17. The LHCb VELO upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosil Suárez, Álvaro

    2016-07-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, planned for 2019, will transform the experiment to a trigger-less system reading out the full detector at 40 MHz event rate. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm. The upgraded detector will run at luminosities of 2×1033 cm-2 s-1 and probe physics beyond the Standard Model in the heavy flavour sector with unprecedented precision. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon vertex detector surrounding the interaction region. The current detector will be replaced with a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at 40 MHz. The detector comprises silicon pixel sensors with 55×55 μm2 pitch, read out by the VeloPix ASIC, based on the TimePix/MediPix family. The hottest region will have pixel hit rates of 900 Mhits/s yielding a total data rate more than 3 Tbit/s for the upgraded VELO. The detector modules are located in a separate vacuum, separated from the beam vacuum by a thin custom made foil. The detector halves are retracted when the beams are injected and closed at stable beams, positioning the first sensitive pixel at 5.1 mm from the beams. The material budget will be minimised by the use of evaporative CO2 coolant circulating in microchannels within 400 μm thick silicon substrates.

  18. First results with charmless two-body B-decays at LHCb, and future prospects

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    LHCb is an experiment which is designed to perform flavour physics measurements at the LHC. Charged two-body charmless B decays (e.g. B^0 -> Kpi, pipi, B_s->KK, etc) receive significant contributions from loop diagrams and are thus sensitive probes of New Physics. Study of these modes is therefore an important physics goal of LHCb. First results will be presented, using around 37 pb^{-1} of data collected at \\sqrt{s}=7 TeV in 2010. These results illustrate the power of the LHCb trigger system and particle identification capabilities of the RICH detectors in isolating clean samples of each final state, and include preliminary measurements of direct CP-violation in certain key modes. The prospects for these measurements in the coming run will be presented. A brief survey will also be given of results and prospect in other areas of the LHCb physics programme.

  19. First results with charmless two-body B-decays at LHCb, and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-22

    LHCb is an experiment which is designed to perform flavour physics measurements at the LHC. Charged two-body charmless B decays (e.g. B^0 -> Kpi, pipi, B_s->KK, etc) receive significant contributions from loop diagrams and are thus sensitive probes of New Physics. Study of these modes is therefore an important physics goal of LHCb. First results will be presented, using around 37 pb^{-1} of data collected at \\sqrt{s}=7 TeV in 2010. These results illustrate the power of the LHCb trigger system and particle identification capabilities of the RICH detectors in isolating clean samples of each final state, and include preliminary measurements of direct CP-violation in certain key modes. The prospects for these measurements in the coming run will be presented. A brief survey will also be given of results and prospect in other areas of the LHCb physics programme.

  20. Fast readout of the COMPASS RICH CsI-MWPC photon chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbon, P.; Delagnes, E.; Deschamps, H.; Kunne, F.; Gerasimov, S.; Ketzer, B.; Konorov, I.; Kravtchuk, N.; Magnon, A.; Neyret, D.; Panebianco, S.; Paul, S.; Rebourgeard, P.; Tessaroto, F.

    2006-11-01

    A new readout system for CsI-coated MWPCs, used in the COMPASS RICH detector, has been proposed and tested in nominal high-rate conditions. It is based on the APV25-S1 analog sampling chip, and will replace the Gassiplex chip readout used up to now. The APV chip, originally designed for silicon microstrip detectors, is shown to perform well even with "slow" signals from a MWPC, keeping a signal-to-noise ratio of 9. For every trigger the system reads three consecutive in-time samples, thus allowing to extract information on the signal shape and its timing. The effective time window is reduced from ˜3 μs for the Gassiplex to below 400 ns for the APV25-S1 chip, reducing pile-up events at high particle rate. A significant improvement of the signal-to-background ratio by a factor 5-6 with respect to the original readout has been measured in the central region of the RICH detector. Due to its pipelined architecture, the new readout system also considerably reduces the dead time per event, allowing efficient data taking at higher trigger rate.

  1. TORCH - Cherenkov and Time-of-Flight PID Detector for the LHCb Upgrade at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Föhl, K.; Brook, N.; Castillo García, L.; Conneely, T.; Cussans, D.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Milnes, J.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros Garcì a, A.; van Dijk, M.

    2016-05-01

    TORCH is a large-area precision time-of-flight detector, based on Cherenkov light production and propagation in a quartz radiator plate, which is read out at its edges. TORCH is proposed for the LHCb experiment at CERN to provide positive particle identification for kaons, and is currently in the Research-and-Development phase. A brief overview of the micro-channel plate photon sensor development, the custom-made electronics, and an introduction to the current test beam activities is given. Optical readout solutions are presented for the potential use of BaBar DIRC bar boxes as part of the TORCH configuration in LHCb.

  2. LHCb Upgrade: Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Mark; LHCb Upgrade Scintillating Fibre Tracker Group

    2016-07-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres and a custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The evolution of the design since the Technical Design Report in 2014 and the latest R & D results are presented.

  3. A Review of Recent Results on Quarkonium Production at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe Altarelli, Monica

    2014-04-01

    A selection of LHCb results is presented on the production of heavy quarkonium states in pp collisions, including results on J/ψ and ϓ production at √s = 8 TeV, the measurement of prompt J/ψ polarisation, the production of χc mesons from converted photons, exclusive charmonium production, double J/ψ production, as well as recent results on J/ψ production in proton-lead collisions at √sNN = 5 TeV.

  4. DIRAC3 - the new generation of the LHCb grid software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Brook, N.; Casajus Ramo, A.; Charpentier, Ph; Closier, J.; Cowan, G.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Lanciotti, E.; Mathe, Z.; Nandakumar, R.; Paterson, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Santinelli, R.; Sapunov, M.; Smith, A. C.; Seco Miguelez, M.; Zhelezov, A.

    2010-04-01

    DIRAC, the LHCb community Grid solution, was considerably reengineered in order to meet all the requirements for processing the data coming from the LHCb experiment. It is covering all the tasks starting with raw data transportation from the experiment area to the grid storage, data processing up to the final user analysis. The reengineered DIRAC3 version of the system includes a fully grid security compliant framework for building service oriented distributed systems; complete Pilot Job framework for creating efficient workload management systems; several subsystems to manage high level operations like data production and distribution management. The user interfaces of the DIRAC3 system providing rich command line and scripting tools are complemented by a full-featured Web portal providing users with a secure access to all the details of the system status and ongoing activities. We will present an overview of the DIRAC3 architecture, new innovative features and the achieved performance. Extending DIRAC3 to manage computing resources beyond the WLCG grid will be discussed. Experience with using DIRAC3 by other user communities than LHCb and in other application domains than High Energy Physics will be shown to demonstrate the general-purpose nature of the system.

  5. Highlights from the LHCb ion physics program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelling, Michael; LHCb collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Following the successful participation of LHCb in the 2013 proton-lead run of the LHC, in 2015 the collaboration decided to further extend its physics program to study also lead-lead collisions and fixed target interactions. These proceedings discuss the physics reach of the detector and the first results from the LHCb ion physics and fixed target program.

  6. Pentaquarks and Tetraquarks at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, S.

    Exotic resonant structures found in $\\Lambda^0_b$ and $\\overline{B}^0$ decays into charmonium in the LHCb experiment are discussed. Examination of the $J/\\psi p$ system in $\\Lambda^0_b\\to J/\\psi K^- p$ decays shows two states each of which must be composed of $uudc\\overline{c}$ quarks, and thus are called charmonium pentaquarks. Their masses are $4380\\pm 8\\pm 29$~MeV and $4449.8\\pm 1.7\\pm 2.5$~MeV, and their corresponding widths ($\\Gamma$) are $205\\pm 18\\pm 86$ MeV, and $39\\pm 5\\pm 19$ MeV. The preferred $J^P$ assignments are of opposite parity, with one state having spin 3/2 and the other 5/2. Models of internal binding of the pentaquark states are discussed. Finally, another mesonic state is discussed, the $Z(4430)^-$ that decays into $\\psi' \\pi^-$ and was first observed by the Belle collaboration in $B^0\\to \\psi' K^+\\pi^-$ decays. Using a sample of approximately 25,000 signal events, LHCb determines the $J^{P}$ to be $1^{+}$.

  7. Prospects for the search of at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucio Martinez, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    The sensitivity of the LHCb experiment to is analyzed in light of the 2011, 2012 and 2016 data and the oportunity of having a full software trigger with the LHCb upgrade. Two strategies are considered: the full reconstruction of the decay products and the partial reconstruction using only the dilepton pair and kinematic constraints. In both cases, the sensitivity achieved can surpass the world's current best measurement. Both approaches could be statistically combined to further improve the result.

  8. Heavy Flavour and Quarkonia production at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Katharina; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    The LHCb detector, with its excellent momentum resolution and flexible trigger strategy, is ideally suited for measuring heavy quark and quarkonia production properties. Recent LHCb measurements of inclusive and differential cross-sections of the production of J/ψ and ϒ resonances, as well as charm, bottom and top quarks, in pp collisions at different centre-of-mass energies are presented. Finally, results on the associated production of ϒ and open charm hadrons and the exclusive production of charmonium are discussed.

  9. DIRAC: reliable data management for LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. C.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.

    2008-07-01

    DIRAC, LHCb's Grid Workload and Data Management System, utilizes WLCG resources and middleware components to perform distributed computing tasks satisfying LHCb's Computing Model. The Data Management System (DMS) handles data transfer and data access within LHCb. Its scope ranges from the output of the LHCb Online system to Grid-enabled storage for all data types. It supports metadata for these files in replica and bookkeeping catalogues, allowing dataset selection and localization. The DMS controls the movement of files in a redundant fashion whilst providing utilities for accessing all metadata. To do these tasks effectively the DMS requires complete self integrity between its components and external physical storage. The DMS provides highly redundant management of all LHCb data to leverage available storage resources and to manage transient errors in underlying services. It provides data driven and reliable distribution of files as well as reliable job output upload, utilizing VO Boxes at LHCb Tier1 sites to prevent data loss. This paper presents several examples of mechanisms implemented in the DMS to increase reliability, availability and integrity, highlighting successful design choices and limitations discovered.

  10. The LHCb trigger and its upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziurda, A.

    2016-07-01

    The current LHCb trigger system consists of a hardware level, which reduces the LHC inelastic collision rate of 30 MHz, at which the entire detector is read out. In a second level, implemented in a farm of 20 k parallel-processing CPUs, the event rate is reduced to about 5 kHz. We review the performance of the LHCb trigger system during Run I of the LHC. Special attention is given to the use of multivariate analyses in the High Level Trigger. The major bottleneck for hadronic decays is the hardware trigger. LHCb plans a major upgrade of the detector and DAQ system in the LHC shutdown of 2018, enabling a purely software based trigger to process the full 30 MHz of inelastic collisions delivered by the LHC. We demonstrate that the planned architecture will be able to meet this challenge.

  11. Implications of LHCb measurements and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharucha, A.; Bigi, I. I.; Bobeth, C.; Bobrowski, M.; Brod, J.; Buras, A. J.; Davies, C. T. H.; Datta, A.; Delaunay, C.; Descotes-Genon, S.; Ellis, J.; Feldmann, T.; Fleischer, R.; Gedalia, O.; Girrbach, J.; Guadagnoli, D.; Hiller, G.; Hochberg, Y.; Hurth, T.; Isidori, G.; Jäger, S.; Jung, M.; Kagan, A.; Kamenik, J. F.; Lenz, A.; Ligeti, Z.; London, D.; Mahmoudi, F.; Matias, J.; Nandi, S.; Nir, Y.; Paradisi, P.; Perez, G.; Petrov, A. A.; Rattazzi, R.; Sharpe, S. R.; Silvestrini, L.; Soni, A.; Straub, D. M.; van Dyk, D.; Virto, J.; Wang, Y.-M.; Weiler, A.; Zupan, J.; Aaij, R.; Abellan Beteta, C.; Adametz, A.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Anelli, M.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Band, H.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bates, A.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bediaga, I.; Beigbeder-Beau, C.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benayoun, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernard, F.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; van Beveren, V.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blanks, C.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bobrov, A.; Bocci, V.; Bochin, B.; Boer Rookhuizen, H.; Bogdanova, G.; Bonaccorsi, E.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Brarda, L.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Büchler-Germann, A.; Burducea, I.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cacérès, T.; Cachemiche, J.-P.; Cadeddu, S.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casajus Ramo, A.; Casse, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Ceelie, L.; Chadaj, B.; Chanal, H.; Charles, M.; Charlet, D.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chebbi, M.; Chen, P.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciambrone, P.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Corajod, B.; Corti, G.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; D'Antone, I.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Groen, P.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Decreuse, G.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Buono, L.; Deplano, C.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dickens, J.; Dijkstra, H.; Diniz Batista, P.; Dogaru, M.; Domingo Bonal, F.; Domke, M.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Drancourt, C.; Duarte, O.; Dumps, R.; Dupertuis, F.; Duval, P.-Y.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisenhardt, S.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Elsby, D.; Evangelisti, F.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Fardell, G.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Fave, V.; Felici, G.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Föhr, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Fournier, C.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frei, R.; Frosini, M.; Fuchs, H.; Furcas, S.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garosi, P.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Gets, S.; Ghez, Ph.; Giachero, A.; Gibson, V.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golovtsov, V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gong, G.; Gong, H.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Gromov, V.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Guzik, Z.; Gys, T.; Hachon, F.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; van der Heijden, B.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hicks, E.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hofmann, W.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, P.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Ilten, P.; Imong, J.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jamet, O.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Jansen, L.; Jansweijer, P.; Jaton, P.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Karavichev, O.; Karbach, T. M.; Kashchuk, A.; Kechadi, T.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kerzel, U.; Ketel, T.; Keune, A.; Khanji, B.; Kihm, T.; Kluit, R.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, V.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kos, J.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Kristic, R.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudenko, Y.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Landi, L.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Laptev, S.; Latham, T.; Lax, I.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Likhoded, A.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; von Loeben, J.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Luisier, J.; Luo, H.; Mac Raighne, A.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maino, M.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mangiafave, N.; Marconi, U.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matveev, M.; Maurice, E.; Mauricio, J.; Mazurov, A.; McCarthy, J.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meissner, M.; Mejia, H.; Mendez-Munoz, V.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morawski, P.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Mul, F.; Müller, K.; Munneke, B.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Nawrot, A.; Needham, M.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nikolaiko, Y.; Nisar, S.; Nomerotski, A.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Orlandea, M.; Ostankov, A.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; van Overbeek, M.; Owen, P.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrick, G. N.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perego, D. L.; Perez Trigo, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pessina, G.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; van Petten, O.; Phan, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Piedigrossi, D.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pugatch, M.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Qian, W.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Rethore, F.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roeland, E.; Rogers, G. J.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; de Roo, K.; Rouvinet, J.; Roy, L.; Rudloff, K.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salzmann, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Saornil Gamarra, S.; Sapunov, M.; Saputi, A.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savidge, T.; Savrie, M.; Schaack, P.; Schiller, M.; Schimmel, A.; Schindler, H.; Schleich, S.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schneider, T.; Schopper, A.; Schuijlenburg, H.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shao, B.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shatalov, P.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Sigurdsson, S.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Slater, M. W.; Sluijk, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, M.; Sobczak, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Squerzanti, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Subbiah, V. K.; Swientek, S.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; Tikhonov, A.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tocut, V.; Tolk, S.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ullaland, O.; Urner, D.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vink, W.; Volkov, S.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; Vouters, G.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, R.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Warda, K.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Wenerke, P.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wishahi, J.; Witek, M.; Witzeling, W.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xue, T.; Yang, Z.; Young, R.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zappon, F.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zeng, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zverev, E.; Zvyagin, A.; Zwart, A.

    2013-04-01

    During 2011 the LHCb experiment at CERN collected 1.0 fb-1 of √{s} = 7 TeV pp collisions. Due to the large heavy quark production cross-sections, these data provide unprecedented samples of heavy flavoured hadrons. The first results from LHCb have made a significant impact on the flavour physics landscape and have definitively proved the concept of a dedicated experiment in the forward region at a hadron collider. This document discusses the implications of these first measurements on classes of extensions to the Standard Model, bearing in mind the interplay with the results of searches for on-shell production of new particles at ATLAS and CMS. The physics potential of an upgrade to the LHCb detector, which would allow an order of magnitude more data to be collected, is emphasised.

  12. CLARO-CMOS: a fast, low power and radiation-hard front-end ASIC for single-photon counting in 0.35 micron CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreotti, M.; Baldini, W.; Calabrese, R.; Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Fiorini, M.; Giachero, A.; Gotti, C.; Luppi, E.; Maino, M.; Malaguti, R.; Pessina, G.; Tomassetti, L.

    2015-01-01

    The CLARO-CMOS is a prototype ASIC designed for fast photon counting with multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (MaPMT). The CLARO features a 5 ns peaking time, a recovery time to baseline smaller than 25 ns, and a power consumption of less than 1 mW per channel. The chip was designed in 0.35 μm CMOS technology, and was tested for radiation hardness with neutrons up to 1014 1 MeV neq/cm2, X-rays up to 40 kGy and protons up to 76 kGy. Its capability to read out single photons at high rate from a Hamamatsu R11265 MaPMT, the baseline photon detector for the LHCb RICH upgrade, was demonstrated both with test bench measurements and with actual signals from a R11265 MaPMT. The presented results allowed CLARO to be chosen as the front-end readout chip in the upgraded LHCb RICH detector.

  13. LHCb Physics and 2010-11 prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Perazzini, Stefano

    2011-10-24

    LHCb is one of the four major experiments operating at the Large Hadron Collider, and is specifically dedicated to the measurement of CP-violation and rare decays in the beauty and charm quark sectors. By employing data from early LHC runs it is possible to assess the performance of the detector and to better understand the potential of the LHCb flavour programme. After a brief introduction of the motivations and of the relevant physics goals, the prospects about key CP-violation and rare decay measurements will be presented. Emphasis will be given to those topics where results with particular sensitivity to New Physics are expected during the 2010-11 run.

  14. A New Nightly Build System for LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemencic, M.; Couturier, B.

    2014-06-01

    The nightly build system used so far by LHCb has been implemented as an extension of the system developed by CERN PH/SFT group (as presented at CHEP2010). Although this version has been working for many years, it has several limitations in terms of extensibility, management and ease of use, so that it was decided to develop a new version based on a continuous integration system. In this paper we describe a new implementation of the LHCb Nightly Build System based on the open source continuous integration system Jenkins and report on the experience of configuring a complex build workflow in Jenkins.

  15. Forward physics with the LHCb experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Collaboration: LHCb Collaboration

    2013-04-15

    Due to its unique pseudorapidity coverage and the ability to perform measurements at low transverse momenta p{sub T}, the LHCb detector allows a unique insight into particle production in the forward region at the LHC. Using large samples of proton-proton collision data accumulated at {radical}(s) = 7TeV, the LHCb collaboration has performed a series of dedicated analyses providing important input to the knowledge of the parton density functions, underlying event activity, low Bjorken-x QCD dynamics and exclusive processes. Some of these are briefly summarised here.

  16. Multi-mode interference revealed by two photon absorption in silicon rich SiO{sub 2} waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Manna, S. E-mail: mattia.mancinelli@unitn.it; Ramiro-Manzano, F.; Mancinelli, M. E-mail: mattia.mancinelli@unitn.it; Turri, F.; Pavesi, L.; Ghulinyan, M.; Pucker, G.

    2015-02-16

    Photoluminescence (PL) from Si nanocrystals (NCs) excited by two-photon absorption (TPA) has been observed in Si nanocrystal-based waveguides fabricated by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The TPA excited photoluminescence emission resembles the one-photon excited photoluminescence arising from inter-band transitions in the quantum confined Si nanocrystals. By measuring the non-linear transmission of waveguides, a large TPA coefficient of β up to 10{sup −8 }cm/W has been measured at 1550 nm. These values of β depend on the Si NCs size and are two orders of magnitude larger than the bulk silicon value. Here, we propose to use the TPA excited visible PL emission as a tool to map the spatial intensity profile of the 1550 nm propagating optical modes in multimode waveguides. In this way, multimode interference has been revealed experimentally and confirmed through a finite element simulation.

  17. Non-thermal gamma-ray emission from delayed pair breakdown in a magnetized and photon-rich outflow

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Ramandeep; Thompson, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    We consider delayed, volumetric heating in a magnetized outflow that has broken out of a confining medium and expanded to a high Lorentz factor (Γ ∼ 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3}) and low optical depth to scattering (τ {sub T} ∼ 10{sup –3}-10{sup –2}). The energy flux at breakout is dominated by the magnetic field, with a modest contribution from quasi-thermal gamma rays whose spectrum was calculated in Paper I. We focus on the case of extreme baryon depletion in the magnetized material, but allow for a separate baryonic component that is entrained from a confining medium. Dissipation is driven by relativistic motion between these two components, which develops once the photon compactness drops below 4 × 10{sup 3}(Y{sub e} /0.5){sup –1}. We first calculate the acceleration of the magnetized component following breakout, showing that embedded MHD turbulence provides significant inertia, the neglect of which leads to unrealistically high estimates of flow Lorentz factor. After reheating begins, the pair and photon distributions are evolved self-consistently using a one-zone kinetic code that incorporates an exact treatment of Compton scattering, pair production and annihilation, and Coulomb scattering. Heating leads to a surge in pair creation, and the scattering depth saturates at τ {sub T} ∼ 1-4. The plasma maintains a very low ratio of particle to magnetic pressure, and can support strong anisotropy in the charged particle distribution, with cooling dominated by Compton scattering. High-energy power-law spectra with photon indices in the range observed in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs; –3 < β < –3/2) are obtained by varying the ratio of heat input to the seed energy in quasi-thermal photons. We contrast our results with those for continuous heating across an expanding photosphere, and show that the latter model produces soft-to-hard evolution that is inconsistent with observations of GRBs.

  18. The LHCb Detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LHCb Collaboration; Alves, A. Augusto, Jr.; Filho, L. M. Andrade; Barbosa, A. F.; Bediaga, I.; Cernicchiaro, G.; Guerrer, G.; Lima, H. P., Jr.; Machado, A. A.; Magnin, J.; Marujo, F.; de Miranda, J. M.; Reis, A.; Santos, A.; Toledo, A.; Akiba, K.; Amato, S.; de Paula, B.; de Paula, L.; da Silva, T.; Gandelman, M.; Lopes, J. H.; Maréchal, B.; Moraes, D.; Polycarpo, E.; Rodrigues, F.; Ballansat, J.; Bastian, Y.; Boget, D.; DeBonis, I.; Coco, V.; David, P. Y.; Decamp, D.; Delebecque, P.; Drancourt, C.; Dumont-Dayot, N.; Girard, C.; Lieunard, B.; Minard, M. N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Rambure, T.; Rospabe, G.; T'Jampens, S.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bohner, G.; Bonnefoy, R.; Borras, D.; Carloganu, C.; Chanal, H.; Conte, E.; Cornat, R.; Crouau, M.; Delage, E.; Deschamps, O.; Henrard, P.; Jacquet, P.; Lacan, C.; Laubser, J.; Lecoq, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Magne, M.; Martemiyanov, M.; Mercier, M.-L.; Monteil, S.; Niess, V.; Perret, P.; Reinmuth, G.; Robert, A.; Suchorski, S.; Arnaud, K.; Aslanides, E.; Babel, J.; Benchouk, C.; Cachemiche, J.-P.; Cogan, J.; Derue, F.; Dinkespiler, B.; Duval, P.-Y.; Garonne, V.; Favard, S.; LeGac, R.; Leon, F.; Leroy, O.; Liotard, P.-L.; Marin, F.; Menouni, M.; Ollive, P.; Poss, S.; Roche, A.; Sapunov, M.; Tocco, L.; Viaud, B.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Amhis, Y.; Barrand, G.; Barsuk, S.; Beigbeder, C.; Beneyton, R.; Breton, D.; Callot, O.; Charlet, D.; D'Almagne, B.; Duarte, O.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jean-Marie, B.; Lefrancois, J.; Machefert, F.; Robbe, P.; Schune, M.-H.; Tocut, V.; Videau, I.; Benayoun, M.; David, P.; DelBuono, L.; Gilles, G.; Domke, M.; Futterschneider, H.; Ilgner, Ch; Kapusta, P.; Kolander, M.; Krause, R.; Lieng, M.; Nedos, M.; Rudloff, K.; Schleich, S.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Warda, K.; Agari, M.; Bauer, C.; Baumeister, D.; Bulian, N.; Fuchs, H. P.; Fallot-Burghardt, W.; Glebe, T.; Hofmann, W.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Löchner, S.; Ludwig, A.; Maciuc, F.; Sanchez Nieto, F.; Schmelling, M.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Sexauer, E.; Smale, N. J.; Trunk, U.; Voss, H.; Albrecht, J.; Bachmann, S.; Blouw, J.; Deissenroth, M.; Deppe, H.; Dreis, H. B.; Eisele, F.; Haas, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Hennenberger, S.; Knopf, J.; Moch, M.; Perieanu, A.; Rabenecker, S.; Rausch, A.; Rummel, C.; Rusnyak, R.; Schiller, M.; Stange, U.; Uwer, U.; Walter, M.; Ziegler, R.; Avoni, G.; Balbi, G.; Bonifazi, F.; Bortolotti, D.; Carbone, A.; D'Antone, I.; Galli, D.; Gregori, D.; Lax, I.; Marconi, U.; Peco, G.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vecchi, S.; Bonivento, W.; Cardini, A.; Cadeddu, S.; DeLeo, V.; Deplano, C.; Furcas, S.; Lai, A.; Oldeman, R.; Raspino, D.; Saitta, B.; Serra, N.; Baldini, W.; Brusa, S.; Chiozzi, S.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Evangelisti, F.; Franconieri, A.; Germani, S.; Gianoli, A.; Guoming, L.; Landi, L.; Malaguti, R.; Padoan, C.; Pennini, C.; Savriè, M.; Squerzanti, S.; Zhao, T.; Zhu, M.; Bizzeti, A.; Graziani, G.; Lenti, M.; Lenzi, M.; Maletta, F.; Pennazzi, S.; Passaleva, G.; Veltri, M.; Alfonsi, M.; Anelli, M.; Balla, A.; Battisti, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Campana, P.; Carletti, M.; Ciambrone, P.; Corradi, G.; Dané, E.; Di Virgilio, A.; DeSimone, P.; Felici, G.; Forti, C.; Gatta, M.; Lanfranchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Pistilli, M.; Poli Lener, M.; Rosellini, R.; Santoni, M.; Saputi, A.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Zossi, A.; Ameri, M.; Cuneo, S.; Fontanelli, F.; Gracco, V.; Miní, G.; Parodi, M.; Petrolini, A.; Sannino, M.; Vinci, A.; Alemi, M.; Arnaboldi, C.; Bellunato, T.; Calvi, M.; Chignoli, F.; DeLucia, A.; Galotta, G.; Mazza, R.; Matteuzzi, C.; Musy, M.; Negri, P.; Perego, D.; Pessina, G.; Auriemma, G.; Bocci, V.; Buccheri, A.; Chiodi, G.; Di Marco, S.; Iacoangeli, F.; Martellotti, G.; Nobrega, R.; Pelosi, A.; Penso, G.; Pinci, D.; Rinaldi, W.; Rossi, A.; Santacesaria, R.; Satriano, C.; Carboni, G.; Iannilli, M.; Massafferri Rodrigues, A.; Messi, R.; Paoluzzi, G.; Sabatino, G.; Santovetti, E.; Satta, A.; Amoraal, J.; van Apeldoorn, G.; Arink, R.; van Bakel, N.; Band, H.; Bauer, Th; Berkien, A.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bos, E.; Bron, Ch; Ceelie, L.; Doets, M.; van der Eijk, R.; Fransen, J.-P.; de Groen, P.; Gromov, V.; Hierck, R.; Homma, J.; Hommels, B.; Hoogland, W.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Jansen, L.; Jaspers, M.; Kaan, B.; Koene, B.; Koopstra, J.; Kroes, F.; Kraan, M.; Langedijk, J.; Merk, M.; Mos, S.; Munneke, B.; Palacios, J.; Papadelis, A.; Pellegrino, A.; van Petten, O.; du Pree, T.; Roeland, E.; Ruckstuhl, W.; Schimmel, A.; Schuijlenburg, H.; Sluijk, T.; Spelt, J.; Stolte, J.; Terrier, H.; Tuning, N.; Van Lysebetten, A.; Vankov, P.; Verkooijen, J.; Verlaat, B.; Vink, W.; de Vries, H.; Wiggers, L.; Ybeles Smit, G.; Zaitsev, N.; Zupan, M.; Zwart, A.; van den Brand, J.; Bulten, H. J.; de Jong, M.; Ketel, T.; Klous, S.; Kos, J.; M'charek, B.; Mul, F.; Raven, G.; Simioni, E.; Cheng, J.; Dai, G.; Deng, Z.; Gao, Y.; Gong, G.; Gong, H.; He, J.; Hou, L.; Li, J.; Qian, W.; Shao, B.; Xue, T.; Yang, Z.; Zeng, M.; Muryn, B.; Ciba, K.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Blocki, J.; Galuszka, K.; Hajduk, L.; Michalowski, J.; Natkaniec, Z.; Polok, G.; Stodulski, M.; Witek, M.; Brzozowski, K.; Chlopik, A.; Gawor, P.; Guzik, Z.; Nawrot, A.; Srednicki, A.; Syryczynski, K.; Szczekowski, M.; Anghel, D. V.; Cimpean, A.; Coca, C.; Constantin, F.; Cristian, P.; Dumitru, D. D.; Dumitru, D. T.; Giolu, G.; Kusko, C.; Magureanu, C.; Mihon, Gh; Orlandea, M.; Pavel, C.; Petrescu, R.; Popescu, S.; Preda, T.; Rosca, A.; Rusu, V. L.; Stoica, R.; Stoica, S.; Tarta, P. D.; Filippov, S.; Gavrilov, Yu; Golyshkin, L.; Gushchin, E.; Karavichev, O.; Klubakov, V.; Kravchuk, L.; Kutuzov, V.; Laptev, S.; Popov, S.; Aref'ev, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Dolgoshein, V.; Egorychev, V.; Golutvin, A.; Gushchin, O.; Konoplyannikov, A.; Korolko, I.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Machikhiliyan, I.; Malyshev, S.; Mayatskaya, E.; Prokudin, M.; Rusinov, D.; Rusinov, V.; Shatalov, P.; Shchutska, L.; Tarkovskiy, E.; Tayduganov, A.; Voronchev, K.; Zhiryakova, O.; Bobrov, A.; Bondar, A.; Eidelman, S.; Kozlinsky, A.; Shekhtman, L.; Beloous, K. S.; Dzhelyadin, R. I.; Gelitsky, Yu V.; Gouz, Yu P.; Kachnov, K. G.; Kobelev, A. S.; Matveev, V. D.; Novikov, V. P.; Obraztsov, V. F.; Ostankov, A. P.; Romanovsky, V. I.; Rykalin, V. I.; Soldatov, A. P.; Soldatov, M. M.; Tchernov, E. N.; Yushchenko, O. P.; Bochin, B.; Bondar, N.; Fedorov, O.; Golovtsov, V.; Guets, S.; Kashchuk, A.; Lazarev, V.; Maev, O.; Neustroev, P.; Sagidova, N.; Spiridenkov, E.; Volkov, S.; Vorobyev, An; Vorobyov, A.; Aguilo, E.; Bota, S.; Calvo, M.; Comerma, A.; Cano, X.; Dieguez, A.; Herms, A.; Lopez, E.; Luengo, S.; Garra, J.; Garrido, Ll; Gascon, D.; Gaspar de Valenzuela, A.; Gonzalez, C.; Graciani, R.; Grauges, E.; Perez Calero, A.; Picatoste, E.; Riera, J.; Rosello, M.; Ruiz, H.; Vilasis, X.; Xirgu, X.; Adeva, B.; Cid Vidal, X.; MartÉnez Santos, D.; Esperante Pereira, D.; Fungueiriño Pazos, J. L.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Gómez, C. Lois; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pérez Trigo, E.; Pló Casasús, M.; Rodriguez Cobo, C.; Rodríguez Pérez, P.; Saborido, J. J.; Seco, M.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Bartalini, P.; Bay, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; Blanc, F.; Borel, J.; Carron, B.; Currat, C.; Conti, G.; Dormond, O.; Ermoline, Y.; Fauland, P.; Fernandez, L.; Frei, R.; Gagliardi, G.; Gueissaz, N.; Haefeli, G.; Hicheur, A.; Jacoby, C.; Jalocha, P.; Jimenez-Otero, S.; Hertig, J.-P.; Knecht, M.; Legger, F.; Locatelli, L.; Moser, J.-R.; Needham, M.; Nicolas, L.; Perrin-Giacomin, A.; Perroud, J.-P.; Potterat, C.; Ronga, F.; Schneider, O.; Schietinger, T.; Steele, D.; Studer, L.; Tareb, M.; Tran, M. T.; van Hunen, J.; Vervink, K.; Villa, S.; Zwahlen, N.; Bernet, R.; Büchler, A.; Gassner, J.; Lehner, F.; Sakhelashvili, T.; Salzmann, C.; Sievers, P.; Steiner, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Straumann, U.; van Tilburg, J.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Ziegler, M.; Dovbnya, A.; Ranyuk, Yu; Shapoval, I.; Borisova, M.; Iakovenko, V.; Kyva, V.; Kovalchuk, O.; Okhrimenko, O.; Pugatch, V.; Pylypchenko, Yu; Adinolfi, M.; Brook, N. H.; Head, R. D.; Imong, J. P.; Lessnoff, K. A.; Metlica, F. C. D.; Muir, A. J.; Rademacker, J. H.; Solomin, A.; Szczypka, P. M.; Barham, C.; Buszello, C.; Dickens, J.; Gibson, V.; Haines, S.; Harrison, K.; Jones, C. R.; Katvars, S.; Kerzel, U.; Lazzeroni, C.; Li, Y. Y.; Rogers, G.; Storey, J.; Skottowe, H.; Wotton, S. A.; Adye, T. J.; Densham, C. J.; Easo, S.; Franek, B.; Loveridge, P.; Morrow, D.; Morris, J. V.; Nandakumar, R.; Nardulli, J.; Papanestis, A.; Patrick, G. N.; Ricciardi, S.; Woodward, M. L.; Zhang, Z.; Chamonal, R. J. U.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, P.; Eisenhardt, S.; Gilardi, N.; Khan, A.; Kim, Y. M.; Lambert, R.; Lawrence, J.; Main, A.; McCarron, J.; Mclean, C.; Muheim, F.; Osorio-Oliveros, A. F.; Playfer, S.; Styles, N.; Xie, Y.; Bates, A.; Carson, L.; da Cunha Marinho, F.; Doherty, F.; Eklund, L.; Gersabeck, M.; Haddad, L.; Macgregor, A. A.; Melone, J.; McEwan, F.; Petrie, D. M.; Paterson, S. K.; Parkes, C.; Pickford, A.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rodrigues, E.; Saavedra, A. F.; Soler, F. J. P.; Szumlak, T.; Viret, S.; Allebone, L.; Awunor, O.; Back, J.; Barber, G.; Barnes, C.; Cameron, B.; Clark, D.; Clark, I.; Dornan, P.; Duane, A.; Eames, C.; Egede, U.; Girone, M.; Greenwood, S.; Hallam, R.; Hare, R.; Howard, A.; Jolly, S.; Kasey, V.; Khaleeq, M.; Koppenburg, P.; Miller, D.; Plackett, R.; Price, D.; Reece, W.; Savage, P.; Savidge, T.; Simmons, B.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Websdale, D.; Affolder, A.; Anderson, J. S.; Biagi, S. F.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Carroll, J. L.; Casse, G.; Cooke, P.; Donleavy, S.; Dwyer, L.; Hennessy, K.; Huse, T.; Hutchcroft, D.; Jones, D.; Lockwood, M.; McCubbin, M.; McNulty, R.; Muskett, D.; Noor, A.; Patel, G. D.; Rinnert, K.; Shears, T.; Smith, N. A.; Southern, G.; Stavitski, I.; Sutcliffe, P.; Tobin, M.; Traynor, S. M.; Turner, P.; Whitley, M.; Wormald, M.; Wright, V.; Bibby, J. H.; Brisbane, S.; Brock, M.; Charles, M.; Cioffi, C.; Gligorov, V. V.; Handford, T.; Harnew, N.; Harris, F.; John, M. J. J.; Jones, M.; Libby, J.; Martin, L.; McArthur, I. A.; Muresan, R.; Newby, C.; Ottewell, B.; Powell, A.; Rotolo, N.; Senanayake, R. S.; Somerville, L.; Soroko, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sullivan, P.; Stokes-Rees, I.; Topp-Jorgensen, S.; Xing, F.; Wilkinson, G.; Artuso, M.; Belyaev, I.; Blusk, S.; Lefeuvre, G.; Menaa, N.; Menaa-Sia, R.; Mountain, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Wang, J. C.; Abadie, L.; Aglieri-Rinella, G.; Albrecht, E.; André, J.; Anelli, G.; Arnaud, N.; Augustinus, A.; Bal, F.; Barandela Pazos, M. C.; Barczyk, A.; Bargiotti, M.; Batista Lopes, J.; Behrendt, O.; Berni, S.; Binko, P.; Bobillier, V.; Braem, A.; Brarda, L.; Buytaert, J.; Camilleri, L.; Cambpell, M.; Castellani, G.; Cataneo, F.; Cattaneo, M.; Chadaj, B.; Charpentier, P.; Cherukuwada, S.; Chesi, E.; Christiansen, J.; Chytracek, R.; Clemencic, M.; Closier, J.; Collins, P.; Colrain, P.; Cooke, O.; Corajod, B.; Corti, G.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Damodaran, B.; David, C.; de Capua, S.; Decreuse, G.; Degaudenzi, H.; Dijkstra, H.; Droulez, J.-P.; Duarte Ramos, D.; Dufey, J. P.; Dumps, R.; Eckstein, D.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Flegel, W.; Forty, R.; Fournier, C.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Gaidioz, B.; Gaspar, C.; Gayde, J.-C.; Gavillet, P.; Go, A.; Gracia Abril, G.; Graulich, J.-S.; Giudici, P.-A.; Guirao Elias, A.; Guglielmini, P.; Gys, T.; Hahn, F.; Haider, S.; Harvey, J.; Hay, B.; Hernando Morata, J.-A.; Herranz Alvarez, J.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hilke, H. J.; von Holtey, G.; Hulsbergen, W.; Jacobsson, R.; Jamet, O.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Kanaya, N.; Knaster Refolio, J.; Koestner, S.; Koratzinos, M.; Kristic, R.; Lacarrère, D.; Lasseur, C.; Lastovicka, T.; Laub, M.; Liko, D.; Lippmann, C.; Lindner, R.; Losasso, M.; Maier, A.; Mair, K.; Maley, P.; Mato Vila, P.; Moine, G.; Morant, J.; Moritz, M.; Moscicki, J.; Muecke, M.; Mueller, H.; Nakada, T.; Neufeld, N.; Ocariz, J.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Parzefall, U.; Patel, M.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Piedigrossi, D.; Pivk, M.; Pokorski, W.; Ponce, S.; Ranjard, F.; Riegler, W.; Renaud, J.; Roiser, S.; Rossi, A.; Roy, L.; Ruf, T.; Ruffinoni, D.; Saladino, S.; Sambade Varela, A.; Santinelli, R.; Schmelling, S.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, T.; Schöning, A.; Schopper, A.; Seguinot, J.; Snoeys, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, A. C.; Somogyi, P.; Stoica, R.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; Toledo Alarcon, J.; Ullaland, O.; Valassi, A.; Vannerem, P.; Veness, R.; Wicht, P.; Wiedner, D.; Witzeling, W.; Wright, A.; Wyllie, K.; Ypsilantis, T.

    2008-08-01

    The LHCb experiment is dedicated to precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of B hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva). The initial configuration and expected performance of the detector and associated systems, as established by test beam measurements and simulation studies, is described.

  19. LHCb Conditions database operation assistance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemencic, M.; Shapoval, I.; Cattaneo, M.; Degaudenzi, H.; Santinelli, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Conditions Database (CondDB) of the LHCb experiment provides versioned, time dependent geometry and conditions data for all LHCb data processing applications (simulation, high level trigger (HLT), reconstruction, analysis) in a heterogeneous computing environment ranging from user laptops to the HLT farm and the Grid. These different use cases impose front-end support for multiple database technologies (Oracle and SQLite are used). Sophisticated distribution tools are required to ensure timely and robust delivery of updates to all environments. The content of the database has to be managed to ensure that updates are internally consistent and externally compatible with multiple versions of the physics application software. In this paper we describe three systems that we have developed to address these issues. The first system is a CondDB state tracking extension to the Oracle 3D Streams replication technology, to trap cases when the CondDB replication was corrupted. Second, an automated distribution system for the SQLite-based CondDB, providing also smart backup and checkout mechanisms for the CondDB managers and LHCb users respectively. And, finally, a system to verify and monitor the internal (CondDB self-consistency) and external (LHCb physics software vs. CondDB) compatibility. The former two systems are used in production in the LHCb experiment and have achieved the desired goal of higher flexibility and robustness for the management and operation of the CondDB. The latter one has been fully designed and is passing currently to the implementation stage.

  20. Keloid Management: A Retrospective Case Review on a New Approach Using Surgical Excision, Platelet-Rich Plasma, and In-office Superficial Photon X-ray Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Michael E.; Hardy, Cherrell; Ridgway, Julie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the efficacy of the authors’ combination therapy protocol for keloid treatment. DESIGN: Retrospective. SETTING: Plastic surgery office-based outpatient setting in New York City. PATIENTS: Forty patients with 44 keloid scars requiring surgical excision. INTERVENTIONS: Keloid scars were treated using surgical excision, platelet-rich plasma, and postoperative in-office superficial photon X-ray radiation therapy. Intralesional triamcinolone injections were administered once to 4 patients with poor results on scar scale assessment. Patient follow-up visits ranged from 3 to 11 months to assess for evidence of recurrence and adverse effects. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): For the purpose of this study, recurrence was defined as any sign of extraordinary erythema, induration, and hypertrophy beyond the site of excision. MAIN RESULTS: In the 16 keloids treated with 2 fractions, there was no evidence of recurrence. One of 25 keloids treated with 3 fractions demonstrated evidence of recurrence. One of 3 keloids treated with a single fraction displayed signs of recurrence. Postirradiation hyperpigmentation was noted in all patients. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical excision combined with platelet-rich plasma and postoperative in-office superficial radiation therapy achieved a 95.5% nonrecurrence rate at 1- to 3-month follow-up. This protocol appears to be a safe and viable option in the management of keloids and merits further randomized controlled study of its comparative efficacy. PMID:27300360

  1. Dry etching of Al-rich AlGaAs with silicon nitride masks for photonic crystal fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiuyu; Togano, Yuji; Hashimura, Kentaro; Morifuji, Masato; Kondow, Masahiko

    2015-04-01

    We investigate inductively coupled plasma (ICP) deep dry etching of Al0.8Ga0.2As for photonic crystal (PC) fabrication using a Cl2/BCl3/CH4 gas mixture. On the basis of our previous report [Y. Kitabayashi et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 52, 04CG07 (2013)], we obtained a PC structure having air holes deeper than 1.5 µm and a diameter of 120 nm by adjusting the gas flow rate and increasing the process pressure. In this study, silicon nitride (SiNx) and SiO2 were both used as the mask layer. Furthermore, samples with SiNx and SiO2 masks for ICP deep dry etching were also fabricated and compared. The vertical profile of the PC structure with the SiNx mask layer displayed a rounded shape that was caused by the charge up in the mask layer. Then, a thinner mask layer was used to ease the effects of mask retardation and charge up. As a result, a PC structure with a SiNx mask layer having air holes deeper than 1.7 µm and a diameter of 190 nm was successfully fabricated.

  2. The upgrade of the LHCb Vertex Locator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, T.

    2014-12-01

    The LHCb experiment is set for a significant upgrade, which will be ready for Run 3 of the LHC in 2020. This upgrade will allow LHCb to run at a significantly higher instantaneous luminosity and collect an integrated luminosity of 50fb-1 by the end of Run 4. In this process the Vertex Locator (VELO) detector will be upgraded to a pixel-based silicon detector. The upgraded VELO will improve upon the current detector by being closer to the beams and having lower material modules with microchannel cooling and a thinner RF-foil. Simulations have shown that it will maintain its excellent performance, even after the radiation damage caused by collecting an integrated luminosity of 50fb-1.

  3. The LHCb trigger: Algorithms and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Hugo; LHCb Collaboration

    2010-11-01

    This article describes the hardware architecture of the LHCb trigger system, as well as the algorithms that it executes in order to identify the relevant B meson decays. The expected performance on simulated data and the trigger commissioning status and plans are also presented. The LHCb trigger consists of two phases: the Level 0 and the High Level Trigger. The former is synchronous and implemented in custom electronics, and it reduces the rate to 1 MHz. The High Level Trigger is a C++ algorithm running in a farm of about 1000 16-core computing nodes and further reducing the rate to 2 kHz. The Level 0 efficiency computed on B meson events that would be offline-selected range between 90% for decays containing muons and 50% for purely hadronic decays, the later suffering from higher light quark backgrounds. Overall High Level Trigger efficiencies range between 60% and 80%.

  4. Upgrade of the LHCb VELO detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is a single-arm forward spectrometer optimised for performing heavy-flavour physics analyses, using proton-proton collisions provided by the LHC machine. A major upgrade of the LHCb experiment will take place prior to the start of Run 3 operations in 2021. The upgraded Vertex Locator (VELO) is an essential component of this upgrade. Its main role is to enable high precision track and vertex reconstruction, with data-driven readout to the software trigger at 40 MHz, in the higher-luminosity environment of Run 3. To achieve this goal, significant improvements are planned with respect to the current detector, including a switch from microstrips to pixels, upgraded electronics, and a new cooling system. I will briefly motiviate the need for an upgrade, describe the main aspects of the VELO upgrade design, and show highlights of recent sensor characterisation studies using the CERN SPS test beam.

  5. Pentaquarks and possible anomalies at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafferty, G.

    2016-07-01

    With the LHC Run 1 data, the LHCb experiment discovered two pentaquark states and has evidence for a number of possible anomalies in the flavour sector. The possible anomalies include indications of violations of lepton flavour universality, deviations from Standard Model predictions in several B-meson decay modes that are mediated by flavour-changing neutral currents, and further evidence for a discrepancy between inclusive and exclusive measurements of the CKM matrix element |Vub|.

  6. Pentaquarks and Possible Anomalies at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafferty, G.

    With the LHC Run 1 data, the LHCb experiment discovered two pentaquark states and has evidence for a number of possible anomalies in the avour sector. The possible anomalies include indications of violations of lepton avour universality, deviations from Standard Model predictions in several B-meson decay modes that are mediated by avour-changing neutral currents, and further evidence for a discrepancy between inclusive and exclusive measurements of the CKM matrix element |Vub|.

  7. b and c spectroscopy at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Simone, Patrizia

    2014-06-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study the decays and properties of heavy flavoured hadrons produced in the forward region from pp collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. It has recorded the world's largest data sample of beauty and charm hadrons, enabling precise studies into the spectroscopy of such particles, including discoveries of new states and measurements of their properties such as masses, width and quantum numbers. The latest results in this area are reviewed.

  8. Study of π{sup 0}/γ efficiency using B meson decays in the LHCb experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Govorkova, E.

    2016-12-15

    The reconstruction efficiency of photons and neutral pions is measured using the relative yields of reconstructed B{sup +} → J/ψK{sup *+}(→ K{sup +}π{sup 0}) and B{sup +} → J/ψK{sup +} decays. The efficiency is studied using the data set, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb{sup –1}, collected by the LHCb experiment in proton-proton collisions at the centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV.

  9. Optimization of the LHCb track reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storaci, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    The LHCb track reconstruction uses sophisticated pattern recognition algorithms to reconstruct trajectories of charged particles. Their main feature is the use of a Hough- transform like approach to connect track segments from different sub-detectors, allowing for having no tracking stations in the magnet of LHCb. While yielding a high efficiency, the track reconstruction is a major contributor to the overall timing budget of the software trigger of LHCb, and will continue to be so in the light of the higher track multiplicity expected from Run II of the LHC. In view of this fact, key parts of the pattern recognition have been revised and redesigned. In this document the main features which were studied are presented. A staged approach strategy for the track reconstruction in the software trigger was investigated: it allows unifying complementary sets of tracks coming from the different stages of the high level trigger, resulting in a more flexible trigger strategy and a better overlap between online and offline reconstructed tracks. Furthermore the use of parallelism was investigated, using SIMD instructions for time-critical parts of the software.

  10. The LHCb upgrade: plans and physics potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconi, U.

    2017-04-01

    LHCb is performing a large number of world-class precision measurements in heavy flavour physics. However, yet by the end of the LHC Run 2, many of these measurements will remain limited by statistics, even though adding the expected integrated luminosity of 5 - 6 fb-1. The main obstacle preventing LHCb to run the present detector at higher luminosities, with enhanced trigger efficiencies, is the current 1 MHz readout system limitation. The detector will therefore undergo a major upgrade in the Long Shutdown 2 (2018 - 2019) aiming at collecting an order of magnitude more data by 2028. The upgrade consists of a new readout system operating at the LHC bunch crossing rate of 40 MHz. The data acquisition system will exploit the ultimate flexibility of a software trigger. The instantaneous luminosity will increase to 2 ×1033 cm-2s-1, five times higher than presently. In order to cope with the higher expected occupancies and radiation doses several sub-detector upgrades are underway. The physics potential of LHCb shall improve considerably, as will be discussed.

  11. ARIADNE: a Tracking System for Relationships in LHCb Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapoval, I.; Clemencic, M.; Cattaneo, M.

    2014-06-01

    The data processing model of the LHCb experiment implies handling of an evolving set of heterogeneous metadata entities and relationships between them. The entities range from software and databases states to architecture specificators and software/data deployment locations. For instance, there is an important relationship between the LHCb Conditions Database (CondDB), which provides versioned, time dependent geometry and conditions data, and the LHCb software, which is the data processing applications (used for simulation, high level triggering, reconstruction and analysis of physics data). The evolution of CondDB and of the LHCb applications is a weakly-homomorphic process. It means that relationships between a CondDB state and LHCb application state may not be preserved across different database and application generations. These issues may lead to various kinds of problems in the LHCb production, varying from unexpected application crashes to incorrect data processing results. In this paper we present Ariadne - a generic metadata relationships tracking system based on the novel NoSQL Neo4j graph database. Its aim is to track and analyze many thousands of evolving relationships for cases such as the one described above, and several others, which would otherwise remain unmanaged and potentially harmful. The highlights of the paper include the system's implementation and management details, infrastructure needed for running it, security issues, first experience of usage in the LHCb production and potential of the system to be applied to a wider set of LHCb tasks.

  12. Low-loss Ge-rich Si0.2Ge0.8 waveguides for mid-infrared photonics.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Joan Manel; Vakarin, Vladyslav; Gilles, Clement; Frigerio, Jacopo; Ballabio, Andrea; Chaisakul, Papichaya; Roux, Xavier Le; Alonso-Ramos, Carlos; Maisons, Gregory; Vivien, Laurent; Carras, Mathieu; Isella, Giovanni; Marris-Morini, Delphine

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate low-loss Ge-rich Si0.2Ge0.8 waveguides on Si1-xGex (x from 0 to 0.79) graded substrates operating in the mid-infrared wavelength range at λ=4.6  μm. Propagation losses as low as (1.5±0.5)dB/cm and (2±0.5)dB/cm were measured for the quasi-TE and quasi-TM polarizations, respectively. A total coupling loss (input/output) of only 10 dB was found for waveguide widths larger than 7 μm due to a good fiber-waveguide mode matching. Near-field optical mode profiles measured at the output waveguide facet allowed us to inspect the optical mode and precisely measure the modal effective area of each waveguide providing a good correlation between experiments and simulations. These results put forward the potential of low-index-contrast Si1-xGex waveguides with high Ge concentration as fundamental blocks for mid-infrared photonic integrated circuits.

