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Sample records for lherzolitic shergottite yamato

  1. Sm-Nd isotopic systematics of lherzolitic shergottite Yamato-793605

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Misawa, K.; Yamada, K.; Nakamura, N.; Morikawa, N.; Yamashita, K.; Premo, W.R.

    2006-01-01

    We have undertaken Sm-Nd isotopic studies on Yamato-793605 lherzolitic shergottite. The Sm-Nd internal isochron obtained for acid leachates and residues of whole-rock and separated mineral fractions yields an age of 185 ??16 Ma with an initial ??Nd value of +9.7??0.2. The obtained Sm-Nd age is, within analytical errors, identical to the Rb-Sr age of this meteorite as well as to the previous Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd ages of Allan Hills-77005 and Lewis Cliff 88516, although the ??Nd values are not identical to each other. Elemental abundances of lithophile trace elements remain nearly unaffected by aqueous alteration on the Martian surface. The isotopic systems of lherzolitic shergottites, thus, are considered to be indigenous, although disturbances by shock metamorphism are clearly observed. "Young ages of ??? 180 Ma" have been consistently obtained from this and previous Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd and U-Pb isotopic studies and appear to represent crystallization events. ?? 2006 National Institute of Polar Research.

  2. Rb-Sr Isotopic Studies Of Antarctic Lherzolitic Shergottite Yamato 984028

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Misawa, K.

    2009-01-01

    Yamato 984028 is a Martian meteorite found in the Yamato Mountains of Antarctica. It is classified as a lherzolitic shergottite and petrographically resembles several other lherzolitic shergottites, i.e. ALHA 77005, LEW 88516, Y-793605 and Y-000027/47/97 [e.g. 2-5]. These meteorites have similarly young crystallization ages (152-185 Ma) as enriched basaltic shergottites (157-203 Ma), but have very different ejection ages (approximately 4 Ma vs. approximately 2.5 Ma), thus they came from different martian target crater areas. Lherzolitic shergottites have mg-values approximately 0.70 and represent the most mafic olivine-pyroxene cumulates. Their parental magmas were melts derived probably from the primitive Martian mantle. Here we present Rb-Sr isotopic data for Y-984028 and compare these data with those obtained from other lherzolitic and olivine-phyric basaltic shergottites to better understand the isotopic characteristics of their primitive mantle source regions. Corresponding Sm-Nd analyses for Y-984028 are in progress.

  3. Tracking the Martian Mantle Signature in Olivine-Hosted Melt Inclusions of Basaltic Shergottites Yamato 980459 and Tissint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, T. J.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.; Usui, T.; Moriwaki, R.; Economos, R.; Schmitt, A.; McKeegan, K.

    2014-01-01

    The Martian shergottite meteorites are basaltic to lherzolitic igneous rocks that represent a period of relatively young mantle melting and volcanism, approximately 600-150 Ma (e.g. [1,2]). Their isotopic and elemental composition has provided important constraints on the accretion, evolution, structure and bulk composition of Mars. Measurements of the radiogenic isotope and trace element concentrations of the shergottite meteorite suite have identified two end-members; (1) incompatible trace element enriched, with radiogenic Sr and negative epsilon Nd-143, and (2) incompatible traceelement depleted, with non-radiogenic Sr and positive epsilon 143-Nd(e.g. [3-5]). The depleted component represents the shergottite martian mantle. The identity of the enriched component is subject to debate, and has been proposed to be either assimilated ancient martian crust [3] or from enriched domains in the martian mantle that may represent a late-stage magma ocean crystallization residue [4,5]. Olivine-phyric shergottites typically have the highest Mg# of the shergottite group and represent near-primitive melts having experienced minimal fractional crystallization or crystal accumulation [6]. Olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MI) in these shergottites represent the most chemically primitive components available to understand the nature of their source(s), melting processes in the martian mantle, and origin of enriched components. We present trace element compositions of olivine hosted melt inclusions in two depleted olivinephyric shergottites, Yamato 980459 (Y98) and Tissint (Fig. 1), and the mesostasis glass of Y98, using Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). We discuss our data in the context of understanding the nature and origin of the depleted martian mantle and the emergence of the enriched component.

  4. Igneous cooling history of olivine-phyric shergottite Yamato 980459 constrained by dynamic crystallization experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    First, Emily; Hammer, Julia

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic crystallization experiments were performed on a liquid having the bulk composition of olivine-phyric shergottite Yamato 980459, to constrain the igneous thermal history of this meteorite. Key characteristics of the meteorite's mineralogy and texture, including several morphologically distinct olivine and pyroxene crystal populations and a glassy mesostasis devoid of plagioclase, were replicated upon cooling from 1435 to 909 °C at 1 atmosphere under reducing conditions. Three sequential cooling ramps are required to produce synthetic samples with textures and compositions matching Yamato 980459. Olivine phenocrysts formed at <1 °C h-1, presumably at depth in the Martian crust. Pyroxene phenocrysts formed mainly at ~10 °C h-1, consistent with crystallization within a lava flow at depths of 25-45 cm. Increased cooling rate (~100 °C h-1) in a third stage suppressed the formation of plagioclase and produced groundmass crystals, consistent with crystallization at lava flow depths of 5-7 cm. Although Y 980459 is unique among Martian meteorites (i.e., preserving a primary glassy mesostasis), its emplacement did not require unique physical conditions. Rather, the second and third cooling stages may reflect cooling within the core of a pāhoehoe-like flow and subsequent breakout on the surface of Mars.

  5. Determining the Origin of Phosphates in Lherzolitic Shergottites Through Phosphate Saturation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvin, C.; Rutherford, M.

    2007-12-01

    Phosphorous has been correlated with sulfur and chlorine in martian soils with some soils containing several wt % P2O5 and high-P2O5 layer covers many rocks. However, using the RAT to remove the top few mm of some rocks revealed zones of low-P2O5 in the outer mm relative to the interior composition. This suggests that some igneous rocks of Mars are high in P2O5 and that over time phosphorous has been mobilized into the martian soils. In martian meteorites, phosphorous has been detected in high concentrations relative to terrestrial basalts and cumulates. High intensity x-ray maps of lherzolitic shergottite ALH 77005 reveal phosphates in olivine-hosted melt inclusions and P2O5 zoning in the host-olivine. Analyses of rehomogenized olivine-hosted melt inclusions reveal high-P2O5 glasses (>5 wt %). As phosphates are the major reservoir of REE in martian meteorites, determining if the phosphates are primary igneous or secondary sedimentary minerals may have significant consequences for use of REE as oxybarometers and radiogenic-isotopic dating systems in these meteorites. Therefore, an experimental investigation was initiated to determine whether the phosphates are primary igneous minerals or secondary weathering products. The phosphate saturation curve in SNC magmatic compositions has been studied experimentally by synthesizing the parental melt composition of lherzolitic shergottite ALH 77005 and performing anhydrous crystallization experiments in TZM pressure vessels. The parental melt composition was then doped with 5 wt % P2O5 in the form of CaHPO4 and the crystallization experiments were repeated. ALH 77005's parental melt saturated phosphate near 7 wt % at 1165°C and 5 wt % at 1150°C. These saturation values illustrate how high-P2O5 would have to build up before phosphates would nucleate and are consistent with high-2O5 content found in rehomogenized olivine-hosted melt inclusions. These saturation values are higher than the reported saturation for lunar and

  6. Concordant Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd Ages for NWA 1460: A 340 Ma Old Basaltic Shergottite Related to Lherzolitic Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C-Y; Reese, Y. D.; Irving, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    Preliminary Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd ages reported by [1] for the NWA 1460 basaltic shergottite are refined to 336+/-14 Ma and 345+/-21 Ma, respectively. These concordant ages are interpreted as dating a lava flow on the Martian surface. The initial Sr and Nd isotopic compositions of NWA 1460 suggest it is an earlier melting product of a Martian mantle source region similar to those of the lherzolitic shergottites and basaltic shergottite EETA79001, lithology B. We also examine the suggestion that generally "young" ages for other Martian meteorites should be reinterpreted in light of Pb-207/Pb-206 - Pb-204/Pb-206 isotopic systematics [2]. Published U-Pb isotopic data for nakhlites are consistent with ages of approx.1.36 Ga. The UPb isotopic systematics of some Martian shergottites and lherzolites that have been suggested to be approx.4 Ga old [2] are complex. We nevertheless suggest the data are consistent with crystallization ages of approx.173 Ma when variations in the composition of in situ initial Pb as well as extraneous Pb components are considered.

  7. Experimental Petrology of the Basaltic Shergottite Yamato 980459: Implications for the Thermal Structure of the Martian Mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, H. A.; Musselwhite, D. S.; Kiefer, W.; Treiman, A. H.

    2005-01-01

    Yamato 980459 (Y98) is an olivine-phyric basaltic shergottite composed of 48% pyroxene, 26% olivine, 25% mesostasis, and 1% other minerals. Unlike the other Martian basalts, it contains no plagioclase. Olivine in Y98 is the most magnesian of all Martian meteorites. Thus Y98 is believed to be the most primitive and its composition may be the closest to a primary or direct melt of the Martian mantle. As such, it provides a very useful probe of the mineralogy and depth of its mantle source region. Toward this end, we are conducting crystallization experiments on a synthetic Y98 composition at Martian mantle pressures and temperatures.

  8. Experimental study of polybaric REE partitioning between olivine, pyroxene and melt of the Yamato 980459 composition: Insights into the petrogenesis of depleted shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinova, Alexandra; Herd, Christopher D. K.

    2009-06-01

    A synthetic composition representing the Yamato 980459 martian basalt (shergottite) has been used to carry out phase relation, and rare earth element (REE) olivine and pyroxene partitioning experiments. Yamato 980459 is a sample of primitive basalt derived from a reduced end-member among martian mantle sources. Experiments carried out between 1-2 GPa and 1350-1650 °C simulate the estimated pressure-temperature conditions of basaltic melt generation in the martian mantle. Olivine-melt and orthopyroxene-melt partition coefficients for La, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd and Yb ( DREE values) were determined by LA-ICPMS, and are similar to the published values for terrestrial basaltic systems. We have not detected significant variation in D-values with pressure over the range investigated, and by comparison with previous studies carried out at lower pressure. We apply the experimentally obtained olivine-melt and orthopyroxene-melt DREE values to fractional crystallization and partial melting models to develop a three-stage geochemical model for the evolution of martian meteorites. In our model we propose two ancient (˜4.535 Ga) sources: the Nakhlite Source, located in the shallow mantle, and the Deep Mantle Source, located close to the martian core-mantle boundary. These two sources evolved distinctly on the ɛ 143Nd evolution curve due to their different Sm/Nd ratios. By partially melting the Nakhlite Source at ˜1.3 Ga, we are able to produce a slightly depleted residue (Nakhlite Residue). The Nakhlite Residue is left undisturbed until ˜500 Ma, at which point the depleted Deep Mantle Source is brought up by a plume mechanism carrying with it high heat flow, melts and isotopic signatures of the deep mantle (e.g., ɛ 182W, ɛ 142Nd, etc.). The plume-derived Deep Mantle Source combines with the Nakhlite Residue producing a mixture that becomes a mantle source (herein referred to as "the Y98 source") for Yamato 980459 and the other depleted shergottites with the characteristic range

  9. Constraints on Mantle Plume Melting Conditions in the Martian Mantle Based on Improved Melting Phase Relationships of Olivine-Phyric Shergottite Yamato 980459

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Rapp, Jennifer F.; Usui, Tomohiro; Draper, David S.; Filiberto, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Martian meteorite Yamato 980459 (hereafter Y98) is an olivine-phyric shergottite that has been interpreted as closely approximating a martian mantle melt [1-4], making it an important constraint on adiabatic decompression melting models. It has long been recognized that low pressure melting of the Y98 composition occurs at extremely high temperatures relative to martian basalts (1430 degC at 1 bar), which caused great difficulties in a previous attempt to explain Y98 magma generation via a mantle plume model [2]. However, previous studies of the phase diagram were limited to pressures of 2 GPa and less [2, 5], whereas decompression melting in the present-day martian mantle occurs at pressures of 3-7 GPa, with the shallow boundary of the melt production zone occurring just below the base of the thermal lithosphere [6]. Recent experimental work has now extended our knowledge of the Y98 melting phase relationships to 8 GPa. In light of this improved petrological knowledge, we are therefore reassessing the constraints that Y98 imposes on melting conditions in martian mantle plumes. Two recently discovered olivine- phyric shergottites, Northwest Africa (NWA) 5789 and NWA 6234, may also be primary melts from the martian mantle [7, 8]. However, these latter meteorites have not been the subject of detailed experimental petrology studies, so we focus here on Y98.

  10. Yamato 980459: Crystallization of Martian Magnesian Magma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koizumi, E.; Mikouchi, T.; McKay, G.; Monkawa, A.; Chokai, J.; Miyamoto, M.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, several basaltic shergottites have been found that include magnesian olivines as a major minerals. These have been called olivinephyric shergottites. Yamato 980459, which is a new martian meteorite recovered from the Antarctica by the Japanese Antarctic expedition, is one of them. This meteorite is different from other olivine-phyric shergottites in several key features and will give us important clues to understand crystallization of martian meteorites and the evolution of Martian magma.

  11. Experimental Crystallization of Yamato 980459

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, John H.; Galenas, M. G.; Danielson, L. R.

    2009-01-01

    Currently, only two martian meteorites QUE 94201 (QUE) and Yamato 980459 (Y98) have been experimentally shown to me true melt compositions. Most martian meteorites are instead, cumulates or partial cumulates. We have performed experiments on a Y98 composition to assess whether QUE could be related to Y98 by some fractionation process [1]. Y98 is a basaltic shergottite from the SNC (Shergotty, Nakhla, Chassigny) meteorite group. Y98 is composed of 26% olivine, 48% pyroxene, 25% mesostasis, and no plagioclase [2]. The large size of the olivine megacrysts and absence of plagioclase suggest that the parental melt which formed this meteorite had begun cooling slowly until some mechanism, such as magma ascent, caused rapid cooling [3]. Y98 s olivines have the highest Mg content of all the shergottites suggesting that it is the most primitive [4]. Y98 has been determined to be a melt composition by comparing the composition of experimental liquidus olivines with the composition of the cores of Y98 olivines [4]. The liquidus of Y98 is predicted by MELTS [5] and by experimentation [6] to be 1450 C. Analyses of Y98 show it to be very depleted in LREEs and it has similar depleted patterns as other shergottites such as QUE [7].

  12. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd Studies of Olivine-Phyric Shergottites RBT 04262 and LAR 06319: Isotopic Evidence for Relationship to Enriched Basaltic Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L.E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Reese, Y.

    2009-01-01

    RBT 04262 and LAR 06319 are two Martian meteorites recently discovered in Antarctica. Both contain abundant olivines, and were classified as olivine-phyric shergottites. A detailed petrographic study of RBT 04262 suggested it should be reclassified as a lherzolitic shergottite. However, the moderately LREE-depleted REE distribution pattern indicated that it is closely related to enriched basaltic shergottites like Shergotty, Zagami, Los Angeles, etc. In earlier studies of a similarly olivinephyric shergottite NWA 1068 which contains 21% modal olivine, it was shown that it probably was produced from an enriched basaltic shergottite magma by olivine accumulation . As for LAR 06319, recent petrographic studies suggested that it is different from either lherzolitic shergottites or the highly LREE-depleted olivine-phyric shergottites. We performed Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic analyses on RBT 04262 and LAR 06319 to determine their crystallization ages and Sr and Nd isotopic signatures, and to better understand the petrogenetic relationships between them and other basaltic, lherzolitic and depleted olivine-phyric shergottites.

  13. Radiocarbon datings of Yamato meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kigoshi, K.; Matsuda, E.

    1986-01-01

    The terrestrial ages of five Yamato Meteorites were measured by the content of cosmic-ray-produced carbon-14. Three Yamato Meteorites Y-74013, Y-74097, and Y-74136, which are all diogenites, were found at sites from one to two kilometers apart from each other. Evidence is presented for these three meteorites being a single meteorite. Also presented is a method adopted in the experimental procedure which includes a check for modern carbon contamination in the meteorites.

  14. Constraints on the Parental Melts of Enriched Shergottites from Image Analysis and High Pressure Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collinet, M.; Medard, E.; Devouard, B.; Peslier, A.

    2012-01-01

    Martian basalts can be classified in at least two geochemically different families: enriched and depleted shergottites. Enriched shergottites are characterized by higher incompatible element concentrations and initial Sr-87/Sr-86 and lower initial Nd-143/Nd-144 and Hf-176/Hf-177 than depleted shergottites [e.g. 1, 2]. It is now generally admitted that shergottites result from the melting of at least two distinct mantle reservoirs [e.g. 2, 3]. Some of the olivine-phyric shergottites (either depleted or enriched), the most magnesian Martian basalts, could represent primitive melts, which are of considerable interest to constrain mantle sources. Two depleted olivine-phyric shergottites, Yamato (Y) 980459 and Northwest Africa (NWA) 5789, are in equilibrium with their most magnesian olivine (Fig. 1) and their bulk rock compositions are inferred to represent primitive melts [4, 5]. Larkman Nunatak (LAR) 06319 [3, 6, 7] and NWA 1068 [8], the most magnesian enriched basalts, have bulk Mg# that are too high to be in equilibrium with their olivine megacryst cores. Parental melt compositions have been estimated by subtracting the most magnesian olivine from the bulk rock composition, assuming that olivine megacrysts have partially accumulated [3, 9]. However, because this technique does not account for the actual petrography of these meteorites, we used image analysis to study these rocks history, reconstruct their parent magma and understand the nature of olivine megacrysts.

  15. Melt Inclusion Analysis of RBT 04262 with Relationship to Shergottites and Mars Surface Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, S. A.; Brandon, A. D.; Peslier, A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Martian meteorite RBT 04262 is in the shergottite class. It displays the two lithologies typically found in "lherzolitic shergottites": one with a poikilitic texture of large pyroxene enclosing olivine and another with non-poikilitic texture. In the case of RBT 04262, the latter strongly ressembles an olivine- phyric shergottite which led the initial classification of this meteorite in that class. RBT 04262 has been studied with regards to its petrology, geochemistry and cosmic ray exposure and belongs to the enriched oxidized end-member of the shergottites. Studies on RBT 04262 have primarily focused on the bulk rock composition or each of the lithologies independently. To further elucidate RBT 04262's petrology and use it to better understand Martian geologic history, an in-depth study of its melt inclusions (MI) is being conducted. The MI chosen for this study are found within olivine grains. MI are thought to be trapped melts of the crystallizing magma preserved by the encapsulating olivine and offer snapshots of the composition of the magma as it evolves. Some MI, in the most Mg-rich part of the olivine of olivine-pyric shergottites, may even be representative of the meteorite parent melt.

  16. Geochemical diversity of shergottite basalts: Mixing and fractionation, and their relation to Mars surface basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, Allan H.; Filiberto, Justin

    2015-04-01

    The chemical compositions of shergottite meteorites, basaltic rocks from Mars, provide a broad view of the origins and differentiation of these Martian magmas. The shergottite basalts are subdivided based on their Al contents: high-Al basalts (Al > 5% wt) are distinct from low-Al basalts and olivine-phyric basalts (both with Al < 4.5% wt). Abundance ratios of highly incompatible elements (e.g., Th, La) are comparable in all the shergottites. Abundances of less incompatible elements (e.g., Ti, Lu, Hf) in olivine-phyric and low-Al basalts correlate well with each other, but the element abundance ratios are not constant; this suggests mixing between components, both depleted and enriched. High-Al shergottites deviate from these trends consistent with silicate mineral fractionation. The "depleted" component is similar to the Yamato-980459 magma; approximately, 67% crystal fractionation of this magma would yield a melt with trace element abundances like QUE 94201. The "enriched" component is like the parent magma for NWA 1068; approximately, 30% crystal fractionation from it would yield a melt with trace element abundances like the Los Angeles shergottite. This component mixing is consistent with radiogenic isotope and oxygen fugacity data. These mixing relations are consistent with the compositions of many of the Gusev crater basalts analyzed on Mars by the Spirit rover (although with only a few elements to compare). Other Mars basalts fall off the mixing relations (e.g., Wishstone at Gusev, Gale crater rocks). Their compositions imply that basalt source areas in Mars include significant complexities that are not present in the source areas for the shergottite basalts.

  17. Origin of water and mantle-crust interactions on Mars inferred from hydrogen isotopes and volatile element abundances of olivine-hosted melt inclusions of primitive shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, Tomohiro; Alexander, Conel M. O'D.; Wang, Jianhua; Simon, Justin I.; Jones, John H.

    2012-12-01

    Volatile elements have influenced the differentiation and eruptive behavior of Martian magmas and played an important role in the evolution of Martian climate and near-surface environments. However, the abundances of volatiles, and in particular the amount of water in the Martian interior, are disputed. A record of volatile reservoirs is contained in primitive Martian basalts (shergottites). Olivine-hosted melt inclusions from a geochemically depleted shergottite (Yamato 980459, representing a very primitive Martian melt) possess undegassed water with a chondritic and Earth-like D/H ratio (δD≤275‰). Based on volatile measurements in these inclusions, the water content of the depleted shergottite mantle is calculated to be 15-47 ppm, which is consistent with the dry mantle hypothesis. In contrast to D/H in the depleted shergottite, melt from an enriched shergottite (Larkman Nunatak 06319), which either formed by melting of an enriched mantle or by assimilation of crust, exhibits an extreme δD of ˜5000‰, indicative of a surface reservoir (e.g., the Martian atmosphere or crustal hydrosphere). These data provide strong evidence that the Martian mantle had retained the primordial low-δD component until at least the time of shergottite formation, and that young Martian basalts assimilated old Martian crust.

  18. 39Ar-40Ar "ages" and origin of excess 40Ar in Martian shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogard, Donald; Park, Jisun; Garrison, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    We report new 39Ar-40Ar measurements on 15 plagioclase, pyroxene, and/or whole rock samples of 8 Martian shergottites. All age spectra suggest ages older than the meteorite formation ages, as defined by Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isochrons. Employing isochron plots, only Los Angeles plagioclase and possibly Northwest Africa (NWA) 3171 plagioclase give ages in agreement with their formation ages. Isochrons for all shergottite samples reveal the presence of trapped Martian 40Ar (40Arxs), which exists in variable amounts in different lattice locations. Some 40Arxs is uniformly distributed throughout the lattice, resulting in a positive isochron intercept, and other 40Arxs occurs in association with K-bearing minerals and increases the isochron slope. These samples demonstrate situations where linear Ar isochrons give false ages that are too old. After subtracting 40Ar*that would accumulate by 40K decay since meteorite formation and small amounts of terrestrial 40Ar, all young age samples give similar 40Arxs concentrations of ˜1-2 × 10-6cm3/g, but a variation in K content by a factor of ˜80. Previously reported NASA Johnson Space Center data for Zagami, Shergotty, Yamato (Y-) 000097, Y-793605, and Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 94201 shergottites show similar concentrations of 40Arxs to the new meteorite data reported here. Similar 40Arxs in different minerals and meteorites cannot be explained as arising from Martian atmosphere carried in strongly shocked phases such as melt veins. We invoke the explanation given by Bogard and Park (2008) for Zagami, that this 40Arxs in shergottites was acquired from the magma. Similarity in 40Arxs among shergottites may reveal common magma sources and/or similar magma generation and emplacement processes.

  19. Yamato: Bringing the Moon to the Earth ... Again

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, King; Martinelli, Scott; Patel, Neal; Powell, David; Smith, Brandon

    2008-01-01

    The Yamato mission to the lunar South Pole-Aitken Basin returns samples that enable dating of lunar formation and the lunar bombardment period. The design of the Yamato mission is based on a systems engineering process which takes an advanced consideration of cost and mission risk to give the mission a high probability of success.

  20. Anhydrous Liquid Line of Descent of Yamato 980459 and Evolution of Martian Parental Magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, J. F.; Draper, David S.; Mercer, C. M.

    2013-01-01

    Martian basalts represented by the shergottite meteorites reflect derivation from highly depleted mantle sources (high Nd, strong LREE depletions, low fO2)[1-3], with evidence of mixing with a much more enriched and oxidized reservoir, most likely a late-stage product of crystallization of an initial martian magma ocean [3-6]. The martian basaltic meteorites Yamato 980459 (Y98) and QUE 94201 (QUE) have bulk compositions that appear to represent bonafide liquids, rather than products of protracted crystallization. These two meteorites also represent the most primitive and evolved examples of the depleted basaltic shergottite suite. Magmatic liquids serve as effective probes of their source regions, and thus studying the potential relationship between magmas represented by Y98 and QUE can yield important information on the formation and evolution of martian basalts. Although the ages of these meteorites preclude that they are petrogenetically related to each other, they represent the best existing candidates for genuine liquids (other meteorites are suggested to represent liquid compositions, including LAR 06319 [7] and NWA 5789 [8], but only Y98 and QUE have been verified experimentally). They span much of the bulk-compositional range of martian basaltic meteorites, and represent end-member liquid compositions likely to arise from partial melting of the martian mantle. Recent efforts to model Y98-like parent liquid evolution by fractional crystallization using MELTS [6] produced a derivative liquid composition that closely matches QUE bulk composition, although it required a some-what unusual crystallization sequence. Experimental endeavours to verify this result at 1 bar have, however, been inconclusive [9].

  1. Melts of garnet lherzolite: experiments, models and comparison to melts of pyroxenite and carbonated lherzolite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grove, Timothy L.; Holbig, Eva S.; Barr, Jay A.; Till, Christy B.; Krawczynski, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Phase equilibrium experiments on a compositionally modified olivine leucitite from the Tibetan plateau have been carried out from 2.2 to 2.8 GPa and 1,380–1,480 °C. The experiments-produced liquids multiply saturated with spinel and garnet lherzolite phase assemblages (olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene and spinel ± garnet) under nominally anhydrous conditions. These SiO2-undersaturated liquids and published experimental data are utilized to develop a predictive model for garnet lherzolite melting of compositionally variable mantle under anhydrous conditions over the pressure range of 1.9–6 GPa. The model estimates the major element compositions of garnet-saturated melts for a range of mantle lherzolite compositions and predicts the conditions of the spinel to garnet lherzolite phase transition for natural peridotite compositions at above-solidus temperatures and pressures. We compare our predicted garnet lherzolite melts to those of pyroxenite and carbonated lherzolite and develop criteria for distinguishing among melts of these different source types. We also use the model in conjunction with a published predictive model for plagioclase and spinel lherzolite to characterize the differences in major element composition for melts in the plagioclase, spinel and garnet facies and develop tests to distinguish between melts of these three lherzolite facies based on major elements. The model is applied to understand the source materials and conditions of melting for high-K lavas erupted in the Tibetan plateau, basanite–nephelinite lavas erupted early in the evolution of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, as well as younger tholeiitic to alkali lavas from Kilauea.

  2. Tracking the Depleted Mantle Signature in Melt Inclusions and Residual Glass of Basaltic Martian Shergottites using Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Timothy J.; Simon, Justin I.; Jones, John H.; Usui, Tomohiro; Economos, Rita C.; Schmitt, Axel K.; McKeegan, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Trace element abundances of depleted shergottite magmas recorded by olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MI) and interstitial mesostasis glass were measured using the Cameca ims-1270 ion microprobe. Two meteorites: Tissint, an olivine-­phyric basaltic shergottite which fell over Morocco July 18th 2001; and the Antarctic meteorite Yamato 980459 (Y98), an olivine-phyric basaltic shergottite with abundant glassy mesostasis have been studied. Chondrite-­normalized REE patterns for MI in Tissint and Y98 are characteristically LREE depleted and, within analytical uncertainty, parallel those of their respective whole rock composition; supporting each meteorite to represent a melt composition that has experienced closed-­system crystallization. REE profiles for mesostasis glass in Y98 lie about an order of magnitude higher than those from the MI; with REE profiles for Tissint MI falling in between. Y98 MI have the highest average Sm/Nd and Y/Ce ratios, reflecting their LREE depletion and further supporting Y98 as one of our best samples to probe the depleted shergotitte mantle. In general, Zr/Nb ratios overlap between Y98 and Tissint MI, Ce/Nb ratios overlap between Y98 MI and mesostasis glass, and Sm/Nd ratios overlap between Y98 mesostasis glass and Tissint MI. These features support similar sources for both, but with subtle geochemical differences that may reflect different melting conditions or fractionation paths during ascent from the mantle. Interestingly, the REE patterns for both Y98 bulk and MI analyses display a flattening of the LREE that suggests a crustal contribution to the Y98 parent melt. This observation has important implications for the origins of depleted and enriched shergottites.

  3. The source crater of martian shergottite meteorites.

    PubMed

    Werner, Stephanie C; Ody, Anouck; Poulet, François

    2014-03-21

    Absolute ages for planetary surfaces are often inferred by crater densities and only indirectly constrained by the ages of meteorites. We show that the <5 million-year-old and 55-km-wide Mojave Crater on Mars is the ejection source for the meteorites classified as shergottites. Shergottites and this crater are linked by their coinciding meteorite ejection ages and the crater formation age and by mineralogical constraints. Because Mojave formed on 4.3 billion-year-old terrain, the original crystallization ages of shergottites are old, as inferred by Pb-Pb isotope ratios, and the much-quoted shergottite ages of <600 million years are due to resetting. Thus, the cratering-based age determination method for Mars is now calibrated in situ, and it shifts the absolute age of the oldest terrains on Mars backward by 200 million years.

  4. The source crater of martian shergottite meteorites.

    PubMed

    Werner, Stephanie C; Ody, Anouck; Poulet, François

    2014-03-21

    Absolute ages for planetary surfaces are often inferred by crater densities and only indirectly constrained by the ages of meteorites. We show that the <5 million-year-old and 55-km-wide Mojave Crater on Mars is the ejection source for the meteorites classified as shergottites. Shergottites and this crater are linked by their coinciding meteorite ejection ages and the crater formation age and by mineralogical constraints. Because Mojave formed on 4.3 billion-year-old terrain, the original crystallization ages of shergottites are old, as inferred by Pb-Pb isotope ratios, and the much-quoted shergottite ages of <600 million years are due to resetting. Thus, the cratering-based age determination method for Mars is now calibrated in situ, and it shifts the absolute age of the oldest terrains on Mars backward by 200 million years. PMID:24603150

  5. Melting and Impact Events of the Lodranite Parent Body Inferred from Petrology of Yamato 791491

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasutake, M.; Yamaguchi, A.

    2016-08-01

    We examined chemical composition and petrofabric of Yamato 791491. It shows an olivine fabric with concentration of b-axis. Our results show fabric of Yamato 791491 is developed by solid-state deformation process.

  6. Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd Isotopic Studies of Shergottites and Nakhlites: Implications for Martian Mantle Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debaille, V.; Yin, Q.-Z.; Brandon, A. D.; Jacobsen, B.; Treiman, A. H.

    2007-01-01

    We present a new Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd isotope systematics study of four enriched shergottites (Zagami, Shergotty, NWA856 and Los Angeles), and three nakhlites (Nakhla, MIL03346 and Yamato 000593) in order to further understand processes occurring during the early differentiation of Mars and the crystallization of its magma ocean. Two fractions of the terrestrial petrological analogue of nakhlites, the Archaean Theo's flow (Ontario, Canada) were also measured. The coupling of Nd and Hf isotopes provide direct insights on the mineralogy of the melt sources. In contrast to Sm/Nd, Lu/Hf ratios can be very large in minerals such as garnet. Selective partial melting of garnet bearing mantle sources can therefore lead to characteristic Lu/Hf signatures that can be recognized with Hf-176/Hf-177Hf ratios.

  7. Solar proton produced neon in shergottite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, D. H.; Rao, M. N.; Bogard, D. D.

    1994-01-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides produced by near-surface, nuclear interactions of energetic solar protons (approx. 10-100 MeV) were reported in several lunar rocks and a very small meteorites. We recently documented the existence and isotopic compositions of solar-produced (SCR) Ne in two lunar rocks. Here we present the first documented evidence for SCR Ne in a meteorite, ALH77005, which was reported to contain SCR radionuclides. Examination of literature data for other shergottites suggests that they may also contain a SCR Ne component. The existence of SCR Ne in shergottites may be related to a Martian origin.

  8. Ree in Shergottite Augites and Whole Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musselwhite, D. S.; Wadhwa, M.

    2002-01-01

    Redox variations have been reported among the shergottites. Eu and Gd partitioning experiments designed for the LEW86010 angrite, to infer a range of fo2 for the shergottites have been used. Fo2 using equilibria between Fe-Ti oxides have been inferred. There is fairly good agreement between the Fe-Ti oxide determinations and the estimates from Eu anomalies in terms of which meteorites are more or less oxidized. The Eu anomaly technique and the Fe-Ti oxide technique both essentially show the same trend, with Shergotty and Zagami being the most oxidized and QUE94201 and DaG 476 being the most reduced. Thus, the variation in fo2 appears to be both real and substantive. However, although the redox trends indicated by the two techniques are similar, there is as much as a two log unit offset between the results. One explanation for this offset is that the Eu calibration used for the shergottites was actually designed for the LEW86010 angrite, a silica-undersaturated basalt whose pyroxene (diopside) compositions are rather extreme. To correct this, a set of experiments on the redox relationship of Eu partitioning relative to Sm and Gd for pyroxene and melt compositions more relevant to Martian meteorites were conducted. We have taken the experimentally determined relationship between D (sup Augite/melt) (Sm,Eu,Gd) and fO2 and applied it to augite Eu and Gd data for the basaltic Shergottites of as well as previously unreported augite Sm data.

  9. Basaltic Shergottite NWA 856: Differentiation of a Martian Magma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferdous, J.; Brandon, A. D.; Peslier, A. H.; Pirotte, Z.

    2016-01-01

    NWA 856 or Djel Ibone, is a basaltic shergottite discovered as a single stone of 320 g in South Morocco in April, 2001. This meteorite is fresh, i.e. shows minimal terrestrial weathering for a desert find. No shergottite discovered in North Africa can be paired with NWA 856. The purpose of this study is to constrain its crystallization history using textural observations, crystallization sequence modeling and in-situ trace element analysis in order to understand differentiation in shergottite magmatic systems.

  10. Shock Metamorphism of the Dhofar 378 Basaltic Shergottite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikouchi, T.; McKay, G.

    2006-01-01

    Shock metamorphism is one of the most fundamental processes in the history of Martian meteorites, especially shergottites, which affect their mineralogy and chronology. The formation of "maskelynite" from plagioclase and shock melts is such major mineralogical effects. Dhofar 378 is one of the recently found desert shergottites that is mainly composed of plagioclase and pyroxene. This shergottite is important because of its highly shocked nature and unique plagioclase texture, and thus has a great potential for assessing a "shock" age of shergottites. We have been working on a combined study of mineralogy and chronology of the same rock chip of Dhofar 378. This abstract reports its mineralogical part.

  11. The age of the martian meteorite Northwest Africa 1195 and the differentiation history of the shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symes, Steven J. K.; Borg, Lars E.; Shearer, Charles K.; Irving, Anthony J.

    2008-03-01

    Samarium-neodymium isotopic analyses of unleached and acid-leached mineral fractions from the recently identified olivine-bearing shergottite Northwest Africa 1195 yield a crystallization age of 347 ± 13 Ma and an ɛNd143 value of +40.1 ± 0.9. Maskelynite fractions do not lie on the Sm-Nd isochron and appear to contain a martian surface component with low 147Sm/ 144Nd and 143Nd/ 144Nd ratios that was added during shock. The Rb-Sr system is disturbed and does not yield an isochron. Terrestrial Sr appears to have affected all of the mineral fractions, although a maximum initial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio of 0.7016 is estimated by passing a 347 Ma reference line through the maskelynite fraction that is least affected by contamination. The high initial ɛNd143 value and the low initial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio, combined with the geologically young crystallization age, indicate that Northwest Africa 1195 is derived from a source region characterized by a long-term incompatible-element depletion. The age and initial Sr and Nd isotopic compositions of Northwest Africa 1195 are very similar to those of Queen Alexandra Range 94201, indicating these samples were derived from source regions with similar Sr-Nd isotopic systematics. These similarities suggest that these two meteorites share a close petrogenetic relationship and might have been erupted from a common volcano. The meteorites Yamato 980459, Dar al Gani 476, Sayh al Uhaymir 005/008, and Dhofar 019 also have relatively old ages between 474 and 575 Ma and trace element and/or isotopic systematics that are indicative of derivation from incompatible-element-depleted sources. This suggests that the oldest group of meteorites is more closely related to one another than they are to the younger meteorites that are derived from less incompatible-element-depleted sources. Closed-system fractional crystallization of this suite of meteorites is modeled with the MELTS algorithm using the bulk composition of Yamato 980459 as a parent. These

  12. The age of the martian meteorite Northwest Africa 1195 and the differentiation history of the shergottites

    SciTech Connect

    Symes, S; Borg, L; Shearer, C; Irving, A

    2007-04-05

    Samarium-neodymium isotopic analyses of unleached and acid-leached mineral fractions from the recently identified olivine-bearing shergottite Northwest Africa 1195 yield a crystallization age of 348 {+-} 19 Ma and an {var_epsilon}{sub Nd}{sup 143} value of +40.1 {+-} 1.3. Maskelynite fractions do not lie on the Sm-Nd isochron and appear to contain a martian surface component with low {sup 147}Sm/{sup 144}Nd and {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd ratios that was added during shock. The Rb-Sr system is disturbed and does not yield an isochron. Terrestrial Sr appears to have affected all of the mineral fractions, although a maximum initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio of 0.701614 {+-} 16 is estimated by passing a 348 Ma reference isochron through the maskelynite fraction that is least affected by contamination. The high initial {var_epsilon}{sub Nd}{sup 143} value and the low initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio, combined with the geologically young crystallization age, indicate that Northwest Africa 1195 is derived from a source region characterized by a long-term incompatible element depletion. The age and initial Sr and Nd isotopic compositions of Northwest Africa 1195 are very similar to those of Queen Alexandra Range 94201, indicating these samples were derived from source regions with nearly identical Sr-Nd isotopic systematics. These similarities suggest that these two meteorites share a close petrogenetic relationship and might have been erupted from a common volcano. The meteorites Yamato 980459, Dar al Gani 476, Sayh al Uhaymir 005/008, and Dhofar 019 also have relatively old ages between 474-575 Ma and trace element and/or isotopic systematics that are indicative of derivation from incompatible-element-depleted sources. This suggests that the oldest group of meteorites is more closely related to one another than they are to the younger meteorites that are derived from less incompatible-element-depleted sources. Closed-system fractional crystallization of this suite of

  13. Amino acids in the Yamato carbonaceous chrondrite from Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimoyama, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Yanai, K.

    1979-01-01

    Evidence for the presence of amino acids of extraterrestrial origin in the Antarctic Yamato carbonaceous chrondrite is presented. Hydrolyzed and nonhydrolyzed water-extracted amino acid samples from exterior, middle and interior portions of the meteorite were analyzed by an amino acid analyzer and by gas chromatography of N-TFA-isopropyl amino acid derivatives. Nine protein and six nonprotein amino acids were detected in the meteorite at abundances between 34 and less than one nmole/g, with equal amounts in interior and exterior portions. Nearly equal abundances of the D and L enantiomers of alanine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid were found, indicating the abiotic, therefore extraterrestrial, origin of the amino acids. The Antarctic environment and the uniformity of protein amino acid abundances are discussed as evidence against the racemization of terrestrially acquired amino acids, and similarities between Yamato amino acid compositions and the amino acid compositions of the Murchison and Murray type II carbonaceous chrondrites are indicated.

  14. New Titanium Monosulfide Mineral Phase in Yamato 691 Enstatite Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K; Clemett, S. J.; Rubin, A. E.; Choi, B.-G.; Zhang, S.; Rahman, Z.; Oikawa, K.; Keller, L. P.

    2011-01-01

    Yamato 691, an EH3 enstatite chondrite, was among the first meteorites discovered by chance in Antarctica by the Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE) team in 1969. This discovery led to follow-up searches for meteorites in Antarctica [1]. These international searches have been very successful recovering over 40,000 total specimens (and still counting), including martian and lunar meteorites. Titanium is partly chalcophile in enstatite-rich meteorites. Previous occurrences of Ti-bearing sulfides include troilite, daubrelite and ferroan alabandite in enstatite chondrites and aubrites [2], and heideite with 28.5 wt% Ti in the Bustee aubrite [3]. Here we report a new mineral from Yamato 691, ideally stoichiometric TiS, titanium monosulfide, a simple two-element mineral phase, yet with a very unique crystal structure that, to our knowledge, has not been observed previously in nature.

  15. A More Reduced Mantle Source for Enriched Shergottites; Insights from the Olivine-Phyric Shergottite Lar 06319

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, A. H.; Hnatyshin, D.; Herd, C. D. K.; Walton, E. L.; Brandon, A. D.; Lapen, T. J.; Shafer, J.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed petrographic study of melt inclusions and Cr-Fe-Ti oxides of LAR 06319 leads to two main conclusions: 1) this enriched oxidized olivine- phyric shergottite represents nearly continuous crystallization of a basaltic shergottite melt, 2) the melt became more oxidized during differentiation. The first crystallized mineral assemblages record the oxygen fugacity which is closest to that of the melt s mantle source, and which is lower than generally attributed to the enriched shergottite group.

  16. Northwest Africa 5298: A Basaltic Shergottite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Hejiu; Peslier, Anne; Lapen, Thomas J.; Brandon, Alan; Shafer, John

    2009-01-01

    NWA 5298 is a single 445 g meteorite found near Bir Gandouz, Morocco in March 2008 [1]. This rock has a brown exterior weathered surface instead of a fusion crust and the interior is composed of green mineral grains with interstitial dark patches containing small vesicles and shock melts [1]. This meteorite is classified as a basaltic shergottite [2]. A petrologic study of this Martian meteorite is being carried out with electron microprobe analysis and soon trace element analyses by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Oxygen fugacity is calculated from Fe-Ti oxides pairs in the sample. The data from this study constrains the petrogenesis of basaltic shergottites.

  17. Volatile compounds in shergottite and nakhlite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, James L.; Aggrey, Kwesi E.; Muenow, David W.

    1990-01-01

    Since discovery of apparent carbonate carbon in Nakhla, significant evidence has accumulated for occurrence of volatile compounds in shergotties and nakhlites. Results are presented from a study of volatile compounds in three shergottites, one nakhlite, and three eucrite control samples. Shergotties ALHA77005, EETA79001, and Shergotty, and the nakhlite Nakhla, all contain oxidized sulfur (sulfate) of preterrestrial origin; sulfur oxidation is most complete in EETA79001/Lith-C. Significant bulk carbonate was confirmed in Nakhla and trace carbonate was substantiated for EETA79001, all of which appears to be preterrestrial in origin. Chlorine covaries with oxidized sulfur, whereas carbonate and sulfate are inversely related. These volatile compounds were probably formed in a highly oxidizing, aqueous environment sometime in the late stage histories of the rocks that are now represented as meteorites. They are consistent with the hypothesis that shergottite and nakhlite meteorites originated on Mars and that Mars has supported aqueous geochemistry during its history.

  18. Martian meteorite Dhofar 019: A new shergottite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, L. A.; Nazarov, M. A.; Shearer, C. K.; McSween, H. Y., Jr.; Cahill, J.; Neal, C. R.; Ivanova, M. A.; Barsukova, L. D.; Lentz, R. C.; Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.

    2002-08-01

    Dhofar 019 is a new martian meteorite found in the desert of Oman. In texture, mineralogy, and major and trace element chemistry, this meteorite is classified as a basaltic shergottite. Olivine megacrysts are set within a groundmass composed of finer grained olivine, pyroxene (pigeonite and augite), and maskelynite. Minor phases are chromite-ulvöspinel, ilmenite, silica, K-rich feldspar, merrillite, chlorapatite, and pyrrhotite. Secondary phases of terrestrial origin include calcite, gypsum, celestite, Fe hydroxides, and smectite. Dhofar 019 is most similar to the Elephant Moraine (EETA) 79001 lithology A and Dar al Gani (DaG) 476/489 shergottites. The main features that distinguish Dhofar 019 from other shergottites are lack of orthopyroxene; lower Ni contents of olivine; the heaviest oxygen-isotopic bulk composition; and larger compositional ranges for olivine, maskelynite, and spinel, as well as a wide range for pyroxenes. The large compositional ranges of the minerals are indicative of relatively rapid crystallization. Modeling of olivine chemical zonations yield minimum cooling rates of 0.5-0.8 ?C/h. Spinel chemistry suggests that crystallization took place under one of the most reduced conditions for martian meteorites, at an oxygen fugacity of 3 log units below the quartz-fayalite-magnetite (QFM) buffer. The olivine megacrysts are heterogeneously distributed in the rock. Crystal size distribution analysis suggests that they constitute a population formed under steady-state conditions of nucleation and growth, although a few grains may be cumulates. The parent melt is thought to have been derived from partial melting of a light rare earth element- and platinum group element-depleted mantle source. Shergottites, EETA79001 lithology A, DaG 476/489, and Dhofar 019, although of different ages, comprise a particular type of martian rocks. Such rocks could have formed from chemically similar source(s) and parent melt(s), with their bulk compositions affected by

  19. REE in Shergottite Augites and Whole Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musselwhite, D. S.; Wadhwa, M.

    2002-01-01

    Redox variations have been reported among the shergottites. Eu and Gd were used in partitioning experiments designed for the LEW86010 angrite, to infer a range of fO2 for the shergottites. Inferred fO2 using equilibria between Fe-Ti oxides was used. There is fairly good agreement between the Fe- Ti oxide determinations and the estimates from Eu anomalies in terms of which meteorites are more or less oxidized. The Eu anomaly technique and the Fe-Ti oxide technique both essentially show the same trend, with Shergotty and Zagami being the most oxidized and QUE94201 and DaG 476 being the most reduced. Thus, the variation in fO2 appears to be both real and substantive. However, although the redox trends indicated by the two techniques are similar, there is as much as a two log unit offset between the results of presented. One explanation for this offset is that the Eu calibration used for the shergottites was actually designed for the LEW86010 angrite, a silica-undersaturated basalt whose pyroxene (diopside) compositions are rather extreme. To correct this, a set of experiments were conducted on the redox relationship of Eu partitioning relative to Sm and Gd for pyroxene and melt compositions more relevant to Martian meteorites. We have taken the experimentally determined relationship between (Sm,Eu,Gd) and fO2 and applied it to augite Eu and Gd data for the basaltic Shergottites as well as previously unreported augite Sm data.

  20. Lherzolite, anorthosite, gabbro, and basalt dredged from the Mid-Indian Ocean Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engel, C.G.; Fisher, R.L.

    1969-01-01

    The Central Indian Ridge is mantled with flows of low-potassium basalt of uniform composition. Gabbro, anorthosite, and garnet-bearing lherzolite are exposed in cross fractures, and lherzolite is the bedrock at the center of the ridge. The lherzolites are upper-mantle rock exposed by faulting.

  1. Crystallization and Alteration Ages of the Antarctic Nakhlite Yamato 000593

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musawa, K.; Shih, C.-Y.; Wiesmann, H.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2003-01-01

    Nakhlites are unbrecciated, olivine-bearing clinopyroxenites that probably came from Mars. A total of eight nakhlites have been identified, including five recent finds: two samples (104 g and 456 g) from the hot desert of Morocco (NWA 817 and NWA 998), and three samples, a total weight of approx.15 kg, from the Yamato Mountains of Antarctica (Y000593, Y000749 and Y000802). Preliminary isotopic results for Y000593 have been given by Shih et al.. In this report, we present Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isochron data for Y000593 and discuss the age correlation with other nakhlites and the timing of aqueous alteration on Mars.

  2. Carbonaceous Chondrite Fragments in the Polymict Eucrite Yamato 791834

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, P. C.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2003-01-01

    Buchanan et al. and Zolensky et al. described carbonaceous chondrite fragments in a variety of howardites and concluded that the majority are CM2 and CR2 materials. Gounelle et al. also described similar, but very small, fragments in these meteorites. These clasts are important because they represent materials that were in orbital proximity to the HED parent body (4 Vesta) and they may be similar to the primitive materials that originally accreted to form this body. The present study describes two carbonaceous chondrite clasts in the Yamato 791834 (Y791834) polymict eucrite.

  3. Rheology of Partially Molten Spinel Lherzolite at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Jin, Z.; Zhang, J.; Jin, S.

    2007-12-01

    Uniaxial creep experiments were performed on synthetic spinel lherzolite samples with grain sizes of 25- 50μm in a gas medium dead-load creep rig to investigate the deformation behavior of partially molten upper mantle. The room pressure experiments were conducted at conditions of elevated temperatures of 1140-1200 °C and well-controlled oxygen fugacities of 10-6-10-10atm. Differential stresses of 4-74MPa were applied to yield strain rates between 10-8 and 10-5 s-1. By fitting the steady-state creep strength with empirical power law, we obtain an oxygen fugacity exponent of 0.05 ± 0.02, a stress exponent of 1.5 ± 0.4, and an activation energy of 1428 ± 48 KJ/mol for the high-temperature deformation of a partially molten spinel lherzolite. The oxygen fugacity exponent, m, is comparable to those obtained for deformation of olivine single crystal, which suggests that deformation of pyroxene doesn't depend significantly on oxygen fugacity as olivine. The creep activation energy obtained in this study is about twice of those from previous studies. SEM observations show about 2-4% melt existing as melt pockets in triple junctions and melt films between grain boundaries in deformed spinel lherzolite. The stress exponent of 1.5 suggests that both dislocation creep and melt-enhanced diffusion creep contribute significantly to the deformation of lherzolite. Our results provide constrains on the rheology and deformation microstructures of partially molten upper mantle.

  4. Terrestrial C-14 age of the Antarctic shergottite, EETA 79001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jull, A. J. T.; Donahue, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    The terrestrial age of the Elephant Moraine shergottite EETA 79001 (lithology A) has been determined from measurement of its cosmogenic C-14 content as 12 +/- 2 kyr. The results on saturated and blank samples of 1 g or less are also discussed. The age calculated for EETA 79001 is compared to exposure and terrestrial ages of other shergottites in the light of possible origins of these meteorites on Mars.

  5. The Origin and Impact History of Lunar Meteorite Yamato 86032

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, A.; Takeda, H.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bogard, D. D.; Ebihara, M.; Karouji, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Yamato (Y) 86032 is a feldspathic lunar highland breccia having some characteristics of regolith breccia. The absence of KREEP components in the matrix in Y86032 indicates that these meteorites came from a long distance from Mare Imbrium, perhaps from the far-side of the moon. One ferroan anorthosite (FAN) clast in Y86032 has a very old Ar-Ar age of approximately 4.35-4.4 Ga. The negative Nd of this clast may suggest a direct link with the primordial magma ocean. The facts indicate that Y86032 contains components derived from a protolith of the original lunar crust. Detailed petrologic characterization of each component in this breccia is essential to understand the early impact history and origin of the lunar highland crust. We made a large slab (5.2 x 3.6 cm x 3-5 mm) of Y86032 to better understand the relationship of various lithologies and their petrologic origin.

  6. Some phase equilibrium systematics of lherzolite melting: I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, John

    2002-03-01

    New piston-cylinder experiments constrain the compositions of a series of synthetic picritic liquids that are in equilibrium with forsteritic olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, and garnet or spinel from 2.4 to 3.4 Gpa. Mass balance calculations show that two of the liquid + crystal assemblages are consistent with those expected by 4.4 and 1.6 wt % anhydrous partial melting of a peridotite generally similar in composition to estimates of depleted upper mantle (DPUM). The liquids in these runs contain <=2.0 wt % Na2O. Lherzolitic liquids with higher concentrations of Na2O have negative mass balance coefficients, regardless of Mg', implying that there is a limit of ~2 wt % Na2O in anhydrous partial melts of peridotites with ~0.3 wt % bulk Na2O in the upper garnet-lherzolite stability field. Examination of liquidus equilibria in the NCMAS system demonstrates that coupling of Na2O and SiO2 concentrations in liquids saturated with lherzolite assemblages permits high-Na2O, high-SiO2 melts at pressures ~1.0 GPa, whereas only high-Na2O, low-SiO2 melts are possible in the garnet-lherzolite stability field. Because the bulk partition coefficient for Na2O increases with pressure, the concentration of Na2O in batch melts of the same percent will necessarily decrease with pressure. Calculations of low-degree anhydrous melting of DPUM with a revised melting model, BATCH, indicate that the Na2O concentration decreases with increasing pressure more rapidly than in previous models. Thus, for example, 1% melting of lherzolite with Na2O bulk concentration typical of estimated terrestrial mantle (~0.3 wt %), can produce a liquid with ~6 wt % Na2O at 1.0 GPa but only ~2% Na2O at 3.0 Gpa. In calculated melts of the DPUM and PUM compositions at 1.0 Gpa, the TiO2 concentration decreases between 10 and 1% melting in response to an increase inDTiO2cpx, consistent reported experimental observations. The increase in DTiO2cpx appears to be a response to increasing alkalis in the melt

  7. Jarosite in the Shergottite Que 94201

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. K.; Ito, M.; Rao, M. N.; Hervig, R.; Williams, L. B.; Nyquist, Laurence E.; Peslier, A.

    2010-01-01

    Veins of the hydroxylated, potassium ferric sulfate mineral jarosite - KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6 - have been identified in the martian meteorite Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 94201. Iron potassium sulfate had been reported in QUE 94201 by Wentworth and Gooding. Jarosite has been reported in other Martian meteorites - Roberts Massif (RBT) 04262, Miller Range (MIL) 03346, and Yamato 000593 - and it has been identified on the Martian surface by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Given the presence of jarosite on Mars, and the burgeoning interest in water-rock interactions on Mars, the question arises whether jarosite in Martian meteorites is formed by aqueous alteration on Mars, or in Antarctica. Hydrogen isotopes are potentially sensitive indicators of the site of formation or last equilibration of hydrous alteration minerals, because of the large difference between D/H ratio of the Martian atmosphere (and also presumably the cryosphere) and terrestrial hydrogen. The Martian atmospheric delta D(sub SMOW) ratio is approximately +4200%o, igneous minerals with substantial hydrogen (phosphates) have high D, +2000%o to +4700%o versus terrestrial waters with approximately 480%o to +130%o. The crystal chemistry and structure of jarosite are reviewed in Papi ke et al. Here we report hydrogen isotopes measured in jarosite in QUE 94201 by ion microprobe, and also report on the major element composition of jarosite measured by electron microprobe.

  8. Crystallization Age of NWA 1460 Shergottite: Paradox Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C-Y.; Reese, Y. D.; Irving, A. J.

    2004-01-01

    We have determined the Rb-Sr age of basaltic shergottite NWA 1460 to be 312 +/- 3 Ma, and the Sm-Nd age to be 352 +/- 30 Ma. The initial Sr and Nd isotopic compositions of NWA 1460 suggest it is an earlier melting product of a Martian mantle source region similar to those of the Iherzolitic shergottites and basaltic shergottite EETA79001, lithology B. The new ages of NWA 1460 and other recently analyzed Martian meteorites leads us to reexamine the paradox that most of the Martian meteorites appear to be younger from the majority of the Martian surface. This paradox continues to pose a challenge to determining a reliable Martian chronology.

  9. Thermobarometry for spinel lherzolite xenoliths in alkali basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Kazuhito; Youbi, Nasrrddine; Boumehdi, Moulay Ahmed; Nagahara, Hiroko

    2016-04-01

    Application of geothermobarometers to peridotite xenoliths has been providing very useful information on thermal and chemical structure of lithospheric or asthenospheric mantle at the time of almost instantaneous sampling by the host magmas, based on which various thermal (e.g., McKenzie et al., 2005), chemical (e.g., Griffin et al., 2003), and rheological (e.g., Ave Lallemant et al., 1980) models of lithosphere have been constructed. Geothermobarometry for garnet or plagioclase-bearing lithologies provide accurate pressure estimation, but this is not the case for the spinel peridotites, which are frequently sampled from Phanerozoic provinces in various tectonic environments (Nixon and Davies, 1987). There are several geobarometers proposed for spinel lherzolite, such as single pyroxene geothermobarometer (Mercier, 1980) and geothermobarometer based on Ca exchange between olivine and clinopyroxene (Köhler and Brey, 1990), but they have essential problems and it is usually believed that appropriated barometers do not exist for spinel lherzolites (O'Reilly et al., 1997; Medaris et al., 1999). It is thus imperative to develop reliable barometry for spinel peridotite xenoliths. We have developed barometry for spinel peridotite xenoliths by exploiting small differences in pressure dependence in relevant reactions, whose calibration was made through careful evaluation of volume changes of the reactions. This is augmented with higher levels of care in application of barometer by choosing mineral domains and their chemical components that are in equilibrium as close as possible. This is necessary because such barometry is very sensitive to changes in chemical composition induced by transient state of the system possibly owing to pressure and temperature changes as well as chemical modification, forming chemical heterogeneity or zoning frequently reported from various mantle xenoliths (Smith, 1999). Thus very carful treatment of heterogeneity, which might be trivial for

  10. Lherzolite, anorthosite, gabbro, and basalt dredged from the mid-Indian ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Engel, C G; Fisher, R L

    1969-11-28

    The Central Indian Ridge is mantled with flows of low-potassium basalt of uniform composition. Gabbro, anorthosite, and garnet-bearing lherzolite are exposed in cross fractures, and lherzolite is the bedrock at the center of the ridge. The Iherzolites are upper-mantle rock exposed by faulting.

  11. Lherzolite, anorthosite, gabbro, and basalt dredged from the mid-Indian ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Engel, C G; Fisher, R L

    1969-11-28

    The Central Indian Ridge is mantled with flows of low-potassium basalt of uniform composition. Gabbro, anorthosite, and garnet-bearing lherzolite are exposed in cross fractures, and lherzolite is the bedrock at the center of the ridge. The Iherzolites are upper-mantle rock exposed by faulting. PMID:17775570

  12. Lead Isotopes in Olivine-Phyric Shergottite Tissint: Implications for the Geochemical Evolution of the Shergottite Source Mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriwaki, R.; Usui, T.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.; Yokoyama, T.

    2015-01-01

    Geochemically-depleted shergottites are basaltic rocks derived from a martian mantle source reservoir. Geochemical evolution of the martian mantle has been investigated mainly based on the Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and Lu-Hf isotope systematics of the shergottites [1]. Although potentially informative, U-Th- Pb isotope systematics have been limited because of difficulties in interpreting the analyses of depleted meteorite samples that are more susceptible to the effects of near-surface processes and terrestrial contamination. This study conducts a 5-step sequential acid leaching experiment of the first witnessed fall of the geochemically-depleted olivinephyric shergottite Tissint to minimize the effect of low temperature distrubence. Trace element analyses of the Tissint acid residue (mostly pyroxene) indicate that Pb isotope compositions of the residue do not contain either a martian surface or terrestrial component, but represent the Tissint magma source [2]. The residue has relatively unradiogenic initial Pb isotopic compositions (e.g., 206Pb/204Pb = 10.8136) that fall within the Pb isotope space of other geochemically-depleted shergottites. An initial µ-value (238U/204Pb = 1.5) of Tissint at the time of crystallization (472 Ma [3]) is similar to a time-integrated mu- value (1.72 at 472 Ma) of the Tissint source mantle calculated based on the two-stage mantle evolution model [1]. On the other hand, the other geochemically-depleted shergottites (e.g., QUE 94201 [4]) have initial µ-values of their parental magmas distinctly lower than those of their modeled source mantle. These results suggest that only Tissint potentially reflects the geochemical signature of the shergottite mantle source that originated from cumulates of the martian magma ocean

  13. Crystallization kinetics of olivine-phyric shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennis, Megan E.; McSween, Harry Y.

    2014-08-01

    Crystal size distribution (CSD) and spatial distribution pattern (SDP) analyses are applied to the early crystallizing phases, olivine and pyroxene, in olivine-phyric shergottites (Elephant moraine [EET] 79001A, Dar al Gani [DaG] 476, and dhofar [Dho] 019) from each sampling locality inferred from Mars ejection ages. Trace element zonation patterns (P and Cr) in olivine are also used to characterize the crystallization history of these Martian basalts. Previously reported 2-D CSDs for these meteorites are re-evaluated using a newer stereographically corrected methodology. Kinks in the olivine CSD plots suggest several populations that crystallized under different conditions. CSDs for pyroxene in DaG 476 and EET 79001A reveal single populations that grew under steady-state conditions; pyroxenes in Dho 019 were too intergrown for CSD analysis. Magma chamber residence times of several days for small grains to several months for olivine megacrysts are calculated using the CSD slopes and growth rates inferred from previous experimental data. Phosphorus imaging in olivines in DaG 476 and Dho 019 indicate rapid growth of skeletal, sector-zoned, or patchy cores, probably in response to delayed nucleation, followed by slow growth, and finally rapid dendritic growth with back-filling to form oscillatory zoning in rims. SPD analyses indicate that olivine and pyroxene crystals grew or accumulated in clusters rather than as randomly distributed grains. These data reveal complex solidification histories for Martian basalts, and are generally consistent with the formation at depth of olivine megacryst cores, which were entrained in ascending magmas that crystallized pyroxenes, small olivines, and oscillatory rims on megacrysts.

  14. Putative Indigenous Carbon-Bearing Alteration Features in Martian Meteorite Yamato 000593

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Everett K.; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; McKay, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We report the first observation of indigenous carbonaceous matter in the martian meteorite Yamato 000593. The carbonaceous phases are heterogeneously distributed within secondary iddingsite alteration veins and present in a range of morphologies including areas composed of carbon-rich spheroidal assemblages encased in multiple layers of iddingsite. We also observed microtubular features emanating from iddingsite veins penetrating into the host olivine comparable in shape to those interpreted to have formed by bioerosion in terrestrial basalts. Key Words: Meteorite—Yamato 000593—Mars—Carbon. Astrobiology 14, 170–181. PMID:24552234

  15. Provenance and Concentration of Water in the Shergottite Mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.; Usui, T.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Simon, J. I.; Wang, J.

    2012-01-01

    The water content of the martian mantle is controversial. In particular, the role of water in the petrogenesis of the shergottites has been much debated. Although the shergottites, collectively, contain very little water [e.g., 1,2], some experiments have been interpreted to show that percent levels of water are required for the petrogenesis of shergottites such as Shergotty and Zagami [3]. In this latter interpretation, the general paucity of water in the shergottites and their constituent minerals is attributed to late-stage degassing. Y980459 (Y98) is a very primitive, perhaps even parental, martian basalt, with a one-bar liquidus temperature of approx.1400 C. Olivine is the liquidus phase, and olivine core compositions are in equilibrium with the bulk rock [e.g., 4]. Petrogenetically, therefore, Y98 has had a rather simple history and can potentially help constrain the role of water in martian igneous processes. In particular, once trapped, melt inclusions should not be affected by subsequent degassing.

  16. Rare Earth elements in individual minerals in Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Crozaz, Ghislaine

    1993-01-01

    Shergottites (i.e., Shergotty, Zagami, EETA79001, ALHA77005, and LEW88516) are an important set of achondrites because they comprise the majority of the SNC group of meteorites (nine, in total, known to us), which are likely to be samples of the planet Mars. Study of these meteorites may therefore provide valuable information about petrogenetic processes on a large planetary body other than Earth. Rare earth element (REE) distributions between various mineral phases were found to be useful in geochemically modeling the petrogenesis of various rock types (terrestrial and meteoritic). However, with the exception of a few ion microprobe studies and analyses of mineral separates, there has previously not been any comprehensive effort to characterize and directly compare REE in individual minerals in each of the five known shergottites. Ion microprobe analyses were made on thin sections of each of the shergottites. Minerals analyzed were pyroxenes (pigeonite and augite), maskelynite, and whitlockite. The REE concentrations in each mineral type in each shergottite is given.

  17. Solubility of Sulfur in Shergottitic Silicate Melts Up to 0.8 GPA: Implications for S Contents of Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K.M.; Danielson, L.

    2009-01-01

    Shergottites have high S contents (1300 to 4600 ppm; [1]), but it is unclear if they are sulfide saturated or under-saturated. This issue has fundamental implications for determining the long term S budget of the martian surface and atmosphere (from mantle degassing), as well as evolution of the highly siderophile elements (HSE) Au, Pd, Pt, Re, Rh, Ru, Ir, and Os, since concentrations of the latter are controlled by sulfide stability. Resolution of sulfide saturation depends upon temperature, pressure, oxygen fugacity (and FeO), and magma composition [2]. Expressions derived from experimental studies allow prediction of S contents, though so far they are not calibrated for shergottitic liquids [3-5]. We have carried out new experiments designed to test current S saturation models, and then show that existing calibrations are not suitable for high FeO and low Al2O3 compositions characteristic of shergottitic liquids. The new results show that existing models underpredict S contents of sulfide saturated shergottitic liquids by a factor of 2.

  18. A neutron activation analysis of iridium concentration in Yamato carbonaceous chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabushita, S.; Wada, K.; Moriyama, H.; Takeuchi, K.

    1988-09-01

    Iridium concentration in extra-terrestrial bodies is an important quantity in relation to Ir-rich geological layers. Ir concentration of a Yamato carbonaceous chondrite (Y-793321) has been measured by a neutron activation method. The measurement yields a value (0.57±0.06) μg per gramme for the chondrite.

  19. Dipeptides and Diketopiperazines in the Yamato-791198 and Murchison Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoyama, Akira; Ogasawara, Ryo

    2002-04-01

    The Yamato-791198 and Murchison carbonaceous chondrites were analyzed for dipeptides and diketopiperazines as well as amino acids and hydantoins by gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry. Glycylglycine (gly-gly) and cyclo(gly-gly) were detected at the concentrations of 11 and 18 pmol g^-1, respectively, in Yamato-791198, and 4 and 23 pmol g^-1, respectively, in Murchison. No other dipeptide and diketopiperazine were detected. Five hydantoins were detected at 8 to 65 pmol g^-1 in Yamato-791198 and seven in Murchison at 6 to 104 pmol g^-1. Total concentration of the glycine (gly) dimers is approximately four orders of magnitude less than the concentration of free gly in Yamato-791198, and three orders of magnitude less than that in Murchison. The absence of L- and LL-stereoisomers of dipeptides consisting of protein amino acids indicates that gly-gly and cyclo(gly-gly) detected are native to the chondrites and not from terrestrial contaminants. A possibility was discussed that the gly dimers might have been formed by condensation of gly monomers but not formed through N-carboxyanhydrides of gly.

  20. AR-39-AR-40 "Age" of Basaltic Shergottite NWA-3171

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Park, Jisun

    2007-01-01

    North-West-Africa 3171 is a 506 g, relatively fresh appearing, basaltic shergottite with similarities to Zagami and Shergotty, but not obviously paired with any of the other known African basaltic shergottites. Its exposure age has the range of 2.5-3.1 Myr , similar to those of Zagami and Shergotty. We made AR-39-AR-40 analyses of a "plagioclase" (now shock-converted to maskelynite) separate and of a glass hand-picked from a vein connected to shock melt pockets.. Plagioclase was separated using its low magnetic susceptibility and then heavy liquid with density of <2.85 g/cm(exp 3). The AR-39-AR-40 age spectrum of NWA-317 1 plag displays a rise in age over 20-100% of the 39Ar release, from 0.24 Gyr to 0.27 Gy.

  1. An Experimental Investigation of the Shergottite NWA 6162

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, R. Gaylen; Jones, John H.; Draper, David S.; Le, Loan H.

    2012-01-01

    The Martian meteorite North West Africa 6162 (NWA 6162) is a shergottite found in Morocco in 2010. The meteorite has large olivine crystals with Mg-depleted rims as low as FO(sub 65) and Mg-rich cores of up to FO(sub 74). It is similar both in appearance and composition to another shergottite, SaU 005. Our objective is to determine if NWA 6162 represents a liquid or if it is a product of olivine accumulation. Olivine accumulation would leave the parent melt Mg-depleted and the complementary olivine cumulates would be Mg-enriched. Therefore, if NWA 6162 is a partial cumulate we would expect that liquidus olivines grown from this bulk composition would be more magnesium than olivines in the natural sample.

  2. APXS ANALYSES OF BOUNCE ROCK: THE FIRST SHERGOTTITE ON MARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Zipfel, J.; Anderson, R.; Brueckner, J.; Clark, B. C.; Dreibus, G.; Economou, T.; Gellert, R.; Lugmair, G. W.; Klingelhoefer, G.

    2005-01-01

    During the MER Mission, an isolated rock at Meridiani Planum was analyzed by the Athena instrument suite [1]. Remote sensing instruments noticed its distinct appearance. Two areas on the untreated rock surface and one area that was abraded with the Rock Abrasion Tool were analyzed by Microscopic Imager, Mossbauer Mimos II [2], and Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS). Results of all analyses revealed a close relationship of this rock with known basaltic shergottites.

  3. Martian meteorite Tissint records unique petrogenesis among the depleted shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu Sarbadhikari, A.; Babu, E. V. S. S. K.; Vijaya Kumar, T.; Chennaoui Aoudjehane, H.

    2016-07-01

    Tissint, a new unaltered piece of Martian volcanic materials, is the most silica-poor and Mg-Fe-rich igneous rock among the "depleted" olivine-phyric shergottites. Fe-Mg zoning of olivine suggests equilibrium growth (<0.1 °C h-1) in the range of Fo80-56 and olivine overgrowth (Fo55-18) through a process of rapid disequilibrium (~1.0-5.0 °C h-1). The spatially extended (up to 600 μm) flat-top Fe-Mg profiles of olivine indicates that the early-stage cooling rate of Tissint was slower than the other shergottites. The chemically metastable outer rim of olivine (shergottites. Dominance of augite over plagioclase induced augite to control the Ca-buffer in the residual melt suppressing the plagioclase crystallization, which also caused a profound effect on the Al-content in the late-crystallized pyroxenes. Mineral chemical stability, phase-assemblage saturation, and pressure-temperature path of evolution indicates that the parent magma entered the solidus and left the liquidus field at a depth of 40-80 km in the upper mantle. Petrogenesis of Tissint appears to be similar to LAR 06319, an enriched olivine-phyric shergottite, during the early to intermediate stage of crystallization. A severe shock-induced deformation resulted in remelting (10-15 vol%), recrystallization (most Fe-rich phases), and exhumation of Tissint in a time scale of 1-8 yr. Tissint possesses some distinct characteristics, e.g., impact-induced melting and deformation, forming phosphorus-rich recrystallization rims of olivine, and shock-induced melt domains without relative enrichment of LREEs compared to the bulk; and shared characteristics, e.g., modal

  4. Martian meteorite Tissint records unique petrogenesis among the depleted shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu Sarbadhikari, A.; Babu, E. V. S. S. K.; Vijaya Kumar, T.; Chennaoui Aoudjehane, H.

    2016-09-01

    Tissint, a new unaltered piece of Martian volcanic materials, is the most silica-poor and Mg-Fe-rich igneous rock among the "depleted" olivine-phyric shergottites. Fe-Mg zoning of olivine suggests equilibrium growth (<0.1 °C h-1) in the range of Fo80-56 and olivine overgrowth (Fo55-18) through a process of rapid disequilibrium (~1.0-5.0 °C h-1). The spatially extended (up to 600 μm) flat-top Fe-Mg profiles of olivine indicates that the early-stage cooling rate of Tissint was slower than the other shergottites. The chemically metastable outer rim of olivine (shergottites. Dominance of augite over plagioclase induced augite to control the Ca-buffer in the residual melt suppressing the plagioclase crystallization, which also caused a profound effect on the Al-content in the late-crystallized pyroxenes. Mineral chemical stability, phase-assemblage saturation, and pressure-temperature path of evolution indicates that the parent magma entered the solidus and left the liquidus field at a depth of 40-80 km in the upper mantle. Petrogenesis of Tissint appears to be similar to LAR 06319, an enriched olivine-phyric shergottite, during the early to intermediate stage of crystallization. A severe shock-induced deformation resulted in remelting (10-15 vol%), recrystallization (most Fe-rich phases), and exhumation of Tissint in a time scale of 1-8 yr. Tissint possesses some distinct characteristics, e.g., impact-induced melting and deformation, forming phosphorus-rich recrystallization rims of olivine, and shock-induced melt domains without relative enrichment of LREEs compared to the bulk; and shared characteristics, e.g., modal

  5. Crustal structure of the western Yamato Basin, Japan Sea, revealed from seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    No, T.; Sato, T.; Kodaira, S.; Miura, S.; Ishiyama, T.; Sato, H.

    2015-12-01

    The Yamato Basin is the second largest basin of the Japan Sea. This basin is important to clarify its formation process. Some studies of crustal structure had been carried out in the Yamato Basin (e.g. Ludwig et al., 1975; Katao, 1988; Hirata et al., 1989; Sato et al., 2006). However, the relationship between formation process and crustal structure is not very clear, because the amount of seismic exploration data is very limited. In addition, since there is ODP Leg 127 site 797 (Tamaki et al., 1990) directly beneath our seismic survey line, we contributed to the study on the formation of the Yamato Basin by examining the relation between the ODP results and our results. During July-August 2014, we conducted a multi-channel seismic (MCS) survey and ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) survey to study the crustal structure of the western Yamato Basin. We present an outline of the data acquisition and results of the data processing and preliminary interpretations from this study. As a result of our study, the crust, which is about 12 km thick, is thicker than standard oceanic crust (e.g., Spudich and Orcutt, 1980; White et al., 1992) revealed from P-wave velocity structure by OBS survey. A clear reflector estimated to be the Moho can be identified by MCS profiles. The characteristics of the sedimentary layer are common within the survey area. For example, a strong coherent reflector that is estimated to be an opal-A/opal-CT BSR (bottom simulating reflector) (Kuramoto et al., 1992) was confirmed in the sediment of all survey lines. On the other hand, a coherent reflector in the crust was confirmed in some lines. It is identified as this reflector corresponding with the deformation structure in the sediment and basement.

  6. Putative indigenous carbon-bearing alteration features in martian meteorite Yamato 000593.

    PubMed

    White, Lauren M; Gibson, Everett K; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L; Clemett, Simon J; McKay, David S

    2014-02-01

    We report the first observation of indigenous carbonaceous matter in the martian meteorite Yamato 000593. The carbonaceous phases are heterogeneously distributed within secondary iddingsite alteration veins and present in a range of morphologies including areas composed of carbon-rich spheroidal assemblages encased in multiple layers of iddingsite. We also observed microtubular features emanating from iddingsite veins penetrating into the host olivine comparable in shape to those interpreted to have formed by bioerosion in terrestrial basalts. PMID:24552234

  7. Putative indigenous carbon-bearing alteration features in martian meteorite Yamato 000593.

    PubMed

    White, Lauren M; Gibson, Everett K; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L; Clemett, Simon J; McKay, David S

    2014-02-01

    We report the first observation of indigenous carbonaceous matter in the martian meteorite Yamato 000593. The carbonaceous phases are heterogeneously distributed within secondary iddingsite alteration veins and present in a range of morphologies including areas composed of carbon-rich spheroidal assemblages encased in multiple layers of iddingsite. We also observed microtubular features emanating from iddingsite veins penetrating into the host olivine comparable in shape to those interpreted to have formed by bioerosion in terrestrial basalts.

  8. Formation of Secondary Lherzolite and Refertilization of the Subcontinental Lithospheric Mantle: The Record of Orogenic Peridotites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, Carlos J.; Varas-Reus, María Isabel; Bodinier, Jean-Louis; Marchesi, Claudio; Bosch, Delphine; Hidas, Károly

    2016-04-01

    Correlations observed between major and minor transition elements in tectonically-emplaced orogenic peridotites have classically been ascribed to variable degrees of melt extraction. There is a growing body of evidence indicating that these chemical variations mostly reflect melt redistribution and near solidus reactions superimposed onto previous melting depletion events. Here we will assess this hypothesis using a large database of peridotites from orogenic peridotites in the westernmost Mediterranean (Ronda and Beni Bousera peridotites). We show that lherzolite samples show some trends in major elements and modal variations that are inconsistent with their interpretation as depleted MORB mantle (DMM). These trends are more consistent with the secondary formation of lherzolites by refertilization processes involving a least two different near-solidus, melt-processes: refertilization by pyroxenite-derived melts and by hydrous melts leading, respectively, to secondary lherzolites with Ol/Opx and Cpx/Opx ratios greater than those expected from residues from a primitive upper mantle source. Together with their N-MORB, LREE-depleted pattern, their fertile lherzolitic composition may have been acquired as a result of melt-rock interaction processes associated with the thermomechanical erosion of lithospheric mantle by asthenosphere. Major refertilization of depleted subcontinental mantle is an alternative to the small degrees of melt extraction to account for LREE depletion in otherwise fertile orogenic lherzolites.

  9. The Martian Surface is old and so are Shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier, A.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Vervoort, J. D.; Albarede, F.

    2005-12-01

    We report new Sm-Nd, Lu-Hf, and Pb-Pb mineral and whole-rock (WR) isotope data for the basaltic shergottite (BS) Zagami (Zag), as well as Pb-Pb WR isotope data for the BS Los Angeles (LA). The isotopic analyses were carried out by MC-ICP-MS at ENSL. The Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf data for Zag yield internal isochron ages of 155±9 Ma (MSWD=0.45) and 185±36 Ma (MSWD=1.2), respectively. While these young ages overlap with earlier Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and U-Pb ages (2), the Pb-Pb age does not. Our Pb isotope data on Zag and LA lie on the same Pb-Pb array as previous analyses of BS by (1), which, if interpreted as an isochron, indicate an age of ~4 Ga. The range of δ18O (3.9-5.2 permil) observed in shergottites (3, 4) is too broad to be accounted for by igneous processes only and attests to low-T interaction with fluids. The Martian surface appears to be covered with sulfates, while essentially lacking carbonates (5, 6), implying that the surface of Mars was once covered with acidic water bodies of unknown depths (7). An important observation is that apatite is a common phase in Zag and LA, as in all the shergottites (8), and explains why most of the REE, Th, U, and some fraction of Pb can be removed by leaching (9). The main inventory of Pb, however, resides in maskelynite. The Pb isotope data on shergottites, in conjunction with the existing body of geochemical and geophysical evidence, have important implications for the history of the Martian surface and lithosphere. A fundamental problem with the young crystallization ages for the Martian meteorites has been that these ages are difficult to reconcile with the large 182W and 142Nd isotopic anomalies present in these meteorites. On one hand, the anomalies from the extinct radionuclides appear to require a static, non-convecting mantle, whereas widespread volcanism on Mars as young as 150 Ma seems to require an actively convecting mantle. We suggest, based on the Pb isotope systematics of shergottites, that the Martian surface is

  10. PGE distribution in deformed lherzolites of the Udachnaya kimberlite pipe (Yakutia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyina, O. V.; Tychkov, N. S.; Agashev, A. M.; Golovin, A. V.; Izokh, A. E.; Kozmenko, O. A.; Pokhilenko, N. P.

    2016-04-01

    The results of the first study of the PGE distribution in deformed lherzolites of the Udachnaya kimberlite pipe (Yakutia) are presented here. The complex character of evolution of the PGE composition in the Deformed lherzolites is assumed to be the result of silicate metasomatism. At the first stage, growth in the amount of clinopyroxene and garnet in the rock is accompanied by a decrease in the concentration of the compatible PGE (Os, Ir). During the final stage, the rock is enriched with incompatible PGE (Pt, Pd) and Re possible due to precipitation of submicron-sized particles of sulfides in the interstitial space of these mantle rocks.

  11. Enriched Shergottite NWA 5298 As An Evolved Parent Melt: Trace Element Inventory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Hejiu; Peslier, Anne H.; Lapen, Thomas J.; Shafer, John; Brandon, Alan; Irving, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Martian meteorite Northwest Africa 5298 is a basaltic shergottite that was found near Bir Gandouz (Morocco). Its martian origin was confirmed by oxygen isotopes [1], as well as Mn/Fe ratios in the pyroxenes and K/anorthite ratios in the plagioclases [2]. Here we present a petrographic and geochemical study of NWA 5298. Comparison of mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of this meteorite with other Martian rocks shows that NWA 5298 is not likely paired with any other known shergottites, but it has similarities to another basaltic shergottite Dhofar 378.

  12. Rare earth patterns in shergottite phosphates and residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laul, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    Leaching experiments with 1M HCl on ALHA 77005 powder show that rare earth elements (REE) are concentrated in accessory phosphate phases (whitlockite, apatite) that govern the REE patterns of bulk shergottites. The REE patterns of whitlockite are typically light REE-depleted with a negative Eu anomaly and show a hump at the heavy REE side, while the REE pattern of apatite (in Shergotty) is light REE-enriched. Parent magmas are calculated from the modal compositions of residues of ALHA 77005, Shergotty, and EETA 79001. The parent magmas lack a Eu anomaly, indicating that plagioclase was a late-stage crystallizing phase and that it probably crystallized before the phosphates. The parent magmas of ALHA 77005 and Shergotty have similar REE patterns, with a subchondritic Nd/Sm ratio. However, the Sm/Nd isotopoics require a light REE-depleted source for ALHA 77005 (if the crystallization age is less than 600 Myr) and a light REE-enriched source for Shergotty. Distant Nd and Sr isotopic signatures may suggest different source regions for shergottites.

  13. Lead Isotope Compositions of Acid Residues from Olivine-Phyric Shergottite Tissint: Implications for Heterogeneous Shergottite Source Reservoirs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriwaki, R.; Usui, T.; Yokoyama, T.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Geochemical studies of shergottites suggest that their parental magmas reflect mixtures between at least two distinct geochemical source reservoirs, producing correlations between radiogenic isotope compositions and trace element abundances. These correlations have been interpreted as indicating the presence of a reduced, incompatible element- depleted reservoir and an oxidized, incompatible- element-enriched reservoir. The former is clearly a depleted mantle source, but there is ongoing debate regarding the origin of the enriched reservoir. Two contrasting models have been proposed regarding the location and mixing process of the two geochemical source reservoirs: (1) assimilation of oxidized crust by mantle derived, reduced magmas, or (2) mixing of two distinct mantle reservoirs during melting. The former requires the ancient Martian crust to be the enriched source (crustal assimilation), whereas the latter requires isolation of a long-lived enriched mantle domain that probably originated from residual melts formed during solidification of a magma ocean (heterogeneous mantle model). This study conducts Pb isotope and trace element concentration analyses of sequential acid-leaching fractions (leachates and the final residues) from the geochemically depleted olivine-phyric shergottite Tissint. The results suggest that the Tissint magma is not isotopically uniform and sampled at least two geochemical source reservoirs, implying that either crustal assimilation or magma mixing would have played a role in the Tissint petrogenesis.

  14. Noble gases in twenty Yamato H-chondrites: Comparison with Allan Hills chondrites and modern falls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeken, TH.; Scherer, P.; Schultz, L.

    1993-01-01

    Concentration and isotopic composition of noble gases have been measured in 20 H-chrondrites found on the Yamato Mountains ice fields in Antarctica. The distribution of exposure ages as well as of radiogenic He-4 contents is similar to that of H-chrondrites collected at the Allan Hills site. Furthermore, a comparison of the noble gas record of Antarctic H-chrondrites and finds or falls from non-Antarctic areas gives no support to the suggestion that Antarctic H-chrondrites and modern falls derive from differing interplanetary meteorite populations.

  15. An experimental study of the kinetics of lherzolite reactive dissolution: Implications for contrasting styles of melt transport in the mantle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; Morgan, Z. T.

