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Sample records for ligament reconstruction surgical

  1. Failed medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction: Causes and surgical strategies

    PubMed Central

    Sanchis-Alfonso, Vicente; Montesinos-Berry, Erik; Ramirez-Fuentes, Cristina; Leal-Blanquet, Joan; Gelber, Pablo E; Monllau, Joan Carles

    2017-01-01

    Patellar instability is a common clinical problem encountered by orthopedic surgeons specializing in the knee. For patients with chronic lateral patellar instability, the standard surgical approach is to stabilize the patella through a medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction. Foreseeably, an increasing number of revision surgeries of the reconstructed MPFL will be seen in upcoming years. In this paper, the causes of failed MPFL reconstruction are analyzed: (1) incorrect surgical indication or inappropriate surgical technique/patient selection; (2) a technical error; and (3) an incorrect assessment of the concomitant risk factors for instability. An understanding of the anatomy and biomechanics of the MPFL and cautiousness with the imaging techniques while favoring clinical over radiological findings and the use of common sense to determine the adequate surgical technique for each particular case, are critical to minimizing MPFL surgery failure. Additionally, our approach to dealing with failure after primary MPFL reconstruction is also presented. PMID:28251062

  2. Outcome of surgical treatment of arthrofibrosis following ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Said, Sinan; Christainsen, Svend Erik; Faunoe, Peter; Lund, Bent; Lind, Martin

    2011-10-01

    Clinical outcome following surgical treatment and intensive physiotherapy was evaluated in patients with arthrofibrosis as a complication to varying knee-ligament reconstructions. From 2003 to 2007, 31 patients underwent surgery for arthrofibrosis as a postoperative complication following knee-ligament reconstruction. Treatment for reduced range of motion consisted of forced manipulation or arthroscopic arthrolysis followed by intensive physiotherapy. Twenty-seven patients (12 men and 15 women; median age 35(12-70) years) were followed up. Objective examination, Pain, KOOS and Tegner scores were used to evaluate the clinical outcome at follow-up. Fourteen patients were treated with forced manipulation alone, and the remaining thirteen were treated with forced manipulation and arthroscopic arthrolysis. The patients' median follow-up was 51 months (19-73 months). Median interval between primary surgery and surgical release was 4 (1-32) months. Median range of motion (ROM) improved from -0°(0 to 20) to 0°(+2-9) in extension deficit and from 90°(40-145) to 130°(90-155) in flexion. Mean KOOS score were symptoms 63, pain 72, ADL 77, sport 42, QOL 45. Median Tegner score was 4 (2-9). Surgical arthrolysis combined with intensive physiotherapy improved range of motion to nearly normal values. Subjective outcome scores revealed relatively poor outcome levels compared to uncomplicated knee-ligament reconstruction. Predictors of poor outcome were global arthrofibrosis and greater than 6-month time interval from primary reconstruction and surgical release. Retrospective clinical case series, Level IV.

  3. Ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Glickel, Steven Z; Gupta, Salil

    2006-05-01

    Volar ligament reconstruction is an effective technique for treating symptomatic laxity of the CMC joint of the thumb. The laxity may bea manifestation of generalized ligament laxity,post-traumatic, or metabolic (Ehler-Danlos). There construction reduces the shear forces on the joint that contribute to the development and persistence of inflammation. Although there have been only a few reports of the results of volar ligament reconstruction, the use of the procedure to treat Stage I and Stage II disease gives good to excellent results consistently. More advanced stages of disease are best treated by trapeziectomy, with or without ligament reconstruction.

  4. Surgical Indications and Technique for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Combined with Lateral Extra-articular Tenodesis or Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Vundelinckx, Bart; Herman, Benjamin; Getgood, Alan; Litchfield, Robert

    2017-01-01

    After anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, anteroposterior and rotational laxity in the knee causes instability, functional symptoms, and damage to other intra-articular structures. Surgical reconstruction aims to restore the stability in the knee, and to improve function and ability to participate in sports. It also protects cartilage and menisci from secondary injuries. Because of persistent rotational instability after ACL reconstruction, combined intra-articular and extra-articular procedures are more commonly performed. In this article, an overview of anatomy, biomechanical studies, current gold standard procedures, techniques, and research topics are summarized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Posterior cruciate ligament revision reconstruction, part 1: causes of surgical failure in 52 consecutive operations.

    PubMed

    Noyes, Frank R; Barber-Westin, Sue D

    2005-05-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament reconstructions have not shown uniformly predictable results in restoration of normal posterior tibial translation. The authors are unaware of any study that has assessed the causes of failure of these operations, and they investigated 52 prior unsuccessful posterior cruciate ligament procedures to determine the factors that contributed to failure of the operations. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. The authors studied 52 prior failed posterior cruciate ligament surgeries that had been done in 41 knees (40 patients). Graft reconstructions had been done in 31 cases, primary repairs in 14, synthetic replacements in 4, and thermoplasties in 3. Medical records, operative notes, radiographs, and magnetic resonance imaging scans were reviewed, and a comprehensive knee examination was conducted. A single factor that caused the operations to fail was identified in 23 (44%) of 52 operations, and multiple factors were identified in 29 (56%). The most common probable causes of failure were associated posterolateral ligament deficiency (40%), improper graft tunnel placement (33%), associated varus malalignment (31%), and primary suture repair (25%). Sixteen of 21 (76%) prior posterolateral ligament procedures had failed, as had 9 of 19 (47%) prior anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. Twenty-nine knees (71%) presented with pain with activities of daily living. Thirty-four knees (83%) had compounding problems of joint arthritis, prior meniscectomy, associated ligament deficiencies, or varus malalignment. Posterior cruciate revision surgery was done in 22 knees (54%). Eleven knees (27%) had severe joint damage that contraindicated revision, and 8 (19%) declined further operations. Failure to restore associated ligament instabilities and incorrect tunnel placement were major factors contributing to surgical failure. The results suggest the need for greater emphasis on the initial reconstruction in graft tunnel placement, correction of associated

  6. Single-Bundle Anatomic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Surgical Technique Pearls and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Malempati, Chaitu S; Metzler, Adam V; Johnson, Darren L

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures are some of the most common sports-related injuries. Treatment of these injuries with ACL reconstruction has evolved over the last several decades. Anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction offers an accurate and reproducible method to reproduce native knee anatomy, restore knee kinematics, and ultimately restore function and decrease long-term degenerative effects. The importance of adequate arthroscopic visualization and a thorough understanding of the native anatomic ACL landmarks are discussed in this article. Furthermore, surgical technique, pearls, pitfalls, potential complications, rehabilitation, and outcomes are reviewed.

  7. Postural stability and responses to vibrations in patients after anterior cruciate ligament surgical reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hirjaková, Z; Šingliarová, H; Bzdúšková, D; Kimijanová, J; Bučková, K; Valkovič, P; Hlavačka, F

    2016-10-24

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of surgical reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) on postural stability and responses to lower limb (LL) muscles vibrations. Centre of pressure (CoP) was measured in 17 subjects during stance on firm/foam surface with eyes open/closed and during unilateral vibrations of LL muscles (m. triceps surae - TS, m. quadriceps femoris - Q, m. quadriceps femoris and hamstrings simultaneously - QH). The measurements were performed: 1) preoperatively, 2) six weeks and 3) three months after the reconstruction. Decreased postural stability was documented six weeks after the reconstruction compared to preoperative measurement. Three months after the reconstruction significant improvement was observed during stance on foam surface with eyes closed. Preoperatively, altered reactions of LL with ACL lesion compared to intact LL were manifested by slower response in first 3 s of TS vibration and by increased CoP shift in last 5 s of QH vibration. After the reconstruction, we observed slower CoP reaction and decreased CoP shift during TS vibration of LL with ACL lesion compared to preoperative level. Posturography during quiet stance and during TS vibration reliably detect postural changes due to ACL reconstruction and can be potentially useful in clinical practice.

  8. The anterior talo-fibular ligament reconstruction in surgical treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Trc, Tomás; Handl, Milan; Havlas, Vojtech

    2010-10-01

    Chronic lateral ankle instability causes significant problems in physical activity and accelerates development of osteoarthritic changes. The results of treatment for chronic ankle instability are often meets controversial. A surgical reconstruction of ATFL as described in this paper was performed during the period 1997-2005 on 47 patients (26 male, 21 female), with a mean age of 29.3 years. The average follow-up period was 46.2 months. All patients had clinical examination, X-ray and MRI. The mean values of the Good score improved from an average 3.32 prior to surgery to 1.19 one year after the operation. Paired t-tests showed improvements of great significance (p < 10(-28)). The Good score prior to surgery ranged from 2-4, whereas the scores one year after surgery were either 1 or 2, with a score of 1 being recorded in 38 cases (81%). In the postoperative follow-up, MRI showed a newly-formed ligament structure in all cases. The authors describe their own technique for a reconstruction of lateral ankle instability using remnants of the former ATFL. The scar tissue seems to be sufficient to form a new duplicated structure providing good stability. MRI proved to be a sensitive and specific method for identifying the extent of talo-fibular ligament injury.

  9. Surgical Predictors of Clinical Outcomes After Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Allen, Christina R; Anderson, Allen F; Cooper, Daniel E; DeBerardino, Thomas M; Dunn, Warren R; Haas, Amanda K; Huston, Laura J; Lantz, Brett Brick A; Mann, Barton; Nwosu, Sam K; Spindler, Kurt P; Stuart, Michael J; Wright, Rick W; Albright, John P; Amendola, Annunziato Ned; Andrish, Jack T; Annunziata, Christopher C; Arciero, Robert A; Bach, Bernard R; Baker, Champ L; Bartolozzi, Arthur R; Baumgarten, Keith M; Bechler, Jeffery R; Berg, Jeffrey H; Bernas, Geoffrey A; Brockmeier, Stephen F; Brophy, Robert H; Bush-Joseph, Charles A; Butler, J Brad; Campbell, John D; Carey, James L; Carpenter, James E; Cole, Brian J; Cooper, Jonathan M; Cox, Charles L; Creighton, R Alexander; Dahm, Diane L; David, Tal S; Flanigan, David C; Frederick, Robert W; Ganley, Theodore J; Garofoli, Elizabeth A; Gatt, Charles J; Gecha, Steven R; Giffin, James Robert; Hame, Sharon L; Hannafin, Jo A; Harner, Christopher D; Harris, Norman Lindsay; Hechtman, Keith S; Hershman, Elliott B; Hoellrich, Rudolf G; Hosea, Timothy M; Johnson, David C; Johnson, Timothy S; Jones, Morgan H; Kaeding, Christopher C; Kamath, Ganesh V; Klootwyk, Thomas E; Levy, Bruce A; Ma, C Benjamin; Maiers, G Peter; Marx, Robert G; Matava, Matthew J; Mathien, Gregory M; McAllister, David R; McCarty, Eric C; McCormack, Robert G; Miller, Bruce S; Nissen, Carl W; O'Neill, Daniel F; Owens, Brett D; Parker, Richard D; Purnell, Mark L; Ramappa, Arun J; Rauh, Michael A; Rettig, Arthur C; Sekiya, Jon K; Shea, Kevin G; Sherman, Orrin H; Slauterbeck, James R; Smith, Matthew V; Spang, Jeffrey T; Svoboda, Steven J; Taft, Timothy N; Tenuta, Joachim J; Tingstad, Edwin M; Vidal, Armando F; Viskontas, Darius G; White, Richard A; Williams, James S; Wolcott, Michelle L; Wolf, Brian R; York, James J

    2017-09-01

    Revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has been documented to have worse outcomes compared with primary ACL reconstruction. Certain factors under the control of the surgeon at the time of revision surgery can both negatively and positively affect outcomes. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Patients undergoing revision ACL reconstruction were identified and prospectively enrolled between 2006 and 2011. Data collected included baseline demographics, intraoperative surgical technique and joint disorders, and a series of validated patient-reported outcome instruments (International Knee Documentation Committee [IKDC] subjective form, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score [KOOS], Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index [WOMAC], and Marx activity rating scale) completed before surgery. Patients were followed up for 2 years and asked to complete an identical set of outcome instruments. Regression analysis was used to control for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), activity level, baseline outcome scores, revision number, time since last ACL reconstruction, and a variety of previous and current surgical variables to assess the surgical risk factors for clinical outcomes 2 years after revision ACL reconstruction. A total of 1205 patients (697 male [58%]) met the inclusion criteria and were successfully enrolled. The median age was 26 years, and the median time since their last ACL reconstruction was 3.4 years. Two-year follow-up was obtained on 82% (989/1205). Both previous and current surgical factors were found to be significant contributors toward poorer clinical outcomes at 2 years. Having undergone previous arthrotomy (nonarthroscopic open approach) for ACL reconstruction compared with the 1-incision technique resulted in significantly poorer outcomes for the 2-year IKDC ( P = .037; odds ratio [OR], 2.43; 95% CI, 1.05-5.88) and KOOS pain, sports/recreation, and quality of life (QOL) subscales ( P ≤ .05; OR range, 2

  10. Causes of Failure of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Revision Surgical Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Di Benedetto, Paolo; Di Benedetto, Enrico; Fiocchi, Andrea; Beltrame, Alessandro; Causero, Araldo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Long-term outcomes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are good or excellent; however, 0.7%–20% of patients suffer from recurrent instability due to graft failure. The purpose of this paper was to analyse failure aetiology and the possibilities of revision surgical strategies, with a description of our experience. We obtained optimal and good results in most of our patients. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 42 patients who underwent revision surgery (43 revisions) due to relapsing instability after ACL reconstruction between 2006 and 2015. We used allografts in 39 cases and autografts in 4 cases. Results The 85.7% of the patients obtained optimal results (normal knee; group A) and the 7.2% obtained good results (nearly normal knee; group B) according to the International Knee Documentation Committee score. The most frequent failure causes were traumatic events, non-anatomic tunnel placement, and lack of graft incorporation. Conclusions A correct revision surgery requires accurate patient evaluation and knee imaging. Preoperative planning starts with the identification of the cause of failure of the primary reconstruction. Then, the most suitable procedure should be determined for each case. It is also important to accurately inform the patient of all the complexity of an ACL revision surgery even if it is a procedure with high rates of excellent and good outcomes. PMID:27894180

  11. Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zordan, J.; Etcheto, H. Rivarola; Blanchod, C. Collazo; Palanconi, M.; Salinas, E. Álvarez; Autorino, CM; Escobar, G.

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a common procedure in daily practice with 75 to 97% excellent long-term results. But in certain cases, some patients perceive rotational instability, for this reason the revision rate can be 10 to 15%. Objectives: evaluate functional outcome in revisions of ACL reconstruction associated with ALL. Methods: Between July 2015 and February 2016 (11 knees) Eleven Revision ACL reconstruction were performed with ALL with double incision technique performed by the same surgical team. Inclusion criteria were: ACL reconstruction failures with a grade 2 or 3 Lachman test, a grade 3 pivot-shift without other ligamentary injury lesions associated and complete range of motion. Results: The concept of rotational instability associated with ACL injury has been described more than a decade ago. However, there is no consensus on how to quantify rotational instability in ACL injuries; so when associating an extracapsular technique. Currently there is a lack of high-level evidence comparing isolated ACL repair and associated with the modified reconstruction of ALL that allows us to define therapeutic approaches. The ALL reconstruction associate an ACL reconstruction remains a matter of study. Conclusion: We obtain excellent results in antero – posterior and rotational stability after performing the procedure.

  12. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J.; Harris, Joshua D.; Chalmers, Peter N.; Bach, Bernard R.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Romeo, Anthony A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injuries lead to pain and loss of performance in the thrower’s elbow. Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) is a reliable treatment option for the symptomatic, deficient UCL. Injury to the UCL usually occurs because of chronic accumulation of microtrauma, although acute ruptures occur and an acute-on-chronic presentation is also common. Evidence Acquisition: Computerized databases, references from pertinent articles, and research institutions were searched for all studies using the search terms ulnar collateral ligament from 1970 until 2015. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: All studies reporting outcomes for UCLR are level 4. Most modern fixation methodologies appear to be biomechanically and clinically equivalent. Viable graft choices include ipsilateral palmaris longus tendon autograft, gracilis or semitendinosus autograft, and allograft. Clinical studies report excellent outcomes of UCLR for both recreational and elite level athletes with regard to return to sport and postoperative performance. Complications, although rare, include graft rerupture or attenuation, ulnar nerve symptoms, stiffness, pain, and/or weakness leading to decreased performance. Conclusion: Injuries to the UCL have become commonplace among pitchers. Nonoperative treatment should be attempted, but the limited studies have not shown promising results. Operative treatment can be performed with several techniques, with retrospective studies showing promising results. Complications include ulnar neuropathy as well as failure to return to sport. Detailed preoperative planning, meticulous surgical technique, and a comprehensive rehabilitation program are essential components to achieving a satisfactory result. PMID:26502444

  13. Dynamic medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction in recurrent patellar instability: A surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    Kiran, Kopuri Ravi; Srikanth, I Muni; Chinnusamy, Lenin; Deepti, K

    2015-01-01

    The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is the primary stabilizer of the patellofemoral joint; its reconstruction has been recommended in adults over the past decade after recurrent patellar instability. However, there has been no standardized technique for reconstruction, therefore, ideal graft and technique for reconstruction are yet undetermined. However, dynamic MPFL reconstruction studies claim to be superior to other procedures as it is more anatomical. This preliminary study aims at assessing the outcomes of MPFL reconstruction in a dynamic pattern using hamstring graft. We performed this procedure in four consecutive patients with chronic patellar instability following trauma. MPFL reconstruction was done with hamstring tendons detached distally and secured to patellar periosteum after being passed through a bony tunnel in the patella without an implant and using the medial collateral ligament as a pulley. In all 4 knees, the MPFL reconstruction was isolated and was not associated with any other realignment procedures. No recurrent episodes of dislocation or subluxation were reported at 24 months followup. PMID:26806970

  14. Effectiveness of surgical reconstruction to restore radiocarpal joint mechanics after scapholunate ligament injury: an in vivo modeling study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joshua E; Lee, Phil; McIff, Terence E; Toby, E Bruce; Fischer, Kenneth J

    2013-05-31

    Disruption of the scapholunate ligament can cause a loss of normal scapholunate mechanics and eventually lead to osteoarthritis. Surgical reconstruction attempts to restore scapholunate relationship show improvement in functional outcomes, but postoperative effectiveness in restoring normal radiocarpal mechanics still remains a question. The objective of this study was to investigate the benefits of surgical repair by observing changes in contact mechanics on the cartilage surface before and after surgical treatment. Six patients with unilateral scapholunate dissociation were enrolled in the study, and displacement driven magnetic resonance image-based surface contact modeling was used to investigate normal, injured and postoperative radiocarpal mechanics. Model geometry was acquired from images of wrists taken in a relaxed position. Kinematics were acquired from image registration between the relaxed images, and images taken during functional loading. Results showed a trend for increase in radiocarpal contact parameters with injury. Peak and mean contact pressures significantly decreased after surgery in the radiolunate articulation and there were no significant differences between normal and postoperative wrists. Results indicated that surgical repair improves contact mechanics after injury and that contact mechanics can be surgically restored to be similar to normal. This study provides novel contact mechanics data on the effects of surgical repair after scapholunate ligament injury. With further work, it may be possible to more effectively differentiate between treatments and degenerative changes based on in vivo contact mechanics data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. 3D Printing Surgical Implants at the clinic: A Experimental Study on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, An; Xue, Guang-huai; Sun, Miao; Shao, Hui-feng; Ma, Chi-yuan; Gao, Qing; Gou, Zhong-ru; Yan, Shi-gui; Liu, Yan-ming; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Desktop three-dimensional (3D) printers (D3DPs) have become a popular tool for fabricating personalized consumer products, favored for low cost, easy operation, and other advantageous qualities. This study focused on the potential for using D3DPs to successfully, rapidly, and economically print customized implants at medical clinics. An experiment was conducted on a D3DP-printed anterior cruciate ligament surgical implant using a rabbit model. A well-defined, orthogonal, porous PLA screw-like scaffold was printed, then coated with hydroxyapatite (HA) to improve its osteoconductivity. As an internal fixation as well as an ideal cell delivery system, the osteogenic scaffold loaded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were evaluated through both in vitro and in vivo tests to observe bone-ligament healing via cell therapy. The MSCs suspended in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel on PLA/HA screw-like scaffold showed the highest cell proliferation and osteogenesis in vitro. In vivo assessment of rabbit anterior cruciate ligament models for 4 and 12 weeks showed that the PLA/HA screw-like scaffold loaded with MSCs suspended in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel exhibited significant bone ingrowth and bone-graft interface formation within the bone tunnel. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that fabricating surgical implants at the clinic (fab@clinic) with D3DPs can be feasible, effective, and economical. PMID:26875826

  16. 3D Printing Surgical Implants at the clinic: A Experimental Study on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liu, An; Xue, Guang-huai; Sun, Miao; Shao, Hui-feng; Ma, Chi-yuan; Gao, Qing; Gou, Zhong-ru; Yan, Shi-gui; Liu, Yan-ming; He, Yong

    2016-02-15

    Desktop three-dimensional (3D) printers (D3DPs) have become a popular tool for fabricating personalized consumer products, favored for low cost, easy operation, and other advantageous qualities. This study focused on the potential for using D3DPs to successfully, rapidly, and economically print customized implants at medical clinics. An experiment was conducted on a D3DP-printed anterior cruciate ligament surgical implant using a rabbit model. A well-defined, orthogonal, porous PLA screw-like scaffold was printed, then coated with hydroxyapatite (HA) to improve its osteoconductivity. As an internal fixation as well as an ideal cell delivery system, the osteogenic scaffold loaded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were evaluated through both in vitro and in vivo tests to observe bone-ligament healing via cell therapy. The MSCs suspended in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel on PLA/HA screw-like scaffold showed the highest cell proliferation and osteogenesis in vitro. In vivo assessment of rabbit anterior cruciate ligament models for 4 and 12 weeks showed that the PLA/HA screw-like scaffold loaded with MSCs suspended in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel exhibited significant bone ingrowth and bone-graft interface formation within the bone tunnel. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that fabricating surgical implants at the clinic (fab@clinic) with D3DPs can be feasible, effective, and economical.

  17. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Jose Antonio; Yacuzzi, Carlos; Oñativia, Jose I.; Zicaro, Juan Pablo; Costa-Paz, Matias

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Recurrent patellofemoral dislocation is usually a multifactorial pathology. Different surgical techniques have been described according to the etiology of dislocation. In absence of a severe malalignment or an anatomical patellofemoral dysplasia, reconstruction of Medial Patello-femoral Ligament (MPFL) can restore the normal tracking of the patella, avoiding lateral excursion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical results and complications in patients who underwent a MPFL reconstruction. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 19 patients who underwent an anatomic MPFL reconstruction using autologous semitendinosus graft between 2007 and 2012. Exclusion criteria were patients with less than three years of follow-up and those with an associated procedure such as distal realignment or trochleoplasty. Clinical outcomes were measured using Kujala score and return to sport rate. We registered the postoperative complications and recurrence rate. Results: Nine patients were men and 10 women with a mean age of 25 years. Average follow-up was 5.8 years. Nine patients (47.4%) returned to their previous sport level, 8 (42.1%) changed to another sport or decreased their level and 2 (10.5%) were unable to practice any sports at all. Kujala score improvement was from 62.8 preoperative to 88.8 postoperative. One patient decreased the Kujala score. Eighty-nine percent of patients were satisfied with their outcome. One patient had a patellar fracture and four developed an arthrofibrosis and required mobilization under anesthesia. No recurrences were registered. Conclusion: Isolated MPFL reconstruction for recurrent patellofemoral dislocation is an effective alternative in absence of severe malalignment or anatomical dysplasia. Although no recurrences where registered at minimum 3-year follow-up, almost half of the patients were not able to return to their previous sport level.

  18. Ligament Injury, Reconstruction and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Braden C.; Hulstyn, Michael J.; Oksendahl, Heidi L.; Fadale, Paul D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose of Review The recent literature on the factors that initiate and accelerate the progression of osteoarthritis following ligament injuries and their treatment is reviewed. Recent Findings The ligament-injured joint is at high risk for osteoarthritis. Current conservative (e.g. rehabilitation) and surgical (e.g. reconstruction) treatment options appear not to reduce osteoarthritis following ligament injury. The extent of osteoarthritis does not appear dependent on which joint is affected, or the presence of damage to other tissues within the joint. Mechanical instability is the likely initiator of osteoarthritis in the ligament-injured patient. Summary The mechanism osteoarthritis begins with the injury rendering the joint unstable. The instability increases the sliding between the joint surfaces and reduces the efficiency of the muscles, factors that alter joint contact mechanics. The load distribution in the cartilage and underlying bone is disrupted, causing wear and increasing shear, which eventually leads to the osteochondral degeneration. The catalyst to the mechanical process is the inflammation response induced by the injury and sustained during healing. In contrast, the inflammation could be responsible for onset, while the mechanical factors accelerate progression. The mechanisms leading to osteoarthritis following ligament injury have not been fully established. A better understanding of these mechanisms should lead to alternative surgical, drug, and tissue-engineering treatment options, which could eliminate osteoarthritis in these patients. Progress is being made on all fronts. Considering that osteoarthritis is likely to occur despite current treatment options, the best solution may be prevention. PMID:17710194

  19. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Jeffrey; Bedi, Asheesh; Altchek, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common surgical procedures, with more than 200,000 ACL tears occurring annually. Although primary ACL reconstruction is a successful operation, success rates still range from 75% to 97%. Consequently, several thousand revision ACL reconstructions are performed annually and are unfortunately associated with inferior clinical outcomes when compared with primary reconstructions. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from peer-reviewed literature through a search of the PubMed database (1988-2013) as well as from textbook chapters and surgical technique papers. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: The clinical outcomes after revision ACL reconstruction are largely based on level IV case series. Much of the existing literature is heterogenous with regard to patient populations, primary and revision surgical techniques, concomitant ligamentous injuries, and additional procedures performed at the time of the revision, which limits generalizability. Nevertheless, there is a general consensus that the outcomes for revision ACL reconstruction are inferior to primary reconstruction. Conclusion: Excellent results can be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability but are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction. A staged approach with autograft reconstruction is recommended in any circumstance in which a single-stage approach results in suboptimal graft selection, tunnel position, graft fixation, or biological milieu for tendon-bone healing. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): Good results may still be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability, but results are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction: Level B. PMID:25364483

  20. "The Superficial Quad Technique" for Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction: The Surgical Video Technique.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Deepak

    2015-10-01

    With the introduction of the superficial quad technique, there has been a recent revival of interest in the quadriceps tendon as a graft choice for medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction. The superficial quad technique has many anatomic advantages because the length, breadth, and thickness of the graft are similar to those of the native MPFL; moreover, the graft provides a continuous patellar attachment at the superior half of the medial border of the patella. The technique requires neither a patellar bony procedure nor patellar hardware. Biomechanically, the mean strength and stiffness of the graft are very similar to those of the native MPFL. The anatomic and biomechanical advantages depend on correct identification of the anatomic superficial lamina of the quadriceps tendon; hence the correct harvesting technique for the superficial lamina is crucial. Various sub-techniques for harvesting the quadriceps graft have emerged recently, such as superficial strip, pedicled, or partial graft harvesting; these can create confusion for surgeons. Additional confusion related to the preparation and fixation of the graft should also be addressed to avoid any potential complications. A step-by-step video of the superficial quad technique is presented, covering the exact dissection of the graft material and its preparation, delivery, and fixation.

  1. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J.; Bach, Bernard R.; Cohen, Mark S.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Cole, Brian J.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Nicholson, Gregory P.; Romeo, Anthony A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) is a common surgery performed in professional, collegiate, and high school athletes. Purpose: To report patient demographics, surgical techniques, and outcomes of all UCLRs performed at a single institution from 2004 to 2014. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: All patients who underwent UCLR from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2014, at a single institution were identified. Charts were reviewed to determine patient age, sex, date of surgery, sport played, athletic level, surgical technique, graft type, and complications. Data were collected prospectively, and patients were contacted via phone calls to obtain the return-to-sport rate, Conway-Jobe score, Andrews-Timmerman score, and Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic (KJOC) Shoulder and Elbow score. Continuous variable data were reported as weighted means, and categorical variable data were reported as frequencies with percentages. Results: A total of 187 patients (188 elbows) underwent UCLR during the study period (92% male; mean age, 19.6 ± 4.7 years; 78.2% right elbows). There were 165 baseball players (87.8% of all patients), 155 of whom were pitchers (82.5% of all patients). Ninety-seven (51.6%) were college athletes, 68 (36.2%) high school athletes, and 7 (3.7%) professional athletes at the time of surgery. The docking technique was used in 110 (58.5%) patients while the double-docking technique was used in 78 (41.5%). An ipsilateral palmaris longus graft was used in 110 (58.5%) patients while a hamstring autograft was used in 48 (25.5%) patients. The ulnar nerve was subcutaneously transposed in 79 (42%) patients. Clinical follow-up data were available on 85 patients. Mean follow-up was 60 ± 30.8 months. Overall, 94.1% of patients were able to return to sport and had a Conway-Jobe score of good/excellent while 4.3% had a score of fair. The mean KJOC score was 90.4 ± 6.7 and mean Andrews-Timmerman score was 92.5 ± 7

  2. Scapholunate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Mark; Loveridge, Jeremy; Cutbush, Kenneth; Couzens, Greg

    2013-01-01

    Background Scapholunate reconstruction poses a challenge to orthopedic surgeons. Materials and Methods Prospective cohort. Description of Technique Our technique for scapholunate (SL) reconstruction involves ligament reconstruction utilizing a portion of the flexor carpi radialis tendon rerouted via transosseous tunnels across the scaphoid, lunate, and triquetrum (scapholunotriquetral tenodesis). The tendon graft is secured with interference screw fixation into the triquetrum. The philosophy of this new technique is to reduce subluxation and maintain the relationship between scaphoid and lunate by placing a graft through the center of the SL articulation. This graft is then tensioned by passing it centrally through the lunate and triquetrum and secured using an interference screw in the triquetrum. Secondary stabilizers, including the dorsal intercarpal ligament, are then augmented by passing the graft back to the scaphoid, crossing from the triquetrum over the proximal capitate. This further reinforces the translational relationship between the scaphoid and the triquetrum and, therefore, augments stability of the SL articulation. Results We have utilized this technique successfully in over 40 patients since 2009. We report on a prospective consecutive series of 11 patients with over 12 months follow-up (range 12 to 24 months) demonstrating good early radiological and clinical outcomes. Conclusions In developing this technique, we aimed to take the best features of previously described techniques and address the perceived shortcomings of each. We believe there are several benefits of our technique. Moreover, few other techniques address as many of the aspects of chronic SL instability as our technique does. PMID:24436802

  3. Efficacy of quadriceps vastus medialis dry needling in a rehabilitation protocol after surgical reconstruction of complete anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Saornil, Jorge; Ruíz-Ruíz, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Sanz, David; Romero-Morales, Carlos; López-López, Daniel; Calvo-Lobo, Cesar

    2017-04-01

    Several new rehabilitation modalities have been proposed after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Among these, trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN) might be useful in the treatment of myofascial pain syndrome associated with ACL reconstruction to reduce pain intensity, increase knee flexion range and modify the mechanical properties of the quadriceps muscle during late-stage rehabilitation. To date, this is the first randomized clinical trial to support the use of TrP-DN in the early rehabilitation process after ACL reconstruction. The aim of this study was to determine the pain intensity, range of motion (ROM), stability, and functionality improvements by adding quadriceps vastus medialis TrP-DN to the rehabilitation protocol (Rh) provided to subacute ACL reconstructed patients. This randomized, single-blinded, clinical trial (NCT02699411) included 44 subacute patients with surgical reconstruction of complete ACL rupture. The patients were randomized into 2 intervention groups: Rh (n = 22) or Rh + TrP-DN (n = 22). Pain intensity, ROM, stability, and functionality were measured at baseline (A0) and immediately (A1), 24 hours (A2), 1 week (A3), and 5 weeks (A4) after the first treatment. Comparing statistically significant differences (P ≤ .001; Eta = 0.198-0.360) between both groups, pain intensity (at A1), ROM (at A1, A2, and A3), and functionality (at A2, A3, and A4) were increased. Nevertheless, the rest of measurements did not show significant differences (P > .05). Quadriceps vastus medialis TrP-DN in conjunction with a rehabilitation protocol in subacute patients with surgical reconstruction of complete ACL rupture increases ROM (short-term) and functionality (short- to mid-term). Although there was an increase in pain intensity with the addition of TrP-DN, this was not detected beyond immediately after the first treatment. Furthermore, stability does not seem to be modified after TrP-DN.

  4. Efficacy of quadriceps vastus medialis dry needling in a rehabilitation protocol after surgical reconstruction of complete anterior cruciate ligament rupture

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez-Saornil, Jorge; Ruíz-Ruíz, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Sanz, David; Romero-Morales, Carlos; López-López, Daniel; Calvo-Lobo, Cesar

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Several new rehabilitation modalities have been proposed after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Among these, trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN) might be useful in the treatment of myofascial pain syndrome associated with ACL reconstruction to reduce pain intensity, increase knee flexion range and modify the mechanical properties of the quadriceps muscle during late-stage rehabilitation. To date, this is the first randomized clinical trial to support the use of TrP-DN in the early rehabilitation process after ACL reconstruction. The aim of this study was to determine the pain intensity, range of motion (ROM), stability, and functionality improvements by adding quadriceps vastus medialis TrP-DN to the rehabilitation protocol (Rh) provided to subacute ACL reconstructed patients. Methods: This randomized, single-blinded, clinical trial (NCT02699411) included 44 subacute patients with surgical reconstruction of complete ACL rupture. The patients were randomized into 2 intervention groups: Rh (n = 22) or Rh + TrP-DN (n = 22). Pain intensity, ROM, stability, and functionality were measured at baseline (A0) and immediately (A1), 24 hours (A2), 1 week (A3), and 5 weeks (A4) after the first treatment. Results: Comparing statistically significant differences (P ≤ .001; Eta2 = 0.198–0.360) between both groups, pain intensity (at A1), ROM (at A1, A2, and A3), and functionality (at A2, A3, and A4) were increased. Nevertheless, the rest of measurements did not show significant differences (P > .05). Conclusion: Quadriceps vastus medialis TrP-DN in conjunction with a rehabilitation protocol in subacute patients with surgical reconstruction of complete ACL rupture increases ROM (short-term) and functionality (short- to mid-term). Although there was an increase in pain intensity with the addition of TrP-DN, this was not detected beyond immediately after the first treatment. Furthermore, stability does not seem to be

  5. Imaging appearances of lateral ankle ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chien, Alexander J; Jacobson, Jon A; Jamadar, David A; Brigido, Monica Kalume; Femino, John E; Hayes, Curtis W

    2004-01-01

    Six patients were retrospectively identified as having undergone lateral ligament reconstruction surgery. The surgical procedures were categorized into four groups: direct lateral ligament repair, peroneus brevis tendon rerouting, peroneus brevis tendon loop, and peroneus brevis tendon split and rerouting. At radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, the presence of one or more suture anchors in the region of the anterior talofibular ligament indicates direct ligament repair, whereas a fibular tunnel indicates peroneus brevis tendon rerouting or loop. Both ultrasonography (US) and MR imaging demonstrate rerouted tendons as part of lateral ankle reconstruction; however, MR imaging can also depict the rerouted tendon within an osseous tunnel if present, especially if T1-weighted sequences are used. Artifact from suture material may obscure the tendon at MR imaging but not at US. With both modalities, the integrity of the rerouted peroneus brevis tendon is best evaluated by following the tendon proximally from its distal attachment site, which typically remains unchanged. The rerouted tendon or portion of the tendon can then be traced proximally to its reattachment site. Familiarity with the surgical procedures most commonly used for lateral ankle ligament reconstruction, and with the imaging features of these procedures, is essential for avoiding diagnostic pitfalls and ensuring accurate assessment of the ligament reconstruction.

  6. Surgical Reconstruction with the Remnant Ligament Improves Joint Position Sense as well as Functional Ankle Instability: A 1-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Iwao, Kamizato; Masataka, Deie; Kohei, Fukuhara

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Chronic functional instability—characterized by repeated ankle inversion sprains and a subjective sensation of instability—is one of the most common residual disabilities after an inversion sprain. However, whether surgical reconstruction improves sensorimotor control has not been reported to date. The purpose of this study was to assess functional improvement of chronic ankle instability after surgical reconstruction using the remnant ligament. Materials and Methods. We performed 10 cases in the intervention group and 20 healthy individuals as the control group. Before and after surgical reconstruction, we evaluated joint position sense and functional ankle instability by means of a questionnaire. Results and Discussion. There was a statistically significant difference between the control and intervention groups before surgical reconstruction. Three months after surgery in the intervention group, the joint position sense was significantly different from those found preoperatively. Before surgery, the mean score of functional ankle instability in the intervention group was almost twice as low. Three months after surgery, however, the score significantly increased. The results showed that surgical reconstruction using the remnant ligament was effective not only for improving mechanical retensioning but also for ameliorating joint position sense and functional ankle instability. PMID:25401146

  7. No differences in subjective knee function between surgical techniques of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction at 2-year follow-up: a cohort study from the Swedish National Knee Ligament Register.

    PubMed

    Hamrin Senorski, Eric; Sundemo, David; Murawski, Christopher D; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Musahl, Volker; Fu, Freddie; Desai, Neel; Stålman, Anders; Samuelsson, Kristian

    2017-03-17

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how different techniques of single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction affect subjective knee function via the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) evaluation 2 years after surgery. It was hypothesized that the surgical techniques of single-bundle ACL reconstruction would result in equivalent results with respect to subjective knee function 2 years after surgery. This cohort study was based on data from the Swedish National Knee Ligament Register during the 10-year period of 1 January 2005 through 31 December 2014. Patients who underwent primary single-bundle ACL reconstruction with hamstrings tendon autograft were included. Details on surgical technique were collected using a web-based questionnaire comprised of essential AARSC items, including utilization of accessory medial portal drilling, anatomic tunnel placement, and visualization of insertion sites and landmarks. A repeated measures ANOVA and an additional linear mixed model analysis were used to investigate the effect of surgical technique on the KOOS4 from the pre-operative period to 2-year follow-up. A total of 13,636 patients who had undergone single-bundle ACL reconstruction comprised the study group for this analysis. A repeated measures ANOVA determined that mean subjective knee function differed between the pre-operative time period and at 2-year follow-up (p < 0.001). No differences were found with respect to the interaction between KOOS4 and surgical technique or gender. Additionally, the linear mixed model adjusted for age at reconstruction, gender, and concomitant injuries showed no difference between surgical techniques in KOOS4 improvement from baseline to 2-year follow-up. However, KOOS4 improved significantly in patients for all surgical techniques of single-bundle ACL reconstruction (p < 0.001); the largest improvement was seen between the pre-operative time period and at 1-year follow-up. Surgical

  8. Tunnel widening prevention with the allo-Achilles tendon graft in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: Surgical tips and short term followup

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Dong Won; Han, Seung Beom; Yeo, Woo Jin; Lee, Won Hee; Kwon, Jae Ho; Kyung, Bong Soo

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tunnel widening (TW) after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction can be a serious complication, and there is controversy over how to prevent it. This study aimed to suggest surgical approaches to prevent TW using an allo-Achilles tendon graft, and then to evaluate TW after these surgical tips were applied. Materials and Methods: Sixty two patients underwent ACL reconstruction with an allo-Achilles tendon graft. Four surgical approaches were used: Making a tibial tunnel by bone impaction, intraarticular reamer application, bone portion application for the femoral tunnel, and an additional bone plug application for the tibial tunnel. After more than 1-year, followup radiographs including anteroposterior and lateral views were taken in 29 patients encompassing thirty knees. The diameter of the tunnels at postoperation day 1 (POD1) and at followup was measured and compared. Results: In 18 knees (60%), there were no visible femoral tunnel margins on the radiographs at POD1 or followup. In the other 12 cases, which had visible femoral tunnel margins on followup radiographs, the mean femoral tunnel diameter was 8.6 mm. In the tibial tunnel, the mean diameters did not increase on all three levels (proximal, middle, and distal), and there was no statistically significant difference between the diameters at POD1 and followup. Conclusion: The suggested tips for surgery involving an allo-Achilles tendon graft can effectively prevent TW after ACL reconstruction according to this case series. These surgical tips can prevent TW. PMID:28400663

  9. Surgical Management and Treatment of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament/Medial Collateral Ligament Injured Knee.

    PubMed

    Dale, Kevin M; Bailey, James R; Moorman, Claude T

    2017-01-01

    The medial collateral ligament (MCL) is the most commonly injured ligament of the knee. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most commonly injured ligament in conjunction with the MCL. Most MCL injuries can be treated nonoperatively, whereas the ACL often requires reconstruction. A good physical examination is essential for diagnosis, whereas radiographs and MRI of the knee confirm diagnosis and help guide treatment planning. Preoperative physical therapy should be completed before surgical management to allow for return of knee range of motion and an attempt at MCL healing.

  10. All-Epiphyseal Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Skeletally Immature Patients: A Surgical Technique Using a Split Tibial Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Lykissas, Marios G.; Nathan, Senthil T.; Wall, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Many techniques have been described for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in skeletally immature patients, including extra-articular, complete or partial transphyseal, and physeal-sparing techniques. An all-epiphyseal technique places the tendon and its tunnels and fixation all within the child's epiphysis, leaving the growth plates untouched. We describe an all-epiphyseal quadruple-hamstring ACL reconstruction using a split tibial tunnel. The split tibial tunnels drop the tunnel size down to 4.5 to 5.5 mm from 7 to 8 mm because only half the total graft diameter passes through each of the split tunnels. This increases the safety margin for keeping the tunnel within the tibial epiphysis, in addition to avoiding damage into the growth plate. The bone bridge between the 2 tunnels serves as a solid low-profile fixation post. Femoral graft fixation is achieved with an interference screw, which allows precise tensioning and low-profile fixation entirely within the femoral tunnel. By placing the graft at the native ACL's anatomic attachment points without spanning or violating the growth plates at any step of the procedure, an all-epiphyseal ACL reconstruction with a split tibial tunnel theoretically minimizes the risk of growth disturbance in an ACL-deficient child. PMID:23766968

  11. Reconstruction of superficial deltoid ligaments with allograft tendons in medial ankle instability: A technical report.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hong-Geun; Park, Jong-Tae; Eom, Joon-Sang; Jung, Myung-Gon; Lee, Dong-Oh

    2016-03-01

    Deltoid ligament insufficiency can cause arthritic changes with various symptoms in the ankle joint. However, reconstruction procedures of the medial collateral and deltoid ligaments have drawn less attention than those of the lateral ankle ligaments. Few techniques for reconstructing deltoid ligaments are available, and those that are can be complex. We introduce a new surgical method for reconstructing superficial deltoid ligaments that is simple and straightforward. With this method, the tibionavicular and tibiocalcaneal ligaments can be reconstructed efficiently and easily. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Return to Play Following Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cain, Edward Lyle; McGonigle, Owen

    2016-10-01

    Ulnar collateral ligament injury in the overhead athlete typically presents as activity-related pain with loss of velocity and control. Treatment options range from nonoperative rehabilitation to ligament reconstruction. Surgical reconstruction is frequently required to allow the athlete to return to competition and many surgical techniques have been described. The rehabilitation process to return back to overhead athletics, in particular pitching, is prolonged and requires progression through multiple phases. Despite this, surgical treatment has been shown by multiple investigators to be successful at returning athletes to their previous level of competition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A minimally invasive surgical technique for augmented reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments with woven polyester tape.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alex P; Sidhom, Sameh; Sefton, Graham

    2007-01-01

    Although stabilization of the lateral ankle ligament complex (LALC) with augmented techniques is known to be successful, it is associated with a number of complications. We hypothesize that successful stabilization of LALC can be achieved with a woven polyester tape implant via a minimally invasive procedure, as an alternative to tenodesis. Four men with chronic instability of the ankle underwent a minimally invasive surgical stabilization of LALC with a woven polyester tape. This tape was passed through the distal fibula to the base of the fifth metatarsal and then back to the fibula once more before being tied. The foot was immobilized in a neutral position for 2 weeks. Partial weightbearing with a walking stick began on the same day, and physiotherapy began for 10 weeks. Evaluation was performed at a mean follow-up of 24.5 months postoperatively. Preoperatively, all patients had a chronically unstable index ankle both functionally and clinically. At a mean of 24.5 months postoperatively, functional stability for all patients was normal (Sefton grade 1). Subjective ankle performance grades were normal in all cases, and all patients felt the outcome was excellent. Objective measurement with clinical stress testing showed anterior drawer and inversion tests to be the same as the contralateral ankle in all patients. However, each displayed limited inversion of the ankle. No complications such as wound dehiscence, infection, pain, or nerve injury were observed after the procedure. All were able to return to their preinjury activity level within 3 months. Stabilization of LALC may be simply and successfully achieved with a woven polyester graft as an alternative to tenodesis.

  14. Trends in Materials Science for Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sava, Oana Roxana; Sava, Daniel Florin; Radulescu, Marius; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Ficai, Denisa; Veloz-Castillo, Maria Fernanda; Mendez-Rojas, Miguel Angel; Ficai, Anton

    2017-01-01

    The number of ligament injuries increases every year and concomitantly the need for materials or systems that can reconstruct the ligament. Limitations imposed by autografts and allografts in ligament reconstruction together with the advances in materials science and biology have attracted a lot of interest for developing systems and materials for ligament replacement or reconstruction. This review intends to synthesize the major steps taken in the development of polymer-based materials for anterior cruciate ligament, their advantages and drawbacks and the results of different in vitro and in vivo tests. Until present, there is no successful polymer system for ligament reconstruction implanted in humans. The developing field of synthetic polymers for ligament reconstruction still has a lot of potential. In addition, several nano-structured materials, made of nanofibers or in the form of ceramic/polymeric nanocomposites, are attracting the interest of several groups due to their potential use as engineered scaffolds that mimic the native environment of cells, increasing the chances for tissue regeneration. Here, we review the last 15 years of literature in order to obtain a better understanding on the state-of-the-art that includes the usage of nano- and poly-meric materials for ligament reconstruction, and to draw perspectives on the future development of the field.

  15. Lateral ligament reconstruction procedures for the ankle.

    PubMed

    Tourné, Y; Mabit, C

    2017-02-01

    Capsule/ligament lesions of the lateral compartment of the ankle lead to lateral laxity, which is a prime contributor to chronic ankle instability. Lateral ligament reconstruction stabilizes the joint. Exhaustive preoperative clinical and paraclinical work-up is essential. The present article classifies, presents and criticizes the main techniques in terms of long-term stabilization and reduction of osteoarthritis risk. Anatomic ligament repair with reinforcement (mainly extensor retinaculum) or anatomic ligament reconstruction are the two recommended options. Non-anatomic reconstructions using the peroneus brevis should be abandoned. Arthroscopy is increasingly being developed, but results need assessment on longer follow-up than presently available. Postoperative neuromuscular reprogramming is fundamental to optimal recovery. Finally, the concept of complex ankle instability is discussed from the diagnostic and therapeutic points of view. The various forms of ligament reconstruction failure and corresponding treatments are reported.