  13. Very rapid phosphorylation kinetics suggest a unique role for Lhcb2 during state transitions in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Claudia; Pietrzykowska, Malgorzata; Kiss, Anett Z; Suorsa, Marjaana; Ceci, Luigi R; Aro, Eva-Mari; Jansson, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) contains three highly homologous chlorophyll-a/b-binding proteins (Lhcb1, Lhcb2 and Lhcb3), which can be assembled into both homo- and heterotrimers. Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 are reversibly phosphorylated by the action of STN7 kinase and PPH1/TAP38 phosphatase in the so-called state-transition process. We have developed antibodies that are specific for the phosphorylated forms of Lhcb1 and Lhcb2. We found that Lhcb2 is more rapidly phosphorylated than Lhcb1: 10 sec of ‘state 2 light’ results in Lhcb2 phosphorylation to 30% of the maximum level. Phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms of the proteins showed no difference in electrophoretic mobility and dephosphorylation kinetics did not differ between the two proteins. In state 2, most of the phosphorylated forms of Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 were present in super- and mega-complexes that comprised both photosystem (PS)I and PSII, and the state 2-specific PSI–LHCII complex was highly enriched in the phosphorylated forms of Lhcb2. Our results imply distinct and specific roles for Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 in the regulation of photosynthetic light harvesting. PMID:23888908

  14. A large Scintillating Fibre Tracker for LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greim, R.

    2017-02-01

    The LHCb experiment will be upgraded during LHC Long Shutdown 2 to be able to record data at a higher instantaneous luminosity. The readout rate is currently limited to 1 MHz by the Level 1 trigger. In order to achieve the target integrated luminosity of 50 fb-1 during LHC Run 3, all subdetectors have to be read out by a 40 MHz trigger-less readout system. Especially, the current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet suffer from large detector dead times and a small granularity in the Outer Tracker, which consists of proportional straw tubes. Therefore, the Downstream Tracker will be replaced by a Scintillating Fibre Tracker with Silicon Photomultiplier readout. The total sensitive area of 340 m2 is made up of 2.5 m long fibre mats consisting of six staggered layers of 250 μm thin scintillating fibres. The scintillation light created by the charged particles traversing the fibre mats is transported to the fibre ends via total internal reflection and detected by state-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays. This paper presents the detector concept, design, challenges, custom-made readout chips, as well as laboratory and beam test results.

  15. Rare beauty and charm decays at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Johannes

    2013-05-01

    Rare heavy flavor decays are an ideal place to search for the effects of potential new particles that modify the decay rates or the Lorentz structure of the decay vertices. The LHCb experiment, a dedicated heavy flavour experiment at the LHC at CERN. It has recorded the worlds largest sample of heavy meson and lepton decays. The status of the rare decay analyses with 1 fb-1 of √s = 7 TeV and 1.1 fb-1 of √s = 8 TeV of pp-collisions collected by the LHCb experiment in 2011 and 2012 is reviewed. The worlds most precise measurements of the angular structure of B0 → K*0μ+μ- and B+ → K+μ+μ- decays is discussed, as well as the isospin asymmetry measurement in B → K(*)μ+μ- decays. The first evidence for the very rare decay Bs0 → µ+µ- is presented together with the most stringent upper exclusion limits on the branching fraction of decays of B0, D0 and Ks0 mesons into two muons. This note finishes with the discussion of searches for lepton number and lepton flavor violating τ decays.

  16. SIMD studies in the LHCb reconstruction software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cámpora Pérez, Daniel Hugo; Couturier, Ben

    2015-12-01

    During the data taking process in the LHC at CERN, millions of collisions are recorded every second by the LHCb Detector. The LHCb Online computing farm, counting around 15000 cores, is dedicated to the reconstruction of the events in real-time, in order to filter those with interesting Physics. The ones kept are later analysed Offline in a more precise fashion on the Grid. This imposes very stringent requirements on the reconstruction software, which has to be as efficient as possible. Modern CPUs support so-called vector-extensions, which extend their Instruction Sets, allowing for concurrent execution across functional units. Several libraries expose the Single Instruction Multiple Data programming paradigm to issue these instructions. The use of vectorisation in our codebase can provide performance boosts, leading ultimately to Physics reconstruction enhancements. In this paper, we present vectorisation studies of significant reconstruction algorithms. A variety of vectorisation libraries are analysed and compared in terms of design, maintainability and performance. We also present the steps taken to systematically measure the performance of the released software, to ensure the consistency of the run-time of the vectorised software.

  17. Particle Identification on an FPGA Accelerated Compute Platform for the LHCb Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fäerber, Christian; Schwemmer, Rainer; Machen, Jonathan; Neufeld, Niko

    2017-07-01

    The current LHCb readout system will be upgraded in 2018 to a “triggerless” readout of the entire detector at the Large Hadron Collider collision rate of 40 MHz. The corresponding bandwidth from the detector down to the foreseen dedicated computing farm (event filter farm), which acts as the trigger, has to be increased by a factor of almost 100 from currently 500 Gb/s up to 40 Tb/s. The event filter farm will preanalyze the data and will select the events on an event by event basis. This will reduce the bandwidth down to a manageable size to write the interesting physics data to tape. The design of such a system is a challenging task, and the reason why different new technologies are considered and have to be investigated for the different parts of the system. For the usage in the event building farm or in the event filter farm (trigger), an experimental field programmable gate array (FPGA) accelerated computing platform is considered and, therefore, tested. FPGA compute accelerators are used more and more in standard servers such as for Microsoft Bing search or Baidu search. The platform we use hosts a general Intel CPU and a high-performance FPGA linked via the high-speed Intel QuickPath Interconnect. An accelerator is implemented on the FPGA. It is very likely that these platforms, which are built, in general, for high-performance computing, are also very interesting for the high-energy physics community. First, the performance results of smaller test cases performed at the beginning are presented. Afterward, a part of the existing LHCb RICH particle identification is tested and is ported to the experimental FPGA accelerated platform. We have compared the performance of the LHCb RICH particle identification running on a normal CPU with the performance of the same algorithm, which is running on the Xeon-FPGA compute accelerator platform.

  18. Upgrade of the LHCb Vertex Locator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leflat, A.

    2014-08-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, planned for 2018, will transform the entire readout to a trigger-less system operating at 40 MHz. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm, with access to all event information. This will enable the detector to run at luminosities of 1-2 × 1033/cm2/s and probe physics beyond the Standard Model in the heavy sector with unprecedented precision. The upgraded VELO must be low mass, radiation hard and vacuum compatible. It must be capable of fast pattern recognition and track reconstruction and will be required to drive data to the outside world at speeds of up to 2.5 Tbit/s. This challenge is being met with a new Vertex Locator (VELO) design based on hybrid pixel detectors positioned to within 5 mm of the LHC colliding beams. The sensors have 55 × 55 μm square pixels and the VELOPix ASIC which is being developed for the readout is based on the Timepix/Medipix family of chips. The hottest ASIC will have to cope with pixel hit rates of up to 900 MHz. The material budget will be optimised with the use of evaporative CO2 coolant circulating in microchannels within a thin silicon substrate. Microchannel cooling brings many advantages: very efficient heat transfer with almost no temperature gradients across the module, no CTE mismatch with silicon components, and low material contribution. This is a breakthrough technology being developed for LHCb. LHCb is also focussing effort on the construction of a lightweight foil to separate the primary and secondary LHC vacua, the development of high speed cables and radiation qualification of the module. The 40 MHz readout will also bring significant conceptual changes to the way in which the upgrade trigger is operated. Work is in progress to incorporate momentum and impact parameter information into the trigger at the earliest possible stage, using the fast pattern recognition capabilities of the upgraded detector. The current status of the VELO upgrade will

  19. Hadron Spectroscopy, exotics and BC + physics at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Biplab

    2016-11-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study properties and decays of heavy flavored hadrons produced from pp collisions at the LHC. During Run 1, it has recorded the world's largest data sample of beauty and charm hadrons, enabling precision spectroscopy studies of such particles. Several important results obtained by LHCb, such as the discovery of the first pentaquark states and the first unambiguous determination of the Zc (4430) - as an exotic state, have dramatically increased the interest in spectroscopy of heavy hadrons. An overview of the latest LHCb results on the subject, including the discovery of four strange exotic states decaying as X → J/ψϕ, is presented. LHCb has also made significant contributions to the field of BC + physics, the lowest bound state of the heavy flavor ̅b and c quarks. A synopsis of the latest results is given.

  20. LHCb pentaquarks in constituent quark models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, P. G.; Entem, D. R.; Fernández, F.

    2017-01-01

    The recently discovered Pc(4380) + and Pc(4450) + states at LHCb have masses close to the D bar Σc* and Dbar*Σc thresholds, respectively, which suggest that they may have significant meson-baryon molecular components. We analyze these states in the framework of a constituent quark model which has been applied to a wide range of hadronic observables, being the model parameters, therefore, completely constrained. The Pc(4380) + and Pc(4450) + are studied as molecular states composed by charmed baryons and open charm mesons. Several bound states with the proper binding energy are found in the D bar Σc* and Dbar*Σc channels. We discuss the possible assignments of these states from their decay widths. Moreover, two more states are predicted, associated with the D bar Σc and Dbar*Σc* thresholds.

  1. Developments towards the LHCb VELO upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid Vidal, Xabier

    2016-09-01

    The Vertex Locator (VELO) is a silicon strip detector surrounding the interaction region of the LHCb experiment. The upgrade of the VELO is planned to be installed in 2019-2020, and the current detector will be replaced by a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at a rate of 40 MHz. The new detector is designed to withstand the radiation dose expected at an integrated luminosity of 50 fb-1. The detector will be composed of silicon pixel sensors, read out by the VeloPix ASIC that is being developed based on the TimePix/MediPix family. The prototype sensors for the VELO upgrade are being irradiated in five different facilities and the post-irradiation performance is being measured with testbeams, and in the lab. These proceedings present the VELO upgrade and briefly discuss the results of the sensor testing campaign.

  2. TELL1: development of a common readout board for LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legger, Federica; Bay, Aurelio; Haefeli, Guido; Locatelli, Laurent

    2004-12-01

    LHCb is one of the four experiments currently under construction at LHC (Large Hadron Collider) at CERN, and its aim is the study of b-quark physics (LHCb Collaboration, CERN-LHCC/98-4). LHCb trigger strategy is based on three levels, and will reduce the event rate from 40 MHz to a few hundred Hz (LHCb Collaboration, CERN/LHCC 2003-031, LHCb TDR 10, September 2003). The first two levels (L0 and L1) will use signals from some part of the detector in order to take fast decisions, while the last one, called High Level Trigger (HLT), will have access to the full event data. An "off detector" readout board (TELL1) has been developed and will be used by the majority of LHCb subdetectors. It takes L0 accepted data as input and, after data processing which includes event synchronization, L1 Trigger pre-processing and zero suppression, L1 buffering, and HLT zero suppression, the output is sent to L1 Trigger and HLT .

  3. The Light-Harvesting Chlorophyll a/b Binding Proteins Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 Play Complementary Roles during State Transitions in Arabidopsis[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pietrzykowska, Malgorzata; Suorsa, Marjaana; Semchonok, Dmitry A.; Tikkanen, Mikko; Boekema, Egbert J.; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic light harvesting in plants is regulated by phosphorylation-driven state transitions: functional redistributions of the major trimeric light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) to balance the relative excitation of photosystem I and photosystem II. State transitions are driven by reversible LHCII phosphorylation by the STN7 kinase and PPH1/TAP38 phosphatase. LHCII trimers are composed of Lhcb1, Lhcb2, and Lhcb3 proteins in various trimeric configurations. Here, we show that despite their nearly identical amino acid composition, the functional roles of Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 are different but complementary. Arabidopsis thaliana plants lacking only Lhcb2 contain thylakoid protein complexes similar to wild-type plants, where Lhcb2 has been replaced by Lhcb1. However, these do not perform state transitions, so phosphorylation of Lhcb2 seems to be a critical step. In contrast, plants lacking Lhcb1 had a more profound antenna remodeling due to a decrease in the amount of LHCII trimers influencing thylakoid membrane structure and, more indirectly, state transitions. Although state transitions are also found in green algae, the detailed architecture of the extant seed plant light-harvesting antenna can now be dated back to a time after the divergence of the bryophyte and spermatophyte lineages, but before the split of the angiosperm and gymnosperm lineages more than 300 million years ago. PMID:25194026

  4. Full Offline Reconstruction in Real Time with the LHCb Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziurda, Agnieszka

    2016-11-01

    This document describes the novel, unique in High Energy Physics, real-time alignment and calibration of the full LHCb detector. The LHCb experiment has been designed as a dedicated heavy flavour physics experiment focused on the reconstruction of c and b hadrons. The LHCb detector is a single-arm forward spectrometer, which measures proton-proton interactions at the LHC. The operational bunch crossing rate is several orders of magnitude above the current abilities of data recording and storage. Therefore, a trigger system has been implemented to reduce this rate to an acceptable value. The LHCb trigger system has been redesigned during the 2013-2015 long shutdown,achieving offline-quality alignment and calibration online. It also allows analyses to be performed entirely at the trigger level. In addition, having the best performing reconstruction in the trigger gives the possibility to fully use the particle identification selection criteria and greatly increases the efficiency, in particular for the selection of charm and strange hadron decays. This results in enhancing the physics programme of the LHCb experiment.

  5. NRQCD Confronts LHCb Data on Quarkonium Production within Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, Reggie; Makris, Yiannis; Mehen, Thomas; Dai, Lin; Leibovich, Adam K.

    2017-07-01

    We analyze the recent LHCb measurement of the distribution of the fraction of the transverse momentum, z (J /ψ ), carried by the J /ψ within a jet. LHCb data are compared with analytic calculations using the fragmenting jet function (FJF) formalism for studying J /ψ in jets. Logarithms in the FJFs are resummed using Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution. We also convolve hard QCD partonic cross sections, showered with pythia, with leading order nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics (NRQCD) fragmentation functions and obtain consistent results. Both approaches use madgraph to calculate the hard process that creates the jet initiating parton. These calculations give reasonable agreement with the z (J /ψ ) distribution that was shown to be poorly described by default pythia simulations in the LHCb paper. We compare our predictions for the J /ψ distribution using various extractions of nonperturbative NRQCD long-distance matrix elements (LDMEs) in the literature. NRQCD calculations agree with LHCb data better than default pythia regardless of which fit to the LDMEs is used. LDMEs from fits that focus exclusively on high transverse momentum data from colliders are in good agreement with the LHCb measurement.

  6. From J/ψ to LHCb pentaquarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, F.; Ortega, P. G.; Entem, D. R.; Segovia, J.

    2016-09-01

    The two exotic $P_c^+(4380)$ and $P_c^+(4450)$ discovered in $2015$ by the LHCb Collaboration, together with the four resonances $X(4140)$, $X(4274)$, $X(4500)$ and $X(4700)$, reported in $2016$ by the same collaboration, are described in a constituent quark model which has been able to explain the properties of charmonium states from the $J/\\psi$ to the $X(3872)$. Using this model we found a $\\bar D\\Sigma_c^*$ bound state with $J^P=\\frac{3}{2}^-$ that may be identified with the $P_c^+(4380)$. In the $\\bar D^*\\Sigma_c$ channel we found three possible candidates for the $P_c^+(4450)$ with $J^P=\\frac{1}{2}^-$, $\\frac{3}{2}^-$ and $\\frac{3}{2}^+$ with almost degenerated energies. The $X(4140)$ resonance appears as a cusp in the $J/\\psi\\phi$ channel due to the near coincidence of the $D_{s}^{\\pm}D_{s}^{\\ast\\pm}$ and $J/\\psi\\phi$ mass thresholds. The remaining three $X(4274)$, $X(4500)$ and $X(4700)$ resonances appear as conventional charmonium states with quantum numbers $3^{3}P_{1}$, $4^{3}P_{0}$ and $5^{3}P_{0}$, respectively; and whose masses and widths are slightly modified due to their coupling with the corresponding closest meson-meson thresholds.

  7. LHCb Results on Penta(tetra)-Quark Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharczyk, Marcin

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study the properties and decays of heavy flavored hadrons produced in pp collisions at the LHC. The data collected in the LHC Run I enables precision spectroscopy studies of beauty and charm hadrons. The latest results on spectroscopy of conventional and exotic hadrons are reviewed, such as the discovery of the first charmonium pentaquark states in the J/ψp system or the confirmation of resonant nature of the Z(4430)- mesonic state. LHCb has also made significant contributions to determination of the quantum numbers for the X(3872) state and to exclude the existence of the X(5568) tetraquark candidate. The LHCb results described in the present document have dramatically increased the interest on spectroscopy of heavy hadrons.

  8. Revision of the LHCb limit on Majorana neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuve, Brian; Peskin, Michael E.

    2016-12-01

    We revisit the recent limits from LHCb on a Majorana neutrino N in the mass range 250-5000 MeV [1 R. Aaij et al. (LHCb Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 131802 (2014)., 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.131802]. These limits are among the best currently available, and they will be improved soon by the addition of data from Run 2 of the LHC. LHCb presented a model-independent constraint on the rate of like-sign leptonic decays, and then derived a constraint on the mixing angle Vμ 4 based on a theoretical model for the B decay width to N and the N lifetime. The model used is unfortunately unsound. We revise the conclusions of the paper based on a decay model similar to the one used for the τ lepton and provide formulas useful for future analyses.

  9. Searching supersymmetry at the LHCb with displaced vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, F. de; Eboli, O. J. P.; Magro, M. B.; Restrepo, D.

    2009-03-01

    Supersymmetric theories with bilinear R-parity violation can give rise to the observed neutrino masses and mixings. One important feature of such models is that the lightest supersymmetric particle might have a sufficiently large lifetime to produce detached vertices. Working in the framework of supergravity models, we analyze the potential of the LHCb experiment to search for supersymmetric models exhibiting bilinear R-parity violation. We show that the LHCb experiment can probe a large fraction of the m{sub 0} x m{sub 1/2}, being able to explore gluino masses up to 1.3 TeV. The LHCb discover potential for these kinds of models is similar to the ATLAS and CMS ones in the low luminosity phase of operation of the LHC.

  10. B-physics prospects with the LHCb experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Harnew, N.

    2008-04-15

    This paper summarizes the B-physics prospects of the LHCb experiment. Firstly, a brief introduction to the CKM matrix and the mechanism of CP violation in the Standard Model is given. The advantages of the LHCb experiment for B-physics exploitation will then be described, together with a short description of the detector components. Finally, the LHCb physics aims and prospects will be summarized, focusing on the measurements of sin(2{beta}) in tree and gluonic penguin diagrams, sin(2{alpha}) in B{sub d}{sup 0} {sup {yields}} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, neutral B-meson oscillations and the B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing phase, and the measurement of {gamma} using a variety of complementary methods.

  11. LHCb Build and Deployment Infrastructure for run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemencic, M.; Couturier, B.

    2015-12-01

    After the successful run 1 of the LHC, the LHCb Core software team has taken advantage of the long shutdown to consolidate and improve its build and deployment infrastructure. Several of the related projects have already been presented like the build system using Jenkins, as well as the LHCb Performance and Regression testing infrastructure. Some components are completely new, like the Software Configuration Database (using the Graph DB Neo4j), or the new packaging installation using RPM packages. Furthermore all those parts are integrated to allow easier and quicker releases of the LHCb Software stack, therefore reducing the risk of operational errors. Integration and Regression tests are also now easier to implement, allowing to improve further the software checks.

  12. Revision of the LHCb limit on Majorana neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Shuve, Brian; Peskin, Michael E.

    2016-12-16

    We revisit the recent limits from LHCb on a Majorana neutrino N in the mass range 250–5000 MeV [R. Aaij et al. (LHCb Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 131802 (2014).]. These limits are among the best currently available, and they will be improved soon by the addition of data from Run 2 of the LHC. LHCb presented a model-independent constraint on the rate of like-sign leptonic decays, and then derived a constraint on the mixing angle V μ 4 based on a theoretical model for the B decay width to N and the N lifetime. The model used is unfortunately unsound. We revise the conclusions of the paper based on a decay model similar to the one used for the τ lepton and provide formulas useful for future analyses.

  13. Prospect of D0 Mixing and Cpv at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spradlin, Patrick

    Precision measurements in charm physics offer a window into a unique sector of potential New Physics interactions. LHCb is poised to become a world leading experiment for charm studies, recording enormous statistics with a detector tailored for flavor physics. This article presents recent charm CPV and mixing studies from LHCb, including LHCb's first CP asymmetry measurement with 37 pb-1 of data collected in 2010. The difference of the CP asymmetries of D0 decays to the K-K+ and π-π+ final states is determined to be Δ {A}CP = (-0.28 ± 0.70 ± 0.25 ) updates to the material presented at the 4th International Workshop on Charm Physics are included.

  14. Virtualization for the LHCb Online system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccorsi, Enrico; Brarda, Loic; Moine, Gary; Neufeld, Niko

    2011-12-01

    Virtualization has long been advertised by the IT-industry as a way to cut down cost, optimise resource usage and manage the complexity in large data-centers. The great number and the huge heterogeneity of hardware, both industrial and custom-made, has up to now led to reluctance in the adoption of virtualization in the IT infrastructure of large experiment installations. Our experience in the LHCb experiment has shown that virtualization improves the availability and the manageability of the whole system. We have done an evaluation of available hypervisors / virtualization solutions and find that the Microsoft HV technology provides a high level of maturity and flexibility for our purpose. We present the results of these comparison tests, describing in detail, the architecture of our virtualization infrastructure with a special emphasis on the security for services visible to the outside world. Security is achieved by a sophisticated combination of VLANs, firewalls and virtual routing - the cost and benefits of this solution are analysed. We have adapted our cluster management tools, notably Quattor, for the needs of virtual machines and this allows us to migrate smoothly services on physical machines to the virtualized infrastructure. The procedures for migration will also be described. In the final part of the document we describe our recent R&D activities aiming to replacing the SAN-backend for the virtualization by a cheaper iSCSI solution - this will allow to move all servers and related services to the virtualized infrastructure, excepting the ones doing hardware control via non-commodity PCI plugin cards.

  15. Overview of LHCb results on beauty and charm spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palano, Antimo

    2016-11-01

    We present a summary of new experimental results from LHCb experiment on the status of the charm spectroscopy using inclusive approaches and Dalitz plot analyses of B and Bs decays. We also summarize latest results on the spectroscopy of heavy baryons.

  16. Onia and onia-like states at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passaleva, Giovanni

    2014-06-01

    We present recent LHCb results of studies on the production of J/ψ and χc charmonium states, of Υ bottomonia and on J/ψ polarization in proton-proton collisions at √s. Results on J/ψ production in proton-lead collisions are also presented.

  17. The CBM RICH project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Akishin, P.; Becker, K.-H.; Belogurov, S.; Bendarouach, J.; Boldyreva, N.; Chernogorov, A.; Deveaux, C.; Dobyrn, V.; Dürr, M.; Eschke, J.; Förtsch, J.; Heep, J.; Höhne, C.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kochenda, L.; Kopfer, J.; Kravtsov, P.; Kres, I.; Lebedev, S.; Lebedeva, E.; Leonova, E.; Linev, S.; Mahmoud, T.; Michel, J.; Miftakhov, N.; Niebur, W.; Ovcharenko, E.; Patel, V.; Pauly, C.; Pfeifer, D.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Reinecke, S.; Riabov, Y.; Roshchin, E.; Samsonov, V.; Tarasenkova, O.; Traxler, M.; Ugur, C.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Vznuzdaev, M.

    2017-02-01

    The CBM RICH detector is an integral component of the future CBM experiment at FAIR, providing efficient electron identification and pion suppression necessary for the measurement of rare dileptonic probes in heavy ion collisions. The RICH design is based on CO2 gas as radiator, a segmented spherical glass focussing mirror with Al+MgF2 reflective coating, and Multianode Photomultipliers for efficient Cherenkov photon detection. Hamamatsu H12700 MAPMTs have recently been selected as photon sensors, following an extensive sensor evaluation, including irradiation tests to ensure sufficient radiation hardness of the MAPMTs. A brief overview of the detector design and concept is given, results on the radiation hardness of the photon sensors are shown, and the development of a FPGA-TDC based readout chain is discussed.

  18. Integration of Cloud resources in the LHCb Distributed Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Úbeda García, Mario; Méndez Muñoz, Víctor; Stagni, Federico; Cabarrou, Baptiste; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Charpentier, Philippe; Closier, Joel

    2014-06-01

    This contribution describes how Cloud resources have been integrated in the LHCb Distributed Computing. LHCb is using its specific Dirac extension (LHCbDirac) as an interware for its Distributed Computing. So far, it was seamlessly integrating Grid resources and Computer clusters. The cloud extension of DIRAC (VMDIRAC) allows the integration of Cloud computing infrastructures. It is able to interact with multiple types of infrastructures in commercial and institutional clouds, supported by multiple interfaces (Amazon EC2, OpenNebula, OpenStack and CloudStack) - instantiates, monitors and manages Virtual Machines running on this aggregation of Cloud resources. Moreover, specifications for institutional Cloud resources proposed by Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG), mainly by the High Energy Physics Unix Information Exchange (HEPiX) group, have been taken into account. Several initiatives and computing resource providers in the eScience environment have already deployed IaaS in production during 2013. Keeping this on mind, pros and cons of a cloud based infrasctructure have been studied in contrast with the current setup. As a result, this work addresses four different use cases which represent a major improvement on several levels of our infrastructure. We describe the solution implemented by LHCb for the contextualisation of the VMs based on the idea of Cloud Site. We report on operational experience of using in production several institutional Cloud resources that are thus becoming integral part of the LHCb Distributed Computing resources. Furthermore, we describe as well the gradual migration of our Service Infrastructure towards a fully distributed architecture following the Service as a Service (SaaS) model.

  19. The TORCH time-of-flight detector for particle identification and photon vertex association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo García, L.; Brook, N.; Cussans, D.; Föhl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros García, A.; van Dijk, M.

    2017-02-01

    TORCH (Time Of internally Reflected CHerenkov light) is a novel time-of-flight detector, designed to provide π /K/p particle identification up to 0~ 1 GeV/c momentum and beyond. To achieve this, a time resolution of ~ 15 ps combining information from 0~ 3 detected photons is required over a 10 m flight path. Large areas can be covered with TORCH, nominally up to 30 m2. One such application is for the LHCb experiment, to complement the particle identification capabilities of its RICH detectors. TORCH has a DIRC-like construction with 10 mm-thick synthetic amorphous fused-silica plates as a radiator. Cherenkov photons propagate by total internal reflection to the plate edges and there are focussed onto an array of position-sensitive photodetectors. Custom-built micro-channel plate photo-multipliers (MCP-PMTs) are being developed in collaboration with industry to provide the lifetime, granularity and time resolution to meet the TORCH specifications. In the present paper, laboratory tests of the MCP-PMTs developed for TORCH and its readout electronics are presented. Test beam measurements of a prototype TORCH detector in a low-momentum mixed beam of pions and protons are highlighted. Time resolutions for individual photons approaching 100 ps is achieved, after correction for dispersion effects in the quartz medium. In addition to the particle identification capabilities, the high-precision timing information that TORCH provides could be used at the high-luminosity LHC to associate high-energy photons with the correct primary interaction vertex amongst the many expected.

  20. The LHCb Vertex Locator (VELO) Pixel Detector Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, E.

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to perform high-precision measurements of CP violation and the decays of beauty and charm hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. There is a planned upgrade during Long Shutdown 2 (LS2), expected in 2019, which will allow the detector to run at higher luminosities by transforming the entire readout to a trigger-less system. This will include a substantial upgrade of the Vertex Locator (VELO), the silicon tracker that surrounds the LHCb interaction region. The VELO is moving from silicon strip technology to hybrid pixel sensors, where silicon sensors are bonded to VeloPix ASICs. Sensor prototypes have undergone rigorous testing using the Timepix3 Telescope at the SPS, CERN. The main components of the upgrade are summarised and testbeam results presented.

  1. A PCIe Gen3 based readout for the LHCb upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellato, M.; Collazuol, G.; D'Antone, I.; Durante, P.; Galli, D.; Jost, B.; Lax, I.; Liu, G.; Marconi, U.; Neufeld, N.; Schwemmer, R.; Vagnoni, V.

    2014-06-01

    The architecture of the data acquisition system foreseen for the LHCb upgrade, to be installed by 2018, is devised to readout events trigger-less, synchronously with the LHC bunch crossing rate at 40 MHz. Within this approach the readout boards act as a bridge between the front-end electronics and the High Level Trigger (HLT) computing farm. The baseline design for the LHCb readout is an ATCA board requiring dedicated crates. A local area standard network protocol is implemented in the on-board FPGAs to read out the data. The alternative solution proposed here consists in building the readout boards as PCIe peripherals of the event-builder servers. The main architectural advantage is that protocol and link-technology of the event-builder can be left open until very late, to profit from the most cost-effective industry technology available at the time of the LHC LS2.

  2. Search for New Physics in rare decays at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Johannes

    2013-08-01

    Rare heavy flavor decays provide stringent tests of the Standard Model of particle physics and allow to test for possible new Physics scenarios. The LHCb experiment at CERN is the ideal place for these searches as it has recorded the worlds largest sample of beauty mesons. The status of the rare decay analyses with 1 fb of √{s}=7 TeV of pp-collisions collected by the LHCb experiment in 2011 is reviewed. The worlds most precise measurements of the angular structure of B0→K*0μ+μ- decays is discussed, as well as the isospin asymmetry measurement in B→Kμ+μ- decays. The most stringent upper exclusion limit on the branching fraction of Bs0→μ+μ- decays is shown, as well as searches for lepton number and lepton flavor violating processes.

  3. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e..gamma.. scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by ..gamma gamma.. collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F/sub 2//sup ..gamma../(x,Q/sup 2/) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved.

  4. b -flavour tagging in pp collisions at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, V.; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    Measurements of CP violation and flavour oscillations of neutral B mesons require the knowledge of the meson flavour at the production time. Flavour-tagging algorithms in the LHCb experiment allow to perform such measurements with very high precision. Recent examples include the determination of the CKM angles 2β and 2βs . The details of these flavour-tagging algorithms are presented, together with their performances.

  5. Comparative Investigation of Shared Filesystems for the LHCb Online Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijay Kartik, S.; Neufeld, Niko

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes the investigative study undertaken to evaluate shared filesystem performance and suitability in the LHCb Online environment. Particular focus is given to the measurements and field tests designed and performed on an in-house OpenAFS setup; related comparisons with NFSv4 and GPFS (a clustered filesystem from IBM) are presented. The motivation for the investigation and the test setup arises from the need to serve common user-space like home directories, experiment software and control areas, and clustered log areas. Since the operational requirements on such user-space are stringent in terms of read-write operations (in frequency and access speed) and unobtrusive data relocation, test results are presented with emphasis on file-level performance, stability and “high-availability” of the shared filesystems. Use cases specific to the experiment operation in LHCb, including the specific handling of shared filesystems served to a cluster of 1500 diskless nodes, are described. Issues of prematurely expiring authenticated sessions are explicitly addressed, keeping in mind long-running analysis jobs on the Online cluster. In addition, quantitative test results are also presented with alternatives including NFSv4. Comparative measurements of filesystem performance benchmarks are presented, which are seen to be used as reference for decisions on potential migration of the current storage solution deployed in the LHCb online cluster.

  6. Photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Va`vra, J.

    1995-10-01

    J. Seguinot and T. Ypsilantis have recently described the theory and history of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. In this paper, I will expand on these excellent review papers, by covering the various photon detector designs in greater detail, and by including discussion of mistakes made, and detector problems encountered, along the way. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photo-electrons. For gaseous devices, this requires the correct choice of gas gain in order to prevent breakdown and wire aging, together with the use of low noise electronics having the maximum possible amplification. In addition, the detector must be constructed of materials which resist corrosion due to photosensitive materials such as, the detector enclosure must be tightly sealed in order to prevent oxygen leaks, etc. The most critical step is the selection of the photocathode material. Typically, a choice must be made between a solid (CsI) or gaseous photocathode (TMAE, TEA). A conservative approach favors a gaseous photocathode, since it is continuously being replaced by flushing, and permits the photon detectors to be easily serviced (the air sensitive photocathode can be removed at any time). In addition, it can be argued that we now know how to handle TMAE, which, as is generally accepted, is the best photocathode material available as far as quantum efficiency is concerned. However, it is a very fragile molecule, and therefore its use may result in relatively fast wire aging. A possible alternative is TEA, which, in the early days, was rejected because it requires expensive CaF{sub 2} windows, which could be contaminated easily in the region of 8.3 eV and thus lose their UV transmission.

  7. Jobs masonry in LHCb with elastic Grid Jobs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagni, F.; Charpentier, Ph

    2015-12-01

    In any distributed computing infrastructure, a job is normally forbidden to run for an indefinite amount of time. This limitation is implemented using different technologies, the most common one being the CPU time limit implemented by batch queues. It is therefore important to have a good estimate of how much CPU work a job will require: otherwise, it might be killed by the batch system, or by whatever system is controlling the jobs’ execution. In many modern interwares, the jobs are actually executed by pilot jobs, that can use the whole available time in running multiple consecutive jobs. If at some point the available time in a pilot is too short for the execution of any job, it should be released, while it could have been used efficiently by a shorter job. Within LHCbDIRAC, the LHCb extension of the DIRAC interware, we developed a simple way to fully exploit computing capabilities available to a pilot, even for resources with limited time capabilities, by adding elasticity to production MonteCarlo (MC) simulation jobs. With our approach, independently of the time available, LHCbDIRAC will always have the possibility to execute a MC job, whose length will be adapted to the available amount of time: therefore the same job, running on different computing resources with different time limits, will produce different amounts of events. The decision on the number of events to be produced is made just in time at the start of the job, when the capabilities of the resource are known. In order to know how many events a MC job will be instructed to produce, LHCbDIRAC simply requires three values: the CPU-work per event for that type of job, the power of the machine it is running on, and the time left for the job before being killed. Knowing these values, we can estimate the number of events the job will be able to simulate with the available CPU time. This paper will demonstrate that, using this simple but effective solution, LHCb manages to make a more efficient use of

  8. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  9. Novel Cherenkov photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauli, Fabio

    2005-11-01

    Gaseous detectors using multiple gas electron multiplier (GEM) electrodes permit to attain large amplification factors with a strong suppression of photon and ion-mediated feedback. With the first GEM in a cascade coated with a photosensitive layer, they provide efficient and fast single photon detection, with excellent position resolution. General performances of CsI-coated multi-GEM detectors are described, as well as a promising method of signal readout, the so-called hexaboard, a matrix of interconnected pads that permits to achieve ambiguity-free reconstruction of multi-photon events, a major requirement for RICH applications.

  10. VeloPix: the pixel ASIC for the LHCb upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poikela, T.; De Gaspari, M.; Plosila, J.; Westerlund, T.; Ballabriga, R.; Buytaert, J.; Campbell, M.; Llopart, X.; Wyllie, K.; Gromov, V.; van Beuzekom, M.; Zivkovic, V.

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb Vertex Detector (VELO) will be upgraded in 2018 along with the other subsystems of LHCb in order to enable full readout at 40 MHz, with the data fed directly to the software triggering algorithms. The upgraded VELO is a lightweight hybrid pixel detector operating in vacuum in close proximity to the LHC beams. The readout will be provided by a dedicated front-end ASIC, dubbed VeloPix, matched to the LHCb readout requirements and the 55 × 55 μm VELO pixel dimensions. The chip is closely related to the Timepix3, from the Medipix family of ASICs. The principal challenge that the chip has to meet is a hit rate of up to 900 Mhits/s, resulting in a required output bandwidth of more than 16 Gbit/s. The occupancy across the chip is also very non-uniform, and the radiation levels reach an integrated 400 Mrad over the lifetime of the detector.VeloPix is a binary pixel readout chip with a data driven readout, designed in 130 nm CMOS technology. The pixels are combined into groups of 2 × 4 super pixels, enabling a shared logic and a reduction of bandwidth due to combined address and time stamp information. The pixel hits are combined with other simultaneous hits in the same super pixel, time stamped, and immediately driven off-chip. The analog front-end must be sufficiently fast to accurately time stamp the data, with a small enough dead time to minimize data loss in the most occupied regions of the chip. The data is driven off chip with a custom designed high speed serialiser. The current status of the ASIC design, the chip architecture and the simulations will be described.

  11. The CBM RICH detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Akishin, P.; Becker, K.-H.; Belogurov, S.; Bendarouach, J.; Boldyreva, N.; Chernogorov, A.; Deveaux, C.; Dobyrn, V.; Dürr, M.; Eschke, J.; Förtsch, J.; Heep, J.; Höohne, C.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kochenda, L.; Kopfer, J.; Kravtsov, P.; Kres, I.; Lebedev, S.; Lebedeva, E.; Leonova, E.; Linev, S.; Mahmoud, T.; Michel, J.; Miftakhov, N.; Niebur, W.; Ovcharenko, E.; Pauly, C.; Pfeifer, D.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Reinecke, S.; Riabov, Y.; Roshchin, E.; Samsonov, V.; Tarasenkova, O.; Traxler, M.; Ugur, C.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Vznuzdaev, M.

    2016-05-01

    The CBM RICH detector will use CO2 as radiator gas, focussing glass mirrors with Al+MgF2 reflective and protective coating and Hamamatsu H12700 MAPMTs as photon detectors. The detector will serve for electron to pion separation up to momenta of 8 GeV/c and thus enable in CBM the measurement of electromagnetic radiation from the early and dense fireball in A+A collisions at SIS 100. In this article, the current status of the CBM RICH development will be presented including new measurements of the radiation hardness of the H12700 MAPMT and WLS coatings with p-terphenyl, the new concept for the readout electronics, and optimizations ongoing with respect to the mirror mount structure and overall geometry. Prior to the usage in CBM, part of the already ordered MAPMTs will be used to upgrade the HADES RICH detector for a new measurement campaign at SIS 18 from 2018-2020.

  12. Phosphorylation of the Light-Harvesting Complex II Isoform Lhcb2 Is Central to State Transitions1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cariti, Federica; Fucile, Geoffrey; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) is a crucial component of the photosynthetic machinery, with central roles in light capture and acclimation to changing light. The association of an LHCII trimer with PSI in the PSI-LHCII supercomplex is strictly dependent on LHCII phosphorylation mediated by the kinase STATE TRANSITION7, and is directly related to the light acclimation process called state transitions. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the LHCII trimers contain isoforms that belong to three classes: Lhcb1, Lhcb2, and Lhcb3. Only Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 can be phosphorylated in the N-terminal region. Here, we present an improved Phos-tag-based method to determine the absolute extent of phosphorylation of Lhcb1 and Lhcb2. Both classes show very similar phosphorylation kinetics during state transition. Nevertheless, only Lhcb2 is extensively phosphorylated (>98%) in PSI-LHCII, whereas phosphorylated Lhcb1 is largely excluded from this supercomplex. Both isoforms are phosphorylated to different extents in other photosystem supercomplexes and in different domains of the thylakoid membranes. The data imply that, despite their high sequence similarity, differential phosphorylation of Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 plays contrasting roles in light acclimation of photosynthesis. PMID:26438789

  13. Prospects for studying penguin decays in LHCb experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Barsuk, S. Ya. Pakhlova, G. V. Belyaev, I. M.

    2006-04-15

    Investigation of loop penguin decays of beauty hadrons seems promising in testing the predictions of the Standard Model of electroweak and strong interactions and in seeking new phenomena beyond the Standard Model. The possibility of studying the radiative penguin decays B{sup 0} {sup {yields}} K*{sup 0}{gamma}, B{sup 0}{sub s} {sup {yields}} {phi}{gamma}, and B{sup 0} {sup {yields}} {omega}{gamma} and the gluonic penguin decays B{sup 0} {sup {yields}} {phi}K{sup 0}{sub S} and B{sup 0}{sub s} {sup {yields}} {phi}{phi} in LHCb experiments is discussed.

  14. Neutral B-meson Mixing and CP Violation at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; LHCb Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    The LHCb detector is a single-arm forward spectrometer that collects data at the LHC, designed for studies of flavour physics with high precision. We present a selection of recent measurements of mixing and CP-violating parameters, including sin 2β and weak phase ϕ s, using several decays. A good understanding of the pollution from sub-leading penguin to pologies in these measurements can be achieved by measuring CP violation and polarization in the decay Bs 0→Jψ⁄K 0* and B 0→Jψ⁄ ρ 0. All results here presented are obtained using the full Run I dataset.

  15. Study of Lepton Flavor Universality in Semileptonic decays with LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Brian; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Semileptonic b-hadron decays to tau leptons provide a powerful probe for a class of new physics models that may have Higgs-like non-universal couplings to the charged leptons. Recent improvements in the measured decay rates in these channels hint at an excess relative to the expected rates in Standard Model calculations. A new development in this area is the emergence of hadron collider measurements with different systematics and backgrounds providing complimentary probes of the same or similar processes. We present the latest progress in these measurements using the LHCb 7 and 8 TeV datasets. National Science Foundation.

  16. 100 Gbps PCI-Express readout for the LHCb upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, P.; Neufeld, N.; Schwemmer, R.; Balbi, G.; Marconi, U.

    2015-04-01

    We present a new data acquisition system under development for the next upgrade of the LHCb experiment at CERN. We focus in particular on the design of a new generation of readout boards, the PCIe40, and on the viability of PCI-Express as an interconnect technology for high speed readout. We show throughput measurements across the PCI-Express bus, on Altera Stratix 5 devices, using a DMA mechanism and different synchronization schemes between the FPGA and the readout unit. Finally we discuss hardware and software design considerations necessary to achieve a data throughput of 100 Gbps in the final readout board.

  17. Measurements of the LHCb software stack on the ARM architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijay Kartik, S.; Couturier, Ben; Clemencic, Marco; Neufeld, Niko

    2014-06-01

    The ARM architecture is a power-efficient design that is used in most processors in mobile devices all around the world today since they provide reasonable compute performance per watt. The current LHCb software stack is designed (and thus expected) to build and run on machines with the x86/x86_64 architecture. This paper outlines the process of measuring the performance of the LHCb software stack on the ARM architecture - specifically, the ARMv7 architecture on Cortex-A9 processors from NVIDIA and on full-fledged ARM servers with chipsets from Calxeda - and makes comparisons with the performance on x86_64 architectures on the Intel Xeon L5520/X5650 and AMD Opteron 6272. The paper emphasises the aspects of performance per core with respect to the power drawn by the compute nodes for the given performance - this ensures a fair real-world comparison with much more 'powerful' Intel/AMD processors. The comparisons of these real workloads in the context of LHCb are also complemented with the standard synthetic benchmarks HEPSPEC and Coremark. The pitfalls and solutions for the non-trivial task of porting the source code to build for the ARMv7 instruction set are presented. The specific changes in the build process needed for ARM-specific portions of the software stack are described, to serve as pointers for further attempts taken up by other groups in this direction. Cases where architecture-specific tweaks at the assembler lever (both in ROOT and the LHCb software stack) were needed for a successful compile are detailed - these cases are good indicators of where/how the software stack as well as the build system can be made more portable and multi-arch friendly. The experience gained from the tasks described in this paper are intended to i) assist in making an informed choice about ARM-based server solutions as a feasible low-power alternative to the current compute nodes, and ii) revisit the software design and build system for portability and generic improvements.

  18. Measuring the D0 lifetime at the LHCb Masterclass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trišović, Ana

    2016-04-01

    The LHCb Event Display was made for educational purposes at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The project was implemented as a stand-alone application using C++ and ROOT, a framework developed by CERN for data analysis. This paper outlines the development and architecture of the application in detail, as well as the motivation for the development and the goals of the exercise. The application focuses on the visualization of events recorded by the LHCb detector, where an event represents a set of charged particle tracks in one proton-proton collision. The application allows students to save this information and calculate the invariant mass for any pair of particles. Furthermore, the students can use additional calculating tools in the application and build up a histogram of these invariant masses. The goal for the students is to find a D0 particle in the event, which decays into the two different particles selected by the students. Even if a student doesn't find all the decays successfully, they will be able to complete the exercise and get a meaningful set of results. The application also offers detailed instructions and inline help available in five languages: English, Italian, French, German and Romanian.

  19. SciFi - A large scintillating fibre tracker for LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirn, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. Concept, design and operational parameters are driven by the challenging LHC environment including significant ionising and neutron radiation levels. Over a total active surface of 360 m2 the SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres (∅ = 0.25 mm) read out by state-of-the-art multi-channel Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) arrays. A custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The project is now at the transition from R&D to series production. We will present the evolution of the design and the latest lab and test beam results.

  20. Disk storage management for LHCb based on Data Popularity estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hushchyn, Mikhail; Charpentier, Philippe; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an algorithm providing recommendations for optimizing the LHCb data storage. The LHCb data storage system is a hybrid system. All datasets are kept as archives on magnetic tapes. The most popular datasets are kept on disks. The algorithm takes the dataset usage history and metadata (size, type, configuration etc.) to generate a recommendation report. This article presents how we use machine learning algorithms to predict future data popularity. Using these predictions it is possible to estimate which datasets should be removed from disk. We use regression algorithms and time series analysis to find the optimal number of replicas for datasets that are kept on disk. Based on the data popularity and the number of replicas optimization, the algorithm minimizes a loss function to find the optimal data distribution. The loss function represents all requirements for data distribution in the data storage system. We demonstrate how our algorithm helps to save disk space and to reduce waiting times for jobs using this data.

  1. More lepton flavor violating observables for LHCb's run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadagnoli, Diego; Melikhov, Dmitri; Reboud, Méril

    2016-09-01

    The RK measurement by LHCb suggests non-standard lepton non-universality (LNU) to occur in b → sℓ+ℓ- transitions, with effects in muons rather than electrons. A number of other measurements of b → sℓ+ℓ- transitions by LHCb and B-factories display disagreement with the SM predictions and, remarkably, these discrepancies are consistent in magnitude and sign with the RK effect. Non-standard LNU suggests non-standard lepton flavor violation (LFV) as well, for example in B → Kℓℓ‧ and Bs → ℓℓ‧. There are good reasons to expect that the new effects may be larger for generations closer to the third one. In this case, the Bs → μe decay may be the most difficult to reach experimentally. We propose and study in detail the radiative counterpart of this decay, namely Bs → μeγ, whereby the chiral-suppression factor is replaced by a factor of order α / π. A measurement of this mode would be sensitive to the same physics as the purely leptonic LFV decay and, depending on experimental efficiencies, it may be more accessible. A realistic expectation is a factor of two improvement in statistics for either of the Bd,s modes.

  2. LHCb experience with running jobs in virtual machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNab, A.; Stagni, F.; Luzzi, C.

    2015-12-01

    The LHCb experiment has been running production jobs in virtual machines since 2013 as part of its DIRAC-based infrastructure. We describe the architecture of these virtual machines and the steps taken to replicate the WLCG worker node environment expected by user and production jobs. This relies on the uCernVM system for providing root images for virtual machines. We use the CernVM-FS distributed filesystem to supply the root partition files, the LHCb software stack, and the bootstrapping scripts necessary to configure the virtual machines for us. Using this approach, we have been able to minimise the amount of contextualisation which must be provided by the virtual machine managers. We explain the process by which the virtual machine is able to receive payload jobs submitted to DIRAC by users and production managers, and how this differs from payloads executed within conventional DIRAC pilot jobs on batch queue based sites. We describe our operational experiences in running production on VM based sites managed using Vcycle/OpenStack, Vac, and HTCondor Vacuum. Finally we show how our use of these resources is monitored using Ganglia and DIRAC.

  3. The LHCb Data Acquisition and High Level Trigger Processing Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, M.; Gaspar, C.; Jost, B.; Neufeld, N.

    2015-12-01

    The LHCb experiment at the LHC accelerator at CERN collects collisions of particle bunches at 40 MHz. After a first level of hardware trigger with an output rate of 1 MHz, the physically interesting collisions are selected by running dedicated trigger algorithms in the High Level Trigger (HLT) computing farm. This farm consists of up to roughly 25000 CPU cores in roughly 1750 physical nodes each equipped with up to 4 TB local storage space. This work describes the LHCb online system with an emphasis on the developments implemented during the current long shutdown (LS1). We will elaborate the architecture to treble the available CPU power of the HLT farm and the technicalities to determine and verify precise calibration and alignment constants which are fed to the HLT event selection procedure. We will describe how the constants are fed into a two stage HLT event selection facility using extensively the local disk buffering capabilities on the worker nodes. With the installed disk buffers, the CPU resources can be used during periods of up to ten days without beams. These periods in the past accounted to more than 70% of the total time.

  4. A brief review of measurements of electroweak bosons at the LHCb experiment in LHC Run 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barter, William

    2016-09-01

    The LHCb experiment is one of four major experiments at the large hadron collider (LHC). Despite being designed for the study of beauty and charm particles, it has made important contributions in other areas, such as the production and decay of W and Z bosons. Such measurements can be used to study and constrain parton distribution functions (PDFs), as well as to test perturbative quantum chromodynamics (QCD) in hard scattering processes. The angular structure of Z boson decays to leptons can also be studied and used to measure the weak mixing angle. The phase-space probed by LHCb is particularly sensitive to this quantity, and the LHCb measurement using the dimuon final state is currently the most precise determination of sin2𝜃 eff.lept. at the LHC. LHCb measurements made using data collected during the first period of LHC operations (LHC Run 1) are discussed in this review. The paper also considers the potential impact of related future measurements.

  5. On-detector Electronics for the LHCb VELO Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, S.

    2017-02-01

    The LHCb Experiment is designed for precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. The experiment will be upgraded to a trigger-less system reading out the full detector at a 40 MHz event rate with all selection algorithms executed in a CPU farm. The upgraded Vertex Locator will be a hybrid pixel detector read out by the VeloPix ASIC with on-chip zero-suppression. The overview of the system and the design of the VELO on-detector electronics that include the front-end hybrid, the opto-conversion and power distribution boards will be summarised. The results from the evaluation of these prototypes and further enhancement techniques will be discussed.

  6. Radiation hard programmable delay line for LHCb calorimeter upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauricio, J.; Gascón, D.; Vilasís, X.; Picatoste, E.; Machefert, F.; Lefrancois, J.; Duarte, O.; Beigbeder, C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a SPI-programmable clock delay chip based on a Delay Locked Loop (DLL) in order to shift the phase of the LHC clock (25 ns) in steps of 1ns, with less than 5 ps jitter and 23 ps of DNL. The delay lines will be integrated into ICECAL, the LHCb calorimeter front-end analog signal processing ASIC in the near future. The stringent noise requirements on the ASIC imply minimizing the noise contribution of digital components. This is accomplished by implementing the DLL in differential mode. To achieve the required radiation tolerance several techniques are applied: double guard rings between PMOS and NMOS transistors as well as glitch suppressors and TMR Registers. This 5.7 mm2 chip has been implemented in CMOS 0.35 μm technology.

  7. Identification of beauty and charm quark jets at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The LHCb Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    Identification of jets originating from beauty and charm quarks is important for measuring Standard Model processes and for searching for new physics. The performance of algorithms developed to select b- and c-quark jets is measured using data recorded by LHCb from proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV in 2011 and at √s = 8 TeV in 2012. The efficiency for identifying a b(c) jet is about 65%(25%) with a probability for misidentifying a light-parton jet of 0.3% for jets with transverse momentum pT > 20GeV and pseudorapidity 2.2 < η < 4.2. The dependence of the performance on the pT and η of the jet is also measured.

  8. A History-based Estimation for LHCb job requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauschmayr, Nathalie

    2015-12-01

    The main goal of a Workload Management System (WMS) is to find and allocate resources for the given tasks. The more and better job information the WMS receives, the easier will be to accomplish its task, which directly translates into higher utilization of resources. Traditionally, the information associated with each job, like expected runtime, is defined beforehand by the Production Manager in best case and fixed arbitrary values by default. In the case of LHCb's Workload Management System no mechanisms are provided which automate the estimation of job requirements. As a result, much more CPU time is normally requested than actually needed. Particularly, in the context of multicore jobs this presents a major problem, since single- and multicore jobs shall share the same resources. Consequently, grid sites need to rely on estimations given by the VOs in order to not decrease the utilization of their worker nodes when making multicore job slots available. The main reason for going to multicore jobs is the reduction of the overall memory footprint. Therefore, it also needs to be studied how memory consumption of jobs can be estimated. A detailed workload analysis of past LHCb jobs is presented. It includes a study of job features and their correlation with runtime and memory consumption. Following the features, a supervised learning algorithm is developed based on a history based prediction. The aim is to learn over time how jobs’ runtime and memory evolve influenced due to changes in experiment conditions and software versions. It will be shown that estimation can be notably improved if experiment conditions are taken into account.

  9. The LHCb Experience on the Grid from the DIRAC Accounting Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casajús, Adrian; Graciani, Ricardo; Puig, Albert; Vázquez, Ricardo; LHCb Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    DIRAC is the software framework developed by LHCb to manage all its computing operations on the Grid. Since 2003 it has been used for large scale Monte Carlo simulation productions and for user analysis of these data. Since the end of 2009, with the start-up of LHC, DIRAC also takes care of the distribution, reconstruction, selection and analysis of the physics data taken by the detector apparatus. During 2009, DIRAC executed almost 5 million jobs for LHCb. In order to execute this workload slightly over 6 million of pilot jobs were submitted, out of which approximately one third were aborted by the Grid infrastructure. In 2010, thanks to their improved efficiency, DIRAC pilots are able, on average, to match and execute between 2 and 3 LHCb jobs during their lifetime, largely reducing the load on the Grid infrastructure. Given the large amount of submitted jobs and used resources, it becomes essential to store detailed information about their execution to track the behaviour of the system. The DIRAC Accounting system takes care, among other things, to collect and store data concerning the execution of jobs and pilots, making it available to everyone via the public interface of the LHCb DIRAC web portal in the form of time-binned accumulated distributions. The analysis of the raw accounting data stored allow us to improve and debug the system performance, as well as, to give a detailed picture on how LHCb uses its Grid resources. A new tool has been developed to extract the raw records from the DIRAC Accounting database and to transform them into ROOT files for subsequent study. This contribution presents an analysis of such data both for LHCb jobs and the corresponding pilots, including resource usage, number of pilots per job, job efficiency and other relevant variables that will help to further improving the LHCb Grid experience.

