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Sample records for lhcb straw tube

  1. PANDA straw tube detectors and readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzempek, P.

    2016-07-01

    PANDA is a detector under construction dedicated to studies of production and interaction of particles in the charmonium mass range using antiproton beams in the momentum range of 1.5 - 15 GeV/c at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. PANDA consists of two spectrometers: a Target Spectrometer with a superconducting solenoid and a Forward Spectrometer using a large dipole magnet and covering the most forward angles (Θ < 10 °). In both spectrometers, the particle's trajectories in the magnetic field are measured using self-supporting straw tube detectors. The expected high count rates, reaching up to 1 MHz/straw, are one of the main challenges for the detectors and associated readout electronics. The paper presents the readout chain of the tracking system and the results of tests performed with realistic prototype setups. The readout chain consists of a newly developed ASIC chip (PASTTREC < PANDASTTReadoutChip >) with amplification, signal shaping, tail cancellation, discriminator stages and Time Readout Boards as digitizer boards.

  2. FPGA Online Tracking Algorithm for the PANDA Straw Tube Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yutie; Ye, Hua; Galuska, Martin J.; Gessler, Thomas; Kuhn, Wolfgang; Lange, Jens Soren; Wagner, Milan N.; Liu, Zhen'an; Zhao, Jingzhou

    2017-06-01

    A novel FPGA based online tracking algorithm for helix track reconstruction in a solenoidal field, developed for the PANDA spectrometer, is described. Employing the Straw Tube Tracker detector with 4636 straw tubes, the algorithm includes a complex track finder, and a track fitter. Implemented in VHDL, the algorithm is tested on a Xilinx Virtex-4 FX60 FPGA chip with different types of events, at different event rates. A processing time of 7 $\\mu$s per event for an average of 6 charged tracks is obtained. The momentum resolution is about 3\\% (4\\%) for $p_t$ ($p_z$) at 1 GeV/c. Comparing to the algorithm running on a CPU chip (single core Intel Xeon E5520 at 2.26 GHz), an improvement of 3 orders of magnitude in processing time is obtained. The algorithm can handle severe overlapping of events which are typical for interaction rates above 10 MHz.

  3. A Novel Approach for an Integrated Straw Tube-Microstrip Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, E.; Bellucci, F.; Benussi, L.; Bertani, M.; Bianco, S.; Caponero, M. A.; Colonna, D.; di Falco, F.; Fabbri, F. L.; Felli, F.; Giardoni, M.; La Monaca, A.; Mensitieri, G.; Ortenzi, B.; Pallotta, M.; Paolozzi, A.; Passamonti, L.; Pierluigi, D.; Pucci, C.; Russo, A.; Saviano, G.; Casali, F.; Bettuzzi, M.; Bianconi, D.; Baruffaldi, F.; Perilli, E.; Massa, F.

    2006-06-01

    We report on a novel concept of silicon microstrips and straw tubes detector, where integration is accomplished by a straw module with straws not subjected to mechanical tension in a Rohacell $^{\\circledR}$ lattice and carbon fiber reinforced plastic shell. Results on mechanical and test beam performances are reported on as well.

  4. The straw tube tracker of the P¯ANDA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanza, S.; Benussi, L.; Braghieri, A.; Boca, G.; Genova, P.; Gianotti, P.; Lavezzi, L.; Lucherini, V.; Montagna, P.; Orecchini, D.; Pierluigi, D.; Ritman, J.; Roeder, M.; Rotondi, A.; Russo, A.; Wintz, P.

    2010-05-01

    P¯ANDA is a new experiment that will be installed at HESR, the new antiproton storage ring under construction as a part of the FAIR facility at Darmstadt, Germany. This experiment, that will investigate QCD in the charmonium mass regime and other aspects of particle and nuclear physics, will be a fixed target detector with a central spectrometer and a forward one. The central tracker will provide information about decay vertices, momenta and types of charged particles emitted after pp¯ annihilations. The design of the Straw Tube Tracker (STT) together with experimental results of the R&D phase are presented here.

  5. - and Three-Dimensional Reconstruction and Analysis of the Straw Tubes Tomography in the Btev Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, E.; Bellucci, F.; Benussi, L.; Bertani, M.; Bianco, S.; Caponero, M. A.; Colonna, D.; di Falco, F.; Fabbri, F. L.; Felli, F.; Giardoni, M.; La Monaca, A.; Massa, F.; Mensitieri, G.; Ortenzi, B.; Pallotta, M.; Paolozzi, A.; Passamonti, L.; Pierluigi, D.; Pucci, C.; Russo, A.; Saviano, G.; Casali, F.; Bettuzzi, M.; Bianconi, D.

    2006-04-01

    A check of the eccentricity of the aluminised kapton straw tubes used in the BTeV experiment is accomplished using X-ray tomography of the sections of tubes modules. 2 and 3-dimensional images of the single tubes and of the modules are reconstructed and analysed. Preliminary results show that a precision better than 40 μm can be reached on the measurement of the straws radii.

  6. Tracking with Straw Tubes in the barP ANDA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianotti, P.; Lucherini, V.; Pace, E.; Kozlov, K.; Ohm, H.; Orfanitski, S.; Mertens, M.; Ritman, J.; Roeder, M.; Serdyuk, V.; Wintz, P.; Ldzik, M.; Przyborowski, D.; Jowzaee, S.; Kajetanowicz, M.; Korcyl, G.; Salabura, P.; Smyrski, J.; Kulessa, P.; Pysz, K.; Boca, G.; Costanza, S.; Lavezzi, L.; Montagna, P.; Rotondi, A.; Savrié, M.; Levitskaya, O.; Kashchuk, A.

    2012-08-01

    Tracking charged particles is one of the essential tasks of the barP ANDA ex periment, providing information about primary and secondary decay vertices, momenta and types of charged particles emitted after antiproton-proton annihilation. Different tracking devices are under construction for the barP ANDA spectrometer and among them the two straw tube trackers. A new technique, based on the use of straw tubes operated at over-pressure has been adopted allowing the construction of self-supporting modules avoiding heavy mechanical frames.

  7. Design of the forward straw tube tracker for the PANDA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyrski, J.; Apostolou, A.; Biernat, J.; Czyżycki, W.; Filo, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Fiutowski, T.; Gianotti, P.; Idzik, M.; Korcyl, G.; Korcyl, K.; Lisowski, E.; Lisowski, F.; Płażek, J.; Przyborowski, D.; Przygoda, W.; Ritman, J.; Salabura, P.; Savrie, M.; Strzempek, P.; Swientek, K.; Wintz, P.; Wrońska, A.

    2017-06-01

    The design of the Forward Tracker for the Forward Spectrometer of the PANDA experiment is described. The tracker consists of 6 tracking stations, each comprising 4 planar double layers of straw tube detectors, and has a total material budget of only 2% X0. The straws are made self-supporting by a 1 bar over-pressure of the working gas mixture (Ar/CO2). This allows to use lightweight and compact rectangular support frames for the double layers and to split the frames into pairs of C-shaped half-frames for an easier installation on the beam line.

  8. Measurement of the absolute gas gain and gain variations study in straw-tube detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianotti, P.; Kashchuk, A.; Levitskaya, O.; Passamonti, L.; Pierluigi, D.; Russo, A.; Savriè, M.

    2013-08-01

    We present the results of the absolute gas gain measurement of a straw drift-tube filled with a binary gaseous mixture Ar-CO2(90-10) at 2 bar absolute pressure. The measurement has been performed using an intense 1.3 GBq 137Cs-source producing the primary ionization current. The results, as a function of the high voltage and gas parameters, were fitted and parameterized with a Diethorn's formula.

  9. The central straw tube tracker in the P̅ANDA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintz, Peter

    2014-02-01

    The wide-range physics program of the P̅ANDA experiment requires detectors which have to combine state-of-the-art and novel techniques in particle measurements and data-readout. The central straw tube tracker (STT) in the P̅ANDA target spectrometer features a high-resolution spatial and momentum reconstruction of charged particle trajectories, a measurement of the specific energy-loss for particle identification, together with a minimal material budget by the technique of self-supporting straw layer modules. The STT is essential for the online track reconstruction and event identification in the continuous, triggerless data-acquisition at P̅ANDA. This paper summarizes the detector design, test system and simulation results, and the time lines of the STT construction.

  10. Next Generation TRD for CREAM Using Gas Straw Tubes and Foam Radiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinin, A.; Ahn, H.S.; Fedin, O.; Ganel, O.; Han, J.H.; Kim, C.H.; Kim, K.C.; Lee, M.H.; Lutz, L.; Seo, E.S.; Walpole, P.; Wu, J.; Yoo, J.H.; Yoon, Y.S.; Zinn, S.Y.

    The Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) experiment is designed to investigate the source, propagation and acceleration mechanism of high energy cosmic-ray nuclei, by directly measuring their energy and charge. Incorporating a transition radiation detector (TRD) provides an energy measurement complementary to the calorimeter, as well as additional track reconstruction capability. The next generation CREAM TRD is designed with 4 mm straw tubes to greatly improve tracking over the previous 20 mm tube design, thereby enhancing charge identification in the silicon charge detector (SCD). Plastic foam provides a weight-efficient radiator that doubles as a mechanical support for the straw layers. This design provides a compact, robust, reliable, low density detector to measure incident nucleus energy for 3 < Z < 30 nuclei in the Lorentz gamma factor range of 102-105. This paper discusses the new TRD design and the low power front end electronics used to achieve the large dynamic range required. Beam test results of a prototype TRD are also reported.

  11. Development of a dedicated front-end electronics for straw tube trackers in the bar PANDA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przyborowski, D.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Kajetanowicz, M.; Korcyl, G.; Salabura, P.; Smyrski, J.; Strzempek, P.; Swientek, K.; Terlecki, P.; Tokarz, J.

    2016-08-01

    The design and tests of front-end electronics for straw tube trackers in the bar PANDA experiment at FAIR are presented. The challenges for the front-end electronics, comprising operation at high counting rate up to 1 MHz per straw tube, are discussed and the proposed architecture comprising a switched gain charge sensitive preamplifier (CSP), a pole-zero cancellation circuit (PZC), a second order variable peaking time shaper, a trimming ion tail cancellation circuit, and a baseline holder (BLH), is described. The front-end provides an analogue output and a discriminator with LVDS differential driver for the Time-of-Arrival (ToA) and Time-over-Threshold (ToT) measurements. A prototype readout ASIC featuring four channels was fabricated in 0.35 μm CMOS technology consuming 15.5 mW (analog part) and 12 mW (LVDS) per channel. The results of measurements of peaking time (25-67 ns), gain, noise (ENC 800-2500 el. for various gains), time walk and jitter are presented as well as the first results obtained with prototype straw tubes connected.

  12. A large Scintillating Fibre Tracker for LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greim, R.

    2017-02-01

    The LHCb experiment will be upgraded during LHC Long Shutdown 2 to be able to record data at a higher instantaneous luminosity. The readout rate is currently limited to 1 MHz by the Level 1 trigger. In order to achieve the target integrated luminosity of 50 fb-1 during LHC Run 3, all subdetectors have to be read out by a 40 MHz trigger-less readout system. Especially, the current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet suffer from large detector dead times and a small granularity in the Outer Tracker, which consists of proportional straw tubes. Therefore, the Downstream Tracker will be replaced by a Scintillating Fibre Tracker with Silicon Photomultiplier readout. The total sensitive area of 340 m2 is made up of 2.5 m long fibre mats consisting of six staggered layers of 250 μm thin scintillating fibres. The scintillation light created by the charged particles traversing the fibre mats is transported to the fibre ends via total internal reflection and detected by state-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays. This paper presents the detector concept, design, challenges, custom-made readout chips, as well as laboratory and beam test results.

  13. The Straw-tube Tracker for the Mu2e Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, MyeongJae; Mu2e Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The Mu2e experiment will search for neutrinoless conversion of muons into electrons in the field of an aluminum nucleus. Precise and robust measurement of the outgoing electron momentum is an essential element to the experiment. We describe the design of a low mass tracking system to meet this requirement. We have chosen to use about 20,000 thin-walled Mylar straws held under tension to avoid the need for supports within the active volume. The electronics system enables the time-division technique to measure hit position along the wire. Charge will be measured using ADCs to provide particle identification capability.

  14. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT): Straw tubes for tracking and particle identification at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindur, Bartosz

    2017-02-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three inner detector tracking subsystems and consists of ∼300,000 thin-walled drift tubes (;straw tubes;) that are 4 mm in diameter. The TRT system provides ∼ 30 space points with ∼130 micron resolution for charged tracks with | η | < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV / c . The TRT also provides electron identification capability by detecting transition radiation (TR) X-ray photons in an Xe-based working gas mixture. Compared to Run 1, the LHC beams now provide a higher centre of mass energy (13 TeV), more bunches with a reduced spacing (25 ns), and more particles in each bunch leading to very challenging, higher occupancies in the TRT. Significant modifications of the TRT detector have been made for LHC Run 2 mainly to improve response to the expected much higher rate of hits and to mitigate leaks of the Xe-based active gas mixture. The higher rates required changes to the data acquisition system and introduction of validity gate to reject out-of-time hits. Many gas leaks were repaired and the gas system was modified to use a cheaper Ar-based gas mixture in some channels. A likelihood method was introduced to optimise the TRT electron identification.

  15. Distributed analysis at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mike; Egede, Ulrik; Paterson, Stuart; LHCb Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The distributed analysis experience to date at LHCb has been positive: job success rates are high and wait times for high-priority jobs are low. LHCb users access the grid using the GANGA job-management package, while the LHCb virtual organization manages its resources using the DIRAC package. This clear division of labor has benefitted LHCb and its users greatly; it is a major reason why distributed analysis at LHCb has been so successful. The newly formed LHCb distributed analysis support team has also proved to be a success.

  16. LHCbDirac: distributed computing in LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagni, F.; Charpentier, P.; Graciani, R.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Closier, J.; Mathe, Z.; Ubeda, M.; Zhelezov, A.; Lanciotti, E.; Romanovskiy, V.; Ciba, K. D.; Casajus, A.; Roiser, S.; Sapunov, M.; Remenska, D.; Bernardoff, V.; Santana, R.; Nandakumar, R.

    2012-12-01

    We present LHCbDirac, an extension of the DIRAC community Grid solution that handles LHCb specificities. The DIRAC software has been developed for many years within LHCb only. Nowadays it is a generic software, used by many scientific communities worldwide. Each community wanting to take advantage of DIRAC has to develop an extension, containing all the necessary code for handling their specific cases. LHCbDirac is an actively developed extension, implementing the LHCb computing model and workflows handling all the distributed computing activities of LHCb. Such activities include real data processing (reconstruction, stripping and streaming), Monte-Carlo simulation and data replication. Other activities are groups and user analysis, data management, resources management and monitoring, data provenance, accounting for user and production jobs. LHCbDirac also provides extensions of the DIRAC interfaces, including a secure web client, python APIs and CLIs. Before putting in production a new release, a number of certification tests are run in a dedicated setup. This contribution highlights the versatility of the system, also presenting the experience with real data processing, data and resources management, monitoring for activities and resources.

  17. Technical design report for the overline{P}ANDA (Anti Proton Annihilations at Darmstadt) Straw Tube Tracker. Strong interaction studies with antiprotons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erni, W.; Keshelashvili, I.; Krusche, B.; Steinacher, M.; Heng, Y.; Liu, Z.; Liu, H.; Shen, X.; Wang, Q.; Xu, H.; Aab, A.; Albrecht, M.; Becker, J.; Csapó, A.; Feldbauer, F.; Fink, M.; Friedel, P.; Heinsius, F. H.; Held, T.; Klask, L.; Koch, H.; Kopf, B.; Leiber, S.; Leyhe, M.; Motzko, C.; Pelizäus, M.; Pychy, J.; Roth, B.; Schröder, T.; Schulze, J.; Sowa, C.; Steinke, M.; Trifterer, T.; Wiedner, U.; Zhong, J.; Beck, R.; Bianco, S.; Brinkmann, K. T.; Hammann, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Kaiser, D.; Kliemt, R.; Kube, M.; Pitka, A.; Quagli, T.; Schmidt, C.; Schmitz, R.; Schnell, R.; Thoma, U.; Vlasov, P.; Walther, D.; Wendel, C.; Würschig, T.; Zaunick, H. G.; Bianconi, A.; Bragadireanu, M.; Caprini, M.; Pantea, D.; Pantelica, D.; Pietreanu, D.; Serbina, L.; Tarta, P. D.; Kaplan, D.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Mindur, B.; Przyborowski, D.; Swientek, K.; Czech, B.; Kistryn, M.; Kliczewski, S.; Kozela, A.; Kulessa, P.; Lebiedowicz, P.; Pysz, K.; Schäfer, W.; Siudak, R.; Szczurek, A.; Jowzaee, S.; Kajetanowicz, M.; Kamys, B.; Kistryn, S.; Korcyl, G.; Korcyl, K.; Krzemien, W.; Magiera, A.; Moskal, P.; Palka, M.; Rudy, Z.; Salabura, P.; Smyrski, J.; Wrońska, A.; Augustin, I.; Lehmann, I.; Nimorus, D.; Schepers, G.; Al-Turany, M.; Arora, R.; Deppe, H.; Flemming, H.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Jordi, A. F.; Kalicy, G.; Karabowicz, R.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Lühning, J.; Maas, F.; Orth, H.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Saito, T.; Schepers, G.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Voss, B.; Wieczorek, P.; Wilms, A.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G.; Arefiev, A.; Astakhov, V. I.; Barabanov, M. Yu.; Batyunya, B. V.; Davydov, Yu. I.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Efremov, A. A.; Fedunov, A. G.; Festchenko, A. A.; Galoyan, A. S.; Grigoryan, S.; Karmokov, A.; Koshurnikov, E. K.; Lobanov, V. I.; Lobanov, Yu. Yu.; Makarov, A. F.; Malinina, L. V.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mustafaev, G. A.; Olshevskiy, A.; Pasyuk, M. A.; Perevalova, E. A.; Piskun, A. A.; Pocheptsov, T. A.; Pontecorvo, G.; Rodionov, V. K.; Rogov, Yu. N.; Salmin, R. A.; Samartsev, A. G.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Shabratova, G. S.; Skachkova, A. N.; Skachkov, N. B.; Strokovsky, E. A.; Suleimanov, M. K.; Teshev, R. Sh.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Uzhinsky, V. V.; Vodopyanov, A. S.; Zaporozhets, S. A.; Zhuravlev, N. I.; Zorin, A. G.; Branford, D.; Glazier, D.; Watts, D.; Woods, P.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Uhlig, F.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K.; Tomaradze, A.; Xiao, T.; Bettoni, D.; Carassiti, V.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dalpiaz, P.; Drago, A.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Savriè, M.; Stancari, G.; Bianchi, N.; Gianotti, P.; Guaraldo, C.; Lucherini, V.; Orecchini, D.; Pace, E.; Bersani, A.; Bracco, G.; Macri, M.; Parodi, R. F.; Bremer, D.; Dormenev, V.; Drexler, P.; Düren, M.; Eissner, T.; Föhl, K.; Galuska, M.; Gessler, T.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Hu, J.; Koch, P.; Kröck, B.; Kühn, W.; Lange, S.; Liang, Y.; Merle, O.; Metag, V.; Moritz, M.; Münchow, D.; Nanova, M.; Novotny, R.; Spruck, B.; Stenzel, H.; Ullrich, T.; Werner, M.; Xu, H.; Euan, C.; Hoek, M.; Ireland, D.; Keri, T.; Montgomery, R.; Protopopescu, D.; Rosner, G.; Seitz, B.; Babai, M.; Glazenborg-Kluttig, A.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Lemmens, P.; Lindemulder, M.; Löhner, H.; Messchendorp, J.; Moeini, H.; Schakel, P.; Schreuder, F.; Smit, H.; Tambave, G.; van der Weele, J. C.; Veenstra, R.; Sohlbach, H.; Büscher, M.; Deermann, D.; Dosdall, R.; Esch, S.; Gillitzer, A.; Goldenbaum, F.; Grunwald, D.; Henssler, S.; Herten, A.; Hu, Q.; Kemmerling, G.; Kleines, H.; Kozlov, V.; Lehrach, A.; Maier, R.; Mertens, M.; Ohm, H.; Orfanitski, S.; Prasuhn, D.; Randriamalala, T.; Ritman, J.; Röder, M.; Schadmand, S.; Serdyuk, V.; Sterzenbach, G.; Stockmanns, T.; Wintz, P.; Wüstner, P.; Xu, H.; Kisiel, J.; Li, S.; Li, Z.; Sun, Z.; Xu, H.; Rigato, V.; Fissum, S.; Hansen, K.; Isaksson, L.; Lundin, M.; Schröder, B.; Achenbach, P.; Bleser, S.; Cahit, U.; Cardinali, M.; Denig, A.; Distler, M.; Fritsch, M.; Jasinski, P.; Kangh, D.; Karavdina, A.; Lauth, W.; Merkel, H.; Michel, M.; Mora Espi, M. C.; Müller, U.; Pochodzalla, J.; Sanchez, S.; Sanchez-Lorente, A.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Weber, T.; Dormenev, V. I.; Fedorov, A. A.; Korzhik, M. V.; Missevitch, O. V.; Balanutsa, V.; Chernetsky, V.; Demekhin, A.; Dolgolenko, A.; Fedorets, P.; Gerasimov, A.; Goryachev, V.; Varentsov, V.; Boukharov, A.; Malyshev, O.; Marishev, I.; Semenov, A.; Böhmer, F.; Dørheim, S.; Ketzer, B.; Paul, S.; Hergemöller, A. K.; Khoukaz, A.; Köhler, E.; Täschner, A.; Wessels, J.; Varma, R.; Chaterjee, A.; Jha, V.; Kailas, S.; Roy, B. J.; Yan, Y.; Chinorat, K.; Khanchai, K.; Ayut, L.; Pomrad, S.; Baldin, E.; Kotov, K.; Peleganchuk, S.; Tikhonov, Yu.; Boucher, J.; Chambert, V.; Dbeyssi, A.; Gumberidze, M.; Hennino, T.; Imre, M.; Kunne, R.; Le Galliard, C.; Ma, B.; Marchand, D.; Maroni, A.; Ong, S.; Ramstein, B.; Rosier, P.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.; Van de Wiele, J.; Boca, G.; Braghieri, A.; Costanza, S.; Genova, P.; Lavezzi, L.; Montagna, P.; Rotondi, A.; Abramov, V.; Belikov, N.; Davidenko, A.; Derevschikov, A.; Goncharenko, Y.; Grishin, V.; Kachanov, V.; Konstantinov, D.; Kormilitsin, V.; Melnik, Y.; Levin, A.; Minaev, N.; Mochalov, V.; Morozov, D.; Nogach, L.; Poslavskiy, S.; Ryazantsev, A.; Ryzhikov, S.; Semenov, P.; Shein, I.; Uzunian, A.; Vasiliev, A.; Yakutin, A.; Bäck, T.; Cederwall, B.; Makónyi, K.; Tegnér, P. E.; von Würtemberg, K. M.; Belostotski, S.; Gavrilov, G.; Itzotov, A.; Kashchuk, A.; Kisselev, A.; Kravchenko, P.; Levitskaya, O.; Manaenkov, S.; Miklukho, O.; Naryshkin, Y.; Veretennikov, D.; Vikhrov, V.; Zhadanov, A.; Alberto, D.; Amoroso, A.; Bussa, M. P.; Busso, L.; De Mori, F.; Destefanis, M.; Fava, L.; Ferrero, L.; Greco, M.; Maggiora, M.; Marcello, S.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Zotti, L.; Calvo, D.; Coli, S.; De Remigis, P.; Filippi, A.; Giraudo, G.; Lusso, S.; Mazza, G.; Morra, O.; Rivetti, A.; Wheadon, R.; Iazzi, F.; Lavagno, A.; Younis, H.; Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Martin, A.; Clement, H.; Galander, B.; Caldeira Balkeståhl, L.; Calén, H.; Fransson, K.; Johansson, T.; Kupsc, A.; Marciniewski, P.; Thomé, E.; Wolke, M.; Zlomanczuk, J.; Díaz, J.; Ortiz, A.; Dmowski, K.; Duda, P.; Korzeniewski, R.; Slowinski, B.; Chlopik, A.; Guzik, Z.; Kosinski, K.; Melnychuk, D.; Wasilewski, A.; Wojciechowski, M.; Wronka, S.; Wysocka, A.; Zwieglinski, B.; Bühler, P.; Hartman, O. N.; Kienle, P.; Marton, J.; Suzuki, K.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.

    2013-02-01

    This document describes the technical layout and the expected performance of the Straw Tube Tracker (STT), the main tracking detector of the overline{P}ANDA target spectrometer. The STT encloses a Micro-Vertex-Detector (MVD) for the inner tracking and is followed in beam direction by a set of GEM stations. The tasks of the STT are the measurement of the particle momentum from the reconstructed trajectory and the measurement of the specific energy loss for a particle identification. Dedicated simulations with full analysis studies of certain proton-antiproton reactions, identified as being benchmark tests for the whole overline{P}ANDA scientific program, have been performed to test the STT layout and performance. The results are presented, and the time lines to construct the STT are described.

  18. Performance of the LHCb tracking system in Run I of the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Adam C. S.

    2016-07-01

    The LHCb tracking system consists of a Vertex Locator around the interaction point, a tracking station with four layers of silicon strip detectors in front of the magnet, and three straw-tube and silicon strip tracking stations behind the magnet. This system allows reconstruction of charged particles with a high efficiency (> 95 % for particles with momentum p > 5 GeV) and excellent momentum resolution (0.5% for particles with p < 20 GeV). The high momentum resolution results in narrow mass peaks, leading to a high signal-to-background ratio in such key channels as Bs0 → μμ. The excellent performance of the tracking system yields a decay time resolution of 50 fs, allowing to resolve the fast B0s oscillation with a mixing frequency of 17.7 ps-1. Such a decay time resolution is an essential element in studies of time dependent CP violation. I present an overview of the track reconstruction in LHCb and its performance in Run I of the LHC. I highlight the challenges and improvements of the track reconstruction from Run II onward, including efforts to improve the timing of the online reconstruction and approaches to unify the online and offline reconstruction.

  19. LHCb calorimeters high voltage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilitsky, Yu.; Golutvin, A.; Konoplyannikov, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Perret, P.; Schopper, A.; Soldatov, M.; Yakimchuk, V.

    2007-02-01

    The calorimeter system in LHCb aims to identify electrons, photons and hadrons. All calorimeters are equipped with Hamamatsu photo tubes as devices for light to signal conversion. Eight thousand R7899-20 tubes are used for electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters and two hundred 64 channels multi-anode R7600-00-M64 for Scintillator-Pad/Preshower detectors. The calorimeter high voltage (HV) system is based on a Cockroft Walton (CW) voltage converter and a control board connected to the Experiment Control System (ECS) by serial bus. The base of each photomultiplier tube (PMT) is built with a high voltage converter and constructed on an individual printed circuit board, using compact surface mount components. The base is attached directly to the PMT. There are no HV cables in the system. A Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is used on the control board as an interface between the ECS and the 200 control channels. The FPGA includes also additional functionalities allowing automated monitoring and ramp up of the high voltage values. This paper describes the HV system architecture, some technical details of the electronics implementation and summarizes the system performance. This safe and low power consumption HV electronic system for the photomultiplier tubes can be used for various biomedical apparatus too.

  20. The LHCb Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsson, Richard

    2013-11-01

    With the demonstration that LHCb can successfully perform forward precision measurements with event pileup, the operation and trigger strategy evolved significantly during the LHC Run 1 allowing LHCb to collect over 3fb-1 at centre-of-mass energies of 7TeV and 8TeV. Increased bandwidth opened the door for LHCb to extend the physics program. The additional statistics and well managed systematic effects together with the stable trigger and data taking conditions have led to a very large number of world-class measurements and dominance in heavy flavour physics [1], in addition to a reputation of an excellent forward general purpose detector at the LHC. Long Shutdown (LS) 1 (2013-2014) will allow LHCb to fully explore the large statistics collected and prepare LHCb for Run 2 (2015 - 2017). However, even after an additional expected integrated luminosity of 5-6 fb-1 in Run 2, many of the LHCb precision measurements will remain limited by statistics, and some exploratory physics modes will not even be accessible yet. With the need for reconstructing the event topology in order to efficiently trigger on the beauty and the charm hadrons decays, the current 1 MHz readout limit is the main bottle neck to run at higher luminosity and with higher trigger efficiencies. LHCb will therefore undergo a major upgrade in LS 2 ( 2018 - 2019) aimed at collecting an order of magnitude more data by 2028. The upgrade consists of a full readout at the LHC bunch crossing rate ( 40 MHz) with the ultimate flexibility of only a software trigger. In order to increase the instantaneous luminosity up to 2x1033cm-2s-1, several sub-detector upgrades are also underway to cope with the higher occupancies and radiation dose.

  1. The LHCb Silicon Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Mark

    2016-09-01

    The LHCb experiment is dedicated to the study of heavy flavour physics at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The primary goal of the experiment is to search for indirect evidence of new physics via measurements of CP violation and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. The LHCb detector has a large-area silicon micro-strip detector located upstream of a dipole magnet, and three tracking stations with silicon micro-strip detectors in the innermost region downstream of the magnet. These two sub-detectors form the LHCb Silicon Tracker (ST). This paper gives an overview of the performance and operation of the ST during LHC Run 1. Measurements of the observed radiation damage are shown and compared to the expectation from simulation.

  2. Radiative decays at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giubega, L. E.

    2016-12-01

    Precise measurements on rare radiative B decays are performed with the LHCb experiment at LHC. The LHCb results regarding the ratio of branching fractions for two radiative decays, B 0 → K *0 γ and B s → ϕ γ, the direct CP asymmetry in B 0 → K *0 γ decay channel and the observation of the photon polarization in the B ± → K ±π∓π± γ decay, are included. The first two measurements were performed in 1 fb-1 of pp collisions data and the third one in 3 fb-1 of data, respectively.

  3. Flexible Straws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentice, Gerard

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the use of flexible straws for teaching properties of figures and families of shapes. Describes a way to make various two- or three-dimensional geometric shapes. Lists eight advantages of the method. (YP)

  4. The LHCb Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piucci, Alessio

    2017-07-01

    During the LHC Run 1 the LHCb experiment has successfully performed a large number of high precision measurements in heavy flavour physics using 3 fb-1 of data collected at centre-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV. In LHC Run 2 the LHCb is expected to integrate an additional 5 fb-1 data, however many of the measurements will remain limited by statistics. For this reason LHCb will undergo in 2020 a major upgrade during the Long Shutdown 2 of LHC, with the aim to collect 50 fb-1 of data by 2028. To achieve this goal the LHCb detector readout rate will be upgraded from the current 1 MHz to the LHC bunch crossing rate of 40 MHz. The luminosity delivered to the experiment will increase by a factor five, up to 2 ṡ 1033 cm-2 s-1. The online selection of events will be uniquely performed by a pure software trigger, improving the trigger efficiencies. In order to sustain the increased luminosity and readout rate, all the sub-detectors will be upgraded. The architecture of the upgraded DAQ system and trigger strategy will be presented, as well an overview of the sub-detector upgrades.

  5. The LHCb Turbo stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puig, A.

    2016-07-01

    The LHCb experiment will record an unprecedented dataset of beauty and charm hadron decays during Run II of the LHC, set to take place between 2015 and 2018. A key computing challenge is to store and process this data, which limits the maximum output rate of the LHCb trigger. So far, LHCb has written out a few kHz of events containing the full raw sub-detector data, which are passed through a full offline event reconstruction before being considered for physics analysis. Charm physics in particular is limited by trigger output rate constraints. A new streaming strategy includes the possibility to perform the physics analysis with candidates reconstructed in the trigger, thus bypassing the offline reconstruction. In the Turbo stream the trigger will write out a compact summary of physics objects containing all information necessary for analyses. This will allow an increased output rate and thus higher average efficiencies and smaller selection biases. This idea will be commissioned and developed during 2015 with a selection of physics analyses. It is anticipated that the turbo stream will be adopted by an increasing number of analyses during the remainder of LHC Run II (2015-2018) and ultimately in Run III (starting in 2020) with the upgraded LHCb detector.

  6. Radiative decays at LHCb

    SciTech Connect

    Giubega, L. E.; Collaboration: LHCb Collaboration

    2016-12-15

    Precise measurements on rare radiative B decays are performed with the LHCb experiment at LHC. The LHCb results regarding the ratio of branching fractions for two radiative decays, B{sup 0} → K{sup *0}γ and B{sub s} → ϕγ, the direct CP asymmetry in B{sup 0} → K{sup *0}γ decay channel and the observation of the photon polarization in the B{sup ±} → K{sup ±}π{sup ∓}π{sup ±}γ decay, are included. The first two measurements were performed in 1 fb{sup –1} of pp collisions data and the third one in 3 fb{sup –1} of data, respectively.

  7. Electroweak penguins at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jibo; LHCb Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Electroweak penguin decays are flavour-changing neutral current processes, and are highly suppressed in the Standard Model. They can only proceed via loop diagrams. Such decays may receive contributions from New Physics and change their decay behaviours like decay rate and angular distribution. Studying the properties of these decays thus provides a powerful method to probe for New Physics. In this contribution the most recent LHCb results on electroweak penguin decays are reported.

  8. Charmonia Production at Lhcb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonov, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    In this article we present a short review on measurements of charmonia production at the LHCb experiment carried out during 2010, 2011 and 2012 data taking periods. The review covers the production of J/ψ, ψ(2S), χc, J/ψJ/ψ, as well as J/ψ in association with open charm. We also review the measurement of J/ψ polarization. The results are compared to theoretical predictions.

  9. LHCb Topological Trigger Reoptimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Ilten, Philip; Khairullin, Egor; Rogozhnikov, Alex; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Williams, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The main b-physics trigger algorithm used by the LHCb experiment is the so- called topological trigger. The topological trigger selects vertices which are a) detached from the primary proton-proton collision and b) compatible with coming from the decay of a b-hadron. In the LHC Run 1, this trigger, which utilized a custom boosted decision tree algorithm, selected a nearly 100% pure sample of b-hadrons with a typical efficiency of 60-70%; its output was used in about 60% of LHCb papers. This talk presents studies carried out to optimize the topological trigger for LHC Run 2. In particular, we have carried out a detailed comparison of various machine learning classifier algorithms, e.g., AdaBoost, MatrixNet and neural networks. The topological trigger algorithm is designed to select all ’interesting” decays of b-hadrons, but cannot be trained on every such decay. Studies have therefore been performed to determine how to optimize the performance of the classification algorithm on decays not used in the training. Methods studied include cascading, ensembling and blending techniques. Furthermore, novel boosting techniques have been implemented that will help reduce systematic uncertainties in Run 2 measurements. We demonstrate that the reoptimized topological trigger is expected to significantly improve on the Run 1 performance for a wide range of b-hadron decays.

  10. LHCb experience with LFC replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifazi, F.; Carbone, A.; Perez, E. D.; D'Apice, A.; dell'Agnello, L.; Duellmann, D.; Girone, M.; Re, G. L.; Martelli, B.; Peco, G.; Ricci, P. P.; Sapunenko, V.; Vagnoni, V.; Vitlacil, D.

    2008-07-01

    Database replication is a key topic in the framework of the LHC Computing Grid to allow processing of data in a distributed environment. In particular, the LHCb computing model relies on the LHC File Catalog, i.e. a database which stores information about files spread across the GRID, their logical names and the physical locations of all the replicas. The LHCb computing model requires the LFC to be replicated at Tier-1s. The LCG 3D project deals with the database replication issue and provides a replication service based on Oracle Streams technology. This paper describes the deployment of the LHC File Catalog replication to the INFN National Center for Telematics and Informatics (CNAF) and to other LHCb Tier-1 sites. We performed stress tests designed to evaluate any delay in the propagation of the streams and the scalability of the system. The tests show the robustness of the replica implementation with performance going much beyond the LHCb requirements.

  11. LHCb Tag Collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuente Fernández, Paloma; Clemencic, Marco; Cousin, Nicolas; LHCb Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The LHCb physics software consists of hundreds of packages, each of which is developed by one or more physicists. When the developers have some code changes that they would like released, they commit them to the version control system, and enter the revision number into a database. These changes have to be integrated into a new release of each of the physics analysis applications. Tests are then performed by a nightly build system, which rebuilds various configurations of the whole software stack and executes a suite of run-time functionality tests. A Tag Collector system has been developed using solid standard technologies to cover both the use cases of developers and integration managers. A simple Web interface, based on an AJAX-like technology, is available. Integration with SVN and Nightly Build System, is possible via a Python API. Data are stored in a relational database with the help of an ORM (Object-Relational Mapping) library.

  12. LHCb VELO upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessy, Karol

    2017-02-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, scheduled for LHC Run-III, scheduled to start in 2021, will transform the experiment to a trigger-less system reading out the full detector at 40 MHz event rate. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm enabling the detector to run at luminosities of 2×1033 cm-2 s-1. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon vertex detector surrounding the interaction region. The current detector will be replaced with a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at 40 MHz. The upgraded VELO will provide fast pattern recognition and track reconstruction to the software trigger. The silicon pixel sensors have 55×55 μm2 pitch, and are read out by the VeloPix ASIC, from the Timepix/Medipix family. The hottest region will have pixel hit rates of 900 Mhits/s yielding a total data rate of more than 3 Tbit/s for the upgraded VELO. The detector modules are located in a separate vacuum, separated from the beam vacuum by a thin custom made foil. The foil will be manufactured through milling and possibly thinned further by chemical etching. The material budget will be minimised by the use of evaporative CO2 coolant circulating in microchannels within 400 μm thick silicon substrates. The current status of the VELO upgrade is described and latest results from operation of irradiated sensor assemblies are presented.

  13. The LHCb VELO upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosil Suárez, Álvaro

    2016-07-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, planned for 2019, will transform the experiment to a trigger-less system reading out the full detector at 40 MHz event rate. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm. The upgraded detector will run at luminosities of 2×1033 cm-2 s-1 and probe physics beyond the Standard Model in the heavy flavour sector with unprecedented precision. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon vertex detector surrounding the interaction region. The current detector will be replaced with a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at 40 MHz. The detector comprises silicon pixel sensors with 55×55 μm2 pitch, read out by the VeloPix ASIC, based on the TimePix/MediPix family. The hottest region will have pixel hit rates of 900 Mhits/s yielding a total data rate more than 3 Tbit/s for the upgraded VELO. The detector modules are located in a separate vacuum, separated from the beam vacuum by a thin custom made foil. The detector halves are retracted when the beams are injected and closed at stable beams, positioning the first sensitive pixel at 5.1 mm from the beams. The material budget will be minimised by the use of evaporative CO2 coolant circulating in microchannels within 400 μm thick silicon substrates.

  14. Building with Straw.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Santo, Gilbert

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the early use of straw in Africa and Europe as a building material. Provides background information and a basic framework for the straw bale project, and recommends supervision for young students. Lists objectives for building a straw bale bench and provides the building instructions which consist of three sessions. Includes four…

  15. Boar sperm thawing practices: the number of straws does matter.

    PubMed

    Casas, I; Torner, E; Yeste, M; Bonet, S

    2012-04-15

    The number of straws thawed has been largely neglected in reports of boar sperm cryopreservation. Whereas previous studies confirm the effect of sperm concentration on function and survival of thawed boar spermatozoa, it is still unknown whether, for a same concentration, total number of sperm in the thawing solution affects its mechanics. The present trial sought to define good boar sperm thawing practices by checking if a minimal number of straws as well as the percentage of air volume in the thawing tube should be stated or not to decrease variability from one trial to another. In a first assay, three tubes with different numbers of thawed straws were compared in terms of motility and membrane integrity: control (C, four straws), T1.1 (two straws), and T1.2 (one straw). In a second parallel assay, the sperm motility was evaluated when one straw was thawed in a tube containing 86.67% of air volume (T2.1), and when the tube contained < 1% air volume (T2.2). In all treatments the final concentration of sperm in Beltsville thawing solution (BTS) was 1:3 (v:v) and quality parameters were assessed 4 h after thawing. Results showed the number of straws does affect motility parameters but not the membrane integrity, whereas less air volume in the tube nonsignificantly minimizes data deviation among replicates. In conclusion, it is recommended the use of four straws at 1:3 (v:v) to maintain motility records in boar sperm thawing practices as well as to be provided with vials that fit the sperm volume.

  16. Operating Hybrid Photon Detectors in the LHCb RICH counters at high occupancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhardt, Stephan

    2014-12-01

    We report about the experiences in the operation of the Hybrid Photon Detectors in the Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detectors of the LHCb experiment during the first run period, 2010-2012. Of particular interest is the ageing due to the deterioration of the vacuum quality of the tubes, leading to an increase of ion feedback.

  17. Building with straw bales

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, B.; Steen, A.

    1996-01-01

    This article describes the outgrowth of The Canelo Project, one of the first straw bale workshops in southeastern Arizona. At the time it started the only straw bale buildings were a few scattered historic structures, mostly in Nebraska, and a handful of simple structures built by modern straw bale pioneers.not the new straw bale structures exceeds 400. Straw bale structures are solid, rugged, inexpensive, energy efficient, and significantly more fireproof than conventional lumber. How structures are build, handling moisture problems and questions, bale sizes and characteristics, bale wall options (load bearing, in-fill systems, hybrid options, wall finishes) are all described in detail.

  18. LHCb Upgrade: Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Mark; LHCb Upgrade Scintillating Fibre Tracker Group

    2016-07-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres and a custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The evolution of the design since the Technical Design Report in 2014 and the latest R & D results are presented.

  19. Vacuum straw tracker test beam run

    SciTech Connect

    Wah, Yau; /Chicago U.

    2005-08-01

    This memorandum of understanding requests beam time at Fermilab during the 2005 Meson Test Beam run to measure the detection inefficiency of vacuum straw tubes. One of the future kaon experiments at J-PARC has the goal to measure the branching ratio of the neutral kaon ''Golden Mode'' K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} with a few hundred event sensitivity. This future J-PARC experiment is a follow up of a current KEK experiment, E391a which has been taking data since February 2004. E391a is a collaboration of five countries (Japan, United States, Russia, Korea, and Taiwan) with ten institutions (KEK, Saga U, Yamagata U, Osaka U, U of Chicago, Pusan U, JINR, NDA, Kyoto U, National Taiwan U, and RCNP). The branching ratio of K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} {nu} {nu} is small, about 3 x 10{sup -11}. To first order, all kaon decays with final states with charged particles need to be vetoed, and those include K{sub e3}, K{sub {mu}3}, and K{sub {+-}0} (about 80% of all neutral kaon decay). The standard and typical veto power comes from sheet scintillator and may not be adequate. Vacuum straw tubes provides additional, independent and orthogonal veto power, but the detection inefficiency has not been known or measured in a detail way. The inefficiency of the straw has three sources, the electronics, the straw wall/wire, and the gas. We like to perform beam test to measure all three sources. There is much experience in straw detector technology, and some in vacuum straw technology (CKM R&D effort). The possible use of straws in the future K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} {nu} {nu} experiment will allow absolute photon/electron energy calibration (via K{sub {+-}0} decays), possible measurement of photon inefficiencies (via K{sub 000} with {pi}{sup 0} Dalitz), and as mentioned, charged particle veto. The results of this proposed beam test will provide new knowledge on the absorption cross section and will direct us on design issues for future neutral kaon decay experiments. Regarding

  20. Characteristics of magnetic shields for protection PMT in the LHCb hadron calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrenko, V. V.; Vlasik, K. F.; Grachev, V. M.; Muravyev-Smirnov, S. S.; Novikov, A. S.; Ulin, S. E.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Shustov, A. E.; Petrenko, D. V.; Chernysheva, I. V.; Lobova, E. I.; Nepochataya, O. E.

    2017-01-01

    CERN is preparing the new experiment aimed at the detection of weakly interacting massive long-lived particles. The experiment was called SHiP. The instrumental and technological solutions successfully used in experimental setups ATLAS, LHCb and others will be applied in experimental setup SHiP. One of these units is a hadrons calorimeter. It uses several thousands photomultiplier tubes (PMT) placed in protective magnetic shields because PMTs are located near strong permanent magnets. Taking into account that since the creation of the experimental setup LHCb has been passed more than 10 years and there are new manufacturing techniques of magnetic screens appeared, we investigate the characteristics of shielding screens used in the LHCb, and proposed the recommendations to magnetic screens’ designs for SHiP experiment.

  1. Highlights from the LHCb ion physics program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelling, Michael; LHCb collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Following the successful participation of LHCb in the 2013 proton-lead run of the LHC, in 2015 the collaboration decided to further extend its physics program to study also lead-lead collisions and fixed target interactions. These proceedings discuss the physics reach of the detector and the first results from the LHCb ion physics and fixed target program.

  2. Straw in a Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerrard, Richard; Schneider, Joel; Smallberg, Ralph; Wetzel, John

    2006-01-01

    A problem on a state's high school exit exam asked for the longest straw that would fit in a box. The examiners apparently wanted the length of a diagonal of the box, but the figure accompanying the question suggested otherwise--that the radius of the straw be considered. This article explores that more general problem.

  3. Dark photons from charm mesons at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilten, Philip; Thaler, Jesse; Williams, Mike; Xue, Wei

    2015-12-01

    We propose a search for dark photons A' at the LHCb experiment using the charm meson decay D*(2007 )0→D0A'. At nominal luminosity, D*0→D0γ decays will be produced at about 700 kHz within the LHCb acceptance, yielding over 5 trillion such decays during Run 3 of the LHC. Replacing the photon with a kinetically mixed dark photon, LHCb is then sensitive to dark photons that decay as A'→e+e-. We pursue two search strategies in this paper. The displaced strategy takes advantage of the large Lorentz boost of the dark photon and the excellent vertex resolution of LHCb, yielding a nearly background-free search when the A' decay vertex is significantly displaced from the proton-proton primary vertex. The resonant strategy takes advantage of the large event rate for D*0→D0A' and the excellent invariant-mass resolution of LHCb, yielding a background-limited search that nevertheless covers a significant portion of the A' parameter space. Both search strategies rely on the planned upgrade to a triggerless-readout system at LHCb in Run 3, which will permit the identification of low-momentum electron-positron pairs online during data taking. For dark photon masses below about 100 MeV, LHCb can explore nearly all of the dark photon parameter space between existing prompt-A' and beam-dump limits.

  4. Pentaquarks and Tetraquarks at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, S.

    Exotic resonant structures found in $\\Lambda^0_b$ and $\\overline{B}^0$ decays into charmonium in the LHCb experiment are discussed. Examination of the $J/\\psi p$ system in $\\Lambda^0_b\\to J/\\psi K^- p$ decays shows two states each of which must be composed of $uudc\\overline{c}$ quarks, and thus are called charmonium pentaquarks. Their masses are $4380\\pm 8\\pm 29$~MeV and $4449.8\\pm 1.7\\pm 2.5$~MeV, and their corresponding widths ($\\Gamma$) are $205\\pm 18\\pm 86$ MeV, and $39\\pm 5\\pm 19$ MeV. The preferred $J^P$ assignments are of opposite parity, with one state having spin 3/2 and the other 5/2. Models of internal binding of the pentaquark states are discussed. Finally, another mesonic state is discussed, the $Z(4430)^-$ that decays into $\\psi' \\pi^-$ and was first observed by the Belle collaboration in $B^0\\to \\psi' K^+\\pi^-$ decays. Using a sample of approximately 25,000 signal events, LHCb determines the $J^{P}$ to be $1^{+}$.

  5. Prospects for the search of at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucio Martinez, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    The sensitivity of the LHCb experiment to is analyzed in light of the 2011, 2012 and 2016 data and the oportunity of having a full software trigger with the LHCb upgrade. Two strategies are considered: the full reconstruction of the decay products and the partial reconstruction using only the dilepton pair and kinematic constraints. In both cases, the sensitivity achieved can surpass the world's current best measurement. Both approaches could be statistically combined to further improve the result.

  6. Heavy Flavour and Quarkonia production at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Katharina; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    The LHCb detector, with its excellent momentum resolution and flexible trigger strategy, is ideally suited for measuring heavy quark and quarkonia production properties. Recent LHCb measurements of inclusive and differential cross-sections of the production of J/ψ and ϒ resonances, as well as charm, bottom and top quarks, in pp collisions at different centre-of-mass energies are presented. Finally, results on the associated production of ϒ and open charm hadrons and the exclusive production of charmonium are discussed.

  7. MCNPX Simulation Study of STRAW Neutron Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Richard Maurer, Stephen Mitchell

    2010-01-08

    A novel prototype fission meter is being designed at National Security Technologies, LLC, using a thin uniform coating (only 1 micron thick) of {sup 10}B as a neutron converter inside a large array of thin (4 mm diameter) copper tubes. The copper tubes are only 2 mils thick, and each holds the stretched anode wire under tension and high voltage. The tubes are filled with proportional counter gas (a mixture of 90%/10% of Ar/CO{sub 2}). The tubes operate in proportional counter mode and attract mobile charged particles ({alpha}'s) created in the nuclear interaction {sup 10}B(n, {sup 4}He){sup 7}Li. However, a single tube has about 1/7th the sensitivity of a {sup 3}He tube. Modeling is required to determine if enough such tubes could be placed in a neutron detection assembly of the current size to give comparable sensitivity to {sup 3}He. Detectors lined with {sup 10}B lie between {sup 3}He and {sup 10}BF{sub 3} proportional counters and fission chambers in terms of neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray insensitivity. The mean free path of thermal neutrons in {sup 10}B is about 18 {micro}m. It takes about 60 {micro}m of {sup 10}B layer to completely stop thermal neutrons, but the energetic {alpha}-particles generated in the reaction have a range of only 3.3 {micro}m in {sup 10}B environment - hence the thin layer of boron coating on the copper tube. The prototype design is shown in Figure 1. It consists of two panels of three staggered rows of 500-mm-long, 4-mm-diameter straws, with 20 in each row, embedded in 30-mm-thick high density polyethylene (HDPE). The project demonstrates a new application of thin neutron and gamma converter technique (1 micron thin {sup 10}B coated copper tube). It exploits fast timing from multiple straw detectors to count multiplicity of both gamma and neutrons from fissioning materials. The objective is to find a near-term replacement of {sup 3}He gas in neutron detection and measurement (with a very large neutron detection area). All

  8. DIRAC: reliable data management for LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. C.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.

    2008-07-01

    DIRAC, LHCb's Grid Workload and Data Management System, utilizes WLCG resources and middleware components to perform distributed computing tasks satisfying LHCb's Computing Model. The Data Management System (DMS) handles data transfer and data access within LHCb. Its scope ranges from the output of the LHCb Online system to Grid-enabled storage for all data types. It supports metadata for these files in replica and bookkeeping catalogues, allowing dataset selection and localization. The DMS controls the movement of files in a redundant fashion whilst providing utilities for accessing all metadata. To do these tasks effectively the DMS requires complete self integrity between its components and external physical storage. The DMS provides highly redundant management of all LHCb data to leverage available storage resources and to manage transient errors in underlying services. It provides data driven and reliable distribution of files as well as reliable job output upload, utilizing VO Boxes at LHCb Tier1 sites to prevent data loss. This paper presents several examples of mechanisms implemented in the DMS to increase reliability, availability and integrity, highlighting successful design choices and limitations discovered.

  9. The LHCb trigger and its upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziurda, A.

    2016-07-01

    The current LHCb trigger system consists of a hardware level, which reduces the LHC inelastic collision rate of 30 MHz, at which the entire detector is read out. In a second level, implemented in a farm of 20 k parallel-processing CPUs, the event rate is reduced to about 5 kHz. We review the performance of the LHCb trigger system during Run I of the LHC. Special attention is given to the use of multivariate analyses in the High Level Trigger. The major bottleneck for hadronic decays is the hardware trigger. LHCb plans a major upgrade of the detector and DAQ system in the LHC shutdown of 2018, enabling a purely software based trigger to process the full 30 MHz of inelastic collisions delivered by the LHC. We demonstrate that the planned architecture will be able to meet this challenge.

  10. Proposed Inclusive Dark Photon Search at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilten, Philip; Soreq, Yotam; Thaler, Jesse; Williams, Mike; Xue, Wei

    2016-06-01

    We propose an inclusive search for dark photons A' at the LHCb experiment based on both prompt and displaced dimuon resonances. Because the couplings of the dark photon are inherited from the photon via kinetic mixing, the dark photon A'→μ+μ- rate can be directly inferred from the off-shell photon γ*→μ+μ- rate, making this a fully data-driven search. For run 3 of the LHC, we estimate that LHCb will have sensitivity to large regions of the unexplored dark-photon parameter space, especially in the 210-520 MeV and 10-40 GeV mass ranges. This search leverages the excellent invariant-mass and vertex resolution of LHCb, along with its unique particle-identification and real-time data-analysis capabilities.

  11. Implications of LHCb measurements and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharucha, A.; Bigi, I. I.; Bobeth, C.; Bobrowski, M.; Brod, J.; Buras, A. J.; Davies, C. T. H.; Datta, A.; Delaunay, C.; Descotes-Genon, S.; Ellis, J.; Feldmann, T.; Fleischer, R.; Gedalia, O.; Girrbach, J.; Guadagnoli, D.; Hiller, G.; Hochberg, Y.; Hurth, T.; Isidori, G.; Jäger, S.; Jung, M.; Kagan, A.; Kamenik, J. F.; Lenz, A.; Ligeti, Z.; London, D.; Mahmoudi, F.; Matias, J.; Nandi, S.; Nir, Y.; Paradisi, P.; Perez, G.; Petrov, A. A.; Rattazzi, R.; Sharpe, S. R.; Silvestrini, L.; Soni, A.; Straub, D. M.; van Dyk, D.; Virto, J.; Wang, Y.-M.; Weiler, A.; Zupan, J.; Aaij, R.; Abellan Beteta, C.; Adametz, A.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Anelli, M.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Band, H.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bates, A.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bediaga, I.; Beigbeder-Beau, C.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benayoun, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernard, F.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; van Beveren, V.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blanks, C.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bobrov, A.; Bocci, V.; Bochin, B.; Boer Rookhuizen, H.; Bogdanova, G.; Bonaccorsi, E.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Brarda, L.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Büchler-Germann, A.; Burducea, I.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cacérès, T.; Cachemiche, J.-P.; Cadeddu, S.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casajus Ramo, A.; Casse, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Ceelie, L.; Chadaj, B.; Chanal, H.; Charles, M.; Charlet, D.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chebbi, M.; Chen, P.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciambrone, P.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Corajod, B.; Corti, G.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; D'Antone, I.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Groen, P.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Decreuse, G.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Buono, L.; Deplano, C.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dickens, J.; Dijkstra, H.; Diniz Batista, P.; Dogaru, M.; Domingo Bonal, F.; Domke, M.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Drancourt, C.; Duarte, O.; Dumps, R.; Dupertuis, F.; Duval, P.-Y.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisenhardt, S.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Elsby, D.; Evangelisti, F.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Fardell, G.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Fave, V.; Felici, G.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Föhr, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Fournier, C.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frei, R.; Frosini, M.; Fuchs, H.; Furcas, S.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garosi, P.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Gets, S.; Ghez, Ph.; Giachero, A.; Gibson, V.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golovtsov, V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gong, G.; Gong, H.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Gromov, V.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Guzik, Z.; Gys, T.; Hachon, F.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; van der Heijden, B.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hicks, E.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hofmann, W.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, P.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Ilten, P.; Imong, J.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jamet, O.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Jansen, L.; Jansweijer, P.; Jaton, P.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Karavichev, O.; Karbach, T. M.; Kashchuk, A.; Kechadi, T.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kerzel, U.; Ketel, T.; Keune, A.; Khanji, B.; Kihm, T.; Kluit, R.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, V.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kos, J.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Kristic, R.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudenko, Y.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Landi, L.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Laptev, S.; Latham, T.; Lax, I.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Likhoded, A.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; von Loeben, J.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Luisier, J.; Luo, H.; Mac Raighne, A.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maino, M.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mangiafave, N.; Marconi, U.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matveev, M.; Maurice, E.; Mauricio, J.; Mazurov, A.; McCarthy, J.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meissner, M.; Mejia, H.; Mendez-Munoz, V.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morawski, P.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Mul, F.; Müller, K.; Munneke, B.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Nawrot, A.; Needham, M.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nikolaiko, Y.; Nisar, S.; Nomerotski, A.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Orlandea, M.; Ostankov, A.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; van Overbeek, M.; Owen, P.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrick, G. N.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perego, D. L.; Perez Trigo, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pessina, G.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; van Petten, O.; Phan, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Piedigrossi, D.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pugatch, M.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Qian, W.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Rethore, F.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roeland, E.; Rogers, G. J.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; de Roo, K.; Rouvinet, J.; Roy, L.; Rudloff, K.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salzmann, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Saornil Gamarra, S.; Sapunov, M.; Saputi, A.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savidge, T.; Savrie, M.; Schaack, P.; Schiller, M.; Schimmel, A.; Schindler, H.; Schleich, S.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schneider, T.; Schopper, A.; Schuijlenburg, H.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shao, B.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shatalov, P.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Sigurdsson, S.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Slater, M. W.; Sluijk, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, M.; Sobczak, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Squerzanti, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Subbiah, V. K.; Swientek, S.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; Tikhonov, A.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tocut, V.; Tolk, S.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ullaland, O.; Urner, D.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vink, W.; Volkov, S.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; Vouters, G.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, R.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Warda, K.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Wenerke, P.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wishahi, J.; Witek, M.; Witzeling, W.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xue, T.; Yang, Z.; Young, R.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zappon, F.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zeng, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zverev, E.; Zvyagin, A.; Zwart, A.

