Science.gov

Sample records for lifting lug welds

  1. Cracked lifting lug welds on ten-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Dorning, R.E.

    1991-12-31

    Ten-ton, Type 48X, UF{sub 6} cylinders are used at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to withdraw enriched uranium hexafluoride from the cascade, transfer enriched uranium hexafluoride to customer cylinders, and feed enriched product to the cascade. To accomplish these activities, the cylinders are lifted by cranes and straddle carriers which engage the cylinder lifting lugs. In August of 1988, weld cracks on two lifting lugs were discovered during preparation to lift a cylinder. The cylinder was rejected and tagged out, and an investigating committee formed to determine the cause of cracking and recommend remedial actions. Further investigation revealed the problem may be general to this class of cylinder in this use cycle. This paper discusses the actions taken at the Portsmouth site to deal with the cracked lifting lug weld problem. The actions include inspection activities, interim corrective actions, metallurgical evaluation of cracked welds, weld repairs, and current monitoring/inspection program.

  2. 33. DETAILS OF SAMPLE SUPPORT FRAME ASSEMLBY, LIFTING LUG, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. DETAILS OF SAMPLE SUPPORT FRAME ASSEMLBY, LIFTING LUG, AND SAMPLE CARRIER ROD. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-701-S-5. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0701 60 851 151979. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. Analysis of lifting beam and redesigned lifting lugs for 241-AZ-01A decant pump

    SciTech Connect

    Coverdell, B.L.

    1994-11-29

    This supporting document details calculations for the proper design of a lifting beam and redesigned lifting lugs for the 241AZO1A decant pump. This design is in accordance with Standard Architectural-Civil Design Criteria, Design Loads for Facilities (DOE-RL 1989) and is safety class three. The design and fabrication is in accordance with American Institute of Steel Construction, Manual of Steel Construction, (AISC, 1989) and the Hanford Hoisting and Rigging Manual (DOE-RL 1993).

  4. Damage Tolerance Analysis of Space Shuttle External Tank Lug Fillet Welds Using NASGRO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.

    2006-01-01

    The damage tolerance of the External Tank (ET) lug welds were reassessed because of an increase in the loads due to the removal of the protuberance air load (PAT.,) ramp. The analysis methods included detailed finite element analysis (FEA) of the ET welded lugs and FEA of the lug weld test configuration. The FEA results were used as input to the crack growth analysis code NASGRO to calculate the mission life capability of the ET lug welds and to predict the number of cycles to failure in the lug weld testing. The presentation presents the method of transferring the FEM results to the NASGRO model and gives correlations between FEM and NASGRO stress intensity calculations.

  5. Precise 3D Lug Pose Detection Sensor for Automatic Robot Welding Using a Structured-Light Vision System

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Byung; Lee, Seung Hun; Lee, Il Jae

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we propose a precise 3D lug pose detection sensor for automatic robot welding of a lug to a huge steel plate used in shipbuilding, where the lug is a handle to carry the huge steel plate. The proposed sensor consists of a camera and four laser line diodes, and its design parameters are determined by analyzing its detectable range and resolution. For the lug pose acquisition, four laser lines are projected on both lug and plate, and the projected lines are detected by the camera. For robust detection of the projected lines against the illumination change, the vertical threshold, thinning, Hough transform and separated Hough transform algorithms are successively applied to the camera image. The lug pose acquisition is carried out by two stages: the top view alignment and the side view alignment. The top view alignment is to detect the coarse lug pose relatively far from the lug, and the side view alignment is to detect the fine lug pose close to the lug. After the top view alignment, the robot is controlled to move close to the side of the lug for the side view alignment. By this way, the precise 3D lug pose can be obtained. Finally, experiments with the sensor prototype are carried out to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed sensor. PMID:22400007

  6. Investigation into Interface Lifting Within FSW Lap Welds

    SciTech Connect

    K. S. Miller; C. R. Tolle; D. E. Clark; C. I. Nichol; T. R. McJunkin; H. B. Smartt

    2008-06-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is rapidly penetrating the welding market in many materials and applications, particularly in aluminum alloys for transportation applications. As this expansion outside the research laboratory continues, fitness for service issues will arise, and process control and NDE methods will become important determinants of continued growth. The present paper describes research into FSW weld nugget flaw detection within aluminum alloy lap welds. We present results for two types of FSW tool designs: a smooth pin tool and a threaded pin tool. We show that under certain process parameters (as monitored during welding with a rotating dynamometer that measures x, y, z, and torque forces) and tooling designs, FSW lap welds allow significant nonbonded interface lifting of the lap joint, while forming a metallurgical bond only within the pin region of the weld nugget. These lifted joints are often held very tightly together even though unbonded, and might be expected to pass cursory NDE while representing a substantial compromise in joint mechanical properties. The phenomenon is investigated here via radiographic and ultrasonic NDE techniques, with a copper foil marking insert (as described elsewhere) and by the tensile testing of joints. As one would expect, these results show that tool design and process parameters significantly affect plactic flow and this lifted interface. NDE and mechanical strength ramifications of this defect are discussed.

  7. 7. DETAIL VIEW OF ROCKER ARM, SHOWING POCKETS, LUGS, INCLINED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL VIEW OF ROCKER ARM, SHOWING POCKETS, LUGS, INCLINED STOPPING BLOCK AT SHOREWARD END OF TRACK GIRDER - Seddon Island Scherzer Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Garrison Channel from Tampa to Seddon Island, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  8. Investigation of Selectively-Reinforced Metallic Lugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Abada, Christopher H.

    2007-01-01

    An investigation of the effects of material and geometric variables on the response of U-shaped band-reinforced metallic lugs was performed. Variables studied were reinforcement, adhesive and metallic lug mechanical properties, hole diameter, reinforcement and adhesive thickness, and the distance from the hole s center to the end of the lug. Generally, U-shaped band reinforced lugs exhibited superior performance than non-reinforced lugs, that is higher load at the conventional lug design criteria of four percent hole elongation. Depending upon the reinforcement configuration the increase in load may be negligible to 15 or 20 percent. U-shaped band reinforcement increases lug load carrying capability primarily through two mechanisms; increasing the slope of the response curve after the initial knee and restraining overall deformation of the metallic portion of the lug facilitating increased yielding of metallic material between the hole and the edge of the metallic portion of the lug.

  9. 7 CFR 29.3650 - Lugs (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... tolerances X1L Choice Quality Light-brown Lugs. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth, oily, clear finish.... X2L Fine Quality Light-brown Lugs. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth, oily, clear finish, deep... Good Quality Light-brown Lugs. Mature, thin, firm leaf structure, crepy, lean in oil, normal finish...

  10. 7 CFR 29.3152 - Lugs or Cutters (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... percent uniform, and 15 percent injury tolerance. C4L Fair Buff Lugs. Thin, mature to ripe, firm to open... percent injury tolerance. C5L Low Buff Lugs. Thin, mature, firm to open, wavy dull finish, pale color... Fair Tan Lugs. Medium to thin body, mature to ripe, firm to open, wavy to even, moderate finish, weak...

  11. 7 CFR 29.3152 - Lugs or Cutters (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... percent uniform, and 15 percent injury tolerance. C4L Fair Buff Lugs. Thin, mature to ripe, firm to open... percent injury tolerance. C5L Low Buff Lugs. Thin, mature, firm to open, wavy dull finish, pale color... Fair Tan Lugs. Medium to thin body, mature to ripe, firm to open, wavy to even, moderate finish, weak...

  12. 7 CFR 29.3152 - Lugs or Cutters (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... percent uniform, and 15 percent injury tolerance. C4L Fair Buff Lugs. Thin, mature to ripe, firm to open... percent injury tolerance. C5L Low Buff Lugs. Thin, mature, firm to open, wavy dull finish, pale color... Fair Tan Lugs. Medium to thin body, mature to ripe, firm to open, wavy to even, moderate finish, weak...

  13. 7 CFR 29.2664 - Lugs (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... X4L Fair Light-brown Lugs. Thin, mature, open, lean in oil, weak, dull finish, pale color intensity, 70 percent uniform, and 30 percent injury tolerance. X5L Low Light-brown Lugs. Thin, mature, open... Medium-brown Lugs. Thin to medium body, mature, open, lean in oil, weak, dull finish, pale color...

  14. 7 CFR 29.2664 - Lugs (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... X4L Fair Light-brown Lugs. Thin, mature, open, lean in oil, weak, dull finish, pale color intensity, 70 percent uniform, and 30 percent injury tolerance. X5L Low Light-brown Lugs. Thin, mature, open... Medium-brown Lugs. Thin to medium body, mature, open, lean in oil, weak, dull finish, pale color...

  15. 7 CFR 29.2439 - Lugs (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... U.S. grades Grade names and specifications X1L Choice Light-brown Lugs. Thin to medium body, ripe... percent injury tolerance. X2L Fine Light-brown Lugs. Thin to medium body, ripe, firm to open, oily, normal... Good Light-brown Lugs. Thin to medium body, ripe, open, lean in oil, normal strength, dull finish, pale...

  16. 7 CFR 29.2664 - Lugs (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... injury. Grades Grade names and specifications X1L Choice Light-brown Lugs. Thin, ripe, firm, oily, normal... Fine Light-brown Lugs. Thin, ripe, firm, oily, normal strength, clear finish, moderate color intensity, 90 percent uniform, and 10 percent injury tolerance. X3L Good Light-brown Lugs. Thin, ripe, firm...

  17. Wafer level self-assembly of microstructures using global magnetic lifting and localized induction welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hsueh-An; Lin, Chiung-Wen; Fang, Weileun

    2006-01-01

    This study has successfully demonstrated a process to localize, assemble and weld microstructures using an external magnetic field. The primary three merits of this technology are as follows. (1) The magnetic field is not only to assemble the microstructures but also to fix them by induction welding. (2) The assembly and welding can be localized by the magnetic film. However, a global wafer level process can be achieved by the magnetic field. (3) It is easy to tune the heating temperature by varying the area of the magnetic film; in other words, photolithography can define various temperature regions on a substrate.

  18. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  19. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  20. THREADED ADAPTOR FOR LUGGED PIPE ENDS

    DOEpatents

    Robb, J.E.

    1962-06-01

    An adaptor is designed for enabling a threaded part to be connected to a member at a region having lugs normally receiving bayonet slots of another part for attachment of the latter. It has been found desirable to replace a closure cap connected in a bayonet joint to the end of a coolant tube containing nuclear- reactor fuel elements, with a threaded valve. An adaptor is used which has J- slots receiving lugs on the end of the reactor tube, a thread for connection with the valve, and gear-tooth section enabling a gear-type of tool to rotate the adaptor to seal the valve to the end of the reactor tube. (AEC)

  1. The Role of Lug Preheating, Melt Pool Temperature, and Lug Entrance Delay on the Cast-on-Strap Joining Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlavan, Sohrab; Nikpour, Saman; Mirjalili, Mostafa; Alagheband, Ali; Azimi, Mohammadyousef; Taji, Iman

    2017-07-01

    This work deals with effective parameters in the cast-on-strap (COS) process during which grid lugs of a lead-acid battery are joined together by a strap. The effects of lug preheating, melt pool temperature, and lug entrance delay on the quality of joints and casting defects were investigated. Lug preheating was found to propitiously reduce joint internal voids because of flux elimination. Its adverse effect on lowering lug wettability, however, made it unfavorable under the experimental conditions. The melt pool temperature also showed a two-sided effect depending on the process conditions. Raising the temperature increases the strap melt fluidity, which improves the joint contact area; however, it has a negative effect on lug wettability by flux evaporation. Besides, higher temperatures cause more lug back-melting and, hence, lower relative contact lengths. Therefore, an intermediate temperature of 683 K (410 °C) was found to make the most proper condition. Moreover, the case at which the lugs enter the mold coincident with its filling by the melt rendered the best joint quality. In this condition, the melt flows through the interlug spaces, which helps the voids to escape, resulting in the better joint interface. As the conclusion, the lug entrance time has the most effective role on joint quality, considering that lug preheating does not show any improving effect.

  2. 7 CFR 29.2664 - Lugs (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing..., 60 percent uniform, and 40 percent injury tolerance. X3M Good Mixed Color or Variegated Lugs. Thin to.... X4M Fair Mixed Color or Variegated Lugs. Thin to heavy, mature, close, lean in oil, weak, dull finish...

  3. 7 CFR 29.1165 - Lugs (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...—Choice Quality Lemon Lugs Ripe, open leaf structure, thin, oily, strong color intensity. Uniformity, 80 percent; injury tolerance 20 percent, of which not over 5 percent may be waste. X2L—Fine Quality Lemon... tolerance 25 percent, of which not over 10 percent may be waste. X3L—Good Quality Lemon Lugs Ripe, open leaf...

  4. 7 CFR 29.1165 - Lugs (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...—Choice Quality Lemon Lugs Ripe, open leaf structure, thin, oily, strong color intensity. Uniformity, 80 percent; injury tolerance 20 percent, of which not over 5 percent may be waste. X2L—Fine Quality Lemon... tolerance 25 percent, of which not over 10 percent may be waste. X3L—Good Quality Lemon Lugs Ripe, open leaf...

  5. 7 CFR 29.1165 - Lugs (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...—Choice Quality Lemon Lugs Ripe, open leaf structure, thin, oily, strong color intensity. Uniformity, 80 percent; injury tolerance 20 percent, of which not over 5 percent may be waste. X2L—Fine Quality Lemon... tolerance 25 percent, of which not over 10 percent may be waste. X3L—Good Quality Lemon Lugs Ripe, open leaf...

  6. 7 CFR 29.1165 - Lugs (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...—Choice Quality Lemon Lugs Ripe, open leaf structure, thin, oily, strong color intensity. Uniformity, 80 percent; injury tolerance 20 percent, of which not over 5 percent may be waste. X2L—Fine Quality Lemon... tolerance 25 percent, of which not over 10 percent may be waste. X3L—Good Quality Lemon Lugs Ripe, open leaf...

  7. 7 CFR 29.1165 - Lugs (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...—Choice Quality Lemon Lugs Ripe, open leaf structure, thin, oily, strong color intensity. Uniformity, 80 percent; injury tolerance 20 percent, of which not over 5 percent may be waste. X2L—Fine Quality Lemon... tolerance 25 percent, of which not over 10 percent may be waste. X3L—Good Quality Lemon Lugs Ripe, open leaf...

  8. 7 CFR 29.2439 - Lugs (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Lugs (X Group). 29.2439 Section 29.2439 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.2439 Lugs (X Group). This group consists of leaves that normally grow near...

  9. 7 CFR 29.2664 - Lugs (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Lugs (X Group). 29.2664 Section 29.2664 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.2664 Lugs (X Group). This group consists of leaves that normally grow near the bottom of the stalk. Leaves of the X group usually have a high degree of maturity and show ground...

  10. 7 CFR 29.3650 - Lugs (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Quality Light-brown Lugs. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil, dull finish, pale color...-brown Lugs. Underripe, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil, dull finish, pale color intensity... leaf structure, rough, lean in oil, dull finish, pale color intensity, inelastic, narrow, 70 percent...

  11. 7 CFR 29.2439 - Lugs (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... medium body, mature open, lean in oil, weak, dull finish, pale color intensity, 70 percent uniform, and 30 percent injury tolerance. X5L Low Light-brown Lugs. Thin to medium body, mature, open, lean in oil.... X4F Fair Medium-brown Lugs. Thin to medium body, mature, open, lean in oil, weak, dull finish, pale...

  12. 7 CFR 29.2439 - Lugs (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... medium body, mature open, lean in oil, weak, dull finish, pale color intensity, 70 percent uniform, and 30 percent injury tolerance. X5L Low Light-brown Lugs. Thin to medium body, mature, open, lean in oil.... X4F Fair Medium-brown Lugs. Thin to medium body, mature, open, lean in oil, weak, dull finish, pale...

  13. 7 CFR 29.3152 - Lugs or Cutters (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ground injury. Grades Grade names and specifications C1L Choice Buff Lugs. Thin, ripe, open, smooth... injury tolerance. C2L Fine Buff Lugs. Thin, ripe, open, smooth, bright finish, strong color intensity... body, ripe, open, smooth, bright finish, deep color intensity, broad, 20″ or over in length, 95 percent...

  14. 7 CFR 29.3650 - Lugs (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... tolerances X1L Choice Quality Light-brown Lugs. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth, oily, clear finish.... X2L Fine Quality Light-brown Lugs. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth, oily, clear finish, deep.... Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth, oily, clear finish, deep color intensity, semielastic, normal...

  15. 7 CFR 29.3650 - Lugs (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... tolerances X1L Choice Quality Light-brown Lugs. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth, oily, clear finish.... X2L Fine Quality Light-brown Lugs. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth, oily, clear finish, deep.... Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth, oily, clear finish, deep color intensity, semielastic, normal...

  16. 7 CFR 29.3650 - Lugs (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... tolerances X1L Choice Quality Light-brown Lugs. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth, oily, clear finish.... X2L Fine Quality Light-brown Lugs. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth, oily, clear finish, deep.... Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth, oily, clear finish, deep color intensity, semielastic, normal...

  17. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehigh County Area Vocational-Technical School, Schnecksville, PA.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a 12-unit secondary course in welding. Purpose stated for the flexible entry and exit course is to help students master manipulative skills to develop successful welding techniques and to gain an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in the welding field. Units cover oxyacetylene…

  18. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehigh County Area Vocational-Technical School, Schnecksville, PA.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a 12-unit secondary course in welding. Purpose stated for the flexible entry and exit course is to help students master manipulative skills to develop successful welding techniques and to gain an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in the welding field. Units cover oxyacetylene…

  19. Large Spun Formed Friction-Stir Welded Tank Domes for Liquid Propellant Tanks Made from AA2195: A Technology Demonstration for the Next Generation of Heavy Lift Launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stachulla, M.; Pernpeinter, R.; Brewster J.; Curreri, P.; Hoffman, E.

    2010-01-01

    Improving structural efficiency while reducing manufacturing costs are key objectives when making future heavy-lift launchers more performing and cost efficient. The main enabling technologies are the application of advanced high performance materials as well as cost effective manufacture processes. This paper presents the status and main results of a joint industrial research & development effort to demonstrate TRL 6 of a novel manufacturing process for large liquid propellant tanks for launcher applications. Using high strength aluminium-lithium alloy combined with the spin forming manufacturing technique, this development aims at thinner wall thickness and weight savings up to 25% as well as a significant reduction in manufacturing effort. In this program, the concave spin forming process is used to manufacture tank domes from a single flat plate. Applied to aluminium alloy, this process allows reaching the highest possible material strength status T8, eliminating numerous welding steps which are typically necessary to assemble tank domes from 3D-curved panels. To minimize raw material costs for large diameter tank domes for launchers, the dome blank has been composed from standard plates welded together prior to spin forming by friction stir welding. After welding, the dome blank is contoured in order to meet the required wall thickness distribution. For achieving a material state of T8, also in the welding seams, the applied spin forming process allows the required cold stretching of the 3D-curved dome, with a subsequent ageing in a furnace. This combined manufacturing process has been demonstrated up to TRL 6 for tank domes with a 5.4 m diameter. In this paper, the manufacturing process as well as test results are presented. Plans are shown how this process could be applied to future heavy-lift launch vehicles developments, also for larger dome diameters.

  20. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  1. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Harold; Whitney, Gregory

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist vocational instructors in preparing students for entry-level employment as welders and preparing them for advanced training in the workplace. The package contains an overview of new and emerging welding technologies, a competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and an annotated bibliography.…

  2. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Harold; Whitney, Gregory

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist vocational instructors in preparing students for entry-level employment as welders and preparing them for advanced training in the workplace. The package contains an overview of new and emerging welding technologies, a competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and an annotated bibliography.…

  3. Advanced Life Analysis Methods. Volume 2. Crack Growth Analysis Methods for Attachment Lugs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    GROUP SUB. GR. ,ttachment Lugs, Cracking, Aircraft, Damage Tolerance, 3 Analysis Methods, Straight Lugs, Tapered Lugs, Stresses, .3 3 Stress Intensity...the damage tolerance of aircraft attachment lugs are developed and presented. Stress and fracture analyses are conducted for simple male straight...Parameter Weight Function Approximation 78 3.3 Three-Dimensional Cracked Finite Element Method 85 4. Elastoplastic Analysis 100 IV STRESS INTENSITY FACTORS

  4. The fatigue strength of riveted joints and lugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schijve, J

    1956-01-01

    This report deals with a number of tests on riveted joints and lugs for the primary purpose of comparing the several types of riveted joints and to study the effect of various factors on the fatigue strength of lugs. A check was made to ascertain whether or not an estimate of the fatigue life at a certain loading could be made from the dimensions of the joint and the fatigue data of the unnotched materials. Recommendations are made on the proportioning of joints to obtain better fatigue behavior.

  5. 7 CFR 29.2439 - Lugs (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing..., dull finish, pale color intensity, 60 percent uniform, and 40 percent injury tolerance. X3M Good Mixed... percent injury tolerance. X4M Fair Mixed Color Lugs. Thin to medium body, mature, open, lean in oil,...

  6. Fatigue Testing of the MK3 Mod0 2000 Lb Bail Lugs: Test Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    REPORT REQUESTING AUTHORITY: No. 1 Central Ammunition Depot, RAAF ITEMS TESTED: Sixty one MK3 MODO 2000 lb bail lugs from four different lot numbers SUMMARY...identifying run-out, lugs from lot numbers I and 4 shall be used due to the availability of a larger quantity of these lugs in comparison to the others. 5...to lugs from four different lot numbers as follows: F1/*t = MK3 MODO (ET) 30003-1380540 ETW-1 277 F2/** = MK3 MODO 30003-1380540 SMN81J 001008 F3

  7. Traction and braking force on three surfaces of agricultural tire lug

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this research was to determine the performance of an agricultural tractor drive tire on soil and in particular, to investigate performance aspects of tire lugs. A 160/85R14 radial-ply tractor drive tire was used. Pressure sensors were mounted in the leading lug side and the traili...

  8. RSRM nozzle actuator bracket/lug fracture mechanics qualification test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Peggy

    1993-01-01

    This is the final report for the actuator bracket/lug fracture mechanics qualification test. The test plan (CTP-0071) outlined a two-phase test program designed to answer questions about the fracture criticality of the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) nozzle actuator bracket. An analysis conducted using the NASA/FLAGRO fracture mechanics computer program indicated that the actuator bracket might be a fracture critical component. In the NASA/FLAGRO analysis, a simple lug model was used to represent the actuator bracket. It was calculated that the bracket would fracture if subjected to an actuator stall load in the presence of a 0.10 in. corner crack at the actuator attachment hole. The 0.10 in. crack size corresponds to the nondestructive inspection detectability limit for the actuator bracket. The inspection method used is the dye penetrant method. The actuator stall load (103,424 lb) is the maximum load which the actuator bracket is required to withstand during motor operation. This testing was designed to establish the accuracy of the analytical model and to directly determine whether the actuator bracket is capable of meeting fracture mechanics safe-life requirements.

  9. Samus Counter Lifting Fixture

    SciTech Connect

    Stredde, H.; /Fermilab

    1998-05-27

    A lifting fixture has been designed to handle the Samus counters. These counters are being removed from the D-zero area and will be transported off site for further use at another facility. This fixture is designed specifically for this particular application and will be transferred along with the counters. The future use of these counters may entail installation at a facility without access to a crane and therefore a lift fixture suitable for both crane and/or fork lift usage has been created The counters weigh approximately 3000 lbs. and have threaded rods extended through the counter at the top comers for lifting. When these counters were first handled/installed these rods were used in conjunction with appropriate slings and handled by crane. The rods are secured with nuts tightened against the face of the counter. The rod thread is M16 x 2({approx}.625-inch dia.) and extends 2-inch (on average) from the face of the counter. It is this cantilevered rod that the lift fixture engages with 'C' style plates at the four top comers. The strongback portion of the lift fixture is a steel rectangular tube 8-inch (vertical) x 4-inch x .25-inch wall, 130-inch long. 1.5-inch square bars are welded perpendicular to the long axis of the rectangular tube at the appropriate lift points and the 'C' plates are fastened to these bars with 3/4-10 high strength bolts -grade 8. Two short channel sections are positioned-welded-to the bottom of the rectangular tube on 40 feet centers, which are used as locators for fork lift tines. On the top are lifting eyes for sling/crane usage and are rated at 3500 lbs. safe working load each - vertical lift only.

  10. Advanced Life Analysis Methods. Volume 1. Cracking Data Survey and NDI (Nondestructive Inspection) Assessment for Attachment Lugs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    Origins of Primary Crack, 155 Lug Coupons (Kiddle [1]) 12 3-4 Number of Origins of Secondary Crack, 155 Lug Coupons ( Kiddie [i]) 13 3-5 Crack Types for...1CSTY: / +5 SURF. SRFC,•C--ONE S S SURFAC Figure 3-3. Number of Origins of Primary Crack, 155 Lug Coupons ( Kiddie [1]) 12 CRACK TYPES: CRACK...MULTIPLICITY’ SURFACE 1 CRACKS CORNER 12 /15 ONLY 2 CORNER SURFACE S;CORNER PT SURFACE Figure 3-4. Number of Origins of Secondary Crack, 155 Lug Coupons ( Kiddie

  11. Structural Analysis of the Right Rear Lug of American Airlines Flight 587

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Glaessgen, Edward H.; Mason, Brian H.; Krishnamurthy, Thiagarajan; Davila, Carlos G.

    2006-01-01

    A detailed finite element analysis of the right rear lug of the American Airlines Flight 587 - Airbus A300-600R was performed as part of the National Transportation Safety Board s failure investigation of the accident that occurred on November 12, 2001. The loads experienced by the right rear lug are evaluated using global models of the vertical tail, local models near the right rear lug, and a global-local analysis procedure. The right rear lug was analyzed using two modeling approaches. In the first approach, solid-shell type modeling is used, and in the second approach, layered-shell type modeling is used. The solid-shell and the layered-shell modeling approaches were used in progressive failure analyses (PFA) to determine the load, mode, and location of failure in the right rear lug under loading representative of an Airbus certification test conducted in 1985 (the 1985-certification test). Both analyses were in excellent agreement with each other on the predicted failure loads, failure mode, and location of failure. The solid-shell type modeling was then used to analyze both a subcomponent test conducted by Airbus in 2003 (the 2003-subcomponent test) and the accident condition. Excellent agreement was observed between the analyses and the observed failures in both cases. The moment, Mx (moment about the fuselage longitudinal axis), has significant effect on the failure load of the lugs. Higher absolute values of Mx give lower failure loads. The predicted load, mode, and location of the failure of the 1985- certification test, 2003-subcomponent test, and the accident condition are in very good agreement. This agreement suggests that the 1985-certification and 2003-subcomponent tests represent the accident condition accurately. The failure mode of the right rear lug for the 1985-certification test, 2003-subcomponent test, and the accident load case is identified as a cleavage-type failure. For the accident case, the predicted failure load for the right rear lug

  12. Breast lift

    MedlinePlus

    ... enable JavaScript. A breast lift, or mastopexy, is cosmetic breast surgery to lift the breasts. The surgery ... the position of the areola and nipple. Description Cosmetic breast surgery can be done at an outpatient ...

  13. Patient lifts.

    PubMed

    1990-03-01

    In this issue, we evaluate conventional patient lifts that operate by hand cranking, hand pumping, or battery-powered motors and are intended for use in the home or in institutions. We did not evaluate lifts that are designed to be used solely in bathrooms or vehicles or those that permanently affix to walls, floors or ceilings. Some of the evaluated lifts are intended primarily for use in specific environments (e.g., one can be easily disassembled into small components for automobile transport). We evaluated 15 patient lifts from eight manufacturers, basing our ratings on performance, safety, and human factors design. Because different designs make lifts preferable for different environments, we rated the lifts for both home and institutional use based on their size, ruggedness, ease of storage, maneuverability, and cost. Seven units-the Arjo 218150; the Handi-Move 1200; the Hoyer C-CBL; the Invacare 9901, 9916 and 9917; and the Porto-Lift PL-1 are rated Acceptable for both home and institutional use. The Trans-Aid S1-600 and the Versa Lift are rated Acceptable for institutional use and Acceptable-Not Recommended for home use because of their size and cost. The Arjo B and the Hoyer Travel Lift are rated Acceptable for home use and Acceptable-Not Recommended for institutional use because they will not comfortably accommodate patients of all sizes; the Arjo B has additional limitations. The Hoyer C-HLA, the Invacare 9902, and the Trans-Aid LAT-2 are rated Conditionally Acceptable for home use on the condition that they are not used to transfer patients who weigh more than 200 lb; all three units are rated Conditionally Acceptable-Not Recommended for institutional use since there is no reliable way to ensure that they will not be used on heavier patients. The Century C-3 lift is rated Conditionally Acceptable for institutional use on the condition that it is used with the base fully extended; because the fully extended base makes the unit awkward to maneuver in

  14. Forehead lift

    MedlinePlus

    ... both sides even. If you have already had plastic surgery to lift your upper eyelids, a forehead ... Managing the cosmetic patient. In: Neligan PC, ed. Plastic Surgery . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013: ...

  15. Buttock Lift

    MedlinePlus

    ... after surgery using a needle and syringe. Poor wound healing. Sometimes areas along the incision line heal poorly ... might be given antibiotics if there is a wound healing problem. Scarring. Incision scars from a buttock lift ...

  16. Face Lift.

    PubMed

    Wan, Dinah; Small, Kevin H; Barton, Fritz E

    2015-11-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Identify the essential anatomy of the aging face and its relationship to face-lift surgery. 2. Understand the common operative approaches to the aging face and a historical perspective. 3. Understand and describe the common complications following face lifting and treatment options. Surgical rejuvenation of the aging face remains one of the most commonly performed plastic surgery procedures. This article reviews the anatomy of the face and its impact on surgical correction. In addition, this review discusses the evolution of various face-lift techniques and the current surgical approach to the aging face. Finally, this article discusses potential postoperative complications after rhytidectomy and management solutions.

  17. View of lifting girder and tower support superstructure on Tensaw ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of lifting girder and tower support superstructure on Tensaw River Bridge, looking north west. Showing rope connectors and welding cut from tower removal. - Tensaw River Lift Bridge, Spanning Tensaw River at U.S. Highway 90, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  18. NASA Structural Analysis Report on the American Airlines Flight 587 Accident - Local Analysis of the Right Rear Lug

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S; Glaessgen, Edward H.; Mason, Brian H; Krishnamurthy, Thiagarajan; Davila, Carlos G

    2005-01-01

    A detailed finite element analysis of the right rear lug of the American Airlines Flight 587 - Airbus A300-600R was performed as part of the National Transportation Safety Board s failure investigation of the accident that occurred on November 12, 2001. The loads experienced by the right rear lug are evaluated using global models of the vertical tail, local models near the right rear lug, and a global-local analysis procedure. The right rear lug was analyzed using two modeling approaches. In the first approach, solid-shell type modeling is used, and in the second approach, layered-shell type modeling is used. The solid-shell and the layered-shell modeling approaches were used in progressive failure analyses (PFA) to determine the load, mode, and location of failure in the right rear lug under loading representative of an Airbus certification test conducted in 1985 (the 1985-certification test). Both analyses were in excellent agreement with each other on the predicted failure loads, failure mode, and location of failure. The solid-shell type modeling was then used to analyze both a subcomponent test conducted by Airbus in 2003 (the 2003-subcomponent test) and the accident condition. Excellent agreement was observed between the analyses and the observed failures in both cases. From the analyses conducted and presented in this paper, the following conclusions were drawn. The moment, Mx (moment about the fuselage longitudinal axis), has significant effect on the failure load of the lugs. Higher absolute values of Mx give lower failure loads. The predicted load, mode, and location of the failure of the 1985-certification test, 2003-subcomponent test, and the accident condition are in very good agreement. This agreement suggests that the 1985-certification and 2003- subcomponent tests represent the accident condition accurately. The failure mode of the right rear lug for the 1985-certification test, 2003-subcomponent test, and the accident load case is identified as a

  19. 29 CFR 1926.453 - Aerial lifts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Qualification Procedure, AWS B3.0-41. (ii) Recommended Practices for Automotive Welding Design, AWS D8.4-61... 22, 1973 shall be designed and constructed in conformance with the applicable requirements of the... conform with the applicable design and construction requirements of ANSI A92.2-1969. Aerial lifts include...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.453 - Aerial lifts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Qualification Procedure, AWS B3.0-41. (ii) Recommended Practices for Automotive Welding Design, AWS D8.4-61... 22, 1973 shall be designed and constructed in conformance with the applicable requirements of the... conform with the applicable design and construction requirements of ANSI A92.2-1969. Aerial lifts include...

  1. FLUXES FOR MECHANIZED ELECTRIC WELDING,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    WELDING FLUXES, WELDING ), (* WELDING , WELDING FLUXES), ARC WELDING , WELDS, STABILITY, POROSITY, WELDING RODS, STEEL, CERAMIC MATERIALS, FLUXES(FUSION), TITANIUM ALLOYS, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, COPPER ALLOYS, ELECTRODEPOSITION

  2. Advanced Life Analysis Methods. Volume 5. Executive Summary and Damage Tolerance Criteria Recommendations for Attachment Lugs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    stress intensity factor. The approximation is given by KLU 1K + (3-1) LUG (K4 1 + K44 ) Equations for K41 and K44 are given in Appendix A of [2]. The two...remain in intimate contact during loading, the stress intensity factor is calculated by Equation (3-2) where stress o(x) is the sum of the residual...multiplying the stress intensity factor for a through-the-thickness crack by the following .7actor: (C) .2886 71 1 + 2’ This equation applies to the crack

  3. Advanced Life Analysis Methods. Volume 3. Experimental Evaluation of Crack Growth Analysis Methods for Attachment Lugs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-17

    Structural Lugs 10 6.00 TETM TESX, MARI LOCKHEED L𔃼.0 GRUP IIhA AND 2Rii * 2~~~~.0 .RUPINI .01 .05 1 .2 .5. 9 99PROABLTY F*ý,r 1-40 4oprsno R ato nTs rga...monitor loads and perform failsafe functions . A sinewave function generator provides load commands to the servo loop and a calibrated amplitude measurement...Simple Compounding Solution o 2-D Cracked Finite Element Procedure o Green’s Function Method 0 3-D Cracked Finite Element PrTocedure Parameters and

  4. Welding Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Welding fabrication and welding processes were studied. The following research projects are reported: (1) welding fabrication; (2) residual stresses and distortion in structural weldments in high strength steels; (3) improvement of reliability of welding by in process sensing and control (development of smart welding machines for girth welding of pipes); (4) development of fully automated and integrated welding systems for marine applications; (5) advancement of welding technology; (6) research on metal working by high power laser (7) flux development; (8) heat and fluid flow; (9) mechanical properties developments.