  10. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector and its performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, S.

    2017-02-01

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the LHC, designed to perform high precision studies of B and D hadrons. In Run II of the LHC, a new scheme for the software trigger at LHCb allows splitting the triggering of events in two stages, giving room to perform the detector alignment and calibration in real time. In the novel detector alignment and calibration strategy for Run II, data collected at the start of the fill are processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment constants, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. This allows identical constants to be used in the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline selected events. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The larger timing budget, available in the trigger, allows us to perform the same track reconstruction online and offline. This enables LHCb to achieve the best reconstruction performance already in the trigger, and allows physics analyses to be performed directly on the data produced by the trigger reconstruction. The novel real-time processing strategy at LHCb is discussed from both the technical and operational point of view. The overall performance of the LHCb detector on the data of Run II is presented as well.

  11. Study for the LHCb upgrade read-out board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachemiche, J.-P.; Duval, P.-Y.; Hachon, F.; Le Gac, R.; Marin, F.

    2010-12-01

    The LHCb experiment envisages to upgrade its readout electronics in order to increase the readout rate from 1 MHz to 40 MHz. This electronics upgrade is very challenging, since readout boards will have to handle a higher number of serial links with an increased bandwidth. In addition, the new communication protocol (GBT) developed by the CERN micro-electronics group mixes data acquisition, slow control and clock distribution on the same link. To explore the feasibility of such a readout system, elementary building blocks have been studied. Their goals are multiple: understand signal integrity when using highly integrated high speed serial links running at 8 - 10 Gbits/s; test the implementation of the GBT protocol within FPGAs; understand advantages and limitations of commercial standard with a predefined interconnection topology; validate ideas on how to control easily such a system. We designed two boards compliant with the xTCA standard which meets an increasing interest in the physics community. The first one is a generic handling 32 high speed serial links. The second one is a communication switch allowing the generic boards to communicate together. In this paper, we present jitter measurements obtained at 8 Gbits/s on serial link. We describe the versatility of this architecture which can be tuned from basic acquisition systems to more high-end complex ones. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of a low cost scalable control system based on NIOS core embedded in FPGAs.

  12. Jet reconstruction in LHCb searching for Higgs-like particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camboni, Alessandro

    2009-06-01

    One of the greatest challenges in High Energy Physics is the discovery of the Higgs boson which is responsible for the Standard Model particles mass generation. Below ~150 GeV/c2 the Higgs decay into two b-quarks, H → bbar b dominates. The two quarks form a string which fragments, giving rise to hadronization in jets containing b-hadrons. The study is focused on the channel where the Higgs boson is produced in association with a gauge boson decaying leptonically H + W → bbar b + lv and H + Z → bbar b + ll and Higgs masses are in the range 115 - 140 GeV/c2. The gauge bosons decay produces hard leptons quite often isolated from the b-jets. Hence an isolated lepton with high transverse momentum is required in order to reject the large QCD background. The aim of this work is to explore the feasibility to observe Higgs-like particles at the LHCb experiment at CERN by exploiting the detector capabilities to identify b-jets.

  13. The LHCb Simulation Application, Gauss: Design, Evolution and Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemencic, M.; Corti, G.; Easo, S.; Jones, C. R.; Miglioranzi, S.; Pappagallo, M.; Robbe, P.; LHCb Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The LHCb simulation application, Gauss, is based on the Gaudi framework and on experiment basic components such as the Event Model and Detector Description. Gauss also depends on external libraries for the generation of the primary events (PYTHIA 6, EvtGen, etc.) and on GEANT4 for particle transport in the experimental setup. The application supports the production of different types of events from minimum bias to B physics signals and particle guns. It is used for purely generator-level studies as well as full simulations. Gauss is used both directly by users and in massive central productions on the grid. The design and implementation of the application and its evolution due to evolving requirements will be described as in the case of the recently adopted Python-based configuration or the possibility of taking into account detectors conditions via a Simulation Conditions database. The challenge of supporting at the same time the flexibililty needed for the different tasks for which it is used, from evaluation of physics reach to background modeling, together with the stability and reliabilty of the code will also be described.

  14. Optimization of Large Scale HEP Data Analysis in LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remenska, Daniela; Aaij, Roel; Raven, Gerhard; Merk, Marcel; Templon, Jeff; Bril, Reinder J.; LHCb Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    Observation has lead to a conclusion that the physics analysis jobs run by LHCb physicists on a local computing farm (i.e. non-grid) require more efficient access to the data which resides on the Grid. Our experiments have shown that the I/O bound nature of the analysis jobs in combination with the latency due to the remote access protocols (e.g. rfio, dcap) cause a low CPU efficiency of these jobs. In addition to causing a low CPU efficiency, the remote access protocols give rise to high overhead (in terms of amount of data transferred). This paper gives an overview of the concept of pre-fetching and caching of input files in the proximity of the processing resources, which is exploited to cope with the I/O bound analysis jobs. The files are copied from Grid storage elements (using GridFTP), while concurrently performing computations, inspired from a similar idea used in the ATLAS experiment. The results illustrate that this file staging approach is relatively insensitive to the original location of the data, and a significant improvement can be achieved in terms of the CPU efficiency of an analysis job. Dealing with scalability of such a solution on the Grid environment is discussed briefly.

  15. γ Determination from TREE Decays (B → DK) with LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tilburg, J.

    2008-12-01

    Direct measurements of the angle γ of the CKM unitarity triangle still have a relatively large uncertainty. B → DK decays provide a theoretically clean way of measuring γ, as they involve only tree diagrams. LHCb will measure γ using various methods. One method uses the B0s -> D∓ sK± decay, where CP violation can be measured from the time-dependent decay rates. The corresponding sensitivity on γ with 2 fb-1 of data is expected to be about 13°. Other methods use B → D0K decays, where the D0 and /line{D}0 decay into the same final state. With the ADS+GLW strategy the sensitivity ranges between 5-15° for the charged B decays and between 7-10° for the neutral B decays. With the Dalitz method the sensitivity is estimated to be 8° using charged B decays. Combining all methods a sensitivity on γ with 2 fb-1 of data is estimated to be roughly 5°.

  16. A Monitoring System for the LHCb Data Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, João; Gaspar, Clara; Jost, Beat; Frank, Markus; Cardoso, Luis G.

    2017-06-01

    The LHCb experiment uses the LHC accelerator for the collisions that produce the physics data necessary for analysis. The data produced by the detector by measuring the results of the collisions at a rate of 40 MHz are read out by a complex data acquisition (DAQ) system, which is summarily described in this paper. Distributed systems of such dimensions rely on monitoring and control systems that account for the numerous faults that can happen throughout the whole operation. With this in mind, a new system was created to extend the monitoring of the readout system, in this case by providing an overview of what is happening in each stage of the DAQ process, starting in the hardware trigger performed right after the detector measurements and ending in the local storage of the experiment. This system, a complement to the current run control (experimental control system), intends to shorten reaction times when a problem occurs by providing the operators with detailed information of where a certain fault is occurring. The architecture of the tool and its utilization by the experiment operators are described in this paper.

  17. Photonic Hypercrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narimanov, Evgenii E.

    2014-10-01

    We introduce a new "universality class" of artificial optical media—photonic hypercrystals. These hyperbolic metamaterials, with periodic spatial variation of dielectric permittivity on subwavelength scale, combine the features of optical metamaterials and photonic crystals. In particular, surface waves supported by a hypercrystal possess the properties of both the optical Tamm states in photonic crystals and surface-plasmon polaritons at the metal-dielectric interface.

  18. Photon absorptiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the detection and treatment of osteoporosis. This paper is a review of the merits and limitations of the various noninvasive modalities currently available for the measurement of bone mineral density with special emphasis placed upon the nuclear medicine techniques of single-photon and dual-photon absorptiometry. The clinicians should come away with an understanding of the relative advantages and disadvantages of photon absorptiometry and its optimal clinical application. 49 references.

  19. Topological photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, S. C.

    2008-03-01

    We associate intrinsic energy equal to hν /2 with the spin angular momentum of photon, and propose a topological model based on orbifold in space and tifold in time as topological obstructions. The model is substantiated using vector wavefield disclinations. The physical photon is suggested to be a particlelike topological photon and a propagating wave such that the energy hν of photon is equally divided between spin energy and translational energy, corresponding to linear momentum of hν /c. The enigma of wave-particle duality finds natural resolution, and the proposed model gives new insights into the phenomena of interference and emission of radiation.

  20. Characteristics of magnetic shields for protection PMT in the LHCb hadron calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrenko, V. V.; Vlasik, K. F.; Grachev, V. M.; Muravyev-Smirnov, S. S.; Novikov, A. S.; Ulin, S. E.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Shustov, A. E.; Petrenko, D. V.; Chernysheva, I. V.; Lobova, E. I.; Nepochataya, O. E.

    2017-01-01

    CERN is preparing the new experiment aimed at the detection of weakly interacting massive long-lived particles. The experiment was called SHiP. The instrumental and technological solutions successfully used in experimental setups ATLAS, LHCb and others will be applied in experimental setup SHiP. One of these units is a hadrons calorimeter. It uses several thousands photomultiplier tubes (PMT) placed in protective magnetic shields because PMTs are located near strong permanent magnets. Taking into account that since the creation of the experimental setup LHCb has been passed more than 10 years and there are new manufacturing techniques of magnetic screens appeared, we investigate the characteristics of shielding screens used in the LHCb, and proposed the recommendations to magnetic screens’ designs for SHiP experiment.

  1. An Information System to Access Status Information of the LHCb Online

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, M.; Gaspar, C.

    2012-12-01

    The LHCb collaboration consists of roughly 700 physicists from 52 institutes and universities. Most of the collaborating physicists - including subdetector experts - are not permanently based at CERN. This paper describes the architecture used to publish data internal to the LHCb experiment control- and data acquisition system to the World Wide Web. Collaborators can access the online (sub-) system status and the system performance directly from the institute abroad, from home or from a smart phone without the need of direct access to the online computing infrastructure.

  2. Implementing a Domain Specific Language to configure and run LHCb Continuous Integration builds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemencic, M.; Couturier, B.

    2015-12-01

    The new LHCb nightly build system described at CHEP 2013 was limited by the use of JSON files for its configuration. JSON had been chosen as a temporary solution to maintain backward compatibility towards the old XML format by means of a translation function. Modern languages like Python leverage on meta-programming techniques to enable the development of Domain Specific Languages (DSLs). In this contribution we will present the advantages of such techniques and how they have been used to implement a DSL that can be used to both describe the configuration of the LHCb Nightly Builds and actually operate them.

  3. The photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Russell L.

    2009-10-01

    There are no TEM waves, only photons. Lets build a photon, using a radio antenna. A short antenna (2L<< λ) simplifies the calculation, letting B fall off everywhere as 1/r^2. The Biot-Savart law finds B = (μ0/4π)(LI0/r^2)θφt. The magnetic flux thru a semi-circle of radius λ/2 is set equal to the flux quantum h/e, determining the needed source strength, LI0. From this, one can integrate the magnetic energy density over a sphere of radius λ/2 and finds it to be 1.0121 hc/λ. Pretty close. A B field collapses when the current ceases, but the photon evades this by creating a ɛ0E / t displacement current at center that fully supports the toroidal B assembly as it moves at c. This E=vxB arises because the photon moves at c. Stopped, a photon decays. At every point along the photon's path, an observer will note a transient oscillation of an E field. This sources the EM ``guiding wave'', carrying little or no energy and expanding at c. At the head of the photon, all these spherical guiding waves gather ``in-phase'' as a planar wavefront. This model speaks to all the many things we know about light. The photon is tiny, but its guiding wave is huge.

  4. The PCIe-based readout system for the LHCb experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachemiche, J. P.; Duval, P. Y.; Hachon, F.; Le Gac, R.; Réthoré, F.

    2016-02-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study differences between particles and anti-particles as well as very rare decays in the beauty and charm sector at the LHC. The detector will be upgraded in 2019 in order to significantly increase its efficiency, by removing the first-level hardware trigger. The upgrade experiment will implement a trigger-less readout system in which all the data from every LHC bunch-crossing are transported to the computing farm over 12000 optical links without hardware filtering. The event building and event selection are carried out entirely in the farm. Another original feature of the system is that data transmitted through these fibres arrive directly to computers through a specially designed PCIe card called PCIe40. The same board handles the data acquisition flow and the distribution of fast and slow controls to the detector front-end electronics. It embeds one of the most powerful FPGAs currently available on the market with 1.2 million logic cells. The board has a bandwidth of 480 Gbits/s in both input and output over optical links and 100 Gbits/s over the PCI Express bus to the CPU. We will present how data circulate through the board and in the PC server for achieving the event building. We will focus on specific issues regarding the design of such a board with a very large FPGA, in particular in terms of power supply dimensioning and thermal simulations. The features of the board will be detailed and we will finally present the first performance measurements.

  5. Kali: The framework for fine calibration of the LHCb Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Ivan; Savrina, Daria; Graciani, Ricardo; Puig, Albert; LHCb Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The precise calibration (at a level of below 1%) of the electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) of the LHCb experiment is an essential task for the fulfilment of the LHCb physics program. The final step of this task is performed with two calibration methods using the real data from the experimental setup. It is a very CPU-consuming procedure as both methods require processing of Script O(108) events which must be selected, reconstructed and analyzed. In this document we present the Kali framework developed within the LHCb software framework, which implements these two final calibration methods. It is integrated with Grid middleware and makes use of parallelism tools, such as python parallel processing modules, to provide an efficient way, both time and disk wise, for the final ECAL calibration. The results of the fine calibration with the very first data collected by the LHCb experiment will also be presented. With the use of the Kali framework it took only two days of processing and allowed to achieve a calibration accuracy of 2-2.5% for the different ECAL areas.

  6. CP Violation in b- and c-hadron decays at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkamp, Olaf; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    Testing the Standard Model of particle physics by precision measurements of CP violating observables in the decays of b and c hadrons has been one of the design goals of the LHCb experiment. World-leading measurements have been performed of the semileptonic asymmetry, {a}ssl, and of the mixing-induced CP-violating phase ϕs in the {B}s0{\\bar{B}}s0 system. The CKM angle γ is still the least known angle of the Unitarity Triangle, and the only one easily accessible using tree-level decays. A recent combination of LHCb measurements in various B → DK decay modes has yielded the most precise determination of γ from a single experiment to date. The LHCb experiment is collecting unprecedented samples of beauty baryons, allowing for the first time to study CP violating observables in their decays. A recent analysis provided the first evidence for CP violation in the beauty baryon sector. Finally, LHCb has the largest samples of charmed hadron decays collected by any experiment to date. These samples yield some of the world’s most sensitive searches for direct and indirect CP violation in the charm sector.

  7. Photon generator

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni

    2002-01-01

    A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

  8. The photon: issues of integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, D. L.

    2013-10-01

    A richly diverse range of phenomena and applications, frequently in the context of laser applications, owe their means of operation to the properties of the photon. Yet, since the arrival of the laser, the distinctive and often paradoxical nature of the photon has become more than ever evident, and what the optics community now understands by a `photon' has become richer - certainly less simple, than Einstein's original conception. There has been a marked expansion in the pace of development since the now familiar derivative term `photonics' first emerged, and in much current theory any dividing line between `real' and `virtual' photons proves to be illusory. So if, in this technical sense, no photon can ever be regarded as entirely real, one is drawn to deeper questions of whether the photon is `real' in the broader sense of reality. Some would argue that electromagnetic fields are closer to irreducible reality. Yet whether we elect to describe optical phenomena in terms of fields or photons, neither represents what is actually measured. The surest ground has to be found where theory is cast in terms that explain or predict actual observations, under given conditions. It is consistent with the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics that derivations should not prescribe what intervenes between setup and measurement, but instead allow for all possibilities. Indeed, one of the beauties of the associated mathematics is its capacity to home in on possibilities that most closely conform to post-event physical interpretation. Still, we can ask: how much do or can we know about the photon itself? How much information could this entity contain or convey? And, how essential is a photonic formulation of theory? This study focuses on some of the key issues.

  9. Photon diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, John

    2009-11-01

    In current light models, a particle-like model of light is inconsistent with diffraction observations. A model of light is proposed wherein photon inferences are combined with the cosmological scalar potential model (SPM). That the photon is a surface with zero surface area in the travel direction is inferred from the Michelson-Morley experiment. That the photons in slits are mathematically treated as a linear antenna array (LAA) is inferred from the comparison of the transmission grating interference pattern and the single slit diffraction pattern. That photons induce a LAA wave into the plenum is inferred from the fractal model. Similarly, the component of the photon (the hod) is treated as a single antenna radiating a potential wave into the plenum. That photons are guided by action on the surface of the hod is inferred from the SPM. The plenum potential waves are a real field (not complex) that forms valleys, consistent with the pilot waves of the Bohm interpretation of quantum mechanics. Therefore, the Afshar experiment result is explained, supports Bohm, and falsifies Copenhagen. The papers may be viewed at http://web.citcom.net/˜scjh/.

  10. Photonic lanterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon-Saval, Sergio G.; Argyros, Alexander; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2013-12-01

    Multimode optical fibers have been primarily (and almost solely) used as "light pipes" in short distance telecommunications and in remote and astronomical spectroscopy. The modal properties of the multimode waveguides are rarely exploited and mostly discussed in the context of guiding light. Until recently, most photonic applications in the applied sciences have arisen from developments in telecommunications. However, the photonic lantern is one of several devices that arose to solve problems in astrophotonics and space photonics. Interestingly, these devices are now being explored for use in telecommunications and are likely to find commercial use in the next few years, particularly in the development of compact spectrographs. Photonic lanterns allow for a low-loss transformation of a multimode waveguide into a discrete number of single-mode waveguides and vice versa, thus enabling the use of single-mode photonic technologies in multimode systems. In this review, we will discuss the theory and function of the photonic lantern, along with several different variants of the technology. We will also discuss some of its applications in more detail. Furthermore, we foreshadow future applications of this technology to the field of nanophotonics.

  11. The specific localizations of phosphorylated Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 isoforms reveal the role of Lhcb2 in the formation of the PSI-LHCII supercomplex in Arabidopsis during state transitions.

    PubMed

    Crepin, Aurelie; Caffarri, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    State transitions are an important photosynthetic short-term response that maintains the excitation balance between photosystems I (PSI) and II (PSII). In plants, when PSII is preferentially excited, LHCII, the main heterotrimeric light harvesting complex of PSII, is phosphorylated by the STN7 kinase, detaches from PSII and moves to PSI to equilibrate the relative absorption of the two photosystems (State II). When PSI is preferentially excited LHCII is dephosphorylated by the PPH1 (TAP38) phosphatase, and returns to PSII (State I). Phosphorylation of LHCII that remain bound to PSII has also been observed. Although the kinetics of LHCII phosphorylation are well known from a qualitative standpoint, the absolute phosphorylation levels of LHCII (and its isoforms) bound to PSI and PSII have been little studied. In this work we thoroughly investigated the phosphorylation level of the Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 isoforms that compose LHCII in PSI-LHCII and PSII-LHCII supercomplexes purified from WT and state transition mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that, at most, 40% of the monomers that make up PSI-bound LHCII trimers are phosphorylated. Phosphorylation was much lower in PSII-bound LHCII trimers reaching only 15-20%. Dephosphorylation assays using a recombinant PPH1 phosphatase allowed us to investigate the role of the two isoforms during state transitions. Our results strongly suggest that a single phosphorylated Lhcb2 is sufficient for the formation of the PSI-LHCII supercomplex. These results are a step towards a refined model of the state transition phenomenon and a better understanding of the short-term response to changes in light conditions in plants.

  12. The COMPASS RICH-1 detector upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbon, P.; Alekseev, M.; Angerer, H.; Apollonio, M.; Birsa, R.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Busso, L.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Colantoni, M. L.; Costa, S.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dafni, T.; Delagnes, E.; Deschamps, H.; Diaz, V.; Dibiase, N.; Duic, V.; Eyrich, W.; Faso, D.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fischer, H.; Gerassimov, S.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Hagemann, R.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F. H.; Joosten, R.; Ketzer, B.; Königsmann, K.; Kolosov, V. N.; Konorov, I.; Kramer, D.; Kunne, F.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Mann, A.; Martin, A.; Menon, G.; Mutter, A.; Nähle, O.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Pagano, P.; Panebianco, S.; Panzieri, D.; Paul, S.; Pesaro, G.; Polak, J.; Rebourgeard, P.; Robinet, F.; Rocco, E.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schröder, W.; Silva, L.; Slunecka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Steiger, L.; Sulc, M.; Svec, M.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Wollny, H.

    2008-08-01

    The COMPASS experiment at CERN provides hadron identification in a wide momentum range employing a large size gaseous Ring Imaging CHerenkov detector (RICH). The presence of large uncorrelated background in the COMPASS environment was limiting the efficiency of COMPASS RICH-1 in the very forward regime. A major upgrade of RICH-1 required a new technique for Cherenkov photon detection at count rates of several 106/s per channel in the central detector part, and a read-out system allowing for trigger rates of up to 100 kHz. To cope with these requirements, the photon detectors of the central region have been replaced with a fast photon detection system described here, while, in the peripheral regions, the existing multi-wire proportional chambers with CsI photo-cathodes have been equipped with a new read-out system based on APV preamplifiers and flash ADC chips. The new system consists of multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMTs) coupled to individual fused silica lens telescopes, and fast read-out electronics based on the MAD4 amplifier-discriminator and the dead-time free F1 TDC chip. The project was completely designed and implemented in less than two years: The upgraded detector is in operation since the 2006 CERN SPS run. We present the photon detection design, constructive aspects and test studies to characterise the single photon response of the MAPMTs coupled to the read-out system as well as the detector performance based on the 2006 data.

  13. Portal Connecting Dark Photons and Axions.

    PubMed

    Kaneta, Kunio; Lee, Hye-Sung; Yun, Seokhoon

    2017-03-10

    The dark photon and the axion (or axionlike particle) are popular light particles of the hidden sector. Each of them has been actively searched for through the couplings called the vector portal and the axion portal. We introduce a new portal connecting the dark photon and the axion (axion-photon-dark photon, axion-dark photon-dark photon), which emerges in the presence of the two particles. This dark axion portal is genuinely new couplings, not just from a product of the vector portal and the axion portal, because of the internal structure of these couplings. We present a simple model that realizes the dark axion portal and discuss why it warrants a rich phenomenology.

  14. Portal Connecting Dark Photons and Axions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneta, Kunio; Lee, Hye-Sung; Yun, Seokhoon

    2017-03-01

    The dark photon and the axion (or axionlike particle) are popular light particles of the hidden sector. Each of them has been actively searched for through the couplings called the vector portal and the axion portal. We introduce a new portal connecting the dark photon and the axion (axion-photon-dark photon, axion-dark photon-dark photon), which emerges in the presence of the two particles. This dark axion portal is genuinely new couplings, not just from a product of the vector portal and the axion portal, because of the internal structure of these couplings. We present a simple model that realizes the dark axion portal and discuss why it warrants a rich phenomenology.

  15. Green photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Frederic

    2012-02-01

    Photonics, the broad merger of electronics with the optical sciences, encompasses such a wide swath of technology that its impact is almost universal in our everyday lives. This is a broad overview of some aspects of the industry and their contribution to the ‘green’ or environmental movement. The rationale for energy conservation is briefly discussed and the impact of photonics on our everyday lives and certain industries is described. Some opinions from industry are presented along with market estimates. References are provided to some of the most recent research in these areas.

  16. Vesicle Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Scott, E. A.; Roke, Sylvie; Hubbell, J. A.; Psaltis, D.

    2013-04-03

    Thin membranes, under appropriate boundary conditions, can self-assemble into vesicles, nanoscale bubbles that encapsulate and hence protect or transport molecular payloads. In this paper, we review the types and applications of light fields interacting with vesicles. By encapsulating light-emitting molecules (e.g. dyes, fluorescent proteins, or quantum dots), vesicles can act as particles and imaging agents. Vesicle imaging can take place also under second harmonic generation from vesicle membrane, as well as employing mass spectrometry. Light fields can also be employed to transport vesicles using optical tweezers (photon momentum) or directly pertrurbe the stability of vesicles and hence trigger the delivery of the encapsulated payload (photon energy).

  17. Photonic Bandgaps in Photonic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok; Gates, Amanda L.; Fuller, Kirk A.; Gregory, Don A.; Witherow, William K.; Paley, Mark S.; Frazier, Donald O.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This talk will focus on photonic bandgaps that arise due to nearly free photon and tight-binding effects in coupled microparticle and ring-resonator systems. The Mie formulation for homogeneous spheres is generalized to handle core/shell systems and multiple concentric layers in a manner that exploits an analogy with stratified planar systems, thereby allowing concentric multi-layered structures to be treated as photonic bandgap (PBG) materials. Representative results from a Mie code employing this analogy demonstrate that photonic bands arising from nearly free photon effects are easily observed in the backscattering, asymmetry parameter, and albedo for periodic quarter-wave concentric layers, though are not readily apparent in extinction spectra. Rather, the periodicity simply alters the scattering profile, enhancing the ratio of backscattering to forward scattering inside the bandgap, in direct analogy with planar quarter-wave multilayers. PBGs arising from tight-binding may also be observed when the layers (or rings) are designed such that the coupling between them is weak. We demonstrate that for a structure consisting of N coupled micro-resonators, the morphology dependent resonances split into N higher-Q modes, in direct analogy with other types of oscillators, and that this splitting ultimately results in PBGs which can lead to enhanced nonlinear optical effects.

  18. Circadian expression of the PpLhcb2 gene encoding a major light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding protein in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Setsuyuki; Kato, Seiji; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Shimizu, Masashi

    2004-01-01

    Circadian clocks control the expression of Lhcb genes encoding the chlorophyll a/b-binding proteins broadly in seed plants. We show here that this regulation is also conserved in the primitive moss Physcomitrella patens. Northern blotting analyses revealed a robust daily oscillation of Lhcb mRNA levels in protonema cells in 12-h : 12-h light-dark cycles (12 : 12LD) that damped rapidly in continuous darkness (DD). In continuous light (LL), by contrast with typical profiles in higher plants, Lhcb mRNA levels only peaked during the first day and thereafter it showed constant levels. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analyses showed similar patterns of expression in LL for three distinct Lhcb genes (PpLhcb1, PpLhcb2 and Zlab1). Moreover, transgenic reporter strains expressing luciferase under the control of the PpLhcb2 promoter showed bioluminescence patterns consistent with the Northern and RT-PCR data. At a higher concentration (4.5%) of glucose in the medium, the reporter strain showed self-sustained rhythms in DD, which was entrained to a differently phased 12 : 12LD, revealing a circadian regulation on the transcription. Kinetics of bioluminescent peaks in 12 : 12LD from gametophore was different to those from protonema, indicating a developmental regulation on PpLhcb2. Together, the regulatory link between the clock and Lhcb genes in P. patens shows characteristics that appear to differ from those in higher plants.

  19. Search for long-lived heavy charged particles using a ring imaging Cherenkov technique at LHCb.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casanova Mohr, R; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Dean, C T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Geraci, A; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M N; Mitzel, D S; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Osorio Rodrigues, B; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Poikela, T; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skillicorn, I; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Sterpka, F; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Tekampe, T; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Todd, J; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Trabelsi, K; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L

    A search is performed for heavy long-lived charged particles using 3.0 [Formula: see text] of proton-proton collisions collected at [Formula: see text][Formula: see text] 7 and 8  TeV with the LHCb detector. The search is mainly based on the response of the ring imaging Cherenkov detectors to distinguish the heavy, slow-moving particles from muons. No evidence is found for the production of such long-lived states. The results are expressed as limits on the Drell-Yan production of pairs of long-lived particles, with both particles in the LHCb pseudorapidity acceptance, [Formula: see text]. The mass-dependent cross-section upper limits are in the range 2-4 fb (at 95 % CL) for masses between 14 and 309 [Formula: see text].

  20. Precision Determination of the Small-x Gluon from Charm Production at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauld, Rhorry; Rojo, Juan

    2017-02-01

    The small-x gluon in global fits of parton distributions is affected by large uncertainties from the lack of direct experimental constraints. In this Letter, we provide a precision determination of the small-x gluon from the exploitation of forward charm production data provided by LHCb for three different center-of-mass (c.m.) energies: 5 TeV, 7 TeV, and 13 TeV. The LHCb measurements are included in the parton distribution function (PDF) fit by means of normalized distributions and cross-section ratios between data taken at different c.m. values, R13 /7 and R13 /5. We demonstrate that forward charm production leads to a reduction of the PDF uncertainties of the gluon down to x ≃10-6 by up to an order of magnitude, with implications for high-energy colliders, cosmic ray physics, and neutrino astronomy.

  1. Improvements to the User Interface for LHCb's Software continuous integration system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemencic, M.; Couturier, B.; Kyriazi, S.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify a set of steps leading to an improved interface for LHCb's Nightly Builds Dashboard. The goal is to have an efficient application that meets the needs of both the project developers, by providing them with a user friendly interface, as well as those of the computing team supporting the system, by providing them with a dashboard allowing for better monitoring of the build job themselves. In line with what is already used by LHCb, the web interface has been implemented with the Flask Python framework for future maintainability and code clarity. The Database chosen to host the data is the schema-less CouchDB[7], serving the purpose of flexibility in document form changes. To improve the user experience, we use JavaScript libraries such as JQuery[11].

  2. Beauty-quark and charm-quark pair production asymmetries at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauld, Rhorry; Haisch, Ulrich; Pecjak, Ben D.; Re, Emanuele

    2015-08-01

    The LHCb Collaboration has recently performed a first measurement of the angular production asymmetry in the distribution of beauty quarks and antiquarks at a hadron collider. We calculate the corresponding standard model prediction for this asymmetry at fixed order in perturbation theory. Our results show good agreement with the data, which are provided differentially for three bins in the invariant mass of the b b ¯ system. We also present similar predictions for both beauty-quark and charm-quark final states within the LHCb acceptance for a collision energy of √{s }=13 TeV . We finally point out that a measurement of the ratio of the b b ¯ and c c ¯ cross sections may be useful for experimentally validating charm-tagging efficiencies.

  3. Search for long-lived heavy charged particles using a ring imaging Cherenkov technique at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casanova Mohr, R.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M. H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-12-01

    A search is performed for heavy long-lived charged particles using 3.0 fb^{-1} of proton-proton collisions collected at √{s} = 7 and 8 TeV with the LHCb detector. The search is mainly based on the response of the ring imaging Cherenkov detectors to distinguish the heavy, slow-moving particles from muons. No evidence is found for the production of such long-lived states. The results are expressed as limits on the Drell-Yan production of pairs of long-lived particles, with both particles in the LHCb pseudorapidity acceptance, 1.8 < η < 4.9. The mass-dependent cross-section upper limits are in the range 2-4 fb (at 95 % CL) for masses between 14 and 309 { GeV/c^2}.

  4. Precision Determination of the Small-x Gluon from Charm Production at LHCb.

    PubMed

    Gauld, Rhorry; Rojo, Juan

    2017-02-17

    The small-x gluon in global fits of parton distributions is affected by large uncertainties from the lack of direct experimental constraints. In this Letter, we provide a precision determination of the small-x gluon from the exploitation of forward charm production data provided by LHCb for three different center-of-mass (c.m.) energies: 5 TeV, 7 TeV, and 13 TeV. The LHCb measurements are included in the parton distribution function (PDF) fit by means of normalized distributions and cross-section ratios between data taken at different c.m. values, R_{13/7} and R_{13/5}. We demonstrate that forward charm production leads to a reduction of the PDF uncertainties of the gluon down to x≃10^{-6} by up to an order of magnitude, with implications for high-energy colliders, cosmic ray physics, and neutrino astronomy.

  5. Real-time alignment and cali bration of the LHCb Detector in Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujany, Giulio; Storaci, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Stable, precise spatial alignment and PID calibration are necessary to achieve optimal detector performance. During Run2, LHCb will have a new real-time detector alignment and calibration to allow equivalent performance in the online and offline reconstruction to be reached. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection by applying stronger constraints, and to use hadronic particle identification at the trigger level. The computing time constraints are met through the use of a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from the operative and physics performance point of view. Specific challenges of this configuration are discussed, as well as the designed framework and its performance.

  6. Studies of charmed hadronic B decays with the early LHCb data and prospects for {gamma} measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nardulli, J.

    2010-12-22

    We present the first studies of decays of the type B{yields}DX, where D represents a charmed meson (D{sup 0}, D{sup (*)+}, or D{sub s}) from the LHCb experiment at CERN. Our studies use data accumulated during the 2010 run of the LHC. This work represents the first steps on a programme towards a precision measurement of the angle {gamma} of the CKM Unitarity Triangle. The prospects for this {gamma} measurement will be reviewed.

  7. The LHCb Online Framework for Experiment Protection, and Global Operational Control and Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessio, F.; Jacobsson, R.; Schleich, S.

    2011-12-01

    The complexity and extreme parameters of the LHC, such as the stored energy, the collision frequency, the high risk of adverse background conditions and potentially damaging beam losses have demanded an unprecedented connectivity between the operation of the accelerator and the experiments at both hardware and software level. LHCb has been at the forefront of developing a software framework and hardware which connects to all of the LHC communication interfaces for timing, control and monitoring of the machine and beam parameters, in addition to its own local systems for beam and background monitoring. The framework also includes failsafe connectivity with the beam interlock system. The framework drives the global operation of the detector and is integrated into the readout control. It provides the shifters with the tools needed to take fast and well-guided decisions to run the LHCb experiment safely and efficiently. In particular, it has allowed the detector to be operated with only two shifters already at the LHC pilot run. The requirements include reliability and clarity for the shifters, and the possibility to retrieve the past conditions for offline analysis. All essential parameters are archived and an interactive analysis tool has been developed which provides overviews of the experimental performance and which allows post-analysis of any anomaly in the operation. This paper describes the architecture and the many functions, including the basis of the automation of the LHCb operational procedure and detector controls, and the information exchange between LHCb and the LHC, and finally the shifter and expert tools for monitoring the experimental conditions.

  8. Photon Collider Physics with Real Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J; Asztalos, S

    2005-11-03

    Photon-photon interactions have been an important probe into fundamental particle physics. Until recently, the only way to produce photon-photon collisions was parasitically in the collision of charged particles. Recent advances in short-pulse laser technology have made it possible to consider producing high intensity, tightly focused beams of real photons through Compton scattering. A linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider could thus be transformed into a photon-photon collider with the addition of high power lasers. In this paper they show that it is possible to make a competitive photon-photon collider experiment using the currently mothballed Stanford Linear Collider. This would produce photon-photon collisions in the GeV energy range which would allow the discovery and study of exotic heavy mesons with spin states of zero and two.

  9. Evaporative CO2 microchannel cooling for the LHCb VELO pixel upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Aguiar Francisco, O. A.; Buytaert, J.; Collins, P.; Dumps, R.; John, M.; Mapelli, A.; Romagnoli, G.

    2015-05-01

    The LHCb Vertex Detector (VELO) will be upgraded in 2018 to a lightweight pixel detector capable of 40 MHz readout and operation in very close proximity to the LHC beams. The thermal management of the system will be provided by evaporative CO2 circulating in microchannels embedded within thin silicon plates. This solution has been selected due to the excellent thermal efficiency, the absence of thermal expansion mismatch with silicon ASICs and sensors, the radiation hardness of CO2, and very low contribution to the material budget. Although microchannel cooling is gaining considerable attention for applications related to microelectronics, it is still a novel technology for particle physics experiments, in particular when combined with evaporative CO2 cooling. The R&D effort for LHCb is focused on the design and layout of the channels together with a fluidic connector and its attachment which must withstand pressures up to 170 bar. Even distribution of the coolant is ensured by means of the use of restrictions implemented before the entrance to a race track like layout of the main cooling channels. The coolant flow and pressure drop have been simulated as well as the thermal performance of the device. This proceeding describes the design and optimization of the cooling system for LHCb and the latest prototyping results.

  10. Two 10-bp regions are critical for phytochrome regulation of a Lemna gibba Lhcb gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Kehoe, D M; Degenhardt, J; Winicov, I; Tobin, E M

    1994-01-01

    Two small regions of the promoter of an Lhcb gene encoding a light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein were identified as essential in conferring phytochrome responsiveness by using a transient expression assay. Initially, 5' deletion analysis of cabAB19, an Lhcb2 gene of Lemna, showed that sequences within the region from -174 to -104 relative to the start of transcription were necessary for phytochrome regulation. Internal deletion and substitution mutants were used to demonstrate that no additional phytochrome-responsive regions exist between -1600 and -174 in this promoter. A 171-bp fragment of the promoter extending from -239 to -69 was sufficient to impart phytochrome responsiveness to a minimal ubiquitin promoter that was not itself regulated by light. Specific binding of Lemna proteins to the region necessary for phytochrome responsiveness was demonstrated using in vitro polyacrylamide gel mobility shift assays and 1,10-phenanthroline copper ion footprinting. Further analysis of the region from -174 to -104 demonstrated that mutations in two separate 10-bp sequences, from -134 to -125 and from -114 to -105, could abolish phytochrome responsiveness; thus, there are two unique regions that are necessary for phytochrome regulation of this gene. One of these regions contains a CCAAT motif and the other a GATA motif. These motifs are conserved in the promoters of many Lhcb genes and may be important elements in the phytochrome responsiveness of this gene family. PMID:7919982

  11. Photonic glasses: a step beyond white paint.

    PubMed

    García, Pedro David; Sapienza, Riccardo; López, Cefe

    2010-01-05

    Self-assembly techniques are widely used to grow ordered structures such as, for example, opal-based photonic crystals. Here, we report on photonic glasses, new disordered materials obtained via a modified self-assembling technique. These random materials are solid thin films which exhibit rich novel light diffusion properties originating from the optical properties of their building blocks. This novel material inaugurated a wide range of nanophotonic materials with fascinating applications, such as resonant random lasers or Anderson localization.

  12. Microalgae photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floume, Timmy; Coquil, Thomas; Sylvestre, Julien

    2011-05-01

    Due to their metabolic flexibility and fast growth rate, microscopic aquatic phototrophs like algae have a potential to become industrial photochemical converters. Algae photosynthesis could enable the large scale production of clean and renewable liquid fuels and chemicals with major environmental, economic and societal benefits. Capital and operational costs are the main issues to address through optical, process and biochemical engineering improvements. In this perspective, a variety of photonic approaches have been proposed - we introduce them here and describe their potential, limitations and compatibility with separate biotechnology and engineering progresses. We show that only sunlight-based approaches are economically realistic. One of photonics' main goals in the algae field is to dilute light to overcome photosaturation effects that impact upon cultures exposed to full sunlight. Among other approaches, we introduce a widely-compatible broadband spectral adaptation technique called AlgoSun® that uses luminescence to optimize sunlight spectrum in view of the bioconverter's requirements.

  13. Photonic homeostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon C.; Li, Fan-Hui

    2010-11-01

    Photonic homeostatics is a discipline to study the establishment, maintenance, decay, upgrading and representation of function-specific homoestasis (FSH) by using photonics. FSH is a negative-feedback response of a biosystem to maintain the function-specific fluctuations inside the biosystem so that the function is perfectly performed. A stress may increase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) activities above FSH-specific SIRT1 activity to induce a function far from its FSH. On the one hand, low level laser irradiation or monochromatic light (LLL) can not modulate a function in its FSH or a stress in its stress-specific homeostasis (StSH), but modulate a function far from its FSH or a stress far from its StSH. On the other hand, the biophotons from a biosystem with its function in its FSH should be less than the one from the biosystem with its function far from its FSH. The non-resonant interaction of low intensity laser irradiation or monochromatic light (LIL) and a kind of membrane protein can be amplified by all the membrane proteins if the function is far from its FSH. This amplification might hold for biophoton emission of the membrane protein so that the photonic spectroscopy can be used to represent the function far from its FSH, which is called photonomics.

  14. Dark photon search at a circular e+e- collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Min; He, Xiao-Gang; Huang, Cheng-Kai

    2017-08-01

    One of the interesting portals linking a dark sector and the Standard Model (SM) is the kinetic mixing between the SM U(1)Y field with a new dark photon A‧ from a U(1)A‧ gauge interaction. Stringent limits have been obtained for the kinetic mixing parameter 𝜖 through various processes. In this work, we study the possibility of searching for a dark photon interaction at a circular e+e- collider through the process e+e-→ γA‧→ γμ+μ-. We find that the constraint on 𝜖2 for dark photon mass in the few tens of GeV range, assuming that the μ+μ- invariant mass can be measured to an accuracy of 0.5% mA‧, can be better than 3 × 10-6 for the proposed CEPC with a 10-year running at 3σ (statistic) level, and better than 2 × 10-6 for FCC-ee with even just one-year running at s = 240GeV, better than the LHCb, ATLAS, CMS experiments and other facilities can do in a similar dark photon mass range. For FCC-ee, running at s = 160GeV, the constraint can be even better.

  15. Light-dependent reversible phosphorylation of the minor photosystem II antenna Lhcb6 (CP24) occurs in lycophytes.

    PubMed

    Ferroni, Lorenzo; Angeleri, Martina; Pantaleoni, Laura; Pagliano, Cristina; Longoni, Paolo; Marsano, Francesco; Aro, Eva-Mari; Suorsa, Marjaana; Baldisserotto, Costanza; Giovanardi, Martina; Cella, Rino; Pancaldi, Simonetta

    2014-03-01

    Evolution of vascular plants required compromise between photosynthesis and photodamage. We analyzed representative species from two divergent lineages of vascular plants, lycophytes and euphyllophytes, with respect to the response of their photosynthesis and light-harvesting properties to increasing light intensity. In the two analyzed lycophytes, Selaginella martensii and Lycopodium squarrosum, the medium phase of non-photochemical quenching relaxation increased under high light compared to euphyllophytes. This was thought to be associated with the occurrence of a further thylakoid phosphoprotein in both lycophytes, in addition to D2, CP43 and Lhcb1-2. This protein, which showed light intensity-dependent reversible phosphorylation, was identified in S. martensii as Lhcb6, a minor LHCII antenna subunit of PSII. Lhcb6 is known to have evolved in the context of land colonization. In S. martensii, Lhcb6 was detected as a component of the free LHCII assemblies, but also associated with PSI. Most of the light-induced changes affected the amount and phosphorylation of the LHCII assemblies, which possibly mediate PSI-PSII connectivity. We propose that Lhcb6 is involved in light energy management in lycophytes, participating in energy balance between PSI and PSII through a unique reversible phosphorylation, not yet observed in other land plants.

  16. Photonic Nanojets.

    PubMed

    Heifetz, Alexander; Kong, Soon-Cheol; Sahakian, Alan V; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2009-09-01

    This paper reviews the substantial body of literature emerging since 2004 concerning photonic nanojets. The photonic nanojet is a narrow, high-intensity, non-evanescent light beam that can propagate over a distance longer than the wavelength λ after emerging from the shadow-side surface of an illuminated lossless dielectric microcylinder or microsphere of diameter larger than λ. The nanojet's minimum beamwidth can be smaller than the classical diffraction limit, in fact as small as ~λ/3 for microspheres. It is a nonresonant phenomenon appearing for a wide range of diameters of the microcylinder or microsphere if the refractive index contrast relative to the background is less than about 2:1. Importantly, inserting within a nanojet a nanoparticle of diameter d(ν) perturbs the far-field backscattered power of the illuminated microsphere by an amount that varies as d(ν)3 for a fixed λ. This perturbation is much slower than the d(ν)6 dependence of Rayleigh scattering for the same nanoparticle, if isolated. This leads to a situation where, for example, the measured far-field backscattered power of a 3-μm diameter microsphere could double if a 30-nm diameter nanoparticle were inserted into the nanojet emerging from the microsphere, despite the nanoparticle having only 1/10,000(th) the cross-section area of the microsphere. In effect, the nanojet serves to project the presence of the nanoparticle to the far field. These properties combine to afford potentially important applications of photonic nanojets for detecting and manipulating nanoscale objects, subdiffraction-resolution nanopatterning and nanolithography, low-loss waveguiding, and ultrahigh-density optical storage.

  17. Photonic Nanojets

    PubMed Central

    Heifetz, Alexander; Kong, Soon-Cheol; Sahakian, Alan V.; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the substantial body of literature emerging since 2004 concerning photonic nanojets. The photonic nanojet is a narrow, high-intensity, non-evanescent light beam that can propagate over a distance longer than the wavelength λ after emerging from the shadow-side surface of an illuminated lossless dielectric microcylinder or microsphere of diameter larger than λ. The nanojet’s minimum beamwidth can be smaller than the classical diffraction limit, in fact as small as ~λ/3 for microspheres. It is a nonresonant phenomenon appearing for a wide range of diameters of the microcylinder or microsphere if the refractive index contrast relative to the background is less than about 2:1. Importantly, inserting within a nanojet a nanoparticle of diameter dν perturbs the far-field backscattered power of the illuminated microsphere by an amount that varies as dν3 for a fixed λ. This perturbation is much slower than the dν6 dependence of Rayleigh scattering for the same nanoparticle, if isolated. This leads to a situation where, for example, the measured far-field backscattered power of a 3-μm diameter microsphere could double if a 30-nm diameter nanoparticle were inserted into the nanojet emerging from the microsphere, despite the nanoparticle having only 1/10,000th the cross-section area of the microsphere. In effect, the nanojet serves to project the presence of the nanoparticle to the far field. These properties combine to afford potentially important applications of photonic nanojets for detecting and manipulating nanoscale objects, subdiffraction-resolution nanopatterning and nanolithography, low-loss waveguiding, and ultrahigh-density optical storage. PMID:19946614

  18. Photon calorimeter

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Tze-Show

    1988-04-22

    A photon calorimeter is provided that comprises a laminar substrate that is uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition. A plasma-sprayed coating, that is generally uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition within the proximity of planes that are parallel to the surfaces of the substrate, is applied to either one or both sides of the laminar substrate. The plasma-sprayed coatings may be very efficiently spectrally tailored in atomic number. Thermocouple measuring junctions, are positioned within the plasma-sprayed coatings. The calorimeter is rugged, inexpensive, and equilibrates in temperature very rapidly. 4 figs.

  19. Photon Calorimeter

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Tze-Show

    1989-01-01

    A photon calorimeter (20, 40) is provided that comprises a laminar substrate (10, 22, 42) that is uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition. A plasma-sprayed coating (28, 48, 52), that is generally uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition within the proximity of planes that are parallel to the surfaces of the substrate, is applied to either one or both sides of the laminar substrate. The plasma-sprayed coatings may be very efficiently spectrally tailored in atomic number. Thermocouple measuring junctions (30, 50, 54) are positioned within the plasma-sprayed coatings. The calorimeter is rugged, inexpensive, and equilibrates in temperature very rapidly.

  20. Tevatron direct photon results.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlmann, S.

    1999-09-21

    Tevatron direct photon results since DIS98 are reviewed. Two new CDF measurements are discussed, the Run Ib inclusive photon cross section and the photon + Muon cross section. Comparisons with the latest NLO QCD calculations are presented.

  1. The 40 MHz trigger-less DAQ for the LHCb Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campora Perez, D. H.; Falabella, A.; Galli, D.; Giacomini, F.; Gligorov, V.; Manzali, M.; Marconi, U.; Neufeld, N.; Otto, A.; Pisani, F.; Vagnoni, V. M.

    2016-07-01

    The LHCb experiment will undergo a major upgrade during the second long shutdown (2018-2019), aiming to let LHCb collect an order of magnitude more data with respect to Run 1 and Run 2. The maximum readout rate of 1 MHz is the main limitation of the present LHCb trigger. The upgraded detector, apart from major detector upgrades, foresees a full read-out, running at the LHC bunch crossing frequency of 40 MHz, using an entirely software based trigger. A new high-throughput PCIe Generation 3 based read-out board, named PCIe40, has been designed for this purpose. The read-out board will allow an efficient and cost-effective implementation of the DAQ system by means of high-speed PC networks. The network-based DAQ system reads data fragments, performs the event building, and transports events to the High-Level Trigger at an estimated aggregate rate of about 32 Tbit/s. Different architecture for the DAQ can be implemented, such as push, pull and traffic shaping with barrel-shifter. Possible technology candidates for the foreseen event-builder under study are InfiniBand and Gigabit Ethernet. In order to define the best implementation of the event-builder we are performing tests of the event-builder on different platforms with different technologies. For testing we are using an event-builder evaluator, which consists of a flexible software implementation, to be used on small size test beds as well as on HPC scale facilities. The architecture of DAQ system and up to date performance results will be presented.

  2. ECFS: A decentralized, distributed and fault-tolerant FUSE filesystem for the LHCb online farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybczynski, Tomasz; Bonaccorsi, Enrico; Neufeld, Niko

    2014-06-01

    The LHCb experiment records millions of proton collisions every second, but only a fraction of them are useful for LHCb physics. In order to filter out the "bad events" a large farm of x86-servers (~2000 nodes) has been put in place. These servers boot from and run from NFS, however they use their local disk to temporarily store data, which cannot be processed in real-time ("data-deferring"). These events are subsequently processed, when there are no live-data coming in. The effective CPU power is thus greatly increased. This gain in CPU power depends critically on the availability of the local disks. For cost and power-reasons, mirroring (RAID-1) is not used, leading to a lot of operational headache with failing disks and disk-errors or server failures induced by faulty disks. To mitigate these problems and increase the reliability of the LHCb farm, while at same time keeping cost and power-consumption low, an extensive research and study of existing highly available and distributed file systems has been done. While many distributed file systems are providing reliability by "file replication", none of the evaluated ones supports erasure algorithms. A decentralised, distributed and fault-tolerant "write once read many" file system has been designed and implemented as a proof of concept providing fault tolerance without using expensive - in terms of disk space - file replication techniques and providing a unique namespace as a main goals. This paper describes the design and the implementation of the Erasure Codes File System (ECFS) and presents the specialised FUSE interface for Linux. Depending on the encoding algorithm ECFS will use a certain number of target directories as a backend to store the segments that compose the encoded data. When target directories are mounted via nfs/autofs - ECFS will act as a file-system over network/block-level raid over multiple servers.

  3. Physics at high energy photon photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    I review the physic prospects for high energy photon photon colliders, emphasizing results presented at the LBL Gamma Gamma Collider Workshop. Advantages and difficulties are reported for studies of QCD, the electroweak gauge sector, supersymmetry, and electroweak symmetry breaking.

  4. Resonance formation in photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gidal, G.

    1988-08-01

    Recent experimental progress on resonance formation in photon-photon collisions is reviewed with particular emphasis on the pseudoscalar and tensor nonents and on the ..gamma gamma..* production of spin-one resonances. 37 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. LHCb Scintillating Fiber detector front end electronics design and quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vink, W. E. W.; Pellegrino, A.; Ietswaard, G. C. M.; Verkooijen, J. C.; Carneiro, U.; Massefferi, A.

    2017-03-01

    The on-detector electronics of the LHCb Scintillating Fiber Detector consists of multiple PCBs assembled in a unit called Read Out Box, capable of reading out 2048 channels with an output rate of 70 Gbps. There are three types of boards: PACIFIC, Clusterization and Master Board. The Pacific Boards host PACIFIC ASICs, with pre-amplifier and comparator stages producing two bits of data per channel. A cluster-finding algorithm is then run in an FPGA on the Clusterization Board. The Master Board distributes fast and slow control, and power. We describe the design, production and test of prototype PCBs.

  6. Disordered photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersma, Diederik S.

    2013-03-01

    What do lotus flowers have in common with human bones, liquid crystals with colloidal suspensions, and white beetles with the beautiful stones of the Taj Mahal? The answer is they all feature disordered structures that strongly scatter light, in which light waves entering the material are scattered several times before exiting in random directions. These randomly distributed rays interfere with each other, leading to interesting, and sometimes unexpected, physical phenomena. This Review describes the physics behind the optical properties of disordered structures and how knowledge of multiple light scattering can be used to develop new applications. The field of disordered photonics has grown immensely over the past decade, ranging from investigations into fundamental topics such as Anderson localization and other transport phenomena, to applications in imaging, random lasing and solar energy.

