Science.gov

Sample records for lidocaine

  1. Lidocaine Viscous

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain of a sore or irritated mouth and throat often associated with cancer chemotherapy and certain medical ... Lidocaine viscous is not normally used for sore throats due to cold, flu, or infections such as ...

  2. Tumescent Liposuction without Lidocaine

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Joshua J.; Fang, Xin-Hua; Williams, Shelley J.; Baynosa, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our previous study demonstrated that lidocaine has a negative impact on adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) survival. Currently for large-volume liposuction, patients often undergo general anesthesia; therefore, lidocaine subcutaneous anesthesia is nonessential. We hypothesized that removing lidocaine from tumescent might improve stromal vascular fraction (SVF) and ASC survival from the standard tumescent with lidocaine. Ropivacaine is also a commonly used local anesthetic. The effect of ropivacaine on ASC survival was examined. Methods: Adults who underwent liposuction on bilateral body areas were included (n = 10). Under general anesthesia, liposuction on 1 area was conducted under standard tumescent with lidocaine. On the contralateral side, liposuction was conducted under the modified tumescent without lidocaine. Five milliliters of lipoaspirate were processed for the isolation of SVF. The adherent ASCs were counted after 24 hours of SVF culture. Apoptosis and necrosis of SVF cells were examined by Annexin/propidium iodide staining and analyzed by flow cytometry. Results: Average percentage of live SVF cells was 68.0% ± 4.0% (28.5% ± 3.8% of apoptosis and 3.4% ± 1.0% of necrosis) in lidocaine group compared with 86.7% ± 3.7% (11.5% ± 3.1% of apoptosis and 1.8% ± 0.7% of necrosis) in no-lidocaine group (P = 0.002). Average number of viable ASC was also significantly lower (367,000 ± 107) in lidocaine group compared with that (500,000 ± 152) in no-lidocaine group (P = 0.04). No significant difference was found between lidocaine and ropivacaine on ASC cytotoxicity. Conclusions: Removing lidocaine from tumescent significantly reduced SVF and ASC apoptosis in the lipoaspirate. We recommend tumescent liposuction without lidocaine, particularly if patient’s lipoaspirate will be used for fat grafting.

  3. Tumescent Liposuction without Lidocaine

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Joshua J.; Fang, Xin-Hua; Williams, Shelley J.; Baynosa, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our previous study demonstrated that lidocaine has a negative impact on adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) survival. Currently for large-volume liposuction, patients often undergo general anesthesia; therefore, lidocaine subcutaneous anesthesia is nonessential. We hypothesized that removing lidocaine from tumescent might improve stromal vascular fraction (SVF) and ASC survival from the standard tumescent with lidocaine. Ropivacaine is also a commonly used local anesthetic. The effect of ropivacaine on ASC survival was examined. Methods: Adults who underwent liposuction on bilateral body areas were included (n = 10). Under general anesthesia, liposuction on 1 area was conducted under standard tumescent with lidocaine. On the contralateral side, liposuction was conducted under the modified tumescent without lidocaine. Five milliliters of lipoaspirate were processed for the isolation of SVF. The adherent ASCs were counted after 24 hours of SVF culture. Apoptosis and necrosis of SVF cells were examined by Annexin/propidium iodide staining and analyzed by flow cytometry. Results: Average percentage of live SVF cells was 68.0% ± 4.0% (28.5% ± 3.8% of apoptosis and 3.4% ± 1.0% of necrosis) in lidocaine group compared with 86.7% ± 3.7% (11.5% ± 3.1% of apoptosis and 1.8% ± 0.7% of necrosis) in no-lidocaine group (P = 0.002). Average number of viable ASC was also significantly lower (367,000 ± 107) in lidocaine group compared with that (500,000 ± 152) in no-lidocaine group (P = 0.04). No significant difference was found between lidocaine and ropivacaine on ASC cytotoxicity. Conclusions: Removing lidocaine from tumescent significantly reduced SVF and ASC apoptosis in the lipoaspirate. We recommend tumescent liposuction without lidocaine, particularly if patient’s lipoaspirate will be used for fat grafting. PMID:27622097

  4. Recurrent seizures after lidocaine ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Laali, Abolghasem; Nosrati, Nazanin; Jahani, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Lidocaine has a concentration-dependent effect on seizures. Concentrations above 15 μg/mL frequently result in seizures in laboratory animals and human. We report a case of central nervous system (CNS) lidocaine toxicity and recurrent seizure after erroneous ingestion of lidocaine solution. A 4-year-old boy presented to the Emergency Department of Imam Hospital of Sari in December 2013 due to tonic-clonic generalized seizures approximately 30 min ago. 3 h before seizure, his mother gave him 2 spoons (amount 20–25 cc) lidocaine hydrochloride 2% solution instead of pediatric gripe by mistake. Seizure with generalized tonic-clonic occurred 3 times in home. Neurological examination was essentially unremarkable except for the depressed level of consciousness. Personal and medical history was unremarkable. There was no evidence of intracranial ischemic or hemorrhagic lesions in computed tomography scan. There were no further seizures, the condition of the patient remained stable, and he was discharged 2 days after admission. The use of viscous lidocaine may result in cardiovascular and CNS toxicity, particularly in children. Conservative management is the best option for treatment of lidocaine induced seizure. PMID:25709968

  5. Recurrent seizures after lidocaine ingestion.

    PubMed

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Laali, Abolghasem; Nosrati, Nazanin; Jahani, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Lidocaine has a concentration-dependent effect on seizures. Concentrations above 15 μg/mL frequently result in seizures in laboratory animals and human. We report a case of central nervous system (CNS) lidocaine toxicity and recurrent seizure after erroneous ingestion of lidocaine solution. A 4-year-old boy presented to the Emergency Department of Imam Hospital of Sari in December 2013 due to tonic-clonic generalized seizures approximately 30 min ago. 3 h before seizure, his mother gave him 2 spoons (amount 20-25 cc) lidocaine hydrochloride 2% solution instead of pediatric gripe by mistake. Seizure with generalized tonic-clonic occurred 3 times in home. Neurological examination was essentially unremarkable except for the depressed level of consciousness. Personal and medical history was unremarkable. There was no evidence of intracranial ischemic or hemorrhagic lesions in computed tomography scan. There were no further seizures, the condition of the patient remained stable, and he was discharged 2 days after admission. The use of viscous lidocaine may result in cardiovascular and CNS toxicity, particularly in children. Conservative management is the best option for treatment of lidocaine induced seizure. PMID:25709968

  6. Lidocaine overdose: another preventable case?

    PubMed

    Gonzalez del Rey, J; Wason, S; Druckenbrod, R W

    1994-12-01

    Physicians who prescribe viscous lidocaine preparations should be aware of the adverse effects and the high risk for overdose in pediatric patients. Owing to altered pharmacokinetics (increased absorption, decreased clearance, and prolonged half-life), doses that are innocuous for adults may present a significant potential toxic hazard in children. Lidocaine should not be used to treat painful mouth lesions in children until further safety data are available. Benzocaine may be considered as a safe alternative to lidocaine. Its low incidence of side effects makes it a safer choice for infants and children. If no other choices are appropriate, then very specific instructions should be given to parents. The amount, frequency, maximum daily dose, and mode of administration should be clearly communicated (eg, cotton pledget to individual lesions, one-half dropper to each cheek every four hours, or 20 minutes before meals). They should never be prescribed on a "PRN" basis.

  7. Benzocaine/Lidocaine/Tetracaine Cream

    PubMed Central

    Boonsiri, Metavee; Marks, Katherine C.

    2016-01-01

    Practitioners are increasingly using topical anesthetics in the field of dermatology. Application of topical anesthetics prior to performing dermatologic procedures has proven to decrease pain and discomfort associated with these procedures. Despite the prevalent use of topical anesthetics, there are few standard guidelines for about which products provide optimal and safest use. Adverse events are often correlated with improper application of topical anesthetics. A few case reports have cited adverse events related to the use of compounded products that the United States Food and Drug Administration has not approved, such as benzocaine, lidocaine, tetracaine. In this article, the authors report the possible ocular side effects due to the use of benzocaine, lidocaine, tetracaine. Careful attention must be paid to this compounded product, and better formulations are needed in order to prevent adverse events. PMID:27354889

  8. Estimated Maximal Safe Dosages of Tumescent Lidocaine

    PubMed Central

    Jeske, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumescent lidocaine anesthesia consists of subcutaneous injection of relatively large volumes (up to 4 L or more) of dilute lidocaine (≤1 g/L) and epinephrine (≤1 mg/L). Although tumescent lidocaine anesthesia is used for an increasing variety of surgical procedures, the maximum safe dosage is unknown. Our primary aim in this study was to measure serum lidocaine concentrations after subcutaneous administration of tumescent lidocaine with and without liposuction. Our hypotheses were that even with large doses (i.e., >30 mg/kg), serum lidocaine concentrations would be below levels associated with mild toxicity and that the concentration-time profile would be lower after liposuction than without liposuction. METHODS: Volunteers participated in 1 to 2 infiltration studies without liposuction and then one study with tumescent liposuction totally by local anesthesia. Serum lidocaine concentrations were measured at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, and 24 hours after each tumescent lidocaine infiltration. Area under the curve (AUC∞) of the serum lidocaine concentration-time profiles and peak serum lidocaine concentrations (Cmax) were determined with and without liposuction. For any given milligram per kilogram dosage, the probability that Cmax >6 μg/mL, the threshold for mild lidocaine toxicity was estimated using tolerance interval analysis. RESULTS: In 41 tumescent infiltration procedures among 14 volunteer subjects, tumescent lidocaine dosages ranged from 19.2 to 52 mg/kg. Measured serum lidocaine concentrations were all <6 μg/mL over the 24-hour study period. AUC∞s with liposuction were significantly less than those without liposuction (P = 0.001). The estimated risk of lidocaine toxicity without liposuction at a dose of 28 mg/kg and with liposuction at a dose of 45 mg/kg was ≤1 per 2000. CONCLUSIONS: Preliminary estimates for maximum safe dosages of tumescent lidocaine are 28 mg/kg without liposuction and 45 mg/kg with liposuction. As a

  9. "Doom anxiety" and delirium in lidocaine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Saravay, S M; Marke, J; Steinberg, M D; Rabiner, C J

    1987-02-01

    Of 15 patients with psychiatric reactions to lidocaine, 12 (80%) had mood changes, 11 (73%) had "doom anxiety," eight (53%) had overt confusional states, and six (40%) had hallucinations and delusions. The authors contend that morbid fears of impending doom or the belief that death has occurred are specific manifestations of lidocaine toxicity and may be mistakenly attributed to "understandable" fears about death during the course of recovery from a myocardial infarction on the coronary care unit.

  10. Treatment of shivering after epidural lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Harris, M M; Lawson, D; Cooper, C M; Ellis, J

    1989-01-01

    The effectiveness of intravenous meperidine and warm local anesthetic for prevention of postanesthetic shivering was evaluated in urology patients undergoing epidural blockade for extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. When administered before the blockade, meperidine, 12.5 mg or 25 mg, was not significantly better than saline placebo for preventing postepidural shivering. Changes in the concentrations of catecholamines or lidocaine did not result in differences between patients who shivered and those who did not shiver. In a second experiment, patients receiving body-temperature or room-temperature epidural lidocaine did not differ with respect to the incidence of postanesthetic shivering, onset of sensory blockade, or core temperature during a 30-minute observation period. The authors concluded that neither meperidine, in doses employed, nor body-temperature lidocaine prevents shivering after epidural blockade. This shivering appears to be different from that observed during emergence from general anesthesia.

  11. Articaine and lidocaine for maxillary infiltration anesthesia.

    PubMed Central

    Vähätalo, K.; Antila, H.; Lehtinen, R.

    1993-01-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the anesthetic properties of articaine hydrochloride with 1:200,000 epinephrine (Ultracain DS) and lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine (Xylocain-Adrenalin) for maxillary infiltration anesthesia. Twenty healthy dental student volunteers were included in this double-blind study. Each subject received 0.6 mL of each test solution at different times. Infiltration anesthesia was performed on the upper lateral incisor. The onset and duration of anesthesia were monitored using an electric pulp tester. No statistically significant differences were seen in the onset and duration of anesthesia between the articaine and lidocaine solutions. PMID:7943919

  12. Nanoethosomes for Dermal Delivery of Lidocaine

    PubMed Central

    Babaie, Soraya; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed; Davaran, Soodabeh; Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: It is necessary for local anesthetics to pass through the stratum corneum to provide rapid pain relief. Many techniques have been reported to enhance intradermal penetration of local anesthetics such as vesicular lipid carriers. Ethosomes are lipid vesicles containing phospholipids, ethanol at relatively high concentration. We hypothesized that synergistic effects of phospholipids and high concentration of ethanol in formulation could accelerate penetration of nanoethosomes in deep layers of skin. Methods: Lidocaine-loaded nanoethosomes were prepared and characterized by size and zeta analyzer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Furthermore, encapsulation efficiency (EE), loading capacity (LC), and skin penetration capability were evaluated by in vitro and in vivo experiments. Results: results showed that the particle size, zeta potential, EE and LC of optimum formulation were 105.4 ± 7.9 nm, -33.6 ± 2.4 mV, 40.14 ± 2.5 %, and 8.02 ± 0.71 respectively. SEM results confirmed the non-aggregated nano-scale size of prepared nanoethosomes. Particle size of ethosomes and EE of Lidocaine were depended on the phospholipid and ethanol concentrations. XRD results demonstrated the drug encapsulation in amorphous status interpreting the achieved high drug EE and LC values. In vitro and in vivo assays confirmed the appropriate skin penetration of Lidocaine with the aid of nanoethosomes and existence of deposition of nanoethosomes in deep skin layers, respectively. Conclusion: The developed nanoethosomes are proposed as a suitable carrier for topical delivery of anesthetics such as Lidocaine. PMID:26819928

  13. Lidocaine Inhibits HCN Currents in Rat Spinal Substantia Gelatinosa Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tao; Liu, Nana; Lv, Minhua; Ma, Longxian; Peng, Huizhen; Peng, Sicong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lidocaine, which blocks voltage-gated sodium channels, is widely used in surgical anesthesia and pain management. Recently, it has been proposed that the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide (HCN) channel is one of the other novel targets of lidocaine. Substantia gelatinosa in the spinal dorsal horn, which plays key roles in modulating nociceptive information from primary afferents, comprises heterogeneous interneurons that can be electrophysiologically categorized by firing pattern. Our previous study demonstrated that a substantial proportion of substantia gelatinosa neurons reveal the presence of HCN current (Ih); however, the roles of lidocaine and HCN channel expression in different types of substantia gelatinosa neurons remain unclear. METHODS: By using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we investigated the effect of lidocaine on Ih in rat substantia gelatinosa neurons of acute dissociated spinal cord slices. RESULTS: We found that lidocaine rapidly decreased the peak Ih amplitude with an IC50 of 80 μM. The inhibition rate on Ih was not significantly different with a second application of lidocaine in the same neuron. Tetrodotoxin, a sodium channel blocker, did not affect lidocaine’s effect on Ih. In addition, lidocaine shifted the half-activation potential of Ih from −109.7 to −114.9 mV and slowed activation. Moreover, the reversal potential of Ih was shifted by −7.5 mV by lidocaine. In the current clamp, lidocaine decreased the resting membrane potential, increased membrane resistance, delayed rebound depolarization latency, and reduced the rebound spike frequency. We further found that approximately 58% of substantia gelatinosa neurons examined expressed Ih, in which most of them were tonically firing. CONCLUSIONS: Our studies demonstrate that lidocaine strongly inhibits Ih in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner in substantia gelatinosa neurons, independent of tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels. Thus, our

  14. Pharmacokinetics of lidocaine delivered from a transmucosal patch in children.

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Andrea; Wilson, Stephen; Weaver, Joel S.; Moursi, Amr M.

    2002-01-01

    The DentiPatch lidocaine transoral delivery system (Noven Pharmaceuticals) is indicated for mild topical anesthesia of mucosal membranes in the mouth. The DentiPatch is a mucoadhesive patch containing 46.1 mg of lidocaine (20% concentration). Current studies in adults report that DentiPatch application produces very low plasma concentrations of lidocaine. However, it is not known what plasma levels are obtained when the same dosage is used in children. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the plasma lidocaine concentrations generated by the DentiPatch are within a safe range for children. The sample in this study was 11 children aged 2-7 years requiring general anesthesia for comprehensive dental care. A lidocaine DentiPatch was placed on the buccal mucosa above the maxillary incisors for 5 minutes. Blood samples were drawn before placing the DentiPatch and at various time intervals after removing it. Blood samples were analyzed by fluorescence polarization immunoassay to determine the plasma concentrations of lidocaine and its major metabolite, monoethylglycinexylidide. The lidocaine and monoethylglycinexylidide absorbed from the DentiPatch did not reach toxic plasma levels in children. However, plasma concentrations were much higher than in adults and were high enough to require inclusion in the calculation of total lidocaine administered to a pediatric patient. Images Figure 1 PMID:15384296

  15. Intravenous lidocaine as a suppressant of coughing during tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Yukioka, H; Yoshimoto, N; Nishimura, K; Fujimori, M

    1985-12-01

    Effects of intravenously administered lidocaine on cough suppression during tracheal intubation under general anesthesia were evaluated in two studies. In study 1, 100 patients received either a placebo or 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, or 2.0 mg/kg lidocaine intravenously 1 min before tracheal intubation. All visible coughs were classified as coughing. The incidence of coughing decreased as the dose of lidocaine increased. A dose of 1 mg/kg or more of intravenous lidocaine suppressed the cough reflex significantly (P less than 0.01). Coughing was suppressed completely by 2 mg/kg of intravenous lidocaine. In study 2, 108 patients received 2 mg/kg lidocaine intravenously or a placebo 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, or 15 min before intubation. The same criteria for determining whether a patient did or did not cough during tracheal intubation were used as in study 1. The incidence of coughing decreased significantly (P less than 0.01) when 2 mg/kg of lidocaine was injected intravenously between 1 and 5 min before our attempting intubation. Cough reflex was suppressed completely by plasma concentrations of lidocaine in excess of 3 micrograms/ml. PMID:4061901

  16. Lidocaine Metabolism and Toxicity: A Laboratory Experiment for Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusek, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    A laboratory exercise for dental students is presented using a toxic dose of lidocaine in place of an anesthetic dose of pentobarbital. The use of lidocaine demonstrates its toxic and lethal actions and increases the relevance of the experience for dental students. (Author/MLW)

  17. Brachial plexus block using lidocaine/epinephrine or lidocaine/xylazine in fat-tailed sheep.

    PubMed

    Ghadirian, Safoura; Vesal, Nasser

    2013-01-01

    This blinded, randomized experimental study was designed to evaluate the analgesic effects of adding epinephrine or xylazine to lidocaine solution for brachial plexus block (BPB) in sheep. Nine healthy, fat-tailed female lambs (26.6 ± 1.5 kg) were randomly allocated into three groups: lidocaine 2%, 5 mg kg(-1) (LID, n = 6), lidocaine (5 mg kg(-1)) with epinephrine 5 µg mL(-1) (LIDEP, n = 6) or lidocaine (5 mg kg(-1)) with xylazine 0.05 mg kg(-1) (LIDXY, n = 6). Each animal was tested twice. The sheep received a total volume of 0.25 mL kg(-1) for BPB. A nerve stimulator was used to locate the nerves of the brachial plexus. Onset and duration of analgesia of the forelimb were evaluated using superficial and deep pin prick and pinching of skin with a hemostat clamp. Heart and respiratory rates, and rectal temperature were recorded before and at predetermined intervals following the completion of the block. Brachial administration of LID, LIDEP or LIDXY produced forelimb analgesia within 11.3, 11.0 and 7.0 minutes, respectively. The mean duration of analgesia was 100.0 min in LID and 133.2 min in LIDEP group. The mean duration of analgesia in LIDXY group (186.8 min) was significantly longer compared with LID group. In LIDEP group a significant increase in heart rate occurred 5 min after drug administration. Heart rate decreased from 35 to 80 min in sheep received LIDXY. In conclusion, the addition of xylazine to lidocaine solution for BBP provided a prolonged duration of action without any adverse effects in fat-tailed sheep. PMID:25653791

  18. Brachial plexus block using lidocaine/epinephrine or lidocaine/xylazine in fat-tailed sheep.

    PubMed

    Ghadirian, Safoura; Vesal, Nasser

    2013-01-01

    This blinded, randomized experimental study was designed to evaluate the analgesic effects of adding epinephrine or xylazine to lidocaine solution for brachial plexus block (BPB) in sheep. Nine healthy, fat-tailed female lambs (26.6 ± 1.5 kg) were randomly allocated into three groups: lidocaine 2%, 5 mg kg(-1) (LID, n = 6), lidocaine (5 mg kg(-1)) with epinephrine 5 µg mL(-1) (LIDEP, n = 6) or lidocaine (5 mg kg(-1)) with xylazine 0.05 mg kg(-1) (LIDXY, n = 6). Each animal was tested twice. The sheep received a total volume of 0.25 mL kg(-1) for BPB. A nerve stimulator was used to locate the nerves of the brachial plexus. Onset and duration of analgesia of the forelimb were evaluated using superficial and deep pin prick and pinching of skin with a hemostat clamp. Heart and respiratory rates, and rectal temperature were recorded before and at predetermined intervals following the completion of the block. Brachial administration of LID, LIDEP or LIDXY produced forelimb analgesia within 11.3, 11.0 and 7.0 minutes, respectively. The mean duration of analgesia was 100.0 min in LID and 133.2 min in LIDEP group. The mean duration of analgesia in LIDXY group (186.8 min) was significantly longer compared with LID group. In LIDEP group a significant increase in heart rate occurred 5 min after drug administration. Heart rate decreased from 35 to 80 min in sheep received LIDXY. In conclusion, the addition of xylazine to lidocaine solution for BBP provided a prolonged duration of action without any adverse effects in fat-tailed sheep.

  19. Tissue distribution of lidocaine in critical care patients after intubation.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Fumio; Hashimoto, Yoshiaki

    2003-11-26

    We investigated tissue distribution of lidocaine in 33 patients after endotracheal intubation with Xylocaine jelly that contains 2% lidocaine hydrochloride. Blood levels of monoethylglycinexylidide (MEGX), an active metabolite of lidocaine, were also determined. Five patients (Group A) were alive on arrival and six patients (Group B) resumed heartbeats after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The survival times for Groups A and B ranged from 3 to 72 h. The remaining 22 patients (Group C) did not survive cardiopulmonary arrest on arrival (CPAOA). Systemic distribution of lidocaine was measured in nine patients from Group C. The liver-to-kidney lidocaine ratios and cerebrum-to-cerebrospinal fluid lidocaine ratios were: Group A, 0.1-0.7 and 1.4-3.6, respectively; Group B, 0.2-0.8 and 1.2-2.3, respectively; Group C, 0.1-17 and 0.2-1.0, respectively. MEGX was detected in all blood samples from Group A and only two samples from Group B. No MEGX was detected in samples from Group C. Our results indicate that the absorption of tracheal lidocaine during natural circulation results in a cerebrum-to-cerebrospinal fluid lidocaine ratio of 1.2 or more, whereas absorption during artificial circulation by cardiac massage gives a ratio of 1.0 or less. The cerebrum-to-cerebrospinal fluid lidocaine ratio may be a more useful index to estimate circulatory dynamics of patients during CPR than the liver-to-kidney lidocaine ratio. MEGX was not a useful parameter for monitoring circulatory changes during cardiac massage.

  20. Comparison of topical lidocaine/prilocaine anesthetic cream and local infiltration of 2% lidocaine for episioplasty in mares.

    PubMed

    Erkert, R S; Macallister, C G; Campbell, G; Payton, M E; Shawley, R; Clarke, C R

    2005-06-01

    Local anesthesia and tissue inflammation associated with lidocaine infiltration and lidocaine/prilocaine topical anesthetic cream for episioplasty in mares were compared. Twenty-two mares were randomly assigned to lidocaine or lidocaine/prilocaine topical anesthetic cream treatment groups. Perineum and vulva were cleaned, 8-12 g (approximately 1 g/cm per side of vulva) of topical anesthetic cream was applied, and the area was covered by plastic wrap 30 min prior to beginning procedure. Alternately, lidocaine was injected (1 mL) every centimeter just prior to the procedure. Episioplasty was conducted using standard methods, but employing simple interrupted sutures. Horses were not sedated and use of a twitch was recorded. Four millimeter punch biopsies were harvested 1, 3, and 10 days following episioplasty and scored for degree of inflammation by a blinded pathologist. Clinical inflammation scores were assigned when biopsies were obtained. Seven of 11 horses receiving lidocaine infiltration required twitching, but none of the horses that received the anesthetic cream required twitching. Six of 11 and seven of 11 of the lidocaine and anesthetic cream groups, respectively, required twitching for episioplasty. Except for the clinical scores on day 3, no statistical differences for clinical and histopathologic scores between samples from the two treatment groups for a given day were identified. Use of lidocaine/prilocaine topical anesthetic cream was as effective as lidocaine infiltration in providing local anesthesia when performing episioplasty in mares. Its use decreased the need for twitching horses as well as the risk of deformation of the labia caused by lidocaine infiltration.

  1. Evaluation of Analgesic Effect of Caudal Epidural Tramadol, Tramadol-Lidocaine, and Lidocaine in Water Buffalo Calves (Bubalus bubalis)

    PubMed Central

    Atiba, Ayman; Ghazy, Alaa; Gomaa, Naglaa; Kamal, Tarek; Shukry, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to compare the analgesic effect of tramadol and a combination of tramadol-lidocaine with that produced by lidocaine administration in the epidural space in buffalo calves. In a prospective randomized crossover study, ten male buffalo calves were used to compare the epidural analgesic effect of tramadol (1 mg/kg) and tramadol-lidocaine combination (0.5 mg/kg and 0.11 mg/kg, resp.) with that produced by 2% lidocaine (0.22 mg/kg). Loss of sensation was examined by pin-prick test. Onset time, duration, and degree of analgesia and ataxia were recorded after each treatment. Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), rectal temperature, and haematobiochemical parameters were recorded after all treatments. Time to onset and duration of analgesia, respectively, were as follows: tramadol 11 ± 2 min and 208 ± 15 min; tramadol-lidocaine 6 ± 2 min and 168 ± 9 min; lidocaine 4 ± 1 min and 67 ± 13 min. Onset time and duration were significantly longer with tramadol than the other treatments. Duration was significantly longer with tramadol-lidocaine than lidocaine. Ataxia was mildly observed in tramadol-lidocaine and was moderate in lidocaine. HR, RR, and rectal temperature did not differ significantly from baseline after any treatment. Haematobiochemical parameters returned to basal levels by 24 h after all treatments. This combination might be clinically useful to provide analgesia in buffalo for long-duration surgical procedures. PMID:26770870

  2. Evaluation of Analgesic Effect of Caudal Epidural Tramadol, Tramadol-Lidocaine, and Lidocaine in Water Buffalo Calves (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Atiba, Ayman; Ghazy, Alaa; Gomaa, Naglaa; Kamal, Tarek; Shukry, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to compare the analgesic effect of tramadol and a combination of tramadol-lidocaine with that produced by lidocaine administration in the epidural space in buffalo calves. In a prospective randomized crossover study, ten male buffalo calves were used to compare the epidural analgesic effect of tramadol (1 mg/kg) and tramadol-lidocaine combination (0.5 mg/kg and 0.11 mg/kg, resp.) with that produced by 2% lidocaine (0.22 mg/kg). Loss of sensation was examined by pin-prick test. Onset time, duration, and degree of analgesia and ataxia were recorded after each treatment. Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), rectal temperature, and haematobiochemical parameters were recorded after all treatments. Time to onset and duration of analgesia, respectively, were as follows: tramadol 11 ± 2 min and 208 ± 15 min; tramadol-lidocaine 6 ± 2 min and 168 ± 9 min; lidocaine 4 ± 1 min and 67 ± 13 min. Onset time and duration were significantly longer with tramadol than the other treatments. Duration was significantly longer with tramadol-lidocaine than lidocaine. Ataxia was mildly observed in tramadol-lidocaine and was moderate in lidocaine. HR, RR, and rectal temperature did not differ significantly from baseline after any treatment. Haematobiochemical parameters returned to basal levels by 24 h after all treatments. This combination might be clinically useful to provide analgesia in buffalo for long-duration surgical procedures.

  3. Evaluation of Analgesic Effect of Caudal Epidural Tramadol, Tramadol-Lidocaine, and Lidocaine in Water Buffalo Calves (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Atiba, Ayman; Ghazy, Alaa; Gomaa, Naglaa; Kamal, Tarek; Shukry, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to compare the analgesic effect of tramadol and a combination of tramadol-lidocaine with that produced by lidocaine administration in the epidural space in buffalo calves. In a prospective randomized crossover study, ten male buffalo calves were used to compare the epidural analgesic effect of tramadol (1 mg/kg) and tramadol-lidocaine combination (0.5 mg/kg and 0.11 mg/kg, resp.) with that produced by 2% lidocaine (0.22 mg/kg). Loss of sensation was examined by pin-prick test. Onset time, duration, and degree of analgesia and ataxia were recorded after each treatment. Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), rectal temperature, and haematobiochemical parameters were recorded after all treatments. Time to onset and duration of analgesia, respectively, were as follows: tramadol 11 ± 2 min and 208 ± 15 min; tramadol-lidocaine 6 ± 2 min and 168 ± 9 min; lidocaine 4 ± 1 min and 67 ± 13 min. Onset time and duration were significantly longer with tramadol than the other treatments. Duration was significantly longer with tramadol-lidocaine than lidocaine. Ataxia was mildly observed in tramadol-lidocaine and was moderate in lidocaine. HR, RR, and rectal temperature did not differ significantly from baseline after any treatment. Haematobiochemical parameters returned to basal levels by 24 h after all treatments. This combination might be clinically useful to provide analgesia in buffalo for long-duration surgical procedures. PMID:26770870

  4. [Magistral prepared lidocaine-gel for topical aplication on skin].

    PubMed

    Sklenár, Zbynĕk; Horácková, Katerína; Bakhouche, Hana; Slanar, Ondrej

    2012-08-01

    Due to a limited availability of industrially manufactured products containing local anesthetics for skin application and an increased demand for lidocaine-containing gel applicable prior to a product containing capsaicin for neuropathic pain treatment, it is necessary to prepare a topical semi-solid preparation containing the local anesthetic in pharmacies. Our aim was to create a mixed system of a hydrophilic gel with the emulsified drug, using excipients to decrease the lidocaine melting point, thereby creating a eutectic mixture with a high concentration of lidocaine in the oil phase. Based on bibliographic data, thymol creating a binary eutectic system containing lidocaine has been chosen. After addition of other excipients, an emulsion system was prepared and the drug was stabilized in the oil phase by a mixed nonionic emulsifier and carbomera. For the optimal anesthetic effects, the pH value should be adjusted; trometamol has been chosen as a suitable basic reacting excipient. Based on the addition of different amounts of trometamol, pH values of individual emulgels have been measured and the final composition of lidocaine emulgel has been created. A recipe for a 5 % lidocaine emulgel with the pH value of 9.1 has been created, based on the gel-forming substance carbomera with an emulsion of the oil phase containing a eutectic mixture of lidocaine and thymol, with an addition of ethanol and propylenglycol, stabilized by a mixed nonionic emulsifier. The advantage is the absence of other local anesthetics. PMID:23251958

  5. Local anesthetic cream prepared from lidocaine-tetracaine eutectic mixture.

    PubMed

    Ohzeki, Keiichi; Kitahara, Masaki; Suzuki, Noriko; Taguchi, Kyoji; Yamazaki, Yuki; Akiyama, Shinji; Takahashi, Kentaro; Kanzaki, Yasushi

    2008-04-01

    Local anesthetic creams for the clinical treatment of conditions such as postherpetic neuralgia were prepared as an in-house formulation from the eutectic mixture of lidocaine-tetracaine (LT cream) using two eutectic mixtures of local anesthetic (EMLA) type bases. The LT formulation was compared with a lidocaine-prilocaine (LP cream) eutectic mixture formulated using the same base as EMLA. The chemical stability of lidocaine was examined in advance and was found to be stable for more than 3 months either in LT cream or in LP cream. The release rate of lidocaine from the formulated creams was examined using a cellulose ester membrane. The release rate of lidocaine from LT cream was similar to that from LP cream. The release rate of tetracaine was slightly slower than that of lidocaine in LT cream reflecting the larger molecular size of tetracaine. The penetration rate was examined in vitro using a Yucatan micropig skin. The penetration rate of lidocaine was similar between LT and LP creams. Infiltration anesthesia action examined in guinea pigs indicated that the difference between the two creams was statistically insignificant. The present study suggests the equivalence of the LT and LP creams as a local anesthetic and the potential of LT cream for clinical use either in the easy formulation or in the low-cost formulation.

  6. Spreading of a Lidocaine Formulation on Microneedle-Treated Skin.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Atul; Das, Diganta B; Chao, Tzu C; Starov, Victor M

    2015-12-01

    The spreadability of a liquid drug formulation on skin is an indication of it either remaining stationary or distributing (spreading) as a droplet. Factors determining droplet spreadability of the formulation are spreading area, diameter of the droplet base, viscosity of the liquid, contact angle, volume of droplet on skin and any others. The creation of microcavities from the application of microneedle (MN) has the potential to control droplet spreading, and hence, target specific areas of skin for drug delivery. However, there is little work that demonstrates spreading of liquid drug formulation on MN-treated skin. Below, spreading of a lidocaine hydrogel formulation and lidocaine solution (reference liquid) on porcine skin is investigated over MN-treated skin. Controlled spreadability was achieved with the lidocaine hydrogel on MN-treated skin as compared with lidocaine solution. It was observed that the droplet spreading parameters such as spreading radius, droplet height and dynamic contact angle were slightly lower for the lidocaine hydrogel than the lidocaine solution on skin. Also, the lidocaine hydrogel on MN-treated skin resulted in slower dynamic reduction of droplet height, contact angle and reduced time taken in attaining static advancing droplets because of the MN microcavities.

  7. Investigations into distribution of lidocaine in human autopsy material.

    PubMed

    Oertel, Reinhard; Arenz, Norman; Zeitz, Sten Gunnar; Pietsch, Jörg

    2015-08-01

    With screening methods in the legal medicine drugs were often detected in autopsy material. In this study the antiarrhythmic and the local anesthetic drug lidocaine could be proved in fifty-one cases and determined in different autopsy materials. For the first time the comparison of so many distribution patterns of lidocaine in human compartments was possible. A liquid-liquid extraction procedure, a standard addition method and LC/MS/MS were used for analytics. The measured concentrations in blood were in the therapeutic range or lower. The time between lidocaine application and death was given in twenty-nine cases. These data were very helpful to estimate and interpret the distribution process of lidocaine between application and death. This time exerted a crucial influence on the distribution of lidocaine in the compartments. Most of the intravenous applicated lidocaine was found in heart blood after a very short time of distribution. Afterwards the highest concentrations were measured in brain. Later the highest concentration was found in the kidney samples or in urine. If the time between lidocaine application and death is known, the results of this study can be used to deepen the knowledge of its pharmacokinetics. If this time is unknown, the circumstances and the causes of death can be better explained.

  8. Ketamine reduces lidocaine-induced seizures in mice.

    PubMed

    Guler, Gulen; Erdogan, Fusun; Golgeli, Asuman; Akin, Aynur; Boyaci, Adem

    2005-08-01

    Systemic toxic reactions to local anesthetics are brought about by absolute overdosage, and, most commonly, inadvertent intravascular injections. The anti-convulsant action of ketamine has been studied. However, the effect of ketamine on lidocaine-induced convulsions has not been reported. This study investigated the effect of ketamine on lidocaine-induced seizures in mice. Mice (32-41 g) were divided into 2 groups, 15 in each group, and were pretreated with intraperitoneal normal saline solution or intraperitenoeal (ip) ketamine before lidocaine. Group 1 (N = 15) received 75 mg kg ip lidocaine; Group 2 (N = 15) received 20 mg kg ketamin ip; 5 min later 75 mg kg lidokaine ip were applied. Clinical features, incidences, latencies, durations, and mortality rate of convulsions were recorded. After 75 mg kg lidocaine injection, ataxia, loss of righting reflex, and generalized tonic-clonic convulsions were seen within 2-5 min in Group 1. Generalized tonic-clonic convulsions were seen in 8 mice and deep sedation was seen in 7 mice in Group 2 (p < .05). Generalized status epilepticus occurred in one mouse in both groups. Three mice from Group l and one mouse from Group 2 died during convulsions. There were no differences between the two groups with regard to the onset and duration of seizures (p > .05). It was concluded that ketamine significantly prevented lidocaine-induced generalized tonic-clonic seizures; on the other hand, the lethality of lidocaine was least reduced by ketamine.

  9. Clinical effectiveness of lidocaine and benzocaine for topical anesthesia.

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, A. L.; Sverzut, C. E.; Xavier, S. P.; Lavrador, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    The effectiveness of lidocaine and benzocaine in reducing pain produced by needle insertion into the palate was evaluated in a double-blind and placebo-controlled study using a more suitable method. Twenty subjects, 10 men and 10 women, submitted to 4 sessions in which they were randomly treated with 5% lidocaine, a placebo that tasted like lidocaine, 20% benzocaine, and a placebo that tasted like benzocaine. At each session, a 27-gauge needle was inserted into the palate twice, once before (baseline) and once after drug application for 1 minute. Immediately after each insertion, subjects indicated on a visual analog scale the pain intensity perceived. Lidocaine and benzocaine were equally efficient, and both were better than placebo in reducing pain caused by insertion of needles into the palate. PMID:11692349

  10. Comparative study between benzydamine hydrochloride gel, lidocaine 5% gel and lidocaine 10% spray on endotracheal tube cuff as regards postoperative sore throat.

    PubMed

    Mekhemar, Nashwa Abdallah; El-Agwany, Ahmed Samy; Radi, Wafaa Kamel; El-Hady, Sherif Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative sore throat is a common complication after endotracheal intubation. After tracheal intubation, the incidence of sore throat varies from 14.4% to 50%. The aim of the study was to compare between benzydamine hydrochloride gel, lidocaine 5% gel and lidocaine 10% spray on the endotracheal tube cuff as regards postoperative sore throat. The present study was carried out on 124 patients admitted to Alexandria university hospitals for lumbar fixation surgery requiring general anesthesia. Patients were randomly allocated into 4 groups. Benzydamine hydrochloride gel, 5% lidocaine hydrochloride gel, 10% lidocaine hydrochloride spray, or normal saline were applied on endotracheal tube cuffs before endotracheal intubation. The patients were examined for sore throat (none, mild, moderate, or severe) at 0, 1, 6, 12, and 24h after extubation. The results were collected, analyzed and presented in table and figure. The highest incidence of postoperative sore throat occurred at 6h after extubation in all groups. There was a significantly lower incidence of postoperative sore throat in the benzydamine group than 5% lidocaine gel, 10% lidocaine spray, and normal saline groups. The benzydamine group had significantly decreased severity of postoperative sore throat compared with the 10% lidocaine, 5% lidocaine, and normal saline groups at observation time point. Compared with the 5% lidocaine the 10% lidocaine group had significantly increased incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat after extubation. Compared with normal saline the 10% lidocaine group had increased incidence of postoperative sore throat. There were no significant differences among groups in local or systemic side effects. So in conclusion, benzydamine hydrochloride gel on the endotracheal tube cuff is a simple and effective method to reduce the incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat. Application of 10% lidocaine spray should be avoided because of worsening of postoperative sore

  11. [Comparative study between benzydamine hydrochloride gel, lidocaine 5% gel and lidocaine 10% spray on endotracheal tube cuff as regards postoperative sore throat].

    PubMed

    Mekhemar, Nashwa Abdallah; El-Agwany, Ahmed Samy; Radi, Wafaa Kamel; El-Hady, Sherif Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative sore throat is a common complication after endotracheal intubation. After tracheal intubation, the incidence of sore throat varies from 14.4% to 50%. The aim of the study was to compare between benzydamine hydrochloride gel, lidocaine 5% gel and lidocaine 10% spray on the endotracheal tube cuff as regards postoperative sore throat. The present study was carried out on 124 patients admitted to Alexandria university hospitals for lumbar fixation surgery requiring general anesthesia. Patients were randomly allocated into 4 groups. Benzydamine hydrochloride gel, 5% lidocaine hydrochloride gel, 10% lidocaine hydrochloride spray, or normal saline were applied on endotracheal tube cuffs before endotracheal intubation. The patients were examined for sore throat (none, mild, moderate, or severe) at 0, 1, 6, 12, and 24h after extubation. The results were collected, analyzed and presented in table and figure. The highest incidence of postoperative sore throat occurred at 6h after extubation in all groups. There was a significantly lower incidence of postoperative sore throat in the benzydamine group than 5% lidocaine gel, 10% lidocaine spray, and normal saline groups. The benzydamine group had significantly decreased severity of postoperative sore throat compared with the 10% lidocaine, 5% lidocaine, and normal saline groups at observation time point. Compared with the 5% lidocaine the 10% lidocaine group had significantly increased incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat after extubation. Compared with normal saline the 10% lidocaine group had increased incidence of postoperative sore throat. There were no significant differences among groups in local or systemic side effects. So in conclusion, benzydamine hydrochloride gel on the endotracheal tube cuff is a simple and effective method to reduce the incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat. Application of 10% lidocaine spray should be avoided because of worsening of postoperative sore

  12. Lidocaine Concentration in Oral Tissue by the Addition of Epinephrine

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Eri; Yoshida, Kenji; Kawaai, Hiroyoshi; Yamazaki, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    The vasoconstrictive effect due to the addition of epinephrine to local anesthetic has been clearly shown by measuring blood-flow volume or blood anesthetic concentration in oral mucosal tissue. However, there are no reports on the measurement of anesthetic concentration using samples directly taken from the jawbone and oral mucosal tissue. Consequently, in this study, the effect of lidocaine concentration in the jawbone and oral mucosal tissue by the addition of epinephrine to the local anesthetic lidocaine was considered by quantitatively measuring lidocaine concentration within the tissue. Japanese white male rabbits (n = 96) were used as test animals. General anesthesia was induced by sevoflurane and oxygen, and then cannulation to the femoral artery was performed while arterial pressure was constantly recorded. Infiltration anesthesia was achieved by 0.5 mL of 2% lidocaine containing 1 : 80,000 epinephrine in the upper jawbone (E+) and 0.5 mL of 2% of epinephrine additive–free lidocaine (E0) under the periosteum. At specified time increments (10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 minutes), samples from the jawbone, oral mucosa, and blood were collected, and lidocaine concentration was directly measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. No significant differences in the change in blood pressure were observed either in E+ or E0. In both E+ and E0 groups, the serum lidocaine concentration peaked 10 minutes after local anesthesia and decreased thereafter. At all time increments, serum lidocaine concentration in E+ was significantly lower than that in E0. There were no significant differences in measured lidocaine concentration between jawbone and mucosa within either the E+ or the E0 groups at all time points, although the E0 group had significantly lower jawbone and mucosa concentrations than the E+ group at all time points when comparing the 2 groups to each other. Addition of epinephrine to the local anesthetic inhibited systemic absorption of local

  13. Effect of 4% lidocaine inhalation in bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Prakash, G S; Sharma, S K; Pande, J N

    1990-01-01

    The effect of 4% lidocaine inhalation was studied in a single-blind fashion in 18 patients with chronic stable asthma. Inhalation of normal saline solution was used as placebo. None of the parameters except flow rate at 50% of vital capacity (V50) showed any statistically significant change from baseline values. V50 at 15 min was significantly lower (p less than 0.05) after 4% lidocaine inhalation. Considering more than 10% change from the baseline value as significant, 8 of 15 patients showed decrease in airway resistance (Raw) and 7 of the 15 patients showed an increase in specific airway conductance (SGaw) after 15 min of inhalation. However, V50 (8/18 patients), flow rate at 25% vital capacity [V25 (6/15 patients], and forced expiratory flow rate at 25-75% of the vital capacity (FEF25-75) (5/15 patients) showed a decrease after 15 min of 4% lidocaine inhalation. No change in pulmonary function was noted after 30 min of lidocaine inhalation. It is concluded from this study that lidocaine produces a small bronchodilatory effect on the large airways and a bronchoconstrictor effect on the small airways after 15 min of inhalation, but this effect is not statistically significant. It can be safely used as topical agent for bronchoscopy in patients with bronchial asthma.

  14. Distinct pharmacologic substrate in lidocaine-sensitive, repetitive atrial tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Chiale, Pablo A; Faivelis, Luciano; Garro, Hugo A; Fernández, Pablo A; Herrera Paz, Juan J; Elizari, Marcelo V

    2012-06-01

    Lidocaine-sensitive, repetitive atrial tachycardia is an uncommon arrhythmia. The electrophysiologic substrate is still unknown, and the pharmacologic responses have not been fully explored. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intravenous adenosine and verapamil in patients with lidocaine-sensitive atrial tachycardia. In 9 patients with repetitive uniform atrial tachycardia, the response to intravenous adenosine (12 mg), lidocaine (1 mg/kg body weight), and verapamil (10 mg) were sequentially investigated. Simultaneous 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) was recorded at baseline and continuously monitored thereafter. Tracings were obtained at regularly timed intervals right after the administration of each drug to evaluate changes in the arrhythmia characteristics. Repetitive atrial tachycardia was abolished by intravenous lidocaine in the 9 patients within the first 2 minutes after the end of injection. Adenosine suppressed the arrhythmia in 2 patients and shortened the runs of atrial ectopic activity in 1 patient, while verapamil was effective in 2 patients, 1 of them insensitive to adenosine and the other 1 sensitive to this agent. In 5 patients, the arrhythmia was abolished by radiofrequency ablation at different sites of the right atrium. Lidocaine-sensitive atrial tachycardia may eventually be also suppressed by adenosine and/or verapamil. This suggests that this enigmatic arrhythmia may be caused by different underlying electrophysiologic substrates and that at least in some cases, delayed afterdepolarizations seem to play a determining role.

  15. Nebulized lidocaine in the treatment of intractable cough.

    PubMed

    Truesdale, Kelly; Jurdi, Adham

    2013-09-01

    Cough is one of the most common symptoms prompting patients to be seen by health care providers in the United States. Persistent cough can disrupt daily activities such as conversation, eating, breathing, and sleeping, and it can become extremely debilitating both physically and mentally. Pharmacological treatments include dextramethorphan, opioid cough suppressants, benzonatate, inhaled ipratropium, and guaifenesin. Successful cough suppression has also been demonstrated in several studies with the use of nebulized lidocaine. Nebulized lidocaine also appears to be well tolerated by patients with minimal side effects including dysphonia, oropharyngeal numbness, and bitter taste. Studies conducted thus far have been small, so larger randomized control trials comparing nebulized lidocaine to placebo need to be conducted in the future. PMID:22964341

  16. Oral mexiletine for lidocaine-responsive neonatal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Mika; Okumura, Akihisa; Niijima, Shinichi; Yamashita, Shintaro; Shimono, Kuriko; Hirose, Shinichi; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2013-08-01

    We report a patient with lidocaine-responsive neonatal epilepsy treated successfully with oral mexiletine. The patient was a male neonate who had seizures since 2days of age. While his seizures were refractory to phenobarbital, lamotrigine, vitamin B6, and midazolam, they were controlled by continuous lidocaine infusion. Oral mexiletine at serum levels of 0.2-0.4μg/ml was used successfully for long-term treatment of his seizures. No delay in psychomotor development was observed at the last follow-up at 20months of age. No mutation was identified in any of four genes: SCN1A, SCN1B, KCNQ2, and KCNQ3. Our patient demonstrates that oral mexiletine can be useful for long-term treatment of patients with lidocaine-responsive epilepsy. PMID:23182886

  17. Characterization and comparison of lidocaine-tetracaine and lidocaine-camphor eutectic mixtures based on their crystallization and hydrogen-bonding abilities.

    PubMed

    Gala, Urvi; Chuong, Monica C; Varanasi, Ravi; Chauhan, Harsh

    2015-06-01

    Eutectic mixtures formed between active pharmaceutical ingredients and/or excipients provide vast scope for pharmaceutical applications. This study aimed at the exploration of the crystallization abilities of two eutectic mixtures (EM) i.e., lidocaine-tetracaine and lidocaine-camphor (1:1 w/w). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) for degradation behavior whereas modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry (MTDSC) set in first heating, cooling, and second heating cycles, was used to qualitatively analyze the complex exothermic and endothermic thermal transitions. Raman microspectroscopy characterized vibrational information specific to chemical bonds. Prepared EMs were left at room temperature for 24 h to visually examine their crystallization potentials. The degradation of lidocaine, tetracaine, camphor, lidocaine-tetracaine EM, and lidocaine-camphor EM began at 196.56, 163.82, 76.86, 146.01, and 42.72°C, respectively, which indicated that eutectic mixtures are less thermostable compared to their individual components. The MTDSC showed crystallization peaks for lidocaine, tetracaine, and camphor at 31.86, 29.36, and 174.02°C, respectively (n = 3). When studying the eutectic mixture, no crystallization peak was observed in the lidocaine-tetracaine EM, but a lidocaine-camphor EM crystallization peak was present at 18.81°C. Crystallization occurred in lidocaine-camphor EM after being kept at room temperature for 24 h, but not in lidocaine-tetracaine EM. Certain peak shifts were observed in Raman spectra which indicated possible interactions of eutectic mixture components, when a eutectic mixture was formed. We found that if the components forming a eutectic mixture have crystallization peaks close to each other and have sufficient hydrogen-bonding capability, then their eutectic mixture is least likely to crystallize out (as seen in lidocaine-tetracaine EM) or vice versa (lidocaine-camphor EM).

  18. Lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster: in minor dermatological and needle puncture procedures.

    PubMed

    Croxtall, Jamie D

    2010-11-12

    The lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster comprises a lidocaine/tetracaine 70 mg/70 mg patch and a controlled heat-assisted drug delivery pod that increases the diffusion of lidocaine and tetracaine into the dermis. Following a 1-hour application period, systemic absorption of lidocaine or tetracaine from the plaster was minimal. The lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster provided effective pain relief for adult (including elderly) patients undergoing minor dermatological procedures and for adult and paediatric patients undergoing vascular access procedures. In randomized, double-blind clinical trials, patient-reported median pain scores were significantly lower with the lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster than with an identical plaster containing placebo in patients undergoing minor dermatological or vascular access procedures. Furthermore, patient-reported median pain scores were significantly lower with the lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster than with a lidocaine/prilocaine cream in patients undergoing vascular access procedures. In a large, randomized, double-blind trial in paediatric patients undergoing venipuncture, the overall incidence of pain was significantly lower with the lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster than with a lidocaine/prilocaine plaster. The lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster was well tolerated, with the most frequent treatment-related adverse events resolving spontaneously.

  19. Intravenous lidocaine for fibromyalgia syndrome: an open trial.

    PubMed

    Schafranski, Marcelo Derbli; Malucelli, Tiago; Machado, Fabíola; Takeshi, Hélcio; Kaiber, Flávia; Schmidt, Carolina; Harth, Fabielle

    2009-07-01

    Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by chronic widespread pain. In this study, we investigated the effect of intravenous infusions of lidocaine in pain and quality of life of patients with fibromyalgia. Twenty-three consecutive patients were included in the study, which consisted on five sequential intravenous 2% lidocaine infusions with rising dosages (2-5 mg/kg, days 1-5). Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Health Assessment Questionnaire, and a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain were applied before the first lidocaine infusion, immediately after the fifth infusion and 30 days after the fifth infusion. A significant improvement was observed in the FIQ scores after the fifth infusion (73.52 +/- 16.56 vs 63.29 +/- 21.21, p = 0.02), which was maintained after 30 days (73.52 +/- 16.56 vs 63.85 +/- 24.59, p = 0.04). Similar results were seen concerning the VAS: 8.19 +/- 1.76 vs 6.84 +/- 2.44, p = 0.01 and 8.19 +/- 1.76 vs 7.17 +/- 2.35, p = 0.05, respectively. Intravenous lidocaine infusions are safe and effective in the management of fibromyalgia.

  20. 21 CFR 522.810 - Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution. 522.810 Section 522.810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... euthanasia. (3) Limitations. Not for use in animals intended for food. Federal law restricts this drug to...

  1. 21 CFR 522.810 - Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution. 522.810 Section 522.810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... euthanasia. (3) Limitations. Not for use in animals intended for food. Federal law restricts this drug to...

  2. 21 CFR 522.810 - Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution. 522.810 Section 522.810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... euthanasia. (3) Limitations. Not for use in animals intended for food. Federal law restricts this drug to...

  3. 21 CFR 522.810 - Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution. 522.810 Section 522.810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... euthanasia. (3) Limitations. Not for use in animals intended for food. Federal law restricts this drug to...

  4. 21 CFR 522.810 - Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution. 522.810 Section 522.810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... euthanasia. (3) Limitations. Not for use in animals intended for food. Federal law restricts this drug to...

  5. Immediate reaction to lidocaine with periorbital edema during upper blepharoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Presman, Benjamin; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Tocco-Tussardi, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Blepharoplasty is the fourth most commonly performed cosmetic surgery in the US, with 207,000 operations in 2014. Lidocaine is the preferred anesthetic agent for blepharoplasty. Presentation of case We describe the unusual case of acute periorbital edema following local anesthesia with lidocaine for upper blepharoplasty. At present, only two other reports of periorbital reactions to lidocaine are present in the literature. The reactions observed are significant palpebral swelling and erythema with scaling of the cheek. Fortunately the swelling, although marked, is transient in nature and resolves almost spontaneously without affecting the visual acuity. Discussion Patients reporting adverse reactions should be screened for allergy according to the standard protocols, but skin testing has only been reported to be positive in less than 10% of all cases and allergy confirmation with IgE is even more rare. Conclusion In clinical practice, we recommend that patient should be informed about the possibility of recurrence of an adverse reaction in case of re-exposure to lidocaine, even in the vast majority of cases where true allergy could not be proven. In case of further need for local anesthesia with history of an adverse event, a different agent may be chosen even from the same class (another amide) as cross-reactions in the amide group are rare. Otherwise, an anesthetic from the ester group can also be safely used. PMID:26785079

  6. 21 CFR 862.3555 - Lidocaine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lidocaine test system. 862.3555 Section 862.3555 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  7. 21 CFR 862.3555 - Lidocaine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lidocaine test system. 862.3555 Section 862.3555 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  8. Intravenous Lidocaine as an Adjuvant for Pain Associated with Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Natalie L; Kome, Anne M; Lowe, Denise K; Coyne, Patrick; Hawks, Kelly G

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the efficacy and safety of adjuvant intravenous (IV) lidocaine in adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). This was a retrospective review. Adults with SCD receiving at least one IV lidocaine infusion from 2004 to 2014 were included. Patient demographics, lidocaine treatment parameters, pain scores, pain medications, and adverse effects were recorded. Eleven patients were identified, yielding 15 IV lidocaine trials. Clinical improvement in pain scores from pre-lidocaine challenge to 24 hours post-lidocaine challenge, defined by ≥ 20% reduction in pain scores, was achieved in 53.3% (8 of 15) of IV lidocaine challenges. Of the 8 clinically successful trials, the mean reduction in morphine dose equivalents (MDE) from 24 hours pre-lidocaine challenge to 24 hours post-lidocaine challenge was 32.2%. Additionally, clinically successful trials had a mean initial and a maximum dose of 1 mg/kg/h (range: 0.5-2.7 mg/kg/h) and 1.3 mg/kg/h (range: 0.5-1.9 mg/kg/h), respectively. On average, these patients underwent 3 dose titrations (range: 1-8) and received lidocaine infusions for 4.4 days (range: 2-8 days). Two patients experienced disorientation and dizziness. The authors conclude that adjuvant IV lidocaine provided pain relief and a mean reduction in MDE during sickle cell pain crisis. These results provide preliminary insight into the use of IV lidocaine for treating pain in patients with SCD, although prospective studies are needed to determine efficacy, dosing, and tolerability of IV lidocaine in this patient population.

  9. Plasma concentration and cardiovascular effects of lidocaine during continuous epidural administration in dogs anesthetized with isoflurane.

    PubMed

    Sakonju, Iwao; Maeda, Kenichi; Karasawa, Koichi; Tadokoro, Toshiyuki; Kakuta, Tomoko; Takase, Katsuaki

    2011-03-01

    The cardiovascular effects of continuous epidural administration (CEA) of lidocaine were investigated in anesthetized dogs. Loading epidural injections of 2, 4, or 6 mg/kg of lidocaine were followed by CEA with 1, 2, or 3 mg/kg/hr lidocaine, respectively, for 2 hr under 2.0% isoflurane anesthesia. Heart rate, direct blood pressure, cardiac index, and stroke volume decreased dose-dependently during CEA, whereas systemic vascular resistance did not significantly differ with dose, and no characteristic changes were observed in any groups. Plasma lidocaine concentration reached a steady state during CEA and increased in a dose-dependent manner. Circulatory suppression caused by lidocaine CEA was not attributable to peripheral vasodilation, but rather to the direct cardiac action of systemic lidocaine absorption from the peridural space. PMID:21048393

  10. The immediate effects of lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current on pressure sense threshold and tactile sensation.

    PubMed

    Yoosefinejad, Amin Kordi; Motealleh, Alireza; Abbasnia, Keramatollah

    2016-01-01

    Iontophoresis is the noninvasive delivery of ions using direct current. The direct current has some disadvantages such as skin burning. Interferential current is a kind of alternating current without limitations of direct current; so the purpose of this study is to investigate and compare the effects of lidocaine, interferential current and lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current. 30 healthy women aged 20-24 years participated in this randomized clinical trial study. Pressure, tactile and pain thresholds were evaluated before and after the application of treatment methods. Pressure, tactile and pain sensitivity increased significantly after the application of lidocaine alone (p < 0.005) and lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current (p < 0.0001). Lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current can increase perception threshold of pain, tactile stimulus and pressure sense more significantly than lidocaine and interferential current alone. PMID:26893248

  11. The immediate effects of lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current on pressure sense threshold and tactile sensation.

    PubMed

    Yoosefinejad, Amin Kordi; Motealleh, Alireza; Abbasnia, Keramatollah

    2016-01-01

    Iontophoresis is the noninvasive delivery of ions using direct current. The direct current has some disadvantages such as skin burning. Interferential current is a kind of alternating current without limitations of direct current; so the purpose of this study is to investigate and compare the effects of lidocaine, interferential current and lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current. 30 healthy women aged 20-24 years participated in this randomized clinical trial study. Pressure, tactile and pain thresholds were evaluated before and after the application of treatment methods. Pressure, tactile and pain sensitivity increased significantly after the application of lidocaine alone (p < 0.005) and lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current (p < 0.0001). Lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current can increase perception threshold of pain, tactile stimulus and pressure sense more significantly than lidocaine and interferential current alone.

  12. Neuroprotective Effects of Intravenous Lidocaine on Early Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction in Elderly Patients Following Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kui; Wei, Penghui; Zheng, Qiang; Zhou, Jinfeng; Li, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the effects of lidocaine treatment on cognitive impairment in aged patients undergoing spine surgery and to explore the underlying mechanism. Material/Methods Patients were randomly divided into 2 treatment groups: (1) saline (control) and (2) lidocaine. After induction of anesthesia, the lidocaine group received lidocaine as a bolus of 1 mg/kg over 5 minutes, followed by a continuous infusion at 1.5 mg/kg/h until the end of the surgery. We examined the effects of lidocaine treatment on the improvement of cognitive function using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) at preoperation and 3 days postoperation. Serum samples were collected to assess the levels of IL-6, TNF-α, MDA, S100β, and NSE before inducing anesthesia, at the end of surgery, and 3 days after the end of surgery. Results We found that the MMSE scores in the lidocaine group were markedly higher than those in the control group at 3 days after surgery. Moreover, lidocaine treatment markedly suppressed the release of IL-6, S100β, and NSE into the serum at the end of surgery and 3 days after the end of surgery. In the control group, serum MDA levels increased by 3 days after the end of surgery. The lidocaine group had lower serum MDA levels than those in the control group. Conclusions Lidocaine may be an effective neuroprotective agent in treating early postoperative cognitive dysfunction in elderly patients undergoing spine surgery. PMID:25975969

  13. Intravenous lidocaine and mexiletine in the management of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias.

    PubMed

    Marmura, Michael J

    2010-04-01

    Lidocaine and mexiletine are class 1B antiarrhythmic drugs that act on sodium channels. Lidocaine is also an important anesthetic and topical agent that is useful in the treatment of multiple pain disorders, and mexiletine is commonly used for neuropathic pain and myotonia. Both intravenous lidocaine and mexiletine are increasingly used to treat pain syndromes and appear to be particularly effective in neuropathic pain. This suggests a role for these agents in patients with headache disorders. This article describes the role of intravenous lidocaine and mexiletine in the management of headache and trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias based on the published literature to date and provides practical guidelines for their use. PMID:20425204

  14. Intravenous lidocaine as a suppressant of coughing during tracheal intubation in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Yukioka, H; Hayashi, M; Terai, T; Fujimori, M

    1993-08-01

    The effects of intravenously administered lidocaine on cough suppression in elderly patients over the age of 60 yr during tracheal intubation under general anesthesia were evaluated in two studies. In the first study, 100 patients received a placebo of either 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, or 2.0 mg/kg lidocaine intravenously 1 min before tracheal intubation. All visible coughs were classified as coughing. The incidence of coughing decreased as the dose of lidocaine increased. A dose of 1.5 mg/kg or more of intravenous lidocaine suppressed the cough reflex significantly (P < 0.01). In the second study, 108 patients received 2 mg/kg lidocaine intravenously or a placebo 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, or 15 min before intubation. The same criteria for determining whether a patient did or did not cough during tracheal intubation were used as in Study 1. The incidence of coughing decreased significantly (P < 0.01) when 2 mg/kg lidocaine was injected intravenously between 1 min and 3 min before attempting intubation. The cough reflex was almost entirely suppressed by plasma concentrations of lidocaine in excess of 4 micrograms/mL. The results suggest that intravenous administration of lidocaine is effective in suppressing the cough reflex during tracheal intubation in elderly patients under general anesthesia, but that relatively high plasma concentrations of lidocaine may be required for suppression of coughing. PMID:8346830

  15. Absorption of intubation-related lidocaine from the trachea during prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Moriya, F; Hashimoto, Y

    1998-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether lidocaine is absorbed from the trachea during the artificial circulation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The tissue distribution of lidocaine was investigated in eight individuals (Cases 1-8) who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation before being pronounced dead. In Cases 1-4, there was no restoration of heart beat during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Heart massage had been continued for 5 min in Cases 1 and 2, and for 60 min in Cases 3 and 4. Relatively high concentrations of lidocaine (more than 0.1 mg/L) were detected in the blood left in the heart and/or in the large thoracic vessels in the four cases. In Cases 1-3, a large proportion of the lidocaine detected in these blood samples may have diffused from the trachea after cessation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation since no lidocaine was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid, cerebrum, liver, right kidney, and/or right femoral muscle. In Case 4, however, tracheal lidocaine was thought to have been absorbed during cardiopulmonary resuscitation because 0.167-0.340 mg/L or mg/kg lidocaine was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid, liver, right kidney, and right femoral muscle. This was substantiated in experiments performed in rabbit carcasses given 50 microL/kg Xylocaine jelly (a 2% lidocaine hydrochloride preparation) intratracheally, followed by rhythmical thoracic compressions (100-150 times per minute) for 60 min. A possible reason for lack of absorption of lidocaine from the trachea of Case 3 during a 60-min cardiopulmonary resuscitation procedure may have been that effective blood circulation was not obtained during cardiopulmonary resuscitation because of bleeding and pulmonary collapse. Cases 5-8 survived for 3 h to 10 days after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation; it was obvious that lidocaine was distributed to the tissues under the influence of the natural circulation. The kidney to liver lidocaine ratio in Case 4 (0.8) was much lower than that

  16. Infiltrated lidocaine 2% with epinephrine 1:80,000 causes more postoperative pain than lidocaine 2% after oral soft tissue surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Jorkjend, L.; Skoglund, L. A.

    1999-01-01

    A controlled, randomized, double-blind, within-patient, crossover study was made with 50 patients (28 women and 22 men) of mean age 47 years (range, 32-69 years) who were subjected to identical bilateral gingivectomies. On one occasion, lidocaine 2% was infiltrated as the local anesthetic. On the other occasion, lidocaine 2% with epinephrine 1:80,000 was given. Postoperative pain intensity was recorded by the patients on a 100-mm visual analogue scale every hour during an 11-hour observation period. The mean pain intensity was numerically higher after lidocaine 2% at 0 hours and 1 hour postoperatively. Then the mean pain intensity after lidocaine 2% was lower than that after lidocaine 2% with epinephrine 1:80,000 throughout the remaining observation period. The difference in pain intensity was statistically significant (P < .05) at 2, 4, 5, 6, and 7 hours after surgery. Mean sum (SEM) pain intensity over the 11-hour observation period was lower (P = .03) after lidocaine 2%, 66.5 (13.4) mm than after lidocaine 2% with epinephrine 1:80,000, 92.6 (15.4) mm. The study shows that high epinephrine concentration (1:80,000) increases the postoperative pain after dental soft tissue surgery with mild pain. PMID:10853568

  17. A Comparative Study of Lidocaine and Lidocaine­ Mannitol in Anesthetizing Human Teeth with Inflamed Pulps

    PubMed Central

    Talati, Ali; Bidar, Maryam; Sadeghi, Ghazal; Nezami, Hossein

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Failure to achieve adequate and profound anesthesia in teeth with acute pulp inflammation is a common condition during emergency visits in root canal therapy. Many different anesthetic solutions such as morphine and capsaicin have accordingly been examined. Mannitol­ an alcoholic sugar with high osmotic pressure level- is applicated for reducing intracranial and post retinal pressure in medicine. It has also been used for its diuretic effect. In combination with local anesthetic solution, it increases permeability of the nerve fiber sheath and leads to influx of the local anesthetic through cytoplasmic membrane .The purpose of the present study was to compare the efficacy of routine local anesthesia with or without using mannitol in teeth with inflamed pulps. MATERIALS AND METHODS: one hundred patients with acute dental pain in posterior teeth were selected. Vials with 3 ml anesthetic solution containing 2.5% lidocaine with 1/80000 epinephrine or 2.5% lidocaine with 1/80000 epinephrine and 0.5 mol mannitol were used for anesthesia. For each patient, the routine injection technique was applied, during the removal of decay and dentine. Depth of anesthesia was evaluated and the supplementary injection was done in case of pain feeling and then pulpotomy was done. The analysis of data was done using chi-square statistical test. RESULTS: The results showed that complete anesthesia after the first injection was obtained with lidocaine mannitol in 46% and with lidocaine alone in 38% of cases. However, the difference was not significant. CONCLUSION: These finding suggest that the addition of mannitol to the standard anesthetic solution could insignificantly increase the level of anesthesia in teeth with inflamed pulps. PMID:24494021

  18. Interaction between lidocaine hydrochloride (with and without adrenaline) and various irrigants: A nuclear magnetic resonance analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vidhya, Nirmal; Karthikeyan, Balasubramanian Saravana; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy; Abarajithan, Mohan; Nithyanandan, Sivasankaran

    2014-01-01

    Background: Interaction between local anesthetic solution, lidocaine hydrochloride (with and without adrenaline), and root canal irrigants such as sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA), and chlorhexidine (CHX) has not been studied earlier. Hence, the purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the chemical interaction between 2% lidocaine hydrochloride (with and without adrenaline) and commonly used root canal irrigants, NaOCl, EDTA, and CHX. Materials and Methods: Samples were divided into eight experimental groups: Group I-Lidocaine hydrochloride (with adrenaline)/3% NaOCl, Group II-Lidocaine hydrochloride (with adrenaline)/17% EDTA, Group III- Lidocaine hydrochloride (with adrenaline)/2% CHX, Group IV-Lidocaine hydrochloride (without adrenaline)/3% NaOCl, Group V-Lidocaine hydrochloride (without adrenaline)/17% EDTA, Group VI-Lidocaine hydrochloride (without adrenaline)/2% CHX, and two control groups: Group VII-Lidocaine hydrochloride (with adrenaline)/deionized water and Group VIII-Lidocaine hydrochloride (without adrenaline)/deionized water. The respective solutions of various groups were mixed in equal proportions (1 ml each) and observed for precipitate formation. Chemical composition of the formed precipitate was then analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and confirmed with diazotation test. Results: In groups I and IV, a white precipitate was observed in all the samples on mixing the respective solutions, which showed a color change to reddish brown after 15 minutes. This precipitate was then analysed by NMR spectroscopy and was observed to be 2,6-xylidine, a reported toxic compound. The experimental groups II, III, V, and VI and control groups VII and VIII showed no precipitate formation in any of the respective samples, until 2 hours. Conclusion: Interaction between lidocaine hydrochloride (with and without adrenaline) and NaOCl showed precipitate formation containing 2,6-xylidine, a toxic compound

  19. Effects of glucose administered with lidocaine solution on spinal neurotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hanxiang; Xu, Tingting; Xiong, Xiangsheng; Mao, Jingjing; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yonghai; Bai, Zhixia; Chen, Xuexin

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether intrathecal administration of 10% glucose increases functional impairment and histologic damage in rats when mixed with 5% lidocaine. After implanted intrathecal catheter, 32 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of four groups: lidocaine group (Group L, n=8) received 5% lidocaine 20 µL, lidocaine with glucose group (Group LG, n=8) received 5% lidocaine with 10% glucose 20 µL, glucose group (Group G, n=8) received 10% glucose 20 µL and normal saline group received normal saline 20 µL (Group NS, n=8). Four days after intrathecal injection, sensory impairments of rats in the four groups were evaluated by using the tail-flick test. The histologic changes of spinal cord and nerve roots were observed by electron microscopy and light microscopy. There was no significant difference in baseline tail-flick latencies between the four groups (P=0.284). On the 4th day after intrathecal injection, the assessment result of sensory function was similar to baseline (P=0.217) in saline-treated animals. Sensory impairment occurred after intrathecal administration of 5% lidocaine, and 10% glucose with 5% lidocaine worsen this satiation (P=0.0001); histologic changes in 10% glucose with 5% lidocaine-treated group has differ significantly from lidocaine-treated group (P=0.001). Sensory function after intrathecal administration of 10% glucose was similar to baseline and did not differ from the saline group (P=0.995); histologic changes in 10% glucose-treated rats did not differ significantly from saline controls (P=0.535). These results suggest that 5% lidocaine can induce spinal neurotoxicity and 10% glucose with 5% lidocaine could worsen spinal neurotoxicity. PMID:26884984

  20. Intravenous lidocaine for the treatment of acute pain in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Brendan Michael; Mullins, Michael Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate intravenous lidocaine’s safety and efficacy as an analgesic agent in the treatment of a variety of painful conditions presenting to the emergency department. Methods This case series identified seventeen patients who received lidocaine over a six month period and recorded demographic data, amount of lidocaine administered, the amount of opioid medication administered before and after lidocaine, pre- and post-lidocaine pain scores, and any qualitative descriptors of the patient’s pain recorded in the record. Side effects and adverse events were also recorded. Results Of the seven patients who had a pre- and post-lidocaine pain score recorded, the mean reduction was 3 points on a 10 point scale. Patients who received lidocaine used less opioid medication. One patient received an improperly high dose of lidocaine and suffered a brief seizure and cardiac arrest, but was quickly resuscitated. Conclusion This series suggests that lidocaine may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of acutely painful conditions in the emergency department. PMID:27752626

  1. Cardiopulmonary Effects of Constant-Rate Infusion of Lidocaine for Anesthesia during Abdominal Surgery in Goats.

    PubMed

    Malavasi, Lais M; Greene, Stephen A; Gay, John M; Grubb, Tammy L

    2016-01-01

    Lidocaine is commonly used in ruminants but has an anecdotal history of being toxic to goats. To evaluate lidocaine's effects on selected cardiopulmonary parameters. Isoflurane-anesthetized adult goats (n = 24) undergoing abdominal surgery received a loading dose of lidocaine (2.5 mg/kg) over 20 min followed by constant-rate infusion of lidocaine (100 μg/kg/min); control animals received saline instead of lidocaine. Data collected at predetermined time points during the 60-min surgery included heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, pO2, and pCO2. According to Welch 2-sample t tests, cardiopulmonary variables did not differ between groups. For example, after administration of the loading dose, goats in the lidocaine group had a mean heart rate of 88 ± 28 bpm, mean arterial blood pressure of 70 ± 19 mm Hg, pCO2 of 65 ± 13 mm Hg, and pO2 of 212 ± 99 mm Hg; in the saline group, these values were 90 ± 16 bpm, 76 ± 12 mm Hg, 61 ± 9 mm Hg, and 209 ± 83 mm Hg, respectively. One goat in the saline group required an additional dose of butorphanol. Overall our findings indicate that, at the dose provided, intravenous lidocaine did not cause adverse cardiopulmonary effects in adult goats undergoing abdominal surgery. Adding lidocaine infusion during general anesthesia is an option for enhancing transoperative analgesia in goats. PMID:27423150

  2. TRPA1 activation by lidocaine in nerve terminals results in glutamate release increase

    SciTech Connect

    Piao, L.-H.; Fujita, Tsugumi; Jiang, C.-Y.; Liu Tao; Yue, H.-Y.; Nakatsuka, Terumasa; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2009-02-20

    We examined the effects of local anesthetics lidocaine and procaine on glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory transmission in substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons in adult rat spinal cord slices with whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. Bath-applied lidocaine (1-5 mM) dose-dependently and reversibly increased the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (sEPSC) in SG neurons. Lidocaine activity was unaffected by the Na{sup +}-channel blocker, tetrodotoxin, and the TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, but was inhibited by the TRP antagonist, ruthenium red. In the same neuron, the TRPA1 agonist, allyl isothiocyanate, and lidocaine both increased sEPSC frequency. In contrast, procaine did not produce presynaptic enhancement. These results indicate that lidocaine activates TRPA1 in nerve terminals presynaptic to SG neurons to increase the spontaneous release of L-glutamate.

  3. Lidocaine Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Apoptosis in Vitro and in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Dae Young; Kwon, Kisang; Lee, Kyeong Ryong; Choi, Young Jin; Goo, Tae-Won; Yu, Kweon; Kim, Seung-Whan; Kwon, O-Yu

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrated that upregulation of both gene expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress chaperones (BiP, calnexin, calreticulin, and PDI) and ER stress sensors (ATF6, IRE1 and PERK) was induced by lidocaine, a local anesthetic, in PC12 cells. In addition to gene regulation, lidocaine also induced typical ER stress phenomena such as ART6 proteolytic cleavage, eIF2 alpha phosphorylation, and XBP1 mRNA splicing. In in vivo experiments, while lidocaine downregulated gene expression of antiapoptotic factors (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl), pro-apoptotic factor (Bak and Bax) gene expression was upregulated. Furthermore, lidocaine induced apoptosis, as measured histochemically, and upregulated PARP1, a DNA damage repair enzyme. These results are the first to show that lidocaine induces apoptosis through ER stress in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22174623

  4. Intrarectal Lidocaine-Diltiazem-Meperidine Gel for Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Imani, Farsad; Moghaddam, Yasaman; Shariat Moharari, Reza; Etezadi, Farhad; Khajavi, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: TRUS-guided needle biopsy of the prostate gland is the current standard method used for diagnosis of prostate cancer. Pain control during this procedure is through the use of i.v. sedation or local anaesthetic (LA), depending on clinician preference. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of intrarectal lidocaine, lidocaine-diltiazem and lidocaine-meperidine-diltiazem gel for anesthetizing transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. Patients and Methods: In a randomized double-blind clinical trial, 100 consecutive patients were divided into three groups. The patients received one of the gels before transrectal ultrasound guided prostate needle biopsy: group A, intrarectal and perianal lidocaine, gel 1 g; group B, intrarectal lidocaine gel, 1 g, + perianal diltiazem, 1 g; group C, intrarectal lidocaine gel, 1 g, + meperidine, 25 mg, and perianal diltiazem, 1 g. Visual analog pain scale was used to estimate pain during probe insertion and biopsy. Heart rate and blood pressure during probe insertion and biopsy were recorded too. Results: The mean of visual analog pain scale was 4.5 in group A, 3.5 in group B, and 2.0 in group C during probe insertion (P value = 0.01). The mean of visual analog pain scale was 5.1 in group A, 3.5 group B, and 2.5 in group C during biopsy (P value = 0.001). The groups were comparable for patients' age, weight, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and prostate size (P > 0.05). No side effects of meperidine and lidocaine including drowsiness, dizziness, tinnitus and light-headedness or requiring assistance for activity were noted. Conclusions: Lidocaine-meperidine-diltiazem gel provides significantly better pain control than lidocaine-diltiazem gel and lidocaine gel alone during transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy and probe insertion. This mixture gel is safe, easy to administer and well accepted by patients. PMID:26161317

  5. Lidocaine induces ROCK-dependent membrane blebbing and subsequent cell death in rabbit articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Tsutomu; Toyoda, Futoshi; Imai, Shinji; Tanigawa, Hitoshi; Kumagai, Kousuke; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Matsusue, Yoshitaka

    2016-05-01

    Local anesthetics are administered intraarticularly for pain control in orthopedic clinics and surgeries. Although previous studies have shown that local anesthetics can be toxic to chondrocytes, the underlying cellular mechanisms remain unclear. The present study investigates acute cellular responses associated with lidocaine-induced toxicity to articular chondrocytes. Rabbit articular chondrocytes were exposed to lidocaine and their morphological changes were monitored with live cell microscopy. The viability of chondrocytes was evaluated using a fluorescence based LIVE/DEAD assay. Acute treatment of chondrocytes with lidocaine (3-30 mM) induced spherical protrusions on the cell surface (so called "membrane blebbing") in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The concentration-response relationship for the lidocaine effect was shifted leftward by elevating extracellular pH, as expected for the non-ionized lidocaine being involved in the bleb formation. ROCK (Rho-kinase) inhibitors Y-27632 and fasudil completely prevented the lidocaine-induced membrane blebbing, suggesting that ROCK activation is required for bleb formation. Caspase-3 levels were unchanged by 10 mM lidocaine (p = 0.325) and a caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not affect the lidocaine-induced blebbing (p = 0.964). GTP-RhoA levels were significantly increased (p < 0.001), but Rho inhibitor-1 failed to suppress the membrane blebbing (p = 0.875). Lidocaine (30 mM) reduced the cell viability of isolated chondrocytes (p < 0.001) and in situ chondrocytes (p < 0.001). The chondrotoxicity was attenuated by pretreatment of cells with ROCK inhibitors or a myosin-II inhibitor blebbistatin (p < 0.001). These findings suggest that lidocaine induces ROCK-dependent membrane blebbing and thereby produces a cytotoxic effect on chondrocytes. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:754-762, 2016.

  6. Skin permeation of lidocaine from crystal suspended oily formulations.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Rakan; Hasegawa, Masaaki; Ishida, Masami; Ebata, Toshiya; Namiki, Noriyuki; Sugibayashi, Kenji

    2005-09-01

    In vitro permeation of lidocaine (lidocaine base, LID) through excised rat skin was investigated using several LID-suspended oily formulations. The first skin permeation of LID from an LID-suspended oily solution such as liquid paraffin (LP), isopropyl myristate (IPM), polyoxyethylene (2) oleylether (BO-2), and diethyl sebacate (DES) was evaluated and compared with that from polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG400) solution, a hydrophilic base. The obtained permeation rate of LID, Japp, from PEG400, LP, IPM, BO-2, and DES was in the order of DES>BO-2=IPM>LP>PEG400, and increased with LID solubility in the oily solvents, although LID crystals were dispersed in all solvents. Subsequently, oily formulations that consisted of different ratios of the first oily solvent (IPM, BO-2, or DES) (each 0-20%), the second oily solvent (LP) and an oily mixture of microcrystalline wax/white petrolatum/paraffin (1/5/4) were evaluated. BO-2 groups at a concentration of 5% and 10% had the highest Japp among the oily formulations, although a higher BO-2 resulted in lower skin permeation. In addition, pretreatment with BO-2 increased the skin permeation of LID. These results suggest that the penetration enhancing effect by the system may be related to the skin penetration of BO-2 itself. Finally, mathematical analysis was done to evaluate the effect of BO-2, and it was shown that BO-2 improved the LID solubility in stratum corneum lipids to efficiently enhance the LID permeation through skin.