    2013-04-01

    During 2011 the LHCb experiment at CERN collected 1.0 fb-1 of √{s} = 7 TeV pp collisions. Due to the large heavy quark production cross-sections, these data provide unprecedented samples of heavy flavoured hadrons. The first results from LHCb have made a significant impact on the flavour physics landscape and have definitively proved the concept of a dedicated experiment in the forward region at a hadron collider. This document discusses the implications of these first measurements on classes of extensions to the Standard Model, bearing in mind the interplay with the results of searches for on-shell production of new particles at ATLAS and CMS. The physics potential of an upgrade to the LHCb detector, which would allow an order of magnitude more data to be collected, is emphasised.

  12. Building a Straw Bridge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teaching Science, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This project is for a team of students (groups of two or three are ideal) to design and construct a model of a single-span bridge, using plastic drinking straws as the building material. All steps of the design, construction, testing and critiquing stages should be recorded by students in a journal. Students may like to include labelled diagrams,…

  13. Building a Straw Bridge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teaching Science, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This project is for a team of students (groups of two or three are ideal) to design and construct a model of a single-span bridge, using plastic drinking straws as the building material. All steps of the design, construction, testing and critiquing stages should be recorded by students in a journal. Students may like to include labelled diagrams,…

  14. LHCb Physics and 2010-11 prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Perazzini, Stefano

    2011-10-24

    LHCb is one of the four major experiments operating at the Large Hadron Collider, and is specifically dedicated to the measurement of CP-violation and rare decays in the beauty and charm quark sectors. By employing data from early LHC runs it is possible to assess the performance of the detector and to better understand the potential of the LHCb flavour programme. After a brief introduction of the motivations and of the relevant physics goals, the prospects about key CP-violation and rare decay measurements will be presented. Emphasis will be given to those topics where results with particular sensitivity to New Physics are expected during the 2010-11 run.

  15. A New Nightly Build System for LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemencic, M.; Couturier, B.

    2014-06-01

    The nightly build system used so far by LHCb has been implemented as an extension of the system developed by CERN PH/SFT group (as presented at CHEP2010). Although this version has been working for many years, it has several limitations in terms of extensibility, management and ease of use, so that it was decided to develop a new version based on a continuous integration system. In this paper we describe a new implementation of the LHCb Nightly Build System based on the open source continuous integration system Jenkins and report on the experience of configuring a complex build workflow in Jenkins.

  16. Forward physics with the LHCb experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Collaboration: LHCb Collaboration

    2013-04-15

    Due to its unique pseudorapidity coverage and the ability to perform measurements at low transverse momenta p{sub T}, the LHCb detector allows a unique insight into particle production in the forward region at the LHC. Using large samples of proton-proton collision data accumulated at {radical}(s) = 7TeV, the LHCb collaboration has performed a series of dedicated analyses providing important input to the knowledge of the parton density functions, underlying event activity, low Bjorken-x QCD dynamics and exclusive processes. Some of these are briefly summarised here.

  17. Calibration of the LHCb calorimetric system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereima, D.

    2017-06-01

    The calorimeter system of LHCb provides information for the hardware Level-0 trigger for selection of events with high transverse energy electrons, hadrons and photons and also participates in offline particle identification and reconstruction. The main instruments and methods developed for monitoring and calibration of electromagnetic and hadron calorimeters are presented.

  18. The LHCb Detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LHCb Collaboration; Alves, A. Augusto, Jr.; Filho, L. M. Andrade; Barbosa, A. F.; Bediaga, I.; Cernicchiaro, G.; Guerrer, G.; Lima, H. P., Jr.; Machado, A. A.; Magnin, J.; Marujo, F.; de Miranda, J. M.; Reis, A.; Santos, A.; Toledo, A.; Akiba, K.; Amato, S.; de Paula, B.; de Paula, L.; da Silva, T.; Gandelman, M.; Lopes, J. H.; Maréchal, B.; Moraes, D.; Polycarpo, E.; Rodrigues, F.; Ballansat, J.; Bastian, Y.; Boget, D.; DeBonis, I.; Coco, V.; David, P. Y.; Decamp, D.; Delebecque, P.; Drancourt, C.; Dumont-Dayot, N.; Girard, C.; Lieunard, B.; Minard, M. N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Rambure, T.; Rospabe, G.; T'Jampens, S.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bohner, G.; Bonnefoy, R.; Borras, D.; Carloganu, C.; Chanal, H.; Conte, E.; Cornat, R.; Crouau, M.; Delage, E.; Deschamps, O.; Henrard, P.; Jacquet, P.; Lacan, C.; Laubser, J.; Lecoq, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Magne, M.; Martemiyanov, M.; Mercier, M.-L.; Monteil, S.; Niess, V.; Perret, P.; Reinmuth, G.; Robert, A.; Suchorski, S.; Arnaud, K.; Aslanides, E.; Babel, J.; Benchouk, C.; Cachemiche, J.-P.; Cogan, J.; Derue, F.; Dinkespiler, B.; Duval, P.-Y.; Garonne, V.; Favard, S.; LeGac, R.; Leon, F.; Leroy, O.; Liotard, P.-L.; Marin, F.; Menouni, M.; Ollive, P.; Poss, S.; Roche, A.; Sapunov, M.; Tocco, L.; Viaud, B.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Amhis, Y.; Barrand, G.; Barsuk, S.; Beigbeder, C.; Beneyton, R.; Breton, D.; Callot, O.; Charlet, D.; D'Almagne, B.; Duarte, O.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jean-Marie, B.; Lefrancois, J.; Machefert, F.; Robbe, P.; Schune, M.-H.; Tocut, V.; Videau, I.; Benayoun, M.; David, P.; DelBuono, L.; Gilles, G.; Domke, M.; Futterschneider, H.; Ilgner, Ch; Kapusta, P.; Kolander, M.; Krause, R.; Lieng, M.; Nedos, M.; Rudloff, K.; Schleich, S.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Warda, K.; Agari, M.; Bauer, C.; Baumeister, D.; Bulian, N.; Fuchs, H. P.; Fallot-Burghardt, W.; Glebe, T.; Hofmann, W.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Löchner, S.; Ludwig, A.; Maciuc, F.; Sanchez Nieto, F.; Schmelling, M.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Sexauer, E.; Smale, N. J.; Trunk, U.; Voss, H.; Albrecht, J.; Bachmann, S.; Blouw, J.; Deissenroth, M.; Deppe, H.; Dreis, H. B.; Eisele, F.; Haas, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Hennenberger, S.; Knopf, J.; Moch, M.; Perieanu, A.; Rabenecker, S.; Rausch, A.; Rummel, C.; Rusnyak, R.; Schiller, M.; Stange, U.; Uwer, U.; Walter, M.; Ziegler, R.; Avoni, G.; Balbi, G.; Bonifazi, F.; Bortolotti, D.; Carbone, A.; D'Antone, I.; Galli, D.; Gregori, D.; Lax, I.; Marconi, U.; Peco, G.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vecchi, S.; Bonivento, W.; Cardini, A.; Cadeddu, S.; DeLeo, V.; Deplano, C.; Furcas, S.; Lai, A.; Oldeman, R.; Raspino, D.; Saitta, B.; Serra, N.; Baldini, W.; Brusa, S.; Chiozzi, S.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Evangelisti, F.; Franconieri, A.; Germani, S.; Gianoli, A.; Guoming, L.; Landi, L.; Malaguti, R.; Padoan, C.; Pennini, C.; Savriè, M.; Squerzanti, S.; Zhao, T.; Zhu, M.; Bizzeti, A.; Graziani, G.; Lenti, M.; Lenzi, M.; Maletta, F.; Pennazzi, S.; Passaleva, G.; Veltri, M.; Alfonsi, M.; Anelli, M.; Balla, A.; Battisti, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Campana, P.; Carletti, M.; Ciambrone, P.; Corradi, G.; Dané, E.; Di Virgilio, A.; DeSimone, P.; Felici, G.; Forti, C.; Gatta, M.; Lanfranchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Pistilli, M.; Poli Lener, M.; Rosellini, R.; Santoni, M.; Saputi, A.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Zossi, A.; Ameri, M.; Cuneo, S.; Fontanelli, F.; Gracco, V.; Miní, G.; Parodi, M.; Petrolini, A.; Sannino, M.; Vinci, A.; Alemi, M.; Arnaboldi, C.; Bellunato, T.; Calvi, M.; Chignoli, F.; DeLucia, A.; Galotta, G.; Mazza, R.; Matteuzzi, C.; Musy, M.; Negri, P.; Perego, D.; Pessina, G.; Auriemma, G.; Bocci, V.; Buccheri, A.; Chiodi, G.; Di Marco, S.; Iacoangeli, F.; Martellotti, G.; Nobrega, R.; Pelosi, A.; Penso, G.; Pinci, D.; Rinaldi, W.; Rossi, A.; Santacesaria, R.; Satriano, C.; Carboni, G.; Iannilli, M.; Massafferri Rodrigues, A.; Messi, R.; Paoluzzi, G.; Sabatino, G.; Santovetti, E.; Satta, A.; Amoraal, J.; van Apeldoorn, G.; Arink, R.; van Bakel, N.; Band, H.; Bauer, Th; Berkien, A.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bos, E.; Bron, Ch; Ceelie, L.; Doets, M.; van der Eijk, R.; Fransen, J.-P.; de Groen, P.; Gromov, V.; Hierck, R.; Homma, J.; Hommels, B.; Hoogland, W.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Jansen, L.; Jaspers, M.; Kaan, B.; Koene, B.; Koopstra, J.; Kroes, F.; Kraan, M.; Langedijk, J.; Merk, M.; Mos, S.; Munneke, B.; Palacios, J.; Papadelis, A.; Pellegrino, A.; van Petten, O.; du Pree, T.; Roeland, E.; Ruckstuhl, W.; Schimmel, A.; Schuijlenburg, H.; Sluijk, T.; Spelt, J.; Stolte, J.; Terrier, H.; Tuning, N.; Van Lysebetten, A.; Vankov, P.; Verkooijen, J.; Verlaat, B.; Vink, W.; de Vries, H.; Wiggers, L.; Ybeles Smit, G.; Zaitsev, N.; Zupan, M.; Zwart, A.; van den Brand, J.; Bulten, H. J.; de Jong, M.; Ketel, T.; Klous, S.; Kos, J.; M'charek, B.; Mul, F.; Raven, G.; Simioni, E.; Cheng, J.; Dai, G.; Deng, Z.; Gao, Y.; Gong, G.; Gong, H.; He, J.; Hou, L.; Li, J.; Qian, W.; Shao, B.; Xue, T.; Yang, Z.; Zeng, M.; Muryn, B.; Ciba, K.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Blocki, J.; Galuszka, K.; Hajduk, L.; Michalowski, J.; Natkaniec, Z.; Polok, G.; Stodulski, M.; Witek, M.; Brzozowski, K.; Chlopik, A.; Gawor, P.; Guzik, Z.; Nawrot, A.; Srednicki, A.; Syryczynski, K.; Szczekowski, M.; Anghel, D. V.; Cimpean, A.; Coca, C.; Constantin, F.; Cristian, P.; Dumitru, D. D.; Dumitru, D. T.; Giolu, G.; Kusko, C.; Magureanu, C.; Mihon, Gh; Orlandea, M.; Pavel, C.; Petrescu, R.; Popescu, S.; Preda, T.; Rosca, A.; Rusu, V. L.; Stoica, R.; Stoica, S.; Tarta, P. D.; Filippov, S.; Gavrilov, Yu; Golyshkin, L.; Gushchin, E.; Karavichev, O.; Klubakov, V.; Kravchuk, L.; Kutuzov, V.; Laptev, S.; Popov, S.; Aref'ev, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Dolgoshein, V.; Egorychev, V.; Golutvin, A.; Gushchin, O.; Konoplyannikov, A.; Korolko, I.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Machikhiliyan, I.; Malyshev, S.; Mayatskaya, E.; Prokudin, M.; Rusinov, D.; Rusinov, V.; Shatalov, P.; Shchutska, L.; Tarkovskiy, E.; Tayduganov, A.; Voronchev, K.; Zhiryakova, O.; Bobrov, A.; Bondar, A.; Eidelman, S.; Kozlinsky, A.; Shekhtman, L.; Beloous, K. S.; Dzhelyadin, R. I.; Gelitsky, Yu V.; Gouz, Yu P.; Kachnov, K. G.; Kobelev, A. S.; Matveev, V. D.; Novikov, V. P.; Obraztsov, V. F.; Ostankov, A. P.; Romanovsky, V. I.; Rykalin, V. I.; Soldatov, A. P.; Soldatov, M. M.; Tchernov, E. N.; Yushchenko, O. P.; Bochin, B.; Bondar, N.; Fedorov, O.; Golovtsov, V.; Guets, S.; Kashchuk, A.; Lazarev, V.; Maev, O.; Neustroev, P.; Sagidova, N.; Spiridenkov, E.; Volkov, S.; Vorobyev, An; Vorobyov, A.; Aguilo, E.; Bota, S.; Calvo, M.; Comerma, A.; Cano, X.; Dieguez, A.; Herms, A.; Lopez, E.; Luengo, S.; Garra, J.; Garrido, Ll; Gascon, D.; Gaspar de Valenzuela, A.; Gonzalez, C.; Graciani, R.; Grauges, E.; Perez Calero, A.; Picatoste, E.; Riera, J.; Rosello, M.; Ruiz, H.; Vilasis, X.; Xirgu, X.; Adeva, B.; Cid Vidal, X.; MartÉnez Santos, D.; Esperante Pereira, D.; Fungueiriño Pazos, J. L.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Gómez, C. Lois; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pérez Trigo, E.; Pló Casasús, M.; Rodriguez Cobo, C.; Rodríguez Pérez, P.; Saborido, J. J.; Seco, M.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Bartalini, P.; Bay, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; Blanc, F.; Borel, J.; Carron, B.; Currat, C.; Conti, G.; Dormond, O.; Ermoline, Y.; Fauland, P.; Fernandez, L.; Frei, R.; Gagliardi, G.; Gueissaz, N.; Haefeli, G.; Hicheur, A.; Jacoby, C.; Jalocha, P.; Jimenez-Otero, S.; Hertig, J.-P.; Knecht, M.; Legger, F.; Locatelli, L.; Moser, J.-R.; Needham, M.; Nicolas, L.; Perrin-Giacomin, A.; Perroud, J.-P.; Potterat, C.; Ronga, F.; Schneider, O.; Schietinger, T.; Steele, D.; Studer, L.; Tareb, M.; Tran, M. T.; van Hunen, J.; Vervink, K.; Villa, S.; Zwahlen, N.; Bernet, R.; Büchler, A.; Gassner, J.; Lehner, F.; Sakhelashvili, T.; Salzmann, C.; Sievers, P.; Steiner, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Straumann, U.; van Tilburg, J.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Ziegler, M.; Dovbnya, A.; Ranyuk, Yu; Shapoval, I.; Borisova, M.; Iakovenko, V.; Kyva, V.; Kovalchuk, O.; Okhrimenko, O.; Pugatch, V.; Pylypchenko, Yu; Adinolfi, M.; Brook, N. H.; Head, R. D.; Imong, J. P.; Lessnoff, K. A.; Metlica, F. C. D.; Muir, A. J.; Rademacker, J. H.; Solomin, A.; Szczypka, P. M.; Barham, C.; Buszello, C.; Dickens, J.; Gibson, V.; Haines, S.; Harrison, K.; Jones, C. R.; Katvars, S.; Kerzel, U.; Lazzeroni, C.; Li, Y. Y.; Rogers, G.; Storey, J.; Skottowe, H.; Wotton, S. A.; Adye, T. J.; Densham, C. J.; Easo, S.; Franek, B.; Loveridge, P.; Morrow, D.; Morris, J. V.; Nandakumar, R.; Nardulli, J.; Papanestis, A.; Patrick, G. N.; Ricciardi, S.; Woodward, M. L.; Zhang, Z.; Chamonal, R. J. U.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, P.; Eisenhardt, S.; Gilardi, N.; Khan, A.; Kim, Y. M.; Lambert, R.; Lawrence, J.; Main, A.; McCarron, J.; Mclean, C.; Muheim, F.; Osorio-Oliveros, A. F.; Playfer, S.; Styles, N.; Xie, Y.; Bates, A.; Carson, L.; da Cunha Marinho, F.; Doherty, F.; Eklund, L.; Gersabeck, M.; Haddad, L.; Macgregor, A. A.; Melone, J.; McEwan, F.; Petrie, D. M.; Paterson, S. K.; Parkes, C.; Pickford, A.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rodrigues, E.; Saavedra, A. F.; Soler, F. J. P.; Szumlak, T.; Viret, S.; Allebone, L.; Awunor, O.; Back, J.; Barber, G.; Barnes, C.; Cameron, B.; Clark, D.; Clark, I.; Dornan, P.; Duane, A.; Eames, C.; Egede, U.; Girone, M.; Greenwood, S.; Hallam, R.; Hare, R.; Howard, A.; Jolly, S.; Kasey, V.; Khaleeq, M.; Koppenburg, P.; Miller, D.; Plackett, R.; Price, D.; Reece, W.; Savage, P.; Savidge, T.; Simmons, B.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Websdale, D.; Affolder, A.; Anderson, J. S.; Biagi, S. F.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Carroll, J. L.; Casse, G.; Cooke, P.; Donleavy, S.; Dwyer, L.; Hennessy, K.; Huse, T.; Hutchcroft, D.; Jones, D.; Lockwood, M.; McCubbin, M.; McNulty, R.; Muskett, D.; Noor, A.; Patel, G. D.; Rinnert, K.; Shears, T.; Smith, N. A.; Southern, G.; Stavitski, I.; Sutcliffe, P.; Tobin, M.; Traynor, S. M.; Turner, P.; Whitley, M.; Wormald, M.; Wright, V.; Bibby, J. H.; Brisbane, S.; Brock, M.; Charles, M.; Cioffi, C.; Gligorov, V. V.; Handford, T.; Harnew, N.; Harris, F.; John, M. J. J.; Jones, M.; Libby, J.; Martin, L.; McArthur, I. A.; Muresan, R.; Newby, C.; Ottewell, B.; Powell, A.; Rotolo, N.; Senanayake, R. S.; Somerville, L.; Soroko, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sullivan, P.; Stokes-Rees, I.; Topp-Jorgensen, S.; Xing, F.; Wilkinson, G.; Artuso, M.; Belyaev, I.; Blusk, S.; Lefeuvre, G.; Menaa, N.; Menaa-Sia, R.; Mountain, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Wang, J. C.; Abadie, L.; Aglieri-Rinella, G.; Albrecht, E.; André, J.; Anelli, G.; Arnaud, N.; Augustinus, A.; Bal, F.; Barandela Pazos, M. C.; Barczyk, A.; Bargiotti, M.; Batista Lopes, J.; Behrendt, O.; Berni, S.; Binko, P.; Bobillier, V.; Braem, A.; Brarda, L.; Buytaert, J.; Camilleri, L.; Cambpell, M.; Castellani, G.; Cataneo, F.; Cattaneo, M.; Chadaj, B.; Charpentier, P.; Cherukuwada, S.; Chesi, E.; Christiansen, J.; Chytracek, R.; Clemencic, M.; Closier, J.; Collins, P.; Colrain, P.; Cooke, O.; Corajod, B.; Corti, G.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Damodaran, B.; David, C.; de Capua, S.; Decreuse, G.; Degaudenzi, H.; Dijkstra, H.; Droulez, J.-P.; Duarte Ramos, D.; Dufey, J. P.; Dumps, R.; Eckstein, D.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Flegel, W.; Forty, R.; Fournier, C.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Gaidioz, B.; Gaspar, C.; Gayde, J.-C.; Gavillet, P.; Go, A.; Gracia Abril, G.; Graulich, J.-S.; Giudici, P.-A.; Guirao Elias, A.; Guglielmini, P.; Gys, T.; Hahn, F.; Haider, S.; Harvey, J.; Hay, B.; Hernando Morata, J.-A.; Herranz Alvarez, J.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hilke, H. J.; von Holtey, G.; Hulsbergen, W.; Jacobsson, R.; Jamet, O.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Kanaya, N.; Knaster Refolio, J.; Koestner, S.; Koratzinos, M.; Kristic, R.; Lacarrère, D.; Lasseur, C.; Lastovicka, T.; Laub, M.; Liko, D.; Lippmann, C.; Lindner, R.; Losasso, M.; Maier, A.; Mair, K.; Maley, P.; Mato Vila, P.; Moine, G.; Morant, J.; Moritz, M.; Moscicki, J.; Muecke, M.; Mueller, H.; Nakada, T.; Neufeld, N.; Ocariz, J.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Parzefall, U.; Patel, M.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Piedigrossi, D.; Pivk, M.; Pokorski, W.; Ponce, S.; Ranjard, F.; Riegler, W.; Renaud, J.; Roiser, S.; Rossi, A.; Roy, L.; Ruf, T.; Ruffinoni, D.; Saladino, S.; Sambade Varela, A.; Santinelli, R.; Schmelling, S.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, T.; Schöning, A.; Schopper, A.; Seguinot, J.; Snoeys, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, A. C.; Somogyi, P.; Stoica, R.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; Toledo Alarcon, J.; Ullaland, O.; Valassi, A.; Vannerem, P.; Veness, R.; Wicht, P.; Wiedner, D.; Witzeling, W.; Wright, A.; Wyllie, K.; Ypsilantis, T.

    2008-08-01

    The LHCb experiment is dedicated to precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of B hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva). The initial configuration and expected performance of the detector and associated systems, as established by test beam measurements and simulation studies, is described.

  19. LHCb Conditions database operation assistance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemencic, M.; Shapoval, I.; Cattaneo, M.; Degaudenzi, H.; Santinelli, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Conditions Database (CondDB) of the LHCb experiment provides versioned, time dependent geometry and conditions data for all LHCb data processing applications (simulation, high level trigger (HLT), reconstruction, analysis) in a heterogeneous computing environment ranging from user laptops to the HLT farm and the Grid. These different use cases impose front-end support for multiple database technologies (Oracle and SQLite are used). Sophisticated distribution tools are required to ensure timely and robust delivery of updates to all environments. The content of the database has to be managed to ensure that updates are internally consistent and externally compatible with multiple versions of the physics application software. In this paper we describe three systems that we have developed to address these issues. The first system is a CondDB state tracking extension to the Oracle 3D Streams replication technology, to trap cases when the CondDB replication was corrupted. Second, an automated distribution system for the SQLite-based CondDB, providing also smart backup and checkout mechanisms for the CondDB managers and LHCb users respectively. And, finally, a system to verify and monitor the internal (CondDB self-consistency) and external (LHCb physics software vs. CondDB) compatibility. The former two systems are used in production in the LHCb experiment and have achieved the desired goal of higher flexibility and robustness for the management and operation of the CondDB. The latter one has been fully designed and is passing currently to the implementation stage.

  20. Corrosion in coal and straw co-combustion environments

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, N.

    1997-08-01

    In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emission, ELSAM (the electric utility company of the western part of Denmark) is looking into the possibilities for using biomass--mainly straw--for combustion in high-efficiency power plants. In this connection ELSAM has investigated 3 ultra supercritical boiler concepts for combustion of straw only or together with coal: (1) pulverized fuel boilers (PF-boilers); (2) circulating fluidized bed boilers (CFB-boilers); and (3) vibrating grate boilers with 100% straw. These investigations have mainly been full-scale tests with straw fed into existing boilers. Corrosion tests have been performed in these boilers using temperature regulated probes and in-plant test tubes in existing superheaters. The corrosion has been determined by detailed measurements of wall thickness reduction and light optical microscopic measurements of the material degradation due to high temperature corrosion. Corrosion mechanisms have been evaluated using SEM/EDX together with thermodynamic considerations based on measurements of the chemical environment of the flue gas. Great differences were found in the corrosion mechanisms for superheaters in PF-boilers and the CFB-boilers fired with almost the same share of straw and at the same metal temperatures.

  1. An ASIC for fast single photon counting in the LHCb RICH upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotti, C.

    2017-03-01

    The LHCb experiment will be upgraded during the second LHC long shutdown (years 2019–2020) to operate at higher luminosity. The new triggerless architecture of LHCb requires data from the entire detector to be read out at 40 MHz. The basic element of the front-end electronics of the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector upgrade is the "Elementary Cell" (EC), a readout system for multianode photomultiplier tubes designed to minimise parasitic capacitance at the anodes, to obtain a fast readout with low noise and low crosstalk. At the heart of the EC is the CLARO, an 8 channel, low power and radiation hard front-end ASIC designed in 0.35 μm CMOS technology. Each channel compares the charge signals from the photomultiplier anodes with a programmable threshold, and gives a digital pulse at the output when the threshold is exceeded. Baseline recovery occurs in less than 25 ns for typical single photon signals. In the LHCb RICH upgrade environment, the chips will have to withstand radiation up to a total ionising dose of 2 kGy (200 krad) and neutron and hadron fluences up to 03×112 cm‑2 and following irradiation, the chips have been shown to tolerate such doses with a margin of safety.

  2. Development of an extremely thin-wall straw tracker operational in vacuum - The COMET straw tracker system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiguchi, H.; Evtoukhovitch, P.; Fujii, Y.; Hamada, E.; Mihara, S.; Moiseenko, A.; Noguchi, K.; Oishi, K.; Tanaka, S.; Tojo, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Tsverava, N.; Ueno, K.; Volkov, A.

    2017-02-01

    The COMET experiment at J-PARC aims to search for a lepton-flavour violating process of muon to electron conversion in a muonic atom, μ-e conversion, with a branching-ratio sensitivity of better than 10-16, 4 orders of magnitude better than the present limit, in order to explore the parameter region predicted by most of well-motivated theoretical models beyond the Standard Model. The need for this sensitivity places several stringent requirements on the detector development. The experiment requires to detect the monochromatic electron of 105 MeV, the momentum resolution is primarily limited by the multiple scattering effect for this momentum region. Thus we need the very light material detector in order to achieve an excellent momentum resolution, better than 2%, for 100 MeV region. In order to fulfil such a requirement, the thin-wall straw-tube planar tracker has been developed by an extremely light material which is operational in vacuum. The COMET straw tracker consists of 9.8 mm diameter straw tube, longer than 1 m length, with 20-μm-thick Mylar foil and 70-nm-thick aluminium deposition. Currently even thinner and smaller, 12 μm thick and 5 mm diameter, straw is under development by the ultrasonic welding technique.

  3. The upgrade of the LHCb Vertex Locator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, T.

    2014-12-01

    The LHCb experiment is set for a significant upgrade, which will be ready for Run 3 of the LHC in 2020. This upgrade will allow LHCb to run at a significantly higher instantaneous luminosity and collect an integrated luminosity of 50fb-1 by the end of Run 4. In this process the Vertex Locator (VELO) detector will be upgraded to a pixel-based silicon detector. The upgraded VELO will improve upon the current detector by being closer to the beams and having lower material modules with microchannel cooling and a thinner RF-foil. Simulations have shown that it will maintain its excellent performance, even after the radiation damage caused by collecting an integrated luminosity of 50fb-1.

  4. The LHCb trigger: Algorithms and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Hugo; LHCb Collaboration

    2010-11-01

    This article describes the hardware architecture of the LHCb trigger system, as well as the algorithms that it executes in order to identify the relevant B meson decays. The expected performance on simulated data and the trigger commissioning status and plans are also presented. The LHCb trigger consists of two phases: the Level 0 and the High Level Trigger. The former is synchronous and implemented in custom electronics, and it reduces the rate to 1 MHz. The High Level Trigger is a C++ algorithm running in a farm of about 1000 16-core computing nodes and further reducing the rate to 2 kHz. The Level 0 efficiency computed on B meson events that would be offline-selected range between 90% for decays containing muons and 50% for purely hadronic decays, the later suffering from higher light quark backgrounds. Overall High Level Trigger efficiencies range between 60% and 80%.

  5. Upgrade of the LHCb VELO detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is a single-arm forward spectrometer optimised for performing heavy-flavour physics analyses, using proton-proton collisions provided by the LHC machine. A major upgrade of the LHCb experiment will take place prior to the start of Run 3 operations in 2021. The upgraded Vertex Locator (VELO) is an essential component of this upgrade. Its main role is to enable high precision track and vertex reconstruction, with data-driven readout to the software trigger at 40 MHz, in the higher-luminosity environment of Run 3. To achieve this goal, significant improvements are planned with respect to the current detector, including a switch from microstrips to pixels, upgraded electronics, and a new cooling system. I will briefly motiviate the need for an upgrade, describe the main aspects of the VELO upgrade design, and show highlights of recent sensor characterisation studies using the CERN SPS test beam.

  6. Pentaquarks and possible anomalies at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafferty, G.

    2016-07-01

    With the LHC Run 1 data, the LHCb experiment discovered two pentaquark states and has evidence for a number of possible anomalies in the flavour sector. The possible anomalies include indications of violations of lepton flavour universality, deviations from Standard Model predictions in several B-meson decay modes that are mediated by flavour-changing neutral currents, and further evidence for a discrepancy between inclusive and exclusive measurements of the CKM matrix element |Vub|.

  7. Pentaquarks and Possible Anomalies at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafferty, G.

    With the LHC Run 1 data, the LHCb experiment discovered two pentaquark states and has evidence for a number of possible anomalies in the avour sector. The possible anomalies include indications of violations of lepton avour universality, deviations from Standard Model predictions in several B-meson decay modes that are mediated by avour-changing neutral currents, and further evidence for a discrepancy between inclusive and exclusive measurements of the CKM matrix element |Vub|.

  8. b and c spectroscopy at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Simone, Patrizia

    2014-06-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study the decays and properties of heavy flavoured hadrons produced in the forward region from pp collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. It has recorded the world's largest data sample of beauty and charm hadrons, enabling precise studies into the spectroscopy of such particles, including discoveries of new states and measurements of their properties such as masses, width and quantum numbers. The latest results in this area are reviewed.

  9. Optimization of the LHCb track reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storaci, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    The LHCb track reconstruction uses sophisticated pattern recognition algorithms to reconstruct trajectories of charged particles. Their main feature is the use of a Hough- transform like approach to connect track segments from different sub-detectors, allowing for having no tracking stations in the magnet of LHCb. While yielding a high efficiency, the track reconstruction is a major contributor to the overall timing budget of the software trigger of LHCb, and will continue to be so in the light of the higher track multiplicity expected from Run II of the LHC. In view of this fact, key parts of the pattern recognition have been revised and redesigned. In this document the main features which were studied are presented. A staged approach strategy for the track reconstruction in the software trigger was investigated: it allows unifying complementary sets of tracks coming from the different stages of the high level trigger, resulting in a more flexible trigger strategy and a better overlap between online and offline reconstructed tracks. Furthermore the use of parallelism was investigated, using SIMD instructions for time-critical parts of the software.

  10. The LHCb upgrade: plans and physics potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconi, U.

    2017-04-01

    LHCb is performing a large number of world-class precision measurements in heavy flavour physics. However, yet by the end of the LHC Run 2, many of these measurements will remain limited by statistics, even though adding the expected integrated luminosity of 5 - 6 fb-1. The main obstacle preventing LHCb to run the present detector at higher luminosities, with enhanced trigger efficiencies, is the current 1 MHz readout system limitation. The detector will therefore undergo a major upgrade in the Long Shutdown 2 (2018 - 2019) aiming at collecting an order of magnitude more data by 2028. The upgrade consists of a new readout system operating at the LHC bunch crossing rate of 40 MHz. The data acquisition system will exploit the ultimate flexibility of a software trigger. The instantaneous luminosity will increase to 2 ×1033 cm-2s-1, five times higher than presently. In order to cope with the higher expected occupancies and radiation doses several sub-detector upgrades are underway. The physics potential of LHCb shall improve considerably, as will be discussed.

  11. ARIADNE: a Tracking System for Relationships in LHCb Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapoval, I.; Clemencic, M.; Cattaneo, M.

    2014-06-01

    The data processing model of the LHCb experiment implies handling of an evolving set of heterogeneous metadata entities and relationships between them. The entities range from software and databases states to architecture specificators and software/data deployment locations. For instance, there is an important relationship between the LHCb Conditions Database (CondDB), which provides versioned, time dependent geometry and conditions data, and the LHCb software, which is the data processing applications (used for simulation, high level triggering, reconstruction and analysis of physics data). The evolution of CondDB and of the LHCb applications is a weakly-homomorphic process. It means that relationships between a CondDB state and LHCb application state may not be preserved across different database and application generations. These issues may lead to various kinds of problems in the LHCb production, varying from unexpected application crashes to incorrect data processing results. In this paper we present Ariadne - a generic metadata relationships tracking system based on the novel NoSQL Neo4j graph database. Its aim is to track and analyze many thousands of evolving relationships for cases such as the one described above, and several others, which would otherwise remain unmanaged and potentially harmful. The highlights of the paper include the system's implementation and management details, infrastructure needed for running it, security issues, first experience of usage in the LHCb production and potential of the system to be applied to a wider set of LHCb tasks.

  12. Very rapid phosphorylation kinetics suggest a unique role for Lhcb2 during state transitions in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Claudia; Pietrzykowska, Malgorzata; Kiss, Anett Z; Suorsa, Marjaana; Ceci, Luigi R; Aro, Eva-Mari; Jansson, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) contains three highly homologous chlorophyll-a/b-binding proteins (Lhcb1, Lhcb2 and Lhcb3), which can be assembled into both homo- and heterotrimers. Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 are reversibly phosphorylated by the action of STN7 kinase and PPH1/TAP38 phosphatase in the so-called state-transition process. We have developed antibodies that are specific for the phosphorylated forms of Lhcb1 and Lhcb2. We found that Lhcb2 is more rapidly phosphorylated than Lhcb1: 10 sec of ‘state 2 light’ results in Lhcb2 phosphorylation to 30% of the maximum level. Phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms of the proteins showed no difference in electrophoretic mobility and dephosphorylation kinetics did not differ between the two proteins. In state 2, most of the phosphorylated forms of Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 were present in super- and mega-complexes that comprised both photosystem (PS)I and PSII, and the state 2-specific PSI–LHCII complex was highly enriched in the phosphorylated forms of Lhcb2. Our results imply distinct and specific roles for Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 in the regulation of photosynthetic light harvesting. PMID:23888908

  13. Tube support

    DOEpatents

    Mullinax, Jerry L.

    1988-01-01

    A tube support for supporting horizontal tubes from an inclined vertical support tube passing between the horizontal tubes. A support button is welded to the vertical support tube. Two clamping bars or plates, the lower edges of one bearing on the support button, are removably bolted to the inclined vertical tube. The clamping bars provide upper and lower surface support for the horizontal tubes.

  14. Rare beauty and charm decays at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Johannes

    2013-05-01

    Rare heavy flavor decays are an ideal place to search for the effects of potential new particles that modify the decay rates or the Lorentz structure of the decay vertices. The LHCb experiment, a dedicated heavy flavour experiment at the LHC at CERN. It has recorded the worlds largest sample of heavy meson and lepton decays. The status of the rare decay analyses with 1 fb-1 of √s = 7 TeV and 1.1 fb-1 of √s = 8 TeV of pp-collisions collected by the LHCb experiment in 2011 and 2012 is reviewed. The worlds most precise measurements of the angular structure of B0 → K*0μ+μ- and B+ → K+μ+μ- decays is discussed, as well as the isospin asymmetry measurement in B → K(*)μ+μ- decays. The first evidence for the very rare decay Bs0 → µ+µ- is presented together with the most stringent upper exclusion limits on the branching fraction of decays of B0, D0 and Ks0 mesons into two muons. This note finishes with the discussion of searches for lepton number and lepton flavor violating τ decays.

  15. SIMD studies in the LHCb reconstruction software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cámpora Pérez, Daniel Hugo; Couturier, Ben

    2015-12-01

    During the data taking process in the LHC at CERN, millions of collisions are recorded every second by the LHCb Detector. The LHCb Online computing farm, counting around 15000 cores, is dedicated to the reconstruction of the events in real-time, in order to filter those with interesting Physics. The ones kept are later analysed Offline in a more precise fashion on the Grid. This imposes very stringent requirements on the reconstruction software, which has to be as efficient as possible. Modern CPUs support so-called vector-extensions, which extend their Instruction Sets, allowing for concurrent execution across functional units. Several libraries expose the Single Instruction Multiple Data programming paradigm to issue these instructions. The use of vectorisation in our codebase can provide performance boosts, leading ultimately to Physics reconstruction enhancements. In this paper, we present vectorisation studies of significant reconstruction algorithms. A variety of vectorisation libraries are analysed and compared in terms of design, maintainability and performance. We also present the steps taken to systematically measure the performance of the released software, to ensure the consistency of the run-time of the vectorised software.

  16. Ear Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Tubes Ear Tubes Patient Health Information News media ... and throat specialist) may be considered. What are ear tubes? Ear tubes are tiny cylinders placed through ...

  17. Physical and thermochemical properties of cereal straws

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaly, A.E. ); Al-Taweel, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Cereal straws are one of the most commonly available lignocellulosic materials that can be converted to different types of fuels and chemical feedstocks through a variety of thermochemical conversion processes. This study provides information on moisture content, bulk density, particle size, heating values, proximate analysis, ultimate analysis, ash composition, and ash feasibility characteristics for four cereal straws (wheat, barley, oats, and rye). The type of straw and the crop variety have significant effects on the chemical properties of straw.

  18. Upgrade of the LHCb Vertex Locator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leflat, A.

    2014-08-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, planned for 2018, will transform the entire readout to a trigger-less system operating at 40 MHz. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm, with access to all event information. This will enable the detector to run at luminosities of 1-2 × 1033/cm2/s and probe physics beyond the Standard Model in the heavy sector with unprecedented precision. The upgraded VELO must be low mass, radiation hard and vacuum compatible. It must be capable of fast pattern recognition and track reconstruction and will be required to drive data to the outside world at speeds of up to 2.5 Tbit/s. This challenge is being met with a new Vertex Locator (VELO) design based on hybrid pixel detectors positioned to within 5 mm of the LHC colliding beams. The sensors have 55 × 55 μm square pixels and the VELOPix ASIC which is being developed for the readout is based on the Timepix/Medipix family of chips. The hottest ASIC will have to cope with pixel hit rates of up to 900 MHz. The material budget will be optimised with the use of evaporative CO2 coolant circulating in microchannels within a thin silicon substrate. Microchannel cooling brings many advantages: very efficient heat transfer with almost no temperature gradients across the module, no CTE mismatch with silicon components, and low material contribution. This is a breakthrough technology being developed for LHCb. LHCb is also focussing effort on the construction of a lightweight foil to separate the primary and secondary LHC vacua, the development of high speed cables and radiation qualification of the module. The 40 MHz readout will also bring significant conceptual changes to the way in which the upgrade trigger is operated. Work is in progress to incorporate momentum and impact parameter information into the trigger at the earliest possible stage, using the fast pattern recognition capabilities of the upgraded detector. The current status of the VELO upgrade will

  19. Hadron Spectroscopy, exotics and BC + physics at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Biplab

    2016-11-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study properties and decays of heavy flavored hadrons produced from pp collisions at the LHC. During Run 1, it has recorded the world's largest data sample of beauty and charm hadrons, enabling precision spectroscopy studies of such particles. Several important results obtained by LHCb, such as the discovery of the first pentaquark states and the first unambiguous determination of the Zc (4430) - as an exotic state, have dramatically increased the interest in spectroscopy of heavy hadrons. An overview of the latest LHCb results on the subject, including the discovery of four strange exotic states decaying as X → J/ψϕ, is presented. LHCb has also made significant contributions to the field of BC + physics, the lowest bound state of the heavy flavor ̅b and c quarks. A synopsis of the latest results is given.

  20. LHCb pentaquarks in constituent quark models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, P. G.; Entem, D. R.; Fernández, F.

    2017-01-01

    The recently discovered Pc(4380) + and Pc(4450) + states at LHCb have masses close to the D bar Σc* and Dbar*Σc thresholds, respectively, which suggest that they may have significant meson-baryon molecular components. We analyze these states in the framework of a constituent quark model which has been applied to a wide range of hadronic observables, being the model parameters, therefore, completely constrained. The Pc(4380) + and Pc(4450) + are studied as molecular states composed by charmed baryons and open charm mesons. Several bound states with the proper binding energy are found in the D bar Σc* and Dbar*Σc channels. We discuss the possible assignments of these states from their decay widths. Moreover, two more states are predicted, associated with the D bar Σc and Dbar*Σc* thresholds.

  1. Developments towards the LHCb VELO upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid Vidal, Xabier

    2016-09-01

    The Vertex Locator (VELO) is a silicon strip detector surrounding the interaction region of the LHCb experiment. The upgrade of the VELO is planned to be installed in 2019-2020, and the current detector will be replaced by a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at a rate of 40 MHz. The new detector is designed to withstand the radiation dose expected at an integrated luminosity of 50 fb-1. The detector will be composed of silicon pixel sensors, read out by the VeloPix ASIC that is being developed based on the TimePix/MediPix family. The prototype sensors for the VELO upgrade are being irradiated in five different facilities and the post-irradiation performance is being measured with testbeams, and in the lab. These proceedings present the VELO upgrade and briefly discuss the results of the sensor testing campaign.

  2. TELL1: development of a common readout board for LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legger, Federica; Bay, Aurelio; Haefeli, Guido; Locatelli, Laurent

    2004-12-01

    LHCb is one of the four experiments currently under construction at LHC (Large Hadron Collider) at CERN, and its aim is the study of b-quark physics (LHCb Collaboration, CERN-LHCC/98-4). LHCb trigger strategy is based on three levels, and will reduce the event rate from 40 MHz to a few hundred Hz (LHCb Collaboration, CERN/LHCC 2003-031, LHCb TDR 10, September 2003). The first two levels (L0 and L1) will use signals from some part of the detector in order to take fast decisions, while the last one, called High Level Trigger (HLT), will have access to the full event data. An "off detector" readout board (TELL1) has been developed and will be used by the majority of LHCb subdetectors. It takes L0 accepted data as input and, after data processing which includes event synchronization, L1 Trigger pre-processing and zero suppression, L1 buffering, and HLT zero suppression, the output is sent to L1 Trigger and HLT .

  3. Bucket and straw technique to facilitate passage of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt through the distal tunneling sheath.

    PubMed

    Downes, Angela E; Vandergrift, William A; Beckman, Joshua M; Truong, Devon; Tuite, Gerald F

    2014-12-01

    Placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) is a procedure comprising many small steps. Difficulties and delays can arise when passing the distal shunt tubing down the distal tunneling sheath during surgery. The authors of this report describe a simple technique for quickly passing the distal catheter of a VPS through the tunneler sheath, whereby the sheath is used as a fluid tube to allow the distal catheter to be drawn through the fluid tube under suction pressure. The plastic sheath that surrounds the shunt tunneler device is used as a fluid tube, or "straw," with the proximal aperture submerged into a bucket of sterile irrigation liquid containing the distal catheter. Suction pressure is placed against the distal aperture of the tunneler, and the shunt catheter is quickly drawn through the sheath. No special equipment is required. In time trials, the bucket and straw technique took an average of 0.43 seconds, whereas traditional passage methods took 32.3 seconds. The "bucket and straw" method for passing distal shunt tubing through the tunneler sheath is a technique that increases surgical efficiency and reduces manual contact with shunt hardware.

  4. [Response of Straw and Straw Biochar Returning to Soil Carbon Budget and Its Mechanism].

    PubMed

    Hou, Ya-hong; Wang, Lei; Fu, Xiao-hua; Le, Yi-quan

    2015-07-01

    Direct straw returning and straw carbonization returning are the main measures of straw returning. Because of the differences in structure and nature as well as returning process between straw and straw biochar, the soil respiration and soil carbon budget after returning must have significant differences. In this study, outdoor pot experiment was carried out to study the response of soil respiration and carbon budget to straw and straw biochar returning and its possible mechanism. The results showed that soil respiration of straw biochar returning [mean value 21. 69 µmol.(m2.s)-1] was significantly lower than that of direct straw returning [mean value 65.32 µmol.(m2.s)-1], and its soil organic carbon content ( mean value 20. 40 g . kg-1) and plant biomass (mean value 138. 56 g) were higher than those of direct straw returning (mean values 17. 76 g . kg-1 and 76. 76 g). Considering the carbon loss after the biochar preparation process, its soil carbon budget was also significantly higher than that of direct straw returning, so it was a low carbon mode of straw returning. Direct straw returning significantly promoted soil dehydrogenase activity, soil β-glycosidase activity and soil microorganism quantity, leading to higher soil respiration, but straw biochar did play an obvious role in promoting the microbial activity index. Easily oxidizable carbon (EOC) and biodegradability of straw biochar were lower than those of straw, which showed that straw biochar had higher stability, and was more difficult to degrade for soil microorganisms so its soil microbial activity was generally lower, and could be retained in the soil for a long time.

  5. The Light-Harvesting Chlorophyll a/b Binding Proteins Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 Play Complementary Roles during State Transitions in Arabidopsis[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pietrzykowska, Malgorzata; Suorsa, Marjaana; Semchonok, Dmitry A.; Tikkanen, Mikko; Boekema, Egbert J.; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic light harvesting in plants is regulated by phosphorylation-driven state transitions: functional redistributions of the major trimeric light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) to balance the relative excitation of photosystem I and photosystem II. State transitions are driven by reversible LHCII phosphorylation by the STN7 kinase and PPH1/TAP38 phosphatase. LHCII trimers are composed of Lhcb1, Lhcb2, and Lhcb3 proteins in various trimeric configurations. Here, we show that despite their nearly identical amino acid composition, the functional roles of Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 are different but complementary. Arabidopsis thaliana plants lacking only Lhcb2 contain thylakoid protein complexes similar to wild-type plants, where Lhcb2 has been replaced by Lhcb1. However, these do not perform state transitions, so phosphorylation of Lhcb2 seems to be a critical step. In contrast, plants lacking Lhcb1 had a more profound antenna remodeling due to a decrease in the amount of LHCII trimers influencing thylakoid membrane structure and, more indirectly, state transitions. Although state transitions are also found in green algae, the detailed architecture of the extant seed plant light-harvesting antenna can now be dated back to a time after the divergence of the bryophyte and spermatophyte lineages, but before the split of the angiosperm and gymnosperm lineages more than 300 million years ago. PMID:25194026

  6. Full Offline Reconstruction in Real Time with the LHCb Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziurda, Agnieszka

    2016-11-01

    This document describes the novel, unique in High Energy Physics, real-time alignment and calibration of the full LHCb detector. The LHCb experiment has been designed as a dedicated heavy flavour physics experiment focused on the reconstruction of c and b hadrons. The LHCb detector is a single-arm forward spectrometer, which measures proton-proton interactions at the LHC. The operational bunch crossing rate is several orders of magnitude above the current abilities of data recording and storage. Therefore, a trigger system has been implemented to reduce this rate to an acceptable value. The LHCb trigger system has been redesigned during the 2013-2015 long shutdown,achieving offline-quality alignment and calibration online. It also allows analyses to be performed entirely at the trigger level. In addition, having the best performing reconstruction in the trigger gives the possibility to fully use the particle identification selection criteria and greatly increases the efficiency, in particular for the selection of charm and strange hadron decays. This results in enhancing the physics programme of the LHCb experiment.

  7. NRQCD Confronts LHCb Data on Quarkonium Production within Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, Reggie; Makris, Yiannis; Mehen, Thomas; Dai, Lin; Leibovich, Adam K.

    2017-07-01

    We analyze the recent LHCb measurement of the distribution of the fraction of the transverse momentum, z (J /ψ ), carried by the J /ψ within a jet. LHCb data are compared with analytic calculations using the fragmenting jet function (FJF) formalism for studying J /ψ in jets. Logarithms in the FJFs are resummed using Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution. We also convolve hard QCD partonic cross sections, showered with pythia, with leading order nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics (NRQCD) fragmentation functions and obtain consistent results. Both approaches use madgraph to calculate the hard process that creates the jet initiating parton. These calculations give reasonable agreement with the z (J /ψ ) distribution that was shown to be poorly described by default pythia simulations in the LHCb paper. We compare our predictions for the J /ψ distribution using various extractions of nonperturbative NRQCD long-distance matrix elements (LDMEs) in the literature. NRQCD calculations agree with LHCb data better than default pythia regardless of which fit to the LDMEs is used. LDMEs from fits that focus exclusively on high transverse momentum data from colliders are in good agreement with the LHCb measurement.

  8. TUBE TESTER

    DOEpatents

    Gittings, H.T. Jr.; Kalbach, J.F.

    1958-01-14

    This patent relates to tube testing, and in particular describes a tube tester for automatic testing of a number of vacuum tubes while in service and as frequently as may be desired. In it broadest aspects the tube tester compares a particular tube with a standard tube tarough a difference amplifier. An unbalanced condition in the circuit of the latter produced by excessive deviation of the tube in its characteristics from standard actuates a switch mechanism stopping the testing cycle and indicating the defective tube.

  9. From J/ψ to LHCb pentaquarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, F.; Ortega, P. G.; Entem, D. R.; Segovia, J.

    2016-09-01

    The two exotic $P_c^+(4380)$ and $P_c^+(4450)$ discovered in $2015$ by the LHCb Collaboration, together with the four resonances $X(4140)$, $X(4274)$, $X(4500)$ and $X(4700)$, reported in $2016$ by the same collaboration, are described in a constituent quark model which has been able to explain the properties of charmonium states from the $J/\\psi$ to the $X(3872)$. Using this model we found a $\\bar D\\Sigma_c^*$ bound state with $J^P=\\frac{3}{2}^-$ that may be identified with the $P_c^+(4380)$. In the $\\bar D^*\\Sigma_c$ channel we found three possible candidates for the $P_c^+(4450)$ with $J^P=\\frac{1}{2}^-$, $\\frac{3}{2}^-$ and $\\frac{3}{2}^+$ with almost degenerated energies. The $X(4140)$ resonance appears as a cusp in the $J/\\psi\\phi$ channel due to the near coincidence of the $D_{s}^{\\pm}D_{s}^{\\ast\\pm}$ and $J/\\psi\\phi$ mass thresholds. The remaining three $X(4274)$, $X(4500)$ and $X(4700)$ resonances appear as conventional charmonium states with quantum numbers $3^{3}P_{1}$, $4^{3}P_{0}$ and $5^{3}P_{0}$, respectively; and whose masses and widths are slightly modified due to their coupling with the corresponding closest meson-meson thresholds.

  10. Tube supports

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, K.A.

    1989-01-10

    This patent describes an apparatus consisting of parallel tubes arranged in the form of a tube bundle having a first plurality of parallel tube rows with lanes between adjacent rows and a second plurality of parallel tube rows with lanes between adjacent rows and support structure for supporting the tubes. The support structure consists of at least a first baffle and a second baffle, wherein each baffle comprises an outer ring surrounding the tube bundle and at least one slat attached to the outer ring as a chord and extending through the tube bundle between adjacent rows in one of the parallel tube rows. At least one slat is characterized by corrugations or folds extending along its length for point contact with the tubes of the bundle, the slat in the first baffle extending in lanes between the first plurality of parallel tube rows, and the slat in the second baffle extending in lanes between the second plurality of parallel tube rows.

  11. Plutonium Detection with Straw Neutron Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Guss, Paul

    2014-03-27

    A kilogram of weapons grade plutonium gives off about 56,000 neutrons per second of which 55,000 neutrons come from spontaneous fission of 240Pu (~6% by weight of the total plutonium). Actually, all even numbered isotopes (238Pu, 240Pu, and 242Pu) produce copious spontaneous fission neutrons. These neutrons induce fission in the surrounding fissile 239Pu with an approximate multiplication of a factor of ~1.9. This multiplication depends on the shape of the fissile materials and the surrounding material. These neutrons (typically of energy 2 MeV and air scattering mean free path >100 meters) can be detected 100 meters away from the source by vehicle-portable neutron detectors. [1] In our current studies on neutron detection techniques, without using 3He gas proportional counters, we designed and developed a portable high-efficiency neutron multiplicity counter using 10B-coated thin tubes called straws. The detector was designed to perform like commercially available fission meters (manufactured by Ortec Corp.) except instead of using 3He gas as a neutron conversion material, we used a thin coating of 10B.

  12. Bio-composites made from pine straw

    Treesearch

    Cheng Piao; Todd F. Shupe; Chung Y. Hse; Jamie Tang

    2004-01-01

    Pine straw is renewable natural resource that is under-utilized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the physical and mechanical performances of pine straw composites. Three panel density levels (0.8, 0.9, 1.0 g/cm2) and two resin content levels (1% pMDI + 4% UF, 2% pMDI + 4% UF) were selected as treatments. For the pine-straw-bamboo-...

  13. LHCb Results on Penta(tetra)-Quark Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharczyk, Marcin

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study the properties and decays of heavy flavored hadrons produced in pp collisions at the LHC. The data collected in the LHC Run I enables precision spectroscopy studies of beauty and charm hadrons. The latest results on spectroscopy of conventional and exotic hadrons are reviewed, such as the discovery of the first charmonium pentaquark states in the J/ψp system or the confirmation of resonant nature of the Z(4430)- mesonic state. LHCb has also made significant contributions to determination of the quantum numbers for the X(3872) state and to exclude the existence of the X(5568) tetraquark candidate. The LHCb results described in the present document have dramatically increased the interest on spectroscopy of heavy hadrons.

  14. Revision of the LHCb limit on Majorana neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuve, Brian; Peskin, Michael E.

    2016-12-01

    We revisit the recent limits from LHCb on a Majorana neutrino N in the mass range 250-5000 MeV [1 R. Aaij et al. (LHCb Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 131802 (2014)., 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.131802]. These limits are among the best currently available, and they will be improved soon by the addition of data from Run 2 of the LHC. LHCb presented a model-independent constraint on the rate of like-sign leptonic decays, and then derived a constraint on the mixing angle Vμ 4 based on a theoretical model for the B decay width to N and the N lifetime. The model used is unfortunately unsound. We revise the conclusions of the paper based on a decay model similar to the one used for the τ lepton and provide formulas useful for future analyses.

  15. Searching supersymmetry at the LHCb with displaced vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, F. de; Eboli, O. J. P.; Magro, M. B.; Restrepo, D.

    2009-03-01

    Supersymmetric theories with bilinear R-parity violation can give rise to the observed neutrino masses and mixings. One important feature of such models is that the lightest supersymmetric particle might have a sufficiently large lifetime to produce detached vertices. Working in the framework of supergravity models, we analyze the potential of the LHCb experiment to search for supersymmetric models exhibiting bilinear R-parity violation. We show that the LHCb experiment can probe a large fraction of the m{sub 0} x m{sub 1/2}, being able to explore gluino masses up to 1.3 TeV. The LHCb discover potential for these kinds of models is similar to the ATLAS and CMS ones in the low luminosity phase of operation of the LHC.

  16. B-physics prospects with the LHCb experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Harnew, N.

    2008-04-15

    This paper summarizes the B-physics prospects of the LHCb experiment. Firstly, a brief introduction to the CKM matrix and the mechanism of CP violation in the Standard Model is given. The advantages of the LHCb experiment for B-physics exploitation will then be described, together with a short description of the detector components. Finally, the LHCb physics aims and prospects will be summarized, focusing on the measurements of sin(2{beta}) in tree and gluonic penguin diagrams, sin(2{alpha}) in B{sub d}{sup 0} {sup {yields}} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, neutral B-meson oscillations and the B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing phase, and the measurement of {gamma} using a variety of complementary methods.

  17. LHCb Build and Deployment Infrastructure for run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemencic, M.; Couturier, B.

    2015-12-01

    After the successful run 1 of the LHC, the LHCb Core software team has taken advantage of the long shutdown to consolidate and improve its build and deployment infrastructure. Several of the related projects have already been presented like the build system using Jenkins, as well as the LHCb Performance and Regression testing infrastructure. Some components are completely new, like the Software Configuration Database (using the Graph DB Neo4j), or the new packaging installation using RPM packages. Furthermore all those parts are integrated to allow easier and quicker releases of the LHCb Software stack, therefore reducing the risk of operational errors. Integration and Regression tests are also now easier to implement, allowing to improve further the software checks.

  18. Revision of the LHCb limit on Majorana neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Shuve, Brian; Peskin, Michael E.

    2016-12-16

    We revisit the recent limits from LHCb on a Majorana neutrino N in the mass range 250–5000 MeV [R. Aaij et al. (LHCb Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 131802 (2014).]. These limits are among the best currently available, and they will be improved soon by the addition of data from Run 2 of the LHC. LHCb presented a model-independent constraint on the rate of like-sign leptonic decays, and then derived a constraint on the mixing angle V μ 4 based on a theoretical model for the B decay width to N and the N lifetime. The model used is unfortunately unsound. We revise the conclusions of the paper based on a decay model similar to the one used for the τ lepton and provide formulas useful for future analyses.