  7. Upgrade of the proximity focusing RICH at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Cisbani, Evaristo; Colilli, Stefano; Cusanno, Francesco; Fratoni, Rolando; Frullani, Salvatore; Garibaldi, Franco; Giuliani, Fausto; Gricia, Massimo; Lucentini, Maurizio; Santavenere, Fabio; Urciuoli, Guido; Iodice, Mauro; Argentieri, A.; de Cataldo, Giacinto; De Leo, Raffaele; Lagamba, Luigi; Marrone, Stefano; Nappi, E.; Camsonne, Alexandre; Kross, Brian; Michaels, Robert; Reitz, Bodo; Segal, John; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Zorn, Carl; Monno, E.; Breuer, Herbert

    2009-09-01

    The Hall A RICH at Jefferson Lab is undergoing an upgrade to adapt to the higher momentum kinematics of the neutron spin structure Transversity experiments planned to run in 2008. The JLab RICH is a proximity focusing detector using liquid C6F14 as Cherenkov radiator, a thin layer of CsI as photon converter, evaporated on segmented pad panels of a proportional chamber. The original RICH had a superior hadron identification up to 2 GeV/c with pion/kaon rejection at the level of 1:1000 at ~ similar90% intrinsic efficiency. The upgrade will extend this performance above 2.4 GeV/c by means of a larger photon detector (a multiwire-multipad proportional chamber) and a longer proximity gap which will improve the photon detection geometrical efficiency and the angular resolution, respectively.

  8. GeSi photonics for telecommunication applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaisakul, Papichaya; Vakarin, Vladyslav; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Frigerio, Jacopo; Wada, Kazumi; Isella, Giovanni; Vivien, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    We experimentally and theoretically investigate GeSi-based photonics for future on-chip optical interconnect on bulk Silicon substrates with dense wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) system. We experimentally show that Ge-rich Si1-xGex can be used as both a passive low loss waveguide and a substrate to facilitate low-temperature epitaxial growth of Ge-based active devices working at low optical loss wavelength of Ge-rich Si1-xGex waveguides. We also theoretically discussed the possibilities to realize a compact passive component based on Ge-rich Si1-xGex material system on bulk Si wafer. From simulation the system based on Ge-rich Si1-xGex waveguide and the Si1-yGey (y < x) lower cladding layer is good enough to ensure compactness of important on-chip photonic components including passive waveguide and GeSi-based array waveguide grating (AWG). The small refractive index contrast between Ge-rich Si1-xGex waveguide and the Si1-yGey lower cladding layer potentially avoid the polarization dependent loss and detrimental fabrication tolerance of WDM system. Our studies show that GeSi-based photonics could uniquely provide both passive and active functionalities for dense WDM system.

  9. Quantum Dot Spins and Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atature, Mete

    2012-02-01

    Self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots are interesting and rich physical systems. Their inherently mesoscopic nature leads to a multitude of interesting interaction mechanisms of confined spins with the solid state environment of spins, charges and phonons. In parallel, the relatively clean spin-dependent optical transitions make quantum dots strong candidates for stationary and flying qubits within the context of spin-based quantum information science. The recently observed quantum dot resonance fluorescence has become a key enabler for further progress in this context. I will first discuss the real-time optical detection (or single-shot readout) of quantum dot spins, and then I will discuss how resonance fluorescence allows coherent generation of single photons suitable (and tailored) for linear-optics quantum computation and for establishing a high-efficiency spin-photon quantum interface within a distributed quantum network.

  10. A new algorithm for identifying the flavour of B0s mesons at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusardi, N.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-05-01

    A new algorithm for the determination of the initial flavour of B0s mesons is presented. The algorithm is based on two neural networks and exploits the b hadron production mechanism at a hadron collider. The first network is trained to select charged kaons produced in association with the B0s meson. The second network combines the kaon charges to assign the B0s flavour and estimates the probability of a wrong assignment. The algorithm is calibrated using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1 collected by the LHCb experiment in proton-proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV centre-of-mass energies. The calibration is performed in two ways: by resolving the B0s-bar B0s flavour oscillations in B0s → D-sπ+ decays, and by analysing flavour-specific B*s2(5840)0 → B+K- decays. The tagging power measured in B0s → D-sπ+ decays is found to be (1.80 ± 0.19 (stat) ± 0.18 (syst))%, which is an improvement of about 50% compared to a similar algorithm previously used in the LHCb experiment.

  11. Systematic profiling to monitor and specify the software refactoring process of the LHCb experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couturier, Ben; Kiagias, E.; Lohn, Stefan B.

    2014-06-01

    The LHCb upgrade program implies a significant increase in data processing that will not be matched by additional computing resources. Furthermore, new architectures such as many-core platforms can currently not be fully exploited due to memory and I/O bandwidth limitations. A considerable refactoring effort will therefore be needed to vectorize and parallelize the LHCb software, to minimize hotspots and to reduce the impact of bottlenecks. It is crucial to guide refactoring with a profiling system that gives hints to regions in source-code for possible and necessary re-engineering and which kind of optimization could lead to final success. Software optimization is a sophisticated process where all parts, compiler, operating system, external libraries and chosen hardware play a role. Intended improvements can have different effects on different platforms. To obtain precise information of the general performance, to make profiles comparable, reproducible and to verify the progress of performance in the framework, it is crucial to produce profiles more systematically in terms of regular profiling based on representative use cases and to perform regression tests. Once a general execution, monitoring and analysis platform is available, software metrics can be derived from the collected profiling results to trace changes in performance back and to create summary reports on a regular basis with an alert system if modifications led to significant performance degradations.

  12. Performance of the LHCb tracking system in Run I of the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Adam C. S.

    2016-07-01

    The LHCb tracking system consists of a Vertex Locator around the interaction point, a tracking station with four layers of silicon strip detectors in front of the magnet, and three straw-tube and silicon strip tracking stations behind the magnet. This system allows reconstruction of charged particles with a high efficiency (> 95 % for particles with momentum p > 5 GeV) and excellent momentum resolution (0.5% for particles with p < 20 GeV). The high momentum resolution results in narrow mass peaks, leading to a high signal-to-background ratio in such key channels as Bs0 → μμ. The excellent performance of the tracking system yields a decay time resolution of 50 fs, allowing to resolve the fast B0s oscillation with a mixing frequency of 17.7 ps-1. Such a decay time resolution is an essential element in studies of time dependent CP violation. I present an overview of the track reconstruction in LHCb and its performance in Run I of the LHC. I highlight the challenges and improvements of the track reconstruction from Run II onward, including efforts to improve the timing of the online reconstruction and approaches to unify the online and offline reconstruction.

  13. Large-pT production of D mesons at the LHCb in the parton Reggeization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpishkov, A. V.; Saleev, V. A.; Shipilova, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The production of D mesons in proton-proton collisions at the LHCb detector is studied. We consider the single production of D0/D¯0, D±, D*±, and Ds± mesons and correlation spectra in the production of D D ¯ and D D pairs at the √{S }=7 TeV and √{S }=13 TeV . In case of the single D -meson production we calculate differential cross sections over transverse momentum pT while in the pair D D ¯ , D D -meson production the cross sections are calculated over the azimuthal angle difference Δ φ , rapidity difference Δ y , invariant mass of the pair M and over the pT of the one meson from a pair. The cross sections are obtained at the leading order of the parton Reggeization approach using Kimber-Martin-Ryskin unintegrated parton distribution functions in a proton. To describe the D -meson production we use universal scale-dependent c -quark and gluon fragmentation functions fitted to e+e- annihilation data from CERN LEP1. Our predictions find a good agreement with the LHCb Collaboration data within uncertainties and without free parameters.

  14. bar{D}Σ c* and bar{D}nolimits*Σ c Interactions and LHCb Pentaquarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun

    Recently, LHCb collaboration reported the observation of two hidden-charmed resonances Pc(4380) and Pc(4450) consistent with hidden-charmed pentaquarks. We perform a dynamical investigation about the bar{D}Σ c*(2520) and bar{D}nolimits*Σ c(2455) interactions which are described by the meson exchanges in a quasipotential Bethe-Salpeter equation approach. Two poles around 4450 and 4390 MeV are produced from the bar{D}nolimits*Σ c(2455) interaction with spin parities 3/2- and 5/2+, respectively. The peak for 5/2+ state has a comparable hight as that of 3/2- state in the J/ψ p invariant mass spectrum. Another bound state with spin-parity JP = 3/2- is produced from the bar{D}Σ c*(2520) interaction. Such results suggest that the narrower LHCb pentaquark Pc(4450) can be well interpreted as a 5/2+ bar{D}nolimits*Σ c(2455) molecular state while the Pc(4380) is a 3/2- bar{D}nolimits*Σ c(2455) molecular state mixed with other secondary origins.

  15. Gauge-invariant implications of the LHCb measurements on lepton-flavor nonuniversality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis, Alejandro; Fuentes-Martín, Javier; Vicente, Avelino; Virto, Javier

    2017-08-01

    We study the implications of the recent measurements of RK and RK* by the LHCb Collaboration. We do that by adopting a model-independent approach based on the Standard Model effective field theory (SMEFT), with the dominant new physics (NP) effects encoded in the coefficients of dimension-6 operators respecting the full Standard Model (SM) gauge symmetry. After providing simplified expressions for RK and RK*, we determine the implications of the recent LHCb results for these observables on the coefficients of the SMEFT operators at low and high energies. We also take into account all b →s ℓℓ data, which combined lead to effective NP scenarios with SM pulls in excess of 5 σ . Thus, the operators discussed in this paper would be the first dimension-6 terms in the SM Lagrangian to be detected experimentally. Indirect constraints on these operators are also discussed. The results of this paper transcend the singularity of the present situation and set a standard for future analyses in b →s transitions when the NP is assumed to lie above the electroweak scale.

  16. Migration of the Gaudi and LHCb software repositories from CVS to Subversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemencic, M.; Degaudenzi, H.; LHCb Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    A common code repository is of primary importance in a distributed development environment such as large HEP experiments. CVS (Concurrent Versions System) has been used in the past years at CERN for the hosting of shared software repositories, among which were the repositories for the Gaudi Framework and the LHCb software projects. Many developers around the world produced alternative systems to share code and revisions among several developers, mainly to overcome the limitations in CVS, and CERN has recently started a new service for code hosting based on the version control system Subversion. The differences between CVS and Subversion and the way the code was organized in Gaudi and LHCb CVS repositories required careful study and planning of the migration. Special care was used to define the organization of the new Subversion repository. To avoid as much as possible disruption in the development cycle, the migration has been gradual with the help of tools developed explicitly to hide the differences between the two systems. The principles guiding the migration steps, the organization of the Subversion repository and the tools developed will be presented, as well as the problems encountered both from the librarian and the user points of view.

  17. PACIFIC: A 64-channel ASIC for scintillating fiber tracking in LHCb upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascon, D.; Chanal, H.; Comerma, A.; Gomez, S.; Han, X.; Mazorra, J.; Mauricio, J.; Pillet, N.; Yengui, F.; Vandaele, R.

    2015-04-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the next LHC shutdown in 2018/19 [1]. The tracker system will have a major overhaul. Its components will be replaced with new technologies in order to cope with the increased hit occupancy and radiation environment. Here we describe a detector made of scintillating fibers read out by silicon photomultipliers (SiPM), with a view to its application for this upgrade. This technology has been shown to achieve high efficiency and spatial resolution, but its integration within a LHCb experiment presents new challenges. This article gives an overview of the R&D status of the low-Power ASIC for the sCIntillating FIbres traCker (PACIFIC) chip implemented in a 130 nm CMOS technology. The PACIFIC chip is a 64-channel ASIC which can be connected to a SiPM without the need of any external component. It includes analog signal processing and digitization. The first stage is a current conveyor followed by a tunable fast shaper (≈10 ns) and a gated integrator. The digitization is performed using a 3 threshold non-linear flash ADC operating at 40 MHz. The PACIFIC chip has the ability to cope with different SiPM suppliers with a power consumption below 8 mW per channel and it is radiation-tolerant. Lastly, simulation and test results show the proper read out of the SiPMs with the PACIFIC chip.

  18. Machine Learning and Parallelism in the Reconstruction of LHCb and its Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cian, Michel

    2016-11-01

    The LHCb detector at the LHC is a general purpose detector in the forward region with a focus on reconstructing decays of c- and b-hadrons. For Run II of the LHC, a new trigger strategy with a real-time reconstruction, alignment and calibration was employed. This was made possible by implementing an offline-like track reconstruction in the high level trigger. However, the ever increasing need for a higher throughput and the move to parallelism in the CPU architectures in the last years necessitated the use of vectorization techniques to achieve the desired speed and a more extensive use of machine learning to veto bad events early on. This document discusses selected improvements in computationally expensive parts of the track reconstruction, like the Kalman filter, as well as an improved approach to get rid of fake tracks using fast machine learning techniques. In the last part, a short overview of the track reconstruction challenges for the upgrade of LHCb, is given. Running a fully software-based trigger, a large gain in speed in the reconstruction has to be achieved to cope with the 40 MHz bunch-crossing rate. Two possible approaches for techniques exploiting massive parallelization are discussed.

  19. Optomechanical photon shuttling between photonic cavities.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan; Li, Mo

    2014-11-01

    Mechanical motion of photonic devices driven by optical forces provides a profound means of coupling between optical fields. The current focus of these optomechanical effects has been on cavity optomechanics systems in which co-localized optical and mechanical modes interact strongly to enable wave mixing between photons and phonons, and backaction cooling of mechanical modes. Alternatively, extended mechanical modes can also induce strong non-local effects on propagating optical fields or multiple localized optical modes at distances. Here, we demonstrate a multicavity optomechanical device in which torsional optomechanical motion can shuttle photons between two photonic crystal nanocavities. The resonance frequencies of the two cavities, one on each side of this 'photon see-saw', are modulated antisymmetrically by the device's rotation. Pumping photons into one cavity excites optomechanical self-oscillation, which strongly modulates the inter-cavity coupling and shuttles photons to the other empty cavity during every oscillation cycle in a well-regulated fashion.

  20. First Experimental Study of Photon Polarization in Radiative Bs0 Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Arnau Romeu, J.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baszczyk, M.; Batozskaya, V.; Batsukh, B.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bezshyiko, I.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Campora Perez, D. H.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombs, G.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Costa Sobral, C. M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Déléage, N.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Franco Lima, V.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruberg Cazon, B. R.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Göbel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hatch, M.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, H.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kozachuk, A.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Mussini, M.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubert, K.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Toriello, F.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhu, X.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The polarization of photons produced in radiative Bs0 decays is studied for the first time. The data are recorded by the LHCb experiment in p p collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1 at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. A time-dependent analysis of the Bs0→ϕ γ decay rate is conducted to determine the parameter AΔ, which is related to the ratio of right- over left-handed photon polarization amplitudes in b →s γ transitions. A value of AΔ=-0.98-0.52-0.20+0.46+0.23

  1. First Experimental Study of Photon Polarization in Radiative B_{s}^{0} Decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Arnau Romeu, J; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Babuschkin, I; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baker, S; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Baszczyk, M; Batozskaya, V; Batsukh, B; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Betti, F; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bezshyiko, I; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bitadze, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Boettcher, T; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borgheresi, A; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Bossu, F; Boubdir, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Campora Perez, D H; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chobanova, V; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombs, G; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Costa Sobral, C M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Da Cunha Marinho, F; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Serio, M; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Demmer, M; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Dungs, K; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Déléage, N; Easo, S; Ebert, M; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Fazzini, D; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Fernandez Prieto, A; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fini, R A; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fleuret, F; Fohl, K; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forshaw, D C; Forty, R; Franco Lima, V; Frank, M; Frei, C; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Färber, C; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garcia Martin, L M; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Garsed, P J; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gizdov, K; Gligorov, V V; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorelov, I V; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Gruberg Cazon, B R; Grünberg, O; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Göbel, C; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hatch, M; He, J; Head, T; Heister, A; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hombach, C; Hopchev, H; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hushchyn, M; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jiang, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Kariuki, J M; Karodia, S; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khairullin, E; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Kirn, T; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Koliiev, S; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Kosmyntseva, A; Kozachuk, A; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lefèvre, R; Lemaitre, F; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, X; Loh, D; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusiani, A; Lyu, X; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Maltsev, T; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massacrier, L M; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Merli, A; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Mitzel, D S; Mogini, A; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Mulder, M; Mussini, M; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nieswand, S; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pais, P R; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parker, W; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Pastore, A; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petrov, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pikies, M; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Poikela, T; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Pomery, G J; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Poslavskii, S; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Ramos Pernas, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Dos Reis, A C; Remon Alepuz, C; Renaudin, V; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogozhnikov, A; Roiser, S; Rollings, A; Romanovskiy, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Rudolph, M S; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sadykhov, E; Sagidova, N; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schael, S; Schellenberg, M; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schubert, K; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sergi, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Silva de Oliveira, L; Simi, G; Simone, S; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Stefko, P; Stefkova, S; Steinkamp, O; Stemmle, S; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tilley, M J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Toriello, F; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Trabelsi, K; Traill, M; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tully, A; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valassi, A; Valat, S; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; van Veghel, M; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Venkateswaran, A; Vernet, M; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Volkov, V; Vollhardt, A; Voneki, B; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Vázquez Sierra, C; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Wark, H M; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wraight, K; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yin, H; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zarebski, K A; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Y; Zhokhov, A; Zhu, X; Zhukov, V; Zucchelli, S

    2017-01-13

    The polarization of photons produced in radiative B_{s}^{0} decays is studied for the first time. The data are recorded by the LHCb experiment in pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3  fb^{-1} at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. A time-dependent analysis of the B_{s}^{0}→ϕγ decay rate is conducted to determine the parameter A^{Δ}, which is related to the ratio of right- over left-handed photon polarization amplitudes in b→sγ transitions. A value of A^{Δ}=-0.98_{-0.52}^{+0.46}_{-0.20}^{+0.23} is measured. This result is consistent with the standard model prediction within 2 standard deviations.

  2. Rich catalytic injection

    SciTech Connect

    Veninger, Albert

    2008-12-30

    A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

  3. Hydrogen rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus is described for producing a hydrogen rich gas by introducing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel in the form of a spray into a partial oxidation region and mixing with a mixture of steam and air that is preheated by indirect heat exchange with the formed hydrogen rich gas, igniting the hydrocarbon fuel spray mixed with the preheated mixture of steam and air within the partial oxidation region to form a hydrogen rich gas.

  4. Research: Rags to Rags? Riches to Riches?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2004-01-01

    Everyone has read about what might be called the "gold gap"--how the rich in this country are getting richer and controlling an ever-larger share of the nation's wealth. The Century Foundation has started publishing "Reality Check", a series of guides to campaign issues that sometimes finds gaps in these types of cherished delusions. The guides…

  5. Nuclear photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habs, D.; Günther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-01

    With the planned new γ-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 1013 γ/s and a band width of ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-3, a new era of γ beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HIγS facility at Duke University (USA) with 108 γ/s and ΔEγ/Eγ≈3ṡ10-2. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for γ beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused γ beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the γ beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for γ beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for γ beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the γ-beam facility, the γ-beam optics and γ detectors. We can trade γ intensity for band width, going down to ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-6 and address individual nuclear levels. The term "nuclear photonics" stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with γ-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, γ beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to μm resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

  6. Nuclear photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Habs, D.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-09

    With the planned new {gamma}-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 10{sup 13}{gamma}/s and a band width of {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3}, a new era of {gamma} beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HI{gamma}S facility at Duke University (USA) with 10{sup 8}{gamma}/s and {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 3 Dot-Operator 10{sup -2}. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for {gamma} beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused {gamma} beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the {gamma} beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for {gamma} beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for {gamma} beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the {gamma}-beam facility, the {gamma}-beam optics and {gamma} detectors. We can trade {gamma} intensity for band width, going down to {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -6} and address individual nuclear levels. The term 'nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with {gamma}-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, {gamma} beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to {mu}m resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of

  7. The lepton flavor violating decay {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} Micro-Sign {sup {+-}} Micro-Sign {sup {+-}} Micro-Sign {sup Minus-Or-Plus-Sign} at LHCb

    SciTech Connect

    Keune, A.

    2012-09-15

    The possibility of improving the limit on the branching fraction of the lepton flavor violating decay {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} Micro-Sign {sup {+-}} Micro-Sign {sup {+-}} Micro-Sign {sup Minus-Or-Plus-Sign} at LHCb is discussed. It is shown that a simple, cut-based analysis is sufficient to improve the upper limit on this branching fraction within the lifetime of LHCb.

  8. Photonic MEMS switch applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Anis

    2001-07-01

    As carriers and service providers continue their quest for profitable network solutions, they have shifted their focus from raw bandwidth to rapid provisioning, delivery and management of revenue generating services. Inherently transparent to data rate the transmission wavelength and data format, MEMS add scalability, reliability, low power and compact size providing flexible solutions to the management and/or fiber channels in long haul, metro, and access networks. MEMS based photonic switches have gone from the lab to commercial availability and are now currently in carrier trials and volume production. 2D MEMS switches offer low up-front deployment costs while remaining scalable to large arrays. They allow for transparent, native protocol transmission. 2D switches enable rapid service turn-up and management for many existing and emerging revenue rich services such as storage connectivity, optical Ethernet, wavelength leasing and optical VPN. As the network services evolve, the larger 3D MEMS switches, which provide greater scalability and flexibility, will become economically viable to serve the ever-increasing needs.

  9. SALT, a dedicated readout chip for high precision tracking silicon strip detectors at the LHCb Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugiel, Sz.; Dasgupta, R.; Firlej, M.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Kuczynska, M.; Moron, J.; Swientek, K.; Szumlak, T.

    2016-02-01

    The Upstream Tracker (UT) silicon strip detector, one of the central parts of the tracker system of the modernised LHCb experiment, will use a new 128-channel readout ASIC called SALT. It will extract and digitise analogue signals from the UT sensors, perform digital signal processing and transmit a serial output data. The SALT is being designed in CMOS 130 nm process and uses a novel architecture comprising of analog front-end and fast (40 MSps) ultra-low power (<0.5 mW) 6-bit ADC in each channel. The prototype ASICs of important functional blocks, like analogue front-end, 6-bit SAR ADC, PLL, and DLL, were designed, fabricated and tested. A prototype of an 8-channel version of the SALT chip, comprising all important functionalities was also designed and fabricated. The architecture and design of the SALT, together with the selected preliminary tests results, are presented.

  10. Measurement of the CKM angle γ from a combination of LHCb results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Arnau Romeu, J.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baszczyk, M.; Batozskaya, V.; Batsukh, B.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bezshyiko, Ia.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Campora Perez, D. H.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombs, G.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Costa Sobral, C. M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Déléage, N.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Franco Lima, V.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruberg Cazon, B. R.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Göbel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hatch, M.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, H.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kozachuk, A.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Mussini, M.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubert, K.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Toriello, F.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhu, X.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-12-01

    A combination of measurements sensitive to the CKM angle γ from LHCb is performed. The inputs are from analyses of time-integrated B + → DK +, B 0 → DK ∗0, B 0 → DK +π- and B + → DK +π+π- tree-level decays. In addition, results from a time-dependent analysis of B s 0 → D s ∓ K ± decays are included. The combination yields γ = (72. 2 - 7.3 + 6.8 ) °, where the uncertainty includes systematic effects. The 95.5% confidence level interval is determined to be γ ∈ [55 .9 , 85 .2]°. A second combination is investigated, also including measurements from B + → Dπ+ and B + → Dπ+π-π+ decays, which yields compatible results. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Evaporative CO2 cooling using microchannels etched in silicon for the future LHCb vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomerotski, A.; Buytart, J.; Collins, P.; Dumps, R.; Greening, E.; John, M.; Mapelli, A.; Leflat, A.; Li, Y.; Romagnoli, G.; Verlaat, B.

    2013-04-01

    The extreme radiation dose received by vertex detectors at the Large Hadron Collider dictates stringent requirements on their cooling systems. To be robust against radiation damage, sensors should be maintained below -20°C and at the same time, the considerable heat load generated in the readout chips and the sensors must be removed. Evaporative CO2 cooling using microchannels etched in a silicon plane in thermal contact with the readout chips is an attractive option. In this paper, we present the first results of microchannel prototypes with circulating, two-phase CO2 and compare them to simulations. We also discuss a practical design of upgraded VELO detector for the LHCb experiment employing this approach.

  12. A flavor dependent gauge symmetry, predictive radiative seesaw and LHCb anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, P.; Nomura, Takaaki; Okada, Hiroshi

    2017-09-01

    We propose a predictive radiative seesaw model at one-loop level with a flavor dependent gauge symmetry U(1) xB3 - xe - μ + τ and Majorana fermion dark matter. For the neutrino mass matrix, we obtain an A1 type texture (with two zeros) that provides us several predictions such as the normal ordering for the neutrino masses. We analyze the constraints from lepton flavor violations, relic density of dark matter, and collider physics for the new U(1) xB3 - xe - μ + τ gauge boson. Within the allowed region, the LHCb anomalies in B →K*μ+μ- and B → Kℓ+ℓ- with ℓ = e or μ can be resolved, and such Z‧ could be also observed at the LHC.

  13. 8-channel prototype of SALT readout ASIC for Upstream Tracker in the upgraded LHCb experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abellan Beteta, C.; Bugiel, S.; Dasgupta, R.; Firlej, M.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Kane, C.; Moron, J.; Swientek, K.; Wang, J.

    2017-02-01

    SALT is a new 128-channel readout ASIC for silicon strip detectors in the upgraded Upstream Tracker of the LHCb experiment. It will extract and digitise analogue signals from the sensor, perform digital processing and transmit serial output data. SALT is designed in CMOS 130 nm process and uses a novel architecture comprising of an analogue front-end and an ultra-low power (<0.5 mW) fast (40 MSps) sampling 6-bit ADC in each channel. An 8-channel prototype (SALT8), comprising all important functionalities was designed, fabricated and tested. A full 128-channel version was also submitted. The design and test results of the SALT8 prototype are presented showing its full functionality.

  14. Development and test of the CO2 evaporative cooling system for the LHCb UT Tracker Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelli, S.

    2017-03-01

    The LHCb upgrade requires a new silicon strip tracker detector placed between the vertex locator and the magnet. The new detector will have improved performance in charged particle tracking and triggering. The front-end electronics will be in the active area, close to the sensors: this is a key feature driving the mechanical and cooling detector design, together with the requirement to make the sensors work below -5°C, to withstand radiation damage. The new design exploits a cooling system based on CO2 evaporation at temperatures around -25°C. The support structure for the sensor modules is a lightweight carbon fiber mechanical structure embedding a cooling pipe, designed to pass underneath the read-out ASICs, which are the main thermal power sources to be cooled down. Here a description of the detector will be given, with a main focus on the cooling system and on the progress done to its qualification.

  15. Opposite-side flavour tagging of B mesons at the LHCb experiment.

    PubMed

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Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrella, A; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Voss, H; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    The calibration and performance of the opposite-side flavour tagging algorithms used for the measurements of time-dependent asymmetries at the LHCb experiment are described. The algorithms have been developed using simulated events and optimized and calibrated with B(+)→J/ψK(+), B(0)→J/ψK(∗0) and B(0)→D(∗-)μ(+)νμ decay modes with 0.37 fb(-1) of data collected in pp collisions at [Formula: see text] during the 2011 physics run. The opposite-side tagging power is determined in the B(+)→J/ψK(+) channel to be (2.10±0.08±0.24) %, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  16. Central FPGA-based destination and load control in the LHCb MHz event readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsson, R.

    2012-10-01

    The readout strategy of the LHCb experiment is based on complete event readout at 1 MHz. A set of 320 sub-detector readout boards transmit event fragments at total rate of 24.6 MHz at a bandwidth usage of up to 70 GB/s over a commercial switching network based on Gigabit Ethernet to a distributed event building and high-level trigger processing farm with 1470 individual multi-core computer nodes. In the original specifications, the readout was based on a pure push protocol. This paper describes the proposal, implementation, and experience of a non-conventional mixture of a push and a pull protocol, akin to credit-based flow control. An FPGA-based central master module, partly operating at the LHC bunch clock frequency of 40.08 MHz and partly at a double clock speed, is in charge of the entire trigger and readout control from the front-end electronics up to the high-level trigger farm. One FPGA is dedicated to controlling the event fragment packing in the readout boards, the assignment of the farm node destination for each event, and controls the farm load based on an asynchronous pull mechanism from each farm node. This dynamic readout scheme relies on generic event requests and the concept of node credit allowing load control and trigger rate regulation as a function of the global farm load. It also allows the vital task of fast central monitoring and automatic recovery in-flight of failing nodes while maintaining dead-time and event loss at a minimum. This paper demonstrates the strength and suitability of implementing this real-time task for a very large distributed system in an FPGA where no random delays are introduced, and where extreme reliability and accurate event accounting are fundamental requirements. It was in use during the entire commissioning phase of LHCb and has been in faultless operation during the first two years of physics luminosity data taking.

  17. PACIFIC: the readout ASIC for the SciFi Tracker of the upgraded LHCb detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazorra, J.; Chanal, H.; Comerma, A.; Gascón, D.; Gómez, S.; Han, X.; Pillet, N.; Vandaele, R.

    2016-02-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and will switch to a 40 MHz readout rate using a trigger-less software based system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with the higher detector occupancy and radiation damage. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed and a custom ASIC, called the low-Power ASIC for the sCIntillating FIbres traCker (PACIFIC), will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. This article presents an overview of the R&D for the PACIFIC. It is a 64-channel ASIC implemented in 130 nm CMOS technology, aiming at a radiation tolerant design with a power consumption below 10 mW per channel. It interfaces directly with the SiPM anode through a current mode input, and provides a configurable non-linear 2-bit per channel digital output. The SiPM signal is acquired by a current conveyor and processed with a fast shaper and a gated integrator. The digitization is performed using a three threshold non-linear flash ADC operating at 40 MHz. Simulation and test results show the PACIFIC chip prototypes functioning well.

  18. High energy photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; Zerwas, P.M.

    1994-07-01

    The collisions of high energy photons produced at a electron-positron collider provide a comprehensive laboratory for testing QCD, electroweak interactions and extensions of the standard model. The luminosity and energy of the colliding photons produced by back-scattering laser beams is expected to be comparable to that of the primary e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions. In this overview, we shall focus on tests of electroweak theory in photon-photon annihilation, particularly {gamma}{gamma} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}, {gamma}{gamma} {yields} Higgs bosons, and higher-order loop processes, such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, Z{gamma} and ZZ. Since each photon can be resolved into a W{sup +}W{sup minus} pair, high energy photon-photon collisions can also provide a remarkably background-free laboratory for studying WW collisions and annihilation. We also review high energy {gamma}{gamma} tests of quantum chromodynamics, such as the scaling of the photon structure function, t{bar t} production, mini-jet processes, and diffractive reactions.

  19. Accelerator prospects for photon-photon physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, A.

    1992-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of the accelerators in the world where two-photon physics could be carried out in the future. The list includes facilities where two-photon physics is already an integral part of the scientific program but also mentions some other machines where initiating new programs may be possible.

  20. Simulating single photons with realistic photon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiao; Zhang, Zhen; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2016-12-01

    Quantum information processing provides remarkable advantages over its classical counterpart. Quantum optical systems have been proved to be sufficient for realizing general quantum tasks, which, however, often rely on single-photon sources. In practice, imperfect single-photon sources, such as a weak-coherent-state source, are used instead, which will inevitably limit the power in demonstrating quantum effects. For instance, with imperfect photon sources, the key rate of the Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) quantum key distribution protocol will be very low, which fortunately can be resolved by utilizing the decoy-state method. As a generalization, we investigate an efficient way to simulate single photons with imperfect ones to an arbitrary desired accuracy when the number of photonic inputs is small. Based on this simulator, we can thus replace the tasks that involve only a few single-photon inputs with the ones that make use of only imperfect photon sources. In addition, our method also provides a quantum simulator to quantum computation based on quantum optics. In the main context, we take a phase-randomized coherent state as an example for analysis. A general photon source applies similarly and may provide some further advantages for certain tasks.

  1. Photonic Design for Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Kosten, E.; Callahan, D.; Horowitz, K.; Pala, R.; Atwater, H.

    2014-08-28

    We describe photonic design approaches for silicon photovoltaics including i) trapezoidal broadband light trapping structures ii) broadband light trapping with photonic crystal superlattices iii) III-V/Si nanowire arrays designed for broadband light trapping.

  2. Photonic crystal light source

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G [Albuquerque, NM; Lin, Shawn-Yu [Albuquerque, NM; Bur, James A [Corrales, NM

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  3. Photon structure function - theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1984-12-01

    The theoretical status of the photon structure function is reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the hadronic mixing problem and the ability of perturbative QCD to make definitive predictions for the photon structure function. 11 references.

  4. Photon track evolution.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A D

    2005-01-01

    Given the time scale of biological, biochemical, biophysical and physical effects in a radiation exposure of living tissue, the first physical stage can be considered to be independent of time. All the physical interactions caused by the incident photons happen at the same starting time. From this point of view it would seem that the evolution of photon tracks is not a relevant topic for analysis; however, if the photon track is considered as a sequence of several interactions, there are several steps until the total degradation of the energy of the primary photon. We can characterise the photon track structure by the probability p(E,j), that is, the probability that a photon with energy E suffers j secondary interactions. The aim of this work is to analyse the photon track structure by considering j as a step of the photon track evolution towards the total degradation of the photon energy. Low energy photons (<150 keV) are considered, with water phantoms and half-extended geometry. The photon track evolution concept is presented and compared with the energy deposition along the track and also with the spatial distribution of the several steps in the photon track.

  5. Impact of heavy-flavour production cross sections measured by the LHCb experiment on parton distribution functions at low x

    SciTech Connect

    Zenaiev, O.; Geiser, A.; Lipka, K.; Blumlein, J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.; Garzelli, M. -V.; Guzzi, M.; Kuprash, O.; Moch, S. -O.; Nadolsky, P.; Placakyte, R.; Rabbertz, K.; Schienbein, I.; Starovoitov, P.

    2015-08-01

    The impact of recent measurements of heavy-flavour production in deep inelastic ep scattering and in pp collisions on parton distribution functions is studied in a QCD analysis in the fixed-flavour number scheme at next-to-leading order. Differential cross sections of charm- and beauty-hadron production measured by LHCb are used together with inclusive and heavy-flavour production cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. The heavy-flavour data of the LHCb experiment impose additional constraints on the gluon and the sea-quark distributions at low partonic fractions x of the proton momentum, down to x~5×10-6. This kinematic range is currently not covered by other experimental data in perturbative QCD fits.

  6. Impact of heavy-flavour production cross sections measured by the LHCb experiment on parton distribution functions at low x

    DOE PAGES

    Zenaiev, O.; Geiser, A.; Lipka, K.; ...

    2015-08-01

    The impact of recent measurements of heavy-flavour production in deep inelastic ep scattering and in pp collisions on parton distribution functions is studied in a QCD analysis in the fixed-flavour number scheme at next-to-leading order. Differential cross sections of charm- and beauty-hadron production measured by LHCb are used together with inclusive and heavy-flavour production cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. The heavy-flavour data of the LHCb experiment impose additional constraints on the gluon and the sea-quark distributions at low partonic fractions x of the proton momentum, down to x~5×10-6. This kinematic range is currently not covered by othermore » experimental data in perturbative QCD fits.« less

  7. Photon correlation holography.

    PubMed

    Naik, Dinesh N; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Ezawa, Takahiro; Miyamoto, Yoko; Takeda, Mitsuo

    2011-01-17

    Unconventional holography called photon correlation holography is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Using photon correlation, i.e. intensity correlation or fourth order correlation of optical field, a 3-D image of the object recorded in a hologram is reconstructed stochastically with illumination through a random phase screen. Two different schemes for realizing photon correlation holography are examined by numerical simulations, and the experiment was performed for one of the reconstruction schemes suitable for the experimental proof of the principle. The technique of photon correlation holography provides a new insight into how the information is embedded in the spatial as well as temporal correlation of photons in the stochastic pseudo thermal light.

  8. Photonic Equations of Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, A B; Crenshaw, M E

    2004-09-17

    Although the concept of the photon as a quantum particle is sharpened by the quantization of the energy of the classical radiation field in a cavity, the photon's spin has remained a classical degree of freedom. The photon is considered a spin-1 particle, although only two classical polarization states transverse to its direction of propagation are allowed. Effectively therefore the photon is a spin-1/2 particle, although it still obeys Bose-Einstein statistics because the photon-photon interaction is zero. Here they show that the two polarization states of the photon can be quantized using Pauli's spin vector, such that a suitable equation of motion for the photon is Dirac's relativistic wave equation for zero mass and zero charge. Maxwell's equations for a free photon are inferred from the Dirac-field formalism and thus provide proof of this claim. For photons in the presence of electronic sources for electromagnetic fields we posit Lorentz-invariant inhomogeneous photonic equations of motion. Electro-dynamic operator equations are inferred from this modified Dirac-field formalism which reduce to Maxwell's equations if spin-dependent terms in the radiation-matter interaction are dropped.

  9. Light acclimation of shade-tolerant and light-resistant Tradescantia species: induction of chlorophyll a fluorescence and P700 photooxidation, expression of PsbS and Lhcb1 proteins.

    PubMed

    Mishanin, Vladimir I; Trubitsin, Boris V; Benkov, Michael A; Minin, Andrei A; Tikhonov, Alexander N

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we have compared photosynthetic performance and expression of the PsbS and Lhcb1 proteins in two contrast ecotypes of Tradescantia species, T. fluminensis (shade-tolerant) and T. sillamontana (light-resistant), grown at two intensities of light: 50-125 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) (low light, LL) and 875-1000 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) (high light, HL). Using the EPR method for measuring the P700 content, we have found that LL-grown plants of both species have higher (by a factor of ≈1.7-1.8) contents of PSI per fresh weight unit as compared to HL-grown plants. Acclimation of plants to LL or HL irradiation also influences the Chl(a + b) level and expression of the PsbS and Lhcb1 proteins. Immunoblotting analysis showed that acclimation to HL stimulates (by a factor of ≈1.7-1.8) the level of PsbS related to the total number of P700 centers. In light-resistant species T. sillamontana, the ratio PsbS/P700 is about 2-times higher than in shade-tolerant species T. fluminensis grown under the same conditions. This should enhance the capacity of their leaves for protection against the light stress. In agreement with these observations, the capacity of leaves for NPQ induction was enhanced during plant acclimation to HL. Kinetic studies of P700 photooxidation and light-induced changes in the yield of Chl a fluorescence also revealed that the short-term regulation of electron transport processes in chloroplasts, which manifested themselves in the kinetics of [Formula: see text] induction and the rate of Chl a fluorescence quenching, occurred more rapidly in HL-grown plants than in LL-grown plants. Thus, both factors, enhanced expression of PsbS and more rapid response of the photosynthetic electron transport chain to dark-to-light transitions should increase the capacity of HL-grown plants for their resistance to rapid fluctuations of solar light.

  10. Long term experience and performance of COMPASS RICH-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessarotto, F.; Abbon, P.; Alexeev, M.; Birsa, R.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Dafni, T.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.; Delagnes, E.; Denisov, O.; Duic, V.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; Gerassimov, S.; Gobbo, B.; Gregori, M.; Herrmann, F.; Ketzer, B.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Kunne, F.; Levorato, S.; Maggiora, A.; Makke, N.; Martin, A.; Menon, G.; Neyret, D.; Novakova, K.; Panzieri, D.; Paul, S.; Pereira, F. A.; Polak, J.; Rocco, E.; Santos, C. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schopferer, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Steiger, L.; Sulc, M.; Takekawa, S.

    2014-09-01

    COMPASS RICH-1 is a large size gaseous Imaging Cherenkov Detector providing hadron identification in the range from 3 to 55 GeV/c, in the wide acceptance spectrometer of the COMPASS Experiment at CERN SPS. It uses a 3 m long C4F10 radiator, a 21 m2 large VUV mirror surface and two kinds of photon detectors: MAPMTs and MWPCs with CsI photocathodes, covering a total of 5.5 m2. It is in operation since 2002 and its performance increased thanks to progressive optimization and to a major upgrade of its photon detection system, implemented in 2006; a new upgrade is foreseen for 2016, with the use of MPGD-based photon detectors. The main characteristics of COMPASS RICH-1 components are described and the most critical aspects related to the C4F10 radiator gas system, to the mirrors and their alignment, as well as the performance of the photon detectors are presented and discussed. The response of the MWPCs and the observed evolution of the effective quantum efficiency of the CsI photocathodes is analyzed. The properties and performance of the MAPMTs with individual fused lens telescopes are presented together with the readout characteristics. The PID performance of COMPASS RICH-1 is discussed and the future upgrade program is mentioned.

  11. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, M.; Castellan, C.; Signorini, S.; Trenti, A.; Pavesi, L.

    2017-09-01

    Silicon photonics is a technology based on fabricating integrated optical circuits by using the same paradigms as the dominant electronics industry. After twenty years of fervid development, silicon photonics is entering the market with low cost, high performance and mass-manufacturable optical devices. Until now, most silicon photonic devices have been based on linear optical effects, despite the many phenomenologies associated with nonlinear optics in both bulk materials and integrated waveguides. Silicon and silicon-based materials have strong optical nonlinearities which are enhanced in integrated devices by the small cross-section of the high-index contrast silicon waveguides or photonic crystals. Here the photons are made to strongly interact with the medium where they propagate. This is the central argument of nonlinear silicon photonics. It is the aim of this review to describe the state-of-the-art in the field. Starting from the basic nonlinearities in a silicon waveguide or in optical resonator geometries, many phenomena and applications are described—including frequency generation, frequency conversion, frequency-comb generation, supercontinuum generation, soliton formation, temporal imaging and time lensing, Raman lasing, and comb spectroscopy. Emerging quantum photonics applications, such as entangled photon sources, heralded single-photon sources and integrated quantum photonic circuits are also addressed at the end of this review.

  12. Single-photon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lounis, Brahim; Orrit, Michel

    2005-05-01

    The concept of the photon, central to Einstein's explanation of the photoelectric effect, is exactly 100 years old. Yet, while photons have been detected individually for more than 50 years, devices producing individual photons on demand have only appeared in the last few years. New concepts for single-photon sources, or 'photon guns', have originated from recent progress in the optical detection, characterization and manipulation of single quantum objects. Single emitters usually deliver photons one at a time. This so-called antibunching of emitted photons can arise from various mechanisms, but ensures that the probability of obtaining two or more photons at the same time remains negligible. We briefly recall basic concepts in quantum optics and discuss potential applications of single-photon states to optical processing of quantum information: cryptography, computing and communication. A photon gun's properties are significantly improved by coupling it to a resonant cavity mode, either in the Purcell or strong-coupling regimes. We briefly recall early production of single photons with atomic beams, and the operation principles of macroscopic parametric sources, which are used in an overwhelming majority of quantum-optical experiments. We then review the photophysical and spectroscopic properties and compare the advantages and weaknesses of various single nanometre-scale objects used as single-photon sources: atoms or ions in the gas phase and, in condensed matter, organic molecules, defect centres, semiconductor nanocrystals and heterostructures. As new generations of sources are developed, coupling to cavities and nano-fabrication techniques lead to improved characteristics, delivery rates and spectral ranges. Judging from the brisk pace of recent progress, we expect single photons to soon proceed from demonstrations to applications and to bring with them the first practical uses of quantum information.

  13. Photonic quantum well composed of photonic crystal and quasicrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shaohui; Zhu, Yiping; Wang, Lianwei; Yang, Pingxiong; Chu, Paul K.

    2014-02-01

    A photonic quantum well structure composed of photonic crystal and Fibonacci quasicrystal is investigated by analyzing the transmission spectra and electric field distributions. The defect band in the photonic well can form confined quantized photonic states that can change in the band-gap of the photonic barriers by varying the thickness ratio of the two stacking layers. The number of confined states can be tuned by adjusting the period of the photonic well. The photons traverse the photonic quantum well by resonance tunneling and the coupling effect leads to the high transmission intensity of the confined photonic states.

  14. Hydrogen rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Rupe, J. H.; Kushida, R. O. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus is described for producing a hydrogen rich gas by injecting air and hydrocarbon fuel at one end of a cylindrically shaped chamber to form a mixture and igniting the mixture to provide hot combustion gases by partial oxidation of the hydrocarbon fuel. The combustion gases move away from the ignition region to another region where water is injected to be turned into steam by the hot combustion gases. The steam which is formed mixes with the hot gases to yield a uniform hot gas whereby a steam reforming reaction with the hydrocarbon fuel takes place to produce a hydrogen rich gas.

  15. Photonically Engineered Incandescent Emitter

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2005-03-22

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  16. Photonically engineered incandescent emitter

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2003-08-26

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  17. Photon reconstruction in CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nysten, J.

    2004-11-01

    If the mass of the Higgs boson is less than 150 GeV/ c2, the H→γγ channel will provide a clear signature at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). An overview of the general design of photon reconstruction in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment is given. The handling of converted photons and rejection of neutral pions pose an additional challenge to triggering and measuring. Topics related to photon reconstruction are presented, such as an algorithm for track building of the electron and the positron coming from the photon conversion.

  18. Photonic Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael; Merritt, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Integrated photonics generally is the integration of multiple lithographically defined photonic and electronic components and devices (e.g. lasers, detectors, waveguides passive structures, modulators, electronic control and optical interconnects) on a single platform with nanometer-scale feature sizes. The development of photonic integrated circuits permits size, weight, power and cost reductions for spacecraft microprocessors, optical communication, processor buses, advanced data processing, and integrated optic science instrument optical systems, subsystems and components. This is particularly critical for small spacecraft platforms. We will give an overview of some NASA applications for integrated photonics.

  19. From Rags to Riches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Colleen

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author presents the "Rags to Riches" design project she introduced to her students. She assigned each of her students one item from an array to thrift store goods which included old scarves, sweaters, jackets, and even evening gowns. The design problem was to imagine what a clothing tag might look like if the assigned item…

  20. From Rags to Riches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Colleen

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author presents the "Rags to Riches" design project she introduced to her students. She assigned each of her students one item from an array to thrift store goods which included old scarves, sweaters, jackets, and even evening gowns. The design problem was to imagine what a clothing tag might look like if the assigned item…

  1. Mangrove bacterial richness

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Daniel FR; Calado, Ricardo; Costa, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    Mangroves are complex and dynamic ecosystems varying in salinity, water level and nutrient availability; they also contain diverse and distinct microbial communities. Studies of microbes and their interactions with other ecosystem components (e.g., tree roots) are critical for our understanding of mangrove ecosystem functioning and remediation. Using a barcoding pyrosequencing approach, we previously noted the persistence of terrestrial bacterial populations on mangrove roots when nursery raised saplings were transplanted back to their natural environment. Here we go into further detail about the potential functional associations of bacterial guilds with distinct mangrove microhabitats including the rhizosphere. We also use a nonparametric richness estimator to show that estimated operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness is more than twice that observed. In the transplant microhabitat, our estimate suggests that there are almost 7,000 OTU's for a sample size of 10,400 individual sequences with no sign of an asymptote, indicating that “true” richness for this microhabitat is substantially larger. Results on the number of bacterial OTU's should, however, be viewed with caution given that the barcoding pyrosequencing technique used can yield sequencing artifacts that may inflate richness estimates if not properly removed. PMID:21966560

  2. Thinking about "Rich" Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Box, Lorna; Watson, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an e-mail conversation between two teachers discussing how to have a "rich task" lesson in which they get to the heart of mathematical modeling and in which students are motivated into working on mathematics. One teacher emphasizes that the power of maths is in developing mathematical descriptions of situations by…

  3. Thinking about "Rich" Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Box, Lorna; Watson, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an e-mail conversation between two teachers discussing how to have a "rich task" lesson in which they get to the heart of mathematical modeling and in which students are motivated into working on mathematics. One teacher emphasizes that the power of maths is in developing mathematical descriptions of situations by…

  4. Measurement of C P violation in B → J/ ψ KS0 decays at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, F.; LHCb Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Analysing a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1 of pp collisions collected by the LHCb detector at the LHC CP violation in B0→J/ψK0S and B0s→J/ψK0S is measured. The results S(B0→J/ψK0S) = -0.038 ± 0.035 {(stat)} ± 0.020 {(syst)} are consistent with the current world averages and with the Standard Model expectations. In B0s→J/ψK0s the results A_{ΔΓ(B0s→J/ψK0s) = 0.49 ±^{0.77}_{0.65} {(stat)} ± 0.06 {(syst)}, S(B0s→J/ψK0s) = -0.08 ± 0.40 {(stat)} ± 0.08 {(syst)}, C(B0s→J/ψK0s) = - 0.28 ± 0.41 {(stat)} ± 0.08 {(syst)} reflect the first determination of these C P observables paving a new way towards the control of penguin pollutions in the determination of sin 2β.

  5. Some predictions of diquark model for hidden charm pentaquark discovered at the LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guan-Nan; He, Xiao-Gang; He, Min

    2015-12-01

    The LHCb has discovered two new states with preferred J P quantum numbers 3/2- and 5/2+ from Λ b decays. These new states can be interpreted as hidden charm pentaquarks. It has been argued that the main features of these pentaquarks can be described by diquark model. The diquark model predicts that the 3/2- and 5/2+ are in two separate octet multiplets of flavor SU(3) and there is also an additional decuplet pentaquark multiplet. Finding the states in these multiplets can provide crucial evidence for this model. The weak decays of b-baryon to a light meson and a pentaquark can have Cabibbo allowed and suppressed decay channels. We find that in the SU(3) limit, for U-spin related decay modes the ratio of the decay rates of Cabibbo suppressed to Cabibbo allowed decay channels is given by | V cd |2/| V cs |2. There are also other testable relations for b-baryon weak decays into a pentaquark and a light pseudoscalar. These relations can be used as tests for the diquark model for pentaquark.

  6. Nucleon resonances N (1875 ) and N (2100 ) as strange partners of the LHCb pentaquarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we investigate the possibility of interpreting two nucleon resonances, the N (1875 ) and the N (2100 ), as hadronic molecular states from the Σ*K and Σ K* interactions, respectively. With the help of effective Lagrangians in which coupling constants are determined by the SU(3) symmetry, the Σ*K and Σ K* interactions are described by the vector-meson and pseudoscalar-meson exchanges. With the one-boson-exchange potential obtained, bound states from the Σ*K and Σ K* interactions are searched for in a quasipotential Bethe-Saltpeter equation approach. A bound state with quantum number I (JP)=1 /2 (3 /2-) is produced from the Σ*K interaction, which can be identified as the N (1875 ) listed in PDG. It can be seen as a strange partner of the LHCb pentaquark Pc(4380 ) with the same quantum numbers in the molecular state picture. The Σ K* interaction also produces a bound state with quantum number I (JP)=1 /2 (3 /2-), which is related to experimentally observed N (2100 ) in the ϕ photoproduction. Our results suggest that the N (2120 ) observed in the K Λ (1520 ) photoproduction and the N (2100 ) observed in the ϕ photoproduction have different origins. The former is a conventional three-quark state while the latter is a Σ K* molecular state, which can be seen as a strange partner of the Pc(4450 ) with different spin parity.

  7. LHCb anomaly and B physics in flavored Z' models with flavored Higgs doublets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, P.; Omura, Yuji; Shigekami, Yoshihiro; Yu, Chaehyun

    2017-06-01

    We study an extended Standard Model with a gauged U(1 ) ' flavor symmetry, motivated not only by the fermion mass hierarchy but also by the excesses in B →K(*)l l reported by the LHCb collaborations. The U(1 ) ' charges are assigned to quarks and leptons in a flavor-dependent manner, and flavored Higgs doublets are also introduced in order to detail the Yukawa couplings at the renormalizable level. Then, the fermion mass hierarchy is realized by the vacuum alignment of the Higgs doublets. In this model, flavor-changing currents involving the gauge boson of U(1 ) ' and the scalars generated by the Higgs doublets are predicted and the observables in the B →K(*)l l process possibly deviate from the Standard Model predictions. We study the possibility that these new flavor-changing interactions can explain the excesses in the B →K(*)l l process, and we derive some predictions for the other flavor-violating processes based on the analysis. We specifically investigate the Δ F =2 processes and the other B decays: e.g., B →Xsγ and B →D(*)τ ν , where the deviations are reported by the Belle and BABAR collaborations.

  8. Production and quality assurance of a Scintillating Fibre detector for the LHCb experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieswand, S.

    2017-02-01

    To deal with the instantaneous luminosity of the LHC after the Long Shutdown 2 in 2018/19, several subsystems of the LHCb detector have to be exchanged or upgraded. For this purpose, the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker is being built to replace the current downstream tracking system. The base of this new tracker are 2.5m long scintillating fibres (varnothing 250µm) in which light is generated by passing charged particles. The fibres are arranged in six-layer fibre mats which are read out with the help of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) at the edge of the tracker's acceptance. The tracker will cover an area larger than 340m2. To produce the required total of 1024 fibre mats, serial production was set up at several production sites. To assure the quality of the fibre mats, they are subject to various tests during the production. The different production steps as well as the quality assurance measurements will be presented.