  7. Radioprotective Effect of Lidocaine on Function and Ultrastructure of Salivary Glands Receiving Fractionated Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hakim, Samer George; Benedek, Geza Attila; Su Yuxiong; Jacobsen, Hans Christian; Klinger, Matthias; Dendorfer, Andreas; Hemmelmann, Claudia; Meller, Birgit; Nadrowitz, Roger; Rades, Dirk; Sieg, Peter

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Radiation-induced xerostomia still represents a common side effect after radiotherapy for head-and-neck malignancies. The aim of the present study was to examine the radioprotective effect of lidocaine hydrochloride during fractionated radiation in an experimental animal model. Methods and Materials: To evaluate the influence of different radiation doses on salivary gland function and the radioprotective effect of lidocaine, rabbits were irradiated with 15, 25, 30, and 35 Gy (equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions equivalent to 24, 40, 48, and 56 Gy, respectively). Lidocaine hydrochloride (10 and 12 mg/kg) was administered before every radiation fraction in the treatment groups. Salivary gland function was assessed by flow sialometry and sialoscintigraphy, and the morphologic changes were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. Results: Functional impairment was first observed after 35 Gy and pretreatment with lidocaine improved radiation tolerance of both parotid and submandibular glands. The use of 12 mg/kg lidocaine was superior and displayed significant radioprotection with regard to flow sialometry and sialoscintigraphy. The ultrastructure was largely preserved after pretreatment with both lidocaine doses. Conclusions: Lidocaine represents an effective radioprotective agent and a promising approach for clinical application to avoid radiation-induced functional impairment of salivary glands.

  8. Effects of eight vehicles on transdermal lidocaine penetration in sheep skin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bayldon, W; Narishetty, S; De Rose, G; Rothwell, J; Mills, P C

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of vehicles on penetration and retention of lidocaine applied to sheep skin in vitro. Thoracic skin from two sheep was clipped of wool and stored at -20 °C, until used. Skin samples were defrosted and mounted in Franz-type diffusion cells, and then one of the following formulations, each saturated with lidocaine, was added: sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) 0.5% in water, SLS 1% in water, dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) 50% in water (wt/wt), DMSO 100%, isopropyl myristate 100% (IPM), water alone, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (DGME) 50% in water (wt/wt) and DGME 100%. The penetration of lidocaine in each skin sample was measured over 8 h. Significantly greater lidocaine skin concentrations and flux (J(SS)) were achieved with the nonaqueous vehicles, DMSO 100% (P < 0.00001 and P < 0.01, respectively), followed by DGME 100% and IPM (P < 0.00001 and P < 0.01, respectively). The lag time (t(lag)) for lidocaine penetration in the DMSO 100% vehicle was significantly shorter (P < 0.01) compared with all other vehicles except water. Improved transdermal penetration of lidocaine in the DMSO 100% vehicle was likely due to skin barrier disruption, as determined by differences in pre- and post-treatment transepidermal water loss (TEWL). This study has shown that nonaqueous vehicles enhanced penetration of lidocaine in sheep skin to a greater extent than aqueous vehicles, which has implications for topically applied local anaesthesia in sheep.

  9. The topical 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in localized neuropathic pain: a reappraisal of the clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    de León-Casasola, Oscar A; Mayoral, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Topical 5% lidocaine medicated plasters represent a well-established first-line option for the treatment of peripheral localized neuropathic pain (LNP). This review provides an updated overview of the clinical evidence (randomized, controlled, and open-label clinical studies, real-life daily clinical practice, and case series). The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster effectively provides pain relief in postherpetic neuralgia, and data from a large open-label controlled study indicate that the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster is as effective as systemic pregabalin in postherpetic neuralgia and painful diabetic polyneuropathy but with an improved tolerability profile. Additionally, improved analgesia and fewer side effects were experienced by patients treated synchronously with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster, further demonstrating the value of multimodal analgesia in LNP. The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster provides continued benefit after long-term (≤7 years) use and is also effective in various other LNP conditions. Minor application-site reactions are the most common adverse events associated with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster; there is minimal risk of systemic adverse events and drug–drug interactions. Although further well-controlled studies are warranted, the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster is efficacious and safe in LNP and may have particular clinical benefit in elderly and/or medically compromised patients because of the low incidence of adverse events. PMID:26929664

  10. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of lidocaine- loaded biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianming; Lv, Xin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop novel lidocaine microspheres. Microspheres were prepared by the oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion technique using poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide acid) (PLGA) for the controlled delivery of lidocaine. The average diameter of lidocaine PLGA microspheres was 2.34±0.3 μm. The poly disperse index was 0.21±0.03, and the zeta potential was +0.34±0.02 mV. The encapsulation efficiency and drug loading of the prepared microspheres were 90.5%±4.3% and 11.2%±1.4%. In vitro release indicated that the lidocaine microspheres had a well-sustained release efficacy, and in vivo studies showed that the area under the curve of lidocaine in microspheres was 2.02-2.06-fold that of lidocaine injection (p<0.05). The pharmacodynamics results showed that lidocaine microspheres showed a significant release effect in rats, that the process to achieve efficacy was calm and lasting and that the analgesic effect had a significant dose-dependency.

  11. Toxicity of topical lidocaine applied to the breasts to reduce discomfort during screening mammography

    PubMed Central

    Lambertz, Colleen K; Johnson, Christopher J; Montgomery, Paul G; Maxwell, James R; Fry, Stefanie J

    2012-01-01

    Background: We measured the effect of 30 milliliters (mL) of 4% lidocaine gel on the breasts and chest wall of healthy women covered for 1 h on plasma concentrations of lidocaine and its principal metabolite, monoethylglycinexylidide (MEGX), electrocardiogram (EKG) results, and adverse events. Materials and Methods: This institutional review board-approved, prospective, open-label study complied with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). The study evaluated 10 healthy women aged 42-75 years with 30 mL of 4% lidocaine gel on the skin of the breasts and chest wall covered for 1 h. Cardiac and neurological assessments were performed and blood was drawn for lidocaine and MEGX levels at baseline and 1/2, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 h after application. EKGs were performed before application and at 3 h. Subjects provided informed written consent. Primary and secondary outcomes were plasma concentrations of lidocaine and MEGX and frequency of adverse events, respectively. Statistical analysis included paired t-tests for EKGs and repeated measures regression for vital signs. Results: No lidocaine was detected in the blood of 9 of 10 subjects. One subject had low plasma concentrations of lidocaine just above the level of detection the first 4 h after application only. No MEGX was detected. Mean decrease in heart rate was likely multifactorial. Conclusion: Thirty mL of 4% lidocaine gel on the breasts and chest wall covered for 1 h in healthy women resulted in plasma concentrations of lidocaine and MEGX well below therapeutic or toxic levels and no clinically significant adverse events. PMID:22557743

  12. Efficacy of Intravenous Lidocaine During Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Gastric Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Eun; Choi, Jong Bum; Koo, Bon-Nyeo; Jeong, Hae Won; Lee, Byung Ho; Kim, So Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an advanced therapy for early gastric neoplasm and requires sedation with adequate analgesia. Lidocaine is a short-acting local anesthetic, and intravenous lidocaine has been shown to have analgesic efficacy in surgical settings. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of intravenous lidocaine on analgesic and sedative requirements for ESD and pain after ESD. Sixty-six patients scheduled for ESD randomly received either intravenous lidocaine as a bolus of 1.5 mg/kg before sedation, followed by continuous infusion at a rate of 2 mg/kg/h during sedation (lidocaine group; n = 33) or the same bolus and infusion volumes of normal saline (control group; n = 33). Sedation was achieved with propofol and fentanyl. The primary outcome was fentanyl requirement during ESD. We recorded hemodynamics and any events during ESD and evaluated post-ESD epigastric and throat pain. Fentanyl requirement during ESD reduced by 24% in the lidocaine group compared with the control group (105 ± 28 vs. 138 ± 37 μg, mean ± SD; P < 0.001). The lidocaine group reached sedation faster [40 (20–100) vs. 55 (30–120) s, median (range); P = 0.001], and incidence of patient movement during ESD decreased in the lidocaine group (3% vs. 26%, P = 0.026). Numerical rating scale for epigastric pain was significantly lower at 6 hours after ESD [2 (0–6) vs. 3 (0–8), median (range); P = 0.023] and incidence of throat pain was significantly lower in the lidocaine group (27% vs. 65%, P = 0.003). No adverse events associated with lidocaine were discovered. Administration of intravenous lidocaine reduced fentanyl requirement and decreased patient movement during ESD. Moreover, it alleviated epigastric and throat pain after ESD. Thus, we conclude that the use of intravenous adjuvant lidocaine is a new and safe sedative method during ESD. PMID:27149489

  13. How acidic is the lidocaine we are injecting, and how much bicarbonate should we add?

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Simon G; Lalonde, Donald H

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The infiltration of local anesthetics can be painful, which is likely due, in part, to their acidity. In spite of a Cochrane study that recommended neutralizing lidocaine with bicarbonate to decrease the pain of injection, not many surgeons have adopted the practice, and there are many ‘recipes’ for how much bicarbonate one should add. OBJECTIVE: To determine the acidity of lidocaine and the correct ratio of bicarbonate that should be added to neutralize lidocaine to achieve body pH. METHODS: Fifty samples each of commonly used anesthetics (lidocaine 1% and 2%, with and without epinephrine 1:100,000) were obtained and tested for pH. Data were also analyzed according to whether the vials had been previously opened. Ten additional samples of lidocaine 1% with 1:100,000 epinephrine were titrated against sodium bicarbonate 8.4% and tested for pH and the presence of precipitate. RESULTS: A solution of 1% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine had a mean (± SD) pH of 4.24±0.42, and 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine had a mean pH of 3.93±0.43. Plain 1% lidocaine had a pH of 6.09±0.16, and plain 2% lidocaine had a pH of 6.00±0.27. Epinephrine-containing solutions were more acidic when they had been previously opened. One per cent lidocaine with epinephrine required 8.4% sodium bicarbonate at a ratio of 1.1 mL:10 mL to 1.8 mL:10 mL to achieve the target tissue pH of 7.38 to 7.62. CONCLUSION: Lidocaine with epinephrine was approximately 1000 times more acidic than subcutaneous tissue. The addition of bicarbonate to the local anesthetic solution is simple to perform and is inexpensive. The proper volume ratio of 8.4% sodium bicarbonate to 1% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine is approximately 1 mL:10 mL. Surgeons should be more aware of the simplicity and value of buffering with bicarbonate to decrease the pain of injection. PMID:23730153

  14. Despite Differences in Cytosolic Calcium Regulation, Lidocaine Toxicity Is Similar in Adult and Neonatal Rat Dorsal Root Ganglia in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Lisa V.; Eydlin, Olga; Piskoun, Boris; Kline, Richard P; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza; Rosenberg, Andrew D; Blanck, Thomas JJ; Xu, Fang

    2013-01-01

    Background Neuraxial local anesthetics may have neurological complications thought to be due to neurotoxicity. A primary site of action for local anesthetics is the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neuron. Physiologic differences have been noted between young and adult DRG neurons; hence, we examined whether there were differences in lidocaine-induced changes in calcium and lidocaine toxicity in neonatal and adult rat DRG neurons. Methods DRG neurons were cultured from postnatal day 7 (P7) and adult rats. Lidocaine-induced changes in cytosolic calcium were examined with the calcium indicator Fluo-4. Cells were incubated with varying concentrations of lidocaine and examined for viability using calcein AM and ethidium homodimer-1 staining. Live imaging of caspase-3/7 activation was performed after incubation with lidocaine. Results The mean KCl-induced calcium transient was greater in P7 neurons (p < 0.05), and lidocaine significantly inhibited KCl-induced calcium responses in both ages (p < 0.05). Frequency distribution histograms of KCl-evoked calcium increases were more heterogeneous in P7 than in adult neurons. With lidocaine, KCl-induced calcium transients in both ages became more homogeneous but remained different between the groups. Interestingly cell viability was decreased by lidocaine in a dose-dependent manner similarly in both ages. Lidocaine treatment also activated caspase-3/7 in a dose- and time-dependent manner similarly in both ages. Conclusions Despite physiological differences in P7 and adult DRG neurons, lidocaine cytotoxicity is similar in P7 and adult DRG neurons in vitro. Differences in lidocaine- and KCl-evoked calcium responses suggest the similarity in lidocaine cytotoxicity involves other actions in addition to lidocaine-evoked effects on cytosolic calcium responses. PMID:23851347

  15. Differentiation by in vitro treatment of lidocaine-epinephrine and prilocaine-felypressine in neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Y; Wang, P L; Shinohara, M; Ohura, K

    2001-07-01

    Neutrophils are often the first cells of the immune system to encounter an invader, such as bacteria and fungi. Lidocaine-epinephrine induced transient potentiation of the production of superoxide anion, while prilocaine-felypressine induced persistent inhibition of the production in neutrophils. Moreover, lidocaine-epinephrine inhibited the production of hydrogen peroxide in spite that it potentiated the production of superoxide anion, while prilocaine-felypressine inhibited the production of hydrogen peroxide as well as superoxide anion. By contrast, lidocaine-epinephrine and prilocaine-felypressine are both effective in significantly inhibiting adhesion and phagocytosis. Using flow cytometric analysis, both local anesthetics were found to be effective in inhibiting the expression of Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) in neutrophils. These results suggest that lidocaine-epinephrine and prilocaine-felypressine differentially modulate the production of superoxide anion, and could similarly inhibit adhesion, phagocytosis, and the production of hydrogen peroxide by neutrophils.

  16. Lidocaine 2.5%/prilocaine 2.5% EMLA cream.

    PubMed

    Farrington, E

    1993-01-01

    EMLA cream is a topical emulsion composed of prilocaine and lidocaine, produced complete anesthesia of intact skin following application. For the optimum effect, EMLA cream must be applied and covered with an occlusive dressing for 60 minutes prior to the procedure. This limits its use in emergency situations. However, in most situations where procedures are anticipated, EMLA can be applied in advance, including outpatient surgery. Furthermore, if the procedure is a venipuncture, multiple sites should be prepared in case one's initial attempt is unsuccessful. EMLA has been used in children of all ages and provides significant pain relief for venipunctures and lumbar punctures; it is being investigated in children for intramuscular injections and circumcision.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of Lidocaine With Epinephrine Following Local Anesthesia Reversal With Phentolamine Mesylate

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Paul A; Hersh, Elliot V; Papas, Athena S; Goodson, J. Max; Yagiela, John A; Rutherford, Bruce; Rogy, Seigried; Navalta, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Phentolamine mesylate accelerates recovery from oral soft tissue anesthesia in patients who have received local anesthetic injections containing a vasoconstrictor. The proposed mechanism is that phentolamine, an alpha-adrenergic antagonist, blocks the vasoconstriction associated with the epinephrine used in dental anesthetic formulations, thus enhancing the systemic absorption of the local anesthetic from the injection site. Assessments of the pharmacokinetics of lidocaine and phentolamine, and the impact of phentolamine on the pharmacokinetics of lidocaine with epinephrine were performed to characterize this potentially valuable strategy. The blood levels of phentolamine were determined following its administration intraorally and intravenously. Additionally, the effects of phentolamine mesylate on the pharmacokinetics of intraoral injections of lidocaine with epinephrine were evaluated. Sixteen subjects were enrolled in this phase 1 trial, each receiving 4 drug treatments: 1 cartridge lidocaine/epinephrine followed after 30 minutes by 1 cartridge phentolamine (1L1P), 1 cartridge phentolamine administered intravenously (1Piv), 4 cartridges lidocaine/epinephrine followed after 30 minutes by 2 cartridges phentolamine (4L2P), and 4 cartridges lidocaine/epinephrine followed by no phentolamine (4L). Pharmacokinetic parameters estimated for phentolamine, lidocaine, and epinephrine included peak plasma concentration (Cmax), time to peak plasma concentration (Tmax), area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to the last time point (AUClast) or from time 0 to infinity (AUCinf), elimination half-life (t1/2), clearance (CL), and volume of distribution (Vd). The phentolamine Tmax occurred earlier following the intravenous administration of 1Piv (7 minutes than following its submucosal administration in treatment 1L1P (15 minutes) or 4L2P (11 minutes). The phentolamine t1/2, CL, and Vd values were similar for 1L1P, 1Piv, and 4L2P. The Tmax for lidocaine occurred

  18. The Efficacy of Lidocaine in Laryngospasm Prevention in Pediatric Surgery: a Network Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xiaojing; Lai, Zhoupeng; Li, Si; Liu, Xiaochen; Wang, Zhongxing; Tan, Wulin

    2016-01-01

    Higher incidence and worse outcomes of laryngospasm during general anesthesia in children than adults have been reported for many years, but few prevention measures are put forward. Efficacy of lidocaine in laryngospasm prevention has been argued for many years and we decided to design this network meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of lidocaine. We conducted an electronic search of six sources and finally included 12 Randomized Controlled Trials including 1416 patients. A direct comparison between lidocaine and placebo revealed lidocaine had the effect on preventing laryngospasm in pediatric surgery (RR = 0.46, 95% CI = [0.30, 0.70], P = 0.0002, I2 = 0%). Both subgroup analysis and network analysis demonstrated that both intravenous lidocaine (subgroup: RR = 0.39, 95% CI = [0.18, 0.86], P = 0.02, I2 = 38%; network: RR = 0.25, 95% CI = [0.04, 0.86]) and topical lidocaine (subgroup: RR = 0.37, 95% CI = [0.19, 0.72], P = 0.003, I2 = 0%; network: RR = 0.14, 95% CI = [0.02, 0.55]) was effective in laryngospasm prevention, while no statistical difference was found in a comparison between intravenous and topical lidocaine. In conclusion, both intravenous and topical lidocaine are effective in laryngospasm prevention in pediatric surgery, while a comparison between them needs more evidences. PMID:27586012

  19. The Efficacy of Lidocaine in Laryngospasm Prevention in Pediatric Surgery: a Network Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaojing; Lai, Zhoupeng; Li, Si; Liu, Xiaochen; Wang, Zhongxing; Tan, Wulin

    2016-01-01

    Higher incidence and worse outcomes of laryngospasm during general anesthesia in children than adults have been reported for many years, but few prevention measures are put forward. Efficacy of lidocaine in laryngospasm prevention has been argued for many years and we decided to design this network meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of lidocaine. We conducted an electronic search of six sources and finally included 12 Randomized Controlled Trials including 1416 patients. A direct comparison between lidocaine and placebo revealed lidocaine had the effect on preventing laryngospasm in pediatric surgery (RR = 0.46, 95% CI = [0.30, 0.70], P = 0.0002, I(2) = 0%). Both subgroup analysis and network analysis demonstrated that both intravenous lidocaine (subgroup: RR = 0.39, 95% CI = [0.18, 0.86], P = 0.02, I(2) = 38%; network: RR = 0.25, 95% CI = [0.04, 0.86]) and topical lidocaine (subgroup: RR = 0.37, 95% CI = [0.19, 0.72], P = 0.003, I(2) = 0%; network: RR = 0.14, 95% CI = [0.02, 0.55]) was effective in laryngospasm prevention, while no statistical difference was found in a comparison between intravenous and topical lidocaine. In conclusion, both intravenous and topical lidocaine are effective in laryngospasm prevention in pediatric surgery, while a comparison between them needs more evidences. PMID:27586012

  20. Reversal of the electrocardiographic effects of cocaine by lidocaine. Part 2. Concentration-effect relationships.

    PubMed

    Grawe, J J; Hariman, R J; Winecoff, A P; Fischer, J H; Bauman, J L

    1994-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias due to cocaine may be related to its ability to slow ventricular conduction or prolong repolarization. We previously showed that lidocaine reversed QRS prolongation due to cocaine. The purposes of these experiments were to characterize cocaine's concentration-effect relationship on both ventricular conduction and repolarization, and to determine the effects of lidocaine on these relationships. The effects of lidocaine on cocaine-induced electrocardiographic changes were studied in 20 isolated, Tyrode-perfused guinea pig hearts. Variables at cocaine concentrations ranging from 3-195 microM were measured and repeated in the presence of a fixed concentration of lidocaine 30 microM. Using nonlinear regression analysis, the sigmoid Emax and simple Emax models were fit to cocaine concentration versus percentage change in QRS plots. Measures of best fit indicated that this relationship was best described by the sigmoid Emax model. Compared with cocaine alone, the curve for cocaine with lidocaine showed a greater EC50 (concentration at 50% of maximum effect) (59 vs 100 microM) but similar Emax (371 vs 367%), consistent with competition. Similar values were obtained from the linear transformation of the data. Cocaine concentration versus percentage change in the JTc interval showed a biphasic effect: concentrations below 65 microM prolonged JTc, but those above 65 microM had no effect or decreased JTc. In contrast to changes in QRS, addition of lidocaine increased the effects of cocaine on JTc: area under the concentration-effect curve for cocaine alone was 720 versus 859 microM% for cocaine with lidocaine. Lidocaine reverses cocaine-induced slowed ventricular conduction through competition for binding, but it appeared to increase cocaine-induced prolongation of repolarization.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7885974

  1. The Efficacy of Lidocaine in Laryngospasm Prevention in Pediatric Surgery: a Network Meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xiaojing; Lai, Zhoupeng; Li, Si; Liu, Xiaochen; Wang, Zhongxing; Tan, Wulin

    2016-09-01

    Higher incidence and worse outcomes of laryngospasm during general anesthesia in children than adults have been reported for many years, but few prevention measures are put forward. Efficacy of lidocaine in laryngospasm prevention has been argued for many years and we decided to design this network meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of lidocaine. We conducted an electronic search of six sources and finally included 12 Randomized Controlled Trials including 1416 patients. A direct comparison between lidocaine and placebo revealed lidocaine had the effect on preventing laryngospasm in pediatric surgery (RR = 0.46, 95% CI = [0.30, 0.70], P = 0.0002, I2 = 0%). Both subgroup analysis and network analysis demonstrated that both intravenous lidocaine (subgroup: RR = 0.39, 95% CI = [0.18, 0.86], P = 0.02, I2 = 38% network: RR = 0.25, 95% CI = [0.04, 0.86]) and topical lidocaine (subgroup: RR = 0.37, 95% CI = [0.19, 0.72], P = 0.003, I2 = 0% network: RR = 0.14, 95% CI = [0.02, 0.55]) was effective in laryngospasm prevention, while no statistical difference was found in a comparison between intravenous and topical lidocaine. In conclusion, both intravenous and topical lidocaine are effective in laryngospasm prevention in pediatric surgery, while a comparison between them needs more evidences.

  2. Lidocaine Enhances Contractile Function of Ischemic Myocardial Regions in Mouse Model of Sustained Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Kania, Gabriela; Osto, Elena; Jakob, Philipp; Krasniqi, Nazmi; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Eriksson, Urs

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Perioperative myocardial ischemia is common in high-risk patients. The use of interventional revascularisation or even thrombolysis is limited in this patient subset due to exceedingly high bleeding risks. Blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) with lidocaine had been suggested to reduce infarct size and cardiomyocyte cell death in ischemia/reperfusion models. However, the impact of lidocaine on cardiac function during sustained ischemia still remains unclear. Methods Sustained myocardial ischemia was induced by ligation of the left anterior descending artery in 12–16 weeks old male BALB/c mice. Subcutaneous lidocaine (30 mg/kg) was used to block VGSC. Cardiac function was quantified at baseline and at 72h by conventional and speckle-tracking based echocardiography to allow high-sensitivity in vivo phenotyping. Infarct size and cardiomyocyte cell death were assessed post mortem histologically and indirectly using troponin measurements. Results Ischemia strongly impaired both, global systolic and diastolic function, which were partially rescued in lidocaine treated in mice. No differences regarding infarct size and cardiomyocyte cell death were observed. Mechanistically, and as shown with speckle-tracking analysis, lidocaine specifically improves residual contractility in the ischemic but not in the remote, non-ischemic myocardium. Conclusion VGSC blockade with lidocaine rescues function of ischemic myocardium as a potential bridging to revascularisation in the setting of perioperative myocardial ischemia. PMID:27140425

  3. Comparison of the effect of lidocaine-epinephrine and prilocaine-felypressine to alter macrophage functions.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Y; Ohura, K

    2001-05-01

    In vitro treatment of macrophages with lidocaine-epinephrine or prilocaine-felypressine resulted in inhibition of their adhesion, chemotaxis and phagocytosis. However, prilocaine-felypressine was a much more potent inhibitor of adhesion and phagocytosis than lidocaine-epinephrine. On the other hand, lidocaine-epinephrine induced transient potentiation of superoxide anion production by macrophages, while prilocaine-felypressine consistently inhibited this. Moreover, lidocaine-epinephrine and prilocaine-felypressine both inhibited the production of hydrogen peroxide. In contrast, epinephrine strongly potentiated superoxide anion production, while markedly inhibiting hydrogen peroxide production. This potentiation by epinephrine was not prevented by adrenergic antagonists. In addition, superoxide dismutase potentiated the production of hydrogen peroxide, which was in part prevented by epinephrine. These results suggest that lidocaine-epinephrine and prilocaine-felypressine inhibit adhesion, chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and the production of hydrogen peroxide by macrophages. In addition, lidocaine-epinephrine evidently differs from prilocaine-felypressine regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying the modulation of superoxide anion production by macrophages.

  4. Effects of ketamine and lidocaine in combination on the sevoflurane minimum alveolar concentration in alpacas

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz-Williams, Patricia; Doherty, Thomas J.; da Cunha, Anderson F.; Leonardi, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of ketamine and lidocaine in combination on the minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane (MACSEVO) in alpacas. Eight healthy, intact male, adult alpacas were studied on 2 separate occasions. Anesthesia was induced with SEVO, and baseline MAC (MACB) determination began 45 min after induction. After MACB determination, alpacas were randomly given either an intravenous (IV) loading dose (LD) and infusion of saline or a loading dose [ketamine = 0.5 mg/kg body weight (BW); lidocaine = 2 mg/kg BW] and an infusion of ketamine (25 μg/kg BW per minute) in combination with lidocaine (50 μg/kg BW per minute), and MACSEVO was re-determined (MACT). Quality of recovery, time-to-extubation, and time-to-standing, were also evaluated. Mean MACB was 1.88% ± 0.13% and 1.89% ± 0.14% for the saline and ketamine + lidocaine groups, respectively. Ketamine and lidocaine administration decreased (P < 0.05) MACB by 57% and mean MACT was 0.83% ± 0.10%. Saline administration did not change MACB. Time to determine MACB and MACT was not significantly different between the treatments. The quality of recovery, time-to-extubation, and time-to-standing, were not different between groups. The infusion of ketamine combined with lidocaine significantly decreased MACSEVO by 57% and did not adversely affect time-to-standing or quality of recovery. PMID:27127341

  5. Comparison of intravenous and topical lidocaine as a suppressant of coughing after bronchoscopy during general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, C J; Ahlburg, P; Holdgård, H O; Olsen, K H; Thomsen, A

    1991-04-01

    Twenty-four consecutive patients scheduled for fiberbronchoscopy were randomized to receive double-blind either intravenous (1.5 mg/kg) or laryngotracheal (3 mg/kg) lidocaine to evaluate the influence on post-bronchoscopic laryngospasm, pain in the throat and coughing. Plasma lidocaine concentrations were analyzed 5, 15, 30 and 60 min after administration. None of the patients demonstrated laryngospasm or pain in the throat during the first hour after bronchoscopy. Patients receiving topical lidocaine coughed significantly more than patients receiving intravenous lidocaine, with a median number of coughs of 20 compared to 4, during the first hour (P less than 0.01). The plasma lidocaine concentrations were significantly higher after intravenous than after topical administration (P less than 0.001). After intravenous administration the plasma lidocaine concentrations exceeded the accepted level for potential toxicity in five out of 11 patients, but none of the patients developed toxic symptoms and no side-effects were observed. PMID:2038931

  6. Effect of modulated alternating and direct current iontophoresis on transdermal delivery of lidocaine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Gaurav; Banga, Ajay K

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the iontophoretic delivery of lidocaine hydrochloride through porcine skin and to compare the effects of modulated alternating and direct current iontophoresis. Continuous and modulated iontophoresis was applied for one hour and two hours (0-1 h and 4-5th h) using a 1% w/v solution of lidocaine hydrochloride. Tape stripping was done to quantify the amount of drug permeated into stratum corneum and skin extraction studies were performed to determine the amount of drug in stripped skin. Receptor was sampled and analyzed over predefined time periods. The amount of lidocaine delivered across porcine skin after modulated direct current iontophoresis for 2 h was 1069.87 ± 120.03 μ g/sq · cm compared to 744.81 ± 125.41 μ g/sq · cm after modulated alternating current iontophoresis for 2 h. Modulated direct current iontophoresis also enhanced lidocaine delivery by twelvefold compared to passive delivery as 91.27 ± 18.71 μ g/sq · cm of lidocaine was delivered after passive delivery. Modulated iontophoresis enhanced the delivery of lidocaine hydrochloride across porcine skin compared to the passive delivery. Modulated alternating current iontophoresis for duration of 2 h at frequency of 1 kHz was found to be comparable to the continuous direct current iontophoresis for 1 h.

  7. Efficacy of lidocaine lontophoresis using either alternating or direct current in hairless rats.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Atsushi; Wakita, Ryo; Haida, Haruka; Fukayama, Haruhisa

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine transport of lidocaine ions through a hairless rat skin in vivo and to compare the efficacy of alternating current (AC) with that of direct current (DC) iontophoresis (IOP). We measured the concentration of lidocaine transported through a cellophane membrane or a hairless rat dorsal skin applying either AC-IOP or DC-IOP. The results revealed that lidocaine concentration increased in a time-dependent manner in vitro in both DC-IOP and AC-IOP. However, the in vivo study showed different tendencies in lidocaine concentration. In the DCIOP group, lidocaine concentration reached its maximum 20 min after current application and then decreased rapidly; the AC-IOP group showed an increase in lidocaine concentration in a time-dependent manner. There were no side effects such as electrical burns in the rats. In conclusion, AC can be applied for long periods and DC for short periods, or their application time can be appropriately scheduled. Our study also suggests the mechanism by which voltage waveforms affect the skin when applied by IOP. In the future, these findings will be a solid foundation for developing various kinds of medical equipment such as scheduled drug delivery system that can easily deliver various types of drug.

  8. Effect of Modulated Alternating and Direct Current Iontophoresis on Transdermal Delivery of Lidocaine Hydrochloride

    PubMed Central

    Banga, Ajay K.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the iontophoretic delivery of lidocaine hydrochloride through porcine skin and to compare the effects of modulated alternating and direct current iontophoresis. Continuous and modulated iontophoresis was applied for one hour and two hours (0-1 h and 4-5th h) using a 1% w/v solution of lidocaine hydrochloride. Tape stripping was done to quantify the amount of drug permeated into stratum corneum and skin extraction studies were performed to determine the amount of drug in stripped skin. Receptor was sampled and analyzed over predefined time periods. The amount of lidocaine delivered across porcine skin after modulated direct current iontophoresis for 2 h was 1069.87 ± 120.03 μg/sq·cm compared to 744.81 ± 125.41 μg/sq·cm after modulated alternating current iontophoresis for 2 h. Modulated direct current iontophoresis also enhanced lidocaine delivery by twelvefold compared to passive delivery as 91.27 ± 18.71 μg/sq·cm of lidocaine was delivered after passive delivery. Modulated iontophoresis enhanced the delivery of lidocaine hydrochloride across porcine skin compared to the passive delivery. Modulated alternating current iontophoresis for duration of 2 h at frequency of 1 kHz was found to be comparable to the continuous direct current iontophoresis for 1 h. PMID:24959580

  9. Skin biopsy and quantitative sensory testing do not predict response to lidocaine patch in painful neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, David N; Pannoni, Valerie; Barbano, Richard L; Pennella-Vaughan, Janet; Dworkin, Robert H

    2006-01-01

    Predictors of response to neuropathic pain treatment in patients with painful distal sensory neuropathies are lacking. The 5% lidocaine patch is believed to exert its effects on neuropathic pain via a local stabilizing effect on cutaneous sensory afferents. As such, it provides a model to assess whether the status of epidermal innervation as determined by skin biopsy or quantitative sensory testing (QST) of small- and large-diameter sensory afferents might serve as predictors of response to topical, locally active treatment. In this study we assessed associations between epidermal nerve fiber (ENF) densities, sensory nerve conduction studies (NCS), QST, and response to a 5% lidocaine patch in patients with painful distal sensory neuropathies. We observed no association between distal leg epidermal and subepidermal innervation and response to the lidocaine patch. Several patients with complete loss of distal leg ENF showed a response to the lidocaine patch. Similarly we observed no consistent association between treatment response and QST for vibration, cooling, warm, heat-pain, and cold-pain thresholds, or distal sensory NCS. Thus, distal-leg skin biopsy, QST, and sensory NCS cannot be used to identify patients with painful polyneuropathy likely to respond to a lidocaine patch in clinical practice. Further studies are required to clarify precisely the mechanism and site of action of the lidocaine patch in patients with peripheral neuropathic pain.

  10. Understanding the large solubility of lidocaine in 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium based ionic liquids using molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley, Ryan T.; Paluch, Andrew S.

    2016-02-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids have been proposed as replacement solvents in a wide range of industrial separation processes. Here, we focus on the use of ionic liquids as solvents for the pharmaceutical compound lidocaine. We show that the solubility of lidocaine in seven common 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium based ionic liquids is greatly enhanced relative to water. The predicted solubility is greatest in [BMIM]+[CH3CO2]-, which we find results from favorable hydrogen bonding between the lidocaine amine hydrogen and the [CH3CO2]- oxygen, favorable electrostatic interactions between the lidocaine amide oxygen with the [BMIM]+ aromatic ring hydrogens, while lidocaine does not interfere with the association of [BMIM]+ with [CH3CO2]-. Additionally, by removing functional groups from the lidocaine scaffold while maintaining the important amide group, we found that as the van der Waals volume increases, solubility in [BMIM]+[CH3CO2]- relative to water increases.

  11. Understanding the large solubility of lidocaine in 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium based ionic liquids using molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Ley, Ryan T; Paluch, Andrew S

    2016-02-28

    Room temperature ionic liquids have been proposed as replacement solvents in a wide range of industrial separation processes. Here, we focus on the use of ionic liquids as solvents for the pharmaceutical compound lidocaine. We show that the solubility of lidocaine in seven common 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium based ionic liquids is greatly enhanced relative to water. The predicted solubility is greatest in [BMIM](+)[CH3CO2](-), which we find results from favorable hydrogen bonding between the lidocaine amine hydrogen and the [CH3CO2](-) oxygen, favorable electrostatic interactions between the lidocaine amide oxygen with the [BMIM](+) aromatic ring hydrogens, while lidocaine does not interfere with the association of [BMIM](+) with [CH3CO2](-). Additionally, by removing functional groups from the lidocaine scaffold while maintaining the important amide group, we found that as the van der Waals volume increases, solubility in [BMIM](+)[CH3CO2](-) relative to water increases. PMID:26931706

  12. Muscle-Type Nicotinic Receptor Blockade by Diethylamine, the Hydrophilic Moiety of Lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Alberola-Die, Armando; Fernández-Ballester, Gregorio; González-Ros, José M; Ivorra, Isabel; Morales, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Lidocaine bears in its structure both an aromatic ring and a terminal amine, which can be protonated at physiological pH, linked by an amide group. Since lidocaine causes multiple inhibitory actions on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), this work was aimed to determine the inhibitory effects of diethylamine (DEA), a small molecule resembling the hydrophilic moiety of lidocaine, on Torpedo marmorata nAChRs microtransplanted to Xenopus oocytes. Similarly to lidocaine, DEA reversibly blocked acetylcholine-elicited currents (I ACh ) in a dose-dependent manner (IC 50 close to 70 μM), but unlike lidocaine, DEA did not affect I ACh desensitization. I ACh inhibition by DEA was more pronounced at negative potentials, suggesting an open-channel blockade of nAChRs, although roughly 30% inhibition persisted at positive potentials, indicating additional binding sites outside the pore. DEA block of nAChRs in the resting state (closed channel) was confirmed by the enhanced I ACh inhibition when pre-applying DEA before its co-application with ACh, as compared with solely DEA and ACh co-application. Virtual docking assays provide a plausible explanation to the experimental observations in terms of the involvement of different sets of drug binding sites. So, at the nAChR transmembrane (TM) domain, DEA and lidocaine shared binding sites within the channel pore, giving support to their open-channel blockade; besides, lidocaine, but not DEA, interacted with residues at cavities among the M1, M2, M3, and M4 segments of each subunit and also at intersubunit crevices. At the extracellular (EC) domain, DEA and lidocaine binding sites were broadly distributed, which aids to explain the closed channel blockade observed. Interestingly, some DEA clusters were located at the α-γ interphase of the EC domain, in a cavity near the orthosteric binding site pocket; by contrast, lidocaine contacted with all α-subunit loops conforming the ACh binding site, both in α-γ and α-δ and

  13. Muscle-Type Nicotinic Receptor Blockade by Diethylamine, the Hydrophilic Moiety of Lidocaine

    PubMed Central

    Alberola-Die, Armando; Fernández-Ballester, Gregorio; González-Ros, José M.; Ivorra, Isabel; Morales, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Lidocaine bears in its structure both an aromatic ring and a terminal amine, which can be protonated at physiological pH, linked by an amide group. Since lidocaine causes multiple inhibitory actions on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), this work was aimed to determine the inhibitory effects of diethylamine (DEA), a small molecule resembling the hydrophilic moiety of lidocaine, on Torpedo marmorata nAChRs microtransplanted to Xenopus oocytes. Similarly to lidocaine, DEA reversibly blocked acetylcholine-elicited currents (IACh) in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 close to 70 μM), but unlike lidocaine, DEA did not affect IACh desensitization. IACh inhibition by DEA was more pronounced at negative potentials, suggesting an open-channel blockade of nAChRs, although roughly 30% inhibition persisted at positive potentials, indicating additional binding sites outside the pore. DEA block of nAChRs in the resting state (closed channel) was confirmed by the enhanced IACh inhibition when pre-applying DEA before its co-application with ACh, as compared with solely DEA and ACh co-application. Virtual docking assays provide a plausible explanation to the experimental observations in terms of the involvement of different sets of drug binding sites. So, at the nAChR transmembrane (TM) domain, DEA and lidocaine shared binding sites within the channel pore, giving support to their open-channel blockade; besides, lidocaine, but not DEA, interacted with residues at cavities among the M1, M2, M3, and M4 segments of each subunit and also at intersubunit crevices. At the extracellular (EC) domain, DEA and lidocaine binding sites were broadly distributed, which aids to explain the closed channel blockade observed. Interestingly, some DEA clusters were located at the α-γ interphase of the EC domain, in a cavity near the orthosteric binding site pocket; by contrast, lidocaine contacted with all α-subunit loops conforming the ACh binding site, both in α-γ and α-δ and

  14. Muscle-Type Nicotinic Receptor Blockade by Diethylamine, the Hydrophilic Moiety of Lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Alberola-Die, Armando; Fernández-Ballester, Gregorio; González-Ros, José M; Ivorra, Isabel; Morales, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Lidocaine bears in its structure both an aromatic ring and a terminal amine, which can be protonated at physiological pH, linked by an amide group. Since lidocaine causes multiple inhibitory actions on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), this work was aimed to determine the inhibitory effects of diethylamine (DEA), a small molecule resembling the hydrophilic moiety of lidocaine, on Torpedo marmorata nAChRs microtransplanted to Xenopus oocytes. Similarly to lidocaine, DEA reversibly blocked acetylcholine-elicited currents (I ACh ) in a dose-dependent manner (IC 50 close to 70 μM), but unlike lidocaine, DEA did not affect I ACh desensitization. I ACh inhibition by DEA was more pronounced at negative potentials, suggesting an open-channel blockade of nAChRs, although roughly 30% inhibition persisted at positive potentials, indicating additional binding sites outside the pore. DEA block of nAChRs in the resting state (closed channel) was confirmed by the enhanced I ACh inhibition when pre-applying DEA before its co-application with ACh, as compared with solely DEA and ACh co-application. Virtual docking assays provide a plausible explanation to the experimental observations in terms of the involvement of different sets of drug binding sites. So, at the nAChR transmembrane (TM) domain, DEA and lidocaine shared binding sites within the channel pore, giving support to their open-channel blockade; besides, lidocaine, but not DEA, interacted with residues at cavities among the M1, M2, M3, and M4 segments of each subunit and also at intersubunit crevices. At the extracellular (EC) domain, DEA and lidocaine binding sites were broadly distributed, which aids to explain the closed channel blockade observed. Interestingly, some DEA clusters were located at the α-γ interphase of the EC domain, in a cavity near the orthosteric binding site pocket; by contrast, lidocaine contacted with all α-subunit loops conforming the ACh binding site, both in α-γ and α-δ and

  15. Blood cardioplegia delivery. Deleterious effects of potassium versus lidocaine.

    PubMed Central

    Leicher, F G; Magrassi, P; LaRaia, P J; Derkac, W M; Buckley, M J; Austen, W G

    1983-01-01

    Delivery of cardioplegic (CP) solutions to all regions of the myocardium is critical for optimal myocardial protection during cardiac surgery. However, there are little data regarding the effects of CP agents upon coronary vascular resistance (CVR) and CP delivery. Accordingly, we evaluated blood CP (Hct 30) delivery and CVR during 75 minutes of multi-dose hypothermic blood CP arrest in an in vivo isolated dog heart preparation. Three groups of dogs were studied: K(K+ = 30 mEq/L; n = 6), L (Lidocaine = 400 mg/L; K+ = 4 mEq/L; n = 6), and KL (K+ = 30 mEq/L, Lidocaine 400 mg/L; n = 6) during total cardiopulmonary bypass and moderate systemic hypothermia (28 C). Basal CVR was calculated by measuring total coronary flow (HR 120/min; mean aortic pressure = 80 mmHg) in the empty beating heart. After aortic cross-clamping, the blood CP solution was infused into the aortic root at a constant pressure (80 mmHg) and constant temperature (16 +/- 2 C) for 60 seconds at 15 minute intervals for a total arrest time of 75 min. Total CP flow, CVR, O2 consumption, lactate extraction/production, and K+ balance during 75 minutes of arrest and 30 minutes of reperfusion were determined. The distribution of the CP solution in the left ventricle was measured with radioactive microspheres (9 +/- 1 mu). Biopsy specimens were taken to measure wet to dry ratios. Values are mean +/- SEM. Data were analyzed by BMDP-P2V. During the first CP infusion, after aortic cross-clamping, no differences in CVR or CP distribution were found among the three groups. However, CVR was increased significantly in the K group during the second CP infusion (O': 0.98 +/- 0.20 mmHg/ml/min/100 g; 15': 2.66 +/- 0.82; p less than 0.001). The CVR remained high for the remainder of the arrest period. Moreover, total, epi- and endocardial flow decreased significantly (54%, p less than 0.001). In groups L and KL, no significant changes in CVR were seen. Groups K and KL showed a significant K+ extraction during the first CP

  16. The effect of lidocaine on components of excitability in long mammalian cardiac Purkinje fibers.

    PubMed

    Arnsdorf, M F; Bigger, J T

    1975-11-01

    In contrast to the usual microelectrode techniques employing extracellular tissue stimulation, the double microelectrode technique of intracellular constant current application and intracellular transmembrane voltage recording permits quantitative definition of the components of cardiac excitability. This technique was employed to assess the effect of lidocaine, in a concentration equivalent to clinically effective antiarrhythmic plasma levels (5 mug/ml), on membrane characteristics, cable properties, strength-duration curves and change-duration curves in long sheep Purkinje fibers in normal Tyrode's solution at [K]0 = 4.0 mM. As determined by small hyperpolarizing pulses, lidocaine increased membrane conductance (GM) where GM approximates membrane potassium conductance (GM congruent to GK congruent to gK1) and decreased both the membrane length (lambdam) and time (taum) constants. Lidocaine shifted non-normalized strength-duration curves (threshold current, Ith, vs. current duration, t) and charge-duration curves (charge threshold th, vs. t) upward without altering either the resting transmembrane voltage (Vr) or threshold voltage (Vth). Normalized strength-duration curves and charge-duration curves, however, were superimposable during the control and lidocaine periods. This is best explained by lidocaine altering passive resistance-capacitance properties by increasing membrane potassium conductance without influencing active generator properties dependent on sodium conductance. Lidocaine did not alter the passive or active membrane properties relevant to conduction velocity. By increasing membrane potassium conductance, lidocaine decreases excitability in long Purkinje fibers by increasing Ith without altering Vr or Vth, by increasing Qth; by decreasing lambdam and by rendering local circuit currents less effectual in eliciting an action potential. PMID:1185592

  17. Onset and duration of intradermal mixtures of bupivacaine and lidocaine with epinephrine

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James B; Song, Juhee; Mahabir, Raman C

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Bupivacaine and lidocaine are often used concurrently, in theory, to combine the more rapid onset of lidocaine and the longer duration of bupivacaine. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this concept. METHODS: Twenty-five subjects were enrolled in a double-blinded, randomized block design study to evaluate the onset and duration of four different mixtures of lidocaine and bupivacaine with epinephrine. The study was designed to achieve 80% power to detect an effect size of 0.37 at 5% overall significance. The four mixtures tested were: 0.25% bupivacaine with epinephrine (1:200,000); 1% lidocaine with epinephrine (1:100,000); 0.125% bupivacaine and 0.5% lidocaine with epinephrine (1:150,000); and 0.25% bupivacaine and 1% lidocaine with epinephrine (1:150,000). Four intradermal injections were made in the volar forearms of each participant. Time to effect and duration were measured by sensation of a sharp skin prick. RESULTS: Mean time to onset ranged from 12 s to 29 s without statistical significance across all tested solutions (P=0.891). Mean duration of effect ranged from 6 h 38 min to 7 h 25 min with a statistically significant difference across the tested solutions (P=0.036). CONCLUSIONS: No statistical benefit was measured when comparing lidocaine with epinephrine, bupivacaine with epinephrine, and mixtures of these local anesthetics with regard to onset of action. While a statistical difference was observed in duration of effect, the clinical benefit measured was narrow. PMID:24431939

  18. Safe extensive tumescent liposuction with segmental infiltration of lower concentration lidocaine under monitored anesthesia care.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Cao, Wei-Gang; Li, Sheng-Li; Liu, Li-Na; Jiang, Zhao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Tumescent anesthesia makes it feasible to perform liposuction in an office setting. There are often patients who desire extensive liposuction on approximately 30% of total body surface area, which means the lidocaine total dose might be over the dosing recommendation. So the segmental infiltration is applied, although the concentration of lidocaine in tumescent fluid is gradually reduced to 0.0252%. Moreover, supplemental intravenous (IV) sedation using monitored anesthesia care is usually applied concurrently to help alleviate discomfort and pain of the patients during tumescent anesthetic infusion and fat extraction which in turn increases the risks of potential lidocaine toxicity due to possible drug interactions. This study was to demonstrate the safety of segmental infiltration of tumescent fluid with lower lidocaine concentration combined with IV sedation in extensive liposuction and determine whether the risk of lidocaine toxicity is increased in this protocol. Ten female patients who requested the extensive liposuction participated in the study. The targeted areas were divided into 2 segments and treated in turn in 1 session. Lidocaine (1600 mg) was infiltrated into the first segment, and approximately 928 mg lidocaine was subsequently infiltrated after accomplishment of the first segment operation. Serum levels of lidocaine were taken every 4 hours during the first 24 hours after the second infiltration. The average time of the procedure is 222 (33) minutes. The dose and total amount of lidocaine injected are 40.7 (5.8) mg/kg and 2528.2 (155.2) mg, respectively. The total volume of the infusates and aspirates are 9918.1 (494) and 6325 (1461.6) mL, respectively, the ratio of total infusates to total aspirates is 1.66 (0.45). The total aspirated fat and fluids are 3280 (1051.8) and 3045 (824.1) mL, respectively. The peak lidocaine levels [2.18 (0.63) μg/mL] occurred after 12 to 20 hours [16.4 (2.27) hours]. No significant correlation between dose per

  19. Microdialysis and Delivery of Iontophoresis-Driven Lidocaine Into the Human Gastrocnemius Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Coglianese, Mark; Draper, David O.; Shurtz, Joseph; Mark, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Context: Iontophoresis is used frequently in physical medicine and rehabilitation, but many research techniques do not adequately measure it for depth of medicine delivery. Objective: To determine if iontophoresis delivers lidocaine 5 mm under the surface of human skin. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Therapeutic modalities research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Eight men and 5 women volunteers (age range = 21 ± 2.3 years) who had less than 5 mm of adipose tissue in the area we measured participated in the study. Intervention(s): We inserted a microdialysis probe 5 mm under the skin of both legs and into the triceps surae muscle groups of 10 participants. Microdialysis was performed for 60 minutes to allow a recovery period for local skin blood flow to return to baseline. We then delivered 2 mL of 1% lidocaine to the treatment leg via iontophoresis at 40 mA/min. Next, microdialysis was performed continuously in both legs during the treatment and for 30 minutes posttreatment to collect the lidocaine samples. After we had gathered the samples, several saline solutions with various amounts of lidocaine (0.005%, 0.025%, 0.05%, and 0.1%) were prepared in vitro and analyzed. Although we did not intend to do so as a part of the original study, we also performed an identical follow-up study at 3 mm in 3 participants. Main Outcome Measure(s): Both in vitro and in vivo samples were analyzed via reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). A protocol for detection and quantification of lidocaine using RP-HPLC was followed. Results: We did not detect any measurable levels or concentrations of lidocaine in the 10 control samples. According to the RP-HPLC analysis, the 10 treatment samples also were negative for the presence of lidocaine. However, when we performed the study at 3 mm, microdialysis detected lidocaine in the 3 participants at this depth in the treatment leg only. Conclusions: Measurable levels of lidocaine were not

  20. Paraspinous Lidocaine Injection for Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Marta; Imamura, Satiko Tomikawa; Targino, Rosa Alves; Morales-Quezada, León; Onoda Tomikawa, Luis C.; Onoda Tomikawa, Luis G.; Alfieri, Fabio M.; Filippo, Thais R.; da Rocha, Ivan D.; Neto, Raul Bolliger; Fregni, Felipe; Battistella, Linamara Rizzo

    2016-01-01

    In this large, sham-controlled, randomized trial, we examined the efficacy of the combination of standard treatment and paraspinous lidocaine injection compared with standard therapy alone in subjects with chronic low back pain. There is little research-based evidence for the routine clinical use of paraspinous lidocaine injection for low back pain. A total of 378 subjects with nonspecific chronic low back pain were randomized to 3 groups: paraspinous lidocaine injection, analgesics, and exercises (group 1, LID-INJ); sham paraspinous lidocaine injection, analgesics, and exercises (group 2, SH-INJ); and analgesics and exercises (group 3, STD-TTR). A blinded rater assessed the study outcomes at 3 time points: baseline, after treatment, and after 3 months of follow-up. There were increased frequency of pain responses and better low back functional scores in the LID-INJ group compared with the SH-INJ and STD-TTR groups. These effects remained at the 3-month follow-up but differed between all 3 groups. There were significant changes in pain threshold immediately after treatment, supporting the effects of this intervention in reducing central sensitization. Paraspinous lidocaine injection therapy is not associated with a higher risk of adverse effects compared with conventional treatment and sham injection. Its effects on hyperalgesia might correlate with changes in central sensitization. PMID:26828801

  1. A comparison of the anesthetic efficacy of articaine and lidocaine in patients with irreversible pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Tortamano, Isabel Peixoto; Siviero, Marcelo; Costa, Carina Gisele; Buscariolo, Inês Aparecida; Armonia, Paschoal Laércio

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine with that of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine during pulpectomy in patients with irreversible pulpitis in mandibular posterior teeth. Forty volunteers, patients with irreversible pulpitis admitted to the Emergency Center of the School of Dentistry at the University of São Paulo, randomly received a conventional inferior alveolar nerve block containing 3.6 mL of either 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine or 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. During the subsequent pulpectomy, we recorded the patients' subjective assessments of lip anesthesia, the absence/presence of pulpal anesthesia through electric pulp stimulation, and the absence/presence of pain through a verbal analogue scale. All tested patients reported lip anesthesia after the application of either inferior alveolar nerve block. Regarding pulpal anesthesia success as measured with the pulp tester, the lidocaine solution had a higher success rate (70%) than the articaine solution (65%). For patients reporting none or mild pain during pulpectomy, the success rate of the articaine solution (65%) was higher than that of the lidocaine solution (45%). Yet, none of the observed differences between articaine and lidocaine were statistically significant. Apparently, therefore, both local anesthetic solutions had similar effects on the patients with irreversible pulpitis in mandibular posterior teeth. Neither of the solutions, however, resulted in an effective pain control during irreversible pulpitis treatments.

  2. A comparison of cocaine, lidocaine with epinephrine, and oxymetazoline for prevention of epistaxis on nasotracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Katz, R I; Hovagim, A R; Finkelstein, H S; Grinberg, Y; Boccio, R V; Poppers, P J

    1990-01-01

    The alpha-adrenergic agonist oxymetazoline was compared to cocaine and to lidocaine with epinephrine with respect to prevention of epistaxis on nasotracheal intubation. The nares of three groups of 14 patients each were topically pretreated with 4% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine (group 1), 10% cocaine (group 2), or 0.05% oxymetazoline (group 3) prior to nasotracheal intubation. After intubation, epistaxis was estimated on a scale of 0 to 3, with 0 indicating no bleeding, 1 representing blood on the nasotracheal tube only, 2 indicating blood pooling in the pharynx, and 3 representing blood in the pharynx sufficient to impede intubation. Only 29% of the patients in group 1 displayed no bleeding, whereas 57% of those in group 2 and 86% of those in group 3 had no bleeding. Nonparametric analysis showed a statistically significant difference (p less than 0.013) between oxymetazoline and lidocaine with epinephrine. In addition, heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were examined prior to administration of the medications; at 5 minutes, 10 minutes, and 15 minutes after administration of the medications; and after intubation. No significant differences were noted (p greater than 0.05) between the medications except for a slightly higher systolic BP for cocaine than for lidocaine with epinephrine at 15 minutes. The results of this double-blind, randomized trial demonstrate that the alpha-adrenergic agonist oxymetazoline is as effective as cocaine, and more effective than lidocaine with epinephrine, for the prevention of epistaxis associated with nasotracheal intubation.

  3. Analysis of Lidocaine Interactions with Serum Proteins Using High-Performance Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Soman, Sony; Yoo, Michelle J.; Jang, Yoon Jeong; Hage, David S.

    2010-01-01

    High-performance affinity chromatography was used to study binding by the drug lidocaine to human serum albumin (HSA) and α1–acid glycoprotein (AGP). AGP had strong binding to lidocaine, with an association equilibrium constant (Ka) of 1.1-1.7 × 105 M-1 at 37 °C and pH 7.4. Lidocaine had weak-to-moderate binding to HSA, with a Ka in the range of 103 to 104 M-1. Competitive experiments with site selective probes showed that lidocaine was interacting with Sudlow site II of HSA and the propranolol site of AGP. These results agree with previous observations in the literature and provide a better quantitative understanding of how lidocaine binds to these serum proteins and is transported in the circulation. This study also demonstrates how HPAC can be used to examine the binding of a drug with multiple serum proteins and provide detailed information on the interaction sites and equilibrium constants that are involved in such processes. PMID:20138813

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is involved in the lidocaine-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Kehan; Han, Xuechang

    2015-05-01

    Lidocaine has been indicated to promote apoptosis and to promote endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. However, the mechanism underlining ER stress-mediated apoptosis is unclear. In the present study, we investigated the promotion to ER stress in the lidocaine-induced apoptosis in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Firstly, we confirmed that lidocaine treatment induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells, time-dependently and dose-dependently, via MTT cell viability assay and annexin V/FITC apoptosis detection with a FACScan flow cytometer. And the anti-apoptosis Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL were downregulated, whereas the apoptosis-executive caspase 3 was promoted through Western blot assay and caspase 3 activity assay. Moreover, the ER stress-associated binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP), PKR-like ER kinase (PERK), activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) were also upregulated at both mRNA and protein levels by lidocaine treatment. On the other hand, downregulation of the ER stress-associated BiP by RNAi method not only blocked the lidocaine-promoted ER stress but also attenuated the lidocaine-induced SH-SY5Y cell apoptosis. In conclusion, the present study confirmed the involvement of ER stress in the lidocaine-induced apoptosis in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Our study provides a better understanding on the mechanism of lidocaine's neurovirulence.

  5. [Sensitization of bradycardia during final hypotension induced by serotonin in rats: effect of lidocaine].

    PubMed

    Valle, L B; Oliveira-Filho, R M; Armonia, P L; Nassif, M; Saraceni, G

    1975-10-01

    It was studied the sensibilizing effect of lidocaine (8.5 mg/kg, i.v.) on the ECG (heart rate, P-R interval, QRS complex and Q-T interval) of both intact and bilaterally vagotomised rats, in the nadir of the final hypotension determined by serotonine (60 mug/kg, i.v.). The results showed (1) a certain degree of selectivity of the vagi, and (2) the effects of serotonine either isolated or associated to lidocaine on P-R interval and heart rate were reinforced when intact animals were used. Although no significant alterations of Q-T were elicited by the drugs, lidocaine surprisingly enlarged the QRS complex in a more significant fashion for the intact than for the vagotomised animals.

  6. Analgesic efficacy of lidocaine and multimodal analgesia for chest tube removal: A randomized trial study1

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Valdecy Ferreira de Oliveira; da Costa, José Madson Vidal; Cascudo, Marcelo Matos; Pinheiro, Ênio de Oliveira; Fernandes, Maria Angela Ferreira; de Araujo, Ivonete Batista

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to assess the analgesic efficacy of subcutaneous lidocaine and multimodal analgesia for chest tube removal following heart surgery. Methods: sixty volunteers were randomly allocated in two groups; 30 participants in the experimental group were given 1% subcutaneous lidocaine, and 30 controls were given a multimodal analgesia regime comprising systemic anti-inflammatory agents and opioids. The intensity and quality of pain and trait and state anxiety were assessed. The association between independent variables and final outcome was assessed by means of the Chi-squared test with Yates' correction and Fisher's exact test. Results: the groups did not exhibit significant difference with respect to the intensity of pain upon chest tube removal (p= 0.47). The most frequent descriptors of pain reported by the participants were pressing, sharp, pricking, burning and unbearable. Conclusion: the present study suggests that the analgesic effect of the subcutaneous administration of 1% lidocaine combined with multimodal analgesia is most efficacious. PMID:26625989

  7. Profound bradycardia with lidocaine during anesthesia induction in a silent sick sinus syndrome patient.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Ok; Chung, Seunghyun; Lee, Kyoungjin; Cho, Hun

    2011-05-01

    Sick sinus syndrome is caused by sinus node dysfunction that renders it unable to function as a pacemaker. Patients with sick sinus syndrome are often asymptomatic or have symptoms that are mild and nonspecific. Lidocaine (0.5 mg/kg) injection is used for reduction of pain associated with intravenous injection of propofol. Episodes of marked bradycardia with sinus arrest after prophylactic lidocaine injection are reported in a 69-y-old man with no apparent preoperative cardiac disease or electrocardiographic abnormality. Surgery was postponed, and he was later diagnosed with sick sinus syndrome.

  8. Enhanced skin penetration of lidocaine through encapsulation into nanoethosomes and nanostructured lipid carriers: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Babaei, S; Ghanbarzadeh, S; Adib, Z M; Kouhsoltani, M; Davaran, S; Hamishehkar, H

    2016-05-01

    Lipid based nanoparticles have become a major research object in topical drug delivery to enable drugs to pass the stratum corneum and reach the desired skin layer. The present investigation deals with the encapsulation of lidoacine into nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) and nanoethosomes for improving its dermal delivery and consequently local anesthetic efficacy. Concurrently these two topical delivery systems were compared. Lidocaine-loaded NLCs and nanoethosomes were characterized by various techniques and used for an in vitro skin penetration study using excised rat skin and Franz diffusion cells. The nanoparticles were tracked in the skin by following the Rhodamine-labled nanocarriers under fluorescent microscopy. Optimized lidocaine-loaded NLCs (size 96 nm, zeta potential -13.7 mV, encapsulation efficiency (EE) % 69.86% and loading capacity (LC) % 10.47%) and nanoethosomes (size 105.4 nm, zeta potential -33.6 mV, EE 40.14% and LC 8.02%) were chosen for a skin drug delivery study. Higher skin drug deposition of NLCs and nanoethosomal formulations compared to lidocaine hydroalcoholic solution represented a better localization of the drug in the skin. NLC formulation showed the lowest entered drug in the receptor phase of Franz diffusion cell in comparison with nanoethosomes and hydroalcoholic solution confirming the highest skin accumulation of drug. Both colloidal systems showed superiority over the drug solution for dermal delivery of lidocaine, however, NLC exhibited more promising characteristics than nanoethosomes regarding drug loading and skin targeted delivery. PMID:27348967

  9. Anesthetic efficacy of a combination of hyaluronidase and lidocaine with epinephrine in inferior alveolar nerve blocks.

    PubMed Central

    Ridenour, S.; Reader, A.; Beck, M.; Weaver, J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to determine the anesthetic efficacy of a buffered lidocaine with epinephrine solution compared to a combination buffered lidocaine with epinephrine plus hyaluronidase solution in inferior alveolar nerve blocks. Thirty subjects randomly received an inferior alveolar nerve block using 1 of the 2 solutions at 2 separate appointments using a repeated-measures design. Mandibular anterior and posterior teeth were blindly pulp tested at 4-minute cycles for 60 minutes postinjection. No response from the subject to the maximum output (80 reading) of the pulp tester was used as the criterion for pulpal anesthesia. Anesthesia was considered successful when 2 consecutive readings of 80 were obtained. A postoperative survey was used to measure pain and trismus. The results demonstrated 100% of the subjects had profound lip numbness with both solutions for inferior alveolar nerve blocks. The anesthetic success rates for individual teeth ranged from 20 to 80%. There were no significant differences (P > .05) between the 2 solutions. However, the combination lidocaine/hyaluronidase solution resulted in a significant increase in postoperative pain and trismus. It was concluded that adding hyaluronidase to a buffered lidocaine solution with epinephrine did not statistically increase the incidence of pulpal anesthesia in inferior alveolar nerve blocks and, because of its potential tissue damaging effect, it should not be added to local anesthetic solutions for inferior alveolar nerve blocks. PMID:11495405

  10. Effects of two newly synthesized analogues of lidocaine on rat arterial blood pressure and heart rate.

    PubMed

    Al Rasheed, N M; Al Sayed, M I; Al Zuhair, H H; Al Obaid, A R; Fatani, A J

    2001-04-01

    Two new analogues of lidocaine were synthesized at the College of Pharmacy, King Saud University: compound I (Methyl-2-[2-(N,N-diethylamino) acetamido]-3-cyano-4,5-dimethylbenzoate) and compound II (Methyl-2-[2-(piperidino) acetamido]-3-cyano-4,5-dimethylbenzoate). Their influence on the arterial blood pressure and the heart rate of urethane-anaesthetized rats was studied and compared with the actions of lidocaine. Compounds I, II and lidocaine induced significant dose-dependent decreases in the arterial blood pressure and heart rate, which usually returned to basal values within 3-5 min. There were significant differences in the potency of the three compounds in producing their effects on blood pressure and heart rate (P< 0.0001, ANOVA). Compound II was 14 and 6 times more potent in reducing blood pressure and 8 and 2 times more capable of reducing the heart rate than lidocaine and compound I, respectively. The results of this study also indicated the ineffectiveness of antagonists of autonomic, histaminergic and 5-HT receptor, and various vasodilators in blocking the actions of the three compounds on blood pressure and heart rate. Pretreatment with CaCl(2)significantly reduced the hypotension and bradycardia induced by the three compounds, suggesting the involvement of calcium channels, probably of the L type. Several possible mechanisms are postulated. In conclusion, the results direct attention to the capability of the two new compounds to decrease blood pressure and heart rate; affects that may have clinical potential.

  11. Intracuff alkalized lidocaine reduces sedative/analgesic requirements for mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    Basuni, Ahmed Sobhy

    2014-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of intracuff alkalized lidocaine on sedative/analgesic requirements for mechanically ventilated patients and its consequence on patient-ventilator interaction. Materials and Methods: A total of 64 patients who expected to require ventilatory support for a period of more than 48 h were randomly assigned to groups S and L. In group S, the endotracheal tube (ETT) cuffs were inflated with normal saline. In group L, the ETT cuffs were inflated with lidocaine 2% and sodium bicarbonate 8.4%. The investigator and the surgical intensive care unit staff were blinded to the nature of cuff-filled solutions. Sedation was maintained with propofol and fentanyl infusions. The total requirements for propofol and fentanyl, frequency and severity of cough and number of ineffective triggering during the first 24 h of mechanical ventilation were recorded. Results: There was a significant reduction (about 30%) in the requirements for propofol and fentanyl in patients who received intracuff alkalinized lidocaine; P < 0.001. The frequency and severity of cough were significantly lower in group L compared with group S and the frequency of ineffective triggering was significantly lower in group L; P < 0.001 for both comparisons. Conclusion: Intracuff alkalized lidocaine increases ETT tolerance and hence, decreases sedatives/analgesics requirements for mechanically ventilated patients. This results in improved patient-ventilator synchronization. PMID:25422600

  12. Lidocaine attenuates anisomycin-induced amnesia and release of norepinephrine in the amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Renee N.; Canal, Clint E.; Gold, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    When administered near the time of training, protein synthesis inhibitors such as anisomycin impair later memory. A common interpretation of these findings is that memory consolidation requires new protein synthesis initiated by training. However, recent findings support an alternative interpretation that abnormally large increases in neurotransmitter release after injections of anisomycin may be responsible for producing amnesia. In the present study, a local anesthetic was administered prior to anisomycin injections in an attempt to mitigate neurotransmitter actions and thereby attenuate the resulting amnesia. Rats received lidocaine and anisomycin injections into the amygdala 130 and 120 min, respectively, prior to inhibitory avoidance training. Memory tests 48 hr later revealed that lidocaine attenuated anisomycin-induced amnesia. In other rats, in vivo microdialysis was performed at the site of amygdala infusion of lidocaine and anisomycin. As seen previously, anisomycin injections produced large increases in release of norepinephrine in the amygdala. Lidocaine attenuated the anisomycin-induced increase in release of norepinephrine but did not reverse anisomycin inhibition of protein synthesis, as assessed by c-Fos immunohistochemistry. These findings are consistent with past evidence suggesting that anisomycin causes amnesia by initiating abnormal release of neurotransmitters in response to the inhibition of protein synthesis. PMID:21453778

  13. A New Anaesthetic Protocol for Adult Zebrafish (Danio rerio): Propofol Combined with Lidocaine

    PubMed Central

    Valentim, Ana M.; Félix, Luís M.; Carvalho, Leonor; Diniz, Enoque; Antunes, Luís M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The increasing use of zebrafish model has not been accompanied by the evolution of proper anaesthesia for this species in research. The most used anaesthetic in fishes, MS222, may induce aversion, reduction of heart rate, and consequently high mortality, especially during long exposures. Therefore, we aim to explore new anaesthetic protocols to be used in zebrafish by studying the quality of anaesthesia and recovery induced by different concentrations of propofol alone and in combination with different concentrations of lidocaine. Material and Methods In experiment A, eighty-three AB zebrafish were randomly assigned to 7 different groups: control, 2.5 (2.5P), 5 (5P) or 7.5 μg/ml (7.5P) of propofol; and 2.5 μg/ml of propofol combined with 50, (P/50L), 100 (P/100L) or 150 μg/ml (P/150L) of lidocaine. Zebrafish were placed in an anaesthetic water bath and time to lose the equilibrium, reflex to touch, reflex to a tail pinch, and respiratory rate were measured. Time to gain equilibrium was also assessed in a clean tank. Five and 24 hours after anaesthesia recovery, zebrafish were evaluated concerning activity and reactivity. Afterwards, in a second phase of experiments (experiment B), the best protocol of the experiment A was compared with a new group of 8 fishes treated with 100 mg/L of MS222 (100M). Results In experiment A, only different concentrations of propofol/lidocaine combination induced full anaesthesia in all animals. Thus only these groups were compared with a standard dose of MS222 in experiment B. Propofol/lidocaine induced a quicker loss of equilibrium, and loss of response to light and painful stimuli compared with MS222. However zebrafish treated with MS222 recovered quickly than the ones treated with propofol/lidocaine. Conclusion In conclusion, propofol/lidocaine combination and MS222 have advantages in different situations. MS222 is ideal for minor procedures when a quick recovery is important, while propofol/lidocaine is best to

  14. The effect of lidocaine, bupivacaine and ropivacaine in nasal packs on pain and hemorrhage after septoplasty.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Emin; Gungor, Gurcan; Alimoglu, Yalcin; Kilic, Erkan; Tarakci, Eylem; Bozkurt, Pervin; Enver, Ozgun

    2011-05-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of local anesthetics soaked in Merocel nasal packs on hemorrhage and pain after septoplasty. The methodology includes a prospective double-blind study that was conducted in patients undergoing septoplasty because of nasal septal deviation. The study included 143 patients. The patients were divided into four groups. Each group received 1% lidocaine + 0.000625% adrenalin, 0.375% ropivacaine, 0.25% bupivacaine as study groups or 0.9% sodium chloride as a control group in their Merocel packs postoperatively. The local anesthetics or sodium chloride were reapplied at the eighth postoperative hour. Each patient was given a questionnaire where verbal analog score and amount of postoperative hemorrhage was noted. The statistical analysis was performed using two sided t test on each patient group at each time point. The results included the patients in the control group needing rescue drug most often. There was no statistically significant difference between bupivacaine and lidocaine plus adrenalin in the patients who requested rescue drug. The patients in the ropivacaine group requested rescue drug more frequently than the bupivacaine and lidocaine plus adrenalin groups. Bupivacaine group had significantly better pain scores versus control group at all intervals except for the first postoperative hour.The bupivacaine group had better pain scores versus ropivacaine and lidocaine plus adrenalin groups in the 4th, 8th and the 24th hours. The bupivacaine group had better pain scores versus lidocaine plus adrenalin in the 12th, 16th and the 20th hours. The ropivacaine group had significantly better pain scores versus control group in the 8th, 12th, 16th, 20th and 24th postoperative hours. The ropivacaine group scored better than lidocaine plus adrenalin group just in the 16th hour. The lidocaine plus adrenalin group had significantly better pain scores versus control group in 4th and 12th hours. There was no statistically significant

  15. Addition of lidocaine injection immediately before physiotherapy for frozen shoulder: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Chun; Wang, Tao-Liang; Lin, Yi-Jia; Hsieh, Lin-Fen; Tsai, Chun-Mei; Huang, Kuang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The intraarticular injection of lidocaine immediately before a physiotherapy session may relieve pain during the stretching and mobilization of the affected joint in patients with a frozen shoulder, thus enhancing the treatment effect. To compare the effects of intraarticular injection of lidocaine plus physiotherapy to that of physiotherapy alone in the treatment of a frozen shoulder, a prospective randomized controlled trial was conducted in the rehabilitation department of a private teaching hospital. Patients with a frozen shoulder were randomized into the physiotherapy group or the lidocaine injection plus physiotherapy (INJPT) group. The subjects in the INJPT group underwent injection of 3 ml of 1% lidocaine into the affected shoulder 10 to 20 minutes before each physiotherapy session. In each group, the treatment lasted 3 months. The primary outcome measures were the active and passive range of motion of the affected shoulder. The secondary outcome measures were the results of the Shoulder Disability Questionnaire, the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, and the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). The outcome measures were evaluated before treatment and 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 months after the start of treatment. The group comparisons showed significantly greater improvement in the INJPT group, mainly in active and passive shoulder range of motion in flexion and external rotation and improvements in pain and disability (P < 0.05); however, no significant group difference was seen in the SF-36 results. The intraarticular injection of lidocaine immediately before a physiotherapy session might be superior to physiotherapy alone in the treatment of a frozen shoulder. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01817348.

  16. [Use of a mix of lidocaine and butorphanol as a caudal epidural anesthesia in a mare].

    PubMed

    Csik-Salmon, J; Blais, D; Vaillancourt, D; Garon, O; Bisaillon, A

    1996-10-01

    Loss of rear motor control is the main limiting factor in the use of caudal epidural anesthesia in the horse. In man and laboratory animals, a small dose of an opiate combined with a local anesthetic enhances analgesia without impairing motor function. Thus, the amount of local anesthetic administered may be reduced. Butorphanol is an opiate widely used in horses. It has a good margin of safety and few cardiorespiratory effects. The effects of lidocaine (0.25 mg/kg) and lidocaine-butorphanol (0.25 mg/kg, and 0.04 mg/kg, respectively) were compared in 2 groups of 5 healthy unsedated mares. Horses in each group received either lidocaine or lidocaine-butorphanol in saline solution for a total volume of 0.0165 mg/kg. Epidural injection was performed at the first coccygeal interspace. Each mare was used only once. Cutaneous analgesia was assessed by a response to a pin prick; and visceral analgesia was assessed by response to a noxious stimulus applied to the urethra. Heart rate, respiratory rate, and arterial blood pressure were also measured. Analysis of the results showed an increase in duration of both cutaneous and visceral analgesia in the mares given lidocaine-butorphanol. Cutaneous analgesia increased from 36 +/- 13 to 150 +/- 21 min and visceral analgesia increased from 22 +/- 10 to 162 +/- 16 min. A cranial extension of the cutaneous analgesia was also observed. Cardiorespiratory depression or signs of excitation were not observed. However, these mares demonstrated peculiar walking in the hind limbs, not associated with signs of ataxia or hyperkinesia.

  17. Lidocaine patch (5%) produces a selective, but incomplete block of Aδ and C fibers.

    PubMed

    Krumova, Elena K; Zeller, Martina; Westermann, Andrea; Maier, Christoph

    2012-02-01

    Topical lidocaine (5%) leads to sufficient pain relief in only 29%-80% of treated patients, presumably by small-fiber block. The reasons for nonresponse are unclear; it may be due to different underlying pain mechanisms or partly insufficient anesthetic effect. Using quantitative sensory testing (QST) following the protocol of the DFNS (German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain), this study aims to assess the type and extent of somatosensory changes after lidocaine application in healthy volunteers. Twenty-six healthy volunteers underwent QST on the volar forearm, including thermal and mechanical detection and pain thresholds, twice before (for baseline retest reliability) and once after 6-hour simultaneous application with lidocaine patch 5% and contralateral placebo in a double-blinded manner. Pre and post differences of QST parameters were analyzed by paired t-test (Bonferroni-corrected alpha 0.0023). QST profiles did not change between the 2 baseline measurements and after the placebo application. Lidocaine application led to a significant change of only the small-fiber-associated thresholds (increase of thermal detection and mechanical pain thresholds, decrease of mechanical pain sensitivity). Tactile detection thresholds representing Aβ function remained unchanged. Interindividually, the extent of the small-fiber block varied widely (eg, thermal detection thresholds: in 54% of the subjects there were only minimal changes; in only 8% were there changes of >60% of the maximal achievable value). Topical lidocaine (5%) induces thermal hypoesthesia and pinprick hypoalgesia, suggesting an isolated but only partial block of Aδ and C fibers of unpredictable extent. Further studies must analyze the influencing factors and determine whether patients with poor analgesic effect, in particular, are those with insufficient small-fiber block.