  5. Body lift.

    PubMed

    Capella, Joseph F

    2008-01-01

    The body in the patient who has lost a massive amount of weight presents an extreme form of traditional esthetic and functional body contour concerns. Routine body contouring procedures usually produce only suboptimal results in this patient population. The body lift described herein is an excellent alternative to treat the body contour deformity of the patient who has undergone bariatric surgery. As with every technique, careful patient selection, education, and preparation are critical to minimizing complications and optimizing outcome.

  6. Face lift.

    PubMed

    Warren, Richard J; Aston, Sherrell J; Mendelson, Bryan C

    2011-12-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Identify and describe the anatomy of and changes to the aging face, including changes in bone mass and structure and changes to the skin, tissue, and muscles. 2. Assess each individual's unique anatomy before embarking on face-lift surgery and incorporate various surgical techniques, including fat grafting and other corrective procedures in addition to shifting existing fat to a higher position on the face, into discussions with patients. 3. Identify risk factors and potential complications in prospective patients. 4. Describe the benefits and risks of various techniques. The ability to surgically rejuvenate the aging face has progressed in parallel with plastic surgeons' understanding of facial anatomy. In turn, a more clear explanation now exists for the visible changes seen in the aging face. This article and its associated video content review the current understanding of facial anatomy as it relates to facial aging. The standard face-lift techniques are explained and their various features, both good and bad, are reviewed. The objective is for surgeons to make a better aesthetic diagnosis before embarking on face-lift surgery, and to have the ability to use the appropriate technique depending on the clinical situation.

  7. Welding Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  8. Welding IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding IV, a competency-based course in advanced arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with proficiency in: (1) single vee groove welding using code specifications established by the American Welding Society…

  9. Welding IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding IV, a competency-based course in advanced arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with proficiency in: (1) single vee groove welding using code specifications established by the American Welding Society…

  10. Advanced Welding Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  11. Welding Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  12. Welding Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  13. Total facelift: forehead lift, midface lift, and neck lift.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong Man

    2015-03-01

    Patients with thick skin mainly exhibit the aging processes of sagging, whereas patients with thin skin develop wrinkles or volume loss. Asian skin is usually thicker than that of Westerners; and thus, the sagging of skin due to aging, rather than wrinkling, is the chief problem to be addressed in Asians. Asian skin is also relatively large in area and thick, implying that the weight of tissue to be lifted is considerably heavier. These factors account for the difficulties in performing a facelift in Asians. Facelifts can be divided into forehead lift, midface lift, and lower face lift. These can be performed individually or with 2-3 procedures combined.

  14. Total Facelift: Forehead Lift, Midface Lift, and Neck Lift

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Patients with thick skin mainly exhibit the aging processes of sagging, whereas patients with thin skin develop wrinkles or volume loss. Asian skin is usually thicker than that of Westerners; and thus, the sagging of skin due to aging, rather than wrinkling, is the chief problem to be addressed in Asians. Asian skin is also relatively large in area and thick, implying that the weight of tissue to be lifted is considerably heavier. These factors account for the difficulties in performing a facelift in Asians. Facelifts can be divided into forehead lift, midface lift, and lower face lift. These can be performed individually or with 2-3 procedures combined. PMID:25798381

  15. Elements of arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This paper looks at the following arc welding techniques: (1) shielded metal-arc welding; (2) submerged-arc welding; (3) gas metal-arc welding; (4) flux-cored arc welding; (5) electrogas welding; (6) gas tungsten-arc welding; and (7) plasma-arc welding.

  16. Variable Lifting Index (VLI)

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Thomas; Occhipinti, Enrico; Colombini, Daniela; Alvarez-Casado, Enrique; Fox, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We seek to develop a new approach for analyzing the physical demands of highly variable lifting tasks through an adaptation of the Revised NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) Lifting Equation (RNLE) into a Variable Lifting Index (VLI). Background: There are many jobs that contain individual lifts that vary from lift to lift due to the task requirements. The NIOSH Lifting Equation is not suitable in its present form to analyze variable lifting tasks. Method: In extending the prior work on the VLI, two procedures are presented to allow users to analyze variable lifting tasks. One approach involves the sampling of lifting tasks performed by a worker over a shift and the calculation of the Frequency Independent Lift Index (FILI) for each sampled lift and the aggregation of the FILI values into six categories. The Composite Lift Index (CLI) equation is used with lifting index (LI) category frequency data to calculate the VLI. The second approach employs a detailed systematic collection of lifting task data from production and/or organizational sources. The data are organized into simplified task parameter categories and further aggregated into six FILI categories, which also use the CLI equation to calculate the VLI. Results: The two procedures will allow practitioners to systematically employ the VLI method to a variety of work situations where highly variable lifting tasks are performed. Conclusions: The scientific basis for the VLI procedure is similar to that for the CLI originally presented by NIOSH; however, the VLI method remains to be validated. Application: The VLI method allows an analyst to assess highly variable manual lifting jobs in which the task characteristics vary from lift to lift during a shift. PMID:26646300

  17. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  18. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  19. Lift truck safety review

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents safety information about powered industrial trucks. The basic lift truck, the counterbalanced sit down rider truck, is the primary focus of the report. Lift truck engineering is briefly described, then a hazard analysis is performed on the lift truck. Case histories and accident statistics are also given. Rules and regulations about lift trucks, such as the US Occupational Safety an Health Administration laws and the Underwriter`s Laboratories standards, are discussed. Safety issues with lift trucks are reviewed, and lift truck safety and reliability are discussed. Some quantitative reliability values are given.

  20. Friction Stir Welding and NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, K Renee

    2016-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process with potential advantages for aerospace and automotive industries dealing with light alloys. Self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW) is one variation of the FSW process being developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for use in the fabrication of propellant tanks and other areas used on the Space Launch System (SLS) NASA's SLS is an advanced, heavy-lift launch vehicle which will provide an entirely new capability for science and human exploration beyond Earth's orbit. The SLS will give the nation a safe, affordable and sustainable means of reaching beyond our current limits and open new doors of discovery from the unique vantage point of space This talk will elaborate on the SR-FSW process and it's usage on the current Space Launch System Program at NASA.

  1. WELDING TORCH

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  2. Breast lift (mastopexy) - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100188.htm Breast lift (mastopexy) - series—Incisions To use the sharing features ... to slide 3 out of 3 Overview Breast lift (mastopexy) is usually performed for drooping breasts, which ...

  3. Forehead lift - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100020.htm Forehead lift - series—Indications To use the sharing features on ... to slide 3 out of 3 Overview Forehead lifts are most commonly done for people in their ...

  4. Plasma arc welding weld imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has a transparent shield cup disposed about the constricting nozzle, the cup including a small outwardly extending polished lip. A guide tube extends externally of the torch and has a free end adjacent to the lip. First and second optical fiber bundle assemblies are supported within the guide tube. Light from a strobe light is transmitted along one of the assemblies to the free end and through the lip onto the weld site. A lens is positioned in the guide tube adjacent to the second assembly and focuses images of the weld site onto the end of the fiber bundle of the second assembly and these images are transmitted along the second assembly to a video camera so that the weld site may be viewed continuously for monitoring the welding process.

  5. Inexpensive Dramatic Pneumatic Lift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Robert A.

    2017-09-01

    Various experiments and demonstrations relate air pressure and air pressure difference to force and area. Carpenter and Minnix describe a large-scale pneumatic lift in which a person sitting on a board atop a plastic garbage bag is lifted when the bag is connected to the exhaustport of a vacuum cleaner, which easily lifts the person. This article describes the construction and use of an inexpensive hand-held pneumatic lift to demonstrate the same principle.

  6. Inexpensive Dramatic Pneumatic Lift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Robert A.

    Various experiments and demonstrations relate air pressure and air pressure difference to force and area. Carpenter and Minnix describe a large-scale pneumatic lift in which a person sitting on a board atop a plastic garbage bag is lifted when the bag is connected to the exhaustport of a vacuum cleaner, which easily lifts the person. This article…

  7. Robotic Vision for Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Vision system for robotic welder looks at weld along axis of welding electrode. Gives robot view of most of weld area, including yet-unwelded joint, weld pool, and completed weld bead. Protected within welding-torch body, lens and fiber bundle give robot closeup view of weld in progress. Relayed to video camera on robot manipulator frame, weld image provides data for automatic control of robot motion and welding parameters.

  8. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  9. Welding Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    The purpose of this welding program is to provide students with skills and techniques to become employed as advanced apprentice welders. The welding program manual includes the following sections: (1) course description; (2) general objectives; (3) competencies; (4) curriculum outline for 13 areas; (5) 13 references; and (6) student progress…

  10. Welding Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    The purpose of this welding program is to provide students with skills and techniques to become employed as advanced apprentice welders. The welding program manual includes the following sections: (1) course description; (2) general objectives; (3) competencies; (4) curriculum outline for 13 areas; (5) 13 references; and (6) student progress…

  11. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  12. WELDING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  13. High lift selected concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    The benefits to high lift system maximum life and, alternatively, to high lift system complexity, of applying analytic design and analysis techniques to the design of high lift sections for flight conditions were determined and two high lift sections were designed to flight conditions. The influence of the high lift section on the sizing and economics of a specific energy efficient transport (EET) was clarified using a computerized sizing technique and an existing advanced airplane design data base. The impact of the best design resulting from the design applications studies on EET sizing and economics were evaluated. Flap technology trade studies, climb and descent studies, and augmented stability studies are included along with a description of the baseline high lift system geometry, a calculation of lift and pitching moment when separation is present, and an inverse boundary layer technique for pressure distribution synthesis and optimization.

  14. Pig lift: A new artifical lift method

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, P.C.R.

    1996-12-31

    Artificial lift of oil wells is a fairly broad subject. There are many different methods available but in a few cases none of them turns out to be a fit option. Some specific situation such as high viscosity or waxy oil, high gas-to-liquid ratio (GLR), horizontal and/or very deep well generate artificial lift problems that causes high reservoir back pressure, and, consequently, low production rates. Pig lift is a new novel artificial lift method developed to solve some of these problems. It uses a U-shaped double completion string in the wellbore, with a full bore bottom hole connector, and a surface piping and control system. This physical arrangement is put together to allow the cyclic and automated launching of a low density foam pig from the surface, pushing along with it the liquid phase accumulated into the tubing string. The method is, therefore, cyclic. High pressure gas is used to displace the pig. The system was successfully installed in five wells in Brazil, increasing the production flow rate significantly, as compared to conventional artificial lift methods. This paper presents the description of the pig lift method, and reports the results obtained in these field trials. Discussions of its technical and economical advantages and potential areas of application is also given.

  15. A user`s guide to LUGSAN II. A computer program to calculate and archive lug and sway brace loads for aircraft-carried stores

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, W.N.

    1998-03-01

    LUG and Sway brace ANalysis (LUGSAN) II is an analysis and database computer program that is designed to calculate store lug and sway brace loads for aircraft captive carriage. LUGSAN II combines the rigid body dynamics code, SWAY85, with a Macintosh Hypercard database to function both as an analysis and archival system. This report describes the LUGSAN II application program, which operates on the Macintosh System (Hypercard 2.2 or later) and includes function descriptions, layout examples, and sample sessions. Although this report is primarily a user`s manual, a brief overview of the LUGSAN II computer code is included with suggested resources for programmers.

  16. A user`s guide to LUGSAN 1.1: A computer program to calculate and archive lug and sway brace loads for aircraft-carried stores

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, W.N.

    1994-07-01

    LUGSAN (LUG and Sway brace ANalysis) is a analysis and database computer program designed to calculate store lug and sway brace loads from aircraft captive carriage. LUGSAN combines the rigid body dynamics code, SWAY85 and the maneuver calculation code, MILGEN, with an INGRES database to function both as an analysis and archival system. This report describes the operation of the LUGSAN application program, including function description, layout examples, and sample sessions. This report is intended to be a user`s manual for version 1.1 of LUGSAN operating on the VAX/VMS system. The report is not intended to be a programmer or developer`s manual.

  17. Clamp usable as jig and lifting clamp

    DOEpatents

    Tsuyama, Yoshizo

    1976-01-01

    There is provided a clamp which is well suited for use as a lifting clamp for lifting and moving materials of assembly in a shipyard, etc. and as a pulling jig in welding and other operations. The clamp comprises a clamp body including a shackle for engagement with a pulling device and a slot for receiving an article, and a pair of jaws provided on the leg portions of the clamp body on the opposite sides of the slot to grip the article in the slot, one of said jaws consisting of a screw rod and the other jaw consisting of a swivel jaw with a spherical surface, whereby when the article clamped in the slot by the pair of jaws tends to slide in any direction with respect to the clamp body, the article is more positively gripped by the pair of jaws.

  18. ELECTRIC WELDING EQUIPMENT AND AUTOMATION OF WELDING IN CONSTRUCTION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    WELDING , *ARC WELDING , AUTOMATION, CONSTRUCTION, INDUSTRIES, POWER EQUIPMENT, GENERATORS, POWER TRANSFORMERS, RESISTANCE WELDING , SPOT WELDING , MACHINES, AUTOMATIC, STRUCTURES, WIRING DIAGRAMS, USSR.

  19. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  20. Wonder Weld

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    Engineers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory are using the process shown here to create a super-strong weld for the upgrade of a key component of the Lab's experimental nuclear fusion reactor.

  1. Lifting BLS Power Supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Sarychev, Michael

    2007-08-01

    This note describes BLS power supplies lifting techniques and provides stress calculations for lifting plate and handles bolts. BLS power supply weight is about 120 Lbs, with the center of gravity shifted toward the right front side. A lifting plate is used to attach a power supply to a crane or a hoist. Stress calculations show that safety factors for lifting plate are 12.9 (vs. 5 required) for ultimate stress and 5.7 (vs. 3 required) for yield stress. Safety factor for shackle bolt thread shear load is 37, and safety factor for bolts that attach handles is 12.8.

  2. Welding method combining laser welding and MIG welding

    SciTech Connect

    Hamasaki, M.

    1985-03-26

    Welding of deep penetration is obtained in a sustrate by a method which comprises first melting the joint portion of the substrates by MIG welding and then focusing a laser beam in the bottom surface of a crater formed in consequence of the MIG welding thereby effecting laser welding of the crater.

  3. Welded Kimberlite?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Straaten, B. I.; Kopylova, M. G.; Russell, J. K.; Scott Smith, B. H.

    2009-05-01

    Welding of pyroclastic deposits generally involves the sintering of hot glassy vesicular particles and requires the presence of a load and/or high temperatures. Welding can occur on various scales as observed in large welded pyroclastic flows, in small-volume agglutinated spatter rims, or as in coalesced clastogenic lava flows. In all these examples welding occurs mainly by reduction or elimination of porosity within the vesicular clasts and/or inter-clast pore space. The end result of welding in pyroclastic deposits is to produce dense, massive, coherent deposits. Here, we present a possible new end-member of the welding process: welding of non- vesicular pyroclasts in intra-crater kimberlite deposits. Kimberlite melt is a low-viscosity liquid carrying abundant crystals. Because of this, kimberlite eruptions generally produce non-vesicular pyroclasts. During welding, these pyroclast cannot deform by volume reduction to form typical fiamme. As a result, welding and compaction in kimberlites proceeds via the reduction of inter-clast pore space alone. The lack of porous pyroclasts limits the maximum amount of volumetric strain within pyroclastic kimberlite deposits to about 30%. This value is substantially lower than the limiting values for welding of more common felsic pyroclastic flows. The lower limit for volumetric strain in welded kimberlite deposits severely restricts the development of a fabric. In addition, pyroclastic kimberlite deposits commonly feature equant-shaped pyroclasts, and equant-shaped crystals. This, in turn, limits the visibility of the results of compaction and pore space reduction, as there are few deformable markers and elongate rigid markers that are able to record the strain during compaction. These features, together with the low viscosity of kimberlite magma and the stratigraphic position of these kimberlite deposits within the upper reaches of the volcanic conduit, call for careful interpretation of coherent-looking rocks in these

  4. Catwalk grate lifting tool

    DOEpatents

    Gunter, Larry W.

    1992-01-01

    A device for lifting catwalk grates comprising an elongated bent member with a handle at one end and a pair of notched braces and a hook at the opposite end that act in conjunction with each other to lock onto the grate and give mechanical advantage in lifting the grate.

  5. Portable Lifting Seat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    Portable lifting machine assists user in rising from seated position to standing position, or in sitting down. Small and light enough to be carried like briefcase. Used on variety of chairs and benches. Upholstered aluminum box houses mechanism of lifting seat. Springs on outer shaft-and-arm subassembly counterbalance part of user's weight to assist motor.

  6. Catwalk grate lifting tool

    DOEpatents

    Gunter, L.W.

    1992-08-11

    A device is described for lifting catwalk grates comprising an elongated bent member with a handle at one end and a pair of notched braces and a hook at the opposite end that act in conjunction with each other to lock onto the grate and give mechanical advantage in lifting the grate. 10 figs.

  7. Understanding Wing Lift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, J.; Soares, A. A.

    2010-01-01

    The conventional explanation of aerodynamic lift based on Bernoulli's equation is one of the most common mistakes in presentations to school students and is found in children's science books. The fallacies in this explanation together with an alternative explanation for aerofoil lift have already been presented in an excellent article by Babinsky…

  8. Portable Lifting Seat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    Portable lifting machine assists user in rising from seated position to standing position, or in sitting down. Small and light enough to be carried like briefcase. Used on variety of chairs and benches. Upholstered aluminum box houses mechanism of lifting seat. Springs on outer shaft-and-arm subassembly counterbalance part of user's weight to assist motor.

  9. High lift aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, John; Schneider, Steve; Campbell, Bryan; Bucci, Greg; Boone, Rod; Torgerson, Shad; Erausquin, Rick; Knauer, Chad

    1994-01-01

    The current program is aimed at providing a physical picture of the flow physics and quantitative turbulence data of the interaction of a high Reynolds number wake with a flap element. The impact of high lift on aircraft performance is studied for a 150 passenger transport aircraft with the goal of designing optimum high lift systems with minimum complexity.

  10. Understanding Wing Lift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, J.; Soares, A. A.

    2010-01-01

    The conventional explanation of aerodynamic lift based on Bernoulli's equation is one of the most common mistakes in presentations to school students and is found in children's science books. The fallacies in this explanation together with an alternative explanation for aerofoil lift have already been presented in an excellent article by Babinsky…

  11. Portable seat lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A portable seat lift that can help individuals either (1) lower themselves to a sitting position or (2) raise themselves to a standing position is presented. The portable seat lift consists of a seat mounted on a base with two levers, which are powered by a drive unit.

  12. Hybrid welding of hollow section beams for a telescopic lifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jernstroem, Petteri

    2003-03-01

    Modern lifting equipment is normally constructed using hollow section beams in a telescopic arrangement. Telescopic lifters are used in a variety number of applications including e.g. construction and building maintenance. Also rescue sector is one large application field. It is very important in such applications to use a lightweight and stable beam construction, which gives a high degree of flexibility in working high and width. To ensure a high weld quality of hollow section beams, high efficiency and minimal distortion, a welding process with a high power density is needed. The alternatives, in practice, which fulfill these requirements, are laser welding and hybrid welding. In this paper, the use of hybrid welding process (combination of CO2 laser welding and GMAW) in welding of hollow section beam structure is presented. Compared to laser welding, hybrid welding allows wider joint tolerances, which enables joints to be prepared and fit-up less accurately, aving time and manufacturing costs. A prerequisite for quality and effective use of hybrid welding is, however, a complete understanding of the process and its capabilities, which must be taken into account during both product design and manufacture.

  13. Welding Curtains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-01-01

    Concept of transparent welding curtains made of heavy duty vinyl originated with David F. Wilson, President of Wilson Sales Company. In 1968, Wilson's curtains reduced glare of welding arc and blocked ultraviolet radiation. When later research uncovered blue light hazards, Wilson sought improvement of his products. He contracted Dr. Charles G. Miller and James B. Stephens, both of Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and they agreed to undertake development of a curtain capable of filtering out harmful irradiance, including ultraviolet and blue light and provide protection over a broad range of welding operation. Working on their own time, the JPL pair spent 3 years developing a patented formula that includes light filtering dyes and small particles of zinc oxide. The result was the Wilson Spectra Curtain.

  14. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, John O.; Sklar, Edward

    1998-01-01

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

  15. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

    1998-06-02

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

  16. Weld pool oscillation during pulsed GTA welding

    SciTech Connect

    Aendenroomer, A.J.R.; Ouden, G. den

    1996-12-31

    This paper deals with weld pool oscillation during pulsed GTA welding and with the possibility to use this oscillation for in-process control of weld penetration. Welding experiments were carried out under different welding conditions. During welding the weld pool was triggered into oscillation by the normal welding pulses or by extra current pulses. The oscillation frequency was measured both during the pulse time and during the base time by analyzing the arc voltage variation using a Fast Fourier Transformation program. Optimal results are obtained when full penetration occurs during the pulse time and partial penetration during the base time. Under these conditions elliptical overlapping spot welds are formed. In the case of full penetration the weld pool oscillates in a low frequency mode (membrane oscillation), whereas in the case of partial penetration the weld pool oscillates in a high frequency mode (surface oscillation). Deviation from the optimal welding conditions occurs when high frequency oscillation is observed during both pulse time and base time (underpenetration) or when low frequency oscillation is observed during both pulse time and base time (overpenetration). In line with these results a penetration sensing system with feedback control was designed, based on the criterion that optimal weld penetration is achieved when two peaks are observed in the frequency distribution. The feasibility of this sensing system for orbital tube welding was confirmed by the results of experiments carried out under various welding conditions.

  17. ARc Welding (Industrial Processing Series).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ARC WELDING , *BIBLIOGRAPHIES), (*ARC WELDS, BIBLIOGRAPHIES), ALUMINUM ALLOYS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, CHROMIUM ALLOYS, METAL PLATES, SPOT WELDING , STEEL...INERT GAS WELDING , MARAGING STEELS, MICROSTRUCTURE, HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS, HEAT RESISTANT METALS, WELDABILITY, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, RESISTANCE WELDING

  18. Advanced underwater lift device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, David T.; Hopkins, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    Flexible underwater lift devices ('lift bags') are used in underwater operations to provide buoyancy to submerged objects. Commercially available designs are heavy, bulky, and awkward to handle, and thus are limited in size and useful lifting capacity. An underwater lift device having less than 20 percent of the bulk and less than 10 percent of the weight of commercially available models was developed. The design features a dual membrane envelope, a nearly homogeneous envelope membrane stress distribution, and a minimum surface-to-volume ratio. A proof-of-concept model of 50 kg capacity was built and tested. Originally designed to provide buoyancy to mock-ups submerged in NASA's weightlessness simulators, the device may have application to water-landed spacecraft which must deploy flotation upon impact, and where launch weight and volume penalties are significant. The device may also be useful for the automated recovery of ocean floor probes or in marine salvage applications.

  19. Lifting the Runners

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-25

    Under the unflinching summer sun, workers at NASA Deep Space Network complex in Goldstone, Calif., use a crane to lift a runner segment that is part of major surgery on a giant, 70-meter-wide antenna.

  20. Wind tower service lift

    DOEpatents

    Oliphant, David; Quilter, Jared; Andersen, Todd; Conroy, Thomas

    2011-09-13

    An apparatus used for maintaining a wind tower structure wherein the wind tower structure may have a plurality of legs and may be configured to support a wind turbine above the ground in a better position to interface with winds. The lift structure may be configured for carrying objects and have a guide system and drive system for mechanically communicating with a primary cable, rail or other first elongate member attached to the wind tower structure. The drive system and guide system may transmit forces that move the lift relative to the cable and thereby relative to the wind tower structure. A control interface may be included for controlling the amount and direction of the power into the guide system and drive system thereby causing the guide system and drive system to move the lift relative to said first elongate member such that said lift moves relative to said wind tower structure.

  1. FREIGHT CONTAINER LIFTING STANDARD

    SciTech Connect

    POWERS DJ; SCOTT MA; MACKEY TC

    2010-01-13

    This standard details the correct methods of lifting and handling Series 1 freight containers following ISO-3874 and ISO-1496. The changes within RPP-40736 will allow better reading comprehension, as well as correcting editorial errors.

  2. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  3. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  4. Multi-Canister overpack ultrasonic examination of closure weld

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH, K.E.

    1998-11-03

    The method used for non-destructive examination of the closure weld must provide adequate assurance that the weld is structurally sound for the pressure and lifting loads to be imposed, and must be consistent with NRC equivalency requirements established for the SNF Project. Given the large flaw size that would need to exist before the structural integrity of the weld is challenged, liquid penetrant testing of the root and final passes provides adequate assurance of weld quality to meet structural loads. In addition, the helium leak test provides confirmation that the containment boundary is intact and leaktight. While UT examination does provide additional evidence of weld integrity, the value of that additional evidence for this particular application does not justify performing UT examination, given the additional financial and ALARA costs associated with performing the examination.

  5. Weld Tests Conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Zirker; Lance Lauerhass; James Dowalo

    2007-02-01

    During the fiscal year of 2006, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed many tests and work relating to the Mobile Melt-Dilute (MMD) Project components. Tests performed on the Staubli quick disconnect fittings showed promising results, but more tests were needed validate the fittings. Changes were made to the shield plug design—reduced the closure groove weld depth between the top of the canister and the top plate of the shielding plug from 0.5-in to 0.375-in deep. Other changes include a cap to cover the fitting, lifting pintle and welding code citations on the prints. Tests conducted showed stainless steel tubing, with 0.25-in, 0.375-in, and 0.5-in diameters, all with 0.035-in wall thickness, could be pinch seal welded using commercially available resistance welding equipment. Subsequent testing showed that these welds could be real-time inspected with ultrasonic inspection methods.

  6. Electroslag and electrogas welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, H. C.

    1972-01-01

    These two new joining methods perform welding in the vertical position, and therein lies the secret of their impressive advantages in material handling, in weld preparation, in welding speed, in freedom from distortion, and in weld soundness. Once the work has been set in the proper vertical position for welding, no further plate handling is required. The molten filler metal is held in place by copper shoes or dams, and the weld is completed in one pass.

  7. Welding processes and practices

    SciTech Connect

    Koellhoffer, L.; Manz, A.F.; Hornberger, G.

    1987-01-01

    Each section begins with basic process theory and moves on to practical exercises that become increasingly more difficult. Among the many processes and practices covered are: the materials and mechanical factors, basic positions and joints, oxyfuel gas welding, oxyacetylene welding of carbon steel, shielded metal arc welding, flux-colored arc welding, and gas tungsten arc welding. Discusses the advantages and disadvantages of welding, and presents trouble-shooting techniques.

  8. Method for welding an article and terminating the weldment within the perimeter of the article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smashey, Russell W. (Inventor); Snyder, John H. (Inventor); Boerger, Eric J. (Inventor); Borne, Bruce L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An article is welded, as in weld repair of a defect, by positioning a weld lift-off block at a location on the surface of the article adjacent to the intended location of the end of the weldment on the surface of the article. The weld lift-off block has a wedge shape including a base contacting the surface of the article, and an upper face angled upwardly from the base from a base leading edge. A weld pool is formed on the surface of the article by directly heating the surface of the article using a heat source. The heat source is moved relative to the surface of the article and onto the upper surface of the weld lift-off block by crossing the leading edge of the wedge, without discontinuing the direct heating of the article by the heat source. The heating of the article with the heat source is discontinued only after the heat source is directly heating the upper face of the weld lift-off block, and not the article.

  9. Weld pool phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Zacharia, T.; DebRoy, T.

    1994-09-01

    During welding, the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure are affected by the interaction of the heat source with the metal. The interaction affects the fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transfer in the weld pool, and the solidification behavior of the weld metal. In recent years, there has been a growing recognition of the importance of the weld pool transport processes and the solid state transformation reactions in determining the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure. The relation between the weld pool transport processes and the composition and structure is reviewed. Recent applications of various solidification theories to welding are examined to understand the special problems of weld metal solidification. The discussion is focussed on the important problems and issues related to weld pool transport phenomena and solidification. Resolution of these problems would be an important step towards a science based control of composition, structure and properties of the weld metal.

  10. Friction plug welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeshita, Riki (Inventor); Hibbard, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Friction plug welding (FPW) usage is advantageous for friction stir welding (FSW) hole close-outs and weld repairs in 2195 Al--Cu--Li fusion or friction stir welds. Current fusion welding methods of Al--Cu--Li have produced welds containing varied defects. These areas are found by non-destructive examination both after welding and after proof testing. Current techniques for repairing typically small (<0.25) defects weaken the weldment, rely heavily on welders' skill, and are costly. Friction plug welding repairs increase strength, ductility and resistance to cracking over initial weld quality, without requiring much time or operator skill. Friction plug welding while pulling the plug is advantageous because all hardware for performing the weld can be placed on one side of the workpiece.

  11. WELDING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.; DeWitt, D.E.; Nelson, I.V.

    1963-04-23

    This patent covers an arrangement for replacing air in a welding chamber with an inert gas. This operation usually is time-consuming because of the tendency of the inert gas to mix with the air being removed from the welding chamber. The chamber is open at the bottom and has at its top a cover and a porous plate a little below the cover. The inert gas is admitted to the chamber through two screened openings in the cover. On passing through the porous plate, the gas acts as a piston extending across the chamber and moving downwardly to expel the air through the lower open end of the chamber, with a minimum of mixing with the air being expelled. (AEC)

  12. WELDING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  13. Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  14. Regional changes in spine posture at lift onset with changes in lift distance and lift style.

    PubMed

    Gill, K Peter; Bennett, Simon J; Savelsbergh, Geert J P; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2007-07-01

    Repeated measures experiment. To determine the effect of changes in horizontal lift distance on the amount of flexion, at lift onset, in different spine regions when using different lift styles. By approximating spine bending during lifting as a pure rotation about a single revolute joint, the differential effects of task constraints and instructions on motions of different spine levels will be obscured. Eight participants lifted a 10-kg crate from the floor, 10 times at each of five distances. Participants were instructed to use freestyle (a participant's preferred lift style), squat, or stoop lift styles. Kinematic data were collected from the mid thoracic spine, lower thoracic/upper lumbar spine, mid lumbar spine, and the lower lumbar spine at lift onset. A whole spine angle was also calculated. Flexion of the lower lumbar spine was not affected by lift distance and style. Differences between lift styles occurred mainly in the mid thoracic and the lower thoracic/upper lumbar regions. With increasing horizontal distance, changes in lift style occurred in the upper three spine regions. These results suggest that the tensile strain on tissues in the lower lumbar spine, which can be a cause of injury in lifting, was not affected by lift style or horizontal lift distance when lifting from floor level.

  15. [Modern face lift surgery].

    PubMed

    von Gregory, H F; Gubisch, W

    2011-09-01

    Face lift surgery is generally considered the classical surgical procedure of plastic surgery. This is an extensive operation which has undergone a huge development since its first implementation more than 100 years ago. What began as a simple skin tightening procedure is today a sophisticated and complex technique which ideally combines different treatment methods planned with surgical precision. This article provides an overview of the history of the procedure to the present state of the art concept of pairing biplanar and bivectorial face-neck lifts with autologous fat transfer and dermabrasion.

  16. Introduction to Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  17. Weld-Bead Shaver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guirguis, Kamal; Price, Daniel S.

    1990-01-01

    Hand-held power tool shaves excess metal from inside circumference of welded duct. Removes excess metal deposited by penetration of tungsten/inert-gas weld or by spatter from electron-beam weld. Produces smooth transition across joint. Easier to use and not prone to overshaving. Also cuts faster, removing 35 in. (89 cm) of weld bead per hour.

  18. [Endoscopy and face-lift].

    PubMed

    Dardour, J C; Abbou, R

    2017-08-02

    For many years, the face-lift has not been the only intervention for facial rejuvenation. It is necessary today to specify the type of face-lift, cervico-facial lifting, frontal lifting or facelift. We will consider in this article the frontal lift and centro-facial lift and its possible execution assisted by endoscopy with therefore minimal scars, hidden in the scalp. We will consider successively its technique, its indications and its results highlighting a very long hold over time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Laser welding in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Workman, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Autogenous welds in 304 stainless steel were performed by Nd-YAG laser heating in a simulated space environment. Simulation consists of welding on the NASA KC-135 aircraft to produce the microgravity and by containing the specimen in a vacuum chamber. Experimental results show that the microgravity welds are stronger, harder in the fusion zone, have deeper penetration and have a rougher surface rippling of the weld pool than one-g welds. To perform laser welding in space, a solar-pumped laser concept that significantly increases the laser conversion efficiency and makes welding viable despite the limited power availability of spacecraft is proposed.

  20. On-line crack prognosis in attachment lug using Lamb wave-deterministic resampling particle filter-based method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shenfang; Chen, Jian; Yang, Weibo; Qiu, Lei

    2017-08-01

    Fatigue crack growth prognosis is important for prolonging service time, improving safety, and reducing maintenance cost in many safety-critical systems, such as in aircraft, wind turbines, bridges, and nuclear plants. Combining fatigue crack growth models with the particle filter (PF) method has proved promising to deal with the uncertainties during fatigue crack growth and reach a more accurate prognosis. However, research on prognosis methods integrating on-line crack monitoring with the PF method is still lacking, as well as experimental verifications. Besides, the PF methods adopted so far are almost all sequential importance resampling-based PFs, which usually encounter sample impoverishment problems, and hence performs poorly. To solve these problems, in this paper, the piezoelectric transducers (PZTs)-based active Lamb wave method is adopted for on-line crack monitoring. The deterministic resampling PF (DRPF) is proposed to be used in fatigue crack growth prognosis, which can overcome the sample impoverishment problem. The proposed method is verified through fatigue tests of attachment lugs, which are a kind of important joint component in aerospace systems.