  9. Formation of hidden-charm pentaquarks in photon-nucleon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Kubarovsky, Valery P.; Voloshin, M. B.

    2015-08-01

    The cross section for formation in γ + ρ collisions of the recently found hidden-charm pentaquark states Ρc(4380) and Ρc(4450) is discussed and estimated. The studies of these resonances in photon beam experiments can be complementary to those in the LHCb experiment setting, and may be more advantageous for measurement of their additional decay channels. It is pointed out that both the relative importance of such decays and the yield of the resonances in the γ + ρ collisions are sensitive to the internal dynamics of the pentaquarks and can resolve between theoretical models. Specific numerical estimates are discussed within a simple ‘baryocharmonium’ model, where the the observed Ρc resonances are composites of J/ψ and excited nucleon states with the quantum numbers of Ν(1440) and Ν(1520).

  10. Formation of hidden-charm pentaquarks in photon-nucleon collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubarovsky, V.; Voloshin, M. B.

    2015-08-01

    The cross section for formation in γ +p collisions of the recently found hidden-charm pentaquark states Pc(4380 ) and Pc(4450 ) is discussed and estimated. The studies of these resonances in photon beam experiments can be complementary to those in the LHCb experiment setting, and may be more advantageous for measurement of their additional decay channels. It is pointed out that both the relative importance of such decays and the yield of the resonances in the γ +p collisions are sensitive to the internal dynamics of the pentaquarks and can resolve between theoretical models. Specific numerical estimates are discussed within a simple "baryocharmonium" model, where the observed Pc resonances are composites of J /ψ and excited nucleon states with the quantum numbers of N (1440 ) and N (1520 ).

  11. Formation of hidden-charm pentaquarks in photon-nucleon collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Kubarovsky, Valery P.; Voloshin, M. B.

    2015-08-01

    The cross section for formation in γ + ρ collisions of the recently found hidden-charm pentaquark states Ρc(4380) and Ρc(4450) is discussed and estimated. The studies of these resonances in photon beam experiments can be complementary to those in the LHCb experiment setting, and may be more advantageous for measurement of their additional decay channels. It is pointed out that both the relative importance of such decays and the yield of the resonances in the γ + ρ collisions are sensitive to the internal dynamics of the pentaquarks and can resolve between theoretical models. Specific numerical estimates are discussed withinmore » a simple ‘baryocharmonium’ model, where the the observed Ρc resonances are composites of J/ψ and excited nucleon states with the quantum numbers of Ν(1440) and Ν(1520).« less

  12. Resonances in photon-photon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1984-11-01

    A quantity called stickiness is introduced which should be largest for J not equal to 0 glueballs and can be measured in two photon scattering and radiative J/psi decay. An argument is reviewed suggesting that light J = 0 glueballs may have large couplings to two photons. The analysis of radiative decays of eta and eta' is reviewed and a plea made to desist from false claims that they are related to GAMMA(..pi../sup 0/ ..-->.. ..gamma gamma..) by SU(3) symmetry. It is shown that two photon studies can refute the difficult-to-refute hypothesis that xi(2220) or zeta(8320) are Higgs bosons. A gallery of rogue resonances and resonance candidates is presented which would usefully be studied in ..gamma gamma.. scattering, including especially the low mass dipion. 34 references.

  13. Resonances in photon-photon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1988-06-01

    Selected topics in meson spectroscoy are reviewed as they are illuminated by photon-photon collisons. Subjects include the S*/f/sub 0/ (975) and delta/a/sub 0/ (980) as /ovr qq/qq candidates, the /iota///eta/ (1460) and theta/f/sub 2/ (1700) as glueball candidates, and the spin 1 X(1420) seen in tagged events which represents new physics whether its parity is positive, J/sup PC/ = 1/sup + +/, or negative with exotic J/sup PC/ = 1/sup /minus/+/. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Photonic layered media

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2002-01-01

    A new class of structured dielectric media which exhibit significant photonic bandstructure has been invented. The new structures, called photonic layered media, are easy to fabricate using existing layer-by-layer growth techniques, and offer the ability to significantly extend our practical ability to tailor the properties of such optical materials.

  15. Photon beam position monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kuzay, Tuncer M.; Shu, Deming

    1995-01-01

    A photon beam position monitor for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade "shadowing". Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation.

  16. Photon beam position monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kuzay, T.M.; Shu, D.

    1995-02-07

    A photon beam position monitor is disclosed for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade ''shadowing''. Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation. 18 figs.

  17. Exponential Localization of Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo

    1998-06-01

    It is shown that photons can be localized in space with an exponential falloff of the energy density and photodetection rates. The limits of localization are determined by the fundamental Paley-Wiener theorem. A direct mathematical connection between the spatial localization of photons and the decay in time of quantum mechanical systems is established.

  18. Ion photon emission microscope

    DOEpatents

    Doyle, Barney L.

    2003-04-22

    An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.

  19. Silicon nitride membrane photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernice, W. H. P.; Li, M.; Gallagher, D. F. G.; Tang, H. X.

    2009-11-01

    We propose a concept for realizing large area nanophotonic circuits in a silicon nitride membrane. Light is coupled into the membrane using a novel metallic photonic crystal grating coupler. A coupling loss of 5.5 dB is predicted for TE polarized light at 1550 nm. Waveguiding at telecoms wavelengths is achieved by using low loss photonic crystal defect waveguides. The propagation losses of the photonic crystal waveguides are estimated at 8.6 dB mm-1, comparable to early silicon photonic crystal waveguides. Using the proposed approach, photonic circuits can be fabricated using a single lithography and etching step. Thus the design scheme shows a route to low-cost fabrication.

  20. Nonlinear Photonics 2014: introduction.

    PubMed

    Akhmediev, N; Kartashov, Yaroslav

    2015-01-12

    International Conference "Nonlinear Photonics-2014" took place in Barcelona, Spain on July 27-31, 2014. It was a part of the "Advanced Photonics Congress" which is becoming a traditional notable event in the world of photonics. The current focus issue of Optics Express contains contributions from the participants of the Conference and the Congress. The articles in this focus issue by no means represent the total number of the congress contributions (around 400). However, it demonstrates wide range of topics covered at the event. The next conference of this series is to be held in 2016 in Australia, which is the home of many researchers working in the field of photonics in general and nonlinear photonics in particular.

  1. A novel photonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. S.; Maleki, L.

    1995-01-01

    We report a novel oscillator for photonic RF systems. This oscillator is capable of generating high-frequency signals up to 70 GHz in both electrical and optical domains and is a special voltage-controlled oscillator with an optical output port. It can be used to make a phase-locked loop (PLL) and perform all functions that a PLL is capable of for photonic systems. It can be synchronized to a reference source by means of optical injection locking, electrical injection locking, and PLL. It can also be self-phase locked and self-injection locked to generate a high-stability photonic RF reference. Its applications include high-frequency reference regeneration and distribution, high-gain frequency multiplication, comb-frequecy and square-wave generation, carrier recovery, and clock recovery. We anticipate that such photonic voltage-controlled oscillators (VCOs) will be as important to photonic RF systems as electrical VCOs are to electrical RF systems.

  2. The photochemistry of carbon-rich circumstellar shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggins, P. J.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of ambient ultraviolet photons on the chemical structure of carbon-rich, circumstellar envelopes is investigated with a simple formulation of the time-dependent, photochemical rate equations valid for optically thick shells. Molecules injected into the shielded inner envelope are broken down when they reach the outer regions where ambient ultraviolet photons can penetrate. A quantitative description of the abundance variations is obtained for the case of uniform expansion by detailed consideration of the shielding of the radiation by the dust and molecules of the envelope. Representative results are presented to illustrate the role of shielding in defining the extent of molecular envelopes, the formation of C I and C II shells by photodestruction of carbon-bearing molecules, and the development of layered chemical structures from the photobreakup of polyatomic molecules. Photochemistry makes the outer parts of thick, carbon-rich envelopes into complex regions containing radicals, ions, and atoms which are of considerable observational and theoretical interest.

  3. Roadmap on silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, David; Zilkie, Aaron; Bowers, John E.; Komljenovic, Tin; Reed, Graham T.; Vivien, Laurent; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Cassan, Eric; Virot, Léopold; Fédéli, Jean-Marc; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Schmid, Jens H.; Xu, Dan-Xia; Boeuf, Frédéric; O'Brien, Peter; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Nedeljkovic, M.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon photonics research can be dated back to the 1980s. However, the previous decade has witnessed an explosive growth in the field. Silicon photonics is a disruptive technology that is poised to revolutionize a number of application areas, for example, data centers, high-performance computing and sensing. The key driving force behind silicon photonics is the ability to use CMOS-like fabrication resulting in high-volume production at low cost. This is a key enabling factor for bringing photonics to a range of technology areas where the costs of implementation using traditional photonic elements such as those used for the telecommunications industry would be prohibitive. Silicon does however have a number of shortcomings as a photonic material. In its basic form it is not an ideal material in which to produce light sources, optical modulators or photodetectors for example. A wealth of research effort from both academia and industry in recent years has fueled the demonstration of multiple solutions to these and other problems, and as time progresses new approaches are increasingly being conceived. It is clear that silicon photonics has a bright future. However, with a growing number of approaches available, what will the silicon photonic integrated circuit of the future look like? This roadmap on silicon photonics delves into the different technology and application areas of the field giving an insight into the state-of-the-art as well as current and future challenges faced by researchers worldwide. Contributions authored by experts from both industry and academia provide an overview and outlook for the silicon waveguide platform, optical sources, optical modulators, photodetectors, integration approaches, packaging, applications of silicon photonics and approaches required to satisfy applications at mid-infrared wavelengths. Advances in science and technology required to meet challenges faced by the field in each of these areas are also addressed together with

  4. Photonic Crystal Fiber Based Entangled Photon Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    shifted-fiber ( DSF ) and a highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF) can be cooled at the liquid nitrogen temperature (77K). The advantage of the HNLF is a larger......signal for one of the photon-pair generated in four-wave mixing process. χ : the Kerr nonlinearity. k : wave vector. DSF : dispersion shifted fiber

  5. Low noise 4-channel front end ASIC with on-chip DLL for the upgrade of the LHCb Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picatoste, E.; Bigbeder-Beau, C.; Duarte, O.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Grauges, E.; Lefrançois, J.; Machefert, F.; Mauricio, J.; Vilasis, X.

    2015-04-01

    An integrated circuit for the Upgrade of the LHCb Calorimeter front end electronics is presented. It includes four analog channels, a Delay Locked Loop (DLL) for signal phase synchronization for all channels and an SPI communication protocol based interface. The analog circuit is based on two fully differential interleaved channels with a switched integrator to avoid dead time and it incorporates dedicated solutions to achieve low noise, linearity and spill-over specifications. The included DLL is capable of shifting the phase of the LHC clock (25 ns) in steps of 1 ns. The selected technology is AMS SiGe BiCMOS 0.35 um.

  6. A generic firmware core to drive the Front-End GBT-SCAs for the LHCb upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessio, F.; Caplan, C.; Gaspar, C.; Jacobsson, R.; Wyllie, K.

    2015-02-01

    The LHCb experiment has proposed an upgrade towards a full 40 MHz readout system in order to run between five and ten times its initial design luminosity. The entire Front-End electronics will be upgraded in order to cope with higher sub-detector occupancy, higher data rate and to work in a complete trigger-less fashion. In this paper, we describe a novel way to transmit slow control information to the Front-End electronics, by profiting from bidirectional optical connections and the GBT and GBT-SCA chipset capabilities. The implementation and preliminary validation tests are shown as well.

  7. Developing a photonics education program at college level from the ground up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, Anca L.

    2014-09-01

    While graduate level optics and photonics education in the state of Michigan has a rich tradition, college level programs that produce photonics technicians are virtually non-existent. Baker College has started the first two-year photonics program in the state in fall 2013. The program is leveraging support from Mi-Light, the Michigan Photonics Cluster; OP-TEC, the National Center for Optics and Photonics Education; and an NSF Project Grant awarded to the College. In its first year the photonics program has achieved important milestones - convening an Advisory Board with industry participation, developing almost the entire curriculum, and creating a fully functional optics and photonics laboratory. Outreach activities have also taken place. The paper will describe the steps taken to introduce the new program and the lessons learned along the way.

  8. Progress in Ultrafast Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Takeshi; Tsuchiya, Masahiro

    2005-08-01

    Recent progress in ultrafast photonics is reviewed with special emphasis on the research and development activities in Japanese research institutions in the field of optical communication and related measurement technologies. After summarizing the physical natures of ultrashort optical pulses, selected topics are reviewed on such as (1) ultrahigh-bit-rate optical communication employing the combination of optical time division multiplexing (OTDM) and wavelength division multiplexing (WDM), (2) optical components for ultrafast photonics with emphasis on all optical switches including semiconductor optical amplifiers, cascaded second order frequency converters, semiconductor saturable absorber switches, organic dye saturable absorber switches and bistable semiconductor lasers, (3) microwave photonics, emphasizing millimeter-wave/photonic communication technologies, and (4) high-speed optical measurements featuring both compact femtosecond pulse source development and rf magnetic field imaging. Some comments on the future prospect of ultrafast photonics are also given. It is concluded that in order to bring the powerful and versatile capability of ultrafast photonics into the real world, further collaboration between photonics specialists and production engineers/information specialists is strongly desired.

  9. Direct Photons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor,D.

    2008-07-29

    Direct photons are ideal tools to investigate kinematical and thermodynamical conditions of heavy ion collisions since they are emitted from all stages of the collision and once produced they leave the interaction region without further modification by the medium. The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured direct photon production in p+p and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV over a wide transverse momentum (p{sub T}) range. The p+p measurements allow a fundamental test of QCD, and serve as a baseline when we try to disentangle more complex mechanisms producing high p{sub T} direct photons in Au+Au. As for thermal photons in Au+Au we overcome the difficulties due to the large background from hadronic decays by measuring 'almost real' virtual photons which appear as low invariant mass e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs: a significant excess of direct photons is measured above the above next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. Additional insights on the origin of direct photons can be gained with the study of the azimuthal anisotropy which benefits from the increased statistics and reaction plane resolution achieved in RHIC Year-7 data.

  10. Progress in neuromorphic photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira de Lima, Thomas; Shastri, Bhavin J.; Tait, Alexander N.; Nahmias, Mitchell A.; Prucnal, Paul R.

    2017-03-01

    As society's appetite for information continues to grow, so does our need to process this information with increasing speed and versatility. Many believe that the one-size-fits-all solution of digital electronics is becoming a limiting factor in certain areas such as data links, cognitive radio, and ultrafast control. Analog photonic devices have found relatively simple signal processing niches where electronics can no longer provide sufficient speed and reconfigurability. Recently, the landscape for commercially manufacturable photonic chips has been changing rapidly and now promises to achieve economies of scale previously enjoyed solely by microelectronics. By bridging the mathematical prowess of artificial neural networks to the underlying physics of optoelectronic devices, neuromorphic photonics could breach new domains of information processing demanding significant complexity, low cost, and unmatched speed. In this article, we review the progress in neuromorphic photonics, focusing on photonic integrated devices. The challenges and design rules for optoelectronic instantiation of artificial neurons are presented. The proposed photonic architecture revolves around the processing network node composed of two parts: a nonlinear element and a network interface. We then survey excitable lasers in the recent literature as candidates for the nonlinear node and microring-resonator weight banks as the network interface. Finally, we compare metrics between neuromorphic electronics and neuromorphic photonics and discuss potential applications.

  11. Photonic quasi-crystal terahertz lasers

    PubMed Central

    Vitiello, Miriam Serena; Nobile, Michele; Ronzani, Alberto; Tredicucci, Alessandro; Castellano, Fabrizio; Talora, Valerio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles

    2014-01-01

    Quasi-crystal structures do not present a full spatial periodicity but are nevertheless constructed starting from deterministic generation rules. When made of different dielectric materials, they often possess fascinating optical properties, which lie between those of periodic photonic crystals and those of a random arrangement of scatterers. Indeed, they can support extended band-like states with pseudogaps in the energy spectrum, but lacking translational invariance, they also intrinsically feature a pattern of ‘defects’, which can give rise to critically localized modes confined in space, similar to Anderson modes in random structures. If used as laser resonators, photonic quasi-crystals open up design possibilities that are simply not possible in a conventional periodic photonic crystal. In this letter, we exploit the concept of a 2D photonic quasi crystal in an electrically injected laser; specifically, we pattern the top surface of a terahertz quantum-cascade laser with a Penrose tiling of pentagonal rotational symmetry, reaching 0.1–0.2% wall-plug efficiencies and 65 mW peak output powers with characteristic surface-emitting conical beam profiles, result of the rich quasi-crystal Fourier spectrum. PMID:25523102

  12. Photonic quasi-crystal terahertz lasers.

    PubMed

    Vitiello, Miriam Serena; Nobile, Michele; Ronzani, Alberto; Tredicucci, Alessandro; Castellano, Fabrizio; Talora, Valerio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H; Davies, A Giles

    2014-12-19

    Quasi-crystal structures do not present a full spatial periodicity but are nevertheless constructed starting from deterministic generation rules. When made of different dielectric materials, they often possess fascinating optical properties, which lie between those of periodic photonic crystals and those of a random arrangement of scatterers. Indeed, they can support extended band-like states with pseudogaps in the energy spectrum, but lacking translational invariance, they also intrinsically feature a pattern of 'defects', which can give rise to critically localized modes confined in space, similar to Anderson modes in random structures. If used as laser resonators, photonic quasi-crystals open up design possibilities that are simply not possible in a conventional periodic photonic crystal. In this letter, we exploit the concept of a 2D photonic quasi crystal in an electrically injected laser; specifically, we pattern the top surface of a terahertz quantum-cascade laser with a Penrose tiling of pentagonal rotational symmetry, reaching 0.1-0.2% wall-plug efficiencies and 65 mW peak output powers with characteristic surface-emitting conical beam profiles, result of the rich quasi-crystal Fourier spectrum.

  13. Single photon quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Beveratos, Alexios; Brouri, Rosa; Gacoin, Thierry; Villing, André; Poizat, Jean-Philippe; Grangier, Philippe

    2002-10-28

    We report the full implementation of a quantum cryptography protocol using a stream of single photon pulses generated by a stable and efficient source operating at room temperature. The single photon pulses are emitted on demand by a single nitrogen-vacancy color center in a diamond nanocrystal. The quantum bit error rate is less that 4.6% and the secure bit rate is 7700 bits/s. The overall performances of our system reaches a domain where single photons have a measurable advantage over an equivalent system based on attenuated light pulses.

  14. Is the photon paramagnetic?

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Rojas, H.; Querts, E. Rodriguez

    2009-05-01

    A photon exhibits a tiny anomalous magnetic moment {mu}{sub {gamma}} due to its interaction with an external constant magnetic field in vacuum through the virtual electron-positron background. It is paramagnetic ({mu}{sub {gamma}}>0) in the whole region of transparency, i.e., below the first threshold energy for pair creation, and has a maximum near this threshold. The photon magnetic moment is different for eigenmodes polarized along and perpendicular to the magnetic field. Explicit expressions are given for {mu}{sub {gamma}} for the cases of photon energies smaller than and closer to the first pair creation threshold. The region beyond the first threshold is briefly discussed.

  15. Integrated photonics research, 1993

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberberg, Yaron

    1994-06-01

    Summaries of papers from the Integrated Photonics Research Topical Meeting, March 22-24, 1993, in Palm Springs, California are presented. Sessions include Novel Material and Devices, Time Domain Methods, Photonic Circuits and Lightwave Reception, III-V Semiconductor Switches and Modulators, Wavelength Selective Components, Optical Waveguide Simulators, Optical Switching, Silica on Silicon, Nonlinear Wave Propagation, Semiconductor Lasers, LiNbO3 and LiTaO3 Devices, Beam Propagation Methods, Photonic Integrated Circuits and Applications, Semiconductor Device Modeling, Waveguide Frequency Conversion, and Spatial and Temporal Solitons.

  16. Photon detector system

    DOEpatents

    Ekstrom, Philip A.

    1981-01-01

    A photon detector includes a semiconductor device, such as a Schottky barrier diode, which has an avalanche breakdown characteristic. The diode is cooled to cryogenic temperatures to eliminate thermally generated charge carriers from the device. The diode is then biased to a voltage level exceeding the avalanche breakdown threshold level such that, upon receipt of a photon, avalanche breakdown occurs. This breakdown is detected by appropriate circuitry which thereafter reduces the diode bias potential to a level below the avalanche breakdown threshold level to terminate the avalanche condition. Subsequently, the bias potential is reapplied to the diode in preparation for detection of a subsequently received photon.

  17. Strained Silicon Photonics

    PubMed Central

    Schriever, Clemens; Bohley, Christian; Schilling, Jörg; Wehrspohn, Ralf B.

    2012-01-01

    A review of recent progress in the field of strained silicon photonics is presented. The application of strain to waveguide and photonic crystal structures can be used to alter the linear and nonlinear optical properties of these devices. Here, methods for the fabrication of strained devices are summarized and recent examples of linear and nonlinear optical devices are discussed. Furthermore, the relation between strain and the enhancement of the second order nonlinear susceptibility is investigated, which may enable the construction of optically active photonic devices made of silicon. PMID:28817015

  18. Photonics: Technology project summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Depaula, Ramon P.

    1991-01-01

    Photonics involves the use of light (photons) in conjunction with electronics for applications in communications, computing, control, and sensing. Components used in photonic systems include lasers, optical detectors, optical wave guide devices, fiber optics, and traditional electronic devices. The goal of this program is to develop hybrid optoelectronic devices and systems for sensing, information processing, communications, and control. It is hoped that these new devices will yield at least an order of magnitude improvement in performance over existing technology. The objective of the program is to conduct research and development in the following areas: (1) materials and devices; (2) networking and computing; (3) optical processing/advanced pattern recognition; and (4) sensing.

  19. Photonics: Technology project summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Depaula, Ramon P.

    1991-01-01

    Photonics involves the use of light (photons) in conjunction with electronics for applications in communications, computing, control, and sensing. Components used in photonic systems include lasers, optical detectors, optical wave guide devices, fiber optics, and traditional electronic devices. The goal of this program is to develop hybrid optoelectronic devices and systems for sensing, information processing, communications, and control. It is hoped that these new devices will yield at least an order of magnitude improvement in performance over existing technology. The objective of the program is to conduct research and development in the following areas: (1) materials and devices; (2) networking and computing; (3) optical processing/advanced pattern recognition; and (4) sensing.

  20. Photonic Maxwell's Demon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidrighin, Mihai D.; Dahlsten, Oscar; Barbieri, Marco; Kim, M. S.; Vedral, Vlatko; Walmsley, Ian A.

    2016-02-01

    We report an experimental realization of Maxwell's demon in a photonic setup. We show that a measurement at the few-photons level followed by a feed-forward operation allows the extraction of work from intense thermal light into an electric circuit. The interpretation of the experiment stimulates the derivation of an equality relating work extraction to information acquired by measurement. We derive a bound using this relation and show that it is in agreement with the experimental results. Our work puts forward photonic systems as a platform for experiments related to information in thermodynamics.

  1. Optimization of photon correlations by frequency filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Tudela, Alejandro; del Valle, Elena; Laussy, Fabrice P.

    2015-04-01

    Photon correlations are a cornerstone of quantum optics. Recent works [E. del Valle, New J. Phys. 15, 025019 (2013), 10.1088/1367-2630/15/2/025019; A. Gonzalez-Tudela et al., New J. Phys. 15, 033036 (2013), 10.1088/1367-2630/15/3/033036; C. Sanchez Muñoz et al., Phys. Rev. A 90, 052111 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.052111] have shown that by keeping track of the frequency of the photons, rich landscapes of correlations are revealed. Stronger correlations are usually found where the system emission is weak. Here, we characterize both the strength and signal of such correlations, through the introduction of the "frequency-resolved Mandel parameter." We study a plethora of nonlinear quantum systems, showing how one can substantially optimize correlations by combining parameters such as pumping, filtering windows and time delay.

  2. The effect of entanglement in gravitational photon-photon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rätzel, Dennis; Wilkens, Martin; Menzel, Ralf

    2016-09-01

    The differential cross-section for gravitational photon-photon scattering calculated in perturbative quantum gravity is shown to depend on the degree of polarization entanglement of the two photons. The interaction between photons in the symmetric Bell state is stronger than between not entangled photons. In contrast, the interaction between photons in the anti-symmetric Bell state is weaker than between not entangled photons. The results are interpreted in terms of quantum interference, and it is shown how they fit into the idea of distance-dependent forces.

  3. Effect of polarization entanglement in photon-photon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rätzel, Dennis; Wilkens, Martin; Menzel, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    It is found that the differential cross section of photon-photon scattering is a function of the degree of polarization entanglement of the two-photon state. A reduced general expression for the differential cross section of photon-photon scattering is derived by applying simple symmetry arguments. An explicit expression is obtained for the example of photon-photon scattering due to virtual electron-positron pairs in quantum electrodynamics. It is shown how the effect in this explicit example can be explained as an effect of quantum interference and that it fits with the idea of distance-dependent forces.

  4. Data Rich, Information Poor

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, P.G.; Rautman, C.A.

    1998-11-09

    Surviving in a data-rich environment means understanding the difference between data and information. This paper reviews an environmental case study that illustrates that understanding and shows its importance. In this study, a decision problem was stated in terms of au economic-objective fimction. The function contains a term that defines the stochastic relationship between the decision and the information obtained during field chamctetition for an environmental contaminant. Data is defied as samples drawn or experimental realizations of a mudom fimction. Information is defined as the quantitative change in the value of the objective fiction as a result of the sample.

  5. Microwave background constraints on mixing of photons with hidden photons

    SciTech Connect

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Redondo, Javier; Sigl, Guenter E-mail: javier.redondo@desy.de

    2009-03-15

    Various extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of hidden photons kinetically mixing with the ordinary photon. This mixing leads to oscillations between photons and hidden photons, analogous to the observed oscillations between different neutrino flavors. In this context, we derive new bounds on the photon-hidden photon mixing parameters using the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer instrument on board of the Cosmic Background Explorer. Requiring the distortions of the CMB induced by the photon-hidden photon mixing to be smaller than experimental upper limits, this leads to a bound on the mixing angle {chi}{sub 0} {approx}< 10{sup -7}-10{sup -5} for hidden photon masses between 10{sup -14} eV and 10{sup -7} eV. This low-mass and low-mixing region of the hidden photon parameter space was previously unconstrained.

  6. Multiscale Analysis of Photon-Limited Astronomical Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, R.

    2007-11-01

    Many astronomical studies rely upon the accurate reconstruction of spatially distributed phenomena from photon-limited data. These measurements are inherently ``noisy'' due to low photon counts. In addition, the behavior of the underlying photon intensity functions can be very rich and complex, and consequently difficult to model a priori. Nonparametric multiscale reconstruction methods overcome these challenges and facilitate characterization of fundamental performance limits. In this paper, we review several multiscale approaches to photon-limited image reconstruction, including wavelets combined with variance stabilizing transforms, corrected Haar wavelet transforms, multiplicative multiscale innovations, platelets, and the à trous wavelet transform. We discuss the performance of these methods in simulation studies, and describe statistical analyses of their performances.

  7. New results for a photon-photon collider

    SciTech Connect

    David Asner et al.

    2002-09-26

    We present new results from studies in progress on physics at a two-photon collider. We report on the sensitivity to top squark parameters of MSSM Higgs boson production in two-photon collisions; Higgs boson decay to two photons; radion production in models of warped extra dimensions; chargino pair production; sensitivity to the trilinear Higgs boson coupling; charged Higgs boson pair production; and we discuss the backgrounds produced by resolved photon-photon interactions.

  8. New Results for a Photon-Photon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, D; Grzadkowski, B; Gunion, J F; Logan, H E; Martin, V; Schmitt, M; Velasco, M M

    2002-08-23

    We present new results from studies in progress on physics at a two-photon collider. We report on the sensitivity to top squark parameters of MSSM Higgs boson production in two-photon collisions; Higgs boson decay to two photons; radion production in models of warped extra dimensions; chargino pair production; sensitivity to the trilinear Higgs boson coupling; charged Higgs boson pair production; and we discuss the backgrounds produced by resolved photon-photon interactions.

  9. Experiments with Individual Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Mark

    2004-05-01

    I describe several different experiments we have performed with individual photons. For example, while well known experiments involving phenomena such as the photoelectric effect and Compton scattering strongly suggest the existence of photons, they do not prove the existence of light quanta. To prove the existence of light quanta one must perform an experiment whose results cannot be explained using classical waves. We have performed such an experiment--it demonstrates the localization of light quanta by showing that a single photon only goes one way when it leaves a beamsplitter [1]. In a second experiment we demonstrate that this single photon will interfere with itself when it transits an interferometer. The experiments have been performed by undergraduates, and the goal of this project is to develop a series of experiments exploring fundamental aspects of quantum mechanics for an undergraduate teaching lab. [1] P. Grangier, G. Roger and A. Aspect, Europhys. Lett. 1, 173 (1986).

  10. Silicon photonics: optical modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, G. T.; Gardes, F. Y.; Hu, Youfang; Thomson, D.; Lever, L.; Kelsall, R.; Ikonic, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon Photonics has the potential to revolutionise a whole raft of application areas. Currently, the main focus is on various forms of optical interconnects as this is a near term bottleneck for the computing industry, and hence a number of companies have also released products onto the market place. The adoption of silicon photonics for mass production will significantly benefit a range of other application areas. One of the key components that will enable silicon photonics to flourish in all of the potential application areas is a high performance optical modulator. An overview is given of the major Si photonics modulator research that has been pursued at the University of Surrey to date as well as a worldwide state of the art showing the trend and technology available. We will show the trend taken toward integration of optical and electronic components with the difficulties that are inherent in such a technology.

  11. Smart packaging for photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.; Carson, R.F.; Sullivan, C.T.; McClellan, G.; Palmer, D.W.

    1997-09-01

    Unlike silicon microelectronics, photonics packaging has proven to be low yield and expensive. One approach to make photonics packaging practical for low cost applications is the use of {open_quotes}smart{close_quotes} packages. {open_quotes}Smart{close_quotes} in this context means the ability of the package to actuate a mechanical change based on either a measurement taken by the package itself or by an input signal based on an external measurement. One avenue of smart photonics packaging, the use of polysilicon micromechanical devices integrated with photonic waveguides, was investigated in this research (LDRD 3505.340). The integration of optical components with polysilicon surface micromechanical actuation mechanisms shows significant promise for signal switching, fiber alignment, and optical sensing applications. The optical and stress properties of the oxides and nitrides considered for optical waveguides and how they are integrated with micromechanical devices were investigated.

  12. Dispersion in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzens, Jeremy

    2005-11-01

    Investigations on the dispersive properties of photonic crystals, modified scattering in ring-resonators, monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers and advanced data processing techniques for the finite-difference time-domain method are presented. Photonic crystals are periodic mesoscopic arrays of scatterers that modify the propagation properties of electromagnetic waves in a similar way as "natural" crystals modify the properties of electrons in solid-state physics. In this thesis photonic crystals are implemented as planar photonic crystals, i.e., optically thin semiconductor films with periodic arrays of holes etched into them, with a hole-to-hole spacing of the order of the wavelength of light in the dielectric media. Photonic crystals can feature forbidden frequency ranges (the band-gaps) in which light cannot propagate. Even though most work on photonic crystals has focused on these band-gaps for application such as confinement and guiding of light, this thesis focuses on the allowed frequency regions (the photonic bands) and investigates how the propagation of light is modified by the crystal lattice. In particular the guiding of light in bulk photonic crystals in the absence of lattice defects (the self-collimation effect) and the angular steering of light in photonic crystals (the superprism effect) are investigated. The latter is used to design a planar lightwave circuit for frequency domain demultiplexion. Difficulties such as efficient insertion of light into the crystal are resolved and previously predicted limitations on the resolution are circumvented. The demultiplexer is also fabricated and characterized. Monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers by means of resonantly enhanced grating couplers is investigated. The grating coupler is designed to bend light through a ninety-degree angle and is characterized with the finite-difference time-domain method. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers are

  13. D bar Σc* and Dbar*Σc interactions and the LHCb hidden-charmed pentaquarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Very recently, two hidden-charmed resonances Pc (4380) and Pc (4450) consistent with pentaquark states were observed at the LHCb detector. The two Pc states locate just below the D bar Σc* and Dbar*Σc thresholds with mass of gaps about 5 and 15 MeV, respectively. Inspired by this fact we perform a dynamical investigation about the D bar Σc* (2520) and Dbar*Σc (2455) interactions which are described by the meson exchanges. A bound state which carries spin-parity JP = 3 /2- is produced from the D bar Σc* (2520) interaction, which is consistent with the Pc (4380) observed at the LHCb detector. From the D*Σc (2455) interaction, a bound state with 5 /2+ is produced, which can be related to the Pc (4450). The results suggest that the Pc (4380) and Pc (4450) are good candidates of D bar Σc* (2520) and Dbar*Σc (2455) molecular states, respectively.

  14. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of LHCb detector for Run II and tracking for the upgrade.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quagliani, Renato; LHCb Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    LHCb has introduced a novel real-time detector alignment and calibration strategy for LHC Run II. Data collected at the start of the fill is processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. The procedure aims to improve the quality of the online selection and performance stability. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. A similar scheme is planned to be used for Run III foreseen to start in 2020. At that time LHCb will run at an instantaneous luminosity of 2 x 1033 cm-2 s-1 and a fully software based trigger strategy will be used. The new running conditions and the tighter timing constraints in the software trigger (only 13 ms per event are available) represent a big challenge for track reconstruction. The new software based trigger strategy implies a full detector read-out at the collision rate of 40 MHz. High performance and timing constraints are ensured by a new tracking system and a fast and efficient track reconstruction strategy.

  15. Photonics Explorer: revolutionizing photonics in the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Amrita; Debaes, Nathalie; Cords, Nina; Fischer, Robert; Vlekken, Johan; Euler, Manfred; Thienpont, Hugo

    2012-10-01

    The `Photonics Explorer' is a unique intra-curricular optics kit designed to engage, excite and educate secondary school students about the fascination of working with light - hands-on, in their own classrooms. Developed with a pan European collaboration of experts, the kit equips teachers with class sets of experimental material provided within a supporting didactic framework, distributed in conjunction with teacher training courses. The material has been specifically designed to integrate into European science curricula. Each kit contains robust and versatile components sufficient for a class of 25-30 students to work in groups of 2-3. The didactic content is based on guided inquiry-based learning (IBL) techniques with a strong emphasis on hands-on experiments, team work and relating abstract concepts to real world applications. The content has been developed in conjunction with over 30 teachers and experts in pedagogy to ensure high quality and ease of integration. It is currently available in 7 European languages. The Photonics Explorer allows students not only to hone their essential scientific skills but also to really work as scientists and engineers in the classroom. Thus, it aims to encourage more young people to pursue scientific careers and avert the imminent lack of scientific workforce in Europe. 50 Photonics Explorer kits have been successfully tested in 7 European countries with over 1500 secondary school students. The positive impact of the kit in the classroom has been qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated. A non-profit organisation, EYESTvzw [Excite Youth for Engineering Science and Technology], is responsible for the large scale distribution of the Photonics Explorer.

  16. Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    passive and active versions of each fiber designed under this task. Crystal Fibre shall provide characteristics of the fiber fabricated to include core...passive version of multicore fiber iteration 2. 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, Laser physics, Fibre Lasers, Photonic Crystal, Multicore, Fiber Laser 16...9 00* 0 " CRYSTAL FIBRE INT ODUCTION This report describes the photonic crystal fibers developed under agreement No FA8655-o5-a- 3046. All

  17. Happy centenary, photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeilinger, Anton; Weihs, Gregor; Jennewein, Thomas; Aspelmeyer, Markus

    2005-01-01

    One hundred years ago Albert Einstein introduced the concept of the photon. Although in the early years after 1905 the evidence for the quantum nature of light was not compelling, modern experiments - especially those using photon pairs - have beautifully confirmed its corpuscular character. Research on the quantum properties of light (quantum optics) triggered the evolution of the whole field of quantum information processing, which now promises new technology, such as quantum cryptography and even quantum computers.

  18. Ultrastable Multigigahertz Photonic Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Ronald T., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Novel photonic oscillator developed to serve as ultrastable source of microwave and millimeter-wave signals. In system, oscillations generated photonically, then converted to electronic form. Includes self-mode-locked semiconductor laser producing stream of pulses, detected and fed back to laser as input. System also includes fiber-optic-delay-line discriminator, which detects fluctuations of self-mode-locking frequency and generates error signal used in negative-feedback loop to stabilize pulse-repetition frequency.

  19. Nonclassical correlations between terahertz-bandwidth photons mediated by rotational quanta in hydrogen molecules.

    PubMed

    Bustard, Philip J; Erskine, Jennifer; England, Duncan G; Nunn, Josh; Hockett, Paul; Lausten, Rune; Spanner, Michael; Sussman, Benjamin J

    2015-03-15

    Quantum photonics offers much promise for the development of new technologies. The ability to control the interaction of light and matter at the level of single quantum excitations is a prerequisite for the construction of potentially powerful devices. Here we use the rotational levels of a room temperature ensemble of hydrogen molecules to couple two distinct optical modes at the single photon level using femtosecond pulses with 2 THz bandwidth. We observe photon correlations that violate a Cauchy-Schwarz inequality, thereby verifying the creation of a nonclassical state. This work demonstrates the rich potential of molecules for use in ultrafast quantum photonic devices.

  20. Photonic quantum technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Jeremy

    2013-03-01

    Of the approaches to quantum computing, photons are appealing for their low-noise properties and ease of manipulation, and relevance to other quantum technologies, including communication, metrology and measurement. We report an integrated waveguide approach to photonic quantum circuits for high performance, miniaturization and scalability [6-10]. We address the challenges of scaling up quantum circuits using new insights into how controlled operations can be efficiently realised, demonstrating Shor's algorithm with consecutive CNOT gates and the iterative phase estimation algorithm. We have shown how quantum circuits can be reconfigured, using thermo-optic phase shifters to realise a highly reconfigurable quantum circuit, and electro-optic phase shifters in lithium niobate to rapidly manipulate the path and polarisation of telecomm wavelength single photons. We have addressed miniaturisation using multimode interference architectures to directly implement NxN Hadamard operations, and by using high refractive index contrast materials such as SiOxNy, in which we have implemented quantum walks of correlated photons, and Si, in which we have demonstrated generation of orbital angular momentum states of light. We have incorporated microfluidic channels for the delivery of samples to measure the concentration of a blood protein with entangled states of light. We have begun to address the integration of superconducting single photon detectors and diamond and non-linear single photon sources. Finally, we give an overview of recent work on fundamental aspects of quantum measurement, including a quantum version of Wheeler's delayed choice experiment.

  1. Virtual and real photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulenberg, Andrew, Jr.

    2011-09-01

    Maxwell did not believe in photons. However, his equations lead to electro-magnetic field structures that are considered to be photonic by Quantum ElectroDynamics (QED). They are complete, relativistically correct, and unchallenged after nearly 150 years. However, even though his far-field solution has been considered as the basis for photons, as they stand and are interpreted, they are better fitted to the concept of virtual rather than to real photons. Comparison between staticcharge fields, near-field coupling, and photonic radiation will be made and the distinctions identified. The question of similarities in, and differences between, the two will be addressed. Implied assumptions in Feynman's "Lectures" could lead one to believe that he had provided a general classical electrodynamics proof that an orbital electron must radiate. While his derivation is correct, two of the conditions defined do not always apply in this case. As a result, the potential for misinterpretation of his proof (as he himself did earlier) for this particular case has some interesting implications. He did not make the distinction between radiation from a bound electron driven by an external alternating field and one falling in a nuclear potential. Similar failures lead to misinterpreting the differences between virtual and real photons.

  2. Photonic band structure

    SciTech Connect

    Yablonovitch, E.

    1993-05-01

    We learned how to create 3-dimensionally periodic dielectric structures which are to photon waves, as semiconductor crystals are to electron waves. That is, these photonic crystals have a photonic bandgap, a band of frequencies in which electromagnetic waves are forbidden, irrespective of propagation direction in space. Photonic bandgaps provide for spontaneous emission inhibition and allow for a new class of electromagnetic micro-cavities. If the perfect 3-dimensional periodicity is broken by a local defect, then local electromagnetic modes can occur within the forbidden bandgap. The addition of extra dielectric material locally, inside the photonic crystal, produces {open_quotes}donor{close_quotes} modes. Conversely, the local removal of dielectric material from the photonic crystal produces {open_quotes}acceptor{close_quotes} modes. Therefore, it will now be possible to make high-Q electromagnetic cavities of volume {approx_lt}1 cubic wavelength, for short wavelengths at which metallic cavities are useless. These new dielectric micro-resonators can cover the range all the way from millimeter waves, down to ultraviolet wavelengths.

  3. Multi-photon absorption limits to heralded single photon sources

    PubMed Central

    Husko, Chad A.; Clark, Alex S.; Collins, Matthew J.; De Rossi, Alfredo; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; Rey, Isabella H.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Xiong, Chunle; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Single photons are of paramount importance to future quantum technologies, including quantum communication and computation. Nonlinear photonic devices using parametric processes offer a straightforward route to generating photons, however additional nonlinear processes may come into play and interfere with these sources. Here we analyse spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) sources in the presence of multi-photon processes. We conduct experiments in silicon and gallium indium phosphide photonic crystal waveguides which display inherently different nonlinear absorption processes, namely two-photon (TPA) and three-photon absorption (ThPA), respectively. We develop a novel model capturing these diverse effects which is in excellent quantitative agreement with measurements of brightness, coincidence-to-accidental ratio (CAR) and second-order correlation function g(2)(0), showing that TPA imposes an intrinsic limit on heralded single photon sources. We build on these observations to devise a new metric, the quantum utility (QMU), enabling further optimisation of single photon sources. PMID:24186400

  4. Photonic Aharonov-Bohm effect in photon-phonon interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Enbang; Eggleton, Benjamin J; Fang, Kejie; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-01-01

    The Aharonov-Bohm effect is one of the most intriguing phenomena in both classical and quantum physics, and associates with a number of important and fundamental issues in quantum mechanics. The Aharonov-Bohm effects of charged particles have been experimentally demonstrated and found applications in various fields. Recently, attention has also focused on the Aharonov-Bohm effect for neutral particles, such as photons. Here we propose to utilize the photon-phonon interactions to demonstrate that photonic Aharonov-Bohm effects do exist for photons. By introducing nonreciprocal phases for photons, we observe experimentally a gauge potential for photons in the visible range based on the photon-phonon interactions in acousto-optic crystals, and demonstrate the photonic Aharonov-Bohm effect. The results presented here point to new possibilities to control and manipulate photons by designing an effective gauge potential.

  5. Multi-photon absorption limits to heralded single photon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husko, Chad A.; Clark, Alex S.; Collins, Matthew J.; de Rossi, Alfredo; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; Rey, Isabella H.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Xiong, Chunle; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2013-11-01

    Single photons are of paramount importance to future quantum technologies, including quantum communication and computation. Nonlinear photonic devices using parametric processes offer a straightforward route to generating photons, however additional nonlinear processes may come into play and interfere with these sources. Here we analyse spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) sources in the presence of multi-photon processes. We conduct experiments in silicon and gallium indium phosphide photonic crystal waveguides which display inherently different nonlinear absorption processes, namely two-photon (TPA) and three-photon absorption (ThPA), respectively. We develop a novel model capturing these diverse effects which is in excellent quantitative agreement with measurements of brightness, coincidence-to-accidental ratio (CAR) and second-order correlation function g(2)(0), showing that TPA imposes an intrinsic limit on heralded single photon sources. We build on these observations to devise a new metric, the quantum utility (QMU), enabling further optimisation of single photon sources.

  6. Deterministic photon-emitter coupling in chiral photonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söllner, Immo; Mahmoodian, Sahand; Hansen, Sofie Lindskov; Midolo, Leonardo; Javadi, Alisa; Kiršanskė, Gabija; Pregnolato, Tommaso; El-Ella, Haitham; Lee, Eun Hye; Song, Jin Dong; Stobbe, Søren; Lodahl, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Engineering photon emission and scattering is central to modern photonics applications ranging from light harvesting to quantum-information processing. To this end, nanophotonic waveguides are well suited as they confine photons to a one-dimensional geometry and thereby increase the light-matter interaction. In a regular waveguide, a quantum emitter interacts equally with photons in either of the two propagation directions. This symmetry is violated in nanophotonic structures in which non-transversal local electric-field components imply that photon emission and scattering may become directional. Here we show that the helicity of the optical transition of a quantum emitter determines the direction of single-photon emission in a specially engineered photonic-crystal waveguide. We observe single-photon emission into the waveguide with a directionality that exceeds 90% under conditions in which practically all the emitted photons are coupled to the waveguide. The chiral light-matter interaction enables deterministic and highly directional photon emission for experimentally achievable on-chip non-reciprocal photonic elements. These may serve as key building blocks for single-photon optical diodes, transistors and deterministic quantum gates. Furthermore, chiral photonic circuits allow the dissipative preparation of entangled states of multiple emitters for experimentally achievable parameters, may lead to novel topological photon states and could be applied for directional steering of light.

  7. Deterministic photon-emitter coupling in chiral photonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Söllner, Immo; Mahmoodian, Sahand; Hansen, Sofie Lindskov; Midolo, Leonardo; Javadi, Alisa; Kiršanskė, Gabija; Pregnolato, Tommaso; El-Ella, Haitham; Lee, Eun Hye; Song, Jin Dong; Stobbe, Søren; Lodahl, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Engineering photon emission and scattering is central to modern photonics applications ranging from light harvesting to quantum-information processing. To this end, nanophotonic waveguides are well suited as they confine photons to a one-dimensional geometry and thereby increase the light-matter interaction. In a regular waveguide, a quantum emitter interacts equally with photons in either of the two propagation directions. This symmetry is violated in nanophotonic structures in which non-transversal local electric-field components imply that photon emission and scattering may become directional. Here we show that the helicity of the optical transition of a quantum emitter determines the direction of single-photon emission in a specially engineered photonic-crystal waveguide. We observe single-photon emission into the waveguide with a directionality that exceeds 90% under conditions in which practically all the emitted photons are coupled to the waveguide. The chiral light-matter interaction enables deterministic and highly directional photon emission for experimentally achievable on-chip non-reciprocal photonic elements. These may serve as key building blocks for single-photon optical diodes, transistors and deterministic quantum gates. Furthermore, chiral photonic circuits allow the dissipative preparation of entangled states of multiple emitters for experimentally achievable parameters, may lead to novel topological photon states and could be applied for directional steering of light.

  8. CMOS-compatible photonic devices for single-photon generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Chunle; Bell, Bryn; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2016-09-01

    Sources of single photons are one of the key building blocks for quantum photonic technologies such as quantum secure communication and powerful quantum computing. To bring the proof-of-principle demonstration of these technologies from the laboratory to the real world, complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible photonic chips are highly desirable for photon generation, manipulation, processing and even detection because of their compactness, scalability, robustness, and the potential for integration with electronics. In this paper, we review the development of photonic devices made from materials (e.g., silicon) and processes that are compatible with CMOS fabrication facilities for the generation of single photons.

  9. Two-photon interference with non-identical photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianbin; Zhou, Yu; Zheng, Huaibin; Chen, Hui; Li, Fu-li; Xu, Zhuo

    2015-11-01

    Two-photon interference with non-identical photons is studied based on the superposition principle in Feynman's path integral theory. The second-order temporal interference pattern is observed by superposing laser and pseudothermal light beams with different spectra. The reason why there is two-photon interference for photons of different spectra is that non-identical photons can be indistinguishable for the detection system when Heisenberg's uncertainty principle is taken into account. These studies are helpful to understand the second-order interference of light in the language of photons.

  10. Unconventional Photon Blockade Based on Two-Photon Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y. H.; Shen, H. Z.

    2017-09-01

    The study on the unconventional photon blockade mainly focus on Kerr nonlinearity. In this paper, we study the unconventional photon blockade based on another kind of nonlinearity, that is two-photon tunneling. The optimal conditions for strong antibunching are found by analytic calculations and numerical simulations, and the results are compared with the unconventional photon blockade based on Kerr nonlinearity, we find that the two-photon tunneling system has advantages for the larger antibunching area. Finally, we show that, after the symmetric-antisymmetric mode transformation, the two kinds of nonlinearities are equivalent from the perspective of photon antibunching.

  11. Fuel Effective Photonic Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajalakshmi, N.; Srivarshini, S.

    2017-09-01

    With the entry of miniaturization in electronics and ultra-small light-weight materials, energy efficient propulsion techniques for space travel can soon be possible. We need to go for such high speeds so that the generation’s time long interstellar missions can be done in incredibly short time. Also renewable energy like sunlight, nuclear energy can be used for propulsion instead of fuel. These propulsion techniques are being worked on currently. The recently proposed photon propulsion concepts are reviewed, that utilize momentum of photons generated by sunlight or onboard photon generators, such as blackbody radiation or lasers, powered by nuclear or solar power. With the understanding of nuclear photonic propulsion, in this paper, a rough estimate of nuclear fuel required to achieve the escape velocity of Earth is done. An overview of the IKAROS space mission for interplanetary travel by JAXA, that was successful in demonstrating that photonic propulsion works and also generated additional solar power on board, is provided; which can be used as a case study. An extension of this idea for interstellar travel, termed as ‘Star Shot’, aims to send a nanocraft to an exoplanet in the nearest star system, which could be potentially habitable. A brief overview of the idea is presented.

  12. Gravitation, photons, clocks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okun, L. B.; Selivanov, K. G.; Telegdi, V.

    1999-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the classical phenomenon of gravitational red shift, the decrease in the measured frequency of a photon moving away from a gravitating body (e.g., the Earth) of the two current interpretations, one is that at higher altitudes the frequency-measuring clocks (atoms or atomic nuclei) run faster, i.e., their characteristic frequencies are higher, while the photon frequency in a static gravitational field is independent of the altitude and so the photon only reddens relative to the clocks. The other approach is that the photon reddens because it loses the energy when overcoming the attraction of the gravitational field. This view, which is especially widespread in popular science literature, ascribes such notions as a "gravitational mass" and "potential energy" to the photon. Unfortunately, also scientific papers and serious books on the general theory of relativity often employ the second interpretation as a "graphic" illustration of mathematically immaculate results. The authors show that this approach is misleading and only serves to create confusion in a simple subject.

  13. Antigravity Acts on Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brynjolfsson, Ari

    2002-04-01

    Einstein's general theory of relativity assumes that photons don't change frequency as they move from Sun to Earth. This assumption is correct in classical physics. All experiments proving the general relativity are in the domain of classical physics. This include the tests by Pound et al. of the gravitational redshift of 14.4 keV photons; the rocket experiments by Vessot et al.; the Galileo solar redshift experiments by Krisher et al.; the gravitational deflection of light experiments by Riveros and Vucetich; and delay of echoes of radar signals passing close to Sun as observed by Shapiro et al. Bohr's correspondence principle assures that quantum mechanical theory of general relativity agrees with Einstein's classical theory when frequency and gravitational field gradient approach zero, or when photons cannot interact with the gravitational field. When we treat photons as quantum mechanical particles; we find that gravitational force on photons is reversed (antigravity). This modified theory contradicts the equivalence principle, but is consistent with all experiments. Solar lines and distant stars are redshifted in accordance with author's plasma redshift theory. These changes result in a beautiful consistent cosmology.

  14. Observing Photons in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Martin C. E.; Pauluhn, Anuschka; Timothy, J. Gethyn

    This first chapter of the book "Observing Photons in Space" serves to illustrate the rewards of observing photons in space, to state our aims, and to introduce the structure and the conventions used. The title of the book reflects the history of space astronomy: it started at the high-energy end of the electromagnetic spectrum, where the photon aspect of the radiation dominates. Nevertheless, both the wave and the photon aspects of this radiation will be considered extensively. In this first chapter we describe the arduous efforts that were needed before observations from pointed, stable platforms, lifted by rocket above the Earth"s atmosphere, became the matter of course they seem to be today. This exemplifies the direct link between technical effort -- including proper design, construction, testing and calibration -- and some of the early fundamental insights gained from space observations. We further report in some detail the pioneering work of the early space astronomers, who started with the study of γ- and X-rays as well as ultraviolet photons. We also show how efforts to observe from space platforms in the visible, infrared, sub-millimetre and microwave domains developed and led to today"s emphasis on observations at long wavelengths.