  18. Transient impairment of the axolemma following regional anaesthesia by lidocaine in humans

    PubMed Central

    Moldovan, Mihai; Lange, Kai Henrik Wiborg; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob; Kjær, Troels Wesenberg; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Krarup, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The local anaesthetic lidocaine is known to block voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs), although at high concentration it was also reported to block other ion channel currents as well as to alter lipid membranes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the clinical regional anaesthetic action of lidocaine could be accounted for solely by the block of VGSCs or whether other mechanisms are also relevant. We tested the recovery of motor axon conduction and multiple measures of excitability by ‘threshold-tracking’ after ultrasound-guided distal median nerve regional anaesthesia in 13 healthy volunteers. Lidocaine caused rapid complete motor axon conduction block localized at the wrist. Within 3 h, the force of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle and median motor nerve conduction studies returned to normal. In contrast, the excitability of the motor axons at the wrist remained markedly impaired as indicated by a 7-fold shift of the stimulus–response curves to higher currents with partial recovery by 6 h and full recovery by 24 h. The strength–duration properties were abnormal with markedly increased rheobase and reduced strength–duration time constant. The changes in threshold during electrotonus, especially during depolarization, were markedly reduced. The recovery cycle showed increased refractoriness and reduced superexcitability. The excitability changes were only partly similar to those previously observed after poisoning with the VGSC blocker tetrodotoxin. Assuming an unaltered ion-channel gating, modelling indicated that, apart from up to a 4-fold reduction in the number of functioning VGSCs, lidocaine also caused a decrease of passive membrane resistance and an increase of capacitance. Our data suggest that the lidocaine effects, even at clinical ‘sub-blocking’ concentrations, could reflect, at least in part, a reversible structural impairment of the axolemma. PMID:24710060

  19. Comparison of the Effect of Lidocaine Adding Dexketoprofen and Paracetamol in Intravenous Regional Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Akdogan, Ali; Eroglu, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Comparison of dexketoprofen and paracetamol added to the lidocaine in Regional Intravenous Anesthesia in terms of hemodynamic effects, motor and sensorial block onset times, intraoperative VAS values, and analgesia requirements. Method. The files of 73 patients between 18 and 65 years old in the ASA I-II risk group who underwent hand and forearm surgery were analyzed and 60 patients were included in the study. Patients were divided into 3 groups: Group D (n = 20), 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine and 50 mg/2 mL dexketoprofen trometamol; Group P (n = 20), 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine and 3 mg/kg paracetamol; Group K (n = 20), 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine. Demographic data, motor and sensorial block times, heart rate, mean blood pressure, VAS values, and intraoperative and postoperative analgesia requirements were recorded. Results. Sensorial and motor block onset durations of Group K were significantly longer than other groups. Motor block termination duration was found to be significantly longer in Group D than in Group K. VAS values of Group K were found higher than other groups. There was no significant difference in VAS values between Group D and Group P. Analgesia requirement was found to be significantly more in Group K than in Group P. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of heart rates and mean arterial pressures. Conclusion. We concluded that the addition of 3 mg/kg paracetamol and 50 mg dexketoprofen to lidocaine as adjuvant in Regional Intravenous Anesthesia applied for hand and/or forearm surgery created a significant difference clinically. PMID:24800256

  20. Comparison of the effects of acetaminophen to ketorolac when added to lidocaine for intravenous regional anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Myoung Jin; Cheong, Soon Ho; Shin, Chee Mahn; Kim, Young Jae; Choe, Young Kyun; Lee, Kun Moo; Lim, Se Hun; Kim, Young Hwan; Cho, Kwang Rae; Lee, Sang Eun

    2010-01-01

    Background This study was done to evaluate the effect on pain relief when acetaminophen was added to lidocaine for intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA). Methods Sixty patients undergoing hand or forearm surgery received IVRA were assigned to three groups: Group C received 0.5% lidocaine diluted with 0.9% normal saline to a total volume of 40 ml (n = 20), Group P received 0.5% lidocaine diluted with intravenous acetaminophen 300 mg to a total volume of 40 ml (n = 20) and Group K received 0.5% lidocaine diluted with 0.9% normal saline plus ketorolac 10 mg made up to a total volume of 40 ml (n = 20). Sensory block onset time, tourniquet pain onset time, which was defined as the time from tourniquet application to fentanyl administration for relieving tourniquet pain and amount of analgesic consumption during surgery were recorded. Following deflation of tourniquet sensory recovery time, postoperative pain and quantity of analgesic uses in post-anesthesia care unit were assessed. Results Sensory block onset time was shorter in Group P compared to Group C (P < 0.05). Tourniquet pain onset time was delayed in Group P when compared with group C (P < 0.05). Postoperative pain and analgesic consumption were reduced in Group P and Group K compared to Group C (P < 0.001). Conclusions The addition of acetaminophen to lidocaine for IVRA shortens the onset time of sensory block and delays tourniquet pain onset time, but not with ketorolac. Both acetaminophen and ketorolac reduce postoperative pain and analgesic consumption. PMID:20508792

  1. Comparison of indomethacin suppository and lidocaine cream on post-episiotomy pain: A randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Delaram, Masoumeh; Dadkhah, Narges-Khaton; Jafarzadeh, Loabat

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the most important problems after episiotomy is perineal pain which is more severe on the first day of postpartum period. The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic effects of indomethacin suppository and lidocaine cream in the management of post-episiotomy pain. Materials and Methods: In a randomized, controlled trial, 60 primiparous women who had mediolateral episiotomy received 50 mg indomethacin suppository (n = 30) or 2% lidocaine cream (n = 30) in the postpartum period in Hajar Hospital in Shahrekord (Iran). The mean severity of post-episiotomy pain was assessed with the first complaint and at 6, 12, and 24 h after the delivery, and compared in the two groups. The visual analog scale (VAS) was used for pain recording and data were analyzed with independent-samples t-test, χ2, and Fisher's exact tests, and significance was defined as P < 0.05. Results: With the first complaint of pain, the mean intensity of pain was 4.9 (1.9) in the indomethacin group and 4.9 (1.8) in the lidocaine group, and the difference was not significant (P = 0.25). Six hours after birth, it was 3.3 (1.3) in the indomethacin group and 3.2 (1.9) in the lidocaine group, and there was not a significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.90). No significant difference was found between the two groups at 12 h after birth [2.3 (1.7) vs 2.5 (1.7); P = 0.59]. Also, the difference was not significant at 24 h after birth [1.5 (1.3) vs 1.8 (1.3); P = 0.31]. Conclusions: It was concluded from the study that indomethacin suppository and lidocaine cream have similar efficacy on episiotomy pain relief on the first day of postpartum period. PMID:26257799

  2. Case studies illustrating the management of trigeminal neuropathic pain using topical 5% lidocaine plasters

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Zehra; Renton, Tara

    2013-01-01

    Chronic trigeminal pain, with its severe related functional problems, is difficult to treat. Treatment is often empirically based on medications used for other chronic pain conditions. Systemic sodium channel and calcium channel blocking agents may cause a multitude of complications that are often poorly tolerated by the patient. Aim: The aim of this case report was to assess the efficacy of topical 5% lidocaine plasters in reducing pain and reducing adjuvant medication in patients with orofacial neuropathic pain. Method: Fourteen patients with chronic orofacial pain conditions referred to the oral surgery department were instructed to wear 5% lidocaine plasters for 12 hours each day over the painful area. The conditions included post-surgical neuropathy (n = 10), multiple sclerosis-related pain (n = 1), persistent idiopathic facial pain (n = 1), Ramsay Hunt syndrome (post-herpetic neuralgia, n = 1) and trigeminal neuralgia (n = 1). Data were collected on patient demographics, pain levels and medication. Results: Pain levels improved in 12 out of 14 patients. Nine patients had a reduction in adjuvant medication, two of whom completely stopped adjuvant treatment. Conclusion: This case series demonstrates that of the use of 5% lidocaine plasters may play a useful role in the management of chronic trigeminal pain. A suggested novel approach for the management of orofacial pain, for clinicians, is presented. Summary points Management of chronic orofacial pain continues to be a major challenge to the clinician. Patients are often placed on a multitude of medications in an attempt to alleviate pain without success. Topical 5% lidocaine plasters, currently used for the management of post-herpetic neuralgia, offer the option of locally targeting trigeminal pain without the multiple side-effects of systemic medication. This case series demonstrates that lidocaine plasters decrease verbal pain scores in extraoral, trigeminal and neuropathic pain, and reduce the use of other

  3. Effects of Lidocaine, Dexmedetomidine or Their Combination on the Minimum Alveolar Concentration of Sevoflurane in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    MORAN-MUÑOZ, Rafael; IBANCOVICHI, J. A.; Gutierrez-BLANCO, Eduardo; ACEVEDO-ARCIQUE, Carlos M.; Victoria MORA, J. Mauro; TENDILLO, Francisco J.; SANTOS-GONZALEZ, Martin; YAMASHITA, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to determine the effects of lidocaine (LIDO) and dexmedetomidine (DEX) or their combination (LIDO–DEX), administered by constant-rate infusion (CRI), on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane in dogs. Seven healthy mongrel dogs were used with a 2-week washout interval between treatments in this study. Anesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with sevoflurane in oxygen, and MAC of sevoflurane was determined after 90 min equilibration period in the dogs (SEV-MACBASAL). Then, sevoflurane MAC was determined again in the dogs after 45 min equilibration period of one of the following treatments: an intravenous loading dose of lidocaine 2 mg/kg followed by 6 mg/kg/hr CRI (SEV-MACLIDO); an intravenous loading dose of dexmedetomidine 2 µg/kg followed by 2 µg/kg/hr CRI (SEV-MACDEX); or their combination (SEV-MACLIDO-DEX). These SEV-MACs were determined in duplicate. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and post hoc Tuckey test when appropriate. The SEV-MACBASAL was 1.82 ± 0.06%, SEV-MACLIDO was 1.38 ± 0.08%, SEV-MACDEX was 1.22 ± 0.10%, and SEV-MACLIDO-DEX was 0.78 ± 0.06%. The CRI administration of lidocaine, dexmedetomidine and their combination produced a significant reduction in the MAC of sevoflurane by 26.1 ± 9.0% (P<0.0001), 43.7 ± 11.8% (P<0.0002) and 54.4 ± 9.8% (P<0.0001), respectively. The MAC reduction was significantly greater after the CRI combination of lidocaine and dexmedetomidine when compared with lidocaine CRI (P<0.0001) or dexmedetomidine CRI treatments (P<0.025). PMID:24572631

  4. A randomized trial of topical anesthesia comparing lidocaine versus lidocaine plus xylometazoline for unsedated transnasal upper gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Justin; Goodman, Karen J; Bailey, Robert; Fedorak, Richard N; Morse, John; Millan, Mario; Guzowski, Tom; van Zanten, Sander Veldhuyzen

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal topical anesthesia regimen for unsedated transnasal endoscopy is unknown. The addition of a nasal decongestant, such as xylometazoline (X), to a topical anesthestic may improve patient comfort. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of lidocaine (L) versus L plus X (LX) for anesthesia in unsedated transnasal endoscopy. METHODS: Consecutive participants of the Aklavik Helicobacter pylori project were prospectively randomly assigned to receive LX or L for unsedated transnasal 4.9 mm ultrathin endoscopy. The primary outcome was overall procedure discomfort on a validated 10-point visual analogue scale (1 = no discomfort, 10 = severe discomfort). Secondary outcomes included pain, endoscope insertion difficulty, gagging, adverse events and encounter times. Results were presented as mean ± SD, difference in mean, 95% CI. RESULTS: A total of 181 patients were randomly assigned to receive LX (n=94) and L (n=87). Baseline characteristics between the two groups were similar (mean age 40 years, 59% women). Overall, patient procedural discomfort with LX and L were 4.2±2.4 versus 3.9±2.1, respectively (0.29; 95% CI −0.39 to 0.96). Transnasal insertion difficulty was significantly lower with LX than with L (2.4±2.1 versus 3.2±2.8, respectively [−0.80; 95% CI −1.54 to −0.06]). Compared with L, the use of LX was associated with significantly less time needed to apply anesthesia (2.4±1.8 min versus 3.5±2.2 min, respectively [−1.10; 95% CI −1.71 min to −0.50 min]) and less time for insertion (3.2±1.8 min versus 3.9±2.2 min, respectively [−0.70 min; 95% CI −1.30 min to −0.10 min]). Epistaxis was rare but occurred less frequently with LX (1.1%) than with L (4.6%) (P=0.19). CONCLUSIONS: LX did not improve patient comfort for transnasal endoscopy compared with L alone. However, LX was associated with less difficulty with endoscope transnasal insertion and reduced insertion time. Further studies on the optimal regimen and dosing of

  5. Intravenous administration of lidocaine directly acts on spinal dorsal horn and produces analgesic effect: An in vivo patch-clamp analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kurabe, Miyuki; Furue, Hidemasa; Kohno, Tatsuro

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous lidocaine administration produces an analgesic effect in various pain states, such as neuropathic and acute pain, although the underlying mechanisms remains unclear. Here, we hypothesized that intravenous lidocaine acts on spinal cord neurons and induces analgesia in acute pain. We therefore examined the action of intravenous lidocaine in the spinal cord using the in vivo patch-clamp technique. We first investigated the effects of intravenous lidocaine using behavioural measures in rats. We then performed in vivo patch-clamp recording from spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons. Intravenous lidocaine had a dose-dependent analgesic effect on the withdrawal response to noxious mechanical stimuli. In the electrophysiological experiments, intravenous lidocaine inhibited the excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked by noxious pinch stimuli. Intravenous lidocaine also decreased the frequency, but did not change the amplitude, of both spontaneous and miniature EPSCs. However, it did not affect inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Furthermore, intravenous lidocaine induced outward currents in SG neurons. Intravenous lidocaine inhibits glutamate release from presynaptic terminals in spinal SG neurons. Concomitantly, it hyperpolarizes postsynaptic neurons by shifting the membrane potential. This decrease in the excitability of spinal dorsal horn neurons may be a possible mechanism for the analgesic action of intravenous lidocaine in acute pain. PMID:27188335

  6. Durability of Benefit From Repeated Intravenous Lidocaine Infusions in Fibromyalgia Patients: A Case Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Marks, David M.; Newhouse, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a painful disorder with no curative treatments, and available medications typically provide partial relief of pain. Reported here is the effective use of serial intravenous lidocaine infusions for the chronic management of 3 patients with fibromyalgia. The details of the infusion procedure are described, and relevant literature is reviewed. Lidocaine infusions should be considered in fibromyalgia patients who are refractory to other treatments, and a positive response to 1 infusion may justify repeated infusions for chronic management. PMID:26835161

  7. Ocular and systemic pharmacokinetics of lidocaine hydrochloride ophthalmic gel in rabbits after topical ocular administration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Ding, Li; Xu, Xiaowen; Lin, Hongda; Sun, Chenglong; You, Linjun

    2015-12-01

    Lidocaine hydrochloride ophthalmic gel is a novel ophthalmic preparation for topical ocular anesthesia. The study is aimed at evaluating the ocular and systemic pharmacokinetics of lidocaine hydrochloride 3.5 % ophthalmic gel in rabbits after ocular topical administration. Thirty-six rabbits were randomly placed in 12 groups (3 rabbits per group). The rabbits were quickly killed according to their groups at 0 (predose), 0.0833, 0.167, 0.333, 0.667, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 h postdose and then the ocular tissue and plasma samples were collected. All the samples were analyzed by a validated LC-MS/MS method. The test result showed that the maximum concentration (C max) of lidocaine in different ocular tissues and plasma were all achieved within 20 min after drug administration, and the data of C max were (2,987 ± 1814) μg/g, (44.67 ± 12.91) μg/g, (26.26 ± 7.19) μg/g, (11,046 ± 2,734) ng/mL, and (160.3 ± 61.0) ng/mL for tear fluid, cornea, conjunctiva, aqueous humor, and plasma, respectively. The data of the elimination half-life in these tissues were 1.5, 3.2, 3.5, 1.9, and 1.7 h for tear fluid, cornea, conjunctiva, aqueous humor, and plasma, respectively. The intraocular lidocaine levels were significantly higher than that in plasma, and the elimination half-life of lidocaine in cornea, conjunctiva, and aqueous humor was relatively longer than that in tear fluid and plasma. The high intraocular penetration, low systemic exposure, and long duration in the ocular tissues suggested lidocaine hydrochloride 3.5 % ophthalmic gel as an effective local anesthetic for ocular anesthesia during ophthalmic procedures.

  8. Disposition of a flow-limited drug (lidocaine) and a metabolic capacity-limited drug (theophylline) in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Colli, A; Buccino, G; Cocciolo, M; Parravicini, R; Scaltrini, G

    1988-12-01

    The plasma clearance after oral administration of a completely absorbed drug that is metabolized by the liver depends on its intrinsic clearance. In cirrhosis the bioavailability of a flow-dependent drug increases because of both portosystemic shunting and hepatocyte dysfunction. A drug with a high extraction ratio, lidocaine, and a drug with a low extraction ratio, theophylline, were administered to 27 patients with cirrhosis and 16 control subjects. We found a significant impairment of both theophylline clearance (p less than 0.001) and lidocaine clearance (p less than 0.001) and an increase in the lidocaine peak concentration (p less than 0.001). The three parameters were significantly correlated with each other. The impairment of theophylline metabolism did not correlate with other indexes of disease severity, whereas lidocaine clearance was lower and lidocaine peak level higher in patients with decompensated cirrhosis and evidence of portal hypertension. Thus impairment in lidocaine disposition, which reflects both hepatocyte dysfunction and portosystemic shunting, correlated closer with the severity of liver disease than did theophylline metabolism.

  9. Benzocaine/Lidocaine/Tetracaine Cream: Report of Corneal Damage and Review.

    PubMed

    Boonsiri, Metavee; Marks, Katherine C; Ditre, Chérie M

    2016-03-01

    Practitioners are increasingly using topical anesthetics in the field of dermatology. Application of topical anesthetics prior to performing dermatologic procedures has proven to decrease pain and discomfort associated with these procedures. Despite the prevalent use of topical anesthetics, there are few standard guidelines for about which products provide optimal and safest use. Adverse events are often correlated with improper application of topical anesthetics. A few case reports have cited adverse events related to the use of compounded products that the United States Food and Drug Administration has not approved, such as benzocaine, lidocaine, tetracaine. In this article, the authors report the possible ocular side effects due to the use of benzocaine, lidocaine, tetracaine. Careful attention must be paid to this compounded product, and better formulations are needed in order to prevent adverse events.

  10. Development of an ANN optimized mucoadhesive buccal tablet containing flurbiprofen and lidocaine for dental pain.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Amjad; Syed, Muhammad Ali; Abbas, Nasir; Hanif, Sana; Arshad, Muhammad Sohail; Bukhari, Nadeem Irfan; Hussain, Khalid; Akhlaq, Muhammad; Ahmad, Zeeshan

    2016-06-01

    A novel mucoadhesive buccal tablet containing flurbiprofen (FLB) and lidocaine HCl (LID) was prepared to relieve dental pain. Tablet formulations (F1-F9) were prepared using variable quantities of mucoadhesive agents, hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) and sodium alginate (SA). The formulations were evaluated for their physicochemical properties, mucoadhesive strength and mucoadhesion time, swellability index and in vitro release of active agents. Release of both drugs depended on the relative ratio of HPMC:SA. However, mucoadhesive strength and mucoadhesion time were better in formulations, containing higher proportions of HPMC compared to SA. An artificial neural network (ANN) approach was applied to optimise formulations based on known effective parameters (i.e., mucoadhesive strength, mucoadhesion time and drug release), which proved valuable. This study indicates that an effective buccal tablet formulation of flurbiprofen and lidocaine can be prepared via an optimized ANN approach. PMID:27279067

  11. Development of an ANN optimized mucoadhesive buccal tablet containing flurbiprofen and lidocaine for dental pain.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Amjad; Syed, Muhammad Ali; Abbas, Nasir; Hanif, Sana; Arshad, Muhammad Sohail; Bukhari, Nadeem Irfan; Hussain, Khalid; Akhlaq, Muhammad; Ahmad, Zeeshan

    2016-06-01

    A novel mucoadhesive buccal tablet containing flurbiprofen (FLB) and lidocaine HCl (LID) was prepared to relieve dental pain. Tablet formulations (F1-F9) were prepared using variable quantities of mucoadhesive agents, hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) and sodium alginate (SA). The formulations were evaluated for their physicochemical properties, mucoadhesive strength and mucoadhesion time, swellability index and in vitro release of active agents. Release of both drugs depended on the relative ratio of HPMC:SA. However, mucoadhesive strength and mucoadhesion time were better in formulations, containing higher proportions of HPMC compared to SA. An artificial neural network (ANN) approach was applied to optimise formulations based on known effective parameters (i.e., mucoadhesive strength, mucoadhesion time and drug release), which proved valuable. This study indicates that an effective buccal tablet formulation of flurbiprofen and lidocaine can be prepared via an optimized ANN approach.

  12. The relation between the duty cycle and anesthetic effect in lidocaine iontophoresis using alternating current.

    PubMed

    Wakita, Ryo; Nakajima, Atsushi; Haida, Yu; Umino, Masahiro; Fukayama, Haruhisa

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the effect of the duty cycle on the anesthetic effect during lidocaine alternating current (AC) iontophoresis. A solution of 2% lidocaine was delivered to the medial antecubital skin for 20 minutes using AC iontophoresis with a duty cycle of 60%, 70%, or 80%. The von Frey test was then performed to evaluate the anesthetic effect. In the groups treated with a duty cycle of 80% or 70% the touch thresholds (TT) were significantly elevated from 0 minutes to 30 minutes and from 0 minutes to 20 minutes. TT were significantly elevated at 0 minutes in the group treated with a 60% duty cycle. The anesthetic effect was significantly enhanced in a duty cycle-dependent manner.

  13. Lidocaine inhibits the invasion and migration of TRPV6-expressing cancer cells by TRPV6 downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuan; Gou, Hui; Zhu, Jiang; Tian, Si; Yu, Lehua

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that local anesthetics have a broad spectrum of pharmacological actions, acting as nerve blocks, and treating pain and cardiac arrhythmias via blocking of the sodium channel. The use of local anesthetics could reduce the possibility of cancer metastasis and recurrence following surgical tumor excision. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of lidocaine upon the invasion and migration of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 6 (TRPV6)-expressing cancer cells. Human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, prostatic cancer PC-3 cells and ovarian cancer ES-2 cells were treated with lidocaine. Cell viability was quantitatively determined by MTT assay. The migration of the cells was evaluated using the wound healing assay, and the invasion of the cells was assessed using a Transwell assay. Calcium (Ca2+) measurements were performed using a Fluo-3 AM fluorescence kit. The expression of TRPV6 mRNA and protein in the cells was determined by quantitative-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. The results suggested that lidocaine inhibits the cell invasion and migration of MDA-MB-231, PC-3 and ES-2 cells at lower than clinical concentrations. The inhibitory effect of lidocaine on TRPV6-expressing cancer cells was associated with a reduced rate of calcium influx, and could occur partly as a result of the downregulation of TRPV6 expression. The use of appropriate local anesthetics may confer potential benefits in clinical practice for the treatment of patients with TRPV6-expressing cancer. PMID:27446413

  14. Calcium Hydroxylapatite With Integral Lidocaine Provides Improved Pain Control for the Correction of Nasolabial Folds.

    PubMed

    Schachter, Daniel; Bertucci, Vince; Solish, Nowell

    2016-08-01

    Calcium hydroxylapatite microspheres in a carrier gel (CaHA; Radiesse®: Merz North America, Inc., Raleigh, NC) is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for subdermal implantation for the correction of moderate-to-severe facial wrinkles and folds, such as nasolabial folds (NLFs). Lidocaine is often mixed with injectable dermal fillers to reduce injection pain. A new formulation of CaHA has been developed with the convenience of integral 0.3% lidocaine, CaHA (+).
    This multicenter, split-face, double-blind study randomized subjects to receive treatment with CaHA (+) in one NLF and CaHA without lidocaine in the contralateral NLF. The pain level for each NLF was evaluated immediately following the injection using a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS), and every 15 minutes for 60 minutes plus follow-up visits. Additional endpoints included aesthetic outcomes and subject preference. All subjects (N=102) received treatment.
    CaHA (+) treatment resulted in a statistically and clinically significant reduction in pain ratings immediately after injection compared with CaHA. The mean difference in VAS scores for pain was -4.41 (P<0.0001). In 90% of subjects, the VAS scores were ≥2.0 cm lower for the CaHA (+)-treated NLF. A significant reduction in pain ratings throughout the first hour after injection was observed with CaHA (+) compared with CaHA (P<0.0001). Both treatment groups achieved significant aesthetic improvement; however, the pain differential resulted in a subject-reported preference for CaHA (+). CaHA (+) with integral lidocaine significantly reduces pain and is as effective as CaHA.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(8):1005-1010.

  15. [The concentration of free lidocaine in arterial, central venous and peripheral vein plasma following intravenous injection].

    PubMed

    Nolte, H; al Saydali, B; Weissenberg, W

    1990-03-01

    Ten intensive care patients and five healthy volunteers each received a bolus injection of lidocaine HCl (100 mg, 2%) over an injection period of 5 s. After 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 15 and 25 min arterial, central venous and peripheral venous blood samples were collected. In four of the volunteers, arterial and central venous samples were also taken about 10 s after the end of injection. The fluorescence polarization method by means of the Abbott-TDx system was used, and plasma concentrations of lidocaine were determined. The measurements showed that lidocaine levels in central venous plasma 10 s after the end of administration were higher than those in arterial plasma. By 30 s after administration the opposite situation had developed, so that arterial concentrations were higher than those in central venous plasma. This relation did not change throughout the study, though the two levels became closer, as is shown by the ratios (Table 3, Fig. 2). Concentrations in peripheral venous plasma increased more slowly but remained far below those in arterial and central venous plasma, at least for the first 8 min. After 15 min lidocaine levels were almost the same in all three samples. During the entire study there were no ECG changes, and neither heart rate nor blood pressure showed any significant deviation from the values obtained at the beginning. The volunteers had minor toxic manifestations, such as dizziness, tinnitus and a metallic taste in the mouth; one person had a sensation of pressure in his chest, which improved following oxygen administration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Sucralfate and Lidocain: Antacid 50:50 solution in Post Esophageal Variceal Band Ligation Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hafeez, Muhammad; Kadir, Ehsan; Aijaz, Anjum

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of pain relief of Sucralfate and lidocain antacid 50:50 solution in post esophageal variceal band ligation pain. Methods: All patients who had under gone Esophageal Variceal Band Ligation (EVBL) were included in the study. Patients un-willing to be included in the study or those who didn’t have post EVBL pain were excluded. Patients with post EVBL pains were divided into two groups: one group was given sucralfate and other was given lidocaine: antacid 50:50 solution. Both were inquired about the duration of the pain relief after the medication. The results were analyzed on SPSS 23. Independent samples T-test was performed to find out whether the difference in duration of pain relief was significantly different in the two groups Results: Out of 110 patients who have EVBL, 66(60.00%) had pain and 44(40.00%) were pain free. In the pain group 46 (69.7%) were given sucralfate and 20 (30.3%) were given lidocain: antacid 50:50 solution. Mean duration of pain relief in two groups was 2.78 (SD ± 2.096) and 2.5 days (SD ±. 0.76) respectively. Independent samples T-test results revealed that there was no statistically significant difference in the duration of pain relief between these two groups with p value 0.426. Conclusion: Both Sucralfate and Lidocain: antacid 50:50 solutions are effective in relieving the post EVBL pain. However, no statistically significant difference in duration of pain relief was detected in separate groups of patients treated with either treatment.

  17. Calcium Hydroxylapatite With Integral Lidocaine Provides Improved Pain Control for the Correction of Nasolabial Folds.

    PubMed

    Schachter, Daniel; Bertucci, Vince; Solish, Nowell

    2016-08-01

    Calcium hydroxylapatite microspheres in a carrier gel (CaHA; Radiesse®: Merz North America, Inc., Raleigh, NC) is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for subdermal implantation for the correction of moderate-to-severe facial wrinkles and folds, such as nasolabial folds (NLFs). Lidocaine is often mixed with injectable dermal fillers to reduce injection pain. A new formulation of CaHA has been developed with the convenience of integral 0.3% lidocaine, CaHA (+).
    This multicenter, split-face, double-blind study randomized subjects to receive treatment with CaHA (+) in one NLF and CaHA without lidocaine in the contralateral NLF. The pain level for each NLF was evaluated immediately following the injection using a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS), and every 15 minutes for 60 minutes plus follow-up visits. Additional endpoints included aesthetic outcomes and subject preference. All subjects (N=102) received treatment.
    CaHA (+) treatment resulted in a statistically and clinically significant reduction in pain ratings immediately after injection compared with CaHA. The mean difference in VAS scores for pain was -4.41 (P<0.0001). In 90% of subjects, the VAS scores were ≥2.0 cm lower for the CaHA (+)-treated NLF. A significant reduction in pain ratings throughout the first hour after injection was observed with CaHA (+) compared with CaHA (P<0.0001). Both treatment groups achieved significant aesthetic improvement; however, the pain differential resulted in a subject-reported preference for CaHA (+). CaHA (+) with integral lidocaine significantly reduces pain and is as effective as CaHA.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(8):1005-1010. PMID:27538003

  18. Sucralfate and Lidocain: Antacid 50:50 solution in Post Esophageal Variceal Band Ligation Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hafeez, Muhammad; Kadir, Ehsan; Aijaz, Anjum

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of pain relief of Sucralfate and lidocain antacid 50:50 solution in post esophageal variceal band ligation pain. Methods: All patients who had under gone Esophageal Variceal Band Ligation (EVBL) were included in the study. Patients un-willing to be included in the study or those who didn’t have post EVBL pain were excluded. Patients with post EVBL pains were divided into two groups: one group was given sucralfate and other was given lidocaine: antacid 50:50 solution. Both were inquired about the duration of the pain relief after the medication. The results were analyzed on SPSS 23. Independent samples T-test was performed to find out whether the difference in duration of pain relief was significantly different in the two groups Results: Out of 110 patients who have EVBL, 66(60.00%) had pain and 44(40.00%) were pain free. In the pain group 46 (69.7%) were given sucralfate and 20 (30.3%) were given lidocain: antacid 50:50 solution. Mean duration of pain relief in two groups was 2.78 (SD ± 2.096) and 2.5 days (SD ±. 0.76) respectively. Independent samples T-test results revealed that there was no statistically significant difference in the duration of pain relief between these two groups with p value 0.426. Conclusion: Both Sucralfate and Lidocain: antacid 50:50 solutions are effective in relieving the post EVBL pain. However, no statistically significant difference in duration of pain relief was detected in separate groups of patients treated with either treatment. PMID:27648035

  19. Is Lidocaine Infiltration Really Necessary in Micro Ear Surgeries performed Under General Anaesthesia?

    PubMed

    Senthil, K; Samuel, John; Ramachandran, V V

    2012-12-01

    To study the role of infiltrating 2% Lidocaine in Micro ear surgeries performed under general anaesthesia. To measure the impact of infiltration of 2% Lidocaine in post operative pain relief and per operative bleeding. A Double blinded, Prospective randomized comparative study was conducted in a tertiary care referral centre. A total of 30 patients planned for micro ear surgeries under general anaesthesia (Tympanoplasty and Cortical mastoidectomy) for CSOM tubotympanic disease were selected and divided into two groups randomly by the chief senior consultant. Group A patients received local infiltration of 2% Lidocaine with one in 200,000 adrenaline and Group B patients received infiltration of one in 200,000 adrenaline in distilled water alone. Operating surgeon assessed the bleeding in the surgical field using Boezaart's grading system. Post operative pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Pain scores of these patients were assessed in the 1st, 4 and 24th h post operatively and recorded. The mean post operative pain score in the 1st h for the patients in Group A was 0.93 and for patients in Group B was two. The difference in the pain scores between the two groups was significant (P < 0.02).The difference in the mean post operative pain scores between the two groups in the 4 and 24th h were not significant (P < 0.1).Per operatively, grade III bleeding was present in 73% of patients in group B and only 33% of patients had grade III bleeding in group A. Infiltration of 2% Lidocaine has a significant impact over the grade of bleeding in the operative field and also on 1st h post operative pain relief. It did not have a significant influence on the pain relief in the 4 and 24th h post operatively. PMID:24294573

  20. Lidocaine injection versus dry needling to myofascial trigger point. The importance of the local twitch response.

    PubMed

    Hong, C Z

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of injection with a local anesthetic agent or dry needling into a myofascial trigger point (TrP) of the upper trapezius muscle in 58 patients. Trigger point injections with 0.5% lidocaine were given to 26 patients (Group I), and dry needling was performed on TrPs in 15 patients (Group II). Local twitch responses (LTRs) were elicited during multiple needle insertions in both Groups I and II. In another 17 patients, no LTR was elicited during TrP injection with lidocaine (9 patients, group Ia) or dry needling (8 patients, group IIa). Improvement was assessed by measuring the subjective pain intensity, the pain threshold of the TrP and the range of motion of the cervical spine. Significant improvement occurred immediately after injection into the patients in both group I and group II. In Groups Ia and Ib, there was little change in pain, tenderness or tightness after injection. Within 2-8 h after injection or dry needling, soreness (different from patients' original myofascial pain) developed in 42% of the patients in group I and in 100% of the patients in group II. Patients treated with dry needling had postinjection soreness of significantly greater intensity and longer duration than those treated with lidocaine injection. The author concludes that it is essential to elicit LTRs during injection to obtain an immediately desirable effect. TrP injection with 0.5% lidocaine is recommended, because it reduces the intensity and duration of postinjection soreness compared with that produced by dry needling.

  1. Cardiovascular alterations after injection of 2% lidocaine with norepinephrine 1:50,000 (xylestesin) in rats.

    PubMed

    Faraco, Fatima Neves; Armonia, Paschoal Laercio; Malamed, Stanley F

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to determine the cardiovascular effects produced by intravascular injection of 2% lidocaine with 20 microg/mL of norepinephrine on systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures and heart rate of rats at the following times: control period, during the injection (first 15 seconds), during the first minute, and at the end of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 minutes after drug administration. The study was performed on 13 male Wistar rats with weights between 200 grams and 220 grams that were awake during the recording of these parameters. The dose administered was proportional to 1 cartridge of local anesthetic (1.8 mL) in an average-size human, which is equivalent to 0.51 mg/kg of lidocaine hydrochloride and 0.51 microg/kg of norepinephrine hydrochloride. The average time of injection was 15.7 seconds. The results of this study showed significant increases in systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure and a noticeable decrease in heart rate. The greatest variation occurred in the systolic blood pressure. The greatest alterations occurred during injection and within the first minute following administration of the anesthetic solution. We would anticipate these changes in the parameters analyzed to be clinically significant. Thus, dentists using 2% lidocaine with norepinephrine 20 mug/mL should be very careful to avoid intravascular injection.

  2. Cardiovascular Alterations After Injection of 2% Lidocaine With Norepinephrine 1:50,000 (Xylestesin) in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Faraco, Fatima Neves; Armonia, Paschoal Laercio; Malamed, Stanley F

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to determine the cardiovascular effects produced by intravascular injection of 2% lidocaine with 20 μg/mL of norepinephrine on systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures and heart rate of rats at the following times: control period, during the injection (first 15 seconds), during the first minute, and at the end of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 minutes after drug administration. The study was performed on 13 male Wistar rats with weights between 200 grams and 220 grams that were awake during the recording of these parameters. The dose administered was proportional to 1 cartridge of local anesthetic (1.8 mL) in an average-size human, which is equivalent to 0.51 mg/kg of lidocaine hydrochloride and 0.51 μg/kg of norepinephrine hydrochloride. The average time of injection was 15.7 seconds. The results of this study showed significant increases in systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure and a noticeable decrease in heart rate. The greatest variation occurred in the systolic blood pressure. The greatest alterations occurred during injection and within the first minute following administration of the anesthetic solution. We would anticipate these changes in the parameters analyzed to be clinically significant. Thus, dentists using 2% lidocaine with norepinephrine 20 μg/mL should be very careful to avoid intravascular injection. PMID:17579502

  3. Effect of Duration and Amplitude of Direct Current when Lidocaine Is Delivered by Iontophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Saliba, Susan A.; Teeter-Heyl, Courtney L.; McKeon, Patrick; Ingeroll, Christopher D.; Saliba, Ethan N.

    2011-01-01

    Dosage for the galvanic stimulation for iontophoresis varies. Clinicians manipulate the duration or the amplitude of the current, but it is not known which is more effective. We compared the anesthetic effect of lidocaine HCL (2%) by manipulating the current parameters on 21 healthy volunteers (age: 21.2 ± 4.2, height 170.7 ± 10.2 cm, mass 82.1 ± 19.2 kg). Three conditions were administered in a random order using a Phoresor II® with 2 mL, 2% lidocaine HCL in an iontophoresis electrode. (1) HASD (40 mA*min): High amplitude (4 mA), short duration (10 min); (2) LALD (40 mA.min): Low amplitude (2 mA), long duration (20 min); (3) Sham condition (0 mA, 20 min). Semmes-Weinstein monofilament (SWM) scores were taken pre and post intervention to measure sensation changes. Two-way ANOVA with repeated measures was used to compare sensation. Both iontophoresis treatments: LALD (4.2 ± 0.32 mm) and HASD (4.2 ± 0.52 mm) significantly increased SWM scores, indicating an increase in anesthesia, compared to the sham condition (3.6 ± 0.06 mm) p < 0.05. Neither LALD nor HASD was more effective and there was no difference in anesthesia with the sham. Lidocaine delivered via iontophoresis reduces cutaneous sensation. However, there was no benefit in either a HASD or LALD treatment. PMID:24309314

  4. Articaine versus lidocaine for third molar surgery: A randomized clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Thiago-de-S; Santos, Jadson-A.; Maia, Marcelo-C; Mendonça, Carla-G

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Pain reduction has been the subject of continuous research in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery since postoperative pain with ranging of intensity and duration may affects the patient submitted in an oral surgical procedure. The aim of present study was to compare the analgesic effectiveness between two different anesthetic solutions (articaine and lidocaine) in third molar surgery. Study Design: A prospective, randomized and clinical study with patients submitted to third molar surgery at two distinct times. The visual analogue scale, the McGill Pain Questionnaire and the analgesic consumption record were used to measure the pain after each surgical time. Results: Duration of surgery, latency, the amount of anesthetic used and analgesic consumption showed clinical differences with highlights of articaine, though statistical significance was not observed (P<0.05). The pain scores indicated similar anesthetic efficacy with both solutions. Conclusion: In the present study no significant differences were observed between lidocaine and articaine in the control of postoperative pain. Key words: Articaine, lidocaine, pain control, lower third molar. PMID:22157664

  5. Use of adrenalin with lidocaine in hand surgery☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas Novais Junior, Ronaldo Antonio; Bacelar Costa, Jorge Ribamar; de Morais Carmo, Jose Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Objective Because of the received wisdom within our setting that claims that local anesthesia should not be used with adrenalin in hand surgery; we conducted a study using lidocaine with adrenalin, to demonstrate its safety, utility and efficacy. Methods We conducted a prospective study in which, in wrist, hand and finger surgery performed from July 2012 onwards, we used local anesthesia comprising a 1% lidocaine solution with adrenalin at 1:100,000. We evaluated the quantity of bleeding, systemic alterations, signs of arterial deficit and complications, among other parameters. We described the infiltration techniques for specific procedures individually. Results We operated on 41 patients and chose to describe separately the raising of a lateral microsurgical flap on the arm, which was done without excessive bleeding and within the usual length of time. In only three cases was there excessive bleeding or use of bipolar tweezers. No systemic alterations were observed by the anesthesiologists or any complications relating to ischemia and necrosis in the wounds or in the fingers, and use of tourniquets was not necessary in any case. Conclusions Use of lidocaine with adrenalin in hand surgery was shown to be a safe local anesthetic technique, without complications relating to necrosis. It provided efficient exsanguination of the surgical field and made it possible to perform the surgical procedures without using a pneumatic tourniquet, thereby avoiding its risks and benefiting the patient through lower sedation. PMID:26229844

  6. Lidocaine, Dexmedetomidine and Their Combination Reduce Isoflurane Minimum Alveolar Concentration in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo-Arcique, Carlos M.; Ibancovichi, José A.; Chavez, Julio R.; Gutierrez-Blanco, Eduardo; Moran-Muñoz, Rafael; Victoria-Mora, José M.; Tendillo-Cortijo, Francisco; Santos-González, Martín; Sanchez-Aparicio, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    The effects of intravenous (IV) lidocaine, dexmedetomidine and their combination delivered as a bolus followed by a constant rate infusion (CRI) on the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane (MACISO) in dogs were evaluated. Seven healthy adult dogs were included. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane. For each dog, baseline MAC (MACISO/BASAL) was determined after a 90-minute equilibration period. Thereafter, each dog received one of the following treatments (loading dose, CRI): lidocaine 2 mg kg−1, 100 µg kg−1 minute−1; dexmedetomidine 2 µg kg−1, 2 µg kg−1 hour−1; or their combination. MAC was then determined again after 45- minutes of treatment by CRI. At the doses administered, lidocaine, dexmedetomidine and their combination significantly reduced MACISO by 27.3% (range: 12.5–39.2%), 43.4% (33.3–53.3%) and 60.9% (46.1–78.1%), respectively, when compared to MACISO/BASAL. The combination resulted in a greater MACISO reduction than the two drugs alone. Their use, at the doses studied, provides a clinically important reduction in the concentration of ISO during anaesthesia in dogs. PMID:25232737

  7. Effect of duration and amplitude of direct current when lidocaine is delivered by iontophoresis.

    PubMed

    Saliba, Susan A; Teeter-Heyl, Courtney L; McKeon, Patrick; Ingeroll, Christopher D; Saliba, Ethan N

    2011-01-01

    Dosage for the galvanic stimulation for iontophoresis varies. Clinicians manipulate the duration or the amplitude of the current, but it is not known which is more effective. We compared the anesthetic effect of lidocaine HCL (2%) by manipulating the current parameters on 21 healthy volunteers (age: 21.2 ± 4.2, height 170.7 ± 10.2 cm, mass 82.1 ± 19.2 kg). Three conditions were administered in a random order using a Phoresor II® with 2 mL, 2% lidocaine HCL in an iontophoresis electrode. (1) HASD (40 mA*min): High amplitude (4 mA), short duration (10 min); (2) LALD (40 mA.min): Low amplitude (2 mA), long duration (20 min); (3) Sham condition (0 mA, 20 min). Semmes-Weinstein monofilament (SWM) scores were taken pre and post intervention to measure sensation changes. Two-way ANOVA with repeated measures was used to compare sensation. Both iontophoresis treatments: LALD (4.2 ± 0.32 mm) and HASD (4.2 ± 0.52 mm) significantly increased SWM scores, indicating an increase in anesthesia, compared to the sham condition (3.6 ± 0.06 mm) p < 0.05. Neither LALD nor HASD was more effective and there was no difference in anesthesia with the sham. Lidocaine delivered via iontophoresis reduces cutaneous sensation. However, there was no benefit in either a HASD or LALD treatment.

  8. Pheniramine Maleate is more effective than Lidocaine on Fentanyl Induced Cough

    PubMed Central

    Ozmen, Ozgur; Kara, Duygu; Karaman, Emine Uzlas; Karakoc, Fatma; Karakaya, Muhammet Ahmet; Arslan, Zakir

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Fentanyl is frequently used during anesthesia induction. The use of fentanyl can cause cough through different mechanisms. Here, we aimed to investigate effects of pheniramine maleate (PM), an antihistaminic agent, and compare it with lidocaine on fentanyl induced cough. Methods: This is a randomized double-blind prospective clinical study of ASA I-II, 120 patients scheduled for elective abdominal surgery. Patients were administered drugs intravenously and randomly allocated into three groups: Group C (2 ml 0.9 % normal saline), Group L (1mg/kg lidocaine), and Group F (PM 45.5 mg). 90 seconds after administration, 2µ/kg fentanyl was applied in three seconds to all patients. Severity of cough (mild: 1-2, moderate: 3-5, severe> 5), time of the cough and vital parameters were recorded 90 seconds after fentanyl injection. Results: Eight patients (25%) in Group C had fentanyl induced cough whereas three patients (7.5%) in Group L and one patient (2.5%) in Group F experienced this phenomenon. There was statistically significant difference between Group F and Group C (p<0.05); however, differences between Group L and Group C or Group F and Group L were not statistically significant (p>0.05). Conclusions: Pheniramine Maleate 45.5 mg is better that placebo and as effective as lidocaine to prevent fentanyl induced cough. PMID:27375720

  9. Plasma concentrations of prilocaine and lidocaine and methaemoglobin formation in infants after epicutaneous application of a 5% lidocaine-prilocaine (EMLA).

    PubMed

    Engberg, G; Danielson, K; Henneberg, S; Nilsson, A

    1987-10-01

    The aim of the study was to measure the plasma levels of lidocaine and prilocaine after dermal application of EMLA in infants and to evaluate whether this procedure increases the levels of methaemoglobin (Met-Hb). Two groups of infants, 3-6 (n = 12) and 6-12 months (n = 10) of age, were studied. In total, 2 ml of EMLA was applied to 4 x 4 cm of skin surface for 4 h and blood samples for detection of Met-Hb and plasma levels of local anaesthetics were taken at 0, 2, 4 and 8 h after the application. After removal of the cream the infants were operated mainly for minor procedures under general anaesthesia. The plasma concentrations of lidocaine and prilocaine were in all cases below toxic levels and there were only minor increases in Met-Hb in a few infants. In conclusion, EMLA can be used safely in infants above 3 months of age provided that the recommendations with regard to dose, application area and time are followed. The use of EMLA in smaller infants and in children taking other Met-Hb-inducing drugs needs further evaluation.

  10. Potentiation of epidural lidocaine by co-administering tramadol by either intramuscular or epidural route in cats

    PubMed Central

    Hermeto, Larissa C.; DeRossi, Rafael; Marques, Beatriz C.; Jardim, Paulo H.A.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the analgesic and systemic effects of intramuscular (IM) versus epidural (EP) administration of tramadol as an adjunct to EP injection of lidocaine in cats. Six healthy, domestic, shorthair female cats underwent general anesthesia. A prospective, randomized, crossover trial was then conducted with each cat receiving the following 3 treatments: EP injection of 2% lidocaine [LEP; 3.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)]; EP injection of a combination of lidocaine and 5% tramadol (LTEP; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively); or EP injection of lidocaine and IM injection of tramadol (LEPTIM; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively). Systemic effects, spread and duration of analgesia, behavior, and motor blockade were determined before treatment and at predetermined intervals afterwards. The duration of analgesia was 120 ± 31 min for LTEP, 71 ± 17 min for LEPTIM, and 53 ± 6 min for LEP (P < 0.05; mean ± SD). The cranial spread of analgesia obtained with LTEP was similar to that with LEP or LEPTIM, extending to dermatomic region T13–L1. Complete motor blockade was similar for the 3 treatments. It was concluded that tramadol produces similar side effects in cats after either EP or IM administration. Our findings indicate that EP and IM tramadol (2 mg/kg BW) with EP lidocaine produce satisfactory analgesia in cats. As an adjunct to lidocaine, EP tramadol provides a longer duration of analgesia than IM administration. The adverse effects produced by EP and IM administration of tramadol were not different. Further studies are needed to determine whether EP administration of tramadol could play a role in managing postoperative pain in cats when co-administered with lidocaine after painful surgical procedures. PMID:26130854

  11. Hyaluronan suppresses lidocaine-induced apoptosis of human chondrocytes in vitro by inhibiting the p53-dependent mitochondrial apoptotic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kim, Soo A; Lee, Sang-Han

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Intra-articular injection of local anesthetics (LAs) is a common procedure for therapeutic purposes. However, LAs have been found toxic to articular cartilage, and hyaluronan may attenuate this toxicity. In this study we investigated whether hyaluronan attenuated lidocaine-induced chondrotoxicity, and if so, to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Human chondrocyte cell line SW1353 and newly isolated murine chondrocytes were incubated in culture medium containing hyaluronan and/or lidocaine for 72 h. Cell viability was evaluated using MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was detected with DAPI staining, caspase 3/7 activity assay and flow cytometry. Cell cycle distributions, ROS levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) were determined using flow cytometry. The expression of p53 and p53-regulated gene products was measured with Western blotting. Results: Lidocaine (0.005%−0.03%) dose-dependently decreased the viability of SW1353 cells. This local anesthetic (0.015%, 0.025%) induced apoptosis, G2/M phase arrest and loss of ΔΨm, and markedly increased ROS production in SW1353 cells. Hyaluronan (50−800 μg/mL) alone did not affect the cell viability, but co-treatment with hyaluronan (200 μg/mL) significantly attenuated lidocaine-induced apoptosis and other abnormalities in SW1353 cells. Furthermore, co-treatment with lidocaine and hyaluronan significantly decreased the levels of p53 and its transcription targets Bax and p21 in SW1353 cells, although treatment with lidocaine alone did not significantly change these proteins. Similar results were obtained in ex vivo cultured murine chondrocytes. Conclusion: Hyaluronan suppresses lidocaine-induced apoptosis of human chondrocytes in vitro through inhibiting the p53-dependent mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. PMID:27041463

  12. Potentiation of epidural lidocaine by co-administering tramadol by either intramuscular or epidural route in cats.

    PubMed

    Hermeto, Larissa C; DeRossi, Rafael; Marques, Beatriz C; Jardim, Paulo H A

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the analgesic and systemic effects of intramuscular (IM) versus epidural (EP) administration of tramadol as an adjunct to EP injection of lidocaine in cats. Six healthy, domestic, shorthair female cats underwent general anesthesia. A prospective, randomized, crossover trial was then conducted with each cat receiving the following 3 treatments: EP injection of 2% lidocaine [LEP; 3.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)]; EP injection of a combination of lidocaine and 5% tramadol (LTEP; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively); or EP injection of lidocaine and IM injection of tramadol (LEPTIM; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively). Systemic effects, spread and duration of analgesia, behavior, and motor blockade were determined before treatment and at predetermined intervals afterwards. The duration of analgesia was 120 ± 31 min for LTEP, 71 ± 17 min for LEPTIM, and 53 ± 6 min for LEP (P < 0.05; mean ± SD). The cranial spread of analgesia obtained with LTEP was similar to that with LEP or LEPTIM, extending to dermatomic region T13-L1. Complete motor blockade was similar for the 3 treatments. It was concluded that tramadol produces similar side effects in cats after either EP or IM administration. Our findings indicate that EP and IM tramadol (2 mg/kg BW) with EP lidocaine produce satisfactory analgesia in cats. As an adjunct to lidocaine, EP tramadol provides a longer duration of analgesia than IM administration. The adverse effects produced by EP and IM administration of tramadol were not different. Further studies are needed to determine whether EP administration of tramadol could play a role in managing postoperative pain in cats when co-administered with lidocaine after painful surgical procedures. PMID:26130854

  13. Neonatal bilateral lidocaine administration into the ventral hippocampus caused postpubertal behavioral changes: An animal model of neurodevelopmental psychopathological disorders.

    PubMed

    Blas-Valdivia, Vanessa; Cano-Europa, Edgar; Hernández-García, Adelaida; Ortiz-Butrón, Rocio

    2009-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate if neonatal bilateral administration of lidocaine into the ventral hippocampus would cause behavioral changes related to schizophrenia. A neonatal ventral-hippocampal lesion (nVH lesion) was made with lidocaine in Wistar male pups. Two groups were formed, the first received lidocaine (4 mug/0.3 muL) and the second an equal volume of vehicle. At day 35 and 56, both groups were tested for social contact, immobility caused by clamping the neck and dorsal immobility, locomotor activity in an open field, and tail flick (TF) latency after a painful heat stimulus. All animals were then killed. Coronal cuts (7 mum) of the brain were obtained and each brain section was stained with cresyl violet-eosin. The animals which received the nVH lesion with lidocaine had decreased social interaction at both ages. The rats with lesions, only at day 58 postnatal, increased their distance traveled and ambulatory time, with a decrease in their nonambulatory and reset time. The rats with lesions had a longer duration of immobility caused by clamping the neck and a longer dorsal immobility at both days 34 and 57 compared to control rats. The lidocaine-treated group spent less time to deflect the tail compared to the control group at postpubertal age. The neonatal bilateral administration of lidocaine into the ventral hippocampus caused some alterations, such as chromatin condensation, nucleolus loss, and cell shrinkage, but glial proliferation was not seen. Neonatal bilateral lidocaine administration into the ventral hippocampus caused postpubertal behavioral changes.

  14. Comparison Between Intraperitoneal and Intravenous Lidocaine for Postoperative Analgesia After Elective Abdominal Hysterectomy, a Double-Blind Placebo Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Samimi, Saghar; Taheri, Arman; Davari Tanha, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of intravenous and intraperitoneal injection of lidocaine and normal saline in relieving postoperative pain after elective abdominal hysterectomy. Materials and methods: For this double-blind randomized controlled study 109 patients undergoing elective abdominal hysterectomy were randomly allocated to three groups :1) IV group (intravenous injection group) received intravenous lidocaine %2 bolus 1.5mg/kg 30 min before incision and then a continuous lidocaine infusion of 2mg/kg and before the wound closure an intraperitoneal injection of N/S , 2) IP group (intraperitoneal group) received intravenous N/S and intraperitoneal lidocaine 3mg/kg , 3) P group (placebo, N/S) received both intravenous and intraperitoneal N/S. The pain scores (VAS) at rest, total morphine consumption , the time to first need for rescue analgesic ,incidence of lidocaine related adverse effects and nausea and vomiting were recorded at 0,2,4,8,12 and 24 hrs postoperatively. Results: The VAS scores were significantly lower in IP and IV groups compared with placebo (p = 0.001). Total consumption of morphine (p = 0.001) and time to firs request of recue analgesic (p = 0.001) were lower too in IP and IV groups.Incidence of vomiting was comparable between groups (p < 0.05) but nausea was higher in control group (p > 0.05).There were not notable lidocaine-related adverse effects. IP and IV groups were not statistically different for all investigated variables. Conclusion: This study showed lidocaine administration both intravenously and intraperitoneally are effective in reducing the postoperative pain and also have opioid sparing effect and can be safely used in elective abdominal hysterectomy without any major adverse effects. PMID:27047566

  15. WITHDRAWN The analgesic effect of paracetamol when added to lidocaine for intravenous regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Celik, M; Saricaoglu, F; Canbay, O; Dal, D; Uzumcigil, A; Leblebicioglu, G; Aypar, U

    2011-10-21

    Ahead of Print article withdrawn by publisher AIM: Intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA) is frequently used in patients who will undergo upper extremity surgical operations for its ease of use, rapid effectiveness and short hospitalization period. Different drug combinations have been used to overcome some systemic adverse effects and to increase the postoperative analgesic effectiveness. In our study, we evaluated the effects of paracetamol (Perfalgan) when added to lidocaine for IVRA, looking specifically at tourniquet pain and postoperative pain. METHODS: Ninety patients undergoing elective hand surgery with IVRA were randomly assigned to three groups to receive either IV saline and C-IVRA with 0.5% lidocaine 3 mg/kg (control group, N=30), IV saline and IVRA with 0.5% lidocaine and 20 mL paracetamol (10 mg/cc) (P-IVRA group, N=30) or IV paracetamol and IVRA with 0.5% lidocaine (L-IV group, N=30). The following were measured: 1) sensory and motor block onset and recovery time, 2) tourniquet pain after tourniquet application and at 10, 20 and 30 min after tourniquet deflation, 3) the visual analog scale (VAS) scores of tourniquet pain at 30 min and 1, 2, 4, 6 and 24 h postoperatively, 4) the time to first analgesic requirement, 5) total analgesic consumption in 24 h and 6) side effects. RESULTS: Sensory and motor block onset and recovery times were similar in both groups. VAS scores of tourniquet pain were lower in group P-IRVA at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 24 h, postoperatively (P<0.01). Anesthesia quality, as determined by the anesthesiologist and surgeon, was similar in both groups. The time to the first postoperative analgesic request was 67.83±57.48 min in group C-IRVA and 93±80.79 min in group P-IRVA (P<0.05). Paracetamol consumption was significantly less in group P-IRVA (1.60± 1 [tablets]) when compared with group C-IRVA (2.45±0.9; P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Perfalgan as an adjunct to lidocaine improves postoperative analgesia in IVRA without adverse effects. PMID

  16. Prolongation of greater occipital neural blockade with 10% lidocaine neurolysis: a case series of a new technique

    PubMed Central

    Kim, David Daewhan; Sibai, Nabil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Greater occipital nerve blocks (GONB) have been used for headache but their benefit may be short. Ready et al performed intrathecal injections on rabbits and reported neurologic/histologic changes that required concentrations of at least 8%. Our study tests the hypothesis that the neurolytic effects of GONB with 10% lidocaine can prolong relief. Methods After an approval from Henry Ford Hospital Institutional Review Board, a chart review was performed for patients who had GONB with 10% lidocaine. Patients received 10% lidocaine after short response (<1 month / >50% relief) to GONB with 1 cc of a solution containing 9 mL 0.5 % bupivacaine and 40 mg methylprednisolone. They received a block with 10% lidocaine with volume given at <80% of the maximum dose of 4 mg/kg. Injections were performed under fluoroscopic guidance after injection of 0.1 cc of contrast (isovue or magnevist). All patients had intravenous access and were given fentanyl and midazolam. The visual analog scale (VAS) scores were recorded on follow-up, and the duration of response was noted. VAS changes with 10% lidocaine and comparison of duration with methylprednisolone were performed using paired t-test. Results Thirteen patients were reviewed; 12 were female and the mean age was 47. Ten were diagnosed with migraine, and three with occipital neuralgia; 12 had bilateral symptoms. Baseline VAS prior to 10% lidocaine averaged 86.92 mm. The mean volume injected per nerve was 1.096 mL. There was significant decrease in mean% VAS with 10% lidocaine at 60.4% (mean: −52.69 mm) (P=0.001). The mean duration of relief was significantly higher with 10% lidocaine at 148.05 days ([standard deviation]=98.87) versus methylprednisolone at 6.33 days (standard deviation=5.01) (P=0.001). No complications or side effects were reported. Conclusion Ten percent lidocaine may be a useful neurolytic agent in prolonging the duration of GONB. PMID:27729811

  17. A comparative evaluation of 4% articaine and 2% lidocaine in mandibular buccal infiltration anesthesia: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Maruthingal, Sunith; Mohan, Dennis; Maroli, Ramesh Kumar; Alahmari, Ali; Alqahtani, Ahmed; Alsadoon, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: To compare 4% articaine and 2% lidocaine local anesthetics in achieving pulpal anesthesia of the lower first permanent molar teeth objectively, and to assess and compare lip and lingual mucosa numbness subjectively. Materials and Methods: All subjects received 1.7 ml of any one anesthetic in the mucobuccal fold adjacent to mandibular first molar teeth; the same individuals received the second infiltration at least 1 week after the first. Later, comparisons for pulpal anesthesia, lip and lingual mucosa numbness between these two anesthetics solutions were made. Results: Articaine showed significant results with P = 0.006 in achieving pulpal anesthesia objectively, when compared with lidocaine. Articaine also showed very high significant results subjectively with P = 0.0006 in achieving lip numbness, when compared with lidocaine. But the results in achieving lingual mucosa numbness with articaine subjectively was not significant with P = 0.01, when compared with lidocaine. Conclusion: Endodontic and operative treatments are one of the most common oral non-surgical procedures done under local anesthesia. The diversity of anesthetic substances currently available on the market requires dental professionals to assess the drug both by its pharmacokinetic and also by its clinical characteristics during dental treatments. Our study used 4% articaine, which is available in the market, for comparison with 2% lidocaine. Further studies are required to use an equal concentration of solutions to achieve more accurate results. PMID:26759799

  18. Prophylactic Effects of Lidocaine or Beclomethasone Spray on Post-Operative Sore Throat and Cough after Orotracheal Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Banihashem, Nadia; Alijanpour, Ebrahim; Hasannasab, Bahman; Zarei, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Post-operative sore throat and cough are common complications of endotracheal intubation. These conditions may be very distressing for the patient and may lead to unpleasant memories. This study was performed in order to determine whether beclomethasone and lidocaine spray could reduce the frequency of post-operative sore throat and hoarseness after tracheal extubation. Materials and Methods: Ninety women (18–60 years of age) with an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I or II and undergoing elective mastoidectomy were randomized into three groups of 30 patients. The endotracheal tubes in each group were sprayed with 50% beclomethasone, 10% lidocaine hydrochloride, or normal saline (control group) before endotracheal intubation. Patients were examined for sore throat (none, mild, moderate, or severe), cough, and hoarseness at 1 and 24 h after extubation. Results: There was a significantly lower incidence and severity of post-operative sore throat in the beclomethasone group than the lidocaine and control groups (P<0.05) at each observation time point. At 24 h after extubation, the incidence and severity of sore throat and cough was significantly lower in the lidocaine compared with the control group. The incidence of hoarseness was not significantly different among the three groups. Conclusion: Spraying beclomethasone and lidocaine on the endotracheal tube is a simple and effective method to reduce the incidence and severity of post-operative sore throat. PMID:26082898

  19. Electroencephalographic Changes Associated with Antinociceptive Actions of Lidocaine, Ketamine, Meloxicam, and Morphine Administration in Minimally Anaesthetized Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Hui Cheng, Chen; Meng, Goh Yong; Fakurazi, Sharida; Kaka, Asmatullah; Behan, Atique Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Effects of ketamine and lidocaine on electroencephalographic (EEG) changes were evaluated in minimally anaesthetized dogs, subjected to electric stimulus. Six dogs were subjected to six treatments in a crossover design with a washout period of one week. Dogs were subjected to intravenous boluses of lidocaine 2 mg/kg, ketamine 3 mg/kg, meloxicam 0.2 mg/kg, morphine 0.2 mg/kg and loading doses of lidocaine 2 mg/kg followed by continuous rate infusion (CRI) of 50 and 100 mcg/kg/min, and ketamine 3 mg/kg followed by CRI of 10 and 50 mcg/kg/min. Electroencephalogram was recorded during electrical stimulation prior to any drug treatment (before treatment) and during electrical stimulation following treatment with the drugs (after treatment) under anaesthesia. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with halothane at a stable concentration between 0.85 and 0.95%. Pretreatment median frequency was evidently increased (P < 0.05) for all treatment groups. Lidocaine, ketamine, and morphine depressed the median frequency resulting from the posttreatment stimulation. The depression of median frequency suggested evident antinociceptive effects of these treatments in dogs. It is therefore concluded that lidocaine and ketamine can be used in the analgesic protocol for the postoperative pain management in dogs. PMID:25695060

  20. Evaluation of calcium alginate gel as electrode material for alternating current iontophoresis of lidocaine using excised rat skin.

    PubMed

    Ebisawa, Tomoko; Nakajima, Atsushi; Haida, Haruka; Wakita, Ryo; Ando, Shizuka; Yoshioka, Tomohiko; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Junzo; Fukayama, Haruhisa

    2014-01-01

    Iontophoresis (IOP) is a noninvasive method of delivering medication transcutaneously through the skin. The electrodes used in this method should tightly fit to rough and irregular surfaces and be biologically safe, easy to handle and prepare, and cost-effective. To satisfy these requirements, calcium alginate gel can be a candidate electrode for IOP. Using calcium alginate gel electrodes, we examined whether lidocaine can be effectively transported across an excised rat skin by squarewave alternating current (AC) application. A squarewave AC with either a 70% or 80% duty cycle was continuously applied to 0.5% calcium alginate gel electrodes containing 10% lidocaine at 10 V and 1 kHz for 60 min. Lidocaine concentration was measured using a spectrophotometer and the temperature of the gel was determined. The lidocaine concentrations for AC-IOP at the 70% and 80% duty cycles were significantly higher than that without AC-IOP. Furthermore, the group with the 80% duty cycle showed higher lidocaine concentrations than the group with the 70% duty cycle. The temperatures of all the groups were lower than 28 °C throughout the procedure. In conclusion, the calcium alginate gel can be used as a possible matrix for IOP electrodes.

  1. Efficacy and safety of bupivacaine versus lidocaine in dental treatments: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Su, Naichuan; Wang, Hang; Zhang, Shu; Liao, Shuang; Yang, Shuying; Huang, Yi

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of bupivacaine compared with lidocaine in local anaesthesia in dental treatment. Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and the World Health Organisation (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched electronically. Relevant journals and references of studies included were hand-searched for randomised controlled trials comparing bupivacaine with lidocaine in terms of efficacy and safety. Sixteen studies were included, of which nine had low, six had moderate and one had high risk of bias. In comparison with 2% lidocaine plus 1:100,000 adrenaline, 0.5% bupivacaine plus 1:200,000 adrenaline showed a higher success rate in inflamed pulp (P = 0.03) but a lower success rate in vital pulp (P < 0.00001), a lower percentage of patients using postoperative analgesics (P < 0.00001), a longer onset times of pulpal anaesthesia and a longer duration of pulpal anaesthesia (P < 0.00001). In comparison with 2% lidocaine plus 1:80,000 adrenaline, 0.75% bupivacaine plus 1:200,000 adrenaline had same level of success rate (P = 0.29), and was better in postoperative pain control (P = 0.001) while 0.75% levobupivacaine had same level of postoperative pain control (P = 0.16); 0.5% levobupivacaine had higher success rate (P = 0.04) and was better in postoperative pain control (P = 0.001) than 2% lidocaine. There was no statistically significance in adverse events between two groups. Given the efficacy and safety, the bupivacaine group is better than the lidocaine group in dental operations that take a relatively long time, especially in endodontic treatments or where there is a need for postoperative pain management.

  2. Presentation of Neurolytic Effect of 10% Lidocaine after Perineural Ultrasound Guided Injection of a Canine Sciatic Nerve: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Asma; Kataria, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Background Phenol and alcohol have been used to ablate nerves to treat pain but are not specific for nerves and can damage surrounding soft tissue. Lidocaine at concentrations > 8% injected intrathecal in the animal model has been shown to be neurotoxic. Tests the hypothesis that 10% lidocaine is neurolytic after a peri-neural blockade in an ex vivo experiment on the canine sciatic nerve. Methods Under ultrasound, one canine sciatic nerve was injected peri-neurally with 10 cc saline and another with 10 cc of 10% lidocaine. After 20 minutes, the sciatic nerve was dissected with gross inspection. A 3 cm segment was excised and preserved in 10% buffered formalin fixative solution. Both samples underwent progressive dehydration and infusion of paraffin after which they were placed on paraffin blocks. The sections were cut at 4 µm and stained with hemoxylin and eosin. Microscopic review was performed by a pathologist from Henry Ford Hospital who was blinded to which experimental group each sample was in. Results The lidocaine injected nerve demonstrated loss of gross architecture on visual inspection while the saline injected nerve did not. No gross changes were seen in the surrounding soft tissue seen in either group. The lidocaine injected sample showed basophilic degeneration with marked cytoplasmic vacuolation in the nerve fibers with separation of individual fibers and endoneurial edema. The saline injected sample showed normal neural tissue. Conclusions Ten percent lidocaine causes rapid neurolytic changes with ultrasound guided peri-neural injection. The study was limited by only a single nerve being tested with acute exposure. PMID:27413480

  3. Allergic reaction to epinephrine preparation in 2% lidocaine: two case reports.

    PubMed Central

    Kohase, Hikaru; Umino, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    We report 2 cases of hypersensitivity to an epinephrine preparation in local anesthetics which were found by skin tests for local anesthetics. Both patients had uncomfortable episodes to local anesthetics at dental treatment. In both cases, the skin tests showed positive reactions to 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine. Furthermore drug lymphocyte stimulation test revealed positive reaction to epinephrine hydrochloride, epinephrine bitartrate in case 1, whereas in case 2, the drug lymphocyte stimulation test showed positive response to epinephrine bitartrate. Attention should be paid to exogenous epinephrine preparations that have the potential to induce hypersensitivity during dental treatment. PMID:15675262

  4. Tolerability of 2.5% Lidocaine/Prilocaine Hydrogel in Children Undergoing Cryotherapy for Molluscum Contagiosum.

    PubMed

    Gobbato, André A M; Babadópulos, Tainah; Gobbato, Cintia A R S; Moreno, Ronilson A; Gagliano-Jucá, Thiago; De Nucci, Gilberto

    2016-05-01

    The tolerability of a 2.5% lidocaine/prilocaine hydrogel (Nanorap, Biolab Indústria Farmacêutica Ltd., Sao Paulo, Brazil) was evaluated in 20 children ages 2 to 11 years undergoing cryotherapy for molluscum contagiosum (MC). The product was well tolerated, with only two children presenting with eczema at the application site. These adverse reactions were considered unlikely to be related to the test product, because a patch test was negative in one of the individuals and the other event occurred in only one of the two treated areas. Nanorap is an efficacious and well-tolerated option for topical anesthesia in children undergoing cryotherapy for MC.

  5. Tolerability of 2.5% Lidocaine/Prilocaine Hydrogel in Children Undergoing Cryotherapy for Molluscum Contagiosum.

    PubMed

    Gobbato, André A M; Babadópulos, Tainah; Gobbato, Cintia A R S; Moreno, Ronilson A; Gagliano-Jucá, Thiago; De Nucci, Gilberto

    2016-05-01

    The tolerability of a 2.5% lidocaine/prilocaine hydrogel (Nanorap, Biolab Indústria Farmacêutica Ltd., Sao Paulo, Brazil) was evaluated in 20 children ages 2 to 11 years undergoing cryotherapy for molluscum contagiosum (MC). The product was well tolerated, with only two children presenting with eczema at the application site. These adverse reactions were considered unlikely to be related to the test product, because a patch test was negative in one of the individuals and the other event occurred in only one of the two treated areas. Nanorap is an efficacious and well-tolerated option for topical anesthesia in children undergoing cryotherapy for MC. PMID:27041686

  6. Comparison of two different doses of lidocaine on the pain sensation during transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Ateş, Ferhat; Dursun, Furkan; Malkoç, Ercan; Yılmaz, Ömer; Soydan, Hasan; Şen, Hüseyin; Başal, Şeref; Zekey, Fatih; Karademir, Kenan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare two different doses of lidocaine used for periprostatic nerve block on pain perception during transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy. Material and methods A total of 288 patients with elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels and/or abnormal digital rectal examination who underwent TRUS-guided prostate biopsy were included in the study. The patients were divided into 3 groups: Group 1 (n=103) prostate biopsy were performed after administering perianal intrarectal application of 10 mL 2% lidocaine gel, Group 2 (n=98) 2 mL of 2% lidocaine injection on each side following rectal installation of lidocaine gel and Group 3 (n=87) 4 mL of 2% lidocaine injection on each side after rectal instillation of lidocaine gel. Patients’ pain scores during biopsy procedure were reported using visual analogue score (VAS). Independent sample t test, ANOVA test and Tukey test were used for statistical evaluation. Results The mean age, prostate volume and PSA level were 65.6±8.4 years, 58.2±34.8 mL, and 11.8±3.4 ng/mL respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in baseline characteristics between the groups. The mean VAS scores were 2.4±1.8 in Group 1, 2.5±1.9 in Group 2 and 1.6±1.6 in Group 3. Patients in Group 3, reported significant pain reduction compared with patients in Groups 1 and 2 (p=0.002, and 0.001, respectively). However, there was no statistically significant difference in VAS scores between Groups 1 and 2 (p=0.815). Conclusion According to our results we recommend the use of perianal intrarectal lidocain gel application, and periprostatic nerve block with injection of 4 ml 2% lidocaine per side combination in TRUS-guided prostate biopsies. Further large-scale randomized control studies are needed to validate these finding.

  7. Comparison of two different doses of lidocaine on the pain sensation during transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Ateş, Ferhat; Dursun, Furkan; Malkoç, Ercan; Yılmaz, Ömer; Soydan, Hasan; Şen, Hüseyin; Başal, Şeref; Zekey, Fatih; Karademir, Kenan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare two different doses of lidocaine used for periprostatic nerve block on pain perception during transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy. Material and methods A total of 288 patients with elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels and/or abnormal digital rectal examination who underwent TRUS-guided prostate biopsy were included in the study. The patients were divided into 3 groups: Group 1 (n=103) prostate biopsy were performed after administering perianal intrarectal application of 10 mL 2% lidocaine gel, Group 2 (n=98) 2 mL of 2% lidocaine injection on each side following rectal installation of lidocaine gel and Group 3 (n=87) 4 mL of 2% lidocaine injection on each side after rectal instillation of lidocaine gel. Patients’ pain scores during biopsy procedure were reported using visual analogue score (VAS). Independent sample t test, ANOVA test and Tukey test were used for statistical evaluation. Results The mean age, prostate volume and PSA level were 65.6±8.4 years, 58.2±34.8 mL, and 11.8±3.4 ng/mL respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in baseline characteristics between the groups. The mean VAS scores were 2.4±1.8 in Group 1, 2.5±1.9 in Group 2 and 1.6±1.6 in Group 3. Patients in Group 3, reported significant pain reduction compared with patients in Groups 1 and 2 (p=0.002, and 0.001, respectively). However, there was no statistically significant difference in VAS scores between Groups 1 and 2 (p=0.815). Conclusion According to our results we recommend the use of perianal intrarectal lidocain gel application, and periprostatic nerve block with injection of 4 ml 2% lidocaine per side combination in TRUS-guided prostate biopsies. Further large-scale randomized control studies are needed to validate these finding. PMID:27635288

  8. Xyloglucan Based In Situ Gel of Lidocaine HCl for the Treatment of Periodontosis

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Ashlesha P.; Pol, Vaibhav V.; Kulkarni, Vinit S.

    2016-01-01

    The present study was aimed at formulating thermoreversible in situ gel of local anesthetic by using xyloglucan based mucoadhesive tamarind seed polysaccharide (TSP) into periodontal pocket. Temperature-sensitive in situ gel of lidocaine hydrochloride (LH) (2% w/v) was formulated by cold method. A full 32 factorial design was employed to study the effect of independent variables concentrations of Lutrol F127 and TSP to optimize in situ gel. The dependent variables evaluated were gelation temperature (Y1) and drug release (Y2). The results revealed the surface pH of 6.8, similar to the pH of saliva. Viscosity study showed the marked increase in the viscosity of gel at 37°C due to sol-gel conversion. TSP was found to act as good mucoadhesive component to retain gel at the site of application in dental pocket. Gelation of formulation occurred near to body temperature. In vitro study depicted the fast onset of drug action but lasting the release (90%) till 2 h. Formulation F7 was considered as optimized batch, containing 18% Lutrol F127 and 1% tamarind seed polysaccharide. Thus, lidocaine hydrochloride thermoreversible in situ gel offered an alternative to painful injection therapy of anesthesia during dental surgery, with fast onset of anesthetic action lasting throughout the dental procedure. PMID:27034908

  9. Heated lidocaine/tetracaine patch for treatment of patellar tendinopathy pain

    PubMed Central

    Gammaitoni, Arnold R; Goitz, Henry T; Marsh, Stephanie; Marriott, Thomas B; Galer, Bradley S

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The pain of patellar tendinopathy (PT) may be mediated by neuronal glutamate and sodium channels. Lidocaine and tetracaine block both of these channels. This study tested the self-heated lidocaine-tetracaine patch (HLT patch) in patients with PT confirmed by physical examination to determine if the HLT patch might relieve pain and improve function. Methods Thirteen patients with PT pain of ≥14 days’ duration and baseline average pain scores ≥4 (on a 0–10 scale) enrolled in and completed this prospective, single-center pilot study. Patients applied one HLT patch to the affected knee twice daily for 2–4 hours for a total of 14 days. Change in average pain intensity and interference (Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment [VISA]) scores from baseline to day 14 were assessed. No statistical inference testing was performed. Results Average pain scores declined from 5.5 ± 1.3 (mean ± standard deviation) at baseline to 3.8 ± 2.5 on day 14. Similarly, VISA scores improved from 45.2 ± 14.4 at baseline to 54.3 ± 24.5 on day 14. A clinically important reduction in pain score (≥30%) was demonstrated by 54% of patients. Conclusion The results of this pilot study suggest that topical treatment that targets neuronal sodium and glutamate channels may be useful in the treatment of PT. PMID:23888118

  10. Risk of systemic toxicity with topical lidocaine/prilocaine: a review.

    PubMed

    Tran, Anh N; Koo, John Y

    2014-09-01

    The eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine (EMLA, APP Pharmaceuticals, LLC.) is an anesthetic cream frequently used by dermatologists. Although side effects of EMLA are usually mild local skin reactions (ie, edema, pallor, erythema), more severe complications can be encountered including methemoglobinemia, central nervous system toxicity, and cardiotoxicity. This article reviewed the literature regarding risk of systemic toxicity associated with use of EMLA in the pediatric and adult population. All 12 clinical trials evaluating the safety of EMLA in either the pediatric or adult population generally followed dosing and administration guidelines set by the manufacturer and reported clinically insignificant plasma levels of methemoglobin, lidocaine, prilocaine, and their respective metabolites. To date, nine pediatric cases and three adult cases of systemic toxicity associated with EMLA have been published. Possible factors that contributed to the development of systemic toxicity include excessive amount of EMLA, large application area, prolonged application time, diseased and/or inflamed skin (eg, vascular malformations, molluscum contagiosum, eczema, previously abraded skin), age less than 3 months, prematurity, and concomitant use of a methemoglobin-inducing agent. Recommendations are provided on how to safely use EMLA to minimize the risk of systemic toxicity.

  11. Buccal Injection of 2% Lidocaine With Epinephrine for the Removal of Maxillary Third Molars

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sunil; Verma, Ajay; Sachdeva, Akash

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate if 2% lidocaine hydrochloride with 1 : 200,000 epinephrine could provide palatal anesthesia in maxillary tooth removal with a single buccal injection. The subjects included in the clinical study were those requiring extraction of the maxillary third molar of either side. For the purpose of comparison, the sample was randomly divided into 2 main groups: group 1 (study group) included 100 subjects who were to receive a single injection before extraction, and group 2 (control group) included 100 subjects who were to receive a single buccal injection and a single palatal injection before extraction. After 5 minutes the extraction was performed. All patients were observed for Faces Pain Scale during extraction and asked for the same on a 100-mm visual analog scale after extraction. According to visual analog scale and Faces Pain Scale scores, when maxillary third molar removal without palatal injection (study group) and with palatal injection (control group) were compared the difference was not statistically significant (P > .05). Removal of maxillary third molars without palatal injection is possible by depositing 2 mL of 2% lidocaine hydrochloride with 1 : 200,000 epinephrine to the buccal vestibule of the tooth. PMID:24010986

  12. Anesthetic Efficacy of 3 Volumes of Lidocaine With Epinephrine in Maxillary Infiltration Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Brunetto, Paula Cristina; Ranali, José; Bovi Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria; de Oliveira, Patrícia Cristine; Groppo, Francisco Carlos; Meechan, John Gerard; Volpato, Maria Cristina

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this randomized double-blind investigation was to compare the anesthetic efficacy and injection discomfort of 3 volumes of 2% lidocaine with 1∶100,000 epinephrine for maxillary infiltration anesthesia. A total of 25 subjects received 0.6, 0.9, and 1.2 mL of the anesthetic buccal to an upper canine. Test teeth were assessed with electrical stimulation to determine onset and duration of pulpal anesthesia; soft tissue anesthesia and injection discomfort were assessed by pin-prick test and visual analog scale (VAS). Data were analyzed by 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Friedman, and chi-square tests (α  =  5%). The 1.2 mL dose induced faster onset of pulpal anesthesia, a higher success rate, and a longer duration of soft tissue/pulpal anesthesia than were achieved with the other doses (P < .05). No differences in injection discomfort were observed between treatments. It is concluded that maxillary infiltration anesthesia with lidocaine and epinephrine has a faster onset, a greater success rate, and a longer duration when a volume of 1.2 mL is used than when volumes less than 1.0 mL are used. PMID:18547150

  13. Reduction in radiation-induced brain injury by use of pentobarbital or lidocaine protection

    SciTech Connect

    Oldfield, E.H.; Friedman, R.; Kinsella, T.; Moquin, R.; Olson, J.J.; Orr, K.; DeLuca, A.M. )

    1990-05-01

    To determine if barbiturates would protect brain at high doses of radiation, survival rates in rats that received whole-brain x-irradiation during pentobarbital- or lidocaine-induced anesthesia were compared with those of control animals that received no medication and of animals anesthetized with ketamine. The animals were shielded so that respiratory and digestive tissues would not be damaged by the radiation. Survival rates in rats that received whole-brain irradiation as a single 7500-rad dose under pentobarbital- or lidocaine-induced anesthesia was increased from between from 0% and 20% to between 45% and 69% over the 40 days of observation compared with the other two groups (p less than 0.007). Ketamine anesthesia provided no protection. There were no notable differential effects upon non-neural tissues, suggesting that pentobarbital afforded protection through modulation of ambient neural activity during radiation exposure. Neural suppression during high-dose cranial irradiation protects brain from acute and early delayed radiation injury. Further development and application of this knowledge may reduce the incidence of radiation toxicity of the central nervous system (CNS) and may permit the safe use of otherwise unsafe doses of radiation in patients with CNS neoplasms.

  14. Comparison of lidocaine and compression for velvet antler analgesia in wapiti

    PubMed Central

    Woodbury, Murray R.; Caulkett, Nigel A.; Wilson, Peter R.

    2002-01-01

    This research compared ring block lidocaine anesthesia (L) and compression (C) for velvet antler removal in elk. Thirty-two wapiti were given 1 mg/kg body weight of zuclopenthixol acetate. The next day, they were restrained in a hydraulic chute and given either a compression device or a lidocaine ring block on the antler pedicle. Behavioral and physiological responses to treatment application and antler removal were recorded, and blood was collected for cortisol analysis. During application of L and C, increases in mean heart rate and systolic arterial blood pressure were greater in the C treatment group (P < 0.05, and P = 0.05, respectively). When antler was removed, more behavioral responses occurred in the C treatment group (P = 0.02) and its median behavior score was higher (P = 0.03). Mean heart rates increased for both treatment groups when antlers were removed (P < 0.01). It was concluded that application of C may be painful, and that C was not as effective as L for analgesia for velvet antler removal. PMID:12497964

  15. Xyloglucan Based In Situ Gel of Lidocaine HCl for the Treatment of Periodontosis.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Ashlesha P; Pol, Vaibhav V; Kulkarni, Vinit S

    2016-01-01

    The present study was aimed at formulating thermoreversible in situ gel of local anesthetic by using xyloglucan based mucoadhesive tamarind seed polysaccharide (TSP) into periodontal pocket. Temperature-sensitive in situ gel of lidocaine hydrochloride (LH) (2% w/v) was formulated by cold method. A full 3(2) factorial design was employed to study the effect of independent variables concentrations of Lutrol F127 and TSP to optimize in situ gel. The dependent variables evaluated were gelation temperature (Y 1) and drug release (Y 2). The results revealed the surface pH of 6.8, similar to the pH of saliva. Viscosity study showed the marked increase in the viscosity of gel at 37°C due to sol-gel conversion. TSP was found to act as good mucoadhesive component to retain gel at the site of application in dental pocket. Gelation of formulation occurred near to body temperature. In vitro study depicted the fast onset of drug action but lasting the release (90%) till 2 h. Formulation F7 was considered as optimized batch, containing 18% Lutrol F127 and 1% tamarind seed polysaccharide. Thus, lidocaine hydrochloride thermoreversible in situ gel offered an alternative to painful injection therapy of anesthesia during dental surgery, with fast onset of anesthetic action lasting throughout the dental procedure. PMID:27034908

  16. Biodegradable nanofiber-membrane for sustainable release of lidocaine at the femoral fracture site as a periosteal block: In vitro and in vivo studies in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ying-Chao; Cheng, Yi-Shiun; Hsu, Yung-Heng; Yu, Yi-Hsun; Liu, Shih-Jung

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a biodegradable, lidocaine-embedded, nanofibrous membrane for the sustainable analgesic release onto fragments of a segmental femoral fracture site. Membranes of three different lidocaine concentrations (10%, 30%, and 50%) were produced via an electrospinning technique. In vitro lidocaine release was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography. A femoral segmental fracture, with intramedullary Kirschner-wire fixation and polycaprolactone stent enveloping the fracture site, was set-up in a rabbit model for in vivo assessment of post-operative recovery of activity. Eighteen rabbits were randomly assigned to three groups (six rabbits per group): group A comprised of rabbits with femoral fractures and underwent fixation; group B comprised of a comparable fracture model to that of group A with the implantation of lidocaine-loaded nanofibers; and group C, the control group, received only anesthesia. The following variables were measured: change in body weight, food and water intake before and after surgery, and total activity count post-surgery. All membranes eluted effective levels of lidocaine for more than 3 weeks post-surgery. Rabbits in group B showed faster recovery of activity post-operatively, compared with those in group A, which confirmed the pain relief efficacy of the lidocaine-embedded nanofibers. Nanofibers with sustainable lidocaine release have adequate efficacy and durability for pain relief in rabbits with segmental long bone fractures.

  17. Comparative study on anesthetic potency depending on concentrations of lidocaine and epinephrine: assessment of dental local anesthetics using the jaw-opening reflex.