  16. Anatomic Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction Improves Postoperative Clinical Outcomes Combined with Anatomic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Man; Zhou, Aiguo; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Dianming

    2016-01-01

    A significant cohort of patients is plagued by postoperative rotational instability after the anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery. Anatomic anterolateral ligament (ALL) reconstruction was performed in this study with the aim to assess the clinical role of ALL in knee’s stability and joint functions. Sixty patients were recruited and divided into three groups to perform the operations of anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction, anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction, and anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction + anterolateral ligament reconstruction, respectively. And then postoperative knee’s stability and joint functions were evaluated to compare the clinical outcomes among the three different kind of operations. The postoperative knee’s stability and joint functions of the anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction group and the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction + ALL reconstruction group were better than the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction group. No significant difference was observed between the anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction group and the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction + ALL reconstruction group. The anatomic anterolateral ligament reconstruction could improve the clinical outcomes after patients performed the anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. This indicates that the anterolateral ligament plays a crucial role in knee’s stability and joint function, especially the rotational stability. Key points Anatomic anterolateral ligament reconstruction combined with anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was performed to treat the patients with ACL rupture. Compared to the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction group, the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction + ALL reconstruction group achieve a better clinical outcomes. The results suggest that the anterolateral ligament plays a crucial role in knee’s stability and joint function

  17. Do Clinical Results and Return-to-Sport Rates After Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction Differ Based on Graft Choice and Surgical Technique?

    PubMed

    Erickson, Brandon J; Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Frank, Rachel M; Bach, Bernard R; Cohen, Mark S; Bush-Joseph, Charles A; Cole, Brian J; Romeo, Anthony A

    2016-11-01

    Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) has become a common procedure performed in overhead-throwing athletes of many athletic levels. The purpose of this study was to determine whether clinical outcomes and return-to-sport (RTS) rates differ among patients undergoing UCLR based on graft choice, surgical technique, athletic competition level, handedness, and treatment of the ulnar nerve. We hypothesized that no differences would exist in clinical outcomes or RTS rates between technique, graft choice, or other variables. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. All patients who underwent UCLR from January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2014 at a single institution were identified. Charts were reviewed to determine patient age, sex, date of surgery, sport played, handedness, athletic level, surgical technique, graft type, and complications. Patients were contacted via telephone to obtain the RTS rate, Conway-Jobe score, Timmerman-Andrews score, and Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic (KJOC) Shoulder and Elbow score. Eighty-five patients (mean age at surgery, 19.3 ± 4.7 years; 92% male; 78% right hand-dominant) underwent UCLR between 2004 and 2014 and were available for follow-up. Overall, 87% were baseball pitchers, 49.4% were college athletes, and 41.2% were high school athletes. No significant difference existed between the docking and double-docking techniques, graft choice, handedness, sex, activity level, and treatment of the ulnar nerve with regard to clinical outcomes, RTS, or subsequent surgeries (all P > .05). More complications were seen in the docking technique compared with the double-docking technique (P = .036). Hamstring autograft was used more commonly with the docking technique (P = .023) while allograft was used more commonly with the double-docking technique (P = .0006). Both the docking and double-docking techniques produce excellent clinical outcomes in patients undergoing UCLR. No difference in outcome scores was seen between surgical technique or

  18. Reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament and anterolateral ligament using interlinked hamstrings - technical note.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Marcio de Castro; Zidan, Flavio Ferreira; Miduati, Francini Belluci; Fortuna, Caio Cesar; Mizutani, Bruno Moreira; Abdalla, Rene Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Recent anatomical and biomechanical studies on the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee have shown that this structure has an important function in relation to joint stability, especially when associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, the criteria for its reconstruction have not yet been fully established and the surgical techniques that have been described present variations regarding anatomical points and fixation materials. This study presents a reproducible technique for ALL and ACL reconstruction using hamstring tendons, in which three interference screws are used for fixation.

  19. Bone tunnel enlargement on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, Adriano Barros de Aguiar; Duarte, Aires; Severino, Nilson Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the presence of tibial bone tunnel enlargement after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using quadruple graft of the flexor tendons and correlate the functional results in their presence. Methods: The studied lasted six months and included 25 patients, with ages ranging from 18 to 43 years old. Assessment was based on radiographs taken immediately postoperatively and at the third and sixth month of follow up in the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Reconstruction of ligaments was performed with tendon grafts of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscle fixated in the femur with transverse metal screw and in the tibia with interference screws. Patients were evaluated objectively by tests ligament, graded from zero to four crosses and subjectively by the Lysholm method preoperative and after sixth month follow up. Results: Significant increase in the tunnels diameters were observed, 20.56% for radiographs in the anteroposterior view, 26.48% in profile view and 23.22% in computed tomography. Descriptive statistics showed significant improvement in subjective and objective clinical parameters. Conclusions: The bone tunnel enlargement is a phenomenon found in the first months after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament and it has no implications on clinical outcomes in the short term. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Study. PMID:25328430

  20. Popliteal artery injury during posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cenni, Marcos Henrique Frauendorf; do Nascimento, Bruno Fajardo; Carneiro, Guilherme Galvão Barreto; de Andrade, Rodrigo Cristiano; Pinheiro Júnior, Lúcio Flávio Biondi; Nicolai, Oscar Pinheiro

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a case of popliteal artery injury during arthroscopic reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament. The evolution of the injury is described and comments are made regarding the anatomy of this artery and potential risks of this surgical technique. This study had the aims of alerting the medical community, especially knee surgeons, regarding a severe surgical complication and discussing the ways of preventing it.

  1. Cadaveric Scapholunate Reconstruction Using the Ligament Augmentation and Reconstruction System

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Kevin; Wagels, Michael; Tham, Stephen K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Untreated scapholunate ligament disruption may lead to progressive wrist arthritis. Current techniques used to treat the disruption may not prevent arthritis because of attenuation of a reconstructive ligament substitute or failure to re-establish normal wrist kinematics. Questions/Purposes This study evaluates a combined synthetic-autologous technique for the treatment of scapholunate dissociation. Methods Scapholunate dissociation was created in six cadaveric wrists. The dorsal and volar components of the scapholunate ligament were reconstructed using the Ligament Augmentation & Reconstruction System (LARS; LARS, Arc-sur-Tille, France) and a modified Blatt capsulodesis performed. Reconstructed wrists were subjected to cyclic passive motion. Outcomes were measured radiologically and compared using Student's t-test. Results Carpal alignment was re-established following scapholunate ligament reconstruction. Carpal alignment was maintained after cyclic loading. Conclusions The technique described corrected the carpal malalignment associated with scapholunate dissociation. Corrected positions were maintained after one thousand cycles of flexion and extension without fraying or loosening of the LARS. Clinical Relevance Current popular techniques for scapholunate reconstruction do not address the important dorsal and palmar components of the ligament that control their intercarpal motion. Reconstruction of the dorsal and palmar components of the scapholunate ligament can be achieved through a dorsal approach to the wrist. PMID:25097813

  2. Psychological Aspects of Recovery Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Christino, Melissa A; Fantry, Amanda J; Vopat, Bryan G

    2015-08-01

    Recovery following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is an arduous process that requires a significant mental and physical commitment to rehabilitation. Orthopaedic research in recent years has focused on optimizing anterior cruciate ligament surgical techniques; however, despite stable anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions, many athletes still never achieve their preinjury ability or even return to sport. Psychological factors associated with patient perceptions and functional outcomes following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are important to acknowledge and understand. Issues related to emotional disturbance, motivation, self-esteem, locus of control, and self-efficacy can have profound effects on patients' compliance, athletic identity, and readiness to return to sport. The psychological aspects of recovery play a critical role in functional outcomes, and a better understanding of these concepts is essential to optimize the treatment of patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, particularly those who plan to return to sport. Identifying at-risk patients, encouraging a multidisciplinary approach to patient care, and providing early referral to a sports psychologist may improve patient outcomes and increase return-to-play rates among athletes.

  3. Single-Stage Reconstruction of Both Cruciate Ligaments

    PubMed Central

    Andreoli, Mauro; Zicaro, Juan Pablo; Yacuzzi, Carlos; Costa-Paz, Matias

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Isolated Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) and Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL), or central pivot lesions are rare. These are frequently associated with collateral ligaments injuries. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate clinical and functional outcomes of 4 patients with acute ACL and PCL injury who underwent a simultaneous single-stage arthroscopic reconstruction. Methods: The inclusion criteria were patients with isolated ACL and PCL injuries, with a minimum follow-up of 2 years. We evaluated the type of graft used, the surgical technique and postoperative complications. The scales used for clinical evaluation were the Knee Society Score (KSS), IKDC, Lysholm and Tegner. Knee stability was assessed using the KT-1000 arthrometer. Results: Three men and one woman, with an average age of 48 years (45 to 56 years) were evaluated. Three presented a sport injury and one a car accident. Mean follow-up was 8 years. In all patients allograft was used for ligament reconstruction. Average postoperative results were: KSS 74-82, Lysholm 76, IKDC 63 and Tegner 6. KT-1000 arthrometer showed an average difference of 4mm compared to the contralateral knee. One patient underwent reintervention due to meniscal injury. Conclusion: ACL and PCL simultaneous single-stage reconstruction is a really demanding surgery. We achieved good results using allograft for both ligaments reconstruction. No clinical or functional postoperative complications were recorded.

  4. Do Clinical Results and Return-to-Sport Rates After Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction Differ Based on Graft Choice and Surgical Technique?

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J.; Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Frank, Rachel M.; Bach, Bernard R.; Cohen, Mark S.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Cole, Brian J.; Romeo, Anthony A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) has become a common procedure performed in overhead-throwing athletes of many athletic levels. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to determine whether clinical outcomes and return-to-sport (RTS) rates differ among patients undergoing UCLR based on graft choice, surgical technique, athletic competition level, handedness, and treatment of the ulnar nerve. We hypothesized that no differences would exist in clinical outcomes or RTS rates between technique, graft choice, or other variables. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: All patients who underwent UCLR from January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2014 at a single institution were identified. Charts were reviewed to determine patient age, sex, date of surgery, sport played, handedness, athletic level, surgical technique, graft type, and complications. Patients were contacted via telephone to obtain the RTS rate, Conway-Jobe score, Timmerman-Andrews score, and Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic (KJOC) Shoulder and Elbow score. Results: Eighty-five patients (mean age at surgery, 19.3 ± 4.7 years; 92% male; 78% right hand–dominant) underwent UCLR between 2004 and 2014 and were available for follow-up. Overall, 87% were baseball pitchers, 49.4% were college athletes, and 41.2% were high school athletes. No significant difference existed between the docking and double-docking techniques, graft choice, handedness, sex, activity level, and treatment of the ulnar nerve with regard to clinical outcomes, RTS, or subsequent surgeries (all P > .05). More complications were seen in the docking technique compared with the double-docking technique (P = .036). Hamstring autograft was used more commonly with the docking technique (P = .023) while allograft was used more commonly with the double-docking technique (P = .0006). Conclusion: Both the docking and double-docking techniques produce excellent clinical outcomes in patients undergoing

  5. Surgical reconstruction of TMJ.

    PubMed

    Ramil Novo, V M; Garcìa, A G; Berini Aytès, L; Escoda, C G

    1999-01-01

    Certain situations and pathological processes that arise with temporomandibular joint destruction can only be resolved with surgical reconstructive procedures in order to attempt a functional and anatomical rehabilitation of this joint. Many of these situations can be surgically treated with the patient's own autologous tissues. However, in some patients reconstruction is complex and the use of autologous tissues is unadvisable whereas reconstruction utilizing alloplastic materials may be an appropriate alternative. The following report describes 4 clinical cases in which autologous grafts or Christensen joint prosthesis are employed in temporomandibular joint reconstruction.

  6. MRI features most often associated with surgically proven tears of the spring ligament complex.

    PubMed

    Williams, Geraint; Widnall, James; Evans, Paul; Platt, Simon

    2013-07-01

    The authors aim to present the common MRI appearances of surgically proven spring ligament tears as minimal radiological literature exists regarding injury to this increasingly important structure. Our retrospective review identified a treatment group comprising 13 cases of surgically proven spring ligament injury and a 96-patient comparison group. All patients underwent standard musculoskeletal MRI sequences of the foot and ankle. Images were reviewed by a registrar-grade orthopedic surgeon and a consultant musculoskeletal radiologist for abnormalities of the spring ligament complex. MRI findings in relation to surgically proven injury of the superior-medial portion of the spring ligament included proximal thickening >5 mm in 92 % and distal thinning <2 mm in 85 % of proven injures to the spring ligament complex. Common abnormalities of the medio-plantar portion comprised ligament thickening >7 mm in 31 % and intra-substance signal heterogenicity demonstrated in 38 % of cases. The complex orientation of the medio-plantar ligament makes its evaluation unreliable due to the difficulty obtaining diagnostic quality imaging and our inability to correlate MRI findings in this portion of the ligament with surgically proven injury. However, MRI abnormalities of the superior-medial ligament are consistent, reproducible, and correlate with surgical pathology. As our incomplete understanding of the flexible flatfoot deformity evolves, our ability to recognize injury to the spring ligament may encourage novel surgical treatments looking to incorporate its repair or reconstruction into deformity correction.

  7. REHABILITATION FOLLOWING MEDIAL PATELLOFEMORAL LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION FOR PATELLAR INSTABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Prohaska, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Patellar instability is a common problem seen by physical therapists, athletic trainers and orthopedic surgeons. Although following an acute dislocation, conservative rehabilitation is usually the first line of defense; refractory cases exist that may require surgical intervention. Substantial progress has been made in the understanding of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) and its role as the primary stabilizer to lateral patellar displacement. Medial patellofemoral ligament disruption is now considered to be the essential lesion following acute patellar dislocation due to significantly high numbers of ruptures following this injury. Evidence is now mounting that demonstrates the benefits of early reconstruction with a variety of techniques. Recently rehabilitation has become more robust and progressive due to our better understanding of soft tissue reconstruction and repair techniques. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe the etiology of patellar instability, the anatomy and biomechanics and examination of patellofemoral instability, and to describe surgical intervention and rehabilitation following MPFL rupture. Level of Evidence 5 PMID:28593102

  8. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Paschos, Nikolaos K

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is a traumatic event that can lead to significant functional impairment and inability to participate in high-level sports-related activities. ACL reconstruction is considered the treatment of choice for symptomatic ACL-deficient patients and can assist in full functional recovery. Furthermore, ACL reconstruction restores ligamentous stability to normal, and, therefore, can potentially fully reinstate kinematics of the knee joint. As a consequence, the natural history of ACL injury could be potentially reversed via ACL reconstruction. Evidence from the literature is controversial regarding the effectiveness of ACL reconstruction in preventing the development of knee cartilage degeneration. This editorial aims to present recent high-level evidence in an attempt to answer whether ACL injury inevitably leads to osteoarthritis and whether ACL reconstruction can prevent this development or not. PMID:28361013

  9. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury, Reconstruction, and the Optimization of Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, James Philip

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) provides an established surgical intervention to control pathological tibiofemoral translational and rotational movement. ACLR is a safe and reproducible intervention, but there remains an underlying rate of failure to return to preinjury sporting activity levels. Postoperative pathological laxity and graft reinjury remain concerns. Previously, unrecognized meniscal lesions, disruption of the lateral capsule, and extracapsular structures offer potential avenues to treat and to therefore improve kinematic outcome and functional results, following reconstruction. Addressing laterally based injuries may also improve the durability of intraarticular ACLR. Improving the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft replication of the normal ACL attachment points on the femur and the tibia, using either double bundle or anatomical single bundle techniques, improves kinematics, which may benefit outcome and functionality, following reconstruction. PMID:28966384

  10. Rehabilitation After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, L.M.; Gray, B.; Wright, R.W.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rigorous rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is necessary for a successful surgical outcome. A large number of clinical trials continue to assess aspects of this rehabilitation process. Prior systematic reviews evaluated fifty-four Level-I and II clinical trials published through 2005. Methods: Eighty-five articles from 2006 to 2010 were identified utilizing multiple search engines. Twenty-nine Level-I or II studies met inclusion criteria and were evaluated with use of the CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) criteria. Topics included in this review are postoperative bracing, accelerated strengthening, home-based rehabilitation, proprioception and neuromuscular training, and six miscellaneous topics investigated in single trials. Results: Bracing following ACL reconstruction remains neither necessary nor beneficial and adds to the cost of the procedure. Early return to sports needs further research. Home-based rehabilitation can be successful. Although neuromuscular interventions are not likely to be harmful to patients, they are also not likely to yield large improvements in outcomes or help patients return to sports faster. Thus, they should not be performed to the exclusion of strengthening and range-of-motion exercises. Vibration training may lead to faster and more complete proprioceptive recovery but further evidence is needed. Conclusions: Several new modalities for rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction may be helpful but should not be performed to the exclusion of range-of-motion, strengthening, and functional exercises. Accelerated rehabilitation does not appear to be harmful but further investigation of rehabilitation timing is warranted. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:23032584

  11. Patellofemoral Joint Reconstruction for Patellar Instability: Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction, Trochleoplasty, and Tibial Tubercle Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Dean, Chase S; Chahla, Jorge; Serra Cruz, Raphael; Cram, Tyler R; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    Recurrent patellar instability can be very debilitating and may require surgical intervention. A thorough workup must be completed in this subset of patients. Risk factors for recurrent instability include patella alta, trochlear dysplasia, an increased tibial tubercle-trochlear groove distance, and insufficiencies in the medial retinacular structures. Necessary treatment of these risk factors, once identified, should be addressed surgically. Patellofemoral reconstruction must be individually tailored to each patient's anatomy and may necessitate medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction, tibial tubercle osteotomy, or trochleoplasty in any combination or as a standalone procedure. This article details our technique for surgical treatment of recurrent patellar instability with a medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction, an open trochleoplasty, and a tibial tubercle osteotomy for patients with severe trochlear dysplasia, an increased tibial tubercle-trochlear groove distance, or patella alta.

  12. A Finite Element Analysis of Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    DeVries Watson, Nicole A.; Duchman, Kyle R.; Bollier, Matthew J.; Grosland, Nicole M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The medial patellofemoral ligament is the primary soft-tissue restraint to lateral patella translation. Medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction has become a viable surgical option to provide patellar stability in patients with recurrent instability. The primary goal of this study was to determine the effect of medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction on the lateral force-displacement behavior of the patella using finite element analyses. Methods A finite element model of the knee was created using cadaveric image data. Experimental testing was performed to validate the computational model. After validation, the model was modified to study the effect of various medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction insertion sites, allowing comparison of patellofemoral contact force and pressure. Results For the intact anatomic model, the lateral restraining force was 80.0 N with a corresponding patellar contact area of 54.97 mm2. For the anatomic reconstructed medial patellofemoral ligament model, the lateral restraining force increased to 148.9 N with a contact area of 71.78 mm2. This compared favorably to the corresponding experimental study. The force required to laterally displace the patella increased when the femoral insertion site was moved anteriorly or distally. The lateral restraining force decreased when the femoral insertion site moved proximally and the patellar insertion site moved either proximal or distal by 5 mm. Conclusion The line of action was altered with insertion site position, which in turn changed the amount of force it took to displace the patella laterally. Considering the model constraints, an anterior femoral attachment may over constrain the patella and increase cartilage wear due to increase contact area and restraining force. Clinical Relevance A malpositioned femoral tunnel in MPFL reconstruction could increase restraining forces and PF contact pressure, thus it is suggested to use intra-operative fluoroscopy to confirm

  13. LARS Artificial Ligament Versus ABC Purely Polyester Ligament for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Iliadis, Dimitrios Ph.; Bourlos, Dimitrios N.; Mastrokalos, Dimitrios S.; Chronopoulos, Efstathios; Babis, George C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Graft choice for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is of critical importance. Various grafts have been used so far, with autografts long considered the optimal solution for the treatment of ACL-deficient knees. Limited data are available on the long-term survivorship of synthetic grafts. Purpose: To compare the functional outcome and survivorship of ACL reconstructions performed using the LARS (ligament augmentation and reconstruction system) ligament and the ABC (active biosynthetic composite) purely polyester ligament. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: The results of 72 patients who underwent primary arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with the LARS ligament and 31 cases with an ABC purely polyester ligament were reviewed. The mean follow-up periods for the LARS and ABC groups were 9.5 and 5.1 years, respectively. A survivorship analysis of the 2 synthetic grafts was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method with a log-rank test (Mantel-Cox, 95% CI). Lysholm, Tegner activity, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores as well as laxity measurements obtained using a KT-1000 arthrometer were recorded for all intact grafts, and a Mann-Whitney U test was used for comparison reasons. Results: The rupture rates for LARS and ABC grafts were 31% (95% CI, 20%-42%) and 42% (95% CI, 25%-59%), respectively. For intact grafts, the mean Lysholm score was good for both groups (90 for the LARS group and 89 for the ABC group), with the majority of patients returning to their preinjury level of activities, and the mean IKDC score was 90 for the LARS group and 86 for the ABC group. Conclusion: The rupture rates of both LARS and ABC grafts were both high. However, the LARS ligament provided significantly better survivorship compared with the ABC ligament at short- to midterm follow-up (95% CI). PMID:27453894

  14. LARS Artificial Ligament Versus ABC Purely Polyester Ligament for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Iliadis, Dimitrios Ph; Bourlos, Dimitrios N; Mastrokalos, Dimitrios S; Chronopoulos, Efstathios; Babis, George C

    2016-06-01

    Graft choice for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is of critical importance. Various grafts have been used so far, with autografts long considered the optimal solution for the treatment of ACL-deficient knees. Limited data are available on the long-term survivorship of synthetic grafts. To compare the functional outcome and survivorship of ACL reconstructions performed using the LARS (ligament augmentation and reconstruction system) ligament and the ABC (active biosynthetic composite) purely polyester ligament. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. The results of 72 patients who underwent primary arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with the LARS ligament and 31 cases with an ABC purely polyester ligament were reviewed. The mean follow-up periods for the LARS and ABC groups were 9.5 and 5.1 years, respectively. A survivorship analysis of the 2 synthetic grafts was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method with a log-rank test (Mantel-Cox, 95% CI). Lysholm, Tegner activity, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores as well as laxity measurements obtained using a KT-1000 arthrometer were recorded for all intact grafts, and a Mann-Whitney U test was used for comparison reasons. The rupture rates for LARS and ABC grafts were 31% (95% CI, 20%-42%) and 42% (95% CI, 25%-59%), respectively. For intact grafts, the mean Lysholm score was good for both groups (90 for the LARS group and 89 for the ABC group), with the majority of patients returning to their preinjury level of activities, and the mean IKDC score was 90 for the LARS group and 86 for the ABC group. The rupture rates of both LARS and ABC grafts were both high. However, the LARS ligament provided significantly better survivorship compared with the ABC ligament at short- to midterm follow-up (95% CI).

  15. Two-Stage Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Brandon J; Cvetanovich, Gregory; Waliullah, Khalid; Khair, Michael; Smith, Patrick; Bach, Bernard; Sherman, Seth

    2016-05-01

    The number of primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears is rapidly increasing. In patients who wish to return to their preoperative level of function, specifically as it pertains to participation in sports, the gold standard of treatment following an ACL tear remains an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Despite a majority of good/excellent results following primary ACL reconstruction, there is a growing subset of patients with persistent or recurrent functional instability who require revision ACL reconstruction. Preoperative planning for revision ACL reconstruction requires a careful understanding of the root cause of ACL failure, including possible technical causes of primary ACL failure and the presence of combined knee pathology that was not addressed at the index ACL reconstruction. The decision to perform 2-stage revision ACL reconstruction is multifactorial and is reached by technical considerations that may make a 1-stage revision less optimal, including tunnel widening, arthrofibrosis, active infection, and others. Concomitant knee pathology such as meniscal deficiency, malalignment (including an increase in posterior tibial slope), chondral lesions, and other ligamentous laxity may also require a staged approach to treatment. This evidence-based review covers the indications for 2-stage revision ACL reconstruction, surgical techniques, evidence for and technique of bone grafting prior ACL tunnels, and outcomes of 2-stage revision stratified by initial cause of ACL reconstruction failure. With proper preoperative planning and an understanding of the cause of failure following the primary ACL reconstruction, revision ACL reconstruction can offer excellent outcomes in the motivated patient. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e456-e464.].

  16. Tissue engineering of ligaments for reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Hogan, MaCalus V; Kawakami, Yohei; Murawski, Christopher D; Fu, Freddie H

    2015-05-01

    The use of musculoskeletal bioengineering and regenerative medicine applications in orthopaedic surgery has continued to evolve. The aim of this systematic review was to address tissue-engineering strategies for knee ligament reconstruction. A systematic review of PubMed/Medline using the terms "knee AND ligament" AND "tissue engineering" OR "regenerative medicine" was performed. Two authors performed the search, independently assessed the studies for inclusion, and extracted the data for inclusion in the review. Both preclinical and clinical studies were reviewed, and the articles deemed most relevant were included in this article to provide relevant basic science and recent clinical translational knowledge concerning "tissue-engineering" strategies currently used in knee ligament reconstruction. A total of 224 articles were reviewed in our initial PubMed search. Non-English-language studies were excluded. Clinical and preclinical studies were identified, and those with a focus on knee ligament tissue-engineering strategies including stem cell-based therapies, growth factor administration, hybrid biomaterial, and scaffold development, as well as mechanical stimulation modalities, were reviewed. The body of knowledge surrounding tissue-engineering strategies for ligament reconstruction continues to expand. Presently, various tissue-engineering techniques have some potential advantages, including faster recovery, better ligamentization, and possibly, a reduction of recurrence. Preclinical research of these novel therapies continues to provide promising results. There remains a need for well-designed, high-powered comparative clinical studies to serve as a foundation for successful translation into the clinical setting going forward. Level IV, systematic review of Level IV studies. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: a logical approach

    PubMed Central

    Gali, Julio Cesar

    2015-01-01

    We describe the surgical approach that we have used over the last years for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, highlighting the importance of arthroscopic viewing through the anteromedial portal (AMP) and femoral tunnel drilling through an accessory anteromedial portal (AMP). The AMP allows direct view of the ACL femoral insertion site on the medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle, does not require guides for anatomic femoral tunnel reaming, prevents an additional lateral incision in the distal third of the thigh (as would be unavoidable when the outside-in technique is used) and also can be used for double-bundle ACL reconstruction. PMID:26417571

  18. Anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: a logical approach.

    PubMed

    Gali, Julio Cesar

    2015-01-01

    We describe the surgical approach that we have used over the last years for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, highlighting the importance of arthroscopic viewing through the anteromedial portal (AMP) and femoral tunnel drilling through an accessory anteromedial portal (AMP). The AMP allows direct view of the ACL femoral insertion site on the medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle, does not require guides for anatomic femoral tunnel reaming, prevents an additional lateral incision in the distal third of the thigh (as would be unavoidable when the outside-in technique is used) and also can be used for double-bundle ACL reconstruction.

  19. Posterior Wall Blowout in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Justin J.; Dean, Chase S.; Chahla, Jorge; Menge, Travis J.; Cram, Tyler R.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Violation of the posterior femoral cortex, commonly referred to as posterior wall blowout, can be a devastating intraoperative complication in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and lead to loss of graft fixation or early graft failure. If cortical blowout occurs despite careful planning and adherence to proper surgical technique, a thorough knowledge of the anatomy and alternative fixation techniques is imperative to ensure optimal patient outcomes. This article highlights anatomic considerations for femoral tunnel placement in ACL reconstruction and techniques for avoidance and salvage of a posterior wall blowout. PMID:27335885

  20. Combined supracondylar femoral derotation osteotomy and patellofemoral ligament reconstruction for recurrent patellar dislocation and severe femoral anteversion syndrome: surgical technique and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Nelitz, Manfred; Dreyhaupt, Jens; Williams, Sean Robert March; Dornacher, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Severly increased femoral anteversion is an important risk factor for patellofemoral instability. Recurrent dislocations cause a traumatic disruption of the medial patellofemoral ligament. Therefore a procedure that combines femoral derotation osteotomy and patellofemoral ligament reconstruction should be considered for patients with severely increased femoral anteversion. The aim of the study was to evaluate the subjective and objective outcomes after combined femoral derotation osteotomy and anatomical reconstruction of the MPFL. 12 consecutive patients (12 knees) with patellofemoral instability and severely increased femoral anteversion underwent combined femoral derotation osteotomy and anatomical reconstruction of the MPFL. Preoperative radiographic examination included AP and lateral views to assess patella alta. MRI was performed to evaluate trochlear dysplasia and tibial tubercle-trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance. Additionally, MRI assessment of the rotational profile was performed. Evaluation included evaluation of cartilage injuries, preoperative and postoperative physical examination, visual analog scale (VAS), Kujala score, International Knee Documentation Committee score (IKDC), Activity Rating Scale (ARS) and Tegner activity score. The average age at the time of operation was 18.2 years (range, 15-26 years). The average follow-up after operation was 16.4 months postoperatively (range, 12-28 months). No recurrent dislocation occurred. The results showed a significant improvement of the Kujala score, IKDC score and VAS (p < 0.01). The activity level according to the Tegner activity score and ARS did not show statistically significant changes (p = 0.75; p = 1.0). Combined anatomical reconstruction of the MPFL and femoral derotation osteotomy resulted in significant improvement of knee function and good patient satisfaction in young patients with severely increased femoral anteversion. No re-dislocation of the patella occured.

  1. A review of ligament augmentation with the InternalBrace™: the surgical principle is described for the lateral ankle ligament and ACL repair in particular, and a comprehensive review of other surgical applications and techniques is presented.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Gordon M; Blyth, Mark J G; Anthony, Iain; Hopper, Graeme P; Ribbans, William J

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews the surgical decision-making considerations when preparing to undertake an anatomic ligament repair with augmentation using the InternalBrace™. Lateral ankle ligament stabilization of the Broström variety and ACL repair in particular are used to illustrate its application. The InternalBrace™ supports early mobilization of the repaired ligament and allows the natural tissues to progressively strengthen. The principle established by this experience has resulted in its successful application to other distal extremity ligaments including the deltoid, spring, and syndesmosis complex. Knee ligament augmentation with the InternalBrace™ has been successfully applied to all knee ligaments including anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), medial collateral ligament (MCL), lateral collateral ligament (LCL), anterolateral ligament (ALL), and patellofemoral ligament (PFL). The surgical technique and early results will be reviewed including multi-ligament presentations. Upper limb experience with acromioclavicular (AC) joint augmentation and ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) repair of the elbow with the InternalBrace™ will also be discussed. This article points to a change in orthopaedic practice positioning reconstruction as a salvage procedure that has additional surgical morbidity and should be indicated only if the tissues fail to heal adequately after augmentation and repair.

  2. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction of the Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J.; Chalmers, Peter N.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Romeo, Anthony A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) is a common procedure in both professional and high-level athletes. Purpose: To determine the effect of technique and level of play with UCLR on return to sport (RTS). Hypothesis: When comparing different surgical techniques or preoperative level of sports participation, there is no difference in rate of RTS after UCLR. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review was registered with PROSPERO and performed following PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines using 3 publicly available free databases. Therapeutic clinical outcome investigations reporting UCLR outcomes with level of evidence 1 through 4 were eligible for inclusion. All study, subject, and surgical technique demographics were analyzed and compared between continents and countries. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and 2-proportion 2-sample z-test calculators with α = .05 were used to compare RTS between level of play and technique. Results: Twenty studies (2019 patients/elbows; mean age, 22.13 ± 4 years; 97% male; mean follow-up, 39.9 ± 16.2 months) were included. The majority of patients were baseball players (94.5%), specifically pitchers (80%). The most common level of play was collegiate (44.6%). Palmaris longus (71.2%) and the American Sports Medicine Institute (ASMI) technique (65.6%) were the most common graft choice and surgical technique, respectively. There was a pooled 86.2% RTS rate, and 90% of players scored excellent/good on the Conway-Jobe scale. RTS rates were higher among collegiate athletes (95.5%) than either high school (89.4%, P = .023) or professional athletes (86.4%, P < .0001). RTS rates were higher for the docking technique (97.0%, P = .001) and the ASMI technique (93.3%, P = .0034) than the Jobe technique (66.7%). Conclusion: UCLR is performed most commonly in collegiate athletes. Collegiate athletes have the highest RTS rate

  3. Tibial inlay for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Papalia, Rocco; Osti, Leonardo; Del Buono, Angelo; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-08-01

    Although no consensus has been reached regarding the management of PCL deficiency, in vitro and in vivo studies have investigated whether the tibial inlay technique restores the anatomical site of insertion of the PCL, prevents elongation, stretching, graft failure, and improves long-term PCL stability. A systematic search using PubMed, Ovid, the Cochrane Reviews, and Google Scholar databases using 'posterior cruciate ligament tear', 'Tibial inlay technique' and 'posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction' as keywords identified 71 publications, of which 10 were relevant to the topic, and included a total of 255 patients. The tibial inlay technique restores the anatomic insertion site of the PCL, eliminates the killer turn effect, and places the graft at lower potential risk for abrasion and subsequent rupture. It has the disadvantages of increased operating time and risk to the posterior neurovascular structures. There was no evidence of an association between outcome results and Coleman methodology score, but the Coleman methodology scores correlated positively with the level-of-evidence rating. The methodological quality of the studies included has not improved over the years. Given the few reported published findings, we cannot ascertain whether this procedure may provide a consistent alternative to commonly used PCL surgical strategies. The lack of published randomized clinical trials and few reported findings did not allow to ascertain whether the tibial inlay for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction may provide a consistent alternative to commonly used PCL surgical strategies and to demonstrate procedure efficacy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cyclical loading of coracoclavicular ligament reconstructions: a comparative biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Steven J; Keefer, Eric P; McHugh, Malachy P; Kremenic, Ian J; Orishimo, Karl F; Ben-Avi, Simon; Nicholas, Stephen J

    2008-10-01

    Reconstruction for injuries to the acromioclavicular joint remains controversial. A coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction with a semitendinosus tendon would have superior performance to the classic coracoacromial ligament transfer with or without augmentation. Controlled laboratory study. Five cadaveric shoulders were used to reconstruct the coracoclavicular ligaments with 3 methods: coracoacromial ligament transfer without augmentation, coracoacromial ligament transfer augmented with No. 5 Ethibond suture, and a semitendinosus tendon. Each reconstruction was cyclically loaded at 40 N to 80 N for 2500 cycles, then from 40 N to 210 N for 2500 cycles, followed by loading to failure. The number of cycles to 50% and 100% loss of acromioclavicular joint reduction were recorded. During the 40 N to 80 N-loading cycle, the coracoacromial transfer without augmentation failed (15 +/- 16 cycles). The augmented coracoacromial ligament transfer and the semitendinosus reconstruction did not fail (P = .008). During the 40 N to 210 N-loading cycle, the augmented coracoacromial ligament transfer failed (207 +/- 399 cycles). The semitendinosus reconstruction survived through both loading cycles (P < .01). Coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction with a semitendinosus graft is a biomechanically superior construct in a cyclically loaded setting to a coracoacromial ligament transfer augmented with a No. 5 Ethibond suture. The semitendinosus graft is a strong, biologic option for reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments.

  5. Arthroscopic procedures and therapeutic results of anatomical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments for acromioclavicular Joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Takase, K; Yamamoto, K

    2016-09-01

    Surgical treatment is recommended for type 5 acromioclavicular joint dislocation on Rockwood's classification. We believe that anatomic repair of the coracoclavicular ligaments best restores the function of the acromioclavicular joint. We attempted to correctly reconstruct the anatomy of the coracoclavicular ligaments under arthroscopy, and describe the minimally invasive arthroscopic procedure. There were 22 patients; mean age at surgery, 38.1 years. Mean time to surgery was 13.2 days. Mean follow-up was 3 years 2 months. The palmaris longus tendon was excised from the ipsilateral side to replace the conoid ligament, while artificial ligament was used for reconstructing the trapezoid ligament. Both ligament reconstructions were performed arthroscopically. No temporary fixation of the acromioclavicular joint was performed. On postoperative radiographic evaluation, 4 patients showed subluxation and 2 showed dislocation of the acromioclavicular joint; the other 16 patients had maintained reduction at the final consultation. MR images 1year after surgery clearly revealed the reconstructed ligaments in 19 patients. Only 1 patient showed osteoarthritis of the acromioclavicular joint. Although it requires resection of the ipsilateral palmaris longus for grafting, we believe that anatomic reconstruction of both coracoclavicular ligaments best restores the function of the acromioclavicular joint. 4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: principles of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Paschos, Nikolaos K.; Howell, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is one of the most common procedures in sports medicine. Several areas of controversy exist in ACL tear management which have engaged surgeons and researchers in debates towards identifying an ideal approach for these patients. This instructional review discusses the principles of ACL reconstruction in an attempt to provide guidelines and initiate a critical thinking approach on the most common areas of controversy regarding ACL reconstruction. Using high-level evidence from the literature, as presented in randomised controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses, operative versus conservative treatment, timing of surgery, and rehabilitation are discussed. Also, the advantages and disadvantages of the most common types of autografts, such as patellar tendon and hamstrings as well as allografts are presented. Key considerations for the anatomical, histological, biomechanical and clinical data (‘IDEAL’) graft positioning are reviewed. Cite this article: Paschos NK, Howell SM. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: principles of treatment. EFORT Open Rev 2016;398-408. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.160032. PMID:28461919

  7. An In Vitro Robotic Assessment of the Anterolateral Ligament, Part 2: Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction Combined With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nitri, Marco; Rasmussen, Matthew T; Williams, Brady T; Moulton, Samuel G; Cruz, Raphael Serra; Dornan, Grant J; Goldsmith, Mary T; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-03-01

    Recent biomechanical studies have demonstrated that an extra-articular lateral knee structure, most recently referred to as the anterolateral ligament (ALL), contributes to overall rotational stability of the knee. However, the effect of anatomic ALL reconstruction (ALLR) in the setting of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction (ACLR) has not been biomechanically investigated or validated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanical function of anatomic ALLR in the setting of a combined ACL and ALL injury. More specifically, this investigation focused on the effect of ALLR on resultant rotatory stability when performed in combination with concomitant ACLR. It was hypothesized that ALLR would significantly reduce internal rotation and axial plane translation laxity during a simulated pivot-shift test compared with isolated ACLR. Controlled laboratory study. Ten fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were evaluated with a 6 degrees of freedom robotic system. Knee kinematics were evaluated with simulated clinical examinations including a simulated pivot-shift test consisting of coupled 10-N·m valgus and 5-N·m internal rotation torques, a 5-N·m internal rotation torque, and an 88-N anterior tibial load. Kinematic differences between ACLR with an intact ALL, ACLR with ALLR, and ACLR with a deficient ALL were compared with the intact state. Single-bundle ACLR tunnels and ALLR tunnels were placed anatomically according to previous quantitative anatomic attachment descriptions. Combined anatomic ALLR and ACLR significantly improved the rotatory stability of the knee compared with isolated ACLR in the face of a concurrent ALL deficiency. During a simulated pivot-shift test, ALLR significantly reduced internal rotation and axial plane tibial translation when compared with ACLR with an ALL deficiency. Isolated ACLR for the treatment of a combined ACL and ALL injury was not able to restore stability of the knee, resulting in a significant increase in

  8. Infections in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Stucken, Charlton; Garras, David N.; Shaner, Julie L.; Cohen, Steven B.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a safe, common, and effective method of restoring stability to the knee after injury, but evolving techniques of reconstruction carry inherent risk. Infection after ACL reconstruction, while rare, carries a high morbidity, potentially resulting in a poor clinical outcome. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from previously published peer-reviewed literature through a search of the entire PubMed database (up to December 2012) as well as from textbook chapters. Results: Treatment with culture-specific antibiotics and debridement with graft retention is recommended as initial treatment, but with persistent infection, consideration should be given to graft removal. Graft type likely has no effect on infection rates. Conclusion: The early diagnosis of infection and appropriate treatment are necessary to avoid the complications of articular cartilage damage and arthrofibrosis. PMID:24427432

  9. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL)

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allograft tendon is used to reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both). Currently, ankle stabilization surgery is most commonly performed through an open incision, but arthroscopic ankle stabilization using repair techniques has been described and is being used more often. We present our technique for anatomic ankle arthroscopic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments (anti-ROLL) performed in an all–inside-out manner that is likely safe for patients and minimally invasive. PMID:26900560

  10. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL).

    PubMed

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-10-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allograft tendon is used to reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both). Currently, ankle stabilization surgery is most commonly performed through an open incision, but arthroscopic ankle stabilization using repair techniques has been described and is being used more often. We present our technique for anatomic ankle arthroscopic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments (anti-ROLL) performed in an all-inside-out manner that is likely safe for patients and minimally invasive.

  11. Surgical Adjustment of the Guide Pin to Perform a Correct Tibial Tunnel in Anatomical Anterior Cruciate Ligament Single-Bundle Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Bharath S; Andrade, Renato; Leal, Ana; Sarmento, André; Pereira, Hélder; Sevivas, Nuno; Espregueira-Mendes, João

    2016-08-01

    Anatomical positioning of the graft in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is important to restore normal knee kinematics and prevent early joint degeneration. Inadequate position of a first attempt to place the guide pin within the center of the tibial footprint may occur. Therefore, its adjustment is important to achieve the anatomical positioning of the graft within the tibial footprint. When the guide pin exits eccentrically in an inadequate position, it is possible to correct it to the center of the footprint. A small tunnel with a 4.5-mm reamer is made and the guide pin is shifted to the center of the footprint. The center of the tunnel can be corrected until 50% and in all direction in relation to the initial drilled tunnel, without additional associated morbidity. Once the correct position of the center is achieved, the guide pin is fixed in the femoral notch roof to guarantee the accurate correction of the axis, without toggling of the guide pin inside the tunnel and metal dusting. The final tunnel is then drilled with the same size of the graft. With this technique it is possible to adjust an eccentrically misplaced guide pin to the center of the footprint without additional morbidity.

  12. Predictors of Revision Surgery After Primary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yabroudi, Mohammad A.; Björnsson, Haukur; Lynch, Andrew D.; Muller, Bart; Samuelsson, Kristian; Tarabichi, Majd; Karlsson, Jón; Fu, Freddie H.; Harner, Christopher D.; Irrgang, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery occurs in 5% to 15% of individuals undergoing ACL reconstruction. Identifying predictors for revision ACL surgery is of essence in the pursuit of creating adequate prevention programs and to identify individuals at risk for reinjury and revision. Purpose: To determine predictors of revision ACL surgery after failed primary ACL reconstruction. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 251 participants (mean age ± SD, 26.1 ± 9.9 years) who had undergone primary ACL reconstruction 1 to 5 years earlier completed a comprehensive survey to determine predictors of revision ACL surgery at a mean 3.4 ± 1.3 years after the primary ACL reconstruction. Potential predictors that were assessed included subject characteristics (age at the time of surgery, time from injury to surgery, sex, body mass index, preinjury activity level, return to sport status), details of the initial injury (mechanism; concomitant injury to other ligaments, menisci, and cartilage), surgical details of the primary reconstruction (Lachman and pivot shift tests under anesthesia, graft type, femoral drilling technique, reconstruction technique), and postoperative course (length of rehabilitation, complications). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors that predicted the need for revision ACL surgery. Results: Overall, 21 (8.4%) subjects underwent revision ACL surgery. Univariate analysis showed that younger age at the time of surgery (P = .003), participation in sports at a competitive level (P = .023), and double-bundle ACL reconstruction (P = .024) predicted increased risk of revision ACL surgery. Allograft reconstructions also demonstrated a trend toward greater risk of revision ACL surgery (P = .076). No other variables were significantly associated with revision ACL surgery. Multivariate analysis revealed that revision ACL surgery was

  13. Clinical results in reconstruction of medial patellofemoral ligament

    PubMed Central

    Irigoitia, Nicolas Alejandro; Catan, Agustín Felipe; Arroquy, Damián; Guiñazu, Jorge; Vilaseca, Tomas; Nazur, Gabriel; Bisso, Martín Carboni

    2017-01-01

    Background: The reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is the most suitable treatment for the patellar instability at the present in patients with two or more episodes of dislocation or only one with condral lesion. This is because it is the principal medial stabilizer of the patella. This process could be supplemented with an osseous correction as tibial tuberosity transference. Objectives: assess the clinical results of the reconstruction of the MPLF in patients with patellar instability. Study Design: Case series, level of evidence IV. Methods: We enroll all patients with this procedure between form April 2011 to February 2015, the sample has 27 reconstruction in 25 patients, who has two or more episodes of patellar dislocation. The graft used was gracilis tendon, set with suture anchor, and tibial tuberosity transfer in 9 patients who need an osseous procedure. Results: The average Kujala score was 90,1 points ( 64-100). Was necessary tibial tuberosity transference in one third of se sample. And in those patients there no difference compared with the isolated reconstruction.There was no episode of patellar dislocation or a second surgical time in the sample. Conclusion: The reconstruction of MPLF show excellent clinical outcomes in a short and medium terms , with 0% of dislocation and no second surgical time, in this kind of patients.

  14. Osteonecrosis of the Knee After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lansdown, Drew A.; Shaw, Jeremy; Allen, Christina R.; Ma, C. Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is performed commonly, with a low risk of complication. Osteonecrosis of the knee is a potentially devastating condition and has been observed both spontaneously and after meniscectomy, although osteonecrosis has not been described as a complication after ACL reconstruction. Purpose: To describe the development of osteonecrosis of the knee in 5 patients after arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: This study involved 5 patients (mean age, 33.2 years) who developed osteonecrosis of the knee after ACL reconstruction. A retrospective chart review was performed to identify clinical characteristics and surgical factors present in each of the 5 cases. Results: In 4 cases, the pathologic changes were present in both the medial and lateral femoral condyles, with isolated lateral condyle changes in the other case. The mean time to diagnosis was 11.6 months. These patients underwent an average of 1.8 additional surgical procedures after the diagnosis of osteonecrosis. Conclusion: Osteonecrosis of the knee is a rare outcome after ACL reconstruction. We are unable to identify clear risk factors for the development of this complication, although we hope the presentation of these cases will help promote the identification of other cases in future studies. PMID:26665035

  15. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction without drill holes.

    PubMed

    Brief, L P

    1991-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in adolescents with open physes remains a difficult problem for the orthopedic surgeon, especially in view of growing teenage participation in contact sports. Traditionally, treatment of ACL tears in adolescents has been conservative; the patient is advised to delay surgery up to several years for fear of damaging physes by drilling holes across them. Unfortunately, this waiting period may inflict irreparable knee damage. This paper suggests an ACL reconstruction technique that utilizes no drill holes, thus causing no harm to physes or other essential knee structures. A graft consisting of semitendinosus and gracilis (SG) tendons is passed under the anterior horn of the medial meniscus through the knee joint, then brought out through the posterior capsule and secured to the lateral femoral metaphysis. The graft is augmented with an iliotibial band tenodesis. Designed primarily but not exclusively for teenagers with open physes, the procedure has produced encouraging results thus far in a small series.

  16. Tear patterns, surgical repair, and clinical outcomes of patellar tendon ruptures after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with a bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft.