  1. Welding properties of thin steel sheets by laser-arc hybrid welding: laser focused arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Moriaki; Shinbo, Yukio; Yoshitake, Akihide; Ohmura, Masanori

    2003-03-01

    Laser-arc hybrid welding combines the laser and arc welding processes to provide advantages not found in either. This process can weld lapped steel sheets that have a larger gap than is possible with laser welding. Blowholes form when lap-welding zinc-coated steel sheets because of the zinc that is vaporized. The laser-arc hybrid welding process can lap-weld zinc-coated steel sheets without causing blowholes. The welding speed of laser-arc hybrid welding is nearly equivalent to that of laser welding. Laser-arc hybrid welding produces high-quality lap joints and is ideal for assembly welding of automotive parts.

  2. JWST Lifting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolleson, William

    2012-01-01

    A document describes designing, building, testing, and certifying a customized crane (Lifting Device LD) with a strong back (cradle) to facilitate the installation of long wall panels and short door panels for the GHe phase of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The LD controls are variable-frequency drive controls designed to be adjustable for very slow and very-short-distance movements throughout the installation. The LD has a lift beam with an electric actuator attached at the end. The actuator attaches to a rectangular strong back (cradle) for lifting the long wall panels and short door panels from a lower angle into the vertical position inside the chamber, and then rotating around the chamber for installation onto the existing ceiling and floor. The LD rotates 360 (in very small increments) in both clockwise and counterclockwise directions. Eight lifting pads are on the top ring with 2-in. (.5-cm) eye holes spaced evenly around the ring to allow for the device to be suspended by three crane hoists from the top of the chamber. The LD is operated by remote controls that allow for a single, slow mode for booming the load in and out, with slow and very slow modes for rotating the load.

  3. Lifting as You Climb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Debra R.

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses leadership themes and answers leadership questions presented to "Exchange" by the Panel members who attended the "Exchange" Panel of 300 Reception in Dallas, Texas, last November. There is an old proverb that encourages people to lift as they climb: "While you climb a mountain, you must not forget others along the way." With…

  4. Lifting Sample Return Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Stardust sample return capsule successfully landed at the U.S. Air Force Utah Test and Training Range at 2:10 a.m. Pacific time (3:10 a.m. Mountain time). The capsule contains cometary and interstellar samples gathered by the Stardust spacecraft.

    Here, the capsule is being lifted at the landing site.

  5. Hydraulic lifting device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrell, Kyle (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A piston and cylinder assembly is disclosed which is constructed of polyvinyl chloride that uses local water pressure to perform small lifting tasks. The chamber is either pressurized to extend the piston or depressurized to retract the piston. The present invention is best utilized for raising and lowering toilet seats.

  6. Lifting as You Climb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Debra R.

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses leadership themes and answers leadership questions presented to "Exchange" by the Panel members who attended the "Exchange" Panel of 300 Reception in Dallas, Texas, last November. There is an old proverb that encourages people to lift as they climb: "While you climb a mountain, you must not forget others along the way." With…

  7. Advanced Welding Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  8. Fusion Welding Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    alloy for a variety of Navy systems. The fracture toughness of thick plate submerged arc welds is of particular interesc. This project is an...research S on welding processes. Studies include metal vapors in the arc , development of a high speed infrared temperature monitor, digital signal...analysis as a weld process monitor, convection in arc weld pools, droplet transfer and contact tip wear in gas metal arc welding of titanium, and fractd’re

  9. [Maximum acceptable weight of lift for manual lifting tasks].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Yang, Lei

    2006-04-01

    To explore the maximum acceptable weight of lift (MAWL) in different lifting conditions and the suitable lifting equation for the stipulation of occupational health standard of manual lifting tasks in China. The MAWL was investigated among the thirteen male and ten female students using psychophysical methodology and the recommended weight of limit (RWL) was compared. The MAWL of male and female subjects was decreased gradually with the increase of lifting height. Once the height of lifting was over shoulder, the MAWL was decreased dramatically. The RWL was greater than the MAWL at 25 cm horizontal distance in male subjects, but the RWL was smaller than the MAWL at the distance of 45 cm and 63 cm. The average MAWL of male subjects was 30.8% greater than that of female subjects. The MAWL was decreased gradually with increase of the horizontal distance at the same height of lifting. The result of the male subjects was consistent with that of the female subjects. For the asymmetric lifting tasks of the male subjects, the bigger the angle of rotation was, the less the MAWL became. The angle of rotation had negative correlation with the capability of lifting (r = -0.996 6, P < 0.01). When the subjects performed asymmetric lifting tasks, the RWL was smaller than the MAWL and the difference was significant. The revision is sufficient for the horizontal distance and asymmetric lifting in the NIOSH lifting equation, but it is not suitable for height, especially for the task of lifting over shoulder. The RWL for the task of lifting over shoulder should be lowered. The factor of gender should be taken into account in the lifting equation and the constant of gender S can be added. Then S = 1 for male while S = 0.692 for female.

  10. Television Monitoring System for Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallow, K.; Gordon, S.

    1986-01-01

    Welding process in visually inaccessible spots viewed and recorded. Television system enables monitoring of welding in visually inaccessible locations. System assists welding operations and provide video record, used for weld analysis and welder training.

  11. Television Monitoring System for Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallow, K.; Gordon, S.

    1986-01-01

    Welding process in visually inaccessible spots viewed and recorded. Television system enables monitoring of welding in visually inaccessible locations. System assists welding operations and provide video record, used for weld analysis and welder training.

  12. Lifting speed preferences and their effects on the maximal lifting capacity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiuhsiang Joe; Cheng, Chih-Feng

    2017-02-07

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate how lifting capacity and subjective preferences are affected by different lifting speeds. The maximum lifting capacity of lift was determined with three independent variables, lifting speed, lifting technique, and lifting height. Questionnaires were evaluated after the experiment by the participants for the lifting speed preferences. This study found that the lifting speed was a significant factor in the lifting capacity (p<0.001); and the lifting height (p<0.001) and the interaction of lifting speed and lifting height (p=0.005) affected the lifting capacity significantly. The maximal lifting capacity was achieved around the optimal speed that was neither too fast nor too slow. Moreover, the participants' preferred lifting speeds were consistently close to the optimal lifting speed. The results showed that the common lifting practice guideline to lift slowly might make the worker unable to generate a large lifting capacity.

  13. Lifting speed preferences and their effects on the maximal lifting capacity

    PubMed Central

    LIN, Chiuhsiang Joe; CHENG, Chih-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate how lifting capacity and subjective preferences are affected by different lifting speeds. The maximum lifting capacity of lift was determined with three independent variables, lifting speed, lifting technique, and lifting height. Questionnaires were evaluated after the experiment by the participants for the lifting speed preferences. This study found that the lifting speed was a significant factor in the lifting capacity (p<0.001); and the lifting height (p<0.001) and the interaction of lifting speed and lifting height (p=0.005) affected the lifting capacity significantly. The maximal lifting capacity was achieved around the optimal speed that was neither too fast nor too slow. Moreover, the participants’ preferred lifting speeds were consistently close to the optimal lifting speed. The results showed that the common lifting practice guideline to lift slowly might make the worker unable to generate a large lifting capacity. PMID:27383532

  14. Helicopter Toy and Lift Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakerin, Said

    2013-01-01

    A $1 plastic helicopter toy (called a Wacky Whirler) can be used to demonstrate lift. Students can make basic measurements of the toy, use reasonable assumptions and, with the lift formula, estimate the lift, and verify that it is sufficient to overcome the toy's weight. (Contains 1 figure.)

  15. Helicopter Toy and Lift Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakerin, Said

    2013-01-01

    A $1 plastic helicopter toy (called a Wacky Whirler) can be used to demonstrate lift. Students can make basic measurements of the toy, use reasonable assumptions and, with the lift formula, estimate the lift, and verify that it is sufficient to overcome the toy's weight. (Contains 1 figure.)

  16. Modification of integrated partial payload lifting assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groah, Melodie; Haddock, Michael; Woodworth, Warren

    1986-01-01

    The Integrated Partial Payload Lifting Assembly (IPPLA) is currently used to transport and load experimental payloads into the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle. It is unable to carry the astronaut/passenger tunnel without a structural modification. The purpose of this design is to create a removalbe modification that will allow the IPPLA to lift and carry the passenger tunnel. Modifications evaluated were full-length insert beams which would extend through the existing strongback arms. These beam proposals were eliminated because of high cost and weight. Other proposals evaluated were attachments of cantilever beams to the existing strongback areas. The cantilever proposals reduced cost and weight compared to the full-length modifications. A third method evaluated was to simply make modifications to one side of the IPPLA therefore reducing the materials of the cantilever proposals by 40 percent. The design of the modification selected was completed with two channel beams jointly welded to a centered steel plate. The extension arm modification is inserted into the existing strongback channel beams and bolted into place. Two extension arms are added to one side of the IPPLA to provide the extra length needed to accommodate the passenger tunnel. The center counterbalance will then be offset about 20 inches to center gravity and therefore maintain horizontal status. The extension arm modification was selected because of minimum cost, low weight, and minimal installation time.

  17. Modification of integrated partial payload lifting assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groah, Melodie; Haddock, Michael; Woodworth, Warren

    The Integrated Partial Payload Lifting Assembly (IPPLA) is currently used to transport and load experimental payloads into the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle. It is unable to carry the astronaut/passenger tunnel without a structural modification. The purpose of this design is to create a removalbe modification that will allow the IPPLA to lift and carry the passenger tunnel. Modifications evaluated were full-length insert beams which would extend through the existing strongback arms. These beam proposals were eliminated because of high cost and weight. Other proposals evaluated were attachments of cantilever beams to the existing strongback areas. The cantilever proposals reduced cost and weight compared to the full-length modifications. A third method evaluated was to simply make modifications to one side of the IPPLA therefore reducing the materials of the cantilever proposals by 40 percent. The design of the modification selected was completed with two channel beams jointly welded to a centered steel plate. The extension arm modification is inserted into the existing strongback channel beams and bolted into place. Two extension arms are added to one side of the IPPLA to provide the extra length needed to accommodate the passenger tunnel. The center counterbalance will then be offset about 20 inches to center gravity and therefore maintain horizontal status. The extension arm modification was selected because of minimum cost, low weight, and minimal installation time.

  18. Laser weld jig

    DOEpatents

    Van Blarigan, Peter; Haupt, David L.

    1982-01-01

    A system is provided for welding a workpiece (10, FIG. 1) along a predetermined weld line (12) that may be of irregular shape, which includes the step of forming a lip (32) on the workpiece to extend parallel to the weld line, and moving the workpiece by engaging the lip between a pair of rotatable members (34, 36). Rotation of one of the members at a constant speed, causes the workpiece to move so that all points on the weld line sequentially pass a fixed point in space (17) at a constant speed, so that a laser welding beam can be directed at that fixed point to form a weld along the weld line. The workpiece can include a reuseable jig (24) forming the lip, and with the jig constructed to detachably hold parts (22, 20) to be welded at a position wherein the weld line of the parts extends parallel to the lip on the jig.

  19. Welded solar cell interconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stofel, E. J.; Browne, E. R.; Meese, R. A.; Vendura, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The efficiency of the welding of solar-cell interconnects is compared with the efficiency of soldering such interconnects, and the cases in which welding may be superior are examined. Emphasis is placed on ultrasonic welding; attention is given to the solar-cell welding machine, the application of the welding process to different solar-cell configurations, producibility, and long-life performance of welded interconnects. Much of the present work has been directed toward providing increased confidence in the reliability of welding using conditions approximating those that would occur with large-scale array production. It is concluded that there is as yet insufficient data to determine which of three methods (soldering, parallel gap welding, and ultrasonic welding) provides the longest-duration solar panel life.

  20. Lift performance and lumbar loading in standing and seated lifts.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Kane J; Carstairs, Greg L; Ham, Daniel J

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of posture on lifting performance. Twenty-three male soldiers lifted a loaded box onto a platform in standing and seated postures to determine their maximum lift capacity and maximum acceptable lift. Lift performance, trunk kinematics, lumbar loads, anthropometric and strength data were recorded. There was a significant main effect for lift effort but not for posture or the interaction. Effect sizes showed that lumbar compression forces did not differ between postures at lift initiation (Standing 5566.2 ± 627.8 N; Seated 5584.0 ± 16.0) but were higher in the standing posture (4045.7 ± 408.3 N) when compared with the seated posture (3655.8 ± 225.7 N) at lift completion. Anterior shear forces were higher in the standing posture at both lift initiation (Standing 519.4 ± 104.4 N; Seated 224.2 ± 9.4 N) and completion (Standing 183.3 ± 62.5 N; Seated 71.0 ± 24.2 N) and may have been a result of increased trunk flexion and a larger horizontal distance of the mass from the L5-S1 joint. Practitioner Summary: Differences between lift performance and lumbar forces in standing and seated lifts are unclear. Using a with-in subjects repeated measures design, we found no difference in lifted mass or lumbar compression force at lift initiation between standing and seated lifts.

  1. High lift wake investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, J. P.; Schneider, S. P.; Hoffenberg, R.

    1996-01-01

    The behavior of wakes in adverse pressure gradients is critical to the performance of high-lift systems for transport aircraft. Wake deceleration is known to lead to sudden thickening and the onset of reversed flow; this 'wake bursting' phenomenon can occur while surface flows remain attached. Although known to be important for high-lift systems, few studies of such decelerated wakes exist. In this study, the wake of a flat plate has been subjected to an adverse pressure gradient in a two-dimensional diffuser, whose panels were forced to remain attached by use of slot blowing. Pitot probe surveys, L.D.V. measurements, and flow visualization have been used to investigate the physics of this decelerated wake, through the onset of reversed flow.

  2. Lifting Bodies on Lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The wingless, lifting body aircraft sitting on Rogers Dry Lake at what is now NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, from left to right are the X-24A, M2-F3 and the HL-10.The lifting body aircraft studied the feasibility of maneuvering and landing an aerodynamic craft designed for reentry from space. These lifting bodies were air launched by a B-52 mother ship, then flew powered by their own rocket engines before making an unpowered approach and landing. They helped validate the concept that a space shuttle could make accurate landings without power. The X-24A flew from April 17, 1969 to June 4, 1971. The M2-F3 flew from June 2, 1970 until December 21, 1971. The HL-10 flew from December 22, 1966 until July 17, 1970, and logged the highest and fastest records in the lifting body program. The X-24 was one of a group of lifting bodies flown by the NASA Flight Research Center (now Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, in a joint program with the U.S. Air Force at Edwards Air Force Base from 1963 to 1975. The lifting bodies were used to demonstrate the ability of pilots to maneuver and safely land wingless vehicles designed to fly back to Earth from space and be landed like an airplane at a predetermined site. Lifting bodies' aerodynamic lift, essential to flight in the atmosphere, was obtained from their shape. The addition of fins and control surfaces allowed the pilots to stabilize and control the vehicles and regulate their flight paths. Built by Martin Aircraft Company, Maryland, for the U.S. Air Force, the X-24A was a bulbous vehicle shaped like a teardrop with three vertical fins at the rear for directional control. It weighed 6,270 pounds, was 24.5 feet long and 11.5 feet wide (measuring just the fuselage, not the distance between the tips of the outboard fins). Its first unpowered glide flight was on April 17, 1969, with Air Force Maj. Jerauld Gentry at the controls. Gentry also piloted its first powered flight on March 19

  3. Enhanced Rescue Lift Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.

    2007-01-01

    The evolving and ever-increasing demands of emergency response and disaster relief support provided by rotorcraft dictate, among other things, the development of enhanced rescue lift capability for these platforms. This preliminary analysis is first-order in nature but provides considerable insight into some of the challenges inherent in trying to effect rescue using a unique form of robotic rescue device deployed and operated from rotary-wing aerial platforms.

  4. ESB Heavy Lift Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    capacity, cross-country travel ability, and redundancy than the three axles and twelve tires found on the M870 trailer.13,14 In fact, this...equates to an organic ability to move approximately twenty- three percent of the battalion’s heavy equipment that requires prime movers in one lift...Truck Tractor manufactured by Oshkosh Truck Corporation and the M1000 Heavy Equipment Transporter semi-trailer manufactured by Systems

  5. Lifting liquid from boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, T.E.

    1983-05-17

    A device for lifting liquid from boreholes comprises a pump which is located downhole in the region of a production formation and which consists of a fluid-actuated, double-action piston. The pump is connected by fluid pressure lines to a source of fluid pressure disposed above ground and a switching valve is connected to provide fluid pressure to alternate sides of the piston to effect reciprocation thereof.

  6. Intelligent Welding Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, George E.; Kumar, Ramaswamy; Prasad, Tanuji; Andersen, Kristinn; Barnett, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    Control system adapts to changing design requirements and operating conditions. Proposed control system for gas/tungsten arc welding requires only that operator specifies such direct parameters of welds as widths and depths of penetration. In control system for robotic welder, components and functions intimately connected with welding process assigned to controller domain. More general functions assigned to supervisor domain. Initial estimate of indirect parameters of welding process applied to system only at beginning of weld (t=0); after start of welding, outputs from multivariable controller takes place of estimate.

  7. Fusion welding process

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Kenneth C.; Jones, Eric D.; McBride, Marvin A.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

  8. Powered-lift aircraft technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckert, W. H.; Franklin, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    Powered lift aircraft have the ability to vary the magnitude and direction of the force produced by the propulsion system so as to control the overall lift and streamwise force components of the aircraft, with the objective of enabling the aircraft to operate from minimum sized terminal sites. Power lift technology has contributed to the development of the jet lift Harrier and to the forth coming operational V-22 Tilt Rotor and the C-17 military transport. This technology will soon be expanded to include supersonic fighters with short takeoff and vertical landing capability, and will continue to be used for the development of short- and vertical-takeoff and landing transport. An overview of this field of aeronautical technology is provided for several types of powered lift aircraft. It focuses on the description of various powered lift concepts and their operational capability. Aspects of aerodynamics and flight controls pertinent to powered lift are also discussed.

  9. Welding in airplane construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rechtlich, A; Schrenk, M

    1928-01-01

    The present article attempts to explain the principles for the production of a perfect weld and to throw light on the unexplained problems. Moreover, it is intended to elucidate the possibilities of testing the strength and reliability of welded parts.

  10. Detail of lift wire rope attachment to lift span at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of lift wire rope attachment to lift span at southeast corner. Note rope-adjustment turnbuckle with strap keepers to prevent its rotation, which could pull the bridge out of alignment. A single rope and light-gauge attachment at each corner were adequate for lifting the span because most of its weight was balanced by the two counterweights. - Potomac Edison Company, Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Bridge, Spanning C & O Canal South of U.S. 11, Williamsport, Washington County, MD

  11. Ceramic Weld Backing Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    deposition rate welding processes such as GTAW and GMAW short arc, to some degree, no others will consistently produce full penetration one side welds ...OFFSHORE POWER SYSTEMS 8000 Arlington Expressway Jacksonville, Florida 32211 CERAMIC WELD BACKING EVALUATION FINAL REFORT JUNE 1980 Project Manager...Ceramic Weld Backing Evaluation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER

  12. Low Gravity Improves Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.; Plaster, Teresa C.

    1993-01-01

    Hardnesses and tensile strengths greater. Welds made under right conditions in low gravity appear superior to those made under high gravity. Conclusion drawn from results of welding experiments conducted during low- and high-gravity-simulating maneuvers of KC-135 airplane. Results have implications not only for welding in outer space but also for repeated rapid welding on Earth or in airplanes under simulated low gravity to obtain unusually strong joints.

  13. Infrared Thermography For Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Lucky, Brian D.; Spiegel, Lyle B.; Hudyma, Russell M.

    1992-01-01

    Infrared imaging and image-data-processing system shows temperatures of joint during welding and provides data from which rates of heating and cooling determined. Information used to control welding parameters to ensure reliable joints, in materials which microstructures and associated metallurgical and mechanical properties depend strongly on rates of heating and cooling. Applicable to variety of processes, including tungsten/inert-gas welding; plasma, laser, and resistance welding; cutting; and brazing.

  14. Low Gravity Improves Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.; Plaster, Teresa C.

    1993-01-01

    Hardnesses and tensile strengths greater. Welds made under right conditions in low gravity appear superior to those made under high gravity. Conclusion drawn from results of welding experiments conducted during low- and high-gravity-simulating maneuvers of KC-135 airplane. Results have implications not only for welding in outer space but also for repeated rapid welding on Earth or in airplanes under simulated low gravity to obtain unusually strong joints.

  15. Comparing Laser Welding Technologies with Friction Stir Welding for Production of Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Carlson, Blair; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan; Pilli, Siva Prasad

    2014-01-15

    A comparison of welding techniques was performed to determine the most effective method for producing aluminum tailor-welded blanks for high volume automotive applications. Aluminum sheet was joined with an emphasis on post weld formability, surface quality and weld speed. Comparative results from several laser based welding techniques along with friction stir welding are presented. The results of this study demonstrate a quantitative comparison of weld methodologies in preparing tailor-welded aluminum stampings for high volume production in the automotive industry. Evaluation of nearly a dozen welding variations ultimately led to down selecting a single process based on post-weld quality and performance.

  16. Lifting Bodies on Lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The wingless, lifting body aircraft sitting on Rogers Dry Lake at what is now NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, from left to right are the X-24A, M2-F3 and the HL-10.The lifting body aircraft studied the feasibility of maneuvering and landing an aerodynamic craft designed for reentry from space. These lifting bodies were air launched by a B-52 mother ship, then flew powered by their own rocket engines before making an unpowered approach and landing. They helped validate the concept that a space shuttle could make accurate landings without power. The X-24A flew from April 17, 1969 to June 4, 1971. The M2-F3 flew from June 2, 1970 until December 22, 1972. The HL-10 flew from December 22, 1966 until July 17, 1970, and logged the highest and fastest records in the lifting body program. The X-24 was one of a group of lifting bodies flown by the NASA Flight Research Center (FRC-now Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, in a joint program with the U.S. Air Force at Edwards Air Force Base from 1963 to 1975. The lifting bodies were used to demonstrate the ability of pilots to maneuver and safely land wingless vehicles designed to fly back to Earth from space and be landed like an airplane at a predetermined site. Lifting bodies' aerodynamic lift, essential to flight in the atmosphere, was obtained from their shape. The addition of fins and control surfaces allowed the pilots to stabilize and control the vehicles and regulate their flight paths. Built by Martin Aircraft Company, Maryland, for the U.S. Air Force, the X-24A was a bulbous vehicle shaped like a teardrop with three vertical fins at the rear for directional control. It weighed 6,270 pounds, was 24.5 feet long and 11.5 feet wide (measuring just the fuselage, not the distance between the tips of the outboard fins). Its first unpowered glide flight was on April 17, 1969, with Air Force Maj. Jerauld Gentry at the controls. Gentry also piloted its first powered flight on March 19

  17. Coil Welding Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesenbach, W. T.; Clark, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Positioner holds coil inside cylinder during tack welding. Welding aid spaces turns of coil inside cylinder and applies contact pressure while coil is tack-welded to cylinder. Device facilitates fabrication of heat exchangers and other structures by eliminating hand-positioning and clamping of individual coil turns.

  18. Variable polarity arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E. O., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Technological advances generate within themselves dissatisfactions that lead to further advances in a process. A series of advances in welding technology which culminated in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process and an advance instituted to overcome the latest dissatisfactions with the process: automated VPPA welding are described briefly.

  19. Welding Course Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  20. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  1. Welding Plutonium Storage Containers

    SciTech Connect

    HUDLOW, SL

    2004-04-20

    The outer can welder (OCW) in the FB-Line Facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Gas Tungsten Arc Weld (GTAW) system used to create outer canisters compliant with the Department of Energy 3013 Standard, DOE-STD-3013-2000, Stabilization, Packaging, and Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Materials. The key welding parameters controlled and monitored on the outer can welder Data Acquisition System (DAS) are weld amperage, weld voltage, and weld rotational speed. Inner 3013 canisters from the Bagless Transfer System that contain plutonium metal or plutonium oxide are placed inside an outer 3013 canister. The canister is back-filled with helium and welded using the outer can welder. The completed weld is screened to determine if it is satisfactory by reviewing the OCW DAS key welding parameters, performing a helium leak check, performing a visual examination by a qualified weld inspector, and performing digital radiography of the completed weld. Canisters with unsatisfactory welds are cut open and repackaged. Canisters with satisfactory welds are deemed compliant with the 3013 standard for long-term storage.

  2. Portable Weld Tester.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Douglas

    This training manual, which was developed for employees of an automotive plant, is designed to teach trainees to operate a portable weld tester (Miyachi MM-315). In chapter 1, the weld tester's components are illustrated and described, and the procedure for charging its batteries is explained. Chapter 2 illustrates the weld tester's parts,…

  3. Active weld control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Bradley W.; Burroughs, Ivan A.

    1994-01-01

    Through the two phases of this contract, sensors for welding applications and parameter extraction algorithms have been developed. These sensors form the foundation of a weld control system which can provide action weld control through the monitoring of the weld pool and keyhole in a VPPA welding process. Systems of this type offer the potential of quality enhancement and cost reduction (minimization of rework on faulty welds) for high-integrity welding applications. Sensors for preweld and postweld inspection, weld pool monitoring, keyhole/weld wire entry monitoring, and seam tracking were developed. Algorithms for signal extraction were also developed and analyzed to determine their application to an adaptive weld control system. The following sections discuss findings for each of the three sensors developed under this contract: (1) weld profiling sensor; (2) weld pool sensor; and (3) stereo seam tracker/keyhole imaging sensor. Hardened versions of these sensors were designed and built under this contract. A control system, described later, was developed on a multiprocessing/multitasking operating system for maximum power and flexibility. Documentation for sensor mechanical and electrical design is also included as appendices in this report.

  4. Portable Weld Tester.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Douglas

    This training manual, which was developed for employees of an automotive plant, is designed to teach trainees to operate a portable weld tester (Miyachi MM-315). In chapter 1, the weld tester's components are illustrated and described, and the procedure for charging its batteries is explained. Chapter 2 illustrates the weld tester's parts,…

  5. Welding Course Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  6. Penetration in GTA welding

    SciTech Connect

    Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

    1990-01-01

    The size and shape of the weld bead produced in GTA welding depends on the magnitude and distribution of the energy incident on the workpiece surfaces as well as the dissipation of that energy in the workpiece. The input energy is largely controllable through the welding parameters selected, however the dissipation of that energy in the workpiece is less subject to control. Changes in energy dissipation can produce large changes in weld shape or penetration. Heat transport away from the weld pool is almost entirely by conduction, but heat transport in the weld pool is more complicated. Heat conduction through the liquid is an important component, but heat transport by convection (mass transport) is often the dominant mechanism. Convective heat transport is directional and changes the weld pool shape from that produced by conduction alone. Surface tension gradients are often the dominant forces driving fluid flow in GTA weld pools. These gradients are sensitive functions of weld pool chemistry and the energy input distribution to the weld. Experimental and theoretical work conducted primarily in the past decade has greatly enhanced our understanding of weld pool fluid flow, the forces which drive it, and its effects on weld pool shape. This work is reviewed here. While less common, changes in energy dissipation through the unmelted portion of the workpiece can also affect fusion zone shape or penetration. These effects are also described. 41 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Coil Welding Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesenbach, W. T.; Clark, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Positioner holds coil inside cylinder during tack welding. Welding aid spaces turns of coil inside cylinder and applies contact pressure while coil is tack-welded to cylinder. Device facilitates fabrication of heat exchangers and other structures by eliminating hand-positioning and clamping of individual coil turns.

  8. Study of weld offset in longitudinally welded SSME HPFTP inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Spanyer, K. S.; Brunair, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    Welded joints are an essential part of rocket engine structures such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps. Defects produced in the welding process can be detrimental to weld performance. Recently, review of the SSME high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) titanium inlet X-rays revealed several weld discrepancies such as penetrameter density issues, film processing discrepancies, weld width discrepancies, porosity, lack of fusion, and weld offsets. Currently, the sensitivity of welded structures to defects is of concern. From a fatigue standpoint, weld offset may have a serious effect since local yielding, in general, aggravates cyclic stress effects. Therefore, the weld offset issue is considered in this report. Using the FEM and beamlike plate approximations, parametric studies were conducted to determine the influence of weld offsets and a variation of weld widths in longitudinally welded cylindrical structures with equal wall thicknesses on both sides of the joint. Following the study, some conclusions are derived for the weld offsets.

  9. Framelet lifting in image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Da-Yong; Feng, Tie-Yong

    2010-08-01

    To obtain appropriate framelets in image processing, we often need to lift existing framelets. For this purpose the paper presents some methods which allow us to modify existing framelets or filters to construct new ones. The relationships of matrices and their eigenvalues which be used in lifting schemes show that the frame bounds of the lifted wavelet frames are optimal. Moreover, the examples given in Section 4 indicate that the lifted framelets can play the roles of some operators such as the weighted average operator, the Sobel operator and the Laplacian operator, which operators are often used in edge detection and motion estimation applications.

  10. Method for welding beryllium

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, Raymond D.; Smith, Frank M.; O'Leary, Richard F.

    1997-01-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon.

  11. (Welding under extreme conditions)

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.A.

    1989-09-29

    The traveler was an invited member of the United States delegation and representative of the Basic Energy Science Welding Science program at the 42nd Annual International Institute of Welding (IIW) Assembly and Conference held in Helsinki, Finland. The conference and the assembly was attended by about 600 delegates representing 40 countries. The theme of the conference was welding under extreme conditions. The conference program contained several topics related to welding in nuclear, arctic petrochemical, underwater, hyperbaric and space environments. At the annual assembly the traveler was a delegate (US) to two working groups of the IIW, namely Commission IX and welding research study group 212. Following the conference the traveler visited the Danish Welding Institute in Copenhagen and the Risoe National Laboratory in Roskilde. Prior to the conference the traveler visited Lappeenranta University of Technology and presented an invited seminar entitled Recent Advances in Welding Science and Technology.''

  12. Optically controlled welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An optically controlled welding system wherein a welding torch having through-the-torch viewing capabilities is provided with an optical beam splitter to create a transmitted view and a reflective view of a welding operation. These views are converted to digital signals which are then processed and utilized by a computerized robotic welder to make the welding torch responsive thereto. Other features include an actively cooled electrode holder which minimizes a blocked portion of the view by virtue of being constructed of a single spoke or arm, and a weld pool contour detector comprising a laser beam directed onto the weld pool with the position of specular radiation reflected therefrom, being characteristic of a penetrated or unpenetrated condition of the weld pool.

  13. Optically controlled welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An optically controlled welding system (10) wherein a welding torch (12) having through-the-torch viewing capabilities is provided with an optical beam splitter (56) to create a transmitted view and a reflective view of a welding operation. These views are converted to digital signals which are then processed and utilized by a computerized robotic welder (15) to make the welding torch responsive thereto. Other features includes an actively cooled electrode holder (26) which minimizes a blocked portion of the view by virtue of being constructed of a single spoke or arm (28) and a weld pool contour detector (14) comprising a laser beam directed onto the weld pool with the position of specular radiation reflected therefrom being characteristic of a penetrated or unpenetrated condition of the weld pool.

  14. Robotic Welding Of Injector Manifold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Shelley, D. Mark

    1992-01-01

    Brief report presents history, up through October 1990, of continuing efforts to convert from manual to robotic gas/tungsten arc welding in fabrication of main injector inlet manifold of main engine of Space Shuttle. Includes photographs of welding machinery, welds, and weld preparations. Of interest to engineers considering establishment of robotic-welding facilities.

  15. Robotic Welding Of Injector Manifold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Shelley, D. Mark

    1992-01-01

    Brief report presents history, up through October 1990, of continuing efforts to convert from manual to robotic gas/tungsten arc welding in fabrication of main injector inlet manifold of main engine of Space Shuttle. Includes photographs of welding machinery, welds, and weld preparations. Of interest to engineers considering establishment of robotic-welding facilities.

  16. Effects of range and mode on lifting capability and lifting time.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzu-Hsien

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of 3 lifting ranges and 3 lifting modes on maximum lifting capability and total lifting time. The results demonstrated that the maximum lifting capability for FK (from floor to knuckle height) was greater than that for KS (from knuckle height to shoulder height) or FS (from floor to shoulder height). Additionally, asymmetric lifting with initial trunk rotation decreased maximum lifting capability compared with symmetric lifting or asymmetric lifting with final trunk rotation. The difference in total lifting time between KS and FS was not significant, while FK increased total lifting time by ~20% compared with FS even though the travel distance was 50% shorter.

  17. Virtual Welding — Applying Science to Welding Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhishang; Cao, Zhenning; Chen, X. L.; Ludewig, Howard W.

    2004-06-01

    Welding practice has traditionally been treated as an art and in most cases experience based trial-and-error experimentation has been the major approach to establish a feasible welding procedure. In recent years, significant progress has been made in understanding welding phenomena based on numerical modeling. Recent modeling efforts include simulation of the weld pool formation, weld microstructure evolution, and welding induced residual stress and distortion. The numerical models based on interdisciplinary applied sciences (e.g. heat transfer and fluid flow, materials science, mechanical engineering, and fracture mechanics) have provided detailed insights into welding process and guidance in design of high performance welded-joints and cost effective welding process. The concept of "Virtual Welding," which is a simulation package based on interdisciplinary applied science and multi-scale numerical models, is proposed in this paper. Examples are provided to demonstrate the applications of "Virtual Welding" in industrial practices for high performance welds and reduced manufacturing cost.

  18. SMAP Lift to CR

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-10-16

    Inside the Astrotech payload processing facility on Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, engineers and technicians use a crane to move a component of NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive, or SMAP, spacecraft for a lift by a crane. SMAP will launch on a Delta II 7320 configuration vehicle featuring a United Launch Alliance first stage booster powered by an Aerojet Rocketdyne RS-27A main engine and three Alliant Techsystems, or ATK, strap-on solid rocket motors. Once on station in Earth orbit, SMAP will provide global measurements of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw state. These measurements will be used to enhance understanding of processes that link the water, energy and carbon cycles, and to extend the capabilities of weather and climate prediction models. SMAP data also will be used to quantify net carbon flux in boreal landscapes and to develop improved flood prediction and drought monitoring capabilities. Launch from Space Launch Complex 2 is targeted for Jan. 29, 2015.

