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Sample records for liebermann orthoptera tristiridae

  1. Demographic study of two population outbreaks of Elasmoderus wagenknechti (Liebermann) (Orthoptera: Tristiridae) in the transitional desert of Chile.

    PubMed

    Cepeda-Pizarro, Jorge; Vega, Solange; Vásquez, Hernán; Elgueta, Mario; Pizarro-Araya, Jaime

    2007-01-01

    Under certain environmental conditions, several species of grasshoppers inhabiting rangeland areas (e.g., inter-valleys) of the Chilean transitional desert can irrupt demographically. One of them is Elasmoderus wagenknechti (Liebermann), an endemic species. We studied two outbreaks occurred in 1996 and 1999. The objectives of the research were to (i) estimate some demographic parameters associated with the aforementioned events, and (ii) compare between them the population parameters. The parameters we studied were density (ind/m(2)), sexual proportion, female fertility (i.e., eggs/female), and the relationship eggs/female versus female size. Density (ind/m(2)) ranged from 0.2 to 0.4 in 1996 and from 0.5 to 0.6 in 1999. ANOVA-tests registered differences in density among study sites and between years. In some of the study sites, females were more abundant than males (e.g., Lomas del Sauce). Females fertility ranged from 27 to 39 eggs per female, with significant differences among sites in 1996 but not in 1999. For females of 30-50 mm body size, a linear relationship was detected between egg number/female and body size. It is concluded that the E. wagenknechti outbreaks are site-specific in the study area and that the demographic parameters examined show a high variability among sites and between events.

  2. 70 FR 43928 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Max Liebermann: From...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2005-07-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Max Liebermann: From Realism to... , I hereby determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition, ``Max Liebermann: From...

  3. Robert Cooper Liebermann Receives 2012 Edward A. Flinn III Award: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Jay; Duffy, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Robert Cooper Liebermann received the 2012 Edward A. Flinn III Award at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 5 December 2012 in San Francisco, Calif. The award honors "individuals who personify the Union's motto `unselfish cooperation in research' through their facilitating, coordinating, and implementing activities."

  4. The Liebermann-Burchard reaction: sulfonation, desaturation, and rearrangment of cholesterol in acid.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Quanbo; Wilson, William K; Pang, Jihai

    2007-02-01

    In the Liebermann-Burchard (LB) colorimetric assay, treatment of cholesterol with sulfuric acid, acetic anhydride, and acetic acid elicits a blue color. We studied the reactivity of cholesterol under LB conditions and provide definitive NMR characterization for approximately 20 products, whose structure and distribution suggest the following mechanistic picture. The major reaction pathways do not involve cholestadienes, i-steroids, or cholesterol dimers, as proposed previously. Instead, cholesterol and its acetate and sulfate derivatives undergo sulfonation at a variety of positions, often with skeletal rearrangements. Elimination of an SO(3)H group as H(2)SO(3) generates a new double bond. Repetition of this desaturation process leads to polyenes and ultimately to aromatic steroids. Linearly conjugated polyene cations can appear blue but form too slowly to account for the LB color response, whose chemical origin remains unidentified. Nevertheless, the classical polyene cation model is not excluded for Salkowski conditions (sulfuric acid), which immediately generate considerable amounts of cholesta-3,5-diene. Some rearrangements of cholesterol in H(2)SO(4) resemble the diagenesis pathways of sterols and may furnish useful lipid biomarkers for characterizing geological systems.

  5. The portrait of James Israel by the German impressionist Max Liebermann: a selected pictorial view on the early twentieth century development of surgical urology in Berlin.

    PubMed

    Schultheiss, D; Jonas, U

    2001-11-01

    On the occasion of his retirement from the position as head of the Jewish Hospital in Berlin in 1917, the famous kidney surgeon James Israel (1848-1926) was portrayed by Max Liebermann (1847-1935). At that time both men were leading members of their professions--medicine and fine arts--and represented the Jewish community in Berlin. Private contacts between the surgeon and the artist had been established when Liebermann and his wife needed surgical treatment themselves some years before. Liebermann's later friendship with the surgeon Ferdinand Sauerbruch (1875-1951) culminated in one of the best-known portraits of a member of the medical profession. This biographical article from the history of medicine and fine arts reflecting the relation of these men provides a special view of the development of urological surgery in Berlin at the beginning of the twentieth century.

  6. Incomplete hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters during the enzymatic cholesterol determination as evidenced by aqueous cholesteryl ester solutions: comparison of six enzymatic procedures with the Liebermann-Burchard method.

    PubMed

    Tel, R M; Berends, G T

    1980-10-01

    Aqueous solutions of cholesterol and some cholesteryl esters were prepared. The hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters with enzymatic methods could therefore be studied in some detail. The total cholesterol concentration of the aqueous cholesterol and cholesteryl ester solutions was determined by 6 different enzymatic procedures as well as the Liebermann-Burchard method. For some esters (acetate and arachidonate esters) the esterase reaction is not complete within the usual reaction time, whereas most other esters gave analytical results lower than the theoretical. With the Liebermann-Burchard method all esters reacted completely within the reaction time. The esterase have very different specificities for the various cholesteryl esters. With the enzymatic method several commercial control sera as well as human sera gave lower cholesterol concentrations than the Liebermann-Burchard method. These differences can be explained mainly by this incomplete hydrolysis. Some practical recommendations are given.

  7. Standardization of serum cholesterol assays by use of serum calibrators and direct addition of Liebermann-Burchard reagent.

    PubMed

    Katan, M B; van der Haar, F; Kromhout, D; Schouten, F J

    1982-04-01

    Serum cholesterol concentrations of subjects in epidemiological studies were measured after direct addition of Liebermann-Burchard reagent; results were calibrated with human serum pools assayed according to Abell et al. (J. Biol. Chem. 195:357-366, 1952). Accuracy and precision were monitored for six years by analysis of internal-control pools and blind external-control pools. For various internal-control pools, the imprecision (CV) of the long-term averages of run means ranged from 0.5 to 0.9%. The within-run CV for internal control and patients' sera was about 1%. For blind control sera with different concentrations (provided by the Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA, over the same period), the average difference per three-month period between the values found and the target values was usually between -0.5% and +0.7% for medium-concentration pools and between -2% and +2% for low- and high-concentration pools (extreme values: -2.4% and +2.5%). The CV per three-month period ranged from 0.6 to 2.7%. Sera from subjects on diets of high or low linoleic acid content were analyzed to study the effect of the fatty acid portion of serum cholesterol esters; the differences between values obtained with the comparison method and the direct method was insignificant on both diets. We conclude that the use of serum calibrators eliminates the bias inherent in the direct method.

  8. Mitochondrial genomics in Orthoptera using MOSAS.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, Nathan C; Hiatt, Kevin D; Valentine, Mark C; Song, Hojun; Whiting, Michael F

    2010-06-01

    We present complete mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) for three orthopterans (Xyleus modestus, Physemacris variolosa, and Ellipes minuta) and describe MOSAS (manipulation, organization, storage, and analysis of sequences), software we developed to facilitate annotation and analysis. We analyze the base composition, start and stop codons, non-coding regions, and gene order among these and 18 other orthopteran mitogenomes from GenBank and reconstruct a phylogeny of Orthoptera. We propose a tetranucleotide start codon for cox1, and hypothesize that the tRNA(Asp)-tRNA(Lys) rearrangement is a synapomorphy for Acridomorpha, but not Caelifera. We further describe MOSAS, user-friendly software we used for this analysis. MOSAS streamlines sequence data storage, organization, annotation, and alignment, and provides convenient search tools for dataset construction and a robust annotation engine particularly suited to annotating mitogenomes (available at http://mosas.byu.edu).

  9. Effects of sample aging on total cholesterol values determined by the automated ferric chloride-sulfuric acid and Liebermann-Burchard procedures.

    PubMed

    Wood, P D; Bachorik, P S; Albers, J J; Stewart, C C; Winn, C; Lippel, K

    1980-04-01

    To investigate the comparability of three commonly used methods for determination of total cholesterol in plasma in several studies, we used fresh plasma samples as well as plasmas and reference sera that had been stored frozen at -15 degrees C for as long as several years. Duplicate determinations by the manual method of Abell et al. (J. Biol. Chem. 195: 357, 1952) were compared with estimates from one to five continuous-flow analyzers by the ferric chloride-sulfuric acid procedure and also with estimates from five to 13 continuous-flow analyzers by the Liebermann-Burchard procedure with calibrator, as part of the laboratory standardization activities of the Lipid Research Clinics. The agreement among all three procedures was generally within acceptable limits (within 5% of the manual method) when plasmas or sera were fresh or had been frozen for less than one month. Results by the manual method of Abell et al. agreed well with those by the automated Liebermann-Burchard method for samples that had been stored at -15 degrees C for as long as two years. However, the automated ferric chloride-sulfuric acid procedure often showed unacceptably high values (as compared with those from the manual method) for samples that had been stored frozen for a year or more. With the ferric chloride-sulfuric acid method, measured cholesterol concentration increased about 2.5% per year of storage for at least two years. We conclude that reference sera of plasmas that have been kept in long-term frozen storage (-15 degrees C) are not suitable for ongoing standardization of the automated ferric chloride-sulfuric acid assay for cholesterol.

  10. Digestive morphophysiology of Gryllodes sigillatus (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    PubMed

    Biagio, Fernanda P; Tamaki, Fabio K; Terra, Walter R; Ribeiro, Alberto F

    2009-12-01

    The evolution of the digestive system in the Order Orthoptera is disclosed from the study of the morphophysiology of the digestive process in its major taxa. This paper deals with a cricket representing the less known suborder Ensifera. Most amylase and trypsin activities occur in crop and caeca, respectively. Maltase and aminopeptidase are found in soluble and membrane-bound forms in caeca, with aminopeptidase also occurring in ventriculus. Amaranth was orally fed to Gryllodes sigillatus adults or injected into their haemolymph. The experiments were performed with starving and feeding insects with identical results. Following feeding of the dye the luminal side of the most anterior ventriculus (and in lesser amounts the midgut caeca) became heavily stained. In injected insects, the haemal side of the most posterior ventriculus was stained. This suggested that the anterior ventriculus is the main site of water absorption (the caeca is a secondary one), whereas the posterior ventriculus secretes water into the gut. Thus, a putative counter-current flux of fluid from posterior to anterior ventriculus may propel digestive enzyme recycling. This was confirmed by the finding that digestive enzymes are excreted at a low rate. The fine structure of midgut caeca and ventriculus cells revealed that they have morphological features that may be related to their involvement in secretion (movement from cell to lumen) and absorption (movement from lumen to cell) of fluids. Furthermore, morphological data showed that both merocrine and apocrine secretory mechanisms occur in midgut cells. The results showed that cricket digestion differs from that in grasshopper in having: (1) more membrane-bound digestive enzymes; (2) protein digestion slightly displaced toward the ventriculus; (3) midgut fluxes, and hence digestive enzyme recycling, in both starved and fed insects.

  11. Annotated list of Ensifera (Orthoptera) and further records on Caelifera (Orthoptera) of Mt Kilimanjaro, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Hemp, Claudia

    2013-02-12

    A list of the Tettigoniidae and Gryllacrididae (Orthoptera: Ensifera) of Mt Kilimanjaro is presented. A total number of 63 Ensifera was recorded for this mountain, of which 25 species belonged to Phaneropterinae, 18 to Conocephalinae, 6 to Hetrodinae and three to Pseudophyllinae. The subfamily Meconematinae contributed two species while only one species of the subfamilies Hexacentrinae, Mecopodinae and Saginae was found. Gryllacrididae contributed six species. Three species recorded in literature were not found again during the research period. 15 species are newly recorded for Mt Kilimanjaro in this study and one species of Agraeciini newly described. Two new genera, Afroanthracites Hemp & Ingrisch n. gen. (type species: Anthracites montium Sjöstedt, 1910) and Afroagraecia Ingrisch & Hemp n. gen. (type species: Agraecia sansibara Redtenbacher, 1891), are erected on African Agraeciini (Conocephalinae). Anthracites kilimandjaricus Sjöstedt, 1910 is snonymized with A. montium Sjöstedt, 1910. Agraecia sansibara (Redtenbacher, 1891), Anthracites bloyeti Brongniart, 1897 and Anelytra panteli Karny are transferred to Afroagraecia. Aethiomerus stenorhinus Saussure, 1899 is synonymised with Afroagraecia sansibara (Redtenbacher, 1891). In Caelifera two Catantopinae (Acrididae) species are newly recorded for Mt Kilimanjaro and one pyrgomorphid species, Maura lurida (Fabricius, 1781), recovered again for the area.

  12. Use of large-scale acoustic monitoring to assess anthropogenic pressures on Orthoptera communities.

    PubMed

    Penone, Caterina; Le Viol, Isabelle; Pellissier, Vincent; Julien, Jean-François; Bas, Yves; Kerbiriou, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Biodiversity monitoring at large spatial and temporal scales is greatly needed in the context of global changes. Although insects are a species-rich group and are important for ecosystem functioning, they have been largely neglected in conservation studies and policies, mainly due to technical and methodological constraints. Sound detection, a nondestructive method, is easily applied within a citizen-science framework and could be an interesting solution for insect monitoring. However, it has not yet been tested at a large scale. We assessed the value of a citizen-science program in which Orthoptera species (Tettigoniidae) were monitored acoustically along roads. We used Bayesian model-averaging analyses to test whether we could detect widely known patterns of anthropogenic effects on insects, such as the negative effects of urbanization or intensive agriculture on Orthoptera populations and communities. We also examined site-abundance correlations between years and estimated the biases in species detection to evaluate and improve the protocol. Urbanization and intensive agricultural landscapes negatively affected Orthoptera species richness, diversity, and abundance. This finding is consistent with results of previous studies of Orthoptera, vertebrates, carabids, and butterflies. The average mass of communities decreased as urbanization increased. The dispersal ability of communities increased as the percentage of agricultural land and, to a lesser extent, urban area increased. Despite changes in abundances over time, we found significant correlations between yearly abundances. We identified biases linked to the protocol (e.g., car speed or temperature) that can be accounted for ease in analyses. We argue that acoustic monitoring of Orthoptera along roads offers several advantages for assessing Orthoptera biodiversity at large spatial and temporal extents, particularly in a citizen science framework.

  13. The impact of grazing management on Orthoptera abundance varies over the season in Mediterranean steppe-like grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonderflick, Jocelyn; Besnard, Aurélien; Beuret, Aurore; Dalmais, Mathieux; Schatz, Bertrand

    2014-10-01

    As semi-natural grassland has a high level of biological diversity, understanding the effects of grazing and its variation over time is important in order to identify sustainable grazing practices. We measured temporal variation in Orthoptera abundance and spatial vegetation structure during seasonal grazing in an extensive sheep-farming system. We studied five grazed pasture areas (pre-grazing and post-grazing) and two adjacent ungrazed grasslands. We recorded the total abundance of Orthoptera and described the vegetation structure of 175 replicate plots (25 per pasture/grassland) during six field sampling sessions. We demonstrated that the impact of grazing on Orthoptera abundance is species-specific and greatly varies over the grazing season. The decrease of phytovolume is significant after 4-7 weeks of sheep grazing. Total Orthoptera abundance was higher in pre-grazed plots than in ungrazed plots, and higher in ungrazed plots than in post-grazed plots. These differences were particularly high during the peak of adult abundance. No difference in species richness was observed between grazing intensities. Total Orthoptera abundance positively correlated to phytovolume only when grazing pressure was high. However, the relationship between abundance and phytovolume differed between species. Extensive grazing by sheep tends to homogenize spatial vegetation structure and to temporarily reduce total Orthoptera abundance at pasture scale. However, rotational grazing allows spatial and temporal heterogeneity in vegetation structure to be maintained at farm scale, heterogeneity that is beneficial for Orthoptera. In contrast, absence of grazing has a negative impact on Orthoptera abundance as it favours the accumulation of litter, which is detrimental for a high proportion of xerothermophilic Orthoptera associated with bare ground and short vegetation.

  14. Grasshoppers, Crickets and Katydids (Insecta: Orthoptera) of Cuba: an annotated checklist.

    PubMed

    Yong, Sheyla; Perez-Gelabert, Daniel E

    2014-07-07

    An annotated list of the Cuban fauna of Orthoptera is presented. For each species we include details of valid names, synonyms, type specimens (type category, sex, locality and depository), geographic distribution and bibliographic references. Clarifying notes are added, as well as comments on the species considered doubtful. A total of 140 species included in 62 genera, 31 subfamilies and 12 families make up the known Cuban fauna of Orthoptera. The family Episactidae, the acridid subfamily Ommatolampidinae with 3 unknown genera, 3 unknown genera of Tettigoniidae (Conocephalinae) and 1 undescribed new genus of Tetrigidae (Cladonotinae) are here recorded for the first time from Cuba. Syntypes are designated for Hygronemobius histrionicus Zayas.

  15. Comparison of chitin structures isolated from seven Orthoptera species.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Murat; Erdogan, Sevil; Mol, Abbas; Baran, Talat

    2015-01-01

    Differences in the physichochemical properties of the chitin structure of the exoskeleton of seven species from four genera were investigated in this study. The same method was used to isolate the chitin structure of the seven species. The physicochemical properties of the isolated chitins were revealed by ESEM, FTIR, TGA and XRD analyses. The FTIR, TGA and XRD results from the chitin samples were similar. The surface morphologies of the chitins were investigated by ESEM and interesting results were noted. While the surface morphologies of the chitins isolated from two species within the same genus were quite different, the surface morphologies of chitins isolated from species belonging to different genera showed similarity. It was determined that the dry weight chitin contents of the grasshopper species varied between 5.3% and 8.9%. The results of molecular analysis showed that the chitins from seven Orthoptera species (between 5.2 and 6.8 kDa) have low molecular weights. Considering that these invasive and harmful species are killed with insecticides and go to waste in large amounts, this study suggests that they should be collected and evaluated as an alternative chitin source.

  16. Movement analyses of wood cricket ( Nemobius sylvestris) (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    PubMed

    Brouwers, N C; Newton, A C

    2010-12-01

    Information on the dispersal ability of invertebrate species associated with woodland habitats is severely lacking. Therefore, a study was conducted examining the movement patterns of wood cricket (Nemobius sylvestris) (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) on the Isle of Wight, UK. Juvenile (i.e. nymphs) and adult wood crickets were released and observed over time within different ground surface substrates. Their movement paths were recorded and subsequently analysed using random walk models. Nymphs were found to move more slowly than adults did; and, when given a choice, both nymphs and adults showed a preference for moving through or over leaf litter compared to bare soil or grass. A correlated random walk (CRW) model accurately described the movement pattern of adult wood crickets through leaf litter, indicating a level of directional persistence in their movements. The estimated population spread through leaf litter for adults was 17.9 cm min-1. Movements of nymphs through leaf litter could not accurately be described by a random walk model, showing a change in their movement pattern over time from directed to more random movements. The estimated population spread through leaf litter for nymphs was 10.1 cm min-1. The results indicate that wood cricket adults can be considered as more powerful dispersers than nymphs; however, further analysis of how the insects move through natural heterogeneous environments at a range of spatio-temporal scales needs to be performed to provide a complete understanding of the dispersal ability of the species.

  17. The scolopidial accessory organ in the Jerusalem cricket (Orthoptera: Stenopelmatidae).

    PubMed

    Strauß, Johannes

    2017-03-01

    Multiple mechanosensory organs form the subgenual organ complex in orthopteroid insects, located in the proximal tibia. In several Ensifera (Orthoptera), a small chordotonal organ, the so-called accessory organ, is the most posterior part of this sensory complex. In order to document the presence of this accessory organ among the Ensifera, the chordotonal sensilla and their innervation in the posterior tibia of two species of Jerusalem crickets (Stenopelmatidae: Stenopelmatus) is described. The sensory structures were stained by axonal tracing. Scolopidial sensilla occur in the posterior subgenual organ and the accessory organ in all leg pairs. The accessory organ contains 10-17 scolopidial sensilla. Both groups of sensilla are commonly spatially separated. However, in few cases neuronal fibres occurred between both organs. The two sensillum groups are considered as separate organs by the general spatial separation and innervation by different nerve branches. A functional role for mechanoreception is considered: since the accessory organ is located closely under the cuticle, sensilla may be suited to detect vibrations transferred over the leg's surface. This study extends the known taxa with an accessory organ, which occurs in several taxa of Ensifera. Comparative neuroanatomy thus suggests that the accessory organ may be conserved at least in Tettigoniidea. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Weather-dependent microhabitat use by Tetrix tenuicornis (Orthoptera: Tetrigidae).

    PubMed

    Musiolek, David; Kočárek, Petr

    2016-08-01

    For ectothermic animals, selection of a suitable microhabitat is affected by a combination of abiotic and biotic factors. Also important is the trade-off between those microhabitats with optimal microclimatic conditions and food availability vs. those with the lowest level of competition and lowest risk of predation. Central European species of groundhoppers (Orthoptera: Tetrigidae) live in locations with small-scale mosaics of patches formed by bare ground, moss cushions and vascular plants (grasses and forbs). Our research focused on the effects of selected weather components (current temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure and sunlight) on specific microhabitat selection by adults (during the reproductive season) and by the last-instar nymphs (during the non-reproductive season) of the groundhopper Tetrix tenuicornis. Using experimental conditions, we determined that microhabitat use by T. tenuicornis is sex-specific and that microhabitat preference differs between adults and nymphs. We suppose that microhabitats are used according to groundhopper current needs in relation to each habitat's suitability for maintaining body temperature, food intake and reproductive behaviour. Microhabitat preferences were significantly associated with temperature and atmospheric pressure. Changes in atmospheric pressure signal changes in weather, and insects respond to increases or decreases in pressure by adjusting their behaviour in order to enhance survival. We propose that, under low atmospheric pressure, T. tenuicornis actively seeks microhabitats that provide increased protection from adverse weather.

  19. New Phlugidia species (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Meconematinae, Phlugidini) from the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania, Africa.

    PubMed

    Hemp, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Two new species of Phlugidia (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Meconematinae) are described from the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania. P. planicercus Hemp n. sp. occurs in lowland forest at the foothills of the Uluguru Mountains, while P. ob- tusicercus Hemp n. sp. was collected in the Nguru Mountains. A key to Phlugidia species is provided.

  20. Rampant nuclear insertion of mtDNA across diverse lineages within Orthoptera (Insecta).

    PubMed

    Song, Hojun; Moulton, Matthew J; Whiting, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes (numts) are non-functional fragments of mtDNA inserted into the nuclear genome. Numts are prevalent across eukaryotes and a positive correlation is known to exist between the number of numts and the genome size. Most numt surveys have relied on model organisms with fully sequenced nuclear genomes, but such analyses have limited utilities for making a generalization about the patterns of numt accumulation for any given clade. Among insects, the order Orthoptera is known to have the largest nuclear genome and it is also reported to include several species with a large number of numts. In this study, we use Orthoptera as a case study to document the diversity and abundance of numts by generating numts of three mitochondrial loci across 28 orthopteran families, representing the phylogenetic diversity of the order. We discover that numts are rampant in all lineages, but there is no discernable and consistent pattern of numt accumulation among different lineages. Likewise, we do not find any evidence that a certain mitochondrial gene is more prone to nuclear insertion than others. We also find that numt insertion must have occurred continuously and frequently throughout the diversification of Orthoptera. Although most numts are the result of recent nuclear insertion, we find evidence of very ancient numt insertion shared by highly divergent families dating back to the Jurassic period. Finally, we discuss several factors contributing to the extreme prevalence of numts in Orthoptera and highlight the importance of exploring the utility of numts in evolutionary studies.

  1. A new species of Gryllotalpa mole cricket (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae: Gryllotalpinae) from Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ming Kai; Kamaruddin, Khairul Nizam

    2016-01-19

    A new species of Gryllotalpa mole cricket (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae) is described from Bukit Larut, Perak, Peninsular Malaysia: Gryllotalpa permai sp. n. Acoustic analysis of the male calling songs were also provided for Gryllotalpa permai sp. n. and the morphologically similar Gryllotalpa fulvipes.

  2. Rampant Nuclear Insertion of mtDNA across Diverse Lineages within Orthoptera (Insecta)

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hojun; Moulton, Matthew J.; Whiting, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes (numts) are non-functional fragments of mtDNA inserted into the nuclear genome. Numts are prevalent across eukaryotes and a positive correlation is known to exist between the number of numts and the genome size. Most numt surveys have relied on model organisms with fully sequenced nuclear genomes, but such analyses have limited utilities for making a generalization about the patterns of numt accumulation for any given clade. Among insects, the order Orthoptera is known to have the largest nuclear genome and it is also reported to include several species with a large number of numts. In this study, we use Orthoptera as a case study to document the diversity and abundance of numts by generating numts of three mitochondrial loci across 28 orthopteran families, representing the phylogenetic diversity of the order. We discover that numts are rampant in all lineages, but there is no discernable and consistent pattern of numt accumulation among different lineages. Likewise, we do not find any evidence that a certain mitochondrial gene is more prone to nuclear insertion than others. We also find that numt insertion must have occurred continuously and frequently throughout the diversification of Orthoptera. Although most numts are the result of recent nuclear insertion, we find evidence of very ancient numt insertion shared by highly divergent families dating back to the Jurassic period. Finally, we discuss several factors contributing to the extreme prevalence of numts in Orthoptera and highlight the importance of exploring the utility of numts in evolutionary studies. PMID:25333882

  3. A remarkable new pygmy grasshopper (Orthoptera, Tetrigidae) in Miocene amber from the Dominican Republic

    PubMed Central

    Heads, Sam W.; Thomas, M. Jared; Wang, Yinan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A new genus and species of pygmy grasshopper (Orthoptera: Tetrigidae) is described from Early Miocene (Burdigalian) Dominican amber. Electrotettix attenboroughi Heads & Thomas, gen. et sp. n. is assigned to the subfamily Cladonotinae based on the deeply forked frontal costa, but is remarkable for the presence of tegmina and hind wings, hitherto unknown in this subfamily. PMID:25147472

  4. A contribution to the knowledge of Orthoptera diversity from Peninsular Malaysia: Bukit Larut, Perak.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ming Kai; Kamaruddin, Khairul Nizam

    2016-05-12

    Bukit Larut is a hill station at the southern tip of the Bintang Range, Perak of Peninsular Malaysia. While the biodiversity of Bukit Larut has been previously documented, its entomofauna, including the Orthoptera, remains relatively unknown. A faunistic survey was conducted in 2015 as part of the continuous exploration of the highlands in Malay Peninsula. An annotated species list of 71 (24 Caelifera and 47 Ensifera) species of Orthoptera from ten families (five from each order) is presented here. While the coverage of lineages in the orthopteran phylogeny is well-represented, the diversity in Bukit Larut is dominated by the three main families: Acrididae, Gryllidae and Tettigoniidae. Eight new locality records for Bukit Larut and/or Peninsular Malaysia and potential new species awaiting description highlight that the orthopteran diversity in Bukit Larut is not exhaustive.

  5. Annotated checklist of the grasshoppers and crickets (Orthoptera) of the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Holuša, Jaroslav; Kočárek, Petr; Vlk, Robert; Marhoul, Pavel

    2013-02-22

    A checklist is presented of the Orthoptera of the Czech Republic. Based on the critical revision of published data and previous lists of species, which often contained only general or questionable data and which often inaccurately cited each other, we found 96 species of Orthoptera belonging to the fauna of the Czech Republic. We emphasize those changes that are based on comparison with previous checklists. We provide information on missing, unclear, and extinct species and on newly detected species, and we confirm the status of species that have been missing for a long time (Leptophyes boscii, Polysarcus denticauda, Ruspolia nitidula, Eumodicogryllus bordigalensis, Tetrix bolivari, Mecostethus parapleurus). We also note those species for which only several individuals have been detected (Pteronemobius heydenii) or those survived only at a single locality (Platycleis montana, Aiolopus thalassinus, Dociostaurus brevicollis, Omocestus petraeus) or at two localities (Poecilimon intermedius, Platycleis veyseli, Pseudopodisma nagyi). Phaneroptera nana is recorded as new for Bohemia.

  6. New species of Lentulidae and Tettigoniidae (Orthoptera) from the Udzungwa Mountains, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Hemp, Claudia

    2017-02-02

    A list of the Caelifera and Ensifera (Orthoptera) of lowland wet forest of the Udzungwa Mountains is presented. Five new species are described. These are the Agraeciini Afroagraecia mangula n. sp. (Conocephalinae), the Meconematinae Afrophisis undosa n. sp. and Phlugidia ampendiculata n. sp., the Phaneropterinae Eurycorypha pianofortis n. sp., and the lentulid Usambilla castigata n. sp. A total number of 19 Caelifera and 26 Tettigoniidea species are recorded. About one third of the species are endemic to the Udzungwa Mountains.

  7. First record of the genus Pycnodictya with its subspecies P. galinieri galinieri from Egypt (Orthoptera, Acrididae)

    PubMed Central

    Haggag, Asmaa A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The band-winged Pycnodictya galinieri galinieri (Reiche & Fairmaire, 1849) and its genus Pycnodictya Stål, 1873 (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Oedipodinae) are recorded for the first time for the Egyptian fauna. The species was collected from Gabal Elba, in the southeastern corner of Egypt. This record expands the known distributional range of Pycnodictya galinieri towards the north of Africa. Descriptions of the genus and the Egyptian subspecies are given using multiple diagnostic characters. The descriptions are supplemented by drawings and photographs of the specimen collected. It is proposed that the genus Pycnodictya belongs to the tribe Locustini. PMID:27917042

  8. A new species of Thelastomathidae (Nematoda) a parasite of Neocurtilla claraziana Saussure (Orthoptera, Gryllotalpidae) in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Camino, Nora B; Maiztegui, Bárbara

    2002-07-01

    Gryllophila cephalobulata n. sp. (Nematoda, Thelastomatidae) a parasite of the mole cricket Neocurtilla claraziana (Orthoptera, Gryllotalpidae) isolated in Buenos Aires Province, is described and illustrated. It is characterized by cuticle annulated all along the length of the body; the first ring has 4 lobules, the second one has 14 lobules, the others rings are simple, the stoma is short and has 4 small teeth, the genital papillae are arranged in 5 pairs, of which 3 pairs are preanal and 2 pairs are postanal. The tail appendage of the male is long and filiform.

  9. A note on the new species of the genus Isopsera (Orthoptera: Phaneropteridae: Phaneropterinae) from India.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Rajendra; Mal, Jhabar; Swaminathan, R

    2015-05-29

    A new species of the genus, Isopsera: Isopsera arcuata Nagar, Mal, Swaminathan sp. nov. (Orthoptera:Phaneropteridae Burmeister, 1838; Phaneropterinae Burmeister, 1838) is described. The holotype (♂) was collected from South India: Coimbatore (Tamil Nadu). The geographical location had the following specifications: 12⁰58 N 77⁰35E 930MSL South India. The described species differs from the two closely related species, I. caligula Ingrisch and I. spinosa Ingrisch, based on the structure of the male sub-genital plate, cerci and stridulatory file on the left tegmen.

  10. New and little-known pygmy grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Tetrigidae) from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Storozhenko, Sergey Yu; Dawwrueng, Pattarawich

    2015-12-07

    An annotated list of 39 species in 25 genera and seven subfamilies of the pygmy grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Tetrididae) from Thailand is given; from these 18 species are recorded from this country for the first time. Five new species are described: Cotysoides gaponi sp. nov. (subfamily Metrodorinae), Eucriotettix anisyutkini sp. nov., Gavialidium bufocrocodil sp. nov., Scelimena bellula sp. nov. (subfamily Scelimeninae) and Phaesticus uvarovi sp. nov. (subfamily Discotettiginae). One species is transferred from Scelimena to Amphibotettix and a new combination is proposed: Scelimena hafizhaii Mahmmod, Idris et Salman, 2007 = Amphibotettix hafizhaii (Mahmmod, Idris et Salman, 2007), comb. nov. The previously unknown male of Falconius tschernovi Storozhenko, 2014 is described.

  11. Invertebrates of The H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Western Cascades, Oregon: III. The Orthoptera (Grasshoppers and Crickets).

    Treesearch

    David C. Lightfoot

    1986-01-01

    An inventory of Orthoptera (grasshoppers and crickets) at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, near Blue River, Oregon, was conducted to determine the species present and ecological relationships. A key for identification and an annotated list are presented. From qualitative assessments of successional habitat relationships, generalized species associations of forest...

  12. A new species of Cephalobium (Rhabditida, Cephalobiidae), a parasite of Anurogryllus muticus (De Geer) (Orthoptera, Gryllidae) in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Camino, Nora B; Maiztegui, Bárbara

    2002-10-01

    Cephalobium odontolateralis n. sp. (Nematoda, Cephalobiidae) is described and illustrated from the nymphs of Anurogryllus muticus (De Geer) (Orthoptera, Gryllidae) from Buenos Aires province, Argentina. It is characterized by a lateral large tooth in the stoma and by the arrangement and number of the genital papillae in the male; there are 6 pairs of postanal papillae, but none is preanal.

  13. A new genus and species of larval mite (Acari: Prostigmata: Microtrombidiidae) parasitising Orthoptera (Tettigoniidae) from the Sierra Nevada, Spain.

    PubMed

    Mayoral, Jaime G; Barranco, Pablo

    2012-09-01

    Nevada capileirarum n. g., n. sp. (Acari: Microtrombidiidae: Microtrombidiinae) is described from ectoparasitic larvae parasitising two endemic species of Orthoptera (Tettigoniidae), Baetica ustulata (Rambur) and Pycnogaster inermis (Rambur) from the Sierra Nevada mountain range, Granada, Spain. A key to the larvae of microtrombidiine genera with three dorsal scuta and a coxal setal formula of 2-1-1 is presented.

  14. Four new species of Dolichopoda Bolivar, 1880 from Southern Sporades and Western Turkey (Orthoptera, Rhaphidophoridae, Dolichopodainae)

    PubMed Central

    Rampini, Mauro; Russo, Claudio Di; Taylan, Mehmet Sait; Gelosa, Arianna; Cobolli, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A description of four new species of Dolichopoda Bolivar, 1880 (Orthoptera, Rhaphidophoridae) from Eastern Aegean region (Southern Sporades), including Western Turkey, is reported. This brings to a total of 11 the number of Dolichopoda species recorded for caves of the Aegean area. Overall, these species show a high degree of morphological homogeneity and they are very close to Dolichopoda paraskevi Boudou-Saltet, 1973 from Crete and Dolichopoda naxia Boudou-Saltet, 1972 from Cyclades (Naxos Island). The Western Turkish species are morphologically not closely related to the other Anatolian species; this suggests an independent origin for the taxa occurring in the Southern Taurus and Black Sea regions. These new data help to better define the already high level of diversity of the Hellenic Dolichopoda and strengthen the hypothesis that the central area of dispersal for the genus would correspond to the ancient Aegean plate. PMID:22768003

  15. Egg structure and ultrastructure of Paterdecolyus yanbarensis (Insecta, Orthoptera, Anostostomatidae, Anabropsinae).

    PubMed

    Mashimo, Yuta; Fukui, Makiko; Machida, Ryuichiro

    2016-11-01

    The egg structure of Paterdecolyus yanbarensis was examined using light, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. The egg surface shows a distinct honeycomb pattern formed by exochorionic ridges. Several micropyles are clustered on the ventral side of the egg. The egg membrane is composed of an exochorion penetrated with numerous aeropyles, an endochorion, and an extremely thin vitelline membrane. The endochorion is thickened at the posterior egg pole, probably associated with water absorption. A comparison of egg structure among Orthoptera revealed that the micropylar distribution pattern is conserved in Ensifera and Caelifera and might be regarded as a groundplan feature for each group; in Ensifera, multiple micropyles are clustered on the ventral side of the egg, whereas in Caelifera, micropyles are arranged circularly around the posterior pole of the egg.

  16. Occurrence of a new species of Letana (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Phaneropterinae) in India.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Rajendra; Swaminathan, R

    2015-11-19

    A new species of the Oriental genus Letana, Walker (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Phaneropterinae), proposed as Letana dentata sp. nov., collected from the North-eastern province, Meghalaya, India (Ri bhoi 90°55'15 to 91°16' latitude and 25°40' to 25°21' longitude, 993 MSL), is described together with the morphological characterization of eight reported species. Of these, Letana rubescens (Stål, 1861) collected from Shalimar, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir (India) is being reported for the first time from India. The other species of Letana include: L. atomifera, L. bulbosa, L. inflata, L. infurcata, L. pyrifera and L. rufonatata. Taxonomic and diagnostic characters with illustrations of the head, pronotum, ventral view of left tegmina to show stridulatory file teeth and the genitalia (supra-anal plate and subgenital plate) including the phallus sclerite has been given.

  17. Degree-day requirements for eight economically important grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) in Nebraska using field data.

    PubMed

    Brust, Mathew L; Hoback, W Wyatt; Wright, Robert J

    2009-10-01

    The timing of application for the management of rangeland grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) is critical, especially as insecticides become more specialized and the use of Insect Growth Regulators becomes more widespread. The general seasonal occurrence of adults of many grasshopper species has been well documented; however, their appearance varies widely between years. We analyzed sweep samples collected over the western two thirds of Nebraska from a 3-yr period and noted the occurrence of adults by region for eight species of rangeland grasshoppers. We analyzed occurrence based on degree-day accumulations for the region and developed estimates of degree-day requirements for these species. Because these grasshopper species are common rangeland pests, degree-day requirements to reach adulthood should improve the effectiveness of grasshopper treatment programs over a large geographic area.

  18. Studies in Guatemalan Caelifera: New grasshoppers and monkey grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Caelifera: Acridoidea & Eumastacoidea) and an updated checklist.

    PubMed

    Cadena-Castañeda, Oscar J; Monzón-Sierra, José

    2014-08-29

    We describe six species of Acridomorpha, Orthoptera from Guatemala: Paralethus rowelli n. sp., Paralethus cerezoi n. sp., Episactus schusteri n. sp. (Episactidae: Episactinae), Pararhicnoderma eniocanoi n. sp. (Romaleidae: Bactrophorinae), Tela neumanni n. sp. and Leioscapheus faustinoi n. sp. (Acrididae: Proctolabinae). four genera and five species are recorded for Guatemala and, at the same time a checklist is provided for Caelifera species found so far in the country. 

  19. A multi-scale study of Orthoptera species richness and human population size controlling for sampling effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantarello, Elena; Steck, Claude E.; Fontana, Paolo; Fontaneto, Diego; Marini, Lorenzo; Pautasso, Marco

    2010-03-01

    Recent large-scale studies have shown that biodiversity-rich regions also tend to be densely populated areas. The most obvious explanation is that biodiversity and human beings tend to match the distribution of energy availability, environmental stability and/or habitat heterogeneity. However, the species-people correlation can also be an artefact, as more populated regions could show more species because of a more thorough sampling. Few studies have tested this sampling bias hypothesis. Using a newly collated dataset, we studied whether Orthoptera species richness is related to human population size in Italy’s regions (average area 15,000 km2) and provinces (2,900 km2). As expected, the observed number of species increases significantly with increasing human population size for both grain sizes, although the proportion of variance explained is minimal at the provincial level. However, variations in observed Orthoptera species richness are primarily associated with the available number of records, which is in turn well correlated with human population size (at least at the regional level). Estimated Orthoptera species richness (Chao2 and Jackknife) also increases with human population size both for regions and provinces. Both for regions and provinces, this increase is not significant when controlling for variation in area and number of records. Our study confirms the hypothesis that broad-scale human population-biodiversity correlations can in some cases be artefactual. More systematic sampling of less studied taxa such as invertebrates is necessary to ascertain whether biogeographical patterns persist when sampling effort is kept constant or included in models.

  20. Male Responses to Conspecific Advertisement Signals in the Field Cricket Gryllus rubens (Orthoptera: Gryllidae)

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yikweon

    2011-01-01

    In many species males aggregate and produce long-range advertisement signals to attract conspecific females. The majority of the receivers of these signals are probably other males most of the time, and male responses to competitors' signals can structure the spatial and temporal organization of the breeding aggregation and affect male mating tactics. I quantified male responses to a conspecific advertisement stimulus repeatedly over three age classes in Gryllus rubens (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) in order to estimate the type and frequency of male responses to the broadcast stimulus and to determine the factors affecting them. Factors tested included body size, wing dimorphism, age, and intensity of the broadcast stimulus. Overall, males employed acoustic response more often than positive phonotactic response. As males aged, the frequency of positive phonotactic response decreased but that of the acoustic response increased. That is, males may use positive phonotaxis in the early stages of their adult lives, possibly to find suitable calling sites or parasitize calling males, and then later in life switch to acoustic responses in response to conspecific advertisement signals. Males with smaller body size more frequently exhibited acoustic responses. This study suggests that individual variation, more than any factors measured, is critical for age-dependent male responses to conspecific advertisement signals. PMID:21283758

  1. Male responses to conspecific advertisement signals in the field cricket Gryllus rubens (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    PubMed

    Jang, Yikweon

    2011-01-20

    In many species males aggregate and produce long-range advertisement signals to attract conspecific females. The majority of the receivers of these signals are probably other males most of the time, and male responses to competitors' signals can structure the spatial and temporal organization of the breeding aggregation and affect male mating tactics. I quantified male responses to a conspecific advertisement stimulus repeatedly over three age classes in Gryllus rubens (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) in order to estimate the type and frequency of male responses to the broadcast stimulus and to determine the factors affecting them. Factors tested included body size, wing dimorphism, age, and intensity of the broadcast stimulus. Overall, males employed acoustic response more often than positive phonotactic response. As males aged, the frequency of positive phonotactic response decreased but that of the acoustic response increased. That is, males may use positive phonotaxis in the early stages of their adult lives, possibly to find suitable calling sites or parasitize calling males, and then later in life switch to acoustic responses in response to conspecific advertisement signals. Males with smaller body size more frequently exhibited acoustic responses. This study suggests that individual variation, more than any factors measured, is critical for age-dependent male responses to conspecific advertisement signals.

  2. A summary of eight traits of Coleoptera, Hemiptera, Orthoptera and Araneae, occurring in grasslands in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Gossner, Martin M; Simons, Nadja K; Achtziger, Roland; Blick, Theo; Dorow, Wolfgang H.O; Dziock, Frank; Köhler, Frank; Rabitsch, Wolfgang; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of species traits have increased our understanding of how environmental drivers such as disturbances affect the composition of arthropod communities and related processes. There are, however, few studies on which traits in the arthropod community are affected by environmental changes and which traits affect ecosystem functioning. The assembly of arthropod traits of several taxa is difficult because of the large number of species, limited availability of trait databases and differences in available traits. We sampled arthropod species data from a total of 150 managed grassland plots in three regions of Germany. These plots represent the spectrum from extensively used pastures to mown pastures to intensively managed and fertilized meadows. In this paper, we summarize information on body size, dispersal ability, feeding guild and specialization (within herbivores), feeding mode, feeding tissue (within herbivorous suckers), plant part (within herbivorous chewers), endophagous lifestyle (within herbivores), and vertical stratum use for 1,230 species of Coleoptera, Hemiptera (Heteroptera, Auchenorrhyncha), Orthoptera (Saltatoria: Ensifera, Caelifera), and Araneae, sampled by sweep-netting between 2008 and 2012. We compiled traits from various literature sources and complemented data from reliable internet sources and the authors’ experience. PMID:25977817

  3. Revisiting adaptations of neotropical katydids (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) to gleaning bat predation

    PubMed Central

    ter Hofstede, Hannah; Voigt-Heucke, Silke; Lang, Alexander; Römer, Heinrich; Page, Rachel; Faure, Paul; Dechmann, Dina

    2017-01-01

    All animals have defenses against predators, but assessing the effectiveness of such traits is challenging. Neotropical katydids (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) are an abundant, ubiquitous, and diverse group of large insects eaten by a variety of predators, including substrate-gleaning bats. Gleaning bats capture food from surfaces and usually use prey-generated sounds to detect and locate prey. A number of Neotropical katydid signaling traits, such as the emission of ultrasonic frequencies, substrate vibration communication, infrequent calling, and ultrasound-evoked song cessation are thought to have evolved as defenses against substrate-gleaning bats. We collected insect remains from hairy big-eared bat (Micronycteris hirsuta) roosts in Panama. We identified insect remains to order, species, or genus and quantified the proportion of prey with defenses against predatory bats based on defenses described in the literature. Most remains were from katydids and half of those were from species with documented defenses against substrate-gleaning bats. Many culled remains were from insects that do not emit mate-calling songs (e.g. beetles, dragonflies, cockroaches, and female katydids), indicating that eavesdropping on prey signals is not the only prey-finding strategy used by this bat. Our results show that substrate-gleaning bats can occasionally overcome katydid defenses. PMID:28261664

  4. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Chinese endemic grasshopper Fruhstorferiola kulinga (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Podismini).

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Guan, De-Long; Xu, Sheng-Quan

    2016-09-01

    The whole-genome Illumina sequence of the Chinese endemic grasshopper Fruhstorferiola kulinga mitogenome was constructed and reported in this study. In all, the circular genome was obtained with 15,655 bp in length and contains 75.4% A + T. It typically consists of 37 genes, including 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNAs (tRNAs), 2 ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and 1 D-loop region. All PCGs are initiated with ATN codons. Most of the PCGs use TAA as their stop codons, while the others use TAG as stop codons (COX1 and ND1). The size of the large and small ribosomal RNA genes are 1314 bp and 851 bp. The A + T-rich region (777 bp) showed strong resemblance to the other known Orthoptera insects. Our data would contribute to confirm the close relationship and other evolutionary researches of the F. kulinga.

  5. Phylogeography and systematics of the westernmost Italian Dolichopoda species (Orthoptera, Rhaphidophoridae)

    PubMed Central

    Allegrucci, Giuliana; Rampini, Mauro; Di Russo, Claudio; Lana, Enrico; Cocchi, Sara; Sbordoni, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The genus Dolichopoda (Orthoptera; Rhaphidopohoridae) is present in Italy with 9 species distributed from northwestern Italy (Piedmont and Liguria) to the southernmost Apennines (Calabria), occurring also in the Tyrrhenian coastal areas and in Sardinia. Three morphologically very close taxa have been described in Piedmont and Liguria, i.e., D. ligustica ligustica, D. ligustica septentrionalis and D. azami azami. To investigate the delimitation of the northwestern species of Dolichopoda, we performed both morphological and molecular analyses. Morphological analysis was carried out by considering diagnostic characters generally used to distinguish different taxa, as the shape of epiphallus in males and the subgenital fig in females. Molecular analysis was performed by sequencing three mitochondrial genes, 12S rRNA, 16S rRNA, partially sequenced and the entire gene of COI. Results from both morphological and molecular analyses highlighted a very homogeneous group of populations, although genetically structured. Three haplogroups geographically distributed could be distinguished and based on these results we suggest a new taxonomic arrangement. All populations, due to the priority of description, should be assigned to D. azami azami Saulcy, 1893 and to preserve the names ligustica and septentrionalis, corresponding to different genetic haplogroups, we assign them to D. azami ligustica stat. n. Baccetti & Capra, 1959 and to D. azami septentrionalis stat. n. Baccetti & Capra, 1959. PMID:25197209

  6. Three new species of the genus Ripipteryx from Colombia (Orthoptera, Ripipterygidae)

    PubMed Central

    Baena-Bejarano, Nathalie; Heads, Sam W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Three new species of Ripipteryx Newman (Orthoptera: Tridactyloidea: Ripipterygidae) are described from Colombia; namely Ripipteryx diegoi sp. n. (Forceps Group) and Ripipteryx guacharoensis sp. n. (Marginipennis Group) from Parque Nacional Natural Cueva de los Guacharos in Huila, and Ripipteryx gorgonaensis sp. n. (Crassicornis Group) from Parque Nacional Natural Gorgona in Cauca. Ripipteryx diegoi sp. n. is characterized by the antennae black with white spots on flagellomeres 3–7, male subgenital plate with median ridge forming a bilobed setose process, epiproct produced laterally near its base and phallic complex with virga thickened distally and not reaching beyond the membrane. Ripipteryx guacharoensis sp. n. is characterized by the antennae thick with white spots present dorsally on flagellomeres 1–4 and 8, epiproct narrow and triangular, uncus reduced and lacking a distal hook, phallic complex with a concave ventral plate and a dorsal elevation in the middle extended to the virga, and the virga itself with two small projections basally. Ripipteryx gorgonaensis sp. n. is characterized by the epiproct with a lateral notch, antennae with a white dorsal spot on flagellomere 1 and flagellomeres 4–7 entirely white. The antennal color pattern of Ripipteryx gorgonaensis sp. n. strongly resembles that of Ripipteryx atra but differs from the latter in the absence of any significant morphological modification of the flagellomeres. PMID:26019667

  7. DNA damage in grasshopper Chorthippus brunneus (Orthoptera) hatchlings following paraquat exposure.

    PubMed

    Augustyniak, M; Nocoń, Ł; Kędziorski, A; Łaszczyca, P; Sawczyn, T; Tarnawska, M; Zawisza-Raszka, A

    2015-04-01

    Comet assay was applied to study genotoxic damage induced by paraquat (PQ) in brain cells of Chorthippus brunneus (Insecta: Orthoptera) hatchlings. Percentage of the comet fluorescence in the tail (TDNA), length of the comet tail (TL) and Olive tail moment (OTM) were used for quantitative assessment of the DNA damage. Multiple regression analysis supplemented standard statistical elaboration of the results. Increasing PQ concentrations applied either directly to the brain cells suspension (10, 50, and 250 μM PQ final concentration--in vitro protocol) or indirectly (50, 250, and 1250 μM PQ final concentration--in vivo protocol) provoked significant increase of oxidative damage to DNA (higher median TDNA and OTM values). The damage increased with time of exposure (0, 5, 15, and 30 min) following in vitro application, but decreased in longer interval (3 vs 24 h) after in vivo administration of paraquat. On contrary, median TL values did not correlate with paraquat concentration irrespectively of the exposure protocol. Possible reason of this discrepancy in light of paraquat toxicity is discussed.

  8. A new species and locality record for Pseudopsyra katydid (Orthoptera: Phaneropterinae).

    PubMed

    Tan, Ming Kai; Dawwrueng, Pattarawich; Artchawakom, Taksin

    2017-02-13

    Pseudopsyra is a genus of Phaneropterinae katydid (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae), currently comprising of four species - two species each from southern China and Peninsular Malaysia (Hebard, 1922; Liu & Kang, 2006; Tan & Kamaruddin, 2013, 2014). The revision of Pseudopsyra by Liu & Kang (2006) provided a redescription of the genus, a new diagnosis and a key to known species. Subsequently, more surveys were conducted in Peninsular Malaysia and yield another species, representing the lowest latitudinal limits of this genus thus far (Tan & Kamaruddin, 2013). Continued surveys between the upper and lower latitudinal limits of the genus yield a new species: Pseudopsyra taksini sp. nov. from the Sakaerat Biosphere Reserve, Thailand. The orthopteran diversity at Sakaerat Biosphere Reserve remains understudied with numerous new species described recently, including other genus of Phaneropterinae (Tan & Artchawakom, 2014; Tan et al., 2015). With emphasis of using sexual parts for evidence of reproductive isolation in species delimitation, the discovery of a new species of Pseudopsyra also represents the first record of the genus from Thailand. It is not surprising that more undescribed species of Pseudopsyra can be found across the Indo-China region.

  9. A summary of eight traits of Coleoptera, Hemiptera, Orthoptera and Araneae, occurring in grasslands in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossner, Martin M.; Simons, Nadja K.; Achtziger, Roland; Blick, Theo; Dorow, Wolfgang H. O.; Dziock, Frank; Köhler, Frank; Rabitsch, Wolfgang; Weisser, Wolfgang W.

    2015-03-01

    Analyses of species traits have increased our understanding of how environmental drivers such as disturbances affect the composition of arthropod communities and related processes. There are, however, few studies on which traits in the arthropod community are affected by environmental changes and which traits affect ecosystem functioning. The assembly of arthropod traits of several taxa is difficult because of the large number of species, limited availability of trait databases and differences in available traits. We sampled arthropod species data from a total of 150 managed grassland plots in three regions of Germany. These plots represent the spectrum from extensively used pastures to mown pastures to intensively managed and fertilized meadows. In this paper, we summarize information on body size, dispersal ability, feeding guild and specialization (within herbivores), feeding mode, feeding tissue (within herbivorous suckers), plant part (within herbivorous chewers), endophagous lifestyle (within herbivores), and vertical stratum use for 1,230 species of Coleoptera, Hemiptera (Heteroptera, Auchenorrhyncha), Orthoptera (Saltatoria: Ensifera, Caelifera), and Araneae, sampled by sweep-netting between 2008 and 2012. We compiled traits from various literature sources and complemented data from reliable internet sources and the authors’ experience.

  10. [Acoustic behavior of Fenestra bohlsii Giglio-Tos (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Gomphocerinae)].

    PubMed

    Lorier, Estrellita; Clemente, Maria E; García, Maria D; Presa, Juan J

    2010-01-01

    The acoustic behavior of Fenestra bohlsii Giglio-Tos is described for the first time. The sounds and behaviors were observed and registered in captivity. The signals were digitized with the Sound-Blaster AWE64 Gold program and analysed with the Avisoft SAS Lab Pro 30 PC for MS Windows software. Seven different types of sounds are described as produced by males: spontaneous song (also used during the courtship), two different types of courtship song, assault song, tapping associated to the courtship, interaction between males and fly crackling. For each one, the characteristic oscillograms and frequency spectra are given. Sounds are produced by different mechanisms: femoro-tegminal stridulation, typical for Gomphocerinae, fly crackling, hind tarsi tapping and alar beat, the last produced by the beat and clash of hind alae, that is, the castanet method which up to now was only known, among Orthoptera, in Stenobothrus rubicundulus Kruseman & Jeekel. A description of the stridulatory file of male and female is given, as well as that of the alar special structures. Behavioral units and their sequence during the courtship are defined. There, in addition to the acoustic signals, visual signals are present, referring to positions, hind legs, antennae and palpi movements and body vibrations.

  11. Nematodes (Mermithidae) parasitizing grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) in the Pampean region, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, J M; Camino, N B; Achinelly, M F

    2016-07-04

    This work provides the results of a survey of entomonematodes parasites of grasshoppers in grasslands of the Pampean Region, Argentina. Nymphs of Staurorhectus longicornis Giglio-Tos, Laplatacris dispar Rhen, 1939, Dichroplus elongatus Giglio-Tos, 1894 and Metaleptea brevicornis (L.) (Orthoptera: Acrididae) were collected. Mermithidae was the only family registered with seven species: Agamermis decaudata Cobb, Steiner and Christie, 1923, Amphimermis bonaerensis Miralles and Camino, 1983, Amphimermis dichroplusi Camino and Lange, 1997, Amphimermis ronderosi Camino and Lange, 1997, Hexamermis coclhearius Stock and Camino, 1992, Hexamermis ovistriata Stock and Camino, 1992, and Longimermis acridophila Camino and Stock, 1989. The values of parasitism ranged between 1-12%, and intensity not overcome the number of 5.0 nematodes per larva. The nematodes observed showed specificity, not registering the same species of parasite in more than one host species. The Pampean region constituted an area with high diversity of mermithids where new species could be consider as bioregulator agents of this troublesome insect pests in agricultural areas of Argentina.

  12. Three new species of the genus Ripipteryx from Colombia (Orthoptera, Ripipterygidae).

    PubMed

    Baena-Bejarano, Nathalie; Heads, Sam W

    2015-01-01

    Three new species of Ripipteryx Newman (Orthoptera: Tridactyloidea: Ripipterygidae) are described from Colombia; namely Ripipteryxdiegoi sp. n. (Forceps Group) and Ripipteryxguacharoensis sp. n. (Marginipennis Group) from Parque Nacional Natural Cueva de los Guacharos in Huila, and Ripipteryxgorgonaensis sp. n. (Crassicornis Group) from Parque Nacional Natural Gorgona in Cauca. Ripipteryxdiegoi sp. n. is characterized by the antennae black with white spots on flagellomeres 3-7, male subgenital plate with median ridge forming a bilobed setose process, epiproct produced laterally near its base and phallic complex with virga thickened distally and not reaching beyond the membrane. Ripipteryxguacharoensis sp. n. is characterized by the antennae thick with white spots present dorsally on flagellomeres 1-4 and 8, epiproct narrow and triangular, uncus reduced and lacking a distal hook, phallic complex with a concave ventral plate and a dorsal elevation in the middle extended to the virga, and the virga itself with two small projections basally. Ripipteryxgorgonaensis sp. n. is characterized by the epiproct with a lateral notch, antennae with a white dorsal spot on flagellomere 1 and flagellomeres 4-7 entirely white. The antennal color pattern of Ripipteryxgorgonaensis sp. n. strongly resembles that of Ripipteryxatra but differs from the latter in the absence of any significant morphological modification of the flagellomeres.

  13. Excretion of cadmium and zinc during moulting in the grasshopper Omocestus viridulus (Orthoptera)

    SciTech Connect

    Lindqvist, L.; Block, M. )

    1994-10-01

    Nymphs of Omocestus viridulus (Orthoptera) were reared on grass leaves containing known amounts of [sup 109]Cd or [sup 65]Zn. After the animals molted to adults, contents of these metals were measured in the grasshoppers, in the cast of exuviae and in the feces produced during rearing. Dry weights of adult bodies and exuviae were lower for [sup 109]Cd-treated grasshoppers than for those given [sup 65]Zn. Exuviae accounted for only a minor part of the excreted [sup 109]Cd and [sup 65]Zn. The [sup 109]Cd was assimilated from food to a much smaller extent than was [sup 65]Zn. After 15 d of rearing, [approximately] 50% of the ingested [sup 65]Zn, but only 10% of the ingested [sup 109]Cd, remained in the grasshoppers. Because the amount of [sup 109]Cd in the grasshopper nymphs decreased with time, whereas that of the exuviae were constant, content in exuviae constituted a larger portion of the total content of [sup 109]Cd with increasing time between feeding of [sup 109]Cd and molting. For [sup 65]Zn there was no such trend.

  14. New species and new song record of the genus Dociostaurus Fieber, 1853 (Orthoptera, Acrididae, gomphocerinae) from southern Anatolia, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sirin, Deniz; Mol, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    The new species Dociostaurus (Kazakia) icconium Sirin & Mol sp. n. (Orthoptera, Acrididae, Gomphocerinae) is described on the basis of morphology and male calling song. The congeneric partner of new species is Dociostaurus (Stauronotulus) cappadocicus (Azam, 1913) whose song description is done for the first time in this study. The species Dociostaurus (Kazakia) brevicollis (Eversmann, 1848) is assumed to be the closest relative of Dociostaurus (Kazakia) icconium sp. n.. The relationships between the new species and the relatives/congeneric partners were evaluated by using both song and morphological characters, for which illustrations were provided. Finally, a brief remark on the distribution pattern of the species was given.

  15. A new fossil cricket of the genus Proanaxipha in Miocene amber from the Dominican Republic (Orthoptera, Gryllidae, Pentacentrinae)

    PubMed Central

    Heads, Sam W.; Penney, David; Green, David I.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A new species of the cricket genus Proanaxipha Vickery & Poinar (Orthoptera: Gryllidae: Pentacentrinae) from Early Miocene Dominican amber is described and illustrated. Proanaxipha madgesuttonae sp. n. is distinguished from congeners by: (1) head capsule bearing a distinctive posteriorly bilobed colour spot on the vertex; (2) presence of crossveins in the proximal part of the mediocubital area; (3) apical field of tegmen entirely dark; and (4) median process of epiphallus short. The poorly known Proanaxipha bicolorata Vickery & Poinar, of questionable affinity and status, is herein regarded as a nomen inquirendum. PMID:23166475

  16. A new fossil cricket of the genus Proanaxipha in Miocene amber from the Dominican Republic (Orthoptera, Gryllidae, Pentacentrinae).

    PubMed

    Heads, Sam W; Penney, David; Green, David I

    2012-01-01

    A new species of the cricket genus Proanaxipha Vickery & Poinar (Orthoptera: Gryllidae: Pentacentrinae) from Early Miocene Dominican amber is described and illustrated. Proanaxipha madgesuttonaesp. n. is distinguished from congeners by: (1) head capsule bearing a distinctive posteriorly bilobed colour spot on the vertex; (2) presence of crossveins in the proximal part of the mediocubital area; (3) apical field of tegmen entirely dark; and (4) median process of epiphallus short. The poorly known Proanaxipha bicolorata Vickery & Poinar, of questionable affinity and status, is herein regarded as a nomen inquirendum.

  17. Annotated list of Tettigoniidae (Orthoptera) from the East Usambara Mountains, Tanzania and new Tettigoniidae species from East Africa.

    PubMed

    Hemp, Claudia

    2013-12-21

    A list of the Tettigoniidae (Orthoptera) of the East Usambara Mountains is presented and 16 new species are described from East Africa. A total number of 29 Tettigoniidae species is recorded for the East Usambara Mountains. New species are described from the Shimba Hills in Kenya, coastal Tanzania from the Kazimzumbwi forest reserve, Mt Kilimanjaro, the East and West Usambara and Uluguru Mountains in Tanzania, namely in Conocephalinae Afroagraecia pwania n. sp., Afroagraecia shimbaensis n. sp., Afroanthracites discolor n. sp., Afroanthracites jagoi n. sp. and Afroanthracites viridis n. sp., in Meconematinae Afrophisis flagellata n. sp., Afrophisis kisarawe n. sp., Afrophisis mazumbaiensis n. sp. and Afrophisis pseudoflagellata n. sp., in Hexacentrinae Aerotegmina megaloptera n. sp., in Mecopodinae Apteroscirtus cristatus n. sp., and A. planidorsatus n. sp., in Phaneropterinae Gelotopoia amabilis n. sp., and in Pseudophyllinae Cymatomerella pardopunctata n. sp. and Cymatomera viridimaculata n. sp. Seven species are endemic to the East Usambara Mountains which are 25% of the recorded forest-bound bush crickets. The Tettigoniidae fauna is compared between the East Usambara Mountains and Mt Kilimanjaro and mechanisms of speciation discussed in Orthoptera for the area. New Tettigoniidae records are given for Mt Kilimanjaro (Oxyecous apertus Ragge, Tropidonotacris grandis Ragge and Eurycorypha conclusa Hemp).

  18. Morphometric differentiation in Cornops aquaticum (Orthoptera: Acrididae): associations with sex, chromosome, and geographic conditions.

    PubMed

    Romero, María Luciana; Colombo, Pablo César; Remis, María Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The water-hyacinth grasshopper Cornops aquaticum (Bruner) (Orthoptera: Acrididae) is native to South America and inhabits lowlands from southern Mexico to central Argentina and Uruguay. This grasshopper feeds and lays eggs on species from the genera Eichhornia and Pontederia. Particularly, Eichhornia crassipes is considered "the world's worst water weed," and the release of C. aquaticum was proposed as a form of biological control. Morphometric variation on the chromosomally differentiated populations from the middle and lower Paraná River and its possible association with geographic, sex, and chromosomal conditions was analyzed. Significant phenotype variation in C. aquaticum population was detected. C. aquaticum presents body-size sexual dimorphism, females being bigger than males. Female-biased sexual size dimorphism for all five analyzed traits was detected. The assessment of variation in sexual size dimorphism for tegmen length showed that this trait scaled allometrically, indicating that males and females did not vary in a similar fashion. The detected allometry was consistent with Rensch's rule demonstrating greater evolutionary divergence in male size than in female size and suggests that males are more sensitive to environmental condition. The analysis of morphometric variation in the context of chromosome constitution showed that the presence of fusion 1/6 was related to body-size variation. Fusion carriers displayed bigger body size than standard homozygotes. Besides, a positive relationship between tegmen length and the number of fused chromosomes was detected, showing a chromosome dose effect. Because the highest frequency of fusions has been found in the lower Paraná River, a marginal environment for this species, the results found would support the hypothesis that some supergenes located in the fusions may be favored in the southern populations, thus contributing to the establishment and maintenance of the polymorphism.

  19. Molecular phylogeny of Banza (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae), the endemic katydids of the Hawaiian Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, L H; Strazanac, J S; Roderick, G K

    2006-10-01

    The extant endemic katydids (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) of the Hawaiian Archipelago include one to three species per high island and a single species on Nihoa, all currently placed in the genus Banza. These acoustic insects provide an excellent opportunity for investigating the evolution of reproductive isolation and speciation, but such studies require an understanding of phylogenetic relationships within the group. We use maximum parsimony, likelihood-based Bayesian inference, and maximum likelihood to infer phylogenetic relationships among these taxa, based on approximately 2kb of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I and cytochrome b. Our results strongly support two distinct high island clades: one clade ("Clade I") composed of species from Kauai, Oahu, Molokai, and Lanai and another clade ("Clade II") composed of species from Maui and Hawaii (Banza unica, from Oahu, may be basal to both these clades, but its placement is not well resolved). Within these clades, some inferred relationships are strongly supported, such as the sister status of B. kauaiensis (Kauai) and B. parvula (Oahu) within Clade I, but other relationships remain more ambiguous, such as the relative position of B. brunnea (Maui) within Clade II. Although a detailed reconstruction of the historical biogeography of the Hawaiian katydids is difficult, we use our genetic data combined with the known geological history of the Hawaiian Islands to set limits on plausible historical scenarios for diversification of this group. Beyond these historical biogeographic inferences, our results indicate possible cryptic speciation on both Oahu and Hawaii, as well as what may be unusually high average rates of nucleotide substitution. The present work sets the stage for future genetic and experimental investigations of this group.

  20. Embryonic developmental rates of northern grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae): implications for climate change and habitat management.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Dennis J; Defoliart, Linda S

    2010-10-01

    Accurate models of temperature-dependent embryonic developmental rates are important to assess the effects of a changing climate on insect life cycles and to suggest methods of population management by habitat manipulation. Embryonic development determines the life cycle of many species of grasshoppers, which, in cold climates, spend two winters in the egg stage. Increasing temperatures associated with climate change in the subarctic could potentiate a switch to a univoltine life cycle. However, egg hatch could be delayed by maintaining a closed vegetative canopy, which would lower soil temperatures by shading the soil surface. Prediapause and postdiapause embryonic developmental rates were measured in the laboratory over a wide range of temperatures for Melanoplus borealis Fieber and Melanoplus sanguinipes F. (Orthoptera: Acrididae) A model was fit to the data and used to predict dates of egg hatch in the spring and prediapause development in the fall under different temperature regimens. Actual soil temperatures were recorded at several locations over 5 yr. To simulate climate warming, 2, 3, or 4°C was added to each hourly recorded temperature. Results suggest that a 2, 3, or 4°C increase in soil temperatures will result in eggs hatching ≈ 3, 5, or 7 d earlier, respectively. An increase of 3°C would be required to advance prediapause development enough to allow for a portion of the population to be univoltine in warmer years. To simulate shading, 2 and 4°C were subtracted from observed temperatures. A 4°C decrease in temperatures could potentially delay hatch by 8 d.

  1. Remote sensing for environmental control of Dociostaurus maroccanus (Orthoptera, Acrididae) in Apulia (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belviso, Luciano

    Background. Dociostaurus maroccanus (Orthoptera, Acrididae) is a locust widely spread all over the Mediterranean region. This insect is linked to particular oviposition sites (pseudosteppa or garigue). When locusts become adults, they feed on cultivated crops, expanding on wide areas of vegetations and farmlands, threatening economical operators of agriculture and food processing. In the past years, observation attempts have been made, however, the localization of concentrations of locusts as well as their egg-pods is extremely difficult. Moreover, most of the affected areas are under the protection of National Parks Authorities that makes unacceptable any chemical pesticide treatment. The objective of this study, carried out by the University of Bari, is to obtain a behavioural model of locusts propagation using data from remote sensing, in order to predict locusts concentration and promptly act with appropriate biological countermeasures, like enthomopathogenous fungi. Data evaluation. Although insects are affected by climate changes and meteo factors, it is extremely difficult to assess their precise behaviour and the relations among different environmental factors and the global insect population. The infestation of the past years is probably due to the increase of annual temperature means but no explicit relation is currently known. Considering this phenomenon affects wide areas, remote sensing represent the only applicable solution to obtain precise data concerning land coverage, surface temperature, incidence of solar radiation as well as atmospheric contribution. After data collection, clusters are selected using neural networks methods in order to classify big territories. At present, experiments (using MODIS, ASTER, ENVISAT) show that wide areas can be grouped in just a few clusters with some of them suitable for locusts life. In the next months further investigation will be performed to refine the classification procedure. Metamodeling techniques

  2. Molecular Cloning, Characterization, and Expression Analysis of an Ecdysone Receptor Homolog in Teleogryllus emma (Orthoptera: Gryllidae)

    PubMed Central

    He, Hui; Xi, Gengsi; Lu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Ecdysteroids are steroid hormones that play important roles in the regulation of Arthropoda animal growth development, larvae ecdysis, and reproduction. The effect of ecdysteroids is mediated by ecdysteroid receptor (EcR). The ecdysone receptor (EcR) belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptors (NRs) that are ligand-dependent transcription factors. Ecdysone receptor is present only in invertebrates and plays a critical role in regulating the expression of a series of genes during development and reproduction. Here, we isolated and characterized cDNA of the cricket Teleopgryllus emma (Ohmachi & Matsuura) (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) and studied mRNA expression pattern using real time-polymerase chain reaction. The full-length cDNA of T. emma EcR, termed TeEcR, is 2,558 bp and contains a 5′-untranslated region of 555 bp and a 3′-untranslated region of 407 bp. The open reading frame of TeEcR encodes deduced 531-amino acid peptides with a predicted molecular mass of 60.7 kDa. The amino acid sequence of T. emma EcR was similar to that of known EcR especially in the ligand-binding domain of insect EcR. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to compare TeEcR mRNA expression level at the whole body and gonad during T. emma development. The data revealed that TeEcR mRNA is differentially expressed during T. emma development, with the highest expression level in late-instar larvae of the body and lowest in third instar. The levels of TeEcR transcripts also vary among gonads development, and levels in ovaries were higher than in testes at every developmental stage. These results suggest that TeEcR may have potential significance to regulate the morphological structure and gonad development of T. emma, due to its expression in different developmental periods. PMID:25797799

  3. Molecular cloning, characterization, and expression analysis of an ecdysone receptor homolog in Teleogryllus emma (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    PubMed

    He, Hui; Xi, Gengsi; Lu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Ecdysteroids are steroid hormones that play important roles in the regulation of Arthropoda animal growth development, larvae ecdysis, and reproduction. The effect of ecdysteroids is mediated by ecdysteroid receptor (EcR). The ecdysone receptor (EcR) belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptors (NRs) that are ligand-dependent transcription factors. Ecdysone receptor is present only in invertebrates and plays a critical role in regulating the expression of a series of genes during development and reproduction. Here, we isolated and characterized cDNA of the cricket Teleopgryllus emma (Ohmachi & Matsuura) (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) and studied mRNA expression pattern using real time-polymerase chain reaction. The full-length cDNA of T. emma EcR, termed TeEcR, is 2,558 bp and contains a 5'-untranslated region of 555 bp and a 3'-untranslated region of 407 bp. The open reading frame of TeEcR encodes deduced 531-amino acid peptides with a predicted molecular mass of 60.7 kDa. The amino acid sequence of T. emma EcR was similar to that of known EcR especially in the ligand-binding domain of insect EcR. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to compare TeEcR mRNA expression level at the whole body and gonad during T. emma development. The data revealed that TeEcR mRNA is differentially expressed during T. emma development, with the highest expression level in late-instar larvae of the body and lowest in third instar. The levels of TeEcR transcripts also vary among gonads development, and levels in ovaries were higher than in testes at every developmental stage. These results suggest that TeEcR may have potential significance to regulate the morphological structure and gonad development of T. emma, due to its expression in different developmental periods.

  4. Lerneca inalata beripocone subsp. nov. (Orthoptera: Phalangopsidae; Luzarinae): a new taxon for the northern Pantanal of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lima, Raysa Martins; Martins, Luciano De Pinho; Pereira, Marcelo Ribeiro; Ganchev, Todor D; Jahn, Olaf; Lhano, Marcos Gonçalves; Marques, Marinêz Isaac; Schuchmann, Karl-L

    2016-10-17

    The first record of the Orthoptera species Lerneca inalata for Brazil is presented here. The taxon is represented by a new subspecies Lerneca inalata beripocone subsp. nov. (Phalangopsidae, Luzarinae), collected in the Pantanal of Poconé, Mato Grosso, Brazil. This work includes morphological and morphometric data as well as descriptions of female genitalia and calling song. The new subspecies has as diagnostic features the male genitalia with six ventral spines on the B sclerite, the first spine having a subtle bifurcation; the mid-region of the strongly sclerotized pseudepiphallus; inclination of C sclerite with slightly concave curvature; tegmina-length ratio and the speculum (syn. mirror) width approximately three times the length of the apical area. The description of the female genitalia and the calling song is presented for the first time for the species Lerneca inalata. A distribution map covers the local occurrence of its subspecies.