  19. Prospect of D0 Mixing and Cpv at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spradlin, Patrick

    Precision measurements in charm physics offer a window into a unique sector of potential New Physics interactions. LHCb is poised to become a world leading experiment for charm studies, recording enormous statistics with a detector tailored for flavor physics. This article presents recent charm CPV and mixing studies from LHCb, including LHCb's first CP asymmetry measurement with 37 pb-1 of data collected in 2010. The difference of the CP asymmetries of D0 decays to the K-K+ and π-π+ final states is determined to be Δ {A}CP = (-0.28 ± 0.70 ± 0.25 ) updates to the material presented at the 4th International Workshop on Charm Physics are included.

  20. Boron-Lined Straw-Tube Neutron Detector Test

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Stromswold, David C.

    2010-08-07

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. Reported here are the results of tests of a boron-lined proportional counter design variation. In the testing described here, the neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Proportional Technologies, Inc, was tested.

  1. Bioethanol production from rice straw residues.

    PubMed

    Belal, Elsayed B

    2013-01-01

    A rice straw - cellulose utilizing mold was isolated from rotted rice straw residues. The efficient rice straw degrading microorganism was identified as Trichoderma reesei. The results showed that different carbon sources in liquid culture such as rice straw, carboxymethyl cellulose, filter paper, sugar cane bagasse, cotton stalk and banana stalk induced T. reesei cellulase production whereas glucose or Potato Dextrose repressed the synthesis of cellulase. T. reesei cellulase was produced by the solid state culture on rice straw medium. The optimal pH and temperature for T. reesei cellulase production were 6 and 25 °C, respectively. Rice straw exhibited different susceptibilities towards cellulase to their conversion to reducing sugars. The present study showed also that, the general trend of rice straw bioconversion with cellulase was more than the general trend by T. reesei. This enzyme effectively led to enzymatic conversion of acid, alkali and ultrasonic pretreated cellulose from rice straw into glucose, followed by fermentation into ethanol. The combined method of acid pretreatment with ultrasound and subsequent enzyme treatment resulted the highest conversion of lignocellulose in rice straw to sugar and consequently, highest ethanol concentration after 7 days fermentation with S. cerevisae yeast. The ethanol yield in this study was about 10 and 11 g.L(-1).

  2. Virtualization for the LHCb Online system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccorsi, Enrico; Brarda, Loic; Moine, Gary; Neufeld, Niko

    2011-12-01

    Virtualization has long been advertised by the IT-industry as a way to cut down cost, optimise resource usage and manage the complexity in large data-centers. The great number and the huge heterogeneity of hardware, both industrial and custom-made, has up to now led to reluctance in the adoption of virtualization in the IT infrastructure of large experiment installations. Our experience in the LHCb experiment has shown that virtualization improves the availability and the manageability of the whole system. We have done an evaluation of available hypervisors / virtualization solutions and find that the Microsoft HV technology provides a high level of maturity and flexibility for our purpose. We present the results of these comparison tests, describing in detail, the architecture of our virtualization infrastructure with a special emphasis on the security for services visible to the outside world. Security is achieved by a sophisticated combination of VLANs, firewalls and virtual routing - the cost and benefits of this solution are analysed. We have adapted our cluster management tools, notably Quattor, for the needs of virtual machines and this allows us to migrate smoothly services on physical machines to the virtualized infrastructure. The procedures for migration will also be described. In the final part of the document we describe our recent R&D activities aiming to replacing the SAN-backend for the virtualization by a cheaper iSCSI solution - this will allow to move all servers and related services to the virtualized infrastructure, excepting the ones doing hardware control via non-commodity PCI plugin cards.

  3. Book Analysis: ’The Straw Giant’.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    and (3) book reviews of The Straw Giant. An examination of Hadley’s professional career shows he has had a fair amount of association with the...other book on arms control no doubt provided some expertise when he discussed ,.P . this subject in The Straw Giant. Though the book reviews were mixed

  4. Age Norms for Straw-Drinking Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Lauren; Lewis, Danielle; Reisel, Sharon; Waldrup, Lanae; Wooster, Donna M. Adam

    2000-01-01

    A study of 28 infants (ages 8-12 months) investigated their ability to drink from a straw. Results indicate 22 percent were not able to drink from a straw, whereas 78 percent were able to do so. Data failed to reveal any significant differences based on gender, age, or ethnicity. (Contains nine references.) (Author/CR)

  5. Overview of LHCb results on beauty and charm spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palano, Antimo

    2016-11-01

    We present a summary of new experimental results from LHCb experiment on the status of the charm spectroscopy using inclusive approaches and Dalitz plot analyses of B and Bs decays. We also summarize latest results on the spectroscopy of heavy baryons.

  6. Onia and onia-like states at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passaleva, Giovanni

    2014-06-01

    We present recent LHCb results of studies on the production of J/ψ and χc charmonium states, of Υ bottomonia and on J/ψ polarization in proton-proton collisions at √s. Results on J/ψ production in proton-lead collisions are also presented.

  7. Moisture in a straw bale wall

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.Z.; Fremouw, S.; Kline, J.; Northcutt, D.; Wang, Z.; Weiser, R.

    1999-07-01

    The objective of this project was to see if there was sufficient moisture to promote fungus growth within a straw bale wall. To determine the level of moisture, the walls in a straw bale building were instrumented to monitor relative humidity. The year-long monitoring began in August, 1997. During the monitoring period the building's interior relative humidity ranged from 22 to 71% and the exterior relative humidity ranged from 10 to 94%. The maximum straw bale relative humidity recorded was 85%, which occurred on February 21 on the south side of the building in a lower bale on the exterior side. The minimum straw bale relative humidity occurred on August 13 on the east side of the building in a lower bale on the exterior side and was 27%. In the 23 studies of mold growth in straw bales the authors reviewed, mold growth occurred between 70 and 91% relative humidity.

  8. Pilot-scale semisolid fermentation of straw.

    PubMed

    Grant, G A; Han, Y W; Anderson, A W

    1978-03-01

    Semisolid fermentation of ryegrass straw to increase its animal feed value was successfully performed on a pilot scale. The pilot plant, which could handle 100 kg of straw per batch, was designed so that all major operations could take place in one vessel. The straw was hydrolyzed at 121 degrees C for 30 min with 0.5 N H2SO4 (7:3 liquid:solid), treated with ammonia to raise the pH to 5.0, inoculated with Candida utilis, and fermented in a semisolid state (70% moisture). During fermentation the straw was held stationary with air blown up through it. Batch fermentation times were 12 to 29 h. Semisolid fermentation did not require agitation and supported abundant growth at 20 to 40 degrees C even at near zero oxygen tensions. Fermentation increased the protein content, crude fat content, and in vitro rumen digestibility of the straw.

  9. Integration of Cloud resources in the LHCb Distributed Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Úbeda García, Mario; Méndez Muñoz, Víctor; Stagni, Federico; Cabarrou, Baptiste; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Charpentier, Philippe; Closier, Joel

    2014-06-01

    This contribution describes how Cloud resources have been integrated in the LHCb Distributed Computing. LHCb is using its specific Dirac extension (LHCbDirac) as an interware for its Distributed Computing. So far, it was seamlessly integrating Grid resources and Computer clusters. The cloud extension of DIRAC (VMDIRAC) allows the integration of Cloud computing infrastructures. It is able to interact with multiple types of infrastructures in commercial and institutional clouds, supported by multiple interfaces (Amazon EC2, OpenNebula, OpenStack and CloudStack) - instantiates, monitors and manages Virtual Machines running on this aggregation of Cloud resources. Moreover, specifications for institutional Cloud resources proposed by Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG), mainly by the High Energy Physics Unix Information Exchange (HEPiX) group, have been taken into account. Several initiatives and computing resource providers in the eScience environment have already deployed IaaS in production during 2013. Keeping this on mind, pros and cons of a cloud based infrasctructure have been studied in contrast with the current setup. As a result, this work addresses four different use cases which represent a major improvement on several levels of our infrastructure. We describe the solution implemented by LHCb for the contextualisation of the VMs based on the idea of Cloud Site. We report on operational experience of using in production several institutional Cloud resources that are thus becoming integral part of the LHCb Distributed Computing resources. Furthermore, we describe as well the gradual migration of our Service Infrastructure towards a fully distributed architecture following the Service as a Service (SaaS) model.

  10. Feeding Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Tubes Health Information Sheet Q & A with Experts Patient Stories Social Security Disability Application Process For Kids ... Feeding Tubes Health Information Sheet Q & A with Experts Patient Stories Social Security Disability Application Process For Kids ...

  11. Comparative Properties of Bamboo and Rice Straw Pellets

    Treesearch

    Xianmiao Liu; Zhijia Liu; Benhua Fei; Zhiyong Cai; Zehui Jiang; Xing' e Liu

    2013-01-01

    Bamboo is a potential major bio-energy resource. Tests were carried out to compare and evaluate the property of bamboo and rice straw pellets, rice straw being the other main source of biomass solid fuel in China. All physical properties of untreated bamboo pellets (UBP), untreated rice straw pellets (URP), carbonized bamboo pellets (CBP), and carbonized rice straw...

  12. Etching of Copper Coated Mylar Tubes With CF-4 Gas

    DOE PAGES

    Ecklund, Karl M.; Hartman, Keith W.; Hebert, Michael J.; ...

    1996-04-01

    Using 5 mm diameter copper coated mylar straw tubes at a potential of 2.30 KV relative to a concentric 20 (mu)m diameter gold-plated tungsten anode, it has been observed that with very low flow rates of CF4-based gases the conductive copper cathode material may be removed entirely from the mylar surface.

  13. Resin straw as an alternative system to securely store frozen microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Thammavongs, Bouachanh; Poncet, Jean-Marc; Desmasures, Nathalie; Guéguen, Micheline; Panoff, Jean-Michel

    2004-05-01

    Freezing of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms is the main interest in the study of cold stress responses of living organisms. In parallel, applications which arise from this approach are of two types: (i) optimization of the frozen starters used in food processing; and (ii) improvement of the ex situ preservation of microorganisms in collections. Currently, cryopreservation of microorganisms in collections is carried out in cryotubes, and bibliographical references related to freezing microorganisms packaged in straws are scarce. In this context, a preliminary study was completed to evaluate the technological potential of ionomeric resin straws compared to polycarbonate cryo-tubes. Survival under freezing stress was tested on three microorganisms selected for their biotechnological interest: two lactic acid bacteria, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and a deuteromycete fungus, Geotrichum candidum. The stress was carried out by repeated freezing-thawing cycles to artificially accelerate the lethal effect of freezing on the microorganisms. Two main results were obtained: (i) the survival rate values (per freezing-thawing cycle) seems to depend on the thermal type of the studied microorganism, and (ii) there was no, under our experimental conditions, significant difference between straws and tubes. However, conservation in the resin straws lead to a slight increase in the survival of L. cremoris and G. candidum compared to microtubes. In those conditions, straws seems an alternative system to securely store frozen microorganisms with three main characteristics: (i) a high resistance to thermal stress, (ii) a safe closing by hermetic weld, and (iii) a system for inviolable identification.

  14. Tracheostomy tubes.

    PubMed

    Hess, Dean R; Altobelli, Neila P

    2014-06-01

    Tracheostomy tubes are used to administer positive-pressure ventilation, to provide a patent airway, and to provide access to the lower respiratory tract for airway clearance. They are available in a variety of sizes and styles from several manufacturers. The dimensions of tracheostomy tubes are given by their inner diameter, outer diameter, length, and curvature. Differences in dimensions between tubes with the same inner diameter from different manufacturers are not commonly appreciated but may have important clinical implications. Tracheostomy tubes can be cuffed or uncuffed and may be fenestrated. Some tracheostomy tubes are designed with an inner cannula. It is important for clinicians caring for patients with a tracheostomy tube to appreciate the nuances of various tracheostomy tube designs and to select a tube that appropriately fits the patient. The optimal frequency of changing a chronic tracheostomy tube is controversial. Specialized teams may be useful in managing patients with a tracheostomy. Speech can be facilitated with a speaking valve in patients with a tracheostomy tube who are breathing spontaneously. In mechanically ventilated patients with a tracheostomy, a talking tracheostomy tube, a deflated cuff technique with a speaking valve, or a deflated cuff technique without a speaking valve can be used to facilitate speech. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  15. Determination of the anode wire position by visible light in a new type straw for NA62 experiment tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glonti, L.; Misheva, M.; Potrebenikov, Yu.; Samsonov, V.; Movchan, S.; Enik, T.; Kolesnikov, A.

    2016-07-01

    Microscope investigations of new-type thin-wall tubes (straws) produced for NA62 drift chambers revealed that they are semitransparent and allow anode wires to be observed under illumination by visible light. In this work it is shown that positions of wires in straws and thus the anode spacing in the drift chambers can be directly determined with a high accuracy ( 5-10 μm) using a microscope mounted on a high-precision optical bench. These data are important for decreasing errors during reconstruction of charged particle track coordinates in the drift chambers. The proposed technique is much simpler than the X-ray or radioactive source methods.

  16. Preliminary investigation of fungal bioprocessing of wheat straw for production of straw-thermoplastic composites.

    PubMed

    Thompson, David N; Houghton, Tracy P; Lacey, Jeffrey A; Shaw, Peter G; Hess, J Richard

    2003-01-01

    Straw utilization for composites is limited by poor resin and polymer penetration, and excessive resin consumption owing to the straw cuticle, fines, and lignin-hemicellulose matrix. White-rot fungi degrade these components of straw and could, therefore, potentially be used to improve resin penetration and resin binding without the use of physical or chemical pretreatments. Although long treatment times and large footprints the limit use of fungal treatments on a large scale, distributed fungal pretreatments could alleviate land requirements. In this article, we present progress toward the development of a passive fungal straw upgrading system utilizing whiterot fungi.

  17. The LHCb Vertex Locator (VELO) Pixel Detector Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, E.

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to perform high-precision measurements of CP violation and the decays of beauty and charm hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. There is a planned upgrade during Long Shutdown 2 (LS2), expected in 2019, which will allow the detector to run at higher luminosities by transforming the entire readout to a trigger-less system. This will include a substantial upgrade of the Vertex Locator (VELO), the silicon tracker that surrounds the LHCb interaction region. The VELO is moving from silicon strip technology to hybrid pixel sensors, where silicon sensors are bonded to VeloPix ASICs. Sensor prototypes have undergone rigorous testing using the Timepix3 Telescope at the SPS, CERN. The main components of the upgrade are summarised and testbeam results presented.

  18. A PCIe Gen3 based readout for the LHCb upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellato, M.; Collazuol, G.; D'Antone, I.; Durante, P.; Galli, D.; Jost, B.; Lax, I.; Liu, G.; Marconi, U.; Neufeld, N.; Schwemmer, R.; Vagnoni, V.

    2014-06-01

    The architecture of the data acquisition system foreseen for the LHCb upgrade, to be installed by 2018, is devised to readout events trigger-less, synchronously with the LHC bunch crossing rate at 40 MHz. Within this approach the readout boards act as a bridge between the front-end electronics and the High Level Trigger (HLT) computing farm. The baseline design for the LHCb readout is an ATCA board requiring dedicated crates. A local area standard network protocol is implemented in the on-board FPGAs to read out the data. The alternative solution proposed here consists in building the readout boards as PCIe peripherals of the event-builder servers. The main architectural advantage is that protocol and link-technology of the event-builder can be left open until very late, to profit from the most cost-effective industry technology available at the time of the LHC LS2.

  19. Search for New Physics in rare decays at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Johannes

    2013-08-01

    Rare heavy flavor decays provide stringent tests of the Standard Model of particle physics and allow to test for possible new Physics scenarios. The LHCb experiment at CERN is the ideal place for these searches as it has recorded the worlds largest sample of beauty mesons. The status of the rare decay analyses with 1 fb of √{s}=7 TeV of pp-collisions collected by the LHCb experiment in 2011 is reviewed. The worlds most precise measurements of the angular structure of B0→K*0μ+μ- decays is discussed, as well as the isospin asymmetry measurement in B→Kμ+μ- decays. The most stringent upper exclusion limit on the branching fraction of Bs0→μ+μ- decays is shown, as well as searches for lepton number and lepton flavor violating processes.

  20. New pioneering in straw bale building

    SciTech Connect

    Jaccaci, A.; Bodzin, S.

    1996-07-01

    This article describes the use of straw bales into a cheap superinsulating wall material. Among the topics covered are the following: energy efficiency; fire and moisture; weight bearing; building codes. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  1. b -flavour tagging in pp collisions at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, V.; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    Measurements of CP violation and flavour oscillations of neutral B mesons require the knowledge of the meson flavour at the production time. Flavour-tagging algorithms in the LHCb experiment allow to perform such measurements with very high precision. Recent examples include the determination of the CKM angles 2β and 2βs . The details of these flavour-tagging algorithms are presented, together with their performances.

  2. DIRAC3 - the new generation of the LHCb grid software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Brook, N.; Casajus Ramo, A.; Charpentier, Ph; Closier, J.; Cowan, G.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Lanciotti, E.; Mathe, Z.; Nandakumar, R.; Paterson, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Santinelli, R.; Sapunov, M.; Smith, A. C.; Seco Miguelez, M.; Zhelezov, A.

    2010-04-01

    DIRAC, the LHCb community Grid solution, was considerably reengineered in order to meet all the requirements for processing the data coming from the LHCb experiment. It is covering all the tasks starting with raw data transportation from the experiment area to the grid storage, data processing up to the final user analysis. The reengineered DIRAC3 version of the system includes a fully grid security compliant framework for building service oriented distributed systems; complete Pilot Job framework for creating efficient workload management systems; several subsystems to manage high level operations like data production and distribution management. The user interfaces of the DIRAC3 system providing rich command line and scripting tools are complemented by a full-featured Web portal providing users with a secure access to all the details of the system status and ongoing activities. We will present an overview of the DIRAC3 architecture, new innovative features and the achieved performance. Extending DIRAC3 to manage computing resources beyond the WLCG grid will be discussed. Experience with using DIRAC3 by other user communities than LHCb and in other application domains than High Energy Physics will be shown to demonstrate the general-purpose nature of the system.

  3. Comparative Investigation of Shared Filesystems for the LHCb Online Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijay Kartik, S.; Neufeld, Niko

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes the investigative study undertaken to evaluate shared filesystem performance and suitability in the LHCb Online environment. Particular focus is given to the measurements and field tests designed and performed on an in-house OpenAFS setup; related comparisons with NFSv4 and GPFS (a clustered filesystem from IBM) are presented. The motivation for the investigation and the test setup arises from the need to serve common user-space like home directories, experiment software and control areas, and clustered log areas. Since the operational requirements on such user-space are stringent in terms of read-write operations (in frequency and access speed) and unobtrusive data relocation, test results are presented with emphasis on file-level performance, stability and “high-availability” of the shared filesystems. Use cases specific to the experiment operation in LHCb, including the specific handling of shared filesystems served to a cluster of 1500 diskless nodes, are described. Issues of prematurely expiring authenticated sessions are explicitly addressed, keeping in mind long-running analysis jobs on the Online cluster. In addition, quantitative test results are also presented with alternatives including NFSv4. Comparative measurements of filesystem performance benchmarks are presented, which are seen to be used as reference for decisions on potential migration of the current storage solution deployed in the LHCb online cluster.

  4. Biodegradation of wheat straw by Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Pandey, V K; Singh, M P

    2014-12-24

    Wheat straw pretreated with chemicals as well as hot water was subjected to degradation by edible mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus. Lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses component of both chemically as well as hot water treated wheat straw was degraded by the fungus and in turn the edible and nutritious fruiting body of the mushroom was produced. Biodegradation of wheat straw in terms of loss of lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose showed positive correlation with cellulases, xylanase, laccase and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity of the fungus. During vegetative growth of the fungus, lignin degradation was faster and during fructification, lignin degradation was slower than cellulose and hemicellulose. The carbon content of the wheat straw decreased while, nitrogen content increased during degradation of the waste. Hot water treated wheat straw supported better production of enzymatic activity and degraded more efficiently than chemically sterilized substrate. The cumulative yield and biological efficiency (BE) of the mushroom was maximum on the hot water treated substrate. Degradation of the hot water treated wheat straw was better and faster than chemically treated substrate.

  5. Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube insertion; G-tube insertion; PEG tube insertion; Stomach tube insertion; Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube insertion ... and down the esophagus, which leads to the stomach. After the endoscopy tube is inserted, the skin ...

  6. Jobs masonry in LHCb with elastic Grid Jobs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagni, F.; Charpentier, Ph

    2015-12-01

    In any distributed computing infrastructure, a job is normally forbidden to run for an indefinite amount of time. This limitation is implemented using different technologies, the most common one being the CPU time limit implemented by batch queues. It is therefore important to have a good estimate of how much CPU work a job will require: otherwise, it might be killed by the batch system, or by whatever system is controlling the jobs’ execution. In many modern interwares, the jobs are actually executed by pilot jobs, that can use the whole available time in running multiple consecutive jobs. If at some point the available time in a pilot is too short for the execution of any job, it should be released, while it could have been used efficiently by a shorter job. Within LHCbDIRAC, the LHCb extension of the DIRAC interware, we developed a simple way to fully exploit computing capabilities available to a pilot, even for resources with limited time capabilities, by adding elasticity to production MonteCarlo (MC) simulation jobs. With our approach, independently of the time available, LHCbDIRAC will always have the possibility to execute a MC job, whose length will be adapted to the available amount of time: therefore the same job, running on different computing resources with different time limits, will produce different amounts of events. The decision on the number of events to be produced is made just in time at the start of the job, when the capabilities of the resource are known. In order to know how many events a MC job will be instructed to produce, LHCbDIRAC simply requires three values: the CPU-work per event for that type of job, the power of the machine it is running on, and the time left for the job before being killed. Knowing these values, we can estimate the number of events the job will be able to simulate with the available CPU time. This paper will demonstrate that, using this simple but effective solution, LHCb manages to make a more efficient use of

  7. LHCb RICH Upgrade: an overview of the photon detector and electronic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassina, L.

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is one of the four large detectors operating at the LHC at CERN and it is mainly devoted to CP violation measurements and to the search for new physics in rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. The data from the two Ring Image Cherenkov (RICH-1 and RICH-2) detectors are essential to identify particles in a wide momentum range. From 2019 onwards 14 TeV collisions with luminosities reaching up to 2 × 1033 cm-2s-1 with 25 ns bunch spacing are planned, with the goal of collecting 5 fb-1 of data per year. In order to avoid degradation of the PID performance at such high rate (40 MHz), the RICH detector has to be upgraded. New photodetectors (Multi-anode photomultiplier tubes, MaPMTs) have been chosen and will be read out using an 8-channel chip, named CLARO, designed to sustain a photon counting rate up to 40 MHz, while minimizing the power consumption and the cross-talk. A 128-bit digital register allows selection of thresholds and attenuation values and provides features useful for testing and debugging. Photosensors and electronics are arranged in basic units, the first prototypes of which have been tested in charged particle beams in autumn 2014. An overview of the CLARO features and of the readout electronics is presented.

  8. Gastrostomy Tube (G-Tube)

    MedlinePlus

    ... warmth at the tube site; discharge that's yellow, green, or foul-smelling; fever) excessive bleeding or drainage from the tube site severe abdominal pain persistent vomiting or diarrhea trouble passing gas or having a bowel movement pink-red tissue (called granulation tissue) coming out ...

  9. Experimental and numerical analysis of cylindrical straw drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryl, Wojciech; Filipowicz, Mariusz

    The paper presents experimental and numerical results of the heat and mass transfer in a cylindrical bale of straw. The experimental measurements were made in a specialized stand of straw driers. Flue gasses, comes from straw combustion in the biomass boiler, are used as a drying medium. There were made measurements of humidity and temperature inside the cylindrical straw bale during the drying process. The results were used to prepare the drying rate curve. Moreover, data were used to validate the numerical model of straw drying. The numerical model was performed to depict the heat and mass transfer inside the straw bale. Furthermore, the model was used to optimize the drying process. The paper presents result of experimental and numerical drying rates of cylindrical straw bale and heat and mass transfer in its interior. As a result of the work numerical model was obtained. It satisfactorily describes the mechanisms inside the drying straw bale.

  10. Ash chemistry aspects of straw and coal-straw co-firing in utility boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Frandsen, F.J.; Nielsen, H.P.; Hansen, L.A.; Hansen, P.F.B.; Andersen, K.H.

    1998-12-31

    Deposits formed in straw-fired grate-boilers showed significant amounts of KCl (40--80% (w/w)) and KCl-coated Ca-Si-rich particles. CFB co-firing of straw and coal caused deposits in the convective pass containing predominantly K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (50--60% (w/w)) with small amounts of KCl close to the metal surface. In pulverized coal-straw co-fired boilers, deposits almost free of KCl were found. Most of the potassium in these deposits is derived from K-Al-Si-rich fly ash particles and the rest occurs as K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The presence of K-Al-Si-rich fly ash particles indicates that solid residue quality and reuse of fly ash in cement and concrete production rather than deposit formation may be of concern when utilizing straw in pulverized fuel boilers. This paper provides a review of Danish experiences with high-temperature ash deposit formation in the following full-scale utility boilers: Slagelse CHP (31 MWth), Haslev CHP (23 MWth) and Rudkoebing CHP (10.7 MWth), all straw-fired grate-boilers; Grenaa CHP (80 MWth), a coal-straw co-fired Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) boiler; and the Midtkraft-Studstrup Power Station, Unit 1 (380 MWth), a coal-straw co-fired PF-boiler.

  11. VeloPix: the pixel ASIC for the LHCb upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poikela, T.; De Gaspari, M.; Plosila, J.; Westerlund, T.; Ballabriga, R.; Buytaert, J.; Campbell, M.; Llopart, X.; Wyllie, K.; Gromov, V.; van Beuzekom, M.; Zivkovic, V.

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb Vertex Detector (VELO) will be upgraded in 2018 along with the other subsystems of LHCb in order to enable full readout at 40 MHz, with the data fed directly to the software triggering algorithms. The upgraded VELO is a lightweight hybrid pixel detector operating in vacuum in close proximity to the LHC beams. The readout will be provided by a dedicated front-end ASIC, dubbed VeloPix, matched to the LHCb readout requirements and the 55 × 55 μm VELO pixel dimensions. The chip is closely related to the Timepix3, from the Medipix family of ASICs. The principal challenge that the chip has to meet is a hit rate of up to 900 Mhits/s, resulting in a required output bandwidth of more than 16 Gbit/s. The occupancy across the chip is also very non-uniform, and the radiation levels reach an integrated 400 Mrad over the lifetime of the detector.VeloPix is a binary pixel readout chip with a data driven readout, designed in 130 nm CMOS technology. The pixels are combined into groups of 2 × 4 super pixels, enabling a shared logic and a reduction of bandwidth due to combined address and time stamp information. The pixel hits are combined with other simultaneous hits in the same super pixel, time stamped, and immediately driven off-chip. The analog front-end must be sufficiently fast to accurately time stamp the data, with a small enough dead time to minimize data loss in the most occupied regions of the chip. The data is driven off chip with a custom designed high speed serialiser. The current status of the ASIC design, the chip architecture and the simulations will be described.

  12. Design, the "Straw" Missing from the "Bricks" of IS Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waguespack, Leslie J.

    2011-01-01

    As punishment in the biblical story of Moses the slaves were told they had to make bricks without straw. This was impossible because bricks made without straw had the appearance of strength and function but could not withstand the proof of actual use. The slaves' punishment was therefore not only to make bricks, but also to find the straw on their…

  13. Thermal degradation of cereal straws in air

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaly, A.E. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports the thermogravimetric behavior of four cereal straws (wheat, barley, oats, and rye) at three heating rates (10, 20, and 50{degrees}C/min) in air examined. The thermal degradation rate, the initial degradation temperature, the active and passive pyrolysis zones, and the residual weight at 600{degrees}C were determined. Increasing the heating rate increased the thermal degradation rate and decreased both the initial degradation temperature and the residual weight at 600{degrees}C. The higher the cellulosic content of the straw, the higher the thermal degradation rate and the initial degradation temperature. Also, higher ash content in the straw resulted in higher residual weight at 600{degrees}C.

  14. Protective tubes for sodium heated water tubes

    DOEpatents

    Essebaggers, Jan

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which water tubes are heated by liquid sodium which minimizes the results of accidental contact between the water and the sodium caused by failure of one or more of the water tubes. A cylindrical protective tube envelopes each water tube and the sodium flows axially in the annular spaces between the protective tubes and the water tubes.

  15. Phosphorylation of the Light-Harvesting Complex II Isoform Lhcb2 Is Central to State Transitions1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cariti, Federica; Fucile, Geoffrey; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) is a crucial component of the photosynthetic machinery, with central roles in light capture and acclimation to changing light. The association of an LHCII trimer with PSI in the PSI-LHCII supercomplex is strictly dependent on LHCII phosphorylation mediated by the kinase STATE TRANSITION7, and is directly related to the light acclimation process called state transitions. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the LHCII trimers contain isoforms that belong to three classes: Lhcb1, Lhcb2, and Lhcb3. Only Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 can be phosphorylated in the N-terminal region. Here, we present an improved Phos-tag-based method to determine the absolute extent of phosphorylation of Lhcb1 and Lhcb2. Both classes show very similar phosphorylation kinetics during state transition. Nevertheless, only Lhcb2 is extensively phosphorylated (>98%) in PSI-LHCII, whereas phosphorylated Lhcb1 is largely excluded from this supercomplex. Both isoforms are phosphorylated to different extents in other photosystem supercomplexes and in different domains of the thylakoid membranes. The data imply that, despite their high sequence similarity, differential phosphorylation of Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 plays contrasting roles in light acclimation of photosynthesis. PMID:26438789

  16. Prospects for studying penguin decays in LHCb experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Barsuk, S. Ya. Pakhlova, G. V. Belyaev, I. M.

    2006-04-15

    Investigation of loop penguin decays of beauty hadrons seems promising in testing the predictions of the Standard Model of electroweak and strong interactions and in seeking new phenomena beyond the Standard Model. The possibility of studying the radiative penguin decays B{sup 0} {sup {yields}} K*{sup 0}{gamma}, B{sup 0}{sub s} {sup {yields}} {phi}{gamma}, and B{sup 0} {sup {yields}} {omega}{gamma} and the gluonic penguin decays B{sup 0} {sup {yields}} {phi}K{sup 0}{sub S} and B{sup 0}{sub s} {sup {yields}} {phi}{phi} in LHCb experiments is discussed.

  17. Neutral B-meson Mixing and CP Violation at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; LHCb Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    The LHCb detector is a single-arm forward spectrometer that collects data at the LHC, designed for studies of flavour physics with high precision. We present a selection of recent measurements of mixing and CP-violating parameters, including sin 2β and weak phase ϕ s, using several decays. A good understanding of the pollution from sub-leading penguin to pologies in these measurements can be achieved by measuring CP violation and polarization in the decay Bs 0→Jψ⁄K 0* and B 0→Jψ⁄ ρ 0. All results here presented are obtained using the full Run I dataset.

  18. Study of Lepton Flavor Universality in Semileptonic decays with LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Brian; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Semileptonic b-hadron decays to tau leptons provide a powerful probe for a class of new physics models that may have Higgs-like non-universal couplings to the charged leptons. Recent improvements in the measured decay rates in these channels hint at an excess relative to the expected rates in Standard Model calculations. A new development in this area is the emergence of hadron collider measurements with different systematics and backgrounds providing complimentary probes of the same or similar processes. We present the latest progress in these measurements using the LHCb 7 and 8 TeV datasets. National Science Foundation.

  19. A Review of Recent Results on Quarkonium Production at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe Altarelli, Monica

    2014-04-01

    A selection of LHCb results is presented on the production of heavy quarkonium states in pp collisions, including results on J/ψ and ϓ production at √s = 8 TeV, the measurement of prompt J/ψ polarisation, the production of χc mesons from converted photons, exclusive charmonium production, double J/ψ production, as well as recent results on J/ψ production in proton-lead collisions at √sNN = 5 TeV.

  20. 100 Gbps PCI-Express readout for the LHCb upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, P.; Neufeld, N.; Schwemmer, R.; Balbi, G.; Marconi, U.

    2015-04-01

    We present a new data acquisition system under development for the next upgrade of the LHCb experiment at CERN. We focus in particular on the design of a new generation of readout boards, the PCIe40, and on the viability of PCI-Express as an interconnect technology for high speed readout. We show throughput measurements across the PCI-Express bus, on Altera Stratix 5 devices, using a DMA mechanism and different synchronization schemes between the FPGA and the readout unit. Finally we discuss hardware and software design considerations necessary to achieve a data throughput of 100 Gbps in the final readout board.

  1. Measurements of the LHCb software stack on the ARM architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijay Kartik, S.; Couturier, Ben; Clemencic, Marco; Neufeld, Niko

    2014-06-01

    The ARM architecture is a power-efficient design that is used in most processors in mobile devices all around the world today since they provide reasonable compute performance per watt. The current LHCb software stack is designed (and thus expected) to build and run on machines with the x86/x86_64 architecture. This paper outlines the process of measuring the performance of the LHCb software stack on the ARM architecture - specifically, the ARMv7 architecture on Cortex-A9 processors from NVIDIA and on full-fledged ARM servers with chipsets from Calxeda - and makes comparisons with the performance on x86_64 architectures on the Intel Xeon L5520/X5650 and AMD Opteron 6272. The paper emphasises the aspects of performance per core with respect to the power drawn by the compute nodes for the given performance - this ensures a fair real-world comparison with much more 'powerful' Intel/AMD processors. The comparisons of these real workloads in the context of LHCb are also complemented with the standard synthetic benchmarks HEPSPEC and Coremark. The pitfalls and solutions for the non-trivial task of porting the source code to build for the ARMv7 instruction set are presented. The specific changes in the build process needed for ARM-specific portions of the software stack are described, to serve as pointers for further attempts taken up by other groups in this direction. Cases where architecture-specific tweaks at the assembler lever (both in ROOT and the LHCb software stack) were needed for a successful compile are detailed - these cases are good indicators of where/how the software stack as well as the build system can be made more portable and multi-arch friendly. The experience gained from the tasks described in this paper are intended to i) assist in making an informed choice about ARM-based server solutions as a feasible low-power alternative to the current compute nodes, and ii) revisit the software design and build system for portability and generic improvements.

  2. Performance of the LHCb RICH detector at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Adinolfi, M; Aglieri Rinella, G; Albrecht, E; Bellunato, T; Benson, S; Blake, T; Blanks, C; Brisbane, S; Brook, N H; Calvi, M; Cameron, B; Cardinale, R; Carson, L; Contu, A; Coombes, M; D'Ambrosio, C; Easo, S; Egede, U; Eisenhardt, S; Fanchini, E; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Frei, C; Gandini, P; Gao, R; Garra Tico, J; Giachero, A; Gibson, V; Gotti, C; Gregson, S; Gys, T; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Harnew, N; Hill, D; Hunt, P; John, M; Jones, C R; Johnson, D; Kanaya, N; Katvars, S; Kerzel, U; Kim, Y M; Koblitz, S; Kucharczyk, M; Lambert, D; Main, A; Maino, M; Malde, S; Mangiafave, N; Matteuzzi, C; Mini', G; Mollen, A; Morant, J; Mountain, R; Morris, J V; Muheim, F; Muresan, R; Nardulli, J; Owen, P; Papanestis, A; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Perego, D L; Pessina, G; Petrolini, A; Piedigrossi, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Powell, A; Rademacker, J H; Ricciardi, S; Rogers, G J; Sail, P; Sannino, M; Savidge, T; Sepp, I; Sigurdsson, S; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Storaci, B; Thomas, C; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Ullaland, O; Vervink, K; Voong, D; Websdale, D; Wilkinson, G; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xing, F; Young, R

    The LHCb experiment has been taking data at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN since the end of 2009. One of its key detector components is the Ring-Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) system. This provides charged particle identification over a wide momentum range, from 2-100 GeV/c. The operation and control, software, and online monitoring of the RICH system are described. The particle identification performance is presented, as measured using data from the LHC. Excellent separation of hadronic particle types (π, K, p) is achieved.

  3. The effect of long or chopped straw on pig behaviour.

    PubMed

    Lahrmann, H P; Oxholm, L C; Steinmetz, H; Nielsen, M B F; D'Eath, R B

    2015-05-01

    In the EU, pigs must have permanent access to manipulable materials such as straw, rope, wood, etc. Long straw can fulfil this function, but can increase labour requirements for cleaning pens, and result in problems with blocked slatted floors and slurry systems. Chopped straw might be more practical, but what is the effect on pigs' behaviour of using chopped straw instead of long straw? Commercial pigs in 1/3 slatted, 2/3 solid pens of 15 pigs were provided with either 100 g/pig per day of long straw (20 pens) or of chopped straw (19 pens). Behavioural observations were made of three focal pigs per pen (one from each of small, medium and large weight tertiles) for one full day between 0600 and 2300 h at each of ~40 and ~80 kg. The time spent rooting/investigating overall (709 s/pig per hour at 40 kg to 533 s/pig per hour at 80 kg), or directed to the straw/solid floor (497 s/pig per hour at 40 kg to 343 s/pig per hour at 80 kg), was not affected by straw length but reduced with age. Time spent investigating other pigs (83 s/pig per hour at 40 kg), the slatted floor (57 s/pig per hour) or pen fixtures (21 s/pig per hour) was not affected by age or straw length. Aggressive behaviour was infrequent, but lasted about twice as long in pens with chopped straw (2.3 s/pig per hour at 40 kg) compared with pens with long straw (1.0 s/pig per hour at 40 kg, P=0.060). There were no significant effects of straw length on tail or ear lesions, but shoulders were significantly more likely to have minor scratches with chopped straw (P=0.031), which may reflect the higher levels of aggression. Smaller pigs showed more rooting/investigatory behaviour, and in particular directed towards the straw/solid floor and the slatted floor than their larger pen-mates. Females exhibited more straw and pen fixture-directed behaviour than males. There were no effects of pig size or sex on behaviour directed towards other pigs. In summary, pigs spent similar amounts of time interacting with straw

  4. Multiple tube premixing device

    DOEpatents

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Naidu, Balachandar; Ziminksy, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin; Stevenson, Christian; Felling, David

    2013-08-13

    The present application provides a premixer for a combustor. The premixer may include a fuel plenum with a number of fuel tubes and a burner tube with a number of air tubes. The fuel tubes extend about the air tubes.

  5. Multiple tube premixing device

    DOEpatents

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin; Stevenson, Christian; Felling, David

    2012-12-11

    The present application provides a premixer for a combustor. The premixer may include a fuel plenum with a number of fuel tubes and a burner tube with a number of air tubes. The fuel tubes extend about the air tubes.

  6. A drift chamber with a new type of straws for operation in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azorskiy, N.; Glonti, L.; Gusakov, Yu.; Elsha, V.; Enik, T.; Kakurin, S.; Kekelidze, V.; Kislov, E.; Kolesnikov, A.; Madigozhin, D.; Movchan, S.; Polenkevich, I.; Potrebenikov, Yu.; Samsonov, V.; Shkarovskiy, S.; Sotnikov, S.; Zinchenko, A.; Danielsson, H.; Bendotti, J.; Degrange, J.; Dixon, N.; Lichard, P.; Morant, J.; Palladino, V.; Gomez, F. Perez; Ruggiero, G.; Vergain, M.

    2016-07-01

    A 2150×2150 mm2 registration area drift chamber capable of working in vacuum is presented. Thin-wall tubes (straws) of a new type are used in the chamber. A large share of these 9.80 mm diameter drift tubes are made in Dubna from metalized 36 μm Mylar film welded along the generatrix using an ultrasonic welding machine created at JINR. The main features of the chamber and some characteristics of the drift tubes are described. Four such chambers with the X, Y, U, V coordinates each, containing 7168 straws in total, are designed and produced at JINR and CERN. They are installed in the vacuum volume of the NA62 setup in order to study the ultra-rare decay K+ →π+ vv bar and to search for and study rare meson decays. In autumn 2014 the chambers were used for the first time for the data taking in the experimental run of the NA62 at CERN's SPS.

  7. Measuring the D0 lifetime at the LHCb Masterclass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trišović, Ana

    2016-04-01

    The LHCb Event Display was made for educational purposes at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The project was implemented as a stand-alone application using C++ and ROOT, a framework developed by CERN for data analysis. This paper outlines the development and architecture of the application in detail, as well as the motivation for the development and the goals of the exercise. The application focuses on the visualization of events recorded by the LHCb detector, where an event represents a set of charged particle tracks in one proton-proton collision. The application allows students to save this information and calculate the invariant mass for any pair of particles. Furthermore, the students can use additional calculating tools in the application and build up a histogram of these invariant masses. The goal for the students is to find a D0 particle in the event, which decays into the two different particles selected by the students. Even if a student doesn't find all the decays successfully, they will be able to complete the exercise and get a meaningful set of results. The application also offers detailed instructions and inline help available in five languages: English, Italian, French, German and Romanian.

  8. SciFi - A large scintillating fibre tracker for LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirn, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. Concept, design and operational parameters are driven by the challenging LHC environment including significant ionising and neutron radiation levels. Over a total active surface of 360 m2 the SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres (∅ = 0.25 mm) read out by state-of-the-art multi-channel Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) arrays. A custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The project is now at the transition from R&D to series production. We will present the evolution of the design and the latest lab and test beam results.

  9. Disk storage management for LHCb based on Data Popularity estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hushchyn, Mikhail; Charpentier, Philippe; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an algorithm providing recommendations for optimizing the LHCb data storage. The LHCb data storage system is a hybrid system. All datasets are kept as archives on magnetic tapes. The most popular datasets are kept on disks. The algorithm takes the dataset usage history and metadata (size, type, configuration etc.) to generate a recommendation report. This article presents how we use machine learning algorithms to predict future data popularity. Using these predictions it is possible to estimate which datasets should be removed from disk. We use regression algorithms and time series analysis to find the optimal number of replicas for datasets that are kept on disk. Based on the data popularity and the number of replicas optimization, the algorithm minimizes a loss function to find the optimal data distribution. The loss function represents all requirements for data distribution in the data storage system. We demonstrate how our algorithm helps to save disk space and to reduce waiting times for jobs using this data.

  10. More lepton flavor violating observables for LHCb's run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadagnoli, Diego; Melikhov, Dmitri; Reboud, Méril

    2016-09-01

    The RK measurement by LHCb suggests non-standard lepton non-universality (LNU) to occur in b → sℓ+ℓ- transitions, with effects in muons rather than electrons. A number of other measurements of b → sℓ+ℓ- transitions by LHCb and B-factories display disagreement with the SM predictions and, remarkably, these discrepancies are consistent in magnitude and sign with the RK effect. Non-standard LNU suggests non-standard lepton flavor violation (LFV) as well, for example in B → Kℓℓ‧ and Bs → ℓℓ‧. There are good reasons to expect that the new effects may be larger for generations closer to the third one. In this case, the Bs → μe decay may be the most difficult to reach experimentally. We propose and study in detail the radiative counterpart of this decay, namely Bs → μeγ, whereby the chiral-suppression factor is replaced by a factor of order α / π. A measurement of this mode would be sensitive to the same physics as the purely leptonic LFV decay and, depending on experimental efficiencies, it may be more accessible. A realistic expectation is a factor of two improvement in statistics for either of the Bd,s modes.

  11. LHCb experience with running jobs in virtual machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNab, A.; Stagni, F.; Luzzi, C.

    2015-12-01

    The LHCb experiment has been running production jobs in virtual machines since 2013 as part of its DIRAC-based infrastructure. We describe the architecture of these virtual machines and the steps taken to replicate the WLCG worker node environment expected by user and production jobs. This relies on the uCernVM system for providing root images for virtual machines. We use the CernVM-FS distributed filesystem to supply the root partition files, the LHCb software stack, and the bootstrapping scripts necessary to configure the virtual machines for us. Using this approach, we have been able to minimise the amount of contextualisation which must be provided by the virtual machine managers. We explain the process by which the virtual machine is able to receive payload jobs submitted to DIRAC by users and production managers, and how this differs from payloads executed within conventional DIRAC pilot jobs on batch queue based sites. We describe our operational experiences in running production on VM based sites managed using Vcycle/OpenStack, Vac, and HTCondor Vacuum. Finally we show how our use of these resources is monitored using Ganglia and DIRAC.

  12. The LHCb Data Acquisition and High Level Trigger Processing Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, M.; Gaspar, C.; Jost, B.; Neufeld, N.

    2015-12-01

    The LHCb experiment at the LHC accelerator at CERN collects collisions of particle bunches at 40 MHz. After a first level of hardware trigger with an output rate of 1 MHz, the physically interesting collisions are selected by running dedicated trigger algorithms in the High Level Trigger (HLT) computing farm. This farm consists of up to roughly 25000 CPU cores in roughly 1750 physical nodes each equipped with up to 4 TB local storage space. This work describes the LHCb online system with an emphasis on the developments implemented during the current long shutdown (LS1). We will elaborate the architecture to treble the available CPU power of the HLT farm and the technicalities to determine and verify precise calibration and alignment constants which are fed to the HLT event selection procedure. We will describe how the constants are fed into a two stage HLT event selection facility using extensively the local disk buffering capabilities on the worker nodes. With the installed disk buffers, the CPU resources can be used during periods of up to ten days without beams. These periods in the past accounted to more than 70% of the total time.

  13. Life cycle assessment of rice straw utilization practices in India.

    PubMed

    Soam, Shveta; Borjesson, Pal; Sharma, Pankaj K; Gupta, Ravi P; Tuli, Deepak K; Kumar, Ravindra

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study is to find potential utilization practice of rice straw in India from an environmental perspective. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is conducted for four most realistic utilization practices of straw including: (1) incorporation into the field as fertilizer (2) animal fodder (3) electricity (4) biogas. The results show that processing of 1 ton straw to electricity and biogas resulted in net reduction of 1471 and 1023kg CO2 eq., 15.0 and 3.4kg SO2 eq. and 6.7 and 7.1kg C2H6 eq. emissions in global warming, acidification and photochemical oxidation creation potential respectively. Electricity production from straw replaces the coal based electricity and resulted in benefits in most of the environmental impacts whereas use as an animal fodder resulted in eutrophication benefits. The burning of straw is a harmful practice of managing straw in India which can be avoided by utilizing straw for bioenergy.

  14. A new system of STRAW chambers operating in vacuum for the NA62 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potrebenikov, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Large 2.15 × 2.15 m2 area straw tube chambers have been developed to meet the specific requirements of the NA62 experiment. The main goal of the NA62 experiment at the CERN SPS is to measure the branching ratio of the ultra-rare decay with 10% accuracy. This can be achieved by detecting about 100 Standard Model events with 10% background in 2 - 3 years of data taking. A low mass tracking system is necessary to achieve a high resolution on kinematic quantities while timing resolution is mandatory to match the outgoing pion with the incoming kaon. Design, construction and first performance are reported.

  15. Straw Rockets Are out of This World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillman, Joan

    2013-01-01

    To capture students' excitement and engage their interest in rocketships and visiting planets in the solar system, the author designed lessons that give students the opportunity to experience the joys and challenges of developing straw rockets, and then observing which design can travel the longest distance. The lessons are appropriate for…

  16. Straw Rockets Are out of This World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillman, Joan

    2013-01-01

    To capture students' excitement and engage their interest in rocketships and visiting planets in the solar system, the author designed lessons that give students the opportunity to experience the joys and challenges of developing straw rockets, and then observing which design can travel the longest distance. The lessons are appropriate for…

  17. Tube Feedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy

    This module on tube feedings is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who work in long-term care. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then provided. A brief discussion follows…

  18. Tube Feedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy

    This module on tube feedings is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who work in long-term care. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then provided. A brief discussion follows…

  19. The Flow and Pressure Relationships in Different Tubes Commonly Used for Semi-occluded Vocal Tract Exercises.

    PubMed

    Amarante Andrade, Pedro; Wistbacka, Greta; Larsson, Hans; Södersten, Maria; Hammarberg, Britta; Simberg, Susanna; Švec, Jan G; Granqvist, Svante

    2016-01-01

    This experimental study investigated the back pressure (P(back)) versus flow (U) relationship for 10 different tubes commonly used for semi-occluded vocal tract exercises, that is, eight straws of different lengths and diameters, a resonance tube, and a silicone tube similar to a Lax Vox tube. All tubes were assessed with the free end in air. The resonance tube and silicone tube were further assessed with the free end under water at the depths from 1 to 7 cm in steps of 1 cm. The results showed that relative changes in the diameter of straws affect P(back) considerably more compared with the same amount of relative change in length. Additionally, once tubes are submerged into water, P(back) needs to overcome the pressure generated by the water depth before flow can start. Under this condition, only a small increase in P(back) was observed as the flow was increased. Therefore, the wider tubes submerged into water produced an almost constant P(back) determined by the water depth, whereas the thinner straws in air produced relatively large changes to P(back) as flow was changed. These differences may be taken advantage of when customizing exercises for different users and diagnoses and optimizing the therapy outcome. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A brief review of measurements of electroweak bosons at the LHCb experiment in LHC Run 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barter, William

    2016-09-01

    The LHCb experiment is one of four major experiments at the large hadron collider (LHC). Despite being designed for the study of beauty and charm particles, it has made important contributions in other areas, such as the production and decay of W and Z bosons. Such measurements can be used to study and constrain parton distribution functions (PDFs), as well as to test perturbative quantum chromodynamics (QCD) in hard scattering processes. The angular structure of Z boson decays to leptons can also be studied and used to measure the weak mixing angle. The phase-space probed by LHCb is particularly sensitive to this quantity, and the LHCb measurement using the dimuon final state is currently the most precise determination of sin2𝜃 eff.lept. at the LHC. LHCb measurements made using data collected during the first period of LHC operations (LHC Run 1) are discussed in this review. The paper also considers the potential impact of related future measurements.

  1. First results with charmless two-body B-decays at LHCb, and future prospects

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    LHCb is an experiment which is designed to perform flavour physics measurements at the LHC. Charged two-body charmless B decays (e.g. B^0 -> Kpi, pipi, B_s->KK, etc) receive significant contributions from loop diagrams and are thus sensitive probes of New Physics. Study of these modes is therefore an important physics goal of LHCb. First results will be presented, using around 37 pb^{-1} of data collected at \\sqrt{s}=7 TeV in 2010. These results illustrate the power of the LHCb trigger system and particle identification capabilities of the RICH detectors in isolating clean samples of each final state, and include preliminary measurements of direct CP-violation in certain key modes. The prospects for these measurements in the coming run will be presented. A brief survey will also be given of results and prospect in other areas of the LHCb physics programme.

  2. First results with charmless two-body B-decays at LHCb, and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-22

    LHCb is an experiment which is designed to perform flavour physics measurements at the LHC. Charged two-body charmless B decays (e.g. B^0 -> Kpi, pipi, B_s->KK, etc) receive significant contributions from loop diagrams and are thus sensitive probes of New Physics. Study of these modes is therefore an important physics goal of LHCb. First results will be presented, using around 37 pb^{-1} of data collected at \\sqrt{s}=7 TeV in 2010. These results illustrate the power of the LHCb trigger system and particle identification capabilities of the RICH detectors in isolating clean samples of each final state, and include preliminary measurements of direct CP-violation in certain key modes. The prospects for these measurements in the coming run will be presented. A brief survey will also be given of results and prospect in other areas of the LHCb physics programme.

  3. [Mechanisms of algal inhibition by rice straw extract].

    PubMed

    Feng, Jing; Zhu, Qing; Wu, Wei-zhong; Rui, Ke-jian; Li, Yan-bo

    2008-12-01

    An indoor experiment was conducted to investigate the inhibition effects and mechanisms of rice straw extracts to the harmful bloom-forming algae, Microcystis aeruginosa. It was found that there were algae inhibitory chemicals in rice straw. The inhabitation ratio of rice straw extract to Microcystis was 69.3% when stored at a low temperature of - 4 degrees C for 4 days with a concentration of 2.5 g/L. The algal inhibition depends on both chemicals and biological responses from decomposed rice straw extracts. Their relative contributions to the algal inhibition depended on decomposition pathway and time. Algal inhibitory chemicals played more important roles in anaerobic decomposed rice straw extracts than aerobic decomposed ones in the algal-inhibition process. For anaerobically decomposed straw extracts, if stored for 15 and 30 days with the concentration of 1.5 g/L, the inhabitation ratio of rice straw to Microcystis was 83% and 46% respectively. However, for aerobically decomposed straw extracts, the biologic mechanism was more important. The inhibition effects of biologic mechanism increased with the decomposition time. For aerobically decomposed straw extracts, if stored for 15 and 30 days with the concentration of 1.5 g/L, the inhabitation ratio of rice straw to Microcystis was 81% and 93% respectively.

  4. On-detector Electronics for the LHCb VELO Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, S.

    2017-02-01

    The LHCb Experiment is designed for precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. The experiment will be upgraded to a trigger-less system reading out the full detector at a 40 MHz event rate with all selection algorithms executed in a CPU farm. The upgraded Vertex Locator will be a hybrid pixel detector read out by the VeloPix ASIC with on-chip zero-suppression. The overview of the system and the design of the VELO on-detector electronics that include the front-end hybrid, the opto-conversion and power distribution boards will be summarised. The results from the evaluation of these prototypes and further enhancement techniques will be discussed.

  5. Radiation hard programmable delay line for LHCb calorimeter upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauricio, J.; Gascón, D.; Vilasís, X.; Picatoste, E.; Machefert, F.; Lefrancois, J.; Duarte, O.; Beigbeder, C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a SPI-programmable clock delay chip based on a Delay Locked Loop (DLL) in order to shift the phase of the LHC clock (25 ns) in steps of 1ns, with less than 5 ps jitter and 23 ps of DNL. The delay lines will be integrated into ICECAL, the LHCb calorimeter front-end analog signal processing ASIC in the near future. The stringent noise requirements on the ASIC imply minimizing the noise contribution of digital components. This is accomplished by implementing the DLL in differential mode. To achieve the required radiation tolerance several techniques are applied: double guard rings between PMOS and NMOS transistors as well as glitch suppressors and TMR Registers. This 5.7 mm2 chip has been implemented in CMOS 0.35 μm technology.

  6. Identification of beauty and charm quark jets at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The LHCb Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    Identification of jets originating from beauty and charm quarks is important for measuring Standard Model processes and for searching for new physics. The performance of algorithms developed to select b- and c-quark jets is measured using data recorded by LHCb from proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV in 2011 and at √s = 8 TeV in 2012. The efficiency for identifying a b(c) jet is about 65%(25%) with a probability for misidentifying a light-parton jet of 0.3% for jets with transverse momentum pT > 20GeV and pseudorapidity 2.2 < η < 4.2. The dependence of the performance on the pT and η of the jet is also measured.

  7. A History-based Estimation for LHCb job requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauschmayr, Nathalie

    2015-12-01

    The main goal of a Workload Management System (WMS) is to find and allocate resources for the given tasks. The more and better job information the WMS receives, the easier will be to accomplish its task, which directly translates into higher utilization of resources. Traditionally, the information associated with each job, like expected runtime, is defined beforehand by the Production Manager in best case and fixed arbitrary values by default. In the case of LHCb's Workload Management System no mechanisms are provided which automate the estimation of job requirements. As a result, much more CPU time is normally requested than actually needed. Particularly, in the context of multicore jobs this presents a major problem, since single- and multicore jobs shall share the same resources. Consequently, grid sites need to rely on estimations given by the VOs in order to not decrease the utilization of their worker nodes when making multicore job slots available. The main reason for going to multicore jobs is the reduction of the overall memory footprint. Therefore, it also needs to be studied how memory consumption of jobs can be estimated. A detailed workload analysis of past LHCb jobs is presented. It includes a study of job features and their correlation with runtime and memory consumption. Following the features, a supervised learning algorithm is developed based on a history based prediction. The aim is to learn over time how jobs’ runtime and memory evolve influenced due to changes in experiment conditions and software versions. It will be shown that estimation can be notably improved if experiment conditions are taken into account.

  8. QUANTIZING TUBE

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, A.S.; Gray, G.W.

    1958-07-01

    Beam deflection tubes are described for use in switching or pulse amplitude analysis. The salient features of the invention reside in the target arrangement whereby outputs are obtained from a plurality of collector electrodes each correspondlng with a non-overlapping range of amplitudes of the input sigmal. The tube is provded with mcans for deflecting the electron beam a1ong a line in accordance with the amplitude of an input signal. The target structure consists of a first dymode positioned in the path of the beam wlth slots spaced a1ong thc deflection line, and a second dymode posltioned behind the first dainode. When the beam strikes the solid portions along the length of the first dymode the excited electrons are multiplied and collected in separate collector electrodes spaced along the beam line. Similarly, the electrons excited when the beam strikes the second dynode are multiplied and collected in separate electrodes spaced along the length of the second dyode.