  19. What is a safe lift?

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Kathy

    2013-09-01

    In a perfect world, a "safe" lift would be 51 pounds if the object is within 7 inches from the front of the body, if it is at waist height, if it is directly in front of the person, if there is a handle on the object, and if the load inside the box/bucket doesn't shift once lifted. If the load to be lifted does not meet all of these criteria, then it is an unsafe lift, and modifications must be made. Modifications would include lightening the load, getting help, or using a mechanical lifting device. There is always a way to turn an unsafe lift into a safer lift. An excellent resource for anyone interested in eliminating some of the hazards associated with lifting is the "Easy Ergonomics" publication from Cal/OSHA. This booklet offers practical advice on how to improve the workplace using engineering and administrative controls, problem-solving strategies and solutions, and a vast amount of ergonomics information and resources. "Easy Ergonomics" can be obtained by calling Cal/OSHA's education and training unit in Sacramento at 800-963-9424. A free copy can be obtained via www.dir.ca.gov/dosh/puborder.asp.

  20. Pneumatic Spoiler Controls Airfoil Lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, D.; Krauss, T.

    1991-01-01

    Air ejection from leading edge of airfoil used for controlled decrease of lift. Pneumatic-spoiler principle developed for equalizing lift on helicopter rotor blades. Also used to enhance aerodynamic control of short-fuselage or rudderless aircraft such as "flying-wing" airplanes. Leading-edge injection increases maneuverability of such high-performance fixed-wing aircraft as fighters.

  1. Project LIFT: Year Two Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Michael; Piccinino, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Research for Action (RFA) has completed its second year of a five-year external evaluation of the Project Leadership and Investment for Transformation (LIFT) Initiative in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg School District (CMS). Project LIFT is a public-private partnership between CMS and the local philanthropic and business communities in Charlotte,…

  2. Project LIFT: Year 1 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Michael; Piccinino, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Research for Action (RFA) is currently in the second year of a five-year external evaluation of the Project Leadership and Investment for Transformation (LIFT) Initiative in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg School District (CMS). Project LIFT is a public-private partnership between CMS and the local philanthropic and business communities in Charlotte,…

  3. Lift enhancing tabs for airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, James C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A tab deployable from the trailing edge of a main airfoil element forces flow onto a following airfoil element, such as a flap, to keep the flow attached and thus enhance lift. For aircraft wings with high lift systems that include leading edge slats, the slats may also be provided with tabs to turn the flow onto the following main element.

  4. Pneumatic Spoiler Controls Airfoil Lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, D.; Krauss, T.

    1991-01-01

    Air ejection from leading edge of airfoil used for controlled decrease of lift. Pneumatic-spoiler principle developed for equalizing lift on helicopter rotor blades. Also used to enhance aerodynamic control of short-fuselage or rudderless aircraft such as "flying-wing" airplanes. Leading-edge injection increases maneuverability of such high-performance fixed-wing aircraft as fighters.

  5. VPPA weld model evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccutcheon, Kimble D.; Gordon, Stephen S.; Thompson, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    NASA uses the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process extensively for fabrication of Space Shuttle External Tanks. This welding process has been in use at NASA since the late 1970's but the physics of the process have never been satisfactorily modeled and understood. In an attempt to advance the level of understanding of VPPAW, Dr. Arthur C. Nunes, Jr., (NASA) has developed a mathematical model of the process. The work described in this report evaluated and used two versions (level-0 and level-1) of Dr. Nunes' model, and a model derived by the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH) from Dr. Nunes' level-1 model. Two series of VPPAW experiments were done, using over 400 different combinations of welding parameters. Observations were made of VPPAW process behavior as a function of specific welding parameter changes. Data from these weld experiments was used to evaluate and suggest improvements to Dr. Nunes' model. Experimental data and correlations with the model were used to develop a multi-variable control algorithm for use with a future VPPAW controller. This algorithm is designed to control weld widths (both on the crown and root of the weld) based upon the weld parameters, base metal properties, and real-time observation of the crown width. The algorithm exhibited accuracy comparable to that of the weld width measurements for both aluminum and mild steel welds.

  6. Welding for life

    SciTech Connect

    Stiebler, T.J.; Nugent, R.M.; Wilson, R.P.

    1994-12-31

    State of the Art Welding Techniques are being utilized to extend the life of major steam turbine components, as well as other traditional types of repairs. The development of a temper bead welding technique has allowed Houston Lighting and Power (HL and P) to perform innovative weld repairs. Nozzle vanes are weld repaired without removing the nozzle blocks from the case; repair life has also been doubled. A new two wire Gas Tungsten ARC Welding (GTAW) machine has produced high deposition rates while maintaining excellent mechanical properties. This results in faster turn-around time and with an improved weld repair. Development of a weld wire specification has also been instrumental in achieving additional component life by increasing the resistance to fatigue, especially in the heat affected zone. All these factors work together to enhance the weld repairs. Tensile strengths of 140,000 PSI with good ductility have been achieved. This paper will discuss their experiences with several repairs and recap the results of some studies and tests performed during the technique development stages. Major repairs include; weld repair of cases, nozzle blocks, nozzle boxes, stationary blade repair, forced draft fan shaft buildup, weld repair of turbine shrouds, blades, tennons and journals.

  7. Weld electrode cooling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Robert C.; Simon, Daniel L.

    1999-03-01

    The U.S. auto/truck industry has been mandated by the Federal government to continuously improve their fleet average gas mileage, measured in miles per gallon. Several techniques are typically used to meet these mandates, one of which is to reduce the overall mass of cars and trucks. To help accomplish this goal, lighter weight sheet metal parts, with smaller weld flanges, have been designed and fabricated. This paper will examine the cooling characteristics of various water cooled weld electrodes and shanks used in resistance spot welding applications. The smaller weld flanges utilized in modern vehicle sheet metal fabrications have increased industry's interest in using one size of weld electrode (1/2 inch diameter) for certain spot welding operations. The welding community wants more data about the cooling characteristics of these 1/2 inch weld electrodes. To hep define the cooling characteristics, an infrared radiometer thermal vision system (TVS) was used to capture images (thermograms) of the heating and cooling cycles of several size combinations of weld electrodes under typical production conditions. Tests results will show why the open ended shanks are more suitable for cooling the weld electrode assembly then closed ended shanks.

  8. Welding arc plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  9. Welding and joining: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A compilation is presented of NASA-developed technology in welding and joining. Topics discussed include welding equipment, techniques in welding, general bonding, joining techniques, and clamps and holding fixtures.

  10. Welding skate with computerized controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    New welding skate concept for automatic TIG welding of contoured or double-contoured parts combines lightweight welding apparatus with electrical circuitry which computes the desired torch angle and positions a torch and cold-wire guide angle manipulator.

  11. Impact testing of welded samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundeen, Calvin D.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate how welding practice and joint design affect the performance of the joint. Also demonstrated is the importance of weld inspection to ensure quality welds.

  12. EVALUATION OF CONSTANT CURRENT WELD CONTROL FOR PINCH WELDING

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P; STANLEY, S; HOWARD, H

    2005-10-11

    Modern weld controllers typically use current to control the weld process. SRS uses a legacy voltage control method. This task was undertaken to determine if the improvements in the weld control equipment could be implemented to provide improvements to the process control. The constant current mode of operation will reduce weld variability by about a factor of 4. The constant voltage welds were slightly hotter than the constant current welds of the same nominal current. The control mode did not appear to adversely affect the weld quality, but appropriate current ranges need to be established and a qualification methodology for both welding and shunt calibrations needs to be developed and documented.

  13. Computerized adaptive control weld skate with CCTV weld guidance project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes progress of the automatic computerized weld skate development portion of the Computerized Weld Skate with Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Arc Guidance Project. The main goal of the project is to develop an automatic welding skate demonstration model equipped with CCTV weld guidance. The three main goals of the overall project are to: (1) develop a demonstration model computerized weld skate system, (2) develop a demonstration model automatic CCTV guidance system, and (3) integrate the two systems into a demonstration model of computerized weld skate with CCTV weld guidance for welding contoured parts.

  14. Summary of Lift and Lift/Cruise Fan Powered Lift Concept Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Woodrow L.

    1993-01-01

    A summary is presented of some of the lift and lift/cruise fan technology including fan performance, fan stall, ground effects, ingestion and thrust loss, design tradeoffs and integration, control effectiveness and several other areas related to vertical short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) aircraft conceptual design. The various subjects addressed, while not necessarily pertinent to specific short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) supersonic designs being considered, are of interest to the general field of lift and lift/cruise fan aircraft designs and may be of importance in the future. The various wind tunnel and static tests reviewed are: (1) the Doak VZ-4 ducted fan, (2) the 0.57 scale model of the Bell X-22 ducted fan aircraft, (3) the Avrocar, (4) the General Electric lift/cruise fan, (5) the vertical short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) lift engine configurations related to ingestion and consequent thrust loss, (6) the XV-5 and other fan-in-wing stall consideration, (7) hybrid configurations such as lift fan and lift/cruise fan or engines, and (8) the various conceptual design studies by air-frame contractors. Other design integration problems related to small and large V/STOL transport aircraft are summarized including lessons learned during more recent conceptual design studies related to a small executive V/STOL transport aircraft.

  15. Lift Recovery for AFC-Enabled High Lift System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shmilovich, Arvin; Yadlin, Yoram; Dickey, Eric D.; Gissen, Abraham N.; Whalen, Edward A.

    2017-01-01

    This project is a continuation of the NASA AFC-Enabled Simplified High-Lift System Integration Study contract (NNL10AA05B) performed by Boeing under the Fixed Wing Project. This task is motivated by the simplified high-lift system, which is advantageous due to the simpler mechanical system, reduced actuation power and lower maintenance costs. Additionally, the removal of the flap track fairings associated with conventional high-lift systems renders a more efficient aerodynamic configuration. Potentially, these benefits translate to a approx. 2.25% net reduction in fuel burn for a twin-engine, long-range airplane.

  16. Numerical Modeling of Fluid Flow, Heat Transfer and Arc-Melt Interaction in Tungsten Inert Gas Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linmin; Li, Baokuan; Liu, Lichao; Motoyama, Yuichi

    2017-04-01

    The present work develops a multi-region dynamic coupling model for fluid flow, heat transfer and arc-melt interaction in tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding using the dynamic mesh technique. The arc-weld pool unified model is developed on basis of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations and the interface is tracked using the dynamic mesh method. The numerical model for arc is firstly validated by comparing the calculated temperature profiles and essential results with the former experimental data. For weld pool convection solution, the drag, Marangoni, buoyancy and electromagnetic forces are separately validated, and then taken into account. Moreover, the model considering interface deformation is adopted in a stationary TIG welding process with SUS304 stainless steel and the effect of interface deformation is investigated. The depression of weld pool center and the lifting of pool periphery are both predicted. The results show that the weld pool shape calculated with considering the interface deformation is more accurate.

  17. Dual wire welding torch and method

    DOEpatents

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  18. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  19. Welding in Space Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    The potential was discussed for welding in space, its advantages and disadvantages, and what type of programs can benefit from the capability. Review of the various presentations and comments made in the course of the workshop suggests several routes to obtaining a better understanding of how welding processes can be used in NASA's initiatives in space. They are as follows: (1) development of a document identifying well processes and equipment requirements applicable to space and lunar environments; (2) more demonstrations of welding particular hardware which are to be used in the above environments, especially for space repair operations; (3) increased awareness among contractors responsible for building space equipment as to the potential for welding operations in space and on other planetary bodies; and (4) continuation of space welding research projects is important to maintain awareness within NASA that welding in space is viable and beneficial.

  20. WELDED JACKETED URANIUM BODY

    DOEpatents

    Gurinsky, D.H.

    1958-08-26

    A fuel element is presented for a neutronic reactor and is comprised of a uranium body, a non-fissionable jacket surrounding sald body, thu jacket including a portion sealed by a weld, and an inclusion in said sealed jacket at said weld of a fiux having a low neutron capture cross-section. The flux is provided by combining chlorine gas and hydrogen in the intense heat of-the arc, in a "Heliarc" welding muthod, to form dry hydrochloric acid gas.

  1. Development lifts Egyptian output

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    Oil revenue is now the largest source of foreign exchange for the Arab Republic of Egypt, and, as such, is of vital importance to the country's plans for industrial and social development. Last year oil exports earned Egypt $2.9 billion, playing a key role in keeping the nation's economy in the black. Oil production in 1980 averaged 585,000 bpd, up from 510,000 bpd in 1979. This year oil output should average 650,000 bpd. While output is increasing, it does not appear to be doing so at a sufficient rate to meet the 1984 government target of 1 million bpd. However, the oil industry view in Egypt is that this target is achievable, though not until the mid to late 1980s. Development work scheduled for completion by 1984 only seems set to lift output to between 750,000 and 800,000 bpd. At the same time, if expansions plans for gas production are taken into account, then total hydrocarbon output measured in oil equivalents will not be too far short of the 1-million-bpd figure.

  2. Physics of Fusion Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Applicabilities and limitations of three techniques analyzed. NASA technical memorandum discusses physics of electron-beam, gas/ tungsten-arc, and laser-beam welding. From comparison of capabilities and limitations of each technique with regard to various welding conditions and materials, possible to develop criteria for selecting best welding technique in specific application. All three techniques classified as fusion welding; small volume of workpiece melted by intense heat source. Heat source moved along seam, leaving in wake solid metal that joins seam edges together.

  3. Electric arc welding gun

    DOEpatents

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  4. Explosive Welding of Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drennov, Oleg; Drennov, Andrey; Burtseva, Olga

    2013-06-01

    For connection by welding it is suggested to use the explosive welding method. This method is rather new. Nevertheless, it has become commonly used among the technological developments. This method can be advantageous (saving material and physical resources) comparing to its statical analogs (electron-beam welding, argon-arc welding, plasma welding, gas welding, etc.), in particular, in hard-to-reach areas due to their geographic and climatic conditions. Explosive welding of cylindrical surfaces is performed by launching of welded layer along longitudinal axis of construction. During this procedure, it is required to provide reliable resistance against radial convergent strains. The traditional method is application of fillers of pipe cavity, which are dense cylindrical objects having special designs. However, when connecting pipes consecutively in pipelines by explosive welding, removal of the fillers becomes difficult and sometimes impossible. The suggestion is to use water as filler. The principle of non-compressibility of liquid under quasi-dynamic loading is used. In one-dimensional gasdynamic and elastic-plastic calculations we determined non-deformed mass of water (perturbations, which are moving in the axial direction with sound velocity, should not reach the layer end boundaries for 5-7 circulations of shock waves in the radial direction). Linear dimension of the water layer from the zone of pipe coupling along axis in each direction is >= 2R, where R is the internal radius of pipe.

  5. Physics of Fusion Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Applicabilities and limitations of three techniques analyzed. NASA technical memorandum discusses physics of electron-beam, gas/ tungsten-arc, and laser-beam welding. From comparison of capabilities and limitations of each technique with regard to various welding conditions and materials, possible to develop criteria for selecting best welding technique in specific application. All three techniques classified as fusion welding; small volume of workpiece melted by intense heat source. Heat source moved along seam, leaving in wake solid metal that joins seam edges together.

  6. Robot welding process control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1991-01-01

    This final report documents the development and installation of software and hardware for Robotic Welding Process Control. Primary emphasis is on serial communications between the CYRO 750 robotic welder, Heurikon minicomputer running Hunter & Ready VRTX, and an IBM PC/AT, for offline programming and control and closed-loop welding control. The requirements for completion of the implementation of the Rocketdyne weld tracking control are discussed. The procedure for downloading programs from the Intergraph, over the network, is discussed. Conclusions are made on the results of this task, and recommendations are made for efficient implementation of communications, weld process control development, and advanced process control procedures using the Heurikon.

  7. IR Spot Weld Inspect

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Feng, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    In automotive industry, destructive inspection of spot welds is still the mandatory quality assurance method due to the lack of efficient non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tools. However, it is costly and time-consuming. Recently at ORNL, a new NDE prototype system for spot weld inspection using infrared (IR) thermography has been developed to address this problem. This software contains all the key functions that ensure the NDE system to work properly: system input/output control, image acquisition, data analysis, weld quality database generation and weld quality prediction, etc.

  8. Welding irradiated stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.; Chandler, G.T.; Nelson, D.Z.; Franco-Ferreira, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    Conventional welding processes produced severe underbead cracking in irradiated stainless steel containing 1 to 33 appm helium from n,a reactions. A shallow penetration overlay technique was successfully demonstrated for welding irradiated stainless steel. The technique was applied to irradiated 304 stainless steel that contained 10 appm helium. Surface cracking, present in conventional welds made on the same steel at the same and lower helium concentrations, was eliminated. Underbead cracking was minimal compared to conventional welding methods. However, cracking in the irradiated material was greater than in tritium charged and aged material at the same helium concentrations. The overlay technique provides a potential method for repair or modification of irradiated reactor materials.

  9. Lifting strength in two-person teamwork.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzu-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of lifting range, hand-to-toe distance, and lifting direction on single-person lifting strengths and two-person teamwork lifting strengths. Six healthy males and seven healthy females participated in this study. Two-person teamwork lifting strengths were examined in both strength-matched and strength-unmatched groups. Our results showed that lifting strength significantly decreased with increasing lifting range or hand-to-toe distance. However, lifting strengths were not affected by lifting direction. Teamwork lifting strength did not conform to the law of additivity for both strength-matched and strength-unmatched groups. In general, teamwork lifting strength was dictated by the weaker of the two members, implying that weaker members might be exposed to a higher potential danger in teamwork exertions. To avoid such overexertion in teamwork, members with significantly different strength ability should not be assigned to the same team.

  10. Null lifts and projective dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cariglia, Marco

    2015-11-15

    We describe natural Hamiltonian systems using projective geometry. The null lift procedure endows the tangent bundle with a projective structure where the null Hamiltonian is identified with a projective conic and induces a Weyl geometry. Projective transformations generate a set of known and new dualities between Hamiltonian systems, as for example the phenomenon of coupling-constant metamorphosis. We conclude outlining how this construction can be extended to the quantum case for Eisenhart–Duval lifts.

  11. Vortex Lift Augmentation by Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. H.; Jackson, L. R.; Huffman, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Lift performance is improved on a 60 degrees swept Gothic wing. Vortex lift at moderate to high angles of attack on highly swept wings used to improve takeoff performance and maneuverability. New design proposed in which suction of propulsion system augments vortex. Turbofan placed at down stream end of leading-edge vortex system induces vortex to flow into inlet which delays onset of vortex breakdown.

  12. The Future of Heavy Lift

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    Future of Heavy Lift. MAWTS-1 Memo, 2001. Osprey On-Line. Home Page. <http://www.navair.navy.mil/ v22 />. Overarching Commonality Assessment...logistics tails grow. While the MV-22 Osprey will provide this "Over the Horizon" (OTH) capability, it is strictly a medium lift aircraft. It will never...territory. The MV-22 is the Marine Corps’ current answer to implementing OMFTS/STOM from an aviation perspective. 3 The Osprey will eventually

  13. Vortex Lift Augmentation by Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. H.; Jackson, L. R.; Huffman, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Lift performance is improved on a 60 degrees swept Gothic wing. Vortex lift at moderate to high angles of attack on highly swept wings used to improve takeoff performance and maneuverability. New design proposed in which suction of propulsion system augments vortex. Turbofan placed at down stream end of leading-edge vortex system induces vortex to flow into inlet which delays onset of vortex breakdown.

  14. Improved diffusion welding and roll welding of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holko, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Auto-vacuum cleaning technique was applied to titanium parts prior to welding. This provides oxide-free welding surfaces. Diffusion welding can be accomplished in as little as five minutes of hot pressing. Roll welding can be accomplished with only ten percent deformation.

  15. The effect of welding parameters on penetration in GTA welds

    SciTech Connect

    Shirali, A.A. ); Mills, K.C. )

    1993-07-01

    The effect of various welding parameters on the penetration of GTA welds has been investigated. Increases in welding speed were found to reduce penetration; however, increases in welding current were observed to increase the penetration in high sulfur (HS) casts and decrease penetration in low sulfur (LS) steels. Plots of penetration as a function of increasing linear energy (the heat supplied per unit length of weld) revealed a similar trend with increased penetration in HS casts, but the penetration in LS casts was unaffected by increases in linear energy. These results support the Burgardt-Heiple proposition that changes in welding parameters on penetration can be explained in terms of their effect, sequentially, on the temperature gradient and the Marangoni forces operating in the weld pool. Increases in arc length were found to decrease weld penetration regardless of the sulfur concentration of the steel, and the effects of electrode geometry and welding position on weld penetration were also investigated.

  16. DC arc weld starter

    DOEpatents

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  17. Fine welding with lasers.

    PubMed

    MacLellan, D

    2008-01-01

    The need for micro joining metallic alloys for surgical instruments, implants and advanced medical devices is driving a rapid increase in the implementation of laser welding technology in research, development and volume production. This article discusses the advantages of this welding method and the types of lasers used in the process.

  18. Laser Welding in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1989-01-01

    Solidification type welding process experiments in conditions of microgravity were performed. The role of convection in such phenomena was examined and convective effects in the small volumes obtained in the laser weld zone were observed. Heat transfer within the weld was affected by acceleration level as indicated by the resulting microstructure changes in low gravity. All experiments were performed such that both high and low gravity welds occurred along the same weld beam, allowing the effects of gravity alone to be examined. Results indicate that laser welding in a space environment is feasible and can be safely performed IVA or EVA. Development of the hardware to perform the experiment in a Hitchhiker-g platform is recomended as the next step. This experiment provides NASA with a capable technology for welding needs in space. The resources required to perform this experiment aboard a Shuttle Hitchhiker-pallet are assessed. Over the four year period 1991 to 1994, it is recommended that the task will require 13.6 manyears and $914,900. In addition to demonstrating the technology and ferreting out the problems encountered, it is suggested that NASA will also have a useful laser materials processing facility for working with both the scientific and the engineering aspects of materials processing in space. Several concepts are also included for long-term optimization of available solar power through solar pumping solid state lasers directly for welding power.

  19. Removing Welding Fumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Lloyd J.; Hall, Vandel L.

    1987-01-01

    Portable exhaust duct for machining and welding shops removes oil mist, dust, smoke, and fumes. Duct used with shop exhaust system, inlets of which placed at various convenient locations in shop floor. Flanged connector on underside of wheeled base links flexible tube to exhaust system under floor. Made especially for welding in room with low ceiling.

  20. Welding: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    Intended for use by all welding instructors in the Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools, this guide provides a sequential listing of course content and scope. A course description provides a brief overview of the content of the courses offered in the welding program. General course objectives are then listed. Outlines of the course content are…

  1. 1974 Welding Task Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Charles Frederick

    The study seeks to provide current empirical data for welding curriculum development and updating and for an occupational ladder. To secure information, a descriptive survey was conducted in Washington, Oregon, and British Columbia. A welder and welding supervisor in each of 58 responding industries filled out an in-depth questionnaire; the…

  2. Friction Stir Welding Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1998-01-01

    The research of this summer was a continuation of work started during the previous summer faculty fellowship period. The Friction Stir Welding process (FSW) patented by The Welding Institute (TWI), in Great Britain, has become a popular topic at the Marshall Space Flight Center over the past year. Last year it was considered a novel approach to welding but few people took it very seriously as a near term solution. However, due to continued problems with cracks in the new aluminum-lithium space shuttle external tank (ET), the friction stir process is being mobilized at full speed in an effort to mature this process for the potential manufacture of flight hardware. It is now the goal of NASA and Lockheed-Martin Corporation (LMC) to demonstrate a full-scale friction stir welding system capable of welding ET size barrel sections. The objectives this summer were: (1) Implementation and validation of the rotating dynamometer on the MSFC FSW system; (2) Collection of data for FSW process modeling efforts; (3) Specification development for FSW implementation on the vertical weld tool; (4) Controls and user interface development for the adjustable pin tool; and (5) Development of an instrumentation system for the planishing process. The projects started this summer will lead to a full scale friction stir welding system that is expected to produce a friction stir welded shuttle external tank type barrel section. The success of this could lead to the implementation of the friction stir process for manufacturing future shuttle external tanks.

  3. Vocational Preparation Curriculum: Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usoro, Hogan

    Designed to be a workable guide for instructors serving the occupational needs of various categories of disadvantaged and handicapped students, this welding curriculum contains fourteen units of self-paced and self-contained instructional materials. The instructional units cover the following topics: job opportunities in welding, safety rules in…

  4. Welding: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    Intended for use by all welding instructors in the Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools, this guide provides a sequential listing of course content and scope. A course description provides a brief overview of the content of the courses offered in the welding program. General course objectives are then listed. Outlines of the course content are…

  5. NASA welding assessment program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    A program was conducted to demonstrate the cycle life capability of welded solar cell modules relative to a soldered solar cell module in a simulated low earth orbit thermal environment. A total of five 18-cell welded (parallel gap resistance welding) modules, three 18-cell soldered modules, and eighteen single cell samples were fabricated using 2 x 4 cm silicon solar cells from ASEC, fused silica cover glass from OCLI, silver plated Invar interconnectors, DC 93-500 adhesive, and Kapton-Kevlar-Kapton flexible substrate material. Zero degree pull strength ranged from 2.4 to 5.7 lbs for front welded contacts (40 samples), and 3.5 to 6.2 lbs for back welded contacts (40 samples). Solar cell cross sections show solid state welding on both front and rear contacts. The 18-cell welded modules have a specific power of 124 W/kg and an area power density of 142 W/sq m (both at 28 C). Three welded and one soldered module were thermal cycle tested in a thermal vacuum chamber simulating a low earth orbit thermal environment.

  6. Sorting Titanium Welding Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, W. D., Jr.; Brown, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Three types of titanium welding wires identified by their resistance to current flow. Welding-wire tester quickly identifies unknown titaniumalloy wire by touching wire with test probe, and comparing meter response with standard response. Before touching wire, tip of test probe dipped into an electrolyte.

  7. Integrated Flexible Welding System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-09

    systems are employed at the top of the 7 INTEGRATED FLEXIBLE WELDING SYSTEM ARCHMiECTURE II * II COMUN CAD DEMUI=TNS WELD IAIN CMMUNICATTHNSCO UTION A TA...planning and online functional processes is successful in this case because much is known for certain about the environment and task. Thus, it is

  8. Welding blades to rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoklo, K. H.; Moore, T. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A process is described to form T-joints between dissimilar thickness parts by magnetic force upset welding. This type of resistance welding is used to join compressor and turbine parts which thereby reduces the weight and cost of jet engines.

  9. Effect of welding position on porosity formation in aluminum alloy welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haryung, J.; Wroth, R. S.

    1967-01-01

    Program investigates the effects of varied welding positions on weld qualities. Progressive changes in bead geometry occur as the weld plane angle is varied from upslope to downslope. The gravitational effect on the weld puddle varies greatly with welding position.

  10. Argon Welding Inside A Workpiece

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.

    1988-01-01

    Canopies convert large hollow workpiece into inert-gas welding chamber. Large manifold serves welding chamber for attachment of liner parts in argon atmosphere. Every crevice, opening and passageway provided with argon-rich environment. Weld defects and oxidation dramatically reduced; also welding time reduced.

  11. Alternating-Polarity Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Brief reversing polarity of welding current greatly improves quality of welds. NASA technical memorandum recounts progress in art of variable-polarity plasma-arc (VPPA) welding, with emphasis on welding of aluminum-alloy tanks. VPPA welders offer important advantages over conventional single-polarity gas/tungsten arc welders.

  12. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  13. Solidification of underwater wet welds

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, A.M.; Medeiros, R.C. de; Liu, S.

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the shape of a weld pool can influence the microstructure and segregation pattern of the final solidified weld metal. Mechanical properties and susceptibility to defects are consequently affected by the solidification mode of the weld. In this work the solidification behavior of weld beads deposited in air and underwater wet welding using rutile electrodes were compared. The welds were deposited by gravity feed, on low carbon, manganese steel plates using similar welding conditions. Macroscopic observation of the weld craters showed that welds deposited in air presented an elliptical weld pool. The underwater wet welds, on the other hand, solidified with a tear drop shape. Although the welds differed in shape, their lengths were approximately the same. Microscopic examinations carried out on transverse, normal and longitudinal sections revealed a coarser columnar grain structure in the underwater welds. These results suggest that the tear-drop shaped pool induced solidification in a preferred orientation with segregation more likely in welds deposited under wet conditions. This change in weld pool geometry can be explained by the surface heat loss conditions that occur in a wet weld: slower when covered by the steam bubble and faster in the region in contact with water behind the pool.

  14. The basics of semiautomatic welding

    SciTech Connect

    Uttrachi, G.D. ); Meyer, D.W. )

    1993-08-01

    By definition, gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and flux cored arc welding (FCAW) are semiautomatic processes in which a consumable electrode is fed into a weld at a controlled rate, while in most cases a continuous blanket of gas shields the weld zone from contamination by the atmosphere. Semiautomatic welding includes five distinctive techniques or process variations, known as short circuiting, spray transfer, pulsed spray, gas shielded flux cored, and self-shielded flux cored welding. Short circuiting welding operates on generally lower arc voltages and amperages than spray transfer. This process pinpoints the arc heat and produces a small fast-freezing weld pool. The spray transfer process provides an intensely hot, higher voltage arc and high deposition rates. The pulsed spray mode of metal transfer uses two weld current levels: low background and pulse peak. Droplet transfer usually occurs during the pulse peak portion of the cycle. The low current background allows reduced heat input and improved weld pool control. Flux cored welding transfers metal in a manner similar to spray transfer, but with larger droplets. The higher weld currents usable with flux cored welding result in higher deposition rates and deeper penetration. Self-shielded flux cored welding is similar to gas-shielded flux cored welding except that its weld shielding mechanism is self-contained in the wire. As a result, it can be used outdoors with less need for wind breaks.

  15. Rheomorphism of welded tuffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, J. A.; Wright, J. V.

    1981-05-01

    Peralkaline welded tuffs from the islands of Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, and Pantelleria, Italy, show abundant evidence for post-depositional flow. It is demonstrated that rheomorphism, or secondary mass flowage, can occur in welded tuffs of ignimbrite and air-fall origin. The presence of a linear fabric is taken as the diagnostic criterion for the recognition of the process. Deposition on a slope is an essential condition for the development of rheomorphism after compaction and welding. Internal structures produced during rheomorphic flow can be studied by the methods of structural geology and show similar dispositions to comparable features in sedimentary slump sheets. It is shown that secondary flowage can occur in welded tuffs emplaced on gentle slopes, provided that the apparent viscosity of the magma is sufficiently low. Compositional factors favor the development of rheomorphism in densely welded tuffs of peralkaline type.

  16. Method for welding beryllium

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1997-04-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs.

  17. Method for welding beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1995-12-31

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. Beryllium parts made using this method can be used as structural components in aircraft, satellites and space applications.

  18. Welding Sensor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A system originally designed for welding components of the huge Space Shuttle external tank led to a laser-based automated welder for industrial use. A laser sensor tracks the seam where two pieces of metal are to be joined, measures gaps, misfits and automatically corrects welding of torch distance and height. A small industrial computer translates the sensor's information to the weld head and records and displays weld data for control purposes and analysis. The system was modified for commercial use by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Martin Marietta and Applied Research, Inc., which produces the commercial system. Applications are in industrial welding processes that require repetitive operations and a high degree of reliability.

  19. Grinding Parts For Automatic Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.; Hoult, William S.

    1989-01-01

    Rollers guide grinding tool along prospective welding path. Skatelike fixture holds rotary grinder or file for machining large-diameter rings or ring segments in preparation for welding. Operator grasps handles to push rolling fixture along part. Rollers maintain precise dimensional relationship so grinding wheel cuts precise depth. Fixture-mounted grinder machines surface to quality sufficient for automatic welding; manual welding with attendant variations and distortion not necessary. Developed to enable automatic welding of parts, manual welding of which resulted in weld bead permeated with microscopic fissures.

  20. Adaptive weld control for high-integrity welding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Bradley W.

    Adaptive, closed-loop weld control is necessary to maintain high-integrity, zero-defect welds. Conventional weld control techniques using weld parameter feedback control loops are sufficient to maintain set points, but fall short when confronted with unexpected variations in part/tooling temperature and mechanical structure, weldment material, arc skew angle, or calibration in weld parameter feedback measurement. Modern technology allows closed-loop control utilizing input from real-time weld monitoring sensors and inspection devices. Weld puddle parameters, bead profile parameters, and weld seam position are fed back into the weld control loop which adapts for the weld condition variations and drives them back to a desired state, thereby preventing weld defects or perturbations. Parameters such as arc position relative to the weld seam, puddle symmetry, arc length, weld width, and bead shape can be extracted from sensor imagery and used in closed-loop active weld control. All weld bead and puddle measurements are available for real-time display and statistical process control analysis, after which the data is archived to permanent storage or later retrieval and analysis.

  1. Capabilities of infrared weld monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, P.G.; Keske, J.S.; Leong, K.H.; Kornecki, G.

    1997-11-01

    A non-obtrusive pre-aligned, solid-state device has been developed to monitor the primary infrared emissions during laser welding. The weld monitor output is a 100-1000 mV signal that depends on the beam power and weld characteristics. The DC level of this signal is related to weld penetration, while AC portions of the output can be correlated with surface irregularities and part misalignment or contamination. Changes in DC behavior are also noted for both full and deep penetration welds. Full penetration welds are signified by an abrupt reduction in the weld monitor output. Bead on plate welds were made on steel, aluminum, and magnesium with both a CW CO{sub 2} laser and a pulsed Nd:YAG laser to explore the relationships between the weld characteristics and the weld monitor output.

  2. Calibration Fixture For Welding Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holly, Krisztina J.

    1990-01-01

    Compact, lightweight device used in any position or orientation. Calibration fixture designed for use on robotic gas/tungsten-arc welding torch equipped with vision-based seam-tracking system. Through optics in hollow torch cylinder, video camera obtains image of weld, viewing along line of sight coaxial with welding electrode. Attaches to welding-torch cylinder in place of gas cup normally attached in use. By use of longer or shorter extension tube, fixture accommodates welding electrode of unusual length.