  5. Divergence in the calling songs between sympatric and allopatric populations of the southern wood cricket Gryllus fultoni (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    PubMed

    Jang, Y; Gerhardt, H C

    2006-03-01

    In the eastern United States the wood cricket Gryllus fultoni (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) occurs in sympatry with G. vernalis in an area between eastern Kansas and west of the Appalachian Mountains. Calling songs were recorded from 13 sympatric and allopatric localities. Both field and laboratory recordings showed that chirp rate (CR) and pulse rate (PR) overlapped extensively between allopatric populations of G. fultoni and sympatric populations of G. vernalis; by contrast, there was little or no overlap in these variables between sympatric populations of these two species. Divergence in PR and CR between the two species was thus greater in areas of sympatry than in areas of allopatry. Our field and laboratory studies of G. fultoni calling songs thus demonstrate the pattern expected of character displacement and support the genetic assumptions of this hypothesis. Other possible explanations for the sympatric divergence such as ecological character displacement and clinal variation are discussed.

  6. The type specimen and generic placement of Tridactylus galla Saussure, 1895 (Orthoptera: Caelifera: Tridactylidae).

    PubMed

    Heads, Sam W; Hollier, John

    2016-11-15

    Tridactylus galla was described by Henri de Saussure (1895) on the basis of a single adult female collected during Vittorio Bottego's first expedition to the Horn of Africa in 1892 and 1893. The species appears in lists compiled by Fenizia (1896), Lucas (1898) and Kirby (1906), but aside from a brief mention by Günther (1995), is entirely overlooked by subsequent authors and is absent from Otte's (1997) catalogue. During the course of compiling an annotated catalogue of the Orthoptera described by Saussure (Hollier and Heads, 2012) we were able to relocate the type of Tridactylus galla in the collection of the Museo Civico di Storia Naturale "Giacomo Doria" in Genova, Italy. Our examination of the specimen confirmed Günther's (1995) assertion that its placement in Tridactylus Olivier, 1789 is erroneous, and the species is herein formally transferred to the genus Xya Latreille, 1809.

  7. Orthoptera (Insecta: Tettigonioidea, Pyrgomorphoidea, Acridoidea) of Kafa Biosphere Reserve, Bale Mountains National Park and other areas of conservation interest in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Felix, Rob P W H; Massa, Bruno

    2016-11-09

    An annotated checklist of 51 Orthoptera taxa (Tettigonioidea, Pyrgomorphoidea and Acridoidea) of Kafa Biosphere Reserve, Bale Mountains National Park and some additional sites in Ethiopia is presented. Ten species are newly recorded for the country. Four species are new to science: Peropyrrhicia attilioi n. sp., P. keffensis n. sp., P. semiensis n. sp. and Coryphosima danieli n. sp. The status of Peropyrrhicia cooperi Uvarov, 1934 and P. scotti Uvarov, 1934 is revised: both are considered valid species.

  8. Two functional types of attachment pads on a single foot in the Namibia bush cricket Acanthoproctus diadematus (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae)

    PubMed Central

    Grohmann, Constanze; Henze, Miriam Judith; Nørgaard, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2015-01-01

    Insects have developed different structures to adhere to surfaces. Most common are smooth and hairy attachment pads, while nubby pads have also been described for representatives of Mantophasmatodea, Phasmida and Plecoptera. Here we report on the unusual combination of nubby and smooth tarsal attachment structures in the !nara cricket Acanthoproctus diadematus. Their three proximal tarsal pads (euplantulae) have a nubby surface, whereas the most distal euplantula is rather smooth with a hexagonal ground pattern resembling that described for the great green bush-cricket Tettigonia viridissima. This is, to our knowledge, the first report on nubby euplantulae in Orthoptera and the co-occurrence of nubby and smooth euplantulae on a single tarsus in a polyneopteran species. When adhering upside down to a horizontal glass plate, A. diadematus attaches its nubby euplantulae less often, compared to situations in which the animal is hanging upright or head down on a vertical plate. We discuss possible reasons for this kind of clinging behaviour, such as morphological constrains, the different role of normal and shear forces in attachment enhancement of the nubby and smooth pads, ease of the detachment process, and adaptations to walking on cylindrical substrates. PMID:26213740

  9. The morphological and behavioral analysis of geographically separated Rammeihippus turcicus (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Gomphocerinae) populations: data result in taxonomical conflict.

    PubMed

    Şirin, Deniz; Mol, Abbas; Akyıldız, Gürkan

    2014-10-15

    Rammeihippus Woznessenskij, 1996 (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Gomphocerinae) is a genus represented by two species. Rammeihippus turcicus (Ramme, 1939) is the only known species of the genus from Anatolia. As for most of the Gomphocerinae species in Anatolia, all populations of the species are intermittently distributed at high altitudes. In this study, three populations of R. turcicus were studied for the first time to determine the song and mating behavior. Males of the species produce typical calling song for Gomphocerinae and complex courtship songs and mating behavior. Thus, an accurate taxonomy requires extensive material and different character sources. In this study, the Anatolian Rammeihippus was re-examined on the basis of qualitative and morphometric morphology, male songs, and behavioral characteristics. There was no agreement between the results of the song and morphology. Acoustic analysis suggested one species and patchy distribution in the area, whereas morphology pointed out that each population was a different taxonomical unit. The results of the study show that the aberrant morphology does not necessarily indicate a new species in the Gomphocerinae genus. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  10. Effection of Ocneridia volxemi Bolivar (Pamphaginae, Orthoptera) hoppers and adults by Beauveria bassiana (Deuteromycotina, hyphomycetes) conidia in an oil formulation.

    PubMed

    Bounechada, M; Doumandji, S E

    2004-01-01

    Ocneridia volxemi Bolivar (Pamphaginae, Orthoptera) is one of the important insects pest in the heigh plains of north east of Algeria. Larval and adult stages caused severe damage to the leaves of cereals and an other various crops. Laboratory studies were conducted to the determine the potential of the fungus Beauveria bassiana for the control of the pest of larval and adults. Positive results were obtaved when larvae and adults were sprayed with different concentration of fungus conidia (D1: 2 x 10(6) conidia/ml, D2: 5 x 10(5) conidia/ml, D3: 8 x 10(4) conidia/ml, D4: 10(2) conidia/ml). Concentration at D1 and D2 in an oil formulation showed respectively 100% and 90 % larval mortality at the first day of treatment and 100%-9% adults mortality at the five day of treatement. The results revealed that the rates of infection and mortality were significantly related to the concentration of conidia in the corresponding samples. Beauveria bassiana can be considerd as a promising biocontrol agents of Ocneridia volxemi may be an other locuts, but field experimentation is necessary to subtantiate these finding.

  11. Grasshopper (Orthoptera: Acrididae) Community Composition in the Rangeland of the Northern Slopes of the Qilian Mountains in Northwestern China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, T.; Liu, Z. Y.; Qin, L. P.; Long, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    In order to describe grasshopper (Orthoptera: Acrididae) species composition, diversity, abundance, and density of four rangelands types, we compared the grasshopper community composition and dynamics in the rangeland of the northern slopes of the Qilian Mountains. In total, 55 grasshopper species were collected from 2007 to 2009, representing three families and six subfamilies. The subfamily Oedipodinae was dominant, followed by Gomphocerinae and Catantopinae. Species abundance varied among rangeland types (RTs). The greatest abundance of grasshoppers was found in mountain rangeland, while the lowest abundance of grasshoppers was caught in alpine shrublands. Three species (Chorthippus cf. brunneus (Thunberg) (Acrididae), Chorthippus Dubius (Zubovski), and Gomphocerus licenti (Chang) were broadly distributed in the four RTs and constituted 7.5% of all grasshoppers collected. Ch. dubius was very abundant in desert rangeland and alpine shrubland. Bryodema dolichoptera Yin et Feng Eremippus qilianshanensis Lian and Zheng, and Filchnerella qilianshanensis Xi and Zheng (Pamphagidae) were endemic to the region of the Qilian Mountains. Species similarity between RTs ranged from 17.8 to 51.6 based on the Renkonen index. Similarly, the Sörensen index indicated a wide separation in species composition among RTs. The abundance of the eight most common species showed obvious differences among RTs and years. On average, mountain rangeland had the highest density values in 2007 and 2008, and alpine shrubland supported the smallest density. The densities in desert and mountain rangeland in 2007 were significantly higher than in 2008, while alpine rangeland and shrublands did not present obvious differences among years. PMID:25688084

  12. The Morphological and Behavioral Analysis of Geographically Separated Rammeihippus turcicus (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Gomphocerinae) Populations: Data Result in Taxonomical Conflict

    PubMed Central

    Şirin, Deniz; Mol, Abbas; Akyıldız, Gürkan

    2014-01-01

    Rammeihippus Woznessenskij, 1996 (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Gomphocerinae) is a genus represented by two species. Rammeihippus turcicus (Ramme, 1939) is the only known species of the genus from Anatolia. As for most of the Gomphocerinae species in Anatolia, all populations of the species are intermittently distributed at high altitudes. In this study, three populations of R. turcicus were studied for the first time to determine the song and mating behavior. Males of the species produce typical calling song for Gomphocerinae and complex courtship songs and mating behavior. Thus, an accurate taxonomy requires extensive material and different character sources. In this study, the Anatolian Rammeihippus was re-examined on the basis of qualitative and morphometric morphology, male songs, and behavioral characteristics. There was no agreement between the results of the song and morphology. Acoustic analysis suggested one species and patchy distribution in the area, whereas morphology pointed out that each population was a different taxonomical unit. The results of the study show that the aberrant morphology does not necessarily indicate a new species in the Gomphocerinae genus. PMID:25347836

  13. Radio-telemetric evidence of migration in the gregarious but not the solitary morph of the Mormon cricket (Anabrus simplex: Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorch, Patrick D.; Gwynne, D. T.

    The Mormon cricket, Anabrus simplex, is one of just a few species of katydids (or bushcrickets, Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) that, like migratory locusts, appear to have solitary and migratory morphs. Using radio telemetry we studied movements of individuals of two morphs of this flightless species. Individuals within each migratory band had similar rates of movements along similar directional headings whereas solitary individuals moved little and showed little evidence of directionality in movement. Our results also add to other recent radio-telemetry studies showing that flightless insects of 1-2g in mass can be tracked successfully using these methods.

  14. Fluorescence microscopy study on the cytoskeletal displacements during sperm differentiation in the bush-cricket Tylopsis liliifolia (Fabricius) (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae).

    PubMed

    Viscuso, Renata; Federico, Concetta; Saccone, Salvatore; Bonaccorsi, Bianca; Vitale, Danilo G M

    2016-02-01

    A study by fluorescence microscopy has been carried out on male gametes from testicular follicles, seminal vesicles, spermatophores, and seminal receptacles of the bush-cricket Tylopsis liliifolia, focusing the attention on localization and movements of F-actin and α-tubulin during sperm differentiation, since data in this respect are lacking in the Orthoptera. F-actin and α-tubulin positivity was detected in the testicular follicles, in particular at the bridges connecting spermatids of a same clone and around their nucleus, during the first differentiation stages. During the following differentiation stages in the testes, F-actin was found at one of the spermatid poles and then, during nucleus elongation, at the whole acrosomal region. A peculiar F-actin-positivity was found at the flagellum, more markedly immediately posterior to the nucleus, at the basal body region of the gametes from the testicular follicles and from the other examined districts. Other interesting data from our investigations concerns the α-tubulin displacements during the differentiation stages of the spermatid and a constant absence of α-tubulin-positivity where the centrioles are located. No positivity was also found for both α-tubulin and nuclear markers at the anterior region of the gamete, where the acrosomal wings are localized. Our results, compared with what is so far known in literature for the insects, lead us to assert that microfilaments and microtubules undergo gradual displacements, markedly in the testicular follicles, during the morphogenesis of the male gamete of T. liliifolia aimed to its organization and motility and probably also to its interaction with the female gamete. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Ecological drivers of body size evolution and sexual size dimorphism in short-horned grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    García-Navas, V; Noguerales, V; Cordero, P J; Ortego, J

    2017-08-01

    Sexual size dimorphism (SSD) is widespread and variable in nature. Although female-biased SSD predominates among insects, the proximate ecological and evolutionary factors promoting this phenomenon remain largely unstudied. Here, we employ modern phylogenetic comparative methods on eight subfamilies of Iberian grasshoppers (85 species) to examine the validity of different models of evolution of body size and SSD and explore how they are shaped by a suite of ecological variables (habitat specialization, substrate use, altitude) and/or constrained by different evolutionary pressures (female fecundity, strength of sexual selection, length of the breeding season). Body size disparity primarily accumulated late in the history of the group and did not follow a Brownian motion pattern, indicating the existence of directional evolution for this trait. We found support for the converse of Rensch's rule (i.e. females are proportionally bigger than males in large species) across all taxa but not within the two most speciose subfamilies (Gomphocerinae and Oedipodinae), which showed an isometric pattern. Our results do not provide support for the fecundity or sexual selection hypotheses, and we did not find evidence for significant effects of habitat use. Contrary to that expected, we found that species with narrower reproductive window are less dimorphic in size than those that exhibit a longer breeding cycle, suggesting that male protandry cannot solely account for the evolution of female-biased SSD in Orthoptera. Our study highlights the need to consider alternatives to the classical evolutionary hypotheses when trying to explain why in certain insect groups males remain small. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  16. First Occurrence and Paleo-Ecological Implications of Insects (Orthoptera: Ensifera Gryllidae) in the Romualdo Member of the Santana Formation, Eo-Cretaceous of the Araripe Basin.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Luís C B; Moura, Geraldo J B DE; Saraiva, Antônio A F

    2016-01-01

    The Romualdo Member of the Santana Formation, a lithostatigraphic unit attributed to a marine intrusion, is famous for its preserved fossils in calcareous concretions, which stand out for their diversity and excellent preservation levels. This paper aims to record the first occurrence of the Class Insecta in the Romualdo Member of the Santana Formation of the Araripe Basin, as well as to describe and discuss the paleo-ecological implications of such finding. The first occurrence of the order Orthoptera (family Gryllidae) is presented for this unit. This new species is attributed to the genus Araripegryllus, that lasted throughout the deposition of the Crato Member, which is under the Romualdo Member. In reference to its statigraphic origin, the specimens was named Araripegryllus romualdoi sp. nov.

  17. Monograph of the Afrotropical species of Scelio Latreille (Hymenoptera, Platygastridae), egg parasitoids of acridid grasshoppers (Orthoptera, Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Yoder, Matthew J; Valerio, Alejandro A; Polaszek, Andrew; van Noort, Simon; Masner, Lubomír; Johnson, Norman F

    2014-01-01

    The genus Scelio is a cosmopolitan and speciose group of solitary parasitoids of the eggs of short-horned grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae). A number of these hosts are important pests, including plague locusts of the genus Schistocerca. Species of Scelio are recognized as potentially important biological control agents, but this possibility has yet to be fully realized, in part because the species-level taxonomy is still incompletely developed. The species of the pulchripennis group have been recently revised. As a continuation of this effort, here we revise the Afrotropical species of Scelio, excluding the pulchripennis species group. Sixty two (62) species are treated, 48 of which are new. Species are classified into the following species groups: ernstii (12 species, 9 new), howardi (23 species, 19 new), ipomeae (6 species, 5 new), irwini (4 species, 3 new), simoni (3 new species) and walkeri (12 species, 9 new). Keys to species groups and to the species within each group are provided. New species described are: S. albatus Yoder, sp. n., S. aphares Yoder, sp. n., S. apospastos Yoder, sp. n., S. ardelio Yoder, sp. n., S. aurantium Yoder, sp. n., S. balo Valerio & Yoder, sp. n., S. bayanga Yoder, sp. n., S. bubulo Yoder, sp. n., S. cano Yoder, sp. n., S. clypeatus Yoder, sp. n., S. concavus Yoder, sp. n., S. copelandi Yoder, sp. n., S. crepo Yoder, sp. n., S. destico Yoder, sp. n., S. dupondi Yoder, sp. n., S. effervesco Yoder, sp. n., S. erugatus Yoder, sp. n., S. exophthalmus Yoder, sp. n., S. fremo Valerio & Yoder, sp. n., S. gemo Yoder, sp. n., S. grunnio Yoder, sp. n., S. harinhalai Yoder, sp. n., S. igland Yoder, sp. n., S. impostor Yoder, sp. n., S. irwini Yoder, sp. n., S. janseni Yoder, sp. n., S. latro Yoder, sp. n., S. memorabilis Yoder, sp. n., S. modulus Yoder, sp. n., S. mutio Yoder, sp. n., S. ntchisii Yoder, sp. n., S. parkeri Yoder, sp. n., S. phaeoprora Yoder, sp. n., S. pilosilatus Yoder, sp. n., S. pipilo Yoder, sp. n., S. quasiclypeatus

  18. Monograph of the Afrotropical species of Scelio Latreille (Hymenoptera, Platygastridae), egg parasitoids of acridid grasshoppers (Orthoptera, Acrididae)

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Matthew J.; Valerio, Alejandro A.; Polaszek, Andrew; van Noort, Simon; Masner, Lubomír; Johnson, Norman F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The genus Scelio is a cosmopolitan and speciose group of solitary parasitoids of the eggs of short-horned grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae). A number of these hosts are important pests, including plague locusts of the genus Schistocerca. Species of Scelio are recognized as potentially important biological control agents, but this possibility has yet to be fully realized, in part because the species-level taxonomy is still incompletely developed. The species of the pulchripennis group have been recently revised. As a continuation of this effort, here we revise the Afrotropical species of Scelio, excluding the pulchripennis species group. Sixty two (62) species are treated, 48 of which are new. Species are classified into the following species groups: ernstii (12 species, 9 new), howardi (23 species, 19 new), ipomeae (6 species, 5 new), irwini (4 species, 3 new), simoni (3 new species) and walkeri (12 species, 9 new). Keys to species groups and to the species within each group are provided. New species described are: S. albatus Yoder, sp. n., S. aphares Yoder, sp. n., S. apospastos Yoder, sp. n., S. ardelio Yoder, sp. n., S. aurantium Yoder, sp. n., S. balo Valerio & Yoder, sp. n., S. bayanga Yoder, sp. n., S. bubulo Yoder, sp. n., S. cano Yoder, sp. n., S. clypeatus Yoder, sp. n., S. concavus Yoder, sp. n., S. copelandi Yoder, sp. n., S. crepo Yoder, sp. n., S. destico Yoder, sp. n., S. dupondi Yoder, sp. n., S. effervesco Yoder, sp. n., S. erugatus Yoder, sp. n., S. exophthalmus Yoder, sp. n., S. fremo Valerio & Yoder, sp. n., S. gemo Yoder, sp. n., S. grunnio Yoder, sp. n., S. harinhalai Yoder, sp. n., S. igland Yoder, sp. n., S. impostor Yoder, sp. n., S. irwini Yoder, sp. n., S. janseni Yoder, sp. n., S. latro Yoder, sp. n., S. memorabilis Yoder, sp. n., S. modulus Yoder, sp. n., S. mutio Yoder, sp. n., S. ntchisii Yoder, sp. n., S. parkeri Yoder, sp. n., S. phaeoprora Yoder, sp. n., S. pilosilatus Yoder, sp. n., S. pipilo Yoder, sp. n., S

  19. Shrinking wings for ultrasonic pitch production: hyperintense ultra-short-wavelength calls in a new genus of neotropical katydids (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae).

    PubMed

    Sarria-S, Fabio A; Morris, Glenn K; Windmill, James F C; Jackson, Joseph; Montealegre-Z, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the discovery of a new genus and three species of predaceous katydid (Insecta: Orthoptera) from Colombia and Ecuador in which males produce the highest frequency ultrasonic calling songs so far recorded from an arthropod. Male katydids sing by rubbing their wings together to attract distant females. Their song frequencies usually range from audio (5 kHz) to low ultrasonic (30 kHz). However, males of Supersonus spp. call females at 115 kHz, 125 kHz, and 150 kHz. Exceeding the human hearing range (50 Hz-20 kHz) by an order of magnitude, these insects also emit their ultrasound at unusually elevated sound pressure levels (SPL). In all three species these calls exceed 110 dB SPL rms re 20 µPa (at 15 cm). Males of Supersonus spp. have unusually reduced forewings (<0.5 mm(2)). Only the right wing radiates appreciable sound, the left bears the file and does not show a particular resonance. In contrast to most katydids, males of Supersonus spp. position and move their wings during sound production so that the concave aspect of the right wing, underlain by the insect dorsum, forms a contained cavity with sharp resonance. The observed high SPL at extreme carrier frequencies can be explained by wing anatomy, a resonant cavity with a membrane, and cuticle deformation.

  20. Genetic differentiation among populations of Brachytrupes portentosus (Lichtenstein 1796) (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) in Thailand and the Lao PDR: the Mekong River as a biogeographic barrier.

    PubMed

    Tantrawatpan, C; Saijuntha, W; Pilab, W; Sakdakham, K; Pasorn, P; Thanonkeo, S; Thiha; Satrawaha, R; Petney, T

    2011-12-01

    The Mekong River is known to act as a boundary between a number of terrestrial and freshwater species, including various parasites and their intermediate hosts as well as endangered mammal species. Little information is available, however, on the genetic differentiation between terrestrial invertebrates to the east and the west of this wide river. The genetic diversity among eight natural populations of Brachytrupes portentosus (Lichtenstein, 1796) (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) collected from Thailand and the Lao People's Democratic Republic (PDR) were analyzed by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. The allelic profiles of 20 enzymes encoding 23 loci were analyzed. An average of 41% fixed differences was detected between the populations from Thailand and Lao PDR, which are separated by the Mekong River. The percent fixed differences ranged between 4% and 26% within the populations from Thailand and between 4% and 22% within the populations from Lao PDR. A phenogram shows that the eight populations fell into two major clusters based on the Thai and Lao sampling sites. The genetic distance between the samples within Thailand and within Lao PDR was related to the distances between sampling areas. The genetic variability between populations of this cricket indicates that genetic relationships are influenced by a natural barrier as well as by the geographical distance between these allopatric populations.

  1. Shrinking Wings for Ultrasonic Pitch Production: Hyperintense Ultra-Short-Wavelength Calls in a New Genus of Neotropical Katydids (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae)

    PubMed Central

    Sarria-S, Fabio A.; Morris, Glenn K.; Windmill, James F. C.; Jackson, Joseph; Montealegre-Z, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the discovery of a new genus and three species of predaceous katydid (Insecta: Orthoptera) from Colombia and Ecuador in which males produce the highest frequency ultrasonic calling songs so far recorded from an arthropod. Male katydids sing by rubbing their wings together to attract distant females. Their song frequencies usually range from audio (5 kHz) to low ultrasonic (30 kHz). However, males of Supersonus spp. call females at 115 kHz, 125 kHz, and 150 kHz. Exceeding the human hearing range (50 Hz–20 kHz) by an order of magnitude, these insects also emit their ultrasound at unusually elevated sound pressure levels (SPL). In all three species these calls exceed 110 dB SPL rms re 20 µPa (at 15 cm). Males of Supersonus spp. have unusually reduced forewings (<0.5 mm2). Only the right wing radiates appreciable sound, the left bears the file and does not show a particular resonance. In contrast to most katydids, males of Supersonus spp. position and move their wings during sound production so that the concave aspect of the right wing, underlain by the insect dorsum, forms a contained cavity with sharp resonance. The observed high SPL at extreme carrier frequencies can be explained by wing anatomy, a resonant cavity with a membrane, and cuticle deformation. PMID:24901234

  2. Geographic distribution of Gryllotalpa stepposa in south-eastern Europe, with first records for Romania, Hungary and Serbia (Insecta, Orthoptera, Gryllotalpidae)

    PubMed Central

    Iorgu, Ionuț Ștefan; Iorgu, Elena Iulia; Puskás, Gellért; Ivković, Slobodan; Borisov, Simeon; Gavril, Viorel Dumitru; Chobanov, Dragan Petrov

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Described from the steppe zones north of the Black Sea, Caucasus, and central Asia, Gryllotalpa stepposa Zhantiev was recently recorded from a few localities in Greece, R. Macedonia, and Bulgaria. In May 2015, several specimens were collected from Ivrinezu Mare in Romania, which suggested a continuous distribution area of the species, stretching from the central Balkans to central Asia. Thus, to reveal its actual range of occurrence, a survey of several Orthoptera collections became mandatory and, as expected, a large number of misidentified specimens of Gryllotalpa stepposa were discovered, providing new data on the species distribution in south-eastern Europe, including also the first records of this mole cricket in Serbia and Hungary. Here a full locality list is presented of this species west of Ukraine and Moldova and the current geographic distribution of the genus Gryllotalpa in the Balkans is revised. A key for distinguishing the mole crickets in south-eastern Europe and a distribution map for this region are presented. PMID:27551213

  3. Understanding the genetic effects of recent habitat fragmentation in the context of evolutionary history: Phylogeography and landscape genetics of a southern California endemic Jerusalem cricket (Orthoptera: Stenopelmatidae: Stenopelmatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandergast, A.G.; Bohonak, A.J.; Weissman, D.B.; Fisher, R.N.

    2007-01-01

    Habitat loss and fragmentation due to urbanization are the most pervasive threats to biodiversity in southern California. Loss of habitat and fragmentation can lower migration rates and genetic connectivity among remaining populations of native species, reducing genetic variability and increasing extinction risk. However, it may be difficult to separate the effects of recent anthropogenic fragmentation from the genetic signature of prehistoric fragmentation due to previous natural geological and climatic changes. To address these challenges, we examined the phylogenetic and population genetic structure of a flightless insect endemic to cismontane southern California, Stenopelmatus 'mahogani' (Orthoptera: Stenopelmatidae). Analyses of mitochondrial DNA sequence data suggest that diversification across southern California began during the Pleistocene, with most haplotypes currently restricted to a single population. Patterns of genetic divergence correlate with contemporary urbanization, even after correcting for (geographical information system) GIS-based reconstructions of fragmentation during the Pleistocene. Theoretical simulations confirm that contemporary patterns of genetic structure could be produced by recent urban fragmentation using biologically reasonable assumptions about model parameters. Diversity within populations was positively correlated with current fragment size, but not prehistoric fragment size, suggesting that the effects of increased drift following anthropogenic fragmentation are already being seen. Loss of genetic connectivity and diversity can hinder a population's ability to adapt to ecological perturbations commonly associated with urbanization, such as habitat degradation, climatic changes and introduced species. Consequently, our results underscore the importance of preserving and restoring landscape connectivity for long-term persistence of low vagility native species. Journal compilation ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Understanding the genetic effects of recent habitat fragmentation in the context of evolutionary history: phylogeography and landscape genetics of a southern California endemic Jerusalem cricket (Orthoptera: Stenopelmatidae: Stenopelmatus).

    PubMed

    Vandergast, Amy G; Bohonak, Andrew J; Weissman, David B; Fisher, Robert N

    2007-03-01

    Habitat loss and fragmentation due to urbanization are the most pervasive threats to biodiversity in southern California. Loss of habitat and fragmentation can lower migration rates and genetic connectivity among remaining populations of native species, reducing genetic variability and increasing extinction risk. However, it may be difficult to separate the effects of recent anthropogenic fragmentation from the genetic signature of prehistoric fragmentation due to previous natural geological and climatic changes. To address these challenges, we examined the phylogenetic and population genetic structure of a flightless insect endemic to cismontane southern California, Stenopelmatus'mahogani' (Orthoptera: Stenopelmatidae). Analyses of mitochondrial DNA sequence data suggest that diversification across southern California began during the Pleistocene, with most haplotypes currently restricted to a single population. Patterns of genetic divergence correlate with contemporary urbanization, even after correcting for (geographical information system) GIS-based reconstructions of fragmentation during the Pleistocene. Theoretical simulations confirm that contemporary patterns of genetic structure could be produced by recent urban fragmentation using biologically reasonable assumptions about model parameters. Diversity within populations was positively correlated with current fragment size, but not prehistoric fragment size, suggesting that the effects of increased drift following anthropogenic fragmentation are already being seen. Loss of genetic connectivity and diversity can hinder a population's ability to adapt to ecological perturbations commonly associated with urbanization, such as habitat degradation, climatic changes and introduced species. Consequently, our results underscore the importance of preserving and restoring landscape connectivity for long-term persistence of low vagility native species.

  5. [A morphofunctional analysis of the hemocytes in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) normally and in acute microsporidiosis due to Nosema grylli].

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Iu Ia; Tokarev, Iu S; Lozinskaia, Ia L; Glupov, V V

    2000-01-01

    Microsporidians (M) are supposed to be ancient eukaryotic parasites with a broad range of animal hosts, being especially abundant in Arthropoda. They are supposed to pass a long way of adaptation to parasitism, that usually means inhibiting or avoiding host immune reactions alongside with the reduction of pathogenicity. However M, unlike other eukaryotic obligate parasites, preserved a high pathogenicity, comparable with one of viruses, and thus they could be expected to possess a unique mode of interactions with their hosts. The goal of the present work is to assess how M influence the cellular immune response of an insect host. Experiments were performed on the host-parasite system Gryllus bimaculatus (Orthoptera, Gryllidae)--Nosema grylli (Microsporidia, Nosematidae); coccidia Adelina grylli--infected crickets were used to compare the host cellular response against two pathogens. Haemocytes (H) were observed using phase contrast and electron microscope. H smears were stained for a phenoloxidase (PO), esterase activities and "respiratory burst" reaction. Five H type can be distinguished in the cricket haemolymph. (1) Prohaemocytes, relatively small (13-30 microns) cells with large nuclei, are observed both in control and infected insects. (2) Plasmatocytes, round (30-35 microns in diameter) or fusiod (40-63 x 13-38 microns) cells, can hardly be distinguished from (1) ultrastructurally; during the coccidian infection of the cricket fat body these H infiltrate the infected organ and turn into amebocytes with laciniate nuclei, they usually contain electron dense granules, that release during the formation of a capsule around the coccidian oocytes. (3) Granulocytes (Gr, 20-33 microns in diameter) are cells with the extremely refractive cytoplasm when observed in phase contrast microscope, they contain vacuoles with typical crystal needle-like inclusions. The transitional forms between the mentioned above three cell types can be observed. The next two H types also

  6. even-skipped has gap-like, pair-rule-like, and segmental functions in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, a basal, intermediate germ insect (Orthoptera).

    PubMed

    Mito, Taro; Kobayashi, Chiharu; Sarashina, Isao; Zhang, Hongjie; Shinahara, Wakako; Miyawaki, Katsuyuki; Shinmyo, Yohei; Ohuchi, Hideyo; Noji, Sumihare

    2007-03-01

    Developmental mechanisms of segmentation appear to be varied among insects in spite of their conserved body plan. Although the expression patterns of the segment polarity genes in all insects examined imply well conserved function of this class of genes, expression patterns and function of the pair-rule genes tend to exhibit diversity. To gain further insights into the evolution of the segmentation process and the role of pair-rule genes, we have examined expression and function of an ortholog of the Drosophila pair-rule gene even-skipped (eve) in a phylogenetically basal insect, Gryllus bimaculatus (Orthoptera, intermediate germ cricket). We find that Gryllus eve (Gb'eve) is expressed as stripes in each of the prospective gnathal, thoracic, and abdominal segments and as a broad domain in the posterior growth zone. Dynamics of stripe formation vary among Gb'eve stripes, representing one of the three modes, the segmental, incomplete pair-rule, and complete pair-rule mode. Furthermore, we find that RNAi suppression of Gb'eve results in segmentation defects in both anterior and posterior regions of the embryo. Mild depletion of Gb'eve shows a pair-rule-like defect in anterior segments, while stronger depletion causes a gap-like defect showing deletion of anterior and posterior segments. These results suggest that Gb'eve acts as a pair-rule gene at least during anterior segmentation and also has segmental and gap-like functions. Additionally, Gb'eve may be involved in the regulation of hunchback and Krüppel expression. Comparisons with eve functions in other species suggest that the Gb'eve function may represent an intermediate state of the evolution of pair-rule patterning by eve in insects.

  7. The level of DNA damage in adult grasshoppers Chorthippus biguttulus (Orthoptera, Acrididae) following dimethoate exposure is dependent on the insects' habitat.

    PubMed

    Karpeta-Kaczmarek, Julia; Kubok, Magdalena; Dziewięcka, Marta; Sawczyn, Tomasz; Augustyniak, Maria

    2016-08-01

    The comet assay was used to study the DNA damage that was induced by dimethoate in the hemocyte cells of adult Chorthippus biguttulus grasshoppers (Insecta: Orthoptera) that originated from two sites with varying levels of pollution. The primary focus of the study was to examine whether continuous exposure to environmental stress can modify the effect of pesticides on genome stability. After three days of acclimation to laboratory conditions, the level of DNA damage in the hemocytes of Bow-winged grasshoppers was within a similar range in the insects from both areas. However, the level of DNA damage following dimethoate treatment was significantly higher in the insects from the reference area (Pogoria) than in the individuals from the heavily polluted location (Szopienice). Four hours after pesticide treatment, the Tail DNA (TDNA) in the hemocytes of the male and female specimens from Pogoria was as high as 75% and 50% respectively, whereas the values in males and females from Szopienice only reached 30% and 20%, respectively. A rapid decrease in DNA damage was observed in both populations 24 h after the pesticide application. The habitat of an insect (site), the administration of the dimethoate (treatment), and the period following the application of the pesticide (time), all significantly influenced the levels of DNA damage. No interactions related to TDNA were observed between the variables 'sex' and 'treatment'. Similarly, the variable 'sex', when analyzed alongside 'treatment' and 'site' (the area from which the insects were collected), or 'treatment' and 'time' had no influence on TL. Exposure to dimethoate undoubtedly contributed to the formation of DNA damage in the hemocytes of adult C. biguttulus. However, the level of damage was clearly dependent on the place where the insects were captured.

  8. Light and electron microscopy study of the spermatheca of Eupholidoptera chabrieri bimucronata (Ramme, 1927) and Uromenus brevicollis trinacriae La Greca 1964 (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae).

    PubMed

    Viscuso, Renata; Camiolo, Giuseppina; Vitale, Danilo G M

    2015-07-01

    A study by both optical and electron microscopy has been carried out on the spermatheca of Eupholidoptera chabrieri bimucronata and Uromenus brevicollis trinacriae (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae). In both the examined species, the spermatheca consists of a sac/kidney-shaped seminal receptacle and a more or less tortuous spermathecal duct that opens into the common oviduct. The wall of both the organs consists of a pseudostratified epithelium surmounted by a cuticular intima; the latter is made up of a thicker endocuticle and an epicuticle. The epithelium shows two different cell types, irregularly arranged and with well differentiated functions: cuticle-forming and gland cells. In both the species, the cuticle-forming cells perform other functions, in addition to producing the cuticular intima. The gland cells never come in contact with the cuticular intima, have inside the reservoir a secretion whose appearance can diversify also in contiguous zones of the seminal receptacle. Based on our findings in both the species, the functions of the seminal receptacle would differ from those of the spermathecal duct. In the latter, some areas of the wall of the connecting tract show an activity of lysis, by contiguous epithelial cells, that could play a role in control and selection of spermatozoa. As for the feather-shaped spermatodesms, similar in both the species, freeze-fracture observations have shown that the acrosome of each spermatozoon regularly covers three-quarters of the extension of the acrosome of the following spermatozoon. Finally, the significance of our findings, compared with what is known in literature, is discussed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Phylogenetic relationships of Heterovesicula cowani, a microsporidian pathogen of Mormon crickets, Anabrus simplex (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae), based on SSU rDNA-sequence analyses.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Yuliya Y; Lange, Carlos E; Fuxa, James R

    2008-09-01

    The microsporidium Heterovesicula cowani, discovered in 1985, was initially identified as Vairimorpha sp. because it produces two types of spores: Nosema-like diplokaryotic spores and Thelohania-like mononuclear meiospores. However, light and electron microscopy studies revealed characters that did not fit any known microsporidian genera, and a new monotypic genus Heterovesicula was erected. The goal of this study was to test the validity of the genus Heterovesicula by molecular characterization of H. cowani and to assess its phylogenetic relationships to other microsporidia from insects. DNA from spores stored at -32 degrees C since 1992 was isolated and PCR-amplified with V1-1492 primers to obtain a partial small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequence of 1165bp, which was submitted to GenBank (Accession No. EU275200). Neighbor joining, maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood analyses performed against 18 microsporidia sequences, placed H. cowani as a sister taxon to the Nosema-Vairimorpha clade. The consensus of these analyses suggests that the Heterovesicula-Nosema-Vairimorpha group forms a dichotomy with the Encephalitozoon spp. branch. Other microsporidia parasitizing Orthoptera fell into two unrelated (or distantly related) lineages of terrestrial microsporidia: the Liebermannia spp. branch forms a dichotomy with Orthosomella operophterae within the Endoreticulatus-Orthosomella-Liebermannia group; and the Paranosema spp. branch clusters together with the Tubulinosema-Systenostrema lineage. The minimum pairwise distance in Kimura-2-Parameter analysis among 18 analyzed sequences was 0.37, which supports well the generic status for Heterovesicula. The obtained phylogenetic trees suggest that H. cowani is related to the Vairimorpha necatrix group, but not to other insect microsporidia producing octospores.

  10. [Influencing the automatized chelesterol determination using the Liebermann-Burchard technic through selected drugs in vitro].

    PubMed

    Böhme, H R; Barthel, U G

    1978-12-15

    The ascertained influences of this cholesterol determination in vitro mentioned in the survey literature for therapeutically relevant doses are astonishingly small. In the present paper the following drugs were tested: Dextran, vitamin C, procain, chlorpromazine, methyldopa, phenacetin, fluphenazine. With the exception of methyldopa pure substance was used. In every case twelve-fold determinations with the concentrations 0.02, 0.2 and 2 mmol/l were performed. Though particularly for vitamin C and methyldopa depending on dose, as well as for all other drugs with the exception of dextran increases can be proved, these, however, remain eventually in the normal region of the method. The influence of the determination of cholesterol proposed by the drugs tested under therapeutic conditions is only of insignificant practice relevance. This is a positive evidence for the use of this method in the routine laboratory.

  11. 75 FR 47337 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “German Impressionist...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... Painting: Liebermann-- Corinth--Slevogt'' SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the following determinations... the exhibition ``German Impressionist Landscape Painting: Liebermann--Corinth--Slevogt,''...

  12. Enzymatic analysis of total- and HDL-cholesterol: comparison with the standardized Liebermann-Burchard method used by the Lipid Research Clinics program.

    PubMed

    Bachorik, P S; Virgil, D G; Derby, C; Widman, D; McMahon, R; Fulwood, R P; Ezzati, T

    1988-06-15

    We compared two enzymatic cholesterol methods with the standardized chemical method used in the Lipid Research Clinic's (LRC) program. The methods were used to measure total cholesterol and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in heparin-MnCl2 supernatants of 1,812 sera collected over a 16-mth period from subjects who were sampled as part of the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Thirty percent of the subjects had fasted for 12 h or more before venepuncture. The enzymatic total cholesterol values were 1.4-1.8% lower than the LRC method and both enzymatic methods correlated highly with the LRC method (r greater than 0.97). The enzymatic HDL cholesterol values were 2.4 and 6.4% higher than the LRC method, and the correlation between the enzymatic and LRC methods was greater than 0.93. The differences between the enzymatic and LRC methods were the same in samples from fasting and non-fasting subjects.

  13. New species of Anisophya Karabag from Chile (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Phanopterinae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many of the most primitive Neotropical bush katydids (Phaneropterinae) — including species of Cosmophyllum Blanchard, Stenophylla Brunner von Wattenwyl, Marenestha Brunner von Wattenwyl, Anisophya Karabag, Coryphoda Brunner von Wattenwyl, and Burgilis Stål — are endemic in Chile. The Chilean species...

  14. Entomopathogenic fungi detection and avoidance by mole crickets (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae).

    PubMed

    Thompson, Sarah R; Brandenburg, Rick L; Roberson, Gary T

    2007-02-01

    A chamber to monitor mole cricket behavior was designed using two different soil-filled containers and photosensors constructed from infrared emitters and detectors. Mole crickets (Scapteriscus spp.) were introduced into a center tube that allowed them to choose whether to enter and tunnel in untreated soil or soil treated with Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin. Each time the cricket passed through the photosensor located near the entrance of soil-filled containers, the infrared light was blocked and the exact moment that this occurred was logged onto a computer using custom-written software. Data examined included the first photosensor trigger, total number of sensor triggers, presence of tunneling, and final location of the cricket after 18 h. These behaviors were analyzed to discern differences in mole cricket behavior in the presence of different treatments and to elucidate the mechanism that mole crickets use to detect fungal pathogens. The first study examined substrate selection and tunneling behavior of the southern mole cricket, Scapteriscus borellii Giglio-Tos, to the presence of five strains of B. bassiana relative to a control. There were no differences between the first sensor trigger and total number of triggers, indicating the mole crickets are not capable of detecting B. bassiana at a distance of 8 cm. Changes in mole cricket tunneling and residence time in treated soil occurred for some strains of B. bassiana but not others. One of the strains associated with behavioral changes in the southern mole cricket was used in a second experiment testing behavioral responses of the tawny mole cricket, S. vicinus Scudder. In addition to the formulated product of this strain, the two separate components of that product (conidia and carrier) and bifenthrin, an insecticide commonly used to control mole crickets, were tested. There were no differences in mole cricket behavior between treatments in this study. The differences in behavioral responses between the two species could suggest a more sensitive chemosensory recognition system for southern mole crickets.

  15. The phylogeny of mole crickets (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpoidea: Gryllotalpidae).

    PubMed

    Cadena-Castañeda, Oscar J

    2015-07-14

    The monophyly and phylogenetic relationships of the family Gryllotalpidae were researched. Twenty-six in-group taxa, representing all known genera of Gryllotalpidae were included in a cladistic analysis, based on 89, morphological characters (including genital characters of the males). The different analyses of the resulting data matrix supported the monophyly of Scapteriscinae and Gryllotalpinae and its internal group. Subfamilies, tribes and genera of Gryllotalpidae are fully diagnosed, illustrated and keys to their identification are provided. Four tribes are established (Indioscaptorini n. trib. (Scapteriscinae), Triamescaptorini n. trib., Gryllotalpellini n. trib. and Neocurtillini n. trib. (Gryllotalpinae)) and two other are fully delimited (Scapteriscini stat. rev. and Gryllotalpini stat. rev.). Two new genera are described (Neoscapteriscus n. gen. and Leptocurtilla n. gen.) and as well as seven new species: Gryllotalpella rehni n. sp., G. tindalei n. sp., G. lawrencei n. sp., Neocurtilla ingrischi n. sp., N. townsendi n. sp., Leptocurtilla juanmanueli n. sp. and L. chopardi n. sp. The following nomenclatural changes were made: All species previously placed in Scapteriscus s.l. are transferred to the new genus Neoscapteriscus, except Scapteriscus oxydactilus and S. headsi that are still placed in Scapteriscus, Gryllotalpa chilensis reinst. stat. and Leptocurtilla maranona, n. comb. Finally, previous contributions about the phylogenetic relationships of molecrickets are contrasted with the results of this research.

  16. A new Bradyporus Charpentier, 1825 species from Iran (Orthoptera, Bradyporinae).

    PubMed

    Garai-Gyulai, Adrienne; Unal, Mustafa

    2014-06-09

    The species of Bradyporus Charpentier, 1825 found in Turkey has been revised by the second author (M. Ünal, 2011). Bradyporus comprises thirteen species and subspecies at present. The species of the genus have a range of Central Palaearctic distribution; most of the species are Balkanian-Anatolian-Iranian, whereas some of them are restricted to Ukraine, the Caucasus, Transcaucasus, being inhabitants in the continental mountain steppe belt. It seems that Anatolia, with 8 species, and Balkans, with 6 species, are two diversity centres of this genus. Iran represented by only species, B. latipes (Stal, 1875). But, one more peculiar species is described from north west of Iran herein. The species of this genus are very similar to one another in their external features, however, detailed descriptions and characterizations are given for the authentic separation of the known species in the exhausting revision of the genus by the second author (Ünal, 2011).

  17. Relationship of metabolic rate to body size in Orthoptera

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Metabolic rate determines an individual’s rate of resource acquisition, assimilation, growth, survival, and reproduction. Studies involving a broad range of taxa and body sizes typically result in whole-organism metabolic rate scaling to the ¾ power of body mass. Competing models have been proposed ...

  18. Revision of the genus Prionotropis Fieber, 1853 (Orthoptera: Pamphagidae: Thrinchinae).

    PubMed

    Massa, Bruno; Ünal, Mustafa; Lo Verde, Gabriella

    2015-12-23

    The genus Prionotropis Fieber, 1853 is revised. It is distributed in scattered areas of the Mediterranean region from Turkey in the East to Spain in the West. Overall, seven species are listed, namely P. maculinervis (Stål, 1878) (Turkey; P. urfensis Ramme, 1933 is here considered its synonym), P. willemsorum n. sp. (Greece, Epirus; previously considered P. appula), P. appula (O.G. Costa, 1836) (South Italy), P. hystrix (Germar, 1817) (Bosnia and Herzegovina, Slovenia, Croatia, North-East Italy; P. hystrix sontiaca is here synonymized), P. rhodanica Uvarov, 1923 resurrected status (France, Crau, Rhone delta; here considered a valid species), P. azami Uvarov, 1923 n. status (France, Var region; here considered a valid species), and P. flexuosa (Serville, 1838) (Spain; the ssp. pereezi Bolívar, 1921 and sulphurans Bolívar, 1921 are here considered its synonyms). A key to species is presented.

  19. Chemical Carcinogen-Induced Changes in tRNA Metabolism in Human Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    for cultured rodent cells (Gansler and Kopelovich, 1981; Kinzel et al., 1981; Kopelovich et al., 1979; Liebermann et al., 1981; Rovera et al., 1979...genetically predisposed to cancer. Nature 282: 619-621. Liebermann , D., Hoffman- Liebermann , B., and Sachs, L. (1981) Regulation of gene expression by tumor

  20. Low Temperature Storage of Eggs Improve the Development and Reproduction of Locusta migratoria (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Cao, Guangchun; Jia, Miao; Zhao, Xia; Wang, Lei; Tu, Xiongbing; Wang, Guangjun; Nong, Xiangqun; Zhang, Zehua

    2016-10-01

    Locusta migratoria L. is an insect with significant economic value. Improving the long-term storage of L. migratoria eggs will help promote the large-scale rearing of this insect. We assessed multiple fitness parameters and enzyme activities of locusts emerged from eggs exposed to 4 °C for 1-4 wk. Locusts emerged from eggs stored at 4 °C for 2 wk showed significantly improved development and reproduction compared with locusts emerged from eggs stored for other time periods. The preimaginal survival rate increased significantly after 2-wk storage while it decreased significantly after 4-wk storage compared with other storage times. The fecundity, hatching rate, and growth rate increased significantly after 2-wk storage, but decreased significantly after 1, 3, and 4 wk compared with the control. However, the preimaginal developmental duration decreased significantly after 2-wk storage but increased significantly after storage for 1, 3, and 4 wk compared with the control. The activities of esterase, glutathione-S-transferases, phenol oxidase, and chitinase were obviously fluctuated with changes in intrinsic rate of increase (rm). These results showed that eggs stored at 4 °C for 2 wk could improve the development and reproduction of locust emerged from eggs, and four enzymes activities in above could reflect the health of locust. Our results could be useful in developing large-scale rearing protocols for L. migratoria.

  1. Bambuina bambui: a new genus and species of cave cricket from Brazil (Orthoptera: Grylloidea: Phalangopsidae: Luzarinae).

    PubMed

    De Mello, Francisco De A G; Horta, Lília S; Bolfarini, Marcio P

    2013-01-03

    Bambuina bambui, um novo gênero e espécie de grilo falangopsídeo é descrito a partir de espécimes obtidos na Gruta do Centenário, uma caverna de quartzo localizada na Serra do Inficionado, um subconjunto de montanhas pertencentes ao complexo da Serra do Caraça no estado de Minas Gerais, Brasil.

  2. Behavioral Responses of Pest Mole Crickets, Neoscapteriscus SPP. (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae), to Selected Insecticides.

    PubMed

    Kostromytska, Olga S; Scharf, Michael E; Buss, Eileen A

    2017-09-13

    Mole crickets (Neoscapteriscus spp.) consume turfgrasses and pasture grasses and uproot plants by their tunneling, which decreases turf aesthetics and decreases forage quantity and quality. Insecticides are frequently used to prevent damage. In typical field trials, damage symptoms, not percent of mortality or achieved level of control, are used to assess treatment efficacy. Here however, we evaluated the direct effect of key insecticides on Neoscapteriscus mole cricket behavior. Mole crickets, Neoscapteriscus spp. were able to detect and avoid areas treated with fipronil (FP) and imidacloprid (FP). They tunneled less in sand treated with fipronil; and avoided sand treated with fipronil and imidacloprid if given a choice. Mole crickets escaped areas treated with acephate, bifenthrin and fipronil. Bifenthrin and acephate caused increased tunneling during the first 90 min of observation. Fipronil and imidacloprid significantly reduced overall tunneling on treated areas. Tested insecticides elicited two types of behavioral changes in Neoscapteriscus mole crickets: increased locomotory activity and tunneling (acephate [organophosphate] and bifenthrin [pyrethroid]) and reduced spatial movement (fipronil [phenylpyrazole] and imidacloprid [neonicotinoid]). These behavioral responses resulted mainly from contact chemoreception and inherent neurotoxicity of the chemicals on Neoscapteriscus mole crickets. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Re-Visiting Phylogenetic and Taxonomic Relationships in the Genus Saga (Insecta: Orthoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Kolics, Balázs; Ács, Zoltán; Chobanov, Dragan Petrov; Orci, Kirill Márk; Qiang, Lo Shun; Kovács, Balázs; Kondorosy, Előd; Decsi, Kincső; Taller, János; Specziár, András; Orbán, László; Müller, Tamás

    2012-01-01

    Twelve of the 13 bushcricket species of the Saga genus are bisexuals and diploids, except the parthenogenetic and tetraploid bush cricket, Saga pedo. Despite a continuous research effort stretching through the 1900s, the taxonomic relationships of the Saga species are still disputed. In this study, our primary aim was to reveal natural relationships of the European Saga species and three of their Asian relatives, with special attention to the problematic taxonomy of two subspecies: S. campbelli campbelli and S. c. gracilis. Following a phylogenetic analysis of eight species, a comprehensive study was carried out on the above three taxa by using acoustic and morphometric approaches in parallel. Our phylogenetic data showed that European Saga species evolved from a monophyletic lineage. The geographical transitional species S. cappadocica was positioned between European and Asian lineages supporting the idea that the European Saga lineage originated phylogeographically from the Asian clade. The above results showed better agreement with the morphological data than with earlier ones based either on karyology or acoustic information only. After reviewing our data, we concluded that Saga pedo has most likely evolved from S. c. gracilis and not from S. rammei or S. ephippigera, as proposed by earlier studies. S. c. gracilis shares the same ITS2 haplotype with S. pedo, indicating that the latter could have evolved from populations of the former, probably through whole genome duplication. Based on acoustic and morphometric differences, we propose to elevate the two subspecies, S. campbelli campbelli and S. c. gracilis, to species level status, as Saga gracilis Kis 1962, and Saga campbelli Uvarov 1921. The present work sets the stage for future genetic and experimental investigations of Saginae and highlights the need for additional comprehensive analysis involving more Asian Saga species. PMID:22912691

  4. Re-visiting phylogenetic and taxonomic relationships in the genus Saga (Insecta: Orthoptera).

    PubMed

    Kolics, Balázs; Ács, Zoltán; Chobanov, Dragan Petrov; Orci, Kirill Márk; Qiang, Lo Shun; Kovács, Balázs; Kondorosy, Előd; Decsi, Kincső; Taller, János; Specziár, András; Orbán, László; Müller, Tamás

    2012-01-01

    Twelve of the 13 bushcricket species of the Saga genus are bisexuals and diploids, except the parthenogenetic and tetraploid bush cricket, Saga pedo. Despite a continuous research effort stretching through the 1900s, the taxonomic relationships of the Saga species are still disputed. In this study, our primary aim was to reveal natural relationships of the European Saga species and three of their Asian relatives, with special attention to the problematic taxonomy of two subspecies: S. campbelli campbelli and S. c. gracilis. Following a phylogenetic analysis of eight species, a comprehensive study was carried out on the above three taxa by using acoustic and morphometric approaches in parallel. Our phylogenetic data showed that European Saga species evolved from a monophyletic lineage. The geographical transitional species S. cappadocica was positioned between European and Asian lineages supporting the idea that the European Saga lineage originated phylogeographically from the Asian clade. The above results showed better agreement with the morphological data than with earlier ones based either on karyology or acoustic information only. After reviewing our data, we concluded that Saga pedo has most likely evolved from S. c. gracilis and not from S. rammei or S. ephippigera, as proposed by earlier studies. S. c. gracilis shares the same ITS2 haplotype with S. pedo, indicating that the latter could have evolved from populations of the former, probably through whole genome duplication. Based on acoustic and morphometric differences, we propose to elevate the two subspecies, S. campbelli campbelli and S. c. gracilis, to species level status, as Saga gracilis Kis 1962, and Saga campbelli Uvarov 1921. The present work sets the stage for future genetic and experimental investigations of Saginae and highlights the need for additional comprehensive analysis involving more Asian Saga species.

  5. A New Synonym and New Records of South-American Eumastacidae (Caelifera: Orthoptera: Eumastacoidea).

    PubMed

    Olivier, R S

    2017-04-01

    Temnomastax spielmanni Olivier, 2014 n. syn. is proposed as new synonym of Eumastacops nemorivaga Rehn & Rehn, 1942. New distribution records in Peru and Colombia are provided for the following four species: Eumastax nigrovittata Descamps, 1979; Paramastax nigra (Scudder, 1875); Pseudomastax nigroplagiata Descamps, 1970; and Pseudomastax personata (Bolívar, 1881). New information on the distribution of Paramastax flavovittata Descamps, 1973 and E. nemorivaga is added, resulting in the expansion of the geographic distribution. Photographs of all studied species are provided.

  6. The unexpected finding of Parapholidoptera castaneoviridis in south-eastern Romania (Insecta, Orthoptera, Tettigoniidae)

    PubMed Central

    Iorgu, Ionuț Ștefan; Chobanov, Dragan Petrov; Iorgu, Elena Iulia

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The Balkano-Anatolian genus Parapholidoptera comprises 21 species and the westernmost one, Parapholidoptera castaneoviridis, previously recognized to occur in western Turkey, north-eastern Greece and south-eastern Bulgaria is recorded for the first time from south-eastern Romania, almost 300 km away from the closest known locality. Illustrations and measurements of morphological characters are given and the male calling song from this new, northernmost population is described. PMID:28144178

  7. Acoustic analysis reveals a new cryptic bush-cricket in the Carpathian Mountains (Orthoptera, Phaneropteridae).

    PubMed

    Iorgu, Ionuţ Ştefan

    2012-01-01

    A new morphologically cryptic species of phaneropterid bush-cricket from the genus Isophya is described from the Eastern Carpathian Mountains: Isophya dochiasp. n. Sound analysis and morphological details are discussed in the paper comparing the new species with several Isophya species having similar morphology and acoustic behavior.

  8. Two new species of the genus Aalatettix Zheng & Mao (Orthoptera, Tetrigoidea, Tetrigidae) from Taiwan, China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fang-Qiang; Shi, Jian-Ping; Yin, Zhan

    2015-09-28

    Two new species of the genus Aalatettix Zheng & Mao, 2002, namely Aalatettix yangi sp. nov. and Aalatettix xiai sp. nov. are described and illustrated. The new species Aalatettix yangi sp. nov. is allied to Aalatettix gibbosa Zheng, Cao & Chen, 2011, but upper margin of pronotum waved in lateral view, width of frontal ridge narrower than width of basal joint of antennae, hind tibiae dark brown, base not pale. The new species Aalatettix xiai sp. nov. is allied to Aalatettix yangi sp. nov., but length of pronotum shorter, not reaching epiproct, width of vertex 1.5 times diameter of eye, lateral carinae of pronotum contracted backward distinctly, posterior apex of lower margin angular on lateral lobe of pronotum, lower margin of median femur waved, antennae placed under lower margin of eyes. The type specimens are deposited in the National Museum of Natural Science, Taichung, Taiwan, China.

  9. Supercooling capacity and cold hardiness of band-winged grasshopper eggs (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Pang, Bao-Ping; Li, Na; Zhou, Xiao-Rong

    2014-01-01

    The band-winged grasshopper, Oedaleus asiaticus Bei-Bienko, is one of the most dominant and economically important grasshopper species in the steppe grasslands and farming-pastoral ecotone in northern China. It is a univoltine species and overwinters as eggs in soil. The cold hardiness of its eggs was examined in the laboratory. Water content in soil significantly affected the supercooling points (SCPs), water content and fat content of prediapause eggs. With the increase of water content in soil, the SCP, and water content of prediapause eggs rose whereas the fat content declined. There was a significant relationship between the SCP and water content or fat content of prediapause eggs. The SCPs of prediapause and diapause eggs varied from -7.6 to -28.4°C and the SCPs of eggs 30 d after oviposition could be divided into two groups. The means of high SCP group (-11.0 to -11.9°C) were much higher than those of low SCP group (-21.8 to -21.9°C), and the majority belonged to the latter (90.48-93.33%). The SCPs of prediapause eggs and early-diapause eggs 30 d after oviposition were significantly higher than those of deep-diapause eggs 60 d after oviposition. The survival rates of diapause eggs were significantly different among different temperature treatments. The survival rate was higher than 88% at greater than -20°C and declined significantly to 57% at -25°C, and suddenly dropped to zero at -30°C. The lower lethal temperature (Ltemp50) for 12 h exposure was -25.3°C and the lower lethal time (Ltime50) at -20°C was 32.8 d. As the mean SCPs of diapause eggs were similar to their Ltemp50, the SCP of eggs can be considered as a good indicator of cold hardiness for O. asiaticus and that this grasshopper is a freeze-intolerant insect.

  10. [Supercooling capacity and cold hardiness of the Pararcyplera microptera meridionalis (Orthoptera: Acrididae) eggs].

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Zhou, Xiao-Rong; Pang, Bao-Ping

    2014-07-01

    Using the thermocouple method, the supercooling point (SCP) and cold hardiness of Pararcyplera microptera meridionalis eggs were measured in the laboratory. The soil water content significantly affected the water content of pre-diapause eggs, but had no significant effect on the SCP, and the water content of pre-diapause eggs rose with the increasing soil water content. There were highly significant differences among the SCPs, water contents or fat contents in the eggs at different developmental stages. With the egg' s development, the water content decreased from 51.5% at oviposition to 46.8% in 120 days after oviposition, the fat content increased from 10.5% (fresh mass)/19.0% (dry mass) to 14.5% (fresh mass)/28.9% (dry mass), and the SCP declined from -23.5 degrees C to -30.0 degrees C. There was a significant correlation between the SCP and the water content or fat content. The SCPs of deep-diapause eggs were lower than those of pre- and early-diapause eggs. The different low temperatures and treatment durations significantly affected the survival rate of diapause eggs. The lethal low temperature (Ltemp50) for 12 h exposure was -27.3 degrees C and the lethal time (Ltime50) at -25 degrees C was 22.73 days. As the mean SCPs of diapause eggs was much similar to their Ltemp50, the SCP could be considered as a good indicator of cold hardiness for P. m. meridionalis eggs and this species is a freeze-intolerant insect.

  11. Little walking leaves from southeast Ecuador: biology and taxonomy of Typophyllum species (Orthoptera, Tettigoniidae, Pterochrozinae).

    PubMed

    Braun, Holger

    2015-09-02

    Eight katydid species of the leaf-mimicking specialist genus Typophyllum were found in the southeast of Ecuador in an area comprising part of the eastern Andean cordillera and foothills toward the Cordillera del Cóndor in elevations between 850 and 3000 m. They are described along with the peculiar calling songs and other interesting aspects of their biology. Three of these species are new: T. morrisi sp. nov., T. onkiosternum sp. nov. and T. vignoni sp. nov. A fourth species represented by a single male is possibly new as well. In males and females of a species considered as identical with T. egregium Hebard 1924, which was previously known from a unique female specimen, was found a remarkable variation of coloration, in addition to the striking sexual dimorphism typical for the genus, with the females being twice as large as the small males. The latter is related to the curious mating behaviour, which is documented for this species and T. erosifolium Walker 1870. The two other species found in the region are T. bolivari Vignon 1925 and T. mortuifolium Walker 1870. The calling songs of four species were recorded. In T. erosifolium and T. morrisi sp. nov. the sounds are almost pure sine waves at the lower boundary of ultrasound. In T. egregium and T. onkiosternum sp. nov. the spectrum of the carrier frequency is broader, which might be related to lower and denser vegetation at higher elevation. Based on the intraspecific variety found in T. egregium and T. erosifolium, which includes variation in tegmina shape and venation pattern, are established several syonymies among Typophyllum species from western South America. T. erosifolium is found to be identical with T. peruvianum Pictet 1888 syn. nov. Additionally are considered identical T. inflatum Vignon 1925 and T. gibbosusm Vignon 1925 syn. nov., T. trigonum Vignon 1925 and T. quadriincisum Vignon 1925 syn. nov., and finally T. lacinipenne Enderlein 1917 and T. acutum Vignon 1925 syn. nov. and T. undulatum Caudell 1918 syn. nov. The discussion treats the problematic taxonomy of the little walking leaves, bioacoustics, the pre-copulatory riding behaviour, the sophisticated mimesis, and very briefly the uncertain position within the katydid phylogeny.

  12. Phylogeny and chromosomal diversification in the Dichroplus elongatus species group (Orthoptera, Melanoplinae)

    PubMed Central

    Taffarel, Alberto; Maronna, Maximiliano M.; Cigliano, María Marta; Palacios-Gimenez, Octavio M.; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo C.; Martí, Dardo A.

    2017-01-01

    In an attempt to track the chromosomal differentiation in the Dichroplus elongatus species group, we analyzed the karyotypes of four species with classical cytogenetic and mapping several multigene families through fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). We improved the taxon sampling of the D. elongatus species group adding new molecular data to infer the phylogeny of the genus and reconstruct the karyotype evolution. Our molecular analyses recovered a fully resolved tree with no evidence for the monophyly of Dichroplus. However, we recovered several stable clades within the genus, including the D. elongatus species group, under the different strategies of tree analyses (Maximum Parsimony and Maximum Likelihood). The chromosomal data revealed minor variation in the D. elongatus species group’s karyotypes caused by chromosome rearrangements compared to the phylogenetically related D. maculipennis species group. The karyotypes of D. intermedius and D. exilis described herein showed the standard characteristics found in most Dichroplini, 2n = 23/24, X0♂ XX♀, Fundamental number (FN) = 23/24. However, we noticed two established pericentric inversions in D. intermedius karyotype, raising the FN to 27♂/28♀. A strong variation in the heterochromatic blocks distribution was evidenced at interespecific level. The multigene families’ mapping revealed significant variation, mainly in rDNA clusters. These variations are probably caused by micro chromosomal changes, such as movement of transposable elements (TEs) and ectopic recombination. These observations suggest a high genomic dynamism for these repetitive DNA sequences in related species. The reconstruction of the chromosome character “variation in the FN” posits the FN = 23/24 as the ancestral state, and it is hypothesized that variations due to pericentric inversions has arisen independently three times in the evolutionary history of Dichroplus. One of these independent events occurred in the D. elongatus species group, where D. intermedius is the unique case with the highest FN described in the tribe Dichroplini. PMID:28245223

  13. Trends in new species discovery of Orthoptera (Insecta) from Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ming Kai; Choi, Jihea; Shankar, Nivedita

    2017-03-02

    The orthopterans are diverse insects and play important roles in the ecosystem as well as having "love-hate relationship" with humans. Documentation of diversity in Southeast Asia has long history but remains incomplete. Using information of type specimens and Geographic Information System (GIS) techniques, we investigated the following questions on new species discovery for the region, specifically: (1) How are new species discoveries of orthopterans distributed in Southeast Asia? (2) How have new species discoveries changed with time? (3) How do new species discoveries relate to the countries of the type depositories? We found that new species discoveries, relative to sampling, are fragmentary in Southeast Asia and changes with different time periods. We also find type depositories tightly linked to the human (colonial) history of Southeast Asian countries. We provide some recommendations and hope that this can help to accelerate the study of orthopteran diversity in the region.

  14. Revision of the South American genus Xiphiola Bolívar, 1896 (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Ommatolampidinae: Abracrini).

    PubMed

    Costa, Maria Kátia Matiotti Da; Ferrari, Augusto; Zefa, Edison; Carvalho, Gervásio Silva

    2016-09-26

    The Neotropical genus Xiphiola Bolívar, 1896 is revised. It includes two valid species: Xiphiola borellii Giglio-Tos, 1900 and Xiphiola cyanoptera (Gerstaecker, 1889). The genus and the species are redescribed and diagnostic characters are provided along with illustrations of each species. A lectotype and paralectoype for X. cyanoptera are here designated. We also include new morphological characters from male and female genitalia, and external characters that have not been employed until now. We present the distribution map based on material examined, as well as a key to species.

  15. Oxya hyla hyla (Orthoptera: Acrididae) as an Alternative Protein Source for Japanese Quail

    PubMed Central

    Das, Mousumi; Mandal, Suman Kalyan

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient composition of the grasshoppers Oxya hyla hyla showed that they are a rich nutrient source containing 687.7 g protein/kg of dry body weight. Their antinutrient values fell within nutritionally acceptable values of the poultry bird Coturnix japonica japonica (Japanese quail). The most required essential amino acids and fatty acids were also present in sufficient amount. For feeding trial nine diets were formulated on an equal crude protein (230 g/kg) basis with grasshopper meal, fish meal, and soybean meal. Three sets of diets with grasshopper meal were prepared with 50 g/kg, 100 g/kg, and 150 g/kg grasshopper of total feed. Similarly, other diet sets were prepared with fish meal and also with soybean meal. Results were compared with another group of Japanese quails fed on a reference diet that was considered as control. Two experiments were conducted with a total number of 600, seven-day-old, Japanese quails. In experiment 1 for determination of growth performance, quails were randomly distributed into ten groups of males and ten groups of females containing 30 birds each. In experiment 2 for determination of laying performance, identical ten groups were prepared in ten repetitions (2 females and 1 male in each group) from the six-week-old birds of experiment 1. Birds of diet set GM2 have gained the highest body weight (male 4.04 g/bird/day; female 5.01 g/bird/day) followed by birds of FM3 diet set (male 3.72 g/bird/day; female 4.40 g/bird/day), whereas birds of reference diet have gained 3.05 g/bird/day for male and 3.23 g/bird/day for female. Feed conversion ratio (FCR) of birds fed with GM2 was the lowest (male 3.33; female 2.97) whereas FCR of R group was higher (male 4.37; female 4.65) than grasshopper meal and fish meal based diets. Hen day production percentage was higher (72.2) in GM2 group, followed by FM3 (63.5) group. R group had lower 1st egg weight (9.0 g), weight gain (8.2 g), percentage of hen day production (41.8%), higher feed intake (33.6 g/day/bird), and age at 1st laid egg than the grasshopper meal and fish meal based diets. So growth and laying performance of the birds were significantly better in grasshopper meal and fish meal added diet fed sets than the reference diet fed group; among all the dietary groups 100 g/kg grasshopper meal added diet mostly gave significantly better results followed by 150 g/kg fish meal added diets. It was ascertained that the O. hyla hyla meal had pronounced positive response on the birds. So, the quails could be easily fed 100 g/kg grasshopper meal added diet as it was the most suitable alternative feedstuff compared to the conventional protein source based diets. PMID:27355015

  16. Improving the degree-day model for forecasting Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen) (Orthoptera: Acridoidea).

    PubMed

    Tu, Xiongbing; Li, Zhihong; Wang, Jie; Huang, Xunbing; Yang, Jiwen; Fan, Chunbin; Wu, Huihui; Wang, Qinglei; Zhang, Zehua

    2014-01-01

    The degree-day (DD) model is an important tool for forecasting pest phenology and voltinism. Unfortunately, the DD model is inaccurate, as is the case for the Oriental migratory locust. To improve the existing DD model for this pest, we first studied locust development in seven growth chambers, each of which simulated the complete growing-season climate of a specific region in China (Baiquan, Chengde, Tumotezuoqi, Wenan, Rongan, Qiongzhong, or Qiongshan). In these seven treatments, locusts completed 0.95, 1, 1.1, 2.2, 2.95, 3.95, and 4.95 generations, respectively. Hence, in the Baiquan (700), Rongan (2400), Qiongzhong (3200), and Qiongshan (2400) treatments, the final generation were unable to lay eggs. In a second experiment, we reared locusts for a full generation in growth chambers, at different constant temperatures. This experiment provided two important findings. First, temperatures between 32 and 42°C did not influence locust development rate. Hence, the additional heat provided by temperatures above 32°C did not add to the total heat units acquired by the insects, according to the traditional DD model. Instead, temperatures above 32°C represent overflow heat, and can not be included when calculating total heat acquired during development. We also noted that females raised at constant 21°C failed to oviposit. Hence, temperatures lower than 21°C should be deducted when calculating total heat acquired during adult development. Using our experimental findings, we next micmiked 24-h temperature curve and constructed a new DD model based on a 24-h temperature integral calculation. We then compared our new model with the traditional DD model, results showed the DD deviation was 166 heat units in Langfang during 2011. At last we recalculated the heat by our new DD model, which better predicted the results from our first growth chamber experiment.

  17. Taxonomy and distribution of some katydids (Orthoptera Tettigoniidae) from tropical Africa

    PubMed Central

    Massa, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Results of the study of specimens collected in tropical Africa and preserved in different European collections and museums are reported and extensively illustrated. The following three new species are described: Horatosphaga aethiopica sp. n., Dapanera occulta sp. n. and Cestromoecha laeglae sp. n. In addition, new diagnostic characters or distributional data for Ruspolia differens (Serville, 1838), Thyridorhoptrum senegalense Krauss, 1877, Horatosphaga leggei (Kirby, 1909), Horatosphaga linearis (Rehn, 1910), Preussia lobatipes Karsch, 1890 and Dapanera eidmanni Ebner, 1943 are reported. Finally, Symmetropleura plana (Walker, 1869) is proposed to be transferred to the genus Symmetrokarschia Massa, 2015, Conocephalus carbonarius (Redtenbacher, 1891) to the genus Thyridorhoptrum Rehn & Hebard, 1915; the genus Gonatoxia Karsch, 1889 is proposed to be synonymized with Dapanera Karsch, 1889. PMID:26478704

  18. Phylogeny and classification of the Catantopidae at the tribal level (Orthoptera, Acridoidea)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baoping; Liu, Zhiwei; Zheng, Zhe-Min

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The grasshopper family Catantopidae is a well-known group, whose members include some of the most notorious agricultural pests. The existing classifications of the family are mostly utilitarian rather than being based on phylogenetic analysis and therefore unable to provide the stability desired for such an economically important group. In the present study, we present the first comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of the family based on morphology. By extensively sampling from the Chinese fauna, we included in the present analysis multiple representatives of each of the previously recognized tribes in the family. In total, we examined 94 genera represented by 240 species and evaluated 116 characters, including 84 for external morphology and 32 for male genitalia. The final matrix consists of 86 ingroup taxa and 88 characters. Our phylogenetic analyses resulted in a high resolution of the basal relationships of the family while showed considerable uncertainty about the relationships among some crown taxa. We further evaluated the usefulness of morphological characters in phylogeny reconstruction of the catantopids by examining character fit to the shortest trees found, and contrary to previous suggestions, our results suggest that genitalia characters are not as informative as external morphology in inferring higher-level relationship. We further suggest that earlier classification systems of grasshoppers in general and Catantopidae in particular most probably consist of many groups that are not natural due the heavy reliance on genitalia features and need to be revised in the light of future phylogenetic studies. Finally, we outlined a tentative classification scheme based on the results of our phylogenetic analysis. PMID:22287899

  19. Acoustic, genetic and morphological variations within the katydid Gampsocleis sedakovii (Orthoptera, Tettigonioidea)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xue; Wen, Ming; Li, Junjian; Zhu, Hui; Wang, Yinliang; Ren, Bingzhong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In an attempt to explain the variation within this species and clarify the subspecies classification, an analysis of the genetic, calling songs, and morphological variations within the species Gampsocleis sedakovii is presented from Inner Mongolia, China. Recordings were compared of the male calling songs and analysis performed of selected acoustic variables. This analysis is combined with sequencing of mtDNA - COI and examination of morphological traits to perform cluster analyses. The trees constructed from different datasets were structurally similar, bisecting the six geographical populations studied. Based on two large branches in the analysis, the species Gampsocleis sedakovii was partitioned into two subspecies, Gampsocleis sedakovii sedakovii (Fischer von Waldheim, 1846) and Gampsocleis sedakovii obscura (Walker, 1869). Comparing all the traits, the individual of Elunchun (ELC) was the intermediate type in this species according to the acoustic, genetic, and morphological characteristics. This study provides evidence for insect acoustic signal divergence and the process of subspeciation. PMID:26692795

  20. Montane and coastal species diversification in the economically important Mexican grasshopper genus Sphenarium (Orthoptera: Pyrgomorphidae).