    2004-12-01

    It has been suggested that dunite dikes or veins found in harzburgite and lherzolite hosts in the mantle sections of ophiolites are high porosity channels through which basaltic magmas were extracted from their source regions. The formation of such channels may involve pervasive melt flow and reactive dissolution. In order to better understand the kinetics of reactive dissolution we conducted two series of lherzolite dissolution experiments: one in an alkali basalt and the other in a basaltic andesite. Dissolution experiments were run at 1300° C and 1 GPa using lherzolite-melt reaction couple method. The lherzolite dissolution experiments produce a reactive boundary layer (RBL) that consists of distinct lithological units separated by sharp mineralogical interfaces. The details of the RBL depend on the relative stabilities of the lherzolite minerals with respect to the reacting melt. Dissolution of lherzolite in the basaltic andesite resulted in 2 distinct regions: harzburgite (45% ol, 45% opx, 10% melt) and lherzolite (45% ol, 35% opx, 12% cpx, 8% melt). In contrast, dissolution of lherzolite in the alkali basalt resulted in 3 distinct rock units: dunite (75% ol, 25% melt), harzburgite (60% ol, 30% opx, and 10% melt), and lherzolite (50% ol, 30% opx, 10% cpx, 10% melt). The average grain size of the dunite is greater than the average grain size of unreacted lherzolite, whereas the average grain size of the harzburgite in the two sets of dissolution experiments are nearly the same as the average grain size of the lherzolite. This implies that the permeability of the dunite is larger than either the newly created harzburgite or the unreacted lherzolite, and that the permeabilities of the harzburgite and lherzolite are about the same within the DHL sequence. Hence dunite dikes in the mantle are capable of serving as melt channels, whereas harzburgites may not. Systematic compositional variations in the interstitial melt, olivine, and to a lesser extent, pyroxenes in

  16. Evidence for a reduced, Fe-depleted martian mantle source region of shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, Subhabrata; Sack, Richard O.; Ghiorso, Mark S.; Lipschutz, Michael E.

    Estimates of the oxygen fugacity of the source regions of martian shergottites are obtained from coexisting Fe-Ti oxides and from Fe3+/Fe2+ ratios in pyroxenes. These estimates are one to four log10 units lower than previously reported values, and indicate that the shergottite source region has an oxidation state about two or three orders of magnitude below the quartz-fayalite-magnetite (QFM) oxygen reference buffer. An approximation of the major element composition of the shergottite source region is obtained utilizing the MELTS petrologic modeling software. A bulk composition of the shergottite source region is derived, which is consistent with the generation of sher-gottites upon 3% partial melting at 10 kbar. This composition is decidedly less enriched in Na2O and FeOTot than previous estimates. When compared to the bulk composition of the terrestrial mantle, the source region of the shergottites is lower in CaO, Al2O3, Na2O and TiO2, and higher in MgO.

  17. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Martian Meteorites: Petrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Martian Meteorites: Petrology: included the following reports:Volatile Behavior in Lunar and Terrestrial Basalts During Shock: Implications for Martian Magmas; Problems with a Low-Pressure Tholeiitic Magmatic History for the Chassigny Dunite; Fast Cooling History of the Chassigny Martian Meteorite; Rehomogenized Interstitial and Inclusion Melts in Lherzolitic Shergottite ALH 77005: Petrologic Significance; Compositional Controls on the Formation of Kaersutite Amphibole in Shergottite Meteorites; Chemical Characteristics of an Olivine-Phyric Shergottite, Yamato 980459; Pb-Hf-Sr-Nd Isotopic Systematics and Age of Nakhlite NWA 998; Noble Gases in Two Samples of EETA 79001 (Lith. A); Experimental Constraints on the Iron Content of the Martian Mantle; and Mars as the Parent Body for the CI Carbonaceous Chondrites: New Data.

  18. Reaction between lherzolite and eclogite-derived melts in the upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Cascio, M.; Liang, Y.

    2007-12-01

    During mantle upwelling, pyroxenite-rich regions are likely to start melting at greater depths than peridotite. As a result, we can anticipate the existence of at least two regimes of chemical and mechanical interaction between peridotites and pyroxenites: one in which pyroxenite is partially molten while peridotite is subsolidus, and the other in which both lithologies are partially molten. In this study we explored the nature of such interactions in both regimes by conducting lherzolite\\--pyroxenite-derived melt dissolution experiments. All experiments were performed at 1300°C - 1375°C and 2 GPa in a piston cylinder apparatus using the reaction couple method. At lherzolite subsolidus conditions, the reaction involves negligible amounts dissolution of the lherzolite with crystallization of garnet at the rock-melt interface, shifting the melt towards a more qz-normative composition. The lherzolite is chemically unaffected by the reaction, suggesting that dissolution is rate-limited by the slowest diffusing component in the melt. In contrast, when the lherzolite is partially molten we observed large dissolution rates and the formation of an opx-rich harzburgite + melt layer, sandwiched between the original partially molten lherzolite and pyroxenite-derived melt. The composition of the minerals across the capsule shows the existence of chemical gradients that extend beyond the boundaries of the newly formed lithology. The fast dissolution rates and chemical gradients indicate that melt is interconnected, as confirmed by BSE images. Therefore the opx-rich region does not represent an impermeable barrier as suggested in previous studies. The critical difference between the two regimes is the physical state of the surrounding lherzolite: subsolidus or partially molten. The P-T conditions and the composition of the pyroxenite-derived liquid are important additional factors that determine, for example, the mineralogy of the reaction boundary layer, the dissolution

  19. An "Andesitic" Component in Shergottites with Restored LREE Abundances?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Wiesmann, H.; Barrat, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    The shergottite Martian meteorites present a variety of oft-confusing petrologic features. In particular, represented among this subgroup are basalts with very depleted LREE abundances, as well as those with nearly chondritic overall REE abundances. The LREE-depleted basalts appear to more closely record the REE and isotopic features of their mantle source legions. Those basalts with more nearly chondritic REE abundances appear to contain an extra component often referred to as a "crustal" component. The addition of the crustal component tends to restore the overall REE abundance pattern towards chondritic relative abundances. Here we suggest that the crustal component could derive from andesitic rocks observed remotely to occur on the Martian surface, and which were analysed at the Pathfinder site.

  20. An "Andestic" Component in Shergottites with Restored LREE Abundances?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Wiesmann, H.; Barrat, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    The shergottite Martian meteorites present a variety of oft-confusing petrologic features. In particular, represented among this subgroup are basalts with very depleted LREE abundances, as well as those with nearly chondritic overall REE abundances. The LREE-depleted basalts appear to more closely record the REE and isotopic features of their mantle source regions. Those basalts with more nearly chondritic REE abundances appear to contain an extra component often referred to as a "crustal" component. The addition of the crustal component tends to restore the overall REE abundance pattern towards chondritic relative abundances. Here we suggest that the crustal component could derive from "andesitic" rocks observed remotely to occur on the Martian surface, and which were analysed at the Pathfinder site.

  1. Mineralogy of Dhofar 309, 489, and Yamato-86032 and Varieties of Lithologies of the Lunar Farside Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, H.; Arai, T.; Yamaguchi, A.; Otuki, M.; Ishii, T.

    2007-03-01

    Dhofar 489 and Yamato(Y)-86032 are keys to understanding the lunar farside crust. Mg-rich anorthosites were found in Dhofar 309, as well as Dhofar 489. Fe-rich anorthosite with negative epsilon Nd in Y-86032 requires the crustal formation process of farsi

  2. Solidus and liquidus temperatures and mineralogies for anhydrous garnet-lherzolite to 15 GPa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzberg, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    Strong convergence is noted, in experimental data for systems pertaining to anhydrous fertile garnet-lherzolite in the 6.5-15 GPa range, either to a common temperature or to temperatures differing by only about 100 C. The major element composition of magmas generated by even minor degrees of partial melting may be similar to the composition of the primordial, bulk silicate earth in an upper mantle stratigraphic column more than 160 km deep. Whether or not the solidus and liquidus intersect, the liquidus mineralogy for undepleted garnet-lherzolite compositions is found to change from olivine, at low pressures, to pyroxene, garnet, or a solid solution of both, at pressures greater than 10-15 GPa.

  3. Mantle metasomatism beneath western Victoria, Australia: I. Metasomatic processes in Cr-diopside lherzolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, Suzanne Y.; Griffin, W. L.

    1988-02-01

    Most Cr-diopside spinel lherzolite xenoliths from Bullenmerri and Gnotuk Maars, western Victoria, show modal metasomatism involving the growth of amphibole ± mica ± apatite at the expense of primary pyroxenes + spinel. The metasomatism is attributed to CO 2-rich fluids, observed in fluid inclusions. Median values of Ni, Cr, V, Sc, Y, Ti, K and Na are similar to those in depleted mantle xenoliths and the source regions of N-type MORB. Median concentrations of Ba, Th, U, Ta, Nb, Sr and REE range from 1-10 times "primordial" values. REE patterns of anhydrous lherzolites range from LREE-depleted ( (La/Yb) n ≈ 0.3 ) to LREE-enriched ( (La/Yb) n = 30-60 ), and show an inverse correlation of Nd/Sm with CaO. Amphibole-rich peridotites are enriched in LREE ( (La/Yb) n = 10-30 ), Zr and Ta, with high K/Rb. Mica-rich rocks are enriched in K, Rb, Ba, Ta and Ti, with low K/ Rb. Introduction of apatite leads to high σREE (with (La/Yb) n = 40-100 ), Sr, U and Th contents. The distribution of trace and minor elements in the Iherzolites is thus controlled by the crystal chemistry of the primary and metasomatic phases. Micaceous xenoliths may be derived from thin selvedges on pyroxenite veins. Abundant amphibole lherzolites may form a matrix enclosing relict volumes of anhydrous lherzolites showing varying degrees of cryptic metasomatism. The overall pattern of trace-element enrichment in the mantle beneath Victoria will depend on the volumetric proportions of these rock types.

  4. Partitioning REE between minerals and coexisting melts during partial melting of a garnet lherzolite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    Partition coefficients for Ce, Sm, and Tm between garnet, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, olivine, and melt are determined at 35 kbar for 2.3, 8, 20, and 37.7% melting of a garnet lherzolite nodule with chondritic REE abundances. Partition coefficients are found to increase as the degree of partial melting increases. From 2.3 to 8% melting, this increase is for the most part a consequence of non-Henry's law behavior of REE in minerals.

  5. Mantle metasomatism beneath western Victoria, Australia. I. Metasomatic processes in Cr-diopside lherzolites

    SciTech Connect

    O'Reilly, S.Y.; Griffin, W.L.

    1988-02-01

    Most Cr-diopside spinel lherzolite xenoliths from Bullenmerri and Gnotuk Maars, western Victoria, show modal metasomatism involving the growth of amphibole +- mica +- apatite at the expense of primary pyroxenes + spinel. The metasomatism is attributed to CO/sub 2/-rich fluids, observed in fluid inclusions. REE patterns of anhydrous lherolites range from LREE-depleted ((LaYb)/sub n/ approx. = 0.3) to LREE-enriched ((LaYb)/sub n/ = 30-60), and show an inverse correlation of NdSm with CaO. Amphibole-rich peridotites are enriched in LREE ((LaYb)/sub n/ = 10-30), Ar and Ta, with high KRb. Mica-rich rocks are enriched in K, Rb, Ba, Ta and Ti, with low KRb. Introduction of apatite leads to high ..sigma..REE (with (LaYb)/sub n/ = 40-100), Sr, U and Th contents. The distribution of trace and minor elements in the ilherzolites is thus controlled by the crystal chemistry of the primary and metasomatic phases. Micaceous xenoliths may be derived from thin selvedges on pyroxenite veins. Abundant amphibole lherzolites may form a matrix enclosing relic volumes of anhydrous lherzolites showing varying degrees of cryptic metasomatism. The overall pattern of trace-element enrichment in the mantle beneath Victoria will depend on the volumetric proportions of these rock types.

  6. Mineral chemistry of the shergottites, nakhlites, Chassigny, Brachina, pallasites and urelites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. V.; Steele, I. M.; Leitch, C. A.

    1983-11-01

    The mineral chemistry is compared for selected achondrites. Olivine in the ALHA 77005 and EETA 79001 shergottites, olivine-rich Chassigny and Brachina, and the nakhlites, contains Ni indicative of oxidizing conditions, whereas pallasitic and ureilitic olivines contain much lower Ni due to reducing conditions. The Brachina olivine and pyroxene have distinctively higher Fe/Mn than the shergottites and Chassigny, further indicating that Brachina is unique. The Chassigny and 77005 olivines contain lower Cr2O3 (0.03 wt. pct) than the Brachina and 79001 olivines. Values of Fe/Mn for cumulus augites in nakhlites are higher than for the shergottites, whereas those for ferropigeonites are not. The 77005 shergottite contains troilite FeS in contrast to 79001, Shergotty, Zagami, and Chassigny, which contain pyrrhotite. Further analyses are needed, but the present survey indicates that at least Brachina is not chemically cogenetic with the other 'oxidized achondrites', and that the Fe/Mn ratio of the cumulus augites in nakhlites is a problem for the assignment of the nakhlites, shergottites, and Chassigny to a single genetic group.

  7. Melt extraction and enrichment processes in the New Caledonia lherzolites: Evidence from geochemical and Sr-Nd isotope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secchiari, Arianna; Montanini, Alessandra; Bosch, Delphine; Macera, Patrizia; Cluzel, Dominique

    2016-09-01

    The New Caledonia ophiolite (Peridotite Nappe) is dominated by mantle lithologies, composed of forearc-related refractory harzburgites and minor lherzolites in both the spinel and plagioclase facies. In this study, a comprehensive geochemical data set (major, trace elements and Sr-Nd isotopes) is used to constrain the mantle evolution of the lherzolites and their relationships with the basalts from the Poya Terrane, which tectonically underlies the mantle rocks. The majority of the lherzolites are low-strain porphyroclastic tectonites. They likely record an asthenospheric origin followed by re-equilibration at lithospheric conditions, as supported by geothermometric estimates (T = 1100-940 °C and 920-890 °C for porphyroclastic and neoblastic spinel-facies assemblages, respectively). Olivine composition (Fo = 88.5-90.0 mol%), spinel Cr# ([molar 100 • Cr/(Cr + Al)] = 13-17) and relatively high amounts (7-8 vol%) of Al2O3- and Na2O-rich clinopyroxene (up to 0.5 and 6.5 wt.%, respectively) indicate a moderately depleted geochemical signature for the spinel lherzolites. Bulk rock and clinopyroxene rare earth elements (REE) patterns display a typical abyssal-type signature, i.e. steeply plunging LREE accompanied by nearly flat HREE to MREE. Clinopyroxene REE compositions of the spinel lherzolites may be reproduced by small amounts of fractional melting of a garnet lherzolite precursor (~ 4%), followed by 4%-5% melting in the spinel peridotite field. The plagioclase lherzolites show melt impregnation microstructures, Cr- and Ti-rich spinels and incompatible trace element enrichments (REE, Ti, Y, and Zr) in bulk rocks and clinopyroxenes. Impregnation modelling for these elements suggests that the plagioclase lherzolites originated from residual spinel lherzolites by entrapment of highly depleted (non-aggregated) MORB melt fractions in the shallow oceanic lithosphere. Nd isotope compositions of the investigated peridotites are consistent with derivation from an

  8. Consortium reports on lunar meteorites Yamato 793169 and Asuka 881757, a new type of mare basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanai, Keizo; Takeda, Hiroshi; Lindstrom, M. M.; Tatsumoto, M.; Torigoe, N.; Misawa, K.; Warren, P. H.; Kallemeyn, G. W.; Koeberl, C.; Kojima, H.

    1993-01-01

    Consortium studies on lunar meteorites Yamato 793169 and Asuka 881757 (formerly Asuka-31) were performed to characterize these new samples from unknown locations in the lunar mare. Both meteorites are coarse-grained mare rocks having low Mg/Fe ratios (bulk mg'=30-35) and low TiO2 (1.5-2.5 percent in homogenized bulk samples). They are intermediate between VLT and low-Ti mare basalts. Although these meteorites are not identical to each other, their mineral and bulk compositions, isotopic systematics, and crystallization ages are remarkably similar and distinct from those of all other mare basalts. They appear to represent a new type of low-Ti mare basalt that crystallized at about 3.9Ga. These meteorites are inconsistent with the canonical correlation between the TiO2 contents and ages of mare basalts and suggest that our knowledge of lunar volcanism is far from complete.

  9. Compositional Controls on the Formation of Kaersutite Amphibole in Shergottite Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitman, K. M.; Treiman, A. H.

    2004-01-01

    The shergottite basalts, meteorites of Martian origin, contain rare small grains (approx. 10-100 microns diam.) of kaersutite, a Ca-amphibole rich in Al and Ti. Kaersutites have been used to estimate the water content of shergottites and the Martian mantle; however, questions remain about the original water content of the amphiboles and if they formed from magma. We investigated the petrographic settings of amphiboles in two shergottites and confirm that these amphiboles occur only in multiphase inclusions in pyroxene. In fact, kaersutite is found only in pigeonite. This suggests that the occurrence of amphibole is controlled in part by the composition of its host phase. Crystallization of host (cognate) pigeonite from a magmatic inclusion will enrich the remaining melt in Ca, Al, and Ti, supporting formation of kaersutite.

  10. Complex Formation History of Highly Evolved Basaltic Shergottite, Zagami

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niihara, T.; Misawa, K.; Mikouchi, T.; Nyquist, L. E.; Park, J.; Hirata, D.

    2012-01-01

    Zagami, a basaltic shergottite, contains several kinds of lithologies such as Normal Zagami consisting of Fine-grained (FG) and Coarse-grained (CG), Dark Mottled lithology (DML), and Olivine-rich late-stage melt pocket (DN). Treiman and Sutton concluded that Zagami (Normal Zagami) is a fractional crystallization product from a single magma. It has been suggested that there were two igneous stages (deep magma chamber and shallow magma chamber or surface lava flow) on the basis of chemical zoning features of pyroxenes which have homogeneous Mg-rich cores and FeO, CaO zoning at the rims. Nyquist et al. reported that FG has a different initial Sr isotopic ratio than CG and DML, and suggested the possibility of magma mixing on Mars. Here we report new results of petrology and mineralogy for DML and the Olivine-rich lithology (we do not use DN here), the most evolved lithology in this rock, to understand the relationship among lithologies and reveal Zagami s formation history

  11. Beryllium-10 contents of shergottites, nakhlites, and Chassigny

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pal, D. K.; Tuniz, C.; Moniot, R. K.; Savin, W.; Kruse, T.

    1986-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry gives the following Be-10 contents (dpm/kg) for the SNC meteorites: Shergotty, 13.0 + or - 1.5 and 17.3 + or - 2.7; Zagami, 18.6 + or - 2.5 and 20.0 + or - 3.2; ALHA 77005, 15 + or - 3; EETA 79001A, 7.8 + or - 1.1 and 6.3 + or - 0.5; EETA 79001B, 8.5 + or - 1.1; Nakhla, 19.7 + or - 3.3; Lafayette, 18.1 + or - 2.5; Governador Valadares, 25.6 + or - 3.6; Chassigny, 20.5 + or - 3.1. The Be-10 contents of the NC meteorites indicate that significant accumulation of cosmogenic nuclides occurred in decimeter rather than planetary-size bodies. The agreement of the He-3, Ne-21, and Be-10 exposure ages of the shergottites also supports small-body irradiation. A long terrestrial age for EETA 79001 appears unlikely.

  12. The Shergottite Age Paradox and the Relative Probabilities of Ejecting Martian Meteorites of Differing Ages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borg, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.

    1998-01-01

    The apparent paradox that the majority of impacts yielding Martian meteorites appear to have taken place on only a few percent of the Martian surface can be resolved if all the shergottites were ejected in a single event rather than in multiple events as expected from variations in their cosmic ray exposure and crystallization ages. If the shergottite-ejection event is assigned to one of three craters in the vicinity of Olympus Mons that were previously identified as candidate source craters for the SNC (Shergottites, Nakhlites, Chassigny) meteorites, and the nakhlite event to another candidate crater in the vicinity of Ceraunius Tholus, the implied ages of the surrounding terranes agree well with crater density ages. EN,en for high cratering rates (minimum ages), the likely origin of the shergottites is in the Tharsis region, and the paradox of too many meteorites from too little terrane remains for multiple shergottite-ejection events. However, for high cratering rates it is possible to consider sources for the nakhlltes which are away from the Tharsis region. The meteorite-yielding impacts may have been widely dispersed with sources of the young SNC meteorites in the northern plains, and the source of the ancient orthopyroxenite, ALH84001, in the ancient southern uplands. Oblique-impact craters can be identified with the sources of the nakhlites and the orthopyroxenite,, respectively, in the nominal cratering rate model, and with the shergottites and orthopyroxenite, respectively, in the high cratering rate model. Thus, oblique impacts deserve renewed attention as an ejection mechanism for Martian meteorites.

  13. Noble gases in LEW88516 shergottite: Evidence for exposure age pairing with ALH77005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.

    1993-01-01

    LEW88516 contains excess amounts of radiogenic Ar-40 and Xe-129 that are slightly greater than those observed in ALH77005, but in the same relative proportion as much larger excesses observed in EET79001. Cosmogenic He-3 and Ne-21 abundances in LEW88516 are very similar to those for ALH77005 and are consistent with a common initiation of cosmic ray exposure -2.8 Myr ago for four of the five shergottites. Exposure of these four shergottites could have been under different shielding in a common meteoroid, or in several objects.

  14. First finding of burkeite in melt inclusions in olivine from sheared lherzolite xenoliths.

    PubMed

    Korsakov, Andrey V; Golovin, Alexander V; De Gussem, Kris; Sharygin, Igor S; Vandenabeele, Peter

    2009-08-01

    For the first time burkeite was observed as a daughter phase in the melt inclusions in olivine by Raman spectroscopy. The olivine comes from sheared lherzolite xenoliths from the Udachnaya-East kimberlite pipe (Yakutia, Russia). This anhydrous sulfate-carbonate mineral (Na(6)(CO(3))(SO(4))(2)) is generally considered to be a characteristic mineral in saline soils or in continental lacustrine evaporite deposits. Recently, however, this mineral was identified in hydrothermal fluids. Our observations indicate that burkeite can also be formed from a mantle-derived melt.

  15. First finding of burkeite in melt inclusions in olivine from sheared lherzolite xenoliths.

    PubMed

    Korsakov, Andrey V; Golovin, Alexander V; De Gussem, Kris; Sharygin, Igor S; Vandenabeele, Peter

    2009-08-01

    For the first time burkeite was observed as a daughter phase in the melt inclusions in olivine by Raman spectroscopy. The olivine comes from sheared lherzolite xenoliths from the Udachnaya-East kimberlite pipe (Yakutia, Russia). This anhydrous sulfate-carbonate mineral (Na(6)(CO(3))(SO(4))(2)) is generally considered to be a characteristic mineral in saline soils or in continental lacustrine evaporite deposits. Recently, however, this mineral was identified in hydrothermal fluids. Our observations indicate that burkeite can also be formed from a mantle-derived melt. PMID:19058996

  16. Water in Nominally Anhydrous Minerals from Nakhlites and Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, Anne H.

    2013-01-01

    Estimating the amount of water in the interior of terrestrial planets has tremendous implications on our understanding of solar nebula evolution, planet formation and geological history, and extraterrestrial volcanism. Mars has been a recent focus of such enquiry with complementary datasets from spacecrafts, rovers and martian meteorite studies. In planetary interiors, water can be dissolved in fluids or melts and hydrous phases, but can also be locked as protons attached to structural oxygen in lattice defects in nominally anhydrous minerals (NAM) such as olivine, pyroxene, or feldspar [1-3]. Measuring water in Martian meteorite NAM is challenging because the minerals are fragile and riddled with fractures from impact processes that makes them break apart during sample processing. Moreover, curing the sample in epoxy causes problems for the two main water analysis techniques, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS). Measurements to date have resulted in a heated debate on how much water the mantle of Mars contains. SIMS studies of NAM [4], amphiboles [5], and apatites [6-8] from Martian meteorites report finding enough water in these phases to infer that the martian mantle is as hydrous as that of the Earth. On the other hand, a SIMS study of glass in olivine melt inclusions from shergottites concludes that the Martian mantle is much drier [9]. The latter interpretation is also supported by the fact that most martian hydrous minerals generally have the relevant sites filled with Cl and F instead of H [10,11]. As for experimental results, martian basalt compositions can be reproduced using water as well as Cl in the parent melts [12,13]. Here FTIR is used to measure water in martian meteorite minerals in order to constrain the origin of the distribution of water in martian meteorite phases.

  17. Argon Analyses of Lherzolic Shergottites Y984028 and Y000097

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.; Shih, C.-Y.; Mikouchi, T.; Misawa, K.

    2010-01-01

    Antarctic Martian meteorites Yamato (Y) 984028 and Y000027/47/97 have similar textures, mineralogy, chemistry, and isotopic composition and are possibly paired. We analyzed the argon isotopic composition of Y984028 whole rock (WR) and pyroxene mineral separates (Px) in order to evaluate their trapped Ar components and compare with Y000097 Ar data. WR and Px yield an apparent Ar-39-Ar-40 age spectra of roughly 2 Ga, much older than the crystallization age determined by other isotopic techniques. Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr ages for Y984028 are approximately 170 Ma. This discrepancy is likely the byproduct of several coexisting Ar components, such as radiogenic 40Ar*, cosmogenic Ar, and trapped Ar from the multiple minerals, as well as multiple source origins. Similarly, the reported Ar-39-Ar-40 age of Y000097 is approximately 260 Ma with a Rb-Sr age of 147+/- 28 Ma and a Sm-Nd age of 152 +/- 13 Ma [4]. Apparently Ar-Ar ages of both Y984028 and Y000097 show trapped Ar components. Stepwise temperature extractions of Ar from Y984028 Px show several Arcomponents released at different temperatures. For example, intermediate temperature data (800-1100 C) are nominally consistent with the Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr radiometric ages (approximately 170 Ma) with an approximately Martian atmosphere trapped Ar composition with a Ar-40-Ar-36 ratio of approximately 1800. Based on K/Ca distribution, we know that Ar-39 at both lower and intermediate temperatures is primarily derived from plagioclase and olivine. Argon released during higher temperature extractions (1200-1500 C), however, differs significantly. The thermal profile of argon released from Martian meteorites is complicated by multiple sources, such as Martian atmosphere, Martian mantle, inherited Ar, terrestrial atmosphere, cosmogenic Ar. Obviously, Ar release at higher temperatures from Px should contain little terrestrial atmospheric component. Likewise, Xe-129/Xe-132 from high temperature extractions (1200-1800 C) gives a value above that

  18. Sulfur Isotopes in Gas-rich Impact-Melt Glasses in Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Hoppe, P.; Sutton, S. R.; Nyquist, Laurence E.; Huth, J.

    2010-01-01

    Large impact melt glasses in some shergottites contain huge amounts of Martian atmospheric gases and they are known as gas-rich impact-melt (GRIM) glasses. By studying the neutron-induced isotopic deficits and excesses in Sm-149 and Sm-150 isotopes resulting from Sm-149 (n,gamma) 150Sm reaction and 80Kr excesses produced by Br-79 (n,gamma) Kr-80 reaction in the GRIM glasses using mass-spectrometric techniques, it was shown that these glasses in shergottites EET79001 and Shergotty contain regolith materials irradiated by a thermal neutron fluence of approx.10(exp 15) n/sq cm near Martian surface. Also, it was shown that these glasses contain varying amounts of sulfates and sulfides based on the release patterns of SO2 (sulfate) and H2S (sulfide) using stepwise-heating mass-spectrometric techniques. Furthermore, EMPA and FE-SEM studies in basaltic-shergottite GRIM glasses EET79001, LithB (,507& ,69), Shergotty (DBS I &II), Zagami (,992 & ,994) showed positive correlation between FeO and "SO3" (sulfide + sulfate), whereas those belonging to olivine-phyric shergottites EET79001, LithA (,506, & ,77) showed positive correlation between CaO/Al2O3 and "SO3".

  19. Ar-Ar Age of NWA-1460 and Evidence For Young Formation Ages of the Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Park, Jisun

    2006-01-01

    Agreement of Ar-Ar, Sm-Nd, and Rb-Sr ages for NWA1460, and the inconsistency between a low shock-heating temperature for Zagami and the proposition that a 4.0 Gyr-old Zagami lost most of its Ar-40 are inconsistent with ancient formation ages for these shergottites, but are consistent with relatively young igneous formation ages.

  20. Rb-Sr And Sm-Nd Ages, and Petrogenesis of Depleted Shergottite Northwest Africa 5990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C. Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Irving, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Northwest Africa (NWA) 5990 is a very fresh Martian meteorite recently found on Hamada du Draa, Morocco and was classified as an olivine-bearing diabasic igneous rock related to depleted shergottites [1]. The study of [1] also showed that NWA 5990 resembles QUE 94201 in chemical, textural and isotopic aspects, except QUE 94201 contains no olivine. The depleted shergottites are characterized by REE patterns that are highly depleted in LREE, older Sm-Nd ages of 327-575 Ma and highly LREE-depleted sources with Nd= +35+48 [2-7]. Age-dating these samples by Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr methods is very challenging because they have been strongly shocked and contain very low abundances of light rare earth elements (Sm and Nd), Rb and Sr. In addition, terrestrial contaminants which are commonly present in desert meteorites will compromise the equilibrium of isotopic systems. Since NWA 5990 is a very fresh meteorite, it probably has not been subject to significant desert weathering and thus is a good sample for isotopic studies. In this report, we present Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic results for NWA 5990, discuss the correlation of the determined ages with those of other depleted shergottites, especially QUE 94201, and discuss the petrogenesis of depleted shergottites.

  1. Petrography and geochemistry of the enriched basaltic shergottite Northwest Africa 2975

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qi; Xiao, Long; Balta, J. Brian; Baziotis, Ioannis P.; Hsu, Weibiao; Guan, Yunbin

    2015-11-01

    We present a study of the petrology and geochemistry of basaltic shergottite Northwest Africa 2975 (NWA 2975). NWA 2975 is a medium-grained basalt with subophitic to granular texture. Electron microprobe (EMP) analyses show two distinct pyroxene compositional trends and patchy compositional zoning patterns distinct from those observed in other meteorites such as Shergotty or QUE 94201. As no bulk sample was available to us for whole rock measurements, we characterized the fusion crust and its variability by secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS) measurements and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (LA-ICP-MS) analyses as a best-available proxy for the bulk rock composition. The fusion crust major element composition is comparable to the bulk composition of other enriched basaltic shergottites, placing NWA 2975 within that sample group. The CI-normalized REE (rare earth element) patterns are flat and also parallel to those of other enriched basaltic shergottites. Merrillite is the major REE carrier and has a flat REE pattern with slight depletion of Eu, parallel to REE patterns of merrillites from other basaltic shergottites. The oxidation state of NWA 2975 calculated from Fe-Ti oxide pairs is NNO-1.86, close to the QFM buffer. NWA 2975 represents a sample from the oxidized and enriched shergottite group, and our measurements and constraints on its origin are consistent with the hypothesis of two distinct Martian mantle reservoirs: a reduced, LREE-depleted reservoir and an oxidized, LREE-enriched reservoir. Stishovite, possibly seifertite, and dense SiO2 glass were also identified in the meteorite, allowing us to infer that NWA 2975 experienced a realistic shock pressure of ~30 GPa.

  2. An Exploration Zone in Cerberus Containing Young and Old Terrains, Including Fossae/Faults and Shergottite Distal Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, S. P.; Niles, P. B.; Bell, M. S.; Milbury, C.; Rice, J. W.; Burton, A. S.; Archer, P. D.; Rampe, E. B.; Piqueux, S.

    2015-10-01

    Cerberus contains Amazonian lava flows embaying a range of photogeologic units: ridged plains, heavily cratered terrain, highland knobs, and perhaps the Medusa Fossae Fm. Zunil Crater distal ejecta produced secondary crater fields (of shergottites?).

  3. Age and Petrogenesis of Picritic Shergottite NWA1068: Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr Isotopic Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Wiesmann, H.; Barrat, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    NWA 1068 is a 577g picritic shergottite found in the Moroccan Sahara in 2001. The meteorite resembles several other picritic shergottites, e.g. EETA79001B, DaG476, SaU005 and Dho019, in major-element chemistry and mineralogy, but it differs significantly from these meteorites in REE distribution pattern. It has a slightly LREE-depleted pattern commonly shared by some olivine-free basaltic shergottites, e.g. Shergotty, Zagami and Los Angeles, but not QUE94201. Detailed geochemical and mineral-petrological studies were given in. We performed Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic analyses on this rock to determine its crystallization age and to study the petrogenetic relationship between this meteorite and other basaltic and pricritic shergottites.

  4. The Formation of Wassonite: A New Titanium Monosulfide Mineral in the Yamato 691 Enstatite Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Choi, B.-G.; Petaev, M. I.; Clemett, S. J.; Zhang, S.; Rahman, Z.; Oikawa, K.

    2011-01-01

    Wassonite, ideally stoichiometric TiS, is a titanium monosulfide not previously observed in nature, that was discovered within the Yamato 691 EH3 enstatite chondrite [1]. Because of the submicrometer size of the wassonite grains, it was not possible to determine conventional macroscopic properties. However, the chemical composition and crystal structure were well constrained by extensive quantitative energy dispersive x-ray analysis and electron diffraction using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The crystal system for wassonite is rhombohedral (a = 3.42 plus or minus 0.07, c = 26.50 plus or minus 0.53 Angstroms) with space group: R(sup 3 raised bar) m (R9 type), cell volume: 268.4 plus or minus 0.53 Angstroms(sup 3), Z=9, density (calculated): 4.452 grams per cubic centimeter, empirical formula: (Ti(sub 0.93), Fe(sub 0.06), Cr(sub 0.01))S. In this study, we discuss possible formation mechanisms of wassonite and its associated minerals based on the petrology, mineralogy, crystallography, thermodynamic calculations, Al/Mg isotopic systematics and the O-isotopic composition of the wassonite-bearing BO chondrule.

  5. Sm-Nd, Rb-Sr, and Mn-Cr Ages of Yamato 74013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.- Y.; Reese, Y.D.

    2009-01-01

    Yamato 74013 is one of 29 paired diogenites having granoblastic textures. The Ar-39 - Ar-40 age of Y-74097 is approximately 1100 Ma. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd analyses of Y-74013, -74037, -74097, and -74136 suggested that multiple young metamorphic events disturbed their isotopic systems. Masuda et al. reported that REE abundances were heterogeneous even within the same sample (Y-74010) for sample sizes less than approximately 2 g. Both they and Nyquist et al. reported data for some samples showing significant LREE enrichment. In addition to its granoblastic texture, Y-74013 is characterized by large, isolated clots of chromite up to 5 mm in diameter. Takeda et al. suggested that these diogenites originally represented a single or very small number of coarse orthopyroxene crystals that were recrystallized by shock processes. They further suggested that initial crystallization may have occurred very early within the deep crust of the HED parent body. Here we report the chronology of Y-74013 as recorded in chronometers based on long-lived Rb-87 and Sm-147, intermediate- lived Sm-146, and short-lived Mn-53.

  6. Garnet lherzolites from Louwrensia, Namibia: Bulk composition and P/T relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, F.R.; Pearson, D.G.; Hoal, Karin O.; Hoal, B.G.; Nixon, P.H.; Kingston, M.J.; Mertzman, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    Bulk, mineral and trace element analyses of garnet lherzolite xenoliths from the Louwrensia kimberlite pipe, south-central Namibia, together with previously published Re-Os isotopic data [Chem. Geol. (2004)], form the most extensive set of chemical data for off-craton suites from southern Africa. The Louwrensia suite is similar to those from the Kaapvaal craton in that it includes both predominantly coarse-grained, equant-textured peridotites characterised by equilibration temperatures 1200 ??C. Redepletion ages range back to 2.1 Gy, concordant with the age of the crustal basement and about 1 Gy younger than the older peridotites of the adjacent Kaapvaal craton root. The coarse, low-temperature Louwrensia peridotites have an average Mg number for olivine of 91.6 in comparison to 92.6 for low-temperature peridotites from the craton. Orthopyroxene content averages 24 wt.% with a range of 11-40 wt.% for Louwrensia low-temperature peridotites, in comparison to a mean of 31.5 wt.% and a range of 11-44 wt.% for low-temperature peridotites from the Kaapvaal craton. Other major, minor and trace element concentrations in minerals forming Louwrensia lherzolites are more similar to values in corresponding Kaapvaal peridotite minerals than to those in lithospheric peridotites of Phanerozoic age as represented by off-craton basalt-hosted xenoliths and orogenic peridotites. Proportions of clinopyroxene and garnet in both the Louwrensia and Kaapvaal lherzolites overlap in the range up to 10 wt.% forming a trend extending towards pyrolite composition. Disequilibrium element partitioning between clinopyroxene and garnet for some incompatible trace elements is evidence that some of the trend is caused by enrichment following depletion. The disequilibrium is interpreted to have been caused by relatively recent growth of diopside, as previously suggested for cratonic peridotites. Attempts to constrain the depth of melting required to produce the Louwrensia peridotites suggests

  7. Mn-Cr Systematics in Sphalerites and Niningerites From Qingzhen and Yamato69001: Implications Regarding Their Formation Histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Goresy, A.; Wadhwa, M.; Zinner, E. K.; Nagel, H.-J.; Janicke, J.; Crozaz, G.

    1992-07-01

    Recent Cr isotopic measurements of sphalerites and alabandites in three EL3 chondrites MAC88136, MAC88180, and MAC88184 and of sphalerites in the EH4 chondrite Indarch (El Goresy et al., 1992) revealed ^53Cr excesses (^53Cr*), resulting from the in situ decay of ^53Mn (tau(sub)1/2=3.7 Ma), in most grains analysed. However, the initial ^53Mn/^55Mn ratios calculated for these grains were quite variable, and it was concluded that redistribution of ^53Cr* by diffusional processes was the most likely cause for these variations. In a continuation of the previous work (El Goresy et al., 1992), we report new mineral-chemical and Cr-isotopic data for two EH3 chondrites, Qingzhen and Yamato 69001. The distribution of Fe, Mg, and Mn in niningerites and sphalerites occurring in individual sulfide assemblages was determined by electron microprobe analysis. Among the meteorites of the EH3 subgroup, Qingzhen and Yamato 69001 are unique in that niningerites in both meteorites display normal as well as reversed zoning, indicating complex thermal histories (Ehlers and El Goresy, 1988; Lin et al., 1989; Lin, 1991; Nagel, 1991). Niningerites have different MnS contents (9.2-32.6 mol% MnS in Qingzhen vs. 4.2- 6.3 mol% MnS in Yamato 69001), as do the sphalerites (4.0-9.2 mol% MnS in Qingzhen vs. 2.0-3.5 mol% in Yamato 69001). Sphalerites in both meteorites are normally zoned, with 46.0-49.8 mol% FeS in sphalerites from Qingzhen, and 42.3-49.7 mol% FeS in sphalerites from Yamato 69001. The spatial distributions of Fe and Mg in niningerites and of Fe and Mn in sphalerites indicate complex processes that may have occurred before accretion and/or during later metamorphic events in the parent body (El Goresy and Ehlers, 1989; Lin, 1991; Nagel, 1991). Ion microprobe measurements of 6 sphalerites and 3 niningerites in Qingzhen and of 3 sphalerites and 2 niningerites in Yamato 69001 showed that ^55Mn/^52Cr ratios in these sulfide phases are significantly lower than in sphalerites and

  8. 16O excesses in olivine inclusions in Yamato-86009 and Murchison chondrites and their relation to CAIs.

    PubMed

    Hiyagon, H; Hashimoto, A

    1999-02-01

    In situ ion microprobe analyses of oxygen isotopes in Yamato-86009 and Murchison chondrites show that they contain abundant olivine-rich inclusions that have large oxygen-16 (16O) excesses, similar to those in spinel grains in calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions in Allende and other carbonaceous chondrites. The existence of 16O-enriched olivine-rich inclusions suggests that oxygen isotopic anomalies were more extensive in the early solar system than was previously thought and that their origin may be attributed to a nebular chemical process rather than to an unidentified 16O-rich carrier of presolar origin.

  9. Rb-Sr Isotopic Systematics of Alkali-Rich Fragments in the Yamato-74442 LL-Chondritic Breccia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokoyama, T.; Misawa, K.; Okano, O.; Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Simo, J. I.; Tappa, M. J.; Yoneda, S.

    2012-01-01

    Alkali-rich igneous fragments were identified in the brecciated LL-chondrites, Kr henberg (LL5)], Bhola (LL3-6) and Yamato (Y)-74442 (LL4), and show characteristic fractionation patterns of alkaline elements. The K-Rb-Cs-rich fragments in Kr henberg, Bhola, and Y-74442 are very similar in mineralogy and petrography (olivine + pyroxene + glass), suggesting that they could have come from related precursor materials. We have undertaken Rb-Sr isotopic studies on alkali-rich fragments in Y-74442 to precisely determine their crystallization ages and the isotopic signatures of their precursor material(s).

  10. Sulfur Speciation in the Martian Regolith Component in Shergottite Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, Laurence E.; Sutton, S.; Huth, J.

    2009-01-01

    We have shown that Gas-Rich Impact-Melt (GRIM) glasses in Shergotty, Zagami, and EET79001 (Lith A and Lith B) contain Martian regolith components that were molten during impact and quenched into glasses in voids of host rock materials based on neutron-capture isotopes, i.e., Sm-150 excesses and Sm-149 deficits in Sm, and Kr-80 excesses produced from Br [1, 2]. These GRIM glasses are rich in S-bearing secondary minerals [3.4]. Evidence for the occurrence of CaSO4 and S-rich aluminosilicates in these glasses is provided by CaO-SO3 and Al2O3-SO3 correlations, which are consistent with the finding of gypsum laths protruding from the molten glass in EET79001 (Lith A) [5]. However, in the case of GRIM glasses from EET79001 (Lith B), Shergotty and Zagami, we find a different set of secondary minerals that show a FeO-SO3 correlation (but no MgOSO3 correlation), instead of CaO-SO3 and Al2O3-SO3 correlations observed in Lith A. These results might indicate different fluidrock interactions near the shergottite source region on Mars. The speciation of sulfur in these salt assemblages was earlier studied by us using XANES techniques [6], where we found that Lith B predominantly contains Fe-sulfide globules (with some sulfate). On the other hand, Lith A showed predominantly Casulfite/ sulfate with some FeS. Furthermore, we found Fe to be present as Fe2+ indicating little oxidation, if any, in these glasses. To examine the sulfide-sulfate association in these glasses, we studied their Fe/Ni ratios with a view to find diagnostic clues for the source fluid. The Fe-sulfide mineral (Fe(0.93)Ni(0.3)S) in EET79001, Lith A is pyrrhotite [7, 8]. It yields an Fe/Ni ratio of 31. In Shergotty, pyrrhotite occurs with a molar ratio of Fe:S of 0.94 and a Ni abundance of 0.12% yielding a Fe/Ni ratio of approx.500 [8]. In this study, we determined a NiO content of approx.0.1% and FeO/NiO ratio of approx.420 in S-rich globules in #507 (EET79001, Lith B) sample using FE-SEM. In the same sample

  11. Anhydrous liquid line of descent of Yamato-980459 and evolution of Martian parental magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Jennifer F.; Draper, David S.; Mercer, Cameron M.

    2013-10-01

    We report the results of nominally anhydrous equilibrium and fractional crystallization experiments on a synthetic Yamato-980459 (Y98) bulk composition at 0.5 GPa. These experiments allow us to test a suggested fractional crystallization model, calculated using MELTS by Symes et al. (), in which a Y98-like initial liquid yielded a magma closely resembling the bulk composition of QUE 94201. Although the two meteorites cannot be cogenetic owing to their age difference, they are thought to represent bona fide magmatic liquids rather than products of crystal accumulation, as are most Martian basaltic meteorites. Hence, understanding possible petrogenetic links between these types of liquids could be revealing about processes of melting and crystallization that formed the range of Martian basalts. We find that Y98 can, in fact, generate a residual liquid closely resembling QUE, but only after a very different crystallization process, and different degree of crystallization, than that modeled using MELTS. In addition, both the identity and sequence of crystallizing phases are very different between model and experiments. Our fractional crystallization experiments do not produce a QUE-like liquid, and the crystallizing phases are an even poorer match to the MELTS-calculated compositions than in the equilibrium runs. However, residual liquids from our experiments define a liquid line of descent that encompasses bulk compositions of parental melts calculated for several Martian basaltic meteorites, suggesting that the known Martian basaltic meteorites had their ultimate origin from the same or very similar source lithologies. These are, in turn, similar to source rocks modeled by previous studies as products of extensive crystallization of an initial Martian magma ocean.

  12. Yamato 86029: Aqueously altered and thermally metamorphosed CI-like chondrite with unusual textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonui, E. K.; Zolensky, M. E.; Lipschutz, M. E.; Wang, M. S.; Nakamura, T.

    2003-02-01

    We describe the petrologic and trace element characteristics of the Yamato 86029 (Y-86029) meteorite. Y-86029 is a breccia consisting of a variety of clasts, and abundant secondary minerals including coarse- and fine-grained phyllosilicates, Fe-Ni sulfides, carbonates, and magnetite. There are no chondrules, but a few anhydrous olivine-rich grains are present within a very fine-grained phyllosilicate-rich matrix. Analyses of 14 thermally mobile trace elements suggest that Y-86029 experienced moderate, open-system thermal metamorphism. Comparison with data for other heated carbonaceous chondrites suggests metamorphic temperatures of 500­600 deg C for Y-86029. This is apparent petrographically, in partial dehydration of phyllosilicates to incompletely re-crystallized olivine. This transformation appears to proceed through `intermediate' highly-disordered `poorly crystalline' phases consisting of newly formed olivine and residual desiccated phyllosilicate and their mixtures. Periclase is also present as a possible heating product of Mg-rich carbonate precursors. Y-86029 shows unusual textures rarely encountered in carbonaceous chondrites. The periclase occurs as unusually large Fe-rich clasts (300­500 μm). Fine-grained carbonates with uniform texture are also present as small (10­15 μm in diameter), rounded to sub-rounded `shells' of ankerite/siderite enclosing magnetite. These carbonates appear to have formed by low temperature aqueous alteration at specific thermal decomposition temperatures consistent with thermodynamic models of carbonate formation. The fine and uniform texture suggests crystallization from a fluid circulating in interconnected spaces throughout entire growth. One isolated aggregate in Y-86029 also consists of a mosaic of polycrystalline olivine aggregates and sulfide blebs typical of shock-induced melt re- crystallization. Except for these unusual textures, the isotopic, petrologic and chemical characteristics of Y- 86029 are quite similar

  13. Weathering features and secondary minerals in Antarctic Shergottites ALHA77005 and LEW88516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentworth, Susan J.; Gooding, James L.

    1993-01-01

    Previous work has shown that all three sub-groups of the shergottite, nakhlite, and chassignite (SNC) clan of meteorites contain aqueous precipitates of probable pre-terrestrial origin. In the context of secondary minerals, the most thoroughly studied shergottite has been Elephant Moraine, Antarctica A79001 (EETA79001). The recognition of LEW88516 as the latest SNC specimen, and its close similarity with ALHA77005, invite a comparative study of the latter two meteorites, and with EETA79001, from the perspective of aqueous alteration. The fusion crusts of the two meteorites are quite similar except that ALHA77005 is more vesicular (possibly indicating a higher indigenous volatile content). Secondary aluminosilicates (and salts on LEW88516) of definite Antarctic origin partially fill vesicles and fractures on both fusion crusts. Interior samples of the two meteorites are grossly similar in that traces of secondary minerals are present in both.

  14. Correlations Between Surficial Sulfur and a REE Crustal Assimilation Signature in Martian Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.; Franz, H. B.

    2015-01-01

    Compared to terrestrial basalts, the Martian shergottite meteorites have an extraordinary range of Sr and Nd isotopic signatures. In addition, the S isotopic compositions of many shergottites show evidence of interaction with the Martian surface/ atmosphere through mass-independent isotopic fractionations (MIF, positive, non-zero delta(exp 33)S) that must have originated in the Martian atmosphere, yet ultimately were incorporated into igneous sulfides (AVS - acid-volatile sulfur). These positive delta(exp 33)S signatures are thought to be governed by solar UV photochemical processes. And to the extent that S is bound to Mars and not lost to space from the upper atmosphere, a positive delta(exp 33)S reservoir must be mass balanced by a complementary negative reservoir.

  15. Stabile Chlorine Isotope Study of Martian Shergottites and Nakhlites; Whole Rock and Acid Leachates and Residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2011-01-01

    We have established a precise analytical technique for stable chlorine isotope measurements of tiny planetary materials by TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) [1], for which the results are basically consistent with the IRMS tech-nique (gas source mass spectrometry) [2,3,4]. We present here results for Martian shergottites and nakhlites; whole rocks, HNO3-leachates and residues, and discuss the chlorine isotope evolution of planetary Mars.

  16. Sulfide isotopic compositions in shergottites and ALH84001, and possible implications for life on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, J.P.; McSween, H.Y. Jr.; Riciputi, L.R.

    1997-10-01

    The shergottite and ALH84001 meteorites hold keys for understanding geologic and possibly biologic processes on Mars. Recently, it has been proposed that carbonates in ALH84001, and the Fe-sulfides they contain, are products of extraterrestrial biogenic activity. Here we report ion microprobe analyses of sulfides in shergottites and ALH84001. The sulfur isotope ratios of igneous pyrrhotites in shergottites (mean {delta}{sup 34}S{sub CDT}: Shergotty = -0.4{per_thousand}, Zagami = +2.7{per_thousand}, EETA79001A = 1.9{per_thousand}, EETA79001B = -1.7{per_thousand}, LEW88516 = -1.9{per_thousand}, QUE94201 = +0.8{per_thousand}) are similar to those of terrestrial ocean-floor basalts, suggesting that the sulfur isotopic composition of the Martian mantle may be similar to that of the mantle of the Earth. The sulfur isotopic systematics of ALH84001 sulfides are distinct from the shergottites. Measured sulfur isotope ratios of eight pyrite grains ({delta}{sup 34}S{sub CDT} = +2.0 to +7.3{per_thousand}) in crushed zones confirm previously reported analyses of isotopically heavy sulfides and are indistinguishable from an Fe-sulfide zone within a carbonate globule ({delta}{sup 34}S{sub CDT} = +6.0{per_thousand}). Analyses of synthesized, fine-grained mixtures of sulfide, carbonate, and magnetite indicate than the measured sulfur isotope ratio is independent of the presence of carbonate and magnetite in the sputtered volume, confirming the accuracy of the analysis of the fine-grained sulfide in the carbonate globule. Terrestrial biogenic sulfate reduction typically results in light isotopic enrichments. The similarity of {delta}{sup 34}S values of the sulfides in ALH84001 imply that the Fe-sulfide zones within ALH84001 carbonates are probably not the result of bacterial reduction of sulfate. 38 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Excess Ar-40 in the Zagami Shergottite: Does It Reveal Crystallization History?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Park, Jisun

    2007-01-01

    The Zagami basaltic shergottite has fine- and coarse-grained (FG & CG) areas, which may reflect partial crystallization in a deep, slowly cooled magma chamber to form Mg-rich pyroxene cores, followed by entrainment of these crystals into a magma that rose and crystallized near the surface. Late-stage melt pockets formed mesostasis and feldspar (maskelynite) having a range of compositions, but low water abundance. Higher I(sub Sr) in the FG portion may result from the second stage having incorporated old crustal rocks that failed to reach isotopic equilibrium. Zagami, like other shergottites, contains excess Ar-40(sub xs) beyond that expected from internal decay of K-40 during its Sm-Nd age of 177 Myr. We suggest that at least a portion of this Ar-40(sub xs) in Zagami and some other shergottites was inherited from the magma, much as is the case of MORBs on Earth. We made Ar-39-Ar-40 age determinations on feldspar and pyroxene separates from both the FG and CG portions of Zagami. If Zagami experienced an evolving fractional crystallization history, including possible crustal contamination of the magma, that might be indicated in differing amounts of Ar-40(sub xs) between mineral phases and between FG and CG portions.

  18. Bounce Rock-A shergottite-like basalt encountered at Meridiani Planum, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zipfel, J.; Schroder, C.; Jolliff, B.L.; Gellert, Ralf; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Rieder, R.; Anderson, R.; Bell, J.F.; Brückner, J.; Crisp, J.A.; Christensen, P.R.; Clark, B. C.; de Souza, P.A.; Dreibus, G.; D'uston, C.; Economou, T.; Gorevan, S.P.; Hahn, B.C.; Klingelhofer, G.; McCoy, T.J.; McSween, H.Y.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R.V.; Rodionov, D.S.; Squyres, S. W.; Wanke, H.; Wright, S.P.; Wyatt, M.B.; Yen, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    The Opportunity rover of the Mars Exploration Rover mission encountered an isolated rock fragment with textural, mineralogical, and chemical properties similar to basaltic shergottites. This finding was confirmed by all rover instruments, and a comprehensive study of these results is reported here. Spectra from the miniature thermal emission spectrometer and the Panoramic Camera reveal a pyroxene-rich mineralogy, which is also evident in M??ssbauer spectra and in normative mineralogy derived from bulk chemistry measured by the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer. The correspondence of Bounce Rock's chemical composition with the composition of certain basaltic shergottites, especially Elephant Moraine (EET) 79001 lithology B and Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 94201, is very close, with only Cl, Fe, and Ti exhibiting deviations. Chemical analyses further demonstrate characteristics typical of Mars such as the Fe/Mn ratio and P concentrations. Possible shock features support the idea that Bounce Rock was ejected from an impact crater, most likely in the Meridiani Planum region. Bopolu crater, 19.3km in diameter, located 75km to the southwest could be the source crater. To date, no other rocks of this composition have been encountered by any of the rovers on Mars. The finding of Bounce Rock by the Opportunity rover provides further direct evidence for an origin of basaltic shergottite meteorites from Mars. ?? The Meteoritical Society, 2011.

  19. Chemical Composition of Four Shergottites from Northwest Africa (NWA 2800, NWA, 5214, NWA 5990, NWA 6342)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, S.; Humayun, M.; Jefferson, G.; Fields, D.; Righter, K.; Irving, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Shergottites represent the majority of recovered Martian meteorites. As basic igneous rocks, they formed from magmas that were emplaced in the Martian crust [1]. Due to the low ambient pressure of the Martian atmosphere, subaerial lavas and shallow magma chambers are expected to outgas volatile metals (e.g., Cd, Te, Re, Bi) [2]. The planetary abundances of the volatile siderophile and chalcophile elements are important at establishing the depth of core formation for Mars, and must be known as a baseline for understanding volcanic outgassing on Mars, particularly the large enrichments of S and Cl observed in modern Martian soils [3]. There is little data on volatile siderophile and chalcophile elements from Martian meteorites, excluding a few well-analyzed samples [2]. Further, a large number of shergottites being recovered from North West Africa are in need of chemical analysis. All of the shergottites are in need of state-of-the art analysis for such ratios as Ge/Si and Ga/Al, which can now be accomplished by LA-ICP-MS [2].

  20. Bounce Rock - A shergottite-like basalt encountered at Meridiani Planum, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipfel, Jutta; Schräder, Christian; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Gellert, Ralf; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Rieder, Rudolf; Anderson, Robert; Bell, James F., III; Brückner, Johannes; Crisp, Joy A.; Christensen, Philip R.; Clark, Benton C.; de Souza, Paulo A., Jr.; Dreibus, Gerlind; D'Uston, Claude; Economou, Thanasis; Gorevan, Steven P.; Hahn, Brian C.; Klingelhäfer, Göstar; McCoy, Timothy J.; McSween, Harry Y., Jr.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Rodionov, Daniel S.; Squyres, Steven W.; Wńnke, Heinrich; Wright, Shawn P.; Wyatt, Michael B.; Yen, Albert S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract- The Opportunity rover of the Mars Exploration Rover mission encountered an isolated rock fragment with textural, mineralogical, and chemical properties similar to basaltic shergottites. This finding was confirmed by all rover instruments, and a comprehensive study of these results is reported here. Spectra from the miniature thermal emission spectrometer and the Panoramic Camera reveal a pyroxene-rich mineralogy, which is also evident in Mössbauer spectra and in normative mineralogy derived from bulk chemistry measured by the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer. The correspondence of Bounce Rock’s chemical composition with the composition of certain basaltic shergottites, especially Elephant Moraine (EET) 79001 lithology B and Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 94201, is very close, with only Cl, Fe, and Ti exhibiting deviations. Chemical analyses further demonstrate characteristics typical of Mars such as the Fe/Mn ratio and P concentrations. Possible shock features support the idea that Bounce Rock was ejected from an impact crater, most likely in the Meridiani Planum region. Bopolu crater, 19.3 km in diameter, located 75 km to the southwest could be the source crater. To date, no other rocks of this composition have been encountered by any of the rovers on Mars. The finding of Bounce Rock by the Opportunity rover provides further direct evidence for an origin of basaltic shergottite meteorites from Mars.

  1. Melting of metasomatized subcontinental mantle: New experiments and a new predictive models for plagioclase, spinel and garnet lherzolite melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, T. L.; Till, C. B.; Barr, J. A.; Krawczynski, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    Data from new experiments where liquid is in equilibrium with olivine + orthopyroxene + high-Ca clinopyroxene + Al-phase (plagioclase, spinel or garnet) have allowed us to recalibrate and update the melting model of Kinzler and Grove (K&G, JGR 97: 6885-6926, 1992) for melting under nominally anhydrous conditions over a larger range of pressure. We use existing literature data along with new experiments on melting of a high K2O primitive high alumina olivine tholeiite (HAOT) from the Oregon High Lava Plains, a high-K olivine leucitite from the Tibetan Plateau and low alkali, high FeO + MgO lunar ultramafic glasses. The new spinel lherzolite model is constrained by 114 experimental data that span a temperature range of 1200 to 1580 oC, a pressure range of 1 to 2.7 GPa and liquid alkali contents of up to 4.5 wt. % K2O and 5 wt. % Na2O. The garnet-lherzolite melting model uses 26 experimental constraints with new experiments containing up to 3.4 wt. % K2O. We use the following dependent variables to represent the melt composition in terms of oxygen-based mineral components: Olivine - Clinopyroxene - Plagioclase - Quartz and temperature. The independent variables are: pressure (P), molar Mg/(Mg+Fe) (Mg#), wt. % (K2O + Na2O)/(Na2O + K2O + CaO) (1-Ca#), wt.% Al2O3/(Al2O3+SiO2) (Al#), wt% K2O and wt. % TiO2. These variables describe the departure of melting behavior from the simplified lherzolite analog in CMAS (CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2) in which melting behavior in univariant. This revised model facilitates a prediction of the liquid composition and temperature of multiple saturation with a mantle mineral assemblage for a given pressure. The new model allows compositional dependent calibration of the spinel to garnet lherzolite transition in sub-continental mantle environments. For example, beneath the Tibetan Plateau melting occurs near this transition and primitive high-K lavas show evidence of derivation from spinel- and garnet-bearing lherzolite. In addition, the HAOT lavas

  2. Suppressive effect of Yamato-mana (Brassica rapa L. Oleifera Group) constituent 3-butenyl glucosinolate (gluconapin) on postprandial hypertriglyceridemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Washida, Kazuto; Miyata, Mitsuyoshi; Koyama, Tomoyuki; Yazawa, Kazunaga; Nomoto, Kyosuke

    2010-01-01

    We examined the bioactivity of Yamato-mana (Brassica rapa L. Oleifera Group) constituent glucosinolates and found that 3-butenyl glucosinolate (gluconapin) decreased the plasma triglyceride gain induced by corn oil administration to mice. However, phenethyl glucosinolate (gluconasturtiin) had little effect. 2-Propenyl glucosinolate (sinigrin) also reduced the plasma triglyceride level, which suggests that alkenyl glucosinolates might be promising agents to prevent postprandial hypertriglyceridemia.

  3. What Were the Major Factors That Controlled Mineralogical Similarities and Differences of Basaltic, Lherzolitic and Clinopyroxentic Martian Meteorites Within Each Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikouchi, T.; Miyamoto, M.; McKay, G. A.

    1998-01-01

    Twelve martian meteorites that have been re- covered so far are classified into five groups (basalt, lherzolite, clinopyroxenite, dunite, and orthopyroxenite) mainly from petrology and chemistry. Among them, the dunite and orthopyroxenite groups consist of only one meteorite each (dunite: Chassigny, orthopyroxenite: ALH 84001). The basalt group is the largest group and consists of four meteorites (Shergotty, Zagani, EETA 79001, and QUE 94201). The lherzolitic and clinopyroxenitic groups include three meteorites each (Lherzolite: ALH 77005, LEW 88516, and Y793605, clinopyroxenite: Nakhla, Governador Valadares, and Lafayette). These meteorites within each group are generally similar to the others, but none of them is paired with the others. In this abstract, we discuss the major factors that controlled mineralogical similarities and differences of basaltic, lherzolitic, and clinopyroxenitic meteorites within each group. This may help in understanding their petrogenesis and original locations on Mars in general.

  4. A study of REE and Pb, Sr and Nd isotopes in garnet-lherzolite xenoliths from Mingxi, Fujian Province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wankang, H.; Junwen, W.; Basu, A.R.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1993-01-01

    The REE and Pb, Sr, Nd isotopes in three xenoliths from limburgite and scoria-breccias, including spinel-lherzolite, spinel-garnet-lherzolite and phlogopite-gamet-lherzolite, were analysed. The REE contents of the xenoliths are 1.3 to 3.3 times those of the chondrites with their REE patterns characterized by weak LREE depletion. The143Nd/144Nd values of whole rocks and minerals range from 0.51306 to 0.51345 with ??Nd=+ 8.2- +15.8,206Pb/204 Pb < 18.673, and207Pb/204Pb < 15.574. All this goes to show that the upper mantle in Mingxi at the depth of 67-82 km is a depleted mantle of MORB type, with87Sr/86 Sr ratios 0.70237-0.70390. In Nd-Sr diagram the data points of whole rocks are all out of the mantle array, implying that the xenoliths from Mingxi have more radiogenic Sr isotopes than those of the mantle array. ?? 1993 Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  5. Petrology of basaltic sills from ocean drilling program sites 794 and 797 in the Yamato Basin of the Japan Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thy, P.

    1992-01-01

    The basaltic sills from ocean drilling program sites 794 and 797 in the Yamato Basin of the Japan Sea are characterized petrographically on the basis of a detailed study of the composition of relict phenocryst and groundmass phases. The systematic variation in the rock compositions is discussed. Results of 1-atm melting experiments on a relatively primitive basalt from site 797 are reported. The sills are found to constitute two distinct groups of suites: primitive, olivine-bearing suites with low potassium and primitive olivine-bearing to evolved, olivine-free suites with relatively high potassium. A pseudoinvariant reaction relationship between olivine and augite and magnetite is inferred. Complex magmatic and tectonic evolutions in the region, perhaps reflecting a transitional stage between subduction zone activity and back arc spreading, are suggested.

  6. Sm-Nd Age and Initial Sr-87/Sr-86 for Yamato 980318: An Old Cumulate Eucrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Takeda, H.; Shih, C.-Y.; Wiesmann, H.

    2004-01-01

    The complex pyroxene exsolution texture of the Moore County cumulate eucrite was interpreted by Miyamoto and Takeda as indicating initial cooling at 160 C/Ma followed by a sudden temperature rise and final cooling at 0.35 C/yr. They suggested initial cooling at a depth of approx. 8 km near the base of Vesta s crust, followed by impact excavation to its surface. Young Sm-Nd ages of approx. 4456, 4460, and 4410 Ma, respectively, for the Moore County, Moama, and Serra de Mag cumulate eucrites are puzzling because closure to Nd isotopic exchange would occur in only a few Ma at the above initial cooling rate. The exception to young ages among the cumulate eucrites is EET87520, with a 147Sm-147 - Nd-143 age of 4547-4598 Ma. We report here initial results of a combined mineralogical/chronological study of the Yamato 980318 feldspar-cumulate eucrite.

  7. Acid-Sulfate-Weathering Activity in Shergottite Sites on Mars Recorded in Grim Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Ross, K.; Sutton, S. R.; Schwandt, C. S.

    2011-01-01

    Based on mass spectrometric studies of sulfur species in Shergotty and EET79001, [1] and [2] showed that sulfates and sulfides occur in different proportions in shergottites. Sulfur speciation studies in gas-rich impact-melt (GRIM) glasses in EET79001 by the XANES method [3] showed that S K-XANES spectra in GRIM glasses from Lith A indicate that S is associated with Ca and Al presumably as sulfides/sulfates whereas the XANES spectra of amorphous sulfide globules in GRIM glasses from Lith B indicate that S is associated with Fe as FeS. In these amorphous iron sulfide globules, [4] found no Ni using FE-SEM and suggested that the globules resulting from immiscible sulfide melt may not be related to the igneous iron sulfides having approximately 1-3% Ni. Furthermore, in the amorphous iron sulfides from 507 GRIM glass, [5] determined delta(sup 34)S values ranging from +3.5%o to -3.1%o using Nano-SIMS. These values plot between the delta(sup 34)S value of +5.25%o determined in the sulfate fraction in Shergotty [6] at one extreme and the value of -1.7%o obtained for igneous sulfides in EET79001 and Shergotty [7] at the other. These results suggest that the amorphous Fe-S globules likely originated by shock reduction of secondary iron sulfate phases occurring in the regolith precursor materials during impact [7]. Sulfates in the regolith materials near the basaltic shergottite sites on Mars owe their origin to surficial acid-sulfate interactions. We examine the nature of these reactions by studying the composition of the end products in altered regolith materials. For the parent material composition, we use that of the host shergottite material in which the impact glasses are situated.

  8. Crystallization conditions in the lherzolite-gabbronorite Suoi Cun intrusion (Northeastern Vietnam)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izokh, A. E.; Svetlitskaya, T. V.; Tolstykh, N. D.; Phuong, N. T.

    2012-04-01

    Crystallization conditions in the lherzolite-gabbronorite Suoi Cun intrusion (Northeastern Vietnam) Suoi Cun intrusion refers to the Late Permian Cu-Ni-PGE ultramafic-mafic complex (Cao Bang complex) of the Song Hiem rift zone of the northeastern Vietnam. The lower part of the intrusion is composed of plagiolherzolite, and the upper part consists of olivine gabbronorite and gabbronorite. The most magnesian olivines are in ultramafic rocks (Mg # = 86), less magnesian olivines are in gabbronorites (Mg # = 70). Clinopyroxene are represented by magnesium diopside-augite. Plagioclase composition varies from anorthite (An90) in plagiolherzolite to labradorite (An55) in gabbronorites. Interstitial sulphide inclusions (pyrrhotite + chalcopyrite + pentlandite) occur in plagiolherzolite. Richest sulfide zone is located near contact zone of inversion.The presence of sulphide droplets in liquidus olivine and in Cr-spinel inclusions in olivine indicates the saturation of the sulfur of the parent picrobasalt melt in the intermediate chamber.The presence of an early liquidus orthopyroxene in plagiolherzolite not consistent with the theoretical calculations by the program «Comagmat», but may be explained by early sulfurization of the melt. Data of zircons from plagiolherzolite and gabbronorites show considerable degree of crustal contamination. Geochemical features of sulfides, including the distribution of platinum group elements (PGE), suggest that the sulfide liquid was segregated from the primary PGE-enriched picrobasalt melt. Based on the calculated concentrations of ore-forming elements (Ni, Cu, PGE) in the parental melts, the ratio of the mass of sulfide liquid to the total mass of the equilibrium silicate melt (N factor) for the Suoi Cun intrusion is 500-2000. Thus, geochemical features of sulfide of the Suoi Cun intrusion indicate that sulfurization of picrobasalt melt occurred in the deep intermediate chamber.

  9. Petrology and Mineral Chemistry of New Olivine-Phyric Shergottite RBT04262

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, H. A.; Peslier, A. H.; Brandon, A. D.; Lee, C.-T. A.; Lapen, T. J.

    2008-01-01

    RBT04262 was found by the 2004-2005 ANSMET team at the Roberts Massif in Antarctica. It is paired with RBT04261 and is classified as an olivine-phyric shergottite. RBT04261 is 4.0 x 3.5 x 2.5 cm and 78.8 g, and RBT04262 is 6.5 x 5.5 x 3.5 cm and 204.6 g. Both were partially covered by a fusion crust [1]. Chemical analysis and mapping of this meteorite was performed using the Cameca SX100 electron microprobe at NASA Johnson Space Center.

  10. Magnetic properties and remanent magnetization of a mixture of Fe-Ni alloys simulated to the Yamato 74646 (LL6) chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, H.; Momose, K.-I.; Funaki, M.

    Magnetic properties of mixtures of two alloys, 5 at pct Ni-Fe and 29 at pct Ni-Fe, containing varying (from 0.0 to 100 at pct) concentrations of the former, were investigated and compared to those of a Ni-Fe alloy mixture simulating the Yamato 74646 (LL6) chondrite; this mixture was prepared in accordance with the analysis data of Nagahara (1979). The original thermoremanent magnetization of alloy mixtures was acquired by heating for 2 h at 850 C and cooling to room temperature in a geomagnetic field. Remanent magnetization (RM) was measured during cooling at 77 K. It was found that the RM of the alloys simulating the Yamato chondrite was thermally stable. The intensity of RM obtained by cooling at 77 K in geomagnetic field increased by about 10 percent compared to the original one, whereas that acquired by cooling at 77 K in zero magnetic field decreased by about 25 percent.

  11. Magmatic/metasomatic amphibole in the mantle: evidence from the Balmuccia lherzolite massif, Ivrea zone, western Italian Alps

    SciTech Connect

    Shervais, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Amphibole and mica are the most important alkali-rich phases stable under mantle P-T conditions, and constitute the primary source of the alkalis needed to form basaltic magmas. Yet, the origin and distribution of these phases in the upper mantle is poorly understood. The Balmuccia lherzolite massif is a small slice of subcontinental mantle in the western Alps that intruded granulite facies lower crust 250 m.y. ago, and was exposed during the Alpine orogeny. Amphibole (HB) ranging in composition from Ti-pargasite to kaersutite in a minor but widespread accessory phase in the lherzolite, in websterite and bronzite dikes of the Cr-Di suite, and in pyroxenite and gabbro dikes of the Al-Aug suite. Textural and compositional relations show that HB in the Cr-Di and Al-Aug suite dikes formed by crystallization of residual magma, or by reaction between this magma and earlier formed phases (primarily spinel). Hb also occurs in thin (1-2 cm) veins of hornblendite and pyroxene hornblendite, and in the HB-enriched wallrock adjacent to these veins. Similar Hb veins in the Lherz massif have been shown to form from an alkali and water-enriched residual magma derived by filter pressing of Al-Aug pyroxenites. This origin is not possible at Balmuccia because the Hb veins have higher Ti, Cr, K/Na and Mgnumbers than any accessory Hb in Al-Aug suite dikes. Fractionation trends in the veins are controlled by HB. This requires that the HB veins formed from a separate and distinct parent magma that metasomatically enriched the lherzolite on a local scale. However, remelting of the widespread pyroxenite dikes may constitute a more important source of alkalis than the rare HB-rich veins.

  12. Nuclear tracks, Sm isotopes and neutron capture effects in the Elephant Morraine shergottite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajan, R. S.; Lugmair, G.; Tamhane, A. S.; Poupeau, G.

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear track studies, uranium concentration measurements and Sm-isotope studies have been performed on both lithologies A and B of the Elephant Morraine shergottite, EETA 79001. Track studies show that EETA 79001 was a rather small object in space with a preatmospheric radius of 12 + or - 2 cm, corresponding to a preatmospheric mass of 28 + or - 13 kg. Phosphates have U concentrations ranging from 0.3 to 1.3 ppm. There are occasional phosphates with excess fission tracks, possibly produced from neutron-induced fission of U and Th, during the regolith exposure in the shergottite parent body (SPB). Sm-isotope studies, while not showing any clear-cut excess in Sm-150, make it possible to derive meaningful upper limits to thermal neutron fluences of 2 to 3 x 10 to the 15th n/sq cm, during a possible regolith irradiation. These limits are consistent with the track data and also make it possible to derive an upper limit to the neutron exposure age of EETA 79001 of 55 Myr in the SPB regolith.

  13. The case for a Martian origin of the shergottites - Nitrogen and noble gases in EETA 79001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Pepin, R. O.

    1984-01-01

    Nitrogen and noble gases have been measured in samples of a glass inclusion and its surrounding basaltic matrix in an Antarctic shergottite meteorite (EETA 79001). The nitrogen component was found trapped in the glass, but not the matrix, having a value of delta 15-N = +190 per mil. Ratios between abundances of Ar-40 and N-14, N-15 and N-14 in the glass are consistent with the dilution of a Martian atmospheric component. The trapped noble gases in the glass are similar to elemental and isotopic compositions measured in Mars atmosphere by the Viking lander, and are in general agreement with previous measurements. It is suggested that a sample of Martian atmosphere has been caught in the EETA 79001 glass, and that other shergottite, nakhilite, and chassignite meteorites with similar features probably also originated on Mars. A table is presented which lists the abundances of nitrogen and the noble gases found in the non-glassy matrix and in the EETA 79001 glass.

  14. Thermoluminescence and the shock and reheating history of meteorites. III - The shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, F. A.; Haq, M.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1986-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) measurements on Shergotty, ALHA 77005, Zagami, and EETA 79001 (lithology A) have been used to obtain further information on the shock history of these meteorites. The level of TL sensitivity in the shergottites varied by a factor of 10, but was always low, probably reflecting the amount of crystalline material in the maskelynite. There are trends in the TL peak temperature, peak width, and TL sensitivity which are believed to be associated with different proportions of feldspar in high- and low-temperature forms. This interpretation is consistent with the observed changes induced in the TL properties by annealing shergottites at 400-900 C. It is suggested that the observed trends were produced during postshock crystallization at a variety of cooling rates, the increasing order of cooling rate being EETA 79001, Zagami, ALHA 77005, and Shergotty, and that there is high-temperature feldspar present in all the samples. This implies a postshock temperature above 600 C, and a small (less than 10 m) size of the ejecta. Current theories are well able to explain how objects of this size could have been ejected from Mars.

  15. SNC meteorites - Clues to Martian petrologic evolution?. [Shergottites, Nakhlites and Chassigny

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcsween, H. Y., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Shergottites, nakhlites and the Chassigny meteorites (SNC group) may have originated on Mars. The shergottites are medium-grained basalts, the nakhlites are pyroxenites and the Chassigny is a dunite. The SNC group is petrologically diverse but differs from all other known achondrites in terms of mineral chemistry, the redox state, the oxygen isotopic composition and the radiometric ages. The SNC stones are mafic and ultramafic cumulate rocks with mineralogies that indicate rapid cooling and crystallization from tholeiitic magmas which contained water and experienced a high degree of oxidation. The characteristics suggest formation from a large parent body, i.e., a planet, but not earth. The estimated ages for the rocks match the estimated ages for several mapped Martian volcanoes in the Tharsis region. Additionally, the elemental and isotopic abundances of atmospheric gases embedded in melts in the SNC stones match Viking Lander data for the Martian atmosphere. However, reasons are cited for discounting the possibility that a large meteorite(s) collided with Mars about 180 myr ago and served as the mechanism for ejecting the SNC stones to earth.

  16. Formation and Preservation of the Depleted and Enriched Shergottite Isotopic Reservoirs in a Convecting Martian Mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Jones, John H.

    2015-01-01

    There is compelling isotopic and crater density evidence for geologically recent volcanism on Mars, in the last 100-200 million years and possibly in the last 50 million years. This volcanism is due to adiabatic decompression melting and thus requires some type of present-day convective upwelling in the martian mantle. On the other hand, martian meteorites preserve evidence for at least 3 distinct radiogenic isotopic reservoirs. Anomalies in short-lived isotopic systems (Sm-146, Nd-142, Hf-182, W-182) require that these reservoirs must have developed in the first 50 to 100 million years of Solar System history. The long-term preservation of chemically distinct reservoirs has sometimes been interpreted as evidence for the absence of mantle convection and convective mixing on Mars for most of martian history, a conclusion which is at odds with the evidence for young volcanism. This apparent paradox can be resolved by recognizing that a variety of processes, including both inefficient mantle mixing and geographic separation of isotopic reservoirs, may preserve isotopic heterogeneity on Mars in an actively convecting mantle. Here, we focus on the formation and preservation of the depleted and enriched isotopic and trace element reservoirs in the shergottites. In particular, we explore the possible roles of processes such as chemical diffusion and metasomatism in dikes and magma chambers for creating the isotopically enriched shergottites. We also consider processes that may preserve the enriched reservoir against convective mixing for most of martian history.

  17. The behavior of Fe3+/∑Fe during partial melting of spinel lherzolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaetani, Glenn A.

    2016-07-01

    This study presents an internally consistent model for the behavior of Fe3+/∑Fe during partial melting of spinel lherzolite. The Fe3+/∑Fe ratio for olivine is calculated on the basis of point defect thermodynamics, and the oxidation states of iron in the other solid phases are calculated using Fe3+/Fe2+ distribution between olivine and orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, or spinel. Conservation of mass is used to relate the Fe3+/Fe2+ ratio of partial melt to the concentrations of Fe3+ and Fe2+ in the initial and residual solids as a function of pressure, temperature, and oxygen fugacity. Results from isobaric batch melting calculations demonstrate that the Fe3+/∑Fe ratio of the partial melt decreases with increasing melt fraction. Conversely, the Fe3+/∑Fe ratio of the partial melt increases with increasing melt fraction during decompression batch melting. The relative oxygen fugacity of the upper mantle depends on both the oxidation state of iron and mantle potential temperature. Results from incremental decompression melting calculations in which 1% melt is produced for each 100 MPa of decompression and then removed from the residual solid indicate that relative oxygen fugacity calculated from the oxidation state of iron in basaltic glass does not represent a unique value for the oceanic upper mantle but, rather, reflects conditions in the lower portion of the melting regime. A 100 °C change in mantle potential temperature produces a change in relative oxygen fugacity of ∼0.8 log units, similar to the global range inferred from mid-ocean ridge basalt glasses. It is necessary, therefore, to compare relative oxygen fugacity calculated from basaltic glass with proxies for potential temperature before drawing conclusions on heterogeneity of the oxidation state of iron in the oceanic upper mantle. Results from model calculations also suggest that the sub-arc mantle is intrinsically more oxidizing than the oceanic mantle because it is cooler. The global correlation

  18. Exposure History of Shergottites Dar Al Gani 476/489/670/735 and Sayh Al Uhaymir 005

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiizumi, N.; Caffee, M.; Jull, A.J.T.; Klandrud, S.E.

    2001-04-01

    Four basaltic shergottites, Dar al Gani (DaG) 476, 489, 670, and 735 were found in the Libyan Sahara [1-3]; two basaltic shergottites, Sayh al Uhaymir (SaU) 005 and 008 were found in Oman [4]. Recently SaU 051 was also recognized as a possible pair of SaU 005/008. Although the collection sites were different, the texture, bulk chemical compositions, and noble gas compositions of these shergottites are similar [e.g. 4]. However, cosmic-ray-produced noble gases alone cannot unambiguously constrain the irradiation history for these objects. From a combination of cosmogenic stable- and radionuclides, exposure histories, and ejection conditions from the hypothesized Martian parent body, and genetic relationships between the Martian meteorites can be determined. In addition to those nuclides produced by galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are those produced by solar cosmic rays (SCR). Radionuclides produced by SCRs reside in the uppermost few centimeters of extraterrestrial bodies and their presence in meteorites indicates the degree to which a meteorite has been ablated. Previous work shows ablation is less than 1-2 cm in at least three shergottites, ALH 77005, Shergotty, and EETA79001 [e.g. 5] and so it is possible some SCR signal may be observed in these meteorites. This suggests that the atmospheric entry velocity and/or entry angle of these shergottites is much lower than the velocity and/or entry angle of most ordinary chondrites. We report here preliminary results of cosmogenic nuclides, {sup 14}C (half-life = 5,730 yr), {sup 36}Cl (3.01 x 10{sup 5} yr), {sup 26}Al (7.05 x 10{sup 5} yr), and {sup 10}Be(1.5 x 10{sup 6} yr).

  19. Low temperature fertile spinel lherzolites from Sikhote-Alin, Far East Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluemel, Andrea; Ntaflos, Theo; Ashchepkov, Igor; Prikhodko, Vladimir; Gregoire, Michél

    2013-04-01

    The Pacific margin of East and NE Asia is part of the circum-Pacific orogenic system and could be considered as a tectonic collage of nappes, displaced terrenes, accreted island arcs and accretionary complexes. This tectonic environment is the consequence of the convergence between the Palaeo-Pacific plate and the eastern Eurasian continent. It could be divided into three main units; the Koryak-Kamachatka fold belt, the Sikhote-Alin fold belt and the Okhotsk volcanic belt. The broadly defined Sikhote-Alin fold belt here refers to a nearly N-S belt extending north from the southern shoreline of the Okhotsk Sea south to the northern margin of the Japan Sea. The Mantle xenoliths come from Tuttochi, a locality close to Khabarovsk, Sikhote-Alin. The xenoliths are spinel peridotites, their sizes vary from 3 to 8 cm in diameter and they are exceptional fresh. The majority of the samples are coarse grained with protogranular texture. However a number of xenoliths have transitional textures from relatively coarse grained protogranular to fine grained equigranular textures. Hydrous phases such as phlogopite and/or amphibole were not found so far. The most striking feature is the fact that part of the xenoliths show heavy infiltration of melts. These melts circulate intergranular and react with the neighbor minerals creating veinlets with variable thickness that consists of glass and new forming minerals. Especially, their interaction with orthopyroxene results often to its almost entirely consumption, indicating that the invaded melt was silica undersaturated but rich in alkalies. According to their modal composition the xenoliths are fertile spinel lherzolites as also can be inferred from the compositions of the constituent minerals. Olivine is forsteritic with Fo varying from 89.3 to 90.1 and the average NiO content is 0.37 wt%. The mg# of orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene vary from 0.895-0.904 and 0.904-0.915, respectively and the spinel is Al2O3-rich with an average of cr

  20. Microprobe studies of microtomed particles of white druse salts in shergottite EETA 79001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The white druse material in Antarctic shergottite EETA 79001 has attracted much attention as a possible sample fo Martian aqueous deposits. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) was used to determine trace element analyses of small particles of this material obtained by handpicking of likely grains from broken surfaces of the meteorite. Electron microprobe work was attempted on grain areas as large as 150x120 microns. Backscattered electron images show considerable variations in brightness, and botryoidal structures were observed. Microprobe analyses showed considerable variability both within single particles and between different particles. Microtomed surfaces of small selected particles were shown to be very useful in obtaining information on the texture and composition of rare lithologies like the white druse of EETA 79001. This material is clearly heterogeneous on all distance scales, so a large number of further analyses will be required to characterize it.

  1. A Younger Age for ALH84001 and Its Geochemical Link to Shergottite Sources in Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapen, T. J.; Righter, M.; Brandon, A. D.; Debaille, V.; Beard, B. L.; Shafer, J. T.; Peslier, A. H.

    2010-04-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 (ALH) is the oldest known igneous rock from Mars and has been used to constrain its early history. Lutetium-hafnium (Lu-Hf) isotope data for ALH indicate an igneous age of 4.091 ± 0.030 billion years, nearly coeval with an interval of heavy bombardment and cessation of the martian core dynamo and magnetic field. The calculated Lu/Hf and Sm/Nd (samarium/neodymium) ratios of the ALH parental magma source indicate that it must have undergone extensive igneous processing associated with the crystallization of a deep magma ocean. This same mantle source region also produced the shergottite magmas (dated 150 to 570 million years ago), possibly indicating uniform igneous processes in Mars for nearly 4 billion years.