  15. Photonic topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanikaev, Alexander B.; Hossein Mousavi, S.; Tse, Wang-Kong; Kargarian, Mehdi; MacDonald, Allan H.; Shvets, Gennady

    2013-03-01

    Recent progress in understanding the topological properties of condensed matter has led to the discovery of time-reversal-invariant topological insulators. A remarkable and useful property of these materials is that they support unidirectional spin-polarized propagation at their surfaces. Unfortunately topological insulators are rare among solid-state materials. Using suitably designed electromagnetic media (metamaterials) we theoretically demonstrate a photonic analogue of a topological insulator. We show that metacrystals—superlattices of metamaterials with judiciously designed properties—provide a platform for designing topologically non-trivial photonic states, similar to those that have been identified for condensed-matter topological insulators. The interfaces of the metacrystals support helical edge states that exhibit spin-polarized one-way propagation of photons, robust against disorder. Our results demonstrate the possibility of attaining one-way photon transport without application of external magnetic fields or breaking of time-reversal symmetry. Such spin-polarized one-way transport enables exotic spin-cloaked photon sources that do not obscure each other.

  16. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsia, Kevin K.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-05-01

    An intriguing optical property of silicon is that it exhibits a large third-order optical nonlinearity, with orders-ofmagnitude larger than that of silica glass in the telecommunication band. This allows efficient nonlinear optical interaction at relatively low power levels in a small footprint. Indeed, we have witnessed a stunning progress in harnessing the Raman and Kerr effects in silicon as the mechanisms for enabling chip-scale optical amplification, lasing, and wavelength conversion - functions that until recently were perceived to be beyond the reach of silicon. With all the continuous efforts developing novel techniques, nonlinear silicon photonics is expected to be able to reach even beyond the prior achievements. Instead of providing a comprehensive overview of this field, this manuscript highlights a number of new branches of nonlinear silicon photonics, which have not been fully recognized in the past. In particular, they are two-photon photovoltaic effect, mid-wave infrared (MWIR) silicon photonics, broadband Raman effects, inverse Raman scattering, and periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). These novel effects and techniques could create a new paradigm for silicon photonics and extend its utility beyond the traditionally anticipated applications.

  17. Photonics for life.

    PubMed

    Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Bassi, Andrea; Comelli, Daniela; Cova, Sergio; Farina, Andrea; Ghioni, Massimo; Rech, Ivan; Pifferi, Antonio; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Taroni, Paola; Torricelli, Alessandro; Tosi, Alberto; Valentini, Gianluca; Zappa, Franco

    2011-01-01

    Light is strictly connected with life, and its presence is fundamental for any living environment. Thus, many biological mechanisms are related to light interaction or can be evaluated through processes involving energy exchange with photons. Optics has always been a precious tool to evaluate molecular and cellular mechanisms, but the discovery of lasers opened new pathways of interactions of light with biological matter, pushing an impressive development for both therapeutic and diagnostic applications in biomedicine. The use of light in different fields has become so widespread that the word photonics has been utilized to identify all the applications related to processes where the light is involved. The photonics area covers a wide range of wavelengths spanning from soft X-rays to mid-infrared and includes all devices related to photons as light sources, optical fibers and light guides, detectors, and all the related electronic equipment. The recent use of photons in the field of telecommunications has pushed the technology toward low-cost, compact, and efficient devices, making them available for many other applications, including those related to biology and medicine where these requirements are of particular relevance. Moreover, basic sciences such as physics, chemistry, mathematics, and electronics have recognized the interdisciplinary need of biomedical science and are translating the most advanced researches into these fields. The Politecnico school has pioneered many of them,and this article reviews the state of the art of biomedical research at the Politecnico in the field internationally known as biophotonics.

  18. Photonic topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Khanikaev, Alexander B; Mousavi, S Hossein; Tse, Wang-Kong; Kargarian, Mehdi; MacDonald, Allan H; Shvets, Gennady

    2013-03-01

    Recent progress in understanding the topological properties of condensed matter has led to the discovery of time-reversal-invariant topological insulators. A remarkable and useful property of these materials is that they support unidirectional spin-polarized propagation at their surfaces. Unfortunately topological insulators are rare among solid-state materials. Using suitably designed electromagnetic media (metamaterials) we theoretically demonstrate a photonic analogue of a topological insulator. We show that metacrystals-superlattices of metamaterials with judiciously designed properties-provide a platform for designing topologically non-trivial photonic states, similar to those that have been identified for condensed-matter topological insulators. The interfaces of the metacrystals support helical edge states that exhibit spin-polarized one-way propagation of photons, robust against disorder. Our results demonstrate the possibility of attaining one-way photon transport without application of external magnetic fields or breaking of time-reversal symmetry. Such spin-polarized one-way transport enables exotic spin-cloaked photon sources that do not obscure each other.

  19. Photonic bandgap materials: Design, fabrication, and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramania, Ganapathi S.

    The last few decades have seen a tremendous explosion in the area of new synthetic materials. As we begin to better understand the nature of the atomic and molecular bonds it has been possible to systematically search for materials with specific properties thanks to the availability of powerful supercomputers. Due to significant advances in materials synthesis a rich variety of artificial materials whose mechanical, chemical, electronic and optical properties can be suitably tailored can now be produced. Some of the materials (plastics, synthetic fibers, ceramics, alloys etc.) can replace or substitute traditional materials; some others have managed to create new applications themselves (semiconductors, superconductors, optical fibers etc.). Over the last decade there has been a growing interest in a new material called "photonic bandgap structures" which can manipulate light in an extraordinary way opening up new possibilities in the area of optics and optoelectronics, eventually paving the way for optical computing. Proof of principle structures that demonstrates the expected property has been successfully fabricated for low frequency electromagnetic waves. However, making photonic bandgap structures that can operate at visible frequency is quite challenging. This is because photonic bandgap material are essentially periodic dielectric structures where the periodicity is on the order of the wavelength of light. The goal of this dissertation is to develop a technique for the fabrication inverse FCC photonic crystals that can operate at the visible and near infrared frequencies. The technique essentially focuses on employing self organizing systems such as monodisperse colloidal systems of polystyrene microspheres as a basis for forming periodic structure at submicron dimensions. The main aspects are first to show that the experimental procedure for fabrication developed in this dissertation actually has the desired structural property. Demonstration of structural

  20. Compact photonic spin filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Yougang; Liu, Zhenxing; Liu, Yachao; Zhou, Junxiao; Shu, Weixing; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2016-10-01

    In this letter, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a compact photonic spin filter formed by integrating a Pancharatnam-Berry phase lens (focal length of ±f ) into a conventional plano-concave lens (focal length of -f). By choosing the input port of the filter, photons with a desired spin state, such as the right-handed component or the left-handed one, propagate alone its original propagation direction, while the unwanted spin component is quickly diverged after passing through the filter. One application of the filter, sorting the spin-dependent components of vector vortex beams on higher-order Poincaré sphere, is also demonstrated. Our scheme provides a simple method to manipulate light, and thereby enables potential applications for photonic devices.

  1. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-09-01

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M2 reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the “photonic crystal microchip laser”, a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation.

  2. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser

    PubMed Central

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-01-01

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M2 reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the “photonic crystal microchip laser”, a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation. PMID:27683066

  3. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser.

    PubMed

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-09-29

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M(2) reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the "photonic crystal microchip laser", a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation.

  4. Photonic crystal microchip laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailevicius, D.; Koliadenko, V.; Purlys, V.; Peckus, M.; Taranenko, V.; Staliunas, K.

    2017-02-01

    The microchip lasers, being sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam, strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here we propose that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. We experimentally show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M2 reducing it by factor of 2, and thus increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 4. This comprises a new kind of laser, the "photonic crystal microchip laser", a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial high brightness radiation.

  5. Photon Dynamics in Inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Törnkvist, O.

    2003-06-01

    In this talk, I present a recent calculation of one-loop vacuum polarization in a de-Sitter inflationary background. This provides possibly the first example of an analytical result from a calculation by hand of radiative corrections in an out-of-equilibrium situation. The model considered is massless, minimally coupled scalar QED. Gauge invariance remains manifest, but as a result of the photon coupling to the scalar, the conformal invariance of electromagnetism is broken. An effective photon field equation is obtained which, to leading order in the number of inflationary e-folds, is consistent with the existence of a dynamically generated photon mass. This work has been done in collaboration with Tomislav Prokopec at Heidelberg University and Richard Woodard at the University of Florida.

  6. Photon physics with PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    White, S.

    1995-07-15

    In this Paper the author discusses briefly the physics motivation for extending measurements of particle production with high granularity and particle id capabilities to neutrals in PHENIX. The author then discusses the technique of direct photon measurement in the presence of copious background photons from {pi}{sup o} decays. The experiment will measure relatively low p{sub t} photons near y=0 in the lab frame. This new experimental environment of high multiplicity and low {gamma} momenta will affect both the techniques used and the type of analysis which can be performed. The Phenix Electromagnetic calorimeter is described and its capabilities illustrated with results from simulation and beam tests of the first production array.

  7. Photonic Floquet topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Rechtsman, Mikael C; Zeuner, Julia M; Plotnik, Yonatan; Lumer, Yaakov; Podolsky, Daniel; Dreisow, Felix; Nolte, Stefan; Segev, Mordechai; Szameit, Alexander

    2013-04-11

    Topological insulators are a new phase of matter, with the striking property that conduction of electrons occurs only on their surfaces. In two dimensions, electrons on the surface of a topological insulator are not scattered despite defects and disorder, providing robustness akin to that of superconductors. Topological insulators are predicted to have wide-ranging applications in fault-tolerant quantum computing and spintronics. Substantial effort has been directed towards realizing topological insulators for electromagnetic waves. One-dimensional systems with topological edge states have been demonstrated, but these states are zero-dimensional and therefore exhibit no transport properties. Topological protection of microwaves has been observed using a mechanism similar to the quantum Hall effect, by placing a gyromagnetic photonic crystal in an external magnetic field. But because magnetic effects are very weak at optical frequencies, realizing photonic topological insulators with scatter-free edge states requires a fundamentally different mechanism-one that is free of magnetic fields. A number of proposals for photonic topological transport have been put forward recently. One suggested temporal modulation of a photonic crystal, thus breaking time-reversal symmetry and inducing one-way edge states. This is in the spirit of the proposed Floquet topological insulators, in which temporal variations in solid-state systems induce topological edge states. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate a photonic topological insulator free of external fields and with scatter-free edge transport-a photonic lattice exhibiting topologically protected transport of visible light on the lattice edges. Our system is composed of an array of evanescently coupled helical waveguides arranged in a graphene-like honeycomb lattice. Paraxial diffraction of light is described by a Schrödinger equation where the propagation coordinate (z) acts as 'time'. Thus the helicity of the

  8. Quasars in rich galaxy clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellingson, Erica; Yee, Howard K. C.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of AGN activity in rich clusters of galaxies is found to be approximately 5 times more rapid than that in poor clusters. This rapid evolution may be driven by evolution in the dynamics of galaxy cluster cores. Results from our spectroscopic studies of galaxies associated with quasars are consistent with this scenario, in that bright AGN are preferentially found in regions of lower velocity dispersion. Alternately, the evolution may be driven by formation of a dense intra-cluster medium (ICM). Galaxies close to quasars in rich cluster cores are much bluer (presumably gas rich) than galaxies in the cores of other rich clusters, in support of this model.

  9. Photon Sieve Space Telescope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    a two-year effort to test and construct a membrane photon sieve for deployment from a 3U CubeSat. With a 0.3m diameter and 1m focal length this...Photon Sieve Space Telescope Geoff Andersen, Mike Dearborn and Geoff McHarg 2354 Fairchild Dr, Ste 2A31 USAF Academy, CO 80840 Contact...geoff.andersen@usafa.edu, 719-333-2829 Introduction One approach for constructing ultra-large (>20m) next-generation, space-based telescopes is to use

  10. Coherent terahertz photonics.

    PubMed

    Seeds, Alwyn J; Fice, Martyn J; Balakier, Katarzyna; Natrella, Michele; Mitrofanov, Oleg; Lamponi, Marco; Chtioui, Mourad; van Dijk, Frederic; Pepper, Michael; Aeppli, Gabriel; Davies, A Giles; Dean, Paul; Linfield, Edmund; Renaud, Cyril C

    2013-09-23

    We present a review of recent developments in THz coherent systems based on photonic local oscillators. We show that such techniques can enable the creation of highly coherent, thus highly sensitive, systems for frequencies ranging from 100 GHz to 5 THz, within an energy efficient integrated platform. We suggest that such systems could enable the THz spectrum to realize its full applications potential. To demonstrate how photonics-enabled THz systems can be realized, we review the performance of key components, show recent demonstrations of integrated platforms, and give examples of applications.

  11. The Metal-Rich Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israelian, Garik; Meynet, Georges

    2012-10-01

    Preface; Part I. Abundances in the Galaxy: Field Stars: 1. Metal-rich stars and stellar populations: A brief history and new results; 2. The metal-rich nature of stars with planets; 3. Solar chemical peculiarities; 4. Kinematics of metal-rich stars with and without planets; 5. Elemental abundance trends in the metal-rich thin and thick disks; 6. Metal-rich massive stars - how metal-rich are they?; 7. Hercules stream stars and the metal-rich thick disk; 8. Abundance survey of the galactic thick disk; Part II. Abundances in the Galaxy: Galactic Stars in Clusters, Bulges and Centre: 9. Galactic open clusters with super solar metallicities; 10. Old and very metal-rich open clusters in the BOCCE project; 11. Massive stars vs. nebular abundances in the Orion nebula; 12. Abundance surveys of metal-rich bulge stars; 13. Metal abundances in the galactic center; 14. Light elements in the galactic bulge; 15. Metallicity and ages of selected G-K giants; Part III. Observations - Abundances in Extragalactic Contexts: 16. Stellar abundances of early-type galaxies and galactic spheroids: Evidence for metal-rich stars; 17. Measuring chemical abundances in extragalactic metal-rich HII regions; 18. On the maximum oxygen abundance in metal-rich spiral galaxies; 19. Starbursts and their contribution to metal enrichment; 20. High metallicities at high redshifts; 21. Evolution of dust and elemental abundances in quasar DLAs and GRB afterglows as a function of cosmic time; 22. Dust, metals and diffuse interstellar bands in damped Lyman Alpha systems; 23. Tracing metallicities in the Universe with the James Webb Space Telescope; Part IV. Stellar Populations and Mass Functions: 24. The stellar initial mass function of metal-rich populations; 25. IMF effects on the metallicity and colour evolution of disk galaxies; 26. The metallicity of circumnuclear star forming regions; 27. The stellar population of bulges; 28. The metallicity distribution of the stars in elliptical galaxies; 29. Wolf

  12. Two-photon interference of temporally separated photons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heonoh; Lee, Sang Min; Moon, Han Seb

    2016-10-06

    We present experimental demonstrations of two-photon interference involving temporally separated photons within two types of interferometers: a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and a polarization-based Michelson interferometer. The two-photon states are probabilistically prepared in a symmetrically superposed state within the two interferometer arms by introducing a large time delay between two input photons; this state is composed of two temporally separated photons, which are in two different or the same spatial modes. We then observe two-photon interference fringes involving both the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference effect and the interference of path-entangled two-photon states simultaneously in a single interferometric setup. The observed two-photon interference fringes provide simultaneous observation of the interferometric properties of the single-photon and two-photon wavepackets. The observations can also facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of the origins of the interference phenomena arising from spatially bunched/anti-bunched two-photon states comprised of two temporally separated photons within the interferometer arms.

  13. Two-photon interference of temporally separated photons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heonoh; Lee, Sang Min; Moon, Han Seb

    2016-01-01

    We present experimental demonstrations of two-photon interference involving temporally separated photons within two types of interferometers: a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and a polarization-based Michelson interferometer. The two-photon states are probabilistically prepared in a symmetrically superposed state within the two interferometer arms by introducing a large time delay between two input photons; this state is composed of two temporally separated photons, which are in two different or the same spatial modes. We then observe two-photon interference fringes involving both the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference effect and the interference of path-entangled two-photon states simultaneously in a single interferometric setup. The observed two-photon interference fringes provide simultaneous observation of the interferometric properties of the single-photon and two-photon wavepackets. The observations can also facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of the origins of the interference phenomena arising from spatially bunched/anti-bunched two-photon states comprised of two temporally separated photons within the interferometer arms. PMID:27708380

  14. Two-photon interference of temporally separated photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Heonoh; Lee, Sang Min; Moon, Han Seb

    2016-10-01

    We present experimental demonstrations of two-photon interference involving temporally separated photons within two types of interferometers: a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and a polarization-based Michelson interferometer. The two-photon states are probabilistically prepared in a symmetrically superposed state within the two interferometer arms by introducing a large time delay between two input photons; this state is composed of two temporally separated photons, which are in two different or the same spatial modes. We then observe two-photon interference fringes involving both the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference effect and the interference of path-entangled two-photon states simultaneously in a single interferometric setup. The observed two-photon interference fringes provide simultaneous observation of the interferometric properties of the single-photon and two-photon wavepackets. The observations can also facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of the origins of the interference phenomena arising from spatially bunched/anti-bunched two-photon states comprised of two temporally separated photons within the interferometer arms.

  15. A fast, low-power, 6-bit SAR ADC for readout of strip detectors in the LHCb Upgrade experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firlej, M.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Moron, J.; Swientek, K.

    2014-07-01

    The readout of silicon strip sensors in the upgraded Tracker System of Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) experiment will require a novel complex Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC). The ASIC will extract and digitise analogue signal from the sensor and subsequently will perform digital processing and serial data transmission. One of the key processing blocks, placed in each channel, will be an Analogue to Digital Converter (ADC). A prototype of fast, low-power 6-bit Successive Approximation Register (SAR) ADC was designed, fabricated and tested. The measurements of ADC prototypes confirmed simulation results showing excellent overall performance. In particular, very good resolution with Effective Number Of Bits (ENOB) 5.85 was obtained together with very low power consumption of 0.35 mW at 40 MS/s sampling rate. The results of the performed static and dynamic measurements confirm excellent ADC operation for higher sampling rates up to 80 MS/s.

  16. Quantum optics: Arithmetic with photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajcsy, Michal; Majumdar, Arka

    2016-01-01

    Extracting a single photon from a light pulse is deceptively complicated to accomplish. Now, a deterministic experimental implementation of photon subtraction could bring a host of opportunities in quantum information technology.

  17. Why photonic systems for space?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Norman P.; Brost, George A.; Hayduk, Michael J.; Hunter, James R.; Nichter, James E.; Payson, Paul M.; Repak, Paul L.

    2000-09-01

    Future space-based platforms can and will benefit from the implementation of photonics in both analog and digital subsystems. This paper will discuss potential applications and advantages to the platforms through the use of photonics.

  18. Electronic interfaces to silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentine, Anthony L.; Cox, Jonathan A.; Zortman, William A.; Savignon, Daniel J.

    2014-03-01

    We describe the interface circuits to silicon photonics modulators, optical filters, and detectors that will be required to enable silicon photonics micro-ring and micro-disk devices to be integrated in dense wavelength division multiplexing circuitry.

  19. Spectroscopic characterization of the spinach Lhcb4 protein (CP29), a minor light-harvesting complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Pascal, A; Gradinaru, C; Wacker, U; Peterman, E; Calkoen, F; Irrgang, K D; Horton, P; Renger, G; van Grondelle, R; Robert, B; van Amerongen, H

    1999-06-01

    A spectroscopic characterization is presented of the minor photosystem II chlorophyll a/b-binding protein CP29 (or the Lhcb4 protein) from spinach, prepared by a modified form of a published protocol [Henrysson, T., Schroder, W. P., Spangfort, M. & Akerlund, H.-E. (1989) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 977, 301-308]. The isolation procedure represents a quicker, cheaper means of isolating this minor antenna protein to an equally high level of purity to that published previously. The pigment-binding protein shows similarities to other related light-harvesting complexes (LHCs), including the bulk complex LHCIIb but more particularly another minor antenna protein CP26 (Lhcb5). It is also, in the main, similar to other preparations of CP29, although some significant differences are discussed. In common with CP26, the protein binds about six chlorophyll a and two chlorophyll b molecules. Two chlorophyll b absorption bands are present at 638 and 650 nm and they are somewhat more pronounced than in a recent report [Giuffra, E., Zucchelli, G., Sandonà, D., Croce, R., Cugini, D., Garlaschi, F.M., Bassi, R. & Jennings, R.C. (1997) Biochem. 36, 12984-12993]. The bands give rise to positive and negative linear dichroism, respectively; both show negative CD bands (cf. bands with similar properties at 637 and 650 nm in CP26). Chlorophyll a absorption is dominated by a large contribution at 674 nm which also shows similarities to the major band in LHCIIb and CP26, while (as for CP26) a reduction in absorption around 670 nm is observed relative to the bulk complex. Principal differences from LHCIIb and CP26, and from other CP29 preparations, occur in the carotenoid region.

  20. Time-dependent measurement of the γ angle in the B0s↦ Ds± K± decay at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellarini, G.

    2015-03-01

    This document describes the measurement of the weak phase γ in the B0sto Ds^{±} K^{∓} decay performed by the LHCb experiment. The γ angle is the worst measured among the CKM unitarity triangle angles. The B0sto Ds^{±} K^{∓} mode allows to measure γ in a very clean way since it decays through tree-level diagram avoiding the problem of the penguin pollution. The analysis is performed on the 2011 data sample collected by LHCb at the center of mass energy of 7TeV, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 1fb-1. The relevant observables to be measured through the decay time dependence are the CP -violating coefficients Cf , Sf , S_{bar{f}} , A^{Δ Γ}f , A^{Δ Γ}_{bar{f}} since they depend on the γ angle. We find the CP observables to be: Cf=0.53± 0.25± 0.04 , Sf=-1.09± 0.33± 0.08 , S_{bar{f}}=-0.36± 0.34± 0.08 , A^{Δ Γ}f=0.37± 0.42± 0.20 , A^{ΔΓ}_{bar{f}}=0.20± 0.41± 0.20 , where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. We use these observables to perform the first measurement of γ in the B0sto Ds^{±} K^{∓} decay mode, finding γ=(115^{+28}_{-43})° modulo 180° at 68% CL where both the statistical and systematic uncertainties are included.

  1. Photonics in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Bishnu

    2011-08-01

    India has long been active in the field of photonics, dating back to famous scientists such as Raman and Bose. Today, India is home to numerous research groups and telecommunications companies that own a sizeable amount of the fibre-optic links installed around the globe.

  2. Technical Assessment: Integrated Photonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    have severe size, weight, and power restrictions. Integrated Photonic Circuits (IPCs) offer a way to circumvent these challenges by miniaturizing... circuits . Commercially, silicon is being touted as a low-cost, low defect density material platform which can afford a high-degree of integration ...requirements of applications dictate the material choice. Production challenges: In IPC technology, as with silicon integrated circuits , the wide

  3. Photonic curvilinear data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Clyde; Quaglio, Thomas; Figueiro, Thiago; Pauliac, Sébastien; Belledent, Jérôme; Fay, Aurélien; Bustos, Jessy; Marusic, Jean-Christophe; Schiavone, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    With more and more photonic data presence in e-beam lithography, the need for efficient and accurate data fracturing is required to meet acceptable manufacturing cycle time. Large photonic based layouts now create high shot count patterns for VSB based tools. Multiple angles, sweeping curves, and non-orthogonal data create a challenge for today's e-beam tools that are more efficient on Manhattan style data. This paper describes techniques developed and used for creating fractured data for VSB based pattern generators. Proximity Effect Correction is also applied during the fracture process, taking into account variable shot sizes to apply for accuracy and design style. Choosing different fracture routines for pattern data on-the-fly allows for fast and efficient processing. Data interpretation is essential for processing curvilinear data as to its size, angle, and complexity. Fracturing complex angled data into "efficient" shot counts is no longer practical as shot creation now requires knowledge of the actual data content as seen in photonic based pattern data. Simulation and physical printing results prove the implementations for accuracy and write times compared to traditional VSB writing strategies on photonic data. Geometry tolerance is used as part of the fracturing algorithm for controlling edge placement accuracy and tuning to different e-beam processing parameters.

  4. Photon collider at TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnov, Valery

    2001-10-01

    High energy photon colliders ( γγ, γe) based on backward Compton scattering of laser light is a very natural addition to e +e - linear colliders. In this report, we consider this option for the TESLA project. Recent study has shown that the horizontal emittance in the TESLA damping ring can be further decreased by a factor of four. In this case, the γγ luminosity in the high energy part of spectrum can reach about (1/3) Le +e -. Typical cross-sections of interesting processes in γγ collisions are higher than those in e +e - collisions by about one order of magnitude, so the number of events in γγ collisions will be more than that in e +e - collisions. Photon colliders can, certainly, give additional information and they are the best for the study of many phenomena. The main question is now the technical feasibility. The key new element in photon colliders is a very powerful laser system. An external optical cavity is a promising approach for the TESLA project. A free electron laser is another option. However, a more straightforward solution is "an optical storage ring (optical trap)" with a diode pumped solid state laser injector which is today technically feasible. This paper briefly reviews the status of a photon collider based on the linear collider TESLA, its possible parameters and existing problems.

  5. Bridging Between Photonic Scales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-29

    Science Foundation’s CAREER Grant Lett. 29, 1626 (2004). No. 0446571. The authors would also like to thank [15] C. Pollock and M. Lipson, Integrated ... Photonics (Kluwer Gernot Pomrenke from the Air Force Office of Scientific Academic, Dordrecht, 2003). Research for supporting the work under Grants [16

  6. Photonics and Optoelectronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-07

    Distribution Outline/Agenda • Nanophotonics: plasmonics, nanostructures, metasurfaces etc • Integrated Nanophotonics & Silicon Photonics...Highlights Nanophotonics Nanophotonics: metasurfaces , nanostructures, plasmonics etc • Shalaev – Broadband Light Bending with Plasmonic...solitons, slot waveguide, “ Metasurface ” collimator etc " World Changing Ideas 2012” Electronic Tattoos, sciencemag , J. Rogers UICU P

  7. Seeing single photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Rebecca

    2016-12-01

    The decades-old question of whether humans can see individual photons is on the brink of being answered thanks to advances in quantum optics. A positive result would let us use human observers as “detectors” to explore quantum effects such as entanglement, as Rebecca Holmes explains

  8. Two-photon cryomicroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Köhler, C.; König, K.

    2012-03-01

    We report on a new two-photon cryomicroscope which consist of a compact laser-scanning microscope combined with a motorized heating and freezing stage. Samples can be cooled down to -196 °C (77 K) and heated up to 600 °C (873 K) with adjustable heating/freezing rates between 0.01 K / min and 150 K / min. Two-photon imaging is realized by near infrared femtosecond-laser pulse excitation. The abilities of the two-photon cryomicroscope are illustrated in several measurements: imaging of fluorescent microspheres inside a piece of ice illustrates the feasibility of deep-microscopic imaging inside frozen sample. The temperature-dependent structural integrity of collagen is monitored by detection of second harmonic generation signals from porcine cornea. The measurements reveal also the dependence of the collagendenaturation temperature on hydration state of the cornea collagen. Furthermore, the potential of the two-photon cryomicroscope for optimization of freezing and thawing procedures as well as to evaluate the viability of frozen cells and tissue is discussed.

  9. Photonics in cardiovascular medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Soest, Gijs; Regar, Evelyn; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.

    2015-10-01

    The use of photonics technology is bringing new capabilities and insights to cardiovascular medicine. Intracoronary imaging and sensing, laser ablation and optical pacing are just some of the functions being explored to help diagnose and treat conditions of the heart and arteries.

  10. Membrane photon sieve telescopes.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Geoff

    2010-11-20

    We present results of research into the design and construction of membrane photon sieves as primaries for next-generation lightweight space telescopes. We have created prototypes in electroformed nickel as well as diazo and CP-1 polymer films. In two such cases, diffraction-limited imaging performance was demonstrated over a narrow bandwidth.

  11. Photons, photon jets, and dark photons at 750 GeV and beyond.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Basudeb; Kopp, Joachim; Schwaller, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    In new physics searches involving photons at the LHC, one challenge is to distinguish scenarios with isolated photons from models leading to "photon jets". For instance, in the context of the 750 GeV diphoton excess, it was pointed out that a true diphoton resonance [Formula: see text] can be mimicked by a process of the form [Formula: see text], where S is a new scalar with a mass of 750 GeV and a is a light pseudoscalar decaying to two collinear photons. Photon jets can be distinguished from isolated photons by exploiting the fact that a large fraction of photons convert to an [Formula: see text] pair inside the inner detector. In this note, we quantify this discrimination power, and we study how the sensitivity of future searches differs for photon jets compared to isolated photons. We also investigate how our results depend on the lifetime of the particle(s) decaying to the photon jet. Finally, we discuss the extension to [Formula: see text], where there are no photons at all but the dark photon [Formula: see text] decays to [Formula: see text] pairs. Our results will be useful in future studies of the putative 750 GeV signal, but also more generally in any new physics search involving hard photons.

  12. Photons, photon jets, and dark photons at 750 GeV and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Basudeb; Kopp, Joachim; Schwaller, Pedro

    2016-05-01

    In new physics searches involving photons at the LHC, one challenge is to distinguish scenarios with isolated photons from models leading to "photon jets". For instance, in the context of the 750 GeV diphoton excess, it was pointed out that a true diphoton resonance S → γ γ can be mimicked by a process of the form p p → S → a a → 4γ , where S is a new scalar with a mass of 750 GeV and a is a light pseudoscalar decaying to two collinear photons. Photon jets can be distinguished from isolated photons by exploiting the fact that a large fraction of photons convert to an e^+e^- pair inside the inner detector. In this note, we quantify this discrimination power, and we study how the sensitivity of future searches differs for photon jets compared to isolated photons. We also investigate how our results depend on the lifetime of the particle(s) decaying to the photon jet. Finally, we discuss the extension to S→ A^' A^' → e^+e^-e^+e^-, where there are no photons at all but the dark photon A^' decays to e^+e^- pairs. Our results will be useful in future studies of the putative 750 GeV signal, but also more generally in any new physics search involving hard photons.

  13. Photon momentum sharing between an electron and an ion in photoionization: from one-photon (photoelectric effect) to multiphoton absorption.

    PubMed

    Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, André D; Corkum, Paul B

    2014-12-31

    We investigate photon-momentum sharing between an electron and an ion following different photoionization regimes. We find very different partitioning of the photon momentum in one-photon ionization (the photoelectric effect) as compared to multiphoton processes. In the photoelectric effect, the electron acquires a momentum that is much greater than the single photon momentum ℏω/c [up to (8/5) ℏω/c] whereas in the strong-field ionization regime, the photoelectron only acquires the momentum corresponding to the photons absorbed above the field-free ionization threshold plus a momentum corresponding to a fraction (3/10) of the ionization potential Ip. In both cases, due to the smallness of the electron-ion mass ratio, the ion takes nearly the entire momentum of all absorbed N photons (via the electron-ion center of mass). Additionally, the ion takes, as a recoil, the photoelectron momentum resulting from mutual electron-ion interaction in the electromagnetic field. Consequently, the momentum partitioning of the photofragments is very different in both regimes. This suggests that there is a rich, unexplored physics to be studied between these two limits which can be generated with current ultrafast laser technology.

  14. One- and two-photon absorption of highly conjugated multiporphyrin systems in the two-photon Soret transition region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Jonathan A. N.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Therien, Michael J.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2009-04-01

    This study presents a detailed investigation of near-infrared one- and two-photon absorption (TPA) in a series of highly conjugated (porphinato)zinc(II) compounds. The chromophores interrogated include meso-to-meso ethyne-bridged (porphinato)zinc(II) oligomers (PZnn species), (porphinato)zinc(II)-spacer-(porphinato)zinc(II) (PZn-Sp-PZn) complexes, PZnn structures featuring terminal electron-releasing and -withdrawing substituents, related conjugated arrays in which electron-rich and -poor PZn units alternate, and benchmark PZn monomers. Broadband TPA cross-section measurements were performed ratiometrically using fluorescein as a reference. Superficially, the measurements indicate very large TPA cross-sections (up to ˜104GM; 1GM =1×10-50cm4sphoton-1) in the two-photon Soret (or B-band) resonance region. However, a more careful analysis of fluorescence as a function of incident photon flux suggests that significant one-photon absorption is present in the same spectral region for all compounds in the series. TPA cross-sections are extracted for the first time for some of these compounds using a model that includes both one-photon absorption and TPA contributions. Resultant TPA cross-sections are ˜10GM. The findings suggest that large TPA cross-sections reported in the Soret resonance region of similar compounds might contain significant contributions from one-photon absorption processes.

  15. Accidental degeneracy in photonic bands and topological phase transitions in two-dimensional core-shell dielectric photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Wang, Hai-Xiao; Xu, Ya-Dong; Chen, Huan-Yang; Jiang, Jian-Hua

    2016-08-08

    A simple core-shell two-dimensional photonic crystal is studied where the triangular lattice symmetry and the C6 point group symmetry give rich physics in accidental touching points of photonic bands. We systematically evaluate different types of accidental nodal points at the Brillouin zone center for transverse-magnetic harmonic modes when the geometry and permittivity of the core-shell material are continuously tuned. The accidental nodal points can have different dispersions and topological properties (i.e., Berry phases). These accidental nodal points can be the critical states lying between a topological phase and a normal phase of the photonic crystal. They are thus very important for the study of topological photonic states. We show that, without breaking time-reversal symmetry, by tuning the geometry of the core-shell material, a phase transition into the photonic quantum spin Hall insulator can be achieved. Here the "spin" is defined as the orbital angular momentum of a photon. We study the topological phase transition as well as the properties of the edge and bulk states and their application potentials in optics.

  16. Band gap characterization and slow light effects in periodic and quasiperiodic one dimensional photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghdoudi, J.; Kuszelewicz, R.; Kanzari, M.; Rezig, B.

    2008-04-01

    Slow light offers many opportunities for photonic devices by increasing the effective interaction length of imposed refractive index changes. The slow wave effect in photonic crystals is based on their unique dispersive properties and thus entirely dielectric in nature. In this work we demonstrate an interesting opportunity to decrease drastically the group velocity of light in one-dimensional photonic crystals constructed form materials with large dielectric constant without dispersion). We use numerical analysis to study the photonic properties of periodic (Bragg mirror) and quasiperiodic one dimensional photonic crystals realized to engineer slow light effects. Various geometries of the photonic pattern have been characterized and their photonic band-gap structure analyzed. Indeed, one dimensional quasi periodic photonic multilayer structure based on Fibonacci, Thue-Morse, and Cantor sequences were studied. Quasiperiodic structures have a rich and highly fragmented reflectivity spectrum with many sharp resonant peaks that could be exploited in a microcavity system. A comparison of group velocity through periodic and quasiperiodic photonic crystals was discussed in the context of slow light propagation. The velocity control of pulses in materials is one of the promising applications of photonic crystals. The material systems used for the numerical analysis are TiO II/SiO II and Te/SiO II which have a refractive index contrast of approximately 1.59 and 3.17 respectively. The proposed structures were modelled using the Transfer Matrix Method.

  17. Direct Photon Results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tingjun

    2013-01-01

    Direct (prompt) photon production is a field of very high interest in hadron colliders. It provides probes to search for new phenomena and to test QCD predictions. In this article, two recent cross-section results for direct photon production using the full CDF Run II data set are presented: diphoton production and photon production in association with a heavy quark.

  18. Photon-number resolving detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haderka, O.; Peřina, J., Jr.; Hamar, M.; Michálek, V.; Černoch, A.; Soubusta, J.

    2010-12-01

    An overview of current commercial and emerging approaches to single-photon-sensitive detection is given. Special attention is devoted to the detectors providing photon-number resolution with respect to their application in quantum optics and quantum information. Besides detectors offering photon-number resolution intrinsically, also multiplexing detectors are treated. A comparison of the detector technologies is presented.

  19. Photonics in Processing (BRIEFING CHARTS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-06

    nm ena ble s PIGGYBANK ON CMOS INFRASTRUCTURE AND PROGRESS Seamless Photonics-Electronics Interface Slide 5 Signal Processing with Integrated ... Photonics “Application Specific Electronic-Photonic Integrated Circuit” (AS-EPIC) demonstration vehicle: Broadband RF Receiver (HF to Ku) using optical

  20. Two-photon spectroscopy of excitons with entangled photons.

    PubMed

    Schlawin, Frank; Mukamel, Shaul

    2013-12-28

    The utility of quantum light as a spectroscopic tool is demonstrated for frequency-dispersed pump-probe, integrated pump-probe, and two-photon fluorescence signals which show Ramsey fringes. Simulations of the frequency-dispersed transmission of a broadband pulse of entangled photons interacting with a three-level model of matter reveal how the non-classical time-bandwidth properties of entangled photons can be used to disentangle congested spectra, and reveal otherwise unresolved features. Quantum light effects are most pronounced at weak intensities when entangled photon pairs are well separated, and are gradually diminished at higher intensities when different photon pairs overlap.

  1. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Karthik

    2011-12-01

    Silicon Photonics is quickly proving to be a suitable interconnect technology for meeting the future goals of on-chip bandwidth and low power requirements. However, it is not clear how silicon photonics will be integrated into CMOS chips, particularly microprocessors. The issue of integrating photonic circuits into electronic IC fabrication processes to achieve maximum flexibility and minimum complexity and cost is an important one. In order to minimize usage of chip real estate, it will be advantageous to integrate in three-dimensions. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is emerging as a promising material for the 3-D integration of silicon photonics for on-chip optical interconnects. In addition, a-Si:H film can be deposited using CMOS compatible low temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process at any point in the fabrication process allowing maximum flexibility and minimal complexity. In this thesis, we demonstrate a-Si:H as a high performance alternate platform to crystalline silicon, enabling backend integration of optical interconnects in a hybrid photonic-electronic network-on-chip architecture. High quality passive devices are fabricated on a low-loss a-Si:H platform enabling wavelength division multiplexing schemes. We demonstrate a broadband all-optical modulation scheme based on free-carrier absorption effect, which can enable compact electro-optic modulators in a-Si:H. Furthermore, we comprehensively characterize the optical nonlinearities in a-Si:H and observe that a-Si:H exhibits enhanced nonlinearities as compared to crystalline silicon. Based on the enhanced nonlinearities, we demonstrate low-power four-wave mixing in a-Si:H waveguides enabling high speed all-optical devices in an a-Si:H platform. Finally, we demonstrate a novel data encoding scheme using thermal and all-optical tuning of silicon waveguides, increasing the spectral efficiency in an interconnect link.

  2. Observation of photon polarization in the b→sγ transition.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Caponio, F; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dorosz, P; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Esen, S; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Giani', S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Hafkenscheid, T W; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manzali, M; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spinella, F; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-04-25

    This Letter presents a study of the flavor-changing neutral current radiative B±→K±π∓π±γ decays performed using data collected in proton-proton collisions with the LHCb detector at 7 and 8 TeV center-of-mass energies. In this sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3  fb-1, nearly 14 000 signal events are reconstructed and selected, containing all possible intermediate resonances with a K±π∓π± final state in the [1.1,1.9]  GeV/c2 mass range. The distribution of the angle of the photon direction with respect to the plane defined by the final-state hadrons in their rest frame is studied in intervals of K±π∓π± mass and the asymmetry between the number of signal events found on each side of the plane is obtained. The first direct observation of the photon polarization in the b→sγ transition is reported with a significance of 5.2σ.

  3. Aerogel RICH for the Belle II forward PID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, S.; Adachi, I.; Hamada, N.; Hara, K.; Iijima, T.; Iwata, S.; Kakuno, H.; Kawai, H.; Korpar, S.; Kriz^an, P.; Ogawa, S.; Pestotnik, R.; Ŝantelj, L.; Seljak, A.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tabata, M.; Tahirovic, E.; Yoshida, K.; Yusa, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Belle II spectrometer, a follow up of the very successful Belle experiment, is under construction at the SuperKEKB electron-positron collider at KEK in Japan. For the PID system in the forward region of the spectrometer, a proximity focusing ring-imaging Cherenkov (RICH) counter with an aerogel radiator is being developed. The counter will provide a 4σ separation of pions and kaons up to momenta of 4 GeV/c. For the position sensitive photon sensor, a 144-channel Hybrid Avalanche Photo-Detector (HAPD) has been developed with Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. The readout electronics is based on the custom developed ASIC. The design of the components is currently being finalized and part of their mass production have already started. Herein, we report the final design of the counter and a prototype test conducted with test beams at DESY.

  4. Improved photon counting efficiency calibration using superconducting single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Haiyong; Xu, Nan; Li, Jianwei; Sun, Ruoduan; Feng, Guojin; Wang, Yanfei; Ma, Chong; Lin, Yandong; Zhang, Labao; Kang, Lin; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2015-10-01

    The quantum efficiency of photon counters can be measured with standard uncertainty below 1% level using correlated photon pairs generated through spontaneous parametric down-conversion process. Normally a laser in UV, blue or green wavelength range with sufficient photon energy is applied to produce energy and momentum conserved photon pairs in two channels with desired wavelengths for calibration. One channel is used as the heralding trigger, and the other is used for the calibration of the detector under test. A superconducting nanowire single photon detector with advantages such as high photon counting speed (<20 MHz), low dark count rate (<50 counts per second), and wideband responsivity (UV to near infrared) is used as the trigger detector, enabling correlated photons calibration capabilities into shortwave visible range. For a 355nm single longitudinal mode pump laser, when a superconducting nanowire single photon detector is used as the trigger detector at 1064nm and 1560nm in the near infrared range, the photon counting efficiency calibration capabilities can be realized at 532nm and 460nm. The quantum efficiency measurement on photon counters such as photomultiplier tubes and avalanche photodiodes can be then further extended in a wide wavelength range (e.g. 400-1000nm) using a flat spectral photon flux source to meet the calibration demands in cutting edge low light applications such as time resolved fluorescence and nonlinear optical spectroscopy, super resolution microscopy, deep space observation, and so on.

  5. Twin-photon correlations in single-photon interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, Mayukh; Hochrainer, Armin; Lapkiewicz, Radek; Lemos, Gabriela Barreto; Zeilinger, Anton

    2017-07-01

    The measurement of the correlation between two quantum systems or particles has a broad significance in physics and also plays a central role in the fields of quantum optics and quantum information science. We propose a method of measuring the correlation between the transverse momenta of two photons, in which one only needs to detect one of the photons. We show that it is possible to generate a single-photon fringe pattern by using two spatially separated identical biphoton sources. The fringes are similar to the ones observed in a Michelson interferometer and possess certain remarkable properties. A striking feature of the fringes is that although the pattern is obtained by detecting one photon only of each photon pair, the fringes shift due to a change in the optical path traversed by the undetected photon; the shift is characterized by a combination of wavelengths of both photons. Using this method one can, therefore, measure the wavelength of a photon without detecting it. The visibility of the fringes diminishes as the correlation between the transverse momenta of twin photons decreases: visibility is unity for maximum momentum correlation and zero for no momentum correlation. This dependence allows us to determine the momentum correlation between both photons from the visibility of the fringe pattern obtained by detecting one of the photons only. Our method can potentially be generalized to other quantum entities.

  6. Faking ordinary photons by displaced dark photon decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yuhsin; Wang, Lian-Tao; Zhao, Yue

    2017-01-01

    A light metastable dark photon decaying into a collimated electron/positron pair can fake a photon, either converted or unconverted, at the LHC. The detailed object identification relies on the specifics of the detector and strategies for the reconstruction. We study the fake rate based on the ATLAS (CMS) detector geometry and show that it can be O(1) with a generic choice of parameters. Especially, the probability of being registered as a photon is angular dependent. Such detector effects can induce bias to measurements on certain properties of new physics. In this paper, we consider the scenario where dark photons in final states are from a heavy resonance decay. Consequently, the detector effects can dramatically affect the results when determining the spin of a resonance. Further, if the decay products from the heavy resonance are one photon and one dark photon, which has a large probability to fake a diphoton event, the resonance is allowed to be a vector. Because of the difference in detectors, the cross sections measured in ATLAS and CMS do not necessarily match. Furthermore, if the diphoton signal is given by the dark photons, the standard model Z γ and Z Z final states do not necessarily come with the γ γ channel, which is a unique signature in our scenario. The issue studied here is relevant also for any future new physics searches with photon(s) in the final state. We discuss possible ways of distinguishing dark photon decay and a real photon in the future.

  7. Photonic Crystal Devices for Quantum and Nanoscale Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuckovic, Jelena

    2005-03-01

    Photonic crystal structures can be built to operate in two opposite regimes: one is a suppression of photon states inside the photonic band gap, and the other is a large enhancement of the density of photon states. Both regimes are of consequence to a number of applications in nanoscale and nonlinear optics, as well as to photonic quantum information technologies. Our work on the employment of photonic crystals to build hardware of solid-state photonic quantum information systems, as well as to construct miniaturized optical devices will be reviewed in this talk. We have demonstrated sources of single photons on demand based on quantum dots in micropost microcavities that exhibit a large spontaneous emission rate enhancement (Purcell factor of five) together with a small multi-photon probability (2% compared to a Poisson-distributed source of the same intensity). We have also tested the indistinguishability of emitted single photons from such a source through a Hong-Ou-Mandel-type two-photon interference experiment, and found that consecutive photons exhibit a mean wave-packet overlap as large as 0.81, making this source useful in a variety of experiments in quantum optics and quantum information. The applications of such a device include secure quantum cryptography and linear optical quantum computation. We have also developed two-dimensional photonic crystal microcavities of finite depth with embedded quantum dots that exhibit large quality factors (˜3000) together with small mode volumes (˜0.5(λ/n)^3) and with a maximum field intensity in the high-index region, which is of importance for enhanced interaction with quantum dot excitons. We have performed spectroscopy on a single quantum dot coupled to such a cavity, and demonstrated a very strong modification of its radiative properties, as well as a single-photon generation on demand. A strong interaction between a quantum dot exciton and the field enabled by such a microcavity is of importance for

  8. Radiation hardness test of the Philips Digital Photon Counter with proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnyakov, M. Yu.; Frach, T.; Kononov, S. A.; Kuyanov, I. A.; Prisekin, V. G.

    2016-07-01

    The Philips Digital Photon Counter (DPC) is a silicon photomultiplier combining Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (G-APD) and dedicated readout electronics in the same chip. The DPC is a promising photon sensor for future RICH detectors. A known issue of G-APD is its sensitivity to radiation damage. Two DPC sensors were tested using 800 MeV/c protons. An increase of dark counting rate with proton fluence up to 4 ·1011cm-2 has been measured.

  9. Structural Color Palettes of Core-Shell Photonic Ink Capsules Containing Cholesteric Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Seok; Seo, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Yun Ho; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2017-06-01

    Photonic microcapsules with onion-like topology are microfluidically designed to have cholesteric liquid crystals with opposite handedness in their core and shell. The microcapsules exhibit structural colors caused by dual photonic bandgaps, resulting in a rich variety of color on the optical palette. Moreover, the microcapsules can switch the colors from either core or shell depending on the selection of light-handedness. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Photonic-powered cable assembly

    DOEpatents

    Sanderson, Stephen N.; Appel, Titus James; Wrye, IV, Walter C.

    2013-01-22

    A photonic-cable assembly includes a power source cable connector ("PSCC") coupled to a power receive cable connector ("PRCC") via a fiber cable. The PSCC electrically connects to a first electronic device and houses a photonic power source and an optical data transmitter. The fiber cable includes an optical transmit data path coupled to the optical data transmitter, an optical power path coupled to the photonic power source, and an optical feedback path coupled to provide feedback control to the photonic power source. The PRCC electrically connects to a second electronic device and houses an optical data receiver coupled to the optical transmit data path, a feedback controller coupled to the optical feedback path to control the photonic power source, and a photonic power converter coupled to the optical power path to convert photonic energy received over the optical power path to electrical energy to power components of the PRCC.

  11. Photonic-powered cable assembly

    DOEpatents

    Sanderson, Stephen N; Appel, Titus James; Wrye, IV, Walter C

    2014-06-24

    A photonic-cable assembly includes a power source cable connector ("PSCC") coupled to a power receive cable connector ("PRCC") via a fiber cable. The PSCC electrically connects to a first electronic device and houses a photonic power source and an optical data transmitter. The fiber cable includes an optical transmit data path coupled to the optical data transmitter, an optical power path coupled to the photonic power source, and an optical feedback path coupled to provide feedback control to the photonic power source. The PRCC electrically connects to a second electronic device and houses an optical data receiver coupled to the optical transmit data path, a feedback controller coupled to the optical feedback path to control the photonic power source, and a photonic power converter coupled to the optical power path to convert photonic energy received over the optical power path to electrical energy to power components of the PRCC.

  12. Level structures of neutron-rich Xe isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Lister, C.J.; Morss, L.R.

    1995-08-01

    The level structures of neutron-rich Xe isotopes were determined by observing prompt gamma-ray coincidences in {sup 248}Cm fission fragments. A 5-mg {sup 248}Cm, in the form of {sup 248}Cm-KCl pellet, was placed inside Eurogam array which consisted of 45 Compton-suppressed Ge detectors and 5 Low-Energy Photon Spectrometers. Transitions in Xe isotopes were identified by the appearance of new peaks in the {gamma}-ray spectra obtained by gating on the gamma peaks of the complementary Mo fragments.

  13. Measurement of the front-end dead-time of the LHCb muon detector and evaluation of its contribution to the muon detection inefficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderlini, L.; Anelli, M.; Archilli, F.; Auriemma, G.; Baldini, W.; Bencivenni, G.; Bizzeti, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Bochin, B.; Bozzi, C.; Brundu, D.; Cadeddu, S.; Campana, P.; Carboni, G.; Cardini, A.; Carletti, M.; Casu, L.; Chubykin, A.; Ciambrone, P.; Dané, E.; De Simone, P.; Falabella, A.; Felici, G.; Fiore, M.; Fontana, M.; Fresch, P.; Furfaro, E.; Graziani, G.; Kashchuk, A.; Kotriakhova, S.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Loi, A.; Maev, O.; Manca, G.; Martellotti, G.; Neustroev, P.; Oldeman, R. G. C.; Palutan, M.; Passaleva, G.; Penso, G.; Pinci, D.; Polycarpo, E.; Saitta, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Saputi, A.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, T.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Tellarini, G.; Vacca, C.; Vazquez-Gomez, R.; Vecchi, S.; Veltri, M.; Vorobyev, A.

    2016-04-01

    A method is described which allows to deduce the dead-time of the front-end electronics of the LHCb muon detector from a series of measurements performed at different luminosities at a bunch-crossing rate of 20 MHz. The measured values of the dead-time range from ~ 70 ns to ~ 100 ns. These results allow to estimate the performance of the muon detector at the future bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz and at higher luminosity.

  14. Quantum Communication with Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenn, Mario; Malik, Mehul; Scheidl, Thomas; Ursin, Rupert; Zeilinger, Anton

    The secure communication of information plays an ever increasing role in our society today. Classical methods of encryption inherently rely on the difficulty of solving a problem such as finding prime factors of large numbers and can, in principle, be cracked by a fast enough machine. The burgeoning field of quantum communication relies on the fundamental laws of physics to offer unconditional information security. Here we introduce the key concepts of quantum superposition and entanglement as well as the no-cloning theorem that form the basis of this field. Then, we review basic quantum communication schemes with single and entangled photons and discuss recent experimental progress in ground and space-based quantum communication. Finally, we discuss the emerging field of high-dimensional quantum communication, which promises increased data rates and higher levels of security than ever before. We discuss recent experiments that use the orbital angular momentum of photons for sharing large amounts of information in a secure fashion.

  15. Highly integrated photonic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmulovich, J.; Frolov, S.; Paunescu, A.; Lee, D. C.; DeHazan, Y.; Hanjani, A.; Bruce, A.

    2006-02-01

    From its foundation Inplane Photonics focused on developing integrated solutions based on Planar Lightwave Circuit(PLC) technology. It is universally agreed that the path to lower cost-per-function in Photonics, as in Electronics, leads to integration. The timing of introduction of a new technological solution and the rate at which it will penetrate the market very much depends on the interplay between the size of the market, advantages the new technology offers, and the investment needed to achieve the level of performance that is envisioned. In telecom applications, where the main drivers for technology selection are cost and performance, such large-scale investment did not materialized yet for the PLC technology mostly due to a limited market size.

  16. A photon thermal diode.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Wong, Carlaton; Lubner, Sean; Yee, Shannon; Miller, John; Jang, Wanyoung; Hardin, Corey; Fong, Anthony; Garay, Javier E; Dames, Chris

    2014-11-17

    A thermal diode is a two-terminal nonlinear device that rectifies energy carriers (for example, photons, phonons and electrons) in the thermal domain, the heat transfer analogue to the familiar electrical diode. Effective thermal rectifiers could have an impact on diverse applications ranging from heat engines to refrigeration, thermal regulation of buildings and thermal logic. However, experimental demonstrations have lagged far behind theoretical proposals. Here we present the first experimental results for a photon thermal diode. The device is based on asymmetric scattering of ballistic energy carriers by pyramidal reflectors. Recent theoretical work has predicted that this ballistic mechanism also requires a nonlinearity in order to yield asymmetric thermal transport, a requirement of all thermal diodes arising from the second Law of Thermodynamics, and realized here using an 'inelastic thermal collimator' element. Experiments confirm both effects: with pyramids and collimator the thermal rectification is 10.9 ± 0.8%, while without the collimator no rectification is detectable (<0.3%).