    PubMed

    Pedraza-Lara, Carlos; Barrientos-Lozano, Ludivina; Rocha-Sánchez, Aurora Y; Zaldívar-Riverón, Alejandro

    2015-03-01

    The genus Sphenarium (Pyrgomorphidae) is a small group of grasshoppers endemic to México and Guatemala that are economically and culturally important both as a food source and as agricultural pests. However, its taxonomy has been largely neglected mainly due to its conserved interspecific external morphology and the considerable intraspecific variation in colour pattern of some taxa. Here we examined morphological as well as mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence data to assess the species boundaries and evolutionary history in Sphenarium. Our morphological identification and DNA sequence-based species delimitation, carried out with three different approaches (DNA barcoding, general mixed Yule-coalescent model, Bayesian species delimitation), all recovered a higher number of putative species of Sphenarium than previously recognised. We unambiguously delimit seven species, and between five and ten additional species depending on the data/method analysed. Phylogenetic relationships within the genus strongly support two main clades, one exclusively montane, the other coastal. Divergence time estimates suggest late Miocene to Pliocene ages for the origin and most of the early diversification events in the genus, which were probably influenced by the formation of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. A series of Pleistocene events could have led to the current species diversification in both montane and coastal regions. This study not only reveals an overlooked species richness for the most popular edible insect in Mexico, but also highlights the influence of the dynamic geological and climatic history of the region in shaping its current diversity.

  1. New species of Microcentrum Scudder, 1862 (Orthoptera: Tettigonioidea: Phaneropteridae) from Amazon rainforest.

    PubMed

    Da Silva Sovano, Rafael S; Cadena-Castañeda, Oscar J

    2015-03-26

    A regional study is performed for the Amazonian species of the genus Microcentrum Scudder, 1862, its proposed Microcentrum punctifrons Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1891 as nomen dubium n. stat. and two new species are described: Microcentrum amacayacu Cadena-Casteñada, Sovano n. sp. and Microcentrum xavieri Sovano, Cadena-Casteñada n. sp. the Colombian and Brazilian Amazon, respectively. A list and a key to the Amazonian species are also provided, along with a discussion on their distribution, according to endemism areas established to Amazon rainforest.

  2. A new genus of predatory katydids (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Listroscelidinae) from the Amazonian Rainforest.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Diego Matheus De Mello; Chamorro-Rengifo, Juliana; Rafael, José Albertino

    2016-09-12

    Most of the predatory katydids Listroscelidini species known were described from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. Here a new genus and species from the Amazonian Rainforest is described. Based on its morphological characteristics, this new genus represents an intermediate form between two closely related genera, Listroscelis Serville and Monocerophora Walker.

  3. Characterization of cellulolytic activity from digestive fluids of Dissosteira carolina (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Willis, Jonathan D; Klingeman, William E; Oppert, Cris; Oppert, Brenda; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan L

    2010-11-01

    Previous screening of head-derived and gut fluid extracts of Carolina grasshoppers, Dissosteira carolina (L.) revealed relatively high activity against cellulase substrates when compared to other insect groups. In this work we report on the characterization and identification of enzymes involved in cellulolytic activity in digestive fluids of D. carolina. In zymograms using carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) as substrate, we detected four distinct cellulolytic protein bands in D. carolina gut fluids, common to all developmental stages. These cellulolytic enzymes were localized to foregut and midgut regions of the D. carolina digestive tract. Cellulases were purified from D. carolina head and gut fluid extracts by liquid chromatography to obtain N-terminal amino acid sequence tags. Database searches with sequence tags from head fluids indicated high similarity with invertebrate, bacterial and plant beta1,4-endoglucanases, while no homologues were identified for the gut-derived protein. Our data demonstrate the presence of cellulolytic activity in the digestive system of D. carolina and suggest that cellulases of endogenous origin are present in this organism. Considering that this grasshopper species is a pest of grasses, including switchgrass that has been suggested bioethanol feedstock, characterization of insect cellulolytic systems may aid in developing applications for plant biomass biodegradation for biofuel production. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Neuronal correlates of a preference for leading signals in the synchronizing bushcricket Mecopoda elongata (Orthoptera, Tettigoniidae)

    PubMed Central

    Siegert, M. E.; Römer, H.; Hashim, R.; Hartbauer, M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Acoustically interacting males of the tropical katydid Mecopoda elongata synchronize their chirps imperfectly, so that one male calls consistently earlier in time than the other. In choice situations, females prefer the leader signal, and it has been suggested that a neuronal mechanism based on directional hearing may be responsible for the asymmetric, stronger representation of the leader signal in receivers. Here, we investigated the potential mechanism in a pair of interneurons (TN1 neuron) of the afferent auditory pathway, known for its contralateral inhibitory input in directional hearing. In this interneuron, conspecific signals are reliably encoded under natural conditions, despite high background noise levels. Unilateral presentations of a conspecific chirp elicited a TN1 response where each suprathreshold syllable in the chirp was reliably copied in a phase-locked fashion. Two identical chirps broadcast with a 180 deg spatial separation resulted in a strong suppression of the response to the follower signal, when the time delay was 20 ms or more. Muting the ear on the leader side fully restored the response to the follower signal compared with unilateral controls. Time–intensity trading experiments, in which the disadvantage of the follower signal was traded against higher sound pressure levels, demonstrated the dominating influence of signal timing on the TN1 response, and this was especially pronounced at higher sound levels of the leader. These results support the hypothesis that the female preference for leader signals in M. elongata is the outcome of a sensory mechanism that originally evolved for directional hearing. PMID:22071183

  5. Microsatellite markers for the Chameleon grasshopper (Kosciuscola tristis) (Orthoptera: Acrididae), an Australian Alpine Specialist.

    PubMed

    Umbers, Kate D L; Dennison, Siobhan; Manahan, Czarina A; Blondin, Laurence; Pagés, Christine; Risterucci, Ange-Marie; Chapuis, Marie-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    A set of polymorphic loci was characterised using an enrichment library for the Australian alpine specialist, the chameleon grasshopper (Kosciuscola tristis), an atypical grasshopper known for its remarkable temperature-controlled colour change. The number of alleles per locus ranged from three to 20 and observed heterozygosity from 0.16 to 0.76. These are the first microsatellite markers for a non-endangered Australian alpine animal and will inform questions of gene flow across the sky islands of this unique and threatened region.

  6. Studies in Guatemalan Ensifera: Mayacephalus (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) a new cone-headed katydid genus.

    PubMed

    Cadena-Castañeda, Oscar J; Monzón-Sierra, José; Cortés-Torres, Carolina

    2016-02-25

    Mayacephalus dickmanorum n. gen. et n. sp., from eastern Guatemala is described in this contribution. This new genus highlights from other related ones by its short tegmina; unusual for the tribe Copiphorini, and only present in three neotropical genera: Toledopizia, Brachycaulopsis and Daedalellus, being closer to the first one.

  7. The phallic structures in Gryllotalpidae (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpoidea), and its generic implications.

    PubMed

    Cadena-Castañeda, Oscar J

    2015-07-03

    A nomenclature for phallic structures of members of the family Gryllotalpidae is proposed. Genital structures of the main genera of mole crickets are described, discussing the relationships among subfamilies and their generic delimitation. A key is provided for separation of genera based on genitalia structure. Finally, parthenogenesis in genus Gryllotalpella is recorded for the first time.

  8. Systematics and phylogeny of the genus Caenomastax Hebard, 1923
    (Orthoptera: Eumastacidae: Eumastacinae).

    PubMed

    Cadena-Castañeda, Oscar J; Garay, Andrea; Castañeda, Didier M; Cardona-Granda, Juan Manuel; García, Alexander García

    2016-05-31

    Eumastacinae are well-recognized because most genera feature showy colors, and because of particular morphological characteristics of the phallic complex. This orthopteran subfamily includes the genus Caenomastax, distributed in mid-elevations in the departments of Boyacá, Cundinamarca and Santander in Colombia. Three new species are described for this genus: Caenomastax similis n. sp., C. bimaculata n. sp. and C. magdalenensis n. sp. A phylogenetic analysis was performed based on morphological characters for 10 species (five ingroup and five outgroup) and 61 characters, which comprised external and genital morphology. Among the main results cast by this analysis was the proposition of Hebardomastax n. gen., within which C. atopa was previously placed, and a clarification was made on the status of the genus Zeromastax. Using the analyzed characters, an identification key is proposed for the genus.

  9. Suprageneric taxa derived from Amblycoryphini sensu lato (Orthoptera: Tettigonioidea: Phaneropteridae: Phaneropterinae).

    PubMed

    Cadena-Castañeda, Oscar J

    2015-01-07

    Based on the current description of the tribe Amblycoryphini some related genera have been excluded. These genera comprise two new tribes (Vossiini n. trib. and Plangiopsiini n. trib.) and a new generic group (Plangiae n. group). The main differences between the taxa described and the tribe Amblycoryphini are discussed, to understand the new proposed classification. Plangiopsis aedeps is placed in the genus Plangiola. This paper contributes to the knowledge of the tettigonid fauna from Africa and understanding of the taxonomy of neotropical Phaneropterinae. 

  10. The tribe Dysoniini part II: the genus Markia (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae; Phaneropterinae), new species and some clarifications.

    PubMed

    Cadena-Castañeda, Oscar J

    2013-01-10

    This paper clarifies the status of the species of the genus Markia White, 1862, also providing new distribution data. It describes M. erinaceus from Peru, M. arizae n.sp. from the Amazonian foothills of Colombia and Ecuador, M. sarriai n.sp. from the Colombian Biogeographic Chocó, M. espinachi n.sp. from Costa Rica; as well as the true male of M. major (Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1878), clarifying the real distributional range this latter species. M. longivertex n. syn., is proposed as a synonym of M. major. The colour polymorphism in M. hystrix (Westwood, 1844) is discussed and its distribution range is defined. A key to the species of Markia is provided.

  11. Tackling an intractable problem: Can greater taxon sampling help resolve relationships within the Stenopelmatoidea (Orthoptera: Ensifera)?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandergast, Amy; Weissman, David B; Wood, Dustin; Rentz, David C F; Bazelet, Corinna S; Ueshima, Norihiro

    2017-01-01

    The relationships among and within the families that comprise the orthopteran superfamily Stenopelmatoidea (suborder Ensifera) remain poorly understood. We developed a phylogenetic hypothesis based on Bayesian analysis of two nuclear ribosomal and one mitochondrial gene for 118 individuals (84 de novo and 34 from GenBank). These included Gryllacrididae from North, Central, and South America, South Africa and Madagascar, Australia and Papua New Guinea; Stenopelmatidae from North and Central America and South Africa; Anostostomatidae from North and Central America, Papua New Guinea, New Zealand, Australia, and South Africa; members of the Australian endemic Cooloola (three species); and a representative of Lezina from the Middle East. We also included representatives of all other major ensiferan families: Prophalangopsidae, Rhaphidophoridae, Schizodactylidae, Tettigoniidae, Gryllidae, Gryllotalpidae and Myrmecophilidae and representatives of the suborder Caelifera as outgroups. Bayesian analyses of concatenated sequence data supported a clade of Stenopelmatoidea inclusive of all analyzed members of Gryllacrididae, Stenopelmatidae, Anostostomatidae, Lezina and Cooloola. We found Gryllacrididae worldwide to be monophyletic, while we did not recover a monophyletic Stenopelmatidae nor Anostostomatidae. Australian Cooloola clustered in a clade composed of Australian, New Zealand, and some (but not all) North American Anostostomatidae. Lezina was included in a clade of New World Anostostomatidae. Finally, we compiled and compared karyotypes and sound production characteristics for each supported group. Chromosome number, centromere position, drumming, and stridulation differed among some groups, but also show variation within groups. This preliminary trait information may contribute toward future studies of trait evolution. Despite greater taxon sampling within Stenopelmatoidea than previous efforts, some relationships among the families examined continue to remain elusive.

  12. Records of Hedotettix and Teredorus in Thailand with the description of three new species (Orthoptera, Tetrigidae)

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Ling-Sheng; Wen, Ting-Chi; Kang, Ji-Chuan; Hyde, Kevin D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We are studying the fungi associated with insects in northern Thailand and as a result several rarely collected insect species have been uncovered. The genera Hedotettix with one new species and Teredorus with two new species are reported from Thailand. Hedotettix triangularis Zha & Hyde, sp. n., Teredorus chiangraiensis Zha & Hyde, sp. n. and Teredorus combfemorus Zha & Hyde, sp. n. are introduced, described and photographed and compared with other species. Keys to species of Hedotettix and Teredorus from Thailand are provided. PMID:26877695

  13. Records of Hedotettix and Teredorus in Thailand with the description of three new species (Orthoptera, Tetrigidae).

    PubMed

    Zha, Ling-Sheng; Wen, Ting-Chi; Kang, Ji-Chuan; Hyde, Kevin D

    2016-01-01

    We are studying the fungi associated with insects in northern Thailand and as a result several rarely collected insect species have been uncovered. The genera Hedotettix with one new species and Teredorus with two new species are reported from Thailand. Hedotettix triangularis Zha & Hyde, sp. n., Teredorus chiangraiensis Zha & Hyde, sp. n. and Teredorus combfemorus Zha & Hyde, sp. n. are introduced, described and photographed and compared with other species. Keys to species of Hedotettix and Teredorus from Thailand are provided.

  14. Preservation Methods Alter Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope Values in Crickets (Orthoptera: Grylloidea)

    PubMed Central

    Jesus, Fabiene Maria; Pereira, Marcelo Ribeiro; Rosa, Cassiano Sousa; Moreira, Marcelo Zacharias; Sperber, Carlos Frankl

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis (SIA) is an important tool for investigation of animal dietary habits for determination of feeding niche. Ideally, fresh samples should be used for isotopic analysis, but logistics frequently demands preservation of organisms for analysis at a later time. The goal of this study was to establish the best methodology for preserving forest litter-dwelling crickets for later SIA analysis without altering results. We collected two cricket species, Phoremia sp. and Mellopsis doucasae, from which we prepared 70 samples per species, divided among seven treatments: (i) freshly processed (control); preserved in fuel ethanol for (ii) 15 and (iii) 60 days; preserved in commercial ethanol for (iv) 15 and (v) 60 days; fresh material frozen for (vi) 15 and (vii) 60 days. After oven drying, samples were analyzed for δ15N, δ13C values, N(%), C(%) and C/N atomic values using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. All preservation methods tested, significantly impacted δ13C and δ15N and C/N atomic values. Chemical preservatives caused δ13C enrichment as great as 1.5‰, and δ15N enrichment as great as 0.9‰; the one exception was M. doucasae stored in ethanol for 15 days, which had δ15N depletion up to 1.8‰. Freezing depleted δ13C and δ15N by up to 0.7 and 2.2‰, respectively. C/N atomic values decreased when stored in ethanol, and increased when frozen for 60 days for both cricket species. Our results indicate that all preservation methods tested in this study altered at least one of the tested isotope values when compared to fresh material (controls). We conclude that only freshly processed material provides adequate SIA results for litter-dwelling crickets. PMID:26390400

  15. Phylogeny and chromosomal diversification in the Dichroplus elongatus species group (Orthoptera, Melanoplinae).

    PubMed

    Castillo, Elio R D; Taffarel, Alberto; Maronna, Maximiliano M; Cigliano, María Marta; Palacios-Gimenez, Octavio M; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo C; Martí, Dardo A

    2017-01-01

    In an attempt to track the chromosomal differentiation in the Dichroplus elongatus species group, we analyzed the karyotypes of four species with classical cytogenetic and mapping several multigene families through fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). We improved the taxon sampling of the D. elongatus species group adding new molecular data to infer the phylogeny of the genus and reconstruct the karyotype evolution. Our molecular analyses recovered a fully resolved tree with no evidence for the monophyly of Dichroplus. However, we recovered several stable clades within the genus, including the D. elongatus species group, under the different strategies of tree analyses (Maximum Parsimony and Maximum Likelihood). The chromosomal data revealed minor variation in the D. elongatus species group's karyotypes caused by chromosome rearrangements compared to the phylogenetically related D. maculipennis species group. The karyotypes of D. intermedius and D. exilis described herein showed the standard characteristics found in most Dichroplini, 2n = 23/24, X0♂ XX♀, Fundamental number (FN) = 23/24. However, we noticed two established pericentric inversions in D. intermedius karyotype, raising the FN to 27♂/28♀. A strong variation in the heterochromatic blocks distribution was evidenced at interespecific level. The multigene families' mapping revealed significant variation, mainly in rDNA clusters. These variations are probably caused by micro chromosomal changes, such as movement of transposable elements (TEs) and ectopic recombination. These observations suggest a high genomic dynamism for these repetitive DNA sequences in related species. The reconstruction of the chromosome character "variation in the FN" posits the FN = 23/24 as the ancestral state, and it is hypothesized that variations due to pericentric inversions has arisen independently three times in the evolutionary history of Dichroplus. One of these independent events occurred in the D. elongatus species group, where D. intermedius is the unique case with the highest FN described in the tribe Dichroplini.

  16. Differential Gene Expression Analysis of the Epacromius coerulipes (Orthoptera: Acrididae) Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yongling; Cong, Bin; Wang, Liyan; Gao, Yugang; Zhang, Haiyan; Dong, Hui; Lin, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Epacromius coerulipes (Ivanov) is one of the most widely distributed locusts. To date, the main methods to kill locusts still rely on chemical controls, which can result in the selection of locusts with resistance to chemical pesticides. Butene-fipronil is a new pesticide that was discovered by the structural modification of fipronil. This pesticide has been used to control various agricultural pests and has become an important pesticide product to control pests that exhibit resistance to other pesticides, including locusts. To extend its useful half-life, studies of the initiation and progression of resistance to this pesticide are needed. Herein, two E. coerulipes strains, a pesticide-sensitive (PS) and a pesticide-resistant (PR) strain, were chosen to undergo de novo assembly by paired-end transcriptome Illumina sequencing. Overall, 63,033 unigenes were detected; the average gene length was 772 bp and the N50 was 1,589 bp. Among these unigenes, ∼25,132 (39.87% of the total) could be identified as known proteins in bioinformatic databases from national centers. A comparison of the PR and PS strains revealed that 2,568 genes were differentially expressed, including 1,646 and 922 genes that were up- and down-regulated, respectively. According to the Gene Ontology (GO) database, among biological processes the metabolic process group was the largest group (6,900 genes, 22.47%) and contained a high frequency of differentially expressed genes (544 genes, 27.54%). According to the Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) categories, 28 genes, representing 2.98% of all genes, belonged to the group of genes involved in the biosynthesis, transportation, and catabolism of secondary metabolites. The differentially expressed genes that we identified are involved in 50 metabolic pathways. Among these pathways, the metabolism pathway was the most represented. After enrichment analysis of differential gene expression pathways, six pathways—ribosome; starch, and sucrose metabolism; ascorbate and aldarate metabolism; drug metabolism-cytochrome P450; metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450; and glutathione metabolism—showed a high degree of enrichment. Among these pathways, drug metabolism-cytochrome P450, metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450, and glutathione metabolism have been associated with pesticide metabolism. Furthermore, 316 unigenes in the E. coerulipes transcriptome encode detoxifying enzymes and 76 unigenes encode target proteins of pesticides. Among these genes, 23 genes that encode detoxifying enzymes in the resistance group were found to be up-regulated. The transcriptome sequencing results of E. coerulipes established a genomics database of E. coerulipes for the first time. This study also establishes a molecular basis for gene function analysis of E. coerulipes. Moreover, it provides a theoretical resource for mechanistic studies on pesticide resistance through the screening and investigation of resistance genes. PMID:27142308

  17. Development of a toxic bait for control of eastern lubber grasshopper (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Barbara, Kathryn A; Capinera, John L

    2003-06-01

    This study assessed baits for eastern lubber grasshopper, Romalea guttata (Houttuyn). When offered a choice among several grain-based baits (rolled oats, wheat bran, oat bran, yeast, corn meal, cornflakes) and vegetable oils (canola, corn, peanut, soybean), eastern lubber grasshopper adults preferred bait consisting of wheat bran carrier with corn oil as an added phagostimulant. Other carriers were accepted but consumed less frequently. Discrimination by eastern lubber grasshoppers among oils was poor. Similarly, addition of flavorings (peppermint, anise, lemon, banana) resulted in few significant effects. The carbaryl, wheat bran, and oil bait developed in this study was effective at causing eastern lubber grasshopper mortality in field-cage studies. Significant mortality occurred even though grasshoppers had to locate dishes of bait in a large cage, and could feed on daylilies, or grass growing through the bottom of the cage, rather than on the bran flakes. Consumption of as little as a single carbaryl-treated bran flake could induce mortality, although individuals varied greatly in their susceptibility. The bait matrix developed in this study was readily consumed when in the presence of some plant species. We expect that wheat bran and corn oil bait would be most effective as protection for less preferred plants (tomato, pepper, eggplant, leek, parsley, fennel, daylily, lily of the Nile, and canna lily) because baits were readily consumed in the presence of these plants. Plants that are readily consumed in the presence of bait (preferred plants) included butter crunch lettuce, carrot, yellow squash, cauliflower, collards, green onion, chive, cucumber, cabbage, cantalope, endive, red leaf lettuce, society garlic, caladium, and amaryllis. Baits are likely to be less effective in the presence of such plants. On average, vegetables in Solanaceae (i.e., tomato, pepper, and eggplant) and Apiaceae (i.e., fennel and parsley) elicited high levels of bait-feeding activity, indicating that these vegetables were not highly preferred. The plants tested from Liliaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Asteraceae, and Brassicaceae elicited an intermediate-to-low level of bait feeding.

  18. Vapor phase toxicity of marjoram oil compounds and their related monoterpenoids to Blattella germanica (Orthoptera: Blattellidae).

    PubMed

    Jang, Young-Su; Yang, Young-Cheol; Choi, Dal-Soon; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2005-10-05

    The toxicity of marjoram, Origanum majorana L., oil, 41 monoterpenoids, and 2 sesquiterpenoids against adult females of the German cockroach, Blattella germanica L., was examined using direct contact and vapor phase toxicity bioassays and compared with those of deltamethrin, dichlorvos, permethrin, and propoxur, four commonly used insecticides. In a filter-paper contact toxicity bioassay, the adulticidal activities of pulegone (0.06 mg/cm2), (+/-)-camphor (0.07 mg/cm2), and verbenone (0.07 mg/cm2) were comparable to that of permethrin (0.05 mg/cm2) but more pronounced than that of propoxur (0.18 mg/cm2), as judged by the 24-h LC50 values. These compounds were less effective than either deltamethrin (0.013 mg/cm2) or dichlorvos (0.007 mg/cm2). The toxicity of marjoram oil, thymol, alpha-terpineol, (-)-alpha-thujone, linalool, 1,8-cineole, (-)-camphor, and (+)-carvone, ranging from 0.08 to 0.18 mg/cm2, was higher than that of propoxur. In vapor phase toxicity tests, verbenone (11.48 mg/L air) was the most toxic compound followed by (-)-alpha-thujone (18.43 mg/L of air), thymol (18.76 mg/L of air), alpha-terpineol (21.89 mg/L of air), (+/-)-camphor (24.59 mg/L of air), linalool (26.20 mg/L of air), and marjoram oil (38.28 mg/L of air) on the basis of the 24-h LC50 values. Dichlorvos (0.07 mg/L of air) was the most potent fumigant. Structure-activity relationships indicate that structural characteristics, such as degrees of saturation and types of functional groups rather than types of carbon skeleton, and hydrophobicity and vapor pressure parameters appear to play a role in determining the monoterpenoid toxicities to adult B. germanica. Marjoram oil and the monoterpenoids described merit further study as potential fumigants or leads for the control of B. germanica.

  19. Notes on the genus Larnaca Walker, 1869 (Orthoptera: Gryllacridinae) from China.

    PubMed

    DU, Baojie; Bian, Xun; Shi, Fuming

    2017-02-13

    Walker (1869) proposed the genus Larnaca with type species Larnaca fasciata Walker, 1869. Karny (1937) gave the characters of the genus and listed 8 species. Gorochov (2003) subdivided the genus into two subgenera: Larnaca and Paralarnaca, and their type species are Larnaca (Larnaca) fasciata Walker, 1869 (Malesia) and Larnaca (Paralarnaca) johni (Griffini, 1911) (Malesia) respectively, and described 2 new species, i.e. Larnaca (Larnaca) vietnamensis Gorochov, 2003 (type locality: Vietnam) and Larnaca (Larnaca) phetchaburi Gorochov, 2003 (type locality: Thailand). Bian et al. (2015) firstly reported Larnaca Walker, 1869 from China, and described 1 new species, i.e. Larnaca (Larnaca) emarginata Bian, Guo & Shi, 2015. So far, the genus Larnaca includes 13 species.

  20. Dynamics of Reintroduced Populations of Oedipoda caerulescens (Orthoptera, Acrididae) over 21 Years.

    PubMed

    Baur, Bruno; Thommen, G Heinrich; Coray, Armin

    2017-01-01

    Conservation programs increasingly involve the reintroduction of animals which otherwise would not recolonize restored habitats. We assessed the long-term success of a project in which the Blue-winged grasshopper, Oedipoda caerulescens (L., 1758), was reintroduced to a nature reserve in Northwestern Switzerland, an alluvial gravel area where the species went extinct in the 1960s. In summer 1995, we released 110 individuals (50 females and 60 males) and 204 individuals (101 females and 103 males) into two restored gravel patches with sparse vegetation. We used a transect count technique to assess the population size of O. caerulescens in the years 1995-2004 and 2015-2016 and recorded the area occupied by the species. At both release sites, the populations persisted and increased significantly in size. Individuals that followed a newly created corridor established four new subpopulations. Seven years after reintroduction, O. caerulescens had reached a high abundance around the release sites and in the four colonized patches, indicating a successful project. At the same time, the dispersal corridor became increasingly overgrown by dense vegetation. Surveys 20 and 21 yr after introduction showed that the abundance of the Blue-winged grasshopper had strongly declined in the established subpopulations and moderately in the original release sites, owing to natural succession of the habitat and lack of disturbances, which reduced the area suitable for the species by 59%. Our study shows that reintroductions are unlikely to succeed without integration of long-term habitat management (in the present case maintenance of open ground).

  1. Annotated checklist and key to species of Gryllotalpa (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae) from the Oriental region.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ming Kai

    2016-06-28

    The cosmopolitan Gryllotalpa mole cricket is the most speciose genus (70 species) in the family Gryllotalpidae. The taxonomy and diversity of Oriental species are not well understood. A species list with 26 species is presented here. An artificial key is also presented aimed to help with species identification, new species discovery and future taxonomic revision in the biodiverse Oriental region.

  2. Inversion polymorphisms in Trimerotropis pallidipennis (Orthoptera): clinical variation along an altitudinal gradient.

    PubMed

    Confalonieri, V A; Colombo, P C

    1989-02-01

    Six populations of Trimerotropis pallidipennis located along an altitudinal gradient in the Antinaco-Los Colorados valley (La Rioja, Argentina), were cytologically analysed. The male karyotype consists of 23 chromosomes (22 + XO) with three long pairs submetacentric, the X-chromosome metacentric and the remaining ones basically acrocentric. Populations from La Rioja were polymorphic for seven pericentric inversions. Correlations between chromosome frequencies and altitude were statistically tested. In most cases, variables were either positively or negatively related in a significant fashion. As a consequence, mean populational heterozygosis (measured as the mean number of heteromorphic bivalents per individual per population) was also positively correlated with altitude. These results suggest that altitude (or other correlated environmental variable) may exert a differential selective pressure on coadapted gene blocks in the mutually inverted sequences. The possible relation of these results with the central-marginal model is discussed.

  3. Micromorphological differentiation of left and right stridulatory apparatus in crickets (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Xue; Luo, Wenqi; Wang, Yinliang; Ren, Bingzhong

    2016-06-24

    The present study compared micromorphological differentiation of stridulatory apparatus between the functional right tegmen and non-functional left tegmen, analyzed under scanning electron microscope (SEM), among eight Gryllidae species. The results showed that the main differences were found on the length and shape of files and teeth. The length of stridulatory file and teeth number were lower on the left stridulatory apparatus than that on right stridulatory apparatus in all species. However, the ratio between the length of stridulatory teeth and the interval of stridulatory teeth was significantly higher on the left stridulatory apparatus than that on right stridulatory apparatus in Dianemobius fascipes, Polionemobius taprobanensis, Pteronemobius gifuensis, Teleogryllus occipitalis and Oecanthus longicauda. In addition, the length of stridulatory teeth was positively related to number of stridulatory teeth, however, the interval of stridulatory teeth was negatively related to the ratio between the length of stridulatory teeth and the interval of stridulatory teeth for left and right stridulatory apparatus. Our result illustrated that the length of left and right stridulatory file and teeth length could be an effective character to distinguish species. Left stridulatory apparatus was not entirely degraded than right stridulatory apparatus.

  4. Sexual dimorphism in cuticular hydrocarbons of the Australian field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    PubMed

    Thomas, Melissa L; Simmons, Leigh W

    2008-06-01

    Sexual dimorphism is presumed to reflect adaptive divergence in response to selection favouring different optimal character states in the two sexes. Here, we analyse patterns of sexual dimorphism in the cuticular hydrocarbons of the Australian field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus using gas chromatography. Ten of the 25 peaks found in our chromatographs, differed in their relative abundance between the sexes. The presence of sexual dimorphism in T. oceanicus is discussed in reference to a review of sexual dimorphism in cuticular hydrocarbons of other insects. We found that this trait has been examined in 103 species across seven different orders. Seventy-six of these species (73%) displayed sex specificity of cuticular hydrocarbons, the presence/absence of which does not appear to be directly linked to phylogeny. The occurrence of sexual dimorphism in cuticular hydrocarbons of some but not other species, and the extent of variation within genera, suggest that this divergence has been driven primarily by sexual selection.

  5. Body Size, Fecundity, and Sexual Size Dimorphism in the Neotropical Cricket Macroanaxipha macilenta (Saussure) (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    PubMed

    Cueva Del Castillo, R

    2015-04-01

    Body size is directly or indirectly correlated with fitness. Body size, which conveys maximal fitness, often differs between sexes. Sexual size dimorphism (SSD) evolves because body size tends to be related to reproductive success through different pathways in males and females. In general, female insects are larger than males, suggesting that natural selection for high female fecundity could be stronger than sexual selection in males. I assessed the role of body size and fecundity in SSD in the Neotropical cricket Macroanaxipha macilenta (Saussure). This species shows a SSD bias toward males. Females did not present a correlation between number of eggs and body size. Nonetheless, there were fluctuations in the number of eggs carried by females during the sampling period, and the size of females that were collected carrying eggs was larger than that of females collected with no eggs. Since mating induces vitellogenesis in some cricket species, differences in female body size might suggest male mate choice. Sexual selection in the body size of males of M. macilenta may possibly be stronger than the selection of female fecundity. Even so, no mating behavior was observed during the field observations, including audible male calling or courtship songs, yet males may produce ultrasonic calls due to their size. If female body size in M. macilenta is not directly related to fecundity, the lack of a correlated response to selection on female body size could represent an alternate evolutionary pathway in the evolution of body size and SSD in insects.

  6. A new species of the genus Duolandrevus (Orthoptera: Gryllidae: Landrevinae) from China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Libin; Gorochov, Andrej V; Zhang, Yalin

    2015-05-27

    A bark cricket genus Duolandrevus Kirby, 1906 is discussed here. These species are brownish with depressed bodies, with reduced elytra, lack hind wings and live in the bark of dead trees or branches. Duolandrevus are distributed from the south of China and Japan to the Philippines, the Malay Archipelago and New Guinea. Only one species, Duolandrevus hongkongae Otte, 1988, was recorded in China. Here, one additional species, Duolandrevus (Eulandrevus) unguiculatus sp. nov. is described from Southern China. Its description and illustrations and the key to the subgenera of Duolandrevus worldwide are given.

  7. Two new species of Eneopterinae crickets (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) from Luzon, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Baroga, Jessica B; Yap, Sheryl A; Robillard, Tony

    2016-07-19

    Luzon Island is considered as the largest island in the Philippines and is characterized by a considerable biodiversity encompassing many endemic plant and animal species. In this paper, two new species of Eneopterinae crickets: (1) Lebinthus polillensis n. sp., and (2) Paranisitra septentria n. sp. are described and an updated key to the Philippines species of the subfamily Eneopterinae is provided.

  8. Morphological characterization of some representative species of the genus Loxoblemmus (Orthoptera: Gryllidae; Gryllinae; Gryllini) from India.

    PubMed

    Mal, Jhabar; Nagar, Rajendra; Swaminathan, R

    2015-05-05

    Morphological characterization of some common species of the genus Loxoblemmus (Gryllidae: Gryllinae) from India is presented. In all, 5 species were identified that included two, Loxoblemmus equestris Saussure and Loxoblemmus haani Saussure, from the sub-humid regions of Rajasthan (South West India) and Madhya Pradesh (Central India); while three species, Loxoblemmus taicoun Saussure, Loxoblemmus jacobsoni Chopard and Loxoblemmus intermedius Chopard from the humid hilly regions of Meghalaya and Assam (North East India). Of the 5 reported species, based on the comparative linear measurements, L. haani is relatively larger than the other species encountered.

  9. The characteristics of karyotype and telomeric satellite DNA sequences in the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus (Orthoptera, Gryllidae).

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, A; Nakata, A; Mito, T; Noji, S

    2006-01-01

    The chromosomes derived from the Japanese population of Gryllus bimaculatus were characterized by C-banding and Ag-NOR staining. The chromosome number, 2n = 28 + XX (female)/XO (male), corresponded with that of other populations of G. bimaculatus, but the chromosome configuration in idiograms varied between the populations. NORs were carried on one pair of autosomes and appeared polymorphous. The positive C-bands located at the centromere of all chromosomes and the distal regions of many chromosome pairs, and the size and the distribution pattern of the distal C-heterochromatin showed differences among the chromosomes. In addition, this paper reports on the characteristics of HindIII satellite DNA isolated from the genome of G. bimaculatus. The HindIII repetitive fragments were about 0.54 kb long, and localized at the distal C-bands of the autosomes and the interstitial C-bands of the X chromosome. Molecular analysis showed two distinct satellite DNA sequences, named the GBH535 and GBH542 families, with high AT contents of about 67 and 66%, respectively. The two repetitive families seem to be derived from a common ancestral sequence, and both families possessed the same 13-bp palindrome sequence. The results of Southern blot hybridization suggest that the sequence of the GBH535 family is conserved in the genomic DNAs of Gryllus species, whereas the GBH542 family is a species-specific sequence. 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. New record of the bush cricket, Zvenella yunnana Gorochov (Orthoptera: Gryllidae: Podoscirtinae) from India.

    PubMed

    Mal, Jhabar; Nagar, Rajendra; Swaminathan, R

    2014-10-07

    The first record of a known species of bush cricket, Zvenella yunnana (Gryllidae: Podoscirtinae), collected from the North-eastern province, Meghalaya (India) is reported. Previously, the species was reported from Thailand and the Indo-China region (Gorochov, 1985, 1988). The other congeneric species reported is Zvenella geniculata (Chopard) from Thailand. The morphological characterization of Z. yunnana has been presented with suitable illustrations.

  11. Epichloë uncinata Infection and Loline Content Protect Festulolium Grasses From Crickets (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    PubMed

    Barker, Gary M; Patchett, Brian J; Cameron, Nicholas E

    2015-04-01

    Experiments with artificial diets demonstrated that black field cricket (Teleogryllus commodus (Walker)) and Lepidogryllus sp. were highly responsive to presence of lolines in their diet-quantities of diet consumed declined exponentially with increasing loline concentration. Amount consumed by black field cricket and Lepidogryllus sp. on diet containing 5,600 µg/g lolines was only 8 and 2% relative to those on loline-free diet, respectively. Additional experiments with Festulolium seeds demonstrated that both cricket species predated heavily on endophyte-free seed but largely avoided Epichloë uncinata-infected seed. By 12 h, black field cricket had destroyed 98.8% of endophyte-free but only 24.8% of E. uncinata-infected, loline-containing seed. By 36 h, Lepidogryllus sp. crickets had destroyed 40% of endophyte-free but had not fed on E. uncinata-infected, loline-containing seed. Glasshouse experiments demonstrated this aversion to lolines greatly reduces the damage potential of black field cricket in E. uncinata-infected Festulolium. When microswards were sown with E. uncinata-infected Festulolium, seedling numbers were reduced 25-26%, and yields 29-40%, by black field crickets relative to microswards sown without insect infestation. This contrasts with 70-78% reduction in seedling numbers and 67-80% reduction in yields in microswards sown to either endophyte-free Festulolium, endophyte-free perennial ryegrass, or Epichloë festucae var. lolii-infected Festulolium. Yields of mature E. uncinata-infected Festulolium plants were not adversely affected by black field crickets, irrespective of the presence of the endophyte-free standard Festulolium sown as a companion. In contrast, yields of endophyte-free Festulolium, endophyte-free perennial ryegrass, and E. festucae var. lolii-infected Festulolium plants were reduced by 56-61% by crickets. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Taxonomic recovery of the ant cricket Myrmecophilus albicinctus from M. americanus (Orthoptera, Myrmecophilidae)

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Takashi; Maruyama, Munetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Myrmecophilus americanus and Myrmecophilus albicinctus are typical myrmecophilous insects living inside ant nests. These species are ecologically important due to the obligate association with tramp ant species, including harmful invasive ant species. However, the taxonomy of these “white-banded ant crickets” is quite confused owing to a scarcity of useful external morphological characteristics. Recently, Myrmecophilus albicinctus was synonymized with Myrmecophilus americanus regardless of the apparent host use difference. To clarify taxonomical relationship between Myrmecophilus albicinctus and Myrmecophilus albicinctus, we reexamined morphological characteristics of both species mainly in the viewpoint of anatomy. Observation of genitalia parts, together with a few external body parts, revealed that Myrmecophilus albicinctus showed different tendency from them of Myrmecophilus americanus. Therefore, we recover Myrmecophilus albicinctus as a distinct species on the basis of the morphology. PMID:27408536

  13. New Podoscirtine crickets (Orthoptera: Gryllidae; Podoscirtinae) from National Natural Park Amacayacu, Amazonas, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Cadena-Castañeda, Oscar J; Noriega, Jorge Ari

    2015-03-30

    We describe six new species of crickets from the subfamily Podoscirtinae in the family Gryllidae from the "Amacayacu" National Park: Diatrypa (Latispeculum) didieri n. sp. (Aphonoidini: Diatrypina), Ectotrypa brachyptera n. sp. (Paroecanthini: Paroecanthina), Aphonomorphus (Aphonomorphus) desutterae n. sp., Aphonomorphus (Euaphonus) andreae n. sp., Aphonomorphus (Euaphonus) gorochovi n. sp., and Aphonomorphus (Nigraphonus) otavoi n. sp. (Podoscirtini: Aphonomorphina). Nigraphonus n. subgen. is proposed as a new subgenus of Aphonomorphus, grouping the species with unclear position into Neoaphonus (A. obscurus Chopard, 1956 n. comb., A. parobscurus Gorochov, 2010 n. comb., and A. nigra n. sp.). The state of knowledge of Podoscirtinae in Colombia is discussed.

  14. Mechanisms for synchrony and alternation in song interactions of the bushcricket Mecopoda elongata (Tettigoniidae: Orthoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Hartbauer, Manfred; Kratzer, Silvia; Steiner, Klaus; Römer, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    Males of the bushcricket Mecopoda elongata synchronise or alternate their chirps with their neighbours in an aggregation. Since synchrony is imperfect, leader and follower chirps are established in song interactions; females prefer leader chirps in phonotactic trials. Using playback experiments and simulations of song oscillator interactions, we investigate the mechanisms that result in synchrony and alternation, and the probability for the leader role in synchrony. A major predictor for the leader role of a male is its intrinsic chirp period, which varies in a population from 1.6 to 2.3 s. Faster singing males establish the leader role more often than males with longer chirp periods. The phase-response curve (PRC) of the song oscillators differs to other rhythmically calling or flashing insects, in that only the disturbed cycle is influenced in duration by a stimulus. This results in sustained leader or follower chirps of one male, when the intrinsic chirp periods of two males differ by 150 ms or more. By contrast, the individual shape of the male’s PRC has only little influence on the outcome of chirp interactions. The consequences of these findings for the evolution of synchrony in this species are discussed. PMID:15614532

  15. Characterization of cellulolytic activity from digestive fluids of Dissosteira carolina (Orthoptera: Acrididae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previous screening of head-derived and gut fluid extracts of Carolina grasshoppers, Dissosteira carolina (L.), revealed relatively high activity against cellulase substrates when compared to other insect groups. In this work we report on the characterization and identification of enzymes involved i...

  16. Pharmacological properties of the repellent secretion of Zonocerus variegatus (Orthoptera: Prygomorphidae).

    PubMed

    Idowu, A B; Idowu, O A

    1999-12-01

    The odours of the whole body and the secretion of Zonocerus variegatus were easily recognised and perceived by human volunteers. However, the secretion odour is not related to the odour of the food plant consumed by the grasshopper. The repellency of Z. variegatus becomes more pronounced in the 6th. and adult instars whose gland lumens contain an appreciable volume of secretion. The secretion odour is so strong that even dilution does not affect its repulsiveness to humans. The secretion had pharmacological properties: it induced contraction in rat (Rattus rattus) stomach smooth muscle preparations and guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) ileum, and induced oedema formation in the rat hind paw. The secretion was not lethal to the animals used in this study, effects were temporary and recovery occurs after a short time.

  17. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SUPERCOOLING CAPABILITY AND CRYOPROTECTANT CONTENT IN EGGS OF PARARCYPTERA MICROPTERA MERIDIONALIS (ORTHOPTERA: ACRYPTERIDAE).

    PubMed

    Zhou, X R; Li, Y Y; Li, N; Pang, Bp P

    2015-01-01

    Grasshoppers are major agricultural pests throughout the world. The egg stage is important for the low temperature resistance, and almost all grasshoppers overwinter in the egg stage. To study the relationship between cold hardiness and cryoprotectant content in Pararcyptera microptera meridionalis eggs. The supercooling point (SCP) of the eggs was measured, along with the contents of water, fat, amino acids, low molecular sugars and polyols. SCP, water content and glucose concentration decreased during egg development, whereas the contents of fat, trehalose, glycerol, inositol and sorbitol increased. SCP is negatively correlated with the concentrations of fat, trehalose, glycerol, inositol and sorbitol, but positively with water content and glucose concentration. Among low molecular weight sugars and polyols tested in eggs, trehalose concentration was highest, followed by glycerol. Although total content of free amino acids did not change much, of the tested 17 free amino acids in eggs, proline and glutamine had increased by 46.3 % and 13.2 %, respectively, and both showed a negative correlation with SCP. Stepwise regression analysis showed that proline, glycerol, trehalose and inositol contribute most to the SCP depression. Cold acclimation at 0 degree C increased the contents of trehalose and glycerol, and decreased SCP. The increase of the supercooling capacity in P. microptera meridionalis eggs during development could be attributed mainly to proline, glycerol, trehalose and inositol. Cold acclimation enhances supercooling capacity via glycerol and trehalose.

  18. Measuring sexual selection on females in sex-role-reversed Mormon crickets (Anabrus simplex, Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae).

    PubMed

    Robson, L J; Gwynne, D T

    2010-07-01

    Although many studies examine the form of sexual selection in males, studies characterizing this selection in females remain sparse. Sexual selection on females is predicted for sex-role-reversed Mormon crickets, Anabrus simplex, where males are choosy of mates and nutrient-deprived females compete for matings and nutritious nuptial gifts. We used selection analyses to describe the strength and form of sexual selection on female morphology. There was no positive linear sexual selection on the female body size traits predicted to be associated with male preferences and female competition. Instead, we detected selection for decreasing head width and mandible length, with stabilizing selection as the dominant form of nonlinear selection. Additionally, we tested the validity of a commonly used instantaneous measure of mating success by comparing selection results with those determined using cumulative mating rate. The two fitness measures yielded similar patterns of selection, supporting the common sampling method comparing mated and unmated fractions.

  19. Body Size Adaptations to Altitudinal Climatic Variation in Neotropical Grasshoppers of the Genus Sphenarium (Orthoptera: Pyrgomorphidae)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Altitudinal clines in body size can result from the effects of natural and sexual selection on growth rates and developing times in seasonal environments. Short growing and reproductive seasons constrain the body size that adults can attain and their reproductive success. Little is known about the effects of altitudinal climatic variation on the diversification of Neotropical insects. In central Mexico, in addition to altitude, highly heterogeneous topography generates diverse climates that can occur even at the same latitude. Altitudinal variation and heterogeneous topography open an opportunity to test the relative impact of climatic variation on body size adaptations. In this study, we investigated the relationship between altitudinal climatic variation and body size, and the divergence rates of sexual size dimorphism (SSD) in Neotropical grasshoppers of the genus Sphenarium using a phylogenetic comparative approach. In order to distinguish the relative impact of natural and sexual selection on the diversification of the group, we also tracked the altitudinal distribution of the species and trends of both body size and SSD on the phylogeny of Sphenarium. The correlative evidence suggests no relationship between altitude and body size. However, larger species were associated with places having a warmer winter season in which the temporal window for development and reproduction can be longer. Nonetheless, the largest species were also associated with highly seasonal environments. Moreover, large body size and high levels of SSD have evolved independently several times throughout the history of the group and male body size has experienced a greater evolutionary divergence than females. These lines of evidence suggest that natural selection, associated with seasonality and sexual selection, on maturation time and body size could have enhanced the diversification of this insect group. PMID:26684616

  20. Nuptial gifts and female fecundity in the neotropical katydid Conocephalus ictus (Orthoptera: Tettigonidae).

    PubMed

    Ortíz-Jiménez, Isabel; Cueva del Castillo, Raúl

    2015-02-01

    In general, female fitness is greatly increased in gift-giving insects. In katydids, this nuptial gift consists of a gelatinous mass produced by accessory glands: the spermatophylax, which is attached to the ampulla. During mating, males of the neotropical katydid Conocephalus ictus transfer a spermatophylax that is ingested by the females. Fecundity, egg-laying rate and longevity were higher in females that consumed the spermatophylax than in those that did not. Also, female receptivity turned off after mating. Females actively rejected other males by hitting them with their forelegs and moving away. Their refractory period lasted as long as 17 d. Only a few females accepted a 2nd mating and died a few days later. In C. ictus, spermatophylax consumption can be beneficial for both males and females. On one hand, the compounds in the spermatophylax or the ejaculate could prevent or delay females from copulating with rivals, thus avoiding sperm competition. On the other hand, such compounds can improve the females' opportunity to increase their lifespan and fecundity. Moreover, a rise in egg-laying rate may lower the risk of female prereproductive death caused by rapid oviposition. In any case, the boost in female egg laying might also be beneficial for males because their number of offspring increases. © 2014 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  1. Differential Gene Expression Analysis of the Epacromius coerulipes (Orthoptera: Acrididae) Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yongling; Cong, Bin; Wang, Liyan; Gao, Yugang; Zhang, Haiyan; Dong, Hui; Lin, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Epacromius coerulipes (Ivanov) is one of the most widely distributed locusts. To date, the main methods to kill locusts still rely on chemical controls, which can result in the selection of locusts with resistance to chemical pesticides. Butene-fipronil is a new pesticide that was discovered by the structural modification of fipronil. This pesticide has been used to control various agricultural pests and has become an important pesticide product to control pests that exhibit resistance to other pesticides, including locusts. To extend its useful half-life, studies of the initiation and progression of resistance to this pesticide are needed. Herein, two E. coerulipes strains, a pesticide-sensitive (PS) and a pesticide-resistant (PR) strain, were chosen to undergo de novo assembly by paired-end transcriptome Illumina sequencing. Overall, 63,033 unigenes were detected; the average gene length was 772 bp and the N50 was 1,589 bp. Among these unigenes, ∼ 25,132 (39.87% of the total) could be identified as known proteins in bioinformatic databases from national centers. A comparison of the PR and PS strains revealed that 2,568 genes were differentially expressed, including 1,646 and 922 genes that were up- and down-regulated, respectively. According to the Gene Ontology (GO) database, among biological processes the metabolic process group was the largest group (6,900 genes, 22.47%) and contained a high frequency of differentially expressed genes (544 genes, 27.54%). According to the Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) categories, 28 genes, representing 2.98% of all genes, belonged to the group of genes involved in the biosynthesis, transportation, and catabolism of secondary metabolites. The differentially expressed genes that we identified are involved in 50 metabolic pathways. Among these pathways, the metabolism pathway was the most represented. After enrichment analysis of differential gene expression pathways, six pathways--ribosome; starch, and sucrose metabolism; ascorbate and aldarate metabolism; drug metabolism-cytochrome P450; metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450; and glutathione metabolism--showed a high degree of enrichment. Among these pathways, drug metabolism-cytochrome P450, metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450, and glutathione metabolism have been associated with pesticide metabolism. Furthermore, 316 unigenes in the E. coerulipes transcriptome encode detoxifying enzymes and 76 unigenes encode target proteins of pesticides. Among these genes, 23 genes that encode detoxifying enzymes in the resistance group were found to be up-regulated. The transcriptome sequencing results of E. coerulipes established a genomics database of E. coerulipes for the first time. This study also establishes a molecular basis for gene function analysis of E. coerulipes Moreover, it provides a theoretical resource for mechanistic studies on pesticide resistance through the screening and investigation of resistance genes.

  2. Multivariate sexual selection on male tegmina in wild populations of sagebrush crickets, Cyphoderris strepitans (Orthoptera: Haglidae).

    PubMed

    Ower, G D; Hunt, J; Sakaluk, S K

    2017-02-01

    Although the strength and form of sexual selection on song in male crickets have been studied extensively, few studies have examined selection on the morphological structures that underlie variation in males' song, particularly in wild populations. Geometric morphometric techniques were used to measure sexual selection on the shape, size and symmetry of both top and bottom tegmina in wild populations of sagebrush crickets, a species in which nuptial feeding by females imposes an unambiguous phenotypic marker on males. The size of the tegmina negatively covaried with song dominant frequency and positively covaried with song pulse duration. Sexual selection was more intense on the bottom tegmen, conceivably because it interacts more freely with the subtegminal airspace, which may play a role in song amplification. An expanded coastal/subcostal region was one of the phenotypes strongly favoured by disruptive selection on the bottom tegmen, an adaptation that may form a more effective seal with the thorax to prevent noise cancellation. Directional selection also favoured increased symmetry in tegminal shape. Assuming more symmetrical males are better able to buffer against developmental noise, the song produced by these males may make them more attractive to females. Despite the strong stabilizing selection documented previously on the dominant frequency of the song, stabilizing selection on the resonator that regulates dominant frequency was surprisingly absent. Nonetheless, wing morphology had an important influence on song structure and appears to be subject to significant linear and nonlinear sexual selection through female mate choice.

  3. Acoustic analysis reveals a new cryptic bush–cricket in the Carpathian Mountains (Orthoptera, Phaneropteridae)

    PubMed Central

    Iorgu, Ionuţ Ştefan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A new morphologically cryptic species of phaneropterid bush–cricket from the genus Isophya is described from the Eastern Carpathian Mountains: Isophya dochia sp. n. Sound analysis and morphological details are discussed in the paper comparing the new species with several Isophya species having similar morphology and acoustic behavior. PMID:23378813

  4. Exposure to Exogenous Enkephalins Disrupts Reproductive Development in the Eastern Lubber Grasshopper, Romalea microptera (Insecta: Orthoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Ganji, Purnachandra Nagaraju; Song, Hojun; von Kalm, Laurence; Borst, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Enkephalins play a major role in reproductive physiology in crustaceans; however their role in reproductive development in insects is largely unknown. We investigated the effect of exposure to exogenous leucine-enkephalin (Leu-Enk), methionine-enkephalin (Met-Enk), and the opioid antagonist naloxone on gonad development in the Eastern lubber grasshopper, Romalea microptera. Injection of either Leu-Enk or naloxone alone significantly increased the testicular index and testicular follicular diameter in males, and the ovarian index, oocyte length, and oocyte diameter in females. In contrast, injection of Met-Enk inhibited all measures of reproductive development in both sexes. Surprisingly, co-injection of naloxone with either enkephalin enhanced the effect associated with administration of the enkephalin alone. This study clearly demonstrates the ability of enkephalins to disrupt insect sexual development and also suggests the existence of conserved enkephaline-dependent regulatory mechanisms in insects and crustaceans. PMID:23226477

  5. Improving the Degree-Day Model for Forecasting Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen) (Orthoptera: Acridoidea)

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Xiongbing; Li, Zhihong; Wang, Jie; Huang, Xunbing; Yang, Jiwen; Fan, Chunbin; Wu, Huihui; Wang, Qinglei; Zhang, Zehua

    2014-01-01

    The degree-day (DD) model is an important tool for forecasting pest phenology and voltinism. Unfortunately, the DD model is inaccurate, as is the case for the Oriental migratory locust. To improve the existing DD model for this pest, we first studied locust development in seven growth chambers, each of which simulated the complete growing-season climate of a specific region in China (Baiquan, Chengde, Tumotezuoqi, Wenan, Rongan, Qiongzhong, or Qiongshan). In these seven treatments, locusts completed 0.95, 1, 1.1, 2.2, 2.95, 3.95, and 4.95 generations, respectively. Hence, in the Baiquan (700), Rongan (2400), Qiongzhong (3200), and Qiongshan (2400) treatments, the final generation were unable to lay eggs. In a second experiment, we reared locusts for a full generation in growth chambers, at different constant temperatures. This experiment provided two important findings. First, temperatures between 32 and 42°C did not influence locust development rate. Hence, the additional heat provided by temperatures above 32°C did not add to the total heat units acquired by the insects, according to the traditional DD model. Instead, temperatures above 32°C represent overflow heat, and can not be included when calculating total heat acquired during development. We also noted that females raised at constant 21°C failed to oviposit. Hence, temperatures lower than 21°C should be deducted when calculating total heat acquired during adult development. Using our experimental findings, we next micmiked 24-h temperature curve and constructed a new DD model based on a 24-h temperature integral calculation. We then compared our new model with the traditional DD model, results showed the DD deviation was 166 heat units in Langfang during 2011. At last we recalculated the heat by our new DD model, which better predicted the results from our first growth chamber experiment. PMID:24599091

  6. Effects of forest-dune ecotone management on the endangered heath grasshopper, Chorthippus vagans (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Hochkirch, A; Gärtner, A-C; Brandt, T

    2008-10-01

    Dry, oligotrophic ecosystems are highly threatened in Europe due to massive changes in land use and eutrophication. The conservation of these xeric habitats has received much attention, whereas the ecotones between xeric habitats and other habitat types are often disregarded. One species which mainly inhabits the transition zone between pine forests and adjacent xeric habitats is the heath grasshopper, Chorthippus vagans. This species is endangered in large parts of Europe. One of the largest populations in northern Germany is found on a degraded inland dune near Hanover. This population is threatened by dense growth of deciduous trees and litter accumulation. We analyzed changes in the distribution of this population after the implementation of conservation measures (thinning out the forest and removal of leaf litter). Moreover, we examined dispersal distances of the species in order to assess its colonization potential. We also studied the microhabitat preferences of C. vagans to assess key factors influencing its local distribution. Our data show a substantial growth in population size, which might be a consequence of the conservation measures. New patches on the dune were colonized, promoting dispersal between the subpopulations. We propose that restoration of forest-dune ecotones should be considered more often in landscape planning and conservation management.

  7. Biomonitoring of genotoxicity of industrial fertilizer pollutants in Aiolopus thalassinus (Orthoptera: Acrididae) using alkaline comet assay.

    PubMed

    Abdelfattah, Eman A; Augustyniak, Maria; Yousef, Hesham A

    2017-09-01

    Phosphate fertilizer industry is considered as one of the main sources of environmental pollutants. Besides solid waste products, e.g. phosphates, sulphates, and heavy metals, also atmospheric pollutants, such as hydrofluoric acid fumes (HF), sulphur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NO2), and particulate matter with diameter up to 10 μm (PM10) can be dangerous. Genotoxic effect of these pollutants was monitored by assessing the DNA damage using alkaline comet assay on cells from brain, thoracic muscles and gut of Aiolopus thalassinus collected at three sites (A-C) located at 1, 3, and 6 km away from Abu-Zaabal Company for Fertilizers and Chemical Industries. Control site was established 32 km from the source of pollution, at the Cairo University Campus. The level of the DNA damage was significantly higher in insects from polluted sites comparing to that from the control site. A strong negative correlation between percentage of cells with visible DNA damage (% of severed cells) and the distance of the sites from Abu-Zaabal Company was found. The best parameter for monitoring of fertilizer pollutants is % of severed cells. Possible impact of Abu-Zaabal Company (extremely high concentration of phosphates and sulphates in all the polluted sites) on DNA integrity in A. thalassinus tissues was discussed. The potential use of the comet assay as a biomonitoring method of the environmental pollution caused by fertilizer industry was proposed. Specific pollution resulting from the activity of the fertilizer industry can cause comparable adverse effects in the organisms inhabiting areas up to 6 km from the source of contamination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A new species of Platydecticus (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Tettigoniinae; Nedubini) from the Andes of Chile.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Alejandro Vera

    2015-11-10

    A new species of the genus Platydecticus is described based on adult male and female specimens and the egg. The new species, Platydecticus diaguita, inhabits the Andes Range at 27º S latitude, above 3000 m elevation. Both sexes are easily identifiable by genital morphology characters and by the external characters of the fastigium of the vertex and the reduced number of spines in the hind tibia. It is also the smallest species described for the genus.

  9. Age-related mandible abrasion in the groundhopper Tetrix tenuicornis (Tetrigidae, Orthoptera).

    PubMed

    Kuřavová, Kateřina; Hajduková, Lenka; Kočárek, Petr

    2014-05-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether the mandibles of the detrito-/bryophagous groundhopper Tetrix tenuicornis are subject to mechanical wear as a result of feeding, as is the case for grasshoppers that feed on silica-rich grasses. Abrasion was evaluated by measuring the length and width of the 3rd incisor and length of the 4th incisor in adults of different ages collected under natural conditions during one season. Although T. tenuicornis and other groundhoppers avoid feeding on grasses, we found that mandible abrasion increased with T. tenuicornis age. Age-related abrasion of the incisors of left and right mandibles was statistically significant in both sexes but the degree of abrasion was greater for females than males, apparently reflecting differences in the frequency and magnitude of feeding. Degree of abrasion also differed between right and left mandibles, probably because of differences in how each mandible is used during food processing. Abrasion of cuticular mandible structures may reduce the effectiveness of food processing late in the season. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Neuroanatomy of the complex tibial organ of Stenopelmatus (Orthoptera: Ensifera: Stenopelmatidae).

    PubMed

    Strauss, Johannes; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard

    2008-11-01

    Stenopelmatidae (or "Jerusalem crickets") belong to the atympanate Ensifera, lacking hearing organs in the foreleg tibiae. Their phylogenetic position is controversial, either as a taxon in Tettigonioidea or within the clade of Gryllacridoidea. Similarly, the origin of tibial auditory systems in Ensifera is controversial. Therefore, we investigated the neuronal structures of the proximal tibiae of Stenopelmatus spec. with the hypothesis that internal sensory structures are similar to those in tympanate Ensifera. In Stenopelmatus the complex tibial organ consists of three neuronal parts: the subgenual organ, the intermediate organ, and a third part with linearly arranged neurons. This tripartite organization is also found in tympanate Ensifera, verifying our hypothesis. The third part of the sense organ found in Stenopelmatus can be regarded by the criterion of position as homologous to auditory receptors of hearing Tettigonioidea. This crista acustica homolog is found serially in all thoracic leg pairs and contains 20 +/- 2 chordotonal neurons in the foreleg. The tibial organ was shown to be responsive to vibration, with a broad threshold of about 0.06 ms(-2) in a frequency range from 100-600 Hz. The central projection of tibial sensory neurons terminates into two equally sized lobes in the primary sensory neuropil, the medial ventral association center. The data are discussed comparatively to those of other Ensifera and mapped phylogenetically onto recently proposed phylogenies for Ensifera. The crista acustica homolog could represent a neuronal rudiment of a secondarily reduced ear, but neuronal features are also consistent with an evolutionary preadaptation.

  11. Position-dependent hearing in three species of bushcrickets (Tettigoniidae, Orthoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard; Scherberich, Jan

    2015-01-01

    A primary task of auditory systems is the localization of sound sources in space. Sound source localization in azimuth is usually based on temporal or intensity differences of sounds between the bilaterally arranged ears. In mammals, localization in elevation is possible by transfer functions at the ear, especially the pinnae. Although insects are able to locate sound sources, little attention is given to the mechanisms of acoustic orientation to elevated positions. Here we comparatively analyse the peripheral hearing thresholds of three species of bushcrickets in respect to sound source positions in space. The hearing thresholds across frequencies depend on the location of a sound source in the three-dimensional hearing space in front of the animal. Thresholds differ for different azimuthal positions and for different positions in elevation. This position-dependent frequency tuning is species specific. Largest differences in thresholds between positions are found in Ancylecha fenestrata. Correspondingly, A. fenestrata has a rather complex ear morphology including cuticular folds covering the anterior tympanal membrane. The position-dependent tuning might contribute to sound source localization in the habitats. Acoustic orientation might be a selective factor for the evolution of morphological structures at the bushcricket ear and, speculatively, even for frequency fractioning in the ear. PMID:26543574

  12. Lectin binding to the egg envelopes in Eyprepocnemis plorans (Charp.) (Orthoptera, Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Longo, G; Viscuso, R; Sottile, L; Giuffrida, A

    1990-01-01

    The distribution of glycoconjugates in the egg envelopes of Eyprepocnemis plorans was investigated using various FITC-conjugated lectins. In the epichorion, the lectins ConA, SBA and WGA each have particular binding patterns, while TPA binding is confined to its deepest regions only. The glycoconjugates of the micropylar wall present different characteristics from those of the surrounding chorion. The vitelline coat shows a marked binding for WGA and TPA only; below the inner micropylar openings, this binding pattern is uniform over the whole extent of the coat and therefore it is not possible to identify specific binding sites for these two lectins. Contrary to what has been observed in some other insect species, the vitelline coat does not seem to be involved in the structural organization of the mycropyles.

  13. Synonymies of wasp-mimicking species within the katydid genus Aganacris (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Phaneropterinae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Five neotropical wasp-mimicking species of the genus Aganacris—two known from females only and three from males only—are reviewed. Based on observations of interspecific interactions and morphological comparisons, sexual dimorphism is shown to occur within species, and that female species are consp...

  14. Selenium accumulation protects plants from herbivory by Orthoptera via toxicity and deterrence.

    PubMed

    Freeman, John L; Lindblom, Stormy Dawn; Quinn, Colin F; Fakra, Sirine; Marcus, Matthew A; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2007-01-01

    To investigate whether selenium (Se) accumulation in plants provides a chemical defense against generalist insect herbivores, the feeding preference and performance of a mix of orthopteran species were investigated. The selenium hyperaccumulator Stanleya pinnata and accumulator Brassica juncea were used in herbivory studies in the laboratory, and S. pinnata was also used in a manipulative field experiment. In laboratory studies, both crickets and grasshoppers avoided plants pretreated with selenate, while those given no choice died after eating leaves with elevated Se (447 +/- 68 and 230 +/- 68 microg Se g(-1) DW, respectively). B. juncea has previously been shown to accumulate selenate, while S. pinnata hyperaccumulates methyl-selenocysteine. Thus, these findings demonstrate that both inorganic and organic forms of selenium protect plants from herbivory. Grasshoppers fed S. pinnata contained methylselenocysteine in their midgut and absorbed this form into surrounding tissues. In a manipulative field experiment, methylselenocysteine protected S. pinnata from invertebrate herbivory and increased its long-term survival rate over an entire growth season. * In native habitats of selenium hyperaccumulators, orthopterans represent a major group of insect herbivores. Protection offered by organic selenium accumulation against these herbivores may have promoted the evolution of selenium hyperaccumulation in plants.

  15. [Biomass of Cornops aquaticum (Orthoptera: Acrididae) in wetlands of Northeast Argentina].

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Luciana Irene; Celeste Franceschini, María; Guadalupe Poi, Alicia Susana; Laura de Wysiecki, María

    2015-03-01

    The estimation of biomass in insect populations is a key factor to quantify the available resources and energy fluxes in ecosystems food webs. Cornops aquaticum is a common herbivore in Eichhornia plants in wetlands of Northeast Argentina. We aimed to analyse its biomass variation, related to the different grasshopper age categories populations in two host-plants: Eichhornia azurea and Eichhornia crassipes. For this, standard samplings of C. aquaticum populations were carried out with an entomological net of 70 cm diameter in two wetlands with E. azurea and E. crassipes, in Corrientes and Chaco Provinces; besides, dry weight was also obtained (directly and indirectly), and a regression model to indirectly estimate the biomass from a linear dimension measure (hind femur length) is proposed. A total of 2307 individuals were collected and separated in different age categories; their abundance and linear dimension data were obtained. The model proposed was InDM=lna+b*lnH (where DM=dry mass, a and b are constants and H=hind femur length) (R2 = 0.97). The population biomass variations of C. aquaticum were due to the relative abundance of each age category and the grasshopper individual dry weight. No significant differences were found between populations biomasses obtained by direct and indirect methods in E. azurea and E. crassipes floating meadows. This model made easier the C. aquaticum biomass calculation for both individuals and the population, and accelerated the processing of high number of samples. Finally, high biomass values of populations and individual age category (especially in adults) emphasize the importance of C. aquaticum as a consumer and a resource for predators on Eichhornia floating meadows food webs.

  16. New genera, species and records of Phaneropterinae (Orthoptera, Phaneropteridae) from sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Massa, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The results of the study of many specimens preserved in different European museums are reported. The tribe Terpnistrini Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1878 is resurrected. The distribution of the following species is enhanced: Pardalota asymmetrica Karsch, 1896, Diogena denticulata Chopard, 1954, Diogena fausta (Burmeister, 1838), Plangiopsis adeps Karsch, 1896, Poreuomena sanghensis Massa, 2013 and Tylopsis continua (Walker, 1869). Further, for their peculiar characteristics, two African representatives of the American genus Symmetropleura Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1878 are included in two new genera: Symmetrokarschia africana (Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1878), comb. n. and Symmetroraggea dirempta (Karsch, 1889), comb. n. A new genus and species from the Democratic Republic of Congo, Angustithorax spiniger gen. n., sp. n., and a new genus and species from Tanzania, Arostratum oblitum gen. n., sp. n. are described. Finally Melidia claudiae sp. n. and Atlasacris brevipennis sp. n. are described and compared with related species. PMID:25632250

  17. The identity of the tropical African Polichne mukonja Griffini, 1908 (Orthoptera, Tettigoniidae, Phaneropterinae)

    PubMed Central

    Massa, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Polichne mukonja Griffini, 1908 from Cameroon was hitherto known only from the holotype preserved at the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, Brussels. This was probably due to the fact that the genus Polichne Stål, 1874 distributed only in Australia and Papua New Guinea. In view of this distribution, the tropical African species was therefore overlooked in the African literature. The recent discovery of two specimens at the Naturhistorisches Museum, Vienna, now provides us with a better understanding of the identity of this taxon, which is related to the African genus Catoptropteryx Karsch, 1890. Polichne mukonja is here transferred to a new genus Griffinipteryx and both taxa are proposed to be included in the new tribe Catoptropterigini. PMID:27833418

  18. Dynamics of Reintroduced Populations of Oedipoda caerulescens (Orthoptera, Acrididae) over 21 Years

    PubMed Central

    Baur, Bruno; Thommen, G. Heinrich; Coray, Armin

    2017-01-01

    Conservation programs increasingly involve the reintroduction of animals which otherwise would not recolonize restored habitats. We assessed the long-term success of a project in which the Blue-winged grasshopper, Oedipoda caerulescens (L., 1758), was reintroduced to a nature reserve in Northwestern Switzerland, an alluvial gravel area where the species went extinct in the 1960s. In summer 1995, we released 110 individuals (50 females and 60 males) and 204 individuals (101 females and 103 males) into two restored gravel patches with sparse vegetation. We used a transect count technique to assess the population size of O. caerulescens in the years 1995–2004 and 2015–2016 and recorded the area occupied by the species. At both release sites, the populations persisted and increased significantly in size. Individuals that followed a newly created corridor established four new subpopulations. Seven years after reintroduction, O. caerulescens had reached a high abundance around the release sites and in the four colonized patches, indicating a successful project. At the same time, the dispersal corridor became increasingly overgrown by dense vegetation. Surveys 20 and 21 yr after introduction showed that the abundance of the Blue-winged grasshopper had strongly declined in the established subpopulations and moderately in the original release sites, owing to natural succession of the habitat and lack of disturbances, which reduced the area suitable for the species by 59%. Our study shows that reintroductions are unlikely to succeed without integration of long-term habitat management (in the present case maintenance of open ground). PMID:28042108

  19. Taxonomy and distribution of some katydids (OrthopteraTettigoniidae) from tropical Africa.

    PubMed

    Massa, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Results of the study of specimens collected in tropical Africa and preserved in different European collections and museums are reported and extensively illustrated. The following three new species are described: Horatosphaga aethiopica sp. n., Dapanera occulta sp. n. and Cestromoecha laeglae sp. n. In addition, new diagnostic characters or distributional data for Ruspolia differens (Serville, 1838), Thyridorhoptrum senegalense Krauss, 1877, Horatosphaga leggei (Kirby, 1909), Horatosphaga linearis (Rehn, 1910), Preussia lobatipes Karsch, 1890 and Dapanera eidmanni Ebner, 1943 are reported. Finally, Symmetropleura plana (Walker, 1869) is proposed to be transferred to the genus Symmetrokarschia Massa, 2015, Conocephalus carbonarius (Redtenbacher, 1891) to the genus Thyridorhoptrum Rehn & Hebard, 1915; the genus Gonatoxia Karsch, 1889 is proposed to be synonymized with Dapanera Karsch, 1889.

  20. Metaphase I orientation of Robertsonian trivalents in the water-hyacinth grasshopper, Cornops aquaticum (Acrididae, Orthoptera)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Trivalents resulting from polymorphic Robertsonian rearrangements must have a regular orientation in metaphase I if the polymorphisms are to be maintained. It has been argued that redistribution of proximal and interstitial chiasmata to more distal positions is necessary for a convergent orientation, the only one that produces viable gametes. Cornops aquaticum is a South-American grasshopper that lives and feeds on water-hyacinths, and has three polymorphic Robertsonian rearrangements in its southernmost distribution area in Central Argentina and Uruguay. The orientation of trivalents in metaphase I, the formation of abnormal spermatids and the frequency and position of chiasmata in the trivalents, was analysed in a polymorphic population of C. aquaticus. In this study we observed a correlation between the number of trivalents with the frequency of abnormal spermatids; additionally, the number of chiasmata, especially proximal and interstitial ones, was strongly correlated with the frequency of the linear orientation. Therefore we confirmed our previous assumption, based on other evidence, that the chiasmata redistribution in fusion carriers is essential to the maintenance of the polymorphisms. PMID:21637651

  1. New species of Eidmanacris Chopard, 1956 from Brazil (Orthoptera: Phalangopsidae: Luzarinae).

    PubMed

    De Campos, Lucas Denadai; Souza-Dias, Pedro G B; Nihei, Silvio Shigueo; De Mello, Francisco De A G

    2015-09-15

    With 15 described species, Eidmanacris is one of the largest Luzarinae genera from South America. In Brazil, 12 species occur in two large biomes, the Atlantic Forest and Cerrado. Here, we describe four new species of Eidmanacris from Brazil: E. bernardii Nihei & de Mello, n. sp., E. papaveroi Nihei & de Mello, n. sp., E. simoesi Nihei & de Mello, n. sp., and E. eliethae Nihei & de Mello, n. sp., from Cerrado (E. bernardii n. sp.), and the other from Atlantic Forest. The type material is deposited in the Museu de Zoologia da Universidade de São Paulo (MZSP) and the Zoology Department Insect Colletion (Coleção de Insetos do Departamento de Zoologia), Botucatu campus of São Paulo State University, UNESP.