  2. A younger age for ALH84001 and its geochemical link to shergottite sources in Mars.

    PubMed

    Lapen, T J; Righter, M; Brandon, A D; Debaille, V; Beard, B L; Shafer, J T; Peslier, A H

    2010-04-16

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 (ALH) is the oldest known igneous rock from Mars and has been used to constrain its early history. Lutetium-hafnium (Lu-Hf) isotope data for ALH indicate an igneous age of 4.091 +/- 0.030 billion years, nearly coeval with an interval of heavy bombardment and cessation of the martian core dynamo and magnetic field. The calculated Lu/Hf and Sm/Nd (samarium/neodymium) ratios of the ALH parental magma source indicate that it must have undergone extensive igneous processing associated with the crystallization of a deep magma ocean. This same mantle source region also produced the shergottite magmas (dated 150 to 570 million years ago), possibly indicating uniform igneous processes in Mars for nearly 4 billion years. PMID:20395507

  3. A younger age for ALH84001 and its geochemical link to shergottite sources in Mars.

    PubMed

    Lapen, T J; Righter, M; Brandon, A D; Debaille, V; Beard, B L; Shafer, J T; Peslier, A H

    2010-04-16

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 (ALH) is the oldest known igneous rock from Mars and has been used to constrain its early history. Lutetium-hafnium (Lu-Hf) isotope data for ALH indicate an igneous age of 4.091 +/- 0.030 billion years, nearly coeval with an interval of heavy bombardment and cessation of the martian core dynamo and magnetic field. The calculated Lu/Hf and Sm/Nd (samarium/neodymium) ratios of the ALH parental magma source indicate that it must have undergone extensive igneous processing associated with the crystallization of a deep magma ocean. This same mantle source region also produced the shergottite magmas (dated 150 to 570 million years ago), possibly indicating uniform igneous processes in Mars for nearly 4 billion years.

  4. Ar-Ar and Rb-Sr Ages of the Tissint Olivine-phyric Martian Shergottite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Herzog, G. F.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Turin, B.; Lindsay, F. N.; Delaney, J. S.; Swisher, C. C., III; Agee, C.

    2013-01-01

    The fifth martian meteorite fall, Tissint, is an olivine-phyric shergottite that contains olivine macrocrysts (approximately 1.5 mm) [1]. [2] reported the Sm-Nd age of Tissint as 596 plus or minus 23 Ma along with Rb-Sr data that defined no isochron. [3] reported Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd ages of 583 plus or minus 86 Ma and 616 plus or minus 67 Ma, respectively. The cosmic-ray exposure ages of Tissint are 1.10 plus or minus 0.15 Ma based on 10Be [4], and 1.0-1.1 Ma, based on 3He, 21Ne, and 38Ar [5,6].We report Ar-Ar ages and Rb-Sr data.

  5. Preliminary Report on U-Th-Pb Isotope Systematics of the Olivine-Phyric Shergottite Tissint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriwaki, R.; Usui, T.; Yokoyama, T.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Geochemical studies of shergottites suggest that their parental magmas reflect mixtures between at least two distinct geochemical source reservoirs, producing correlations between radiogenic isotope compositions, and trace element abundances.. These correlations have been interpreted as indicating the presence of a reduced, incompatible-element- depleted reservoir and an oxidized, incompatible-element-rich reservoir. The former is clearly a depleted mantle source, but there has been a long debate regarding the origin of the enriched reservoir. Two contrasting models have been proposed regarding the location and mixing process of the two geochemical source reservoirs: (1) assimilation of oxidized crust by mantle derived, reduced magmas, or (2) mixing of two distinct mantle reservoirs during melting. The former clearly requires the ancient martian crust to be the enriched source (crustal assimilation), whereas the latter requires a long-lived enriched mantle domain that probably originated from residual melts formed during solidification of a magma ocean (heterogeneous mantle model). This study conducts Pb isotope and U-Th-Pb concentration analyses of the olivine-phyric shergottite Tissint because U-Th-Pb isotope systematics have been intensively used as a powerful radiogenic tracer to characterize old crust/sediment components in mantle- derived, terrestrial oceanic island basalts. The U-Th-Pb analyses are applied to sequential acid leaching fractions obtained from Tissint whole-rock powder in order to search for Pb isotopic source components in Tissint magma. Here we report preliminary results of the U-Th-Pb analyses of acid leachates and a residue, and propose the possibility that Tissint would have experienced minor assimilation of old martian crust.

  6. Garnet lherzolite xenoliths in the kimberlites of northern Lesotho: revised P-T equilibration conditions and upper mantle Palaeogeotherm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carswell, D. A.; Gibb, F. G. F.

    1987-12-01

    Evidence is presented that the inflected palaeogeotherm for northern Lesotho, previously highlighted by Boyd (1973), Boyd and Nixon (1973, 1975), Finnerty and Boyd (1984, 1987), is essentially an artifact of the unsatisfactory, over-simplified barometer formulation (based on MacGregor 1974) employed. The absence of an inflection in the palaeogeotherm for Udachnaya, Siberia based on P-T estimates for garnet lherzolite xenoliths calculated with the same barometer, does not prove the reality of an inflected palaeogeotherm for northern Lesotho. Rather, it reflects, at least in part, chemical differences between the equivalent deformed, high- T xenoliths in these two areas — most importantly expressed in the respective contents of Jadeite relative to ureyite in the constituent orthopyroxenes. Accurate estimation of P-T equilibration conditions for garnet lherzolite xenoliths requires both complete and precise mineral analyses and adequate consideration of the influence of minor elements, such as Cr and Na, on the element exchange reaction thermometers and barometers employed. The barometer formulation of Nickel and Green (1985) is judged to be the best currently available. As no single thermometer is entirely satisfactory and dependable throughout the P-T range of interest, equilibration temperatures are currently best assessed as a mean value obtained from application of the most accurate formulations for both the two-pyroxene solvus thermometer (Bertrand and Mercier 1985) and Fe2+-Mg2+ exchange reactions between garnet-clinopyroxene (Powell 1985), garnet-orthopyroxene (Harley 1984a) and garnet-olivine (O'Neill and Wood 1979) mineral pairs. Such ‘best’ P-T estimates for xenoliths in the kimberlites of northern Lesotho indicate a somewhat elevated, non-inflected, upper mantle palaeogeotherm, compatible with a 120 145 km thick thermally conductive lithosphere above a convecting asthenosphere. The common coarse textured, chemically depleted, garnet lherzolite

  7. Partial Melting of Garnet Lherzolite with H2o and CO2 at 3 GPa: Implications for Intraplate Magmatism.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baasner, A.; Medard, E.; Laporte, D.

    2014-12-01

    The origin and source rock of alkali-rich and SiO2-undersatured magmas in the Earth`s upper mantle have been under debate for a long time. The garnet signature in rare earth element patterns of such magmas suggest a garnet-bearing source rock, which could be garnet lherzolite or garnet pyroxenite. Partial melting experiments were performed at 3 GPa and 1345-1445 °C in a piston-cylinder apparatus using mixtures of natural lherzolite with 0.4-0.7 wt% H2O and 0.4-0.7 wt% CO2 as starting materials. Different designs of AuPd capsules were used for melt extraction. Mineral and melt phases were analysed with electron microprobe and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The degree of partial melting in the experiments ranges from ~20% to ~4% and decreases with decreasing temperature and decreasing volatile content in the starting material. All samples contain olivine and orthopyroxene. Garnet is present in experiments performed below 1420 °C. The amount of clinopyroxene decreases with increasing degree of partial melting and volatile concentration in the starting material. Depending on the capsule design the melts quenched to glasses or to a mixture of quench crystals and residual glass. The composition of the partial melts ranges from basalts through picrobasalts to foidites. The alkali concentration increases and the SiO2 concentration decreases with decreasing degree of partial melting and increasing volatile concentration in the starting material. The partial melts are similar in many aspects to alkali intraplate magmas (basanites to melilitites), although they are richer in MgO. Compositions closer to natural basanites could be obtained either at lower degree of melting (and lower volatile contents) or through olivine fractionation. Our results strongly suggests that. SiO2-undersaturated intraplate magmas can be generated by mantle melting of garnet-lherzolite in the presence of H2O and CO2 in the Earth`s upper mantle at 3 GPa (~100 km depth).

  8. Petrogenesis of the SNC (shergottites, nakhlites, chassignites) meteorites - Implications for their origin from a large dynamic planet, possibly Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. R.; Laul, J. C.; Ma, M. S.; Huston, T.; Verkouteren, R. M.; Lipschutz, M. E.; Schmitt, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Comprehensive chemical data are presented on the shergottites Shergotty, Zagami, Allan Hills (ALHA) 77005, and the new member Elephant Moraine (EETA) 79001 using results of sequential instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis. The close relationship of the Antarctic shergotites indicates that ALHA 77005 is a residual source produced by incongruent melting of a source similar in bulk composition to EETA 79001A and that EETA 79001B and the interstitial phases in EETA 79001A are the melts produced by such melting episodes. The large ion lithophile LIL) trace element abundanced of the shergottites require variable but extensive degrees of nomodal melting of isotopically constrained parent sources. The SNG sources are consistent with their derivation by extensive fractionation of a primitive magma initially produced from a source having chondritic refractory LIL trace element abundances. Petrogenetic and age relationships among SNC meteorites suggest a single complex-provenance on a dynamic planet not unlike earth, probably Mars.

  9. Identification of Martian Regolith Sulfur Components in Shergottites Using Sulfur K Xanes and Fe/S Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, S. R.; Ross, D. K.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2014-01-01

    Based on isotopic anomalies in Kr and Sm, Sr-isotopes, S-isotopes, XANES results on S-speciation, Fe/S ratios in sulfide immiscible melts [5], and major element correlations with S determined in impact glasses in EET79001 Lith A & Lith B and Tissint, we have provided very strong evidence for the occurrence of a Martian regolith component in some impact melt glasses in shergottites. Using REE measurements by LA-ICP-MS in shergottite impact glasses, Barrat and co-workers have recently reported conflicting conclusions about the occurrence of Martian regolith components: (a) Positive evidence was reported for a Tissint impact melt, but (b) Negative evidence for impact melt in EET79001 and another impact melt in Tissint. Here, we address some specific issues related to sulfur speciation and their relevance to identifying Martian regolith components in impact glasses in EET79001 and Tissint using sulfur K XANES and Fe/S ratios in sulfide immiscible melts. XANES and FE-SEM measurements in approx. 5 micron size individual sulfur blebs in EET79001 and Tissint glasses are carried out by us using sub-micron size beams, whereas Barrat and coworkers used approx. 90 micron size laser spots for LA- ICP-MS to determine REE abundances in bulk samples of the impact melt glasses. We contend that Martian regolith components in some shergottite impact glasses are present locally, and that studying impact melts in various shergottites can give evidence both for and against regolith components because of sample heterogeneity.

  10. Mineralogical Comparison of Olivine in Shergottites and A Shocked L Chondrite: Implications for Shock Histories of Brown Olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takenouchi, A.; Mikouchi, T.; Yamaguchi, A.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Most Martian meteorites are heavily shocked, exhibiting numerous shock features, for example undulatory extinction of olivine and pyroxene, the presence of diaplectic glass ("maskelynite") and the formation of shock melt. Among these shock features, olivine darkening ("brown" olivine) is unique in Martian meteorites because no other meteorite group shows such a feature. Although the presence of brown olivine in shergottites was reported thirty years ago, detailed observation by TEM has not been performed until the NWA 2737 chassignite was discovered, whose olivine is darkened, being completely black in hand specimen. Fe metal nano-particles were found in NWA 2737 olivine which are considered to have been formed by olivine reduction during heavy shock. Subsequently, magnetite nano-particles were also found in other Martian meteorites and the coexistence of Fe metal and magnetite nano-particles was reported in the NWA 1950 shergottite and some Fe metal nano-particles were mantled by magnetite. Therefore, the formation process of nano-particles seems to be complex. Because "brown" olivine is unique to Martian meteorites, they have a potential to constrain their shock conditions. In order to better understand the shock history of Martian meteorites, we compared olivine in several shergottites with that in a highly-shocked L chondrite which contains ringwoodite.

  11. Feldspathic Clasts in Yamato 86032: Remnants of the Lunar Crust with Implications for its Formation and Impact History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L.; Bogard, D.; Yamaguchi, A.; Shih, C.-Y.; Ebihara, M.; Reese, Y.; Garrison, D.; Takeda, H.

    2006-01-01

    Yamato (Y)-86032 is a relatively large, feldspathic lunar highlands meteorite composed of a variety of highland lithologies. Low bulk contents of Th and Fe indicated that it came from a region of the moon far distant from the Procellarum KREEP Terrain (PKT) and the Apollo landing sites, perhaps from the farside. A large (5.2 x 3.6 cm) slab was cut from Y-86032 . We report results from coordinated textural, mineralogical-petrological, chemical, and isotopic studies of lithologies identified in the slab, emphasizing the results of Ar-39/Ar-40, Rb-Sr, and Sm-Nd chronological studies as well as Sm-isotopic studies. These studies characterize the history of Y-86032 and its precursors in the farside mega-regolith, leading to inferences about the formation and evolution of the lunar crust. Textural studies establish that the Y-86032 breccia is composed of a variety of highland components including feldspathic breccias, and other components, such as possible VLT mare basalts. Impact melt veins smoothly abut the other lithologies. Thus, Y-86032 experienced at least two impact events. These impacts occurred on a predominantly feldspathic protolith, which formed 4.43+/-0.03 Ga ago as determined from a Sm-Nd isochron for mineral clasts separated from the two dominant lithologies. Initial Nd-143/Nd-144 in the protolith at that time was -0.64+/-0.13 epsilon-units below Nd-143/Nd-144 in reservoirs having chondritic Sm/Nd ratios, consistent with prior fractionation of mafic cumulates from the LMO. Although the mineral chemistry of these clasts differs in detail from that of minerals in Apollo 16 Ferroan Anorthosites (FANs), the Rb-Sr studies establish that the initial Sr-87/Sr-86 in them was the same as in the FANs.

  12. Thermal history of Iodranites Yamato 74357 and MAC88177 as inferred from the chemical zoning of pyroxene and olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, M.; Takeda, H.

    1994-03-01

    The chemical zoning profiles of pyroxene and olivine in the Yamato (Y) 74357 and MacAlpine Hills (MAC) 88177 acapulcoite-lodranite primitive achondrites were measured by using an electron probe microanalyzer in order to study their cooling histories. The reverse zoning of Fe and Mg, and MnO enrichment were observed within a few tens of micrometers from the rim of orthopyroxene in Y74357; this is probably related to reduction. The CaO of orthopyroxene in Y74357 and MAC88177 decreases gradually toward the rim, as do the Cr2O3, Al2O3, TiO2, and Na2O) in orthopyroxene and augite. These results suggest that interstitial melt was present and was then extracted at a late stage in the formation of these meteorites. In addition to these observations, the absence of Fe-Mg reverse zoning and MnO enrichment at the rim of MAC88177 orthopyroxene implies that the reduction process of Y74357 took place after partial melting. A calculated cooling rate of 2-3 C/yr gives the best fit for the observed Fe-Mg and CaO profiles of orthopyroxene, and CaO of olivine in Y74357, suggesting that the zonings were formed during the same event that probably caused the reduction. Thermal model calculations show that the maximum attainable temperature in the parent body was about 1000 C, if the decay of Al-26 is the heat source and if the Al-26/Al-27 ratio is 5 X 10-6, identical to that used for the ordinary chondrite parent body. Partial melt was probably produced at this temperature; this is an important part of the history of some primitive achondrites.

  13. Martian Pyroxenes in the Shergottite Meteorites; Zagami, SAU005, DAG476 and EETA79001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, N.; Benedix, G. K.; Bland, P.; Hamilton, V. E.

    2010-12-01

    The geology and surface mineralogy of Mars is characterised using remote sensing techniques such as thermal emission spectroscopy (TES) from instruments on a number of spacecraft currently orbiting Mars or gathered from roving missions on the Martian surface. However, the study of Martian meteorites is also important in efforts to further understand the geological history of Mars or to interpret mission data as they are believed to be the only available samples that give us direct clues as to Martian igneous processes [1]. We have recently demonstrated that the spectra of Martian-specific minerals can be determined using micro-spectroscopy [2] and that these spectra can be reliably obtained from thin sections of Martian meteorites [3]. Accurate modal mineralogy of these meteorites is also important [4]. In this study we are using a variety of techniques to build upon previous studies of these particular samples in order to fully characterise the nature of the 2 common pyroxenes found in Martian Shergottites; pigeonite and augite [5], [6]. Previous studies have shown that the Shergottite meteorites are dominated by pyroxene (pigeonite and augite in varying quantities) [4], [5], commonly but not always olivine, plagioclase or maskelynite/glass and also hydrous minerals, which separate the Martian meteorites from other achondrites [7]. Our microprobe study of meteorites Zagami, EETA79001, SAU005 and DAG476 in thin-section at the Natural History Museum, London shows a chemical variability within both the pigeonite and augite composition across individual grains in all thin sections; variation within either Mg or Ca concentration varies from core to rim within the grains. This variation can also be seen in modal mineralogy maps using SEM-derived element maps and the Photoshop® technique previously described [4], and in new micro-spectroscopy data, particularly within the Zagami meteorite. New mineral spectra have been gathered from the Shergottite thin-sections by

  14. On the recent enrichment of subcontinental lithosphere: A detailed UPb study of spinel lherzolite xenoliths, Yukon, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignan, Jean; Ludden, John; Francis, Don

    1996-11-01

    Lead strontium, and osmium isotopic data have been obtained for whole rocks and mineral separates (olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, and spinel) for spinel lherzolite xenoliths hosted by lavas of the Quaternary Alligator Lake volcanic centre, southern Yukon. Whole-rock xenolith samples display a large variation of lead concentrations, from 16 ppb for a harzburgite to up to 400 ppb for a lherzolite. However, their lead isotope ratios are relatively homogeneous with 206Pb /204Pb of 19.07 ± 0.08, 207Pb /204Pb of 15.65 ± 0.07, and 208Pb /204Pb of 38.67 ± 0.17 ( n = 7). However, the 238U /204Pb ratios display a large variation, from 12.2 to 46.5, and do not correlate with indices of fertility such as calcium or aluminum content. Mineral separates yield even larger variations in lead isotopic composition and lead and uranium concentrations. Some olivine fractions have both the lowest radiogenic compositions ( 206Pb /204Pb = 18.75 ) and the lowest 238U /204Pb ratios (˜3.1). Clinopyroxenes (cpx) display the highest lead and uranium concentrations (up to 1277 ppb and 195 ppb, respectivelly) and generally similar or more radiogenic lead isotopic composition and higher 238U /204Pb ratios than their whole-rock compositions. Orthopyroxene and spinel fractions yield intermediate compositions between olivine and cpx. Although whole rocks and cpx for individual samples yield almost identical 87Sr /86Sr , the xenoliths ( n = 5) display a large variation of strontium isotopic compositions ( 87Sr /86Sr from 0.07033 to 0.7050), lead and strontium isotope ratios of cpx and the distribution of the data in a UPb isochron diagram suggest that the subcontinental lithosphere under the Yukon was affected by a recent (< ˜30 Ma) enrichment in uranium, lead, and strontium. The metasomatic fluid/magma might have had an isotopic composition close to that of some sediments in the northern Pacific Ocean. When compared to K d values reported in the literature, olivine is enriched in

  15. Evidence for a late thermal event of unequilibrated enstatite chondrites: a Rb-Sr study of Qingzhen and Yamato 6901 (EH3) and Khairpur (EL6)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torigoye, N.; Shima, M.

    1993-01-01

    The Rb-Sr whole rock and internal systematics of two EH3 chondrites, Qingzhen and Yamato 6901, and of one EL6 chondrite, Khairpur, were determined. The internal Rb-Sr systematics of the EH3 chondrites are highly disturbed. Fractions corresponding to sulfide phases show excess 87Sr, while other fractions corresponding to silicate phases produce a linear trend on a Rb-Sr evolution diagram. If these linear relations are interpreted as isochrons, the ages of the silicate phases are 2.12?? 0.23 Ga and 2.05 ??0.33 Ga with the initial Sr isotopic ratios of 0.7112 ?? 0.0018 and 0.7089 ?? 0.0032, for Qingzhen and Yamato 6901, respectively. The Rb-Sr results are interpeted as indicative of a late thermal event about 2Ga ago on the parent bodies of these EH3 chondrites. These ages agree well with previously published K-Ar ages. An older isochron age of 4.481 ?? 0.036 Ga with a low initial Sr isotopic ratio of 0.69866 ?? 0.00038 was obtained for the data from silicate fractions of Khairpur, indicating early petrological equilibrium on the parent body of EL6 chondrites. -from Authors

  16. Nitrogen and noble gases in a glass sample from the LEW88516 shergottite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Richard H.; Pepin, Robert O.

    1993-01-01

    A glass separate from the LEW88516 shergottite was analyzed by step-wise combustion for N and noble gases to determine whether it contained trapped gas similar in composition to the martian atmosphere-like component previously observed in lithology C of EETA79001. Excesses of Ar-40 and Xe-129 were in fact observed in this glass, although the amounts of these excesses less than or = to 20% of those seen in the latter meteorite, and are comparable to the amounts seen in whole-rock analyses of LEW88516. The isotopic composition of N in LEW88516 does not show an enrichment in delta N-15 commensurate with the amount of isotopically-heavy N expected from the noble gases excesses. One must posit some extreme assumptions about the nature of the N components present in LEW88516 in order to allow the presence of the trapped nitrogen component. Alternatively, the N has somehow been decoupled from the noble gases, and was either never present of has been lost.

  17. Postcrystallization metasomatism in shergottites: Evidence from the paired meteorites LAR 06319 and LAR 12011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, Geoffrey H.; Liu, Yang; Chen, Yang; Pernet-Fisher, John F.; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    2016-03-01

    Apatite is the major volatile-bearing phase in Martian meteorites, containing structurally bound fluorine, chlorine, and hydroxyl ions. In apatite, F is more compatible than Cl, which in turn is more compatible than OH. During degassing, Cl strongly partitions into the exsolved phase, whereas F remains in the melt. For these reasons, the volatile concentrations within apatite are predictable during magmatic differentiation and degassing. Here, we present compositional data for apatite and merrillite in the paired enriched, olivine-phyric shergottites LAR 12011 and LAR 06319. In addition, we calculate the relative volatile fugacities of the parental melts at the time of apatite formation. The apatites are dominantly OH-rich (calculated by stoichiometry) with variable yet high Cl contents. Although several other studies have found evidence for degassing in the late-stage mineral assemblage of LAR 06319, the apatite evolutionary trends cannot be reconciled with this interpretation. The variable Cl contents and high OH contents measured in apatites are not consistent with fractionation either. Volatile fugacity calculations indicate that water and fluorine activities remain relatively constant, whereas there is a large variation in the chlorine activity. The Martian crust is Cl-rich indicating that changes in Cl contents in the apatites may be related to an external crustal source. We suggest that the high and variable Cl contents and high OH contents of the apatite are the results of postcrystallization interaction with Cl-rich, and possibly water-rich, crustal fluids circulating in the Martian crust.

  18. Cathodoluminescence Characterization of Maskelynite and Alkali Feldspar in Shergottite (Dhofar 019)

    SciTech Connect

    Kayama, M.; Nakazato, T.; Nishido, H.; Ninagawa, K.; Gucsik, A.

    2009-08-17

    Dhofar 019 is classified as an olivine-bearing basaltic shergottite and consists of subhedral grains of pyroxene, olivine, feldspar mostly converted to maskelynite and minor alkali feldspar. The CL spectrum of its maskelynite exhibits an emission band at around 380 nm. Similar UV-blue emission has been observed in the plagioclase experimentally shocked at 30 and 40 GPa, but not in terrestrial plagioclase. This UV-blue emission is a notable characteristic of maskelynite. CL spectrum of alkali feldspar in Dhofar 019 has an emission bands at around 420 nm with no red emission. Terrestrial alkali feldspar actually consists of blue and red emission at 420 and 710 nm assigned to Al-O{sup -}-Al and Fe{sup 3+} centers, respectively. Maskelynite shows weak and broad Raman spectral peaks at around 500 and 580 cm{sup -1}. The Raman spectrum of alkali feldspar has a weak peak at 520 cm{sup -1}, whereas terrestrial counterpart shows the emission bands at 280, 400, 470, 520 and 1120 cm{sup -1}. Shock pressure on this meteorite transformed plagioclase and alkali feldspar into maskelynite and almost glass phase, respectively. It eliminates their luminescence centers, responsible for disappearance of yellow and/or red emission in CL of maskelynite and alkali feldspar. The absence of the red emission band in alkali feldspar can also be due to the lack of Fe{sup 3+} in the feldspar as it was reported for some lunar feldspars.

  19. Experimental quantification of P-T conditions of mantle refertilisation at shallow depth under spreading ridges and formation of plagioclase + spinel lherzolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalot-Prat, Françoise; Falloon, Trevor J.; Green, David H.

    2014-05-01

    We studied the first-order melting process of differentiation in the Earth, and the major process of rejuvenation of the upper mantle after melting related to plate spreading (Chalot-Prat et al, 2010; 2013). We conducted experiments at High Pressure (0.75 and 0.5 GPa) and High Temperature (1260-1100°C) to obtain magma compositions in equilibrium with the mineral assemblages of a plagioclase + spinel lherzolite. These PT conditions prevail at 17-30km below axial oceanic spreading ridges. We used a "trial and error" approach in a system involving nine elements (Cr-Na-Fe-Ca-Mg-Al-Si-Ti-Ni). This approaches as closely as possible a natural mantle composition, Cr being a key element in the system. Our objectives were : • to determine experimentally the compositions of melts in equilibrium with plagioclase + spinel lherzolite, with emphasis on the role of plagioclase composition in controlling melt compositions; • to test the hypothesis that MORB are produced at shallow depth (17-30kms) • to quantify liquid- and mantle residue compositional paths at decreasing T and low P to understand magma differentiation by "percolation-reaction" at shallow depth in the mantle; • to compare experimental mantle mineral compositions to those of re-fertilised oceanic mantle lithosphere outcropping at the axis of oceanic spreading ridges, enabling quantification of the pressure (i.e. depth) and temperature of the re-fertilisation process that leads to formation of plagioclase and indicates the minimum thickness of the lithosphere at ridge axes. In the normative basalt tetrahedron, liquids plot on two parallel cotectic lines from silica-oversaturated (basaltic andesite at 0.75 GPa or andesite at 0.5 GPa) at the calcic end to silica-undersaturated compositions (trachyte) at the sodic end. The lower the pressure, the greater the silica oversaturation. Besides the plagioclase solid solution has a dominant role in determining the solidus temperature of plagioclase + spinel lherzolites

  20. 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy of mineral assemblages in mantle spinel lherzolites from Cenozoic alkali basalt, eastern China: Petrological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Xi-Luo; Li, Yi-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Mineral assemblages in spinel lherzolite xenoliths from the Cenozoic alkali basalt of eastern China were analyzed by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy for Fe3+/ΣFe and distribution of Fe2+/Fe3+ in non-equivalent crystal cites. Orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene and spinel have 0.08-0.13, 0.19-0.31 and 0.13-0.23 Fe3+/ΣFe, respectively. The cation-exchange equilibrium temperatures, Fe3+ partition coefficient and oxygen fugacity of the upper mantle peridotites were calculated. The equilibrium temperatures are between 1103 K and 1405 K consistent with those reported elsewhere. The oxygen fugacities of spinel lherzolites calculated with olivine-orthopyroxene-spinel (ΔlogƒO2 from - 1.1 to 0) and clinopyroxene-olivine-orthopyroxene oxybarometers (ΔlogƒO2 from - 2.0 to 0.7) are consistent with previously reported upper mantle values.

  1. Partial melting of garnet lherzolite with water and carbon dioxide at 3 GPa using a new melt extraction technique: implications for intraplate magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baasner, Amrei; Médard, Etienne; Laporte, Didier; Hoffer, Géraldine

    2016-05-01

    The origin and source rocks of alkali-rich and SiO2-undersatured magmas in the Earth's upper mantle are still under debate. The garnet signature in rare earth element patterns of such magmas suggests a garnet-bearing source rock, which could be garnet lherzolite or garnet pyroxenite. Partial melting experiments were performed at 2.8 GPa and 1345-1445 °C in a piston-cylinder using mixtures of natural lherzolite with either 0.4 wt% H2O and 0.4 wt% CO2 or 0.7 wt% H2O and 0.7 wt% CO2. Different designs of AuPd capsules were used for melt extraction. The most successful design included a pentagonally shaped disc placed in the top part of the capsule for sufficient melt extraction. The degrees of partial melting range from 0.2 to 0.04 and decrease with decreasing temperature and volatile content. All samples contain olivine and orthopyroxene. The amounts of garnet and clinopyroxene decrease with increasing degree of partial melting until both minerals disappear from the residue. Depending on the capsule design, the melts quenched to a mixture of quench crystals and residual glass or to glass, allowing measurement of the volatile concentrations by Raman spectroscopy. The compositions of the partial melts range from basalts through picrobasalts to foidites. Compared to literature data for melting of dry lherzolites, the presence of H2O and CO2 reduces the SiO2 concentration and increases the MgO concentration of partial melts, but it has no observable effect on the enrichment of Na2O in the partial melts. The partial melts have compositions similar to natural melilitites from intraplate settings, which shows that SiO2-undersaturated intraplate magmas can be generated by melting of garnet lherzolite in the Earth's upper mantle in the presence of H2O and CO2.

  2. Lithium isotopes and light lithophile element abundances in shergottites: Evidence for both magmatic degassing and subsolidus diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udry, Arya; McSween, Harry Y.; Hervig, Richard L.; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    2016-01-01

    Degassed magmatic water was potentially the major source of surficial water on Mars. We measured Li, B, and Be abundances and Li isotope profiles in pyroxenes, olivines, and maskelynite from four compositionally different shergottites—Shergotty, QUE 94201, LAR 06319, and Tissint—using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). All three light lithophile elements (LLE) are incompatible: Li and B are soluble in H2O-rich fluids, whereas Be is insoluble. In the analyzed shergottites, Li concentration decreases and Be concentration increases from cores to rims in pyroxenes. However, B concentrations do not vary consistently with Li and Be abundances, except in QUE 94201 pyroxenes. Additionally, abundances of these three elements in olivines show a normal igneous-fractionation trend consistent with the crystallization of olivine before magma ascent and degassing. We expect that kinetic effects would lead to fractionation of 6Li in the vapor phase compared to 7Li during degassing. The Li isotope profiles, with increasing δ7Li from cores to rims, as well as Li and B profiles indicate possible degassing of hydrous fluids only for the depleted shergottite QUE 94201, as also supported by degassing models. Conversely, Shergotty, LAR 06319, and Tissint appear to have been affected by postcrystallization diffusion, based on their LLE and Li isotope profiles, accompanied by diffusion models. This process may represent an overlay on a degassing pattern. The LLE profiles and isotope profiles in QUE 94201 support the hypothesis that degassing of some basaltic shergottite magmas provided water to the Martian surface, although evidence may be obscured by subsolidus diffusion processes.

  3. Shear-induced ringwoodite formation in the Martian shergottite Dar al Gani 670

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greshake, Ansgar; Fritz, Jörg; Böttger, Ute; Goran, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Shock-produced melt veins in the Martian shergottite Dar al Gani 670 crosscut large olivine crystals. The upper part of one of these crystals appears to be sheared off and displaced along the shock vein. From the olivine-vein interface small lamellae of ringwoodite grow into the host crystal. The ≤1-3 μm wide and up to 20 μm long lamellae consist of small bands and blocks and are orientated along specific crystallographic orientations. Texture and composition, i.e., more Fe-rich than the host olivine, indicate that lamellae formed via incoherent diffusion-controlled growth. It is suggested that a combination of high particle velocities and shock-induced defects lead to enhanced diffusion rates. In addition, shearing caused grain size reduction allowing rapid Fe-Mg interchange and induced lattice defects serving as nucleation sites for ringwoodite. Crystallographic orientation of ringwoodite lamellae indicates that during shock deformation the [001]{hk0} slip system was activated in olivine. Natural high-pressure phases in Martian meteorite allow to constrain phase transitions taking place in the inaccessible Earth's mantle. High-pressure shear instabilities of olivine at subduction zones in 400-700 km depth are considered being responsible for deep earthquakes. At such p-T-conditions, breakdown of olivine results in formation of ringwoodite filled micro-anticracks which interact with each other finally leading to catastrophic shear failure. Our results strongly suggest that shearing itself contributes to a runaway process of enhanced ringwoodite formation and, thus, reinforces catastrophic material failure that may result in deep earthquakes.

  4. Recognizing the Effects of Terrestrial Contamination on D/H Ratios in Shergottite Phosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. K.; Ito, M.; Hervig, R.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios in shergottite phosphate minerals have been investigated by SIMS in the meteorites Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 94201 and Los Angeles. We have also collected electron probe data on these phosphates in order to characterize the phosphate minerals and attempt to document any potential hydrogen isotopic differences between chlor-apatite and whitlockite. In the section of Los Angeles we studied (748), we found both chlor-apatite and whitlockite, but in the section of QUE 94201,38 studied, we found only whitlockite. In both meteorites, D/H ratios (expressed in units of delta D (sub SMOW) vary, from terrestrial values up to approximately 5400%o in QUE 94201, and to approximately 3800%o in Los Angeles. We have carefully examined the ion probed pits with high-resolution FE-SEM. In most cases where the D/H ratios are low, we have iden-tified cracks that instersect the ion probe pit. These cracks are not visible in the optical microscope attached to the SIMS instument, making them impossible to avoid during SIMS data collection. We contend that the low ratios are a function of substantial terrestrial contamination, and that similar contamination is a likely factor in previously published studies on D/H ratios in martian phosphates. Here we highlight the difficulty of attempts to constrain the martian mantle D/H ratio using phosphate data, given that both terrestrial contamination and martian mantle hydrogen will move phosphate D/H ratios in the same direction, toward lower values. We note that our data include some of the most deuterium-rich values ever reported for martian phosphates. It is clear that some of our measurements are only minimally or totally uncontaminated, but the question arises, are intermediate values diminished because of true martian variability, or do they reflect contamination?

  5. Chalcophile and Siderophile Element Abundances in Kilbourne Hole Lherzolites: Distinguishing the Signature of Melt Depleted Primitive Mantle from Metasomatic Overprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J.; König, S.; Luguet, A.

    2013-12-01

    Selenium, tellurium and the highly siderophile elements in peridotites have the potential to illustrate planetary scale processes that are opaque to lithophile elements. However, the interpretation of chalcophile and siderophile element abundances relies heavily on the selection of representative mantle material and the determination of what processes have affected these elements since melt depletion. Whole rock and in-situ sulfide data demonstrate that chalcophile and HSE systematics of the upper mantle could be significantly modified through sulfide-metasomatism, particularly by C-O-H-S × Cl fluids[1] or sulfide melts[2] i.e., chalcophile and siderophile element abundances result from a complex interplay between sulfide addition and alteration of pre-existing sulfide. Here we present new bulk-rock S-Se-Te-PGE abundances on a suite (n = 17) of lherzolite and harzburgite xenoliths from Kilbourne Hole, USA[3, 4]. Mineral modal abundances, major element contents and LREE/HREE ratios for 10 of these xenoliths are consistent with varying degrees of melt depletion (≤ 20 %) whereas the remainder appear to have been affected by cryptic metasomatism, refertilization, or melt-rock interaction which affected lithophile element abundances [4]. While sulfur, Se and PGE budgets are primarily controlled by sulfides, 50 × 30% of Te in peridotite may be accounted for by Pt-Pd tellurides[5]. Although most Kilbourne Hole peridotite xenoliths have PGE characteristics consistent with varying degrees of melt depletion and somewhat scattered Se/Te ratios, KH96-24 has Pt-Pd-Te abundances consistent with Pt-Pd-telluride precipitation, in addition to petrographic evidence for alteration by secondary processes[4]. S/Se are well correlated within the suite. However, lherzolites that retain a strong melt-depletion signature have distinctly lower abundances of both S and Se (<65 ppm and <31 ppm respectively) compared to peridotites that have had their lithophile element budgets perturbed

  6. Compositions of Magmatic and Impact Melt Sulfides in Tissint And EETA79001: Precursors of Immiscible Sulfide Melt Blebs in Shergottite Impact Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. K.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L.; Agee, C.; Sutton, S.

    2013-01-01

    Immiscible sulfide melt spherules are locally very abundant in shergottite impact melts. These melts can also contain samples of Martian atmospheric gases [1], and cosmogenic nuclides [2] that are present in impact melt, but not in the host shergottite, indicating some components in the melt resided at the Martian surface. These observations show that some regolith components are, at least locally, present in the impact melts. This view also suggests that one source of the over-abundant sulfur in these impact melts could be sulfates that are major constituents of Martian regolith, and that the sulfates were reduced during shock heating to sulfide. An alternative view is that sulfide spherules in impact melts are produced solely by melting the crystalline sulfide minerals (dominantly pyrrhotite, Fe(1-x)S) that are present in shergottites [3]. In this abstract we report new analyses of the compositions of sulfide immiscible melt spherules and pyrrhotite in the shergottites Tissint, and EETA79001,507, and we use these data to investigate the possible origins of the immiscible sulfide melt spherules. In particular, we use the metal/S ratios determined in these blebs as potential diagnostic criteria for tracking the source material from which the numerous sulfide blebs were generated by shock in these melts.

  7. An Experimental Study of Eu/Gd Partitioning Between a Shergottite Melt and Pigeonite: Implications for the Oxygen Fugacity of the Martian Interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCanta, M. C.; Rutherford, M. J.; Jones, J. H.

    2002-01-01

    We experimentally investigated the partitioning behavior of Eu/Gd between a synthetic shergottite melt and pigeonite as a function of oxygen fugacity. This has implications for the oxidation state of the source region of the martian meteorites. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Carbonated alkali-silicate metasomatism in the North Africa lithosphere: Evidence from Middle Atlas spinel-lherzolites, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natali, C.; Beccaluva, L.; Bianchini, G.; Ellam, R. M.; Siena, F.; Stuart, F. M.

    2013-01-01

    Mantle xenoliths from Pliocene-Quaternary volcanic diatremes in the Azrou area (Middle Atlas, Morocco) include protogranular to porphyroclastic spinel lherzolites with superimposed metasomatic textures involving pyroxenes and spinel as the main reacting phases. Thermobarometric estimates on these xenoliths show pressure (P)-temperature (T) equilibrium conditions in the range 1.1-1.4 GPa and 900-1090 °C. Bulk rocks have flat heavy rare earth element (HREE) patterns (0.6-2.2 times chondrite) and are variably enriched in light REE (LREE; LaN/YbN between 1.1 and 15.6). The constituent clinopyroxenes are characterized by flat HREE distributions (5.1-11.9 times chondrite) and variable LREE enrichment with LaN/YbN from 0.4 to 25, which generally conform to the bulk rock chemistry. Trace elements characteristics of the metasomatised clinopyroxenes suggest that the metasomatasing agents were highly alkaline carbonate-rich melts such as nephelinites/melilitites or, as extreme, silico-carbonatites. Sr-Nd isotopic composition analyses carried out on clinopyroxene separates yield 87Sr/86Sr = 0.70243-0.70335, 143Nd/144Nd = 0.51273-0.51325. The helium isotope composition of olivines ranges from 6.2 to 6.8 Ra. These values, coupled with the radiogenic lead isotopic composition available in the literature, suggest that the Middle-Atlas lithospheric mantle interacted with HIMU-like metasomatic components. These are in turn related to local mantle upwellings along pre-existing tectonic lineaments - located at the northern border of the West African Craton - that were reactivated as far-field foreland reaction of the Africa-Europe collisional system.

  9. Feldspathic clasts in Yamato-86032: Remnants of the lunar crust with implications for its formation and impact history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyquist, L.; Bogard, D.; Yamaguchi, A.; Shih, C.-Y.; Karouji, Y.; Ebihara, M.; Reese, Y.; Garrison, D.; McKay, G.; Takeda, H.

    2006-12-01

    Low concentrations of Th and Fe in the Yamato (Y)-86032 bulk meteorite support earlier suggestions that Y-86032 comes from a region of the moon far distant from the Procellarum KREEP Terrain (PKT), probably from the lunar farside. 39Ar- 40Ar, Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and Sm-isotopic studies characterize the chronology of Y-86032 and its precursors in the mega regolith. One of the rock types present in a light gray breccia lithology is an anorthosite characterized by plagioclase with An ˜93, i.e., more sodic than lunar FANs, but with very low 87Rb/ 86Sr and 87Sr/ 86Sr similar to those of FANs. (FAN stands for Ferroan Anorthosite). This "An93 anorthosite" has Nd-isotopic systematics similar to those of nearside norites. A FAN-like "An97 anorthosite" is present in a second light-colored feldspathic breccia clast and has a more negative ɛNd value consistent with residence in a LREE-enriched environment as would be provided by an early plagioclase flotation crust on the Lunar Magma Ocean (LMO). This result contrasts with generally positive values of ɛNd for Apollo 16 FANs suggesting the possibility of assymetric development of the LMO. Other possible explanations for the dichotomy in ɛNd values are advanced in the text. The Y-86032 protolith formed at least 4.43 ± 0.03 Ga ago as determined from a Sm-Nd isochron for mineral fragments from the breccia clast composed predominantly of An93 anorthosite and a second clast of more varied composition. We interpret the mineral fragments as being predominatly from a cogenetic rock suite. An 39Ar- 40Ar age of 4.36-4.41 ± 0.035 Ga for a third clast composed predominantly of An97 anorthosite supports an old age for the protolith. Initial 143Nd/ 144Nd in that clast was -0.64 ± 0.13 ɛ-units below 143Nd/ 144Nd in reservoirs having chondritic Sm/Nd ratios, consistent with prior fractionation of mafic cumulates from the LMO. A maximum in the 39Ar- 40Ar age spectrum of 4.23 ± 0.03 Ga for a second sample of the same feldspathic breccia clast

  10. Gusev-Meridiani-Type Soil Component Dissolved in Some Shock Glasses in Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. K.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shi, C. Y.; Sutton, S.; Harrison, D. H.

    2015-01-01

    Modal analysis, based on APXS, MiniTES and Mossbauer results obtained at Gusev and Meridiani sites on Mars, indicates that Martian soils consist predominantly of igneous minerals such as olivine, pyroxene and feldspar (approximately70 - 80%), with the balance consisting of alteration minerals such as sulfates, silica and chlorides]. These studies also showed that soil alteration did not occur in-situ and igneous and alteration components are derived from different sources. Below, we analyse the chemical abundance data obtained from shock glasses in shergottites using mass balance mixing models. In these models, the two main end members used are (a) host rock chemical composition and (b) the GM soils average composition as the second component. Here, we consider the S-bearing phases as indicators of added alteration phases in the shock glasses and GM soils. Although the S-bearing phase in shock glasses occurs as micron sized sulfide blebs, we showed in earlier abstracts that sulfur was originally present as sulfate in impact glass-precursor materials and was subsequently reduced to sulfide during shock melting. This conclusion is based on results obtained from S-K XANES studies, Fe/S atomic ratios in sulfide blebs and 34S/32S isotopic measurements in these sulfide blebs. Additionally, sulfur in several EET79001 Lith. A glasses is found to correlate positively with Al2O3 and CaO (and negatively with FeO and MgO), suggesting the presence of Al- and Ca- sul-fate-bearing phases. The distribution of the 87Sr/86Sr iso-topic ratios determined in Lith. A glasses (,27 &,188 and,54) indicate that Martian soil gypsum and host rock material were mixed with each other in the glass precursors. In some vugs in Lith A glass,27 detected gypsum laths. Furthermore, the Martian regolith-de-rived component (where sulfur typically occurs as sul-fate) is identified in these glasses by determining neutron produced isotopic excesses/deficits in 80Kr and 149Sm isotopes. Moreover, the

  11. Comparing MSL ChemCam Analyses to Shergottite and Terrestrial Rock Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, J.; Edwards, P.; Dyar, M. D.; Fisk, M. R.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Forni, O.; Wiens, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    The ChemCam instrument on Mars Science Laboratory determines the elemental composition of target areas at ≤6m range, and has acquired over 145000 spectra. Here we use the individual shots and averaged targets with the PLS1 dataset on both outcrops and float rocks. Various localities were sampled, including Rocknest, Sheepbed, Shaler, Cooperstown, Darwin and Kimberley. Rocknest and Sheepbed shots have quite homogeneous, basaltic compositions with Gini factors of 0.66 and 0.67 respectively (a Gini factor of 0 indicates a completely homogeneous dataset). Shaler is similarly homogeneous with a Gini factor 0.62 but is more felsic in composition. Darwin and Kimberley both follow a basaltic mixing trend between pyroxene and alkali feldspars. They have a heterogeneous spread with factors of 0.77 and 0.74. Kimberley and Darwin are the most alkaline outcrops, and then Shaler, finally Sheepbed and Rocknest are the least alkaline. The Na2O and K2O contents are controlled by variable abundances of alkaline feldspars. Many float rocks were also analysed. They include samples with mm-sized, visible feldspar grains, which are probable phenocrysts and cumulate grains. These rocks likely come from different sources as their compositions are quite heterogeneous e.g. the Gini factor for the whole set of feldspar-rich float rocks is 0.76 (using an average composition for each target). We compare these compositions with data from the MER APXS, and from this we can see that the float rocks sampled by MSL are closer to the alkaline feldspar end of the basaltic mixing trend than the more FeO+MgO-rich MER basalts (e.g. Rieder et al. 2004 10.1126/science.1104358) The basaltic shergottite meteorites also have higher FeO+MgO contents and lower Al2O3 than the MSL rocks. When compared on Al2O3-(FeOMgO)-(Na2OK2O)-CaO and other plots, the float rocks have compositions similar to a spread between terrestrial diorite and gabbro, though some have high Na2O+K2O contents.

  12. Fe3+ partitioning during basalt differentiation on Mars: insights into the oxygen fugacity of the shergottite mantle source(s).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medard, E.; Martin, A. M.; Collinet, M.; Righter, K.; Grove, T. L.; Newville, M.; Lanzirotti, A.

    2014-12-01

    The partitioning of Fe3+ between silicate melts and minerals is a key parameter to understand magmatic processes, as it is directly linked to oxygen fugacity (fO2). fO2 is, a priori, not a constant during magmatic processes, and its evolution depends on the compatibility of Fe3+. We have experimentally determined the partition coefficients of Fe3+ between augite, pigeonite, and silicate melt, and use them to constrain the fO2of the martian mantle and of differentiated martian basalts. A series of experiments on various martian basaltic compositions were performed under controlled fO2 in one-atmosphere gas-mixing furnaces. Fe3+/Fetotal ratios in silicate melts and pyroxenes were determined using synchrotron Fe K-edge XANES on the 13 IDE beamline at APS (Argonne). Fe3+ mineral/melt partition coefficients (DFe3+) for augite and pigeonite were obtained with a relative uncertainty of 10-15 %. Both are constant over a wide range of oxygen fugacity (FMQ-2.5 to FMQ+2.0). DFe3+ for augite and pigeonite are broadly consistent with previous data by [1], but DFe3+ for augite is significantly higher (by a factor of 2) than the indirect determinations of [2]. Since augites in [2] are extremely poor in iron compared to ours (0.18 wt% vs 13 wt% FeO), this strongly suggests that DFe3+ varies with Mg#, indicating that Fe3+is more compatible than previously thought in terrestrial mantle pyroxenes (3 wt% FeO) as well. Crystallization paths for shergottite parental melts have been calculated using the MELTS software, combined with our partition coefficients. fO2 in the residual melts is calculated from the models of [3] and [4]. It stays relatively constant at high temperatures, but increases very strongly during the latest stages of crystallization. These results explain the large range of fO2 determined in enriched shergottites. In order to estimate the fO2 of the martian mantle, only the highest temperature phases in the most primitive martian samples should be used. The most

  13. Evidence for heterogeneous enriched shergottite mantle sources in Mars from olivine-hosted melt inclusions in Larkman Nunatak 06319

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu Sarbadhikari, Amit; Goodrich, Cyrena A.; Liu, Yang; Day, James M. D.; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    2011-11-01

    Larkman Nunatak (LAR) 06319 is an olivine-phyric shergottite whose olivine crystals contain abundant crystallized melt inclusions. In this study, three types of melt inclusion were distinguished, based on their occurrence and the composition of their olivine host: Type-I inclusions occur in phenocryst cores (Fo 77-73); Type-II inclusions occur in phenocryst mantles (Fo 71-66); Type-III inclusions occur in phenocryst rims (Fo 61-51) and within groundmass olivine. The sizes of the melt inclusions decrease significantly from Type-I (˜150-250 μm diameter) to Type-II (˜100 μm diameter) to Type-III (˜25-75 μm diameter). Present bulk compositions (PBC) of the crystallized melt inclusions were calculated for each of the three melt inclusion types based on average modal abundances and analyzed compositions of constituent phases. Primary trapped liquid compositions were then reconstructed by addition of olivine and adjustment of the Fe/Mg ratio to equilibrium with the host olivine (to account for crystallization of wall olivine and the effects of Fe/Mg re-equilibration). The present bulk composition of Type-I inclusions (PBC1) plots on a tie-line that passes through olivine and the LAR 06319 whole-rock composition. The parent magma composition can be reconstructed by addition of 29 mol% olivine to PBC1, and adjustment of Fe/Mg for equilibrium with olivine of Fo 77 composition. The resulting parent magma composition has a predicted crystallization sequence that is consistent with that determined from petrographic observations, and differs significantly from the whole-rock only in an accumulated olivine component (˜10 wt%). This is consistent with a calculation indicating that ˜10 wt% magnesian (Fo 77-73) olivine must be subtracted from the whole-rock to yield a melt in equilibrium with Fo 77. Thus, two independent estimates indicate that LAR 06319 contains ˜10 wt% cumulate olivine. The rare earth element (REE) patterns of Type-I melt inclusions are similar to that of

  14. Rare earth elements in minerals of the ALHA77005 shergottite and implications for its parent magma and crystallization history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundberg, Laura L.; Crozaz, Ghislaine; Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Analyses of mineral REE and selected minor and trace elements were carried out on individual grains of pyroxenes, whitlockite, maskelynite, and olivine of the Antarctic shergottite ALHA77005, and the results are used to interpret its parent magma and crystallization history. The results of mineral compositions and textural observations suggest that ALHA77005 is a cumulate with about half cumulus material (olivine + chromite) and half postcumulus phases. Most of the REEs in ALHA77005 reside in whitlockite whose modal concentration is about 1 percent. Mineral REE data support previous suggestions that plagioclase and whitlockite crystallized late, and that low-Ca pyroxene initiated crystallization before high-Ca pyroxene. The REE patterns for the intercumulus liquid, calculated from distribution coefficients for ALHA77005 pyroxene, plagioclase, and whitlockite, are in very good agreement and are similar to that of Shergotty.

  15. Composition of a carbonatitic melt in equilibrium with lherzolite at 5.5-6.3 GPa and 1350°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, A. N.; Sokol, A. G.; Chebotarev, D. A.; Palyanov, Yu. A.; Sobolev, N. V.

    2016-03-01

    Generation of ultra-alkaline melts by the interaction of lherzolite with cardonatites of various genesis was simulated at the P- T parameters typical of the base of the subcratonic lithosphere. Experiments with a duration of 150 h were performed at 5.5 and 6.3 GPa and 1350°C. The concentrations of CaO and MgO in melts are buffered by the phases of peridotite, and the concentrations of alkalis and FeO depend on the composition of the starting carbonatite. Melts are characterized by a low (<7 wt %) concentration of SiO2 and Ca# from 0.40 to 0.47. It is demonstrated that only high-Mg groups of carbonatitic inclusions in fibrous diamonds have a composition close to that of carbonatitic melts in equilibrium with lherzolite. Most likely, the formation of kimberlite-like melts relatively enriched in SiO2 requires an additional source of heat from mantle plumes and probably H2O fluid.

  16. U-Pb isotopic systematics of shock-loaded and annealed baddeleyite: Implications for crystallization ages of Martian meteorite shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niihara, Takafumi; Kaiden, Hiroshi; Misawa, Keiji; Sekine, Toshimori; Mikouchi, Takashi

    2012-08-01

    Shock-recovery and annealing experiments on basalt-baddeleyite mixtures were undertaken to evaluate shock effects on U-Pb isotopic systematics of baddeleyite. Shock pressures up to 57 GPa caused fracturing of constituent phases, mosaicism of olivine, maskelynitization of plagioclase, and melting, but the phase transition from monoclinic baddeleyite structure to high-pressure/temperature polymorphs of ZrO2 was not confirmed. The U-Pb isotopic systems of the shock-loaded baddeleyite did not show a large-scale isotopic disturbance. The samples shock-recovered from 47 GPa were then employed for annealing experiments at 1000 or 1300 °C, indicating that the basalt-baddeleyite mixture was almost totally melted except olivine and baddeleyite. Fine-grained euhedral zircon crystallized from the melt was observed around the relict baddeleyite in the sample annealed at 1300 °C for 1 h. The U-Pb isotopic systems of baddeleyite showed isotopic disturbances: many data points for the samples annealed at 1000 °C plotted above the concordia. Both radiogenic lead loss/uranium gain and radiogenic lead gain/uranium loss were observed in the baddeleyite annealed at 1300 °C. Complete radiogenic lead loss due to shock metamorphism and subsequent annealing was not observed in the shock-loaded/annealed baddeleyites studied here. These results confirm that the U-Pb isotopic systematics of baddeleyite are durable for shock metamorphism. Since shergottites still preserve Fe-Mg and/or Ca zonings in major constituent phases (i.e. pyroxene and olivine), the shock effects observed in Martian baddeleyites seem to be less intense compared to that under the present experimental conditions. An implication is that the U-Pb systems of baddeleyite in shergottites will provide crystallization ages of Martian magmatic rocks.

  17. A discussion of isotopic systematics and mineral zoning in the shergottites - Evidence for a 180 m.y. igneous crystallization age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The chronologies of the Shergotty, Zagami, ALHA 77005, and EETA 79001 meteorites were reexamined on the basis of shergottites' petrography and mineral chemistry data. Among the various isochrons, the concordant Rb-Sr (about 180 Myr) and U-Th-Pb (about 190 Myr) internal isochrons are interpreted as representing the time of igneous crystallization, while the Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and Pb-Pb whole-rock isochrons are interpreted as mixing lines, and are reasonably attributed to igneous processes such as wall-rock assimilation and magma mixing. If the approximated age of less than 200 Myr is correct, the shergottites represent the youngest known extraterrestrial basalts. This conclusion supports the hypothesis that the SNC meteorites are samples of Mars.

  18. Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr Isotopic Systematics of a Heavily Shocked Martian Meteorite Tissint and Petrogenesis of Depleted Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Park, J.; Agee, Carl B.

    2014-01-01

    Tissint is a very fresh Martian meteorite that fell near the town of Tissint in Morocco on July 18, 2011. It contains abundant olivine megacrysts (23%) in a fine-grained matrix of pyroxene (55%), maskelynitized plagioclase (15%), opaques (4%) and melt pockets (3%) and is petrographically similar to lithologies A and C of picritic shergottite EETA 79001 [1,2]. The presence of 2 types of shock-induced glasses and all 7 high-pressure mineral phases that were ever found in melt pockets of Martian meteorites suggests it underwent an intensive shock metamorphism of 25 GPa and 2000 C localized in melt pockets [2]. Mineral textures suggest that olivines, pyroxenes and plagioclases probably did not experience such hightemperature. Earlier determinations of its age yielded 596+/-23 Ma [3] and 616+/-67 Ma [4], respectively, for the Sm-Nd system and 583+/-86 Ma for the Lu-Hf system [4], in agreement with the 575+/-18 Ma age of the oldest olivine-phyric depleted shergottite Dho 019 [5]. However, the exposure ages of Tissint (1 Ma [1, 6, 7]) and Dho 019 (20 Ma [8]) are very different requiring two separate ejection events. These previously determined Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf ages are older than the Ar-Ar maskelynite plateau age of 524+/-15 Ma [9], reversing the pattern usually observed for Martian meteorites. In order to clarify these age issues and place models for Tissint's petrogenesis on a firm basis, we present new Rb-Sr and Sm- Nd isotopic results for Tissint, and discuss (a) the shock effects on them and the Ar-Ar chronometer, (b) correlation of the determined ages with those of other depleted shergottites, and (c) the petrogenesis of depleted shergottites. Since the meteorite is a recent fall, terrestrial contamination is expected to be minimal, but, the strong shock metamorphism might be expected to compromise the equilibrium of the isotopic systems.

  19. Lherzolitic versus harzburgitic garnet trends: sampling of extended depth versus extended composition. Reply to the comment by Ivanic et al. 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylova, M.; Hill, P. J. A.; Russell, J. K.; Cookenboo, H.

    2016-02-01

    Using the Hill et al. (Contrib Mineral Petrol 169:13, 2015. doi: 10.1007/s00410-014-1102-7) modeling technique, we have tested the idea of Ivanic et al. (Contrib Mineral Petrol 164:505-520, 2012) that decompression and metamorphic re-equilibration of garnet with spinel causes garnet zoning perpendicular to the Cr-Ca harzburgitic trend in garnet composition. The modeling confirms that garnet zoning across the harzburgitic trend cannot form without spinel buffering. The harzburgitic trend is very rare because it results from extreme compositional heterogeneity of the mantle at the same depth. In contrast, the common lherzolitic trend requires less diversity in the bulk composition of the mantle, as it can be established with only a few samples of metamorphically re-equilibrated mantle peridotite deriving from a variety of depths.

  20. Sulfur and Iron Speciation in Gas-rich Impact-melt Glasses from Basaltic Shergottites Determined by Microxanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, S. R.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2008-01-01

    Sulfur is abundantly present as sulfate near Martian surface based on chemical and mineralogical investigations on soils and rocks in Viking, Pathfinder and MER missions. Jarosite is identified by Mossbauer studies on rocks at Meridian and Gusev, whereas MgSO4 is deduced from MgO - SO3 correlations in Pathfinder MER and Viking soils. Other sulfate minerals such as gypsum and alunogen/ S-rich aluminosilicates and halides are detected only in martian meteorites such as shergottites and nakhlites using SEM/FE-SEM and EMPA techniques. Because sulfur has the capacity to occur in multiple valence states, determination of sulfur speciation (sulfide/ sulfate) in secondary mineral assemblages in soils and rocks near Mars surface may help us understand whether the fluid-rock interactions occurred under oxidizing or reducing conditions. To understand the implications of these observations for the formation of the Gas-rich Impact-melt (GRIM) glasses, we determined the oxidation state of Fe in the GRIM glasses using Fe K micro-XANES techniques.

  1. Complementary rare earth element patterns in unique achondrites, such as ALHA 77005 and shergottites, and in the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, M.-S.; Schmitt, R. A.; Laul, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    Abundances of major, minor, and trace elements are determined in the Antarctic achondrite Allan Hills (ALHA) 77005 via sequential instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis. The rare earth element (REE) abundances of ALHA 77005 reveal a unique chondritic normalized pattern; that is, the REEs are nearly unfractionated from La to Pr at approximately 1.0X chondrites, monotonically increased from Pr to Gd at approximately 3.4X with no Eu anomaly, nearly unfractionated from Gd and Ho and monotonically decreased from Ho to Lu at approximately 2.2X. It is noted that this unique REE pattern of ALHA 77005 can be modeled by a melting process involving a continuous melting and progressive partial removal of melt from a light REE enriched source material. In a model of this type, ALHA 77005 could represent either a crystallized cumulate from such a melt or the residual source material. Calculations show that the parent liquids for the shergottites could also be derived from a light REE enriched source material similar to that for ALHA 77005.

  2. Fertility of the Mantle beneath the Ocean Basins: Harzburgite, Lherzolite, and Eclogite in Depleted to Enriched Sources of Abyssal Tholeiites, Ocean Islands, and LIPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natland, J. H.; Anderson, D. L.

    2002-12-01

    Current models for the origin of MORB and OIB invoke different degrees of partial melting of a homogeneous lherzolitic source, and a heterogeneous deep mantle source, respectively. In the ocean basins, MORBs are only part of a spectrum of geochemically diverse depleted to enriched basalts that erupt at or near ridges, off-axis seamounts and large igneous provinces. Even at ridges, mantle is locally enriched (e.g. E-MORB). The gradation in compositions from MORB to slightly less depleted tholeiites at LIPS, to variably enriched tholeiitic and alkalic basalts, basanites and olivine nephelinites of many ocean islands requires only differences in depth and degree of partial melting of shallow mantle lherzolite upon which trace-element and isotopic heterogeneity are superimposed. Alkalic basalts and differentiates in the oceans occur along nearly every seamount ridge rising >2000 m above the seafloor, a distribution too extensive to be explained by any number of plumes; this makes a plume origin for similar lavas on linear island chains questionable. Tapping along fractures of a shallow asthenospheric layer of variably enriched and fertile mantle that develops beneath the lithosphere through time is more likely. The long-term differentiation of the Earth, magmatism, recycling, continental rifting, and subduction insure that the upper mantle cannot be well mixed and homogeneous, a common but fallacious assumption in much petrogenetic theory. Mantle major-element and isotopic heterogeneity and variable temperature is a consequence of plate tectonics. Every association of ultramafic rocks in the ocean crust, ophiolites, and xenolith suites demonstrates significant bulk heterogeneity that survives partial melting. Thus sources of modern abyssal tholeiites must be variably fertile with respect to a basaltic melt fraction, and range from average harzburgite to fertile lherzolite, on both local and regional scales. In addition, subduction guarantees that most abyssal basalt

  3. The Mineralogy, Geochemistry, and Redox State of Multivalent Cations During the Crystallization of Primitive Shergottitic Liquids at Various (f)O2. Insights into the (f)O2 Fugacity of the Martian Mantle and Crustal Influences on Redox Conditions of Martian Magmas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Bell, A. S.; Burger, P. V.; Papike, J. J.; Jones, J.; Le, L.; Muttik, N.

    2016-01-01

    The (f)O2 [oxygen fugacity] of crystallization for martian basalts has been estimated in various studies to range from IW-1 to QFM+4 [1-3]. A striking geochemical feature of the shergottites is the large range in initial Sr isotopic ratios and initial epsilon(sup Nd) values. Studies by observed that within the shergottite group the (f)O2 [oxygen fugacity] of crystallization is highly correlated with these chemical and isotopic characteristics with depleted shergottites generally crystallizing at reduced conditions and enriched shergottites crystallizing under more oxidizing conditions. More recent work has shown that (f)O2 [oxygen fugacity] changed during the crystallization of these magmas from one order of magnitude in Y980459 (Y98) to several orders of magnitude in Larkman Nunatak 06319. These real or apparent variations within single shergottitic magmas have been attributed to mixing of a xenocrystic olivine component, volatile loss-water disassociation, auto-oxidation during crystallization of mafic phases, and assimilation of an oxidizing crustal component (e.g. sulfate). In contrast to the shergottites, augite basalts such as NWA 8159 are highly depleted yet appear to be highly oxidized (e.g. QFM+4). As a first step in attempting to unravel petrologic complexities that influence (f)O2 [oxygen fugacity] in martian magmas, this study explores the effect of (f)O2 [oxygen fugacity] on the liquid line of descent (LLD) for a primitive shergottite liquid composition (Y98). The results of this study will provide a fundamental basis for reconstructing the record of (f)O2 [oxygen fugacity] in shergottites and other martian basalts, its effect on both mineral chemistries and valence state partitioning, and a means for examining the role of crystallization (and other more complex processes) on the petrologic linkages between olivine-phyric and pyroxene-plagioclase shergottites.

  4. Sulfur and iron speciation in gas-rich impact-melt glasses from basaltic shergottites determined by microXANES

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, S.R.; Rao, M.N.; Nyquist, L.E.

    2008-04-28

    Sulfur and iron K XANES measurements were made on GRIM glasses from EET 79001. Iron is in the ferrous state. Sulfur speciation is predominately sulfide coordination but is Fe coordinated in Lith B and, most likely, Ca coordinated in Lith A. Sulfur is abundantly present as sulfate near Martian surface based on chemical and mineralogical investigations on soils and rocks in Viking, Pathfinder and MER missions. Jarosite is identified by Moessbauer studies on rocks at Meridian and Gusev, whereas MgSO{sub 4} is deduced from MgO-SO{sub 3} correlations in Pathfinder MER and Viking soils. Other sulfate minerals such as gypsum and alunogen/S-rich aluminosilicates and halides are detected only in martian meteorites such as shergottites and nakhlites using SEM/FE-SEM and EMPA techniques. Because sulfur has the capacity to occur in multiple valence states, determination of sulfur speciation (sulfide/sulfate) in secondary mineral assemblages in soils and rocks near Mars surface may help us understand whether the fluid-rock interactions occurred under oxidizing or reducing conditions. On Earth, volcanic rocks contain measurable quantities of sulfur present as both sulfide and sulfate. Carroll and Rutherford showed that oxidized forms of sulfur may comprise a significant fraction of total dissolved sulfur, if the oxidation state is higher than {approx}2 log fO{sub 2} units relative to the QFM buffer. Terrestrial samples containing sulfates up to {approx}25% in fresh basalts from the Galapagos Rift on one hand and high sulfide contents present in oceanic basalts on the other indicate that the relative abundance of sulfide and sulfate varies depending on the oxygen fugacity of the system. Basaltic shergottites (bulk) such as Shergotty, EET79001 and Zagami usually contain small amounts of sulfur ({approx}0.5%) as pyrrhotite. But, in isolated glass pockets containing secondary salts (known as GRIM glasses) in these meteorites, sulfur is present in high abundance ({approx}1-12%). To

  5. Chemical composition and osmium-isotope systematics of primary and secondary PGM assemblages from high-Mg chromitite of the Nurali lherzolite massif, the South Urals, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malitch, K. N.; Anikina, E. V.; Badanina, I. Yu.; Belousova, E. A.; Pushkarev, E. V.; Khiller, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    The isotopic and geochemical characteristics of PGE mineralization in high-Mg chromitite from the banded dunite-wehrlite-clinopyroxenite complex of the Nurali lherzolite massif, the South Urals, Russia is characterized for the first time. Electron microprobe analysis and LA MC-ICP-MS mass spectrometry are used for studying Cr-spinel and platinum-group minerals (PGM). Two processes synchronously develop in high-Mg chromitite subject to metamorphism: (1) the replacement of Mg-Al-rich Cr-spinel, orthopyroxene, and diopside by chromite, Cr-amphibole, chlorite, and garnet; (2) the formation of a secondary mineral assemblage consisting of finely dispersed ruthenium or Ru-hexaferrum aggregate and silicate-oxide or silicate matter on the location of primary Ru-Os-sulfides of the laurite-erlichmanite solid solution series. Similar variations of Os-isotopic composition in both primary and secondary PGM assemblages are evidence for the high stability of the Os isotope system in PGM and for the possibility of using model 187Os/188Os ages in geodynamic reconstructions.

  6. Noble gases in 18 Martian meteorites and angrite Northwest Africa 7812—Exposure ages, trapped gases, and a re-evaluation of the evidence for solar cosmic ray-produced neon in shergottites and other achondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieler, R.; Huber, L.; Busemann, H.; Seiler, S.; Leya, I.; Maden, C.; Masarik, J.; Meier, M. M. M.; Nagao, K.; Trappitsch, R.; Irving, A. J.

    2016-02-01

    We present noble gas data for 16 shergottites, 2 nakhlites (NWA 5790, NWA 10153), and 1 angrite (NWA 7812). Noble gas exposure ages of the shergottites fall in the 1-6 Ma range found in previous studies. Three depleted olivine-phyric shergottites (Tissint, NWA 6162, NWA 7635) have exposure ages of ~1 Ma, in agreement with published data for similar specimens. The exposure age of NWA 10153 (~12.2 Ma) falls in the range of 9-13 Ma reported for other nakhlites. Our preferred age of ~7.3 Ma for NWA 5790 is lower than this range, and it is possible that NWA 5790 represents a distinct ejection event. A Tissint glass sample contains Xe from the Martian atmosphere. Several samples show a remarkably low (21Ne/22Ne)cos ratio < 0.80, as previously observed in a many shergottites and in various other rare achondrites. This was explained by solar cosmic ray-produced Ne (SCR Ne) in addition to the commonly found galactic cosmic ray-produced Ne, implying very low preatmospheric shielding and ablation loss. We revisit this by comparing measured (21Ne/22Ne)cos ratios with predictions by cosmogenic nuclide production models. Indeed, several shergottites, acalpulcoites/lodranites, angrites (including NWA 7812), and the Brachina-like meteorite LEW 88763 likely contain SCR Ne, as previously postulated for many of them. The SCR contribution may influence the calculation of exposure ages. One likely reason that SCR nuclides are predominantly detected in meteorites from rare classes is because they usually are analyzed for cosmogenic nuclides even if they had a very small (preatmospheric) mass and hence low ablation loss.

  7. Melt localization and its relation to deformation in the subcontinental mantle: a case study from layered dunite-harzburgite-lherzolite bodies of the Ronda peridotite massif, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidas, Karoly; Garrido, Carlos J.; Bodinier, Jean-Louis; Tommasi, Andrea; Booth-Rea, Guillermo; Gervilla, Fernando; Marchesi, Claudio

    2010-05-01

    ; Vauchez & Garrido, 2001). In the vicinity of the recrystallization front, coarse granular peridotites pass into layered granular peridotites with a typical layered structure composed of plagioclase lherzolites, harzburgites and dunites. The main scientific goals of this study are to test new mechanism(s) for the formation of dunites and dunite-harzburgite-lherzolite layered bodies in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle on the example of Ronda peridotite massif (Spain), and to introduce new processes that are expected to lead the evolution of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle in extensional settings. References Kelemen, P.B. & Dick, H.J.B. (1995). Focused melt flow and localized deformation in the upper-mantle — juxtaposition of replacive dunite and ductile shear zones in the Josephine peridotite, SW Oregon. J. Geophys. Res. 100 (B1): 423-438. Kelemen, P.B., Hirth, G., Shimizu, N., Spiegelman, M. & Dick, H.J.B. (1997). A review of melt migration processes in the adiabatically upwelling mantle beneath oceanic spreading ridges. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society a-Mathematical Physical and Engineering Sciences 355(1723): 283-318. Lenoir, X., Garrido, C.J., Bodinier, J.L., Dautria, J.M. & Gervilla, F. (2001). The recrystallization front of the Ronda peridotite: Evidence for melting and thermal erosion of subcontinental lithospheric mantle beneath the Alboran basin. pp. 141-158. Savelieva, G.N., Sobolev, A.V., Batanova, V.G., Suslov, P.V. & Bruhmann, G. (2008). The structure of melt transport mantle channels. Geotectonics 42 (6): 430--447. Van Der Wal, D. & Bodinier, J.L. (1996). Origin of the recrystallisation front in the Ronda peridotite by km-scale pervasive porous melt flow. Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, 122(4): 387-405. Vauchez, A. & Garrido, C.J. (2001). Seismic properties of an asthenospherized lithospheric mantle: constraints from lattice preferred orientations in peridotite from the Ronda massif. Earth and Planetary Science Letters

  8. Orthopyroxene-enrichment in the lherzolite-websterite xenolith suite from Paleogene alkali basalts of the Poiana Ruscă Mountains (Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nédli, Zsuzsanna; Szabó, Csaba; Dégi, Júlia

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we present the petrography and geochemistry of a recently collected lherzolite-websterite xenolith series and of clinopyroxene xenocrysts, hosted in Upper Cretaceous-Paleogene basanites of Poiana Ruscă (Romania), whose xenoliths show notable orthopyroxene-enrichment. In the series a slightly deformed porphyroclastic-equigranular textured series could represent the early mantle characteristics, and in many cases notable orthopyroxene growth and poikilitic texture formation was observed. The most abundant mantle lithology, Type A xenoliths have high Al and Na-contents but low mg# of the pyroxenes and low cr# of spinel suggesting a low degree (< 10 %) of mafic melt removal. They are also generally poor in overall REE-s (rare earth elements) and have flat REY (rare earth elements+ Y) patterns with slight LREE-depletion. The geochemistry of the Type A xenoliths and calculated melt composition in equilibrium with the xenolith clinopyroxenes suggests that the percolating melt causing the poikilitization can be linked to a mafic, Al-Na-rich, volatile-poor melt and show similarity with the Late Cretaceous-Paleogene (66-72 Ma) subduction-related andesitic magmatism of Poiana Ruscă. Type B xenoliths, with their slightly different chemistry, suggest that, after the ancient depletion, the mantle went through a slight metasomatic event. A subsequent passage of mafic melts in the mantle, with similar compositions to the older andesitic magmatism of Poiana Ruscă, is recorded in the pyroxenites (Fe-rich xenoliths), whereas the megacrysts seem to be cogenetic with the host basanite. The Poiana Ruscă xenoliths differ from the orthopyroxene-enriched mantle xenoliths described previously from the Carpathian-Pannonian Region and from the Dacia block.

  9. Trace element partitioning between mica- and amphibole-bearing garnet lherzolite and hydrous basanitic melt: 1. Experimental results and the investigation of controls on partitioning behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, John; Green, Trevor

    2006-07-01

    Thirty five minor and trace elements (Li, Be, B, Sc, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Rb, Nb, Mo, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Tb, Ho, Tm, Lu, Hf, Ta, W, Tl, Pb, Bi, Th and U) in experimentally produced near-liquidus phases, from a primitive nelpheline basanite from Bow Hill in Tasmania (Australia), were analysed by LAM ICP-MS. A number of halogens (F, Cl and I) were also analysed by electron microprobe. The analyses were used to determine mineral/melt partition coefficients for mica, amphibole, garnet, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene and olivine for conditions close to multiple saturation of the basanite liquidus with garnet lherzolite (approximately 2.6 GPa and 1,200°C with 7.5 wt% of added H2O). A broader range of conditions was also investigated from 1.0 GPa and 1,025°C to 3.5 GPa and 1,190°C with 5-10 wt% of added H2O. The scope and comprehensiveness of the data allow them to be used for two purposes, these include the following: an investigation of some of the controlling influences on partition coefficients; and the compilation of a set partition coefficients that are directly relevant to the formation of the Bow Hill basanite magma by partial melting of mantle peridotite. Considering clinopyroxene, the mineral phase for which the most data were obtained, systematic correlations were found between pressure and temperature, mineral composition, cation radius and valence, and Δ G coulb (the coulombic potential energy produced by substituting a cation of mismatched valence into a crystallographic site). Δ G coulb is distinctly different for different crystallographic sites, including the M2 and M1 sites in clinopyroxene. These differences can be modelled as a function of variations in optimum valence (expressed as 1 sigma standard deviations) within individual M1 and M2 site populations.

  10. Melting Processes at the Base of the Mantle Wedge: Melt Compositions and Melting Reactions for the First Melts of Vapor-Saturated Lherzolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, T. L.; Till, C. B.

    2014-12-01

    Vapor-saturated melting experiments have been performed at pressures near the base of the mantle wedge (3.2 GPa). The starting composition is a metasomatized lherzolite containing 3 wt. % H2O. Near-solidus melts and coexisting mineral phases have been characterized in experiments that span 925 to 1100 oC with melt % varying from 6 to 9 wt. %. Olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene and garnet coexist with melt over the entire interval and rutile is also present at < 1000 oC. Melt is andesitic in composition and varies from 60 wt. % SiO2 at 950 oC to 52 wt. % at 1075 oC. The Al2O3 contents of the melt are 13 to 14 wt. %, and CaO contents range from 1 and 4 wt. %. Melting is peritectic with orthopyroxene + liquid produced by melting of garnet + olivine + high-Ca pyroxene. In addition to quenched melt, we observe a quenched silicate component that is rhyolitic (>72 % SiO2) that we interpret as a precipitate from the coexisting supercritical H2O-rich vapor. Extrapolation of the measured compositional variation toward the solidus suggests that the first melt may be very SiO2 rich (i.e., granitic). We suggest that these granitic melts are the first melts of the mantle near the slab-wedge interface. As these SiO2-rich melts ascend into shallower, hotter overlying mantle, they continue to interact with the surrounding mantle and evolve in composition. These first melts may elucidate the geochemical and physical processes that accompany the beginnings of H2O flux melting.

  11. Assimilation of High 18O/16O Crust by Shergottite-Nakhlite-Chassigny (SNC) Magmas on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, J. M.; Taylor, L. A.; Valley, J. W.; Spicuzza, M. J.

    2005-12-01

    There is significant geochemical evidence for assimilation of crustal material into sub-aerial, mantle-derived, terrestrial basaltic magmas. Some of the most powerful constraints on crustal assimilation come from oxygen isotope studies, because supracrustal rocks often have distinct 18O/16O ratios resulting from interaction with Earth's hydrosphere. From a planetary perspective, studies of carbonate concretions from meteorite ALH84001 have yielded evidence for low-temperature crustal interaction at or near the surface of its putative parent body, Mars. This finding raises the possibility that crustal assimilation processes may be tracked using oxygen isotopes in combination with geochemical data of other reputed martian (SNC) meteorites. The whole-rock oxygen isotope ratios (Laser fluorination δ18O = +4.21 to +5.85‰ VSMOW) of SNC meteorites, correlate with aspects of their incompatible element chemistry. Some of the oxygen isotope variability may be explained by post-magmatic alteration on Mars or Earth; however, it appears, based on petrographic and geochemical observations, that a number of SNC meteorites, especially Shergottites, retain the original whole-rock oxygen isotope values of their magmas prior to crystallisation. Correlations between oxygen isotopes and incompatible element geochemistry are consistent with assimilation of a high-18O/16O, incompatible-element rich, oxidizing crustal component by hot, mantle-derived magmas (δ18O = ~~4.2‰). A crustal component has previously been recognized from Sr-Nd-Os isotope systematics and oxygen fugacity measurements of SNC meteorites. Oxygen isotope evidence from SNC meteorites suggests high-18O/16O crustal contaminants on Mars result from low temperature (< 300°C) interaction with martian hydrosphere. The extent of apparent crustal contamination tracked by oxygen isotopes in SNC meteorites implies that the majority of martian crust may have undergone such interactions. Evidence for assimilation of

  12. Trace element systematics and 147Sm- 143Nd and 176Lu- 176Hf ages of Larkman Nunatak 06319: Closed-system fractional crystallization of an enriched shergottite magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, J. T.; Brandon, A. D.; Lapen, T. J.; Righter, M.; Peslier, A. H.; Beard, B. L.

    2010-12-01

    Combined 147Sm- 143Nd and 176Lu- 176Hf chronology of the martian meteorite Larkman Nunatak (LAR) 06319 indicates an igneous crystallization age of 193 ± 20 Ma (2 σ weighted mean). The individual 147Sm- 143Nd and 176Lu- 176Hf internal isochron ages are 183 ± 12 Ma and 197 ± 29 Ma, respectively, and are concordant with two previously determined 147Sm- 143Nd and 87Rb- 87Sr internal isochron ages of 190 ± 26 Ma and 207 ± 14 Ma, respectively ( Shih et al., 2009). With respect to the 147Sm- 143Nd isotope systematics, maskelynite lies above the isochron defined by primary igneous phases and is therefore not in isotopic equilibrium with the other phases in the rock. Non-isochronous maskelynite is interpreted to result from shock-induced reaction between plagioclase and partial melts of pyroxene and phosphate during transformation to maskelynite, which resulted in it having unsupported 143Nd relative to its measured 147Sm/ 144Nd ratio. The rare earth element (REE) and high field strength element (HFSE) compositions of major constituent minerals can be modeled as the result of progressive crystallization of a single magma with no addition of secondary components. The concordant ages, combined with igneous textures, mineralogy, and trace element systematics indicate that the weighted average of the radiometric ages records the true crystallization age of this rock. The young igneous age for LAR 06319 and other shergottites are in conflict with models that advocate for circa 4.1 Ga crystallization ages of shergottites from Pb isotope compositions, however, they are consistent with updated crater counting statistics indicating that young volcanic activity on Mars is more widespread than previously realized ( Neukum et al., 2010).

  13. Ga, Ca, and 3d transition element (Cr through Zn) partitioning among spinel-lherzolite phases from the Lanzo massif, Italy: Analytical results and crystal chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Wogelius, R.A.; Fraser, D.G.

    1994-06-01

    Ultramafic rocks exposed in Lanzo massif, Italy is a record of mantle geochemistry, melting, sub-solidus re-equilibration. Plagioclase(+ spinel)-lherzolite samples were analyzed by Scanning Proton Microscopy, other techniques. Previous work postulated partial melting events and a two-stage sub-solidus cooling history; this paper notes Ga enrichment on spinel-clinopyroxene grain boundaries, high Ga and transition element content of spinel, and pyroxene zonation in Ca and Al. Trace element levels in olivine and orthopyroxene are also presented. Zoning trends are interpreted as due to diffusion during cooling. Olivine-clinopyroxene Cr and Ca exchange as well as clinopyroxene and spinel zonation trends indicate that the massif experienced at least two sub-solidus cooling episodes, one at 20 kbar to 1000 C and one at 8 kbar <750C. Ga levels in cores of Lanzo high-Cr spinels are high (82-66 ppM) relative to other mantle spinels (66-40 ppM), indicating enrichment. Ga content of ultramafic spinels apparently increases with Cr content; this may be due to: increased Ga solubility stemming from crystal chemical effects and/or higher Ga activities in associated silicate melts. Thus, during melting, high-Cr residual spinel may tend to buffer solid-phase Ga level. These spinels are not only rich in Ga and Cr (max 26.37 el. wt %), but also in Fe (max 21.07 el. wt %), Mn (max 3400 ppM), and Zn (max 2430 ppM). These enrichments are again due to melt extraction and partitioning into spinel structure. Low Ni (min 1050 ppM) levels are due to unsuccessful competition of Ni with Cr for octahedral structural sites caused by crystal field. Comparisons of change in partitioning vs Cr content among several 3d transition elements for spinels from Lanzo, other localities allow us to separate crystal field effects from bulk chemical effects and to show that in typical assemblages, inversion of olivine-spinel partition coefficient for Ni from <1 to >1 should occur at 11% el. wt. Cr in spinel.

  14. Variable microstructural response of baddeleyite to shock metamorphism in young basaltic shergottite NWA 5298 and improved U-Pb dating of Solar System events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, James R.; Moser, Desmond E.; Barker, Ivan R.; Tait, Kim T.; Chamberlain, Kevin R.; Schmitt, Axel K.; Hyde, Brendt C.

    2016-06-01

    The accurate dating of igneous and impact events is vital for the understanding of Solar System evolution, but has been hampered by limited knowledge of how shock metamorphism affects mineral and whole-rock isotopic systems used for geochronology. Baddeleyite (monoclinic ZrO2) is a refractory mineral chronometer of great potential to date these processes due to its widespread occurrence in achondrites and robust U-Pb isotopic systematics, but there is little understanding of shock-effects on this phase. Here we present new nano-structural measurements of baddeleyite grains in a thin-section of the highly-shocked basaltic shergottite Northwest Africa (NWA) 5298, using high-resolution electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques, to investigate shock-effects and their linkage with U-Pb isotopic disturbance that has previously been documented by in-situ U-Pb isotopic analyses. The shock-altered state of originally igneous baddeleyite grains is highly variable across the thin-section and often within single grains. Analyzed grains range from those that preserve primary (magmatic) twinning and trace-element zonation (baddeleyite shock Group 1), to quasi-amorphous ZrO2 (Group 2) and to recrystallized micro-granular domains of baddeleyite (Group 3). These groups correlate closely with measured U-Pb isotope compositions. Primary igneous features in Group 1 baddeleyites (n = 5) are retained in high shock impedance grain environments, and an average of these grains yields a revised late-Amazonian magmatic crystallization age of 175 ± 30 Ma for this shergottite. The youngest U-Pb dates occur from Group 3 recrystallized nano- to micro-granular baddeleyite grains, indicating that it is post-shock heating and new mineral growth that drives much of the isotopic disturbance, rather than just shock deformation and phase transitions. Our data demonstrate that a systematic multi-stage microstructural evolution in

  15. Constraints on Martian Differentiation Processes from Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd Isotopic Analyses of the Basaltic Shergottite QUE 94201

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borg, Lars E.; Nyquist, Larry E.; Taylor, Larry A.; Wiesmann, Henry; Shih, Chi-Y.