    PubMed Central

    Ohkado, S.; Ichinohe, T.; Kaneko, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Anesthetic potency of a local anesthetic on the dental pulp was investigated by increasing or decreasing the concentration of lidocaine and that of epinephrine. An electromyogram of the digastric muscle in Japan White male rabbits was recorded during the jaw-opening reflex induced by electrical stimulation of the dental pulp. Probit analysis was used for the determination of the 50% effective volume (ED50) values of the anesthetic. The anesthetics used were plain 2% lidocaine solution (2Lid-0 group), 2% lidocaine solution with 12.5 microgram/mL of epinephrine (2Lid-1/8 group), 2% lidocaine solution with 6.25 microgram/mL of epinephrine (2Lid-1/16 group), and 4% lidocaine solution with 5 microgram/mL of epinephrine (4Lid-1/20 group). No anesthetic effect was shown in the 2Lid-0 group. The 2Lid-1/8 group indicated adequate anesthetic potency with the smallest dosage at all observation periods. The potency in the 2Lid-1/16 group was 0.3-0.5 times, and that in the 4Lid-1/20 group was 0.3-0.4 times as much as the 2Lid-1/8 group. The decrease in epinephrine concentration produced the decrease in the anesthetic potency on the dental pulp independent of lidocaine concentration. These results suggest that the increase in lidocaine concentration may not compensate the decrease in epinephrine concentration. PMID:11495400

  18. Perineural Dexmedetomidine as an Adjuvant Reduces the Median Effective Concentration of Lidocaine for Obturator Nerve Blocking: A Double-Blinded Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuechun; Sun, Jian; Zhuang, Xinqi; Lv, Guoyi; Li, Yize; Wang, Haiyun; Wang, Guolin

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that the addition of dexmedetomidine to local anesthetics can prolong peripheral nerve blocks; however, it is not known whether dexmedetomidine can reduce the quantity of local anesthetic needed. We hypothesized that adding dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to an obturator nerve block could reduce the median effective concentration of lidocaine. In this double-blinded randomized trial, 60 patients scheduled for elective transurethral resection of bladder tumors on the lateral wall were randomly divided into two groups: the control group (C group, n = 30) and the dexmedetomidine group (D group, n = 30). Two main branches of the obturator nerve (i.e., anterior and posterior) were identified using neural stimulation at the inguinal level, with only lidocaine used for the C group and 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine combined with lidocaine used for the D group. The median effective concentration was determined by an up-and-down sequential trial. The ratio of two consecutive concentrations was 1.2. The median effective concentration (95% confidence interval) of lidocaine was 0.57% (0.54%-0.62%) in the C group and 0.29% (0.28%-0.38%) in the D group. The median effective concentration of lidocaine was significantly lower in the D group than in the C group (p < 0.05). These results indicate that dexmedetomidine (1 μg/kg) in combination with lidocaine for obturator nerve block decreases the median effective concentration of lidocaine. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02066727 PMID:27341450

  19. Comparison of Gating Properties and Use-Dependent Block of Nav1.5 and Nav1.7 Channels by Anti-Arrhythmics Mexiletine and Lidocaine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Mi, Jianxun; Lu, Ka; Lu, Yanxin; Wang, KeWei

    2015-01-01

    Mexiletine and lidocaine are widely used class IB anti-arrhythmic drugs that are considered to act by blocking voltage-gated open sodium currents for treatment of ventricular arrhythmias and relief of pain. To gain mechanistic insights into action of anti-arrhythmics, we characterized biophysical properties of Nav1.5 and Nav1.7 channels stably expressed in HEK293 cells and compared their use-dependent block in response to mexiletine and lidocaine using whole-cell patch clamp recordings. While the voltage-dependent activation of Nav1.5 or Nav1.7 was not affected by mexiletine and lidocaine, the steady-state fast and slow inactivation of Nav1.5 and Nav1.7 were significantly shifted to hyperpolarized direction by either mexiletine or lidocaine in dose-dependent manner. Both mexiletine and lidocaine enhanced the slow component of closed-state inactivation, with mexiletine exerting stronger inhibition on either Nav1.5 or Nav1.7. The recovery from inactivation of Nav1.5 or Nav1.7 was significantly prolonged by mexiletine compared to lidocaine. Furthermore, mexiletine displayed a pronounced and prominent use-dependent inhibition of Nav1.5 than lidocaine, but not Nav1.7 channels. Taken together, our findings demonstrate differential responses to blockade by mexiletine and lidocaine that preferentially affect the gating of Nav1.5, as compared to Nav1.7; and mexiletine exhibits stronger use-dependent block of Nav1.5. The differential gating properties of Nav1.5 and Nav1.7 in response to mexiletine and lidocaine may help explain the drug effectiveness and advance in new designs of safe and specific sodium channel blockers for treatment of cardiac arrhythmia or pain. PMID:26068619

  20. Comparison of Gating Properties and Use-Dependent Block of Nav1.5 and Nav1.7 Channels by Anti-Arrhythmics Mexiletine and Lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Mi, Jianxun; Lu, Ka; Lu, Yanxin; Wang, KeWei

    2015-01-01

    Mexiletine and lidocaine are widely used class IB anti-arrhythmic drugs that are considered to act by blocking voltage-gated open sodium currents for treatment of ventricular arrhythmias and relief of pain. To gain mechanistic insights into action of anti-arrhythmics, we characterized biophysical properties of Nav1.5 and Nav1.7 channels stably expressed in HEK293 cells and compared their use-dependent block in response to mexiletine and lidocaine using whole-cell patch clamp recordings. While the voltage-dependent activation of Nav1.5 or Nav1.7 was not affected by mexiletine and lidocaine, the steady-state fast and slow inactivation of Nav1.5 and Nav1.7 were significantly shifted to hyperpolarized direction by either mexiletine or lidocaine in dose-dependent manner. Both mexiletine and lidocaine enhanced the slow component of closed-state inactivation, with mexiletine exerting stronger inhibition on either Nav1.5 or Nav1.7. The recovery from inactivation of Nav1.5 or Nav1.7 was significantly prolonged by mexiletine compared to lidocaine. Furthermore, mexiletine displayed a pronounced and prominent use-dependent inhibition of Nav1.5 than lidocaine, but not Nav1.7 channels. Taken together, our findings demonstrate differential responses to blockade by mexiletine and lidocaine that preferentially affect the gating of Nav1.5, as compared to Nav1.7; and mexiletine exhibits stronger use-dependent block of Nav1.5. The differential gating properties of Nav1.5 and Nav1.7 in response to mexiletine and lidocaine may help explain the drug effectiveness and advance in new designs of safe and specific sodium channel blockers for treatment of cardiac arrhythmia or pain. PMID:26068619

  1. Effects of lidocaine injections into the lateral parabrachial nucleus on dipsogenic and pressor response to central angiotensin 2 in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menani, Jose Vanderlei; Beltz, Terry G.

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of bilateral injections of the local anesthetic, lidocaine, into the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN) on the dipsogenic and pressor responses induced by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of angiotensin 2 (ANG 2). Centrally injected ANG 2 (50 ng/1 microliter) induced water intake ( IO.2 +/- 0.8 ml/h) and pressor responses (22 +/- 1 mmHg). Prior bilateral injection of 10% lidocaine (200 nl) into the LPBN increased the water intake (14.2 +/- 1.4 ml/h), but did not change the pressor response (17 +/- 1 mmHg) to i.c.v. ANG 2. Lidocaine alone injected into the LPBN also induced a pressor response (23 +/- 3 mmHg). These results showing that bilateral LPBN injection of lidocaine increase water intake induced bv i.c.v. ANG 2 are consistent with electrolytic and neurotoxic lesion studies and suggest that the LPBN is associated with inhibitory mechanisms controlling water intake induced by ANG 2. These results also provide evidence that it is feasible to reversibly anesthetize this brain area to facilitate fluid-related ingestive behavior.

  2. Validation of a Thin-Layer Chromatography for the Determination of Hydrocortisone Acetate and Lidocaine in a Pharmaceutical Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Dołowy, Małgorzata; Kulpińska-Kucia, Katarzyna; Pyka, Alina

    2014-01-01

    A new specific, precise, accurate, and robust TLC-densitometry has been developed for the simultaneous determination of hydrocortisone acetate and lidocaine hydrochloride in combined pharmaceutical formulation. The chromatographic analysis was carried out using a mobile phase consisting of chloroform + acetone + ammonia (25%) in volume composition 8 : 2 : 0.1 and silica gel 60F254 plates. Densitometric detection was performed in UV at wavelengths 200 nm and 250 nm, respectively, for lidocaine hydrochloride and hydrocortisone acetate. The validation of the proposed method was performed in terms of specificity, linearity, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), precision, accuracy, and robustness. The applied TLC procedure is linear in hydrocortisone acetate concentration range of 3.75 ÷ 12.50 μg·spot−1, and from 1.00 ÷ 2.50 μg·spot−1 for lidocaine hydrochloride. The developed method was found to be accurate (the value of the coefficient of variation CV [%] is less than 3%), precise (CV [%] is less than 2%), specific, and robust. LOQ of hydrocortisone acetate is 0.198 μg·spot−1 and LOD is 0.066 μg·spot−1. LOQ and LOD values for lidocaine hydrochloride are 0.270 and 0.090 μg·spot−1, respectively. The assay value of both bioactive substances is consistent with the limits recommended by Pharmacopoeia. PMID:24526880

  3. Lidocaine Concentration in Mandibular Bone After Subperiosteal Infiltration Anesthesia Decreases With Elevation of Periosteal Flap and Irrigation With Saline

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Sachie; Watanabe, Masahiro; Kawaai, Hiroyoshi; Tada, Hitoshi; Yamazaki, Shinya

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that the action of infiltration anesthesia on the jawbone is attenuated significantly by elevation of the periosteal flap with saline irrigation in clinical studies; however, the reason is unclear. Therefore, the lidocaine concentration in mandibular bone after subperiosteal infiltration anesthesia was measured under several surgical conditions. The subjects were 48 rabbits. Infiltration anesthesia by 0.5 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1 : 80,000 epinephrine (adrenaline) was injected into the right mandibular angle and left mandibular body, respectively. Under several surgical conditions (presence or absence of periosteal flap, and presence or absence of saline irrigation), both mandibular bone samples were removed at a fixed time after subperiosteal infiltration anesthesia. The lidocaine concentration in each mandibular bone sample was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. As a result, elevation of the periosteal flap with saline irrigation significantly decreased the lidocaine concentration in the mandibular bone. It is suggested that the anesthetic in the bone was washed out by saline irrigation. Therefore, supplemental conduction and/or general anesthesia should be utilized for long operations that include elevation of the periosteal flap with saline irrigation. PMID:24932978

  4. A randomised comparison of lidocaine 2% gel and proparacaine 0.5% eye drops in paediatric squint surgery.

    PubMed

    Sinha, R; Chandralekha; Batra, M; Ray, B R; Mohan, V K; Saxena, R

    2013-07-01

    We conducted a randomised trial comparing lidocaine 2% gel with proparacaine 0.5% eye drops in children having elective squint surgery. One hundred and forty children aged between 3 and 14 years were recruited. The requirement for intra-operative fentanyl and postoperative ibuprofen was significantly less in the lidocaine group compared with the proparacaine group (1 (1.7%) vs 12 (18.5%), p=0.002 and 16 (27.6%) 38 (58.5%), p=0.001, respectively). The incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting was significantly less in the lidocaine group compared with the proparacaine group (6 (10.3%) vs 16 (24.6%), p=0.04). There were no differences between the groups in terms of incidence and severity of the oculocardiac reflex. We conclude that, compared with proparacaine 0.5% eye drops, a single application of lidocaine 2% gel improves peri-operative analgesia and reduces the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting in elective paediatric squint surgery.

  5. A comparative study among normal saline, water soluble gel and 2% lidocaine gel as a SLIPA lubricant

    PubMed Central

    Park, Pyung-Gul; Choi, Geun Joo; Kim, Won Joong; Yang, So-Young; Shin, Hwa-Yong; Kang, Hyun; Baek, Chong Wha; Kim, Jin-Yun; Kang, Min-Su

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was designed to find appropriate lubricant for streamed lined liner of pharyngeal airway™ (SLIPA™). We evaluated the incidence of sore throat, nausea, vomiting, hoarseness, paresthesia and blood stain after using saline, water soluble gel and 2% lidocaine gel as a SLIPA™ lublicant. Methods One hundred twenty three patients scheduled for minor surgery to whom the SLIPA™ was considered suitable were randomly allocated to one of three groups which receive normal saline, water soluble gel or 2% lidocaine gel as a SLIPA™ lublicant. Patients were interviewed at recovery room, post operation 6-12 hour, post operation 18-24 hour about sore throat and other complications. Results There were no statistical difference in sore throat and blood stain among three groups. Also there were no statistical differences in hoarseness, nausea, vomiting. The incidence of paresthesia in 2% lidocaine gel group was significantly higher than those of the other two groups immediately after operation, but it was resolved after leaving the recovery room. Conclusions Our results suggest that normal saline, water soluble gel and 2% lidocaine gel are all available as a SLIPA™ lubricant. Size of SLIPA™, insertion technique and difficulty of insertion should be further investigated as the main causes of a sore throat and other complications which can occur after the insertion of SLIPA™. PMID:24624267

  6. A Needle-Free Injection System (INJEX™) with lidocaine for epidural needle insertion: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Gozdemir, Muhammet; Demircioglu, Ruveyda Irem; Karabayirli, Safinaz; Sert, Huseyin; Muslu, Bunyamin; Usta, Burhanettin; Yazici, Ummugulsum

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Local anesthetic infiltration is also a process of a painful process itself. INJEX™ technology, known as “Needle-free” drug delivery system, was designed for reducing the pain associated with cutaneous procedures. We conducted a prospective, randomized trial to evaluate the application of lidocaine with INJEX™ system and 27-gauge needle. Methods: A total of 60 consecutive patients were allocated to receive either INJEX group or 27-gauge needle group. Local anesthetic infiltration was applied two minutes before epidural needle insertion. Results: Mean VAS, at the time of local anesthetic injection was 0 for group I and 2 for group II. When the effect of epidural needle insertion was compared, the mean VAS score was one versus two for Group-I versus Group-II, respectively. Lidocaine applied with the INJEX™ system before epidural needle insertion significantly reduced the intensity of pain during that procedure and was least effective the lidocaine applied with the 27-gauge needle and patients felt less pain during at the time of local anesthetic injection in Group-I. Conclusion: Needle-free delivery of lidocaine is an effective, easy to-use and noninvasive method of providing local anesthesia for the epidural needle insertion. PMID:27375728

  7. Percutaneous penetration kinetics of lidocaine and prilocaine in two local anesthetic formulations assessed by in vivo microdialysis in pigs.

    PubMed

    Wei, Huilin; Chen, Yun; Xu, Lanfang; Zheng, Jiarun

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize and compare the percutaneous penetration kinetics of lidocaine (L) and prilocaine (P) in two local anesthetic formulations by in vivo microdialysis coupled with HPLC. The microdialysis system for studying lidocaine and prilocaine was calibrated by a no-net-flux method in vitro and retrodialysis method in vivo, respectively. A dosage of 0.2 g/cm2 of an in-house P-L formulation (2.5% lidocaine and 2.5% prilocaine, methylcellulose-based) and commercially available Eutectic Mixture of Local Anesthesia (EMLA, 2.5% lidocaine and 2.5% prilocaine, carbopol-based) was separately but symmetrically applied in the dorsal region of pigs. Saline (0.9%, w/v) was perfused into the linear microdialysis probe at a flow rate of 1.5 microl/min. Dialysate was collected upon topical application up to 6 h at 20-min intervals and assessed by HPLC. The results demonstrated the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC(0-6 h)) of lidocaine and prilocaine in EMLA was 71.95+/-23.36 microg h/ml and 38.01+/-14.8 microg h/ml, respectively, in comparison to 167.11+/-56.12 microg h/ml and 87.02+/-30.38 microg h/ml in the P-L formulation. The maximal concentrations (Cmax) of lidocaine and prilocaine in the dermis were 29.2+/-9.08 microg/ml and 16.54+/-5.31 microg/ml in EMLA and 80.93+/-17.98 microg/ml and 43.69+/-12.87 microg/ml in the P-L formulation, respectively. This study indicates a well-calibrated microdialysis system can provide vital real-time information on percutaneous drug delivery and specifically a methylcellulose-based P-L formulation can increase percutaneous absorption of both lidocaine and prilocaine in pigs compared to carbopol-based EMLA.

  8. Analgesic and Anti-Hyperalgesic Effects of Muscle Injections with Lidocaine or Saline in Patients with Fibromyalgia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Staud, Roland; Weyl, Elizabeth E.; Bartley, Emily; Price, Donald D.; Robinson, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with musculoskeletal pain syndrome including fibromyalgia (FM) complain of chronic pain from deep tissues including muscles. Previous research suggests the relevance of impulse input from deep tissues for clinical FM pain. We hypothesized that blocking abnormal impulse input with intramuscular lidocaine would decrease primary and secondary hyperalgesia and FM patients’ clinical pain. Methods We enrolled 62 female FM patients into a double-blind controlled study of 3 groups who received 100 mg or 200 mg lidocaine or saline injections into both trapezius and gluteal muscles. Study variables included pressure and heat hyperalgesia as well as clinical pain. In addition, placebo factors like patients’ anxiety and expectation for pain relief were used as predictors of analgesia. Results Primary mechanical hyperalgesia at the shoulders and buttocks decreased significantly more after lidocaine than saline injections (p = .004). Similar results were obtained for secondary heat hyperalgesia at the arms (p = .04). After muscle injections clinical FM pain significantly declined by 38% but was not statistically different between lidocaine and saline conditions. Placebo related analgesic factors (e.g. patients’ expectations of pain relief) accounted for 19.9% of the variance of clinical pain after the injections. Injection related anxiety did not significantly contribute to patient analgesia. Conclusion These results suggest that muscle injections can reliably reduce clinical FM pain and that peripheral impulse input is required for the maintenance of mechanical and heat hyperalgesia of FM patients. Whereas the effects of muscle injections on hyperalgesia were greater for lidocaine than saline, the effects on clinical pain were similar for both injectates. PMID:24193993

  9. Efficacy of caudal epidural injection of lidocaine, xylazine and xylazine plus hyaluronidase in reducing discomfort produced by electroejaculation in bulls

    PubMed Central

    PAGLIOSA, Ronaldo C.; DEROSSI, Rafael; COSTA, Deiler S.; FARIA, Fabio J.C.

    2015-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that epidural administration of lidocaine, xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase provides reduced pain and stress during electroejaculation in bulls, eight 30-month-old Nellore bulls received saline solution (control), 2% lidocaine, 2% xylazine or 2% xylazine plus hyaluronidase injected into the first intercoccygeal (Co1–Co2) epidural space in randomized order. Heart rate, respiratory rate, mean arterial pressure, analgesia, animal behavior and motor blockade were evaluated before treatment and at predetermined intervals during and after treatment. Pain and stress were scored subjectively, and semen quality was evaluated. The onset of anesthetic action was significantly faster with lidocaine (3.0 ± 1.2 min) than with xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase (8.9 ± 1.5 and 5.5 ± 2.6 min, P=0.021 and P=0.012, respectively), and the onset of anesthesia with xylazine plus hyaluronidase was significantly faster than that with xylazine alone (P=0.032). Treatment with xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase resulted in less discomfort than treatment with lidocaine, as indicated by animal behavior. Changes in heart rate, respiratory rate and arterial pressure were within acceptable limits. Penile protrusion and semen emission occurred in all animals during all four treatments. Our results suggest that xylazine plus hyaluronidase reduced discomfort during electroejaculation more effectively than xylazine or lidocaine alone. Further experiments are necessary to determine whether electroejaculation with xylazine plus hyaluronidase is feasible for obtaining semen from Nellore bulls unaccustomed to being handled or restrained. PMID:26097016

  10. Echinacea/sage or chlorhexidine/lidocaine for treating acute sore throats: a randomized double-blind trial

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this trial was to assess the relative efficacy of a sage/echinacea spray and a chlorhexidine/lidocaine spray in the treatment of acute sore throats. Methods This was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy controlled trial carried out in eleven general practices in Switzerland. A total of 154 patients (133 analyzed in per protocol collective) at least 12 years old with acute sore throat present for not more than 72 hours prior to inclusion and with a throat score ≥6 participated in the study. They used either an echinacea/sage spray or a chlorhexidine/lidocaine spray with two puffs every 2 hours, in a double-dummy blinded manner, up to 10 times daily until they were symptom-free, for a maximum of 5 days. The main outcome measures was the comparison of response rates during the first three days. A response was defined as a decrease of at least 50% of the total symptoms compared to baseline. Results The echinacea/sage treatment exhibited similar efficacy to the chlorhexidine/lidocaine treatment in reducing sore throat symptoms during the first 3 days (P(x < Y) = .5083). Response rates after 3 days were 63.8% in the echinacea/sage group and 57.8% in the chlorhexidine/lidocaine group. For all secondary parameters, such as time to becoming symptom free, throat pain, and global assessments of efficacy by the physician and patient, no difference between the two treatments was seen. They were both very well tolerated. Conclusion An echinacea/sage preparation is as efficacious and well tolerated as a chlorhexidine/lidocaine spray in the treatment of acute sore throats. PMID:19748859

  11. Transplacental Distribution of Lidocaine and Its Metabolite in Peridural Anesthesia Administered to Patients With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Luciana de Barros; Cavalli, Ricardo de Carvalho; Carvalho, Daniela Miarelli; Filgueira, Gabriela Campos de Oliveira; Marques, Maria Paula; Lanchote, Vera Lucia; Duarte, Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neonatal effects of drugs administered to mothers before delivery depend on the quantity that crosses the placental barrier, which is determined by the pharmacokinetics of the drug in the mother, fetus, and placenta. Diabetes mellitus can alter the kinetic disposition and the metabolism of drugs. This study investigated the placental transfer of lidocaine and its metabolite monoethylglycinexylidide (MEGX) in pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) submitted to peridural anesthesia. Patients and Methods: A total of 10 normal pregnant women (group 1) and 6 pregnant women with GDM (group 2) were studied, all at term. The patients received 200 mg 2% lidocaine hydrochloride by the peridural locoregional route. Maternal blood samples were collected at the time of delivery and, after placental expulsion, blood samples were collected from the intervillous space, umbilical artery, and vein for determination of lidocaine and MEGX concentrations and analysis of the placental transfer of the drug. Results: The following respective lidocaine ratios between the maternal and the fetal compartments were obtained for groups 1 and 2: umbilical vein/maternal peripheral blood, 0.60 and 0.46; intervillous space/maternal blood, 1.01 and 0.88; umbilical artery/umbilical vein, 0.77 and 0.91; and umbilical vein/intervillous space, 0.53 and 0.51. The following MEGX ratios for groups 1 and 2 were, respectively, fetal/maternal, 0.43 and 0.97; intervillous space/maternal blood, 0.64 and 0.90; umbilical artery/umbilical vein, 1.09 and 0.99; and umbilical vein/intervillous space, 0.55 and 0.78. Conclusion: Gestational diabetes mellitus did not affect the transplacental transfer of lidocaine but interfered with the transfer of MEGX, acting as a mechanism facilitating the transport of the metabolite. PMID:25563756

  12. Anesthetic and cardiorespiratory effects of propofol, medetomidine, lidocaine and butorphanol total intravenous anesthesia in horses.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Tomohito; Itami, Takaharu; Tamura, Jun; Saitoh, Yasuo; Saitoh, Motoaki; Umar, Mohammed A; Miyoshi, Kenjirou; Yamashita, Kazuto; Muir, William W

    2013-02-01

    Anesthetic and cardiorespiratory effects of medetomidine, lidocaine, butorphanol and propofol total intravenous anesthesia (MLBP-TIVA) were evaluated in horses undergoing an experimental surgery. Ten horses were premedicated with an intravenous injection (IV) of medetomidine (5 µg/kg) and butorphanol (20 µg/kg). Anesthesia was induced by administration of 1% propofol (3 mg/kg, IV) at a rate of 1 mg/kg/min (n=5, group-1) or 2% propofol administered at a rate of 6 mg/kg/min (n=5, group-2) following administration of lidocaine (1 mg/kg, IV) and then maintained by infusions of propofol, medetomidine (3.5 µg/kg/hr), lidocaine (3 mg/kg/hr) and butorphanol (24 µg/kg/hr). The mean durations of anesthesia and propofol infusion rate required for maintaining surgical anesthesia were 130 ± 17 min and 0.10 ± 0.01 mg/kg/min in group 1 and 129 ± 14 min and 0.10 ± 0.02 mg/kg/min in group 2. Four horses in group 1 and 2 horses in group 2 paddled following recumbency during induction of anesthesia. The median quality scores for induction (0-4: poor-excellent) and recovery (0-5: unable to stand-excellent) were 3 and 4 for both groups, respectively. Transition to anesthesia (the first 20-min period after induction) was uneventful in group 2, while all horses showed a light plane of anesthesia in group 1. The quality score (0-3: poor-excellent) for the transition to anesthesia in group 2 was significantly higher than in group 1 (median 3 versus 1, P=0.009). Heart rate and arterial blood pressure were maintained within acceptable ranges, but hypercapnia occurred during anesthesia in both groups. In conclusion, MLBP-TIVA may provide clinically useful surgical anesthesia in horses. A rapid induction with propofol may improve the qualities of induction and transition to MLBP-TIVA.

  13. Pregabalin, the lidocaine plaster and duloxetine in patients with refractory neuropathic pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients frequently fail to receive adequate pain relief from, or are intolerant of, first-line therapies prescribed for neuropathic pain (NeP). This refractory chronic pain causes psychological distress and impacts patient quality of life. Published literature for treatment in refractory patients is sparse and often published as conference abstracts only. The aim of this study was to identify published data for three pharmacological treatments: pregabalin, lidocaine plaster, and duloxetine, which are typically used at 2nd line or later in UK patients with neuropathic pain. Methods A systematic review of the literature databases MEDLINE, EMBASE and CCTR was carried out and supplemented with extensive conference and grey literature searching. Studies of any design (except single patient case studies) that enrolled adult patients with refractory NeP were included in the review and qualitatively assessed. Results Seventeen studies were included in the review: nine of pregabalin, seven of the lidocaine plaster, and one of duloxetine. No head-to-head studies of these treatments were identified. Only six studies included treatments within UK licensed indications and dose ranges. Reported efficacy outcomes were not consistent between studies. Pain scores were most commonly assessed in studies including pregabalin; trials of pregabalin and the lidocaine plaster reported the proportion of responders. Significant improvements in the total, sensory and affective scores of the Short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire, and in function interference, sleep interference and pain associated distress, were associated with pregabalin treatment; limited or no quality of life data were available for the other two interventions. Limitations to the review are the small number of included studies, which are generally small, of poor quality and heterogeneous in patient population and study design. Conclusions Little evidence is available relevant to the treatment of refractory

  14. Guest:host interactions of lidocaine and prilocaine with natural cyclodextrins: Spectral and molecular modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendiran, N.; Mohandoss, T.; Saravanan, J.

    2014-11-01

    Inclusion complex formation of two local anesthetics drugs (lidocaine (LC) and prilocaine (PC)) with α- and β-cyclodextrins (CDs) in aqueous solution were studied by absorption, fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence and molecular modeling methods. The formation of inclusion complexes was confirmed by 1H NMR, FTIR, differential scanning calorimetry, SEM, TEM and X-ray diffractometry. Both drugs formed 1:1 inclusion complex and exhibit biexponential decay in water whereas triexponential decay in the CD solution. Nanosized self-aggregated particles of drug: CD complexes were found by TEM. Both experimental and theoretical studies revealed that the phenyl ring with the amide group of the drug is encapsulated in the hydrophobic CD nanocavity. Investigations of energetic and thermodynamic properties confirmed the stability of the inclusion complexes. van der Waals interactions are mainly responsible for enthalpy driven complex formation of LC and PC with CDs.

  15. Guest:host interactions of lidocaine and prilocaine with natural cyclodextrins: spectral and molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Rajendiran, N; Mohandoss, T; Saravanan, J

    2014-11-11

    Inclusion complex formation of two local anesthetics drugs (lidocaine (LC) and prilocaine (PC)) with α- and β-cyclodextrins (CDs) in aqueous solution were studied by absorption, fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence and molecular modeling methods. The formation of inclusion complexes was confirmed by 1H NMR, FTIR, differential scanning calorimetry, SEM, TEM and X-ray diffractometry. Both drugs formed 1:1 inclusion complex and exhibit biexponential decay in water whereas triexponential decay in the CD solution. Nanosized self-aggregated particles of drug: CD complexes were found by TEM. Both experimental and theoretical studies revealed that the phenyl ring with the amide group of the drug is encapsulated in the hydrophobic CD nanocavity. Investigations of energetic and thermodynamic properties confirmed the stability of the inclusion complexes. van der Waals interactions are mainly responsible for enthalpy driven complex formation of LC and PC with CDs.

  16. Buffered lidocaine and bupivacaine mixture – the ideal local anesthetic solution?

    PubMed Central

    Best, Corliss A; Best, Alyssa A; Best, Timothy J; Hamilton, Danielle A

    2015-01-01

    The use of injectable local anesthetic solutions to facilitate pain-free surgery is an integral component of many procedures performed by the plastic surgeon. In many instances, a solution that has both rapid onset and prolonged duration of analgesia is optimal. A combination of lidocaine and bupivacaine, plain or with epinephrine, is readily available in most Canadian health care settings where such procedures are performed, and fulfills these criteria. However, commercially available solutions of both medications are acidic and cause a burning sensation on injection. Buffering to neutral pH with sodium bicarbonate is a practical method to mitigate the burning sensation, and has the added benefit of increasing the fraction of nonionized lipid soluble drug available. The authors report on the proportions of the three drugs to yield a neutral pH, and the results of an initial survey regarding the use of the combined solution with epinephrine in hand surgery. PMID:26090348

  17. Bladder tissue permeability and transport modelling of intravesical alum, lidocaine hydrochloride, methylprednisolone hemisuccinate and mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Moch, Céline; Salmon, Damien; Rodríguez Armesto, Laura; Colombel, Marc; Pivot, Christine; Pirot, Fabrice

    2014-04-10

    The aims of this study were to assess the tissue permeability of the bladder and to characterize the transport of four drugs displaying different physico-chemical properties and commonly used in intravesical delivery, through porcine bladder. The transport of aluminium through porcine bladder was assessed by using a vertical static diffusion cell. Lidocaine hydrochloride, methylprednisolone hemisuccinate and mitomycin C were tested by using three different experimental setups, including vertical static diffusion cell, microdialyseur and lab-patented device. Penetration results on different experimental setups were homogenous suggesting dependency on physico-chemical characteristics of drug and subsequent interaction with bladder wall structure. Oppositely, permeation varied consistently with experimental setup characteristics (i.e., permeation surface, receptor fluid volume and hydrodynamic). Mathematical modelling of drug transport through bladder wall is proposed considering scarce literature on this route of administration. Practical outcome of this study could drive compounding optimization towards improvement of safety and efficacy in patient undergoing intravesical administration. PMID:24463072

  18. The lidocaine metabolite N-ethylglycine has antinociceptive effects in experimental inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Werdehausen, Robert; Mittnacht, Sebastian; Bee, Lucy A; Minett, Michael S; Armbruster, Anja; Bauer, Inge; Wood, John N; Hermanns, Henning; Eulenburg, Volker

    2015-09-01

    Glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1) plays a crucial role in regulating extracellular glycine concentrations and might thereby constitute a new drug target for the modulation of glycinergic inhibition in pain signaling. Consistent with this view, inhibition of GlyT1 has been found to induce antinociceptive effects in various animal pain models. We have shown previously that the lidocaine metabolite N-ethylglycine (EG) reduces GlyT1-dependent glycine uptake by functioning as an artificial substrate for this transporter. Here, we show that EG is specific for GlyT1 and that in rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, systemic treatment with EG results in an efficient amelioration of hyperalgesia and allodynia without affecting acute pain. There was no effect on motor coordination or the development of inflammatory edema. No adverse neurological effects were observed after repeated high-dose application of EG. EG concentrations both in blood and spinal fluid correlated with an increase of glycine concentration in spinal fluid. The time courses of the EG and glycine concentrations corresponded well with the antinociceptive effect. Additionally, we found that EG reduced the increase in neuronal firing of wide-dynamic-range neurons caused by inflammatory pain induction. These findings suggest that systemically applied lidocaine exerts antihyperalgesic effects through its metabolite EG in vivo, by enhancing spinal inhibition of pain processing through GlyT1 modulation and subsequent increase of glycine concentrations at glycinergic inhibitory synapses. EG and other substrates of GlyT1, therefore, may be a useful therapeutic agent in chronic pain states involving spinal disinhibition.

  19. Permeation and block of TRPV1 channels by the cationic lidocaine derivative QX-314

    PubMed Central

    Puopolo, Michelino; Binshtok, Alexander M.; Yao, Gui-Lan; Oh, Seog Bae; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2013-01-01

    QX-314 (N-ethyl-lidocaine) is a cationic lidocaine derivative that blocks voltage-dependent sodium channels when applied internally to axons or neuronal cell bodies. Coapplication of external QX-314 with the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 protein (TRPV1) agonist capsaicin produces long-lasting sodium channel inhibition in TRPV1-expressing neurons, suggestive of QX-314 entry into the neurons. We asked whether QX-314 entry occurs directly through TRPV1 channels or through a different pathway (e.g., pannexin channels) activated downstream of TRPV1 and whether QX-314 entry requires the phenomenon of “pore dilation” previously reported for TRPV1. With external solutions containing 10 or 20 mM QX-314 as the only cation, inward currents were activated by stimulation of both heterologously expressed and native TRPV1 channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. QX-314-mediated inward current did not require pore dilation, as it activated within several seconds and in parallel with Cs-mediated outward current, with a reversal potential consistent with PQX-314/PCs = 0.12. QX-314-mediated current was no different when TRPV1 channels were expressed in C6 glioma cells, which lack expression of pannexin channels. Rapid addition of QX-314 to physiological external solutions produced instant partial inhibition of inward currents carried by sodium ions, suggesting that QX-314 is a permeant blocker. Maintained coapplication of QX-314 with capsaicin produced slowly developing reduction of outward currents carried by internal Cs, consistent with intracellular accumulation of QX-314 to concentrations of 50–100 μM. We conclude that QX-314 is directly permeant in the “standard” pore formed by TRPV1 channels and does not require either pore dilation or activation of additional downstream channels for entry. PMID:23303863

  20. The lidocaine metabolite N-ethylglycine has antinociceptive effects in experimental inflammatory and neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Werdehausen, Robert; Mittnacht, Sebastian; Bee, Lucy A.; Minett, Michael S.; Armbruster, Anja; Bauer, Inge; Wood, John N.; Hermanns, Henning; Eulenburg, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1) plays a crucial role in regulating extracellular glycine concentrations and might thereby constitute a new drug target for the modulation of glycinergic inhibition in pain signaling. Consistent with this view, inhibition of GlyT1 has been found to induce antinociceptive effects in various animal pain models. We have shown previously that the lidocaine metabolite N-ethylglycine (EG) reduces GlyT1-dependent glycine uptake by functioning as an artificial substrate for this transporter. Here, we show that EG is specific for GlyT1 and that in rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, systemic treatment with EG results in an efficient amelioration of hyperalgesia and allodynia without affecting acute pain. There was no effect on motor coordination or the development of inflammatory edema. No adverse neurological effects were observed after repeated high-dose application of EG. EG concentrations both in blood and spinal fluid correlated with an increase of glycine concentration in spinal fluid. The time courses of the EG and glycine concentrations corresponded well with the antinociceptive effect. Additionally, we found that EG reduced the increase in neuronal firing of wide-dynamic-range neurons caused by inflammatory pain induction. These findings suggest that systemically applied lidocaine exerts antihyperalgesic effects through its metabolite EG in vivo, by enhancing spinal inhibition of pain processing through GlyT1 modulation and subsequent increase of glycine concentrations at glycinergic inhibitory synapses. EG and other substrates of GlyT1, therefore, may be a useful therapeutic agent in chronic pain states involving spinal disinhibition. PMID:25932687

  1. Prilocaine- and lidocaine-induced methemoglobinemia is caused by human carboxylesterase-, CYP2E1-, and CYP3A4-mediated metabolic activation.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Ryota; Fukami, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Miki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2013-06-01

    Prilocaine and lidocaine are classified as amide-type local anesthetics for which serious adverse effects include methemoglobinemia. Although the hydrolyzed metabolites of prilocaine (o-toluidine) and lidocaine (2,6-xylidine) have been suspected to induce methemoglobinemia, the metabolic enzymes that are involved remain uncharacterized. In the present study, we aimed to identify the human enzymes that are responsible for prilocaine- and lidocaine-induced methemoglobinemia. Our experiments revealed that prilocaine was hydrolyzed by recombinant human carboxylesterase (CES) 1A and CES2, whereas lidocaine was hydrolyzed by only human CES1A. When the parent compounds (prilocaine and lidocaine) were incubated with human liver microsomes (HLM), methemoglobin (Met-Hb) formation was lower than when the hydrolyzed metabolites were incubated with HLM. In addition, Met-Hb formation when prilocaine and o-toluidine were incubated with HLM was higher than that when lidocaine and 2,6-xylidine were incubated with HLM. Incubation with diisopropyl fluorophosphate and bis-(4-nitrophenyl) phosphate, which are general inhibitors of CES, significantly decreased Met-Hb formation when prilocaine and lidocaine were incubated with HLM. An anti-CYP3A4 antibody further decreased the residual formation of Met-Hb. Met-Hb formation after the incubation of o-toluidine and 2,6-xylidine with HLM was only markedly decreased by incubation with an anti-CYP2E1 antibody. o-Toluidine and 2,6-xylidine were further metabolized by CYP2E1 to 4- and 6-hydroxy-o-toluidine and 4-hydroxy-2,6-xylidine, respectively, and these metabolites were shown to more efficiently induce Met-Hb formation than the parent compounds. Collectively, we found that the metabolites produced by human CES-, CYP2E1-, and CYP3A4-mediated metabolism were involved in prilocaine- and lidocaine-induced methemoglobinemia.

  2. [Monoethylglycinexylidide--a metabolite of lidocaine--as an index of liver function in chronic hepatic parenchymal diseases].

    PubMed

    Kupcová, V; Turecký, L; Szántová, M; Schmidtová, K

    1999-01-01

    The changes of biotransformation enzyme system (b.e.s.) activity and capacity in liver diseases significantly influence the metabolism of various xenobiotics. Lidocaine is metabolised through oxidative N-deethylation by b.e.s. resulting in the production of monoethylglycinexylide (MEGX). The aim of this study was the determination of serum MEGX concentration as a model substance for indirect evaluation of liver b.e.s. function in patients with liver steatofibrosis and cirrhosis and the assessment of the possibilities to use it as a quantitave test of liver functional state. The study group consisted of 53 patients, 36 of them with liver disease of different etiology (postviral, ethyltoxic, cryptogenic, liver cirrhosis on the basis of autoimmune hepatitis, liver cirrhosis induced by primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cirrhosis in the stage of cirrhosis, Wilson's disease in the stage of cirrhosis), 7 patients with liver steatofibrosis and 10 control persons. After intravenous administration of lidocaine (1 mg/kg of body weight), concentration of MEGX was assessed by fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) using Tdx system in venous blood. The concentration was assesed prior to administration of lidocaine and 15 and 30 minutes after. In the group of liver steatofibrosis the concentrations in the 15th minute after administration were lower comparing to controls, in the 30th minute the difference was less significant. The values of MEGX in cirrhosis group were significantly decreased 15 and 30 minutes after lidocaine administration in comparison with control group. The cirrhosis group was divided into two subgroups: compensated (Ci c) and decompensated (Ci d) and independently of this division into three parts according to score system of Child-Pugh classification (Ci A, Ci B, Ci C). The concentrations 15 and 30 minutes after lidocaine administration in patients with Ci c and Ci d were significantly different, similarly there were statistically

  3. Lidocaine and structure-related mexiletine induce similar contractility-enhancing effects in ischaemia-reperfusion injured equine intestinal smooth muscle in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tappenbeck, Karen; Hoppe, Susanne; Hopster, Klaus; Kietzmann, Manfred; Feige, Karsten; Huber, Korinna

    2013-06-01

    Postoperative ileus (POI) is a severe complication following small intestinal surgery in horses. It was hypothesised that prokinetic effects of lidocaine, the most commonly chosen drug for treatment of POI, resulted from drug integration into smooth muscle (SM) cell membranes, thereby modulating cell membrane properties. This would probably depend on the structural and lipophilic characteristics of lidocaine. To assess the influence of molecular structure and lipophilicity on prokinetic effects in vitro, the current study compared the effects of lidocaine with four structure-related drugs, namely, mexiletine, bupivacaine, tetracaine and procaine. The response to cumulative drug administration and reversibility of effects were tested by measuring isometric contractile performance of equine jejunal circular SM strips, challenged by a standardised, artificial in vivo ischaemia-reperfusion injury. A second set of SM strips were incubated with the different drugs to determine changes in creatine kinase (CK) release. All drugs caused a drug-specific increase in contractility, although only lidocaine and mexiletine induced similar concentration-dependent curve progressions, significantly reduced CK release, and featured shorter recovery times of tissue contractility after washing, compared to bupivacaine and tetracaine. In was concluded that the structural and lipophilic similarity of mexiletine and lidocaine were responsible for the similar effects of these drugs on SM contractility and cell membrane permeability, which supported the hypothesis that prokinetic effects of lidocaine are based on interactions with SM cell membranes modulated by these features. PMID:23265867

  4. The conformational stability, solvation and the assignments of the experimental infrared, Raman, 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawi, Hassan M.; Förner, Wolfgang; Ali, Shaikh A.

    2015-05-01

    The structure, vibrational and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine were investigated by the B3LYP/6-311G∗∗ calculations. The molecule was predicted to have the non-planar cis (NCCN ∼ 0°) structures being about 2-6 kcal/mol lower in energy than the corresponding trans (NCCN ∼ 180°) forms. The calculated NCCN (9.6°) and CNCC (-132.2°) torsional angles were in a good qualitative agreement with the reported X-ray angles (3.1 and 13.0°, -102.67 and -77.9°, respectively, for H-bonded dimers). The Gibbs energy of solution of lidocaine in formamide, water, dimethylsulfoxide, acetonitrile, methanol, ethanol and chloroform solutions was estimated at the B3LYP level. The predicted affinity of lidocaine toward the alcohols, acetonitrile and chloroform solutions was in excellent agreement with the reported experimental solubility of the drug in organic solvents. The analysis of the observed vibrational spectra is consistent with the presence of lidocaine in only one conformation at room temperature. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of lidocaine were interpreted by experimental and DFT calculated chemical shifts of the drug. The RMSD between experimental and theoretical 1H and 13C chemical shifts for lidocaine is 0.47 and 8.26 ppm, respectively.

  5. The application of conductivity measurements for preliminary assessments of chlorhexidine and lidocaine hydrochloride release from methylcellulose gel at various temperatures.

    PubMed

    Musial, Witold; Kokol, Vanja; Voncina, Bojana

    2009-01-01

    For the evaluation of conductivity measurements in the control and monitoring of release process, high number of conductivity measurements was performed. The measurements were done for the compositions of chlorhexidine with methylcellulose, and lidocaine hydrochloride with methylcellulose. Chlorhexidine, a very slightly soluble substance is released from the methylcellulose bead in the amounts ca. 30%-70%, and it depends of temperature of the release process. The lidocaine hydrochloride at the same time is released from methylcellulose formulation in 70-100%. The conductivity in the donor compartment at the start point, and in the acceptor compartment at the termination point, reflect the released amounts of the drug. This study confirms the possibility of application of conductivity measurements for the preliminary assessments of the kinetics of release of soluble and practically insoluble substances from the nonionic polymeric matrix.

  6. Combination of pharmacotherapy and lidocaine analgesic block of the peripheral trigeminal branches for trigeminal neuralgia: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Di Stani, Fabrizio; Ojango, Christine; Dugoni, Demo; Di Lorenzo, Luigi; Masala, Salvatore; Delfini, Roberto; Bruti, Gianluca; Simonetti, Giovanni; Piovesan, Elcio Juliato; Ruggeri, Andrea Gennaro

    2015-08-01

    Classical trigeminal neuralgia (CTN) is treated predominantly by pharmacotherapy but side effects and unsuccessful occurs. The current study was carried out to evaluate the therapeutic effect of combination of pharmacotherapy and lidocaine block. Thirteen patients with CTN managed with pharmacotherapy were recruited and assigned either to no additional treatment (Group I) or to additional analgesic block (Group II). The primary endpoint was the reduction in the frequency of pain episodes in a month assessed at 30 and 90 days. Comparisons of measurements of pain, general health and depression scales were secondary endpoints. The results from the follow-up visits at 30 and 90 days showed the Group II to have larger reduction in the frequency of pain and exhibited a bigger improvement in the scores of the pain, general health and depression scales. The results from this preliminary study suggest a clinical benefit of the combination of pharmacotherapy and lidocaine block.

  7. A microdialysis model to examine nasal drug delivery and olfactory absorption in rats using lidocaine hydrochloride as a model drug.

    PubMed

    Bagger, Morten; Bechgaard, Erik

    2004-01-28

    Targeting of the central nervous system by direct drug transport from the nose to the brain has gained increased attention through the last decade. In the present study, a model for olfactory drug absorption has been investigated using intravenous and unilateral nasal administration of lidocaine hydrochloride in rats. To investigate the possible drug delivery aspects of this route of transport to a central part of the brain a microdialysis model using in vivo recovery by calibrator was applied to the systemic blood and to right and left striatum. The integrity of the blood-brain barrier was evaluated following microdialysis probe implantation. The in vivo experiments were carried out as a cross-over study in rats. The drainage from the nasal cavity was not restricted by occlusion. It was found that true unbound lidocaine concentrations could be calculated from in vivo recovery measurements of retrodialysis of prilocaine hydrochloride. The relative in vivo recoveries in striatum (11.3%) and blood (24.0%) were significantly lower than in vitro (31.3 and 44.9%). The blood-brain barrier was found to retain its physical integrity when evaluated one hour after probe implantation. From pharmacokinetic modelling of the time-concentration curves it was found that the absorption rates and area under the curve (AUC) values of lidocaine in left and right striatum were not statistically different following nasal and intravenous administration, respectively. The average nasal bioavailabilities of lidocaine in blood, left and right striatum were 85, 103 and 129%, respectively. It was concluded that no significant olfactory absorption to striatum was evident in the present study. However, the method should be applicable to studies of drug delivery to blood and brain following nasal administration of other drugs.

  8. Characterisation and in vitro stability of low-dose, lidocaine-loaded poly(vinyl alcohol)-tetrahydroxyborate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Abdelkader, D H; Osman, M A; El-Gizawy, S A; Faheem, A M; McCarron, P A

    2016-03-16

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels cross-linked with the tetrahydroxyborate anion possess textural and rheological properties that can be used as novel drug-loaded vehicles for application to traumatic wounds. However, addition of soluble drug substances causes concentration-dependent phase separation and rheological changes. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of adding a local anaesthetic, but keeping the concentration low in an attempt to prevent these changes. Cross-linked hydrogels prepared from three grades of poly(vinyl alcohol) were characterised rheologically. Temperature sweep studies showed an elevated complex viscosity upon moving from 25°C to 80°C, which remained high for 48 h following completion of the cycle. Adhesion to model dermal surfaces achieved a maximum of 2.62 N cm(-2) and were greater than that observed to epidermal substrates, with a strong dependence on the rate of detachment used during testing. An optimised formulation (6% w/w PVA (31-50; 99) and 2% w/w THB) containing lidocaine hydrochloride loaded to an upper maximum concentration of 1.5% w/w was assessed for phase separation and drug crystallisation. After six months, crystallisation was present in formulations containing 0.7% and 1.5% lidocaine HCl. Changes in pH in response to increases in lidocaine loading were low. Drug release was shown to operate via a non-Fickian process for all three concentrations, with 60% occurring after approximately 24h. It can be concluded that using a low concentration of lidocaine hydrochloride in hydrogels based on poly(vinyl alcohol) will result in crystallisation. Furthermore, these hydrogels are unlikely to induce rapid anaesthesia due to the low loading and slow release kinetics. PMID:26802495

  9. Prevention of Withdrawal Movement Associated with the Injection of Rocuronium in Children: Comparison of Paracetamol and Lidocaine

    PubMed Central

    Polat, Reyhan; Akın, Mine; Keskin, Gülsen; Ünal, Dilek; Dönmez, Aslı

    2016-01-01

    Objective Pain from rocuronium injection is observed in 50%–80 % of patients. This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of pretreatment with paracetamol and lidocaine in preventing pain-induced withdrawal caused by the intravenous injection of rocuronium during the induction of general anaesthesia in paediatric patients. Methods Ninety children were randomized into two groups using a simple drawing from the box method: a paracetamol group (Group P, n=45) and a lidocaine group (Group L, n=45). After anaesthesia induction, venous occlusion was applied by a paediatric cuff inflated to a pressure of 75 mmHg and by 50 mg paracetamol and 0.5 mg kg−1 lidocaine was injected in Groups P and L, respectively. Venous occlusion was then released, followed by rocuronium injection (0.6 mg kg−1). Withdrawal was evaluated using a 4-point scale (1, no response; 2, movement at the wrist only; 3, movement/withdrawal involving arm only (elbow/shoulder) and 4, generalized response, movement/withdrawal in more than one extremity). Results The incidence of withdrawal movement was 42% and 26% in the Groups P and L, respectively (p=0.120). Although no significant differences were noted in the number of patients who had no withdrawal movement and mild withdrawal movement in Groups P and L, compared with Group L, the incidences of moderate withdrawal movement were significantly higher in Group P (p<0.05). No patient in either group revealed generalized movement. Conclusion Using a venous occlusion technique, pretreatment with 50 mg paracetamol can prevent withdrawal movement caused by rocuronium injection in children but is not as effective as lidocaine to prevent moderate withdrawal movement. PMID:27366564

  10. The Effect of Intravenous Lidocaine on Brain Activation During Non-Noxious and Acute Noxious Stimulation of the Forepaw: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhongchi; Yu, Mei; Smith, S. David; Kritzer, Mary; Du, Congwu; Ma, Yu; Volkow, Nora D.; Glass, Peter S.; Benveniste, Helene

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lidocaine can alleviate acute as well as chronic neuropathic pain at very low plasma concentrations in humans and laboratory animals. The mechanism(s) underlying lidocaine’s analgesic effect when administered systemically is poorly understood but clearly not related to interruption of peripheral nerve conduction. Other targets for lidocaine’s analgesic action(s) have been suggested, including sodium channels and other receptor sites in the central rather than peripheral nervous system. To our knowledge, the effect of lidocaine on the brain’s functional response to pain has never been investigated. Here, we therefore characterized the effect of systemic lidocaine on the brain’s response to innocuous and acute noxious stimulation in the rat using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). METHODS Alpha-chloralose anesthetized rats underwent fMRI to quantify brain activation patterns in response to innocuous and noxious forepaw stimulation before and after IV administration of lidocaine. RESULTS Innocuous forepaw stimulation elicited brain activation only in the contralateral primary somatosensory (S1) cortex. Acute noxious forepaw stimulation induced activation in additional brain areas associated with pain perception, including the secondary somatosensory cortex (S2), thalamus, insula and limbic regions. Lidocaine administered at IV doses of either 1 mg/kg, 4 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg did not abolish or diminish brain activation in response to innocuous or noxious stimulation. In fact, IV doses of 4 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg lidocaine enhanced S1 and S2 responses to acute nociceptive stimulation, increasing the activated cortical volume by 50%–60%. CONCLUSION The analgesic action of systemic lidocaine in acute pain is not reflected in a straightforward interruption of pain-induced fMRI brain activation as has been observed with opioids. The enhancement of cortical fMRI responses to acute pain by lidocaine observed here has also been reported for cocaine. We

  11. Nematocyst discharge in Pelagia noctiluca (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa) oral arms can be affected by lidocaine, ethanol, ammonia and acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Rossana; Marino, Angela; Dossena, Silvia; La Spada, Giuseppa

    2014-06-01

    Nematocyst discharge and concomitant delivery of toxins is triggered to perform both defence and predation strategies in Cnidarians, and may lead to serious local and systemic reactions in humans. Pelagia noctiluca (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa) is a jellyfish particularly abundant in the Strait of Messina (Italy). After accidental contact with this jellyfish, not discharged nematocysts or even fragments of tentacles or oral arms may tightly adhere to the human skin and, following discharge, severely increase pain and the other adverse consequences of the sting. The aim of the present study is to verify if the local anesthetic lidocaine and other compounds, like alcohols, acetic acid and ammonia, known to provide pain relief after jellyfish stings, may also affect in situ discharge of nematocysts. Discharge was induced by a combined physico-chemical stimulation of oral arms by chemosensitizers (such as N-acetylated sugars, aminoacids, proteins and nucleotides), in the presence or absence of 1% lidocaine, 70% ethanol, 5% acetic acid or 20% ammonia, followed by mechanical stimulation by a non-vibrating test probe. The above mentioned compounds failed to induce discharge per se, and dramatically impaired the chemosensitizer-induced discharge response. We therefore suggest that prompt local treatment of the stung epidermis with lidocaine, acetic acid, ethanol and ammonia may provide substantial pain relief and help in reducing possible harmful local and systemic adverse reaction following accidental contact with P. noctiluca specimens.

  12. Absorption of lidocaine and prilocaine after application of a eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA) on normal and diseased skin.

    PubMed

    Juhlin, L; Hägglund, G; Evers, H

    1989-01-01

    A eutectic mixture of 5% lidocaine and prilocaine was applied under occlusion for 1 or 2 hours on 25-100 cm2 areas of normal and diseased skin, and the absorption was followed by measuring the concentrations of the drugs in the draining vein and the general circulation at different time intervals after the application. The analgesic and vascular effects in the skin were also recorded. When the mixture was applied on normal skin the absorption was more rapid from the face than from the forearm. The absorption from diseased skin was faster than that from normal skin, with higher plasma concentrations, and a more rapid but shorter anesthetic effect was noted. With the doses used the plasma levels in the general circulation were 100 times lower than those associated with toxicity. The drug concentrations in the draining vein were highest after treatment of diseased skin and were 2-90 times higher than in the general circulation. The plasma concentrations of lidocaine and prilocaine ran parallel to each other, but the prilocaine level was 10-50% lower than that of lidocaine in the draining vein and 200-300% lower in the general circulation.

  13. Comparison of Topical Anesthetics for Radiofrequency Ablation of Achrocordons: Eutectic Mixture of Lignocaine/Prilocaine versus Lidocaine/Tetracaine

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Nitin; Chauhan, Sandhya; Rastogi, Madhur Kant

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Topical application of local anesthetics is currently considered to be the easiest, most effective, and convenient way for treatment of patients who may be undergoing superficial dermatosurgical procedures. Materials and Methods. This study compares the anesthetic potential of 2.5% lidocaine and 2.5% prilocaine topical cream with 7% lignocaine and 7% tetracaine combination cream for radio ablative dermatosurgery when applied, under occlusion, for 30 minutes. 40 subjects of achrocordons were enrolled in this split-side randomized trial. Result. The pain severity experienced by subjects in terms of visual analogue scale score was significantly lesser for lignocaine/tetracaine combination cream as compared to lidocaine/prilocaine combination. Conclusion. This small study proves the efficacy of lidocaine/tetracaine combination as a topical anesthetic cream when applied for a short time interval of 30 minutes. This will help a dermatosurgeon to perform various dermatological procedures in a better and efficient manner with a shorter waiting period for analgesia to set in. PMID:24600520

  14. Randomized clinical trial of multimodal physiotherapy treatment compared to overnight lidocaine ointment in women with provoked vestibulodynia: Design and methods.

    PubMed

    Morin, Mélanie; Dumoulin, Chantale; Bergeron, Sophie; Mayrand, Marie-Hélène; Khalifé, Samir; Waddell, Guy; Dubois, Marie-France

    2016-01-01

    Provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) is a highly prevalent and debilitating condition yet its management relies mainly on non-empirically validated interventions. Among the many causes of PVD, there is growing evidence that pelvic floor muscle (PFM) dysfunctions play an important role in its pathophysiology. Multimodal physiotherapy, which addresses these dysfunctions, is judged by experts to be highly effective and is recommended as a first-line treatment. However, the effectiveness of this promising intervention has been evaluated through only two small uncontrolled trials. The proposed bi-center, single-blind, parallel group, randomized controlled trial (RCT) aims to evaluate the efficacy of multimodal physiotherapy and compare it to a frequently used first-line treatment, topical overnight application of lidocaine, in women with PVD. A total of 212 women diagnosed with PVD according to a standardized protocol were eligible for the study and were randomly assigned to either multimodal physiotherapy or lidocaine treatment for 10weeks. The primary outcome measure is pain during intercourse (assessed with a numerical rating scale). Secondary measures include sexual function, pain quality, psychological factors (including pain catastrophizing, anxiety, depression and fear of pain), PFM morphology and function, and patients' global impression of change. Assessments are made at baseline, post-treatment and at the 6-month follow-up. This manuscript presents and discusses the rationale, design and methodology of the first RCT investigating physiotherapy in comparison to a commonly prescribed first-line treatment, overnight topical lidocaine, for women with PVD.

  15. Bupivacaine Lozenge Compared with Lidocaine Spray as Topical Pharyngeal Anesthetic before Unsedated Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Salale, Nesrin; Treldal, Charlotte; Mogensen, Stine; Rasmussen, Mette; Petersen, Janne; Andersen, Ove; Jacobsen, Jette

    2014-01-01

    Unsedated upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE) can induce patient discomfort, mainly due to a strong gag reflex. The aim was to assess the effect of a bupivacaine lozenge as topical pharyngeal anesthetic compared with standard treatment with a lidocaine spray before UGE. Ninety-nine adult outpatients undergoing unsedated diagnostic UGE were randomized to receive either a bupivacaine lozenge (L-group, n = 51) or lidocaine spray (S-group, n = 42). Primary objective was assessment of patient discomfort including acceptance of the gag reflex during UGE. The L-group assessed the discomfort significantly lower on a visual analog scale compared with the S-group (P = 0.02). There was also a significant difference in the four-point scale assessment of the gag reflex (P = 0.03). It was evaluated as acceptable by 49% in the L-group compared with 31% in the S-group. A bupivacaine lozenge compared with a lidocaine spray proved to be a superior option as topical pharyngeal anesthetic before an UGE. PMID:25374463

  16. Dynamics of bio-membranes investigated by neutron spin echo: Effects of phospholipid conformations and presence of lidocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zheng

    Bio-membranes of the natural living cells are made of bilayers of phospholipids molecules embedded with other constituents, such as cholesterol and membrane proteins, which help to accomplish a broad range of functions. Vesicles made of lipid bilayers can serve as good model systems for bio-membranes. Therefore these systems have been extensively characterized and much is known about their shape, size, porosity and functionality. In this dissertation we report the studies of the effects of the phosoholipid conformation, such as hydrocarbon number and presence of double bond in hydrophobic tails on dynamics of phospholipids bilayers studied by neutron spin echo (NSE) technique. We have investigated how lidocaine, the most medically used local anesthetics (LA), influence the structural and dynamical properties of model bio-membranes by small angle neutron scattering (SANS), NSE and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). To investigate the influence of phospholipid conformation on bio-membranes, the bending elasticities kappac of seven saturated and monounsaturated phospholipid bilayers were investigated by NSE spectroscopy. kappa c of phosphatidylcholines (PCS) in liquid crystalline (L alpha) phase ranges from 0.38x10-19 J for 1,2-Dimyristoyl- sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (14:0 PC) to 0.64x10-19 J for 1,2-Dieicosenoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (20:1 PC). It was confirmed that when the area modulus KA varies little with chain unsaturation or length, the elastic ratios (kappac/ KA)1/2 of bilayers varies linearly with lipid hydrophobic thickness d. For the study of the influence of LA on bio-membranes, SANS measurements have been performed on 14:0 PC bilayers with different concentrations of lidocaine to determine the bilayer thickness dL as a function of the lidocaine concentration. NSE has been used to study the influence of lidocaine on the bending elasticity of 14:0 PC bilayers in Lalpha and ripple gel (Pbeta') phases. Our results confirmed that the molecules of

  17. Methemoglobin and sulfhemoglobin formation due to benzocaine and lidocaine in macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.G.; Woodard, C.L.; Gold, M.B.; Watson, C.E.; Baskin, S.I.

    1993-05-13

    Benzocaine (BNZ) and lidocaine (LC) are commonly used topical (spray) anesthetics approved for use in humans. BNZ has structural similarities to methemoglobin (MHb) forming drugs that are current candidates for cyanide prophylaxis, while LC has been reported to increase MHb in man. We therefore, compared MHb and sulfhemoglobin (SHb) production in three groups of Macaques (Macaca mulata, Chinese rhesus and Indian rhesus, and Macaca nemistrina, Pig-tailed Macaques) after exposure to BNZ and LC. Formation of SHb, unlike MHb, is not thought to be reversible and is considered to be toxic. MHb and SHb levels were measured periodically on a CO-Oximeter. All rhesus (n=8) were dosed intratrachealy/intranasaly with 56 mg and 280 mg BNZ and with 40 mg of LC in a randomized cross-over design. Pig-tailed macaques (n=6) were dosed with BNZ intranasaly 56 mg and with 40 mg of LC. Since no differences in the peak MHb or time to peak (mean +/- SD) were observed among the three macaque subspecies, the data were pooled. LC did not cause MHb or SHb formation above baseline in any monkey.

  18. EMLA and Lidocaine Spray: A Comparison for Surgical Debridement in Venous Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Cuomo, Roberto; D'Aniello, Carlo; Grimaldi, Luca; Nisi, Giuseppe; Botteri, Gaia; Zerini, Irene; Brandi, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this study the author proposes to compare eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA) and an odontoiatric spray solution of 10% Lidocaine (Ecocain) for surgical debridement in venous leg ulcers. Approach: Fifty patients were recruited and randomly assigned into two groups (A, B). All of them have venous leg ulcer in the medial and/or lateral malleolar region. Group A: topical anesthetic EMLA with film occlusion. Group B: topical anesthesia with Ecocain. The author proceeded to surgical debridement after local anesthesia. A questionnaire and a visual analog scale (VAS) were administered to assess the amount of pain felt during the debridement and during the following 6 h. Results: The analysis of the VAS revealed no major significant differences statistically. The analysis of the questionnaires showed patients treated with Ecocain took more analgesic drugs. Analysis of the timing and quality of procedure showed that Ecocain reduced the timing of debridement and dressing change, improving the outpatient management and patient compliance. Innovations: For rapid debridement, the most appropriate is to use Ecocain. Conclusion: Methods of local anesthesia are multiple and must be identified according to the needs of the patient and the surgeon trying to get the best anesthesia with minimal use of time and resources. PMID:26029486

  19. Estimation of skin concentrations of topically applied lidocaine at each depth profile.

    PubMed

    Oshizaka, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Keisuke; Kadhum, Wesam R; Todo, Hiroaki; Hatanaka, Tomomi; Wierzba, Konstanty; Sugibayashi, Kenji

    2014-11-20

    Skin concentrations of topically administered compounds need to be considered in order to evaluate their efficacies and toxicities. This study investigated the relationship between the skin permeation and concentrations of compounds, and also predicted the skin concentrations of these compounds using their permeation parameters. Full-thickness skin or stripped skin from pig ears was set on a vertical-type diffusion cell, and lidocaine (LID) solution was applied to the stratum corneum (SC) in order to determine in vitro skin permeability. Permeation parameters were obtained based on Fick's second law of diffusion. LID concentrations at each depth of the SC were measured using tape-stripping. Concentration-depth profiles were obtained from viable epidermis and dermis (VED) by analyzing horizontal sections. The corresponding skin concentration at each depth was calculated based on Fick's law using permeation parameters and then compared with the observed value. The steady state LID concentrations decreased linearly as the site became deeper in SC or VED. The calculated concentration-depth profiles of the SC and VED were almost identical to the observed profiles. The compound concentration at each depth could be easily predicted in the skin using diffusion equations and skin permeation data. Thus, this method was considered to be useful for promoting the efficient preparation of topically applied drugs and cosmetics.

  20. 5% lidocaine medicated plaster double effect in a case of orofacial localized neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Casale, Roberto; Romanenko, Yuriy; Allegri, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Localized neuropathic pain (LNP) is a type of neuropathic pain that is characterized by "consistent and limited area(s) of maximum pain associated with negative or positive sensory signs and/or spontaneous symptoms characteristic of neuropathic pain". This definition encompasses a huge number of neuropathic orofacial pain syndromes. We present a case report of a patient who was affected with sleep apnea syndrome treated with nocturnal oxygen mask delivery, in whom orofacial LNP hampered the wearing of a mask due to unbearable burning and throbbing pain. The application of 5% lidocaine medicated plaster during the night led to an impressive reduction of both the pain level and the size of the painful area due to the plaster's pharmacological mechanisms, which were associated with a secondary benefit due to its mechanical protective action. This case report shows how these two factors could be of clinical value and have to be considered more systematically in the treatment of LNP in reducing pain and the size of the painful area.

  1. Features of heat-induced amorphous complex between indomethacin and lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yohsuke; Goto, Satoru; Uchiro, Hiromi; Hirabayashi, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Kazuaki; Hirota, Keiji; Terada, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    We studied temperature-dependent phase changes in the mixture of indomethacin (IM) and lidocaine (LC) in various molar ratios by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). DSC studies were carried out between -40°C and 180°C heating/cooling/heating cycle at a rate of 10°C/min under a nitrogen gas flow. Although LC in the liquid state was crystallized, fused IM showed a glass transition signal upon cooling. Hence, cooling of fused IM caused it to assume the amorphous state below its glass transition temperature. Heating of the mixture of IM and LC resulted in formation of a eutectic mixture between them, and cooling of the fused mixture caused formation of the amorphous state at any molar ratio examined. It is noteworthy that the amorphous solid of the fused complex of IM and LC was in the rubber state and glass state in the mixtures containing IM between 20% and 40%, whereas there was only the glass state in the samples containing 50% IM and higher. In addition, crystallization of LC took place by cooling the fused sample containing 10% IM.

  2. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided Embolization of Growing Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm after Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Transretroperitoneal Approach with Intramuscular Lidocaine Injection Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joon Young Kim, Shin Jung Kim, Hyoung Ook; Kim, Yong Tae; Lim, Nam Yeol Kim, Jae Kyu; Chung, Sang Young Choi, Soo Jin Na Lee, Ho Kyun

    2015-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided embolization of internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA) after repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm by transretroperitoneal approach using the lidocaine injection technique to iliacus muscle, making window for safe needle path for three patients for whom CT-guided embolization of IIAA was performed by transretroperitoneal approach with intramuscular lidocaine injection technique. Transretroperitoneal access to the IIAA was successful in all three patients. In all three patients, the IIAA was first embolized using microcoils. The aneurysmal sac was then embolized with glue and coils without complication. With a mean follow-up of 7 months, the volume of the IIAAs remained stable without residual endoleaks. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided embolization of IIAA using intramuscular lidocaine injection technique is effective, safe, and results in good outcome.

  3. Comparison of the effect of intratesticular lidocaine/bupivacaine vs. saline placebo on pain scores and incision site reactions in dogs undergoing routine castration.

    PubMed

    Stevens, B J; Posner, L P; Jones, C A; Lascelles, B D

    2013-06-01

    Post-operative pain scores and incision site reactions were compared in healthy dogs undergoing routine castration at a county animal shelter and assigned to two treatment groups, namely: (1) lidocaine/bupivacaine (1mg/kg lidocaine+1mg/kg bupivacaine mixture; n=17), or (2) placebo (0.9% saline; n=16), administered via intratesticular injection. Dogs were injected with an equivalent volume of solution based on bodyweight. Premedication, induction and anesthetic maintenance protocols were identical in all animals. Pain scores were assessed at 15min, 60min, 120min and 24h post-recovery from anesthesia. Surgical site evaluation based on swelling and bruising was evaluated at 24h. The addition of lidocaine/bupivacaine did not impact pain scores compared to the saline placebo (P>0.05). Incision site reactions were statistically similar between the two groups.

  4. Outward stabilization of the S4 segments in domains III and IV enhances lidocaine block of sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Sheets, Michael F; Hanck, Dorothy A

    2007-01-01

    The anti-arrhythmic drug lidocaine has been shown to have a lower affinity for block of voltage-gated sodium channels at hyperpolarized potentials compared to depolarized potentials. Concomitantly, lidocaine reduces maximum gating charge (Qmax) by 40% resulting from the complete stabilization of the S4 in domain III in an outward, depolarized position and partial stabilization of the S4 in domain IV in wild-type Na+ channels (NaV1.5). To investigate whether the pre-positioning of the S4 segments in these two domains in a depolarized conformation increases affinity for lidocaine block, a cysteine residue was substituted for the 3rd outermost charged residue in the S4 of domain III (R3C-DIII) and for the 2nd outermost Arg in S4 of domain IV (R2C-DIV) in NaV1.5. After biotinylation by exposure to extracellular MTSEA-biotin the mutated S4s became stabilized in an outward, depolarized position. For Na+ channels containing both mutations (R3C-DIII + R2C-DIV) the IC50 for rested-state lidocaine block decreased from 194 ± 15 μm in control to 28 ± 2 μm after MTSEA-biotin modification. To determine whether an intact inactivation gate (formed by the linker between domains III and IV) was required for local anaesthetic drugs to modify Na+ channel gating currents, a Cys was substituted for the Phe in the IFM motif of the inactivation gate (ICM) and then modified by intracellular MTSET (WT-ICMMTSET) before exposure to intracellular QX-222, a quarternary amine. Although WT-ICMMTSET required higher concentrations of drug to block INa compared to WT, Qmax decreased by 35% and the V1/2 shifted leftward as previously demonstrated for WT. The effect of stabilization of the S4s in domains III and IV in the absence of an intact inactivation gate on lidocaine block was determined for R3C-DIII + ICM, R2C-DIV + ICM and R3C-DIII + R2C-DIV + ICM, and compared to WT-ICM. IC50 values were 1360 ± 430 μm, 890 ± 70 μm, 670 ± 30 μm and 1920 ± 60 μm, respectively. Thermodynamic mutant

  5. Fast-onset lidocaine block of rat NaV1.4 channels suggests involvement of a second high-affinity open state.

    PubMed

    Gingrich, Kevin J; Wagner, Larry E

    2016-06-01

    Local anesthetics (LAs) block resting, open, and inactivated states of voltage-gated Na(+) channels where inactivated states are thought to bind with highest affinity. However, reports of fast-onset block occurring over milliseconds hint at high-affinity block of open channels. Movement of voltage-sensor domain IV-segment 4 (DIVS4) has been associated with high affinity LA block termed voltage-sensor block (VSB) that also leads to a second open state. These observations point to a second high-affinity open state that may underlie fast-onset block. To test for this state, we analyzed the modulation of Na(+) currents by lidocaine and its quaternary derivative (QX222) from heterologously expressed (Xenopus laevis oocytes) rat skeletal muscle μ1 NaV1.4 (rSkM1) with β1 (WT-β1), and a mutant form (IFM-QQQ mutation in the III-IV interdomain, QQQ) lacking fast inactivation, in combination with Markov kinetic gating models. 100 μM lidocaine induced fast-onset (τonset≈2 ms), long-lived (τrecovery≈120 ms) block of WT-β1 macroscopic currents. Lidocaine blocked single-channel and macroscopic QQQ currents in agreement with our previously described mechanism of dual, open-channel block (DOB mechanism). A DOB kinetic model reproduced lidocaine effects on QQQ currents. The DOB model was extended to include trapping fast-inactivation and activation gates, and a second open state (OS2); the latter arising from DIVS4 translocation that precedes inactivation and exhibits high-affinity, lidocaine binding (apparent Kd=25 μM) that accords with VSB (DOB-S2VSB mechanism). The DOB-S2VSB kinetic model predicted fast-onset block of WT-β1. The findings support the involvement of a second, high-affinity, open state in lidocaine modulation of Na(+) channels.

  6. Effects of local lidocaine treatment before and after median nerve injury on mechanical hypersensitivity and microglia activation in rat cuneate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Chang; Yeh, Jiann-Horng; Chen, Chih-Li; Chou, Shiu-Huey; Tsai, Yi-Ju

    2011-04-01

    This study examined the relationship between microglia activation in the cuneate nucleus (CN) and behavioral hypersensitivity after chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the median nerve. We also investigated effects of local lidocaine pre- and post-treatment on microglia activation and development of hypersensitivity in this model. By immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting, little immunoreactivity of OX-42, a microglia activation marker, was detected in the CN of normal rats. As early as 1 day after CCI, there was a significant increase in OX-42 immunoreactivity in the lesion side of CN, which reached a maximum at 14 days. Microinjection of minocycline, a microglia activation inhibitor, into the CN 1 day after CCI attenuated injury-induced behavioral hypersensitivity in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the animals received 1%, 2% or 5% lidocaine 15 min prior to median nerve CCI (pre-treatment), 5h (early post-treatment) or 1 day (late post-treatment) after median nerve CCI. Pre-treatment and early post-treatment with 2% and 5% lidocaine, but not 1% lidocaine, attenuated OX-42 immunoreactivity and behavioral hypersensitivity following median nerve injury. Late post-treatment with 1%, 2%, or 5% lidocaine failed to decrease OX-42 immunoreactivity and mechanical hypersensitivity in CCI rats. In conclusion, median nerve injury-induced microglia activation in the CN modulated development of behavioral hypersensitivity. High-concentration lidocaine was effective in decreasing microglia activation in the CN and in attenuating neuropathic pain sensations at the early stage following nerve injury, when microglia had not yet been activated.

  7. Oral gabapentin and intradermal injection of lidocaine: is there any role in the treatment of moderate/severe tinnitus?

    PubMed

    Ciodaro, Francesco; Mannella, Valentina Katia; Cammaroto, Giovanni; Bonanno, Lilla; Galletti, Francesco; Galletti, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    The objective of our work is to evaluate recovery induced by gabapentin alone and in association with intradermal infiltration of lidocaine in patients affected by moderate/severe tinnitus. Seventy-two patients suffering from moderate/severe unilateral non-pulsatile subjective tinnitus were enrolled. Severity and behaviour of tinnitus were assessed by Tinnitus handicap Index (THI) on the 8th, 22nd and 36th days from onset of therapy, and on the 3rd and 6th month after the end of therapy in patients treated with oral gabapentin (Group I), oral gabapentin and intradermal injection of lidocaine (Group II), and placebo (Group III) Significant differences in THI scores from the 8th day of therapy to the 22nd (p < 0.0001) and from the 22nd day to the 36th (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.0004, respectively) were found in Group I and Group II. In Group II, another relevant decrease of THI scores from the 36th day of therapy to 3 months from the end of treatment (p = 0.0004) was found. A significant difference in THI scores between Group I and Group II was found after 8 days of treatment (p = 0.05) with a more relevant decrease registered in Group II; significant differences were also found in THI scores between Group I and Group III after 8 days of treatment (p = 0.01), with a more relevant decrease registered in Group III; significant differences in THI scores between Group II and Group III were found after 36 days of treatment (p = 0.009), 3 and 6 months after the end of therapy (p = 0.005 and p = 0.007, respectively), with a more relevant decrease registered in Group II. In conclusion, the use of gabapentin associated to lidocaine seems to be superior to placebo and gabapentin in relieving tinnitus.

  8. Mechanism of Modification, by Lidocaine, of Fast and Slow Recovery from Inactivation of Voltage-Gated Na⁺ Channels.

    PubMed

    Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S; Lukacs, Peter; Cervenka, Rene; Koenig, Xaver; Rubi, Lena; Hilber, Karlheinz; Sandtner, Walter; Todt, Hannes

    2015-11-01

    The clinically important suppression of high-frequency discharges of excitable cells by local anesthetics (LA) is largely determined by drug-induced prolongation of the time course of repriming (recovery from inactivation) of voltage-gated Na(+) channels. This prolongation may result from periodic drug-binding to a high-affinity binding site during the action potentials and subsequent slow dissociation from the site between action potentials ("dissociation hypothesis"). For many drugs it has been suggested that the fast inactivated state represents the high-affinity binding state. Alternatively, LAs may bind with high affinity to a native slow-inactivated state, thereby accelerating the development of this state during action potentials ("stabilization hypothesis"). In this case, slow recovery between action potentials occurs from enhanced native slow inactivation. To test these two hypotheses we produced serial cysteine mutations of domain IV segment 6 in rNav1.4 that resulted in constructs with varying propensities to enter fast- and slow-inactivated states. We tested the effect of the LA lidocaine on the time course of recovery from short and long depolarizing prepulses, which, under drug-free conditions, recruited mainly fast- and slow-inactivated states, respectively. Among the tested constructs the mutation-induced changes in native slow recovery induced by long depolarizations were not correlated with the respective lidocaine-induced slow recovery after short depolarizations. On the other hand, for long depolarizations the mutation-induced alterations in native slow recovery were significantly correlated with the kinetics of lidocaine-induced slow recovery. These results favor the "dissociation hypothesis" for short depolarizations but the "stabilization hypothesis" for long depolarizations. PMID:26358763

  9. Rapid determination of lidocaine solutions with non-column chromatographic diode array UV spectroscopy and multivariate calibration.

    PubMed

    Wiberg, Kent; Hagman, Anders; Jacobsson, Sven P

    2003-01-01

    A new method for the rapid determination of pharmaceutical solutions is proposed. A conventional HPLC system with a Diode Array Detector (DAD) was used with no chromatographic column connected. As eluent, purified water (Milli Q) was used. The pump and autosampler of the HPLC system were mainly utilised as an automatic and convenient way of introducing the sample into the DAD. The method was tested on the local anaesthetic compound lidocaine. The UV spectrum (245-290 nm) from the samples analysed in the detector was used for multivariate calibration for the determination of lidocaine solutions. The content was determined with PLS regression. The effect on the predictive ability of three factors: flow, data-collection rate and rise time as well as two ways of exporting a representative UV spectrum from the DAD file collected was investigated by means of an experimental design comprising 11 experiments. For each experiment, 14 solutions containing a known content of lidocaine were analysed (0.02-0.2 mg ml(-1)). From these 14 samples two calibration sets and two test sets were made and as the response in the experimental design the Root Mean Square Error of Prediction (RMSEP) values from the predictions of the two test sets were used. When the factor setting giving the lowest RMSEP was found, this setting was used when analysing a new calibration set of 12 lidocaine samples (0.1-0.2 mg ml(-1)). This calibration model was validated by two external test sets, A and B, analysed on separate occasions for the evaluation of repeatability (test set A) and determination over time (test set B). For comparison, the reference method, liquid chromatography, was also used for analysis of the ten samples in test set B. This comparison of the two methods was done twice on different occasions. The results show that in respect of accuracy, precision and repeatability the new method is comparable to the reference method. The main advantages compared with liquid chromatography are the

  10. Lidocaine injection of pericranial myofascial trigger points in the treatment of frequent episodic tension-type headache

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of local lidocaine injections into the myofascial trigger points (TPs) located at the pericranial muscles in patients with episodic tension-type headache (ETTH). Methods The study included 108 patients with frequent ETTH that were randomized into 4 groups. One injection of saline (NaCl 0.9%) was administered to group 1 (n = 27), 1 injection of lidocaine (0.5%) was administered to group 2 (n = 27), group 3 (n = 27) received 5 injections of saline (NaCl 0.9%), and group 4 (n = 27) received 5 injections of lidocaine (0.5%); on alternate days 2 mL for each muscle was injected into the frontal, temporal, masseter, sternocleidomastoid, semispinalis capitis, trapezius and splenius capitis muscles bilaterally. The frequency of painful days per month (FPD) and the patients’ visual analogue scales (VAS) were evaluated before treatment, and 2, 4 and 6 months after treatment. Results Mean age of the patients was 36.28 ± 9.41 years (range: 18–54 years). FPD scores improved significantly in group 2, 3 and 4 at 2 months posttreatment compared to pre- treatment (all P < 0.05), and also VAS scores improved significantly in group 2 and 4 at 2 months posttreatment (P < 0.05) but this improvement insisted at the 6 month only in group 4. Group 2 had better VAS and FPD than group 1 only at 2. and 4. months after treatment (for VAS P < 0.0121, P = 0.0232; for FPD P = 0.0003, P = 0.0004, respectively). Group 4 had better scores than group 3 at the 2., 4. and 6. months after treatment in both parameters (all P < 0.05). Group 2 had better scores than group 1 in FPD at the 2. and 4. months posttreatment (P = 0.0003, P = 0.0004, respectively), but not at the 6. month. Conclusion Local lidocaine injections into the myofascial TPs located in the pericranial muscles could be considered as an effective alternative treatment for ETTH. PMID:23698019

  11. Rapid determination of lidocaine solutions with non-column chromatographic diode array UV spectroscopy and multivariate calibration.

    PubMed

    Wiberg, Kent; Hagman, Anders; Jacobsson, Sven P

    2003-01-01

    A new method for the rapid determination of pharmaceutical solutions is proposed. A conventional HPLC system with a Diode Array Detector (DAD) was used with no chromatographic column connected. As eluent, purified water (Milli Q) was used. The pump and autosampler of the HPLC system were mainly utilised as an automatic and convenient way of introducing the sample into the DAD. The method was tested on the local anaesthetic compound lidocaine. The UV spectrum (245-290 nm) from the samples analysed in the detector was used for multivariate calibration for the determination of lidocaine solutions. The content was determined with PLS regression. The effect on the predictive ability of three factors: flow, data-collection rate and rise time as well as two ways of exporting a representative UV spectrum from the DAD file collected was investigated by means of an experimental design comprising 11 experiments. For each experiment, 14 solutions containing a known content of lidocaine were analysed (0.02-0.2 mg ml(-1)). From these 14 samples two calibration sets and two test sets were made and as the response in the experimental design the Root Mean Square Error of Prediction (RMSEP) values from the predictions of the two test sets were used. When the factor setting giving the lowest RMSEP was found, this setting was used when analysing a new calibration set of 12 lidocaine samples (0.1-0.2 mg ml(-1)). This calibration model was validated by two external test sets, A and B, analysed on separate occasions for the evaluation of repeatability (test set A) and determination over time (test set B). For comparison, the reference method, liquid chromatography, was also used for analysis of the ten samples in test set B. This comparison of the two methods was done twice on different occasions. The results show that in respect of accuracy, precision and repeatability the new method is comparable to the reference method. The main advantages compared with liquid chromatography are the

  12. Ultrasound-guided intra-articular lidocaine block for reduction of anterior shoulder dislocation in the pediatric emergency department.