  2. Populations of the northern grasshopper, Melanoplus borealis (Orthoptera: Acrididae), in Alaska are rarely food limited

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Grasshoppers can cause substantial losses to forage on rangelands and pastures and to field crops, but chemical control of grasshopper pests is rarely justified because of the low per-area value of forages, the extensive areas needed to be treated to protect crops, and because of potential impacts t...

  3. Body Size Adaptations to Altitudinal Climatic Variation in Neotropical Grasshoppers of the Genus Sphenarium (Orthoptera: Pyrgomorphidae).

    PubMed

    Sanabria-Urbán, Salomón; Song, Hojun; Oyama, Ken; González-Rodríguez, Antonio; Serrano-Meneses, Martin A; Cueva Del Castillo, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Altitudinal clines in body size can result from the effects of natural and sexual selection on growth rates and developing times in seasonal environments. Short growing and reproductive seasons constrain the body size that adults can attain and their reproductive success. Little is known about the effects of altitudinal climatic variation on the diversification of Neotropical insects. In central Mexico, in addition to altitude, highly heterogeneous topography generates diverse climates that can occur even at the same latitude. Altitudinal variation and heterogeneous topography open an opportunity to test the relative impact of climatic variation on body size adaptations. In this study, we investigated the relationship between altitudinal climatic variation and body size, and the divergence rates of sexual size dimorphism (SSD) in Neotropical grasshoppers of the genus Sphenarium using a phylogenetic comparative approach. In order to distinguish the relative impact of natural and sexual selection on the diversification of the group, we also tracked the altitudinal distribution of the species and trends of both body size and SSD on the phylogeny of Sphenarium. The correlative evidence suggests no relationship between altitude and body size. However, larger species were associated with places having a warmer winter season in which the temporal window for development and reproduction can be longer. Nonetheless, the largest species were also associated with highly seasonal environments. Moreover, large body size and high levels of SSD have evolved independently several times throughout the history of the group and male body size has experienced a greater evolutionary divergence than females. These lines of evidence suggest that natural selection, associated with seasonality and sexual selection, on maturation time and body size could have enhanced the diversification of this insect group.

  4. Species composition of grasshoppers (Orthoptera) in open plots and farmlands in calabar metropolis, southern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Oku, E E; Arong, G A; Bassey, D A

    2011-04-15

    The grasshoppers are strategic in the welfare of man and may constitute a major threat when its population is not checked. A study on the distribution of grasshoppers in open plots and farmlands was carried out within Calabar Metropolis between August to November, 2010. A total of 295 grasshoppers belonging to 11 species grouped under 3 families (Tettigoniidae, Acrididae and Pyrgomorphidae) were collected from 8 study locations. Grasshoppers were collected weekly from all study sites using sweep nets between 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The collection was done using sweep nets between 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. when grasshoppers baked themselves under the sun. The percentage abundance of these species were Spathosterrium pygmaeum (16.27%), Tettigonia viridissima (11.86%), Catantops spissus (11.19%) Acridaturita sp. (10.17%), Gastrimargus acrididae (9.83%), Schistocerca nitens (9.49%), Tylopsis sp. (7.46%), Zonocerus variegatus (6.78%), Omocestus viridulus (6.10%), Scudderia mexicana (5.76%) and Zonocerus elegans (5.08%). Tettigonia viridissima and Acridaturita sp. were largely distributed as it occurred in 7 of 8 study sites while Scudderia mexicana was the least distributed, as it was reported in 3 sites only. The dominant grasshopper species in open plot was Spathosterrium pygmaeum (19%) in relative abundance and the least was Zonocerus variegatus (0.64%). Zonocerus variegatus was the dominant species in farmland (14%) in relative abundance and the least was Schistocerca nitens (4%). Chi-square test showed a high significant difference between the distribution of grasshoppers in open plots and farmlands (p < 0.05). Variations in grasshopper species composition were attributed to lizard predation and management practices such as grass cutting, fertilizer and pesticide applications. It was therefore concluded that species abundance and population of grasshoppers could be enhanced by minimizing human activities that interfere with land use.

  5. Grasshoppers of the Mascarene Islands: new species and new records (Orthoptera, Caelifera).

    PubMed

    Hugel, Sylvain

    2014-12-23

    The grasshopper fauna of Mascarene Islands (Mauritius, Rodrigues and La Réunion), in South Western Indian ocean is examined. Numerous field surveys and examination of museum specimens recorded twenty species of Grasshoppers on the archipelago. Five of them are new records, including a new species: Odontomelus ancestrus n. sp. restricted to Round Island, a 2 km² islet North to Mauritius. Despite intensive searching, five of the non endemic species once recorded on the archipelago have not been recorded again and might correspond to temporary settlements/introductions. A key to Mascarene grasshoppers is given.

  6. Laboratory bioassays of vegetable oils as kairomonal phagostimulants for grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Latchininsky, Alexandre V; Schell, Scott P; Lockwood, Jeffrey A

    2007-10-01

    Vegetable oils have kairomonal attractant properties to grasshoppers primarily due to the presence of linoleic and linolenic fatty acids. These fatty acids are dietary essentials for grasshoppers and, once volatilized, can be detected by the insects' olfactory receptors. A laboratory bioassay method has been developed to identify vegetable oils that have fatty acid profiles similar to grasshoppers and that induce grasshopper attraction and feeding. Such oils could be useful kairomonal adjuvants and/or carriers for acridicide formulations. Three sets of laboratory bioassays demonstrated that the addition of a standard aliquot of different vegetable oils resulted in varying degrees of grasshopper feeding on otherwise neutral substrates. Addition of olive oil stimulated the greatest feeding in all three sets of assays, regardless of the age of the tested insects. Furthermore, addition of canola or flax oils markedly enhanced grasshopper feeding. These three oils--i.e., olive, canola, and flax oil--proved to be the best performing grasshopper stimulants. A second group of oils included rapeseed-flax mix and rapeseed oils; however, their performance was not as consistent as oils in the first group--especially with regard to nymphal feeding. A third group of oils consisted of soybean, corn, peanut, and sunflower oil. Theoretical expectations regarding these oils varied wildly, suggesting that the results of a single bioassay should be cautiously interpreted as being negative.

  7. Influence of individual body size on reproductive traits in Melanopline grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Body size is a fundamental trait of an organism, affecting most aspects of its performance, including reproduction. Numerous biotic and environmental factors can influence individual body size and reproduction in grasshoppers. Using data from four experiments, I examined intraspecific relationships ...

  8. Taxonomic and Functional Resilience of Grasshoppers (Orthoptera, Caelifera) to Fire in South Brazilian Grasslands.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, C P R; Podgaiski, L R; Costa, M K M; Mendonça, M D S

    2016-08-01

    Fire is a frequent disturbance in grassland ecosystems enabling variability in habitat characteristics and creating important environmental filters for community assembly. Changes in vegetation have a large influence on herbivore insect assemblages. Here, we explored the responses of grasshoppers to disturbance by fire in grasslands of southern Brazil through a small-scale experiment based in paired control and burned plots. The resilience of grasshoppers was assessed by monitoring changes to their abundance, taxonomic, and functional parameters along time. Burned patches have been already recolonized by grasshoppers 1 month after fire and did not differ in terms of abundance and richness from control areas in any evaluated time within 1 year. Simpson diversity decreased 1 month after fire due to the increased dominance of Dichroplus misionensis (Carbonell) and Orphulella punctata (De Geer). In this period, grasshoppers presented in average a smaller body and a larger relative head size; these are typically nymph characteristics, which are possibly indicating a preference of juveniles for the young high-quality vegetation, or a diminished vulnerability to predation in open areas. Further, at 6 months after fire grasshoppers with smaller relative hind femur and thus lower dispersal ability seemed to be benefitted in burned patches. Finally, 1 year after fire grasshoppers became more similar to each other in relation to their set of traits. This study demonstrates how taxonomic and functional aspects of grasshopper assemblages can be complementary tools to understand their responses to environmental change.

  9. [Diversity and distribution of grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acridoidea) in grasslands of the Southern Pampas region, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Mariottini, Yanina; De Wysiecki, María Laura; Lange, Carlos Ernesto

    2013-03-01

    In Argentina, the grasslands of Pampas region comprise approximately 15% of the country. As in other grasslands of the world, grasshoppers are among the most important native herbivores. Their economic importance has been recognized in Argentina since the mid to late nineteenth century, since outbreaks of different species have become recurrent phenomena. Therefore, the main objective of this work was to study their diversity and distribution in grasslands of the Southern Pampas region (Laprida county, Buenos Aires province), as one of the most affected areas. The study was conducted during five seasons (2005-10). Sampling sites were represented by the most common plant communities in this area, classified in four categories: native grasslands, disturbed grasslands, implanted pastures and halophilous grasslands. The samplings were conducted from mid-spring to early autumn, with five or six samples per season. We estimated the following population descriptors: species richness (S), eveness (E), dominance (J), and diversity index (H'). In order to evaluate the similitude of the grasshopper communities present in the different plant communities, we used qualitative and quantitative coefficients of similitude. A total of 22 species of grasshoppers were collected, of which 21 belong to the family Acrididae. The subfamily Melanoplinae was the most diverse with eight species. The largest species richness was recorded in native grasslands (18). The different communities of grasshoppers had similar indices of evenness and dominance (p>0.05). Considering all plant communities, the average value of Shannon-Wiener index was 1.58+/-0.075. There was a positive correlation between evenness index and species richness (p<0.05). The diversity index H' was different between plants communities (p<0.05), and it was higher in the disturbed grassland (1.75+/-0.096, p<0.05) than in the halophilous grasslands (1.34+/-0.12). Native and disturbed grasslands had a higher plant richness than halophilous grasslands and implanted pastures (p<0.05). There was a positive relationship between plant richness and grasshoppers species richness, and diversity of grasshoppers. According to the qualitative indices applied, the similitude between different grasshopper communities was higher than 60%. In general, the species that had a higher frequency of occurrence showed greater abundance and distribution. Covasacris pallidinota, Dichroplus elongatus, D. maculipennis, Borellia bruneri and B. pallida were the most widely distributed species, most of them (12) showed a restricted distribution and few (five) an intermediate distribution.

  10. Oviposition site selection by the grasshoppers Melanoplus borealis and M. sanguinipes (Orthoptera: Acrididae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Female grasshoppers can affect the fitness of their offspring through their selection of oviposition sites. Successful embryological development depends on suitable temperature and moisture levels, factors which may vary considerably on a fine scale in natural environments where grasshoppers occur. ...

  11. Embryonic development rates of northern grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae): implications for climate change and habitat management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Temperature-dependent rates of embryonic development are a primary determinant of the life cycle of many species of grasshoppers which, in cold climates, spend two winters in the egg stage. Knowledge of embryonic developmental rates is important for an assessment of the effects of climate change and...

  12. The complete mitochondrial genomes of three grasshoppers, Asiotmethis zacharjini, Filchnerella helanshanensis and Pseudotmethis rubimarginis (Orthoptera: Pamphagidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Li; Zeng, Hui-Hua; Huang, Yuan; Zheng, Zhe-Min

    2013-03-15

    The complete mitogenomes of Asiotmethis zacharjini, Filchnerella helanshanensis and Pseudotmethis rubimarginis are 15,660 bp, 15,657 bp and 15,661 bp in size, respectively. All three mitogenomes contain a standard set of 13 protein - coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes (tRNAs), 2 ribosomal RNA genes (rRNAs) and an A+T-rich region in the same order as those of the other analysed caeliferan species, including the rearrangement of trnAsp and trnLys. The putative initiation codon for the cox1 gene in the three species is CCG. The long polythymine stretch (T-stretch) in the A+T-rich region of the three species is not adjacent to the trnIle but inside the stem-loop sequence in the majority strand. The mitogenomes of F. helanshanensis and P. rubimarginis have higher overall similarities. The characterization of the three mitogenomes will enrich our knowledge on the Pamphagidae mitogenome. The phylogenetic analyses indicated that within the Caelifera, Pyrgomorphoidea is a sister group to Acridoidea. The species from the Pamphagidae form a monophyletic group, as is the case for Acrididae. Furthermore, the two families cluster as sister groups, supporting the monophyly of Acridoidea. The relationships among eight acridid subfamilies were (Cyrtacanthacridinae+(Calliptaminae+(Catantopinae+(Oxyinae+(Melanopline+(Acridinae+(Oedipodinae+Gomphocerinae).

  13. Physical mapping of the Period gene on meiotic chromosomes of South American grasshoppers (Acridomorpha, Orthoptera).

    PubMed

    Souza, T E; Oliveira, D L; Santos, J F; Rieger, T T

    2014-12-19

    The single-copy gene Period was located in five grasshopper species belonging to the Acridomorpha group through permanent in situ hybridization (PISH). The mapping revealed one copy of this gene in the L1 chromosome pair in Ommexecha virens, Xyleus discoideus angulatus, Tropidacris collaris, Schistocerca pallens, and Stiphra robusta. A possible second copy was mapped on the L2 chromosome pair in S. robusta, which should be confirmed by further studies. Except for the latter case, the chromosomal position of the Period gene was highly conserved among the four families studied. The S. robusta karyotype also differs from the others both in chromosome number and morphology. The position conservation of the single-copy gene Period contrasts with the location diversification of multigene families in these species. The localization of single-copy genes by PISH can provide new insights about the genomic content and chromosomal evolution of grasshoppers and others insects.

  14. Spreading of heterochromatin and karyotype differentiation in two Tropidacris Scudder, 1869 species (Orthoptera, Romaleidae)

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Marília de França; Pine, Mariana Bozina; Oliveira, Elizabeth Felipe Alves dos Santos; Loreto, Vilma; Gallo, Raquel Bozini; da Silva, Carlos Roberto Maximiano; de Domenico, Fernando Campos; da Rosa, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tropidacris Scudder, 1869 is a genus widely distributed throughout the Neotropical region where speciation was probably promoted by forest reduction during the glacial and interglacial periods. There are no cytogenetic studies of Tropidacris, and information allowing inference or confirmation of the evolutionary events involved in speciation within the group is insufficient. In this paper, we used cytogenetic markers in two species, Tropidacris collaris (Stoll, 1813) and Tropidacris cristata grandis (Thunberg, 1824), collected in different Brazilian biomes. Both species exhibited 2n=24,XX for females and 2n=23,X0 for males. All chromosomes were acrocentric. There were some differences in the karyotype macrostructure, e.g. in the chromosome size. A wide interspecific variation in the chromosome banding (C-banding and CMA3/DAPI staining) indicated strong differences in the distribution of repetitive DNA sequences. Specifically, Tropidacris cristata grandis had a higher number of bands in relation to Tropidacris collaris. FISH with 18S rDNA revealed two markings coinciding with the NORs in both species. However, two analyzed samples of Tropidacris collaris revealed a heterozygous condition for the rDNA site of S10 pair. In Tropidacris collaris, the histone H3 genes were distributed on three chromosome pairs, whereas in Tropidacris cristata grandis, these genes were observed on 14 autosomes and on the X chromosome, always in terminal regions. Our results demonstrate that, although the chromosome number and morphology are conserved in the genus, Tropidacris cristata grandis substantially differs from Tropidacris collaris in terms of the distribution of repetitive sequences. The devastation and fragmentation of the Brazilian rainforest may have led to isolation between these species, and the spreading of these repetitive sequences could contribute to speciation within the genus. PMID:26312132

  15. Preservation Methods Alter Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope Values in Crickets (Orthoptera: Grylloidea).

    PubMed

    Jesus, Fabiene Maria; Pereira, Marcelo Ribeiro; Rosa, Cassiano Sousa; Moreira, Marcelo Zacharias; Sperber, Carlos Frankl

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis (SIA) is an important tool for investigation of animal dietary habits for determination of feeding niche. Ideally, fresh samples should be used for isotopic analysis, but logistics frequently demands preservation of organisms for analysis at a later time. The goal of this study was to establish the best methodology for preserving forest litter-dwelling crickets for later SIA analysis without altering results. We collected two cricket species, Phoremia sp. and Mellopsis doucasae, from which we prepared 70 samples per species, divided among seven treatments: (i) freshly processed (control); preserved in fuel ethanol for (ii) 15 and (iii) 60 days; preserved in commercial ethanol for (iv) 15 and (v) 60 days; fresh material frozen for (vi) 15 and (vii) 60 days. After oven drying, samples were analyzed for δ15N, δ13C values, N(%), C(%) and C/N atomic values using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. All preservation methods tested, significantly impacted δ13C and δ15N and C/N atomic values. Chemical preservatives caused δ13C enrichment as great as 1.5‰, and δ15N enrichment as great as 0.9‰; the one exception was M. doucasae stored in ethanol for 15 days, which had δ15N depletion up to 1.8‰. Freezing depleted δ13C and δ15N by up to 0.7 and 2.2‰, respectively. C/N atomic values decreased when stored in ethanol, and increased when frozen for 60 days for both cricket species. Our results indicate that all preservation methods tested in this study altered at least one of the tested isotope values when compared to fresh material (controls). We conclude that only freshly processed material provides adequate SIA results for litter-dwelling crickets.

  16. Desert acridian fauna (Orthoptera, Acridomorpha): Comparison between steppic and oasian habitats in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Moussi, Abdelhamid; Abba, Abderrahmane; Harrat, Abboud; Petit, Daniel

    2011-02-01

    Through monthly samplings of grasshoppers taken from five sites in oases and two in steppes in the area of Biskra, 45 species could be recorded. Four assemblages of species can be defined, two in the oasian zones, one in the stony steppe and a last one in the sandy steppe. The two oasian assemblages are interpreted in the light of a gradient of salinity and humidity determined by the vegetation. In each type of steppe, there is a spring sub-assemblage and a summer-autumnal one, but such a distinction is not possible in the anthropised sites. The steppe stations are moreover characterized by a larger diversity determined by the Shannon index and a weaker density than in the oases, in spite of a comparable richness. The comparative analysis of species phenology between the different assemblages allows discussing their adaptation toward seasonal variations of dryness in these arid environments.

  17. Behavioral responses of Schistocerca americana (Orthoptera: Acrididae) to Azadirex (neem)-treated host plants.

    PubMed

    Capinera, John L; Froeba, Jason G

    2007-02-01

    Azadirex (azadirachtin and other biologically active extracts from neem trees) has been shown to have considerable potential to be used in integrated pest management systems based on its growth regulator/insecticide properties. Less well known are the antifeedant properties. The feeding-deterrent properties of a commercial azadirex formulation (Azatrol EC) were evaluated using both no-choice and choice tests, the American grasshopper, Schistocerca americana (Drury), and four host plants [savoy cabbage, Brassica oleracea variety capitata L.; cos (romaine) lettuce, Lactuca sativa variety longifolia Lam.; sweet orange, Citrus sinensis variety Hamlin L.; and peregrina, Jatropha integerrima Jacq.]. These studies demonstrated that azadirex application can significantly affect the feeding behavior of grasshoppers. Some degree of protection can be afforded to plants that differ markedly in their innate attractiveness to the insect, although the level of protection varies among hosts. The tendency of grasshoppers to sometimes feed on azadirex-treated foliage suggests that it will be difficult to prevent damage from occurring at all times, on all hosts. No evidence of rapid habituation to azadirex was detected. Rapid loss of efficacy was observed under field conditions, suggesting that daily retreatment might be necessary to maintain protection of plants from feeding.

  18. Age- and density-dependent prophylaxis in the migratory, cannibalistic Mormon cricket Anabrus simplex (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae).

    PubMed

    Srygley, Robert B

    2012-02-01

    As a result of the increased potential for disease transmission, insects are predicted to show an increased constitutive immunity when crowded. Cannibalistic aggressive interactions further increase the risk of wounding and pathogen transmission in crowds. Nymphal Mormon crickets Anabrus simplex Haldeman were collected in Montana and reared in the laboratory either solitarily or at densities similar to that experienced by Mormon crickets in migratory bands. As teneral adults, solitarily-reared Mormon crickets tended to have greater phenoloxidase activity than those reared in groups. Sampling enzyme activity a second time when the adults were nearing reproductive maturity, group-reared Mormon crickets had elevated levels of prophenoloxidase and encapsulated foreign objects faster than solitarily-reared insects. Rearing density did not have a significant effect on either the darkness of the cuticle or antibacterial activity. This is the first report of age-related responses of adult insect immunity to crowding.

  19. Age- and density-dependent prophylaxis in the migratory Mormon cricket Anabrus simplex (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As a result of the increased potential for disease transmission, insects are predicted to show an increased constitutive immunity when crowded. Nymphal Mormon crickets were collected in Montana and reared in the laboratory either solitarily or at densities similar to that experienced by Mormon cric...

  20. Are solitary and gregarious Mormon crickets (Anabrus simplex, Orthoptera, Tettigoniidae) genetically distinct?

    PubMed

    Bailey, N W; Gwynne, D T; Ritchie, M G

    2005-08-01

    Phase polyphenisms are usually thought to reflect plastic responses of species, independent of genetic differences; however, phase differences could correlate with genetic differentiation for various reasons. Mormon crickets appear to occur in two phases that differ in morphology and behaviour. Solitary individuals are cryptic and sedentary whereas gregarious individuals form bands, migrate, and are aposematically coloured. These traits have been thought to be phenotypically plastic and induced by environmental conditions. However, there has been no previous investigation of the extent of genetic differences between solitary and gregarious populations of this widespread North American species. We sequenced two mitochondrial genes, COII and COIII, in samples of Mormon crickets from gregarious populations west of the continental divide and solitary mountain populations primarily east of the divide. Sequencing revealed two genetically distinct clades that broadly correspond with the solitary eastern populations and the mainly gregarious western populations. We used coalescent modelling to test the hypothesis that the species consists of two deep genetic clades, as opposed to a series of equally distinct populations. Results allowed us to reject the null hypothesis that a radiation independent of phase produced these clades, and molecular clock estimates indicate the time of divergence to be approximately 2 million years ago. This work establishes that the solitary populations found in the mountains on the eastern slope are part of a clade that is genetically distinct from the western populations, which are primarily gregarious, and the implications of this apparent correlation between phase and genetic differentiation are discussed.

  1. The Influence of Protection, Mobility and Risk Perception on the Behaviour and Physical Performance of a Combat Soldier (De Invloed van Bescherming, Mobiliteit en Risicoperceptie op het Gedrag en de Fysieke Prestatie van een Gevechtssoldaat)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    which threat consisted of environmental stress (cold) and psychological pressure ( Liebermann et al., 2002). However, no reports were found in which...down on the ground during the last 40m, this could not explain the lower velocity in condition A. Liebermann et al. (2002) studied in exercises...vigilance were significantly impaired, as were more complex functions, including memory and logical reasoning. Liebermann et al. (2002) used environmental

  2. Melt Spinning of Crystalline Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    manufactoring iron-based amorphous alloys for magnetic appli- cations (2). Liebermann and Graham (3) and Kavesh (-)’have discussed the effect of melt spinning...and Mn. The main objectige was to determine whether the conclusions of Liebermann and Graham and Kavesh can be applied over a wide range of materials...length, width and thickness, p is density (2.71.103 Kgm-3 ), and W is the measured weight. Liebermann and Graham (3) applied Bernoulli’s equation

  3. Injury Prevention and Performance Enhancement in 101st Airbourne Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    force (VGRF) without vision, 16 while Liebermann and Goodman found unchanged or decreased VGRF when blindfolded. 15, 18 Nevertheless, none of these...adaptation effect for both WV and NV conditions. 16 The second issue is that the subjects were aware of the platform height. Liebermann and Goodman allowed...our results of decreased maximum knee flexion and increased VGRF were comparable to Santello et al. 16 while our design was more similar to Liebermann

  4. Electrical and Thermal Conductivity and Radiation Power of Air Measured at 1-30 ATM and 6500-11500 deg. K

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-01

    agreement with the theory of Sokolova (Ref. 19) but is 50% higher than predicted by Liebermann (Ref. 20) or Nicolet (Ref. 1). Cau t ion must be...at Pressures of 0.~ i, 10, and I00 Atm., AD-779-809, FTD-HT-23-907-74, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA. R. W. Liebermann

  5. An Investigation of Seismic Wave Propagation in Eastern North America

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-07-30

    Also shown in Figure 22 are the Ms-mb results of Liebermann and Pomeroy for explosions and earth- quakes in the Western United States. The Ms-mb...United States Earth- quakes, Ph.D. Dissertation, Saint Louis University. Liebermann , R.C., and P.W. Pomeroy, 1969, Relative Excitation of Surface Waves

  6. Titanium Production by a Plasma Process.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    and their valuable contributions are gratefully acknowledged: J. V. R. Heberlein - plasma consultancy and equipment design, R. W. Liebermann ...Reberlein, J. V. R., Liebermann , R. W., U. S. Air Force Contract #F33615-80-C-5091, First Quarterly Progress Report,(October 1980). 15. Heberlein

  7. Measurements of the Growth of Air Bubbles by Rectified Diffusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    enough each cycle to cause a significant increase in the amount of gas containea within the bubble. The observations 32 by Liebermann that diffusion rates...32. L. Liebermann , J. Appl. Phys. 28, 205-211 (1957). 33. Lord Rayleiyh, Proc. Roy. Soc. 47, 231-287 (1890). -25- Ii. DISTRIBUTION LIST Director 3

  8. Theoretical Studies of Ion-Molecule and Ion-Surface Collisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-07

    Peter Liebermann , Robert Buenker, and George C. Schatz, J. Chem. Phys., in preparation. (20) Scattering dynamics of hyperthermal oxygen atoms on...Lendvay, G.; Liebermann , P.; Buenker, R.; Schatz, G. C. J. Chem. Phys. 2009, in preparation. (30) Lodriguito, M. D.; Lendvay, G.; Schatz, G. C. J. Chem

  9. Long-Period Seismological Research Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-31

    wave magnitude, Ms:mb, provides one of the principal means of distinguishing earthquakes from underground explosions (eg. Evernden, 1969; Liebermann ... Liebermann . R.C. and P.W. Pomerey (1969). Relative excitation of surface waves by earthquakes and underground explosions, J^eoj^s^^., ll±> 1575-1590

  10. Coalition Search and Rescue - Task Support Intelligent Task Achieving Agents on the Semantic Web

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    Creating the Semantic Web”, Fensel, D., Hendler, J., Liebermann , H. and Wahlster, W. (eds.), MIT Press, 2001. Uszok, A., Bradshaw, J. M., Jeffers...Agents on the World Wide Web, in Spinning the Semantic Web, Fensel, D., Hendler, J., Liebermann , H. and Wahlster, W. (eds.), Chapter 15, pp. 431-458

  11. Approaches to a Quantitative Analytical Description of Low Frequency Sound Absorption in Sea Water,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    Liebermann (1948) found that the absorption coefficient, a, was frequency dependent in the range 100- 1000 kHz and could be attributed to perturbations due...Affecting the Attenuation of Low Frequency Sound in Sea Water", MRL Report No. R-782 (1979). 2. Liebermann , R.M., "Origin of Sound Absorption in Water

  12. Hematologic and Biochemical Data on Healthy Individuals Participating in a Physical Conditioning Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-28

    lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL) were performed with the Technicon SMAC instrument;* cholesterol by the colorimetric method of Liebermann and Burchard ; 18...1972. 18. Levine, J., S. Morgenstern, and D. Vlastelica: A direct Liebermann - Burchard mthod for serum cholesterol. Automation in Analytical Chemstry

  13. Comparison of 9 methods for the determination of cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Haeckel, R; Sonntag, O; Külpmann, W R; Feldmann, U

    1979-08-01

    Seven enzymatic procedures for the determination of cholesterol in serum were compared with the Liebermann-Burchard- and a gas-chromatographic method. Using a decision matrix all methods could be ranked according to reliability and practicability . With the exception of the cholesterol oxidase-coupled Kageyama principle and the Liebermann-Burchard procedure, all the other methods showed similar reliability.

  14. Complete mitochondrial genome of Locusta migratoria migratoria (Orthoptera: Oedipodidae): three tRNA-like sequences on the N-strand.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hai-Yan; Xiao, Li-Li; Zhou, Zhi-Jun; Huang, Yuan

    2012-02-01

    The complete 16053 bp mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequence of Locusta migratoria migratoria has been determined. This mitogenome contains the base compositional biases and codon usage typical of metazoans, and the RSCU values indicate a negative correlation with the C and G contents in codon. The orientation and gene order of the L. migratoria migratoria is identical to Locusta migratoria migratoiodes. An unusual feature of the L. migratoria migratoria mitogenome is the presence of three tRNA-like structures on the N-strand: one tRNA(Ile)-like and two tRNA(Leu(CUN))-like sequences. The tRNA-like sequences have proper folding structures and anticodons sequences. Two repeated DNA sequences, Rpt I and Rpt II, were found in the A+T-rich region of the L. migratoria migratoria mitogenome. Both repeated sequences have various features. In the 5' region of Rpt I, a 51 bp fragment is localized in the srRNA gene; and there are two tandemly sub-repeated DNA sequences (sub-Rpts), Rpt 1-4, within Rpt I and Rpt II. One stem-loop structure on the N-strand that may be involved in the N-strand replication initiation was found in the A+T-rich region.

  15. Comparison of Leg Regeneration Potency Between Holometabolous Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Hemimetabolous Locusta migratoria manilensis (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingpo; Li, Zhen; Li, Hui; Li, Yanrong; Yang, Yuhui; Zhang, Qingwen; Liu, Xiaoxia

    2016-09-11

    After injury many insects could regenerate lost limb. In this study, Helicoverpa armigera Hubner and Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen, 1835) were chosen to compare the regeneration potency of holometabolous and hemimetabolous insects. We employed the classical approach of surgical excision to verify the regeneration ability and to investigate the factors that affect the extent of regeneration. The results found that H. armigera could regenerate intact legs when the larval legs were excised at the first and second instar and that legs of adult H. armigera had a close relationship with their larval counterparts. However, the adult legs became malformed or disappeared when excised at other older instars. For the L. migratoria, we found the legs have weak partial regeneration ability when amputation was conducted at the joint of two segments. The regeneration potency might be stronger the more proximal the operation. Regeneration process had a negative impact on the larval development. This is the first report of complete leg regeneration capacity having a strong correlation with the instar but not with the position where amputation occurred for H. armigera, while for the L. migratoria, partial regenerative ability had a close relationship with the position where amputation occurred but not with instars.

  16. Comparison of Leg Regeneration Potency Between Holometabolous Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Hemimetabolous Locusta migratoria manilensis (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingpo; Li, Zhen; Li, Hui; Li, Yanrong; Yang, Yuhui; Zhang, Qingwen; Liu, Xiaoxia

    2016-12-01

    After injury many insects could regenerate lost limb. In this study, Helicoverpa armigera Hubner and Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen, 1835) were chosen to compare the regeneration potency of holometabolous and hemimetabolous insects. We employed the classical approach of surgical excision to verify the regeneration ability and to investigate the factors that affect the extent of regeneration. The results found that H. armigera could regenerate intact legs when the larval legs were excised at the first and second instar and that legs of adult H. armigera had a close relationship with their larval counterparts. However, the adult legs became malformed or disappeared when excised at other older instars. For the L. migratoria, we found the legs have weak partial regeneration ability when amputation was conducted at the joint of two segments. The regeneration potency might be stronger the more proximal the operation. Regeneration process had a negative impact on the larval development. This is the first report of complete leg regeneration capacity having a strong correlation with the instar but not with the position where amputation occurred for H. armigera, while for the L. migratoria, partial regenerative ability had a close relationship with the position where amputation occurred but not with instars.

  17. Selection and assessment of reference genes for quantitative PCR normalization in migratory locust Locusta migratoria (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingpo; Li, Zhen; Cao, Jinjun; Zhang, Songdou; Zhang, Huaijiang; Wu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Qingwen; Liu, Xiaoxia

    2014-01-01

    Locusta migratoria is a classic hemimetamorphosis insect and has caused widespread economic damage to crops as a migratory pest. Researches on the expression pattern of functional genes in L. migratoria have drawn focus in recent years, especially with the release of genome information. Real-time quantitative PCR is the most reproducible and sensitive approach for detecting transcript expression levels of target genes, but optimal internal standards are key factors for its accuracy and reliability. Therefore, it's necessary to provide a systematic stability assessment of internal control for well-performed tests of target gene expression profile. In this study, twelve candidate genes (Ach, Act, Cht2, EF1α, RPL32, Hsp70, Tub, RP49, SDH, GAPDH, 18S, and His) were analyzed with four statistical methods: the delta Ct approach, geNorm, Bestkeeper and NormFinder. The results from these analyses aimed to choose the best suitable reference gene across different experimental situations for gene profile study in L. migratoria. The result demonstrated that for different developmental stages, EF1α, Hsp70 and RPL32 exhibited the most stable expression status for all samples; EF1α and RPL32 were selected as the best reference genes for studies involving embryo and larvae stages, while SDH and RP49 were identified for adult stage. The best-ranked reference genes across different tissues are RPL32, Hsp70 and RP49. For abiotic treatments, the most appropriate genes we identified were as follows: Act and SDH for larvae subjected to different insecticides; RPL32 and Ach for larvae exposed to different temperature treatments; and Act and Ach for larvae suffering from starvation. The present report should facilitate future researches on gene expression in L. migratoria with accessibly optimal reference genes under different experimental contexts.

  18. The bush-cricket Isophya kraussii (Orthoptera: Phaneropteridae): bioacoustics, distribution and description of a new subspecies from Romania.

    PubMed

    Iorgu, Ionuţ Ştefan; Heller, Klaus-Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Isophya kraussii Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1878, one of the widest spread bush-crickets within this genus, is confirmed to be present east of the Carpathian Mountains. Based on acoustic analysis and morphological characters, the populations from NE Romania are considered to belong to a different subspecies, I. kraussii moldavica ssp. n. A map with distribution of both subspecies is presented.

  19. Evaluation of oxidative stress biomarkers in Aiolopus thalassinus (Orthoptera: Acrididae) collected from areas polluted by the fertilizer industry.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Hesham A; Abdelfattah, Eman A; Augustyniak, Maria

    2017-04-01

    The waste products of the fertilizer industry such as heavy metals, but especially phosphates and sulphates, are a serious problem that influences the structure and functioning of ecosystems. The levels of Cd, Pb, Zn, Cu, sulphates and phosphates were measured in soil samples from four sites: a control and sites that were 1, 3 and 6 km (sites A-C) away from the Abu-Zaabal Fertilizer Company. Oxidative stress markers (protein carbonyls, lipid peroxides), antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), polyphenoloxidase (PPO) and ascorbate peroxidase (APOX)) were evaluated in the tissues of Aiolopus thalassinus, collected from the corresponding sites. The highest concentrations of Cu and Zn were found in the soil from site A. The level of protein carbonyls in the brain, thoracic muscles and gut of the males and females from sites A, B and C were 11.82, 4.38, 5.97 (males) and 19.04, 16.65, 7.79 (females) times higher, respectively, compared to the individuals from the control site. Lipid peroxides levels in both sexes were significantly correlated with the distance from the source of the contamination. In the brain, thoracic muscles and gut of the males and females collected from site A, the level of lipid peroxides were 15.41, 23.49, 11.50 (males) and 25.36, 11.34, 15.37 (females) times higher compared to the values of the control animals. The activities of SOD, PPO, CAT and APOX were significantly affected by the environmental pollutants. The enzymatic and non-enzymatic oxidative markers in the Aiolopus thalassinus, a common insect species that inhabits various ecosystems, can also be used as a relevant biomarker of the pollution that is caused by the fertilizer industry.

  20. Potential of the desert locust schistocerca gregaria (Orthoptera: Acrididae) as an unconventional source of dietary and therapeutic sterols

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Insects are increasingly being recognized not only as a source of food to feed the ever growing world population but also as potential sources of new products and therapeutic agents, among which are sterols. In this study, we sought to profile sterols and their derivatives present in the desert locu...

  1. Neuroanatomy of the complex tibial organ in the splay-footed cricket Comicus calcaris Irish 1986 (Orthoptera: Ensifera: Schizodactylidae).

    PubMed

    Strauss, Johannes; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard

    2010-11-15

    The subgenual chordotonal organ complex in insects is modified in ensiferan taxa like Gryllidae and Tettigoniidae into hearing organs with specific sets of auditory receptors. Here, this sensory organ complex is documented in the nonhearing splay-footed cricket Comicus calcaris. The tibial chordotonal organ consists of three parts: the subgenual organ, the intermediate organ, and the crista acustica homolog. The latter is an array of linearly organized neurons homologous to auditory receptors in the tibial hearing organs of Tettigoniidae. The tibial organ is structurally similar in all three leg pairs, with similar neuron numbers in the fore- and midleg, but lower numbers in the hindleg. The foreleg crista acustica homolog consists of 34±4 neurons, the highest number in an atympanate Ensiferan. Additionally, an accessory chordotonal organ with 15±5 neurons innervated by nerve 5B1 is present in the foreleg. The central projection of the tibial organreveals ipsilateral sensory terminals in the primary sensory neuropil, the medial ventral association center with terminations close to the midline. As determined from extracellular recordings, the entire tibial organ is vibrosensitive. The organization of the tibial organ is compared to other ensiferan auditory and nonauditory tibial organs. Spatial orientation of neurons in the crista acustica homolog is not reminiscent of auditory structures, and the neuroanatomy is discussed with respect to stridulation behavior and the evolutionary origin of hearing in Ensifera.

  2. Molecular systematics of the genus Troglophilus (Rhaphidophoridae, Orthoptera) in Turkey: mitochondrial 16S rDNA evidences

    PubMed Central

    Taylan, Mehmet Sait; Russo, Claudio Di; Rampini, Mauro; Ketmaier, Valerio

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This study focuses on the evolutionary relationships among Turkish species of the cave cricket genus Troglophilus.Fifteen populations were studied for sequence variation in a fragment (543 base pairs) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) 16S rDNA gene (16S) to reconstruct their phylogenetic relationships and biogeographic history. Genetic data retrieved three main clades and at least three divergent lineages that could not be attributed to any of the taxa known for the area. Molecular time estimates suggest that the diversification of the group took place between the Messinian and the Plio-Pleistocene. PMID:23653493

  3. New records of nematomorph parasites (Nematomorpha: Gordiida) of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) and camel crickets (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae) in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Looney, Chris; Hanelt, Ben; Zack, Richard S

    2012-06-01

    From 1998 to 2003, beetles and crickets infected with hairworms were collected from 4 localities within the Hanford Nuclear Site and the Hanford Reach National Monument, located in a shrub-steppe region of Washington State along the Columbia River. Infected hosts comprised 6 species of carabid beetles within 5 genera and 2 camel crickets within 1 genus; all are newly documented insect-nematomorph associations. A large proportion of the infected hosts (48%) were collected from a single site during a single collecting period. Of the 38 infected hosts, 32 contained a single worm, 4 hosts contained 2 worms, and 2 hosts contained 3 worms. Five of the hosts with multiple infections contained at least 1 male and 1 female worm. Camel crickets were infected with Neochordodes occidentalis while carabids were infected with an undescribed species of Gordionus . As the majority of hairworms are collected in the post-parasitic adult phase, host data and hairworm-arthropod associations remain poorly documented and our work adds new data to this area of nematomorph biology.

  4. Assortative preferences and discrimination by females against hybrid male song in the grasshoppers Chorthippus brunneus and Chorthippus jacobsi (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Bridle, J R; Saldamando, C I; Koning, W; Butlin, R K

    2006-07-01

    The grasshoppers Chorthippus brunneus and Chorthippus jacobsi are highly differentiated for male mating signals, and form a mosaic hybrid zone in northern Spain. At some sites within this zone, many hybrids are observed. At others, few hybrids are observed. Such bimodal sites may reflect recent contacts between parental genotypes, or local variation in levels of assortative mating or selection against hybrids. Playback of 12 parental and F1 male songs to 296 parental and hybrid females revealed positive assortative preferences in C. brunneus and C. jacobsi females, supporting a direct role of male mating signals in female choice. However, all female genotypic classes showed reduced responsiveness to F1 male songs. Such sexual selection against hybrids is consistent with the narrow cline width observed in the field for song characters relative to morphology. These results have implications for the genetic structure of the hybrid zone and for models of speciation by reinforcement.

  5. Do Mediterranean crickets Gryllus bimaculatus De Geer (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) come from the Mediterranean? Largescale phylogeography and regional gene flow.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, M; Ferguson, J W H

    2010-02-01

    We investigate the degree of between-population genetic differentiation in the Mediterranean field cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, as well as the possible causes of such differentiation. Using cytochrome b mtDNA sequences, we estimate genetic variation in G. bimaculatus from seven South African and two Mediterranean populations. Within-population genetic variation in Europe (two haplotypes, one unique to a single individual) suggest low effective population size and strong bottlenecks with associated founder effects, probably due to cold winter environments in Europe that limit reproduction to a short part of the summer. The likely cause for this is the daily maxima in winter temperatures that fall below the critical level of 16 degrees C (enabling normal calling and courtship behaviour) in Mediterranean Europe, whereas the equivalent temperatures in southern Africa are above this limit and enable reproduction over a large part of the year. European genetic variants were either shared with Africa or closely related to African haplotypes. For survival, European populations are probably dependent on immigration from other areas, including Africa. South African populations have low but measurable gene flow with Europe and show significant between-population genetic differentiation (30 haplotypes). Isolation-by-distance is not sufficient to explain the degree of between-population genetic differences observed, and a large degree of dispersal is also required in order to account for the observed patterns. Differences in morphology and calling behaviour among these populations are underlied by these genetic differences.

  6. Multivariate sexual selection on male song structure in wild populations of sagebrush crickets, Cyphoderris strepitans (Orthoptera: Haglidae)

    PubMed Central

    Ower, Geoffrey D; Judge, Kevin A; Steiger, Sandra; Caron, Kyle J; Smith, Rebecca A; Hunt, John; Sakaluk, Scott K

    2013-01-01

    While a number of studies have measured multivariate sexual selection acting on sexual signals in wild populations, few have confirmed these findings with experimental manipulation. Sagebrush crickets are ideally suited to such investigations because mating imposes an unambiguous phenotypic marker on males arising from nuptial feeding by females. We quantified sexual selection operating on male song by recording songs of virgin and mated males captured from three wild populations. To determine the extent to which selection on male song is influenced by female preference, we conducted a companion study in which we synthesized male songs and broadcast them to females in choice trials. Multivariate selection analysis revealed a saddle-shaped fitness surface, the highest peak of which corresponded to longer train and pulse durations, and longer intertrain intervals. Longer trains and pulses likely promote greater mate attraction, but selection for longer intertrain durations suggests that energetic constraints may necessitate “time outs”. Playback trials confirmed the selection for longer train and pulse durations, and revealed significant stabilizing selection on dominant frequency, suggesting that the female auditory system is tightly tuned to the species-specific call frequency. Collectively, our results revealed a complex pattern of multivariate nonlinear selection characterized primarily by strong stabilizing and disruptive selection on male song traits. PMID:24223293

  7. Morphological redescription and molecular characterization of three species of Travassosinematidae (Nematoda: Oxyurida: Thelastomatoidea) from Gryllotalpa africana Beauv (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae).

    PubMed

    Singh, Neetu; Chaudhary, Anshu; Singh, Hridaya Shanker

    2013-01-01

    Binema mirzaia (Basir, 1942a) Basir, 1956, Cameronia nisari (Parveen and Jairajpuri, 1985) Adamson and Van Waerebeke, 1992a and Mirzaiella meerutensis Singh and Malti, 2003 are redescribed morphologically along with molecular identification from the intestine of mole cricket Gryllotalpa africana. Molecular characterization was carried out using the D2-D3 expansion domains of the 18S ribosomal DNA region. This study first time presents molecular data for the above three nematode species.

  8. Discrimination of grasshopper (Orthoptera: Acrididae) diet and niche overlap using next-generation sequencing of gut contents

    PubMed Central

    McClenaghan, Beverly; Gibson, Joel F; Shokralla, Shadi; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Species of grasshopper have been divided into three diet classifications based on mandible morphology: forbivorous (specialist on forbs), graminivorous (specialist on grasses), and mixed feeding (broad-scale generalists). For example, Melanoplus bivittatus and Dissosteira carolina are presumed to be broad-scale generalists, Chortophaga viridifasciata is a specialist on grasses, and Melanoplus femurrubrum is a specialist on forbs. These classifications, however, have not been verified in the wild. Multiple specimens of these four species were collected, and diet analysis was performed using DNA metabarcoding of the gut contents. The rbcLa gene region was amplified and sequenced using Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Levins’ measure and the Shannon–Wiener measure of niche breadth were calculated using family-level identifications and Morisita’s measure of niche overlap was calculated using operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Gut contents confirm both D. carolina and M. bivittatus as generalists and C. viridifasciata as a specialist on grasses. For M. femurrubrum, a high niche breadth was observed and species of grasses were identified in the gut as well as forbs. Niche overlap values did not follow predicted patterns, however, the low values suggest low competition between these species. PMID:26356479

  9. Potential of the Desert Locust Schistocerca gregaria (Orthoptera: Acrididae) as an Unconventional Source of Dietary and Therapeutic Sterols.

    PubMed

    Cheseto, Xavier; Kuate, Serge Philibert; Tchouassi, David P; Ndung'u, Mary; Teal, Peter E A; Torto, Baldwyn

    2015-01-01

    Insects are increasingly being recognized not only as a source of food to feed the ever growing world population but also as potential sources of new products and therapeutic agents, among which are sterols. In this study, we sought to profile sterols and their derivatives present in the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria, focusing on those with potential importance as dietary and therapeutic components for humans. Using coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), we analyzed and compared the quantities of sterols in the different sections of the gut and tissues of the locust. In the gut, we identified 34 sterols which showed a patchy distribution, but with the highest composition in the foregut (55%) followed by midgut (31%) and hindgut (14%). Fed ad libitum on wheat seedlings, five sterols unique to the insect were detected. These sterols were identified as 7-dehydrocholesterol, desmosterol, fucosterol, (3β, 5α) cholesta-8, 14, 24-trien-3-ol, 4, 4-dimethyl, and (3β, 20R) cholesta-5, 24-dien-3, 20-diol with the first three having known health benefits in humans. Incubation of the fore-, mid- and hindgut with cholesterol-[4-13C] yielded eight derivatives, three of these were detected in the gut of the desert locust after it had consumed the vegetative diet but were not detected in the diet. Our study shows that the desert locust ingests phytosterols from a vegetative diet and, amplifies and metabolizes them into derivatives with potential salutary benefits and we discuss our findings in this context.

  10. Complete mitogenome of the semi-aquatic grasshopper Oxya intricate (Stål.) (Insecta: Orthoptera: Catantopidae).

    PubMed

    Dong, Jia-Jia; Guan, De-Long; Xu, Sheng-Quan

    2016-09-01

    The complete mitogenome of Oxya intricate (Stål.) has been reconstructed from whole-genome Illumina sequencing data with an average coverage of 294×. The circular genome is 15,466 bp in length, and consists of 22 transfer RNAs (tRNAs), 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 2 ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and 1 D-loop region. All PCGs are initiated with ATN codons, and are terminated with TAR codons except for ND5 with the incomplete stop codon T. The nucleotide composition is asymmetric (42.5%A, 14.6%C, 10.6%G, 32.3%T) with an overall GC content of 25.2%. These data would contribute to the design of novel molecular markers for population and evolutionary studies of this and related orthopteran species.

  11. Studies in Guatemalan Ensifera: New Glaphyrosoma species (Orthoptera: Anostostomatidae) and additional data for other described species.

    PubMed

    Cadena-Castañeda, Oscar J; Monzón-Sierra, José

    2017-03-13

    We describe three new species in the genus Glaphyrosoma: G. magnaproctalis n. sp., G. franciscoasturiasi n. sp. and G. hectorcentenoi n. sp. We provide new data on the distribution of G. karnyi, G. beretka and G. anderi in Guatemala. We propose G. bruneri as nomen dubium and we define the status of specimens recorded as G. gracile in Guatemala and Costa Rica. We also include a species distribution map of this genus with the information available to us up to date and a key to species.

  12. Pamphagidae (Orthoptera: Caelifera) of North Africa: key to genera and the annotated check-list of species.

    PubMed

    Massa, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    At least 95 species of Pamphagidae belonging to 17 genera are known in North Africa. Taxonomic status is fairly known, with some exception, mainly due to scarcity of available specimens of some genera in museums and collections. In this paper, the author proposes a new key to genera and reports the annotated list of all the known species, based on specimens examined in different European museums. Concerning the subfamily Thrinchinae, he proposes to consider only the following species of the genus Tmethis: T. cisti, T. harterti new status, T. maroccanus and T. pulchripennis. He also considers Neotmethis bidentatus synonym of T. harterti, and the three newly described species of the genus Tuarega as synonyms of T. insignis. In addition, he proposes to remove Batrachotettix elephas from the synonyms of T. insignis, because its description consents to establish that it belongs to a South African Porthetinae, not to a Thrinchinae. With regard to the subfamily Pamphaginae, the author recognizes the presence in North Africa of three tribes, until now containing 90 species: Finotiini, Pamphagini and Euryparyphini; Amigus is definitively considered a valid genus within the tribe Pamphagini, with the only species A. nigroadspersus. Additionally, he proposes a new key to species of the genus Paracinipe. He considers Paracinipe theryi as a valid species; previously it has been listed as subspecies of P. dolichocera. He also establishes that Acinipe calabra of Italy is the same taxon living in North Africa. Further, he describes Euryparyphes rungsi new species from Middle Atlas, and Paraeumigus lopezi new species from West Morocco, and synonymizes Eunapiodes granosus rungsi with E. atlantis. Finally, he reports biometric data of the genera Tmethis, Paracinipe, Paraeumigus and Eunapiodes.

  13. Review of the cave cricket genus Tamdaotettix Gorochov with a new species and some new descriptions (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae, Aemodogryllinae).

    PubMed

    Qin, Yanyan; Liu, Xianwei; Li, Kai

    2016-08-22

    A review of the rhaphidophorid genus Tamdaotettix Gorochov, 1998 is presented. One new species, one newly-recorded species from China and one species from Vietnam are identified and described. These are namely Tamdaotettix (Tamdaotettix) tridenticulatus sp. nov., Tamdaotettix (Laotettix) curvatus Gorochov, 2015 and Tamdaotettix (Tamdaotettix) semipullus Gorochov, 1998. At the same time, Megadiestramima extensa Gorochov, 1998 is redescribed. A key to the species of Tamdaotettix is provided.

  14. A modified mole cricket lure and description of Scapteriscus borellii (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae) range expansion and calling song in California.

    PubMed

    Dillman, Adler R; Cronin, Christopher J; Tang, Joseph; Gray, David A; Sternberg, Paul W

    2014-02-01

    Invasive mole cricket species in the genus Scapteriscus have become significant agricultural pests and are continuing to expand their range in North America. Though largely subterranean, adults of some species, such as Scapteriscus borellii Giglio-Tos 1894, are capable of long dispersive flights and phonotaxis to male calling songs to find suitable habitats and mates. Mole crickets in the genus Scapteriscus are known to be attracted to and can be caught by audio lure traps that broadcast synthesized or recorded calling songs. We report improvements in the design and production of electronic controllers for the automation of semipermanent mole cricket trap lures as well as highly portable audio trap collection designs. Using these improved audio lure traps, we collected the first reported individuals of the pest mole cricket S. borellii in California. We describe several characteristic features of the calling song of the California population including that the pulse rate is a function of soil temperature, similar to Florida populations of S. borellii. Further, we show that other calling song characteristics (carrier frequency, intensity, and pulse rate) are significantly different between the populations.

  15. Ecology of the tawny mole cricket, Scapteriscus vicinus (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae): population estimation, spatial distribution, movement, and host relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, W.G.

    1985-01-01

    Scapteriscus vicinus is the most important pest of turf and pasture grasses in Florida. This study develops a method of correlating sample results with true population density and provides the first quantitative information on spatial distribution and movement patterns of mole crickets. Three basic techniques for sampling mole crickets were compared: soil flushes, soil corer, and pitfall trapping. No statistical difference was found between the soil corer and soil flushing. Soil flushing was shown to be more sensitive to changes in population density than pitfall trapping. No technique was effective for sampling adults. Regression analysis provided a means of adjusting for the effects of soil moisture and showed soil temperature to be unimportant in predicting efficiency of flush sampling. Cesium-137 was used to label females for subsequent location underground. Comparison of mean distance to nearest neighbor with the distance predicted by a random distribution model showed that the observed distance in the spring was significantly greater than hypothesized (Student's T-test, p < 0.05). Fall adult nearest neighbor distance was not different than predicted by the random distribution hypothesis.

  16. Patterns of ecology and distribution of the tree crickets Oecanthus dulcisonans and O. pellucens (Orthoptera: Gryllidae; Oecanthinae) in southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Labadessa, Rocco; Todisco, Simone

    2016-09-21

    Ecological proclivities of the tree cricket Oecanthus dulcisonans, which has been recently separated from the well known O. pellucens, have been poorly investigated. Moreover, studies on the patterns driving niche segregation between these related species are still needed. This study aims to explore the role of macro-habitat in shaping the distribution of O. dulcisonans and O. pellucens in southern Italy. Occurrence data were sampled by means of a rapid acoustic survey scheme at a regional scale. The significance of difference in ecological and habitat parameters was tested between the two species. While confirming species behavioural patterns, new findings are provided with regard to their ecological difference. Species distribution proves to be primarily driven by elevation gradient and temperature variation, with O. dulcisonans common and widespread in warmer lowlands and O. pellucens limited to higher altitudes. The two species also show significant spatial segregation within vegetation layers. These findings also provide cues for future studies on species interaction, as well as for the assessment of a monitoring scheme which may help interpreting the effects of broad environmental changes.

  17. Effect of a strong, DC-induced magnetic field on circadian singing activity of the house cricket (orthoptera:gryllidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, K.C.; Bitzer, R.J.; Galliart, L.

    1995-05-01

    We investigated the effect of a strong, DC-induced electromagnetic field (EMF) on the circadian singing activity of the house cricket, Acheta domesticus (L.). Groups of 10 crickets were exposed to strong, DC-induced EMFs under two light regimes, 12:12 (L:D) h and 0:24 (L:D) h. Exposure to the strong EMF resulted in an increase in mean time per hour during which one or more crickets were singing and in number of crickets singing per hour. Correcting for phase shift during O:24 (L:D) h, the daily pattern of singing was apparently unaffected by any treatment. The greatest percentage of singing and number of crickets singing per hour occurred during actual or expected scotophase. This is the first report of an increase in insect activity during exposure to a strong DC-induced EMF.

  18. Gleaning bat echolocation calls do not elicit antipredator behaviour in the Pacific field cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    PubMed

    ter Hofstede, Hannah M; Killow, Joanne; Fullard, James H

    2009-08-01

    Bats that glean prey (capture them from surfaces) produce relatively inconspicuous echolocation calls compared to aerially foraging bats and could therefore be difficult predators to detect, even for insects with ultrasound sensitive ears. In the cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus, an auditory interneuron (AN2) responsive to ultrasound is known to elicit turning behaviour, but only when the cricket is in flight. Turning would not save a cricket from a gleaning bat so we tested the hypothesis that AN2 elicits more appropriate antipredator behaviours when crickets are on the ground. The echolocation calls of Nyctophilus geoffroyi, a sympatric gleaning bat, were broadcast to singing male and walking female T. oceanicus. Males did not cease singing and females did not pause walking more than usual in response to the bat calls up to intensities of 82 dB peSPL. Extracellular recordings from the cervical connective revealed that the echolocation calls elicited AN2 action potentials at high firing rates, indicating that the crickets could hear these stimuli. AN2 appears to elicit antipredator behaviour only in flight, and we discuss possible reasons for this context-dependent function.

  19. A new genus and two new species of Luzarinae cricket from the Atlantic Forest of Northeast Brazil (Orthoptera, Grylloidea).

    PubMed

    Souza-Dias, Pedro G B; Desutter-Grandcolas, Laure

    2014-10-13

    A new genus and two new species of Luzarinae crickets (Grylloidea, Phalangopsidae) are described from the Atlantic Forest of Northeast Brazil. Marcgraviella muriciensis Souza-Dias n. gen., n. sp. and M. christianae Desutter-Grandcolas & Souza-Dias n. gen., n. sp. are described using characters of morphology and male genitalia. The new genus is characterized by male genitalia singularities, presenting elongated and inflatable pseudepiphallic parameres, which lies in vertical or almost vertical position, and long and tubular pseudepiphallic arms associated to phallic glands. We provide a discussion about the morphology of male genitalia and the function of the phallic glands and pseudepiphallic arms in Marcgraviella n. gen. and related taxa. An identification key for Marcgraviella n. gen. and related genera is proposed. These genera, which bear phallic glands, are placed in the newly named group, the Aracambiae.

  20. First record of Sonotrella Gorochov (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) from Laos, with description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Yu; Zhang, Dong-Xiao; Shi, Fu-Ming

    2016-05-23

    The genus Sonotrella Gorochov, 1988 is recorded to Laos for the first time. A new species is described and illustrated, S. (Sonotrella) laosensis sp. nov. (type locality: Laos). A distribution map of the species of Sonotrella (Sonotrella) and a key to the subgenera of Sonotrella worldwide are given.

  1. Molecular cytogenetic characterization and chromosomal distribution of the satellite DNA in the genome of Oxya hyla intricata (Orthoptera: Catantopidae).

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, A; Nakata, A; Kuro-o, M; Obara, Y; Ando, Y

    2006-01-01

    The genomic DNA of the grasshopper (Oxya hyla intricata) was subjected to electrophoresis after digestion with HaeIII, and the result showed two bands of highly repetitive DNA, approximately 200 and 400 bp in length. The 200-bp HaeIII-digested fragment was cloned and characterized by sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The results showed the presence of two distinct satellite DNA (stDNA) families: one consisting of a 169-bp repeated element having an A+T content of 60.9% and the other consisting of a 204-bp repeated element having an A+T content of 53.9%. No significant homology between the two stDNA families was observed. FISH showed that the chromosomal locations of these families are different from each other. The 169-bp element was located in the C-band-positive regions of the short arms of most of the chromosomes, whereas the 204-bp element was located in the centromeric regions of three chromosome pairs. These results imply that the origins of these two DNA families are different. The results of zoo-blot hybridization to the genomic DNA from four Oxya species, O. hyla intricata, O. japonica japonica, O. chinensis formosana, and O. yezoensis, suggest that the two stDNA families found in the present study are species-specific for O. hyla intricata. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Potential of the Desert Locust Schistocerca gregaria (Orthoptera: Acrididae) as an Unconventional Source of Dietary and Therapeutic Sterols

    PubMed Central

    Cheseto, Xavier; Kuate, Serge Philibert; Tchouassi, David P.; Ndung’u, Mary; Teal, Peter E. A.; Torto, Baldwyn

    2015-01-01

    Insects are increasingly being recognized not only as a source of food to feed the ever growing world population but also as potential sources of new products and therapeutic agents, among which are sterols. In this study, we sought to profile sterols and their derivatives present in the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria, focusing on those with potential importance as dietary and therapeutic components for humans. Using coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), we analyzed and compared the quantities of sterols in the different sections of the gut and tissues of the locust. In the gut, we identified 34 sterols which showed a patchy distribution, but with the highest composition in the foregut (55%) followed by midgut (31%) and hindgut (14%). Fed ad libitum on wheat seedlings, five sterols unique to the insect were detected. These sterols were identified as 7-dehydrocholesterol, desmosterol, fucosterol, (3β, 5α) cholesta-8, 14, 24-trien-3-ol, 4, 4-dimethyl, and (3β, 20R) cholesta-5, 24-dien-3, 20-diol with the first three having known health benefits in humans. Incubation of the fore-, mid- and hindgut with cholesterol-[4-13C] yielded eight derivatives, three of these were detected in the gut of the desert locust after it had consumed the vegetative diet but were not detected in the diet. Our study shows that the desert locust ingests phytosterols from a vegetative diet and, amplifies and metabolizes them into derivatives with potential salutary benefits and we discuss our findings in this context. PMID:25970517

  3. Identification and Characterization of Two “Sensory Neuron Membrane Proteins” (SNMPs) of the Desert Locust, Schistocerca gregaria (Orthoptera: Acrididae)

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xingcong; Pregitzer, Pablo; Grosse-Wilde, Ewald; Breer, Heinz; Krieger, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Pheromone-responsive neurons of insects not only require specific receptors but in addition several auxiliary components, including the “sensory neuron membrane protein,” SNMP. Accordingly, SNMP is considered as a marker for neurons responding to pheromones. For the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria, it is known that the behavior, including aggregation behavior and courtship inhibition, is largely controlled by pheromones. However, little is known about pheromones, their receptors, and the pheromone-responsive cells in locusts. In this study, we have identified two SNMP subtypes, SNMP1 and SNMP2, and compared their phylogenetic relationship and primary structure motifs with SNMPs from other species. Both SNMPs were found in chemosensory tissues, especially the antennae. Employing double in situ hybridization, we identified and localized the SNMP-expressing cells in the antennae. Cells expressing SNMP1 were localized to sensilla trichodea but also to sensilla basiconica, which in locust respond to pheromones. One or a few cells express SNMP1 within the multineuron clusters from sensilla basiconica, whereas the SNMP2 subtype was expressed in cells surrounding the neuron clusters, possibly supporting cells. Based on the finding that SNMP1 is expressed in distinct neurons under chemosensory sensilla, it is conceivable that these cells may represent pheromone-responsive neurons of the desert locust. PMID:27012870

  4. Chamber music: an unusual Helmholtz resonator for song amplification in a Neotropical bush-cricket (Orthoptera, Tettigoniidae).

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Thorin; Chivers, Benedict D; Robson Brown, Kate; Sarria-S, Fabio A; Walker, Matthew; Montealegre-Z, Fernando

    2017-08-15

    Animals use sound for communication, with high-amplitude signals being selected for attracting mates or deterring rivals. High amplitudes are attained by employing primary resonators in sound-producing structures to amplify the signal (e.g. avian syrinx). Some species actively exploit acoustic properties of natural structures to enhance signal transmission by using these as secondary resonators (e.g. tree-hole frogs). Male bush-crickets produce sound by tegminal stridulation and often use specialised wing areas as primary resonators. Interestingly, Acanthacara acuta, a Neotropical bush-cricket, exhibits an unusual pronotal inflation, forming a chamber covering the wings. It has been suggested that such pronotal chambers enhance amplitude and tuning of the signal by constituting a (secondary) Helmholtz resonator. If true, the intact system - when stimulated sympathetically with broadband sound - should show clear resonance around the song carrier frequency which should be largely independent of pronotum material, and change when the system is destroyed. Using laser Doppler vibrometry on living and preserved specimens, microcomputed tomography, 3D-printed models and finite element modelling, we show that the pronotal chamber not only functions as a Helmholtz resonator owing to its intact morphology but also resonates at frequencies of the calling song on itself, making song production a three-resonator system. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Neyraiella distinctus n. sp. (Oxyurida, Blattophilidae) parasite of nymphs of Gryllodes laplatae Sauss (Orthoptera, Gryllidae) in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Camino, Nora B; de Villalobos, Cristina

    2002-04-01

    Neyraiella distinctus n. sp. was found parasitizing nymphs of the cricket Gryllodes laplatae Sauss in City Bell, Argentina. This species was characterized by having the excretory pore in the posterior end of the basal bulb, vulva protruding with one lip well developed in the 1/3 end of the body, anus of the female with wings, male with a single spicule without any sculpture, gubernaculum and bursa are absent, six pairs of genital papillae arranged in two preanal pairs, one adanal pair and three postanal pairs, and the tail appendage in both sexes was short and conic.

  6. The tribe Dysoniini part IV: New species of Quiva Hebard, 1927 (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Phaneropterinae) from Brazilian rainforest and some clarifications.

    PubMed

    Cadena-Castañeda, Oscar J; Mendes, Diego Matheus De Mello; Sovano, Rafael S Da Silva

    2015-06-10

    Two new species of the genus Quiva: Quiva buhrnheimi n. sp. and Quiva gutjahrae n. sp. from Brazilian Amazon are described. Determinations for distributional data previously published by Sovano & Mendes (2013) are clarified and the synonymy of Ituana dorisae under Q. abacata is confirmed. In this paper, an updated key to subgenus Quiva is provided.

  7. Molecular Phylogeny of Nematodes (Oxyurida: Travassosinematidae) from Orthoptera (Gryllotalpidae) Inferred by Mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase Subunit 1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Neetu; Chaudhary, Anshu; Singh, Hridaya Shanker

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we sequenced mt Cox 1 gene sequences of five nematode spp. that were infective to arthropod, Gryllotalpa africana. The nematode belongs to Thelastomatoidea, a group of pinworms that parasitizes only invertebrates. Currently, in India spp. of this group are distinguished mainly on the basis of morphological characters that present possible confusions. Therefore, we identified the species through morphological and genetic analysis. We selected mt Cox 1 gene region to show their phylogenetic position with closely related spp. and confirmed their molecular validation. The present findings are important to confirm the phylogenetic position and relationship among five nematode spp. and avoid misidentification regarding their validation, as it is more necessary in that case when many species harbours the same host. PMID:26339150

  8. A Modified Mole Cricket Lure and Description of Scapteriscus borellii (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae) Range Expansion and Calling Song in California

    PubMed Central

    Dillman, Adler R.; Cronin, Christopher J.; Tang, Joseph; Gray, David A.; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Invasive mole cricket species in the genus Scapteriscus have become significant agricultural pests and are continuing to expand their range in North America. Though largely subterranean, adults of some species such as S. borellii are capable of long dispersive flights and phonotaxis to male calling songs to find suitable habitats and mates. Mole crickets in the genus Scapteriscus are known to be attracted to and can be caught by audio lure traps that broadcast synthesized or recorded calling songs. We report improvements in the design and production of electronic controllers for the automation of semi-permanent mole cricket trap lures as well as highly portable audio trap collection designs. Using these improved audio lure traps we collected the first reported individuals of the pest mole cricket S. borellii in California. We describe several characteristic features of the calling song of the California population including that the pulse rate is a function of soil temperature, similar to Florida populations of S. borellii. Further, we show that other calling song characteristics (carrier frequency, intensity, and pulse rate) are significantly different between the populations. PMID:24472207

  9. The subgenual organ complex in the cave cricket Troglophilus neglectus (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae): comparative innervation and sensory evolution

    PubMed Central

    Strauß, Johannes; Stritih, Nataša; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Comparative studies of the organization of nervous systems and sensory organs can reveal their evolution and specific adaptations. In the forelegs of some Ensifera (including crickets and tettigoniids), tympanal hearing organs are located in close proximity to the mechanosensitive subgenual organ (SGO). In the present study, the SGO complex in the non-hearing cave cricket Troglophilus neglectus (Rhaphidophoridae) is investigated for the neuronal innervation pattern and for organs homologous to the hearing organs in related taxa. We analyse the innervation pattern of the sensory organs (SGO and intermediate organ (IO)) and its variability between individuals. In T. neglectus, the IO consists of two major groups of closely associated sensilla with different positions. While the distal-most sensilla superficially resemble tettigoniid auditory sensilla in location and orientation, the sensory innervation does not show these two groups to be distinct organs. Though variability in the number of sensory nerve branches occurs, usually either organ is supplied by a single nerve branch. Hence, no sensory elements clearly homologous to the auditory organ are evident. In contrast to other non-hearing Ensifera, the cave cricket sensory structures are relatively simple, consistent with a plesiomorphic organization resembling sensory innervation in grasshoppers and stick insects. PMID:26064547

  10. The thorax of the cave cricket Troglophilus neglectus: anatomical adaptations in an ancient wingless insect lineage (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae).

    PubMed

    Leubner, Fanny; Hörnschemeyer, Thomas; Bradler, Sven

    2016-02-18

    Secondary winglessness is a common phenomenon found among neopteran insects. With an estimated age of at least 140 million years, the cave crickets (Rhaphidophoridae) form the oldest exclusively wingless lineage within the long-horned grasshoppers (Ensifera). With respect to their morphology, cave crickets are generally considered to represent a `primitive' group of Ensifera, for which no apomorphic character has been reported so far. We present the first detailed investigation and description of the thoracic skeletal and muscular anatomy of the East Mediterranean cave cricket Troglophilus neglectus (Ensifera: Rhaphidophoridae). T. neglectus possesses sternopleural muscles that are not yet reported from other neopteran insects. Cave crickets in general exhibit some unique features with respect to their thoracic skeletal anatomy: an externally reduced prospinasternum, a narrow median sclerite situated between the meso- and metathorax, a star-shaped prospina, and a triramous metafurca. The thoracic muscle equipment of T. neglectus compared to that of the bush cricket Conocephalus maculatus (Ensifera: Tettigoniidae) and the house cricket Acheta domesticus (Ensifera: Gryllidae) reveals a number of potentially synapomorphic characters between these lineages. Based on the observed morphology we favor a closer relationship of Rhaphidophoridae to Tettigoniidae rather than to Gryllidae. In addition, the comparison of the thoracic morphology of T. neglectus to that of other wingless Polyneoptera allows reliable conclusions about anatomical adaptations correlated with secondary winglessness. The anatomy in apterous Ensifera, viz. the reduction of discrete direct and indirect flight muscles as well as the strengthening of specific leg muscles, largely resembles the condition found in wingless stick insects (Euphasmatodea), but is strikingly different from that of other related wingless insects, e.g. heel walkers (Mantophasmatodea), ice crawlers (Grylloblattodea), and certain grasshoppers (Caelifera). The composition of direct flight muscles largely follows similar patterns in winged respectively wingless species within major polyneopteran lineages, but it is highly heterogeneous between those lineages.

  11. [The b chromosome polymorphism in Armenian and Turkey populations of the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans plorans (Charpentier) (Orthoptera, Acrididae, Eyprepocnemidinae)].

    PubMed

    Dziubenko, V V; Karagian, G I; Chiplak, B; Rubtsov, N B; Bugrov, A G

    2006-01-01

    Karyotype analysis of the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans samples derived from Armenian and Turkey populations was performed using C-banding technique. Chromosome polymorphism was associated only with B chromosomes that were revealed in all studied populations. Six new B chromosome morphotypes were described. Four morphotypes were found only in Armenian populations. One morphotype was revealed only in Turkey populations. One B chromosome morphotype was present in Armenian and Turkey populations. B chromosomes derived from Asian populations consisted mostly from C-positive regions. In some of the B chromosomes small C-negative regions were also registered. Morphotypes of the B chromosomes derived from Armenian and Turkey populations drastically differed from the B chromosomes described in the Iberian Peninsula and North African populations. In contrast to the B chromosomes from Armenian and Turkey populations the B chromosomes from Spain populations contained C-positive and C-negative regions alternated in their arms.

  12. Resource-mediated impact of spider predation risk on performance in the grasshopper Ageneotettix deorum (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Danner, Bradford J; Joern, Anthony

    2003-11-01

    In response to increased exposure to predators when searching for food, many prey increase the frequency of antipredator behaviors, potentially reducing foraging rate and food intake. Such direct, nonlethal interactions between predators and prey resulting in reduced food intake can indirectly influence lifecycle development through effects on growth, developmental rate, and survival. We investigated the general hypothesis that individual performance of a herbivorous insect can be negatively affected when exposed to nonlethal predation risk, and that the response can be mediated by food quality. This hypothesis was tested using the common rangeland grasshopper Ageneotettix deorum with and without exposure to common wolf spider predators (Lycosidae, Schizocosa spp.) on both untreated natural and fertilized vegetation. All spiders were rendered temporarily incapable of direct feeding by restricting function of the chelicerae with beeswax. Detectable responses by grasshoppers to spiders indicate indirect consequences for lifecycle development. Grasshopper performance was measured as hind femur growth, duration of nymphal lifecycle stages, and survivorship in a caged field experiment conducted over 2 years. Grasshoppers developed faster and grew 3-5% larger when allowed to forage on fertilized vegetation in the absence of risk from a spider predator. Failure-time analysis illustrated enhanced survival probability in response to elevated food quality and the negative effects of grasshopper susceptibility to nonlethal predation risk. Performance on food of relatively low, ambient quality with no predation risk equaled that of grasshoppers caged with high quality vegetation in the presence of a modified spider. Increased resource quality can clearly moderate the negative life history responses caused by the behavioral modification of grasshoppers when exposed to spider predation risk, a compensatory response.