    1997-01-01

    Isotopic analyses of mineral, leachate, and whole rock fractions from the Martian shergottite meteorite QUE 94201 yield Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd crystallization ages of 327 +/- 12 and 327 +/- 19 Ma, respectively. These ages are concordant, although the isochrons are defined by different fractions within the meteorite. Comparison of isotope dilution Sm and Nd data for the various QUE 94201 fractions with in situ ion microprobe data for QUE 94201 minerals from the literature demonstrate the presence of a leachable crustal component in the meteorite. This component is likely to have been added to QUE 94201 by secondary alteration processes on Mars, and can affect the isochrons by selectively altering the isotopic systematics of the leachates and some of the mineral fractions. The absence of crustal recycling processes on Mars may preserve the geochemical evidence for early differentiation and the decoupling of the Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic systems, underscoring one of the fundamental differences between geologic processes on Mars and the Earth.

  16. Magmatic history and parental melt composition of olivine-phyric shergottite LAR 06319: Importance of magmatic degassing and olivine antecrysts in Martian magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balta, J. Brian; Sanborn, Matthew; McSween, Harry Y.; Wadhwa, Meenakshi

    2013-08-01

    Several olivine-phyric shergottites contain enough olivine that they could conceivably represent the products of closed-system crystallization of primary melts derived from partial melting of the Martian mantle. Larkman Nunatak (LAR) 06319 has been suggested to represent a close approach to a Martian primary liquid composition based on approximate equilibrium between its olivine and groundmass. To better understand the olivine-melt relationship and the evolution of this meteorite, we report the results of new petrographic and chemical analyses. We find that olivine megacryst cores are generally not in equilibrium with the groundmass, but rather have been homogenized by diffusion to Mg# 72. We have identified two unique grain types: an olivine glomerocryst and an olivine grain preserving a primary magmatic boundary that constrains the time scale of eruption to be on the order of hours. We also report the presence of trace oxide phases and phosphate compositions that suggest that the melt contained approximately 1.1% H2O and lost volatiles during cooling, also associated with an increase in oxygen fugacity upon degassing. We additionally report in situ rare earth element measurements of the various mineral phases in LAR 06319. Based on these reported trace element abundances, we estimate the oxygen fugacity in the LAR 06319 parent melt early in its crystallization sequence (i.e., at the time of crystallization of the low-Ca and high-Ca pyroxenes), the rare earth element composition of the parent melt, and those of melts in equilibrium with later formed phases. We suggest that LAR 06319 represents the product of closed-system crystallization within a shallow magma chamber, with additional olivine accumulated from a cumulate pile. We infer that the olivine megacrysts are antecrysts, derived from a single magma chamber, but not directly related to the host magma, and suggest that mixing of antecrysts within magma chambers may be a common process in Martian magmatic

  17. Effect of chlorine on near-liquidus crystallization of olivine-phyric shergottite NWA 6234 at 1 GPa: Implication for volatile-induced melting of the Martian mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farcy, Benjamin J.; Gross, Juliane; Carpenter, Paul; Hicks, Jacob; Filiberto, Justin

    2016-05-01

    Martian magmas are thought to be rich in chlorine compared with their terrestrial counterparts. Here, we experimentally investigate the effect of chlorine on liquidus depression and near-liquidus crystallization of olivine-phyric shergottite NWA 6234 and compare these results with previous experimental results on the effect of chlorine on near-liquidus crystallization of the surface basalts Humphrey and Fastball. Previous experimental results showed that the change in liquidus temperature is dependent on the bulk composition of the basalt. The effect of chlorine on liquidus depression is greater for lower SiO2 and higher Al2O3 magmas than for higher SiO2 and lower Al2O3 magmas. The bulk composition for this study has lower Al2O3 and higher FeO contents than previous work; therefore, we provide additional constraints on the effect of the bulk composition on the influence of chlorine on near-liquidus crystallization. High pressure and temperature crystallization experiments were performed at 1 GPa on a synthetic basalt, of the bulk composition of NWA 6234, with 0-4 wt% Cl added to the sample as AgCl. The results are consistent with previous notions that with increasing wt% Cl in the melt, the crystallization temperature decreases. Importantly, our results have a liquidus depression ∆T (°C) from added chlorine that is consistent with the difference in bulk composition and suggest a dependence on both the bulk Al2O3 and FeO content. Our results suggest that the addition of chlorine to the Martian mantle may lower magma genesis temperatures and potentially aid in the petrogenesis of Martian magmas.

  18. Melting in the system CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-FeO-Cr2O3 spanning the plagioclase-spinel lherzolite transition at 7 to 10 kbar: experiments versus thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshav, S.; Tirone, M.; Gudfinnsson, G.; Presnall, D.

    2008-12-01

    Voluminous basaltic magmas erupt at mid-oceanic ridges (mid-ocean ridge basalts, MORB) as a consequence of mantle upwelling and melting beneath spreading plates. However, because the geochemistry of MORB is distinct from OIB (ocean-island basalts), both have great petrogenetic significance and carry important information about the chemical and physical properties/dynamics of the mantle. In the context of MORB, a critical yet unresolved question is how phase transitions within a polybaric melting zone affect melt productivity and thereby, possibly exert control on major and trace element composition of erupted magmas. Currently, the disagreements on these issues are fundamental, with great consequences that extend beyond petrology to global issues of potential temperatures, mantle melting, mantle heterogeneity, and mantle dynamics. Thermodynamics show that melt productivity depends critically on the transition reaction, and melting can in principle increase, decrease, or even stop at a transition. Phase equilibrium work from both systems CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-Na2O (CMASN) and CMAS-FeO (CMASF) have been used to argue that melt productivity may increase at the plagioclase-spinel (pl-sp) transition because the univariant solidus transition reaction has a positive dT/dP slope in these systems, moving to higher pressure relative to the CMAS system. However, melting models derived on the basis of MELTS and pMELTS show that the solidus has a negative slope on the pl-sp transition. If correct, this would cause suppression of melting as the mantle decompresses along a pertinent adiabat. Owing to these vast discrepancies between experiments and thermodynamics and to further clarify MORB genesis, in this work we present melting phase relations in the system CMASFCr at the plagioclase-spinel lherzolite transition from 7 to 10 kbar. Cr was chosen since recent work has shown that the addition of Cr to CMAS has an unusually large effect on Ca/Al of melt compositions at 1.1 GPa. With

  19. Laboratory Shock Experiments on Basalt - Iron Sulfate Mixes at Approximately 40-50 GPa and Their Relevance to the Martian Regolith Component Present in Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Ross, D. K.; Asimow, P. D.; See, T.; Sutton, S.; Cardernas, F.; Montes, R.; Cintala, M.

    2012-01-01

    Basaltic shergottites such as Shergotty, Zagami and EET79001 contain impact melt glass pockets that are rich in Martian atmospheric gases [1] and are known as gas-rich impact-melt (GRIM) glasses. These glasses show evidence for the presence of a Martian regolith component based on Sm and Kr isotopic studies [2]. The GRIM glasses are sometimes embedded with clusters of innumerable micron-sized iron-sulfide blebs associated with minor amounts of iron sulfate particles [3, 4]. These sulfide blebs are secondary in origin and are not related to the primary igneous sulfides occurring in Martian meteorites. The material comprising these glasses arises from the highly oxidizing Martian surface and sulfur is unlikely to occur as sulfide in the Martian regoilith. Instead, sulfur is shown to occur as sulfate based on APXS and Mossbauer results obtained by the Opportunity and Spirit rovers at Meridiani and Gusev [5]. We have earlier suggested that the micron-sized iron sulfide globules in GRIM glasses were likely produced by shock-reduction of iron sulfate occurring in the regolith at the time when the GRIM glasses were produced by the meteoroid impact that launched the Martian meteorites into space [6]. As a result of high energy deposition by shock (approx. 40-60 GPa), the iron sulfate bearing phases are likely to melt along with other regolith components and will get reduced to immiscible sulfide fluid under reducing conditions. On quenching, this generates a dispersion of micron-scale sulfide blebs. The reducing agents in our case are likely to be H2 and CO which were shock-implanted from the Martian atmosphere into these glasses along with the noble gases. We conducted lab simulation experiments in the Lindhurst Laboratory of Experimental Geophysics at Caltech and the Experimental Impact Laboratory at JSC to test whether iron sulfide globules can be produced by impact-driven reduction of iron sulfate by subjecting Columbia River Basalt (CRB) and ferric sulfate mixtures to

  20. Determination of volatile concentrations in fluorapatite of Martian shergottite NWA 2975 by combining synchrotron FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, EMPA, and TEM, and inferences on the volatile budget of the apatite host-magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SłAby, Ewa; Koch-Müller, Monika; FöRster, Hans-Jürgen; Wirth, Richard; Rhede, Dieter; Schreiber, Anja; Schade, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    We combined the focused ion beam sample preparation technique with polarized synchrotron-based FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy, laser-Raman spectroscopy, electron microprobe analysis (EMPA), and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis to identify and quantify structurally bound OH, F, Cl, and CO3 groups in fluorapatite from the Northwest Africa 2975 (NWA 2975) shergottite. In this study, the first FTIR spectra of the OH-stretching region from a Martian apatite are presented that show characteristic OH-bands of a F-rich, hydroxyl-bearing apatite. Depending on the method of apatite-formula calculation and whether charge balance is assumed or not, the FTIR-based quantification of the incorporated OH, expressed as wt% H2O, is in variably good agreement with the H2O concentration calculated from electron microprobe data. EMP analyses yielded between 0.35 and 0.54 wt% H2O, and IR data yielded an average H2O content of 0.31 ± 0.03 wt%, consistent with the lower range determined from EMP analyses. The TEM observations implied that the volatiles budget of fluorapatite is magmatic. The water content and the relative volatile ratios calculated for the NWA 2975 magma are similar to those established for other enriched or intermediate shergottites. It is difficult to define the source of enrichment: either Martian wet mantle or crustal assimilation. Comparing the environment of parental magma generation for NWA 2975 with the terrestrial mantle in terms of water content, it displays a composition intermediate between enriched and depleted MORB.

  1. Xenon and other noble gases in shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Caffee, M. W.; Hohenberg, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    The isotopic composition of the xenon component trapped in EETA 79001's lithologies B and C has been determined, and other noble gases were measured in some samples. The Xe component was found to have light isotope ratios indistinguishable from those of the terrestrial atmosphere. The trapped component has a Xe-129/Xe-132 ratio of about 2.4, and is enhanced in Xe-134 and Xe-136 relative to the terrestrial atmosphere or the average carbonaceous chondrite. Similarities between values for Ar-40/Ar-36, Xe-129/Xe-132, and N-15/N-14 and the corresponding Martian atmospheric values suggest Martian origin of the trapped gases.

  2. Compositional evolution of high-temperature sheared lherzolite PHN 1611

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. ); Griffin, W.L.; Ryan, C.G. )

    1993-02-01

    The evolution of fertile' mantle has been studied by proton microprobe (PIXE) analysis of minerals of a high-temperature sheared xenolith from the Thaba Putsoa kimerlite in Lesotho, southern Africa. Analyzed elements include Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Sr, Y, and Zr. Garnets are homogeneous in Ni and Zn but have rims enriched relative to cores in Zr and Y. Compositions of olivine neoblasts define intergranular gradients of Fe, Zn, and Ni; Fe-rich olivine is relatively Zn-rich but Ni-poore. Although individual clinopyroxene grains are nearly homogeneous, clinopyroxene associated with Fe-rich olivine is relatively Fe- and Zn-rich but Sr- and Cr-poor. The trace-element abundances and compositional gradients constrain the processes of periodotite enrichment and the thermal history. Enrichment of Zr, Y, and Fe in garnet rims documents infiltration of a silica-undersaturated melt. The Fe-rich olivine compositions and the Zn and Fe gradients establish that the xenolith was sampled from near a melt conduit. Mechanical mixing of inhomogeneous peridotite and melt infiltration may have been concurrent. Because garnets appear homogeneous in Ni, mantle temperature changes affecting PHN 1611 occurred before or over a longer period than the melt infiltration. Measured and calculated abundances of many incompatible trace elements in the rock are similar to those proposed for primitive mantle. Calculated chondrite-normalized abundances of Sr, Ti, Zr, and Y are like those of appropriate REE. Enrichment processes in PHN 1611 proceeded at unusually high recorded temperature and in the apparent absence of minor phases common in lower-temperature metasomatized rocks, but similar processes may be common. In particular, mechanical mixing near mantle dikes may frequently occur. These enrichment mechanisms may produce xenolith compositions that resemble some proposed for primitive mantle but that have different implications for mantle evolution. 61 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Volatile and other trace elements in Martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ming-Sheng; Mokos, Jennifer; Lipschutz, Michael E.

    1997-03-01

    We summarize RNAA data for 15 trace elements - U, Au, Co, Sb, Ga, Rb, Ag, Se, Cs, Te, Zn, Cd, Bi, Tl and In (in order of putative volatility during nebular condensation and accretion) - in 11 of the 12 known Martian meteorites. We have not yet measured Yamato 793605. Some shergottite data (Shergotty, Zagami, ALH A77005, EET A79001, LEW 88516) were published previously. Data for the six other Martian meteorites are new: the nakhlites and Chassigny samples studied were previously analyzed at NASA/JSC using INAA.

  4. Crystallization of the Zagami Shergottite: An Experimental Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofgren, Gary E.; McCoy, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    Spherulites are usually rounded or spherical objects found in rhyolitic obsidian. They usually comprise acicular crystals of alkali feldspar that radiate from a single point. The radiating array of crystalline fibers typically have a similar crystallographic orientation such that a branch fiber departs slightly but appreciably from that of its parent fiber. Individual fibers range from 1 to several micrometers in diameter. The spherulites most likely form by heterogeneous nucleation on microscopic seed crystals, bubbles, or some other surface at high degrees of supercooling. They grow very rapidly stabilizing their fibrous habit and typically range in size from microscopic to a few cm in diameter.

  5. Iron Redox Systematics of Shergottites and Martian Magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, Kevin; Danielson, L. R.; Martin, A. M.; Newville, M.; Choi, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Martian meteorites record a range of oxygen fugacities from near the IW buffer to above FMQ buffer [1]. In terrestrial magmas, Fe(3+)/ SigmaFe for this fO2 range are between 0 and 0.25 [2]. Such variation will affect the stability of oxides, pyroxenes, and how the melt equilibrates with volatile species. An understanding of the variation of Fe(3+)/SigmaFe for martian magmas is lacking, and previous work has been on FeO-poor and Al2O3-rich terrestrial basalts. We have initiated a study of the iron redox systematics of martian magmas to better understand FeO and Fe2O3 stability, the stability of magnetite, and the low Ca/high Ca pyroxene [3] ratios observed at the surface.

  6. Crystallization of Yamato 980459 at 0.5 GPA: Are Residual Liquids Like QUE 94201?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, J. F.; Draper, D. S.; Mercer, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Martian basaltic meteorites Y980459 and QUE94201 (henceforth referred to as Y98 and QUE respectively) are thought to represent magmatic liquid compositions, rather than being products of protracted crystallization and accumulation like the majority of other martian meteorites. Both meteorite compositions have been experimentally crystallized at 1 bar, and liquidus phases were found to match corresponding mineral core compositions in the meteorites, consistent with the notion that these meteorites represent bona fide melts. They also represent the most primitive and most evolved basaltic martian samples, respectively. Y98 has Mg# (molar Mg/Mg+Fe) approximates 65, and lacks plagioclase; whereas QUE has Mg# approximates 40, and lacks olivine. However they share important geochemical characteristics (e.g. superchondritic CaO/Al2O3, very high epsilon(sub Nd) and low Sr-87/Sr-87) that suggest they sample a similar highly depleted mantle reservoir. As such, they represent likely endmembers of martian magmatic liquid compositions, and it is natural to seek petrogenetic linkages between the two. We make no claim that the actual meteorites themselves share a genetic link (the respective ages rule that out); we are exploring only in general whether primitive martian liquids like Y98 could evolve to liquids resembling QUE. Both experimental and computational efforts have been made to determine if there is indeed such a link. Recent petrological models at 1 bar generated using MELTS suggest that a QUE-like melt can be derived from a parental melt with a Y98 composition. However, experimental studies at 1 bar have been less successful at replicating this progression. Previous experimental crystallization studies of Y98 by our group at 0.5 GPa have produced melt compositions approaching that of QUE, although these results were complicated by the presence of small, variable amounts of H2O in some of the runs owing to the use of talc/pyrex experimental assemblies. Therefore we have repeated the four experiments, augmented with additional runs, all using BaCO3 cell assemblies, which are devoid of water, and these new experiments supersede those reported earlier. Here we report results of experiments simulating equilibrium crystallization; fractional crystallization experiments are currently underway.

  7. Mineralogy and Petrology of Yamato 86029: A New Type of Carbonaceous Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tonui, E.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2001-01-01

    Y-86029 resembles CI chondrites. Its matrix is very fine-grained. Olivine shows evidence of shock, which has rarely been observed in carbonaceous chondrites. Y-86029 experienced aqueous and thermal alteration during or after accretion in parent body. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Petrology and bulk chemistry of Yamato-82094, a new type of carbonaceous chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, M.; Barrat, J. A.; Weisberg, M. K.; Imae, N.; Yamaguchi, A.; Kojima, H.

    2014-03-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites are classified into several groups. However, some are ungrouped. We studied one such ungrouped chondrite, Y-82094, previously classified as a CO. In this chondrite, chondrules occupy 78 vol%, and the matrix is distinctly poor in abundance (11 vol%), compared with CO and other C chondrites. The average chondrule size is 0.33 mm, different from that in C chondrites. Although these features are similar to those in ordinary chondrites, Y-82094 contains 3 vol% Ca-Al-rich inclusions and 5% amoeboid olivine aggregates (AOAs). Also, the bulk composition resembles that of CO chondrites, except for the volatile elements, which are highly depleted. The oxygen isotopic composition of Y-82094 is within the range of CO and CV chondrites. Therefore, Y-82094 is an ungrouped C chondrite, not similar to any other C chondrite previously reported. Thin FeO-rich rims on AOA olivine and the mode of occurrence of Ni-rich metal in the chondrules indicate that Y-82094 is petrologic type 3.2. The extremely low abundance of type II chondrules and high abundance of Fe-Ni metal in the chondrules suggest reducing condition during chondrule formation. The depletion of volatile elements indicates that the components formed under high-temperature conditions, and accreted to the parent body of Y-82094. Our study suggests a wider range of formation conditions than currently recorded by the major C chondrite groups. Additionally, Y-82094 may represent a new, previously unsampled, asteroidal body.

  9. Samarium-neodymium systematics in kimberlites and in the minerals of garnet lherzolite inclusions.

    PubMed

    Basu, A R; Tatsumoto, M

    1979-07-27

    The initial ratios of neodymium-143 to neodymium-144 in kimberlites ranging in age between 90 x 10(6) to 1300 x 10(6) years from South Africa, India, and the United States are different from the corresponding ratios in the minerals of peridotite inclusions in the kimberlites but are identical to the ratios in the basaltic achondrite Juvinas at the times of emplacement of the respective kimberlite pipes. This correlation between the kimberlites and Juvinas, which represents the bulk chondritic earth in rare-earth elements, strongly indicates that the kimberlite's source in the mantle is chondritic in rare-earth elements and relatively primeval in composition. PMID:17790851

  10. Samarium-neodymium systematics in kimberlites and in the minerals of garnet lherzolite inclusions.

    PubMed

    Basu, A R; Tatsumoto, M

    1979-07-27

    The initial ratios of neodymium-143 to neodymium-144 in kimberlites ranging in age between 90 x 10(6) to 1300 x 10(6) years from South Africa, India, and the United States are different from the corresponding ratios in the minerals of peridotite inclusions in the kimberlites but are identical to the ratios in the basaltic achondrite Juvinas at the times of emplacement of the respective kimberlite pipes. This correlation between the kimberlites and Juvinas, which represents the bulk chondritic earth in rare-earth elements, strongly indicates that the kimberlite's source in the mantle is chondritic in rare-earth elements and relatively primeval in composition.

  11. Samarium-neodymium systematics in kimberlites and in the minerals of garnet lherzolite inclusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Basu, A.R.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1979-01-01

    The initial ratios of neodymium-143 to neodymium-144 in kimberlites ranging in age between 90 ?? 106 to 1300 ?? 106 years from South Africa, India, and the United States are different from the corresponding ratios in the minerals of peridotite inclusions in the kimberlites but are identical to the ratios in the basaltic achondrite Juvinas at the times of emplacement of the respective kimberlite pipes. This correlation between the kimberlites and Juvinas, which represents the bulk chondritic earth in rare-earth elements, strongly indicates that the kimberlite's source in the mantle is chondritic in rare-earth elements and relatively primeval in composition. Copyright ?? 1979 AAAS.

  12. Martian Igneous Geochemistry: The Nature of the Martian Mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Peng, Z. X.; Herrin, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Mafic igneous rocks probe the interiors of their parent objects, reflecting the compositions and mineralogies of their source regions, and the magmatic processes that engendered them. Incompatible trace element contents of mafic igneous rocks are widely used to constrain the petrologic evolution of planets. We focus on incompatible element ratios of martian meteorites to constrain the petrologic evolution of Mars in the context of magma ocean/cumulate overturn models [1]. Most martian meteorites contain some cumulus grains, but regardless, their incompatible element ratios are close to those of their parent magmas. Martian meteorites form two main petrologic/ age groupings; a 1.3 Ga group composed of clinopyroxenites (nakhlites) and dunites (chassignites), and a <1 Ga group composed of basalts and lherzolites (shergottites).

  13. Early Solar System Alkali Fractionation Events Recorded by K-Ca Isotopes in the Yamato-74442 LL-Chondritic Breccia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatsunori, T.; Misawa, K.; Okano, O.; Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Simon, J. I.; Tappa, M. J.; Yoneda, S.

    2015-01-01

    Radiogenic ingrowth of Ca-40 due to decay of K-40 occurred early in the solar system history causing the Ca-40 abundance to vary within different early-former reservoirs. Marshall and DePaolo ] demonstrated that the K-40/Ca-40 decay system could be a useful radiogenic tracer for studies of terrestrial rocks. Shih et al. [3,4] determined 40K/40Ca ages of lunar granitic rock fragments and discussed the chemical characteristics of their source materials. Recently, Yokoyama et al. [5] showed the application of the K-40/Ca-40 chronometer for high K/Ca materials in ordinary chondrites (OCs). High-precision calcium isotopic data are needed to constrain mixing processes among early solar system materials and the time of planetesimal formation. To better constrain the solar system calcium isotopic compositions among astromaterials, we have determined the calcium isotopic compositions of OCs and an angrite. We further estimated a source K/Ca ratio for alkali-rich fragments in a chondritic breccia using the estimated solar system initial Ca-40/Ca-44.

  14. Martian Meteorite Chronology and Effects of Impact Metamorphism (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier, A.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Albarede, F.

    2009-12-01

    Martian (SNC) meteorites provide important clues to processes of alteration or shock at the surface of the planet as many of them contain secondary phases and/or high-pressure assemblages, which are the products of aqueous alteration and impact events, respectively. They include gabbros (shergottites), pyroxenites (nakhlites), and dunites (chassignites), and a single orthopyroxenite, ALH 84001. Pb-Pb isotope systematics of Martian meteorites favor three groups of formation ages: 4.3 Ga for depleted shergottites, 4.1 Ga for ALH 84001 and intermediate and enriched shergottites, and 1.3 Ga for nakhlites and Chassigny [1]. This contrasts with the young mineral isochron ages obtained by Ar-Ar dating or phosphate-based chronometers (e.g., U-Pb, Sm-Nd). In addition to Pb-Pb isotope systematics [1], we have obtained preliminary Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf mineral isochron data for the shergottite NWA 480 and find an age of ~345 Ma in contrast to its ~4.1 Ga Pb-Pb age. For the nakhlites MIL 03346 and Yamato-000593, we find Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf ages at ~1335 Ma, consistent with their ~1.3 Ga Pb-Pb age. Hence, all shergottites unambiguously show evidence of resetting events, which is not the case for nakhlites. We interpret the young ages indicated by shergottite Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, Lu-Hf, and U-Pb internal isochrons as recent resetting by fluids, impacts, or both. Internal isochrons date the last closure, whether initial cooling or late resetting, of the chronometric system in coexisting minerals. Problems arise in part because the carriers of the parent and daughter nuclides have been wrongly assigned to major rather than accessory minerals, and in part because, with the exception of the Pb-Pb chronometer, the rock samples have been strongly leached and, hence, the parent and daughter nuclides became fractionated in the process. The Rb-Sr, U-Pb, Sm-Nd, and Lu-Hf mineral isochrons of shergottites show young age clusters around 180, 350, 475, and 575 Ma. Each cluster of young mineral isochron ages

  15. Disturbance of isotope systematics in meteorites during shock and thermal metamorphism and implications for shergottite chronology

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, A M; Borg, L E; Asmerom, Y

    2008-12-10

    Shock and thermal metamorphism of meteorites from differentiated bodies such as the Moon and Mars have the potential to disturb chronometric information contained in these meteorites. In order to understand the impact-related mechanisms and extent of disturbance to isochrons, we undertook experiments to shock and heat samples of 10017, a 3.6 billion year old lunar basalt. One sub-sample was shocked to 55 GPa, a second subsample was heated to 1000 C for one week, and a third sub-sample was maintained as a control sample. Of the isotope systems analyzed, the Sm-Nd system was the least disturbed by shock or heat, followed by the Rb-Sr system. Ages represented by the {sup 238}U-{sup 206}Pb isotope system were degraded by shock and destroyed with heating. In no case did either shock or heating alone result in rotated or reset isochrons that represent a spurious age. In some cases the true crystallization age of the sample was preserved, and in other cases age information was degraded or destroyed. Although our results show that neither shock nor thermal metamorphism alone can account for the discordant ages represented by different isotope systems in martian meteorites, we postulate that shock metamorphism may render a meteorite more susceptible than unshocked material to subsequent disturbance during impact-related heating or aqueous alteration on Mars or Earth. The combination of these processes may result in the disparate chronometric information preserved in some meteorites.

  16. North West Africa 8657 Shergottite Micro-Investigation by Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzari, P.; De Angelis, S.; De Sanctis, M. C.

    2016-08-01

    In this abstract preliminary results from the comparison of data obtained by the VIS-IR SPIM spectrometer and SEM backscattered images are reported. In particular, for validating spectra interpretation, EDS and WDS spot analyses were collected.

  17. Siderophile and chalcophile element abundances in shergottites: Implications for Martian core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuying; Humayun, Munir; Righter, Kevin; Jefferson, Gwendolyn; Fields, Dana; Irving, Anthony J.

    2015-04-01

    Elemental abundances for volatile siderophile and chalcophile elements for Mars inform us about processes of accretion and core formation. Such data are few for Martian meteorites, and are often lacking in the growing number of desert finds. In this study, we employed laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to analyze polished slabs of 15 Martian meteorites for the abundances of about 70 elements. This technique has high sensitivity, excellent precision, and is generally accurate as determined by comparisons of elements for which literature abundances are known. However, in some meteorites, the analyzed surface is not representative of the bulk composition due to the over- or underrepresentation of a key host mineral, e.g., phosphate for rare earth elements (REE). For other meteorites, the range of variation in bulk rastered analyses of REE is within the range of variation reported among bulk REE analyses in the literature. An unexpected benefit has been the determination of the abundances of Ir and Os with a precision and accuracy comparable to the isotope dilution technique. Overall, the speed and small sample consumption afforded by this technique makes it an important tool widely applicable to small or rare meteorites for which a polished sample was prepared. The new volatile siderophile and chalcophile element abundances have been employed to determine Ge and Sb abundances, and revise Zn, As, and Bi abundances for the Martian mantle. The new estimates of Martian mantle composition support core formation at intermediate pressures (14 ± 3 GPa) in a magma ocean on Mars.

  18. Volatile Siderophile Elements in Shergottites: Constraints on Core Formation and Magmatic Degassing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, Kevin; Humayun, M.

    2012-01-01

    Volatile siderophile elements (e.g., As, Sb, Ge, Ga, In, Bi, Zn, Cd, Sn, Cu, Pb) can place constraints both on early differentiation as well as the origin of volatiles. This large group of elements has been used to constrain Earth accretion [1,2], and Earth-Moon geochemistry [3]. Application to Earth has been fostered by new experimental studies of these elements such as Ge, In, and Ga [4,5,6]. Application to Mars has been limited by the lack of data for many of these elements on martian meteorites. Many volatile elements are considered in the pioneering work by [7] but for only the small number of martian samples then available. We have made new measurements on a variety of martian meteorites in order to obtain more substantial datasets for these elements using the analytical approach of [8]. We use the new dataset, together with published data from the literature, to define martian mantle abundances of volatile siderophile elements. Then, we evaluate the possibility that these abundances could have been set by mid-mantle (14 GPa, 2100 C) metal-silicate equilibrium, as suggested by the moderately and slightly siderophile elements [9]. Finally, we examine the possibility that some elements were affected by volatility and magmatic degassing.

  19. Petrogenesis of the Elephant Moraine A79001 meteorite Multiple magma pulses on the shergottite parent body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcsween, H. Y., Jr.; Jarosewich, E.

    1983-01-01

    The EETA 79001 achondrite consists of two distinct igneous lithologies joined along a planar, non-brecciated contact. Both are basaltic rocks composed primarily of pigeonite, augite, and maskelynite, but one contains zoned megacrysts of olivine, orthopyroxene, and chromite that represent disaggregated xenoliths of harzburzite. Both lithologies probably formed from successive volcanic flows or multiple injections of magma into a small, shallow chamber. Many similarities between the two virtually synchronous magmas suggest that they are related. Possible mechanisms to explain their differences involve varying degrees of assimilation, fractionation from similar parental magmas, or partial melting of a similar source peridotite; of these, assimilation of the observed megacryst assemblage seems most plausible. However, some isotopic contamination may be required in any of these petrogenetic models. The meteorite has suffered extensive shock metamorphism and localized melting during a large impact event that probably excavated and liberated it from its parent body.

  20. Martian Noble Gases in Recently Found Shergottites, Nakhlites, and Breccia Northwest Africa 8114

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busemann, H.; Seiler, S.; Wieler, R.; Kuga, M.; Maden, C.; Irving, A. J.; Clay, P. L.; Joy, K. H.

    2015-07-01

    New noble gas data for several recently found martian meteorites will be presented to determine cosmic-ray exposure ages and source pairing. The presence of trapped (atmospheric) components and discrepancies to earlier data sets will be discussed.

  1. Clinopyroxene REE distribution coefficients for shergottites The REE content of the Shergotty melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, G.; Wagstaff, J.; Yang, S.-R.

    1986-01-01

    Rare-earth element (REE) distribution coefficients were measured between synthetic pyroxenes and melts similar in composition to the Shergotty intercumulus fluid. REE-doped synthetic glass samples were analyzed by means of an automated microbeam electron microprobe. The coefficients were found to exhibit a strong positive correlation with pyroxene wollastonite content. Using distribution coefficients measured for the natural phase compositions, REE abundances for the Shergotty intercumulus melt were computed.

  2. Uranium-lead isotope systematics of Mars inferred from the basaltic shergottite QUE 94201

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, A M; Borg, L E; Connelly, J N

    2006-12-22

    Uranium-lead ratios (commonly represented as {sup 238}U/{sup 204}Pb = {mu}) calculated for the sources of martian basalts preserve a record of petrogenetic processes that operated during early planetary differentiation and formation of martian geochemical reservoirs. To better define the range of {mu} values represented by the source regions of martian basalts, we completed U-Pb elemental and isotopic analyses on whole rock, mineral and leachate fractions from the martian meteorite Queen Alexandra Range 94201 (QUE 94201). The whole rock and silicate mineral fractions have unradiogenic Pb isotopic compositions that define a narrow range ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb = 11.16-11.61). In contrast, the Pb isotopic compositions of weak HCl leachates are more variable and radiogenic. The intersection of the QUE 94201 data array with terrestrial Pb in {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb-{sup 207}Pb/{sup 204}Pb-{sup 208}Pb/{sup 204}Pb compositional space is consistent with varying amounts of terrestrial contamination in these fractions. We calculate that only 1-7% contamination is present in the purified silicate mineral and whole rock fractions, whereas the HCl leachates contain up to 86% terrestrial contamination. Despite the contamination, we are able to use the U-Pb data to determine the initial {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb of QUE 94201 (11.086 {+-} 0.008) and calculate the {mu} value of the QUE 94201 mantle source to be 1.823 {+-} 0.008. This is the lowest {mu} value calculated for any martian basalt source, and, when compared to the highest values determined for martian basalt sources, indicates that {mu} values in martian source reservoirs vary by at least 100%. The range of source {mu} values further indicates that the {mu} value of bulk silicate Mars is approximately three. The amount of variation in the {mu} values of the mantle sources ({mu} {approx} 2-4) is greater than can be explained by igneous processes involving silicate phases alone. We suggest the possibility that a small amount of sulfide crystallization may generate large extents of U-Pb fractionation during formation of the mantle sources of martian basalts.

  3. Evidence from Hydrogen Isotopes in Meteorites for a Subsurface Hydrogen Reservoir on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usui, Tomohiro; Alexander, Conel M. O'D.; Wang, Jianhua; Simon, Justin I.; Jones, John H.

    2015-01-01

    The surface geology and geomorphology of Mars indicates that it was once warm enough to maintain a large body of liquid water on its surface, though such a warm environment might have been transient. The transition to the present cold and dry Mars is closely linked to the history of surface water, yet the evolution of surficial water is poorly constrained. We have conducted in situ hydrogen isotope (D/H) analyses of quenched and impact glasses in three Martian meteorites (Yamato 980459, EETA79001, LAR 06319) by Cameca ims-6f at Digital Terrain Models (DTM) following the methods of [1]. The hydrogen isotope analyses provide evidence for the existence of a distinct but ubiquitous water/ice reservoir (D/H = 2-3 times Earth's ocean water: Standard Mean Ocean Water (SMOW)) that lasted from at least the time when the meteorites crystallized (173-472 Ma) to the time they were ejected by impacts (0.7-3.3 Ma), but possibly much longer [2]. The origin of this reservoir appears to predate the current Martian atmospheric water (D/H equals approximately 5-6 times SMOW) and is unlikely to be a simple mixture of atmospheric and primordial water retained in the Martian mantle (D/H is approximately equal to SMOW [1]). Given the fact that this intermediate-D/H reservoir (2-3 times SMOW) is observed in a diverse range of Martian materials with different ages (e.g., SNC (Shergottites, Nakhlites, Chassignites) meteorites, including shergottites such as ALH 84001; and Curiosity surface data [3]), we conclude that this intermediate-D/H reservoir is likely a global surficial feature that has remained relatively intact over geologic time. We propose that this reservoir represents either hydrated crust and/or ground ice interbedded within sediments. Our results corroborate the hypothesis that a buried cryosphere accounts for a large part of the initial water budget of Mars.

  4. Mineralogy and Textural Characteristics of Fine-grained Rims in the Yamato 791198 CM2 Carbonaceous Chondrite: Constraints on the Location of Aqueous Alteration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chizmadia, Lysa J.; Brearley, Adrian J.

    2003-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites provide important clues into the nature of physical and chemical processes in the early solar system. A question of key importance concerns the role of water in solar nebular and asteroidal processes. The effects of water on primary mineral assemblages have been widely recognized in chondritic meteorites, especially the CI and CM carbonaceous chondrites. These meteorites have undergone extensive aqueous alteration that occurred prior to their arrival on Earth. In the case of the CM chondrites, this alteration has resulted in the partial to complete replacement of the primary nebular phases with secondary alteration phases. Considerable controversy exists as to the exact location where the alteration of the CM chondrites occurred. Several textural lines of evidence have been cited in support of aqueous alteration prior to the accretion of the final parent asteroid. An important line of evidence to support this hypothesis is the dis-equilibrium nature of fine-grained rims and matrix materials. [2] also noted the juxtaposition of micron-sized Fe-Ni metal grains and apparently unaltered chondrule glass against hydrated rim silicates. Conversely, there is a large body of evidence in favor of parent body alteration such as the occurrence of undisturbed Fe-rich aureoles and the systematic redistribution of elemental components over millimeters, e.g., Mg(+2) into the matrix and Fe(+2) into chondrules etc.

  5. Petrographic Studies of Fine-grained Rims in the Yamato 791198 cm Carbonaceous Chondrite and Comparison to Murchison and ALH81002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chizmadia, L. J.; Brearley, A. J.

    2001-01-01

    Fine-grained rims in Y791198 (CM2) have been studied in detail using SEM and EPMA techniques. In comparison with the more highly altered CM chondrite, ALH 81002, the rims are texturally and compositionally more heterogeneous. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Allan Hills 84025 - The second brachinite, far more differentiated than brachina, and an ultramafic achondritic clast from L chondrite Yamato 75097

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, P. H.; Kallemeyn, G. W.

    1989-01-01

    New bulk-compositional and petrographic data tend to confirm that dunitic-wehrlitic meteorite ALH84025 is a second brachinite. It is suggested here that ALH84025 originated as an olivine heteradcumulate, whereas Brachina, or ALH84025, originated as an olivine orthocumulate. The tendency for pyroxenes among brachinites to be high-Ca may be a consequence of a relatively low MgO/FeO ratio, and/or high Na/Ca and K/Ca ratios in the bulk parent body. New data for a 2.5-cm dunite-melatroctolite clast from L6 chondrite Y75097 are reported. This clast has experience depletion of middle REE, except for a large (+) Eu anomaly. The clast as a whole is enriched in phosphates, but almost exclusively in its least-metamorphosed 'core' portion, whereas the analyzed samples represent phosphate-poor portions. It is suggested that this bizarre assemblage probably originated as an achondrite containing cumulus olivine, plagioclase, and phosphate, not necessarily all from a single igneous source rock.

  7. SM-ND Age and REE Systematics of Larkman Nunatek 06319: Closed System Fractional Crystallization of a Shergottite Magma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, J. T.; Brandon, A. D.; Lapen T. J.; Righter, M.; Peslier, A. H.

    2010-01-01

    Sm-Nd isotopic data were collected on mineral separates and bulk rock powders of LAR 06319, yielding an age of 180+/-13 Ma (2(sigma)). This age is concordant with the Lu-Hf age (197+/-29 Ma, [1]) determined in conjunction with these data and the Sm-Nd age (190+/-26 Ma) of Shih et al., 2009 [2]. The Sm-Nd data form at statistically significant isochron (Fig. 1) that is controlled largely by leachate-residue pairs (samples with the R suffix are residues after leaching in cold 2N HCl for 10 minutes).

  8. Shock-implanted noble gases - An experimental study with implications for the origin of Martian gases in shergottite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Horz, Friedrich; Johnson, Pratt H.

    1986-01-01

    The shock-implantation of gases is studied by artificially shocking whole rock and power samples of terrestrial basalt to pressures of 2-40 GPa. Ar, Kr, Xe, and Ne were implanted into the silicate. It is observed that the amount of implanted gas is linearly proportional to its partial pressure over a pressure range of 0.0001 to 0.1 atmosphere. The fractionation effect in the implanted gas and the gas diffusion properties are examined. The amounts of gas that would have been implanted with 100 percent efficiency are calculated from the measured porosities of the power samples and are compared to observed abundances. It is determined that the implantation efficiencies are approximately 0.5 percent at 2 GPa, 7 percent at 5 GPa, and greater than 50 percent at both 20 and 35 GPa. The experimental data correlate with the shock implantation of Martian gases without mass fractionation into the shock-melted phase of meteorite EETA 79001.

  9. Noble Gas Analysis for Mars Robotic Missions: Evaluating K-Ar Age Dating for Mars Rock Analogs and Martian Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Ming, D. W.; Garrison, D. H.; Jones, J. H.; Bogard, D. D.; Nagao, K.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this noble gas investigation was to evaluate the possibility of measuring noble gases in martian rocks and air by future robotic missions such as the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The MSL mission has, as part of its payload, the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument, which consists of a pyrolysis oven integrated with a GCMS. The MSL SAM instrument has the capability to measure noble gas compositions of martian rocks and atmosphere. Here we suggest the possibility of K-Ar age dating based on noble gas release of martian rocks by conducting laboratory simulation experiments on terrestrial basalts and martian meteorites. We provide requirements for the SAM instrument to obtain adequate noble gas abundances and compositions within the current SAM instrumental operating conditions, especially, a power limit that prevents heating the furnace above approx.1100 C. In addition, Martian meteorite analyses from NASA-JSC will be used as ground truth to evaluate the feasibility of robotic experiments to constrain the ages of martian surface rocks.

  10. Geochemistry and petrology of spinel lherzolite xenoliths from Xalapasco de La Joya, San Luis Potosi, Mexico: Partial melting and mantle metasomatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yan; Elthon, Don

    1990-09-01

    Spinel Iherzolite xenoliths from Xalapasco de La Joya, San Luis Potosi, Mexico, are divided into two distinct groups according to their major element and trace element characteristics. Group Ia xenoliths are characterized by light rare earth element (LREE) depletion ((La/Lu)N = 0.10-0.77 in clinopyroxene) and linear major and compatible trace element relationships. Group Ib xenoliths are characterized by FeO and Na2O enrichment and higher (La/Lu)N ratios (0.80-4.1 in clinopyroxene) and complex major element relationships. These samples, which have a range of equilibrium temperatures of 910°-1070°C, exhibit protogranular textures and typical orthopyroxene+clinopyroxene+spinel clusters. Modal abundances and chemical compositions of the group Ia xenoliths vary from primitive (15.2% clinopyroxene, 38.5% MgO, 1824 ppm Ni) to moderately depleted (6.4-8.7% clinopyroxene, 43.8-44.1% MgO, 2192 ppm Ni). Systematic variations of major elements and compatible trace elements in the group Ia xenoliths are interpreted to result from various degrees (<25%) of partial melting and melt extraction, followed by subsolidus equilibration and annealing. The extracted melts have a range of compositions similar to picritic basalts. Abundances of moderately incompatible trace elements, Sc and Cr, in the group Ia minerals have been substantially redistributed during subsolidus equilibration. In a few of these xenoliths there appears to be vestiges of incipient metasomatism, but metasomatism has not substantially influenced the group as a whole. Group Ib xenoliths have been substantially influenced by metasomatic processes. The ∑FeO and Na2O contents of the cores of clinopyroxenes in group Ib xenoliths are higher than clinopyroxenes in group Ia samples. The higher La contents and La/Lu ratios in group Ib clinopyroxenes (compared to group Ia), together with this FeO and Na2O enrichment, suggest that equilibration of basanites with residual mantle has been a major process in the evolution of group Ib peridotites. Clinopyroxenes in the group Ib xenoliths are reversely zoned with higher Mg # (100×Mg/(Mg+∑Fe)), CaO, and TiO2 and with lower Na2O and Al2O3 in their rims than in their cores. Bulk rock Al2O3 and SiO2 contents of the group Ib xenoliths tend to be lower than those of group Ia at the same MgO contents. The Al2O3 and SiO4 depletion in bulk rocks and Al2O3 and Na2O depletion in the rims of the group Ib minerals result from reaction with an alkaline-element-enriched, H2O dominated fluid. The history of group Ib xenoliths appear to be dominated by an early phase of melt extraction followed by interaction with a basanitic melt to produce the FeO, Na2O, and LREE enrichment in clinopyroxenes. These peridotites then appear to have been affected by a H2O-rich fluid that depleted Al2O3 and Na2O from the rims of clinopyroxenes and produced incipient melt veins in the xenoliths.

  11. Duration of a Magma Ocean and Subsequent Mantle Overturn in Mars: Evidence from Nakhlites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debaille, V.; Brandon, A. D.; Yin, Q.-Z.; Jacobsen, B.

    2008-01-01

    It is now generally accepted that the heat produced by accretion, short-lived radioactive elements such as Al-26, and gravitational energy from core formation was sufficient to at least partially melt the silicate portions of terrestrial planets resulting in a global-scale magma ocean. More particularly, in Mars, the geochemical signatures displayed by shergottites, are likely inherited from the crystallization of this magma ocean. Using the short-lived chronometer Sm-146 - Nd-142 (t(sup 1/2) = 103 Myr), the duration of the Martian magma ocean (MMO) has been evaluated to being less than 40 Myr, while recent and more precise ND-142/ND-144 data were used to evaluate the longevity of the MMO to approximately 100 Myr after the solar system formation. In addition, it has been proposed that the end of the crystallization of the MMO may have triggered a mantle overturn, as a result of a density gradient in the cumulate layers crystallized at different levels. Dating the mantle overturn could hence provide additional constraint on the duration of the MMO. Among SNC meteorites, nakhlites are characterized by high epsilon W-182 of approximately +3 and an epsilon Nd-142 similar to depleted shergottites of +0.6-0.9. It has hence been proposed that the source of nakhlites was established very early in Mars history (approximately 8-10 Myr). However, the times recorded in HF-182-W-182 isotope system, i.e. when 182Hf became effectively extinct (approximately 50 Myr after solar system formation) are less than closure times recorded in the Sm-146-Nd-142 isotope system (with a full coverage of approximately 500 Myr after solar system formation). This could result in decoupling between the present-day measured epsilon W-182 and epsilon Nd-142 as the SM-146 may have recorded later differentiation events in epsilon ND-142 not observed in epsilon W-182 values. With these potential complexities in short-lived chronological data for SNC's in mind, new Hf-176/Hf-177, Nd-143/Nd-144 and Nd

  12. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXVI, Part 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: High-Resolution Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (HREELS) Using a Monochromated TEM/STEM. Dynamical Evolution of Planets in Open Clusters. Experimental Petrology of the Basaltic Shergottite Yamato 980459: Implications for the Thermal Structure of the Martian Mantle. Cryogenic Reflectance Spectroscopy of Highly Hydrated Sulfur-bearing Salts. Implications for Core Formation of the Earth from High Pressure-Temperature Au Partitioning Experiments. Uranium-Thorium Cosmochronology. Protracted Core Differentiation in Asteroids from 182Hf-182W Systematics in the Eagle Station Pallasite. Maximizing Mission Science Return Through Use of Spacecraft Autonomy: Active Volcanism and the Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment. Classification of Volcanic Eruptions on Io and Earth Using Low-Resolution Remote Sensing Data. Isotopic Mass Fractionation Laws and the Initial Solar System (sup26)Al/(sup27)Al Ratio. Catastrophic Disruption of Porous and Solid Ice Bodies (sup187)Re-(sup187)Os Isotope Disturbance in LaPaz Mare Basalt Meteorites. Comparative Petrology and Geochemistry of the LaPaz Mare Basalt Meteorites. A Comparison of the Structure and Bonding of Carbon in Apex Chert Kerogenous Material and Fischer-Tropsch-Type Carbons. Broad Spectrum Characterization of Returned Samples: Orientation Constraints of Small Samples on X-Ray and Other Spectroscopies. Apollo 14 High-Ti Picritic Glass: Oxidation/Reduction by Condensation of Alkali Metals. New Lunar Meteorites from Oman: Dhofar 925, 960 and 961. The First Six Months of Iapetus Observations by the Cassini ISS Camera. First Imaging Results from the Iapetus B/C Flyby of the Cassini Spacecraft. Radiative Transfer Calculations for the Atmosphere of Mars in the 200-900 nm Range. Geomorphologic Map of the Atlantis Basin, Terra Sirenum, Mars. The Meaning of Iron 60: A Nearby Supernova Injected Short-lived Radionuclides into Our Protoplanetary Disk.

  13. Nature of Reduced Carbon in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; McKay, D. S.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; White, L. M.

    2012-01-01

    Martian meteorites provide important information on the nature of reduced carbon components present on Mars throughout its history. The first in situ analyses for carbon on the surface of Mars by the Viking landers yielded disappointing results. With the recognition of Martian meteorites on Earth, investigations have shown carbon-bearing phases exist on Mars. Studies have yielded presence of reduced carbon, carbonates and inferred graphitic carbon phases. Samples ranging in age from the first approximately 4 Ga of Mars history [e.g. ALH84001] to nakhlites with a crystallization age of 1.3 Ga [e.g. Nakhla] with aqueous alteration processes occurring 0.5-0.7 Ga after crystallizaton. Shergottites demonstrate formation ages around 165-500 Ma with younger aqueous alterations events. Only a limited number of the Martian meteorites do not show evidence of significance terrestrial alterations. Selected areas within ALH84001, Nakhla, Yamato 000593 and possibly Tissint are suitable for study of their indigenous reduced carbon bearing phases. Nakhla possesses discrete, well-defined carbonaceous phases present within iddingsite alteration zones. Based upon both isotopic measurements and analysis of Nakhla's organic phases the presence of pre-terrestrial organics is now recognized. The reduced carbon-bearing phases appear to have been deposited during preterrestrial aqueous alteration events that produced clays. In addition, the microcrystalline layers of Nakhla's iddingsite have discrete units of salt crystals suggestive of evaporation processes. While we can only speculate on the origin of these unique carbonaceous structures, we note that the significance of such observations is that it may allow us to understand the role of Martian carbon as seen in the Martian meteorites with obvious implications for astrobiology and the pre-biotic evolution of Mars. In any case, our observations strongly suggest that reduced organic carbon exists as micrometer- size, discrete structures

  14. New Bulk Sulfur Measurements of Martian Meteorites - Implications for Sulfur Cycle on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, S.; Dasgupta, R.; Lee, C.; Wadhwa, M.

    2013-12-01

    Magmatic degassing was likely critical in giving rise to a thick atmosphere of ancient Mars and SO2 and H2S could have been key greenhouse gases. How much S was released depends on (1) the S content of the mantle-derived magma and (2) the magmatic sulfur budget of the basaltic crust. While the former is estimated by S content of basaltic melts at sulfide saturation (SCSS) [1,2], assuming mantle-derived magma is sulfide saturated, it is unclear how much S gets trapped during crystallization of basalts in the crust versus how much is released to the atmosphere. S content of the martian crust can be estimated from martian meteorites, yet bulk S concentration data of martian meteorites is limited [3]. Further, most martian meteorites contain cumulus minerals and some have experienced secondary alteration (weathering/ impact effects), which could either deplete or enrich S in these samples. To better constrain the degassing of S from the martian interior, we measured bulk S contents of 7 martian meteorites via high mass-resolution solution ICP-MS [4]. Basaltic shergottites Los Angeles, Zagami and NWA 856 have S contents of 2865×224, 1954×91 and 1584×10 ppm, respectively while clinopyroxenites Nakhla and NWA 998 give values of 690×60 and 253×42 ppm S. Olivine-phyric shergottites NWA 1068 and Tissint have intermediate S contents of 1280×48 and 2120×68 ppm. The meteorites have lower S contents than the predicted SCSS of ~3500-4500 ppm [2] along liquid line of descent for a liquid similar to Yamato 980459 at 1 GPa, estimated using alphaMELTS. Taking into account the possible proportion of inter-cumulus liquid (f= 6-70 wt.%) in the analyzed meteorites estimated by previous studies, the degassed S could be as low as ~300-1900 ppm (estimated by the difference between the SCSS×f and the S in the meteorites). However, nakhlite Nakhla and basaltic shergottites NWA 856 and Zagami show higher S than the calculated SCSS×f. In these two meteorites, sulfides occur as

  15. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd Isotope Systematics of Shergottite NWA 856: Crystallization Age and Implications for Alteration of Hot Desert SNC Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, A. D.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Wiesmann, H.

    2004-01-01

    Nakhlite NWA 998 was discovered in Algeria in 2001, and is unique among the six known members of this group of Martian meteorites in containing significant modal orthopyroxene. Initial petrologic and isotopic data were reported by Irving et al. This 456 gram stone consists mainly of sub-calcic augite with subordinate olivine and minor orthopyroxene, titanomagnetite, pyrrhotite, chlorapatite, and intercumulus An(sub 35) plagioclase. We report here preliminary results of radiogenic isotopic analyses conducted on fragmental material from the main mass.

  16. Oxygen Fugacity of the Upper Mantle of Mars. Evidence from the Partitioning Behavior of Vanadium in Y980459 (Y98) and other Olivine-Phyric Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, C. K.; McKay, G. A.; Papike, J. J.; Karner, J.

    2006-01-01

    Using partitioning behavior of V between olivine and basaltic liquid precisely calibrated for martian basalts, we determined the redox state of primitive (olivine-rich, high Mg#) martian basalts near their liquidus. The combination of oxidation state and incompatible element characteristics determined from early olivine indicates that correlations between fO2 and other geochemical characteristics observed in many martian basalts is also a fundamental characteristic of these primitive magmas. However, our data does not exhibit the range of fO2 observed in these previous studies.. We conclude that the fO2 for the martian upper mantle is approximately IW+1 and is incompatible-element depleted. It seems most likely (although clearly open to interpretation) that these mantle-derived magmas assimilated a more oxidizing (>IW+3), incompatible-element enriched, lower crustal component as they ponded at the base of the martian crust.

  17. Laboratory shock emplacement of noble gases, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide into basalt, and implications for trapped gases in shergottite EETA 79001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiens, R. C.; Pepin, R. O.

    1988-01-01

    Basalts from the Servilleta flows, Taos, NM, described by Lofgren (1983) were analyzed by mass spectrometry for shock-implanted noble gases, N2, and CO2 (which were isotopically labeled) after an exposure to 20-60 GPa shock in the presence of 0.0045-3.0 atm of ambient gas. The results were compared with data available on the constituents of the EETA 79001 meteorite. As expected, the samples shocked in this study attained emplacement efficiencies significantly lower than those apparent for lithology C of EETA 79001. Possible explanations for this difference include atmospheric overpressure at the time of EETA 79001 exposure to shock, the trapping of gas already in vugs by the intruding melt material, or the collapse of gas-filled vugs to form gas-laden glass inclusions.

  18. Petrology and Geochemistry of a Mg- and Al-Rich Orthopyroxenite Xenolith in the EETA79001 Shergottite: Implications for Mars Crustal Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkley, John L.

    1999-01-01

    EETA79001 is a Mars meteorite (SNC) consisting of multiple rock types, including two basalt types, olivine and pyroxene xenocrysts, and ultramafic xenoliths. This study is focused on the petrology and geochemistry of one orthopyroxenite xenolith in PTS 68, designated X-1. It consists of chemically homogeneous orthopyroxene cores with exceptionally high Mg/Fe (mg#=85) and Al. Cores are permeated by minute high-Si+Al glassy inclusions, some with augite microlites. Magnesian core areas are mantled by more Fe-rich orthopyroxene rims grading to pigeonite away from cores. The xenolith is transected by cross-cutting shear planes, some of pre-incorporation origin. Major and minor element composition and variation suggest that core areas are primarily igneous, crystallized from a high temperature mafic melt. However, nearly constant mg# across cores suggest metamorphic equilibration. Si+Al inclusions may result from, among other processes, exsolution of feldspathic material during subsolidus cooling, or may be solid materials (alkali feldspar) poikilitically enclosed by growing igneous orthopyroxene crystals. Late reaction with more fractionated melts produced Fe-rich mantles, the whole assemblage later cut by tectonic micro-shear planes. Raw electron microprobe data produced during this study are available on request from the author.

  19. The Shergotites Are Young

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, Bouvier et al. (2006), interpreting their Pb isotopic data, have inferred that the shergottite suite of the SNC (martian) meteorites have ancient ages of approximately 4-4.5 b.y. But conventional wisdom has it that the shergottites are much younger (approximately 500-150 m.y.) Are the shergottites young or are they ancient rocks whose ages have been reset by metamorphism or alteration?

  20. The Effects of Oxygen Fugacity on the Crystallization Sequence and Cr Partitioning of an Analog Y-98 Liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, A. S.; Burger, P. V.; Le, Loan; Papike, J. J.; Jones, J.; Shearer, C. K.

    2013-01-01

    Interpreting the relationship between "enriched" olivine-phyric shergottites (e.g. NWA 1068/1110) and the "enriched" pyroxene-plagioclase shergottites (e.g. Shergotty, Los Angeles) is problematic. Symes et al. [1] and Shearer et al. [2]) proposed that the basaltic magma that crystallized to produce olivine-phyric shergottite NWA 1068/1110 could produce pyroxene-plagioclase shergottites with additional fractional crystallization. However, additional observations indicate that the relationship among the enriched shergottites may be more complex [1-3]. For example, Herd [3] concluded that some portion of the olivine megacrysts in this meteorite was xenocrystic in origin, seemingly derived from more reduced basaltic liquids. This conclusion may imply that a variety of complex processes such as magma mixing, entrainment, and assimilation may play important roles in the petrologic history of these meteorites. It is therefore possible that these processes have obscured the petrogenetic linkages between the enriched olivine-phyric shergottites and the pyroxene-plagioclase shergottites. As a first order step in attempting to unravel these petrologic complexities, this study focuses upon exploring the effect of fO2 on the crystallization history for an analog primitive shergottite liquid composition (Y98). Results from this work will provide a basis for reconstructing the record of fO2 in shergottites, its effect on both mineral chemistries and valence state partitioning, and a means for examining the role of crystallization on the petrologic linkages between olivine-phyric and pyroxene-plagioclase shergottites. A companion abstract [4] explores the behavior of V over this range of fO2.

  1. The Noble Gas Concentration of the Martian Meteorites GRV 99027 and NWA 7906/NWA 7907 (Paired with NWA 7034)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, P. C.; Leya, I.

    2016-08-01

    We report the noble gas inventory and cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages for three martian meteorites: Grove Mountains 99027 (a shergottite), Northwest Africa 7906, and Northwest Africa 7907 (both basaltic breccias paired with NWA 7034).

  2. Petrology and Geochemistry of New Paired Martian Meteorites Larkman Nunatak 12240 and Larkman Nunatak 12095

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, R. C.; Peslier, A. H.; Brandon, A. D.; Humayun, M.

    2016-08-01

    Two of the latest Martian meteorites found in Antarctica, paired olivine-phyric shergottites LAR 12240 and LAR 12095, are described in order to decipher their petrological context, and place constraints on the geological history of Mars.

  3. Experimental Confirmation of the Volatility of Germanium in Martian Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humayun, M.; DiFrancesco, N.; Ustunisik, G.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental degassing of a synthetic martian basalt doped with Ge and Zn resulted in nearly total loss of both elements after 6 hours of heating, implying that the Ge depletion in shergottites is complemented by Ge excesses in sedimentary rocks.

  4. Measurements of Cl-36 in Antarctic meteorites and Antarctic ice using a Van de Graaff accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Arnold, J. R.; Finkel, R. C.; Elmore, D.; Ferraro, R. D.; Gove, H. E.; Beukens, R. P.; Chang, K. H.; Kilius, L. R.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents measurements of cosmic-ray produced (Cl-36) in Antarctic meteorites and ice using a Van de Graaff accelerator as an ultrasensitive mass spectrometer. Results from this ion counting technique are used to support a two-stage irradiation model for the Yamato-7301 and Allan Hills-76008 meteorites and to show a long terrestrial age for Allan Hills-77002. Yamato-7304 has a terrestrial age of less than 0.1 m.y., and the (Cl-36) content of the Antarctic ice sample from the Yamato mountain is consistent with levels expected in currently depositing snow implying that the age of the ice cap at this site is less than on (Cl-36) half-life.

  5. Alteration Mineralogy of Adirondack-class Rocks in Gusev Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, V. E.; Ruff, S. W.

    2009-12-01

    The rock Adirondack is the type example of a class of basaltic rocks analyzed by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit in Gusev crater. Thermal infrared spectra of Adirondack-class rocks acquired by the Mini-TES instrument are distinguishable from spectra of other rock classes by the presence of an emissivity peak at 430 cm-1 and a minimum near 510 cm-1, which are characteristic of olivine. This is the primary spectral class on the plains of Gusev, but spectra of rocks exhibiting similar low wavenumber spectral character have been acquired along the rover traverse in the Columbia Hills, and we have confirmed that these also are Adirondack-class. Linear mixture modeling of their infrared spectra (enabled by applying a correction for dust on the Mini-TES optics) suggests that they are mafic with sulfate minerals present as alteration phases (up to 25%) in the majority of these rocks, broadly consistent with APXS-measured chemistry. The RAT-brushed surface of an unusual plains rock referred to as Mazatzal exhibits a spectral shape and modeled mineralogy consistent with the absence of olivine and the presence of amorphous phases low in silica, and is a coating unlike any other observed on Mars. We have also used a previously-demonstrated factor analysis and target transformation (FATT) technique with Adirondack-class rock spectra to retrieve the spectral shapes of independently-varying components within the data set. Using this approach, we have identified four shapes attributable to two distinct surface components, fine particulate surface dust, and a second dust component similar to downwelling sky radiance and/or dust on the Mini-TES optics. The two surface shapes do not resemble those of the two canonical surface types measured from orbit. One of the surface shapes is very similar to that of the lherzolitic Shergottite ALH A77005. Preliminary linear mixture analysis of this shape shows that it is dominated by olivine (~57%, ~Fo45) and pyroxene (~28%), with minor

  6. Comparisons of Antarctic and non-Antarctic achondrites and possible origin of the differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, H.

    1991-01-01

    Pairing information on Yamato chondrites was obtained using mineralogical techniques, and the results are used to discuss differences between Antarctic and non-Antarctic achondrites, their sources, and their relation to asteroids. It was found that the Antarctic HED (howardites, eucrites, diogenites) achondrites and ureilites differ from non-Antarctic specimens by the following two criteria: (1) polymict eucrites excluding those with howarditic affinity are not found in the non-Antarctic collections, and (2) magnesian ureilites and augite-bearing ureilites are found only in Antarctica. It is suggested that the Yamato diogenites may represent falls on restricted areas in the distant past.

  7. Source Mineralogy for Hawaiian Tholeiites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presnall, D. C.

    2009-05-01

    Hawaiian tholeiites commonly have been thought to be the melting product of garnet lherzolite. However, Sobolev, et al. (2005, Nature, 434, 590) proposed a pyroxenite source. This idea is based on their claim that melting of garnet lherzolite at P > 3 GPa would yield magmas with low SiO2 (< 47%), a feature that is not characteristic of Hawaiian tholeiites. Phase relations for the CaO-MgO-Al2O3- SiO2 (CMAS) system show that melt at the lherzolite solidus with the lowest SiO2 at any pressure occurs just at the solidus transition from spinel lherzolite to garnet lherzolite (3 GPa), and that solidus melts become progressively richer in SiO2 as pressure either decreases (spinel lherzolite field) or increases (garnet lherzolite field) from 3 GPa. Absolute values of melt compositions in CMAS do not precisely reproduce natural compositions, but the trends hold. As pressure increases from 3 to 6 GPa (the high-pressure limit of the experimental data), model basalt liquid compositions at the garnet lherzolite solidus increase significantly in both MgO (22.1 to 30.8 wt. %) and SiO2 (47.3 to 51.6 wt. %). This is consistent with the characteristically high SiO2 of Hawaiian tholeiites and strongly supports a source with a garnet lherzolite mineralogy, olivine + orthopyroxene + clinopyroxene + garnet. This result holds for a wide range of lherzolitic to pyroxenitic bulk source compositions, as long as the bulk compositional variations are not so extreme that one or more of these minerals is lost. Phase relations in the CMAS tetrahedron at 3 GPa (Milholland and Presnall, 1998, J. Petrol., 39, 3-27) show that an eclogitic mineralogy produces melts that are enriched in SiO2 and low in MgO - very different from the least-fractionated Kilauea glasses. Glass compositions at the least- fractionated end of the olivine-controlled trend for the Puna Ridge at Kilauea (Clague, D. A., et al., 1995, J. Petrol., 36, 299-346) plot very close to the experimental determination of the initial melt

  8. Controls on Highly Siderophile Element Concentrations in Martian Basalt: Sulfide Saturation and Under-Saturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Highly siderophile elements (HSE; Re, Au and the platinum group elements) in shergottites exhibit a wide range from very high, similar to the terrestrial mantle, to very low, similar to sulfide saturated mid ocean ridge basalt (e.g., [1]). This large range has been difficult to explain without good constraints on sulfide saturation or under-saturation [2]. A new model for prediction of sulfide saturation places new constraints on this problem [3]. Shergottite data: For primitive shergottites, pressure and temperature estimates are between 1.2-1.5 GPa, and 1350-1470 C [4]. The range of oxygen fugacities is from FMQ-2 to IW, where the amount of Fe2O3 is low and thus does not have a significant effect on the S saturation values. Finally, the bulk compositions of shergottites have been reported in many recent studies (e.g., [5]). All of this information will be used to test whether shergottites are sulfide saturated [3]. Modeling values and results: The database for HSE partition coefficients has been growing with many new data for silicates and oxides [6-8] to complement a large sulfide database [9- 11]. Combining these data with simple batch melting models allows HSE contents of mantle melts to be estimated for sulfide-bearing vs. sulfide-free mantle. Combining such models with fractional crystallization modeling (e.g., [12]) allows HSE contents of more evolved liquids to be modeled. Most primitive shergottites have high HSE contents (and low S contents) that can be explained by sulfide under-saturated melting of the mantle. An exception is Dhofar 019 which has high S contents and very low HSE contents suggesting sulfide saturation. Most evolved basaltic shergottites have lower S contents than saturation, and intermediate HSE contents that can be explained by olivine, pyroxene, and chromite fractionation. An exception is EET A79001 lithology B, which has very low HSE contents and S contents higher than sulfide saturation values . evidence for sulfide saturation

  9. Metabolic profiling of Angelica acutiloba roots utilizing gas chromatography-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry for quality assessment based on cultivation area and cultivar via multivariate pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Tianniam, Sukanda; Tarachiwin, Lucksanaporn; Bamba, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Akio; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2008-06-01

    Gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry was applied to elucidate the profiling of primary metabolites and to evaluate the differences between quality differences in Angelica acutiloba (or Yamato-toki) roots through the utilization of multivariate pattern recognition-principal component analysis (PCA). Twenty-two metabolites consisting of sugars, amino and organic acids were identified. PCA analysis successfully discriminated the good, the moderate and the bad quality Yamato-toki roots in accordance to their cultivation areas. The results signified two reducing sugars, fructose and glucose being the most accumulated in the bad quality, whereas higher quantity of phosphoric acid, proline, malic acid and citric acid were found in the good and the moderate quality toki roots. PCA was also effective in discriminating samples derive from different cultivars. Yamato-toki roots with the moderate quality were compared by means of PCA, and the results illustrated good discrimination which was influenced most by malic acid. Overall, this study demonstrated that metabolomics technique is accurate and efficient in determining the quality differences in Yamato-toki roots, and has a potential to be a superior and suitable method to assess the quality of this medicinal plant. PMID:18640606

  10. Regolith breccia consisting of H and LL chondrite mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanai, Keizo; Kojima, Hideyasu

    1993-01-01

    Antarctic meteorite Yamato-8424 (Y-8424) is a regolith breccia that is homogenized mixture of H and LL chondrite components. The breccia consists mainly of a fine-grained material with mineral fragments of olivine, pyroxene, and Fe-Ni metal with traces of plagioclase.

  11. Radioactivities in returned lunar materials and in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fireman, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon 14 terrestial ages were determined with low level minicomputers and accelerator mass spectrometry on 1 Yamato and 18 Allan Hills and nearby sited meteorites. Techniques for an accelerator mass spectrometer which make C(14) measurements on small samples were developed. Also Be(10) concentrations were measured in Byrd core and Allan Hills ice samples.

  12. Lunar Meteorite Queen Alexandra Range 93069 and the Iron Concentration of the Lunar Highlands Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korotev, Randy L.; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Rockow, Kaylynn M.

    1996-01-01

    Lunar meteorite Queen Alexandra Range 93069 is a clast-rich, glassy-matrix regolith breccia of ferroan, highly aluminous bulk composition. It is similar in composition to other feldspathic lunar meteorites but differs in having higher concentrations of siderophile elements and incompatible trace elements. Based on electron microprobe analyses of the fusion crust, glassy matrix, and clasts, and instrumental neutron activation analysis of breccia fragments, QUE 93069 is dominated by nonmare components of ferroan, noritic- anorthosite bulk composition. Thin section QUE 93069,31 also contains a large, impact-melted, partially devitrified clast of magnesian, anorthositic-norite composition. The enrichment in Fe, Sc, and Cr and lower Mg/Fe ratio of lunar meteorites Yamato 791197 and Yamato 82192/3 compared to other feldspathic lunar meteorites can be attributed to a small proportion (5-10%) of low-Ti mare basalt. It is likely that the non- mare components of Yamato 82192/3 are similar to and occur in similar abundance to those of Yamato 86032, with which it is paired. There is a significant difference between the average FeO concentration of the lunar highlands surface as inferred from the feldspathic lunar meteorites (mean: approx. 5.0%; range: 4.3-6.1 %) and a recent estimate based on data from the Clementine mission (3.6%).

  13. Over 5,600 Japanese collection of Antarctic meteorites: Recoveries, curation and distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanai, K.; Kojima, H.

    1986-01-01

    The history of recovery of meteorite fragments in the Yamato Mountains, Allan Hills, and Victoria Land, Antarctica is reviewed. The Japanese collection of Antarctic meteorites were numbered, weighed, photographed, identified, and classified. Sample distribution of the Japanese Antarctic meteorites is described.

  14. A petrogenetic model of the relationships among achondritic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolper, E.; Hays, J. F.; Mcsween, H. Y., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Petrological evidence is used to support the hypothesis that although the magma source regions and parent bodies of basaltic achondrite, shergottite, nakhlite, and chassignite meteorites are clearly distinct, they may be simply related. It is proposed that the peridotites which on partial melting generated the parent magmas of the shergottite meteorites differed from those which gave rise to eucritic magmas by being enriched in a component rich in alkalis and other volatiles. Similarly, the source regions of the parent magmas of the nakhlite and chassignite meteorites differed from those on the shergottite parent body by being still richer in this volatile-rich component. These regions could have been related by processes such as mixture of variable amounts of volatile-rich and volatile-poor components in planetary or nebular settings, or alternatively by variable varying degrees of volatile loss from volatile-rich materials.

  15. Petrogenetic relationship between Allan Hills 77005 and other achondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcsween, H. Y., Jr.; Taylor, L. A.; Stolper, E. M.; Muntean, R. A.; Okelley, G. D.; Eldridge, J. S.; Biswas, S.; Ngo, H. T.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents chemical and petrologic data relating the Allan Hills (ALHA) 77005 achondrite from Antarctica and explores their petrogenetic relationship with the shergottites. Petrologic similarities with the latter in terms of mineralogy, oxidation state, inferred source region composition, and shock ages suggest a genetic relationship, also indicated by volatile to involatile element ratios and abundances of other trace elements. ALHA 77005 may be a cumulate crystallized from a liquid parental to materials from which the shergottites crystallized or a sample of peridotite from which shergottite parent liquids were derived. Chemical similarities with terrestrial ultramafic rocks suggest that it provides an additional sample of the only other solar system body with basalt source origins chemically similar to the upper earth mantle.

  16. Ar-Ar Dating of Martian Meteorite, Dhofar 378: An Early Shock Event?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Bogard, D. D.

    2006-01-01

    Martian meteorite, Dhofar 378 (Dho378) is a basaltic shergottite from Oman, weighing 15 g, and possessing a black fusion crust. Chemical similarities between Dho378 and the Los Angeles 001 shergottite suggests that they might have derived from the same Mars locale. The plagioclase in other shergottites has been converted to maskelenite by shock, but Dho378 apparently experienced even more intense shock heating, estimated at 55-75 GPa. Dho378 feldspar (approximately 43 modal %) melted, partially flowed and vesiculated, and then partially recrystallized. Areas of feldspathic glass are appreciably enriched in K, whereas individual plagioclases show a range in the Or/An ratio of approximately 0.18-0.017. Radiometric dating of martian shergottites indicate variable formation times of 160-475 Myr, whereas cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages of shergottites indicate most were ejected from Mars within the past few Myr. Most determined Ar-39-Ar-40 ages of shergottites appear older than other radiometric ages because of the presence of large amounts of martian atmosphere or interior Ar-40. Among all types of meteorites and returned lunar rocks, the impact event that initiated the CRE age very rarely reset the Ar-Ar age. This is because a minimum time and temperature is required to facilitate Ar diffusion loss. It is generally assumed that the shock-texture characteristics in martian meteorites were produced by the impact events that ejected the rocks from Mars, although the time of these shock events (as opposed to CRE ages) are not directly dated. Here we report Ar-39-Ar-40 dating of Dho378 plagioclase. We suggest that the determined age dates the intense shock heating event this meteorite experienced, but that it was not the impact that initiated the CRE age.

  17. New Martian Meteorite Is One of the Most Oxidized Found to Date

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Hejiu; Peslier, Anne; Lapen, Thomas J.; Shafer, John T.; Brandon, Alan D.; Irving, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    As of 2013, about 60 meteorites from the planet Mars have been found and are being studied. Each time a new Martian meteorite is found, a wealth of new information comes forward about the red planet. The most abundant type of Martian meteorite is a shergottite; its lithologies are broadly similar to those of Earth basalts and gabbros; i.e., crustal igneous rocks. The entire suite of shergottites is characterized by a range of trace element, isotopic ratio, and oxygen fugacity values that mainly reflect compositional variations of the Martian mantle from which these magmas came. A newly found shergottite, NWA 5298, was the focus of a study performed by scientists within the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Directorate at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in 2012. This sample was found in Morocco in 2008. Major element analyses were performed in the electron microprobe (EMP) laboratory of ARES at JSC, while the trace elements were measured at the University of Houston by laser inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). A detailed analysis of this stone revealed that this meteorite is a crystallized magma that comes from the enriched end of the shergottite spectrum; i.e., trace element enriched and oxidized. Its oxidation comes in part from its mantle source and from oxidation during the magma ascent. It represents a pristine magma that did not mix with any other magma or see crystal accumulation or crustal contamination on its way up to the Martian surface. NWA 5298 is therefore a direct, albeit evolved, melt from the Martian mantle and, for its lithology (basaltic shergottite), it represents the oxidized end of the shergottite suite. It is thus a unique sample that has provided an end-member composition for Martian magmas.

  18. SNC Meteorites and Martian Reservoirs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.

    2002-01-01

    Jones first suggested that the inverse covariation of initial epsilon (Nd-143) and Sr-87/Sr-86 of the shergottites could be explained by interaction between mantle-derived magmas with another isotopic reservoir(s) (i.e., assimilation or contamination). In that model, magmas were generated in a source region that was isotopically similar to the Nakhla source and the second reservoir(s) was presumed to be crust. The text also permitted the second reservoir to be another type of mantle, but I can confirm that a second mantle reservoir was never seriously considered by that author. Other features of this model were that (i) it occurred at a particular time, 180 m.y. ago, and (ii) the interacting reservoirs had been separated at approximately 4.5 b.y. In a later paper Jones explored this mixing model more quantitatively and concluded that magmas from a Nakhla-like source region at 180 m.y. would fall on or near an isotopic Nd-Sr-Pb hyperplane defined by the shergottites. This criterion was a necessary prerequisite for the parent magma(s) of the shergottites to have initially been Nakhla-like isotopically. At this juncture, it is perhaps worthwhile to note that this mixing model was not presented to explain geochemical variations but as a justification for a 180 m.y. crystallization age for the shergottites and a 1.3 b.y. crystallization age for the nakhlites. In the mid-1980's crystallization ages estimated for Nakhla ranged from approximately 1.3 b.y to 4.5 b.y. Similarly, preferred crystallization ages for the shergottites ranged from 360 m.y., to 1.3 b.y., to 4.5 b.y. In all these models, the 180 m.y. event seen in the shergottites was deemed to be metamorphic. The fit between the Nakhla-like source region and the shergottite hyperplane was a validation both of the 1.3 b.y. igneous age of Nakhla and the 180 m.y. igneous age of the shergottites.

  19. The Early Differentiation History of Mars from W-182-Nd-142 Isotope Systematics in the SNC Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foley, C. Nicole; Wadhwa, M.; Borg, L. E.; Janney, P. E.; Hines, R.; Grove, T. L.

    2005-01-01

    We report here the results of an investigation of W and Nd isotopes in the SNC (Shergottite-Nakhlite-Chassignite (martian)) meteorites. We have determined that epsilon W-182 values in the nakhlites are uniform within analytical uncertainties and have an average value of approx. 3. Also, while epsilon W-182 values in the shergottites have a limited range (from 0.3-0.7), their epsilon Nd-142 values vary considerably (from -0.2-0.9). There appears to be no correlation between epsilon W-182 and epsilon Nd-142 in the nakhlites and shergottites. These results shed new light on early differentiation processes on Mars, particularly on the timing and nature of fractionation in silicate reservoirs. Assuming a two-stage model, the metallic core is estimated to have formed at approx. 12 Myr after the beginning of the solar system. Major silicate differentiation established the nakhlite source reservoir before approx. 4542 Ma and the shergottite source reservoirs at 4525 [sup +19 sub -21] Ma. These ages imply that, within the uncertainties afforded by the Hf-182-W-182 and Sm-146-Nd-142 chronometers, the silicate differentiation events that established the source reservoirs of the nakhlites and shergottites may have occurred contemporaneously, possibly during crystallization of a global magma ocean. The distinct W-182-Nd-142 isotope systematics in the nakhlites and the shergottites imply the presence of at least three isotopically distinct silicate reservoirs on Mars, two of which are depleted in incompatible lithophile elements relative to chondrites, and the third is enriched. The two depleted silicate reservoirs most likely reside in the Martian mantle, while the enriched reservoir could be either in the crust or the mantle. Therefore, the W-182-Nd-142 isotope systematics indicate that the nakhlites and the shergottites originated from distinct source reservoirs and cannot be petrogenetically related. A further implication is that the source reservoirs of the nakhlites and

  20. Peology and Geochemistry of New Paired Martian Meteorites 12095 and LAR 12240

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, R. C.; Brandon, A. D.; Peslier, A.

    2015-01-01

    The meteorites LAR 12095 and LAR 12240 are believed to be paired Martian meteorites and were discovered during the Antarctic Search for Meteorites (ANSMET) 2012-2013 Season at Larkman Nunatak. The purpose of this study is to characterize these olivine-phyric shergottites by analyzing all mineral phases for major, minor and trace elements and examining their textural relationships. The goal is to constrain their crystallization history and place these shergottites among other Martian meteorites in order to better understand Martian geological history.

  1. Partial melting on the acapulcoite-lodranite meteorite parent body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Timothy James

    1994-01-01

    Many asteroids experienced partial melting and incomplete differentiation. Our knowledge of the detailed of these processes are incomplete, owing to the paucity of partially melted meteorites. 1 studied two groups of meteorites which originated on a common parent body and are residues of a wide range of partial melting acapulcoites and lodranites. These meteorites formed from a chemically and isotopically heterogeneous precursor chondrite. Heating and cooling occurred early in the history of the solar system, as evidenced by the approximately 4.51 Ga 39 Ar40Ar age of acapulcoites and the approximately 4.48 Ga39Ar40Ar age of the lodranite Gibson. The heating was probably caused by non-collisional heat sources. Acapulcoites (Acapulco, Monument Draw, Yamato 74063, ALH A77081, ALH A81261, ALH A81315, ALH 78230, ALH A81187 and ALH 84190) formed by low degrees of partial melting (e.g., Fe, Ni-FeS eutectic melting, but not silicate partial melting). Fe, Ni-FeS partial melts concentrated into micron- to centimeter-sized veins, but migration distances were short. In contrast, lodranites (Lodran, Gibson, Yamato 791491, Yamato 791493, Yamato 74357, Yamato 8002, Yamato 75274, MAC 88177, LEW 88280, EET 84302 and FRO 90011) experienced higher degrees of partial melting, including silicate partial melting. The higher degree of partial melting allowed efficient melt migration, depleting the residues in plagioclase and troilite. Volatiles played a major role in melt migration, driving partial melts to the surface where they were erupted at greater than the escape velocity and lost into space, Thus, basaltic partial melts are not sampled as discrete meteorites. In one meteorite (LEW 86220), these basaltic, Fe, Ni, FeS-rich partial melts from a lodranite source region were injected into a cooler, acapulcoite region. The acapulcoite-lodranite parent body experienced a range of partial melting and melt migration. Cooling of this body may have been complex, with slow cooling at high

  2. Sidi Ali Ou Azza (L4): A New Moroccan Fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chennaoui Aoudjehane, H.; Agee, C. B.; Aaranson, A.; Bouragaa, A.

    2016-08-01

    Sidi Ali Ou Azza is the latest meteorite fall in Morocco, it occurred on 28 July 2015 very close (about 40 km) to Tissint martian shergottite fall that occurred on 18 July 2011. It's one of the small group of 23 L4 ordinary chondrite falls.

  3. The Pb isotopic evolution of the Martian mantle constrained by initial Pb in Martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, J. J.; Nemchin, A. A.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Snape, J. F.; Bland, P.; Benedix, G. K.

    2015-12-01

    The Pb isotopic compositions of maskelynite and pyroxene grains were measured in ALH84001 and three enriched shergottites (Zagami, Roberts Massif 04262, and Larkman Nunatuk 12011) by secondary ion mass spectrometry. A maskelynite-pyroxene isochron for ALH84001 defines a crystallization age of 4089 ± 73 Ma (2σ). The initial Pb isotopic composition of each meteorite was measured in multiple maskelynite grains. ALH84001 has the least radiogenic initial Pb isotopic composition of any Martian meteorite measured to date (i.e., 206Pb/204Pb = 10.07 ± 0.17, 2σ). Assuming an age of reservoir formation for ALH84001 and the enriched shergottites of 4513 Ma, a two-stage Pb isotopic model has been constructed. This model links ALH84001 and the enriched shergottites by their similar μ value (238U/204Pb) of 4.1-4.6 from 4.51 Ga to 4.1 Ga and 0.17 Ga, respectively. The model employed here is dependent on a chondritic μ value (~1.2) from 4567 to 4513 Ma, which implies that core segregation had little to no effect on the μ value(s) of the Martian mantle. The proposed Pb isotopic model here can be used to calculate ages that are in agreement with Rb-Sr, Lu-Hf, and Sm-Nd ages previously determined in the meteorites and confirm the young (~170 Ma) ages of the enriched shergottites and ancient, >4 Ga, age of ALH84001.

  4. Geochronology of the Martian meteorite Zagami revealed by U-Pb ion probe dating of accessory minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qin; Herd, Christopher D. K.; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Li, Xian-Hua; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Li, Qiu-Li; Liu, Yu; Tang, Guo-Qiang; McCoy, Timothy J.

    2013-07-01

    The precise chronology of geological events on Mars is hampered by the lack of absolute ages for the Martian timescale, and the significant uncertainties that result from the extrapolation of the lunar timescale to Mars (Hartmann and Neukum, 2001). Martian meteorites represent the only samples of Mars currently available. Attempts to identify source craters for the meteorites have thus far proven inconclusive (Hamilton et al., 2003; Lang et al., 2009; Mouginis-Mark and Boyce, 2012>), precluding their use in constraining the absolute Martian timescale. The majority of the known Martian meteorites are basalts ("shergottites"); all dated shergottites have mineral separate (Rb-Sr or Sm-Nd) ages of <600 Ma (Borg et al., 2005). Here we report a 238U/206Pb age of 182.7±6.9 Ma by ion microprobe analysis of baddeleyite (ZrO2) grains in the Zagami shergottite. There is no correlation between discordancy and baddeleyite grain location relative to shock metamorphism. Mineral petrography demonstrates that baddeleyite is the result of late-stage igneous crystallization, and Raman spectroscopy shows that baddeleyite has not been transformed by shock into preservable high-pressure polymorphs. Supported by an age of 153±81 Ma for phosphate grains, obtained using the same method, we conclude that Zagami crystallized at ~180 Ma, in agreement with previous results from mineral separate geochronology. Therefore, the shergottites represent igneous rocks preferentially ejected from young terrains on Mars in a small number of ejection events.