  9. Neutron tubes

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Reijonen, Jani

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  10. Electron tube

    DOEpatents

    Suyama, Motohiro [Hamamatsu, JP; Fukasawa, Atsuhito [Hamamatsu, JP; Arisaka, Katsushi [Los Angeles, CA; Wang, Hanguo [North Hills, CA

    2011-12-20

    An electron tube of the present invention includes: a vacuum vessel including a face plate portion made of synthetic silica and having a surface on which a photoelectric surface is provided, a stem portion arranged facing the photoelectric surface and made of synthetic silica, and a side tube portion having one end connected to the face plate portion and the other end connected to the stem portion and made of synthetic silica; a projection portion arranged in the vacuum vessel, extending from the stem portion toward the photoelectric surface, and made of synthetic silica; and an electron detector arranged on the projection portion, for detecting electrons from the photoelectric surface, and made of silicon.

  11. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... When your chest tube is inserted, you will lie on your side or sit partly upright, with one arm over your head. Sometimes, ...

  12. Simple and inexpensive method for cryopreservation of fish sperm combining straw and powdered dry ice.

    PubMed

    Yasui, George Shigueki; Arias-Rodriguez, Lenin; Fujimoto, Takafumi; Arai, Katsutoshi

    2008-01-01

    Here, we propose a simple and inexpensive method for fish sperm cryopreservation. Sperm samples of the loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (Teleostei: Cobitidae) were diluted 7-fold by an extender containing 63.5 mM NaCl, 114 mM KCl, 20 mM Tris and 10% methanol. The cryogenic straws were placed in three kinds of self-made tubes which diameter was changed by commercially available materials and then immersed into powdered dry ice for 2 min and plunged into liquid nitrogen. This procedure resulted in a cooling rate at -421.4 +/- 119.84 (control), -55.8 +/- 4.32 (tube 1), -40.2 +/- 3.43 (tube 2) and -33.3 +/- 2.09 C/min (tube 3). In the slowest cooling rate by the tube 3, total motility (72 +/- 3 %), duration (146 +/- 12 s) and hatching rates (29 +/- 04 %) were higher than those by other rates. Progressive motility (83 +/- 5 %) did not differ significantly from fresh samples.

  13. Effect of integrating straw into agricultural soils on soil infiltration and evaporation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jiansheng; Liu, Changming; Zhang, Wanjun; Guo, Yunlong

    2012-01-01

    Soil water movement is a critical consideration for crop yield in straw-integrated fields. This study used an indoor soil column experiment to determine soil infiltration and evaporation characteristics in three forms of direct straw-integrated soils (straw mulching, straw mixing and straw inter-layering). Straw mulching is covering the land surface with straw. Straw mixing is mixing straw with the top 10 cm surface soil. Then straw inter-layering is placing straw at the 20 cm soil depth. There are generally good correlations among the mulch integration methods at p < 0.05, and with average errors/biases <10%. Straw mixing exhibited the best effect in terms of soil infiltration, followed by straw mulching. Due to over-burden weight-compaction effect, straw inter-layering somehow retarded soil infiltration. In terms of soil water evaporation, straw mulching exhibited the best effect. This was followed by straw mixing and then straw inter-layering. Straw inter-layering could have a long-lasting positive effect on soil evaporation as it limited the evaporative consumption of deep soil water. The responses of the direct straw integration modes to soil infiltration and evaporation could lay the basis for developing efficient water-conservation strategies. This is especially useful for water-scarce agricultural regions such as the arid/semi-arid regions of China.

  14. An environmental and economical solution to sound absorption using straw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinnes, Courtney; Kleiner, Mendel; Xiang, Ning

    2005-09-01

    The growing attentiveness to using environmentally friendly materials in the building construction industry as a whole has led many architects to research the use of natural materials. Natural fibers, such as straw, are advantageous due to their accessibility, ease of processing, and their ability to be discarded with a lesser environmental impact through biodegradability. While the material focus may have shifted, the need for quality acoustic environments has remained the same. In a set of preliminary studies, the absorption coefficients of sound absorbers using natural fibers have been proven to have comparable values relative to other highly absorptive, nonenvironmentally friendly materials such as mineral wool and fiberglass. The absorption coefficients were evaluated for octave and third-octave frequencies (125 to 4000 Hz) using the impedance tube method with one microphone. While these absorbers may be acoustically effective as well as environmentally friendly, there may be potential concerns in using natural fibers such as their life span, fire rating, and potential health risks, i.e., disposal techniques, allergenic reactions, and insect and fungus infestation.

  15. Biological nitrate removal using wheat straw and PLA as substrate.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhenxing; Hu, Jun; Wang, Jianlong

    2012-01-01

    Biological nitrate removal using wheat straw and polylactic acid (PLA) as both carbon source and biofilm support was investigated. The results showed that biofilm could develop on the surface of wheat straw within 15 d, the denitrification rate was 0.067 mg-N/(g-wheat straw x h) and nitrate removal efficiency was about 100%. For PLA, the time required for biofilm development was 40 d, the denitrification rate was 0.0026 mg-N/(g-PLA x h) and nitrate removal efficiency could also reach 100%. Temperature had a substantial influence on the denitrification performance of both wheat straw and PLA. The FTIR analysis and SEM observation confirmed that wheat straw and PLA were used for denitrification, and explained some reasons for the differences between the two substrates. The wheat straw was superior to PLA when used as carbon source for nitrate removal, in terms of the denitrification rate.

  16. Growth of Aureobasidium pullulans on straw hydrolysate.

    PubMed Central

    Han, Y W; Cheeke, P R; Anderson, A W; Lekprayoon, C

    1976-01-01

    Growth characteristics and cell properties of Aureobasidium (Pullularia) pullulans were studied. The organism grew well on an acid hydrolysate of ryegrass straw over a wide range of pH and temperature. The optimum temperature and pH for the growth of the organism were 32 degrees C and 5.5, respectively. A cell yield of 1.5 g/liter of straw hydrolysate was obtained. The dried cell mass contained 42.6% crude protein, 0.4% crude fat, and 6.4% nucleic acids. The essential amino acid profile of the microbial protein was comparable to that of Candida utilis. A rat feeding study indicated that the A. pullulans cells were not toxic and that the feed intake, weight gain, and protein efficiency ratio values were superior to those obtained with C. utilis. Once the question of mathogenicity is resolved, A. pullulans could be useful for production of single-cell protein from cellulosic wastes. PMID:12721

  17. In-straw cryoprotectant dilution of IVP bovine blastocysts vitrified in hand-pulled glass micropipettes.

    PubMed

    Vieira, A D; Forell, F; Feltrin, C; Rodrigues, J L

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of two ethylene glycol-based vitrification solutions on in vitro and in vivo survival after in-straw cryoprotectant dilution of vitrified in vitro-produced bovine embryos. Day-7 expanded blastocysts were selected according to diameter (> or = 180 microm) and osmotic characteristics and randomly assigned to one of three groups (i) VSa: vitrification in 40% EG+17.1% SUC+0.1% PVA; (ii) VSb: vitrification in 20% EG+20% DMSO; (iii) control: non-vitrified embryos. Vitrification was performed in hand-pulled glass micropipettes (GMP) and cryoprotectant dilution in 0.25 ml straws after warming in a plastic tube. Embryo viability was assessed by re-expansion and hatching rates after 72 h of IVC and by pregnancy rates after direct transfer of vitrified embryos. No differences in re-expansion rates were observed between vitrified groups after 24 h in culture (VSa=84.5%; VSb=94.8%). However, fewer VSa embryos (55.2%, P<0.05) hatched after 72 h than the VSb (75.8%) and control embryos (80.0%). To evaluate in vivo viability, vitrified embryos (VSa=20; VSb=21) were warmed under field conditions and individually transferred to synchronous recipients. Pregnancy rates (day 60) were similar between groups (VSa=20%; VSb=19%). Greater hatching rates occurred after 72 h of IVC for EG+DMSO than EG+SUC+PVA vitrification solutions. However, using a GMP vitrification container and in-tube warming, both solutions provided similar pregnancy rates after the in-straw cryoprotectant dilution and direct embryo transfer.

  18. Boron-coated straws as a replacement for 3He-based neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L.; Athanasiades, Athanasios; Sun, Liang; Martin, Christopher S.; Lyons, Tom D.; Foss, Michael A.; Haygood, Hal B.

    2011-10-01

    US and international government efforts to equip major seaports with large area neutron detectors, aimed to intercept the smuggling of nuclear materials, have precipitated a critical shortage of 3He gas. It is estimated that the annual demand of 3He for US security applications alone is more than the worldwide supply. This is strongly limiting the prospects of neutron science, safeguards, and other applications that rely heavily on 3He-based detectors. Clearly, alternate neutron detection technologies that can support large sensitive areas, and have low gamma sensitivity and low cost must be developed. We propose a low-cost technology based on long copper tubes (straws), coated on the inside with a thin layer of 10B-enriched boron carbide ( 10B 4C). In addition to the high abundance of boron on Earth and low cost of 10B enrichment, the boron-coated straw (BCS) detector offers distinct advantages over conventional 3He-based detectors, and alternate technologies such as 10BF 3 tubes and 10B-coated rigid tubes. These include better distribution inside moderator assemblies, many-times faster electronic signals, no pressurization, improved gamma-ray rejection, no toxic or flammable gases, and ease of serviceability. We present the performance of BCS detectors dispersed in a solid plastic moderator to address the need for portal monitoring. The design adopts the outer dimensions of currently deployed 3He-based monitors, but takes advantage of the small BCS diameter to achieve a more uniform distribution of neutron converter throughout the moderating material. We show that approximately 63 BCS detectors, each 205 cm long, distributed inside the moderator, can match or exceed the detection efficiency of typical monitors fitted with a 5 cm diameter 3He tube, 187 cm long, pressurized to 3 atm.

  19. Jejunostomy feeding tube

    MedlinePlus

    Feeding - jejunostomy tube; G-J tube; J-tube; Jejunum tube ... Q-tip to clean the skin around the J-tube 1 to 3 times a day with ... To flush the J-tube, follow the instructions your nurse gave you. You will use the syringe to slowly push warm water into ...

  20. Nasogastric feeding tube

    MedlinePlus

    Feeding - nasogastric tube; NG tube; Bolus feeding; Continuous pump feeding; Gavage tube ... If your child has an NG tube, try to keep your child from touching or pulling on the tube. After your nurse teaches you how to flush the tube ...

  1. STRAW - An Integrated Mobility and Traffic Model for VANETs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    STRAW - An Integrated Mobility and Traffic Model for VANETs David R. Choffnes Fabiàn E. Bustamante drchoffnes...3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2005 to 00-00-2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE STRAW - An Integrated Mobility and Traffic Model for VANETs 5a. CONTRACT...STRAW - An Integrated Mobility and Traffic Model for VANETs David R. Choffnes Fabián E. Bustamante Department of Computer Science Northwestern

  2. Lignocarbohydrate Solubilization from Straw by Actinomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Ball, A. S.; Godden, B.; Helvenstein, P.; Penninckx, M. J.; McCarthy, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    Actinomycetes grown on wheat straw solubilized a lignocarbohydrate fraction which could be recovered by acid precipitation. Further characterization of this product (APPL) during growth of Streptomyces sp. strain EC1 revealed an increase in carboxylic acid and phenolic hydroxyl content, suggesting progressive modification. This was also observed in dioxane-extracted lignin fractions of degraded straw, and some similarity was further suggested by comparative infrared spectroscopy. However, the molecular weight profile of APPL was relatively constant during growth of Streptomyces sp. strain EC1 on straw, while analysis of the dioxane-extracted lignin fractions appeared to show fragmentation followed by repolymerization. Lignocarbohydrate solubilization could be monitored in all cultures by routine assay of APPL-associated protein, which accounted for up to 20% of the extracellular culture protein in some cases. Interestingly, this protein fraction was found to include active hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes involved in the degradation of lignocellulose, and specific enzyme activities were often increased in the acid-insoluble fractions of culture supernatants. This was particularly important for peroxidase and veratryl oxidase activities, which could be readily detected in the acid-precipitable lignocarbohydrate complex but were virtually undetectable in untreated culture supernatants. PMID:16348309

  3. Heat and microbial treatments for nutritional upgrading of wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Milstein, O; Vered, Y; Sharma, A; Gressel, J; Flowers, H M

    1986-03-01

    The ligninolytic activities of four cellulolytic organisms were compared using straw. Only Aspergillus japonicus and Polyporous versicolor appreciably degraded lignin with A. japonicus yielding the most protein. In solid culture, most protein was produced by P. versicolor, closely followed by A. japonicus. Pretreatment of the straw by hot water facilitated biodegradation and protein production. The nutritional value of the residual straw was also increased by some fungal cultures. The greatest amount of degradable polysaccharide in the straw was made available by A. japonicus in liquid media and Pleurotus ostreatus in solid media.

  4. Heat and microbial treatments for nutritional upgrading of wheat straw

    SciTech Connect

    Milstein, O.; Vered, Y.; Sharma, A.; Gressel, J.; Flowers, H.M.

    1986-03-01

    The ligninolytic activities of four cellulolytic organisms were compared using straw. Only Aspergillus japonicus and Polyporous versicolor appreciably degraded lignin with A. japonicus yielding the most protein. In solid culture, most protein was produced by P. versicolor, closely followed by A. japonicus. Pertreatment of the straw by hot water facilitated biodegradation and protein production. The nutritional value of the residual straw was also increased by some fungal cultures. The greatest amount of degradable polysaccharide in the straw was made available by A. japonicus in liquid media and Pleurotus ostreatus in solid media. 29 references.

  5. Physical Separation of Straw Stem Components to Reduce Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, John Richard; Thompson, David Neal; Hoskinson, Reed Louis; Shaw, Peter Gordon; Grant, D.R.

    2002-04-01

    In this paper, we describe ongoing efforts to solve challenges to using straw for bioenergy and bioproducts. Among these, silica in straw forms a low-melting eutectic with potassium, causing slag deposits, and chlorides cause corrosion beneath the deposits. Straw consists principally of stems, leaves, sheaths, nodes, awns, and chaff. Leaves and sheaths are higher in silica, while chaff, leaves and nodes are the primary source of fines. Our approach to reducing silica is to selectively harvest the straw stems using an in-field physical separation, leaving the remaining components in the field to build soil organic matter and contribute soil nutrients.

  6. Tube furnace

    DOEpatents

    Foster, Kenneth G.; Frohwein, Eugene J.; Taylor, Robert W.; Bowen, David W.

    1991-01-01

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  7. Tube furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.G.; Frohwein, E.J.; Taylor, R.W.; Bowen, D.W.

    1990-12-31

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  8. Tube furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.G.; Frohwein, E.J.; Taylor, R.W.; Bowen, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  9. Tapered pulse tube for pulse tube refrigerators

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Olson, Jeffrey R.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal insulation of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube refrigerator is maintained by optimally varying the radius of the pulse tube to suppress convective heat loss from mass flux streaming in the pulse tube. A simple cone with an optimum taper angle will often provide sufficient improvement. Alternatively, the pulse tube radius r as a function of axial position x can be shaped with r(x) such that streaming is optimally suppressed at each x.

  10. The LHCb Experience on the Grid from the DIRAC Accounting Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casajús, Adrian; Graciani, Ricardo; Puig, Albert; Vázquez, Ricardo; LHCb Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    DIRAC is the software framework developed by LHCb to manage all its computing operations on the Grid. Since 2003 it has been used for large scale Monte Carlo simulation productions and for user analysis of these data. Since the end of 2009, with the start-up of LHC, DIRAC also takes care of the distribution, reconstruction, selection and analysis of the physics data taken by the detector apparatus. During 2009, DIRAC executed almost 5 million jobs for LHCb. In order to execute this workload slightly over 6 million of pilot jobs were submitted, out of which approximately one third were aborted by the Grid infrastructure. In 2010, thanks to their improved efficiency, DIRAC pilots are able, on average, to match and execute between 2 and 3 LHCb jobs during their lifetime, largely reducing the load on the Grid infrastructure. Given the large amount of submitted jobs and used resources, it becomes essential to store detailed information about their execution to track the behaviour of the system. The DIRAC Accounting system takes care, among other things, to collect and store data concerning the execution of jobs and pilots, making it available to everyone via the public interface of the LHCb DIRAC web portal in the form of time-binned accumulated distributions. The analysis of the raw accounting data stored allow us to improve and debug the system performance, as well as, to give a detailed picture on how LHCb uses its Grid resources. A new tool has been developed to extract the raw records from the DIRAC Accounting database and to transform them into ROOT files for subsequent study. This contribution presents an analysis of such data both for LHCb jobs and the corresponding pilots, including resource usage, number of pilots per job, job efficiency and other relevant variables that will help to further improving the LHCb Grid experience.

  11. Fungal diversity of rice straw for meju fermentation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Ho; Kim, Seon-Hwa; Kwon, Soon-Wo; Lee, Jong-Kyu; Hong, Seung-Beom

    2013-12-01

    Rice straw is closely associated with meju fermentation and it is generally known that the rice straw provides meju with many kinds of microorganisms. In order to elucidate the origin of meju fungi, the fungal diversity of rice straw was examined. Rice straw was collected from 12 Jang factories where meju are produced, and were incubated under nine different conditions by altering the media (MEA, DRBC, and DG18), and temperature (15°C, 25°C, and 35°C). In total, 937 strains were isolated and identified as belonging to 39 genera and 103 species. Among these, Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Eurotium, Fusarium, and Penicillium were the dominant genera. Fusarium asiaticum (56.3%), Cladosporium cladosporioides (48.6%), Aspergillus tubingensis (37.5%), A. oryzae (31.9%), Eurotium repens (27.1%), and E. chevalieri (25.0%) were frequently isolated from the rice straw obtained from many factories. Twelve genera and 40 species of fungi that were isolated in the rice straw in this study were also isolated from meju. Specifically, A. oryzae, C. cladosporioides, E. chevalieri, E. repens, F. asiaticum, and Penicillium polonicum (11.8%), which are abundant species in meju, were also isolated frequently from rice straw. C. cladosporioides, F. asiaticum, and P. polonicum, which are abundant in the low temperature fermentation process of meju fermentation, were frequently isolated from rice straw incubated at 15°C and 25°C, whereas A. oryzae, E. repens, and E. chevalieri, which are abundant in the high temperature fermentation process of meju fermentation, were frequently isolated from rice straw incubated at 25°C and 35°C. This suggests that the mycobiota of rice straw has a large influence in the mycobiota of meju. The influence of fungi on the rice straw as feed and silage for livestock, and as plant pathogens for rice, are discussed as well.

  12. VALIDATION OF FIRESIDE PERFORMANCE INDICES: FOULING/CORROSION EVALUATION OF MDF PARTICLEBOARD AND BLENDS WITH WHEAT STRAW BOARD

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Jay R. Gunderson; Donald P. McCollor

    1999-02-01

    Sauder Woodworking currently fires a large portion of all wood wastes in a boiler producing process steam. It is investigating using particleboard made from wheat straw in its manufacturing process and is concerned with the effects of the inorganics on its boiler. Wheat straw board contains higher ash contents and increased levels of potassium, creating concern over fouling characteristics in Sauder's tight boiler design. In addition, the wheat straw board contains high concentrations of chlorine, which may affect boiler tube corrosion when fired in combination with the particleboard wastes currently generated. Sauder has engaged the services of the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) at the University of North Dakota to investigate the potential detrimental effects of firing blends containing wheat straw on boiler tube fouling and corrosion. Additional funding for this project was provided through the U.S. Department of Energy Jointly Sponsored Research Program (DOE JSRP) project ''Validation of Fireside Performance Indices'' to validate, improve, and expand the PCQUEST (Predictive Coal Quality Effects Screening Tool) program. The PCQUEST fuel database is constantly expanding and adding new fuels, for which the algorithms may need refinement and additional verification in order to accurately predict index values. A key focus is on performing advanced and conventional fuel analyses and adding these analyses to the PCQUEST database. Such fuels include coals of all ranks and origins, upgraded coals, petroleum coke, biomass and biomass-coal blends, and waste materials blended with coal. Since there are differences in the chemical and mineral form of the inorganic content in biomass and substantial differences in organic matrix characteristics, analysis and characterization methods developed for coal fuels may not be applicable. The project was seen to provide an excellent opportunity to test and improve the ability of PCQUEST to handle nontypical soil and

  13. Bioconversion of straw into improved fodder: mycoprotein production and cellulolytic acivity of rice straw decomposing fungi.

    PubMed

    Helal, G A

    2005-06-01

    Sixty two out of the sixty four species of fungal isolates tested could produce both exo-β1,4-gluconase (C1) and endo-β1,4-gluconase (Cx) on pure cellulose and rice straw as carbon source in Czapek's medium. Fifty-eight and fifteen species were able to grow at 25℃ and at 45℃, respectively. Eleven species could grow at both 25℃ and 45℃ while, four species appeared only at 45℃. The most cellulolytic species at 25℃ was Trichoderma koningii producing 1.164 C1 (mg glucose/1 ml culture filtrate/1 hr) and 2.690 Cx on pure cellulose, and 0.889 C1 and 1.810 Cx on rice straw, respectively. At 45℃, the most active thermotolerant species were Aspergillus terreus, followed by A. fumigatus. Talaromyces thermophilus was the highest active thermophilic species followed by Malbranchea sulfurea. Most of these species were also active in fermentation of rice straw at 25 and 45℃ (P<0.05). The most active ones were T. koningii, A. ochraceus and A. terreus, which produced 201.5, 193.1 and 188.1 mg crude protein/g dry straw, respectively.

  14. Bioconversion of Straw Into Improved Fodder: Mycoprotein Production and Cellulolytic Acivity of Rice Straw Decomposing Fungi

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Sixty two out of the sixty four species of fungal isolates tested could produce both exo-β1,4-gluconase (C1) and endo-β1,4-gluconase (Cx) on pure cellulose and rice straw as carbon source in Czapek's medium. Fifty-eight and fifteen species were able to grow at 25℃ and at 45℃, respectively. Eleven species could grow at both 25℃ and 45℃ while, four species appeared only at 45℃. The most cellulolytic species at 25℃ was Trichoderma koningii producing 1.164 C1 (mg glucose/1 ml culture filtrate/1 hr) and 2.690 Cx on pure cellulose, and 0.889 C1 and 1.810 Cx on rice straw, respectively. At 45℃, the most active thermotolerant species were Aspergillus terreus, followed by A. fumigatus. Talaromyces thermophilus was the highest active thermophilic species followed by Malbranchea sulfurea. Most of these species were also active in fermentation of rice straw at 25 and 45℃ (P<0.05). The most active ones were T. koningii, A. ochraceus and A. terreus, which produced 201.5, 193.1 and 188.1 mg crude protein/g dry straw, respectively. PMID:24049480

  15. Tube-in-tube thermophotovoltaic generator

    DOEpatents

    Ashcroft, John; Campbell, Brian; DePoy, David

    1998-01-01

    A thermophotovoltaic device includes at least one thermal radiator tube, a cooling tube concentrically disposed within each thermal radiator tube and an array of thermophotovoltaic cells disposed on the exterior surface of the cooling tube. A shell having a first end and a second end surrounds the thermal radiator tube. Inner and outer tubesheets, each having an aperture corresponding to each cooling tube, are located at each end of the shell. The thermal radiator tube extends within the shell between the inner tubesheets. The cooling tube extends within the shell through the corresponding apertures of the two inner tubesheets to the corresponding apertures of the two outer tubesheets. A plurality of the thermal radiator tubes can be arranged in a staggered or an in-line configuration within the shell.

  16. Tube-in-tube thermophotovoltaic generator

    DOEpatents

    Ashcroft, J.; Campbell, B.; DePoy, D.

    1998-06-30

    A thermophotovoltaic device includes at least one thermal radiator tube, a cooling tube concentrically disposed within each thermal radiator tube and an array of thermophotovoltaic cells disposed on the exterior surface of the cooling tube. A shell having a first end and a second end surrounds the thermal radiator tube. Inner and outer tubesheets, each having an aperture corresponding to each cooling tube, are located at each end of the shell. The thermal radiator tube extends within the shell between the inner tubesheets. The cooling tube extends within the shell through the corresponding apertures of the two inner tubesheets to the corresponding apertures of the two outer tubesheets. A plurality of the thermal radiator tubes can be arranged in a staggered or an in-line configuration within the shell. 8 figs.

  17. Bioconversion of Straw into Improved Fodder: Preliminary Treatment of Rice Straw Using Mechanical, Chemical and/or Gamma Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Crude protein (CP) content of mechanically ground rice straw into small particles by an electric grinder and reducing value (RV) and soluble protein (SP) in the culture filtrate were lower than that of the chopped straw into 5~6 cm lengths when both ground and chopped straws were fermented with Aspergillus ochraceus, A. terreus or Trichoderma koningii, at steady conditions. The reduction rate of RV, SP and CP was 22.2, 2.4, 7.3%; 9.1, 4.9, 8.5% or 0.0, 0.0, 3.6% for the three fungi, respectively. Chemical pretreatment of straw by soaking in NH4OH for a day caused significant increase in CP of the fermented straw than the other alkali and acidic pretreatments. Gamma irradiation pretreatment of dry and wet straw with water, specially at higher doses, 100, 200 or 500 kGy, caused significant increase in RV and SP as CP in the fermented straw by any of these fungi. Chemical-physical combination pretreatment of rice straw reduced the applied dose of gamma irradiation required for increasing fermentable ability of fungi from 500 kGy to 10 kGy with approximately the same results. Significant increases in RV and SP of fermented straw generally occurred as the dose of gamma irradiation for pretreated straw, which combined with NH4OH, gradually rose. Whereas, the increase percentage in CP of fermented straw that was pretreated by NH4OH-10 kGy was 12.4%, 15.4% or 8.6% for A. ochraceus, A. terreus or T. koningii, respectively. PMID:24039464

  18. Coproduction of xylose, lignosulfonate and ethanol from wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shengdong; Huang, Wangxiang; Huang, Wenjing; Wang, Ke; Chen, Qiming; Wu, Yuanxin

    2015-06-01

    A novel integrated process to coproduce xylose, lignosulfonate and ethanol from wheat straw was investigated. Firstly, wheat straw was treated by dilute sulfuric acid and xylose was recovered from its hydrolyzate. Its optimal conditions were 1.0wt% sulfuric acid, 10% (w/v) wheat straw loading, 100°C, and 2h. Then the acid treated wheat straw was treated by sulfomethylation reagent and its hydrolyzate containing lignosulfonate was directly recovered. Its optimal conditions were 150°C, 15% (w/v) acid treated wheat straw loading, and 5h. Finally, the two-step treated wheat straw was converted to ethanol through enzymatic hydrolysis and microbial fermentation. Under optimal conditions, 1kg wheat straw could produce 0.225kg xylose with 95% purity, 4.16kg hydrolyzate of sulfomethylation treatment containing 5.5% lignosulfonate, 0.183kg ethanol and 0.05kg lignin residue. Compared to present technology, this process is a potential economically profitable wheat straw biorefinery.

  19. Coffee Stirrers and Drinking Straws as Disposable Spatulas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turano, Morgan A.; Lobuono, Cinzia; Kirschenbaum, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    Although metal spatulas are damaged through everyday use and become discolored and corroded by chemical exposure, plastic drinking straws are inexpensive, sterile, and disposable, reducing the risk of cross-contamination during laboratory procedures. Drinking straws are also useful because they come in a variety of sizes; narrow sample containers…

  20. Aragonite straw stalactite collected in Minamidaito-Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terukina, A.; Tanahara, A.

    2012-12-01

    Naturally, the crystal structure of the straw stalactite forms a calcite type. However, the straw of aragonite type was found at Hoshino cave in Minamidaito-Island, Okinawa, Japan. We have been trying to characterize the factor of forming aragonite straw in cave environment. The growth rate of the straw was measured using by 210Pb excess method, and the average growth rate was estimated to be 3.5 mm/year which is similar to that of calcite straw collected from the same cave. From the results of powder X-ray diffractometry, aragonite straws contain partly calcite phase with high Mg. The chemical compositions in the dripping water were also measured by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry and Ion Chromatography. Concentrations of Mg in the dripping water from aragonite straws were not very high compared with that from calcite. This could indicate that Mg may not be a main factor of forming aragonite in this cave environment. The results of crystal structure of host rock by powder X-ray diffractometry showed calcite type. Because the forming aragonite straws seem to have various factors, continued observation and study is currently in progress.

  1. Thermal transitions of the amorphous polymers in wheat straw

    Treesearch

    Wolfgang Stelte; Craig Clemons; Jens K. Holm; Jesper Ahrenfeldt; Ulrik B. Henriksen; Anand R. Sanadi

    2011-01-01

    The thermal transitions of the amorphous polymers in wheat straw were investigated using dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The study included both natural and solvent extracted wheat straw, in moist (8–9% water content) and dry conditions, and was compared to spruce samples. Under these conditions two transitions arising from the glass transition of lignin...

  2. Coffee Stirrers and Drinking Straws as Disposable Spatulas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turano, Morgan A.; Lobuono, Cinzia; Kirschenbaum, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    Although metal spatulas are damaged through everyday use and become discolored and corroded by chemical exposure, plastic drinking straws are inexpensive, sterile, and disposable, reducing the risk of cross-contamination during laboratory procedures. Drinking straws are also useful because they come in a variety of sizes; narrow sample containers…

  3. Temporal Changes in Tall Fescue Straw Residue Degradation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In grass seed agriculture, straw residue is a byproduct. Traditionally it has been thought of as a “waste” product yielding little additional net income to the grower. Straw residue can be baled and sold to Asian or local markets, open field burned, or flailed and left on the soil surface or incorpo...

  4. Bioethanol production from rice straw by popping pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rice straw has considerable potential as a raw material for bioethanol production. Popping pretreatment of rice straw prior to downstream enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation was found to increase cellulose to glucose conversion efficiency. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of popping pretreatment and determine the optimal enzyme loading using a surface response design. Results The optimal doses of cellulase and xylanase enzymes were 23 FPU and 62 IU/g biomass, respectively. Using the optimized enzyme condition and popping pretreatment of rice straw (15% substrate loading, w/v), a sugar recovery of 0.567 g/g biomass (glucose; 0.394 g/g) was obtained in 48 h, which was significantly higher than that from untreated rice straw (total sugar recovery; 0.270 g/g biomass). Fermentation of the hydrolyzates by Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in 0.172 g ethanol/g biomass after 24 h, equivalent to 80.9% of the maximum theoretical yield (based on the amount of glucose in raw material). Changes in the chemical composition and surface area of rice straw were also investigated before and after popping pretreatment. The results showed little or no difference in chemical composition between the pretreated rice straw and the control. However, the surface area of pretreated rice straw increased twofold compared to the control. Conclusion Popping pretreatment of rice straw can effectively improve downstream saccharification and fermentation, important for bioethanol production. PMID:24286244

  5. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector and its performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, S.

    2017-02-01

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the LHC, designed to perform high precision studies of B and D hadrons. In Run II of the LHC, a new scheme for the software trigger at LHCb allows splitting the triggering of events in two stages, giving room to perform the detector alignment and calibration in real time. In the novel detector alignment and calibration strategy for Run II, data collected at the start of the fill are processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment constants, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. This allows identical constants to be used in the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline selected events. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The larger timing budget, available in the trigger, allows us to perform the same track reconstruction online and offline. This enables LHCb to achieve the best reconstruction performance already in the trigger, and allows physics analyses to be performed directly on the data produced by the trigger reconstruction. The novel real-time processing strategy at LHCb is discussed from both the technical and operational point of view. The overall performance of the LHCb detector on the data of Run II is presented as well.

  6. Evaluation of Biogas Production Performance and Dynamics of the Microbial Community in Different Straws.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Liu, Yan-Hua; Zhang, Xin; Ge, Chang-Ming; Piao, Ren-Zhe; Wang, Wei-Dong; Cui, Zong-Jun; Zhao, Hong-Yan

    2017-03-28

    The development and utilization of crop straw biogas resources can effectively alleviate the shortage of energy, environmental pollution, and other issues. This study performed a continuous batch test at 35°C to assess the methane production potential and volatile organic acid contents using the modified Gompertz equation. Illumina MiSeq platform sequencing, which is a sequencing method based on sequencing-by-synthesis, was used to compare the archaeal community diversity, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to analyze the bacterial community diversity in rice straw, dry maize straw, silage maize straw, and tobacco straw. The results showed that cumulative gas production values for silage maize straw, rice straw, dry maize straw, and tobacco straw were 4,870, 4,032.5, 3,907.5, and 3,628.3 ml/g ·VS , respectively, after 24 days. Maximum daily gas production values of silage maize straw and rice straw were 1,025 and 904.17 ml/g ·VS, respectively, followed by tobacco straw and dry maize straw. The methane content of all four kinds of straws was > 60%, particularly that of silage maize straw, which peaked at 67.3%. Biogas production from the four kinds of straw was in the order silage maize straw > rice straw > dry maize straw > tobacco straw, and the values were 1,166.7, 1,048.4, 890, and 637.4 ml/g ·VS, respectively. The microbial community analysis showed that metabolism was mainly carried out by acetate-utilizing methanogens, and that Methanosarcina was the dominant archaeal genus in the four kinds of straw, and the DGGE bands belonged to the phyla Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Chloroflexi. Silage maize is useful for biogas production because it contains four kinds of straw.

  7. Straw pellets as fuel in biomass combustion units

    SciTech Connect

    Andreasen, P.; Larsen, M.G.

    1996-12-31

    In order to estimate the suitability of straw pellets as fuel in small combustion units, the Danish Technological Institute accomplished a project including a number of combustion tests in the energy laboratory. The project was part of the effort to reduce the use of fuel oil. The aim of the project was primarily to test straw pellets in small combustion units, including the following: ash/slag conditions when burning straw pellets; emission conditions; other operational consequences; and necessary work performance when using straw pellets. Five types of straw and wood pellets made with different binders and antislag agents were tested as fuel in five different types of boilers in test firings at 50% and 100% nominal boiler output.

  8. Promising cellulolytic fungi isolates for rice straw degradation.

    PubMed

    Pedraza-Zapata, Diana Catalina; Sánchez-Garibello, Andrea Melissa; Quevedo-Hidalgo, Balkys; Moreno-Sarmiento, Nubia; Gutiérrez-Rojas, Ivonne

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of eight fungal isolates obtained from soils in rice crops for straw degradation in situ. From the initial eight isolates, Pleurotus ostreatus T1.1 and Penicillium sp. HC1 were selected for further characterization based on qualitative cellulolytic enzyme production and capacity to use rice straw as a sole carbon source. Subsequently, cellulolytic, xylanolytic, and lignolytic (Pleurotus ostreatus) activity on carboxymethyl cellulose, oat xylan, and rice straw with different nitrogen sources was evaluated. From the results obtained it was concluded both isolates are capable to produce enzymes necessary for rice straw degradation. However, their production is dependent upon carbon and nitrogen source. Last, it was established that Pleurotus ostreatus T1.1 and Penicillium sp. HC1 capability to colonize and mineralize rice straw, in mono-and co-culture, without affecting nitrogen soil content.

  9. Wheat straw: An inefficient substrate for rapid natural lignocellulosic composting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Jia, Yangyang; Zhang, Xiaomei; Feng, Xihong; Wu, Jinjuan; Wang, Lushan; Chen, Guanjun

    2016-06-01

    Composting is a promising method for the management of agricultural wastes. However, results for wheat straw composts with different carbon-to-nitrogen ratios revealed that wheat straw was only partly degraded after composting for 25days, with hemicellulose and cellulose content decreasing by 14% and 33%, respectively. No significant changes in community structure were found after composting according to 454-pyrosequencing. Bacterial communities were represented by Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes throughout the composting process, including relatively high abundances of pathogenic microbes such as Pseudomonas and Flexibacter, suggesting that innocent treatment of the composts had not been achieved. Besides, the significant lignocellulose degrader Thermomyces was not the exclusively dominant fungus with relative abundance only accounting for 19% of fungal communities. These results indicated that comparing with maize straw, wheat straw was an inefficient substrate for rapid natural lignocellulose-based composting, which might be due to the recalcitrance of wheat straw.

  10. Study for the LHCb upgrade read-out board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachemiche, J.-P.; Duval, P.-Y.; Hachon, F.; Le Gac, R.; Marin, F.

    2010-12-01

    The LHCb experiment envisages to upgrade its readout electronics in order to increase the readout rate from 1 MHz to 40 MHz. This electronics upgrade is very challenging, since readout boards will have to handle a higher number of serial links with an increased bandwidth. In addition, the new communication protocol (GBT) developed by the CERN micro-electronics group mixes data acquisition, slow control and clock distribution on the same link. To explore the feasibility of such a readout system, elementary building blocks have been studied. Their goals are multiple: understand signal integrity when using highly integrated high speed serial links running at 8 - 10 Gbits/s; test the implementation of the GBT protocol within FPGAs; understand advantages and limitations of commercial standard with a predefined interconnection topology; validate ideas on how to control easily such a system. We designed two boards compliant with the xTCA standard which meets an increasing interest in the physics community. The first one is a generic handling 32 high speed serial links. The second one is a communication switch allowing the generic boards to communicate together. In this paper, we present jitter measurements obtained at 8 Gbits/s on serial link. We describe the versatility of this architecture which can be tuned from basic acquisition systems to more high-end complex ones. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of a low cost scalable control system based on NIOS core embedded in FPGAs.

  11. Jet reconstruction in LHCb searching for Higgs-like particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camboni, Alessandro

    2009-06-01

    One of the greatest challenges in High Energy Physics is the discovery of the Higgs boson which is responsible for the Standard Model particles mass generation. Below ~150 GeV/c2 the Higgs decay into two b-quarks, H → bbar b dominates. The two quarks form a string which fragments, giving rise to hadronization in jets containing b-hadrons. The study is focused on the channel where the Higgs boson is produced in association with a gauge boson decaying leptonically H + W → bbar b + lv and H + Z → bbar b + ll and Higgs masses are in the range 115 - 140 GeV/c2. The gauge bosons decay produces hard leptons quite often isolated from the b-jets. Hence an isolated lepton with high transverse momentum is required in order to reject the large QCD background. The aim of this work is to explore the feasibility to observe Higgs-like particles at the LHCb experiment at CERN by exploiting the detector capabilities to identify b-jets.

  12. The LHCb Simulation Application, Gauss: Design, Evolution and Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemencic, M.; Corti, G.; Easo, S.; Jones, C. R.; Miglioranzi, S.; Pappagallo, M.; Robbe, P.; LHCb Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The LHCb simulation application, Gauss, is based on the Gaudi framework and on experiment basic components such as the Event Model and Detector Description. Gauss also depends on external libraries for the generation of the primary events (PYTHIA 6, EvtGen, etc.) and on GEANT4 for particle transport in the experimental setup. The application supports the production of different types of events from minimum bias to B physics signals and particle guns. It is used for purely generator-level studies as well as full simulations. Gauss is used both directly by users and in massive central productions on the grid. The design and implementation of the application and its evolution due to evolving requirements will be described as in the case of the recently adopted Python-based configuration or the possibility of taking into account detectors conditions via a Simulation Conditions database. The challenge of supporting at the same time the flexibililty needed for the different tasks for which it is used, from evaluation of physics reach to background modeling, together with the stability and reliabilty of the code will also be described.

  13. Optimization of Large Scale HEP Data Analysis in LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remenska, Daniela; Aaij, Roel; Raven, Gerhard; Merk, Marcel; Templon, Jeff; Bril, Reinder J.; LHCb Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    Observation has lead to a conclusion that the physics analysis jobs run by LHCb physicists on a local computing farm (i.e. non-grid) require more efficient access to the data which resides on the Grid. Our experiments have shown that the I/O bound nature of the analysis jobs in combination with the latency due to the remote access protocols (e.g. rfio, dcap) cause a low CPU efficiency of these jobs. In addition to causing a low CPU efficiency, the remote access protocols give rise to high overhead (in terms of amount of data transferred). This paper gives an overview of the concept of pre-fetching and caching of input files in the proximity of the processing resources, which is exploited to cope with the I/O bound analysis jobs. The files are copied from Grid storage elements (using GridFTP), while concurrently performing computations, inspired from a similar idea used in the ATLAS experiment. The results illustrate that this file staging approach is relatively insensitive to the original location of the data, and a significant improvement can be achieved in terms of the CPU efficiency of an analysis job. Dealing with scalability of such a solution on the Grid environment is discussed briefly.

  14. γ Determination from TREE Decays (B → DK) with LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tilburg, J.

    2008-12-01

    Direct measurements of the angle γ of the CKM unitarity triangle still have a relatively large uncertainty. B → DK decays provide a theoretically clean way of measuring γ, as they involve only tree diagrams. LHCb will measure γ using various methods. One method uses the B0s -> D∓ sK± decay, where CP violation can be measured from the time-dependent decay rates. The corresponding sensitivity on γ with 2 fb-1 of data is expected to be about 13°. Other methods use B → D0K decays, where the D0 and /line{D}0 decay into the same final state. With the ADS+GLW strategy the sensitivity ranges between 5-15° for the charged B decays and between 7-10° for the neutral B decays. With the Dalitz method the sensitivity is estimated to be 8° using charged B decays. Combining all methods a sensitivity on γ with 2 fb-1 of data is estimated to be roughly 5°.

  15. A Monitoring System for the LHCb Data Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, João; Gaspar, Clara; Jost, Beat; Frank, Markus; Cardoso, Luis G.

    2017-06-01

    The LHCb experiment uses the LHC accelerator for the collisions that produce the physics data necessary for analysis. The data produced by the detector by measuring the results of the collisions at a rate of 40 MHz are read out by a complex data acquisition (DAQ) system, which is summarily described in this paper. Distributed systems of such dimensions rely on monitoring and control systems that account for the numerous faults that can happen throughout the whole operation. With this in mind, a new system was created to extend the monitoring of the readout system, in this case by providing an overview of what is happening in each stage of the DAQ process, starting in the hardware trigger performed right after the detector measurements and ending in the local storage of the experiment. This system, a complement to the current run control (experimental control system), intends to shorten reaction times when a problem occurs by providing the operators with detailed information of where a certain fault is occurring. The architecture of the tool and its utilization by the experiment operators are described in this paper.

  16. Gaseous and particulate emission profiles during controlled rice straw burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchis, E.; Ferrer, M.; Calvet, S.; Coscollà, C.; Yusà, V.; Cambra-López, M.

    2014-12-01

    Burning of rice straw can emit considerable amounts of atmospheric pollutants. We evaluated the effect of rice straw moisture content (5%, 10%, and 20%) on the emission of carbon dioxide (CO2) and on the organic and inorganic constituents of released particulate matter (PM): dioxins, heavy metals, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Four burning tests were conducted per moisture treatment using the open chamber method. Additionally, combustion characteristics, including burning stages, durations, temperature, and relative humidity, were recorded. Burning tests showed flaming and smoldering stages were significantly longer in 20% moisture treatment (P < 0.05) compared with the rest. The amount of burned straw and ashes decreased with increasing straw moisture content (P < 0.001). Carbon dioxide was the main product obtained during combustion with emission values ranging from 692 g CO2 kg dry straw-1 (10% moisture content) to 835 g CO2 kg dry straw-1 (20% moisture content). Emission factors for PM were the highest in 20% moisture treatment (P < 0.005). Fine PM (PM2.5) accounted for more than 60% of total PM mass. Emission factors for dioxins increased with straw moisture content, being the highest in 20% moisture treatment, although showing a wide variability among burning tests (P > 0.05). Emissions factors for heavy metals were low and similar among moisture treatments (P > 0.05). Emission factors for individual PAHs were generally higher in 20% moisture treatment. Overall, emission factors of atmospheric pollutants measured in our study were higher in the 20% moisture content. This difference could be attributed to the incomplete combustion at higher levels of rice straw moisture content. According to our results, rice straw burning should be done after straw drying and under minimal moisture conditions to lower pollutant emission levels.

  17. On-farm conversion of straw to bioenergy – A value added solution to grass seed straw

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Knowledge of the geospatial distribution of straw from grass seed and cereal production in the PNW is vital to the accuracy and reliability of feasibility studies comparing scales of operation of proposed bioenergy conversion plants. The first step in identifying optimum locations for straw-based bi...

  18. New type of drift tubes for gas-discharge detectors operating in vacuum: Production technology and quality control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azorskii, N. I.; Gusakov, Yu. V.; Elsha, V. V.; Enik, T. L.; Ershov, Yu. V.; Kekelidze, V. D.; Kislov, E. M.; Kolesnikov, A. O.; Madigozhin, D. T.; Movchan, S. A.; Polenkevich, I. A.; Potrebenikov, Yu. K.; Samsonov, V. A.; Shkarovskiy, S. N.; Sotnikov, A. N.; Volkov, A. D.; Zinchenko, A. I.

    2017-01-01

    A device for fabricating thin-wall (straw) drift tubes using polyethylene terephthalate film 36 μm thick by ultrasonic welding is described together with the technique for controlling their quality. The joint width amounts to 0.4-1.0 mm. The joint breaking strength is 31.9 kg/mm2. The argon leakage from a tube of volume 188.6 cm3 under a pressure gradient of 1.0 atm does not exceed 0.3 × 10-3 cm3/min, which is mainly related to the absence of metallization in the joint vicinity. The high strength, the low tensile creep due to the absence of glued layers, the small value of gas leakage makes the new tubes capable of reliable and long-term operation in vacuum, which is confirmed by the operation of 7168 straw tubes for two years in the NA62 experiment.

  19. Tracheostomy tube - eating

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000464.htm Tracheostomy tube - eating To use the sharing features on this ... you swallow foods or liquids. Eating and Tracheostomy Tubes When you get your tracheostomy tube, or trach, ...

  20. Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Birth defects & other health conditions > Neural tube defects Neural tube defects E-mail to a friend Please ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Neural tube defects (NTDs) are birth defects of the ...

  1. Heat exchanger tube mounts

    DOEpatents

    Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.; Dawson, B.E.

    1974-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which tubes are secured to a tube sheet by internal bore welding is described. The tubes may be moved into place in preparation for welding with comparatively little trouble. A number of segmented tube support plates are provided which allow a considerable portion of each of the tubes to be moved laterally after the end thereof has been positioned in preparation for internal bore welding to the tube sheet. (auth)

  2. Tube-shape verifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, A. N.; Christ, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    Inexpensive apparatus checks accuracy of bent tubes. Assortment of slotted angles and clamps is bolted down to flat aluminum plate outlining shape of standard tube bent to desired configuration. Newly bent tubes are then checked against this outline. Because parts are bolted down, tubes can be checked very rapidly without disturbing outline. One verifier per tube-bending machine can really speed up production in tube-bending shop.

  3. Microbial Activity and Silica Degradation in Rice Straw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Esther Jin-kyung

    Abundantly available agricultural residues like rice straw have the potential to be feedstocks for bioethanol production. Developing optimized conditions for rice straw deconstruction is a key step toward utilizing the biomass to its full potential. One challenge associated with conversion of rice straw to bioenergy is its high silica content as high silica erodes machinery. Another obstacle is the availability of enzymes that hydrolyze polymers in rice straw under industrially relevant conditions. Microbial communities that colonize compost may be a source of enzymes for bioconversion of lignocellulose to products because composting systems operate under thermophilic and high solids conditions that have been shown to be commercially relevant. Compost microbial communities enriched on rice straw could provide insight into a more targeted source of enzymes for the breakdown of rice straw polysaccharides and silica. Because rice straw is low in nitrogen it is important to understand the impact of nitrogen concentrations on the production of enzyme activity by the microbial community. This study aims to address this issue by developing a method to measure microbial silica-degrading activity and measure the effect of nitrogen amendment to rice straw on microbial activity and extracted enzyme activity during a high-solids, thermophilic incubation. An assay was developed to measure silica-degrading enzyme or silicase activity. This process included identifying methods of enzyme extraction from rice straw, identifying a model substrate for the assay, and optimizing measurement techniques. Rice straw incubations were conducted with five different levels of nitrogen added to the biomass. Microbial activity was measured by respiration and enzyme activity. A microbial community analysis was performed to understand the shift in community structure with different treatments. With increased levels of nitrogen, respiration and cellulose and hemicellulose degrading activity

  4. An Information System to Access Status Information of the LHCb Online

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, M.; Gaspar, C.

    2012-12-01

    The LHCb collaboration consists of roughly 700 physicists from 52 institutes and universities. Most of the collaborating physicists - including subdetector experts - are not permanently based at CERN. This paper describes the architecture used to publish data internal to the LHCb experiment control- and data acquisition system to the World Wide Web. Collaborators can access the online (sub-) system status and the system performance directly from the institute abroad, from home or from a smart phone without the need of direct access to the online computing infrastructure.

  5. Test of the photon detection system for the LHCb RICH Upgrade in a charged particle beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baszczyk, M. K.; Benettoni, M.; Calabrese, R.; Cardinale, R.; Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Cavallero, G.; Cojocariu, L.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dorosz, P. A.; Easo, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Fiorini, M.; Frei, C.; Gambetta, S.; Gibson, V.; Gotti, C.; Harnew, N.; He, J.; Keizer, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Maciuc, F.; Maino, M.; Malaguti, R.; Matteuzzi, C.; McCann, M.; Morris, A.; Muheim, F.; Papanestis, A.; Pessina, G.; Petrolini, A.; Piedigrossi, D.; Pistone, A.; Placinta, V. M.; Sigurdsson, S.; Simi, G.; Smith, J.; Spradlin, P.; Tomassetti, L.; Wotton, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded to make more efficient use of the available luminosity at the LHC in Run III and extend its potential for discovery. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors are key components of the LHCb detector for particle identification. In this paper we describe the setup and the results of tests in a charged particle beam, carried out to assess prototypes of the upgraded opto-electronic chain from the Multi-Anode PMT photosensor to the readout and data acquisition system.

  6. TORCH - Cherenkov and Time-of-Flight PID Detector for the LHCb Upgrade at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Föhl, K.; Brook, N.; Castillo García, L.; Conneely, T.; Cussans, D.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Milnes, J.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros Garcì a, A.; van Dijk, M.

    2016-05-01

    TORCH is a large-area precision time-of-flight detector, based on Cherenkov light production and propagation in a quartz radiator plate, which is read out at its edges. TORCH is proposed for the LHCb experiment at CERN to provide positive particle identification for kaons, and is currently in the Research-and-Development phase. A brief overview of the micro-channel plate photon sensor development, the custom-made electronics, and an introduction to the current test beam activities is given. Optical readout solutions are presented for the potential use of BaBar DIRC bar boxes as part of the TORCH configuration in LHCb.

  7. Implementing a Domain Specific Language to configure and run LHCb Continuous Integration builds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemencic, M.; Couturier, B.

    2015-12-01

    The new LHCb nightly build system described at CHEP 2013 was limited by the use of JSON files for its configuration. JSON had been chosen as a temporary solution to maintain backward compatibility towards the old XML format by means of a translation function. Modern languages like Python leverage on meta-programming techniques to enable the development of Domain Specific Languages (DSLs). In this contribution we will present the advantages of such techniques and how they have been used to implement a DSL that can be used to both describe the configuration of the LHCb Nightly Builds and actually operate them.

  8. Soil bacterial community shifts associated with sugarcane straw removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, Laisa; Gumiere, Thiago; Andreote, Fernando; Cerri, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    In Brazil, the adoption of the mechanical unburned sugarcane harvest potentially increase the quantity of residue left in the field after harvesting. Economically, this material has a high potential for second generation ethanol (2G) production. However, crop residues have an essential role in diverse properties and processes in the soil. The greater part of the uncertainties about straw removal for 2G ethanol production is based on its effects in soil microbial community. In this sense, it is important to identify the main impacts of sugarcane straw removal on soil microbial community. Therefore, we conducted a field study, during one year, in Valparaíso (São Paulo state - Brazil) to evaluate the effects of straw decomposition on soil bacterial community. Specifically, we wanted: i) to compare the rates of straw removal and ii) to evaluate the effects of straw decomposition on soil bacterial groups over one year. The experiment was in a randomized block design with treatments arranged in strip plot. The treatments are different rates of sugarcane straw removal, namely: no removal, 50, 75 and 100% of straw removal. Soil sampling was carried out at 0, 4, 8 and 12 months after the sugarcane harvest (August 2015). Total DNA was extracted from soil using the PowersoilTM DNA Isolation kit. And the abundance of bacterial in each soil sample was estimated via quantification of 16S rRNA gene. The composition of the bacterial communities was estimated via terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis, and the T-RF sizes were performed on a 3500 Genetic Analyzer. Finally, the results were examined with GeneMapper 4.1 software. There was bacterial community shifts through the time and among the rates of sugarcane straw removal. Bacterial community was firstly determined by the time scale, which explained 29.16% of total variation. Rates of straw removal explained 11.55% of shifts on bacterial community. Distribution through the time is an important

  9. The PCIe-based readout system for the LHCb experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachemiche, J. P.; Duval, P. Y.; Hachon, F.; Le Gac, R.; Réthoré, F.

    2016-02-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study differences between particles and anti-particles as well as very rare decays in the beauty and charm sector at the LHC. The detector will be upgraded in 2019 in order to significantly increase its efficiency, by removing the first-level hardware trigger. The upgrade experiment will implement a trigger-less readout system in which all the data from every LHC bunch-crossing are transported to the computing farm over 12000 optical links without hardware filtering. The event building and event selection are carried out entirely in the farm. Another original feature of the system is that data transmitted through these fibres arrive directly to computers through a specially designed PCIe card called PCIe40. The same board handles the data acquisition flow and the distribution of fast and slow controls to the detector front-end electronics. It embeds one of the most powerful FPGAs currently available on the market with 1.2 million logic cells. The board has a bandwidth of 480 Gbits/s in both input and output over optical links and 100 Gbits/s over the PCI Express bus to the CPU. We will present how data circulate through the board and in the PC server for achieving the event building. We will focus on specific issues regarding the design of such a board with a very large FPGA, in particular in terms of power supply dimensioning and thermal simulations. The features of the board will be detailed and we will finally present the first performance measurements.

  10. Dynamics of Potassium Release and Adsorption on Rice Straw Residue

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jifu; Lu, Jianwei; Li, Xiaokun; Ren, Tao; Cong, Rihuan; Zhou, Li

    2014-01-01

    Straw application can not only increase crop yields, improve soil structure and enrich soil fertility, but can also enhance water and nutrient retention. The aim of this study was to ascertain the relationships between straw decomposition and the release-adsorption processes of K+. This study increases the understanding of the roles played by agricultural crop residues in the soil environment, informs more effective straw recycling and provides a method for reducing potassium loss. The influence of straw decomposition on the K+ release rate in paddy soil under flooded condition was studied using incubation experiments, which indicated the decomposition process of rice straw could be divided into two main stages: (a) a rapid decomposition stage from 0 to 60 d and (b) a slow decomposition stage from 60 to 110 d. However, the characteristics of the straw potassium release were different from those of the overall straw decomposition, as 90% of total K was released by the third day of the study. The batches of the K sorption experiments showed that crop residues could adsorb K+ from the ambient environment, which was subject to decomposition periods and extra K+ concentration. In addition, a number of materials or binding sites were observed on straw residues using IR analysis, indicating possible coupling sites for K+ ions. The aqueous solution experiments indicated that raw straw could absorb water at 3.88 g g−1, and this rate rose to its maximum 15 d after incubation. All of the experiments demonstrated that crop residues could absorb large amount of aqueous solution to preserve K+ indirectly during the initial decomposition period. These crop residues could also directly adsorb K+ via physical and chemical adsorption in the later period, allowing part of this K+ to be absorbed by plants for the next growing season. PMID:24587364

  11. Dynamics of potassium release and adsorption on rice straw residue.

    PubMed

    Li, Jifu; Lu, Jianwei; Li, Xiaokun; Ren, Tao; Cong, Rihuan; Zhou, Li

    2014-01-01

    Straw application can not only increase crop yields, improve soil structure and enrich soil fertility, but can also enhance water and nutrient retention. The aim of this study was to ascertain the relationships between straw decomposition and the release-adsorption processes of K(+). This study increases the understanding of the roles played by agricultural crop residues in the soil environment, informs more effective straw recycling and provides a method for reducing potassium loss. The influence of straw decomposition on the K(+) release rate in paddy soil under flooded condition was studied using incubation experiments, which indicated the decomposition process of rice straw could be divided into two main stages: (a) a rapid decomposition stage from 0 to 60 d and (b) a slow decomposition stage from 60 to 110 d. However, the characteristics of the straw potassium release were different from those of the overall straw decomposition, as 90% of total K was released by the third day of the study. The batches of the K sorption experiments showed that crop residues could adsorb K(+) from the ambient environment, which was subject to decomposition periods and extra K(+) concentration. In addition, a number of materials or binding sites were observed on straw residues using IR analysis, indicating possible coupling sites for K(+) ions. The aqueous solution experiments indicated that raw straw could absorb water at 3.88 g g(-1), and this rate rose to its maximum 15 d after incubation. All of the experiments demonstrated that crop residues could absorb large amount of aqueous solution to preserve K(+) indirectly during the initial decomposition period. These crop residues could also directly adsorb K(+) via physical and chemical adsorption in the later period, allowing part of this K(+) to be absorbed by plants for the next growing season.