  13. Habitat Association and Seasonality in a Mosaic and Bimodal Hybrid Zone between Chorthippus brunneus and C. jacobsi (Orthoptera: Acrididae)

    PubMed Central

    Tatsuta, Haruki; Butlin, Roger K.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding why some hybrid zones are bimodal and others unimodal can aid in identifying barriers to gene exchange following secondary contact. The hybrid zone between the grasshoppers Chorthippus brunneus and C. jacobsi contains a mix of allopatric parental populations and inter-mingled bimodal and unimodal sympatric populations, and provides an ideal system to examine the roles of local selection and gene flow between populations in maintaining bimodality. However, it is first necessary to confirm, over a larger spatial scale, previously identified associations between population composition and season and habitat. Here we use cline-fitting of one morphological and one song trait along two valley transects, and intervening mountains, to confirm previously identified habitat associations (mountain versus valley) and seasonal changes in population composition. As expected from previous findings of studies on a smaller spatial scale, C. jacobsi dominated mountain habitats and mixed populations dominated valleys, and C. brunneus became more prevalent in August. Controlling for habitat and incorporating into the analysis seasonal changes in cline parameters and the standard errors of parental trait values revealed wider clines than previous studies (best estimates of 6.4 to 24.5 km in our study versus 2.8 to 4.7 km in previous studies) and increased percentage of trait variance explained (52.7% and 61.5% for transects 1 and 2 respectively, versus 17.6%). Revealing such strong and consistent patterns within a complex hybrid zone will allow more focused examination of the causes of variation in bimodality in mixed populations, in particular the roles of local selection versus habitat heterogeneity and gene flow between differentiated populations. PMID:22675485

  14. Comparison of the olfactory sensitivity of two sympatric steppe grasshopper species (Orthoptera: Acrididae) to plant volatile compounds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huhai; Zhao, Yunxian; Kang, Le

    2004-04-01

    Electroantennogram (EAG) responses of male and female Oedipodinae grasshoppers, Oedaleus decorus asiaticus B.-Bienko and Angaracris barabensis Pall to 37 plant volatile compounds were recorded. The two species have sympatric distribution and synchronous seasonal activity in Inner Mongolia Grasslands. They have different host plant preference with Oedaleus decorus asiaticus graminivorous and A. barabensis forbivorous. The EAG response profiles to 37 compounds of the two species and their both sexes were similar. Most of the green leaf volatiles elicited higher EAG responses in both species and sexes than terpenic compounds and some aromatic compounds. Strong EAG responses were elicited by 6-carbon alcohols (1-hexanol, Z-hexen-2-ol-1, E-2-hexen-1-ol, E-hexen-3-ol-1), aldehyde (E-2-hexen-1-al), ester (Z-hexen-3-yl acetate), and 7-carbon alcohols (1-heptanol) in both species and sexes. Monoterpenes with functional groups of alcohols and aldehydes were more stimulating than other monoterpenes tested. The sesquiterpenes tested elicited relatively low responses. Benzaldehyde elicited the highest responses for both species among aromatic components. Oedaleus decorus asiaticus showed higher EAG responses than A. barabensis to the green leaf volatiles, 1-decanol, 1-nonanol, 1-pentanol, hexanal, Z-hexen-3-yl acetate and to the sesquiterpenes (-)-trans-caryophyllene. Males have higher responses than females in Oedaleus decorus asiaticus. No sexual difference was observed in A. barabensis. Dose-dependent responses to six selected chemicals were observed from females. In both species, all the chemicals tested elicit EAG responses at concentration between 10(-3) mol/L and 10(-2) mol/L, except that the responses of A. barabensis to terpineol had a threshold concentration of 10(-2) mol/L benzaldehyde and 1-hexanol had the highest slopes in dose curves, while 1-octen-3-ol showed the smallest slope in responses to the six chemicals tested. Comparative studies on the responses of two antennal sections and the whole antenna to six selected chemicals were carried out using females of both species. A significant EAG response was only recorded from the distal part of the antenna and not from the proximal seven segments.

  15. Turn the temperature to turquoise: cues for colour change in the male chameleon grasshopper (Kosciuscola tristis) (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Umbers, Kate D L

    2011-09-01

    Rapid, reversible colour change is unusual in animals, but is a feature of male chameleon grasshoppers (Kosciuscola tristis). Understanding what triggers this colour change is paramount to developing hypotheses explaining its evolutionary significance. In a series of manipulative experiments the author quantified the effects of temperature, and time of day, as well as internal body temperature, on the colour of male K. tristis. The results suggest that male chameleon grasshoppers change colour primarily in response to temperature and that the rate of colour change varies considerably, with the change from black to turquoise occurring up to 10 times faster than the reverse. Body temperature changed quickly (within 10min) in response to changes in ambient temperature, but colour change did not match this speed and thus colour is decoupled from internal temperature. This indicates that male colour change is driven primarily by ambient temperature but that their colour does not necessarily reflect current internal temperature. I propose several functional hypotheses for male colour change in K. tristis.

  16. Phalangopsidae crickets from Tropical Africa (Orthoptera, Grylloidea), with descriptions of new taxa and an identification key for African genera.

    PubMed

    Desutter-Grandcolas, Laure

    2015-04-22

    New Phalangopsidae crickets are described from tropical Africa, including three new genera and ten new species: Afrophaloria Desutter-Grandcolas, n.gen., Afrophaloria amani Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., type species, Afrophaloria apiariensis Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Afrophaloria hempae Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Kameruloria gabonensis Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Kameruloria nigricornis Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Kameruloria trimaculata Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Paragryllodes amani Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Phasmagryllus Desutter-Grandcolas, n.gen., Phasmagryllus elegans Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., type species, Upupagryllus Desutter-Grandcolas, n.gen., Upupagryllus subalatus Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., type species, and Upupagryllus alatus Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp. All these taxa, except Paragryllodes amani Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., belong to the subfamily Phaloriinae. The subfamily is redefined, to take into account their morphological (apterous taxa) and ecological (straminicolous taxa) diversity. A key for phalangopsid African genera is proposed, and the status of Larandeicus Chopard, 1937 briefly discussed.

  17. Description of two new species of the genus Atlanticus from Southern China and their songs  (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae; Tettigoniinae).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kun; Wang, Xue-Song; Liu, Chun-Xiang; Wu, Chao

    2016-04-15

    Two new species Atlanticus (Sinpacificus) jiangyei sp. n. and Atlanticus (Sinpacificus) helleri sp. n. are described, based on morphology and male calling songs. Based on the morphological characters, the closest relative of Atlanticus (Sinpacificus) jiangyei sp. n. and that of Atlanticus (Sinpacificus) helleri sp. n. are separately assumed to be Atlanticus (Sinpacificus) hangfui Liu, and Atlanticus (Sinpacificus) kiangsui Tinkham. Discussion about characteristics of Atlanticus species is also provided.

  18. Ommexecha virens (Thunberg, 1824) and Descampsacris serrulatum (Serville, 1831) (Orthoptera, Ommexechidae): karyotypes, constitutive heterochromatin and nucleolar organizing regions

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, D.B.; Rocha, M.F.; Loreto, V.; Silva, A.E.B.; Souza, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Chromosomes of Ommexecha virens and Descampsacris serrulatum (Ommexechidae) were analyzed through conventional staining, C-banding, base specific fluorochromes, silver nitrate impregnation (AgNO3), and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with probe for 45S rDNA. The two species presented diploid number 2n= 23,X0 in males and acrocentric autosomes, except the pair one that presented submetacentric morphology. The X chromosome has distinct morphology in the two analyzed species, being a medium acrocentric in Ommexecha virens and large submetacentric in Descampsacris serrulatum. The C-banding revealed pericentromeric blocks of constitutive heterochromatin (CH) in all the chromosomes of Descampsacris serrulatum. For Ommexecha virens it was evidenced that the blocks of CH are preferentially located in the pericentromeric area (however some bivalents presents additional blocks) or in different positions. The staining with CMA3/DA/DAPI showed GC rich CH blocks (CMA3+) in some chromosomes of the two species. The nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) were located in the bivalents L2, S9, S10 of Ommexecha virens and M5, M6, M7, S11 of Descampsacris serrulatum. The FISH for rDNA showed coincident results with the pattern of active NORs revealed by AgNO3. This work presents the first chromosomal data, obtained through differential cytogenetics techniques in Ommexechidae, contributing to a better characterization of karyotypic evolution for this grasshopper family. PMID:24260624

  19. Organization of some repetitive DNAs and B chromosomes in the grasshopper Eumastusia koebelei koebelei (Rehn, 1909) (Orthoptera, Acrididae, Leptysminae)

    PubMed Central

    Anjos, Allison; Loreto, Vilma; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract B chromosomes occur in approximately 15% of eukaryotes and are usually heterochromatic and rich in repetitive DNAs. Here we describe characteristics of a B chromosome in the grasshopper Eumastusia koebelei koebelei (Rehn, 1909) through classical cytogenetic methods and mapping of some repetitive DNAs, including multigene families, telomeric repeats and a DNA fraction enriched with repetitive DNAs obtained from DOP-PCR. Eumastusia koebelei koebelei presented 2n=23, X0 and, in one individual, two copies of the same variant of a B chromosome were noticed, which are associated during meiosis. The C-positive blocks were located in the pericentromeric regions of the standard complement and along the entire length of the B chromosomes. Some G+C-rich heterochromatic blocks were noticed, including conspicuous blocks in the B chromosomes. The mapping of 18S rDNA and U2 snDNA revealed only autosomal clusters, and the telomeric probe hybridized in terminal regions. Finally, the DOP-PCR probe obtained from an individual without a B chromosome revealed signals in the heterochromatic regions, including the entire length of the B chromosome. The possible intraspecific origin of the B chromosomes, due to the shared pool of repetitive DNAs between the A and B chromosomes and the possible consequences of their association are discussed. PMID:27551344

  20. The effect of discontinuous gas exchange on respiratory water loss in grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) varies across an aridity gradient.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu-Ping; Talal, Stav; Ayali, Amir; Gefen, Eran

    2015-08-01

    The significance of discontinuous gas-exchange cycles (DGC) in reducing respiratory water loss (RWL) in insects is contentious. Results from single-species studies are equivocal in their support of the classic 'hygric hypothesis' for the evolution of DGC, whereas comparative analyses generally support a link between DGC and water balance. In this study, we investigated DGC prevalence and characteristics and RWL in three grasshopper species (Acrididae, subfamily Pamphaginae) across an aridity gradient in Israel. In order to determine whether DGC contributes to a reduction in RWL, we compared the DGC characteristics and RWL associated with CO2 release (transpiration ratio, i.e. the molar ratio of RWL to CO2 emission rates) among these species. Transpiration ratios of DGC and continuous breathers were also compared intraspecifically. Our data show that DGC characteristics, DGC prevalence and the transpiration ratios correlate well with habitat aridity. The xeric-adapted Tmethis pulchripennis exhibited a significantly shorter burst period and lower transpiration ratio compared with the other two mesic species, Ocneropsis bethlemita and Ocneropsis lividipes. However, DGC resulted in significant water savings compared with continuous exchange in T. pulchripennis only. These unique DGC characteristics for T. pulchripennis were correlated with its significantly higher mass-specific tracheal volume. Our data suggest that the origin of DGC may not be adaptive, but rather that evolved modulation of cycle characteristics confers a fitness advantage under stressful conditions. This modulation may result from morphological and/or physiological modifications.

  1. Spore loads of Paranosema locustae (Microsporidia) in heavily infected grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acridoidea) of the Argentine Pampas and Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Plischuk, Santiago; Bardi, Christian J; Lange, Carlos E

    2013-09-01

    Paranosema locustae, an entomopathogen of grasshoppers and locusts, remains the only microsporidium registered as a biocontrol agent. After introductions from North America, it became established in grasshopper communities of Argentina. We measured the infection intensity of field collected, heavily infected male and female adults of individuals belonging to six grasshopper species, five melanoplines (Melanoplinae) (Baeacris pseudopunctulatus, Dichroplus maculipennis, Dichroplus vittatus, Neopedies brunneri, Scotussa lemniscata), and one gomphocerine (Gomphocerinae) (Staurorhectus longicornis). Average spore load among heavily infected grasshoppers ranged from 8.7±0.5×10(7) to 1.1±0.7×10(9). Only females of B. pseudopunctulatus and S. longicornis showed significantly higher spore loads than the males.

  2. New case of long-term persistence of Paranosema locustae (Microsporidia) in melanopline grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Melanoplinae) of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Lange, Carlos E; Azzaro, Francisco G

    2008-11-01

    We report an additional case of long-term persistence of Paranosema locustae in grasshoppers of Argentina. The pathogen was introduced from North America on rangeland at Loncopué, Neuquén province. Microsporidia were not detected in pre-introduction samples whereas infected grasshoppers were found 11 years after introduction. Affected grasshoppers were the melanoplines Dichroplus elongatus, Dichroplus maculipennis, and Scotussa lemniscata, some of them with high spore loads. The case highlights the ability of P. locustae to recycle in local grasshopper communities by parasitizing susceptible species other than the natural hosts.

  3. Simultaneous measurement of metabolic and acoustic power and the efficiency of sound production in two mole cricket species (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae).

    PubMed

    Prestwich, Kenneth N; O'Sullivan, Kristin

    2005-04-01

    We here report the first simultaneous measurement of metabolic cost of calling, acoustic power and efficiency of sound production in animals--the mole crickets Scapteriscus borellii and S. vicinus (Gryllotalpidae). We measured O(2) consumption, CO(2) production and acoustic power as the crickets called from their burrows in an open room. We utilized their calling burrow as the functional equivalent of a mask. Both species had a respiratory quotient near 0.85, indicative of metabolism based on a mix of carbohydrates and fats. The metabolic rate was significantly higher in S. borellii (11.6 mW g(-1)) than in S. vicinus (9.0 mW g(-1)) and averaged about eight- to fivefold greater, respectively, than resting metabolism. In some individuals, metabolic rate decreased by 20% during calling bouts. Costs of refurbishing calling burrows in S. borellii were less than calling costs, due to the behavior's short duration (ca. 15 min) and its relatively low average metabolic rate (4 mW). Acoustic power was on average sevenfold greater in S. borellii (21.2 vs 2.9 microW) and was more variable within individuals and across species than the metabolic rate. The efficiency of sound production was significantly higher in S. borellii (0.23 vs 0.03%). These values are below published estimates for other insects even though these mole crickets construct acoustic burrows that have the potential to increase efficiency. The cricket/burrow system in both species have an apparent Q(ln decrement) of about 6, indicative of significant internal damping caused by the airspaces in the sand that forms the burrow's walls. Damping is therefore an important cause of the low sound production efficiency. In field conditions where burrow walls are saturated with water and there is less internal damping, calls are louder and sound production efficiency is likely higher. File tooth depths and file tooth-to-tooth distances correlated with interspecific differences in metabolism and acoustic power much better than with wing stroke rates and plectrum-to-file tooth strike rates. To further investigate these correlations, we constructed two models of energy input to the tegminal oscillator. A model based on transfer of kinetic energy based on differences in tegminal velocity and file tooth spacing showed the most promise. Related calculations suggest that if there are no elastic savings, the power costs to accelerate and decelerate the tegmina are greater than the predicted power input to the tegminal oscillator, and that they are similar in the two species even though S. vicinus has a nearly threefold higher wing stroke rate.

  4. A new species of tree crickets Oecanthus (Orthoptera, Gryllidae, Oecanthinae) in tobacco plantation from Southern Brazil, with body color variation.

    PubMed

    Milach, Elisa Machado; Martins, Luciano De P; Da Costa, Maria Kátia Matiotti; Gottschalk, Marco Silva; De Oliveira, Gabriel Lobregat; Redü, Darlan Rutz; Neutzling, Alexandre Schneid; Dornelles, José Eduardo Figueiredo; Vasconcellos, Lucas Azevedo; Zefa, Edison

    2015-09-15

    We provide herein a description of a new species of Oecanthus collected from the tobacco plantation in southern Brazil, municipality of São Lourenço do Sul, State of Rio Grande do Sul. Description focused metanotal gland features, phallic sclerites, and calling song. A large sampling of individuals was distributed into four groups according to body and appendages color and dotted. We also rank all kind of marks present in the scape and pedicel. We compare linear morphometric variables of the metanotal glands and tegmina, as well as calling song parameters between groups in order do define all of them as the same species. Photographs and measurements are provided.

  5. Immediate Protein Dietary Effects on Movement and the Generalised Immunocompetence of Migrating Mormon Crickets Anabrus simplex (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    1. Mormon crickets form large migratory bands that march over rangeland in the western United States seeking salt and protein. Immune defense is particularly relevant to survival in migratory bands, but little is known about the role of nutrition in insect immunocompetence. We hypothesized that imm...

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Mormon cricket (Anabrus simplex: Tettigoniidae: Orthoptera) and an analysis of control region variability.

    PubMed

    Fenn, J D; Cameron, S L; Whiting, M F

    2007-04-01

    The Anabrus simplex is a swarming plague orthopteran found in western North America. The genome is 15 766 bp in length and genome organization follows the ancestral insect gene arrangement. atp6 lacked any readily identifiable stop codon. Examination of mRNA secondary structure for this gene suggested a stem/loop-mediated mRNA post-transcriptional processing to liberate a mature atp6 mRNA with a complete stop codon produced by polyadenylation. Comparison of similar protein with protein gene boundaries in other insect species reveal a general mechanism for mRNA excision and provide further supporting evidence for post-transcriptional mRNA processing in mitochondrial genomes. The A + T-rich region, or control region, was sequenced for 55 A. simplex individuals from 12 different populations. Variance studies between these individuals show that the A + T-rich region contains significant phylogenetic signal to be used in population studies.

  7. Origin of Magnetic Properties in Amorphous Metals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    Magnetic Properties of Fe-Ni-B Amorphous Alloys," F. E. Luborsky, J. L. Walter, and H. H. Liebermann , IEEE Trans. on Magnetics MAG-15, 909 (1979). Also GE...Report 78CRD132. 2. "Formation and Magnetic Properties of Fe-B-Si Amorphous Alloys," F. E. Luborsky, J. J. Becker, J. L. Walter, and H. H. Liebermann ...Amorphous Alloys," F. E. Luborsky and H. H. Liebermann , J. Appl. Phys., to appear. Also GE Report 79CRD177. 4. "The Effect of Temperature on Magnetic

  8. 75 FR 45194 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Drawing from Nature...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Drawing from Nature: Landscapes by... objects to be included in the exhibition ``Drawing from Nature: Landscapes by Max Liebermann, Lovis...

  9. Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of pre-diapause and non-diapause eggs of migratory locust, Locusta migratoria L. (Orthoptera: Acridoidea).

    PubMed

    Tu, Xiongbing; Wang, Jie; Hao, Kun; Whitman, Douglas W; Fan, Yaoli; Cao, Guangchun; Zhang, Zehua

    2015-06-19

    Low temperature induces diapause in locusts. However, the physiological processes and initiation mechanism of diapause are not well understood. To understand the molecular basis of diapause, 'omics' analyses were performed to examine the differences between diapause and non-diapause eggs at both transcriptional and translational levels. Results indicated that a total of 62,241 mRNAs and 212 proteins were differentially expressed. Among them, 116 transcripts had concurrent transcription and translation profiles. Up-regulated genes related to diapause included glutathiones-S-transferase et al., and down-regulated genes including juvenile hormone esterase-like protein et al. KEGG analysis mapped 7,243 and 99 differentially expressed genes and proteins, to 83 and 25 pathways, respectively. Correlation enriched pathways indicated that there were nine identical pathways related to diapause. Gene Ontology analysis placed these genes and proteins into three categories, and a higher proportion of genes related to metabolism was up-regulated than down-regulated. Furthermore, three up-regulated pathways were linked to cryoprotection. This study demonstrates the applicability of high-throughput omics tools to identify molecules linked to diapause in the locust. In addition, it reveals cellular metabolism in diapause eggs is more active than in non-diapause eggs, and up-regulated enzymes may play roles in cryoprotection and storing energy for diapause and post-diapause stages.

  10. Effects of a methanolic extract of the plant Haplophyllum tuberculatum and of teflubenzuron on female reproduction in the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria (Orthoptera: Oedipodinae).

    PubMed

    Acheuk, Fatma; Cusson, Michel; Doumandji-Mitiche, Bahia

    2012-03-01

    The effects of a methanolic extract of the plant Haplophyllum tuberculatum (ME-Ht) and of teflubenzuron (TFB) were compared on several reproductive variables and ecdysteroid titers in the females of Locusta migratoria. The test products were administered orally to newly emerged females at doses of 1500 (ME-Ht) and 10μg/female (TFB). The methanolic extract and TFB had comparable effects on several of the variables examined. Both significantly delayed the first oviposition and reduced fecundity and fertility. ME-Ht and TFB also displayed similar effects on ovarian growth, vitellogenesis and ecdysteroid titers. Both treatments induced a drop in hemolymph protein levels as well as a reduction in vitellogenin uptake by oocytes. This delay in oogenesis was accompanied by a resorption of terminal oocytes. However, whereas TFB completely blocked egg hatch, ME-Ht only had a modest inhibitory effect on this variable. Hemolymph and ovarian ecdysteroid titers, as measured by radioimmunoassay, were similar and low in both control and treated females, except for a peak observed only in control females at the end of vitellogenesis. We discuss the functional significance of the observed effects in the context of the putative modes of action of the methanolic plant extract and TFB.

  11. Feeding preference for and impact on an invasive weed (Crepis tectorum L.) by a native, generalist insect herbivore, Melanoplus borealis (Orthoptera: Acrididae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crepis tectorum L., narrow leaf hawksbeard, was first collected in Alaska in 1974 and by 2004 was a common weed in agricultural fields. Introduction and establishment of a new plant species in a region represents a potential new resource for herbivores, as well as a new competitor for plant species ...

  12. Mitochondrial DNA variation and GIS analysis confirm a secondary origin of geographical variation in the bushcricket Ephippiger ephippiger (Orthoptera: Tettigonioidea), and resurrect two subspecies.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, M G; Kidd, D M; Gleason, J M

    2001-03-01

    Geographic variation within species can originate through selection and drift in situ (primary variation) or from vicariant episodes (secondary variation). Most patterns of subspecific variation within European flora and fauna are thought to have secondary origins, reflecting isolation in refugia during Quaternary ice ages. The bushcricket Ephippiger ephippiger has an unusual pattern of geographical variability in morphology, behaviour and allozymes in southern France, which has been interpreted as reflecting recent primary origins rather than historical isolation. Re-analysis of this variation using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) suggests a possible zone of hybridization within a complex pattern of geographical variation. Here we produce a genetic distance matrix from restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) bandsharing of an approximately 4.5 kb fragment of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and compare this with predictions resulting from the GIS analysis. The mtDNA variation supports a postglacial origin of geographical variation. Partial Mantel test comparisons of genetic distances with matrices of geographical distance, relevant environmental characteristics and possible refugia show refugia to be the best predictors of genetic distance. There is no evidence to support isolation by distance. However, environmental contrasts do explain significant variation in genetic distance after allowing for the effect of refugial origin. Also, a neighbour-joining tree has a major division separating eastern and western forms. We conclude that the major source of variation within the species is historical isolation in glacial refugia, but that dispersal, hybridization and selection associated with environmental features has influenced patterns of mtDNA introgression. At least two valid subspecies can be defined.

  13. [Phenology of Cornops aquaticum (Bruner) (Orthoptera: Acrididae) in Eichhornia azurea (Pontederiaceae) in the northern region of Pantanal of Mato Grosso, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Silva, Fatima R J da; Marques, Marinêz I; Battirola, Leandro D; Lhano, Marcos G

    2010-01-01

    Cornops aquaticum (Bruner) has Eichhornia crassipes, E. azurea, Pontederia cordata and P. lanceolata (Pontederiaceae) as the known host plants. This grasshopper species is cited as a possible agent of biological control for native aquatic macrophytes E. azurea and E. crassipes. This study, carried out from March, 2006 to February, 2007, aimed to evaluate the phenology and age structure of the population of C. aquaticum associated with E. azurea in Piuval bay, Pantanal of Poconé, MT, and to identify possible relationships of its life cycle to abiotic factors such as insolation, temperature and precipitation. Monthly collections of 50 individuals were carried out according to the protocol defined by the "Host - Insect Coevolution on Waterhyacinth" project. Adults and nymphs were separated and the females dissected in order to evaluate ovary maturation. The population presented adults and nymphs during the whole year, suggesting the occurrence of more than one reproductive period. The nymphs from the first stage predominated in August 2006 and the adults in September and October 2006, synchronized with the dry period and beginning of the flooding period, respectively. The highest relative abundance of the females with mature ovaries occurred in July 2006 (50%), indicating that this may be a more propitious period for reproduction. The data suggest that C. aquaticum is a species in continual reproduction in Piuval bay and its cycle is associated with the environmental conditions guided by the flood pulse in the Pantanal of Mato Grosso.

  14. Endecous peruassuensis n. sp. (Orthoptera: Grylloidea: Phalangopsidae) from caves of Eastern Brazil: evidence of isolation in the subterranean realm and discussion about troglomorphisms.

    PubMed

    Bolfarini, Marcio P; Bichuette, Maria Elina

    2015-10-16

    We describe a new species of the genus Endecous Saussure (1878), recorded at the Lapa do Cipó and Olhos d'Água caves, which are located in the Itacarambi municipality, Minas Gerais state, Eastern Brazil. Another species, E. aguassay Mews, 2008 was recordedin the surroundings of the caves. The genus Endecous corresponds to the most common cricket in Brazilian hypogean environments. In general, these crickets inhabit the areas around cave entrances up to the aphotic zones of caves. The genus Endecous is the only cave cricket to present troglobiomorphosis, i.e., an apterous condition. The distribution of the new species is limited to these two caves, which suggests an endemism in this karst system similar to the distribution of other endemic animals, such as harvestmen and amblypygid arachnids. This species is the sixth troglobitic one described for Olhos d'Água cave, which sets this cave as a spot of subterranean fauna in Brazil.

  15. A new genus of katydid from the Amazon Rainforest (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae; Phaneropterinae; Steirodontini): Ninth contribution to the suprageneric organization of the Neotropical phaneropterines.

    PubMed

    Cadena-Castañeda, Oscar J; Mendes, Diego Matheus De Mello; Alves-Oliveira, João Rafael

    2016-08-15

    Emsleyfolium diasae n. gen. et n. sp., from the Brazilian, Colombian, Ecuadorian and Peruvian Amazon is described in this contribution. This new genus is morphologically very similar to Stilpnochlora, but is distinguished from the other Steirodiontini genera by its cone-head (similar to some genera of subfamily Conocephalinae, e.g. Neoconocephalus and Bucrates), modification of the tenth tergite into three lobes and absence of styles on subgenital plate. Thanatosis behavior is described as a defense mechanism.

  16. New and little known Orthoptera (Ensifera and Caelifera) from the Ñambí River Natural Reserve, Nariño, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Cadena-Castañeda, Oscar J; Gutiérrez, Yeisson; Bacca, Tito

    2016-09-09

    A preliminary checklist of the Orthopterans from the Ñambí River Natural reserve is presented. A total of 26 species were studied, five new species are herein described: Championica nambiensis n. sp., Cocconotus awa n. sp., Cocconotus levyi n. sp. (Tettigoniidae: Pseudophyllinae), Antillicharis kwaiker n. sp. (Gryllidae) and Brachybaenus nariniensis n. sp. (Gryllacrididae). Three species are recorded from Colombia for the first time (Legua crenulata, Uvaroviella (Holacla) nebulosa and Anabropsis alata) and seven species are new records for Nariño department (Allotettix peruvianus, Ripipteryx ecuadoriensis, Neoconocephalus affinis, Anaulacomera poculigera, Orophus conspersus, Orophus tessellatus and Neocurtilla hexadactyla). Further comments on species distribution and taxonomy are given.

  17. Two new species and key to six species of the genus Taipodisma Yin, Zheng & Yin, 2014 from Taiwan, China (Orthoptera, Acridoidea, Catantopidae, Podisminae).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fang-Qiang; Shi, Jian-Ping; Dang, Yan

    2016-07-06

    Two new species of the genus Taipodisma Yin et al, 2014 from Taiwan, China are described in this paper. The new species Taipodisma viriditibia sp. nov. is similar to Taipodisma hsiehi Yin et al., 2014, it differs from the latter by antennae longer, length of a middle segment 4.0 times its width; interspace of mesosternum longer in male, the length 2.0 times the narrowest; lateral lobes of metasternum slightly separated in male; epiproct of male with longitudinal sulcus at base only and length of subgenital plate of female longer than width. The new species Taipodisma kaohsiungensis sp. nov. is similar to Taipodisma nigritibia Yin et al., 2014, it differs from the latter by prozona of pronotum 1.2 times metazona; length of interspace as long as the narrowest in mesosternum of male; hind tibia yellowish green on lower side and length of subgenital plate longer than width in female. The type specimens are deposited in the National Museum of Natural Science, Taichung, Taiwan, China and the Institute of Entomology, Taiwan University, Taibei, Taiwan, China, respectively.

  18. Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of pre-diapause and non-diapause eggs of migratory locust, Locusta migratoria L. (Orthoptera: Acridoidea)

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Xiongbing; Wang, Jie; Hao, Kun; Whitman, Douglas W.; Fan, Yaoli; Cao, Guangchun; Zhang, Zehua

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature induces diapause in locusts. However, the physiological processes and initiation mechanism of diapause are not well understood. To understand the molecular basis of diapause, ‘omics’ analyses were performed to examine the differences between diapause and non-diapause eggs at both transcriptional and translational levels. Results indicated that a total of 62,241 mRNAs and 212 proteins were differentially expressed. Among them, 116 transcripts had concurrent transcription and translation profiles. Up-regulated genes related to diapause included glutathiones-S-transferase et al., and down-regulated genes including juvenile hormone esterase-like protein et al. KEGG analysis mapped 7,243 and 99 differentially expressed genes and proteins, to 83 and 25 pathways, respectively. Correlation enriched pathways indicated that there were nine identical pathways related to diapause. Gene Ontology analysis placed these genes and proteins into three categories, and a higher proportion of genes related to metabolism was up-regulated than down-regulated. Furthermore, three up-regulated pathways were linked to cryoprotection. This study demonstrates the applicability of high-throughput omics tools to identify molecules linked to diapause in the locust. In addition, it reveals cellular metabolism in diapause eggs is more active than in non-diapause eggs, and up-regulated enzymes may play roles in cryoprotection and storing energy for diapause and post-diapause stages. PMID:26091374

  19. Bioelimination of /sup 51/Cr and /sup 85/Sr by cockroaches, Gromphadorhina portentosa (Orthoptera: Blaberidae), as affected by mites, Gromphadorholaelaps schaeferi (parasitiformes: laelapidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Schowalter, T.D.; Crossley, D.A. Jr.

    1982-03-01

    This paper describes rates of Chromium-51 and Strontium-85 assimilation and bioelimination by the hissing cockroach, Gromphadorhina portentosa (Schaum), when the symbiotic mite, Gromphadorholaelaps schaeferi Till, was present or removed. Mite-infested cockroaches had significantly higher rates of /sup 51/Cr elimination relative to mite-free cockroaches, implying more rapid gut clearance times. We did not find a significant mite effect on /sup 85/Sr elimination by the host, but mite effects could have been masked by the apparently unique process of nutrient assimilation and elimination by G. portentosa. Conventional models of radioactive tracer bioelimination predict a rapid initial loss of tracer due to gut clearance, followed by a slower loss due to excretion of assimilated tracer. Our results indicated that assimilated /sup 85/Sr was eliminated earlier than unassimilated /sup 85/Sr was lost by defecation.

  20. Bioelimination of /sup 51/Cr and /sup 85/Sr by cockroaches, Gromphadorhina portentosa (orthoptera: blaberidae), as affected by mites, Gromphadorholaelaps schaeferi (parasitiformes: laelapidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Schowalter, T.D.; Crossley, D.A. Jr.

    1982-03-01

    The rates of Chromium-51 and Strontium-85 assimilation and bioelimination by the hissing cockroach, Gromphadorhina portentosa (Schaum) are described when the symbiotic mite, Gromphadorholaelaps schaeferi Till, was present or removed. Mite-infested cockroaches had significantly higher rates of /sup 51/Cr elimination relative to mite-free cockroaches, implying more rapid gut clearance times. The authors did not find a significant mite effect on /sup 85/Sr elimination by the host, but mite effects could have been masked by the apparently unique process of nutrient assimilation and elimination by G. portentosa. Conventional models of radioactive tracer bioelimination predict a rapid initial loss of tracer due to gut clearance, followed by a slower loss due to excretion of assimilated tracer. The results indicated that assimilated /sup 85/Sr was eliminated earlier than unassimilated /sup 85/Sr, which was lost by defecation.

  1. EFFECTS OF pH AND OF VARIOUS CONCENTRATIONS OF SODIUM, POTASSIUM, AND CALCIUM CHLORIDE ON MUSCULAR ACTIVITY OF THE ISOLATED CROP OF PERIPLANETA AMERICANA (ORTHOPTERA)

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, James T.; Tauber, Oscar E.

    1943-01-01

    1. Twenty-five solutions which contained KCl (0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 gm. per liter), in combination with CaCl2 (0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 gm. per liter), 10.0 gm. of NaCl, and 0.2 gm. of NaHCO3 per liter of solution were tested in order to determine satisfactory KCl/CaCl2 ratios in an insect physiological salt mixture for the maintenance of muscular activity by the isolated crop of the American roach. Satisfactory activity products (0.390 to 0.549) were obtained in seven mixtures with KCl/CaCl2 ratios of 0.2/0.2, 0.4/0.4, 0.6/0.6, 0.8/0.8, 0.2/0.4, 0.4/0.6, and 0.6/0.8, expressed as gram per liter. These ratios lie between 0.50 and 1.00. In solutions which contained calcium, but no potassium, approximately 50 per cent of the crops exhibited an initial tone increase and were arrested in rigor. See Fig. 2. In solutions which contained potassium, but no calcium, all crops showed an initial loss of tone and arrest in relaxation. See Fig. 2. 2. Seven KCl/CaCl2 ratios (see paragraph 1 above) were tested with eight NaCl concentrations (1.0, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7, and 1.8 per cent) at a pH of 8.0. In these mixtures, the ones with KCl/CaCl2 ratios of less than 1.0 produced higher activity products than those with ratios equal to 1.00. The highest average activity product (0.849) was obtained in the solutions with 0.2 gm. of KCl and 0.4 gm. of CaCl2 per liter. 3. Four KCl/CaCl2 ratios (0.2/0.2, 0.4/0.4, 0.2/0.4, and 0.4/0.6 gm. per liter) were tested with 1.4, 1.5, and 1.6 per cent NaCl at a pH of 7.5. When analyzed with data from comparable solutions at a pH of 8.0, it was found that 1.4 per cent NaCl afforded an optimum environment for isolated crop activity. 4. Effects of hydrogen and hydroxyl ion concentrations were studied at pH values of 6.8, 7.5, 8.0, and 8.9. The highest average activity product, 1.011, was produced at a pH of about 8.0. 5. A satisfactory physiological salt solution for the isolated foregut of the American roach, Periplaneta americana, would contain 14.0 gm. of NaCl, 0.4 gm. of CaCl2, 0.2 gm. of KCl, and 0.2 gm. of NaHCO3 per liter of solution. This mixture should have a pH value between 7.8 and 8.2. 6. Durations of crop activity extending over periods as long as 25 hours were quite common, and several crops maintained contractions for more than 30 hours. The greatest longevity was for crop 814, from a female, which continued activity for slightly more than 47 hours. 7. A significant difference between the activity products of the crops from males and the crops from females was recorded. Although there was not a significant difference in the amount of food ingested by males and females, 12 hours after feeding there was more food in the females' crops, and the food progressed more rapidly through the males' crops than through the females'. In addition, crops from the two sexes reacted differently to the effects of day old solutions. This sex difference is apparently related to an inherently increased activity of the crop from the male roach. PMID:19873366

  2. New species of tree cricket Oecanthus Serville, 1831 (Orthoptera: Gryllidae: Oecanthinae) from Reserva Natural Vale, Espírito Santo, Brazil, with chromosome complement.

    PubMed

    Milach, Elisa Machado; Costa, Maria Kátia Matiotti Da; Martins, Luciano De Pinho; Nunes, Lorena Andrade; Silva, Daniela Santos Martins; Garcia, Flávio Roberto Mello; Oliveira, Elliott Centeno De; Zefa, Edison

    2016-10-04

    A new species of the genus Oecanthus Serville, 1831 from Reserva Natural Vale, state of Espírito Santo, Brazil is described. The new species differs from other of this genus in characteristics of the pseudepiphallus main lobe, endophallic sclerites, posterior median lobe of the metanotal gland and black spots on the femora and tibiae. The chromosome number is 2n=16+XY♂=18 and 2n=16+XX♀=18, and this complement present one pair of autosomes less than the other five cytological studied species.

  3. Endecous apterus: a new species of cave cricket from northeast Brazil, with comments on the use of subterranean habitats by Luzarinae crickets (Orthoptera: Grylloidea: Phalangopsidae: Luzarinae).

    PubMed

    Souza-Dias, Pedro G B; Bolfarini, Márcio P; Nihei, Silvio S; De Mello, Francisco A G

    2014-03-27

    In this study we describe the first apterous species of Endecous Saussure (1878), collected in two caves at Ituaçu, Bahia State, Brazil. In Brazil, Endecous is the most widespread cricket in hypogean environments and its species can colonize caves and inhabit the entrance and the aphotic zones; Endecous species can also be found in the litter, rock gullies, crevices, burrows, and any natural cavities. The use of subterranean habitat by Endecous crickets and its related genera are discussed.

  4. A new mute species of the genus Nemobius Serville (Orthoptera, Gryllidae, Nemobiinae) discovered in colluvial, stony debris in the Iberian Peninsula: A biological, phenological and biometric study.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Pablo; Gilgado, José D; Ortuno, Vicente M

    2013-01-01

    Sampling of a Mesovoid Shallow Substratum (MSS) of a scree in the Guadarrama mountains (Madrid, Spain) revealed a population of crickets of the genus Nemobius Serville. A detailed morphological study revealed that the cricket was a new species, Nemobius interstitialis sp. nov., which is principally characterized by the absence of a tympanum in the outer margin of the foreleg tibiae and a peculiar design of venation of the forewing of the male. Sampling of this environment over 1 year using surface and MSS pitfall traps, set at a depth of one meter, allowed study of population dynamics. A population maximum is attained in August. Abiotic (temperature and humidity) and biotic (accompanying fauna) data are given to contextualize the habitat of this new species.

  5. Annotated checklist of Orthoptera from Kazimzumbwi Forest Reserve, Tanzania with the description of new species and discussion of the biogeographic patterns of threatened species.

    PubMed

    Hemp, Claudia

    2017-01-26

    A checklist of Ensifera and Acridomorpha of Kazimzumbwi Forest Reserve, Kisarawe near Dar es Salaam is given and eight new Tettigoniidae species described. These are the Agraeciini species Afroagraecia kisarawe n. sp., the Meconematinae species Phlugidia kisarawe n. sp., and the female of Aerotegmina megaloptera (Hexacentrinae). The Phaneropterinae species Dioncomena scutellata n. sp. is known at present only from two localities, the Pugu Hills near Dar es Salaam and Kwamgumi forest reseve on the foothills of the East Usambara Mountains. Two new Eurycorypha species, E. annexata n. sp. and E. ligata n. sp. are described from the area known at present only from the male sex. A second species is described in the genus Lunidia Hemp, L. acuticercata n. sp. Two new Phaneropterinae genera are erected on Pseudopreussia flavifolia n. gen. n. sp. and Materuana ericki n. gen. n. sp., species of wet lowland forest along coastal Tanzania and forest reserves in the East Usambara and on the foothills of the Uluguru Mountains.Kazimzumbwi Forest Reserve is severly threatened by encroachment and deforestation although it is recognized as belonging to the oldest surviving forests of the world.

  6. The femur-tibia control system in a proscopiid (Caelifera, Orthoptera): a test for assumptions on the functional basis and evolution of twig mimesis in stick insects.

    PubMed

    Wolf, H; Bässler, U; Spiess, R; Kittmann, R

    2001-11-01

    The extremely slow return movements observed in stick insects (phasmids) after imposed changes in posture are termed catalepsy. In the literature, catalepsy is treated as a behavioural component of the twig mimesis observed in walking stick insects. It is produced by the high gain of the velocity-sensitive component of the relevant joint control systems and by the non-linear dependency of its time constant on movement velocity. The high gain, in turn, causes the system to work close to instability, and this may have driven the evolution of gain control mechanisms. Although these statements represent plausible assumptions, based on correlated occurrence, they remain largely hypothetical like many ideas concerning evolutionary tendencies. To test these hypotheses, we studied catalepsy and the relevant properties of the femur-tibia control system in the middle and hind legs of Prosarthria teretrirostris.cf. Prosarthria teretrirostris is a proscopiid closely related to grasshoppers and locusts. With its slender, green-to-brown body and legs, it shows clear morphological twig mimesis, which has evolved independently of the well-known twig mimesis in stick insects. The animals show clear catalepsy. The main properties of femur-tibia joint control are remarkably similar between proscopiids and stick insects (e.g. the marked sensitivity to movement velocity rather than to joint position and the non-linear dependency of the time constants of response decay on movement velocity), but there are also important differences (habituation and activity-related mechanisms of gain control are absent). Together, these results validate the main concepts that have been developed concerning the neural basis and evolution of catalepsy in stick insects and its relationship to twig mimesis, while demonstrating that ideas on the role of habituation and gain control should be refined.

  7. Zebragryllus Desutter-Grandcolas & Cadena-Casteñada, n.gen. a new Gryllinae genus from Eastern and Western Amazonia, South America (Orthoptera, Grylloidea, Gryllidae).

    PubMed

    Desutter-Grandcolas, Laure; Cadena-Castañeda, Oscar J; Jaiswara, Ranjana; Anso, Jeremy

    2014-02-24

    We describe a new genus of grylline cricket, Zebragryllus Desutter-Grandcolas & Cadena-Casteñada n. gen., from the Neotropical Region, using characters of morphology and male genitalia; genitalic characters clearly show that Zebragryllus n. gen. is closely related to Anurogryllus Saussure, 1878. Six species are described as new to science, originating from western (Peru, Colombia) and eastern (French Guiana) Amazonia: Zebragryllus fuscus Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Z. guianensis Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Z. intermedius Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Zebragryllus nauta Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Zebragryllus nouragui Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., and Zebragryllus wittoto Desutter-Grandcolas and Cadena-Casteñada, n. sp., type species of the genus. They are characterized by their size, coloration (shining black, most often with white patterns of coloration, hence the genus name), and male and female genitalia. The calling songs of Z. guianensis Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Z. intermedius Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Z. nouragui Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., and Z. wittoto Desutter-Grandcolas and Cadena-Casteñada, n. sp. are described. An identification key is proposed for both males and females.

  8. Clarification of the katydid genus Uchuca Giglio-tos, 1898 (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae): A new species in the Brazilian Amazon Rainforest.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Gustavo Costa; Sovano, Rafael Segtowick Da Silva; Gutjahr, Ana Lúcia Nunes

    2016-07-22

    This paper accomplishes three tasks: Firstly, description of a new species, Uchuca almeirina sp. nov., from the Brazilian Amazon Rainforest, specifically from Monte Dourado, Almeirim, Pará. Secondly, it is proposed that Uchuca macroptera Montealegre-Z & Morris, 2003 be made a synonym of Uchuca ferreirai (Piza, 1976). Thirdly, a compilation of the generic distribution is presented, which includes new records of Uchuca amacayaca Montealegre-Z & Morris (2003) in Brazil and Uchuca similis Montealegre-Z & Morris (2003) in Colombia and Brazil, and the amplification of the occurrences of U. ferreirai.

  9. New species and new behavioral data of Phlugiola Karny, 1907 (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Meconematinae) from the Brazilian Amazonian Rainforest.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Diego Matheus DE Mello; Oliveira, Jomara Cavalcante DE; Alves-Oliveira, João Rafael; Rafael, José Albertino

    2017-03-16

    Phlugiola Karny, 1907 is a genus of small predatory katydids with six included species distributed in Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia, Peru and Suriname. In this paper two new Brazilian species are described, Phlugiola longipedes sp. nov. (type locality: Amazonas, Tefé) and Phlugiola igarape sp. nov., (type locality: Acre, Bujari) both from tropical rainforests. Behavioral data and natural history notes are provided.

  10. New taxa and some clarification of the tribe Steirodontini (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae; Phaneropterinae): Tenth contribution to the suprageneric organization of Neotropical phaneropterines.

    PubMed

    Cadena-Castañeda, Oscar J

    2016-12-16

    The tribe of the giant katydids Steirodontini is reviewed, its relationship with other groups of Phaneropterinae from the Old and New World is discussed, and an updated key to genera is presented. Nicklephyllum n. gen. is established to accommodate one species described as Stilpnochlora acanthonotum Nickle, 1985 from Colombia. Cnemidophyllum tani n. sp. from the Colombian Amazon is described. Another new combination and two synonymies are proposed: Steirodon (Frontinus) emsleyi (Piza, 1979) n. comb., Steirodon (Posidippus) parastahli Piza, 1979 n. syn. (of Steirodon (Steirodon) ponderosum Stål, 1873), and Steirodon (Posidippus) tricenarius (Piza, 1974) n. syn. (of Steirodon (Frontinus) rufolineatum Emsley, 1970). Finally, Steirodon (Posidippus) rarospinulosum (Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1891), only known from Peru, is reported from the Colombian Amazon.

  11. Redescription and revision of the Neotropical genus Pseudoheptascelio Szabó (Hymenoptera, Platygastridae, Scelioninae), parasitoids of eggs of short-horned grasshoppers (Orthoptera, Acrididae)

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Norman F.; Musetti, Luciana

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The genus Pseudoheptascelio Szabó is redescribed and its species revised. We recognize four species: Pseudoheptascelio muesebecki Szabó, Pseudoheptascelio cornopis Masner, Pseudoheptascelio tico sp. n. and Pseudoheptascelio rex sp. n. The genus is found from Guatemala south to the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul. The species Pseudoheptascelio cornopis is recorded as a parasitoid of the eggs of Cornops aquaticum (Bruner) on water hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms. PMID:22140350

  12. Evolutionary diversification of the auditory organ sensilla in Neoconocephalus katydids (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) correlates with acoustic signal diversification over phylogenetic relatedness and life history.

    PubMed

    Strauß, Johannes; Alt, Joscha A; Ekschmitt, Klemens; Schul, Johannes; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard

    2017-03-13

    Neoconocephalus Tettigoniidae are a model for the evolution of acoustic signals as male calls have diversified in temporal structure during the radiation of the genus. The call divergence and phylogeny in Neoconocephalus are established, but in tettigoniids in general, accompanying evolutionary changes in hearing organs are not studied. We investigated anatomical changes of the tympanal hearing organs during evolutionary radiation and divergence of intraspecific acoustic signals. We compared the neuroanatomy of auditory sensilla (crista acustica) from nine Neoconocephalus species for the number of auditory sensilla and the crista acustica length. These parameters were correlated to differences in temporal call features, body size, life histories, and different phylogenetic positions. By this, adaptive responses to shifting frequencies of male calls and changes in their temporal patterns can be evaluated against phylogenetic constraints and allometry. All species showed well-developed auditory sensilla, on average 32-35 between species. Crista acustica length and sensillum numbers correlated with body size, but not with phylogenetic position or life history. Statistically significant correlations existed also with specific call patterns: a higher number of auditory sensilla occurred in species with continuous calls or slow pulse rates, and a longer crista acustica occurred in species with double pulses or slow pulse rates. The auditory sensilla show significant differences between species despite their recent radiation, and morphological and ecological similarities. This indicates the responses to natural and sexual selection, including divergence of temporal and spectral signal properties. Phylogenetic constraints are unlikely to limit these changes of the auditory systems. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. A new species of mole cricket (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae: Gryllotalpinae) from Bukit Fraser, Malay Peninsula, with taxa notes on another similar mole cricket.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ming Kai; Kamaruddin, Khairul Nizam

    2013-01-01

    One new species of Gryllotalpa from Bukit Fraser, Pahang of Malay Peninsula is described: Gryllotalpafraser sp. n. Pho tographs of Gryllotalpa hirsuta Burmeister, 1838 were examined and some remarks are made here, including a compari son with Gryllotalpafraser sp. n. and Gyllotalpa nymphicus Tan, 2012.

  14. Characterization of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) activities and action spectrum for suppression in the band-legged cricket, Dianemobius nigrofasciatus (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    PubMed

    Izawa, Norimitsu; Suzuki, Takeshi; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Takeda, Makio

    2009-04-01

    Arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT), constituting a large family of enzymes, catalyzes the transacetylation from acetyl-CoA to monoamine substrates, although homology among species is not very high. AANAT in vertebrates is photosensitive and mediates circadian regulation. Here, we analyzed AANAT of the cricket, Dianemobius nigrofasciatus. The central nervous system contained AANAT activity. The optimum pHs were 6.0 (a minor peak) and 10.5 (a major peak) with crude enzyme solution. We analyzed the kinetics at pH 10.5 using the sample containing collective AANAT activities, which we term AANAT. Lineweaver-Burk plot and secondary plot yielded a K(m) for tryptamine as substrate of 0.42 microM, and a V(max) of 9.39 nmol/mg protein/min. The apparent K(m) for acetyl-CoA was 59.9 microM and the V(max) was 8.14 nmol/mg protein/min. AANAT of D. nigrofasciatus was light-sensitive. The activity was higher at night-time than at day-time as in vertebrates. To investigate most effective wavelengths on AANAT activity, a series of monochromatic lights was applied (350, 400, 450, 500, 550, 600 and 650 nm). AANAT showed the highest sensitivity to around 450 nm and 550 nm. 450 nm light was more effective than 550 nm light. Therefore, the most effective light affecting AANAT activity is blue light, which corresponds to the absorption spectrum of blue wave (BW)-opsin.

  15. Pizacris: a new genus and two new species of Luzarinae cricket close to Guabamima de Mello, 1992 and Mellopsis Mews & Sperber, 2010 (Orthoptera: Grylloidea: Luzarinae).

    PubMed

    Souza-Dias, Pedro G B; Desutter-Grandcolas, Laure; Pereira, Marcelo Ribeiro

    2015-05-11

    Here we describe a new genus and two new species of Luzarinae crickets (Grylloidea, Phalangopsidae) from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest of Espírito Santo, Minas Gerais and Rio de Janeiro States (Brazil). We describe Pizacris Souza-Dias & Desutter-Grandcolas, n. gen., transfer the species Mellopsis zefai Mews & Sperber, 2010 to P. zefai (Mews & Sperber, 2010) n. comb., redescribe this species based in topotypes and, since the type series is lost, designate a neotype. We also describe the second species of this genus, P. carioca Desutter-Grandcolas & Souza-Dias n. gen., n. sp. The new genus is characterized by the dark brown uniform coloration with strikingly white joints 4 and 5 of maxillary palpi, reduced FWs, without stridulatory file and, mainly, the absence of the pseudepiphallic arms in male phallic complex. We provide a brief discussion about the morphology of male genitalia in Pizacris Souza-Dias & Desutter-Grandcolas, n. gen. and related genera, Guabamima de Mello, 1992 and Mellopsis Mews & Sperber, 2010. We also provide an identification key for these genera and notes about the reproductive behavior of P. zefai (Mews & Sperber, 2010) n. comb.

  16. Revision of the cricket genus Cardiodactylus (Orthoptera, Eneopterinae, Lebinthini): the species from both sides of the Wallace line, with description of 25 new species.

    PubMed

    Robillard, Tony; Gorochov, Andrej V; Poulain, Simon; Suhardjono, Yayuk R

    2014-08-20

    The genus Cardiodactylus is the most speciose and widely distributed genus of the cricket subfamily Eneopterinae and of the Lebinthini tribe. Along with diverse acoustic features, this genus is also characterized by a wide distribution area running from Japan to Southeast Asia, Northern Australia and in many archipelagos in the Western Pacific, with a high contrast in species distributions. In this paper we start revising Cardiodactylus by focusing on the western region of its wide distribution and the Novaeguineae species group. We describe 25 new species of Cardiodactylus, redescribe 3 species and bring new signalizations for 5 species. Whenever possible, information is provided about species distribution, male calling song and male and female genitalia, forewing venation and habitat. 

  17. Convergent and divergent patterns of morphological differentiation provide more evidence for reproductive character displacement in a wood cricket Gryllus fultoni (Orthoptera: Gryllidae)

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yikweon; Won, Yong-Jin; Choe, Jae Chun

    2009-01-01

    Background In ecological character displacement, traits involved in reproductive isolation may not evolve in arbitrary directions when changes in these traits are by-products of adaptation to an ecological niche. In reproductive character displacement, however, selection acts directly on reproductive characters to enhance the degree of reproductive isolation between sympatric populations. Thus, the direction of change in reproductive characters may be arbitrary in relation to changes in other morphological characters. We characterized both tegminal characters and characters indicative of body size in sympatric and allopatric populations of Gryllus fultoni, a species displaying character displacement in its calling song characters in areas of sympatry with G. vernalis populations, to infer the nature and direction of selection acting on reproductive and morphological characters in sympatry. Results Except for mirror area, the number of teeth in a file, and ovipositor length of G. fultoni, all male and female morphological characters in G. fultoni and G. vernalis exhibited a uniform tendency to decrease in size with increasing latitude. There was no significant variation in female morphological characters between sympatric and allopatric G. fultoni populations. However, males of sympatric and allopatric G. fultoni populations significantly differed in head width, hind femur length, and mirror area even after controlling for clinal factors. Head width and hind femur length of G. fultoni were more similar to those of G. vernalis in sympatric populations than in allopatric populations, resulting in morphological convergence of G. fultoni and G. vernalis in sympatry. However, the mirror area of G. fultoni displayed the divergent pattern in relation to the sympatric G. vernalis populations. Conclusion Divergence-enhancing selection may be acting on mirror area as well as calling song characters, whereas local adaptation or clinal effects may explain variation in other morphological characters in sympatric populations of G. fultoni. This study also suggests that structures and behaviors that directly enhance reproductive isolation may evolve together, independently of other morphological traits. PMID:19183503

  18. A new species of Endecous Saussure, 1878 (Orthoptera, Gryllidae) from northeast Brazil with the first X1X20 chromosomal sex system in Gryllidae.

    PubMed

    Zefa, Edison; Redü, Darlan Rutz; Da Costa, Maria Kátia Matiotti; Fontanetti, Carmem S; Gottschalk, Marco Silva; Padilha, Giovanna Boff; Fernandes e Silva, Anelise; Martins, Luciano De P

    2014-08-06

    In this paper we describe a new species of Luzarinae cricket collected from the cave "Gruta de Ubajara, municipality of Ubajara, State of Ceará, Brazil, highlighting phallic sclerites morphology and chromosome complement as diagnostic characters. We presented meiotic and mitotic characterization in order to define the karyotype with 2n = 12 + X1X2♂/12 + X1X1X2X2♀. This represents the first record of X1X20 chromosomal sex system in Gryllidae.

  19. First record of the subgenus Duolandrevus (Duolandrevus) (Orthoptera: Gryllidae: Landrevinae) from China, with description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong-Xiao; Liu, Hao-Yu; Shi, Fu-Ming

    2017-04-20

    The subgenus Duolandrevus (Duolandrevus) Kirby, 1906 is recorded for the first time in China, a new species i.e.: Duolandrevus (Duolandrevus) bannanus sp. nov. was collected from Xishuangbanna of Yunnan province, China. The description and illustrations of the new species are provided. A distribution map of all species of Duolandrevus (Duolandrevus) in the world is presented.

  20. Convergent and divergent patterns of morphological differentiation provide more evidence for reproductive character displacement in a wood cricket Gryllus fultoni (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    PubMed

    Jang, Yikweon; Won, Yong-Jin; Choe, Jae Chun

    2009-02-01

    In ecological character displacement, traits involved in reproductive isolation may not evolve in arbitrary directions when changes in these traits are by-products of adaptation to an ecological niche. In reproductive character displacement, however, selection acts directly on reproductive characters to enhance the degree of reproductive isolation between sympatric populations. Thus, the direction of change in reproductive characters may be arbitrary in relation to changes in other morphological characters. We characterized both tegminal characters and characters indicative of body size in sympatric and allopatric populations of Gryllus fultoni, a species displaying character displacement in its calling song characters in areas of sympatry with G. vernalis populations, to infer the nature and direction of selection acting on reproductive and morphological characters in sympatry. Except for mirror area, the number of teeth in a file, and ovipositor length of G. fultoni, all male and female morphological characters in G. fultoni and G. vernalis exhibited a uniform tendency to decrease in size with increasing latitude. There was no significant variation in female morphological characters between sympatric and allopatric G. fultoni populations. However, males of sympatric and allopatric G. fultoni populations significantly differed in head width, hind femur length, and mirror area even after controlling for clinal factors. Head width and hind femur length of G. fultoni were more similar to those of G. vernalis in sympatric populations than in allopatric populations, resulting in morphological convergence of G. fultoni and G. vernalis in sympatry. However, the mirror area of G. fultoni displayed the divergent pattern in relation to the sympatric G. vernalis populations. Divergence-enhancing selection may be acting on mirror area as well as calling song characters, whereas local adaptation or clinal effects may explain variation in other morphological characters in sympatric populations of G. fultoni. This study also suggests that structures and behaviors that directly enhance reproductive isolation may evolve together, independently of other morphological traits.

  1. New species of Zygoclistron Rehn, 1905 (Insecta: Orthoptera: Acrididae: Copiocerinae) in the central corridor of the Atlantic Forest biome.

    PubMed

    Silva, Daniela Santos Martins; Pereira, Marcelo Ribeiro; Domenico, Fernando Campos De; Sperber, Carlos Frankl

    2016-06-17

    Herein we describe a new species of Copiocerinae, Zygoclistron ruschii Silva n. sp., from Atlantic Forest remnants in southeastern Brazil, collected from the Reserva Biológica Augusto Ruschi in the Santa Teresa municipality, Espírito Santo state, Brazil. The diagnosis of this new species is based on phallic complex and terminalia characters.

  2. Lethal effects of treatment with a special dimeticone formula on head lice and house crickets (Orthoptera, Ensifera: Acheta domestica and Anoplura, phthiraptera: Pediculus humanus). Insights into physical mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Richling, Ira; Böckeler, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    The present study provides the first convincing explanation of the mode of action of the medical device NYDA, a special dimeticone (CAS 9006-65-9) formula containing 92% of two dimeticones with different viscosities specifically designed for the physical treatment of head lice infestations (pediculosis capitis) by suffocation. Both, lice (Pediculus humanus) and house crickets (Acheta domestica) treated with this anti-head lice product are knocked out to the status "of no major vital signs" within less than 1 min that in consequence is accompanied irreversibly with the death of the respective insects. Scanning electron microscopical investigations have revealed that the cuticle is coated by a thin closed layer of the dimeticone formula that also enters the stigmata. In vivo observations and dissections of Acheta domestica have shown that application of the medical device to the thoracic stigmata invariably leads to rapid death; this is strongly correlated with the influx of the special dimeticone formula into the head trachea, whereby the solution effectively blocks the oxygen supply of the central nervous system. Dissections after application of the stained product show that it also enters the finest tracheal branches. Analogous in vivo observations in Pediculus humanus have confirmed the correlation between the disappearance of major vital signs and the displacement of air by the dimeticone formula in the tracheal system of the head. For both insect species, statistical data are provided for the chronological sequence of the filling of the tracheal system in relation to the respective vitality conditions of the Insects. On average, the special dimeticone formula reaches the insect's head tracheae within 0.5 min in house crickets and in less than 1 min in lice with a complete filling of the entire head tracheal system of lice within 3.5 min. In addition, a timed sequence of images illustrates this process for lice. The experiments clearly reveal the exclusive and pure physical mode of action of the tested dimeticone formula.

  3. Geographic variation in wing size and shape of the grasshopper Trilophidia annulata (Orthoptera: Oedipodidae): morphological trait variations follow an ecogeographical rule

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yi; Dong, Jia-Jia; Guan, De-Long; Xie, Juan-Ying; Xu, Sheng-Quan

    2016-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of wing variation in grasshoppers can help us to understand how environmental heterogeneity affects the phenotypic patterns of insects. In this study, geometric morphometric methods were used to measure the differences in wing shape and size of Trilophidia annulata among 39 geographical populations in China, and a regression analysis was applied to identify the major environmental factors contributing to the observed morphological variations. The results showed that the size of the forewing and hindwing were significantly different among populations; the shape of the forewing among populations can be divided into geographical groups, however hindwing shape are geographical overlapped, and populations cannot be divided into geographical groups. Environmental PCA and thin-plate spline analysis suggested that smaller individuals with shorter and blunter-tip forewings were mainly distributed in the lower latitudes and mountainous areas, where they have higher temperatures and more precipitation. Correspondingly, the larger-bodied grasshoppers, those that have longer forewings with a longer radial sector, are distributed in contrary circumstances. We conclude that the size variations in body, forewing and hindwing of T. annulata apparently follow the Bergmann clines. The importance of climatic variables in influencing morphological variation among populations, forewing shape of T. annulata varies along an environmental gradient. PMID:27597437

  4. Reinforcement and a cline in mating behaviour evolve in response to secondary contact and hybridization in shield-back katydids (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae).

    PubMed

    Cole, J A

    2016-09-01

    In a dispersal-limited species that has evolved reproductive character displacement at a contact zone, a cline in mating behaviour may result if gene flow diffuses alleles out of the contact zone into allopatric populations. Prior work has found such a clinal pattern in the shield-back katydid Aglaothorax morsei, in which the male calling songs in a sympatric population have a displaced, short interpulse interval that increases in length with increasing distance from the contact zone. In this study, molecular phylogenetic and female preference data show that (1) sympatric populations result from secondary contact, (2) hybridization in sympatry has resulted in unidirectional mitochondrial introgression and (3) female preferences are consistent with reproductive character displacement and could generate a cline in mating behaviour. These data together suggest a history of reinforcement, generally considered rare in acoustically communicating insects; thus, Aglaothorax represents an important example of a rarely documented evolutionary process. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  5. Divergent Host Plant Adaptation Drives the Evolution of Sexual Isolation in the Grasshopper Hesperotettix viridis (Orthoptera: Acrididae) in the Absence of Reinforcement

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The beginning stages of lineage divergence can be difficult to detect, as correlations between altered genotypic and phenotypic attributes are often weak early in the process. Shifts in host plant use and divergence in mating signals can lead to sexual isolation and ultimately speciation. To underst...

  6. Beauveria bassiana (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) Introduced as an Endophyte in Corn Plants and Its Effects on Consumption, Reproductive Capacity, and Food Preference of Dichroplus maculipennis (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Melanoplinae)

    PubMed Central

    Mariottini, Yanina; Russo, Leticia M.; Vianna, M. Florencia; Scorsetti, Ana C.; Lange, Carlos E.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the effects of strain Beauveria bassiana (LPSC 1067) as an endophyte in corn plants on consumption, fecundity, and food preference of Dichroplus maculipennis were examined. We observed that the daily consumption by grasshoppers fed with control plants was almost twice that of those that were fed treated plants. Significant differences in fecundity of grasshoppers that were fed with treated plants compared with those that only fed on control plants were also observed. The number of eggs laid per female fed with control plants was 27.2, while the number of eggs laid per female that were fed during 15 d with treated plants was 17.7. Similar results were observed when the number of embryonated eggs was evaluated. The highest number of embryonated eggs were recorded in those females that only fed on control plants (96%) while fewer embryonated eggs were recorded in grasshoppers fed for 15 d with treated plants only (25%). In relation to food preference the average consumption rate for D. maculipennis females on control corn plants was 303.8 ± 24.5 mg while it was only 25 ± 2.1 mg on plants treated with B. bassiana as an endophyte. In summary, we observed that B. bassiana as a corn plant endophyte negatively affected the daily consumption rate, fecundity and food preference of D. maculipennis. PMID:28423416

  7. Beauveria bassiana (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) Introduced as an Endophyte in Corn Plants and Its Effects on Consumption, Reproductive Capacity, and Food Preference of Dichroplus maculipennis (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Melanoplinae).

    PubMed

    Pelizza, Sebastian A; Mariottini, Yanina; Russo, Leticia M; Vianna, M Florencia; Scorsetti, Ana C; Lange, Carlos E

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the effects of strain Beauveria bassiana (LPSC 1067) as an endophyte in corn plants on consumption, fecundity, and food preference of Dichroplus maculipennis were examined. We observed that the daily consumption by grasshoppers fed with control plants was almost twice that of those that were fed treated plants. Significant differences in fecundity of grasshoppers that were fed with treated plants compared with those that only fed on control plants were also observed. The number of eggs laid per female fed with control plants was 27.2, while the number of eggs laid per female that were fed during 15 d with treated plants was 17.7. Similar results were observed when the number of embryonated eggs was evaluated. The highest number of embryonated eggs were recorded in those females that only fed on control plants (96%) while fewer embryonated eggs were recorded in grasshoppers fed for 15 d with treated plants only (25%). In relation to food preference the average consumption rate for D. maculipennis females on control corn plants was 303.8 ± 24.5 mg while it was only 25 ± 2.1 mg on plants treated with B. bassiana as an endophyte. In summary, we observed that B. bassiana as a corn plant endophyte negatively affected the daily consumption rate, fecundity and food preference of D. maculipennis. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  8. Comparison of reproductive traits of regular and irradiated male desert locust Schistocerca gregaria (Orthoptera: Acrididae): Evidence of last-male sperm precedence

    PubMed Central

    Dushimirimana, Severin; Hance, Thierry; Damiens, David

    2012-01-01

    Summary The sterile insect technique (SIT) is increasingly used to control pest insect populations. The success of SIT control programs depends on the ability to release sterile males and on the capacity of sterile males to compete with wild males to inseminate wild females. In this study, we evaluated the mating performance of Schistocerca gregaria (Försk.) males irradiated with 4 Gray. We compared reproductive traits, such as duration of precopulation time, mating duration, quantity of sperm stored by females after copulation, number of females mated successively and postmating competition of irradiated males with non-irradiated males. Irradiated males were able to mate but the resulting number of offspring was dramatically reduced compared to the average number of offspring observed during a regular mating. During a single copulation, irradiated males transferred fewer sperm than regular males but, theoretically, this quantity is enough to fertilize all the eggs produced by a female during its reproductive life. Irradiated males also had the ability to remove sperm from a previous mating with unirraditated males. This new information on the mating strategies helps explain the post-copulation guarding behaviour of S. gregaria. PMID:23213413

  9. Interactions of two insect pathogens, Paranosema locustae (Protista: Microsporidia) and Metarhizium acridum (Fungi: Hypocreales), during a mixed infection of Locusta migratoria (Insecta: Orthoptera) nymphs.

    PubMed

    Tokarev, Yuri S; Levchenko, Maxim V; Naumov, Anton M; Senderskiy, Igor V; Lednev, Georgiy R

    2011-02-01

    Locusta migratoria nymphs were fed Paranosema locustae spores and/or surface-treated with Metarhizium acridum 3 (assay 1), 6 (assay 2) or 9 days (assay 3) post microsporidia application (p.m.a.). These three dates corresponded to the key phases of P. locustae development: (a) mass proliferation, (b) transition to sporogenesis and (c) onset of spore maturation, respectively. As a result, locust mortality due to mixed treatment increased slower, equally and faster, as compared to mortality expected from the combination of two pathogens in assays 1-3, respectively. However, a statistically significant difference in survival times was observed only in assay 3, indicating that only at the phase of spore maturation microsporidia drastically increase locust susceptibility to fungal infection. Analysis of perished nymphs showed that fungal treatment 3 days p.m.a. impeded development of microsporidia. Fungal sporulation on locust cadavers was not affected by co-occurring microsporidiosis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The thoracic morphology of the wingless dune cricket Comicus calcaris (Orthoptera: Schizodactylidae): Novel apomorphic characters for the group and adaptations to sand desert environments.

    PubMed

    Leubner, Fanny; Bradler, Sven; Wipfler, Benjamin

    2017-07-01

    Schizodactylidae, splay-footed or dune crickets, represents a distinct lineage among the highly diverse orthopteran subgroup Ensifera (crickets, katydids and allies). Only two extant genera belong to the Schizodactylidae: the winged Eurasian genus Schizodactylus, whose ecology and morphology is well documented, and the wingless South African Comicus, for which hardly any studies providing morphological descriptions have been conducted since its taxonomic description in 1888. Based on the first in-depth study of the skeletomuscular system of the thorax of Comicus calcaris Irish 1986, we provide information on some unique characteristics of this character complex in Schizodactylidae. They include a rigid connection of prospinasternite and mesosternum, a T-shaped mesospina, and a fused meso- and metasternum. Although Schizodactylidae is mainly characterized by group-specific anatomical traits of the thorax, its bifurcated profuca supports a closer relationship to the tettigonioid ensiferans, like katydids, wetas, and hump-winged crickets. Some specific features of the thoracic musculature of Comicus seem to be correlated to the skeletal morphology, e.g., due to the rigid connection of the tergites and pleurites in the pterothorax not a single direct flight muscle is developed. We show that many of the thoracic adaptations in these insects are directly related to their psammophilous way of life. These include a characteristic setation of thoracic sclerites that prevent sand grains from intrusion into vulnerable membranous areas, the striking decrease in size of the thoracic spiracles that reduces the respirational water loss, and a general trend towards a fusion of sclerites in the thorax. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Neuroanatomy and physiology of the complex tibial organ of an atympanate ensiferan, Ametrus tibialis (Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1888) (Gryllacrididae, Orthoptera) and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Johannes; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the neuroanatomy and physiology of the complex tibial organ of an atympanate ensiferan, the Gryllacridid Ametrus tibialis. This represents the first analysis of internal mechanoceptors in Gryllacridids. The complex tibial organ is tripartite consisting of a subgenual organ, intermediate organ and a homologue organ to the crista acustica of tympanate ensiferan taxa of Tettigoniidae, Haglidae, and Anostostomatidae. The crista homologue contains 23 +/- 2 receptor neurons in the foreleg. It is associated with the leg trachea and found serially in all three thoracic leg pairs. Central projections of the sensory nerve of the complex tibial organ bifurcate in two lobes in the prothoracic ganglion, which do not reach the midline. The axonal endings project into the mVAC, the main vibratory-auditory neuropile of Ensifera. Recordings of the tibial nerve show that the tibial organ is sensitive to vibrational stimuli with a minimum threshold of 0.02 to 0.05 ms(-2) at 200-500 Hz, but rather insensitive to airborne sound. The main function of the tibial organ is therefore vibration sensing, although the specific function of the crista homologue remains unclear. The presence of the crista acustica homologue is interpreted in phylogenetic context. Because ensiferan phylogeny is unresolved, two alternative scenarios can be deduced: (a) the crista homologue is a precursor structure which was co-opted as an auditory system and represent a morphologically highly specialized structure before acquisition of its new function; (b) a previously functional tibial ear is evolutionary reduced but the neuronal structures are maintained. Based on comparison of neuroanatomical details, the crista acustica homologue of A. tibialis could present the neuronal complement of an ear evolutionary precursor structure, which was successively made sensitive to airborne sound by elaboration of cuticular tympana, auditory spiracle and trachea for sound propagation.

  12. Microsatellite Organization in the Grasshopper Abracris flavolineata (Orthoptera: Acrididae) Revealed by FISH Mapping: Remarkable Spreading in the A and B Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Diogo; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti

    2014-01-01

    With the aim of acquiring deeper knowledge about repetitive DNAs chromosomal organization in grasshoppers, we used fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to map the distribution of 16 microsatellite repeats, including mono-, di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotides, in the chromosomes of the species Abracris flavolineata (Acrididae), which harbors B chromosome. FISH revealed two main patterns: (i) exclusively scattered signals, and (ii) scattered and specific signals, forming evident blocks. The enrichment was observed in both euchromatic and heterochromatic areas and only the motif (C)30 was absent in heterochromatin. The A and B chromosomes were enriched with all the elements that were mapped, being observed in the B chromosome more distinctive blocks for (GA)15 and (GAG)10. For A complement distinctive blocks were noticed for (A)30, (CA)15, (CG)15, (GA)15, (CAC)10, (CAA)10, (CGG)10, (GAA)10, (GAC)10 and (GATA)8. These results revealed an intense spreading of microsatellites in the A. flavolineata genome that was independent of the A+T or G+C enrichment in the repeats. The data indicate that the microsatellites compose the B chromosome and could be involved in the evolution of this element in this species, although no specific relationship with any A chromosome was observed to discuss about its origin. The systematic analysis presented here contributes to the knowledge of repetitive DNA chromosomal organization among grasshoppers including the B chromosomes. PMID:24871300

  13. Weighing costs and benefits of mating in bushcrickets (Insecta: Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae), with an emphasis on nuptial gifts, protandry and mate density.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Gerlind U C

    2012-08-15

    Sexual selection is a major force driving evolution and is intertwined with ecological factors. Differential allocation of limited resources has a central role in the cost of reproduction. In this paper, I review the costs and benefits of mating in tettigoniids, focussing on nuptial gifts, their trade-off with male calling songs, protandry and how mate density influences mate choice. Tettigoniids have been widely used as model systems for studies of mating costs and benefits; they can provide useful general insights. The production and exchange of large nuptial gifts by males for mating is an important reproductive strategy in tettigoniids. As predicted by sexual selection theory spermatophylax size is condition dependent and is constrained by the need to invest in calling to attract mates also. Under some circumstances, females benefit directly from the nuptial gifts by an increase in reproductive output. However, compounds in the nuptial gift can also benefit the male by prolonging the period before the female remates. There is also a trade-off between adult male maturation and mating success. Where males mature before females (protandry) the level of protandry varies in the direction predicted by sperm competition theory; namely, early male maturation is correlated with a high level of first inseminations being reproductively successful. Lastly, mate density in bushcrickets is an important environmental factor influencing the behavioural decisions of individuals. Where mates are abundant, individuals are more choosey of mates; when they are scarce, individuals are less choosey. This review reinforces the view that tettigoniids provide excellent models to test and understand the economics of matings in both sexes.