  3. Thermoplastic welding apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Matsen, Marc R.; Negley, Mark A.; Geren, William Preston; Miller, Robert James

    2017-03-07

    A thermoplastic welding apparatus includes a thermoplastic welding tool, at least one tooling surface in the thermoplastic welding tool, a magnetic induction coil in the thermoplastic welding tool and generally encircling the at least one tooling surface and at least one smart susceptor in the thermoplastic welding tool at the at least one tooling surface. The magnetic induction coil is adapted to generate a magnetic flux field oriented generally parallel to a plane of the at least one smart susceptor.

  4. Elucidation of laser welding phenomena and factors affecting weld penetration and welding defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Seiji; Kawahito, Yousuke; Mizutani, Masami

    The behavior and effect of a plasma plume on the weld penetration are greatly different between CO2 laser welding and YAG, disk or fiber laser welding. The effects of the power and the power density on the weld penetration are elucidated. Spattering leading to the formation of underfilled weld beads is controlled by inclining the laser beam. Porosity is formed from bubbles generated from the tip of the keyhole at low welding speed or from the middle part of the keyhole at high laser power density. Cracking easily occurs in pulsed spot welding of aluminum alloys.

  5. Weld analysis and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Larry Z. (Inventor); Rodgers, Michael H. (Inventor); Powell, Bradley W. (Inventor); Burroughs, Ivan A. (Inventor); Goode, K. Wayne (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a Weld Analysis and Control System developed for active weld system control through real time weld data acquisition. Closed-loop control is based on analysis of weld system parameters and weld geometry. The system is adapted for use with automated welding apparatus having a weld controller which is capable of active electronic control of all aspects of a welding operation. Enhanced graphics and data displays are provided for post-weld analysis. The system provides parameter acquisition, including seam location which is acquired for active torch cross-seam positioning. Torch stand-off is also monitored for control. Weld bead and parent surface geometrical parameters are acquired as an indication of weld quality. These parameters include mismatch, peaking, undercut, underfill, crown height, weld width, puddle diameter, and other measurable information about the weld puddle regions, such as puddle symmetry, etc. These parameters provide a basis for active control as well as post-weld quality analysis and verification. Weld system parameters, such as voltage, current and wire feed rate, are also monitored and archived for correlation with quality parameters.

  6. Mist lift analysis summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, R.L.

    1980-09-01

    The mist flow open-cycle OTEC concept proposed by S.L. Ridgway has much promise, but the fluid mechanics of the mist flow are not well understood. The creation of the mist and the possibility of droplet growth leading to rainout (when the vapor can no longer support the mist) are particularly troublesome. This report summarizes preliminary results of a numerical analysis initiated at SERI in FY79 to study the mist-lift process. The analysis emphasizes the mass transfer and fluid mechanics of the steady-state mist flow and is based on one-dimensional models of the mist flow developed for SERI by Graham Wallis. One of Wallis's models describes a mist composed of a single size of drops and another considers several drop sizes. The latter model, further developed at SERI, considers a changing spectrum of discrete drop sizes and incorporates the mathematics describing collisions and growth of the droplets by coalescence. The analysis results show that under conditions leading to maximum lift in the single-drop-size model, the multigroup model predicts significantly reduced lift because of the growth of droplets by coalescence. The predicted lift height is sensitive to variations in the mass flow rate and inlet pressure. Inclusion of a coasting section, in which the drops would rise ballistically without change in temperature, may lead to increased lift within the existing range of operation.

  7. Normalized lift: an energy interpretation of the lift coefficient simplifies comparisons of the lifting ability of rotating and flapping surfaces.

    PubMed

    Burgers, Phillip; Alexander, David E

    2012-01-01

    For a century, researchers have used the standard lift coefficient C(L) to evaluate the lift, L, generated by fixed wings over an area S against dynamic pressure, ½ρv(2), where v is the effective velocity of the wing. Because the lift coefficient was developed initially for fixed wings in steady flow, its application to other lifting systems requires either simplifying assumptions or complex adjustments as is the case for flapping wings and rotating cylinders.This paper interprets the standard lift coefficient of a fixed wing slightly differently, as the work exerted by the wing on the surrounding flow field (L/ρ·S), compared against the total kinetic energy required for generating said lift, ½v(2). This reinterpreted coefficient, the normalized lift, is derived from the work-energy theorem and compares the lifting capabilities of dissimilar lift systems on a similar energy footing. The normalized lift is the same as the standard lift coefficient for fixed wings, but differs for wings with more complex motions; it also accounts for such complex motions explicitly and without complex modifications or adjustments. We compare the normalized lift with the previously-reported values of lift coefficient for a rotating cylinder in Magnus effect, a bat during hovering and forward flight, and a hovering dipteran.The maximum standard lift coefficient for a fixed wing without flaps in steady flow is around 1.5, yet for a rotating cylinder it may exceed 9.0, a value that implies that a rotating cylinder generates nearly 6 times the maximum lift of a wing. The maximum normalized lift for a rotating cylinder is 1.5. We suggest that the normalized lift can be used to evaluate propellers, rotors, flapping wings of animals and micro air vehicles, and underwater thrust-generating fins in the same way the lift coefficient is currently used to evaluate fixed wings.

  8. Normalized Lift: An Energy Interpretation of the Lift Coefficient Simplifies Comparisons of the Lifting Ability of Rotating and Flapping Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Burgers, Phillip; Alexander, David E.

    2012-01-01

    For a century, researchers have used the standard lift coefficient CL to evaluate the lift, L, generated by fixed wings over an area S against dynamic pressure, ½ρv2, where v is the effective velocity of the wing. Because the lift coefficient was developed initially for fixed wings in steady flow, its application to other lifting systems requires either simplifying assumptions or complex adjustments as is the case for flapping wings and rotating cylinders. This paper interprets the standard lift coefficient of a fixed wing slightly differently, as the work exerted by the wing on the surrounding flow field (L/ρ·S), compared against the total kinetic energy required for generating said lift, ½v2. This reinterpreted coefficient, the normalized lift, is derived from the work-energy theorem and compares the lifting capabilities of dissimilar lift systems on a similar energy footing. The normalized lift is the same as the standard lift coefficient for fixed wings, but differs for wings with more complex motions; it also accounts for such complex motions explicitly and without complex modifications or adjustments. We compare the normalized lift with the previously-reported values of lift coefficient for a rotating cylinder in Magnus effect, a bat during hovering and forward flight, and a hovering dipteran. The maximum standard lift coefficient for a fixed wing without flaps in steady flow is around 1.5, yet for a rotating cylinder it may exceed 9.0, a value that implies that a rotating cylinder generates nearly 6 times the maximum lift of a wing. The maximum normalized lift for a rotating cylinder is 1.5. We suggest that the normalized lift can be used to evaluate propellers, rotors, flapping wings of animals and micro air vehicles, and underwater thrust-generating fins in the same way the lift coefficient is currently used to evaluate fixed wings. PMID:22629326

  9. Model of Layered Weld Formation Under Narrow Gap Pulse Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krampit, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    The model parameters of narrow gap pulse welding can be divided into input, internal and output ones. The breadth of gap, that is, clearance breadth between upright edges is one of key parameters securing high quality of a weld joint. The paper presents theoretical outcomes for the model of layered weld formation under narrow gap pulse welding. Based on these studies is developed model of processes, which occur in the weld pool under pulse grove welding. It comprises the scheme of liquid metal motion in the weld pool, scheme of fusion with the side edge and in the bottom part, and the scheme of welding current impulse effect on the structure of a weld joint.

  10. Pipeline welding goes mechanized

    SciTech Connect

    Beeson, R.

    1999-11-01

    Spread four has bugs in the cornfield--but not to worry. The bug referred to here is a mechanized welding bug, specifically a single welding head, computer-aided gas metal arc (GMAW) system from CRC-Evans Automatic Welding powered by a Miller Electric XMT{reg{underscore}sign} 304 inverter-based welding machine. The bug operator and owner of 32 inverters is Welded Construction, L.P., of Perrysburgh, Ohio. Spread four is a 147-mile stretch of the Alliance Pipeline system (Alliance) cutting through the cornfields of northeast Iowa. While used successfully in Canada and Europe for onshore and offshore pipeline construction for 30 years, this is the first large-scale use of mechanized welding in the US on a cross-country pipeline. On longer, larger-diameter and thicker-wall pipe projects--the Alliance mainline has 1,844 miles of pipe, most of it 36-in. diameter with a 0.622-in. wall thickness--mechanized GMAW offers better productivity than manual shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). In addition, high-strength steels, such as the API 5L Grade X70 pipe used on the Alliance, benefit from the low-hydrogen content of certain solid and tubular wire electrodes.

  11. Serrated-Planform Lifting-Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrath, Brian E. (Inventor); Wood, Richard M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A novel set of serrated-planform lifting surfaces produce unexpectedly high lift coefficients at moderate to high angles-of-attack. Each serration, or tooth, is designed to shed a vortex. The interaction of the vortices greatly enhances the lifting capability over an extremely large operating range. Variations of the invention use serrated-planform lifting surfaces in planes different than that of a primary lifting surface. In an alternate embodiment, the individual teeth are controllably retractable and deployable to provide for active control of the vortex system and hence lift coefficient. Differential lift on multiple serrated-planform lifting surfaces provides a means for vehicle control. The important aerodynamic advantages of the serrated-planform lifting surfaces are not limited to aircraft applications but can be used to establish desirable performance characteristics for missiles, land vehicles, and/or watercraft.

  12. Solar array welding developement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elms, R. V., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The present work describes parallel gap welding as used for joining solar cells to the cell interconnect system. Sample preparation, weldable cell parameter evaluation, bond scheduling, bond strength evaluation, and bonding and thermal shock tests are described. A range of weld schedule parameters - voltage, time, and force - can be identified for various cell/interconnect designs that will provide adequate bond strengths and acceptably small electrical degradation. Automation of solar array welding operations to a significant degree has been achieved in Europe and will be receiving increased attention in the U.S. to reduce solar array fabrication costs.

  13. Thermal stir welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A welding method is provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  14. APPARATUS FOR ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Lingafelter, J.W.

    1960-04-01

    An apparatus is described in which a welding arc created between an annular electrode and a workpiece moves under the influence of an electromagnetic field about the electrode in a closed or annular path. This mode of welding is specially suited to the enclosing of nuclear-fuel slugs in a protective casing. For example, a uranium slug is placed in an aluminum can, and an aluminum closure is welded to the open end of the can along a closed or annular path conforming to the periphery of the end closure.

  15. Robotics for welding research

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, G.; Jones, J.

    1984-09-01

    The welding metallurgy research and education program at Colorado School of Mines (CSM) is helping industries make the transition toward automation by training students in robotics. Industry's interest is primarily in pick and place operations, although robotics can increase efficiency in areas other than production. Training students to develop fully automated robotic welding systems will usher in new curriculum requirements in the area of computers and microprocessors. The Puma 560 robot is CSM's newest acquisition for welding research 5 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  16. Thermal stir welding apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A welding method and apparatus are provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  17. Fusion Welding Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    34Metullurgical Factors Influencing Charpy Energy of Submerged Arc Welded HY-80 Steel, by A. 0. Oladipupo (Abstract). "Influence of Surface Depression and...of submerged arc welded HY-80 steel. The abstract for a thesis discussing this work is included in Appendix E. Further work is being carried out to...Professor of Materials Engineering fi&foteft^^^^ vV L%1 <° .’•- $ APPENDIX E CHARPY ENERGY OF SUBMERGED ARC WELDED BT-80 STEEL by •£> Adebisi 0

  18. Weld Wire Investigation Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, M.A.

    1999-03-22

    After GTA welding reservoir A production/process prove-in assemblies, X-ray examination detected a lack of sidewall fusion. After examining several possible causes, it was determined that the weld wire filler metal was responsible, particularly the wire cleaning process. The final conclusion was that the filler wire must be abrasively cleaned in a particular manner to perform as required. The abrasive process was incorporated into the wire material specification, ensuring consistency for all reservoir GTA welding at AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T).

  19. Integral lift engine preliminary design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, W.; Leto, A.; Schaefer, R.

    1971-01-01

    A preliminary mechanical design of a complete lift fan engine system is reported. A description of the lift fan engine, layout drawings of the components and complete engine, and a discussion of the design analyses and results are presented. The design features and areas of analysis include fan and compressor rotor blades of composite construction, a combustor folded over the compressor, relatively high-temperature blades in the high-pressure turbine, the first stage of the low-pressure turbine used for bearing support and ducting of lubricant to the bearings, a complete lubrication system, critical speeds of the shafting, and vibration and flutter of the blading.

  20. Unsteady Lift Generation for MAVs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-22

    canonical pitch - up , pitch -down wing maneuver, in 39th AIAA Fluid Dynamics Conference, AIAA 2009-3687, San Antonio, TX, 22-25 June 2009. [7] C. P. Ellington...unsteady lift generation on three-dimensional flapping wings in the MAV flight regime and, if a leading edge vortex develops at MAV-like Reynolds numbers... wing rotates in a propeller-like motion through a wing stroke angle up to 90 degrees. Unsteady lift and drag force data was acquired throughout the

  1. Endoscopic brow lifts uber alles.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhupendra C K

    2006-12-01

    Innumerable approaches to the ptotic brow and forehead have been described in the past. Over the last twenty-five years, we have used all these techniques in cosmetic and reconstructive patients. We have used the endoscopic brow lift technique since 1995. While no one technique is applicable to all patients, the endoscopic brow lift, with appropriate modifications for individual patients, can be used effectively for most patients with brow ptosis. We present the nuances of this technique and show several different fixation methods we have found useful.

  2. Specs add confidence in use of wet welding. [Underwater welding

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    Underwater wet welding can now be utilized with the same confidence as dry welding, provided certain guidelines are followed. A new electrode is discussed that has been delivering exceptionally high quality welds by a diving firm in Houston. With the issuance of the American Welding Society's specifications (ANS/LAWS D3.6-83) much of the confusion surrounding underwater welding should be eliminated. The new specifications establish the levels of quality for underwater welding and gives everyone in the business a common language.

  3. Underwater wet welding of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, S.; Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1995-05-01

    Underwater wet welding is conducted directly in water with the shielded metal arc (SMA) and flux cored arc (FCA) welding processes. Underwater wet welding has been demonstrated as an acceptable repair technique down to 100 meters (325 ft.) in depth, but wet welds have been attempted on carbon steel structures down to 200 meters (650 ft.). The primary purpose of this interpretive report is to document and evaluate current understanding of metallurgical behavior of underwater wet welds so that new welding consumables can be designed and new welding practices can be developed for fabrication and repair of high strength steel structures at greater depths. First the pyrometallurgical and physical metallurgy behaviors of underwater weldments are discussed. Second, modifications of the welding consumables and processes are suggested to enhance the ability to apply wet welding techniques.

  4. Laser weld jig. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Van Blarigan, P.; Haupt, D.L.

    1980-12-05

    A system is provided for welding a workpiece along a predetermined weld line that may be of irregular shape, which includes the step of forming a lip on the workpiece to extend parallel to the weld line, and moving the workpiece by engaging the lip between a pair of rotatable members. Rotation of one of the members at a constant speed, causes the workpiece to move so that all points on the weld line sequentially pass a fixed point in space at a constant speed, so that a laser welding beam can be directed at that fixed point to form a weld along the weld line. The workpiece can include a reusable jig forming the lip, and with the jig constructed to detachably hold parts to be welded at a position wherein the weld line of the parts extends parallel to the lip on the jig.

  5. 46 CFR 154.660 - Pipe welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... § 154.660 Pipe welding. (a) Pipe welding must meet Part 57 of this chapter. (b) Longitudinal butt welds... butt welds must meet the following: (1) Butt welds of pipes made from carbon, carbon manganese, or low... treatment. (2) Except for piping inside an independent cargo tank type A, B, or C, butt welds must be 100...

  6. 46 CFR 154.660 - Pipe welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... § 154.660 Pipe welding. (a) Pipe welding must meet part 57 of this chapter. (b) Longitudinal butt welds... butt welds must meet the following: (1) Butt welds of pipes made from carbon, carbon manganese, or low... treatment. (2) Except for piping inside an independent cargo tank type A, B, or C, butt welds must be 100...

  7. 46 CFR 154.660 - Pipe welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... § 154.660 Pipe welding. (a) Pipe welding must meet part 57 of this chapter. (b) Longitudinal butt welds... butt welds must meet the following: (1) Butt welds of pipes made from carbon, carbon manganese, or low... treatment. (2) Except for piping inside an independent cargo tank type A, B, or C, butt welds must be 100...

  8. 46 CFR 154.660 - Pipe welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... § 154.660 Pipe welding. (a) Pipe welding must meet part 57 of this chapter. (b) Longitudinal butt welds... butt welds must meet the following: (1) Butt welds of pipes made from carbon, carbon manganese, or low... treatment. (2) Except for piping inside an independent cargo tank type A, B, or C, butt welds must be 100...

  9. Customized orbital welding meets the challenge of titanium welding

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    Titanium has emerged as the material of choice for tubing used in surface condensers around the world in both new and retrofit configurations. A major worldwide supplier of steam surface condensers to the electric utility industry, Senior Engineering is finding an increased use of titanium tubes and tube sheets in condenser specifications. When compared to other alloys, titanium`s light weight is efficient in design, handling, transportation and installation activities. Additionally, it maintains a stable price structure. Senior Engineering implements an orbital welding process using fusion gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) for its titanium tube-to-tube sheet welding. Orbital welding involves the use of a welding apparatus placed inside a tube or pipe to automatically and precisely weld a 360-deg joint. When welding manually, a welder stops several times during the weld due to the large amount of time and fatigue involved in achieving 360-deg welds, which results in lack of fusion. An automated orbital welding system, however, can accomplish the task as one continuous weld. This reduces process time and decreases lack of fusion. The orbital welding systems, featuring a microprocessor-based controller, an inverter-based power supply, an expandable mandrel and a customized torch shroud, reduced welding labor by 35%. The improved labor efficiency justified the addition of two more of the systems in January 1996.

  10. Welding Qualification Sharing

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, Bruce

    2002-07-01

    ASME Section IX, 'Welding Qualifications', requires that each organization qualify its own welders and welding procedures. Qualification responsibility cannot be subcontracted, and qualifications administered by one organization cannot be transferred to another organization. This requirement has become the subject of close scrutiny as the demand for efficiency, particularly among nuclear plant owners, has increased. Two recent Code Cases change procedure and performance qualification requirements for the better. The first, N-573, enables nuclear plant owners to share welding procedure qualifications. The second, N-600, enables nuclear plant owners to share welder performance qualifications. Several owners have reduced costs using N-573. N-600, because it is relatively new, has not yet been implemented. Its potential for cost savings, though, is equivalent to that afforded by N-573. This paper discusses ASME Section IX's procedure and performance qualification philosophy, assesses that philosophy in light of today's welding environment, and discusses implementation of Code Cases N-573 and N-600. (authors)

  11. Friction stir welding tool

    DOEpatents

    Tolle; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy A.

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  12. Friction stir welding tool

    DOEpatents

    Tolle, Charles R.; Clark, Denis E.; Barnes, Timothy A.

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  13. Weld failure detection

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.; Sutton, Jr., Harry G.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting failure in a welded connection, particrly applicable to not readily accessible welds such as those joining components within the reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor system. A preselected tag gas is sealed within a chamber which extends through selected portions of the base metal and weld deposit. In the event of a failure, such as development of a crack extending from the chamber to an outer surface, the tag gas is released. The environment about the welded area is directed to an analyzer which, in the event of presence of the tag gas, evidences the failure. A trigger gas can be included with the tag gas to actuate the analyzer.

  14. Neutral polypropylene laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandolfino, Chiara; Lertora, Enrico; Gambaro, Carla

    2016-10-01

    The joining of polymeric materials is a technology used in many industrial applications, from transport to telecommunications and the medical sector. A new technology for the joining of polymers is the laser welding process. In particular, fibre laser welding is a flexible technology which allows high process speed and the realization of good quality joints. Despite its application becoming more widespread in the production of assemblies of high precision, the application of laser technology for the welding of polymers has not been the subject of many studies up to now. This study focused on the welding of neutral polypropylene. The window process parameter was identified, without the use of additives to increase radiation absorption, and a mechanical characterization was conducted in order to evaluate the quality of the joints realized.

  15. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    DOEpatents

    Hood, D.W.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.

    1987-12-15

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder is disclosed. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws. 5 figs.

  16. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    DOEpatents

    Hood, Donald W.; Johnson, John A.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1987-01-01

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

  17. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    DOEpatents

    Hood, D.W.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.

    1985-09-04

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

  18. Friction Stir Weld Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Payton, Lewis N. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A friction stir weld tool sleeve is supported by an underlying support pin. The pin material is preferably selected for toughness and fracture characteristics. The pin sleeve preferably has a geometry which employs the use of an interrupted thread, a plurality of flutes and/or eccentric path to provide greater flow through. Paddles have been found to assist in imparting friction and directing plastic metal during the welding process.

  19. Friction stir weld tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Payton, Lewis N. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A friction stir weld tool sleeve is supported by an underlying support pin. The pin material is preferably selected for toughness and fracture characteristics. The pin sleeve preferably has a geometry which employs the use of an interrupted thread, a plurality of flutes and/or eccentric path to provide greater flow through. Paddles have been found to assist in imparting friction and directing plastic metal during the welding process.

  20. Weld braze technique

    DOEpatents

    Kanne, Jr., William R.; Kelker, Jr., John W.; Alexander, Robert J.

    1982-01-01

    High-strength metal joints are formed by a combined weld-braze technique. A hollow cylindrical metal member is forced into an undersized counterbore in another metal member with a suitable braze metal disposed along the bottom of the counterbore. Force and current applied to the members in an evacuated chamber results in the concurrent formation of the weld along the sides of the counterbore and a braze along the bottom of the counterbore in one continuous operation.

  1. Numerical Study for Gta Weld Shape Variation by Coupling Welding Arc and Weld Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wenchao; Lu, Shanping; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi

    A numerical modeling of the welding arc and weld pool is studied for moving GTA welding to investigate the effect of the surface active element oxygen and the plasma drag force on the weld shape. Based on the 2D axisymmetric numerical modeling of the argon arc, the heat flux, current density and plasma drag force are obtained under different welding currents. Numerical calculations to the weld pool development are carried out for moving GTA welding on SUS304 stainless steel with different oxygen contents 30 ppm and 220 ppm, respectively. The results show that the plasma drag force is another dominating driving force affecting the liquid pool flow pattern, except for the Marangoni force. The different welding currents will change the temperature distribution and plasma drag force on the pool surface, and affect the strength of Marangoni convection and the weld shape. The weld D/W ratio initially increases, followed by a constant value around 0.5 with the increasing welding current under high oxygen content. The weld D/W ratio under the low oxygen content slightly decreases with the increasing welding current. The predicted weld shape by simulation agrees well with experimental results.

  2. Prosthetic Hand Lifts Heavy Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, James R.; Norton, William; Belcher, Jewell G.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand designed to enable amputee to lift diverse heavy objects like rocks and logs. Has simple serrated end effector with no moving parts. Prosthesis held on forearm by system of flexible straps. Features include ruggedness, simplicity, and relatively low cost.

  3. Prosthetic Hand Lifts Heavy Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, James R.; Norton, William; Belcher, Jewell G.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand designed to enable amputee to lift diverse heavy objects like rocks and logs. Has simple serrated end effector with no moving parts. Prosthesis held on forearm by system of flexible straps. Features include ruggedness, simplicity, and relatively low cost.

  4. Automatic Welding System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Robotic welding has been of interest to industrial firms because it offers higher productivity at lower cost than manual welding. There are some systems with automated arc guidance available, but they have disadvantages, such as limitations on types of materials or types of seams that can be welded; susceptibility to stray electrical signals; restricted field of view; or tendency to contaminate the weld seam. Wanting to overcome these disadvantages, Marshall Space Flight Center, aided by Hayes International Corporation, developed system that uses closed-circuit TV signals for automatic guidance of the welding torch. NASA granted license to Combined Technologies, Inc. for commercial application of the technology. They developed a refined and improved arc guidance system. CTI in turn, licensed the Merrick Corporation, also of Nashville, for marketing and manufacturing of the new system, called the CT2 Optical Trucker. CT2 is a non-contracting system that offers adaptability to broader range of welding jobs and provides greater reliability in high speed operation. It is extremely accurate and can travel at high speed of up to 150 inches per minute.

  5. Weld radiograph enigmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jemian, Wartan A.

    1986-01-01

    Weld radiograph enigmas are features observed on X-ray radiographs of welds. Some of these features resemble indications of weld defects, although their origin is different. Since they are not understood, they are a source of concern. There is a need to identify their causes and especially to measure their effect on weld mechanical properties. A method is proposed whereby the enigmas can be evaluated and rated, in relation to the full spectrum of weld radiograph indications. Thie method involves a signature and a magnitude that can be used as a quantitive parameter. The signature is generated as the diference between the microdensitometer trace across the radiograph and the computed film intensity derived from a thickness scan along the corresponding region of the sample. The magnitude is the measured difference in intensity between the peak and base line values of the signature. The procedure is demonstated by comparing traces across radiographs of a weld sample before and after the introduction of a hole and by a system based on a MacIntosh mouse used for surface profiling.

  6. Powered-Lift Aerodynamics and Acoustics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Powered lift technology is reviewed. Topics covered include: (1) high lift aerodynamics; (2) high speed and cruise aerodynamics; (3) acoustics; (4) propulsion aerodynamics and acoustics; (5) aerodynamic and acoustic loads; and (6) full-scale and flight research.

  7. Fluid Flow Phenomena during Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    MOLTEN WELD POOLS are dynamic. Liquid in the weld pool in acted on by several strong forces, which can result in high-velocity fluid motion. Fluid flow velocities exceeding 1 m/s (3.3 ft/s) have been observed in gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds under ordinary welding conditions, and higher velocities have been measured in submerged arc welds. Fluid flow is important because it affects weld shape and is related to the formation of a variety of weld defects. Moving liquid transports heat and often dominates heat transport in the weld pool. Because heat transport by mass flow depends on the direction and speed of fluid motion, weld pool shape can differ dramatically from that predicted by conductive heat flow. Temperature gradients are also altered by fluid flow, which can affect weld microstructure. A number of defects in GTA welds have been attributed to fluid flow or changes in fluid flow, including lack of penetration, top bead roughness, humped beads, finger penetration, and undercutting. Instabilities in the liquid film around the keyhole in electron beam and laser welds are responsible for the uneven penetration (spiking) characteristic of these types of welds.

  8. METHOD OF OBTAINING AN IMPROVED WELD IN INERT ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1962-12-11

    A method is reported for inert arc welding. An a-c welding current is applied to the workpiece and welding electrode such that the positive portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode positive, has only sufficient energy to clean the surface of the workpiece and the negative portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode negative, contains the energy required to weld. (AEC)

  9. Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding

    DOEpatents

    Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

    2013-10-01

    Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

  10. Welding structures in gas tungsten arc-welded zircaloy-4

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, T.E.; Saggese, M.E.

    1982-02-01

    Microstructures were obtained by welding tubes to end caps in fuel elements. The final joint properties are influenced by different structural elements including microstructure, porosity, and inclusions. The secondary structure found after welding is Widmanstaetten. Welding thermal cycles are inherently inhomogeneous, affecting both plate width and /beta/ primary grain. 4 refs.

  11. Pre-weld heat treatment improves welds in Rene 41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prager, M.

    1968-01-01

    Cooling of Rene 41 prior to welding reduces the incidence of cracking during post-weld heat treatment. The microstructure formed during the slow cooling rate favors elevated temperature ductility. Some vestiges of this microstructure are apparently retained during welding and thus enhance strain-age crack resistance in air.

  12. Weld pool oscillation during GTA welding of mild steel

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Y.H.; Ouden, G. den . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    In this paper the results are reported of a study dealing with the oscillation behavior of weld pools in the case of GTA bead-on-plate welding of mild steel, Fe 360. During welding, the weld pool was brought into oscillation by applying short current pulses, and the oscillation frequency and amplitude were measured by monitoring the arc voltage. It was found that the oscillation of the partially penetrated weld pool is dominated by one of two different oscillation modes (Mode 1 and Mode 2) depending on the welding conditions, whereas the oscillation of the fully penetrated weld pool is characterized by a third oscillation mode (Mode 3). It is possible to maintain partially penetrated weld pool oscillation in Mode 1 by choosing appropriate welding conditions. Under these conditions, an abrupt decrease in oscillation frequency occurs when the weld pool transfers from partial penetration to full penetration. Thus, weld penetration can be in-process controlled by monitoring the oscillation frequency during welding.

  13. Weld line detection and process control for welding automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sang-Min; Cho, Man-Ho; Lee, Ho-Young; Cho, Taik-Dong

    2007-03-01

    Welding has been widely used as a process to join metallic parts. But because of hazardous working conditions, workers tend to avoid this task. Techniques to achieve the automation are the recognition of joint line and process control. A CCD (charge coupled device) camera with a laser stripe was applied to enhance the automatic weld seam tracking in GMAW (gas metal arc welding). The adaptive Hough transformation having an on-line processing ability was used to extract laser stripes and to obtain specific weld points. The three-dimensional information obtained from the vision system made it possible to generate the weld torch path and to obtain information such as the width and depth of the weld line. In this study, a neural network based on the generalized delta rule algorithm was adapted to control the process of GMAW, such as welding speed, arc voltage and wire feeding speed. The width and depth of the weld joint have been selected as neurons in the input layer of the neural-network algorithm. The input variables, the width and depth of the weld joint, are determined by image information. The voltage, weld speed and wire feed rate are represented as the neurons in the output layer. The results of the neural-network learning applied to the welding are as follows: learning ratio 0.5, momentum ratio 0.7, the number of hidden layers 2 and the number of hidden units 8. They have significant influence on the weld quality.

  14. Protect Your Back: Guidelines for Safer Lifting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantu, Carolyn O.

    2002-01-01

    Examines back injury in teachers and child care providers; includes statistics, common causes of back pain (improper alignment, improper posture, improper lifting, and carrying), and types of back pain (acute and chronic). Focuses on preventing back injury, body mechanics for lifting and carrying, and proper lifting and carrying of children. (SD)

  15. 30 CFR 56.16016 - Lift trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lift trucks. 56.16016 Section 56.16016 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND....16016 Lift trucks. Fork and other similar types of lift trucks shall be operated with the— (a) Upright...

  16. 30 CFR 57.16016 - Lift trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lift trucks. 57.16016 Section 57.16016 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... § 57.16016 Lift trucks. Fork and other similar types of lift trucks shall be operated with the: (a...

  17. 46 CFR 64.43 - Lifting fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lifting fittings. 64.43 Section 64.43 Shipping COAST... HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.43 Lifting fittings. Each MPT must have attached lifting fittings so that the tank remains horizontal and stable while being moved....

  18. Protect Your Back: Guidelines for Safer Lifting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantu, Carolyn O.

    2002-01-01

    Examines back injury in teachers and child care providers; includes statistics, common causes of back pain (improper alignment, improper posture, improper lifting, and carrying), and types of back pain (acute and chronic). Focuses on preventing back injury, body mechanics for lifting and carrying, and proper lifting and carrying of children. (SD)

  19. Project LIFT: Year Three Student Outcomes Memo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Michael; Kim, Dae Y.; Long, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Research for Action (RFA) was commissioned to evaluate changes in student outcomes during the first three years of the Project Leadership and Investment for Transformation (LIFT). This report focuses on two questions: (1) how do LIFT students' behavioral and academic performance compare to those of a matched set of non-LIFT comparison students?;…

  20. Vertical Lift - Not Just For Terrestrial Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A

    2000-01-01

    Autonomous vertical lift vehicles hold considerable potential for supporting planetary science and exploration missions. This paper discusses several technical aspects of vertical lift planetary aerial vehicles in general, and specifically addresses technical challenges and work to date examining notional vertical lift vehicles for Mars, Titan, and Venus exploration.

  1. 49 CFR 37.203 - Lift maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lift maintenance. 37.203 Section 37.203... DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.203 Lift maintenance. (a) The entity shall establish a system of regular and frequent maintenance checks of lifts sufficient to determine if they are operative...

  2. Resistance-Welding Test Fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, Andrew D.

    1990-01-01

    Realistic welding conditions produce reliable specimens. Simple fixture holds resistance-welding test specimens. Specimen holder includes metallic holder and clamps to provide electrical and thermal paths and plastic parts providing thermal and electrical isolation.

  3. Welding arc length control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a welding arc length control system. The system includes, in its broadest aspects, a power source for providing welding current, a power amplification system, a motorized welding torch assembly connected to the power amplification system, a computer, and current pick up means. The computer is connected to the power amplification system for storing and processing arc weld current parameters and non-linear voltage-ampere characteristics. The current pick up means is connected to the power source and to the welding torch assembly for providing weld current data to the computer. Thus, the desired arc length is maintained as the welding current is varied during operation, maintaining consistent weld penetration.

  4. Remote welding equipment for TPX

    SciTech Connect

    Silke, G.W.; Junge, R.

    1995-12-31

    Remote welding equipment and techniques are necessary for maintenance of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) Plasma Facing Components (PFCs). The processes identified for this application includes inside diameter (i.d.) and outside diameter (o.d.) Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) welding of titanium and stainless steel alloys. Welding equipment developed for this application includes some unique features due to the specialized environment of the TPX vessel. Remote features of this equipment must include the ability to acquire and align the parts being welded, perform all welding operations and visually inspect the weld area. Designs for weld heads require the integration of industry proven hardware with the special features include compact size, remote manipulation, remote clamping and alignment, remote vision, full inert gas coverage, arc voltage control, wire feed, programmable weld schedules and failure recovery.

  5. Workmanship standards for fusion welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, M. D.

    1967-01-01

    Workmanship standards manual defines practices, that adhere to rigid codes and specifications, for fusion welding of component piping, assemblies, and systems. With written and pictorial presentations, it is part of the operating procedure for fusion welding.

  6. Fractured welds stir not debate

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbaum, D.B.; Stocker, L.J.P.

    1996-05-06

    This article reviews the growing discussion regarding the failures of welded joints in a number of beam-to-column connections. In the Northridge Earthquake of 1994, there were a large number of such failures, and weld material E70T-4 was the common element in each failure. This weld material is utilized with FCAW, a semiautomatic welding process that allows a higher deposition rate. The manufacturer of the weld material argues that many of the welds were improperly performed, while others argue that the fracture toughness of the weld material is very low. With a minor defect, this would lead to brittle fracture under the cyclic loading that would occur during a seismic event. Use of the manual SMAW process using weld material E7018 is recommended.