  12. Carboxylic acid functionalized sesame straw: A sustainable cost-effective bioadsorbent with superior dye adsorption capacity.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yanfang; Liu, Yang; Xue, Lihong; Sun, Haijun; Guo, Zhi; Zhang, Yingying; Yang, Linzhang

    2017-08-01

    This study prepared a carboxylic functionalized bioadsorbent that met the "4-E" criteria: Efficient, Economical, Environmentally friendly, and Easily-produced. Sesame straw (Sesamum indicum L.) was functionalized through treatment with citric acid (SSCA) and tartaric acid (SSTA). The products were examined for adsorption capacity and mechanisms. Langmuir model gave the best fit for the isotherm data, and the maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of SSCA was 650mgg(-1) for methylene blue (MB). The excellent dye adsorption capacity of SSCA can be attributed to the introduction of ester groups during citric-acid modification and the tube-like structures (i.e., sesame straw cell wall remnants). At last, the cost of carboxylic acid functionalized bioadsorbents was evaluated, which showed that SSCA would be the most cost-effective bioadsorbent. Additionally, this study presents a thermo-decomposition methodology for contaminant-loaded bioadsorbent. Results showed that SSCA is probably one of the few bioadsorbents that can be produced and applied in industrial scale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of five simulated straw harvest scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Stephen, Jamie; Stumborg, Mark; Fenton, James; Mani, Sudhagar

    2008-01-01

    Almost 36 million tonnes (t) of cereal grains are harvested annually on more than 16 million hectares (ha) in Canada. The net straw production varies year by year depending upon weather patterns, crop fertility, soil conservation measures, harvest method, and plant variety. The net yield of straw, after discounting for soil conservation, averages approximately 2.5 dry (d)t ha-1. Efficient equipment is needed to collect and package the material as a feedstock for industrial applications. This paper investigates the costs, energy input, and emissions from power equipment used for harvesting straw. Five scenarios were investigated: (1) large square bales, (2) round bales, (3) large compacted stacks (loafs), (4) dried chops, and (5) wet chops. The baled or loafed biomass is stacked next to the farm. Dry chop is collected in a large pile and wet chop is ensiled. The baling and stacking cost was $21.47 dt-1 (dry tonne), with little difference between round and large square baling. Loafing was the cheapest option at $17.08 dt-1. Dry chop and piling was $23.90 dt-1 and wet chop followed by ensiling was $59.75 dt-1. A significant portion of the wet chop cost was in ensiling. Energy input and emissions were proportional to the costs for each system, except for loafing, which required more energy input than the baling systems. As a fraction of the energy content of biomass (roughly 16 GJ dt-1), the energy input ranged from 1.2% for baling to 3.2% for ensiling. Emissions from the power equipment ranged from 20.3 kg CO2e dt-1 to more than 40 kg CO2e dt-1. A sensitivity analysis on the effect of yield on collection costs showed that a 33% increase in yield reduced the cost by 20%. Similarly a sensitivity analysis on weather conditions showed that a 10oC cooler climate extended the harvest period by 5-10 days whereas a 10oC warmer climate shortened the harvest period by 2-3 days.

  14. Effects of changes in straw chemical properties and alkaline soils on bacterial communities engaged in straw decomposition at different temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guixiang; Zhang, Jiabao; Zhang, Congzhi; Feng, Youzhi; Chen, Lin; Yu, Zhenghong; Xin, Xiuli; Zhao, Bingzi

    2016-01-01

    Differences in the composition of a bacterial community engaged in decomposing wheat straw in a fluvo-aquic soil at 15 °C, 25 °C, and 35 °C were identified using barcode pyrosequencing. Functional carbon groups in the decomposing wheat straw were evaluated by 13C-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance). Actinobacteria and Firmicutes were more abundant, whereas Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were less abundant, at higher temperatures during the later stages of decomposition. Differences in the chemical properties of straw accounted for 19.3% of the variation in the community composition, whereas soil properties accounted for more (24.0%) and temperature, for less (7.4%). Carbon content of the soil microbial biomass and nitrogen content of straw were significantly correlated with the abundance of Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. The chemical properties of straw, especially the NCH/OCH3, alkyl O-C-O, and O-alkyl functional groups, exercised a significant effect on the composition of the bacterial community at different temperatures during decomposition—results that extend our understanding of bacterial communities associated with the decomposition of straw in agro-ecosystems and of the effects of temperature and chemical properties of the decomposing straw and soil on such communities. PMID:26916902

  15. Straw- and slurry-associated prokaryotic communities differ during co-fermentation of straw and swine manure.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiabao; Rui, Junpeng; Pei, Zhaojun; Sun, Xiaori; Zhang, Shiheng; Yan, Zhiying; Wang, Yuanpeng; Liu, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Tao; Li, Xiangzhen

    2014-05-01

    Anaerobic co-fermentation of straw and manure is widely used for waste treatment and biogas production. However, the differences between the straw- and slurry-associated prokaryotic communities, their dynamic changes throughout the co-fermentation process, and their correlations with bioreactor performance are not fully understood. To address these questions, we investigated the prokaryotic community compositions and the dynamics of prokaryotes attached to the straw and in the slurry during co-fermentation of wheat straw and swine manure using pyrosequencing technique. The results showed that straw- and slurry-associated prokaryotes were different in their structure and function. Straw-associated prokaryotic communities were overrepresented by the phyla Spirochaetes and Fibrobacteres, while Synergistetes and Euryarchaeota were more abundant in the slurry. The straw-associated candidate class TG3, genera Fibrobacter, Bacteroides, Acetivibrio, Clostridium III, Papillibacter, Treponema, Sedimentibacter, and Lutispora may specialize in substrate hydrolysis. Propionate was the most abundant volatile fatty acid in the slurry, and it was probably degraded through syntrophic oxidation by the genera Pelotomaculum, Methanoculleus, and Methanosaeta. The protein-fermenting bacteria Aminobacterium and Cloacibacillus were much abundant in the slurry, indicating that proteins are important substrates in the co-fermentation. This study provided a better understanding of the anaerobic co-fermentation process that is driven by spatially differentiated microbiota.

  16. Effects of changes in straw chemical properties and alkaline soils on bacterial communities engaged in straw decomposition at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guixiang; Zhang, Jiabao; Zhang, Congzhi; Feng, Youzhi; Chen, Lin; Yu, Zhenghong; Xin, Xiuli; Zhao, Bingzi

    2016-02-26

    Differences in the composition of a bacterial community engaged in decomposing wheat straw in a fluvo-aquic soil at 15 °C, 25 °C, and 35 °C were identified using barcode pyrosequencing. Functional carbon groups in the decomposing wheat straw were evaluated by (13)C-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance). Actinobacteria and Firmicutes were more abundant, whereas Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were less abundant, at higher temperatures during the later stages of decomposition. Differences in the chemical properties of straw accounted for 19.3% of the variation in the community composition, whereas soil properties accounted for more (24.0%) and temperature, for less (7.4%). Carbon content of the soil microbial biomass and nitrogen content of straw were significantly correlated with the abundance of Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. The chemical properties of straw, especially the NCH/OCH3, alkyl O-C-O, and O-alkyl functional groups, exercised a significant effect on the composition of the bacterial community at different temperatures during decomposition-results that extend our understanding of bacterial communities associated with the decomposition of straw in agro-ecosystems and of the effects of temperature and chemical properties of the decomposing straw and soil on such communities.

  17. New laser tracheal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungemach, Josef; Foth, Hans-Jochen; Hoermann, Karl; Preponis, E.

    1996-09-01

    The complication of a laser induced tube fire during surgery was first published in 1979. The protection of tracheal tubes against ignition is necessary to enable a safe laser surgery of the upper airway. in an experimental study a new compound tube was tested: this tube had a higher laser resistance than a pure metal tube. The damage threshold of this tube was tested against the emission of various lasers as CO2. The metal tube was damaged within seconds at CO2 laser power densities of 103 W/cm2 whereas the damage threshold of the compound tube was 3.106 W/cm2. We compared the compound laser tube to the so far used metal tube in a prospective clinical trial in our department of ENT in patients undergoing CO2-laser surgery of the upper airway. 66 patients were included into the study: 33 received the compound tube, 33 the metal tube. During endotracheal intubation the handling of the compound tube was better. During laser surgery high airway pressures occured more often with the metal tube. Whereas kinking was the problem of the compound tubes. Destruction of cuffs occured in both groups but did not cause any complications. No tube or cuff fire was noticed.

  18. EC Tube Fits

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, C.H.; /Fermilab

    1987-03-03

    In the design of the EC, the beam tube, through which the beam line travels, can be found in the IH tube which is centrally located in the IH module. However, also between the beam tube and the IH tube lie both the vacuum and inner tubes of the vacuum and inner vessels. It is the vacuum between these vessels which provides insulation between the ambient beam tube and liquid argon in the cryostat. while the vacuum tube is supported along its length with the inner tube as best as possible, the inner tube will only be supported at the ends. The beam tube will also be end-supported, but it will be allowed to rest directly on the inner surface of the vacuum tube. It is required that the beam tube be able to slide in and out of the vacuum tube with relative ease in order that the EC's can be moved away from the CC when necessary (repair work, etc.). Although the frequency of such a move is not known, it is hoped to be low, and it would therefore be desirable, for cost reasons, to be able to use stock tubing for the vacuum and beam tubes instead of using specially machined tubing.

  19. Production of rice straw hydrolysis enzymes by the fungi Trichoderma reesei and Humicola insolens using rice straw as a carbon source.

    PubMed

    Kogo, Takashi; Yoshida, Yuki; Koganei, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Taisuke; Ogihara, Jun; Kasumi, Takafumi

    2017-02-11

    Rice straw was evaluated as a carbon source for the fungi, Trichoderma reesei and Humicola insolens, to produce enzymes for rice straw hydrolysis. The enzyme activity of T. reesei and H. insolens cultivated in medium containing non-treated rice straw were almost equivalent to the enzyme of T. reesei cultivated in Avicel medium, a form of refined cellulose. The enzyme activity of T. reesei cultivated in medium containing NH4OH-treated rice straw was 4-fold higher than enzyme from cultures grown in Avicel medium. In contrast, H. insolens enzyme from cultures grown in NH4OH-treated rice straw had significantly lower activity compared with non-treated rice straw or Avicel. The combined use of T. reesei and H. insolens enzymes resulted in a significant synergistic enhancement in enzymatic activity. Our data suggest that rice straw is a promising low-cost carbon source for fungal enzyme production for rice straw hydrolysis.

  20. Bender/Coiler for Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Easy-to-use tool makes coils of tubing. Tubing to be bend clamped with stop post. Die positioned snugly against tubing. Operator turns handle to slide die along tubing, pushing tubing into spiral groove on mandrel.

  1. Prospects in straw disintegration for biogas production.

    PubMed

    Maroušek, Josef

    2013-10-01

    The pretreatment methods for enhancing biogas production from oat straw under study include hot maceration, steam explosion, and pressure shockwaves. The micropore area (9, 55, and 64 m(2) g(-1)) inhibitor formations (0, 15, and 0 mL L(-1)) as well as the overall methane yields (67, 179, and 255 CH4 VS t(-1)) were robustly analyzed. It was confirmed that the operating conditions of the steam explosion must be precisely tailored to the substrate. Furthermore, it was beneficial to prepend the hot maceration before the steam explosion and the pressure shockwaves. The second alternative may give increased methane yields (246 in comparison to 273 CH4 VS t(-1)); however, the application of pressure shockwaves still faces limitations for deployment on a commercial scale.

  2. STRAW: Species TRee Analysis Web server

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Timothy I.; Ruan, Zheng; Glenn, Travis C.; Liu, Liang

    2013-01-01

    The coalescent methods for species tree reconstruction are increasingly popular because they can accommodate coalescence and multilocus data sets. Herein, we present STRAW, a web server that offers workflows for reconstruction of phylogenies of species using three species tree methods—MP-EST, STAR and NJst. The input data are a collection of rooted gene trees (for STAR and MP-EST methods) or unrooted gene trees (for NJst). The output includes the estimated species tree, modified Robinson-Foulds distances between gene trees and the estimated species tree and visualization of trees to compare gene trees with the estimated species tree. The web sever is available at http://bioinformatics.publichealth.uga.edu/SpeciesTreeAnalysis/. PMID:23661681

  3. Tubing suspension system

    SciTech Connect

    Berner, P. C.; Brickman, E. L.

    1985-12-31

    A tubing suspension system for undersea well production operations employs a nonoriented tubing hanger having an inner body for supporting a tubing string and a landing collar for supporting the tubing hanger on a wellhead casing. The tubing hanger includes three co-operating concentric sleeve assemblies which are employed to lock and seal the tubing hanger to the wellhead housing. The outer sleeve assembly includes a locking actuator and a dual seal assembly and is separately retrievable from the remainder of the hanger assmebly. A nonorienting hydraulic set running tool is employed to run the tubing hanger, set the seals, lock the tubing hanger to the wellhead casing, retrieve either the outer sleeve assembly or the entire tubing hanger. The running tool includes a hydraulically controlled actuating sleeve which carries a latch dog assembly which locks with the tubing hanger.

  4. Kali: The framework for fine calibration of the LHCb Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Ivan; Savrina, Daria; Graciani, Ricardo; Puig, Albert; LHCb Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The precise calibration (at a level of below 1%) of the electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) of the LHCb experiment is an essential task for the fulfilment of the LHCb physics program. The final step of this task is performed with two calibration methods using the real data from the experimental setup. It is a very CPU-consuming procedure as both methods require processing of Script O(108) events which must be selected, reconstructed and analyzed. In this document we present the Kali framework developed within the LHCb software framework, which implements these two final calibration methods. It is integrated with Grid middleware and makes use of parallelism tools, such as python parallel processing modules, to provide an efficient way, both time and disk wise, for the final ECAL calibration. The results of the fine calibration with the very first data collected by the LHCb experiment will also be presented. With the use of the Kali framework it took only two days of processing and allowed to achieve a calibration accuracy of 2-2.5% for the different ECAL areas.

  5. CP Violation in b- and c-hadron decays at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkamp, Olaf; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    Testing the Standard Model of particle physics by precision measurements of CP violating observables in the decays of b and c hadrons has been one of the design goals of the LHCb experiment. World-leading measurements have been performed of the semileptonic asymmetry, {a}ssl, and of the mixing-induced CP-violating phase ϕs in the {B}s0{\\bar{B}}s0 system. The CKM angle γ is still the least known angle of the Unitarity Triangle, and the only one easily accessible using tree-level decays. A recent combination of LHCb measurements in various B → DK decay modes has yielded the most precise determination of γ from a single experiment to date. The LHCb experiment is collecting unprecedented samples of beauty baryons, allowing for the first time to study CP violating observables in their decays. A recent analysis provided the first evidence for CP violation in the beauty baryon sector. Finally, LHCb has the largest samples of charmed hadron decays collected by any experiment to date. These samples yield some of the world’s most sensitive searches for direct and indirect CP violation in the charm sector.

  6. Microwave pyrolysis of rice straw: products, mechanism, and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Fong; Chiueh, Pei-Te; Kuan, Wen-Hui; Lo, Shang-Lien

    2013-08-01

    Rice straw is an abundant resource for the production of biofuels and bio-based products. How to convert the recalcitrant lignocellulose effectually is a critical issue. The objective of this study was to investigate the products, mechanism, and kinetics of rice straw pyrolysis by using microwave heating. The highest energy densification ratio of solid residues was achieved at the microwave power level of 300 W. The atomic H/C and O/C ratios of solid residues were much lower than those of rice straw. The primary components of gaseous product were CO, H2, CO2, and CH4, whose molecular fractions were 57%, 21%, 14%, and 8%, respectively. The more gaseous product and the less solid residues were obtained at higher microwave power levels, while the liquid production remained the same and showed a maximum of about 50 wt.%. The kinetic parameters of rice straw pyrolysis were increased with increasing microwave power level.

  7. 5. DETAIL OF MUD INFILL (MIXED WITH STRAW), LATHS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL OF MUD INFILL (MIXED WITH STRAW), LATHS AND STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS (CORNER POST, SILL AND STUD), SOUTHEAST CORNER OF EAST SIDE OF ORIGINAL SECTION. - Thomas Threlkeld House, Benson Pike, Shelbyville, Shelby County, KY

  8. [Proximate analysis of straw by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)].

    PubMed

    Huang, Cai-jin; Han, Lu-jia; Liu, Xian; Yang, Zeng-ling

    2009-04-01

    Proximate analysis is one of the routine analysis procedures in utilization of straw for biomass energy use. The present paper studied the applicability of rapid proximate analysis of straw by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technology, in which the authors constructed the first NIRS models to predict volatile matter and fixed carbon contents of straw. NIRS models were developed using Foss 6500 spectrometer with spectra in the range of 1,108-2,492 nm to predict the contents of moisture, ash, volatile matter and fixed carbon in the directly cut straw samples; to predict ash, volatile matter and fixed carbon in the dried milled straw samples. For the models based on directly cut straw samples, the determination coefficient of independent validation (R2v) and standard error of prediction (SEP) were 0.92% and 0.76% for moisture, 0.94% and 0.84% for ash, 0.88% and 0.82% for volatile matter, and 0.75% and 0.65% for fixed carbon, respectively. For the models based on dried milled straw samples, the determination coefficient of independent validation (R2v) and standard error of prediction (SEP) were 0.98% and 0.54% for ash, 0.95% and 0.57% for volatile matter, and 0.78% and 0.61% for fixed carbon, respectively. It was concluded that NIRS models can predict accurately as an alternative analysis method, therefore rapid and simultaneous analysis of multicomponents can be achieved by NIRS technology, decreasing the cost of proximate analysis for straw.

  9. Microbial production of biopolymers from the renewable resource wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Gasser, E; Ballmann, P; Dröge, S; Bohn, J; König, H

    2014-10-01

    Production of poly-ß-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and the chemical basic compound lactate from the agricultural crop 'wheat straw' as a renewable carbon resource. A thermal pressure hydrolysis procedure for the breakdown of wheat straw was applied. By this means, the wheat straw was converted into a partially solubilized hemicellulosic fraction, consisting of sugar monomers, and an insoluble cellulosic fraction, containing cellulose, lignin and a small portion of hemicellulose. The insoluble cellulosic fraction was further hydrolysed by commercial enzymes in monomers. The production of PHB from the sugar monomers originating from hemicellulose or cellulose was achieved by the isolates Bacillus licheniformis IMW KHC 3 and Bacillus megaterium IMW KNaC 2. The basic chemical compound, lactate, a starting compound for the production of polylactide (PLA), was formed by some heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria (LAB) able to grow with xylose from the hemicellulosic wheat straw hydrolysate. Two strains were selected which were able to produce PHB from the sugars both from the hemicellulosic and the cellulosic fraction of the wheat straw. In addition, some of the LAB tested were capable of producing lactate from the hemicellulosic hydrolysate. The renewable resource wheat straw could serve as a substrate for microbiologically produced basic chemicals and biodegradable plastics. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Ethanol production from steam-explosion pretreated wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Ignacio; Negro, Ma José; Oliva, José Miguel; Cabañas, Araceli; Manzanares, Paloma; Ballesteros, Mercedes

    2006-01-01

    Bioconversion of cereal straw to bioethanol is becoming an attractive alternative to conventional fuel ethanol production from grains. In this work, the best operational conditions for steam-explosion pretreatment of wheat straw for ethanol production by a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process were studied, using diluted acid [H2SO4 0.9% (w/w)] and water as preimpregnation agents. Acid- or water-impregnated biomass was steam-exploded at different temperatures (160-200 degrees C) and residence times (5, 10, and 20 min). Composition of solid and filtrate obtained after pretreatment, enzymatic digestibility and ethanol production of pretreated wheat straw at different experimental conditions was analyzed. The best pretreatment conditions to obtain high conversion yield to ethanol (approx 80% of theoretical) of cellulose-rich residue after steam-explosion were 190 degrees C and 10 min or 200 degrees C and 5 min, in acid-impregnated straw. However, 180 degrees C for 10 min in acid-impregnated biomass provided the highest ethanol yield referred to raw material (140 L/t wheat straw), and sugars recovery yield in the filtrate (300 g/kg wheat straw).

  11. Alkaline peroxide mechanical pulping of wheat straw with enzyme treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Li, Xuezhi; Qu, Yinbo; Gao, Peiji

    2004-01-01

    Alkaline peroxide mechanical pulping (APMP) of wheat straw with enzyme treatment was studied. Instead of direct enzyme pretreatment on wheat straw, an alternative treatment method was used, in which coarse pulps from refiner defibrated wheat straw rather than wheat straw were pretreated with a crude enzyme containing mainly xylanase, then impregnated with alkaline H2O2 solution and further refined. The optimum conditions of enzyme treatment were xylanase dosage of 10-15 IU/g of oven-dried wheat straw, 90 min, 50-60 degrees C, pulp consistency of 5-10%, and initial pH of 5.0, and those for chemical impregnation were 6% NaOH, 70-80 degrees C, 60-90 min, and 4 to 5% H2O2. Enzyme treatment improved pulpability of wheat straw by the APMP process, and final pulp quality such as brightness, breaking length, and burst index of pulp. Pulp from the APMP process with enzyme treatment could be bleached to a brightness of 70.5% ISO by two-stage H2O2 bleaching sequence with only 4% H2O2, and breaking length of the bleach pulp reached 4470 m

  12. Torsion Tests of Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stang, Ambrose H; Ramberg, Walter; Back, Goldie

    1937-01-01

    This report presents the results of tests of 63 chromium-molybdenum steel tubes and 102 17st aluminum-alloy tubes of various sizes and lengths made to study the dependence of the torsional strength on both the dimensions of the tube and the physical properties of the tube material. Three types of failure are found to be important for sizes of tubes frequently used in aircraft construction: (1) failure by plastic shear, in which the tube material reached its yield strength before the critical torque was reached; (2) failure by elastic two-lobe buckling, which depended only on the elastic properties of the tube material and the dimensions of the tube; and (3) failure by a combination of (1) and (2) that is, by buckling taking place after some yielding of the tube material.

  13. The specific localizations of phosphorylated Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 isoforms reveal the role of Lhcb2 in the formation of the PSI-LHCII supercomplex in Arabidopsis during state transitions.

    PubMed

    Crepin, Aurelie; Caffarri, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    State transitions are an important photosynthetic short-term response that maintains the excitation balance between photosystems I (PSI) and II (PSII). In plants, when PSII is preferentially excited, LHCII, the main heterotrimeric light harvesting complex of PSII, is phosphorylated by the STN7 kinase, detaches from PSII and moves to PSI to equilibrate the relative absorption of the two photosystems (State II). When PSI is preferentially excited LHCII is dephosphorylated by the PPH1 (TAP38) phosphatase, and returns to PSII (State I). Phosphorylation of LHCII that remain bound to PSII has also been observed. Although the kinetics of LHCII phosphorylation are well known from a qualitative standpoint, the absolute phosphorylation levels of LHCII (and its isoforms) bound to PSI and PSII have been little studied. In this work we thoroughly investigated the phosphorylation level of the Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 isoforms that compose LHCII in PSI-LHCII and PSII-LHCII supercomplexes purified from WT and state transition mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that, at most, 40% of the monomers that make up PSI-bound LHCII trimers are phosphorylated. Phosphorylation was much lower in PSII-bound LHCII trimers reaching only 15-20%. Dephosphorylation assays using a recombinant PPH1 phosphatase allowed us to investigate the role of the two isoforms during state transitions. Our results strongly suggest that a single phosphorylated Lhcb2 is sufficient for the formation of the PSI-LHCII supercomplex. These results are a step towards a refined model of the state transition phenomenon and a better understanding of the short-term response to changes in light conditions in plants.

  14. Compostability and biodegradation study of PLA-wheat straw and PLA-soy straw based green composites in simulated composting bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Ranjan; Misra, Manjusri; Erickson, Larry; Mohanty, Amar

    2010-11-01

    A laboratory scale simulated composting facility (as per ASTM D 5338) was designed and utilized to determine and evaluate the extent of degradation of polylactic acid (PLA), untreated wheat and soy straw and injection moulded composites of PLA-wheat straw (70:30) and PLA-soy straw (70:30). The outcomes of the study revealed the suitability of the test protocol, validity of the test system and defined the compostability of the composites of PLA with unmodified natural substrate. The study would help to design composites using modified soy straw and wheat straw as reinforcement/filler to satisfy ASTM D 6400 specifications.

  15. Glass tube splitting tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, J. A.; Murray, C. D.; Stein, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    Tool accurately splits glass tubing so cuts are aligned 180 deg apart and reassembled tube forms low pressure, gastight enclosure. Device should interest industries using cylindrical closed glass containers.

  16. Eustachian tube (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... are more common in children because their eustachian tubes are shorter, narrower, and more horizontal than in ... become trapped when the tissue of the eustachian tube becomes swollen from colds or allergies. Bacteria trapped ...

  17. Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the first month ... she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In spina ...

  18. PEG tube insertion -- discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... shower or bathe. Keeping the PEG-tube in Place If the feeding tube comes out, the stoma ... eds. Pfenninger and Fowler's Procedures for Primary Care . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2011:chap 100. ...

  19. Feeding tube - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... NG - infants Images Feeding tube References Kim YS. Nasogastric and nasoenteric tube insertion. In: Pfenninger JL, Fowler GC, eds. Pfenninger and Fowler's Procedures for Primary Care . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2011:chap ...

  20. Eustachian tube patency

    MedlinePlus

    ... refers to how much the eustachian tube is open. The eustachian tube runs between the middle ear and the throat. It controls the pressure behind the eardrum and middle ear space. This helps keep the middle ear free of ...

  1. Guide tube flow diffuser

    SciTech Connect

    Berringer, R.T.; Myron, D.L.

    1980-11-04

    A nuclear reactor upper internal guide tube has a flow diffuser integral with its bottom end. The guide tube provides guidance for control rods during their ascent or descent from the reactor core. The flow diffuser serves to divert the upward flow of reactor coolant around the outside of the guide tube thereby limiting the amount of coolant flow and turbulence within the guide tube, thus enhancing the ease of movement of the control rods.

  2. Acetylation of rice straw for thermoplastic applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangzhi; Huang, Kai; Jiang, Xue; Huang, Dan; Yang, Yiqi

    2013-07-01

    An inexpensive and biodegradable thermoplastic was developed through acetylation of rice straw (RS) with acetic anhydride. Acetylation conditions were optimized. The structure and properties of acetylated RS were characterized by fourier transform infrared (FTIR), solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results showed that acetylation of RS has successfully taken place, and comparing with raw RS, the degree of crystallinity decreased and the decomposition rate was slow. The acetylated RS has got thermoplasticity when weight ratio of RS and acetic anhydride was 1:3, using sulphuric acid (9% to RS) as catalyst in glacial acetic acid 35°C for 12h, and the dosage of solvent was 9 times RS, in which weight percent gain (WPG) of the modified RS powder was 35.5% and its percent acetyl content was 36.1%. The acetylated RS could be formed into transparent thin films with different amount of plasticizer diethyl phthalate (DEP) using tape casting technology.

  3. Microhole Tubing Bending Report

    DOE Data Explorer

    Oglesby, Ken

    2012-01-01

    A downhole tubing bending study was made and is reported herein. IT contains a report and 2 excel spreadsheets to calculate tubing bending and to estimate contact points of the tubing to the drilled hole wall (creating a new support point).

  4. 1992 tubing tables

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This paper is helpful to those designing oil well completions or purchasing tubing with proprietary or premium connections. Tables contain specifications and application data for over 100 different tubing joints, including those used with fiberglass pipe. The tables this year contain dimensional and performance data for coiled tubing.

  5. Circadian expression of the PpLhcb2 gene encoding a major light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding protein in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Setsuyuki; Kato, Seiji; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Shimizu, Masashi

    2004-01-01

    Circadian clocks control the expression of Lhcb genes encoding the chlorophyll a/b-binding proteins broadly in seed plants. We show here that this regulation is also conserved in the primitive moss Physcomitrella patens. Northern blotting analyses revealed a robust daily oscillation of Lhcb mRNA levels in protonema cells in 12-h : 12-h light-dark cycles (12 : 12LD) that damped rapidly in continuous darkness (DD). In continuous light (LL), by contrast with typical profiles in higher plants, Lhcb mRNA levels only peaked during the first day and thereafter it showed constant levels. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analyses showed similar patterns of expression in LL for three distinct Lhcb genes (PpLhcb1, PpLhcb2 and Zlab1). Moreover, transgenic reporter strains expressing luciferase under the control of the PpLhcb2 promoter showed bioluminescence patterns consistent with the Northern and RT-PCR data. At a higher concentration (4.5%) of glucose in the medium, the reporter strain showed self-sustained rhythms in DD, which was entrained to a differently phased 12 : 12LD, revealing a circadian regulation on the transcription. Kinetics of bioluminescent peaks in 12 : 12LD from gametophore was different to those from protonema, indicating a developmental regulation on PpLhcb2. Together, the regulatory link between the clock and Lhcb genes in P. patens shows characteristics that appear to differ from those in higher plants.

  6. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  7. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  9. Bioconversion of rice straw into a soil-like substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chengying; Liu, Hong; Xing, Yidong; Manukovsky, N. S.; Kovalev, V. S.; Gurevich, Yu. L.

    To increase the closure of bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS), the bioconversion of rice straw into a soil-like substrate (SLS) by mushrooms and worms has been studied. The results showed that rice straw could be treated better by aerobic fermentation and succeeding growth of mushrooms Pleurotus ostreatus. In this process the total content of lignocellulose in the straw was removed by 37.74%. Furthermore, 46.68 g (fresh weight) of mushrooms could be produced from 100.0 g (dry weight) of rice straw. During the conversion of rice straw into a starting SLS by mushrooms and worms, the matter loss was 77.31%. The lettuce has been planted in the SLS and the yield when lettuce was cultivated on the SLS (8.77gm-2day-1) was comparable to the yield obtained on the nutrient solution. In addition, the silicon in the SLS ash can reach upto 32% and the circulation of it is expected during the growth of rice.

  10. Potassium hydroxide pulping of rice straw in biorefinery initiatives.

    PubMed

    Jahan, M Sarwar; Haris, Fahmida; Rahman, M Mostafizur; Samaddar, Purabi Rani; Sutradhar, Shrikanta

    2016-11-01

    Rice straw is supposed to be one of the most important lignocellulosic raw materials for pulp mill in Asian countries. The major problem in rice straw pulping is silica. The present research is focused on the separation of silica from the black liquor of rice straw pulping by potassium hydroxide (KOH) and pulp evaluation. Optimum KOH pulping conditions of rice straw were alkali charge 12% as NaOH, cooking temperature 150°C for 2h and material to liquor ratio, 1:6. At this condition pulp yield was 42.4% with kappa number 10.3. KOH pulp bleached to 85% brightness by D0EpD1 bleaching sequences with ClO2 consumption of 25kg/ton of pulp. Silica and lignin were separated from the black liquor of KOH pulping. The amount of recovered silica, lignin and hemicelluloses were 10.4%, 8.4% and 13.0%. The papermaking properties of KOH pulp from rice straw were slightly better than those of corresponding NaOH pulp.

  11. REACTOR COOLANT TUBE SEAL

    DOEpatents

    Morris, W.J.

    1958-12-01

    A plle-flattenlng control element and a fluid seal therefore to permit movement of the element into a liquld contnining region of a neutronlc reactor are described. The device consists of flattened, thin-walled aluminum tubing contalnlng a uniform mixture of thermal neutron absorbing material, and a number of soft rubber closures for the process tubes, having silts capable of passing the flattened elements therethrough, but effectively sealing the process tubes against fluld leaknge by compression of the rubber. The flattened tubing is sufficiently flexible to enable it to conform to the configuratlon of the annular spacing surrounding the fuel elements ln the process tubes.

  12. Telescoping tube assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturm, Albert J. (Inventor); Marrinan, Thomas E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An extensible and retractable telescoping tube positions test devices that inspect large stationary objects. The tube has three dimensional adjustment capabilities and is vertically suspended from a frame. The tube sections are independently supported with each section comprising U-shaped housing secured to a thicker support plate. Guide mechanisms preferably mounted only to the thicker plates guide each tube section parallel to a reference axis with improved accuracy so that the position of the remote end of the telescoping tube is precisely known.

  13. Pollen tube development.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mark A; Kost, Benedikt

    2010-01-01

    Pollen tubes grow rapidly in a strictly polarized manner as they transport male reproductive cells through female flower tissues to bring about fertilization. Vegetative pollen tube cells are an excellent model system to investigate processes underlying directional cell expansion. In this chapter, we describe materials and methods required for (1) the identification of novel factors essential for polarized cell growth through the isolation and analysis of Arabidopsis mutants with defects in pollen tube growth and (2) the detailed functional characterization of pollen tube proteins based on transient transformation and microscopic analysis of cultured tobacco pollen tubes.

  14. Butterfly proboscis: combining a drinking straw with a nanosponge facilitated diversification of feeding habits

    PubMed Central

    Monaenkova, Daria; Lehnert, Matthew S.; Andrukh, Taras; Beard, Charles E.; Rubin, Binyamin; Tokarev, Alexander; Lee, Wah-Keat; Adler, Peter H.; Kornev, Konstantin G.

    2012-01-01

    The ability of Lepidoptera, or butterflies and moths, to drink liquids from rotting fruit and wet soil, as well as nectar from floral tubes, raises the question of whether the conventional view of the proboscis as a drinking straw can account for the withdrawal of fluids from porous substrates or of films and droplets from floral tubes. We discovered that the proboscis promotes capillary pull of liquids from diverse sources owing to a hierarchical pore structure spanning nano- and microscales. X-ray phase-contrast imaging reveals that Plateau instability causes liquid bridges to form in the food canal, which are transported to the gut by the muscular sucking pump in the head. The dual functionality of the proboscis represents a key innovation for exploiting a vast range of nutritional sources. We suggest that future studies of the adaptive radiation of the Lepidoptera take into account the role played by the structural organization of the proboscis. A transformative two-step model of capillary intake and suctioning can be applied not only to butterflies and moths but also potentially to vast numbers of other insects such as bees and flies. PMID:21849382

  15. Butterfly proboscis: natural combination of a drinking straw with a nanosponge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornev, Kostya; Monaenkova, Daria; Adler, Peter; Lee, Wah-Keat; Lehnert, Matthew; Andrukh, Taras; Beard, Charles; Rubin, Binyamin; Tokarev, Alexander

    2011-11-01

    The ability of Lepidoptera, or butterflies and moths, to drink liquids from rotting fruit and wet soil, as well as nectar from floral tubes, raises the question of whether the conventional view of the proboscis as a drinking straw can account for the withdrawal of fluids from porous substrates or of films and droplets from floral tubes. We discovered that the proboscis promotes capillary pull of liquids from diverse sources due to a hierarchical pore structure spanning nano- and microscales. X-ray phase-contrast imaging reveals that Plateau instability causes liquid bridges to form in the food canal, which are transported to the gut by the muscular sucking pump in the head. The dual functionality of the proboscis represents a key innovation for exploiting a vast range of nutritional sources. A transformative two-step model of capillary intake and suctioning can be applied not only to butterflies and moths but also potentially to vast numbers of other insects such as bees and flies. NSF EFRI - 0937985.

  16. Search for long-lived heavy charged particles using a ring imaging Cherenkov technique at LHCb.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casanova Mohr, R; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Dean, C T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Geraci, A; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M N; Mitzel, D S; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Osorio Rodrigues, B; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Poikela, T; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skillicorn, I; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Sterpka, F; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Tekampe, T; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Todd, J; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Trabelsi, K; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L

    A search is performed for heavy long-lived charged particles using 3.0 [Formula: see text] of proton-proton collisions collected at [Formula: see text][Formula: see text] 7 and 8  TeV with the LHCb detector. The search is mainly based on the response of the ring imaging Cherenkov detectors to distinguish the heavy, slow-moving particles from muons. No evidence is found for the production of such long-lived states. The results are expressed as limits on the Drell-Yan production of pairs of long-lived particles, with both particles in the LHCb pseudorapidity acceptance, [Formula: see text]. The mass-dependent cross-section upper limits are in the range 2-4 fb (at 95 % CL) for masses between 14 and 309 [Formula: see text].

  17. Precision Determination of the Small-x Gluon from Charm Production at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauld, Rhorry; Rojo, Juan

    2017-02-01

    The small-x gluon in global fits of parton distributions is affected by large uncertainties from the lack of direct experimental constraints. In this Letter, we provide a precision determination of the small-x gluon from the exploitation of forward charm production data provided by LHCb for three different center-of-mass (c.m.) energies: 5 TeV, 7 TeV, and 13 TeV. The LHCb measurements are included in the parton distribution function (PDF) fit by means of normalized distributions and cross-section ratios between data taken at different c.m. values, R13 /7 and R13 /5. We demonstrate that forward charm production leads to a reduction of the PDF uncertainties of the gluon down to x ≃10-6 by up to an order of magnitude, with implications for high-energy colliders, cosmic ray physics, and neutrino astronomy.

  18. Improvements to the User Interface for LHCb's Software continuous integration system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemencic, M.; Couturier, B.; Kyriazi, S.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify a set of steps leading to an improved interface for LHCb's Nightly Builds Dashboard. The goal is to have an efficient application that meets the needs of both the project developers, by providing them with a user friendly interface, as well as those of the computing team supporting the system, by providing them with a dashboard allowing for better monitoring of the build job themselves. In line with what is already used by LHCb, the web interface has been implemented with the Flask Python framework for future maintainability and code clarity. The Database chosen to host the data is the schema-less CouchDB[7], serving the purpose of flexibility in document form changes. To improve the user experience, we use JavaScript libraries such as JQuery[11].

  19. Beauty-quark and charm-quark pair production asymmetries at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauld, Rhorry; Haisch, Ulrich; Pecjak, Ben D.; Re, Emanuele

    2015-08-01

    The LHCb Collaboration has recently performed a first measurement of the angular production asymmetry in the distribution of beauty quarks and antiquarks at a hadron collider. We calculate the corresponding standard model prediction for this asymmetry at fixed order in perturbation theory. Our results show good agreement with the data, which are provided differentially for three bins in the invariant mass of the b b ¯ system. We also present similar predictions for both beauty-quark and charm-quark final states within the LHCb acceptance for a collision energy of √{s }=13 TeV . We finally point out that a measurement of the ratio of the b b ¯ and c c ¯ cross sections may be useful for experimentally validating charm-tagging efficiencies.

  20. Search for long-lived heavy charged particles using a ring imaging Cherenkov technique at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casanova Mohr, R.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M. H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-12-01

    A search is performed for heavy long-lived charged particles using 3.0 fb^{-1} of proton-proton collisions collected at √{s} = 7 and 8 TeV with the LHCb detector. The search is mainly based on the response of the ring imaging Cherenkov detectors to distinguish the heavy, slow-moving particles from muons. No evidence is found for the production of such long-lived states. The results are expressed as limits on the Drell-Yan production of pairs of long-lived particles, with both particles in the LHCb pseudorapidity acceptance, 1.8 < η < 4.9. The mass-dependent cross-section upper limits are in the range 2-4 fb (at 95 % CL) for masses between 14 and 309 { GeV/c^2}.

  1. Precision Determination of the Small-x Gluon from Charm Production at LHCb.

    PubMed

    Gauld, Rhorry; Rojo, Juan

    2017-02-17

    The small-x gluon in global fits of parton distributions is affected by large uncertainties from the lack of direct experimental constraints. In this Letter, we provide a precision determination of the small-x gluon from the exploitation of forward charm production data provided by LHCb for three different center-of-mass (c.m.) energies: 5 TeV, 7 TeV, and 13 TeV. The LHCb measurements are included in the parton distribution function (PDF) fit by means of normalized distributions and cross-section ratios between data taken at different c.m. values, R_{13/7} and R_{13/5}. We demonstrate that forward charm production leads to a reduction of the PDF uncertainties of the gluon down to x≃10^{-6} by up to an order of magnitude, with implications for high-energy colliders, cosmic ray physics, and neutrino astronomy.

  2. Real-time alignment and cali bration of the LHCb Detector in Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujany, Giulio; Storaci, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Stable, precise spatial alignment and PID calibration are necessary to achieve optimal detector performance. During Run2, LHCb will have a new real-time detector alignment and calibration to allow equivalent performance in the online and offline reconstruction to be reached. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection by applying stronger constraints, and to use hadronic particle identification at the trigger level. The computing time constraints are met through the use of a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from the operative and physics performance point of view. Specific challenges of this configuration are discussed, as well as the designed framework and its performance.

  3. Heat tube device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattar, Mukesh K. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The present invention discloses a heat tube device through which a working fluid can be circulated to transfer heat to air in a conventional air conditioning system. The heat tube device is disposable about a conventional cooling coil of the air conditioning system and includes a plurality of substantially U-shaped tubes connected to a support structure. The support structure includes members for allowing the heat tube device to be readily positioned about the cooling coil. An actuatable adjustment device is connected to the U-shaped tubes for allowing, upon actuation thereof, for the heat tubes to be simultaneously rotated relative to the cooling coil for allowing the heat transfer from the heat tube device to air in the air conditioning system to be selectively varied.

  4. Studies of charmed hadronic B decays with the early LHCb data and prospects for {gamma} measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nardulli, J.

    2010-12-22

    We present the first studies of decays of the type B{yields}DX, where D represents a charmed meson (D{sup 0}, D{sup (*)+}, or D{sub s}) from the LHCb experiment at CERN. Our studies use data accumulated during the 2010 run of the LHC. This work represents the first steps on a programme towards a precision measurement of the angle {gamma} of the CKM Unitarity Triangle. The prospects for this {gamma} measurement will be reviewed.

  5. The LHCb Online Framework for Experiment Protection, and Global Operational Control and Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessio, F.; Jacobsson, R.; Schleich, S.

    2011-12-01

    The complexity and extreme parameters of the LHC, such as the stored energy, the collision frequency, the high risk of adverse background conditions and potentially damaging beam losses have demanded an unprecedented connectivity between the operation of the accelerator and the experiments at both hardware and software level. LHCb has been at the forefront of developing a software framework and hardware which connects to all of the LHC communication interfaces for timing, control and monitoring of the machine and beam parameters, in addition to its own local systems for beam and background monitoring. The framework also includes failsafe connectivity with the beam interlock system. The framework drives the global operation of the detector and is integrated into the readout control. It provides the shifters with the tools needed to take fast and well-guided decisions to run the LHCb experiment safely and efficiently. In particular, it has allowed the detector to be operated with only two shifters already at the LHC pilot run. The requirements include reliability and clarity for the shifters, and the possibility to retrieve the past conditions for offline analysis. All essential parameters are archived and an interactive analysis tool has been developed which provides overviews of the experimental performance and which allows post-analysis of any anomaly in the operation. This paper describes the architecture and the many functions, including the basis of the automation of the LHCb operational procedure and detector controls, and the information exchange between LHCb and the LHC, and finally the shifter and expert tools for monitoring the experimental conditions.

  6. Dustiness of chopped straw as affected by lignosulfonate as a dust suppressant.

    PubMed

    Breum, N O; Nielsen, B H; Lyngbye, M; Midtgård, U

    1999-01-01

    Many sources add to the concentration of bioaerosols in livestock buildings, and source control is the number one priority for keeping a low concentration. Straw is a common but dusty bedding material in livestock buildings and the present study is focused on the dustiness of chopped straw (barley) as affected by lignosulfonate (LS) as a dust suppressant. A LS-solution was aerosolized in a spray chamber fitted to an existing bedding chopper to allow the chopped straw to adsorb the LS-solution. The dustiness of straw treated with LS was compared to non-treated straw. As storage conditions may affect dustiness, the study included treated straw kept for 4 weeks in sealed plastic bags. Dustiness of the chopped straw was measured in terms of the potential of the straw to emit bioaerosols in a rotating drum. The LS-treated straw proved low in dustiness compared to the non-treated straw. The dustiness with respect to the mass of dust was reduced by at least a factor of 6, and for fungi and endotoxin the factors of reduction were 4 and 3, respectively. Dustiness of LS-treated straw kept in plastic bags was reduced by a factor of 2 for mass of dust and by a factor of 4 for endotoxin, but dustiness for fungi was increased by a factor of 3. It is concluded that lignosulfonate has potential as a dust suppressant for chopped straw.

  7. 9 CFR 95.28 - Hay or straw and similar material from tick-infested areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... tick-infested areas. 95.28 Section 95.28 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... PRODUCTS SANITARY CONTROL OF ANIMAL BYPRODUCTS (EXCEPT CASINGS), AND HAY AND STRAW, OFFERED FOR ENTRY INTO THE UNITED STATES § 95.28 Hay or straw and similar material from tick-infested areas. Hay or straw...

  8. 9 CFR 95.28 - Hay or straw and similar material from tick-infested areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... tick-infested areas. 95.28 Section 95.28 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... PRODUCTS SANITARY CONTROL OF ANIMAL BYPRODUCTS (EXCEPT CASINGS), AND HAY AND STRAW, OFFERED FOR ENTRY INTO THE UNITED STATES § 95.28 Hay or straw and similar material from tick-infested areas. Hay or straw...

  9. 9 CFR 95.28 - Hay or straw and similar material from tick-infested areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... tick-infested areas. 95.28 Section 95.28 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... PRODUCTS SANITARY CONTROL OF ANIMAL BYPRODUCTS (EXCEPT CASINGS), AND HAY AND STRAW, OFFERED FOR ENTRY INTO THE UNITED STATES § 95.28 Hay or straw and similar material from tick-infested areas. Hay or straw...

  10. 9 CFR 95.28 - Hay or straw and similar material from tick-infested areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... tick-infested areas. 95.28 Section 95.28 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... PRODUCTS SANITARY CONTROL OF ANIMAL BYPRODUCTS (EXCEPT CASINGS), AND HAY AND STRAW, OFFERED FOR ENTRY INTO THE UNITED STATES § 95.28 Hay or straw and similar material from tick-infested areas. Hay or straw...

  11. 9 CFR 95.28 - Hay or straw and similar material from tick-infested areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... tick-infested areas. 95.28 Section 95.28 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... PRODUCTS SANITARY CONTROL OF ANIMAL BYPRODUCTS (EXCEPT CASINGS), AND HAY AND STRAW, OFFERED FOR ENTRY INTO THE UNITED STATES § 95.28 Hay or straw and similar material from tick-infested areas. Hay or straw...

  12. Selected properties of particleboard panels manufactured from rice straws of different geometries

    Treesearch

    Xianjun Li; Zhiyong Cai; Jerrold E. Winandy; Altaf H. Basta

    2010-01-01

    The objective is to evaluate the primary mechanical and physical properties of particleboard made from hammer-milled rice straw particles of six different categories and two types of resins. The results show the performance of straw particleboards is highly dependent upon the straw particle size controlled by the opening size of the perforated plate inside the hammer-...

  13. 9 CFR 95.21 - Hay and straw; requirements for unrestricted entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hay and straw; requirements for... SANITARY CONTROL OF ANIMAL BYPRODUCTS (EXCEPT CASINGS), AND HAY AND STRAW, OFFERED FOR ENTRY INTO THE UNITED STATES § 95.21 Hay and straw; requirements for unrestricted entry. Except as provided in §...

  14. 9 CFR 95.22 - Hay and straw; importations permitted subject to restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hay and straw; importations permitted... ANIMAL PRODUCTS SANITARY CONTROL OF ANIMAL BYPRODUCTS (EXCEPT CASINGS), AND HAY AND STRAW, OFFERED FOR ENTRY INTO THE UNITED STATES § 95.22 Hay and straw; importations permitted subject to...

  15. Pine straw harvesting, fire, and fertilization affect understory vegetation within a Louisiana longleaf pine stand

    Treesearch

    James D. Haywood

    2012-01-01

    Pine straw harvesting can provide an economic benefit to landowners, but the practice may also change the composition of plant communities. This research was initiated in a 34-year-old stand of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) established in 1956 to study how pine straw management practices (fertilization, prescribed fire, and straw harvesting) affected plant...

  16. Intercostal drainage tube or intracardiac drainage tube?

    PubMed Central

    Anitha, N.; Kamath, S. Ganesh; Khymdeit, Edison; Prabhu, Manjunath

    2016-01-01

    Although insertion of chest drain tubes is a common medical practice, there are risks associated with this procedure, especially when inexperienced physicians perform it. Wrong insertion of the tube has been known to cause morbidity and occasional mortality. We report a case where the left ventricle was accidentally punctured leading to near-exsanguination. This report is to highlight the need for experienced physicians to supervise the procedure and train the younger physician in the safe performance of the procedure. PMID:27397467

  17. Pseudomonas punonensis sp. nov., isolated from straw.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Elena; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha-Helena; Valverde, Angel; Velázquez, Encarna; Zúñiga, Doris; Velezmoro, Carmen; Peix, Alvaro

    2013-05-01

    During a study of the 'tunta' (frozen-dry potato) production process in Peru, a bacterial strain, LMT03(T), was isolated from the straw grass in which the potatoes are dried. This strain was classified into the genus Pseudomonas on the basis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, and is most closely related to Pseudomonas argentinensis CH01(T) with 99.3 % identity in this gene and 96 %, 92 % and 86 % identities in rpoB, rpoD and gyrB genes, respectively. Strain LMT03(T) has a single polar flagellum, like other related yellow-pigment-producing pseudomonads. The major quinone is Q-9. The major fatty acids are C18 : 1ω7c in summed feature 8 (40.82 %), C16 : 1ω6c/C16 : 1ω6c in summed feature 3 (23.72 %) and C16 : 0 (15.20 %). The strain produces oxidase but it does not produce gelatinase, indole, urease, arginine dihydrolase or β-galactosidase. Catalase production was very weak after 28 and 48 h incubation on nutrient agar medium. Nitrate reduction is negative. It does not hydrolyse aesculin. The DNA G+C content is 57.8 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization results showed lower than 52 % relatedness with respect to the type strain of P. argentinensis, CH01(T). These results, together with other phenotypic characteristics, support the definition of a novel species within the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas punonensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LMT03(T) ( = LMG 26839(T) = CECT 8089(T)).

  18. Xylanase and ultrasound assisted pulping of wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Dedhia, Bhavin S; Csoka, Levente; Rathod, Virendra K

    2012-10-01

    In the present work, a novel approach to pretreat wheat straw pulping was investigated with ultrasound and xylanase to achieve maximum reduction in lignin content. Sequential xylanase pretreatment and alkaline pulping was found to reduce kappa number by 0.31 to 4.84 % compared with only alkaline pulping alone at different pulping conditions. Although Klason lignin of ultrasound-treated straw was found to be 7.37 % less compared with untreated straw, sequential ultrasound pretreatment and alkaline pulping could not show any significant reduction in kappa number compared with alkaline pulping alone. Also, sequential xylanase and ultrasound pretreatment could not show any significant reduction in kappa number. Total yield of the pulp was found to be less in ultrasound-assisted processing compared with both alkaline pulping alone and sequential xylanase pretreatment and alkaline pulping.

  19. Soil microbial activity as influenced by compaction and straw mulching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siczek, A.; Frąc, M.

    2012-02-01

    Field study was performed on Haplic Luvisol soil to determine the effects of soil compaction and straw mulching on microbial parameters of soil under soybean. Treatments with different compaction were established on unmulched and mulched with straw soil. The effect of soil compaction and straw mulching on the total bacteria number and activities of dehydrogenases, protease, alkaline and acid phosphatases was studied. The results of study indicated the decrease of enzymes activities in strongly compacted soil and their increase in medium compacted soil as compared to no-compacted treatment. Mulch application caused stimulation of the bacteria total number and enzymatic activity in the soil under all compaction levels. Compaction and mulch effects were significant for all analyzed microbial parameters (P<0.001).

  20. Lightweight composites from long wheat straw and polypropylene web.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yi; Huda, Shah; Yang, Yiqi

    2010-03-01

    Whole and split wheat straws (WS) with length up to 10 cm have been used with polypropylene (PP) webs to make lightweight composites with properties superior to jute-PP composites with the same density. The effect of WS concentration, WS length, and split configuration (half, quarter, and mechanically split) on flexural and tensile properties of the composites has been investigated. The sound absorption properties of composites from whole straw and split straw have been studied. Compared with whole WS-PP composites, mechanically split WS-PP composites have 69% higher flexural strength, 39% higher modulus of elasticity, 18% higher impact resistance properties, 69% higher tensile strength and 26% higher Young's modulus. Compared with jute-PP composites, mechanically split WS-PP composites have 114% higher flexural strength, 38% higher modulus of elasticity, 10% higher tensile strength, 140% higher Young's modulus, better sound absorption properties and 50% lower impact resistance.

  1. Evaporative CO2 microchannel cooling for the LHCb VELO pixel upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Aguiar Francisco, O. A.; Buytaert, J.; Collins, P.; Dumps, R.; John, M.; Mapelli, A.; Romagnoli, G.

    2015-05-01

    The LHCb Vertex Detector (VELO) will be upgraded in 2018 to a lightweight pixel detector capable of 40 MHz readout and operation in very close proximity to the LHC beams. The thermal management of the system will be provided by evaporative CO2 circulating in microchannels embedded within thin silicon plates. This solution has been selected due to the excellent thermal efficiency, the absence of thermal expansion mismatch with silicon ASICs and sensors, the radiation hardness of CO2, and very low contribution to the material budget. Although microchannel cooling is gaining considerable attention for applications related to microelectronics, it is still a novel technology for particle physics experiments, in particular when combined with evaporative CO2 cooling. The R&D effort for LHCb is focused on the design and layout of the channels together with a fluidic connector and its attachment which must withstand pressures up to 170 bar. Even distribution of the coolant is ensured by means of the use of restrictions implemented before the entrance to a race track like layout of the main cooling channels. The coolant flow and pressure drop have been simulated as well as the thermal performance of the device. This proceeding describes the design and optimization of the cooling system for LHCb and the latest prototyping results.

  2. Two 10-bp regions are critical for phytochrome regulation of a Lemna gibba Lhcb gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Kehoe, D M; Degenhardt, J; Winicov, I; Tobin, E M

    1994-01-01

    Two small regions of the promoter of an Lhcb gene encoding a light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein were identified as essential in conferring phytochrome responsiveness by using a transient expression assay. Initially, 5' deletion analysis of cabAB19, an Lhcb2 gene of Lemna, showed that sequences within the region from -174 to -104 relative to the start of transcription were necessary for phytochrome regulation. Internal deletion and substitution mutants were used to demonstrate that no additional phytochrome-responsive regions exist between -1600 and -174 in this promoter. A 171-bp fragment of the promoter extending from -239 to -69 was sufficient to impart phytochrome responsiveness to a minimal ubiquitin promoter that was not itself regulated by light. Specific binding of Lemna proteins to the region necessary for phytochrome responsiveness was demonstrated using in vitro polyacrylamide gel mobility shift assays and 1,10-phenanthroline copper ion footprinting. Further analysis of the region from -174 to -104 demonstrated that mutations in two separate 10-bp sequences, from -134 to -125 and from -114 to -105, could abolish phytochrome responsiveness; thus, there are two unique regions that are necessary for phytochrome regulation of this gene. One of these regions contains a CCAAT motif and the other a GATA motif. These motifs are conserved in the promoters of many Lhcb genes and may be important elements in the phytochrome responsiveness of this gene family. PMID:7919982

  3. Environmentally friendly education: A passive solar, straw-bale school

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, L.; Dickinson, J.

    1999-07-01

    The Waldorf students in the Roaring Fork Valley of western Colorado are learning their reading, writing and arithmetic in the cozy confines of a solar heated, naturally lit, straw-bale school. The Waldorf education system, founded in 1919 by Austrian Rudolph Steiner, stresses what's appropriate for the kids, not what's easiest to teach. In constructing a new school, the Waldorf community wanted a building that would reflect their philosophy. There was a long list of requirements: natural, energy efficient, light, warm, alive, and earthy. Passive solar straw-bale construction brought together all those qualities.

  4. Drinking-Straw Microbalance and Seesaw: Stability and Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Peter; Glasser, Leslie

    2015-03-01

    The mechanics of a beam balance are little appreciated and seldom understood. We here consider the conditions that result in a stable balance, with center of gravity below the fulcrum (pivot point), while an unstable balance results when the center of gravity is above the fulcrum. The highly sensitive drinking-straw microbalance, which uses a plastic drinking straw as a rigid beam, is briefly described with some slight convenient modifications. Different placements of the center of gravity are considered analytically to explain the equilibrium neutrality, stability, and instability of such beam balances as the microbalance, the playground "seesaw" or "teeter-totter," the "dipping bird," and other toys and magic tricks.

  5. Performance of large balers for collecting rice straw

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, B.M.; Joerjes, D.A.; Dobie, J.B.; Arthur, J.F.

    1985-03-01

    A large rectangular baler was tested and evaluated for application in harvesting rice straw. Baler performance is compared to that of big roll balers and other handling systems. Large bale systems offer economic advantages over small rectangular bale systems. Large rectangular bales are excellent for transport but must be provided with covered storage to avoid spoilage. Big roll bales are less desirable for long distance transport but can be left in uncovered storage without excessive dry matter loss. Total delivered cost of straw depends on packaging system, transportation distance, processing requirements, and utilization mode. 7 references.