    PubMed

    Benner, Rodney W; Shelbourne, K Donald; Urch, Scott E; Lazarus, David

    2012-08-01

    Patellar tendon ruptures are rare after graft harvest for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Few reports are available in the literature. To report the common tear patterns and results of treatment with tendon repair and cable augmentation. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. All tendon ruptures were repaired to bone with suture anchors and augmented with a Dall-Miles cable, followed by an aggressive rehabilitation protocol. The tear location was recorded. Range of motion, strength, and subjective survey testing were conducted preoperatively and postoperatively. Thirteen patellar tendon ruptures were found from our database of 5364 ACL reconstructions, for an incidence of 0.24%. Seven ruptures occurred from the patellar origin medially and the tibial attachment laterally in a Z-shaped pattern. Four were completely distal, and 2 were completely proximal ruptures. All patients exhibited early flexion loss, but 11 of 13 patients maintained full, terminal hyperextension throughout treatment. The mean postoperative side-to-side flexion deficit was 33° at 1 month, 6° at 3 months, and 3° at latest follow-up at a mean of 4.8 years after tendon repair (range, 1-16 years). By International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) criteria, 10 patients had normal flexion, and 3 were nearly normal at latest follow-up. Twelve patients had normal extension, and 1 had nearly normal extension at latest follow-up. Mean isokinetic quadriceps muscle strength was 68.7% of the other side at 3 months after repair and 100.0% at latest follow-up, occurring at a mean of 47.5 months (range, 12-120 months). At a mean of 2 years (range, 1-4 years) after repair, the mean modified Noyes subjective score was 89.8 ± 9.2. Patellar tendon ruptures are rare after ACL graft harvest. These ruptures usually occur in either a proximal-medial and distal-lateral pattern or an entirely distal pattern, in contrast to the proximal-only tear pattern commonly observed in unharvested patellar

  17. A modified surgical technique for reconstruction of an acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Marchie, Anthony; Kumar, Arun; Catre, Melanio

    2009-01-01

    We report a modified surgical technique for reconstruction of coracoclavicular and acromioclavicular ligaments after acute dislocation of acromioclavicular joint using suture anchors. We have repaired 3 consecutive type III acromioclavicular dislocations with good results. This technique is simple and safe and allows anatomical reconstruction of the ligaments in acute dislocations. PMID:20671868

  18. MRI of knee ligament injury and reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Farshad-Amacker, Nadja A; Potter, Hollis G

    2013-10-01

    Knee ligament instability may lead to meniscal and chondral damage, resulting in early osteoarthritis. Due to its superior soft tissue contrast and avoidance of harmful ionizing radiation, MRI has become the most important imaging modality for early recognition of structural defects of the knee joint. This review aims to the understanding of MRI appearances of knee ligament structures associated with knee instability, and to review the common patterns of altered knee mechanics that lead to ligament failure. Normal anatomy of the knee ligaments, pathologic conditions, and postsurgical appearances of the anterior cruciate ligament, posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament, and posterolateral corner are described.

  19. Reconstruction of medial patellofemoral ligament using quadriceps tendon combined with reconstruction of medial patellotibial ligament using patellar tendon: initial experience☆

    PubMed Central

    Hinckel, Betina Bremer; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe a surgical technique for anatomical reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the quadriceps tendon, combined with reconstruction of the medial patellotibial ligament using the patellar tendon; and to present the initial results from a case series. Method The proposed technique was used on a series of cases of patients with diagnoses of patellofemoral instability and indications for surgical treatment, who were attended by the Knee Group of HC-IOT, University of São Paulo. The following were evaluated before and after the operation: range of motion (ROM), apprehension test, lateral translation test, patellar inclination test, inverted J sign, subluxation upon extension, pain from compression of the patella and pain from contraction of the quadriceps. After the operation, the patients were asked whether any new episode of dislocation had occurred, what their degree of satisfaction with the surgery was (on a scale from 0 to 10) and whether they would be prepared to go through this operation again. Results Seven knees were operated, in seven patients, with a mean follow-up of 5.46 months (±2.07). Four patients who presented apprehension before the operation did not show this after the operation. The lateral translation test became normal for all the patients, while the patellar inclination test remained positive for two patients. The patients with an inverted J sign continued to be positive for this sign. Five patients were positive for subluxation upon extension before the operation, but all patients were negative for this after the operation. None of the patients presented any new episode of dislocation of the patella. All of them stated that they were satisfied: five gave a satisfaction score of 9 and two, a score of 10. All of them said that they would undergo the operation again. Only one patient presented a postoperative complication: dehiscence of the wound. Conclusion Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament

  20. Ligament Tissue Engineering and Its Potential Role in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yates, E. W.; Rupani, A.; Foley, G. T.; Khan, W. S.; Cartmell, S.; Anand, S. J.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering is an emerging discipline that combines the principle of science and engineering. It offers an unlimited source of natural tissue substitutes and by using appropriate cells, biomimetic scaffolds, and advanced bioreactors, it is possible that tissue engineering could be implemented in the repair and regeneration of tissue such as bone, cartilage, tendon, and ligament. Whilst repair and regeneration of ligament tissue has been demonstrated in animal studies, further research is needed to improve the biomechanical properties of the engineered ligament if it is to play an important part in the future of human ligament reconstruction surgery. We evaluate the current literature on ligament tissue engineering and its role in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. PMID:22253633

  1. Postoperative Infection After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Gobbi, Alberto; Karnatzikos, Georgios; Chaurasia, Sanyam; Abhishek, Mudhigere; Bulgherhoni, Erica; Lane, John

    2015-01-01

    Context: Infection after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is uncommon; if it occurs, it can lead to disastrous complications. Objective: To analyze post-ACLR infections and identify related complications to provide the most effective treatment protocol. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Among approximately 1850 ACLRs performed by a single surgeon over the past 20 years, 7 cases of post-ACLR infection were identified (incidence, 0.37%). Five patients presenting with low-severity infection were successfully treated without any complication or residual functional disability. The remaining 2 patients, although successfully treated, presented with minor residual limitations. From a literature review, 16 studies including 246 cases of infection were reported among 35,795 ACLRs, making the rate of infection 0.68% (range, 0.14%-2.6%). Conclusion: With proper treatment protocols, post-ACLR infection is rare but can compromise outcomes. PMID:26603553

  2. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: allograft versus autograft.

    PubMed

    Chang, Spencer K Y; Egami, Darren K; Shaieb, Mark D; Kan, Darryl M; Richardson, Allen B

    2003-01-01

    This study was performed to compare the minimal 2-year outcome of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) allografts versus autografts, both augmented with an iliotibial band tenodesis. Retrospective review. Forty-six of 52 BPTB ACL reconstructions using allografts and 33 of 37 BPTB ACL reconstructions using autografts were followed up at a mean of 2.75 and 3.36 years, respectively. All patients had an iliotibial band tenodesis. Evaluations included the Lysholm II scale, a questionnaire, physical examination findings, and KT-1000 arthrometry. No statistically significant differences were seen between groups in Lysholm II scores or in any subjective category. Most patients (91% allograft; 97% autograft) had good to excellent Lysholm II scores. Sixty-five percent of allograft patients and 73% of autograft patients returned to their preinjury activity level. More allograft patients complained of retropatellar pain (16% v 9% for autograft patients). Fifty-three percent of allograft patients versus 23% of autograft patients had a flexion deficit of 5 degrees or more when compared with the normal contralateral side. When comparing KT-1000 side-to-side differences, we found no significant differences between groups. Ninety-one percent of both groups had maximum side-to-side differences less than 5 mm. Three allograft patients (6.5%) had traumatic ruptures at 12, 19, and 43 months postoperatively versus none in the autograft group. All three allograft patients who sustained postoperative traumatic ruptures had received fresh frozen, nonirradiated allografts. Results of ACL reconstruction using allografts or autografts augmented with an iliotibial band tenodesis were comparable. The BPTB autograft should remain the gold standard, although the BPTB allograft in ACL reconstruction is a reasonable alternative.

  3. Dimensions and attachments of the ankle ligaments: evaluation for ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wenny, Raphael; Duscher, Dominik; Meytap, Emmy; Weninger, Patrick; Hirtler, Lena

    2015-06-01

    For operative reconstruction, precise anatomic information on the dimensions of the ankle ligaments is important and can help to optimize these procedures. The purpose of this study was to investigate the length and width dimensions of the ankle ligaments and to contrast the results with the published literature. Seventeen non-paired adult, formalin-fixed ankle specimen were dissected to expose the capsuloligamentous structures. The following ligaments were investigated: tibiofibular syndesmosis (anterior and posterior tibiofibular ligament/ATiFL and PTiFL), lateral ankle ligaments (anterior and posterior talofibular ligament, calcaneofibular ligament/ATFL, PTFL and CFL), medial ankle ligaments (deltoid ligament, anterior and posterior tibiotalar ligament/ATTL and PTTL). After identification of the ligaments, the dimensions were measured with a ruler and a sliding caliper. Additionally, the attachment area and the center of insertion (COI) were evaluated. The dimensions of the ligaments were recorded. Measurements were calculated and discussed according to the existing literature. The tibial COI of the ATiFL was situated 8.35 ± 2.05 mm from the inferior articular surface of the tibia and 5.04 ± 1.32 mm from the fibular notch. Its fibular COI was situated 25.45 ± 5.84 mm from the tip of the lateral malleolus and 3.12 ± 1.01 mm from the malleolar articular surface. The calcaneal COI of the CFL was situated 20.63 ± 3.56 mm anterior and 5.73 ± 1.89 mm plantar to the superior edge of the calcaneal. Its fibular attachment of the CFL was directly at the tip of the lateral malleolus, dorsal to the fibular attachment of the ATFL. Studies of the therapeutic options in severe ankle ligament injuries have shown better results in anatomical reconstructions compared to other operative treatments. To optimize these procedures, exact anatomical information on the dimensions of the ankle ligaments should be beneficial.

  4. Fracture of the proximal extremity of the tibia after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: case report.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Carneiro, Márcio; de Almeida Monteiro, Thiago; Zenovello Bueno, Marcos Renato; Augustin Júnior, Jorge Luis

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare condition that has been little described in the literature: a fracture of the proximal extremity of the tibia after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using an autologous patellar bone-tendon graft. In this report, we discuss the factors that predisposed toward this episode, the treatment and the evolution of the case after the surgical treatment.

  5. A New Reconstructive Technique of the Anterolateral Ligament with Iliotibial Band-Strip.

    PubMed

    Stuyts, Bart; Van den Eeden, Elke; Victor, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a well-established surgical procedure for the correction of ACL ruptures. However, the incidence of instability following ACL reconstruction is substantial. Recent studies have led to greater insight into the anatomy and the radiographic characteristics of the native anterolateral ligament (ALL), along with its possible role in residual instability after ACL reconstruction. The current paper describes a lateral extra-articular tenodesis to reconstruct the ALL during ACL procedures, using a short iliotibial band strip. The distal insertion of this strip is left intact on the anterolateral side of the proximal tibia, and the proximal part is fixed at the anatomic femoral insertion of the ALL. Our technique avoids the sacrifice of one of the hamstring tendons for the ALL reconstruction. Additionally, there is no interference with the anatomical location or function of the LCL. Our technique offers a minimally invasive and nearly complete anatomical reconstruction of the ALL with minimal additional operative time.

  6. Digital infrared thermal imaging following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Barker, Lauren E; Markowski, Alycia M; Henneman, Kimberly

    2012-03-01

    This case describes the selective use of digital infrared thermal imaging for a 48-year-old woman who was being treated by a physical therapist following left anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with a semitendinosus autograft.

  7. Adaptation Strategies of Individuals With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Roper, Jaimie A.; Terza, Matthew J.; Tillman, Mark D.; Hass, Chris J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the strong implications for rehabilitation design, the capability of individuals with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) to adapt and store novel gait patterns have not been well studied. Purpose: To investigate how reconstructive surgery may affect the ability to adapt and store novel gait patterns in persons with ACLR while walking on a split-belt treadmill. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Gait adaptation was compared between 20 participants with ACLR and 20 healthy controls during split-belt treadmill walking. Gait adaptation was assessed in slow- and fast-adapting parameters by (1) the magnitude of symmetry during late adaptation and (2) the amount of the asymmetry during de-adaptation. Results: Healthy individuals adapted a new walking pattern and stored the new walking pattern equally in both the dominant and nondominant limbs. Conversely, individuals with ACLR displayed impairments in both slow-adapting and fast-adapting derived gait adaptation and significant differences in behavior between the reconstructed and uninjured limb. Conclusion: While surgical reconstruction and physical therapy are aimed at improving mechanical stability to the knee, the study data suggest that fundamental features of motor control remain altered. After ACLR, participants display an altered ability to learn and store functional gait patterns. PMID:26894200

  8. Pain Assessment After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Okoroha, Kelechi R.; Keller, Robert A.; Jung, Edward K.; Khalil, Lafi; Marshall, Nathan; Kolowich, Patricia A.; Moutzouros, Vasilios

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a common outpatient procedure that is accompanied by significant postoperative pain. Purpose: To determine differences in acute pain levels between patients undergoing ACL reconstruction with bone–patellar tendon–bone (BTB) versus hamstring tendon (HS) autograft. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A total of 70 patients who underwent primary ACL reconstruction using either BTB or HS autografts consented to participate. The primary outcome of the study was postoperative pain levels (visual analog scale), which were collected immediately after surgery and for 3 days postoperatively. Secondary outcome measures included opioid consumption (intravenous morphine equivalents), hours slept, patient satisfaction, reported breakthrough pain, and calls to the physician. Results: Patients treated with BTB had increased pain when compared with those treated with HS in the acute postoperative period (mean ± SD: day 0, 6.0 ± 1.7 vs 5.2 ± 2.0 [P = .066]; day 1, 5.9 ± 1.7 vs 4.9 ±1.7 [P = .024]; day 2, 5.2 ± 1.9 vs 4.1 ± 2.0 [P = .032]; day 3, 4.8 ± 2.1 vs 3.9 ± 2.3 [P = .151]). There were also significant increases in reported breakthrough pain (day 0, 76% vs 43% [P = .009]; day 1, 64% vs 35% [P = .003]) and calls to the physician due to pain (day 1, 19% vs 0% [P = .041]) in the BTB group. There were no significant differences in narcotic requirements or sleep disturbances. Overall, the BTB group reported significantly less satisfaction with pain management on days 0 and 1 (P = .024 and .027, respectively). Conclusion: A significant increase in acute postoperative pain was found when performing ACL reconstruction with BTB compared with HS. Patients treated with BTB were more likely to have breakthrough pain, decreased satisfaction with their pain management, and to contact their physician due to pain. These findings suggest a difference in early postoperative pain between the 2 most

  9. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction Femoral Tunnel Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, Laurie A.; Kerslake, Sarah; Lafave, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Background: Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction is a procedure aimed to reestablish the checkrein to lateral patellar translation in patients with symptomatic patellofemoral instability. Correct femoral tunnel position is thought to be crucial to successful MPFL reconstruction, but the accuracy of this statement in terms of patient outcomes has not been tested. Purpose: To assess the accuracy of femoral tunnel placement in an MPFL reconstruction cohort and to determine the correlation between tunnel accuracy and a validated disease-specific, patient-reported quality-of-life outcome measure. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Between June 2008 and February 2014, a total of 206 subjects underwent an MPFL reconstruction. Lateral radiographs were measured to determine the accuracy of the femoral tunnel by measuring the distance from the center of the femoral tunnel to the Schöttle point. Banff Patella Instability Instrument (BPII) scores were collected a mean 24 months postoperatively. Results: A total of 155 (79.5%) subjects had adequate postoperative lateral radiographs and complete BPII scores. The mean duration of follow-up (±SD) was 24.4 ± 8.2 months (range, 12-74 months). Measurement from the center of the femoral tunnel to the Schöttle point resulted in 143 (92.3%) tunnels being categorized as “good” or “ideal.” There were 8 failures in the cohort, none of which occurred in malpositioned tunnels. The mean distance from the center of the MPFL tunnel to the center of the Schöttle point was 5.9 ± 4.2 mm (range, 0.5-25.9 mm). The mean postoperative BPII score was 65.2 ± 22.5 (range, 9.2-100). Pearson r correlation demonstrated no statistically significant relationship between accuracy of femoral tunnel position and BPII score (r = –0.08; 95% CI, –0.24 to 0.08). Conclusion: There was no evidence of a correlation between the accuracy of MPFL reconstruction femoral tunnel in relation to the Schöttle point and

  10. REHABILITATION PROTOCOL AFTER ISOLATED POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Leite Cury, Ricardo; Kiyomoto, Henry Dan; Rosal, Gustavo Fogolin; Bryk, Flávio Fernandes; de Oliveira, Victor Marques; de Camargo, Osmar Pedro Arbix

    2015-01-01

    To create a rehabilitation protocol following reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), through a literature review. The literature review was conducted in the Medline and Embase databases, to search for data on biomechanical concepts and analyses relating to the posterior cruciate ligament of the knee. The search strategy was set up using the following rules: problem or injury in association with anatomical location terms; or surgical intervention procedure in association with rehabilitation terms. We began the process in this manner and subsequently introduced restrictions on certain terms to improve the search specificity. To design the protocol, a table was created for better data assessment, based on the time that elapsed between surgery and the start of physiotherapy. A rehabilitation protocol was created to improve weight-bearing control in the initial weeks after surgery, with the aid of a knee brace. Our aim was to achieve gains in total range of motion of the knee, which should be attained by the third month, thereby avoiding contractures resulting from the tissue healing process. Strengthening exercises and sensory-motor training were guided accordingly, thus avoiding overload on the graft and respecting the healing phases. The protocol proposed through this review was based on the current evidence relating to this subject. PMID:27047844

  11. Failure of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Samitier, Gonzalo; Marcano, Alejandro I.; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Cugat, Ramon; Farmer, Kevin W; Moser, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The present review classifies and describes the multifactorial causes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery failure, concentrating on preventing and resolving such situations. The article particularly focuses on those causes that require ACL revision due to recurrent instability, without neglecting those that affect function or produce persistent pain. Although primary ACL reconstruction has satisfactory outcome rates as high as 97%, it is important to identify the causes of failure, because satisfactory outcomes in revision surgery can drop to as much as 76%. It is often possible to identify a primary or secondary cause of ACL surgery failure; even the most meticulous planning can give rise to unexpected findings during the intervention. The adopted protocol should therefore be sufficiently flexible to adapt to the course of surgery. Preoperative patient counseling is essential. The surgeon should limit the patient’s expectations for the outcome by explaining the complexity of this kind of procedure. With adequate preoperative planning, close attention to details and realistic patient expectations, ACL revision surgery may offer beneficial and satisfactory results for the patient. PMID:26550585

  12. Arthrofibrosis after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Nwachukwu, Benedict U; McFeely, Eric D; Nasreddine, Adam; Udall, John H; Finlayson, Craig; Shearer, David W; Micheli, Lyle J; Kocher, Mininder S

    2011-12-01

    Arthrofibrosis is a known complication after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. ACL reconstruction is being performed with increased frequency in the pediatric population. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of arthrofibrosis in children and adolescents and to identify risk factors for arthrofibrosis. The study design was a retrospective case series. Medical records for 1016 consecutive ACL reconstructions in patients aged 7 to 18 years old between 1995 to 2008 at a major tertiary care children's hospital were reviewed to identify cases of postoperative arthrofibrosis. Arthrofibrosis was defined as a loss of 5 degrees or more extension compared with the contralateral knee that required a follow-up procedure or a loss of 15 degrees or more flexion compared with the contralateral knee that required a follow-up procedure. Patient data were recorded and analyzed using bivariate models to identify predictors for arthrofibrosis. Further, we reviewed the clinical course of patients with treated arthrofibrosis to assess functional outcomes of this complication. Nine hundred two patients with 933 knees met the inclusion criteria for this study, of which 60% were female. The mean age at the time of surgery was 15 years (range, 7 to 18 y), and the average follow-up from original ACL reconstruction was 6.3 years (range, 1.6 to 14.2 y). The overall prevalence of arthrofibrosis in our cohort was 8.3%, with 77 of the 933 knees had at least 1 procedure to treat arthrofibrosis after ACL reconstruction. Risk factors for arthrofibrosis were female sex (11.1% females, P = 0.0001), patients aged 16 to 18 years [11.6%; odds ratio (OR) 3.51; P = 0 .007], patellar tendon autograft (OR, 1.7; P = 0.026), and concomitant meniscal repair (OR, 2.08; P = 0.007). Prior knee surgery and ACL reconstruction within 1 month of injury were not significantly associated with arthrofibrosis after ACL reconstruction. Fifty-three patients had a minimum of 6 months

  13. An Ecological Study of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction, Part 1

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Timothy M.; Waddington, Gordon; Scarvell, Jennie M.; Ball, Nick; Creer, Rob; Woods, Kevin; Smith, Damian; Adams, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Background: Additional high-quality prospective studies are needed to better define the objective criteria used in relation to return-to-sport decisions after synthetic (ligament advanced reinforcement system [LARS]) and autograft (hamstring tendon [2ST/2GR]) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in active populations. Purpose: To prospectively investigate and describe the recovery of objective clinical outcomes after autograft (2ST/2GR) and synthetic (LARS) ACL reconstructions, as well as to investigate the relationship between these clinimetric test outcomes and return-to-sport activity (Tegner activity scale [TAS] score) at 12 and 24 months postoperatively. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A total of 64 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction (32 LARS, 32 2ST/2GR autograft) and 32 healthy reference participants were assessed for joint laxity (KT-1000 arthrometer), clinical outcome (2000 International Knee Documentation Committee [IKDC] knee examination), and activity (TAS score) preoperatively and at 12, 16, 20, and 24 weeks and 12 and 24 months postoperatively. Results: There was no significant correlation observed between clinical results using the 2000 IKDC knee examination and TAS score at 24 months (r s = 0.188, P = .137), nor were results for side-to-side difference (r s = 0.030, P = .814) or absolute KT-1000 arthrometer laxity of the surgical leg at 24 months postoperatively (r s = 0.076, P = .553) correlated with return-to-sport activity. Nonetheless, return-to-sport rates within the surgical cohort were 81% at 12 months and 83% at 24 months, respectively. No statistically significant differences were observed between physiological laxity of the uninjured knee within the surgical group compared with healthy knees within the reference group (P = .522). Conclusion: The results indicate that although relatively high levels of return-to-sport outcomes were achieved at 24 months compared with those previously reported in

  14. Postoperative Evaluation after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Measurements and Abnormalities on Radiographic and CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minchul; Choi, Yun Sun; Kim, Hyoungseop; Choi, Nam-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a well-established procedure for repair of ACL injury. Despite improvement of surgical and rehabilitation techniques over the past decades, up to 25% of patients still fail to regain satisfactory function after an ACL reconstruction. With development of CT imaging techniques for reducing metal artifacts, multi-planar reconstruction, and three-dimensional reconstruction, early post-operative imaging is increasingly being used to provide immediate feedback to surgeons regarding tunnel positioning, fixation, and device placement. Early post-operative radiography and CT imaging are easy to perform and serve as the baseline examinations for future reference.

  15. Biomechanics of the anterior cruciate ligament: Physiology, rupture and reconstruction techniques

    PubMed Central

    Domnick, Christoph; Raschke, Michael J; Herbort, Mirco

    2016-01-01

    The influences and mechanisms of the physiology, rupture and reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) on kinematics and clinical outcomes have been investigated in many biomechanical and clinical studies over the last several decades. The knee is a complex joint with shifting contact points, pressures and axes that are affected when a ligament is injured. The ACL, as one of the intra-articular ligaments, has a strong influence on the resulting kinematics. Often, other meniscal or ligamentous injuries accompany ACL ruptures and further deteriorate the resulting kinematics and clinical outcomes. Knowing the surgical options, anatomic relations and current evidence to restore ACL function and considering the influence of concomitant injuries on resulting kinematics to restore full function can together help to achieve an optimal outcome. PMID:26925379

  16. Scapholunate ligament reconstruction using the palmaris longus tendon and suture anchor fixation in chronic scapholunate instability

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Maulik Jagdish; Knight, Timothy Paul; Ratcliffe, Peter John

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiple reconstruction techniques have been described in the management of chronic scapholunate (SL) instability, either based on the capsulodesis or tenodesis principle. It is uncertain which surgical method produces the best patient outcomes. We describe results of a technique using palmaris longus (PL) tendon for surgical reconstruction of the SL ligament and provide functional outcomes scores. Materials and Methods: We surgically reconstructed the SL ligament using a PL tendon graft secured with Mitek® bone anchors. Surgical technique with photographs is provided in the main text. Functional outcomes were measured using the disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand and Mayo wrist scores. Patient satisfaction was assessed using a simple measure. Results: Eleven patients attended mid-term followup (mean 45.8 months post-surgery) and had functional outcomes and satisfaction of this procedure that compared favorably to case series that used tenodesis for chronic SL ligament injuries. Almost all patients (n = 10) were able to return to regular employment. The majority of patients (n = 10) were satisfied with their primary reconstruction procedure. Conclusion: This technique avoids the use of drill holes to weave tendon through bone, uses an easy to access graft, and exploits the superior pullout strength of anchors while offering satisfactory functional outcomes that are comparable to alternative tenodesis techniques. PMID:27904216

  17. Anatomical reconstruction of the spring ligament complex: "internal brace" augmentation.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Jorge; Vora, Anand

    2013-12-01

    The calcaneonavicular (spring) ligament complex is a critical static support of the medial arch of the foot. Compromise of this structure has been implicated as a primary causative factor of talar derotation leading to the clinical deformity of peritalar subluxation. Few procedures have been described to address this deficiency. The technique we describe here is a simple yet effective method to reconstruct the spring ligament complex that can easily be used in conjunction with other more commonly used procedures for extra-articular reconstructions of this deformity. We believe this procedure allows for a more powerful deformity correction and may decrease dependency on other nonanatomic reconstructive procedures.

  18. A biomechanical study of human lateral ankle ligaments and autogenous reconstructive grafts.

    PubMed

    Attarian, D E; McCrackin, H J; Devito, D P; McElhaney, J H; Garrett, W E

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanical behavior of human anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments, as well as peroneus brevis, split peroneus brevis, and toe extensor tendon grafts. This article represents the first published data comparing the most frequently injured ankle ligaments to the most commonly used autogenous reconstructive grafts. Twenty fresh human ankles provided the bone-ligament-bone and tendon graft specimens for biomechanical testing on a Minneapolis Testing System. Protocol consisted of cyclic loading at physiologic deflections, followed by several load-deflection tests at varying velocities, followed by a final extremely rapid load to failure test. The load-deflection data for all ligaments and tendons demonstrated nonlinearity and strain rate dependence. The maximum load to failure for the anterior talofibular ligament was the lowest of all specimens tested, while its strain to failure was the highest. The loads to failure of the peroneus brevis and split peroneus tendons were significantly greater than the anterior talofibular ligament and approximately equal to the calcaneofibular ligament. Strains to failure for all tendons were significantly less than ligament strains. The high strain to failure of the anterior talofibular ligament demonstrates its physiologic function of allowing increased ankle plantar flexion-internal rotation, while its low load to failure shows its propensity for injury. The greater strength of the tendon grafts explains the success of most reconstructive procedures in reestablishing stability in chronic ankle sprains; at the same time, the data presented suggest that those surgical procedures sacrificing the entire peroneus brevis tendon are unnecessary.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a look at prosthetics--past, present and possible future.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Randy; MacDonald, Peter B

    2008-01-01

    Biological tissue autograft reconstruction using the patellar tendon or quadrupled semitendinosus/gracilis tendons has become the most popular procedure in surgical treatment of a ruptured ACL. This article provides a review of the history of the use of prosthetics with respect to ACL reconstruction grafts including Carbon Fibre, Gore-Tex and Dacron prosthetics as well as the Leeds-Keio Artificial Ligament and the Kennedy Ligament Augmentation Device (LAD). Emphasis is placed on the Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS) as preliminary investigations of its use have been encouraging. Significant progress has been made recently with respect to the understanding of ACL anatomy, composition, biomechanics, and healing processes, leading to innovative techniques using approaches based in tissue engineering principles and computer - assisted surgery. While research into improved ACL treatment options continues, the synthesis of recent advancements provides a new optimism towards the regeneration of an ACL mirroring its original stability, function, and longevity.

  20. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a look at prosthetics - past, present and possible future

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas, Randy; MacDonald, Peter B.

    2008-01-01

    Biological tissue autograft reconstruction using the patellar tendon or quadrupled semitendinosus/gracilis tendons has become the most popular procedure in surgical treatment of a ruptured ACL. This article provides a review of the history of the use of prosthetics with respect to ACL reconstruction grafts including Carbon Fibre, Gore-Tex and Dacron prosthetics as well as the Leeds-Keio Artificial Ligament and the Kennedy Ligament Augmentation Device (LAD). Emphasis is placed on the Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS) as preliminary investigations of its use have been encouraging. Significant progress has been made recently with respect to the understanding of ACL anatomy, composition, biomechanics, and healing processes, leading to innovative techniques using approaches based in tissue engineering principles and computer – assisted surgery. While research into improved ACL treatment options continues, the synthesis of recent advancements provides a new optimism towards the regeneration of an ACL mirroring its original stability, function, and longevity. PMID:18523530

  1. Combined chronic anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: functional and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Denti, Matteo; Tornese, Davide; Melegati, Gianluca; Schonhuber, Herbert; Quaglia, Alessandro; Volpi, Piero

    2015-10-01

    the healthy knee and 65 % in group A and 64.9 % in group B in the operated knee (angular velocity 180°/s). Lysholm outcome was 93.9 ± 3.9 in group A and 89.1 ± 7.6 in group B (n.s). Cincinnati score was 89.6 ± 7.3 in group A and 91.0 ± 6.9 in group B (p = 0.791). IKDC results were group A in six patients (60 %), group B in three patients (30 %) and group C in one patient (10 %) in the allograft group and group A in seven patients (70 %) and group B in three patients (30 %) for autologous group. The results of this study suggest that one-stage arthroscopic bicruciate ligament reconstruction can restore good knee joint function. Surgical treatment should be followed by a comprehensive rehabilitation programme with specific goals, objectives and strategies, including pain management and assessment of progress in recovery of joint function and perception of knee stability. Retrospective case series, Level IV.

  2. Modeling the growth plates in the pediatric knee: implications for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Guarino, J; Tennyson, S; Barrios, Y; Shea, K; Pfeiffer, R; Sabick, M

    2004-10-01

    The authors develop 3-D models of the pediatric knee from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image files, with the goal of minimizing injury to the pediatric growth plate during surgery. Computerized tomography (CT) scans have better resolution and contrast between bone and soft tissue than MRI scans; however, surgeons rely upon MRI scans to plan knee-joint surgeries such as anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Surgeons can use the virtual models to plan and verify surgical procedures such as hole drilling and ligament attachments, and to determine volume removed from a growth plate due to different drill-hole placements with various drill sizes.

  3. Cable-Augmented, Quad Ligament Tenodesis Scapholunate Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Gregory I.; Watts, Adam C.; McLean, James; Lee, Yu C.; Eng, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining reduction of the scapholunate interval after reconstruction can be difficult. The authors performed scapholunate reconstruction using tensionable suture anchors in 8 patients. The anchors provide a fixed cable that both fixes the graft, and reduces the scapholunate diastasis and maintains reduction. The flexor carpi radialis tendon graft stabilizes not only the volar scaphotrapezial ligament, and dorsal scapholunate ligament, but also the dorsal intercarpal and dorsal radiocarpal ligament. The Berger flap is closed using an ulnar advancement capsulodesis that further reinforces the dorsal intercarpal and dorsal radiocarpal ligament. The mean pain score improved from 5.8 to 2.1. Mean extension was 56° (91% of contralateral side), flexion 44° (70% of contralateral side), and grip strength was 41kg (95% of the contralateral side). The mean scapholunate angle was 71°, radiolunate angle 16° and scapholunate interval 3.0 mm. The cable augmented, quad ligament scapholunate ligament reconstruction offers theoretical advantages but long term follow up is required. PMID:26649256

  4. Graft selection in arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Romanini, Emilio; D'Angelo, Franca; De Masi, Salvatore; Adriani, Ezio; Magaletti, Massimiliano; Lacorte, Eleonora; Laricchiuta, Paola; Sagliocca, Luciano; Morciano, Cristina; Mele, Alfonso

    2010-12-01

    anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgical reconstruction is performed with the use of an autogenic, allogenic or synthetic graft. The document issued by the Italian National Guidelines System (SNLG, Sistema Nazionale Linee Guida) at the National Institute of Health aims to guide orthopaedic surgeons in selecting the optimal graft for ACL reconstruction using an evidence-based approach. A monodisciplinary panel was formed to define a restricted number of clinical questions, develop specific search strategies and critically appraise the literature using the grading of recommendations assessment, development, and evaluation (GRADE) method. The final draft was shared by the panel and then sent to four external referees to assess its readability and clarity, its clinical relevance and the feasibility of recommendations. autograft shows moderate superiority compared with allograft, in relation to the relevant outcomes and the quality of selected evidence, after an appropriate risk-benefit assessment. Allograft shows higher failure rate and higher risk of infection. The panel recommends use of autografts; patellar tendon should be the first choice, due to its higher stability, while use of hamstring is indicated for subjects for whom knee pain can represent a particular problem (e.g., some categories of workers). autograft shows better performance compared with allograft and no significant heterogeneity in relation to relevant outcomes. The GRADE method allowed collation of all the information needed to draw up the recommendations, and to highlight the core points for discussion.

  5. Anterolateral Ligament of the Knee: Back to the Future in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; D’Amelio, Andrea; Pellegrino, Pietro; Rosso, Federica; Rossi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Although the importance of the anterolateral stabilizing structures of the knee in the setting of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries has been recognized since many years, most of orthopedic surgeons do not take into consideration the anterolateral structures when performing an ACL reconstruction. Anatomic single or double bundle ACL reconstruction will improve knee stability, but a small subset of patients may experience some residual anteroposterior and rotational instability. For this reason, some researchers have turned again towards the anterolateral aspect of the knee and specifically the anterolateral ligament. The goal of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge regarding the anterolateral ligament of the knee, including anatomy, histology, biomechanics and imaging. In addition, the most common anterolateral reconstruction/tenodesis techniques are described together with their respective clinical outcomes. PMID:26330991

  6. Functional results from reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using the central third of the patellar ligament and flexor tendons☆

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Leao, Marcos George; Pampolha, Abelardo Gautama Moreira; Orlando Junior, Nilton

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate knee function in patients undergoing reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using the central third of the patellar ligament or the medial flexor tendons of the knee, i.e. quadruple ligaments from the semitendinosus and gracilis (ST-G), by means of the Knee Society Score (KSS) and the Lysholm scale. Methods This was a randomized prospective longitudinal study on 40 patients who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction between September 2013 and August 2014. They comprised 37 males and three females, with ages ranging from 16 to 52 years. The patients were numbered randomly from 1 to 40: the even numbers underwent surgical correction using the ST-G tendons and the odd numbers, using the patellar tendon. Functional evaluations were made using the KSS and Lysholm scale, applied in the evening before the surgical procedure and six months after the operation. Results From the statistical analysis, it could be seen that the patients’ functional capacity was significantly greater after the operation than before the operation. There was strong evidence that the two forms of therapy had similar results (p = >0.05), in all the comparisons. Conclusions The results from the ACL reconstructions were similar with regard to functional recovery of the knee and improvement of quality of life, independent of the type of graft. It was not possible to identify the best method of surgical treatment. The surgeon's clinical and technical experience and the patient are the factors that determine the choice of graft type for use in ACL surgery. PMID:27218084

  7. Tibial tunnel placement in posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Nicodeme, J-D; Löcherbach, C; Jolles, B M

    2014-07-01

    Reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) yields less satisfying results than anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with respect to laxity control. Accurate tibial tunnel placement is crucial for successful PCL reconstruction using arthroscopic tibial tunnel techniques. A discrepancy between anatomical studies of the tibial PCL insertion site and surgical recommendations for tibial tunnel placement remains. The objective of this study was to identify the optimal placement of the tibial tunnel in PCL reconstruction based on clinical studies. In a systematic review of the literature, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Review, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were screened for articles about PCL reconstruction from January 1990 to September 2011. Clinical trials comparing at least two PCL reconstruction techniques were extracted and independently analysed by each author. Only studies comparing different tibial tunnel placements in the retrospinal area were included. This systematic review found no comparative clinical trial for tibial tunnel placement in PCL reconstruction. Several anatomical, radiological, and biomechanical studies have described the tibial insertion sites of the native PCL and have led to recommendations for placement of the tibial tunnel outlet in the retrospinal area. However, surgical recommendations and the results of morphological studies are often contradictory. Reliable anatomical landmarks for tunnel placement are lacking. Future randomized controlled trials could compare precisely defined tibial tunnel placements in PCL reconstruction, which would require an established mapping of the retrospinal area of the tibial plateau with defined anatomical and radiological landmarks.

  8. Prolonged infection at the tibial bone tunnel after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Numazaki, Hironori; Kobayashi, Hideo; Yoshida, Katsuhiro; Hakozaki, Michiyuki; Konno, Shin-Ichi

    2017-08-09

    A 24-year-old man with severe atopic dermatitis underwent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction of the right knee seven years earlier but developed a surgical site infection. The infection did not heal after removal of the metal implants, and a fistula eventually developed. This condition was left untreated for six years before he was referred to our hospital. Magnetic resonance imaging showed fluid in the tibial bone tunnel and extensive bone marrow edema surrounding the bone tunnel. Based on these findings, abscess formation within the tibial bone tunnel and osteomyelitis spreading to the proximal tibia were suspected. During the surgery, a portion of artificial ligament and non-absorbable suture were observed in the bone tunnel, and the infection healed immediately after removal of this complex. When surgical site infection occurs after ACL reconstruction, it is important to completely remove all artificial materials as early as possible.

  9. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Williams, John; Hutt, Jonathan; Rickman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This report details the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in an 18-year-old man with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). The reduced mechanical properties of the tissue in EDS can pose a challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon. In this case, we describe the use of a hamstring autograft combined with a Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS). There was a good radiographical, clinical, and functional outcome after two years. This technique gave a successful outcome in the reconstruction of the ACL in a patient with EDS and therefore may help surgeons faced with the same clinical scenario. PMID:26221555

  10. Arthroscopically assisted anatomical coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction using tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yon-Sik; Seo, Young-Jin; Noh, Kyu-Cheol; Patro, Bishu Prasad; Kim, Do-Young

    2011-07-01

    We describe a method of arthroscopically assisted, mini-open, anatomical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligament. This method restores both components of the native ligament with the aim of achieving maximum stability with minimal disruption of the normal anatomy. Using the same principles of ligament reconstruction that are employed in other joints, transosseous tunnels are created following the native footprints of the conoid and trapezoid ligaments and an autologous graft is fixed using a PEEK screw. Adequate healing of the ligament occurs within the bone, to prevent stress risers with an appropriate working length. This procedure is unique, as it replaces the torn ligament with a natural substitute, in the appropriate location, through a minimally invasive procedure. This technique would be suitable for treatment of patients with either grade III or V acute acromioclavicular dislocations. Clinical outcomes for the first 13 consecutive patients treated with this procedure are reported, revealing excellent satisfaction rates with a Constant score of 96.6 at final follow-up.

  11. Bone tunnel enlargement following hamstring anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Stolarz, Mateusz; Ficek, Krzysztof; Binkowski, Marcin; Wróbel, Zygmunt

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, bone tunnel enlargement (BTE) after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is a well-known phenomenon. It has been identified, investigated and described by many authors during the last thirty years. Nevertheless, the etiology of bone tunnel enlargement still remains unclear. It is known that the causes are multifactorial and may include the surgical technique, the method of fixation, materials used, type of graft as well as biological factors. Due to the recent popularization of the use of hamstring grafts in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, the bone tunnel enlargement phenomenon is becoming increasingly common. In this review article, the authors focus on compiling current knowledge about the etiology, diagnosis, and the possibility of reducing the occurrence of this phenomenon by using the latest methods of supporting reconstruction surgery.

  12. Simultaneous anatomic reconstruction of the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments using a single tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Campbell, Sean; Scott, Jonathan; McGarry, Michelle H; Lee, Thay Q

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce a novel surgical technique for simultaneous anatomic reconstruction of the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments using a single tendon graft and to compare its biomechanical characteristics to those of a coracoid cerclage reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments. Six matched pairs of human acromioclavicular joints with an average age of 54.8 ± 7.8 years were used. One shoulder from each pair received the single tendon acromioclavicular-coracoclavicular reconstruction; the contralateral shoulder received the coracoid cerclage reconstruction. Bovine extensor tendon was used for both techniques. The single tendon acromioclavicular-coracoclavicular reconstruction technique provided anatomic restoration of the two coracoclavicular ligaments and the superior and inferior acromioclavicular ligaments simultaneously using one coracoid hole, one acromion hole, and two clavicular holes with interference screws. Anterior-posterior and superior-inferior translations were quantified for all specimens before and after reconstruction, followed by load to failure testing. Following coracoid cerclage reconstruction, total anterior-posterior translation was significantly greater than intact (10.0 ± 5.7 mm; p = 0.008). Following single tendon acromioclavicular-coracoclavicular reconstruction, there was no significant difference in anterior-posterior translation compared to intact (-1.6 ± 2.2 mm; n.s.). The coracoid cerclage technique demonstrated significantly greater anterior-posterior translation than the single tendon acromioclavicular-coracoclavicular technique (p = 0.007). Both techniques restored superior-inferior translation to the intact condition (n.s.). Ultimate load, deformation at ultimate load, and energy absorbed at ultimate load were significantly greater after acromioclavicular-coracoclavicular reconstruction than after coracoid cerclage reconstruction (p < 0.05). This novel single tendon

  13. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction in a Below-Knee Amputee.

    PubMed

    El-Tawil, Sherif; Elfons Tawafig, Marian; Miles, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Patellar instability is a common finding in patients with below-knee amputation and yet management options are not commonly described in the literature. We describe the first reported case of a medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction using allograft in a patient with a below-knee amputation. Clinical outcome at two-year follow-up remains very good.

  14. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction in a Below-Knee Amputee

    PubMed Central

    El-Tawil, Sherif; Elfons Tawafig, Marian; Miles, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Patellar instability is a common finding in patients with below-knee amputation and yet management options are not commonly described in the literature. We describe the first reported case of a medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction using allograft in a patient with a below-knee amputation. Clinical outcome at two-year follow-up remains very good. PMID:26579321

  15. Finite element analysis of nonanatomic tenodesis reconstruction methods of combined anterior talofibular ligament and calcaneofibular ligament deficiency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Yan; Xu, Can; Li, Kang-Hua

    2011-10-01

    Nonanatomic tenodesis reconstruction procedures have been used for lateral ankle ligament reconstruction. However, there has been no comparison of Watson-Jones, Evans, and Chrisman-Snook procedures with respect to biomechanical characteristics such as kinematics, ligaments and grafts stresses using finite element analysis. A three-dimensional finite element model of the ankle including seven bony structures, cartilage and nine principal ligaments surrounding the ankle joint complex was developed and validated. In addition to the intact model, combined anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) and calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) deficient, Watson-Jones reconstruction, Evans reconstruction and Chrisman-Snook reconstruction models were simulated. Then, the forces in the ligaments and grafts and the kinematics of the talus and calcaneus were predicted for an inversion or internal torque of 1.7 Nom and an anterior drawer stress of 150 N through the range of ankle motion. All three operations were able to improve the stability of the ankle, but the effectiveness of each procedure was dependent on the direction of the stress applied and the position of the ankle in dorsiflexion-plantarflexion. This study showed that the Watson-Jones procedure has advantages with regard to anterior and rotational stabilities as well as ligaments and grafts stresses in comparison with other nonanatomic tenodesis reconstruction methods. The knowledge of stress inside the ligaments and reconstructed grafts could help to better understand the biomechanical behavior of the reconstructed joint.

  16. The sacrotuberous and the sacrospinous ligament--a virtual reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hammer, N; Steinke, H; Slowik, V; Josten, C; Stadler, J; Böhme, J; Spanel-Borowski, K

    2009-10-01

    Little is known about the morphometric properties of the sacrotuberous ligament (ST) and the sacrospinous ligament (SS). The influence of ligaments on pelvic stability and the extent of reconstruction in case of instability are controversially discussed. The ST and the SS of 55 human subjects fixed in alcohol solution and of four fresh cadavers were measured. Both ligaments were defined as geometric figures. The ST was a contorted bifrustum, while the SS was a contorted frustum, both with elliptic planes. In all cases investigated, the ST and the SS fibres were twisted. For men, the ST and the SS had a mean length of 64 and 38 mm. For women, lengths of 70 and 46 mm were measured in the ST and the SS. The ST length, height and cross-sectional area showed gender-specific differences at statistically significant level. The ST and the SS volumes correlated closely, regardless of gender or side. Measurements of fresh ligaments of four unfixed cadavers showed similar results. The data obtained were then used to generate computer-based three-dimensional models of both ligaments, using the Catia software. Conclusively, the virtually generated ST and SS are suitable models to be included in pelvic fracture simulation, using the finite element method.