  17. Photon scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Goudonnet, J.P.; Salomon, L.; De Fornel, F.; Chabrier, G. . Lab. de Physique du Solide); Warmack, R.J.; Ferrell, T.L. )

    1990-01-01

    The Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (PSTM) is the photon analogue of the electron Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM). It uses the evanescent field due to the total internal reflection of a light beam in a Total Internal Reflection (TIR) prism. The sample, mounted on the base of the prism, modulates the evanescent field. A sharpened optical fiber probes this field, and the collected light is processed to generate an image of the topography and the chemical composition of the surface. We give, in this paper, a description of the microscope and discuss the influence of several parameters such as -- polarization of light, angle of incidence, shape of the end of the fiber -- on the resolution. Images of various samples -- glass samples, teflon spheres -- are presented. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Photonics meet digital art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curticapean, Dan; Israel, Kai

    2014-09-01

    The paper focuses on the work of an interdisciplinary project between photonics and digital art. The result is a poster collection dedicated to the International Year of Light 2015. In addition, an internet platform was created that presents the project. It can be accessed at http://www.magic-of-light.org/iyl2015/index.htm. From the idea to the final realization, milestones with tasks and steps will be presented in the paper. As an interdisciplinary project, students from technological degree programs were involved as well as art program students. The 2015 Anniversaries: Alhazen (1015), De Caus (1615), Fresnel (1815), Maxwell (1865), Einstein (1905), Penzias Wilson, Kao (1965) and their milestone contributions in optics and photonics will be highlighted.

  19. Natural photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneron, Jean Pol; Simonis, Priscilla

    2012-10-01

    Photonic structures appeared in nature several hundred millions years ago. In the living world, color is used for communication and this important function strongly impacts the individual chances of survival as well as the chances to reproduce. This has a statistical influence on species populations. Therefore, because they are involved in evolution, natural color-generating structures are - from some point of view - highly optimized. In this short review, a survey is presented of the development of natural photonic crystal-type structures occurring in insects, spiders, birds, fishes and other marine animals, in plants and more, from the standpoint of light-waves propagation. One-, two-, and three-dimensional structures will be reviewed with selected examples.

  20. Nanowire Photonic Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-22

    synthesis of silicon and gallium-indium nitride alloy nanowire heterostructures to provide building blocks for photonic devices that can span the...the Si-nanowire etching profile follows the order in which dopants were introduced during synthesis : First boron for p-type, no dopant for i-type... synthesis of nanoscale building blocks, (ii) characterization of fundamental physical properties of the building blocks, and (iii) assembly of

  1. Slotted photonic crystal biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scullion, Mark Gerard

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them result in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This thesis presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which engender higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the peak of optical mode within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. High sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than most competing devices in the literature. Initial tests with cellular material for real applications was also performed, and shown to be of promise. In addition, groundwork to make an integrated device that includes the spectrometer function was also carried out showing that slotted photonic crystals themselves can be used for on-chip wavelength specific filtering and spectroscopy, whilst gas-free microvalves for automation were also developed. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study.

  2. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  3. Integrated photonic quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, Markus; Heilmann, René; Lebugle, Maxime; Guzman-Silva, Diego; Perez-Leija, Armando; Szameit, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Over the last 20 years quantum walks (QWs) have gained increasing interest in the field of quantum information science and processing. In contrast to classical walkers, quantum objects exhibit intrinsic properties like non-locality and non-classical many-particle correlations, which renders QWs a versatile tool for quantum simulation and computation as well as for a deeper understanding of genuine quantum mechanics. Since they are highly controllable and hardly interact with their environment, photons seem to be ideally suited quantum walkers. In order to study and exploit photonic QWs, lattice structures that allow low loss coherent evolution of quantum states are demanded. Such requirements are perfectly met by integrated optical waveguide devices that additionally allow a substantial miniaturization of experimental settings. Moreover, by utilizing the femtosecond direct laser writing technique three-dimensional waveguide structures are capable of analyzing QWs also on higher dimensional geometries. In this context, advances and findings of photonic QWs are discussed in this review. Various concepts and experimental results are presented covering, such as different quantum transport regimes, the Boson sampling problem, and the discrete fractional quantum Fourier transform.

  4. Heterogeneous photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Alexander W.; Fish, Gregory; Hall, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Photonic Integrated Circuits (PICs) have been dichotomized into circuits with high passive content (silica and silicon PLCs) and high active content (InP tunable lasers and transceivers) due to the trade-off in material characteristics used within these two classes. This has led to restrictions in the adoption of PICs to systems in which only one of the two classes of circuits are required to be made on a singular chip. Much work has been done to create convergence in these two classes by either engineering the materials to achieve the functionality of both device types on a single platform, or in epitaxial growth techniques to transfer one material to the next, but have yet to demonstrate performance equal to that of components fabricated in their native substrates. Advances in waferbonding techniques have led to a new class of heterogeneously integrated photonic circuits that allow for the concurrent use of active and passive materials within a photonic circuit, realizing components on a transferred substrate that have equivalent performance as their native substrate. In this talk, we review and compare advances made in heterogeneous integration along with demonstrations of components and circuits enabled by this technology.

  5. Photonics Explorer Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Amrita; Debaes, Nathalie

    2014-07-01

    The Photonics Explorer is an intra-curricular educational kit developed in a European project with a pan-European collaboration of over 35 teachers and science education professors. Unlike conventional educational outreach kits, the Photonics Explorer is specifically designed to integrate seamlessly in school curricula and enhance and complement the teaching and learning of science and optics in the classroom. The kit equips teachers with class sets of experimental components, provided within a supporting didactic framework and is designed for lower and upper secondary students (12-18 years). The kit is provided completely free of charge to teachers in conjunction with teacher training courses. The workshop will provide an overview of the Photonics Explorer intra-curricular kit and give teachers the opportunity to work hands-on with the material and didactic content of two modules, `Light Signals' (lower secondary) and `Diffraction and Interference'(upper secondary). We also aim to receive feedback regarding the content, components and didactic framework from teachers from non- European countries, to understand the relevance of the kit for their teaching and the ability for such a kit to integrate into non-EU curricula.

  6. Nonlocal Structures: Bilocal Photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, Roger E.

    1980-01-01

    As a starting point, it is postulated that all particles and fields are built from a single primitive field, which must then be a massless fermion with a σ spin of one-half. Two helicities are embodied in a τ spin of one-half. The vacuum is an open Fermi sea whose height is a wave number κ. Elementary particles are structures having the form of standing-wave systems floating on the vacuum sea, with the height κ providing both the scale of inner structural size and the mass unit for the elementary particle mass spectrum. A bilocal photon starts with a function describing two primitive quanta with parallel σ spin and opposite τ spin. A centroid-time wave equation then couples-in an infinite set of orthogonal functions. The introduction of an operator Q λ permits the reduction of the infinite secular determinant to a finite six-by-six determinant. Solutions (for the infinite expansion) are obtained describing photons with right-handed and left-handed polarizations. Superpositions of these give linearly polarized photons. Electric and magnetic field vectors, satisfying the vacuum Maxwell equations, are obtained from a bilocal Hertz vector given by п= (2/κ3 c)(∂/∂ t r)∇rΨ(1,2), where Ψ(1,2) is the bilocal wave function, and tr and r are the relative time and relative position variables.

  7. Slotted Photonic Crystal Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Di Falco, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them results in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This review article presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which provide higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the optical mode peak within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. Higher sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than possible with most competing devices reported in the literature. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study. PMID:23503295

  8. Super Photon Counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John

    1999-01-01

    The perfect photon detector would measure the arrival time, the energy, the polarization, and the position of every arriving quantum, but that is easier said than done. Two groups have now succeeded in doing time-resolved spectroscopy on the Crab Nebula pulsar, measuring everything but the polarization, with reports from Romani et al. at Stanford and from Perryman et al. at ESTEC. Both groups use superconducting detectors to gain the necessary speed and sensitivity. The photon can heat the electrons in a superconductor biased in the middle of its resistive transition, or break bound superconducting electron-hole pairs, which can then be collected. Three years ago, Peacock et al. reported that they had detected single optical photons with a superconducting tunnel junction (STJ), and Paresce wrote a News and Views article. A tunnel junction uses two pieces of conductive material, separated by a tiny gap of insulating material or even vacuum. If the gap is thin enough, electrons can tunnel across anyway, and if the conductors are superconductors, the junction displays very useful quantum mechanical properties and electrical nonlinearities. Amplifiers, detectors, oscillators, and computer circuits can all be made from them. Their special advantage is that they operate at very low temperatures, dissipate very little power, operate very fast, and are very small.

  9. Photon strength functions from photon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwengner, Ronald

    2015-10-01

    We present photon-scattering experiments using bremsstrahlung at the γELBE facility of Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and using quasi-monoenergetic, polarized γ rays at the HI γS facility of the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) in Durham. In the analysis of the spectra measured by using bremsstrahlung at γELBE, we include intensity in the quasi-continuum and perform simulations of statistical γ-ray cascades using the code γDEX to estimate intensities of inelastic transitions to low-lying excited states. Simulated average branching ratios are compared with model-independent branching ratios obtained from spectra measured by using monoenergetic γ beams at HI γS. Photoabsorption cross sections deduced in this way are presented for selected nuclides. Strength in the energy region of the so-called pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) is considered in nuclei around mass 80 and in xenon isotopes. In collaboration with Ralph Massarczyk, Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  10. An Improved Cluster Richness Estimator

    SciTech Connect

    Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli S.; Koester, Benjamin P.; McKay, Timothy; Hao, Jiangang; Evrard, August; Wechsler, Risa H.; Hansen, Sarah; Sheldon, Erin; Johnston, David; Becker, Matthew R.; Annis, James T.; Bleem, Lindsey; Scranton, Ryan; /Pittsburgh U.

    2009-08-03

    Minimizing the scatter between cluster mass and accessible observables is an important goal for cluster cosmology. In this work, we introduce a new matched filter richness estimator, and test its performance using the maxBCG cluster catalog. Our new estimator significantly reduces the variance in the L{sub X}-richness relation, from {sigma}{sub lnL{sub X}}{sup 2} = (0.86 {+-} 0.02){sup 2} to {sigma}{sub lnL{sub X}}{sup 2} = (0.69 {+-} 0.02){sup 2}. Relative to the maxBCG richness estimate, it also removes the strong redshift dependence of the richness scaling relations, and is significantly more robust to photometric and redshift errors. These improvements are largely due to our more sophisticated treatment of galaxy color data. We also demonstrate the scatter in the L{sub X}-richness relation depends on the aperture used to estimate cluster richness, and introduce a novel approach for optimizing said aperture which can be easily generalized to other mass tracers.

  11. Topological Photonic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Cheng; Lin, Liang; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2014-01-01

    As exotic phenomena in optics, topological states in photonic crystals have drawn much attention due to their fundamental significance and great potential applications. Because of the broken time-reversal symmetry under the influence of an external magnetic field, the photonic crystals composed of magneto-optical materials will lead to the degeneracy lifting and show particular topological characters of energy bands. The upper and lower bulk bands have nonzero integer topological numbers. The gapless edge states can be realized to connect two bulk states. This topological photonic states originated from the topological property can be analogous to the integer quantum Hall effect in an electronic system. The gapless edge state only possesses a single sign of gradient in the whole Brillouin zone, and thus the group velocity is only in one direction leading to the one-way energy flow, which is robust to disorder and impurity due to the nontrivial topological nature of the corresponding electromagnetic states. Furthermore, this one-way edge state would cross the Brillouin center with nonzero group velocity, where the negative-zero-positive phase velocity can be used to realize some interesting phenomena such as tunneling and backward phase propagation. On the other hand, under the protection of time-reversal symmetry, a pair of gapless edge states can also be constructed by using magnetic-electric coupling meta-materials, exhibiting Fermion-like spin helix topological edge states, which can be regarded as an optical counterpart of topological insulator originating from the spin-orbit coupling. The aim of this article is to have a comprehensive review of recent research literatures published in this emerging field of photonic topological phenomena. Photonic topological states and their related phenomena are presented and analyzed, including the chiral edge states, polarization dependent transportation, unidirectional waveguide and nonreciprocal optical transmission, all

  12. Photonics21 and the perspectives from the European photonics industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertin, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Photonics provide indispensable technology buildings bricks that enable a wide range of products as well as driving the development of entirely new industries. The European Commission recognized the potential of photonics to strengthen Europe's industrial and innovation capacity and consequently declared photonics as a Key Enabling Technology. Photonics21 as partner of the European Commission developed a Multiannual Strategic Roadmap which aims at boosting European photonics along the whole innovation chain with special focus on the gap between generating knowledge and products. The roadmap will be realized in a Public Private Partnership between the European photonics industry and the European Commission until 2020. In this PPP it is intended that the industry commits to leverage the public funds by the factor of 4.

  13. Photon-triggered nanowire transistors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungkil; Lee, Hoo-Cheol; Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Hwang, Min-Soo; Park, Jin-Sung; Lee, Jung Min; So, Jae-Pil; Choi, Jae-Hyuck; Kwon, Soon-Hong; Barrelet, Carl J; Park, Hong-Gyu

    2017-10-01

    Photon-triggered electronic circuits have been a long-standing goal of photonics. Recent demonstrations include either all-optical transistors in which photons control other photons or phototransistors with the gate response tuned or enhanced by photons. However, only a few studies report on devices in which electronic currents are optically switched and amplified without an electrical gate. Here we show photon-triggered nanowire (NW) transistors, photon-triggered NW logic gates and a single NW photodetection system. NWs are synthesized with long crystalline silicon (CSi) segments connected by short porous silicon (PSi) segments. In a fabricated device, the electrical contacts on both ends of the NW are connected to a single PSi segment in the middle. Exposing the PSi segment to light triggers a current in the NW with a high on/off ratio of >8 × 10(6). A device that contains two PSi segments along the NW can be triggered using two independent optical input signals. Using localized pump lasers, we demonstrate photon-triggered logic gates including AND, OR and NAND gates. A photon-triggered NW transistor of diameter 25 nm with a single 100 nm PSi segment requires less than 300 pW of power. Furthermore, we take advantage of the high photosensitivity and fabricate a submicrometre-resolution photodetection system. Photon-triggered transistors offer a new venue towards multifunctional device applications such as programmable logic elements and ultrasensitive photodetectors.

  14. Synthetic Landau levels for photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Gromov, Andrey; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic photonic materials are an emerging platform for exploring the interface between microscopic quantum dynamics and macroscopic material properties. Photons experiencing a Lorentz force develop handedness, providing opportunities to study quantum Hall physics and topological quantum science. Here we present an experimental realization of a magnetic field for continuum photons. We trap optical photons in a multimode ring resonator to make a two-dimensional gas of massive bosons, and then employ a non-planar geometry to induce an image rotation on each round-trip. This results in photonic Coriolis/Lorentz and centrifugal forces and so realizes the Fock-Darwin Hamiltonian for photons in a magnetic field and harmonic trap. Using spatial- and energy-resolved spectroscopy, we track the resulting photonic eigenstates as radial trapping is reduced, finally observing a photonic Landau level at degeneracy. To circumvent the challenge of trap instability at the centrifugal limit, we constrain the photons to move on a cone. Spectroscopic probes demonstrate flat space (zero curvature) away from the cone tip. At the cone tip, we observe that spatial curvature increases the local density of states, and we measure fractional state number excess consistent with the Wen-Zee theory, providing an experimental test of this theory of electrons in both a magnetic field and curved space. This work opens the door to exploration of the interplay of geometry and topology, and in conjunction with Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency, enables studies of photonic fractional quantum Hall fluids and direct detection of anyons.

  15. Photonic Crystal Laser Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M

    2003-05-21

    Photonic crystals have great potential for use as laser-driven accelerator structures. A photonic crystal is a dielectric structure arranged in a periodic geometry. Like a crystalline solid with its electronic band structure, the modes of a photonic crystal lie in a set of allowed photonic bands. Similarly, it is possible for a photonic crystal to exhibit one or more photonic band gaps, with frequencies in the gap unable to propagate in the crystal. Thus photonic crystals can confine an optical mode in an all-dielectric structure, eliminating the need for metals and their characteristic losses at optical frequencies. We discuss several geometries of photonic crystal accelerator structures. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) are optical fibers which can confine a speed-of-light optical mode in vacuum. Planar structures, both two- and three-dimensional, can also confine such a mode, and have the additional advantage that they can be manufactured using common microfabrication techniques such as those used for integrated circuits. This allows for a variety of possible materials, so that dielectrics with desirable optical and radiation-hardness properties can be chosen. We discuss examples of simulated photonic crystal structures to demonstrate the scaling laws and trade-offs involved, and touch on potential fabrication processes.

  16. Cyanines as new fluorescent probes for DNA detection and two-photon excited bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin Jiang; Wu, Po Lam; Bolze, Frédéric; Leung, Heidi W C; Li, King Fai; Mak, Nai Ki; Kwong, Daniel W J; Nicoud, Jean-François; Cheah, Kok Wai; Wong, Man Shing

    2010-05-21

    A series of cyanine fluorophores based on fused aromatics as an electron donor for DNA sensing and two-photon bioimaging were synthesized, among which the carbazole-based biscyanine exhibits high sensitivity and efficiency as a fluorescent light-up probe for dsDNA, which shows selective binding toward the AT-rich regions. The synergetic effect of the bischromophoric skeleton gives a several-fold enhancement in a two-photon absorption cross-section as well as a 25- to 100-fold enhancement in two-photon excited fluorescence upon dsDNA binding.

  17. Optical gaps, mode patterns and dipole radiation in two-dimensional aperiodic photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boriskina, Svetlana V.; Gopinath, Ashwin; Negro, Luca Dal

    2009-05-01

    Based on the rigorous generalized Mie theory solution of Maxwell's equations for dielectric cylinders we theoretically investigate the optical properties of two-dimensional deterministic structures based on the Fibonacci, Thue-Morse and Rudin-Shapiro aperiodic sequences. In particular, we investigate bandgap formation and mode localization properties in aperiodic photonic structures based on the accurate calculation of their local density of states (LDOS). In addition, we explore the potential of photonic structures based on aperiodic order for the engineering of radiative rates and emission patterns in erbium-doped silicon-rich nitride photonic structures.

  18. Optics of globular photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, V S

    2007-05-31

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the optical properties of globular photonic crystals - new physical objects having a crystal structure with the lattice period exceeding considerably the atomic size, are presented. As globular photonic crystals, artificial opal matrices consisting of close-packed silica globules of diameter {approx}200 nm were used. The reflection spectra of these objects characterising the parameters of photonic bands existing in these crystals in the visible spectral region are presented. The idealised models of the energy band structure of photonic crystals investigated in the review give analytic dispersion dependences for the group velocity and the effective photon mass in a globular photonic crystal. The characteristics of secondary emission excited in globular photonic crystals by monochromatic and broadband radiation are presented. The results of investigations of single-photon-excited delayed scattering of light observed in globular photonic crystals exposed to cw UV radiation and radiation from a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser are presented. The possibilities of using globular photonic crystals as active media for lasing in different spectral regions are considered. It is proposed to use globular photonic crystals as sensitive sensors in optoelectronic devices for molecular analysis of organic and inorganic materials by the modern methods of laser spectroscopy. The results of experimental studies of spontaneous and stimulated globular scattering of light are discussed. The conditions for observing resonance and two-photon-excited delayed scattering of light are found. The possibility of accumulation and localisation of the laser radiation energy inside a globular photonic crystal is reported. (review)

  19. The HERMES dual-radiator RICH detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, H. E.

    2003-04-01

    The HERMES experiment emphasizes measurements of semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering. Most of the hadrons produced lie between 2 and 10 GeV, a region in which it had not previously been feasible to separate pions, kaons, and protons with standard particle identification (PID) techniques. The recent development of new clear, large, homogeneous and hydrophobic silica aerogel material with a low index of refraction offered the means to apply RICH PID techniques to this difficult momentum region. The HERMES instrument uses two radiators, C 4F 10, a heavy fluorocarbon gas, and a wall of silica aerogel tiles. A lightweight spherical mirror constructed using a newly perfected technique to make resin-coated carbon-fiber surfaces of optical quality provides optical focusing on a photon detector consisting of 1934 photomultiplier tubes (PMT) for each detector half. The PMT array is held in a soft steel matrix to provide shielding against the residual field of the main spectrometer magnet. Ring reconstruction is accomplished with pattern recognition techniques based on a combination of inverse and direct ray tracing.

  20. The CLAS12-RICH hybrid geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelini, Giovanni; CLAS12-RICH Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A Ring-imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH) has been designed for the CLAS12 spectrometer (JLAB, Hall B) in order to increase the particle identification. Among the approved physics program focused upon 3D imaging of the nucleon, some Semi Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering experiments (E12-09-007, E12-09-008, E12-09-009) demand an efficient kaon identification across the momentum range from 3 to 8 GeV/c. The detector exploits a novel elaborated hybrid geometry based on a complex focusing mirror system that will reduce the area instrumented with photon detectors. For forward scattered particles (θ <12°) with momenta p = 3-8 GeV/c, a proximity imaging method with direct Cherenkov light detection will be used. For larger angles of 12° < θ <35° and momenta of p = 3-6 GeV/c, the Cherenkov light will be focused by a spherical mirror, undergo two further passes through the aerogel radiator and will be reflected from planar mirrors before detection. A carefully study on reflections has been performed considering microscopic and macroscopic effects. In addition, a new feature has been introduced in the CLAS12 simulation software in order to generate the geometry of the detector by using a computer-aided design (CAD) file for an accurate geometrical description. U.S. Department of Energy, GWU Columbian College Art and Science Facilitating Fund Award (CCAS CCFF).

  1. Magneto-tunable one-dimensional graphene-based photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Jahani, D. Soltani-Vala, A. Barvestani, J.; Hajian, H.

    2014-04-21

    We investigate the effect of a perpendicular static magnetic field on the optical bandgap of a one-dimensional (1D) graphene-dielectric photonic crystal in order to examine the possibility of reaching a rich tunable photonic bandgap. The solution of the wave equation in the presence of the anisotropic Hall situation suggests two decoupled circularly polarized wave each exhibiting different degrees of bandgap tunability. It is also numerically demonstrated that applying different values of field intensity lead to perceptible changes in photonic bandgap of such a structure. Finally, the effect of opening a finite electronic gap in the spectrum of graphene on the optical dispersion solution of such a 1D photonic crystal is reported. It is shown that increasing the value of the electronic gap results in the shrinkage of the associated photonic bandgaps.

  2. Programmable atom-photon quantum interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Christoph; Eich, Pascal; Schug, Michael; Müller, Philipp; Eschner, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    We present the implementation of a programmable atom-photon quantum interface, employing a single trapped +40Ca ion and single photons. Depending on its mode of operation, the interface serves as a bidirectional atom-photon quantum-state converter, as a source of entangled atom-photon states, or as a quantum frequency converter of single photons. The interface lends itself particularly to interfacing ions with spontaneous parametric down-conversion-based single-photon or entangled-photon-pair sources.

  3. Non-Poissonian photon statistics from macroscopic photon cutting materials

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Mathijs; Meijerink, Andries; Rabouw, Freddy T.

    2017-01-01

    In optical materials energy is usually extracted only from the lowest excited state, resulting in fundamental energy-efficiency limits such as the Shockley–Queisser limit for single-junction solar cells. Photon-cutting materials provide a way around such limits by absorbing high-energy photons and ‘cutting' them into multiple low-energy excitations that can subsequently be extracted. The occurrence of photon cutting or quantum cutting has been demonstrated in a variety of materials, including semiconductor quantum dots, lanthanides and organic dyes. Here we show that photon cutting results in bunched photon emission on the timescale of the excited-state lifetime, even when observing a macroscopic number of optical centres. Our theoretical derivation matches well with experimental data on NaLaF4:Pr3+, a material that can cut deep-ultraviolet photons into two visible photons. This signature of photon cutting can be used to identify and characterize new photon-cutting materials unambiguously. PMID:28537257

  4. Photon correlation in single-photon frequency upconversion.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaorong; Huang, Kun; Pan, Haifeng; Wu, E; Zeng, Heping

    2012-01-30

    We experimentally investigated the intensity cross-correlation between the upconverted photons and the unconverted photons in the single-photon frequency upconversion process with multi-longitudinal mode pump and signal sources. In theoretical analysis, with this multi-longitudinal mode of both signal and pump sources system, the properties of the signal photons could also be maintained as in the single-mode frequency upconversion system. Experimentally, based on the conversion efficiency of 80.5%, the joint probability of simultaneously detecting at upconverted and unconverted photons showed an anti-correlation as a function of conversion efficiency which indicated the upconverted photons were one-to-one from the signal photons. While due to the coherent state of the signal photons, the intensity cross-correlation function g(2)(0) was shown to be equal to unity at any conversion efficiency, agreeing with the theoretical prediction. This study will benefit the high-speed wavelength-tunable quantum state translation or photonic quantum interface together with the mature frequency tuning or longitudinal mode selection techniques.

  5. Topological photonics: an observation of Landau levels for optical photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    Creating photonic materials with nontrivial topological characteristics has seen burgeoning interest in recent years; however, a major route to topology, a magnetic field for continuum photons, has remained elusive. We present the first experimental realization of a bulk magnetic field for optical photons. By using a non-planar ring resonator, we induce an image rotation on each round trip through the resonator. This results in a Coriolis/Lorentz force and a centrifugal anticonfining force, the latter of which is cancelled by mirror curvature. Spatial- and energy- resolved spectroscopy tracks photonic eigenstates as residual trapping is reduced, and we observe photonic Landau levels as the eigenstates become degenerate. We will discuss the conical geometry of the resulting manifold for photon dynamics and present a measurement of the local density of states that is consistent with Landau levels on a cone. While our work already demonstrates an integer quantum Hall material composed of photons, we have ensured compatibility with strong photon-photon interactions, which will allow quantum optical studies of entanglement and correlation in manybody systems including fractional quantum Hall fluids. This work was supported by DOE, DARPA, and AFOSR.

  6. Resonant photonic States in coupled heterostructure photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jd; Sabarinathan, J; Singh, Mr

    2010-02-09

    In this paper, we study the photonic resonance states and transmission spectra of coupled waveguides made from heterostructure photonic crystals. We consider photonic crystal waveguides made from three photonic crystals A, B and C, where the waveguide heterostructure is denoted as B/A/C/A/B. Due to the band structure engineering, light is confined within crystal A, which thus act as waveguides. Here, photonic crystal C is taken as a nonlinear photonic crystal, which has a band gap that may be modified by applying a pump laser. We have found that the number of bound states within the waveguides depends on the width and well depth of photonic crystal A. It has also been found that when both waveguides are far away from each other, the energies of bound photons in each of the waveguides are degenerate. However, when they are brought close to each other, the degeneracy of the bound states is removed due to the coupling between them, which causes these states to split into pairs. We have also investigated the effect of the pump field on photonic crystal C. We have shown that by applying a pump field, the system may be switched between a double waveguide to a single waveguide, which effectively turns on or off the coupling between degenerate states. This reveals interesting results that can be applied to develop new types of nanophotonic devices such as nano-switches and nano-transistors.

  7. Resonant Photonic States in Coupled Heterostructure Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study the photonic resonance states and transmission spectra of coupled waveguides made from heterostructure photonic crystals. We consider photonic crystal waveguides made from three photonic crystals A, B and C, where the waveguide heterostructure is denoted as B/A/C/A/B. Due to the band structure engineering, light is confined within crystal A, which thus act as waveguides. Here, photonic crystal C is taken as a nonlinear photonic crystal, which has a band gap that may be modified by applying a pump laser. We have found that the number of bound states within the waveguides depends on the width and well depth of photonic crystal A. It has also been found that when both waveguides are far away from each other, the energies of bound photons in each of the waveguides are degenerate. However, when they are brought close to each other, the degeneracy of the bound states is removed due to the coupling between them, which causes these states to split into pairs. We have also investigated the effect of the pump field on photonic crystal C. We have shown that by applying a pump field, the system may be switched between a double waveguide to a single waveguide, which effectively turns on or off the coupling between degenerate states. This reveals interesting results that can be applied to develop new types of nanophotonic devices such as nano-switches and nano-transistors. PMID:20672066

  8. Interfacing single photons and single quantum dots with photonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodahl, Peter; Mahmoodian, Sahand; Stobbe, Søren

    2015-04-01

    Photonic nanostructures provide a means of tailoring the interaction between light and matter and the past decade has witnessed tremendous experimental and theoretical progress on this subject. In particular, the combination with semiconductor quantum dots has proven successful. This manuscript reviews quantum optics with excitons in single quantum dots embedded in photonic nanostructures. The ability to engineer the light-matter interaction strength in integrated photonic nanostructures enables a range of fundamental quantum-electrodynamics experiments on, e.g., spontaneous-emission control, modified Lamb shifts, and enhanced dipole-dipole interaction. Furthermore, highly efficient single-photon sources and giant photon nonlinearities may be implemented with immediate applications for photonic quantum-information processing. This review summarizes the general theoretical framework of photon emission including the role of dephasing processes and applies it to photonic nanostructures of current interest, such as photonic-crystal cavities and waveguides, dielectric nanowires, and plasmonic waveguides. The introduced concepts are generally applicable in quantum nanophotonics and apply to a large extent also to other quantum emitters, such as molecules, nitrogen vacancy centers, or atoms. Finally, the progress and future prospects of applications in quantum-information processing are considered.

  9. Adaptive Reactive Rich Internet Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Kay-Uwe; Stühmer, Roland; Dörflinger, Jörg; Rahmani, Tirdad; Thomas, Susan; Stojanovic, Ljiljana

    Rich Internet Applications significantly raise the user experience compared with legacy page-based Web applications because of their highly responsive user interfaces. Although this is a tremendous advance, it does not solve the problem of the one-size-fits-all approach1 of current Web applications. So although Rich Internet Applications put the user in a position to interact seamlessly with the Web application, they do not adapt to the context in which the user is currently working. In this paper we address the on-the-fly personalization of Rich Internet Applications. We introduce the concept of ARRIAs: Adaptive Reactive Rich Internet Applications and elaborate on how they are able to adapt to the current working context the user is engaged in. An architecture for the ad hoc adaptation of Rich Internet Applications is presented as well as a holistic framework and tools for the realization of our on-the-fly personalization approach. We divided both the architecture and the framework into two levels: offline/design-time and online/run-time. For design-time we explain how to use ontologies in order to annotate Rich Internet Applications and how to use these annotations for conceptual Web usage mining. Furthermore, we describe how to create client-side executable rules from the semantic data mining results. We present our declarative lightweight rule language tailored to the needs of being executed directly on the client. Because of the event-driven nature of the user interfaces of Rich Internet Applications, we designed a lightweight rule language based on the event-condition-action paradigm.2 At run-time the interactions of a user are tracked directly on the client and in real-time a user model is built up. The user model then acts as input to and is evaluated by our client-side complex event processing and rule engine.

  10. Quantum simulation with interacting photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Michael J.

    2016-10-01

    Enhancing optical nonlinearities so that they become appreciable on the single photon level and lead to nonclassical light fields has been a central objective in quantum optics for many years. After this has been achieved in individual micro-cavities representing an effectively zero-dimensional volume, this line of research has shifted its focus towards engineering devices where such strong optical nonlinearities simultaneously occur in extended volumes of multiple nodes of a network. Recent technological progress in several experimental platforms now opens the possibility to employ the systems of strongly interacting photons, these give rise to as quantum simulators. Here we review the recent development and current status of this research direction for theory and experiment. Addressing both, optical photons interacting with atoms and microwave photons in networks of superconducting circuits, we focus on analogue quantum simulations in scenarios where effective photon-photon interactions exceed dissipative processes in the considered platforms.

  11. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-04-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories.

  12. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  13. Single-photon quadratic optomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jie-Qiao; Nori, Franco

    2014-01-01

    We present exact analytical solutions to study the coherent interaction between a single photon and the mechanical motion of a membrane in quadratic optomechanics. We consider single-photon emission and scattering when the photon is initially inside the cavity and in the fields outside the cavity, respectively. Using our solutions, we calculate the single-photon emission and scattering spectra, and find relations between the spectral features and the system's inherent parameters, such as: the optomechanical coupling strength, the mechanical frequency, and the cavity-field decay rate. In particular, we clarify the conditions for the phonon sidebands to be visible. We also study the photon-phonon entanglement for the long-time emission and scattering states. The linear entropy is employed to characterize this entanglement by treating it as a bipartite one between a single mode of phonons and a single photon. PMID:25200128

  14. All-photonic quantum repeaters.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-04-15

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories.

  15. 'Photonic jets' from dielectric microaxicons

    SciTech Connect

    Geints, Yu E; Zemlyanov, A A; Panina, E K

    2015-08-31

    We consider a specific spatially localised light structure, namely, a 'photonic jet' formed in the near field upon scattering of an optical wave in a dielectric micron particle. Dimensional parameters and intensity of a photonic jet from microaxicons of different spatial orientation are studied theoretically. It is found for the first time that an axicon-generated photonic jet has in this case a substantially larger length compared with the case of a jet formed on a spherical particle. (scattering of light)

  16. Experimental interference of independent photons.

    PubMed

    Kaltenbaek, Rainer; Blauensteiner, Bibiane; Zukowski, Marek; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Zeilinger, Anton

    2006-06-23

    Interference of photons emerging from independent sources is essential for modern quantum-information processing schemes, above all quantum repeaters and linear-optics quantum computers. We report an observation of nonclassical interference of two single photons originating from two independent, separated sources, which were actively synchronized with a rms timing jitter of 260 fs. The resulting (two-photon) interference visibility was (83+/-4)%.

  17. Physics at a photon collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan Soldner-Rembold

    2002-09-30

    A Photon Collider will provide unique opportunities to study the SM Higgs boson and to determine its properties. MSSM Higgs bosons can be discovered at the Photon Collider for scenarios where they might escape detection at the LHC. As an example for the many other physics topics which can be studied at a Photon Collider, recent results on Non-Commutative Field Theories are also discussed.

  18. Silicon photonic heater-modulator

    DOEpatents

    Zortman, William A.; Trotter, Douglas Chandler; Watts, Michael R.

    2015-07-14

    Photonic modulators, methods of forming photonic modulators and methods of modulating an input optical signal are provided. A photonic modulator includes a disk resonator having a central axis extending along a thickness direction of the disk resonator. The disk resonator includes a modulator portion and a heater portion. The modulator portion extends in an arc around the central axis. A PN junction of the modulator portion is substantially normal to the central axis.

  19. Silicon applications in photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelenski, A. M.; Gawlik, G.; Wesolowski, M.

    2005-09-01

    Silicon technology enabled the miniaturization of computers and other electronic system for information storage, transmission and transformation allowing the development of the Knowledge Based Information Society. Despite the fact that silicon roadmap indicates possibilities for further improvement, already now the speed of electrons and the bandwidth of electronic circuits are not sufficient and photons are commonly utilized for signal transmission through optical fibers and purely photonic circuits promise further improvements. However materials used for these purposes II/V semiconductor compounds, glasses make integration of optoelectronic circuits with silicon complex an expensive. Therefore research on light generation, transformation and transmission in silicon is very active and recently, due to nanotechnology some spectacular results were achieved despite the fact that mechanisms of light generation are still discussed. Three topics will be discussed. Porous silicon was actively investigated due to its relatively efficient electroluminescence enabling its use in light sources. Its index of refraction, differs considerably from the index of silicon, and this allows its utilization for Bragg mirrors, wave guides and photonic crystals. The enormous surface enables several applications on medicine and biotechnology and in particular due to the effective chemo-modulation of its refracting index the design of optical chemosensors. An effective luminescence of doped and undoped nanocrystalline silicon opened another way for the construction of silicon light sources. Optical amplification was already discovered opening perspectives for the construction of nanosilicon lasers. Luminescences was observed at red, green and blue wavelengths. The used technology of silica and ion implantation are compatible with commonly used CMOS technology. Finally the recently developed and proved idea of optically pumped silicon Raman lasers, using nonlinearity and vibrations in the

  20. High Energy Photon-Photon Collisions at a Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S

    2004-04-19

    High intensity back-scattered laser beams will allow the efficient conversion of a substantial fraction of the incident lepton energy into high energy photons, thus significantly extending the physics capabilities of an e{sup -}e{sup +} linear collider. The annihilation of two photons produces C = + final states in virtually all angular momentum states. An important physics measurement is the measurement of the Higgs coupling to two photons. The annihilation of polarized photons into the Higgs boson determines its fundamental H{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} coupling as well as determining its parity. Other novel two-photon processes include the two-photon production of charged pairs {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}, W{sup +}W{sup -}, t{bar t} and supersymmetric squark and slepton pairs. The one-loop box diagram leads to the production of pairs of neutral particles such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} Z{sup 0}Z{sup 0}, {gamma}Z{sup 0}, and {gamma}{gamma}. At the next order one can study Higgstrahlung processes, such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}H. Since each photon can be resolved into a W{sup +}W{sup -} pair, high energy photon-photon collisions can also provide a remarkably background-free laboratory for studying possibly anomalous WW collisions and annihilation. In the case of QCD, each photon can materialize as a quark anti-quark pair which interact via multiple gluon exchange. The diffractive channels in photon-photon collisions allow a novel look at the QCD pomeron and odderon. The C = - odderon exchange contribution can be identified by looking at the heavy quark asymmetry. In the case of e{gamma} {yields} e{prime} collisions, one can measure the photon structure functions and its various components. Exclusive hadron production processes in photon-photon collisions provide important tests of QCD at the amplitude level, particularly as measures of hadron distribution amplitudes which are also important for the analysis of exclusive semi-leptonic and two

  1. Silicon active photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitropoulos, Dimitrios

    Active photonic devices utilizing the optical nonlinearities of silicon have emerged in the last 5 years and the effort for commercial photonic devices in the material that has been the workhorse of electronics has been building up since. This dissertation presents the theory for some of these devices. We are concerned herein with CW lasers, amplifiers and wavelength converters that are based on the Raman effect. There have already been cursory experimental demonstrations of these devices and some of their limitations are already apparent. Most of the limitations observed are because of the appearance of effects that are competing with stimulated Raman scattering. Under the high optical powers that are necessary for the Raman effect (tens to hundrends of mW's) the process of optical two-photon (TPA) absorption occurs. The absorption of optical power that it causes itself is weak but in the process electrons and holes are generated which can further absorb light through the free-carrier absorption effect (FCA). The effective "lifetime" that these carriers have determines the magnitude of the FCA loss. We present a model for the carrier lifetime in Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) waveguides and numerical simulations to understand how this critical parameter varies and how it can be controlled. A p-i-n junction built along SOI waveguides can help achieve lifetime of the order of 20--100 ps but the price one has to pay is on-chip electrical power consumption on the order of 100's of mWs. We model CW Raman lasers and we find that the carrier lifetime reduces the output power. If the carrier lifetime exceeds a certain "critical" value optical losses become overwhelming and lasing is impossible. As we show, in amplifiers, the nonlinear loss does not only result in diminished gain, but also in a higher noise figure. Finally the effect of Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is examined. The effect is important because with a pump frequency at 1434nm coherent power

  2. Robust Photon Locking

    SciTech Connect

    Bayer, T.; Wollenhaupt, M.; Sarpe-Tudoran, C.; Baumert, T.

    2009-01-16

    We experimentally demonstrate a strong-field coherent control mechanism that combines the advantages of photon locking (PL) and rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). Unlike earlier implementations of PL and RAP by pulse sequences or chirped pulses, we use shaped pulses generated by phase modulation of the spectrum of a femtosecond laser pulse with a generalized phase discontinuity. The novel control scenario is characterized by a high degree of robustness achieved via adiabatic preparation of a state of maximum coherence. Subsequent phase control allows for efficient switching among different target states. We investigate both properties by photoelectron spectroscopy on potassium atoms interacting with the intense shaped light field.

  3. Photonic crystal optofluidic biolaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozaffari, Mohammad Hazhir; Ebnali-Heidari, Majid; Abaeiani, Gholamreza; Moravvej-Farshi, Mohammad Kazem

    2017-09-01

    Optofluidic biolasers are recently being considered in bioanalytical applications due to their advantages over the conventional biosensing methods Exploiting a photonic crystal slab with selectively dye-infiltrated air holes, we propose a new optofluidic heterostructure biolaser, with a power conversion efficiency of 25% and the spectral linewidth of 0.24 nm. Simulations show that in addition to these satisfactory lasing characteristics, the proposed lab-on-a-chip biolaser is highly sensitive to the minute biological changes that may occur in its cavity and can detect a single virus with a radius as small as 13 nm.

  4. Photonic crystal microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhokhov, A. A.; Masalov, V. M.; Sukhinina, N. S.; Matveev, D. V.; Dolganov, P. V.; Dolganov, V. K.; Emelchenko, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    Spherical samples of photonic crystals formed by colloidal SiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized. Synthesis of microspheres from 160 nm, 200 nm and 430 nm diameter colloidal nanoparticles was performed over a wide size range, from 5 μm to 50 μm. The mechanism of formation of void microparticles exceeding 50 μm is discussed. The spectral measurements verified the association of the spectra with the peaks of selective reflection from the cubic lattice planes. The microparticle morphology is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  5. Spaceborne Photonics Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, D. D.; Farrukh, U. O.; Han, K. S.; Hwang, I. H.; Jalufka, N. W.; Lowe, C. W.; Tabibi, B. M.; Lee, C. J.; Lyons, D.; Maclin, A.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes in chronological detail the development of the Spaceborne Photonics Institute as a sustained research effort at Hampton University in the area of optical physics. This provided the research expertise to initiate a PhD program in Physics. Research was carried out in the areas of: (1) modelling of spaceborne solid state laser systems; (2) amplified spontaneous emission in solar pumped iodine lasers; (3) closely simulated AM0 CW solar pumped iodine laser and repeatedly short pulsed iodine laser oscillator; (4) a materials spectroscopy and growth program; and (5) laser induced fluorescence and atomic and molecular spectroscopy.

  6. Generalized Fibonacci photon sieves.

    PubMed

    Ke, Jie; Zhang, Junyong

    2015-08-20

    We successfully extend the standard Fibonacci zone plates with two on-axis foci to the generalized Fibonacci photon sieves (GFiPS) with multiple on-axis foci. We also propose the direct and inverse design methods based on the characteristic roots of the recursion relation of the generalized Fibonacci sequences. By switching the transparent and opaque zones, according to the generalized Fibonacci sequences, we not only realize adjustable multifocal distances but also fulfill the adjustable compression ratio of focal spots in different directions.

  7. Photon Induced Electron Attachment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    initial measure- ments was that high switch currents and long pulse durations appear to lead to substantially enhanced attachment rates in C3F8 ...similar conditions, but with 1.9 x 1015 C3F8 molecules/cm 3 added to the switch gas mixture. The initial current rise is comparable in both plots, but the...enhanced attachment during the switch opening time period. B. C0O Laser Excitation The photon enhanced attachment of the three gases NF3, C3F8 I and

  8. Determinations of Photon Spectra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    COVERED O14. DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month, Day) 115. PAGE COUNT THESIS/ftFROW*W FROM TO 1989 1 54 16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION A ?RQVk;U kOR 3UB LIC RELEASE...IAW AFR 190- 1 ERNEST A. HAYGOOD, 1st Lt, USAF Executive Officer, Civilian Institution ProQrams 17. COSATI CODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on...spectra from measurements obtained with a sodium iodide counting system. A response matrix is computed by combining photon cross sections with

  9. Nanoimprinted photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Jayan; Gangopadhyay, Palash; Munoz, Ramon; Peyghambarian, N.

    2010-08-01

    We introduce a simple yet efficient approach for nanoimprinting sub-50 nm dimensions starting from a low molecular weight plasticized polymer melt. This technique enabled us to successfully imprint versatile large area nanopatterns with high degrees of fidelity and rational control over the residual layers. The key advantage is its reliability in printing versatile nanostructures and nanophotonic devices doped with organic dyes owing to its low processing temperature. Since nanopatterns can be fabricated easily at low costs, this approach offers an easy pathway for achieving excellent nanoimprinted structures for a variety of photonic, electronic and biological research and applications.

  10. Fiber-mesh photonic molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Subodha; Satpathy, Sashi

    2008-03-01

    Analogous to the photonic crystal, we introduce the concept of a fiber-mesh photonic molecule made up of optical fibers and study its transmission characteristics. We consider a specific example of a photonic molecule, inspired by the well-known C60 molecule, with the arms of the molecule formed out of single-moded optical fibers. The transmittance consists of sharp peaks determined by the pole structure of the scattering matrix in the complex energy plane. A molecule can be designed to control the positions and the widths of the transmission peaks, opening up the possibility of building new photonic devices such as high quality band-pass filters.

  11. Photonic quantum computing (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Jeremy L.

    2017-05-01

    Of the various approaches to quantum computing, photons are appealing for their low-noise properties and ease of manipulation at the single photon level; while the challenge of entangling interactions between photons can be met via measurement induced non-linearities. However, the real excitement with this architecture is the promise of ultimate manufacturability: All of the components--inc. sources, detectors, filters, switches, delay lines--have been implemented on chip, and increasingly sophisticated integration of these components is being achieved. We will discuss the opportunities and challenges of a fully integrated photonic quantum computer.

  12. Photonic Landau levels on cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Gromov, Andrey; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Creating photonic materials with nontrivial topological characteristics has seen burgeoning interest in recent years; however, a major route to topology, a magnetic field for continuum photons, has remained elusive. We present the first experimental realization of a bulk magnetic field for optical photons. By using a non-planar ring resonator, we induce an image rotation on each round trip through the resonator. This results in a Coriolis/Lorentz force and a centrifugal anticonfining force, the latter of which is cancelled by mirror curvature. Spatial- and energy- resolved spectroscopy tracks photonic eigenstates as residual trapping is reduced, and we observe photonic Landau levels as the eigenstates become degenerate. We will discuss the conical geometry of the resulting manifold for photon dynamics and present a measurement of the local density of states that is consistent with Landau levels on a cone. While our work already demonstrates an integer quantum Hall material composed of photons, we have ensured compatibility with strong photon-photon interactions, which will allow quantum optical studies of entanglement and correlation in manybody systems including fractional quantum Hall fluids.

  13. Lhcb transcription is coordinated with cell size and chlorophyll accumulation. Studies on fluorescence-activated, cell-sorter-purified single cells from wild-type and immutans Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Meehan, L.; Harkins, K.; Rodermel, S.

    1996-11-01

    To study the mechanisms that integrate pigment and chlorophyll a/b-binding apoprotein biosynthesis during light-harvesting complex II assembly, we have examined {beta}-glucuronidase (GUS) enzyme activities, cell-sorting-separated single cells sizes in fluorescence activated, cell-sorting-separated single cells from transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type and immutans variegation mutant plants that express an Lhcb (photosystem II chlorophyll a/b-binding polypeptide gene)/GUS promoter fusion. We found that GUS activities are positively correlated with chlorophyll content and cell size in green cells from the control and immutans plants, indicating that Lhcb gene transcription is coordinated with cell size in this species. Compared with the control plants, however, chlorophyll production is enhanced in the green cells of immutans; this may represent part of a strategy to maximize photosynthesis in the white sectors of the mutant. Lhcb transcription is significantly higher in pure-white cells of the transgenic immutans plants than in pure-white cells from norflurazon-treated, photooxidized A. thaliana leaves. This suggests that immutans partially uncouples Lhcb transcription from its normal dependence on chlorophyll accumulation and chloroplast development. We conclude that immutans may play a role in regulating Lhcb transcription, and may be a key component in the signal transduction pathways that control chloroplast biogenesis. 58 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Lhcb Transcription Is Coordinated with Cell Size and Chlorophyll Accumulation (Studies on Fluorescence-Activated, Cell-Sorter-Purified Single Cells from Wild-Type and immutans Arabidopsis thaliana).

    PubMed Central

    Meehan, L.; Harkins, K.; Chory, J.; Rodermel, S.

    1996-01-01

    To study the mechanisms that integrate pigment and chlorophyll a/b-binding apoprotein biosynthesis during light-harvesting complex II assembly, we have examined [beta]-glucuronidase (GUS) enzyme activities, chlorophyll contents, and cell sizes in fluorescence-activated, cell-sorting-separated single cells from transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type and immutans variegation mutant plants that express an Lhcb (photosystem II chlorophyll a/b-binding polypeptide gene)/GUS promoter fusion. We found that GUS activities are positively correlated with chlorophyll content and cell size in green cells from the control and immutans plants, indicating that Lhcb gene transcription is coordinated with cell size in this species. Compared with the control plants, however, chlorophyll production is enhanced in the green cells of immutans; this may represent part of a strategy to maximize photosynthesis in the green sectors to compensate for a lack of photosynthesis in the white sectors of the mutant. Lhcb transcription is significantly higher in pure-white cells of the transgenic immutans plants than in pure-white cells from norflurazon-treated, photooxidized A. thaliana leaves. This suggests that immutans partially uncouples Lhcb transcription from its normal dependence on chlorophyll accumulation and chloroplast development. We conclude that immutans may play a role in regulating Lhcb transcription, and may be a key component in the signal transduction pathways that control chloroplast biogenesis. PMID:12226428

  15. Photon Detection Systems for Modern Cherenkov Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, B.; Britting, A.; Cowie, E.; Eyrich, W.; Hoek, M.; Keri, T.; Lehmann, A.; Montgomery, R.; Uhlig, F.

    Modern experiments in hadronic physics require detector systems capable of identifying and reconstructing all final-state particle and their momentum vectors. The ANDA experiment at FAIR and the CLAS 12 experiment and Jefferson Laboratory both plan to use imaging Cherenkov counters for particle identification. CLAS 12 will feature a Ring Imaging CHerenkov counter (RICH), while ANDA plans to construct Cherenkov counters relying on the Detections of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light (DIRC). These detectors require high-rate, single-photon capable light detection systems with sufficient granularity and position resolution. Several candidate systems are available, ranging from multi-anode photomultiplier tubes to micro-channel plate systems to silicon photomultipliers. Each of these detection solutions has particular advantages and disadvantages. Detailed studies of the rate dependence, cross-talk, time-resolution and position resolution fro a range of commercially available photon detection solutions are presented and evaluated on their applicability to the ANDA and CLAS12 Cherenkov counters.

  16. Si-rich Silicon Nitride for Nonlinear Signal Processing Applications.

    PubMed

    Lacava, Cosimo; Stankovic, Stevan; Khokhar, Ali Z; Bucio, T Dominguez; Gardes, F Y; Reed, Graham T; Richardson, David J; Petropoulos, Periklis

    2017-12-01

    Nonlinear silicon photonic devices have attracted considerable attention thanks to their ability to show large third-order nonlinear effects at moderate power levels allowing for all-optical signal processing functionalities in miniaturized components. Although significant efforts have been made and many nonlinear optical functions have already been demonstrated in this platform, the performance of nonlinear silicon photonic devices remains fundamentally limited at the telecom wavelength region due to the two photon absorption (TPA) and related effects. In this work, we propose an alternative CMOS-compatible platform, based on silicon-rich silicon nitride that can overcome this limitation. By carefully selecting the material deposition parameters, we show that both of the device linear and nonlinear properties can be tuned in order to exhibit the desired behaviour at the selected wavelength region. A rigorous and systematic fabrication and characterization campaign of different material compositions is presented, enabling us to demonstrate TPA-free CMOS-compatible waveguides with low linear loss (~1.5 dB/cm) and enhanced Kerr nonlinear response (Re{γ} = 16 Wm(-1)). Thanks to these properties, our nonlinear waveguides are able to produce a π nonlinear phase shift, paving the way for the development of practical devices for future optical communication applications.