  6. Pulse Tube Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Yoichi

    The pulse tube refrigerator is one of the regenerative cycle refrigerators such as Stirling cycle or Gifford-McMahon cycle which gives the cooling temperature below 150 K down to liquid helium temperature. In 1963, W. E. Gifford invented a simple refrigeration cycle which is composed of compressor, regenerator and simple tube named as pulse tube which gives a similar function of the expander in Stirling or Gifford-McMahon cycle. The thermodynamically performance of this pulse tube refrigerator is inferior to that of other regenerative cycles. In 1984, however, Mikulin and coworkers made a significant advance in pulse tube configuration called as orifice pulse tube. After this, several modifications of the pulse tube hot end configuration have been developed. With those modifications, the thermodynamic performance of the pulse tube refrigerator became the same order to that of Stirling and Gifford-McMahon refrigerator. This article reviews the brief history of the pulse tube refrigerator development in the view point of its thermodynamically efficiency. Simplified theories of the energy flow in the pulse tube have also been described.

  7. [Effect of pretreatment on storage and biogas production of baling wheat straw].

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui-Juan; Chen, Guang-Yin; Du, Jing; Chang, Zhi-Zhou; Ye, Xiao-Mei

    2013-08-01

    Long-term storage of crop straw is very important for biogas plant while pretreatment is always used to improve biogas production of crop straw. Feasibility of integrating the storage with pretreatment of baling wheat straw was studied. Changes of physicochemical properties and the biogas productivity of wheat straw obtained before and after 120 days storage were analyzed. The results showed that it was feasible to directly bale wheat straw for storage (control) and storage treatment had little effect on the physicochemical properties, structure and biogas productivity of wheat straw. After 120 day's storage, biogas production potential of the surface wheat straw of pile was decreased by 7.40%. Integrating NaOH pretreatment with straw storage was good for biogas production of wheat straw and the total solid (TS) biogas yield was increased by 7.02%-8.31% (compared to that of wheat straw without storage) and 5.68% -16.96% (compared to that of storage without alkaline pretreatment), respectively. Storage with urea treatment was adverse to biogas production of wheat straw and the contents of cellulose and hemicellulose of wheat straw were decreased by 18.25%-27.22% and 5.31%-16.15% and the TS biogas yield was decreased by 2.80%-7.71% after 120 day's storage. Exposing wheat straw to the air during the storage process was adverse to the conserving of organic matter and biogas utilization of wheat straw, but the influence was very slight and the TS biogas yield of wheat straw obtained from pile surface of control and urea treatment was decreased by 7.40% and 4.25%, respectively.

  8. Effects of incorporating differently-treated rice straw on phytoavailability of methylmercury in soil.

    PubMed

    Shu, Rui; Dang, Fei; Zhong, Huan

    2016-02-01

    Differently-treated crops straw is being widely used to fertilize soil, while the potential impacts of straw amendment on the biogeochemistry and phytoavailability of mercury in contaminated soils are largely unknown. In the present study, differently-treated rice straw (dry straw, composted straw, straw biochar, and straw ash) was incorporated into mercury-contaminated soil at an environment relevant level (1/100, w/w), and mercury speciation, methylmercury (MeHg) phytoavailability (using ammonium thiosulfate extraction method, validated elsewhere) and bioaccumulation (in Indian mustard Brassica junceas) were quantified. Our results indicated that incorporating straw biochar or composted straw into soil would decrease phytoavailable MeHg levels, possibly due to the strong binding of MeHg with particulate organic matter in amended straw ('MeHg immobilization effect'). Consequently, MeHg accumulation in aboveground tissue of Indian mustard harvested from straw biochar-amended soil decreased by 20% compared to the control. Differently, incorporation of dry straw resulted in elevated MeHg levels in soil ('Mercury methylation effect'). Decomposition of amended dry straw in soil would evidently increase DOC levels (averagely 40%-195% higher than the control), which may subsequently mobilize MeHg in the soil ('MeHg mobilization effect'). Accordingly, incorporation of dry straw led to increased phytoavailable MeHg levels in the soil and doubled MeHg accumulation in Indian mustard. Our results provided the first evidence that incorporating differently-treated rice straw into soil could have diverse effects on mercury biogeochemistry and phytoavailability, which should be taken into account in risk assessment or soil remediation.

  9. Delignification of wheat straw by Pleurotus spp. under mushroom-growing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, L.J.; Reid, I.D.; Coxworth, E.C.

    1987-06-01

    Pleurotus sajor-caju, P. sapidus, P. cornucopiae, and P. ostreatus mushrooms were produced on unsupplemented wheat straw. The yield of mushrooms averaged 3.6% (dry-weight basis), with an average 18% straw weight loss. Lignin losses (average, 11%) were lower than cellulose (20%) and hemicellulose (50%) losses. The cellulase digestibility of the residual straw after mushroom harvest was generally lower than that of the original straw. It does not appear feasible to simultaneously produce Pleurotus mushrooms and a highly delignified residue from wheat straw. (Refs. 24).

  10. Lunar Lava Tube Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Cheryl Lynn; Walden, Bryce; Billings, Thomas L.; Reeder, P. Douglas

    1992-01-01

    Large (greater than 300 m diameter) lava tube caverns appear to exist on the Moon and could provide substantial safety and cost benefits for lunar bases. Over 40 m of basalt and regolith constitute the lava tube roof and would protect both construction and operations. Constant temperatures of -20 C reduce thermal stress on structures and machines. Base designs need not incorporate heavy shielding, so lightweight materials can be used and construction can be expedited. Identification and characterization of lava tube caverns can be incorporated into current precursor lunar mission plans. Some searches can even be done from Earth. Specific recommendations for lunar lava tube search and exploration are (1) an Earth-based radar interferometer, (2) an Earth-penetrating radar (EPR) orbiter, (3) kinetic penetrators for lunar lava tube confirmation, (4) a 'Moon Bat' hovering rocket vehicle, and (5) the use of other proposed landers and orbiters to help find lunar lava tubes.

  11. Kaumana lava tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.

    1974-01-01

    The entrance to Kaumana Lava Tube is in a picnic ground next to Highway 20 (Kaumana Drive) about 6.5 km southwest of Hilo. The area is passed on the way to the Kona Coast via the Saddle Road and is identified by a Hawaii Visitors Bureau sign. Although it is not the largest lava tube in the islands, Kaumana Lava Tube is an interesting geological formation, displaying many of the features typical of lava tube interiors. It is accessible, relatively easy to walk through, and is in an excellent state of preservation. The tube developed in a historic lava flow (1881, from Mauna Loa), and many aspects of lava tube activity are observed.

  12. Ruggedized electronographic tube development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nevin, S.

    1981-01-01

    Because of their glass components and lack of far ultraviolet sensitivity, currently available Spectracons are not suited for rocket launch. Technology developed for second generation image tubes and for magnetically focused image tubes can be applied to improve the optical and mechanical properties of these magnetically focused electronographic tubes whose 40 kilovolt signal electrons exit a 4-micrometer thick mica window and penetrate a photographic recording emulsion.

  13. COAXIAL TUBE COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Niemoth, H.R.

    1963-02-26

    BS>This patent shows a device for quickly coupling coaxial tubes in metal-to-metal fashion, so as to be suitable for use in a nuclear reactor. A threaded coliar urges a tapered metal extension on the outer coaxial tube into a tapered seat in the device and simultaneously exerts pressure through a coaxial helical spring so that a similar extension on the inner tube seats in a similar seat near the other end. (AEC)

  14. TUBE SPLITTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Frantz, C.E.; Cawley, W.E.

    1961-05-01

    A tool is described for cutting a coolant tube adapted to contain fuel elements to enable the tube to be removed from a graphite moderator mass. The tool splits the tube longitudinally into halves and curls the longitudinal edges of the halves inwardly so that they occupy less space and can be moved radially inwardly away from the walls of the hole in the graphite for easy removal from the graphite.

  15. Programming DNA tube circumferences.

    PubMed

    Yin, Peng; Hariadi, Rizal F; Sahu, Sudheer; Choi, Harry M T; Park, Sung Ha; Labean, Thomas H; Reif, John H

    2008-08-08

    Synthesizing molecular tubes with monodisperse, programmable circumferences is an important goal shared by nanotechnology, materials science, and supermolecular chemistry. We program molecular tube circumferences by specifying the complementarity relationships between modular domains in a 42-base single-stranded DNA motif. Single-step annealing results in the self-assembly of long tubes displaying monodisperse circumferences of 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, or 20 DNA helices.

  16. Tubing weld cracking test

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Qiao, C.Y.P.

    1995-12-31

    A tubing weld cracking (TWC) test was developed for applications involving advanced austenitic alloys (such as modified 800H and 310HCbN). Compared to the Finger hot cracking test, the TWC test shows an enhanced ability to evaluate the crack sensitivity of tubing materials. The TWC test can evaluate the cracking tendency of base as well as filter materials. Thus, it is a useful tool for tubing suppliers, filler metal producers and fabricators.

  17. Conduction cooled tube supports

    DOEpatents

    Worley, Arthur C.; Becht, IV, Charles

    1984-01-01

    In boilers, process tubes are suspended by means of support studs that are in thermal contact with and attached to the metal roof casing of the boiler and the upper bend portions of the process tubes. The support studs are sufficiently short that when the boiler is in use, the support studs are cooled by conduction of heat to the process tubes and the roof casing thereby maintaining the temperature of the stud so that it does not exceed 1400.degree. F.

  18. Tube-welder aids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    Simple tools assist in setting up and welding tubes. Welder aids can be easily made to fit given tube diameter. Finished set can be used repeatedly to fix electrode-to-weld gap and mark sleeve and joint positions. Tools are readily made in tube-manufacturing plants and pay for themselves in short time in reduced labor costs and quality control: Conventional measurements are too slow for mass production and are prone to errors.

  19. Retrograde gastrojejunostomy tube migration.

    PubMed

    Adesina, Adeleke; Rammohan, Guhan; Jeanmonod, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous enteral feeding tubes are placed about 250,000 times each year in the United States. Although they are relatively safe, their placement may be complicated by perforation, infection, bleeding, vomiting, dislodgment, and obstruction. There have been numerous reports of antegrade migration of gastrojejunostomy (G-J) tubes. We report a case of G-J tube regurgitation following protracted vomiting and discuss the management of this very rare entity.

  20. Straw in the B Ring Edge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-30

    This image shows a region in Saturn's outer B ring. NASA's Cassini spacecraft viewed this area at a level of detail twice as high as it had ever been observed before. The view here is of the outer edge of the B ring, at left, which is perturbed by the most powerful gravitational resonance in the rings: the "2:1 resonance" with the icy moon Mimas. This means that, for every single orbit of Mimas, the ring particles at this specific distance from Saturn orbit the planet twice. This results in a regular tugging force that perturbs the particles in this location. A lot of structure is visible in the zone near the edge on the left. This is likely due to some combination of the gravity of embedded objects too small to see, or temporary clumping triggered by the action of the resonance itself. Scientists informally refer to this type of structure as "straw." This image was taken using a fairly long exposure, causing the embedded clumps to smear into streaks as they moved in their orbits. Later Cassini orbits will bring shorter exposures of the same region, which will give researchers a better idea of what these clumps look like. But in this case, the smearing does help provide a clearer idea of how the clumps are moving. This image is a lightly processed version, with minimal enhancement; this version preserves all original details present in the image. Another other version (Figure 1) has been processed to remove the small bright blemishes due to cosmic rays and charged particle radiation near the planet -- a more aesthetically pleasing image, but with a slight softening of the finest details. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Dec. 18, 2016. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 32,000 miles (52,000 kilometers) from the rings and looks toward the unilluminated side of the rings. Image scale is about a quarter-mile (360 meters) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21057

  1. Light-dependent reversible phosphorylation of the minor photosystem II antenna Lhcb6 (CP24) occurs in lycophytes.

    PubMed

    Ferroni, Lorenzo; Angeleri, Martina; Pantaleoni, Laura; Pagliano, Cristina; Longoni, Paolo; Marsano, Francesco; Aro, Eva-Mari; Suorsa, Marjaana; Baldisserotto, Costanza; Giovanardi, Martina; Cella, Rino; Pancaldi, Simonetta

    2014-03-01

    Evolution of vascular plants required compromise between photosynthesis and photodamage. We analyzed representative species from two divergent lineages of vascular plants, lycophytes and euphyllophytes, with respect to the response of their photosynthesis and light-harvesting properties to increasing light intensity. In the two analyzed lycophytes, Selaginella martensii and Lycopodium squarrosum, the medium phase of non-photochemical quenching relaxation increased under high light compared to euphyllophytes. This was thought to be associated with the occurrence of a further thylakoid phosphoprotein in both lycophytes, in addition to D2, CP43 and Lhcb1-2. This protein, which showed light intensity-dependent reversible phosphorylation, was identified in S. martensii as Lhcb6, a minor LHCII antenna subunit of PSII. Lhcb6 is known to have evolved in the context of land colonization. In S. martensii, Lhcb6 was detected as a component of the free LHCII assemblies, but also associated with PSI. Most of the light-induced changes affected the amount and phosphorylation of the LHCII assemblies, which possibly mediate PSI-PSII connectivity. We propose that Lhcb6 is involved in light energy management in lycophytes, participating in energy balance between PSI and PSII through a unique reversible phosphorylation, not yet observed in other land plants.

  2. Sapphire tube pressure vessel

    DOEpatents

    Outwater, John O.

    2000-01-01

    A pressure vessel is provided for observing corrosive fluids at high temperatures and pressures. A transparent Teflon bag contains the corrosive fluid and provides an inert barrier. The Teflon bag is placed within a sapphire tube, which forms a pressure boundary. The tube is received within a pipe including a viewing window. The combination of the Teflon bag, sapphire tube and pipe provides a strong and inert pressure vessel. In an alternative embodiment, tie rods connect together compression fittings at opposite ends of the sapphire tube.

  3. Fuel nozzle tube retention

    DOEpatents

    Cihlar, David William; Melton, Patrick Benedict

    2017-02-28

    A system for retaining a fuel nozzle premix tube includes a retention plate and a premix tube which extends downstream from an outlet of a premix passage defined along an aft side of a fuel plenum body. The premix tube includes an inlet end and a spring support feature which is disposed proximate to the inlet end. The premix tube extends through the retention plate. The spring retention feature is disposed between an aft side of the fuel plenum and the retention plate. The system further includes a spring which extends between the spring retention feature and the retention plate.

  4. Sapphire tube pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Outwater, J.O.

    2000-05-23

    A pressure vessel is provided for observing corrosive fluids at high temperatures and pressures. A transparent Teflon bag contains the corrosive fluid and provides an inert barrier. The Teflon bag is placed within a sapphire tube, which forms a pressure boundary. The tube is received within a pipe including a viewing window. The combination of the Teflon bag, sapphire tube and pipe provides a strong and inert pressure vessel. In an alternative embodiment, tie rods connect together compression fittings at opposite ends of the sapphire tube.

  5. Wound tube heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

  6. Composite Pulse Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jerry L.; Cloyd, Jason H.

    2007-01-01

    A modification of the design of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube cryocooler reduces axial thermal conductance while preserving radial thermal conductance. It is desirable to minimize axial thermal conductance in the pulse-tube wall to minimize leakage of heat between the warm and cold ends of the pulse tube. At the same time, it is desirable to maximize radial thermal conductance at the cold end of the pulse tube to ensure adequate thermal contact between (1) a heat exchanger in the form of a stack of copper screens inside the pulse tube at the cold end and (2) the remainder of the cold tip, which is the object to which the heat load is applied and from which heat must be removed. The modified design yields a low-heat-leak pulse tube that can be easily integrated with a cold tip. A typical pulse tube of prior design is either a thin-walled metal tube or a metal tube with a nonmetallic lining. It is desirable that the outer surface of a pulse tube be cylindrical (in contradistinction to tapered) to simplify the design of a regenerator that is also part of the cryocooler. Under some conditions, it is desirable to taper the inner surface of the pulse tube to reduce acoustic streaming. The combination of a cylindrical outer surface and a tapered inner surface can lead to unacceptably large axial conduction if the pulse tube is made entirely of metal. Making the pulse-tube wall of a nonmetallic, lowthermal- conductivity material would not solve the problem because the wall would not afford the needed thermal contact for the stack of screens in the cold end. The modified design calls for fabricating the pulse tube in two parts: a longer, nonmetallic part that is tapered on the inside and cylindrical on the outside and a shorter, metallic part that is cylindrical on both the inside and the outside. The nonmetallic part can be made from G-10 fiberglass-reinforced epoxy or other low-thermal-conductivity, cryogenically compatible material. The metallic part must have high

  7. Combined pretreatment using ozonolysis and ball milling to improve enzymatic saccharification of corn straw.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Xiang, Heji; Li, Yongfu

    2015-03-01

    Two clean pretreatments, ozonolysis (OZ) and planetary ball milling (BM) were applied separately and in combination to improve the enzymatic hydrolysis of corn straw. Pretreatment of corn straw by OZ and BM alone improved the enzymatic hydrolysis significantly, primarily through delignification and decrystallization of cellulose, respectively. When combined, OZ-BM and BM-OZ pretreatments made the enzymatic hydrolysis more efficient. The glucose and xylose yield of corn straw treated with OZ for 90 min followed by BM for 8 min (OZ90-BM8) reached to 407.8 and 101.9 mg/g-straw, respectively under cellulase loading of 15 FPU/g-straw, which was fivefold more than that of untreated straw. Under much lower cellulase loading of 1.5 FPU/g-straw, the glucose and xylose yield of treated straw OZ90-BM8 remained at 416.0 and 108.4 mg/g-straw, respectively, while the yield of untreated straw decreased. These findings indicate that the combined OZ-BM can be used as a promising pretreatment for corn straw.

  8. Regularity and mechanism of wheat straw properties change in ball milling process at cellular scale.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chongfeng; Xiao, Weihua; Ji, Guanya; Zhang, Yang; Cao, Yaoyao; Han, Lujia

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the change of structure and physicochemical properties of wheat straw in ball milling process at cellular scale, a series of wheat straws samples with different milling time were produced using an ultrafine vibration ball mill. A multitechnique approach was used to analyze the variation of wheat straw properties. The results showed that the characteristics of wheat straw powder displayed regular changes as a function of the milling time, i.e., the powder underwent the inversion of breakage to agglomerative regime during wheat straw ball milling process. The crystallinity index, bulk density and water retention capacity of wheat straw were exponential relation with ball milling time. Moreover, ball milling continually converted macromolecules of wheat straw cell wall into water-soluble substances resulting in the water extractives proportional to milling time. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. A comparative LCA of rice straw utilization for fuels and fertilizer in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Silalertruksa, Thapat; Gheewala, Shabbir H

    2013-12-01

    Life cycle assessment of four rice straw utilization systems including; (1) direct combustion for electricity, (2) biochemical conversion to bio-ethanol and biogas, (3) thermo-chemical conversion to bio-DME, and (4) incorporation into the soil as fertilizer have been conducted to compare their environmental performances. The results showed that per ton of dry rice straw, the bio-ethanol pathway resulted in the highest environmental sustainability with regards to reductions in global warming and resource depletion potentials. Rice straw bio-DME was preferable vis-à-vis reduction in acidification potential. Rice straw electricity and fertilizer also brought about several environmental benefits. The key environmental benefit of rice straw utilization came from avoiding the deleterious effects from burning straw in situ in the field. Recommendations for enhancing environmental sustainability of rice straw utilization for fuels and fertilizer are provided.

  10. Charcoal from the pyrolysis of rapeseed plant straw-stalk

    SciTech Connect

    Karaosmanoglu, F.; Tetik, E.

    1999-07-01

    Charcoal is an important product of pyrolysis of biomass sources. Charcoal can be used for domestic, agricultural, metallurgical, and chemical purposes. In this study different characteristics of charcoal, one of the rape seed plant straw-stalk pyrolysis product, was researched and presented as candidates.

  11. Cryoprotectant redistribution along the frozen straw probed by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Karpegina, Yu A; Okotrub, K A; Brusentsev, E Yu; Amstislavsky, S Ya; Surovtsev, N V

    2016-04-01

    The distribution of cryoprotectant (10% glycerol) and ice along the frozen plastic straw (the most useful container for freezing mammalian semen, oocytes and embryos) was studied by Raman scattering technique. Raman spectroscopy being a contactless, non-invasive tool was applied for the straws filled with the cryoprotectant solution and frozen by controlled rate programs commonly used for mammalian embryos freezing. Analysis of Raman spectra measured at different points along the straw reveals a non-uniform distribution of the cryoprotectant. The ratio between non-crystalline solution and ice was found to be increased by several times at the bottom side of the solution column frozen by the standard freezing program. The increase of the cryoprotectant fraction occurs in the area where embryos or oocytes are normally placed during their freezing. Possible effects of the cooling rate and the ice nucleation temperature on the cryoprotectant fraction at the bottom side of the solution column were considered. Our findings highlight that the ice fraction around cryopreserved embryos or oocytes can differ significantly from the averaged one in the frozen plastic straws.

  12. Truck Drivers, a Straw, and Two Glasses of Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iga, Kevin; Killpatrick, Kendra

    2006-01-01

    While waiting for his meal to arrive, a truck driver was using his straw to move water from one glass to another when he was struck by this question: If I keep doing this, will the two glasses ever have exactly the same amount of water? This article looks at various problems related to that question.

  13. The Truck Driver's Straw Problem and Cantor Sets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iga, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    A colleague was moving, and someone on the professional moving crew, upon hearing she was a mathematician, asked what happens when you repeatedly transfer water back and forth between two classes using a straw. The question is simple to solve if you alternate which glass you transfer from and to, but if more general patters are allowed, some…

  14. Cereal straw analyses for thermochemical conversion: Part II: Thermogravimetric characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Bining, A.S.; Ghaly, A.E.; Taweel, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    The thermogravity characteristics of four cereal straws were investigated in air atmosphere at three heating rates (10, 20 and 50/sup 0/C/min). The thermal degradation rate in active and passive zones, initial degradation temperature and residual weight at 600/sup 0/C are presented.

  15. Truck Drivers, a Straw, and Two Glasses of Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iga, Kevin; Killpatrick, Kendra

    2006-01-01

    While waiting for his meal to arrive, a truck driver was using his straw to move water from one glass to another when he was struck by this question: If I keep doing this, will the two glasses ever have exactly the same amount of water? This article looks at various problems related to that question.

  16. The Truck Driver's Straw Problem and Cantor Sets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iga, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    A colleague was moving, and someone on the professional moving crew, upon hearing she was a mathematician, asked what happens when you repeatedly transfer water back and forth between two classes using a straw. The question is simple to solve if you alternate which glass you transfer from and to, but if more general patters are allowed, some…

  17. Thermal degradation of cereal straws in air and nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaly, A.E.; Ergundenler, A.

    1991-12-31

    The termogravimetric behavior of four cereal straws (wheat, barley, oats, and rye) was examined at three heating rates (10, 20, and 50{degrees}C/min) in air and nitrogen atmospheres. The thermal degradation rate in active and passive pyrolysis zones, the initial degradation temperature, and the residual weight at 600{degrees}C were determined for these straws in both atmospheres. Increasing the heating rate increased the thermal degradation rate, and decreased both the initial degradation temperature and the residual weight at 600{degrees}C. The higher the cellulosic content of the straw, the higher the thermal degradation rate and the initial degradation temperature. Also, higher ash content in the straw resulted in higher residual weight at 600{degrees}C. The thermal degradation rate in active pyrolysis zone was lower in air atmosphere than in nitrogen atmosphere, whereas the thermal degradation rate in passive pyrolysis zone and the residual weight at 600{degrees}C were higher in nitrogen atmosphere than in air atmosphere.

  18. Drinking-Straw Microbalance and Seesaw: Stability and Instability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Peter; Glasser, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    The mechanics of a beam balance are little appreciated and seldom understood. We here consider the conditions that result in a stable balance, with center of gravity below the fulcrum (pivot point), while an unstable balance results when the center of gravity is above the fulcrum. The highly sensitive drinking-straw microbalance, which uses a…

  19. Cavitation assisted delignification of wheat straw: a review.

    PubMed

    Iskalieva, Asylzat; Yimmou, Bob Mbouyem; Gogate, Parag R; Horvath, Miklos; Horvath, Peter G; Csoka, Levente

    2012-09-01

    Wheat is grown in most of the Indian and Chinese regions and after harvesting, the remaining straw offers considerable promise as a renewable source most suitable for papermaking and as a pulping resource. Delignification of wheat straw offers ample scope for energy conservation by way of the application of the process intensification principles. The present work reviews the pretreatment techniques available for improving the effectiveness of the conventional approach for polysaccharide component separation, softening and delignification. A detailed overview of the cavitation assisted delignification process has been presented based on the earlier literature illustrations and important operational guidelines have been presented for overall low-cost and amenable energy utilization in the processes. The effectiveness of the methods has been evaluated according to yield and properties of the isolated fibers in comparison to the conventional treatment. Also the experimental results of one such non-conventional treatment scheme based on the use of hydrodynamic cavitation have been presented for the pulping of wheat straw. The effect of hydrodynamically induced cavitation on cell wall matrix and its components have been characterized using FT-IR analysis with an objective of understanding the cavitation assisted digestion mechanism on straws. It has been observed that the use of hydrodynamic cavitation does not degrade the fibrillar structure of cellulose but causes relocalisation and partial removal of lignin. Overall it appears that considerable improvement can be obtained due to the use of pretreatment or alternate techniques for delignification, which is an energy intensive step in the paper making industries.

  20. Managing pine straw harvests to minimize soil and water losses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pine straw is a valuable landscape mulch because it conserves soil moisture, moderates soil temperature, inhibits weed growth, and protects the soil surface against erosion, while retaining a loose structure that allows water, air, and fertilizer to easily reach the soil surface. As a result, marke...

  1. Folk Arts in the Home: New Mexican Straw Applique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Aurelia; Sullivan, Laura Temple

    In the 16th century the Spanish introduced marquetry techniques to the New World. The term "marquetry" applies to two different types of surface decoration: inlay and veneer; straw applique as it is practiced in New Mexico combines both techniques.) The introduction of marquetry dovetailed with the pre-Hispanic Aztec tradition of…

  2. The properties of pellets from mixing bamboo and rice straw

    Treesearch

    Zhijia Liu; Xing' e Liu; Benhua Fei; Zehui Jiang; Zhiyong Cai; Yan Yu

    2013-01-01

    Rice straw pellets are the main type of biomass solid fuel and have great potential as a bioenergy resource of the future in China. But it also showed important problems because of its high content of ashes and its low gross calorific value, reducing the possibility to be used in domestic heating. It was certified that mixing different types of biomass materials was...

  3. Drinking-Straw Microbalance and Seesaw: Stability and Instability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Peter; Glasser, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    The mechanics of a beam balance are little appreciated and seldom understood. We here consider the conditions that result in a stable balance, with center of gravity below the fulcrum (pivot point), while an unstable balance results when the center of gravity is above the fulcrum. The highly sensitive drinking-straw microbalance, which uses a…

  4. A novel micro-straw for cryopreservation of small number of human spermatozoon.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Zou, Sha-Sha; Zhu, Yong; Sun, Can; Liu, Yu-Fei; Wang, Shan-Shan; Shi, Wen-Bo; Zhu, Jing-Jing; Huang, Yong-Hua; Li, Zheng

    2016-02-02

    Cryopreservation of few spermatozoa is still a major challenge for male fertility preservation. This study reports use a new micro-straw (LSL straw) for freezing few spermatozoa for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Semen samples from 22 fertile donors were collected, and each semen sample was diluted and mixed with cryoprotectant in a ratio of 1:1, and then frozen using three different straws such as LSL straw (50-100 μl), traditional 0.25 ml and 0.5 ml straws. For freezing, all straws were fumigated with liquid nitrogen, with temperature directly reducing to -130--140°C. Sperm concentration, progressive motility, morphology, acrosome integrity, and DNA fragmentation index were evaluated before and after freezing. After freezing-thawing, LSL straw group had significantly higher percentage of sperm motility than traditional 0.25 ml and 0.5 ml straw groups (38.5% vs 27.4% and 25.6%, P < 0.003). Sperm motility and acrosomal integrity after freezing-thawing were significantly lower than that of before freezing. However, there was no significant difference in morphology, acrosome, and DNA integrity between the three types of straws (P > 0.05). As LSL straws were thinner and hold very small volume, the freezing rate of LSL straw was obviously faster than 0.25 ml straw and 0.5 ml straws. In conclusion, LSL micro-straws may be useful to store few motile spermatozoa with good recovery of motility for patients undergoing ICSI treatment.

  5. Steam generator tube failures

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

    1996-04-01

    A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service.

  6. Chemical reaction conditions in a Danish 80 MW{sub th} CFB-boiler co-firing straw and coal

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, P.F.B.

    1997-12-31

    Future boilers to be constructed in Denmark including boilers intended for energy conversion of biomass (straw and wood chips) will be designed for Ultra Super Critical steam data. The high steam temperatures and subsequently metal temperatures in the superheaters will increase the corrosion hazard significantly. Severe superheater corrosion observed in the convective path and on test tubes inserted into the loop seal of a Danish 80 MW{sub th} Ahlstroem Pyroflow CFB boiler co-firing coal and straw initiated this study on the conditions under which the chemical reactions occur and deposits form. Load changes--caused by variations in public demand for district heating shifts the reaction conditions in the loop seal between predominantly reducing and predominantly oxidizing conditions. Furthermore the external particle circulation rate and the local temperatures are strongly affected. Deposits collected in the loop seal on temperature controlled probes reveals Cl concentrations more than Twenty Thousand times higher than found in the surrounding bed material. The results are discussed and suggestions on how to reduce high temperature corrosion and superheater fouling are presented.

  7. How do bendy straws bend? A study of re-configurability of multi-stable corrugated shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bende, Nakul; Selden, Sarah; Evans, Arthur; Santangelo, Christian; Hayward, Ryan

    Shape programmable systems have evolved to allow for reconfiguration of structures through a variety of mechanisms including swelling, stress-relaxation, and thermal expansion. Particularly, there has been a recent interest in systems that exhibit bi-stability or multi-stability to achieve transformation between two or more pre-programmed states. Here, we study the ubiquitous architecture of corrugated shells, such as drinking straws or bellows, which has been well known for centuries. Some of these structures exhibit almost continuous stability amongst a wide range of reconfigurable shapes, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. To understand multi-stability in `bendy-straw' structures, we study the unit bi-conical segment using experiments and finite element modeling to elucidate the key geometrical and mechanical factors responsible for its multi-stability. The simple transformations of a unit segment - a change in length or angle can impart complex re-configurability of a structure containing many of these units. The fundamental understanding provided of this simple multi-stable building block could yield improvements in shape re-configurability for a wide array of applications such as corrugated medical tubing, robotics, and deployable structures. NSF EFRI ODISSEI-1240441.

  8. Method for shaping polyethylene tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Method forms polyethylene plastic tubing into configurations previously only possible with metal tubing. By using polyethylene in place of copper or stain less steel tubing inlow pressure systems, fabrication costs are significantly reduced. Polyethylene tubing can be used whenever low pressure tubing is needed in oil operations, aircraft and space applications, powerplants, and testing laboratories.

  9. Pyrotechnic Tubing Connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Thomas J.; Yang, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    Tool forms mechanical seal at joint without levers or hydraulic apparatus. Proposed tool intended for use in outer space used on Earth by heavily garbed workers to join tubing in difficult environments. Called Pyrotool, used with Lokring (or equivalent) fittings. Piston slides in cylinder when pushed by gas from detonating pyrotechnic charge. Impulse of piston compresses fittings, sealing around butting ends of tubes.

  10. Pyrolysis of agricultural biomass residues: Comparative study of corn cob, wheat straw, rice straw and rice husk.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Bijoy; Pandey, Nidhi; Bisht, Yashasvi; Singh, Rawel; Kumar, Jitendra; Bhaskar, Thallada

    2017-02-23

    Pyrolysis studies on conventional biomass were carried out in fixed bed reactor at different temperatures 300, 350, 400 and 450°C. Agricultural residues such as corn cob, wheat straw, rice straw and rice husk showed that the optimum temperatures for these residues are 450, 400, 400 and 450°C respectively. The maximum bio-oil yield in case of corn cob, wheat straw, rice straw and rice husk are 47.3, 36.7, 28.4 and 38.1wt% respectively. The effects of pyrolysis temperature and biomass type on the yield and composition of pyrolysis products were investigated. All bio-oils contents were mainly composed of oxygenated hydrocarbons. The higher area percentages of phenolic compounds were observed in the corn cob bio-oil than other bio-oils. From FT-IR and (1)H NMR spectra showed a high percentage of aliphatic functional groups for all bio-oils and distribution of products is different due to differences in the composition of agricultural biomass.

  11. Fallopian Tube Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Thurmond, Amy Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Fallopian tube catheterization is used for treatment of infertility caused by proximal tubal occlusion, and has replaced surgical treatment for this condition. More recently, fallopian tube catheterization has been used for tubal sterilization. Interventional radiologists tested numerous methods for tubal occlusion using the rabbit as an animal model. As a result, a tubal device has recently been Food and Drug Administration approved for permanent sterilization using hysteroscopic guidance; it can also be placed fluoroscopically by fallopian tube catheterization as an “off-label” procedure. This is a 5-year continuation and update on a procedure that has been done by interventional radiologists for 25 years; history of the development of fallopian tube catheterization in women has been published in detail in this journal. Highlighted in this article will be description of the basic components needed for fallopian tube catheterization. PMID:24436565

  12. The 40 MHz trigger-less DAQ for the LHCb Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campora Perez, D. H.; Falabella, A.; Galli, D.; Giacomini, F.; Gligorov, V.; Manzali, M.; Marconi, U.; Neufeld, N.; Otto, A.; Pisani, F.; Vagnoni, V. M.

    2016-07-01

    The LHCb experiment will undergo a major upgrade during the second long shutdown (2018-2019), aiming to let LHCb collect an order of magnitude more data with respect to Run 1 and Run 2. The maximum readout rate of 1 MHz is the main limitation of the present LHCb trigger. The upgraded detector, apart from major detector upgrades, foresees a full read-out, running at the LHC bunch crossing frequency of 40 MHz, using an entirely software based trigger. A new high-throughput PCIe Generation 3 based read-out board, named PCIe40, has been designed for this purpose. The read-out board will allow an efficient and cost-effective implementation of the DAQ system by means of high-speed PC networks. The network-based DAQ system reads data fragments, performs the event building, and transports events to the High-Level Trigger at an estimated aggregate rate of about 32 Tbit/s. Different architecture for the DAQ can be implemented, such as push, pull and traffic shaping with barrel-shifter. Possible technology candidates for the foreseen event-builder under study are InfiniBand and Gigabit Ethernet. In order to define the best implementation of the event-builder we are performing tests of the event-builder on different platforms with different technologies. For testing we are using an event-builder evaluator, which consists of a flexible software implementation, to be used on small size test beds as well as on HPC scale facilities. The architecture of DAQ system and up to date performance results will be presented.

  13. ECFS: A decentralized, distributed and fault-tolerant FUSE filesystem for the LHCb online farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybczynski, Tomasz; Bonaccorsi, Enrico; Neufeld, Niko

    2014-06-01

    The LHCb experiment records millions of proton collisions every second, but only a fraction of them are useful for LHCb physics. In order to filter out the "bad events" a large farm of x86-servers (~2000 nodes) has been put in place. These servers boot from and run from NFS, however they use their local disk to temporarily store data, which cannot be processed in real-time ("data-deferring"). These events are subsequently processed, when there are no live-data coming in. The effective CPU power is thus greatly increased. This gain in CPU power depends critically on the availability of the local disks. For cost and power-reasons, mirroring (RAID-1) is not used, leading to a lot of operational headache with failing disks and disk-errors or server failures induced by faulty disks. To mitigate these problems and increase the reliability of the LHCb farm, while at same time keeping cost and power-consumption low, an extensive research and study of existing highly available and distributed file systems has been done. While many distributed file systems are providing reliability by "file replication", none of the evaluated ones supports erasure algorithms. A decentralised, distributed and fault-tolerant "write once read many" file system has been designed and implemented as a proof of concept providing fault tolerance without using expensive - in terms of disk space - file replication techniques and providing a unique namespace as a main goals. This paper describes the design and the implementation of the Erasure Codes File System (ECFS) and presents the specialised FUSE interface for Linux. Depending on the encoding algorithm ECFS will use a certain number of target directories as a backend to store the segments that compose the encoded data. When target directories are mounted via nfs/autofs - ECFS will act as a file-system over network/block-level raid over multiple servers.

  14. Particle Identification on an FPGA Accelerated Compute Platform for the LHCb Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fäerber, Christian; Schwemmer, Rainer; Machen, Jonathan; Neufeld, Niko

    2017-07-01

    The current LHCb readout system will be upgraded in 2018 to a “triggerless” readout of the entire detector at the Large Hadron Collider collision rate of 40 MHz. The corresponding bandwidth from the detector down to the foreseen dedicated computing farm (event filter farm), which acts as the trigger, has to be increased by a factor of almost 100 from currently 500 Gb/s up to 40 Tb/s. The event filter farm will preanalyze the data and will select the events on an event by event basis. This will reduce the bandwidth down to a manageable size to write the interesting physics data to tape. The design of such a system is a challenging task, and the reason why different new technologies are considered and have to be investigated for the different parts of the system. For the usage in the event building farm or in the event filter farm (trigger), an experimental field programmable gate array (FPGA) accelerated computing platform is considered and, therefore, tested. FPGA compute accelerators are used more and more in standard servers such as for Microsoft Bing search or Baidu search. The platform we use hosts a general Intel CPU and a high-performance FPGA linked via the high-speed Intel QuickPath Interconnect. An accelerator is implemented on the FPGA. It is very likely that these platforms, which are built, in general, for high-performance computing, are also very interesting for the high-energy physics community. First, the performance results of smaller test cases performed at the beginning are presented. Afterward, a part of the existing LHCb RICH particle identification is tested and is ported to the experimental FPGA accelerated platform. We have compared the performance of the LHCb RICH particle identification running on a normal CPU with the performance of the same algorithm, which is running on the Xeon-FPGA compute accelerator platform.

  15. Holder for Straightening Bent Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, A. R.; Polzien, E. D.

    1985-01-01

    One-piece holder restrains bent metal tube against further bending during straightening operation. Holder consists of handle 16 in. (41 cm) long welded to short, strong tube that fits around tube to be straightened.

  16. Study of chemical pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification for producing fermentable sugars from rice straw.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Hsing; Chen, Yi-Chun; Lin, Jih-Gaw

    2014-07-01

    This study evaluated a cost-effective approach for the conversion of rice straw into fermentable sugars. The composition of rice straw pretreated with 1 % sulfuric acid or 1 % sodium hydroxide solution was compared to rice straw with no chemical pretreatment. Enzymatic saccharification experiments on non-pretreated rice straw (NPRS), pretreated rice straw (PRS), and pretreated rice straw with acid hydrolysate (PRSAH) were conducted in a series of batch reactors. The results indicated that pretreating the rice straw with dilute acid and base increased the cellulose content from 38 % to over 50 %. During enzymatic saccharification, straight aliphatic cellulose was hydrolyzed before branched hemicellulose, and glucose was the major hydrolysis product. The glucose yield was 0.52 g glucose/g for NPRS and was comparable to the yields of 0.50 g glucose/g for PRS and 0.58 g glucose/g for PRSAH. The hydrolysis of rice straw to produce glucose can be described by a first-order reaction with a rate constant of 0.0550 d(-1) for NPRS, 0.0653 d(-1) for PRSAH, and 0.0654 d(-1) for PRS. Overall, the production of fermentable sugars from ground rice straw will be more cost effective if the straw is not pretreated with chemicals.

  17. Structural convergence of maize and wheat straw during two-year decomposition under different climate conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyue; Sun, Bo; Mao, Jingdong; Sui, Yueyu; Cao, Xiaoyan

    2012-07-03

    Straw decomposition plays an important role in soil carbon sequestration. Litter quality and climate condition are considered to be key factors that regulate straw decomposition. This study investigated the decomposition characteristics of wheat and maize straw under cold temperate, warm temperate, and midsubtropic climate conditions, and examined whether the chemical structures of straw residues became similar during decomposition under different climate conditions. Straws were put in 0.074-mm-mesh size litter bags to exclude soil fauna and buried in black soil plots at three experimental stations located in the aforementioned climate regions to rule out the impact of soil type. The decomposition rate constants of wheat straw and maize straw increased linearly with temperature, and the former was more sensitive to temperature. Climate conditions and straw quality had marked effects on the residual material structure in the first half year of decomposition, but then decreased. Wheat and maize straw showed common decomposition characteristics with a decrease of O/N-alkyl carbons and di-O-alkyls, and a simultaneous increase of alkyl carbons, aromatic carbons, aromatic C-O groups, and COO/N-C ═ O groups. Overall, the results indicated that the chemical compositions of the two types of straw became similar after 2-year decomposition under different climate conditions.

  18. Equine Cyathostominae can develop to infective third-stage larvae on straw bedding.

    PubMed

    Love, Sandy; Burden, Faith A; McGirr, Eoghan C; Gordon, Louise; Denwood, Matthew J

    2016-08-31

    Domesticated grazing animals including horses and donkeys are frequently housed using deep litter bedding systems, where it is commonly presumed that there is no risk of infection from the nematodes that are associated with grazing at pasture. We use two different approaches to test whether equids could become infected with cyathostomines from the ingestion of deep litter straw bedding. Two herbage plot studies were performed in horticultural incubators set up to simulate three straw bedding scenarios and one grass turf positive control. Faeces were placed on 16 plots, and larval recoveries performed on samples of straw/grass substrate over 2- to 3-week periods. Within each incubator, a thermostat was set to maintain an environmental temperature of approximately 10 °C to 20 °C. To provide further validation, 24 samples of straw bedding were collected over an 8-week period from six barns in which a large number of donkeys were housed in a deep litter straw bedding system. These samples were collected from the superficial bedding at 16 sites along a "W" route through each barn. No infective larvae were recovered from any of the plots containing dry straw. However, infective cyathostomine larvae were first detected on day 8 from plots containing moist straw. In the straw bedding study, cyathostomine larvae were detected in 18 of the 24 samples. Additionally, in the two barns which were sampled serially, the level of larval infectivity generally increased from week to week, except when the straw bedding was removed and replaced. We have demonstrated that equine cyathostomines can develop to infective larvae on moist straw bedding. It is therefore possible for a horse or donkey bedded in deep litter straw to become infected by ingesting the contaminated straw. This has implications for parasite control in stabled equids and potentially in housed ruminants, and further investigation is required in order to establish the relative infective pressure from pasture versus

  19. LHCb Scintillating Fiber detector front end electronics design and quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vink, W. E. W.; Pellegrino, A.; Ietswaard, G. C. M.; Verkooijen, J. C.; Carneiro, U.; Massefferi, A.

    2017-03-01

    The on-detector electronics of the LHCb Scintillating Fiber Detector consists of multiple PCBs assembled in a unit called Read Out Box, capable of reading out 2048 channels with an output rate of 70 Gbps. There are three types of boards: PACIFIC, Clusterization and Master Board. The Pacific Boards host PACIFIC ASICs, with pre-amplifier and comparator stages producing two bits of data per channel. A cluster-finding algorithm is then run in an FPGA on the Clusterization Board. The Master Board distributes fast and slow control, and power. We describe the design, production and test of prototype PCBs.

  20. Study of π{sup 0}/γ efficiency using B meson decays in the LHCb experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Govorkova, E.

    2016-12-15

    The reconstruction efficiency of photons and neutral pions is measured using the relative yields of reconstructed B{sup +} → J/ψK{sup *+}(→ K{sup +}π{sup 0}) and B{sup +} → J/ψK{sup +} decays. The efficiency is studied using the data set, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb{sup –1}, collected by the LHCb experiment in proton-proton collisions at the centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV.

  1. Chemical treatment and characterization of soybean straw and soybean protein isolate/straw composite films.

    PubMed

    Martelli-Tosi, Milena; Assis, Odílio B G; Silva, Natália C; Esposto, Bruno S; Martins, Maria Alice; Tapia-Blácido, Delia R

    2017-02-10

    This work investigated changes in the chemical composition and structure of soybean straw (SS) treated with alkali (NaOH 5% and 17.5%) and bleached with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). Removal of the amorphous constituents increased the degree of crystallinity and the content of cellulose fibers particularly after reaction with high concentrations of alkali. Treatment with NaOH 17.5% contributed to the allomorph transition from cellulose I to II regardless of the bleaching agent, but H2O2 as bleaching agent promoted more effective delignification. This work also evaluated the potential use of treated and non-treated SS as reinforcement filler in soy protein isolate film (SPI). Films added with treated SS presented higher mechanical resistance, lower elongation at break, and lower solubility in water. Addition of non-treated SS did not affect the properties of the SPI film significantly. The low solubility and the reasonable water vapor permeability of the composite films make them suitable packaging materials for fresh fruit and vegetables.

  2. [Enteral tube feeding].

    PubMed

    Haller, Alois

    2014-03-01

    Tube feeding is an integral part of medical therapies, and can be easily managed also in the outpatient setting. Tube feeding by the stomach or small intestine with nasogastral or nasojejunal tubes is common in clinical practice. Long-term nutrition is usually provided through a permanent tube, i. e. a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). Modern portable nutrition pumps are used to cover the patient's nutritional needs. Enteral nutrition is always indicated if patients can not or should not eat or if nutritional requirements cannot be covered within 3 days after an intervention, e. g. after abdominal surgery. Industrially produced tube feedings with defined substrate concentrations are being used; different compositions of nutrients, such as glutamine fish oil etc., are used dependent on the the condition of the patient. Enteral nutrition may be associated with complications of the tube, e. g. dislocation, malposition or obstruction, as well as the feeding itself, e. g.hyperglycaemia, electrolyte disturbances, refeeding syndrome diarrhea or aspiration). However, the benefit of tube feeding usually exceeds the potential harm substantially.

  3. Optimization of the dilute maleic acid pretreatment of wheat straw

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In this study, the dilute maleic acid pretreatment of wheat straw is optimized, using pretreatment time, temperature and maleic acid concentration as design variables. A central composite design was applied to the experimental set up. The response factors used in this study are: (1) glucose benefits from improved enzymatic digestibility of wheat straw solids; (2) xylose benefits from the solubilization of xylan to the liquid phase during the pretreatment; (3) maleic acid replenishment costs; (4) neutralization costs of pretreated material; (5) costs due to furfural production; and (6) heating costs of the input materials. For each response factor, experimental data were fitted mathematically. After data translation to €/Mg dry straw, determining the relative contribution of each response factor, an economic optimization was calculated within the limits of the design variables. Results When costs are disregarded, an almost complete glucan conversion to glucose can be reached (90% from solids, 7%-10% in liquid), after enzymatic hydrolysis. During the pretreatment, up to 90% of all xylan is converted to monomeric xylose. Taking cost factors into account, the optimal process conditions are: 50 min at 170°C, with 46 mM maleic acid, resulting in a yield of 65 €/Mg (megagram = metric ton) dry straw, consisting of 68 €/Mg glucose benefits (from solids: 85% of all glucan), 17 €/Mg xylose benefits (from liquid: 80% of all xylan), 17 €/Mg maleic acid costs, 2.0 €/Mg heating costs and 0.68 €/Mg NaOH costs. In all but the most severe of the studied conditions, furfural formation was so limited that associated costs are considered negligible. Conclusions After the dilute maleic acid pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis, almost complete conversion of wheat straw glucan and xylan is possible. Taking maleic acid replenishment, heating, neutralization and furfural formation into account, the optimum in the dilute maleic acid pretreatment of

  4. Lignocellulose degradation patterns, structural changes, and enzyme secretion by Inonotus obliquus on straw biomass under submerged fermentation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangqun; Xu, Zhiqi; Shi, Song; Lin, Mengmeng

    2017-10-01

    This study examined the white rot fungus I. obliquus on the degradation of three types of straw biomass and the production of extracellular lignocellulolytic enzymes under submerged fermentation. The fungus process resulted in a highest lignin loss of 72%, 39%, and 47% in wheat straw, rice straw, and corn stover within 12days, respectively. In merely two days, the fungus selectively degraded wheat straw lignin by 37%, with only limited cellulose degradation (13%). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed that the fungus most effectively degraded the wheat straw lignin and rice straw crystalline cellulose. Scanning electronic microscopy showed the most pronounced structural changes in wheat straw. High activities of manganese peroxidase (159.0U/mL) and lignin peroxidase (123.4U/mL) were observed in wheat straw culture on Day 2 and 4, respectively. Rice straw was the best substrate to induce the production of cellulase and xylanase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Optimization of pulse tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Waele, A. T. A. M.

    1999-03-01

    The coefficient of performance (COP) of pulse tube coolers is mainly determined by irreversible processes in the regenerator. In this paper, a general and basic definition for the efficiency of regenerators is proposed. The efficiency of the regenerator, and consequently of the cooler as a whole, is affected by the system which is used to control the pressure in the tube. For a general pressure-wave form, it is shown that in the optimum situation, under certain conditions, the variation of the pressure in the tube is proportional to the variation of the pressure in the compressor. In that case the COP is independent of the form of the pressure wave.

  6. [Isotope compositions of elemental carbon in the smoke and ash from crop straw combustion].

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Li, Jiu-Hai; Xu, Hui; Wu, Dan; Liu, Yan

    2014-05-01

    Six genotypes of straws for rice, maize and wheat, respectively, were combusted under flaming and smoldering conditions, and the isotope compositions for elemental carbon ( EC) in the straw smoke and ash were investigated with an isotopic mass spectrometer. The results showed that the mean delta 13C values for EC in the flaming and smoldering smoke of rice straw were - 28. 3 per thousand and - 28.7 per thousand, with depletions of 2.7 per thousand and 3. 0 per thousand relative to that of total carbon (TC) in the straw, respectively. The mean delta 13C values for EC in the flaming and smoldering smoke of wheat straw were -28.5 per thousand and - 28. 0 per thousand, with a depletion of 0. 1 per thousand and enrichment of 0. 4 per thousand comparing to TC in the straw, respectively. The average values in two types of maize straw smoke were -17.2 per thousand and - 13. 6 per thousand,with a depletion of 3.4 per thousand and an enrichment of 0. 2 per thousand relative to TC in the straw, respectively. The mean delta 13C ratios for EC in the flaming and smoldering ash of rice straw were -27. 5 per thousand and -27. 3 per thousand, with depletions of 1.8 per thousand and 1. 6 per thousand comparing with TC in the straw, respectively. In the flaming and smoldering ash of wheat straw, the mean ratios were -27.4 per thousand and -26.0 per thousand, with enrichments of 0. 9 per thousand and 2. 4 per thousand relative to TC in the straw, respectively. In the two types of ash for maize straw, the average delta13 C values for EC were - 15. 0 per thousand and - 14. 8 per thousand,which were 1. 2 per thousand and 1.0 per thousand lighter than those of the straw TC. In general, evident isotope fractionations occur between EC in both smoke and ash and TC in the corresponding straws, especially for rice and maize straws. The isotopic ratios may be useful in identifying and estimating the contribution of EC from straw combustion to ambient aerosol.

  7. Behaviour of liquid-fed growing pigs provided with straw in various amounts and frequencies.

    PubMed

    Oxholm, L C; Steinmetz, H V; Lahrmann, H P; Nielsen, M B F; Amdi, C; Hansen, C F

    2014-11-01

    Straw possesses many characteristics that make it attractive to pigs and can therefore be effective in preventing negative penmate-directed behaviours. However, straw is difficult to handle in current vacuum slurry systems under most commercial conditions and can therefore only be used in limited amounts. To occupy pigs effectively, straw must remain attractive to pigs throughout the whole day; hence, have a certain degree of novelty. We investigated the penmate-directed behaviour of liquid-fed growing pigs in a production herd, assigned to five experimental treatments: 1×25, 1×50, 1×100, 2×50 and 4×25 g of chopped straw/pig per day, with 20 replicates of each treatment (pen was regarded as experimental unit). Behaviour was observed at two different growth stages; ~40 and 80 kg live weight of the pigs. Activity and exploratory behaviour directed at penmates, straw, pen components and the slatted floor were registered continuously for 15 min of each hour during day time (0600 to 2200 h) by use of video observation of three focal pigs per pen. The pigs were active for about one-third of the day corresponding to ~5 h/day. Of the active time, an average of 7% (35 min) was spent on penmate-directed behaviour. The pigs were more active and increased their straw-directed behaviour when provided with 100 g straw/pig per day compared with 25 and 50 g (P<0.001). However, penmate-directed behaviour was not reduced with an increased amount of straw (P>0.05), and there was no effect on pigs' behaviour when straw provision was increased per day (P>0.05). Pigs became less active and reduced their straw-directed activities when their weight increased from 40 to 80 kg live weight (P<0.001), but the amount of penmate-directed behaviour was similar (P>0.05). Further, the residual straw results indicated that perhaps a more frequent straw provision could help establish a more even level of fresh available straw during the day. However, the frequent straw provision did not occupy

  8. Pilot scale conversion of wheat straw to ethanol via simultaneous saccharification and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Saha, Badal C; Nichols, Nancy N; Qureshi, Nasib; Kennedy, Gregory J; Iten, Loren B; Cotta, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The production of ethanol from wheat straw (WS) by dilute acid pretreatment, bioabatement of fermentation inhibitors by a fungal strain, and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of the bio-abated WS to ethanol using an ethanologenic recombinant bacterium was studied at a pilot scale without sterilization. WS (124.2g/L) was pretreated with dilute H2SO4 in two parallel tube reactors at 160°C. The inhibitors were bio-abated by growing the fungus aerobically. The maximum ethanol produced by SSF of the bio-abated WS by the recombinant Escherichia coli FBR5 at pH 6.0 and 35°C was 36.0g/L in 83h with a productivity of 0.43gL(-1)h(-1). This value corresponds to an ethanol yield of 0.29g/g of WS which is 86% of the theoretical ethanol yield from WS. This is the first report on the production of ethanol by the recombinant bacterium from a lignocellulosic biomass at a pilot scale. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Rapid analysis of barley straw before and after dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment by photoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Bong; Cui, Chunzhi; Lee, Ja Hyun; Lee, Sang Jun; Ahn, Dong June; Park, Chulhwan; Kim, Jun Seok; Kim, Seung Wook

    2013-10-01

    The fluorescence intensities (FIs) of raw and pretreated barley straws were measured by fluorescence microscopy, and the difference in the fluorescence intensity of barley straw before and after dilute acid pretreatment was analyzed by investigation of the major compounds of barley straw. The difference in fluorescence intensity was due to the difference in xylan content. Barley straw was pretreated using dilute sulfuric acid at various conditions and the correlation between the fluorescence intensity and glucose yield of barley straw was investigated. The coefficient of determination (R(2)) of the correlation was found to be 72.28%. Also the calibration of fluorescence intensity with the xylan content was performed. In addition, the absorption and emission spectra of the raw and the pretreated barley straw were examined to verify the proposed method. The absorption and emission wave lengths were 550 nm and 665 nm, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Effects of irrigation and nitrogen fertilization on winter wheat yield under straw mulch].

    PubMed

    Gao, Yajun; Li, Shengxiu; Li, Shiqing; Tian, Xiaohong; Wang, Zhaohui; Zheng, Xianfeng; Du, Jianjun

    2005-08-01

    A field experiment was conducted on a Hongyou soil of Yangling to investigate the effects of irrigation and nitrogen fertilization on wheat yield under straw mulch. The results showed that under straw mulch, N fertilization contributed more to the increase of wheat yield than irrigation, because soil moisture condition was improved greatly. The interaction between irrigation and nitrogen fertilization was negative in no-mulch treatment, but positive under straw mulch. For dryland, more attention should be paid to the input of nutrients when straw mulch was applied. High moisture content in soil profile before sowing and sufficient N input were essential for good harvest when field was not mulched. Under straw mulch, the irrigation rate for a maximum yield was reduced, and the optimum time of irrigation was postponed. Wheat grain yield had no relation to the irrigation during jointing stage in both no-mulch and straw mulch treatments.

  11. The thermal behaviour of the co-combustion between paper sludge and rice straw.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zeqiong; Ma, Xiaoqian

    2013-10-01

    The thermal characteristics and kinetics of paper sludge, rice straw and their blends were evaluated under combustion condition. The paper sludge was blended with rice straw in the range of 10-95 wt.% to investigate their co-combustion behaviour. There was significant interaction between rice straw and paper sludge in high temperature. The combustion of paper sludge and rice straw could be divided into two stages. The value of the activation energy obtained by the Friedman and the Ozawa-Flynn-Wall (OFW) first decreased and then increased with the conversion degree rising. The average activation energy did not monotonically decrease with increasing the percentage of rice straw in the blends. When the percentage of rice straw in the blends was 80%, the value of the average activation energy was the smallest, which was 139 kJ/mol obtained by OFW and 132 kJ/mol obtained by Friedman, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fermentation Quality and Additives: A Case of Rice Straw Silage

    PubMed Central

    Oladosu, Yusuff; Magaji, Usman; Hussin, Ghazali; Ramli, Asfaliza; Miah, Gous

    2016-01-01

    Rice cultivation generates large amount of crop residues of which only 20% are utilized for industrial and domestic purposes. In most developing countries especially southeast Asia, rice straw is used as part of feeding ingredients for the ruminants. However, due to its low protein content and high level of lignin and silica, there is limitation to its digestibility and nutritional value. To utilize this crop residue judiciously, there is a need for improvement of its nutritive value to promote its utilization through ensiling. Understanding the fundamental principle of ensiling is a prerequisite for successful silage product. Prominent factors influencing quality of silage product include water soluble carbohydrates, natural microbial population, and harvesting conditions of the forage. Additives are used to control the fermentation processes to enhance nutrient recovery and improve silage stability. This review emphasizes some practical aspects of silage processing and the use of additives for improvement of fermentation quality of rice straw. PMID:27429981

  13. Alternative uses of rice-straw in California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bainbridge, D.A.

    1997-03-01

    Interconnectedness and complexity are the hallmarks of almost every environmental problem and opportunity including the challenge of rice straw management in California. Although attempts are often made to solve environmental problems by working on single aspects, this rarely works, just as treating symptoms may do little to resolve diseases. The rice straw problem includes the physical system of the atmosphere, air basins, soils, and local and regional watersheds, and reaches the global scale with concern over atmospheric contribution of methane and implications for global warming. It includes the biological system of the rice crop, soil organisms, crop pests, and wildlife (both beneficial and harmful). And finally, it includes the economic and social systems of the rice grower, farm families, farm service industries, rural communities, the regional population, rice consumers around the world, fishermen and women, hunters, manufacturers of harvesting equipment, medical services, and potentially, builders and home buyers in the region.