  14. The Grasshopper and the Taxonomer. Use of Song and Structure in Orthoptera Saltatoria for Teaching the Principles of Taxonomy. Part 1. Field and Laboratory Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broughton, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the coordinated study of European grasshoppers as living specimens in the field and as permanent laboratory preparations for introducing taxonomic principles. Provides details for the preparation of specimens and sample instructions provided to students. Part I of a three-part series. (AL)

  15. First record of the ant cricket Myrmecophilus (Myrmecophilina) americanus (Orthoptera: Myrmecophilidae) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Morales, Aldo I; Rodríguez, Quetzaly K Siller; Garza-Hernández, Javier A; Adeniran, Adebiyi A; Hernández-Triana, Luis M; Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A

    2017-04-27

    In September 2004, the New World ant cricket, Myrmecophilus americanus Saussure, 1877, was collected in association with longhorn crazy ants, Paratrechina longicornis (Latreille. 1802), in the state of Coahuila, Mexico. We are reporting the DNA barcode using the mitochrondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I for this first record of M. americanus in Mexico.

  16. Phylogenetic footprinting of non-coding RNA: hammerhead ribozyme sequences in a satellite DNA family of Dolichopoda cave crickets (Orthoptera, Rhaphidophoridae)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The great variety in sequence, length, complexity, and abundance of satellite DNA has made it difficult to ascribe any function to this genome component. Recent studies have shown that satellite DNA can be transcribed and be involved in regulation of chromatin structure and gene expression. Some satellite DNAs, such as the pDo500 sequence family in Dolichopoda cave crickets, have a catalytic hammerhead (HH) ribozyme structure and activity embedded within each repeat. Results We assessed the phylogenetic footprints of the HH ribozyme within the pDo500 sequences from 38 different populations representing 12 species of Dolichopoda. The HH region was significantly more conserved than the non-hammerhead (NHH) region of the pDo500 repeat. In addition, stems were more conserved than loops. In stems, several compensatory mutations were detected that maintain base pairing. The core region of the HH ribozyme was affected by very few nucleotide substitutions and the cleavage position was altered only once among 198 sequences. RNA folding of the HH sequences revealed that a potentially active HH ribozyme can be found in most of the Dolichopoda populations and species. Conclusions The phylogenetic footprints suggest that the HH region of the pDo500 sequence family is selected for function in Dolichopoda cave crickets. However, the functional role of HH ribozymes in eukaryotic organisms is unclear. The possible functions have been related to trans cleavage of an RNA target by a ribonucleoprotein and regulation of gene expression. Whether the HH ribozyme in Dolichopoda is involved in similar functions remains to be investigated. Future studies need to demonstrate how the observed nucleotide changes and evolutionary constraint have affected the catalytic efficiency of the hammerhead. PMID:20047671

  17. Revision of the genus Angaracris Bey-Bienko, 1930 (Orthoptera: Acrididae, Oedipodinae) with notes on the tribe Bryodemini.

    PubMed

    Storozhenko, Sergey Yu; Benediktov, Alexander A; Huang, Jianhua

    2017-03-20

    Anagaracris is considered as a monotypic genus in the tribe Bryodemini (Acrididae: Oedipodinae). New synonymy is proposed: Angaracris barabensis (Pallas, 1773) = Angaracris morulimarginis Huang, 1981, syn. nov.; = Angaracris ulashanicus Li, 1981, syn. nov.; Angaracris acrohylina Bi, 1986, syn. nov.; = Angaracris nigrimarginis Zheng et Ren, 1993, syn. nov.; = Angaracris morulipennis Zheng et Ren, 1994, syn. nov.; = Angaracris neimongolensis Zeng et Han, 1998, syn. nov. The diagnosis of the tribe Bryodemini is clarified and a key to the genera and subgenera is provided.

  18. Comments on the status of Xiphidiopsis quadrinotata Bey-Bienko, 1971 and related species with one new genus and species (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Meconematinae).

    PubMed

    Shi, Fuming; Bian, Xun; Zhou, Zhijun

    2016-04-21

    Based on the collections of the Museum of Hebei University, the paper comments Xiphidiopsis quadrinotata Bey-Bienko, 1971 status and reinstates Xizicus (Axizicus) xizangensis Jiao & Shi, 2013 as a valid species. Meanwhile, Alloteratura (Meconemopsis) Karny, 1924 is redefined and one new genus of Meconematinae, Nigrimacula Shi, Bian & Zhou gen. nov., mainly distributed in South China, is erected. The new genus includes three previously known species: Xiphidiopsis quadrinotata Bey-Bienko, 1971, Xizicus (Axizicus) xizangensis Jiao & Shi, 2013 and Meconemopsis paraquadrinotata Wang, Liu & Li, 2015 and one new species, Nigrimacula binotata Shi, Bian & Zhou sp. nov. The male of Xiphidiopsis quadrinotata Bey-Bienko, 1971 and female of Xizicus (Axizicus) xizangensis Jiao & Shi, 2013 are described for the first time. A key to the species based on the morphology and a distribution map are included.

  19. The importance of validated alpha taxonomy for phylogenetic and DNA barcoding studies: a comment on species identification of pygmy grasshoppers (Orthoptera, Tetrigidae).

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Arne W; Devriese, Hendrik; Tumbrinck, Josef; Skejo, Josip; Lehmann, Gerlind U C; Hochkirch, Axel

    2017-01-01

    In a recently published paper on colour polymorphism in a Pygmy grasshopper from China (Zhao et al 2016) an unidentified Paratettix sp. was misidentified as Tetrix bolivari. This case highlights the need for correct species identification and provides an opportunity to recommend some aspects of Good Taxonomic Practice (GTP) in Tetrigidae to reduce the number of erroneous identifications.

  20. Integrative taxonomy reveals cryptic diversity in neotropical grasshoppers: taxonomy, phylogenetics, and evolution of the genus Sphenarium Charpentier, 1842 (Orthoptera: Pyrgomorphidae).

    PubMed

    Sanabria-Urbán, Salomón; Song, Hojun; Oyama, Ken; González-Rodríguez, Antonio; Castillo, Raúl Cueva Del

    2017-06-08

    The genus Sphenarium Charpentier, 1842 comprises the most diverse group of the New World Pyrgomorphidae. These grasshoppers show an extensive variation in external morphology, and are culturally and economically important for Mexican people since pre-Hispanic times. Nevertheless, the taxonomy of Sphenarium has been chaotic and remained incompletely resolved until now. Following an integrative taxonomic framework, we infer the number of species in this genus by species delimitation based on morphological, phylogenetic, and geographic information. Based on our results, we revise the genus and redefine 9 species and describe 8 new species (S. adelinae sp.n., S. crypticum sp.n., S. infernalis sp.n., S. miztecum sp.n., S. occidentalis sp.n., S. tarascum sp.n., S. totonacum sp.n. and S. zapotecum sp.n.). Moreover, we update the knowledge of the evolutionary relationships and biogeographic patterns of Sphenarium species. Our results also demonstrate the importance of historic geological and climatic events on the lineage diversification of this genus. Different levels of morphological and genetic differentiation among species suggest a complex interplay between evolutionary forces during the evolution of these neotropical grasshoppers.

  1. Does insecticide drift adversely affect grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Saltatoria) in field margins? A case study combining laboratory acute toxicity testing with field monitoring data.

    PubMed

    Bundschuh, Rebecca; Schmitz, Juliane; Bundschuh, Mirco; Brühl, Carsten Albrecht

    2012-08-01

    The current terrestrial risk assessment of insecticides regarding nontarget arthropods considers exclusively beneficial organisms, whereas herbivorous insects, such as grasshoppers, are ignored. However, grasshoppers living in field margins or meadows adjacent to crops may potentially be exposed to insecticides due to contact with or ingestion of contaminated food. Therefore, the present study assessed effects of five active ingredients of insecticides (dimethoate, pirimicarb, imidacloprid, lambda-cyhalothrin, and deltamethrin) on the survival of Chorthippus sp. grasshopper nymphs by considering two routes of exposure (contact and oral). The experiments were accompanied by monitoring field margins that neighbored cereals, vineyards, and orchards. Grasslands were used as reference sites. The laboratory toxicity tests revealed a sensitivity of grasshoppers with regard to the insecticides tested in the present study similar to that of the standard test species used in arthropod risk assessments. In the field monitoring program, increasing grasshopper densities were detected with increasing field margin width next to cereals and vineyards, but densities remained low over the whole range of field margins from 0.5 to 20 m next to orchards. Grasshopper densities equivalent to those of grassland sites were only observed in field margins exceeding 9 m in width, except for field margins next to orchards. These results may indicate that current insecticide risk assessments are insufficiently protective for grasshoppers in field margins.

  2. The Grasshopper and the Taxonomer. Use of Song and Structure in Orthoptera Saltatoria for Teaching the Principles of Taxonomy. Part 1. Field and Laboratory Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broughton, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the coordinated study of European grasshoppers as living specimens in the field and as permanent laboratory preparations for introducing taxonomic principles. Provides details for the preparation of specimens and sample instructions provided to students. Part I of a three-part series. (AL)

  3. The role of the host-specific grasshopper Cornops aquaticum (Orthoptera: Acrididae) as consumer of native Eichhornia crassipes (Pontederiaceae) floating meadows.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, María Celeste; De Wysiecki, María Laura; Poi de Neiff, Alicia; Galassi, María Eugenia; Martínez Fedra, Solange

    2011-09-01

    Cornops aquaticum is a widely distributed semiaquatic grasshopper in the Neotropics. The development, feeding and oviposition of C. aquaticum take place on Pontederiaceae, especially on species of Eichhornia. Several aspects of the feeding of C. aquaticum are studied because is one of the most important herbivores of the highly invasive floating Eichhornia crassipes in native areas. The aims of this paper were: (1) to quantify the amount of E. crassipes consumed by C. aquaticum, (2) to determine the growth rate and the conversion efficiency of food ingested by this grasshopper, and (3) to determine the possible effect of consumption on E. crassipes productivity. Thirty individuals from each specific age class were used in the experiment: nymphs A, nymphs B, adult males and adult females. Insects were individually confined in plastic pots with a leaf of E. crassipes. We estimated feeding by individual, consumption index (CI), relative growth rate (GR) and efficiency of conversion of ingested food to body substance (ECI). The impact of C. aquaticum consumption on E. crassipes floating meadows was assessed with the abundance of the grasshopper, and the available data on primary production of the host plant at the study site. Food intake of C. aquaticum was 11.23% of plant productivity. Food consumption, growth rate and food conversion efficiency of this grasshopper varied according to the specific age classes. Damage caused by C. aquaticum is high in comparison with the damage caused by other semiaquatic and grassland grasshoppers, however it is not enough to prevent the growth and coverage of native E. crassipes floating meadows because abundance of grasshoppers are realtively low and the growth rate and productivity of the host plant is high.

  4. Loss of genetic connectivity and diversity in urban microreserves in a southern California endemic Jerusalem cricket (Orthoptera: Stenopelmatidae: Stenopelmatus n. sp. "santa monica")

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandergast, A.G.; Lewallen, E.A.; Deas, J.; Bohonak, A.J.; Weissman, D.B.; Fisher, R.N.

    2009-01-01

    Microreserves may be useful in protecting native arthropod diversity in urbanized landscapes. However, species that do not disperse through the urban matrix may eventually be lost from these fragments. Population extinctions may be precipitated by an increase in genetic differentiation among fragments and loss of genetic diversity within fragments, and these effects should become stronger with time. We analyzed population genetic structure in the dispersal limited Jerusalem cricket Stenopelmatus n. sp. "santa monica" in the Santa Monica Mountains and Simi Hills north of Los Angeles, California (CA), to determine the impacts of fragmentation over the past 70 years. MtDNA divergence was greater among urban fragments than within contiguous habitat and was positively correlated with fragment age. MtDNA genetic diversity within fragments increased with fragment size and decreased with fragment age. Genetic divergence across 38 anonymous nuclear Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) loci was influenced by the presence of major highways and highway age, but there was no effect of additional urban fragmentation. ISSR diversity was not correlated with fragment size or age. Differing results between markers may be due to male-biased dispersal, or different effective population sizes, sorting rates, or mutation rates among sampled genes. Results suggest that genetic connectivity among populations has been disrupted by highways and urban development, prior to declines in local population sizes. We emphasize that genetic connectivity can rapidly erode in fragmented landscapes and that flightless arthropods can serve as sensitive indicators for these effects. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008.

  5. A test of Allen's rule in ectotherms: the case of two south American Melanopline Grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) with partially overlapping geographic ranges.

    PubMed

    Bidau, Claudio J; Martí, Dardo A

    2008-01-01

    We studied the geographic variation of three morphometric characters in relation to body size in two South American grasshoppers (Acrididae), Dichroplus vittatus Bruner and D. pratensis Bruner to test Allen's rule in these ectotherms. Since both species follow the converse to Bergmann's rule owing to latitudinal and/or altitudinal variation in time available for growth and reproduction, geographic variation in body size proportions of protruding parts may obey to differential allometric growth in different geographic areas. Alternatively, it could reflect true Allenian variation related to thermoregulation. Body proportions were studied by correlation/regression analyses with geographic and climatic variables. In D. pratensis, body proportions increased with latitude and decreased with altitude. These results probably obey to the effects of water balance and seasonality on final body size, and on the allometric growth of the three studied characters not being related to thermoregulation. In D. vittatus, a generally non-significant trend towards the decrease of the mean proportions of all three characters with increasing latitude was observed. Nevertheless, also in this species, it is probable that the environmental gradient responds to seasonality factors (although not to water balance) that affect the length of growing season and, in consequence, body size and its allometric relationships. We conclude that the regularities in the geographic distribution of body proportions of D. pratensis and D. vittatus do not follow Allen's rule in the sense of thermoregulation, and result from variables that determine growing season length and the allometric growth of different body parts.

  6. The role of egg pod foam and rearing conditions of the phase state of the Asian migratory locust Locusta migratoria migratoria (Orthoptera, Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Ben Hamouda, Amel; Ammar, Mohamed; Ben Hamouda, Mohamed Habib; Bouain, Abderrahmen

    2009-07-01

    Coloration phase state, morphometrical ratios and the numbers of mature oocytes of Locusta migratoria migratoria were examined in a series of experiments to determine the means by which phase characteristics are passed to the next generation. Washing with distilled water of eggs from egg pods laid by gregarious crowd-reared females resulted in solitarization of the hatchlings after their isolation, indicating that a factor present in eggs encapsulated in foam is causal to gregarization. Such locusts showed a significant shift towards the typical solitarious body coloration, morphometry and number of mature oocytes as compared to locusts resulting from unwashed eggs. Gregarious coloration, morphometrical ratios and oocyte numbers could be partially restored when hatchlings from washed eggs were regrouped. When gregarious locusts were reared in isolation, they showed a solitary body color, whereas, morphometry and oocyte numbers were not affected by isolation.

  7. Simulated aerial sprays for field cage evaluation of Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium brunneum (Ascomycetes: Hypocreales) against Anabrus simplex (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) in Montana

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Field efficacy of the entomopathogenic Ascomycete Beauveria bassiana strain GHA and Metarhizium brunneum strain F52 was evaluated against nymphs of the Mormon cricket, Anabrus simplex. Fungi were applied with a new apparatus that allows simulated aerial sprays to 0.1m2 areas in the field. The Mormon...

  8. [Studies on the accuracy and precision of total serum cholesterol in regional interlaboratory trials (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hohenwallner, W; Sommer, R; Wimmer, E

    1976-01-02

    The between-run precision of the Liebermann-Burchard reaction modified by Watson was, in our laboratory, 2-3%, the within-run coefficient of variation was 1-2%. The between-run precision of the enzymatic test was 3-4%, the within-run coefficient of variation was 3%. The regression analysis of 92 serum specimens from patients was y = -17.31 + 1.04 chi, the coefficient of regression was r = 0.996. Interlaboratory trials of serum cholesterol were studied in the normal and pathological range. Lyophilized samples of serum prepared commercially and from fresh specimens from patients were analysed by the method of Liebermann-Burchard as well as by the enzymatic procedure. Acceptable results estimated by Liebermann-Burchard were obtained in the different laboratories after using a common standard of cholesterol. The coefficient of variation of the enzymatic test in the interlaboratory trial was higher in comparison to the Liebermann-Burchard reaction. Methodological difficulties of the Liebermann-Burchard reaction are discussed and compared with the specific, enzymatic assay.

  9. Reply to ``Comment on `Calculation of ionization balance and electrical conductivity in nonideal aluminum plasma' ''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Deok-Kyu; Kim, Inho

    2004-10-01

    We explain that the classical integral expression of the average electron-ion momentum transfer cross section is of limited applicability to dense plasmas without correcting the cutoff screening radius approximation, and that the Zollweg-Liebermann model appears practically useful to reproduce the experimental data with mathematical simplicity.

  10. New mineral physics panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The AGU Committee on Mineral Physics has formed itself into six panels. The committee chairman is Orson L. Anderson of the Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles; foreign secretary is Robert Liebermann, Department of Earth and Space Sciences, State University of New York, Stony Brook. The six panels are as follows.

  11. Reply to 'Comment on 'Calculation of ionization balance and electrical conductivity in nonideal aluminum plasma''

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Deok-Kyu; Kim, Inho

    2004-10-01

    We explain that the classical integral expression of the average electron-ion momentum transfer cross section is of limited applicability to dense plasmas without correcting the cutoff screening radius approximation, and that the Zollweg-Liebermann model appears practically useful to reproduce the experimental data with mathematical simplicity.

  12. Solidification Structure Synthesis in Undercooled Liquids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-18

    Perepezko in "Rapidly Solidifying Alloys", ed. H. Liebermann (Marcel Dekker, NY), 17 (1993). 13. "Nucleation Kinetics in Undercooled Liquid Metals and...Acta Met., 22, 677 (1974). 93. H. J. Schurhoff, W. Gruhl and W. G. Burchard , Z Metallkde., 74, 132 (1983). 94. 0. M. Suirez. M. S. Thesis, University

  13. Enzymic determination of plasma cholesterol on discrete automatic analysers.

    PubMed

    Nobbs, B T; Smith, J M; Walker, A W

    1977-09-01

    Enzymic procedures for the determination of plasma cholesterol, using cholesterol esterase and cholesterol oxidase, have been adapted to the Vickers D-300, Vickers M,-300, and Vitatron AKES discrete analysers. The results obtained by these methods have been compared to those obtained by manual and continuous flow Liebermann-Burchard methods. The enzymic methods were found to be accurate, precise and of adequate sensitivity.

  14. Transcriptional Changes in nAChRs, Interactive Proteins and P450s in Locusta migratoria manilensis (Orthoptera: Acrididae) CNS in Response to High and Low Oral Doses of Imidacloprid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Sun, Huahua; Zhang, Yixi; Liu, Chuanjun; Liu, Zewen

    2015-01-01

    The insect central nervous system (CNS) is the target for many insecticides, and changes in transcript levels could be expected after insecticide applications. In this study, differentially expressed genes in the locust (Locusta migratoria manilensis) CNS in response to imidacloprid treatments at low dose (LD, 10% mortality) and high dose (HD, 80% mortality) were identified. Two nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits genes and 18 interacting protein genes were regulated at LD, and only one nAChR subunit gene and 11 interacting proteins were regulated at HD. Among the 110 annotated P450 unigenes, 43 unigenes were regulated at LD and 34 unigenes were regulated at HD. Most of the differentially expressed P450 unigenes were mapped to CYP4, in which most unigenes were upregulated at LD, but downregulated at HD. Totally, the numbers and regulation levels of the regulated genes were more at LD than that at HD. Seventeen unigenes were selected to test their expression changes following insecticide treatments by qRT-PCR, in which the changes in more than half of the selected genes were verified. The results revealed the variation in the response of locusts to different insecticide pressure, such as different doses.

  15. A revision of the Axylus group of Agraeciini (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Conocephalinae) and of some other species formerly included in Nicsara or Anthracites Revision of the Indo-Australian Conocephalinae, Part 3.

    PubMed

    Ingrisch, Sigfrid

    2015-11-23

    Axylus group is used to include the five genera Axylus Stål, 1877, Anthracites Redtenbacher, 1891 sensu stricto, Eucoptaspis Willemse, 1966, Eulobaspis gen. nov., and Heminicsara Karny, 1912. It is mainly based on a combination of the characters shape of pronotum, spiniform meso- and metasternal lobes, and similar basic ground plans of the male cerci, titillators and female subgenital plates. The five genera together with two superficially similar genera Euanthracites gen. nov. and Sulasara gen. nov. are fully revised. Papuacites gen. nov. is proposed for two New Guinean species formerly included in Anthracites. Nicsara Walker, 1869 is restricted to Australian species; Spinisternum Willemse, 1942 is synonymised with Heminicsara Karny, 1912; Odontocoryphus Karny, 1907 based on two nymphs is synonymised with Macroxiphus Pictet, 1888; Pseudoliara Karny, 1907 described after one nymph is regarded incertae sedis. 40 new combination of species are proposed: Axylus bimaculatus (Redtenbacher, 1891) comb. nov., A. inferior (Brunner, 1898) comb. nov., A. inflatus (Brunner, 1898) comb. nov., A. loboensis (De Haan, 1842) comb. nov., A. minutus (Dohrn, 1905) comb. nov., A. nigrifrons (Brunner, 1898) comb. nov., A. philippinus (Hebard, 1922) comb. nov., A, taylori (Hebard, 1922) comb. nov., and A. thoracicus (Dohrn, 1905) comb. nov. (all from Nicsara); Euanthracites apoensis (Hebard, 1922) comb. nov., E. femoralis (Dohrn, 1905) comb. nov., E. rufus (Ingrisch, 1998) comb. nov., and E. tibialis (Karny, 1931) comb. nov. (from Anthracites); Eucoptaspis inexpectatus (Willemse, 1953) comb. nov. (from Gonatacanthus Karny, 1907); Eulobaspis dehaani (Karny, 1920) comb. nov., E. emarginata (Karny, 1926) comb. nov., E. moluccana (Redtenbacher, 1891) comb. nov., E. personata (Karny, 1926) comb. nov., E. quadrimaculata (Karny, 1926) comb. nov., E. rotundata (Karny, 1926) comb. nov., and E. strigatipes (Bolivar, 1898) comb. nov. (from Nicsara); Eulobaspis lobaspoides (Karny, 1907) comb. nov. and E. ornata (Brunner, 1898) comb. nov. (from Axylus); Heminicsara excisa (Karny, 1926) comb. nov., H. insulana (Willemse, 1966) comb. nov., H. schlaginhaufeni (Karny, 1912) comb. nov., and H. viridipes (Karny, 1912) comb. nov. (from Nicsara); Heminicsara castaneipictus (Willemse, 1966) comb. nov., H. insularis (Willemse, 1942) comb. nov., and H. palauensis (Vickery & Kevan, 1999) comb. nov. (from Spinisternum); Heminicsara decipiens (Karny, 1926) comb. nov. and H. griffinii (Karny, 1911) comb. nov. (from Gonatacanthus); Heminicsara novaeguineae (Willemse, 1966) comb. nov. (from Eucoptaspis); Sulasara aethiops (Karny, 1931) comb. nov., S. karnyi (Willemse, 1932) comb. nov., and Sulasara sarasini (Karny, 1931) comb. nov. (from Nicsara); Papuacites nigrifrons (Karny, 1912) comb. nov. and P. nakanaiensis (Naskrecki & Rentz, 2010) comb. nov. (from Anthracites); Paramacroxiphus multispinosa (Bolivar, 1898) comb. nov. (from Nicsara); Palaeoagraecia globiceratus Vickery & Kevan, 1999 comb. nov. (from Macroxiphus). Odontocoryphus pullus Karny, 1907 becomes a new synonym of Macroxiphus sumatranus sumatranus (Haan, 1842). 87 species are described as new: nine species in Axylus: A. brachypterus sp. nov., A. dulang sp. nov., A. furcatus sp. nov., A. mengkoka sp. nov., A. montanus sp. nov., A. negros sp. nov. , A. superior sp. nov., A. totop sp. nov. , A. unicolor sp. nov.; six species in Anthracites: A. bilineatus sp. nov., A. flagellatus sp. nov., A. pyramidalis sp. nov., A. romblon sp. nov., A. sinuatus sp. nov., A. unispinus sp. nov.; four species in Euanthracites: E. bispinus sp. nov., E. eboreus sp. nov., E. ile sp. nov., E. uru sp. nov.; six species in Eucoptaspis: E. adonara sp. nov., E. hexamaculatus sp. nov., E. remotus sp. nov., E. stylatus sp. nov., E. trapezoides sp. nov., E. wawo sp. nov.; eight species in Eulobaspis: E. bacan C.Willemse & Ingrisch sp. nov., E. baduri sp. nov., E. buruensis sp. nov., E. ceramica C.Willemse & Ingrisch sp. nov., E. morotai sp. nov., E. sudirman sp. nov., E. ternate sp. nov., E. variata sp. nov.; 51 species in Heminicsara: H. albatros sp. nov., H. albipuncta sp. nov., H. albogeniculata Naskrecki & Ingrisch sp. nov., H. alticola sp. nov., H. ammea sp. nov., H. anggi sp. nov., H. bilobata sp. nov., H. cingima sp. nov., H. comprima sp. nov., H. coriformis sp. nov., H. corneli sp. nov., H. cyclops sp. nov., H. despecta Naskrecki & Ingrisch sp. nov., H. dilatata sp. nov., H. dividata sp. nov., H. dobo sp. nov., H. elongata Naskrecki & Ingrisch sp. nov., H. furcata sp. nov., H. gibba sp. nov., H. gugusu Naskrecki & Ingrisch sp. nov., H. illugi sp. nov., H. jacobii Karny, 1912, H. jayawijaya sp. nov., H. kelila sp. nov., H. kolombangara sp. nov., H. lamas Naskrecki & Ingrisch sp. nov., H. longiloba sp. nov., H. lord sp. nov., H. malu sp. nov., H. mamberamo sp. nov., H. manus sp. nov., H. montana sp. nov., H. nigra sp. nov., H. nomoensis sp. nov., H. obiensis sp. nov., H. ohu sp. nov., H. pak sp. nov., H. parallela Naskrecki & Ingrisch sp. nov., H. pinniger sp. nov., H. popoman sp. nov., H. rugosa sp. nov., H. scutula sp. nov., H. sica sp. nov., H. sinewit sp. nov., H. siwi sp. nov., H. stylata sp. nov., H. tabtab sp. nov., H. truncata Naskrecki & Ingrisch sp. nov., H. tumulus sp. nov., H. umasani sp. nov., H. wanuma sp. nov., H. zugi sp. nov.; and three species in Sulasara: S. armata sp. nov., S. renschi sp. nov., S. tambu sp. nov.

  16. New data on the bush-cricket Montana medvedevi (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae), critically endangered in Europe (EU 28), and a comparison of its song with all known song patterns within the genus.

    PubMed

    Ivković, Slobodan; Iorgu, Ionuț Ștefan; Horvat, Laslo; Chobanov, Dragan; Korsunovskaya, Olga; Heller, Klaus-Gerhard

    2017-05-10

    Montana medvedevi is reported for the first time from Serbia. New information about the distribution, morphology and song of this species is discussed. The song of M. medvedevi is different from that of all other members of the genus, all figured for comparison. Montana is quite diverse regarding the amplitude pattern of the calling song of its members (known in 15 species). Surprisingly, some Montana species seem to have two song patterns, one produced during the day and one at night.

  17. The Entomophaga grylli (Fresenius) Batko species complex (Zygomycetes: Entomophthorales) infecting grasshoppers in Ilheus (Bahia) Brazil: notes and new records

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fungi from the Entomophthoraceae (Zygomycotina; Zygomycetes: Entomophthorales) belonging to the Entomophaga grylli species complex have been found in the state of Bahia, Brazil, to affect populations of grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) of the species Rhammatocerus brasiliensis Bruner, Rhammatoce...

  18. Coping with uncertainty: Nutrient deficiencies motivate insect migration at a cost to immunity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Migration is often associated with movement away from areas with depleted nutrients or other resources, and yet migration itself is energetically demanding. Migrating Mormon crickets Anabrus simplex (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) lack nutrients, and supplementation of deficient nutrients slows migrator...

  19. Effects of temperature and moisture on Mormon cricket reproduction with implications for responses to climate change

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    During the last decade, populations of flightless Mormon crickets Anabrus simplex (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) increased suddenly over vast areas of the western United States, suggesting that climate is an important factor driving outbreaks. Moreover summer temperatures are predicted to increase and...

  20. Charletonia cameroonensis Haitlinger & Kekeunou sp. nov. and the first record of C. justynae Haitlinger, 1987 (Acari: Erythraeidae) from Cameroon with redescription of the species.

    PubMed

    Haitlinger, Ryszard; Kekeunou, Sévilor; Lupicki, Dariusz

    2014-01-30

    Charletonia cameroonensis Haitlinger & Kekeunou sp. nov. is described and illustrated from larvae obtained from Zonocerus variegatus (Linnaeus, 1758) (Orthoptera: Pyrgomorphidae) in Cameroon. For the first time C. justynae Haitlinger, 1987 is reported from Cameroon and from Z. variegatus and Eupezus rufipes Quedenfeldt, 1885 (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae). This paper also presents new morphological data and a range of metric and meristic data for C. justynae. Distribution and hosts of Charletonia found on Orthoptera are given.

  1. An extraction/enzymatic procedure for serum cholesterol measurement: evaluation of performance characteristics.

    PubMed

    Franzini, C; Luraschi, P

    1990-12-01

    The performance characteristics of an extraction/enzymatic procedure for serum cholesterol measurement were evaluated. The procedure is substantially derived from the accepted reference method as standardized by the Centers for Disease Control, substituting the enzymatic reaction for the Liebermann-Burchard reaction. Imprecision (CV) was consistently less than 1.5%, and accuracy was comparable to that of the definitive isotope dilution mass spectrometry method and the accepted reference method. Direct comparison of the enzymatic with the Liebermann-Burchard reaction, using a set of 50 human sera, revealed about -0.05 mmol/l constant bias of the former versus the latter, this being possibly due to higher specificity of the enzymatic reaction. As compared with the accepted reference method, the method described is characterized by higher practicability, the reagent being easier to prepare and to handle, and generating a more stable, chemically defined end-product.

  2. Investigations of Eurasian Seismic Sources and Upper Mantle Structure.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-06

    from seismology, however. From a synthesis of thermobarometric data on kimberlite xenoliths, Boyd and Gurney [ 1986] argue that systematic, nearly...Inclusions in Kimberlites and Other Volcanics, edited by F.R. Boyd and H.O.A. Meyer, Amer. Geophys. Union, Washington, D.C., 1-14, 1979. 51 Jordan...O’Hara, 1975; Boyd and McCallister, 1976; Green and Liebermann, 1976]. Peridotite nodules from kimberlite pipes in cratonic areas are observed to

  3. Ultrasonic attenuation in molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Bernard

    1981-11-01

    It is now well established from an experimental point of view that, concerning the ultrasonic attenuation, molecular crystals exhibit a specific behavior among dielectric crystals. This fact suggests the presence of a relaxation process. Liebermann, who has introduced this field, has proposed a way to analyze this problem and in particular has given an expression for the ultrasonic absorption coefficient in terms of a relaxation time and some thermodynamic quantities. In contrast to Liebermann's approach, a solid-state viewpoint is presented here, and it is shown that this ultrasonic relaxation can be taken into account in the framework of Akhieser's theory. A general expression of the ultrasonic absorption coefficient is calculated in terms of the phonon collision operator using the Boltzmann-equation approach of Woodruff and Ehrenreich. The collision-time approximation widely used in dielectric crystals fails in molecular crystals for which the presence of slow relaxation times in the collision operator prevents the thermalization of the whole set of phonons and gives rise to an ultrasonic relaxation. Thus a more suitable approximation is suggested here, which leads to a new expression of the ultrasonic attenuation valid in molecular crystals. Different forms of this expression are discussed, and comparison with Liebermann's expression used in most of the previous papers shows that the present treatment takes better account of the anisotropy of the solid state. The fit of experimental results obtained for some ionic-molecular crystals also shows that the expression derived here gives better agreement than does Liebermann's. Finally, it is shown that in the framework of the present treatment and under rather general conditions, the anisotropy affects primarily the magnitude of the ultrasonic absorption due to the molecular relaxation, but it does not affect its frequency dependence.

  4. Association between tumour status and serum lipoprotein cholesterol in hemopoietic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Venkatanarayanan, S; Nagarajan, B

    1988-09-01

    Total and lipoprotein cholesterol in serum have been determined in patients with leukemia and lymphoma. Untreated patients were hypocholesterolemic with reduced lipoprotein cholesterol content. On successful chemotherapy most of the patients showed near normal total cholesterol levels with a subsequent increase in LDL cholesterol content. A rapid, sensitive and inexpensive method is reported using agarose electrophoresis and quantitation of cholesterol by Liebermann-Burchard reaction.

  5. [Comparison of two cholesterol determination methods in children (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Menzinger, P; Sitzmann, F C

    1979-01-01

    In 792 children aged 1 day-16 years cholesterol in serum was determined by two different methods: the well-known Liebermann-Burchard-reaction and the new enzymatical colorimetric test (Boehringer). The later procedure is simple and reliable. The cholesterol values got by this method amounted to 20 mg/dl lower. But it is not allowed to use a conversion-factor. The values in newborns and infants were significantly lower than these found in school childrens and adults.

  6. Structure and Dynamics of Shear Bands in Metallic Glasses and Nanophase Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    FUNDING NUMBERS DAAG55-98-1-0487 6. AUTHOR(S) T. C. Hufnagel 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Johns ...ATTN: AMSRL-R0-S (TR) P. O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Submitted by: Department of Materials Science and Engineering Johns ...H. Liebermann, editor, Rapidly Solidified Alloys, pages 269–301. Marcel Dekker, New York, 1993. [7] S. C. Glade , R. Busch, D. S. Lee, W. L. Johnson, R

  7. [Accuracy of HDL cholesterol measurements].

    PubMed

    Niedmann, P D; Luthe, H; Wieland, H; Schaper, G; Seidel, D

    1983-02-01

    The widespread use of different methods for the determination of HDL-cholesterol (in Europe: sodium phosphotungstic acid/MgCl2) in connection with enzymatic procedures (in the USA: heparin/MnCl2 followed by the Liebermann-Burchard method) but common reference values makes it necessary to evaluate not only accuracy, specificity, and precision of the precipitation step but also of the subsequent cholesterol determination. A high ratio of serum vs. concentrated precipitation reagent (10:1 V/V) leads to the formation of variable amounts of delta-3.5-cholestadiene. This substance is not recognized by cholesterol oxidase but leads to an 1.6 times overestimation by the Liebermann-Burchard method. Therefore, errors in HDL-cholesterol determination should be considered and differences up to 30% may occur between HDL-cholesterol values determined by the different techniques (heparin/MnCl2 - Liebermann-Burchard and NaPW/MgCl2-CHOD-PAP).

  8. Analysis of molluscan sterols: Colorimetric methods.

    PubMed

    Swift, M L

    1984-08-01

    The wide variety of sterols normally found in extracts of bivalve molluscs leads to high variability in analytical data obtained with colorimetric (chole)sterol methods. Total sterol levels in oyster (Crassostrea virginica) extracts were determined using the Liebermann-Burchard reagent, an acid-FeCl3 reagent and a cholesterol oxidase procedure. The data from the latter two agreed to within 5.4% and yielded about 30% higher estimates of sterol content than the Liebermann-Burchard test. Gas-liquid chromatographic data also are compared.Several pure sterols, selected because of their presence in oyster sterol fractions or because of their structural similarities to such sterols, were examined using each of the three procedures. Sterols, differing from cholesterol only with regard to the side chain, reacted 80-102% as well as cholesterol with the acid-FeCl3 reagent and cholesterol oxidase. The Liebermann-Burchard reaction was more specific for cholesterol. The colorimetric cholesterol oxidase method is recommended for the estimation of total molluscan sterol content.

  9. Environmental Assessment Wastewater Utility System Privatization Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    that the animals on the installation consume insects such as grasshoppers ( Orthoptera), butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) , beetles (Coleoptera...Pocket Mouse Perognathus jlavescens Plains Pocket Mouse (lighter pelage) Perognathusjlavescens gypsi Silky Pocket Mouse Perognathus jlavus Cactus...Plains Pocket Mouse with the lighter pelage (Perognathus jlavescens gypsi ) were found primarily within the dunes; others were found equally distributed

  10. Catalog of insect type specimens preserved at the Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Science with corrections of some specimens

    PubMed Central

    LI, Kai-Qin; WANG, Yun-Zhen; DONG, Da-Zhi; ZHANG, Li-Kun

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a list of insect types preserved in Kunming Natural History Museum of Zoology (KNHMZ). As of March, 2015, 3 412 type specimens belonging to 266 species/subspecies of 37 families in 9 orders (Odonata, Isoptera, Mantodea, Orthoptera, Hemiptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera and Lepidoptera) are included. Information corrections of some specimens are provided in this article. PMID:26452692

  11. Catalog of insect type specimens preserved at the Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Science with corrections of some specimens.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai-Qin; Wang, Yun-Zhen; Dong, Da-Zhi; Zhang, Li-Kun

    2015-09-18

    This article presents a list of insect types preserved in Kunming Natural History Museum of Zoology (KNHMZ). As of March, 2015, 3 412 type specimens belonging to 266 species/subspecies of 37 families in 9 orders (Odonata, Isoptera, Mantodea, Orthoptera, Hemiptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera and Lepidoptera) are included. Information corrections of some specimens are provided in this article.

  12. Dynamic Pattern Formation for Wings of Pterygota in an Eclosion ---Pattern Analysis for Wings with the Imago---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seino, M.; Kakazu, Y.

    The vein and cell patterns for the fore and hind wing of Lepidoptera, Hemiptera, Orthoptera and Odonata are analyzed and discussed. For vein patterns of them, the fractal properties are shown and the inequality between four orders is obtained. The nature of wings observed by mass distributions for fractal dimensions of the vein pattern is presented.

  13. New Isosomodes (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae) and implications for biological control in rice (Oryza sativae; Poaceae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two new species of Isosomodes Ashmead are described and illustrated: I. monteria from Colombia and I. dorado from Venezuela. Key characters for separation from other species are provided. Rearing data for I. monteria indicate that it is a parasitoid of Conocephalus (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) eggs ...

  14. The Use of Genetic Mechanisms and Behavioral Characteristics to Control Natural Populations of the German Cockroach.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    Population growth and behavior of Blattella germanica (L.) (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae) in experimentally established shipboard infestations. M. H. Ross, B. L...6. Secretion of dispersion-inducing substance by the German cockroach, Blattella germanica (L.) (Orthoptera: Blattellidae). C. Suto and N. Kumada...deprivation effects on reproduction in female Blattella germanica (L.) Ent. exp. appl. (In press). -6- Table 1. Comparative strength of responses to

  15. Characterization of a new iridovirus isolated from crickets and investigations on the host range

    PubMed

    Kleespies; Tidona; Darai

    1999-01-01

    Typical signs of an iridovirus infection were observed in two species of fatally diseased crickets, Gryllus campestris L. and Acheta domesticus L. (Orthoptera, Gryllidae). The infection was manifested by hypertrophy and bluish iridescence of the affected fat body cells. Electron microscope investigations led to the identification of a new iridovirus, which was termed cricket iridovirus (CrIV). In negatively stained preparations the size of the icosahedral virus particles ranged from 151 nm (side-side) to 167 nm (apex-apex). Assembly of virions occurred in the cytoplasm of hypertrophied fat body cells, where they often accumulated in paracrystalline arrays. Genetic analyses of purified viral DNA using a variety of restriction enzymes revealed that CrIV is distinct from all other known iridoviruses that have been isolated from insects and reported so far. In host range studies it was shown that CrIV can be transmitted perorally to other orthopteran species, causing characteristic symptoms and fatal disease. These species include Gryllus bimaculatus L. (Orthoptera, Gryllidae) and the African migratory locust Locusta migratoria migratorioides (R. & F.) (Orthoptera, Acrididae), which represents one of the most important pest insects in developing countries, as well as the cockroaches Blattella germanica L. and Blatta orientalis L. (both Orthoptera, Blattidae). Consequently, the isolation and characterization of this new cricket iridovirus is of particular interest in view of its possible use in biological or integrated control. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  16. [Aprocta cylindrica Linstow, 1883, an oviparous filaria parasite of ploceid birds from Tchad. Larval morphogenesis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Quentin, J C; Troncy, P M; Barre, N

    1976-01-01

    Aprocta cylindrica Linstow, 1883, was identified in Africa (Tchad) from Passeriform birds Ploceidae belonging to the species Quelea quelea quelea (L), Ploceus capitalis (Latham), P. cucullatus (Müller) and Euplectes orix (Insert). Its experimental life cycle achieved in Orthoptera Locusta migratoria allows the study of the three first larval stages.

  17. Relationships between plant diversity and grasshopper diversity and abundance in the Little Missouri National Grassland

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A continuing challenge in Orthoptera ecology is to understand what determines grasshopper species diversity at a given site. In this study, the objective was to determine if variation in grasshopper abundance and diversity between 23 sites in western North Dakota (USA) could be explained by variatio...

  18. Radiotelemetric Analysis of the Effects of Prevailing Wind Direction on Mormon Cricket Migratory Band Movement

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    During outbreaks, flightless Mormon crickets [Anabrus simplex Haldeman (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae)] form large mobile groups known as migratory bands. These bands can contain millions of individuals that march en masse across the landscape. The role of environmental cues in influencing the movement ...

  19. Double trouble for grasshopper molecular systematics: intra-individual heterogeneity of both mitochondrial 12S-valine-16S and nuclear internal transcribed spacer ribosomal DNA sequences in Hesperotettix viridis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hesperotettix viridis grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae:Melanoplinae) exhibit intra-individual variation in both mitochondrial 12S-valine-16S and nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA sequences. These findings violate core assumptions underlying DNA sequence data obtained via pol...

  20. Introduction to C. M. Scarfe Memorial: Special Section on Silicate Melts and Mantle Petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingwell, Donald B.

    1990-09-01

    In the summer of 1988 it was decided to commemorate Chris's career with a special session at an international meeting and a publication containing contributions volunteered by his former friends and associates. The 1989 Spring Meeting of the American Geophysical Union was chosen for the memorial session and the Journal of Geophysical Research was chosen for the publication of contributed scientific papers. This section would not have been possible without the active encouragement, advice, and direction provided by Bob Liebermann. I also extend my thanks to the participants and to the reviewers.

  1. Use of a simple enzymatic assay for cholesterol analysis in human bile.

    PubMed

    Fromm, H; Amin, P; Klein, H; Kupke, I

    1980-02-01

    An enzymatic technique for cholesterol analysis in serum was applied to human bile. The analytical yield was very satisfactory in experiments in which known amounts of cholesterol were added to untreated, as well as Millipore-filtered, samples of human bile. The analytical results of the enzymatic test agreed closely with those of a method utilizing the Liebermann-Burchard reaction. The enzymatic assay of cholesterol in bile proved to be sensitive and precise. In comparison to other methods of biliary cholesterol determination, it has the advantage of being rapid and simple.

  2. A steryl glycoside fraction with hemolytic activity from tubers of Momordica cochinchinensis.

    PubMed

    Ng, T B; Li, W W; Yeung, H W

    1986-10-01

    A hemolytic fraction has been obtained from fresh tubers of Momordica cochinchinensis. The fraction was strongly adsorbed on DEAE-Sepharose CL6B. It did not stain with Coomassie brilliant blue in SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and it gave no immunoprecipitin arcs in immunoelectrophoresis. The hemolytic activity of the fraction was resistant to heat and proteolytic enzymes. The behavior of the fraction in thin-layer chromatography and its positive reaction in Liebermann-Burchard test indicated that the hemolytic activity of the fraction can be attributed to a steryl glycoside(s).

  3. An Investigation of the Effects of Metallurgical and/or Testing Variables on the Acoustic Emission from Crystalline Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    676]. I. Jackson, R.C Liebermann, and A.E. Ringwood (1978) Phys. Chem. Minerals 3, 11-31. M. Shibata and K. Ono (1978a) Mater. Sci. & Eng. 34, 131-137...a power- * ful ferrite stabilizer. The composition of experimental heat 5, which was used for the work reported here, is given in Table 3. The alloy...Mn3 AI20 . Titanium an aluminium-copper-magnesium- zinc alloy. Chromium is is added as a grain refiner. After solution heat treatment added to improve

  4. Measurement of transport properties of SF6 at high temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal, A. R.; Stokes, A. D.

    1999-11-01

    The electrical and thermal conductivity and the net radiation emission of a sulfur hexafluoride plasma were measured for temperatures up to 22 500 K at 1, 4 and 8 bar. These measurements were made on wall stabilized cascade arcs of 3 and 5 mm diameter using spectroscopy. The electrical conductivity was in fair agreement with the theory but was found to be pressure dependent. The thermal conductivity k, at 1 bar pressure was in good agreement with the other experimental results of Frie and Motschmann, but was higher by a factor of three as compared to the theoretical estimates of Frost and Liebermann. At 4 and 8 bar the values of k were higher by a factor of six and eight, respectively. The high value of the thermal conductivity was attributed to the contribution of the thick radiation absorption within the arc column. These experimental measurements have shown for the first time, the strong pressure dependence of the apparent thermal conductivity. The net radiation emission u was also found to be higher, by up to a factor of two, as compared to the theoretical estimates of Liebermann and Lowke.

  5. Cholesterol oxidase-based determination, by continuous-flow analysis, of total and free cholesterol in serum.

    PubMed

    Lie, R F; Schmitz, J M; Pierre, K J; Gochman, N

    1976-10-01

    We describe a continuous-flow, automated determination of total cholesterol in serum, which is based on enzymatic hydrolysis of cholesterol esters, oxidation of cholesterol by cholesterol oxidase, and colorimetric measurement of liberated perioxide with 4-aminoantipyrine, phenol, and peroxidase. Free cholesterol is determined with the same AutoAnalyzer II manifold and reagents, except that cholesterol esterase is omitted from the reagent. Cholesterol-in-serum materials that have been assayed by an established method are used for calibration. We found this approach to be necessary because primary cholesterol standards in organic solvents are incompatible with the aqueous reagent. Results of the enzymatic total cholesterol method correlated well with those by an AutoAnalyzer II method which involves an extraction with isopropanol and the Liebermann-Burchard color reaction (total cholesterol, g/liter, yenz= 0991xlb +0.05;r=0.996). Results of the enzymatic free cholesterol procedure agreed satisfactorily with one in which free cholesterol is precipitated as the digitonide and subsequently analyzed colorimetrically with the Liebermann-Burchard reaction (free cholesterol, %, yenz = 0.982xdig -0.7;r= 0.956).

  6. [Determination of HDL-cholesterol].

    PubMed

    Herrmann, W; Schütz, C; Reuter, W

    1983-01-01

    For the clinical practice methods of the determination of HDL-cholesterol made their way which are based on the precipitation of apolipoprotein-B-containing lipoproteins and a determination of cholesterol following. The expensive methods of the ultracentrifugation serve as reference methods. The most-spread precipitation techniques (heparin/MCl2, dextran sulphate/CaCl2 or MgCl2 photungstic acid/MgCl2) are comparatively observed with regard to their effectiveness, practicability and methodical and technical conditions (influence of the concentration of the precipitation reagents, pH-value, temperature, incubation and centrifugation conditions). Results of own investigations as well as data from literature are presented to the problem of the harmonization of the cholesterol determination with the precipitation technique. According to the opinion of the authors for the enzymatic determination of cholesterol by means of the CHOD-PAP-method the phosphotungstic acid precipitation well stood the test, whereas for the chemical determination of cholesterol after Liebermann-Burchard in manual or automatized works the precipitation by means of dextran sulphate/CaCl2 (40 g/l, 2.0 mol/l) is to be recommended. The superabundant precipitations with phosphotungstic acid and dextran sulphate/MgCl2 (20 g/l, 2.0 mol/l) achieve higher results in Liebermann-Burchard's reaction likely on account of interferences.

  7. Fiddler on the tree--a bush-cricket species with unusual stridulatory organs and song.

    PubMed

    Heller, Klaus-Gerhard; Hemp, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Insects of the order Orthoptera are well-known for their acoustic communication. The structures used for this purpose show a high diversity which obviously relates to differences in song parameters and to the physics of sound production. Here we describe song and morphology of the sound producing organs of a tropical bush-cricket, Ectomoptera nepicauda, from East Africa. It has a very unusual calling song consisting of frequency-modulated, pure-tone sounds in the high ultrasonic range of 80 to 120 kHz and produced by extremely fast wing movements. Concerning morphology, it represents the most extreme state in the degree of left-right fore-wing differentiation found among Orthoptera: the acoustic parts of the left fore-wing consist exclusively of the stridulatory file, comparable in function to the bow of a violin, while the right wing carries only the plectrum ( =  string) and mirror ( =  soundbox).

  8. Bumba, a replacement name for Maraca Pérez-Miles, 2005 and Bumbalennoni, a new tarantula species from western Amazonia (Araneae, Theraphosidae, Theraphosinae).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Miles, Fernando; Bonaldo, Alexandre Bragio; Miglio, Laura Tavares

    2014-01-01

    We propose the name Bumba as a new name for Maraca, preoccupied by Maraca Hebard, 1926 (Orthoptera). We describe and illustrate Bumbalennoni, a new theraphosid species from Caxiuanã, Pará, Brazil. This species differs from the other species of the genus in the extremely reduced keel on male palpal organ and in the higher number of labial and maxillary cuspules. Females additionally differ in the spermathecal morphology. As a consequence of the name replacement, three new combinations are established.

  9. A secondary copulatory structure in a female insect: a clasp for a nuptial meal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Darryl T.

    2002-03-01

    Secondary copulatory structures are well-known in male dragonflies and spiders. Here I report a secondary copulatory organ in female ground weta, Hemiandrus pallitarsis (Ensifera, Orthoptera - crickets and allies). The organ, located on the underside of the abdomen, appears to secure the male's genitalia during the transfer of a spermatophylax nuptial meal to this location, an area quite separate from the female's primary copulatory structures, where the sperm ampulla is attached.

  10. Polarization-Sensitive Interneurons in the Optic Lobe of the Desert Ant Cataglyphis bicolor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labhart, Thomas

    Desert ants, Cataglyphis bicolor (Hymenoptera), navigate by using compass information provided by skylight polarization. In this study, electrophysiological recordings were made from polarization-sensitive interneurons (POL-neurons) in the optic lobe of Cataglyphis. The POL-neurons exhibit a characteristic polarization opponency. They receive monochromatic input from the UV receptors of the specialized dorsal rim area of the compound eye. Both polarization opponency and monochromacy are features also found in the POL-neurons of crickets (Orthoptera).

  11. Effects of Reservoir Releases on Water Quality, Macroinvertebrates, and Fish in Tailwaters: Field Study Results.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    3.14 Number of samples 10 11 V *Includes Empiciidae, Tipulidae, Tabanidae, Odonata , Hemiptera, Megaloptera, Orthoptera, Nematoda, and Hirudinea. 37...Plecoptera 0 0 25 Coleoptera 18 0 27 Odonata 86 43 156 Hydracarina 670 258 204 Oligochaeta 3,929 612 854 Hirudinea 97 2 22 Nema toda 208 74 44 Amphipoda...Hirudinea, Nematoda, and Gastropoda. Again, typical riverine species such as Trichoptera, Ephemeroptera, ..... Plecoptera, Coleoptera, Odonata , and Amphipoda

  12. A New Approach for the Control of Cockroaches Utilizing the Entomophilic Nematode DD-136 in Conjunction with Attractants.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-27

    Neoaplectana Xenorhabdue nematoohilus • • !-•—••• — Blattella germanica 20. ABSTRACT (Conllnuo on rovorto »Ido II nocotoory »no* Identity by...the German cockroach Blattella germanica , under laboratory conditions. All developmental stages, including oothecae, were tested for susceptibility...the aggregation behavior of the German cockroach, ( Blattella germanica (L.) (Orthoptera: Blattidae). The first is that aggregation serves to

  13. Interaction of mimetic analogs of insect kinin neuropeptides with arthropod receptors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Insect kinin neuropeptides share a common C-terminal pentapeptide sequence Phe1-Xaa1-2-Xaa2-3-Trp4-Gly5-NH2 (Xaa1-2 = His, Asn, Phe, Ser or Tyr; Xaa2-3 = Pro, Ser or Ala) and have been isolated from a number of insects, including species of Dictyoptera, Lepidoptera, and Orthoptera. They have been a...

  14. Distribution of Cosmic Rays in the Galaxy -- a Link to Biodiversity Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail

    2007-04-01

    The spectral analysis of fluctuations of biodiversity (Rohde & Muller, 2005) and the subsequent re-analysis of the diversity record, species origination and extinction rates, gene duplication, etc (Melott & Liebermann, 2007) indicate the presence of a 62±3My cyclicity, for the last 500My. Medvedev & Melott (2006) proposed that the cyclicity may be related to the periodicity of the Solar motion with respect to the Galactic plane, which exhibits a 63My oscillation, and the inhomogeneous distribution of Cosmic Rays (CR) throughout the Milky Way, which may affect the biosphere by changing mutation rate, climate, food chain, etc. Here we present a model of CR propagation in the Galactic magnetic fields, in the presence of both the mean field gradient and the strong MHD turbulence in the interstellar medium. We explore the ``magnetic shielding effect'' as a function of CR energy and composition and estimate the resultant flux of mutagenic secondary muons at the Earth surface.

  15. The Mineral Physics Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineral Physics Committee members for the period July 1, 1986, to J ne 30, 1988, have been announced. They are Murli H. Manghnani (Hawaii Institute of Geophysics, Honolulu), and Orson L. Anderson (University of California, Los Angeles), Thomas J. Ahrens (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif.), Subir K. Banerjee (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis), William A. Bassett (Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.), Gordon E. Brown, Jr. (Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.), Michael Brown (University of Washington, Seattle), Robert M. Hazen (Geophysical Laboratory, Washington, D.C.), Raymond F. Jeanloz (University of California, Berkeley), Robert C. Liebermann (State University of New York (SUNY),(Stony Brook), Alexandra Navrotsky (Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.), Robert N. Schock (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, Calif.), and Donald J. Weidner (SUNY Stony Brook).

  16. Cosmic Ray Variability and Galactic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail

    2007-05-01

    The spectral analysis of fluctuations of biodiversity (Rohde & Muller, 2005) and the subsequent re-analysis of the diversity record, species origination and extinction rates, gene duplication, etc (Melott & Liebermann, 2007) indicate the presence of a 62$\\pm$3My cyclicity, for the last 500My. Medvedev & Melott (2006) proposed that the cyclicity may be related to the periodicity of the Solar motion with respect to the Galactic plane, which exhibits a 63My oscillation, and the inhomogeneous distribution of Cosmic Rays (CR) throughout the Milky Way, which may affect the biosphere by changing mutation rate, climate, food chain, etc. Here we present a model of CR propagation in the Galactic magnetic fields, in the presence of both the mean field gradient and the strong MHD turbulence in the interstellar medium. We explore the "magnetic shielding effect" as a function of CR energy and composition and estimate the resultant flux of mutagenic secondary muons at the Earth surface.

  17. Contributions of other sterols to the estimation of cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Munster, D J; Lever, M; Carrell, R W

    1976-04-15

    The responses of 5alpha-cholestan-3beta-ol, 5alpha-cholest-7-ene-3beta-ol and cholesta-5,7-dien-3beta-ol, normally found in human serum, were examined by: (1) the Liebermann-Burchard reaction, (2) the Zak (ferric chloride) reaction, (3) an enzymatic cholesterol method monitored by estimating the amount of hydrogen peroxide produced, (4) an enzymatic cholesterol method monitored by observing the change in absorbance at 240 nm, and (5) gas chromatography. The results show that none of these methods is specific for cholesterol; contributions from the sterols examined range from zero to more than 150% relative to cholesterol. For the first four methods contributions depend on the conditions under which each test is performed.

  18. Characterization of the structure of a 4-methyl-delta 8,24-cholestadien-3 beta-ol isolated from rat skin.

    PubMed

    Sanghvi, A

    1970-03-01

    A new sterol has been isolated from the skin of rats treated with triparanol. Its chromatographic behavior on silicic acid-Celite columns and in gas-liquid chromatographic systems indicated it to be a 4-methyl-Delta(8,24)-cholestadien-3beta-ol. The specific rotation, the delayed color reaction with Liebermann-Burchard reagent, and the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data support the Delta(8(9))-unsaturation. Previous workers have shown that triparanol treatment results in an accumulation of Delta(24)-unsaturated sterols in animal tissues. Consonant with this observation, the infrared, NMR, and mass spectrometric data confirm the presence of a C-24(25) unsaturated side chain in this sterol.

  19. Direct determination of total serum cholesterol by use of double-wavelength spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Sommers, P B; Jatlow, P I; Seligson, D

    1975-05-01

    We describe a simple, accurate method for direct determination of total cholesterol in serum. Systematic investigation of a previously described modified Liebermann-Burchard reagent has indicated the necessity of accounting for both bilirubin interference and decreased specificity owing to exothermia. Double-wavelength spectrophotometry was used to optically null out bilirubin as an interfering factor, whereas adding serum to the cold reagent increases its specificity for the cholesterol color reaction. Comparison of 106 cholesterol values with those obtained by the procedure of Abell et al. [J. Biol. Chem. 195, 357 (1952)] yielded a correlation coefficient greater than 0.99; our inter-run coefficient of variation of polled laboratory serum was 1.7%.

  20. The composition of gallstones from geriatric patients. Methods for the determination of cholesterol and of black substances in gallstones.

    PubMed

    Uldall, A; Petri, C; Geill, T

    1976-12-01

    78 female and 31 male Danish gallstone cases found by autopsy were studied. The mass of the gallstone(s) from each patient was recorded and the stones were ground. The content of cholesterol in the mixed material from each patient was determined, using the Liebermann-Burchard reaction. The ratio Gallstone(s) ash-mass/Gallstone(s)-mass was determined, and where this ratio exceeded 0.10, calcium and phosphate determinations were carried out. Subjective description of the stones as 'mixed stones' or 'pigment stones' was substituted by visual comparison of the ground gallstones with a 'grey scale' (black was given the highest value). The values of this quantity and the ash values generally increased with a decreasing content of cholesterol. The content of cholesterol in the gallstones increased with increasing stone mass. The chemical composition of gallstones found by surgery seems to differ from that of gallstones found by autopsy.

  1. Development of laticifer cells in callus cultures of Calotropis procera (Ait.) R. Br.

    PubMed

    Dhir, S K; Shekhawat, N S; Purohit, S D; Arya, H C

    1984-10-01

    Tissue cultures were established from stem explants of Calotropis procera, a hydrocarbon yielding desert shrub on Murashige and Skoog's medium supplemented with 1.5 mg. 1(-01) 2,4-D + 0.5 mg.1(-1) kinetin and polyvinylpyrrolidone. Laticifer cells were not present in young callus but were observed after 4 weeks of callus growth when examined histochemically. These young laticifers were detected in the 5th week of culture and were distinguished from surrounding cells by the presence of characteristic cytoplasm and thin walls. A group of cells with extensive branching was developed after 8 weeks of growth of the callus cultures. These cells were thick walled and contained latex particles in coagulated masses. Positive Liebermann-Burchard test proved the presence of terpenoids in these laticifers.

  2. Biochemical and genetic aspects of nystatin resistance in saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bard, M

    1972-09-01

    Two phenotypically distinct sets of nystatin-resistant mutants were investigated. One set is resistant, respiratory competent, and requires no lipid for growth. The other set is more resistant, respiratory deficient, and lipid requiring (unsaturated fatty acid or sterol). Both sets show altered sterol composition as demonstrated by the Liebermann-Burchard colorimetric reaction, ultraviolet spectrophotometry, and gas-liquid chromatography. Genetic analysis indicates that all nystatin-resistant mutants can be placed into one of six distinct genetic groups. The phenotype's nystatin resistance, lipid requirement, and respiratory deficiency are recessive. There was one case of allelism for mutants from different sets. Revertants of mutants which have the tripartite phenotype retain a residual level of nystatin resistance, but they are no longer lipid requiring or respiratory deficient. Growth studies in mutants which have the tripartite phenotype reveal that the addition of ergosterol to the growth medium results in decreased resistance to nystatin.

  3. [Diagnostic importance of HDL cholesterol determination].

    PubMed

    Reissner, J; Herrmann, W

    1990-01-01

    The present paper describes the sensitivity to quantification of changes of HDL-cholesterol in serum by two different precipitation and analytical techniques during the treatment of patients. After the precipitation of VLDL and LDL by phosphotungstic acid/magnesium chloride the chemical determination of HDL-cholesterol in serum with the Liebermann-Burchard reaction yields different results in comparison to enzymatic HDL-cholesterol determined in serum supernatant after the precipitation by polyethylene glycol 20.000. Correlation analyses of apolipoprotein A-I with enzymatic HDL-, HDL2-, HDL3-cholesterol or electrophoretic alpha-cholesterol demonstrate that the therapeutically induced changes (by training and diet) of lipid composition are more correctly reflected by the enzymatic determination of HDL-cholesterol after serum precipitation by polyethylene glycol.

  4. Biochemical and Genetic Aspects of Nystatin Resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Bard, Martin

    1972-01-01

    Two phenotypically distinct sets of nystatin-resistant mutants were investigated. One set is resistant, respiratory competent, and requires no lipid for growth. The other set is more resistant, respiratory deficient, and lipid requiring (unsaturated fatty acid or sterol). Both sets show altered sterol composition as demonstrated by the Liebermann-Burchard colorimetric reaction, ultraviolet spectrophotometry, and gas-liquid chromatography. Genetic analysis indicates that all nystatin-resistant mutants can be placed into one of six distinct genetic groups. The phenotype's nystatin resistance, lipid requirement, and respiratory deficiency are recessive. There was one case of allelism for mutants from different sets. Revertants of mutants which have the tripartite phenotype retain a residual level of nystatin resistance, but they are no longer lipid requiring or respiratory deficient. Growth studies in mutants which have the tripartite phenotype reveal that the addition of ergosterol to the growth medium results in decreased resistance to nystatin. PMID:4559817

  5. Normal development, oncogenesis and programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Liebermann, D A

    1998-09-10

    Meeting's Report -- June 2, 1998, Sugarload Estate Conference Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. A symposium on Normal Development, Oncogenesis and Programmed Cell Death, was held at the Sugarload Estate Conference Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA sponsored by the Fels Cancer Institute, Temple University School of Medicine, with the support of the Alliance Pharmaceutical Corporation. The symposium was organized by Drs Dan A Liebermann and Barbara Hoffman at the Fels. Invited speakers included: Dr Andrei V Gudkov (University of Illinois) who started the symposium talking about 'New cellular factors modulating the tumor suppressor function of p53'; Dr Yuri Lazebnik (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories) spoke about 'Caspases considered as enemies within'; Dr E Premkumar Reddy (Fels Institute, Temple University) talked about recent exciting findings in his laboratory regarding 'JAK-STATs dedicated signaling pathways'; Dr Michael Greenberg (Harvard University) spoke about 'Signal transduction pathways that regulate differentiation and survival in the developing nervous system'; Dr Richard Kolesnick's (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center) talk has been focused at 'Stress signals for apoptosis, including Ceramide and c-Jun Kinase/Stress-activated Protein Kinase'; Dr Barbara Hoffman (Fels Institute, Temple University) described research, conducted in collaboration with Dr Dan A Liebermann, aimed at deciphering the roles of 'myc, myb, and E2F as negative regulators of terminal differentiation', using hematopoietic cells as model system. Dr Daniel G Tenen (Harvard Medical School), described studies aimed at understanding the 'Regulation of hematopoietic cell development by lineage specific transcription regulators'. Dr George C Prendergast (The Wistar Institute) talked about the 'Myc-Bin1 signaling pathway in cell death and differentiation. Dr Ruth J Muschel (University of Pennsylvania) spoke about work, conducted in collaboration with Dr WG McKenna, aimed at

  6. True katydids (Pseudophyllinae) from Guadeloupe: acoustic signals and functional considerations of song production.

    PubMed

    Stumpner, Andreas; Dann, Angela; Schink, Matthias; Gubert, Silvia; Hugel, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    Guadeloupe, the largest of the Leeward Islands, harbors three species of Pseudophyllinae (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) belonging to distinct tribes. This study examined the basic aspects of sound production and acousto-vibratory behavior of these species. As the songs of many Pseudophyllinae are complex and peak at high frequencies, they require high quality recordings. Wild specimens were therefore recorded ex situ. Collected specimens were used in structure-function experiments. Karukerana aguilari Bonfils (Pterophyllini) is a large species with a mirror in each tegmen and conspicuous folds over the mirror. It sings 4-6 syllables, each comprising 10-20 pulses, with several peaks in the frequency spectrum between 4 and 20 kHz. The song is among the loudest in Orthoptera (> 125 dB SPL in 10 cm distance). The folds are protective and have no function in song production. Both mirrors may work independently in sound radiation. Nesonotus reticulatus (Fabricius) (Cocconotini) produces verses from two syllables at irregular intervals. The song peaks around 20 kHz. While singing, the males often produce a tremulation signal with the abdomen at about 8-10 Hz. To our knowledge, it is the first record of simultaneous calling song and tremulation in Orthoptera. Other males reply to the tremulation with their own tremulation. Xerophyllopteryx fumosa (Brunner von Wattenwyl) (Pleminiini) is a large, bark-like species, producing a syllable of around 20 pulses. The syllables are produced with irregular rhythms (often two with shorter intervals). The song peaks around 2-3 kHz and 10 kHz. The hind wings are relatively thick and are held between the half opened tegmina during singing. Removal of the hind wings reduces song intensity by about 5 dB, especially of the low frequency component, suggesting that the hind wings have a role in amplifying the song.

  7. The complete mitochondrial genomes of two band-winged grasshoppers, Gastrimargus marmoratus and Oedaleus asiaticus

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chuan; Liu, Chunxiang; Yang, Pengcheng; Kang, Le

    2009-01-01

    Background The two closely related species of band-winged grasshoppers, Gastrimargus marmoratus and Oedaleus asiaticus, display significant differences in distribution, biological characteristics and habitat preferences. They are so similar to their respective congeneric species that it is difficult to differentiate them from other species within each genus. Hoppers of the two species have quite similar morphologies to that of Locusta migratoria, hence causing confusion in species identification. Thus we determined and compared the mitochondrial genomes of G. marmoratus and O. asiaticus to address these questions. Results The complete mitochondrial genomes of G. marmoratus and O. asiaticus are 15,924 bp and 16,259 bp in size, respectively, with O. asiaticus being the largest among all known mitochondrial genomes in Orthoptera. Both mitochondrial genomes contain a standard set of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and an A+T-rich region in the same order as those of the other analysed caeliferan species, but different from those of the ensiferan species by the rearrangement of trnD and trnK. The putative initiation codon for the cox1 gene in the two species is ATC. The presence of different sized tandem repeats in the A+T-rich region leads to size variation between their mitochondrial genomes. Except for nad2, nad4L, and nad6, most of the caeliferan mtDNA genes exhibit low levels of divergence. In phylogenetic analyses, the species from the suborder Caelifera form a monophyletic group, as is the case for the Ensifera. Furthermore, the two suborders cluster as sister groups, supporting the monophyly of Orthoptera. Conclusion The mitochondrial genomes of both G. marmoratus and O. asiaticus harbor the typical 37 genes and an A+T-rich region, exhibiting similar characters to those of other grasshopper species. Characterization of the two mitochondrial genomes has enriched our knowledge on mitochondrial genomes of Orthoptera. PMID

  8. The complete mitochondrial genomes of two band-winged grasshoppers, Gastrimargus marmoratus and Oedaleus asiaticus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chuan; Liu, Chunxiang; Yang, Pengcheng; Kang, Le

    2009-04-10

    The two closely related species of band-winged grasshoppers, Gastrimargus marmoratus and Oedaleus asiaticus, display significant differences in distribution, biological characteristics and habitat preferences. They are so similar to their respective congeneric species that it is difficult to differentiate them from other species within each genus. Hoppers of the two species have quite similar morphologies to that of Locusta migratoria, hence causing confusion in species identification. Thus we determined and compared the mitochondrial genomes of G. marmoratus and O. asiaticus to address these questions. The complete mitochondrial genomes of G. marmoratus and O. asiaticus are 15,924 bp and 16,259 bp in size, respectively, with O. asiaticus being the largest among all known mitochondrial genomes in Orthoptera. Both mitochondrial genomes contain a standard set of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and an A+T-rich region in the same order as those of the other analysed caeliferan species, but different from those of the ensiferan species by the rearrangement of trnD and trnK. The putative initiation codon for the cox1 gene in the two species is ATC. The presence of different sized tandem repeats in the A+T-rich region leads to size variation between their mitochondrial genomes. Except for nad2, nad4L, and nad6, most of the caeliferan mtDNA genes exhibit low levels of divergence. In phylogenetic analyses, the species from the suborder Caelifera form a monophyletic group, as is the case for the Ensifera. Furthermore, the two suborders cluster as sister groups, supporting the monophyly of Orthoptera. The mitochondrial genomes of both G. marmoratus and O. asiaticus harbor the typical 37 genes and an A+T-rich region, exhibiting similar characters to those of other grasshopper species. Characterization of the two mitochondrial genomes has enriched our knowledge on mitochondrial genomes of Orthoptera.

  9. Application of chiral gas chromatography with electroantennographic detection to the determination of the stereochemistry of a cockroach sex pheromone.

    PubMed

    Leal, W S; Shi, X; Liang, D; Schal, C; Meinwald, J

    1995-02-14

    The coupling of an electroantennographic detector to a chiral capillary gas chromatographic system provides a highly sensitive technique for the determination of pheromone stereochemistry. Electronic modification of the usual electroantennographic detector enables the detector to respond to the relatively broad peaks produced by chiral gas chromatographic systems. By using this methodology, supellapyrone, a female sex pheromone of the brownbanded cockroach Supella longipalpa (Orthoptera: Blattellidae), is shown to be 5-(2'R,4'R-dimethylheptanyl)-3-methyl-2H-pyran-2-one.

  10. Application of chiral gas chromatography with electroantennographic detection to the determination of the stereochemistry of a cockroach sex pheromone.

    PubMed Central

    Leal, W S; Shi, X; Liang, D; Schal, C; Meinwald, J

    1995-01-01

    The coupling of an electroantennographic detector to a chiral capillary gas chromatographic system provides a highly sensitive technique for the determination of pheromone stereochemistry. Electronic modification of the usual electroantennographic detector enables the detector to respond to the relatively broad peaks produced by chiral gas chromatographic systems. By using this methodology, supellapyrone, a female sex pheromone of the brownbanded cockroach Supella longipalpa (Orthoptera: Blattellidae), is shown to be 5-(2'R,4'R-dimethylheptanyl)-3-methyl-2H-pyran-2-one. PMID:7862628

  11. Bumba, a replacement name for Maraca Pérez-Miles, 2005 and Bumba lennoni, a new tarantula species from western Amazonia (Araneae, Theraphosidae, Theraphosinae)

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Miles, Fernando; Bonaldo, Alexandre Bragio; Miglio, Laura Tavares

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We propose the name Bumba as a new name for Maraca, preoccupied by Maraca Hebard, 1926 (Orthoptera). We describe and illustrate Bumba lennoni, a new theraphosid species from Caxiuanã, Pará, Brazil. This species differs from the other species of the genus in the extremely reduced keel on male palpal organ and in the higher number of labial and maxillary cuspules. Females additionally differ in the spermathecal morphology. As a consequence of the name replacement, three new combinations are established. PMID:25408606

  12. Organophosphate residues in grasshoppers from sprayed rangelands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stromborg, K.L.; McEwen, L.C.; Lamont, Thair

    1984-01-01

    Grasshoppers (Orthoptera) were collected in pastures that had been sprayed with malathion and acephate to estimate the secondary exposure of insectivorous birds to these pesticides. Residues of malathion were below 3 ppm at 30 'and 54 hours after spraying and no malaoxon was detected. In contrast, acephate was found at 8 and 9 ppm 4 hours after spray; 3-5 ppm of the toxic metabolite methamidophos were also detected at that time. By 53 hours postspray, acephate levels declined to 2 ppm and methamidophos to less than 1 ppm. These results suggest that although malathion may not be a hazard to insectivorous species. acephate may be hazardous through metabolic transformation to methamidophos.