  7. An Alternative Maxillary Sinus Lift Technique – Sinu Lift System

    PubMed Central

    T, Parthasaradhi; B, Shivakumar; Kumar, T.S.S.; P, Suganya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Maxillary sinus augmentation surgical techniques have evolved greatly allowing successful placement of dental implants in the atrophic posterior maxillary region. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes and postoperative morbidity of sinus floor elevation procedures performed using the minimally invasive surgical technique the Sinu lift system. Materials and Methods: Sinus lift procedure was done using the sinu lift system by a transcrestal approach and bone augmentation was done on ten systemically healthy patients using β- tricalcium phosphate and platelet rich plasma mix. The study was evaluated upto six months period with bone related parameters being assessed at base line using CT scan, OPG and after six months the results were analysed using SPSS Version 18.0 software (p < 0.01 (0.005). Wilcoxson signed rank sum test was used to correlate between preoperative and postoperative measurements. Implant placements were done at the desired area of sinus augmentation with a two year follow up. (Nobel Biocare, Nobel Biocare Holding AG, Zürich-Flughafen, Switzerland) Results: The augmented sites had a significant increase in the bone parameters at the desired grafted region. The mean gain in bone height as observed in CT Scan had revealed increased measurements from 5.80mm±0.98 to 10.20mm±1.68 at the sixth month evaluation. This was statistically significant (0.005). Clinically, no complications were observed during or after the surgical procedure. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, the Sinu lift system with a controlled working action resulted in high procedural success and this procedure may be an alternative to the currently used surgical methods. PMID:25954702

  8. An alternative maxillary sinus lift technique - sinu lift system.

    PubMed

    T, Parthasaradhi; B, Shivakumar; Kumar, T S S; Jain, Ashish R; P, Suganya

    2015-03-01

    Maxillary sinus augmentation surgical techniques have evolved greatly allowing successful placement of dental implants in the atrophic posterior maxillary region. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes and postoperative morbidity of sinus floor elevation procedures performed using the minimally invasive surgical technique the Sinu lift system. Sinus lift procedure was done using the sinu lift system by a transcrestal approach and bone augmentation was done on ten systemically healthy patients using β- tricalcium phosphate and platelet rich plasma mix. The study was evaluated upto six months period with bone related parameters being assessed at base line using CT scan, OPG and after six months the results were analysed using SPSS Version 18.0 software (p < 0.01 (0.005). Wilcoxson signed rank sum test was used to correlate between preoperative and postoperative measurements. Implant placements were done at the desired area of sinus augmentation with a two year follow up. (Nobel Biocare, Nobel Biocare Holding AG, Zürich-Flughafen, Switzerland) Results: The augmented sites had a significant increase in the bone parameters at the desired grafted region. The mean gain in bone height as observed in CT Scan had revealed increased measurements from 5.80mm±0.98 to 10.20mm±1.68 at the sixth month evaluation. This was statistically significant (0.005). Clinically, no complications were observed during or after the surgical procedure. Within the limitations of this study, the Sinu lift system with a controlled working action resulted in high procedural success and this procedure may be an alternative to the currently used surgical methods.

  9. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Alloy Circumferential Weld Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Cantrell, Mark; Carter, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an innovative weld process that continues to grow in use, in the commercial, defense, and space sectors. It produces high quality and high strength welds in aluminum alloys. The process consists of a rotating weld pin tool that plasticizes material through friction. The plasticized material is welded by applying a high weld forge force through the weld pin tool against the material during pin tool rotation. The high weld forge force is reacted against an anvil and a stout tool structure. A variation of friction stir welding currently being evaluated is self-reacting friction stir welding. Self-reacting friction stir welding incorporates two opposing shoulders on the crown and root sides of the weld joint. In self-reacting friction stir welding, the weld forge force is reacted against the crown shoulder portion of the weld pin tool by the root shoulder. This eliminates the need for a stout tooling structure to react the high weld forge force required in the typical friction stir weld process. Therefore, the self-reacting feature reduces tooling requirements and, therefore, process implementation costs. This makes the process attractive for aluminum alloy circumferential weld applications. To evaluate the application of self-reacting friction stir welding for aluminum alloy circumferential welding, a feasibility study was performed. The study consisted of performing a fourteen-foot diameter aluminum alloy circumferential demonstration weld using typical fusion weld tooling. To accomplish the demonstration weld, weld and tack weld development were performed and fourteen-foot diameter rings were fabricated. Weld development consisted of weld pin tool selection and the generation of a process map and envelope. Tack weld development evaluated gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding for tack welding rings together for circumferential welding. As a result of the study, a successful circumferential demonstration weld was produced leading

  10. Welding and Brazing Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    Hot isostatic pressing and conventional furnace brazing effective under right conditions. Study performed showed feasibility of welding SiC using several welding and brazing techniques. Use of SiC improves engine efficiency by allowing increase in operating temperature. SiC successfully hot-pressure-welded at 3,550 degrees F (1,950 degrees C) in argon. Refinements of solid-state welding and brazing procedures used sufficient for some specific industrial applications.

  11. Weld-bonded titanium structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Creedon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Structurally stronger titanium articles are produced by a weld-bonding technique comprising fastening at least two plates of titanium together using spotwelding and curing an adhesive interspersed between the spot-weld nuggets. This weld-bonding may be employed to form lap joints or to stiffen titanium metal plates.

  12. Robotic Welding and Inspection System

    SciTech Connect

    H. B. Smartt; D. P. Pace; E. D. Larsen; T. R. McJunkin; C. I. Nichol; D. E. Clark; K. L. Skinner; M. L. Clark; T. G. Kaser; C. R. Tolle

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents a robotic system for GTA welding of lids on cylindrical vessels. The system consists of an articulated robot arm, a rotating positioner, end effectors for welding, grinding, ultrasonic and eddy current inspection. Features include weld viewing cameras, modular software, and text-based procedural files for process and motion trajectories.

  13. Improved welding of Rene-41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunez, S.

    1970-01-01

    Gas-tungsten arc welding with a filler of Rene-41 produces strong welded joints. When Rene-41 is used, resistance to strain-age cracking is greatly increased by post-weld solution annealing in an inert atmosphere. Mechanical properties of Rene-41 and Hastelloy-W are compared.

  14. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  15. Welding. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of eight terminal objectives for a basic welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (2 hours daily) course developed to teach the fundamentals of welding shop work, to become familiar with the operation of the welding shop…

  16. Capillary flow weld-bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Jones, R. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    The invention of a weld-bonding technique for titanium plates was described. This involves fastening at least two plates of titanium together using spot-welding and applying a bead of adhesive along the edge of the resistance spot-welded joint which upon heating, flows and fills the separation between the joint components.

  17. Determination of GTA Welding Efficiencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    Society of Metals , 1981, pp. 91-108. 12. Wilkinson, J.B., and Milner, D.R., Heat Transfer from Arcs, British Welding Journal, vol. 7(2), 115-128, 1960...MIT (1977). 11. Tsai, C.L.,"Modeling of the Thermal Behavior of Metals During Welding," Trends in Welding Research, Edited by S.A. David, American

  18. Automatic welding comes of age. [Offshore

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.L. Jr.

    1981-07-01

    Automatic pipe welding systems today fall into three main categories: gas metal arc welding, gas-tungsten arc welding, and flash-butt welding. The first automatic welding devices used offshore were the CRC and H.C. Price systems. Both use gas metal arc welding with a consumable steel filler wire. The recently developed McDermott flash-butt welding system is described. (DLC)

  19. A Review of Titanium Welding Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-03

    Welding ( GTAW )............................. 2 jPlasma Arc Welding (PAW) ................................... 3 Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW...earliest use of gas tungsten arc welding ( GTAW ). Submerged arc welding (SAW) was introduced in 1944 (p.149(4)). Gas metal arc welding (GMAW) was developed...discussion. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding GTAW )" The GTAW process is due to the heating from an arc between a noncon- sumable tungsten electrode and the work

  20. Program for Heat Flow in Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Graham, M.

    1986-01-01

    Program contains numerical model of temperature distribution in vicinity of weld. Weld model used to produce estimated welding power requirements, welding-power-loss analysis, heat-affected-zone temperature history, and weld-puddle cross-section plots. Applied to gas/tungsten-arc, plasma-arc, electron-beam, and laser-beam welds on wide plates under steady conditions. User predicts power requirements and temperature distributions. Weld model written in BASIC.

  1. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    DOEpatents

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  2. Quiet powered-lift propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Latest results of programs exploring new propulsion technology for powered-lift aircraft systems are presented. Topics discussed include results from the 'quiet clean short-haul experimental engine' program and progress reports on the 'quiet short-haul research aircraft' and 'tilt-rotor research aircraft' programs. In addition to these NASA programs, the Air Force AMST YC 14 and YC 15 programs were reviewed.

  3. Gluteal lift with subfascial implants.

    PubMed

    de la Peña-Salcedo, Jose Abel; Soto-Miranda, Miguel Angel; Vaquera-Guevara, Marcelo Osvaldo; Lopez-Salguero, Jose Fernando; Lavareda-Santana, Marco Antonio; Ledezma-Rodriguez, Jocelyn Celeste

    2013-06-01

    Gluteal enhancement surgery includes buttock implants, gluteal flaps, lipografting, and gluteal lifts. However, no information is available on the outcomes achievable using the gluteal lift combined with subfascial gluteal implants. A retrospective study was performed to analyze the outcomes of gluteal lift combined with subfascial gluteal implants performed during a 7-year period by a single surgeon at a single institution. During the study period, 114 patients (228 implants) ages 27-68 years (mean 47 years) were found. The follow-up period was 1-7 years (mean 4.5 years). The findings showed seroma in 11.4 % of the patients, hematoma in 5.26 %, minor wound dehiscence in 19.29 %, major wound dehiscence in 1.75 %, minor infection in 1.75 %, implant exposure in 0 %, capsular contracture Becker 3 and 4 in 3.5 %, implant rupture in 0 %, implant malposition in 5.25 %, long-term numbness of the buttock in 0 %, palpability of the implant in 0 %, implant rippling in 0 %, implant rupture in 0 %, wide scars in 41.2 %, need for secondary surgery in 26.31 %, and dissatisfaction with the final volume in 10.52 %. A patient satisfaction rate of 9.6 in 10 was found. The study showed that the gluteal lift combined with gluteal implants placed in the subfascial pocket provided good long-lasting results with an acceptable rate of complications, very high patient satisfaction, and easily concealed scars. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  4. Aerodynamics of Supersonic Lifting Bodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    verso of front cover. 19 Y WOROS (Continue on rt.’,;erso side i recessary and identily by block number) Theoretical Aerodynamics Lifting Bodies Wind ...waverider solution, developed from the supersonic wedge flow solution, is then i Fused to fashion vertLcal stabilizer-likh control surfaces. Wind ...served as Project Engineers ror thE wind tunnel work. Important contributions were also made bv: Mr. iis±ung Miin; Lee, -M. Beom-Soo Kim, Mtr. Martin Weeks

  5. Numerical simulation of lifting mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebel, E. S.; Zhursenbaev, B. I.; Solomin, V. Yu.

    2012-11-01

    The article presents a method of kinematical synthesis of planar multilink linkage with adjustable closed loop, which is designed for a plane-parallel motion of the output lever and can be used as an actuator for lifting mechanism. Methods of kinematical synthesis and analysis are developed in this paper allow to design the scheme of mechanism that performs the given function of displacement of the output link, and to evaluate the kinematical characteristics of the designed layout.

  6. Study of inertia welding: the sensitivity of weld configuration and strength to variations in welding parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Mote, M.W.

    1981-12-01

    An experiment is described which is designed to demonstrate the forgiveness of inertia welding, that is, the relative insensitivity of weld strength to variations in energy (rotational speed of parts) and axial force. Although easily observed variations in the welding parameters produced easily observed changes in weldment configuration and changes in dimension (upset), only extremes in parameters produced changes in weld strength. Consequently, process monitoring and product inspection would be sufficient for quality assurance in a production environment.

  7. The science and practice of welding. 8th ed. Vol. 2: The practice of welding

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    This book includes sections on underwater welding and cutting, cold pressure welding, the application of mixed gases to various welding processes, and robot welding. The author uses photographs, tables, figures, and illustrations to explain the text and provides examination questions.

  8. Allometry of hummingbird lifting performance

    PubMed Central

    Altshuler, D. L.; Dudley, R.; Heredia, S. M.; McGuire, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Vertical lifting performance in 67 hummingbird species was studied across a 4000 m elevational gradient. We used the technique of asymptotic load-lifting to elicit maximum sustained muscle power output during loaded hovering flight. Our analysis incorporated direct measurements of maximum sustained load and simultaneous wingbeat kinematics, together with aerodynamic estimates of mass-specific mechanical power output, all within a robust phylogenetic framework for the Trochilidae. We evaluated key statistical factors relevant to estimating slopes for allometric relationships by performing analyses with and without phylogenetic information, and incorporating species-specific measurement error. We further examined allometric relationships at different elevations because this gradient represents a natural experiment for studying physical challenges to animal flight mechanics. Maximum lifting capacity (i.e. vertical force production) declined with elevation, but was either isometric or negatively allometric with respect to both body and muscle mass, depending on elevational occurrence of the corresponding taxa. Maximum relative muscle power output exhibited a negative allometry with respect to muscle mass, supporting theoretical predictions from muscle mechanics. PMID:20154187

  9. Allometry of hummingbird lifting performance.

    PubMed

    Altshuler, D L; Dudley, R; Heredia, S M; McGuire, J A

    2010-03-01

    Vertical lifting performance in 67 hummingbird species was studied across a 4000 m elevational gradient. We used the technique of asymptotic load-lifting to elicit maximum sustained muscle power output during loaded hovering flight. Our analysis incorporated direct measurements of maximum sustained load and simultaneous wingbeat kinematics, together with aerodynamic estimates of mass-specific mechanical power output, all within a robust phylogenetic framework for the Trochilidae. We evaluated key statistical factors relevant to estimating slopes for allometric relationships by performing analyses with and without phylogenetic information, and incorporating species-specific measurement error. We further examined allometric relationships at different elevations because this gradient represents a natural experiment for studying physical challenges to animal flight mechanics. Maximum lifting capacity (i.e. vertical force production) declined with elevation, but was either isometric or negatively allometric with respect to both body and muscle mass, depending on elevational occurrence of the corresponding taxa. Maximum relative muscle power output exhibited a negative allometry with respect to muscle mass, supporting theoretical predictions from muscle mechanics.

  10. Generalised Eisenhart lift of the Toda chain

    SciTech Connect

    Cariglia, Marco; Gibbons, Gary

    2014-02-15

    The Toda chain of nearest neighbour interacting particles on a line can be described both in terms of geodesic motion on a manifold with one extra dimension, the Eisenhart lift, or in terms of geodesic motion in a symmetric space with several extra dimensions. We examine the relationship between these two realisations and discover that the symmetric space is a generalised, multi-particle Eisenhart lift of the original problem that reduces to the standard Eisenhart lift. Such generalised Eisenhart lift acts as an inverse Kaluza-Klein reduction, promoting coupling constants to momenta in higher dimension. In particular, isometries of the generalised lift metric correspond to energy preserving transformations that mix coordinates and coupling constants. A by-product of the analysis is that the lift of the Toda Lax pair can be used to construct higher rank Killing tensors for both the standard and generalised lift metrics.

  11. Lift enhancement by bats' dynamically changing wingspan

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shizhao; Zhang, Xing; He, Guowei; Liu, Tianshu

    2015-01-01

    This paper elucidates the aerodynamic role of the dynamically changing wingspan in bat flight. Based on direct numerical simulations of the flow over a slow-flying bat, it is found that the dynamically changing wingspan can significantly enhance the lift. Further, an analysis of flow structures and lift decomposition reveal that the elevated vortex lift associated with the leading-edge vortices intensified by the dynamically changing wingspan considerably contributed to enhancement of the time-averaged lift. The nonlinear interaction between the dynamically changing wing and the vortical structures plays an important role in the lift enhancement of a flying bat in addition to the geometrical effect of changing the lifting-surface area in a flapping cycle. In addition, the dynamically changing wingspan leads to the higher efficiency in terms of generating lift for a given amount of the mechanical energy consumed in flight. PMID:26701882

  12. Weld Nugget Temperature Control in Thermal Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A control system for a thermal stir welding system is provided. The control system includes a sensor and a controller. The sensor is coupled to the welding system's containment plate assembly and generates signals indicative of temperature of a region adjacent and parallel to the welding system's stir rod. The controller is coupled to the sensor and generates at least one control signal using the sensor signals indicative of temperature. The controller is also coupled to the welding system such that at least one of rotational speed of the stir rod, heat supplied by the welding system's induction heater, and feed speed of the welding system's weld material feeder are controlled based on the control signal(s).

  13. Thermal Stir Welding: A New Solid State Welding Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Thermal stir welding is a new welding process developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Thermal stir welding is similar to friction stir welding in that it joins similar or dissimilar materials without melting the parent material. However, unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the process are all independent of each other and are separately controlled. Furthermore, the heating element of the process can be either a solid-state process (such as a thermal blanket, induction type process, etc), or, a fusion process (YG laser, plasma torch, etc.) The separation of the heating, stirring, forging elements of the process allows more degrees of freedom for greater process control. This paper introduces the mechanics of the thermal stir welding process. In addition, weld mechanical property data is presented for selected alloys as well as metallurgical analysis.

  14. Thermal Stir Welding: A New Solid State Welding Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Thermal stir welding is a new welding process developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Thermal stir welding is similar to friction stir welding in that it joins similar or dissimilar materials without melting the parent material. However, unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the process are all independent of each other and are separately controlled. Furthermore, the heating element of the process can be either a solid-state process (such as a thermal blanket, induction type process, etc), or, a fusion process (YG laser, plasma torch, etc.) The separation of the heating, stirring, forging elements of the process allows more degrees of freedom for greater process control. This paper introduces the mechanics of the thermal stir welding process. In addition, weld mechanical property data is presented for selected alloys as well as metallurgical analysis.

  15. Complex vibration ultrasonic welding systems with large area welding tips.

    PubMed

    Tsujino, Jiromaru; Sano, Tsutomu; Ogata, Hayato; Tanaka, Soichi; Harada, Yoshiki

    2002-05-01

    Vibration and welding characteristics of complex vibration ultrasonic welding systems of 27 and 40 kHz were studied. Complex vibration systems, which have elliptical to circular or rectangular to square locus, are effective for ultrasonic welding of various specimens including the same and different metal specimens, and for direct welding of semiconductor tips and packaging of various electronic devices without solder. The complex vibration systems consist of a one-dimensional longitudinal-torsional vibration converter with slitted part, a stepped horn and a longitudinal vibration transducer as a driving source. The complex vibration welding tips of 27 and 40 kHz have enough area of 6-8 mm square for various welding specimens. Aluminum plate specimens of 0.3-1.0 mm thickness were successfully joined with weld strengths almost equal to aluminum specimen strength, and independent to the specimen direction. Required vibration amplitude of 40 kHz is smaller than that of 27 kHz.

  16. Welding and properties of welds of TMCP-steel

    SciTech Connect

    Brederholm, A.T.; Kotamies, J.M.N.; Haenninen, H.

    1995-12-31

    Thermomechanical control process (TMCP) of steel includes a multiplicity of processing schedules of combined thermal and mechanical working treatments that have been developed to optimize the resulting microstructure and mechanical properties of various steel grades. Weld metal properties of multipass submerged arc welded (SAW) TMCP steel joints were investigated in order to study the influences of different welding wires and heat inputs. Weld metal characterization consisted of tensile, Charpy-V Notch (CVN) and hardness testing, and microstructural examination. Cross-weld tensile specimens were tested principally to examine whether HAZ softening, which might have occurred, causes failure in this region. The tests verified that by using the right welding wire; it is possible to achieve weld joint which fulfills the strength requirements and gives satisfactory toughness at low temperatures.

  17. Thermal Stir Welding: A New Solid State Welding Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Thermal stir welding is a new welding process developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Thermal stir welding is similar to friction stir welding in that it joins similar or dissimilar materials without melting the parent material. However, unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the process are all independent of each other and are separately controlled. Furthermore, the heating element of the process can be either a solid-state process (such as a thermal blanket, induction type process, etc), or, a fusion process (YG laser, plasma torch, etc.) The separation of the heating, stirring, forging elements of the process allows more degrees of freedom for greater process control. This paper introduces the mechanics of the thermal stir welding process. In addition, weld mechanical property data is presented for selected alloys as well as metallurgical analysis.

  18. Thermal Stir Welding: A New Solid State Welding Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Thermal stir welding is a new welding process developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Thermal stir welding is similar to friction stir welding in that it joins similar or dissimilar materials without melting the parent material. However, unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the process are all independent of each other and are separately controlled. Furthermore, the heating element of the process can be either a solid-state process (such as a thermal blanket, induction type process, etc), or, a fusion process (YG laser, plasma torch, etc.) The separation of the heating, stirring, forging elements of the process allows more degrees of freedom for greater process control. This paper introduces the mechanics of the thermal stir welding process. In addition, weld mechanical property data is presented for selected alloys as well as metallurgical analysis.

  19. Variable Lifting Index (VLI): A New Method for Evaluating Variable Lifting Tasks.

    PubMed

    Waters, Thomas; Occhipinti, Enrico; Colombini, Daniela; Alvarez-Casado, Enrique; Fox, Robert

    2016-08-01

    We seek to develop a new approach for analyzing the physical demands of highly variable lifting tasks through an adaptation of the Revised NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) Lifting Equation (RNLE) into a Variable Lifting Index (VLI). There are many jobs that contain individual lifts that vary from lift to lift due to the task requirements. The NIOSH Lifting Equation is not suitable in its present form to analyze variable lifting tasks. In extending the prior work on the VLI, two procedures are presented to allow users to analyze variable lifting tasks. One approach involves the sampling of lifting tasks performed by a worker over a shift and the calculation of the Frequency Independent Lift Index (FILI) for each sampled lift and the aggregation of the FILI values into six categories. The Composite Lift Index (CLI) equation is used with lifting index (LI) category frequency data to calculate the VLI. The second approach employs a detailed systematic collection of lifting task data from production and/or organizational sources. The data are organized into simplified task parameter categories and further aggregated into six FILI categories, which also use the CLI equation to calculate the VLI. The two procedures will allow practitioners to systematically employ the VLI method to a variety of work situations where highly variable lifting tasks are performed. The scientific basis for the VLI procedure is similar to that for the CLI originally presented by NIOSH; however, the VLI method remains to be validated. The VLI method allows an analyst to assess highly variable manual lifting jobs in which the task characteristics vary from lift to lift during a shift. © 2015, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  20. The relationship between maximal lifting capacity and maximum acceptable lift in strength-based soldiering tasks.

    PubMed

    Savage, Robert J; Best, Stuart A; Carstairs, Greg L; Ham, Daniel J

    2012-07-01

    Psychophysical assessments, such as the maximum acceptable lift, have been used to establish worker capability and set safe load limits for manual handling tasks in occupational settings. However, in military settings, in which task demand is set and capable workers must be selected, subjective measurements are inadequate, and maximal capacity testing must be used to assess lifting capability. The aim of this study was to establish and compare the relationship between maximal lifting capacity and a self-determined tolerable lifting limit, maximum acceptable lift, across a range of military-relevant lifting tasks. Seventy male soldiers (age 23.7 ± 6.1 years) from the Australian Army performed 7 strength-based lifting tasks to determine their maximum lifting capacity and maximum acceptable lift. Comparisons were performed to identify maximum acceptable lift relative to maximum lifting capacity for each individual task. Linear regression was used to identify the relationship across all tasks when the data were pooled. Strong correlations existed between all 7 lifting tasks (rrange = 0.87-0.96, p < 0.05). No differences were found in maximum acceptable lift relative to maximum lifting capacity across all tasks (p = 0.46). When data were pooled, maximum acceptable lift was equal to 84 ± 8% of the maximum lifting capacity. This study is the first to illustrate the strong and consistent relationship between maximum lifting capacity and maximum acceptable lift for multiple single lifting tasks. The relationship developed between these indices may be used to help assess self-selected manual handling capability through occupationally relevant maximal performance tests.

  1. Controlling conditions for wet welding

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.

    1985-11-01

    Wet welding is finding increased use for repairing and maintaining vessel hulls around the world. Users are developing new methods and procedures to expand the technology. A wet welded joint underwater can be made as strong as one welded in a dry habitat, but at a greatly reduced cost. The design of the joint for wet welding and the procedures that need to be followed are outlined. In designing for wet welding, high tensile strength, ease of access, and over-design should be considered.

  2. Thermal Stir Welds in Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonda, Richard W.; Knipling, Keith E.; Pilchak, Adam L.

    2016-01-01

    Although conventional friction stir welding (FSW) has proven unsuccessful in joining thick sections of alpha and near-alpha titanium alloys, thermal stir welding, a variant of the FSW process in which an external heat source is used to preheat the workpiece, is demonstrated to be able to reliably join 12.3-mm-thick plates of CP titanium. This paper describes the microstructures and textures that develop in these thermal stir welds. The observed microstructure was used to reconstruct the high-temperature microstructure and texture present during the welding process and therefore reveal the genesis of the welding structures.

  3. Spot Welding of Honeycomb Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohal, V.

    2017-08-01

    Honeycomb structures are used to prepare meals water jet cutting machines for textile. These honeycomb structures are made of stainless steel sheet thickness of 0.1-0.2 mm. Corrugated sheet metal strips are between two gears with special tooth profile. Hexagonal cells for obtaining these strips are welded points between them. Spot welding device is three electrodes in the upper part, which carries three welding points across the width of the strip of corrugated sheet metal. Spot welding device filled with press and advance mechanisms. The paper presents the values of the regime for spot welding.

  4. Extravehicular activity welding experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, J. Kevin

    1989-01-01

    The In-Space Technology Experiments Program (INSTEP) provides an opportunity to explore the many critical questions which can only be answered by experimentation in space. The objective of the Extravehicular Activity Welding Experiment definition project was to define the requirements for a spaceflight experiment to evaluate the feasibility of performing manual welding tasks during EVA. Consideration was given to experiment design, work station design, welding hardware design, payload integration requirements, and human factors (including safety). The results of this effort are presented. Included are the specific objectives of the flight test, details of the tasks which will generate the required data, and a description of the equipment which will be needed to support the tasks. Work station requirements are addressed as are human factors, STS integration procedures and, most importantly, safety considerations. A preliminary estimate of the cost and the schedule for completion of the experiment through flight and postflight analysis are given.

  5. Pulsed welding plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyaz'kov, A.; Pustovykh, O.; Verevkin, A.; Terekhin, V.; Shachek, A.; Tyasto, A.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that in order to form the current pulse of a near rectangular shape, which provides conversion of the welding arc into a dynamic mode, it is rational to connect a forming element made on the basis of an artificial forming line in series to the welding DC circuit. The paper presents a diagram of a pulsed device for welding with a non-consumable electrode in argon which was developed using the forming element. The conversion of the arc into the dynamic mode is illustrated by the current and voltage oscillograms of the arc gap and the dynamic characteristic of the arc within the interval of one pulse generation time in the arc gap. The background current travels in the interpulse interval.

  6. Auto adaptative laser welding

    SciTech Connect

    Coste, F.; Fabbro, R.; Douay, D.; Sabatier, L.; Lacote, D.

    1996-12-31

    The weld preparation in a laboratory environment for laser welding concerning edge misalignments, edge or gap preparation is no longer valid for industrial configurations where these different parameters are not accurately controlled. Therefore in that case, the achievement of consistent qualities of processing, requires the use of sensors for seam tracking and gap recognition. The authors discuss here preliminary experiments involving the use of these elements in order to pilot a scanning head in view of strongly reducing the precision requirements for gap preparation. This set-up is the first step in the development of an auto-adaptative device for laser welding which will be composed of seam tracking and recognition sensors, scanning laser head and a filler wire device.

  7. Welding space vacuum technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. Barry

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to assist the EH 42 Division in putting together a vacuum system that could attain the desired pressure and be large enough to accommodate the gas-metal arc (GMA) welding fixture apparatus. A major accomplishment was the design and fabrication of the controller/annunciator for the 4' by 8' system. It contains many safety features such as thermocouple set point relays that will only allow inlet and exit gas and vacuum valves to be operated at pre-selected system pressures, and a fail safe mode for power interruptions and operator mistakes. It is felt that significant progress was made in this research effort to weld in a vacuum environment. With continued efforts to increase the pump speeds for vacuum chambers and further studies on weld fixtures and gas inlet pressures, the NASA program will be successful.

  8. Abdominal lift for laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Koti, Rahul; Davidson, Brian R

    2013-08-31

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (key-hole removal of the gallbladder) is now the most often used method for treatment of symptomatic gallstones. Several cardiopulmonary changes (decreased cardiac output, pulmonary compliance, and increased peak airway pressure) occur during pneumoperitoneum, which is now introduced to allow laparoscopic cholecystectomy. These cardiopulmonary changes may not be tolerated in individuals with poor cardiopulmonary reserve. To assess the benefits and harms of abdominal wall lift compared to pneumoperitoneum in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We searched the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index Expanded until February 2013. We included all randomised clinical trials comparing abdominal wall lift (with or without pneumoperitoneum) versus pneumoperitoneum. We calculated the risk ratio (RR), rate ratio (RaR), or mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on intention-to-treat analysis with both the fixed-effect and the random-effects models using the Review Manager (RevMan) software. For abdominal wall lift with pneumoperitoneum versus pneumoperitoneum, a total of 130 participants (all with low anaesthetic risk) scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomised in five trials to abdominal wall lift with pneumoperitoneum (n = 53) versus pneumoperitoneum only (n = 52). One trial which included 25 people did not state the number of participants in each group. All five trials had a high risk of bias. There was no mortality or conversion to open cholecystectomy in any of the participants in the trials that reported these outcomes. There was no significant difference in the rate of serious adverse events between the two groups (two trials; 2/29 events (0.069 events per person) versus 2/29 events (0.069 events per person); rate ratio 1.00; 95% CI 0

  9. Abdominal lift for laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Koti, Rahul; Samraj, Kumarakrishnan; Davidson, Brian R

    2012-05-16

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (key-hole removal of the gallbladder) is now the most often used method for treatment of symptomatic gallstones. Several cardiopulmonary changes (decreased cardiac output, pulmonary compliance, and increased peak airway pressure) occur during pneumoperitoneum, which is now introduced to allow laparoscopic cholecystectomy. These cardiopulmonary changes may not be tolerated in individuals with poor cardiopulmonary reserve. To assess the benefits and harms of abdominal wall lift compared with pneumoperitoneum in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We searched the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index Expanded until January 2012. We included all randomised clinical trials comparing abdominal wall lift (with or without pneumoperitoneum) versus pneumoperitoneum. We calculated the risk ratio (RR), rate ratio (RaR), or mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on intention-to-treat analysis with both the fixed-effect and the random-effects models using RevMan software. For abdominal wall lift with pneumoperitoneum versus pneumoperitoneum, a total of 156 participants (all with low anaesthetic risk) who underwent elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomised in six trials to abdominal wall lift with pneumoperitoneum (n = 65) versus pneumoperitoneum only (n = 66). One trial which included 25 patients did not state the number of patients in each group. All six trials had a high risk of bias. There was no mortality or conversion to open cholecystectomy in any of the patients in the trials that reported these outcomes. There was no significant difference in the rate of serious adverse events between the two groups (2 trials; 2/29 events (0.069 events per patient) versus 2/29 events (0.069 events per patient); rate ratio 1.00; 95% CI 0.17 to 5.77). None of the

  10. 73rd American Welding Society annual meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The volume includes the abstracts of papers presented at the 73rd American Welding Society Annual Meeting. Detailed summaries are given for 118 technical sessions papers discussing computer and control applications in welding, stainless steel, nickel and nickel alloys, weld metal microstructure, shipbuilding, consumables, structural welding, investigations in arc welding and cutting, arc welding processes, weldability testing, piping and tubing, high energy beam welding processes, welding metallurgy of structural steels, new applications, weld metal behavior, NDT certification, aluminum welding, submerged arc welding, modeling studies, resistance welding, friction welding, and safety and health. The 23rd International AWS Brazing and Soldering Conference was also held during this meeting. The topics presented in 24 papers included recent developments in soldering technology, brazing of stainless steel, brazing of ceramics and nickel material, filler metal developments for torch brazing, and developments in diffusion and induction brazing.

  11. Method and apparatus for assessing weld quality

    DOEpatents

    Smartt, Herschel B.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Johnson, John A.; Carlson, Nancy M.; Clark, Denis E.; Taylor, Paul L.; Reutzel, Edward W.

    2001-01-01

    Apparatus for determining a quality of a weld produced by a welding device according to the present invention includes a sensor operatively associated with the welding device. The sensor is responsive to at least one welding process parameter during a welding process and produces a welding process parameter signal that relates to the at least one welding process parameter. A computer connected to the sensor is responsive to the welding process parameter signal produced by the sensor. A user interface operatively associated with the computer allows a user to select a desired welding process. The computer processes the welding process parameter signal produced by the sensor in accordance with one of a constant voltage algorithm, a short duration weld algorithm or a pulsed current analysis module depending on the desired welding process selected by the user. The computer produces output data indicative of the quality of the weld.

  12. 49 CFR 195.228 - Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welds and welding inspection: Standards of... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.228 Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability. (a) Each weld and welding must be inspected to insure compliance...

  13. 49 CFR 195.228 - Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welds and welding inspection: Standards of... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.228 Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability. (a) Each weld and welding must be inspected to insure compliance...

  14. 49 CFR 195.228 - Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welds and welding inspection: Standards of... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.228 Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability. (a) Each weld and welding must be inspected to insure compliance...

  15. 49 CFR 195.228 - Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welds and welding inspection: Standards of... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.228 Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability. (a) Each weld and welding must be inspected to insure compliance...

  16. 49 CFR 195.228 - Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welds and welding inspection: Standards of... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.228 Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability. (a) Each weld and welding must be inspected to insure compliance...