  17. Tarsal autografts for reconstruction of the scapholunate interosseous ligament: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Hofstede, D J; Ritt, M J; Bos, K E

    1999-09-01

    A biomechanical cadaver study was performed to identify a potential bone-ligament-bone autograft from the foot for reconstruction of the scapholunate interosseous ligament (SLIL). In this study the biomechanical properties of 9 dorsal tarsal ligaments and the anterior tibiofibular ligament were investigated and compared with those of the dorsal part of the SLIL. Fifteen fresh-frozen human cadaver feet and 14 fresh-frozen human cadaver wrists were used. In a Monsanto Tensometer testing apparatus (Monsanto Limited Instruments, Dorean Swindon, England) the complexes were uniaxially elongated at a constant velocity of 6.35 mm/min until rupture occurred. The stiffness and strength values for each tarsal ligament were calculated and compared with those of the dorsal part of the SL ligament. Analysis indicated that the third dorsal tarsometatarsal ligament (143 +/- 42 N) and the dorsal calcaneocuboid ligament (149 +/- 41 N) were comparable to the dorsal part of the SL ligament (141 +/- 20 N) while all other ligaments were stronger. The stiffness values of the third dorsal tarsometatarsal ligament (67 +/- 17 N/mm) and the dorsal calcaneocuboid ligament (55 +/- 14 N/mm) were comparable to the dorsal part of the SL ligament (61 +/- 6 N/mm). All the other ligaments had values that were higher than the dorsal part of the SL ligament. The strongest ligament appeared to be the medial dorsal cuneonavicular ligament (479 +/- 65 N), which had a stiffness value of 127 +/- 19 N/mm. Although the third dorsal tarsometatarsal ligament and the dorsal calcaneocuboid ligament are biomechanically most similar to the dorsal part of the SLIL, at present it is unclear how strength and stiffness values of ligaments are sustained following transplantation. From this selection of tarsal ligaments, the medial dorsal cuneonavicular ligament is the strongest ligament and it is therefore concluded that this ligament is the most suitable ligament to be used as an autograft for reconstruction of the

  18. Return to Sports after Acute Simultaneous Reconstruction of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury and Grade III Medial Collateral Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bertona, Agustin; Zicaro, Juan Pablo; Viescas, Juan Manuel Gonzalez; Atala, Nicolas; Yacuzzi, Carlos; Costa-Paz, Matias

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Combined Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury and Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) injury account for 20% of knee ligament lesions. Conservative treatment of MCL and surgical ACL reconstruction are generally recommended. Significant medial instability after non-surgical management of MCL can lead to ACL reconstruction failure. The optimal management for athletes with combined ACL-MCL injuries remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to analyze the functional and clinical evolution of patients who underwent combined ACL-MCL surgery and their return-to-sport level with minimum 2-years follow-up. Methods: A total of 20 athletes with acute simultaneous ACL/Grade III MCL reconstructions were treated between March 2006 and January 2014. The minimum follow-up time was 24 months. Subjective functional results (IKDC, Lysholm), range of motion, anterior-medial and rotational stability (Lachmann, Pivot Shift, valgus stress) were evaluated. The ability to return to sport (Tegner) and the level achieved was recorded. Results: All patients significantly improved functional scores and stability tests. The mean subjective IKDC score improved from 37.7 ± 12.9 (range 21-69) preoperatively to 88.21 ± 4.47 (range 80-96) postoperatively (P <0.05). The average Lysholm score was 40.44 ± 10.58 (range 27-65) preoperatively and 90.83 ± 3.38 (range 84-95) postoperatively (P <0.05). Valgus and sagittal laxity was not observed (IKDC A 92% B 8%) at final follow-up. All patients had normal/nearly normal (IKDC A or B) mobility. All patients returned to sports; 90% reached the level they had prior to the ligamentous injury. Of all competitive athletes, 66% achieved the same level of sport. Conclusion: In athletes with acute ACL-Grade III MCL lesions, an early simultaneous reconstruction can significantly improve the medial and sagittal stability of the knee. This procedure resulted in excellent functional outcomes, with return to the same level of sports in the

  19. Postoperative complications of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction after ambulatory surgery.

    PubMed

    Andrés-Cano, P; Godino, M; Vides, M; Guerado, E

    2015-01-01

    To study postoperative complications of arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction performed as an outpatient compared with same surgery performed as a regular admission (inpatient). A study was conducted on a historical cohort of 342 patients (115 outpatients vs 227 inpatients) who underwent arthroscopic ACL primary ligamentoplasty (2004-2012). A review was performed on the demographic, surgical and hospital variables. A study was made of early complications (60 days postoperative) including visits to emergency department and readmissions. A descriptive and bivariate distribution analysis was performed between groups, with the grouping criterion: performing of the surgery with or without admission. The Chi-square test was used for qualitative variables and Mann-Whitney U test for quantitative. Limit significance p<0.05. Overall, there were 13.2% emergency department visits (mean of 1.24 visits) with an average delay of 8.22 days after discharge. pain not controlled with analgesia (6.7%), hemarthrosis that required arthrocentesis (4.4%), fever (3.2%), deep vein thrombosis (0.6%), cellulitis (0.6%), septic arthritis that required arthroscopic debridement (0.3%), and others (1.2%) including problems with immobilization. The hospital readmissions (2.3%) were for surveillance and monitoring of the surgical wound. In the bivariate analysis no statistically significant differences were found between groups as regards the sociodemographic characteristics of the patients or the complications recorded. The most frequent complications recorded were acute pain, hemarthrosis and fever. Serious complications (deep vein thrombosis, septic arthritis or need for hospital readmission) were rare. Outpatient arthroscopic ACL repair is a common technique that can be performed safely by surgery without admission, with an overall low complication rate with no differences between outpatients and inpatients. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All

  20. An Ecological Study of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction, Part 2

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Timothy M.; Waddington, Gordon; Scarvell, Jennie M.; Ball, Nick; Creer, Rob; Woods, Kevin; Smith, Damian; Adams, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Background: Additional high-quality prospective studies are needed to better define the objective criteria used in relation to return-to-sport decisions after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in active populations. Purpose: To investigate prospectively the relationship between functional performance test results at 24 weeks postoperative and return-to-sport activity (Tegner activity score) at 12 and 24 months, respectively, after synthetic (ligament advanced reinforcement system [LARS]) and autograft (doubled semitendinosus/gracilis [2ST/2GR]) ACL reconstructions. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A total of 64 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction (32 LARS, 32 2ST/2GR autograft; mean age, 27.9 years; body mass index [BMI], 24.9 kg/m2) were assessed preoperatively and at staged intervals postoperatively up to 24 weeks for isokinetic testing of quadriceps and hamstring average power per repetition at 60 deg/s and 180 deg/s, a battery of hop tests, peak vertical ground-reaction force (vGRF), and time to peak vGRF (in seconds) during a step- and jump-down task onto a force platform and peak speed (m/s) using a global positioning system (GPS unit) during a running task. A cohort of 32 healthy matched participants (mean age, 26.31 years; BMI, 25.7 kg/m2) were also tested to act as reference. Pearson correlation was calculated to assess correlation of each performance measure at 24 weeks postoperative with activity outcomes (Tegner score) at 12 and 24 months. Results: The strongest correlation between physical performance tests and return-to-sport outcomes was observed with peak speed during running. Large correlations were also observed for hamstring isokinetic power and hop test for distance. Moderate correlations were observed for timed hop, peak vGRF during a jump-down task, and quadriceps isokinetic power. No statistical correlations were observed for time to peak vGRF during a step-down and jump-down task as well as peak v

  1. Beard reconstruction: A surgical algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ninkovic, M; Heidekrueger, P I; Ehrl, D; von Spiegel, F; Broer, P N

    2016-06-01

    Facial defects with loss of hair-bearing regions can be caused by trauma, infection, tumor excision, or burn injury. The presented analysis evaluates a series of different surgical approaches with a focus on male beard reconstruction, emphasizing the role of tissue expansion of regional and free flaps. Locoregional and free flap reconstructions were performed in 11 male patients with 14 facial defects affecting the hair-bearing bucco-mandibular or perioral region. In order to minimize donor-site morbidity and obtain large amounts of thin, pliable, hair-bearing tissue, pre-expansion was performed in five of 14 patients. Eight of 14 patients were treated with locoregional flap reconstructions and six with free flap reconstructions. Algorithms regarding pre- and intraoperative decision making are discussed and long-term (mean follow-up 1.5 years) results analyzed. Major complications, including tissue expander infection with the need for removal or exchange, partial or full flap loss, occurred in 0% (0/8) of patients with locoregional flaps and in 17% (1/6) of patients undergoing free flap reconstructions. Secondary refinement surgery was performed in 25% (2/8) of locoregional flaps and in 67% (4/6) of free flaps. Both locoregional and distant tissue transfers play a role in beard reconstruction, while pre-expansion remains an invaluable tool. Paying attention to the presented principles and considering the significance of aesthetic facial subunits, range of motion, aesthetics, and patient satisfaction were improved long term in all our patients while minimizing donor-site morbidity. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Psychological Factors Associated With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Christino, Melissa A.; Fleming, Braden C.; Machan, Jason T.; Shalvoy, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Psychological factors may have underappreciated effects on surgical outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction; however, few studies have investigated the relationship between specific psychological factors, objective clinical data, and patient-oriented outcomes. Purpose: Psychological factors are significantly associated with patient perceptions and functional outcomes after ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate relationships between self-esteem, health locus of control, and psychological distress with objective clinical outcomes, patient-oriented outcomes, and return to sport. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Twenty-seven patients who were 6 to 24 months post–computer-assisted ACL reconstruction by a single surgeon consented to participate in the study (52% response rate). Participants had a 1-time visit with a physician consisting of: a physical examination, a single-leg hop test, KT-1000 arthrometer measurements, and survey completion. Psychological measures included the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and Brief Profile of Mood States. Outcome measures included the Tegner activity scale, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Score, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score–Quality of Life subscale (KOOS-QOL), and Short Form–36 (SF-36). Patient charts were also reviewed for pertinent operative details. Results: The mean age of patients (±SD) was 25.7 ± 8.4 years, and the mean duration of time since surgery was 16.5 ± 5.9 months. The majority (89%) of the patients identified themselves as athletes, and of these, 65% reported returning to sports at a competitive level. Sport returners were found to have higher levels of self-esteem (P = .002) and higher reported KOOS-QOL scores (P = .02). Self-esteem was significantly associated with IKDC scores (r = 0.46, P < .05), KOOS-QOL scores (r = 0

  3. Weinert and Giachino ligament arthroplasty for the surgical treatment of chronic superior tibiofibular joint instability.

    PubMed

    Cazeneuve, J F; Bracq, H; Meeseman, M

    1997-01-01

    Recurrent dislocations of the superior tibiofibular joint are rare. The majority of these patients are physically active, young adults. Different surgical techniques have been described for the management of this pathology: resection of the proximal aspect of the fibula, arthrodesis of the superior tibiofibular joint with or without fibular osteotomy. Because of the problems reported with these techniques, we opted for Weinert and Giachino ligament reconstruction. From 1989 to 1994, three patients were treated and reviewed in our practice: all, soccer players on the local team, 20, 23, and 25 years old, with superior tibiofibular pain and tumefaction, without neurological symptoms, but with anteroposterior mobility of the fibular head. The average duration of the symptoms before operation was 9 months, and the average follow-up was 15 months. At the follow-up, pain and anteroposterior mobility were gone. Soccer playing was resumed at 7 months without recurrence but with low frequency and stress. In our opinion, the Weinert and Giachino ligament reconstruction, using a portion of the biceps tendon to reconstruct the superior tibiofibular ligament, appears an effective approach to restore indolence and stability to the superior tibiofibular joint and to avoid complications of resection and arthrodesis.

  4. Knee stability after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using the middle third of the patellar ligament and quadrupled hamstring tendons grafts - A two-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Zoran, Zelić; Ivan, Vidakovic; Egon, Biuk; Dubravka, Biuk; Vjekoslav, Wertheimer; Vjekoslav, Kolarević

    2015-11-01

    Knee stability after surgical anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using quadrupled hamstring tendons graft (gracilis and semitendinosus) was compared with that using the middle third of the patellar ligament. All subjects participating in this study had ACL rupture diagnosed by clinical examination and MRI and underwent identical surgical procedure apart from the choice of graft. A total of 112 patients with either patellar ligament or quadrupled hamstring tendons graft were evaluated for 24 months following surgery. Patients were similar in terms of age, sex, activity level, knee instability level and rehabilitation programme. Clinical tests and a measuring instrument, the KT-1000 arthrometer, were used to evaluate knee stability after reconstruction. During the 24-month study there were no significant differences in clinical stability of the knee and the use of both grafts resulted in satisfactory knee stability. The difference between the groups according to the graft was noticed 6 months after reconstruction when the results obtained by a measuring instrument showed that knee stability was significantly higher with the patellar ligament graft (Fisher's exact test, p=0.022). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Is deltoid and lateral ligament reconstruction necessary in varus and valgus ankle osteoarthritis, and how should these procedures be performed?

    PubMed

    Hogan, Macalus V; Dare, David M; Deland, Jonathan T

    2013-09-01

    Varus and valgus ankle deformities represent a challenge to the foot and ankle surgeons. The presence of degenerative changes of the tibiotalar joint articular surfaces introduces an additional layer of complexity. Reconstruction of such deformities requires a customized approach to each patient. Surgical intervention often requires joint-sparing realignment, arthroplasty, and/or arthrodesis, depending on the severity of deformity and the joint surface integrity. The ligamentous stability of the ankle plays an essential role in the preservation and optimization of function. This article reviews the role of deltoid and lateral ligament reconstruction in the treatment of varus and valgus ankle osteoarthritis.

  6. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in skeletally immature patients: an individualized approach☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Lopes Júnior, Osmar Valadão; Saggin, Paulo Renato; Matos do Nascimento, Gilberto; Kuhn, André; Saggin, José; Inácio, André Manoel

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate a series of skeletally immature patients who underwent three surgical techniques for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction according to each patient's growth potential. Methods a series of 23 skeletally immature patients who underwent ACL reconstruction surgery at ages ranging from 7 to 15 years was evaluated prospectively. The surgical technique was individualized according to the Tanner sexual maturity score. The surgical techniques used were transphyseal reconstruction, partial transphyseal reconstruction and extraphyseal reconstruction. Four patients underwent the extraphyseal technique, seven the partial transphyseal technique and twelve the full transphyseal technique, on the ACL. The postoperative evaluation was based on the Lysholm score, clinical analysis on the knee and the presence of angular deformity or dysmetria of the lower limb. Results the mean Lysholm score was 96.34 (±2.53). None of the patients presented differences in length and/or clinical or radiographic misalignment abnormality of the lower limbs. Conclusion ACL reconstruction using flexor tendon grafts in skeletally immature patients provided satisfactory functional results. Use of individualized surgical techniques according to growth potential did not give rise to physeal lesions capable of causing length discrepancies or misalignments of the lower limbs, even in patients with high growth potential. PMID:26229809

  7. [Surgical reconstruction of joint function].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Hajime

    2013-07-01

    In recent years a concept of "treat to target" is introduced into a medical treatment of RA, and tight control is recommended from the early stage of the disease. However, it is difficult to relieve all patients in a true remission. Nowadays, disease activity is controlled well and a reconstructive surgery is performed at a limited number of the damaged joints in a state of good remaining of bone and soft tissue structures. The patients are highly motivated, and a newly developed disorder at the non-surgically treated joints is uncommon. Therefore, an aggressive rehabilitation is possible. Combined with a medical treatment of RA, a surgical intervention enables to acquire a higher level of ADL and an improved QOL (Japanese T2T).

  8. Assessment of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using 3D ultrashort echo-time MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Rahmer, Jürgen; Börnert, Peter; Dries, Sebastian P M

    2009-02-01

    This work demonstrates the potential of ultrashort TE (UTE) imaging for visualizing graft material and fixation elements after surgical repair of soft tissue trauma such as ligament or meniscal injury. Three asymptomatic patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using different graft fixation methods were imaged at 1.5T using a 3D UTE sequence. Conventional multislice turbo spin-echo (TSE) measurements were performed for comparison. 3D UTE imaging yields high signal from tendon graft material at isotropic spatial resolution, thus facilitating direct positive contrast graft visualization. Furthermore, metal and biopolymer graft fixation elements are clearly depicted due to the high contrast between the signal-void implants and the graft material. Thus, the ability of UTE MRI to visualize short-T(2) tissues such as tendons, ligaments, or tendon grafts can provide additional information about the status of the graft and its fixation in the situation after cruciate ligament repair. UTE MRI can therefore potentially support diagnosis when problems occur or persist after surgical procedures involving short-T(2) tissues and implants.

  9. LEG'S COMPARTMENT SYNDROME AFTER RECONSTRUCTION OF THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: CASE REPORT.

    PubMed

    Filho, Jorge Sayum; Ramos, Leonardo Adeo; Sayum, Jorge; de Carvalho, Rogério Teixeira; Ejnisman, Benno; Matsuda, Marcelo Mitsuro; Nicolini, Alexandre; Cohen, Moisés

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of a patient that was submitted to a surgery of reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament and collateral medial ligament repair of the left knee that complicated to a compartment syndrome.

  10. LEG'S COMPARTMENT SYNDROME AFTER RECONSTRUCTION OF THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Jorge Sayum; Ramos, Leonardo Adeo; Sayum, Jorge; de Carvalho, Rogério Teixeira; Ejnisman, Benno; Matsuda, Marcelo Mitsuro; Nicolini, Alexandre; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    The authors report a case of a patient that was submitted to a surgery of reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament and collateral medial ligament repair of the left knee that complicated to a compartment syndrome. PMID:27047834

  11. Synthetic devices for reconstructive surgery of the cruciate ligaments: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Batty, Lachlan M; Norsworthy, Cameron J; Lash, Nicholas J; Wasiak, Jason; Richmond, Anneka K; Feller, Julian A

    2015-05-01

    The role of synthetic devices in the management of the cruciate ligament-injured knee remains controversial. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the safety and efficacy of synthetic devices in cruciate ligament surgery. A systematic review of the electronic databases Medline, Embase, and The Cochrane Library (issue 1, 2014) on January 13, 2014, was performed to identify controlled and uncontrolled trials. Trials that assessed the safety and efficacy of synthetic devices for cruciate ligament surgery were included. The main variables assessed included rates of failure, revision, and noninfective effusion and synovitis. Patient-reported outcome assessments and complications were also assessed where reported. From 511 records screened, we included 85 articles published between 1985 and 2013 reporting on 6 synthetic devices (ligament augmentation and reconstruction system [Ligament Augmentation and Reconstruction System (LARS; Surgical Implants and Devices, Arc-sur-Tille, France)]; Leeds-Keio [Xiros (formerly Neoligaments), Leeds, England]; Kennedy ligament augmentation device [3M, St Paul, MN]; Dacron [Stryker, Kalamazoo, MI]; Gore-Tex [W.L. Gore and Associates, Flagstaff, AZ]; and Trevira [Telos (limited liability company), Marburg, Germany]). The heterogeneity of the included studies precluded meta-analysis. The results were analyzed by device and then type of reconstruction (anterior cruciate ligament [ACL]/posterior cruciate ligament [PCL]/combined ACL and PCL). The lowest cumulative rates of failure were seen with the LARS device (2.6% for ACL and 1% for PCL surgery). The highest failure rate was seen in the Dacron ACL group (cumulative rate, 33.6%). Rates of noninfective synovitis and effusion ranged from 0.2% in the LARS ACL group to 27.6% in the Gore-Tex ACL group. Revision rates ranged from 2.6% (LARS) to 11.8% (Trevira-Hochfest; Telos). Recent designs, specifically the LARS, showed good improvement in the outcome scores. The mean preoperative and

  12. A New Reconstructive Technique of the Anterolateral Ligament with Iliotibial Band-Strip

    PubMed Central

    Stuyts, Bart; Van den Eeden, Elke; Victor, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a well-established surgical procedure for the correction of ACL ruptures. However, the incidence of instability following ACL reconstruction is substantial. Recent studies have led to greater insight into the anatomy and the radiographic characteristics of the native anterolateral ligament (ALL), along with its possible role in residual instability after ACL reconstruction. Method: The current paper describes a lateral extra-articular tenodesis to reconstruct the ALL during ACL procedures, using a short iliotibial band strip. The distal insertion of this strip is left intact on the anterolateral side of the proximal tibia, and the proximal part is fixed at the anatomic femoral insertion of the ALL. Results: Our technique avoids the sacrifice of one of the hamstring tendons for the ALL reconstruction. Additionally, there is no interference with the anatomical location or function of the LCL. Conclusion: Our technique offers a minimally invasive and nearly complete anatomical reconstruction of the ALL with minimal additional operative time. PMID:28553420

  13. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance images to reconstruct solid bones and attachments of ligaments, and assemble femoral and tibial components according representative literatures and operational specifications. Dynamic data of axial tibial rotation and femoral translation from full-extension to 135 were measured for analyzing the motion of knee models. The computational simulation results show that comparing with the posterior cruciate ligament retained knee model and the posterior cruciate ligament substituted knee model, reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament improves the posterior movement of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation through a full range of flexion. The maximum posterior translations of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee are 15.3 mm, 4.6 mm and 20.6 at 135 of flexion. Reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty has been approved to be an more efficient way of maintaining normal knee kinematics comparing to posterior cruciate ligament retained and posterior cruciate ligament substituted total knee arthroplasty.

  14. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. Method: We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance images to reconstruct solid bones and attachments of ligaments, and assemble femoral and tibial components according representative literatures and operational specifications. Dynamic data of axial tibial rotation and femoral translation from full-extension to 135 were measured for analyzing the motion of knee models. Findings: The computational simulation results show that comparing with the posterior cruciate ligament retained knee model and the posterior cruciate ligament substituted knee model, reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament improves the posterior movement of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation through a full range of flexion. The maximum posterior translations of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee are 15.3 mm, 4.6 mm and 20.6 at 135 of flexion. Interpretation: Reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty has been approved to be an more efficient way of maintaining normal knee kinematics comparing to posterior cruciate ligament retained and posterior cruciate ligament substituted total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27347334

  15. Current Concepts for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Criterion–Based Rehabilitation Progression

    PubMed Central

    ADAMS, DOUGLAS; LOGERSTEDT, DAVID; HUNTER-GIORDANO, AIRELLE; AXE, MICHAEL J.; SNYDER-MACKLER, LYNN

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The management of patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction should be evidence based. Since our original published guidelines in 1996, successful outcomes have been consistently achieved with the rehabilitation principles of early weight bearing, using a combination of weight-bearing and non–weight-bearing exercise focused on quadriceps and lower extremity strength, and meeting specific objective requirements for return to activity. As rehabilitative evidence and surgical technology and procedures have progressed, the original guidelines should be revisited to ensure that the most up-to-date evidence is guiding rehabilitative care. Emerging evidence on rehabilitative interventions and advancements in concomitant surgeries, including those addressing chondral and meniscal injuries, continues to grow and greatly affect the rehabilitative care of patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The aim of this article is to update previously published rehabilitation guidelines, using the most recent research to reflect the most current evidence for management of patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The focus will be on current concepts in rehabilitation interventions and modifications needed for concomitant surgery and pathology. PMID:22402434

  16. Functional restoration following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in active-duty military personnel.

    PubMed

    Edwards, K J; Goral, A B; Hay, R M; Kelso, T

    1991-03-01

    A retrospective review was conducted of 112 active-duty military patients receiving anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction between 1985 and 1987. Mean age of these patients was 26.4 years, average follow-up was 2.35 years, and the average interval from time of injury to reconstruction was 13.6 months. The three most commonly employed surgical techniques were the Andrews' iliotibial band tenodesis, mid-third patellar tendon autograft, and a combined Andrews' and mid-third patellar tendon reconstruction. Seventy-eight patients (69.6%) returned to full duty and the ultimate disposition was not affected by the reconstructive procedure performed, chronicity of injury, or sex. A statistically higher percentage of patients over 30 years old returned to full unrestricted military service than did patients under 30. Associated posterior cruciate injury and degenerative joint disease resulted in poorer results. Our results demonstrate that functional restoration, based on the occupational criteria of return to full unrestricted duty, is likely following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  17. Surgical Reconstruction of Radiation Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Patients with cancer receive benefits from radiation therapy; however, it may have adverse effects on normal tissue such as causing radiation-induced ulcer and osteoradionecrosis. The most reliable method to treat a radiation ulcer is wide excision of the affected tissue, followed by coverage with well-vascularized tissue. As usual, radiation-induced skin ulcers are due to therapeutic irradiation for residual cancer or lymph nodes; the locations of radiation ulcers are relatively limited, including the head, neck, chest wall, lumbar, groin, and sacral areas. Thus, suitable reconstructive methods vary according to functional and aesthetic conditions. I reviewed the practices and surgical results for radiation ulcers over the past 30 years, and present the recommended surgical methods for these hard-to-heal ulcers. Recent Advances: At a minimum, flaps are required to treat radiation ulcers. Surgeons can recommend earlier debridement, followed by immediate coverage with axial-pattern musculocutaneous and fasciocutaneous flaps. Free flaps are also a useful soft tissue coverage option. The choice of flap varies with the location and size of the wounds. Critical Issues: The most crucial procedure is the complete resection of the radiation-affected area, followed by coverage with well-vascularized tissue. Future Directions: Recent developments in perforator flap techniques, which are defined as flaps with a blood supply from isolated perforating vessels of a stem artery, have allowed the surgeons to successfully resurface these difficult wounds with reduced morbidity. PMID:24761342

  18. Factors informing fear of reinjury after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ross, Cheryl A; Clifford, Amanda; Louw, Quinette A

    2017-02-01

    Fear of reinjury is associated with cessation of sport after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction despite normal postoperative knee function. The objective of this study is to describe factors informing athletes' experience of fear of reinjury post ACL reconstruction, in athletes who cited fear as the sole reason for not returning to their pre-injury level of sport. Mixed-methods study design of qualitative and a preliminary quantitative component. A conveniently selected private hospital. Ten male and two female athletes, aged between 19 and 45 years, were eligible for the interview from 68 male and 32 female potential participants (age range 17-50) who underwent an ACL reconstruction using any graft type, excluding revision or multi-ligament surgery. To explore factors informing fear of reinjury in participants citing fear of reinjury as the sole reason for not returning to sport, albeit normal knee function. From the participant interview, four themes emerged: undergoing the surgery and recovery again, nature of the pre-injury sport imposing risk of reinjury, personality traits, and social priorities. Clinicians should be aware of factors informing fear of reinjury post ACL reconstruction. Modifiable fears including pain, mode and length of rehabilitation and psychological factors should be considered during rehabilitation to potentially improve the return to sport rate.

  19. Medial patellofemoral ligament and medial patellotibial ligament reconstruction in children: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Sadigursky, David; Garcia, Lucas Cortizo; Armede, Maurício; Oliveira, Lucas Rodrigues de; Carneiro, Rogério Jamil Fernandes; Colavolpe, Paulo Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament associated with the medial patellotibial ligament in skeletally immature patients. This is a case series study in patients with patellar instability with open physis. In total, seven patients were evaluated: four males and three females were operated using the proposed technique. Patients with open physis who had more than two episodes of recurring patellar dislocation were included. No patients underwent additional procedures. The distance from the anterior tibial tuberosity to the trochlea grove (TT-TG) was measured in all patients. On physical examination, the inverted J-sign, the apprehension sign, and the knee range of motion parameters were used in the pre- and post-operative period. In addition, the Kujala and Lysholm scores were applied before and 12 months after surgery. The results were analyzed with the Wilcoxon test. The mean age of the patients was 11.28 in both genders. Comparing the data of the pre- and post-operative period, the inverted J-sign was present in six patients (85.7%) vs. absent in one (14.3%). The apprehension sign was absent in cases in the postoperative period; the range of motion was 117.85 ± 8.09 vs. 148.57 ± 3.77. The Kujala score was 42.57 ± 8.9 vs. 88.57 ± 5.09 and the Lysholm scores were classified as excellent or good in 28.6% and 71.4%, respectively. The combined reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament combined with the medial patellotibial ligament in skeletally immature patients with predisposing factors, presents satisfactory results without episodes of recurrence or residual subluxation; according to these preliminary results, it should be considered as a treatment option.

  20. Physiotherapy after reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Maitê; Vieira, Neiva de Souza; Brandão, Eduardo da Rosa; Ruaro, João Afonso; Grignet, Rodrigo Juliano; Fréz, Andersom Ricardo

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the existence of differences in the rehabilitation of patients after ACL reconstruction using bone-patellar tendon-bone graft and the four-strand semitendinosus and gracilis tendon grafts, through a literature revision. The researched databases were MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, COCHRANE and PEDro. The inclusion criteria were published studies with methodology draw from randomized clinical trials with or without meta-analysis, individuals with ACL injury, associated or not to meniscal injury, submitted to ligamentoplasty using the bone-patellar tendon-bone graft and the four-strand semitendinosus and gracilis tendon grafts and physiotherapy; clinical trials comparing the differences in the rehabilitation of these patients, in Portuguese, English and Spanish, from 1990 to June, 2011. Five clinical trials were reviewed. No difference was observed between the techniques, however, with a recommendation for a less aggressive rehabilitation and greater attention to the strengthening of the hamstring when they are used as grafts.

  1. Evidence-based practice to improve outcomes of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ayeni, O R; Evaniew, N; Ogilvie, R; Peterson, D C; Denkers, M R; Bhandari, M

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies of anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have considered native knee anatomy and biomechanical function, and emphasized the long-term goals of protecting knee health and preventing the development of symptomatic ACL-deficient degenerative arthrosis. Validated and reproducible examination maneuvers are necessary for accurate diagnosis and appraisal of surgical interventions. Appropriately powered expertise-based trials should be emphasized to minimize bias, enhance validity, and reduce crossover. Best practice rehabilitation protocols can guide postoperative care while minimizing heterogeneity within studies. Functional outcome scores should be sensitive, responsive, and able to reliably detect small changes.

  2. Depression and psychiatric disease associated with outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao-Hua; Liu, Max; Dines, Joshua S; Kelly, John D; Garcia, Grant H

    2016-01-01

    While most patients with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury indicate satisfaction with surgical intervention, a significant proportion still do not return to pre-injury level of function or sport. Psychiatric comorbidities, such as depression, have recently been associated with poor clinical outcomes after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). To date, no article has yet examined how depression affects ACLR outcomes and how potential screening and intervention for psychological distress may affect postoperative activity level. The purpose of this review is to delineate potential relationships between depression and ACLR outcome, discuss clinical implications and identify future directions for research. PMID:27900267

  3. Lateral collateral ligament reconstruction for chronic varus instability of the hallux interphalangeal joint.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jaeho

    2014-01-01

    Chronic varus instability of the hallux interphalangeal joint is a rare injury, and only a few reports of this injury have been published. In some studies, this injury has been related to taekwondo. Taekwondo is an essential martial art in the Korean military. We have described a case of varus instability of the hallux interphalangeal joint in a professional soldier who had practiced taekwondo for 5 years and the surgical outcome after reconstruction of the lateral collateral ligament with the fourth toe extensor tendon.

  4. Bioscaffolds and the reconstruction of ligaments and tendons in the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Cook, Jeremy J; Cook, Emily A

    2009-10-01

    Biologic scaffolds have become an integral part of surgical soft tissue reconstruction in recent years. The increased use of these materials can be partially attributed to poor long-term outcomes with synthetic products as well as the cost and morbidity associated with allografts and autografts. Bioscaffolds can augment natural healing processes of tendons and ligaments while providing additional structural support. Although these implants lack the mechanical strength of synthetics and other transplants, proper preparation can optimize their load-sharing capacity. This article presents methods that can improve these characteristics of bioscaffolds. Available studies in foot and ankle applications have shown minimal complications in a variety of techniques.

  5. [The effects of functional knee bracing after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Dubljanin-Raspopović, Emilija; Bumbasirević, Marko; Devecerski, Gordana; Matanović, Dragana

    2009-01-01

    Limited surgical technology in treating injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the past led to the development of a huge number of functional braces. Today, with the advance of the surgical techniques and a more aggressive rehabilitation approach in the postoperative course the use of functional braces after the ACL reconstruction is seriously questioned. The aim of this study was to review the basic functions of functional braces. Mechanical, and biomechanical functions of functional braces have been described, the psychological aspect of wearing them, their impact on thigh circumference, functional performance, muscle activity and postural control and propriocepation have also been addressed. Functional braces definitely increase the knee stability under low clinical loads. However, biomechanical investigations show that functional knee braces do not restore the normal knee stability under high forces related to certain activities. Furthermore, functional braces do not significantly influence proprioceptive abilities, nor functional performance, but have a negative impact on thigh atrophy, and inhibit joint muscle stabilizing activity. Given the generally high surgical success rates, there has been no scientific evidence so far to support the routine use of a functional knee brace following a successful anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in the controlled rehabilitative postoperative course.

  6. Physiotherapy after reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Maitê; Vieira, Neiva de Souza; Brandão, Eduardo da Rosa; Ruaro, João Afonso; Grignet, Rodrigo Juliano; Fréz, Andersom Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the existence of differences in the rehabilitation of patients after ACL reconstruction using bone-patellar tendon-bone graft and the four-strand semitendinosus and gracilis tendon grafts, through a literature revision. The researched databases were MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, COCHRANE and PEDro. The inclusion criteria were published studies with methodology draw from randomized clinical trials with or without meta-analysis, individuals with ACL injury, associated or not to meniscal injury, submitted to ligamentoplasty using the bone-patellar tendon-bone graft and the four-strand semitendinosus and gracilis tendon grafts and physiotherapy; clinical trials comparing the differences in the rehabilitation of these patients, in Portuguese, English and Spanish, from 1990 to June, 2011. Five clinical trials were reviewed. No difference was observed between the techniques, however, with a recommendation for a less aggressive rehabilitation and greater attention to the strengthening of the hamstring when they are used as grafts. PMID:24453634

  7. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction: Current Philosophy in 2016.

    PubMed

    Cain, E Lyle; Mathis, Taylor P

    The ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) is the primary static restraint to valgus stress at the elbow. Since Jobe pioneered reconstruction in 1974, thousands of throwers have undergone UCL reconstruction, and good results have been achieved. The high-profile nature of the elite pitcher has brought this technique into the spotlight, and extensive research has been performed with new techniques emerging. The standard reconstruction, modified only slightly since Jobe's original description, remains the gold standard for treatment of UCL insufficiency. Throwers are able to return to the same or even higher levels of competition in the majority of cases. In this article, we present our standard technique and results and discuss emerging techniques for treatment of UCL injuries.

  8. Kinematic Analysis of Five Different Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Techniques.

    PubMed

    Gadikota, Hemanth R; Hosseini, Ali; Asnis, Peter; Li, Guoan

    2015-06-01

    Several anatomical anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction techniques have been proposed to restore normal joint kinematics. However, the relative superiorities of these techniques with one another and traditional single-bundle reconstructions are unclear. Kinematic responses of five previously reported reconstruction techniques (single-bundle reconstruction using a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft [SBR-BPTB], single-bundle reconstruction using a hamstring tendon graft [SBR-HST], single-tunnel double-bundle reconstruction using a hamstring tendon graft [STDBR-HST], anatomical single-tunnel reconstruction using a hamstring tendon graft [ASTR-HST], and a double-tunnel double-bundle reconstruction using a hamstring tendon graft [DBR-HST]) were systematically analyzed. The knee kinematics were determined under anterior tibial load (134 N) and simulated quadriceps load (400 N) at 0°, 15°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of flexion using a robotic testing system. Anterior joint stability under anterior tibial load was qualified as normal for ASTR-HST and DBR-HST and nearly normal for SBR-BPTB, SBR-HST, and STDBR-HST as per the International Knee Documentation Committee knee examination form categorization. The analysis of this study also demonstrated that SBR-BPTB, STDBR-HST, ASTR-HST, and DBR-HST restored the anterior joint stability to normal condition while the SBR-HST resulted in a nearly normal anterior joint stability under the action of simulated quadriceps load. The medial-lateral translations were restored to normal level by all the reconstructions. The internal tibial rotations under the simulated muscle load were over-constrained by all the reconstruction techniques, and more so by the DBR-HST. All five ACL reconstruction techniques could provide either normal or nearly normal anterior joint stability; however, the techniques over-constrained internal tibial rotation under the simulated quadriceps load.

  9. Sport-specific outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Warner, Stephen J; Smith, Matthew V; Wright, Rick W; Matava, Matthew J; Brophy, Robert H

    2011-08-01

    Although anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has been studied extensively in the literature, sport-specific outcomes have not been well-documented. The purpose of this systematic review was to assess sport-specific outcomes after ACL reconstruction in the literature. We performed a systematic review of the literature to identify studies reporting sport-specific outcomes after primary ACL reconstruction. Included studies were required to have reported standardized outcomes after primary ACL reconstruction for a single sport or comparing between different sports. In total 8 studies conformed to all inclusion criteria: 2 Level II studies, 1 Level III study, and 5 Level IV case series. Only 1 study reported comparisons of standardized outcomes between different sports, whereas 7 studies reported standardized outcomes in a single sport. Return to activity was the most common sport-specific outcome reported and varied from 19% (soccer) to 100% (bicycling and rugby), although the methods of measuring this outcome differed. Whereas return to activity after ACL reconstruction appears more likely for bicycling and jogging than for cutting and pivoting sports such as soccer and football, the literature on sport-specific outcomes from ACL reconstruction is limited with minimal data. Further studies are needed to report sport-specific outcomes and return to play after ACL reconstruction. Level IV, systematic review of Level II, III, and IV studies. Copyright © 2011 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Acromioclavicular motion after surgical reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Motta, Pierorazio; Bruno, Laura; Maderni, Alberto; Tosco, Piermario; Mariotti, Umberto

    2012-06-01

    A retrospective long-term study was carried out to determine whether there was any correlation between the clinical motion of the acromioclavicular joint evaluated by a test we set up using 90° of abduction and 0° of external rotation against resistance [90°/0°RTest] and the cross arm test (compared to the healthy side) and full return to everyday activities after surgical repair. A clinical and radiographic evaluation was carried out on 51/80 subjects at a 5.4-year mean follow-up, treated for acromioclavicular joint dislocation with an extra-articular artificial loop, between 2000 and 2006. The 25 subjects with ossifications obtained a normal acromioclavicular joint motion, on both the horizontal and vertical planes. There was a correlation between the normal motion of the reconstructed acromioclavicular joint (compared to the healthy side) in these 25 patients and full clinical recovery, whilst there was no correlation between the Constant score, the simple shoulder test, the radiographic evaluation on one hand and the clinical motion of the joint on the other. Two patients had recurrent dislocation. Three had mobilization of the screws without reduction loss, or negative clinical outcome. A postoperative radiographic evaluation should be correlated with a clinical evaluation of the acromioclavicular joint motion (normal, hypermobile, unstable). Normal acromioclavicular joint motion was observed in subjects who developed significant ossifications. The study shows that the clinical evaluation of acromioclavicular joint motion is a simple and trustworthy method to assess the clinical result of a surgical repair. Diagnostic study investigating a diagnostic test, Level III.

  11. Transphyseal anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in a skeletally immature knee using anterior tibialis allograft.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yool; Jang, Soo-Jin; Son, Jung-Hwan

    2011-05-18

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in the skeletally immature individual is being recognized with increasing frequency. Nonoperative treatment of ACL injuries in skeletally immature patients have not been favorable. Surgical treatment options for complete ACL tears include primary ligament repair, extraarticular tenodesis, transphyseal reconstruction, partial transphyseal reconstruction, and physeal-sparing reconstruction. The advantage of transphyseal reconstruction is placement of the graft tissue in an isometric position, which provides better results, according to the literature. The potential disadvantage is angular or limb-length discrepancy caused by physeal violation. Controversy exists in allograft selection about whether bone or soft tissue passes into physes. The use of standard tunnels provides reliable results, but carries the risk of iatrogenic growth disturbance from physeal injury.This article presents 4 cases of transphyseal ACL reconstruction using anterior tibialis allograft in skeletally immature patients that had satisfactory functional outcomes with no growth disturbances. This is the first report of transphyseal ACL reconstruction using anterior tibialis allograft in skeletally immature patients in the English-speaking literature. All patients underwent transphyseal ACL reconstruction using anterior tibialis tendon allograft. None of the patients had angular deformities. No early physeal arrest was measured between the preoperative and postoperative radiographs. At last follow-up, the results of the Lachman test were normal for 3 patients and nearly normal for 1 patient. All patients demonstrated full range of knee motion (comparing the reconstructed knee to the contralateral knee). The results of the pivot-shift test were normal for 3 patients and nearly normal for 1 patient. No patients reported giving way.

  12. Clavicle and coracoid process drilling technique for truly anatomic coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Xue, Cheng; Zhang, Ming; Zheng, Tian-Sheng; Zhang, Guo-Ying; Fu, Peng; Fang, Jia-Hu; Li, Xiang

    2013-10-01

    High-grade acromioclavicular (AC) joint separations require surgical treatment, as conservative treatment may result in functional decline or persistent pain. Although many surgical techniques have been described in the literature, there is still no non-controversial gold standard procedure for AC joint dislocation. The different orientation of the two components of the coracoclavicular (CC) ligaments has been proven to account for different functions. However, the majority of the techniques reconstruct the CC ligaments with a single structure. The purposes of this study were to assess the feasibility of truly anatomic coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction (TACCR) and to determine the corresponding drilling parameter. We constructed virtual three-dimensional (3D) models of 105 shoulders from computed tomography (CT) scan data by using SuperImage software. For each model, the attachment sites and footprint dimensions of the conoid and trapezoid ligaments were defined and adjusted according to previously defined anatomic parameters and individual measurement results. Virtual drilling and 3D measurement were carried out in each model separately. Guided by the drilling parameter, we performed TACCR on 24 shoulders from 12 whole cadavers after transecting the AC and CC ligaments. The collinear drilling technique was noted to breach the bone cortex of the clavicle and/or the coracoid process in 95 of 105 virtual models (90.5%). No cortical breach was observed using a non-collinear drilling technique. The anteversion angulation of the conoid-coracoid tunnel ranged from 10° to 15° (mean value 12.4°). The extraversion angulation of the conoid-coracoid tunnel varied from 5° to 10° (mean value 6.8°). The anteversion angulation of the trapezoid-coracoid tunnel ranged from 20° to 30° (mean value 25.2°). There were no failures when performing the non-collinear drilling technique on cadaver models. The collinear drilling technique is not technically feasible for TACCR

  13. Characteristics of inpatient anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions and concomitant injuries.

    PubMed

    Bates, Nathaniel A; McPherson, April L; Rao, Marepalli B; Myer, Gregory D; Hewett, Timothy E

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this epidemiologic study was to quantify the incidence, expense, and concomitant injuries for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) procedures in the USA from 2003 to 2011 that required an inpatient stay. It was hypothesized that the relative reported rates of concomitant knee injuries would be greater with the MCL and menisci compared to all other concomitant knee injuries. The National Inpatient Sample from 2003 to 2011 was retrospectively sampled using ICD-9-CM codes to identify ACLR patients and to extrapolate national averages. Between the years of 2003-2011, an average of 9,037 ± 1,728 inpatient hospitalization included ACLRs, of which 4,252 ± 1,824 were primarily due to the ACLR. Inpatient visits primarily due to ACLR involved an average hospitalization of 1.7 ± 0.2 days and cost $30,118 ± 9,066 per patient. Knee injuries that were commonly reported along with inpatient ACLRs included medial meniscus damage (18.1 %), lateral meniscus damage (16.8 %), collateral ligament repairs (12.3 %), and medial collateral ligament strains (6.9 %). Prevalence of meniscus injuries was consistent across years, but MCL-related injuries increased over time. ACLR-related inpatient hospitalizations account for approximately 7.1 % of the total ACLRs performed annually in the USA. Inpatient ACLR procedures continue to decrease in frequency; however, the mean cost per patient increased. Meniscus and collateral ligament injuries were the most commonly reported concomitant knee injuries. The clinical relevance of this investigation is that it informs, on a large clinical cohort of patients, the current state of incidence and expense for ACLR surgeries in an inpatient setting. Prognostic, retrospective study, Level II.

  14. Biomechanical Comparison of Fracture Risk Created by 2 Different Clavicle Tunnel Preparations for Coracoclavicular Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nuzzo, Michael S; Adamson, Gregory J; Lee, Thay Q; McGarry, Michelle H; Husak, Lisa

    2014-11-01

    -to-posterior clavicle tunnel had similar biomechanical properties to the 2-tunnel technique. However, the single-tunnel technique better reproduced the anatomic footprint of the conoid ligament. Utilizing this single-tunnel technique may yield an anatomic advantage that may also reduce the rate of complications caused by posterior wall blowout. Acromioclavicular joint injuries are common in collision sports. Surgical management is often indicated to reconstruct the joint. This study assesses the feasibility of a novel surgical approach.

  15. Differences in hip-knee joint coupling during gait after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Gribbin, Timothy C; Slater, Lindsay V; Herb, C Collin; Hart, Joseph M; Chapman, Ryan M; Hertel, Jay; Kuenze, Christopher M

    2016-02-01

    After anterior cruciate ligament injury, patients have increased risk for developing degenerative osteoarthritis, potentially due to the kinematic changes that persist after surgical reconstruction. Current research only describes single joint kinematic differences rather than the way in which two joints behave concurrently, termed joint coupling. The purpose of this study was to compare knee motion relative to hip motion in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed and healthy limbs during walking and jogging. Thirty-seven recreationally active volunteers (22 reconstructed, 15 healthy) walked and jogged at 4.83 km/h and 9.66 km/h respectively. Vector coding methods were used to calculate stride-to-stride variability, magnitude, and vector angle of 6 joint couples during walking and jogging: hip frontal-knee frontal planes, hip frontal-knee sagittal, hip frontal-knee transverse, hip sagittal-knee frontal, hip sagittal-knee transverse, and hip transverse-knee frontal planes. The hip sagittal-knee frontal and hip sagittal-knee transverse joint couples had decreased variability during mid-stance, and all other couples had increased variability during the stance phase in the reconstructed group. The reconstructed group had decreased magnitude of joint excursion in the hip frontal-knee sagittal couple during all phases of gait during walking. Vector angles of the hip frontal-knee transverse couple increased in the reconstructed group during the loading, middle, and terminal stance phases, and swing phase of gait during walking. The increased variability and decreased magnitude of joint excursion indicate that movement patterns were less consistent during walking gait despite employing a more constrained system during movement in the reconstructed limb compared to healthy controls. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical outcome after reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament in paediatric patients with recurrent patella instability.

    PubMed

    Lind, Martin; Enderlein, Ditte; Nielsen, Torsten; Christiansen, Svend Erik; Faunø, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction has recently been broadly accepted as primary surgical treatment in adults. Reconstruction techniques with osseous fixation in femur cannot be used for patients with open growth plates. Operative treatment of patella instability in children therefore is a challenge and requires alternative MPFL reconstruction techniques. Limited knowledge exists concerning outcome after MPFL reconstruction in children and adolescents. This study present clinical outcome in a consecutive single clinic series of children treated with paediatric MPFL reconstruction using a soft tissue femoral fixation technique. Twenty-four MPFL reconstructions in 20 operated children aged 8-16 were included in the study. Indication for surgery was two or more patella dislocations. MPFL reconstruction was performed by looping the released gracilis tendon around the adductor magnus tendon insertion and through drill holes in the proximal medial patella edge. Clinical outcome was evaluated by Kujala score and NRS pain score preoperatively, at 1-year follow-up and final follow-up at 39 months. Outcome was compared with a cohort of 179 adult patients with recurrent patella instability operated with an adult MPFL reconstruction technique. Kujala score improved from 61 (13) to 81 (16). NRS pain score improved from 3.0 (3.1) to 1.5 (1.3) in activity. Four patients (20%) experienced redislocation within the first postoperative year compared with 5% in an adult patient population. Five patients (25%) experienced subluxations. One patient with a redislocation was re-operated with adult MPFL reconstruction technique. Cartilage injury was seen in six patients. There are clinical relevant improvements in knee function and pain after MPFL reconstruction in paediatric patients. Patella stability after MPFL reconstruction using femoral soft tissue graft fixation in paediatric patients was inferior to MPFL reconstruction using bony femoral fixation in adult patients

  17. Compartment pressure monitoring during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Amendola, A; Faber, K; Willits, K; Miniaci, A; Labib, S; Fowler, P

    1999-09-01

    A prospective double blind randomized study was carried out using 20 healthy males with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiency undergoing bone-patellar tendon-bone ACL reconstruction. The subjects were randomized into either water or saline irrigation and then underwent identical reconstructive procedures using an arthroscopic pump. Continuous preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative pressures were monitored using the slit catheter technique. Blood pressure and compartment pressure measurements were continuously recorded and noted at all stages of the procedure. Mean preoperative anterior and posterior compartment pressures were similar in both groups. No significant differences were noted between the anterior and posterior compartments of each group. No difference between water and saline irrigation was identified throughout the procedure. In both groups, postoperative pressures were slightly lower in the anterior and posterior compartments compared with preoperative pressures, but not significantly.

  18. Mussel-Inspired Artificial Grafts for Functional Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Chen, Shiyi; Chen, Jiwu; Chang, Jiang; Xu, Mengchi; Sun, Yaying; Wu, Chengtie

    2015-07-15

    The development of an artificial graft with distinct osteogenetic activity to enhance osseointegration and to induce the formation of biomimetic tissue structure for ligament reconstruction remains a significant challenge. Inspired by mussels, biomimetic calcium phosphate apatite/polydopamine hybridized-polyethylene terephthalate (APA/PDA-PET) grafts were successfully prepared. The efficacy and mechanism of APA/PDA-PET grafts to induce osseointegration were systematically investigated. The results from the in vitro study indicated that the prepared APA/PDA-PET grafts support the attachment of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and stimulate the proliferation and osteogenic/angiogenic differentiation of BMSCs via activation of the PKC/p-ERK1/2 signaling pathway. In vivo, histological and radiological results further demonstrate that the APA/PDA-PET grafts significantly improve osseointegration by inducing the formation of new bone tissue and the fibrocartilage transitional zone compared with pure PET grafts. In addition, the pull-out strength of the APA/PDA-PET grafts is significantly higher than that of the pure PET grafts 12 weeks after surgery. These results suggest that this mussel-inspired biomimetic method is an effective strategy for modifying artificial grafts, and the prepared APA/PDA-PET grafts, which possess a beneficial interface, can significantly improve in vivo osseointegration for ligament reconstruction via the synergistic effect of polydopamine and apatite.