    PubMed

    Breslin, Kristen; Boniface, Keith; Cohen, Joanna

    2014-03-01

    We report a case of successful reduction of an anterior shoulder dislocation after ultrasound-guided intra-articular lidocaine (IAL) block with subsequent sonographic confirmation of reduction. Current literature suggests that IAL can provide similar levels of analgesia as intravenous sedation, and IAL block is associated with lower complication rates and shorter emergency department stays. However, these studies may be limited by uncertainty about the accuracy of landmark-based glenohumeral injections. The use of beside ultrasound may improve the effectiveness of IAL block for reduction of anterior shoulder dislocation and provide a mechanism for immediate postreduction evaluation of the placement of the humeral head.

  13. Absorption of Iontophoresis-Driven 2% Lidocaine With Epinephrine in the Tissues at 5 mm Below the Surface of the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Draper, David O.; Coglianese, Mark; Castel, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Context: In a recent study, we were unable to measure lidocaine in the human calf at a 5-mm depth via iontophoresis. We surmised that this might be due to a lack of epinephrine in the compound. Because epinephrine is a vasoconstrictor, it might allow the drug to pass beyond the capillaries and be delivered to the deeper tissues. Objective: To determine if iontophoresis could deliver lidocaine with epinephrine 5 mm under the surface of human skin, as measured by microdialysis. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Therapeutic modalities research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten volunteers (5 males, 5 females; age, 15–28 years) with less than 5 mm of adipose tissue in the area we measured and with no allergies to lidocaine participated. The measurement area had been free of any injury, swelling, or infection for at least 3 months before the study. Intervention(s): We inserted a microdialysis probe 0.5 cm under the skin of the right lower leg. Next, microdialysis was performed through this area for 60 minutes, which allowed local skin blood flow to return to baseline. We then performed iontophoresis at 40 mA/min using 2 mL of 2% lidocaine. Iontophoresis was performed over this area for 10.5 minutes to collect the lidocaine samples. After this stage, the electrode was left in place for another 50 minutes for a total of 60 minutes. Main Outcome Measure(s): The samples of the drug were analyzed via reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) in the chemistry department. Results: The RP-HPLC analysis confirmed the presence of lidocaine in all 10 participants. The mean concentration of lidocaine detected at the 5-mm depth was calculated as 3.63 mg/mL (greater than 18% of delivered concentration). Conclusions: We found that 2% lidocaine can be delivered up to 5 mm below the surface of the skin when the drug compound contains epinephrine and when passive delivery occurs for at least 50 minutes after the active delivery has

  14. Should amiodarone or lidocaine be given to patients who arrest after cardiac surgery and fail to cardiovert from ventricular fibrillation?

    PubMed

    Leeuwenburgh, Boudewijn P J; Versteegh, Michael I M; Maas, Jacinta J; Dunning, Joel

    2008-12-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether the administration of amiodarone or lidocaine in patients with refractory VT/VF after cardiac surgery results in successful cardioversion. Altogether more than 434 papers were found using the reported search, from which 23 articles were used to answer the clinical question. No randomized trials have been found in which amiodarone was studied in patients with refractory VF/VT after cardiac surgery. Recommendations on the use of amiodarone in patients with refractory VF/VT in both European and American 2005 Guidelines on Resuscitation are mainly based on expert consensus and are supported by a few randomized trials in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We would therefore recommend that amiodarone is the first line drug that should be used in patients with refractory ventricular arrhythmias after cardiac surgery that persist after three failed attempts at cardioversion. Lidocaine should only be used if amiodarone is not available or if its use is contraindicated. Amiodarone should be administered as an intravenous bolus of 300 mg after the third unsuccessful shock.

  15. Effect of lidocaine- and prilocaine-based topical anesthetics on the inflammatory exudates in subcutaneous tissue of rats.

    PubMed

    Pochapski, Márcia Thaís; Neto, José Laufer; Jassen, Jocélia Lago; Farago, Paulo Vitor; Santos, Fábio André

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this present study was to evaluate the irritative potential of 2 topical anesthetics used in intrapocket anesthesia for periodontal scaling/root planing when applied in subcutaneous tissue of rats. Sixty animals were divided into 4 groups: group 1, saline solution (control); group 2, poloxamer gel (thermosetting vehicle); group 3, lidocaine and prilocaine poloxamer thermosetting gel; group 4: EMLA, a lidocaine and prilocaine dermatological cream. Injections of 2% Evans blue were administrated intravenously into the lateral caudal vein. In order to analyze vascular permeability, the tested substances were injected intradermally. The rats were sacrificed 3, 6, and 9 hours after injection of the substances. The dorsal skin was dissected and removed. The vascular permeability was evaluated by the measurement of area of dye extravasation and the dye was subsequently extracted after immersion in formamide. Statistical analyses were made by ANOVA with Bonferroni's post hoc test and Pearson correlation. The 2 methods to analyze the exudative phase of the inflammatory process showed statistically significant difference among the groups and periods of evaluation (P < .05). Both methods had a significant correlation (P < .0001). Under the tested conditions, the anesthetic agents showed mild initial inflammatory response when implanted in subcutaneous connective tissue.

  16. Attenuation of Hemodynamic Responses to Laryngoscopy and Tracheal Intubation: Propacetamol versus Lidocaine-A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Kord Valeshabad, Ali; Nabavian, Omid; Nourijelyani, Keramat; Kord, Hadi; Vafainejad, Hossein; Kord Valeshabad, Reza; Reza Feili, Ali; Rezaei, Mehdi; Darabi, Hamed; Koohkan, Mohammad; Golbinimofrad, Poorya; Jafari, Samira

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of propacetamol on attenuating hemodynamic responses subsequent laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation compared to lidocaine. In this randomized clinical trial, 62 patients with the American Anesthesiologists Society (ASA) class I/II who required laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation for elective surgery were assigned to receive propacetamol 2 g/I.V./infusion (group P) or lidocaine 1.5 mg/kg (group L) prior to laryngoscopy. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP, DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) were recorded at baseline, before laryngoscopy and within nine minutes after intubation. In both groups P and L, MAP increased after laryngoscopy and the changes were statistically significant (P < 0.001). There were significant changes of HR in both groups after intubation (P < 0.02), but the trend of changes was different between two groups (P < 0.001). In group L, HR increased after intubation and its change was statistically significant within 9 minutes after intubation (P < 0.001), while in group P, HR remained stable after intubation (P = 0.8). Propacetamol 2 gr one hour prior intubation attenuates heart rate responses after laryngoscopy but is not effective to prevent acute alterations in blood pressure after intubation. PMID:24822063

  17. Preemptive effects of a combination of preoperative diclofenac, butorphanol, and lidocaine on postoperative pain management following orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nagatsuka, C; Ichinohe, T; Kaneko, Y

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether preemptive multimodal analgesia (diclofenac, butorphanol, and lidocaine) was obtained during sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO). Following institutional approval and informed consent, 82 healthy patients (ASA-I) undergoing SSRO were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups, the preemptive multimodal analgesia group (group P, n = 41) and the control group (group C, n = 41). This study was conducted in a double-blind manner. Patients in group P received 50 mg rectal diclofenac sodium, 10 micrograms/kg intravenous 0.1% butorphanol tartrate, and 1% lidocaine solution containing 10 micrograms/mL epinephrine for regional anesthesia and for bilateral inferior alveolar nerve blocks before the start of surgery. Postoperative pain intensity at rest (POPI) was assessed on a numerical rating score (NRS) in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) and on a visual analogue scale (VAS) at the first water intake (FWI) and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after extubation. POPI in the PACU was significantly lower in group P than in group C, whereas there were no significant differences at FWI, 24, 48, and 72 hours after extubation in both groups. Preemptive multimodal analgesia was not observed in this study. PMID:11432176

  18. Risk-benefit stratification as a guide to lidocaine prophylaxis of primary ventricular fibrillation in acute myocardial infarction: an analytic review.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, L.; Batsford, W. P.

    1979-01-01

    Early investigators suggested that ventricular fibrillation without heart failure in acute myocardial infarction was reliably preceded by warning arrhythmias, and that suppression of such arrhythmias with intravenous lidocaine could avoid the need for resuscitation. While the efficacy and safety of lidocaine have been substantiated, the reliability of warning arrhythmias as predictors for primary ventricular fibrillation has not. We present data showing that the risk of primary ventricular fibrillation is most dependent on the patient's age and the interval since the onset of his symptoms, rather than on the presence of warning arrhythmias. We have estimated that lidocaine prophylaxis would have to be given to about 12 patients in the highest risk group (patients under age 50 and within six hours of the onset of symptoms), compared to about 400 patients in the lowest risk group (patients above age 70 and more than 24 hours since the onset of symptoms), to prevent one episode of primary ventricular fibrillation in each group. We propose that these risk stratifications, as adapted to the conditions in specific hospitals, provide the most rational approach to lidocaine prophylaxis of primary ventricular fibrillation. PMID:392960

  19. Safety and performance of cohesive polydensified matrix hyaluronic acid fillers with lidocaine in the clinical setting – an open-label, multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Kühne, Ulrich; Esmann, Jørgen; von Heimburg, Dennis; Imhof, Matthias; Weissenberger, Petra; Sattler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Cohesive polydensified matrix (CPM®) hyaluronic acid fillers are now available with or without lidocaine. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and performance of CPM® fillers with lidocaine in the clinical setting. In an open-label, prospective, postmarketing study, 108 patients from seven sites in Germany and Denmark were treated with one or more lidocaine-containing CPM® fillers. Performance was assessed using the Merz Aesthetics Scales® (MAS). Pain was rated on an 11-point visual analog scale. Patients’ and physicians’ satisfaction as well as adverse events were recorded. Improvements of ≥1-point on MAS immediately after and 17 days posttreatment were observed in ~90% of patients compared with baseline. All investigators assessed ejection force, product positioning, and performance as similar or superior to the respective nonlidocaine products. Overall, 94% of investigators were satisfied with the esthetic outcomes and were willing to continue using the products. All patients except one were satisfied with the results, and all were willing to repeat the treatment. Mean pain scores were low during (<3.0) and after injection (<0.6). Except for one case of bruising, all adverse events were mild to moderate. CPM® fillers with lidocaine are safe and effective for a wide range of esthetic facial indications. PMID:27799807

  20. Effects of Addition of Systemic Tramadol or Adjunct Tramadol to Lidocaine Used for Intravenous Regional Anesthesia in Patients Undergoing Hand Surgery.

    PubMed

    Yektaş, Abdulkadir; Gümüş, Funda; Karayel, Abdulhalim; Alagöl, Ayşin

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA) is used in outpatient hand surgery as an easily applicable and cost-effective technique with clinical advantages. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of addition of systemic tramadol or adjunct tramadol to lidocaine for IVRA in patients undergoing hand surgery. American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I-II patients (n = 60) who underwent hand surgery were included. For this purpose, only lidocaine (LDC), lidocaine+adjunct tramadol (LDC+TRA group), or lidocaine+systemic tramadol (LDC+SysTRA group) was administered to the patients for IVRA and the groups were compared in terms of onset and recovery time of sensory and motor blocks, quality of anesthesia, and the degree of intraoperative and postoperative pain. The onset time of sensorial block was significantly shorter in the LDC+TRA group than that in the LDC+SysTRA group. The motor block recovery time was significantly shorter in the LDC+SysTRA group than that in the LDC+TRA and LDC groups. Administration of tramadol as an adjunct showed some clinical benefits by providing a shorter onset time of sensory and motor block, decreasing pain and analgesic requirement, and improving intraoperative conditions during IVRA. It was determined that systemic tramadol administration had no superiority.

  1. Effects of Addition of Systemic Tramadol or Adjunct Tramadol to Lidocaine Used for Intravenous Regional Anesthesia in Patients Undergoing Hand Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yektaş, Abdulkadir; Gümüş, Funda; Karayel, Abdulhalim; Alagöl, Ayşin

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA) is used in outpatient hand surgery as an easily applicable and cost-effective technique with clinical advantages. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of addition of systemic tramadol or adjunct tramadol to lidocaine for IVRA in patients undergoing hand surgery. American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I-II patients (n = 60) who underwent hand surgery were included. For this purpose, only lidocaine (LDC), lidocaine+adjunct tramadol (LDC+TRA group), or lidocaine+systemic tramadol (LDC+SysTRA group) was administered to the patients for IVRA and the groups were compared in terms of onset and recovery time of sensory and motor blocks, quality of anesthesia, and the degree of intraoperative and postoperative pain. The onset time of sensorial block was significantly shorter in the LDC+TRA group than that in the LDC+SysTRA group. The motor block recovery time was significantly shorter in the LDC+SysTRA group than that in the LDC+TRA and LDC groups. Administration of tramadol as an adjunct showed some clinical benefits by providing a shorter onset time of sensory and motor block, decreasing pain and analgesic requirement, and improving intraoperative conditions during IVRA. It was determined that systemic tramadol administration had no superiority. PMID:27313608

  2. Effects of Addition of Systemic Tramadol or Adjunct Tramadol to Lidocaine Used for Intravenous Regional Anesthesia in Patients Undergoing Hand Surgery.

    PubMed

    Yektaş, Abdulkadir; Gümüş, Funda; Karayel, Abdulhalim; Alagöl, Ayşin

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA) is used in outpatient hand surgery as an easily applicable and cost-effective technique with clinical advantages. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of addition of systemic tramadol or adjunct tramadol to lidocaine for IVRA in patients undergoing hand surgery. American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I-II patients (n = 60) who underwent hand surgery were included. For this purpose, only lidocaine (LDC), lidocaine+adjunct tramadol (LDC+TRA group), or lidocaine+systemic tramadol (LDC+SysTRA group) was administered to the patients for IVRA and the groups were compared in terms of onset and recovery time of sensory and motor blocks, quality of anesthesia, and the degree of intraoperative and postoperative pain. The onset time of sensorial block was significantly shorter in the LDC+TRA group than that in the LDC+SysTRA group. The motor block recovery time was significantly shorter in the LDC+SysTRA group than that in the LDC+TRA and LDC groups. Administration of tramadol as an adjunct showed some clinical benefits by providing a shorter onset time of sensory and motor block, decreasing pain and analgesic requirement, and improving intraoperative conditions during IVRA. It was determined that systemic tramadol administration had no superiority. PMID:27313608

  3. Effect of paracetamol, dexketoprofen trometamol, lidocaine spray, pethidine & diclofenac sodium application for pain relief during fractional curettage: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Açmaz, Gökhan; Bayraktar, Evrim; Aksoy, Hüseyin; Başer, Mürvet; Yilmaz, Mustafa Oğuz; Müderris, İptisam İpek

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Patients frequently experience pain of moderate to severe degree during gynaecologic procedures. This prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was aimed to investigate the analgesic efficacy of preoperative oral dexketoprofen trometamol, intravenous paracetamol, lidocaine spray, pethidine and diclofenac sodium on fractional curettage procedure. Methods: A total of 144 mutiparous women were randomly allocated to one of the six groups. The first group (control group) consisted of 22 participants and they did not receive any treatment. The second group had 26 participants receiving oral 25 mg dexketoprofen trometamol. The 23 participants of the third group received two puff lidocaine sprays on cervical mucosa. The forth group consisted of 25 participants receiving 100 mg pethidine. In the fifth group, the 23 participants received 1000 mg intravenous paracetamol and the sixth group consisted of 25 participants receiving diclofenac sodium. Results: Pethidine was the best choice for reducing pain score during curettage procedure (t2:intra-operative). All analgesic procedures were significantly effective in reducing pain during postoperative period (t3). Significant pain reduction was achieved for both intra- and postoperative period by using analgesics. Interpretation & conclusions: The results of our study showed that lidocaine puffs provided the best pain relief than the other analgesics used. Therefore, lidocaine may be considered as the first choice analgesic in fractional curettage (NCT ID: 01993589). PMID:26609031

  4. Pretreatmet with 5% lidocaine patch reduces cannula-induced and propofol-induced pain: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jung-Min; Cho, Ah Reum; Baik, Ji Seok; Lee, Do Won; Ji, Young Tae; Yoo, Ki Chan; Kim, Hae-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of 5% lidocaine patch in reducing propofol-induced pain and cannula-induced pain. Methods In a randomized, double-blind study, 126 patients were divided into one of three groups: pretreatment with a 5% lidocaine patch (Lidotop®) and premixed 2 ml of normal saline with 1.5 mg/kg of 1% propofol (Group A); pretreatment with a placebo patch and premixed 2 ml of normal saline with 1.5 mg/kg of 1% propofol (Group B); or pretreatment with a placebo patch and premixed 2 ml of 2% lidocaine (40 mg) with 1.5 mg/kg of 1% propofol (Group C) for induction of anesthesia. Pain severity was evaluated on a four-point verbal rating scale during intravenous cannulation, propofol injection, and 24 h after the operation (recall). Results Eighteen patients (47.4%) in Group A complained of cannula-induced pain compared with 35 (94.6%) in Group B and 36 (94.7%) in Group C (P < 0.001). Group A patients showed significantly lower incidence of propofol-induced pain and recall of propofol-induced pain compared with Group B (P < 0.001 and P = 0.01), whereas there was no difference compared with Group C. Conclusions Preoperative transdermal administration of 5% lidocaine patch is an effective and simple method in reducing propofol-induced pain as well as cannula-induced pain.

  5. Primary erythromelalgia in a child responding to intravenous lidocaine and oral mexiletine treatment.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Aruna; Rose, John B; Guite, Jessica W; Hehir, David; Milovcich, Karen

    2005-04-01

    infusion of local anesthetics, which could not be continued because he found the motor blockade that accompanied his analgesia intolerable. However, intravenous lidocaine infusion, with subsequent transition to oral mexiletine therapy, proved very effective in reducing the frequency and severity of the pain episodes. The patient was discharged from the hospital with oral mexiletine therapy and has been monitored at the pain management clinic. He returned to and completed school, attended summer camp, and enjoys an active happy life. He walks without precipitating pain in his feet and sleeps 9 to 10 hours every night. He has needed to soak his feet on only 4 occasions in the 6 months since his discharge from the hospital. His quality of life has improved significantly. He has shown no evidence of liver toxicity, and his mexiletine levels have been stable. PMID:15741349

  6. Cardiorespiratory and antinociceptive effects of two different doses of lidocaine administered to horses during a constant intravenous infusion of xylazine and ketamine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigated the antinociceptive effects of a constant rate infusion (CRI) of lidocaine during xylazine and ketamine anesthesia in horses and aimed to correlate these effects with cardiorespiratory variables, bispectral index (BIS) and plasma lidocaine concentrations. Six adult crossbred mares weighing 320–400 kg were anesthetized on three different occasions. Sedation was performed with xylazine (0.75 mg/kg IV) and anesthetic induction with guaifenesin (75 mg/kg IV) and ketamine (2 mg/kg IV). Anesthesia was maintained with 37.5 μg/kg/min of xylazine and 87.5 μg/kg/min of ketamine both administered intravenously for 75 min. The three treatments consisted of: lidocaine (loading dose: 5 mg/kg, CRI: 100 μg/kg/min; THL); lidocaine (loading dose: 2.5 mg/kg; CRI: 50 μg/kg/min: TLL); and saline (TS); all given 15 min after induction and maintained for 1 h. Antinociception was measured by response to electrical stimulation and bispectral index (BIS) was recorded during anesthesia. Parametric and non-parametric data were compared using ANOVA followed by Student-Newman-Keuls and Friedman tests, respectively. Results Plasma lidocaine concentrations peaked at the end of lidocaine loading dose and was greater in THL (9.61 ± 2.75 μg/mL) vs TLL (4.50 ± 3.34 μg/mL). Electrical noxious stimulation caused purposeful movement in all horses from TS, but no response in THL. The BIS was decreased in THL only and was less when compared to the other treatments throughout anesthesia. Blood pressure, PaO2 and PaCO2 increased and heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), pH, total plasma protein and temperature decreased during anesthesia in all treatments. PaCO2 and HR were greater and RR and pH less in THL compared to TLL and TS at 30 min during anesthesia. All recoveries were considered excellent. Time to standing was longer after THL (60 ± 20 min) than following TLL and TS (32 ± 17 and 30 ± 15 min, respectively

  7. Endothelial Barrier Protection by Local Anesthetics: Ropivacaine and Lidocaine Block Tumor Necrosis Factor-α–induced Endothelial Cell Src Activation

    PubMed Central

    Piegeler, Tobias; Votta-Velis, E. Gina; Bakhshi, Farnaz R.; Mao, Mao; Carnegie, Graeme; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Schwartz, David E.; Borgeat, Alain; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice; Minshall, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary endothelial barrier dysfunction mediated in part by Src-kinase activation plays a crucial role in acute inflammatory disease. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), activate Src via phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/Akt-dependent nitric oxide generation, a process initiated by recruitment of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase regulatory subunit p85 to TNF-receptor-1. Because amide-linked local anesthetics have well-established anti-inflammatory effects, the authors hypothesized that ropivacaine and lidocaine attenuate inflammatory Src signaling by disrupting the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase–Akt–nitric oxide pathway, thus blocking Src-dependent neutrophil adhesion and endothelial hyperpermeability. Methods Human lung microvascular endothelial cells, incubated with TNFα in the absence or presence of clinically relevant concentrations of ropivacaine and lidocaine, were analyzed by Western blot, probing for phosphorylated/activated Src, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, Akt, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and caveolin-1. The effect of ropivacaine on TNFα-induced nitric oxide generation, co-immunoprecipitation of TNF-receptor-1 with p85, neutrophil adhesion, and endothelial barrier disruption were assessed. Results Ropivacaine and lidocaine attenuated TNFα-induced Src activation (half-maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 8.611 × 10−10 M for ropivacaine; IC50 = 5.864 × 10−10 M for lidocaine) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation (IC50 = 7.572 × 10−10 M for ropivacaine; IC50 = 6.377 × 10−10 M for lidocaine). Akt activation (n = 7; P = 0.006) and stimulus-dependent binding of TNF-receptor-1 and p85 (n = 6; P = 0.043) were blocked by 1 nM of ropivacaine. TNFα-induced neutrophil adhesion and disruption of endothelial monolayers via Src-dependent intercellular adhesion molecule-1- and caveolin-1-phosphorylation, respectively, were also attenuated. Conclusions Ropivacaine and lidocaine

  8. Efficacy and safety of mepivacaine compared with lidocaine in local anaesthesia in dentistry: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Su, Naichuan; Liu, Yan; Yang, Xianrui; Shi, Zongdao; Huang, Yi

    2014-04-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the efficacy and safety of mepivacaine compared with lidocaine used in local anaesthesia in dentistry. Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure and WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched electronically. Relevant journals and references of studies included were hand-searched for randomised controlled trials comparing mepivacaine with lidocaine in terms of efficacy and safety. Twenty-eight studies were included, of which 15 had low risk of bias and 13 had moderate risk of bias. In comparison with 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline, 3% mepivacaine showed a lower success rate (P = 0.05), a shorter onset time of pulpal anaesthesia (P = 0.0005), inferior pain control during injection phase and superior inhibition of heart rate increase (P < 0.0001). In contrast, 2% mepivacaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline gave a higher success rate (P < 0.00001), a similar onset time of pulpal anaesthesia (P = 0.34) and superior pain control during injection phase (P < 0.0001); 2% mepivacaine with 1:20,000 levonordefrin had the same success rate (P = 0.69) and similar onset time of pulpal anaesthesia (P = 0.90). In addition, 3% mepivacaine had shorter onset time (P = 0.004), same level of success rate (P = 0.28) and similar pain control during injection and postinjection compared with 2% lidocaine with 1:50,000 adrenaline. Given the efficacy and safety of the two solutions, 2% mepivacaine with vasoconstrictors is better than 2% lidocaine with vasoconstrictors in dental treatment. Meanwhile, 3% plain mepivacaine is better for patients with cardiac diseases.

  9. Inhibitory effect of lidocaine on pain and itch using formalin-induced nociception and 5'-guanidinonaltrindole-induced scratching models in mice: behavioral and neuroanatomical evidence.

    PubMed

    Inan, Saadet; Dun, Nae J; Cowan, Alan

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this study was to establish the effect of lidocaine, a local anesthetic, on pain and itch using formalin-induced nociception and kappa opioid antagonist-induced scratching models in mice. We investigated if local intradermal pretreatment (at -10 min) with lidocaine N-ethyl bromide (lidocaine, 2%, 0.1 ml) antagonizes behavioral responses and prevents c-fos expression induced by pain and itch. Male, Swiss Webster mice (25-30 g, n=6-10) were used. Formalin (5%, 20 microl, s.c.) or saline was administered to the right dorsal hindpaw and the time spent licking this paw was recorded at 0-10 min and 20-35 min. For itching, mice were challenged with 5'-guanidinonaltrindole (GNTI, 0.3mg/kg, s.c., behind the neck) or saline and the number of neck-directed scratches with hindpaws was counted for 30 min. C-fos immunohistochemistry was performed in lumbar (for pain) and cervical (for scratching) spinal sections 2h after the respective treatments. We found that lidocaine (a) antagonizes both formalin-induced pain and GNTI-induced scratching and (b) prevents c-fos expression evoked by pain (medial side of the superficial layer and deeper layers of the dorsal horn) and itch (lateral side of the superficial layer of the dorsal horn). Additionally, GNTI caused c-fos activation in mice wearing an Elizabethan collar (to prevent scratching of the neck) suggesting that GNTI provokes c-fos expression by inducing an itch sensation. Our results highlight the antipruritic properties of lidocaine and argue for its comprehensive clinical testing against pruritic states.

  10. Topical nifedipine with lidocaine ointment versus active control for pain after hemorrhoidectomy: results of a multicentre, prospective, randomized, double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Perrotti, Pasquale; Dominici, Patrizia; Grossi, Enzo; Cerutti, Renata; Antropoli, Carmine

    2010-01-01

    Background Spasm through the internal anal sphincter is one of the supposed causes for pain after hemorrhoidectomy, a common and distressing experience. We hypothesized that the addition of topical nifedipine to lidocaine would improve pain control by causing a relaxation of the smooth muscle of the internal anal sphincter. Methods We conducted a multicentre randomized, double-blind trial to compare the efficacy of 0.3% nifedipine and 1.5% lidocaine ointment versus 1.5% lidocaine ointment alone in reducing pain after hemorrhoidectomy. A physician unaware of the treatment arm measured pain by use of the Analogue Chromatic Continuous Scale (ACCS) at baseline; soon after surgery; at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 24 hours after surgery; on day 7 after surgery; and at a final visit 14 days after surgery. The physician also noted the time to first analgesic administration within 24 hours after surgery. Results In all, 135 patients per group participated (270 total). Evaluation of the delta ACCS score versus basal value, a covariate for rescue analgesic administration time, revealed better pain control in the group that received nifedipine with lidocaine at 6 hours after surgery and on day 7 (p < 0.011 and p < 0.054, respectively). We noticed no difference between groups for time of administration of rescue analgesic, blood pressure, heart rate or frequency of headache. Conclusion Although there was no difference between groups for time of administration of rescue analgesic after open hemorrhoidectomy, the patients’ assessment of pain using ACCS showed that the use of topical nifedipine with lidocaine may provide a slight significant difference in favour of the study group at 6 hours and at day 7 after surgery. Narcotic analgesics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug administration should continue to be recommended. Further research focusing on these outcomes is warranted. PMID:20100408

  11. Pharmacokinetics of lidocaine and bupivacaine following subarachnoid administration in surgical patients: simultaneous investigation of absorption and disposition kinetics using stable isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Burm, A.G.; Van Kleef, J.W.; Vermeulen, N.P.; Olthof, G.; Breimer, D.D.; Spierdijk, J.

    1988-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics of lidocaine and bupivacaine following subarachnoid administration were studied in 12 surgical patients using a stable isotope method. After subarachnoid administration of the agent to be evaluated, a deuterium-labelled analogue was administered intravenously. Blood samples were collected for 24 h. Plasma concentrations of the unlabelled and the deuterium-labelled local anesthetics were determined using a combination of capillary gas chromatography and mass fragmentography. Bi-exponential functions were fitted to the plasma concentration-time data of the deuterium-labelled local anesthetics. The progression of the absorption was evaluated using deconvolution. Mono- and bi-exponential functions were then fitted to the fraction absorbed versus time data. The distribution and elimination half-lives of the deuterium-labelled analogues were 25 +/- 13 min (mean +/- SD) and 121 +/- 31 min for lidocaine and 19 +/- 10 min and 131 +/- 33 min for bupivacaine. The volumes of the central compartment and steady-state volumes of distribution were: lidocaine 57 +/- 10 l and 105 +/- 25 l, bupivacaine 25 +/- 6 l and 63 +/- 22 l. Total plasma clearance values averaged 0.97 +/- 0.21 l/min for lidocaine and 0.56 +/- 0.14 l/min for bupivacaine. The absorption of lidocaine could be described by a single first order absorption process, characterized by a half-life of 71 +/- 17 min in five out of six patients. The absorption of bupivacaine could be described adequately assuming two parallel first order absorption processes in all six patients. The half-lives, characterizing the fast and slow absorption processes of bupivacaine, were 50 +/- 27 min and 408 +/- 275 min, respectively. The fractions of the dose, absorbed in the fast and slow processes, were 0.35 +/- 0.17 and 0.61 +/- 0.16, respectively.

  12. Functional Connectivity of the Default Mode Network and Its Association With Pain Networks in Irritable Bowel Patients Assessed via Lidocaine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Letzen, Janelle E.; Craggs, Jason G.; Perlstein, William M.; Price, Donald D.; Robinson, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    The default mode network (DMN), a group of brain regions implicated in passive thought processes, has been proposed as a potentially informative neural marker to aid in novel treatment development. However, the DMN’s internal connectivity and its temporal relationship (ie, functional network connectivity) with pain-related neural networks in chronic pain conditions is poorly understood, as is the DMN’s sensitivity to analgesic effects. The current study assessed how DMN functional connectivity and its temporal association with 3 pain-related networks changed after rectal lidocaine treatment in irritable bowel syndrome patients. Eleven females with irritable bowel syndrome underwent a rectal balloon distension paradigm during functional magnetic resonance imaging in 2 conditions: natural history (ie, baseline) and lidocaine. Results showed increased DMN connectivity with pain-related regions during natural history and increased within-network connectivity of DMN structures under lidocaine. Further, there was a significantly greater lag time between 2 of the pain networks, those involved in cognitive and in affective pain processes, comparing lidocaine to natural history. These findings suggest that 1) DMN plasticity is sensitive to analgesic effects, and 2) reduced pain ratings via analgesia reflect DMN connectivity more similar to pain-free individuals. Findings show potential implications of this network as an approach for understanding clinical pain management techniques. Perspective This study shows that lidocaine, a peripheral analgesic, significantly altered DMN connectivity and affected its relationship with pain-related networks. These findings suggest that the DMN, which is hypothesized to represent non-goal-oriented activity, is sensitive to analgesic effects and could be useful to understand pain treatment mechanisms. PMID:23743257

  13. Inhibitory effect of lidocaine on pain and itch using formalin-induced nociception and 5′-guanidinonaltrindole-induced scratching models in mice: behavioral and neuroanatomical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Inan, Saadet; Dun, Nae J.; Cowan, Alan

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the effect of lidocaine, a local anesthetic, on pain and itch using formalin-induced nociception and kappa opioid antagonist-induced scratching models in mice. We investigated if local intradermal pretreatment (at −10 min) with lidocaine N-ethyl bromide (lidocaine, 2%, 0.1 ml) antagonizes behavioral responses and prevents c-fos expression induced by pain and itch. Male, Swiss Webster mice (25–30 g, n=6–10) were used. Formalin (5%, 20 µl, s.c.) or saline was administered to the right dorsal hindpaw and the time spent licking this paw was recorded at 0–10 min and 20–35 min. For itching, mice were challenged with 5′- guanidinonaltrindole (GNTI, 0.3 mg/kg, s.c., behind the neck) or saline and the number of neck-directed scratches with hindpaws was counted for 30 min. C-fos immunohistochemistry was performed in lumbar (for pain) and cervical (for scratching) spinal sections 2 h after respective treatments. We found that lidocaine (a) antagonizes both formalin-induced pain and GNTI-induced scratching and (b) prevents c-fos expression evoked by pain (medial side of the superficial layer and deeper layers of the dorsal horn) and itch (lateral side of the superficial layer of the dorsal horn). Additionally, GNTI caused c-fos activation in mice wearing an Elizabethan collar (to prevent scratching of the neck) suggesting that GNTI provokes c-fos expression by inducing an itch sensation. Our results highlight the antipruritic properties of lidocaine and argue for its comprehensive clinical testing against pruritic states. PMID:19549515

  14. Effect of Intracuff Lidocaine on Postoperative Sore Throat and the Emergence Phenomenon: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Fai; Lin, Yu-Cih; Tsai, Hsiao-Chien; Chen, Ta-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background Postoperative sore throat and other airway morbidities are common and troublesome after endotracheal tube intubation general anesthesia (ETGA). We propose lidocaine as endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff inflation media to reduce the postintubation-related emergence phenomenon. Methods We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases systematically for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that have investigated the outcome of intracuff lidocaine versus air or saline in patients receiving ETGA. Using a random-effects model, we conducted a meta-analysis to assess the relative risks (RRs) and mean difference (MD) of the incidence and intensity of relevant adverse outcomes. Results We reviewed nineteen trials, which comprised 1566 patients. The incidence of early- and late-phase postoperative sore throat (POST), coughing, agitation, hoarseness, and dysphonia decreased significantly in lidocaine groups, with RRs of 0.46 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.31 to 0.68), 0.41 (95% CI: 0.25 to 0.66), 0.43 (95% CI: 0.31 to 0.62), 0.37 (95% CI: 0.25 to 0.55), 0.43 (95% CI: 0.29 to 0.63), and 0.19 (95% CI: 0.08 to 0.5), respectively, when compared with the control groups. The severity of POST also reduced significantly (mean difference [MD] -16.43 mm, 95% CI: -21.48 to -11.38) at 1 h and (MD -10.22 mm, 95% CI: -13.5 to -6.94) at 24 h. Both alkalinized and non-alkalinized lidocaine in the subgroup analyses showed significant benefits in emergence phenomena prevention compared with the control. Conclusion Our results indicate that both alkalinized and non-alkalinized intracuff lidocaine may prevent and alleviate POST and postintubation-related emergence phenomena. PMID:26288276

  15. Percutaneous Injection of Lidocaine Within the Carotid Body Area in Carotid Artery Stenting: An 'Old-New' Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mourikis, Dimitrios; Chatoupis, Konstantinos; Katsenis, Konstantinos; Vlahos, Lampros; Chatziioannou, Achilles

    2008-07-15

    Severe bradycardia is a common untoward effect during balloon angioplasty when performing carotid artery stenting. Therefore atropine injection even before dilatation and the presence of an anesthesiologist are advocated in all patients. In the surgical literature, injection of a local anesthetic agent into the carotid sinus before carotid endarterectomy was performed in an attempt to ameliorate perioperative hemodynamic instability. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that percutaneous infiltration of the carotid sinus with local anesthetic immediately before balloon dilatation reduces bradycardia and ameliorates the need for atropine injection or the presence of an anesthesiologist. Infiltration of the carotid sinus with 5 ml of 1% lidocaine, 3 min before dilatation, was performed in 30 consecutive patients. No one exhibited any significant rhythm change that required atropine injection. The anesthesiologist did not face any hemodynamic instability during the carotid artery stenting procedure.

  16. Streptomycin-lidocaine injections for the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia: Report of three cases with literature review

    PubMed Central

    Waghray, Shefali; Asif, Shaik Mohammed; Duddu, Mahesh Kumar; Arakeri, Gururaj

    2013-01-01

    The sudden, stabbing, paroxysmal pain of neuralgia is the fiercest agony that a patient may experience in his life. Many varied medical treatments and surgical procedures have been suggested in the literature for neuralgic pain. Most of the patients fail to respond to medical treatments or succumb to complications of total anesthesia owing to surgical procedures. Herein, we tried a new treatment modality in patients suffering from postherpetic neuralgia with appreciable success in all the three cases that are presented in this paper. Streptomycin sulfate dissolved in 2% lidocaine solution was deposited at the peripheral branches on the involved nerves targeting the trigger zones, given weekly once for a maximum of 6 week period and continued once in 2 weeks if symptoms persisted. All patients were followed-up for 1 year and there was a marked improvement on follow-up. PMID:24966716

  17. Lidocaine promotes the trafficking and functional expression of Na(v)1.8 sodium channels in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Ziane, Rahima; Chatelier, Aurélien; O'leary, Michael E; Chahine, Mohamed

    2007-07-01

    Nociceptive neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) express a combination of rapidly gating TTX-sensitive and slowly gating TTX-resistant Na currents, and the channels that produce these currents have been cloned. The Na(v)1.7 and Na(v)1.8 channels encode for the rapidly inactivating TTX-sensitive and slowly inactivating TTX-resistant Na currents, respectively. Although the Na(v)1.7 channel expresses well in cultured mammalian cell lines, attempts to express the Na(v)1.8 channel using similar approaches has been met with limited success. The inability to heterologously express Na(v)1.8 has hampered detailed characterization of the biophysical properties and pharmacology of these channels. In this study, we investigated the determinants of Na(v)1.8 expression in tsA201 cells, a transformed variant of HEK293 cells, using a combination of biochemistry, immunochemistry, and electrophysiology. Our data indicate that the unusually low expression levels of Na(v)1.8 in tsA201 cells results from a trafficking defect that traps the channel protein in the endoplasmic reticulum. Incubating the cultured cells with the local anesthetic lidocaine dramatically enhanced the cell surface expression of functional Na(v)1.8 channels. The biophysical properties of the heterologously expressed Na(v)1.8 channel are similar but not identical to those of the TTX-resistant Na current of native DRG neurons, recorded under similar conditions. Our data indicate that the lidocaine acts as a molecular chaperone that promotes efficient trafficking and increased cell surface expression of Na(v)1.8 channels. PMID:17507497

  18. Comparison of the effects of two opioid antitussives, vadocaine hydrochloride, clobutinol and lidocaine on lung mechanics in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Salonen, R O

    1988-04-01

    Intravenous administration of opioids, e.g. morphine and codeine, causes bronchoconstriction in animals and susceptible patients such as asthmatics. Therefore, the effects of two opioid antitussives (codeine and dextromethorphan), two non-opioid antitussives (vadocaine hydrochloride (2',4'-dimethyl-6'-methoxy-3-(2-methylpiperidyl) propionanilide hydrochloride, OR K-242-HCl; INN: vadocaine) and clobutinol), and lidocaine on basal lung mechanics and methacholine (MeCh, 6 micrograms/kg i.v.)-induced airway obstruction were investigated in anaesthetized guinea-pigs. Intravenous administration of codeine (10-20 mg/kg) produced a dual response in the airways; initial bronchoconstriction was followed by attenuation of the MeCh-response. Dextromethorphan (10 and 15 mg/kg) caused bronchoconstriction only. Both the opioids affected dynamic lung compliance (CDyn) more than lung resistance (RL). At doses between 1 and 20 mg/kg i.v., vadocaine, clobutinol, and lidocaine had no obvious effect on the airways. Dextromethorphan and vadocaine, both at doses of 10 and 15 mg/kg, and clobutinol (15 and 20 mg/kg) caused irreversible bradycardia and hypotension, whereas codeine (5-20 mg/kg) increased blood pressure, and to a lesser extent heart rate. These results suggest that intravenous administration of an opioid antitussive influences the small peripheral airways more than the large airways, whether the opioid has euphoric analgesic properties or not. In contrast to this, non-opioid antitussives such as vadocaine and clobutinol are without effect. At large doses, all antitussives influence the cardiovascular system considerably.

  19. Lidocaine promotes the trafficking and functional expression of Na(v)1.8 sodium channels in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Ziane, Rahima; Chatelier, Aurélien; O'leary, Michael E; Chahine, Mohamed

    2007-07-01

    Nociceptive neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) express a combination of rapidly gating TTX-sensitive and slowly gating TTX-resistant Na currents, and the channels that produce these currents have been cloned. The Na(v)1.7 and Na(v)1.8 channels encode for the rapidly inactivating TTX-sensitive and slowly inactivating TTX-resistant Na currents, respectively. Although the Na(v)1.7 channel expresses well in cultured mammalian cell lines, attempts to express the Na(v)1.8 channel using similar approaches has been met with limited success. The inability to heterologously express Na(v)1.8 has hampered detailed characterization of the biophysical properties and pharmacology of these channels. In this study, we investigated the determinants of Na(v)1.8 expression in tsA201 cells, a transformed variant of HEK293 cells, using a combination of biochemistry, immunochemistry, and electrophysiology. Our data indicate that the unusually low expression levels of Na(v)1.8 in tsA201 cells results from a trafficking defect that traps the channel protein in the endoplasmic reticulum. Incubating the cultured cells with the local anesthetic lidocaine dramatically enhanced the cell surface expression of functional Na(v)1.8 channels. The biophysical properties of the heterologously expressed Na(v)1.8 channel are similar but not identical to those of the TTX-resistant Na current of native DRG neurons, recorded under similar conditions. Our data indicate that the lidocaine acts as a molecular chaperone that promotes efficient trafficking and increased cell surface expression of Na(v)1.8 channels.

  20. Comparison of the effects of two opioid antitussives, vadocaine hydrochloride, clobutinol and lidocaine on lung mechanics in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Salonen, R O

    1988-04-01

    Intravenous administration of opioids, e.g. morphine and codeine, causes bronchoconstriction in animals and susceptible patients such as asthmatics. Therefore, the effects of two opioid antitussives (codeine and dextromethorphan), two non-opioid antitussives (vadocaine hydrochloride (2',4'-dimethyl-6'-methoxy-3-(2-methylpiperidyl) propionanilide hydrochloride, OR K-242-HCl; INN: vadocaine) and clobutinol), and lidocaine on basal lung mechanics and methacholine (MeCh, 6 micrograms/kg i.v.)-induced airway obstruction were investigated in anaesthetized guinea-pigs. Intravenous administration of codeine (10-20 mg/kg) produced a dual response in the airways; initial bronchoconstriction was followed by attenuation of the MeCh-response. Dextromethorphan (10 and 15 mg/kg) caused bronchoconstriction only. Both the opioids affected dynamic lung compliance (CDyn) more than lung resistance (RL). At doses between 1 and 20 mg/kg i.v., vadocaine, clobutinol, and lidocaine had no obvious effect on the airways. Dextromethorphan and vadocaine, both at doses of 10 and 15 mg/kg, and clobutinol (15 and 20 mg/kg) caused irreversible bradycardia and hypotension, whereas codeine (5-20 mg/kg) increased blood pressure, and to a lesser extent heart rate. These results suggest that intravenous administration of an opioid antitussive influences the small peripheral airways more than the large airways, whether the opioid has euphoric analgesic properties or not. In contrast to this, non-opioid antitussives such as vadocaine and clobutinol are without effect. At large doses, all antitussives influence the cardiovascular system considerably. PMID:3395396

  1. Effects of tocainide and lidocaine on the transmembrane action potentials as related to external potassium and calcium concentrations in guinea-pig papillary muscles.

    PubMed

    Oshita, S; Sada, H; Kojima, M; Ban, T

    1980-10-01

    Effects of lidocaine and tocainide on transmembrane potentials were studied in isolated guinea-pig papillary muscles, superfused with modified Tyrode's solution containing either 5.4, 2.7, 10.0 or 8.1 mmol/l potassium concentration, [K]0. The last solution applied contained either 1.8 (normal [Ca]0) or 7.2 mmol/l [Ca]0 (high [Ca]0. The concentrations of lidocaine and tocainide used were 18.5, 36.9 and 73.9 mumol/l and 43.7, 87.5 and 174.9 mumol/l in 5.4 mmol/l [K]0 solution and 36.9 and 87.5 mumol/l in the other solutions, respectively. At the driving rate of 1 Hz in 5.4 mmol/l "K]0 solution, both drugs produced dose-dependently a reduction of maximum rate of rise of action potential (Vmax), together with a prolongation of the relative refractory period. Vmax decreased progressively as the driving rate was increased from 1 Hz (for lidocaine) and from 0.25 Hz (for tocainide) to 5 Hz. This action was accentuated dose-dependently. A slow component (time constant tau = 232 ms for lidocaine, 281--303 ms for tocainide) and slower component (tau = 2.1--3.8 s for tocainide) of the recovery (reactivation) of Vmax were observed in premature responses at 0.25 Hz and in the first response after interruption of the basic driving rate at 1 Hz. All these effects were accentuated with rising [K]0 and attenuated in the high [Ca]0 solution. Both drugs abbreviated the action potential duration at 50% (APD50) and 90% (APD90) levels at 5.4, 8.1 and 10.0 mmol/l [K]0 but not at 2.7 mmol/l [K]0 nor a high [Ca]0 at 1 Hz. These [K]0-dependent effects of lidocaine on Vmax were successfully simulated by the model proposed by Hondeghem and Katzung (1977), with a slight change in parameter values. The mode of interaction of lidocaine with sodium channels in the open, closed and rested states was deduced from these results.

  2. Biocompatible lidocaine and prilocaine loaded-nanoemulsion system for enhanced percutaneous absorption: QbD-based optimisation, dermatokinetics and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Negi, Poonam; Singh, Bhupinder; Sharma, Gajanand; Beg, Sarwar; Katare, Om Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Barrier properties of the skin and physicochemical properties of the drugs are the main hiccups in delivering local anaesthetic molecules topically. The present work endeavours for systematic optimisation and evaluation of nanoemulsions (NEs) of local anaesthetic drugs, lidocaine and prilocaine, employing the systematic approach of Quality by Design. A 3(3) Box-Behnken design was employed for systematic optimisation of the factors obtained from screening studies employing Plackett-Burman design and risk assessment studies. The superior permeation rates, and higher concentrations of the drugs in skin layers from the optimised NE carriers, were achieved in permeation and dermatokinetic studies, when compared to marketed cream. Furthermore, rapid onset of action was demonstrated by the NE system in rabbit eye corneal reflex model and biocompatibility was confirmed from the absence of any marked skin change(s) in the normal skin histology. The developed NE systems demonstrated it as a promising carrier for topical delivery of lidocaine and prilocaine.

  3. Pain relief with lidocaine 5% patch in localized peripheral neuropathic pain in relation to pain phenotype: a randomised, double-blind, and placebo-controlled, phenotype panel study.

    PubMed

    Demant, Dyveke T; Lund, Karen; Finnerup, Nanna B; Vollert, Jan; Maier, Christoph; Segerdahl, Märtha S; Jensen, Troels S; Sindrup, Søren H

    2015-11-01

    In neuropathic pain with irritable nociceptor (IN) phenotype, upregulation of sodium channels on nociceptors is supposed to be an important pain mechanism that may be targeted by topical sodium channel blockade. This randomised, double-blind, phenotype panel, crossover study with 4-week treatment periods of lidocaine 5% patch and placebo was performed to search for phenotype differences in effect. The primary efficacy measure was the total pain intensity on an 11-point numeric rating scale, and the primary objective was to compare the effect of lidocaine in patients with and without IN phenotype as defined by hypersensitivity and preserved small-fibre function determined by quantitative sensory testing. Forty-six patients with neuropathic pain due to nerve injury or postherpetic neuralgia were randomised. The modified intention-to-treat population comprised 15 patients with irritable nociceptor and 25 patients with nonirritable nociceptor. In the total sample, lidocaine reduced pain by 0.3 numeric rating scale points (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.1-0.5) and pain-related sleep disturbance by 0.6 points (95% CI: 0.4-0.8) more than placebo (P = 0.007 and P < 0.001) and relieved pain by 0.4 verbal score (-1-5) points more (P = 0.036). For these measures, there was no significant interaction between treatment and phenotype, but there was a significant interaction for pain paroxysms (0.8, 95% CI: 0.4-1.2, P < 0.001) and deep aching pain (0.6, 95% CI: 0.1-1.0, P = 0.013). In conclusion, lidocaine 5% patch had an effect on peripheral neuropathic pain, and it may be most efficacious in patients with IN phenotype. The lack of significant phenotype differences may be caused by too low statistical power.

  4. Efficacy of Articaine and Lidocaine for Buccal Infiltration of First Maxillary Molars with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis: A Randomized Double-blinded Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Hamid Reza; Parirokh, Masoud; Nakhaee, Nouzar; V. Abbott, Paul; Samani, Syamak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of 2% lidocaine to 4% articaine in buccal infiltration of maxillary first molars with irreversible pulpitis. Moreover, the effect of root length on success of anesthesia irrespective of the type of anesthetic agent was assessed. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients suffering from painful maxillary first molars with irreversible pulpitis received an infiltration injection of either 4% articaine with 1:100000 epinephrine or 2% lidocaine with 1:80000 epinephrine. Each patient recorded their pain score in response to a cold test on a Heft-Parker visual analogue scale (VAS) before commencing the treatment, 5 min following injection, during access preparation, after pulp exposure and during root canal instrumentation. No or mild pain at any stage was considered a success. Data were analyzed using the multivariate logistic regression analysis, chi-square and t tests. Results: Finally, 47 out of 50 patients were eligible to be included in this study. The anesthetic success rates in the lidocaine and articaine groups were 56.52% and 66.67%, respectively and the difference was not significant (P=0.474). Irrespective of the anesthetic agent, the length of the palatal root (Odds Ratio=0.24, P=0.007) had an adverse effect on anesthetic success. There was an association between longer palatal root length and anesthetic failure. Conclusion: No significant difference was found between 2% lidocaine and 4% articaine in terms of anesthetic success in maxillary first molars with irreversible pulpitis. The length of the palatal root had a significant negative influence on anesthetic success. PMID:27141212

  5. Reduction of painful area as new possible therapeutic target in post-herpetic neuropathic pain treated with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster: a case series.

    PubMed

    Casale, Roberto; Di Matteo, Maria; Minella, Cristina E; Fanelli, Guido; Allegri, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) is neuropathic pain persisting after an acute episode of herpes zoster, and is associated with severe pain and sensory abnormalities that adversely affect the patient's quality of life and increase health care costs. Up to 83% of patients with PHN describe localized neuropathic pain, defined as "a type of neuropathic pain characterized by consistent and circumscribed area(s) of maximum pain". Topical treatments have been suggested as a first-line treatment for localized neuropathic pain. Use of 5% lidocaine medicated plaster could reduce abnormal nervous peripheral discharge and via the plaster could have a "protective" function in the affected area. It has been suggested that use of this plaster could reduce pain as well as the size of the painful area. To evaluate this possible outcome, we retrospectively reviewed eight patients with PHN, treated using 5% lidocaine medicated plaster. During a follow-up period of 3 months, we observed good pain relief, which was associated with a 46% reduction in size of the painful area after one month (from 236.38±140.34 cm(2) to 128.80±95.7 cm(2)) and a 66% reduction after 3 months (81.38±59.19 cm(2)). Our study cohort was composed mainly of elderly patients taking multiple drugs to treat comorbidities, who have a high risk of drug-drug interactions. Such patients benefit greatly from topical treatment of PHN. Our observations confirm the effectiveness of lidocaine plasters in the treatment of PHN, indicating that 5% lidocaine medicated plaster could reduce the size of the painful area. This last observation has to be confirmed and the mechanisms clarified in appropriate larger randomized controlled trials.

  6. Effect of ionic and non-ionic polymer on the pH of lidocaine hydrochloride preparation assessed below and over human skin surface temperature.

    PubMed

    Musial, Witold; Kokol, Vanja; Voncina, Bojana

    2010-01-01

    Lidocaine is widely accepted local anesthetic, which is applied in the form of freely soluble hydrochloride salt. In this study we evaluated the pH of respective solutions of lidocaine hydrochloride with ionic polymer--polyacrylic acid or non-ionic polymer--methylcellulose, and compared to physiological skin conditions in the range between 22 degrees C and 41 degrees C. In microscopic observation of lidocaine hydrochloride preparations with polyacrylic acid the micro-sedimentation was revealed, however obtained mixture was opalescent, and homogenously dispersed in aqueous environment. The pH was maintained on the level not higher then 4,0 in the period of 12 hours for polyacrylic acid formulation, whereas in the case of preparation with methylcellulose, the pH increased from acceptable pH of ca. 4,5 to the level of above 6,0. The polyacrylic acid derivatives should be further studied as vehicles forming preparations with stable pH value during application on the skin, with more specific methods including pH microelectrodes, sufficient for assessments in small quantities of liquids of skin surface.

  7. Effect of Paracetamol, Dexketoprofen Trometamol, Lidocaine Spray, and Paracervical Block Application for Pain Relief during Suction Termination of First-Trimester Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Açmaz, Gökhan; Aksoy, Hüseyin; Özoğlu, Nil; Aksoy, Ülkü; Albayrak, Evrim

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the analgesic efficacy of preoperative oral dexketoprofen trometamol, intravenous paracetamol, lidocaine spray, and paracervical block with ultracaine on curettage procedure. A total of 111 subjects with the request of pregnancy termination between 5 and 7 weeks of gestation were included in the study. The first group (control group) consisted of 20 participants without medication. The second group consisted of 25 participants receiving 2 puffs of lidocaine sprays on cervical mucosa. The third group consisted of 20 participants receiving oral 25 mg dexketoprofen trometamol. The fourth group consisted of 23 participants receiving 1000 mg intravenous paracetamol and the fifth group consisted of 23 participants receiving paracervical block with ultracaine. Paracervical block reduced pain score significantly in both intraoperative and postoperative periods. All analgesic procedures were significantly effective for reducing pain in postoperative period. Paracervical block may be the best method for reducing pain scores in intraoperative and postoperative periods during curettage procedure. All analgesic procedures such as lidocaine, paracetamol, ultracaine, and paracervical block with ultracaine can be used for reducing pain score in postoperative period. This trial is registered with NCT01947205. PMID:24455735

  8. A Prospective Randomized Double-blinded Pilot Study to Examine the Effect of Botulinum Toxin Type A Injection Versus Lidocaine/Depomedrol Injection on Residual and Phantom Limb Pain

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hong; Sultana, Rizwana; Taylor, Kerrey Barton; Szabo, Aniko

    2013-01-01

    Objective Botulinum toxin type A (Botox) injection has been used to manage pain. However, it remains to be proved whether Botox injection is effective to relieve residual limb pain (RLP) and phantom limb pain (PLP). Design Randomized, double-blinded pilot study. Setting Medical College and an outpatient clinic in Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Participants Amputees (n=14) with intractable RLP and/or PLP who failed in the conventional treatments. Interventions Study amputees were randomized to receive 1 Botox injection versus the combination of Lidocaine and Depomedrol injection. Each patient was evaluated at baseline and every month after the injection for 6 months. Main Outcome Measure The changes of RLP and PLP as recorded by VAS, and the changes of the pressure pain tolerance as determined by a pressure algometer. Results All patients completed the protocol treatment without acute side effects, and monthly assessments of RLP, PLP, and pain tolerance after the treatment. The time trend in the outcomes was modeled as an immediate change owing to the treatment followed by a linear tread afterward. Repeated measures were incorporated using mixed effects modeling. We found that both Botox and Lidocaine/Depomedrol injections resulted in immediate improvements of RLP (Botox: P=0.002; Lidocaine/Depomedrol: P=0.06) and pain tolerance (Botox: P=0.01; Lidocaine/Depomedrol: P=0.07). The treatment effect lasted for 6 months in both groups. The patients who received Botox injection had higher starting pain than those who received Lidocaine/Depomedrol injection (P=0.07). However, there were no statistical differences in RLP and pain tolerance between these 2 groups. In addition, no improvement of PLP was observed after Botox or Lidocaine/Depomedrol injection. Conclusions Both Botox and Lidocaine/Depomedrol injections resulted in immediate improvement of RLP (not PLP) and pain tolerance, which lasted for 6 months in amputees who failed in conventional

  9. Systemic and anti-nociceptive effects of prolonged lidocaine, ketamine, and butorphanol infusions alone and in combination in healthy horses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prolonged drug infusions are used to treat horses with severe signs of pain, but can be associated with altered gastrointestinal transit. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of prolonged constant rate infusions (CRI) of lidocaine (L), butorphanol (B), and ketamine (K) alone and in combination on gastrointestinal transit, behavior, and thermal nociceptive threshold in healthy horses. Methods Eight healthy adult horses were used in a randomized, cross-over, blinded, prospective experimental trial. Interventions were saline, L, K, B, LK, LB, BK, and LBK as an intravenous CRI for 96 hours. Drugs were mixed or diluted in saline; following a bolus, CRI rate was 0.15mL/kg/hr with drug doses as follows: L – 1.3 mg/kg then 3 mg/kg/hr; B – 0.018 mg/kg then 0.013 mg/kg/hr; K – 0.55 mg/kg then 0.5 mg/kg/hr. Two-hundred plastic beads were administered intragastrically by nasogastric tube immediately prior to the bolus. Feces were collected every 2 hours, weighed, and beads manually retrieved. Behavior was scored every 2 hours, vital parameters every 6 hours, and thermal nociceptive threshold every 12 hours for 96 hours. Drug concentrations in the LBK solution were tested every 6 hours for 72 hours. Results Four of 64 trials (3 LBK, 1 BK) were discontinued early due to signs of abdominal discomfort. There were no apparent differences between groups in vital parameters or thermal threshold. Transit time was delayed for LB and LBK with a corresponding decrease in fecal weight that was most severe in the final 24 hours of infusion. Significant changes in behavior scores, vital parameters, or thermal threshold were not observed. The concentration of each drug in the combined solution declined by less than 31% over the sampling period. Conclusions Drug combinations containing butorphanol cause an apparent delay in gastrointestinal transit in healthy horses without substantially affecting somatic nociception at the doses studied. Combinations of

  10. High-Throughput Analysis of Lidocaine in Pharmaceutical Formulation by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis Using Multiple Injections in a Single Run

    PubMed Central

    Valese, Andressa C.; Spudeit, Daniel A.; Dolzan, Maressa D.; Bretanha, Lizandra C.; Micke, Gustavo A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the development of a subminute separation method by capillary zone electrophoresis in an uncoated capillary using multiple injection procedure for the determination of lidocaine in samples of pharmaceutical formulations. The separation was performed in less than a minute leading to doing four injections in a single run. The cathodic electroosmotic flow contributed to reducing the analyses time. The background electrolyte was composed of 20 mmol L−1 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol and 40 mmol L−1 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid at pH 6.1. The internal standard used was benzylamine. Separations were performed in a fused uncoated silica capillary (32 cm total length, 23.5 cm effective length, and 50 μm internal diameter) with direct UV detection at 200 nm. Samples and standards were injected hydrodynamically using 40 mbar/3 s interspersed with spacer electrolyte using 40 mbar/7 s. The electrophoretic system was operated under constant voltage of 30 kV with positive polarity on the injection side. The evaluation of some analytical parameters of the method showed good linearity (r2 > 0.999), a limit of detection 0.92 mg L−1, intermediate precision better than 3.2% (peak area), and recovery in the range of 92–102%. PMID:27069712

  11. Topical gels of lidocaine HCl using cashew gum and Carbopol 940: preparation and in vitro skin permeation.

    PubMed

    Das, Biswarup; Nayak, Amit Kumar; Nanda, Upendranath

    2013-11-01

    The present study was attempted to prepare novel topical gels of 4% lidocaine HCl using cashew gum and Carbopol 940. The prepared gels were evaluated for pH, viscosity, and in vitro skin permeation through excised porcine skin. The pH of these topical gels was found within the range of 5.98-6.06; whereas, the viscosity was found 4.58 × 10(6) to 4.88 × 10(6) cps. The in vitro skin permeation from these gels showed permeation flux range, 851.34 ± 9.16 to 1568.15 ± 14.03 μg/cm(2)/h. The highest permeation flux (1568.15 ± 14.03 μg/cm(2)/h) was observed, when 0.01% menthol was added, which was higher than that of the marketed 4% lidicaine HCl topical gel (1355.41 ± 10.92 μg/cm(2)/h). These topical gels found best-fit with Korsmeyer-Peppas model and almost the super case-II transport mechanism. The stability study revealed that these gels were physically stable without occurrence of syneresis.

  12. Prolonged Suppression of Neuropathic Pain by Sequential Delivery of Lidocaine and Thalidomide Drugs Using PEGylated Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Song, Tieying; Gu, Kunfeng; Wang, Wenli; Wang, Hong; Yang, Yunliang; Yang, Lijun; Ma, Pengxu; Ma, Xiaojing; Zhao, Jianhui; Yan, Ruyu; Guan, Jiao; Wang, Chunping; Qi, Yan; Ya, Jian

    2015-11-01

    The management of patients with neuropathic pain is challenging. Monotherapy with a single pain relief drug may encounter different difficulties, such as short duration of efficacy and hence too many times of drug administration, and inadequate drug delivery. Recently, nanocarrier-based drug delivery systems have been proved to provide promising strategies for efficient drug loading, delivery, and release. In the present study, we developed poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether functionalized graphene oxide (GO) bearing two commonly used drugs of lidocaine (LDC) and thalidomide (THD) as an agent for the treatment of neuropathic pain. The sequential drug release of LDC and THD from the developed LDC-THD-GO nanosheets exhibited a synergistic effect on neuropathic pain in vitro and in vivo, as evidenced by the increased pain threshold in mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesic response tests, and the improved inhibition of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and nitric oxide. We believed that the present study herein would hold promise for future development of a new generation of potent agents for neuropathic pain relief.

  13. Fabrication of a bioadhesive transdermal device from chitosan and hyaluronic acid for the controlled release of lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Anirudhan, T S; Nair, Syam S; Nair, Anoop S

    2016-11-01

    A novel efficient transdermal (TD) lidocaine (LD) delivery device based on chitosan (CS) and hyaluronic acid (HA) was successfully developed in the present investigation. CS was grafted with glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) and butyl methacrylate (BMA) to fabricate a versatile material with improved adhesion and mechanical properties. HA was hydrophobically modified by covalently conjugating 3-(dimethylamino)-1-propylamine (DMPA) to encapsulate poorly water soluble LD and was uniformly dispersed in modified CS matrix. The prepared materials were characterized through FTIR, NMR, XRD, SEM, TEM and tensile assay. The dispersion of amine functionalized HA (AHA) on modified CS matrix offered strong matrix - filler interaction, which improved the mechanical properties and drug retention behavior of the device. In vitro skin permeation study of LD was performed with modified Franz diffusion cell using rat skin and exhibited controlled release. The influence of storage time on release profile was investigated and demonstrated that after the initial burst, LD release profile of the device after 30 and 60days storage was identical to that of a device which was not stored. In vivo skin adhesion test and skin irritation assay in human subjects, water vapor permeability and environmental fitness test was performed to judge its application in biomedical field. All results displayed that the fabricated device is a potential candidate for TD LD administration to the systemic circulation. PMID:27516320

  14. Comparison of injection pain, heart rate increase, and postinjection pain of articaine and lidocaine in a primary intraligamentary injection administered with a computer-controlled local anesthetic delivery system.

    PubMed Central

    Nusstein, John; Berlin, Jeffrey; Reader, Al; Beck, Mike; Weaver, Joel M.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to compare the pain of injection, heart rate increase, and postinjection pain of the intraligamentary injection of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine and 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine administered with a computer-controlled local anesthetic delivery system. Using a crossover design, intraligamentary injections of 1.4 mL of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine and 1.4 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine were randomly administered on the mesial and distal aspects of the mandibular first molar with a computer-controlled local anesthetic delivery system in a double-blind manner at 2 separate appointments to 51 subjects. The results demonstrated the incidence of moderate pain was 14%-27% with needle insertion, with 0%-4% reporting severe pain. For solution deposition, moderate pain was reported 8%-18% of the time, with no reports of severe pain. There were no significant differences between the articaine and lidocaine solutions. Regarding heart rate changes, neither anesthetic solution resulted in a significant increase in heart rate over baseline readings. On day 1 postinjection, there was a 31% incidence of moderate/severe pain with the articaine solution and 20% incidence of moderate/severe pain with the lidocaine solution. The moderate/severe pain ratings decreased over the next 2 days. There were no significant differences between the articaine and lidocaine solutions. We concluded that the intraligamentary injection of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine was similar to 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine for injection pain and postinjection pain in the mandibular first molar when administered with a computer-controlled local anesthetic delivery system. For both anesthetic solutions, heart rate did not significantly increase with the intraligamentary injection using the computer-controlled local anesthetic system. PMID:15675261

  15. 5% Lidocaine-medicated plaster for the treatment of chronic peripheral neuropathic pain: complex regional pain syndrome and other neuropathic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Calderón, Enrique; Calderón-Seoane, María Eloísa; García-Hernández, Rafael; Torres, Luis Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Chronic neuropathic pain and chronic complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), in particular, are debilitating and difficult-to-treat conditions that have a strong impact on patient’s quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster as add-on therapy in patients with chronic peripheral neuropathic pain conditions, including CRPS. Patients and methods This was a single-center, prospective, observational study set in a specialized pain unit of a tertiary hospital in Spain. A total of 56 patients with long-standing peripheral neuropathic pain, ten of them with CRPS, received 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster as add-on analgesic therapy for 6 months. Results After 6 months of treatment, a ≥50% reduction in pain intensity was attained by 75% of patients, as measured by numeric rating scale (NRS) for pain. The average NRS score was reduced by 61% (4.7 points), from a baseline mean score of 7.8 to an end point mean score of 3.1. Marked improvements were also observed in the CRPS group: six out of ten patients achieved a ≥50% reduction in NRS score, and the average NRS score for patients with CRPS was reduced by 51% (4.0 points), from a baseline mean score of 7.9 to an end point mean score of 3.9. The improvements in pain intensity were partially translated into a decrease in disability index and in anxiety levels. Conclusion 5% Lidocaine-medicated plaster may be useful as add-on therapy for a number of peripheral neuropathic pain conditions, including CRPS. PMID:27785090

  16. Lidocaine 8 mg sore throat lozenges in the treatment of acute pharyngitis. A new therapeutic option investigated in comparison to placebo treatment.

    PubMed

    Wonnemann, Meinolf; Helm, Ilka; Stauss-Grabo, Manuela; Röttger-Luer, Patricia; Tran, Cam-Tuan; Canenbley, Rainer; Donath, Frank; Nowak, Horst; Schug, Barbara S; Blume, Henning H

    2007-01-01

    An acute pharyngitis is characterised by mild to severe sore throat mostly accompanied by inflammation, throat pain, pain on swallowing, and burning. This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III study was conducted for comparison of the efficacy and safety of a newly developed lidocaine (2-(diethylamino)-N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl) acetamide, CAS 137-58-6) 8 mg lozenge formulation (Trachisan Halsschmerztabletten) for the treatment of acute sore throat not necessarily to be treated with antibiotics. 240 patients of both genders were enrolled. The study was performed in a single centre setting and consisted of two parts. A 2-h stationary phase (single dose treatment) was directly followed by a 46-h ambulatory phase, where patients were allowed to take up to a maximum of 11 further lozenges (multiple dose treatment). Pain intensity was assessed via Visual Analogue Scale during the course of the study. Moreover, the global efficacy and tolerability of the treatments were assessed. Lidocaine 8 mg sore throat lozenges were found to be superior to placebo for all efficacy parameters investigated. For the primary efficacy parameter, area under the curve of pain intensity from baseline over 2 h (AUC(0-2h)), i.e. after single-dose treatment, a significant treatment difference with a p-value of p < 0.001 in favour of the verum treatment could be demonstrated. Significant superiority could also be demonstrated for the descriptive AUC(0-48h) values, reflecting the treatment effect during the ambulatory multiple dose phase. Pain relief, minimum pain intensity, meaningful pain relief and the time of onset of meaningful pain relief as well as the assessments of global efficacy underlined the superiority of the treatment with lidocaine 8 mg sore throat lozenges. Global tolerability of the verum treatment was rated as "good" or "very good" in the majority of cases, the number of study drug related adverse events was low and evenly distributed to both treatment groups

  17. Tolerability of the capsaicin 8% patch following pretreatment with lidocaine or tramadol in patients with peripheral neuropathic pain: A multicentre, randomized, assessor-blinded study

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, TS; Høye, K; Fricová, J; Vanelderen, P; Ernault, E; Siciliano, T; Marques, S

    2014-01-01

    Background Application of the capsaicin 8% patch is associated with treatment-related discomfort. Consequently, pretreatment for 60 min with anaesthetic cream is recommended; however, this may be uncomfortable and time consuming. Methods We conducted a multicentre, randomized (1:1), assessor-blinded study in patients with peripheral neuropathic pain to assess tolerability of the capsaicin patch following topical lidocaine (4%) or oral tramadol (50 mg) pretreatment. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients tolerating capsaicin patch application (ability to receive ≥90% of a 60-min application). Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS) scores were assessed before, during and after treatment. Results Overall, 122 patients were included (61 per arm). The capsaicin patch was tolerated by 121 patients. Tolerability of the capsaicin patch was similar following pretreatment with lidocaine and tramadol. Following patch application, pain levels increased up to 55 min (change from baseline of 1.3 for lidocaine and 1.4 for tramadol). After patch removal, tramadol-treated patients experienced greater pain relief up to the end of day 1; in the evening, mean changes in NPRS scores from baseline were 0 for lidocaine and −1 for tramadol. Proportions of patients reporting increases of ≥2 NPRS points or >33% from baseline at one or more time point(s) on the day of treatment were similar between arms. Adverse event incidence was comparable between arms. Conclusions Capsaicin 8% patch tolerability was similar in the two arms, with comparable results for most secondary endpoints. Tramadol given 30 min before patch application should be considered as an alternative pretreatment option in patients receiving capsaicin patch treatment. What's already known about this topic? Application of topical capsaicin, a treatment for peripheral neuropathic pain conditions associated with allodynia, can cause painful discomfort. Therefore, a 60-min application of local anaesthetic

  18. Lidocaine 8 mg sore throat lozenges in the treatment of acute pharyngitis. A new therapeutic option investigated in comparison to placebo treatment.

    PubMed

    Wonnemann, Meinolf; Helm, Ilka; Stauss-Grabo, Manuela; Röttger-Luer, Patricia; Tran, Cam-Tuan; Canenbley, Rainer; Donath, Frank; Nowak, Horst; Schug, Barbara S; Blume, Henning H

    2007-01-01

    An acute pharyngitis is characterised by mild to severe sore throat mostly accompanied by inflammation, throat pain, pain on swallowing, and burning. This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III study was conducted for comparison of the efficacy and safety of a newly developed lidocaine (2-(diethylamino)-N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl) acetamide, CAS 137-58-6) 8 mg lozenge formulation (Trachisan Halsschmerztabletten) for the treatment of acute sore throat not necessarily to be treated with antibiotics. 240 patients of both genders were enrolled. The study was performed in a single centre setting and consisted of two parts. A 2-h stationary phase (single dose treatment) was directly followed by a 46-h ambulatory phase, where patients were allowed to take up to a maximum of 11 further lozenges (multiple dose treatment). Pain intensity was assessed via Visual Analogue Scale during the course of the study. Moreover, the global efficacy and tolerability of the treatments were assessed. Lidocaine 8 mg sore throat lozenges were found to be superior to placebo for all efficacy parameters investigated. For the primary efficacy parameter, area under the curve of pain intensity from baseline over 2 h (AUC(0-2h)), i.e. after single-dose treatment, a significant treatment difference with a p-value of p < 0.001 in favour of the verum treatment could be demonstrated. Significant superiority could also be demonstrated for the descriptive AUC(0-48h) values, reflecting the treatment effect during the ambulatory multiple dose phase. Pain relief, minimum pain intensity, meaningful pain relief and the time of onset of meaningful pain relief as well as the assessments of global efficacy underlined the superiority of the treatment with lidocaine 8 mg sore throat lozenges. Global tolerability of the verum treatment was rated as "good" or "very good" in the majority of cases, the number of study drug related adverse events was low and evenly distributed to both treatment groups

  19. Use of 5% lidocaine medicated plaster to treat localized neuropathic pain secondary to traumatic injury of peripheral nerves

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Illanes, Gerardo; Roa, Ricardo; Piñeros, José Luis; Calderón, Wilfredo

    2012-01-01

    Objective The efficacy of 5% lidocaine medicated plaster (LMP) has previously been demonstrated in post-traumatic localized neuropathic pain. This study evaluated the use of LMP in localized neuropathic pain secondary to traumatic peripheral nerve injury. Patients and methods This prospective observational study enrolled patients with traumatic injuries to peripheral nerves that were accompanied by localized neuropathic pain of more than 3 months duration. Demographic variables, pain intensity (measured using the numeric rating scale; NRS), answers to the Douleur Neuropathique 4 (DN4) questionnaire, and the size of the painful area were recorded. Results Nineteen patients were included, aged (mean ± standard deviation) 41.4 ± 15.7 years. Nerve injuries affected the upper (eight patients) or lower (11 patients) limbs. The mean duration of pain before starting treatment with LMP was 22.6 ± 43.5 months (median 8 months). Mean baseline values included: NRS 6.7 ± 1.6, painful area 17.8 ± 10.4 cm2 (median 18 cm2), and DN4 score 6.7 ± 1.4. The mean duration of treatment with LMP was 19.5 ± 10.0 weeks (median 17.4 weeks). Mean values after treatment were: NRS 2.8 ± 1.5 (≥3 point reduction in 79% of patients, ≥50% reduction in 57.9% of patients) and painful area 2.1 ± 2.3 cm2 (median 1 cm2, ≥50% reduction in 94.7% of patients). Functional improvement after treatment was observed in 14/19 patients (73.7%). Conclusion LMP effectively treated traumatic injuries of peripheral nerves which presented with chronic localized neuropathic pain, reducing both pain intensity and the size of the painful area. PMID:23152700

  20. Electro-Oxidation Mechanism and Direct Square-Wave Voltammetric Determination of Lidocaine With a Carbon-Paste Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Nadereh; Ramezani, Zahra; Babapour, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background Lidocaine hydrochloride (LH) is one of the most extensively used local anesthetics and peripheral analgesics. Availability of a simple and sensitive assay method for this analyte in pharmaceutical preparations as well as development of new voltammetric detectors that can be applied in chromatographic systems for determination of this analyte in biological samples are of great importance. Objectives In this study, a square-wave voltammetric (SWV) determination of LH at a bare carbon-paste electrode (CPE) was reported. Moreover, the oxidation mechanism for LH molecule at this electrode was investigated. Materials and Methods The SW voltammogram of LH solution at CPE showed a well-defined peak between +0.80 and +0.88 V depending on a scan rate in potassium nitrate (KNO3) solution. Different chemical and instrumental parameters influencing the voltammetric response, such as the pH level and scan rate were optimized for LH determination. Results A linear range of 8.0 - 1000.0 μmol L-1 (r2 = 0.999) was obtained. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.29 μmol L-1. The relative standard deviations of 2.1% obtained for 0.8 800 μmol L-1 solution of LH indicated a reasonable reproducibility of the method. Conclusions The results of this study show that LH in different pharmaceutical preparations could be determined with good reliability. In addition, the results reveal that the equal numbers of electrons and protons are involved in the oxidation of LH and the irreversible oxidation of an analyte was performed via amine groups of LH molecule. PMID:25866720

  1. Effects of a quaternary lidocaine derivative, QX-314, on the respiratory activity in brainstem-spinal cord preparation from newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kenichi; Hayakawa, Chikara; Onimaru, Hiroshi

    2016-04-21

    In the clinical setting, the use of QX-314 (a quaternary derivative of lidocaine) has been proposed to achieve the selective inhibition of nociceptors that express transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels with fewer motor deficits. However, it has been also reported that QX-314 may produce systemic CNS toxicities with relative potencies that are approximately twice as high as those of lidocaine. There are no reports concerning the effects of extracellular QX-314 on the rhythm-generating neurons in the respiratory center. In the present study, we examined the effects of QX-314 on respiratory rhythm generation in brainstem-spinal cord preparations from newborn rats. The extracellular application of QX-314 (200μM) decreased the C4 burst rate, amplitude and slope during the initial rising phase, and the effects slowly developed with a half-decay time of approximately 20min. The combined application of capsaicin (10 or 100μM) with QX-314 (100μM) showed no additional effect. The intracellular application of QX-314 (100μM) to respiratory neurons depressed the action potentials with a half-decay time of around 5min. Our findings could explain one of the mechanisms underlying the central toxicities that occur after the systemic application of QX-314.

  2. Enhancement of the 1-Octanol/Water Partition Coefficient of the Anti-Inflammatory Indomethacin in the Presence of Lidocaine and Other Local Anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Tateuchi, Ryo; Sagawa, Naoki; Shimada, Yohsuke; Goto, Satoru

    2015-07-30

    Side effects and excessive potentiation of drug efficacy caused by polypharmacy are becoming important social issues. The apparent partition coefficient of indomethacin (log P'IND) increases in the presence of lidocaine, and this is used as a physicochemical model for investigating polypharmacy. We examined the changes in log P'IND caused by clinically used local anesthetics-lidocaine, tetracaine, mepivacaine, bupivacaine, and dibucaine-and by structurally similar basic drugs-procainamide, imipramine, and diltiazem. The quantitative structure-activity relationship study of log P'IND showed that the partition coefficient values (log PLA) and the structural entropic terms (ΔSobs, log f) of the additives affect log P'IND. These results indicate that the local anesthetics and structurally similar drugs function as phase-transfer catalysts, increasing the membrane permeability of indomethacin via heterogeneous intermolecular association. Therefore, we expect that the potency of indomethacin, an acidic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, will be increased by concurrent administration of the other drugs.

  3. Sedation using 5% lidocaine patches, midazolam and propofol in a combative, obese adolescent with severe autistic disorder undergoing brain magnetic resonance imaging: a case report.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kwon Hui; Jung, Hong Soo; Kang, Eu Gene; Kim, Change Jae; Rhee, Ho Young; Jeon, Yeon Soo

    2014-12-01

    We present a 17-year-old man who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging and laboratory exams for uncontrolled seizure. Patients with an autistic disorder require deep sedation or, occasionally, general anesthesia even for radiologic exams or simple procedures. The anesthetic management of an obese, violent patient with a severe autistic disorder and mental retardation can be challenging to anesthesiologists and requires a more careful approach in selecting adequate anesthetics and doses. This case emphasizes the importance of having a detailed plan to ensure the smooth process of premedication, anesthetic induction, maintenance, emergence and safe discharge of incorporated patients in the event of unexpected situations. A 5% lidocaine patch to relieve the pain from the intramuscular injection and intravenous cannulation, intramuscular midazolam as premedication, and propofol for the maintenance of sedation can be a good sedation protocol in incorporated patients.

  4. Lidocaine Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... that area. Use scissors to remove the outer seal from the package. Then pull apart the zipper seal. Remove up to three patches from the package and press the zipper seal tightly together. The remaining patches may dry out ...