  17. Ultrasonic Welding of Hybrid Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Guntram; Balle, Frank; Eifler, Dietmar

    2012-03-01

    A central research field of the Institute of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Kaiserslautern (WKK), Germany, is the realization of innovative hybrid joints by ultrasonic metal welding. This article gives an overview of suitable ultrasonic welding systems as well as of essential machine and material parameters, which influence the quality of the welds. Besides the ultrasonic welding of dissimilar metals such as Al to Cu or Al to steels, the welds between newly developed materials like aluminum foam sandwiches or flat flexible cables also can be realized. Moreover, the joining of glass and ceramic to sheet metals is a point of interest at the WKK. By using the ultrasonic metal welding process, it is possible to realize metal/glass welds with tensile shear strengths of 50 MPa. For metal/ceramic joints, the shear strengths values up to 150 MPa were measured. Finally, selected results about the occurring bonding mechanisms will be discussed.

  18. Spot Weld Test Pull

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanek, G.; /Fermilab

    1985-12-07

    Thd D-zero cryostats will contain a number of detector modules. Each module will be made up of plates separated by G-10. To hold the plates together a stainless steel skin has been proposed to cover a whole module. By a series of calculations it was noted that the thin skins would buckle under the force. To prevent the buckling it was proposed to spot weld the skins to some of the internal plates, therefore giving the skins greatly increased strength. This paper gives the results of the test on the proposed spot welds.

  19. Transport and Deposition of Welding Fume Agglomerates in a Realistic Human Nasal Airway.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lin; Inthavong, Kiao; Lidén, Göran; Shang, Yidan; Tu, Jiyuan

    2016-07-01

    Welding fume is a complex mixture containing ultra-fine particles in the nanometer range. Rather than being in the form of a singular sphere, due to the high particle concentration, welding fume particles agglomerate into long straight chains, branches, or other forms of compact shapes. Understanding the transport and deposition of these nano-agglomerates in human respiratory systems is of great interest as welding fumes are a known health hazard. The neurotoxin manganese (Mn) is a common element in welding fumes. Particulate Mn, either as soluble salts or oxides, that has deposited on the olfactory mucosa in human nasal airway is transported along the olfactory nerve to the olfactory bulb within the brain. If this Mn is further transported to the basal ganglia of the brain, it could accumulate at the part of the brain that is the focal point of its neurotoxicity. Accounting for various dynamic shape factors due to particle agglomeration, the current computational study is focused on the exposure route, the deposition pattern, and the deposition efficiency of the inhaled welding fume particles in a realistic human nasal cavity. Particular attention is given to the deposition pattern and deposition efficiency of inhaled welding fume agglomerates in the nasal olfactory region. For particles in the nanoscale, molecular diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism. Therefore, Brownian diffusion, hydrodynamic drag, Saffman lift force, and gravitational force are included in the model study. The deposition efficiencies for single spherical particles, two kinds of agglomerates of primary particles, two-dimensional planar and straight chains, are investigated for a range of primary particle sizes and a range of number of primary particles per agglomerate. A small fraction of the inhaled welding fume agglomerates is deposited on the olfactory mucosa, approximately in the range 0.1-1%, and depends on particle size and morphology. The strong size dependence of the deposition

  20. Friction Plug Weld Repair Geometric Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coletta, Edmond R.; Cantrell, Mark A.; McCool, A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation outlines the fundamentals of friction plug welding. A process overview is given for friction push plug welding, including different uses and strengths of push plug welding. Details are given for friction pull plug welding, including welding parameters, details on observed defects, expected benefits, and test results.

  1. Tool For Robotic Resistive Roll Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilber, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    Roll-welding attachment for robot simple, inexpensive device incorporating modified commercial resistance-welding gun. Modified welding gun easily attaches to end effector of robot. Robot applies welding force and moves electrode wheel along prescribed path. Resistance-welding current starts and stops automatically according to force exerted against workpiece. Used to apply brazing foil to workpiece.

  2. 49 CFR 192.225 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding procedures. 192.225 Section 192.225... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.225 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding...

  3. Method for welding chromium molybdenum steels

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1986-01-01

    Chromium-molybdenum steels exhibit a weakening after welding in an area adjacent to the weld. This invention is an improved method for welding to eliminate the weakness by subjecting normalized steel to a partial temper prior to welding and subsequently fully tempering the welded article for optimum strength and ductility.

  4. Welding Development: Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the basic understanding of the friction stir welding process. It covers process description, pin tool operation and materials, metal flow theory, mechanical properties, and materials welded using the process. It also discusses the thermal stir welding process and the differences between thermal stir and friction stir welding. MSFC weld tools used for development are also presented.

  5. 49 CFR 192.225 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding procedures. 192.225 Section 192.225... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.225 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding...

  6. 49 CFR 192.225 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding procedures. 192.225 Section 192.225... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.225 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding...

  7. 49 CFR 192.225 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding procedures. 192.225 Section 192.225... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.225 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding...

  8. 49 CFR 192.225 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding procedures. 192.225 Section 192.225... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.225 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding...

  9. New and expected developments in artificial lift

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, J.F.; Winkler, H.W.

    1994-12-31

    Artificial lift is a broad subject. This paper discusses some of the new developments in the major areas of artificial lift. These are (1) beam lift, (2) electrical submersible pumping, (3) gas lift, (4) hydraulic pumping and (5) miscellaneous topics. The beam lift discussion concerns a new rod material, downhole measurements for rod loading, unit design and some miscellaneous topics. The ESP (Electrical Submersible Pump) section includes a discussion on solids handling, downhole sensor technology, new motor temperature limitations, motor efficiency, and other topics. The gas lift discussion includes mention of coiled tubing with gas lift valves internal, a surface controlled gas lift valve concept, and gas lift valve testing and modeling. Hydraulic pumping is used in many locations with deep pay and fairly small production rates. New hydraulic developments include a wider availability of power fluid pumps other than positive displacement pumps, and small jet pumps specifically designed for de-watering gas wells. Some miscellaneous developments include an insertable PC (progressing cavity) pump and improved plunger lift algorithms and equipment.

  10. Welding technology transfer task/laser based weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Looney, Alan

    1991-01-01

    Sensors to control and monitor welding operations are currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. The laser based weld bead profiler/torch rotation sensor was modified to provide a weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds. The tracking system features a precision laser based vision sensor, automated two-axis machine motion, and an industrial PC controller. The system benefits are elimination of weld repairs caused by joint tracking errors which reduces manufacturing costs and increases production output, simplification of tooling, and free costly manufacturing floor space.

  11. Deconvoluting the Friction Stir Weld Process for Optimizing Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2008-01-01

    In the friction stir welding process, the rotating surfaces of the pin and shoulder contact the weld metal and force a rotational flow within the weld metal. Heat, generated by the metal deformation as well as frictional slippage with the contact surface, softens the metal and makes it easier to deform. As in any thermo-mechanical processing of metal, the flow conditions are critical to the quality of the weld. For example, extrusion of metal from under the shoulder of an excessively hot weld may relax local pressure and result in wormhole defects. The trace of the weld joint in the wake of the weld may vary geometrically depending upon the flow streamlines around the tool with some geometry more vulnerable to loss of strength from joint contamination than others. The material flow path around the tool cannot be seen in real time during the weld. By using analytical "tools" based upon the principles of mathematics and physics, a weld model can be created to compute features that can be observed. By comparing the computed observations with actual data, the weld model can be validated or adjusted to get better agreement. Inputs to the model to predict weld structures and properties include: hot working properties ofthe metal, pin tool geometry, travel rate, rotation and plunge force. Since metals record their prior hot working history, the hot working conditions imparted during FSW can be quantified by interpreting the final microstructure. Variations in texture and grain size result from variations in the strain accommodated at a given strain rate and temperature. Microstructural data from a variety of FSWs has been correlated with prior marker studies to contribute to our understanding of the FSW process. Once this stage is reached, the weld modeling process can save significant development costs by reducing costly trial-and-error approaches to obtaining quality welds.

  12. Deconvoluting the Friction Stir Weld Process for Optimizing Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2008-01-01

    In the friction stir welding process, the rotating surfaces of the pin and shoulder contact the weld metal and force a rotational flow within the weld metal. Heat, generated by the metal deformation as well as frictional slippage with the contact surface, softens the metal and makes it easier to deform. As in any thermo-mechanical processing of metal, the flow conditions are critical to the quality of the weld. For example, extrusion of metal from under the shoulder of an excessively hot weld may relax local pressure and result in wormhole defects. The trace of the weld joint in the wake of the weld may vary geometrically depending upon the flow streamlines around the tool with some geometry more vulnerable to loss of strength from joint contamination than others. The material flow path around the tool cannot be seen in real time during the weld. By using analytical "tools" based upon the principles of mathematics and physics, a weld model can be created to compute features that can be observed. By comparing the computed observations with actual data, the weld model can be validated or adjusted to get better agreement. Inputs to the model to predict weld structures and properties include: hot working properties ofthe metal, pin tool geometry, travel rate, rotation and plunge force. Since metals record their prior hot working history, the hot working conditions imparted during FSW can be quantified by interpreting the final microstructure. Variations in texture and grain size result from variations in the strain accommodated at a given strain rate and temperature. Microstructural data from a variety of FSWs has been correlated with prior marker studies to contribute to our understanding of the FSW process. Once this stage is reached, the weld modeling process can save significant development costs by reducing costly trial-and-error approaches to obtaining quality welds.

  13. Weld seam tracking and lap weld penetration monitoring using the optical spectrum of the weld plume

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, R.E.; Hopkins, J.A.; Semak, V.V.; McCay, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Joining of dissimilar materials is a long standing problem in manufacturing, with many tricks and special techniques developed to successfully join specific pairs of materials. Often, these special techniques impose stringent requirements on the process such as precise control of process parameters to achieve the desired joint characteristics. Laser welding is one of the techniques which has had some success in welding dissimilar metal alloys, and appears to be a viable process for these materials. Minimal heat input limits differential thermal expansion, and the small weld pool allows precise control of alloy mixing in the fusion zone. Obtaining optimal weld performance requires accurate monitoring and control of absorbed laser power and weld focus position. In order to monitor the laser welding process, the authors have used a small computer controlled optical spectrometer to observe the emission from the weld plume. Absorbed laser power can be related to the temperature of the weld pool surface and the plume above the weld. Focus position relative to the joint can easily be seen by the proportion of elements from each material existing in the plume. This monitor has been used to observe and optimize the performance of butt and lap welds between dissimilar alloys, where each alloy contains at least one element not found in the other alloy. Results will be presented for a copper-steel butt joint and a lap weld between stainless and low alloy steels.

  14. Lift enhancement by trapped vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of lift enhancement by trapped vortex are provided. Efforts are continuously being made to find simple ways to convert wings of aircraft from an efficient cruise configuration to one that develops the high lift needed during landing and takeoff. The high-lift configurations studied here consist of conventional airfoils with a trapped vortex over the upper surface. The vortex is trapped by one or two vertical fences that serve as barriers to the oncoming stream and as reflection planes for the vortex and the sink that form a separation bubble on top of the airfoil. Since the full three-dimensional unsteady flow problem over the wing of an aircraft is so complicated that it is hard to get an understanding of the principles that govern the vortex trapping process, the analysis is restricted here to the flow field illustrated in the first slide. It is assumed that the flow field between the two end plates approximates a streamwise strip of the flow over a wing. The flow between the endplates and about the airfoil consists of a spanwise vortex located between the suction orifices in the endplates. The spanwise fence or spoiler located near the nose of the airfoil serves to form a separated flow region and a shear layer. The vorticity in the shear layer is concentrated into the vortex by withdrawal of fluid at the suction orifices. As the strength of the vortex increases with time, it eventually dominates the flow in the separated region so that a shear or vertical layer is no longer shed from the tip of the fence. At that point, the vortex strength is fixed and its location is such that all of the velocity contributions at its center sum to zero thereby making it an equilibrium point for the vortex. The results of a theoretical analysis of such an idealized flow field are described.

  15. Three Lifting Bodies on Lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The wingless, lifting body aircraft sitting on Rogers Dry Lake at what is now NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, from left to right are the X-24A, M2-F3 and the HL-10.The lifting body aircraft studied the feasibility of maneuvering and landing an aerodynamic craft designed for reentry from space. These lifting bodies were air launched by a B-52 mother ship, then flew powered by their own rocket engines before making an unpowered approach and landing. They helped validate the concept that a space shuttle could make accurate landings without power. The X-24A flew from April 17, 1969 to June 4, 1971. The M2-F3 flew from June 2, 1970 until December 20, 1972. The HL-10 flew from December 22, 1966 until July 17, 1970 and logged the highest and fastest records in the lifting body program. The X-24 was one of a group of lifting bodies flown by the NASA Flight Research Center (FRC--now Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, in a joint program with the U.S. Air Force at Edwards Air Force Base from 1963 to 1975. The lifting bodies were used to demonstrate the ability of pilots to maneuver and safely land wingless vehicles designed to fly back to Earth from space and be landed like an airplane at a predetermined site. Lifting bodies' aerodynamic lift, essential to flight in the atmosphere, was obtained from their shape. The addition of fins and control surfaces allowed the pilots to stabilize and control the vehicles and regulate their flight paths. Built by Martin Aircraft Company, Maryland, for the U.S. Air Force, the X-24A was a bulbous vehicle shaped like a teardrop with three vertical fins at the rear for directional control. It weighed 6,270 pounds, was 24.5 feet long and 11.5 feet wide (measuring just the fuselage, not the distance between the tips of the outboard fins). Its first unpowered glide flight was on April 17, 1969, with Air Force Maj. Jerauld Gentry at the controls. Gentry also piloted its first powered flight on March 19

  16. Ultrasonically assisted face-lift.

    PubMed

    de la Peña, Jose Abel; Soto-Miranda, Miguel Angel; López-Salguero, José Fernando

    2012-08-01

    The face-lift procedure is one of the most skillful interventions performed by plastic surgeons. Ultrasonic energy is used to elevate the facial skin flap, which allows for preservation of vascular, lymphatic, and nervous structures, thereby decreasing the morbidity associated with this procedure. A retrospective study to compare the outcomes of ultrasound and non-ultrasound-assisted face-lifts is reported. All the procedures were performed at the Institute for Plastic Surgery. Each group consisted of 104 patients. Statistical analysis was performed to determine differences between the groups. The mean operating time was 4 h in the treatment group versus 4.2 h in the control group (p>0.05). The incidence of hematoma formation was 0.96% in the treatment group versus 2.4% in the control group (p<0.05). The incidence of flap necrosis was 0% in both groups. The duration of ecchymosis was 13 days in the experimental group versus 17.2 days in the control group (p<0.05). The duration of postoperative swelling was 17.4 days in the treatment group versus 20.4 days in the control group (p<0.05). As reported, 85% of patients in the treatment group were very satisfied, 14.42% were satisfied, 0% were mildly satisfied, and 0% were not satisfied. In the control group, 80.7% were very satisfied, 18.26% were satisfied, 0.96% were mildly satisfied, and 0% were not satisfied. According to Fisher's exact test, the p value for patient satisfaction exceeded 0.05%. The preservation of the blood and lymphatic vessels diminishes postoperative swelling and shortens the duration of ecchymosis considerably. The incidence of hematoma formation is lower than with a non-ultrasonic face-lift. This study failed to prove any statistically significant difference in operating time or patient satisfaction between the two groups.

  17. The vertical medial thigh lift.

    PubMed

    Capella, Joseph F

    2014-10-01

    This article discusses management of the post-weight loss thigh deformity. Beginning with an explanation of the soft tissue variables contributing to the thigh and medial thigh deformity in the postbariatric individual, the article describes the important elements of selecting and screening candidates for surgery and the ideal sequence of procedures that should be followed to optimize results in this patient population. A detailed step-by-step description of the author's technique for medial thigh lift is provided along with multiple examples of outcomes. Aftercare is reviewed along with potential complications and their management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Flow Trajectories in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Edward L.

    1999-01-01

    In the Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process, a rotating, shouldered tool with a threaded pin is inserted under pressure along the seam of two pieces of metal which are tightly clamped together, and secured against a rigid anvil underneath. The rotating pin travels along the seam and through a combination of pressure and friction heating produces a zone of plastic deformation around the pin within the workpiece on either side of the seam. As the pin is moved in the direction of welding, the plasticised material moves around the tool and bonds together behind it. The elements of the material flow behavior are a combination of three elements. There is a rotational transport of material being carried around the tool, extrusion of material being forced around the pin on both sides into the cavity created behind it, and a lifting and dropping of material as it is stirred and mixed by the rotating action of the pin. It was assumed that rotational motion of the plastic zone is the primary mechanism for transport of material around the welding tool. A kinematic mathematical model was used to compute trajectories of material movement for various distributions of rotational slip within the plastic zone. These trajectories were then compared with the results of an experiment that produced radiographs of markers embedded in a workpiece that was welded with the FSW process. It was assumed that the copper wire markers retained their original length as the aluminum material flowed around them. The kinematic model included a constraint so that the displacements were such that the total length of the wire markers did not increase after deformation. There was good agreement between the calculated trajectories for the case of localized slip at the outer surface of the plastic deformation zone and the radiographs of the copper wire markers. The trajectories differed markedly from the radiograph traces when a distributed slip zone was assumed. It was concluded that the flow field could

  19. Welding. Student Learning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palm Beach County Board of Public Instruction, West Palm Beach, FL.

    This student learning guide contains 30 modules for completing a course in welding. It is designed especially for use in secondary schools in Palm Beach County, Florida. Each module covers one task, and consists of a purpose, performance objective, enabling objectives, learning activities keyed to resources, information sheets, student self-check…

  20. Elementary TIG Welding Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierson, John E., III

    The text was prepared to help deaf students develop the skills needed by an employed welder. It uses simplified language and illustrations to present concepts which should be reinforced by practical experience with welding skills. Each of the 12 lessons contains: (1) an information section with many illustrations which presents a concept or…

  1. Welding Supplementary Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Don; And Others

    This document contains supplemental materials for special needs high school students intended to facilitate their mainstreaming in regular welding classes. Teacher's materials precede the materials for students and include general notes for the instructor, suggestions, eight references, a class progress chart, a questionnaire on the usefulness of…

  2. State Skill Standards: Welding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pointer, Mike; Naylor, Randy; Warden, John; Senek, Gene; Shirley, Charles; Lefcourt, Lew; Munson, Justin; Johnson, Art

    2005-01-01

    The Department of Education has undertaken an ambitious effort to develop statewide occupational skill standards. The standards in this document are for welding programs and are designed to clearly state what the student should know and be able to do upon completion of an advanced high-school program. The writing team determined that any statewide…

  3. Welding. Competencies for Articulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeast Community Coll., Lincoln, NE.

    Materials contained in this guide present competencies describing welding skills necessary for success in initial employment or applicable to advanced educational placement, and may be used by administrators, students, and secondary and postsecondary vocational teachers. The student outcomes section provides guidelines for planning of and…

  4. Welding. Student Learning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palm Beach County Board of Public Instruction, West Palm Beach, FL.

    This student learning guide contains 30 modules for completing a course in welding. It is designed especially for use in secondary schools in Palm Beach County, Florida. Each module covers one task, and consists of a purpose, performance objective, enabling objectives, learning activities keyed to resources, information sheets, student self-check…

  5. Welding Rustproof Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, W

    1929-01-01

    The following experimental results will perhaps increase the knowledge of the process of welding rustproof steels. The experiments were made with two chrome-steel sheets and with two chrome-steel-nickel sheets having the composition shown in Table I.

  6. Welding Supplementary Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Don; And Others

    This document contains supplemental materials for special needs high school students intended to facilitate their mainstreaming in regular welding classes. Teacher's materials precede the materials for students and include general notes for the instructor, suggestions, eight references, a class progress chart, a questionnaire on the usefulness of…

  7. Welding. Student Learning Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridge Vocational-Technical Center, Winter Haven, FL.

    These 23 learning guides are self-instructional packets for 23 tasks identified as essential for performance on an entry-level job in welding. Each guide is based on a terminal performance objective (task) and 1-4 enabling objectives. For each enabling objective, some or all of these materials may be presented: learning steps (outline of student…

  8. Welding. Student Learning Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridge Vocational-Technical Center, Winter Haven, FL.

    These 23 learning guides are self-instructional packets for 23 tasks identified as essential for performance on an entry-level job in welding. Each guide is based on a terminal performance objective (task) and 1-4 enabling objectives. For each enabling objective, some or all of these materials may be presented: learning steps (outline of student…

  9. Welding. Competencies for Articulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeast Community Coll., Lincoln, NE.

    Materials contained in this guide present competencies describing welding skills necessary for success in initial employment or applicable to advanced educational placement, and may be used by administrators, students, and secondary and postsecondary vocational teachers. The student outcomes section provides guidelines for planning of and…

  10. Welding of Stainless Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, H; Johnson, Lawrence

    1929-01-01

    It would appear that welds in some stainless steels, heat-treated in some practicable way, will probably be found to have all the resistance to corrosion that is required for aircraft. Certainly these structures are not subjected to the severe conditions that are found in chemical plants.

  11. Tube welding and brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, R. M.

    1969-01-01

    Brochures outline the tools, equipment, materials, and techniques used for joining tubes by automatic and semiautomatic welding and brazing. A few of the metals being joined are stainless steels of various diameters and thickness. Techniques have been developed for on-site or work-bench repair.

  12. Revitalizing a Welding Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Dave

    1997-01-01

    The welding program at Mid-Del Lewis Eubanks Area Vo-Tech in Midwest City, Oklahoma, used a three-part approach to program improvement: ensuring student mastery of employability skills, developing professional relationships and providing students with industry role models, and exposing students to real work settings (JOW)

  13. Welding nozzle position manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L. (Inventor); Gutow, David A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a welding nozzle position manipulator. The manipulator consists of an angle support to which the remaining components of the device are attached either directly or indirectly. A pair of pivotal connections attach a weld nozzle holding link to the angle support and provide a two axis freedom of movement of the holding link with respect to the support angle. The manipulator is actuated by a pair of adjusting screws angularly mounted to the angle support. These screws contact a pair of tapered friction surfaces formed on the upper portion of the welding nozzle holding link. A spring positioned between the upper portions of the support angle and the holding link provides a constant bias engagement between the friction surfaces of the holding link and the adjustment screws, so as to firmly hold the link in position and to eliminate any free play in the adjustment mechanism. The angular relationships between the adjustment screws, the angle support and the tapered friction surfaces of the weld nozzle holding link provide a geometric arrangement which permits precision adjustment of the holding link with respect to the angle support and also provides a solid holding link mount which is resistant to movement from outside forces.

  14. Welding nozzle position manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Gutow, David A.

    1994-11-01

    The present invention is directed to a welding nozzle position manipulator. The manipulator consists of an angle support to which the remaining components of the device are attached either directly or indirectly. A pair of pivotal connections attach a weld nozzle holding link to the angle support and provide a two axis freedom of movement of the holding link with respect to the support angle. The manipulator is actuated by a pair of adjusting screws angularly mounted to the angle support. These screws contact a pair of tapered friction surfaces formed on the upper portion of the welding nozzle holding link. A spring positioned between the upper portions of the support angle and the holding link provides a constant bias engagement between the friction surfaces of the holding link and the adjustment screws, so as to firmly hold the link in position and to eliminate any free play in the adjustment mechanism. The angular relationships between the adjustment screws, the angle support and the tapered friction surfaces of the weld nozzle holding link provide a geometric arrangement which permits precision adjustment of the holding link with respect to the angle support and also provides a solid holding link mount which is resistant to movement from outside forces.

  15. Welding nozzle position manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Gutow, David A.

    1993-08-01

    The present invention is directed to a welding nozzle position manipulator. The manipulator consists of an angle support to which the remaining components of the device are attached either directly or indirectly. A pair of pivotal connections attach a weld nozzle holding link to the angle support and provide a two axis freedom of movement of the holding link with respect to the support angle. The manipulator is actuated by a pair of adjusting screws angularly mounted to the angle support. These screws contact a pair of tapered friction surfaces formed on the upper portion of the welding nozzle holding link. A spring positioned between the upper portions of the support angle and the holding link provides a constant bias engagement between the friction surfaces of the holding link and the adjustment screws, so as to firmly hold the link in position and to eliminate any free play in the adjustment mechanism. The angular relationships between the adjustment screws, the angle support and the tapered friction surfaces of the weld nozzle holding link provide a geometric arrangement which permits precision adjustment of the holding link with respect to the angle support and also provides a solid holding link mount which is resistant to movement from outside forces.

  16. Fusion Welding Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-30

    of deep surface depresion due to vortex formation is being studied through a mathematical model. I Welding direction (a)e S (b) Figure 27: Schematic...each weldment. Specimens were cleaned in acetone and alcohol to remove grease and * dirt. They were finally cleaned ultrasonically in a detergent

  17. Maximum isoinertial lifting capabilities for different lifting ranges and container dimensions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzu-Hsien

    2005-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of lifting range and container dimension on human maximum isoinertial lifting capability in the sagittal plane. Ten young and experienced lifters were tested for their maximum isoinertial lifting capabilities for 12 different lifting conditions (three lifting ranges x four container dimensions). The results showed that lifting range and container dimension significantly affected human maximum isoinertial lifting capability. The order for the highest to lowest lifting capability for the three lifting ranges was FK (from floor to knuckle height, 0-74 cm), FS (from floor to shoulder height, 0-141 cm) and KS (from knuckle height to shoulder height, 74-141 cm) regardless of the container dimension, and for the four container dimensions was 50 x 35 x 15 cm(3), 70 x 35 x 15 cm(3), 50 x 50 x 15 cm(3) and 70 x 50 x 15 cm(3) regardless of the lifting range. The mean(SD) maximum isoinertial lifting capability ranged from 29.3(3.3) kg for the combination of KS range and 70 x 50 x 15 cm(3) container to 53.2(5.7)kg for the combination of FK range and 50 x 35 x 15 cm(3) container. The results of this study can help our knowledge of human maximum isoinertial lifting capability and designing the upper limit of lifting weight.

  18. Training for lifting; an unresolved ergonomic issue?

    PubMed

    Sedgwick, A W; Gormley, J T

    1998-10-01

    The paper describes a nine year project on lifting training which included nine trans-Australia consensus conferences attended by more than 900 health professionals. Major outcomes were: (1) The essence of lifting work is the need for the performer to cope with variability in task, environment, and self, and the essence of lifting skill is therefore adaptability; (2) the semi-squat approach provides the safest and most effective basis for lifting training; (3) for lifting training to be effective, the basic principles of skill learning must be systematically applied, with adaptability as a specific goal; (4) physical work capacity (aerobic power, strength, endurance, joint mobility) is a decisive ingredient of safe and effective lifting and, in addition to skill learning, should be incorporated in the training of people engaging regularly in heavy manual work; (5) if effective compliance with recommended skilled behaviour is to be achieved, then training must apply the principles and methods appropriate to adult learning and behaviour modification.

  19. Influence of Lift Offset on Rotorcraft Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2009-01-01

    The influence of lift offset on the performance of several rotorcraft configurations is explored. A lift-offset rotor, or advancing blade concept, is a hingeless rotor that can attain good efficiency at high speed by operating with more lift on the advancing side than on the retreating side of the rotor disk. The calculated performance capability of modern-technology coaxial rotors utilizing a lift offset is examined, including rotor performance optimized for hover and high-speed cruise. The ideal induced power loss of coaxial rotors in hover and twin rotors in forward flight is presented. The aerodynamic modeling requirements for performance calculations are evaluated, including wake and drag models for the high-speed flight condition. The influence of configuration on the performance of rotorcraft with lift-offset rotors is explored, considering tandem and side-by-side rotorcraft as well as wing-rotor lift share.

  20. Influence of Lift Offset on Rotorcraft Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    The influence of lift offset on the performance of several rotorcraft configurations is explored. A lift-offset rotor, or advancing blade concept, is a hingeless rotor that can attain good efficiency at high speed, by operating with more lift on the advancing side than on the retreating side of the rotor disk. The calculated performance capability of modern-technology coaxial rotors utilizing a lift offset is examined, including rotor performance optimized for hover and high-speed cruise. The ideal induced power loss of coaxial rotors in hover and twin rotors in forward flight is presented. The aerodynamic modeling requirements for performance calculations are evaluated, including wake and drag models for the high speed flight condition. The influence of configuration on the performance of rotorcraft with lift-offset rotors is explored, considering tandem and side-by-side rotorcraft as well as wing-rotor lift share.

  1. Welding, Bonding and Fastening, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, J. D. (Editor); Stein, B. A. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A compilation of papers presented in a joint NASA, American Society for Metals, The George Washington University, American Welding Soceity, and Society of Manufacturing Engineers conference on Welding, Bonding, and Fastening at Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, on October 23 to 25, 1984 is given. Papers were presented on technology developed in current research programs relevant to welding, bonding, and fastening of structural materials required in fabricating structures and mechanical systems used in the aerospace, hydrospace, and automotive industries. Topics covered in the conference included equipment, hardware and materials used when welding, brazing, and soldering, mechanical fastening, explosive welding, use of unique selected joining techniques, adhesives bonding, and nondestructive evaluation. A concept of the factory of the future was presented, followed by advanced welding techniques, automated equipment for welding, welding in a cryogenic atmosphere, blind fastening, stress corrosion resistant fasteners, fastening equipment, explosive welding of different configurations and materials, solid-state bonding, electron beam welding, new adhesives, effects of cryogenics on adhesives, and new techniques and equipment for adhesive bonding.

  2. Galvanic corrosion of beryllium welds

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.A.; Butt, D.P.; Lillard, R.S.

    1997-12-01

    Beryllium is difficult to weld because it is highly susceptible to cracking. The most commonly used filler metal in beryllium welds is Al-12 wt.% Si. Beryllium has been successfully welded using Al-Si filler metal with more than 30 wt.% Al. This filler creates an aluminum-rich fusion zone with a low melting point that tends to backfill cracks. Drawbacks to adding a filler metal include a reduction in service temperature, a lowering of the tensile strength of the weld, and the possibility for galvanic corrosion to occur at the weld. To evaluate the degree of interaction between Be and Al-Si in an actual weld, sections from a mock beryllium weldment were exposed to 0.1 M Cl{sup {minus}} solution. Results indicate that the galvanic couple between Be and the Al-Si weld material results in the cathodic protection of the weld and of the anodic dissolution of the bulk Be material. While the cathodic protection of Al is generally inefficient, the high anodic dissolution rate of the bulk Be during pitting corrosion combined with the insulating properties of the Be oxide afford some protection of the Al-Si weld material. Although dissolution of the Be precipitate in the weld material does occur, no corrosion of the Al-Si matrix was observed.

  3. HSR High-Lift Technology Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applin, Z. T.

    1999-01-01

    High-lift system performance will have a large impact on airplane noise and weight. Successful completion of PCD1 activities provided greater understanding of aerodynamic characteristics and configuration features important to high-lift system performance including: 1) Reynolds number effects (Ref. H); 2) Propulsion/airframe integration effects; and 3) Planform effects, canard/3-surface, alternate high-lift concepts, etc. PCD2 plans are aimed at achieving technology development performance goals and increasing technology readiness level for Technology Concept.

  4. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... fusion welded. Head-to-shell joints must be forge welded on class DOT-106A tanks and fusion welded on... AAR Specifications for Tank Cars, appendix W (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter). (b)...

  5. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... fusion welded. Head-to-shell joints must be forge welded on class DOT-106A tanks and fusion welded on... AAR Specifications for Tank Cars, appendix W (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter). (b)...

  6. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... fusion welded. Head-to-shell joints must be forge welded on class DOT-106A tanks and fusion welded on... AAR Specifications for Tank Cars, appendix W (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter). (b)...

  7. Lightweight, High-Current Welding Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starck, Thomas F.; Brennan, Andrew D.

    1989-01-01

    Lighweight resistance-welding, hand-held gun supplies alternating or direct current over range of 600 to 4,000 A and applies forces from 40 to 60 lb during welding. Used to weld metal sheets in multilayered stacks.

  8. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... fusion welded. Head-to-shell joints must be forge welded on class DOT-106A tanks and fusion welded on... AAR Specifications for Tank Cars, appendix W (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter). (b)...

  9. Lightweight, High-Current Welding Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starck, Thomas F.; Brennan, Andrew D.

    1989-01-01

    Lighweight resistance-welding, hand-held gun supplies alternating or direct current over range of 600 to 4,000 A and applies forces from 40 to 60 lb during welding. Used to weld metal sheets in multilayered stacks.

  10. Small-scale explosive welding of aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    Welding technique uses very small quantities of explosive ribbon to accomplish small-scale lap-welding of aluminum plates. Technique can perform small controlled welding with no length limitations and requires minimal protective shielding.

  11. Closed circuit TV system monitors welding operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilman, M.

    1967-01-01

    TV camera system that has a special vidicon tube with a gradient density filter is used in remote monitoring of TIG welding of stainless steel. The welding operations involve complex assembly welding tools and skates in areas of limited accessibility.

  12. Users manual for the laser welding code WELD2D

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, A.J.

    1984-04-01

    The two-dimensional laser welding code, WELD2D, was developed to model the conduction mode welding (weld pool motions are not considered) of common metals. For butt welded configurations two dissimilar materials may be used. Either Gaussian or uniform laser beam power distributions may be selected and insulated or conducting ends can be treated. Specification of the laser wavelength, energy per pulse, pulse duration and repetition rate is required as input and the temperature field and molten pool shape are calculated as functions of time. Currently material parameters for six metals, aluminum, nickel, steel, molybdenum, copper and silicon are included in the code; however, these may be modified or expanded easily with simple changes to data records. This report is a users manual for WELD2D and contains a description of the models employed, code usage, and sample calculations.

  13. The lift-fan aircraft: Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckert, Wallace H.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the highlights and results of a workshop held at NASA Ames Research Center in October 1992. The objective of the workshop was a thorough review of the lessons learned from past research on lift fans, and lift-fan aircraft, models, designs, and components. The scope included conceptual design studies, wind tunnel investigations, propulsion systems components, piloted simulation, flight of aircraft such as the SV-5A and SV-5B and a recent lift-fan aircraft development project. The report includes a brief summary of five technical presentations that addressed the subject The Lift-Fan Aircraft: Lessons Learned.

  14. Aerodynamic lift effect on satellite orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, G. R.; Cleland, J. G.; Devries, L. L.