  19. Acute patellar dislocation with multiple ligament injuries after knee dislocation and single session reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Gormeli, Gokay; Gormeli, Cemile Ayse; Karakaplan, Mustafa; Gurbuz, Sukru; Ozdemir, Zeynep; Ozer, Mustafa

    2016-06-01

    Knee dislocation is a relatively rare condition of all orthopaedic injuries. Accompanying multiple ligament injuries are common after knee dislocations. A 41-year-old male presented to the emergency department suffering from right knee dislocation in June 2013. The patient had anterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament (MCL), medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) rupture, and lateral meniscal tear. A single-bundle anatomic reconstruction, medial collateral ligament reconstruction, medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction and meniscus repair were performed in single session. At twelve months follow-up; there was 160º flexion and 10° extension knee range of motion. Lysholm knee score was 90. Extensive forces can cause both MCL and MPFL injury due to overload and the anatomical relationship between these two structures. Therefore, patients with valgus instability should be evaluated for both MPFL and MCL tears to facilitate successful treatment.

  20. Efficacy of Two Techniques in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hurt, James A; Berry, John H; Replogle, William; Thibodeaux, Kasey; Hydrick, Josie M; Barrett, Austin M; Barrett, Gene R

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare failure rate and functional outcome in young, active patients (< 25 years) with two-incision (rear-entry) versus transtibial (all-endoscopic) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions.Utilizing a computerized relational database (Access 2007, Microsoft Inc., Redmond, WA), 480 patients were identified that underwent ACL reconstruction, using a bone-patellar-tendon-bone autograft, by a single surgeon between January 2000 and December 2010 via a transtibial or two-incision technique. Totally, 377 (78.6%) of these patients were less than 25 years of age. Data for each patient were collected at their initial clinic visit, at the time of surgery, and at each follow-up clinic visit and entered into the computerized relational database. Overall, 274 patients (72.7%) underwent ACL reconstruction with a transtibial technique, and 103 patients (27.3%) underwent reconstruction with a two-incision technique. Failures were identified as a 2+ Lachman, 1+ or greater pivot shift, or a KT-1000 arthrometer difference of five or more.In patients < 25 years of age, there were 10 failures (9.7%) out of 103 patients undergoing a two-incision reconstruction and 28 failures (10.2%) out of 274 patients undergoing a transtibial reconstruction (p = 1.000). There was no statistical significance between the failure rate in the two different groups in regards to gender, meniscal tear, activity level, or any other factor that was analyzed.Our study showed no statistical difference between the two-incision technique and the transtibial technique for ACL reconstruction using bone-patellar-tendon-bone autograft with an overall 10.1% failure rate in young, active patients (< 25 years of age). The level of evidence is level IV. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. Dynamic knee joint mechanics after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Sarah B; Kenny, Ian C; Harrison, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    There is scarcity of information on the long-term adaptations in lower limb biomechanics during game-specific movements after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Particularly, variables such as knee abduction moments and transverse plane knee motion have not been studied during a game-specific landing and cutting task after ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to compare the hip and knee mechanics between the ACL-reconstructed (ACLr) group and a healthy control group. Thirty-eight reconstructed athletes (18 ACLr, 18 control) participated in the study. Three-dimensional hip, knee, and ankle angles were calculated during a maximal drop jump land from a 0.30-m box and unanticipated cutting task at 45°. During the landing phase, ACLr participants had increased hip flexion (P < 0.003) and transverse plane knee range of motion (P = 0.027). During the cutting phase, the ACLr participant's previously injured limb had increased internal knee abduction moment compared with that of the control group (P = 0.032). No significant differences were reported between the previously injured and contralateral uninjured limb. Previously injured participants demonstrated higher knee abduction moment and transverse plane range of motion when compared with those of control participants during a game-specific landing and cutting task.

  2. Posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in skeletal immature children.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Ole Gade; Faunø, Peter; Christiansen, Svend Erik; Lind, Martin

    2017-02-10

    Rupture of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is a rare knee injury in children with open growth plates. The follow-up results of six patients with open physes treated with PCL reconstruction are presented. The objective is to evaluate the clinical outcomes of PCL reconstruction for six skeletally immature patients. Between 2006 and 2010, six skeletally immature patients were treated with PCL reconstruction. At the time of surgery, the median age was 9 years (range 6-14). The median follow-up time after surgery was 50 months (range 41-90). Outcomes were evaluated by KOOS and Tegner scores, instrumented knee laxity, and radiologic long-axis leg length measurements. The median KOOS score at follow-up was 88 (range 26-98). The median Tegner score was 6 (range 4-7). The median side-to-side difference in laxity according to KT-1000 was 2 mm (range 1-5) at 25° of flexion and 3 mm (range 3-6) at 70° of flexion. A median side-to-side difference in flexion of 8° was found. All but one patient had returned to playing sports at follow-up. One patient's index leg had a length discrepancy of 16 mm. PCL reconstruction resulted in fair to good clinical outcomes for skeletally immature children. Clinically relevant leg length discrepancy was found in one of the six patients examined in this study. Level IV.

  3. Radiation risk from fluoroscopically-assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chitnavis, JP; Karthikesaligam, A; Macdonald, A; Brown, C

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Precise tunnel positioning is crucial for success in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The use of intra-operative fluoroscopy has been shown to improve the accuracy of tunnel placement. Although radiation exposure is a concern, we lack information on the radiation risk to patients undergoing fluoroscopically-assisted ACL reconstruction with a standard C-arm. The aim of our study was to determine the mean radiation doses received by our patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS Radiation doses were recorded for 18 months between 1 April 2007 and 30 September 2008 for 58 consecutive patients undergoing ACL reconstruction assisted by intra-operative fluoroscopy. Dose area product (DAP) values were used to calculate the entrance skin dose (ESD), an indicator of potential skin damage and the effective dose (ED), an indicator of long-term cancer risk, for each patient. RESULTS The median age of 58 patients included in data analysis was 28 years (range, 14–52 years), of whom 44 were male (76%). The mean ESD during intra-operative fluoroscopy was 0.0015 ± 0.0029 Gy. The mean ED was 0.001 ± 0.002 mSv. No results exceeded the threshold of 2 Gy for skin damage, and the life-time risk of developing new cancer due to intra-operative fluoroscopy is less than 0.0001%. CONCLUSIONS Radiation doses administered during fluoroscopically-assisted ACL reconstruction were safe and do not represent a contra-indication to the procedure. PMID:20501019

  4. Finite element study on the anatomic transtibial technique for single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ji Yong; Kim, Geon-Hee; Seon, Jong Keun; Jeon, Insu

    2016-05-01

    The anatomic transtibial (TT) technique is proposed as a new approach for single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Geometric models of the anatomic TT and anteromedial (AM) portal techniques were fabricated with a reconstructed knee joint model and virtual surgical operations. Grafts of 7 mm diameter were modeled and inserted into tunnels drilled in each model. In the models, the shape of the graft between the femur and the tibia, the lengths of the bone tunnels, and the femoral graft bending angles were evaluated. To evaluate the biomechanical effects of both techniques on the grafts, the contact pressures and maximum principal stresses in the grafts were calculated using the finite element method. The anatomic TT technique placed the femoral tunnel to the anatomic position of the native ACL femoral attachment site. In addition, it decreased the peak contact pressure and the maximum principal stress at the full extension position of the graft compared with the AM portal technique. The anatomic TT technique may be regarded as a superior surgical technique compared with the conventional TT and AM portal techniques. Because of the easy surgical operation involved, the technique decreases the operation time for ACL reconstruction and it provides a deformation behavior of grafts similar to that in the native ACL in a knee joint. With its few side effects, the anatomic TT technique may considerably help patients.

  5. Review of evolution of tunnel position in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Rayan, Faizal; Nanjayan, Shashi Kumar; Quah, Conal; Ramoutar, Darryl; Konan, Sujith; Haddad, Fares S

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is one of the commonest knee sport injuries. The annual incidence of the ACL injury is between 100000-200000 in the United States. Worldwide around 400000 ACL reconstructions are performed in a year. The goal of ACL reconstruction is to restore the normal knee anatomy and kinesiology. The tibial and femoral tunnel placements are of primordial importance in achieving this outcome. Other factors that influence successful reconstruction are types of grafts, surgical techniques and rehabilitation programmes. A comprehensive understanding of ACL anatomy has led to the development of newer techniques supplemented by more robust biological and mechanical concepts. In this review we are mainly focussing on the evolution of tunnel placement in ACL reconstruction, focusing on three main categories, i.e., anatomical, biological and clinical outcomes. The importance of tunnel placement in the success of ACL reconstruction is well researched. Definite clinical and functional data is lacking to establish the superiority of the single or double bundle reconstruction technique. While there is a trend towards the use of anteromedial portals for femoral tunnel placement, their clinical superiority over trans-tibial tunnels is yet to be established. PMID:25793165

  6. Surgical management of partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Papalia, Rocco; Franceschi, Francesco; Zampogna, Biagio; Tecame, Andrea; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears involving the posterolateral (PL) bundle can lead to rotatory laxity of the knee, while tears involving the anteromedial (AM) bundle result in abnormal anteroposterior laxity of the knee. In this systematic review, we examine the best evidence on the management of partial tears of the ACL. A comprehensive search of several databases was performed from the inception of the database to December 2011, using various combinations of keywords focusing on clinical outcomes of human patients who had partial tears of ACL and who had undergone ACL augmentation. We evaluated the methodological quality of each article using the Coleman Methodology Score. Ten articles published in peer-reviewed journals were identified (392 males and 242 females), with a mean modified Coleman methodology of 66.1 ± 10.2. Only two studies compared standard ACL reconstruction and augmentation techniques. No study has a sample large enough to allow establishing guidelines. Validated and standardized proprioception assessment methods should be used to report outcomes. Imaging outcomes should be compared to functional outcomes, and a control group consisting of traditional complete ACL reconstruction should be present. There is a need to perform appropriately powered randomized controlled trials presenting clinical outcome with homogeneous score systems to allow accurate statistical analysis. ACL augmentation technique, preserving the intact AM or PL bundle of the ACL, is encouraging but currently available evidences are too weak to support his routine use in clinical practice.

  7. Analysis of the Müller anterolateral femorotibial ligament reconstruction using a computerized knee model.

    PubMed

    Gibson, M; Mikosz, R; Reider, B; Andriacchi, T

    1986-01-01

    Iliotibial tract tenodesis has been described by Müller as part of the surgical treatment for anterolateral rotatory instability in the ACL deficient knee. The aim of this study was to use a previously described and validated computer model of the knee to calculate the effectiveness of Müller's extraarticular anterolateral femorotibial ligament (ALFTL) graft as a substitute for the ACL or as an adjunct to an intraarticular ACL reconstruction in the ACL deficient knee. This effectiveness was tested by simulating the application of a torque sufficient to create 15 degrees of internal rotation or 5 mm of anterior displacement of the tibia on the femur at 0 degrees, 15 degrees, and 30 degrees of knee flexion. The effects of moving the graft's proximal fixation point 1 cm superior, inferior, and anterior to the current surgical attachment site were examined to determine the amount of permissible surgical error in graft placement. The model predicts that the ALFTL is a useful restraint to internal rotation when it is performed with or without an intraarticular ACL reconstruction. The ALFTL graft took up greater amounts of tension and became more effective at increasing angles of knee flexion. Placement of the ALFTL graft 1 cm anterior to the current surgical attachment site decreases the vector component that lies perpendicular to the long axis of the tibia and consequently reduces resistance to internal rotation. The ALFTL graft at any attachment site was ineffective in resisting pure anterior displacement between 0 degrees and 30 degrees.

  8. Physeal-Sparing Technique for Femoral Tunnel Drilling in Pediatric Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Posteromedial Portal

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Stephen E.; Keating, Patrick M.; Scott, Timothy P.; Siwiec, Ryan M.

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears present a technical dilemma for orthopaedic surgeons. Multiple surgical techniques have been described to protect the distal femoral and proximal tibial physes. We present an ACL reconstruction technique performed on a 12-year-old girl with open physes who sustained an ACL tear after a noncontact twisting injury while playing soccer. A hamstring autograft reconstruction was performed by use of a posteromedial portal to drill the femoral tunnel in an all-epiphyseal fashion at the anatomic footprint of the native ACL. This case provides a new surgical technique to achieve anatomic fixation for ACL reconstruction in a skeletally immature individual using a posteromedial portal to drill a physeal-sparing lateral femoral tunnel for anatomic ACL reconstruction. This advancement may make drilling the femoral tunnel less technically challenging compared with other proposed methods while maintaining the lateral wall of the distal femur. PMID:24892013

  9. Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Chronic Isolated Posterior Cruciate Ligament Instability in a Professional Dancer

    PubMed Central

    Aksu, Neslihan; Abay, Burak; Soydan, Ramazan; Ercan, Ertuğrul

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Chronic isolated injuries of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) are very rare in the literature. PCL injuries are often presented undiagnosed because of the weak signs of the injury compared to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. We report the surgical outcome of arthroscopic reconstruction of the chronic isolated PCL rupture with ipsilateral autologous hamstring tendon in a professional Caucasian dancer. Methods: A 21-year-old male professional Caucasian dancer presented severe instability without any pain in his right knee lasting for one year. The patient did not describe any specific traumatic event but his both knees received repeatitive direct pretibial trauma during hyperflexion of the knee while landing to the floor. At the physical examination, posterior sagging of the tibia was observed on the affected side at 90o of knee flexion and step off test and posterior drawer test were positive preoperatively under general anesthesia. The Tegner Lysholm score was evaluated as 59 (poor). A magnetic resonance image (MRI) revealed the isolated total rupture of PCL. The treatment of choice was arthroscopic single bundle reconstruction of PCL with ipsilateral autologous hamstring tendon. A standard arthroscopic exploration of the joint was performed preoperatively and we didn't observe any meniscal, cartilage or ligamentous lesion. Anteromedial and anterolateral portals were made in order to visualize the posterior cortex of the tibia with a 70 degree scope. Intra-operative fluroscopy was used to confirm proper tunnel position. During postoperatively first week, the patient was allowed to mobilize nonweight bearing with the use of two crutches without functional knee brace. Quadriceps musculature and passive range of motion was trained. Results: At the 6 month- follow-up, the patient achieved full symmetric restoration of motion. He had returned to full daily activies. The Tegner Lysholm score was evaluated as 95 (excellent) postoperatively

  10. Popliteal pseudoaneurysm after arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    van Dorp, Karin B; Breugem, Stefan J M; Driessen, Marcel J M

    2014-09-01

    This report presents the case of a 30-year-old motocross (BMX) cyclist with a third-degree posterior cruciate ligament rupture. The technique used for reconstruction was the transtibial single-bundle autologous hamstring technique. Unfortunately, the procedure was complicated by a popliteal pseudoaneurysm, which was located in line with the tibial canal. The pseudoaneurysm was treated with an end-to-end anastomosis and the patient recovered without further complaints. In this case, the popliteal artery was damaged most probably by the edge of the reamer or the guide wire during removal. Vascular complications can be limb- and life-threatening. This case report aims to increase the awareness of this serious complication with a review of the literature.

  11. Popliteal Pseudoaneurysm after Arthroscopic Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Breugem, Stefan J.M.; Driessen, Marcel J.M.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the case of a 30-year-old motocross (BMX) cyclist with a third-degree posterior cruciate ligament rupture. The technique used for reconstruction was the transtibial single-bundle autologous hamstring technique. Unfortunately, the procedure was complicated by a popliteal pseudoaneurysm, which was located in line with the tibial canal. The pseudoaneurysm was treated with an end-to-end anastomosis and the patient recovered without further complaints. In this case, the popliteal artery was damaged most probably by the edge of the reamer or the guide wire during removal. Vascular complications can be limb- and life-threatening. This case report aims to increase the awareness of this serious complication with a review of the literature. PMID:25229050

  12. Transient Superficial Peroneal Nerve Palsy After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Alrowaili, Majed

    2016-04-26

    A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage and knee brace was removed and a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was ruled out. After eight hours, post-operatively, the patient started receiving physiotherapy. He complained of numbness and tingling in the same area. After 24 h, post-operatively, the patient started to regain dorsiflexion and eversion gradually. Two days after the surgery, the patient exhibited complete recovery of neurological status.

  13. Medial collateral ligament reconstruction in the baseball Pitcher's elbow.

    PubMed

    Erne, Holger C; Zouzias, Ioannis C; Rosenwasser, Melvin P

    2009-08-01

    Pitchers are prone to elbow injuries because of high and repetitive valgus stresses on the elbow. The anterior bundle of the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MCL) of the elbow is the primary restraint and is often attenuated with time, leading to functional incompetence and ultimate failure. Pitchers with a history of medial elbow pain, reduced velocity, and loss of command may have an MCL injury in evolution. Physical examination and imaging can confirm the diagnosis. Treatment begins with rest and activity modification. All medial elbow pain is not MCL injury. Surgery is considered only for talented athletes who wish to return to competitive play and may include elite scholastic and other collegiates and professionals. The technique for MCL reconstruction was first described in 1986. Many variations have been offered since then, which can result in predictable outcomes, allowing many to return to the same level of competitive play.

  14. Transient Superficial Peroneal Nerve Palsy After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage and knee brace was removed and a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was ruled out. After eight hours, post-operatively, the patient started receiving physiotherapy. He complained of numbness and tingling in the same area. After 24 h, post-operatively, the patient started to regain dorsiflexion and eversion gradually. Two days after the surgery, the patient exhibited complete recovery of neurological status. PMID:27478579

  15. Rotational and translational stability of different methods for direct acromioclavicular ligament repair in anatomic acromioclavicular joint reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Beitzel, Knut; Obopilwe, Elifho; Apostolakos, John; Cote, Mark P; Russell, Ryan P; Charette, Ryan; Singh, Hardeep; Arciero, Robert A; Imhoff, Andreas B; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2014-09-01

    Many reconstructions of acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocations have focused on the coracoclavicular (CC) ligaments and neglected the functional contribution of the AC ligaments and the deltotrapezial fascia. To compare the modifications of previously published methods for direct AC reconstruction in addition to a CC reconstruction. The hypothesis was that there would be significant differences within the variations of surgical reconstructions. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 24 cadaveric shoulders were tested with a servohydraulic testing system. Two digitizing cameras evaluated the 3-dimensional movement. All reconstructions were based on a CC reconstruction using 2 clavicle tunnels and a tendon graft. The following techniques were used to reconstruct the AC ligaments: a graft was shuttled underneath the AC joint back from anterior and again sutured to the acromial side of the joint (group 1), a graft was fixed intramedullary in the acromion and distal clavicle (group 2), a graft was passed over the acromion and into an acromial tunnel (group 3), and a FiberTape was fixed in a cruciate configuration (group 4). Anterior, posterior, and superior translation, as well as anterior and posterior rotation, were tested. Group 1 showed significantly less posterior translation compared with the 3 other groups (P < .05) but did not show significant differences compared with the native joint. Groups 3 and 4 demonstrated significantly more posterior translation than the native joint. Group 1 showed significantly less anterior translation compared with groups 2 and 3. Group 3 demonstrated significantly more anterior translation than the native joint. Group 1 demonstrated significantly less superior translation compared with the other groups and with the native joint. The AC joint of group 1 was pulled apart less compared with all other reconstructions. Only group 1 reproduced the native joint for the anterior rotation at the posterior marker. Group 4 showed

  16. Medial unicondylar knee arthroplasty combined to anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Alberto; Legnani, Claudio; Terzaghi, Clara; Iori, Stefano; Borgo, Enrico

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the outcomes of patients who underwent combined medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The hypothesis was that this procedure would lead to a high success rate in patients affected by isolated medial unicompartmental osteoarthritis and concomitant ACL deficiency. Fourteen patients with primary ACL lesion and concomitant medial compartment symptomatic osteoarthritis treated from 2006 to 2010 were followed up for an average time of 26.7 months (SD 4.2). Assessment included KOOS score, Oxford Knee score, American Knee Society scores, WOMAC index of osteoarthritis, Tegner activity level and objective examination including instrumented laxity test with KT-1000 arthrometer. Radiological assessment was done with standard simple radiographs in order to get information about any presence of loosening of the components. KOOS score, OKS, WOMAC index and the AKSS improved significantly after surgery (p < 0.001). Regarding AKSS, improvement was noted both in the objective score and in the functional one (p < 0.001). There was no clinical evidence of instability in any of the knees as evaluated with clinical laxity testing. No pathologic radiolucent lines were observed around the components. In one patient signs of osteoarthritis in the lateral compartment were observed 28 months after surgery. UKA combined with ACL reconstruction is a valid therapeutic option for the treatment of combined medial unicompartmental knee osteoarthritis and ACL deficiency in young and active patients and confirms subjective and objective clinical improvement 2 years after surgery. The use of a fixed-bearing prosthesis represents a reliable feature as it allows to overcome problems of improper ligament tensioning during the implantation of the components. IV.

  17. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Balazs, George C; Grimm, Patrick D; Donohue, Michael A; Keblish, David J; Rue, John-Paul

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to report the clinical and functional outcomes of revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in a young, active duty military population. Patients undergoing revision ACL reconstruction were enrolled in an institutional clinical database and followed prospectively. The primary outcomes were patients' scores on a timed run, as compared with recorded scores before reinjury. Secondary outcomes included scores on the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), the International Knee Documentation Committee subjective (IKDC subjective), the Short Form - 36 health survey (SF-36) version 2, the Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE), and the Tegner activity scale. A total of 13 patients were identified who met the inclusion criteria and had complete follow-up. The mean age at revision ACL reconstruction was 20.5 years (range, 19-22 years), and mean follow-up was 40.2 months (range, 13-66 months). All patients underwent a single stage revision ACL reconstruction with ipsilateral bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft, ipsilateral hamstring autograft, or bone-tendon-bone allograft. Mean physical readiness test (PRT) score at final follow-up was not statistically different than documented preinjury PRT score (77.9 vs. 85.5, p > 0.05), nor was the mean run time (7:12 vs. 6:43/mile, p > 0.05). Significant improvements exceeding published minimal clinically important differences were seen in SANE score, SF-36 physical component summary score, KOOS sports and recreation, KOOS quality of life, WOMAC pain score, and WOMAC function score. Patients undergoing revision ACL reconstruction at our facility show good recovery of baseline physical performance as measured by the semiannual PRT and timed run test, and significant improvements in patient-reported outcome scores. Level of Evidence Level IV, case series.

  18. Anatomic and nonanatomic double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: an in vivo kinematic analysis.

    PubMed

    Zaffagnini, Stefano; Marcheggiani Muccioli, Giulio Maria; Signorelli, Cecilia; Lopomo, Nicola; Grassi, Alberto; Bonanzinga, Tommaso; Nitri, Marco; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2014-03-01

    There have been no direct in vivo biomechanical comparisons performed between an anatomic double-bundle (ADB) and a nonanatomic double-bundle (NADB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. There are differences in kinematic outcomes between ADB and NADB ACL reconstruction techniques. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-six consecutive patients (mean age, 30 years; range, 18-32 years; 23 men, 3 women; 17 right knees, 9 left knees) with an isolated ACL injury were included in the study. The first 13 consecutive patients underwent NADB reconstruction (combination of a single-bundle and an over-the-top reconstruction), and the following 13 consecutive patients were treated with an ADB approach (using 2 tibial tunnels and 2 femoral tunnels placed in the center of the native femoral and tibial insertion sites). Grafts were pretensioned at 80 N and secured with cortical fixation systems under manual maximum force tension. Standard clinical laxity and pivot-shift tests were quantified at time zero before and after ACL reconstruction by means of a surgical navigation system dedicated to kinematic assessment; displacement of the medial and lateral compartments during the tests was also analyzed. The ADB-reconstructed knees showed a larger preoperative-to-postoperative difference in anterior-posterior tibial plateau displacement of the medial and lateral compartments when compared with the NADB-reconstructed knees during the internal-external rotation test at 30° of flexion (P < .050). No other significant differences in laxity or pivot-shift values were noted. The mean surgical time for ADB reconstruction was significantly higher than that for NABD reconstruction (62 ± 13 and 43 ± 10 minutes, respectively; P < .0001). Results showed a greater anterior-posterior translation of both compartments during the rotational passive laxity test in the ADB reconstruction group or overconstraint caused by the NADB technique. The 2 analyzed double-bundle ACL reconstructions

  19. Hip and knee joint kinematics during a diagonal jump landing in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed females.

    PubMed

    Delahunt, Eamonn; Prendiville, Anna; Sweeney, Lauren; Chawke, Mark; Kelleher, Judy; Patterson, Matt; Murphy, Katie

    2012-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is a common injury encountered by sport medicine clinicians. Surgical reconstruction is the recommended treatment of choice for those athletes wishing to return to full-contact sports participation and for sports requiring multi-directional movement patterns. The aim of ACL reconstruction is to restore knee joint mechanical stability such that the athlete can return to sporting participation. However, knowledge regarding the extent to which lower limb kinematic profiles are restored following ACL reconstruction is limited. In the present study the hip and knee joint kinematic profiles of 13 ACL reconstructed (ACL-R) and 16 non-injured control subjects were investigated during the performance of a diagonal jump landing task. The ACL-R group exhibited significantly less peak knee joint flexion (P=0.01). Significant between group differences were noted for time averaged hip joint sagittal plane (P<0.05) and transverse plane (P<0.05) kinematic profiles, as well as knee joint frontal plane (P<0.05) and sagittal plane (P<0.05) kinematic profiles. These results suggest that aberrant hip and knee joint kinematic profiles are present following ACL reconstruction, which could influence future injury risk.

  20. All-Epiphyseal, All-Inside Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Technique for Skeletally Immature Patients

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Moira M.; Graziano, Jessica; Green, Daniel W.; Cordasco, Frank A.

    2012-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are an increasingly recognized problem in the juvenile population. Unfortunately, outcomes with conservative treatment are extremely poor. Adult reconstruction techniques are inappropriate to treat skeletally immature patients because of the risk of physeal complications, including limb-length discrepancy and angular deformities. “Physeal-sparing” reconstruction techniques exist, but their ability to restore knee stability is not well understood. We describe an all-epiphyseal ACL reconstruction for use in skeletally immature patients. This is an all-inside technique with the femoral tunnel drilled retrograde and the tibial tunnel drilled retrograde; both tunnels are entirely within the epiphysis. Fixation of the hamstring autograft is achieved with soft-tissue buttons on both the femur and tibia. We present case examples for 2 patients who underwent the all-inside, all-epiphyseal reconstruction and our postoperative rehabilitation protocol. We present a novel surgical technique for an all-inside, all-epiphyseal ACL reconstruction in skeletally immature patients. PMID:23767001

  1. Arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft versus autograft

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiujiang; Zhang, Jianfeng; Qu, Xiaoyi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to compare and analyze retrospectively the outcomes of arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with autograft versus allograft. Material and methods Seventy-one patients who underwent arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with an autograft or allograft met our inclusion criteria. There were 36 patients in the autograft group and 35 patients in the allograft group. All the patients were evaluated by physical examination and a functional ligament test. Comparative analysis was done in terms of operation time, incision length, fever time, postoperative infection rate, incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision, as well as a routine blood test. Results The average follow-up of the autograft group was 3.2 ±0.2 years and that of the allograft group was 3.3 ±0.6 years; there was no significant difference (p > 0.05). No differences existed in knee range of motion, Lysholm scores, International Knee Documentation Committee standard evaluation form and Tegner activity score at final follow-up (p > 0.05), except that patients in the allograft group had a shorter operation time and incision length and a longer fever time (p < 0.05). We found a difference in posterior drawer test and KT-2000 arthrometer assessment (p < 0.05). The posterior tibia displacement averaged 3.8 ±1.5 mm in the autograft group and 4.8 ±1.7 mm in the allograft group (p < 0.05). The incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision in the autograft group was higher than that in the allograft group (p < 0.05). There was no infection postoperatively. The white blood cells and neutrophils in the allograft group increased more than those in the autograft group postoperatively (p < 0.05). Conclusions Both groups of patients had satisfactory outcomes after the operation. However, in the instrumented posterior laxity test, the autograft gave better results than the allograft. No differences in functional scores

  2. From wheelchair to walking: First case report of post-electrical burn destruction of patellar ligament with its one-stage reconstruction and restoration of function

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sandip Kanti; Bain, Jayanta; Majumdar, Bijay Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Debarati; Baitalik, Debasis; Dewangan, Yatindra Kumar; Bhattacharya, Debtanu; Rakshit, Pritha; Gupta, Vivek; Kumar, Ashwani; Haldar, Rathindra Nath

    2017-01-01

    Electrical burn injury causing bilateral patellar ligament destruction leading to complete loss of knee extension is a very rare injury. In such situation, surgical repair or reconstruction of the patellar ligament becomes necessary to restore knee functions. Here, we present such a case of an 8-year-old boy, whose both patellar ligaments were destroyed throughout its length due to high-voltage electrical injury. His left knee joint cavity was exposed and grossly infected, but the right knee joint cavity was apparently intact. The right-sided patellar ligament was reconstructed with an ipsilateral and looped semitendinosus tendon graft and covered with a medial gastrocnemius musculocutaneous flap. The patient had an uneventful recovery, and full range of motion in the right knee joint along with good bipedal locomotion was achieved successfully. PMID:28615820

  3. Material costs of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring tendons by two different techniques.

    PubMed

    Cournapeau, J; Klouche, S; Hardy, P

    2013-04-01

    In France, approximately 36,000 anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgical procedures are performed every year. Technical progress, in particular arthroscopy, has made surgery more precise, but more expensive. In a context of healthcare cost containment, the increase in the cost of technology must be compared to the improved outcome for the patients. The main aim of this study was to determine all material costs related to ACL reconstruction using hamstring tendons. This study also compared the material costs between the two arthroscopic techniques: standard or "all-inside". A retrospective study of material costs was performed in 2011. With the standard technique, the tibial tunnel was drilled from outside to inside, while with the all-inside technique two tunnels were drilled from inside to outside. All of the material used from the first swab to the final bandage was reported. It was classified into three categories: reusable arthroscopy material, disposable arthroscopic material, and disposable surgical supplies. The costs were those of our supplier in 2011 (Arthrex™) and based on Public Hospitals of Paris (AP-HP) public contract tariffs. Standard ligament reconstruction was less expensive than the all-inside technique: 791.59€ versus 931.06€ excluding taxes (hors taxes [HT]), respectively. The largest percentage of expenses was allocated to disposable material use (81 and 84%). Possible avenues of savings are limited: all the material used was necessary. To control costs, correct use and good maintenance of instruments are the most important elements. Level IV. Economic and decision analyses, retrospective study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Surgical menopause initiates molecular changes that do not result in mechanical changes in normal and healing ligaments

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, G. M.; Reno, C. R.; Achari, Y.; Morck, D. W.; Hart, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Ligaments which heal spontaneously have a healing process that is similar to skin wound healing. Menopause impairs skin wound healing and may likewise impair ligament healing. Our purpose in this study was to investigate the effect of surgical menopause on ligament healing in a rabbit medial collateral ligament model. Methods Surgical menopause was induced with ovariohysterectomy surgery in adult female rabbits. Ligament injury was created by making a surgical gap in the midsubstance of the medial collateral ligament. Ligaments were allowed to heal for six or 14 weeks in the presence or absence of oestrogen before being compared with uninjured ligaments. Molecular assessment examined the messenger ribonucleic acid levels for collagens, proteoglycans, proteinases, hormone receptors, growth factors and inflammatory mediators. Mechanical assessments examined ligament laxity, total creep strain and failure stress. Results Surgical menopause in normal medial collateral ligaments initiated molecular changes in all the categories evaluated. In early healing medial collateral ligaments, surgical menopause resulted in downregulation of specific collagens, proteinases and inflammatory mediators at 6 weeks of healing, and proteoglycans, growth factors and hormone receptors at 14 weeks of healing. Surgical menopause did not produce mechanical changes in normal or early healing medial collateral ligaments. With or without surgical menopause, healing ligaments exhibited increased total creep strain and decreased failure stress compared with uninjured ligaments. Conclusions Surgical menopause did not affect the mechanical properties of normal or early healing medial collateral ligaments in a rabbit model. The results in this preclinical model suggest that menopause may result in no further impairment to the ligament healing process. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:38–44 PMID:25761872

  5. Spatial Change of Cruciate Ligaments in Rat Embryo Knee Joint by Three-Dimensional Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangkai; Aoyama, Tomoki; Takaishi, Ryota; Higuchi, Shinya; Yamada, Shigehito; Kuroki, Hiroshi; Takakuwa, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the spatial developmental changes of rat cruciate ligaments by three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction using episcopic fluorescence image capture (EFIC). Cruciate ligaments of Wister rat embryos between embryonic day (E) 16 and E20 were analyzed. Samples were sectioned and visualized using EFIC. 3D reconstructions were generated using Amira software. The length of the cruciate ligaments, distances between attachment points to femur and tibia, angles of the cruciate ligaments and the cross angle of the cruciate ligaments were measured. The shape of cruciate ligaments was clearly visible at E17. The lengths of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) increased gradually from E17 to E19 and drastically at E20. Distances between attachment points to the femur and tibia gradually increased. The ACL angle and PCL angle gradually decreased. The cross angle of the cruciate ligaments changed in three planes. The primordium of the 3D structure of rat cruciate ligaments was constructed from the early stage, with the completion of the development of the structures occurring just before birth. PMID:26098761

  6. Return to Sport After Pediatric Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Its Effect on Subsequent Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Travis J; Godin, Jonathan A; Dale, Kevin M; Garrett, William E; Taylor, Dean C; Riboh, Jonathan C

    2017-06-07

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft failure and contralateral ACL tears are more frequent in children and adolescents than adults. The reasons for higher subsequent injury rates in this population are incompletely understood. We analyzed a continuous cohort of patients who were <18 years of age. Subjects underwent isolated, primary ACL reconstruction with autograft between 2006 and January 1, 2014, and had a minimum 2-year follow-up. Return-to-sport characteristics were described, and multivariable Cox regression modeling was used to identify predictors of a second ACL injury. Candidate variables included patient factors (age, sex, physeal status, tibial slope, notch width index), surgical characteristics (graft type, surgical technique), measures of recovery (time to return to sport, duration of physical therapy), and patients' preoperative and postoperative sports involvement (primary and secondary sports, number of sports). A total of 112 subjects met inclusion criteria; of these patients, 85 (76%) had complete follow-up data and were analyzed. The mean age (and standard deviation) was 13.9 ± 2.1 years (range, 6 to 17 years); 77% had open physes. The mean follow-up was 48.3 ± 15.3 months. Seventy-seven patients (91%) returned to sports, and 84% returned to the same sport. The mean Marx activity score at the time of the latest follow-up was 13.7 ± 3.5 points. Patients were involved in fewer sports after ACL reconstruction, 1.48 ± 0.92 compared with 1.83 ± 1.01 sports before reconstruction (p = 0.002). Sixteen patients (19%) sustained an ACL graft rupture, 11 patients (13%) sustained a contralateral ACL tear, and 1 of these patients (1%) sustained both. The overall prevalence of a second ACL injury was 32%. Time to return to sport was the only significant predictor of a second ACL injury, with a slower return being protective (hazard ratio per month, 0.87 [95% confidence interval, 0.73 to 0.99]; p = 0.04). Pediatric athletes return to sports at a high rate

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A practical guide

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Alberto; Bailey, James R; Signorelli, Cecilia; Carbone, Giuseppe; Tchonang Wakam, Andy; Lucidi, Gian Andrea; Zaffagnini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is one of the most common orthopedic procedures performed worldwide. In this regard, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represents a useful pre-operative tool to confirm a disruption of the ACL and to assess for potential associated injuries. However, MRI is also valuable post-operatively, as it is able to identify, in a non-invasive way, a number of aspects and situations that could suggest potential problems to clinicians. Graft signal and integrity, correct tunnel placement, tunnel widening, and problems with fixation devices or the donor site could all compromise the surgical outcomes and potentially predict the failure of the ACL reconstruction. Furthermore, several anatomical features of the knee could be associated to worst outcomes or higher risk of failure. This review provides a practical guide for the clinician to evaluate the post-surgical ACL through MRI, and to analyze all the parameters and features directly or indirectly related to ACL reconstruction, in order to assess for normal or pathologic conditions. PMID:27795945

  8. Long Term Gait Deviations in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstructed Females

    PubMed Central

    Noehren, Brian; Wilson, Hilary; Miller, Casey; Lattermann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Little is known of the potential long term gait alterations that occur after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. In particular, variables such as impact loading which have been previously associated with joint deterioration have not been studied in walking and running after an ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to define the alterations in impact forces, loading rates, and the accompanying sagittal plane kinematic and kinetic mechanics at the time of impact between the ACL reconstructed group and a healthy control group. Methods 40 females (20 ACL reconstruction, 20 controls) participated in the study. An instrumented gait analysis was performed on all subjects. Between group and limb comparisons were made for initial vertical impact force, loading rate, sagittal plane knee and hip angles as well as moments. Results During walking and running the ACL cohort had significantly greater initial vertical impact force (p=0.002 and p= 0.001), and loading rates (p=0.03 and p= 0.01), as well as a smaller knee extensor moment and hip angle during walking (p=0.000 and p=0.01). There was a trend towards a smaller knee moment and hip angle during running (p=0.08 and p=0.06) as well as a larger hip extensor moment during walking (p=0.06) in the ACL group. No differences were found for hip extensor moment during running, knee angles between groups during walking or running. Lastly, no between limb differences were found for any variable. Conclusion Gait deviations such as elevated impact loading and loading rates do not resolve long term after the individual has resumed previous activity levels and may contribute to the greater risk of early joint degeneration in this population. PMID:23568090

  9. [Follow-up results of reconstructing the knee joint with ligaments of Lavasan (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Mironova, S S

    1978-01-01

    Recommendation of synthetic material for reconstructing the knee joint ligaments. 15 years experience in 262 patients (sportsmen, ballet dancers, circus artistis,. The Lavasan implant was used in isolated as well as in combined injuries of the ligaments. The long-term results (13 years) yielded satisfactory results in 91%.

  10. Individualized anterior cruciate ligament surgery: a prospective study comparing anatomic single- and double-bundle reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Mohsen; van Eck, Carola F; Cretnik, Andrej; Dinevski, Dejan; Fu, Freddie H

    2012-08-01

    Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has become a commonly performed procedure. However, biomechanical studies have demonstrated that conventional single-bundle ACL reconstruction techniques are only successful in limiting anterior tibial translation but less effective for restoring rotatory laxity. This study aimed to compare the results of single- and double-bundle ACL reconstruction using an anatomic technique, individualized based on the patient's native ACL size. The authors hypothesized that there would be no difference between the results of anatomic single-bundle (ASB) and anatomic double-bundle (ADB) reconstruction when the surgical technique is individualized. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Depending on intraoperative measurements of the ACL insertion site size, patients were selected for either ASB (n = 32) or ADB (n = 69) ACL reconstruction. In all groups, hamstring tendons autograft was used with suspensory fixation on the femoral side and bioabsorbable interference screw fixation on the tibial side. The outcomes were evaluated by an independent blinded observer using the Lysholm score, subjective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) form, KT-1000 arthrometer for anteroposterior stability, and pivot-shift test for rotational stability. The average follow-up was 30 months (range, 26-34 months). There were no statistically significant differences in the baseline demographics of the 2 groups. There was no significant difference between the ADB and ASB groups for Lysholm score (93.9 vs 93.5), subjective IKDC score (93.3 vs 93.1), anterior tibial translation (1.5- vs 1.6-mm side-to-side difference), and pivot shift (92% vs 90% with negative pivot-shift examination). Anatomic double-bundle reconstruction is not superior to anatomic single-bundle reconstruction when an individualized ACL reconstruction technique is used.

  11. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Early Reconstruction Versus Rehabilitation and Delayed Reconstruction for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears.

    PubMed

    Mather, Richard C; Hettrich, Carolyn M; Dunn, Warren R; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R; Huston, Laura J; Reinke, Emily K; Spindler, Kurt P

    2014-07-01

    An initial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear can be treated with surgical reconstruction or focused rehabilitation. The KANON (Knee Anterior cruciate ligament, NON-surgical versus surgical treatment) randomized controlled trial compared rehabilitation plus early ACL reconstruction (ACLR) to rehabilitation plus optional delayed ACLR and found no difference at 2 years by an intention-to-treat analysis of total Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) results. To compare the cost-effectiveness of early versus delayed ACLR. Economic and decision analysis; Level of evidence, 2. A Markov decision model was constructed for a cost-utility analysis of early reconstruction (ER) versus rehabilitation plus optional delayed reconstruction (DR). Outcome probabilities and effectiveness were derived from 2 sources: the KANON study and the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) database. Collectively, these 2 sources provided data from 928 ACL-injured patients. Utilities were measured by the Short Form-6 dimensions (SF-6D). Costs were estimated from a societal perspective in 2012 US dollars. Costs and utilities were discounted in accordance with the United States Panel on Cost-Effectiveness in Health and Medicine. Effectiveness was expressed in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained. Principal outcome measures were average incremental costs, incremental effectiveness (as measured by QALYs), and net health benefits. Willingness to pay was set at $50,000, which is the currently accepted standard in the United States. In the base case, the ER group resulted in an incremental gain of 0.28 QALYs over the DR group, with a corresponding lower overall cost to society of $1572. Effectiveness gains were driven by the low utility of an unstable knee and the lower utility for the DR group. The cost of rehabilitation and the rate of additional surgery drove the increased cost of the DR group. The most sensitive variable was the rate of knee instability after initial

  12. Basket-Weave Technique for Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kodkani, Pranjal S.

    2015-01-01

    The anatomy of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) has been well defined, with parts of its uppermost fibers having a soft-tissue insertion onto the vastus intermedius. Bone tunnels and implants on the patellar side therefore cannot replicate this anatomic construct precisely. Because of implants and tunnels, complications have been reported with bone tunnel fracture. Similarly, on the femoral side, rigid fixation with implants can result in over-constraint with compromised results. Moreover, bone tunnels cannot be used in skeletally immature cases. To overcome issues related to bone tunneling and implants, as well as to reconstruct the MPFL in a precise anatomic manner, an all–soft-tissue fixation technique was devised. Bony landmarks were used as reference points instead of radiologic markers to achieve a more precise construct and to eliminate intraoperative radiography. Hamstring graft was used to reconstruct the MPFL. Special suturing techniques were used to achieve optimal graft fixation with minimal suture knots. A special tissue elevator–suture passer device was designed to facilitate graft passage and ease in performing the procedure. This technique permits differential tensioning, and therefore one achieves stability throughout the range of motion. PMID:26258044

  13. Functional Performance Testing After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Geoffrey D.; Harris, Joshua D.; Gupta, Anil K.; McCormick, Frank M.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Cole, Brian J.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: When to allow an athlete to return to unrestricted sporting activity after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction remains controversial. Purpose: To report the results of functional performance testing reported in the literature for individuals at differing time points following ACL reconstruction and to examine differences between graft types. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review of Medline, Scopus, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was performed using PRISMA guidelines. Inclusion criteria were English-language studies that examined any functional rehabilitation test from 6 months to 2 years following ACL reconstruction. All patient-, limb-, and knee-specific demographics were extracted from included investigations. All functional rehabilitation tests were analyzed and compared when applicable. Results: The search term returned a total of 890 potential studies, with 88 meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria. A total of 4927 patients were included, of which 66% were male. The mean patient age was 26.5 ± 3.4 years. The predominant graft choices for reconstruction were bone–patellar tendon–bone (BPTB) autograft (59.8%) and hamstring autograft (37.9%). The most commonly reported functional tests were the hop tests. The results of these functional tests, as reported in the Limb Symmetry Index (LSI), improved with increasing time, with nearly all results greater than 90% at 1 year following primary ACL reconstruction. At 6 months postoperatively, a number of isokinetic strength measurements failed to reach 80% LSI, most commonly isokinetic knee extension testing in both BPTB and hamstring autograft groups. The knee flexion strength deficit was significantly less in the BPTB autograft group as compared with those having hamstring autograft at 1 year postoperatively, while no significant differences were found in isokinetic extension strength between the 2 groups. Conclusion: Hop

  14. Analysis of 3-dimensional finite element after reconstruction of impaired ankle deltoid ligament

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yunhan; Tang, Xianzhong; Li, Yifan; Xu, Wei; Qiu, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    We compared four repair techniques for impaired ankle ligament deltoideum, namely Wiltberger, Deland, Kitaoka and Hintermann using a 3-dimensional finite element. We built an ankle ligament deltoideum model, including six pieces of bone structures, gristles and main ligaments around the ankle. After testing the model, we built an impaired ligament deltoideum model plus four reconstruction models. Subsequently, different levels of force on ankles with different flexion were imposed and ankle biomechanics were compared. In the course of bending, from plantar flexion 20° to back flexion 20°, the extortion of talus decreased while the eversion increased. Four reconstruction models failed to bring back the impaired ankle to normal, with an obvious increase of extortion and eversion. The Kitaoka technique was useful to reduce the extortion angle in a consequential manner. Compared with the other three techniques, the Kitaoka technique produced better results for extortion angle and the difference was statistically significant. However, in case of eversion, there was no significant difference among the four techniques (P>0.05). Lateral ligament's stress in all the four models was different from the normal one. When the ankle was imposed with extortion moment of force, stress of anterior talofibular ligament with the Kitaoka reconstruction method was close to that of the complete deltoid ligament. When ankle was imposed with eversion moment of force, stress of anterior talofibular ligament with Kitaoka and Deland reconstruction methods were close to that of the complete deltoid ligament. We concluded that Kitaoka and Deland tendon reconstruction technique could recover impaired ankle deltoid ligament and re-established its normal biomechanics characteristics. PMID:28105122

  15. Analysis of 3-dimensional finite element after reconstruction of impaired ankle deltoid ligament.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yunhan; Tang, Xianzhong; Li, Yifan; Xu, Wei; Qiu, Wenjun

    2016-12-01

    We compared four repair techniques for impaired ankle ligament deltoideum, namely Wiltberger, Deland, Kitaoka and Hintermann using a 3-dimensional finite element. We built an ankle ligament deltoideum model, including six pieces of bone structures, gristles and main ligaments around the ankle. After testing the model, we built an impaired ligament deltoideum model plus four reconstruction models. Subsequently, different levels of force on ankles with different flexion were imposed and ankle biomechanics were compared. In the course of bending, from plantar flexion 20° to back flexion 20°, the extortion of talus decreased while the eversion increased. Four reconstruction models failed to bring back the impaired ankle to normal, with an obvious increase of extortion and eversion. The Kitaoka technique was useful to reduce the extortion angle in a consequential manner. Compared with the other three techniques, the Kitaoka technique produced better results for extortion angle and the difference was statistically significant. However, in case of eversion, there was no significant difference among the four techniques (P>0.05). Lateral ligament's stress in all the four models was different from the normal one. When the ankle was imposed with extortion moment of force, stress of anterior talofibular ligament with the Kitaoka reconstruction method was close to that of the complete deltoid ligament. When ankle was imposed with eversion moment of force, stress of anterior talofibular ligament with Kitaoka and Deland reconstruction methods were close to that of the complete deltoid ligament. We concluded that Kitaoka and Deland tendon reconstruction technique could recover impaired ankle deltoid ligament and re-established its normal biomechanics characteristics.