  17. First observation of the decay B s 0 → K S 0 K ∗(892)0 at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casanova Mohr, R.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthieu, K.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Ninci, D.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2016-01-01

    A search for B ( s) 0 → K S 0 K ∗(892)0 decays is performed using pp collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1 .0 fb-1, collected with the LHCb detector at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The B s 0 → K S 0 K ∗(892)0 decay is observed for the first time, with a significance of 7.1 standard deviations. The branching fraction is measured to be B({B}_s^0to {overline{K}}^0{K}^{ast }{(892)}^0)+B({B}_s^0to {K}^0{overline{K}}^{ast }{(892)}^0)=(16.4± 3.4± 2.3)× 1{0}^{-6}, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. No evidence is found for the decay B 0 → K S 0 K ∗(892)0 and an upper limit is set on the branching fraction, B({B}^0to {overline{K}}^0{K}^{ast }{(892)}^0)+B({B}^0to {K}^0{overline{K}}^{ast }{(892)}^0)<0.96× 1{0}^{-6} , at 90 % confidence level. All results are consistent with Standard Model predictions. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. A photon thermal diode

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhen; Wong, Carlaton; Lubner, Sean; Yee, Shannon; Miller, John; Jang, Wanyoung; Hardin, Corey; Fong, Anthony; Garay, Javier E.; Dames, Chris

    2014-01-01

    A thermal diode is a two-terminal nonlinear device that rectifies energy carriers (for example, photons, phonons and electrons) in the thermal domain, the heat transfer analogue to the familiar electrical diode. Effective thermal rectifiers could have an impact on diverse applications ranging from heat engines to refrigeration, thermal regulation of buildings and thermal logic. However, experimental demonstrations have lagged far behind theoretical proposals. Here we present the first experimental results for a photon thermal diode. The device is based on asymmetric scattering of ballistic energy carriers by pyramidal reflectors. Recent theoretical work has predicted that this ballistic mechanism also requires a nonlinearity in order to yield asymmetric thermal transport, a requirement of all thermal diodes arising from the second Law of Thermodynamics, and realized here using an ‘inelastic thermal collimator’ element. Experiments confirm both effects: with pyramids and collimator the thermal rectification is 10.9±0.8%, while without the collimator no rectification is detectable (<0.3%). PMID:25399761

  19. Microfluidic photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sung Hwan; Godin, Jessica; Chen, Chun Hao; Tsai, Frank S.; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2008-11-01

    We report on the development of an inexpensive, portable lab-on-a-chip flow cytometer system in which microfluidics, photonics, and acoustics are integrated together to work synergistically. The system relies on fluid-filled twodimensional on-chip photonic components such as lenses, apertures, and slab waveguides to allow for illumination laser beam shaping, light scattering and fluorescence signal detection. Both scattered and fluorescent lights are detected by photodetectors after being collected and guided by the on-chip optics components (e.g. lenses and waveguides). The detected light signal is imported and amplified in real time and triggers the piezoelectric actuator so that the targeted samples are directed into desired reservoir for subsequent advanced analysis. The real-time, closed-loop control system is developed with field-programmable-gate-array (FPGA) implementation. The system enables high-throughput (1- 10kHz operation), high reliability and low-powered (<1mW) fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) on a chip. The microfabricated flow cytometer can potentially be used as a portable, inexpensive point-of-care device in resource poor environments.

  20. Gravitational Repulsion of Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brynjolfsson, Ari

    2012-03-01

    Plasma redshift explains the cosmological redshift, the redshift of stars and galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, the cosmic X-ray background, the observed redshift relation for magnitude and surface-brightness for supernovae, the solar redshift, the transition zone for the solar corona, the high temperatures of the solar corona. Plasma redshift makes it clear that the optical solar lines are not gravitationally redshifted when observed on Earth. Instead their gravitational redshifts in the Sun are reversed, as the photons travel from the Sun to the Earth. This means that the photons are repelled and not attracted by the gravitational field. There is, therefore, no need for Einstein's Lambda for explaining the static Universe. When the matter concentrates and falls towards the center of galaxies, it becomes so hot that it disintegrates matter to reform primordial like matter. In this way the universe can renew itself forever. This is all based on conventional physics, using only more accurate physics and calculations than those usually used. There is no need for Dark Energy, Dark Matter, Accelerated Expansion, nor Black Holes for explaining the everlasting Universe.

  1. Photon Sieve Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, G.; Dearborn, M.; Hcharg, G.

    2010-09-01

    We are investigating new technologies for creating ultra-large apertures (>20m) for space-based imagery. Our approach has been to create diffractive primaries in flat membranes deployed from compact payloads. These structures are attractive in that they are much simpler to fabricate, launch and deploy compared to conventional three-dimensional optics. In this case the flat focusing element is a photon sieve which consists of a large number of holes in an otherwise opaque substrate. A photon sieve is essentially a large number of holes located according to an underlying Fresnel Zone Plate (FZP) geometry. The advantages over the FZP are that there are no support struts which lead to diffraction spikes in the far-field and non-uniform tension which can cause wrinkling of the substrate. Furthermore, with modifications in hole size and distribution we can achieve improved resolution and contrast over conventional optics. The trade-offs in using diffractive optics are the large amounts of dispersion and decreased efficiency. We present both theoretical and experimental results from small-scale prototypes. Several key solutions to issues of limited bandwidth and efficiency have been addressed. Along with these we have studied the materials aspects in order to optimize performance and achieve a scalable solution to an on-orbit demonstrator. Our current efforts are being directed towards an on-orbit 1m solar observatory demonstration deployed from a CubeSat bus.

  2. The ubiquitous photonic wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, Andrea; Banzer, Peter

    2016-08-01

    A circularly polarized electromagnetic plane wave carries an electric field that rotates clockwise or counterclockwise around the propagation direction of the wave. According to the handedness of this rotation, its longitudinal spin angular momentum (AM) density is either parallel or antiparallel to the propagation of light. However, there are also light waves that are not simply plane and carry an electric field that rotates around an axis perpendicular to the propagation direction, thus yielding transverse spin AM density. Electric field configurations of this kind have been suggestively dubbed ‘photonic wheels’. It has been recently shown that photonic wheels are commonplace in optics as they occur in electromagnetic fields confined by waveguides, in strongly focused beams, in plasmonic and evanescent waves. In this work we establish a general theory of electromagnetic waves propagating along a well defined direction, and carrying transverse spin AM density. We show that depending on the shape of these waves, the spin density may be either perpendicular to the mean linear momentum (globally transverse spin) or to the linear momentum density (locally transverse spin). We find that the latter case generically occurs only for non-diffracting beams, such as the Bessel beams. Moreover, we introduce the concept of meridional Stokes parameters to operationally quantify the transverse spin density. To illustrate our theory, we apply it to the exemplary cases of Bessel beams and evanescent waves. These results open a new and accessible route to the understanding, generation and manipulation of optical beams with transverse spin AM density.

  3. Smart photonic carbon brush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Oleg G.; Kuznetsov, Artem A.; Morozov, Gennady A.; Nureev, Ilnur I.; Sakhabutdinov, Airat Z.; Faskhutdinov, Lenar M.; Artemev, Vadim I.

    2016-03-01

    Aspects of the paper relate to a wear monitoring system for smart photonic carbon brush. There are many applications in which regular inspection is not feasible because of a number of factors including, for example, time, labor, cost and disruptions due to down time. Thus, there is a need for a system that can monitor the wear of a component while the component is in operation or without having to remove the component from its operational position. We propose a new smart photonic method for characterization of carbon brush wear. It is based on the usage of advantages of the multiplicative response of FBG and LPFG sensors and its double-frequency probing. Additional measuring parameters are the wear rate, the brush temperature, the engine rotation speed, the hangs control, and rotor speed. Sensor is embedded in brush. Firstly the change of sensor length is used to measure wear value and its central wavelength shift for temperature ones. The results of modeling and experiments are presented.

  4. Better photonic crystal fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, J. C.

    2008-11-01

    The development of optical fibers with two-dimensional patterns of air holes running down their length has reinvigorated research in the field of fiber optics. It has greatly - and fundamentally - broadened the range of specialty optical fibers, by demonstrating that optical fibers can be more 'special" than previously thought. Applications of such special fibers have not been hard to find. Fibers with air cores have made it possible to deliver energetic femtosecond-scale optical pulses, transform limited, as solitons, using single-mode fiber. Other fibers with anomalous dispersion at visible wavelengths have spawned a new generation of single-mode optical supercontinuum sources, spanning visible and near-infrared wavelengths and based on compact pump sources. A third example is in the field of fiber lasers, where the use of photonic crystal fiber concepts has led to a new hybrid laser technology, in which the very high numerical aperture available using air holes have enabled fibers so short they are more naturally held straight than bent. However, commercial success demands more than just a fiber and an application. The useful properties of the fibers need to be optimized for the specific application. This tutorial will describe some of the basic physics and technology behind these photonic crystal fibers (PCF's), illustrated with some of the impressive demonstrations of the past 18 months.

  5. Ion photon emission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, P.; Doyle, B. L.; Banks, J. C.; Battistella, A.; Gennaro, G.; McDaniel, F. D.; Mellon, M.; Vittone, E.; Vizkelethy, G.; Wing, N. D.

    2003-09-01

    A new ion-induced emission microscopy has been invented and demonstrated, which is called ion photon emission microscopy (IPEM). It employs a low current, broad ion beam impinging on a sample, previously coated or simply covered with a few microns of a fast, highly efficient phosphor layer. The light produced at the single ion impact point is collected with an optical microscope and projected at high magnification onto a single photon position sensitive detector (PSD). This allows maps of the ion strike effects to be produced, effectively removing the need for a microbeam. Irradiation in air and even the use of alpha particle sources with no accelerator are possible. Potential applications include ion beam induced charge collection studies of semiconducting and insulating materials, single event upset studies on microchips and even biological cells in radiobiological effectiveness experiments. We describe the IPEM setup, including a 60× OM-40 microscope with a 1.5 mm hole for the beam transmission and a Quantar PSD with 60 μm pixel. Bicron plastic scintillator blades of 10 μm were chosen as a phosphor for their nanosecond time resolution, homogeneity, utility and commercial availability. The results given in this paper are for a prototype IPEM system. They indicate a resolution of ˜12 μm, the presence of a spatial halo and a He-ion efficiency of ˜20%. This marks the first time that nuclear microscopy has been performed with a radioactive source.

  6. Silicon photonics manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Zortman, William A; Trotter, Douglas C; Watts, Michael R

    2010-11-08

    Most demonstrations in silicon photonics are done with single devices that are targeted for use in future systems. One of the costs of operating multiple devices concurrently on a chip in a system application is the power needed to properly space resonant device frequencies on a system's frequency grid. We asses this power requirement by quantifying the source and impact of process induced resonant frequency variation for microdisk resonators across individual die, entire wafers and wafer lots for separate process runs. Additionally we introduce a new technique, utilizing the Transverse Electric (TE) and Transverse Magnetic (TM) modes in microdisks, to extract thickness and width variations across wafers and dice. Through our analysis we find that a standard six inch Silicon on Insulator (SOI) 0.35 μm process controls microdisk resonant frequencies for the TE fundamental resonances to within 1 THz across a wafer and 105 GHz within a single die. Based on demonstrated thermal tuner technology, a stable manufacturing process exhibiting this level of variation can limit the resonance trimming power per resonant device to 231 μW. Taken in conjunction with the power to compensate for thermal environmental variations, the expected power requirement to compensate for fabrication-induced non-uniformities is 17% of that total. This leads to the prediction that thermal tuning efficiency is likely to have the most dominant impact on the overall power budget of silicon photonics resonator technology.

  7. Octonacci photonic quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, E. R.; Costa, C. H.; Vasconcelos, M. S.; Anselmo, D. H. A. L.; Mello, V. D.

    2015-08-01

    We study theoretically the transmission spectra in one-dimensional photonic quasicrystals, made up of SiO2(A) and TiO2(B) materials, organized following the Octonacci sequence, where the nth-stage of the multilayer Sn is given by the rule Sn =Sn-1Sn-2Sn-1 , for n ⩾ 3 and with S1 = A and S2 = B . The expression for transmittance was obtained by employing a theoretical calculation based on the transfer-matrix method. For normally incident waves, we observe that, for a same generation, the transmission spectra for transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) waves are equal, at least qualitatively, and they present a scaling property where a self-similar behavior is obtained, as an evidence that these spectra are fractals. The spectra show regions where the omnidirectional band gaps emerges for specific generations of Octonacci photonic structure, except to TM waves. For TE waves, we note that all of them have almost the same width, for different generations. We also report the localization of modes as a consequence of the quasiperiodicity of the heterostructure.

  8. Hydrogen-rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Cerini, D. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus are described for producing hydrogen-rich product gases. A spray of liquid hydrocarbon is mixed with a stream of air in a startup procedure and the mixture is ignited for partial oxidation. The stream of air is then heated by the resulting combustion to reach a temperature such that a signal is produced. The signal triggers a two way valve which directs liquid hydrocarbon from a spraying mechanism to a vaporizing mechanism with which a vaporized hydrocarbon is formed. The vaporized hydrocarbon is subsequently mixed with the heated air in the combustion chamber where partial oxidation takes place and hydrogen-rich product gases are produced.

  9. Origin of strong photon antibunching in weakly nonlinear photonic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bamba, Motoaki; Ciuti, Cristiano; Imamoglu, Atac; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2011-02-15

    In a recent work [Liew and Savona, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 183601 (2010)] it was numerically shown that a resonantly driven photonic ''molecule'' consisting of two coupled cavities can exhibit strong photon antibunching with a surprisingly weak Kerr nonlinearity. Here, we analytically identify the subtle quantum interference effect that is responsible for the predicted efficient photon blockade effect. We then extend the theory to the experimentally relevant Jaynes-Cummings system consisting of a single quantum emitter in a coupled-cavity structure and predict the strong antibunching even for single-atom cooperativity on the order of or smaller than unity. The potential of this quantum interference effect in the realization of strongly correlated photonic systems with only weak material nonlinearities is assessed by comparing on-site and inter-site correlations in a ring of three coupled photonic molecules.

  10. Photonic module: An on-demand resource for photonic entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Devitt, Simon J.; Greentree, Andrew D.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.; Ionicioiu, Radu; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Munro, William J.

    2007-11-15

    Photonic entanglement has a wide range of applications in quantum computation and communication. Here we introduce a device: the photonic module, which allows for the rapid, deterministic preparation of a large class of entangled photon states. The module is an application independent, ''plug and play'' device, with sufficient flexibility to prepare entanglement for all major quantum computation and communication applications in a completely deterministic fashion without number-discriminated photon detection. We present two alternative constructions for the module, one using free-space components and one in a photonic band-gap structure. The natural operation of the module is to generate states within the stabilizer formalism and we present an analysis on the cavity requirements to experimentally realize this device.

  11. Amplified Photon Upconversion by Photonic Shell of Cholesteric Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Shin-Hyun; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2017-04-26

    As an effective platform to exploit triplet-triplet-annihilation-based photon upconversion (TTA-UC), microcapsules composed of a fluidic UC core and photonic shell are microfluidically prepared using a triple emulsion as the template. The photonic shell consists of cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) with a periodic helical structure, exhibiting a photonic band gap. Combined with planar anchoring at the boundaries, the shell serves as a resonance cavity for TTA-UC emission and enables spectral tuning of the UC under low-power-density excitation. The CLC shell can be stabilized by introducing a polymerizable mesogen in the LC host. Because of the microcapsule spherical symmetry, spontaneous emission of the delayed fluorescence is omnidirectionally amplified at the edge of the stop band. These results demonstrate the range of opportunities provided by TTA-UC systems for the future design of low-threshold photonic devices.

  12. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons.

  13. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber

    PubMed Central

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons. PMID:27170160

  14. XCOM: Photon Cross Sections Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 8 XCOM: Photon Cross Sections Database (Web, free access)   A web database is provided which can be used to calculate photon cross sections for scattering, photoelectric absorption and pair production, as well as total attenuation coefficients, for any element, compound or mixture (Z <= 100) at energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV.

  15. The Impact of Silicon Photonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-29

    integrated photonics 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17.LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18.NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON Richard Soref...The impact of present and potential applications is discussed. key words: silicon, optoelectronics, integrated photonics 1. Introduction Silicon

  16. Compact Photon Source Conceptual Design

    SciTech Connect

    Degtyarenko, Pavel V.; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2016-04-01

    We describe options for the production of an intense photon beam at the CEBAF Hall D Tagger facility, needed for creating a high-quality secondary K 0 L delivered to the Hall D detector. The conceptual design for the Compact Photon Source apparatus is presented.

  17. Silicon photonics developments in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedeli, J. M.; Marti, J.; Van Thourhout, D.; Reed, G.; White, T.

    2009-02-01

    Silicon photonics have generated an increasing interest in the recent year, mainly for optical telecommunications or for optical interconnects in microelectronic circuits. The rationale of silicon photonics is the reduction of the cost of photonic systems through the integration of photonic components and an IC on a common chip, or in the longer term, the enhancement of IC performance with the introduction of optics inside a high performance chip. In order to build a Opto-Electronic Integrated circuit (OEIC), different European project has been launched in Europe. The PICMOS project demonstrated the full optical link on a silicon circuit with InP bonded devices. The following WADIMOS project goes a step further with the demonstration of an optical network on chip with WDM µlaser for on-chip intraconnection between IC cores. The UK silicon photonics project and the European HELIOS project are focalized on telecommunications devices with the aim of photonics and electronics integration which can be done either by wafer bonding of an SOI photonic circuit or by low temperature fabrication of a photonic layer at the metallization levels. Recent development on building blocks will be reported such as low loss couplers, Si and InP µdisk modulators, high speed Ge or InGaAs photodetectors.

  18. Rich-cores in networks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Athen; Mondragón, Raúl J

    2015-01-01

    A core comprises of a group of central and densely connected nodes which governs the overall behaviour of a network. It is recognised as one of the key meso-scale structures in complex networks. Profiling this meso-scale structure currently relies on a limited number of methods which are often complex and parameter dependent or require a null model. As a result, scalability issues are likely to arise when dealing with very large networks together with the need for subjective adjustment of parameters. The notion of a rich-club describes nodes which are essentially the hub of a network, as they play a dominating role in structural and functional properties. The definition of a rich-club naturally emphasises high degree nodes and divides a network into two subgroups. Here, we develop a method to characterise a rich-core in networks by theoretically coupling the underlying principle of a rich-club with the escape time of a random walker. The method is fast, scalable to large networks and completely parameter free. In particular, we show that the evolution of the core in World Trade and C. elegans networks correspond to responses to historical events and key stages in their physical development, respectively.

  19. Be Bold ... Be Enrollment Rich

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perna, Mark C.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, marketing specialist Mark Perna offers advice on how career and technical schools can market themselves and their programs. To become "enrollment rich," he suggests the following: (1) develop a brand plan--something that separates your organization from competitors in the mind of the community; (2) deliver the message--the community…

  20. Technology-Rich Mathematics Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thach, Kim J.; Norman, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    This article uses one of the authors' classroom experiences to explore how teachers can create technology-rich learning environments that support upper elementary students' mathematical understanding of algebra and number and operations. They describe a unit that presents a common financial problem (the use of credit cards) to engage sixth graders…

  1. Technology-Rich Mathematics Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thach, Kim J.; Norman, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    This article uses one of the authors' classroom experiences to explore how teachers can create technology-rich learning environments that support upper elementary students' mathematical understanding of algebra and number and operations. They describe a unit that presents a common financial problem (the use of credit cards) to engage sixth graders…

  2. Be Bold ... Be Enrollment Rich

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perna, Mark C.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, marketing specialist Mark Perna offers advice on how career and technical schools can market themselves and their programs. To become "enrollment rich," he suggests the following: (1) develop a brand plan--something that separates your organization from competitors in the mind of the community; (2) deliver the message--the community…

  3. Rich-Cores in Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Athen; Mondragón, Raúl J.

    2015-01-01

    A core comprises of a group of central and densely connected nodes which governs the overall behaviour of a network. It is recognised as one of the key meso-scale structures in complex networks. Profiling this meso-scale structure currently relies on a limited number of methods which are often complex and parameter dependent or require a null model. As a result, scalability issues are likely to arise when dealing with very large networks together with the need for subjective adjustment of parameters. The notion of a rich-club describes nodes which are essentially the hub of a network, as they play a dominating role in structural and functional properties. The definition of a rich-club naturally emphasises high degree nodes and divides a network into two subgroups. Here, we develop a method to characterise a rich-core in networks by theoretically coupling the underlying principle of a rich-club with the escape time of a random walker. The method is fast, scalable to large networks and completely parameter free. In particular, we show that the evolution of the core in World Trade and C. elegans networks correspond to responses to historical events and key stages in their physical development, respectively. PMID:25799585

  4. Collimator-free photon tomography

    DOEpatents

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Barbour, Randall L.

    1998-10-06

    A method of uncollimated single photon emission computed tomography includes administering a radioisotope to a patient for producing gamma ray photons from a source inside the patient. Emissivity of the photons is measured externally of the patient with an uncollimated gamma camera at a plurality of measurement positions surrounding the patient for obtaining corresponding energy spectrums thereat. Photon emissivity at the plurality of measurement positions is predicted using an initial prediction of an image of the source. The predicted and measured photon emissivities are compared to obtain differences therebetween. Prediction and comparison is iterated by updating the image prediction until the differences are below a threshold for obtaining a final prediction of the source image.

  5. Collimator-free photon tomography

    DOEpatents

    Dilmanian, F.A.; Barbour, R.L.

    1998-10-06

    A method of uncollimated single photon emission computed tomography includes administering a radioisotope to a patient for producing gamma ray photons from a source inside the patient. Emissivity of the photons is measured externally of the patient with an uncollimated gamma camera at a plurality of measurement positions surrounding the patient for obtaining corresponding energy spectrums thereat. Photon emissivity at the plurality of measurement positions is predicted using an initial prediction of an image of the source. The predicted and measured photon emissivities are compared to obtain differences therebetween. Prediction and comparison is iterated by updating the image prediction until the differences are below a threshold for obtaining a final prediction of the source image. 6 figs.

  6. Single Photon diffraction and interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, John

    2015-04-01

    A previous paper based on the Scalar Theory of Everything studied photon diffraction and interference (IntellectualArchive, Vol.1, No. 3, P. 20, Toronto, Canada July 2012. http://intellectualarchive.com/?link=item&id=597). Several photons were required in the experiment at the same time. Interference experiments with one photon in the experiment at a time also showed interference patterns. The previous paper with the Bohm Interpretation, models of the screen and mask, and the Transaction Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics were combined. The reverse wave required by the Transaction Interpretation was provided by a reflected plenum wave rather than a reverse time wave. The speed of the plenum wave was assumed to be much faster than the speed of photons/light. Using the assumptions of Fraunhofer diffraction resulted in the same equation for the photon distribution on a screen as the intensity pattern of the Fraunhofer diffraction. (http://myplace.frontier.com/ ~ jchodge/)

  7. Photon Entanglement Through Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lingyan; Galvez, Enrique J.; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-01-01

    Photon entanglement, the cornerstone of quantum correlations, provides a level of coherence that is not present in classical correlations. Harnessing it by study of its passage through organic matter may offer new possibilities for medical diagnosis technique. In this work, we study the preservation of photon entanglement in polarization, created by spontaneous parametric down-conversion, after one entangled photon propagates through multiphoton-scattering brain tissue slices with different thickness. The Tangle-Entropy (TS) plots show the strong preservation of entanglement of photons propagating in brain tissue. By spatially filtering the ballistic scattering of an entangled photon, we find that its polarization entanglement is preserved and non-locally correlated with its twin in the TS plots. The degree of entanglement correlates better with structure and water content than with sample thickness. PMID:27995952

  8. Photon intensity interferometry with multidetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badalà, A.; Barbera, R.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Riggi, F.; Russo, A. C.; Russo, G.; Turrisi, R.

    1994-12-01

    The technique of two-photon interferometry in heavy ion collisions at the intermediate energies is discussed and the importance of a new methodology, used in the treatment of the experimental data, is evidenced. For the first time, both the relative momentum, qrel, and the relative energy, q0, of the two correlated photons have been simultaneously used to extract the source size and lifetime of the emitting source. As an application, the performances of the BaF 2 ball of the MEDEA multidetector as a photon intensity interferometer have been evaluated. The response of such a detector to correlated pairs of photons has been studied through full GEANT3 simulations. The effects of the experimental filter on the photon correlation function have been investigated, and the noise, induced in the correlation signal by cosmic radiation, neutral pion decay, and γ-conversion, has also been estimated.

  9. Photon Entanglement Through Brain Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lingyan; Galvez, Enrique J.; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-12-01

    Photon entanglement, the cornerstone of quantum correlations, provides a level of coherence that is not present in classical correlations. Harnessing it by study of its passage through organic matter may offer new possibilities for medical diagnosis technique. In this work, we study the preservation of photon entanglement in polarization, created by spontaneous parametric down-conversion, after one entangled photon propagates through multiphoton-scattering brain tissue slices with different thickness. The Tangle-Entropy (TS) plots show the strong preservation of entanglement of photons propagating in brain tissue. By spatially filtering the ballistic scattering of an entangled photon, we find that its polarization entanglement is preserved and non-locally correlated with its twin in the TS plots. The degree of entanglement correlates better with structure and water content than with sample thickness.

  10. A semiconductor photon-sorter.

    PubMed

    Bennett, A J; Lee, J P; Ellis, D J P; Farrer, I; Ritchie, D A; Shields, A J

    2016-10-01

    Obtaining substantial nonlinear effects at the single-photon level is a considerable challenge that holds great potential for quantum optical measurements and information processing. Of the progress that has been made in recent years one of the most promising methods is to scatter coherent light from quantum emitters, imprinting quantum correlations onto the photons. We report effective interactions between photons, controlled by a single semiconductor quantum dot that is weakly coupled to a monolithic cavity. We show that the nonlinearity of a transition modifies the counting statistics of a Poissonian beam, sorting the photons in number. This is used to create strong correlations between detection events and to create polarization-correlated photons from an uncorrelated stream using a single spin. These results pave the way for semiconductor optical switches operated by single quanta of light.

  11. Controlling light in Airy and higher-order caustic photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zannotti, Alessandro; Diebel, Falko; Rüschenbaum, Matthias; Denz, Cornelia

    2017-06-01

    Caustics form geometrically stable structures in light and are hierarchically categorized by the catastrophe theory. We embed higher-order cusp and swallowtail catastrophes in paraxial beams and investigate their dynamics. Utilizing high-intensity caustics that propagate on curved trajectories, we realize photonic caustic lattices in photosensitive media, and demonstrate waveguiding with a rich diversity of light guiding paths.

  12. Photonic quantum information: science and technology.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Recent technological progress in the generation, manipulation and detection of individual single photons has opened a new scientific field of photonic quantum information. This progress includes the realization of single photon switches, photonic quantum circuits with specific functions, and the application of novel photonic states to novel optical metrology beyond the limits of standard optics. In this review article, the recent developments and current status of photonic quantum information technology are overviewed based on the author's past and recent works.

  13. Ferrofluid Photonic Dipole Contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Michael; Frederick, Jonathan

    2008-03-01

    Understanding magnetic fields is important to facilitate magnetic applications in diverse fields in industry, commerce, and space exploration to name a few. Large electromagnets can move heavy loads of metal. Magnetic materials attached to credit cards allow for fast, accurate business transactions. And the Earth's magnetic field gives us the colorful auroras observed near the north and south poles. Magnetic fields are not visible, and therefore often hard to understand or characterize. This investigation describes and demonstrates a novel technique for the visualization of magnetic fields. Two ferrofluid Hele-Shaw cells have been constructed to facilitate the imaging of magnetic field lines [1,2,3,4]. We deduce that magnetically induced photonic band gap arrays similar to electrostatic liquid crystal operation are responsible for the photographed images and seek to mathematically prove the images are of exact dipole nature. We also note by comparison that our photographs are very similar to solar magnetic Heliosphere photographs.

  14. Regenerative photonic therapy: Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salansky, Natasha; Salansky, Norman

    2012-09-01

    After four decades of research of photobiomodulation phenomena in mammals in vitro and in vivo, a solid foundation is created for the use of photobiomodulation in regenerative medicine. Significant accomplishments are achieved in animal models that demonstrate opportunities for photo-regeneration of injured or pathological tissues: skin, muscles and nerves. However, the use of photobiomodulation in clinical studies leads to controversial results while negative or marginal clinical efficacy is reported along with positive findings. A thor ough analysis of requirements to the optical parameters (dosimetry) for high efficacy in photobimodulation led us to the conclusion that there are several misconceptions in the clinical applications of low level laser therapy (LLLT). We present a novel appr oach of regenerative photonic therapy (RPT) for tissue healing and regeneration that overcomes major drawbacks of LLLT. Encouraging clinical results on RPT efficacy are presented. Requirements for RPT approach and vision for its future development for tissue regeneration is discussed.

  15. The Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Galayda, John N.

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a 7-GeV third-generation synchrotron radiation storage ring and full-energy positron injector. Construction project funding began in 1989, and ground breaking took place on 5 May 1990. Construction of all accelerator facilities was completed in January 1995 and storage ring commissioning is underway. First observation of x-rays from a bending magnet source took place on 26 March 1995. Nearly all performance specifications of the injector have been reached, and first observations indicate that the reliability, dynamic aperture, emittance, and orbit stability in the storage ring are satisfactory. Observation of radiation from the first of 20 insertion device beamlines is scheduled for October 1995. Start of regular operations is expected to take place well before the APS Project target date of December 1996.

  16. The advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Galayda, J.N.

    1995-07-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a 7-GeV third-generation synchrotron radiation storage ring and full-energy positron injector. Construction project funding began in 1989, and ground breaking took place on 5 May 1990. Construction of all accelerator facilities was completed in January 1995 and storage ring commissioning is underway. First observation of x-rays from a bending magnet source took place on 26 March 1995. Nearly all performance specifications of the injector have been reached, and first observations indicate that the reliability, dynamic aperture, emittance, and orbit stability in the storage ring are satisfactory. Observation of radiation from the first of 20 insertion device beamlines is scheduled for October 1995. Start of regular operations is expected to take place well before the APS Project target date of December 1996.

  17. Photon enhanced thermionic emission

    DOEpatents

    Schwede, Jared; Melosh, Nicholas; Shen, Zhixun

    2014-10-07

    Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) is exploited to provide improved efficiency for radiant energy conversion. A hot (greater than 200.degree. C.) semiconductor cathode is illuminated such that it emits electrons. Because the cathode is hot, significantly more electrons are emitted than would be emitted from a room temperature (or colder) cathode under the same illumination conditions. As a result of this increased electron emission, the energy conversion efficiency can be significantly increased relative to a conventional photovoltaic device. In PETE, the cathode electrons can be (and typically are) thermalized with respect to the cathode. As a result, PETE does not rely on emission of non-thermalized electrons, and is significantly easier to implement than hot-carrier emission approaches.

  18. Perovskite photonic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Brandon R.; Sargent, Edward H.

    2016-05-01

    The field of solution-processed semiconductors has made great strides; however, it has yet to enable electrically driven lasers. To achieve this goal, improved materials are required that combine efficient (>50% quantum yield) radiative recombination under high injection, large and balanced charge-carrier mobilities in excess of 10 cm2 V-1 s-1, free-carrier densities greater than 1017 cm-3 and gain coefficients exceeding 104 cm-1. Solid-state perovskites are -- in addition to galvanizing the field of solar electricity -- showing great promise in photonic sources, and may be the answer to realizing solution-cast laser diodes. Here, we discuss the properties of perovskites that benefit light emission, review recent progress in perovskite electroluminescent diodes and optically pumped lasers, and examine the remaining challenges in achieving continuous-wave and electrically driven lasing.

  19. Topological photonics: an observation of Landau levels for optical photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    We present the first experimental realization of a bulk magnetic field for optical photons. By using a non-planar ring resonator, we induce an image rotation on each round trip through the resonator. This results in a Coriolis/Lorentz force and a centrifugal anticonfining force, the latter of which is cancelled by mirror curvature. Using a digital micromirror device to control both amplitude and phase, we inject arbitrary optical modes into our resonator. Spatial- and energy- resolved spectroscopy tracks photonic eigenstates as residual trapping is reduced, and we observe photonic Landau levels as the eigenstates become degenerate. We show that there is a conical geometry of the resulting manifold for photon dynamics and present a measurement of the local density of states that is consistent with Landau levels on a cone. While our work already demonstrates an integer quantum Hall material composed of photons, we have ensured compatibility with strong photon-photon interactions, which will allow quantum optical studies of entanglement and correlation in manybody systems including fractional quantum Hall fluids. This work was supported by DOE, DARPA, and AFOSR.

  20. Photon-efficient imaging with a single-photon camera

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dongeek; Xu, Feihu; Venkatraman, Dheera; Lussana, Rudi; Villa, Federica; Zappa, Franco; Goyal, Vivek K.; Wong, Franco N. C.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing a scene's 3D structure and reflectivity accurately with an active imaging system operating in low-light-level conditions has wide-ranging applications, spanning biological imaging to remote sensing. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate a depth and reflectivity imaging system with a single-photon camera that generates high-quality images from ∼1 detected signal photon per pixel. Previous achievements of similar photon efficiency have been with conventional raster-scanning data collection using single-pixel photon counters capable of ∼10-ps time tagging. In contrast, our camera's detector array requires highly parallelized time-to-digital conversions with photon time-tagging accuracy limited to ∼ns. Thus, we develop an array-specific algorithm that converts coarsely time-binned photon detections to highly accurate scene depth and reflectivity by exploiting both the transverse smoothness and longitudinal sparsity of natural scenes. By overcoming the coarse time resolution of the array, our framework uniquely achieves high photon efficiency in a relatively short acquisition time. PMID:27338821

  1. Nonlocal hyperconcentration on entangled photons using photonic module system

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Cong; Wang, Tie-Jun; Mi, Si-Chen; Zhang, Ru; Wang, Chuan

    2016-06-15

    Entanglement distribution will inevitably be affected by the channel and environment noise. Thus distillation of maximal entanglement nonlocally becomes a crucial goal in quantum information. Here we illustrate that maximal hyperentanglement on nonlocal photons could be distilled using the photonic module and cavity quantum electrodynamics, where the photons are simultaneously entangled in polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom. The construction of the photonic module in a photonic band-gap structure is presented, and the operation of the module is utilized to implement the photonic nondestructive parity checks on the two degrees of freedom. We first propose a hyperconcentration protocol using two identical partially hyperentangled initial states with unknown coefficients to distill a maximally hyperentangled state probabilistically, and further propose a protocol by the assistance of an ancillary single photon prepared according to the known coefficients of the initial state. In the two protocols, the total success probability can be improved greatly by introducing the iteration mechanism, and only one of the remote parties is required to perform the parity checks in each round of iteration. Estimates on the system requirements and recent experimental results indicate that our proposal is realizable with existing or near-further technologies.

  2. Nonlocal hyperconcentration on entangled photons using photonic module system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Cong; Wang, Tie-Jun; Mi, Si-Chen; Zhang, Ru; Wang, Chuan

    2016-06-01

    Entanglement distribution will inevitably be affected by the channel and environment noise. Thus distillation of maximal entanglement nonlocally becomes a crucial goal in quantum information. Here we illustrate that maximal hyperentanglement on nonlocal photons could be distilled using the photonic module and cavity quantum electrodynamics, where the photons are simultaneously entangled in polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom. The construction of the photonic module in a photonic band-gap structure is presented, and the operation of the module is utilized to implement the photonic nondestructive parity checks on the two degrees of freedom. We first propose a hyperconcentration protocol using two identical partially hyperentangled initial states with unknown coefficients to distill a maximally hyperentangled state probabilistically, and further propose a protocol by the assistance of an ancillary single photon prepared according to the known coefficients of the initial state. In the two protocols, the total success probability can be improved greatly by introducing the iteration mechanism, and only one of the remote parties is required to perform the parity checks in each round of iteration. Estimates on the system requirements and recent experimental results indicate that our proposal is realizable with existing or near-further technologies.

  3. Polymeric photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Yoel

    Two novel and practical methods for controlling the propagation of light are presented: First, a design criterion that permits truly omnidirectional reflectivity for all polarizations of incident light over a wide selectable range of frequencies is derived and used in fabricating an alldielectric omnidirectional reflector consisting of multilayer films. Because the omnidirectionality criterion is general, it can be used to design omnidirectional reflectors in many frequency ranges of interest. Potential uses depend on the geometry of the system. For example, coating of an enclosure will result in an optical cavity. A hollow tube will produce a low-loss, broadband waveguide, planar film could be used as an efficient radiative heat barrier or collector in thermoelectric devices. A comprehensive framework for creating one-, two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals out of self- assembling block copolymers has been formulated. In order to form useful band gaps in the visible regime, periodic dielectric structures made of typical block copolymers need to be modified to obtain appropriate characteristic distances and dielectric constants. Moreover, the absorption and defect concentration must also be controlled. This affords the opportunity to tap into the large structural repertoire, the flexibility and intrinsic tunability that these self-assembled block copolymer systems offer. A block copolymer was used to achieve a self assembled photonic band gap in the visible regime. By swelling the diblock copolymer with lower molecular weight constituents control over the location of the stop band across the visible regime is achieved. One and three- dimensional crystals have been formed by changing the volume fraction of the swelling media. Methods for incorporating defects of prescribed dimensions into the self-assembled structures have been explored leading to the construction of a self assembled microcavity light- emitting device. (Copies available exclusively from MIT

  4. Photonic crystals, amorphous materials, and quasicrystals.

    PubMed

    Edagawa, Keiichi

    2014-06-01

    Photonic crystals consist of artificial periodic structures of dielectrics, which have attracted much attention because of their wide range of potential applications in the field of optics. We may also fabricate artificial amorphous or quasicrystalline structures of dielectrics, i.e. photonic amorphous materials or photonic quasicrystals. So far, both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted to reveal the characteristic features of their optical properties, as compared with those of conventional photonic crystals. In this article, we review these studies and discuss various aspects of photonic amorphous materials and photonic quasicrystals, including photonic band gap formation, light propagation properties, and characteristic photonic states.

  5. Photonic crystals, amorphous materials, and quasicrystals

    PubMed Central

    Edagawa, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Photonic crystals consist of artificial periodic structures of dielectrics, which have attracted much attention because of their wide range of potential applications in the field of optics. We may also fabricate artificial amorphous or quasicrystalline structures of dielectrics, i.e. photonic amorphous materials or photonic quasicrystals. So far, both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted to reveal the characteristic features of their optical properties, as compared with those of conventional photonic crystals. In this article, we review these studies and discuss various aspects of photonic amorphous materials and photonic quasicrystals, including photonic band gap formation, light propagation properties, and characteristic photonic states. PMID:27877676

  6. Green photonics: the role of photonics in sustainable product design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessler, Berit; Tober, Ursula

    2011-05-01

    Photonic technologies will play an increasingly significant role in reducing our environmental impact. In addition to the direct eco-benefits derived from the products themselves, green photonics will also impact the product design and manufacturing processes employed. Examples are discussed covering laser manufacturing, solid-state lighting, solar cells and optical communications. The importance of considering the full lifetime environmental impact of products is discussed, including raw materials, manufacture, use, and end of life issues. Industrial and legislative strategies are reviewed, and a number of specific measures are presented for accelerating the development of green photonics technologies and promoting their adoption into society.

  7. Higher-order photon correlations in pulsed photonic crystal nanolasers

    SciTech Connect

    Elvira, D.; Hachair, X.; Braive, R.; Beaudoin, G.; Robert-Philip, I.; Sagnes, I.; Abram, I.; Beveratos, A.; Verma, V. B.; Baek, B.; Nam, S. W.; Stevens, M. J.; Dauler, E. A.

    2011-12-15

    We report on the higher-order photon correlations of a high-{beta} nanolaser under pulsed excitation at room temperature. Using a multiplexed four-element superconducting single-photon detector we measured g{sup (n)}(0-vector) with n=2,3,4. All orders of correlation display partially chaotic statistics, even at four times the threshold excitation power. We show that this departure from coherence and Poisson statistics is due to the quantum fluctuations associated with the small number of photons at the lasing threshold.

  8. Photonic Paint Developed with Metallic Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Po; Williams, John D.

    2012-01-01

    This work details the design and simulation of an inconspicuous photonic paint that can be applied onto an object for anticounterfeit and tag, track, and locate (TTL) applications. The paint consists of three-dimensional metallic tilted woodpile photonic crystals embedded into a visible and infrared transparent polymer film, which can be applied to almost any surface. The tilted woodpile photonic crystals are designed with a specific pass band detectable at nearly all incident angles of light. When painted onto a surface, these crystals provide a unique reflective infra-red optical signature that can be easily observed and recorded to verify the location or contents of a package.

  9. The impact of permanent magnetic fields on photomultiplier HAMAMATSU R7899-20 used in a hadron calorimeter of LHCb experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrenko, V. V.; Vorobyev, K. A.; Vlasik, K. F.; Grachev, V. M.; Muravyev-Smirnov, S. S.; Novikov, A. S.; Ulin, S. E.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Shustov, A. E.; Petrenko, D. V.; Chernysheva, I. V.; Shmatkov, I. A.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of a permanent magnetic field strength up to 40 Gs (4 mT) to operation PMT HAMAMATSU R7899-20 with its standart magnetic screens and without them is investigated. This PMT is used in a hadron calorimeter of LHCb experiment at CERN. It is shown that the use of a protective housing made of steel in joint its use with permalloy screen significantly reduces screening efficiency. It proposed to use a protective housing made from non-magnetic material (duralumin) electrolytic coated with a multilayered film as magnetic shield. This solution can be used in a hadron calorimeter, the CERN installations SHiP.

  10. Multi-Photon Quantum Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2007-06-01

    Based on the investigation of multi-photon entanglement, as produced by stimulated parametric down-conversion, a technique is presented to create heralded ``noon'' states. The relevance for interferometry will be discussed. Furthermore we explored the use of photon-number resolving detectors in Mach-Zehnder type of interferometers. Our current detectors can distinguish 0, 1, 2, to7, photon impacts. Although the overall collection and detection efficiency of photons is well below unity (about 0.3) the photon number resolving property is still very useful if combined with coherent input states since those state are eigenstates of the photon annihilation operator. First we analyze the coherent state interferometer with a single photon-number resolving detector, revealing the strong non-linear response of an interferometer in the case of Fock-state projection. Second, we use two such detectors together with a Baysian phase estimation strategy to demonstrate that it is possible to achieve the standard quantum limit independently from the true value of the phase shift. This protocol is unbiased and saturates the Cramer-Rao phase uncertainty bound and, therefore, is an optimal phase estimation strategy. As a final topic it will be shown how quantum interferometry combined with micromechanical structures can be used to investigate quantum superpositions and quantum decoherence of macroscopic objects.

  11. ITMO Photonics: center of excellence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voznesenskaya, Anna; Bougrov, Vladislav; Kozlov, Sergey; Vasilev, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    ITMO University, the leading Russian center in photonics research and education, has the mission to train highlyqualified competitive professionals able to act in conditions of fast-changing world. This paradigm is implemented through creation of a strategic academic unit ITMO Photonics, the center of excellence concentrating organizational, scientific, educational, financial, laboratory and human resources. This Center has the following features: dissemination of breakthrough scientific results in photonics such as advanced photonic materials, ultrafast optical and quantum information, laser physics, engineering and technologies, into undergraduate and graduate educational programs through including special modules into the curricula and considerable student's research and internships; transformation of the educational process in accordance with the best international educational practices, presence in the global education market in the form of joint educational programs with leading universities, i.e. those being included in the network programs of international scientific cooperation, and international accreditation of educational programs; development of mechanisms for the commercialization of innovative products - results of scientific research; securing financial sustainability of research in the field of photonics of informationcommunication systems via funding increase and the diversification of funding sources. Along with focusing on the research promotion, the Center is involved in science popularization through such projects as career guidance for high school students; interaction between student's chapters of international optical societies; invited lectures of World-famous experts in photonics; short educational programs in optics, photonics and light engineering for international students; contests, Olympics and grants for talented young researchers; social events; interactive demonstrations.

  12. Photonic Landau levels on cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Gromov, Andrey; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    We present the first experimental realization of a bulk magnetic field for optical photons. By using a non-planar ring resonator, we induce an image rotation on each round trip through the resonator. This results in a Coriolis/Lorentz force and a centrifugal anticonfining force, the latter of which is cancelled by mirror curvature. Using a digital micromirror device to control both amplitude and phase, we inject arbitrary optical modes into our resonator. Spatial- and energy- resolved spectroscopy tracks photonic eigenstates as residual trapping is reduced, and we observe photonic Landau levels as the eigenstates become degenerate. We show that there is a conical geometry of the resulting manifold for photon dynamics and present a measurement of the local density of states that is consistent with Landau levels on a cone. While our work already demonstrates an integer quantum Hall material composed of photons, we have ensured compatibility with strong photon-photon interactions, which will allow quantum optical studies of entanglement and correlation in manybody systems including fractional quantum Hall fluids.

  13. Photonic crystal enhanced cytokine immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Patrick C; Ganesh, Nikhil; Cunningham, Brian T

    2009-01-01

    Photonic crystal surfaces are demonstrated as a means for enhancing the detection sensitivity and resolution for assays that use a fluorescent tag to quantify the concentration of an analyte protein molecule in a liquid test sample. Computer modeling of the spatial distribution of resonantly coupled electromagnetic fields on the photonic crystal surface are used to estimate the magnitude of enhancement factor compared to performing the same fluorescent assay on a plain glass surface, and the photonic crystal structure is fabricated and tested to experimentally verify the performance using a sandwich immunoassay for the protein Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The demonstrated photonic crystal fabrication method utilizes a nanoreplica molding technique that allows for large-area inexpensive fabrication of the structure in a format that is compatible with confocal microarray laser scanners. The signal-to-noise ratio for fluorescent spots on the photonic crystal is increased by at least five-fold relative to the glass slide, allowing a TNF-alpha concentration of 1.6 pg/ml to be distinguished from noise on a photonic crystal surface. In addition, the minimum quantitative limit of detection on the photonic crystal surface is one-third the limit on the glass slide - a decrease from 18 pg/ml to 6 pg/ml. The increased performance of the immunoassay allows for more accurate quantitation of physiologically relevant concentrations of TNF-alpha in a protein microarray format that can be expanded to multiple cytokines.

  14. Time-Dependent Delayed Signatures From Energetic Photon Interrogations

    SciTech Connect

    D. R. Norman; J. L. Jones; B. W. Blackburn; S. M. Watson; K. J. Haskell

    2006-08-01

    A pulsed photonuclear interrogation environment is rich with time-dependent, material specific, radiation signatures. Exploitation of these signatures in the delayed time regime (>1us after the photon flash) has been explored through various detection schemes to identify both shielded nuclear material and nitrogen-based explosives. Prompt emission may also be invaluable for these detection methods. Numerical and experimental results, which utilize specially modified neutron and HpGe detectors, are presented which illustrate the efficacy of utilizing these time-dependent signatures. Optimal selection of the appropriate delayed time window is essential to these pulsed inspection systems. For explosive (ANFO surrogate) detection, both numerical models and experimental results illustrate that nearly all 14N(n,y) reactions have occurred within l00 us after the flash. In contrast, however, gamma-ray and neutron signals for nuclear material detection require a delay of several milliseconds after the photon pulse. In this case, any data collected too close to the photon flash results in a spectrum dominated by high energy signals which make it difficult to discern signatures from nuclear material. Specifically, two short-lived, high-energy fission fragments (97Ag(T1/2=5.1 s) and 94Sr(T1/2=75.2 s)) were measured and identified as indicators of the presence of fissionable material. These developments demonstrate that a photon inspection environment can be exploited for time-dependent, material specific signatures through the proper operation of specially modified detectors.

  15. Photonic states mixing beyond the plasmon hybridization model

    SciTech Connect

    Suryadharma, Radius N. S.; Iskandar, Alexander A. Tjia, May-On

    2016-07-28

    A study is performed on a photonic-state mixing-pattern in an insulator-metal-insulator cylindrical silver nanoshell and its rich variations induced by changes in the geometry and dielectric media of the system, representing the combined influences of plasmon coupling strength and cavity effects. This study is performed in terms of the photonic local density of states (LDOS) calculated using the Green tensor method, in order to elucidate those combined effects. The energy profiles of LDOS inside the dielectric core are shown to exhibit consistently growing number of redshifted photonic states due to an enhanced plasmon coupling induced state mixing arising from decreased shell thickness, increased cavity size effect, and larger symmetry breaking effect induced by increased permittivity difference between the core and the background media. Further, an increase in cavity size leads to increased additional peaks that spread out toward the lower energy regime. A systematic analysis of those variations for a silver nanoshell with a fixed inner radius in vacuum background reveals a certain pattern of those growing number of redshifted states with an analytic expression for the corresponding energy downshifts, signifying a photonic state mixing scheme beyond the commonly adopted plasmon hybridization scheme. Finally, a remarkable correlation is demonstrated between the LDOS energy profiles outside the shell and the corresponding scattering efficiencies.

  16. Photonic network R and D activities in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitayama, Ken-ichi; Miki, Tetsuya; Morioka, Toshio; Tsushima, Hideaki; Koga, Masafumi; Mori, Kazuyuki; Araki, Soichiro; Sato, Ken-ichi; Onaka, Hiroshi; Namiki, Shu; Aovama, Tomonori

    2005-11-01

    R and D activities on photonic networks in Japan are presented. First, milestones in current, ongoing R and D programs supported by Japanese government agencies are introduced, including long-distance and WDM fiber transmission, wavelength routing, optical burst switching, and control plane technology for IP backbone networks. Their goal was set to evolve a legacy telecommunications network to IP over WDM networks by introducing technologies for WDM and wavelength routing. We then discuss the perspectives of so-called PHASE II R and D programs for photonic networks over the next five years until 2010, by focusing on the report which has been recently issued by the Photonic Internet Forum (PIF), a consortium that has major carriers, telecom vendors, and Japanese academics as members. The PHASE II R and D programs should serve to establish a photonic platform to provide abundant bandwidth on demand, at any time on a real-time basis through the customer's initiative, to promote bandwidth-rich applications, such as grid computing, real-time digital-cinema streaming, medical and educational applications, and network storage in e-commerce.

  17. Photonic states mixing beyond the plasmon hybridization model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryadharma, Radius N. S.; Iskandar, Alexander A.; Tjia, May-On

    2016-07-01

    A study is performed on a photonic-state mixing-pattern in an insulator-metal-insulator cylindrical silver nanoshell and its rich variations induced by changes in the geometry and dielectric media of the system, representing the combined influences of plasmon coupling strength and cavity effects. This study is performed in terms of the photonic local density of states (LDOS) calculated using the Green tensor method, in order to elucidate those combined effects. The energy profiles of LDOS inside the dielectric core are shown to exhibit consistently growing number of redshifted photonic states due to an enhanced plasmon coupling induced state mixing arising from decreased shell thickness, increased cavity size effect, and larger symmetry breaking effect induced by increased permittivity difference between the core and the background media. Further, an increase in cavity size leads to increased additional peaks that spread out toward the lower energy regime. A systematic analysis of those variations for a silver nanoshell with a fixed inner radius in vacuum background reveals a certain pattern of those growing number of redshifted states with an analytic expression for the corresponding energy downshifts, signifying a photonic state mixing scheme beyond the commonly adopted plasmon hybridization scheme. Finally, a remarkable correlation is demonstrated between the LDOS energy profiles outside the shell and the corresponding scattering efficiencies.

  18. Quantum mechanics of a photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaei, Hassan; Mostafazadeh, Ali

    2017-08-01

    A first-quantized free photon is a complex massless vector field A =(Aμ ) whose field strength satisfies Maxwell's equations in vacuum. We construct the Hilbert space H of the photon by endowing the vector space of the fields A in the temporal-Coulomb gauge with a positive-definite and relativistically invariant inner product. We give an explicit expression for this inner product, identify the Hamiltonian for the photon with the generator of time translations in H , determine the operators representing the momentum and the helicity of the photon, and introduce a chirality operator whose eigenfunctions correspond to fields having a definite sign of energy. We also construct a position operator for the photon whose components commute with each other and with the chirality and helicity operators. This allows for the construction of the localized states of the photon with a definite sign of energy and helicity. We derive an explicit formula for the latter and compute the corresponding electric and magnetic fields. These turn out to diverge not just at the point where the photon is localized but on a plane containing this point. We identify the axis normal to this plane with an associated symmetry axis and show that each choice of this axis specifies a particular position operator, a corresponding position basis, and a position representation of the quantum mechanics of a photon. In particular, we examine the position wave functions determined by such a position basis, elucidate their relationship with the Riemann-Silberstein and Landau-Peierls wave functions, and give an explicit formula for the probability density of the spatial localization of the photon.

  19. Single photon, photon-jet and diphoton production at DO

    SciTech Connect

    Abachi, S.; DO Collaboration

    1995-07-01

    Results are described on the observation of isolated single photons by the DO detector at the Fermilab {anti p}p collider. The inclusive cross section has been measured for photons in the central rapidity region ({vert_bar} {eta} {vert_bar}< 0.9) above 10 GeV E{sub T}. Studies of jets recoiling against the single photon permit the measurement of the fundamental hard scattering cos{theta}* distribution. An analysis of the {eta} correlations between high-E{sub T} photons and the leading jet probes the gluon x distribution. Diphoton production measurements are used both as a test of QCD processes and as a search for resonant structure, including bosonic Higgs production.

  20. Photonic crystals as optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halevi, P.; Krokhin, A. A.; Arriaga, J.

    1999-11-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) have already found numerous applications associated with the photonic band gap. We point out that PCs could be also employed as custom-made optical components in the linear region well below the photonic gap. As an example, we discuss a birefringent PC lens that acts as a polarizing beam splitter. This idea is supported by a precise method of calculation of the optical constants of a transparent two-dimensional (2D) PC. Such a process of homogenization is performed for hexagonal arrays of polymer-based PCs and also for the mammalian cornea. Finally, 2D PCs are classified as optically uniaxial or biaxial.