  5. Siderophile elements in planetary mantles and the origin of the moon

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, M.J.

    1987-03-30

    The origin of the moon is examined in the context of theories of planetary accretion and of siderophile element abundances inferred for the upper mantles of the earth, moon, and shergottite parent body (SPB = Mars.). The lunar origin hypotheses examined are collisional ejection in a giant imact, and coaccretion from a circumterrestrial disk of metal-depleted material.

  6. Oxygen Fugacity of the Martian Mantle from Pigeonite/Melt Partitioning of Samarium, Europium and Gadolinium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musselwhite, D. S.; Jnes, J. H.; Shearer, C.

    2004-01-01

    This study is part of an ongoing effort to calibrate the pyroxene/melt REE oxybarometer for conditions relevant to the martian meteorites. These efforts have been motivated by reports of redox variations among the shergottites . We have conducted experiments on martian composition pigeonite/melt rare earth element partitioning as a function of fO2.

  7. Organic analysis of the Antarctic carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotra, R. K.; Shimoyama, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Hare, P. E.; Yanai, K.

    1981-01-01

    Thus far, organic analysis of carbonaceous chondrites has proven the only fruitful means of examining complex organic matter of extraterrestrial origin. The present paper presents the results of organic analysis of two Antarctic meteorites, Allan Hills (77306) and Yamato (74662), which may be considered free from terrestrial contamination. Ion-exchange chromatography, gas chromatography and mass spectrometery of meteorite samples reveal the presence in Yamato of 15 and in Allan Hills of 20 protein and nonprotein amino acids, the most abundant of which are glycine and alanine. Abundances of the D and L enantiomers of each amino acid are also found to be nearly equal. Data thus indicate an abiotic extraterrestrial origin for the matter, and confirm a lack of terrestrial contamination.

  8. Degree of equilibration of eucritic pyroxenes and thermal metamorphism of the earliest planetary crust

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Graham, A.L. Natural History Museum, London )

    1991-06-01

    The pyroxenes in two new monomict eucrites from Antarctica, Yamato 791186 and Yamato 792510, have been studied and compared with those of other Antarctic and non-Antarctic eucrites. The purpose of this study is to identify compositional and textural relationship shown by these pyroxenes which may be used as indicators of the thermal history of the meteorite. An attempt is made, using petrographic and compositional criteria, to distinguish between the initial cooling history and subsequent thermal events. It is suggested that it is possible to identify stages of thermal 'metamorphism' which may be used to indicate the conditions on the surface and crust of the parent body. A picture of the geological setting of the HED (Howardites, Eucrites, Diogenites) parent body is proposed, for which thermal metamorphism by impact heating is an important process. 22 refs.

  9. Evolution of the martian mantle as recorded by igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balta, J. B.; McSween, H. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Martian igneous rocks provide our best window into the current state of the martian mantle and its evolution after accretion and differentiation. Currently, those rocks have been examined in situ by rovers, characterized in general from orbiting spacecraft, and analyzed in terrestrial laboratories when found as meteorites. However, these data have the potential to bias our understanding of martian magmatism, as most of the available meteorites and rover-analyzed rocks come from the Amazonian (<2 Ga) and Hesperian (~3.65 Ga) periods respectively, while igneous rocks from the Noachian (>3.8 Ga) have only been examined by orbiters and as the unique meteorite ALH 84001. After initial differentiation, the main planetary-scale changes in the structure of Mars which impact igneous compositions are cooling of the planet and thickening of the crust with time. As the shergottite meteorites give ages <500 Ma1, they might be expected to represent thick-crust, recent volcanism. Using spacecraft measurements of volcanic compositions and whole rock compositions of meteorites, we demonstrate that the shergottite meteorites do not match the composition of the igneous rocks composing the young volcanoes on Mars, particularly in their silica content, and no crystallization or crustal contamination trend reproduces the volcanoes from a shergottite-like parent magma. However, we show that the shergottite magmas do resemble older martian rocks in composition and mineralogy. The Noachian-aged meteorite ALH 84001 has similar radiogenic-element signatures to the shergottites and may derive from a similar mantle source despite the age difference2. Thus, shergottite-like magmas may represent melting of mantle sources that were much more abundant early in martian history. We propose that the shergottites represent the melting products of an originally-hydrous martian mantle, containing at least several hundred ppm H2O. Dissolved water can increase the silica content of magmas and thus

  10. Petrography of Lunar Meteorite PCA02007, a New Feldspathic Regolith Breccia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, R. A.; Korotev, R. L.; Jolliff, B. L.

    2004-01-01

    PCA 02007 is a 22.4 g lunar meteorite collected in 2003 near the Pecora Escarpment in Antarctica [1]. PCA is a feldspathic regolith breccia composed of mature regolith. It is compositionally and texturally similar to other feldspathic lunar meteorites (FLMs) [2] and may be launch paired with Yamato 791197 [3]. Here we present a petrographic description and compositions of mineral clasts, glass clasts, lithic clasts, and the bulk meteorite.

  11. What Lunar Meteorites Tell Us About the Lunar Highlands Crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korotev, R. L.; Jolliff, B. L.; Zeigler, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    The first meteorite to be found1 that was eventually (1984) recognized to have originated from the Moon is Yamato 791197. The find date, November 20, 1979, was four days after the end of the first Conference on the Lunar Highland Crust. Since then, >75 other lunar meteorites have been found, and these meteorites provide information about the lunar highlands that was not known from studies of the Apollo and Luna samples

  12. Sm-Nd for Norite 78236 and Eucrite Y980318/433: Implications for Planetary and Solar System Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C-Y.; Reese, Y. D.

    2008-01-01

    Here, we compare Sm-147-Nd-143 and Sm-146-Nd-142 data for lunar norite 78236 to those for approximately 4.54-4.56 Ga old cumulate eucrite Yamato 980318/433 and show that the norite data are compatible with its derivation from an isotopic reservoir similar to that from whence the eucrite pair came. Thus, lunar-like Sm-Nd isotopic systematics are not unique to the Earth-Moon system.

  13. Metamorphosed CM and CI Carbonaceous Chondrites Could Be from the Breakup of the Same Earth-crossing Asteroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael; Abell, Paul; Tonui, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Far from being the relatively unprocessed materials they were once believed to be, we now know that a significant number of carbonaceous chondrites were thermally metamorphosed on their parent asteroid(s). Numerous studies indicate that 7 "CM" and 2 "CI" chondrites have been naturally heated, variously, at from 400 to over 700 C on their parent asteroid(s). Petrographic textures reveal that this thermal metamorphism occurred after the dominant aqueous alteration phase, although some meteorites show evidence of a heating event between two aqueous alteration episodes, i.e. pro- and retrograde aqueous alteration. Aside from the issues of the identification of the transient heat source, timing of metamorphism, and the relation of these materials (if any) to conventional CM and CI chondrites, there is also a mystery related to their recovery. All of these meteorites have been recovered from the Antarctic; none are falls or finds from anyplace else. Indeed, the majority have been collected by the Japanese NIPR field parties in the Yamato Mountains. In fact, one estimate is that these meteorites account for approx. 64 wt% of the CM carbonaceous chondrites at the NIPR. The reasons for this are unclear and might be due in part to simple sampling bias. However we suggest that this recovery difference is related to the particular age of the Yamato Mountains meteorite recovery surfaces, and differences in meteoroid fluxes between the Yamato meteorites and recent falls and substantially older Antarctic meteorites. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  14. Rare earth element contents and multiple mantle sources of the transform-related Mount Edgecumbe basalts, southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riehle, J.R.; Budahn, J.R.; Lanphere, M.A.; Brew, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    Pleistocene basalt of the Mount Edgecumbe volcanic field (MEF) is subdivided into a plagioclase type and an olivine type. Th/La ratios of plagioclase basalt are similar to those of mid-ocean-ridge basalt (MORB), whereas those of olivine basalt are of continental affinity. Rare earth element (REE) contents of the olivine basalt, which resemble those of transitional MORB, are modelled by 10-15% partial melting of fertile spinel-plagioclase lherzolite followed by removal of 8-13% olivine. It is concluded that olivine basalt originated in subcontinental spinel lherzolite and that plagioclase basalt may have originated in suboceanic lithosphere of the Pacific plate. -from Authors

  15. Water Contents of the Mantle Beneath the Rio Grande Rift: FTIR Analysis of Kilbourne Hole Peridotite Xenoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffer, Lillian A.; Peslier, Anne; Brandon, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Although nominally anhydrous mantle minerals contain only trace amounts of water, they are the main reservoir of water in the mantle. Added up at the scale of the Earth's mantle, these trace amounts of water represent oceans worth in mass]. Mantle xenoliths from Kilbourne Hole in southern New Mexico are ideal to study mantle water distribution in a rift tectonic setting as they come from a recently-erupted maar in the middle of the Rio Grande Rift. Eleven lherzolites, one harzburgite, and one dunite are being analyzed for water contents by FTIR. The xenoliths will also be analyzed for major and trace element composition, Fe3+/Summation (Fe) ratios, and characterized petrologically. Olivines exhibit variable water contents with less water at the rims compared to the cores. This is probably due to H loss during decompression and xenolith transport by the host magma. Mantle water contents appear to have been primarily preserved in the core of the olivines, based on diffusion modeling of the typically plateau-shaped water content profiles across these grains. Water concentrations are in equilibrium between clino- and orthopyroxene, but olivine concentrations are typically not in equilibrium with those of either pyroxene. Lherzolites analyzed so far have water contents of 2-12 ppm H2O in olivines, 125-165 ppm H2O in orthopyroxenes, and 328-447 ppm H2O in clinopyroxenes. These water contents are similar to, but with a narrower range, than those for the respective minerals in other continental peridotite xenoliths. The lherzolites have bulk-rock (BR) Al2O3 contents that range between 3.17 and 3.78 wt%, indicating similar degrees of partial melting, which could explain the narrow range of their pyroxene water contents. Primitive mantle normalized rare earth element (REE) profiles of the bulk lherzolites vary from light REE depleted to flat, with no significant differences between, nor relation to, their mineral water contents. Consequently, the metasomatic agents that

  16. Olivine compositions from the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project, Phase 2: Evidence for a peridotite mantle source region

    SciTech Connect

    Putirka, K D; Ryerson, F J

    2008-10-27

    To the extent that mantle plumes reflect whole mantle convection, Hawaii may provide the clearest window into Earth's lower mantle. Samples from the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project (HSDP) thus provide valuable tests for models of mantle mineralogy and composition. In this vein, it has been argued recently that Hawaiian olivines, especially those from the shield-building phase as sampled by HSDP, are so high in Ni (Sobolev et al., 2005, 2007), and that Hawaiian whole rocks are so low in CaO (Herzberg, 2006) and high in SiO{sub 2} (Hauri, 1996) that a peridotite mantle source cannot generate such compositions. The Hawaiian plume, so the argument goes, is thus supposedly rich in pyroxenite, and possibly olivine-free. However, comparisons of HSDP olivines to lherzolites, and HSDP whole rocks to lherzolites and partial melting experiments belie these premises. Testable predictions of the pyroxenite model also fail. New comparisons instead show that Hawaiian lavas can be produced from a peridotite source. First, it is unclear that the Hawaiian source is enriched in NiO. The NiO contents of olivines hosted by lherzolites (GEOROC) have the same range as olivines from the HSDP; indeed, the maximum NiO for olivines from lherzolites (0.6 wt.%) is as high as that reported for olivines from any oceanic volcano locality. There is a compositional separation between lherzolite- and HSDP-hosted olivines. But HSDP olivines are not NiO enriched so much as lherzolite olivines are higher in Fo at a given NiO. Lower Fo contents at Hawaii (at a given NiO) ensue because olivine compositions there follow a liquid line of descent, where both Ni and Mg decrease with differentiation. In contrast, subsolidus equilibria involving orthopyroxene enforce a higher and less variable Fo content for lherzolite-derived olivines. Moreover, the pyroxenite mantle model predicts that whole rocks with low CaO and high SiO{sub 2} should host olivines with high NiO. But in HSDP samples, neither correlation

  17. Volatiles (nitrogen, noble gases) in recently discovered SNC meteorites, extinct radioactivities and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, K. J.; Marty, B.; Marti, K.; Zimmermann, L.

    2003-09-01

    We report noble gas and nitrogen analyses of newly discovered SNC meteorites, one nakhlite (NWA817) and four shergottites (NWA480, NWA856, NWA1068, and SaU 005). The K-Ar age (1.3 Ga) as well as the cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) age (10.0±1.3 Ma) of nakhlite NWA817 agree with data of Nakhla. The CRE ages of NWA480, NWA856, and NWA1068 (2.35±0.20, 2.60±0.21 and 2.01±0.65 Ma, respectively) are consistent, within uncertainties, with other basaltic shergottites, but the CRE age of SaU 005 (1.25±0.07 Ma) is distinct and indicates a different ejection event. Bulk K-Ar ages of all shergottites exceed the reported radiometric ages and reveal the presence of inherited radiogenic 40Ar in basaltic lavas. The isotopic composition of nitrogen trapped in these SNC meteorites is not homogeneous, since δ 15N values of either +15 to 20‰ or +45‰, indicate different nitrogen reservoirs. All shergottites contain fission xenon from 238U, and fission Xe of extinct ( T1/2=82 Ma) 244Pu, previously identified in ALH84001, in Chassigny and in Nakhla is also present in at least one shergottite (NWA856). The shergottites contain less fissiogenic Xe than other SNC, suggesting that either their source was more degassed or that the magma source region closed at a later time. In nakhlites, fission xenon from 244Pu correlates with uranium, a geochemical proxy of plutonium. Thus it is possible that fissiogenic Xe was not inherited during magma differentiation, but rather was produced in situ and retained in refractory mineral assemblages. In this interpretation, the magma evolution that settled the mineralogy and geochemistry of nakhlites took place at a time when 244Pu was alive and pre-dated the (late) events recorded in their radiometric ages. Alternatively, fissiogenic xenon was trapped from a mantle source during closed system evolution of the parent magmas, in which case such evolution might have taken place at considerable depth (pressure) in order to inhibit magma degassing during the

  18. Thermal history of the upper mantle beneath a young back-arc extensional zone: ultramafic xenoliths from San Luis Potosí, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Wilhelm; Besch, Thomas

    1992-06-01

    At the San Luis Potosí (SLP) volcanic field (Central Mexico), Quaternary basanites and tuff breccias have sampled a suite of ultramafic xenoliths, predominately spinel lherzolites, spinel-olivine websterites, spinel pyroxenites, and hornblende-rich pyroxenites. Spinel lherzolites from the La Ventura maars have protogranular to equigranular textures, those from the Santo Domingo maars are strongly sheared. Both spinel-lherzolite types show similar whole-rock major and trace-element abundances. They are fertile to slightly depleted with mineralogical and geochemical heterogeneities induced by partial melting processes. Pyroxenites with either magmatic or metamorphic textures are high-pressure cumulates. Hornblende-rich pyroxenites are genetically linked to the host basanites. Most of the protogranular spinel lherzolites contain veinlets of glass along grain boundaries. These glasses are chemically homogeneous and have trachybasaltic to trachyandesitic compositions. Mg- and Fe2+-partitioning between olivine and glass suggests chemical equilibrium between the melts represented by the glasses and the spinel-lherzolite mineral assemblage at about 1,000°C and 10 to 15 kbar. The melts are interpreted to be of upper mantle origin. They may have been formed by in-situ partial melting in the presence of volatiles or represent percolating melts chemically buffered by the spinel-lherzolite mineral assemblage at uppermost mantle conditions. Mineral chemistry in all rock types of the whole xenolith suite reveals distinct disequilibrium features reflecting partial re-equilibration stages towards lower temperatures estimated to be from 1,050°C to 850°C at 9 to 15 kbar. The presence of similar zoning and exsolution features mainly documented in pyroxenes along with similar maximum and minimum temperatures requires all sampled xenoliths to have undergone the same temperature regime within the upper mantle. The sheared spinel lherzolites from the Sto. Domingo field are interpreted

  19. Crystal preferred orientations of minerals from mantle xenoliths in alkali basaltic rocks form the Catalan Volcanic Zone (NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Roig, Mercè; Galán, Gumer; Mariani, Elisabetta

    2015-04-01

    Mantle xenoliths in alkali basaltic rocks from the Catalan Volcanic Zone, associated with the Neogene-Quaternary rift system in NE Spain, are formed of anhydrous spinel lherzolites and harzburgites with minor olivine websterites. Both peridotites are considered residues of variable degrees of partial melting, later affected by metasomatism, especially the harzburgites. These and the websterites display protogranular microstructures, whereas lherzolites show continuous variation between protogranular, porphyroclastic and equigranular forms. Thermometric data of new xenoliths indicate that protogranular harzburgites, lherzolites and websterites were equilibrated at higher temperatures than porphyroclastic and equigranular lherzolites. Mineral chemistry also indicates lower equilibrium pressure for porphyroclastic and equigranular lherzolites than for the protogranular ones. Crystal preferred orientations (CPOs) of olivine and pyroxenes from these new xenoliths were determined with the EBSD-SEM technique to identify the deformation stages affecting the lithospheric mantle in this zone and to assess the relationships between the deformation fabrics, processes and microstructures. Olivine CPOs in protogranular harzburgites, lherzolites and a pyroxenite display [010]-fiber patterns characterized by a strong point concentration of the [010] axis normal to the foliation and girdle distribution of [100] and [001] axes within the foliation plane. Olivine CPO symmetry in porphyroclastic and equigranular lherzolites varies continuously from [010]-fiber to orthorhombic and [100]-fiber types. The orthorhombic patterns are characterized by scattered maxima of the three axes, which are normal between them. The rare [100]-fiber patterns display strong point concentration of [100] axis, with normal girdle distribution of the other two axes, which are aligned with each other. The patterns of pyroxene CPOs are more dispersed than those of olivine, especially for clinopyroxene, but

  20. Geochemical and Sr-Nd isotopic characteristics of mantle xenoliths from NE Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galán, G.; Oliveras, V.

    2012-04-01

    Mantle xenoliths in alkaline mafic lavas and pyroclasts from the Neogene-Quaternary volcanism in NE Spain are studied using major, trace element geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotopes, to compare the lithospheric mantle of this area with that of other European zones, and to assess the different processes that conditioned its evolution. The xenoliths mostly come from two volcanoes and are mainly formed of anhydrous spinel lherzolites and harzburgites, in approximately equal proportion. Accessory amphibole and phlogopite are occasional, as it happens with plagioclase, which appears in corona textures around lherzolite spinel. Much subordinated cumulate pyroxenite xenoliths (olivine wbsterite, clinopyroxenite types) are also found. Textures are mostly protogranular, but there are also porphyroclastic, transitional between protogranular and porphyroclastic, and equigranular forms among lherzolites. Pyrometamorphic textures are observed in a few xenoliths. Co-variation diagrams for basaltic components and MgO concentrations in whole rock analyses show gradation from lherzolites to harzburgites. This is also the case for compatible and mildly incompatible trace elements, but not for the most incompatible ones. This gradual variation is also confirmed by mineral compositions, most of which correspond to off-craton xenoliths. REE patterns for lherzolites and for their clinopyroxene are LREE and MREE depleted, whereas for harzburgites are LREE and MREE enriched. U-shaped REE patterns are rarely observed in lherzolite clinopyroxene that also shows more significant negative anomalies at Zr and Ti. Clinopyroxene from harzburgites is also remarked by more significant negative anomalies at Nb, Ti and Zr, and by higher Th and U abundances, than lherzolite clinopyroxene . Sr and Nd isotopic compositions for clinopyroxene define a continuous and inverse trend from DMM lherzolites to enriched harzburgites (87Sr/86Sr: 0.702486-0.709772; 143Nd/144Nd: 0.513359-0.512411). Harzburgite

  1. The Origin and Evolution of Kimberlite Melts: Stabilizing Phlogopite in the CMAS-CO2- H2O-K2O System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buisman, I.; Sparks, S.; Walter, M.

    2008-12-01

    This project aims to investigate the melting phase relations of model lherzolite in the system CMAS- CO2-H2O-K2O to better understand the role of potassium (K) in the evolution and origin of kimberlitic melts. High-pressure multi-anvil and piston cylinder experiments are used to study this system at upper mantle pressures (3-9 GPa). This study aims at constraining the temperature and composition of primary melts at the volatile-rich mantle solidus at which kimberlite melts form. Kimberlites are potassium-rich, ultrabasic magmas (<35% SiO2), have a low viscosity (0.1-1 Pa s), and contain a very high volatile content (CO2 and H2O). A number of models have been suggested for the generation of carbonatite and kimberlite magmas, with the presence of volatiles being particularly important (eg. CO2). Together, H2O and CO2, show a much greater influence on the solidus of mantle lherzolite than when either are present alone. Melts of carbonatitic and kimberlitic composition can be produced under comparable P-T conditions by partial melting of carbonated lherzolite. Petrogenetic links between carbonatites and kimberlites are therefore implied in the CO2-bearing mantle source region (Gudfinnsson, 2005). The isobaric univariant equilibrium for melting of model lherzolite in CMAS-CO2-H2O-K2O is tracked at upper mantle conditions. This is done by constructing a series of bulk compositions that will saturate all phases and yield enough of each phase for EPMA analysis. The compositions of all phases along a portion of the isobaric univariant melting curves will be traced at a series of pressures. In this way, we can rigorously calculate the melting behaviour of lherzolite compositions as a function of pressure, temperature and bulk composition.

  2. Formation of orthopyroxenite by reaction between peridotite and hydrous basaltic melt: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunguang; Liang, Yan; Dygert, Nick; Xu, Wenliang

    2016-09-01

    The consequences of hydrous basaltic melts and peridotite interaction were examined experimentally in Au-Pd, Pt, and graphite capsules using the reaction couple method. Reactions between a hydrous basaltic andesite (4 wt% H2O) and dunite or lherzolite in an Au-Pd capsule at 1 GPa and 1200 °C produce a melt-bearing orthopyroxenite-dunite sequence. Reactions between a hydrous ferro-basalt and lherzolite in Pt or Au-Pd capsules at 0.8-2 GPa and 1250-1385 °C produce a melt-bearing orthopyroxenite-harzburgite sequence. Reactions between the ferro-basalt and lherzolite in graphite capsules (not designed to retain water) result in a melt-bearing dunite-harzburgite sequence at 1 GPa and a melt-bearing harzburgite-lherzolite sequence at 2 GPa. The orthopyroxenite from the hydrous reaction experiments has a high porosity, and it is separated by a sharp lithological interface from the dunite or harzburgite. Orthopyroxenes in the orthopyroxenite are large in size with resorbed olivine inclusions. Formation of the high-porosity orthopyroxenite in the hydrous melt-rock reaction experiments is determined by the liquidus phase relation of the interface reacting melt and reaction kinetics. Reaction between orthopyroxene-saturated hydrous melt and olivine at melt-rock interface produces orthopyroxenite. Water infiltration induces hydrous melting of the lherzolite, producing a dunite or an orthopyroxene-depleted harzburgite. Efficient diffusive exchange between the partial melt and the hydrous reacting melt promotes orthopyroxene-oversaturation around the melt-rock interfacial region. The simplified experiments reveal end-member processes for understanding the formation of orthopyroxenite in the upper mantle. The presence of orthopyroxenites in mantle samples is a strong indication of hydrous melt and peridotite interaction.

  3. Geochemistry of the Martian meteorite ALH84001, revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrat, Jean-Alix; Bollinger, Claire

    2010-04-01

    Major and trace element abundances were determined on powders prepared from four distinct chips from Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 to constrain the bulk rock composition, and to assess the trace element abundances of orthopyroxenes and phosphates. Our new determinations were used to evaluate the composition of the parental melt of this stone. An unrealistic light rare earth element (REE)-enriched parental melt is calculated from the composition of the orthopyroxene and relevant equilibrium partition coefficients. The involvement of a small amount of trapped melt and subsolidus reequilibrations between orthopyroxene and the interstitial phases can account for this discrepancy. A parental melt that displays a trace element pattern (REE, Zr, and Hf) that closely resembles enriched shergottites such as Zagami or Los Angeles is calculated if these effects are taken into account. These results suggest that some shergottitic melts were already erupted on Mars during the Noachian.

  4. Effect of Cooling Rate and Oxygen Fugacity on the Crystallization of the Queen Alexandra Range 94201 Martian Melt Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koizumi, E.; Mikouchi, T.; McKay, G.; Schwandt, C.; Monkawa, A.; Miyamoto, M.

    2002-01-01

    Although many basaltic shergottites have been recently found in north African deserts, QUE94201 basaltic shergottite (QUE) is still important because of its particular mineralogical and petrological features. This meteorite is thought to represent its parent melt composition [1 -3] and to crystallize under most reduced condition in this group [1,4]. We performed experimental study by using the synthetic glass that has the same composition as the bulk of QUE. After homogenization for 48 hours at 1300 C, isothermal and cooling experiments were done under various conditions (e.g. temperature, cooling rates, and redox states). Our goals are (1) to verify that QUE really represents its parent melt composition, (2) to estimate a cooling rate of this meteorite, (3) to clarify the crystallization sequences of present minerals, and (4) to verity that this meteorite really crystallized under reduced condition.

  5. Tissint martian meteorite: a fresh look at the interior, surface, and atmosphere of Mars.

    PubMed

    Aoudjehane, H Chennaoui; Avice, G; Barrat, J-A; Boudouma, O; Chen, G; Duke, M J M; Franchi, I A; Gattacceca, J; Grady, M M; Greenwood, R C; Herd, C D K; Hewins, R; Jambon, A; Marty, B; Rochette, P; Smith, C L; Sautter, V; Verchovsky, A; Weber, P; Zanda, B

    2012-11-01

    Tissint (Morocco) is the fifth martian meteorite collected after it was witnessed falling to Earth. Our integrated mineralogical, petrological, and geochemical study shows that it is a depleted picritic shergottite similar to EETA79001A. Highly magnesian olivine and abundant glass containing martian atmosphere are present in Tissint. Refractory trace element, sulfur, and fluorine data for the matrix and glass veins in the meteorite indicate the presence of a martian surface component. Thus, the influence of in situ martian weathering can be unambiguously distinguished from terrestrial contamination in this meteorite. Martian weathering features in Tissint are compatible with the results of spacecraft observations of Mars. Tissint has a cosmic-ray exposure age of 0.7 ± 0.3 million years, consistent with those of many other shergottites, notably EETA79001, suggesting that they were ejected from Mars during the same event.

  6. Mantle evolution on Mars: Constraints from Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd isotope systematics of SNC meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, E. E.; Kurahashi, E.; Mezger, K.

    2012-12-01

    The long-lived 176Lu-176Hf and 147Sm-143Nd isotope systems are commonly employed to track the evolution of complementary mantle and crust reservoirs. The four elements involved are refractory and lithophile, and thus their relative abundances are not expected to have been changed by accretion or core formation. Subsequent silicate differentiation processes, however, e.g., the formation of crust by extraction of melts from the mantle, will fractionate Lu/Hf and Sm/Nd. This typically leaves a depleted mantle with higher Lu/Hf and Sm/Nd values than those of the undifferentiated, presumably chondritic parental reservoir. On the other hand, these same values in crustal rocks tend to be lower than those of their source. (Apparent exceptions are the Martian shergottites, which tend to have lower Lu/Hf as expected, but Sm/Nd higher than their presumed sources. Such decoupling of the two isotope systems may be explained by two-stage melting [e.g., 1, 5].) The ensuing chemical variability among secondary and later generation silicate reservoirs causes their isotopic compositions (e.g., 176Hf/177Hf and 143Nd/144Nd) to diverge from that of the bulk silicate planet over hundreds of millions of years. The resulting isotopic diversity preserved (SNC) meteorites is being used to constrain the differentiation history, melting mineralogy, and dynamics of the Martian mantle [e.g., 1-8]. However, interpretations based on the initial isotope compositions of Hf and Nd strongly depend on the accuracy of crystallization ages. The ages of shergottites in particular are debated (e.g., [3,4,7]). To resolve this issue and gain a better understanding of Martian mantle evolution, we are investigating the Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd systematics of bulk SNC meteorites and constructing internal (mineral) isochrons. Eleven bulk Martian meteorites (5 shergottites, 4 nakhlites, and 2 chassignites) were digested without prior leaching in high-pressure autoclaves for 5 days. Initial ɛ176Hf and ɛ143Nd values

  7. Radiometric Ages of Martian Meteorites compared to Martian Surfaces Ages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.

    1999-01-01

    The surprisingly young Rb-Sr age of the Shergotty meteorite contributed to early suggestions that it might be of martian origin. their redox state and oxygen isotopic compositions linked the shergottites to the clino-pyroxenite nakhlites and the dunite Chassigny, causing them to be grouped as SNC meteorites. These characteristics, but especially the similarity of the elemental and isotopic compositions of gases trapped in shergottites to those of the martian atmosphere, have caused the martian origin of the SNC and related meteorites to be widely accepted. Although the young ages were one of the early hints of a martian origin for the SNC meteorites, their interpretation has remained somewhat ambiguous. We will review the radiometric ages of the martian meteorites and attempt to place them into the context of martian surface ages.

  8. Tissint martian meteorite: a fresh look at the interior, surface, and atmosphere of Mars.

    PubMed

    Aoudjehane, H Chennaoui; Avice, G; Barrat, J-A; Boudouma, O; Chen, G; Duke, M J M; Franchi, I A; Gattacceca, J; Grady, M M; Greenwood, R C; Herd, C D K; Hewins, R; Jambon, A; Marty, B; Rochette, P; Smith, C L; Sautter, V; Verchovsky, A; Weber, P; Zanda, B

    2012-11-01

    Tissint (Morocco) is the fifth martian meteorite collected after it was witnessed falling to Earth. Our integrated mineralogical, petrological, and geochemical study shows that it is a depleted picritic shergottite similar to EETA79001A. Highly magnesian olivine and abundant glass containing martian atmosphere are present in Tissint. Refractory trace element, sulfur, and fluorine data for the matrix and glass veins in the meteorite indicate the presence of a martian surface component. Thus, the influence of in situ martian weathering can be unambiguously distinguished from terrestrial contamination in this meteorite. Martian weathering features in Tissint are compatible with the results of spacecraft observations of Mars. Tissint has a cosmic-ray exposure age of 0.7 ± 0.3 million years, consistent with those of many other shergottites, notably EETA79001, suggesting that they were ejected from Mars during the same event. PMID:23065902

  9. The chlorine isotope composition of Martian meteorites 2. Implications for the early solar system and the formation of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Zachary; Williams, Jeffrey; Shearer, Charles; Agee, Carl; McKeegan, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    We determined the chlorine isotope composition of 16 Martian meteorites using gas source mass spectrometry on bulk samples and in situ secondary ion microprobe analysis on apatite grains. Measured δ37Cl values range from -3.8 to +8.6‰. The olivine-phyric shergottites are the isotopically lightest samples, with δ37Cl mostly ranging from -4 to -2‰. Samples with evidence for a crustal component have positive δ37Cl values, with an extreme value of 8.6‰. Most of the basaltic shergottites have intermediate δ37Cl values of -1 to 0‰, except for Shergotty, which is similar to the olivine-phyric shergottites. We interpret these data as due to mixing of a two-component system. The first component is the mantle value of -4 to -3‰. This most likely represents the original bulk Martian Cl isotope value. The other endmember is a 37Cl-enriched crustal component. We speculate that preferential loss of 35Cl to space has resulted in a high δ37Cl value for the Martian surface, similar to what is seen in other volatile systems. The basaltic shergottites are a mixture of the other two endmembers. The low δ37Cl value of primitive Mars is different from Earth and most chondrites, both of which are close to 0‰. We are not aware of any parent-body process that could lower the δ37Cl value of the Martian mantle to -4 to -3‰. Instead, we propose that this low δ37Cl value represents the primordial bulk composition of Mars inherited during accretion. The higher δ37Cl values seen in many chondrites are explained by later incorporation of 37Cl-enriched HCl-hydrate.

  10. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Martian Meteorites: Chemical Weathering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Martian Meteorites: Chemical Weathering" included the following reports:Chemical Weathering Records of Martian Soils Preserved in the Martian Meteorite EET79001; Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction Analysis of Meteorites in Thin Section: Preliminary Results; A Survey of Olivine Alteration Products Using Raman Spectroscopy; and Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd Isotope Systematics of Shergottite NWA 856: Crystallization Age and Implications for Alteration of Hot Desert SNC Meteorites.

  11. Petrology and Geochemistry of New Paired Martian Meteorites Larkman Nunatak 12240 and Larkman Nunatak 12095

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, R. C.; Peslier, A. H.; Brandon, A. D.; Humayun, M.

    2016-01-01

    Two of the latest Martian meteorites found in Antarctica, paired olivine-phyric shergottites LAR 12240 and LAR 12095, are described in order to decipher their petrological context, and place constraints on the geological history of Mars. This project identifies all phases found in LAR 12240 and 12095 and analyzes them for major and trace elements. The textural relationships among these phases are examined in order to develop a crystallization history of the magma(s) that formed these basalts.

  12. Maskelynite: Formation by Explosive Shock.

    PubMed

    Milton, D J; de Carli, P S

    1963-05-10

    When high pressure (250 to 300 kilobars) was applied suddenly (shock-loading) to gabbro, the plagioclase was transformed to a noncrystalline phase (maskelynite) by a solid-state reaction at a low temperature, while the proxene remained crystalline. The shock-loaded gabbro resembles meteorites of the shergottite class; this suggests that the latter formed as a result of shock. The shock-loading of gabbro at 600 to 800 kilobars raised the temperature above the melting range of the plagioclase.

  13. The chlorine isotopic composition of Martian meteorites 1: Chlorine isotope composition of Martian mantle and crustal reservoirs and their interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. T.; Shearer, C. K.; Sharp, Z. D.; Burger, P. V.; McCubbin, F. M.; Santos, A. R.; Agee, C. B.; McKeegan, K. D.

    2016-05-01

    The Martian meteorites record a wide diversity of environments, processes, and ages. Much work has been done to decipher potential mantle sources for Martian magmas and their interactions with crustal and surface environments. Chlorine isotopes provide a unique opportunity to assess interactions between Martian mantle-derived magmas and the crust. We have measured the Cl-isotopic composition of 17 samples that span the range of known ages, Martian environments, and mantle reservoirs. The 37Cl of the Martian mantle, as represented by the olivine-phyric shergottites, NWA 2737 (chassignite), and Shergotty (basaltic shergottite), has a low value of approximately -3.8‰. This value is lower than that of all other planetary bodies measured thus far. The Martian crust, as represented by regolith breccia NWA 7034, is variably enriched in the heavy isotope of Cl. This enrichment is reflective of preferential loss of 35Cl to space. Most basaltic shergottites (less Shergotty), nakhlites, Chassigny, and Allan Hills 84001 lie on a continuum between the Martian mantle and crust. This intermediate range is explained by mechanical mixing through impact, fluid interaction, and assimilation-fractional crystallization.

  14. The dregs of crystallization in Zagami

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, T. J.; Keil, K.; Taylor, G. J.

    1993-01-01

    The Zagami shergottite is a basaltic meteorite which formed when a phenocryst-bearing lava flow was emplaced at or near the surface of Mars. Recently, a cm-sized olivine-rich lithology has been identified in Zagami by Mossbauer spectroscopy. Olivine is extremely rare in shergottites, particularly in Zagami and Shergotty, where it occurs only as minute grains. We report petrologic and microprobe studies of this olivine-rich lithology. This material represents the last few percent of melt and is highly enriched in phosphates, opaques and mesostases, all of which are late-stage crystallization products. Phosphates replaced augite as a phenocryst phase when the magma became saturated in P. This late stage melt also includes a fayalite-bearing, multi-phase intergrowth which crystallized after the melt became too rich in iron to crystallize pigeonite. We can now reconstruct the entire crystallization history of the Zagami shergottite from a deep-seated magma chamber to crystallization of the final few percent of melt in a near-surface dike or thick flow. Small pockets (tens of microns) of late-stage melt pockets are ubiquitous but volumetrically minor in Zagami. We do not know the physical relationship between these areas and the cm-sized olivine-rich material described here. It is possible that these small pockets were mobile, forming larger areas. Perhaps inspection of the entire hand specimen of Zagami would clarify this relationship.

  15. Characterization and petrologic interpretation of olivine-rich basalts at Gusev Crater, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSween, H.Y.; Wyatt, M.B.; Gellert, Ralf; Bell, J.F.; Morris, R.V.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Crumpler, L.S.; Milam, K.A.; Stockstill, K.R.; Tornabene, L.L.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bartlett, P.; Blaney, D.; Cabrol, N.A.; Christensen, P.R.; Clark, B. C.; Crisp, J.A.; Des Marais, D.J.; Economou, T.; Farmer, J.D.; Farrand, W.; Ghosh, A.; Golombek, M.; Gorevan, S.; Greeley, R.; Hamilton, V.E.; Johnson, J. R.; Joliff, B.L.; Klingelhofer, G.; Knudson, A.T.; McLennan, S.; Ming, D.; Moersch, J.E.; Rieder, R.; Ruff, S.W.; Schrorder, C.; de Souza, P.A.; Squyres, S. W.; Wanke, H.; Wang, A.; Yen, A.; Zipfel, J.

    2006-01-01

    Rocks on the floor of Gusev crater are basalts of uniform composition and mineralogy. Olivine, the only mineral to have been identified or inferred from data by all instruments on the Spirit rover, is especially abundant in these rocks. These picritic basalts are similar in many respects to certain Martian meteorites (olivine-phyric shergottites). The olivine megacrysts in both have intermediate compositions, with modal abundances ranging up to 20-30%. Associated minerals in both include low-calcium and high-calcium pyroxenes, plagioclase of intermediate composition, iron-titanium-chromium oxides, and phosphate. These rocks also share minor element trends, reflected in their nickel-magnesium and chromium-magnesium ratios. Gusev basalts and shergottites appear to have formed from primitive magmas produced by melting an undepleted mantle at depth and erupted without significant fractionation. However, apparent differences between Gusev rocks and shergottites in their ages, plagioclase abundances, and volatile contents preclude direct correlation. Orbital determinations of global olivine distribution and compositions by thermal emission spectroscopy suggest that olivine-rich rocks may be widespread. Because weathering under acidic conditions preferentially attacks olivine and disguises such rocks beneath alteration rinds, picritic basalts formed from primitive magmas may even be a common component of the Martian crust formed during ancient and recent times. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Characterization and Petrologic Interpretation of Olivine-Rich Basalts at Gusev Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McSween, H. Y.; Wyatt, M. B.; Gellert, R.; Bell, J. F., III; Morris, R. V.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Crumpler, L. S.; Milam, K. A.; Stockstill, K. R.; Tornabene, L. L.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bartlett, P.; Blaney, D.; Cabrol, N. A.; Christensen, P. R.; Clark, B. C.; Crisp, A.; DesMarais, D. J.; Economou, T.; Farmer, J. D.; Farrand, W.; Ghosh, A.; Golombek, M.; Gorevan, S.; Greeley, R.

    2006-01-01

    Rocks on the floor of Gusev crater are basalts of uniform composition and mineralogy. Olivine, the only mineral to have been identified or inferred from data by all instruments on the Spirit rover, is especially abundant in these rocks. These picritic basalts are similar in many respects to certain Martian meteorites (olivine-phyric shergottites). The olivine megacrysts in both have intermediate compositions, with modal abundances ranging up to 20-30%. Associated minerals in both include low-calcium and high-calcium pyroxenes, plagioclase of intermediate composition, iron-titanium-chromium oxides, and phosphate. These rocks also share minor element trends, reflected in their nickel-magnesium and chromium-magnesium ratios. Gusev basalts and shergottites appear to have formed from primitive magmas produced by melting an undepleted mantle at depth and erupted without significant fractionation. However, apparent differences between Gusev rocks and shergottites in their ages, plagioclase abundances, and volatile contents preclude direct correlation. Orbital determinations of global olivine distribution and compositions by thermal emission spectroscopy suggest that olivine-rich rocks may be widespread. Because weathering under acidic conditions preferentially attacks olivine and disguises such rocks beneath alteration rinds, picritic basalts formed from primitive magmas may even be a common component of the Martian crust formed during ancient and recent times.

  17. LU-HF Age of Martian Meteorite Larkman Nunatek 06319

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, J. T.; Brandon, A. D.; Lapen, T. J.; Righter, M.; Beard, B.; Peslier, A. H.

    2009-01-01

    Lu-Hf isotopic data were collected on mineral separates and bulk rock powders of LAR 06319, yielding an age of 197+/- 29 Ma. Sm-Nd isotopic data and in-situ LA-ICP-MS data from a thin section of LAR 06319 are currently being collected and will be presented at the 2009 LPSC. These new data for LAR 06319 extend the existing data set for the enriched shergottite group. Martian meteorites represent the only opportunity for ground truth investigation of the geochemistry of Mars [1]. At present, approximately 80 meteorites have been classified as Martian based on young ages and distinctive isotopic signatures [2]. LAR 06319 is a newly discovered (as part of the 2006 ANSMET field season) martian meteorite that represents an important opportunity to further our understanding of the geochemical and petrological constraints on the origin of Martian magmas. Martian meteorites are traditionally categorized into the shergottite, nakhlite, and chassignite groups. The shergottites are further classified into three distinct isotopic groups designated depleted, intermediate, and enriched [3,4] based on the isotope systematics and compositions of their source(s).

  18. Chlorine Abundances in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D.D.; Garrison, D.H.; Park, J.

    2009-01-01

    Chlorine measurements made in martian surface rocks by robotic spacecraft typically give Chlorine (Cl) abundances of approximately 0.1-0.8%. In contrast, Cl abundances in martian meteorites appear lower, although data is limited, and martian nakhlites were also subjected to Cl contamination by Mars surface brines. Chlorine abundances reported by one lab for whole rock (WR) samples of Shergotty, ALH77005, and EET79001 range 108-14 ppm, whereas Cl in nakhlites range 73-1900 ppm. Measurements of Cl in various martian weathering phases of nakhlites varied 0.04-4.7% and reveal significant concentration of Cl by martian brines Martian meteorites contain much lower Chlorine than those measured in martian surface rocks and give further confirmation that Cl in these surface rocks was introduced by brines and weathering. It has been argued that Cl is twice as effective as water in lowering the melting point and promoting melting at shallower martian depths, and that significant Cl in the shergottite source region would negate any need for significant water. However, this conclusion was based on experiments that utilized Cl concentrations more analogous to martian surface rocks than to shergottite meteorites, and may not be applicable to shergottites.

  19. The carbon components in SNC meteorites of feldspathic harzburgite composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, I. P.; Douglas, C.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    Two meteorites collected in Antarctica, ALH A77005 and LEW 88516, have characteristics which link them to the shergottite group of SNC meteorites. Essentially, ALH A77005 and LEW 88516 are feldspathic harzburgites, being comprised of roughly equal quantities of olivine and pyroxene, with an additional few percent of feldspar which has subsequently been converted to maskelynite by shock. The meteorites represent samples of a cumulate rock which is itself composed of two different lithologies: in one, large pyroxenes poikilitically enclose olivine crystals, while the other consists of interstitial areas made up of pyroxene, olivine, maskelynite, whitlockite, troilite, ilmenite and chlorapatite. It has been proposed that meteorites such as ALH A77005 (and LEW 88516) are relict samples of the source peridotite from which the other shergottites formed. As such it should be informative to study in detail the carbon components present within these samples, in order to make comparisons with data from other shergottites. Although not plutonic in origin, and therefore not sampling a truly deep source, analyses of ALH A77005 and LEW 88516 should assist with attempts to define the bulk carbon isotopic composition of Mars. This has been assessed previously through analyses of carbon of presumed magmatic origin in other SNC meteorites, but the carbon isotopic compositions obtained seem to be at variance with what might be expected. It is important to constrain the carbon isotopic composition of Mars as well as possible so that models of atmospheric evolution, based on carbon isotopic data, can yield the most reliable results.

  20. Petrography of Lunar Meteorite MET 01210, A New Basaltic Regolith Breccia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, R. A.; Korotev, R. L.; Jolliff, B. L.; Haskin, L. A.

    2005-01-01

    Lunar meteorite MET 01210 (hereafter referred to as MET) is a 22.8 g breccia collected during the 2001 field season in the Meteorite Hills, Antarctica. Although initially classified as an anorthositic breccia, MET is a regolith breccia composed predominantly of very-low-Ti (VLT) basaltic material. Four other brecciated lunar meteorites (NWA 773, QUE 94281, EET 87/96, Yamato 79/98) with a significant VLT basaltic component have been identified. We present here the petrography and bulk major element composition of MET and compare it to previously studied basaltic lunar meteorite breccias.

  1. Terrestrial ages of Antarctic meteorites: Implications for concentration mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, L.

    1986-01-01

    Antarctic meteorites differ from meteorites fallen in other places in their mean terrestrial ages. Boeckl estimated the terrestrial half-life for the disintegration of stone meteorites by weathering under the climatic conditions of the Western United States to be about 3600 years. Antarctic meteorites, however, have terrestrial ages up to 70000 years, indicating larger weathering half-lives. The terrestrial ages of meteorites are determined by their concentration of cosmic-ray-produced radionuclides with suitable half-lives (C-14, Al-26, and Cl-36). These radionuclides have yielded reliable ages for the Antarctic meteorites. The distribution of terrestrial ages of Allan Hills and Yamato meteorites are examined.

  2. Southward trench migration at ∼130-120 Ma caused accretion of the Neo-Tethyan forearc lithosphere in Tibetan ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Qing; Griffin, William L.; Zheng, Jian-Ping; O'Reilly, Suzanne Y.; Pearson, Norman J.; Xu, Bo; Belousova, Elena A.

    2016-03-01

    The preservation of ultrahigh-pressure and super-reduced phases (diamond, moissanite, etc.) in the harzburgites and chromitites of the Yarlung Zangbo ophiolites (South Tibet, China) has major implications for mantle recycling and lithosphere evolution in the tectonic system related to the closing of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean. However, important aspects of the genesis of these enigmatic ophiolites and the related geodynamic evolution are still unclear. In the Zedang ophiolite of the eastern Yarlung Zangbo Suture, detailed mineral chemical data reveal that the harzburgite domain in the east [spinel Cr# (mole Cr3+/(Cr3+ + Al3+) = 0.62-0.33] is more depleted than the lherzolite domain in the west (spinel Cr# = 0.30-0.17) and shows much lower equilibration temperatures (by ∼250-150 °C) than the lherzolites. Clinopyroxene trace-element compositions indicate that the harzburgites underwent pervasive metasomatism after melt extraction, while the lherzolites did not. New zircon U-Pb ages show that the harzburgites were intruded by dolerite dykes with chilled margins at ∼130-128 Ma, consistent with the widespread mafic magmatism at ∼130-120 Ma in the Yarlung Zangbo ophiolites. Nd-Hf isotopic data indicate that the Zedang lherzolites subcreted the pre-emplaced harzburgites concurrently with the intrusion of the dolerite dykes into the harzburgites, and that the lherzolites and dolerites both were derived from upwelling asthenosphere with minor slab input. Available zircon geochronology and Hf-isotope data show that juvenile magmatism in the adjacent Gangdese Arc was almost completely interrupted from ∼130-120 Ma. We suggest that the extension of the overlying harzburgitic lithosphere, subcretion of lherzolites, intrusion of mafic dykes, and the waning of Gangdese-Arc magmatism all reflect a southward trench migration in the Neo-Tethyan subduction system from the Gangdese Arc to the oceanic forearc lithosphere. This magmatic relocation and tectonic linkage are inferred to

  3. Lithospheric Mantle Contribution to High Topography in Central Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Ionov, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Over 110 spinel peridotite xenoliths collected from four localities in the Tariat region, central Mongolia, show a predominance (over 90%) of fertile lherzolites with subordinant harzburgite and peridotites veined with pyroxenite. Equilibration temperatures are high (~900°C at 1.5 GPa [1]). Major element compositions of the fertile samples are consistent with them being the residues of 0-6% partial melt removal at shallow depths [2]. The clinopyroxenes in the lherzolites are moderately LREE depleted (average chondrite normalized La/Sm = 0.45) and most whole rocks show small, if any, depletions in Re and Pd compared to the other HSE. These data point to minimal metasomatic overprinting of these fertile lherzolites. 187Os/188Os for samples with more than 3.2% Al2O3 range only from 0.126 to 0.131, within the range of modern fertile asthenospheric mantle. In contrast to the indicators of fertility in most samples, Sr, Nd and Hf isotopic composition of acid-leached clinopyroxene separates from the lherzolites plot within the range of modern MORB with 87Sr/86Sr from 0.7021 to 0.7026, eNd from +7.7 to +9.8 and eHf from +13.3 to +18.5. The lherzolites thus appear to sample a section of mantle that has compositional and isotope characteristics consistent with modern fertile asthenosphere. The isotopic composition of the Tariat lherzolites are distinct from that of Cenozoic Mongolian basaltic volcanism pointing to limited involvement of the lithospheric mantle in magma generation in this area. The implied asthenospheric provenance of the mantle lithosphere suggests that it either could be the replacement for recently delaminated lithosphere or, more likely, a section of fertile mantle accreted to the base of the crust earlier, e.g. during construction of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt in the Mesozoic/Paleozoic. Although fertile, and hence compositionally dense, the high temperatures of the shallow lithospheric mantle under this section of Mongolia likely contribute to the

  4. Garnet peridotites from Williams kimberlites, north-central Montana, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hearn, B.C.; McGee, E.S.

    1983-01-01

    Two Williams kimberlites, 250x350m and 37x390m, in the eastern part of a swarm of 30 middle Eocene alnoitic diatremes in north-central Montana, USA, contain xenoliths of garnet-bearing lherzolites, harzburgites and dunites, in addition to spinel peridotites and upper and lower crustal amphibolites and granulites. Colluvial purple, red, and pink garnets are dominantly Mg- and Cr-rich, indicating their derivation From peridotites or megacrysts, and have CaO and Cr2O3 contents that fall in the lherzolite trend. Temperatures were calculated by the Lindsley-Dixon 20 kb method for lherzolites and by the O'Neill-Wood method for harzburgites and dunites, and pressures were calculated by the MacGregor method, or were assumed to be 50 kb for dunites. Most peridotites equilibrated at 1220-1350?C and 50-60 kb, well above a 44mW/m2 shield geotherm and on or at higher P than the graphite-diamond boundary. Four lherzolites are low T-P (830-990?C, 23-42 kb) and are close to the shield geotherm. All four low T-P lherzolites have coarse textures whereas the high T-P cluster has both coarse and porphyroclastic textures, indicating a range of conditions of deformation and recrystallization in a restricted high T-P range. The tiny size (0.01-0.2 mm) of granulated and euhedral olivines in several xenoliths shows that deformation was occurring just prior to incorporation in kimberlite and that ascent was rapid enough (40-70 km/hr) to retard Further coarsening of fine-grained olivine. For other high T-P peridotites, cessation of deformation and beginning of recrystallization before or during inclusion in kimberlite is suggested by larger (up to 3mm) euhedral olivines in a matrix of fine granulated olivine or by optical continuity of large and nearby small olivines. Two low T-P lherzolites contain distinctive, phlogopite-rimmed, 5-8mm clots of moderate-Cr garnet + Cr-spinel + Cr-diopside + enstatite that are inferred to have formed by reaction of an initial high-Cr garnet brought into the

  5. Theoretical prediction of phase relationships in planetary mantles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, B. J.; Holloway, J. R.

    Thermodynamic and phase equilibrium data are used to generate an internally consistent set of enthalpies and entropies for important components of the CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (CMAS) system in silica-undersaturated compositions. The addition of Na and Fe(2+) to the CMAS system produces shifts in the plagioclase, spinel and garnet stability fields. While the Morgan and Anders (1979) model Martian composition has stability fields of plagioclase and garnet lherzolite, and a small spinel lherzolite field at temperatures below 900 C, the Martian mantle composition of McGetchin and Smyth (1978) would not contain orthopyroxene, and a low pressure assemblage of plagioclase-spinel wehrlite would be replaced by garnet-spinel wehrlite at higher pressure. In both cases, the Fe-Mg ratio would be substantially greater than that found in primitive terrestrial basalts.

  6. A Dynamic study of Mantle processes applying In-situ Methods to Compound Xenoliths: implications for small to intermediate scale heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baziotis, Ioannis; Asimow, Paul; Koroneos, Antonios; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Poli, Giampero

    2013-04-01

    The mantle is the major geochemical reservoir of most rock-forming elements in the Earth. Convection and plate-tectonic driven processes act to generate local and regional heterogeneity within the mantle, which in turn through thermal and chemical interactions modulates ongoing geophysical processes; this feedback shapes the dynamics of the deep interior. Consequently, these processes contribute to the evolution of the earth throughout its geological history. Up to now, the heterogeneity of the mantle has been extensively studied in terms of conventional methods using basalt chemistry, bulk rock and mineral major and trace element analysis of isolated xenolith specimens of varying lithology, and massif exposures. The milestone of the present study, part of an ongoing research project, is the application of in-situ analytical methods such as microprobe, LA-ICP-MS and high resolution SEM in order to provide high quality major and trace element analyses as well as elemental distribution of the coexisting phases in the preserved intra-mantle lithologies, Particularly, in the context of the current study we used selected compound xenoliths from San Carlos (Arizona, USA), Kilbourne Hole (New Mexico, USA), Cima Dome and Dish Hill suites (California, USA), San Quintin (Baja California, Mexico) and Chino Valley (Arizona, USA), from the Howard Wilshire collection archived at the Smithsonian Institution. The selection of these compound xenoliths was based upon freshness and integrity of specimens, maximum distance on both sides of lithologic contacts, and rock types thought most likely to represent subsolidus juxtaposition of different lithologies that later partially melted in contact. The San Carlos samples comprise composite xenoliths with websterite, lherzolite and clinopyroxenite layers or clinopyroxenite veins surrounded by lherzolite or orthopyroxenite-rich rims. The Kilbourne Hole suite comprises spinel-(olivine) clinopyroxenite and orthopyroxenite dikes cutting

  7. Metasomatized lithosphere and the origin of alkaline lavas.

    PubMed

    Pilet, Sébastien; Baker, Michael B; Stolper, Edward M

    2008-05-16

    Recycled oceanic crust, with or without sediment, is often invoked as a source component of continental and oceanic alkaline magmas to account for their trace-element and isotopic characteristics. Alternatively, these features have been attributed to sources containing veined, metasomatized lithosphere. In melting experiments on natural amphibole-rich veins at 1.5 gigapascals, we found that partial melts of metasomatic veins can reproduce key major- and trace-element features of oceanic and continental alkaline magmas. Moreover, experiments with hornblendite plus lherzolite showed that reaction of melts of amphibole-rich veins with surrounding lherzolite can explain observed compositional trends from nephelinites to alkali olivine basalts. We conclude that melting of metasomatized lithosphere is a viable alternative to models of alkaline basalt formation by melting of recycled oceanic crust with or without sediment.

  8. Garnets from the Camafuca-Camazambo kimberlite (Angola).

    PubMed

    Correia, Eugénio A; Laiginhas, Fernando A T P

    2006-06-01

    This work presents a geochemical study of a set of garnets, selected by their colors, from the Camafuca-Camazambo kimberlite, located on northeast Angola. Mantle-derived garnets were classified according to the scheme proposed by Grütter et al. (2004) and belong to the G1, G4, G9 and G10 groups. Both sub-calcic (G10) and Ca-saturated (G9) garnets, typical, respectively, of harzburgites and lherzolites, were identified. The solubility limit of knorringite molecule in G10D garnets suggests they have crystallized at a minimum pressure of about 40 to 45 kbar (4-4.5 GPa). The occurrence of diamond stability field garnets (G10D) is a clear indicator of the potential of this kimberlite for diamond. The chemistry of the garnets suggests that the source for the kimberlite was a lherzolite that has suffered a partial melting that formed basaltic magma, leaving a harzburgite as a residue.

  9. Theoretical prediction of phase relationships in planetary mantles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, B. J.; Holloway, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Thermodynamic and phase equilibrium data are used to generate an internally consistent set of enthalpies and entropies for important components of the CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (CMAS) system in silica-undersaturated compositions. The addition of Na and Fe(2+) to the CMAS system produces shifts in the plagioclase, spinel and garnet stability fields. While the Morgan and Anders (1979) model Martian composition has stability fields of plagioclase and garnet lherzolite, and a small spinel lherzolite field at temperatures below 900 C, the Martian mantle composition of McGetchin and Smyth (1978) would not contain orthopyroxene, and a low pressure assemblage of plagioclase-spinel wehrlite would be replaced by garnet-spinel wehrlite at higher pressure. In both cases, the Fe-Mg ratio would be substantially greater than that found in primitive terrestrial basalts.

  10. Diamonds in an upper mantle peridotite nodule from kimberlite in southern wyoming.

    PubMed

    McCallum, M E; Eggler, D H

    1976-04-16

    Diamonds in a serpentinized garnet peridotite nodule from a diatreme in southern Wyoming are the first known occurrence in an upper mantle peridotite xenolith from a kimberlite intrusion in North America as well as the second authenticated occurrence of diamonds from kimberlite pipes in North America. The nodule is believed to have come from a section of depleted (partially melted) lherzolite at a depth of 130 to 180 kilometers. PMID:17831161

  11. Clinoenstatite in alpe arami peridotite: additional evidence of very high pressure

    PubMed

    Bozhilov; Green; Dobrzhinetskaya

    1999-04-01

    Observations by transmission electron microscopy show that lamellae of clinoenstatite are present in diopside grains of the Alpe Arami garnet lherzolite of the Swiss Alps. The simplest interpretation of the orientation, crystallography, and microstructures of the lamellae and the phase relationships in this system is that the lamellae originally exsolved as the high-pressure C-centered form of clinoenstatite. These results imply that the rocks were exhumed from a minimum depth of 250 kilometers before or during continental collision. PMID:10102809

  12. Mantle refertilization by garnet pyroxenite melts: Evidence from the Ronda peridotite massif, southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesi, C.; Garrido, C.; Bosch, D.; Bodinier, J.; Gervilla, F.

    2011-12-01

    Lherzolite at the recrystallization front of the Ronda peridotite massif, a mantle region that experienced pervasive melt migration and melt/rock reaction, hosts pyroxenite composite layers that show an inner transition from Al- to Cr-rich compositions. These particular pyroxenite-peridotite associations record intense processes of pyroxenite melting/replacement and related peridotite refertilization. Al-rich spinel websterite in a composite layer close to the front was generated by melting of former garnet pyroxenite with an evident imprint of primary plagioclase and reaction of this protolith with incoming peridotite melt. These events produced more refractory major element compositions of whole-rock and higher REE contents in clinopyroxene but preserved the characteristic MREE/HREE fractionation and positive Eu anomaly of the garnet pyroxenite protolith. In the waning stages of melt porous flow at the recrystallization front, the parental melts of Cr-rich pyroxenite progressively replaced residual Al-rich spinel websterite partially conserving their original subduction-related affinity. Lherzolite hosting the composite layer was intensely refertilized by melt resulted from garnet pyroxenite replacement. The presence in the refertilizing agent of an important component extracted from garnet pyroxenite induced Eu and Sr positive anomalies, higher FeO* at similar SiO2 and higher Sm/Yb in these mantle rocks compared to common peridotite from the Ronda massif. Some peculiar geochemical signatures of garnet pyroxenite were thus imparted to highly fertile lherzolite hosting the pyroxenite composite layer by partial melting, melt migration and melt/rock reaction in the Ronda massif. These mechanisms may explain the presence of a garnet pyroxenite component in the source of different types of melt generated in the mantle. However, the efficiency of these processes in transferring the geochemical imprint of garnet pyroxenite to extruded lavas depends on the reactivity of

  13. Characterization of olivine fabrics and mylonite in the presence of fluid and implications for seismic anisotropy and shear localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sejin; Jung, Haemyeong; Austrheim, Håkon

    2015-04-01

    The Lindås Nappe, Bergen Arc, is located in western Norway and displays two high-grade metamorphic structures. A Precambrian granulite facies foliation is transected by Caledonian fluid-induced eclogite-facies shear zones and pseudotachylytes. To understand how a superimposed tectonic event may influence olivine fabric and change seismic anisotropy, two lenses of spinel lherzolite were studied by SEM and EBSD techniques. The granulite foliation of the surrounding anorthosite complex is displayed in ultramafic lenses as a modal variation in olivine, pyroxenes and spinel, and the Caledonian eclogite-facies structure in the surrounding anorthosite gabbro is represented by thin (<1 cm) garnet-bearing ultramylonite zones. The olivine fabrics in the spinel bearing assemblage were E-type and B-type and a combination of A- and B-type LPOs. There was a change in olivine fabric from a combination of A- and B-type LPOs in the spinel bearing assemblage to B- and E-type LPOs in the garnet lherzolite mylonite zones. FTIR analyses reveal that the water content of olivine in mylonite is much higher (~600 ppm H/Si) than that in spinel lherzolite (~350 ppm H/Si), indicating that water caused the difference in olivine fabric. Fabric strength of olivine gets weaker as the grain size reduced, and as a result calculated seismic properties for the two deformation stages reveal that P- and S-velocity anisotropies are significantly weaker in the mylonite. Microtextures and LPO data indicate that the deformation mechanism changed from dominant dislocation creep in spinel lherzolite to dislocation creep accompanied by grain-boundary sliding in mylonite. Shear localization in the mylonite appears to be originated from the grain size reduction through (1) enhanced dynamic recrystallization of olivine in the presence of water and (2) Zener pinning of clinopyroxene, or (3) by ultracommunition during the pseudotachylyte stage.

  14. Geochemical record of subduction initiation in the sub-arc mantle: insights from Loma Caribe peridotite (Dominican Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesi, Claudio; Garrido, Carlos J.; Proenza, Joaquín A.; Hidas, Károly; Varas-Reus, María Isabel; Butjosa, Lidia; Lewis, John F.

    2016-04-01

    The Loma Caribe peridotite body is mainly composed of serpentinized spinel harzburgite and lherzolite and minor (Opx-bearing) dunite. Modal proportions, mineral and whole-rock major and trace element compositions generally coincide with those of abyssal mantle rocks from mid-ocean ridges for lherzolite and refractory supra-subduction peridotites for harzburgite and (Opx-) dunite. Cpx-bearing harzburgite has intermediate compositions that overlap those of residual mantle from both these settings. Major elements in peridotite were mostly undisturbed by serpentinization and/or seafloor weathering whereas LREE and LILE were enriched by syn- and/or post-melting interaction with fluids/melts. Major element variations support that protoliths of Loma Caribe peridotite mostly melted at 1-2 GPa and 1300-1500 °C, as normal mid-ocean ridge and supra-subduction zone mantle. MREE/HREE fractionations in whole-rocks and clinopyroxene can be explained by initial low (5-6%) fractional melting of a garnet lherzolite source followed by variable (5-20%) melting in the spinel stability field. Lherzolite and Cpx-harzburgite are residues of increasing melting triggered by increasing addition of fluids to a spinel peridotite source, while melting of the harzburgite protolith was likely promoted by focused flux of hydrous melts. Dunite and Opx-bearing dunite are products of pyroxene dissolution in residual peridotite caused by reaction with two different subduction-related melts, likely the parental magmas of Early Cretaceous low-Ti IAT and boninite from Central Hispaniola, respectively. We propose that the geochemical heterogeneity of Loma Caribe peridotite records shifting conditions of melting during the development of subduction beneath the incipient Greater Antilles paleo-island arc in the Early Cretaceous. The common presence in the Caribbean realm of oceanic mantle rocks related to subduction indicates that most peri-Caribbean ophiolitic bodies are not fragments of an oceanic

  15. Geochemical record of subduction initiation in the sub-arc mantle: Insights from the Loma Caribe peridotite (Dominican Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesi, Claudio; Garrido, Carlos J.; Proenza, Joaquín A.; Hidas, Károly; Varas-Reus, María Isabel; Butjosa, Lidia; Lewis, John F.

    2016-05-01

    The Loma Caribe peridotite body is mainly composed of serpentinized spinel harzburgites and lherzolites and minor orthopyroxene-bearing dunites and dunites. Modal proportions, mineral and whole-rock major and trace element compositions generally coincide with those of abyssal mantle rocks from mid-ocean ridges for the lherzolites, and refractory supra-subduction peridotites for the harzburgites and dunites. The clinopyroxene-bearing harzburgites have intermediate compositions that overlap with those of residual mantle from both these settings. Major elements in the peridotites were mostly undisturbed by serpentinization and/or seafloor weathering whereas light rare earth elements (LREE) and large ion lithophile elements (LILE) were enriched by syn- and/or post-melting interaction with fluids/melts. Major element variations indicate that protoliths of the Loma Caribe peridotites mostly melted at 1-2 GPa and 1250 °C-1500 °C, as normal mid-ocean ridge and supra-subduction zone mantle. The MREE/HREE fractionations in both whole rocks and clinopyroxene can be explained by initial low (5%-6%) fractional melting of a garnet lherzolite source followed by variable (5%-20%) melting in the spinel stability field. The lherzolites and clinopyroxene-bearing harzburgites are residues of increasing melting triggered by increasing addition of slab fluids to a spinel peridotite source, while melting of the harzburgite protoliths was likely the result of focused flux of slab hydrous melts. The dunites and orthopyroxene-bearing dunites are products of pyroxene dissolution in residual peridotites caused by reaction with two different subduction-related melts, probably the parental magmas of Early Cretaceous low-Ti island arc tholeiites (IAT) and boninites from Central Hispaniola, respectively. We conclude that the geochemical heterogeneity of the Loma Caribe peridotites records shifting conditions of melting during the development of subduction beneath the incipient Greater Antilles

  16. A summary of the petrology and geochemistry of pristine highlands rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, M. D.; Ryder, G.

    1979-01-01

    The petrology and geochemistry of pristine lunar highlands rock samples consisting of ferroan anorthosites, norites, troctolites, spinel troctolites/dunite/lherzolite, and KREEP, are described. In addition, petrographic and chemical evidence is presented which shows that low-siderophile rocks are the result of endogenous igneous activity and not impact melt differentiation. For example, these rocks contain Fe-metal as a late-crystallizing phase, and have W/La ratios higher than polymict breccias.

  17. Characterization of olivine fabrics and mylonite in the presence of fluid and implications for seismic anisotropy and shear localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sejin; Jung, Haemyeong; Austrheim, Håkon

    2014-12-01

    The Lindås Nappe, Bergen Arc, is located in western Norway and displays two high-grade metamorphic structures. A Precambrian granulite facies foliation is transected by Caledonian fluid-induced eclogite-facies shear zones and pseudotachylytes. To understand how a superimposed tectonic event may influence olivine fabric and change seismic anisotropy, two lenses of spinel lherzolite were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) techniques. The granulite foliation of the surrounding anorthosite complex is displayed in ultramafic lenses as a modal variation in olivine, pyroxenes, and spinel, and the Caledonian eclogite-facies structure in the surrounding anorthosite gabbro is represented by thin (<1 cm) garnet-bearing ultramylonite zones. The olivine fabrics in the spinel bearing assemblage were E-type and B-type and a combination of A- and B-type lattice preferred orientations (LPOs). There was a change in olivine fabric from a combination of A- and B-type LPOs in the spinel bearing assemblage to B- and E-type LPOs in the garnet lherzolite mylonite zones. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analyses reveal that the water content of olivine in mylonite is much higher (approximately 600 ppm H/Si) than that in spinel lherzolite (approximately 350 ppm H/Si), indicating that water caused the difference in olivine fabric. Fabric strength of olivine gets weaker as the grain size reduced, and as a result, calculated seismic properties for the two deformation stages reveal that P- and S-velocity anisotropies are significantly weaker in the mylonite. Microtextures and LPO data indicate that the deformation mechanism changed from dominant dislocation creep in spinel lherzolite to dislocation creep accompanied by grain-boundary sliding in mylonite. Shear localization in the mylonite appears to be originated from the grain size reduction through (1) enhanced dynamic recrystallization of olivine in the presence of

  18. Clinoenstatite in alpe arami peridotite: additional evidence of very high pressure

    PubMed

    Bozhilov; Green; Dobrzhinetskaya

    1999-04-01

    Observations by transmission electron microscopy show that lamellae of clinoenstatite are present in diopside grains of the Alpe Arami garnet lherzolite of the Swiss Alps. The simplest interpretation of the orientation, crystallography, and microstructures of the lamellae and the phase relationships in this system is that the lamellae originally exsolved as the high-pressure C-centered form of clinoenstatite. These results imply that the rocks were exhumed from a minimum depth of 250 kilometers before or during continental collision.

  19. Water in the Lithospheric Mantle Beneath a Phanerozoic Continental Belt: FTIR Analyses of Alligator Lake Xenoliths (Yukon, Canada)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelber, McKensie; Peslier, Ann H.; Brandon, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Water in the mantle influences melting, metasomatism, viscosity and electrical conductivity. The Alligator Lake mantle xenolith suite is one of three bimodal peridotite suites from the northern Canadian Cordillera brought to the surface by alkali basalts, i.e., it consists of chemically distinct lherzolites and harzburgites. The lherzolites have equilibration temperatures about 50 C lower than the harzburgites and are thought to represent the fertile upper mantle of the region. The harzburgites might have come from slightly deeper in the mantle and/or be the result of a melting event above an asthenospheric upwelling detected as a seismic anomaly at 400-500 km depth. Major and trace element data are best interpreted as the lherzolite mantle having simultaneously experienced 20-25% partial melting and a metasomatic event to create the harzburgites. Well-characterized xenoliths are being analyzed for water by FTIR. Harzburgites contain 29-52 ppm H2O in orthopyroxene (opx) and (is) approximately140 ppm H2O in clinopyroxene (cpx). The lherzolites have H2O contents of 27-150 ppm in opx and 46-361 ppm in cpx. Despite correlating with enrichments in LREE, the water contents of the harzburgite pyroxenes are low relative to those of typical peridotite xenoliths, suggesting that the metasomatic agents were water-poor, contrarily to what has been suggested before. The water content of cpx is about double that of opx indicating equilibrium. Olivine water contents are low ((is) less than 5 ppm H2O) and out of equilibrium with those of opx and cpx, which may be due to H loss during xenolith ascent. This is consistent with olivines containing more water in their cores than their rims. Olivines exclusively exhibit water bands in the 3400-3000 cm-1 range, which may be indicative of a reduced environment.

  20. Diamonds in an upper mantle peridotite nodule from kimberlite in southern wyoming.

    PubMed

    McCallum, M E; Eggler, D H

    1976-04-16

    Diamonds in a serpentinized garnet peridotite nodule from a diatreme in southern Wyoming are the first known occurrence in an upper mantle peridotite xenolith from a kimberlite intrusion in North America as well as the second authenticated occurrence of diamonds from kimberlite pipes in North America. The nodule is believed to have come from a section of depleted (partially melted) lherzolite at a depth of 130 to 180 kilometers.

  1. Comparisons of Mineralogy Between Cumulate Eucrites and Lunar Meteorites Possibly from the Farside Anorsothitic Crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeda, H.; Yamaguchi, A.; Hiroi, T.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Ohtake, M.; Karouji, Y.; Kobayashi, S.

    2011-01-01

    Anorthosites composed of nearly pure anorthite (PAN) at many locations in the farside highlands have been observed by the Kaguya multiband imager and spectral profiler [1]. Mineralogical studies of lunar meteorites of the Dhofar 489 group [2,3] and Yamato (Y-) 86032 [4], all possibly from the farside highlands, showed some aspects of the farside crust. Nyquist et al. [5] performed Sm-Nd and Ar-Ar studies of pristine ferroan anorthosites (FANs) of the returned Apollo samples and of Dhofar 908 and 489, and discussed implications for lunar crustal history. Nyquist et al. [6] reported initial results of a combined mineralogical/chronological study of the Yamato (Y-) 980318 cumulate eucrite with a conventional Sm-Nd age of 4567 24 Ma and suggested that all eucrites, including cumulate eucrites, crystallized from parental magmas within a short interval following differentiation of their parent body, and most eucrites participated in an event or events in the time interval 4400- 4560 Ma in which many isotopic systems were partially reset. During the foregoing studies, we recognized that variations in mineralogy and chronology of lunar anorthosites are more complex than those of the crustal materials of the HED parent body. In this study, we compared the mineralogies and reflectance spectra of the cumulate eucrites, Y-980433 and 980318, to those of the Dhofar 307 lunar meteorite of the Dhofar 489 group [2]. Here we consider information from these samples to gain a better understanding of the feldspathic farside highlands and the Vesta-like body.

  2. Workshop on Parent-Body and Nebular Modification of Chondritic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, M. E. (Editor); Krot, A. N. (Editor); Scott, E. R. D. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    Topics considered include: thermal Metamorphosed Antarctic CM and CI Carbonaceous Chondrites in Japanese Collections, and Transformation Processes of Phyllosilicates; use of Oxygen Isotopes to Constrain the Nebular and Asteroidal Modification of Chondritic Materials; effect of Revised Nebular Water Distribution on Enstatite Chondrite Formation; interstellar Hydroxyls in Meteoritic Chondrules: Implications for the Origin of Water in the Inner Solar System; theoretical Models and Experimental Studies of Gas-Grain Chemistry in the Solar Nebula; chemical Alteration of Chondrules on Parent Bodies; thermal Quenching of Silicate Grains in Protostellar Sources; an Experimental Study of Magnetite Formation in the Solar Nebula; the Kaidun Meteorite: Evidence for Pre- and Postaccretionary Aqueous Alteration; a Transmission Electron Microscope Study of the Matrix Mineralogy of the Leoville CV3 (Reduced-Group) Carbonaceous Chondrite: Nebular and Parent-Body Features; rubidium-Strontium Isotopic Systematic of Chondrules from the Antarctic CV Chondrites Yamato 86751 and Yamato 86009: Additional Evidence for Late Parent-Body Modification; oxygen-Fugacity Indicators in Carbonaceous Chondrites: Parent-Body Alteration or High-Temperature Nebular Oxidation; thermodynamic Modeling of Aqueous Alteration in CV Chondrites; asteroidal Modification of C and O Chondrites: Myths and Models; oxygen Fugacity in the Solar Nebular; and the History of Metal and Sulfides in Chondrites.

  3. DUPAL anomaly in the Sea of Japan: Pb, Nd, and Sr isotopic variations at the eastern Eurasian continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tatsumoto, M.; Nakamura, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Volcanic rocks from the eastern Eurasian plate margin (southwestern Japan, the Sea of Japan, and northeastern China) show enriched (EMI) component signatures. Volcanic rocks from the Ulreung and Dog Islands in the Sea of Japan show typical DUPAL anomaly characteristics with extremely high ??208/204 Pb (up to 143) and enriched Nd and Sr isotopic compositions (??{lunate}Nd = -3 to -5, 87Sr 86Sr = ~0.705). The ??208/204 Pb values are similar to those associated with the DUPAL anomaly (up to 140) in the southern hemisphere. Because the EMI characteristics of basalts from the Sea of Japan are more extreme than those of southwestern Japan and inland China basalts, we propose that old mantle lithosphere was metasomatized early (prior to the Proterozoic) with subduction-related fluids (not present subduction system) so that it has been slightly enriched in incompatible elements and has had a high Th/U for a long time. The results of this study support the idea that the old subcontinental mantle lithosphere is the source for EMI of oceanic basalts, and that EMI does not need to be stored at the core/ mantle boundary layer for a long time. Dredged samples from seamounts and knolls from the Yamato Basin Ridge in the Sea of Japan show similar isotopic characteristics to basalts from the Mariana arc, supporting the idea that the Yamato Basin Ridge is a spreading center causing separation of the northeast Japan Arc from Eurasia. ?? 1991.

  4. Chemical studies of H chondrites. II - Weathering effects in the Victoria Land, Antarctic population and comparison of two Antarctic populations with non-Antarctic falls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennison, J. E.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1987-03-01

    The authors report RNAA data for 14 siderophile, lithophile and chalcophile volatile/mobile trace elements in interior portions of 45 different H4-6 chondrites (49 samples) from Victoria Land, Antarctica and 5 H5 chondrites from the Yamato Mts., Antarctica. Relative to H5 chondrites of weathering types A and B, all elements are depleted (10 at statistically significant levels) in extensively weathered (types B/C and C) samples. Chondrites of weathering types A and B seem compositionally uncompromised and as useful as contemporary falls for trace-element studies. When data distributions for these 14 trace elements in non-Antarctic H chondrite falls and unpaired samples from Victoria Land and from the Yamato Mts. (Queen Maud Land) are compared statistically, numerous significant differences are apparent. These and other differences give ample cause to doubt that the various sample populations derive from the same parent population. The observed differences do no reflect weathering, chance or other trivial causes: a preterrestrial source must be responsible.

  5. Sub-continental lithospheric mantle structure beneath the Adamawa plateau inferred from the petrology of ultramafic xenoliths from Ngaoundéré (Adamawa plateau, Cameroon, Central Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nkouandou, Oumarou F.; Bardintzeff, Jacques-Marie; Fagny, Aminatou M.

    2015-11-01

    Ultramafic xenoliths (lherzolite, harzburgite and olivine websterite) have been discovered in basanites close to Ngaoundéré in Adamawa plateau. Xenoliths exhibit protogranular texture (lherzolite and olivine websterite) or porphyroclastic texture (harzburgite). They are composed of olivine Fo89-90, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene and spinel. According to geothermometers, lherzolites have been equilibrated at 880-1060 °C; equilibrium temperatures of harzburgite are rather higher (880-1160 °C), while those of olivine websterite are bracketed between 820 and 1010 °C. The corresponding pressures are 1.8-1.9 GPa, 0.8-1.0 GPa and 1.9-2.5 GPa, respectively, which suggests that xenoliths have been sampled respectively at depths of 59-63 km, 26-33 km and 63-83 km. Texture and chemical compositional variations of xenoliths with temperature, pressure and depth on regional scale may be ascribed to the complex history undergone by the sub-continental mantle beneath the Adamawa plateau during its evolution. This may involve a limited asthenosphere uprise, concomitantly with plastic deformation and partial melting due to adiabatic decompression processes. Chemical compositional heterogeneities are also proposed in the sub-continental lithospheric mantle under the Adamawa plateau, as previously suggested for the whole Cameroon Volcanic Line.

  6. A comparison of peridotites from the Molloy Deep and the Gakkel Ridge with mantle xenolites from Spitsbergen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, H. E.; Amundsen, H. E. F.; Snow, J. E.; Pedersen, R. B.

    2003-04-01

    Along the Arctic ridges, mantle peridotites are tectonically exposed in the Molloy Deep and along the Gakkel Ridge. In the Arctic region, mantel peridotites are also present as xenolites in Quaternary volcanoes in the Bockfjord area on Spitsbergen -- approximately 150 km east of the Molloy Deep. These volcanic centres contain up to 15--20% of xenolites that comprise: Cr-diopside lherzolites, wehrlites, meta-pyroksenites and granulites. The Sr and Nd isotopic composition of clinopyroxenes from lherzolite xenolites have been analysed and compared with the isotopic composition of clinopyroxenes extracted from mantle peridotites from the Molloy Deep and the Gakkel Ridge, as well as with the isotopic compositions of basalts dredged from the Mohns and the Knipovich Ridges. Preliminary results show that a group of lherzolite xenolites from Spitsbergen have Sr-Nd isotopic compositions similar to the enriched end member of the Mohns-Knipovich trend. Other xenolites show much more depleted Nd-isotopic compositions. These xenolites have Sm-Nd model ages ranging from 900 Ma to 1700 Ma suggesting that parts of the sub-continental mantle in the region experienced Precambrian melt extraction. The peridotites from the Molloy Deep have similar Nd-isotopic compositions as the least depleted mantle xenolites from Spitsbergen, and plot also at the enriched end of the Mohns-Knipovich trend. The peridotites analysed from the Gakkel Ridge show, however, significantly higher 143Nd/144Nd ratios than the peridotites from the Molloy Deep.

  7. Comment on "A non-primitive origin of near-chondritic Ssbnd Sesbnd Te ratios in mantle peridotites: Implications for the Earth's late accretionary history" by König S. et al. [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 385 (2014) 110-121

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zaicong; Becker, Harry

    2015-05-01

    The abundances and ratios of S, Se and Te in rocks from the Earth's mantle may yield valuable constraints on the partitioning of these chalcophile elements between the mantle and basaltic magmas and on the compositions of these elements in the primitive mantle (PM) (e.g. Wang and Becker, 2013). Recently, König et al. (2014) proposed a model in which the CI chondrite-like Se/Te of mantle lherzolites (Se /Te = 8 ± 2, 1σ) are explained by mixing of sulfide melts with low Se/Te with harzburgites containing supposedly residual sulfides with high Se/Te. In this model sulfide melts and platinum group element (PGE) rich telluride phases with low Se/Te are assumed to have precipitated during refertilization of harzburgites by basic melts to form lherzolites. Because of the secondary nature of these re-enrichment processes, the authors state that abundances and ratios of S, Se and Te in fertile lherzolites cannot reflect the composition of the PM.

  8. Mantle metasomatism

    SciTech Connect

    Menzies, M.; Hawkesworth, C.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of metasomatism and its role in the geochemical enrichment and depletion processes in upper mantle rocks remains contentious. This volume makes a comprehensive contribution to the study of metasomatic and enrichment processes: origin and importance in determining trace element and isotopic heterogeneity in the lithospheric mantle. It begins with a theoretical thermodynamic and experimental justification for metasomatism and proceeds to present evidence for this process from the study of mantle xenoliths. Finally the importance of metasomatism in relation to basaltic volcanism is assessed. The contents are as follows: Dynamics of Translithospheric Migration of Metasomatic Fluid and Alkaline Magma. Solubility of Major and Trace Elements in Mantle Metasomatic Fluids: Experimental Constraints. Mineralogic and Geochemical Evidence for Differing Styles of Metasomatism in Spinel Lherzolite Xenoliths: Enriched Mantle Source Regions of Basalts. Characterization of Mantle Metasomatic Fluids in Spinel Lherzolites and Alkali Clinophyroyxenites from the West Eifel and South-West Uganda. Metasomatised Harzburgites in Kimberlite and Alkaline Magmas: Enriched Resites and ''Flushed'' Lherzolites. Metasomatic and Enrichment Phenomena in Garnet-Peridotite Facies Mantle Xenoliths from the Matsoku Kimberlite Pipe Lesotho. Evidence for Mantle Metasomatism in Periodite Nodules from the Kimberley Pipes South Africa. Metasomatic and Enrichment Processes in Lithospheric Peridotites, an Effective of Asthenosphere-Lithosphere Interaction. Isotope Variations in Recent Volcanics: A Trace Element Perspective. Source Regions of Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts: Evidence for Enrichment Processes. The Mantle Source for the Hawaiian Islands: Constraints from the Lavas and Ultramafic Inclusions.