  16. Extra-articular subcutaneous "inverted king post-truss" ligament reconstruction for severe swan neck deformity (snapping finger).

    PubMed

    de Soras, X; de Mourgues, P; Pradel, P; Urien, J-P; Beaudoin, E

    2017-02-01

    A swan neck deformity (SND) can be well tolerated for a long time, until the appearance of a disabling "snapping finger". In its most advanced condition, the other hand is needed to initiate finger flexion. We propose a technique of extra-articular, subcutaneous ligament reconstruction with an "inverted king post-truss" configuration use in roofs and to reinforce railway bridges. An artificial ligament (MaxBraid™ polyethylene surgical suture, 5 metric, Biomet) makes a figure of eight between transosseous tunnels in the proximal and middle phalanges, crossing over top of the A3 pulley. We limited our series to severe SND cases with "snapping finger". We excluded isolated SNDs without functional disability. Eleven patients were followed for 3.4 years on average. The cause was an acute injury 8 times (7 balloon accidents), rheumatoid arthritis 2 times and overuse once (saxophone). Only one case was a poor outcome of mallet finger. The 11 patients were reassessed by a telephone survey. Two patients underwent reoperation: one for a ligament rupture, the other one for a knot that became untied. One patient had a suspected late rupture but without recurrence of the disabling snapping finger. The 11 patients considered themselves improved by the intervention. Nine patients did not notice any difference between their operated finger and the contralateral side. Return to manual activity was possible once the skin had healed. The technique is simpler than the spiral oblique retinacular ligament (SORL) reconstruction technique described by Thomson-Littler and also less demanding because it does not involve the distal interphalangeal joint. It requires only a short incision in the volar crease of the proximal interphalangeal joint. No tendon or ligament is sacrificed. Neither postoperative immobilization nor lengthy physical therapy is needed. Complications can be avoided by selecting the appropriate artificial ligament material and careful knot tying.

  17. Lateral patellofemoral ligament reconstruction to restore functional capacity in patients previously undergoing lateral retinacular release

    PubMed Central

    Beckert, Mitch; Crebs, Dylan; Nieto, Michael; Gao, Yubo; Albright, John

    2016-01-01

    AIM To study patient outcomes after surgical correction for iatrogenic patellar instability. METHODS This retrospective study looked at 17 patients (19 knees) suffering from disabling medial patellar instability following lateral release surgery. All patients underwent lateral patellofemoral ligament (LPFL) reconstruction by a single surgeon. Assessments in all 19 cases included functional outcome scores, range of motion, and assessment for the presence of apprehension sign of the patella to determine if LPFL reconstruction surgery was successful at restoring patellofemoral stability. RESULTS No patients reported any residual postoperative symptoms of patellar instability. Also no patients demonstrated medial patellar apprehension or examiner induced subluxation with the medial instability test described earlier following LPFL reconstruction. Furthermore, all patients recovered normal range of motion compared to the contralateral limb. For patients with pre and postoperative outcome scores, the mean overall knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score increased significantly, from 34.39 preoperatively (range: 7.7-70.12) to 69.54 postoperatively (range: 26.82-91.46) at final follow-up (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION This novel technique for LPFL reconstruction is effective at restoring lateral restraint of the patellofemoral joint and improving joint functionality. PMID:27574606

  18. Reconstruction versus conservative treatment after rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament: cost effectiveness analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The decision whether to treat conservatively or reconstruct surgically a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is an ongoing subject of debate. The high prevalence and associated public health burden of torn ACL has led to continuous efforts to determine the best therapeutic approach. A critical evaluation of benefits and expenditures of both treatment options as in a cost effectiveness analysis seems well-suited to provide valuable information for treating physicians and healthcare policymakers. Methods A literature review identified four of 7410 searched articles providing sufficient outcome probabilities for the two treatment options for modeling. A transformation key based on the expert opinions of 25 orthopedic surgeons was used to derive utilities from available evidence. The cost data for both treatment strategies were based on average figures compiled by Orthopaedic University Hospital Balgrist and reinforced by Swiss national statistics. A decision tree was constructed to derive the cost-effectiveness of each strategy, which was then tested for robustness using Monte Carlo simulation. Results Decision tree analysis revealed a cost effectiveness of 16,038 USD/0.78 QALY for ACL reconstruction and 15,466 USD/0.66 QALY for conservative treatment, implying an incremental cost effectiveness of 4,890 USD/QALY for ACL reconstruction. Sensitivity analysis of utilities did not change the trend. Conclusion ACL reconstruction for reestablishment of knee stability seems cost effective in the Swiss setting based on currently available evidence. This, however, should be reinforced with randomized controlled trials comparing the two treatment strategies. PMID:22098703

  19. Massage Therapy Protocol for Post–Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Zalta, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Background: The intent of the present study was to determine the effectiveness of massage therapy in the rehabilitation of post–anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction patellofemoral pain syndrome. The primary complications following surgical repair of the anterior cruciate ligament—classified as patellofemoral pain syndrome—are hamstring flexion contracture and quadriceps weakness, leading to patellofemoral dysfunction and retropatellar pain. Methods: Treatment included lymphatic drainage, myofascial release, neuromuscular techniques including trigger point release, muscle energy techniques and cross-fiber friction. Orthopedic physical assessment tests were used to chart changes in patellofemoral function and changes in range of motion in the knee during the course of the massage interventions. Subjective reporting on pain level and function were also documented. Results: A decrease in pain level, hamstring flexion contracture and lateral tracking of the patella were documented. Conclusion: Massage therapy was determined to be an effective complementary therapy in the treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:21589717

  20. Is bone tunnel osseointegration in hamstring tendon autograft anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction important?

    PubMed

    Logan, Martin; Williams, Andy; Myers, Peter

    2003-10-01

    A 27-year-old man underwent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using 4-strand hamstring autograft with femoral and tibial interference screw fixation. Four weeks after surgery, he developed a discharging hematoma through the graft harvest-tibial tunnel incision, which persisted. The patient required further surgical intervention 7 weeks after the initial surgery. The wound was debrided, the tibial interference screw was removed, and the tibial tunnel was completely cleared of graft remnants. Arthroscopy of the knee was performed, in which the ACL graft appeared healthy and viable. No evidence of intra-articular sepsis was found. Postoperatively, the rehabilitation program was uneventful and, at 36 months, the patient has unrestricted activity and no clinical evidence of excessive ACL laxity. This case supports the importance of marginal articular surface healing of the ACL graft, suggesting that tibial intratunnel healing becomes redundant.

  1. Evidence-based rehabilitation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    van Grinsven, S; van Cingel, R E H; Holla, C J M; van Loon, C J M

    2010-08-01

    Following a bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft (BPTB) or four-stranded semitendinosus/gracilis tendons autograft (ST/G) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, the speed and safety with which an athlete returns to sports (or regains the pre-injury level of function) depends on the rehabilitation protocol. Considering the large differences in clinical and outpatient protocols, there is no consensus regarding the content of such a rehabilitation program. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review to develop an optimal evidence-based rehabilitation protocol to enable unambiguous, practical and useful treatment after ACL reconstruction. The systematic literature search identified 1,096 citations published between January 1995 and December 2006. Thirty-two soundly based rehabilitation programs, randomized clinical trials (RCT's) and reviews were included in which common physical therapy modalities (instruction, bracing, cryotherapy, joint mobility training, muscle-strength training, gait re-education, training of neuromuscular function/balance and proprioception) or rehabilitation programs were evaluated following ACL reconstruction with a BPTB or ST/G graft. Two reviews were excluded because of poor quality. Finally, the extracted data were combined with information from background literature to develop an optimal evidence-based rehabilitation protocol. The results clearly indicated that an accelerated protocol without postoperative bracing, in which reduction of pain, swelling and inflammation, regaining range of motion, strength and neuromuscular control are the most important aims, has important advantages and does not lead to stability problems. Preclinical sessions, clear starting times and control of the rehabilitation aims with objective and subjective tests facilitate an uncomplicated rehabilitation course. Consensus about this evidence-based accelerated protocol will not only enhance the speed and safety with which an athlete returns to sports, but

  2. Predictors of knee joint loading after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wellsandt, Elizabeth; Khandha, Ashutosh; Manal, Kurt; Axe, Michael J; Buchanan, Thomas S; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2017-03-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury results in altered knee joint mechanics which frequently continue even after ACL reconstruction. The persistence of altered mechanical loading of the knee is of concern due to its likely role in the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (OA). Joint contact forces are associated with post-traumatic OA development, but evaluation of factors influencing the magnitude of contact forces after ACL injury is needed to advance current strategies aimed at preventing post-traumatic OA. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify predictive factors of knee joint contact forces after ACL reconstruction. Thirty athletes completed standard gait analysis with surface electromyography 6 months after ACL reconstruction. An electromyographic-driven musculoskeletal model was used to estimate joint contact forces. External knee adduction moment was a significant predictor of medial compartment contact forces in both limbs, while vertical ground reaction force and co-contraction only contributed significantly in the uninvolved limb. The large influence of the knee adduction moment on joint contact forces provides mechanistic clues to understanding the mechanical pathway of post-traumatic OA after ACL injury. Statement of Clinical Significance: This study provides critical information in improving the understanding of mechanisms influencing the development of post-traumatic OA after ACL injury. Further work is needed to identify additional driving factors of joint loading in the ACL-injured limb and develop treatment strategies to avert the deleterious consequences of post-traumatic OA. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:651-656, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Return to sports and functional results after revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by fascia lata autograft.

    PubMed

    Mirouse, G; Rousseau, R; Casabianca, L; Ettori, M A; Granger, B; Pascal-Moussellard, H; Khiami, F

    2016-11-01

    The surgical revision rate following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery is 3% at 2 years and 4% at 5 years. Revision ACL surgery raises the question of the type of graft to be used. The present study assessed return to sports and functional results after revision ACL reconstruction by fascia lata graft. The hypothesis was that fascia lata provides a reliable graft in revision ACL surgery. A single-center retrospective continuous study included 30 sports players with a mean age of 26.8±8 years undergoing surgical revision for iterative ACL tear between 2004 and 2013. Multi-ligament lesions were excluded. Type and level of sports activity were assessed preoperatively, after primary surgery and at end of follow-up. Clinical assessment used subjective IKDC, Lysholm and KOOS scores. At a mean 4.6±1.6 years' follow-up, all patients had resumed sport activity, but only 12 with the same sport at the same level. Median subjective IKDC score increased from 57 [54.3; 58.5] preoperatively to 82 [68.3; 90] at last follow-up, and Lysholm score from 46 [42.3; 51] to 90.5 [80.8; 96.8]; KOOS score at last follow-up was 94.7 [83; 100]. Functional results in revision ACL reconstruction by fascia lata graft were satisfactory, with similar return-to-sports rates as with other techniques. Fascia lata provides a reliable graft in revision ACL surgery. IV, retrospective study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. A Biomechanical Comparison of Allograft Tendons for Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Jeremiah E; Russell, Joseph P; Grieshober, Jason; Iacangelo, Abigail; Ellison, Benjamin A; Lease, T Dylan; Kim, Hyunchul; Henn, R Frank; Hsieh, Adam H

    2017-03-01

    Allograft tendons are frequently used for ligament reconstruction about the knee, but they entail availability and cost challenges. The identification of other tissues that demonstrate equivalent performance to preferred tendons would improve limitations. Hypothesis/Purpose: We compared the biomechanical properties of 4 soft tissue allograft tendons: tibialis anterior (TA), tibialis posterior (TP), peroneus longus (PL), and semitendinosus (ST). We hypothesized that allograft properties would be similar when standardized by the looped diameter. Controlled laboratory study. This study consisted of 2 arms evaluating large and small looped-diameter grafts: experiment A consisted of TA, TP, and PL tendons (n = 47 each) with larger looped diameters of 9.0 to 9.5 mm, and experiment B consisted of TA, TP, PL, and ST tendons (n = 53 each) with smaller looped diameters of 7.0 to 7.5 mm. Each specimen underwent mechanical testing to measure the modulus of elasticity (E), ultimate tensile force (UTF), maximal elongation at failure, ultimate tensile stress (UTS), and ultimate tensile strain (UTε). Experiment A: No significant differences were noted among tendons for UTF, maximal elongation at failure, and UTϵ. UTS was significantly higher for the PL (54 MPa) compared with the TA (44 MPa) and TP (43 MPa) tendons. E was significantly higher for the PL (501 MPa) compared with the TP (416 MPa) tendons. Equivalence testing showed that the TP and PL tendon properties were equivalent or superior to those of the TA tendons for all outcomes. Experiment B: All groups exhibited a similar E. UTF was again highest in the PL tendons (2294 N) but was significantly different from only the ST tendons (1915 N). UTϵ was significantly higher for the ST (0.22) compared with the TA (0.19) and TP (0.19) tendons. Equivalence testing showed that the TA, TP, and PL tendon properties were equivalent or superior to those of the ST tendons. Compared with TA tendons, TP and PL tendons of a given looped

  5. Open anatomical coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction using a tendon graft with an Endobutton loop.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Nagraj S; Yoo, Yon S; Kim, Do Y; Lee, Sang S; Jeong, Un S

    2009-12-01

    We describe a technique of open anatomical coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction restoring both parts of the native ligament, aiming at achieving maximum stability of the acromioclavicular joint without disturbing the normal anatomy. Using the same anatomical principle of ligament reconstruction as in other joints, transosseous tunnels are created at the native footprints of the conoid and trapezoid ligaments. An autologous graft is fixed using an Endobutton continuous loop and a PEEK screw; adequate healing of the ligament is ensured with an appropriate working length. Although an open procedure, this technique offers several advantages. It can be easily reproduced using basic anatomical principles and simple cost-effective instrumentation. The implant does not have to be removed, important anatomical structures are respected, normal acromioclavicular joint kinematics are restored, the scar is cosmetically acceptable and post-operative morbidity is very low.

  6. Virtual Surgical Planning for Orbital Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Susarla, Srinivas M; Duncan, Katherine; Mahoney, Nicholas R; Merbs, Shannath L; Grant, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    The advent of computer-assisted technology has revolutionized planning for complex craniofacial operations, including orbital reconstruction. Orbital reconstruction is ideally suited for virtual planning, as it allows the surgeon to assess the bony anatomy and critical neurovascular structures within the orbit, and plan osteotomies, fracture reductions, and orbital implant placement with efficiency and predictability. In this article, we review the use of virtual surgical planning for orbital decompression, posttraumatic midface reconstruction, reconstruction of a two-wall orbital defect, and reconstruction of a large orbital floor defect with a custom implant. The surgeon managing orbital pathology and posttraumatic orbital deformities can benefit immensely from utilizing virtual planning for various types of orbital pathology.

  7. Virtual Surgical Planning for Orbital Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Susarla, Srinivas M.; Duncan, Katherine; Mahoney, Nicholas R.; Merbs, Shannath L.; Grant, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The advent of computer-assisted technology has revolutionized planning for complex craniofacial operations, including orbital reconstruction. Orbital reconstruction is ideally suited for virtual planning, as it allows the surgeon to assess the bony anatomy and critical neurovascular structures within the orbit, and plan osteotomies, fracture reductions, and orbital implant placement with efficiency and predictability. In this article, we review the use of virtual surgical planning for orbital decompression, posttraumatic midface reconstruction, reconstruction of a two-wall orbital defect, and reconstruction of a large orbital floor defect with a custom implant. The surgeon managing orbital pathology and posttraumatic orbital deformities can benefit immensely from utilizing virtual planning for various types of orbital pathology. PMID:26692714

  8. Current Concepts for Injury Prevention in Athletes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hewett, Timothy E.; Di Stasi, Stephanie L.; Myer, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01

    factors associated with ligament failure or a secondary (contralateral) injury in athletes who return to sport after ACLR. From these data, they propose an EBM paradigm shift in postoperative rehabilitation and return-to-sport training after ACLR that is focused on the resolution of neuromuscular deficits that commonly persist after surgical reconstruction and standard rehabilitation of athletes. PMID:23041233

  9. Radiodense ligament markers for radiographic evaluation of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Borbas, Paul; Wieser, Karl; Rahm, Stefan; Fucentese, Sandro F; Koch, Peter P; Meyer, Dominik C

    2014-12-01

    Early clinical and radiographic diagnosis of failed or loosened anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions can be challenging. The aim of the present study is to retrospectively evaluate the use of radiologically visible markers in the ACL graft, serving as a potential diagnostic tool in ACL graft rupture and insufficiency. Twenty patients were included in the study. ACL reconstruction was performed with use of a hamstring autograft in hybrid fixation technique. The graft was marked with two radiodense suture knots, one at the tibial and femoral tunnel openings. Radiographs were performed postoperatively, after 6 weeks and 12 months. Four distances between markers and landmarks were measured in anteroposterior and three in lateral radiographic views and the positional change between the timepoints of measurement was calculated. Measurements of the marker distances on radiographs showed an excellent interobserver reliability (κ=0.97). In two measured distal anteroposterior distances statistically significant changes could be detected between 6 weeks and 12 months postoperatively in one patient with MRI-documented ACL rerupture and in five patients with ACL elongation defined as anteroposterior-translation with side-to-side difference of ≥3 mm measured with a Rolimeter device. On lateral radiographs, marker distances were highly variable and did not correlate with clinical ACL elongation. The application of radiodense ACL graft markers is a straight-forward, non-expensive and potentially useful diagnostic tool to identify the position of the transplant and for diagnosis of graft elongation or failure. However, the method is sensitive to the radiological projection, which should be further studied and optimized. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Suggestions from the field for return to sports participation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: soccer.

    PubMed

    Bizzini, Mario; Hancock, Dave; Impellizzeri, Franco

    2012-04-01

    Successful return to play remains a challenge for a soccer player after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. In addition to a successful surgical intervention, a soccer-specific functional rehabilitation program is essential to achieve this goal. Soccer-like elements should be incorporated in the early stages of rehabilitation to provide neuromuscular training specific to the needs of the player. Gym-based and, later, field-based drills are gradually intensified and progressed until the player demonstrates the ability to return to team practice. In addition to the recovery of basic attributes such as mobility, flexibility, strength, and agility, the surgically repaired knee must also regain soccer-specific neuromuscular control and conditioning for an effective return to sports. The individual coaching of the player by the sports physiotherapist and compliance with the training program by the player are key factors in the rehabilitation process. To minimize reinjury risk and to maximize the player's career, concepts of soccer-specific injury prevention programs should be incorporated into the training routine during and after the rehabilitation of players post-ACL reconstruction.

  11. Pre-tibial synovial cyst after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: case report.

    PubMed

    Bulisani, Luís Eduardo Pedigoni; Bulisani, Erickson

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament has been modernized through new surgical techniques and new materials. When tibial fixation is performed using an absorbable screw, complications may occur, such as formation of a pre-tibial cyst. The case described here is about a patient who presented an anteromedial synovial cyst in his right knee, three years after having undergone ACL reconstruction. The patient did not present any pain nor any complaints other than a mass that progressively increased in size, worsened after physical activities. Imaging examinations were requested: simple radiography of the knee and magnetic resonance. Anteromedial imaging of the knee showed a mass with well-delimited borders and internal fluid content, suggestive of a synovial cyst, with communication with the joint cavity through the tibial tunnel, without presenting enlargement or absorption of the bone tunnel. The cyst was surgically resected and the tibial tunnel occlusion was performed using a bone plug. The diagnosis of a synovial cyst was subsequently confirmed through the results from the anatomopathological examination. The patient presented good clinical evolution, with disappearance of the symptoms and a return to physical activities.

  12. Patient expectations of primary and revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Feucht, Matthias J; Cotic, Matthias; Saier, Tim; Minzlaff, Philipp; Plath, Johannes E; Imhoff, Andreas B; Hinterwimmer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Unrealistic patient expectations have been shown to negatively influence patient-reported outcomes in orthopaedic surgery. Knowledge about patient expectations is important to associate preoperative expectations with the reasonable outcome of a specific procedure. The purpose of this study was to prospectively analyse and to compare patient expectations of primary and revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) and to assess the factors associated with patient expectations. Preoperative expectations of 181 consecutive patients undergoing ACLR were assessed prospectively using a 5-item questionnaire. Primary ACLR (P-ACLR) was performed in 133 patients (73%), whereas 48 patients (27%) underwent revision ACLR (R-ACLR). The questionnaire assessed the expectation of the overall condition of the knee joint, return to sports, instability, pain, and risk of osteoarthritis. All patients expected a normal (38%) or nearly normal (62%) condition of the knee joint. Return to sports at the same level was expected by 91%. With regard to instability (pain), no instability (pain) independent of the activity level was expected by 77% (58%). No or only a slightly increased risk of the development of osteoarthritis was expected by 98%. The R-ACLR group showed a significantly lower expectation of the overall condition (p = 0.001), return to sports (p < 0.001), and pain (p = 0.002). No statistically significant difference was found between female and male patients (n.s.). In the P-ACLR group, patients with a history of previous knee surgery showed inferior expectations of return to sports (p = 0.015) and risk of osteoarthritis (p = 0.011). Age, number of previous knee surgeries, and pre-injury sports level significantly influenced patient expectations. Overall, patient expectations of ACL reconstruction are high. Patients undergoing revision ACL reconstruction have lower but still demanding expectations. Younger patients, patients without a history of knee surgery, and

  13. Rehabilitation After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in the Female Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, Kevin E.; Arrigo, Christopher; Andrews, James R.; Clancy, William G.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the rehabilitation program after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in the female athlete. In addition, we will discuss 8 unique characteristics identified in the female athlete and specific training drills to address and correct the potentially deleterious effects of these unique characteristics. Background: The female athlete appears to be more susceptible to noncontact ACL injuries than the male athlete. There seem to be many differences between the female and male athlete that may contribute to the increased injury rate in the female athlete. These variations include anatomical and neuromuscular considerations and differences. Description: Based on the unique characteristics of the female athlete and the anatomical and neuromuscular dissimilarities, a specially designed rehabilitation program has been established for the female athlete after ACL surgery. Clinical Advantages: The rehabilitation drills discussed in this article challenge the neuromuscular system through proprioception, kinesthesia, dynamic joint stability, neuromuscular control, and perturbation training activities. Improving the female athlete's neuromuscular system will, we believe, expedite the injured athlete's recovery after ACL injury or surgery. Although the concepts discussed are part of a postoperative rehabilitation program after ACL surgery, these concepts may also be implemented as a preventive program to assist in reducing the incidence of ACL injuries in the female athlete. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12.Figure 13.Figure 14.Figure 15.Figure 16.Figure 17.Figure 18.Figure 19.Figure 20.Figure 21.Figure 22.Figure 23. PMID:16558561

  14. Preoperative cryotherapy use in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Koyonos, Loukas; Owsley, Kevin; Vollmer, Emily; Limpisvasti, Orr; Gambardella, Ralph

    2014-12-01

    Unrelieved postoperative pain may impair rehabilitation, compromise functional outcomes, and lead to patient dissatisfaction. Preemptive multimodal analgesic techniques may improve outcomes after surgery. We hypothesized that patients using preoperative cryotherapy plus a standardized postoperative treatment plan will have lower pain scores and require less pain medication compared with patients receiving a standardized postoperative treatment plan alone after arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). A total of 53 consecutive patients undergoing arthroscopically assisted ACLR performed by one of seven surgeons were randomly assigned to one of two groups. Group 1 received no preoperative cryotherapy and group 2 received 30 to 90 minutes of preoperative cryotherapy to the operative leg using a commercial noncompressive cryotherapy unit. Visual analog scale pain scores and narcotic use were recorded for the first 4 days postoperatively. Total hours of cold therapy and continuous passive motion (CPM) use and highest degree of flexion achieved were recorded as well. Group 1 consisted of 26 patients (15 allograft Achilles tendon and 11 autograft bone patellar tendon bone [BPTB]), and group 2 consisted of 27 patients (16 allograft Achilles tendon and 11 autograft BPTB). Group 2 patients reported less pain (average 1.3 units, p < 0.02) and used less narcotic use (average 1.7 tablets, p < 0.02) for the first 36 hours compared with group 1. No statistically significant differences were identified between the two groups with regard to demographics, hours of postoperative cryotherapy, hours of CPM use, or maximum knee flexion achieved. Complications did not occur in either group. This is the first report we are aware of showing the postoperative effects of preoperative cryotherapy. Our results support the safety and efficacy of preoperative cryotherapy in a multimodal pain regimen for patients undergoing ACL reconstruction.

  15. Gait Asymmetries Persist 1 Year After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    White, Kathleen; Logerstedt, David; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Background: After anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), motivation to return to previous levels of activity is high. Very few studies have used return-to-activity criteria to determine when to permit athletic play. Return-to-activity measures objectively evaluate functional limb symmetry; however, previous biomechanical studies have found gait deviations in these individuals that persist up to 2 years after surgery. Purpose: To evaluate gait biomechanics in a specific cohort of ACL patients 1 year after surgery and retrospectively compare individuals who pass return-to-activity criteria 6 months after surgery with those who fail. Study Design: Prospective analysis. Methods: A total of 40 athletes who participated regularly (>50 h/y) in cutting, jumping, and pivoting activities and who sustained an isolated, unilateral ACL rupture were included in this study. All participants underwent reconstruction by the same surgeon and received individualized postoperative rehabilitation. Performance-based and self-report data were measured 6 months after surgery to assess readiness to return to activity (90% outcome required to pass); 20 subjects passed return-to-activity criteria and 20 subjects did not. Motion analysis was performed 1 year after surgery, and knee flexion angles, moments, and excursions were measured during gait and evaluated for all subjects. Results: There was no limb × group interaction or effect of group for all measures. Decreased knee measures were seen on the involved limb compared with the uninvolved limb for all subjects, and failed subjects demonstrated larger differences between limbs. Conclusion: Patients continued to demonstrate biomechanical limb asymmetries 1 year after ACLR, regardless of performance-based measures at 6 months. Early return to activity did not ensure limb symmetry at 1 year. Clinical Relevance: Gait asymmetries were seen in all subjects 1 year after surgery regardless of status at 6 months. Potentially prolonging

  16. Surgical Management and Treatment of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament/Posterolateral Corner Injured Knee.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Nicholas I; LaPrade, Christopher M; LaPrade, Robert F

    2017-01-01

    Posterolateral knee injuries occur more commonly than in the past. These injuries most commonly occur concurrent with cruciate ligament tears. The main stabilizers of the posterolateral knee are the fibular collateral ligament, the popliteus tendon, and the popliteofibular ligament. These static stabilizers function to prevent increased varus, external rotation, and coupled posterolateral rotation of the knee. The most important clinical tests to diagnose posterolateral knee injuries are the varus stress test, posterolateral drawer, and dial tests. Varus stress radiographs are key objective means to diagnose these injuries. Anatomic- based reconstructions have been validated to restore stability and improve outcomes.

  17. Surgical treatment of acute and chronic anterior and posterior cruciate ligament and lateral side injuries of the knee.

    PubMed

    Levy, Bruce A; Boyd, Joel L; Stuart, Michael J

    2011-06-01

    Combined anterior cruciate ligament, posterior cruciate ligament, and lateral-sided injuries of the knee most often occurs secondary to a forced varus moment or after knee dislocation. Management controversies include the optimal timing of surgery, operative techniques, and postoperative rehabilitation. Recent systematic literature reviews have demonstrated higher rates of failure with repair of the lateral and posterolateral corner structures, as opposed to reconstruction. However, the ideal ligament reconstruction techniques remain unclear. This chapter will review the combined anterior cruciate ligament/posterior cruciate ligament/lateral-sided injury pattern, including the physical examination findings, imaging, timing of surgery, graft selection, operative techniques, and postoperative rehabilitation protocols.

  18. Surgical Pearl on Reconstructing Surgical Defects of the Nasal Tip

    PubMed Central

    César, Artur; Barros, Ana; Santos, Paulo; Azevedo, Filomena

    2016-01-01

    Repairing surgical defects of the nasal tip is challenging, mainly because of the lack of freely mobile skin available peripherally. The Peng flap is a one-stage cutaneous flap that circumvents this difficulty by recruiting skin from the nasal dorsum and sidewall regions. The design produces a tridimensional shape perfectly adapted to the configuration of the nasal tip and allows for an inconspicuous closure of the defect. We present three examples of full-thickness skin defects involving the nasal tip, reconstructed using a modified version of the Peng flap, and present the experience at our department with this surgical technique. PMID:27942370

  19. Surgical management of combined anterior or posterior cruciate ligament and posterolateral corner tears: for what functional results?

    PubMed

    Wajsfisz, A; Bajard, X; Plaweski, S; Djian, P; Demey, G; Limozin, R; Bousquet, V; Rocheconcar, G; Louis, M-L; Arndt, J; Azar, M; Sonnery-Cottet, B; Boisrenoult, P

    2014-12-01

    Management of combined anterior or posterior cruciate ligament and posterolateral corner tears is still poorly codified. The aim of this study was to evaluate functional outcome after complete surgical treatment. This retrospective multicenter study included 53 patients. Mean age was 29.8 yrs. (15-49). The anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments were involved in respectively 48 and 5 cases. Mean time to surgery was 25.6 months (0-184), and in 10 cases less than 21 days. Nine patients were sedentary workers and 29 non-sedentary (13 laborers). All ligament injuries were treated surgically. Mean follow-up was 49 months (12-146). Last follow-up assessment used IKDC, Lysholm and KOOS scores. At last follow-up, IKDC score graded 14 patients A, 25 B, 8 C and 6 D, versus 0 A, 4 B, 25 C, 22 D and 2 ungraded preoperatively. Mean subjective IKDC and Lysholm scores were respectively 72.8 (11.5-100) and 77.5 (37-100). Mean KOOS scores (pain, symptoms, daily life, sports, quality of life) were respectively 78 (3-100), 70 (25-100), 88 (47-100), 53 (0-100) and 50 (0-100). Posterolateral laxity was corrected in all but two cases. All sedentary workers and 86.7% of non-sedentary workers could return to work. The job had to be changed in 10% of cases overall, but in 25% of cases for laborers. The present results are comparable with those of the literature. The strategy of combined surgical treatment showed functional efficacy, usually associated with return to work except for some laborers. There was a non-significant trend in favor of acute-phase ligament reconstruction. IV (retrospective series). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Factors associated with a more rapid recovery after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Job E; Moen, Maarten H; Weir, Adam; Schmikli, Sandor L; Tamminga, Rob; van der Hoeven, Henk

    2016-01-01

    In the past, several studies investigated factors that are prognostic or associated with outcome after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. A recent review showed that only limited evidence is available for most studied factors, and that insufficient analysis methods were used commonly. Therefore, the aim of this study was to add more weight to the existing evidence, about factors that are associated with a more rapid outcome after ACL reconstruction. The second aim was to use multivariate analysis to study the possible factors independently. A cohort study was conducted with a follow-up of six months. Before surgery, patient variables were scored. Surgical variables were scored during arthroscopic ACL reconstructions with a single-bundle technique and hamstring autograft. The Lysholm score and subscales of the Knee Injury Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) were assessed six months post surgery. A multiple analysis of variance (ANOVA) model was used to identify prognostic factors for outcome. In total, 118 patients were included. Patients, aged ≤30years, with a subjective knee score ≥ six, with normal flexion range of motion (ROM) of the knee, with flexion and extension strength deficit of ≤20%, and those with no previous knee surgery in the same knee at baseline scored significantly higher on outcome after multivariate analysis. No significant effect of surgical factors could be found. Younger age, higher subjective knee score, normal knee flexion, normal knee flexion and extension strength, and no previous knee surgery in the patients' history at baseline are associated with a more rapid recovery after ACL reconstruction. Level III, prognostic study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Performance outcomes of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in the National Basketball Association.

    PubMed

    Busfield, Benjamin T; Kharrazi, F Daniel; Starkey, Chad; Lombardo, Stephen J; Seegmiller, Jeffrey

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of return to play and to quantify the effect on the basketball player's performance after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Surgical injuries involving the ACL were queried for a 10-year period (1993-1994 season through 2004-2005 season) from the database maintained by the National Basketball Association (NBA). Standard statistical categories and player efficiency rating (PER), a measure that accounts for positive and negative playing statistics, were calculated to determine the impact of the injury on player performance relative to a matched comparison group. Over the study period, 31 NBA players had 32 ACL reconstructions. Two patients were excluded because of multiple ACL injuries, one was excluded because he never participated in league play, and another was the result of nonathletic activity. Of the 27 players in the study group, 6 (22%) did not return to NBA competition. Of the 21 players (78%) who did return to play, 4 (15%) had an increase in the preinjury PER, 5 (19%) remained within 1 point of the preinjury PER, and the PER decreased by more than 1 point after return to play in 12 (44%). Although decreases occurred in most of the statistical categories for players returning from ACL surgery, the number of games played, field goal percentage, and number of turnovers per game were the only categories with a statistically significant decrease. Players in the comparison group had a statistically significant increase in the PER over their careers, whereas the study group had a marked, though not statistically significant, increase in the PER in the season after reconstruction. After ACL reconstruction in 27 basketball players, 22% did not return to a sanctioned NBA game. For those returning to play, performance decreased by more than 1 PER point in 44% of the patients, although the changes were not statistically significant relative to the comparison group. Level IV, therapeutic

  2. Suggestions from the field for return to sports participation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: basketball.

    PubMed

    Waters, Eric

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline the final, functional phases of rehabilitation that address exercises, drills, and return-to-play criteria for the sport of basketball, following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. ACL injuries can be debilitating and affect the quality of life for recreational and elite athletes alike. Tears of the ACL are common in both male and female basketball players, with a higher incidence rate in females. Incidence of a retear to the existing graft or contralateral knee within 5 years of ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon autograft in young (less than 18 to 25 years of age), active basketball players can be as high as 52%. Reducing the number of ACL injuries or reinjury, of which there are an estimated 80 000 per year at an associated cost of over a billion dollars, can have significant potential long-term fiscal and health benefits. Following surgical reconstruction of the ACL, implementing a tailored rehabilitation protocol can ensure a successful return to sport. When searching the literature for such protocols, clinicians may struggle to find specific exercises, drills, and return-to-play criteria for particular sports. The intent of this manuscript is to present such a rehabilitation protocol for basketball.

  3. The impact of tensioning device mal-positioning on strand tension during Anterior Cruciate Ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In order to confer optimal strength and stiffness to the graft in Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction, the maintenance of equal strand tension prior to fixation, is desired; positioning of the tensioning device can significantly affect strand tension This study aimed to determine the effect of tensioning device mal-positioning on individual strand tension in simulated cadaveric ACL reconstructions. Methods Twenty cadaveric specimens, comprising bovine tibia and tendon harvested from sheep, were used to simulate ACL reconstruction with a looped four-strand tendon graft. A proprietary tensioning device was used to tension the graft during tibial component fixation with graft tension recorded using load cells. The effects of the tensioning device at extreme angles, and in various locking states, was evaluated. Results Strand tension varied significantly when the tensioning device was held at extreme angles (p < 0.001) or in 'locked' configurations of the tensioning device (p < 0.046). Tendon position also produced significant effects (p < 0.016) on the resultant strand tension. Conclusion An even distribution of tension among individual graft strands is obtained by maintaining the tensioning device in an unlocked state, aligned with the longitudinal axis of the tibial tunnel. If the maintenance of equal strand tension during tibial fixation of grafts is important, close attention must be paid to positioning of the tensioning device in order to optimize the resultant graft tension and, by implication, the strength and stiffness of the graft and ultimately, surgical outcome. PMID:21711536

  4. The Effects of Rehabilitation Protocol on Functional Recovery After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Dragicevic-Cvjetkovic, Dragana; Jandric, Slavica; Bijeljac, Sinisa; Palija, Stanislav; Manojlovic, Slavko; Talic, Goran

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The use of rehabilitation protocol which corresponds to surgical technique results in optimal postoperative outcome and functional recovery of patients to a pre-injury level of activity. The aim of this paper is to show the effects of the official rehabilitation protocol in our Institute on functional recovery of patients after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Patients and methods: In prospective study, we evaluated 70 males after ACL reconstruction using hamstring graft. Patients were divided into two groups according to the manner of conducting the postoperative rehabilitation. Group A consisted of 35 patients that followed postoperative rehabilitation according to the rehabilitation protocol. Group B also 35 patients, which did not undergo the rehabilitation protocol. We evaluated thigh muscle circumference and modified Tegner Lysholm Score, preoperatively and postoperatively after 1,3,6 and 12 months. In the statistical analysis, the Studentov T-test was used. Results: In the first postoperative month, the difference between groups in thigh muscle circumference is statistically significant (p<0,05). This difference between groups is statistically highly significant after 3, 6, and 12 months postoperative (p<0,01). Results of the modified Tegner Lysholm Score is statistically highly significant in 1, 3 and 6 postoperative months in patients from the experimental group (p<0,01). Conclusion: The positive effects of the rehabilitation protocol results in significant increase of the thigh muscle circumference and faster functional recovery of patients after ACL reconstruction. PMID:25568570

  5. Segmental Subtotal Corpectomy and Reconstruction With Titanium Cage and Anterior Plate for Multilevel Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Guo, Ying; Hu, Naiwu; Chen, Limin; Wu, Yin; Wang, Yang; Liu, Libing; Zhao, Chengbin

    2016-11-01

    This retrospective study assessed the outcomes of segmental subtotal corpectomy with titanium cage reconstruction and anterior plate fixation for multilevel ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. The study included 34 patients with multilevel ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament who underwent segmental subtotal corpectomy with titanium cage reconstruction and anterior plate fixation from June 2005 to May 2011. Clinical and radiologic data were obtained. Neurologic function was evaluated by Japanese Orthopedic Association scores before and after surgery. No death, paralysis, or other surgically associated injuries occurred. After surgery, the bone graft fusion was firm, with no cases of lack of postoperative bone fusion, broken or loose titanium plate and screws, dislodged titanium cage, or injury to the vertebral artery, nerve root, or spinal cord. Cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred in 2 cases. Japanese Orthopedic Association scores improved from 6.74±1.82 preoperatively to 11.33±3.5 postoperatively (P<.05). Neurologic outcomes were excellent or good in 84.21% of patients at follow-up of 1 to 6 years. No postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred. Reasonable and skilled operation of the pneumatic drill is the key to successful surgery. Anterior corpectomy with titanium cage reconstruction and plate fixation and drilling applications can directly remove the hypertrophy and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament and relieve spinal cord compression. This technique retained the integrity of the vertebrae, increasing the possibility of bone graft healing. Segmental subtotal corpectomy with titanium cage reconstruction and anterior plate fixation can be used for the treatment of multilevel ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1140-e1146.].

  6. Surgical reconstruction in female genital mutilation

    PubMed Central

    Gültekin, İsmail Burak; Altınboğa, Orhan; Dur, Rıza; Kara, Osman Fadıl; Küçüközkan, Tuncay

    2016-01-01

    Female genital mutilation (FGM) is an unusual condition for our country. However, an increase in FGM in future days can be predicted with the increasing numbers of exchange students coming from African countries, migration of refugees and socioeconomic relations with the African countries. We want to share our experience of two FGM victims admitted to our clinic with the request of reconstructive vulvar surgery before their marriage. Both women had WHO Type III FGM. Physical examination findings and surgical reconstruction techniques were presented. PMID:27274899

  7. Promising short-term results following selective bundle reconstruction in partial anterior cruciate ligament tears.

    PubMed

    Abat, Ferran; Gelber, Pablo Eduardo; Erquicia, Juan I; Pelfort, Xavier; Tey, Marc; Monllau, Juan Carlos

    2013-10-01

    The different functions of the two anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) bundles have increased interest in tears of only one of these two bundles. The purpose of this study was to assess the outcome of selective reconstruction of an injured bundle of isolated anteromedial bundle (AMB) or posterolateral bundle (PLB) tears. Consecutive series of 147 ACL reconstructions was prospectively analyzed. Patients with partial ACL tears who underwent selective bundle reconstructions were studied. Stability was assessed with the Lachman, anterior-drawer and pivot-shift tests and KT-1000. Functional assessment was performed with Lysholm and Tegner questionnaires. The preoperative MRI was analyzed to detect differences from arthroscopic findings. Twenty-eight patients (19%) were included. The minimum follow-up period was 30months. Eighteen had AMB and 10 PLB tears. Only 19% of their MRI's were categorized as partial ACL tears. The Lysholm score improved from 66.1/65.5 to 96.6/95.2 in the AMB/PLB groups, respectively (p<0.001). The same or no more than one level lower Tegner score was restored. The pivot-shift, Lachman and anterior-drawer tests were negative in all cases (p<0.001). Two reconstructed AMBs developed extension loss due to Cyclops lesions and were resolved surgically. The technique provided excellent functional scores with normalized stability and a return to previous level of activity with a low rate of minor complications at a minimum 2.5years' follow-up. Arthroscopic examination was the most reliable tool for properly diagnosing and treating a condition observed in almost one out of every five ACL reconstructed knee in this series. Therapeutic case series; level 4. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Knee laxity control in revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction versus anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and lateral tenodesis: clinical assessment using computer-assisted navigation.

    PubMed

    Colombet, Philippe

    2011-06-01

    Rotational laxity control is one of the different options to improve functional results after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Lateral extra-articular tenodesis has been proposed to reduce the rotational laxity, especially in challenging situations such as revision reconstruction after biological failure. We currently lack the practical clinical tools to objectively assess knee rotational laxities. Addition of a lateral tenodesis to anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring tendon graft could improve the knee laxity control, particularly the internal rotation, compared with a standard single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty patients underwent navigated anatomic anteromedial bundle revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with addition of percutaneous extra-articular tenodesis using the same hamstring tendon graft. The navigation was used to optimize femoral and tibial tunnel positions and to measure the knee kinematics in response to the anterior drawer test, Lachman test, maximum internal/external rotation test, and pivot-shift test. All patients underwent revision after failure without any technical error found or new trauma. Two sequential reconstruction protocols were used to assess the contribution of the extra-articular tenodesis and single anteromedial bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction to restrain tibial translations and coupled axial rotation occurring with the manually performed clinical laxity tests. In group A, the intra-articular reconstruction was fixed first and then the lateral tenodesis was fixed, and in group B, the protocol was reversed. Measurements were performed before the reconstruction, after the first part was fixed, and after the second part was fixed in each protocol. At 90° of flexion, addition of lateral tenodesis had a significant effect on coupled internal rotation (P = .003). Addition of the intra

  9. COMPLICATIONS OF THE SCREW/WASHER TIBIAL FIXATION TECHNIQUE FOR KNEE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Alexandre; Roveda, Gilberto; Valin, Márcio Rangel; Almeida, Nayvaldo Couto de; Sartor, Vanderlei; Alves, Soraya Melina

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the presence of pain at the site of the surgical incision and the need to remove the tibial fixation screw in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, in relation to sex and body mass index (BMI). Methods: A group of 265 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction with ipsilateral flexor tendon grafts from the thigh in which the tibial fixation technique consisted of using a cortical screw and metal washer, between July 2000 and November 2007, were evaluated. Results: 176 patients were evaluated for an average of 33.3 ± 19.5 months; median of 29.5 months; IIQ: 17-45 months; minimum of 8 and maximum of 87 months. There was no statistical difference regarding complaints of pain at the site of the screw (p = 0.272) and the need to remove the tibial screw (p = 0.633) between sexes. There was no statistical difference regarding complaints of pain at the site of the screw (p = 0.08) and the need to remove the tibial screw (p = 0.379) according to BMI. Conclusion: The pain complaint rate at the screw site from the screw and metal washer method used for tibial fixation in ACL reconstruction was of the order of 25%, and the screw had to be removed in 10.8% of the cases. There was no predominance of pain complaints at the surgical wound between the sexes. There was a greater tendency to complain about pain among patients with BMI < 25. There was no predominance of screw and washer removal between the sexes or between individuals with different BMIs. PMID:27022587

  10. Micro-organism colonization and intraoperative contamination in patients undergoing arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Yagi, Masayoshi; Yoshiya, Shinichi; Takesue, Yoshio

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the status of preoperative micro-organism colonization and intraoperative contamination in patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Fifty patients who underwent scheduled ACL reconstruction were included in the study. At the preoperative checkup, swabs were taken from the skin at the surgical site and the nose. During surgery, swab samples were taken from the skin adjacent to the incision and the surface of the graft and examined for contamination. Preoperative examination for micro-organism colonization showed positive results in 23 of 50 samples (46%) taken from the skin and 45 of 50 samples (90%) taken from the nose. Intraoperative swab samples taken from the skin and the graft showed positive rates of 6% and 2%, respectively, which were significantly lower compared with the preoperative values (P < .05). The most frequently identified organism in both preoperative and postoperative examinations was coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CNS), representing 93% of the positive results. Among those CNS strains, roughly one-third of the samples were shown to be methicillin resistant. During the study period, surgical-site infection with methicillin-resistant CNS occurred in 1 patient. In this patient the preoperative culture identified methicillin-sensitive CNS, whereas preoperative nasal culture and intraoperative examinations of the skin and the graft were negative. Preoperative examination of micro-organism colonization in patients undergoing ACL reconstruction showed positive results in 46% and 90% of the samples taken from the skin and the nose, respectively. In the intraoperative examination, 6% and 2% of the swabs taken from the adjacent skin and the graft, respectively, showed positive results. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of postoperative immobilization on the reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament. An experimental study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Muneta, T; Yamamoto, H; Takakuda, K; Sakai, H; Furuya, K

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the effects of postoperative immobilization and limited motion on reconstructed anterior cruciate ligaments, 28 rabbits received an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using autogenous Achilles tendon and were then divided into three groups: fully immobilized, 4 weeks immobilized, and limited motion. Two rabbits from each group were evaluated macroscopically, histologically and microangiographically at 4-week intervals until 12 weeks postoperatively. An additional six rabbits in the 4 weeks immobilized and limited motion groups were studied biomechanically at 12 weeks postoperatively. Macroscopically, both immobilized groups showed more proliferation of the infrapatellar fat pad, which was adherent to the reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament. Histology revealed more rapid regeneration of reconstructed anterior cruciate ligaments in the limited motion group, with no findings of necrosis in the mid-substance. Microangiography indicated faster normalization of vascularity in the limited motion group. The biomechanical study showed no significant difference in laxity between the 4 weeks immobilized and limited motion groups. The graft stiffness and maximum load to failure were greater for the limited motion group, although the increase was not statistically significant. The histologic and microangiographic results from the limited number of animals in this study support limited postoperative motion in the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee. However, there were no differences in terms of the biomechanical parameters at 12 weeks postoperatively between the immobilized and limited motion treatment modes.

  12. Biomechanics of a less invasive procedure for reconstruction of the ulnar collateral ligament of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Hechtman, K S; Tjin-A-Tsoi, E W; Zvijac, J E; Uribe, J W; Latta, L L

    1998-01-01

    A reconstruction of the anterior bundle of the ulnar collateral ligament of the elbow using bone anchors was compared regarding strain and valgus load strength with the intact ulnar collateral ligament and the reconstructed ulnar collateral ligament using bone tunnels. In both normal and reconstructed elbows, the anterior band and posterior band were tight during only a portion of the range of motion. Toward extension, the mean peak strain in the anterior band was tight for the normal and bone anchor groups, but lax in the bone tunnel group. Toward extension, the mean peak strain in the posterior band was lax in all elbows. Toward flexion, the strain in the anterior band was lax in the normal and bone anchor groups, but tight in the bone tunnel group. The mean of the peak strains for the posterior band toward flexion was tight for all elbows. Mean valgus load strength of normal elbows was 22.7 +/- 9.0 N.m. The bone tunnel and bone anchor mean strengths were 76.3% and 63.5%, respectively, of normal elbow strength. We concluded that the bone anchor reproduced the normal anatomy and mechanical function of the ulnar collateral ligament more closely than the bone tunnel, and that both reconstruction methods were significantly weaker than the normal ulnar collateral ligament. However, we found no significant difference in reconstruction strength between bone anchor and bone tunnel.