  5. Evaluation of the anaesthetic properties and tolerance of 1:100,000 articaine versus 1:100,000 lidocaine. A comparative study in surgery of the lower third molar

    PubMed Central

    Barona-Dorado, Cristina; Martín-Arés, María; Cortés-Bretón-Brinkman, Jorge; Martínez-González, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the anaesthetic properties and tolerance of articaine versus lidocaine at equal vasoconstrictor concentration. Study Design: A total of 96 male and female patients who underwent surgical treatment of the lower third molar participated. Patients were randomly assigned to articaine hydrochloride with epinephrine 1:100,000 and lidocaine hydrochloride with epinephrine 1:100,000. The variables analysed were latency period, duration of anaesthetic effect, tolerance and adverse reactions. Results: Both the latency period and the duration of anaesthetic effect were greater for articaine, although the differences were not statistically significant. Latency: mean difference of 2.70 ± 2.12 minutes (95%CI of -1.51 minutes - 6.92 minutes). Duration: mean difference of -33 minutes 5 seconds ± 31 minutes (95% CI -1 hour 35 minutes - 29 minutes). There were 4 adverse events that did not require the patients to be withdrawn from the study. Conclusions: The anaesthetics in this study have very similar properties for use in surgery and have demonstrated a good safety and tolerability profile Key words: Articaine, lidocaine, vasoconstrictor, adverse reactions. PMID:22143691

  6. Investigation of Behavior of Forced Degradation of Lidocaine HCl by NMR Spectroscopy and GC-FID Methods: Validation of GC-FID Method for Determination of Related Substance in Pharmaceutical Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Kadioglu, Yucel; Atila, Alptug; Serdar Gultekin, Mehmet; Alcan Alp, Nurdan

    2013-01-01

    The forced degradation study of lidocaine HCl was carried out according to the ICH guideline Q1A (R2). The degradation conditions were assessed to be hydrolysis, oxidation, photolysis and dry heat during 24 h, 48 h and 72 h and then the samples were investigated by GC-FID method and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. According to these results, the degradation products were not observed in all reaction conditions during the 72 h period. Only spectral changes in the 1H and 13C-NMR spectrum were observed in hydrogen peroxide and acid degradation. As a result of this degradation, n-oxide was formed. After acid-induced degradation with HCl, the secondary amine salt was formed. Furthermore, trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) was used as the acidic media, and the decomposition products were observed. A simple and reliable gas chromatography method with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) was developed and validated for the determination of lidocaine HCl in pharmaceutical formulations in the form of a cream and injections. The GC-FID method can be used for a routine analysis of lidocaine HCl in pharmaceutical formulations and the proposed method, together with NMR spectroscopy, can be applied in stability studies. PMID:24523745

  7. Effect of xylazine, isoxsuprine, and lidocaine on Doppler sonographic uterine and umbilical blood flow measurements in cows during the last month of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Waldvogel, D; Bleul, U

    2014-04-15

    The maternal portion of the bovine placenta receives blood mainly from the uterine arteries (AUT) and the fetal portion from the umbilical arteries (AUM). Placental perfusion is crucial for fetal development and undergoes adaptive changes during pregnancy according to the fetal requirements. One goal of this study was to investigate changes in Doppler sonographic measurements of blood vessels that supply blood to the placenta in cows during the last 4 weeks of pregnancy. Another goal was to examine how these measurements are affected by three drugs commonly used in cows at the time of parturition. Nine cows underwent Doppler sonographic examination of the AUT ipsilateral and contralateral to the pregnant horn and one AUM three times per week during the last 4 weeks of gestation. This was followed by the randomized administration of one of the three following experimental drugs per day: isoxsuprine (200 mg/cow, iv), xylazine (2 mg/100 kg, iv), and lidocaine for epidural anesthesia (100 mg/cow). Doppler sonographic examination was repeated 30 minutes after medication. Maternal pulse rate increased during the study period (P < 0.001), and the diameter of the contralateral AUT was smaller in the last week before birth than in the two preceding weeks. The resistance index (RI) of the ipsilateral AUT was smaller in the last week than in the first 2 weeks of the study period. Uterine blood flow volume increased after isoxsuprine by 5% and after epidural anesthesia by 6% (both P ≤ 0.05) and decreased after xylazine by 10% (P < 0.001). Isoxsuprine was the only drug that elevated the blood flow volume in the AUM (P ≤ 0.05). Xylazine increased the RI of both AUT (both P < 0.001) and significantly reduced maternal and fetal pulse frequencies, whereas isoxsuprine significantly reduced the RI of both AUT and the AUM and increased maternal and fetal pulse frequencies. The results reported that Doppler sonographic measurements of uterine and AUM change little in the last

  8. Effect of epidural saline washout on regression of sensory and motor block after epidural anaesthesia with 2% lidocaine and fentanyl in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Park, E Y; Kil, H K; Park, W S; Lee, N-H; Hong, J-Y

    2009-03-01

    Seventy elderly males received lumbar epidural anaesthesia with 12 ml of 2% lidocaine containing fentanyl 50 mug. At the end of transurethral surgery, the washout group (n = 33) received an epidural bolus of 30 ml saline while the control group (n = 34) did not. Mean (SD) times to 1-grade (17.2 (11.9) vs 32.7 (11.3) min) and 2-grade regression (23.8 (12.2) vs 56.0 (23.9) min) of motor block, 3-dermatomal sensory regression (31.4 (11.6) vs 42.2 (14.4) min for cold and 30.8 (15.6) vs 40.6 (14.2) min for pinprick), and regression to S1 (57.7 (16.1) vs 76.2 (20.2) min for cold and 56.8 (17.3) vs 69.2 (16.2) min for pinprick) were significantly shorter in the washout group than the control group. There were no differences in postoperative pain scores and side effects between the two groups. We concluded that epidural washout facilitates regression of both motor and sensory block following epidural anaesthesia without reducing the postoperative analgesic benefit.

  9. Comparison of effects of ephedrine, lidocaine and ketamine with placebo on injection pain, hypotension and bradycardia due to propofol injection: a randomized placebo controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Ayatollahi, Vida; Behdad, Shekoufeh; Kargar, Saeed; Yavari, Tayebe

    2012-01-01

    Propofol is a widely used anesthetic drug because of its minor complication and also its fast effect. One of most popular complication in using this drug is pain during injection that is more sever in new generation of its components (lipid-free microemulsion). Other complications of propofol are bradycardia and hypotension. This study compares 3 drugs with placebo in control of these complications of propofol. In this double blinded randomized placebo controlled trial 140 patient who were candidates for elective surgery were divided in 4 groups (35 patients in each groups) and drugs (ephedrine, lidocaine, ketamine and NaCl solution (as placebo) were tried on each group by a blinded technician and responses to drugs were evaluated under supervision of a blinded anesthesiologist. Pain after injection, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were measured 5 times during anesthesia process of each patient. All gathered data were analyzed using t-test and Chi-square under SPSS software. Our data shows that in pain management all tested drugs can decrease pain significantly comparing with placebo (P=0.017). In control of hemodynamic parameters ephedrine could efficiently control SBP, DBP, MAP at the time 1 min after intubation. Based on our study ephedrine can be an appropriate suggestion for control of both pain and hemodynamic changes induced by propofol, although because of inconsistent result in other studies it is recommended to design a systematic review to draw a broader view on this issue.

  10. Impact of wastewater treatment plant discharge of lidocaine, tramadol, venlafaxine and their metabolites on the quality of surface waters and groundwater.

    PubMed

    Rúa-Gómez, Paola C; Püttmann, Wilhelm

    2012-05-01

    The presence of the anesthetic lidocaine (LDC), the analgesic tramadol (TRA), the antidepressant venlafaxine (VEN) and the metabolites O-desmethyltramadol (ODT) and O-desmethylvenlafaxine (ODV) was investigated in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents, in surface waters and in groundwater. The analytes were detected in all effluent samples and in only 64% of the surface water samples. The mean concentrations of the analytes in effluent samples from WWTPs with wastewater from only households and hospitals were 107 (LDC), 757 (TRA), 122 (ODT), 160 (VEN) and 637 ng L(-1) (ODV), while the mean concentrations in effluents from WWTPs treating additionally wastewater from pharmaceutical industries as indirect dischargers were for some pharmaceuticals clearly higher. WWTP effluents were identified as important sources of the analyzed pharmaceuticals and their metabolites in surface waters. The concentrations of the compounds found in surface waters ranged from

  11. Effects of Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation on Cardiopulmonary Function in Horses Anesthetized with Total Intravenous Anesthesia Using Combination of Medetomidine, Lidocaine, Butorphanol and Propofol (MLBP-TIVA)

    PubMed Central

    ISHIZUKA, Tomohito; TAMURA, Jun; NAGARO, Tsukasa; SUDO, Kanako; ITAMI, Takaharu; UMAR, Mohammed Ahamed; MIYOSHI, Kenjirou; SANO, Tadashi; YAMASHITA, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    Effects of intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) on cardiopulmonary function were evaluated in horses anesthetized with total intravenous anesthesia using constant rate infusions of medetomidine (3.5 µg/kg/hr), lidocaine (3 mg/kg/hr), butorphanol (24 µg/kg/hr) and propofol (0.1 mg/kg/min) (MLBP-TIVA). Five horses were anesthetized twice using MLBP-TIVA with or without IPPV at 4-week interval (crossover study). In each occasion, the horses breathed 100% oxygen with spontaneous ventilation (SB-group, n=5) or with IPPV (CV-group, n=5), and changes in cardiopulmonary parameters were observed for 120 min. In the SB-group, cardiovascular parameters were maintained within acceptable ranges (heart rate: 33–35 beats/min, cardiac output: 27–30 l/min, mean arterial blood pressure [MABP]: 114–123 mmHg, mean pulmonary arterial pressure [MPAP]: 28–29 mmHg and mean right atrial pressure [MRAP]: 19–21 mmHg), but severe hypercapnea and insufficient oxygenation were observed (arterial CO2 pressure [PaCO2]: 84–103 mmHg and arterial O2 pressure [PaO2]: 155–172 mmHg). In the CV-group, normocapnea (PaCO2: 42–50 mmHg) and good oxygenation (PaO2: 395–419 mmHg) were achieved by the IPPV without apparent cardiovascular depression (heart rate: 29–31 beats/min, cardiac output: 17–21 l /min, MABP: 111–123 mmHg, MPAP: 27–30 mmHg and MRAP: 15–16 mmHg). MLBP-TIVA preserved cardiovascular function even in horses artificially ventilated. PMID:25649938

  12. Effects of intermittent positive pressure ventilation on cardiopulmonary function in horses anesthetized with total intravenous anesthesia using combination of medetomidine, lidocaine, butorphanol and propofol (MLBP-TIVA).

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Tomohito; Tamura, Jun; Nagaro, Tsukasa; Sudo, Kanako; Itami, Takaharu; Umar, Mohammed Ahamed; Miyoshi, Kenjirou; Sano, Tadashi; Yamashita, Kazuto

    2014-12-01

    Effects of intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) on cardiopulmonary function were evaluated in horses anesthetized with total intravenous anesthesia using constant rate infusions of medetomidine (3.5 µg/kg/hr), lidocaine (3 mg/kg/hr), butorphanol (24 µg/kg/hr) and propofol (0.1 mg/kg/min) (MLBP-TIVA). Five horses were anesthetized twice using MLBP-TIVA with or without IPPV at 4-week interval (crossover study). In each occasion, the horses breathed 100% oxygen with spontaneous ventilation (SB-group, n=5) or with IPPV (CV-group, n=5), and changes in cardiopulmonary parameters were observed for 120 min. In the SB-group, cardiovascular parameters were maintained within acceptable ranges (heart rate: 33-35 beats/min, cardiac output: 27-30 l/min, mean arterial blood pressure [MABP]: 114-123 mmHg, mean pulmonary arterial pressure [MPAP]: 28-29 mmHg and mean right atrial pressure [MRAP]: 19-21 mmHg), but severe hypercapnea and insufficient oxygenation were observed (arterial CO(2) pressure [PaCO(2)]: 84-103 mmHg and arterial O(2) pressure [PaO(2)]: 155-172 mmHg). In the CV-group, normocapnea (PaCO(2): 42-50 mmHg) and good oxygenation (PaO(2): 395-419 mmHg) were achieved by the IPPV without apparent cardiovascular depression (heart rate: 29-31 beats/min, cardiac output: 17-21 l /min, MABP: 111-123 mmHg, MPAP: 27-30 mmHg and MRAP: 15-16 mmHg). MLBP-TIVA preserved cardiovascular function even in horses artificially ventilated. PMID:25649938

  13. Coelomic implantation of satellite transmitters in the bar-tailed godwit (Limosa lapponica) and the bristle-thighed curlew (Numenius tahitiensis) using propofol, bupivacaine, and lidocaine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, Daniel M.; Gartrell, Brett D.; Gill, Robert E.; Tibbitts, T. Lee; Ruthrauff, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Intravenous propofol was used as a general anesthetic with a 2∶1 (mg∶mg) adjunctive mixture of lidocaine and bupivacaine as local anesthetics infiltrated into the surgical sites for implantation of satellite transmitters into the right abdominal air sac of 39 female and 4 male bar-tailed godwits (Limosa lapponica baueri and Limosa lapponica menzbeiri) and 11 female and 12 male bristle-thighed curlews (Numenius tahitiensis). The birds were captured on nesting grounds in Alaska, USA, and on overwintering areas in New Zealand and Australia from 2005 through 2008. As it was developed, the mass of the transmitter used changed yearly from a low of 22.4 ± 0.2 g to a high of 27.1 ± 0.2 g and weighed 25.1 ± 0.2 g in the final year. The mean load ratios ranged from 5.2% to 7.7% for godwits and from 5.7% to 7.5% for curlews and exceeded 5% for all years, locations, and genders of both species. The maximum load ratio was 8.3% for a female bar-tailed godwit implanted in Australia in 2008. Three godwits and no curlews died during surgery. Most birds were hyperthermic upon induction but improved during surgery. Two godwits (one in New Zealand and one in Australia) could not stand upon release, likely due to capture myopathy. These birds failed to respond to treatment and were euthanized. The implanted transmitters were used to follow godwits through their southern and northern migrations, and curlews were followed on their southern migration.

  14. Effects of intermittent positive pressure ventilation on cardiopulmonary function in horses anesthetized with total intravenous anesthesia using combination of medetomidine, lidocaine, butorphanol and propofol (MLBP-TIVA).

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Tomohito; Tamura, Jun; Nagaro, Tsukasa; Sudo, Kanako; Itami, Takaharu; Umar, Mohammed Ahamed; Miyoshi, Kenjirou; Sano, Tadashi; Yamashita, Kazuto

    2014-12-01

    Effects of intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) on cardiopulmonary function were evaluated in horses anesthetized with total intravenous anesthesia using constant rate infusions of medetomidine (3.5 µg/kg/hr), lidocaine (3 mg/kg/hr), butorphanol (24 µg/kg/hr) and propofol (0.1 mg/kg/min) (MLBP-TIVA). Five horses were anesthetized twice using MLBP-TIVA with or without IPPV at 4-week interval (crossover study). In each occasion, the horses breathed 100% oxygen with spontaneous ventilation (SB-group, n=5) or with IPPV (CV-group, n=5), and changes in cardiopulmonary parameters were observed for 120 min. In the SB-group, cardiovascular parameters were maintained within acceptable ranges (heart rate: 33-35 beats/min, cardiac output: 27-30 l/min, mean arterial blood pressure [MABP]: 114-123 mmHg, mean pulmonary arterial pressure [MPAP]: 28-29 mmHg and mean right atrial pressure [MRAP]: 19-21 mmHg), but severe hypercapnea and insufficient oxygenation were observed (arterial CO(2) pressure [PaCO(2)]: 84-103 mmHg and arterial O(2) pressure [PaO(2)]: 155-172 mmHg). In the CV-group, normocapnea (PaCO(2): 42-50 mmHg) and good oxygenation (PaO(2): 395-419 mmHg) were achieved by the IPPV without apparent cardiovascular depression (heart rate: 29-31 beats/min, cardiac output: 17-21 l /min, MABP: 111-123 mmHg, MPAP: 27-30 mmHg and MRAP: 15-16 mmHg). MLBP-TIVA preserved cardiovascular function even in horses artificially ventilated.

  15. Utility of the heated lidocaine/tetracaine patch in the treatment of pain associated with shoulder impingement syndrome: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Radnovich, Richard; Marriott, Thomas B

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Pain control is an important first step in the treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) because fear of pain must be removed as an obstacle to participation in an appropriate physical therapy program. Methods Adult patients with SIS-associated pain of at least 2 weeks’ duration and who had an average pain score of ≥4 on the zero- to ten-point Numeric Pain Rating Scale were eligible to enroll in this 2-week pilot study. Patients were treated with the heated lidocaine/tetracaine (70 mg/70 mg) patch (HLT patch) placed over the site of shoulder tenderness each morning and evening for a period of 2 to 4 hours. Average and worst pain during the previous 24 hours and shoulder range of motion were assessed at baseline and on Day 14. Results were expressed as change and percent change from baseline to Day 14. This pilot study was not powered for rigorous statistical analysis. Results Twenty patients (seven male, 13 female; average age 51.2 ± 10.8 years [mean ± standard deviation]) enrolled in this study, and 18 patients completed the protocol. The mean average pain score at baseline was 5.5 ± 1.1 (range 4 to 8). In the per-protocol population, average and worst pain scores declined by 2.4 ± 2.0 and 3.7 ± 2.7 points, respectively. Two-thirds of the patients demonstrated a clinically meaningful ≥30% decline in average pain score, and half of the patients demonstrated a ≥50% decline in average pain score. Shoulder internal rotation increased by 29.7° ± 21.8° and abduction increased by 40.0° ± 44.2°. Application-site erythema was reported by ten patients at some time during the study. Conclusion Patients treated with the HLT patch for 14 days demonstrated clinically meaningful improvement in pain intensity and range of motion. Further controlled research is necessary to characterize the efficacy and tolerability of the HLT patch in the treatment of SIS. PMID:23935385

  16. A randomized clinical study of the heated lidocaine/tetracaine patch versus subacromial corticosteroid injection for the treatment of pain associated with shoulder impingement syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Radnovich, Richard; Trudeau, Jeremiah; Gammaitoni, Arnold R

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment for pain due to shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) typically begins conservatively with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and physical therapy and can include subacromial injection of corticosteroids, particularly in patients unresponsive to conservative measures. The heated lidocaine/tetracaine (HLT) patch has been reported to reduce SIS pain in a small case series. Methods This was a prospective, randomized, open-label clinical trial in which adult patients with SIS pain lasting at least 14 days, with an average intensity of ≥4 on a 0–10 scale (0= no pain, 10= worst pain) were randomized to treatment with the HLT patch or a single subacromial injection of triamcinolone acetonide (10 mg). Patients in the HLT patch group applied a single HLT patch to the shoulder for 4 hours twice daily, with a 12-hour interval between treatments during the first 14 days, and could continue to use the patch on an as-needed basis (up to twice daily) during the second 14-day period. No treatment was allowed in the final 14-day period. At baseline and at days 14, 28, and 42, patients rated their pain and pain interference with specific activities (0–10 scale). Results Sixty patients enrolled in the study (average age =51 years, range 18–75, n=21 female). Average pain scores declined from 6.0±1.6 at baseline to 3.5±2.4 at day 42 in the HLT patch group (n=29, P<0.001) and from 5.6±1.2 to 3.2±2.6 in the injection group (n=31, P<0.001). Similar improvements were seen in each group for worst pain; pain interference with general activity, work, or sleep; and range of motion. No significant between-group differences were seen for any pain or pain interference scores at any time point. Conclusion These results suggest that short-term, noninvasive treatment with the HLT patch has similar efficacy to subacromial corticosteroid injections for the treatment of pain associated with SIS. PMID:25525385

  17. Amiodarone supplants lidocaine in ACLS and CPR protocols.

    PubMed

    Mizzi, Anna; Tran, Thanh; Mangar, Devanand; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2011-09-01

    Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic medication used to treat and prevent certain types of serious, life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Amiodarone gained slow acceptance outside the specialized field of cardiac antiarrhythmic surgery because the side-effects are significant. Recent adoption of amiodarone in the ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support) protocol has somewhat popularized this class of antiarrhythmics. Its use is slowly expanding in the acute medicine setting of anesthetics. This article summarizes the use of Amiodarone by anesthesiologists in the operating room and during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  18. Allergic response to metabisulfite in lidocaine anesthetic solution.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, J. R.; Maestrello, C. L.; Campbell, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    True allergies to local anesthetics are rare. It is common for practitioners to misdiagnose a serious adverse event to local anesthetics as an allergic reaction. The most likely causes for an allergic response are the preservative, antioxidant, or metabolites and not the anesthetic itself. This case report illustrates the need for practitioners to understand the many potential allergens in local anesthetics and to correctly diagnose patients that are truly allergic to the local anesthetic. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figures 4 and 5 PMID:11495401

  19. Comparative effect of lidocaine, bupivacaine and RAC 109 on myocardial conduction and contractility in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Kariya, Nobutaka; Cosson, Claudine; Mazoit, Jean-Xavier

    2012-09-15

    Local anesthetic toxicity includes a decrease in ventricular conduction velocity and a decrease in myocardial contractile force. We tested the hypothesis that, like conduction, contraction was stereoselectively impaired by bupivacaine. We compared R(+) and S(-) bupivacaine to S(+) and R(-) RAC 109 in order to study the effects of hydrophobicity and ionization. We measured the changes in QRS duration and developed pressure in isolated perfused rabbit hearts. Binding of bupivacaine and RAC 109 to the ryanodine receptor was measured. The effect on cell shortening and relenghtening was measured on isolated rabbit cardiomyocytes. A mixed-effect pharmacodynamic model was used. The decrease in conduction velocity induced by the molecules was markedly stereospecific. All local anesthetics decreased ventricular velocity in a stereospecific manner with a RAC I(+)/II(-) and bupivacaine R(+)/S(-) potency ratio of maximum effect of 1.7 and 2.25 respectively. Contractility decreased in a dose dependent manner but this negative inotropic effect was not stereospecific with a C50 (concentration leading to half maximum effect) of 30 and 23 μM for RAC and bupivacaine respectively. The two drugs exhibited two-site binding to ryanodyne that may partly explain the observed effect. An effect on relaxation was observed only at very high concentrations. In conclusion, bupivacaine, a long acting local anesthetic, decreases ventricular conduction in a stereospecific manner, and decreases contractility non-stereospecifically.

  20. 21 CFR 522.1662b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride with lidocaine injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Hemolytic staphylococcus, Streptococcus spp., Bacterial pulmonary infections caused by Brucella bronchiseptica, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, secondary bacterial infections caused...

  1. 21 CFR 522.1662b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride with lidocaine injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Hemolytic staphylococcus, Streptococcus spp., Bacterial pulmonary infections caused by Brucella bronchiseptica, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, secondary bacterial infections caused...

  2. 21 CFR 522.1662b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride with lidocaine injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Hemolytic staphylococcus, Streptococcus spp., Bacterial pulmonary infections caused by Brucella bronchiseptica, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, secondary bacterial infections caused...

  3. 21 CFR 522.1662b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride with lidocaine injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Hemolytic staphylococcus, Streptococcus spp., Bacterial pulmonary infections caused by Brucella bronchiseptica, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, secondary bacterial infections caused...

  4. 21 CFR 522.1662b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride with lidocaine injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Hemolytic staphylococcus, Streptococcus spp., Bacterial pulmonary infections caused by Brucella bronchiseptica, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, secondary bacterial infections caused...

  5. Are one or two dangerous? Lidocaine and topical anesthetic exposures in children.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Liesl A; Dolan, Teresa Sullivan; Seibert, H Edward

    2009-07-01

    Topical anesthetics are found in a variety of prescription and non-prescription preparations, from teething gels to hemorrhoid creams. In 2003, there were 8576 exposures to local/topical anesthetics reported to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, with 67% of cases in the age group younger than 6 years old. This report reviews the available literature involving topical anesthetic exposures in children younger than 6 years old, including the National Library of Medicine's Pub Med database (limited to English language) and data from POISINDEX. Additionally, we reviewed the American Association of Poison Control Centers' annual reports from 1983 to 2003. There were 7 deaths in this age range from topical anesthetics. Although the number of deaths is low, the fact that there have been deaths reveals the serious nature of the toxicity that can result from these readily available non-prescription analgesics. Toxicity may result from topical absorption, ingestion, or aspiration. Additionally, toxicity can result from unintentional as well as therapeutic mishaps. Although the number of cases is limited, these medications can be toxic at low doses-which, in children younger than 6 years of age, may amount to as little as a teaspoon.

  6. Effect of a single dose of lidocaine and ketamine on intraoperative opioids requirements in patients undergoing elective gynecological laparotomies under general anesthesia. A randomized, placebo controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    García-Navia, Jusset Teresa; Tornero López, Javier; Egea-Guerrero, Juan José; Vilches Arenas, Angel; Vázquez Gutiérrez, Tiburcio

    2016-01-01

    Introducción y objetivos del estudio: existe evidencia de que la administracion perioperatoria de ketamina y lidocaina intravenosa reduce el dolor y el consumo de opioides postoperatorio, acorta la estancia hospitalaria y acelera la recuperacion de la funcion intestinal. Sin embargo, no se han estudiado los efectos beneficiosos en el periodo intraoperatorio. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar el efecto de una unica dosis de lidocaina y ketamina sobre el consumo intraoperatorio de opioides en pacientes sometidas a cirugia ginecologica electiva bajo anestesia general. Material y métodos: estudio prospectivo, aleatorizado, doble ciego, controlado con placebo en un solo centro. Se incluyeron 33 pacientes (11 en el grupo ketamina, 11 en el grupo lidocaina y 11 en el grupo placebo). Para la analgesia postoperatoria se utilizo una bomba PCA (Analgesia Controlada por el Paciente ) de morfina. Los pacientes fueron asignados al azar a uno de los tres grupos de estudio: 1,5 mg/kg de lidocaina al 2%, 0,5 mg/kg de ketamina al 5% o solucion salina 0.9%. La variable principal del estudio fue el consumo de opioides durante la cirugia. Las variables secundarias fueron: tiempo de educcion de la anestesia, intensidad del dolor, consumo de opioides en las 24 horas posteriores a la cirugia y efectos adversos. Resultados: se observo una disminucion del consumo intraoperatorio de opioides en los grupos ketamina (402,3 } 106,3) y lidocaina (397,7 } 107,5) frente al grupo placebo (561,4 } 97,1); p = 0,001. Se encontro una correlacion positiva entre el consumo intraoperatorio de opioides y el tiempo de despertar (r = 0,864, p.

  7. Liposuction

    MedlinePlus

    ... lidocaine), a drug that contracts the blood vessels (epinephrine), and an intravenous (IV) salt solution. Lidocaine helps ... be the only anesthesia needed for the procedure. Epinephrine in the solution helps reduce loss of blood, ...

  8. Evaluation of possible methods to reduce pain associated with electroejaculation in bulls.

    PubMed Central

    Mosure, W L; Meyer, R A; Gudmundson, J; Barth, A D

    1998-01-01

    Heart rate changes were recorded in attempt to objectively measure pain associated with 6 methods of semen collection, including transrectal massage, conventional electroejaculation, and electroejaculation after either intrarectal lidocaine, epidural lidocaine, epidural xylazine, or intravenous xylazine. Epidural anesthesia with lidocaine or xylazine tended to result in smaller heart rate changes. PMID:9711391

  9. Coating solid dispersions on microneedles via a molten dip-coating method: development and in vitro evaluation for transdermal delivery of a water-insoluble drug.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yunzhe; Gill, Harvinder S

    2014-11-01

    This study demonstrates for the first time the ability to coat solid dispersions on microneedles as a means to deliver water-insoluble drugs through the skin. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) was selected as the hydrophilic matrix, and lidocaine base was selected as the model hydrophobic drug to create the solid dispersion. First, thermal characterization and viscosity measurements of the PEG-lidocaine mixture at different mass fractions were performed. The results show that lidocaine can remain stable at temperatures up to ∼130°C and that viscosity of the PEG-lidocaine molten solution increases as the mass fraction of lidocaine decreases. Differential scanning calorimetry demonstrated that at lidocaine mass fraction less than or equal to 50%, lidocaine is well dispersed in the PEG-lidocaine mixture. Uniform coatings were obtained on microneedle surfaces. In vitro dissolution studies in porcine skin showed that microneedles coated with PEG-lidocaine dispersions resulted in significantly higher delivery of lidocaine in just 3 min compared with 1 h topical application of 0.15 g EMLA®, a commercial lidocaine-prilocaine cream. In conclusion, the molten coating process we introduce here offers a practical approach to coat water-insoluble drugs on microneedles for transdermal delivery.

  10. Coating solid dispersions on microneedles via a molten dip coating method: development and in vitro evaluation for transdermal delivery of a water insoluble drug

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yunzhe; Gill, Harvinder S.

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates for the first time the ability to coat solid dispersions on microneedles as a means to deliver water-insoluble drugs through the skin. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) was selected as the hydrophilic matrix, and lidocaine base was selected as the model hydrophobic drug to create the solid dispersion. First, thermal characterization and viscosity measurements of the PEG-lidocaine mixture at different mass fractions were performed. The results show that lidocaine can remain stable at temperatures up to ~130 °C, and that viscosity of the PEG-lidocaine molten solution increases as the mass fraction of lidocaine decreases. Differential scanning calorimetry demonstrated that at lidocaine mass fraction less than or equal to 50%, lidocaine is well dispersed in the PEG-lidocaine mixture. Uniform coatings were obtained on microneedle surfaces. In vitro dissolution studies in porcine skin showed that microneedles coated with PEG-lidocaine dispersions resulted in significantly higher delivery of lidocaine in just 3 min compared to 1 h topical application of 0.15 g EMLA®, a commercial lidocaine-prilocaine cream. In conclusion, the molten coating process we introduce here offers a practical approach to coat water-insoluble drugs on microneedles for transdermal delivery. PMID:25213295

  11. Subcutaneous L-tyrosine elicits cutaneous analgesia in response to local skin pinprick in rats.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ching-Hsia; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Chen, Yu-Wen; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2015-10-15

    The purpose of the study was to estimate the ability of L-tyrosine to induce cutaneous analgesia and to investigate the interaction between L-tyrosine and the local anesthetic lidocaine. After subcutaneously injecting the rats with L-tyrosine and lidocaine in a dose-dependent manner, cutaneous analgesia (by blocking the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex-CTMR) was evaluated in response to the local pinprick. The drug-drug interaction was analyzed by using an isobolographic method. We showed that both L-tyrosine and lidocaine produced dose-dependent cutaneous analgesia. On the 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the rank of drug potency was lidocaine (5.09 [4.88-5.38] μmol)>L-tyrosine (39.1 [36.5-41.8] μmol) (P<0.05). At the equipotent doses (ED25, ED50, and ED75), the duration of cutaneous analgesia caused by L-tyrosine lasted longer than that caused by lidocaine (P<0.01). Lidocaine co-administered with L-tyrosine exhibited an additive effect on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Our pre-clinical study demonstrated that L-tyrosine elicits the local/cutaneous analgesia, and the interaction between L-tyrosine and lidocaine is additive. L-tyrosine has a lower potency but much greater duration of cutaneous analgesia than lidocaine. Adding L-tyrosine to lidocaine preparations showed greater duration of cutaneous analgesia compared with lidocaine alone. PMID:26376025

  12. Intrathecal orphenadrine elicits spinal block in the rat.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Chen, Yu-Chung; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the local anesthetic effect of orphenadrine, an anti-muscarinic agent, in spinal anesthesia and its comparison with the local anesthetic lidocaine. After the rat was injected intrathecally, the spinal block of orphenadrine and lidocaine was constructed in a dosage-dependent fashion. The potency and duration of spinal anesthesia with orphenadrine were compared with that of lidocaine. Our data demonstrated that orphenadrine and lidocaine elicited dose-dependent spinal blockades on the motor function, sensory, and proprioception. On the 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the ranks of potency in motor function, nociception, and proprioception were orphenadrine>lidocaine (P<0.01). At equipotent doses (ED25, ED50, ED75), the block duration elicited by orphenadrine was greater than that elicited by lidocaine (P<0.01). Orphenadrine, but not lidocaine, exhibited longer duration of nociceptive/sensory blockade than that of motor blockade at equipotent doses. Ineffective-dose orphenadrine as adjuvant did not enhance spinal anesthesia with lidocaine. The preclinical data revealed that orphenadrine with a more sensory-selective action over motor block exhibited more potent and longer spinal anesthesia when compared to lidocaine. PMID:25205132

  13. Co-administration of memantine with epinephrine produces a marked peripheral action in intensifying and prolonging analgesia in response to local skin pinprick in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Pan, He-Jia; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Chen, Yu-Chung; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2014-06-27

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of epinephrine as adjuvant for memantine or lidocaine as an infiltrative anesthetic. Using a rat model of cutaneous trunci muscle reflex (CTMR), we evaluated the effects of adding epinephrine to memantine or lidocaine on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Lidocaine, a known local anesthetic, was used as control. We found that epinephrine, memantine, and lidocaine produced a dose-dependent local anesthetic effect as infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. On a 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the relative potencies were epinephrine [0.012 (0.006-0.020)μmol]>memantine [4.010 (3.311-4.988)μmol]>lidocaine [6.177 (5.333-7.218)μmol] (P<0.05 for each comparison). Mixtures of epinephrine (2.7nmol or 13.7nmol) with drugs (memantine or lidocaine) at ED50 or ED95, respectively, enhanced the potency and prolonged the duration of action on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Intraperitoneal injection of co-administration of drugs (memantine or lidocaine) at ED95 with epinephrine (13.7nmol) produced no cutaneous analgesia (data not shown). Epinephrine, memantine, and lidocaine were shown to have local anesthetic effects as infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Epinephrine increased the duration and potency of memantine and lidocaine as an infiltrative anesthetic. PMID:24861513

  14. Co-administration of memantine with epinephrine produces a marked peripheral action in intensifying and prolonging analgesia in response to local skin pinprick in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Pan, He-Jia; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Chen, Yu-Chung; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2014-06-27

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of epinephrine as adjuvant for memantine or lidocaine as an infiltrative anesthetic. Using a rat model of cutaneous trunci muscle reflex (CTMR), we evaluated the effects of adding epinephrine to memantine or lidocaine on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Lidocaine, a known local anesthetic, was used as control. We found that epinephrine, memantine, and lidocaine produced a dose-dependent local anesthetic effect as infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. On a 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the relative potencies were epinephrine [0.012 (0.006-0.020)μmol]>memantine [4.010 (3.311-4.988)μmol]>lidocaine [6.177 (5.333-7.218)μmol] (P<0.05 for each comparison). Mixtures of epinephrine (2.7nmol or 13.7nmol) with drugs (memantine or lidocaine) at ED50 or ED95, respectively, enhanced the potency and prolonged the duration of action on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Intraperitoneal injection of co-administration of drugs (memantine or lidocaine) at ED95 with epinephrine (13.7nmol) produced no cutaneous analgesia (data not shown). Epinephrine, memantine, and lidocaine were shown to have local anesthetic effects as infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Epinephrine increased the duration and potency of memantine and lidocaine as an infiltrative anesthetic.

  15. Local anesthesia in the palate: a comparison of techniques and solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Meechan, J. G.; Day, P. F.; McMillan, A. S.

    2000-01-01

    It was the purpose of the present investigation to determine if there were differences in soft-tissue anesthesia in the palate following infiltration and greater palatine nerve block anesthesia and to compare lidocaine with lidocaine plus epinephrine as palatal soft tissue anesthetics. Two studies using 10 volunteers were performed. In one trial, volunteers received a palatal infiltration opposite the second maxillary bicuspid on one side and a greater palatine nerve block on the other. Response to sharp probing and pain-pressure thresholds were measured on each side over a 1-hour census period. In the second trial, volunteers received 2% plain lidocaine as a palatal infiltration on one side and a similar infiltration of 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine on the other in a double-blind randomized fashion. Response to sharp probing was assessed over a 55-minute period. Data were analyzed using Student's paired t tests. The response to sharp probing and pressure-pain thresholds did not differ between palatal infiltration and greater palatine nerve block over the 1-hour period. Lidocaine with epinephrine provided longer lasting anesthesia than plain lidocaine following palatal infiltration (P < .001). Greater palatine nerve block and palatal infiltration provide similar soft-tissue anesthesia. Lidocaine with epinephrine produces longer-lasting soft-tissue anesthesia than plain lidocaine following palatal infiltration. PMID:11432180

  16. Memantine elicits spinal blockades of motor function, proprioception, and nociception in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2015-12-01

    Although memantine blocks sodium currents and produces local skin anesthesia, spinal anesthesia with memantine is unknown. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the local anesthetic effect of memantine in spinal anesthesia and its comparison with a widely used local anesthetic lidocaine. After intrathecally injecting the rats with five doses of each drug, the dose-response curves of memantine and lidocaine were constructed. The potencies of the drugs and durations of spinal anesthetic effects on motor function, proprioception, and nociception were compared with those of lidocaine. We showed that memantine produced dose-dependent spinal blockades in motor function, proprioception, and nociception. On a 50% effective dose (ED50 ) basis, the rank of potency was lidocaine greater than memantine (P < 0.05 for the differences). At the equipotent doses (ED25 , ED50 , ED75 ), the block duration produced by memantine was longer than that produced by lidocaine (P < 0.05 for the differences). Memantine, but not lidocaine, displayed more sensory/nociceptive block than motor block. The preclinical data demonstrated that memantine is less potent than lidocaine, whereas memantine produces longer duration of spinal anesthesia than lidocaine. Memantine shows a more sensory-selective action over motor blockade. PMID:26301611

  17. Memantine elicits spinal blockades of motor function, proprioception, and nociception in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2015-12-01

    Although memantine blocks sodium currents and produces local skin anesthesia, spinal anesthesia with memantine is unknown. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the local anesthetic effect of memantine in spinal anesthesia and its comparison with a widely used local anesthetic lidocaine. After intrathecally injecting the rats with five doses of each drug, the dose-response curves of memantine and lidocaine were constructed. The potencies of the drugs and durations of spinal anesthetic effects on motor function, proprioception, and nociception were compared with those of lidocaine. We showed that memantine produced dose-dependent spinal blockades in motor function, proprioception, and nociception. On a 50% effective dose (ED50 ) basis, the rank of potency was lidocaine greater than memantine (P < 0.05 for the differences). At the equipotent doses (ED25 , ED50 , ED75 ), the block duration produced by memantine was longer than that produced by lidocaine (P < 0.05 for the differences). Memantine, but not lidocaine, displayed more sensory/nociceptive block than motor block. The preclinical data demonstrated that memantine is less potent than lidocaine, whereas memantine produces longer duration of spinal anesthesia than lidocaine. Memantine shows a more sensory-selective action over motor blockade.

  18. Long-term efficacy, safety and durability of Juvéderm® XC.

    PubMed

    Ballin, Annelyse C; Cazzaniga, Alex; Brandt, Fredric S

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, there has been increasing interest in minimally invasive cosmetic treatments, especially for facial rejuvenation. Next to botulinum toxin injection, the injection of soft tissue fillers is the second most frequent minimally invasive procedure performed in the USA. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is the most commonly used dermal filler. One of patients' main concerns about filler injections pertains to pain and discomfort. Topical anesthetics, nerve blocks, and/or the incorporation of lidocaine to the filler have been applied in order to reduce distress and pain. Despite nerve blocks being an effective form of anesthesia, they may distort the area to be treated, as well as lengthen and complicate the procedure. Studies have shown that the incorporation of lidocaine to HA fillers significantly reduces pain and discomfort. Yet, one of the dilemmas about the addition of lidocaine solution to HA fillers is the possible alteration of the physical characteristics of the product by negatively impacting the efficacy and/or duration of the filler. The concern is that the addition of lidocaine could dilute the product, creating less correction per mL, changing the product's viscosity and consequently the "lifting" ability. Also, this dilution could reduce the product's duration. There may be a difference between a physician adding an aqueous solution into a lidocaine-free version of HA and the pre-incorporated lidocaine version of HA. An aqueous solution might dilute the product, while the pre-incorporated powder lidocaine appears to avoid this problem. Juvéderm® XC is manufactured with powder lidocaine 0.3%; it is associated with significantly less injection pain than Juvéderm® and other lidocaine-free versions of HA. Studies have shown that lidocaine enhances treatment comfort and optimizes the injection experience while maintaining a similar safety and effectiveness profile. Regarding the longevity, further study is necessary to determine if there is any

  19. Acute physiological responses to castration-related pain in piglets: the effect of two local anesthetics with or without meloxicam.

    PubMed

    Bonastre, C; Mitjana, O; Tejedor, M T; Calavia, M; Yuste, A G; Úbeda, J L; Falceto, M V

    2016-09-01

    Methods to reduce castration-related pain in piglets are still issues of concern and interest for authorities and producers. Our objectives were to estimate the effectiveness of two protocols of local anesthesia (lidocaine and the combination of lidocaine+bupivacaine) as well as the use of meloxicam as a postoperative analgesic in alleviating castration-related pain, measured by acute physiological responses. Eight groups (15 piglets/group) were included in the study: (1) castration without anesthesia or analgesia, without meloxicam (TRAD WITHOUT), (2) castration without anesthesia or analgesia, but with meloxicam (TRAD WITH), (3) handling without meloxicam (SHAM WITHOUT), (4) handling with meloxicam (SHAM WITH), (5) castration after local anesthesia with lidocaine but without meloxicam (LIDO WITHOUT), (6) castration after local anesthesia with lidocaine and meloxicam (LIDO WITH), (7) castration after local anesthesia with lidocaine+bupivacaine without meloxicam (LIDO+BUPI WITHOUT), (8) castration after local anesthesia with lidocaine+bupivacaine and meloxicam (LIDO+BUPI WITH). Acute physiological responses measured included skin surface temperature and serum glucose and cortisol concentrations. On days 4 and 11 post-castration BW was recorded and average daily gain was calculated over this period. Furthermore, piglet mortality was recorded over the 11-day post-castration period. Administration of local anesthetic or meloxicam did not prevent the decrease in skin surface temperature associated with castration. Lidocaine reduced the increase in glucose concentration associated with castration. For castrated pigs, the joint use of lidocaine and meloxicam caused a significant decrease in cortisol concentration; the combination of intratesticular lidocaine and bupivacaine did not seem to be more effective than lidocaine alone. No effect of treatments on mortality and growth were detected. PMID:27080170

  20. Anesthetic efficacy of infiltrations in mandibular anterior teeth.

    PubMed Central

    Yonchak, T.; Reader, A.; Beck, M.; Clark, K.; Meyers, W. J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to measure the degree of anesthesia obtained with a labial infiltration of either 2% lidocaine with 1:50,000 or 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in mandibular anterior teeth. Another objective was to measure the degree of anesthesia obtained with a lingual infiltration of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in mandibular anterior teeth. Through use of a repeated-measures design, 40 subjects randomly received a labial infiltration at the lateral incisor apex of either 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine or 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:50,000 epinephrine at 2 separate appointments. An additional 40 subjects received a lingual infiltration at the lateral incisor apex of 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. The mandibular anterior teeth were blindly pulp tested at 4-minute cycles for 60 minutes postinjection. No response from the subject to the maximum output (80 reading) of the pulp tester was used as the criterion for pulpal anesthesia. Anesthesia was considered successful when 2 consecutive 80 readings were obtained. For the 3 infiltrations, success rates for the lateral incisor ranged from 43 to 50%. Adjacent teeth had success rates of 27 to 63%. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in success between the labial infiltration of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine and 2% lidocaine with 1:50,000 epinephrine or the lingual infiltration of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine when compared with the labial infiltration of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. Duration of pulpal anesthesia declined steadily for all solutions over the 60 minutes. In conclusion, the success rate of 43-50% and declining duration of pulpal anesthesia over an hour indicates that a labial infiltration of 1.8 mL of either 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine or 1: 50,000 epinephrine or a lingual infiltration of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine over the

  1. Hemorrhoids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hemorrhoid creams with lidocaine to help reduce pain Stool softeners help reduce straining and constipation Things you can ... and whole grains. Consider using fiber supplements. Use stool softeners to prevent straining.

  2. Carborane-derived local anesthetics are isomer dependent.

    PubMed

    Kracke, George R; VanGordon, Monika R; Sevryugina, Yulia V; Kueffer, Peter J; Kabytaev, Kuanysh; Jalisatgi, Satish S; Hawthorne, M Frederick

    2015-01-01

    Clinically there is a need for local anesthetics with a greater specificity of action on target cells and longer duration. We have synthesized a series of local anesthetic derivatives we call boronicaines in which the aromatic phenyl ring of lidocaine was replaced with ortho-, meta-, C,C'-dimethyl meta- and para-carborane clusters. The boronicaine derivatives were tested for their analgesic activity and compared with lidocaine using standard procedures in mice following a plantar injection. The compounds differed in their analgesic activity in the following order: ortho-carborane = C,C'-dimethyl meta-carborane > para-carborane > lidocaine > meta-carborane derivative. Both ortho-boronicaine and C,C'-dimethyl meta-boronicaine had longer durations of analgesia than lidocaine. Differences in analgesic efficacies are rationalized by variations in chemical structure and protein binding characteristics.

  3. Adjuvants to prolong the local anesthetic effects of coated microneedle products.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Siebenaler, Kris; Brown, Ken; Dohmeier, Daniel; Hansen, Kris

    2012-12-15

    The objective of this study was to identify an adjuvant for anesthetics coated on microneedles to provide rapid onset and prolonged analgesic action with minimal skin tissue reaction. Aqueous lidocaine or prilocaine formulations with or without clonidine or the related analogs, guanfacine and apraclonidine, were dip-coated onto polymeric microneedles. The amount of lidocaine or prilocaine coated onto the microneedles was assessed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Delivery efficiency and dermal pharmacokinetics associated with lidocaine or prilocaine delivered via the microneedles were characterized in vivo using domestic swine. Skin punch biopsies were collected and analyzed to determine the anesthetic concentrations in the skin using HPLC-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Addition of clonidine to the formulations decreased the systemic absorption rate of the anesthetics from the patch application site without impacting the coating performance or the rapid onset of anesthesia. Formulations with 0.3 wt.% clonidine, identified as the optimal dose for lidocaine-delivery via microneedles, maintained the lidocaine skin concentration above the estimated therapeutic level (100 ng/mg) for 1 h without causing any skin irritation or color change. The other two clonidine analogs, guanfacine and apraclonidine, also led to delayed systemic absorption of lidocaine from the skin, indicating utility in providing prolonged analgesia.

  4. Comparative cardiac effects of three hepatobiliary radiopharmacologicals in the dog: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Shani, J.; Sarel, O.; Rogel, S.; Weininger, J.; Lubin, E.

    1982-04-01

    Three hepatobiliary agents with an acetanilide-imidoacetic-acid moiety resembling that in lidocaine were investigated for their possible effects on contractility and conductivity in the heart and on arterial pressure and aortic blood flow. This was done in the light of lidocaine's numerous cardiac side effects. HIDA, BIDA, and DIPA, each with traces of decayed /sup 99m/Tc, were injected i.v. into anesthetized dogs with an A-V block, and their effects on the above parameters were followed until control levels were reestablished. Whereas lidocaine raises the diastolic threshold and prolongs the refractory period, the three agents tested do not prolong myocardial conductivity. Both HIDA and BIDA have an effect similar to that of lidocaine, but DIPA has no effect on the latter two parameters. Moreover, whereas lidocaine depressed myocardial contractility, blood pressure, and blood flow, HIDA has a less prominent effect on these parameters, and neither BIDA nor DIPA has any such effect. It is concluded that even though the effect of HIDA on the heart is milder than that of lidocaine, the effects of both BIDA and DIPA are even less pronounced, and they are less likely to cause cardiac side effects when similar doses are administered during nuclear medicine procedures.

  5. Comparative cardiac effects of three hepatobiliary radiopharmacologicals in the dog: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Shani, J.; Rogel, S.; Weininger, J.; Lubin, E.

    1982-04-01

    Three hepatobiliary agents with an acetanilide-imidoacetic-acid moiety resembling that in lidocaine were investigated for their possible effects on contractility and conductivity in the heart and on arterial pressure and aortic blood flow. This was done in the light of lidocaine's numerous cardiac side effects. HIDA, BIDA, and DIPA, each with traces of decayed Tc-99m, were injected i.v. into anesthetized dogs with an A-V block, and their effects on the above parameters were followed until control levels were reestablished. Wheras lidocaine raises the diastolic threshold and prolongs the refractory period, the three agents tested do not prolong myocardial conductivity. Both HIDA and BIDA have an effect similar to that of lidocaine, but DIPA has no effect on the latter two parameters. Moreover, whereas lidocaine depresses myocardial contractility, blood pressure, and blood flow, HIDA has a less prominent effect on these parameters, and neither BIDA nor DIPA has any such effect. It is concluded that even though the effect of HIDA on the heart is milder than that of lidocaine, the effects of both BIDA and DIPA are even less pronounced, and they are less likely to cause cardiac side effects when similar doses are administered during nuclear medicine procedures.

  6. Do the Concentration and Volume of Local Anesthetics Affect the Onset and Success of Infraclavicular Anesthesia?

    PubMed Central

    Mosaffa, Faramarz; Gharaei, Babak; Qoreishi, Mohammad; Razavi, Sajjad; Safari, Farhad; Fathi, Mohammad; Mohseni, Gholamreza; Elyasi, Hedayatollah; Hosseini, Fahimeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although local anesthesia is a suitable method for upper limb surgeries, there is debate regarding the effects of appropriate dosing. Objectives: In the current study, we investigated the effects of the concentration and volume of a local anesthetic on the beginning and quality of anesthesia during upper limb orthopedic surgeries. Patients and Methods: This double-blinded, randomized, clinical trial was conducted on 60 patients aged between 18 and 85 years candidated for upper limb orthopedic operations. The patients were equally and randomly distributed into two groups (n = 30). Under ultrasound imaging guidance, the first group received 7 mL of 2% lidocaine and the second group 10 mL of 1.3% lidocaine into the brachial plexus cords. The onset of block and the level of sensory and motor block were documented for each nerve territory. Results: The onset of sensory and motor block was significantly shorter in the 1.3% lidocaine group than in the 2% lidocaine group (P ≤ 0.05). The success rate of sensory and motor block was not different. The quality (completeness) of sensory block for the musculocutaneous nerve and that of motor block for the radial nerve were significantly better in the 1.3% lidocaine group than in the 2% lidocaine group. Conclusions: The volume of the injected anesthetic accelerated the onset of sensory and motor block without affecting the rate of success in our patients. PMID:26473102

  7. Evaluation of Postoperative Anti-nociceptive Efficacy of Intrathecal Dexketoprofen in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Birol Muhammet, Er; Kocamanoğlu, İsmail Serhat; Bozkurt, Ayhan; Bilge, Sırrı; Çetinoğlu, Erhan Çetin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Some studies have suggested that the intrathecal use of cyclooxygenase enzyme inhibitors provides an anti-nociceptive effect. Therefore, the occurrence of side effects seen in systemic usage can be eliminated. Aims: The primary objective of this experimental, randomized, controlled trial was to test the hypothesis asserting that intrathecal dexketoprofen trometamol would demonstrate an analgesic effect during postoperative period. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Forty rats were randomized into 4 groups 7 days after intrathecal catheterization; the following drugs were given through catheter lumens: Group Lidocaine (Group L): Lidocaine 20 μg; Group Lidocaine-Morphine (Group LM): Lidocaine 20 μg and morphine 0.5 μgr; Group Lidocaine-Dexketoprofen (Group LD): Lidocaine 20 μg and dexketoprofen trometamol 100 μg; and Group Dexketoprofen (Group D): Dexketoprofen trometamol 100 μg. Paw incision was achieved under ether inhalation. To measure analgesic potential, hot plate and tail immersion tests were used as nociceptive tests during the postoperative period. Results: The mean reaction times detected in groups during hot plate and tail immersion tests were shortest in Group L at 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105, and 120 minutes after start of surgery (p<0.01, all others). In the groups using dexketoprofen, as in the morphine group, longer reaction times were detected than in the lidocaine group at all measurement times except 120 minutes (p<0.01). Conclusion: Intrathecal dexketoprofen in the optimal perioperative pain management is effective, and can be administered as an adjuvant in clinics after neurotoxicity studies in animals, and effective dose studies in volunteers. PMID:27308067

  8. The tetrodotoxin-resistant Na+ channel Na (v)1.8 reduces the potency of local anesthetics in blocking C-fiber nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Kistner, Katrin; Zimmermann, Katharina; Ehnert, Corina; Reeh, Peter W; Leffler, Andreas

    2010-04-01

    The generation of action potentials in nociceptive neurons is accomplished by the tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTXr) Na+ channel Na(v)1.8. Following nerve injury, a redistribution of Na(v)1.8 from dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons into peripheral axons contributes to hyperexcitability and possibly to neuropathic pain. Na(v)1.8 has been reported to display a lower sensitivity to block by Na+ channel blockers as compared to TTX-sensitive (TTXs) Na(v) subunits. Furthermore, the antinociceptive efficacy of lidocaine is increased in Na(v)1.8-knockout mice. Here, we asked if Na(v)1.8 expression can reduce the susceptibility of sensory neurons to block by lidocaine. Employing wild-type and Na(v)1.8-knockout mice, we examined C-fibers in the skin-nerve preparation and Na+ currents in DRG neurons by patch-clamp recordings. Deletion of Na(v)1.8 resulted in an enhanced tonic block of Na+ currents in DRG neurons held at -80 mV but not at -140 mV. Accordingly, lower concentrations of lidocaine were required for a conduction block of C-fibers from Na(v)1.8-knockout as compared to wild-type mice. The efficacy of lidocaine on neurons lacking Na(v)1.8 was further increased by cold temperatures, due to a synergistic hyperpolarizing shift of the slow inactivation of TTXs Na+ channels by lidocaine and cooling. Finally, the approximately 90% reduction of TTXr Na+ currents in injured neurons from mice with a peripheral nerve injury was accompanied with an enhanced tonic block by lidocaine. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that the expression of Na(v)1.8 in sensory neurons can confine the antinociceptive efficacy of lidocaine and other Na+ channel blockers employed for pain treatment. PMID:20174994

  9. [Local anesthesia in the children undergoing the fibroendoscopic study of the nasal cavity, nasopharynx, and larynx: are topical anesthetics needed?].

    PubMed

    Soldatsky, Yu L; Denisova, O A; Mazur, E M

    2015-01-01

    This prospective randomized study with double blind control was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of various anesthetic techniques employed prior to fibroendoscopy of the nose, nasopharynx, and larynx of the children. The study included 160 children at the age varying from 3 to 14 (mean 7.4±2.96) years randomly allocated to four statistically comparable groups matched for age and sex. The following preparations were used to treat the children prior to fibroendoscopy: physiological solution (group 1), a 0.05% xylometazoline solution (group 2), a 10% lidocaine solution (group 3), and a mixture of 0.05% xylometazoline and 10% lidocaine solutions (group 4). The evaluation of the tolerance to the pretreatment of the nasal cavity with lidocaine and lidocaine plus xylometazoline (groups 3 and 4) showed that it was significantly (p<0.05) worse than in groups 1 and 2. The subjective tolerance to fibroendoscopy as reported by the patients was on the average similar in the children of all four groups (p>0.05). The doctors found the tolerance of fibroendoscopy to be the worst following pretreatment with the physiological solution (group 1) and the best after pretreatment with a mixture of lidocaine and xylometazoline (group 4) (p=0.03). The children comprising groups 2 and 3 were not significantly different in terms of the tolerance to fibroendoscopy (p>0.05). It is concluded that the pretreatment of the nasal cavity of the children with a 10% lidocaine solution before fibroendoscopy has no advantage over the pretreatment with a 0.05% xylometazoline solution; at the same time, insuflation of lidocaine as an anesthetic induces more pronounced negative emotions compared with the application of 0.05% xylometazoline. PMID:26525473

  10. Intrathecal rimantadine induces motor, proprioceptive, and nociceptive blockades in rats.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Wang, Jieh-Neng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chen, Yu-Wen; Hung, Ching-Hsia

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the experiment was to evaluate the local anesthetic effect of rimantadine in spinal anesthesia. Rimantadine in a dose-dependent fashion was constructed after intrathecally injecting the rats with four different doses. The potency and duration of rimantadine were compared with that of the local anesthetic lidocaine at producing spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades. We demonstrated that intrathecal rimantadine dose-dependently produced spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades. On the 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the ranks of potencies at inducing spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades was lidocaine>rimantadine (P<0.01). Rimantadine exhibited more nociceptive block (ED50) than motor block (P<0.05). At equi-anesthetic doses (ED25, ED50, and ED75), the spinal block duration produced by rimantadine was longer than that produced by lidocaine (P<0.01). Furthermore, rimantadine (26.52μmol/kg) prolonged the nociceptive nerve block more than the motor block (P<0.001). Our preclinical data showed that rimantadine, with a more sensory-selective action over motor block, was less potent than lidocaine. Rimantadine produced longer duration in spinal anesthesia when compared with lidocaine.

  11. Effect of pretreatment with acetaminophen on withdrawal movements associated with injection of rocuronium: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Younghoon; Baek, Sung-Uk; Park, Sung Sik; Kim, Si Oh; Baek, Woon-Yi

    2010-01-01

    Background Withdrawal movement during rocuronium injection is a common, unresolved adverse effect. We aimed to investigate the effect of IV acetaminophen pretreatment on withdrawal movement during rocuronium injection. Methods This study enrolled 120 American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I-II patients undergoing general anesthesia. They were randomly assigned to three treatment groups. After occluding venous drainage using a tourniquet on the upper arm, the saline group received 5 ml of 0.9% sodium chloride solution, the lidocaine group received 40 mg of lidocaine, and the acetaminophen group received 50 mg of acetaminophen. During injection of pretreatment drug, pain was assessed on a four-point scale. The tourniquet was released after 120 seconds and anesthesia was performed using thiopental sodium 5 mg/kg followed by rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg. The withdrawal movement was graded on a four-point scale in a double-blind manner. Results The incidence of pain on pretreatment injection in saline, lidocaine, and acetaminophen groups was 7.7%, 5.1%, and 2.5%, respectively. The incidence of withdrawal movements was 77.5% in saline group, 32.5% in lidocaine group, and 37.5% in acetaminophen group (P < 0.05). Conclusions Acetaminophen and lidocaine reduced the incidence of withdrawal movement after rocuronium injection compared with saline. PMID:20651992

  12. Effect of Washes and Centrifugation on the Efficacy of Lipofilling With or Without Local Anesthetic

    PubMed Central

    Mirbeau, Sophie; Gence, Lydie; Hivernaud, Vincent; Delarue, Pierre; Hulard, Olivier; Festy, Franck; Roche, Regis

    2015-01-01

    Background: Among the different parameters that influence fat graft survival and lipofilling success, the use of local anesthetic and the way to process the fat before injection have often been pointed out. Likewise, we evaluated different techniques for processing adipose tissue before its injection and analyzed the quality of the grafts. Methods: Adipose tissue from the same patient was gently harvested from one side of the abdomen after infiltration of a tumescent solution without lidocaine and from the other side of the abdomen using a tumescent solution containing lidocaine 2%. Harvested tissue was prepared with different protocols, from simple decantation to advanced protocols including single or multiple washes and centrifugations. Each type of processed adipose tissue was then injected subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. Adipose grafts were collected after 1 month and analyzed by histology with a detailed scoring method. Results: After lidocaine use, decantation protocol led to adipose grafts of poor quality with high resorption rate and oil vacuole formation. Larger grafts were obtained after centrifugation, but centrifugation alone resulted in increased fibrosis and necrosis, with or without the use of lidocaine. Finally, multiple washes and centrifugations greatly improved the quality of the lipografts. Conclusions: Centrifugation alone is not sufficient and must be associated with multiple washes to improve graft quality. This article aims to provide further evidence of lidocaine and washing/centrifugation effects in fat grafting to provide easy tips aimed at ensuring graft efficiency with a long-term clinical outcome. PMID:26495209

  13. Pharmacokinetics of EMLA cream 5% application to oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Vickers, E R; Marzbani, N; Gerzina, T M; McLean, C; Punnia-Moorthy, A; Mather, L

    1997-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of lidocaine and prilocaine were measured following the application of a 5% eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA) topical anesthetic cream to the oral mucosa of twelve subjects. For each subject, a total of 8 g of EMLA was occluded to 18 cm2 of buccal mucosa for 30 min. Analysis was carried out by high-pressure liquid chromatography, and results showed peak concentrations at 40 min for lidocaine and prilocaine. The maximum concentration measured in any subject was 418 ng/ml for lidocaine and 223 ng/ml for prilocaine, well below known toxic levels. No adverse local effects were observed from a 30-min application of EMLA. A follow-up pilot study assessing the clinical efficacy of EMLA for achieving sufficient analgesia for restorative procedures showed that the cream was successful in 75% of subjects tested.

  14. EO-199, a specific antagonist of antiarrhythmic drugs: Assessment by binding experiments and in vivo studies

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheimer, E.; Harel, G.; Lipinsky, D.; Sarne, Y. )

    1991-01-01

    EO-199, a demethylated analog of the novel class I antiarrhythmic drug EO-122 was found to antagonize the antiarrhythmic activity of EO-122 and that of procainamide (Class I{sub A}). EO-199 did not block significantly the activity of a class I{sub B} antiarrhythmic agent, lidocaine. EO-199 also displaced the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)EO-122 to rate heart membranes similarly to procainamide whereas lidocaine did not. The correlation between binding experiments and pharmacological effects points to a possible subclassification of these drugs; the two chemical analogs EO-199 and EO-122, as well as procainamide (I{sub A}) but not lidocaine (I{sub B}), compete at the same site or the same state of the sodium channel. The availability of a specific antagonist might be useful for studying the mechanism of action of antiarrhythmic drugs as well as an antidote in cases of antiarrhythmics overdose intoxication.

  15. Medial prefrontal cortex modulation of the baroreflex parasympathetic component in the rat.

    PubMed

    Resstel, L B M; Fernandes, K B P; Corrêa, F M A

    2004-07-23

    The ventral portion of the medial prefrontal cortex (vMPFC) that comprises the prelimbic and infralimbic cortex is involved in arterial blood pressure and heart rate control. In the present study, we attempted to verify the effect of an acute and reversible blockade of vMPFC activity by local bilateral microinjections of either lidocaine (a local anesthetic) or CoCl2 (a nonselective synapse blocker) on the baroreflex response of unanesthetized rats. Bilateral microinjection of lidocaine into the vMPFC did not affect the tachycardiac response to mean arterial pressure (MAP) decreases caused by i.v. infusion of sodium nitroprusside or the baroreflex gain in unanesthetized rats. However, lidocaine caused a reversible shift of the reflex threshold pressure toward higher (MAP) increases in response to i.v. infusion of phenylephrine, thus indicating an action on the parasympathetic component of the baroreflex. The effects of the blockade of local synapses in the vMPFC by CoCl2 were similar to those observed after the acute ablation of that area caused by lidocaine. Bilateral microinjection of CoCl2 into the vMPFC also caused a shift of the reflex threshold pressure bradycardiac responses to MAP increases toward higher MAP values, without affecting the baroreflex gain. In conclusion, our data indicate that the vMPFC is involved in baroreflex control, and more specifically in the modulation of the parasympathetic baroreflex component. The temporary ablation of this area by local microinjections of lidocaine caused a shift of the reflex threshold pressure toward higher MAP values, which is compatible with the idea that the vMPFC has a modulatory action on the baroreflex. The observation that CoCl2 and lidocaine microinjections had similar effects on the baroreflex also suggests that this modulation involves local synaptic neurotransmission within the vMPFC. PMID:15223377

  16. Revealing oxidative damage to enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in yeast: An integration of 2D DIGE, quantitative proteomics, and bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Boone, Cory H T; Grove, Ryan A; Adamcova, Dana; Braga, Camila P; Adamec, Jiri

    2016-07-01

    Clinical usage of lidocaine, a pro-oxidant has been linked with severe, mostly neurological complications. The mechanism(s) causing these complications is independent of the blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacks voltage-gated sodium channels, thus provides an ideal system to investigate lidocaine-induced protein and pathway alterations. Whole-proteome alterations leading to these complications have not been identified. To address this, S. cerevisiae was grown to stationary phase and exposed to an LC50 dose of lidocaine. The differential proteomes of lidocaine treatment and control were resolved 6 h post exposure using 2D DIGE. Amine reactive dyes and carbonyl reactive dyes were used to assess protein abundance and protein oxidation, respectively. Quantitative analysis of these dyes (⩾ 1.5-fold alteration, p ⩽ 0.05) revealed a total of 33 proteoforms identified by MS differing in abundance and/or oxidation upon lidocaine exposure. Network analysis showed enrichment of apoptotic proteins and cell wall maintenance proteins, while the abundance of proteins central to carbohydrate metabolism, such as triosephosphate isomerase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and redox proteins superoxide dismutase and peroxiredoxin were significantly decreased. Enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, such as phosphoglycerate kinase and enolase, the TCA cycle enzyme aconitase, and multiple ATP synthase subunits were found to be oxidatively modified. Also, the activity of aconitase was found to be decreased. Overall, these data suggest that toxic doses of lidocaine induce significant disruption of glycolytic pathways, energy production, and redox balance, potentially leading to cell malfunction and death. PMID:27193513

  17. Caramiphen-induced block of sodium currents and spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Leung, Yuk-Man; Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Gong, Chi-Li; Wang, Yu-Wen; Chen, Yu-Wen; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2015-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms for the action of caramiphen used in local anesthesia are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the block of caramiphen on voltage-gated Na⁺ channels and in spinal anesthesia. We investigated the effect of caramiphen on voltage-gated sodium channels in differentiated neuronal NG108-15 cells as well as on rat motor function, proprioception, and pain behavior (when administered intrathecally). In in vitro experiments, lidocaine produced concentration- and state-dependent effects on tonic block of voltage-gated Na⁺ currents (IC₅₀ of 66.2 and 212.9 µM at holding potentials of -70 and -100 mV, respectively). Caramiphen exhibited a milder state-dependence of block (IC₅₀ of 52.1 and 99.5 µM at holding potentials of -70 and -100 mV, respectively). Lidocaine showed a much stronger frequency-dependence of block than caramiphen: with high frequency stimulation (3.33 Hz), 50 µM caramiphen elicited an additional 20% blockade, whereas the same concentration of lidocaine produced 50% more block. In in vivo experiments, caramiphen with a more sensory-selective action over motor blockade was more potent than lidocaine (P<0.05) in spinal anesthesia. On an equipotent basis (25% effective dose (ED₂₅), ED₅₀, and ED₇₅), the duration of caramiphen at producing spinal anesthesia was longer than that of lidocaine (P<0.01). Our data revealed that caramiphen had a more potent, prolonged spinal blockade with a more sensory/nociceptive-selective action over motor blockade in comparison with lidocaine. Spinal anesthesia with caramiphen could be through the suppression of voltage-gated Na⁺ currents. PMID:25446426

  18. Enhanced Central Pain Processing of Fibromyalgia Patients is Maintained by Muscle Afferent Input: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Staud, Roland; Nagel, Susann; Robinson, Michael E.; Price, Donald D.

    2009-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM) is characterized by pain and widespread hyperalgesia to mechanical, thermal, and electrical stimuli. Despite convincing evidence for central sensitization of nociceptive pain pathways, the role of peripheral tissue impulse input in the initiation and maintenance of FM is unclear. Therefore this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 22 normal female controls (NC) and 28 female FM subjects tested the effects of trapezius muscle (TrapM) tender point injections with 1% lidocaine on local pain thresholds as well as on remote heat hyperalgesia at the forearm. Prior to muscle injections shoulder pain was standardized by tonic mechanical muscle stimulation, resulting in local pain ratings of 4.0 ± 0.5 VAS units. Tonic muscle stimulation was interrupted for the TrapM injections but continued afterwards at the same level. NC as well as FM subjects experienced significant increases of TrapM pressure pain-thresholds from lidocaine but not placebo injections (p <.001). Additionally, heat-hyperalgesia of FM participants was significantly reduced at areas remote from the injection site (forearm) by lidocaine but not placebo (p = .02). Neither lidocaine nor saline injections significantly affected clinical FM pain ratings, a result most likely due to the very low dose of lidocaine (50 mg) used in this trial. Conclusion: Lidocaine injections increased local pain-thresholds and decreased remote secondary heat hyperalgesia in FM patients, emphasizing the important role of peripheral impulse input in maintaining central sensitization in this chronic pain syndrome; similar to other persistent pain conditions like irritable bowel syndrome and complex regional pain syndrome. PMID:19540671

  19. A comparison of patient pain and visual outcome using topical anesthesia versus regional anesthesia during cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hosoda, Yoshikatsu; Kuriyama, Shoji; Jingami, Yoko; Hattori, Hidetsugu; Hayashi, Hisako; Matsumoto, Miho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the level of patient pain during the phacoemulsification and implantation of foldable intraocular lenses while under topical, intracameral, or sub-Tenon lidocaine. Patients and methods This was a retrospective study. Three hundred and one eyes subjected to cataract surgery were included in this study. All eyes underwent phacoemulsification surgery and intraocular lens implantation using topical, sub-Tenon, or intracameral anesthesia. The topical group received 4% lidocaine drops, and the intracameral group received a 0.1–0.2 cc infusion of 1% preservative-free lidocaine into the anterior chamber through the side port combined with topical drops of lidocaine. The sub-Tenon group received 2% lidocaine. Best-corrected visual acuity, corneal endothelial cell loss, and intraoperative pain level were evaluated. Pain level was assessed on a visual analog scale (range 0–2). Results There were no significant differences in visual outcome and corneal endothelial cell loss between the three groups. The mean pain score in the sub-Tenon group was significantly lower than that in the topical and intracameral groups (P=0.0009 and P=0.0055, respectively). In 250 eyes without high myopia (< −6D), there were no significant differences in mean pain score between the sub-Tenon and intracameral groups (P=0.1417). No additional anesthesia was required in all groups. Conclusion Intracameral lidocaine provides sufficient pain suppressive effects in eyes without high myopia, while sub-Tenon anesthesia is better for cataract surgery in eyes with high myopia. PMID:27382247

  20. Beneficial effect of trimebutine and N-monodesmethyl trimebutine on trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Eric; Pétoux, Francine; Chovet, Maria; Langlois, Annik

    2004-12-01

    The use of local anesthetics, such as lidocaine, has been proposed in the treatment of distal ulcerative colitis. Trimebutine maleate (TMB) displays a local anesthetic activity higher than that of lidocaine in rabbit corneal reflex. TMB and nor-TMB its main metabolite in human show similar affinity to that of bupivacaine toward sodium channel labeled by [3H]batrachotoxin and block sodium currents in sensory neurons from rat dorsal root ganglia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of TMB and nor-TMB in comparison to lidocaine and bupivacaine in a rat model of acute colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). A single intracolonic instillation of TNBS (50 mg/kg dissolved in ethanol 30%) led to early plasma extravasation then macroscopic damage (hyperemia and necrosis), increased colonic weight and tissular MPO, a marker of neutrophilic infiltration. Local administration of TMB at dose of 3 to 60 mg/kg, 30 min before, 24 and 48 h after colitis induction, significantly reduced the severity of colitis. Nor-TMB (1, 3, 10, 30 mg/kg) as well as lidocaine (1, 3, 10 mg/kg) dose-dependently reduced colitis while bupivacaine at 10 mg/kg did not affect it significantly. In contrast systemic administration of TMB, nor-TMB and lidocaine at 10 mg/kg had no significant effect. Furthermore, local administration of TMB (30 mg/kg) and lidocaine (10 mg/kg) significantly reduced plasmatic extravasation. In conclusion, intracolonic treatment with TMB and nor-TMB improved acute experimental TNBS-induced colitis in rat and these effects could be explained by their local anesthetic activity. PMID:15531383

  1. Effect of Injection Pressure of Infiltration Anesthesia to the Jawbone.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kenji; Tanaka, Eri; Kawaai, Hiroyoshi; Yamazaki, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    To obtain effective infiltration anesthesia in the jawbone, high concentrations of local anesthetic are needed. However, to reduce pain experienced by patients during local anesthetic administration, low-pressure injection is recommended for subperiosteal infiltration anesthesia. Currently, there are no studies regarding the effect of injection pressure on infiltration anesthesia, and a standard injection pressure has not been clearly determined. Hence, the effect of injection pressure of subperiosteal infiltration anesthesia on local anesthetic infiltration to the jawbone was considered by directly measuring lidocaine concentration in the jawbone. Japanese white male rabbits were used as test animals. After inducing general anesthesia with oxygen and sevoflurane, cannulation to the femoral artery was performed and arterial pressure was continuously recorded. Subperiosteal infiltration anesthesia was performed by injecting 0.5 mL of 2% lidocaine containing 1/80,000 adrenaline, and injection pressure was monitored by a pressure transducer for 40 seconds. After specified time intervals (10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 minutes), jawbone and blood samples were collected, and the concentration of lidocaine at each time interval was measured. The mean injection pressure was divided into 4 groups (100 ± 50 mm Hg, 200 ± 50 mm Hg, 300 ± 50 mm Hg, and 400 ± 50 mm Hg), and comparison statistical analysis between these 4 groups was performed. No significant change in blood pressure during infiltration anesthesia was observed in any of the 4 groups. Lidocaine concentration in the blood and jawbone were highest 10 minutes after the infiltration anesthesia in all 4 groups and decreased thereafter. Lidocaine concentration in the jawbone increased as injection pressure increased, while serum lidocaine concentration was significantly lower. This suggests that when injection pressure of subperiosteal infiltration anesthesia is low, infiltration of local anesthetic to the jawbone may

  2. Topical anaesthesia does not affect cutaneous vasomotor or sudomotor responses in human skin.

    PubMed

    Metzler-Wilson, K; Wilson, T E

    2013-10-01

    (1) The effects of local sensory blockade (topical anaesthesia) on eccrine sweat glands and cutaneous circulation are not well understood. This study aimed to determine whether topical lidocaine/prilocaine alters eccrine sweat gland and cutaneous blood vessel responses. (2) Sweating (capacitance hygrometry) was induced via forearm intradermal microdialysis of five acetylcholine (ACh) doses (1 × 10(-4) to 1 × 10(0) m, 10-fold increments) in control and treated forearm sites in six healthy subjects. Nitric oxide-mediated vasodilatory (sodium nitroprusside) and adrenergic vasoconstrictor (noradrenaline) agonists were iontophoresed in lidocaine/prilocaine-treated and control forearm skin in nine healthy subjects during blood flow assessment (laser Doppler flowmetry, expressed as% from baseline cutaneous vascular conductance; CVC; flux/mean arterial pressure). (3) Non-linear regression curve fitting identified no change in the ED50 of ACh-induced sweating after sensory blockade (-1.42 ± 0.23 logM) compared to control (-1.27 ± 0.23 logM; P > .05) or in Emax (0.43 ± 0.08 with, 0.53 ± 0.16 mg cm(-2) min(-1) without lidocaine/prilocaine; P > .05). Sensory blockade did not alter the vasodilator response to sodium nitroprusside (1280 ± 548% change from baseline CVC with, 1204 ± 247% without lidocaine/prilocaine) or vasoconstrictor response to noradrenaline (-14 ± 4% change from baseline CVC with, -22 ± 14% without lidocaine/prilocaine; P > 0.05). (4) Cutaneous sensory blockade does not appear to alter nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation, adrenergic vasoconstriction, or cholinergic eccrine sweating dose-response sensitivity or responsiveness to maximal dose. Thus, lidocaine/prilocaine treatment should not affect sweat gland function or have blood flow implications for subsequent research protocols or clinical procedures.

  3. Screening and determination of drugs in human saliva utilizing microextraction by packed sorbent and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rehim, Abbi; Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed

    2013-09-01

    This study presents a new method for collecting and handling saliva samples using an automated analytical microsyringe and microextraction by packed syringe (MEPS). The screening and determination of lidocaine in human saliva samples utilizing MEPS and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) were carried out. An exact volume of saliva could be collected. The MEPS C8 -cartridge could be used for 50 extractions before it was discarded. The extraction recovery was about 60%. The pharmacokinetic curve of lidocaine in saliva using MEPS-LC-MS/MS is reported.

  4. A preliminary study of painless and effective transdermal botulinum toxin A delivery by jet nebulization for treatment of primary hyperhidrosis

    PubMed Central

    Iannitti, Tommaso; Palmieri, Beniamino; Aspiro, Anna; Di Cerbo, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Background Hyperhidrosis is a chronic disease characterized by increased sweat production. Local injections of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) have been extensively used for treatment of primary hyperhidrosis (idiopathic). The current treatment for this condition involves several intradermal injections, resulting in poor patient compliance due to injection-related pain. Therefore, new protocols, including an improved anesthetic regimen, are required. Aim We designed the present study to determine whether JetPeel™-3, a medical device used for transdermal delivery of drugs by jet nebulization, could be used to deliver lidocaine prior to the standard multiple BTX-A injections or deliver lidocaine together with BTX-A in order to determine the protocol giving better results in terms of procedure-related pain, sweating, and patient satisfaction in subjects affected by primary axillary, palmar or plantar hyperhidrosis. Materials and methods Twenty patients with a visual analog scale (VAS) sweating score ≥ 8 cm were randomized to receive lidocaine 2% (5 mL) delivered by JetPeel™-3 followed by multiple injections of BTX-A (100 units) or lidocaine 2% (5 mL) and BTX-A (50 units) delivered together by JetPeel™-3. Effect of treatment on sweating was measured by VAS (0= minimum sweating; 10= maximum sweating) at 3-month follow-up. Pain induced by the procedure was assessed by VAS (0= minimum pain; 10= maximum pain) immediately after the procedure. Patient satisfaction was assessed at 3-month follow-up using a 5-point scale (1= not at all satisfied; 2= not satisfied; 3= partially satisfied; 4= satisfied; 5= highly satisfied). Results Both treatment modalities reduced sweating at 3-month follow-up, if compared with baseline (all P<0.001). Delivery of lidocaine and BTX-A by JetPeel™-3 resulted in lower procedure-related pain and reduced sweating, if compared with lidocaine delivered by JetPeel™-3 followed by multiple BTX-A injections (all P<0.001). Patient satisfaction with

  5. Anesthetic Efficacy of Meperidine in Teeth With Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis

    PubMed Central

    Mohajeri, Ladan; Salehi, Farnaz; Mehrvarzfar, Payman; Arfaee, Hamide; Bohluli, Behnam; Hamedy, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Achieving adequate pulpal anesthesia in mandibular teeth is always a challenge. Supplementary injections and using drugs in combination are some methods implemented to overcome this hurdle. In this randomized clinical trial, use of meperidine in conjunction with lidocaine in intraligamentary injection did not exhibit significant improvement in anesthesia. PMID:25849469

  6. The effect of topical local anesthetics on thermal pain sensitivity in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Anthony; King, Christopher D; Wong, Fong; Riley, Joseph L; Schmidt, Siegfried; Mauderli, Andre P

    2012-01-01

    Generalized hypersensitivity that extends into somatic areas is common in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The sensitized state, particularly assessed by experimental methods, is known to persist even during remissions of clinical pain. It was hypothesized that disease-related nociceptive activity in the gut maintains a systemic-sensitized state. The present study evaluated responses to prolonged thermal stimuli maintained at constant temperature or constant pain intensity during stimulation. The effect of topically applied rectal lidocaine on heat sensitivity was also evaluated. The question is whether silencing potential intestinal neural activity (which may not always lead to a conscious pain experience) with lidocaine attenuates sensitization of somatic areas. Tests were also performed where lidocaine was applied orally to control for systemic or placebo effects of the drug. The IBS subjects exhibited a greater sensitivity to somatic heat stimuli compared to controls; however, lidocaine had no discernible effect on sensitization in this sample of IBS patients, where most of the individuals did not have clinical pain on the day of testing.

  7. Study of Use of Dexmedetomidine for Regional Anesthesia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Patients Scheduled for Upper Extremity Surgeries (Vascular Occlusion Syndrome, Acute Compartment Syndrome, Capral Tunnell Syndrome Etc.); Will Participate in the Study.; Focus of the Study is to Determine:; the Optimal Dose of Dexmedetomidine Added to Lidocaine; for Infra- and Supra-clavicular Brachial Plexus Block.

  8. Partial intravenous anesthesia in cats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Duke, Tanya

    2013-03-01

    The partial intravenous anesthesia technique (PIVA) is used to lower the inspired concentration of an inhalational anesthetic by concurrent use of injectable drugs. This technique reduces the incidence of undesirable side-effects and provides superior quality of anesthesia and analgesia. Drugs commonly used for PIVA include opioids, alpha-2 adrenergic agonists, injectable anesthetic agents, and lidocaine. Most are administered by intravenous infusion.

  9. Understanding heat facilitated drug transport across human epidermis.

    PubMed

    Wood, D G; Brown, M B; Jones, S A

    2012-08-01

    The application of moderate heat is a safe and effective means to increase drug transport across human skin. However, the cascade of events that follows the exposure of a topical skin formulation to a heating source is not well understood. The aim of this study was to elucidate how three potential rate limiting stages in the drug transport process; formulation release, drug partitioning and epidermal diffusion, responded to changes in local temperature using the model drug lidocaine. Release from the formulation measured using regenerated cellulose membrane was shown to be driven by drug diffusion in the vehicle; it responded linearly when the local temperature was changed (21.6 μg/cm(2)/h for every 1 °C rise) and displayed no measurable partitioning of lidocaine into RCM. Once the drug was within the human epidermis, the structural changes of the barrier controlled its transport. The apparent lidocaine diffusion coefficient through silicone membrane increased from 6.52 to 8.43 × 10(-4) over the 32-45 °C temperature range, but it increased from 7.74 × 10(-5)cm(2)h(-1) to 4.8 × 10(-4)cm(2)h(-1) in the human epidermis. In the absence of large increases in drug partitioning, fluidisation of the lipids in the upper layers of the epidermis at 37-45 °C was shown to facilitate lidocaine diffusion which for human skin transport was the rate limiting process.