    1975-01-01

    Numerical quadrature is employed to obtain orbit perturbation results from the general perturbation equations. Both aerodynamic lift and drag forces are included in the analysis of the satellite orbit. An exponential atmosphere with and without atmospheric rotation is used. A comparison is made of the perturbations which are caused by atmospheric rotation with those caused by satellite aerodynamic effects. Results indicate that aerodynamic lift effects on the semi-major axis and orbit inclination can be of the same order as the effects of atmosphere rotation depending upon the orientation of the lift vector. The results reveal the importance of including aerodynamic lift effects in orbit perturbation analysis.

  15. Lift generation by the avian tail.

    PubMed

    Maybury, W J; Rayner, J M; Couldrick, L B

    2001-07-22

    Variation with tail spread of the lift generated by a bird tail was measured on mounted, frozen European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in a wind tunnel at a typical air speed and body and tail angle of attack in order to test predictions of existing aerodynamic theories modelling tail lift. Measured lift at all but the lowest tail spread angles was significantly lower than the predictions of slender wing, leading edge vortex and lifting line models of lift production. Instead, the tail lift coefficient based on tail area was independent of tail spread, tail aspect ratio and maximum tail span. Theoretical models do not predict bird tail lift reliably and, when applied to tail morphology, may underestimate the aerodynamic optimum tail feather length. Flow visualization experiments reveal that an isolated tail generates leading edge vortices as expected for a low-aspect ratio delta wing, but that in the intact bird body-tail interactions are critical in determining tail aerodynamics: lifting vortices shed from the body interact with the tail and degrade tail lift compared with that of an isolated tail.

  16. Fuel Cell Powered Lift Truck

    SciTech Connect

    Moulden, Steve

    2015-08-20

    This project, entitled “Recovery Act: Fuel Cell-Powered Lift Truck Sysco (Houston) Fleet Deployment”, was in response to DOE funding opportunity announcement DE-PS36-08GO98009, Topic 7B, which promotes the deployment of fuel cell powered material handling equipment in large, multi-shift distribution centers. This project promoted large-volume commercialdeployments and helped to create a market pull for material handling equipment (MHE) powered fuel cell systems. Specific outcomes and benefits involved the proliferation of fuel cell systems in 5-to 20-kW lift trucks at a high-profile, real-world site that demonstrated the benefits of fuel cell technology and served as a focal point for other nascent customers. The project allowed for the creation of expertise in providing service and support for MHE fuel cell powered systems, growth of existing product manufacturing expertise, and promoted existing fuel cell system and component companies. The project also stimulated other MHE fleet conversions helping to speed the adoption of fuel cell systems and hydrogen fueling technology. This document also contains the lessons learned during the project in order to communicate the successes and difficulties experienced, which could potentially assist others planning similar projects.

  17. Hybrid Airships for Lift: A New Lift Paradigm and a Pragmatic Assessment of the Vehicle’s Key Operational Challenges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    required lift for flight, Hybrid Airships use a combination of buoyant lift (provided by a gas such as Helium), aerodynamic lift (generated by airflow...AIR FORCE FELLOWS AIR UNIVERSITY HYBRID AIRSHIPS FOR LIFT: A NEW LIFT PARADIGM AND A PRAGMATIC ASSESSMENT OF THE...00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hybrid Airships for Lift: A New Lift Paradigm And A Pragmatic Assessment Of The Vehicle’s Key

  18. Industrial laser welding evaluation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hella, R.; Locke, E.; Ream, S.

    1974-01-01

    High power laser welding was evaluated for fabricating space vehicle boosters. This evaluation was made for 1/4 in. and 1/2 in. aluminum (2219) and 1/4 in. and 1/2 in. D6AC steel. The Avco HPL 10 kW industrial laser was used to perform the evaluation. The objective has been achieved through the completion of the following technical tasks: (1) parameter study to optimize welding and material parameters; (2) preparation of welded panels for MSFC evaluation; and (3) demonstration of the repeatability of laser welding equipment. In addition, the design concept for a laser welding system capable of welding large space vehicle boosters has been developed.

  19. Welding wire pressure sensor assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Timothy B. (Inventor); Milly, Peter F., Sr. (Inventor); White, J. Kevin (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device which is used to monitor the position of a filler wire relative to a base material being welded as the filler wire is added to a welding pool. The device is applicable to automated welding systems wherein nonconsumable electrode arc welding processes are utilized in conjunction with a filler wire which is added to a weld pool created by the electrode arc. The invention senses pressure deviations from a predetermined pressure between the filler wire and the base material, and provides electrical signals responsive to the deviations for actuating control mechanisms in an automatic welding apparatus so as to minimize the pressure deviation and to prevent disengagement of the contact between the filler wire and the base material.

  20. INERT GAS SHIELD FOR WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Jones, S.O.; Daly, F.V.

    1958-10-14

    S>An inert gas shield is presented for arc-welding materials such as zirconium that tend to oxidize rapidly in air. The device comprises a rectangular metal box into which the welding electrode is introduced through a rubber diaphragm to provide flexibility. The front of the box is provided with a wlndow having a small hole through which flller metal is introduced. The box is supplied with an inert gas to exclude the atmosphere, and with cooling water to promote the solidification of the weld while in tbe inert atmosphere. A separate water-cooled copper backing bar is provided underneath the joint to be welded to contain the melt-through at the root of the joint, shielding the root of the joint with its own supply of inert gas and cooling the deposited weld metal. This device facilitates the welding of large workpieces of zirconium frequently encountered in reactor construction.

  1. Welded Permanent Fittings for Titanium Hydraulic Tubing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FITTINGS, *HYDRAULIC EQUIPMENT, RIVETED JOINTS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, PIPES , JET TRANSPORT AIRCRAFT, COLD WORKING, PRESSURE, RUPTURE, ARC WELDING , INERT...GAS WELDING , RADIOGRAPHY, STRESS RELIEVING, SUPERSONIC AIRCRAFT, COMMERCIAL AIRCRAFT.

  2. Fast, Nonspattering Inert-Gas Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed welding technique combines best features of metal (other than tungsten)/inert-gas welding, plasma arc welding, and tungsten/inert-gas welding. Advantages include: wire fed to weld joint preheated, therefore fed at high speed without spattering; high-frequency energy does not have to be supplied to workpiece to initiate welding; size of arc gap not critical, power-supply control circuit adjusts voltage across gap to compensate for changes; only low gas-flow rate needed; welding electrode replaced easily as prefabricated assembly; external wire-feeding manipulator not needed; and welding process relatively forgiving of operator error.

  3. 77 FR 20558 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Platform Lifts for Motor Vehicles; Platform Lift...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... route bus systems and vehicles purchased by private entities for use in public transportation to provide... use lifts. FMVSS No. 404, S4.1.1 requires that the lift on each lift-equipped bus, school bus and... Body Company (Blue Bird), the School Bus Manufacturers Technical Council (SBMTC), which represents...

  4. Isolated neck-lifting procedure: isolated stork lift.

    PubMed

    Barbarino, Sheila C; Wu, Allan Y; Morrow, David M

    2013-04-01

    Many patients desire cosmetic improvement of neck laxity when consulting with a plastic surgeon about their face. Neck laxity and loss of the cervicomental angle can be due to multiple components of aging such as skin quality/elasticity, loss of platysma muscle tone, and submental fat accumulation. Traditionally, the procedure of choice for patients with an aging lower face and neck is a cervicofacial rhytidectomy. However, occasionally, a patient wishes to have no other facial surgery than an improvement of their excessive skin of the anterior, lateral, and/or posterior neck. In other instances, a patient may present with having had a face/neck-lifting procedure that left objectionable vertical/diagonal lines at the lateral neck. In both these instances, a surgeon should consider an isolated stork lift (ISL) procedure. An ISL procedure avoids and/or corrects problematic vertical/diagonal lateral neck folds by "walking" the excess skin flaps around the posterior inferior occipital hairline bilaterally, bringing the flaps together at the lateral and posterior neck, which sometimes involves a midline posterior dart excision of the dog ear. A patient presenting with excessive skin of the neck (anterior, lateral, and/or posterior) and/or residual vertical/diagonal skin folds is an excellent candidate for the ISL. The ISL procedure was performed on 273 patients over a 2-year period at The Morrow Institute. Patients were included if they had excessive skin of the anterior, lateral, and/or posterior neck and/or diagonal/vertical lateral bands and did not desire a full face-lifting procedure. Patients were excluded from this study if they would not accept having longer hair in order to cover the scar along the posterior inferior occipital hairline or a midline T-flap skin closure scar at the base of the posterior midline neck. Under a combination of local anesthesia and IV sedation, a postauricular face-lift incision was made that was extended in a circumoccipital fashion

  5. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasonic stir welding system includes a welding head assembly having a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. During a welding operation, ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod as it rotates about its longitudinal axis. The ultrasonic pulses are applied in such a way that they propagate parallel to the longitudinal axis of the rod.

  6. Viewing Welds By Computer Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascua, Antonio G.; Roy, Jagatjit

    1990-01-01

    Computer tomography system used to inspect welds for root penetration. Source illuminates rotating welded part with fan-shaped beam of x rays or gamma rays. Detectors in circular array on opposite side of part intercept beam and convert it into electrical signals. Computer processes signals into image of cross section of weld. Image displayed on video monitor. System offers only nondestructive way to check penetration from outside when inner surfaces inaccessible.

  7. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of the...

  8. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of the...

  9. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of the...

  10. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of the...

  11. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of the...

  12. Laser welding of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K.H.; Sabo, K.R.; Sanders, P.G.; Spawr, W.J.

    1997-03-01

    Recent interest in reducing the weight of automobiles to increase fuel mileage has focused attention on the use of aluminum and associated joining technologies. Laser beam welding is one of the more promising methods for high speed welding of aluminum. Consequently, substantial effort has been expended in attempting to develop a robust laser beam welding process. Early results have not been very consistent in the process requirements but more definitive data has been produced recently. This paper reviews the process parameters needed to obtain consistent laser welds on 5,000 series aluminum alloys and discusses the research necessary to make laser processing of aluminum a reality for automotive applications.

  13. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of performing ultrasonic stir welding uses a welding head assembly to include a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. In the method, the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis during a welding operation. During the welding operation, a series of on-off ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod such that they propagate parallel to the rod's longitudinal axis. At least a pulse rate associated with the on-off ultrasonic pulses is controlled.

  14. Automatic Control of Weld Penetration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-02-01

    heat- ing elements. The weldments were made in three passes using the gas tungsten arc welding ( GTAW ) process. The final welding variables used were...operate with both GTAW and GMAW (gas metal arc welding ). The funding for the program allowed only evalua- tion of the GTAW phase. After heat...fMi-A?)54 o^^ E1A-78-U256 5 AD/I QS±Ogp TECHNICAL LIBRARY ^^^^.^ AUTOMATIC CONTROL OF WELD PENETRA ■ ^ v % • •■■/ ^ t I X DONALD C

  15. Reconditioning medical prostheses by welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontescu, C.; Cicic, D. T.; Vasile, I. M.; Bogatu, A. M.; Amza, C. G.

    2017-08-01

    After the technological process of making, some of the medical prostheses may contain imperfections, which can lead to framing the product in the spoilage category. This paper treats the possibility of reconditioning by welding of the prosthesis made of titanium alloys. The paper presents the obtained results after the reconditioning by welding, using the GTAW process, of a intramedullary rod type prosthesis in which was found a crack after the non-destructive examination. The obtained result analysis, after the micrographic examination of the welded joint areas, highlighted that the process of reconditioning by welding can be applied successfully in such situations.

  16. The NASA welding assessment program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J.; Bozek, J.

    1984-01-01

    The potential cost and performance advantages of welding was understood but ignored by solar panel manufacturers in the U.S. Although NASA, DOD and COMSAT have supported welding development efforts, soldering remains the only U.S. space qualified method for interconnecting solar cells. The reason is that no U.S. satellite prime contractor found it necessary, due to mission requirements, to abandon the space proven soldering process. It appears that the proposed NASA space station program will provide an array requirement, a 10 year operation in a low Earth orbital environment, that mandates welding. The status of welding technology in the U.S. is assessed.

  17. Modeling of the Weld Shape Development During the Autogenous Welding Process by Coupling Welding Arc with Weld Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wenchao; Lu, Shanping; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi

    2010-10-01

    A numerical model of the welding arc is coupled to a model for the heat transfer and fluid flow in the weld pool of a SUS304 stainless steel during a moving GTA welding process. The described model avoids the use of the assumption of the empirical Gaussian boundary conditions, and at the same time, provides reliable boundary conditions to analyze the weld pool. Based on the two-dimensional axisymmetric numerical modeling of the argon arc, the heat flux to workpiece, the input current density, and the plasma drag stress are obtained. The arc temperature contours, the distributions of heat flux, and current density at the anode are in fair agreement with the reported experimental results. Numerical simulation and experimental studies to the weld pool development are carried out for a moving GTA welding on SUS304 stainless steel with different oxygen content from 30 to 220 ppm. The calculated result show that the oxygen can change the Marangoni convection from outward to inward direction on the liquid pool surface and make the wide shallow weld shape become narrow deep one. The calculated result for the weld shape and weld D/W ratio agrees well with the experimental one.

  18. Programmable Automated Welding System (PAWS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, Martin D.

    1994-01-01

    An ambitious project to develop an advanced, automated welding system is being funded as part of the Navy Joining Center with Babcock & Wilcox as the prime integrator. This program, the Programmable Automated Welding System (PAWS), involves the integration of both planning and real-time control activities. Planning functions include the development of a graphical decision support system within a standard, portable environment. Real-time control functions include the development of a modular, intelligent, real-time control system and the integration of a number of welding process sensors. This paper presents each of these components of the PAWS and discusses how they can be utilized to automate the welding operation.

  19. Heavy-lift airship dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. B.; Ringland, R. F.; Jex, H. R.

    1983-01-01

    The basic aerodynamic and dynamic properties of an example heavy-lift airship (HLA) configuration are analyzed using a nonlinear, multibody, 6-degrees-of-freedom digital simulation. The slung-payload model is described, and a preliminary analysis of the coupled vehicle-payload dynamics is presented. Trim calculations show the importance of control mixing selection and suggest performance deficiencies in crosswind stationkeeping for the unloaded example HLA. Numerically linearized dynamics of the unloaded vehicle exhibit a divergent yaw mode and an oscillatory pitch mode whose stability characteristic is sensitive to flight speed. An analysis of the vehicle-payload dynamics shows significant coupling of the payload dynamics with those of the basic HLA. It is shown that significant improvement in the vehicle's dynamic behavior can be achieved with the incorporation of a simple flight controller having proportional, rate, and integral-error feedbacks.

  20. What's new in artificial lift

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, J.F.; Winker, H.W.

    1989-05-01

    New developments might be expected to decline as oil, and thus equipment and service, prices decrease. However, there is no indication that this is occurring. In fact, several new and innovative developments are covered in this article. Of the more unique are a new geometry pumping unit and a hydraulic powered sucker and rod system. Other items described in this article include: New pump-off controller; Automatic balancing for air balanced pumping units; New rod couplings; New pump plunger; Sucker rod pulsation dampener; Stripper type BOP; Rod coupling tool; ESP cable protectors; New ESP motor; VSD communications interface; ESP gas separator; Portable hydraulic production test unit; Casing gas lift plunger; Production shut-of valve; Ceramic material for pump parts; Pressure transmitter; and New versatile packer.

  1. Lip Lifting: Unveiling Dental Beauty.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Kyle; Caligiuri, Matthew; Schlichting, Luís Henrique; Bazos, Panaghiotis K; Magne, Michel

    2017-01-01

    The focus for the achievement of complete success in the esthetic zone has traditionally been on addressing deficiencies of intraoral hard and soft tissue. Often, these deficiencies are accompanied by esthetic concerns regarding the lips that are routinely neglected by the dental team. A predictable plastic surgery technique - the lip lift - has been used for decades to enhance lip esthetics by shortening the senile upper lip to achieve a more youthful appearance. Over the years, this technique has been refined and used in many different ways, allowing its routine incorporation into full facial esthetic planning. Through restoration of the upper lip to its optimal position, the artistry of the dentist and dental technician can truly be appreciated in the rejuvenated smile. By the introduction of this minimally invasive surgical technique to the dental community, patients stand to benefit from a comprehensive orofacial approach to anterior dental esthetic planning.

  2. Improving Grading Consistency through Grade Lift Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millet, Ido

    2010-01-01

    We define Grade Lift as the difference between average class grade and average cumulative class GPA. This metric provides an assessment of how lenient the grading was for a given course. In 2006, we started providing faculty members individualized Grade Lift reports reflecting their position relative to an anonymously plotted school-wide…

  3. Training Guidelines: Fork Lift Truck Driving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceramics, Glass, and Mineral Products Industry Training Board, Harrow (England).

    This manual of operative training guidelines for fork lift truck driving has been developed by the Ceramics, Glass and Mineral Products Industry Training Board (Great Britain) in consultation with a number of firms which manufacture fork lift trucks or which already have training--programs for their use. The purpose of the guidelines is to assist…

  4. Soccer Ball Lift Coefficients via Trajectory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, John Eric; Carre, Matt J.

    2010-01-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin…

  5. 49 CFR 37.203 - Lift maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lift maintenance. 37.203 Section 37.203 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.203 Lift maintenance. (a) The entity shall establish...

  6. 49 CFR 37.203 - Lift maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lift maintenance. 37.203 Section 37.203 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.203 Lift maintenance. (a) The entity shall establish...

  7. 49 CFR 37.203 - Lift maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lift maintenance. 37.203 Section 37.203 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.203 Lift maintenance. (a) The entity shall establish...

  8. 49 CFR 37.203 - Lift maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lift maintenance. 37.203 Section 37.203 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.203 Lift maintenance. (a) The entity shall establish...

  9. Retractable End Plates for Aircraft Lifting Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. D.; Mangalam, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    End plates and winglets improve aerodynamic characteristics of aircraft wings and other fixed lifting surfaces. Retractable end plates automatically actuated by same shaft that deflects lifting surface and require little or no extra power and absolutely no control input from cockpit. Besides being modular in construction, easily fitted to any existing aircraft design with only minor modifications.

  10. 29 CFR 1926.453 - Aerial lifts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... American National Standards for “Vehicle Mounted Elevating and Rotating Work Platforms,” ANSI A92.2-1969, including appendix. Aerial lifts acquired before January 22, 1973 which do not meet the requirements of ANSI... conform with the applicable design and construction requirements of ANSI A92.2-1969. Aerial lifts include...

  11. 29 CFR 1926.453 - Aerial lifts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... American National Standards for “Vehicle Mounted Elevating and Rotating Work Platforms,” ANSI A92.2-1969, including appendix. Aerial lifts acquired before January 22, 1973 which do not meet the requirements of ANSI... conform with the applicable design and construction requirements of ANSI A92.2-1969. Aerial lifts include...

  12. Soccer Ball Lift Coefficients via Trajectory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, John Eric; Carre, Matt J.

    2010-01-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin…

  13. Hydraulic lift in a neotropical savanna.

    Treesearch

    M.Z. Moreira; F.G. Scholz; S.J. Bucci; L.S. Sternberg; G. Goldstein; F.C. Meinzer; A.C. Franco

    2003-01-01

    We report hydraulic lift in the sawmlia vegetation of central Brazil (Cerrado). Both heat-pulse measurements and isotopic (deuterium) labelling were used to determine whether hydraulic lift occurred in two common species, and whether neighbouring small shrubs and trees were utilizing this water.Both techniques showed water uptake by tap-...

  14. Laser beam welding of any metal.

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K. H.

    1998-10-01

    The effect of a metal's thermophysical properties on its weldability are examined. The thermal conductivity, melting point, absorptivity and thermal diffusivity of the metal and the laser beam focused diameter and welding speed influence the minimum beam irradiance required for melting and welding. Beam diameter, surface tension and viscosity of the molten metal affect weld pool stability and weld quality. Lower surface tension and viscosity increases weld pool instability. With larger beam diameters causing wider welds, dropout also increases. Effects of focused beam diameter and joint fitup on weldability are also examined. Small beam diameters are sensitive to beam coupling problems in relation to fitup precision in addition to beam alignment to the seam. Welding parameters for mitigating weld pool instability and increasing weld quality are derived from the above considerations. Guidelines are presented for the tailoring of welding parameters to achieve good welds. Weldability problems can also be anticipated from the properties of a metal.

  15. Tubing weld cracking test

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Qiao, C.Y.P.

    1995-12-31

    A tubing weld cracking (TWC) test was developed for applications involving advanced austenitic alloys (such as modified 800H and 310HCbN). Compared to the Finger hot cracking test, the TWC test shows an enhanced ability to evaluate the crack sensitivity of tubing materials. The TWC test can evaluate the cracking tendency of base as well as filter materials. Thus, it is a useful tool for tubing suppliers, filler metal producers and fabricators.

  16. Weld Defect Tolerance Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    load bearing cross-sectional area. 3. into Lack of Fusion and Lack of Penetration Lack of fusion is when the weld metal has not fused (melted) the...probability of survival (12). Each band corresponds to a specific fatigue strength required in a given structure in conformance with design criteria...treatment dates back to Palmgren in 1924. Since then, so many hypotheses for fatigue failure modes have surfaced in the world literature that it is rather

  17. A Decade of Friction Stir Welding R and D at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and a Glance into the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Jeff; Carter, Bob; Lawless, Kirby; Nunes, Arthur; Russell, Carolyn; Suites, Michael; Schneider, Judy

    2006-01-01

    Welding at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Huntsville, Alabama, has taken a new direction through the last 10 years. Fusion welding processes, namely variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) and tungsten inert gas (TIG) were once the corner stone of welding development in the Space Flight Center's welding laboratories, located in the part of MSFC know as National Center for Advanced Manufacturing (NCM). Developed specifically to support the Shuttle Program's External Tank and later International Space Station manufacturing programs, was viewed as the paragon of welding processes for joining aluminum alloys. Much has changed since 1994, however, when NASA's Jeff Ding brought the FSW process to the NASA agency. Although, at that time, FSW was little more than a "lab curiosity", NASA researchers started investigating where the FSW process would best fit NASA manufacturing programs. A laboratory FSW system was procured and the first welds were made in fall of 1995. The small initial investment NASA made into the first FSW system has certainly paid off for the NASA agency in terms of cost savings, hardware quality and notoriety. FSW is now a part of Shuttle External Tank (ET) production and the preferred weld process for the manufacturing of components for the new Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) and Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV) that will take this country back to the moon. It is one of the solid state welding processes being considered for on-orbit space welding and repair, and is of considerable interest for Department of Defense @OD) manufacturing programs. MSFC involvement in these and other programs makes NASA a driving force in this country's development of FSW and other solid state welding technologies. Now, a decade later, almost the entire on-going welding R&D at MSFC now focuses on FSW and other more advanced solid state welding processes.

  18. Spot-Welding Gun Is Easy To Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.; Nguyen, Francis H.

    1991-01-01

    Electrical-resistance spot-welding gun designed to produce more welds per unit time by decreasing technician's effort and fatigue. Vacuum cups on frame secure welding gun to workpiece while compressed air drives welding tip against workpiece to make spot resistance weld. When weld completed, vacuum in frame cups released so frame and gun moved to position of next spot weld.

  19. Spot-Welding Gun Is Easy To Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.; Nguyen, Francis H.

    1991-01-01

    Electrical-resistance spot-welding gun designed to produce more welds per unit time by decreasing technician's effort and fatigue. Vacuum cups on frame secure welding gun to workpiece while compressed air drives welding tip against workpiece to make spot resistance weld. When weld completed, vacuum in frame cups released so frame and gun moved to position of next spot weld.

  20. Mechanics and mechanisms of ultrasonic metal welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Edgar

    During ultrasonic welding of sheet metal, normal and shear forces act on the parts to be welded and the weld interface. These forces are a result of the ultrasonic vibrations of the tool, pressed onto the parts to be welded. Furthermore they determine the weld quality and the power that is needed to produce the weld. The main goal in this study is to measure and calculate the tangential forces during ultrasonic metal welding that act on the parts and the weld interface and correlate them to weld quality. In this study a mechanics based model was developed which included a model for the temperature generation during welding and its effect on the mechanical material properties. This model was then used to calculate the interface forces during welding. The model results were in good agreement with the experimental results, which included the measured shear force during welding. With the knowledge of the forces that act at the interface it might be possible to control weld quality (strength) and avoid sonotrode welding (sticking of the sonotrode to the parts). Without a solution to these two problems USMW will never be applicable to large scale automated production use, despite its advantages. In the experiments the influence of part dimensions, friction coefficient, normal force and vibration amplitude on weld quality and sonotrode adhesion were examined. The presented model is capable of predicting and explaining unfavorable welding conditions, therefore making it possible to predetermine weld locations on larger parts or what surface preparation of the parts to be welded would lead to an improved welding result. Furthermore shear force at the anvil measured during welding could be correlated to changing welding conditions. This is a new approach of explaining the process of USMW, because it is based on mechanical considerations. The use of a shear force measuring anvil has the potential to be implemented into welding systems and the shear force would provide an

  1. Design and analysis of lifting tool assemblies to lift different engine block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, Arpana; Deshmukh, Nilaj N.; Chauhan, Santosh; Dabhadkar, Mandar; Deore, Rupali

    2017-07-01

    Engines block are required to be lifted from one place to another while they are being processed. The human effort required for this purpose is more and also the engine block may get damaged if it is not handled properly. There is a need for designing a proper lifting tool which will be able to conveniently lift the engine block and place it at the desired position without any accident and damage to the engine block. In the present study lifting tool assemblies are designed and analyzed in such way that it may lift different categories of engine blocks. The lifting tool assembly consists of lifting plate, lifting ring, cap screws and washers. A parametric model and assembly of Lifting tool is done in 3D modelling software CREO 2.0 and analysis is carried out in ANSYS Workbench 16.0. A test block of weight equivalent to that of an engine block is considered for the purpose of analysis. In the preliminary study, without washer the stresses obtained on the lifting tool were more than the safety margin. In the present design, washers were used with appropriate dimensions which helps to bring down the stresses on the lifting tool within the safety margin. Analysis is carried out to verify that tool design meets the ASME BTH-1 required safety margin.

  2. Welding monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, Stephen G. (Inventor); Dyer, Gerald E. (Inventor); Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    This invention relates to systems for remotely monitoring automatic welding operations, and more particularly to a system wherein the welder is readily positionable, while components of the optical system remain fixed. A welder having an electrode is mounted in an enclosure containing a pair of mirrors. The electrode passes through an opening in the first mirror and a gas cup. The mirror reflects an image of a welding operation taken through the opening of the gas cup to the second mirror. The second mirror then reflects the image through a rotary coupling to a third mirror which, in turn, reflects the image to a receiving lense mounted to a second rotatable coupling. The image is then projected via a fiber optic bundle to a filter unit where selected wavelengths of light are filtered from the welding image. The filter unit is coupled to an enlarger which enlarges the image and passes it to a camera. The camera is connected to an electronic eclipser which selectively darkens the brightest portions of the image. Finally, the image is recorded by a video tape recorder and displayed by a monitor.

  3. Gas Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 5. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in gas metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety and testing, gas metal arc…

  4. Shielded Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 4. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in shielded metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety; theory, power sources, and…

  5. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. Welding Module 6. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching a three-unit module in gas tungsten arc welding. The module has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The basic principles involved in gas tungsten arc welding, supplies, and applications are covered. The materials included…

  6. Gas Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 5. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in gas metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety and testing, gas metal arc…

  7. Shielded Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 4. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in shielded metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety; theory, power sources, and…

  8. Comparison Between Keyhole Weld Model and Laser Welding Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B C; Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W

    2002-09-23

    A series of laser welds were performed using a high-power diode-pumped continuous-wave Nd:YAG laser welder. In a previous study, the experimental results of those welds were examined, and the effects that changes in incident power and various welding parameters had on weld geometry were investigated. In this report, the fusion zones of the laser welds are compared with those predicted from a laser keyhole weld simulation model for stainless steels (304L and 21-6-9), vanadium, and tantalum. The calculated keyhole depths for the vanadium and 304L stainless steel samples fit the experimental data to within acceptable error, demonstrating the predictive power of numerical simulation for welds in these two materials. Calculations for the tantalum and 21-6-9 stainless steel were a poorer match to the experimental values. Accuracy in materials properties proved extremely important in predicting weld behavior, as minor changes in certain properties had a significant effect on calculated keyhole depth. For each of the materials tested, the correlation between simulated and experimental keyhole depths deviated as the laser power was increased. Using the model as a simulation tool, we conclude that the optical absorptivity of the material is the most influential factor in determining the keyhole depth. Future work will be performed to further investigate these effects and to develop a better match between the model and the experimental results for 21-6-9 stainless steel and tantalum.

  9. Control of back weld pool shape in MIG welding by using switch back method

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, B.; Kaneko, Yasuyoshi; Soeda, Masahiro; Ohshima, Kenji

    1995-12-31

    This paper deals with the problem concerning the sensing and controlling of weld pool shape in MIG welding of plate. In the robotic one side MIG welding process without backing plate, for obtaining the good quality of the weld, it is important to control the weld pool shape so as to prevent the melting metal from burning through. The method of controlling the weld pool shape is discussed. The moving torch is repeat switch change, which is named switch back method. The primary welding experimental results have proved that the switch back method is effective and satisfactory for controlling the back weld pool shape in one side MIG welding process without backing plate.

  10. Effects of Fusion Tack Welds on Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Pendleton, M. L.; Brooke, S. A.; Russell, C. K.

    2012-01-01

    In order to know whether fusion tack welds would affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir seam welds in 2195-T87 aluminum alloy, the fracture stresses of 144 tensile test coupons cut from 24 welded panels containing segments of friction stir welds were measured. Each of the panels was welded under unique processing conditions. A measure of the effect of the tack welds for each panel was devised. An analysis of the measures of the tack weld effect supported the hypothesis that fusion tack welds do not affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir welds to a 5% level of confidence.

  11. View of West end of central lift span truss web ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of West end of central lift span truss web of Tensaw River Bridge, showing web brace of lift girder superstructure, looking west - Tensaw River Lift Bridge, Spanning Tensaw River at U.S. Highway 90, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  12. 29 CFR 1926.453 - Aerial lifts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Specifications for Welding Highway and Railway Bridges, AWS D2.0-69. Note to § 1926.453: Non-mandatory appendix C... National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material...

  13. Narrow groove welding gas diffuser assembly and welding torch

    DOEpatents

    Rooney, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    A diffuser assembly is provided for narrow groove welding using an automatic gas tungsten arc welding torch. The diffuser assembly includes a manifold adapted for adjustable mounting on the welding torch which is received in a central opening in the manifold. Laterally extending manifold sections communicate with a shield gas inlet such that shield gas supplied to the inlet passes to gas passages of the manifold sections. First and second tapered diffusers are respectively connected to the manifold sections in fluid communication with the gas passages thereof. The diffusers extend downwardly along the torch electrode on opposite sides thereof so as to release shield gas along the length of the electrode and at the distal tip of the electrode. The diffusers are of a transverse width which is on the order of the thickness of the electrode so that the diffusers can, in use, be inserted into a narrow welding groove before and after the electrode in the direction of the weld operation.

  14. Narrow groove welding gas diffuser assembly and welding torch

    SciTech Connect

    Rooney, Stephen J.

    2000-02-04

    A diffuser assembly is provided for narrow groove welding using an automatic gas tungsten arc welding torch. The diffuser assembly includes manifold adapted for adjustable mounting on the welding torch which is received in a central opening in the manifold. Laterally extending manifold sections communicate with a shield gas inlet such that shield gas supplied to the inlet passes to gas passages of the manifold sections. First and second tapered diffusers are respectively connected to the manifold sections in fluid communication with the gas passages thereof. The diffusers extend downwardly along the torch electrode on opposite sides thereof so as to release shield gas along the length of the electrode and at the distal tip of the electrode. The diffusers are of a transverse width which is on the order of the thickness of the electrode so that the diffusers can, in use, be inserted into a narrow welding groove before and after the electrode in the direction of the weld operation.

  15. [New welding processes and health effects of welding].

    PubMed

    La Vecchia, G Marina; Maestrelli, Piero

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes some of the recent developments in the control technology to enhance capability of Pulse Gas Metal Arc Welding. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) processing has been also considered. FSW is a new solid-state joining technique. Heat generated by friction at the rotating tool softens the material being welded. FSW can be considered a green and energy-efficient technique without deleterious fumes, gas, radiation, and noise. Application of new welding processes is limited and studies on health effects in exposed workers are lacking. Acute and chronic health effects of conventional welding have been described. Metal fume fever and cross-shift decline of lung function are the main acute respiratory effects. Skin and eyes may be affected by heat, electricity and UV radiations. Chronic effects on respiratory system include chronic bronchitis, a benign pneumoconiosis (siderosis), asthma, and a possible increase in the incidence of lung cancer. Pulmonary infections are increased in terms of severity, duration, and frequency among welders.

  16. Single mode glass fiber welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, M. D.; Fearnehough, H. T.; Goldstein, R.; Goss, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    The electric-arc welding of commercially available single-mode optical fiber has been demonstrated. A mean transmission of 92% and a maximum transmission of 98% are reported for welds of fiber waveguide of 4.5 microns core diameter.

  17. New explosive seam welding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Recently developed techniques provide totally-confined linear explosive seam welding and produce scarf joint with linear explosive seam welding. Linear ribbon explosives are utilized in making narrow, continuous, airtight joints in variety of aluminum alloys, titanium, copper, brass, and stainless steel.

  18. Metal Working and Welding Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by metal workers and welders. Addressed in the six individual units of the course are the following topics: weldable metals and their alloys, arc welding, gas welding,…

  19. Welding--Trade or Profession?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albright, C. E.; Smith, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses a collaborative program between schools with the purpose of training and providing advanced education in welding. Modern manufacturing is turning to automation to increase productivity, but it can be a great challenge to program robots and other computer-controlled welding and joining systems. Computer programming and…

  20. Welding--Trade or Profession?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albright, C. E.; Smith, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses a collaborative program between schools with the purpose of training and providing advanced education in welding. Modern manufacturing is turning to automation to increase productivity, but it can be a great challenge to program robots and other computer-controlled welding and joining systems. Computer programming and…