  13. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction tunnel size: causes of tunnel enlargement and implications for single versus two-stage revision reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Rizer, Magda; Foremny, Gregory Brian; Rush, Augustus; Singer, Adam D; Baraga, Michael; Kaplan, Lee D; Jose, Jean

    2017-02-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions have increased over the past 25 years. The increased incidence of ACL reconstructions has translated into a larger number of graft failures and revision ACL procedures. It is important to understand the causes of graft failure when evaluating for a revision ACL reconstruction and to appreciate changes in tunnel anatomy over time prior to planning revision surgery. In this manuscript, tunnel size for ACL reconstruction and implications for single-stage versus two-stage revision ACL reconstruction will be discussed, as well as causes of tunnel enlargement, including mechanical and biological factors.

  14. Treatment of the ulnar nerve for overhead throwing athletes undergoing ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Matthew S; Camp, Christopher L; Elattrache, Neal S; Altchek, David W; Dines, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    Ulnar nerve (UN) injuries are a common complaint amongst overhead athletes. The UN is strained during periods of extreme valgus stress at the elbow, especially in the late-cocking and early acceleration phases of throwing. Although early ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) reconstruction techniques frequently included routine submuscular UN transposition, this is becoming less common with more modern techniques. We review the recent literature on the sites of UN compression, techniques to evaluate the UN nerve, and treatment of UN pathology in the overhead athlete. We also discuss our preferred techniques for selective decompression and anterior transposition of the UN when indicated. More recent studies support the use of UN transpositions only when there are specific preoperative symptoms. Athletes with isolated ulnar neuropathy are increasingly being treated with subcutaneous anterior transposition of the nerve rather than submuscular transposition. When ulnar neuropathy occurs with UCL insufficiency, adoption of the muscle-splitting approach for UCL reconstructions, as well as using a subcutaneous UN transposition have led to fewer postoperative complications and improved outcomes. Prudent handling of the UN in addition to appropriate surgical technique can lead to a high percentage of athletes who return to competitive sports following surgery for ulnar neuropathy. PMID:27795946

  15. Postoperative analgesic requirements in patients undergoing arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wu, C L; Bronstein, R D; Chen, J M; Lee, D H; Rouse, L M

    2000-12-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) procedures are associated with significant postoperative pain and have traditionally been done on a short-stay hospitalization basis because of concerns for adequate postoperative analgesia. A retrospective chart review was performed to determine postoperative intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) morphine requirements for 80 patients who had undergone arthroscopically assisted ACL reconstruction under general anesthesia by means of a patellar tendon autograft by 1 of 2 surgeons. The mean +/- SD PCA morphine used after surgery was 20.4+/-20.0 mg. There was a wide interpatient difference in postoperative opioid consumption: the amount of PCA morphine used ranged from 0 mg to 124 mg. A comparison between the surgeons revealed that 1 surgeon had significantly longer intraoperative surgical, tourniquet, and anesthesia times; however, there was no difference in the length of recovery room stay, amount of postoperative PCA morphine used, or time to hospital discharge. Predicting which patients may benefit from short-stay hospitalization after arthroscopic ACL reconstruction may be difficult because of considerable interpatient differences in postoperative analgesic requirements.

  16. Perception of symmetry and asymmetry in individuals with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Roper, Jaimie A; Terza, Matthew J; Hass, Chris J

    2016-12-01

    Changes in the quantity, quality and integration of sensory information are thought to persist long after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and completion of physical therapy. Our purpose was to investigate the ability of individuals with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction to perceive imposed asymmetry and symmetry while walking. Twenty participants with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and 20 controls walked on a split-belt treadmill while we assessed the ability to detect symmetry and asymmetry at fast and slow speeds. Detection scores and spatiotemporal data during asymmetric and symmetric tasks in which the belts were coupled or decoupled over time were recorded. The ability to detect symmetry and asymmetry was not altered in individuals with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction compared to healthy young adults. The belt-speed ratio at detection also correlated to asymmetry for step length, stride length, double support time, and stance time. However, the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction group appeared to utilize unique information to determine detection. When asked to detect symmetry at a fast speed, no asymmetry scores significantly correlated with belt-speed ratio in the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction group. Conversely, asymmetry in stride length, step length, and stance time all significantly correlated with belt-speed ratio at detection in the control group. Specific sensory cues arising from the speed of the leg may also augment perception of symmetry. This strategy may be necessary in order to successfully execute the motor task, and could develop due to altered sensory information from the reconstructed knee at faster walking speeds. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, rehabilitation, and return to play: 2015 update

    PubMed Central

    Nyland, John; Mattocks, Alma; Kibbe, Shane; Kalloub, Alaa; Greene, Joe W; Caborn, David N M

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical discoveries and a growing appreciation of the knee as a complex organ are driving innovations in patient care decision-making following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Surgeons are increasing their efforts to restore combined mechanical-neurosensory ACL function and placing more consideration on when to reconstruct versus repair native anatomical structures. Surgical options now include primary repair with or without reinforcing the injured ACL with suture-based internal bracing, and growing evidence supports biological augmentation using platelet-rich plasma and mesenchymal stem cells to enhance tissue healing. Physical therapists and athletic trainers are increasing their efforts to facilitate greater athlete cognitive engagement during therapeutic exercise performance to better restore nonimpaired neuromuscular control activation amplitude and timing. Knee brace design and use needs to evolve to better match these innovations and their influence on the rehabilitation plan timetable. There is a growing appreciation for the multifaceted characteristics of the rehabilitation process and how they influence neuromuscular, educational, and psychobehavioral treatment goal achievement. Multiple sources may influence the athlete during the return to sports process and clinical outcome measures need to be refined to better evaluate these influences. This update summarizes contemporary ACL surgical, medical, and rehabilitation interventions and future trends. PMID:26955296

  18. The use of standard operating procedures in day case anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Khan, T; Jackson, W F; Beard, D J; Marfin, A; Ahmad, M; Spacie, R; Jones, R; Howes, S; Barker, K; Price, A J

    2012-08-01

    The current rate of day-case anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) in the UK remains low. Although specialised care pathways with standard operating procedures (SOPs) have been effective in reducing length of stay following some surgical procedures, this has not been previously reported for ACLR. We evaluate the effectiveness of SOPs for establishing day-case ACLR in a specialist unit. Fifty patients undergoing ACLR between May and September 2010 were studied prospectively ("study group"). SOPs were designed for pre-operative assessment, anaesthesia, surgical procedure, mobilisation and discharge. We evaluated length of stay, readmission rates, patient satisfaction and compliance to SOPs. A retrospective analysis of 50 patients who underwent ACLR prior to implementation of the day-case pathway was performed ("standard practice group"). Eighty percent of patients in the study group were discharged on the day of surgery (mean length of stay=5.3h) compared to 16% in the standard practice group (mean length of stay=21.6h). This difference was statistically significant (p<0.05, Mann-Whitney U test). All patients were satisfied with the day case pathway. Ninety-two percent of the study group were discharged on the day of surgery when all SOPs were followed and 46% where they were not. High rates of day-case ACLR with excellent patient satisfaction can be achieved with the use of a specialised patient pathway with SOPs.

  19. In vivo posterior cruciate ligament elongation in running activity after anatomic and non-anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Thorhauer, Eric; Bowman, Karl; Fu, Freddie H; Tashman, Scott

    2017-04-01

    The goals of this study were to (1) investigate the in vivo elongation behaviour of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) during running in the uninjured knee and (2) evaluate changes in PCL elongation during running after anatomic or non-anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Seventeen unilateral ACL-injured subjects were recruited after undergoing anatomic (n = 9) or non-anatomic (n = 8) ACL reconstruction. Bilateral high-resolution CT scans were obtained to produce 3D models. Anterolateral (AL) and posteromedial (PM) bundles insertion sites of the PCL were identified on the 3D CT scan reconstructions. Dynamic knee function was assessed during running using a dynamic stereo X-ray (DSX) system. The lengths of the AL and PM bundles were estimated from late swing through mid-stance. The contralateral knees served as normal controls. Control knees demonstrated a slight decrease in AL bundle and a significant decrease in PM bundle length following foot strike. Length and elongation patterns of the both bundles of the PCL in the anatomic ACL reconstruction group were similar to the controls. However, the change in dynamic PCL length was significantly greater in the non-anatomic group than in the anatomic reconstruction group after foot strike (p < 0.05). The AL bundle length decreased slightly, and the PM bundle length significantly decreased after foot strike during running in uninjured knees. Anatomic ACL reconstruction maintained normal PCL elongation patterns more effectively than non-anatomic ACL reconstruction during high-demand, functional loading. These results support the use of anatomic ACL reconstruction to achieve normal knee function in high-demand activities. Case-control study, Level III.

  20. Returning to sport after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in amateur sports men: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Notarnicola, Angela; Maccagnano, Giuseppe; Barletta, Federico; Ascatigno, Leonardo; Astuto, Leopoldo; Panella, Antonio; Tafuri, Silvio; Moretti, Biagio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background According to the literature, 95% of professional athletes return to their sport after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery. The main objective of this study was to verify the return to sport after ACL reconstruction in a homogenous group of amateur sportsmen and sportswomen in a series of Italian patients. Materials and methods We designed a retrospective study in which we analyzed the amateur sports patients operated for ACL reconstruction. We verified whether they had returned to sporting activities by comparing the pre- and post-operative Tegner activity scores. We then analyzed the average time to restart the sporting activity and the Lysholm and International Knee Documenting Committee (IKDC) scores. Results We analyzed 80 subjects: 47.5% restarted a sports activity, on average after eight months, with a significant reduction of their competitive level or physical commitment, as expressed by the Tegner activity score (pre-operative: 6.9; post-operative: 3.9; p<0.01). The functional knee recovery was good, as expressed by the average score of the Lyshom Knee Scoring Scale (93.5) and the IKDC (74.7). Conclusions In the literature, a return to sport for international case studies and amateur sports is higher than our data. In our population we found the lack of information provided by the medical staff at discharge and follow-up. The assessment at a short-term follow up allowed us to verify that at the end of the post-surgical rehabilitation program the patients were uninformed about the timing and the ability to resume a sporting activity. An efficacious relationship between orthopedic doctor, physiotherapist and a doctor in motorial science may ensure proper treatment the patient after ACL reconstruction. It is important to guarantee the restarting of the sports activity to have a better quality of life in amateur sports. Level of evidence: V. PMID:28217571

  1. Returning to sport after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in amateur sports men: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Notarnicola, Angela; Maccagnano, Giuseppe; Barletta, Federico; Ascatigno, Leonardo; Astuto, Leopoldo; Panella, Antonio; Tafuri, Silvio; Moretti, Biagio

    2016-01-01

    According to the literature, 95% of professional athletes return to their sport after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery. The main objective of this study was to verify the return to sport after ACL reconstruction in a homogenous group of amateur sportsmen and sportswomen in a series of Italian patients. We designed a retrospective study in which we analyzed the amateur sports patients operated for ACL reconstruction. We verified whether they had returned to sporting activities by comparing the pre- and post-operative Tegner activity scores. We then analyzed the average time to restart the sporting activity and the Lysholm and International Knee Documenting Committee (IKDC) scores. We analyzed 80 subjects: 47.5% restarted a sports activity, on average after eight months, with a significant reduction of their competitive level or physical commitment, as expressed by the Tegner activity score (pre-operative: 6.9; post-operative: 3.9; p<0.01). The functional knee recovery was good, as expressed by the average score of the Lyshom Knee Scoring Scale (93.5) and the IKDC (74.7). In the literature, a return to sport for international case studies and amateur sports is higher than our data. In our population we found the lack of information provided by the medical staff at discharge and follow-up. The assessment at a short-term follow up allowed us to verify that at the end of the post-surgical rehabilitation program the patients were uninformed about the timing and the ability to resume a sporting activity. An efficacious relationship between orthopedic doctor, physiotherapist and a doctor in motorial science may ensure proper treatment the patient after ACL reconstruction. It is important to guarantee the restarting of the sports activity to have a better quality of life in amateur sports. Level of evidence: V.

  2. Using pre-operative MRI to predict intraoperative hamstring graft size for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Leiter, Jeff; Elkurbo, Mohamed; McRae, Sheila; Chiu, James; Froese, Warren; MacDonald, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Large variation in tendon size between individuals makes hamstring graft diameter for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction unpredictable. Inadequate graft diameter may necessitate an alternative source of tissue requiring pre-operative planning. The purpose of this study was to determine whether magnetic resonance image (MRI) measurements and clinical anthropometric data are predictive of hamstring tendon graft diameter. Data from 109 patients having ACL reconstruction with semitendinosus-gracilis (STGT) autograft were retrospectively evaluated. Cross-sectional area (CSA) of the gracilis tendon (GT) and semitendinosus tendon (ST) were determined from pre-operative MRI scans. Variables included pre-operative height, weight, body mass index (BMI), age and gender; and intra-operative graft diameter. Correlations between anthropometric variables, hamstring tendons CSA and intra-operative graft diameter were calculated. Multiple stepwise regression was performed to assess the predictive value of these variables to graft diameter. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated to evaluate the utility of MRI CSA measurements in accurately identifying inadequate graft diameter (<8 mm). All anthropometric variables were positively correlated with intraoperative graft diameter (p < 0.01). Semitendinosus-gracilis tendon CSA (p < 0.001) and STGT CSA and weight (p < 0.001) were significantly predictive models of graft diameter. Sensitivity and specificity were 79 and 74 %, respectively. The strongest indicators of a four-stranded STGT graft for primary ACL reconstruction were STGT CSA on MRI plus weight. Measurement of graft diameter can be performed pre-operatively via MRI to identify tendons that may be of inadequate size for ACL reconstruction. This can assist with surgical planning to determine the most appropriate graft choice. III.

  3. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and return to sport activity: postural control as the key to success.

    PubMed

    Papalia, Rocco; Franceschi, Francesco; Tecame, Andrea; D'Adamio, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    The risk for re-tear following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is influenced by several hormonal, neuromuscular, biomechanical and anatomic factors. One of the most important negative prognostic factors that markedly increase the risk for ACL re-tear is the presence of high knee-abduction moment (KAM), which can be measured immediately by landing on both feet after a vertical jump. We evaluated the effect in postoperative values for KAM according to the type of graft used for ACL reconstruction (hamstring vs patellar tendon) and a specific rehabilitation protocol focusing on recovery of muscular strength, proprioception and joint stabilisation. From November 2010 to September 2012, we enrolled 40 female recreational athletes with clinical and imaging evidence of ACL tear and randomised them in two groups. One group of patients underwent reconstruction with a hamstring-tendon graft and the second with a patellar-tendon graft. A custom rehabilitation programme focusing on proprioception was adopted. Clinical outcomes [International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) and Lysholm scores] and performance in functional test for stability (single-leg hop, timed hop, crossover triple hop, KAM test) were assessed preoperatively at three and six months postoperatively. All patients showed statistically significant clinical improvements postoperatively when compared with preoperative values (P < 0.0001). No significant intergroup difference was observed in all clinical scores and functional tests, with the exception of the value registered for the KAM test (P < 0.0001). ACL reconstruction using patellar-tendon graft followed by rehabilitation centred on strength, proprioception and stability restoration can produce satisfactory values for KAM within the physiological range. The surgical strategies should be adapted to the patient on the basis of a multidisciplinary approach.

  4. Knee kinematics during stair descent 20 years following anterior cruciate ligament rupture with and without reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sole, Gisela; Tengman, Eva; Grip, Helena; Häger, Charlotte K

    2016-02-01

    Changes and asymmetries for walking gait have been explored extensively following injuries of anterior cruciate ligaments within ten years of injury or reconstruction. We examined longer term knee joint kinematics of reconstructed and non-reconstructed knees during stair descent compared to controls. Three-dimensional knee kinematics during stair descent were registered for 33 subjects with ACL reconstruction, 36 subjects with ACL rupture managed with physiotherapy only and 31 uninjured controls. Injured subjects were 23.5 (2.1) years following injury. Linear mixed models were used to compare temporal variables and knee kinematics during stance phase between groups and contralateral sides. Walking speed was slower for the both ACL-injured groups compared to controls and stance duration was longer for the injured than the uninjured sides of the physiotherapy-only group. Compared to controls, the physiotherapy-only group had significantly less adduction at initial foot contact of the injured and uninjured knees. The uninjured side of the physiotherapy-only group also had less flexion than controls at initial foot contact and during weight acceptance. Compared to the surgically-managed group, the injured sides of the physiotherapy-only groups had significantly less adduction at initial contact, peak adduction during weight acceptance, and peak flexion during propulsion. Independent of treatment, altered knee kinematics exist more than 20 years following ACL injury during stair descent. We suggest that future studies investigating short and long-term kinematic outcomes of ACL injury could evaluate stair descent with particular emphasis on weight acceptance of stance, and potential associations to perceived knee function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Simultaneous surgical management of chronic grade-2 valgus instability of the knee and anterior cruciate ligament deficiency in athletes.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Papalia, Rocco; Del Buono, Angelo; Merlo, Franco; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-03-01

    We report on 22 patients with chronic grade-2 valgus laxity of the knee combined with chronic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiency, in whom the two lesions were addressed at the same surgical setting. At a minimum follow-up of 24 months, clinical and functional variables had improved significantly (P < 0.001), and 20 of the 22 patients (91%) had returned to sport at pre-injury level. There were no operative complications in this series. In selected athletes with chronic symptomatic valgus laxity of the knee combined with ACL insufficiency, surgical repair of the MCL in association with ACL reconstruction is a suitable and reliable option to restore knee stability and allow return to pre-injury activity level.

  6. Reconstructive methods in hearing disorders - surgical methods

    PubMed Central

    Zahnert, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Restoration of hearing is associated in many cases with resocialisation of those affected and therefore occupies an important place in a society where communication is becoming ever faster. Not all problems can be solved surgically. Even 50 years after the introduction of tympanoplasty, the hearing results are unsatisfactory and often do not reach the threshold for social hearing. The cause of this can in most cases be regarded as incomplete restoration of the mucosal function of the middle ear and tube, which leads to ventilation disorders of the ear and does not allow real vibration of the reconstructed middle ear. However, a few are also caused by the biomechanics of the reconstructed ossicular chain. There has been progress in reconstructive middle ear surgery, which applies particularly to the development of implants. Implants made of titanium, which are distinguished by outstanding biocompatibility, delicate design and by biomechanical possibilities in the reconstruction of chain function, can be regarded as a new generation. Metal implants for the first time allow a controlled close fit with the remainder of the chain and integration of micromechanical functions in the implant. Moreover, there has also been progress in microsurgery itself. This applies particularly to the operative procedures for auditory canal atresia, the restoration of the tympanic membrane and the coupling of implants. This paper gives a summary of the current state of reconstructive microsurgery paying attention to the acousto-mechanical rules. PMID:22073050

  7. Clinical thresholds for quadriceps assessment after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kuenze, Christopher; Hertel, Jay; Saliba, Susan; Diduch, David R; Weltman, Arthur; Hart, Joseph M

    2015-02-01

    Normal, symmetrical quadriceps strength is a common clinical goal after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). Currently, the clinical thresholds for acceptable unilateral quadriceps function and symmetry associated with positive outcomes after return to activity are unclear. To establish quadriceps-activation and knee-extension-torque cutoffs for clinical assessment after return to activity after ACLR. Descriptive laboratory study. Laboratory. 22 (10 female, 12 male; age = 22.5 ± 5.0 y, height = 172.9 ± 7.1 cm, mass = 74.1 ± 15.5 kg, months since surgery = 31.5 ± 23.5) recreationally active persons with a history of unilateral, primary ACLR at least 6 months prior and 24 (12 female/12 male, age = 21.7 ± 3.6 y, height = 168.0 ± 8.8 cm, mass = 69.3 ± 13.6 kg) recreationally active healthy participants. Patient-reported measures of pain, knee-related function, and physical activity level were recorded for all participants. Normalized knee-extension maximum-voluntary-isometric-contraction (MVIC) torque (Nm/kg) and quadriceps central-activation ratio (CAR, %) were measured bilaterally in all participants. Receiver-operator-characteristic (ROC) curves were used to establish thresholds for unilateral measures of normalized knee-extension MVIC torque and quadriceps CAR, as well as limb-symmetry indices (LSI). ROC curves then established clinical thresholds for normalized knee-extension MVIC torque and quadriceps CAR LSIs associated with healthy knee-related function. Involved-quadriceps CAR above 89.3% was the strongest unilateral indicator of healthy-group membership, while quadriceps CAR LSI above 0.996 and knee-extension MVIC torque above 0.940 were the strongest overall indicators. Unilateral normalized knee-extension MVIC torque above 3.00 Nm/kg and quadriceps CAR LSI above 0.992 were the best indicators of good patient-reported knee-related outcomes. Threshold values established in this study may provide a guide for clinicians when making return

  8. Scapholunate interosseus ligament reconstruction on a cadaver: A technique

    PubMed Central

    Arenas-Prat, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acute rupture of the scapholunate interosseus ligament is a relatively frequent occurrence which can be repaired primarily by direct suturing. However, patients are often seen a few weeks after injury when most of the ligament fibers have degenerated. This poses a challenge because direct repair can be difficult and long term results have not been satisfying. In the present study, a technique is presented to address this problem and its possible advantages are discussed. Materials and Methods: A fresh frozen wrist cadaver specimen, thawed to room temperature, was used to carry out the procedure. The scapholunate joint was exposed through a dorsal approach and stabilized using two percutaneous Kirschner wires. Using a U shaped chisel, a groove along the scapholunate articular margin was created to accommodate a strip from the extensor retinaculum as a ligament plasty. This has been secured using six anchor sutures and several pictures taken during the procedure to expose the key steps. Results: The ligamentoplasty presented in this article preserves most of the articular surface of proximal carpus and at the same time stabilizes the scapholunate joint. However, more in vivo research should be carried out to validate this treatment. Conclusion: The technique suggests a possible way to repair a ruptured scapholunate interosseus ligament that cannot be repaired primarily. Because osteointegration of the ligament strips is not possible in the present experiment, biomechanics of the construct cannot be fully tested. PMID:25298562

  9. Multiple Looping Technique for Tibial Fixation in Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jung Ho; Yoon, Kyoung Ho; Song, Sang Jun; Roh, Young Hak; Lee, Jae Woo

    2015-01-01

    The outcomes of posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction may be negatively affected by insufficient tibial tunnel fixation due to relatively lower bone density of the proximal tibia. We introduce a new technique of tibial fixation for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using free tendon Achilles allograft that is less affected by the bone density of the tibial metaphysis. PMID:25973367

  10. Increased odds of patient-reported success at 2 years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in patients without cartilage lesions: a cohort study from the Swedish National Knee Ligament Register.

    PubMed

    Hamrin Senorski, Eric; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Musahl, Volker; Fu, Freddie; Krupic, Ferid; Desai, Neel; Westin, Olof; Samuelsson, Kristian

    2017-06-07

    To investigate whether the surgical technique of single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, the visualization of anatomic surgical factors and the presence or absence of concomitant injuries at primary ACL reconstruction are able to predict patient-reported success and failure. The hypothesis of this study was that anatomic single-bundle surgical procedures would be predictive of patient-reported success. This cohort study was based on data from the Swedish National Knee Ligament Register during the period of 1 January 2005 through 31 December 2014. Patients who underwent primary single-bundle ACL reconstruction with hamstring tendons were included. Details on surgical technique were collected using an online questionnaire comprising essential anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction scoring checklist items, defined as the utilization of accessory medial portal drilling, anatomic tunnel placement, the visualization of insertion sites and pertinent landmarks. A univariate logistic regression model adjusted for age and gender was used to determine predictors of patient-reported success and failure, i.e. 20th and 80th percentile, respectively, in the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), 2 years after ACL reconstruction. In the 6889 included patients, the surgical technique used for single-bundle ACL reconstruction did not predict the predefined patient-reported success or patient-reported failure in the KOOS4. Patient-reported success was predicted by the absence of concomitant injury to the meniscus (OR = 0.81 [95% CI, 0.72-0.92], p = 0.001) and articular cartilage (OR = 0.70 [95% CI, 0.61-0.81], p < 0.001). Patient-reported failure was predicted by the presence of a concomitant injury to the articular cartilage (OR = 1.27 [95% CI, 1.11-1.44], p < 0.001). Surgical techniques used in primary single-bundle ACL reconstruction did not predict the KOOS 2 years after the reconstruction. However, the absence of

  11. [Intra- and extra-articular hamstring reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament tears].

    PubMed

    Buscayret, C; Buscayret, F; Farenq, C

    2001-05-01

    We examined a reconstruction technique for tears of the anterior cruciate ligament using the hamstring tendons. The tendons were harvested en bloc, leaving the tibial insertion intact. Three intra-articular strands (two semitendinous and one gracilis) and lateral tenodesis were used with continuity via the gracilis. The intra-articular procedure was performed arthroscopically with tunneling laterally to medially to achieve the best position. Ligamentoplasty was performed in 262 cases. Outcome was satisfactory. This method preserves the lateral iliotibial sheath and spares the extensors apparatus. It is particularly interesting for reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament tears when a lateral tenodesis appears to be necessary.

  12. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Screw Fixation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizari, Mahmoud; Wang, Bin; Snow, Martyn; Barrett, Mel

    2008-09-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental and finite element analysis of tibial screw fixation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The mechanical properties of the bone and tendon graft are obtained from experiments using porcine bone and bovine tendon. The results of the numerical study are compared with those from mechanical testing. Analysis shows that the model may be used to establish the optimum placement of the tunnel in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by predicting mechanical parameters such as stress, strain and displacement at regions in the tunnel wall.

  13. RISKS AND CONSEQUENCES OF USING THE TRANSPORTAL TECHNIQUE IN RECONSTRUCTING THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN THE FEMORAL TUNNEL, LATERAL SUPERIOR GENICULAR ARTERY AND LATERAL EPICONDYLE OF THE FEMORAL CONDYLE

    PubMed Central

    Astur, Diego Costa; Aleluia, Vinicius; Santos, Ciro Veronese; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Badra, Ricardo; Oliveira, Saulo Gomes; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Define a security zone to avoid possibles vascular and ligamentar complications during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Methods: Arthroscopic reconstruction using the transtibial and transportal technique in cadaver knees was performed followed by dissection and measurement of the distance between the femoral tunnel and the proximal attachment of the lateral collateral ligament and the femoral tunnel and the lateral superior genicular artery. Results: The measure of the analysed distances show us an aproximation between the major branch of the lateral superior genicular artery and the femoral insertion of the colateral lateral ligament and the femoral tunnel during the transportal technique. Conclusion: We realize that the use of technical ship it to arthroscopic ACL reconstruction has a higher probability of injury to the lateral geniculate artery and insertion of the lateral collateral ligament, promoting post-surgical complications such as instability of the knee, osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle and ligamentização graft. PMID:27047873

  14. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in the Skeletally Immature

    PubMed Central

    Kercher, Jim; Xerogeanes, John; Tannenbaum, Allen; Al-Hakim, Ramsey; Black, James C.; Zhao, John

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has proven to be a reliable method to restore knee stability. However, the risk of physeal arrest with transphyseal tunnel placement in skeletally immature patients has raised concern regarding this technique. Conservative nonoperative management also has its limitations resulting in meniscal and chondral damage that may lead to degenerative joint disease and poor return to sport. Researchers have used animal models to study the threshold of physeal damage producing growth deformity. The purpose of this study was to examine the distal femoral and proximal tibial physes and determine the damage produced by drilling transphyseal tunnels. In addition, we attempted to find a reproducible angle at which to drill the tibial tunnel for safe interference screw placement. To do this, we used a custom software module. Methods A custom software package designed by our team was used: Module for Adolescent ACL Reconstructive Surgery (MAARS). This module created a 3-dimensional model of the distal femur and proximal tibia. The data required for MAARS were sagittal and coronal T1 magnetic resonance imagings of at least 1.5T. Thirty-one knee magnetic resonance imaging studies from patients aged 10 to 15 years old were used. The physes were segmented out to obtain volumetric measurements. Transphyseal tunnels were simulated based on the anatomic trajectory of the native ACL. The module calculated volume of physis was removed with the use of an 8-mm tunnel and the optimum angle for trajectory. Results Average volume of the tibial and femoral physis was 12,683.1 μL and 14,708.3 μL, respectively. The volume increased linearly with age. Average volume removed from the tibial and femoral physis was 318.4 μL and 306.29 μL, respectively. This represented 2.4% of the distal femoral physis and 2.5% of the proximal tibial physis. The volume percent removed decreased linearly with age. Manipulation of the variables

  15. Comparison of artificial graft versus autograft in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Chen; Cao, Shi-Qi; Xue, Chen-Chen; Liu, Tian-Ze; Huang, Xuan; Xu, Wei-Dong

    2017-07-19

    Critically evaluation and summarization for the outcomes between autografts and artificial grafts using in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have not been performed currently. The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical outcomes between artificial ligaments and autografts at a short- to mid-term follow-up. A computerized search of the databases was conducted including Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane library. Only prospective or retrospective comparative studies with a minimum 2-year follow-up and a minimum sample size of 15 for each group were considered for inclusion. Two independent reviewers performed data extraction and methodological quality assessment. A Mantel-Haenszel analysis was used for pooling of results. Sensitivity analysis was performed in order to maintain the stability of results. Seven studies were included in this study. The total sample size was 403 (autograft group: 206 patients; synthetic graft group: 197 patients). Four studies were randomized controlled trials. Two studies were retrospective comparative studies and one study was non-randomized prospective comparative study. In terms of instrumented laxity, patient-oriented outcomes and complications, no significant difference was occurred between new artificial ligaments and autografts. But the results of IKDC grades and instrumented laxity were worsen in early artificial ligaments compared to autografts. The outcomes of new generation of artificial ligaments are similar to autografts at a short- to mid-term follow-up. However, the early artificial ligaments are not suggested for ACL reconstruction compared to autografts.

  16. Surgical retrieval, isolation and in vitro expansion of human anterior cruciate ligament-derived cells for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashim; Sharif, Kevin; Walters, Megan; Woods, Mia D; Potty, Anish; Main, Benjamin J; El-Amin, Saadiq F

    2014-04-30

    Injury to the ACL is a commonly encountered problem in active individuals. Even partial tears of this intra-articular knee ligament lead to biomechanical deficiencies that impair function and stability. Current options for the treatment of partial ACL tears range from nonoperative, conservative management to multiple surgical options, such as: thermal modification, single-bundle repair, complete reconstruction, and reconstruction of the damaged portion of the native ligament. Few studies, if any, have demonstrated any single method for management to be consistently superior, and in many cases patients continue to demonstrate persistent instability and other comorbidities. The goal of this study is to identify a potential cell source for utilization in the development of a tissue engineered patch that could be implemented in the repair of a partially torn ACL. A novel protocol was developed for the expansion of cells derived from patients undergoing ACL reconstruction. To isolate the cells, minced hACL tissue obtained during ACL reconstruction was digested in a Collagenase solution. Expansion was performed using DMEM/F12 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) and 1% penicillin/streptomycin (P/S). The cells were then stored at -80 ºC or in liquid nitrogen in a freezing medium consisting of DMSO, FBS and the expansion medium. After thawing, the hACL derived cells were then seeded onto a tissue engineered scaffold, PLAGA (Poly lactic-co-glycolic acid) and control Tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). After 7 days, SEM was performed to compare cellular adhesion to the PLAGA versus the control TCPS. Cellular morphology was evaluated using immunofluorescence staining. SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope) micrographs demonstrated that cells grew and adhered on both PLAGA and TCPS surfaces and were confluent over the entire surfaces by day 7. Immunofluorescence staining showed normal, non-stressed morphological patterns on both surfaces. This technique is

  17. Landing mechanics during single hop for distance in females following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction compared to healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Trigsted, Stephanie M; Post, Eric G; Bell, David R

    2017-05-01

    To determine possible differences in single-hop kinematics and kinetics in females with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction compared to healthy controls. A second purpose was to make comparisons between the healthy and reconstructed limbs. Subjects were grouped based on surgical status (33 ACLR patients and 31 healthy controls). 3D motion capture synchronized with force plates was used to capture the landing phase of three successful trials of single hop for distance during a single data collection session. Peak values during the loading phase were analysed. Subjects additionally completed three successful trials of the triple hop for distance Tegner activity scale and International Knee Document Committee 2000 (IKDC). Controls demonstrated greater peak knee flexion and greater internal knee extension moment and hip extension moment than ACLR subjects. Within the ACLR group, the healthy limb exhibited greater peak knee flexion, hip flexion, hip extension moment, single hop and triple hops for distance and normalized quadriceps strength. Patients who undergo anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction land in a more extended posture when compared to healthy controls and compared to their healthy limb. III.

  18. The Impact of the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) Research on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Orthopaedic Practice.

    PubMed

    Lynch, T Sean; Parker, Richard D; Patel, Ronak M; Andrish, Jack T; Spindler, Kurt P; Amendola, Annunziata; Brophy, Robert H; Dunn, Warren R; Flanigan, David C; Huston, Laura J; Jones, Morgan H; Kaeding, Christopher C; Marx, Robert G; Matava, Matthew J; McCarty, Eric C; Pedroza, Angela D; Reinke, Emily K; Wolf, Brian R; Wright, Rick W

    2015-03-01

    With an estimated 200,000 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions performed annually in the United States, there is an emphasis on determining patient-specific information to help educate patients on expected clinically relevant outcomes. The Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network consortium was created in 2002 to enroll and longitudinally follow a large population cohort of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. The study group has enrolled >4,400 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions from seven institutions to establish the large level I prospective anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction outcomes cohort. The group has become more than a database with information regarding anterior cruciate ligament injuries; it has helped to establish a new benchmark for conducting multicenter, multisurgeon orthopaedic research. The changes in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction practice resulting from the group include the use of autograft for high school, college, and competitive athletes in their primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. Other modifications include treatment options for meniscus and cartilage injuries, as well as lifestyle choices made after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  19. All Arthroscopic Remnant-Preserving Technique to Reconstruct the Lateral Ankle Ligament Complex.

    PubMed

    Gui, Jianchao; Jiang, Yiqiu; Li, Yang; Tao, Tianqi; Li, Wang; Zhang, Kaibing; Yao, Wangxiang; Dong, Peilong

    2017-06-01

    Arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament reconstruction has been recently advocated. But this technique has not been popularized because of the technical complexity and potential iatrogenic injury. Because the talocalcaneal and calcaneofibular ligaments are extra-articular structures, how to efficiently view and address them is a difficult task. Limited dissection outside the capsule to form a working space is required, but aggressive dissection is harmful for tissue healing although it is helpful for visualization and instrumentation. Because almost the entire talar body is covered by articular cartilage, it is very difficult to safely make a bone tunnel without damaging the cartilage. The remnants of the lateral ankle ligament have proprioceptive sensors that are important for functional stability, but it is difficult to perform anatomical reconstruction arthroscopically while preserving them because of the narrow working space. Furthermore, how to properly tension the reconstructed ligaments in such a narrow working space is also a very difficult task. We have designed a technique that preserves the remnants of lateral ankle ligaments, and all of the above-mentioned problems have been successfully addressed. We have used this technique clinically, and only minor complications occurred.

  20. The improvement of postural control in patients with mechanical ankle instability after lateral ankle ligaments reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Yun; Zheng, Jie-Jiao; Zhang, Jian; Cai, Ye-Hua; Hua, Ying-Hui; Chen, Shi-Yi

    2016-04-01

    Lateral ankle sprain is the most common injury. A previous study demonstrated that patients with mechanical ankle instability suffered deficits in postural control, indicating that structural damage of the lateral ankle ligaments may produce a balance deficit. The purpose of this study was to confirm that lateral ligaments reconstruction could improve postural control in patients with mechanical ankle instability. A total of 15 patients were included in the study. Each patient had a history of an ankle sprain with persistent symptoms of ankle instability and a positive anterior drawer test and had been treated nonoperatively for at least 3 months. All patients were diagnosed with lateral ankle ligaments tear by ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. They underwent arthroscopic debridement and open lateral ankle ligaments reconstruction with a modified Broström procedure. One day before and 6 months after the operation, all of the participants underwent single-limb postural sway tests. The anterior drawer test and the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society scale score were used to evaluate the clinical results in these patients. At 6 months after the operation, with the patients' eyes closed, there was significantly decreased postural sway in the anteroposterior direction, the circumferential area, and the total path length on the operated ankles compared with those measurements before the operation. With eyes open, however, no difference was found in postural sway before and after the operation. Postural control was improved by reconstructing the lateral ligaments. IV.

  1. Accuracy and Learning Curve of Femoral Tunnel Placement in Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hiemstra, Laurie Anne; Kerslake, Sarah; O'Brien, Catherine L; Lafave, Mark R

    2017-02-13

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of femoral tunnel placement in a medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction (MPFL-R) cohort. The secondary purpose was to establish the evidence of a learning curve to achieve acceptable femoral tunnel placement during MPFL-R. Two surgeons, using lateral radiographs, assessed 73 subjects post-MPFL-R. Femoral tunnel accuracy and direction of tunnel error were measured in relation to Schöttle's point (A-T distance). Interrater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient 2,k) of these measures was calculated. Learning curve of accurate femoral tunnel placement was examined by dividing the patient cohort into quartiles. A one-way analysis of variance was used to assess the quartiles for accuracy of femoral tunnel position and surgical time. In relation to Schöttle's point, 66/73 (90.4%) femoral tunnels were categorized as being in a "good" or "excellent" position and 7/73 (9.6%) were categorized as being in a "poor" position. Evidence of an MPFL-R learning curve was established via a statistically significant difference in the mean A to T distance for the four quartiles (F [3, 69] = 6.41, p = 0.001). There was also a statistically significant difference in the surgical time for the four quartiles (F [3, 69] = 8.71, p = 0.001). In this series, accurate femoral tunnels were placed more than 90% of the time during MPFL-R. A clear learning curve for accurate femoral tunnel placement was demonstrated both with respect to distance of the tunnel from Schöttle point and with regard to surgical time. Level of evidence was IV.

  2. Arthroscopic-Assisted Management of Unstable Distal-Third Clavicle Fractures: Conoid Ligament Reconstruction and Fracture Cerclage With Sutures

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, Luis Natera; Reiriz, Juan Sarasquete

    2015-01-01

    Surgical treatment is usually indicated for the management of Neer type IIB fractures of the distal third of the clavicle. These unstable injuries have shown a rate of nonunion that oscillates around 30% to 45% when managed conservatively, and surgical strategies often require a second operation for implant removal. We describe an arthroscopic-assisted technique for the treatment of Neer type IIB unstable distal-third clavicle fractures that overcomes the issues related to open surgery, metal hardware, and implant irritation. This technique increases the load to failure of the construct by means of adding a synthetic conoid ligament reconstruction with a nonrigid suspension device, and it allows the diagnosis and treatment of associated glenohumeral injuries. Our technique incorporates a fracture interfragmentary fixation with sutures, thus avoiding a second operation for implant removal. PMID:26870642

  3. Long-term clinical and radiographic results after delayed anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Månsson, Olle; Sernert, Ninni; Rostgard-Christensen, Lars; Kartus, Jüri

    2015-01-01

    The risk of further intra-articular damage associated with nonoperative or delayed anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction must be considered against the risk of growth disturbance with early reconstruction and transphyseal drilling. Long-term follow-ups after the surgical treatment of ACL injuries in adolescents are rare. To evaluate results 10 to 20 years after ACL reconstruction in terms of the radiographic presence of osteoarthritis, clinical assessments, and health-related quality of life in patients who were adolescents at the time of surgery. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Thirty-two adolescents (mean age, 15.2 years [range, 12-16 years]; 11 boys, 21 girls), with a symptomatic unilateral ACL rupture, underwent reconstruction using bone-patellar tendon-bone (n=10) or hamstring tendon (n=22) autografts at an almost skeletally mature age according to Tanner stage 4. Twenty-nine patients (91%) underwent clinical, radiographic, and health-related quality of life assessments after 10 to 20 years (mean, 175 months). The mean time between the injury and index surgery was 11.6 months. The reconstructed knee had significantly more osteoarthritic changes compared with the noninvolved contralateral knee (P=.001). Preoperatively, the median Tegner activity level was 4 (range, 2-8), and the median Lysholm knee score was 75 (range, 50-90) points. At follow-up, the respective median values were 4 (range, 1-7) and 84 (range, 34-100) points (P=not significant [preoperatively vs follow-up]). The median finding for the single-legged hop test was 84% (range, 0%-105%) preoperatively and 93% (range, 53%-126%) at follow-up (P=.01). At follow-up, muscle strength measurements displayed more than 90% of the noninvolved leg in both extension and flexion. The manual Lachman test result was significantly improved at follow-up compared with preoperatively (P<.001). The 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) revealed scores comparable with those of healthy controls. The mean

  4. Annular Ligament Reconstruction With Triceps Autograft for Chronic Radial Head Instability.

    PubMed

    Marinello, Patrick G; Wagner, Timothy; Styron, Joseph; Maschke, Steven; Evans, Peter J

    2016-03-01

    We present a modification and revisit of the Bell Tawse technique for annular ligament reconstruction with triceps autograft for chronic radial head instability. In patients with instability stemming from an incompetent annular ligament, this technique has proved successful to restore stability to the proximal radial capitellar joint as an augment after ensuring normal boney anatomy. Through a lateral Kocher approach, an approximately 10 cm × 4 mm strip of lateral triceps tendon is harvested as a free graft for the reconstruction. Following passing of the triceps autograft around the radial neck, it is sutured to a mini-Mitek suture anchor and is placed into a decorticated portion of the proximal ulna to recreate the annular ligament. Finally, we present 2 case illustrations where this technique was successfully used for chronic radial head instability.

  5. Neural Excitability Alterations After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Pietrosimone, Brian G.; Lepley, Adam S.; Ericksen, Hayley M.; Clements, Amy; Sohn, David H.; Gribble, Phillip A.

    2015-01-01

    Context Neuromuscular dysfunction is common after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R). However, little is known about quadriceps spinal-reflex and descending corticomotor excitability after ACL-R. Understanding the effects of ACL-R on spinal-reflex and corticomotor excitability will help elucidate the origins of neuromuscular dysfunction. Objective To determine whether spinal-reflex excitability and corticomotor excitability differed between the injured and uninjured limbs of patients with unilateral ACL-R and between these limbs and the matched limbs of healthy participants. Design Case-control study. Setting Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants A total of 28 patients with unilateral ACL-R (9 men, 19 women; age = 21.28 ± 3.79 years, height = 170.95 ± 10.04 cm, mass = 73.18 ± 18.02 kg, time after surgery = 48.10 ± 36.17 months) and 29 participants serving as healthy controls (9 men, 20 women; age = 21.55 ± 2.70 years, height = 170.59 ± 8.93 cm, mass = 71.89 ± 12.70 kg) volunteered. Main Outcome Measure(s) Active motor thresholds (AMTs) were collected from the vastus medialis (VM) using transcranial magnetic stimulation. We evaluated VM spinal reflexes using the Hoffmann reflex normalized to maximal muscle responses (H : M ratio). Voluntary quadriceps activation was measured with the superimposed-burst technique and calculated using the central activation ratio (CAR). We also evaluated whether ACL-R patients with high or low voluntary activation had different outcomes. Results The AMT was higher in the injured than in the uninjured limb in the ACL-R group (t27 = 3.32, P = .003) and in the matched limb of the control group (t55 = 2.05, P = .04). The H : M ratio was bilaterally higher in the ACL-R than the control group (F1,55 = 5.17, P = .03). The quadriceps CAR was bilaterally lower in the ACL-R compared with the control group (F1,55 = 10.5, P = .002). The ACL-R group with low voluntary activation (CAR < 0.95) had higher AMT than

  6. A novel use for suture button suspension: reconstruction of the dorsal ulnar ligament to treat thumb metacarpal dislocation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ajul; Martin, Garry; Thomson, James Grant

    2015-01-01

    There are numerous treatment algorithms that have been developed to treat thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) arthritis. A newer treatment option for these patients is CMC stabilization using suture button suspensionplasty. The authors of this case report have extensive experience with the suture-button suspensionplasty using the Mini TightRope CMC technique (Arthrex). We present a novel usage of the suture-button suspensionplasty to reconstruct the dorsal ulnar ligament (in contrast to the usual reconstruction of the volar beak ligament) to treat a patient with persistent thumb metacarpal dislocation at the CMC joint. Two separate patients are presented. One patient demonstrates volar beak ligament instability, and the other demonstrates dorsal ulnar ligament instability. Both patients' demographics and operative indications are described. The operative technique for the novel usage of the suture-button suspensionplasty is described. Operative results of the dorsal ulnar ligament reconstruction are reviewed. After suture-button suspension of the thumb metacarpal to the trapezium, the dorsal ulnar ligament has been reconstructed. The patient demonstrated stability of the thumb CMC joint without dorsal or radial dislocation. The authors of this case report present a novel usage of the suture-button suspensionplasty to treat a patient with proximal thumb metacarpal dislocation at the trapezial-metacarpal interface. This method, in contrast to the referenced method of volar beak ligament reconstruction, allows reconstruction of the dorsal ulnar ligament. This allows stabilization of the joint by preventing dorsal and radial dislocation of the metacarpal.

  7. Implementation of Open and Closed Kinetic Chain Quadriceps Strengthening Exercises after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Michael D.; Denegar, Craig R.; Winzenried, Jay A.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the effects of open kinetic chain (OKC) and closed kinetic chain (CKC) exercise on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) strain and patellofemoral joint stress, suggesting a combination of the two for quadriceps strengthening after ACL reconstruction. Both OKC and CKC exercises may be modified and implemented for quadriceps strengthening after…

  8. Implementation of Open and Closed Kinetic Chain Quadriceps Strengthening Exercises after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Michael D.; Denegar, Craig R.; Winzenried, Jay A.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the effects of open kinetic chain (OKC) and closed kinetic chain (CKC) exercise on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) strain and patellofemoral joint stress, suggesting a combination of the two for quadriceps strengthening after ACL reconstruction. Both OKC and CKC exercises may be modified and implemented for quadriceps strengthening after…

  9. Pain and negative mood during rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a daily process analysis.

    PubMed

    Brewer, B W; Cornelius, A E; Sklar, J H; Van Raalte, J L; Tennen, H; Armeli, S; Corsetti, J R; Brickner, J C

    2007-10-01

    Daily diary methods were used to examine changes in pain and negative mood over the first 6 weeks of rehabilitation after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Participants (58 men and 33 women) completed measures of personal factors (i.e., age, athletic identity, neuroticism, optimism) before surgery and indices of daily pain, negative mood, and stress for 42 days after surgery. Multilevel modeling revealed that, as would be expected, daily pain ratings decreased significantly over the course of the study and that the rate of decline in pain ratings decreased over time. Age and daily negative mood were positively associated with daily pain ratings. Daily negative mood also decreased significantly over the course of the study and was positively associated with neuroticism, daily pain, and daily stress. Athletic identity and optimism interacted with time since surgery in predicting daily negative mood such that participants with high levels of athletic identity and low levels of optimism reported greater decreases in daily negative mood over time. Overall, the findings reveal a pattern of improved psychological functioning over the early stages of post-operative ACL rehabilitation.