  13. Total and monomethyl mercury in terrestrial arthropods from the central California coast.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Cruz; Weiss-Penzias, Peter S; Fork, Susanne; Flegal, A Russell

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this project was to obtain a baseline understanding and investigate the concentration of mercury (Hg) in the tissue of terrestrial arthropods. The 4-month sampling campaign took place around Monterey Bay, California. Total mercury (HgT) concentrations (x ± SD, dry weight) for the captured specimens ranged from 22 to 188 ng g(-1) in the Jerusalem crickets (Orthoptera: Stenopelmatidae); 65-233 ng g(-1) in the camel crickets (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae); 25-227 ng g(-1) in the pill bugs (Isopoda: Armadillidiidae); 19-563 ng g(-1) in the ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae); 140-441 ng g(-1) in the variegated meadowhawk dragonflies (Odonata: Libellulidae); 607-657 ng g(-1) in the pacific spiketail dragonflies (Odonata: Cordulegastridae); and 81-1,249 ng g(-1) in the wolf spiders (Araneae: Lycosidae). A subset of samples analyzed for monomethyl mercury (MMHg) suggest detrital pill bugs have a higher MMHg/HgT ratio than predatory ground beetles.

  14. Prospecting for cellulolytic activity in insect digestive fluids.

    PubMed

    Oppert, Cris; Klingeman, William E; Willis, Jonathan D; Oppert, Brenda; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan L

    2010-02-01

    Efficient cellulolytic enzymes are needed to degrade recalcitrant plant biomass during ethanol purification and make lignocellulosic biofuels a cost-effective alternative to fossil fuels. Despite the large number of insect species that feed on lignocellulosic material, limited availability of quantitative studies comparing cellulase activity among insect taxa constrains identification of candidate species for more targeted identification of effective cellulolytic systems. We describe quantitative determinations of the cellulolytic activity in gut or head-derived fluids from 68 phytophagous or xylophagous insect species belonging to eight different taxonomic orders. Enzymatic activity was determined for two different substrates, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), approximating endo-beta-1,4-glucanase and complete cellulolytic activity, respectively. Highest CMC gut fluid activities were found in Dictyoptera, Coleoptera, Isoptera, and Orthoptera, while highest MCC gut fluid activities were found in Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera, and Orthoptera. In most cases, gut fluid activities were greater with CMC compared to MCC substrate, except in Diptera, Hymenoptera, and Lepidoptera. In contrast, cellulolytic activity levels in most head fluids were greater on the MCC substrate. Our data suggests that a phylogenetic relationship may exist for the origin of cellulolytic enzymes in insects, and that cellulase activity levels correlate with taxonomic classification, probably reflecting differences in plant host or feeding strategies.

  15. Biological inventory of anchialine pools in the Pu'uhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park and Pu'ukoholā Heiau National Historical Site, Hawaii Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tango, Lori K.; Foote, David; Magnacca, Karl N.; Foltz, Sarah J.; Cutler, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    Inventories for major groups of invertebrates were completed at anchialine pool complexes in Pu‘uhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park (PUHO) and Pu‘ukoholā Heiau National Historic Site (PUHE) on the island of Hawai‘i. Nine pools within two pool complexes were surveyed at PUHO, along with one extensive pool at the terminus of Makeāhua Gulch at PUHE. At both parks, inventories documented previously unreported diversity, with pool complexes at PUHO exhibiting greater species richness for most taxa than the pool at PUHE. Inventories at PUHO recorded five species of molluscs, four species of crustaceans (including the candidate endangered shrimp Metabetaeus lohena), two species of Orthoptera, four species of Odonata (including the candidate endangered damselfly Megalagrion xanthomelas), fourteen species of Diptera, nine taxa of plankton, and thirteen species of ants; inventories at the PUHE pool produced only one species of mollusc, two species of crustacean, at least one species of Orthoptera, four species of Odonata, thirty species of Diptera, five taxa of plankton, and four species of ants. Further survey work may be necessary to document the full diversity of pool fauna, especially in species-rich groups like the Diptera. Inventory data will be used to generate a network wide database of species presence and distribution, and will aid in developing management plans for anchialine pool resources.

  16. Mouthparts and nectar feeding of the flower visiting cricket Glomeremus orchidophilus (Gryllacrididae).

    PubMed

    Krenn, Harald W; Fournel, Jacques; Bauder, Julia A-S; Hugel, Sylvain

    2016-05-01

    Glomeremus orchidophilus (Gryllacrididae) is a flower visiting cricket on the tropical island La Réunion. This species is the only Orthoptera shown to be a pollinator of a plant. We studied its nectar feeding behavior and mouthpart morphology in detail. Since G. orchidophilus possesses biting-and-chewing mouthparts, our objective was to find behavioral and/or structural specializations for nectar-feeding. The comparative analysis of feeding behavior revealed that fluid is taken up without movements of the mouthparts in Glomeremus. A comparative morphological examination of two Glomeremus species, together with several representatives of other Gryllacrididae and other Ensifera taxa revealed subtle adaptations to fluid feeding in Glomeremus. All representatives of Gryllacrididae were found to possess a distinct patch of microtrichia at the tip of their galeae. However, in Glomeremus a channel is formed between the distal components of the maxillae and the mandibles on each side of the body. Micro-CT and SEM examination revealed a longitudinal groove that extends over the galea beginning at the patch of microtrichia in the studied Glomeremus species. We hypothesize that the microtrichia take up fluid by capillarity and the action of the cibarium and pharyngeal pumps transports fluid along the channels between the maxillae and mandibles into the preoral cavity. These mouthpart features allow nectar uptake from flowers that is unique in Orthoptera. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative Isoenzyme Electrophoreses between the Brown-Spotted Locust, Cyrtacanthacris tatarica, and the Desert Locust, Schistocerca gregaria

    PubMed Central

    Elsayed, G.; Amer, S. A. M.

    2014-01-01

    The desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria (Forskål) (Orthoptera: Acrididae), and the brownspotted locust, Cyrtacanthacris tatarica (Linné) (Orthoptera: Acrididae), were collected from Saudi Arabia to investigate their relationships. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoreses of five arbitrarily chosen metabolic enzymes extracted from the leg muscles of the two locust taxa were conducted. These enzymes were acid phosphatase (Acph), alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh), β esterase (β est), malic enzyme (Mal) and malate dehydrogenase (Mdh). Twenty presumptive gene loci and 26 polymorphic alleles were recorded. Acph did not discriminate between the two locust species, while the other four isoenzymes discriminated between them. Most of the alleles were monomeric, but Mal and Mdh exhibited dimeric alleles in the samples of C. tatarica. β est fractions were more expressed in C. tatarica, and the three enzymes β est, Mal, and Mdh discriminated clearly between the two species. The similarity coefficient that was calculated according to the number of sharing alleles between the two locusts was found to be 0.69. The isoenzyme variation presented herein seemed to reflect either their physiological adaptation or the taxonomic consequences between the two taxa. Collecting more isoenzymes for more samples could have taxonomic value. PMID:25373167

  18. Entomopathogens of Amazonian stick insects and locusts are members of the Beauveria species complex (Cordyceps sensu stricto).

    PubMed

    Sanjuan, Tatiana; Tabima, Javier; Restrepo, Silvia; Læssøe, Thomas; Spatafora, Joseph W; Franco-Molano, Ana Esperanza

    2014-01-01

    In the Amazon the only described species of Cordyceps sensu stricto (Hypocreales, Cordycipitaceae) that parasitize insects of Orthopterida (orders Orthoptera and Phasmida) are Cordyceps locustiphila and C. uleana. However, the type specimens for both taxa have been lost and the concepts of these species are uncertain. To achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the systematics of these species, collections of Cordyceps from the Amazon regions of Colombia, Ecuador and Guyana were subjected to morphological, ecological and molecular phylogenetic studies. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted on partial sequences of SSU, LSU, TEF, RPB1 and RPB2 nuclear loci. Two new species are proposed including C. diapheromeriphila, a parasite of Phasmida, and C. acridophila, a parasite of the superfamily Acridomorpha (Orthoptera), which is broadly distributed across the Amazon. For C. locustiphila a lectotypification and an epitypification are made. Cordyceps locustiphila is host specific with Colpolopha (Acridomorpha: Romaleidae), and its distribution coincides with that of its host. The phylogenetic placement of these three species was resolved with strong support in the Beauveria clade of Cordyceps s. str. (Cordycipitaceae). This relationship and the morphological similarity of their yellow stromata with known teleomorphs of the clade, suggest that the holomorphs of these species may include Beauveria or Beauveria-like anamorphs. The varying host specificity of the beauverioid Cordyceps species suggest the potential importance of identifying the natural host taxon before future consideration of strains for use in biological control of pest locusts.

  19. Head capsule, chephalic central nervous system and head circulatory system of an aberrant orthopteran, Prosarthria teretrirostris (Caelifera, Hexapoda).

    PubMed

    Baum, Eileen; Hertel, Wieland; Beutel, Rolf Georg

    2007-01-01

    The head capsule, the circulatory system and the central nervous system of the head of Prosarthria teretrirostris (Proscopiidae) is described in detail, with special consideration of modifications resulting from the aberrant head shape. The transformations of the head are completely different from those found in phasmatodeans, which are also characterised by twig mimesis. The circulatory system is distinctly modified. A hitherto undescribed additional structure in the posterior head region very likely functions as a pulsatile organ. The cephalic central nervous system is strongly elongated, with changes in the position of the suboesophageal ganglion, the corpora cardiaca and the course of the nervus mandibularis. Three-dimensional reconstructions of these two organ systems in combination with the pharynx were made using Alias Maya 6.0 software. Comparisons with other representatives of Caelifera suggest a clade comprising Proscopiidae and Morabinae. The presence of a transverse muscle connecting the antennal ampullae in Prosarthria shows that this structure likely belongs to the groundplan of Orthoptera, even though it is missing in different representatives of this group. The transverse ampullary muscle is a potential synapomorphy of Orthoptera, Phasmatodea and Dictyoptera.

  20. A genes eye view of ontogeny: de novo assembly and profiling of the Gryllus rubens transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Berdan, Emma L; Blankers, Thomas; Waurick, Isabelle; Mazzoni, Camila J; Mayer, Frieder

    2016-11-01

    Crickets (Orthoptera:Gryllidae) are widely used model organisms for developmental, evolutionary, neurobiological and behavioural research. Here, we developed a de novo transcriptome from pooled RNA-seq Illumina data spanning seven stages in the life cycle of Gryllus rubens. Approximately 705 Mbp of data was assembled and filtered to form 27 312 transcripts. We were able to annotate 52% of our transcripts using BLAST and assign at least one gene ontology term to 41%. Pooled samples from three different ontogenetic stages were used for transcriptomic profiling revealing patterns of differential gene expression that highlight processes in the different life stages. Embryonic and early instar development was enriched for ecdysteroid metabolism, cytochrome P450s and glutathione production. Late instar development was enriched for regulation of gene expression and many of the genes highly expressed during this stage were involved in conserved developmental signalling pathways suggesting that these developmental pathways are active beyond embryonic development. Adults were enriched for fat transport (mostly relating to egg production) and production of octopamine, an important neurohormone. We also identified genes involved in conserved developmental pathways (Hedgehog, Hippo, Wnt, JAK/STAT, TGF-beta, Notch, and MEK/ERK). This is the first transcriptome spanning ontogeny in Gryllus rubens and a valuable resource for future work on development and evolution in Orthoptera. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Synchrotron Studies Under Extreme Conditions: Tackling the Multi-Phase with the Multi-Anvil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, M. L.; Chen, H.; Vaughan, M. T.; Weidner, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the properties and behaviors of materials and multi-phase aggregates under conditions of high pressure and temperature are vital to unraveling the mysteries that lie beneath the surface of the planet. Advances in in situ experimental techniques utilizing synchrotron radiation at these extreme conditions have helped to provide answers to many fundamental questions that were previously unattainable. In particular, the Multi-Anvil apparatus has proven to be an invaluable tool for studying the morphological characteristics and physical properties of materials under extreme conditions as a function of pressure, temperature, stress, strain, and time. Moreover, the science is still continuing to evolve, and we have begun to step outside the realm of the static into the study of dynamic processes and their real-time responses to changes in the aforementioned variables, and even to the frequency and rate of these changes. This presentation will discuss the evolution and present state of the art in synchrotron-based multi-anvil techniques at the COMPRES-funded X17MAC Facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source, of which Professor R.C. Liebermann has been an integral player during his scientific career, and particularly during his tenure as President of COMPRES.

  2. Role of the ion plasma frequency in RF sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waelbroeck, F. L.; Hazeltine, R. D.; Xiang, N.

    1999-11-01

    Semiconductor etching relies on rf biasing of the substrate to produce a suitable distribution of energetic ions. The properties of the resulting oscillating sheath depend on two parameters: the ratio of the bias amplitude to the electron temperature, and the ratio of the ion plasma frequency to the rf frequency. In industrial applications, V_rf>> T_e, and nonlinear effects are important. For such large bias the dynamics of the oscillating sheath can be divided into three regimes according to the ratio of the rf frequency to the plasma frequency at the entrance of the sheath and that at the surface of the substrate. Liebermann has given an analytic solution in the high frequency regime. With the increase in plasma density, however, the ion plasma frequency often exceeds the standard rf frequency of 13.56 KHz. We present an analytic solution for the sheath dynamics in the opposite, low-frequency regime. We compare the two regimes, giving particular attention to the distribution of ion energy at the substrate.

  3. Nonadiabatic effects in the lowest 0+(3P) ion-pair states of CIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokh, Daria B.; Li, Yan; Buenker, Robert J.; Alekseyev, Aleksey B.; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter; Alekseev, Vadim A.

    2001-02-01

    Nonadiabatic calculations of vibrational energies and wave functions are carried out for the E(0+, 3P2) and f(0+, 3P0) ion-pair states of the ClF molecule. It is shown that strong radial coupling between these 0+ states is caused by a significant variation of their 3Σ- and 3Π Λ-S contributions with internuclear distance and results in vibrational energy shifts as well as changes in the corresponding adiabatic vibrational wave functions. Both resonance and nonresonance interactions between vibronic levels of these two adiabatic states are found to be important, but significant mixing of the adiabatic wave functions can occur only for the nearly resonant levels located around f,v=3; E,v=7 and f,v=8; E,v=13. Nonadiabatic interactions are found to be responsible for the appearance of long-wavelength maxima in the f,v=3,4 emission spectra that was the subject of the discrepancy between theoretical and experimental data discussed in the previous paper [A. B. Alekseyev, H.-P. Liebermann, R. J. Buenker, and D. B. Kokh, J. Chem. Phys. 112, 2274 (2000)]. Inclusion of nonadiabatic effects leads to notably better agreement between the calculated and measured bound-free emission spectra.

  4. First-principles calculations of high-pressure and -temperature properties of stishovite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, R.; Wu, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Quartz is one of the main gradient of the crust and is transformed into coesite and then stishovite under pressure. Stishovite is stable at 9~50GPa [1,2]. It is estimated that stishovite makes up more than 20% of the subducted oceanic crust in the mantle transition zone and lower mantle [3,4,5]. Therefore, the properties of stishovite under high-pressure and -temperature are very critical for us to understand the mantle convection. We investigated themodynamic properties of stishovite by combing first-principles calculations with quasi-hamonic approximation. We also calculated the elastic constants of stishovite at high-temperature and -pressure using the new method developed by Wu and Wentzcovitch [6]. The calculated results are in consistence with the experimental data. Both temperature and pressure significantly affect the anistropy of the stishovite. 1, Zhang, J., Li, B., Utsumi, W., Liebermann, R. C., Phys. Chem. Miner., 23, 1-10 (1996) 2, Kingma, K. J., R. E. Cohen, R. J. Hemley, and H. K. Mao, Nature, 374, 243-245 (1995). 3. Kesson, S. E., Fitz Gerald, J. D. Shelley, J. M. G., Nature, 372,767-769 (1994) 4, Ono, S., Ito, E., Katsura, T., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 190, 57-63 (2001) 5, Irifue, T., Ringwood, A. E., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 117, 101-110 (1993) 6, Wu, Z., Wentzcovitch, R. M., Phys. Rev. B 83, 184115 (2011)

  5. Elasticity of single-crystal SmAlO 3, GdAlO 3 and ScAlO 3 perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Jay D.

    1984-12-01

    The adiabatic single-crystal elastic moduli of SmAlO 3, GdAlO 3 and ScAlO 3, all with the orthorhombic perovskite structure, have been measured by Brillouin spectroscopy under ambient conditions. These 3 compounds display various degrees of crystallographic distortion from the ideal cubic perovskite structure. We find that longitudinal moduli in directions parallel to the axes of a pseudocubic subcell are nearly equal and insensitive to distortions of the crystal structure from cubic symmetry, whereas, the moduli C 11 and C 22, parallel to the orthorhombic axes, display pronounced anisotropy with the exception of ScAlO 3. The shear moduli also correlate with distortion from cubic symmetry, as measured by rotation, or tilt angles, of the AlO 6 octahedra. Our data support the observations of Liebermann et al. that perovskite-structure compounds define consistent elasticity trends relating bulk modulus and molar volume, and sound speed and mean atomic weight. These relationships have been used to estimate bulk and shear moduli for the high-pressure polymorphs of CaSiO 3 and MgSiO 3 with the perovskite structure.

  6. On Poisson's ratio and composition of the Earth's lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, J. P.

    1987-07-01

    Poisson's ratio of the lower mantle, calculated from recently published values of seismic wave velocities and extrapolated to atmospheric pressure and room temperature is found to be in the range 0.23 ⩽ ν ⩽ 0.25. These values are compared with the values of Poisson's ratio calculated for binary mixtures of MgSiO 3 perovskite and magnesiowüstite with various iron contents. Current values of the experimental error on measured elastic moduli give little hope to be able to discriminate between pyrolite and chondritic lower mantles: both are acceptable if the shear modulus of perovskite is in the upper range of Liebermann et al. estimates. A similar calculation using the seismic parameter φ confirms the results obtained by considering Poisson's ratio and further constrains the value of the shear modulus of perovskite to lie between 1600 and 1700 kilobars for current mantle models to remain plausible. Chemical stratification of the mantle is, therefore, possible but not required by seismological data.

  7. Slow Collisions of Si3+ with Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, D. C.; Gu, J.-P.; Saha, B. C.; Liebermann, H. P.; Funke, P.; Buenker, R. J.

    2010-03-01

    Low energy electron capture from hydrogen atom by multi-charged ions continues to be of interest and applications include both magnetically confined fusion and astrophysical plasmas. The charge exchange process reported here, Si^3+ + H -> Si^2+ + H^+ is an important destruction mechanism of Si^3+ in photo-ionized gas. The soft X-ray emission from comets has been explained by charge transfer of solar wind ions, among them Si^3+, with neutrals in the cometary gas vapor. The state selective cross sections are evaluated using the full quantum [1] and semi-classical molecular orbital close coupling (MOCC) [2] methods. Adiabatic potentials and wave functions for a number of low-lying singlet and triplet states of and symmetry are calculated wing the MRD-CI package [3]. Details will be presented at the conference. [4pt] [1] L. B. Zhao, D. C. Joseph, B. C. Saha, H. P. Liebermann, P. Funke and R. J. Buenker, Phys. Rev A, 79, 034701 (1009).[0pt] [2] M. Kimura and N. F. Lane, At. Mol. Opt. Phys 26, 79 (1990).[0pt] [3] R. J. Buenker, ``Current Aspects of Quantum Chemistry 1981, Vol 21, edited by R. Carbo (Elsevier, Amsterdam) p 17.

  8. A colorimetric assay for 7-dehydrocholesterol with potential application to screening for Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Quanbo; Ruan, Benfang; Whitby, Frank G; Tuohy, Richard P; Belanger, Thomas L; Kelley, Richard I; Wilson, William K; Schroepfer, George J

    2002-05-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS; MIM 270400) is a genetic disorder characterized by hypocholesterolemia and elevated 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DHC) levels resulting from mutations affecting 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase. We describe a colorimetric assay for 7DHC with potential application to large-scale screening for SLOS. Reaction of 7DHC and its esters with the Liebermann-Burchard reagent resulted in a brief initial absorbance at 510 nm (pink color) followed by an absorbance at 620 nm (blue color) after 2 min, while cholesterol samples were essentially colorless. The assay could identify typical SLOS blood samples by their pink color and increased absorbance at 620 nm after 2 min. Colorimetric identification of mild SLOS cases requires monitoring of the transient absorbance at 510 nm, which must be detected immediately after rapid, consistent mixing of the reagents. The need for special mixing devices and rigorous validation precludes sporadic use of the assay for diagnosing suspected SLOS cases. We also studied the stability of 7DHC in dried SLOS blood spots on Guthrie cards, which are widely used for archiving neonatal blood. Decomposition of 7DHC was effectively retarded by storage at low temperature and by precoating of the cards with antioxidants. The combined results provide a foundation for development of a simple, automated test for SLOS screening.

  9. An ultrastructural and biochemical study of the effects of three inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis upon murine adrenal gland and testis. Histochemical evidence for a lysosome response.

    PubMed

    Dietert, S E; Scallen, T J

    1969-01-01

    Triparanol and 20,25-diazacholesterol inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis and result in the accumulation of desmosterol. AY-9944, another inhibitor, produces an accumulation of 7-dehydrocholesterol. Adult male C3H mice receive one of these drugs intraperitoneally. Livers, adrenal glands, and testes from each drug group are excised, and portions of each are analyzed by a modified Liebermann-Burchard reaction for quantitation of sterols. Adrenals and testes are examined also by electron microscopy. Fine-structural localization of acid phosphatase has been studied in triparanol-treated adrenal glands. Biochemical analysis reveals that 14-64% of the sterols occurs as desmosterol or 7-dehydrocholesterol. Fine-structural alterations in the adrenal glands and testes from each drug group are essentially identical. The predominant cytological feature is the occurrence of increased numbers of pleomorphic, unit-membrane-limited, electron-opaque, cytoplasmic inclusions. Hence, the cellular modifications following triparanol administration are not unique, as has been suggested. They represent a generalized phenomenon, probably related to inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis, which is an effect common to each drug. Lead phosphate reaction product (indicating acid phosphatase activity) is demonstrable within these membrane-limited cytoplasmic bodies, identifying them as morphological lysosomes. The utilization of a lysosomal mechanism in sterol-synthesizing cells, which are accumulating cholesterol intermediates, is discussed.

  10. HDL cholesterol quantitation by phosphotungstate-Mg2+ and by dextran sulfate-Mn2+-polyethylene glycol precipitation, both with enzymic cholesterol assay compared with the lipid research method.

    PubMed

    Warnick, G R; Mayfield, C; Benderson, J; Chen, J S; Albers, J J

    1982-11-01

    Two methods using commercial kits for high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol quantitation were compared with the Lipid Research Clinics (LRC) procedures. HDL cholesterol quantitations on 50 patient specimens by the Lancer HDL cholesterol Rapid Stat Kit (Lancer) with phosphotungstate-Mg2+ precipitation and enzymic cholesterol assay averaged 424 mg/L, and by a method with dextran sulfate-Mn2+-polyethylene glycol (dextran sulfate) precipitation and enzymic cholesterol assay averaged 474 mg/L. By comparison, the LRC method (heparin-Mn2+ precipitation combined with a Liebermann-Burchard reagent cholesterol assay) averaged 478 mg/L. Supernates obtained by the three precipitation methods had similar cholesterol values when analyzed by the LRC assay, suggesting that the observed differences were primarily due to differences between the cholesterol assays. Results were consistent with underestimation by the enzymic assay of cholesterol in the supernates, offset by a positive interference of Mn2+ in the dextran sulfate-produced supernates. Among-day CVs of 4-5% were observed for the Lancer method, and 6-7% for the dextran sulfate method. Sedimentation of precipitates in hypertriglyceridemic specimens was excellent by both methods.

  11. Isolation of phytosterols and antihyperlipidemic activity of Lagenaria siceraria.

    PubMed

    Kalsait, Ravi P; Khedekar, Pramod B; Saoji, Ashok N; Bhusari, Kishor P

    2011-10-01

    Lagenaria siceraria (Molina) Standl in the Cucurbitaceae family is a large, pubescent, climbing, or trailing herb cultivated throughout India and the tropical regions of the world. Phytochemical investigation of the methanol extract obtained from the fruits of the plant L. siceraria showed a positive Liebermann-Burchard test for sterols. The white sterol crystals or phytosterols from the methanol extract were isolated for the first time and identified as a mixture of four sterols, including fucosterol (1), racemosol (2), stigmasterol (3), and stigmasta-7,22-dien-3β,4β-diol (4). These compounds were identified by spectroscopic evidence including FTIR, (1)H-NMR, MS, and GC. The white sterol crystals, which are the mixture of four sterols, were evaluated for antihyperlipidemic activity in Wistar rats. The blood samples were collected from the retro-orbital plexus and serum was separated and analyzed for lipid profiles. These sterol crystals (30 mg/kg) showed significant reductions in lipid profiles which included cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL and VLDL. In addition, a significant increase in HDL cholesterol observed, which is a good cholesterol that protects hearts from coronary artery diseases. These sterol crystals or phytosterols can be used as an antihyperlipidemic agent to treat the hyperlipidemic.

  12. Eleutherosides in aerial parts of Eleutherococcus species cultivated in Poland.

    PubMed

    Załuski, Daniel; Smolarz, Helena Danuta; Szpilewska, Monika

    2011-01-01

    Many Eleutherococcus species grow in Siberia, China, Korea, Japan, and the Philippines. The most well known is Eleutherococcus senticosus, which contains pharmacologically active compounds, such as eleutherosides, flavonoids, vitamins, and complex polysaccharides. E. senticosus owes its medicinal properties mainly to eleutherosides. The objective of this study was to determine eleutherosides B, E, and E1 in the aerial parts of different Eleutherococcus species. The eleutherosides were extracted with ethanol, and the extracts were cleaned by SPE on C18 columns, and then analyzed by HPTLC. Silica gel plates with fluorescence indicator, designated F254, were used with chloroform-methanol-water (70 + 30 + 4, v/v/v) and chloroform-methanol-toluene-ammonium hydroxide (9 + 6 + 3 + 2, v/vv/v) mobile phases. Two-step elution with these mobile phases was used for the development of chromatograms. Eleutherosides were visualized by derivatization with Liebermann-Burchard reagent. This reagent was used for the first time to detect eleutherosides. Eleutherosides B, E, and E1 were detected in the fruits of the investigated species. E. senticosus contained three of the investigated compounds, and E. sessiliflorus, E. gracilistylus, and E. divaricatus two compounds each.

  13. Laboratory standardizatin in an international study: the Kaunas--Rotterdam intervention study (KRIS).

    PubMed

    Boerma, G J; Toleikis, A; Mather, A; Bartels, C T; Margeviciene, L; Glasunov, I S; Leijnse, B

    1978-07-01

    Laboratory results obtained in different laboratories over lengthy periods of time usually are difficult to compare. In cooperative long-term studies where such results must be pooled, thorough standardization of methods is vital. We describe a program in which comparable plasma cholesterol and glucose analyses have been obtained, by simple methods. In the Netherlands and the Soviet Union in close collaboration with the Center for Disease Control, Atlanta, Ga., U.S.A. The two laboratories produced glucose values (direct o-toluidine reaction) within 2% of the target reference values and cholesterol results (direct Liebermann-Burchard reaction) with a consistent 6-8% positive bias over the reference method values. Intralaboratory precision was subject to preset acceptance limits. The use of common control materials, exchange of patient samples, and on-site comparison of all details of laboratory procedures are vital tools in standardization efforts. A laboratory protocol that included quality requirements and rejection criteria was developed and proved to be indispensable. The experience gained should be useful in standardizing inter-laboratory results in similar studies.

  14. Concentration of chosen oxycholesterols in plasma of pregnant women with pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bodzek, Piotr; Janoszka, Beata; Wielkoszyński, Tomasz; Bodzek, Danuta; Sieroń, Aleksander

    2002-02-01

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) was applied for isolation of oxycholesterols from plasma lipid extract from pregnant women with hypertension and from a control group. Separation of oxycholesterols fraction was performed in an SD II horizontal chamber (Chromdes, Poland) using silica gel and octadecyl RPC18 silica gel TLC plates (Merck and Machery Nagel). Visualization was carried out under UV light after Liebermann-Burchard reaction specific for cholesterol and its derivatives. The oxycholesterols (5-cholestene-3beta-ol-7-one, sum of 5-cholestene-3beta, 7beta-diol and 5-cholestene-3beta, 7alpha-diol and sum of 5alpha,6alpha-epoxycholestan-3beta-ol and 5beta, 6beta-epoxycholestan-3beta-ol) were quantified by chromatograms scanning in reflectance and fluorescence mode using a CS 9301 densitometer (Shimadzu). The total concentration of the investigated oxycholesterols in the plasma of pregnant women was up to 5000 ng/mL and was statistically significantly higher in women with pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH).

  15. Biochemical typing of hyperlipoproteinemia. The development of a nomogram.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, A; Abrahamsson, H; Wiklund, O

    1975-08-18

    The accurate biochemical typing of hyperlipoproteinemia would require quantification of lipoprotein fractions. At present, typing is frequently based on the lipoprotein electrophoresis pattern together with serum lipid analyses. Lack of facilities for lipoprotein electrophoresis has however focused the clinical interest for classification of hyperlipoproteinemia into other means of a simple biochemical typing. In the present study a nomogram was developed to allow biochemical typing of hyperlipoproteinemia from serum cholesterol and triglyceride values. Serum cholesterol was determined according to a Liebermann-Burchard reaction by the method of Cramer and Isaksson [1], serum triglycerides by the determination of glyceride glycerol according to Carlson [2], and serum lipoprotein electrophoresis was performed on agarose gel [3]. Cholesterol content [4] of alpha-lipoproteins ("alpha-LP cholesterol") was obtained in serum after the precipitation of very-low-density lipoproteins(VLDL) and low-density lipoproteins(LDL) by manganese chloride and heparin [5]. Preparative ultracentrifugation was performed in a one-step, gradient procedure [6] isolating VLDL, d less than 1.006, LDL, d 1.006--1.063 g/ml and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) including very-high-density lipoproteins, d greater than 1.063 g/ml, or alternatively at d 1.006 g/ml according to the procedure by Gustafson et al. [7].

  16. Anatomical distribution of sterols in oysters (Crassostrea gigas).

    PubMed

    Gordon, D T; Collins, N

    1982-11-01

    Oysters (Crassostrea gigas) contain at least 8 predominant sterols as determined by gas liquid chromatography and a modified Liebermann-Burchard reaction. These sterols and the average amount found in mg/100 are: C26-sterol (22-trans-24-norcholesta-5, 22-diene-3 beta-ol), 19.1; 22-dehydrocholesterol, 15.1; cholesterol, 46.8; brassicasterol, 27.2; delta 5,7-sterols (i.e., 7-dehydrocholesterol) 22.5; 24-methylenecholesterol 29.1; 24-ethylcholesta-5,22-diene-3 beta-ol, 1.2; and 24-ethylcholesta-5-en-3 beta-ol, 12.7. The distribution of these sterols appears uniform (r2 = 0.938) between 5 major organs of the oyster. The percent body mass vs percent total sterols in these 5 organs are: mantle 44.1--41.4; visceral mass 30.3--36.7; gills 13.2--11.7; adductor muscle 8.3--3.7; and labial palps 4.2--6.5. The possible sources of these sterols are discussed.

  17. Factors influencing the accuracy of the national reference system total cholesterol reference method.

    PubMed

    Bernert, J T; Akins, J R; Cooper, G R; Poulose, A K; Myers, G L; Sampson, E J

    1991-12-01

    Previous comparisons between the Reference and Definitive Methods for measuring serum cholesterol have demonstrated a small but persistent positive bias in the Reference Method, averaging about +1.6%. Here we describe the results of further investigations designed to better characterize the nature of this bias. Analysis of a well-characterized model serum sample (SRM 909) suggests that more than half of the difference in cholesterol values determined by the two methods is the result of small contributions from cholesterol precursor sterols and phytosterols, which are also measured for the Reference Method. An additional significant contribution may be from cholesterol oxidation products, particularly 7-hydroxycholesterol isomers, which are active in the Liebermann-Burchard reaction. The 7-hydroxycholesterol in SRM 909, most of which appeared to be already present in the serum rather than formed during saponification, may account for as much as 20% of the observed difference between the methods. Contributions from other possible sources, including impurities in the cholesterol standard and incomplete saponification of cholesteryl esters, are very small. Because the observed bias is both quite small and consistent among samples, the cholesterol Reference Method continues to meet all of the requirements generally expected for a dependable and effective Reference Method.

  18. Enzymic determination of free and esterified cholesterol in serum by microcalorimetry.

    PubMed

    Rehak, N N; Young, D S

    1982-11-01

    Concentrations of free and esterified cholesterol in serum can be determined simultaneously by measuring, with a batch-type microcalorimeter, the heat released during the coupled cholesterol esterase/cholesterol oxidase/catalase enzymic reaction. To differentiate the two forms of cholesterol, we used kinetic calorimetry: the rate of heat output due to enzymic hydrolysis of esterified cholesterol (the rate-determining reaction) was subtracted from the measured heat, the difference being the heat released during the enzymic oxidation of free cholesterol (the fast reaction). Results obtained by the kinetic calorimetric method agreed with those obtained by separate sequential end-point calorimetric determinations of free and total cholesterol. We also compared the kinetic calorimetric method with the cholesterol method of Abell and Kendall and a continuous-flow modification of the Liebermann-Burchard method (Technicon SMAC). De-biased linear-regression analysis of the data indicates acceptable agreement between the calorimetric and the Abell-Kendall methods (y = 0.98x + 11.5). The correlation between results by calorimetric and SMAC methods shows a significant proportional error (y = 1.17x - 159.4). Bilirubin (up to 200 mg/L) does not interfere with the calorimetry.

  19. Reactivity of key metabolic sterols in standard colorimetric assays for cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, C P; Cenedella, R J

    1982-01-01

    The reaction of lanosterol, desmosterol and 7-dehydrocholesterol, key intermediates in cholesterol biosynthesis, were-compared with cholesterol in 3 standard colorimetric assays for cholesterol based on formation of chomogens with acetic anhydride, ferric chloride and ferrous sulfate. Marked differences in the reaction of the sterols in the different assays were due both to formation of chomogens with qualitatively similar spectral patterns but with greatly different extinctions and to formation of chromogens with clearly different absorption maxima. For example, in all assays, cholesterol and desmosterol formed chromogens with very similar absorption spectra but with varying extinctions, whereas the lanosterol chromogen in all assays was different from cholesterol's in both absorption maxima and in extinctions. The findings show that attempts to measure tissue sterol levels by colorimetric methods can result in greater errors when cholesterol is not the sole sterol. Also, the unique spectral properties of the lanosterol chromogen formed in the Liebermann-Burchard reaction (a sharp absorption peak at 450 nm) suggests the possible use of this method as a qualitative test for lanosterol.

  20. [Enzymatic determination of total cholesterol in serum: accuracy and comparison with other methods (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Stähler, F; Munz, E; Kattermann, R

    1975-04-18

    Cholesterol can be specifically measured without difficulty and without complex reagents by means of a newly developed enzymatic colour test. Intensive technical evaluation confirmed its accuracy. Manual use gave a day-to-day coefficient of variation of 2-3 per cent; the sensitivity at a cholesterol concentration of 200 mg/dl was E equals 0.153 (gamma equals 405 nm), with a linearity up to 1000 mg/dl. Recovery of added pure cholesterol solution was 100 plus or minus 2 percent. A quantitative study of 53 representative drugs, anti-coagulants and metabolites was performed both in test tube and on patients. Accuracy of the result was unaffected by any of the substances (alpha equals 0.05). Comparison with the multi-step extraction method used at present as a reference (Abell-Kendall) gave a regression equation of y equals 0.99 times plus 1.1 (x axis: extraction method; y axis: enzymatic colour test). The direct chemical method after Liebermann and Burchard gave, in part, markedly differing results because of considerable systematic and accidental errors.

  1. Accuracy and reproducibility of cholesterol assay in the western Cape.

    PubMed

    Berger, G M; Christopher, K; Juritz, J M; Liesegang, F

    1988-11-19

    The accuracy and precision of cholesterol assay in the western Cape region is reported. The survey was carried out over 15 weeks utilising three human EDTA plasma pools with normal, borderline high and high cholesterol levels respectively. All 11 laboratories in the region providing a service to academic, provincial or military hospitals or to the private medical sector were included in the study. Ten of the 11 laboratories utilised automated enzymatic methods of cholesterol assay whereas 1 used a manual procedure based on the Liebermann-Burchard reaction. Methods were standardised by means of a variety of commercial calibrator material in all except 1 laboratory which used reference sera from the Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta. The performance of the 4 best laboratories met the standard of precision recommended for cholesterol assay, viz. total coefficient of variation of less than or equal to 2.5%. However, only 2 of the 11 laboratories achieved the optimum objective of an overall bias of less than 2.0% together with precision of less than or equal to 2.5%. Rational use of cholesterol assay for diagnosis and management will therefore require standardisation of cholesterol assay on a common reference material and greater attention to analytical factors influencing the reproducibility of results. Intrinsic biological variation also contributes uncertainty to the interpretation of a single value. Thus important clinical decisions must be based on two or more assays carried out using appropriate methodology.

  2. High-density-lipoprotein cholesterol in heparin-MnCl2 supernates determined with the Dow enzymic method after precipitation of Mn2+ with HCO3-.

    PubMed

    Bachorik, P S; Walker, R E; Virgil, D G

    1984-06-01

    Manganese interferes with enzymic cholesterol methods. In this study, we enzymically measured high-density-lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in heparin-Mn2+ supernates that had been treated with NaHCO3 (91 mmol/L) to precipitate Mn2+, and compared results with those by an automated Liebermann- Burchard method. For untreated supernates of 96 fresh plasma samples, the enzymic values were 10.4% higher than comparison-method values, a bias that declined to +2.3% for treated supernates. For 72 sera promptly frozen and stored after collection, the enzymic values for untreated and treated supernates were, respectively, 6.0% and 0.5% higher than comparison-method values. In all cases, the magnitude of the bias was independent of the concentrations of cholesterol, triglyceride, and HDL-cholesterol. Enzymic HDL-cholesterol measurements in NaHCO3-treated heparin-Mn2+ supernates prepared from four pooled serum controls agreed within 21 mg/L with values established for these pools by the Centers for Disease Control. We conclude that the accuracy of enzymic HDL cholesterol measurements in heparin-Mn2+ supernates in considerably increased by treatment with NaHCO3.

  3. Analytical performance and comparability of the determination of cholesterol by 12 Lipid-Research Clinics.

    PubMed

    Lippel, K; Ahmed, S; Albers, J J; Bachorik, P; Cooper, G; Helms, R; Williams, J

    1977-09-01

    Twelve Lipid-Research Clinic laboratories performed automated cholesterol analyses on four control-serum pools of known cholesterol concentration, using the Liebermann-Burchard reaction. The analyses were done during a two-year period, with the same standards, methodology, and quality-control procedures. Estimates of analytical bias, variability, and short- and long-term trends for each instrument and for the entire group of LRC instruments are presented. High accuracy, precision, and interlaboratory comparability were achieved through the rigorous standardization and control of the entire analytical procedure. The significance of these results for long-term collaborative studies is discussed. Individual laboratory biases averaged from 0.5 to 2.0% below Abell-Kendall reference values. Between-run variability was about equal to within-run variability and inter-laboratory variation was substantially less than intra-laboratory variation. The total standard deviation for all instruments was about 0.04 g/liter. Only 8-15% of this variation was due to differences between instruments. The between-instrument standard deviation ranged from 0.011 to 0.015 g/liter; the between-run, within-instrument standard deviation ranged from 0.023 to 0.030 g/liter; and within-run standard deviation ranged from 0.023 to 0.028 g/liter. The significance of the achieved results for long-term collaborative studies is discussed.

  4. Fluorometric enzymatic determination of total cholesterol in serum.

    PubMed

    Huang, H; Kauan, J W; Guilbault, G G

    1975-10-01

    We describe a fluorometric enzymatic method for determining total serum cholesterol, based on hydrolysis of cholesterol esters to free cholesterol by cholesterol ester hydrolase (EC 3.1.1.13). The free cholesterol formed, as well as that initially present, is then oxidized by cholesterol oxidase (EC 1.1.3.6) to cholest-4-en-3-one with simultaneous production of hydrogen peroxide. The latter catalytically oxidizes homovanillic acid in the presence of peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) to form the highly fluorescent 2,2'-dihydroxy-3,3'-dimethoxy-biphenyl-5,5'-diacetic acid. A calibration curve is constructed from data on a series of standard cholesterol solutions vs. the corresponding fluorescence change (deltaf/5 min). This curve is linear up to 4.0 g of total serum cholesterol per liter of serum. The method is specific, precise, accurate, rapid, and simple, and results correlate well with those obtained by both the Liebermann-Burchard procedure and the colorimetric enzymatic method (correlation coefficients, 0.984 and 0.981, respectively).

  5. [Serum apolipoprotein and lipoprotein levels in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2].

    PubMed

    Gosiewska, A; Zarzycki, W; Depta, K; Składanek, J; Kinalski, M; Lopaczyński, W

    1989-04-01

    Lipid disturbances were evaluated in type II diabetes comparing the results of determinations of total cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol with apolipoprotein A and B levels. The study was carried out in 32 diabetics with type II disease with mean duration 7 +/- 9 years, 15 males and 17 females, and in 30 controls. In all cases postprandial glycaemia, haemoglobin A1C, total cholesterol concentration (by the Liebermann-Burchardt method), HDL-cholesterol (by the Błaszczyszyn method), triglycerides (by the enzymatic method), an apolipoprotein A and B (by Mancini radial immunodiffusion method using a Bio-Merieux kit) were determined. A significant correlation was demonstrated between the concentrations of cholesterol and apolipoprotein A, on the one hand, and blood glucose level, on the other, and apolipoprotein A was found to be a better indicator of lipid disturbances in the aspect of diabetes control then apolipoprotein B. The latter was a better indicator of lipid disturbances in diabetes connected with obesity, than total cholesterol.

  6. Charge Exchange of Ne^9+ for X-ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, David

    2016-01-01

    Using the molecular-orbital close-coupling (MOCC) method, single electron capture (SEC) cross sections were computed for Ne^9+ colliding with H.Potential energies and nonadiabatic couplings were calculated and used to obtain the MOCC cross sections which are final-quantum-state-resolved including a separation of singlet and triplet states. Atomic-orbital close-coupling, classical trajectory Monte Carlo, and multichannel Landau-Zener (MCLZ) calculations are also performed. Cross sections for more complicated targets including He, H2, N2, H2O, CO, and CO2, were obtained with the MCLZ method. The SEC results are compared with experimental and other theoretical data, where available. The SEC cross sections are being used in cascade models to predict X-ray emission spectra relevant to solar systemand astrophysical environments.D. Lyons, R. S. Cumbee, P. D. Mullen, P. C. Stancil (UGA), D. R. Schultz (UNT), P. Liebermann (Wuppertal Univ.),R. Buenker (NCSU).This work was partially supported by NASA grant NNX09AC46G.

  7. The cytogenetic effects of the aqueous extracts of migratory locust (Locusta migratoria L.) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Turkez, Hasan; Incekara, Umit; Güner, Adem; Aydın, Elanur; Dirican, Ebubekir; Togar, Başak

    2014-04-01

    One of the useful and most commonly cultivated commercially species, migratory locust (Locusta migratoria; Orthoptera), was investigated in light of genotoxic damage potentials. For this aim, we evaluated the genotoxic potentials of water soluble extracts of L. migratoria on cultured human blood cells. The micronucleus, sister chromatid exchange and structural chromosome aberration assays were applied to assess DNA and chromosomal damage produced by aqueous extracts in vitro. The extracts were added to the cultures at different concentrations ranging from 0 to 1000 mg/L. Our results indicated that these extracts did not exhibit genotoxicity at tested concentrations. We conclude that this in vitro approach for biomonitoring genotoxicity assessment is useful for comparing the potential health risks of edible insects.

  8. AN ODORANT-BINDING PROTEIN INVOLVED IN PERCEPTION OF HOST PLANT ODORANTS IN LOCUST Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Zhang, Long; Wang, Xiaoqi

    2016-04-01

    Locusts, Locusta migratoria (Orthoptera: Acrididae), are extremely destructive agricultural pests, but very little is known of their molecular aspects of perception to host plant odorants including related odorant-binding proteins (OBPs), though several OBPs have been identified in locust. To elucidate the function of LmigOBP1, the first OBP identified from locust, RNA interference was employed in this study to silence LmigOBP1, which was achieved by injection of dsRNA targeting LmigOBP1 into the hemolymph of male nymphs. Compared with LmigOBP1 normal nymphs, LmigOBP1 knockdown nymphs significantly decreased food (maize leaf, Zea mays) consumption and electro-antennography responses to five maize leaf volatiles, ((Z)-3-hexenol, linalool, nonanal, decanal, and (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate). These suggest that LmigOBP1 is involved in perception of host plant odorants.

  9. Elicitation and abrupt termination of behaviorally significant catchlike tension in a primitive insect.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, G; Field, L H

    1983-07-01

    Sustained steady contractural or catchlike tension (CT) occurs in the metathoracic extensor tibiae muscle of the primitive insect the weta (Orthoptera: Stenopelmatidae) during its characteristic leg-extension defense behavior or following leg-position conditioning. Similar action occurs occasionally in semi-intact preparations and is abruptly turned off by a single peripheral inhibitory impulse. These phenomena were reproduced routinely by first infusing saline containing 10(-8) M (or stronger) octopamine into the muscle for 12 min, and then stimulating the slow excitatory motor neuron SETi with a brief burst. Direct stimulation of the dorsal unpaired median neuron, innervating the extensor tibiae (DUMETi) prior to SETi stimulation, also led to CT. Both octopamine and DUMETi markedly enhanced the tension developed in response to a burst of impulses in SETi.

  10. Molecular phylogeny of Polyneoptera (Insecta) inferred from expanded mitogenomic data.

    PubMed

    Song, Nan; Li, Hu; Song, Fan; Cai, Wanzhi

    2016-10-26

    The Polyneoptera represents one of the earliest insect radiations, comprising the majority of hemimetabolous orders, in which many species have great economic importance. Here, we sequenced eleven mitochondrial genomes of the polyneopteran insects by using high throughput pooled sequencing technology, and presented a phylogenetic reconstruction for this group based on expanded mitochondrial genome data. Our analyses included 189 taxa, of which 139 species represent all the major polyneopteran lineages. Multiple results support the monophyly of Polyneoptera, the monophyly of Dictyoptera, and the monophyly of Orthoptera. Sister taxon relationships Plecoptera + Dermaptera, and Zoraptera + Embioptera are also supported by most analyses. Within Dictyoptera, the Blattodea is consistently retrieved as paraphyly due to the sister group relationship of Cryptocercus with Isoptera. In addition, the results demonstrate that model selection, data treatment, and outgroup choice can have significant effects on the reconstructed phylogenetic relationships of Polyneoptera.

  11. Detection of Termites and Other Insects Consumed by African Great Apes using Molecular Fecal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hamad, Ibrahim; Delaporte, Eric; Raoult, Didier; Bittar, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    The consumption of insects by apes has previously been reported based on direct observations and/or trail signs in feces. However, DNA-based diet analyses may have the potential to reveal trophic links for these wild species. Herein, we analyzed the insect-diet diversity of 9 feces obtained from three species of African great apes, gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and bonobo (Pan paniscus), using two mitochondrial amplifications for arthropods. A total of 1056 clones were sequenced for Cyt-b and COI gene libraries, which contained 50 and 56 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), respectively. BLAST research revealed that the OTUs belonged to 32 families from 5 orders (Diptera, Isoptera, Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, and Orthoptera). While ants were not detected by this method, the consumption of flies, beetles, moths, mosquitoes and termites was evident in these samples. Our findings indicate that molecular techniques can be used to analyze insect food items in wild animals. PMID:24675424

  12. [Trophic ecology and predation of the greater noctule bat (Nyctalus lasiopterus) in Russia].

    PubMed

    Smirnov, D G; Vekhnik, V P

    2013-01-01

    The trophic ecology of Nyctalus lasiopterus in the Samara Bend during 2008-2010 has been studied. It has been revealed that the main feeding stations for this species are old ecotonal black poplar stands and willow groves. N. lasiopterus keeps to opportunistic foraging by using easily accessible and properly sized food objects. Having analyzed 129 fecal samples, we singled out 10 categories of food objects belonging to six orders of insects. The representatives of Lepidoptera constitute the major part of the ration. Their abundance rates undergo asynchronous changes relative to each other. Homoptera and Neuroptera are found more rarely in the feces. Orthoptera and Diptera are extremely rare. Besides insects, bird feathers were found in 14 faecal samples of N. lasiopterus. They made up from 60 to 90% of the total fecal mass.

  13. Embryonic development of pleuropodia of the cicada, Magicicada cassini

    PubMed Central

    Strauß, Johannes; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard

    2006-01-01

    In many insects the first abdominal segment possesses embryonic appendages called pleuropodia. Here we show the embryogenesis of pleuropodial cells of the periodical cicada, Magicicada cassini (Fisher 1851) (Insecta, Homoptera, Cicadidae). An antibody, anti-horseradish perioxidase (HRP), that is usually neuron-specific strongly marked the pleuropodial anlagen and revealed their ectodermal origin shortly after limb bud formation. Thereafter the cells sank into the epidermis and their apical parts enlarged. A globular part protruded from the body wall. Filamentous structures were marked at the stem region and into the apical dilation. In later embryonic stages the pleuropodia degenerated. Despite the binding of anti-HRP the cells had no morphological neuronal characters and cannot be regarded as neurons. The binding indicates that glycosylated cell surface molecules contribute to the adhesion between the presumably glandular pleuropodial cells. In comparison, anti-HRP does not mark the pleuropodia of Orthoptera. PMID:19537987

  14. Detection of termites and other insects consumed by African great apes using molecular fecal analysis.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Ibrahim; Delaporte, Eric; Raoult, Didier; Bittar, Fadi

    2014-03-27

    The consumption of insects by apes has previously been reported based on direct observations and/or trail signs in feces. However, DNA-based diet analyses may have the potential to reveal trophic links for these wild species. Herein, we analyzed the insect-diet diversity of 9 feces obtained from three species of African great apes, gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and bonobo (Pan paniscus), using two mitochondrial amplifications for arthropods. A total of 1056 clones were sequenced for Cyt-b and COI gene libraries, which contained 50 and 56 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), respectively. BLAST research revealed that the OTUs belonged to 32 families from 5 orders (Diptera, Isoptera, Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, and Orthoptera). While ants were not detected by this method, the consumption of flies, beetles, moths, mosquitoes and termites was evident in these samples. Our findings indicate that molecular techniques can be used to analyze insect food items in wild animals.

  15. The Effects of Hydration on Growth of the House Cricket, Acheta domesticus

    PubMed Central

    McCluney, Kevin E; Date, Rishabh C

    2008-01-01

    Maintenance of biochemical gradients, membrane fluidity, and sustained periods of activity are key physiological and behavioral functions of water for animals living in desiccating environments. Water stress may reduce the organism's ability to maintain these functions and as such, may reduce an organism's growth. However, few studies have examined this potential effect. The effects of altered hydration state of the house cricket, Acheta domesticus L. (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) on individual growth were studied under laboratory conditions. Crickets were permitted access to water for three different durations each day, resulting in significant differences in hydration state (32% greater hydration for maximum than minimum duration of water availability). Growth was 59% and 72% greater in dry mass and length, respectively, between the lowest and highest hydration state treatments. These findings may be representative for a variety of animal species and environments and could have important ecological implications. PMID:20302456

  16. Intrinsic resistance to the lethal effects of x-irradiation in insect and arachnid cells

    PubMed Central

    Koval, Thomas M.

    1983-01-01

    Twelve cell lines representing 10 genera of three orders (Diptera, Lepidoptera, and Orthoptera) of the class Insecta and one cell line (Acarina) from the class Arachnida were examined to discern their sensitivity to the lethal effects of x-irradiation. Radiosensitivity was measured by a combination of colony formation and population growth curve techniques. Each of these arthropod cell lines is significantly more radioresistant than mammalian cells, though the degree of resistance varies greatly with order. Dipteran cells are 3 to 9 times and lepidopteran cells 52 to 104 times more radioresistant than mammalian cells. Orthopteran and acarine cells are intermediate in radiosensitivity between dipteran and lepidopteran cells. These cells, especially the lepidopteran, should be valuable in determining the molecular nature of repair mechanisms that result in resistance to ionizing radiation. PMID:16593348

  17. Exaggerated trait growth in insects.

    PubMed

    Lavine, Laura; Gotoh, Hiroki; Brent, Colin S; Dworkin, Ian; Emlen, Douglas J

    2015-01-07

    Animal structures occasionally attain extreme proportions, eclipsing in size the surrounding body parts. We review insect examples of exaggerated traits, such as the mandibles of stag beetles (Lucanidae), the claspers of praying mantids (Mantidae), the elongated hindlimbs of grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Caelifera), and the giant heads of soldier ants (Formicidae) and termites (Isoptera). Developmentally, disproportionate growth can arise through trait-specific modifications to the activity of at least four pathways: the sex determination pathway, the appendage patterning pathway, the insulin/IGF signaling pathway, and the juvenile hormone/ecdysteroid pathway. Although most exaggerated traits have not been studied mechanistically, it is already apparent that distinct developmental mechanisms underlie the evolution of the different types of exaggerated traits. We suggest this reflects the nature of selection in each instance, revealing an exciting link between mechanism, form, and function. We use this information to make explicit predictions for the types of regulatory pathways likely to underlie each type of exaggerated trait.

  18. Molecular phylogeny of Polyneoptera (Insecta) inferred from expanded mitogenomic data

    PubMed Central

    Song, Nan; Li, Hu; Song, Fan; Cai, Wanzhi

    2016-01-01

    The Polyneoptera represents one of the earliest insect radiations, comprising the majority of hemimetabolous orders, in which many species have great economic importance. Here, we sequenced eleven mitochondrial genomes of the polyneopteran insects by using high throughput pooled sequencing technology, and presented a phylogenetic reconstruction for this group based on expanded mitochondrial genome data. Our analyses included 189 taxa, of which 139 species represent all the major polyneopteran lineages. Multiple results support the monophyly of Polyneoptera, the monophyly of Dictyoptera, and the monophyly of Orthoptera. Sister taxon relationships Plecoptera + Dermaptera, and Zoraptera + Embioptera are also supported by most analyses. Within Dictyoptera, the Blattodea is consistently retrieved as paraphyly due to the sister group relationship of Cryptocercus with Isoptera. In addition, the results demonstrate that model selection, data treatment, and outgroup choice can have significant effects on the reconstructed phylogenetic relationships of Polyneoptera. PMID:27782189

  19. Herbivory increases diversification across insect clades.

    PubMed

    Wiens, John J; Lapoint, Richard T; Whiteman, Noah K

    2015-09-24

    Insects contain more than half of all living species, but the causes of their remarkable diversity remain poorly understood. Many authors have suggested that herbivory has accelerated diversification in many insect clades. However, others have questioned the role of herbivory in insect diversification. Here, we test the relationships between herbivory and insect diversification across multiple scales. We find a strong, positive relationship between herbivory and diversification among insect orders. However, herbivory explains less variation in diversification within some orders (Diptera, Hemiptera) or shows no significant relationship with diversification in others (Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Orthoptera). Thus, we support the overall importance of herbivory for insect diversification, but also show that its impacts can vary across scales and clades. In summary, our results illuminate the causes of species richness patterns in a group containing most living species, and show the importance of ecological impacts on diversification in explaining the diversity of life.

  20. Herbivory increases diversification across insect clades

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, John J.; Lapoint, Richard T.; Whiteman, Noah K.

    2015-01-01

    Insects contain more than half of all living species, but the causes of their remarkable diversity remain poorly understood. Many authors have suggested that herbivory has accelerated diversification in many insect clades. However, others have questioned the role of herbivory in insect diversification. Here, we test the relationships between herbivory and insect diversification across multiple scales. We find a strong, positive relationship between herbivory and diversification among insect orders. However, herbivory explains less variation in diversification within some orders (Diptera, Hemiptera) or shows no significant relationship with diversification in others (Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Orthoptera). Thus, we support the overall importance of herbivory for insect diversification, but also show that its impacts can vary across scales and clades. In summary, our results illuminate the causes of species richness patterns in a group containing most living species, and show the importance of ecological impacts on diversification in explaining the diversity of life. PMID:26399434

  1. The evolution of sex differences in mate searching when females benefit: new theory and a comparative test.

    PubMed

    McCartney, J; Kokko, H; Heller, K-G; Gwynne, D T

    2012-03-22

    Sexual selection is thought to have led to searching as a profitable, but risky way of males obtaining mates. While there is great variation in which sex searches, previous theory has not considered search evolution when both males and females benefit from multiple mating. We present new theory and link it with data to bridge this gap. Two different search protocols exist between species in the bush-cricket genus Poecilimon (Orthoptera): females search for calling males, or males search for calling females. Poecilimon males also transfer a costly nuptial food gift to their mates during mating. We relate variations in searching protocols to variation in nuptial gift size among 32 Poecilimon taxa. As predicted, taxa where females search produce significantly larger nuptial gifts than those where males search. Our model and results show that search roles can reverse when multiple mating brings about sufficiently strong material benefits to females.

  2. Thuringiensin: A Thermostable Secondary Metabolite from Bacillus thuringiensis with Insecticidal Activity against a Wide Range of Insects

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Ruan, Lifang; Peng, Donghai; Li, Lin; Sun, Ming; Yu, Ziniu

    2014-01-01

    Thuringiensin (Thu), also known as β-exotoxin, is a thermostable secondary metabolite secreted by Bacillus thuringiensis. It has insecticidal activity against a wide range of insects, including species belonging to the orders Diptera, Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera, Orthoptera, and Isoptera, and several nematode species. The chemical formula of Thu is C22H32O19N5P, and it is composed of adenosine, glucose, phosphoric acid, and gluconic diacid. In contrast to the more frequently studied insecticidal crystal protein, Thu is not a protein but a small molecule oligosaccharide. In this review, a detailed and updated description of the characteristics, structure, insecticidal mechanism, separation and purification technology, and genetic determinants of Thu is provided. PMID:25068925

  3. Thuringiensin: a thermostable secondary metabolite from Bacillus thuringiensis with insecticidal activity against a wide range of insects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Ruan, Lifang; Peng, Donghai; Li, Lin; Sun, Ming; Yu, Ziniu

    2014-07-25

    Thuringiensin (Thu), also known as β-exotoxin, is a thermostable secondary metabolite secreted by Bacillus thuringiensis. It has insecticidal activity against a wide range of insects, including species belonging to the orders Diptera, Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera, Orthoptera, and Isoptera, and several nematode species. The chemical formula of Thu is C22H32O19N5P, and it is composed of adenosine, glucose, phosphoric acid, and gluconic diacid. In contrast to the more frequently studied insecticidal crystal protein, Thu is not a protein but a small molecule oligosaccharide. In this review, a detailed and updated description of the characteristics, structure, insecticidal mechanism, separation and purification technology, and genetic determinants of Thu is provided.

  4. Morphometric Variations in the Grasshopper, Chromacris speciosa from Two Localities of Pernambuco in Northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cisneiros, Roberta Araújo; de Almeida, Argus Vasconcelos; de Melo, Gabriel Rivas; da Câmara, Cláudio Augusto Gomes

    2012-01-01

    The present study describes morphometric variations in the grasshopper, Chromacris speciosa (Thunberg, 1824) (Orthoptera: Acridoidea: Romaleidae) from two locations in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil. The distance between the sites chosen for collections (Recife and São Lourenço da Mata) is approximately 16 km. The investigation was based on a comparative study of external morphological characteristics of the grasshoppers. Morphometric measurements took into account the different body parts and appendages. Statistical analysis of the measurements revealed significant differences in the size of the specimens between the two locations. Homogeneity tests of the covariance and equality matrices between mean vectors of the results revealed that the grasshopper populations in Recife and São Lourenço da Mata are distinctly different. These findings provide morphological evidence for intraspecific variation in morphological characteristics of the C. speciosa populations from the two locations. PMID:23421530

  5. Sequence studies of proteins from larval and pupal cuticle of the yellow meal worm, Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Andersen, S O; Rafn, K; Roepstorff, P

    1997-02-01

    Complete amino acid sequences have been determined for six larval-pupal cuticular proteins from Tenebrio molitor. The sequenced proteins are major components in both larval and pupal cuticle, and both basic and slightly acidic proteins are represented. The proteins show pronounced similarities to some of the proteins sequenced from other insect cuticles. Three slightly acidic larval-pupal Tenebrio cuticular proteins contain a 66-residue central, hydrophilic region, resembling regions in cuticular proteins from insect species of four different orders (Coleoptera, Diptera, Lepidoptera and Orthoptera), and three basic proteins from larval-pupal Tenebrio cuticle have a 51-residue hydrophilic region in common with two proteins from cuticle of pharate adult locusts (Locusta migratoria). The Tenebrio larval-pupal cuticular proteins are also similar to locust adult cuticular proteins, by frequent occurrence of the short sequence motif Ala-Ala-Pro-Ala/Val. The pronounced sequence similarities between cuticular proteins from different insect orders indicate that the conserved regions are functionally important.

  6. Embryonic development of pleuropodia of the cicada, Magicicada cassini.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Johannes; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard

    2006-01-01

    In many insects the first abdominal segment possesses embryonic appendages called pleuropodia. Here we show the embryogenesis of pleuropodial cells of the periodical cicada, Magicicada cassini (Fisher 1851) (Insecta, Homoptera, Cicadidae). An antibody, anti-horseradish perioxidase (HRP), that is usually neuron-specific strongly marked the pleuropodial anlagen and revealed their ectodermal origin shortly after limb bud formation. Thereafter the cells sank into the epidermis and their apical parts enlarged. A globular part protruded from the body wall. Filamentous structures were marked at the stem region and into the apical dilation. In later embryonic stages the pleuropodia degenerated. Despite the binding of anti-HRP the cells had no morphological neuronal characters and cannot be regarded as neurons. The binding indicates that glycosylated cell surface molecules contribute to the adhesion between the presumably glandular pleuropodial cells. In comparison, anti-HRP does not mark the pleuropodia of Orthoptera.

  7. Biologically relevant environmental data: macros to make the most of microclimate recordings.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, B J

    2001-01-01

    The increased availability and use of automatic data loggers has made collection of microclimatic data cheap and easy. I present macros for the quantitative analysis and comparison of microclimatic (particularly temperature) data in the spreadsheet package Microsoft Excel. The macros presented will (1) collate maximum and minimum values of temperature (or other) cycles, (2) provide a count of the number of times a temperature recording crosses a given threshold, (3) measure the period of time spent above or below a given threshold, and (4) measure the rate of change of a data set as it approaches a threshold. A case study of the freeze tolerant grasshopper Sigaus australis (Orthoptera: Acrididae) and winter temperatures from its alpine habitat is used to demonstrate the macros.

  8. Studies in Mexican Grasshoppers: Liladownsia fraile, a new genus and species of Dactylotini (Acrididae: Melanoplinae) and an updated molecular phylogeny of Melanoplinae.

    PubMed

    Woller, Derek A; Fontana, Paolo; Mariño-Pérez, Ricardo; Song, Hojun

    2014-05-01

    Liladownsia fraile gen. nov. sp. nov. Fontana, Mariño-Pérez, Woller & Song (Lila Downs' friar grasshopper) of the tribe Dactylotini (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Melanoplinae) is described from the pine-oak forest of the Sierra Madre del Sur Mountain Range in Oaxaca, Mexico. Taxonomic placement of this new genus is justified based on morphological characters as well as a molecular phylogeny. Information about the probable host plant, phenology, and known localities is also presented. We also present an updated molecular phylogeny of Melanoplinae, which includes representatives of five of the seven recognized tribes. The monophyly of the subfamily and the included tribes is tested and we find Dactylotini to be paraphyletic because of the placement of Hesperotettix Scudder, 1876. We also recover strong close relationships between the new genus and Perixerus Gerstaecker, 1873 and Dactylotum Charpentier, 1845.  

  9. Effects of different dietary conditions on the expression of trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like protease genes in the digestive system of the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Spit, Jornt; Zels, Sven; Dillen, Senne; Holtof, Michiel; Wynant, Niels; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2014-05-01

    While technological advancements have recently led to a steep increase in genomic and transcriptomic data, and large numbers of protease sequences are being discovered in diverse insect species, little information is available about the expression of digestive enzymes in Orthoptera. Here we describe the identification of Locusta migratoria serine protease transcripts (cDNAs) involved in digestion, which might serve as possible targets for pest control management. A total of 5 putative trypsin and 15 putative chymotrypsin gene sequences were characterized. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these are distributed among 3 evolutionary conserved clusters. In addition, we have determined the relative gene expression levels of representative members in the gut under different feeding conditions. This study demonstrated that the transcript levels for all measured serine proteases were strongly reduced after starvation. On the other hand, larvae of L. migratoria displayed compensatory effects to the presence of Soybean Bowman Birk (SBBI) and Soybean Trypsin (SBTI) inhibitors in their diet by differential upregulation of multiple proteases. A rapid initial upregulation was observed for all tested serine protease transcripts, while only for members belonging to class I, the transcript levels remained elevated after prolonged exposure. In full agreement with these results, we also observed an increase in proteolytic activity in midgut secretions of locusts that were accustomed to the presence of protease inhibitors in their diet, while no change in sensitivity to these inhibitors was observed. Taken together, this paper is the first comprehensive study on dietary dependent transcript levels of proteolytic enzymes in Orthoptera. Our data suggest that compensatory response mechanisms to protease inhibitor ingestion may have appeared early in insect evolution.

  10. A preliminary study on the insect fauna of Al-Baha Province, Saudi Arabia, with descriptions of two new species

    PubMed Central

    El-Hawagry, Magdi S.; Khalil, Mohammed W.; Sharaf, Mostafa R.; Hassan H. Fadl; Aldawood, Abdulrahman S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A preliminary study was carried out on the insect fauna of Al-Baha Province, south-western part of Saudi Arabia. A total number of 582 species and subspecies (few identified only to the genus level) belonging to 129 families and representing 17 orders were recorded. Two of these species are described as new, namely: Monomorium sarawatensis Sharaf & Aldawood, sp. n. [Formicidae, Hymenoptera] and Anthrax alruqibi El-Hawagry sp. n. [Bombyliidae, Diptera]. Another eight species are recorded for the first time in Saudi Arabia, namely: Xiphoceriana arabica (Uvarov, 1922) [Pamphagidae, Orthoptera], Pyrgomorpha conica (Olivier, 1791) [Pyrgomorphidae, Orthoptera], Catopsilia florella (Fabricius, 1775) [Pieridae, Lepidoptera], Anthrax chionanthrax (Bezzi, 1926) [Bombyliidae, Diptera], Spogostylum near tripunctatum Pallas in Wiedemann, 1818 [Bombyliidae, Diptera], Cononedys dichromatopa (Bezzi, 1925) [Bombyliidae, Diptera], Mydas sp. [Mydidae, Diptera], and Hippobosca equina Linnaeus, 1758 [Hippoboscidae, Diptera]. Al-Baha Province is divided by huge and steep Rocky Mountains into two main sectors, a lowland coastal plain at the west, known as “Tihama”, and a mountainous area with an elevation of 1500 to 2450 m above sea level at the east, known as “Al-Sarat or Al-Sarah” which form a part of Al-Sarawat Mountains range. Insect species richness in the two sectors (Tihama and Al-Sarah) was compared, and the results showed that each of the two sectors of Al-Baha Province has a unique insect community. The study generally concluded that the insect faunal composition in Al-Baha Province has an Afrotropical flavor, with the Afrotropical elements predominant, and a closer affiliation to the Afrotropical region than to the Palearctic region or the Eremic zone. Consequently, we tend to agree with those biogeographers who consider that parts of the Arabian Peninsula, including Al-Baha Province, should be included in the Afrotropical region rather than in the Palaearctic

  11. The occurrence of hemocyanin in Hexapoda.

    PubMed

    Pick, Christian; Schneuer, Marco; Burmester, Thorsten

    2009-04-01

    Hemocyanins are copper-containing, respiratory proteins that have been thoroughly studied in various arthropod subphyla. Specific O(2)-transport proteins have long been considered unnecessary in Hexapoda (including Insecta), which acquire O(2) via an elaborate tracheal system. However, we recently identified a functional hemocyanin in the stonefly Perla marginata (Plecoptera) and in the firebrat Thermobia domestica (Zygentoma). We used RT-PCR and RACE experiments to study the presence of hemocyanin in a broad range of ametabolous and hemimetabolous hexapod taxa. We obtained a total of 12 full-length and 5 partial cDNA sequences of hemocyanins from representatives of Collembola, Archeognatha, Dermaptera, Orthoptera, Phasmatodea, Mantodea, Isoptera and Blattaria. No hemocyanin could be identified in Protura, Diplura, Ephemeroptera, Odonata, or in the Eumetabola (Holometabola + Hemiptera). It is not currently known why hemocyanin has been lost in some taxa. Hexapod hemocyanins usually consist of two distinct subunit types. Whereas type 1 subunits may represent the central building block, type 2 subunits may be absent in some species. Phylogenetic analyses support the Pancrustacea hypothesis and show that type 1 and type 2 subunits diverged before the emergence of the Hexapoda. The copperless insect storage hexamerins evolved from hemocyanin type 1 subunits, with Machilis germanica (Archeognatha) hemocyanin being a possible 'intermediate'. The evolution of hemocyanin subunits follows the widely accepted phylogeny of the Hexapoda and provides strong evidence for the monophyly of the Polyneoptera (Plecoptera, Dermaptera, Orthoptera, Phasmatodea, Mantodea, Isoptera, Blattaria) and the Dictyoptera (Mantodea, Isoptera, Blattaria). The Blattaria are paraphyletic with respect to the termites.

  12. LiDAR-based Prediction of Arthropod Abundance at the Southern Slopes of Mt. Kilimanjaro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Alice

    2017-04-01

    LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) is a remote sensing technology that offers high-resolution three-dimensional information about the covered area. These three-dimensional datasets were used in this work to derive structural parameters of the vegetation to predict the abundance of eight different arthropod assemblages with several models. For the model training of each arthropod assemblage, different versions (extent, filters) of the LiDAR datasets were provided and evaluated. Furthermore the importance of each of the LiDAR-derived structural parameters for each model was calculated. The best input dataset and structural parameters were used for the prediction of the abundance of arthropod assemblages. The analyses of the prediction results across seven different landuse types and the eight arthropod assemblages exposed, that for the arthropod assemblages, LiDAR-based predictions were in general best feasible for "Orthoptera" (average R2 (coefficient of determination) over all landuses: 0.14), even though the predictions for the other arthropod assemblages reached values of the same magnitude. It was also found that the landuse type "disturbed forest" showed the best results (average R2 over all assemblages: 0.20), whereas "home garden" was the least predictable (average R2 over all assemblages: 0.04). Differenciated by arthropod-landuse pairs, the results showed distinct differences and the R2 values diverged clearly. It was shown, that when model settings were optimized for only one arthropod taxa, values for R2 could reach values up to 0.55 ("Orthoptera" in "disturbed forest"). The analysis of the importance of each structural parameter for the prediction revealed that about one third of the 18 used parameters were always among the most important ones for the prediction of all assemblages. This strong ranking of parameters implied that focus for further research needs to be put on the selection of predictor variables.