  10. Amitriptyline Activates TrkA to Aid Neuronal Growth and Attenuate Anesthesia-Induced Neurodegeneration in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaochun; Chen, Feng; Zheng, Ting; Huang, Fengyi; Chen, Jianghu; Tu, Wenshao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline (AM) has been shown to exert neurotrophic activity on neurons. We thus explored whether AM may aid the neuronal development and protect anesthesia-induced neuro-injury in young spinal cord dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The DRG explants were prepared from 1-day-old rats. The effect of AM on aiding DRG neural development was examined by immunohistochemistry at dose-dependent manner. AM-induced changes in gene and protein expressions, and also phosphorylation states of tyrosine kinases receptor A (TrkA) and B (TrkB) in DRG, were examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The effect of AM on attenuating lidocaine-induced DRG neurodegeneration was examined by immunohistochemistry, and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated TrkA/B down-regulation. Amitriptyline stimulated DRG neuronal development in dose-dependent manner, but exerted toxic effect at concentrations higher than 10 M. AM activated TrkA in DRG through phosphorylation, whereas it had little effect on TrkB-signaling pathway. AM reduced lidocaine-induced DRG neurodegeneration by regenerating neurites and growth cones. Moreover, the neuroprotection of AM on lidocaine-injured neurodegeneration was blocked by siRNA-mediated TrkA down-regulation, but not by TrkB down-regulation. Amitriptyline facilitated neuronal development and had protective effect on lidocaine-induced neurodegeneration, very likely through the activation of TrkA-signaling pathway in DRG. PMID:27149473

  11. A Multi-Technique Forensic Experiment for a Nonscience-Major Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szalay, Paul S.; Zook-Gerdau, Lois Anne; Schurter, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    This multi-technique experiment with a forensic theme was developed for a nonscience-major chemistry course. The students are provided with solid samples and informed that the samples are either cocaine or a combination of drugs designed to mimic the stimulant and anesthetic qualities of cocaine such as caffeine and lidocaine. The students carry…

  12. Thumbnail Sketches: Consumer Application of Chemical Principles: Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, John W.; Jones, Susan M.

    1985-01-01

    Acid-base chemistry can be made more meaningful to beginning students by using familiar drugs as examples. They include: (1) drugs (nicotine, cocaine, and aspirin); (2) general anesthesia (nitrous oxide, enflurane, isoflurane, and halothane); (3) local anesthetics (procaine, lidocaine, and cocaine); and (4) intravenous anesthetics (thiopental,…

  13. Hand recontouring with calcium hydroxylapatite (Radiesse).

    PubMed

    Edelson, Kenneth L

    2009-03-01

    The aging hand is a common area of concern for many patients. Until recently, adequate treatment options have been hampered by pain of injecting into the dorsum and, post-injection, by the absence of longevity of treatment. In this article, we describe the off-label use of the soft tissue filler calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA; Radiesse) for hand rejuvenation. The product is inherently biocompatible and, when placed in soft tissue, induces neocollagenesis. An alternative injection mixture of CaHA combined with lidocaine is described, as well as the novel "bolus" injection technique. The CaHA-lidocaine emulsion reduces the pain of injection to nearly none at all, improves the rheology of the procedure, and allows for deposition of the product into the correct plane of tissue. The volume of CaHA injected as well as the amount of lidocaine used for the mixture vary according to physician preference. In our practice, 1.3 mL of CaHA combined with 0.5 mL lidocaine per hand usually appears to be sufficient to improve the appearance of the atrophic dorsum of the hand. Side-effects of CaHA (Radiesse), particularly in this off-label application, are minimal and of short duration. The aesthetic result is immediate and generally persists for longer than 6 months. As a treatment option, hand rejuvenation with CaHA (Radiesse) is a very gratifying procedure both to the patient and to the physician.

  14. Tumescent liposuction.

    PubMed

    Lozinski, Ala; Huq, Nasim S

    2013-10-01

    The evolution of liposuction has been multidisciplinary. The tumescent variant was developed using dilute local lidocaine and epinephrine and was meant to specifically exclude additional intravenous sedation, regional or general anesthesia, and intravenous fluids. Clinical pharmacology, pathophysiology, and safety studies are reviewed in this article. Tumescent formulations for varied anatomic sites are discussed, as well as other indications for tumescent anesthesia.

  15. The effect of buffering on pain and duration of local anesthetic in the face: A double-blind, randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Afolabi, Oluwatola; Murphy, Amanda; Chung, Bryan; Lalonde, Donald H

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The acidity of lidocaine preparations is believed to contribute to the pain of local anesthetic injection. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of buffering lidocaine on the pain of injection and duration of anesthetic effect. METHODS: A double-blind, randomized trial involving 44 healthy volunteers was conducted. The upper lip was injected with a solution of: lidocaine 1% (Xylocaine, AstraZeneca, Canada, Inc) with epinephrine; and lidocaine 1% with epinephrine and 8.4% sodium bicarbonate. Volunteers reported pain of injection and duration of anesthetic effect. RESULTS: Twenty-six participants found the unbuffered solution to be more painful. Fifteen participants found the buffered solution to be more painful; the difference was not statistically significant. Twenty-one volunteers reported duration of anesthetic effect. The buffered solution provided longer anesthetic effect than the unbuffered solution (P=0.004). CONCLUSION: Although buffering increased the duration of lidocaine’s anesthetic effect in this particular model, a decrease in the pain of the injection was not demonstrated, likely due to limitations of the study. PMID:24497759

  16. Shingles

    MedlinePlus

    ... shingles or HZO to others? No one can catch shingles or HZO from you. However, they can catch chickenpox if they haven't already had chickenpox ... such as a stronger pain medicine or a patch that contains a numbing medicine called lidocaine. Some ...

  17. Transsacral S2-S4 nerve block for vaginal pain due to pudendal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Cok, Oya Yalcin; Eker, H Evren; Cok, Tayfun; Akin, Sule; Aribogan, Anis; Arslan, Gulnaz

    2011-01-01

    Pudendal neuralgia is a type of neuropathic pain experienced predominantly while sitting, and causes a substantial decrease in quality of life in affected patients. Pudendal nerve block is a diagnostic and therapeutic option for pudendal neuralgia. Transsacral block at S2 through S4 results in pudendal nerve block, which is an option for successful relief of pain due to pudendal nerve injury. Herein is reported blockade of S2 through S4 using lidocaine and methylprednisolone for successful treatment of pudendal neuralgia in 2 patients with severe chronic vaginal pain. The patients, aged 44 and 58 years, respectively, were referred from the Gynecology Department to the pain clinic because of burning, stabbing, electric shock-like, unilateral pain localized to the left portion of the vagina and extending to the perineum. Their initial pain scores were 9 and 10, respectively, on a numeric rating scale. Both patients refused pudendal nerve block using classical techniques. Therefore, diagnostic transsacral S2-S4 nerve block was performed using lidocaine 1%, and was repeated using lidocaine 1% and methylprednisolone 80 mg after confirming block efficiency as demonstrated by an immediate decrease in pain scores. After 1 month, pain scores were 1 and 0, respectively, and both patients were free of pain at 6-month follow up. It is suggested that blockade of S2 through S4 using lidocaine and methylprednisolone is an effective treatment option in patients with chronic pudendal neuralgia when traditional pudendal nerve block is not applicable.

  18. The Mysterious Death: An HPLC Lab Experiment. An Undergraduate Forensic Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beussman, Douglas J.

    2007-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) laboratory experiment based on the separation of four prescription drugs (disopyramide, lidocaine, procainamide, and quinidine) is presented. The experiment is set within the forensic science context of the discovery of a patient's mysterious death where a drug overdose is suspected. Each lab group…

  19. A pH-sensitive potassium conductance (TASK) and its function in the murine gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Yun Cho, Sang; Beckett, Elizabeth A; Baker, Salah A; Han, Insoo; Park, Kyu Joo; Monaghan, Kevin; Ward, Sean M; Sanders, Kenton M; Koh, Sang Don

    2005-01-01

    The excitability of smooth muscles is regulated, in part, by background K+ conductances that determine resting membrane potential. However, the K+ conductances so far described in gastrointestinal (GI) muscles are not sufficient to explain the negative resting potentials of these cells. Here we describe expression of two-pore K+ channels of the TASK family in murine small and large intestinal muscles. TASK-2, cloned from murine intestinal muscles, resulted in a pH-sensitive, time-dependent, non-inactivating K+ conductance with slow activation kinetics. A similar conductance was found in native intestinal myocytes using whole-cell patch-clamp conditions. The pH-sensitive current was blocked by local anaesthetics. Lidocaine, bupivacaine and acidic pH depolarized circular muscle cells in intact muscles and decreased amplitude and frequency of slow waves. The effects of lidocaine were not blocked by tetraethylammonium chloride, 4-aminopyridine, glibenclamide, apamin or MK-499. However, depolarization by acidic pH was abolished by pre-treatment with lidocaine, suggesting that lidocaine-sensitive K+ channels were responsible for pH-sensitive changes in membrane potential. The kinetics of activation, sensitivity to pH, and pharmacology of the conductance in intestinal myocytes and the expression of TASK-1 and TASK-2 in these cells suggest that the pH-sensitive background conductance is encoded by TASK genes. This conductance appears to contribute significantly to resting potential and may regulate excitability of GI muscles. PMID:15774516

  20. Liquid-liquid miscibility gaps in drug-water binary systems: crystal structure and thermodynamic properties of prilocaine and the temperature-composition phase diagram of the prilocaine-water system.

    PubMed

    Rietveld, Ivo B; Perrin, Marc-Antoine; Toscani, Siro; Barrio, Maria; Nicolai, Beatrice; Tamarit, Josep-Lluis; Ceolin, René

    2013-04-01

    EMLA cream, a "eutectic mixture of local anesthetics", was developed in the early 1980s by Astra Pharmaceutical Production. The mixture of anesthetics containing lidocaine, prilocaine, and water is liquid at room temperature, which is partly due to the eutectic equilibrium between prilocaine and lidocaine at 293 K, as was clear from the start. However, the full thermodynamic background for the stability of the liquid and its emulsion-like appearance has never been elucidated. In the present study of the binary system prilocaine-water, a region of liquid-liquid demixing has been observed, linked to a monotectic equilibrium at 302.4 K. It results in a prilocaine-rich liquid containing approximately 0.7 mol fraction of anesthetic. Similar behavior has been reported for the binary system lidocaine-water (Céolin, R.; et al. J. Pharm. Sci. 2010, 99 (6), 2756-2765). In the ternary mixture, the combination of the monotectic equilibrium and the above-mentioned eutectic equilibrium between prilocaine and lidocaine results in an anesthetic-rich liquid that remains stable below room temperature. This liquid forms an emulsion-like mixture in the presence of an aqueous solution saturated with anesthetics. Physical properties and the crystal structure of prilocaine are also reported.

  1. RSD931, a novel anti-tussive agent acting on airway sensory nerves

    PubMed Central

    Adcock, J J; Douglas, G J; Garabette, M; Gascoigne, M; Beatch, G; Walker, M; Page, C P

    2003-01-01

    The anti-tussive effects, of the local anaesthetic, lidocaine and carcainium chloride (RSD931) have been investigated in guinea-pigs and rabbits. Pre-treatment of guinea-pigs with aerosols of lidocaine or RSD931 at 0.1, 1.0 and 10 mg ml−1 reduced the number of citric acid-induced coughs by 9.3, 32.6 and 40.9% (P>0.05) for lidocaine and by 25.3% (P>0.05), 40.4% (P>0.05) and 97.6% (P<0.01) for RSD931, respectively and increased the latency to onset of cough at 10.0 mg ml−1 only. In addition, RSD931 at 10 mg ml−1 reduced citric acid-evoked cough responses in rabbits (with prior exposure to ozone at 3 p.p.m. for 1 h) from 22.1±5.1 to 2.7±0.9 coughs (P<0.01). Acute pre-treatment of guinea-pigs with aerosols of lidocaine or RSD931 at 10.0 and 30.0 mg ml−1 reduced the number of capsaicin-evoked coughs by 42.2 and 10.3% (P>0.05) (lidocaine) and by 25% (P>0.05) and 76.9% (P<0.01) (RSD931), respectively. Lidocaine had little effect on the latency of cough onset at either 10.0 or 30.0 mg ml−1, however, RSD at 30.0 mg ml−1 significantly (P<0.05) prolonged the latency of cough onset. RSD931 (10.0 mg ml−1) significantly (P<0.05–<0.01) reduced the spontaneous and histamine-evoked discharges in Aδ-fibres originating from airway, rapidly adapting stretch receptors (RARs) without affecting histamine-evoked bronchoconstriction. Lidocaine at 10.0 mg ml−1 also significantly (P<0.05) inhibited the spontaneous and histamine-induced discharges of RARs without affecting histamine-evoked bronchoconstriction. Aerosols of RSD931 (10.0 mg ml−1) caused a transient, but significant (P<0.05), activation of pulmonary C-fibre endings 2.5 min after administration started. RSD931 had no significant (P>0.05) effects on discharges in bronchial C-fibres originating from bronchial C-fibre endings, capsaicin-evoked discharges of either pulmonary or bronchial C-fibre endings or on capsaicin-evoked bronchoconstriction. In contrast, lidocaine (10.0 mg ml−1) significantly (P<0

  2. Inhibition of murine cardiomyocyte respiration by amine local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Aburawi, Elhadi H; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2014-12-01

    The hydrophobic amino acyl amide-linked local anesthetics (e.g., lidocaine and bupivacaine) impose potent cardiac toxicity and direct mitochondrial dysfunction. To investigate these adverse events, an in vitro system was employed to measure their effects on O2 consumption (cellular respiration) by murine myocardium. Specimens were collected from the ventricular myocardium and immediately immersed in ice-cold Krebs-Henseleit buffer saturated with 95 % O2:5 % CO2. O2 concentration was determined as a function of time from the phosphorescence decay rates of Pd(II)-meso-tetra-(4-sulfonatophenyl)-tetrabenzoporphyrin. Myocardial O2 consumption was linear with time (zero-order kinetics); its rate (k, in μM O2 min(-1)), thus, was the negative of the slope of [O2] vs. time. Cyanide inhibited O2 consumption, confirming the oxidation occurred in the respiratory chain. Lidocaine and bupivacaine produced immediate and sustained inhibition of cellular respiration at plasma concentrations of the drugs (low micromolar range). Bupivacaine was twice as potent as lidocaine. The inhibition was dose-dependent, saturating at concentrations ≥30 μM. At saturating doses, lidocaine produced ~20 % inhibition and bupivacaine ~40 % inhibition. Cellular ATP was also decreased in the presence of 30 μM lidocaine or bupivacaine. The studied amines inhibited myocardial cellular respiration. This effect is consistent with their known adverse events on mitochondrial function. The described approach allows accurate assessments and comparisons of the toxic effects of local anesthetics on heart tissue bioenergetics. PMID:24254523

  3. PubMed Central

    Csik-Salmon, J; Blais, D; Vaillancourt, D; Garon, O; Bisaillon, A

    1996-01-01

    Loss of rear motor control is the main limiting factor in the use of caudal epidural anesthesia in the horse. In man and laboratory animals, a small dose of an opiate combined with a local anesthetic enhances analgesia without impairing motor function. Thus, the amount of local anesthetic administered may be reduced. Butorphanol is an opiate widely used in horses. It has a good margin of safety and few cardiorespiratory effects. The effects of lidocaine (0.25 mg/kg) and lidocaine-butorphanol (0.25 mg/kg, and 0.04 mg/kg, respectively) were compared in 2 groups of 5 healthy unsedated mares. Horses in each group received either lidocaine or lidocaine-butorphanol in saline solution for a total volume of 0.0165 mg/kg. Epidural injection was performed at the first coccygeal interspace. Each mare was used only once. Cutaneous analgesia was assessed by a response to a pin prick; and visceral analgesia was assessed by response to a noxious stimulus applied to the urethra. Heart rate, respiratory rate, and arterial blood pressure were also measured. Analysis of the results showed an increase in duration of both cutaneous and visceral analgesia in the mares given lidocaine-butorphanol. Cutaneous analgesia increased from 36 +/- 13 to 150 +/- 21 min and visceral analgesia increased from 22 +/- 10 to 162 +/- 16 min. A cranial extension of the cutaneous analgesia was also observed. Cardiorespiratory depression or signs of excitation were not observed. However, these mares demonstrated peculiar walking in the hind limbs, not associated with signs of ataxia or hyperkinesia. PMID:9026402

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF RETROBULBAR AND AURICULOPALPEBRAL NERVE BLOCKS IN CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS).

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, J; Simeone, C; Gulland, F; Johnson, S

    2016-03-01

    Eye lesions are commonly observed in pinnipeds. Clinical assessment is challenging because animals are often blepharospastic and under inhalant anesthesia the globe rotates ventrally, making observation difficult. Retrobulbar and auriculopalpebral nerve block techniques have been developed in other species to alleviate these difficulties and allow for a more thorough ophthalmic exam. Ocular nerve block techniques were developed for California sea lions (CSLs) (Zalophus californianus) using lidocaine hydrochloride 2%. To develop the retrobulbar block, a variety of needle sizes, anatomic approaches, and volumes of methylene blue were injected into the orbits of 10 CSL cadavers. An optimal technique, based on desired distribution of methylene blue dye into periocular muscles and tissues, was determined to be a two-point (ventrolateral and ventromedial) transpalpebral injection with a 20-ga, 1 1/2-inch needle. This technique was then tested using lidocaine on 26 anesthetized animals prior to euthanasia, and on one case with clinical ocular disease. A dose of 4 mg/kg of lidocaine was considered ideal, with positive results and minimal complications. The retrobulbar block had a 76.9% rate of success (using 4 mg/kg of lidocaine), which was defined as the globe returning at least halfway to its central orientation with mydriasis. No systemic adverse effects were noted with this technique. The auriculopalpebral nerve block was also adapted for CSLs from techniques described in dogs, cattle, and horses. Lidocaine was injected (2-3 ml) by subcutaneous infiltration lateral to the orbital rim, where the auriculopalpebral nerve branch courses over the zygomatic arch. This block was used in five blepharospastic animals that were anesthetized for ophthalmic examinations. The auriculopalpebral nerve block was successful in 60% of the cases, which was defined as reduction or elimination of blepharospasm for up to 3 hr. Success appeared to be dependent more on the location of

  5. Effects of topical and systemic administration of Eugenia caryophyllata buds essential oil on corneal anesthesia and analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Khalilzadeh, Emad; Hazrati, Reza; Saiah, Gholamreza Vafaei

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies suggest that essential oil of Eugenia caryophyllata (Clove) buds (EOEC) is efficacious in the treatment of dental pain. In the present study, we investigated the analgesic and local anesthetic effects of EOEC and its possible mechanisms of action in acute corneal pain in rats. EOEC was extracted by hydro-distillation in a Clevenger type apparatus from clove buds. The acute corneal pain was induced by applying a drop (40 µl) of 5 M NaCl solution on the corneal surface, and the numbers of eye wipes were counted during the first 30 s. The mechanical sensation of the cornea was evaluated by calibrated Von Frey filaments. Systemic administration of EOEC (100 and 200 mg/kg, SC) and morphine (2.5 and 5 mg/kg, IP) produced a significant antinociceptive effect in acute corneal pain. Pretreatment with naloxone or atropine prevented the EOEC-induced analgesia. However, L-arginine and methylene blue did not change the suppressive effect of EOEC on corneal pain response. Topical application of EOEC, eugenol and lidocaine significantly decreased corneal sensitivity. Combination treatments of eugenol (25 µg) with lidocaine (0.5%) and EOEC (50 µg) with lidocaine (0.5%) also significantly suppressed corneal sensitivity. Systemic administration of EOEC produced analgesia in the acute corneal pain through mechanisms that involved both opioidergic and cholinergic systems. In addition, topical instillation of EOEC, eugenol, and lidocaine produced local anesthesia in the rat cornea. Sub-anesthetic doses of EOEC or eugenol produced a significant local anesthetic effect when concurrently used with the sub-anesthetic dose of lidocaine.

  6. Antinociceptive effects of topical mepivacaine in a rat model of HIV-associated peripheral neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Sagen, Jacqueline; Castellanos, Daniel A; Hama, Aldric T

    2016-01-01

    Background A consequence of HIV infection is sensory neuropathy, a debilitating condition that degrades the quality of life of HIV patients. Furthermore, life-extending antiretroviral treatment may exacerbate HIV sensory neuropathy. Analgesics that relieve other neuropathic pains show little or no efficacy in ameliorating HIV sensory neuropathy. Thus, there is a need for analgesics for people with this particular pain. While lidocaine is used in the management of painful peripheral neuropathies, another local anesthetic mepivacaine, with a potentially improved bioavailability, could be utilized for the management of HIV neuropathic pain. Methods The efficacy of topical anesthetics was evaluated in a preclinical rodent model of painful peripheral neuropathy induced by epineural administration of the HIV envelope protein gp120 delivered using saturated oxidized cellulose implanted around the sciatic nerve. Beginning at 2 weeks following gp120 administration, the effects of local anesthetics topically applied via gauze pads were tested on heat and mechanical hyperalgesia in the hind paw. Rats were tested using several concentrations of mepivacaine or lidocaine during the following 2 weeks. Results By 2 weeks following epineural gp120 implantation, the ipsilateral hind paw developed significant hypersensitivity to noxious pressure and heat hyperalgesia. A short-lasting, concentration-dependent amelioration of pressure and heat hyperalgesia was observed following topical application of mepivacaine to the ipsilateral plantar hind paw. By contrast, topical lidocaine ameliorated heat hyperalgesia in a concentration-dependent manner but not pressure hyperalgesia. Equipotent concentrations of mepivacaine and lidocaine applied topically to the tail of mice significantly increased tail withdrawal latencies in the tail flick test, demonstrating that both local anesthetics attenuate responding to a brief noxious stimulus. Conclusion These findings showed that mepivacaine, rather

  7. Effects of topical and systemic administration of Eugenia caryophyllata buds essential oil on corneal anesthesia and analgesia.

    PubMed

    Khalilzadeh, Emad; Hazrati, Reza; Saiah, Gholamreza Vafaei

    2016-07-01

    Clinical studies suggest that essential oil of Eugenia caryophyllata (Clove) buds (EOEC) is efficacious in the treatment of dental pain. In the present study, we investigated the analgesic and local anesthetic effects of EOEC and its possible mechanisms of action in acute corneal pain in rats. EOEC was extracted by hydro-distillation in a Clevenger type apparatus from clove buds. The acute corneal pain was induced by applying a drop (40 µl) of 5 M NaCl solution on the corneal surface, and the numbers of eye wipes were counted during the first 30 s. The mechanical sensation of the cornea was evaluated by calibrated Von Frey filaments. Systemic administration of EOEC (100 and 200 mg/kg, SC) and morphine (2.5 and 5 mg/kg, IP) produced a significant antinociceptive effect in acute corneal pain. Pretreatment with naloxone or atropine prevented the EOEC-induced analgesia. However, L-arginine and methylene blue did not change the suppressive effect of EOEC on corneal pain response. Topical application of EOEC, eugenol and lidocaine significantly decreased corneal sensitivity. Combination treatments of eugenol (25 µg) with lidocaine (0.5%) and EOEC (50 µg) with lidocaine (0.5%) also significantly suppressed corneal sensitivity. Systemic administration of EOEC produced analgesia in the acute corneal pain through mechanisms that involved both opioidergic and cholinergic systems. In addition, topical instillation of EOEC, eugenol, and lidocaine produced local anesthesia in the rat cornea. Sub-anesthetic doses of EOEC or eugenol produced a significant local anesthetic effect when concurrently used with the sub-anesthetic dose of lidocaine. PMID:27651809

  8. A Practical Solution for Dyspareunia in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Goetsch, Martha F.; Lim, Jeong Y.; Caughey, Aaron B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Dyspareunia is common in breast cancer survivors because of low estrogen. This study explored whether dyspareunia is introital pain, preventable with analgesic liquid. Patients and Methods In a randomized, controlled, double-blind trial, estrogen-deficient breast cancer survivors with severe penetrative dyspareunia applied either saline or 4% aqueous lidocaine to the vulvar vestibule for 3 minutes before vaginal penetration. After a 1-month blinded trial of patient-assessed twice-per-week tampon insertion or intercourse, all patients received lidocaine for 2 months in an open-label trial. The primary outcome was patient-related assessment of penetration pain on a scale of zero to 10. Secondary outcomes were sexual distress (Female Sexual Distress Scale), sexual function (Sexual Function Questionnaire), and resumption of intercourse. Comparisons were made with the Mann-Whitney U and Wilcoxon signed rank test with significance set at P < .05. Results In all, 46 patients, screened to exclude those with pelvic muscle and organ pain, uniformly had clinical evidence of severe vulvovaginal atrophy, dyspareunia (median pain score, 8 of 10; interquartile range [IQR], 7 to 9), increased sexual distress scores (median, 30.5; IQR, 23 to 37; abnormal, > 11), and abnormal sexual function. Users of lidocaine reported less pain during intercourse in the blinded phase (median score of 1.0 compared with saline score of 5.3; P = .007). After open-label lidocaine use, 37 (90%) of 41 reported comfortable penetration. Sexual distress decreased (median score, 14; IQR, 3 to 20; P < .001), and sexual function improved in all but one domain. Of 20 prior abstainers from intercourse who completed the study, 17 (85%) had resumed comfortable penetrative intimacy. No partners reported penile numbness. Conclusion Breast cancer survivors with menopausal dyspareunia can have comfortable intercourse after applying liquid lidocaine compresses to the vulvar vestibule before penetration. PMID

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF RETROBULBAR AND AURICULOPALPEBRAL NERVE BLOCKS IN CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS).

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, J; Simeone, C; Gulland, F; Johnson, S

    2016-03-01

    Eye lesions are commonly observed in pinnipeds. Clinical assessment is challenging because animals are often blepharospastic and under inhalant anesthesia the globe rotates ventrally, making observation difficult. Retrobulbar and auriculopalpebral nerve block techniques have been developed in other species to alleviate these difficulties and allow for a more thorough ophthalmic exam. Ocular nerve block techniques were developed for California sea lions (CSLs) (Zalophus californianus) using lidocaine hydrochloride 2%. To develop the retrobulbar block, a variety of needle sizes, anatomic approaches, and volumes of methylene blue were injected into the orbits of 10 CSL cadavers. An optimal technique, based on desired distribution of methylene blue dye into periocular muscles and tissues, was determined to be a two-point (ventrolateral and ventromedial) transpalpebral injection with a 20-ga, 1 1/2-inch needle. This technique was then tested using lidocaine on 26 anesthetized animals prior to euthanasia, and on one case with clinical ocular disease. A dose of 4 mg/kg of lidocaine was considered ideal, with positive results and minimal complications. The retrobulbar block had a 76.9% rate of success (using 4 mg/kg of lidocaine), which was defined as the globe returning at least halfway to its central orientation with mydriasis. No systemic adverse effects were noted with this technique. The auriculopalpebral nerve block was also adapted for CSLs from techniques described in dogs, cattle, and horses. Lidocaine was injected (2-3 ml) by subcutaneous infiltration lateral to the orbital rim, where the auriculopalpebral nerve branch courses over the zygomatic arch. This block was used in five blepharospastic animals that were anesthetized for ophthalmic examinations. The auriculopalpebral nerve block was successful in 60% of the cases, which was defined as reduction or elimination of blepharospasm for up to 3 hr. Success appeared to be dependent more on the location of

  10. Effects of topical and systemic administration of Eugenia caryophyllata buds essential oil on corneal anesthesia and analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Khalilzadeh, Emad; Hazrati, Reza; Saiah, Gholamreza Vafaei

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies suggest that essential oil of Eugenia caryophyllata (Clove) buds (EOEC) is efficacious in the treatment of dental pain. In the present study, we investigated the analgesic and local anesthetic effects of EOEC and its possible mechanisms of action in acute corneal pain in rats. EOEC was extracted by hydro-distillation in a Clevenger type apparatus from clove buds. The acute corneal pain was induced by applying a drop (40 µl) of 5 M NaCl solution on the corneal surface, and the numbers of eye wipes were counted during the first 30 s. The mechanical sensation of the cornea was evaluated by calibrated Von Frey filaments. Systemic administration of EOEC (100 and 200 mg/kg, SC) and morphine (2.5 and 5 mg/kg, IP) produced a significant antinociceptive effect in acute corneal pain. Pretreatment with naloxone or atropine prevented the EOEC-induced analgesia. However, L-arginine and methylene blue did not change the suppressive effect of EOEC on corneal pain response. Topical application of EOEC, eugenol and lidocaine significantly decreased corneal sensitivity. Combination treatments of eugenol (25 µg) with lidocaine (0.5%) and EOEC (50 µg) with lidocaine (0.5%) also significantly suppressed corneal sensitivity. Systemic administration of EOEC produced analgesia in the acute corneal pain through mechanisms that involved both opioidergic and cholinergic systems. In addition, topical instillation of EOEC, eugenol, and lidocaine produced local anesthesia in the rat cornea. Sub-anesthetic doses of EOEC or eugenol produced a significant local anesthetic effect when concurrently used with the sub-anesthetic dose of lidocaine. PMID:27651809

  11. Pavlovian conditioning in the rabbit during inactivation of the interpositus nucleus.

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, J P; Harvey, J A

    1991-01-01

    1. We have examined the role of the anterior interpositus nucleus (AIP) of the cerebellum in Pavlovian conditioning of the nictitating membrane response (NMR) of the rabbit with the use of reversible brain lesions produced by the local anaesthetic lidocaine. Previous experiments have demonstrated that destructive lesions of the AIP prevent the performance of conditioned NMRs (CRs). Microinjections of lidocaine into the AIP were used in the present experiment to determine whether the deficit in the performance of CRs resulted from a deficit in learning or memory. 2. A 3-phase procedure was employed to determine whether associative learning required the function of the AIP. In phase 1, rabbits were trained to make CRs to a flashing-light conditioned stimulus (CS) that was paired with an air-puff unconditioned stimulus (UCS) directed at the cornea. In phase 2, the AIP was anaesthetized during a session of conditioning in which a tone CS was paired with the UCS. Presentations of the light CS were interpolated throughout the tone conditioning in order to monitor the degree to which CRs were impaired by lidocaine. Phase 3 occurred after the effects of the lidocaine had dissipated and consisted of a test of retention to determine whether learning occurred during phase 2 but could not be expressed because of a performance deficit resulting from the inactivation of the AIP. 3. Infusion of lidocaine into the AIP abolished CRs to the light CS and prevented the performance of CRs to the tone CS in phase 2. The effect of the infusion was specifically due to a conduction block of neurons and/or fibres in the lateral aspect of the AIP. The infusion of lidocaine into regions surrounding the AIP did not affect CRs elicited by the light CS or prevent acquisition of CRs to the tone. Infusions of saline directly into the AIP did not impair the performance of CRs to either the tone or light CS. Quantitative analysis of diffusion revealed that the abolition of CRs was accompanied by

  12. Modified technique of iontophoretic anesthesia for myringotomy in children.

    PubMed

    Epley, J M

    1977-06-01

    A modified technique is described for iontophoretic anesthesia in children who require myringotomy and insertion of a tube (tympanostomy). Principal modifications include the following procedures: (1) preoperative parenteral sedation; (2) relatively painless injection of lidocaine hydrochloride-epinephrine hydrochloride solution into the external auditory canal skin after iontophoresis alone to eliminate the extreme bony canal wall tenderness; (3) injection of lidocaine-epinephrine solution into an atelectatic middle ear to anesthetize the promontory for painless tube insertion; (4) substitution of a disposable ECG electrode for a metal plate electrode to eliminate the possibility of electrical burn from metal-to-skin contact. These modifications enhance the effectiveness and the safety of iontophoretic anesthesia, minimize the need for general anesthesia, and liberalize the indications for tympanostomy.

  13. Interactive radiopharmaceutical facility between Yale Medical Center and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Progress report, November 1, 1980-October 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschalk, A

    1981-10-31

    Research conducted in three principal areas is discussed and summarized. (1) Investigation of the influence of antiarrhythmic agents, such as lidocaine and procainamide, on the chemotaxis and nylon fiber adherence of indium-111-labelled human polymorphonulcear leukocytes (PMNs) in vitro revealed that at normal therapeutic levels of lidocaine and procaine, the adherence and chemotactic function of In-111-PMNs remain unaltered. Results with higher therapeutic blood levels are also discussed. (2) An improved method for labeling human platelets with In-111-oxine is outlined, and the influence of centrifugal force, oxine, ethanol, and radiation on platelet function is reported. Results indicate that normal labeling procedures induce no gross changes in platelet function. (3) The chemical preparation of radioiodinated arachidonic acid (AA) and nonradioactive acid ester of AA, and the analysis of metabolites of these compounds following myocardial ischemia were investigated in dogs. The tissue uptake of /sup 131/I-AA was compared to that of thallium-201.

  14. [Time to bury the adrenaline-myth!--Safe use of adrenaline anesthesia in hand surgery and orthopedics].

    PubMed

    Hagert, Elisabet; Lalonde, Donald

    2015-01-01

    The epinephrine myth originated in the 1940s, when acidic (pH 1) procaine-epinephrine was injected into fingers, causing finger necrosis. Today, level 1 evidence exists for the safe use of epinephrine in fingers. The ability to use lidocaine-epinephrine in hand surgery and orthopedics eliminates the need for a tourniquet, or "bloodless field". Surgery using Wide Awake, Lidocaine-epinephrine Anesthesia, No Tourniquet (WALANT) reduces patient discomfort, facilitates patient participation in surgery, improves safe outcomes following reconstructions and greatly reduces the cost of medical care. Furthermore, patients regarded as high-risk can be safely treated without risk of cardiac or pulmonary side effects. In this manuscript, the background of the epinephrine myth is described, as well as recommended use of WALANT in hand surgery and orthopedics.

  15. Treatment of radiation- and chemotherapy-induced stomatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Carnel, S.B.; Blakeslee, D.B.; Oswald, S.G.; Barnes, M. )

    1990-04-01

    Severe stomatitis is a common problem encountered during either radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Most therapeutic regimens are empirical, with no scientific basis. The purpose of this study is to determine the efficacy of various topical solutions in the treatment of radiation- or chemotherapy-induced stomatitis. Eighteen patients were entered into a prospective double-blinded study to test several topical solutions: (1) viscous lidocaine with 1% cocaine; (2) dyclonine hydrochloride 1.0% (Dyclone); (3) kaolin-pectin solution, diphenhydramine plus saline (KBS); and (4) a placebo solution. Degree of pain relief, duration of relief, side effects, and palatability were evaluated. The results showed that Dyclone provided the most pain relief. Dyclone and viscous lidocaine with 1% cocaine provided the longest pain relief, which averaged 50 minutes This study provides objective data and defines useful guidelines for treatment of stomatitis.

  16. Novel quinolizidinyl derivatives as antiarrhythmic agents.

    PubMed

    Vazzana, Iana; Budriesi, Roberta; Terranova, Emanuela; Ioan, Pierfranco; Ugenti, Maria Paola; Tasso, Bruno; Chiarini, Alberto; Sparatore, Fabio

    2007-01-25

    Eighteen analogues of lidocaine, mexiletine, and procainamide were synthesized, replacing their aminoalkyl chains with the rigid and cumbersome quinolizidine nucleus. The target compounds were tested for antiarrhythmic, inotropic, and chronotropic effects on isolated guinea pig (gp) heart tissues and to assess calcium antagonist activity. Most compounds exhibited from moderate to high antiarrhythmic activity, and compounds 7, 9, and 19 were more active and potent than quinidine and lidocaine, while producing only modest inotropic, chronotropic, and vasorelaxant effects. These compounds were studied on spontaneously beating Langendorff-perfused gp heart. While quinidine and amiodarone produced a dose-dependent prolongation of all the ECG intervals, compounds 7, 9, and 19, even at concentrations 10-20 times higher than EC50 for the antiarrhythmic activity, only moderately prolonged the PR and QT intervals, leaving unchanged the QRS complex. Ether 7 deserves further investigations due to its interesting cardiovascular profile. PMID:17228875

  17. A novel approach to treatment of the aging hand with Radiesse.

    PubMed

    Bank, David E

    2009-12-01

    The ideal dermal filler for treatment of the aging had needs to have inherent bulk and longevity of effect. The filler calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA) provides a texture that lends itself to injection and then to subsequent massage, without losing control of where the product is placed. In the recent past, delivery of CaHA to the hands has been accomplished by mixing lidocaine with the dermal filler prior to injection into the dorsum of the hand. The author suggests that an alternative way to deliver CaHA is to administer a large bolus of lidocaine immediately prior to injection of the dermal filler itself, followed by firm massage to disseminate the CaHA microspheres and carrier gel into the areas around and above the tendons and veins of the hand.

  18. Sphenopalatine blocks in the treatment of pain in fibromyalgia and myofascial pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Janzen, V D; Scudds, R

    1997-10-01

    Sphenopalatine blocks have been used to treat pain for more than 80 years. Anecdotal support for sphenopalatine ganglion blocks has been very strong in those who believe in the technique, but the research results have been inconclusive. Therefore, a double blind, placebo-controlled study was performed on 61 patients, 42 with fibromyalgia and 19 with myofascial pain syndrome. Pain was measured using visual analogue scales prior to treatment, during treatment, and 28 days after the treatment. Headaches were evaluated in frequency and location prior to and after treatment. Sphenopalatine ganglion blocks were performed under direct vision using 4% lidocaine and sterile water as a placebo. Analysis of the results showed no statistical differences between the lidocaine and the placebo groups.

  19. Chip-based nanoelectrospray ionization with Fourier transform mass spectrometric detection to screen for local anesthetics intended to mask limb sore in walking horses.

    PubMed

    Szarka, Szabolcs; Prokai, Laszlo

    2015-03-01

    We report a high-throughput chip-based nanoelectrospray ionization method coupled with Fourier transform mass spectrometry to screen for local anesthetics in samples collected by swabbing. These drugs have been used to mask pain on the limbs of walking horses after forbidden practices of soring or physical abuse. Optimized for lidocaine, the method afforded sub-ppm mass accuracy for nine local anesthetics included in the study. From doped cotton swabs, two third and all of the analytes were detected after adding 10 ng and 100 ng of each drug, respectively. Benzocaine and/or lidocaine were found on positive swab samples collected during walking horse competitions. PMID:25800188

  20. Dentistry's wonder drugs: local anesthetics and vasoconstrictors.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael J; Brown, Ronald S

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments concerning local anesthetics, including the amount of pain resulting from injection, which drugs achieve anesthesia most effectively, proper dosing for anesthetizing children and adults, the maximum recommended doses of lidocaine 2% with epinephrine for cardiac patients, and which drugs can be used for patients taking monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, or nonselective beta blockers. Dentists should be familiar with all aspects of local anesthetics, especially anesthetic toxicity and maximum recommended doses. PMID:20236919

  1. Effects of prenylamine on transmembrane action potentials as related to the change in external potassium concentrations in guinea pig papillary muscle.

    PubMed

    Ban, T; Kojima, M; Sada, H; Oshita, S

    1982-01-01

    We studied the effects of 4.8 muM prenylamine on transmembrane potentials in isolated guinea pig papillary muscles using a conventional microelectrode technique and compared them with those of 36.9 microM lidocaine. Prenylamine reduced Vmax at 1 Hz increasingly as the external potassium, [K]o, was increased from 2.7 to 10 mM. The reduction was also increased as the driving rate was increased from 0.25 to 5 Hz. The rate-dependent depression was less in 2.7 and 8.1 mM with 7.2 mM [Ca]o and more in 5.4 and 8.1 mM [K]o with 1.8 mM [Ca]o. Prenylamine produced a marked delay in the recovery of Vmax in premature responses inserted between constant driving stimuli at 0.25 Hz. The delay was also less in the former two, and more in the latter two media. Thus the effects of prenylamine on Vmax were more rate dependent and less [K]o-dependent than those of 36.9 microM lidocaine. At the diastolic interval of 100 ms, prenylamine depressed the overshoot, action potential duration at 0 mV level (APDo) and Vmax in premature responses more markedly than did 36.9 microM lidocaine, the differences of the effects being more significant for the first two. The results are interpreted as representing the calcium-antagonistic property of prenylamine of which lidocaine appears to be devoid.

  2. Microprocessor controlled transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Subramony, J Anand; Sharma, Ashutosh; Phipps, J B

    2006-07-01

    Transdermal drug delivery via iontophoresis is reviewed with special focus on the delivery of lidocaine for local anesthesia and fentanyl for patient controlled acute therapy such as postoperative pain. The role of the microprocessor controller in achieving dosimetry, alternating/reverse polarity, pre-programmed, and sensor-based delivery is highlighted. Unique features such as the use of tactile signaling, telemetry control, and pulsatile waveforms in iontophoretic drug delivery are described briefly.

  3. A pain model with a neuropathic somatosensory lesion: Morton neuroma.

    PubMed

    Quiding, Hans; Åkermark, Christian; Segerdahl, Märta; Reinholdsson, Ingalill; Svensson, Hanna; Jonzon, Bror

    2013-11-01

    A randomized, double-blind, three-period cross-over study was performed to characterize the sensory phenotype and pain demographics in patients with Morton neuroma (n=27) and to explore the effects of local administration (2mL) of placebo and lidocaine (1 and 10mg/mL) around the neuroma. Using the pain quality assessment scale (PQAS), the highest rating was seen for unpleasant pain and intensity of deep pain and the lowest for sensitive skin. Ongoing pain was reported in 32% of patients. Patients reported mild to moderate average pain, and that pain had interfered with sleep only marginally. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) measurements in the innervation territory showed hypophenomena or hyperphenomena in all patients, indicating that all had neuropathy. There was no particular QST modality that appeared to be specifically affected. Even the high-dose lidocaine resulted in limited effects on nerve-impulse conduction as judged by the effect on QST variables. However, both doses of lidocaine significantly reduced pain after step-ups, compared to placebo, indicating that lidocaine in this setting affected predominantly impulse generation and not impulse conduction. Following placebo treatment, pain after step-ups was similar in patients with and without hyperalgesia, indicating that the presence of hyperalgesia does not affect the pain intensity evoked by step-ups or walking. This pain model in patients with Morton neuroma allows investigation of drugs in a cross-over design and provides an opportunity to explore drug effects on both pain and QST variables. Commonly, neuromas are surgically removed and can be characterized in depth in vitro, thereby allowing close links to be established between pathophysiology and drug effect.

  4. Dissociation of the vacuolar and macroautophagic cytopathology from the cytotoxicity induced by the lipophilic local anesthetic bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Morissette, Guillaume; Bawolak, Marie-Thérèse; Marceau, François

    2011-07-01

    Local anesthetics, like many other cationic drugs, induce a vacuolar and macroautophagic cytopathology that has been observed in vivo and in various cell types; some also induce cytotoxicity of mitochondrial origin (apoptosis and necrosis) and it is not known whether the 2 types of toxicity overlap or interact. We compared bupivacaine with a more hydrophilic agent, lidocaine, for morphological, functional, and toxicological responses in a previously exploited nonneuronal system, primary smooth muscle cells. Bupivacaine induced little vacuolization (≥2.5 mmol/L, 4 h), but elicited autophagic accumulation (≥0.5 mmol/L, 4 h) and was massively cytotoxic at 2.5-5 mmol/L (4-24 h), the latter effect being unabated by the V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1. Lidocaine exerted little cytotoxicity at and below 5 mmol/L for 24 h, but intensely induced the V-ATPase-dependent vacuolar and autophagic cytopathology. Bupivacaine was more potent than lidocaine in disrupting mitochondrial potential, as judged by Mitotracker staining (significant proportions of cells affected in the 1-5 and 5-10 mmol/L concentration ranges, respectively). The addition of mitochondrial-inactivating toxins antimycin A and oligomycin to lidocaine (2.5 mmol/L) reproduced the profile of bupivacaine action (low intensity of vacuolization and retained autophagic accumulation). The high potency of bupivacaine as a mitochondrial toxicant eclipses the benign vacuolar and autophagic response seen with more hydrophilic local anesthetics. PMID:21812528

  5. Dissociation of the vacuolar and macroautophagic cytopathology from the cytotoxicity induced by the lipophilic local anesthetic bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Morissette, Guillaume; Bawolak, Marie-Thérèse; Marceau, François

    2011-07-01

    Local anesthetics, like many other cationic drugs, induce a vacuolar and macroautophagic cytopathology that has been observed in vivo and in various cell types; some also induce cytotoxicity of mitochondrial origin (apoptosis and necrosis) and it is not known whether the 2 types of toxicity overlap or interact. We compared bupivacaine with a more hydrophilic agent, lidocaine, for morphological, functional, and toxicological responses in a previously exploited nonneuronal system, primary smooth muscle cells. Bupivacaine induced little vacuolization (≥2.5 mmol/L, 4 h), but elicited autophagic accumulation (≥0.5 mmol/L, 4 h) and was massively cytotoxic at 2.5-5 mmol/L (4-24 h), the latter effect being unabated by the V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1. Lidocaine exerted little cytotoxicity at and below 5 mmol/L for 24 h, but intensely induced the V-ATPase-dependent vacuolar and autophagic cytopathology. Bupivacaine was more potent than lidocaine in disrupting mitochondrial potential, as judged by Mitotracker staining (significant proportions of cells affected in the 1-5 and 5-10 mmol/L concentration ranges, respectively). The addition of mitochondrial-inactivating toxins antimycin A and oligomycin to lidocaine (2.5 mmol/L) reproduced the profile of bupivacaine action (low intensity of vacuolization and retained autophagic accumulation). The high potency of bupivacaine as a mitochondrial toxicant eclipses the benign vacuolar and autophagic response seen with more hydrophilic local anesthetics.

  6. Inhibition of hyperhidrosis by topical application of a local anesthetic composition.

    PubMed

    Juhlin, L; Evers, H; Broberg, F

    1979-01-01

    An eutectic mixture of 5% lidocaine and 5% prilocaine applied locally to the skin inhibited epinephrine-induced sweating in healthy subjects. It also inhibited palmar and axillary hyperhidrosis from 1 to 6 hours after application to 15 of 17 patients tested. A placebo lotion was without effect. When used daily for 3--4 weeks, only 25% of the patients were very pleased with the treatment. The reason for the decrease of efficacy is uncertain.

  7. Controlling barrier penetration via exothermic iron oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wood, Daniel G; Brown, Marc B; Jones, Stuart A

    2011-02-14

    Exothermic iron oxidation is an elegant means to generate heat, with the potential to modulate barrier penetration if reaction kinetics can be controlled. This aim of this study was to gain a fundamental understanding of how these temperature change kinetics influenced barrier diffusion rate. Lidocaine transport through a hydrophilic carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) gel was compared using two rapid iron oxidation reactions initiated by water (ExoRap(50), T(max)-47.7 ± 0.6 °C, t(max)-3.3 ± 0.6 min, ExoRap(60), T(max)-60.4 ± 0.3 °C, t(max)-9.3 ± 0.6 min) and a slower reaction initiated by oxygen (ExoSl(45)T(max)-ca. 44 °C, t(max) ca. 240 min). Temperature change induced by the oxygen initiated reaction (ExoSl(45)) was almost double those initiated by water (over 4h), but lidocaine diffusion was approximately 4 times higher for the latter (ExoRap(50), 555.61 ± 22.04 μg/cm(2)/h; ExoRap(60), 663.1 ± 50.95 μg/cm(2)/h; compared to ExoSl(45), 159.36 ± 29.44 μg/cm(2)/h). The large influence of temperature change kinetics on lidocaine diffusion suggested that transport was heavily dependent on temperature induced structural changes of the barrier. CMC, like many polymers adsorbs more water when exposed to moderate increases in temperature and this appeared to be a critical determinant of lidocaine barrier diffusion rate.

  8. Inhibition of fast axonal transport in vitro by the local anesthetics prilocaine, mepivacaine, and bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, P A

    1983-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish the concentrations of prilocaine, mepivacaine, and bupivacaine which are effective at blocking fast axonal transport, to determine whether prilocaine and mepivacaine offer a better prospect of dissociating conduction block and transport block in vivo than does lidocaine and whether bupivacaine offers a better prospect than etidocaine in the same context. Fast axonal transport of [3H]leucine-labeled proteins was studied in vitro in bullfrog spinal nerves and quantitated by liquid scintillation counting. Exposure of spinal nerves to 14 mM prilocaine reduced the quantity of 3H-labeled proteins which accumulated at a ligature by 86%, and exposure to 14 mM mepivacaine reduced it by 70%; 10 mM prilocaine reduced this same parameter by 54%, a degree of inhibition close to the 44% reduction caused by 14 mM lidocaine. The D(-) and L(+) stereoisomers of mepivacaine each reduced transport to the ligature by approximately 50% at a concentration of 14 mM. Bupivacaine reduced the accumulation of 3H-labeled proteins at the ligature by 49% at a 10 mM concentration (pH 6.2); its potency is close to that found for etidocaine in a previous study. Since prilocaine and mepivacaine are at least as potent as lidocaine as transport inhibitors and at blocking impulse conduction, these two anesthetics offer no advantage over lidocaine to achieve dissociation of conduction block from transport block in vivo. Bupivacaine appears to offer no advantage over etidocaine in the same context, as the two agents have a similar potency as local anesthetics and a similar potency as inhibitors of fast axonal transport.

  9. Oral sedation allows for comfort and amnesia during office surgery.

    PubMed

    Gatti, J E

    2000-05-01

    Surgical procedures commonly associated with parenteral sedation or general anesthesia were completed in an office operating room with local anesthesia and oral medication. Diazepam and alprazolam were used in combination to produce a relaxed state, allowing local anesthesia to be instilled. Surgery was completed successfully in all patients, and no untoward effects were seen in the patients. Amnesia was associated with the drug combination, and a protective action of the long-lived drugs against lidocaine toxicity is theorized.

  10. Central origin of secondary mechanical hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Klede, Monika; Handwerker, Hermann O; Schmelz, Martin

    2003-07-01

    The contribution for the development of secondary mechanical hyperalgesia by peripheral mechanisms has not been fully elucidated. We have reevaluated the effects of local anesthetics on electrically evoked flare reaction and mechanical hyperalgesia in human skin. We applied 2% lidocaine via intradermal microdialysis fibers at a length of 10 cm for 110 min to the volar forearm to establish a narrow and stable "anesthetic strip." After 60 min of lidocaine perfusion, transdermal electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 50 mA) was applied at a distance of 1 cm from the microdialysis fibers for 30 min. The areas of allodynia and punctate hyperalgesia were marked at the end of the stimulation period. The flare reaction was assessed by laser Doppler scanner and infrared thermography. Total protein content of the dialysate collected at the stimulating electrode was measured photometrically. We found no increase in protein content during electrical stimulation. Flare area (12.4 +/- 2.3 vs. 3.5 +/- 1.2 cm2) and intensity (426 +/- 24 vs. 257 +/- 21 PU) were significantly reduced beyond the lidocaine strip. The mean temperature increase in the area beyond the lidocaine strip was significantly reduced (1.1 +/- 0.1 vs. 0.2 +/- 0.1 degrees C) and did not differ from control areas. In contrast, allodynia (7.4 +/- 0.7 and 8.6 +/- 0.9 cm) and punctate hyperalgesia (7.6 +/- 0.7 and 8.6 +/- 0.9 cm) developed symmetrically on both sides of the anesthetic strip. Allodynia subsided 4 min after the end of the electrical stimulation. We conclude that the development of allodynia and punctate hyperalgesia in human skin is centrally mediated, whereas the axon reflex vasodilation is of peripheral origin. PMID:12843313

  11. Na channel activation gate modulates slow recovery from use-dependent block by local anesthetics in squid giant axons.

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, J Z; Tanguy, J

    1985-01-01

    The time course of recovery from use-dependent block of sodium channels caused by local anesthetics was studied in squid axons. In the presence of lidocaine or its quaternary derivatives, QX-222 and QX-314, or 9-aminoacridine (9-AA), recovery from use-dependent block occurred in two phases: a fast phase and a slow phase. Only the fast phase was observed in the presence of benzocaine. The fast phase had a time constant of several milliseconds and resembled recovery from the fast Na inactivation in the absence of drug. Depending on the drug present, the magnitude of the time constant of the slow phase varied (for example at -80 mV): lidocaine, 270 ms; QX-222, 4.4 s; QX-314, 17 s; and 9-AA, 14 s. The two phases differed in the voltage dependence of recovery time constants. When the membrane was hyperpolarized, the recovery time constant for the fast phase was decreased, whereas that for the slow phase was increased for QX-compounds and 9-AA or unchanged for lidocaine. The fast phase is interpreted as representing the unblocked channels recovering from the fast Na inactivation, and the slow phase as representing the bound and blocked channels recovering from the use-dependent block accumulated by repetitive depolarizing pulse. The voltage dependence of time constants for the slow recovery is consistent with the m-gate trapping hypothesis. According to this hypothesis, the drug molecule is trapped by the activation gate (the m-gate) of the channel. The cationic form of drug molecule leaves the channel through the hydrophilic pathway, when the channel is open. However, lidocaine, after losing its proton, may leave the closed channel rapidly through the hydrophobic pathway. PMID:2410043

  12. Severe pruritus and myoclonus following intrathecal morphine administration in a dog.

    PubMed

    Iff, Isabelle; Valeskini, Karin; Mosing, Martina

    2012-09-01

    During epidural needle placement in a 32-kg dog the subarachnoid space was punctured and half the intended dose of lidocaine, bupivacaine, and morphine was injected. After recovery from anesthesia the dog showed signs of severe pruritus of the tail base and limbs and myoclonus of the tail and hind limbs. Methadone, acepromazine, ketamine, buprenorphine, and butorphanol were administered to control myoclonus and pruritus, but were unsuccessful. Diazepam was used to control myoclonus until the effects of morphine abated.

  13. Enhanced training protects memory against amnesia produced by concurrent inactivation of amygdala and striatum, amygdala and substantia nigra, or striatum and substantia nigra

    PubMed Central

    Salado-Castillo, Rigoberto; Sánchez-Alavéz, Manuel; Quirarte, Gina L.; Martínez García, María Isabel; Prado-Alcalá, Roberto A.

    2011-01-01

    Memory is markedly impaired when normal activity of any of a number of cerebral structures is disturbed after a learning experience. A growing body of evidence indicates, however, that such interference with neuronal function becomes negligible when the learning experience is significantly enhanced. We now report on the effects of enhanced training on retention after temporary inactivation of cerebral nuclei known to be involved in memory, namely the substantia nigra (SN), striatum (STR), and amygdala (AMY). When training was conducted with a relatively low intensity of footshock (1.0 mA), post-training infusion of lidocaine into the SN, STR, or AMY produced a marked memory deficit. Increasing the aversive stimulation to 2.0 mA protected memory from the amnesic effect of intranigral lidocaine, but there was still a deficit after its infusion into the STR and AMY. Administration of lidocaine into each of these nuclei, in the groups that had been trained with 3.0 mA, was completely ineffective in producing alterations in memory consolidation. Simultaneous infusion of lidocaine into STR + SN, AMY + SN, or AMY + STR was also ineffective in altering memory formation when the highest footshock intensity was used for training. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that an enhanced learning experience guards against memory deficits after simultaneous temporary interruption of neural activity of brain nuclei heretofore thought to be necessary for memory formation. These findings support the proposition that brain structures involved in memory processing are functionally connected in series during memory consolidation and that, after an enhanced learning experience, these structures become functionally connected in parallel. PMID:22203796

  14. Enhanced delivery of topically-applied formulations following skin pre-treatment with a hand-applied, plastic microneedle array.

    PubMed

    Duan, Dan; Moeckly, Craig; Gysbers, Jerry; Novak, Chris; Prochnow, Gayatri; Siebenaler, Kris; Albers, Leila; Hansen, Kris

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize microchannels created by polymeric microneedles, applied by hand, and to demonstrate enhanced delivery of topically applied formulations of lidocaine hydrochloride and methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS). 3M's Microstructured Transdermal System (MTS) arrays were applied to domestic swine to demonstrate reliability of penetration, depth of penetration and durability of the structures to repeat application and high force. Tissue levels of lidocaine and MPSS following topical application with and without microneedle pretreatment were determined by HPLC-MS analysis following digestion of biopsies. Almost all microneedles penetrate the stratum corneum upon hand force application. The depth of penetration varies from <100µm to nearly 150µm depending on the application force and the firmness of the underlying tissue. The arrays show excellent durability to repeated in-vivo application, with less than 5% of the structures evidencing even minimal tip bending after 16 applications. Under extreme force against a rigid surface, the microneedles bend but do not break. A lidocaine hydrochloride formulation applied topically in-vivo showed ~340% increase in local tissue levels when the MTS arrays were used to twice pre-treat the skin prior to applying the drug. Local delivery of a topically applied formulation of MPSS was over one order of magnitude higher when the application site was twice pre-treated with the MTS array. 3M's MTS array (marketed as 3M(TM) Microchannel Skin System) provides repeatable and robust penetration of the stratum corneum and epidermis and enhances delivery of some formulations such as lidocaine hydrochloride. PMID:21696356

  15. Partial intravenous anesthesia in cats and dogs

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Tanya

    2013-01-01

    The partial intravenous anesthesia technique (PIVA) is used to lower the inspired concentration of an inhalational anesthetic by concurrent use of injectable drugs. This technique reduces the incidence of undesirable side-effects and provides superior quality of anesthesia and analgesia. Drugs commonly used for PIVA include opioids, alpha-2 adrenergic agonists, injectable anesthetic agents, and lidocaine. Most are administered by intravenous infusion. PMID:23997266

  16. [Castration in the bull calf and ram lamb].

    PubMed

    Steiner, A; Janett, F

    2013-11-01

    This paper aims to provide an overview of the accepted techniques of pain relief and castration and guidelines of how to best perform these painful interventions in an animal-friendly way under Swiss conditions. Calves should be castrated at the age of 14 days or less, at least 10 minutes after local anesthesia with lidocaine, applying a single rubber ring. Concurrently, a NSAID should be administered intravenously (ketoprofen, 3 mg/kg of bodyweight) and Tetanus-serum subcutaneously (off label use). If possible, ketoprofen(4.5 mg/kg BW) should be orally administered for 3 - 5 days postoperatively. At 10 days after applying the rubber ring, the dried-off scrotum including the rubber ring should be removed with a clean knife or a scalpel. Local anesthesia is not necessary for this procedure. Ram lambs should be castrated at the age of 14 days or less, at least 10 minutes after local anesthesia with lidocaine, applying a rubber ring. The toxic dose of 4 mg lidocaine/kg BW (corresponds to 1 ml lidocaine 2 % per lamb of 5 kg BW) should not be exceeded. Concurrently, a NSAID (off label use) and Tetanus-serum should be administered systemically. Immunization against GnRH represents an animal-friendly and economically feasible alternative to rubber ring castration. With two immunizations at an interval of 3 - 4 weeks testicular development can be inhibited for at least 3 months and the onset of puberty clearly delayed. However, a specific vaccine for use in ruminants is currently registered neither in Switzerland nor in Europe.

  17. A Comparative Study on the Biological Characteristics of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells from Lipectomy and Liposuction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wangzhou; Lei, Zhanjun; Li, Yuejun; Li, Xueyong

    2016-01-01

    Purposes To compare the biological behaviors of human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) isolated from adipose tissue by lipectomy and liposuction, with the purpose of providing the basis for clinical application. Methods The proliferation and apoptosis of ADSCs were analyzed by CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry. Cell migration was measured by a wound healing assay. An ELISA assay was used to evaluate paracrine functions. SOD and MDA were tested by xanthine oxidase and thiobarbituric acid reactions, respectively. In addition, we used a CCK-8, LDH assay and flow cytometry to analyze the proliferation and apoptosis of ADSCs treated with lidocaine or adrenaline. Results The viable ADSCs yield from liposuction was significantly lower than that from lipectomy, while the apoptosis of cells from liposuction was significantly higher than from lipectomy. The paracrine secretion of the two sources of ADSCs was highest when treated with 10−7 mol/L insulin and 10 ng/mL TGF-α, but there were no significant differences in VEGF, IL-6, IL-8 or HGF levels. The ADSCs from lipectomy migrated faster than those from liposuction, and SOD in the lipectomy group was higher than in the liposuction group, whereas MDA of the lipectomy group was lower than that of the liposuction group. The proliferation ADSCs treated with lidocaine or adrenaline was greatly decreased, while apoptosis was significantly increased, and cytotoxicity of lidocaine or adrenaline to ADSCs was dose-dependent. Conclusions Compared with ADSCs from liposuction, the ADSCs from lipectomy have better biological characteristics. Lidocaine and adrenaline decreased the viability of ADSCs, and their cytotoxicity to ADSCs was dose-dependent. PMID:27610618

  18. Immediate allergic cross-reactivity to levobupivacaine and ropivacaine.

    PubMed

    Calderon, A L; Diot, N; Benatir, F; Christin, F; Hautin, E; Truc, C; Allaouchiche, B; Boselli, E

    2013-02-01

    Allergic reactions to amide local anaesthetic agents are rare. We report the case of a 74-year-old man who suffered anaphylaxis, presenting with cardiovascular collapse, immediately after receiving regional anaesthesia on two separate occasions, the first involving the use of levobupivacaine and the second using ropivacaine. Skin testing revealed positive reactions to both levobupivacaine and ropivacaine, and negative reactions to articaine and lidocaine. Severe allergic reactions can be caused by the amide local anaesthetic drugs, levobupivacaine and ropivacaine.

  19. Interaction of local anesthetics with a peptide encompassing the IV/S4-S5 linker of the Na+ channel.

    PubMed

    Fraceto, Leonardo F; Oyama, Sérgio; Nakaie, Clóvis R; Spisni, Alberto; de Paula, Eneida; Pertinhez, Thelma A

    2006-08-20

    The peptide pIV/S4-S5 encompasses the cytoplasmic linker between helices S4-S5 in domain IV of the voltage-gated Na+ channel, residues 1644-1664. The interaction of two local anesthetics (LA), lidocaine and benzocaine, with pIV/S4-S5 has been studied by DOSY, heteronuclear NMR 1H-15N-HSQC spectroscopy and computational methods. DOSY indicates that benzocaine, a neutral ester, exhibits stronger interaction with pIV/S4-S5 than lidocaine, a charged amine-amide. Weighted average chemical shifts, Deltadelta(1H-15N), show that benzocaine affects residues L1653, M1655 and S1656 while lidocaine slightly perturbs residues I1646, L1649 and A1659, L1660, near the N- and C-terminus, respectively. Computational methods confirmed the stability of the benzocaine binding and the existence of two binding sites for lidocaine. Even considering that the approach of studying the peptide in the presence of a co-solvent (TFE/H2O, 30%/70% v/v) has an inherently limited implication, our data strongly support the existence of multiple LA binding sites in the IV/S4-S5 linker, as suggested in the literature. In addition, we consider that LA can bind to the S4-S5 linker with diverse binding modes and strength since this linker is part of the receptor for the "inactivation gate particle". Conditions for devising new functional studies, aiming to better understand Na+ channel functionality as well as the various facets of LA pharmacological activity are proposed in this work.

  20. Somatosensory feedback from the limbs exerts inhibitory influences on central neural drive during whole body endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Amann, Markus; Proctor, Lester T; Sebranek, Joshua J; Eldridge, Marlowe W; Pegelow, David F; Dempsey, Jerome A

    2008-12-01

    We investigated whether somatosensory feedback from contracting limb muscles exerts an inhibitory influence on the determination of central command during closed-loop cycling exercise in which the subject voluntarily determines his second-by-second central motor drive. Eight trained cyclists performed two 5-km time trials either without (5K(Ctrl)) or with lumbar epidural anesthesia (5K(Epi); 24 ml of 0.5% lidocaine, vertebral interspace L(3)-L(4)). Percent voluntary quadriceps muscle activation was determined at rest using a superimposed twitch technique. Epidural lidocaine reduced pretime trial maximal voluntary quadriceps strength (553 +/- 45 N) by 22 +/- 3%. Percent voluntary quadriceps activation was also reduced from 97 +/- 1% to 81 +/- 3% via epidural lidocaine, and this was unchanged following the 5K(Epi), indicating the presence of a sustained level of neural impairment throughout the trial. Power output was reduced by 9 +/- 2% throughout the race (P < 0.05). We found three types of significant effects of epidural lidocaine that supported a substantial role for somatosensory feedback from the exercising limbs as a determinant of central command throughout high-intensity closed-loop cycling exercise: 1) significantly increased relative integrated EMG of the vastus lateralis; 2) similar pedal forces despite the reduced number of fast-twitch muscle fibers available for activation; 3) and increased ventilation out of proportion to a reduced carbon dioxide production and heart rate and increased blood pressure out of proportion to power output and oxygen consumption. These findings demonstrate the inhibitory influence of somatosensory feedback from contracting locomotor muscles on the conscious and/or subconscious determination of the magnitude of central motor drive during high intensity closed-loop endurance exercise.

  1. A bio-artificial poly([d,l]-lactide-co-glycolide) drug-eluting nanofibrous periosteum for segmental long bone open fractures with significant periosteal stripping injuries

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ying-Chao; Cheng, Yi-Shiun; Hsu, Yung-Heng; Yu, Yi-Hsun; Liu, Shih-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradable poly([d,l]-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanofibrous membrane embedded with two drug-to-polymer weight ratios, namely 1:3 and 1:6, which comprised PLGA 180 mg, lidocaine 20 mg, vancomycin 20 mg, and ceftazidime 20 mg, and PLGA 360 mg, lidocaine 20 mg, vancomycin 20 mg, and ceftazidime 20 mg, respectively, was produced as an artificial periosteum in the treatment of segmental femoral fractures. The nanofibrous membrane’s drug release behavior was assessed in vitro using high-performance liquid chromatography and the disk-diffusion method. A femoral segmental fracture model with intramedullary Kirschner-wire fixation was established for the in vivo rabbit activity study. Twenty-four rabbits were divided into two groups. Twelve rabbits in group A underwent femoral fracture fixation only, and 12 rabbits in group B underwent femoral fracture fixation and were administered the drug-loaded nanofibers. Radiographs obtained at 2, 6, and 12 weeks postoperatively were used to assess the bone unions. The total activity counts in animal behavior cages were also examined to evaluate the clinical performance of the rabbits. After the animals were euthanized, both femoral shafts were harvested and assessed for their torque strengths and toughness. The daily in vitro release curve for lidocaine showed that the nanofibers eluted effective levels of lidocaine for longer than 3 weeks. The bioactivity studies of vancomycin and ceftazidime showed that both antibiotics had effective and sustained bactericidal capacities for over 30 days. The findings from the in vivo animal activity study suggested that the rabbits with the artificial drug-eluting periosteum exhibited statistically increased levels of activity and better clinical performance outcomes compared with the rabbits without the artificial periosteum. In conclusion, this artificial drug-eluting periosteum may eventually be used for the treatment of open fractures. PMID:27022261

  2. Glaucoma Surgery in Pregnancy: A Case Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Razeghinejad, Mohammad Reza; Masoumpour, Masoumeh; Eghbal, Mohammad Hossein; Myers, Jonathan S.; Moster, Marlene R.

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma management in pregnant patients is a real challenge, especially when the glaucoma is not controlled with medications. We report the results of 6 incisional glaucoma surgeries for the management of medically uncontrolled glaucoma patients during pregnancy. This retrospective, case series was conducted on the 6 eyes of 3pregnant patients with uncontrolled glaucoma using maximum tolerable medications. Details of the glaucoma surgical management of these patients as well as their postoperative care and pregnancy and clinical outcomes on longitudinal follow-up are discussed. All 3 patients had juvenile open-angle glaucoma and were on various anti-glaucoma medications, including oral acetazolamide. The first case described underwent trabeculectomy without antimetabolites in both eyes because of uncontrolled intraocular pressure with topical medications. The surgery was done with topical lidocaine jelly and subconjunctival lidocaine during the second and third trimesters. The second patient had an Ahmed valve implantation in both eyes during the second and third trimesters because of uncontrolled IOP with topical medications and no response to selective laser trabeculoplasty. Surgery was done with topical tetracaine and subconjunctival and sub-Tenon’s lidocaine. The third case had a Baerveldt valve implantation under general anesthesia in the second trimester. In selected pregnant glaucoma patients with medically uncontrolled intraocular pressure threatening vision, incisional surgery may lead to good outcomes for the patient with no risk for the fetus. PMID:27582594

  3. Skin permeation enhancement by sucrose esters: a pH-dependent phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Cázares-Delgadillo, J; Naik, A; Kalia, Y N; Quintanar-Guerrero, D; Ganem-Quintanar, A

    2005-06-13

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of sucrose esters (particularly, sucrose laureate and sucrose oleate in Transcutol) on the percutaneous penetration of a charged molecule as a function of ionization. We have investigated the influence of these sucrose esters on the in vitro diffusion profiles of lidocaine hydrochloride, a weak ionizable base (pKa=7.9), at different pH values, using porcine ear skin as the barrier membrane. As expected, lidocaine flux in the absence of an enhancer, increased from pH 5 to 9 with a corrresponding increase in the level of the unionized base. However, when skin was pretreated with 2% laureate in Transcutol (2% L-TC), drug permeation was higher at pH 5.0 and 7.0 than at 9.0. A different trend was observed in experiments with 2% oleate in Transcutol (2% O-TC), where skin flux was maximal at a more basic pH, when the degree of ionization is low. The results suggest that sucrose laureate enhances the penetration of the ionized form of the drug (12-fold greater flux relative to control), whereas sucrose oleate is more effective in promoting permeation of the unionized species. The structural properties of the sucrose esters as well as the degree of ionization of the drug are important characteristics affecting the transdermal flux of lidocaine.

  4. New insights into eutectic cream skin penetration enhancement.

    PubMed

    Fiala, Sarah; Roman, Marie; Inacio, Ricardo; Mashal, Sumaia; Brown, Marc B; Jones, Stuart A

    2016-02-29

    The manner in which the eutectic cream EMLA enhances the percutaneous penetration of lidocaine and prilocaine into human skin is still not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate if the modification of drug aggregation played a role in the way EMLA facilitates delivery. Light scattering analysis of lidocaine alone in water gave a critical aggregation concentration (CAC) of 572 μM and a mean aggregate size of 58.8 nm. The analysis of prilocaine in identical conditions gave a CAC of 1177 μM and a mean aggregate size of 105.7 ± 24.8 nm. When the two drugs were mixed at their eutectic 1:1 ratio in water the CAC reduced to 165.8 μM and the aggregate size was 43.82 nm. This lidocaine-prilocaine interaction in water was further modified upon addition of polyoxyethylene hydrogenated castor oil, the surfactant in the EMLA aqueous phase, to produce aggregates of <20 nm. The physical characterisation data suggested that it was the EMLA cream's surfactant that modified the drug molecular interactions in the aqueous continuous phase and caused a 6 fold higher drug penetration through human epidermal tissue compared to the oil formulations tested in this study. PMID:26732522

  5. Electrospinning of PVA/chitosan nanocomposite nanofibers containing gelatin nanoparticles as a dual drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Fathollahipour, Shahrzad; Abouei Mehrizi, Ali; Ghaee, Azadeh; Koosha, Mojtaba

    2015-12-01

    Nanofibrous core-sheath nanocomposite dual drug delivery system based on poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/chitosan/lidocaine hydrochloride loaded with gelatin nanoparticles were successfully prepared by the electrospinning method. Gelatin nanoparticles were prepared by nanoprecipitation and were then loaded with erythromycin antibiotic agent with the average particle size of ∼175 nm. The morphology of gelatin nanoparticles observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was shown to be optimal at the concentration of 1.25 wt % of gelatin in aqueous phase by addition of 20 µL of glutaraldehyde 5% as the crosslinking agent. The nanoparticles were also characterized by dynamic light scattering, zeta potential measurement, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The best bead free morphology for the PVA/chitosan nanofibrous mats were obtained at the solution weight ratio of 96/4. The nanofibrous mats were analyzed by swelling studies, FTIR and antibacterial tests. In vitro dual release profile of the core-sheath nanofibers was also studied within 72 h and showed the release efficiency equal to 84.69 and 75.13% for lidocaine hydrochloride and erythromycin, respectively. According to release exponent n, the release of lidocaine hydrochloride from the sheath part of the matrix is quasi-Fickian diffusion mechanism, while the release of erythromycin is based on anomalous or non-Fickian mechanisms.

  6. Anesthetic Efficacy in Irreversible Pulpitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Allegretti, Carlos E; Sampaio, Roberta M; Horliana, Anna C R T; Armonia, Paschoal L; Rocha, Rodney G; Tortamano, Isabel Peixoto

    2016-01-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve block has a high failure rate in the treatment of mandibular posterior teeth with irreversible pulpitis. The aim of this study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine, 2% lidocaine and 2% mepivacaine, all in combination with 1:100,000 epinephrine, in patients with irreversible pulpitis of permanent mandibular molars during a pulpectomy procedure. Sixty-six volunteers from the Emergency Center of the School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, randomly received 3.6 mL of local anesthetic as a conventional inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB). The subjective signal of lip numbness, pulpal anesthesia and absence of pain during the pulpectomy procedure were evaluated respectively, by questioning the patient, stimulation using an electric pulp tester and a verbal analogue scale. All patients reported the subjective signal of lip numbness. Regarding pulpal anesthesia success as measured with the pulp tester, the success rate was respectively 68.2% for mepivacaine, 63.6% for articaine and 63.6% for lidocaine. Regarding patients who reported no pain or mild pain during the pulpectomy, the success rate was, respectively 72.7% for mepivacaine, 63.6% for articaine and 54.5% for lidocaine. These differences were not statistically significant. Neither of the solutions resulted in 100% anesthetic success in patients with irreversible pulpitis of mandibular molars.

  7. Prilocaine reduces injection pain caused by propofol.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, M

    1995-02-01

    Propofol, which is commonly used for outpatient anaesthesia, may evoke pain during infusion. Forty-eight patients (ASA-I-II) undergoing elective uterine dilatation and curettage received randomly in a standardised fashion: A: Propofol mixed with prilocaine; B: Propofol and lidocaine; C: Propofol with prilocaine+lidocaine (equal amounts) or D: Propofol and saline. The final ratio of propofol:local anaesthetic/saline was 9:1 in all mixtures. Pain on injection was significantly decreased in the three groups receiving propofol and local anaesthetic(s) compared to the one given propofol and saline. Propofol is required in greater amounts when mixed with lidocaine than when mixed with saline. A binding between the algesic part of the propofol molecule and the local anaesthetic agent may explain these findings. Another twenty-two comparable patients were given 30 mg of ketorolac or an equal volume of saline intramuscularly 45-60 minutes prior to propofol. Ketorolac given before propofol did not reduce pain on injection. This indicates that inhibition of the cyclooxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism does not play a major role in the reduction of this pain.

  8. An investigation into the influence of binary drug solutions upon diffusion and partition processes in model membranes.

    PubMed

    Fiala, Sarah; Brown, Marc B; Jones, Stuart A

    2008-12-01

    Few studies have assessed the impact of binary systems on the fundamental mathematical models that describe drug permeation. The aim of this work was to determine the influence of varying the proportions of prilocaine and lidocaine in a binary saturated solution on mass transfer across synthetic membranes. Infinite-dose permeation studies were performed using Franz diffusion cells with either regenerated cellulose or silicone membranes, and partition coefficients were determined by drug loss over 24 h. There was a linear relationship between the flux of prilocaine and lidocaine through regenerated cellulose membrane (R(2) >or= 0.985, n = 5) and their normalised ratio in solution. This linear model was also applicable for the permeation of prilocaine through silicone membrane (R(2) = 0.991, n = 5), as its partition coefficient was independent of the drug ratio (15.84 +/- 1.41). However, the partition coefficient of lidocaine increased from 27.22 +/- 1.68 to 47.03 +/- 3.32 as the ratio of prilocaine increased and this resulted in a non-linear relationship between permeation and drug ratio. Irrespective of the membrane used, the permeation of one drug from a binary system was hindered by the presence of the second, which could be attributed to a reduction in available membrane diffusion volume.

  9. NMR characterisation and transdermal drug delivery potential of microemulsion systems.

    PubMed

    Kreilgaard, M; Pedersen, E J; Jaroszewski, J W

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of structure and composition of microemulsions (Labrasol/Plurol Isostearique/isostearylic isostearate/water) on their transdermal delivery potential of a lipophilic (lidocaine) and a hydrophilic model drug (prilocaine hydrochloride), and to compare the drug delivery potential of microemulsions to conventional vehicles. Self-diffusion coefficients determined by pulsed-gradient spin-echo NMR spectroscopy and T(1) relaxation times were used to characterise the microemulsions. Transdermal flux of lidocaine and prilocaine hydrochloride through rat skin was determined in vitro using Franz-type diffusion cells. The formulation constituents enabled a broad variety of microemulsion compositions, which ranged from water-continuous to oil-continuous aggregates over possible bicontinuous structures, with excellent solubility properties for both lipophilic and hydrophilic compounds. The microemulsions increased transdermal flux of lidocaine up to four times compared to a conventional oil-in-water emulsion, and that of prilocaine hydrochloride almost 10 times compared to a hydrogel. A correlation between self-diffusion of the drugs in the vehicles and transdermal flux was indicated. The increased transdermal drug delivery from microemulsion formulations was found to be due mainly to the increased solubility of drugs and appeared to be dependent on the drug mobility in the individual vehicle. The microemulsions did not perturb the skin barrier, indicating a low skin irritancy.

  10. The rates of interaction of local anesthetics with sodium channels in nerve.

    PubMed

    Courtney, K R; Kendig, J J; Cohen, E N

    1978-11-01

    Voltage clamp experiments were carried out on Rana catesbiana nodes of Ranvier in order to test predictions regarding the relationship between local anesthetic lipid solubility and the rate of development of and recovery from frequency-dependent increments of sodium channel block. Contrary to expectations, the drugs of greater lipid solubility than lidocaine showed slower rates of development of frequency-dependent block and, in addition, induced longer rather than shorter memories for recent frequency-depent increments in channel block. Relaxation time constants for bupivacaine (50 micrometer), etidocaine (15 micrometer) and tetracaine (0.7 micrometer) measured 50, 8 and 8 sec, respectively, compared to shorter time constant of 2 sec for lidocaine (250 micrometer). Rate constants were calculated for binding to channels in both open and closed states. Open channels displayed a 130- to 6000-fold greater affinity for the local anesthetics than did closed channels, verifying an important feature of the "modulated receptor" hypothesis. In addition, binding to closed channels was enhanced by holding the membrane at more depolarizing potentials, which favored the development of inactive channel states. The exceptionally large binding constants of lidocaine for interactions with both closed and open channels cannot be attributed to its lipid solubility characteristics alone. PMID:712641

  11. Dried saliva spot as a sampling technique for saliva samples.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rehim, Abbi; Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed

    2014-06-01

    For the first time, dried saliva spot (DSS) was used as a sampling technique for saliva samples. In the DSS technique 50 μL of saliva was collected on filter paper and the saliva was then extracted with an organic solvent. The local anesthetic lidocaine was used as a model compound, which was determined in the DSS using liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. The results obtained for the determination of lidocaine in saliva using DSS were compared with those from a previous study using a microextraction by packed sorbent syringe as the sampling method for saliva. This study shows that DSS can be used for the analysis of saliva samples. The method is promising and very easy in terms of sampling and extraction procedures. The results from this study are in good agreement with those from our previous work on the determination of lidocaine in saliva. DSS can open a new dimension in the saliva handling process in terms of sampling, storing and transport.

  12. Transdermal anaesthesia for percutaneous trigger finger release.

    PubMed

    Yiannakopoulos, Christos K; Ignatiadis, Ioannis A

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficiency of transdermal anaesthesia using eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine (EMLA) in patients undergoing percutaneous trigger finger release and to compare it with lidocaine infiltration. In this prospective, randomised study percutaneous release of the A1 annular pulley was performed to treat stenosing tenosynovitis (trigger finger syndrome) in 50 patients (50 fingers). The procedure was performed either under transdermal anaesthesia using EMLA applied transcutaneously 120 minutes prior to the operation (Group A, n = 25) or using local infiltration anaesthesia using lidocaine (Group B, n = 25). Pain experienced during administration of anaesthesia and during the operation was assessed using a 10-point Visual Analogue Pain Scale (VAPS), while all patients rated the effectiveness of anaesthesia with a 5-point scale. There were no significant differences between the two groups in the VAPS during the operation (1.33 +/- 0.52 versus 1.59 +/- 0.87) and the satisfaction scores (4.6 +/- 0.2 versus 4.4 +/- 0.3). The VAPS score during the administration of anaesthesia was statistically significantly less in the EMLA group (0 versus 5.96 +/- 2.41). All patients were satisfied with the final result of the operation. Percutaneous trigger finger release can be performed as an office procedure with the use of EMLA avoiding the use of injectable local infiltration anaesthesia. PMID:17405199

  13. Effects of Na+ channel blockers on extrasystolic stimulation-evoked changes in ventricular conduction and repolarization.