  9. Mantle refertilization by melts of crustal-derived garnet pyroxenite: Evidence from the Ronda peridotite massif, southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesi, Claudio; Garrido, Carlos J.; Bosch, Delphine; Bodinier, Jean-Louis; Gervilla, Fernando; Hidas, Károly

    2013-01-01

    Geochemical studies of primitive basalts have documented the presence of crustal-derived garnet pyroxenite in their mantle sources. The processes whereby melts with the signature of garnet pyroxenite are produced in the mantle are, however, poorly understood and somewhat controversial. Here we investigate a natural example of the interaction between melts of garnet pyroxenite derived from recycled plagioclase-rich crust and surrounding mantle in the Ronda peridotite massif. Melting of garnet pyroxenite at ˜1.5 GPa generated spinel websterite residues with MREE/HREE fractionation and preserved the positive Eu anomaly of their garnet pyroxenite precursor in whole-rock and clinopyroxene. Reaction of melts from garnet pyroxenite with depleted surrounding peridotite generated secondary fertile spinel lherzolite. These secondary lherzolites differ from common spinel lherzolite from Ronda and elsewhere by their lower-Mg# in clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene and olivine, lower-Cr# in spinel and higher whole-rock Al2O3, CaO, Sm/Yb and FeO* at a given SiO2. Remarkably, secondary spinel lherzolite shows the geochemical signature of ghost plagioclase in the form of positive Eu and Sr anomalies in whole-rock and clinopyroxene, reflecting the transfer of a low-pressure crustal imprint from recycled pyroxenite to hybridized peridotite. Garnet pyroxenite melting and melt-peridotite interaction, as shown in the Ronda massif, may explain how the signature of subducted or delaminated crust is transferred to the mantle and how a garnet pyroxenite component is introduced into the source region of basalts. The efficiency of these processes in conveying the geochemical imprint of crustal-derived garnet pyroxenite to extruded lavas depends on the reactivity of pyroxenite melt with peridotite and the mantle permeability, which may be controlled by prior refertilization reactions similar to those documented in the Ronda massif. Highly fertile heterogeneities produced by pyroxenite

  10. Asthenosphere-lithosphere interactions in Western Saudi Arabia: Inferences from 3He/4He in xenoliths and lava flows from Harrat Hutaymah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, Kevin; Graham, David W.; Thornber, Carl R.; Duncan, Robert A.; Kent, Adam J. R.; Al-Amri, Abdullah M.

    2016-04-01

    Extensive volcanic fields on the western Arabian Plate have erupted intermittently over the last 30 Ma following emplacement of the Afar flood basalts in Ethiopia. In an effort to better understand the origin of this volcanism in western Saudi Arabia, we analyzed 3He/4He, and He, CO2 and trace element concentrations in minerals separated from xenoliths and lava flows from Harrat Hutaymah, supplemented with reconnaissance He isotope data from several other volcanic fields (Harrat Al Birk, Harrat Al Kishb and Harrat Ithnayn). Harrat Hutaymah is young (< 850 ka) and the northeasternmost of the volcanic fields. There is a remarkable homogeneity of 3He/4He trapped within most xenoliths, with a weighted mean of 7.54 ± 0.03 RA (2σ, n = 20). This homogeneity occurs over at least eight different xenolith types (including spinel lherzolite, amphibole clinopyroxenite, olivine websterite, clinopyroxenite and garnet websterite), and encompasses ten different volcanic centers within an area of ~ 2500 km2. The homogeneity is caused by volatile equilibration between the xenoliths and fluids derived from their host magma, as fluid inclusions are annealed during the infiltration of vapor-saturated magmas along crystalline grain boundaries. The notable exceptions are the anhydrous spinel lherzolites, which have a lower weighted mean 3He/4He of 6.8 ± 0.3 RA (2σ, n = 2), contain lower concentrations of trapped He, and have a distinctly depleted light rare earth element signature. 3He/4He values of ~ 6.8 RA are also commonly found in spinel lherzolites from harrats Ithnayn, Al Birk, and from Zabargad Island in the Red Sea. Olivine from non-xenolith-bearing lava flows at Hutaymah spans the He isotope range of the xenoliths. The lower 3He/4He in the anhydrous spinel lherzolites appears to be tied to remnant Proterozoic lithosphere prior to metasomatic fluid overprinting. Elevated 3He/4He in the western harrats has been observed only at Rahat (up to 11.8 RA; Murcia et al., 2013), a

  11. Petrogenetic significance of spinel-group minerals from the ultramafic rocks of the Iti and Kallidromon ophiolites (Central Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karipi, Sofia; Tsikouras, Basilios; Hatzipanagiotou, Konstantin; Grammatikopoulos, Tassos A.

    2007-11-01

    The peridotites occurring at Iti and Kallidromon ophiolites comprise lherzolite with lensoid dunitic bodies (only at Kallidromon) and harzburgite. The lherzolite contains spinel of aluminous composition forming subhedral to anhedral grains with lobate boundaries. The dunite and harzburgite contain chromite and magnesiochromite, respectively, forming subhedral to euhedral grains. The dunitic chromite displays commonly richer-in-Cr core compositions rimmed by poorer-in-Cr ones. Infrequently, the magnesiochromitic rims show irregular distribution of small areas of poorer-in-Cr composition. On the basis of their Cr#, the lherzolitic spinels and the harburgitic magnesiochromites are analogous to those from abyssal peridotites and oceanic (including back-arc basins) ophiolites, whereas the chromites in the dunite resemble those from arc-related ophiolitic sequences. The lherzolitic spinels show a linear covariation of Cr# with Mg#, compatibly with their being products of restricted partial melting. The richer-in-Cr chromites cluster at high Cr#, as a result of their crystallization from a boninitic melt while the poorer-in-Cr chromites and the magnesiochromites show a linear covariation, with the latter being the Cr-poor end-member of that trend, suggesting crystallization during the evolution of the boninitic melt that interacted with the mantle peridotites. The dunite formation is assigned to the interaction of that melt with the lherzolite after consuming pyroxenes and crystallizing olivine and chromite. This melt subsequently migrated upwards in the harzburgite and evolved, thus magnesiochromite, lower in Cr#, was crystallized. Textural evidence and mineral chemistry data from the harzburgitic magnesiochromite are in agreement with a melt-peridotite interaction after a partial melting event. Later hydrothermal alteration imprinted in the samples by forming ferrian chromite and magnetite at the expense of the spinel-group minerals and developing the silicate

  12. Nitrogen and noble gases in a glass sample from LEW88516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Pepin, R. O.

    1993-01-01

    The Antarctic meteorite LEW88516 has been classified as a member of the SNC group of meteorites, specifically a shergottite. It is reported to be remarkably similar in mineralogy, petrogenesis and chemistry to the previously known ALH77005 shergottite, with both being compositionally distinct from other shergottites. LEW88516 shows pervasive shock features and has been found to contain glass veins attributable to a shock origin. In an effort to determine whether the glass in LEW88516 contains any of the isotopically-heavy trapped nitrogen component observed in EETA 79001 glass, as well as the related high-Ar-40/Ar-36 and high-Xe-129/Xe-132 components, we undertook an analysis of an 11.9 mg glass sample (LEW88516,4) provided to us by H. Y. McSween, Jr. as part of a consortium study of this meteorite. Nitrogen and noble gases were extracted from LEW88516,4 in a series of combustion steps at increasing temperatures followed by a final pyrolysis. Initial steps at 550 C were intended to remove any surface-sited nitrogen-containing contaminants, while the 700 C step was expected to show the onset of release of a trapped argon component, based on our previous data for EETA 79001. It was hoped that the bulk of any trapped gas release would be concentrated in one of two steps at 1100 C and approximately 1400 C, maximizing our analytical sensitivity. Results of the analysis are shown. Except for He and Ne, data obtained for the 550 C steps will be omitted from further consideration on the assumption that they represent terrestrial contamination.

  13. Heterogeneous distribution of H2O in the Martian interior: Implications for the abundance of H2O in depleted and enriched mantle sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCubbin, Francis M.; Boyce, Jeremy W.; Srinivasan, Poorna; Santos, Alison R.; Elardo, Stephen M.; Filiberto, Justin; Steele, Andrew; Shearer, Charles K.

    2016-04-01

    We conducted a petrologic study of apatite within 12 Martian meteorites, including 11 shergottites and one basaltic regolith breccia. These data were combined with previously published data to gain a better understanding of the abundance and distribution of volatiles in the Martian interior. Apatites in individual Martian meteorites span a wide range of compositions, indicating they did not form by equilibrium crystallization. In fact, the intrasample variation in apatite is best described by either fractional crystallization or crustal contamination with a Cl-rich crustal component. We determined that most Martian meteorites investigated here have been affected by crustal contamination and hence cannot be used to estimate volatile abundances of the Martian mantle. Using the subset of samples that did not exhibit crustal contamination, we determined that the enriched shergottite source has 36-73 ppm H2O and the depleted source has 14-23 ppm H2O. This result is consistent with other observed geochemical differences between enriched and depleted shergottites and supports the idea that there are at least two geochemically distinct reservoirs in the Martian mantle. We also estimated the H2O, Cl, and F content of the Martian crust using known crust-mantle distributions for incompatible lithophile elements. We determined that the bulk Martian crust has ~1410 ppm H2O, 450 ppm Cl, and 106 ppm F, and Cl and H2O are preferentially distributed toward the Martian surface. The estimate of crustal H2O results in a global equivalent surface layer (GEL) of ~229 m, which can account for at least some of the surface features on Mars attributed to flowing water and may be sufficient to support the past presence of a shallow sea on Mars' surface.

  14. Oxygen Fugacity of the Martian Mantle From Pyroxene/Melt Partitioning of REE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musselwhite, D. S.; Jones, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    This study is part of an ongoing effort to calibrate the pyroxene/melt REE oxybarometer for conditions relevant to the martian meteorites. Redox variations have been reported among the shergottites. Wadhwa used the Eu and Gd augite/melt partitioning experiments of McKay, designed for the LEW86010 angrite, to infer a range of fo2 for the shergottites. Others inferred fo2 using equilibria between Fe-Ti oxides. There is fairly good agreement between the Fe-Ti oxide determinations and the estimates from Eu anomalies in terms of which meteorites are more or less oxidized. The Eu anomaly technique and the Fe-Ti oxide technique both essentially show the same trend, with Shergotty and Zagami being the most oxidized and QUE94201 and DaG 476 being the most reduced. Thus, the variation in fo2 appears to be both real and substantive. However, although the redox trends indicated by the two techniques are similar, there is as much as two log unit offset between the results of three researchers. One explanation for this offset is that the Eu calibration used for the shergottites was actually designed for the LEW86010 angrite, a silica-undersaturated basalt whose pyroxene (diopside) compositions are rather extreme. To correct this, experiments have been conducted on the redox relationship of Eu partitioning relative to Sm and Gd for pyroxene/melt compositions more relevant to Martian meteorites. We report here preliminary results for experiments on pigeonite/melt partitioning as a function of fO2.

  15. Mineral and whole rock compositions of peridotites from Loma Caribe (Dominican Republic): insights into the evolution of the oceanic mantle in the Caribbean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesi, C.; Garrido, C. J.; Proenza, J. A.; Konc, Z.; Hidas, K.; Lewis, J.; Lidiak, E.

    2012-04-01

    Several mantle peridotite massifs crop out as isolated dismembered bodies in tectonic belts along the northern margin of the Caribbean plate, especially in Cuba, Guatemala, Jamaica, Hispaniola and Puerto Rico. Among these bodies, the Loma Caribe peridotite forms the core of the Median Belt in central Dominican Republic and is considered to have been emplaced in Aptian time as result of the collision between an oceanic plateau (the Duarte plateau terrane) and the primitive Caribbean island arc. This peridotite massif is mainly composed of clinopyroxene-rich harzburgite, harzburgite, lherzolite and dunite which mainly have porphyroclastic texture with strongly deformed orthopyroxene porphyroclasts, as commonly observed in ophiolitic mantle tectonites. Mg# [100*Mg/(Mg+Fe2+)] of olivine increases from lower values in lherzolite (89-90), to higher values in harzburgite (89-91) and dunite (91-92). Orthopyroxene in harzburgite has higher Mg# (91-92) and lower Al2O3 (0.89 to 1.12 wt.%) than in lherzolite (Mg# = 89-91; Al2O3 = 2.4-3.5wt.%), similarly to clinopyroxene (Mg# = 94-95 and Al2O3 = 0.89-1.10 wt% in harzburgite, versus Mg# = 86-94 and Al2O3 = 2.3-4.0 wt% in lherzolite). Cr# [Cr/(Cr+Al)] of spinel spans from 0.30 in lherzolite to 0.88 in dunite. These variations in terms of Mg# in olivine and Cr# in spinel overlap the mineral compositions in both abyssal and supra-subduction zone peridotites. The sample/chondrite REE concentrations of peridotites are variable (0.002 < LREE chondrite-normalized < 0.11 and 0.002 < HREE chondrite-normalized < 1.02) and their HREE contents generally reflect the clinopyroxene proportions in the samples, i.e. harzburgite has lower HREE abundances than lherzolite. These trace element abundances are transitional between those of highly depleted supra-subduction peridotites from ophiolites in eastern Cuba and those of fertile mantle rocks in ultramafic massifs from Puerto Rico. Chondrite-normalized patterns are U-shaped (i.e., relatively

  16. Petrological features of mantle xenoliths from Handler Ridge, Northern Victoria Land (NVL) , Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelorosso, Beatrice; Bonadiman, Costanza; Coltorti, Massimo; Giacomoni, Pier Paolo; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Grégoire, Michel

    2015-04-01

    A petrological study of ultramafic xenoliths from Handler Ridge has been carried out, in order to characterize the lithospheric mantle domain of the Western Antarctic Rift System, from Mt Melbourne (74°21'S 164°42'E) to Handler Ridge (72°31'167°18'E). Samples are mainly anhydrous spinel (sp)-bearing lherzolites, but few wehrlites also occur. Two textures were recognized: i) medium to coarse grained and ii) fine grained types. Evidences of melt/rock interaction (secondary clinopyroxene cpx2, cpx spongy and cloudy rims, glassy patches) can be also observed. Olivine (ol) is forsteritic in composition with Fo varying from 87.5 to 91.0. Within lherzolites a more fertile group can be recognized with Fo ranging between 87.5 and 88.6. In wehrlites ol varies from Fo 84.5 to 86.1. NiO ranges from 0. 28 to 0.44 wt% for lherzolites, while it has a lower content for wehrlites (0.20-0.40 wt%) As for ol, orthopyroxene (opx) in the most fertile lherzolites presents mg# from 88.1 to 88.3, while it varies from 88.3 to 91 in the residual lherzolitic group. None differences in Al2O3 and TiO2 contents between the two groups were recognized. In chondrite-normalized incompatible element patterns opx is depleted in light REE (LREE), with remarkable Ti and Zr positive anomalies. In lherzolites mg# of primary clinopyroxene (cpx1) varies between 87.6 and 92.1. As for ol and opx, two groups can be recognized, although some overlap exists for two samples. Al2O3 and TiO2 vary from 3.68-6.51 wt% and from 0.19 to 0.71 wt% respectively. Secondary cpx (cpx2) is generally richer in FeO, TiO2 and N2O with respect to cpx1. In wehrlites cpx is characterized by very low mg# (84.3-88.6) and higher TiO2 contents (0.69-1.39 wt%) than lherzolites. Irrespective to the lithology, chondrite-normalized incompatible trace element cpx1 patterns are variable enriched in Th, U, Nb, and Ta with negative Sr, Zr and Hf anomalies. Two trends can be recognized. The first one with (La/Yb)N varying from 1.28 to 9

  17. Petrological study of Greene Point mantle xenoliths, Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelorosso, Beatrice; Bonadiman, Costanza; Faccini, Barbara; Coltorti, Massimo; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Grégoire, Michel

    2015-04-01

    A petrological study of mantle, anhydrous spinel-bearing lherzolites and harzburgites from Greene Point (GP) (Northern Victoria Land, NVL) have been carried out. Texturally they vary from protogranular to porphyroclastic with large orthopyroxene (opx) and olivine (ol) grains. Clinopyroxene (cpx) is smaller and often associated with vermicular and lobated spinel (sp). Several types of reaction textures occur with secondary phases represented by olivine (ol2), clinopyroxene (cpx2), cpx with spongy rim, and glass. Ol in lherzolites presents lower forsteritic content (90.5-91.7) than in harzburgites (Fo: 91.6-92.3), but for three samples with an anomalously high Fo contents (92.3-92.7). Irrespective of lithology NiO contents are on the average ~0.38 wt%. Opx, equilibrated with ol1, has mg# (Mg/(Mg+Fe)*100mol) values ranging from 91.0 to 92.6 with the highest values found in harzburgites. As for Ol, however three lherzolitic samples have mg# in opx overlapping the most residual harzburgites; Al2O3 varies from 2.33 to 4.92 wt% following a residual trend. Opx is characterized by fractionated REE-chondrite normalized patterns, depleted in light REE (LREE), with the most residual character in harzburgites. Cpx1 has mg# varying from 91.5 to 93.9, with cpx in harzburgites presenting the highest values. As for the other two phases, cpx in three lherzolites presents mg# values comparable with those of harzburgites. Al2O3 contents is between 4.00 and 6.42 wt% in lherzolites and from 2.32 to 4.37 wt% in harzburgites. TiO2 never exceeds 0.66 wt%. Cpx in lherzolites are usually depleted in Th, U, Nb, and Ta with Ti, Zr and Hf negative anomalies. They present a REE patterns variable from slightly LREE-enriched (with La and Ce inflections) to LREE-depleted with a general convex-upward trend. This latter trend is related to mg# rich lherzolites. In harzburgites cpx show the lowest HREE contents (YbN 1.00-2.94), with a strong positive fractionated L-MREE and flat HREE. Sp1 show a

  18. Petrogenetic implications from ultramafic rocks and pyroxenites in ophiolitic occurrences of East Othris, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsovitis, P.; Magganas, A.

    2012-04-01

    Ultramafic rocks and pyroxenites in east Othris are included within ophiolitic units near the villages of Vrinena, Karavomilos, Pelasgia, Eretria, Agios Georgios, Aerino and Velestino. The first five ophiolitic occurrences are estimated to have been emplaced between the Oxfordian and Tithonian-Berriasian[1,2,3], while the latter two have been emplaced during the Eocene[4]. Ultramafic rocks include variably serpentinized harzburgites and lherzolites. Pyroxenites are usually found in the form of crosscutting veins within the harzburgites. Ultramafic rocks include depleted lherzolites, with Al2O3 ranging from 1.12 to 1.80 wt% and Cr from 3250 to 3290 ppm, as well as moderate to highly depleted serpentinized harzburgites, with Al2O3 ranging from 0.69 to 1.98 wt% and Cr from 2663 to 5582 ppm. Pyroxenites have generally higher Al2O3 ranging from 1.91 to 3.08 wt% and variable Cr ranging from 1798 to 3611 ppm. Lherzolites mostly include olivines (Fo=87.07-89.23) and clinopyroxenes (Mg#=85.71-90.12). Spinels from Eretria lherzolite (TiO2=0.02-0.08 wt%, Al2O3=36.06-42.45 wt%, Cr#=31.67-36.33) are compositionally similar with those of MORB peridotites[5], while those from Vrinena lherzolite (TiO2=0.16-0.43 wt%, Al2O3=6.90-22.12 wt%, Cr#=57.69-76.88) are similar to SSZ peridotites[5]. Serpentinized harzburgites include few olivines (Fo=90.51-91.15), enstatite porphyroclasts (Mg#=87.42-88.91), as well as fine grained enstatites of similar composition. Harzburgites from Pelasgia, Eretria and Agios Georgios include spinels (TiO2=0.03-0.08 wt%, Al2O3=23.21-31.58 wt%, Cr#=45.21-56.85) which do not clearly show if they are related with MORB or SSZ peridotites[5]. Spinels from Karavomilos harzburgite (TiO2=0.02-0.05 wt%, Al2O3=45.71-50.85 wt%, Cr#=16.84-22.32) are compositionally similar with MORB peridotites[5], whereas spinels from Vrinena harzburgite (TiO2=0.15-0.19 wt%, Al2O3=1.42-1.86 wt% Cr#=91.64-93.47) with SSZ peridotites[5]. Pyroxenites include clinopyroxenes (Mg#=84

  19. Partial re-equilibration of highly siderophile elements and the chalcogens in the mantle: A case study on the Baldissero and Balmuccia peridotite massifs (Ivrea Zone, Italian Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zaicong; Becker, Harry; Gawronski, Timo

    2013-05-01

    The conditions at which melt percolation and reactive infiltration of depleted mantle peridotites fractionate highly siderophile elements (HSE) and cause re-equilibration of 187Os/188Os in mantle rocks are still poorly constrained. In a comparative study of the Paleozoic Balmuccia (BM) and Baldissero (BD) peridotite tectonites (Ivrea-Verbano Zone, Northern Italy), the influence of partial melting and melt infiltration on abundances of HSE, chalcogens (S, Se and Te) and 187Os/188Os have been studied. At BM, Re depletion ages (TRD) of lherzolites and replacive dunites display a uniform distribution with a maximum near 400-500 Ma. BD peridotites also display a Paleozoic distribution peak but a significant number of samples yielded Proterozoic TRD. The predominance of Paleozoic Re depletion ages in both bodies is consistent with Sm-Nd ages and the late Paleozoic magmatic and geodynamic evolution of the Ivrea-Verbano Zone. The different extents of preservation of ancient 187Os/188Os in BM and BD peridotites are interpreted to reflect different degrees of isotopic homogenization and chemical re-equilibration with incompatible element-depleted infiltrating melt during the Paleozoic. The differences between the two bodies are also reflected by differences in HSE and chalcogen abundances, with BD displaying large scatter among HSE patterns, slight re-enrichment of Re relative to Au, and linear trends of Pd, Se and Te with Al2O3. The differences in distributions of model ages and heterogeneity in HSE abundances support the view that the lithophile element, HSE and chalcogen variations of different suites of lherzolites likely reflect different extents of reactive melt infiltration in mantle peridotites, with partial re-equilibration and melt extraction in open system environments. However, the variable re-equilibration of BM and BD lherzolites apparently did not produce significant differences in HSE ratios such as Os/Ir, Ru/Ir, Rh/Ir, and Pd/Pt, which are in the range of

  20. Ar-Ar Dating of Martian Chassignites, NWA2737 and Chassigny, and Nakhlite MIL03346

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.

    2006-01-01

    Until recently only three nakhlites and one chassignite had been identified among martian meteorites. These four exhibit very similar radiometric ages and cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages, indicating that they may have derived from a common location on Mars and were ejected into space by a single impact. This situation is quite different from that of martian shergottites, which exhibit a range of radiometric ages and CRE ages (1). Recently, several new nakhlites and a new martian dunite (NWA2737) have been recognized. Here we report our results of Ar-39-Ar-40 dating for the MIL03346 nakhlite and the NWA2737 "chassignite", along with new results on Chassigny.

  1. Siderophile elements in planetary mantles and the origin of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    The collisional ejection and the coaccretion hypotheses of lunar origin are examined in the context of theories of planetary accretion and of siderophile element abundances in planetary mantles. The information concerning the possible dynamical environments within which the terrestrial planets may have grown and the known abundances of siderophile and chalcophile elements in the mantles of the earth, the moon, and the hypothetical shergottite parent body is used to evaluate the existing hypotheses of lunar origin. The analysis indicates that none of the existing theories concerning lunar origin is fully consistent with observed siderophile element abundances in the lunar and terrestrial mantles.

  2. Lithium isotope constraints on crust-mantle interactions and surface processes on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magna, Tomáš; Day, James M. D.; Mezger, Klaus; Fehr, Manuela A.; Dohmen, Ralf; Aoudjehane, Hasnaa Chennaoui; Agee, Carl B.

    2015-08-01

    Lithium abundances and isotope compositions are reported for a suite of martian meteorites that span the range of petrological and geochemical types recognized to date for Mars. Samples include twenty-one bulk-rock enriched, intermediate and depleted shergottites, six nakhlites, two chassignites, the orthopyroxenite Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 and the polymict breccia Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034. Shergottites unaffected by terrestrial weathering exhibit a range in δ7Li from 2.1 to 6.2‰, similar to that reported for pristine terrestrial peridotites and unaltered mid-ocean ridge and ocean island basalts. Two chassignites have δ7Li values (4.0‰) intermediate to the shergottite range, and combined, these meteorites provide the most robust current constraints on δ7Li of the martian mantle. The polymict breccia NWA 7034 has the lowest δ7Li (-0.2‰) of all terrestrially unaltered martian meteorites measured to date and may represent an isotopically light surface end-member. The new data for NWA 7034 imply that martian crustal surface materials had both a lighter Li isotope composition and elevated Li abundance compared with their associated mantle. These findings are supported by Li data for olivine-phyric shergotitte NWA 1068, a black glass phase isolated from the Tissint meteorite fall, and some nakhlites, which all show evidence for assimilation of a low-δ7Li crustal component. The range in δ7Li for nakhlites (1.8 to 5.2‰), and co-variations with chlorine abundance, suggests crustal contamination by Cl-rich brines. The differences in Li isotope composition and abundance between the martian mantle and estimated crust are not as large as the fractionations observed for terrestrial continental crust and mantle, suggesting a difference in the styles of alteration and weathering between water-dominated processes on Earth versus possibly Cl-S-rich brines on Mars. Using high-MgO shergottites (>15 wt.% MgO) it is possible to estimate the δ7Li of Bulk Silicate Mars

  3. Soil mineralogy and chemistry on Mars - Possible clues from salts and clays in SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, James L.

    1992-01-01

    If the shergottite, nakhlite, and chassignite (SNC) meteorites' parent planet is Mars, then the aqueous precipitates found in them imply that oxidizing, water-based solutions may have been chemically active on that planet over the past 200-1300 million yrs. It is suggested that the mixture of aqueous precipitates found in the SNCs furnish a self-consistent model for the bulk elemental composition of surface sediments at the Viking Lander sites. Further mineralogical and stable-isotope studies of the secondary minerals may establish the limits for biological activity over the last 1300 million years of Mars' water-based chemistry.

  4. Moessbauer spectroscopy of the SNC meteorite Zagami

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agerkvist, D. P.; Vistisen, L.

    1993-01-01

    We have performed Mossbauer spectroscopy on two different pieces of the meteorite Zagami belonging to the group of SNC meteorites. In one of the samples we found a substantial amount of olivine inter grown with one kind of pyroxene, and also another kind of pyroxene very similar to the pyroxene in the other sample we examined. Both samples showed less than 1 percent of Fe(3+) in the silicate phase. The group of SNC meteorites called shergottites, to which Zagami belongs, are achondrites whose texture, mineralogy and composition resembles those of terrestrial diabases. The results from the investigation are presented.

  5. What Can Spectral Properties of Martian Surface and Snc Can Tell Us about the Martian Crust Composition and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ody, A.; Poulet, F.; Baratoux, D.; Quantin, C.; Bibring, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    While the study of Martian meteorites can provide detailed information about the crust and mantle composition and evolution, remote-sensing observations, through the merging of compositional and geological data, allow highlighting planetary-scale trends of the Martian crustal evolution [1,2]. Recently, the analysis of the global distribution of mafic minerals [3] has put new constraints on the Martian crust formation and evolution. One of the major results is a past global event of olivine-bearing fissural volcanism that has filled craters and low depressions in the southern highlands and a large part of the Northern plains during the late Noachian/early Hesperian. Petrologic models show that this sudden increase of the olivine content at the Noachian-Hesperian boundary could be the result of a rapid thickening of the lithosphere at the end of the Noachian era [4]. A recent study based on the OMEGA/MEx data has shown that the spectral properties of the shergottites are similar to those of some Noachian and Hesperian terrains [5]. To contrary, the Nakhla spectral properties are very different from those of the observable surface and could be representative of Amazonian terrains buried under dust. These results are best explained with an old age of the shergottites [6] and with the present understanding of the evolution of magma composition at a planetary scale [7]. On the other hand, if shergottites are young [8], the similarities between the shergottites and ancient terrains implies that exceptional conditions of melting with respect to the ambient mantle (e.g., hot spots or water-rich mantle source) were responsible for the formation of these samples [9]. References: [1] McSween et al., 2009, Science, 324. [2] Ehlmann & Edwards 2014, AREPS, vol. 42. [3] Ody et al., 2013, JGR,117,E00J14. [4] Ody et al., 2014, 8th Inter. Conf. on Mars,#1190. [5] Ody et al., 2013, 44th LPSC, #1719. [6] Bouvier et al., 2009, EPSL, 280. [7] Baratoux et al., 2013, JGR, 118. [8] Nyquist

  6. Workshop on chemical weathering on Mars, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger (Editor); Banin, Amos (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The third Mars Surface and Atmosphere Through Time (MSATT) Workshop, which was held 10-12 Sep. 1992, at Cocoa Beach/Cape Kennedy, focused on chemical weathering of the surface of Mars. The 30 papers presented at the workshop described studies of Martian weathering processes based on results from the Viking mission experiments, remote sensing spectroscopic measurements, studies of the shergottite, nakhlite, and chassignite (SNC) meteorites, laboratory measurements of surface analog materials, and modeling of reaction pathways. A summary of the technical sessions is presented and a list of workshop participants is included.

  7. Trace element contents of selected antarctic meteorites, 1. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, S.; Ngo, H. T.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    Data are reported for volatile/mobile Ag, As, Au, Bi, Cd, Co, Cs, Cu, Ga, In, Rb, Sb, Se, Te, T1 and Zn in exterior and/or interior samples of four Antarctic meteorites: 77005 (unique achondrite); 77257 (unreilite); 77278 (L3); 77299 (H3). Exterior samples reflect contamination and/or leaching by weathering but trace element (ppm-ppt) contents in interior samples seem reasonable for representatives of these rare meteoritic types. The 77005 achondrite seems related to shergottites; other samples extend compositional ranges previously known for their types. With suitable precautions, Antarctic meteorite finds yield trace element data as reliable as those obtained from previously known falls.

  8. Ar-39-Ar-40 Ages of Two Nakhlites, MIL03346 and Y000593: A Detailed Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Jisun; Garrison, Daniel; Bogard, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Radiometric dating of martian nakhlites by several techniques have given similar ages of approx.1.2-1.4 Ga [e.g. 1, 2]. Unlike the case with shergottites, where the presence of martian atmosphere and inherited radiogenic Ar-40 produce apparent Ar-39-Ar-40 ages older than other radiometric ages, Ar-Ar ages of nakhlites are similar to ages derived by other techniques. However, even in some nakhlites the presence of trapped martian Ar produces some uncertainty in the Ar-Ar age. We present here an analysis of such Ar-Ar ages from the MIL03346 and Y000593 nakhlites.

  9. Maskelynite: Formation by Explosive Shock.

    PubMed

    Milton, D J; de Carli, P S

    1963-05-10

    When high pressure (250 to 300 kilobars) was applied suddenly (shock-loading) to gabbro, the plagioclase was transformed to a noncrystalline phase (maskelynite) by a solid-state reaction at a low temperature, while the proxene remained crystalline. The shock-loaded gabbro resembles meteorites of the shergottite class; this suggests that the latter formed as a result of shock. The shock-loading of gabbro at 600 to 800 kilobars raised the temperature above the melting range of the plagioclase. PMID:17737107

  10. Phase Equilibrium Investigations of Planetary Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    This grant provided funds to carry out experimental studies designed to illuminate the conditions of melting and chemical differentiation that has occurred in planetary interiors. Studies focused on the conditions of mare basalt generation in the moon's interior and on processes that led to core formation in the Shergottite Parent Body (Mars). Studies also examined physical processes that could lead to the segregation of metal-rich sulfide melts in an olivine-rich solid matrix. The major results of each paper are discussed below and copies of the papers are attached as Appendix I.

  11. Calibration of the EU Oxybarometer for Nakhlites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makishima, J.; McKay, G.; Le, L.; Miyamoto; Mikouchi, T.

    2006-01-01

    Martian meteorites have various characteristics, which are direct clues to understanding the petrogenesis of Mars rocks. The variation in oxidation state among the Martian meteorites must have important implications for redox conditions of the Martian crust/mantle and overall differentiation on Mars. Wadhwa [1] and Herd et al. [2] reported that Martian basalts were formed under a range of oxidation states, suggesting complex petrogenesis processes. The nakhlites, which have rather different characteristics from basaltic shergottites, may give us additional clues to Martian petrogenesis. The oxidation states of meteorites are usually described by the oxygen fugacity (fO2) under which the meteorites crystallized. One of the methods to estimate the oxygen fugacity is the depth of Eu anomaly. Eu(2+)/Eu(3+) is determined by the oxygen fugacity and partitioning is different for Eu(2+) and Eu(3+). Therefore, the depth of Eu anomaly in a mineral is a function of the oxygen fugacity and the Eu2+/Eu3+ in the melt from which the mineral crystallized. This method has some advantages over another major method, the two-oxide oxybarometer [3], which can more easily be affected by subsolidus processes. The Eu oxybarometer can analyze the cores of the earliest formed crystals in Martian meteorites, which means it can give us a better indication of the oxygen fugacity of the parent melt. The calibration of the Eu oxybarometer has been done with the basaltic shergottites before [4]. However, it has never been applied to nakhlites (Oe et al. [5] measured the depth of Eu anomaly in the synthetic pyroxene only at QFM). Partition coefficients are strongly affected by phase compositions, especially pyroxene Ca content and melt Al content [e.g., 5,6]. The composition of nakhlite pyroxene is rather different from basaltic shergottite pyroxene. Thus, there may be problems in applying the Eu oxybarometer calibration for the basaltic shergottites [7] to nakhlites. Thus, we report in this

  12. Clays on Mars: Review of chemical and mineralogical evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, Amos; Gooding, James L.

    1991-01-01

    Mafic igneous bedrock is inferred for Mars, based on spectrophotometric evidence for pyroxene (principally in optically dark areas of the globe) and the pyroxenite-peridotite petrology of shergottite nakhlite chassignite (SNC) meteorites. Visible and infrared spectra of reddish-brown surface fines (which dominate Martian bright areas) indicate ferric iron and compare favorably (though not uniquely) with spectra of palagonitic soils. Laboratory studies of SNC's and Viking Lander results support a model for Martian soil based on chemical weathering of mafic rocks to produce layer structured silicates (clay minerals), salts, and iron oxides.

  13. Deep crustal structure off Akita, eastern margin of the Japan Sea, deduced from ocean bottom seismographic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, Azusa; Asada, Akira

    1999-06-01

    A seismic exploration was carried out to detect the heterogeneity of the seismic wavespeed structure associated with the plate convergence at the eastern margin of the Japan Sea. Two airgun-OBS (ocean bottom seismograph) profiles were shot off Akita, Japan, where a seismic gap seems to exist but the location of the plate boundary has not been confirmed. One of the profiles was 60 km long, trending NNE-SSW, named Line OBS-9, at the northeastern end of the Yamato Basin and the other was 170 km long, trending WNW-ESE, Line NT95-1, parallel to the direction of the supposed plate convergence. The crustal structure beneath Line OBS-9 consists of six layers. The uppermost layer is sediment. Three layers are identified beneath the top sedimentary layer and their P wavespeeds are estimated to be 3.3-3.4 km/s, 5.1-5.4 km/s and 5.8-6.3 km/s, which corresponds to the upper crust. Underneath these layers, a layer with P wavespeed ranges of 6.3-7.2 km/s comprises the middle and lower crust. The depth of Moho is inferred to be 19 km. These wavespeed values are comparable with those of the present Japanese island arc, while the thickness of the crust is one-half of that of the Japanese arc. The crustal model supports the scenario that the Yamato Basin is formed by extension of the island arc. The crustal model for Line NT95-1 shows a transition from the extended island arc structure beneath the Yamato Basin to a thicker crust similar to the Japanese arc. P wavespeed heterogeneity related to the plate boundary is not detected. However, a significant change in the structural model along the profile is found around the region where the largest change in the seafloor topography exists. In that region, the wavespeeds in the middle crust have lower values than those of the neighboring area and the Moho begins to deepen towards the Japanese island arc. From comparison with the relationship between P wavespeed structure and aftershock distribution of the 1993 Hokkaido

  14. Prospects for Chronological Studies of Martian Rocks and Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C-Y.; Reese, Y. D.

    2008-01-01

    Chronological information about Martian processes comes from two sources: Crater-frequency studies and laboratory studies of Martian meteorites. Each has limitations that could be overcome by studies of returned Martian rocks and soils. Chronology of Martian volcanism: The currently accepted chronology of Martian volcanic surfaces relies on crater counts for different Martian stratigraphic units [1]. However, there is a large inherent uncertainty for intermediate ages near 2 Ga ago. The effect of differing preferences for Martian cratering chronologies [1] is shown in Fig. 1. Stoeffler and Ryder [2] summarized lunar chronology, upon which Martian cratering chronology is based. Fig. 2 shows a curve fit to their data, and compares to it a corresponding lunar curve from [3]. The radiometric ages of some lunar and Martian meteorites as well as the crater-count delimiters for Martian epochs [4] also are shown for comparison to the craterfrequency curves. Scaling the Stoeffler-Ryder curve by a Mars/Moon factor of 1.55 [5] places Martian shergottite ages into the Early Amazonian to late Hesperian epochs, whereas using the lunar curve of [3] and a Mars/Moon factor 1 consigns the shergottites to the Middle-to-Late Amazonian, a less probable result. The problem is worsened if a continually decreasing cratering rate since 3 Ga ago is accepted [6]. We prefer the adjusted St ffler-Ryder curve because it gives better agreement with the meteorite ages (Fig.

  15. Experimental determination of crystal/melt partitioning of Ga and Ge in the system forsterite-anorthite-diopside

    SciTech Connect

    Malvin, D.J.; Drake, M.J.

    1987-08-01

    The crystal/liquid partitioning of Ga and Ge has been measured experimentally between forsterite, diopside, anorthite and spinel and melts in the pseudoternary system forsterite-anorthite-diopside at one atmosphere pressure and 1300/sup 0/C. Gallium is incompatible with forsterite and diopside, is only slightly incompatible in anorthite, and is highly compatible in spinel. The partition coefficient for Ge is within a factor of two of unity for forsterite, diopside, and anorthite, but Ge is incompatible in spinel (D (Ge) = 0.1). The coefficients for the exchange of Ga and Al and the exchange of Ge and Si between minerals and melts generally are within a factor of two of unity, as it expected from the geochemical coherence of these element pairs in natural samples. The application of these results to the interpretation of natural basaltic and mantle samples from the Earth and basalts from the Moon and the Shergottite Parent Body demonstrates that it is possible to discriminate between different mantle source compositions using Ga/Al and Ge/Si ratios. The Ge variation among lunar mare basalts may be indicative of a heterogeneous lunar mantle. The substantial depletion of Ge in Chassigny relative to the other SNC meteorites may be evidence of either a heterogeneous Shergottite Parent Body (SPB) mantle, or of different geochemical behavior for Ge in the SPB.

  16. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd Isotopic Studies of Antarctic Nakhlite MIL 03346

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Nakhlites are olivine-bearing clinopyroxenites with cumulate textures, and probably came from Mars [e.g., 1]. A total of seven nakhlites have been identified so far. Unlike other martian meteorites (e.g., shergottites), nakhlites have been only moderately shocked and their original igneous textures are still well-preserved. Also, these meteorites have similarly older crystallization ages of approx.1.3 Ga compared to shergottites with ages of approx.0.18-0.57 Ga [e.g., 2]. MIL 03346 is characterized by abundant (approx.20 vol %) glassy mesostasis, indicating that it cooled rapidly and probably formed near the top [3] or at the bottom [4] of the chilled margin of a thick intrusive body. The mesostasis quenched from the trapped intercumulus liquid may provide information on the parent magma compositions of the nakhlites. In this report, we present Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic data for MIL 03346, discuss correlation of its age with those of other nakhlites and the nature of their source regions in the Martian mantle.

  17. Oxidation State of Nakhlites as inferred from Fe-Ti oxide Equilibria and Augite/Melt Europium Partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makishima, J.; McKay, G.; Le, L.; Miyamoto, M.; Mikouchi, T.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that Martian magmas had wide range of oxygen fugacities (fO2) and that this variation is correlated with the variation of La/Yb ratio and isotopic characteristics of the Martian basalts, shergottite meteorites. The origin of this correlation must have important information about mantle sources and Martian evolution. In order to understand this correlation, it is necessary to know accurate value of oxidation state of other Martian meteorite groups. Nakhlites, cumulate clinopyroxenites, are another major group of Martian meteorites and have distinctly different trace element and isotopic characteristics from shergottites. Thus, estimates of oxidation state of nakhlites will give us important insight into the mantle source in general. Several workers have estimated oxidation state of nakhlites by using Fe-Ti oxide equilibrium. However, Fe-Ti oxides may not record the oxidation state of the parent melt of the nakhlite because it is a late-stage mineral. Furthermore, there is no comprehensive study which analyzed all nakhlite samples at the same time. Therefore, in this study (1) we reduced the uncertainty of the estimate using the same electron microprobe and the same standards under the same condition for Fe-Ti oxide in 6 nakhlites and (2) we also performed crystallization experiments to measure partition coefficients of Eu into pyroxene in the nakhlite system in order to estimate fO2 when the pyroxene core formed (i.e. Eu oxybarometer [e.g. 2,6]).

  18. On the weathering of Martian igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreibus, G.; Waenke, H.

    1992-01-01

    Besides the young crystallization age, one of the first arguments for the martian origin of shergottite, nakhlite, and chassignite (SNC) meteorites came from the chemical similarity of the meteorite Shergotty and the martian soil as measured by Viking XRF analyses. In the meantime, the discovery of trapped rare gas and nitrogen components with element and isotope ratios closely matching the highly characteristic ratios of the Mars atmosphere in the shock glasses of shergottite EETA79001 was further striking evidence that the SNC's are martian surface rocks. The martian soil composition as derived from the Viking mission, with its extremely high S and Cl concentrations, was interpreted as weathering products of mafic igneous rocks. The low SiO2 content and the low abundance of K and other trace elements in the martian soils point to a mafic crust with a considerably smaller degree of fractionation compared to the terrestrial crust. However, the chemical evolution of the martian regolith and soil in respect to surface reaction with the planetary atmosphere or hydrosphere is poorly understood. A critical point in this respect is that the geochemical evidence as derived from the SNC meteorites suggests that Mars is a very dry planet that should have lost almost all its initially large water inventory during its accretion.

  19. Isotopic links between atmospheric chemistry and the deep sulphur cycle on Mars.

    PubMed

    Franz, Heather B; Kim, Sang-Tae; Farquhar, James; Day, James M D; Economos, Rita C; McKeegan, Kevin D; Schmitt, Axel K; Irving, Anthony J; Hoek, Joost; Dottin, James

    2014-04-17

    The geochemistry of Martian meteorites provides a wealth of information about the solid planet and the surface and atmospheric processes that occurred on Mars. The degree to which Martian magmas may have assimilated crustal material, thus altering the geochemical signatures acquired from their mantle sources, is unclear. This issue features prominently in efforts to understand whether the source of light rare-earth elements in enriched shergottites lies in crustal material incorporated into melts or in mixing between enriched and depleted mantle reservoirs. Sulphur isotope systematics offer insight into some aspects of crustal assimilation. The presence of igneous sulphides in Martian meteorites with sulphur isotope signatures indicative of mass-independent fractionation suggests the assimilation of sulphur both during passage of magmas through the crust of Mars and at sites of emplacement. Here we report isotopic analyses of 40 Martian meteorites that represent more than half of the distinct known Martian meteorites, including 30 shergottites (28 plus 2 pairs, where pairs are separate fragments of a single meteorite), 8 nakhlites (5 plus 3 pairs), Allan Hills 84001 and Chassigny. Our data provide strong evidence that assimilation of sulphur into Martian magmas was a common occurrence throughout much of the planet's history. The signature of mass-independent fractionation observed also indicates that the atmospheric imprint of photochemical processing preserved in Martian meteoritic sulphide and sulphate is distinct from that observed in terrestrial analogues, suggesting fundamental differences between the dominant sulphur chemistry in the atmosphere of Mars and that in the atmosphere of Earth.

  20. Unusual Iron Redox Systematics of Martian Magmas

    SciTech Connect

    Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Pando, K.; Morris, R.V.; Graff, T.; Agresti, D.; Martin, A.; Sutton, S.; Newville, M.; Lanzirotti, A.

    2012-03-26

    Martian magmas are known to be FeO-rich and the dominant FeO-bearing mineral at many sites visited by the Mars Exploration rovers (MER) is magnetite. Morris et al. proposed that the magnetite appears to be igneous in origin, rather than of secondary origin. However, magnetite is not typically found in experimental studies of martian magmatic rocks. Magnetite stability in terrestrial magmas is well understood, as are the stabilities of FeO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} in terrestrial magmas. In order to better understand the variation of FeO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and the stability of magnetite (and other FeO-bearing phases) in martian magmas, we have undertaken an experimental study with two emphases. First, we determine the FeO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} contents of super- and sub-liquidus glasses from a shergottite bulk composition at 1 bar to 4 GPa, and variable fO{sub 2}. Second, we document the stability of magnetite with temperature and fO{sub 2} in a shergottite bulk composition.

  1. The Germanium Dichotomy in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humayun, M.; Yang, S.; Righter, K.; Zanda, B.; Hewins, R. H.

    2016-01-01

    Germanium is a moderately volatile and siderophile element that follows silicon in its compatibility during partial melting of planetary mantles. Despite its obvious usefulness in planetary geochemistry germanium is not analyzed routinely, with there being only three prior studies reporting germanium abundances in Martian meteorites. The broad range (1-3 ppm) observed in Martian igneous rocks is in stark contrast to the narrow range of germanium observed in terrestrial basalts (1.5 plus or minus 0.1 ppm). The germanium data from these studies indicates that nakhlites contain 2-3 ppm germanium, while shergottites contain approximately 1 ppm germanium, a dichotomy with important implications for core formation models. There have been no reliable germanium abundances on chassignites. The ancient meteoritic breccia, NWA 7533 (and paired meteorites) contains numerous clasts, some pristine and some impact melt rocks, that are being studied individually. Because germanium is depleted in the Martian crust relative to chondritic impactors, it has proven useful as an indicator of meteoritic contamination of impact melt clasts in NWA 7533. The germanium/silicon ratio can be applied to minerals that might not partition nickel and iridium, like feldspars. We report germanium in minerals from the 3 known chassignites, 2 nakhlites and 5 shergottites by LAICP- MS using a method optimized for precise germanium analysis.

  2. Natural dissociation of olivine to (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite and magnesiowüstite in a shocked Martian meteorite

    PubMed Central

    Miyahara, Masaaki; Ohtani, Eiji; Ozawa, Shin; Kimura, Makoto; El Goresy, Ahmed; Sakai, Takeshi; Nagase, Toshiro; Hiraga, Kenji; Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    We report evidence for the natural dissociation of olivine in a shergottite at high-pressure and high-temperature conditions induced by a dynamic event on Mars. Olivine (Fa34-41) adjacent to or entrained in the shock melt vein and melt pockets of Martian meteorite olivine-phyric shergottite Dar al Gani 735 dissociated into (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite (Pv)+magnesiowüstite (Mw), whereby perovskite partially vitrified during decompression. Transmission electron microscopy observations reveal that microtexture of olivine dissociation products evolves from lamellar to equigranular with increasing temperature at the same pressure condition. This is in accord with the observations of synthetic samples recovered from high-pressure and high-temperature experiments. Equigranular (Mg,Fe)SiO3 Pv and Mw have 50–100 nm in diameter, and lamellar (Mg,Fe)SiO3 Pv and Mw have approximately 20 and approximately 10 nm in thickness, respectively. Partitioning coefficient, KPv/Mw = [FeO/MgO]/[FeO/MgO]Mw, between (Mg,Fe)SiO3 Pv and Mw in equigranular and lamellar textures are approximately 0.15 and approximately 0.78, respectively. The dissociation of olivine implies that the pressure and temperature conditions recorded in the shock melt vein and melt pockets during the dynamic event were approximately 25 GPa but 700 °C at least. PMID:21444781

  3. Sm-Nd Age and Nd- and Sr- Isotopic Evidence for the Petrogenesis of Dhofar 378

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Ikeda, Y.; Shih, C.-Y.; Reese, Y. D.; Nakamura, N.; Takeda, H.

    2006-01-01

    Dhofar 378 (hereafter Dho 378) is one of the most ferroan lithologies among martian meteorites, resembling the Los Angeles basaltic shergottite in lithology and mineral chemistry, although it is more highly shocked than Los Angeles. All plagioclase (Pl) grains in the original lithology were melted by an intense shock in the range 55-75 GPa. Clinopyroxenes (Cpx) sometimes show mosaic extinction under a microscope showing that they, too, experienced intense shock. Nevertheless, they zone from magnesian cores to ferroan rims, reflecting the original lithology. Cpx grains also often contain exsolution lamellae, showing that the original lithology cooled slowly enough for the lamellae to form. Because all plagioclase grains were melted by the intense shock and subsequently quenched, the main plagioclase component is glass (Pl-glass) rather than maskelynite. Like Los Angeles, but unlike most basaltic shergottites, Dho 378 contains approximately equal modal abundances of Cpx and Pl-glass. The grain sizes of the original minerals were comparatively large (approximately 1 mm). The original plagioclase zoning has been severely modified. Following shock melting, the plagioclase melts crystallized from the outside inward, first forming outer rims of Cpx-Pl intergrowths (approximately 10 micrometers) followed by inner rims (10's to 100 micrometers) of An(sub 40-50) feldspar, and finally Pl-gl cores of compositions An(sub 33-50) with orthoclase compositions up to Or(sub 12).

  4. The water content and parental magma of the second chassignite NWA 2737: Clues from trapped melt inclusions in olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qi; Xiao, Long; Hsu, Weibiao; Balta, J. Brian; McSween, Harry Y.; Liu, Yang

    2013-03-01

    NWA 2737, the second known chassignite, mainly consists of cumulate olivine crystals of homogeneous composition (Fo = 78.7 ± 0.9). These brown colored olivine grains exhibit two sets of perpendicular planar defects due to shock. Two forms of trapped liquids, interstitial melts and magmatic inclusions, have been examined. Mineral assemblages within the olivine-hosted magmatic inclusions include low-Ca pyroxene, augite, kaersutite, fluorapatite, biotite, chromite, sulfide, and feldspathic glass. The reconstructed parental magma composition (A#) of the NWA 2737 is basaltic and resembles both the experimentally constrained parental melt composition of chassiginites and the Gusev basalt Humphrey, albeit with lower Al contents. A# also broadly resembles the average of shergottite parent magmas or LAR 06319. However, we suggest that the mantle source for the chassignite parental magmas was distinct from that of the shergottite meteorites, particularly in CaO/Al2O3 ratio. In addition, based on the analysis of the volatile contents of kaersutite, we derived a water content of 0.48-0.67 wt% for the parental melt. Finally, our MELTS calculations suggest that moderate pressure (approximately 6.8 kb) came closest to reproducing the crystallized melt-inclusion assemblages.

  5. Unusual Iron Redox Systematics of Martian Magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Pando, K.; Morris, R. V.; Graff, T.; Agresti, D.; Martin, A.; Sutton, S.; Newville, M.; Lanzirotti, A.

    2012-01-01

    Martian magmas are known to be FeO-rich and the dominant FeO-bearing mineral at many sites visited by the Mars Exploration rovers (MER) is magnetite. Morris et al. proposed that the magnetite appears to be igneous in origin, rather than of secondary origin. However, magnetite is not typically found in experimental studies of martian magmatic rocks. Magnetite stability in terrestrial magmas is well understood, as are the stabilities of FeO and Fe2O3 in terrestrial magmas. In order to better understand the variation of FeO and Fe2O3, and the stability of magnetite (and other FeO-bearing phases) in martian magmas, we have undertaken an experimental study with two emphases. First, we determine the FeO and Fe2O3 contents of super- and sub-liquidus glasses from a shergottite bulk composition at 1 bar to 4 GPa, and variable fO2. Second, we document the stability of magnetite with temperature and fO2 in a shergottite bulk composition.

  6. Iron Redox Systematics of Martian Magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Danielson, L.; Martin, A.; Pando, K.; Sutton, S.; Newville, M.

    2011-01-01

    Martian magmas are known to be FeO-rich and the dominant FeO-bearing mineral at many sites visited by the Mars Exploration rovers (MER) is magnetite [1]. Morris et al. [1] propose that the magnetite appears to be igneous in origin, rather than of secondary origin. However, magnetite is not typically found in experimental studies of martian magmatic rocks [2,3]. Magnetite stability in terrestrial magmas is well understood, as are the stability of FeO and Fe2O3 in terrestrial magmas [4,5]. In order to better understand the variation of FeO and Fe2O3, and the stability of magnetite (and other FeO-bearing phases) in martian magmas we have undertaken an experimental study with two emphases. First we document the stability of magnetite with temperature and fO2 in a shergottite bulk composition. Second, we determine the FeO and Fe2O3 contents of the same shergottite bulk composition at 1 bar and variable fO2 at 1250 C, and at variable pressure. These two goals will help define not only magnetite stability, but pyroxene-melt equilibria that are also dependent upon fO2.

  7. Magnetism of nakhlites and chassignites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisowski, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    Hysteresis measurements on three shergottite and two nakhlite meteorites indicate single domain grain size behavior for the highly shocked Shergotty, Zagami, and EETA 79001 meteorites, with more multidomain-like behavior for the unshocked Nakhla and Governador Valadares meteorites. High viscosity and initial susceptibility for Antarctic shergottite ALHA 7705 indicate the presence of superparamagnetic grains in this specimen. Thermomagnetic analysis indicate Shergotty and Zagami as the least initially oxidized, while EETA 79001 appears to be the most oxidized. Cooling of the meteorite samples from high temperature in air results in a substantial increase in magnetization due to the production of magnetite through oxidation exsolution of titanomagnetite. However, vacuum heating substantially suppresses this process, and in the case of EETA 79001 and Nakhla, results in a rehomogenization of the titanomagnetite grains. Remanence measurements on several subsamples of Shergotty and Zagami meteorites reveal a large variation in intensity that does not seem related to the abundance of remanence carriers. The other meteorites carry only weak remanence, suggesting weak magnetizing fields as the source of their magnetic signal. The meteorites' weak field environment is consistent with Martian or asteroidal body origin but inconsistent with terrestrial origin.

  8. Fractionated martian atmosphere in the nakhlites?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Michael J.; Swindle, Timothy D.; Owen, Tobias; Musselwhite, Donald S.

    1994-01-01

    Considerable evidence points to a martian origin of the shergottite-nakhlite-chassignite (SNC) meteorites. Noble gas isotopic compositions have been measured in most SNC meteorites. The Xe-129/Xe-132 vs. Kr-84/Xe-132 ratios in Chassigny, most shergottites, and lithology C of EETA 79001 define a linear array. This array is thought to be a mixing line between martian mantle and martian atmosphere. One of the SNC meteorites, Nakhla, contains a leachable component that has an elevated Xe-129/Xe-132 ratio relative to its Kr-84/Xe-132 ratio when compared to this approximately linear array. The leachable component probably consists in part of iddingsite, an alteration product produced by interaction of olivine with aqueous fluid at temperatures lower than 150 C. The elevated Xe isotopic ratio may represent a distinct reservoir in the martian crust or mantle. More plausibly, it is elementally fractionated martian atmosphere. Formation of sediments fractionates the noble gases in the correct direction. The range of sediment/atmosphere fractionation factors is consistent with the elevated Xe-129/Xe-132 component in Nakhla being contained in iddingsite, a low temperature weathering product. The crystallization age of Nakhla is 1.3 Ga. Its low-shock state suggests that it was ejected from near the surface of Mars. As liquid water is required for the formation of iddingsite, these observations provide further evidence for the near surface existence of aqueous fluids on Mars more recently than 1.3 Ga.

  9. Isotopic links between atmospheric chemistry and the deep sulphur cycle on Mars.

    PubMed

    Franz, Heather B; Kim, Sang-Tae; Farquhar, James; Day, James M D; Economos, Rita C; McKeegan, Kevin D; Schmitt, Axel K; Irving, Anthony J; Hoek, Joost; Dottin, James

    2014-04-17

    The geochemistry of Martian meteorites provides a wealth of information about the solid planet and the surface and atmospheric processes that occurred on Mars. The degree to which Martian magmas may have assimilated crustal material, thus altering the geochemical signatures acquired from their mantle sources, is unclear. This issue features prominently in efforts to understand whether the source of light rare-earth elements in enriched shergottites lies in crustal material incorporated into melts or in mixing between enriched and depleted mantle reservoirs. Sulphur isotope systematics offer insight into some aspects of crustal assimilation. The presence of igneous sulphides in Martian meteorites with sulphur isotope signatures indicative of mass-independent fractionation suggests the assimilation of sulphur both during passage of magmas through the crust of Mars and at sites of emplacement. Here we report isotopic analyses of 40 Martian meteorites that represent more than half of the distinct known Martian meteorites, including 30 shergottites (28 plus 2 pairs, where pairs are separate fragments of a single meteorite), 8 nakhlites (5 plus 3 pairs), Allan Hills 84001 and Chassigny. Our data provide strong evidence that assimilation of sulphur into Martian magmas was a common occurrence throughout much of the planet's history. The signature of mass-independent fractionation observed also indicates that the atmospheric imprint of photochemical processing preserved in Martian meteoritic sulphide and sulphate is distinct from that observed in terrestrial analogues, suggesting fundamental differences between the dominant sulphur chemistry in the atmosphere of Mars and that in the atmosphere of Earth. PMID:24740066

  10. Effect of Sulfur on Siderophile Element Partitioning Between Olivine and Martian Primary Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usui, T.; Shearer, C. K.; Righter, K.; Jones, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    Since olivine is a common early crystallizing phase in basaltic magmas that have produced planetary and asteroidal crusts, a number of experimental studies have investigated elemental partitioning between olivine and silicate melt [e.g., 1, 2, 3]. In particular, olivine/melt partition coefficients of Ni and Co (DNi and DCo) have been intensively studied because these elements are preferentially partitioned into olivine and thus provide a uniquely useful insight into the basalt petrogenesis [e.g., 4, 5]. However, none of these experimental studies are consistent with incompatible signatures of Co [e.g., 6, 7, 8] and Ni [7] in olivines from Martian meteorites. Chemical analyses of undegassed MORB samples suggest that S dissolved in silicate melts can reduce DNi up to 50 % compared to S-free experimental systems [9]. High S solubility (up to 4000 ppm) for primitive shergottite melts [10] implies that S might have significantly influenced the Ni and Co partitioning into shergottite olivines. This study conducts melting experiments on Martian magmatic conditions to investigate the effect of S on the partitioning of siderophile elements between olivine and Martian primary melt.

  11. Instantaneous and scale-versatile gourdron theory: pair momentum equation, quasi-stability concept, and statistical indeterminacy revealing masses of elementary, bio-molecular, and cosmic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naitoh, Ken

    2014-04-01

    Flexible particles, including hadrons, atoms, hydrated biological molecules, cells, organs containing water, liquid fuel droplets in engines, and stars commonly break up after becoming a gourd shape rather than that of a string; this leads to cyto-fluid dynamics that can explain the proliferation, differentiation, and replication of biomolecules, onto-biology that clarifies the relationship between information, structure, and function, and the gourd theory that clarifies masses, including quark-leptons and Plank energy. The masses are related to the super-magic numbers, including the asymmetric silver ratio and symmetric yamato ratio, and reveal further mechanisms underlying symmetry breaking. This paper gives further theoretical basis and evidence, because the gourd theory reported previously is a little analogical and instinctive.

  12. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Lunar Rocks from Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The following topics were discussed: Mineralogy and Petrology of Unbrecciated Lunar Basaltic Meteorite LAP 02205; LAP02205 Lunar Meteorite: Lunar Mare Basalt with Similarities to the Apollo 12 Ilmenite Basalt; Mineral Chemistry of LaPaz Ice Field 02205 - A New Lunar Basalt; Petrography of Lunar Meteorite LAP 02205, a New Low-Ti Basalt Possibly Launch Paired with NWA 032; KREEP-rich Basaltic Magmatism: Diversity of Composition and Consistency of Age; Mineralogy of Yamato 983885 Lunar Polymict Breccia with Alkali-rich and Mg-rich Rocks; Ar-Ar Studies of Dhofar Clast-rich Feldspathic Highland Meteorites: 025, 026, 280, 303; Can Granulite Metamorphic Conditions Reset 40Ar-39Ar Ages in Lunar Rocks? [#1009] A Ferroan Gabbronorite Clast in Lunar Meteorite ALHA81005: Major and Trace Element Composition, and Origin; Petrography of Lunar Meteorite PCA02007, a New Feldspathic Regolith Breccia; and Troilite Formed by Sulfurization: A Crystal Structure of Synthetic Analogue

  13. Signatures in Martian Volatiles and the Magma Sources of NC Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marti, K.; Mathew, K. J.

    2004-01-01

    We report nitrogen and xenon isotopic signatures in Yamato nakhlites and use the data to assess properties of the magma source of NC meteorites in planet Mars. The Chassigny meteorite was investigated by Floran et al, who classified it as a cumulate dunite with hydrous amphibole-bearing melt inclusions with no preferred orientation of the olivines. Their inferred composition of the parent magma, which was based on electron microprobe analyses, has been questioned. The trace and minor elements in minerals were analyzed in nakhlites and in Chassigny and the authors conclude that nakhlites may represent samples from different horizons of the same lithologic unit, but that Chassigny was not co-magmatic with the nakhlites.

  14. Late Miocene obduction and microplate migration around the southern Banda Sea and the closure of the Indonesian Seaway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linthout, Kees; Helmers, Henk; Sopaheluwakan, Jan

    1997-11-01

    Miocene shallowing and closure of the Indonesian Seaway between the Indian Ocean and the Pacific is related to plate-tectonic developments at the southern margins of the Banda Sea. Ultramafites, mainly lherzolite, closely associated with quartzo-pelitic metamorphic rocks, on the northern coast of Timor and on smaller islands in the southern Outer Banda Arc and also on southwest Seram in the northern Banda Arc, are fragments of Middle Miocene oceanic lithosphere obducted in the Late Miocene on sole rock of Australian continental origin. Initially cool sole rock was dynamo-thermally metamorphosed by heating from above by very hot, overriding oceanic lithosphere. Temperature equilibration between the sole and the Kaibobo lherzolitic complex (southwest Seram) took place at about 740°C and 4-5 kbar. Anatectic granitic magma formed in the sole and intruded in the ultramafite. 40Ar 39Ar determinations on muscovite and biotite from the sole and anatectic granite indicate that the system cooled through 400°C 6.0 Ma ago and through 320°C 0.5 Ma later. P-T-t modelling of the obduction/post-obduction exhumation curve, which is based on thermobarometry of the Kaibobo ultramafic complex and its sole, suggests that obduction started about 9.5 Ma, emplacement was completed about 8 Ma ago and that fast vertical movements continued until about 7 Ma. The obduction of the Kaibobo lherzolitic complex actually took place in an area northeast of the current position of Tanimbar, where Seram (as a micro-continental Australian fragment) lay 8 Ma ago, as it migrated northward with the Australian Plate. The reconstructed obduction site of the southwest Seram ultramafites and those between northern Timor and Tanimbar determine an 850 km-long, ENE-trending zone along the southern margin of the Banda Sea. As the obduction of the lherzolitic complex on northern Timor also took place 8 Ma ago and cooling to 300°C occurred 5.5 Ma ago, a similar time setting to Kaibobo is inferred. It is

  15. Pyroxenites - Melting or Migration?: Evidence from the Balmuccia massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sossi, Paolo; O'Neill, Hugh

    2014-05-01

    The recognition of pyroxenites in the mantle, combined with their lower solidus temperatures than peridotite, have been proposed as contributors to melting (Pertermann and Hirschmann, 2003; Sobolev et al, 2005; 2007). Geochemical fingerprints of this process invoke an unspecified 'pyroxenite' as the putative source. In reality, mantle pyroxenites are diverse (Downes, 2007), requiring that their mode of origin and compositional variability be addressed. Due to the excellent preservation and exposure of the Balmuccia massif, it has become an archetype for orogenic peridotites, providing information on their composition, field relationships and metamorphic history (Shervais and Mukasa, 1991; Hartmann and Wedepohl, 1993; Rivalenti et al., 1995; Mazzucchelli et al., 2009). The Balmuccia massif consists of fertile lherzolite with subordinate harzburgite and dunite and is riddled with pyroxenite bands, which fall into two suites - Chrome-Diopside (Cr-Di) and Aluminous-Augite (Al-Aug), a pairing present in most massif peridotites. Two-pyroxene thermometry gives temperatures of 850±25°C at 1-1.5 GPa, 500°C lower than asthenospheric mantle at that pressure, meaning they do not preserve their original, high temperature mineralogy. Decimetre-sized Cr-Di bands (≡75% CPX, 25% OPX) occur as initially Ol-free and bound by refractory dunite, but, as the bands are rotated into the plane of foliation, they mechanically incorporate olivine. Al-Aug veins (60% CPX, 25% OPX, 15% Sp) discordantly cut the body, intruding lherzolites which show enrichments in Fe, Al and Ti adjacent to the dykes. Both the Cr-Di suite and the Al-Aug series have indistinguishable Sr-, Nd-isotopic compositions to the host peridotite (Mukasa and Shervais, 1999). The major element compositions of pyroxenes in the Cr-Di bands and those in the surrounding peridotites are identical. Together with isotopic evidence, this suggests a local source, not only chemically but spatially, where a very low degree melt (

  16. Evolution of mantle column beneath Bartoy volcanoes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashchepkov, Igor; Karmanov, Nikolai; Kanakin, Sergei; Ntaflos, Theodoros

    2013-04-01

    Pleistocene Bartoy volcanoes 1.5-0.8 Ma (Ashchepkov et al., 2003) represent variable set of hydrous cumulates and megacrysts and peridotite mantle xenoliths from spinel facies (Ashchepkov, 1991; Ionov, Kramm, 1992). Hydrous peridotites give series of the temperature groups: 1) deformed Fe - lherzolites (1200-1100o) , 2) Phl porhyroclastiμ (1100-1020o), 3) Amph -Phl (1020-940o), 4) Dry protogranular (1020-940o), 5)Amph equigranular (940-880o) and 6) dry and fine grained (880-820o). and Fe-rich poikilitic (700-600o) (Ashchepkov, 1991). T according (Nimis, Taylor, 2000) The sequence of the megacrysts crystallized on the wall of basaltic feeder in pre - eruption stage is starting from HT dark green websterites (1300-1200o), black Cpx- Gar varieties (1250-1200o) evolved to Phl -CPx (1200-1130o) and Cpx - Kaers (1130-1020o) - Cpx low in TiO2., Ilm and San (<1000o) like in Vitim (Ashchepkov et la., 2011). The differentiation trends looks branched but the question if they. Differentiation ain relatively large magma bodies p produced Ga- Cpx (+Amph-Phl- Ilm +-San) and then Cpx-Gar -Pl cumulates in( ~8-12 kbar) interval. In the ToC-Fe# diagram the Intermediate trend between lherzolites and megacrysts sub parallel to lherzolitic is correspondent to the fractionation of the hydrous alkali basalt melts in vein network created from the highly H2O bearing basaltic derivates formed in intermediate magma chambers. The interaction of the peridotites with the pulsing rising and evolving basaltic system produced the wall rock metasomatism and separate groups of peridotites in different levels of mantle column. PT calculations show two PT path and probably melt intrusion events. Trace elements in glass from crystalline basalts show Zr, Pb dips and Ta, Nb, Sr enrichment for the black megacrystalline Cpx , Gar series. They show link with evolved basalts by HFSE, Ba enrichment but Cpx from kaersutite and further Gar - Cpx cumulates show depressions in Ta, Nb, Zr, and Pb moderate

  17. Shock Recovery and Heating Experiments on Baddeleyite: Implications for U-Pb Isotopic Systematics of Martian Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, K.; Niihara, T.; Kaiden, H.; Sekine, T.; Mikouchi, T.

    2009-12-01

    Introduction: Radiometric ages of Martian meteorites, shergottites are generally young (i.e., ~165-475 Ma), and are in the late Amazonian chronostratigraphic unit [1]. Bouvier et al. [2-4] reported ~4.1-4.3 Ga old Pb-Pb ages for shergottites, and suggested that young Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and Lu-Hf ages so far obtained were affected by alteration of phosphates, interaction with Martian subsurface fluids, or intense shock metamorphism. Baddeleyite (ZrO2) with apparently primary igneous morphology is an important phase in shergottites for U-Pb age determination. In order to investigate shock effects on U-Pb isotopic systematics of baddeleyite, we undertook shock recovery and heating experiments on baddeleyite. Experimental: We used coarse-grained baddeleyite from Phalaborwa for a starting material. The baddeleyite was mixed with a coarse-grained terrestrial basalt with a weight ratio of 1:2. Shock-recovery experiments were performed using a propellant gun at NIMS [5]. The run products were placed in a vertical gas-mixing furnace and heated for 1-3 h at 1000-1300oC under log fO2 of IW+2.5 at 105 Pa. Textures were observed by a scanning electron microprobe and Raman spectra of shocked baddeleyite were obtained. In situ U-Th-Pb isotopic analysis was carried out with the SHRIMP II at NIPR [6]. Results and Discussion: We observed Raman peak shifts of 2-4 cm-1 in the 34-57 GPa samples. Lead loss from baddeleyite was not observed for the experimentally shocked samples. In addition, the U-Pb and Pb-Pb ages of shocked and heated baddeleyites are indistinguishable from those of unshocked baddeleyite within errors except minor lead loss from the baddeleyite shocked at 57 GPa and heated for 1 h at 1300oC. Although duration of peak shock-pressure and grain size of baddeleyite are different from the nature of basaltic shergottites, our experimental results suggest that it is hard to completely reset U-Pb isotopic systematics of baddeleyite in Martian meteorite by shock events below ~60

  18. Chemical composition of interstitial waters from the Japan Sea, ODP Leg 128

    SciTech Connect

    Sturz, A. ); Von Breymann, M.; Dunbar, R. )

    1990-06-01

    During ODP Leg 128, interstitial waters were recovered from Oki Ridge (Site 798) and Kita-Yamato Trough (Site 799) sediment, Sea of Japan. Interstitial water chemical composition reflects diagenetic processes. Evidence indicating organic matter degradation processes includes sulfate depletion, high ammonium concentrations, and shallow maxima of dissolved phosphate. Rapid alkalinity increases in the uppermost sections of the sediments are accompanied by decreases in dissolved calcium, reflecting inorganic calcite precipitation. Authigenic dolomitization results in changes in slopes of the Mg/Ca molar ratios with depth. The opal-A/opal-CT transition is documented by the concentration depth profiles of dissolved silica and lithium. Dolomitization precedes the opal-A/opal-CT transition at both sites. Kita-Yamato Trough sediments show an abrupt change in the compositional character of the pore fluids below 435 mbsf, which coincides with the occurrence of low porosity and high bulk density layers composed of dolomite and opal-CT. These layers impede to some extent diffusional communication with the overlying interstitial waters. The interstitial waters in sediments below 435 mbsf have chloride concentrations of 504-515 mM, significantly lower than that of modern day Japan Sea water (540 mM). The presence of low chloride waters within Miocene age sediments may indicate: (1) diagenetic reactions that involve the release of exchangeable and structural bound water from clay minerals and/or opal-A, (2) Miocene connate brackish lake water, (3) phase separation of hydrothermal fluids associated with rifting, (4) potential effects of clay membrane filtration in a high pressure zone.

  19. Jadeite formation in shocked ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Masaaki; Ozawa, Shin; Ohtani, Eiji; Kimura, Makoto; Kubo, Tomoaki; Sakai, Takeshi; Nagase, Toshiro; Nishijima, Masahiko; Hirao, Naohisa

    2013-07-01

    Albitic feldspar in shocked ordinary chondrites (Yamato 791384 L6 and Yamato 75100 H6) and albite recovered from static high-pressure and high-temperature synthetic experiments (Kubo et al., 2010) were investigated with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) subsequent to a conventional micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis to clarify albite dissociation reaction under high-pressure and high-temperature condition. When jadeite forms from albite, SiO2 phase as a residual phase of albite dissociation reaction should accompany jadeite from the stoichiometry. However, albitic feldspar in and adjacent to shock-melt veins of the shocked chondrites dissociates into jadeite+residual amorphous (or poorly-crystallized) material having varied chemical compositions between jadeite and SiO2 phase. TEM observations of albitic feldspar in the shocked chondrites and albite recovered from the static high-pressure and high-temperature synthetic experiments show that jadeite crystallization is initiated by grain refinement of albite (or albitic feldspar). Nucleation occurs along grain-boundaries or at triple-junctions of the fine-grained albite crystal assemblage. Jadeite crystal starts to grow from the nucleus through grain-boundary diffusion. Considering pressure condition recorded in the shock-melt veins of the shocked chondrites, stishovite is the most likely as a residual SiO2 phase accompanying jadeite. High-pressure and high-temperature condition induced by a dynamic event is very short. Stishovite would be hardy formed through a dynamic event due to sluggish nucleation rate of stishovite compared with that of jadeite, thus leading to induce heterogeneous and incomplete albite dissociation reaction; albite dissociates into jadeite+residual amorphous material.

  20. Experimental melting of phlogopite-bearing mantle at 1 GPa: Implications for potassic magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condamine, Pierre; Médard, Etienne

    2014-07-01

    We have experimentally investigated the fluid-absent melting of a phlogopite peridotite at 1.0 GPa (1000-1300 °C) to understand the source of K2O- and SiO2-rich magmas that occur in continental, post-collisional and island arc settings. Using a new extraction technique specially developed for hydrous conditions combined with iterative sandwich experiments, we have determined the composition of low- to high-degree melts (Φ=1.4 to 24.2 wt.%) of metasomatized lherzolite and harzburgite sources. Due to small amounts of adsorbed water in the starting material, amphibole crystallized at the lowest investigated temperatures. Amphibole breaks down at 1050-1075 °C, while phlogopite-breakdown occurs at 1150-1200 °C. This last temperature is higher than the previously determined in a mantle assemblage, due to the presence of stabilizing F and Ti. Phlogopite-lherzolite melts incongruently according to the continuous reaction: 0.49 phlogopite + 0.56 orthopyroxene + 0.47 clinopyroxene + 0.05 spinel = 0.58 olivine + 1.00 melt. In the phlogopite-harzburgite, the reaction is: 0.70 phlogopite + 1.24 orthopyroxene + 0.05 spinel = 0.99 olivine + 1.00 melt. The K2O content of water-undersaturated melts in equilibrium with residual phlogopite is buffered, depending on the source fertility: from ∼3.9 wt.% in lherzolite to ∼6.7 wt.% in harzburgite. Primary melts are silica-saturated and evolve from trachyte to basaltic andesite (63.5-52.1 wt.% SiO2) with increasing temperature. Calculations indicate that such silica-rich melts can readily be extracted from their mantle source, due to their low viscosity. Our results confirm that potassic, silica-rich magmas described worldwide in post-collisional settings are generated by melting of a metasomatized phlogopite-bearing mantle in the spinel stability field.

  1. Wehrlitisation in the upper mantle beneath the Nógrád-Gömör Volcanic Field (Northern Pannonian Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patkó, Levente; Előd Aradi, László; Liptai, Nóra; Szabó, Csaba

    2013-04-01

    The Nógrád-Gömör Volcanic Field is situated in the northern part of the Pannonian Basin, where Plio-Pleistocene alkaline basalts brought upper mantle xenoliths to the surface. We collected great number of ultramafic xenoliths from the central part of the region, Medves-plateau (Eresztvény, Magyarbánya) and Baby hill (Ratka, Filakovske Kovace, Terbelovce), and detailed petrographic studies were carried out. As a result, beside the dominating lherzolite xenoliths, large number of wehrlite xenoliths also appeared, in which the modal proportion of clinopyroxene was increased in contrast to the descending amount of ortopyroxene. These wehrlite xenoliths show very unique texture, which is characterized by irregularly shaped olivine grains hosted in clinopyroxene and vermicular spinel inclusions in clinopyroxenes. According to petrographic features, ten wehrlite xenoliths have been selected for a detailed study. Based on the major elements of rock forming minerals, Fe and Mn enrichment in olivines, Ti, Al and Fe enrichment in clinopyroxenes, and Fe and Ti enrichment in spinels can be observed compared to those of lherzolite xenoliths. In the studied wehrlite xenoliths silicate, fluid and sulfide inclusions are also abundant. We focused on the latter ones in this thesis. The mineralogy of these multi-phase sulfides is in agreement with those usually found in the upper mantle with domination of pyrrhotite, pentlandite and chalcopyrite. However, bulk composition of the sulfides slightly differs from the lherzolite xenoliths. Sulfides in wehrlite xenoliths show higher Fe and lower Cu concentrations. Based on our detailed petrography and geochemistry of rock forming constituents and sulfide minerals, wehrlite xenoliths are products of a process called stealth mantle metasomatism where new minerals, in our case clinopyroxene is introduced to the system that is mineralogically indistinguishable from common upper mantle peridotites. This metasomatism is supposed to be

  2. Re-Os isotopic composition of peridotitic sulphide inclusions in diamonds from Ellendale, Australia: Age constraints on Kimberley cratonic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, K. V.; Shirey, S. B.; Richardson, S. H.; le Roex, A. P.; Gurney, J. J.

    2010-06-01

    Sulphide-bearing diamonds recovered from the ˜20 Ma Ellendale 4 and 9 lamproite pipes in north-western Australia were investigated to determine the nitrogen aggregation state of the diamonds and Re-Os isotope geochemistry of the sulphide inclusions. The majority of diamond studies have been based on diamonds formed in the sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) below stable cratons, whereas the Ellendale lamproites intrude the King Leopold Orogen, south of the Kimberley craton. The sulphide inclusions consist of pyrrhotite-pentlandite-chalcopyrite assemblages, and can be divided into peridotitic and eclogitic parageneses on the basis of their Ni and Os contents. A lherzolitic paragenesis for the high-Ni sulphide inclusions is suggested from their Re and Os concentrations. Regression analysis of the Re-Os isotope data for the lherzolitic sulphides yields an age of 1426 ± 130 Ma, with an initial 187Os/ 188Os ratio of 0.1042 ± 0.0034. The upper limit of the uncertainty on the 187Os/ 188Os initial ratio gives a Re depletion age of 2.96 Ga, indicating the presence of SCLM beneath Ellendale since at least the Mesoarchaean, with the lherzolitic diamond-forming event much younger and unrelated to the craton keel stabilisation. The nitrogen aggregation state of the diamonds and calculated mantle residence temperatures suggest an origin and storage of the Ellendale diamonds in a stable cratonic SCLM, consistent with the King Leopold Orogen being cratonised by about 1.8 Ga. The diamonds do not show evidence for pervasive deformation or platelet degradation, which suggests that the diamonds had a relatively undisturbed 1.4 billion year mantle storage history.

  3. Mineral associations and major element compositions of base metal sulphides from the subcontinental lithospheric mantle of NE Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galán, Gumer; Cruz, Erzika; Fernández-Roig, Mercè; Martínez, Francisco J.; Oliveras, Valentí

    2016-02-01

    This study deals with textural types and major element compositions of Cu-Ni-Fe sulphides from spinel lherzolite, harzburgite and olivine websterite xenoliths found in alkali basaltic rocks of the Neogene-Quaternary volcanic zone of Catalonia (NE Spain). Sulphides in harzburgites and websterites are scarce. Four textural types have been distinguished: inclusions in silicates and spinel, trails of small droplets often radiating from inclusions, interstitial grains, and grains related to pyrometamorphic textures. The mineral associations are dominated by one or two low-temperature monosulphide solid solutions: mss1, mss2, occasionally accompanied by pyrrhotite, pentlandite and Cu-rich sulphides. Compositions of mss1 are more Fe-enriched in inclusions and interstitial grains than in grains related to pyrometamorphism. Compositions of mss2 are Ni-rich very close to pentlandite. Sulphide bulk compositions correspond to high-temperature monosulphide solid solution equilibrated with a relatively Cu-Ni enriched sulphide melt at 1100-1000 °C. The breakdown products of these earlier compositions could have been either equilibrated below 600, 300 °C or being at disequilibrium. A restitic origin is consistent with the main sulphide mineral associations, the estimated melt extraction for peridotites (<30 %) and with the fact that lherzolites are less affected by cryptic metasomatism than harzburgites . However, Ni exchange coefficients between olivine and the high-temperature monosulphide solid solution underestimate equilibrium values. This suggests that some lherzolites could derive from pervasive refertilization. The scarcity of sulphides in websterites is explained by S incompatible behaviour during the formation of earlier cumulates from the mafic alkaline magmas which caused the cryptic metasomatism.

  4. How mantle heterogeneity can affect geochemistry of magmas and their styles of emplacement: a fascinating tale revealed by Etna alkaline lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viccaro, Marco; Zuccarello, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Geochemical investigations of Mt. Etna magmas have led to notable findings on the nature of compositional heterogeneity of the mantle source beneath the volcano. Some of the observed features explain the short-term geochemical variability of volcanic rocks erupted at Mt. Etna in recent times, which are characterized by increase of LILE, 87Sr/86Sr and decrease of 143Nd/144Nd, 206Pb/204Pb,176Hf/177Hf. This compositional behavior has not attributed exclusively to differentiation processes such as fractional crystallization, crustal assimilation and effects of volatile flushing. In this study, based on some geochemical similarities of the Etnean and Hyblean alkaline magmas, we have modeled partial melting of a composite source constituted by two rock types, inferred by various observations performed on some Hyblean xenoliths, namely: a spinel lherzolite bearing phlogopite-amphibole and a garnet pyroxenite in form of veins intruded into lherzolite that is interpreted as metasomatic high-temperature fluids (silicate melts) crystallized at mantle conditions. Partial melting modeling has been applied to each rock type and the resulting primary liquids have been then mixed in various proportions. The concentrations of major and trace elements along with the water obtained from the modeling are remarkably comparable with those of Etnean melts re-equilibrated at primary conditions. Different proportions of spinel lherzolite bearing metasomatic phases and garnet pyroxenite can account for the signature of a large spectrum of Etnean alkaline magmas and for their geochemical variability through time. Our study implies that magmas characterized by variable compositions and volatile contents directly inherited from the source can undergo distinct histories of ascent and evolution in the plumbing system at crustal levels, potentially leading to a wide range of eruptive styles. A rather shallow source inferred from the model also excludes the presence of deep mantle structures

  5. The basaltic volcanism of the Dumisseau Formation in the Sierra de Bahoruco, SW Dominican Republic: A record of the mantle plume-related magmatism of the Caribbean Large Igneous Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escuder-Viruete, Javier; Joubert, Marc; Abad, Manuel; Pérez-Valera, Fernando; Gabites, Janet

    2016-06-01

    The basaltic volcanism of the Dumisseau Fm in the Sierra de Bahoruco, SW Dominican Republic, offers the opportunity to study, on land, the volcanism of the Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP). It consists of an at least 1.5 km-thick sequence of submarine basaltic flows and pyroclastic deposits, intruded by doleritic dykes and sills. Three geochemical groups have been identified: low-Ti tholeiites (group I); high-Ti transitional basalts (group II); and high-Ti and LREE-enriched alkaline basalts (group III). These geochemical signatures indicate a plume source for all groups of basalts, which are compositionally similar to the volcanic rocks that make up various CLIP fragments in the northern region of the Caribbean Plate. Trace element modelling indicates that group I magmas are products of 8-20% melting of spinel lherzolite, group II magmas result 4-10% melting of a mixture of spinel and garnet lherzolite, and group III basalts are derived by low degrees (0.05-4%) of melting of garnet lherzolite. Dynamic melting models suggest that basalts represent aggregate melts produced by progressive decompression melting in a mantle plume. There is no compositional evidence for the involvement of a Caribbean supra-subduction zone mantle or crust in the generation of the basalts. Two 40Ar/39Ar whole-rock ages reflect the crystallisation of group II magmas at least in the late Campanian (~ 74 Ma) and the lower Eocene (~ 53 Ma). All data suggest that the Dumisseau Fm is an emerged fragment of the CLIP, which continues southward through the Beata Ridge

  6. Trace Element and Os-Hf-Nd-Sr Isotope Systematics of Pervasively Metasomatised Ancient Lithospheric Mantle at the Southeastern rim of the Siberian Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionov, D.; Weis, D.; Shirey, S.; Prikhodko, V.; Chazot, G.