  14. Potential of rice straw for bio-refining: An overview.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Amith; Mathew, Anil Kuruvilla; Sindhu, Raveendran; Pandey, Ashok; Binod, Parameswaran

    2016-09-01

    The biorefinery approach for the production of fuels and chemicals is gaining more and more attraction in recent years. The major advantages of biorefineries are the generation of multiple products with complete utilization of biomass with zero waste generation. Moreover the process will be economically viable when it targets low volume high value products in addition to high volume low value products like bioethanol. The present review discuss about the potential of rice straw based biorefinery. Since rice is a major staple food for many Asian countries, the utilization of the rice straw residue for fuel and chemicals would be very economical. The review focuses the availability and the potential of this residue for the production of fuel and other high value chemicals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of biological pretreatments in enhancing corn straw biogas production.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Weizhang; Zhang, Zhongzhi; Luo, Yijing; Sun, Shanshan; Qiao, Wei; Xiao, Meng

    2011-12-01

    A biological pretreatment with new complex microbial agents was used to pretreat corn straw at ambient temperature (about 20°C) to improve its biodegradability and anaerobic biogas production. A complex microbial agent dose of 0.01% (w/w) and pretreatment time of 15 days were appropriate for biological pretreatment. These treatment conditions resulted in 33.07% more total biogas yield, 75.57% more methane yield, and 34.6% shorter technical digestion time compared with the untreated sample. Analyses of chemical compositions showed 5.81-25.10% reductions in total lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose contents, and 27.19-80.71% increases in hot-water extractives; these changes contributed to the enhancement of biogas production. Biological pretreatment could be an effective method for improving biodegradability and enhancing the highly efficient biological conversion of corn straw into bioenergy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Microwave pyrolysis of wheat straw: product distribution and generation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiqiang; Wang, Wenlong; Liu, Hongzhen; Ma, Chunyuan; Song, Zhanlong

    2014-04-01

    Microwave pyrolysis of wheat straw is studied, combined with analysis of products, the distribution and generation pathway of products are investigated. Only a small amount of volatiles released when microwave pyrolysis of pure straw. Mixtures of adding CuO and Fe3O4 can pyrolyze, and the majority in pyrolysis products is in liquid-phase. Severe pyrolysis occur after adding carbon residue, the CO content in pyrolysis gas products is high, and the maximum volume content of H2 can exceed 35 vol.%. The high-temperature is helpful for increasing the yield of combustible gas in gaseous products, in particular the H2 production, but also helpful for improving the conversion of sample. Pyrolysis is carried out layer by layer from the inside to outside. As the internal material firstly pyrolyze and pyrolysis products released pass through the low temperature zone, the chance of occurrence of secondary reactions is reduced.

  17. Ear tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ear tube surgery - what to ask your doctor Review Date 8/5/2015 Updated by: Sumana Jothi ... Otolaryngology, NCHCS VA, SFVA, San Francisco, CA. Internal review and update on 09/01/2016 by David ...

  18. Kinking of medical tubes.

    PubMed

    Ingles, David

    2004-05-01

    The phenomenon of kinking in medical tubing remains a problem for some applications, particularly critical ones such as transporting gasses or fluids. Design features are described to prevent its occurrence.

  19. Tube Alinement for Machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, J.

    1984-01-01

    Tool with stepped shoulders alines tubes for machining in preparation for welding. Alinement with machine tool axis accurate to within 5 mils (0.13mm) and completed much faster than visual setup by machinist.

  20. Tracheostomy tube - speaking

    MedlinePlus

    Air passing through vocal cords (larynx) causes them to vibrate, creating sounds and speech. A tracheostomy tube blocks most of the air from passing through your vocal cords. Instead, your breath (air) goes out ...

  1. Tube Feeding Troubleshooting Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... written materials as well as DVDs on a range of topics of interest to tube feeders, including ... be caused by several things. Power failure/low battery. Pump charger parts aren’t fully connected. Pump ...

  2. Integrated structure vacuum tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Kerwin, W. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    High efficiency, multi-dimensional thin film vacuum tubes suitable for use in high temperature, high radiation environments are described. The tubes are fabricated by placing thin film electrode members in selected arrays on facing interior wall surfaces of an alumina substrate envelope. Cathode members are formed using thin films of triple carbonate. The photoresist used in photolithography aids in activation of the cathodes by carbonizing and reacting with the reduced carbonates when heated in vacuum during forming. The finely powdered triple carbonate is mixed with the photoresist used to delineate the cathode locations in the conventional solid state photolithographic manner. Anode and grid members are formed using thin films of refractory metal. Electron flow in the tubes is between grid elements from cathode to anode as in a conventional three-dimensional tube.

  3. Tube-Forming Assays.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ryan M; Meah, Christopher J; Heath, Victoria L; Styles, Iain B; Bicknell, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis involves the generation of new blood vessels from the existing vasculature and is dependent on many growth factors and signaling events. In vivo angiogenesis is dynamic and complex, meaning assays are commonly utilized to explore specific targets for research into this area. Tube-forming assays offer an excellent overview of the molecular processes in angiogenesis. The Matrigel tube forming assay is a simple-to-implement but powerful tool for identifying biomolecules involved in angiogenesis. A detailed experimental protocol on the implementation of the assay is described in conjunction with an in-depth review of methods that can be applied to the analysis of the tube formation. In addition, an ImageJ plug-in is presented which allows automatic quantification of tube images reducing analysis times while removing user bias and subjectivity.

  4. Snorkeling and Jones tubes.

    PubMed

    Lam, Lewis Y W; Weatherhead, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of tympanic membrane rupture during snorkeling in a 17-year-old young man who had previously undergone bilateral Jones tubes placed for epiphora. To our knowledge, this phenomenon has not been previously reported.

  5. Enteral nutrition by tube.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, P J; Hand, M S; Frederick, G S

    1990-01-01

    When oral intake is unsatisfactory or contraindicated, maintenance of nutrition by tube feeding is an alternative to the parenteral route. A large volume of research data supports the decision to use the enteral route whenever possible. Entry of food into the alimentary tract is a stimulus to structural and functional maintenance of that tract. Enteral nutrition can be given via indwelling nasoesophageal, pharyngostomy, esophagostomy, percutaneous or surgical gastrostomy, or enterostomy tube. Use of an appropriate catheter, familiarity with the technique used, and careful patient selection and monitoring are important factors in successful tube feeding. Blenderized pet food diets should be fed whenever possible; commercially available liquid diets provide an alternative when tube caliber or patient factors preclude the use of blenderized foods.

  6. Bull Moose Tube Company

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA is providing notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against the Bull Moose Tube Company, a business located at 1819 Clarkson Road, Chesterfield, MO, 63017, for alleged violations at the facility located at 406 East Industrial Drive,

  7. Ear tube insertion - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100045.htm Ear tube insertion - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... 4 Overview The eardrum (tympanic membrane) separates the ear canal from the middle ear. Review Date 8/ ...

  8. Gastrostomy tube placement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... presentations/100125.htm Gastrostomy tube placement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  9. Building with Tubes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Eugenio, Terrance, Ed.

    Text and illustrations show how to assemble furniture and toys out of cardboard tubes and sheets. Basic directions are provided, and the tools and materials necessary to the assembly of specific items are described. (MLF)

  10. Using a nasogastric tube.

    PubMed

    Candy, C

    1986-09-01

    This discussion of the use of a nasogastric tube covers the equipment needed, the method, rehydration and feeding, prolonged nasogastric feeding, and stopping nasogastric feeding. A nasogastric tube is useful when children are unable to drink safely and in sufficient amounts for any of the following reasons: severe dehydration; if intravenous (IV) therapy is unavailable; low birth weight infants; or the child is drowsy or vomiting. Severely malnourished children may be fed initially in this way if they are too weak or anorexic to eat or drink normally. The following equipment is needed: nasogastric tube; lubricating fluid; a syringe; blue litmus paper, if available; adhesive tape; stethoscope if available; and fluid to be given. Explain to the child's parents and the child, if old enough to understand, what will be done; lie infants flat; measure the approximate length from the child's nostril to the ear lobe and then to the top of the abdomen with the tube and mark the position; clean the nostrils to remove the mucus, and lubricate the tip of the tube and gently insert into the nostril; give the child a drink of water if he or she is conscious; continue to pass the tube down until the position marked reaches the nostril; use the syringe to suck up some fluid and test with blue litmus paper to check that the tube is in the stomach; and inject 5-10 ml of fluid (saline or oral rehydration solution, not milk formula) by syringe if satisfied the tube is in the correct position. Where possible, give a continuous drip of fluid. If this is not possible, give frequent small amounts using the syringe as a funnel. If feeding continues for more than 24 hours, clean the nostrils daily with warm water and change the tube to the other nostril every few days. Also keep the mouth very clean with a dilute solution of 8% sodium bicarbonate, if available, or citrus fruit juice. To remove the tube, remove the adhesive tape, take the tube out gently and smoothly, and offer the child a

  11. Deconvolution of grading curves during milling: example of wheat straw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, Nicolas; Richefeu, Vincent; Mayer, Claire; Delenne, Jean-Yves

    2017-06-01

    The evolution of grading-curves during powder milling or agglomeration processes includes a wealth of information about the mechanisms involved at the scale of particles. However, such information can hardly be retrieved from the particle size distribution (PSD). Based on a minimization technique we developed a methodology for the decomposition of grading curves as sub-PSDs. In this paper we follow their evolution with time in the specific case of the comminution of wheat straw.

  12. Tubing crimping pliers

    DOEpatents

    Lindholm, G.T.

    1981-02-27

    The disclosure relates to pliers and more particularly to pliers for crimping two or more pieces of copper tubing together prior to their being permanently joined by brazing, soldering or the like. A die containing spring-loaded pins rotates within a cammed ring in the head of the pliers. As the die rotates, the pins force a crimp on tubing held within the pliers.

  13. A new algorithm for identifying the flavour of B0s mesons at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusardi, N.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-05-01

    A new algorithm for the determination of the initial flavour of B0s mesons is presented. The algorithm is based on two neural networks and exploits the b hadron production mechanism at a hadron collider. The first network is trained to select charged kaons produced in association with the B0s meson. The second network combines the kaon charges to assign the B0s flavour and estimates the probability of a wrong assignment. The algorithm is calibrated using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1 collected by the LHCb experiment in proton-proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV centre-of-mass energies. The calibration is performed in two ways: by resolving the B0s-bar B0s flavour oscillations in B0s → D-sπ+ decays, and by analysing flavour-specific B*s2(5840)0 → B+K- decays. The tagging power measured in B0s → D-sπ+ decays is found to be (1.80 ± 0.19 (stat) ± 0.18 (syst))%, which is an improvement of about 50% compared to a similar algorithm previously used in the LHCb experiment.

  14. Systematic profiling to monitor and specify the software refactoring process of the LHCb experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couturier, Ben; Kiagias, E.; Lohn, Stefan B.

    2014-06-01

    The LHCb upgrade program implies a significant increase in data processing that will not be matched by additional computing resources. Furthermore, new architectures such as many-core platforms can currently not be fully exploited due to memory and I/O bandwidth limitations. A considerable refactoring effort will therefore be needed to vectorize and parallelize the LHCb software, to minimize hotspots and to reduce the impact of bottlenecks. It is crucial to guide refactoring with a profiling system that gives hints to regions in source-code for possible and necessary re-engineering and which kind of optimization could lead to final success. Software optimization is a sophisticated process where all parts, compiler, operating system, external libraries and chosen hardware play a role. Intended improvements can have different effects on different platforms. To obtain precise information of the general performance, to make profiles comparable, reproducible and to verify the progress of performance in the framework, it is crucial to produce profiles more systematically in terms of regular profiling based on representative use cases and to perform regression tests. Once a general execution, monitoring and analysis platform is available, software metrics can be derived from the collected profiling results to trace changes in performance back and to create summary reports on a regular basis with an alert system if modifications led to significant performance degradations.

  15. Large-pT production of D mesons at the LHCb in the parton Reggeization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpishkov, A. V.; Saleev, V. A.; Shipilova, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The production of D mesons in proton-proton collisions at the LHCb detector is studied. We consider the single production of D0/D¯0, D±, D*±, and Ds± mesons and correlation spectra in the production of D D ¯ and D D pairs at the √{S }=7 TeV and √{S }=13 TeV . In case of the single D -meson production we calculate differential cross sections over transverse momentum pT while in the pair D D ¯ , D D -meson production the cross sections are calculated over the azimuthal angle difference Δ φ , rapidity difference Δ y , invariant mass of the pair M and over the pT of the one meson from a pair. The cross sections are obtained at the leading order of the parton Reggeization approach using Kimber-Martin-Ryskin unintegrated parton distribution functions in a proton. To describe the D -meson production we use universal scale-dependent c -quark and gluon fragmentation functions fitted to e+e- annihilation data from CERN LEP1. Our predictions find a good agreement with the LHCb Collaboration data within uncertainties and without free parameters.

  16. bar{D}Σ c* and bar{D}nolimits*Σ c Interactions and LHCb Pentaquarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun

    Recently, LHCb collaboration reported the observation of two hidden-charmed resonances Pc(4380) and Pc(4450) consistent with hidden-charmed pentaquarks. We perform a dynamical investigation about the bar{D}Σ c*(2520) and bar{D}nolimits*Σ c(2455) interactions which are described by the meson exchanges in a quasipotential Bethe-Salpeter equation approach. Two poles around 4450 and 4390 MeV are produced from the bar{D}nolimits*Σ c(2455) interaction with spin parities 3/2- and 5/2+, respectively. The peak for 5/2+ state has a comparable hight as that of 3/2- state in the J/ψ p invariant mass spectrum. Another bound state with spin-parity JP = 3/2- is produced from the bar{D}Σ c*(2520) interaction. Such results suggest that the narrower LHCb pentaquark Pc(4450) can be well interpreted as a 5/2+ bar{D}nolimits*Σ c(2455) molecular state while the Pc(4380) is a 3/2- bar{D}nolimits*Σ c(2455) molecular state mixed with other secondary origins.

  17. Gauge-invariant implications of the LHCb measurements on lepton-flavor nonuniversality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis, Alejandro; Fuentes-Martín, Javier; Vicente, Avelino; Virto, Javier

    2017-08-01

    We study the implications of the recent measurements of RK and RK* by the LHCb Collaboration. We do that by adopting a model-independent approach based on the Standard Model effective field theory (SMEFT), with the dominant new physics (NP) effects encoded in the coefficients of dimension-6 operators respecting the full Standard Model (SM) gauge symmetry. After providing simplified expressions for RK and RK*, we determine the implications of the recent LHCb results for these observables on the coefficients of the SMEFT operators at low and high energies. We also take into account all b →s ℓℓ data, which combined lead to effective NP scenarios with SM pulls in excess of 5 σ . Thus, the operators discussed in this paper would be the first dimension-6 terms in the SM Lagrangian to be detected experimentally. Indirect constraints on these operators are also discussed. The results of this paper transcend the singularity of the present situation and set a standard for future analyses in b →s transitions when the NP is assumed to lie above the electroweak scale.

  18. Migration of the Gaudi and LHCb software repositories from CVS to Subversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemencic, M.; Degaudenzi, H.; LHCb Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    A common code repository is of primary importance in a distributed development environment such as large HEP experiments. CVS (Concurrent Versions System) has been used in the past years at CERN for the hosting of shared software repositories, among which were the repositories for the Gaudi Framework and the LHCb software projects. Many developers around the world produced alternative systems to share code and revisions among several developers, mainly to overcome the limitations in CVS, and CERN has recently started a new service for code hosting based on the version control system Subversion. The differences between CVS and Subversion and the way the code was organized in Gaudi and LHCb CVS repositories required careful study and planning of the migration. Special care was used to define the organization of the new Subversion repository. To avoid as much as possible disruption in the development cycle, the migration has been gradual with the help of tools developed explicitly to hide the differences between the two systems. The principles guiding the migration steps, the organization of the Subversion repository and the tools developed will be presented, as well as the problems encountered both from the librarian and the user points of view.

  19. PACIFIC: A 64-channel ASIC for scintillating fiber tracking in LHCb upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascon, D.; Chanal, H.; Comerma, A.; Gomez, S.; Han, X.; Mazorra, J.; Mauricio, J.; Pillet, N.; Yengui, F.; Vandaele, R.

    2015-04-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the next LHC shutdown in 2018/19 [1]. The tracker system will have a major overhaul. Its components will be replaced with new technologies in order to cope with the increased hit occupancy and radiation environment. Here we describe a detector made of scintillating fibers read out by silicon photomultipliers (SiPM), with a view to its application for this upgrade. This technology has been shown to achieve high efficiency and spatial resolution, but its integration within a LHCb experiment presents new challenges. This article gives an overview of the R&D status of the low-Power ASIC for the sCIntillating FIbres traCker (PACIFIC) chip implemented in a 130 nm CMOS technology. The PACIFIC chip is a 64-channel ASIC which can be connected to a SiPM without the need of any external component. It includes analog signal processing and digitization. The first stage is a current conveyor followed by a tunable fast shaper (≈10 ns) and a gated integrator. The digitization is performed using a 3 threshold non-linear flash ADC operating at 40 MHz. The PACIFIC chip has the ability to cope with different SiPM suppliers with a power consumption below 8 mW per channel and it is radiation-tolerant. Lastly, simulation and test results show the proper read out of the SiPMs with the PACIFIC chip.

  20. Machine Learning and Parallelism in the Reconstruction of LHCb and its Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cian, Michel

    2016-11-01

    The LHCb detector at the LHC is a general purpose detector in the forward region with a focus on reconstructing decays of c- and b-hadrons. For Run II of the LHC, a new trigger strategy with a real-time reconstruction, alignment and calibration was employed. This was made possible by implementing an offline-like track reconstruction in the high level trigger. However, the ever increasing need for a higher throughput and the move to parallelism in the CPU architectures in the last years necessitated the use of vectorization techniques to achieve the desired speed and a more extensive use of machine learning to veto bad events early on. This document discusses selected improvements in computationally expensive parts of the track reconstruction, like the Kalman filter, as well as an improved approach to get rid of fake tracks using fast machine learning techniques. In the last part, a short overview of the track reconstruction challenges for the upgrade of LHCb, is given. Running a fully software-based trigger, a large gain in speed in the reconstruction has to be achieved to cope with the 40 MHz bunch-crossing rate. Two possible approaches for techniques exploiting massive parallelization are discussed.

  1. Clearing obstructed feeding tubes.

    PubMed

    Marcuard, S P; Stegall, K L; Trogdon, S

    1989-01-01

    This is a report of an in vitro study evaluating the ability of six solutions to dissolve clotted enteral feeding, which can cause feeding tube occlusion. The following clotted enteral feeding products were tested: Ensure Plus, Ensure Plus with added protein (Promod 20 g/liter), Osmolite, Enrich, and Pulmocare. Clot dissolution was then tested by adding Adolf's Meat Tenderizer, Viokase, Sprite, Pepsi, Coke, or Mountain Dew. Distilled water served as control. Dissolution score for each mixture was assessed blindly. Best dissolution was observed with Viokase in pH 7.9 solution (p less than 0.01). Similar results were obtained when feeding tube patency was restored in eight in vitro occluded feeding tubes (Dobbhoff, French size 8) by using first Pepsi (two/eight successful) and then Viokase in pH 7.9 (six/six successful). We also report our experience in the first 10 patients with occluded feeding tubes using this Viokase solution injected through a Drum catheter into the feeding tube. In seven patients, this method proved to be successful, and the reasons for failure in three patients include a knotted tube, impacted tablet powder, and a formula clot fo 24 hr duration and 45 cm in length.

  2. Dynamic tube/support interaction in heat exchanger tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.

    1991-01-01

    The supports for heat exchanger tubes are usually plates with drilled holes; other types of supports also have been used. To facilitate manufacture and to allow for thermal expansion of the tubes, small clearances are used between tubes and tube supports. The dynamics of tube/support interaction in heat exchangers is fairly complicated. Understanding tube dynamics and its effects is important for heat exchangers. This paper summarizes the current state of the art on this subject and to identify future research needs. Specifically, the following topics are discussed: dynamics of loosely supported tubes, tube/support gap dynamics, tube response in flow, tube damage and wear, design considerations, and future research needs. 55 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Erythritol production on wheat straw using Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We overexpressed the err1 gene in the Trichoderma reesei wild-type and in the cellulase hyperproducing, carbon catabolite derepressed strain Rut-C30 in order to investigate the possibility of producing erythritol with T. reesei. Two different promoters were used for err1 overexpression in both strains, a constitutive (the native pyruvat kinase (pki) promoter) and an inducible one (the native β-xylosidase (bxl1) promoter). The derived recombinant strains were precharacterized by analysis of err1 transcript formation on D-xylose and xylan. Based on this, one strain of each type was chosen for further investigation for erythritol production in shake flasks and in bioreactor experiments. For the latter, we used wheat straw pretreated by an alkaline organosolve process as lignocellulosic substrate. Shake flask experiments on D-xylose showed increased erythritol formation for both, the wild-type and the Rut-C30 overexpression strain compared to their respective parental strain. Bioreactor cultivations on wheat straw did not increase erythritol formation in the wild-type overexpression strain. However, err1 overexpression in Rut-C30 led to a clearly higher erythritol formation on wheat straw. PMID:24949268

  4. Erythritol production on wheat straw using Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Birgit; Mach, Robert L; Mach-Aigner, Astrid R

    2014-01-01

    We overexpressed the err1 gene in the Trichoderma reesei wild-type and in the cellulase hyperproducing, carbon catabolite derepressed strain Rut-C30 in order to investigate the possibility of producing erythritol with T. reesei. Two different promoters were used for err1 overexpression in both strains, a constitutive (the native pyruvat kinase (pki) promoter) and an inducible one (the native β-xylosidase (bxl1) promoter). The derived recombinant strains were precharacterized by analysis of err1 transcript formation on D-xylose and xylan. Based on this, one strain of each type was chosen for further investigation for erythritol production in shake flasks and in bioreactor experiments. For the latter, we used wheat straw pretreated by an alkaline organosolve process as lignocellulosic substrate. Shake flask experiments on D-xylose showed increased erythritol formation for both, the wild-type and the Rut-C30 overexpression strain compared to their respective parental strain. Bioreactor cultivations on wheat straw did not increase erythritol formation in the wild-type overexpression strain. However, err1 overexpression in Rut-C30 led to a clearly higher erythritol formation on wheat straw.

  5. Selective liquefaction of wheat straw in phenol and its fractionation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongzhang; Zhang, Yuzhen; Xie, Shuangping

    2012-05-01

    For the first time, a method of phenol-selective liquefaction is proposed for the fractionation and multilevel conversion of lignocellulose. Through phenol-selective liquefaction, lignin and hemicellulose are liquefied, with large amounts of cellulose retained in the unliquefied residues. Using a phenol/straw ratio of 3 and a sulfuric acid concentration of 3%, large amounts of hemicellulose (≥85%) and lignin (≥70%) can be liquefied at 100 °C in 30 min, with a high quantity of cellulose (≥80%) retained. Unliquefied residues from selective liquefaction have higher susceptibility for enzymatic attack. Enzymatic hydrolyzation of residues can be as high as 65% in 48 h with 40.7 FPU/g of dry materials, which can then be used to prepare sugar platform intermediates. The liquefied products of wheat straw are then resinified with formaldehyde in the presence of NaOH as a catalyst and synthesized into phenol formaldehyde-type resins reaching up to GB/T 14732-2006 standards. Phenol selective liquefaction, a new technology for the fractionation of lignocellulose, achieves effective fractionation and multilevel conversion of straw components. Hence, it is an important tool to achieve full utilization of biomass and high value-added conversion of lignocellulose.

  6. Rice straw pulp obtained by using various methods.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Alejandro; Moral, Ana; Serrano, Luis; Labidi, Jalel; Jiménez, Luis

    2008-05-01

    Rice straw was used as an alternative raw material to obtain cellulosics pulps. Pulping was done by using classics reagents as soda (with anthraquinone and parabenzoquinone as aditives), potassium hydroxide and Kraft process. The holocellulose, alpha-cellulose and lignin contents of rice straw (viz. 60.7, 41.2 and 21.9 wt%, respectively) are similar to those of some woody raw materials such as pine and eucalyptus, and various non-wood materials including olive tree prunings, wheat straw and sunflower stalks. Pulping tests were conducted by using soda, soda and anthraquinone at 1 wt%, soda and parabenzoquinone at 1 wt%, potassium hydroxide and sodium sulphate (Kraft process) under two different sets of operating conditions, namely: (a) a 10 wt% reagent concentration, 170 degrees C and 60 min; and (b) 15 wt% reagent, 180 degrees C and 90 min. The solid/liquid ratio was 6 in both cases. Paper sheets made from pulp extracted by cooking with soda (15 wt%) and AQ (1 wt%) at 180 degrees C and 90 min pulp exhibit the best drainage index, breaking length, stretch and burst index (viz. 23 degrees SR, 3494 m, 3.34% and 2.51 kN/g, respectively).

  7. Nutrient removal efficiency in a rice-straw denitrifying bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xinqiang; Lin, Limin; Ye, Yushi; Gu, Jiatao; Wang, Zhibo; Xu, Lixian; Jin, Yi; Ru, Qiukai; Tian, Guangming

    2015-12-01

    Rice straw was used as a carbon source in a denitrifying bioreactor, for the removal of nutrients from agricultural drainage. Nutrient removal efficiency was evaluated by: (a) nutrient loading rates (low, medium, and high); (b) hydraulic retention time, and (c) comparison with another carbon source (woodchip). The results show that concentrations of nitrate nitrogen (NO3(-)-N), ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+)-N), total nitrogen (TN), and orthophosphate phosphorus (PO4(3-)-P) in the rice-straw bioreactor effluents were reduced by 53%, 25%, 40%, and 35%, respectively, compared with influents at the medium nutrient loading rate (NO3(-)-N: 10-15 mg N L(-1), NH4(+)-N: 10-15 mg N L(-1), PO4(3-)-P: 1.0-1.5 mg P L(-1)) and long hydraulic retention time (HRT, 24h), with a corresponding denitrification rate (DR) of 0.40 mg N L(-1)h(-1). Moreover, the rice-straw bioreactor showed significantly higher (p<0.05) nutrient removal efficiency than the woodchip bioreactor at the medium nutrient loading rate and 24h HRT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of grinding processes on enzymatic degradation of wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gabriela Ghizzi D; Couturier, Marie; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Buléon, Alain; Rouau, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of wheat straw fine to ultra-fine grindings at pilot scale was studied. The produced powders were characterised by their particle-size distribution (laser diffraction), crystallinity (WAXS) and enzymatic degradability (Trichoderma reesei enzymatic cocktail). A large range of wheat-straw powders was produced: from coarse (median particle size ∼800 μm) to fine particles (∼50 μm) using sieve-based grindings, then ultra-fine particles ∼20 μm by jet milling and ∼10 μm by ball milling. The wheat straw degradability was enhanced by the decrease of particle size until a limit: ∼100 μm, up to 36% total carbohydrate and 40% glucose hydrolysis yields. Ball milling samples overcame this limit up to 46% total carbohydrate and 72% glucose yields as a consequence of cellulose crystallinity reduction (from 22% to 13%). Ball milling appeared to be an effective pretreatment with similar glucose yield and superior carbohydrate yield compared to steam explosion pretreatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Removal of phenol from aqueous solution using rice straw as adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarker, Nandita; Fakhruddin, A. N. M.

    2017-06-01

    Phenol is an environmental pollutant; the present study was conducted to examine the adsorption of phenol by rice straw. For this purpose raw (untreated), physically treated (boiled and dried) and thermally treated (heated at 230 °C for 3 h to produce ash) rice straw were selected to determine phenol removal efficiency at different contact times and adsorbent dosages for 1 and <1 mm rice straw particles. Residual phenol concentrations were determined by colorimetric method. Highest 84 % of phenol removal was observed for thermally treated <1 mm rice straw particle. Equilibrium time was more than four hour. Percentage of removal of phenol increased as the adsorbent dose increase. The removal efficiency increase in the order of: raw rice straw < physically treated < thermally treated (ash) rice straw. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm was developed for 1 and <1 mm particle size of thermally (ash) treated rice straw. Freundlich isotherm best fit the equilibrium data for 1 mm thermally treated rice straw. The results showed that thermally treated rice straw (ash) can be developed as a potential adsorbent for phenol removal from aqueous solution.

  10. Reduction of odor and odorant emissions from slurry stores by means of straw covers.

    PubMed

    Blanes-Vidal, Victoria; Hansen, Martin N; Sousa, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Swine (Sus scrofa) slurry stored in open storages is a source of airborne contaminants. A customary practice for ammonia and odor control consists of covering the surface of the slurry with floating materials, such as straw. Although straw covers have been proven to generally reduce gaseous emissions, more knowledge is needed regarding how age, moisture content, and microbiological development of the straw cover affect the emissions of odor and odorants to develop recommendations for the practical use of straw covers. This study compiles data on odor concentration and odorants above swine slurry covered by straw of different ages and moisture contents, during a 9 wk laboratory scale study. The results showed that aged straw covers significantly reduced emissions of ammonia (by 99%), dimethyl sulfide (by 81%), phenol (82%), p-cresol (by 95%), skatole (by 98%), and benzylalcohol (by 97%), while no significant differences were found between uncovered and covered slurry for emission of odor, hydrogen sulfide, volatile fatty acids, dimethyl disulfide, and indole. The moisture content of the straw cover neither affected emissions of odor nor odorants. This study suggests that the main mechanism for odor and odorants emission reduction from straw covered slurry is as a physical barrier and not as a biofilter. However, the reduction in emissions of specific gases (such as ammonia, dimethyl sulfide, p-cresol, and benzyl alcohol) appears to be also caused by the straw cover acting as a biofilter.

  11. Pretreatment of rice straw by proton beam irradiation for efficient enzyme digestibility.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Bong; Kim, Jun Seok; Lee, Jong Ho; Kang, Seong Woo; Park, Chulhwan; Kim, Seung Wook

    2011-08-01

    Biomass was pretreated with proton beam irradiation (PBI) in order to enhance enzyme digestibility. Rice straw and soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA)-treated rice straw were treated with 1-25 kGy doses of PBI at a beam energy of 45 MeV. The optimal doses of PBI for efficient sugar recovery were 15 and 3 kGy for rice straw and SAA-treated rice straw, respectively. When PBI was applied to rice straw at 15 kGy, the glucose conversion reached 68% of the theoretical maximum at 72 h. When 3 kGy of PBI was applied to SAA-treated rice straw, approximately 90% of the theoretical glucose conversion was obtained at 12 h compared to a 89% conversion at 48 h. After 2 h of enzymatic saccharification, the initial reaction rates of raw rice straw pretreated with 15 kGy of PBI and SAA-treated rice straw pretreated with 3 kGy of PBI were 1.4 × 10⁻⁴ and 9.7 × 10⁻⁴ g L⁻¹ s⁻¹, respectively. Further, the results of X-ray diffractometry support the effect of PBI on sugar recovery, whereas scanning electron microscopy images revealed a more rugged rice straw surface.

  12. Barriers and incentives to the production of bioethanol from cereal straw: A farm business perspective

    PubMed Central

    Glithero, N.J.; Ramsden, S.J.; Wilson, P.

    2013-01-01

    The EU renewable energy directive stipulates a requirement for 10% of transport fuels to be derived from renewable sources by 2020. Second generation biofuels offer potential to contribute towards this target with cereal straw representing a potentially large feedstock source. From an on-farm survey of 240 arable farmers, timeliness of crop establishment and benefits of nutrient retention from straw incorporation were cited as reasons for straw incorporation. However, two-thirds (one-third) of farmers would supply wheat (barley) straw for bioenergy. The most popular contract length and continuous length of straw supply was either 1 or 3 years. Contracts stipulating a fixed area of straw supply for a fixed price were the most frequently cited preferences, with £50 t−1 the most frequently cited minimum contract price that farmers would find acceptable. Arable farmers in England would be willing to sell 2.52 Mt of cereal straw for bioenergy purposes nationally and 1.65 Mt in the main cereal growing areas of Eastern England. Cereal straw would be diverted from current markets or on-farm uses and from straw currently incorporated into soil. Policy interventions may be required to incentivise farmers to engage in this market, but food and fuel policies must increasingly be integrated to meet societal goals. PMID:24926116

  13. Evaluation of pretreatment with Pleurotus ostreatus for enzymatic hydrolysis of rice straw.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masayuki; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Daisuke; Sakai, Kenji; Hoshino, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Takaaki

    2005-12-01

    The effects of biological pretreatment of rice straw using four white-rot fungi (Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Trametes versicolor, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora, and Pleurotus ostreatus) were evaluated on the basis of quantitative and structural changes in the components of the pretreated rice straw as well as susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis. Of these white-rot fungi, P. ostreatus selectively degraded the lignin fraction of rice straw rather than the holocellulose component. When rice straw (water content of 60%) was pretreated with P. ostreatus for 60 d, the total weight loss and the degree of Klason lignin degraded were 25% and 41%, respectively. After the pretreatment, the residual amounts of cellulose and hemicellulose were 83% and 52% of those in untreated rice straw, respectively. By enzymatic hydrolysis with a commercial cellulase preparation for 48 h, 52% holocellulose and 44% cellulose in the pretreated rice straw were solubilized. The net sugar yields based on the amounts of holocellulose and cellulose of untreated rice straw were 33% for total soluble sugar from holocellulose and 32% for glucose from cellulose. The SEM observations showed that the increase in susceptibility of rice straw to enzymatic hydrolysis by pretreatment with P. ostreatus is caused by partial degradation of the lignin seal. When the content of Klason lignin was less than 15% of the total weight of the pretreated straw, enhanced degrees of enzymatic solubilization of holocellulose and cellulose fractions were observed as the content of Klason lignin decreased.

  14. Isotopic compositions of elemental carbon in smoke and ash derived from crop straw combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Li, Jiuhai; Xu, Hui; Wu, Dan; Liu, Yan; Yang, Hui

    2014-08-01

    Six cultivars of straw for rice, maize and wheat, respectively, were burned under flaming and smoldering conditions, and carbon isotopic ratio values of elemental carbon (EC) in smoke and ash determined. The results showed that mean carbon isotopic fractionation (Δ13C) between EC in flaming and smoldering smoke from rice straw, and the starting material was -2.7‰ and -3.0‰, respectively. Moreover, the corresponding Δ13C values for EC in flaming and smoldering smoke from wheat straw were -0.1‰ and +0.4‰, respectively. Δ13C for EC in the two types of smoke from maize straw were -3.4‰ and +0.2‰, respectively. Δ13C for EC in flaming and smoldering ash from rice straw were -1.8‰ and -1.6‰ in turn. Δ13C for EC in flaming and smoldering ash from wheat straw were +0.9‰ and +2.4‰, respectively. Additionally, the ones for EC in the two types of ash from maize straw were -1.2‰ and -1.0‰, respectively. If δ13CEC values for pollutants, such as straw smoke, soot from coal and diesel-powered vehicles, and ambient PM2.5 in a region, are determined in summer and autumn, the contribution of straw burning to ambient EC is likely to be estimated with the approach of carbon isotopic mass balance.

  15. The impact of barley straw conditioning on the inhibition of Scenedesmus using chemostats.

    PubMed

    Murray, Daniel; Parsons, Simon A; Jarvis, Peter; Jefferson, Bruce

    2010-03-01

    The current paper investigates the role of barley straw conditioning on inhibiting the alga Scenedesmus. Fresh, pre-rotted and white rot fungi (WRF) augmented straw was tested in a series of chemostat experiments over 15 weeks. All three systems were effective at inhibiting the alga with differences observed in the lag time before inhibition occurred and the rate of alga decline. Lag times of 8, 4 and 1 week(s) were recorded for the fresh, rotted and fungi-treated straws, respectively, with a maximum inhibition rate of >7x10(4) cellsweek(-1) observed for the fungi pre-treated system. Overall, the results indicate that pre-treatment is a viable method to enable barley straw to be used in a more reactive manner. Explanation is postulated that during pre-treatment no alternative sources of nitrogen are available, thereby leading to greater bacterial decomposition of straw lignin to release inhibitory substances. The principle of utilising an engineered pre-treatment by inoculating barley straw with WRF to enhance the impact of the straw on algal inhibition has been clearly demonstrated. Further work is required to understand how the straw pre-treatment stage can be reduced to minimise its duration while maximising the inhibitory effect of adding barley straw.

  16. [Effects of straw mulching and irrigation on solar energy utilization efficiency of winter wheat farmland].

    PubMed

    Li, Quanqi; Chen, Yuhai; Wu, Wei; Yu, Shunzhang; Zhou, Xunbo; Dong, Qingyu; Yu, Songlie

    2006-02-01

    The study showed that straw mulching decreased the basic seedlings and tillers of winter wheat and the leaf area index (LAI) at earlier growth stage, but increased the LAI at latter growth stage. Straw mulching and irrigation reduced the transmittance and reflectance of PAR, resulting in the increase of PAR capture ratio mainly at the height of 40-60 cm. The solar energy utilization ratio of grain was decreased by straw mulching, while that of stem and leaf was increased. The total solar energy utilization efficiency of winter wheat could also be increased by straw mulching.

  17. Coiled tubing operations and services

    SciTech Connect

    Jaworsky, A.S. II )

    1991-11-01

    Coiled tubing offers many advantages over conventional jointed tubing used for drilling in oil fields, including time savings, pumping flexibility, fluid placement, reduced formation damage and safety. The article gives an overview of coiled tubing history and development. Operating concepts are explained, along with descriptions of the major equipment and components associated with coiled tubing use in the oil field today.

  18. Neutron multiplicity ,easurements With 3He alternative: Straw neutron detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wolff, Ronald S.; Meade, John A.; ...

    2015-01-27

    Counting neutrons emitted by special nuclear material (SNM) and differentiating them from the background neutrons of various origins is the most effective passive means of detecting SNM. Unfortunately, neutron detection, counting, and partitioning in a maritime environment are complex due to the presence of high-multiplicity spallation neutrons (commonly known as “ship effect”) and to the complicated nature of the neutron scattering in that environment. In this study, a prototype neutron detector was built using 10B as the converter in a special form factor called “straws” that would address the above problems by looking into the details of multiplicity distributions ofmore » neutrons originating from a fissioning source. This paper describes the straw neutron multiplicity counter (NMC) and assesses the performance with those of a commercially available fission meter. The prototype straw neutron detector provides a large-area, efficient, lightweight, more granular (than fission meter) neutron-responsive detection surface (to facilitate imaging) to enhance the ease of application of fission meters. Presented here are the results of preliminary investigations, modeling, and engineering considerations leading to the construction of this prototype. This design is capable of multiplicity and Feynman variance measurements. This prototype may lead to a near-term solution to the crisis that has arisen from the global scarcity of 3He by offering a viable alternative to fission meters. This paper describes the work performed during a 2-year site-directed research and development (SDRD) project that incorporated straw detectors for neutron multiplicity counting. The NMC is a two-panel detector system. We used 10B (in the form of enriched boron carbide: 10B4C) for neutron detection instead of 3He. In the first year, the project worked with a panel of straw neutron detectors, investigated its characteristics, and developed a data acquisition (DAQ) system to collect

  19. [15N-flow after in sacco incubation and feeding of sheep and goats with untreated wheat straw or straw treated with 15N horse urine].

    PubMed

    Schubert, R; Flachowsky, G; Bochröder, B

    1994-01-01

    Chopped wheat straw was homogeneously mixed with urine of horses (5.75 gN per 1, 16.88 atom-% 15N-excess) and airtightly stored in plastic containers for 6 months. Three rumen fistulated sheep and goats each were fed with untreated or urine treated straw. Concentrate was added to straw. Untreated and urine treated straw were given in nylon bags and incubated in the rumen of sheep and goats for 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours. A three compartment exponential function was used to fit the measurements of 15N-excess and 15N-amount of bag content. The curves and the calculated partial Y-values of the three compartments show the inflow and outflow of 15N into or from the bags and allow conclusions about the binding of urine N. Most N of urine was not compactly bound by straw during storage. Primarily microbial N was attached to the straw in the rumen. About 6% of urine N were bound more compact to the straw. Similar curves were calculated for 15N-excess and 15N-amount of nylon bags. The curves allow conclusions about tracer flows without quantitative knowledge. There were no significant differences between animal species.

  20. Autohydrolysis pretreatment of waste wheat straw for cellulosic ethanol production in a co-located straw pulp mill.

    PubMed

    Han, Qiang; Jin, Yanbin; Jameel, Hasan; Chang, Hou-Min; Phillips, Richard; Park, Sunkyu

    2015-01-01

    Waste wheat straw (WWS) is the waste product from feedstock preparation process in a straw pulp mill. It has a significant annual production rate and no commercial value has been explored on this material. In this study, waste wheat straw was pretreated using an autohydrolysis process followed by mechanical refining, and the pretreated materials were further enzymatically hydrolyzed to evaluate the total sugar recovery for bioethanol production. Results show that autohydrolysis at 170 °C for 40 min followed by 6000 revolution PFI refining provided the best result in this study, where a total sugar recovery (total sugars in autohydrolysis filtrate and enzymatic hydrolyzate over total carbohydrates on raw WWS) of 70 % at 4 filter paper unit per oven dry gram (FPU/OD g) substrate enzyme charge could be obtained. The economic evaluation of this biorefinery process indicates that cellulosic ethanol production from autohydrolysis of WWS is a very profitable business, with 28.4 % of internal rate of return can be achieved based on current ethanol wholesale price in China.

  1. Co-firing coal and straw in PF boilers -- Performance impact of straw with emphasis on SCR catalyst for deNOx catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wieck-Hansen, K.

    1999-07-01

    A two year co-firing coal/straw program was carried out on a 150 MWel pulverized fired boiler at Studstrupvaerket in Denmark from January 1996 to January 1998. The reason for burning straw is based on a political decision where the Power utilities have accepted to burn 1 mill ton straw/year and 0.4-mill tons wood. This amount is about 5 % of the total fuel consumption for energy production in Denmark. Straw is found to be CO{sub 2} neutral and therefore an important factor in CO{sub 2} reduction. This full-scale long-term test was based on many years' experience with straw firing. Late 1980 tests with coal and straw co-combustion on a test CFB plant were carried out with such successful results, that a full scale plant of 80 MWth was built and commissioned in January 1992. In 1992 the first tests were performed on a grate fired boiler, where up to 30 % straw on energy basis, were co-fired with coal. The growing optimism lead to a short-term test with coal and straw on a pulverized fuel-fired 330th MW boiler in 1993. Limited corrosion was found and a long-term test was accepted on another full-scale boiler. To minimize the overall risk, the authors chose an old boiler, but with the intention of using the technique on new and modern plants equipped with desulfurization and DeNOx catalyst. A comprehensive test program was carried out in order to evaluate and quantify the impact of straw on corrosion, slagging and fouling, emissions and on SCR catalysts deactivation.

  2. Circle nephrostomy tube revisited

    PubMed Central

    Noureldin, Yasser A.; Diab, Christian; Valenti, David; Andonian, Sero

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There are few options for patients requiring chronic urinary drainage using nephrostomy tubes. Although circle nephrostomy tube (CNT) was invented in 1954, it is rarely used. Its advantages include longer indwelling time such that it is changed semi-annually when compared with the standard nephrostomy tube (SNT), which is changed monthly. However, there are no studies comparing indwelling times and costs with these two tubes. The aim of the present study was to compare CNT with SNT in terms of frequency of tube changes, reasons for earlier tube changes, and associated costs. Methods: Patients who had CNT inserted between 2009 and 2015 were reviewed. The indications for chronic indwelling nephrostomy tubes were tabulated. The frequency of tube changes was compared between CNT and SNT in the same patients. Furthermore, costs associated with insertion and exchange of CNT and SNT were analyzed. Results: Seven patients with mean age of 71.9 ± 7.6 years (range 43–96) had a total of 36 CNT changes. The mean number of CNT changes was four (range 2–5) at a mean interval of 168.3 ± 15.6 days (range 120–231). All patients had SNT prior to converting to CNT. When compared with the mean interval for SNT changes, the mean interval for CNT changes was significantly longer (44.8 ± 19.4 vs. 168.3 ± 41.3 days; p=0.028). Tube blockage and urinary leakage were the most common reasons for earlier than scheduled CNT changes. In our centre, CNT insertion and exchange cost $1965.48 and $923.96 compared with $1450.43 and $803.81 for SNT, respectively. There was an estimated cost savings of $46 861.10 (range $87 414.30 –$40 553.20) for the whole cohort by switching from SNTs to CNTs. Conclusions: Despite the small sample size as the main limitation, this study confirms that CNTs are associated with significantly fewer changes and lower cost when compared with SNTs for poor-surgical-risk patients requiring chronic NTs.

  3. [Effects of straw incorporation on rice carbon sequestration characteristics and grain yield formation].

    PubMed

    Pei, Peng-Gang; Zhang, Jun-Hua; Zhu, Lian-Feng; Yu, Sheng-Miao; Hu, Zhi-Hua

    2014-10-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the effects of straw incorporation on rice dry matter accumulation and transportation, rice carbon sequestration and grain yield formation. The experiment included four levels of straw incorporation: 0 (control), 4000, 6000 and 8000 kg · hm(-2). Hybrid rice cultivar Zhongzheyou 1 was used in this experiment. The results showed that the average rice dry matter accumulation amount of the three straw incorporation treatments was increased by 63.03 g · m(-2) compared with the control, and that of straw incorporation of 6000 kg · hm(-2) showed the most favorable result, which was 154.40 g · m(-2) higher than the control. Effects of straw incorporation on rice dry matter accumulation showed the best performance from the maximum tillering stage to the full heading stage, and the dry matter accumulation at this stage was 71.25 g · m(-2) higher than the control. Compared with the control, the average dry matter exportation rate and apparent transformation rate from rice stem and leaf in the straw incorporation treatments were increased by 4.2% and 3.7%, respectively. The highest dry matter exportation rate and apparent transformation rate from rice stem and leaf were observed in the straw incorporation treatment of 6000 kg · hm(-2), which were increased by 12.8% and 11.1% compared to the control, respectively. The average rice carbon sequestration from the straw incorporation treatments was increased by 55.38 g · m(-2) compared with the control, and straw incorporation of 6000 kg · hm(-2) performed best with an increase of 17.8% compared with the control. Straw incorporation played a positive role in regulating the carbon sequestration of stem and leaf at the early growth stage and carbon sequestration of spike at the late growth stage. The average grain yield from the straw incorporation treatments was increased by 794.59 kg · hm(-2) (9.5% higher) compared with the control. Rice grain yields from the straw incorporation

  4. Distributed Physical and Molecular Separations for Selective Harvest of Higher Value Wheat Straw Components Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, J.R

    2005-01-31

    Wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.) is an abundant source of plant fiber. It is regenerated, in large quantities, every year. At present, this potentially valuable resource is greatly under-exploited. Most of the excess straw biomass (i.e., tonnage above that required for agronomic cropping system sustainability) is managed through expensive chopping/tillage operations and/or burnt in the field following harvest, resulting in air pollution and associated health problems. Potential applications for wheat straw investigated within this project include energy and composites manufacture. Other methods of straw utilization that will potentially benefit from the findings of this research project include housing and building, pulp and paper, thermal insulation, fuels, and chemicals. This project focused on components of the feedstock assembly system for supplying a higher value small grains straw residue for (1) gasification/combustion and (2) straw-thermoplastic composites. This project was an integrated effort to solve the technological, infrastructural, and economic challenges associated with using straw residue for these bioenergy and bioproducts applications. The objective of the research is to contribute to the development of a low-capital distributed harvesting and engineered storage system for upgrading wheat straw to more desirable feedstocks for combustion and for straw-plastic composites. We investigated two processes for upgrading wheat straw to a more desirable feedstock: (1) An efficient combine-based threshing system for separating the internodal stems from the leaves, sheaths, nodes, and chaff. (2) An inexpensive biological process using white-rot fungi to improve the composition of the mechanically processed straw stems.

  5. Distributed Physical and Molecular Separations for Selective Harvest of Higher Value Wheat Straw Components Project

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2004-09-30

    Wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.) is an abundant source of plant fiber. It is regenerated, in large quantities, every year. At present, this potentially valuable resource is greatly under-exploited. Most of the excess straw biomass (i.e., tonnage above that required for agronomic cropping system sustainability) is managed through expensive chopping/tillage operations and/or burnt in the field following harvest, resulting in air pollution and associated health problems. Potential applications for wheat straw investigated within this project include energy and composites manufacture. Other methods of straw utilization that will potentially benefit from the findings of this research project include housing and building, pulp and paper, thermal insulation, fuels, and chemicals. This project focused on components of the feedstock assembly system for supplying a higher value small grains straw residue for (1) gasification/combustion and (2) straw-thermoplastic composites. This project was an integrated effort to solve the technological, infrastructural, and economic challenges associated with using straw residue for these bioenergy and bioproducts applications. The objective of the research is to contribute to the development of a low-capital distributed harvesting and engineered storage system for upgrading wheat straw to more desirable feedstocks for combustion and for straw-plastic composites. They investigated two processes for upgrading wheat straw to a more desirable feedstock: (1) an efficient combine-based threshing system for separating the intermodal stems from the leaves, sheaths, nodes, and chaff. (2) An inexpensive biological process using white-rot fungi to improve the composition of the mechanically processed straw stems.

  6. Tracheostomy tubes and related appliances.

    PubMed

    Hess, Dean R

    2005-04-01

    Tracheostomy tubes are used to administer positive-pressure ventilation, to provide a patent airway, to provide protection from aspiration, and to provide access to the lower respiratory tract for airway clearance. They are available in a variety of sizes and styles, from several manufacturers. The dimensions of tracheostomy tubes are given by their inner diameter, outer diameter, length, and curvature. Differences in length between tubes of the same inner diameter, but from different manufacturers, are not commonly appreciated but may have important clinical implications. Tracheostomy tubes can be angled or curved, a feature that can be used to improve the fit of the tube in the trachea. Extra proximal length tubes facilitate placement in patients with large necks, and extra distal length tubes facilitate placement in patients with tracheal anomalies. Several tube designs have a spiral wire reinforced flexible design and have an adjustable flange design to allow bedside adjustments to meet extra-length tracheostomy tube needs. Tracheostomy tubes can be cuffed or uncuffed. Cuffs on tracheostomy tubes include high-volume low-pressure cuffs, tight-to-shaft cuffs, and foam cuffs. The fenestrated tracheostomy tube has an opening in the posterior portion of the tube, above the cuff, which allows the patient to breathe through the upper airway when the inner cannula is removed. Tracheostomy tubes with an inner cannula are called dual-cannula tracheostomy tubes. Several tracheostomy tubes are designed specifically for use with the percutaneous tracheostomy procedure. Others are designed with a port above the cuff that allows for subglottic aspiration of secretions. The tracheostomy button is used for stoma maintenance. It is important for clinicians caring for patients with a tracheostomy tube to understand the nuances of various tracheostomy tube designs and to select a tube that appropriately fits the patient.

  7. Neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nicholas D E; Copp, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs), including spina bifida and anencephaly, are severe birth defects of the central nervous system that originate during embryonic development when the neural tube fails to close completely. Human NTDs are multifactorial, with contributions from both genetic and environmental factors. The genetic basis is not yet well understood, but several nongenetic risk factors have been identified as have possibilities for prevention by maternal folic acid supplementation. Mechanisms underlying neural tube closure and NTDs may be informed by experimental models, which have revealed numerous genes whose abnormal function causes NTDs and have provided details of critical cellular and morphological events whose regulation is essential for closure. Such models also provide an opportunity to investigate potential risk factors and to develop novel preventive therapies.

  8. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TUBING

    DOEpatents

    Creutz, E.C.

    1958-04-15

    The manufacture of thin-walled uranium tubing by the hot-piercing techique is described. Uranium billets are preheated to a temperature above 780 d C. The heated billet is fed to a station where it is engaged on its external surface by three convex-surfaced rotating rollers which are set at an angle to the axis of the billet to produce a surface friction force in one direction to force the billet over a piercing mandrel. While being formed around the mandrel and before losing the desired shape, the tube thus formed is cooled by a water spray.

  9. The electrostatic storage tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, R. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    An electrostatic camera system is discussed which is based on the electrostatic storage tube. The development of the system was begun following a series of experiments which indicated that the device offers signficantly improved performance over currently available devices. The approach used in developing the high performance camera involves: converting the input image to an electron image at low loss, applying a low noise gain process, and storing the resulting charge pattern in a low-loss target. The basic processes and elements of the electrostatic storage tube are illustrated and discussed. Graphs that depict the camera performance characteristics are included.

  10. The lepton flavor violating decay {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} Micro-Sign {sup {+-}} Micro-Sign {sup {+-}} Micro-Sign {sup Minus-Or-Plus-Sign} at LHCb

    SciTech Connect

    Keune, A.

    2012-09-15

    The possibility of improving the limit on the branching fraction of the lepton flavor violating decay {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} Micro-Sign {sup {+-}} Micro-Sign {sup {+-}} Micro-Sign {sup Minus-Or-Plus-Sign} at LHCb is discussed. It is shown that a simple, cut-based analysis is sufficient to improve the upper limit on this branching fraction within the lifetime of LHCb.

  11. Impact of removing straw from wheat and barley fields: A literature review

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The sustainability of straw removal from wheat and barley fields from the standpoint of its effects on soil properties and nutrient cycling is a concern. A recent literature review reveals that there is no negative effect of small grain straw removal on soil organic carbon (SOC) content with irriga...

  12. Wood strands as an alternative to agricultural straw for erosion control

    Treesearch

    Randy B. Foltz; James H. Dooley

    2004-01-01

    Agricultural straw is used in forested areas of the United States for erosion control on burned areas, harvest landings, decommissioned road prisms, road cuts and fills, and other areas of disturbed soil. However, an increased agronomic and ecological value for straw; an increased utilization for energy production, fiber panels, and other higher value uses; a...

  13. Effect of water washing on the thermal behavior of rice straw.

    PubMed

    Said, N; Bishara, T; García-Maraver, A; Zamorano, M

    2013-11-01

    Rice straw can be used as a renewable fuel for heat and power generation. It is a viable mean of replacing fossil fuels and preventing pollution caused by open burning, especially in the areas where this residual biomass is generated. Nevertheless, the thermal conversion of rice straw can cause some operating problems such as slag formation, which negatively affects thermal conversion systems. So, the main objective of this research is studying the combustion behavior of rice straw samples collected from various regions by applying thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In addition, the thermal behavior of ashes from rice straw was also analyzed in order to detect their melting points, and ash sintering was detected at different temperatures within the range between 550 and 1000°C. Since washing rice straw with water could reduce the content of undesirable inorganic compounds related to the ash fusibility, samples of washed rice straw were analyzed under combustion conditions to investigate its differences regarding the thermal behavior of rice straw. The results showed that rice straw washing led to a significant improvement in its thermal behavior, since it reduced the ash contents and sintering formation.

  14. Methane emission from fields with three various rice straw treatments in Taiwan paddy soils.

    PubMed

    Liou, Rey-May; Huang, Shan-Ney; Lin, Chin-Wei; Chen, Shin-Hsiung

    2003-07-01

    Flooded rice fields are one of the major biogenic methane sources. In this study, the effects of straw residual treatments on methane emission from paddy fields were discussed. The experimental field was located at Tainan District Agricultural Improvement Station in Chia-Yi county (23 degrees 25'08''N, 120degrees16'26''E) of southern Taiwan throughout the first and the second crop seasons in 2000. The seasonal methane fluxes in the first crop season with rice stubble removed, rice straw burned and rice straw incorporated were 4.41, 3.78 and 5.27 g CH4 m(-2), and the values were 32.8, 38.9 and 75.1 g CH4 m(-2) in the second crop season, respectively. In comparison of three management methods of rice straw residue, the incorporation of rice straw residue should show a significant tendency for enhancing methane emission in the second crop season. Moreover, stubble removed and straw burned treatments significantly reduced CH4 emissions by 28 approximately 56% emissions compared to straw incorporated plot. Concerning for air quality had led to legislation restricting rice straw burning, removing of rice stubble might be an appropriate methane mitigation strategy in Taiwan paddy soils.