  13. Ground-Dwelling Arthropod Communities of a Sky Island Mountain Range in Southeastern Arizona, USA: Obtaining a Baseline for Assessing the Effects of Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Wallace M.; Eble, Jeffrey A.; Franklin, Kimberly; McManus, Reilly B.; Brantley, Sandra L.; Henkel, Jeff; Marek, Paul E.; Hall, W. Eugene; Olson, Carl A.; McInroy, Ryan; Bernal Loaiza, Emmanuel M.; Brusca, Richard C.; Moore, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    The few studies that have addressed past effects of climate change on species distributions have mostly focused on plants due to the rarity of historical faunal baselines. However, hyperdiverse groups like Arthropoda are vital to monitor in order to understand climate change impacts on biodiversity. This is the first investigation of ground-dwelling arthropod (GDA) assemblages along the full elevation gradient of a mountain range in the Madrean Sky Island Region, establishing a baseline for monitoring future changes in GDA biodiversity. To determine how GDA assemblages relate to elevation, season, abiotic variables, and corresponding biomes, GDA were collected for two weeks in both spring (May) and summer (September) 2011 in the Santa Catalina Mountains, Arizona, using pitfall traps at 66 sites in six distinct upland (non-riparian/non-wet canyon) biomes. Four arthropod taxa: (1) beetles (Coleoptera), (2) spiders (Araneae), (3) grasshoppers and crickets (Orthoptera), and (4) millipedes and centipedes (Myriapoda) were assessed together and separately to determine if there are similar patterns across taxonomic groups. We collected 335 species of GDA: 192/3793 (species/specimens) Coleoptera, 102/1329 Araneae, 25/523 Orthoptera, and 16/697 Myriapoda. GDA assemblages differed among all biomes and between seasons. Fifty-three percent (178 species) and 76% (254 species) of all GDA species were found in only one biome and during only one season, respectively. While composition of arthropod assemblages is tied to biome and season, individual groups do not show fully concordant patterns. Seventeen percent of the GDA species occurred only in the two highest-elevation biomes (Pine and Mixed Conifer Forests). Because these high elevation biomes are most threatened by climate change and they harbor a large percentage of unique arthropod species (11–25% depending on taxon), significant loss in arthropod diversity is likely in the Santa Catalina Mountains and other isolated

  14. Temporal Dynamics of Arthropods on Six Tree Species in Dry Woodlands on the Caribbean Island of Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán, William; Wunderle, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    The seasonal dynamics of foliage arthropod populations are poorly studied in tropical dry forests despite the importance of these studies for understanding arthropod population responses to environmental change. We monitored the abundance, temporal distributions, and body size of arthropods in five naturalized alien and one native tree species to characterize arthropod seasonality in dry novel Prosopis–Leucaena woodlands in Puerto Rico. A branch clipping method was used monthly to sample foliage arthropod abundance over 39 mo. Seasonal patterns of rainfall and abundance within various arthropod taxa were highly variable from year to year. Abundance for most taxa did not show significant seasonality over the 3 yr, although most taxa had abundance peaks each year. However, Homoptera displayed high seasonality with significant temporal aggregations in each year. Formicidae, Orthoptera, and Coleoptera showed high variation in abundance between wet and dry periods, whereas Hemiptera were consistently more abundant in the wet period. Seasonal differences in mean abundance were found only in a few taxa on Tamarindus indica L., Bucida buceras L., Pithecellobium dulce, and (Roxburgh) Benth. Mean arthropod abundance varied among tree species, with highest numbers on Prosopis juliflora, (Swartz) De Candolle, Pi. dulce, Leucaena leucocephala, and (Lamarck) de Wit. Abundance of Araneae, Orthoptera, Coleoptera, Lepidoptera larvae, and all arthropods showed weak relationships with one or more climatic variables (rainfall, maximum temperature, or relative humidity). Body size of arthropods was usually largest during the dry periods. Overall, total foliage arthropod abundance showed no consistent seasonality among years, which may become a more common trend in dry forests and woodlands in the Caribbean if seasonality of rainfall becomes less predictable. PMID:25502036

  15. Practices of entomophagy and entomotherapy by members of the Nyishi and Galo tribes, two ethnic groups of the state of Arunachal Pradesh (North-East India)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We prepared a consolidated list of edible and therapeutic insects used in Arunachal Pradesh (N.E. India) by two tribal societies (i.e., the Nyishi of East Kameng and the Galo of West Siang). The list is based on thorough, semi-structured field-interviews with 20 informants of each tribal group. At least 81 species of local insects, belonging to 26 families and five orders of insects, namely Coleoptera (24 species), Orthoptera (17 species), Hemiptera (16 species), Hymenoptera (15 species) and Odonata (9 species), are being used as food among members of these two indigenous societies. However, Nyishi use overall more species of insects as food than Galo people do and consume mostly Coleoptera and Hemiptera; amongst the Galo, on the other hand, Odonata and Orthoptera dominate. The selection of the food insects amongst the Nyishi and Galo is dictated by traditional tribal beliefs as well as the taste and availability of the insects. Depending on the species, only particular or all developmental stages are consumed. Some food insects may be included in the local diet throughout the year, others only when seasonally available. Commonly specimens are being prepared for consumption by roasting, frying or boiling. Twelve species of insects are deemed therapeutically valuable by the locals and are being used by the tribes investigated to treat a variety of disorders in humans and domestic animals. Members of the Galo use a greater number of insect species for remedial purposes than the Nyishi. With the degradation of natural resources, rapid population growth, and increasing influence of 'westernization', the traditional wisdom of entomophagy and entomotherapy is at risk of being lost. There is thus an urgent need to record the role insects play as components of local diets and folk remedies and to assess insect biodiversity in the light of these uses. PMID:21235790

  16. Diet and resource partitioning among anurans in irrigated rice fields in Pantanal, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Piatti, L; Souza, F L

    2011-08-01

    Artificial ponds or irrigated systems scattered throughout farmlands can offer important habitats for anurans and can be interesting sites for research on species resources use in a changing landscape. This study describes the diet and resource partitioning among anurans inhabiting irrigated rice fields in the Pantanal region. Twenty categories of prey were found in the stomachs of Leptodactylus chaquensis, L. elenae, L. podicipinus and Rhinella bergi, the most frequent being Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, larvae of Hexapoda, Hemiptera, Diptera and Orthoptera. The great differences found in the diet of these species in rice fields compared to other locations, according to available records in the literature, was the increased importance of Hemipitera and Orthoptera and the decrease in importance of Hymenoptera in the diet of leptodactylids. These differences might be attributed to changes in the availability of resources in response to habitat modification. Although diet composition was very similar among species, niche overlap was larger than expected by chance, suggesting that the competition for food resources is not, or has not been, a significant force in determining the structure of this frog community. Two non-exclusive hypotheses could be considered as a justification for this result: 1) the high niche overlap could result from resource availability, which is sufficient to satisfy all species without any strong competition; 2) or the high values of niche overlap could be a selective force driving species to compete, but there has not been enough time to express a significant divergence in the species diet because the study area is characterised as a dynamic habitat influenced by frequent and cyclical changes.

  17. Mercury Concentration in the Tissue of Terrestrial Arthropods from the Central California Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, C.; Weiss-Penzias, P. S.; Flegal, A. R.

    2012-12-01

    The primary goal of this project was to obtain a baseline understanding and investigate the concentration of mercury (Hg) in the tissue of arthropods in coastal California. This region receives significant input of fog which may contain enhanced levels of Hg. Currently there is a lack of data on Hg concentration in the tissue of arthropods (Insecta, Malacostraca, and Arachnida). The sample collection sites were Elkhorn Slough Estuarine Reserve in Moss Landing, and the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) campus. Samples collected between February and March, 2012 had total Hg (HgT) concentrations in dry weight that ranged from 27 - 39 ng/g in the Jerusalem cricket (Orthoptera Stenopelmatidae); 80 - 110 ng/g in the camel cricket (Orthoptera Rhaphidophoridae); 21 - 219 ng/g in the ground beetle (Coleoptera Carabidae); 100 - 228 ng/g in the pill bug (Isopoda Armadillidiidae); and 285 - 423 ng/g in the wolf spider (Araneae Lycosidae). Monomethyl mercury (MMHg) concentrations in dry weight were determine to be 4.3 -28.2 ng/g for the ground beetle; 45.5 - 87.8 ng/g for the pill bug, and 252.3 - 293.7 ng/g for the wolf spider. Samples collected in July, 2012 had HgT concentrations in dry weight that ranged from 110 - 168 ng/g in the camel cricket; 337 - 562 ng/g in the ground beetle; 25 - 227 ng/g in the pill bug; and 228 - 501 ng/g in the wolf spider. The preliminary data revealed an 18% increase in the concentration of HgT for wolf spiders, and a 146% increase for ground beetles in the summer when compared to those concentrations measured in the spring. It is hypothesized that coastal fog may be a contributor to this increase of Hg concentration in coastal California arthropods.

  18. Practices of entomophagy and entomotherapy by members of the Nyishi and Galo tribes, two ethnic groups of the state of Arunachal Pradesh (North-East India).

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Jharna; Ghosh, Sampat; Meyer-Rochow, Victor Benno

    2011-01-14

    We prepared a consolidated list of edible and therapeutic insects used in Arunachal Pradesh (N.E. India) by two tribal societies (i.e., the Nyishi of East Kameng and the Galo of West Siang). The list is based on thorough, semi-structured field-interviews with 20 informants of each tribal group. At least 81 species of local insects, belonging to 26 families and five orders of insects, namely Coleoptera (24 species), Orthoptera (17 species), Hemiptera (16 species), Hymenoptera (15 species) and Odonata (9 species), are being used as food among members of these two indigenous societies. However, Nyishi use overall more species of insects as food than Galo people do and consume mostly Coleoptera and Hemiptera; amongst the Galo, on the other hand, Odonata and Orthoptera dominate. The selection of the food insects amongst the Nyishi and Galo is dictated by traditional tribal beliefs as well as the taste and availability of the insects. Depending on the species, only particular or all developmental stages are consumed. Some food insects may be included in the local diet throughout the year, others only when seasonally available. Commonly specimens are being prepared for consumption by roasting, frying or boiling. Twelve species of insects are deemed therapeutically valuable by the locals and are being used by the tribes investigated to treat a variety of disorders in humans and domestic animals. Members of the Galo use a greater number of insect species for remedial purposes than the Nyishi. With the degradation of natural resources, rapid population growth, and increasing influence of 'westernization', the traditional wisdom of entomophagy and entomotherapy is at risk of being lost. There is thus an urgent need to record the role insects play as components of local diets and folk remedies and to assess insect biodiversity in the light of these uses.

  19. Evolution of the insect body plan as revealed by the Sex combs reduced expression pattern.

    PubMed

    Rogers, B T; Peterson, M D; Kaufman, T C

    1997-01-01

    The products of the HOM/Hox homeotic genes form a set of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors that control elaborate developmental processes and specify cell fates in many metazoans. We examined the expression of the ortholog of the homeotic gene Sex combs reduced (Scr) of Drosophila melanogaster in insects of three divergent orders: Hemiptera, Orthoptera and Thysanura. Our data reflect how the conservation and variation of Scr expression has affected the morphological evolution of insects. Whereas the anterior epidermal expression of Scr, in a small part of the posterior maxillary and all of the labial segment, is found to be in common among all four insect orders, the posterior (thoracic) expression domains vary. Unlike what is observed in flies, the Scr orthologs of other insects are not expressed broadly over the first thoracic segment, but are restricted to small patches. We show here that Scr is required for suppression of wings on the prothorax of Drosophila. Moreover, Scr expression at the dorsal base of the prothoracic limb in two other winged insects, crickets (Orthoptera) and milkweed bugs (Hemiptera), is consistent with Scr acting as a suppressor of prothoracic wings in these insects. Scr is also expressed in a small patch of cells near the basitarsal-tibial junction of milkweed bugs, precisely where a leg comb develops, suggesting that Scr promotes comb formation, as it does in Drosophila. Surprisingly, the dorsal prothoracic expression of Scr is also present in the primitively wingless firebrat (Thysanura) and the leg patch is seen in crickets, which have no comb. Mapping both gene expression patterns and morphological characters onto the insect phylogenetic tree demonstrates that in the cases of wing suppression and comb formation the appearance of expression of Scr in the prothorax apparently precedes these specific functions.

  20. Ground-Dwelling Arthropod Communities of a Sky Island Mountain Range in Southeastern Arizona, USA: Obtaining a Baseline for Assessing the Effects of Climate Change.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Wallace M; Eble, Jeffrey A; Franklin, Kimberly; McManus, Reilly B; Brantley, Sandra L; Henkel, Jeff; Marek, Paul E; Hall, W Eugene; Olson, Carl A; McInroy, Ryan; Bernal Loaiza, Emmanuel M; Brusca, Richard C; Moore, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    The few studies that have addressed past effects of climate change on species distributions have mostly focused on plants due to the rarity of historical faunal baselines. However, hyperdiverse groups like Arthropoda are vital to monitor in order to understand climate change impacts on biodiversity. This is the first investigation of ground-dwelling arthropod (GDA) assemblages along the full elevation gradient of a mountain range in the Madrean Sky Island Region, establishing a baseline for monitoring future changes in GDA biodiversity. To determine how GDA assemblages relate to elevation, season, abiotic variables, and corresponding biomes, GDA were collected for two weeks in both spring (May) and summer (September) 2011 in the Santa Catalina Mountains, Arizona, using pitfall traps at 66 sites in six distinct upland (non-riparian/non-wet canyon) biomes. Four arthropod taxa: (1) beetles (Coleoptera), (2) spiders (Araneae), (3) grasshoppers and crickets (Orthoptera), and (4) millipedes and centipedes (Myriapoda) were assessed together and separately to determine if there are similar patterns across taxonomic groups. We collected 335 species of GDA: 192/3793 (species/specimens) Coleoptera, 102/1329 Araneae, 25/523 Orthoptera, and 16/697 Myriapoda. GDA assemblages differed among all biomes and between seasons. Fifty-three percent (178 species) and 76% (254 species) of all GDA species were found in only one biome and during only one season, respectively. While composition of arthropod assemblages is tied to biome and season, individual groups do not show fully concordant patterns. Seventeen percent of the GDA species occurred only in the two highest-elevation biomes (Pine and Mixed Conifer Forests). Because these high elevation biomes are most threatened by climate change and they harbor a large percentage of unique arthropod species (11-25% depending on taxon), significant loss in arthropod diversity is likely in the Santa Catalina Mountains and other isolated

  1. Temporal dynamics of arthropods on six tree species in dry woodlands on the Caribbean Island of Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, William; Wunderle, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    The seasonal dynamics of foliage arthropod populations are poorly studied in tropical dry forests despite the importance of these studies for understanding arthropod population responses to environmental change. We monitored the abundance, temporal distributions, and body size of arthropods in five naturalized alien and one native tree species to characterize arthropod seasonality in dry novel Prosopis-Leucaena woodlands in Puerto Rico. A branch clipping method was used monthly to sample foliage arthropod abundance over 39 mo. Seasonal patterns of rainfall and abundance within various arthropod taxa were highly variable from year to year. Abundance for most taxa did not show significant seasonality over the 3 yr, although most taxa had abundance peaks each year. However, Homoptera displayed high seasonality with significant temporal aggregations in each year. Formicidae, Orthoptera, and Coleoptera showed high variation in abundance between wet and dry periods, whereas Hemiptera were consistently more abundant in the wet period. Seasonal differences in mean abundance were found only in a few taxa on Tamarindus indica L., Bucida buceras L., Pithecellobium dulce, and (Roxburgh) Benth. Mean arthropod abundance varied among tree species, with highest numbers on Prosopis juliflora, (Swartz) De Candolle, Pi. dulce, Leucaena leucocephala, and (Lamarck) de Wit. Abundance of Araneae, Orthoptera, Coleoptera, Lepidoptera larvae, and all arthropods showed weak relationships with one or more climatic variables (rainfall, maximum temperature, or relative humidity). Body size of arthropods was usually largest during the dry periods. Overall, total foliage arthropod abundance showed no consistent seasonality among years, which may become a more common trend in dry forests and woodlands in the Caribbean if seasonality of rainfall becomes less predictable.

  2. Silicate perovskite analogue ScAlO 3: temperature dependence of elastic moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Jennifer; Rigden, Sally M.; Jackson, Ian

    2000-08-01

    The elastic moduli of ScAlO 3 perovskite, a very close structural analogue for MgSiO 3 perovskite, have been measured between 300 and 600 K using high precision ultrasonic interferometry in an internally heated gas-charged pressure vessel. This new capability for high temperature measurement of elastic wave speeds has been demonstrated on polycrystalline alumina. The temperature derivatives of elastic moduli of Al 2O 3 measured in this study agree within 15% with expectations based on published single-crystal data. For ScAlO 3 perovskite, the value of (∂ KS/∂ T) P is -0.033 GPa K -1 and (∂ G/∂ T) P is -0.015 GPa K -1. The relative magnitudes of these derivatives agree with the observation in Duffy and Anderson [Duffy, T.S., Anderson, D.L., 1989. Seismic velocities in mantle minerals and the mineralogy of the upper mantle. J. Geophys. Res. 94, 1895-1912.] that |(∂ KS/∂ T) P| is typically about twice |(∂ G/∂ T) P|. The value of (∂ KS/∂ T) P for ScAlO 3 is intermediate between those inferred less directly from V( P, T) studies of Fe-free and Fe- and Al-bearing MgSiO 3 perovskites [Wang, Y., Weidner, D.J., Liebermann, R.C., Zhao, Y., 1994. P- V- T equation of state of (Mg,Fe)SiO 3 perovskite: constraints on composition of the lower mantle. Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 83, 13-40; Mao, H.K., Hemley, R.J., Shu, J., Chen, L., Jephcoat, A.P., Wu, Y., Bassett, W.A., 1991. Effect of pressure, temperature and composition on the lattice parameters and density of (Mg,Fe) SiO 3 perovskite to 30 GPa. J. Geophys. Res. 91, 8069-8079; Zhang, Weidner, D., 1999. Thermal equation of state of aluminum-enriched silicate perovskite. Science 284, 782-784]. The value of |(∂ G/∂ T)| P for ScAlO 3 is similar to those of most other mantle silicate phases but lower than the recent determination for MgSiO 3 perovskite [Sinelnikov, Y., Chen, G., Neuville, D.R., Vaughan, M.T., Liebermann, R.C., 1998. Ultrasonic shear wave velocities of MgSiO 3 perovskite at 8 GPa and 800K and

  3. Pressure and temperature dependence of the elasticity of pyrope-majorite [Py 60Mj 40 and Py 50Mj 50] garnets solid solution measured by ultrasonic interferometry technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwanmesia, Gabriel D.; Wang, Liping; Triplett, Richard; Liebermann, Robert C.

    2009-05-01

    Compressional (P) and shear (S) wave velocities have been measured for two synthetic polycrystalline specimens of pyrope-majorite garnets [Py 60Mj 40 and Py 50Mj 50] by ultrasonic interferometry to 8 GPa and 1000 K, in a DIA-type cubic anvil high pressure apparatus (SAM-85) interfaced with synchrotron X-radiation and X-ray imaging. Elastic bulk ( KS) and shear ( G) moduli data obtained at the end of the cooling cycles were fitted to functions of Eulerian strain to third order yielding pressure derivatives of the elastic moduli (∂ KS/∂ P) T = 4.3 (3); (∂ G/∂ P) T = 1.5 (1) for Py 60Mj 40 garnet and (∂ KS/∂ P) T = 4.4 (1); (∂ G/∂ P) T = 1.3 (1) for Py 50Mj 40 garnet. Both (∂ KS/∂ P) T and (∂ G/∂ P) T are identical for the two garnet compositions and are also consistent with Brillouin scattering data for polycrystalline Py 50Mj 50. Moreover, the new pressure derivatives of the elastic moduli are equal within experimental uncertainties to those of end-member pyrope garnet from ultrasonic studies [Gwanmesia, G.D., Zhang. J, Darling, K., Kung, J., Li, B., Wang, L., Neuville, D., Liebermann, R.C., 2006. Elasticity of polycrystalline pyrope (Mg 3Al 2Si 3O 12) to 9 GPa and 1000 °C. Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 155, 179-190] and from Brillouin spectroscopic studies [Sinogeikin, S.V., Bass, J.D., 2002a. Elasticity of majorite and majorite-pyrope solid solution to high pressure: implications for the transition zone. Geophys. Res. 9(2), 1017], thereby demonstrating that the pressure derivatives of the elastic moduli are independent of the physical acoustics technique employed and unaffected by substitution of Si for Mg and Al within the Py-Mj solid solution in the range (Py 100-Py 50) of the present measurements. Temperature dependence of the elastic obtained from linear regression of entire P- T- K and P- T- G data are (∂ KS/∂ T) P = -14.6 (4) MPa/K; (∂ G/∂ T) P = -9.4 (4) MPa/K for Py 60Mj 40 garnet, and (∂ KS/∂ T) P = -14.6 (4) MPa/K; (

  4. Equation of state of synthetic qandilite Mg2TiO4 at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Mingda; Liu, Xi; Shieh, Sean R.; Xie, Tianqi; Wang, Fei; Prescher, Clemens; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2016-04-01

    Using a diamond-anvil cell and synchrotron X-ray diffraction, the compressional behavior of a synthetic qandilite Mg2.00(1)Ti1.00(1)O4 has been investigated up to about 14.9 GPa at 300 K. The pressure-volume data fitted to the third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state yield an isothermal bulk modulus ( K T0) of 175(5) GPa, with its first derivative K_{T0}^' }} attaining 3.5(7). If K_{T0}^' }} is fixed as 4, the K T0 value is 172(1) GPa. This value is substantially larger than the value of the adiabatic bulk modulus ( K S0) previously determined by an ultrasonic pulse echo method (152(7) GPa; Liebermann et al. in Geophys J Int 50:553-586, 1977), but in general agreement with the K T0 empirically estimated on the basis of crystal chemical systematics (169 GPa; Hazen and Yang in Am Miner 84:1956-1960, 1999). Compared to the K T0 values of the ulvöspinel (Fe2TiO4; 148(4) GPa with K_{T0}^' }} = 4) and the ringwoodite solid solutions along the Mg2SiO4-Fe2SiO4 join, our finding suggests that the substitution of Mg2+ for Fe2+ on the T sites of the 4-2 spinels can have more significant effect on the K T0 than that on the M sites.

  5. Etude de la physico-chime d'un magnetoplasma de chlore pour la gravure sous-micrometrique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauna, Olivier Daniel

    The aim of this thesis is to achieve a better understanding of physical and chemical phenomena occurring in a high-density plasma designed for sub-micron etching of thin films. The plasma is produced in chlorine by means of an electromagnetic surface wave and it can be confined by a uniform static magnetic field. The flexibility offered by the reactor in terms of operating conditions makes possible a parametric study of the influence of the magnetic confinement on the plasma characteristics. Thus, we have examined the plasma properties by means of several diagnostics techniques, including electrostatic probes, laser photodetachment of negative ions, ion acoustic wave propagation and optical emission spectroscopy. First, we investigated the influence of the operating conditions on the spatial properties of the plasma; this includes electric characteristics (electrons, positive and negative ions) as well as chemical characteristics (reactive neutrals). Second, we studied the impact of the reactor aspect ratio (i.e. reactor length/radius ratio) on both electrical and chemical characteristics. Together with these experimental studies, we have developed a bidimensional fluid model, by solving self-consistently the first two moments of Bolzmann equation and Poisson's equation. Using a semi-implicit scheme, it was possible to maintain a short computation time and to use this model to investigate a diffusion plasma in an electropositive gas. We were thus able to estimate the value of the diffusion coefficient in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field. The results thus obtained are in good qualitative agreement with the diffusion coefficient proposed by Liebermann and Lichtenberg.

  6. Elasticity of orthoenstatite at high-pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Jackson, J. M.; Chen, B.; Zhao, J.; Yan, J.

    2011-12-01

    Orthoenstatite is an abundant yet complex mineral in Earth's upper mantle. Despite its abundance, the properties of orthopyroxene at high pressure remain ambiguous (e.g., Zhang et al. 2011; Jahn 2008; Kung et al. 2004). We explored select properties of a synthetic powdered orthoenstatite (Mg0.8757Fe0.13)2Si2O6 sample by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and nuclear resonance inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) as a function of pressure in a neon pressure medium at 300 K. The XRD measurements were carried out at beamline 12.2.2 of the Advanced Light Source (Berkeley, CA), and the sample was studied up to 34 GPa. NRIXS measurements were carried out at sector 3ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source (Chicago, IL) in the pressure range of 3 to 17 GPa. From the raw NRIXS data, the partial phonon density of states (DOS) was derived (e.g., Sturhahn 2004). The volume (or pressure) dependence of several properties, such as the Lamb-Mössbauer factor, mean force constant, specific heat, vibrational entropy, and vibrational kinetic energy were determined from the DOS. We will discuss our results from these combined studies and the implications for Earth's upper mantle. References Zhang, D., J.M. Jackson, W. Sturhahn, and Y. Xiao (2011): Local structure variations observed in orthoenstatite at high-pressures. American Mineralogist, in press. Jahn, S. (2008) High-pressure phase transitions in MgSiO3 orthoenstatite studied by atomistic computer simulation. American Mineralogist, 93(4), 528-532. Kung, J., Li, B., Uchida, T., Wang, Y., Neuville, D., and Liebermann, R. (2004) In situ measurements of sound velocities and densities across the orthopyroxene high-pressure clinopyroxene transition in MgSiO3 at high pressure. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 147(1), 27-44. Sturhahn, W. (2004): Nuclear Resonant Spectroscopy. J. Phys. Condens. Matter, 16, S497-S530.

  7. Saponins from Quillaja saponaria Molina: isolation, characterization and ability to form immuno stimulatory complexes (ISCOMs).

    PubMed

    Pham, Hoang L; Ross, Benjamin P; McGeary, Ross P; Shaw, P Nicholas; Hewavitharana, Amitha K; Davies, Nigel M

    2006-10-01

    ISCOMs have received much attention as vaccine adjuvants due to their immunostimulatory effects. They are colloidal particles typically comprised of phospholipids, cholesterol and Quil A, a crude mixture of saponins extracted from the bark of Quillaja saponaria Molina. We have previously shown that ISCOMs can be prepared by ether injection wherein an ether solution of phospholipids and cholesterol in a mass ratio of 5:2 is injected into a solution of Quil A at a mass ratio of 7 lipids: 3 Quil A. The aim of this study was firstly to isolate and characterise discrete fractions of Quil A and secondly to investigate which of these fractions were able to form ISCOMs by the method of ether injection. Six fractions of Quil A were isolated by semi-preparative reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and characterised by analytical HPLC, liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and the qualitative Liebermann-Burchard and Molisch tests for triterpenoids and carbohydrates respectively. ISCOMs were subsequently prepared from the isolated fractions by the method of ether injection and the resulting preparations characterized by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and negative stain transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The molecular weights of the major compounds in the fractions ranged from approximately 1200 to approximately 2300 Da; all fractions tested positive for triterpenoids and saccharides and four of the fractions were identified as QS-7, QS-17, QS-18 and QS-21 by analysis (LC-MS and analytical HPLC). Injection of ether solutions of lipids into aqueous solutions of QS-17, QS-18 or QS-21 all resulted in homogeneous ISCOM dispersions. The combination of lipids and QS-7 by ether injection produced lamellae and liposomes as the prominent structures and a minor amount of ISCOMs. The remaining two hydrophilic, low molecular weight fractions of Quil A did not produce ISCOMs, instead liposomes and helical structures predominated in the

  8. Cholesterol oxidase: sources, physical properties and analytical applications.

    PubMed

    MacLachlan, J; Wotherspoon, A T; Ansell, R O; Brooks, C J

    2000-04-01

    Since Flegg (H.M. Flegg, An investigation of the determination of serum cholesterol by an enzymatic method, Ann. Clin. Biochem. 10 (1973) 79-84) and Richmond (W. Richmond, The development of an enzymatic technique for the assay of cholesterol in biological fluids, Scand. J. clin. Lab. Invest. 29 (1972) 25; W. Richmond, Preparation and properties of a bacterial cholesterol oxidase from Nocardia sp. and its application to enzyme assay of total cholesterol in serum, Clinical Chemistry 19 (1973) 1350-1356) first illustrated the suitability of cholesterol oxidase (COD) for the analysis of serum cholesterol, COD has risen to become the most widely used enzyme in clinical laboratories with the exception of glucose oxidase (GOD). The use is widespread because assays incorporating the enzyme are extremely simple, specific, and highly sensitive and thus offer distinct advantages over the Liebermann-Burchard analytical methodologies which employ corrosive reagents and can be prone to unreliable results due to interfering substances such as bilirubin. Individuals can now readily determine their own serum cholesterol levels with a simple disposable test kit. This review discusses COD in some detail and includes the topics: (1) The variety of bacterial sources available; (2) The various extraction/purification protocols utilised in order to obtain protein of sufficient clarification (purity) for use in food/clinical analysis; (3) Significant differences in the properties of the individual enzymes; (4) Substrate specificities of the various enzymes; (5) Examples of biological assays which have employed cholesterol oxidase as an integral part of the analysis, and the various assay protocols; (6) New steroidal products of COD. This review is not a comprehensive description of published work, but is intended to provide an account of recent and current research, and should promote further interest in the application of enzymes to analytical selectivity.

  9. The 4-hydroxybenzoate/4-aminophenazone chromogenic system used in the enzymic determination of serum cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Meiattini, F; Prencipe, L; Bardelli, F; Giannini, G; Tarli, P

    1978-12-01

    A single reagent, containing cholesterol oxidase, cholesterol esterase, peroxidase, 4-hydroxybenzoate, and 4-aminophenazone, is used in determining serum cholesterol. Analysis time is 15 min, and the standard curve is linear to 6.0 g/liter. Analytical recovery of cholesterol was 100.1 +/- 0.4%. Within-run precision (CV) was less than or equal to 1.4 1.4%, between-run less than or equal to 4.8%. Comparison with results by a Liebermann Burchard method [Clin. Chim. Acta 5, 637 (1960)] gave a linear regression of y = 1.08x--0.05, with a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.985. Comparison with the Roeschlau enzymic method [J. Clin. Chem. Clin. Biochem, 12, 226 (1974)] gave y = 1.02x + 0.01 (r = 0.958). Comparison with the enzymic method of Allain et al. [Clin. Chem. 20, 470 (1974)] gave y = 1.01x--0.00 (r = 0.995). The following substances do not interfere up to the indicated concentrations (mg/liter): hemoglobin (5000), bilirubin (100), reduced glutathione (150), l-cysteine (400), urea (3000), creatinine (200), uric acid (200), d-glucose (10000), L-ascorbic acid (50), acetylsalicylic acid (500), L-DOPA (10), ergothioneine (1000), 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (20), and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (10). Stored in an amber-colored bottle, the working reagent is stable for three months at 2--8 degrees C and for three weeks at 25 degrees C.

  10. Cholesterol-Loaded Cyclodextrin Increases the Cholesterol Content of Goat Sperm to Improve Cold and Osmotic Resistance and Maintain Sperm Function after Cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Vianney M; Leclerc, Pierre; Bailey, Janice L

    2016-04-01

    The success of semen cryopreservation depends on sperm membrane integrity and function after thawing. Cholesterol-loaded cyclodextrin (CLC) is used for in vitro incorporation of cholesterol to protect cells against cold temperatures. We hypothesized that CLC treatment also enhances sperm cholesterol content to increase tolerance to osmotic shock and cryoresistance, thereby improving fertility. We confirmed the fact that treatment of goat semen with 3 mg/ml CLC increases sperm cholesterol content using both the Liebermann-Burchard approach and filipin III labeling of membrane cholesterol. Sperm were then treated with or without CLC and cryopreserved. After thawing, sperm cholesterol dramatically fell, even in the presence of CLC, which explains the mechanism of cryocapacitation. CLC treatment, however, maintained a normal prefreeze cholesterol level in sperm after cryopreservation. Furthermore, fresh sperm treated with CLC and subjected to either cold shock or incubated in hypo-, iso-, and hyperosmotic media, designed to mimic stresses associated with freezing/thawing, displayed increased temperature and osmotic tolerance. CLC treatment also improved sperm viability, motility, and acrosome integrity after thawing. Furthermore, CLC treatment did not affect the sperm's ability to undergo in vitro capacitation according to chlortetracycline fluorescence and protein tyrosine phosphorylation. A pilot field trial demonstrated that artificial insemination with sperm that underwent increased cholesterol levels following CLC treatment yielded higher fertility ( ITALIC! P< 0.1) and proliferation ( ITALIC! P< 0.05) rates in vivo than untreated semen from the same ejaculate samples. These observations suggest that CLC treatment could be used to improve cryoprotection during the freezing and thawing of goat sperm.

  11. Mormon Cricket Control in Utah's West Desert - Evaluation of Impacts of the Pesticide Diflubenzuron on Nontarget Arthropod Communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, Tim B.; Brasher, Anne M.D.; Close, Rebecca N.

    2008-01-01

    Grasshopper and Mormon cricket (Orthoptera) populations periodically build to extremely high numbers and can cause significant economic damage in rangelands and agricultural fields of the Great Plains and Intermountain West. A variety of insecticides have been applied to control population outbreaks, with recent efforts directed at minimizing impacts to nontarget fauna in treated ecosystems. A relatively new insecticide for control of Orthoptera is diflubenzuron, which acts to inhibit chitin production, ultimately causing death during the molt following ingestion of the insecticide. All arthropods, including insects, mites, and crustaceans, use chitin to build their exoskeletons and will die if they are unable to produce it during the next molt. Diflubenzuron is not taxon specific - it affects all arthropods that ingest it, except adult insects, which do not molt. Consequently, application of this pesticide has the potential to significantly reduce not only target populations but all terrestrial and aquatic arthropods within treatment zones. Some research has been done in the Great Plains on the impact of diflubenzuron on nontarget arthropods in the context of grasshopper-control programs, but no work has been done in the Great Basin in Mormon cricket-control areas. This study was instigated in anticipation of the need for extensive control of Orthoptera outbreaks in Utah's west desert during 2005, and it was designed to sample terrestrial and aquatic arthropod communities in both treated and untreated zones. Three areas were sampled: Grouse Creek, Ibapah, and Vernon. High mortality of Mormon cricket eggs in the wet, cool spring of 2005 restricted the need to control Mormon crickets to Grouse Creek. Diflubenzuron was applied (aerial reduced agent-area treatment) in May 2005. Terrestrial and aquatic arthropod communities were sampled before and after application of diflubenzuron in the Grouse Creek area of northwestern Utah in May and June of 2005. In July 2005, U

  12. Seasonal abundance of soil arthropods in relation to meteorological and edaphic factors in the agroecosystems of Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakir, Muhammad Mussadiq; Ahmed, Sohail

    2015-05-01

    Soil arthropods are an important component of agroecosystems, contributing significantly to their biodiversity and functioning. However, seasonal patterns, population dynamics, and significant roles of these soil arthropods in improvement of soil structures and functions are influenced by many factors. The objective of the current study was to investigate soil arthropod abundance in relation to a blend of meteorological and edaphic factors and to find out the difference in abundance among various crops (sugarcane, cotton, wheat, alfalfa fodder, and citrus orchards). The arthropod sampling was done by pitfall traps and Tullgren extractions on fortnightly intervals. Soil temperature and relative humidity were noted on the field sites while analysis for soil pH, organic matter, and soil moisture contents were done in the laboratory. The rainfall data was obtained from an observatory. Results showed that significant differences were found in soil arthropod abundance across different sampling months and crops. Out of total 13,673 soil arthropods sampled, 38 % belonged to Collembola, followed by 15 % Hymenoptera, 15 % Acarina, 11 % Myriapods, 6 % Coleoptera, 5 % Orthoptera, and 5 % Araneae. Mean abundance per sample was highest in summer months as compared to winter. Overall abundance per sample was significantly different between all crops ( p < 0.05). Cluster analysis revealed four categories of soil arthropods according to abundance, i.e., highly abundant (Collembola, Acarina, Myripoda, Hymenoptera), moderately abundant (Orthoptera, Aranae, Coleoptera), least abundant (Dermaptera, Hemiptera, Diptera), and rare (Blattaria, Isoptera, Diplura, Lepidoptera). Soil temperature and soil organic matter showed significant positive correlation with abundance, while relative humidity was significantly negatively correlated. Soil moisture and soil pH showed no significant correlations while no correlation was found with total rainfall. PCA analysis revealed that soil surface

  13. Invertebrate community response to coarse woody debris removal for bioenergy production from intensively managed forests.

    PubMed

    Grodsky, Steven M; Moorman, Christopher E; Fritts, Sarah R; Campbell, Joshua W; Sorenson, Clyde E; Bertone, Matthew A; Castleberry, Steven B; Wigley, T Bently

    2017-09-26

    Increased market viability of harvest residues as forest bioenergy feedstock may escalate removal of coarse woody debris in managed forests. Meanwhile, many forest invertebrates use coarse woody debris for cover, food, and reproduction. Few studies have explicitly addressed effects of operational-scale woody biomass harvesting on invertebrates following clearcutting. Therefore, we measured invertebrate community response to large-scale harvest residue removal and micro-site manipulations of harvest residue availability in recently clearcut, intensively managed loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) forests in North Carolina (NC; n = 4) and Georgia (GA; n = 4), USA. We captured 39,794 surface-active invertebrates representing 171 taxonomic groups using pitfall traps situated among micro-site locations (i.e., purposefully retained piles of hardwood stems and piles of conifer stems and areas without coarse woody debris in NC; windrows and no windrows in GA). Micro-site locations were located within six, large-scale treatments (7.16 - 14.3 ha) in clearcuts. Large-scale treatments represented intensive harvest residue removal, 15% and 30% harvest residue retention, and no harvest residue removal. In NC, ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) and crickets (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) were three times more abundant in treatments with no harvest residue removal than those with the most intensive harvest residue removal and were reduced in treatments that retained 15% or 30% of harvest residues, although not significantly. Invertebrate taxa richness was greater at micro-site locations with retained hardwood and pine (Pinus spp.) harvest residues than those with minimal amounts of coarse woody debris. In both states, relative abundances of several invertebrate taxa, including cave crickets (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae), fungus gnats (Diptera: Mycetophilidae and Sciaridae), millipedes (Diplopoda), and wood roaches (Blattodea: Ectobiidae), were greater at micro-site locations with retained

  14. Seasonal abundance of soil arthropods in relation to meteorological and edaphic factors in the agroecosystems of Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shakir, Muhammad Mussadiq; Ahmed, Sohail

    2015-05-01

    Soil arthropods are an important component of agroecosystems, contributing significantly to their biodiversity and functioning. However, seasonal patterns, population dynamics, and significant roles of these soil arthropods in improvement of soil structures and functions are influenced by many factors. The objective of the current study was to investigate soil arthropod abundance in relation to a blend of meteorological and edaphic factors and to find out the difference in abundance among various crops (sugarcane, cotton, wheat, alfalfa fodder, and citrus orchards). The arthropod sampling was done by pitfall traps and Tullgren extractions on fortnightly intervals. Soil temperature and relative humidity were noted on the field sites while analysis for soil pH, organic matter, and soil moisture contents were done in the laboratory. The rainfall data was obtained from an observatory. Results showed that significant differences were found in soil arthropod abundance across different sampling months and crops. Out of total 13,673 soil arthropods sampled, 38 % belonged to Collembola, followed by 15 % Hymenoptera, 15 % Acarina, 11 % Myriapods, 6 % Coleoptera, 5 % Orthoptera, and 5 % Araneae. Mean abundance per sample was highest in summer months as compared to winter. Overall abundance per sample was significantly different between all crops (p < 0.05). Cluster analysis revealed four categories of soil arthropods according to abundance, i.e., highly abundant (Collembola, Acarina, Myripoda, Hymenoptera), moderately abundant (Orthoptera, Aranae, Coleoptera), least abundant (Dermaptera, Hemiptera, Diptera), and rare (Blattaria, Isoptera, Diplura, Lepidoptera). Soil temperature and soil organic matter showed significant positive correlation with abundance, while relative humidity was significantly negatively correlated. Soil moisture and soil pH showed no significant correlations while no correlation was found with total rainfall. PCA analysis revealed that soil surface

  15. Fine structure of the sensilla and immunolocalisation of odorant binding proteins in the cerci of the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanxue; Zhou, Shuhui; Zhang, Shangan; Zhang, Long

    2011-01-01

    Using light and electron microscopy (both scanning and transmission), we observed the presence of sensilla chaetica and hairs on the cerci of the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria L. (Orthoptera: Acrididae). Based on their fine structures, three types of sensilla chaetica were identified: long, medium, and short. Males presented significantly more numbers of medium and short sensilla chaetica than females (p<0.05). The other hairs can also be distinguished as long and short. Sensilla chaetica were mainly located on the distal parts of the cerci, while hairs were mostly found on the proximal parts. Several dendritic branches, enveloped by a dendritic sheath, are present in the lymph cavity of the sensilla chaetica. Long, medium, and short sensilla chaetica contain five, four and three dendrites, respectively. In contrast, no dendritic structure was observed in the cavity of the hairs. By immunocytochemistry experiments only odorant-binding protein 2 from L. migratoria (LmigOBP2) and chemosensory protein class I from the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria Forsskål (SgreCSPI) strongly stained the outer lymph of sensilla chaetica of the cerci. The other two types of hairs were never labeled. The results indicate that the cerci might be involved in contact chemoreception processes.

  16. Identification of representative genes of the central nervous system of the locust, Locusta migratoria manilensis by deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengyi; Peng, Zhi-Yu; Yi, Kang; Cheng, Yanbing; Xia, Yuxian

    2012-01-01

    The shortage of available genomic and transcriptomic data hampers the molecular study on the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria manilensis (L.) (Orthoptera: Acrididae) central nervous system (CNS). In this study, locust CNS RNA was sequenced by deep sequencing. 41,179 unigenes were obtained with an average length of 570 bp, and 5,519 unigenes were longer than 1,000 bp. Compared with an EST database of another locust species Schistocerca gregaria Forsskåi, 9,069 unigenes were found conserved, while 32,110 unigenes were differentially expressed. A total of 15,895 unigenes were identified, including 644 nervous system relevant unigenes. Among the 25,284 unknown unigenes, 9,482 were found to be specific to the CNS by filtering out the previous ESTs acquired from locust organs without CNS's. The locust CNS showed the most matches (18%) with Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) sequences. Comprehensive assessment reveals that the database generated in this study is broadly representative of the CNS of adult locust, providing comprehensive gene information at the transcriptional level that could facilitate research of the locust CNS, including various physiological aspects and pesticide target finding.

  17. A broadly tuned odorant receptor in neurons of trichoid sensilla in locust, Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    You, Yinwei; Smith, Dean P; Lv, Mingyue; Zhang, Long

    2016-12-01

    Insects have evolved sophisticated olfactory reception systems to sense exogenous chemical signals. Odorant receptors (ORs) on the membrane of chemosensory neurons are believed to be key molecules in sensing exogenous chemical cues. ORs in different species of insects are diverse and should tune a species to its own specific semiochemicals relevant to their survival. The orthopteran insect, locust (Locusta migratoria), is a model hemimetabolous insect. There is very limited knowledge on the functions of locust ORs although many locust OR genes have been identified in genomic sequencing experiments. In this paper, a locust OR, LmigOR3 was localized to neurons housed in trichoid sensilla by in situ hybridization. LmigOR3 was expressed as a transgene in Drosophila trichoid olfactory neurons (aT1) lacking the endogenous receptor Or67d and the olfactory tuning curve and dose-response curves were established for this locust receptor. The results show that LmigOR3 sensitizes neurons to ketones, esters and heterocyclic compounds, indicating that LmigOR3 is a broadly tuned receptor. LmigOR3 is the first odorant receptor from Orthoptera that has been functionally analyzed in the Drosophila aT1 system. This work demonstrates the utility of the Drosophila aT1 system for functional analysis of locust odorant receptors and suggests that LmigOR3 may be involved in detecting food odorants, or perhaps locust body volatiles that may help us to develop new control methods for locusts.

  18. A broadly tuned odorant receptor in neurons of trichoid sensilla in locust, Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    You, Yinwei; Smith, Dean P; Lv, Mingyue; Zhang, Long

    2016-10-27

    Insects have evolved sophisticated olfactory reception systems to sense exogenous chemical signals. Odorant receptors (ORs) on the membrane of chemosensory neurons are believed to be key molecules in sensing exogenous chemical cues. ORs in different species of insects are diverse and should tune a species to its own specific semiochemicals relevant to their survival. The orthopteran insect, locust (Locusta migratoria), is a model hemimetabolous insect. There is very limited knowledge on the functions of locust ORs although many locust OR genes have been identified in genomic sequencing experiments. In this paper, a locust OR, LmigOR3 was localized to neurons housed in trichoid sensilla by in situ hybridization. LmigOR3 was expressed as a transgene in Drosophila trichoid olfactory neurons (aT1) lacking the endogenous receptor Or67d and the olfactory tuning curve and dose-response curves were established for this locust receptor. The results show that LmigOR3 sensitizes neurons to ketones, esters and heterocyclic compounds, indicating that LmigOR3 is a broadly tuned receptor. LmigOR3 is the first odorant receptor from Orthoptera that has been functionally analyzed in the Drosophila aT1 system. This work demonstrates the utility of the Drosophila aT1 system for functional analysis of locust odorant receptors and suggests that LmigOR3 may be involved in detecting food odorants, or perhaps locust body volatiles that may help us to develop new control methods for locusts.

  19. Simulating small-scale climate change effects-lessons from a short-term field manipulation experiment on grassland arthropods.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Sascha; Rolfsmeyer, Dorothee; Schirmel, Jens

    2013-10-01

    Climate change is expected to cause major consequences on biodiversity. Understanding species-specific reactions, such as species shifts, species declines, and changes in population dynamics is a key issue to quantify large-scale impacts of climate change on biotic communities. As it is often impossible or at least impracticable to conduct large-scale experiments on biotic responses to climate change, studies at a smaller scale may be a useful alternative. In our study, we therefore tested responses of grassland arthropods (carabid beetles, spiders, grasshoppers) to simulated climate change in terms of species activity densities and diversity. We conducted a controlled field experiment by changing water and microclimatic conditions at a small scale (16 m(2) ). Roof constructions were used to increase drought-like conditions, whereas water supply was enhanced by irrigation. In all, 2 038 carabid beetles (36 species), 4 893 spiders (65 species), and 303 Orthoptera (4 species) were caught using pitfall traps from May to August, 2010. During our experiment, we created an artificial small-scale climate change; and statistics revealed that these changes had short-term effects on the total number of individuals and Simpson diversity of the studied arthropod groups. Moreover, our results showed that certain species might react very quickly to climate change in terms of activity densities, which in turn might influence diversity due to shifts in abundance patterns. Finally, we devised methodological improvements that may further enhance the validity of future studies. © 2012 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  20. Foods and foraging of prairie striped skunks during the avian nesting season

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenwood, R.J.; Sargeant, A.B.; Piehl, J.L.; Buhl, D.A.; Hanson, B.A.

    1999-01-01

    Food habits of prairie skunks are not well understood, yet such knowledge might provide insight into factors influencing nest depredation. We studied food habits of radiocollared adult striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) during 1976-78 in North Dakota, where skunks are regarded as important predators of ground-nesting birds. Plant foods, primarily grain and sunflower seeds, occurred in a larger percentage of scats in spring (15 Apr 31 May) than summer (1 Jun 15 July, P=0.04), but overall, plant foods were a minor part of skunk diets. Animal foods, primarily birds (including eggs), small rodents, and insects occurred annually in a large percentage of scats of all skunks. These foods were acquired nearly exclusively in grasslands. Percentage of scats containing animal foods was similar, irrespective of sex, season, or year (P>0.45). In spring, vertebrates occurred in a smaller percentage of scats of females than males (P0.15). Insects were mostly adult and larval Coleoptera, larval Lepidoptera, and adult and nymph Orthoptera.

  1. Extensive Natural Intraspecific Variation in Stoichiometric (C:N:P) Composition in Two Terrestrial Insect Species

    PubMed Central

    Bertram, S. M.; Bowen, M.; Kyle, M.; Schade, J. D.

    2008-01-01

    Heterotrophic organisms must obtain essential elements in sufficient quantities from their food. Because plants naturally exhibit extensive variation in their elemental content, it is important to quantify the within-species stoichiometric variation of consumers. If extensive stoichiometric variation exists, it may help explain consumer variation in life-history strategy and fitness. To date, however, research on stoichiometric variation has focused on interspecific differences and assumed minimal intraspecific differences. Here this assumption is tested. Natural variation is quantified in body stoichiometry of two terrestrial insects: the generalist field cricket, Gryllus texensis Cade and Otte (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) and a specialist curculionid weevil, Sabinia setosa (Le Conte) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Both species exhibited extensive intraspecific stoichiometric variation. Cricket body nitrogen content ranged from 8–12% and there was a four-fold difference in body phosphorus content, ranging from 0.32–1.27%. Body size explained half this stoichiometric variation, with larger individuals containing less nitrogen and phosphorus. Weevils exhibited an almost three-fold difference in body phosphorus content, ranging from 0.38–0.97%. Overall, the variation observed within each of these species is comparable to the variation previously observed across almost all terrestrial insect species. PMID:20298114

  2. How dietary phosphorus availability during development influences condition and life history traits of the cricket, Acheta domesticas.

    PubMed

    Visanuvimol, Laksanavadee; Bertram, Susan M

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorus is extremely limited in the environment, often being 10-20 times lower in plants than what invertebrate herbivores require. This mismatch between resource availability and resource need can profoundly influence herbivore life history traits and fitness. This study investigated how dietary phosphorus availability influenced invertebrate growth, development time, consumption, condition, and lifespan using juvenile European house crickets, Acheta domesticus L. (Orthoptera: Gryllidae). Crickets reared on high phosphorus diets ate more food, gained more weight, were in better condition at maturity, and contained more phosphorus, nitrogen, and carbon in their bodies at death than crickets reared on low phosphorus diets. There was also a trend for crickets reared on high phosphorus diets to become larger adults (interaction with weight prior to the start of the experiment). These findings can be added to the small but growing number of studies that reveal the importance of phosphorus to insect life history traits. Future research should explore the importance of dietary phosphorus availability relative to protein, lipid, and carbohydrate availability.

  3. Human population, grasshopper and plant species richness in European countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steck, Claude E.; Pautasso, Marco

    2008-11-01

    Surprisingly, several studies over large scales have reported a positive spatial correlation of people and biodiversity. This pattern has important implications for conservation and has been documented for well studied taxa such as plants, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. However, it is unknown whether the pattern applies also to invertebrates other than butterflies and more work is needed to establish whether the species-people relationship is explained by both variables correlating with other environmental factors. We studied whether grasshopper species richness (Orthoptera, suborder Caelifera) is related to human population size in European countries. As expected, the number of Caelifera species increases significantly with increasing human population size. But this is not the case when controlling for country area, latitude and number of plant species. Variations in Caelifera species richness are primarily associated with variations in plant species richness. Caelifera species richness also increases with decreasing mean annual precipitation, Gross Domestic Product per capita (used as an indicator for economic development) and net fertility rate of the human population. Our analysis confirms the hypothesis that the broad-scale human population-biodiversity correlations can be explained by concurrent variations in factors other than human population size such as plant species richness, environmental productivity, or habitat heterogeneity. Nonetheless, more populated countries in Europe still have more Caelifera species than less populated countries and this poses a particular challenge for conservation.

  4. Fauna Europaea - Orthopteroid orders.

    PubMed

    Heller, Klaus-Gerhard; Bohn, Horst; Haas, Fabian; Willemse, Fer; de Jong, Yde

    2016-01-01

    Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all extant European terrestrial and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at the level of countries and major islands (west of the Urals and excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project comprises about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. Fauna Europaea represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. The "Orthopteroid orders" is one of the 58 Fauna Europaea major taxonomic groups. It contains series of mostly well-known insect orders: Embiodea (webspinners), Dermaptera (earwigs), Phasmatodea (walking sticks), Orthoptera s.s. (grasshoppers, crickets, bush-crickets) and Dictyoptera with the suborders Mantodea (mantids), Blattaria (cockroaches) and Isoptera (termites). For the Orthopteroid orders, data from 35 families containing 1,371 species are included in this paper.

  5. Is radon emission in caves causing deletions in satellite DNA sequences of cave-dwelling crickets?

    PubMed

    Allegrucci, Giuliana; Sbordoni, Valerio; Cesaroni, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    The most stable isotope of radon, 222Rn, represents the major source of natural radioactivity in confined environments such as mines, caves and houses. In this study, we explored the possible radon-related effects on the genome of Dolichopoda cave crickets (Orthoptera, Rhaphidophoridae) sampled in caves with different concentrations of radon. We analyzed specimens from ten populations belonging to two genetically closely related species, D. geniculata and D. laetitiae, and explored the possible association between the radioactivity dose and the level of genetic polymorphism in a specific family of satellite DNA (pDo500 satDNA). Radon concentration in the analyzed caves ranged from 221 to 26,000 Bq/m3. Specimens coming from caves with the highest radon concentration showed also the highest variability estimates in both species, and the increased sequence heterogeneity at pDo500 satDNA level can be explained as an effect of the mutation pressure induced by radon in cave. We discovered a specific category of nuclear DNA, the highly repetitive satellite DNA, where the effects of the exposure at high levels of radon-related ionizing radiation are detectable, suggesting that the satDNA sequences might be a valuable tool to disclose harmful effects also in other organisms exposed to high levels of radon concentration.

  6. Is Radon Emission in Caves Causing Deletions in Satellite DNA Sequences of Cave-Dwelling Crickets?

    PubMed Central

    Allegrucci, Giuliana; Sbordoni, Valerio; Cesaroni, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    The most stable isotope of radon, 222Rn, represents the major source of natural radioactivity in confined environments such as mines, caves and houses. In this study, we explored the possible radon-related effects on the genome of Dolichopoda cave crickets (Orthoptera, Rhaphidophoridae) sampled in caves with different concentrations of radon. We analyzed specimens from ten populations belonging to two genetically closely related species, D. geniculata and D. laetitiae, and explored the possible association between the radioactivity dose and the level of genetic polymorphism in a specific family of satellite DNA (pDo500 satDNA). Radon concentration in the analyzed caves ranged from 221 to 26000 Bq/m3. Specimens coming from caves with the highest radon concentration showed also the highest variability estimates in both species, and the increased sequence heterogeneity at pDo500 satDNA level can be explained as an effect of the mutation pressure induced by radon in cave. We discovered a specific category of nuclear DNA, the highly repetitive satellite DNA, where the effects of the exposure at high levels of radon-related ionizing radiation are detectable, suggesting that the satDNA sequences might be a valuable tool to disclose harmful effects also in other organisms exposed to high levels of radon concentration. PMID:25822625

  7. Characterization of an Indonesian isolate of Paecilomyces reniformis.

    PubMed

    Kalkar, O; Carner, G R; Scharf, D; Boucias, D G

    2006-02-01

    An entomopathogenic fungus (IndGH 96), identified as Paecilomyces reniformis, was isolated from long-horned grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) in Sulawesi, Indonesia. The phenotypic and molecular data identified the IndGH 96 as a P. reniformis. We present the first comprehensive characterization of this species using morphological features, sequencing of the ITS1-5.8s-ITS2 region, D1/D2 region of 28S of rDNA, and a portion of the tubulin gene, and laboratory bioassays. Distinguishing features include a hyphal body stage during vegetative growth and the production of distinctly curved, light-green conidia. High dosage bioassays showed that IndGH 96 was infectious to both long-horned and short-horned grasshoppers but not to the house cricket, Acheta domestica, or to the lepidopterans velvetbean caterpillar, Anticarsia gemmatalis or fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda. Phenotypic and genetic analyses suggest that IndGH 96 and other isolates of P. reniformis are more closely related to Nomuraea rileyi than to other species of Paecilomyces.

  8. Complete mitochondrial genomes of two cockroaches, Blattella germanica and Periplaneta americana, and the phylogenetic position of termites.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bo; Chen, Ai-Hui; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Jiang, Guo-Fang; Hu, Chao-Chao; Zhu, Chao-Dong

    2012-04-01

    The mitochondrial genomes are one of the most information-rich markers in phylogenetics. The relationships within superorder Dictyoptera have been debated in the literature. However, the closely related termites (Isoptera) are retained as unranked taxon within the order Blattaria (cockroaches). In this work, we sequenced the complete mitogenomes of two cockroaches, reconstructed the molecular phylogeny and attempted to infer the phylogenetic position of termites in Blattaria more reliably. The complete mtDNA nucleotide sequences of the peridomestic American cockroach (Periplaneta americana L.) and the domestic German cockroach (Blattella germanica L.) are 15,025 and 15,584 bp in size, respectively. The genome shares the gene order and orientation with previously known Blattaria mitogenomes. Most tRNAs could be folded into the typical cloverleaf secondary structure, but the tRNA-Ser (AGN) of P. americana appears to be missing the dihydrouridine arm. Using nucleotide and amino acid sequences as phylogenetic markers, we proposed that termites should be treated as a superfamily (Termitoidea) of cockroaches. We suggested that Polyphagoidea was the sister group of Termitoidea in Blattaria and supported that the suborder Caelifera is more closely related to the Phasmatodea than to the suborder Ensifera of Orthoptera.

  9. Pathogenicity of the Fungus, Aspergillus clavatus, Isolated from the Locust, Oedaleus senegalensis, Against Larvae of the Mosquitoes Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus

    PubMed Central

    Seye, Fawrou; Faye, Oumar; Ndiaye, Mady; Njie, Ebrima; Marie Afoutou, José

    2009-01-01

    The use of insect pathogenic fungi is a promising alternative to chemical control against mosquitoes. Among the Hyphomycetes isolated from insects for mosquito control, the genus Aspergillus remains the least studied. In September 2005, four fungi were isolated from the Senegalese locust, Oedaleus senegalensis Kraus (Orthoptera: Acrididae), collected in Dakar, Senegal. One of these fungi, identified as Aspergillus clavatus, Desmazières (Eurotiales: Trichocomaceae) was highly pathogenic against larvae of the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti L., Anopheles gambiae s.l. Giles and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae). An application of 1.2 mg/ml dry conidia yielded 100% mortality after 24 hours against both Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus while with An. gambiae it was 95%. With unidentified species in the genus Aspergillus, mortality after 24 h was <5% against all the larval species. Application of A. clavatus produced in a wheat powder medium using doses ranging between 4.3 to 21×107 spores/ml, caused 11 to 68% mortality against Cx. quinquefasciatus at 24h, and 37 to 100% against Ae. aegypti. Microscopic observations showed fungal germination on both Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae. Histological studies revealed that A. clavatus penetrated the cuticle, invaded the gut and disintegrated its cells. Some Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae, treated with A. clavatus reached the pupal stage and produced infected adults. However, the infection was mainly located on the extremity of their abdomen. These results suggest that A. clavatus could be an effective tool to manage mosquito proliferation. PMID:20050773

  10. Pathogenicity of the Fungus, Aspergillus clavatus, isolated from the locust, Oedaleus senegalensis, against larvae of the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Seye, Fawrou; Faye, Oumar; Ndiaye, Mady; Njie, Ebrima; Marie Afoutou, José

    2009-01-01

    The use of insect pathogenic fungi is a promising alternative to chemical control against mosquitoes. Among the Hyphomycetes isolated from insects for mosquito control, the genus Aspergillus remains the least studied. In September 2005, four fungi were isolated from the Senegalese locust, Oedaleus senegalensis Kraus (Orthoptera: Acrididae), collected in Dakar, Senegal. One of these fungi, identified as Aspergillus clavatus, Desmazières (Eurotiales: Trichocomaceae) was highly pathogenic against larvae of the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti L., Anopheles gambiae s.l. Giles and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae). An application of 1.2 mg/ml dry conidia yielded 100% mortality after 24 hours against both Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus while with An. gambiae it was 95%. With unidentified species in the genus Aspergillus, mortality after 24 h was <5% against all the larval species. Application of A. clavatus produced in a wheat powder medium using doses ranging between 4.3 to 21x107 spores/ml, caused 11 to 68% mortality against Cx. quinquefasciatus at 24h, and 37 to 100% against Ae. aegypti. Microscopic observations showed fungal germination on both Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae. Histological studies revealed that A. clavatus penetrated the cuticle, invaded the gut and disintegrated its cells. Some Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae, treated with A. clavatus reached the pupal stage and produced infected adults. However, the infection was mainly located on the extremity of their abdomen. These results suggest that A. clavatus could be an effective tool to manage mosquito proliferation.

  11. Diet of feral cats in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, S.C.; Hansen, H.; Nelson, D.; Swift, R.; Banko, P.C.

    2007-01-01

    We documented the diet of feral cats by analysing the contents of 42 digestive tracts from Kilauea and Mauna Loa in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. Small mammals, invertebrates, and birds were the most common prey types consumed by feral cats. Birds occurred in 27.8-29.2% of digestive tracts. The total number of bird, small mammal, and invertebrate prey differed between Kilauea and Mauna Loa. On Mauna Loa, significantly more (89%) feral cats consumed small mammals, primarily rodents, than on Kilauea Volcano (50%). Mice (Mus musculus) were the major component of the feral cat diet on Mauna Loa, whereas Orthoptera were the major component of the diet on Kilauea. We recovered a mandible set, feathers, and bones of an endangered Hawaiian Petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis) from a digestive tract from Mauna Loa. This specimen represents the first well-documented endangered seabird to be recovered from the digestive tract of a feral cat in Hawai'i and suggests that feral cats prey on this species.

  12. Restricted occurrence of Locusta migratoria ovary maturing parsin in the brain-corpora cardiaca complex of various insect species.

    PubMed

    Richard, O; Tamarelle, M; Geoffre, S; Girardie, J

    1994-09-01

    Ovary maturing parsin (OMP) is a gonadotrophic molecule previously isolated from the neurosecretory lobes of the corpora cardiaca of Locusta migratoria (acridian Orthoptera). A polyclonal antiserum directed against the two biologically active domains of the L. migratoria (Lom) OMP was used to investigate the occurrence of Lom OMP-like substances in brain-corpora cardiaca complexes of other insect species. Using immunohistochemistry, specimens of 40 different insect species belonging to 13 insect orders were tested. The Lom OMP-like substance was strictly limited to specimens of insect species belonging to the Acridae. It occurred in non-basophilic cells of the pars intercerebralis that project to the corpora cardiaca, as in Locusta. Although the antiserum only detected Lom OMP-like material in the Acridae, it is possible that related molecules exist in other insects. The antiserum may be very specific for domains of the Lom OMP molecule that have not been highly conserved during evolution or possibly these domains are not accessible to the antiserum in other insects.

  13. Silk from Crickets: A New Twist on Spinning

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Andrew A.; Weisman, Sarah; Church, Jeffrey S.; Merritt, David J.; Mudie, Stephen T.; Sutherland, Tara D.

    2012-01-01

    Raspy crickets (Orthoptera: Gryllacrididae) are unique among the orthopterans in producing silk, which is used to build shelters. This work studied the material composition and the fabrication of cricket silk for the first time. We examined silk-webs produced in captivity, which comprised cylindrical fibers and flat films. Spectra obtained from micro-Raman experiments indicated that the silk is composed of protein, primarily in a beta-sheet conformation, and that fibers and films are almost identical in terms of amino acid composition and secondary structure. The primary sequences of four silk proteins were identified through a mass spectrometry/cDNA library approach. The most abundant silk protein was large in size (300 and 220 kDa variants), rich in alanine, glycine and serine, and contained repetitive sequence motifs; these are features which are shared with several known beta-sheet forming silk proteins. Convergent evolution at the molecular level contrasts with development by crickets of a novel mechanism for silk fabrication. After secretion of cricket silk proteins by the labial glands they are fabricated into mature silk by the labium-hypopharynx, which is modified to allow the controlled formation of either fibers or films. Protein folding into beta-sheet structure during silk fabrication is not driven by shear forces, as is reported for other silks. PMID:22355311

  14. Nitrogen in insects: implications for trophic complexity and species diversification.

    PubMed

    Fagan, William F; Siemann, Evan; Mitter, Charles; Denno, Robert F; Huberty, Andrea F; Woods, H Arthur; Elser, James J

    2002-12-01

    Disparities in nutrient content (nitrogen and phosphorus) between herbivores and their plant resources have lately proven to have major consequences for herbivore success, consumer-driven nutrient cycling, and the fate of primary production in ecosystems. Here we extend these findings by examining patterns of nutrient content between animals at higher trophic levels, specifically between insect herbivores and predators. Using a recently compiled database on insect nutrient content, we found that predators exhibit on average 15% greater nitrogen content than herbivores. This difference persists after accounting for variation from phylogeny and allometry. Among herbivorous insects, we also found evidence that recently derived lineages (e.g., herbivorous Diptera and Lepidoptera) have, on a relative basis, 15%-25% less body nitrogen than more ancient herbivore lineages (e.g., herbivorous Orthoptera and Hemiptera). We elaborate several testable hypotheses for the origin of differences in nitrogen content between trophic levels and among phylogenetic lineages. For example, interspecific variation in insect nitrogen content may be directly traceable to differences in dietary nitrogen (including dilution by gut contents), selected for directly in response to the differential scarcity of dietary nitrogen, or an indirect consequence of adaptation to different feeding habits. From some functional perspectives, the magnitude rather than the source of the interspecific differences in nitrogen content may be most critical. We conclude by discussing the implications of the observed patterns for both the trophic complexity of food webs and the evolutionary radiation of herbivorous insects.

  15. Forb, insect, and soil response to burning and mowing Wyoming big sagebrush in greater sage-grouse breeding habitat.

    PubMed

    Hess, Jennifer E; Beck, Jeffrey L

    2014-04-01

    Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata wyomingensis A. t. Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle and Young) communities provide structure and forbs and insects needed by greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) for growth and survival. We evaluated forb, insect, and soil responses at six mowed and 19 prescribed burned sites compared to 25, paired and untreated reference sites. Sites were classified by treatment type, soil type, season, and decade of treatment (sites burned during 1990-1999 and sites burned or mowed during 2000-2006). Our objective was to evaluate differences in ten habitat attributes known to influence sage-grouse nesting and brood rearing to compare responses among treatment scenarios. Contrary to desired outcomes, treating Wyoming big sagebrush through prescribed burning or mowing may not stimulate cover or increase nutrition in food forbs, or increase insect abundance or indicators of soil quality compared with reference sites. In some cases, prescribed burning showed positive results compared with mowing such as greater forb crude protein content (%), ant (Hymenoptera; no./trap), beetle (Coleoptera/no./trap), and grasshopper abundance (Orthoptera; no./sweep), and total (%) soil carbon and nitrogen, but of these attributes, only grasshopper abundance was enhanced at burned sites compared with reference sites in 2008. Mowing did not promote a statistically significant increase in sage-grouse nesting or early brood-rearing habitat attributes such as cover or nutritional quality of food forbs, or counts of ants, beetles, or grasshoppers compared with reference sites.

  16. The 'other faunivory' revisited: Insectivory in human and non-human primates and the evolution of human diet.

    PubMed

    McGrew, William C

    2014-06-01

    The role of invertebrates in the evolution of human diet has been under-studied by comparison with vertebrates and plants. This persists despite substantial knowledge of the importance of the 'other faunivory', especially insect-eating, in the daily lives of non-human primates and traditional human societies, especially hunters and gatherers. Most primates concentrate on two phyla, Mollusca and Arthropoda, but of the latter's classes, insects (especially five orders: Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Isoptera, Lepidoptera, Orthoptera) are paramount. An insect product, bees' honey, is particularly important, and its collection shows a reversal of the usual sexual division of labor. Human entomophagy involves advanced technology (fire, containers) and sometimes domestication. Insectivory provides comparable calorific and nutritional benefits to carnivory, but with different costs. Much insectivory in hominoids entails elementary technology used in extractive foraging, such as termite fishing by chimpanzees. Elucidating insectivory in the fossil and paleontological record is challenging, but at least nine avenues are available: remains, lithics, residues, DNA, coprolites, dental microwear, stable isotopes, osteology, and depictions. All are in play, but some have been more successful so far than others. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Insect Species Damage on Ornamental Plants and Saplings of Bartin Province and Its Vicinity in the Western Black Sea Region of Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Kaygin, Azize Toper; Sönmezyildiz, Hilmi; Ülgentürk, Selma; Özdemir, Işıl

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify harmful insect species, understand their biology, assess their damage potential and target plants and define distribution areas. There are a lot of native or cultured ornamental plants in Bartın and its surrounding (Çaycuma, Zonguldak, Karabük, Mengen, Devrek). These plants are herbaceous and woody species. Specimens were collected from various cultured and non-cultured plants. A total of 34 species belonging to 20 families of 5 orders were identified. The order Hemiptera was represented by the highest number of species (19 species), followed by Coleoptera (8), Lepidoptera (4), Orthoptera (2), and Dermaptera (1). Insect samples were collected from plants by net traps, special insect aspirators, and various insect traps. The identified species have been stored in the collection room of the Forest Entomology and Protection Unit, Bartın Forestry Faculty, Zonguldak Karaelmas University (Z.K.U.), Turkey. This is the first detailed study about insect species causing damage on ornamental plants and saplings of Bartın province and its vicinity, although similar studies of different regions exist. This research makes a very important contribution to the insect fauna of Bartın, its environs and Turkey. Twenty four of the identified species were new for Bartın and its vicinity, while the remainder had been previously recorded in different parts of Bartın. PMID:19325767

  18. Systematics of Spiny Predatory Katydids (Tettigoniidae: Listroscelidinae) from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest Based on Morphology and Molecular Data

    PubMed Central

    Fialho, Verônica Saraiva; Chamorro-Rengifo, Juliana; Lopes-Andrade, Cristiano; Yotoko, Karla Suemy Clemente

    2014-01-01

    Listroscelidinae (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) are insectivorous Pantropical katydids whose taxonomy presents a long history of controversy, with several genera incertae sedis. This work focused on species occurring in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest, one of the world's most threatened biomes. We examined material deposited in scientific collections and visited 15 conservation units from Rio de Janeiro to southern Bahia between November 2011 and January 2012, catching 104 specimens from 10 conservation units. Based on morphological and molecular data we redefined Listroscelidini, adding a new tribe, new genus and eight new species to the subfamily. Using morphological analysis, we redescribed and added new geographic records for six species, synonymized two species and built a provisional identification key for the Atlantic Forest Listroscelidinae. Molecular results suggest two new species and a new genus to be described, possibly by the fission of the genus Hamayulus. We also proposed a 500 bp region in the final portion of the COI to be used as a molecular barcode. Our data suggest that the Atlantic Forest Listroscelidinae are seriously endangered, because they occur in highly preserved forest remnants, show high rates of endemism and have a narrow geographic distribution. Based on our results, we suggest future collection efforts must take into account the molecular barcode data to accelerate species recognition. PMID:25118712

  19. Systematics of spiny predatory katydids (Tettigoniidae: Listroscelidinae) from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest based on morphology and molecular data.

    PubMed

    Fialho, Verônica Saraiva; Chamorro-Rengifo, Juliana; Lopes-Andrade, Cristiano; Yotoko, Karla Suemy Clemente

    2014-01-01

    Listroscelidinae (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) are insectivorous Pantropical katydids whose taxonomy presents a long history of controversy, with several genera incertae sedis. This work focused on species occurring in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest, one of the world's most threatened biomes. We examined material deposited in scientific collections and visited 15 conservation units from Rio de Janeiro to southern Bahia between November 2011 and January 2012, catching 104 specimens from 10 conservation units. Based on morphological and molecular data we redefined Listroscelidini, adding a new tribe, new genus and eight new species to the subfamily. Using morphological analysis, we redescribed and added new geographic records for six species, synonymized two species and built a provisional identification key for the Atlantic Forest Listroscelidinae. Molecular results suggest two new species and a new genus to be described, possibly by the fission of the genus Hamayulus. We also proposed a 500 bp region in the final portion of the COI to be used as a molecular barcode. Our data suggest that the Atlantic Forest Listroscelidinae are seriously endangered, because they occur in highly preserved forest remnants, show high rates of endemism and have a narrow geographic distribution. Based on our results, we suggest future collection efforts must take into account the molecular barcode data to accelerate species recognition.

  20. The occurrence of amphibians in bromeliads from a southeastern Brazilian restinga habitat, with special reference to Aparasphenodon brunoi (Anura, Hylidae).

    PubMed

    Teixeira, R L; Schineider, J A P; Almeida, G I

    2002-05-01

    Five species of anuran amphibians, all belonging to the family Hylidae, were collected at Praia das Neves, municipality of President Kennedy, southeastern Brazil. The species were represented by four genera: Scinax, Hyla, Aparasphenodon, and Trachycephalus. Four species (A. brunoi, Hyla albomarginata, Scinax altera, and S. cuspidatus) were found during the dry season (August 1999), and two (A. brunoi and Trachycephalus nigromaculatus) in the rainy season (February 2000). Aparasphenodon brunoi was the most abundant species in Praia das Neves. Some reproductive aspects and feeding habits of this hylid were investigated. Aparasphenodon brunoi was found mainly inside the bromeliad Aechmea lingulata, the largest plant analyzed. Fifteen specimens were collected during the dry season (August 1999) (11 males and 4 females). During the rainy season (February 2000), we collected 14 specimens (3 males, 10 females, and 1 juvenile). Sex-ratio was 1:1. Frogs ranged in snout-vent length from 31.2 to 69.3 mm. Females were larger than males. One female had 1,451 fully developed oocytes in her ovaries. The major groups of prey found in the stomachs were: Insecta, Myriapoda, and Arachnida. Blattodea, Orthoptera, Lepidoptera, and Hymenoptera (only ants) were the main food types in frequency, number, and weight. Aparasphenodon brunoi is a threatened species in many habitats of southeastern Brazil. Only natural vegetation protection may guarantee its survival during the immediate future.