    2001-12-01

    Spinel peridotite xenoliths in Late Cenozoic basalts from the Aldan-Stanovoi shield show effects of Meso-Cenozoic tectonic re-activation and magmatism on the ancient lithospheric mantle. Most of the xenoliths are harzburgites and cpx-poor lherzolites; less common are fertile lherzolites and olivine-rich cumulates. Petrographic and chemical data indicate profound metasomatic alteration of the refractory peridotites, possibly due to interaction with evolved magmatic liquids: precipitation of secondary clinopyroxene and gabbroic interstitial material, low Mg-numbers of olivine and whole-rocks in combination with high Cr in spinel; high whole-rock Ca/Al, enrichments in highly incompatible elements and/or inversely U-shaped REE patterns. Re abundances in all xenoliths are <0.06 ppb; Os abundances range from 0.1 to 4 ppb. Re and Os (0.9-3 ppb) in a subset of samples (including all cpx-rich lherzolites) that show no or limited metasomatism are positively correlated with modal clinopyroxene or whole-rock Al. 187/188Os in those xenoliths show linear correlations with Al or modal cpx consistent with a depletion age about 2 Ga and the formation of the lithosphere in the Precambrian. By contrast, the metasomatised refractory (2-7% cpx) xenoliths show a broad range in Os abundances and 187/188Os values (0.116-0.127), possibly due to disturbance of the Re-Os system during metasomatism. 176/177Hf is above the N-MORB average in one clinopyroxene separate and range between BSE and MORB values in the few other samples analysed. The 176/177Hf variations could be explained by mixing of ancient depleted mantle with an OIB-type metasomatic agent. We conclude that the xenoliths represent cratonic mantle strongly modified by metasomatism in hot-spot or subduction-related environments, possibly following removal of the cratonic keel and involving underplating of basaltic melts and their cumulates.

  7. Variably Depleted Peridotites from Loma Caribe (Dominican Republic): A Possible Record of Subduction Initiation beneath the Greater Antilles Paleo-Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesi, C.; Garrido, C. J.; Proenza, J. A.; Butjosa, L.; Lewis, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Several mantle peridotite massifs crop out as isolated dismembered bodies in tectonic belts along the northern margin of the Caribbean plate. Among these bodies, the Loma Caribe peridotite forms the core of the Median Belt in central Dominican Republic. This peridotite massif is mainly composed of Cpx-bearing harzburgite, harzburgite, lherzolite and (Opx-bearing) dunite, locally intruded by gabbroic rocks of Barremian age (~ 125 Ma). Mg# of olivine increases from lower values in lherzolite (90), to higher values in Cpx-harzburgite (91), harzburgite (92) and dunite (92-94). Cr# of spinel spans from 0.23 in lherzolite to 0.87 in dunite, and progressively increases from fertile to refractory lithologies. These variations overlap the mineral compositions of both abyssal and supra-subduction zone peridotites. The sample/chondrite REE concentrations of whole rocks are variable (0.002 < LREEN < 0.11 and 0.003 < HREEN < 1.02), and the HREE contents generally reflect the fertility of the samples. Similar to mineral chemistry, these trace element abundances overlap the compositions of both highly depleted supra-subduction and more fertile abyssal peridotites. Peridotites are variably enriched in the most incompatible and fluid-mobile trace elements (Cs, Rb, Ba, Th, U and Pb), and show negative anomalies of Nb and Ta. MREE/HREE fractionations in whole rocks and clinopyroxene support that these rocks are residues after initial fractional melting (~ 4%) in the garnet stability field and additional melting (~ 5-15%) in the spinel peridotite facies. The relative enrichment in incompatible and fluid-mobile elements (e.g., LILE and LREE) probably resulted from interaction of melting residues with ascending fluids/melts. We interpret the compositional variability of the Loma Caribe peridotite as reflecting different stages of generation of sub-oceanic mantle lithosphere during the Lower Cretaceous initiation of subduction beneath the Greater Antilles Paleo-arc.

  8. Depletion, cryptic metasomatism, and modal metasomatism (refertilization) of Variscan lithospheric mantle: Evidence from major elements, trace elements, and Sr-Nd-Os isotopes in a Saxothuringian garnet peridotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon Medaris, L.; Ackerman, Lukáš; Jelínek, Emil; Michels, Zachary D.; Erban, Vojtěch; Kotková, Jana

    2015-06-01

    Orogenic garnet peridotites of diverse origins and histories in the Bohemian Massif attest to a variety of mantle processes, including partial melting, cryptic metasomatism, and modal metasomatism (refertilization), all of which are recorded by Saxothuringian garnet peridotite from the T-7 borehole in northern Bohemia. The T-7 peridotite consists of interlayered garnet lherzolite, harzburgite, and phlogopite-garnet pyroxenite lenses that yield peak temperatures and pressures of 1030-1150 °C and 36.1-48.0 kbar. Olivine crystallographic preferred orientations exhibit [axial](010) slip, corresponding to a pure shear component of deformation under relatively low flow stress conditions. Some lherzolite samples are fertile, resembling primitive mantle in major and trace element composition, but other lherzolites are slightly depleted in incompatible major elements, HREE, and HFSE, and slightly enriched in LREE. Harzburgite is depleted in incompatible major elements, HREE, and HFSE, but enriched in LREE. Harzburgite adjacent to pyroxenite has been refertilized, containing phlogopite, less olivine, more orthopyroxene, and more garnet than distal harzburgite. The T-7 peridotite compositions are the result of variable degrees of partial melting in the spinel stability field, followed by cryptic metasomatism and modal metasomatism by transient basaltic melts in the garnet field. Trace elements, Sr and Nd isotopes, and occurrence of phlogopite reflect a subduction component in the metasomatising melts. Partial melting of the T-7 peridotite was a Proterozoic event, as indicated by Rhenium depletion model ages (TRD); the age of cryptic and modal metasomatism is unconstrained, but is thought to be related to Variscan subduction and amalgamation of the Bohemian Massif.

  9. Water and its influence on the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary.

    PubMed

    Green, David H; Hibberson, William O; Kovács, István; Rosenthal, Anja

    2010-09-23

    The Earth has distinctive convective behaviour, described by the plate tectonics model, in which lateral motion of the oceanic lithosphere of basaltic crust and peridotitic uppermost mantle is decoupled from the underlying mechanically weaker upper mantle (asthenosphere). The reason for differentiation at the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary is currently being debated with relevant observations from geophysics (including seismology) and geochemistry (including experimental petrology). Water is thought to have an important effect on mantle rheology, either by weakening the crystal structure of olivine and pyroxenes by dilute solid solution, or by causing low-temperature partial melting. Here we present a novel experimental approach to clarify the role of water in the uppermost mantle at pressures up to 6 GPa, equivalent to a depth of 190 km. We found that for lherzolite in which a water-rich vapour is present, the temperature at which a silicate melt first appears (the vapour-saturated solidus) increases from a minimum of 970 °C at 1.5 GPa to 1,350 °C at 6 GPa. We have measured the water content in lherzolite to be approximately 180 parts per million, retained in nominally anhydrous minerals at 2.5 and 4 GPa at temperatures above and below the vapour-saturated solidus. The hydrous mineral pargasite is the main water-storage site in the uppermost mantle, and the instability of pargasite at pressures greater than 3 GPa (equivalent to more than about 90 km depth) causes a sharp drop in both the water-storage capacity and the solidus temperature of fertile upper-mantle lherzolite. The presence of interstitial melt in mantle with more than 180 parts per million of water at pressures greater than 3 GPa alters mantle rheology and defines the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. Modern asthenospheric mantle acting as the source for mid-oceanic ridge basalts has a water content of 50-200 parts per million (refs 3-5). We show that this matches the

  10. Diamond genesis, seismic structure, and evolution of the Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe craton.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Steven B; Harris, Jeffrey W; Richardson, Stephen H; Fouch, Matthew J; James, David E; Cartigny, Pierre; Deines, Peter; Viljoen, Fanus

    2002-09-01

    The lithospheric mantle beneath the Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe craton of southern Africa shows variations in seismic P-wave velocity at depths within the diamond stability field that correlate with differences in the composition of diamonds and their syngenetic inclusions. Middle Archean mantle depletion events initiated craton keel formation and early harzburgitic diamond formation. Late Archean accretionary events involving an oceanic lithosphere component stabilized the craton and contributed a younger Archean generation of eclogitic diamonds. Subsequent Proterozoic tectonic and magmatic events altered the composition of the continental lithosphere and added new lherzolitic and eclogitic diamonds to the Archean diamond suite. PMID:12215642

  11. Asthenosphere–lithosphere interactions in Western Saudi Arabia: Inferences from 3He/4He in xenoliths and lava flows from Harrat Hutaymah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, Kevin;; Graham, David W; Thornber, Carl; Duncan, Robert A; Kent, Adam J.R.; Al-Amri, Abdulla

    2016-01-01

    Elevated 3He/4He in the western harrats has been observed only at Rahat (up to 11.8 RA; Murcia et al., 2013), a volcanic field situated above thinned lithosphere beneath the Makkah-Medinah-Nafud volcanic lineament. Previous work established that spinel lherzolites at Hutaymah are sourced near the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), while other xenolith types there are derived from shallower depths within the lithosphere itself (Thornber, 1992). Helium isotopes are consistent with melts originating near the LAB beneath many of the Arabian harrats, and any magma derived from the Afar mantle plume currently appears to be of minor importance.

  12. Implications of spinel compositions for the petrotectonic history of abyssal peridotite from Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T.; Jin, Z.; Wang, Y.; Tao, C.

    2012-12-01

    Abyssal peridotites generate at mid-ocean ridges. Lherzolite and harzburgite are the main rock types of peridotites in the uppermost mantle. The lherzolite subtype, less depleted and less common in ophiolites, characterizes mantle diapirs and slow-spreading ridges. Along the Earth's mid-ocean ridges, abyssal peridotites undergo hydration reactions to become serpentinite minerals, especially in slow to ultraslow spreading mid-ocean ridges. Spinel is common in small quantities in peridotites, and its compositions have often been used as petrogenetic indicators [1]. The Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) is one of the two ultraslow spreading ridges in the world. The studied serpentinized peridotite sample was collected by the 21st Voyage of the Chinese oceanic research ship Dayang Yihao (aka Ocean No. 1) from a hydrothermal field (63.5°E, 28.0°S, and 3660 m deep) in SWIR. The studied spinels in serpentinized lherzolite have four zones with different compositions: relic, unaltered core is magmatic Al-spinels; micro- to nano- sized ferrichromite zoned particles; narrow and discontinuous magnetite rim; and chlorite aureoles. The values Cr# of the primary Al-spinels indicate the range of melting for abyssal peridotites from SWIR extends from ~4% to ~7% [2]. The alteration rims of ferrichromite have a chemical composition characterized by Fe enrichment and Cr# increase indicating chromite altered under greenschist-amphibolite facies. Magnetites formed in syn- and post- serpentinization. Chlorite (clinochlore) formed at the boundary and crack of spinel indicating it had undergone with low-temperature MgO- and SiO2-rich hydrothermal fluids [3]. It suggests that serpentinized lherzolite from SWIR had undergone poly-stage hydration reactions with a wide range of temperature. Acknowledgments: EMPA experiment was carried out by Xihao Zhu and Shu Zheng in The Second Institute of Oceanography and China University of Geosciences, respectively. The work was supported by NSFC

  13. Water and its influence on the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary.

    PubMed

    Green, David H; Hibberson, William O; Kovács, István; Rosenthal, Anja

    2010-09-23

    The Earth has distinctive convective behaviour, described by the plate tectonics model, in which lateral motion of the oceanic lithosphere of basaltic crust and peridotitic uppermost mantle is decoupled from the underlying mechanically weaker upper mantle (asthenosphere). The reason for differentiation at the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary is currently being debated with relevant observations from geophysics (including seismology) and geochemistry (including experimental petrology). Water is thought to have an important effect on mantle rheology, either by weakening the crystal structure of olivine and pyroxenes by dilute solid solution, or by causing low-temperature partial melting. Here we present a novel experimental approach to clarify the role of water in the uppermost mantle at pressures up to 6 GPa, equivalent to a depth of 190 km. We found that for lherzolite in which a water-rich vapour is present, the temperature at which a silicate melt first appears (the vapour-saturated solidus) increases from a minimum of 970 °C at 1.5 GPa to 1,350 °C at 6 GPa. We have measured the water content in lherzolite to be approximately 180 parts per million, retained in nominally anhydrous minerals at 2.5 and 4 GPa at temperatures above and below the vapour-saturated solidus. The hydrous mineral pargasite is the main water-storage site in the uppermost mantle, and the instability of pargasite at pressures greater than 3 GPa (equivalent to more than about 90 km depth) causes a sharp drop in both the water-storage capacity and the solidus temperature of fertile upper-mantle lherzolite. The presence of interstitial melt in mantle with more than 180 parts per million of water at pressures greater than 3 GPa alters mantle rheology and defines the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. Modern asthenospheric mantle acting as the source for mid-oceanic ridge basalts has a water content of 50-200 parts per million (refs 3-5). We show that this matches the

  14. Characterization of hydration in the mantle lithosphere: Peridotite xenoliths from the Ontong Java Plateau as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demouchy, Sylvie; Ishikawa, Akira; Tommasi, Andréa; Alard, Olivier; Keshav, Shantanu

    2015-01-01

    We report concentrations of hydrogen (H) in upper mantle minerals of peridotites (olivine and pyroxenes) transported by alnöitic lavas, which erupted on the southwestern border of the Ontong Java Plateau (Malaita, Solomon Islands, West Pacific). Unpolarized FTIR analyses show that olivine, orthopyroxene, and diopside contain 2-32 ppm, 162-362 ppm and 159-459 ppm wt H2O, respectively. In the studied lherzolites, garnets are anhydrous. The concentration of hydrogen within individual olivine and pyroxene grains is almost homogeneous, indicating no evidence of dehydration or hydration by ionic diffusion. In the lherzolite, the concentration of hydrogen in olivine tends to increase weakly with depth (based on geothermobarometry), consistent with the increase of water solubility with increasing water fugacity as a function of pressure, but concentrations remain well below water-saturation values determined experimentally. The highest concentration of H in olivine (32 ppm wt H2O) is, however, found in refractory spinel harzburgites, which equilibrated at depths of 85 km., while deeper specimens as the high-temperature spinel harzburgites, and some of the garnet lherzolites, contain less hydrogen in olivine. Olivines from pyroxene- or pargasite-rich peridotites have also lower hydrogen concentrations. We interpret the high hydrogen concentrations in olivine from the refractory spinel harzburgites as due to (1) simultaneous hydration and metasomatism of the lithospheric mantle by a water-rich silicate melt/fluid, during which hydrogen follows MREE and where spinel harzburgite have experienced 'stealth' metasomatism, and/or (2) to a late 'fleeting' hydrogen metasomatism, which would hydrate the rock after this first 'stealth' metasomatism event. In the second case, the composition of the 'fleeting' percolating fluid (small volume fraction of very evolved fluids, with high volatiles concentration and transient properties) is likely to be linked to the decrease of the plume

  15. Al-augite and Cr-diopside ultramafic xenoliths in basaltic rocks from western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilshire, H.G.; Shervais, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    Ultramafic xenoliths in basalts from the western United States are divided into Al-augite and Cr-diopside groups. The Al-augite group is characterized by Al, Ti-rich augites, comparatively Fe-rich olivine and orthopyroxene, and Al-rich spinel, the Cr-diopside group by Cr-rich clinopyroxene and spinel and by Mg-rich olivine and pyroxenes. Both groups have a wide range of subtypes, but the Al-augite group is dominated by augite-rich varieties, and the Cr-diopside group by olivine-rich lherzolites. ?? 1975.

  16. Variable mineralization processes during the formation of the Permian Hulu Ni-Cu sulfide deposit, Xinjiang, Northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yun; Xue, Chunji; Zhao, Xiaobo; Yang, Yongqiang; Ke, Junjun; Zu, Bo

    2016-08-01

    The Permian Hulu Ni-Cu sulfide deposit is located at the southern margin of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) in Northern Xinjiang, Northwestern China. The host intrusion of the Hulu deposit is composed of a layered mafic-ultramafic sequence and a dike-like unit. The layered sequence is composed of harzburgite, lherzolite, pyroxenite, gabbro, gabbrodiorite and diorite. The dike-like body comprises lherzolite and gabbro. Sulfide orebodies occur mainly within the harzburgite, pyroxenite and lherzolite at the base of the layered sequence and within the lherzolite in the dike-like body. Sulfide mineralization from the Hulu deposit shows significant depletion of PGE relative to Cu and Ni. These elements show good positive correlations with S in the sulfide mineralization from the dike-like unit but relatively weak correlations in the sulfide mineralization from the layered sequence. The sulfide mineralization from the layered unit shows excellent positive correlations between Ir and Os, Ru or Rh, and poor relationships between Ir and Pt or Pd. On the contrary, sulfide mineralization from the dike-like unit shows good correlations in the diagrams of Os, Ru, Rh, Pt and Pd against Ir. Both high Cu/Pd ratios (8855-481,398) and our modeling indicate that PGE depletion resulted from sulfide removal in a deep staging magma chamber. The evolved PGE-depleted magmas then ascended to the shallower magma chamber and became sulfide saturation due to crustal contamination. Both low Se/S ratios (33.5 × 10-6-487.5 × 10-6) and a negative correlation between Se/S and Cu/Pd ratios are consistent with the addition of crustal S. A large number of sulfide liquids segregated with minor crystallization of monosulfide solid solution (MSS) in the shallower magma chamber. When new magma pulses with unfractionated sulfide droplets entered the shallower magma chamber, the sulfide slurry containing crystallized MSS may be disrupted and mixed with the unfractionated sulfide droplets. The

  17. The formation of volcanic centers at the Colorado Plateau as a result of the passage of aqueous fluid through the oceanic lithosphere and the subcontinental mantle: New implications for the planetary water cycle in the western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Holger; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Gasharova, Biliana; Jung, Haemyeong

    2012-10-01

    We provide new petrological evidence for the strong influence of water on the formation of the oceanic lithospheric mantle, the subcontinental mantle above, and the continental lithosphere. Our analysis throws new light on the hypothesis that new continental lithosphere was formed by the passage of silicate-rich aqueous fluid through the sub-continental mantle. In order to investigate this hypothesis, we analyzed a representative collection of lherzolite and harzburgite xenoliths from the sample volcano known as "The Thumb", located in the center of the Colorado Plateau, western United States. The studied sample collection exhibits multi-stage water enrichment processes along point, line and planar defect structures in nominally anhydrous minerals and the subsequent formation of the serpentine polymorph antigorite along grain boundaries and in totally embedded annealed cracks. Planar defect structures act like monomineralic and interphase grain boundaries in the oceanic lithosphere and the subcontinental mantle beneath the North American plate, which was hydrated by the ancient oceanic Farallon plate during the Cenozoic and Mesozoic eras. We used microspectroscopical, petrological, and seismological techniques to confirm multi-stage hydration from a depth of ˜150 km to just below the Moho depth. High-resolution mapping of the water distribution over homogeneous areas and fully embedded point, line and planar defects in olivine crystals of lherzolitic and harzburgitic origin by synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy enabled us to resolve local wet spots and thus reconstruct the hydration process occurring at a depth of ˜150 km (T ≈ 1225 °C). These lherzolites originated from the middle part of the Farallon mantle slab; they were released during the break up of the Farallon mantle slab, caused by the instability of the dipping slab. The background hydration levels in homogeneous olivines reached ˜138 ppm wt H2O, and the water concentration at the planar defects

  18. Water in the lithospheric mantle beneath a Phanerozoic continental belt: FTIR analyses of Alligator Lake Xenoliths (Yukon, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelber, M.; Peslier, A. H.; Brandon, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Water in the mantle influences melting, metasomatism, viscosity and electrical conductivity. The Alligator Lake mantle xenolith suite is one of three bimodal peridotite suites from the northern Canadian Cordillera brought to the surface by alkali basalts, i.e., it consists of chemically distinct lherzolites and harzburgites [1-2]. The lherzolites have equilibration temperatures about 50 °C lower than the harzburgites and are thought to represent the fertile upper mantle of the region. The harzburgites might have come from slightly deeper in the mantle and/or be the result of a melting event above an asthenospheric upwelling detected as a seismic anomaly at 400-500 km depth [3]. Major and trace element data are best interpreted as the lherzolite mantle having simultaneously experienced 20-25% partial melting and a metasomatic event to create the harzburgites [3]. Well-characterized xenoliths are being analyzed for water by FTIR. Harzburgites contain 29-52 ppm H2O in orthopyroxene (opx) and ~140 ppm H2O in clinopyroxene (cpx). The lherzolites have H2O contents of 27-150 ppm in opx and 46-361 ppm in cpx. Despite correlating with enrichments in LREE, the water contents of the harzburgite pyroxenes are low relative to those of typical peridotite xenoliths [4], suggesting that the metasomatic agents were water-poor, contrarily to what has been suggested before [3]. The water content of cpx is about double that of opx indicating equilibrium. Olivine water contents are low (< 5 ppm H2O) and out of equilibrium with those of opx and cpx, which may be due to H loss during xenolith ascent. This is consistent with olivines containing more water in their cores than their rims. Olivines exclusively exhibit water bands in the 3400-3000 cm-1 range, which may be indicative of a reduced environment [5]. [1] Francis. 1987 JP 28, 569-97. [2] Eiche et al. 1987 CMP 95, 191-201. [3] Shi et al. 1997 CMP 131, 39-53. [4] Peslier et al. 2015 GGG 154, 98-117. [5] Bai et al. 1993 PCM 19, 460-71.

  19. Re-Os isotopic constraints on the evolution of the Bangong-Nujiang Tethyan oceanic mantle, Central Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qi-Shuai; Shi, Ren-Deng; O'Reilly, Suzanne Y.; Griffin, William L.; Zhang, Ming; Liu, De-Liang; Zhang, Xiao-Ran

    2015-05-01

    Geochemical (including Re-Os isotopic) studies of the mantle rocks of ophiolites in the Bangong-Nujiang suture zone in central Tibet have provided a coherent picture of the evolution of the Bangong-Nujiang Tethyan oceanic mantle from mid-ocean ridge (MOR) to subduction-zone (SSZ) settings. Clinopyroxene (cpx)-harzburgites and lherzolites in the Bangong Lake ophiolite were formed in a MOR setting, as demonstrated by the Cr# of spinels (< 0.60) and whole-rock LREE-depleted patterns. Suprachondritic 187Re/188Os ratios (up to 1.833) of cpx-harzburgites and their spinels can be explained by interaction with melts derived from high Re/Os sources. Re-depletion (TRD) model ages (0.48-0.55 Ga) suggest these rocks may represent a Pan-African domain beneath the Gondwana continent. High TiO2 contents of spinels and whole-rock samples imply that the lherzolites were formed through a refertilization process. Similarly, Re-Os isotopic systematics of sulfides in the lherzolites (187Re/188Os: 0.173-1.717, 187Os/188Os: 0.12646-0.17340) demonstrate that they are mixtures of primary and secondary sulfides. 187Os/188Os ratios (0.1211-0.1226) of whole-rock lherzolites give TRD ages of 0.73-0.97 Ga, indicating the presence of Neoproterozoic lithospheric mantle under the spreading ridges. Mantle rocks in the SSZ-type ophiolites from Bangong Lake, Dongqiao and Nagqu reflect the complex evolution of the Bangong-Nujiang oceanic mantle during the SSZ stage. Most harzburgites from the Bangong Lake ophiolite give TRD ages of 1.0-1.5 Ga, possibly representing relics of a Mesoproterozoic lithospheric mantle. However, three samples have both high Os contents (1.32-4.45 ppb) and near-chondritic 187Os/188Os (0.1260-0.1297), and may represent Mesozoic oceanic lithospheric mantle. 187Os/188Os ratios of dunites and harzburgites from the Dongqiao and Nagqu ophiolites vary from 0.1174 to 0.1316 and give TRD ages up to 1.43 Ga, also suggesting the existence of a Mesoproterozoic lithospheric mantle which

  20. Pyroxene-spinel intergrowths in lunar and terrestrial pyroxenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okamura, F. P.; Mccallum, I. S.; Stroh, J. M.; Ghose, S.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes the oriented intergrowth of spinel and pyroxene in a pigeonite from Luna 20, an augite from Apollo 16 anorthosite 67075, and an orthopyroxene from a spinel lherzolite nodule from the San Quintin volcanic field, Mexico. Using Mo K alpha radiation, photographs were taken of small, hand-picked single-crystals. A mechanism of exsolution is suggested in which the oxygen framework remains intact and spinel nuclei are formed by the migration of cations from interstitial sites and tetrahedral sites in the original non-stoichiometric pyroxene.

  1. Evidence for a Heterogeneous Distribution of Water in the Martian Interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCubbin, Francis; Boyce, Jeremy W.; Srinvasan, Poorna; Santos, Alison R.; Elardo, Stephen M.; Filiberto, Justin; Steele, Andrew; Shearer, Charles K.

    2016-01-01

    The abundance and distribution of H2O within the terrestrial planets, as well as its timing of delivery, is a topic of vital importance for understanding the chemical and physical evolution of planets and their potential for hosting habitable environments. Analysis of planetary materials from Mars, the Moon, and the eucrite parent body (i.e., asteroid 4Vesta) have confirmed the presence of H2O within their interiors. Moreover, H and N isotopic data from these planetary materials suggests H2O was delivered to the inner solar system very early from a common source, similar in composition to the carbonaceous chondrites. Despite the ubiquity of H2O in the inner Solar System, the only destination with any prospects for past or present habitable environments at this time, outside of the Earth, is Mars. Although the presence of H2O within the martian interior has been confirmed, very little is known regarding its abundance and distribution within the martian interior and how the martian water inventory has changed over time. By combining new analyses of martian apatites within a large number of martian meteorite types with previously published volatile data and recently determined mineral-melt partition coefficients for apatite, we report new insights into the abundance and distribution of volatiles in the martian crust and mantle. Using the subset of samples that did not exhibit crustal contamination, we determined that the enriched shergottite mantle source has 36-73 ppm H2O and the depleted shergottite mantle source has 14-23 ppm H2O. This result is consistent with other observed geochemical differences between enriched and depleted shergottites and supports the idea that there are at least two geochemically distinct reservoirs in the martian mantle. We also estimated the H2O content of the martian crust using the revised mantle H2O abundances and known crust-mantle distributions of incompatible lithophile elements. We determined that the bulk martian crust has

  2. Gold in the mantle: The role of pyroxenites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, J. Edward; Pearson, Norman J.; O'Reilly, Suzanne Y.; Griffin, William L.

    2016-02-01

    Mantle pyroxenites are the crystallised products of mafic silicate melts, which are commonly invoked as metasomatic agents in the upper mantle. This study has analysed the trace elements of sulfides, with a specific focus on gold, hosted in a suite of mantle pyroxenite xenoliths from Qilin in the Cathaysia Block, southeast China. These are compared with sulfides hosted in peridotite xenoliths from the same locality to assess the difference in the abundances of Au, and a suite of siderophile and chalcophile elements between the sulfides hosted in mobile melts in the upper mantle and their host "wall" rocks. Both the peridotite- and pyroxenite-hosted sulfides show a wide spectrum of trace element contents. The pyroxenite-hosted sulfides typically have PGE and Au concentrations that are an order of magnitude or more below those measured in the peridotite-hosted sulfides (lherzolite-hosted sulfides: total PGE = 95 ± 118 ppm, Au = 1.4 ± 2.6 ppm; pyroxenite-hosted sulfides: total PGE = 0.25 ± 0.70 ppm, Au = 0.14 ± 0.39 ppm). Furthermore, the Ir group PGE (Ir, Os and Ru) are present in lower concentrations than the Pd-group PGE (Pd, Pt and Rh). This may lead to a distinct signature if the melts from which these sulfides crystallise interact with lherzolitic sulfides. The overall low abundances of these elements within the pyroxenites suggests that the parent melts are an inefficient medium for enriching any of these elements in the upper mantle.

  3. Multi-Isotopic evidence from West Eifel Xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemens, M. M.; Sprung, P.

    2015-12-01

    Mantle Xenoliths from the West Eifel intraplate volcanic field of Germany provide insights into the nature and evolution of the regional continental lithospheric mantle. Previous isotope studies have suggested a primary Paleoproterozoic depletion age, a second partial melting event in the early Cambrian, and a Variscan metasomatic overprint. Textural and Sr-Nd isotopic observations further suggest two episodes of melt infiltration of early Cretaceous and Quaternary age. We have investigated anhydrous, vein-free lherzolites from this region, focusing on the Dreiser Weiher and Meerfelder Maar localities. Hand separated spinel, olivine, ortho- and clinopryoxene, along with host and bulk rocks were dissolved and purified for Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and Lu-Hf analysis on the Cologne/Bonn Neptune MC-ICP-MS. We find an unexpected discontinuity between mineral separates and whole rocks. While the latter have significantly more radiogenic ɛNd and ɛHf, mineral separates imply close-to chondritic compositions. Our Lu-Hf data imply resetting of the Lu-Hf systematic after 200 Ma. Given the vein-free nature of the lherzolites, this appears to date to the second youngest metasomatic episode. We suggest that markedly radiogenic Nd and Hf were introduced during the Quarternary metasomatic episode and most likely reside on grain boundaries.

  4. Sapphirine and fluid inclusions in Tel Thanoun mantle xenoliths,Syria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilal, Ahmad

    2016-04-01

    Volcanoes along the Syrian rift, which extend a distance of about 1000 km, brought to the surface mantle xenoliths within erupted basalts, during multiples periods of volcanic activity. Xenoliths in early Cretaceous volcanoes originate in the garnet peridotite field of the subcontinental mantle, whereas those in recent Cenozoic volcanoes, the prime object of this study, are issued from shallower levels (spinel peridotite field). The recent discovery of sapphirine-bearing websterite in Tel Thanoun, a small volcanic diatreme inside the larger Quaternary volcanic field (Djebel Al Arab), allows us to estimate the P-T evolution and fluid-rock interaction at the volcanic source. Harzburgites and lherzolites are equilibrated at a temperature of about 1000 °C at a depth of 35-40 km. Sapphirine appears to have formed during cooling, at depth at a temperature of about 900 °C, at a time where spinel exsolution occurred in harzburgite and lherzolite pyroxenes. This occurred in the presence of a high-density pure CO2 fluid phase, still present in primary fluid inclusions. The highly-aluminous sapphirine-bearing protolith might be former garnet websterite (possibly uplifted during cretaceous magmatism), which resided and cooled in the spinel peridotite stability field, and was then dragged and brought to the surface by quaternary basalts.

  5. Timing of eclogite-facies metamorphism of mafic and ultramafic rocks from the Pohorje Mountains (Eastern Alps, Slovenia) based on Lu-Hf garnet geochronometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandmann, Sascha; Herwartz, Daniel; Kirst, Frederik; Froitzheim, Nikolaus; Nagel, Thorsten J.; Fonseca, Raúl O. C.; Münker, Carsten; Janák, Marian

    2016-10-01

    The metamorphic series of the Pohorje Mountains represents a part of the Eastern Alpine realm that was subjected to ultrahigh-pressure conditions during the Cretaceous Eo-Alpine orogenic cycle. The Slovenska Bistrica Ultramafic Complex located in the south-eastern Pohorje Mountains is an 8 km wide serpentinite body that contains lenses of garnet-bearing ultramafites and eclogites. It is embedded in and part of a mixed continental unit of metapelitic gneisses, orthogneisses, and eclogites. We present Lu-Hf garnet chronometry coupled with geochemical and petrological data from three samples: one garnet lherzolite, one eclogite from within the ultramafic complex, and one eclogite from the surrounding mixed unit. All obtained ages are identical within error, i.e. 96.6 ± 1.2 Ma and 94.8 ± 5.1 Ma, respectively, for the two eclogites and 91.6 ± 4.1 Ma for the garnet lherzolite. Garnet of all samples shows homogeneous concentrations of major bivalent elements due to high temperature re-equilibration. It does, however, preserve growth-related zoning with respect to Lu in all three samples implying that Lu-Hf ages still record garnet growth. The coincidence of ages suggests that the ultramafic complex and the surrounding continental mixed unit share the same subduction history, i.e. the complex was part of the subducting plate during and after the garnet growth stages.

  6. Geochemistry of the Madawara Igneous Complex, Bundelkhand Craton, Central India: Implications for PGE Metallogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manavalan, Satyanarayanan; Singh, Surya Prakash; Balaram, Vysetti; Niranjan, Mohanty

    2015-12-01

    The southern part of the Bundelkhand craton contains a series of a E-W trending mafic and ultramafic rocks, about 40 km in length and 2-4 km wide, that occur as intrusions within the Bundelkhand Gneissic Complex (BnGC). They are confined between the Madawara- Karitoran and Sonrai-Girar shear zones. Dunite, harzburgite, lherzolite and websterite are the commonly occurring ultramafic rocks that have high MgO, Ni, Cr, PGE and low Al2O3, CaO, K2O, TiO2 and V contents, and shows peridotitic affinity. A distinct trend of crystallization from peridotite to komatiitic basalt has been inferred from geochemical plots, which also indicates the occurrence of at least two varieties among the ultramafic suite of the Madawara ultramafic complex, namely, Group I comprising dunite, spinel peridotite, harzburgite and lherzolite, and Group II consisting of pyroxenite, websterite and olivine websterite. In several places, the rocks of Group II have an intrusive relationship with Group I, and are relatively enriched in total platinum group elements (PGE ~ 300 ppb). The discrimination diagrams suggest that the PGE are enriched in low sulphur-fugacity source magma at moderate to deeper depths by high degree of partial melting of the mantle.

  7. CMAS pyroxenes coexisting with mafic melts: new activity-composition models for THERMOCALC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, E. C.; Holland, T.; Powell, R.

    2009-12-01

    The results of thermodynamic calculations for pyroxenes in the CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (CMAS) system are presented, including calculations for equilibria with simple mafic melts. The underlying activity-composition models are written for use with the phase equilibrium calculation software THERMOCALC, and version 6 of its dataset. Two distinct orthopyroxene polymorphs may be modelled in the CMS subsystem below 10kb, in accordance with recently published experimental results. This approach provides an alternative to previous models, in which the orthopyroxene-protopyroxene loop within the enstatite-diopside join is curved, intersecting the enstatite composition at both ends. By incorporating two orthopyroxene phases in the model one may avoid the invocation of strongly anomalous thermodynamic properties for protoenstatite, and strongly curved phase field boundaries in P-T and T-X space. The full system pyroxene model includes a Ca-eskolaite endmember, representing excess silica content in aluminous clinopyroxene. It is therefore suitable for use in metabasic melting studies, in conjunction with the mafic melt model currently being formulated for THERMOCALC. Similar calculations offer an interpretation of the spinel lherzolite to garnet lherzolite transition and its likely path in pressure-temperature space, for which experimental evidence remains equivocal.

  8. Garnets from the Camafuca-Camazambo kimberlite (Angola).

    PubMed

    Correia, Eugénio A; Laiginhas, Fernando A T P

    2006-06-01

    This work presents a geochemical study of a set of garnets, selected by their colors, from the Camafuca-Camazambo kimberlite, located on northeast Angola. Mantle-derived garnets were classified according to the scheme proposed by Grütter et al. (2004) and belong to the G1, G4, G9 and G10 groups. Both sub-calcic (G10) and Ca-saturated (G9) garnets, typical, respectively, of harzburgites and lherzolites, were identified. The solubility limit of knorringite molecule in G10D garnets suggests they have crystallized at a minimum pressure of about 40 to 45 kbar (4-4.5 GPa). The occurrence of diamond stability field garnets (G10D) is a clear indicator of the potential of this kimberlite for diamond. The chemistry of the garnets suggests that the source for the kimberlite was a lherzolite that has suffered a partial melting that formed basaltic magma, leaving a harzburgite as a residue. PMID:16710568

  9. P-T Equilibrium Conditions of Xenoliths from the Udachnaya Kimberlite Pipe: Thermal Perturbations in the Lithospheric Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tychkov, Nikolay; Agashev, Alexey; Malygina, Elena; Pokhilenko, Nikolay

    2014-05-01

    Integrated study of 250 peridotite xenoliths from Udachnaya -East pipe show difference in mineral paragenesises and textural-structural peculiarities in the different level of cratonic lithosphere mantle (CLM). The compositions of minerals were determined using EPMA. Thermobarometric parameters (Brey, Kohller, 1990) were determined for all rocks occupying different fields on geothermal curve. The deepest layer (the pressure interval of 5.0-7.0 GPa) contains mostly pophyroclastic lherzolites. Anyway, some rocks of this layer have an idiomorphic texture being also enriched in incompatible components. Higher in the CLM sequence, the interval (4.2-6.3 GPa) is composed of the most depleted rocks: megacristalline ultradepleted harzburgite-dunites and depleted granular harzburgite-dunites, as well as lherzolites in a subordinate amount. They correspond strate to 35 mW/m2 and partly overlap the deeper layer in dapth. It is likely that rocks of this layer are in equilibrium and were not subject to significant secondary changes due to kimberlite magma intrusion. Thus, this interval of the CLM sequence reflects the true (relic) geotherm for the area of the Udachnaya kimberlite pipe. Moreover, it is obvious that this interval was a major supplier of diamonds into kimberlites of the Udachnaya pipe. The interval of 4.2-2.0 GPa in the CLM sequence is also composed of coarse depleted lherzolites and harzburgites. Rocks of this interval are slightly more enriched than those of the underlying interval. This is confirmed by the distinct predominance of lherzolites over harzburgite-dunites. The heat flow in this layer varies in the range of 38-45 mW/m2 and shows a general tendency to increase with decreasing depth. According to occurrence of nonequilibrium mineral assemblages and increased heat flow relative to the major heat flow of 35 mW/m2, this interval is similar to the deepest interval of secondary enriched rocks. Interval of less than 2.0 GPa composed of spinel lherzolites and

  10. Petrological constraints on evolution of continental lithospheric mantle beneath the northwestern Ethiopian plateau: Insight from mantle xenoliths from the Gundeweyn area, East Gojam, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemayehu, Melesse; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Zhu, Bin; Fentie, Birhanu; Abraham, Samuel; Haji, Muhammed

    2016-01-01

    Detailed petrographical observations and in-situ major- and trace-element data for minerals from ten spinel peridotite xenoliths from a new locality in Gundeweyn area, East Gojam, have been examined in order to understand the composition, equilibrium temperature and pressure conditions as well as depletion and enrichment processes of continental lithospheric mantle beneath the Ethiopian plateau. The peridotite samples are very fresh and, with the exception of one spinel harzburgite, are all spinel lherzolites. Texturally, the xenoliths can be divided into two groups as primary and secondary textures. Primary textures are protogranular and porphyroclastic while secondary ones include reaction, spongy and lamellae textures. The Fo content of olivine and Cr# of spinel ranges from 86.5 to 90.5 and 7.7 to 14.1 in the lherzolites, respectively and are 89.8 and 49.8, respectively, in the harzburgite. All of the lherzolites fall into the lower Cr# and Fo region in the olivine-spinel mantle array than the harzburgite, which indicates that they are fertile peridotites that experienced low degrees of partial melting and melt extraction. Orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene show variable Cr2O3 and Al2O3 contents regardless of their lithology. The Mg# of orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene are 87.3 to 90.1 and 85.8 to 90.5 for lherzolite and 90.4 and 91.2 for harzburgite, respectively. The peridotites have been equilibrated at a temperature and pressure ranging from 850 to 1100 °C and 10.2 to 30 kbar, respectively, with the highest pressure record from the harzburgite. They record high mantle heat flow between 60 and 150 mW/m2, which is not typical for continental environments (40 mW/m2). Such a high geotherm in continental area shows the presence of active mantle upwelling beneath the Ethiopian plateau, which is consistent with the tectonic setting of nearby area of the Afar plume. Clinopyroxene of five lherzolites and one harzburgite samples have a LREE enriched pattern and the rest

  11. Melting the hydrous, subarc mantle: the origin of primitive andesites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Alexandra L.; Grove, Timothy L.

    2015-08-01

    This experimental study is the first comprehensive investigation of the melting behavior of an olivine + orthopyroxene ± spinel—bearing fertile mantle (FM) composition as a function of variable pressure and water content. The fertile composition was enriched with a metasomatic slab component of ≤0.5 % alkalis and investigated from 1135 to 1470 °C at 1.0-2.0 GPa. A depleted lherzolite with 0.4 % alkali addition was also studied from 1225 to 1240 °C at 1.2 GPa. Melts of both compositions were water-undersaturated: fertile lherzolite melts contained 0-6.4 wt% H2O, and depleted lherzolite melts contained ~2.5 wt% H2O. H2O contents of experimental glasses are measured using electron microprobe, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and synchrotron-source reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, a novel technique for analyzing H2O in petrologic experiments. Using this new dataset in conjunction with results from previous hydrous experimental studies, a thermobarometer and a hygrometer-thermometer are presented to determine the conditions under which primitive lavas were last in equilibration with the mantle. These predictive models are functions of H2O content and pressure, respectively. A predictive melting model is also presented that calculates melt compositions in equilibrium with an olivine + orthopyroxene ± spinel residual assemblage (harzburgite). This model quantitatively predicts the following influences of H2O on mantle lherzolite melting: (1) As melting pressure increases, melt compositions become more olivine-normative, (2) as melting extent increases, melt compositions become depleted in the normative plagioclase component, and (3) as melt H2O content increases, melts become more quartz-normative. Natural high-Mg# [molar Mg/(Mg + Fe2+)], high-MgO basaltic andesite and andesite lavas—or primitive andesites (PAs)—contain high SiO2 contents at mantle-equilibrated Mg#s. Their compositional characteristics cannot be readily explained by melting

  12. Cosmogenic Radionuclides in Antarctic Meteorites: Preliminary Results on Terrestrial Ages and Temporal Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlovich, E.; Vogt, S.; Wolf, S. F.; Elmore, D.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1993-07-01

    the production rates for these radionuclides in this group of meteorites to be 18.2 +/- 2.3 and 58 +/- 13 dpm/kg respectively, consistent with production rates cited for falls [8]. Cosmic ray exposure ages using the ^10Be/^21Ne method outlined by Graf et al. [9] substantially agree with ages calculated from noble gases alone. Similar agreements are obtained between cosmic ray exposure ages based solely on noble gases and those calculated using ^26Al/^21Ne [9]. We calculated terrestrial ages using the secular equilibrium distribution for ^36Cl of 22.8 +/- 3.1 dpm/kg [10]. Our results are similar to those seen by Nishiizumi et al. [10], with a few ages ranging up to several hundred thousand years. It is worth noting that the Yamato meteorites measured in the present study, all of which happen to have been collected in the 1979 recovery effort ("Y79"), have a much older terrestrial age distribution (median age of 140 ka) than the Yamato distribution shown in [10]. We find it interesting that our Yamato age distribution is, however, consistent with the distribution of Y79 ages (median age, 110 ka) listed in [10], and that non-Y79 Yamato meteorites (median age in [10], 22 ka) seem to be responsible for a disproportionate number of the youngest Yamato meteorites. This possible collection area phenomenon is under investigation. Preliminary statistical analysis of the results using the preliminary terrestrial ages calculated here, trace-element data [3,4,11], and the methods elucidated in [2] is consistent with the notion that the meteorite flux sampled by the Earth has changed as a function of time. The latest results will be presented in Vail. References: [1] Koeberl C. and Cassidy W. A. (1991) GCA, 55, 3-18. [2] Lipschutz M. E. and Samuels S. M. (1991) GCA, 55, 19-34. [3] Wolf S. F. and Lipschutz M. E. (1992) LPS XXIII, 1545-1546. [4] Dodd R. T. et al. (1993) JGR, submitted. [5] Wetherill G. W. (1986) Nature, 319, 357-358. [6] Schultz L., personal communication. [7

  13. Water on Mars: Clues from Deuterium/Hydrogen and Water Contents of Hydrous Phases in SNC Meteorites.

    PubMed

    Watson, L L; Hutcheon, I D; Epstein, S; Stolper, E M

    1994-07-01

    Ion microprobe studies of hydrous amphibole, biotite, and apatite in shergottite-nakhlite-chassignite (SNC) meteorites, probable igneous rocks from Mars, indicate high deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratios relative to terrestrial values. The amphiboles contain roughly one-tentn as much water as expected, suggesting that SNC magmas were less hydrous than previously proposed. The high but variable D/H values of these minerals are best explained by postcrystallization D enrichment of initially D-poor phases by martian crustal fluids with near atmospheric D/H (about five times the terrestrial value). These igneous phases do not directly reflect the D/H ratios of martian "magmatic" water but provide evidence for a D-enriched martian crustal water reservoir.

  14. Outgassed Water on Mars: Constraints from Melt Inclusions in SNC Meteorites.

    PubMed

    McSween, H Y; Harvey, R P

    1993-03-26

    The SNC (shergottite-nakhlite-chassignite) meteorites, thought to be igneous rocks from Mars, contain melt inclusions trapped at depth in early-formed crystals. Determination of the pre-eruptive water contents of SNC parental magmas from calculations of the solidification histories of these amphibole-bearing inclusions indicates that martian magmas commonly contained 1.4 percent water by weight. When combined with an estimate of the volume of igneous materials on Mars, this information suggests that the total amount of water outgassed since 3.9 billion years ago corresponds to global depths on the order of 200 meters. This value is significantly higher than previous geochemical estimates but lower than estimates based on erosion by floods. These results imply a wetter Mars interior than has been previously thought and support suggestions of significant outgassing before formation of a stable crust or heterogeneous accretion of a veneer of cometary matter.

  15. Calcium carbonate and sulfate of possible extraterrestrial origin in the EETA 79001 meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, James L.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Wentworth, Susan J.

    1988-01-01

    Two varieties of Ca-carbonate were found in a total of three interior (greater than 2-cm depth) samples of glass inclusions from the shergottite meteorite, Elephant Moraine, Antarctica, A79001. Two of the samples, including the largest deposit around a vug near the center of the meteorite (8-cm depth), contained veins of granular calcite with significant Mg and P, either as Mg-calcite with dissolved P or as calcite with very finely intergrown Mg-bearing phosphate. The second variety, which occurred in a third sample with a previously documented high concentration of trapped gases, consisted of disseminated 10-20-micron anhedral grains of nearly pure CaCO3 and was intimately associated with laths and needles of Ca-sulfate (possibly gypsum). All evidence considered, it is probable that both varieties of Ca-carbonate (and the Ca-sulfate) formed on a planetary body (probably Mars) before the meteorite fell on earth.

  16. The stable isotopic compositions of indigenous carbon-bearing components in EETA 79001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmetz, C. P.; Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that the most likely source of SNC meteorites is Mars. An oblique impact on Mars, or vaporization of permafrost, by an impactor seem to be the most likely ejection mechanisms capable of accelerating material to the 5 km/s velocity needed to overcome the gravitational field of Mars. These ejection mechanisms involve a large shock event in the SNC class, the shergottites EETA 79001 and ALHA 77055 are the most likely shocked samples, in which whole rock pressures of 35 to 45 GPa have been estimated. Martian weathering products have also been identified in EETA 79001. Here, the author started a series of analyses of EETA 79001 using a high-sensitivity static mass spectrometer capable of measuring sub-nanogram quantities of carbon. Recent measurements of lithology C confirm that the shock-implanted atmospheric CO2 is released during the 1100 to 1200 C step.

  17. High D/H ratios of water in magmatic amphiboles in Chassigny: Possible constraints on the isotopic composition of magmatic water on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, L. L.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Epstein, S.; Stolper, E. M.

    1993-01-01

    The D/H ratios of kaersutitic amphiboles contained in magmatic inclusions in the Shergottites Nakhlites Chassignites (SNC) meteorite Chassigny using the ion microprobe were measured. A lower limit on the delta(D(sub SMOW)) of the amphiboles is +1420 +/- 47 percent. Assuming Chassigny comes from Mars and the amphiboles have not been subject to alteration after their crystallization, this result implies either that recycling of D-enriched Martian atmosphere-derived waters into the planetary interior has taken place, or that the primordial hydrogen isotopic composition of the interior of Mars differs significantly from that of the Earth (delta(D(sub SMOW)) approximately 0 percent). In addition, the measurements indicate that the amphiboles contain less than 0.3 wt. percent water. This is much lower than published estimates, and indicates a less-hydrous Chassigny parent magma than previously suggested.

  18. Outgassed water on Mars - Constraints from melt inclusions in SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.; Harvey, Ralph P.

    1993-01-01

    The SNC (shergottite-nakhlite-chassignite) meteorites, thought to be igneous rocks from Mars, contain melt inclusions trapped at depth in early-formed crystals. Determination of the pre-eruptive water contents of SNC parental magmas from calculations of the solidification histories of these amphibole-bearing inclusions indicates that Martian magmas commonly contained 1.4 percent water by weight. When combined with an estimate of the volume of igneous materials on Mars, this information suggests that the total amount of water outgassed since 3.9 billion years ago corresponds to global depths on the order of 200 meters. This value is significantly higher than previous geochemical estimates but lower than estimates based on erosion by floods. These results imply a wetter Mars interior than has been previously thought and support suggestions of significant outgassing before formation of a stable crust or heterogeneous accretion of a veneer of cometary matter.

  19. Chemistry and mineralogy of Martian dust: An explorer's primer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, James L.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of chemical and mineralogical properties of Martian surface dust is offered for the benefit of engineers or mission planners who are designing hardware or strategies for Mars surface exploration. For technical details and specialized explanations, references should be made to literature cited. Four sources used for information about Martian dust composition: (1) Experiments performed on the Mars surface by the Viking Landers 1 and 2 and Earth-based lab experiments attempting to duplicate these results; (2) Infrared spectrophotometry remotely performed from Mars orbit, mostly by Mariner 9; (3) Visible and infrared spectrophotometry remotely performed from Earth; and (4) Lab studies of the shergottite nakhlite chassignite (SNC) clan of meteorites, for which compelling evidence suggests origin on Mars. Source 1 is limited to fine grained sediments at the surface whereas 2 and 3 contain mixed information about surface dust (and associated rock) and atmospheric dust. Source 4 has provided surprisingly detailed information but investigations are still incomplete.

  20. Sulfide Stability of Planetary Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiazza, C. M.; Righter, K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Chesley, J. T.; Ruiz, J.

    2004-01-01

    The isotopic system, 187Re 187Os, can be used to determine the role of crust and mantle in magma genesis. In order to apply the system to natural samples, we must understand variations in Re/Os concentrations. It is thought that low [Os] and [Re] in basalts can be attributed to sulfide (FeS) saturation, as Re behaves incompatibly to high degrees of evolution until sulfide saturation occurs [1]. Previous work has shown that lunar basalts are sulfide under-saturated, and mid-ocean ridge, ocean-island and Martian (shergottites) basalts are saturated [2,3]. However, little is known about arc basalts. In this study, basaltic rocks were analyzed across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt.

  1. SNC meteorites - Igneous rocks from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C. A.; Ashwal, L. D.

    1982-01-01

    It is argued that SNC (shergottite, nakhlite, chassignite) meteorites are ejecta from Mars. The mineralogy and chemistry of these objects is discussed, including rare earth element content, potassium/uranium ratios, oxidation state, oxygen isotopes, ages and isotopic evolution, magnetism, shock and texture. The possibility of SNC's deriving from Mercury, Venus, earth, moon, or a eucrite parent body is argued against. Mercury is too volatile-poor and anhydrous, Venus's atmosphere too thick and hot and its gravitational field too large, earth's oxygen isotope content too different from that of SNC's, the moon too different isotopically and chemically, and the ages of eucrites too different. Models suggest that SNC's could have escaped from Mars's gravitational field, and their composition supports Martian origin. Statistically, they could have reached the earth within their measured shock ages. Objections to the hypothesis are also discussed.

  2. Aqueous geochemistry on Mars: Possible clues from salts and clays in SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, James L.

    1992-01-01

    All subgroups of the shergottite, nakhlite, and chassignite (SNC) meteorites contain traces of water precipitated minerals that include various combinations of carbonates, sulfates, halides, ferric oxides, and aluminosilicate clays of preterrestrial origin. Oxygen three-isotope analysis of thermally extracted bulk water has confirmed that at least some of the water in SNC's is, indeed, extraterrestrial. A mixture of aqueous precipitates found in the SNC's, comprising smectite, illite, and gypsum (with minor halite +/- calcite and hematite), provides a self-consistent, though not unique, model for the bulk elemental composition of surface sediments at the Viking Lander sites. Therefore, if the salts and clays in SNC's are truly linked to aqueous alteration and soil formation on Mars, then the suite of SNC secondary minerals might provide the best currently available insight into near-surface martian chemistry.

  3. Oxygen Fugacity of the Martian Mantle from Pigeonite/Melt Partitioning of Samarium, Europium and Gadolinium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musselwhite, S.; Jones, J. H.; Shearer, C.

    2004-01-01

    This study is part of an ongoing effort to calibrate the pyroxene/melt Eu oxybarometer for conditions relevant to the martian meteorites. There is fairly good agreement between a determinations using equilibria between Fe-Ti oxides and the estimates from Eu anomalies in shergottite augites in tenns of which meteorites are more or less oxidized. The Eu calibration was for angrite composition pyroxenes which are rather extreme. However, application of a calibration for martian composition augites 113 does not significantly reduce the discrepancy between the two methods. One possible reason for this discrepancy is that augites are non-liquidus. The use of pigeonite rather than augite as the oxy-barometer phase is considered. We have conducted experiments on martian composition pigeonite/melt REE partitioning as a function of fO2.

  4. Isotopic Evidence for a Martian Regolith Component in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.; Sutton, S.

    2009-01-01

    Noble gas measurements in gas-rich impact-melt (GRIM) glasses in EET79001 shergottite showed that their elemental and isotopic composition is similar to that of the Martian atmosphere [1-3]. The GRIM glasses contain large amounts of Martian atmospheric gases. Those measurements further suggested that the Kr isotopic composition of Martian atmosphere is approximately similar to that of solar Kr. The (80)Kr(sub n) - (80)Kr(sub M) mixing ratio in the Martian atmosphere reported here is approximately 3%. These neutron-capture reactions presumably occurred in the glass-precursor regolith materials containing Sm- and Br- bearing mineral phases near the EET79001/ Shergotty sites on Mars. The irradiated materials were mobilized into host rock voids either during shock-melting or possibly by earlier aeolian / fluvial activity.

  5. Mineralogy and chemistry of planets and meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The data collection and the interpretation with respect to the mineralogy of meteoritic and terrestrial samples are summarized. The key conclusion is that the Moon underwent a series of melting episodes with complex crystal-liquid differentiation. It was not possible to determine whether the Moon melted completely or only partially. The stage is now set for a systematical geochemical and geophysical survey of the Moon. Emphasis was moved to meteorites in order to sort out their interrelationships from the viewpoint of mineral chemistry. Several parent bodies are needed for the achondrites with different chemical properties. Exploration of Mars is required to test ideas based on the possible assignment of shergottites, nakhlites and chassignite to this planet. Early rocks on the Earth have properties consistent with a heavy bombardment and strong volcanic activity prior to 4 billion years ago.

  6. Does Lafayette = Nakhla? Not necessarily so, based on 4.2K Mossbauer spectra of all of the SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.

    1991-01-01

    In previous Mossbauer spectral studies of many of the Shergotite Nakhlite Chassignite (SNC) meteorites, attention was drawn to the close similarities of spectrum profiles between Lafayette and Nakhla, which were once suggested to be identical meteorites. These observations led to the acquisition of Governador Valadares and another specimen of Nakhla, as well as Zagami and Shergotty, for Mossbauer spectral measurements at 4.2K. Results reported here demonstrate that there are subtle differences between the three nakhlites (Nakhla, Lafayette, and Governador Valadares), as there are for three of the shergottites (Shergotty, Zagami, EETA 79001/lithologies A and B) and olivine-dominated Chassigny and ALHA 77005, indicating that all eight of the SNC meteorites discovered to data fell independently to Earth.

  7. A Pb isotopic resolution to the Martian meteorite age paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, J. J.; Nemchin, A. A.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Snape, J. F.; Kielman, R. B.; Bland, P. A.; Benedix, G. K.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the chronology and quantifying various geochemical reservoirs on planetary bodies is fundamental to understanding planetary accretion, differentiation, and global mass transfer. The Pb isotope compositions of individual minerals in the Martian meteorite Chassigny have been measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). These measurements indicate that Chassigny has mixed with a Martian reservoir that evolved with a long-term 238U/204Pb (μ) value ˜ two times higher than those inferred from studies of all other Martian meteorites except 4.428 Ga clasts in NWA7533. Any significant mixing between this and an unradiogenic reservoir produces ambiguous trends in Pb isotope variation diagrams. The trend defined by our new Chassigny data can be used to calculate a crystallization age for Chassigny of 4.526 ± 0.027 Ga (2σ) that is clearly in error as it conflicts with all other isotope systems, which yield a widely accepted age of 1.39 Ga. Similar, trends have also been observed in the Shergottites and have been used to calculate a >4 Ga age or, alternatively, attributed to terrestrial contamination. Our new Chassigny data, however, argue that the radiogenic component is Martian, mixing occurred on the surface of Mars, and is therefore likely present in virtually every Martian meteorite. The presence of this radiogenic reservoir on Mars resolves the paradox between Pb isotope data and all other radiogenic isotope systems in Martian meteorites. Importantly, Chassigny and the Shergottites are likely derived from the northern hemisphere of Mars, while NWA 7533 originated from the Southern hemisphere, implying that the U-rich reservoir, which most likely represents some form of crust, must be widespread. The significant age difference between SNC meteorites and NWA 7533 is also consistent with an absence of tectonic recycling throughout Martian history.

  8. Solving the Martian meteorite age conundrum using micro-baddeleyite and launch-generated zircon.

    PubMed

    Moser, D E; Chamberlain, K R; Tait, K T; Schmitt, A K; Darling, J R; Barker, I R; Hyde, B C

    2013-07-25

    Invaluable records of planetary dynamics and evolution can be recovered from the geochemical systematics of single meteorites. However, the interpreted ages of the ejected igneous crust of Mars differ by up to four billion years, a conundrum due in part to the difficulty of using geochemistry alone to distinguish between the ages of formation and the ages of the impact events that launched debris towards Earth. Here we solve the conundrum by combining in situ electron-beam nanostructural analyses and U-Pb (uranium-lead) isotopic measurements of the resistant micromineral baddeleyite (ZrO2) and host igneous minerals in the highly shock-metamorphosed shergottite Northwest Africa 5298 (ref. 8), which is a basaltic Martian meteorite. We establish that the micro-baddeleyite grains pre-date the launch event because they are shocked, cogenetic with host igneous minerals, and preserve primary igneous growth zoning. The grains least affected by shock disturbance, and which are rich in radiogenic Pb, date the basalt crystallization near the Martian surface to 187 ± 33 million years before present. Primitive, non-radiogenic Pb isotope compositions of the host minerals, common to most shergottites, do not help us to date the meteorite, instead indicating a magma source region that was fractionated more than four billion years ago to form a persistent reservoir so far unique to Mars. Local impact melting during ejection from Mars less than 22 ± 2 million years ago caused the growth of unshocked, launch-generated zircon and the partial disturbance of baddeleyite dates. We can thus confirm the presence of ancient, non-convecting mantle beneath young volcanic Mars, place an upper bound on the interplanetary travel time of the ejected Martian crust, and validate a new approach to the geochronology of the inner Solar System.

  9. A new approach to cosmogenic corrections in 40Ar/39Ar chronometry: Implications for the ages of Martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, W. S.; Borg, L. E.

    2016-08-01

    Anomalously old 40Ar/39Ar ages are commonly obtained from Shergottites and are generally attributed to uncertainties regarding the isotopic composition of the trapped component and/or the presence of excess 40Ar. Old ages can also be obtained if inaccurate corrections for cosmogenic 36Ar are applied. Current methods for making the cosmogenic correction require simplifying assumptions regarding the spatial homogeneity of target elements for cosmogenic production and the distribution of cosmogenic nuclides relative to trapped and reactor-derived Ar isotopes. To mitigate uncertainties arising from these assumptions, a new cosmogenic correction approach utilizing the exposure age determined on an un-irradiated aliquot and step-wise production rate estimates that account for spatial variations in Ca and K is described. Data obtained from NWA 4468 and an unofficial pairing of NWA 2975, which yield anomalously old ages when corrected for cosmogenic 36Ar using conventional techniques, are used to illustrate the efficacy of this new approach. For these samples, anomalous age determinations are rectified solely by the improved cosmogenic correction technique described herein. Ages of 188 ± 17 and 184 ± 17 Ma are obtained for NWA 4468 and NWA 2975, respectively, both of which are indistinguishable from ages obtained by other radioisotopic systems. For other Shergottites that have multiple trapped components, have experienced diffusive loss of Ar, or contain excess Ar, more accurate cosmogenic corrections may aid in the interpretation of anomalous ages. The trapped 40Ar/36Ar ratios inferred from inverse isochron diagrams obtained from NWA 4468 and NWA 2975 are significantly lower than the Martian atmospheric value, and may represent upper mantle or crustal components.

  10. Solving the Martian meteorite age conundrum using micro-baddeleyite and launch-generated zircon.

    PubMed

    Moser, D E; Chamberlain, K R; Tait, K T; Schmitt, A K; Darling, J R; Barker, I R; Hyde, B C

    2013-07-25

    Invaluable records of planetary dynamics and evolution can be recovered from the geochemical systematics of single meteorites. However, the interpreted ages of the ejected igneous crust of Mars differ by up to four billion years, a conundrum due in part to the difficulty of using geochemistry alone to distinguish between the ages of formation and the ages of the impact events that launched debris towards Earth. Here we solve the conundrum by combining in situ electron-beam nanostructural analyses and U-Pb (uranium-lead) isotopic measurements of the resistant micromineral baddeleyite (ZrO2) and host igneous minerals in the highly shock-metamorphosed shergottite Northwest Africa 5298 (ref. 8), which is a basaltic Martian meteorite. We establish that the micro-baddeleyite grains pre-date the launch event because they are shocked, cogenetic with host igneous minerals, and preserve primary igneous growth zoning. The grains least affected by shock disturbance, and which are rich in radiogenic Pb, date the basalt crystallization near the Martian surface to 187 ± 33 million years before present. Primitive, non-radiogenic Pb isotope compositions of the host minerals, common to most shergottites, do not help us to date the meteorite, instead indicating a magma source region that was fractionated more than four billion years ago to form a persistent reservoir so far unique to Mars. Local impact melting during ejection from Mars less than 22 ± 2 million years ago caused the growth of unshocked, launch-generated zircon and the partial disturbance of baddeleyite dates. We can thus confirm the presence of ancient, non-convecting mantle beneath young volcanic Mars, place an upper bound on the interplanetary travel time of the ejected Martian crust, and validate a new approach to the geochronology of the inner Solar System. PMID:23887429

  11. The Mineralogical Record of Oxygen Fugacity Variation and Alteration in Northwest Africa 8159: Evidence for Interaction Between a Mantle Derived Martian Basalt and a Crustal Component(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, Charles K.; Burger, Paul V.; Bell, Aaron S.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Agee, Carl; Simon, Justin I.; Papike, James J.

    2015-01-01

    A prominent geochemical feature of basaltic magmatism on Mars is the large range in initial Sr isotopic ratios (approx. 0.702 - 0.724) and initial epsilon-Nd values (approx. -10 to greater than +50). Within this range, the shergottites fall into three discreet subgroups. These subgroups have distinct bulk rock REE patterns, mineral chemistries (i.e. phosphate REE patterns, Ni, Co, V in olivine), oxygen fugacity of crystallization, and stable isotopes, such as O. In contrast, nakhlites and chassignites have depleted epsilon-Nd values (greater than or equal to +15), have REE patterns that are light REE enriched, and appear to have crystallized near the FMQ buffer. The characteristics of these various martian basalts have been linked to different reservoirs in the martian crust and mantle, and their interactions during the petrogenesis of these magmas. These observations pose interesting interpretive challenges to our understanding of the conditions of the martian mantle (e.g. oxygen fugacity) and the interaction of mantle derived magmas with the martian crust and surface. Martian meteorite NWA 8159 is a unique fine-grained augite basalt derived from a highly depleted mantle source as reflected in its initial epsilon-Nd value, contains a pronounced light REE depleted pattern, and crystallized presumably under very oxidizing conditions. Although considerably older than both shergottites and nahklites, it has been petrogenetically linked to both styles of martian magmatism. These unique characteristics of NWA 8159 may provide an additional perspective for deciphering the petrogenesis of martian basalts and the nature of the crust of Mars.

  12. Crustal architecture of the eastern margin of Japan Sea: back-arc basin opening and contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    No, T.; Sato, T.; Takahashi, N.; Kodaira, S.; Kaneda, Y.; Ishiyama, T.; Sato, H.

    2012-12-01

    Although large earthquakes such as the 1964 Niigata earthquake (M 7.5), 1983 Nihonkai-Chubu earthquake (M 7.8), and 1993 Hokkaido Nansei-Oki earthquake (M 7.8) have caused large amounts of damage to the eastern margin of the Japan Sea, a substantial number of seismic studies have been conducted for the seismogenic zone on the Pacific Ocean side of Japan. In addition, the detail of the source fault model for the eastern margin of the Japan Sea is not well defined for all cases. This highlights the need for further studies to investigate seismic imaging. Therefore, we have collaborated with other Japanese research institutions for a project titled "Priority Investigations of Strain Concentration Areas" (which is funded by Special Coordination Funds for Promoting Science and Technology, Japan). This project has conducted seismic surveys from 2009 to 2012 using the deep-sea research vessel, Kairei, from the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology. There is a strain concentration area in the eastern part of the survey area (Okamura et al., 1995). The western part of the survey area includes the Yamato Basin and Japan Basin. It is very important to study the crustal structure in the seismotectonic studies of the eastern margin of the Japan Sea. We conducted a marine seismic survey by using a multichannel seismic (MCS) system and ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) along the eastern margin of the Japan Sea. Seismic data were acquired along 42 lines with a total length of approximately 9,000 km. The following results were obtained from seismic imaging. On the basis of the results of the MCS imaging, active reverse faults and folds were observed in the margin of the Toyama Trough; however, the sedimentary layers in the trough were flat. In the sedimentary layers and crusts of the Sado Ridge, Mogami Trough, and source area of the 1964 Niigata earthquake located north of the Sado Island, greater deformation was observed. The deformation weakened toward the Yamato

  13. Magnetic levitation and MHD propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tixador, P.

    1994-04-01

    Magnetic levitation and MHD propulsion are now attracting attention in several countries. Different superconducting MagLev and MHD systems will be described concentrating on, above all, the electromagnetic aspect. Some programmes occurring throughout the world will be described. Magnetic levitated trains could be the new high speed transportation system for the 21st century. Intensive studies involving MagLev trains using superconductivity have been carried out in Japan since 1970. The construction of a 43 km long track is to be the next step. In 1991 a six year programme was launched in the United States to evaluate the performances of MagLev systems for transportation. The MHD (MagnetoHydroDynamic) offers some interesting advantages (efficiency, stealth characteristics, ...) for naval propulsion and increasing attention is being paid towards it nowadays. Japan is also up at the top with the tests of Yamato I, a 260 ton MHD propulsed ship. Depuis quelques années nous assistons à un redémarrage de programmes concernant la lévitation et la propulsion supraconductrices. Différents systèmes supraconducteurs de lévitation et de propulsion seront décrits en examinant plus particulièrement l'aspect électromagnétique. Quelques programmes à travers le monde seront abordés. Les trains à sustentation magnétique pourraient constituer un nouveau mode de transport terrestre à vitesse élevée (500 km/h) pour le 21^e siècle. Les japonais n'ont cessé de s'intéresser à ce système avec bobine supraconductrice. Ils envisagent un stade préindustriel avec la construction d'une ligne de 43 km. En 1991 un programme américain pour une durée de six ans a été lancé pour évaluer les performances des systèmes à lévitation pour le transport aux Etats Unis. La MHD (Magnéto- Hydro-Dynamique) présente des avantages intéressants pour la propulsion navale et un regain d'intérêt apparaît à l'heure actuelle. Le japon se situe là encore à la pointe des d

  14. XANES Measurements of Cr Valence in Olivine and their Applications to Planetary Basalts (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, A. S.; Burger, P.; Le, L.; Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J.; Sutton, S. R.; Newville, M.; Jones, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    The oxidation state and partitioning behavior of trace Cr in terrestrial and planetary basaltic magmas has long been a subject of petrologic inquiry. We have performed a series of experiments designed to examine the relationship between oxygen fugacity and the ratio of divalent to trivalent Cr present in olivine crystals grown from a basaltic liquid. The experimental olivine crystals were grown at fO2 values ranging from IW-1 to IW+3.4. The melt composition used in this work was modeled after the bulk composition of the primitive, basaltic martian meteorite Yamato 980459 (Y-98). Chromium valence in the olivine crystals was measured with X-ray-Absorption-Near-Edge-Spectroscopy (XANES) at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. Chromium K-edge XANES data were acquired with the x-ray microprobe of GSECARS beamline 13-ID-E. Beam focusing was accomplished with dynamically-figured Kirkpatrick-Baez focusing mirrors; this configuration yielded a beam focused to a final spot size of ~ 4 μm2. Results from the XANES measurements indicate that the ratio of divalent to trivalent Cr in the olivine is systematically correlated with fO2 in a manner that is consistent with the expected redox systematics for Cr2+- Cr3+ in the melt. In this way, measurements of the Cr2+/Cr3+ in olivine phenocrysts can indirectly reveal information about the Cr valence ratio and fO2 the liquid from which it grew even in the absence of a quenched melt phase. Although the results from the experiments presented in this work specifically apply to the Yamato 98 parental liquid, the concepts and XANES analytical techniques used in this study present a novel, generalized methodology that may be applicable to any olivine-bearing basalt. Furthermore, the XANES based measurements are made on a micron-scale, thus potential changes of the Cr2+/Cr3+ in the melt occurring during crystallization may be recorded in detail.

  15. Fe-XANES analyses of Reykjanes Ridge basalts: Implications for oceanic crust's role in the solid Earth oxygen cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorttle, Oliver; Moussallam, Yves; Hartley, Margaret E.; Maclennan, John; Edmonds, Marie; Murton, Bramley J.

    2015-10-01

    3]source) we project observed liquid compositions to an estimate of Fe2O3 in the pure enriched endmember melt, and then apply simple fractional melting models, considering lherzolitic and pyroxenitic source mineralogies, to estimate [Fe2O3](source) content. Propagating uncertainty through these steps, we obtain a range of [Fe2O3](source) for the enriched melts (0.9-1.4 wt%) that is significantly greater than the ferric iron content of typical upper mantle lherzolites. This range of ferric iron contents is consistent with a hybridised lherzolite-basalt (pyroxenite) mantle component. The oxidised signal in enriched Icelandic basalts is therefore potential evidence for seafloor-hydrosphere interaction having oxidised ancient mid-ocean ridge crust, generating a return flux of oxygen into the deep mantle.

  16. Nature and evolution of lithospheric mantle beneath the southern Ethiopian rift zone: evidence from petrology and geochemistry of mantle xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemayehu, Melesse; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Sakyi, Patrick Asamoah

    2016-06-01

    Mantle xenoliths hosted in Quaternary basaltic lavas from the Dillo and Megado areas of the southern Ethiopian rift are investigated to understand the geochemical composition and associated processes occurring in the lithospheric mantle beneath the region. The xenoliths are comprised of predominantly spinel lherzolite with subordinate harzburgite and clinopyroxenite. Fo content of olivine and Cr# of spinel for peridotites from both localities positively correlate and suggest the occurrence of variable degrees of partial melting and melt extraction. The clinopyroxene from lherzolites is both LREE depleted (La/Sm(N) = 0.11-0.37 × Cl) and LREE enriched (La/Sm(N) = 1.88-15.72 × Cl) with flat HREEs (Dy/Lu(N) = 0.96-1.31 × Cl). All clinopyroxene from the harzburgites and clinopyroxenites exhibits LREE-enriched (La/Sm(N) = 2.92-27.63.1 × Cl and, 0.45 and 1.38 × Cl, respectively) patterns with slight fractionation of HREE. The 143Nd/144Nd and 176Hf/177Hf ratios of clinopyroxene from lherzolite range from 0.51291 to 0.51370 and 0.28289 to 0.28385, respectively. Most of the samples define ages of 900 and 500 Ma on Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf reference isochrons, within the age range of Pan-African crustal formation. The initial Nd and Hf isotopic ratios were calculated at 1, 1.5, 2 and 2.5 Ga plot away from the trends defined by MORB, DMM and E-DMM which were determined from southern Ethiopian peridotites, thus indicating that the Dillo and Megado xenoliths could have been produced by melt extraction from the asthenosphere during the Pan-African orogenic event. There is no significant difference in 87Sr/86Sr ratios between the depleted and enriched clinopyroxene. This suggests that the melts that caused the enrichment of the clinopyroxene are mainly derived from the depleted asthenospheric mantle from which the xenoliths are extracted. Largely, the mineralogical and isotopic compositions of the xenoliths show heterogeneity of the CLM that could have been produced from various

  17. Composition of the earth's upper mantle-I. Siderophile trace elements in ultramafic nodules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, J.W.; Wandless, G.A.; Petrie, R.K.; Irving, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    Seven siderophile elements (Au, Ge, Ir, Ni, Pd, Os, Re) were determined by radiochemical neutron activation analysis in 19 ultramafic rocks, which are spinel lherzollites-xenoliths from North and Central America, Hawaii and Australia, and garnet Iherzolitexenoliths from Lesotho. Abundances of the platinum metals are very uniform in spinel lherzolites averaging 3.4 ?? 1.2 ppb Os, 3.7 ?? 1.1 ppb Ir, and 4.6 ?? 2.0 ppb Pd. Sheared garnet lherzolite PHN 1611 has similar abundances of these elements, but in 4 granulated garnet lherzolites, abundances are more variable. In all samples, the Pt metals retain cosmic ( Cl-chondrite) ratios. Abundances of Au and Re vary more than those of Pt metals, but the Au/Re ratio remains close to the cosmic value. The fact that higher values of Au and Re approach cosmic proportions with respect to the Pt metals, suggests that Au and Re have been depleted in some ultramafic rocks from an initially chondrite-like pattern equivalent to about 0.01 of Cl chondrite abundances. The relative enrichment of Au and Re in crustal rocks is apparently the result of crust-mantle fractionation and does not require a special circumstance of core-mantle partitioning. Abundances of moderately volatile elements Ni, Co and Ge are very uniform in all rocks, and are much higher than those of the highly siderophile elements Au, Ir, Pd, Os and Re. When normalized to Cl chondrites, abundances of Ni and Co are nearly identical, averaging 0.20 ?? 0.02 and 0.22 ?? 0.02, respectively; but Ge is only 0.027 ?? 0.004. The low abundance of Ge relative to Ni and Co is apparently a reflection of the general depletion of volatile elements in the Earth. The moderately siderophile elements cannot be derived from the same source as the highly siderophile elements because of the marked difference in Cl chondrite-normalized abundances and patterns. We suggest that most of the Ni, Co and Ge were enriched in the silicate by the partial oxidation of pre-existing volatile-poor Fe

  18. Volatiles in Kimberlitic Magmas: Forced Multiple Saturation with a Mantle Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamm, N.; Schmidt, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    The geochemistry and mineralogy of the mantle source for primary kimberlite melts is still very much debated, the primary melt is argued to be either of carbonatitic or kimberlitic nature and proposed melting mechanisms range from low-degree partial melting of a carbonated peridotite to high-degree melting of strongly metasomatized veins. Experimental multiple saturation of a proposed close-to-primary kimberlitic composition from Jericho (Kopylova et al. 2007, GCA) at 7 GPa shows that saturation of a lherzolitic mineral assemblage occurs at 1300-1350 °C resulting in a carbonatitic melt with less than 8 wt% SiO2 and >35 wt% CO2. At higher temperatures, where the Jericho melt stays kimberlitic, it is only saturated in opx and garnet. We hence forced the close-to-primary Jericho kimberlite into multiple saturation with a lherzolitic assemblage (7 GPa, 1400-1650 °C) by adding a volatile-free peridotite with the aim to saturate the system in olivine, opx, cpx and garnet. This mineral assemblage is obtained over a wide temperature range (1400-1600 °C) for a starting Jericho composition with 20-22.5 wt% CO2, H2O was kept at 0.46 wt% corresponding to the K:H ratio of phlogopite. The transition from a carbonatitic melt with ~10 wt% SiO2 and >35 wt% CO2 to a kimberlitic melt with ~27 wt% SiO2 and <25 wt% CO2 occurs from 1450 to 1600 °C. Compared to the Jericho composition, these melts have higher Na2O and lower XMg. At lower CO2 contents (10 wt%) opx was absent, while at higher CO2 (30 wt%) olivine and cpx were not stable. Kimberlitic melts in equilibrium with a lherzolite are obtained for temperatures of >1500 °C, requiring a few hundred degrees more than estimated for the base of the cratonic lithosphere (1200-1400 °C at a heat flux of 40-45 mW/m2). If lower temperature carbonatites intrude into the base of the lithosphere it is questionable how these should develop into kimberlites within the lithosphere.

  19. Petrogenesis and economic potential of the Erhongwa mafic-ultramafic intrusion in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, NW China: Constraints from olivine chemistry, U-Pb age and Hf isotopes of zircons, and whole-rock Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao; Qian, Zhuang-Zhi; Li, Chusi; Xia, Ming-Zhe; Yang, Su-Hong

    2013-12-01

    The Erhongwa mafic-ultramafic intrusion is located in the southern margin of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt in northern Xinjiang where many early-Permian mafic-ultramafic intrusions host important Ni-Cu sulfide deposits. In this paper we report zircon U-Pb age, olivine chemistry and integrated whole-rock chemical and isotopic compositions for the Erhongwa mafic-ultramafic intrusion. This intrusion is composed of lherzolites and gabbroic rocks. The U-Pb age of zircon from a large olivine gabbro sample from the intrusion is 283.1 ± 1.5 Ma, which indicates that the Erhongwa intrusion is contemporaneous with the early-Permian sulfide ore-bearing mafic-ultramafic intrusions in the central Tianshan region. Olivine from the Erhongwa intrusion contains up to 89.5 mol% Fo and 3000 ppm Ni, which are the highest among all known early-Permian mafic-ultramafic intrusions in the region. The occurrence of small sulfide inclusions in the most primitive olivine and significant Ni depletion in more fractionated olivine in the Erhongwa intrusion indicate that sulfide segregation took place during olivine fractional crystallization. The Erhongwa intrusive rocks are characterized by light REE enrichment relative to heavy REE, negative Nb anomalies, positive εNd (t = 283 Ma) values from + 6.3 to + 7.7, low initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios from 0.7034 to 0.7036, initial 206Pb/204Pb ratios from 17.8 to 17.9 and zircon εHf values from 8.0 to 15.5. The Erhongwa mafic-ultramafic rocks and coeval A-type granites in the region have similar isotopic compositions but the former have lower Th/Nb ratios than the latter. These similarities and differences are consistent with the interpretation that the Erhongwa magma formed by the mixing of a mafic magma derived from a depleted mantle with a granitic melt derived from a juvenile arc crust. It is deduced that sulfide saturation in the Erhongwa magmatic system was related to the magma mixing event at depth. More significant sulfide mineralization may

  20. Experimental determination of the H2O-undersaturated peridotite solidus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarafian, E. K.; Gaetani, G. A.; Hauri, E. H.; Sarafian, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of the H2O-undersaturated lherzolite solidus places important constraints on the process of melt generation and mantle potential temperatures beneath oceanic spreading centers. The small concentration of H2O (~50-200 μg/g) dissolved in the oceanic mantle is thought to exert a strong influence on the peridotite solidus, but this effect has not been directly determined. The utility of existing experimental data is limited by a lack of information on the concentration of H2O dissolved in the peridotite and uncertainties involved with identifying small amounts of partial melt. We have developed an experimental approach for determining the peridotite solidus as a function of H2O content that overcomes these difficulties. Our initial results demonstrate that the solidus temperature for spinel lherzolite containing 150 μg/g H2O is higher than existing estimates for the anhydrous solidus. Our approach to determining the H2O-undersaturated lherzolite solidus is as follows. First, a small proportion (~5 %) of San Carlos olivine spheres, ~300 μm in diameter, are added to a peridotite synthesized from high-purity oxides and carbonates. Melting experiments are then conducted in pre-conditioned Au80Pd20 capsules over a range of temperatures at a single pressure using a piston-cylinder device. Water diffuses rapidly in olivine resulting in thorough equilibration between the olivine spheres and the surrounding fine-grained peridotite, and allowing the spheres to be used as hygrometers. After the experiment, the concentration of H2O dissolved in the olivine spheres is determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Melting experiments, spaced 20°C apart, were performed from 1250 to 1430°C at 1.5 GPa. The starting material has the composition of the depleted MORB mantle of Workman and Hart (2005) containing 0.13 wt% Na2O and 150 µg/g H2O. The concentration of H2O in the olivine spheres remains constant up to 1350°C, and then decreases systematically with increasing

  1. Primary alkaline magmas associated with the Quaternary Alligator Lake volcanic complex, Yukon Territory, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiché, G. E.; Francis, D. M.; Ludden, J. N.

    1987-02-01

    The Alligator Lake complex is a Quaternary alkaline volcanic center located in the southern Yukon Territory of Canada. It comprises two cinder cones which cap a shield consisting of five distinct lava units of basaltic composition. Units 2 and 3 of this shield are primitive olivine-phyric lavas (13.5 19.5 cation % Mg) which host abundant spinel lherzolite xenoliths, megacrysts, and granitoid fragments. Although the two lava types have erupted coevally from adjacent vents and are petrographically similar, they are chemically distinct. Unit 2 lavas have considerably higher abundances of LREE, LILE, and Fe, but lower HREE, Y, Ca, Si, and Al relative to unit 3 lavas. The 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd isotopic ratios of these two units are, however, indistinguishable. The differences between these two lava types cannot be explained in terms of low pressure olivine fractionation, and the low concentrations of Sr, Nb, P, and Ti in the granitoid xenoliths relative to the primitive lavas discounts differential crustal contamination. The abundance of spinel lherzolite xenoliths and the high Mg contents in the lavas of both units indicates that their compositional differences originated in the upper mantle. The Al and Si systematics of these lavas suggests that, compared to unit 3 magmas, the unit 2 magmas may have segregated at greater depths from a garnet lherzolite mantle. The identical isotopic composition and similar ratios of highly incompatible elements in these two lava units argues against their differences being a consequence of random metasomatism or mantle heterogeneity. The lower Y and HREE contents but higher concentrations of incompatible elements in the unit 2 lavas relative to unit 3 can be most simply explained by differential partial melting of similar garnet-bearing sources. The unit 2 magmas thus appear to have been generated by smaller degrees of melting at a greater depth than the unit 3 magmas. The contemporaneous eruption of two distinct but

  2. Selenium and Tellurium concentrations of ultradepleted peridotites determined by isotope dilution ICPMS: implications for Se-Te systematics of the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, S.; Luguet, A.; Lorand, J.-P.; Wombacher, F.; Lissner, M.

    2012-04-01

    As for highly siderophile elements, selenium and tellurium may constitute key tracers for planetary processes such as formation of the Earth's core and the Late Veneer composition, provided that their geochemical behaviour and abundances in the primitive upper mantle (PUM) are constrained. Within this scope, we have developed a high precision analytical method for the simultaneous determination of selenium and tellurium concentrations from a single sample aliquot and various rock matrices, including ultradepleted peridotites. The technique employs isotope dilution, thiol cotton fiber (TCF) separation and hydride generation MC-ICP-MS. A selection of international mafic and ultramafic rock reference materials BIR-1, BE-N, TDB-1, UB-N, FON B 93, BIR-1 and BHVO-2 with a range of 30 to 350 ppb Se and 0.7 to 12 ppb Te show external reproducibilities of 3 to 8% for Se and 0.4 to 11% for Te (2 relative standard deviations (r.s.d.)). We have applied this method to a suite of refractory mantle peridotites (Al2O3 <1.5 wt. %) from Lherz, previously shown to be strongly and uniformly depleted in Se, Te and incompatible elements by high degree of partial melting (20 ± 5%). In contrast to fertile lherzolites which remain at broadly chondritic values (Se/Te = 9), the ultradepleted harzburgites show highly fractionated and up to suprachondritic Se/Te (< 35) that correlate with decreasing Te concentrations. The fractionation is displayed by the depleted peridotites as well as multiple analysis of a single Lherz harzburgite sample (64-3). This shows 1) a strong sample heterogeneity effect for Te and 2) a more incompatible behaviour of Te compared to Se on the whole rock scale, once base metal sulfides are highly depleted and in some cases entirely consumed by partial melting. The marked differences in Se-Te systematics observed between fertile lherzolites and depleted harzburgites can be explained by the combined effect of i) different abundances and proportions of residual and

  3. Esmeralda Bank: Geochemistry of an active submarine volcano in the Mariana Island Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Robert J.; Bibee, L. D.