  15. Barley hulls and straw constituents and emulsifying properties of their hemicelluloses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Barley hulls (husks) are potential by-products of barley ethanol production. Barley straw is an abundant biomass in the regions producing barley for malting, feeds, and fuel ethanol. Both barley hulls and straw contain valuable hemicelluloses (arabinoxylans) and other useful carbohydrate and non-car...

  16. Biochars derived from various crop straws: characterization and Cd(II) removal potential.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingkuan; Lian, Fei; Liu, Zhongqi; Zhu, Lingyan; Song, Zhengguo

    2014-08-01

    Five types of biochars prepared from four crop straws and one wood shaving at 600 °C were characterized, and their sorption to Cd(II) were determined to investigate the differences in capacity to function as sorbents to heavy metals. Surface areas and pore volumes of the biochars were inversely correlated to the lignin content of raw biomass. The biochars derived from crop straws displayed more developed pore structure than wood char due to the higher lignin content of wood. Sorption capacity of the biochars to Cd(II) followed the order of corn straw>cotton straw>wheat straw>rice straw>poplar shaving, which was not strictly consistent with the surface area of the chars. The surface characteristics of chars before and after Cd(II) sorption were investigated with scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, which suggested that the higher sorption of Cd(II) on corn straw chars was mainly attributed to cation exchange, surface precipitation of carbonate, and surface complexation with oxygen-containing groups. This study indicated that crop straw biochars exhibit distinct sorption capacities to heavy metals due to various surface characteristics, and thus the sorption efficiency should be carefully evaluated specific to target contaminant.

  17. Preference by horses for bedding pellets made from switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) straw

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The bedding system used for stalled horses can impact their health and well-being. This study examined the saponin concentration in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) straw, and bedding pellets made from switchgrass straw. Further, this study determined the palatability of bedding pellets made from sw...

  18. Influence of pine straw harvesting, prescribed fire, and fertilization on a Louisiana longleaf pine site

    Treesearch

    James D. Haywood

    2009-01-01

    This research was initiated in a 34-year-old, direct-seeded stand of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) to study how pine straw management practices (harvesting, fire, and fertilization) affected the longleaf pine overstory and pine straw yields. A randomized complete block split-plot design was installed with two main plot treatments...

  19. Effects of straw processing and pen stocking density on holstein dairy heifers: ii) behavior and hygiene

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of pen-stocking density and straw processing on the daily behavior traits and hygiene of Holstein dairy heifers housed in a freestall system are not understood. Our objective was to evaluate these factors in a trial with a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement of straw-processing (GOOD or POOR) an...

  20. Research about the effect of straw burning on aerosol in Northeast China based on MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mingchao; Li, Jingchao; Chen, Hui; Yao, Lei; Chen, Hui; Liang, Wanjuan

    2016-03-01

    Straw burning has great influence on ambient air quality. In this paper, we study the advantages of satellite remote sensing monitoring technology, extract the straw burning and aerosol remote sensing monitoring results from the MODIS data during Sep-Oct-Nov 2013 in Northeast China. We analyze the temporal and spatial distribution characteristics of straw burning and aerosol in autumn, and study through the statistics and relevant analysis method for the quantitative straw burning in northeast China's impact on local air quality. The results show that the monthly change of straw burning and AOD in the autumn of 2013 has a high consistency, from which in October the straw burning is the most frequent, aerosol pollution is also the most serious. And the straw burning point distribution density area and the AOD high value area are basically consistent with the space position. Furthermore, every increase of a straw burning point can make the monthly average AOD of the three provinces of northeast China increases by 0.0006.

  1. Properties of Wheat-Straw Boards with Frw Based on Interface Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X. D.; Wang, F. H.; Liu, Y.

    This paper explored the effect of MDI, UF and FRW content on the mechanical and fire retardant property of straw based panels with surface alkali liquor processing. In order to manufacture the straw based panel with high quality, low toxic and fire retardant, the interface of wheat-straw was treated with alkaline liquid, and the orthogonal test was carried out to optimize the technical parameters. The conductivity and diffusion coefficient K of the straw material after alkaline liquid treatment increased obviously. This indicated that alkaline liquid treatment improved the surface wet ability of straw, which is helpful for the infiltration of resin. The results of orthogonal test showed that the optimized treating condition was alkaline liquid concentration as 0.4-0.8%, alkaline dosage as 1:2.5-1:4.5, alkalinetreated time as 12h-48 h.The physical and mechanical properties of wheat-straw boards after treated increased remarkably and it could satisfy the national standard. The improvement of the straw surface wet ability is helpful to the forming of chemical bond. Whereas the variance analysis of the fire retardant property of straw based panel showed that TTI, pkHRR and peak value appearance time were not affected by the MDI, UF and FRW content significantly. The results of orthogonal test showed that the optimized processing condition was MDI content as 3%, UF resin content as 6% and the FRW content as 10%.

  2. Response of direct seeded Pinus palustris and herbaceous vegetation to fertilization, burning, and pine straw harvesting

    Treesearch

    James D. Haywood; Allan E. Tiarks; Michael L. Elliott-Smith; Henry A. Pearson

    1998-01-01

    Fallen pine straw (needles) is a renewable biological resource valued as a mulch in horticulture and for landscaping. However, its harvesting may have detrimental long-term effects on forest soils and vegetation. To compare current pine straw harvesting practices, a randomized complete block splitplot study was established during 1990 in a 34-year-old stand of direct-...

  3. Oxalic acid pretreatment of rice straw particles and loblolly pine chips : release of hemicellulosic carbohydrates

    Treesearch

    Xianjun Li; Zhiyong Cai; Eric Horn; Jerrold E. Winandy

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of oxalic acid (OA) pretreatment on carbohydrates released from rice straw particles and wood chips. The results showed that OA treatment accelerated carbohydrates extraction from rice straw particles and wood chips. OA pretreatment dramatically increased the amount of carbohydrates extracted, up to 24 times for wood...

  4. Adding sweet potato vines improve the quality of rice straw silage.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Ji, Shuren; Wang, Qian; Qin, Mengzhen; Hou, Chen; Shen, Yixin

    2016-08-23

    Rice straw and sweet potato vines are the main by-products of agricultural crops, and their disposal creates problems for the environment in the south of China. In order to establish an easy method for making rice straw silage successfully, experiments were conduct to evaluate fermentation quality and nutritive value of rice straw silages ensiled with or without sweet potato vine. Paddy rice straw (PR) and upland rice straw (UP) were ensiled alone or with sweet potato vines (SP) by a ratio of 1:1 (fresh matter basis), over 3 years. Compared with rice straw silages ensiled alone, the mixed-material silages (PR + SP, UR + SP) showed higher fermentation quality with lower propionic acid content and NH3 -N ratio of total N, and higher (P < 0.05) concentrations of lactic acid and acetic acid, resulting in decrease (P < 0.05) of dry matter loss and higher (P < 0.05) in vitro ruminal dry matter digestion. When the fermentation quality, chemical composition and in vitro rumen fermentation characteristics were considered, ensiling would be an effective way of utilization of rice straw and sweet potato vines in the regions where rice and sweet potato are harvested at same season, and the sweet potato vines have the potential to improve rice straw fermentation quality with low water soluble carbohydrate content in south of China.

  5. Impact of environmental factors on fungal respiration and dry matter losses in wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Willcock; Magan

    2000-01-15

    An automatic electrolytic respirometer enabled replicated determinations of the respiration rates of individual fungi on sterile straw, and the mixed mycoflora of naturally contaminated wheat straw at different steady-state temperatures (10-30 degrees C) and water activities (a(w), 0.75-0.98) over periods of 8-14 days. Generally, the respiratory activity of individual spoilage fungi (Alternaria alternata, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Eurotium amstelodami, Fusarium culmorum and Penicillium aurantiogriseum) on sterile wheat straw increased linearly with increasing a(w) at 25 degrees C. The calculated maximum dry matter loss of wheat straw due to colonisation by individual species was about 10%, regardless of a(w). On naturally contaminated wheat straw fungal activity was also related to temperature and a(w), with maximum respiration at 30 degrees C and 0.98 a(w). At the lowest temperature examined, 10 degrees C, there was a slight lag prior to respiratory activity occurring. The respiratory activity was also significantly reduced (by half) when available water was reduced to 0.95-0.90 a(w). In contrast to the colonisation of sterile straw by individual species, the maximum dry matter loss caused by fungal deterioration of naturally contaminated wheat straw was 3.4% at 0.98 a(w) and 30 degrees C. The dominant fungal genera and species varied with a(w) and temperature. These results are discussed in relation to the storage of cereal straw without spoilage.

  6. Scale-up of wheat straw conversion to fuel ethanol at 100 liter scale

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat straw can serve as low cost feedstock for conversion to ethanol. Pretreatment is crucial prior to enzymatic hydrolysis. We have used dilute H2SO4 pretreatment at a high temperature for pretreatment of wheat straw. The pretreated hydrolyzate was bioabated using a novel fungal strain able to ...

  7. On-combine Sensing Technique for Mapping Straw Yield within Wheat Fields

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Straw from production of wheat is available for conversion to bioenergy. However, not all of this straw is available for conversion because a certain amount must be returned to the soil for conservation. County and state-wide inventories do not account for variation within farm fields. In this st...

  8. Mapping straw yield using on-combine light detection and ranging (LiDAR)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) straw is not only important for long-term soil productivity, but also as a raw material for biofuel, livestock feed, building, packing, and bedding. Inventory figures in the United States for potential straw availability are largely based on whole states and counties. ...

  9. SALT, a dedicated readout chip for high precision tracking silicon strip detectors at the LHCb Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugiel, Sz.; Dasgupta, R.; Firlej, M.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Kuczynska, M.; Moron, J.; Swientek, K.; Szumlak, T.

    2016-02-01

    The Upstream Tracker (UT) silicon strip detector, one of the central parts of the tracker system of the modernised LHCb experiment, will use a new 128-channel readout ASIC called SALT. It will extract and digitise analogue signals from the UT sensors, perform digital signal processing and transmit a serial output data. The SALT is being designed in CMOS 130 nm process and uses a novel architecture comprising of analog front-end and fast (40 MSps) ultra-low power (<0.5 mW) 6-bit ADC in each channel. The prototype ASICs of important functional blocks, like analogue front-end, 6-bit SAR ADC, PLL, and DLL, were designed, fabricated and tested. A prototype of an 8-channel version of the SALT chip, comprising all important functionalities was also designed and fabricated. The architecture and design of the SALT, together with the selected preliminary tests results, are presented.

  10. Measurement of the CKM angle γ from a combination of LHCb results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Arnau Romeu, J.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baszczyk, M.; Batozskaya, V.; Batsukh, B.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bezshyiko, Ia.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Campora Perez, D. H.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombs, G.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Costa Sobral, C. M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Déléage, N.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Franco Lima, V.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruberg Cazon, B. R.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Göbel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hatch, M.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, H.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kozachuk, A.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Mussini, M.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubert, K.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Toriello, F.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhu, X.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-12-01

    A combination of measurements sensitive to the CKM angle γ from LHCb is performed. The inputs are from analyses of time-integrated B + → DK +, B 0 → DK ∗0, B 0 → DK +π- and B + → DK +π+π- tree-level decays. In addition, results from a time-dependent analysis of B s 0 → D s ∓ K ± decays are included. The combination yields γ = (72. 2 - 7.3 + 6.8 ) °, where the uncertainty includes systematic effects. The 95.5% confidence level interval is determined to be γ ∈ [55 .9 , 85 .2]°. A second combination is investigated, also including measurements from B + → Dπ+ and B + → Dπ+π-π+ decays, which yields compatible results. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Evaporative CO2 cooling using microchannels etched in silicon for the future LHCb vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomerotski, A.; Buytart, J.; Collins, P.; Dumps, R.; Greening, E.; John, M.; Mapelli, A.; Leflat, A.; Li, Y.; Romagnoli, G.; Verlaat, B.

    2013-04-01

    The extreme radiation dose received by vertex detectors at the Large Hadron Collider dictates stringent requirements on their cooling systems. To be robust against radiation damage, sensors should be maintained below -20°C and at the same time, the considerable heat load generated in the readout chips and the sensors must be removed. Evaporative CO2 cooling using microchannels etched in a silicon plane in thermal contact with the readout chips is an attractive option. In this paper, we present the first results of microchannel prototypes with circulating, two-phase CO2 and compare them to simulations. We also discuss a practical design of upgraded VELO detector for the LHCb experiment employing this approach.

  12. A flavor dependent gauge symmetry, predictive radiative seesaw and LHCb anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, P.; Nomura, Takaaki; Okada, Hiroshi

    2017-09-01

    We propose a predictive radiative seesaw model at one-loop level with a flavor dependent gauge symmetry U(1) xB3 - xe - μ + τ and Majorana fermion dark matter. For the neutrino mass matrix, we obtain an A1 type texture (with two zeros) that provides us several predictions such as the normal ordering for the neutrino masses. We analyze the constraints from lepton flavor violations, relic density of dark matter, and collider physics for the new U(1) xB3 - xe - μ + τ gauge boson. Within the allowed region, the LHCb anomalies in B →K*μ+μ- and B → Kℓ+ℓ- with ℓ = e or μ can be resolved, and such Z‧ could be also observed at the LHC.

  13. 8-channel prototype of SALT readout ASIC for Upstream Tracker in the upgraded LHCb experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abellan Beteta, C.; Bugiel, S.; Dasgupta, R.; Firlej, M.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Kane, C.; Moron, J.; Swientek, K.; Wang, J.

    2017-02-01

    SALT is a new 128-channel readout ASIC for silicon strip detectors in the upgraded Upstream Tracker of the LHCb experiment. It will extract and digitise analogue signals from the sensor, perform digital processing and transmit serial output data. SALT is designed in CMOS 130 nm process and uses a novel architecture comprising of an analogue front-end and an ultra-low power (<0.5 mW) fast (40 MSps) sampling 6-bit ADC in each channel. An 8-channel prototype (SALT8), comprising all important functionalities was designed, fabricated and tested. A full 128-channel version was also submitted. The design and test results of the SALT8 prototype are presented showing its full functionality.

  14. Development and test of the CO2 evaporative cooling system for the LHCb UT Tracker Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelli, S.

    2017-03-01

    The LHCb upgrade requires a new silicon strip tracker detector placed between the vertex locator and the magnet. The new detector will have improved performance in charged particle tracking and triggering. The front-end electronics will be in the active area, close to the sensors: this is a key feature driving the mechanical and cooling detector design, together with the requirement to make the sensors work below -5°C, to withstand radiation damage. The new design exploits a cooling system based on CO2 evaporation at temperatures around -25°C. The support structure for the sensor modules is a lightweight carbon fiber mechanical structure embedding a cooling pipe, designed to pass underneath the read-out ASICs, which are the main thermal power sources to be cooled down. Here a description of the detector will be given, with a main focus on the cooling system and on the progress done to its qualification.

  15. Opposite-side flavour tagging of B mesons at the LHCb experiment.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Arrabito, L; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Bailey, D S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; de Bruyn, K; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Constantin, F; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Lorenzi, F; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Falabella, A; Fanchini, E; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Messi, R; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Musy, M; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Nedos, M; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, K; Palacios, J; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrella, A; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Voss, H; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    The calibration and performance of the opposite-side flavour tagging algorithms used for the measurements of time-dependent asymmetries at the LHCb experiment are described. The algorithms have been developed using simulated events and optimized and calibrated with B(+)→J/ψK(+), B(0)→J/ψK(∗0) and B(0)→D(∗-)μ(+)νμ decay modes with 0.37 fb(-1) of data collected in pp collisions at [Formula: see text] during the 2011 physics run. The opposite-side tagging power is determined in the B(+)→J/ψK(+) channel to be (2.10±0.08±0.24) %, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  16. Addition of straw from hyperaccumulator plants to cadmium-contaminated soil increases cadmium uptake by loquat seedlings.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lijin; Liao, Ming'an; Lv, Xiulan; Liang, Dong; Xia, Hui; Wang, Jin; Wang, Xun

    2017-05-01

    The straw from three different cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulators (Galinsoga parviflora, Youngia erythrocarpa, and Solanum photeinocarpum) was added to Cd-contaminated soil, and its effects on plant growth and Cd accumulation in loquat seedlings were evaluated. Straw from each of G. parviflora, Y. erythrocarpa, and S. photeinocarpum was added to Cd-contaminated soil before planting seedlings of two varieties of loquat (Dawuxing and Chuanzao). Addition of straw from G. parviflora and S. photeinocarpum increased the root and shoot biomasses of both loquat varieties, compared with that in the control. Addition of straw also increased Cd uptake by loquat seedlings. The treatments could be ranked, from highest Cd contents in roots and shoots of loquat seedlings to lowest, as follows: S. photeinocarpum straw > Y. erythrocarpa straw > G. parviflora straw > control. All three types of hyperaccumulator straw increased the amount of Cd extracted by shoots of two loquat seedlings, with the maximum effect in the S. photeinocarpum straw treatment. Addition of hyperaccumulator straw also resulted in increased soil invertase, urease, and catalase activities to varying degrees. Among the three types of hyperaccumulator straw, S. photeinocarpum straw was the most effective to increase Cd accumulation in loquat seedlings. Therefore, this material has the potential to increase the phytoremediation capacity of loquat seedlings in Cd-contaminated orchards.

  17. Fuel Pellets from Wheat Straw: The Effect of Lignin Glass Transition and Surface Waxes on Pelletizing Properties

    Treesearch

    Wolfgang Stelte; Craig Clemons; Jens K. Holm; Jesper Ahrenfeldt; Ulrik B. Henriksen; Anand R. Sanadi

    2012-01-01

    The utilization of wheat straw as a renewable energy resource is limited due to its low bulk density. Pelletizing wheat straw into fuel pellets of high density increases its handling properties but is more challenging compared to pelletizing wood biomass. Straw has a lower lignin content and a high concentration of hydrophobic waxes on its outer surface that may limit...

  18. 9 CFR 72.19 - Interstate shipments and use of pine straw, grass, litter from quarantined area; prohibited until...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... straw, grass, litter from quarantined area; prohibited until disinfected. 72.19 Section 72.19 Animals... Interstate shipments and use of pine straw, grass, litter from quarantined area; prohibited until disinfected. Pine straw, grass, or similar litter collected from tick-infested pastures, ranges, or premises may...

  19. 9 CFR 72.19 - Interstate shipments and use of pine straw, grass, litter from quarantined area; prohibited until...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... straw, grass, litter from quarantined area; prohibited until disinfected. 72.19 Section 72.19 Animals... Interstate shipments and use of pine straw, grass, litter from quarantined area; prohibited until disinfected. Pine straw, grass, or similar litter collected from tick-infested pastures, ranges, or premises may...

  20. 9 CFR 72.19 - Interstate shipments and use of pine straw, grass, litter from quarantined area; prohibited until...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... straw, grass, litter from quarantined area; prohibited until disinfected. 72.19 Section 72.19 Animals... and use of pine straw, grass, litter from quarantined area; prohibited until disinfected. Pine straw, grass, or similar litter collected from tick-infested pastures, ranges, or premises may disseminate the...

  1. 76 FR 43706 - Final Supplementary Rules To Require the Use of Certified Noxious-Weed-Free Forage and Straw on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... Bureau of Land Management Final Supplementary Rules To Require the Use of Certified Noxious-Weed-Free... straw on BLM-administered land in Idaho to use certified noxious-weed-free forage and straw. Restoration, rehabilitation, and stabilization projects also will be required to use weed-free straw bales and mulch for...

  2. 7 CFR 319.55a - Administrative instructions relating to entry of rice straw and rice hulls into Guam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... straw and rice hulls into Guam. 319.55a Section 319.55a Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... QUARANTINE NOTICES Rice Quarantine § 319.55a Administrative instructions relating to entry of rice straw and rice hulls into Guam. Rice straw and rice hulls may be imported into Guam without further permit, other...

  3. 7 CFR 319.55a - Administrative instructions relating to entry of rice straw and rice hulls into Guam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... straw and rice hulls into Guam. 319.55a Section 319.55a Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... QUARANTINE NOTICES Rice Quarantine § 319.55a Administrative instructions relating to entry of rice straw and rice hulls into Guam. Rice straw and rice hulls may be imported into Guam without further permit, other...

  4. 9 CFR 72.19 - Interstate shipments and use of pine straw, grass, litter from quarantined area; prohibited until...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... straw, grass, litter from quarantined area; prohibited until disinfected. 72.19 Section 72.19 Animals... Interstate shipments and use of pine straw, grass, litter from quarantined area; prohibited until disinfected. Pine straw, grass, or similar litter collected from tick-infested pastures, ranges, or premises...

  5. 9 CFR 72.19 - Interstate shipments and use of pine straw, grass, litter from quarantined area; prohibited until...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... straw, grass, litter from quarantined area; prohibited until disinfected. 72.19 Section 72.19 Animals... Interstate shipments and use of pine straw, grass, litter from quarantined area; prohibited until disinfected. Pine straw, grass, or similar litter collected from tick-infested pastures, ranges, or premises...

  6. Manufacturing SP-100 rhenium tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayre, Edwin D.; Ruffo, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    A process for producing high quality, thin walled, wrought, rhenium tubing was successfully developed and qualified in the SP-100 fuel fabrication program. Rhenium was selected for the fuel-cladding barrier versus tungsten because of the cold workability and nuclear characteristics of rhenium. Several tube fabricating processes including swaging, drawing, and extruding sintered tube shells and chemical vapor deposition were evaluated before a drawn tube made by forming and electron beam welding rhenium strip was selected as the most cost effective. The process for making the rhenium tubes is discussed in general and the tube, room temperature, tensile properties are compared favorably with the properties reported in the literature.

  7. Central FPGA-based destination and load control in the LHCb MHz event readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsson, R.

    2012-10-01

    The readout strategy of the LHCb experiment is based on complete event readout at 1 MHz. A set of 320 sub-detector readout boards transmit event fragments at total rate of 24.6 MHz at a bandwidth usage of up to 70 GB/s over a commercial switching network based on Gigabit Ethernet to a distributed event building and high-level trigger processing farm with 1470 individual multi-core computer nodes. In the original specifications, the readout was based on a pure push protocol. This paper describes the proposal, implementation, and experience of a non-conventional mixture of a push and a pull protocol, akin to credit-based flow control. An FPGA-based central master module, partly operating at the LHC bunch clock frequency of 40.08 MHz and partly at a double clock speed, is in charge of the entire trigger and readout control from the front-end electronics up to the high-level trigger farm. One FPGA is dedicated to controlling the event fragment packing in the readout boards, the assignment of the farm node destination for each event, and controls the farm load based on an asynchronous pull mechanism from each farm node. This dynamic readout scheme relies on generic event requests and the concept of node credit allowing load control and trigger rate regulation as a function of the global farm load. It also allows the vital task of fast central monitoring and automatic recovery in-flight of failing nodes while maintaining dead-time and event loss at a minimum. This paper demonstrates the strength and suitability of implementing this real-time task for a very large distributed system in an FPGA where no random delays are introduced, and where extreme reliability and accurate event accounting are fundamental requirements. It was in use during the entire commissioning phase of LHCb and has been in faultless operation during the first two years of physics luminosity data taking.

  8. PACIFIC: the readout ASIC for the SciFi Tracker of the upgraded LHCb detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazorra, J.; Chanal, H.; Comerma, A.; Gascón, D.; Gómez, S.; Han, X.; Pillet, N.; Vandaele, R.

    2016-02-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and will switch to a 40 MHz readout rate using a trigger-less software based system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with the higher detector occupancy and radiation damage. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed and a custom ASIC, called the low-Power ASIC for the sCIntillating FIbres traCker (PACIFIC), will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. This article presents an overview of the R&D for the PACIFIC. It is a 64-channel ASIC implemented in 130 nm CMOS technology, aiming at a radiation tolerant design with a power consumption below 10 mW per channel. It interfaces directly with the SiPM anode through a current mode input, and provides a configurable non-linear 2-bit per channel digital output. The SiPM signal is acquired by a current conveyor and processed with a fast shaper and a gated integrator. The digitization is performed using a three threshold non-linear flash ADC operating at 40 MHz. Simulation and test results show the PACIFIC chip prototypes functioning well.

  9. Environmental profile of paddy rice cultivation with different straw management.

    PubMed

    Fusi, Alessandra; Bacenetti, Jacopo; González-García, Sara; Vercesi, Annamaria; Bocchi, Stefano; Fiala, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Italy is the most important European country in terms of paddy rice production. North Italian districts such as Vercelli, Pavia, Novara, and Milano are known as some of the world's most advanced rice cultivation sites. In 2013 Italian rice cultivation represented about 50% of all European rice production by area, and paddy fields extended for over 216,000 ha. Cultivation of rice involves different agricultural activities which have environmental impacts mainly due to fossil fuels and agrochemical requirements as well as the methane emission associated with the fermentation of organic material in the flooded rice fields. In order to assess the environmental consequences of rice production in the District of Vercelli, the cultivation practices most frequently carried out were inventoried and evaluated. The general approach of this study was not only to gather the inventory data for rice production and quantify their environmental impacts, but also to identify the key environmental factors where special attention must be paid. Life Cycle Assessment methodology was applied in this study from a cradle-to-farm gate perspective. The environmental profile was analyzed in terms of seven different impact categories: climate change, ozone depletion, human toxicity, terrestrial acidification, freshwater eutrophication, marine eutrophication, and fossil depletion. Regarding straw management, two different scenarios (burial into the soil of the straw versus harvesting) were compared. The analysis showed that the environmental impact was mainly due to field emissions, the fuel consumption needed for the mechanization of field operations, and the drying of the paddy rice. The comparison between the two scenarios highlighted that the collection of the straw improves the environmental performance of rice production except that for freshwater eutrophication. To improve the environmental performance of rice production, solutions to save fossil fuel and reduce the emissions from

  10. Biogeochemical Processes That Produce Dissolved Organic Matter From Wheat Straw

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, Robert L.; Rutherford, David W.; Leenheer, Jerry A.; Kennedy, Kay R.; Cox, Larry G.; Koci, Donald R.

    2003-01-01

    The chemical reactions that lead to the formation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in natural waters are poorly understood. Studies on the formation of DOM generally are complicated because almost all DOM isolates have been derived from mixtures of plant species composed of a wide variety of different types of precursor compounds for DOM formation. This report describes a study of DOM derived mainly from bales of wheat straw that had been left in a field for several years. During this period of time, black water from the decomposing wheat straw accumulated in pools in the field. The nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectra of the black water DOM indicate that it is composed almost entirely of lignin and carbohydrate polymeric units. Analysis by high-performance size-exclusion chromatography with multi-angle laser-light scattering detection indicates that the number average molecular weight of the DOM is 124,000 daltons. The results presented in this report indicate that the black water DOM is composed of hemicellulose chains cross-linked to lignin oligomers. These types of structures have been shown to exist in the hemicellulose matrix of plant cell walls. The cross-linked lignin-hemicellulose complexes apparently were released from partially degraded wheat-straw cell walls with little alteration. In solution in the black water, these lignin-hemicellulose polymers fold into compact globular particles in which the nonpolar parts of the polymer form the interiors of the particles and the polar groups are on the exterior surfaces of the particles. The tightly folded, compact conformation of these particles probably renders them relatively resistant to microbial degradation. This should be especially the case for the aromatic lignin structures that will be buried in the interiors of the particles.

  11. Flowability parameters for chopped switchgrass, wheat straw and corn stover

    SciTech Connect

    Chevanan, Nehru; Womac, A.R.; Bitra, V.S.P.; Yoder, D.C.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2009-02-01

    A direct shear cell to measure the shear strength and flow properties of chopped switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover was designed, fabricated, and tested. Yield loci (r2=0.99) determined at pre-consolidation pressures of 3.80 kPa and 5.02 kPa indicated that chopped biomass followed Mohr-Coulomb failure. Normal stress significantly affected the displacement required for shear failure, as well as the friction coefficient values for all three chopped biomass types. Displacement at shear failure ranged from 30 to 80 mm, and depended on pre-consolidation pressure, normal stress, and particle size. Friction coefficient was inversely related to normal stress, and was highest for chopped corn stover. Also, chopped corn stover exhibited the highest angle of internal friction, unconfined yield strength, major consolidation strength, and cohesive strength, all of which indicated increased challenges in handling chopped corn stover. The measured angle of internal friction and cohesive strength indicated that chopped biomass cannot be handled by gravity alone. The measured angle of internal friction and cohesive strength were 43 and 0.75 kPa for chopped switchgrass; 44 and 0.49 kPa for chopped wheat straw; and 48 and 0.82 kPa for chopped corn stover. Unconfined yield strength and major consolidation strength used for characterization of bulk flow materials and design of hopper dimensions were 3.4 and 10.4 kPa for chopped switchgrass; 2.3 and 9.6 kPa for chopped wheat straw and 4.2 and 11.8 kPa for chopped corn stover. These results are useful for development of efficient handling, storage, and transportation systems for biomass in biorefineries.

  12. Evaluation of high solids alkaline pretreatment of rice straw.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Shen; Zheng, Yi; Yu, Chao Wei; Dooley, Todd M; Jenkins, Bryan M; VanderGheynst, Jean S

    2010-11-01

    Fresh-harvested, air-dried rice straw was pretreated at a water content of 5 g H(2)O/g straw using sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and compared to pretreatment at 10 g H(2)O/g straw by hydrated lime (Ca(OH)(2)). Full factorial experiments including parallel wash-only treatments were completed with both sources of alkali. The experiments were designed to measure the effects of alkaline loading and pretreatment time on delignification and sugar yield upon enzymatic hydrolysis. Reaction temperature was held constant at 95 degrees C for lime pretreatment and 55 degrees C for NaOH pretreatment. The range of delignification was 13.1% to 27.0% for lime pretreatments and was 8.6% to 23.1% for NaOH pretreatments. Both alkaline loading and reaction time had significant positive effects (p < 0.001) on delignification under the design conditions, but only alkaline loading had a significant positive effect on enzymatic hydrolysis. Treatment at higher temperature also improved delignification; delignification with water alone ranged from 9.9% to 14.5% for pretreatment at 95 degrees C, but there was little effect observed at 55 degrees C. Post-pretreatment washing of biomass was not necessary for subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Maximum glucose yields were 176.3 mg/g dried biomass (48.5% conversion efficiency of total glucose) in lime-pretreated and unwashed biomass and were 142.3 mg/g dried biomass (39.2% conversion efficiency of total glucose) in NaOH-pretreated and unwashed biomass.

  13. Spontaneous use of tools as straws in great apes.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Héctor Marín; Call, Josep

    2011-03-01

    Great apes can use multiple tools to extract food embedded in substrates and can invent new ways to exploit those resources. We tested five bonobos, five chimpanzees, and six orangutans in a task in which they had to use (and modify) a tool as a straw to drink the juice located inside a container. Experiment 1 showed that four orangutans and one chimpanzee invented the use of a piece of electric cable to get the juice. Experiment 2 investigated whether subjects could transform a non-functional hose into a functional one by removing blockages that impeded the free flow of juice. Orangutans outperformed chimpanzees and bonobos by differentially removing those blockages that prevented the flow of juice, often doing so before attempting to extract the juice. In Experiment 3, we presented chimpanzees and orangutans with four 3-tool sets (each tool set contained a single straw-like tool) and allowed them to select one tool. Unlike chimpanzees, orangutans succeeded in selecting the straw-like tool above chance levels without having to physically manipulate it. We suggest that orangutans' superior performance is related to their greater reliance on mouth actions during foraging. Experiment 4 investigated whether orangutans were also capable of selecting the suitable tool not by its appearance, but by the effects that it produced. After witnessing the experimenter blow bubbles or absorb liquid with a functional tool but fail to accomplish the same thing with the non-functional tool, orangutans failed to select the functional tool above chance levels. © Springer-Verlag 2010

  14. Release of potassium accompanying the dissolution of rice straw phytolith.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh Ngoc; Dultz, Stefan; Picardal, Flynn; Bui, Anh Thi Kim; Pham, Quang Van; Schieber, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    In rice, Si assimilated from the soil solution is deposited in inter- and intracellular spaces throughout the leaf and stems to form silicified structures (so-called phytoliths). Because K is also present in significant concentrations in rice stems and leaves, the question arises if K is immobilized in the mineralized silica during the precipitation of Si. This work determined whether desilification of the phytolith is a factor regulating K release by implementing batch experiments. Solubility of Si and K of the rice straw heated at different temperatures were examined to identify effect of pretreatment. Analyses of phytoliths using SEM-EDX and X-ray tomographic microscopy in conjunction with the results from batch experiments revealed that K might co-exist with occluded organic matter inside the phytolith structure. In the kinetic experiments, corresponding increases of K and Si concentrations in the supernatants were observed which suggested that desilification of the phytolith is a main factor regulating K release. The extent of heat pretreatment of the rice straw is of significant importance with respect to dissolution of the phytolith by affecting organic removal and surface modification. At temperatures lower than 600 °C, corresponding increases of the soluble Si and K with heating temperature have been obviously observed. In contrast, the solubility of Si and K gradually decreased at temperatures above 600 °C. This work provides insights into factors that control release of K and Si from phytolith and a practical recommendation for practices of burning rice straw that may maximize subsequent release of Si and K for crops. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparative study of crude and purified cellulose from wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Feng; Sun, Run-Cang; Su, Yinquan; Sun, Jing-Xia

    2004-02-25

    A sequential totally chlorine-free procedure for isolation of cellulose from wheat straw was proposed in this study. The dewaxed straw was pretreated with 0.5 M NaOH in 60% methanol at 60 degrees C for 2.5 h under ultrasonic irradiation for 0-35 min and sequentially posttreated with 2% H(2)O(2)-0.2% TAED at pH 11.8 for 12 h at 48 degrees C, which together solubilized 85.3-86.1% of the original hemicelluloses and 91.7-93.2% of the original lignin, respectively. The yield of crude cellulose ranged between 46.2 and 49.2% on a dry weight basis related to wheat straw, which contained 11.2-12.2% residual hemicelluloses and 2.5-2.9% remaining lignin. Further treatment of the corresponding crude cellulosic preparations with 80% acetic acid-70% nitric acid under the condition given yielded 36.8-37.7% of the purified cellulose, which contained minor amounts of bound hemicelluloses (2.5-2.8%) and was relatively free of associated lignin (0.1-0.2%). The isolated crude and purified cellulose samples were comparatively studied by FT-IR and CP/MAS (13)C NMR spectroscopy, and the relative crystallinity was also estimated. The final stage treatment with 80% acetic acid-70% nitric acid decreased the hemicelluloses and lignin associated in the crude cellulose but led to 3.1-5.4% degradation of the original cellulose; in addition, the purity of the obtained cellulose was high. However, it was found that the final stage treatment is not severe enough to cause decrystallization of cellulose. The thermal stability of the purified cellulose is higher than that of the corresponding crude cellulose.

  16. Evaluation of High Solids Alkaline Pretreatment of Rice Straw

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yu-Shen; Zheng, Yi; Yu, Chao Wei; Dooley, Todd M.; Jenkins, Bryan M.

    2010-01-01

    Fresh-harvested, air-dried rice straw was pretreated at a water content of 5 g H2O/g straw using sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and compared to pretreatment at 10 g H2O/g straw by hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2). Full factorial experiments including parallel wash-only treatments were completed with both sources of alkali. The experiments were designed to measure the effects of alkaline loading and pretreatment time on delignification and sugar yield upon enzymatic hydrolysis. Reaction temperature was held constant at 95°C for lime pretreatment and 55°C for NaOH pretreatment. The range of delignification was 13.1% to 27.0% for lime pretreatments and was 8.6% to 23.1% for NaOH pretreatments. Both alkaline loading and reaction time had significant positive effects (p < 0.001) on delignification under the design conditions, but only alkaline loading had a significant positive effect on enzymatic hydrolysis. Treatment at higher temperature also improved delignification; delignification with water alone ranged from 9.9% to 14.5% for pretreatment at 95°C, but there was little effect observed at 55°C. Post-pretreatment washing of biomass was not necessary for subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Maximum glucose yields were 176.3 mg/g dried biomass (48.5% conversion efficiency of total glucose) in lime-pretreated and unwashed biomass and were 142.3 mg/g dried biomass (39.2% conversion efficiency of total glucose) in NaOH-pretreated and unwashed biomass. PMID:20440580

  17. Heat-shrink plastic tubing seals joints in glass tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Del Duca, B.; Downey, A.

    1968-01-01

    Small units of standard glass apparatus held together by short lengths of transparent heat-shrinkable polyolefin tubing. The tubing is shrunk over glass O-ring type connectors having O-rings but no lubricant.

  18. Comparing the performance of Miscanthus x giganteus and wheat straw biomass in sulfuric acid based pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Kärcher, M A; Iqbal, Y; Lewandowski, I; Senn, T

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess and compare the suitability of Miscanthus x giganteus and wheat straw biomass in dilute acid catalyzed pretreatment. Miscanthus and wheat straw were treated in a dilute sulfuric acid/steam explosion pretreatment. As a result of combining dilute sulfuric acid- and steam explosion pretreatment the hemicellulose hydrolysis yields (96% in wheat straw and 90% in miscanthus) in both substrates were higher than reported in literature. The combined severity factor (=CSF) for optimal hemicellulose hydrolysis was 1.9 and 1.5 in for miscanthus and wheat straw respectively. Because of the higher CSF value more furfural, furfuryl alcohol, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and acetic acid was formed in miscanthus than in wheat straw pretreatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of surfactant type for ionic liquid pretreatment on enhancing delignification of rice straw.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ken-Lin; Chen, Xi-Mei; Wang, Xiao-Qin; Han, Ye-Ju; Potprommanee, Laddawan; Liu, Jing-Yong; Liao, Yu-Ling; Ning, Xun-An; Sun, Shui-Yu; Huang, Qing

    2017-03-01

    This work describes an environmentally friendly method for pretreating rice straw by using 1-Allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([AMIM]Cl) as an ionic liquid (IL) assisted by surfactants. The impacts of surfactant type (including nonionic-, anionic-, cationic- and bio-surfactant) on the ionic liquid pretreatment were investigated. The bio-surfactant+IL-pretreated rice straw showed significant lignin removal (26.14%) and exhibited higher cellulose conversion (36.21%) than the untreated (16.16%) rice straw. The cellulose conversion of the rice straw pretreated with bio-surfactant+IL was the highest and the lowest was observed for pretreated with cationic-surfactant+IL. Untreated and pretreated rice straw was thoroughly characterized through SEM and AFM. In conclusion, the results provided an effective and environmental method for pretreating lignocellulosic substrates by using green solvent (ionic liquid) and biodegradable bio-surfactant.

  20. Cellulose accessibility and microbial community in solid state anaerobic digestion of rape straw.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jiang-Hao; Pourcher, Anne-Marie; Bureau, Chrystelle; Peu, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Solid state anaerobic digestion (SSAD) with leachate recirculation is an appropriate method for the valorization of agriculture residues. Rape straw is a massively produced residue with considerable biochemical methane potential, but its degradation in SSAD remains poorly understood. A thorough study was conducted to understand the performance of rape straw as feedstock for laboratory solid state anaerobic digesters. We investigated the methane production kinetics of rape straw in relation to cellulose accessibility to cellulase and the microbial community. Improving cellulose accessibility through milling had a positive influence on both the methane production rate and methane yield. The SSAD of rape straw reached 60% of its BMP in a 40-day pilot-scale test. Distinct bacterial communities were observed in digested rape straw and leachate, with Bacteroidales and Sphingobacteriales as the most abundant orders, respectively. Archaeal populations showed no phase preference and increased chronologically.

  1. Bioaugmentation with an acetate-type fermentation bacterium Acetobacteroides hydrogenigenes improves methane production from corn straw.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Guo, Rong-Bo; Qiu, Yan-Ling; Qiao, Jiang-Tao; Yuan, Xian-Zheng; Shi, Xiao-Shuang; Wang, Chuan-Shui

    2015-03-01

    The effect of bioaugmentation with an acetate-type fermentation bacterium in the phylum Bacteroidetes on the anaerobic digestion of corn straw was evaluated by batch experiments. Acetobacteroides hydrogenigenes is a promising strain for bioaugmentation with relatively high growth rate, hydrogen yields and acetate tolerance, which ferments a broad spectrum of pentoses, hexoses and polyoses mainly into acetate and hydrogen. During corn straw digestion, bioaugmentation with A. hydrogenigenes led to 19-23% increase of the methane yield, with maximum of 258.1 mL/g-corn straw achieved by 10% inoculation (control, 209.3 mL/g-corn straw). Analysis of lignocellulosic composition indicated that A. hydrogenigenes could increase removal rates of cellulose and hemicelluloses in corn straw residue by 12% and 5%, respectively. Further experiment verified that the addition of A. hydrogenigenes could improve the methane yields of methyl cellulose and xylan (models for cellulose and hemicelluloses, respectively) by 16.8% and 7.0%.

  2. [Observational study of black carbon aerosol during straw-burning period].

    PubMed

    Wu, De-xia; Wei, Qing-nong; Wei, Jian-li; Liu, Shi-sheng; Feng, Wei-wei

    2008-12-01

    Black carbon aerosol (BC) has been measured at three sites in Hefei City during May and June, 2007. Analyzing these real-time BC data, the concentration characters and the sources of black carbon aerosol can be found. The average concentrations of BC in normal period and straw-burning period are 4.85 microg/m3 and 8.38 microg/m3, respectively. The significant difference shows that the straw-burning is one of the main sources. The correlation coefficients between daily average concentration of BC and PM10 is 0.74, while the values of BC/PM10 in normal period and straw-burning period are 4.7% and 7.9%, respectively. Through comparing to the BC concentration during straw-burning period in 2004, the results indicated that pollution of BC has reduced after straw-burning was forbidden by the government.

  3. Adsorption of anionic dyes from aqueous solutions using chemically modified straw.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenxuan; Li, Haijiang; Kan, Xiaowei; Dong, Lei; Yan, Han; Jiang, Ziwen; Yang, Hu; Li, Aimin; Cheng, Rongshi

    2012-08-01

    The effective disposal of redundant straw is a significant work for environmental protection and full utilization of resource. In this work, the wheat straw has been modified by etherification to prepare a kind of quaternary ammonium straw adsorbents. The adsorption behaviors of the modified straw for methyl orange (MO) and acid green 25(AG25) were studied in both batch and column systems. The adsorption capacity of the straw for both dyes improved evidently after modification. The maximal MO and AG25 uptakes were more than 300 and 950 mg g(-1), respectively. Furthermore, the adsorption equilibrium, kinetics and column studies all indicated that the adsorption behavior was a monolayer chemical adsorption with an ion-exchange process. In addition, after adsorption of anionic dyes, the used adsorbents were successfully applied to adsorb a cationic dye directly at suitable conditions in the secondary adsorption. This was due to the altered surface structures of the used adsorbents.

  4. Enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw by gamma irradiation-alkaline pretreatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yanan; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-06-01

    Pretreatment of wheat straw with gamma irradiation and NaOH was performed to enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw for production of reducing sugar. The results showed that the irradiation of wheat straw at 50 kGy decreased the yield of reducing sugar, however, the reducing sugar yield increased with increasing dose from 50 kGy to 400 kGy. The irradiation of wheat straw at 100 kGy can significantly decrease NaOH consumption and treatment time. The reducing sugar yield could reach 72.67% after irradiation at 100 kGy and 2% NaOH treatment for 1 h. The combined pretreatment of wheat straw by gamma radiation and NaOH immersion can increase the solubilization of hemicellulose and lignin as well as the accessible surface area for enzyme molecules.

  5. Preparation of Potassium-Posphate-embedded Amorphous Silicate Material from Rice Straw Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandiyanto, A. B. D.; Permatasari, N.; Sucahya, T. N.; Purwanti, S. T.; Munawaroh, H. S. H.; Abdullah, A. G.; Hasanah, L.

    2017-03-01

    Rice straw is one of the agricultural wastes that increased every year. Since rice straw ash contains 74.6% of silica, this material is potentially used to produce silica. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility process for generating potassium-phosphate-embedded amorphous silica material. To extract silica from rice straw waste, we used potassium hydroxide solution followed by an acid precipitation treatment. Based on the experimental results, the proposed method is potential to be used as an alternative technique for getting silica material. In addition, the method has a positive impact on the environment because this is potential for reducing the amount of rice straw waste, whereas at the same time this provides an added value to the rice straw waste itself.

  6. [Effects of straw returning on the integrated soil fertility and crop yield in southern China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Dong, Yan; Xu, Ming-Gang; Bao, Yao-Xian

    2012-11-01

    Based on the data from 94 experiments of straw returning in Anhui, Jiangxi, Hunan, Hubei, Guangxi, Sichuan, and Chongqing, and by using mathematic modeling approach, this paper evaluated the effects of straw returning on the soil fertility and crop yield in southern China. Obvious regional differences were observed in the soil fertility index (SFI) and crop yield response. In study area, the croplands with the SFI of Grade III and Grade IV were predominant, occupying 69.1% and 21.3% of the total, respectively. Averagely, straw returning increased the SFI and crop yield by 6.8% and 4.4%, respectively, as compared with the control (no straw returning). The SFI was significantly linearly correlated with rice yield, and could well reflect the integrated soil fertility in study area. At present, straw returning with decomposing agent added is one of the most important measures to improve the integrated soil fertility in southern China, which should be widely popularized.

  7. [Effects of straw mulching on CO2 flux in wintry fallow paddy field].

    PubMed

    Yin, Chun-mei; Xie, Xiao-li; Wang, Kai-rong

    2008-01-01

    This paper studied the effects of straw mulching on the CO2 flux in a wintry fallow paddy field at Taoyuan Agro-ecological Station, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The results showed that the effects of straw mulching mainly exerted in two ways. First, it positively affected soil temperature, making the CO2 flux increased obviously. Straw mulching gave a net emission of 2.68 g CO2 x m(-2) x d(-1), while no mulching gave a net fixation of 1.99 g CO2 x m(-2) x d(-1), the difference between them being very significant (P < 0.01). Second, straw mulching decreased the biomass of weeds and the photosynthetically active radiation they absorbed, which in turn resulted in an increase of CO2 flux. Under straw mulching, the water content in surface soil layer (0-15 cm) increased by 9% or more, but no significant change was observed in CO2 flux.

  8. Determination of the Airborne Sound Insulation of a Straw Bale Partition Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teslík, Jiří; Fabian, Radek; Hrubá, Barbora

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes the results of a scientific project focused on determining of the Airborne Sound Insulation of a peripheral non-load bearing wall made of straw bales expressed by Weighted Sound Reduction Index. Weighted Sound Reduction Index was determined by measuring in the certified acoustic laboratory at the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering at Brno University of Technology. The measured structure of the straw wall was modified in combinations with various materials, so the results include a wide range of possible compositions of the wall. The key modification was application of plaster on both sides of the straw bale wall. This construction as is frequently done in actual straw houses. The additional measurements were performed on the straw wall with several variants of additional wall of slab materials. The airborne sound insulation value has been also measured in separate stages of the construction. Thus it is possible to compare and determinate the effect of the single layers on the airborne sound insulation.

  9. Downhole pulse tube refrigerators

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G.; Gardner, D.

    1997-12-01

    This report summarizes a preliminary design study to explore the plausibility of using pulse tube refrigeration to cool instruments in a hot down-hole environment. The original motivation was to maintain Dave Reagor`s high-temperature superconducting electronics at 75 K, but the study has evolved to include three target design criteria: cooling at 30 C in a 300 C environment, cooling at 75 K in a 50 C environment, cooling at both 75 K and 30 C in a 250 C environment. These specific temperatures were chosen arbitrarily, as representative of what is possible. The primary goals are low cost, reliability, and small package diameter. Pulse-tube refrigeration is a rapidly growing sub-field of cryogenic refrigeration. The pulse tube refrigerator has recently become the simplest, cheapest, most rugged and reliable low-power cryocooler. The authors expect this technology will be applicable downhole because of the ratio of hot to cold temperatures (in absolute units, such as Kelvin) of interest in deep drilling is comparable to the ratios routinely achieved with cryogenic pulse-tube refrigerators.

  10. Investigation of Pitot tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herschel, W H; Buckingham, E

    1917-01-01

    Report describes the principles of operation and characteristics of some of the instruments which have been devised or used to measure both low and high speeds of aeroplanes. Since the pitot tube is the instrument which has been most commonly used in the United States and Great Britain as a speedometer for aeroplanes, it is treated first and somewhat more fully than the others.

  11. Misdirected Minitracheostomy Tube

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajmer; Nanda, Chinmaya; Mehta, Yatin

    2017-01-01

    We report a patient who after an uneventful coronary artery bypass graft surgery and left ventricular aneurysmorrhaphy developed intracerebral hemorrhage and subsequently required minitracheostomy. Chest X-ray showed misdirected minitracheostomy tube facing upward toward the laryngeal opening which was repositioned using bronchoscope. PMID:28074805

  12. Misdirected minitracheostomy tube.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajmer; Nanda, Chinmaya; Mehta, Yatin

    2017-01-01

    We report a patient who after an uneventful coronary artery bypass graft surgery and left ventricular aneurysmorrhaphy developed intracerebral hemorrhage and subsequently required minitracheostomy. Chest X-ray showed misdirected minitracheostomy tube facing upward toward the laryngeal opening which was repositioned using bronchoscope.

  13. Tube welding and brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, R. M.

    1969-01-01

    Brochures outline the tools, equipment, materials, and techniques used for joining tubes by automatic and semiautomatic welding and brazing. A few of the metals being joined are stainless steels of various diameters and thickness. Techniques have been developed for on-site or work-bench repair.

  14. Snorkeling and Jones tubes

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Lewis Y. W.; Weatherhead, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We report a case of tympanic membrane rupture during snorkeling in a 17-year-old young man who had previously undergone bilateral Jones tubes placed for epiphora. To our knowledge, this phenomenon has not been previously reported. PMID:27330470

  15. Flux Tube Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, O.

    2011-05-01

    This Fortran code computes magnetohydrostatic flux tubes and sheets according to the method of Steiner, Pneuman, & Stenflo (1986) A&A 170, 126-137. The code has many parameters contained in one input file that are easily modified. Extensive documentation is provided in README files.

  16. Tube Feeding Transition Plateaus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Marsha Dunn

    2007-01-01

    The journey children make from tube feeding to oral feeding is personal for each child and family. There is a sequence of predictable plateaus that children climb as they move toward orally eating. By better understanding this sequence, parents and children can maximize the development, learning, enjoyment and confidence at each plateau. The…

  17. Modeling the greenhouse gas budget of straw returning in China: feasibility of mitigation and countermeasures.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fei; Wang, Xiao-Ke; Han, Bing; Ouyang, Zhi-Yun; Zheng, Hua

    2010-05-01

    Straw returning is considered to be one of the most promising carbon sequestration measures in China's cropland. A compound model, namely "Straw Returning and Burning Model-Expansion" (SRBME), was built to estimate the net mitigation potential, economic benefits, and air pollutant reduction of straw returning. Three scenarios, that is, baseline, "full popularization of straw returning (FP)," and "full popularization of straw returning and precision fertilization (FP + P)," were set to reflect popularization of straw returning. The results of the SRBME indicated that (1) compared with the soil carbon sequestration of 13.37 Tg/yr, the net mitigation potentials, which were 6.328 Tg/yr for the FP scenario and 9.179 Tg/yr for the FP + P scenario, had different trends when the full budget of the greenhouse gases was considered; (2) when the feasibility in connection with greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation, economic benefits, and environmental benefits was taken into consideration, straw returning was feasible in 15 provinces in the FP scenario, with a total net mitigation potential of 7.192 TgCe/yr and the total benefits of CNY 1.473 billion (USD 216.6 million); (3) in the FP + P scenario, with the implementation of precision fertilization, straw returning was feasible in 26 provinces with a total net mitigation potential of 10.39 TgCe/yr and the total benefits of CNY 5.466 billion (USD 803.8 million); (4) any extent of change in the treatment of straw from being burnt to being returned would contribute to air pollution reduction; (5) some countermeasures, such as CH(4) reduction in rice paddies, precision fertilization, financial support, education and propaganda, would promote the feasibility of straw returning as a mitigation measure.

  18. [Effects of different straw recycling and tillage methods on soil respiration and microbial activity].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-sha; Wu, Ning; Liu, Ling; Feng, Yu-peng; Xu, Xu; Han, Hui-fang; Ning, Tang-yuan; Li, Zeng-jia

    2015-06-01

    To explore the effects of different tillage methods and straw recycling on soil respiration and microbial activity in summer maize field during the winter wheat and summer maize double cropping system, substrate induced respiration method and CO2 release method were used to determine soil microbial biomass carbon, microbial activity, soil respiration, and microbial respiratory quotient. The experiment included 3 tillage methods during the winter wheat growing season, i.e., no-tillage, subsoiling and conventional tillage. Each tillage method was companied with 2 straw management patterns, i.e., straw recycling and no straw. The results indicated that the conservation tillage methods and straw recycling mainly affected 0-10 cm soil layer. Straw recycling could significantly improve the microbial biomass carbon and microbial activity, while decrease microbial respiratory quotient. Straw recycling could improve the soil respiration at both seedling stage and anthesis, however, it could reduce the soil respiration at filling stage, wax ripeness, and harvest stage. Under the same straw application, compared with conventional tillage, the soil respiration and microbial respiratory quotient in both subsoiling and no-tillage were reduced, while the microbial biomass carbon and microbial activity were increased. During the summer maize growing season, soil microbial biomass carbon and microbial activity were increased in straw returning with conservation tillage, while the respiratory quotient was reduced. In 0-10 cm soil layer, compared with conventional tillage, straw recycling with subsoiling and no-tillage significantly increased soil microbial biomass carbon by 95.8% and 74.3%, and increased soil microbial activity by 97.1% and 74.2%, respectively.

  19. Speciation and phytoavailability of cadmium in soil treated with cadmium-contaminated rice straw.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Huang, Dao-You; Zhu, Qi-Hong; Zhu, Han-Hua; Liu, Shou-Long; Luo, Zun-Chang; Cao, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Ji-Yu; Rao, Zhong-Xiu; Shen, Xin

    2015-02-01

    When grown on Cd-contaminated soil, rice typically accumulates considerable Cd in straw, and which may return to the soil after harvest. This work was undertaken to assess the pollution risk of Cd associated to the Cd-contaminated rice straw after incorporating into an uncontaminated soil. With the Cd-contaminated rice straw added at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 % (w/w), an incubation experiment (28 days) with non-planting and a followed pot experiment sequent with two planting (rice and Chinese cabbage, transplanted after 28-day incubation) were carried out to investigate the changes of soil Cd speciation and phytoavailability. The results indicated that the Cd-contaminated rice straw addition significantly increased soil pH and dissolved organic carbon during the 28-day incubation. For the high availability of Cd in contaminated rice straw, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) extractable Cd significantly increased, and the percentages of acetic acid extractable and reducible Cd in soil significantly enhanced after the addition of Cd-contaminated rice straw. However, the Cd-contaminated rice straw addition inhibited the rice growth and induced the decrease of Cd in rice grain and straw by 12.8 to 70.2 % and 39.3 to 57.3 %, respectively, whereas the Cd contents increased by 13.9 to 84.1 % in Chinese cabbage that planted after rice harvest. In conclusion, Cd associated with Cd-contaminated rice straw was highly available after incorporating into the soil, and thus the Cd pollution risk via the Cd-contaminated rice straw incorporation should be evaluated in the Cd-contaminated paddy region.

  20. [Study on volatile organic compounds emission of straw combustion and management countermeasure in Wuhan city].

    PubMed

    Huang, Bi-Jie

    2013-12-01

    Straw combustion is an important anthropogenic source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in China. Emissions of VOCs from straw combustion significantly affect climate forcing and human health. A reliable estimation of VOCs emission from the source is the important prerequisite for emission impact assessment and control strategy in the urban or regional areas. VOCs emissions from straw combustion in Wuhan City and the districts were estimated by factor analysis method, which was based on the yield of major farm crops in the period of 2005-2011. Moreover, Cultivated-land Emission Intensity (Ie) and Regional Emission Intensity (Ir) were also calculated. VOCs Emissions from straw combustion in Wuhan City were (3,163 +/- 139) t in the period of 2005-2011; Ie and Ir was (1.52 +/- 0.06) t x km(-2) and (0.37 +/- 0.02) t x km(-2), respectively; Straw combustion of grain and oilseed crops was the main source of the emissions; 21 kinds of VOCs should be listed as the priority control pollutants for straw combustion in Wuhan City. The order of successively decreasing VOCs emission of districts in Wuhan City was Huangpi District, Xinzhou District, Jiangxia District, Caidian District, Hannan District, and Dongxihu District, the former 4 districts contributed to almost 90% VOCs emissions of the Wuhan City. Huangpi District, Xinzhou District, Jiangxia District, and Hannan District should be regarded as priority control areas of VOCs emission from straw combustion in Wuhan City. Much attention should be paid to Jiangxia District, which was nationally representative. Ie and Ir are important basic data for ecological risk assessment of some kind of pollutants emitted from straw combustion in the urban or regional areas. Furthermore, straw utilization model according to agricultural cyclic economy is a feasible way to cope with the environmental problem of straw combustion.