    PubMed

    Osadchii, Oleg E

    2014-03-01

    Antiarrhythmic agents which belong to class Ia (quinidine) and Ic (flecainide) reportedly increase propensity to ventricular tachyarrhythmia, whereas class Ib agents (lidocaine and mexiletine) are recognized as safe antiarrhythmics. Clinically, tachyarrhythmia is often initiated by a premature ectopic beat, which increases spatial nonuniformities in ventricular conduction and repolarization thus facilitating reentry. This study examined if electrical derangements evoked by premature excitation may be accentuated by flecainide and quinidine, but unchanged by lidocaine and mexiletine, which would explain the difference in their safety profile. In perfused guinea pig hearts, a premature excitation evoked over late repolarization phase was associated with prolonged epicardial activation time, reduced monophasic action potential duration (APD), and increased transepicardial dispersion of the activation time and APD. Flecainide and quinidine increased conduction slowing evoked by extrasystolic stimulation, prolonged APD, and accentuated spatial heterogeneities in ventricular conduction and repolarization associated with premature excitation. Spontaneous episodes of nonsustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia were observed in 50% of heart preparations exposed to drug infusion. In contrast, lidocaine and mexiletine had no effect on extrasystolic stimulation-evoked changes in ventricular conduction and repolarization or arrhythmic susceptibility. These findings suggest that flecainide and quinidine may promote arrhythmia by exaggerating electrophysiological abnormalities evoked by ectopic beats. PMID:24220314

  14. Sodium channel molecular conformations and antiarrhythmic drug affinity.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Michael F; Fozzard, Harry A; Lipkind, Gregory M; Hanck, Dorothy A

    2010-01-01

    Class I cardiac antiarrhythmic drugs, for example, lidocaine, mexiletine, flecainide, quinidine, and procainamide, continue to play an important role in the therapy for cardiac arrhythmias because of the presence of use-dependent block. Lidocaine, as well as related drugs such as mepivacaine, bupivacaine, and cocaine, also belong to the class of medications referred to as local anesthetics. In this review, we will consider lidocaine as the prototypical antiarrhythmic drug because it continues to be widely used both as an antiarrhythmic drug (first used as an antiarrhythmic drug in 1950) as well as a local anesthetic agent. Both of these clinical uses depend upon block of sodium current (I(Na)), but it is the presence of use-dependent I(Na) block, that is, an increasing amount of block at faster heart rates, which enables a local anesthetic agent to be a useful antiarrhythmic drug. Although many early studies investigated the action of antiarrhythmic drugs on Na currents, the availability of site-directed mutant Na channels has enabled for major advances in understanding their mechanisms of action based upon molecular conformations of the Na channel. PMID:20685573

  15. In vivo potency of different ligands on voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Safrany-Fark, Arpad; Petrovszki, Zita; Kekesi, Gabriella; Liszli, Peter; Benedek, Gyorgy; Keresztes, Csilla; Horvath, Gyongyi

    2015-09-01

    The Ranvier nodes of thick myelinated nerve fibers contain almost exclusively voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs), while the unmyelinated fibers have several receptors (e.g., cannabinoid, transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1), too. Therefore, a nerve which contains only motor fibers can be an appropriate in vivo model for selective influence of Navs. The goals were to evaluate the potency of local anesthetic drugs on such a nerve in vivo; furthermore, to investigate the effects of ligands with different structures (arachidonic acid, anandamide, capsaicin and nisoxetine) that were proved to inhibit Navs in vitro with antinociceptive properties. The marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve was explored in anesthetized Wistar rats; after its stimulation, the electrical activity of the vibrissae muscles was registered following the perineural injection of different drugs. Lidocaine, bupivacaine and ropivacaine evoked dose-dependent decrease in electromyographic activity, i.e., lidocaine had lower potency than bupivacaine or ropivacaine. QX-314 did not cause any effect by itself, but its co-application with lidocaine produced a prolonged inhibition. Nisoxetine had a very low potency. While anandamide and capsaicin in high doses caused about 50% decrease in the amplitude of action potential, arachidonic acid did not influence the responses. We proved that the classical local anesthetics have high potency on motor nerves, suggesting that this method might be a reliable model for selective targeting of Navs in vivo circumstances. It is proposed that the effects of these endogenous lipids and capsaicin on sensory fibers are not primarily mediated by Navs.

  16. Evaluation of the effects of various chemicals on discharge of and pain caused by jellyfish nematocysts.

    PubMed

    Birsa, Laura M; Verity, Peter G; Lee, Richard F

    2010-05-01

    Jellyfish tentacles in contact with human skin can produce pain swelling and redness. The pain is due to discharge of jellyfish nematocysts and associated toxins and discharge can be caused by a variety of mechanical and chemical stimuli. A series of tests were carried out with chemicals traditionally used to treat jellyfish stings e.g. acetic acid ammonia meat tenderizer baking soda and urea to determine if these chemicals stimulated or inhibited nematocyst discharge and if they brought relief to testers who were exposed to jellyfish tentacles. Chrysaora quinquecirrha (sea nettle) Chiropsalmus quadrumanus (sea wasp) and Physalia physalis (Portuguese man-of-war) were used in the study. It was found that many of the chemicals traditionally used to treat jellyfish stings stimulated nematocyst discharge and did not relieve the pain. However there was immediate relief when a common anesthetic lidocaine was sprayed on the skin of testers in contact with jellyfish tentacles. Initial exposure of tentacle suspensions to lidocaine prevented the nematocyst discharge by subsequent exposure to acetic acid ethanol ammonia or bromelain. Thus lidocaine in addition to acting as an anesthetic on skin in contact with jellyfish tentacles inhibited nematocyst discharge possibly by blocking sodium and/or calcium channels of the nematocytes.

  17. Glaucoma Surgery in Pregnancy: A Case Series and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Razeghinejad, Mohammad Reza; Masoumpour, Masoumeh; Eghbal, Mohammad Hossein; Myers, Jonathan S; Moster, Marlene R

    2016-09-01

    Glaucoma management in pregnant patients is a real challenge, especially when the glaucoma is not controlled with medications. We report the results of 6 incisional glaucoma surgeries for the management of medically uncontrolled glaucoma patients during pregnancy. This retrospective, case series was conducted on the 6 eyes of 3pregnant patients with uncontrolled glaucoma using maximum tolerable medications. Details of the glaucoma surgical management of these patients as well as their postoperative care and pregnancy and clinical outcomes on longitudinal follow-up are discussed. All 3 patients had juvenile open-angle glaucoma and were on various anti-glaucoma medications, including oral acetazolamide. The first case described underwent trabeculectomy without antimetabolites in both eyes because of uncontrolled intraocular pressure with topical medications. The surgery was done with topical lidocaine jelly and subconjunctival lidocaine during the second and third trimesters. The second patient had an Ahmed valve implantation in both eyes during the second and third trimesters because of uncontrolled IOP with topical medications and no response to selective laser trabeculoplasty. Surgery was done with topical tetracaine and subconjunctival and sub-Tenon's lidocaine. The third case had a Baerveldt valve implantation under general anesthesia in the second trimester. In selected pregnant glaucoma patients with medically uncontrolled intraocular pressure threatening vision, incisional surgery may lead to good outcomes for the patient with no risk for the fetus. PMID:27582594

  18. The efficacy of ketorolac as an adjunct to the Bier block for controlling postoperative pain following nontraumatic hand and wrist surgery.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Jesse J; Villecco, Dante J; Dehner, Bryan K; Burkard, Joseph F; Osborne, Lisa A; Pellegrini, Joseph E

    2008-10-01

    Research indicates that using a combination of ketorolac and lidocaine in the administration of a Bier block results in significant postoperative analgesia and decreased inflammation; however, the optimal dose of ketorolac to coadminister with the local anesthetic has not been established. This study was performed to determine if a 20-mg dose of ketorolac is effective in providing prolonged postoperative analgesia without adverse effects. A total of 55 patients (29 lidocaine-ketorolac, 26 lidocaine-placebo) were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study. Pain was measured using a 0 to 10 visual analogue scale and analysis of postoperative analgesic requirements. Incidence of bruising and postoperative analgesic satisfaction scores were determined 48 hours following discharge. No difference in demographic variables, adverse effect profiles, or satisfaction scores was noted between groups. Visual analogue scale scores were increased in the placebo group in the hospital but not following discharge to home. There was also a prolonged time to postoperative analgesic requests in the ketorolac group compared with the placebo group following discharge to home, achieving statistical significance for the time to second analgesic request (P = .012). Based on the results of this study we recommend that 20 mg ketorolac be considered in intravenous regional anesthesia.

  19. Effects of Na+ channel blockers on extrasystolic stimulation-evoked changes in ventricular conduction and repolarization.

    PubMed

    Osadchii, Oleg E

    2014-03-01

    Antiarrhythmic agents which belong to class Ia (quinidine) and Ic (flecainide) reportedly increase propensity to ventricular tachyarrhythmia, whereas class Ib agents (lidocaine and mexiletine) are recognized as safe antiarrhythmics. Clinically, tachyarrhythmia is often initiated by a premature ectopic beat, which increases spatial nonuniformities in ventricular conduction and repolarization thus facilitating reentry. This study examined if electrical derangements evoked by premature excitation may be accentuated by flecainide and quinidine, but unchanged by lidocaine and mexiletine, which would explain the difference in their safety profile. In perfused guinea pig hearts, a premature excitation evoked over late repolarization phase was associated with prolonged epicardial activation time, reduced monophasic action potential duration (APD), and increased transepicardial dispersion of the activation time and APD. Flecainide and quinidine increased conduction slowing evoked by extrasystolic stimulation, prolonged APD, and accentuated spatial heterogeneities in ventricular conduction and repolarization associated with premature excitation. Spontaneous episodes of nonsustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia were observed in 50% of heart preparations exposed to drug infusion. In contrast, lidocaine and mexiletine had no effect on extrasystolic stimulation-evoked changes in ventricular conduction and repolarization or arrhythmic susceptibility. These findings suggest that flecainide and quinidine may promote arrhythmia by exaggerating electrophysiological abnormalities evoked by ectopic beats.

  20. Evaluation of the effects of various chemicals on discharge of and pain caused by jellyfish nematocysts.

    PubMed

    Birsa, Laura M; Verity, Peter G; Lee, Richard F

    2010-05-01

    Jellyfish tentacles in contact with human skin can produce pain swelling and redness. The pain is due to discharge of jellyfish nematocysts and associated toxins and discharge can be caused by a variety of mechanical and chemical stimuli. A series of tests were carried out with chemicals traditionally used to treat jellyfish stings e.g. acetic acid ammonia meat tenderizer baking soda and urea to determine if these chemicals stimulated or inhibited nematocyst discharge and if they brought relief to testers who were exposed to jellyfish tentacles. Chrysaora quinquecirrha (sea nettle) Chiropsalmus quadrumanus (sea wasp) and Physalia physalis (Portuguese man-of-war) were used in the study. It was found that many of the chemicals traditionally used to treat jellyfish stings stimulated nematocyst discharge and did not relieve the pain. However there was immediate relief when a common anesthetic lidocaine was sprayed on the skin of testers in contact with jellyfish tentacles. Initial exposure of tentacle suspensions to lidocaine prevented the nematocyst discharge by subsequent exposure to acetic acid ethanol ammonia or bromelain. Thus lidocaine in addition to acting as an anesthetic on skin in contact with jellyfish tentacles inhibited nematocyst discharge possibly by blocking sodium and/or calcium channels of the nematocytes. PMID:20116454

  1. In vitro evaluation of calcium alginate gels as matrix for iontophoresis electrodes.

    PubMed

    Haida, Haruka; Ando, Shizuka; Ogami, Saori; Wakita, Ryo; Kohase, Hikaru; Saito, Norio; Yoshioka, Tomohiko; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Junzo; Umino, Masahiro; Fukayama, Haruhisa

    2012-01-01

    Calcium alginate gel has some unique properties, such as the capability to keep the drugs, bioadhesiveness, safety, and low cost. The purpose of this study is to determine whether calcium alginate gel can be used as a matrix of electrodes for iontophoresis (IOP). We measured the concentration of lidocaine transported from calcium alginate gels with various concentrations of alginic acid using an in vitro experimental cell with square-wave alternating current (AC) application. Temperature and pH changes were also determined during AC-IOP. The results revealed that lidocaine was released from calcium alginate gels at concentrations nearly 1.71-fold larger at 5 V, 60 min after AC application than in the case of passive diffusion. Lidocaine transport depended on the alginic acid concentration in the gels. Although there were slight increases in temperature and pH, chemical and thermal burns were not severe enough to be a concern. In conclusion, the calcium alginate gel can be used as a possible matrix for IOP electrodes.

  2. Reversible hippocampal lesions disrupt water maze performance during both recent and remote memory tests.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Nicola J; Squire, Larry R; Clark, Robert E

    2006-01-01

    Conventional lesion methods have shown that damage to the rodent hippocampus can impair previously acquired spatial memory in tasks such as the water maze. In contrast, work with reversible lesion methods using a different spatial task has found remote memory to be spared. To determine whether the finding of spared remote spatial memory depends on the lesion method, we reversibly inactivated the hippocampus with lidocaine either immediately (0-DAY) or 1 mo (30-DAY) after training in a water maze. For both the 0-DAY and 30-DAY retention tests, rats that received lidocaine infusions exhibited impaired performance. In addition, when the 0-DAY group was retested 2 d later, (when the drug was no longer active), the effect was reversed. That is, rats that had previously received lidocaine performed as well as control rats did. These findings indicate that the rodent hippocampus is important for both recent and remote spatial memory, as assessed in the water maze. What determines whether remote spatial memory is preserved or impaired following disruption of hippocampal function appears to be the type of task used to assess spatial memory, not the method used to disrupt the hippocampus.

  3. Temporary amygdala inhibition reduces stress effects in female mice.

    PubMed

    Dalooei, Jila Rezaeian; Sahraei, Hedayat; Meftahi, Gholam Hossein; Khosravi, Maryam; Bahari, Zahra; Hatef, Boshra; Mohammadi, Alireza; Nicaeili, Fateme; Eftekhari, Fateme; Ghamari, Fateme; Hadipour, Mohamadmehdi; Kaka, Gholamreza

    2016-09-01

    The current study investigated the effect of temporary inhibition of amygdala in response to metabolic changes caused by stress in female mice. Unilateral and bilateral amygdala cannulation was carried out, and after a week of recovery, 2% lidocaine hydrochloride was injected into the mice amygdalae five minutes before the induction of stress. A communication box was employed to induce stress for four consecutive days and plasma corticosterone, food and water intake, weight changes, and anorexia were measured as stress-induced metabolic changes. Results demonstrated that stress, increases stress, increased plasma corticosterone concentrations, weight, food, and water intake. Temporary inhibition of the amygdala slightly decreased plasma corticosterone concentrations, but did not fully reduce the effect of stress. The bilateral injection of lidocaine hydrochloride to the amygdala reduced the effect of stress and reduced water intake and weight. Unilateral injection of lidocaine hydrochloride into the left and right amygdala reduced food intake. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the left side and right side of amygdala nuclei play a different role in metabolic responses in stress. PMID:27489731

  4. Topical methadone and meperidine analgesic synergy in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kolesnikov, Yuri A.; Oksman, Galina; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2010-01-01

    Topical analgesics have many potential advantages over systemic administration. Prior work has shown potent analgesic activity of a number of topical opioids in the radiant heat tailflick assay. The current study confirms the analgesic activity of morphine and extends it to two other mu opioids, methadone and meperidine. Combinations of topical morphine and lidocaine are synergistic. Similarly, the combination of methadone and lidocaine is synergistic. While there appeared to be some potentiation with the combination of meperidine and lidocaine, it did not achieve significance. Systemically, prior studies have shown that co-administration of morphine and methadone was synergistic. The combination of morphine and methadone was also synergistic when given topically. In contrast, the combination of morphine and meperidine was not synergistic systemically and it was not synergistic topically. Thus, the pharmacology of topical opioids mimics that seen with systemic administration. Their activity in the topical model supports their potential utility while the local limitation of their actions offers the possibility of a reduced side-effect profile. PMID:20433826

  5. Temporary amygdala inhibition reduces stress effects in female mice.

    PubMed

    Dalooei, Jila Rezaeian; Sahraei, Hedayat; Meftahi, Gholam Hossein; Khosravi, Maryam; Bahari, Zahra; Hatef, Boshra; Mohammadi, Alireza; Nicaeili, Fateme; Eftekhari, Fateme; Ghamari, Fateme; Hadipour, Mohamadmehdi; Kaka, Gholamreza

    2016-09-01

    The current study investigated the effect of temporary inhibition of amygdala in response to metabolic changes caused by stress in female mice. Unilateral and bilateral amygdala cannulation was carried out, and after a week of recovery, 2% lidocaine hydrochloride was injected into the mice amygdalae five minutes before the induction of stress. A communication box was employed to induce stress for four consecutive days and plasma corticosterone, food and water intake, weight changes, and anorexia were measured as stress-induced metabolic changes. Results demonstrated that stress, increases stress, increased plasma corticosterone concentrations, weight, food, and water intake. Temporary inhibition of the amygdala slightly decreased plasma corticosterone concentrations, but did not fully reduce the effect of stress. The bilateral injection of lidocaine hydrochloride to the amygdala reduced the effect of stress and reduced water intake and weight. Unilateral injection of lidocaine hydrochloride into the left and right amygdala reduced food intake. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the left side and right side of amygdala nuclei play a different role in metabolic responses in stress.

  6. Temporary deafferentation evoked by cutaneous anesthesia: behavioral and electrophysiological findings in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sehle, Aida; Büsching, Imke; Vogt, Eva; Liepert, Joachim

    2016-05-01

    Motor function and motor excitability can be modulated by changes of somatosensory input. Here, we performed a randomized single-blind trial to investigate behavioral and neurophysiological changes during temporary deafferentation of left upper arm and forearm in 31 right-handed healthy adults. Lidocaine cream was used to anesthetize the skin from wrist to shoulder, sparing the hand. As control condition, on a different day, a neutral cream was applied to the same skin area. The sequence (first Lidocaine, then placebo or vice versa) was randomized. Behavioral measures included the Grating Orientation Task, the Von Frey hair testing and the Nine-hole-peg-test. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to investigate short-interval intracortical inhibition, stimulus response curves, motor evoked potential amplitudes during pre-innervation and the cortical silent period (CSP). Recordings were obtained from left first dorsal interosseous muscle and from left flexor carpi radialis muscle. During deafferentation, the threshold of touch measured at the forearm was significantly worse. Other behavioral treatment-related changes were not found. The CSP showed a significant interaction between treatment and time in first dorsal interosseous muscle. CSP duration was longer during Lidocaine application and shorter during placebo exposure. We conclude that, in healthy subjects, temporary cutaneous deafferentation of upper and lower arm may have minor effects on motor inhibition, but not on sensory or motor function for the adjacent non-anesthetized hand. PMID:26983925

  7. Pain during injection of propofol: the effect of prior administration of butorphanol.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anil; Raza, Mehdi; Dhiraaj, Sanjay; Pandey, Ravinder; Gupta, Devendra; Pandey, Chandra Kant; Singh, Prabhat K; Singh, Uttam

    2004-07-01

    Propofol causes pain or discomfort on injection in 28%-90% of patients. A number of techniques have been tried for minimizing propofol-induced pain with variable results. We compared the efficacy of butorphanol and lidocaine for prevention of propofol-induced pain. One-hundred-fifty ASA I-II adults, undergoing elective surgery were randomly assigned into 3 groups of 50 each. Group I (NS) received normal saline, Group II (L) received lidocaine 2% (40 mg), and Group III (B) received butorphanol 2 mg. All patients received pretreatment solutions made in 2 mL with normal saline administered over 5 s. One min after pretreatment patients received one-fourth of the total calculated dose of propofol (2.5 mg/kg) over 5 s. Assessment of pain with IV propofol was done by using a four-point scale: 0 = no pain, 1 = mild pain, 2 = moderate pain and 3 = severe pain at the time of propofol injection. In the control Group 39 (78%) patients had pain during propofol injection as compared to 21 (42%) and 10 (20%) in the lidocaine and butorphanol groups, respectively (P < 0.05). Butorphanol was the most effective. We therefore suggest the IV pretreatment with butorphanol 2 mg for attenuation of pain associated with propofol injection. PMID:15281515

  8. Membrane permeable local anesthetics modulate Na(V)1.5 mechanosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Beyder, Arthur; Strege, Peter R; Bernard, Cheryl; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium selective ion channel Na(V)1.5 is expressed in the heart and the gastrointestinal tract, which are mechanically active organs. Na(V)1.5 is mechanosensitive at stimuli that gate other mechanosensitive ion channels. Local anesthetic and antiarrhythmic drugs act upon Na(V)1.5 to modulate activity by multiple mechanisms. This study examined whether Na(V)1.5 mechanosensitivity is modulated by local anesthetics. Na(V)1.5 channels were expressed in HEK-293 cells, and mechanosensitivity was tested in cell-attached and excised inside-out configurations. Using a novel protocol with paired voltage ladders and short pressure pulses, negative patch pressure (-30 mmHg) in both configurations produced a hyperpolarizing shift in the half-point of the voltage-dependence of activation (V(1/2a)) and inactivation (V(1/2i)) by about -10 mV. Lidocaine (50 µM) inhibited the pressure-induced shift of V(1/2a) but not V(1/2i). Lidocaine inhibited the tonic increase in pressure-induced peak current in a use-dependence protocol, but it did not otherwise affect use-dependent block. The local anesthetic benzocaine, which does not show use-dependent block, also effectively blocked a pressure-induced shift in V(1/2a). Lidocaine inhibited mechanosensitivity in Na(V)1.5 at the local anesthetic binding site mutated (F1760A). However, a membrane impermeable lidocaine analog QX-314 did not affect mechanosensitivity of F1760A Na(V)1.5 when applied from either side of the membrane. These data suggest that the mechanism of lidocaine inhibition of the pressure-induced shift in the half-point of voltage-dependence of activation is separate from the mechanisms of use-dependent block. Modulation of Na(V)1.5 mechanosensitivity by the membrane permeable local anesthetics may require hydrophobic access and may involve membrane-protein interactions.

  9. A pharmacokinetic study of a topical anesthetic (EMLA® ) in mouse soft tissue laceration.

    PubMed

    Al-Musawi, Alaa; Matar, Kamal; Kombian, Samuel B; Andersson, Lars

    2012-12-01

    The use of topical anesthesia instead of injection of local anesthetics for managing soft tissue lacerations in the emergency situations may be a relief for both patients and surgeons. Topical anesthesia in the form of a cream eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA®) containing 2.5% lidocaine and 2.5% prilocaine has been reported as an efficient anesthetic on skin before venipuncture anesthesia and as an alternative to injection anesthesia in some minor surgery situations. The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics of EMLA® when applied in a laceration with topical skin application in the mouse. A total of 120 Albino Laboratory-bred strain mouse (BALB-c) male mice were divided into three groups with regard to application mode of EMLA®. Group A: with laceration, 48 mice; Group B: on intact shaved skin, 48 mice; Group C: control group (24 mice) with same procedures but without application of EMLA®. Blood levels were collected at 0, 10, 20, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 min post-EMLA® application. Plasma sample analysis was carried out by employing liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method, and the pharmacokinetic analysis of the mouse plasma samples was estimated by standard non-compartmental methods. The pharmacokinetic parameters of lidocaine and prilocaine were significantly altered following EMLA® application to lacerated mouse skin in contrast to intact skin. The absorption of lidocaine and prilocaine was rapid following application of EMLA® to lacerated and intact mouse skin. Maximum drug plasma concentration (C(max) ) and area under the drug plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) values of lidocaine were significantly increased by 448.6% and 161.5%, respectively, following application of EMLA to lacerated mouse skin in comparison with intact mouse skin. Similarly, prilocaine's C(max) and AUC values were also increased by 384% and 265.7%, respectively, following EMLA application to lacerated mouse skin, in

  10. Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy for Sustained Ventricular Arrhythmias Complicating Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Piccini, Jonathan P.; Schulte, Phillip J.; Pieper, Karen S.; Mehta, Rajendra H.; White, Harvey D.; Van de Werf, Frans; Ardissino, Diego; Califf, Robert M.; Granger, Christopher B.; Ohman, E. Magnus; Alexander, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Few data exist to guide antiarrhythmic drug therapy for sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT)/ventricular fibrillation (VF) after acute myocardial infarction (MI). The objective of this analysis was to describe survival of patients with sustained VT/VF post-MI according to antiarrhythmic drug treatment. Design & Setting We conducted a retrospective analysis of ST-segment elevation MI patients with sustained VT/VF in GUSTO IIB and III and compared all-cause death in patients receiving amiodarone, lidocaine, or no antiarrhythmic. We used Cox proportional hazards modeling and inverse weighted estimators to adjust for baseline characteristics, beta-blocker use, and propensity to receive antiarrhythmics. Due to non-proportional hazards for death in early follow-up (0–3 hours after sustained VT/VF) compared with later follow-up (>3 hours), we analyzed all-cause mortality using time-specific hazards. Patients & Interventions Among 19,190 acute MI patients, 1126 (5.9%) developed sustained VT/VF and met the inclusion criteria. Patients received lidocaine (n=664, 59.0%), amiodarone (n=50, 4.4%), both (n=110, 9.8%), or no antiarrhythmic (n=302, 26.8%). Results In the first 3 hours after VT/VF, amiodarone (adjusted HR 0.39, 95% CI 0.21–0.71) and lidocaine (adjusted HR 0.72, 95% CI 0.53–0.96) were associated with a lower hazard of death—likely evidence of survivor bias. Among patients who survived 3 hours, amiodarone was associated with increased mortality at 30 days (adjusted HR 1.71, 95% CI 1.02–2.86) and 6 months (adjusted HR 1.96, 95% CI 1.21–3.16) but lidocaine was not at 30 days (adjusted HR 1.19, 95% CI 0.77–1.82) and 6 months (adjusted HR 1.10, 95% CI 0.73–1.66). Conclusion Among patients with acute MI complicated by sustained VT/VF who survive 3 hours, amiodarone, but not lidocaine, is associated with an increased risk of death; reinforcing the need for randomized trials in this population. PMID:20959785

  11. Anti-metastatic Potential of Amide-linked Local Anesthetics: Inhibition of Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Migration and Inflammatory Src Signaling Independent of Sodium Channel Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Piegeler, Tobias; Votta-Velis, E. Gina; Liu, Guoquan; Place, Aaron T.; Schwartz, David E.; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice; Minshall, Richard D.; Borgeat, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Background Retrospective analysis of patients undergoing cancer surgery suggests the use of regional anesthesia may reduce cancer recurrence and improve survival. Amide-linked local anesthetics have anti-inflammatory properties, although the mechanism of action in this regard is unclear. As inflammatory processes involving Src tyrosine protein kinase and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 are important in tumor growth and metastasis, we hypothesized that amide-linked local anesthetics may inhibit inflammatory Src-signaling involved in migration of adenocarcinoma cells. Methods NCI-H838 lung cancer cells were incubated with Tumor Necrosis Factor-α in absence/presence of ropivacaine, lidocaine, or chloroprocaine (1nM-100μM). Cell migration and total cell lysate Src-activation and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 phosphorylation were assessed. The role of voltage-gated sodium-channels in the mechanism of local anesthetic effects was also evaluated. Results Ropivacaine treatment (100μM) of H838 cells for 20 minutes decreased basal Src activity by 62% (p=0.003), and both ropivacaine and lidocaine co-administered with Tumor Necrosis Factor-α statistically significantly decreased Src-activation and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 phosphorylation, whereas chloroprocaine had no such effect. Migration of these cells at 4 hours was inhibited by 26% (p=0.005) in presence of 1μM ropivacaine and 21% by 1μM lidocaine (p=0.004). These effects of ropivacaine and lidocaine were independent of voltage-gated sodium-channel inhibition. Conclusions This study indicates that amide-, but not ester-linked local anesthetics may provide beneficial anti-metastatic effects. The observed inhibition of NCI-H838 cell migration by lidocaine and ropivacaine was associated with the inhibition of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-induced Src-activation and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 phosphorylation, providing the first evidence of a molecular mechanism which appears to be independent of their

  12. Prophylactic and Therapeutic Effects of Oleuropein on Reperfusion-Induced Arrhythmia in Anesthetized Rat

    PubMed Central

    Baharvand, Babak; Esmailidehaj, Mansour; Alihosaini, Jamileh; Bajoovand, Shirin; Esmailidehaj, Saeedeh; Hafizibarjin, Zeynab

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to reveal that whether i.v. injection of oleuropein, the most potent polyphenolic antioxidant in olive leaf, has any effect on the magnitude of reperfusion arrhythmia in anesthetized rats or not. Methods: Eighty male Wistar rats were divided into 8 groups of 10 each: groups 1 and 5 were assigned as the prophylactic and treatment control groups, groups 2 and 6 as the prophylactic and treatment groups with lidocaine (10 mg/kg), groups 3 and 4 as the prophylactic groups with 10 and 50 mg/kg oleuropein (i.v.), and groups 7 and 8 as the treatment groups with 10 and 50 mg/kg oleuropein (i.v.), respectively. Reperfusion injury was induced by 5-min regional ischemia and 15-min reperfusion of left anterior descending coronary artery. Heart rate, blood pressure, and electrocardiogram were monitored throughout the procedure. Results: blood pressure was significantly decreased by infusion of 50 mg/kg oleuropein in groups 4 and 8, but unlike the lidocaine as a standard anti-arrhythmic drug in groups 2 and 5 had not significant effect on heart rate. The onset of arrhythmia in groups received oleuropein (groups 3, 4, 7, and 8) was significantly delayed. The mortality rate due to irreversible ventricular fibrillation was also significantly reduced in groups 3, 4, 7, and 8. The effect of lidocaine in groups 2 and 5 was more potent than that in oleuropein group. Conclusion: These findings indicate that i.v. injection of oleuropein possibly through its antioxidant activity reduces the magnitude of reperfusion-induced arrhythmia. PMID:26411972

  13. New patents on topical anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Carmen; Macaluso, Laura; Frascani, Federica; Paolino, Giovanni; D'Andrea, Vito; Richetta, Antonio G; Calvieri, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Anesthesia is defined as a total or partial loss of sensation and it may be general, local or topical, depending on the method of drug administration and area of the body affected. General anesthesia is a reversible state of unconsciousness produced by anesthetic agents, characterized by amnesia, muscle relaxation and loss of sensitivity to pain of the whole body. General anesthetic drugs can be classified into two main groups according to their predominant molecular pharmacological effects: volatile and intravenous agents. Local anesthesia produce a reversible loss of sensation in a portion of the body and it reversibly block impulse conduction along nerve axons and other excitable membrane. All local anesthetics (LA) are membrane stabilizing drugs; they reversibly decrease the rate of depolarization and repolarization of excitable membranes. They act mainly by inhibiting sodium influx through sodium-specific ion channels in the neuronal cell membrane, in particular the voltage-gated sodium channels. When the influx of sodium is interrupted, an action potential cannot arise and signal conduction is inhibited. The main local anesthetic (LA) agents for skin anesthesia are benzocaine (aminoester), prilocaine and lidocaine (aminoamides) which are commercially available as gels, ointments and creams (benzocaine and eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine) or as a bioadhesive (lidocaine) with different compositions (vehicles and excipients) for adults or pediatric use. Topical anesthetics decrease anxiety, pain and discomfort during cutaneous procedures and provide effective analgesia with rapid onset, prolonged duration and minimal side effects. This article outlines the different classes of topical anesthetics available and gives an overview of the mechanism of action, metabolism of each different class, of the possible complications that can occur because of their use and their possible treatment options and new patents.

  14. Nucleus incertus inactivation impairs spatial learning and memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Nategh, Mohsen; Nikseresht, Sara; Khodagholi, Fariba; Motamedi, Fereshteh

    2015-02-01

    Nucleus incertus (NI) is a pontine nucleus which releases mainly GABA and relaxin-3 in rats. Its suggested functions include response to stress, arousal, and modulation of hippocampal theta rhythm. Since the role of NI in learning and memory has not been well characterized, therefore the involvement of this nucleus in spatial learning and memory and the aftermath hippocampal levels of c-fos and pCREB were evaluated. NI was targeted by implanting cannula in male rats. For reference memory, NI was inactivated by lidocaine (0.4 μl, 4%) at three stages of acquisition, consolidation and retrieval in Morris water maze paradigm. For working memory, NI was inactivated in acquisition and retrieval phases. Injection of lidocaine prior to the first training session of reference memory significantly increased the distance moved, suggesting that inactivation of NI delays acquisition in this spatial task. Inactivation also interfered with the retrieval phase of spatial reference memory, as the time in target quadrant for lidocaine group was less, and the escape latency was higher compared to the control group. However, no difference was observed in the consolidation phase. In the working memory task, with inter-trial intervals of 75 min, the escape latency was higher when NI was inactivated in the retrieval phase. In addition, c-fos and pCREB/CREB levels decreased in NI-inhibited rats. This study suggests that nucleus incertus might participate in acquisition of spatial reference, and retrieval of both spatial reference and working memory. Further studies should investigate possible roles of NI in the hippocampal plasticity.

  15. Unilateral Hypothalamus Inactivation Prevents PTZ Kindling Development through Hippocampal Orexin Receptor 1 Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Nasibe; Salmani, Mahmoud Elahdadi; Goudarzvand, Mahdi; LashkarBoluki, Taghi; Goudarzi, Iran; Abrari, Kataneh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Epilepsy is a neural disorder in which abnormal plastic changes during short and long term periods lead to increased excitability of brain tissue. Kindling is an animal model of epileptogenesis which results in changes of synaptic plasticity due to repetitive electrical or chemical sub-convulsive stimulations of the brain. Lateral hypothalamus, as the main niche of orexin neurons with extensive projections, is involved in sleep and wakefulness and so it affects the excitability of the brain. Therefore, we investigated whether lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) inactivation or orexin-A receptor blocking could change convulsive behavior of acute and kindled PTZ treated animals and if glutamate has a role in this regard. Methods Kindling was induced by 40 mg/kg PTZ, every 48 hours up to 13 injections to each rat. Three consecutive stages 4 or 5 of convulsive behavior were used to ensure kindling. Lidocaine was injected stereotaxically to inactivate LHA, unilaterally. SB334867 used for orexin receptor 1 (OX1R) blocking administered in CSF. Results We demonstrated that LHA inactivation prevented PTZ kindling and hence, excitability evolution. Hippocampal glutamate content was decreased due to LHA inactivation, OX1R antagonist infusion, lidocaine injection and kindled groups. In accordance, OX1R antagonist (SB334867) and lidocaine injection decreased PTZ single dose induced convulsive behavior. While orexin-A i.c.v. infusion increased hippocampal glutamate content, it did not change PTZ induced convulsive intensity. Discussion It is concluded that LHA inactivation prevented kindling development probably through orexin receptor antagonism. CSF orexin probably acts as an inhibitory step on convulsive intensity through another unknown process. PMID:25436086

  16. Implementation of Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring during Endovascular Procedures in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Martinez Piñeiro, Alicia; Cubells, Carles; Garcia, Pablo; Castaño, Carlos; Dávalos, Antonio; Coll-Canti, Jaume

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Intraoperative monitoring (IOM) has been used in different surgical disciplines since the 1980s. Nonetheless, regular routine use of IOM in interventional neuroradiology units has only been reported in a few centers. The aim of this study is to report our experience, 1 year after deciding to implement standardized IOM during endovascular treatment of vascular abnormalities of the central nervous system. Methods Basic recordings included somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) and motor-evoked potentials (MEPs). Corticobulbar motor-evoked potentials and flash-visual-evoked potentials were also recorded depending on the topography of the lesion. Intra-arterial provocative tests (PTs) with amobarbital and lidocaine were also performed. All patients except 1 were under total intravenous anesthesia. Clinical outcome was assessed prospectively and correlated with IOM events. Results Twelve patients and 15 procedures were monitored during the inclusion period. Significant IOM events were detected during 3 of the 15 procedures (20%). We observed temporary MEP changes in 2 cases which resolved after interruption of the embolization or application of corrective measures, leaving no postoperative neurological deficits. In 1 case, persistent SEP and MEP deterioration was detected secondary to a frontal hematoma, resulting in mild sensory-motor deficit in the right upper extremity after the procedure. Overall, 12 PTs (4 spinal cord and 8 brain abnormalities) were performed using lidocaine and sodium amytal injections. One positive result occurred after the injection of lidocaine. No false negatives were detected. Conclusions IOM may provide continuous real-time data about the functional status of eloquent areas and pathways of the central nervous system in patients under general anesthesia. It therefore allows us to detect early neurological damage in time to perform specific actions that may prevent irreversible neurological deficits. PMID:26019712

  17. Evidence for a peripheral origin of the tonic nociceptive response to subcutaneous formalin.

    PubMed

    Dallel, R; Raboisson, P; Clavelou, P; Saade, M; Woda, A

    1995-04-01

    The orofacial formalin test in the rat is a valid and reliable model of nociception and is sensitive to various classes of analgesic drugs. The noxious stimulus consists in an injection of diluted formalin (2.5% in saline) into the upper lip. The behavioural nociceptive response is measured in terms of the amount of time the animal spends rubbing the injected area. Two distinct periods of intense rubbing activity can be identified, a first phase occurring in the first 3 min and a second phase lasting from 12 to 39 min after formalin injection. The present study verified the peripheral origin of the first phase of the formalin response and examined whether the second phase is produced by peripheral activation of afferent fibres and/or by a phenomenon of central facilitation induced by the neural activity that occurs during the first phase. This was determined by assessing the effect of a local anaesthetic agent (lidocaine) administered into the formalin injection site, before or after the first phase of the formalin response. Local injection of 50 microliters of lidocaine prior to formalin completely abolished the first phase of the formalin response but this blockade did not significantly influence the appearance and development of the second phase. Thus, the primary afferent activity that normally occurs during the first phase of the formalin response is not a prerequisite for the expression of the second phase. A higher dose of lidocaine (150 microliters) induced, in addition, inhibition of the first part of the second phase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. [Cervical echomyography in cervical dystonia and its application to the monitoring for muscle afferent block (MAB)].

    PubMed

    Mezaki, T; Matsumoto, S; Sakamoto, T; Mizutani, K; Kaji, R

    2000-07-01

    Muscle afferent block (MAB) is an intramuscular injection of 0.5% lidocaine and pure ethanol with a volume ratio of 10:1, introduced as an alternative to botulinum toxin injection for focal dystonia and spasticity. As in the case of botulinum toxin injection, the precise localization of target muscles is crucial to obtain the maximal effect from MAB. For this purpose, we performed ultrasonography of cervical muscles (echomyography) in 20 patients with cervical dystonia (11 men, 9 women; mean age 46.1), with ultrasonograph SSD-5500 (Aloca Co. Ltd., Japan) and a 7.5 MHz linear probe. In untreated subjects, the boundaries of muscles could be easily identified, while they tended to become ambiguous after repeated MAB sessions. At rest, there were involuntary worm-like movements of a specific muscle group observed in all patients. Contrary to our expectation, in all but one patient abnormal contraction was limited only in a part of synergists responsible for the abnormal posture. In normal subjects there was no abnormal contraction at rest, and all the synergists were simultaneously activated by the voluntary neck deviation. Normal subjects could not mimick the pattern of muscle activity in dystonic patients. The echo-guided MAB was performed in 16 patients. We could easily observe the diffusion of lidocaine and ethanol into the targeted muscle, and injected portions of the muscle stopped their activities just after MAB. The effect persisted for 3-4 days in at least 5 out of 10 patients who had follow-up examination. On the other hand, the movement stopped only temporarily after the injection of saline or lidocaine only. In 3 out of 16 patients, some of the uninjected synergists were activated as if to substitute for the treated muscle just after the injection. We conclude that cervical echomyography is useful to investigate the pattern of muscle activity in cervical dystonia and to accurately localize the contracting muscles during MAB.

  19. Peripheral Disc Margin Shape and Internal Disc Derangement: Imaging Correlation in Significantly Painful Discs Identified at Provocation Lumbar Discography

    PubMed Central

    Bartynski, W.S.; Rothfus, W.E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Annular margin shape is used to characterize lumbar disc abnormality on CT/MR imaging studies. Abnormal discs also have internal derangement including annular degeneration and radial defects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential correlation between disc-margin shape and annular internal derangement on post-discogram CT in significantly painful discs encountered at provocation lumbar discography (PLD). Significantly painful discs were encountered at 126 levels in 86 patients (47 male, 39 female) studied by PLD where no prior surgery had been performed and response to intradiscal lidocaine after provocation resulted in either substantial/total relief or no improvement after lidocaine administration. Post-discogram CT and discogram imaging was evaluated for disc-margin characteristics (bulge/protrusion), features of disc internal derangement (radial annular defect [RD: radial tear/fissure/annular gap], annular degeneration) and presence/absence of discographic contrast leakage. In discs with focal protrusion, 50 of 63 (79%) demonstrated Grade 3 RD with 13 (21%) demonstrating severe degenerative change only. In discs with generalized-bulge-only, 48 of 63 (76%) demonstrated degenerative change only (primarily Dallas Grade 3) with 15 of 63 (24%) demonstrating a RD (Dallas Grade 3). Differences were highly statistically significant (p<0.001). Pain elimination with intra-discal lidocaine correlated with discographic contrast leakage (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape correlates with features of internal derangement in significantly painful discs encountered at PLD. Discs with focal protrusion typically demonstrate RD while generalized bulging discs typically demonstrated degenerative changes only (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape may provide an important imaging clue to the cause of chronic discogenic low back pain. PMID:22681741

  20. A survey of adulterants used to cut cocaine in samples seized in the Espírito Santo State by GC-MS allied to chemometric tools.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Lindamara M; Rodrigues, Rayza R T; Santos, Heloá; Costa, Helber B; Merlo, Bianca B; Filgueiras, Paulo R; Poppi, Ronei J; Vaz, Boniek G; Romão, Wanderson

    2016-03-01

    Cocaine is a stimulant drug of the central nervous system (CNS) extracted from the leaves of Erytroxylum coca. It is defined as a tropane alkaloid containing 1R-(exo,exo)-3-(benzoyloxy)-8-methyl-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane-2-carboxylic acid methyl esther. However, despite its defined composition, a wide variety of chemical additives are present in cocaine found in the illicit market, such as benzocaine, lidocaine, caffeine, procaine and phenacetin. In this work, 512 cocaine samples seized by the Civil Police of Espirito Santo state (PC-ES, Brazil) were analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) allied to principal component analysis (PCA) in order to classify the samples as a function of seizure year (2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012) and location (metropolitan, north, south and central). The cocaine content (wt.%) and its adulterants were also estimated. Analyzing the samples seized between 2008 and 2011, three sample sets are clearly grouped according to the degree of adulteration with caffeine and lidocaine: 100-50 wt.% of cocaine; 50-20 wt.% of cocaine; and 20-80 wt.% of lidocaine and 60-80 wt.% of caffeine, simultaneously. The last group is formed by samples seized between 2008 and 2009, which proves the higher degree of adulteration during this period. In 2012, higher cocaine content was observed for the 191 analyzed samples than in samples from previous years. The PCA data also suggests that the metropolitan region samples had a higher degree of adulteration than the state countryside samples. PMID:26976463

  1. Crystallization of Local Anesthetics When Mixed With Corticosteroid Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyeoncheol; Park, Jihong; Lee, Won Kyung; Lee, Woo Hyung; Leigh, Ja-Ho; Lee, Jin Joo; Chung, Sun G.; Lim, Chaiyoung; Park, Sang Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate at which pH level various local anesthetics precipitate, and to confirm which combination of corticosteroid and local anesthetic crystallizes. Methods Each of ropivacaine-HCl, bupivacaine-HCl, and lidocaine-HCl was mixed with 4 different concentrations of NaOH solutions. Also, each of the three local anesthetics was mixed with the same volume of 3 corticosteroid solutions (triamcinolone acetonide, dexamethasone sodium phosphate, and betamethasone sodium phosphate). Precipitation of the local anesthetics (or not) was observed, by the naked eye and by microscope. The pH of each solution and the size of the precipitated crystal were measured. Results Alkalinized with NaOH to a certain value of pH, local anesthetics precipitated (ropivacaine pH 6.9, bupivacaine pH 7.7, and lidocaine pH 12.9). Precipitation was observed as a cloudy appearance by the naked eye and as the aggregation of small particles (<10 µm) by microscope. The amount of particles and aggregation increased with increased pH. Mixed with betamethasone sodium phosphate, ropivacaine was precipitated in the form of numerous large crystals (>300 µm, pH 7.5). Ropivacaine with dexamethasone sodium phosphate also precipitated, but it was only observable by microscope (a few crystals of 10–100 µm, pH 7.0). Bupivacaine with betamethasone sodium phosphate formed precipitates of non-aggregated smaller particles (<10 µm, pH 7.7). Lidocaine mixed with corticosteroids did not precipitate. Conclusion Ropivacaine and bupivacaine can precipitate by alkalinization at a physiological pH, and therefore also produce crystals at a physiological pH when they are mixed with betamethasone sodium phosphate. Thus, the potential risk should be noted for their use in interventions, such as epidural steroid injections. PMID:26949665

  2. The Bite of the Honeybee: 2-Heptanone Secreted from Honeybee Mandibles during a Bite Acts as a Local Anaesthetic in Insects and Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Papachristoforou, Alexandros; Kagiava, Alexia; Papaefthimiou, Chrisovalantis; Termentzi, Aikaterini; Fokialakis, Nikolas; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Watkins, Max; Arnold, Gérard; Theophilidis, George

    2012-01-01

    Honeybees secrete 2-heptanone (2-H) from their mandibular glands when they bite. Researchers have identified several possible functions: 2-H could act as an alarm pheromone to recruit guards and soldiers, it could act as a chemical marker, or it could have some other function. The actual role of 2-H in honeybee behaviour remains unresolved. In this study, we show that 2-H acts as an anaesthetic in small arthropods, such as wax moth larva (WML) and Varroa mites, which are paralysed after a honeybee bite. We demonstrated that honeybee mandibles can penetrate the cuticle of WML, introducing less than one nanolitre of 2-H into the WML open circulatory system and causing instantaneous anaesthetization that lasts for a few minutes. The first indication that 2-H acts as a local anaesthetic was that its effect on larval response, inhibition and recovery is very similar to that of lidocaine. We compared the inhibitory effects of 2-H and lidocaine on voltage-gated sodium channels. Although both compounds blocked the hNav1.6 and hNav1.2 channels, lidocaine was slightly more effective, 2.82 times, on hNav.6. In contrast, when the two compounds were tested using an ex vivo preparation–the isolated rat sciatic nerve–the function of the two compounds was so similar that we were able to definitively classify 2-H as a local anaesthetic. Using the same method, we showed that 2-H has the fastest inhibitory effect of all alkyl-ketones tested, including the isomers 3- and 4-heptanone. This suggests that natural selection may have favoured 2-H over other, similar compounds because of the associated fitness advantages it confers. Our results reveal a previously unknown role of 2-H in honeybee defensive behaviour and due to its minor neurotoxicity show potential for developing a new local anaesthetic from a natural product, which could be used in human and veterinary medicine. PMID:23091624

  3. A survey of adulterants used to cut cocaine in samples seized in the Espírito Santo State by GC-MS allied to chemometric tools.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Lindamara M; Rodrigues, Rayza R T; Santos, Heloá; Costa, Helber B; Merlo, Bianca B; Filgueiras, Paulo R; Poppi, Ronei J; Vaz, Boniek G; Romão, Wanderson

    2016-03-01

    Cocaine is a stimulant drug of the central nervous system (CNS) extracted from the leaves of Erytroxylum coca. It is defined as a tropane alkaloid containing 1R-(exo,exo)-3-(benzoyloxy)-8-methyl-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane-2-carboxylic acid methyl esther. However, despite its defined composition, a wide variety of chemical additives are present in cocaine found in the illicit market, such as benzocaine, lidocaine, caffeine, procaine and phenacetin. In this work, 512 cocaine samples seized by the Civil Police of Espirito Santo state (PC-ES, Brazil) were analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) allied to principal component analysis (PCA) in order to classify the samples as a function of seizure year (2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012) and location (metropolitan, north, south and central). The cocaine content (wt.%) and its adulterants were also estimated. Analyzing the samples seized between 2008 and 2011, three sample sets are clearly grouped according to the degree of adulteration with caffeine and lidocaine: 100-50 wt.% of cocaine; 50-20 wt.% of cocaine; and 20-80 wt.% of lidocaine and 60-80 wt.% of caffeine, simultaneously. The last group is formed by samples seized between 2008 and 2009, which proves the higher degree of adulteration during this period. In 2012, higher cocaine content was observed for the 191 analyzed samples than in samples from previous years. The PCA data also suggests that the metropolitan region samples had a higher degree of adulteration than the state countryside samples.

  4. Coronary responses to cold air inhalation following afferent and efferent blockade

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhaohui; McQuillan, Patrick M.; Leuenberger, Urs A.; Sinoway, Lawrence I.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac ischemia and angina pectoris are commonly experienced during exertion in a cold environment. In the current study we tested the hypotheses that oropharyngeal afferent blockade (i.e., local anesthesia of the upper airway with lidocaine) as well as systemic β-adrenergic receptor blockade (i.e., intravenous propranolol) would improve the balance between myocardial oxygen supply and demand in response to the combined stimulus of cold air inhalation (−15 to −30°C) and isometric handgrip exercise (Cold + Grip). Young healthy subjects underwent Cold + Grip following lidocaine, propranolol, and control (no drug). Heart rate, blood pressure, and coronary blood flow velocity (CBV, from Doppler echocardiography) were continuously measured. Rate-pressure product (RPP) was calculated, and changes from baseline were compared between treatments. The change in RPP at the end of Cold + Grip was not different between lidocaine (2,441 ± 376) and control conditions (3,159 ± 626); CBV responses were also not different between treatments. With propranolol, heart rate (8 ± 1 vs. 14 ± 3 beats/min) and RPP responses to Cold + Grip were significantly attenuated. However, at peak exercise propranolol also resulted in a smaller ΔCBV (1.4 ± 0.8 vs. 5.3 ± 1.4 cm/s, P = 0.035), such that the relationship between coronary flow and cardiac metabolism was impaired under propranolol (0.43 ± 0.37 vs. 2.1 ± 0.63 arbitrary units). These data suggest that cold air breathing and isometric exercise significantly influence efferent control of coronary blood flow. Additionally, β-adrenergic vasodilation may play a significant role in coronary regulation during exercise. PMID:24816257

  5. The bite of the honeybee: 2-heptanone secreted from honeybee mandibles during a bite acts as a local anaesthetic in insects and mammals.

    PubMed

    Papachristoforou, Alexandros; Kagiava, Alexia; Papaefthimiou, Chrisovalantis; Termentzi, Aikaterini; Fokialakis, Nikolas; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Watkins, Max; Arnold, Gérard; Theophilidis, George

    2012-01-01

    Honeybees secrete 2-heptanone (2-H) from their mandibular glands when they bite. Researchers have identified several possible functions: 2-H could act as an alarm pheromone to recruit guards and soldiers, it could act as a chemical marker, or it could have some other function. The actual role of 2-H in honeybee behaviour remains unresolved. In this study, we show that 2-H acts as an anaesthetic in small arthropods, such as wax moth larva (WML) and Varroa mites, which are paralysed after a honeybee bite. We demonstrated that honeybee mandibles can penetrate the cuticle of WML, introducing less than one nanolitre of 2-H into the WML open circulatory system and causing instantaneous anaesthetization that lasts for a few minutes. The first indication that 2-H acts as a local anaesthetic was that its effect on larval response, inhibition and recovery is very similar to that of lidocaine. We compared the inhibitory effects of 2-H and lidocaine on voltage-gated sodium channels. Although both compounds blocked the hNav1.6 and hNav1.2 channels, lidocaine was slightly more effective, 2.82 times, on hNav.6. In contrast, when the two compounds were tested using an ex vivo preparation-the isolated rat sciatic nerve-the function of the two compounds was so similar that we were able to definitively classify 2-H as a local anaesthetic. Using the same method, we showed that 2-H has the fastest inhibitory effect of all alkyl-ketones tested, including the isomers 3- and 4-heptanone. This suggests that natural selection may have favoured 2-H over other, similar compounds because of the associated fitness advantages it confers. Our results reveal a previously unknown role of 2-H in honeybee defensive behaviour and due to its minor neurotoxicity show potential for developing a new local anaesthetic from a natural product, which could be used in human and veterinary medicine.

  6. The Pre-Optic Anterior Hypothalamus (POAH) partially mediates the hypothermic response to hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Brown, Justin W; Whitehurst, Marvin E; Gordon, Christopher J; Carroll, Robert G

    2005-04-11

    Two sets of experiments were performed to characterize the role of the Pre-Optic Area of the Anterior Hypothalamus (POAH) in the decrease in set point and hypothermia that follows severe hemorrhage. In the first set, lidocaine or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) was microinjected into the POAH of rats at the time of hemorrhage. Lidocaine microinjection attenuated the hemorrhagic hypothermia by approximately 50%. The mean drop in core temperature (Tc) following hemorrhage was 1.5 degrees C with ACSF microinjection (N = 6), 0.70 degrees C (N = 6) with lidocaine, and 1.77 degrees C (N = 6) after sham microinjection. This partial attenuation of the hemorrhagic hypothermic response indicates that an intact POAH is necessary for at least some of the hypothermia following hemorrhage. In the second experimental set, hypothalamic tissue temperature (Thyp) was modulated in an attempt to alter the hemorrhagic hypothermic response. Bilateral closed-ended cannulas were inserted into the POAH. One cannula consisted of a water-perfused thermode to change local tissue temperature. The other housed a thermocouple to measure local temperature. The effectiveness of the thermode was first confirmed in conscious rats, evidenced by an inverse deflection in Tc upon Thyp modulation. Then, the POAH region was either heated, cooled, or sham perfused following hemorrhage. The mean drop in Tc following hemorrhage was 2.16 degrees C (N = 5) with hypothalamic heating, 1.35 degrees C (N = 5) with cooling, and 1.44 degrees C (N = 5) following the sham perfusion control. Heating of the POAH significantly exacerbated the hemorrhagic hypothermic response. These data further suggest that the POAH is at least partially responsible for mediating hemorrhagic hypothermia. PMID:15804494

  7. Disposable circumcision suture device: clinical effect and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lv, Bo-Dong; Zhang, Shi-Geng; Zhu, Xuan-Wen; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Gang; Chen, Min-Fu; Shen, Hong-Liang; Pei, Zai-Jun; Chen, Zhao-Dian

    2014-01-01

    In our experience patients undergoing circumcision are mostly concerned about pain and penile appearances. We conducted a prospective randomized trial to assess the benefits of a new disposable circumcision suture device (DCSD). A total of 942 patients were equally divided into three groups (conventional circumcision, Shang ring and disposable suture device group). Patients in the DCSD group were anesthetized with compound 5% lidocaine cream, the others with a 2% lidocaine penile block. Operation time, intra-operative blood loss, incision healing time, intra-operative and post-operative pain, the penile appearance and overall satisfaction degree were measured. Operation time and intra-operative blood loss were significantly lower in the Shang ring and suture device groups compared to the conventional group (P < 0.001). Intra-operative pain was less in the suture device group compared with the other two groups (P < 0.001); whereas post-operative pain was higher in the conventional group compared to the other two groups (P < 0.001). Patients in the suture device (80.57%) and Shang ring (73.57%) groups were more satisfied with penile appearances compared with the conventional circumcision group (20.06%, P < 0.05). Patients in suture device group also healed markedly faster than the conventional group (P < 0.01). The overall satisfaction rate was better in the suture device group (78.66%) compared with the conventional (47.13%) and Shang ring (50.00%) groups (P < 0.05). The combination of DCSD and lidocaine cream resulted in shorter operation and incision healing times, reduced intra-operative and post-operative pain and improved patient satisfaction with the cosmetic appearances. PMID:24759586

  8. Amine blockers of the cytoplasmic mouth of sodium channels: a small structural change can abolish voltage dependence.

    PubMed Central

    Zamponi, G W; French, R J

    1994-01-01

    Many drugs block sodium channels from the cytoplasmic end (Moczydlowski, E., A. Uehara, X, Guo, and J. Heiny. 1986. Isochannels and blocking modes of voltage-dependent sodium channels. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 479:269-292.). Lidocaine, applied to either side of the membrane, induces two blocking modes, a rapid, voltage-dependent open-channel block, and a block of the inactivated channel that occurs on a 1000-fold slower timescale. Here we describe the actions of several lidocaine-related amines on batrachotoxin(BTX)-activated bovine cardiac sodium channels incorporated into planar lipid bilayers. We applied blocking amines from the intracellular side and examined the structural determinants of fast, open-channel block. Neither hydroxyl nor carbonyl groups, present in the aryl-amine link of lidocaine, were necessary, indicating that hydrogen bonding between structures in the aryl-amine link and the channel is not required. Block, however, was significantly enhanced by addition of an aromatic ring, or by the lengthening of aliphatic side chains, suggesting that a hydrophobic domain strengthens binding while the amine group blocks the pore. For most blockers, depolarizing potentials enhanced block, with the charged amine group apparently traversing 45-60% of the transmembrane voltage. By contrast, block by phenylhydrazine was essentially voltage-independent. The relatively rigid planar structure of phenylhydrazine may prevent the charged amino end from entering the electric field when the aromatic ring is bound. The relation between structural features of different blockers and their sensitivity to voltage suggests that the transmembrane voltage drops completely over less than 5 A. We raise the possibility that the proposed hydrophobic binding domain overlaps the endogenous receptor for the inactivation gate. If so, our data place limits on the distance between this receptor and the intrapore site at which charged amines bind. PMID:7811912

  9. Effect of local anesthesia on atypical odontalgia--a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    List, Thomas; Leijon, Göran; Helkimo, Martti; Oster, Anders; Svensson, Peter

    2006-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the analgesic effect of lidocaine in a double-blind, controlled multi-center study on patients with atypical odontalgia (AO)--a possible orofacial neuropathic pain condition. Thirty-five consecutive AO patients (range 31-81 years) with a mean pain duration of 7.2 years (range 1-30 years) were recruited from four different orofacial pain clinics in Sweden. In a randomized cross-over design, 1.5 ml local anesthesia (20mg/ml lidocaine and 12.5 microg/ml adrenaline) or 1.5 ml saline (9 mg/ml NaCl solution) (placebo) was injected to block the painful area. The VAS pain scores showed an overall effect of time (ANOVA: P<0.001) and treatment (ANOVA: P=0.018) with a significant interaction between the factors (ANOVA: P<0.001). Overall, VAS pain relief was significantly greater at 15-120 min following the lidocaine injections compared to the placebo injections (Tukey: P<0.05). All patients demonstrated significant disturbances in somatosensory function on the painful side compared to the non-painful side as revealed by quantitative sensory tests, however, only one significant inverse correlation was found between percentage pain relief and the magnitude of brush-evoked allodynia (Spearman: P<0.01). In conclusion, AO patients experienced significant, but not complete, pain relief from administration of local anesthetics compared with placebo. The findings indicate that the spontaneous pain in AO patients only to some extent is dependent on peripheral afferent inputs and that sensitization of higher order neurons may be involved in the pathophysiology of AO.

  10. Comparative Effects of Clonidine and Adrenaline with Lignocaine during Maxillary Infiltration Anaesthesia for Dental Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Ranjani, Sree S; Lenka, Sthithaprajna; Jimson, Sudha

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Lignocaine is a commonly used local anaesthetic in dental practice. Many practitioners use adrenaline (epinephrine) as additive with lignocaine, and some have used clonidine, instead of adrenaline. Both having benefits and limitations. Aims Hence a study was undertaken in our department to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using (plain lidocaine local anaesthetic) versus (lidocaine with adrenaline as additive) versus (lidocaine with clonidine as additive). Study Design Randomised, prospective, double blind study. Materials and Methods Seventy five patients requiring extraction of maxillary molar teeth who fall under ASA I category were included and randomly divided into group – I (n=25) (Lignocaine), group – II (n=25) (Lignocaine ± Adrenaline) and group – III (n=25) (Lignocaine ± Clonidine). The observations recorded were, time of onset of anaesthesia, hemodynamic parameters, blood loss during procedure and duration of post operative analgesia. Statistical Analysis The statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS 16 software. Results A statistically significant difference was seen in blood loss, being higher in group I and duration of anaesthesia, being shortest in group I. There was no statistical difference between the three groups amongst other parameters. Conclusion Adrenaline at 10 μg/ml and clonidine at 15 μg/ml can be safely used as additives with lignocaine, in maxillary infiltration anaesthesia for dental extraction; with addition of either of these two drugs, having an equal advantage over use of plain lignocaine; in terms of lower blood loss and longer duration of anaesthesia; but, with no difference in the onset of anaesthesia and with no significant hemodynamic changes. PMID:26155571

  11. Peripheral disc margin shape and internal disc derangement: imaging correlation in significantly painful discs identified at provocation lumbar discography.

    PubMed

    Bartynski, W S; Rothfus, W E

    2012-06-01

    Annular margin shape is used to characterize lumbar disc abnormality on CT/MR imaging studies. Abnormal discs also have internal derangement including annular degeneration and radial defects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential correlation between disc-margin shape and annular internal derangement on post-discogram CT in significantly painful discs encountered at provocation lumbar discography (PLD). Significantly painful discs were encountered at 126 levels in 86 patients (47 male, 39 female) studied by PLD where no prior surgery had been performed and response to intradiscal lidocaine after provocation resulted in either substantial/total relief or no improvement after lidocaine administration. Post-discogram CT and discogram imaging was evaluated for disc-margin characteristics (bulge/protrusion), features of disc internal derangement (radial annular defect [RD: radial tear/fissure/annular gap], annular degeneration) and presence/absence of discographic contrast leakage. In discs with focal protrusion, 50 of 63 (79%) demonstrated Grade 3 RD with 13 (21%) demonstrating severe degenerative change only. In discs with generalized-bulge-only, 48 of 63 (76%) demonstrated degenerative change only (primarily Dallas Grade 3) with 15 of 63 (24%) demonstrating a RD (Dallas Grade 3). Differences were highly statistically significant (p<0.001). Pain elimination with intra-discal lidocaine correlated with discographic contrast leakage (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape correlates with features of internal derangement in significantly painful discs encountered at PLD. Discs with focal protrusion typically demonstrate RD while generalized bulging discs typically demonstrated degenerative changes only (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape may provide an important imaging clue to the cause of chronic discogenic low back pain. PMID:22681741

  12. Temporary ventricular overdrive pacing for electrical storm after coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Toshihito; Naito, Yuji; Nishimura, Kuniharu

    2011-11-01

    A 57-year-old man who had been receiving chemotherapy for multiple myeloma complained of chest pain and was diagnosed with coronary artery disease. Coronary artery bypass grafting without cardiopulmonary bypass was performed smoothly, and extubation was done in the operating room. The next evening, cluster of ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation triggered by ventricular premature contractions occurred and required multiple electrical defibrillations. Despite intravenous administration of lidocaine, amiodarone, magnesium, and β-blocker, the storm sustained and was suppressed only by temporary ventricular overdrive pacing. He was discharged on foot.

  13. [Despite medication, overdrive pacing is required to stabilize the electrical storm associated with acute coronary syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Umeda, Masanobu; Morimoto, Atsushi; Yokoyama, Kaori; Tateishi, Emi; Makino, Kanako; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Nakagawa, Yoko; Fukuhara, Shinya; Takase, Eiji

    2007-10-01

    A 75-year-old female complained of severe chest pain and was emergently admitted to our hospital because of anterior acute myocardial infarction. Emergent coronary angiography was performed and revealed occlusion in segment 7, so a stent was implanted. Lidocaine, carvedilol, amiodarone, magnesium, and nifekalant were administered successively because non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT) frequently appeared like an electrical storm. After nifekalant administration, QTc was significantly prolonged and torsades de pointes was induced. Overdrive pacing was performed and finally the NSVT was completely controlled. If fatal arrhythmias such as NSVT show resistance to medication, overdrive pacing should be considered to stabilize the arrhythmia associated with acute coronary syndrome.

  14. Topical and Intranasal Analgesic Therapy in a Woman with Refractory Postherpetic Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Hohmeier, Kenneth C.; Almon, Lyndsey M.

    2015-01-01

    A patient-specific, stepped approach to topical and intranasal analgesic pharmacotherapy was effective in reducing refractory postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) not responding to the current standard of care for PHN. The use of topical analgesic therapy allowed for higher concentrations of medication locally while reducing the likelihood of systemic side effects common to the drugs used. No adverse effects were noted for either topical or intranasal drug therapy. The patient-specific, stepped approach resulted in clinically significant decreases in pain on visual analog scale (VAS), with the use of intranasal ketamine 10% solution and topical gabapentin 6%, ketoprofen 10%, lidocaine 5%, and ketamine 10% cream. PMID:25949241

  15. Chronic Pain in Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Grodofsky, Samuel

    2016-09-01

    This review includes a summary of contemporary theories of pain processing and advocates a multimodal analgesia approach for providing perioperative care. A summary of various medication classes and anesthetic techniques is provided that highlights evidence emerging from neurosurgical literature. This summary covers opioid management, acetaminophen, nonsteroidal antiinflammatories, ketamine, lidocaine, dexmedetomidine, corticosteroids, gabapentin, and regional anesthesia for neurosurgery. At present, there is not enough investigation into these areas to describe best practices for treating or preventing chronic pain in neurosurgery; but providers can identify a wider range of options available to personalize perioperative care strategies. PMID:27521193

  16. Balanced anesthesia and constant-rate infusions in horses.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Balanced anesthetic techniques are commonly used in equine patients, and include the combination of a volatile anesthetic with at least one injectable anesthetic throughout the maintenance period. Injectable anesthetics used in balanced anesthesia include the α2-agonists, lidocaine, ketamine, and opioids, and those with muscle-relaxant properties such as benzodiazepines and guaifenesin. Administration of these injectable anesthetics is best using constant-rate infusions based on the pharmacokinetics of the drug, which allows steady-state concentrations and predictable pharmacodynamic actions. This review summarizes the different drug combinations used in horses, and provides calculated recommended doses based on the pharmacokinetics of individual drugs. PMID:23498047

  17. The OVLT initiates the fall in arterial pressure evoked by high dose lipopolysaccharide: Evidence that dichotomous, dose-related mechanisms mediate endotoxic hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Feleder, Carlos; Yilmaz, M. Sertac; Peng, Jianya; Göktalay, Gökhan; Millington, William R.

    2015-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) lowers arterial pressure through two different mechanisms depending on the dose. Previously, we found that a low hypotensive dose of LPS (1 mg/kg) lowers arterial pressure by activating vagus nerve afferents. Here we report that hypotension evoked by high dose LPS (15 mg/kg) can be prevented by injecting lidocaine into the OVLT but not by vagotomy or inactivation of the NTS. The hypotension produced by both LPS doses was correlated with elevated extracellular norepinephrine concentrations in the POA and prevented by blocking alpha-adrenergic receptors. Thus, initiation of endotoxic hypotension is dose-related, mechanistically. PMID:26198924

  18. Mimosa pudica, Dionaea muscipula and anesthetics.

    PubMed

    De Luccia, Thiago Paes de Barros

    2012-09-01

    Some studies showed that anesthetics reduce the response of physical stimuli in Mimosa pudica and in Venus Flytrap (Dionaea muscipula), peculiar plants that have the ability to respond to touch stimuli. In this research we tested the effects of ketamine, lidocaine, diethyl ether, and amlodipine on the movements of Mimosa pudica and Venus Flytrap. With a literature review, we tried to bring elements to theorize about the interaction of these substances with these plants. The angular displacement in Mimosa´s petiole and in Dionaea leaves is what was measured to compare the drugs group with control groups.

  19. Mimosa pudica, Dionaea muscipula and anesthetics

    PubMed Central

    De Luccia, Thiago Paes de Barros

    2012-01-01

    Some studies showed that anesthetics reduce the response of physical stimuli in Mimosa pudica and in Venus Flytrap (Dionaea muscipula), peculiar plants that have the ability to respond to touch stimuli. In this research we tested the effects of ketamine, lidocaine, diethyl ether, and amlodipine on the movements of Mimosa pudica and Venus Flytrap. With a literature review, we tried to bring elements to theorize about the interaction of these substances with these plants. The angular displacement in Mimosa´s petiole and in Dionaea leaves is what was measured to compare the drugs group with control groups. PMID:22899087

  20. Cortisol and pain-related behavior in disbudded goat kids with and without cornual nerve block.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, L; De Luna, J B; Gamboa, D; Reyes, M; Sánchez, A; Terrazas, A; Rojas, S; Galindo, F

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cortisol and behavior were measured in disbudded goat kids with and without the use of cornual nerve block. A total of 45 kids were used in 5 experimental groups (n=9, males and females). Group LidoD was infiltrated with 1 mL of 2% lidocaine locally at the cornual branches of lacrimal and infratrochlear nerves, 15 min before thermal disbudding. Group Lido was similarly infiltrated and was not disbudded. In group Sim, the disbudding procedure was simulated. A control group (CD) was disbudded without lidocaine infiltration, and group SD was infiltrated with saline before disbudding. The cornual nerve block did not prevent the short-term increase in cortisol levels during and after disbudding. LidoD, CD and SD groups showed higher cortisol concentrations than Lido and Sim (p<0.05) during the first 20 min after the procedure. Frequency of vocalizations during the procedure was significantly different between groups and was higher in SD (29.6 ± 3.1; mean±SE) and CD (28.4 ± 3.1) than in Sim (16.6 ± 3.1; p<0.05). Infiltrating lidocaine did not decrease this response to disbudding (21.1 ± 3.1; p>0.05). Struggles tended to be higher in SD (16.5 ± 2.5), CD (17.8 ± 2.5) and LidoD (15.6 ± 2.5) than Sim (10.6 ± 2.5; p=0.1). The total behavioral response was different between groups (CD, 59.6 ± 6.8; LidoD, 52 ± 6.8; SD, 62.6 ± 6.8; Sim, 36.8 ± 6.8; p=0.05), and disbudded animals showed the strongest reactions (disbudded, 58.1 ± 3.9 vs non-disbudded, 36.8 ± 6.8; p=0.01). It was concluded that cornual nerve block (lacrimal and infratrochlear) using 2% lidocaine did not prevent pain during thermal disbudding of goat kids.

  1. Hypersensitivity to the local anesthetic articaine hydrochloride.

    PubMed Central

    Malanin, K.; Kalimo, K.

    1995-01-01

    A patient developed skin erythema and wheals within 1 h after local dental anesthesia with articaine hydrochloride. Pretreatment with oral terfenadine or topical betamethasone dipropionate prevented her reaction to articaine. In contrast, neither pretreatment with oral aspirin nor topical capsaicin affected her reaction to articaine. The results of radioallergosorbent tests (RAST) to articaine and a passive transfer test were negative. The reaction was probably caused by a complement-mediated mechanism leading to the degranulation of mast cells. The patient tolerated local anesthesia with lidocaine. PMID:8934983

  2. Dilatation in anastomosed arteries can be an artifact of explantation.

    PubMed

    LeGrand, E K; Stoloff, D R; Kirsch, W M; Zhu, Y H; Boukouvalas, Z; Hardesty, R

    1992-01-01

    Fusiform dilation of the anastomotic site was found at explantation in the majority of rabbit femoral arteries anastomosed with newly developed microclips. This observation was also noted at sutured anastomoses. The mechanism responsible for this morphologic finding was studied by the following experiments: 1) measuring and explanting anastomosed arteries relaxed with 20% lidocaine, 2) latex casts of microclipped arteries, 3) comparing angiographic and histologic morphometric data, and 4) examining synthetic vascular graft anastomoses with identical dilatation. The observations demonstrate that trauma associated with explantation (direct dissection and fixative perfusion) leads to arterial vasoconstriction, but focal medial damage at the anastomotic site prevents constriction at this site.

  3. Cardiovascular risk: the safety of local anesthesia, vasoconstrictors, and sedation in heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Middlehurst, R. J.; Gibbs, A.; Walton, G.

    1999-01-01

    As part of a large pragmatic study, the authors investigated heart rate, blood pressure, dysrhythmic and ischemic responses to lidocaine 2% with a combination vasoconstrictor (noradrenaline 1:50,000 and vasopressin 0.25 IU/mL), and midazolam sedation in a medically compromised population. There were anesthesia-induced physiological changes to both hemodynamics and the electrocardiogram. The use of midazolam significantly ameliorated the sympathoadrenal response to stress, and the greatest hemodynamic and electrocardiographic changes were observed during surgery. PMID:11692352

  4. New index of pain triggered by spinal activation of voltage-dependent sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Ryugo; Tsukamoto, Mina; Shimoshige, Yukinori; Aoki, Toshiaki; Matsuoka, Nobuya

    2013-12-01

    Voltage-dependent sodium channels (VDSCs) are crucial for pain generation. Here, to develop a new behavioral index of pain induced by spinal VDSC activation, we examined whether intrathecal veratridine injection produced nociceptive behavior. Intrathecal injection of the VDSC opener veratridine in mice dose-dependently induced nociceptive responses, with response times subsequently reduced by administration of morphine or pregabalin. Systemic administration of lidocaine and mexiletine, but not amitriptyline, also decreased this response time. Taken together, these results demonstrated that response time of nociceptive behavior induced by intrathecal veratridine injection is a quantitative index of pain triggered by spinal VDSC activation. PMID:23760511

  5. Pharmacotherapy for neuropathic pain in adults: systematic review, meta-analysis and updated NeuPSIG recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Finnerup, Nanna B; Attal, Nadine; Haroutounian, Simon; McNicol, Ewan; Baron, Ralf; Dworkin, Robert H; Gilron, Ian; Haanpaa, Maija; Hansson, Per; Jensen, Troels S; Kamerman, Peter R; Lund, Karen; Moore, Andrew; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rice, Andrew SC; Rowbotham, Michael; Sena, Emily; Siddall, Philip; Smith, Blair H; Wallace, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Neuropathic pain is difficult to treat. New treatments, clinical trials and standards of quality for assessing evidence justify an update of evidence-based recommendations for its pharmacological treatment. Methods The Neuropathic Pain Special Interest Group (NeuPSIG) of the International Association for the Study of Pain conducted a systematic review of randomised double-blind studies of oral and topical pharmacotherapy for neuropathic pain, including unpublished trials (retrieved from clinicaltrials.gov and pharmaceutical websites). Meta-analysis used Numbers Needed to Treat (NNT) for 50 % pain relief as primary measure and assessed publication bias. Recommendations used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE). Findings In total 229 studies were included. Analysis of publication bias suggested a 10% overstatement of treatment effects. Studies published in peer-review journals reported greater effects than online studies (R2=9·3%, p<0·01). Trial outcomes were generally modest even for effective drugs : in particular NNTs were 3·6 (95 % CI 3·0–4·4) for tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), 6·4 (95 % CI 5·2–8·4) for serotonin- noradrenaline reuptake inbibitor (SNRI) antidepressants duloxetine and venlafaxine, 7·7 (95 % CI 6·5–9·4) for pregabalin and 6·3 (95 % CI 5·0–8·3) for gabapentin. NNTs were higher for gabapentin ER/enacarbil and capsaicin high concentration patches, lower for opioids and botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) and undetermined for lidocaine patches. Final quality of evidence was lower for lidocaine patches and BTX-A. Tolerability/safety and values/preferences were high for lidocaine patches and lower for opioids and TCAs. This permitted a strong GRADE recommendation for use and proposal as first line for TCAs, SNRIs, pregabalin, gabapentin and gabapentin ER/enacarbil in neuropathic pain, a weak recommendation for use and proposal as second line for lidocaine patches, capsaicin

  6. Herpes Zoster.

    PubMed

    Schmader, Kenneth

    2016-08-01

    Herpes zoster causes significant suffering owing to acute and chronic pain or postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). Varicella-zoster virus-induced neuronal destruction and inflammation causes the principal problems of pain, interference with activities of daily living, and reduced quality of life in older adults. The optimal treatment of herpes zoster requires early antiviral therapy and careful pain management. For patients who have PHN, evidence-based pharmacotherapy using topical lidocaine patch, gabapentin, pregabalin, tricyclic antidepressants, or opiates can reduce pain burden. The live attenuated zoster vaccine is effective in reducing pain burden and preventing herpes zoster and PHN in older adults.

  7. New fillers for the new man.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kevin C

    2007-01-01

    Two new collagen-based lidocaine-containing dermal fillers, ArteSense/ArteFill (Artes Medical, San Diego, CA) and Evolence (Colbar LifeScience Ltd., Herzliya, Israel), have proved to be of particular interest to men, many of whom seek a long-lasting or permanent correction. ArteFill has been available in the United States since 2006, and it is expected that Evolence will reach the American market in 2008. The properties of the two products will be described, and experience based on the administration of many hundreds of syringes of both products by a Canadian dermatologist will be detailed here, with tips and precautions to optimize patient outcomes.

  8. Non-intubated anesthesia in thoracic surgery—technical issues

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Performing awake thoracic surgery (ATS) is technically more challenging than thoracic surgery under general anesthesia (GA), but it can result in a greater benefit for the patient. Local wound infiltration and lidocaine administration in the pleural space can be considered for ATS. More invasive techniques are local wound infiltration with wound catheter insertion, thoracic wall blocks, selective intercostal nerve blockade, thoracic paravertebral blockade and thoracic epidural analgesia, offering the advantage of a catheter placement which can also be continued for postoperative analgesia. PMID:26046050

  9. An accidental intra-arterial injection of phenytoin in a 43-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Khan, ZH; Faghihnassiri, S

    2016-01-01

    We report an accidental intra-arterial injection of phenytoin in a 43-year-old woman undergoing ventriculoperitoneal shunt for hydrocephalus. To flush the arterial line with heparin, mistakenly phenytoin was injected which caused cutaneous gangrene along the radial side of the forearm and an absence of pulsation in the radial artery. After flushing the artery with normal saline and lidocaine, the patient was transferred to the Intensive Care Unit. There the patient was put on intravenous heparin that resolved the problem leading to complete recovery of the patient. The case is being reported to emphasize the importance of close surveillance in injecting drugs through the arterial line access. PMID:27375394

  10. Verapamil-sensitive idiopathic left ventricular tachycardia in a 6-month-old: unique considerations in diagnosis and management in an infant.

    PubMed

    Hiremath, Gurumurthy; Li, Walter; Foltz, Rhonda; Roy-Burman, Arup; Cocalis, Mark; Tanel, Ronn E

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic left ventricular tachycardia of the Belhassen type is rare in infants. We present a 6-month-old infant girl with a wide-complex tachycardia with right bundle branch block QRS morphology, a superior axis, and atrioventricular dissociation, consistent with a left anterior fascicular tachycardia. Initial echocardiogram revealed depressed ventricular function. The tachycardia was unresponsive to therapeutic trials of adenosine, esmolol, procainamide, and lidocaine. There was brief conversion of the tachycardia to sinus rhythm with transesophageal atrial overdrive pacing, suggesting a reentrant mechanism of the arrhythmia. Ultimately, the judicious administration of intravenous verapamil resulted in termination of the arrhythmia, which has been sustained on oral therapy. PMID:25526021

  11. The effects of localized inactivation of somatosensory cortex, area 3a, on area 2 in cats.

    PubMed

    Porter, L L; Izraeli, R

    1993-01-01

    In cats and primates, area 3a of the somatosensory cortex is the primary recipient of proprioceptive input (Phillips et al., 1971). Neurons in area 3a project to area 2 (Pons and Kaas, 1986; Porter, 1991), where somatic input relayed from the cortex and the thalamus may be integrated (Iwamura and Tanaka, 1978a,c). The goal of the present study was to determine the effects of area 3a input on neuronal activity in area 2 of cats. Extracellular recording techniques were used to identify neurons in area 2 that responded to deep stimulation of the contralateral forepaw. Neurons in area 3a that responded to the same receptive field modality and location as those in area 2 were also isolated. Single-unit or multiunit responses and evoked potentials to electrical stimulation of the shared peripheral receptive field and spontaneous activity were recorded from areas 2 and 3a. Lidocaine, a local anesthetic, was injected at the area 3a recording site to block neuronal activity. Spontaneous activity and receptive fields were abolished and evoked potentials were considerably diminished at the injection site, immediately after lidocaine was administered. Changes in unit responses, spontaneous activity, and evoked potentials in area 2 were monitored following inactivation of the somatotopically "matched" site in area 3a. Unit activity was recorded at 15 matched sites. In area 2, changes in unit responses to the peripheral stimulation and/or in spontaneous activity were observed at most of the recording sites following inactivation of area 3a. Spontaneous activity rates changed at 63% of the sites (mean change = 85%). Unit responses to the peripheral stimulation changed at 57% of the recording sites (mean change = 47%). The remaining sites in area 2 did not show lidocaine-induced changes. These sites may not have been connected with the matched sites in area 3a. Spontaneous activity and unit responses were not always similarly altered at a given site; sometimes one increased while

  12. Chronic abdominal pain due to periostitis pubis. A new syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, N H

    1992-01-01

    Periostitis pubis is a clinical syndrome previously undescribed in the literature. It is characterized by lower abdominal pain that may have persisted for several weeks to several years. Physical findings are limited to tenderness in one of the lower abdominal quadrants and over the os pubis on