    1984-05-01

    Esmeralda Bank is the southernmost active volcano in the Izu-Volcano-Mariana Arc. This submarine volcano is one of the most active vents in the western Pacific. It has a total volume of about 27 km3, rising to within 30 m of sea level. Two dredge hauls from Esmeralda recovered fresh, nearly aphyric, vesicular basalts and basaltic andesites and minor basaltic vitrophyre. These samples reflect uniform yet unusual major and trace element chemistries. Mean abundances of TiO2 (1.3%) and FeO* (12.6%) are higher and CaO (9.2%) and Al2O3 (15.1%) are lower than rocks of similar silica content from other active Mariana Arc volcanoes. Mean incompatible element ratios K/Rb (488) and K/Ba (29) of Esmeralda rocks are indistinguishable from those of other Mariana Arc volcanoes. On a Ti-Zr plot, Esmeralda samples plot in the field of oceanic basalts while other Mariana Arc volcanic rocks plot in the field for island arcs. Incompatible element ratios K/Rb and K/Ba and isotopic compositions of Sr (87Sr/86Sr=0.70342 0.70348), Nd (ɛND=+7.6 to +8.1), and O(δ18O=+5.8 to +5.9) are incompatible with models calling for the Esmeralda source to include appreciable contributions from pelagic sediments or fresh or altered abyssal tholeiite from subduction zone melting. Instead, incompatible element and isotopic ratios of Esmeralda rocks are similar to those of intra-plate oceanic islands or “hot-spot” volcanoes in general and Kilauean tholeiites in particular. The conclusion that the source for Esmeralda lavas is an ocean-island type mantle reservoir is preferred. Esmeralda Bank rare earth element patterns are inconsistent with models calling for residual garnet in the source region, but are adequately modelled by 7 10% equilibrium partial melting of spinel lherzolite. This is supported by consideration of the results of melting experiments at 20 kbars, 1,150° C with CO2 and H2O as important volatile components. These experiments further indicate that low MgO (4.1%), MgO/FeO*(0.25) and

  4. Generation of High-Silica Melts From the Mantle: Effects of Alkalis and Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, B. J.; Turner, S. P.

    2007-12-01

    It seems to be generally accepted that addition of water to mantle compositions has a dramatic effect on the compositions of the silicate melts produced. Thus, for example, experiments at close to H2O saturation in the 70's demonstrated expansion of the liquidus field of olivine and implied that liquids of "andesitic" composition could be generated by partial melting of water-saturated peridotite. At that, time, however, experimental difficulties cast doubt on some of the conclusions. As part of a study of high Mg-andesites from arc settings, we have re-visited the question of the effects of P, T, H2O (and other minor components) on the compositions of mantle melts. We began with dry lherzolite melting in the systems CMAS, NCMAS and natural bulk compositions. Simple and systematic variations in SiO2 and MgO contents of lherzolite-saturated melts with pressure and alkali content can be observed. Specifically, SiO2 concentration increases with decreasing pressure and increasing total alkalis while MgO shows exactly opposite behavior. The effects of H2O, at least up to ~10 weight per cent are much less obvious. There is a slight depression of MgO content and, surprisingly, little systematic effect on SiO2. It appears, therefore that, in the concentration range of relevance to arc settings, H2O may not be particularly important in mantle melting except for its effect on liquidus temperature. We then turned to the question of how to generate high Mg-andesites which precipitate olivines of Fo90 composition if water isn't important. Harzburgitic rather than lherzolitic residue is the most obvious answer. Loss of clinopyroxene from the residue means that Ca and Al contents of the melts decrease while Si and Mg increase. In terms of oxides we find that MgO and SiO2 increase in the approximate ratio 3:1 after cpx is lost. Thus a "typical" high Mg-andesite with 55 SiO2, 10 MgO and 3.5 per cent total alkali oxide could be generated at around 1 GPa without water in equilibrium

  5. Insight into the upper mantle beneath an active extensional zone: the spinel-peridotite xenoliths from San Quintin (Baja California, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanes, N.; Mercier, J.-C. C.

    1988-11-01

    Many of the peridotite xenoliths included in the San Quintin (Baja California Norte, Mexico) quaternary alkali-basalts have undergone a very intense shear deformation (deviatoric stresses up to 0.1 GPa), hence a first-order classification into coarse-grained lherzolites and deformed peridotites (porphyroclastic and mosaic textures) has been applied. All of these rocks show a very limited compositional variability in the Mg/(Mg+Fe2+) ratios (olivine: 0.894 0.905±0.005; orthopyroxene: 0.899 0.9105±0.005), and the observed trends in the Cr/(Cr+Al) spinel ratios (from 0.1 to 0.6) can be interpreted as resulting from gradual partial melting followed by homogenization of the bulk phases. A later and less accentuated melting event is also evidenced by internal core-rim variations in the spinels from a few samples and ascribed to the thermal effect of the host lava. Simultaneous application of exchange geothermometers which give the latest equilibrium temperatures (i.e. at the time of eruption: Fe-Mg exchange between olivine and spinel) and of pyroxene transfer thermobarometers yields two distinct behaviours: the porphyroclastic and mosaic peridotites record an event of deformation and recrystallization and were equilibrated at 800° 950° C and P≲-1 GPa at the time of eruption, but have also retained evidence of higher temperatures (1000° 1050° C) and pressures; the coarsegrained lherzolites, which yield conditions of 1000° 1050° C and P<-2 GPa at the time of eruption, were originally equilibrated at higher temperature and pressure conditions and were subsequently re-equilibrated to 1000° 1050° C by solid-state bulk diffusion, without exsolution. Clinopyroxenite veins provide evidence of magma injection into the host-peridotite, before deformation but after the major melting event. To explain the simultaneous sampling of both groups of peridotites by the San Quintin alkali basalts, we suggest that the ascending magma reached the critical limit for hydraulic

  6. Melting of metasomatized peridotite at 4-6 GPa and up to 1200 °C: an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, R.; Pettke, T.; Fumagalli, P.

    2015-04-01

    The phase assemblages and compositions in a K-bearing lherzolite + H2O system are determined between 4 and 6 GPa and 850-1200 °C, and the melting reactions occurring at subarc depth in subduction zones are constrained. Experiments were performed on a rocking multi-anvil apparatus. The experiments had around 16 wt% water content, and hydrous melt or aqueous fluid was segregated and trapped in a diamond aggregate layer. The compositions of the aqueous fluid and hydrous melt phases were measured using the cryogenic LA-ICP-MS technique. The residual lherzolite consists of olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, and garnet, while diamond (C) is assumed to be inert. Hydrous and alkali-rich minerals were absent from the run products due to preferred dissolution of K2O (and Na2O) to the aqueous fluid/hydrous melt phases. The role of phlogopite in melting relations is, thus, controlled by the water content in the system: at the water content of around 16 wt% used here, phlogopite is unstable and thus does not participate in melting reactions. The water-saturated solidus, i.e., the first appearance of hydrous melt in the K-lherzolite composition, is located between 900 and 1000 °C at 4 GPa and between 1000 and 1100 °C at 5 and 6 GPa. Compositional jumps between hydrous melt and aqueous fluid at the solidus include a significant increase in the total dissolved solids load. All melts/fluids are peralkaline and calcium-rich. The melting reactions at the solidus are peritectic, as olivine, clinopyroxene, garnet, and H2O are consumed to generate hydrous melt plus orthopyroxene. Our fluid/melt compositional data demonstrate that the water-saturated hybrid peridotite solidus lies above 1000 °C at depths greater than 150 km and that the second critical endpoint is not reached at 6 GPa for a K2O-Na2O-CaO-FeO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O-Cr2O3(-TiO2) peridotite composition.

  7. Diamond formation - Where, when and how?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachel, T.; Luth, R. W.

    2015-04-01

    Geothermobarometric calculations for a worldwide database of inclusions in diamond indicate that formation of the dominant harzburgitic diamond association occurred predominantly (90%) under subsolidus conditions. Diamonds in eclogitic and lherzolitic lithologies grew in the presence of a melt, unless their formation is related to strongly reducing CHO fluids that would increase the solidus temperature or occurred at pressure-temperature conditions below about 5 GPa and 1050 °C. Three quarters of peridotitic garnet inclusions in diamond classify as "depleted" due to their low Y and Zr contents but, based on LREEN-HREEN ratios invariably near or greater than one, they nevertheless reflect re-enrichment through either highly fractionated fluids or small amounts of melt. The trace element signatures of harzburgitic and lherzolitic garnet inclusions are broadly consistent with formation under subsolidus and supersolidus conditions, respectively. Diamond formation may be followed by cooling in the range of ~ 60-180 °C as a consequence of slow thermal relaxation or, in the case of the Kimberley area in South Africa, possibly uplift due to extension in the lithospheric mantle. In other cases, diamond formation and final residence took place at comparable temperatures or even associated with small temperature increases over time. Diamond formation in peridotitic substrates can only occur at conditions at least as reducing as the EMOD buffer. Evaluation of the redox state of 225 garnet peridotite xenoliths from cratons worldwide indicates that the vast majority of samples deriving from within the diamond stability field represent fO2 conditions below EMOD. Modeling reveals that less than 50 ppm fluid are required to completely reset the redox state of depleted cratonic peridotite to that of the fluid. Consequently, the overall reduced state of diamond stable peridotites implies that the last fluids to interact with the deep cratonic lithosphere were generally reducing in

  8. Nd, Sr and Pb isotopic composition of metasomatised xenoliths from the backarc Patagonian Mantle Wedge: Insights into the origin of the uprising melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanetti, Alberto; Mazzucchelli, Maurizio; Hemond, Christope; Cipriani, Anna; Bertotto, Gustavo W.; Cingolani, Carlos; Vannucci, Riccardo

    2010-05-01

    Information about the geochemical composition of metasomatic melts migrating through the Patagonian mantle wedge is provided by the ultramafic xenoliths occurrence of Tres Lagos (TL; lat. 49.13°S, long. 71.18°W), Argentina. Such a locality is placed at the eastern border of the Meseta de la Muerte backarc basaltic plateau, where a post-plateau volcanic diatreme contains mantle xenoliths in both pyroclastites and lavas. Its latitude corresponds with the Northern limit of the Austral Volcanic Arc (AVZ), which is separated from the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ) by a gap in the arc magmatism ranging between 49° and 46°30' latitude S. The analysed xenoliths have been distinguished into two groups (Group 1 & 2). Group 1 consists of lherzolites and harzburgites, whereas Group 2 is formed by harzburgites. The texture of the Group 1 lherzolites varies from protogranular to granoblastic to porphyroblastic, whereas Group 1 harzburgites have always granoblastic texture. Group 2 harzburgites have granular texture, which may change to porphyroblastic owing to the random concentration of large olivine and orthopyroxene crystals. The clinopyroxenes (Cpx) from Group 1 lherzolites have PM-normalised REE patterns ranging from LREE-depleted (LaN/SmN= 0.24-0.37), to LREE-enriched (LaN/YbN up to 4.08) and spoon-shaped: the latter have minimum at Pr and Pr-Yb concentrations similar to those shown by the LREE-depleted Cpx. The Cpx from Group 1 harzburgites have lower REE concentrations with respect to the lherzolite ones and their REE patterns vary from HREE-enriched, steadily fractionated, (LaN/YbN = 0.21-0.35, Ybn ~ 1-2) to spoon-shaped (LaN/SmN = 2.81; SmN/YbN = 0.89; YbN ~ 3. The Cpx from the Group 2 harzburgites have convex-upward (LaN/SmN = 0.31; SmN/YbN = 1.50) to LREE-enriched (LaN/YbN = 2.94) patterns. The Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of the Group 1 clinopyroxenes form arrays spanning from DM to the field delimited by the TL basaltic lavas, pointing to EMI end

  9. Petrological characteristics of the Masontown, Pennsylvania kimberlite dike

    SciTech Connect

    Prellwitz, H.S.; Bikerman, M. . Dept. of Geology and Planetary Science)

    1993-03-01

    The Masontown, PA, kimberlite dike intrudes flat-lying Pennsylvanian and early Permian sedimentary rocks, via a pre-existing vertical fault zone, contact relationship indicate a low temperature of intrusion. The kimberlite consists of a phenocryst mineral assemblage which includes olivine, phlogopite, Ti rich oxides, and very fine grained carbonate, that is believed to be of primary origin. Most of the olivine has been altered to serpentine, and post emplacement fractures are filled with secondary carbonate. Most of the mineral grains have reaction rims, which record high pressure/temperature melt conditions that later changed into a lower pressure/temperature environment. Vertical alignment of the mineral grains suggest an upward flow direction. Lithospheric mantle xenoliths of garnet lherzolite and crustal xenoliths of biotite gneiss show probable compositions of deep-seated rocks. These rocks are normally inaccessible because they are converted by a thick Paleozoic sedimentary blanket in this area.

  10. Mantle xenoliths from Marosticano area (Northern Italy): a comparison with Veneto Volcanic Province lithospheric mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brombin, Valentina; Bonadiman, Costanza; Coltorti, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    The Tertiary Magmatic Province of Veneto, known as Veneto Volcanic Province (VVP), in the North-East of Italy, represents the most important volcanic distric of Adria Plate. It is composed by five volcanic bodies: Val d'Adige, Marosticano, Mts. Lessini, Berici Hills and Euganean Hills. Most of the volcanic products are relatively undifferentiated lavas and range in composition from nephelinites to tholeiites. Often VVP nephelinites and basanites carry mantle xenoliths (mainly harzburgites and lherzolite). This study reports petrological comparison between Marosticano xenoliths (new outcrop) and xenoliths from the Lessinean and Val d'Adige areas already studied by many Authors (Siena & Coltorti 1989; Beccaluva et al., 2001, Gasperini et al., 2006). Mineral major elements analyses show that the Marosticano lherzolites and harzburgites reflect "more restitic" composition than the mantle domain beneath the other VVP districts (Lessini Mts. and Val d'Adige). In fact, olivine and pyroxene of Marosticano xenoliths have the highest mg# values of the entire district (Marosticano→90-93; literature→86-92). At comparable mg# (45-85 wt%) Marosticano spinels tend to be higher in Cr2O3 (23-44 wt%) contents with respect to the other VVP sp (7-25 wt%). It is worth noting that, Ni contents of Marosticano olivines in both harzburgites and lherzolites are higher (2650-3620 ppm) than those of the Lessinean xenoliths (1500- 3450 ppm), and similar to that of Val d'Adige lherzolites (3000-3500 ppm), approaching the contents of Archean cratonic mantle (Kelemen, 1998). In turn, Lessinean olivines properly fall in the Ni-mg# Phanerozoic field. At fixed pressure of 15 kbar, the equilibration temperature of Marosticano xenoliths are similar (Brey & Köhler: 920-1120°C) to those of Lessini (O'Neill & Wall: 990-1110°C; Beccaluva et al., 2007), but higher than those of Val d'Adige (Wells: 909-956°C; Gasperini et al., 2006). Finally, Marosticano mantle fragment show similar relatively high

  11. The role of vaporization and dissipation processes in the formation of the moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakovlev, O. I.; Markova, O. M.; Manzon, B. M.

    1987-04-01

    The experimental data of Markova et al. (1986) on the changing compositions of basalt and lherzolite melts and complementary vapors after heating at progressively increasing temperatures are compared with the compositions of the earth and lunar mantles to determine the role of selective vaporization and vapor dissipation in the formation of the moon. The cause for the paucity in volatile components seen in the lunar mantle, as compared with the earth mantle, is explained in the framework of a mechanism involving impact evaporation and selective dissipation of vapor at the stage of lunar accretion, when collisions in the swarm of bodies in earth orbit and the bombardment of lunar planetesimals took place. This mechanism explains the cause of the deficit on the moon of heavy volatile elements (such as Pb and Rb), K and Na oxides, MgO, and SiO2, and the lack of a deficit of less volatile Al2O3 and FeO.

  12. Partition coefficients for REE between garnets and liquids - Implications of non-Henry's Law behaviour for models of basalt origin and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental investigation of Ce, Sm and Tm rare earth element (REE) partition coefficients between coexisting garnets (both natural and synthetic) and hydrous liquids shows that Henry's Law may not be obeyed over a range of REE concentrations of geological relevance. Systematic differences between the three REE and the two garnet compositions may be explained in terms of the differences between REE ionic radii and those of the dodecahedral site into which they substitute, substantiating the Harrison and Wood (1980) model of altervalent substitution. Model calculations demonstrate that significant variation can occur in the rare earth contents of melts produced from a garnet lherzolite, if Henry's Law partition coefficients do not apply for the garnet phase.

  13. Multistage metasomatism in lithospheric mantle beneath V. Grib pipe (Arkhangelsk diamondiferous province, Russia): evidence from REE patterns in garnet xenocrysts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchukina, Elena; Alexei, Agashev; Nikolai, Pokhilenko

    2015-04-01

    150 garnet xenocrysts from V. Grib kimberlite pipe were analyzed for major and trace elements compositions. 70 % of garnet belong to lherzolite field; 14 % - megacrysts and pyroxenites; 11 % - eclogites; 4 % - harzburgite; 1 % (1- wehrlite defined by Sobolev (1973). Harzburgite garnets: sinusoidal REE patterns Smn/Ern > 5 (5.2 - 19.8). low Y (0.5 - 3.9 ppm), Zr (1.1 - 44.6 ppm), Ti (54 - 1322 ppm). Wehrlite garnetd: close to sinusoidal REE patterns, Smn/Ern - 1.8. Megacrysts and pyroxenites garnets: normal REE patterns Smn/Ern < 1 (0.2 - 0.6), high TiO2 (0.9 - 1.3 wt %). Lherzolite garnets 70 % show four groups of REE patterns similar to peridotite xenoliths (Shchukina et al., 2013, 2015). 1-st contains MREE at С1 level, Sm/Ern - 0.03, La/Ybn - 0.002. increasing La -Yb range, low Y, Zr, Ti indicating residual nature. 2-nd: MREE at 2 - 13 chondrite units, Smn/Ern (0.16 - 0.98), La/Ybn - 0.001 - 0.040 and flat pattern from MREE to HREE. 3-rd -MREE at 5 - 14 chondrite units, Sm/Ern > 1 (1.05 - 4.81) La/Ybn - 0.010-0.051 increasing an hump at MREE decreasing to HREE. 4-th: sinusoidal REE, Sm/Ern 4.2 - 27.2. and harzburgite Y, Zr, Ti . Average Cr2O3 content increases from 2-nd to the 3-rd group (3.3 to 5.7 wt%) and 4th (7.9 wt %). Average Y/Zr decreases from 2-nd (0.6) to 3rd (0.2) and 4th group (0.08). REE and Y, Zr, Ti indicate the metasomatic origin of garnets of 2, 3. 4 groups. Modeling of TREfor equilibrated melts and fractional crystallization 2nd group close to Turyino field basalts and 3-rd - to Izmozero field picrites of Arkhangelsk diamondiferous province (ADP). Basing on geochemical data of garnet xenocrysts and garnets and clinopyroxenes in peridotites (Shchukina et al., 2013, 2015) we suppose at least 3 stage of high-temperature metasomatic enrichment. 1st stage - is enrichment of residual garnets (found only in peridotite garnets) in LREE by the influence of carbonatite melt close to the Mela field carbonatites of ADP. REE patterns in clinopyroxenes from

  14. Conditions of origin of natural diamonds of peridotite affinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, F. R.; Finnerty, A. A.

    1980-01-01

    Studies of mineral inclusions in natural diamonds and rare diamondiferous xenoliths from kimberlites show that most diamonds are associated with a dunite or harzburgite paragenesis. The diamondiferous periodites and dunites have predominantly coarse or tabular textures that suggest low-temperature (less than 1100 C) equilibration. Application of the K(D) Fe/Mg(Ga/Ol) geothermometer of O'Neill and Wood to analytical data for the minerals in these rocks shows that most have equilibrated below 1100 C. Application of this thermometer to pairs of olivine and garnet crystals included in individual diamonds indicates that the diamonds have crystallized in the range 900-1300 C, with a majority of estimated equilibration temperatures falling in the range below 1150 C. Comparison of these estimates of equilibration temperature with the zone of invariant vapor composition solidus for kimberlite and garnet lherzolite determined by Eggler and Wendlandt (1979) suggests that many diamonds may have formed in subsolidus events.

  15. PALLADIUM, PLATINUM, RHODIUM, RUTHENIUM AND IRIDIUM IN PERIDOTITES AND CHROMITITES FROM OPHIOLITE COMPLEXES IN NEWFOUNDLAND.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, Norman J; Talkington, Raymond W.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of spinel lherzolite, harzburgite, dunite, and chromitite from the Bay of Islands, Lewis Hills, Table Mountain, Advocate, North Arm Mountain, White Hills Periodite Point Rousse, Great Bend and Betts Cove ophiolite complexes in Newfoundland were analyzed for the platinum-group elements (PGE) Pd, Pt, Rh, Ru and Ir. The ranges of concentration (in ppb) observed for all rocks are: less than 0. 5 to 77 (Pd), less than 1 to 120 (Pt), less than 0. 5 to 20 (Rh), less than 100 to 250 (Ru) and less than 20 to 83 (Ir). Chondrite-normalized PGE ratios suggest differences between rock types and between complexes. Samples of chromitite and dunite show relative enrichment in Ru and Ir and relative depletion in Pt and Pd.

  16. Evidence for the Jurassic arc volcanism of the Lolotoi complex, Timor: Tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seung-Ik; Kwon, Sanghoon; Kim, Sung Won

    2014-12-01

    We report the first sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) U-Pb zircon ages with geochemical data from metavolcanic rocks in the Lolotoi complex, Timor. The zircon U-Pb ages of two andesitic metavolcanic rocks yield a permissible range of the Middle Jurassic extrusion from 177 Ma to 174 Ma. The geochemical data indicate that the origins of the basaltic and andesitic metavolcanic rocks are products of prolonged oceanic crust and arc magmatism, respectively. They are originated from partial melting of lherzolites, providing an insight into the tectonic evolution of the forearc basements of the Banda volcanic arc. Thus, parts of the Banda forearc basement are pieces of allochthonous oceanic basalts and Jurassic arc-related andesites accreted to the Sundaland during the closure of Mesotethys, and are incorporated later into the Great Indonesian Volcanic Arc system along the southeastern margin of the Sundaland.

  17. Petrogenesis of basalts and gabbros from an ancient continent ocean transition (External Liguride ophiolites, Northern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanini, Alessandra; Tribuzio, Riccardo; Vernia, Luigi

    2008-03-01

    Remnants of a fossil continent-ocean transition similar to that of the modern non-volcanic continental margins are preserved in the Jurassic External Liguride units. They consist of fertile lherzolites of subcontinental origin, MOR-type basalts and rare gabbroic intrusives, together with continental crust bodies exhumed during the rifting phases preceding the oceanization. The gabbroic rocks include troctolites, (olivine) gabbros, Fe-Ti oxide-bearing gabbros and diorites. Trace element and Nd isotope compositions indicate that these rocks were derived from N-MORB melts variably evolved through fractional crystallisation. In the gabbroic rocks, high-temperature (˜ 900 °C) shearing along ductile shear zones is locally overprinted by amphibolite-facies recrystallization ( T ˜ 650 °C), which was most likely assisted by seawater-derived fluids. Basalts crop out as lava flows and as dykes crosscutting mantle lherzolites and gabbroic rocks. They display nearly flat REE patterns and high Y/Nb values (5-14), similar to modern N-MORB. Basalts are also characterised by weak Zr enrichment relative to neighbouring REE (Zr/Zr * = 1.1-1.7) and high (Sm/Yb) DM ratios (1.5-1.8). Their Nd isotope compositions are close to typical depleted mantle (initial ɛ Nd = +7.6 to + 9.4). The geochemical features of parental melts of basaltic and gabbroic rocks may be attributed to melting of a MORB-type asthenospheric source. Trace element modelling shows that low-degree (≤ 6%) fractional melting of a depleted spinel peridotite cannot account for the elevated Sm/Yb ratios of basalts. Low-degree melting of a mixed source of spinel peridotite with small amounts of garnet pyroxenite has been proposed to explain the trace element signature of basalts.

  18. Calcium isotopic composition of mantle peridotites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Kang, J.; Zhang, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Ca isotopes are useful to decipher mantle evolution and the genetic relationship between the Earth and chondrites. It has been observed that Ca isotopes can be fractionated at high temperature [1-2]. However, Ca isotopic composition of the mantle peridotites and fractionation mechanism are still poorly constrained. Here, we report Ca isotope composition of 12 co-existing pyroxene pairs in 10 lherzolites, 1 harzburgite, and 1 wehrlite xenoliths collected from Hainan Island (South Eastern China). Ca isotope data were measured on a Triton-TIMS using the double spike method at the Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, CAS. The long-term external error is 0.12‰ (2SD) based on repeated analyses of NIST SRM 915a and geostandards. δ44Ca of clinopyroxenes except that from the wehrlite ranges from 0.85‰ to 1.14‰, while opx yields a wide range from 0.98‰ up to 2.16‰. Co-existing pyroxene pairs show large ∆44Caopx-cpx (defined as δ44Caopx-δ44Cacpx) ranging from 0 to 1.23‰, reflecting equilibrium fractionation controlled by variable Ca contents in the opx. Notably, clinopyroxene of wehrlite shows extremely high δ44Ca (3.22‰). δ44Ca of the bulk lherzolites and harzburgites range from 0.86‰ to 1.14‰. This can be explained by extracting melts with slightly light Ca isotopic compositions. Finally, the high δ44Ca of the wehrlite (3.22‰) may reflect metasomatism by melt which has preferentially lost light Ca isotopes due to chemical diffusion during upwelling through the melt channel. [1] Amini et al (2009) GGR 33; [2] Huang et al (2010) EPSL 292.

  19. Crystal chemical constraints on inter-mineral Fe isotope fractionation and implications for Fe isotope disequilibrium in San Carlos mantle xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macris, Catherine A.; Manning, Craig E.; Young, Edward D.

    2015-04-01

    The origin of variations in iron isotope compositions of mantle minerals is uncertain, and predictions of equilibrium inter-mineral iron isotope fractionation conflict. This hinders interpretation of the petrologic and geochemical implications of Fe isotope data from mantle lithologies. To address this, we present a revised ionic model for predicting equilibrium iron isotope fractionation between mantle minerals and use it to interpret measured inter-mineral iron isotopic fractionation from five distinct mantle xenolith lithologies from San Carlos, Arizona. The samples represent a broad range of modal abundances and include lherzolite, harzburgite, dunite, clinopyroxenite, and websterite. The xenoliths exhibit Fe-isotopic variation between minerals in a single sample, and between samples. In all cases where spinel and olivine coexist, the 57Fe/54Fe of spinel is greater than that of the corresponding olivine, agreeing with expectations for equilibrium fractionation from theory (ionic model), but disagreeing with predictions based on Mössbauer data. The 57Fe/54Fe values of clinopyroxenes from the xenoliths show no clear systematic differences. We interpret this to be a result of varying degrees of metasomatism, perhaps involving interaction with a melt. The spinel peridotite samples (lherzolite, harzburgite, and dunite) are partially melted residual mantle that exhibit a decrease in whole-rock 57Fe/54Fe with increasing olivine abundance. This is consistent with progressive extraction of a 57Fe-rich partial melt. The clinopyroxenite has the highest whole-rock 57Fe/54Fe, consistent with its origin as a cumulate from an unrelated magma possessing elevated 57Fe/54Fe. The websterite sample is transitional to Group II type xenoliths, has the lowest whole-rock 57Fe/54Fe of the investigated samples, and likely experienced a more complex metasomatic history. This study demonstrates that the Fe isotope compositions of San Carlos xenoliths and their component minerals record

  20. The effect of water and iron content on electrical conductivity of upper mantle rocks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Yi, L.

    2008-12-01

    Geophysical observations (MT and GDS) show the conductivity anomaly which may be related to the presence of water and melting. Recently, several researchers have estimated the water content in the transition zone (Huang et al. 2005; Yoshino et al. 2008) and the upper mantle (Wang et al.2006; Yoshino et al. 2006) by electrical conductivity methods. They may underestimate the water content, especially, Yoshino et al did too much underestimate. However, other coexisting phases such as pyroxene and its high-pressure polymorphs may also contribute to the bulk conductivity of the mantle. To test this hypothesis, we measured the electrical conductivity of upper mantle rocks- dunite, pyroxenite and lherzolite at ~ 2-3 GPa and ~1273-1573 K using impedance spectra within a frequency range of 0.1~1000000 Hz. The oxygen fugacity was controlled by a Mo-MoO2 solid buffer. The results show that the electrical conductivity of lherzolite and pyroxenite are ~ half and one order of magnitude higher than that of dunite. These differences were interpreted through a preliminary model involving water and iron content effects on the electrical conductivity. We extrapolated our results and compared the results with some of geophysical observations of the upper mantle. Our results indicate the maximum water content in oceanic upper mantle is as high as ~ 0.09wt % and suggest that pyroxenes dominate the bulk conductivity of upper mantle in hydrous conditions. These results indicated that our model with various water contents could explain the conductivity anomaly in the oceanic upper mantle without involving the presence of partial melt at these depths. This work was supported by national natural science foundation of china (40774036); the special grant from the president of Chinese Academy of Sciences and Graduate University of Chinese Academy Sciences.

  1. Geochemical and oxygen isotope signatures of mantle corundum megacrysts from the Mbuji-Mayi kimberlite, Democratic Republic of Congo, and the Changle alkali basalt, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Gaston; Pivin, Marjorie; Fallick, Anthony E.; Ohnenstetter, Daniel; Song, Yucai; Demaiffe, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen isotope signatures of ruby and sapphire megacrysts, combined with trace-element analysis, from the Mbuji-Mayi kimberlite, Democratic Republic of Congo, and the Changle alkali basalt, China, provide clues to specify their origin in the deep Earth. At Mbuji-Mayi, pink sapphires have δ18O values in the range 4.3 to 5.4‰ (N = 10) with a mean of 4.9 ± 0.4‰, and rubies from 5.5 to 5.6‰ (N = 3). The Ga/Mg ratio of pink sapphires is between 1.9 and 3.9, and in rubies, between 0.6 and 2.6. The blue or yellow sapphires from Changle have δ18O values from 4.6 to 5.2 ‰, with a mean of 4.9 ± 0.2‰ (N = 9). The Ga/Mg ratio is between 5.7 and 11.3. The homogenous isotopic composition of ruby suggests a derivation from upper mantle xenoliths (garnet lherzolite, pyroxenite) or metagabbros and/or lower crustal garnet clinopyroxenite eclogite-type xenoliths included in kimberlites. Data from the pink sapphires from Mbuji-Mayi suggest a mantle origin, but different probable protoliths: either subducted oceanic protolith transformed into eclogite with δ18O values buffered to the mantle value, or clinopyroxenite protoliths in peridotite. The Changle sapphires have a mantle O-isotope signature. They probably formed in syenitic magmas produced by low degree partial melting of a spinel lherzolite source. The kimberlite and the alkali basalt acted as gem conveyors from the upper mantle up to the surface.

  2. Metasomatism and current state of the lithospheric mantle beneath the Nógrád-Gömör Volcanic Field constrained by trace element modelling and magnetotelluric survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klébesz, Rita; Patkó, Levente; Novák, Attila; Wesztergom, Viktor; Szabó, Csaba

    2016-04-01

    The Nógrád-Gömör Volcanic Field (NGVF) is one of the five mantle xenolith bearing alkali basalt locations in the Carpathian-Pannonian Region, where Plio-Pleistocene alkali basalt brought to the surface lherzolite and wehrlite xenoliths. Petrographic and geochemical signature (i.e. newly formed clinopyroxene and olivine grains, Ti, Al, Fe, Mn and LRRE enrichment in rock-forming minerals) of the wehrlite xenoliths suggest that a portion of the upper mantle was transformed to wehrlite beneath the NGVF by upward migrating mafic melt agents. Based on trace element modelling, we argue that the metasomatic agent had an OIB-like trace element composition, similar to the host alkali basalts. In order to study the current state of the lithospheric mantle and to test whether the spatial distribution of the metasomatism can be imaged, magnetotelluric (MT) survey was carried out. Long period MT data were collected at 14 locations along a ~50 km long NNW-SSE profile in the NGVF. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary was detected at 70-90 km of depth. A low resistivity anomaly (~5-10 Ωm) was observed at 30-45 km in depth below the central part of the NNW-SSE profile, indicating the presence of a conductive body barely below the Moho. We suggest that the low resistivity body is related to the presence of residual, connected melt and/or the conductivity differences between the lherzolitic and wehrlitic mantle domain due to different chemical composition and ratio of the rock-forming minerals.

  3. Subduction initiation for the formation of high-Cr chromitites in the Kop ophiolite, NE Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng-Fei; Uysal, Ibrahim; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Su, Ben-Xun; Avcı, Erdi

    2016-09-01

    The Kop ophiolite in NE Turkey is a forearc fragment of Neo-Tethys ocean, consisting mainly of a paleo-Moho transition zone (MTZ) and a harzburgitic upper mantle unit. Locally, the Kop MTZ contains cumulate dunites and high-Cr chromitites (Cr# up to ca. 79), which are cut by pyroxenites. Dunites and chromitites in the MTZ have REE concentrations that are 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than those of chondrite; they are either depleted in LREE or have concave REE shapes. The LREE depleted patterns are interpreted to reflect production of cumulate rocks by magmas derived from a depleted mantle, the concave patterns the modification of these rocks by LREE-enriched fluids. Clinopyroxenes from pyroxenites are diopsidic and characterized by high Mg#s (ca. 92-96) and high CaO contents (ca. 24-25 wt.%); their Al2O3 contents (1.0-3.0 wt.%) fall between those of clinopyroxenes in N-MORB and komatiite/boninite, suggesting that the parental melts originated from more refractory mantle than abyssal lherzolites. However, these clinopyroxenes display LREE depleted patterns consistent with those of clinopyroxenes in abyssal lherzolites, indicating their genetic connection with decompression melting of asthenosphere. The cross-cutting relationship between pyroxenite veins and chromitiferous rocks suggests that depleted mantle remained beneath the proto-forearc after chromitite formation; it had not been significantly modified by slab-derived components and continued interacting with the upwelling asthenosphere until pyroxenite crystallization. This study provides a temporal constraint on the formation of high-Cr chromitites; they possibly began to be produced during the transition between early and late proto-forearc spreading, during which subduction dehydration had not well developed.

  4. Petrogenesis of fertile mantle peridotites from the Monte del Estado massif (southwest Puerto Rico): a preserved section of Proto-Caribbean oceanic lithospheric mantle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesi, Claudio; Jolly, Wayne T.; Lewis, John F.; Garrido, Carlos J.; Proenza, Joaquín. A.; Lidiak, Edward G.

    2010-05-01

    The Monte del Estado massif is the largest and northernmost serpentinized peridotite belt in southwest Puerto Rico. It is mainly composed of spinel lherzolite and minor harzburgite with variable clinopyroxene modal abundances. Mineral and whole rock major and trace element compositions of peridotites coincide with those of fertile abyssal peridotites from mid ocean ridges. Peridotites lost 2-14 wt% of relative MgO and variable amounts of CaO by serpentinization and seafloor weathering. HREE contents in whole rock indicate that the Monte del Estado peridotites are residues after low to moderate degrees (2-15%) of fractional partial melting in the spinel stability field. However, very low LREE/HREE and MREE/HREE in clinopyroxene cannot be explained by melting models of a spinel lherzolite source and support that the Monte del Estado peridotites experienced initial low fractional melting degrees (~ 4%) in the garnet stability field. The relative enrichment of LREE in whole rock is not due to secondary processes but probably reflects the capture of percolating melt fractions along grain boundaries or as microinclusions in minerals, or the presence of exotic micro-phases in the mineral assemblage. We propose that the Monte del Estado peridotite belt represents a section of ancient Proto-Caribbean (Atlantic) lithospheric mantle originated by seafloor spreading between North and South America in the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous. This portion of oceanic lithospheric mantle was subsequently trapped in the forearc region of the Greater Antilles paleo-island arc generated by the northward subduction of the Caribbean plate beneath the Proto-Caribbean ocean. Finally, the Monte del Estado peridotites belt was emplaced in the Early Cretaceous probably as result of the change in subduction polarity of the Greater Antilles paleo-island arc without having been significantly modified by subduction processes.

  5. Comments on Evaluation of thermobarometers for garnet peridotites' by A. A. Finnerty and F. R. Boyd

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, J. )

    1992-02-01

    In order to evaluate the accuracy of a given combination of thermo-barometer, Finnerty and Boyd (1984) calculated the P-T conditions of two control samples of garnet lherzolite xenoliths, namely BD 2125 and PHN 1569. The importance of the samples lies in the fact that BD 2125 is diamond bearing, whereas PHN 1569 is graphite bearing. The alumina solubility in orthopyroxene (OPx) coexisting with garnet (Gt) is sensitive to both pressure and temperature changes and has thus been used widely, in combination with various geothermometers, for the thermo-barometry of garnet lherzolite xenoliths. Finnerty and Boyd (1984) concluded that the experimental calibrations of alumina solubility in OPx by Akella (1976) and Lane and Ganguly (1980) are as precise as, but probably less accurate than MC74 barometer,' where MC74 referred to the experimental calibration of alumina solubility in OPx by McGregor (1974) in the system MgSiO{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} (MAS) based on synthesis experiments from glass of appropriate compositions. This conclusion on the accuracy of the above barometers was based on their observation that the use of only MC74 placed the calculated P-T conditions of the control samples in the right field with respect to the diamond-graphite equilibrium boundary, while those of Akella (1976; AK76) and Lane and Ganguly (1980; LG80) yielded P-T conditions that did not exactly satisfy the latter constraint, but were within 2 kb of the phase boundary. While it is clear from thermodynamic considerations that an unambiguous test of the accuracy of the calibrations cannot be carried out without making corrections for the effects of the additional components which are present in the natural samples but not in the experimental charges, the calculations of Finnerty and Boyd (1984) using LG80 are grossly erroneous.

  6. Characterization of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle beneath the Cameroon volcanic line inferred from alkaline basalt hosted peridotite xenoliths from Barombi Mbo and Nyos Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintér, Zsanett; Patkó, Levente; Tene Djoukam, Joëlle Flore; Kovács, István; Tchouankoue, Jean Pierre; Falus, György; Konc, Zoltán; Tommasi, Andréa; Barou, Fabrice; Mihály, Judith; Németh, Csaba; Jeffries, Teresa

    2015-11-01

    We carried out detailed petrographic, major and trace element geochemical, microstructural and FTIR analyses on eight characteristic ultramafic xenoliths from Nyos and Barombi Mbo Lakes in the continental sector of the Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL). The studied xenoliths are spinel lherzolites showing lithologies similar to the other xenoliths reported previously along the CVL. They have protogranular and porphyroclastic textures. One of the Barombi xenolith contains amphibole, which had not been previously reported in this locality. Amphibole is common in the Nyos xenoliths suite. Peridotite xenoliths from both localities show some chemical heterogeneity, but Barombi xenoliths generally are less depleted in basaltic elements with respect to Nyos xenoliths. Trace element compositions of Nyos spinel lherzolites show a moderately depleted initial (premetasomatic) composition and variable enrichment in REE. Evidence for both modal and cryptic metasomatism is present in Nyos xenoliths. Rare earth element patterns of clinopyroxene suggest that interaction between mafic melts and the upper mantle occurred beneath the Nyos locality. Barombi Mbo xenoliths, on the other hand, record a small degree of partial melting. The Barombi Mbo xenoliths have weak, dominantly orthorhombic olivine crystal preferred orientations, whereas Nyos ones have strong axial-[010] patterns, which may have formed in response to transpression. Nominally anhydrous mantle minerals (NAMs) of the Barombi Mbo xenoliths show generally higher bulk concentrations of 'water' (70-127 ppm) than Nyos xenoliths (32-81 ppm). The Barombi Mbo xenoliths could originate from a juvenile segment of the lithospheric mantle, which had been originally part of the asthenosphere. It became a part of the lithosphere in response to thermal relaxation following the extension, forming a weakly deformed lower lithospheric mantle region along the CVL. The Nyos xenoliths, however, represent a shallow lithospheric mantle bearing

  7. CO2-SO3-rich (carbonate-sulfate) melt/fluids in the lithosphere beneath El Hierro, Canary Islands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oglialoro, E.; Ferrando, S.; Malaspina, N.; Villa, I. M.; Frezzotti, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Mantle xenoliths from the island of El Hierro, the youngest of the Canary Islands, have been studied to characterize fluxes of carbon in the lithosphere of an OIB volcanism region. Fifteen xenoliths (4-10 cm in diameter) were collected in a rift lava flow (15-41 ka) at a new xenolith locality in El Julan cliff (S-SW of the island). Peridotites consist of protogranular to porphyroblastic spinel harzburgites, lherzolites, and subordinate dunites. One spinel clinopyroxenite, and one olivine-websterite were also analyzed. Ultramafic xenoliths were classified as HEXO (harzburgite and dunite with exsolved orthopyroxene), HLCO (harzburgite and lherzolite containing orthopyroxene without visible exsolution lamellae), and HTR (transitional harzburgite with exsolved orthopyroxene porphyroclasts, and poikilitic orthopyroxene) following [1]. While HLCO and HTR peridotites contain mostly CO2 fluid inclusions, HEXO peridotites preserve an early association of melt/fluid inclusions containing dominantly carbonate/sulfate/silicate glass, evolving to carbonate/sulfate/phosphate/spinel aggregates, with exsolved CO2 (± carbonates, anhydrite and H2O). Chemical and Raman analyses identify dolomite, Mg-calcite, anhydrite, sulfohalite [Na6(SO4)2FCl] (± other anhydrous and hydrous alkali-sulfates), apatite, and Cr-spinel in the inclusions. Sulfides are noticeably absent. The microstructure and chemical composition of the metasomatic fluids indicate that the peridotites were infiltrated by a carbonate-sulfate-silicate melt/fluid enriched in CO2, H2O, and P. A mantle origin for this fluid is supported by high densities of CO2inclusions (> 1g/cm3), determined by Raman microspectroscopy and cross-checked by microthermometry. Consequently, El Julan peridotites provide the first evidence for liberating oxidized C and S fluxes from the Earth lithosphere in an OIB source region, and suggest that oxidation of sulfide to sulfate can occur during small-degree partial melting of the upper mantle

  8. Mantle evolution in the Variscides of SW England: Geochemical and isotopic constraints from mafic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Nicolle E.; Murphy, J. Brendan; Braid, James A.; Shail, Robin K.; Nance, R. Damian

    2016-06-01

    The geology of SW England has long been interpreted to reflect Variscan collisional processes associated with the closure of the Rhenohercynian Ocean and the formation of Pangea. The Cornish peninsula is composed largely of Early Devonian to Late Carboniferous volcanosedimentary successions that were deposited in pre- and syn-collisional basins and were subsequently metamorphosed and deformed during the Variscan orogeny. Voluminous Early Permian granitic magmatism (Cornubian Batholith) is broadly coeval with the emplacement of ca. 280-295 Ma lamprophyric dykes and flows. Although these lamprophyres are well mapped and documented, the processes responsible for their genesis and their relationship with regional Variscan tectonic events are less understood. Pre- to syn-collisional basalts have intra-continental alkalic affinities, and have REE profiles consistent with derivation from the spinel-garnet lherzolite boundary. εNd values for the basalts range from + 0.37 to + 5.2 and TDM ages from 595 Ma to 705 Ma. The lamprophyres are extremely enriched in light rare earth elements, large iron lithophile elements, and are depleted in heavy rare earth elements, suggesting a deep, garnet lherzolite source that was previously metasomatised. They display εNd values ranging from - 1.4 to + 1.4, initial Sr values of ca. 0.706, and TDM ages from 671 Ma to 1031 Ma, suggesting that metasomatism occurred in the Neoproterozoic. Lamprophyres and coeval granite batholiths of similar chemistry to those in Cornwall occur in other regions of the Variscan orogen, including Iberia and Bohemia. By using new geochemical and isotopic data to constrain the evolution of the mantle beneath SW England and the processes associated with the formation of these post-collisional rocks, we may be able to gain a more complete understanding of mantle processes during the waning stages of supercontinent formation.

  9. Geochemistry of Paraná-Etendeka basalts from Misiones, Argentina: Some new insights into the petrogenesis of high-Ti continental flood basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rämö, O. Tapani; Heikkilä, Pasi A.; Pulkkinen, Arto H.

    2016-04-01

    The Early Cretaceous (˜135-131 Ma) Paraná-Etendeka continental flood basalts, preserved in bulk in the Paraná basin of southern Brazil and vicinity, have been divided into low-Ti and high-Ti types that govern the southern and northern halves of the basin, respectively. We have examined a new sample set from the southern margin of the northern high-Ti segment of Paraná basalts in Misiones, northeastern Argentina. These basalts are strongly to moderately enriched in TiO2 (2-4 wt.%), have relatively high Ti/Y (300-500), low MgO (3.5-6.5 wt.%), and high Fe (FeO(tot) 12-14 wt.%) and belong to the Pitanga and Paranapanema magma types of Peate et al. (1992). Nd and Sr isotope compositions are quite unvarying with ɛNd (at 133 Ma) values of -4.6 to -3.6 and initial 87Sr/86Sr of 0.7054-0.7059 and show no variation with fractionation. Compared to high-Ti lavas in the central and northern parts of the Paraná high-Ti basalt segment, the lavas from Misiones are similar to those in the northeastern magin of the basin but less radiogenic in initial Nd isotope composition than those in the central part. This variation probably reflects mixed EM1-EM2 source components in the sublithospheric mantle. A polybaric melt model of a sublithospheric mantle source at the garnet lherzolite-spinel lherzolite transition is compatible with the observed Ti budget of the Pitanga and Paranapanema lavas, regardless of the Nd isotope composition of their purported source.

  10. Magmatic Cu-Ni sulfide mineralization of the Huangshannan mafic-untramafic intrusion, Eastern Tianshan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yun; Xue, Chunji; Zhao, Xiaobo; Yang, YongQiang; Ke, Junjun

    2015-06-01

    The Huangshannan Ni-Cu (-PGE) sulfide deposit, a new discovery from geological prospecting in Eastern Tianshan, is in a belt of magmatic Ni-Cu (-PGE) sulfide deposits along the southern margin of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt. The host intrusion of the Huangshannan deposit is composed of a layered ultramafic sequence and a massive gabbro-diorite unit. The major sulfide orebodies occur mainly within websterite and lherzolite in the layered ultramafic sequence. In-situ zircon U-Pb dating analyses yielded a crystallization age of 282.5 ± 1.4 Ma, similar to the ages of the Permian Tarim mantle plume. Samples from the Huangshannan intrusion are characterized by nearly flat rare earth elements patterns, negative Zr, Ti and Nb anomalies, arc-like Th/Yb and Nb/Yb ratios, and significantly lower rare earth element and immobile trace element contents than the Tarim basalts. These characteristics suggest that the Huangshannan intrusion was not generated from the Tarim mantle plume. The primary magma for the Huangshannan intrusion and its associated sulfide mineralization were formed from different pulses of picritic magma with different degrees of crustal contamination. The first pulse underwent an initial removal of 0.016% sulfide in the deep magma chamber. The evolved magma reached sulfide saturation again in the shallow magma chamber and formed sulfide ores in lherzolite. The second pulse of magma reached a level of 0.022% sulfide segregation at staging chamber before ascending up to the shallow magma chamber. In the shallow conduit system, this sulfide-unsaturated magma mixed with the first pulse of magma and with contamination from the country rocks, leading to the formation of sulfide ores in websterite. The third magma pulse from the deep chamber formed the unmineralized massive gabbro-diorite unit of the Huangshannan intrusion.

  11. Old mantle beneath the Avalon terrane: evidence from Osmium isotopes in spinel peridotite xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minarik, W. G.; Hermes, O. D.; Walker, R. J.

    2002-05-01

    Spinel lherzolite xenoliths from mid-Jurassic lamprophyre dikes near Ashaway, R.I. have been analyzed for Os isotopic ratios and Re and Os concentrations. The xenoliths were collected from freshly exposed outcrops, and are minimally serpentinized. Most contain evidence of carbonate metasomatism. Two grams of powdered peridotite was dissolved in aqua regia in sealed Carius tubes, purified using solvent extraction (Os) and anion resin exchange (Re) and analyzed using NTIMS. The bulk xenoliths contain approx. 4 ppb Os, and have 187Re/188Os ratios of 0.04 to 0.2. These low Re concentrations result in minimal correction back to an initial Jurassic 187Os/188Os ratio of 0.1165, which corresponds to a sub-chondritic initial γ Os of -7.4. The minimum model age (TRD) of melt extraction and separation of these lherzolites from the convecting upper mantle using these 187Os/188Os ratios is 1.5 to 1.7 Ga (after Meisel et al., 2001). Major and trace element compositions will be used to estimate the degree of melt depletion in order to refine the constraints on formation of this subcontinental lithospheric mantle. Avalonian supercrustal rocks range from the Neoproterozoic to Permian in age. These preliminary model ages imply that Mesoproterozoic (or older) mantle remains under the Hope Valley subterrane of Avalonia in Rhode Island. This supports evidence from Archean-age zircon cores found in the surrounding Permian-age granites that significantly older lithosphere exists at depth. This lithosphere could be either an old lithosphere core to the Avalonian arc or underthrust West African craton. Models that call for the introduction of asthenospheric mantle during the Alleghanian orogeny or the initiation of Atlantic rifting are not supported by these data.

  12. Today's research development on the application of the superconductivity transport system in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyotani, Yoshihiro

    1995-01-01

    At the Miyazaki test track today, the new test vehicle, MLU002N, is under test run to obtain necessary data for Yamanashi test track where the construction is underway, the test vehicle has been ordered and the first tunnel was completed in December 1993. Superconducting magnetohydrodynamic drive ship, MHDS, 'Yamato 1' has completed its experiment in 1992 and it is now under preparation to exhibit to the public in___1994. Furthermore, to promote the research development of MHDS, the detailed discussion is underway on the magnetohydrodynamic drive equipment as well as the research on the future scheme. Neither an automobile nor railway but a new transport system called EQUOS LIM CAR(ELC) has been proposed. By using the rotating magnetic field, it will levitate on the aluminum like reaction plate. On the normal road, it will run by rolling the wheels like an electric car but on the highway, it will levitate on the guideway resulting to less noise, less vibration and pollution free drive. To understand the concept of the ELC, the model was built and experimented by using permanent magnet. The same model was donated to the MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY in Chicago and was displayed to the public. Today, the trial superconducting magnet has been made and the research development of the subsystem is underway. Research development of superconducting elevator, equipment for the launching of spaceship, tube transportation system and others are in progress for the superconducting applied transportation system.

  13. Elementary study on superconducting electromagnetic ships with helical insulation wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishigaki, Kazu; Sha, Ciwen; Takeda, Minoru; Peng, Yan; Zhou, Kuo; Yang, Aihua; Suyama, Daiki; Qing, Qin Jun; Yan, Luguang; Kiyoshi, Tsukasa; Wada, Hitoshi

    2000-01-01

    We, Kobe University of Mercantile Marine (KUMM) and Institute of Electrical Engineering (IEE) research teams, have carried out in Japan, the joint experimental test of the high magnetic field (˜14 T) superconducting electromagnetic ship performance in co-operation with the researchers of NRIM. In this experimental study, the major system components are thruster, seawater circulating system and various measuring instruments. The NRIMs 15 T class superconducting magnet that forms the outmost member of the 40 T class hybrid magnet was used. The flow guide and flow rectifier are of same lengths of 0.2 m, and the length of the electrodes are 0.6 m. The anode's outer diameter is 0.1 m, and the cathode's inner diameter is 0.346 m. The helical insulation wall is 10 mm thick and the pitch number is 3.8. During the experiment, magnetic fields were changed to six stages 3, 5, 8, 10, 12 and 14 T, whereby seawater pressures, temperatures and flow rates were measured. Electric currents were changed from 10 to 700 A. In one of results, the thruster efficiency increases in association with the increase of the magnetic field. It has been demonstrated that the helical-type superconducting electromagnetic thruster is superior, in terms of thruster efficiency, than that of earlier works by Iwata et al. and YAMATO-1's group. So, it is considered that this thruster is better suited to commerical application than earlier works.

  14. Igneous inclusions from ordinary chondrites: High temperature cumulates and a shock melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sack, Richard O.; Ghiorso, Mark S.; Wang, Ming-Sheng; Lipschutz, Michael E.

    1994-12-01

    We report microprobe, instrumental neutron activation analysis, and radiochemical neutron activation analysis data for three large igneous inclusions in the Yamato (Y-)75097, Y-793241, and Y-794046 ordinary chondrites. The inclusions in the first two chondrites are troctolitic cumulates that have undergone appreciable reactions with their hosts either during emplacement and/or cooling. Olivine-spinel Fe-Mg exchange pairs in these two inclusions record equilibration temperatures of about 710 C, and these temperatures are similar to those exhibited by mineral pairs in the Y-75097 and Y-793241 hosts. The inclusion in Y-794046 is texturally unique, consisting of fine-grained, randomly distributed olivines, coarse (approximately 2 mm) fascicular pyroxene laths, and angular pockets of maskelynite/plagioclase feldspar. The phase compositions are readily interpreted as having resulted from extremely rapid, essentially isochemical cooling to temperatures less than 1000 C of a melt with an initial temperature greater than 1670 C. We suggest that this igneous inclusion formed in-situ by shock.

  15. Mineralogy of coexisting pyroxenes in magnesian ureilites and their formation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, H.

    1989-06-01

    The occurrence of orthopyroxene in two magnesian ureilites found in Antarctica, Yamato (Y) 791538 and LEW85440 has been confirmed by electron probe microanalysis and by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The first coexisting equilibrium pigeonite-orthopyroxene pair has been found in Y791538. The LEW85440 orthopyroxene coexists with minor augite. The orthopyroxenes and olivines in Y791538, Y74659 and LEW85440 have almost identical compositions, but the Ca contents of their coexisting clinopyroxenes differ considerably. These phase assemblages can be explained by crystallization of mafic silicates with a similar composition, oxygen fugacity and oxygen isotope anomaly at different temperature above 1220 C. The high-temperature crystallization of refractory Mg-rich silicates and the possible preservation of the oxygen isotope anomaly of precursor carbonaceous chondrite-like materials may be consistent with their formation processes probably through local melting of more matrices than Mg-rich silicates and crystal growth induced by the planetesimal-scale collision.

  16. Effects of Varying Proportions of Glass on Reflectance Spectra of HED Polymict Breccias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, P. C.; Reddy, V; LeCorre, L.; Cloutis, E. A.; Mann, P.; Le, L.

    2014-01-01

    Some meteorites contain significant amounts of glass, which, in most cases, probably results from impact processes on parent bodies.. Yamato 82202 is an example of one of the unequilibrated eucrites that contains significant proportions of impact glass distributed as veins throughout the meteorite. In other cases, fragments of glass are distributed throughout polymict breccias. For example, the polymict eucrite EET 87509 contains rare angular fragments of devitrified glass. Proportions of glass in most of these meteorites and in lithic clasts within these meteorites may vary locally from small amounts (less than one percent) to much larger amounts (subequal proportions of glass and mineral material). For example, some fragments within the South African polymict eucrite Macibini contain approximately 50% glass. The presence of these variable proportions of meteorite glass confirm the increased recognition that impact processes played an important role in the histories of asteroidal bodies. This study attempts to quantify the effects of a glass component on reflectance spectra by analyzing in the laboratory mixtures of varying proportions of a well-characterized HED polymict breccia and glass derived by melting a bulk sample of that breccia.

  17. High-pressure experiments on magnesian eucrite compositions - Constraints on magmatic processes in the eucrite parent body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, K. S.; Grove, T. L.

    1991-01-01

    Melting experiments were conducted on synthetic analogs of two magnesian eucrite clasts from howardites, Kapoeta clast rho and Yamato 7308 pigeonite-eucrite clast 1, at 1 atm and 1-kbar pressure at oxygen fugacities in the range of iron-wuestite (IW) to iron-quartz-fayalite (IQF). The compositions of liquids and coexisting minerals (olivine-low-Ca pyroxene-plagioclase spinel) were used to constrain possible melting and crystallization processes in the parent bodies of eucrite basalts. In agreement with previous studies, the experimental results at 1 atm indicate that the olivine-low-Ca pyroxene-plagioclase-spinel-liquid and olivine-low Ca pyroxene-spinel-liquid boundaries are reaction boundaries involving olivine. At 1 kbar, however, the olivine primary-phase volume shrinks, and the reaction relationship involving olivine disappears for both boundaries. The maximum pressure attained in a Vesta-sized eucrite parent body (EPB) is about 1 kbar, and these results provide important constraints on models relating the howardite-eucrite-diogenite (HED) meteorite association through melting and differentiation processes.

  18. Minor Elements in Nakhlite Pyroxenes: Does Cr Record Changes in REDOX Conditions during Crystallization?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, G.; Schwandt, C.; Le, L.; Mikouchi, T.

    2007-01-01

    Nakhlites are olivine-bearing clinopyroxene cumulates. Based on petrographic characteristics, they may be divided into groups that cooled at different rates and may have been formed at different depths in a single flow. The order of cooling rate from slowest to fastest is NWA998Yamato000593 < NWA817 approx. MIL03346. Nakhlite cumulus pyroxene grains consist of large cores that are nearly homogeneous in major element composition surrounded by thin rims that are zoned to Fe-rich compositions. Detailed study of these pyroxenes is important because they retain a record of the crystallization history of the nakhlite magma. Moreover, because the composition of the nakhlite parent melt cannot be directly determined, inversion of the major and minor element composition of the cumulate pyroxene cores can be used to estimate the composition of that melt. Moreover, minor and trace element zoning of pyroxenes can provide information about the oxidation conditions under which these samples crystallized. Thus it is important to understand the major and minor element zoning in the cumulus pyroxenes. While major elements are nearly homogeneous, minor elements exhibit distinctive zoning patterns that vary from one nakhlite to another. This abstract reports unusual Cr zoning patterns in pyroxenes from MIL03346 (MIL) and contrast these with pyroxenes from Y593 and Nakhla.

  19. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Lunar Crust as Sampled by Basins and Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Lunar Crust as Samples by Basins and Craters" included:Radar Properties of Lunar Basin Deposits; Numerical Modeling of the South Pole-Aitkin Impact; Lunar South Pole-Aitken Impact Basin: Topography and Mineralogy; Comparison of the Geologic Setting of the South Pole-Aitken Basin Interior with Apollo 16: Implications for Regolith Components; Identifying Impact Events Within the Lunar Cataclysm from 40Ar-39Ar Ages of Apollo 16 Impact Melt Rocks; Apollo 16 Mafic Glass: Geochemistry, Provenance, and Implications; Lunar Meteorite PCA 02 007: A Feldspathic Regolith Breccia with Mixed Mare/Highland Components; Compositional Constraints on the Launch Pairing of LAP 02205 and PCA 02007 with Other Lunar Meteorites; An In-Situ Study of REE Abundances in Three Anorthositic Impact Melt Lunar Highland Meteorites; A Crustal Rock Clast in Magnesian Anorthositic Breccia, Dhofar 489 and Its Excavation from a Large Basin; The Origin and Impact History of Lunar Meteorite Yamato 86032; Evolved Lithologies and Their Inferred Sources in the Northwestern Procellarum Region of the Moon; and Revisiting the Interpretation of Thorium Abundances at Hansteen Alpha.

  20. Comparisons of Mineralogy of Lunar Meteorites Possibly from the Farside and The Kaguya Remote Sensing Data to Reconstruct the Earliest Anorthositic Crust of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeda, H.; Nagaoka, H.; Ohtake, M.; Kobayashi, S.; Yamaguchi, A.; Morota, T.; Karouji, Y.; Haruyma, J.; Katou, M.; Hiroi, T.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2012-01-01

    Ohtake et al. [1] observed by the Kaguya multiband imager and spectral profiler anorthosites composed of nearly pure anorthite (PAN) at numerous locations in the farside highlands. Based on the Th map made by the GRS group of the Kaguya mission, Kobayashi et al. [2] showed that the lowest Th region in the lunar farside occurs near the equatorial region and noted that the regions well correspond to the lunar highest region and the thickest crust region recently measured by Kaguya mission [3,4]. Such remote sensing data have been interpreted in terms of mineralogical studies of lunar meteorites of the Dhofar 489 group [5,6] (e.g., Dhofar 489, 908, and 307) and Yamato (Y-) 86032 [7], all possibly from the farside highlands. Although the presence of magnesian anorthosites in the Dhofar 489 group has been reported, we have not encountered large clast clearly identifiable as PAN. In this study, we investigated mineralogy and textures of large clasts of nearly pure anorthosites recognized in Dhofar 911 and the d2 clast in Dhofar 489 [8]. The d2 clast is the largest white anorthosite clast in Dhofar 489, but its mineralogy has not been investigated at that time. The low bulk FeO concentrations suggests that the d2 clast may be the pure anorthosite with very low abundance of mafic silicates. In conjunction with all data of the Dhofar 489 group including Dhofar 489, 908, 309 and 307, we propose a model of formation of the farside crust.

  1. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd Isotopic Studies of Lunar Highland Meteorite Y86032 and Lunar Ferroan Anorthosites 60025 and 67075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Yamaguchi, A.; Takeda, H.

    2005-01-01

    Lunar meteorite Yamato (Y) 86032 is a feldspathic breccia containing anorthositic fragments similar to ferroan anorthosite (FAN) clasts commonly found in Apollo 16 highland rocks. Previous Ar-39-Ar-40 analyses of a grey anorthositic clast (,116 GC) in Y86032 revealed an old degassing age of 4.39 plus or minus 0.06 Ga, which is as old as crystallization ages of some FANs e.g. 60025, 67016 and 67215, as determined by the more robust Sm-Nd radiometric method. The calculated initial Nd value for the clast is -1.8 plus or minus 0.3 for the age. The old age and its negative initial Nd value indicate that Y86032 contains components of the primitive lunar crust related to the lunar magma ocean (LMO). We undertook further Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic investigation of three major lithologies in the meteorite as described in the mineralogical and petrological studies. Ar-39-Ar-40 analyses of these component lithologies are presented in this volume. Also, we analyzed two Apollo 16 FANs, 60025 and 67075, to compare their ages and isotopic signatures to Y86032. Y86032 probably came from a feldspathic highland terrane (FHT) on the northern farside highlands, a locality not sampled by the Apollo and Luna missions.

  2. Effects of Short-Term Thermal Alteration on Organic Matter in Experimentally-Heated Tagish Lake Observed by Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Nakato, A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Nakamura, T.; Kebukawa, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites exhibit a wide range of aqueous and thermal alteration characteristics. Examples of the thermally metamorphosed carbonaceous chondrites (TMCCs) include the C2-ung/CM2TIVs Belgica (B)-7904 and Yamato (Y) 86720. The alteration extent is the most complete in these meteorites and thus they are considered typical end-members of TMCCs exhibiting complete dehydration of matrix phyllosilicates [1, 2]. The estimated heating conditions are 10 to 10(sup 3) days at 700 C to 1 to 100 hours at 890 C, i.e. short-term heating induced by impact and/or solar radiation [3]. The chemical and bulk oxygen isotopic compositions of the matrix of the carbonate (CO3)-poor lithology of the Tagish Lake (hereafter Tag) meteorite bears similarities to these TMCCs [4]. We investigated the experimentally-heated Tag with the use of Raman spectroscopy to understand how short-term heating affects the maturity of insoluble organic matter (IOM) in aqueously altered meteorites.

  3. The Xe-Q in lodranites and a hint for Xe-L. FRO90011 another lodranite?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eugster, O.; Weigel, A.

    1993-01-01

    The Lodran achondrite contains about one-quarter metallic Fe/Ni, two-thirds olivine and pyroxene, some troilite, plus minor phases. In a previous study we demonstrated that Lodran and three other lodranites - LEW88280, Yamato-791491, and MAC88177 - yield the same cosmic-ray exposure age of a few million years, suggesting that they originate from the same parent body. In the present work we show that the mineral phases of Lodran contain large concentrations of planetary-type but no solar-type trapped noble gases. Surprisingly, the highest concentrations were observed in the Fe/Ni-phase (e.g. 1520 x 10(exp -12) cc STP per g (132)Xe). A large fraction of the trapped gas is released between 1200 C and 1400 C. The Xe isotopic pattern is similar to that of Xe-Q. The 1400 C fraction of the Fe/Ni-phase shows excesses of (124)Xe, (126)Xe, and (128)Xe similar to Xe-L (pre-solar Xe enriched in the light isotopes) that has, until now, only been observed in combination with Xe-H (pre-solar Xe enriched in the heavy isotopes).

  4. Evidence from Olivine-Hosted Melt Inclusions that the Martian Mantle has a Chondritic D/H Ratio and that Some Young Basalts have Assimilated Old Crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usui, Tomohiro; Alexander, O'D.; Wang, J.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    Magmatic degassing of volatile elements affects the climate and near-surface environment of Mars. Telescopic and meteorite studies have revealed that the Martian atmosphere and near-surface materials have D/H ratios 5-6 times terrestrial values [e.g., 1, 2]. Such high D/H ratios are interpreted to result from the preferential loss of H relative to heavier D from the Martian atmosphere, assuming that the original Martian water inventory had a D/H ratio similar to terrestrial values and to H in primitive meteorites [e.g., 1, 3]. However, the primordial Martian D/H ratio has, until now, not been well constrained. The uncertainty over the Martian primordial D/H ratio has arisen both from the scarcity of primitive Martian meteorites and as a result of contamination by terrestrial and, perhaps, Martian surface waters that obscure the signature of the Martian mantle. This study reports a comprehensive dataset of magmatic volatiles and D/H ratios in Martian primary magmas based on low-contamination, in situ ion microprobe analyses of olivine-hosted melt inclusions from both depleted [Yamato 980459 (Y98)] and enriched [Larkman Nunatak 06319 (LAR06)] Martian basaltic meteorites. Analyses of these primitive melts provide definitive evidence that the Martian mantle has retained a primordial D/H ratio and that young Martian basalts have assimilated old Martian crust.

  5. Compositional Evidence for Launch Pairing of the YQ and Elephant Moraine Lunar Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korotev, R. L.; Jollitt, B. L.; Zeigler, R. A.; Haskin, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    Arai and Warren provide convincing evidence that QUE (Queen Alexandra Range) 94281 derives from the same regolith as Y (Yamato) 793274 and, therefore, that the two meteorites were likely ejected from the Moon by the same impact. Recently discovered Y981031 is paired with Y793274. The "YQ" meteorites (Y793274/Y981031 and QUE 94281 are unique among lunar meteorites in being regolith breccias composed of subequal amounts of mare volcanic material (a VLT [very-low-Ti] basalt or gabbro) and feldspathic highland material. EET (Elephant Moraine) 87521 and its pair EET 96008 are fragmental breccias composed mainly of VLT basalt or gabbro. Warren, Arai, and colleagues note that the volcanic components of the YQ and EET meteorites are texturally similar more similar to each other than either is to mare basalts of the Apollo collection. Warren and colleagues address the issue of possible launch pairing of YQ and EET, but note compositional differences between EET and the volcanic component of YQ, as inferred from extrapolations of regressions to high FeO concentration. We show here that: (1) EET 87/96 consists of fragments of a differentiated magma body, (2) subsamples of EET represent a mixing trend between Fe-rich and Mg-rich differentiates, and (3) the inferred volcanic component of YQ is consistent with a point on the EET mixing line. Thus, there is no compositional impediment to the hypothesis that YQ is launch paired with EET.

  6. Spatial distribution of seasonality of SeaWiFS chlorophyll-a concentrations in the East/Japan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Chun Ok; Park, Sunyoung; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Kyung-Ae; Park, Jong Jin; Park, Mi-Kyung; Li, Shanlan; Kim, Jae-Yeon; Park, Ji-Eun; Kim, Ji-Yoon; Kim, Kyung-Ryul

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the spatial characteristics of seasonality in phytoplankton productivity over the entire East/Japan Sea (EJS), a wavelet analysis was applied to SeaWiFS chlorophyll-a (chl-a) data over the period from 1998 to 2007. The wavelet analysis revealed that a 6-month period of change in chl-a concentration, explained by spring and fall blooms, was persistent throughout EJS during the ten years examined. The time series seasonality could be further classified into three patterns: (1) the highest variance peak at the 6-month period, (2) double variance peaks with similar values at the periods of 6- and 12-month, and (3) the highest variance at the 12-month period. A spatial map of the ratios between variances at the 6- and 12-month periods illustrated geographical distribution of the chl-a seasonality patterns. The Japan Basin and Ulleung Warm Eddy area were characterized by pattern 1 associated with clear spring and fall blooms. The region near the sub-polar front had seasonality pattern 2 characterized by two similar, weak blooms, and the area of East Koran Bay and the Yamato Basin are distinguished by pattern 3 with strong spring bloom, but irregular and unnoticeable fall bloom due to relatively high chl-a concentrations in wintertime. Distinct regional distribution of the seasonality patterns may suggest that phytoplankton productivity and its seasonal cycles respond not only to basin-scale or mesoscale climate forcing but also to changes in local physical properties characterizing each region.

  7. Modal abundances of pyroxene, olivine, and mesostasis in nakhlites: Heterogeneity, variation, and implications for nakhlite emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrigan, Catherine M.; Velbel, Michael A.; Vicenzi, Edward P.

    2015-09-01

    Nakhlites, clinopyroxenite meteorites from Mars, share common crystallization and ejection ages, suggesting that they might have been ejected from the same place on Mars by the same ejection event (impact) and are different samples of the same thick volcanic flow unit or shallow sill. Mean modal abundances and abundance ranges of pyroxene, olivine, and mesostasis vary widely among different thin-sections of an individual nakhlite. Lithologic heterogeneity is the main factor contributing to the observed modal-abundance variations measured in thin-sections prepared from different fragments of the same stone. Two groups of nakhlites are distinguished from one another by which major constituent varies the least and the abundance of that constituent. The group consisting of Nakhla, Lafayette, Governador Valadares, and the Yamato nakhlite pairing group is characterized by low modal mesostasis and pyroxene-olivine covariance, whereas the group consisting of the Miller Range nakhlite pairing group and Northwest Africa 5790 is characterized by low modal olivine and pyroxene-mesostasis covariance. These two groups sample the slowest-cooled interior portion and the chilled margin, respectively, of the nakhlite emplacement body as presently understood, and appear to be also related to recently proposed nakhlite groups independently established using compositional rather than petrographic observations. Phenocryst modal abundances vary with inferred depth in the nakhlite igneous body in a manner consistent with solidification of the nakhlite stack from dynamically sorted phenocryst-rich magmatic crystal-liquid mush.

  8. The petrology and geochemistry of Miller Range 05035: A new lunar gabbroic meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joy, K. H.; Crawford, I. A.; Anand, M.; Greenwood, R. C.; Franchi, I. A.; Russell, S. S.

    2008-08-01

    Miller Range (MIL) 05035 is a lunar gabbroic meteorite. The mineralogy, Fe/Mn ratios in olivine and pyroxene, bulk-rock chemical composition and the bulk oxygen isotope values (δ 17O = 2.86-2.97‰ and δ 18O = 5.47-5.71‰) are similar to those of other mare basalts, and are taken as supporting evidence for a lunar origin for this meteorite. The sample is dominated by pyroxene grains (54-61% by area mode of thin section) along with large plagioclase feldspar (25-36% by mode) and accessory quartz, ilmenite, spinel, apatite and troilite. The bulk-rock major element composition of MIL 05035 indicates that the sample has a very low-Ti (VLT) to low-Ti lunar heritage (we measure bulk TiO 2 to be 0.9 Wt.%) and has low bulk incompatible trace element (ITE) concentrations, akin to samples from the VLT mare basalt suite. To account for these geochemical characteristics we hypothesize that MIL 05035's parental melt was derived from a mantle region dominated by early cumulates of the magma ocean (comprised principally of olivine and orthopyroxene). MIL 05035 is likely launch paired with the Asuka-881757 and Yamato-793169 basaltic lunar meteorites and the basaltic regolith breccia MET 01210. This group of meteorites (Y/A/M/M) therefore may be a part of a stratigraphic column consisting of an upper regolith environment underlain by a coarsening downwards basalt lava flow.

  9. Amphibole in Martian Meteorites: Composition and Implication for Volatile Content of Parental Magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, K. B.; Sonzogni, Y.; Treiman, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Titanium-rich amphibole is present in melt inclusions in many martian (SNC) meteorites, suggesting that martian magmas contained water. Amphibole has been reported in melt inclusions within olivine grains in chassignites [1-3], and occurs in melt inclusions within pigeonite grains in most shergottites [4-10]. This study focuses on a comparison of amphibole compositions in two olivine-phyric shergottites: Tissint and Elephant Moraine (EETA) 79001, Lithology A. While amphibole (commonly of kaersutitic composition) is rare in martian meteorites, the mineral is widespread and may be useful in constraining volatile abundances in the martian mantle. Amphibole incorporates hydroxyl into its mineral structure on its O(3) site, which can also contain F-, Cl-, and O2-. Previous chemical analyses of amphiboles in martian meteorites show low halogen abundances, implying high proportions of OH- and/or O2- in the O(3) site [6, 11]. Presence of O2- on O(3) is not considered in this study, even though oxy-kaersutite can be stable at 1 bar pressure [11, 12]. Our chemical data on amphibole in martian meteorites will expand the current compositional database and provide amphibole water content estimates that can then be used to constrain the water content of the parental magma. Amphiboles were identified in polished thin sections of Tissint and EETA79001A by their yellow-orange to light brown pleochroism. Consistent with previous observations of amphibole in shergottites [4-10], the amphiboles are present only in melt inclusions in the cores of pigeonite grains, and never in augite, olivine, or mesostasis. The amphibole grains are subhedral, and range up to 15 μm in diameter. Amphibole formulae were calculated from chemical analyses by normalizing to 23 O, assuming that all iron is ferrous, and assuming that halogens and hydroxyl fully occupy the O(3) site (i.e., F-+Cl-+OH-= 2). Variability in iron oxidation and the possibility of internal amphibole dehydrogenation provide

  10. Long-Term Evolution of the Martian Crust-Mantle System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grott, M.; Baratoux, D.; Hauber, E.; Sautter, V.; Mustard, J.; Gasnault, O.; Ruff, S. W.; Karato, S.-I.; Debaille, V.; Knapmeyer, M.; Sohl, F.; Van Hoolst, T.; Breuer, D.; Morschhauser, A.; Toplis, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Lacking plate tectonics and crustal recycling, the long-term evolution of the crust-mantle system of Mars is driven by mantle convection, partial melting, and silicate differentiation. Volcanic landforms such as lava flows, shield volcanoes, volcanic cones, pyroclastic deposits, and dikes are observed on the martian surface, and while activity was widespread during the late Noachian and Hesperian, volcanism became more and more restricted to the Tharsis and Elysium provinces in the Amazonian period. Martian igneous rocks are predominantly basaltic in composition, and remote sensing data, in-situ data, and analysis of the SNC meteorites indicate that magma source regions were located at depths between 80 and 150 km, with degrees of partial melting ranging from 5 to 15 %. Furthermore, magma storage at depth appears to be of limited importance, and secular cooling rates of 30 to 40 K Gyr-1 were derived from surface chemistry for the Hesperian and Amazonian periods. These estimates are in general agreement with numerical models of the thermo-chemical evolution of Mars, which predict source region depths of 100 to 200 km, degrees of partial melting between 5 and 20 %, and secular cooling rates of 40 to 50 K Gyr-1. In addition, these model predictions largely agree with elastic lithosphere thickness estimates derived from gravity and topography data. Major unknowns related to the evolution of the crust-mantle system are the age of the shergottites, the planet's initial bulk mantle water content, and its average crustal thickness. Analysis of the SNC meteorites, estimates of the elastic lithosphere thickness, as well as the fact that tidal dissipation takes place in the martian mantle indicate that rheologically significant amounts of water of a few tens of ppm are still present in the interior. However, the exact amount is controversial and estimates range from only a few to more than 200 ppm. Owing to the uncertain formation age of the shergottites it is unclear whether

  11. A Groundmass Composition for EET 79001A Using a Novel Microprobe Technique for Estimating Bulk Compositions. Lithology A as an Impact Melt?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, John H.; Hanson, B. Z.

    2011-01-01

    Petrologic investigation of the shergottites has been hampered by the fact that most of these meteorites are partial cumulates. Two lines of inquiry have been used to evaluate the compositions of parental liquids: (i) perform melting experiments at different pressures and temperatures until the compositions of cumulate crystal cores are reproduced [e.g., 1]; and (ii) use point-counting techniques to reconstruct the compositions of intercumulus liquids [e.g., 2]. The second of these methods is hampered by the approximate nature of the technique. In effect, element maps are used to construct mineral modes; and average mineral compositions are then converted into bulk compositions. This method works well when the mineral phases are homogeneous [3]. However, when minerals are zoned, with narrow rims contributing disproportionately to the mineral volume, this method becomes problematic. Decisions need to be made about the average composition of the various zones within crystals. And, further, the proportions of those zones also need to be defined. We have developed a new microprobe technique to see whether the point-count method of determining intercumulus liquid composition is realistic. In our technique, the approximating decisions of earlier methods are unnecessary because each pixel of our x-ray maps is turned into a complete eleven-element quantitative analysis. The success or failure of our technique can then be determined by experimentation. As discussed earlier, experiments on our point-count composition can then be used to see whether experimental liquidus phases successfully reproduce natural mineral compositions. Regardless of our ultimate outcome in retrieving shergottite parent liquids, we believe our pixel-bypixel analysis technique represents a giant step forward in documenting thin-section modes and compositions. For a third time, we have analyzed the groundmass composition of EET 79001, 68 [Eg]. The first estimate of Eg was made by [4] and later

  12. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic investigation of an exceptionally pristine sample from Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochette, P.; Gattacceca, J.; Cournède, C.; Sautter, V.

    2012-04-01

    Unaltered samples from Mars are available as meteorites recovered right after their fall. Only 4 of them were available (the last one fell 50 yrs ago) until the recovery of a Martian meteorite fallen in Morocco in July 2010. We obtained a 1.8 g sample away from the fusion crust of this fall (named Tissint), to study its magnetic properties. Petrographic examination indicates the meteorite is an olivine-phyric shergottite, with pyrrhotite and chromite as the only identified potentially magnetic minerals. Rock magnetism is fully consistent with pyrrhotite-bearing shergottites [1], with a high coercivity of remanence (Mrs/Ms ≈0.4, Bcr of 80 mT, S ratio of -0.75, etc). Ms is about 0.15 Am2/kg, equivalent to 1 wt.% pyrrhotite. Micromagnetometric investigation should allow to identify the mineral phase responsible for remanence and solve the debate on chromite [2] versus pyrrhotite [1]. Magnetic anisotropy and NRM are directionally consistent in oriented subsamples. The meteorite shows no sign of remagnetization by magnet application (a customary practice among meteorite hunters). NRM is very hard with respect to alternating field demagnetization with a median destructive field of about 70 mT. Very low NRM/IRM derivative ratio (REM' integrated between 10 and 80 mT is about 2 10-4, the lowest ever measured in a meteorite) suggest NRM acquisition in very low ambient field (<1 µT). Moreover, the high coercivity of the NRM and the increasing REM' value with alternating field suggest that the NRM may be a shock-hardened magnetization (for instance a primary thermoremanent magnetization acquired in a crustal remanent field of a few µT, and later shocked in a similar field). Indeed this meteorite has suffered high shock pressure, as evidenced by amorphization of plagioclase and formation of numerous large melt pockets. [1] Rochette P et al. Meteorit. Planet. Sci, 40, 529-540 (2005) [2] Yu Y.J., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 250, 27-37 (2006)

  13. The primary fO2 of basalts examined by the Spirit rover in Gusev Crater, Mars: Evidence for multiple redox states in the martian interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Mariek E.; Schrader, Christian M.; McCoy, Timothy J.

    2013-12-01

    The primary oxygen fugacity (fO2) of basaltic melts reflects the mantle source oxidation state, dictates the crystallizing assemblage, and determines how the magma will evolve. Basalts examined by the Spirit Mars Exploration Rover in Gusev Crater range from the K-poor Adirondack class (0.02 wt% K2O) to K-rich Backstay class (up to 1.2 wt% K2O) and exhibit substantially more variation than observed in martian basaltic meteorites. The ratios of ferric to total iron (Fe3+/FeT) measured by the Mössbauer spectrometer are high (equivalent to -0.76 to +2.98ΔQFM; quartz-fayalite-magnetite buffer as defined by Wones and Gilbert, 1969), reflecting secondary Fe3+ phases. By combining the Fe3+/FeT of the igneous minerals (olivine, pyroxene, and magnetite) determined by Mössbauer spectrometer, we estimate primary fO2 for the Gusev basalts to be -3.6 to 0.5ΔQFM. Estimating the fO2 as a function of the dependence of the CIPW normative fayalite/magnetite ratios on Fe3+/FeT yields a slightly smaller range of -2.58 to +0.57ΔQFM. General similarity between the fO2 estimated for the Gusev basalts and ranges in fO2 for the shergottitic meteorites (-3.8 to 0.2ΔQFM; Herd, 2003; Goodrich et al., 2003) suggests that the overall range of fO2 for the martian igneous rocks and mantle is relatively restricted. Like the shergottites (Herd, 2003), estimated fO2 of three Gusev classes (Adirondack, Barnhill and Irvine) correlates with a proxy for LREE enrichment (K2O/TiO2). This suggests mixing between melts or fluids derived from reservoirs with contrasting fO2 and REE characteristics. Oxygen fugacity estimates for the martian interior suggest that tectonic processes have not led to sufficient recycling of oxidized surface material into the martian interior to entirely affect the overall oxidation state of the mantle.

  14. On the iron isotope composition of Mars and volatile depletion in the terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sossi, Paolo A.; Nebel, Oliver; Anand, Mahesh; Poitrasson, Franck

    2016-09-01

    Iron is the most abundant multivalent element in planetary reservoirs, meaning its isotope composition (expressed as δ57Fe) may record signatures of processes that occurred during the formation and subsequent differentiation of the terrestrial planets. Chondritic meteorites, putative constituents of the planets and remnants of undifferentiated inner solar system bodies, have δ57Fe ≈ 0 ‰; an isotopic signature shared with the Martian Shergottite-Nakhlite-Chassignite (SNC) suite of meteorites. The silicate Earth and Moon, as represented by basaltic rocks, are distinctly heavier, δ57Fe ≈ + 0.1 ‰. However, some authors have recently argued, on the basis of iron isotope measurements of abyssal peridotites, that the composition of the Earth's mantle is δ57Fe = + 0.04 ± 0.04 ‰, indistinguishable from the mean Martian value. To provide a more robust estimate for Mars, we present new high-precision iron isotope data on 17 SNC meteorites and 5 mineral separates. We find that the iron isotope compositions of Martian meteorites reflect igneous processes, with nakhlites and evolved shergottites displaying heavier δ57Fe (+ 0.05 ± 0.03 ‰), whereas MgO-rich rocks are lighter (δ57Fe ≈