  10. Arthroscopically Assisted Acromioclavicular and Coracoclavicular Ligament Reconstruction for Chronic Acromioclavicular Joint Instability.

    PubMed

    Martetschläger, Frank; Tauber, Mark; Habermeyer, Peter; Hawi, Nael

    2016-12-01

    Acromioclavicular (AC) joint injuries are common injuries, especially in the young and active, male population. AC joint injuries account for 12% of all injuries of the shoulder girdle in the overall population. Although conservative treatment is recommended for Rockwood type I and type II injuries, there is controversial debate about optimal treatment for type III injuries. High-grade injuries are typically treated operatively to avoid painful sequelae. A vast number of different surgical methods have been described over the past few decades. Recent advances in arthroscopic surgery have enabled the shoulder surgeon to treat acute and chronic AC lesions arthroscopically assisted. Clinical studies have already shown good and reliable results. Although surgeons agree that a biological augmentation is required to minimize the risk of recurrent instability in chronic cases, a gold standard still needs to be defined. We present an arthroscopically assisted biological augmentation technique to reconstruct the AC and coracoclavicular ligaments, protected by a button-suture tape construct for chronic AC joint instability. The presented arthroscopic biological augmentation technique uses less and/or smaller drill holes in the clavicle and coracoid than previously described, thus reducing weakening of the bony structures. At the same time it enhances both horizontal and vertical stability.

  11. Performance and Return to Sport After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in X-Games Skiers and Snowboarders.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Brandon J; Harris, Joshua D; Fillingham, Yale A; Cvetanovich, Greg L; Bhatia, Sanjeev; Bach, Bernard R; Bush-Joseph, Charles A; Cole, Brian J

    2013-11-01

    Skiing and snowboarding have become increasingly popular since the inception of the winter X-Games in 1997. To determine (1) rate of return to sport (RTS) to the winter X-Games following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and (2) performance upon RTS following ACL reconstruction. There is a high rate of RTS to the winter X-Games in subjects undergoing ACL reconstruction. There is no difference in performance upon RTS following ACL reconstruction versus preinjury. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Skiers and snowboarders competing in the winter X-Games who tore their ACL and underwent ACL reconstruction between 1997 and 2012 were evaluated. Athlete data were extracted from winter X-Games media websites, ESPN, injury reports, player profiles/biographies, and press releases. All athlete, knee, and surgical demographic data were analyzed. RTS and performance as it related to the number of gold, silver, and bronze medals won both pre- and postoperatively in the X-Games were analyzed. Fifteen skiers (19 knees) and 10 snowboarders (10 knees) were analyzed. There were 13 males and 12 females, with a mean subject age of 22.6 ± 4.45 years. The rate of RTS in the X-Games following ACL reconstruction was 80% overall (20/25 subjects). The rate of RTS in winter X-Games following ACL reconstruction in skiers was 87% (13/15 subjects) and in snowboarders was 70% (7/10 subjects). The rate of RTS in winter X-Games following ACL reconstruction in males and females was 85% (11/13 subjects) and 75% (9/12 subjects), respectively. The rate of revision ACL reconstruction due to ACL tear following primary ACL reconstruction was 4% (1/25 subjects). There were more left- than right-sided tears (18 vs 11). Skiers and snowboarders competed in the X-Games for 3.84 ± 2.73 and 3.40 ± 2.84 years prior to ACL reconstruction and 2.56 ± 2.06 and 7.29 ± 3.30 years after ACL reconstruction, respectively. Skiers earned 22 medals prior to ACL reconstruction (9 gold, 5 silver, 8 bronze

  12. Tendon Interposition and Ligament Reconstruction with ECRL Tendon in the Late Stages of Kienböck's Disease: A Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Karalezli, Nazım; Uz, Aysun; Esmer, Ali Fırat; Demirtaş, Mehmet; Taşcı, Arzu Gül; Kütahya, Harun; Ulusoy, Gürhan

    2013-01-01

    Background. The optimal surgical treatment for Kienböck's disease with stages IIIB and IV remains controversial. A cadaver study was carried out to evaluate the use of coiled extensor carpi radialis longus tendon for tendon interposition and a strip obtained from the same tendon for ligament reconstruction in the late stages of Kienböck's disease. Methods. Coiled extensor carpi radialis longus tendon was used to fill the cavity of the excised lunate, and a strip obtained from this tendon was sutured onto itself after passing through the scaphoid and the triquetrum acting as a ligament to preserve proximal row integrity. Biomechanical tests were carried out in order to evaluate this new ligamentous reconstruction. Results. It was biomechanically confirmed that the procedure was effective against axial compression and distributed the upcoming mechanical stress to the distal row. Conclusion. Extensor carpi radialis longus tendon has not been used for tendon interposition and ligament reconstruction in the treatment of this disease before. In view of the biomechanical data, the procedure seems to be effective for the stabilization of scaphoid and carpal bones. PMID:23606814

  13. Fastball Pitch Velocity Helps Predict Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction in Major League Baseball Pitchers.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Peter N; Erickson, Brandon J; Ball, Brian; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-08-01

    Ulnar collateral ligament injury and its subsequent surgical reconstruction are some of the most common issues among Major League Baseball (MLB) players. The purpose of this study was to determine factors predictive of ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) among MLB pitchers. The hypothesis was that pitchers who underwent UCLR would have higher preinjury peak fastball pitch velocity. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Data on pitch velocity, number, and type (fastball, curveball, etc) for every pitcher and game within MLB from April 2, 2007 to April 14, 2015 were gathered from the publically available PitchFx database. Pitcher demographic information was also recorded. Data from after 2012 were excluded to avoid lead-time bias. Using publically available information, the names and approximate dates of surgery for every MLB pitcher who ever underwent UCLR, including those before 2007 and after 2012, were collected. Each pitcher-game was then classified as "control," "preinjury," or "postoperative." Control and preinjury pitchers were then compared to determine risk factors for UCLR. Overall, 1327 pitchers were included, of whom 309 (26.8%) had undergone UCLR. Of these, 145 had preinjury velocity data. Peak pitch velocity was significantly higher among preinjury pitchers than control pitchers (mean [95% CI], 93.3 mph [92.8-93.8] vs 92.1 mph [91.9-92.3]; P < .001), as was mean pitch velocity (87.8 mph [87.3-88.3] vs 86.9 mph [86.7-87.1]; P = .001). Both demonstrated a dose-response relationship. Although height did not differ (P = .934), weight was significantly higher for preinjury pitchers than controls (P = .005). Pitch counts per year were significantly lower for preinjury pitchers compared with control pitchers, although preinjury pitchers threw more breaking pitches (P = .003). On multivariate regression, peak pitch velocity was the primary independent predictor of whether a pitcher underwent UCLR (P < .001), with mean velocity (P = .013), body

  14. Biomechanical Outcomes After Bio-enhanced Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Are Equal in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Vavken, Patrick; Fleming, Braden C.; Mastrangelo, Ashley N.; Machan, Jason T.; Murray, Martha M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to compare the biomechanical outcomes of a new method of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) treatment, bio-enhanced ACL repair, with ACL reconstruction in a large animal model. Methods Twenty-four skeletally immature pigs underwent unilateral ACL transection and were randomly allocated to receive bio-enhanced ACL repair with a collagen-platelet composite, allograft (bone–patellar tendon– bone) reconstruction, or no further treatment (n = 8 for each group). The structural properties and anteroposterior laxity of the experimental and contralateral ACL-intact knees were measured 15 weeks postoperatively. All dependent variables were normalized to those of the contralateral knee and compared by use of generalized linear mixed models. Results After 15 weeks, bio-enhanced ACL repair and ACL reconstruction produced superior biomechanical outcomes to ACL transection. However, there were no significant differences between bio-enhanced ACL repair and ACL reconstruction for maximum load (P = .4745), maximum displacement (P = .4217), or linear stiffness (P = .6327). There were no significant differences between the 2 surgical techniques in anteroposterior laxity at 30° (P = .7947), 60° (P = .6270), or 90° (P = .9008). Conclusions Bio-enhanced ACL repair produced biomechanical results that were not different from ACL reconstruction in a skeletally immature, large animal model, although the variability associated with both procedures was large. Both procedures produced significantly improved results over ACL transection, showing that both were effective in this model. Clinical Relevance Bio-enhanced ACL repair may 1 day provide an alternative treatment option for ACL injury. PMID:22261137

  15. Biomechanical jumping differences among elite female handball players with and without previous anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a novel inertial sensor unit study.

    PubMed

    Setuain, Igor; Millor, Nora; González-Izal, Miriam; Gorostiaga, Esteban M; Gómez, Marisol; Alfaro-Adrián, Jesús; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2015-09-01

    Persistent biomechanical and jumping capacity alterations have been observed among female athletes who have sustained anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. The purpose of this study was to examine if biomechanical jumping differences persist among a cohort of elite female handball players with previous ACL reconstruction several years after return to top-level competition. In order to achieve this goal, a direct mechanics simplified analysis by using a single Inertial Sensor Unit (IU) was used. Twenty-one elite female (6 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed and 15 uninjured control players) handball players were recruited and evaluated 6.0 ± 3.5 years after surgical anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Bilateral and unilateral vertical jumps were performed to evaluate the functional performance and a single inertial sensor unit was employed in order to collect 3D acceleration and 3D orientation data. Previously ACL-reconstructed analysed athletes demonstrated significant (p < 0.05) alterations in relation to the three-dimensional axis (X-Y-Z) supported accelerations and differing jump phase durations, including jumping performance values, in both bilateral and unilateral jumping manoeuvres several years after ACL reconstruction. Identification of the encountered deficits through the use of an IU devise could provide clinicians with a new reliable tool for movement analysis in a clinical setting.

  16. Computer-assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Four generations of development and usage.

    PubMed

    Klos, Tiburtius V S

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the literature about the contribution of navigation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The evolution of computer-assisted surgery (CAS) for ACL reconstruction has undergone several steps. These steps were divided into 4 subsequent developments: (1) positioning of ACL graft placement; (2) laxity measurement of ACL reconstruction (quality control); (3) kinematic evaluation during ACL reconstruction (navigated pivot shift); (4) case-specific individual ACL reconstruction with adjustments and additional reconstruction options. CAS has shown to improve femoral tunnel positioning, even if clinical outcomes do not improve results of manual techniques. CAS technology has helped researchers better understand the effects of different ACL reconstruction techniques and bundles replacements on joint laxity and to describe tunnel positioning in relation to native ACL insertion. CAS in ACL surgery can improve results at time zero and can improve knowledge in this field.

  17. [The three-dimensional reconstruction of penile suspensory ligament and adjacent structures based on the MRI image].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-long; Ji, Yu-jun; Wang, Hong-yi; Zhang, Yu-long; Li, Shi-rong

    2012-11-01

    To establish a three-dimensional image of the penile suspensory ligament, and explore a stereoscopic and multi angle observation method of patient' s penile suspensory ligament. This study selected the patients with small penis from our hospital as subjects. The participants were conducted on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination before operation. Afterwards, the results of MRI were imported into 3D reconstruction software (MIMICS 10.0), and the suspensory ligament of penis, the pubic symphysis and other related structures were reconstructed for observation. The pubic symphysis, penis and corpus spongiosum can be quite clearly displayed in the thin-section MRI images. In addition, penile suspensory with patchy distribution can be visible between lower part of ligament pubic symphysis and corpus cavernosum. Finally, we can reconstruct the three-dimensional structures through MIMICS 10.0, and then precisely describe the suspensory ligament's start-stop point, the angle with cavernous body of penis and the attached area in the corpus cavernosum penis. Based on the MRI 3D reconstruction of deep penile suspensory ligament and adjacent structures, we can carry out dynamic, three-dimensional multi angle observation of patients deep penile suspensory ligament, and can use the reconstructed image to provide certain theory basis for the judgement of the corpus cavernosum penis extension length and penile suspensory ligament depth before penis extension operation.

  18. Strength and Functional Performance Recovery After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Preadolescent Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Elliot M.; Greenberg, Eric T.; Ganley, Theodore J.; Lawrence, J. Todd R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the skeletally immature population, the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and ACL reconstructions appears to be increasing. Differences in surgical techniques, physiology, and emotional maturity may alter the rehabilitation progression and impact the outcomes when compared with adults. Reports of objective strength recovery and performance-based outcome measures after pediatric ACL reconstruction (ACLR) are limited. Study Design: Retrospective case series. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Methods: All patients that underwent all-epiphyseal ACLR from January 2008 to August 2010 were identified. Isokinetic peak quadriceps/hamstring torque values and functional performance measures in unilateral hopping tasks were extracted and compared with the noninjured limb. A limb symmetry index (LSI) of ≥90% was considered satisfactory. Results: Complete data were available for 16 patients (mean age, 12.28 years; range, 8.51-14.88 years). By a mean 7 months (range, 3.02-12.56 years) postoperatively, only 9 of 16 (56%) were able to achieve a satisfactory LSI for quadriceps strength. For hamstring strength, 15 of 16 (94%) were able to achieve satisfactory LSI. By a mean of 12 months (range, 5.39-24.39 months) postoperatively, only 6 of 16 subjects (38%) were able to achieve satisfactory performance on all functional hop tests. At a mean 15.42 months (range, 8.58-24.39 months) postsurgery, only 4 of 16 (25%) subjects were able to achieve an LSI of ≥90% on all testing parameters. Conclusion: For some pediatric patients, significant strength and functional deficits may be present at greater than 1 year after ACLR. This population may require more prolonged rehabilitation programs to allow for adequate recovery of strength and function because of unique characteristics of normal growth and development. PMID:24982702

  19. Antecedent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery and optimal duration of supervised physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Darain, Haider; Alkitani, Abdulhameed; Yates, Christopher; Bailey, Andrea; Roberts, Simon; Coutts, Fiona; Gleeson, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old patient undergoing unilateral surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the right knee volunteered for the research project and followed an established contemporary hospital-based rehabilitation programme. The patient was supervised post-surgically by an experienced and clinically specialized physiotherapist. The clinical outcomes of rehabilitation were assessed by selected validated patient-reported and objectively-measured outcomes of functional performance capability on four different occasions (pre-surgery, 6th, 12th and 24th week post-surgery). The patient scored 30, 56, 60 and 85 on IKDC (maximum score, 100); 46, 53, 90 and 91 on Lysholm (maximum score, 100); 141, 73, 128 and 175 on K-SES (maximum score, 220); 17, 12, 6 and 6 on the symptom subsection of KOOS (maximum score, 28); 7, 7, 5 and 5 on the pain subsection (maximum score, 36); 1, 0, 3 and 1 on the daily function subsection (maximum score, 68); 0, 0, 5 and 5 on the sport and recreation function subsection (maximum score, 20); 13, 11, 15 and 13 on the quality of life subsection (maximum score, 16) of KOOS at pre-surgery and at the 6th, 12th and 24th week following ACL reconstruction, respectively. Moreover, the patient scored 1.96 m, 1.92 m and 1.99 m on single-leg hop (injured leg) when assessed at pre-surgery and at the 12th and 24th week post-surgery, respectively, following ACL reconstruction. The total time spent in supervised rehabilitation by the patient (675 minutes) was computed as the aggregate patient-reported time spent in exercise during each hospital-based rehabilitation session (verified by physiotherapist evaluation) across the total number of sessions. The patient managed to return to the sport in which he had participated prior to the injury, immediately after the completion of the contemporary rehabilitation programme, at 24 weeks post-surgery. A total of fifteen physiotherapy sessions supervised by the physiotherapist, were attended by the

  20. Ascertaining maximal voluntary effort production during isokinetic knee strength testing of anterior cruciate ligament-reconstructed patients.

    PubMed

    Almosnino, Sivan; Dvir, Zeevi; Bardana, Davide D; Diaconescu, Elena D; Stevenson, Joan M

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of prediction rules meant for declaration of efforts as being maximal or not during isokinetic strength testing in a cohort that underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Thirty-six individuals performed four sets of six reciprocal concentric knee extension/flexion repetitions at a testing speed of 60 degrees per second through a 60-degree range of motion. The sets consisted of a maximal voluntary effort, two nonmaximal sincere efforts at 50% and 75% of self-perceived maximum, and a set attempting to feign or exaggerate thigh muscle strength deficiencies. Strength curve derived set internal consistency measures, namely, cross-correlation and percent root mean square difference scores, were inputted into the prediction rules, whose performance is reported as specificity and sensitivity percentages. Dependent on the prediction rule used and when expressed on an individual participant basis, the corresponding specificity and sensitivity values ranged from 66.6% to 97.2% and 97.2% to 94.4%, respectively. Using the prediction rules presented in this investigation, clinicians may be able to ascertain maximal effort production during isokinetic testing in those who have undergone surgical reconstruction of their anterior cruciate ligament.

  1. EVALUATION OF THE RESULTS OF ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION USING FLEXOR TENDONS AND RIGID GUIDE TRANSVERSE SCREW

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Renato Luiz Bevilacqua; Acras, Sandor Dosa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the results of ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) reconstruction using quadruple flexor tendons as grafts, with ligament fixation in the femur using a rigid guide transverse screw and in the tibia, using a cancellous screw with a fixing washer. Methods: 173 knees (166 from males and seven from females) that had undergone surgery with ACL reconstruction using this technique between December 2002 and February 2007 were evaluated. The mean age was 30 years (from 13 to 56 years), and the mean follow-up time was 30 months (6-55 months). We divided the knees into three groups, which were assessed using the Lysholm scale: Group A with six months of follow-up; Group B with 12 months of follow-up; and Group C with 24 months of follow-up. Results: We evaluated the results, and groups A, B and C received 94, 95 and 95 points respectively on the Lysholm scale. Conclusions: The surgical technique proved to be safe and easy to perform, with good results and a low complication rate. Also, its results were maintained throughout the study period of 24 months. PMID:27027002

  2. The Role of the Accessory Malleolar Ossicles and Malleolar Avulsion Fractures in Lateral Ankle Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Matthew M; Sharpe, Jonathan J

    2017-09-01

    While it is well known that ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries in the United States, predictive factors regarding failure of conservative treatment are not well known. There are many biomechanical and epidemiological factors that play a role in recurrence and failure of conservative treatment, but most cases are able to be treated with immobilization and/or rest, ice, elevation, physical therapy, and bracing. We propose that one important risk factor is often overlooked simply due to the fact that a vast majority of these cases resolve without the need for surgery. Accessory ossicles and avulsion fractures of the malleoli or talus may represent a predisposition or marker for ligamentous damage that may lead to the need for lateral ankle ligament repair or reconstruction in the future. We have identified 61 consecutive patients who underwent lateral ankle ligament repair or reconstruction by the primary surgeon from the years 2007 to 2017. Out of those patients who met our inclusion and exclusion criteria, 66% had the presence of osseous pathology consisting of accessory ossicles or avulsion fractures of the medial or lateral malleolus or talus. The proportion of osseous pathology seen with lateral ankle ligament repair or reconstruction was higher than what has been previously reported in both operative and nonoperative settings. This may help identify a risk factor for failure of conservative treatment in patients presenting with acute ankle sprains or ankle instability especially in the active cohort. Level IV: Case series.

  3. Osborne’s Ligament: A Review of its History, Anatomy, and Surgical Importance

    PubMed Central

    Granger, Andre; Iwanaga, Joe; Wilson, Thomas J; Yang, Lynda; Loukas, Marios; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R. Shane

    2017-01-01

    When discussing the pathophysiology of ulnar neuropathy, Geoffrey Vaughan Osborne described a fibrous band that can be responsible for the symptoms seen in this disorder. In this paper, we take a glimpse at the life of Osborne and review the anatomy and surgical significance of Osborne’s ligament. This band of tissue connects the two heads of the flexor carpi ulnaris and thus forms the roof of the cubital tunnel. To our knowledge, no prior publication has reviewed the history of this ligament, and very few authors have studied its anatomy in any detail. Therefore, the aim of the present paper is to elucidate this structure that is often implicated and surgically transected to decompress the ulnar nerve at the elbow. PMID:28405530

  4. Comparison of Outcomes of Two Femoral Fixation Devices in Hamstring Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Carrasco, Miguel Angel; Abellán, Juan Francisco; Qudsi-Sinclair, Salima; Ruiz-Merino, Guadalupe; Carrillo-Juliá, Francisco Javier; Bo-Rueda, David

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common ligamentous injury of the knee. Reconstruction of this ligament is often required to restore functional stability of the knee. Outcome of ACL reconstruction is significantly affected by how the graft is fixed to the bone. This study is to determine if there is a different clinical outcome after cortical versus cortical-cancellous suspension femoral fixation in hamstring based anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective comparative study conducted between 2006 and 2010. We enrolled patients who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. Sixty two patients met inclusion criteria and 41 agreed to come for followup assessment. Median age was of 28 years (range 18–39 years). Demographic baseline profile of both groups was similar. The femoral fixation devices were cortical (n = 16) and cortical-cancellous suspension techniques (n = 25). The average period of evolution at the time of assessment was 40 months (range 12-72 months). The patients were examined according to Lachman test (using Rolimeter knee tester), anterior drawer test, pivot shift test, International Knee Documentation Committee questionnaire, and Tegner-Lysholm knee scoring scale. Results: The objective evaluation of the patients (Lachman test) showed better results in terms of stability in the group of patients who underwent the cortical-cancellous suspension method. These differences were not reflected in the assessment of activity level (Tegner-Lysholm), where both groups showed the same results. Conclusions: ACL reconstruction with both cortical and cortical-cancellous suspension femoral fixation techniques show the same clinical results at medium long followup. However, cortical-cancellous fixations seem to provide greater stability to the reconstruction. PMID:28966371

  5. PHYSICAL THERAPY INTERVENTION FOR MEDIAL PATELLOFEMORAL LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION AFTER REPEATED LATERAL PATELLAR SUBLUXATION/DISLOCATION

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Brianne; Vitale, Ashley; Apergis, Demitra; Wirth, Stephen; Grossman, Mark G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The incidence of patellar subluxation or dislocation has been documented up to 43/100,000 with females more prevalent then males. There are many contributing factors involving the hip, knee, and ankle that lead to patellar subluxation. A patellar position of lateral tilt with lateral glide may indicate weakness of the vastus medialis oblique (VMO) and adductors, increased tightness in the iliotibial band, and overpowering of the vastus lateralis. Patella alta can predispose an individual to lateral dislocation due to the patella placement outside of the femoral trochlear groove with a disadvantage of boney stability. Other factors that may cause the patella to laterally sublux or dislocate during a functional activity or sporting activity include a position of femoral external rotation, tibial internal rotation, and excessive contraction of the vastus lateralis. The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) aids in the prevention of a lateral patellar subluxation or dislocation. In cases where there is recurrent subluxation/dislocation and Magnetic Resonance Imaging confirms a MPFL tear, a reconstruction may be the treatment of choice. Purpose The purpose of this case series is to describe the post-surgical physical therapy management of MPFL reconstructions, outcomes using the Modified Cincinnati Knee Outcome Measure (MCKOM) and to propose staged physical therapy interventions for this pathology in the form of a treatment progression. Methods Post-operative management data and outcomes were retrospectively collected using a detailed chart review methodology from seven subjects who underwent MPFL reconstruction. Findings The Modified Cincinnati Knee Outcome Measure (MCKOM) was analyzed for each participant in four sections that were most important to the return and maintenance of participation in sport. At follow-up the mean scores for the seven subjects in Section 3 (instability) was 19.3/20, Section 4 (overall activity level) was 17.3/20, Section

  6. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in the skeletally immature athlete: a review of current concepts: AAOS exhibit selection.

    PubMed

    Fabricant, Peter D; Jones, Kristofer J; Delos, Demetris; Cordasco, Frank A; Marx, Robert G; Pearle, Andrew D; Warren, Russell F; Green, Daniel W

    2013-03-06

    Intrasubstance tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) were once considered a rare injury in skeletally immature athletes but are now observed with increasing frequency. Treatment strategies have evolved as recent studies have identified unique considerations specific to the skeletally immature patient. The current literature now supports the trend toward early operative treatment to restore knee stability and prevent progressive meniscal and/or articular cartilage damage, but the optimal approach to ACL reconstruction in this age group remains controversial. Despite the reported clinical success of transphyseal reconstruction, iatrogenic growth disturbance secondary to physeal damage remains a genuine concern. The reluctance to place drill-holes across open physes has led to the development of numerous "physeal-sparing" reconstruction techniques using anatomic femoral and tibial footprints that have adequately restored anteroposterior and rotational knee stability in biomechanical studies but have demonstrated mixed results in the clinical setting. The intent of this review is to (1) highlight the unique anatomic considerations pertaining to ACL reconstruction in the skeletally immature athlete, (2) discuss preoperative clinical and radiographic assessment of the pediatric patient with a suspected ACL injury, (3) review transphyseal and physeal-sparing reconstruction techniques and highlight surgical technical considerations, (4) present clinical outcomes according to patient and technique-specific factors, and (5) review age-specific injury prevention treatment strategies and a novel treatment algorithm based on skeletal maturity. ACL reconstruction in the skeletally immature athlete typically results in a successful clinical outcome, yet the optimal surgical technique is still controversial. This review will help guide the management of ACL injuries in the pediatric athlete.

  7. Arthroscopic anatomical reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments: A technical simplification.

    PubMed

    Lopes, R; Decante, C; Geffroy, L; Brulefert, K; Noailles, T

    2016-12-01

    Anatomical reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments has become a pivotal component of the treatment strategy for chronic ankle instability. The recently described arthroscopic version of this procedure is indispensable to ensure that concomitant lesions are appropriately managed, yet remains technically demanding. Here, we describe a simplified variant involving percutaneous creation of the calcaneal tunnel for the distal attachment of the calcaneo-fibular ligament. The rationale for this technical stratagem was provided by a preliminary cadaver study that demonstrated a correlation between the lateral malleolus and the distal footprint of the calcaneo-fibular ligament. The main objectives are simplification of the operative technique and decreased injury to tissues whose function is crucial to the recovery of proprioception. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Protecting a Patellar Ligament Reconstruction after Proximal Tibial Resection: A Simplified Approach

    PubMed Central

    Titus, Vijay

    2008-01-01

    Limb salvage in tumor surgery has encouraged the development of megaprostheses. However, reattaching the ligamentum patellae poses a particular problem: avulsion and/or extensor lag may lead to poor function. We describe a new technique of patellar ligament reconstruction. The technique involves reattachment of the patellar ligament to the tibial tuberosity of the proximal tibial megaprosthesis, which has a porous surface created, and the repair is protected with a cerclage wire through the patella and the prosthesis. In 10 consecutive patients, the range of motion averaged 95° (median, 90°; range, 70°–120°), and the mean extension lag averaged 4° (median, 0°; range, 0°–20°). We had one case of patellar ligament avulsion. This technique resulted in good quadriceps function and a low incidence of complications. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18425561

  9. Arterial complications, venous thromboembolism and deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Rob Paulus Augustinus; Reijman, Max; Janssen, Daan Martijn; van Mourik, Jan Bernardus Antonius

    2016-01-01

    AIM To summarize the current knowledge on vascular complications and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. METHODS A systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, Web of Science, CINAHL, PubMed publisher, and Google scholar medical literature databases were searched up to November 10, 2015. Any arthroscopic surgical method of primary or revision intra-articular ACL reconstruction of all graft types in humans was included. A risk of bias assessment was determined. RESULTS Fourty-seven studies were included in the review. Pseudaneurysms were the most frequently reported arterial complication after ACL reconstruction, irrespective of graft type or method of graft fixation with an incidence of 0.3%. The time to diagnosis of arterial complications after ACL reconstruction varied from days to mostly weeks but even years. After ACL reconstruction without thromboprophylaxis, the incidence of DVT was 9.7%, of which 2.1% was symptomatic. The incidence of pulmonary embolism was 0.1%. Tourniquet time > 2 h was related to venous thromboembolism. Thromboprophylaxis is indicated in patients with risk factors for venous thromboembolism. CONCLUSION After ACL reconstruction, the incidence of arterial complications, symptomatic DVT and pulmonary embolism was 0.3%, 2.1% and 0.1% respectively. Arterial complications may occur with all types of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, methods of graft fixation as well as any type of graft. Patients considered to be at moderate or high risk of venous thromboembolism should routinely receive thromboprophylaxis after ACL reconstruction. PMID:27672574

  10. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and cartilage contact forces – a 3D computational simulation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lianxin; Lin, Lin; Feng, Yong; Fernandes, Tiago Lazzaretti; Asnis, Peter; Hosseini, Ali; Li, Guoan

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical outcome studies showed a high incidence of knee osteoarthritis after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Abnormal joint kinematics and loading conditions were assumed as risking factors. However, little is known on cartilage contact forces after the surgery. Methods A validated computational model was used to simulate anatomic and transtibial single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. Two graft fixation angles (0° and 30°) were simulated for each reconstruction. Biomechanics of the knee was investigated in intact, anterior cruciate ligament deficient and reconstructed conditions when the knee was subjected to 134N anterior load and 400N quadriceps load at 0°, 30°, 60° and 90° of flexion. The tibial translation and rotation, graft forces, medial and lateral contact forces were calculated. Findings When the graft was fixed at 0°, the anatomic reconstruction resulted in slightly larger lateral contact force at 0° compared to the intact knee while the transtibial technique led to higher contact force at both 0° and 30° under the muscle load. When graft was fixed at 30°, the anatomic reconstruction overstrained the knee at 0° with larger contact forces, while the transtibial technique resulted in slightly larger contact forces at 30°. Interpretation This study suggests that neither the anatomic nor the transtibial reconstruction can consistently restore normal knee biomechanics at different flexion angles. The anatomic reconstruction may better restore anteroposterior stability and contact force with the graft fixed at 0°. The transtibial technique may better restore knee anteroposterior stability and articular contact force with the graft fixed at 30° of flexion. PMID:26320976

  11. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and cartilage contact forces--A 3D computational simulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lianxin; Lin, Lin; Feng, Yong; Fernandes, Tiago Lazzaretti; Asnis, Peter; Hosseini, Ali; Li, Guoan

    2015-12-01

    Clinical outcome studies showed a high incidence of knee osteoarthritis after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Abnormal joint kinematics and loading conditions were assumed as risking factors. However, little is known on cartilage contact forces after the surgery. A validated computational model was used to simulate anatomic and transtibial single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. Two graft fixation angles (0° and 30°) were simulated for each reconstruction. Biomechanics of the knee was investigated in intact, anterior cruciate ligament deficient and reconstructed conditions when the knee was subjected to 134 N anterior load and 400 N quadriceps load at 0°, 30°, 60° and 90° of flexion. The tibial translation and rotation, graft forces, medial and lateral contact forces were calculated. When the graft was fixed at 0°, the anatomic reconstruction resulted in slightly larger lateral contact force at 0° compared to the intact knee while the transtibial technique led to higher contact force at both 0° and 30° under the muscle load. When graft was fixed at 30°, the anatomic reconstruction overstrained the knee at 0° with larger contact forces, while the transtibial technique resulted in slightly larger contact forces at 30°. This study suggests that neither the anatomic nor the transtibial reconstruction can consistently restore normal knee biomechanics at different flexion angles. The anatomic reconstruction may better restore anteroposterior stability and contact force with the graft fixed at 0°. The transtibial technique may better restore knee anteroposterior stability and articular contact force with the graft fixed at 30° of flexion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical outcome of primary medial collateral ligament-posteromedial corner repair with or without staged anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vivek; Khanna, Vikrant; Madi, Sandesh; Tripathi, Anshul; Acharya, Kiran

    2017-06-01

    Medial collateral ligament (MCL) is a prime valgus stabilizer of the knee, and MCL tears are currently managed conservatively. However, posteromedial corner (PMC) injury along with MCL tear is not same as isolated MCL tear and the former is more serious injury and requires operative attention. However, literature is scarce about the management and outcome of PMC-MCL tear alongside anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The purpose of this study is to report the clinical outcome of primary repair of MCL and PMC with or without staged ACL reconstruction. A retrospective evaluation was performed on patients with MCL-PMC complex injury with ACL tear who underwent primary repair of MCL-PMC tear followed by rehabilitation. Further, several of them chose to undergo ACL reconstruction whereas rest opted conservative treatment for the ACL tear. A total of 35 patients of two groups [Group 1 (n=15): MCL-PMC repaired and ACL conserved; Group 2 (n=20): MCL-PMC repaired and ACL reconstructed] met the inclusion criteria with a minimum follow-up of two years. Clinical outcome measures included grade of valgus medial opening (0° extension and 30° flexion), Lysholm and International knee documentation committee (IKDC) scores, KT-1000 measurement, subjective feeling of instability, range of motion (ROM) assessment and complications. While comparing group 2 versus group 1, mean Lysholm (94.6 vs. 91.06; p=0.017) and IKDC scores (86.3 vs. 77.6; p=0.011) of group 2 were significantly higher than group 1. 60% patients of group 1 complained of instability against none in the group 2 (p<0.0001). All the knees of both the groups were valgus stable with none requiring late reconstruction. The mean loss of flexion ROM in group 1 and 2 was 12° and 9° respectively which was not statistically different (p=0.41). However while considering the loss of motion, two groups did not show any significant difference in clinical scores. Primary MCL-PMC repair renders the knee stable in coronal plane in

  13. Total autogenous mandibular reconstruction using virtual surgical planning.

    PubMed

    Winters, Ryan; Saad, Adam; Beahm, Donald David; Wise, Matthew Whitten; St Hilaire, Hugo

    2012-09-01

    Free fibula transfer has become the workhorse in mandibular reconstruction. Total mandibular reconstruction is an uncommon procedure with added complexity. Numerous techniques have been described for such reconstruction, many requiring a temporomandibular joint prosthesis. We present a novel method where simultaneous bilateral free fibula transfer utilizing preoperative virtual surgical planning was used to produce a total autogenous reconstruction. The virtual surgical planning allows to effectively quantify the bone stock required preoperatively and facilitates intraoperative modeling of the fibula. Therefore, a more anatomically correct reconstruction is obtained resulting in improved functional and aesthetic outcomes.

  14. EFFECT OF THE GRAFTING SECTION AREA ON ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION SURGERY – HISTOLOGICAL STUDY ON DOGS

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Ricardo Violante; Müller, Sérgio Swain; Vannini, Rodrigo; Felisbino, Sérgio Luiz; Curcelli, Emilio Carlos; Pereira, Gilberto José Caçdo; de Almeida Silvares, Paulo Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To correlate the initial grafting section area with the outcomes from anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery. Eight dogs underwent operations, divided into two groups according to graft size: Group A, 25% and Group B, 40% of the patellar ligament (PL) width. Methods: After eight months, the dogs were sacrificed for macroscopic and histological analysis on the reconstructed ligaments. Each dog's contralateral knee was used as a control. Results: In both groups, all the reconstructed ligaments were seen to be viable and hypertrophied. The morphology of the PL grafting had changed, which was observed by measuring the crimp and cellularity, and it resembled that of the ACL. Conclusion: The grafting section area did not influence the histological outcomes from ACL reconstruction surgery in dogs. PMID:27047857

  15. Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction in high school baseball players: clinical results and injury risk factors.

    PubMed

    Petty, Damon H; Andrews, James R; Fleisig, Glenn S; Cain, E Lyle

    2004-01-01

    The incidence of ulnar collateral ligament injury has increased in baseball, especially at the high school level. Ulnar collateral ligament injury in high school baseball players is associated with overuse, high-velocity throwing, early throwing of breaking pitches, and improper warm-ups. Retrospective cohort study. Follow-up physical examination and questionnaire data were collected at an average of 35 months after ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction from 27 former high school baseball players. Six potential risk factors were evaluated: year-round throwing, seasonal overuse, event overuse, throwing velocity more than 80 mph, throwing breaking pitches before age 14, and inadequate warm-ups. Overall, 74% returned to baseball at the same or higher level. Patients averaged 3 potential risk factors, and 85% demonstrated at least one overuse category. Of the pitchers, the average self-reported fastball velocity was 83 mph, and 67% threw breaking pitches before age 14. The success rate of ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction in high school baseball players is nearly equal to that in more mature groups of throwers. Overuse of the throwing arm and throwing breaking pitches at an early age may be related to their injuries. Special attention should be paid to elite-level teenage pitchers who throw with high velocity. Copyright 2004 American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine

  16. Effect of Direct Ligament Repair and Tenodesis Reconstruction on Simulated Subtalar Joint Instability.

    PubMed

    Choisne, Julie; Hoch, Matthew C; Alexander, Ian; Ringleb, Stacie I

    2017-03-01

    Subtalar instability is associated with up to 80% of patients presenting with chronic ankle instability but is often not considered in the diagnosis or treatment. Operative procedures to repair ankle instability have shown good clinical results, but the effects of these reconstruction procedures on isolated subtalar instability are not well understood. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of the Gould modification of the Broström procedure and a new tenodesis reconstruction procedure on ankle and subtalar joint kinematics after simulating a subtalar injury. Kinematic data were collected on 7 cadaveric ankles during inversion through the range of ankle flexion and during internal rotation. Testing was performed on the intact foot; after sectioning the calcaneofibular ligament, cervical ligament, and interosseous talocalcaneal ligament; after the Gould modification of the Broström procedure was performed; and after tenodesis was performed and sutures from the Gould modification removed. The Gould modification of the Broström procedure significantly decreased subtalar and ankle inversion motion and subtalar internal rotation compared to the unstable condition. The tenodesis method restricted internal rotation at the subtalar joint and ankle inversion compared to the intact state. Both operative procedures improved stability of the ankle complex, but tenodesis was unable to restore subtalar inversion and restricted ankle inversion in maximum plantarflexion. The Gould modification of Broström ligament repair may be a favorable operative procedure for the restoration of subtalar and ankle joint kinematics.

  17. Tibiofemoral Osteoarthritis After Surgical or Nonsurgical Treatment of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kyle P; Driban, Jeffrey B; Sitler, Michael R; Cattano, Nicole M; Balasubramanian, Easwaran; Hootman, Jennifer M

    2017-06-02

      To determine if surgical or nonsurgical treatment of anterior cruciate ligament rupture affects the prevalence of posttraumatic tibiofemoral osteoarthritis (OA).   Studies published between 1983 and April 2012 were identified via EBSCOhost and OVID. Reference lists were then screened in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement.   Studies were included if (a) treatment outcomes focused on a direct comparison of surgical versus nonsurgical treatment of anterior cruciate ligament rupture, (b) the prevalence of tibiofemoral OA was reported, and (c) they were written in English. Studies were excluded if (a) the included patients were treated with cast immobilization after surgery, (b) the mean follow-up was less than 10 years, or (c) the patients underwent anterior cruciate ligament revision surgery.   Two independent investigators reviewed the included articles using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Frequency of OA, surgical procedure, nonsurgical treatments, and participant characteristics were extracted and summarized. We calculated prevalence (%) and 95% confidence intervals for treatment groups for each individual study and overall. We developed 2 × 2 contingency tables to assess the association between treatment groups (exposed had surgery, referent was nonsurgical treatment) and the prevalence of OA.   Four retrospective studies were identified (140 surgical patients, 240 nonsurgical patients). The mean Newcastle-Ottawa Scale score was 5 (range = 4-6 [of 10] points). Average length of follow-up was 11.8 years (range = 10-14 years). The prevalence of OA for surgically treated patients ranged from 32.6% to 51.2% (overall = 41.4%, 95% confidence interval = 35.0%, 48.1%) and for nonsurgical patients ranged from 24.5% to 42.3% (overall = 30.9%, 95% confidence interval = 24.4%, 38.3%).   Although OA prevalence was higher in the surgical treatment group at a mean follow-up of 11.8 years, no

  18. Reconstruction of medial collateral ligament defects with a flexor-pronator fascia patch in complete open release of stiff elbows.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuai; Yan, Hede; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Mei; Hildebrand, Kevin A; Fan, Cun-Yi

    2017-01-01

    Because medial elbow stability is essential for stiff elbow release, surgical techniques have been reported for reconstructing medial elbow stability. However, medial collateral ligament (MCL) defects, caused by inevitable detachment and resection performed for complete release, make the reconstruction more challenging. To our knowledge, no study has evaluated the outcomes after using a flexor-pronator fascia patch in medial elbow reconstruction for open release of stiff elbows. We hypothesized that this technique is effective for repairing MCL defects. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 10 patients. The MCL defects were all reconstructed with a flexor-pronator fascia patch. An external fixator was used in all patients. One patient could not be contacted and was thus excluded from the study. Outcome measures included stability, range of motion, Mayo Elbow Performance Score, ulnar nerve symptoms, power grip, and radiographic findings. The mean follow-up period was 19.6 months; all elbows were stable by the last follow-up. One patient presented with moderate elbow instability and then regained stability 3 months after the external fixator was removed. The Mayo Elbow Performance Score improved from 58 points to 94 points, and the mean flexion arc improved from 40° to 133°. No radiographic manifestations of elbow dislocation or suture anchor looseness were observed. A flexor-pronator fascia patch provides sufficient stability for repairing MCL defects without restricting the range of motion gained during arthrolysis. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. All rights reserved.

  19. Median arcuate ligament syndrome: vascular surgical therapy and follow-up of 18 patients.

    PubMed

    Grotemeyer, Dirk; Duran, Mansur; Iskandar, Franziska; Blondin, Dirk; Nguyen, Kim; Sandmann, Wilhelm

    2009-11-01

    The median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS) or celiac artery compression syndrome is a rare vascular disorder caused by an extrinsic compression of the celiac artery from the median arcuate ligament, prominent fibrous bands, and ganglionic periaortic tissue. Clinical symptoms are postprandial abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, unintentional weight loss, and sometimes, abdominal pain during body exercise caused by an intermittent visceral ischemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the operative management of patients with MALS in our institution, especially in consideration of various vascular reconstructive techniques. Between June 2000 and January 2009, a total of 341 patients were treated in our department for vascular pathologies of the visceral arteries (225 chronic visceral ischaemia, 84 acute visceral ischaemia, and 14 visceral artery aneurysms). In a retrospective study of 18 patients with MALS, the records, clinical symptoms, diagnostic evaluation, and surgical procedures were compiled. This was completed by a reassessment for a follow-up. A MALS was diagnosed in 15 female (83.3%) and three male (16.7%) patients. The mean patient age was 46.2 years (range 20-68 years). The diagnosis of MALS was based on a radiological analysis in all patients by a digitally subtracted angiogram, but duplex ultrasound was used lately more frequently to study the influence of respiration on the stenotic degree of the celiac trunk. All 18 patients were treated with open surgery in an elective situation. Due to the local and specific pathology of the celiac trunk with a fixed stricture or stenosis, out of 18 cases beside decompression, 11 (primary, seven; secondary, four patients) further procedures were performed on the celiac artery (aorto-celiac vein interposition n = 6, aorto-hepatic vein interposition n = 1, resection of the celiac artery and end-to-end anastomosis n = 2, patchplasty of the celiac artery with vein n = 1, and transaortic removal of a stent of the celiac

  20. Anterolateral Tenodesis or Anterolateral Ligament Complex Reconstruction: Effect of Flexion Angle at Graft Fixation When Combined With ACL Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Inderhaug, Eivind; Stephen, Joanna M; Williams, Andy; Amis, Andrew A

    2017-09-01

    Despite numerous technical descriptions of anterolateral procedures, knowledge is limited regarding the effect of knee flexion angle during graft fixation. To determine the effect of knee flexion angle during graft fixation on tibiofemoral joint kinematics for a modified Lemaire tenodesis or an anterolateral ligament (ALL) complex reconstruction combined with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Controlled laboratory study. Twelve cadaveric knees were mounted in a test rig with kinematics recorded from 0° to 90° flexion. Loads applied to the tibia were 90-N anterior translation, 5-N·m internal tibial rotation, and combined 90-N anterior force and 5-N·m internal rotation. Intact, ACL-deficient, and combined ACL plus anterolateral-deficient states were tested, and then ACL reconstruction was performed and testing was repeated. Thereafter, modified Lemaire tenodeses and ALL procedures with graft fixation at 0°, 30°, and 60° of knee flexion and 20-N graft tension were performed combined with the ACL reconstruction, and repeat testing was performed throughout. Repeated-measures analysis of variance and Bonferroni-adjusted t tests were used for statistical analysis. In combined ACL and anterolateral deficiency, isolated ACL reconstruction left residual laxity for both anterior translation and internal rotation. Anterior translation was restored for all combinations of ACL and anterolateral procedures. The combined ACL reconstruction and ALL procedure restored intact knee kinematics when the graft was fixed in full extension, but when the graft was fixed in 30° and 60°, the combined procedure left residual laxity in internal rotation ( P = .043). The combined ACL reconstruction and modified Lemaire procedure restored internal rotation regardless of knee flexion angle at graft fixation. When the combined ACL reconstruction and lateral procedure states were compared with the ACL-only reconstructed state, a significant reduction in internal rotation

  1. Allograft Augmentation of Hamstring Autograft for Younger Patients Undergoing Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Cale A; Burnham, Jeremy M; Makhni, Eric; Malempati, Chaitu S; Swart, Eric; Johnson, Darren L

    2017-03-01

    Younger patients and those with smaller hamstring autograft diameters have been shown to be at significantly greater risk of graft failure after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. To date, there is no information in the literature about the clinical success and/or cost-effectiveness of increasing graft diameter by augmenting with semitendinosus allograft tissue for younger patients. Hybrid hamstring grafts are a cost-effective treatment option because of a reduced rate of graft failure. Cohort study (economic and decision analysis); Level of evidence, 3. We retrospectively identified patients younger than 18 years who had undergone ACL reconstruction by a single surgeon between 2010 and 2015. During this period, the operating surgeon's graft selection algorithm included the use of bone-patellar tendon-bone (BTB) autografts for the majority of patients younger than 18 years. However, hamstring autografts (hamstring) or hybrid hamstring autografts with allograft augment (hybrid) were used in skeletally immature patients and in those whom the surgeon felt might have greater difficulty with postoperative rehabilitation after BTB graft harvest. Patient demographics, graft type, graft diameter, the time the patient was cleared to return to activity, and the need for secondary surgical procedures were compared between the hamstring and hybrid groups. The clinical results were then used to assess the potential cost-effectiveness of hybrid grafts in this select group of young patients with an ACL injury or reconstruction. This study comprised 88 patients (hamstring group, n = 46; hybrid group, n = 42). The 2 groups did not differ in terms of age, sex, timing of return to activity, or prevalence of skeletally immature patients. Graft diameters were significantly smaller in the hamstring group (7.8 vs 9.9 mm; P < .001), which corresponded with a significantly greater rate of graft failure (13 of 46 [28.3%] vs 5 of 42 [11.9%]; P = .049). As a result of the

  2. Reconstruction for chronic grade-II posterior cruciate ligament deficiency in Malaysian military personnel.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shahrulazua; Mahidon, Rafedon; Shukur, Mohammad Hassan; Hamdan, Amiruddin; Kasmin, Musa

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the outcome of reconstruction for chronic grade-II posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) deficiency in Malaysian military personnel. Medical records of 16 male military personnel aged 25 to 41 years who underwent reconstruction for chronic grade-II PCL deficiency using the quadruple hamstrings tendon by a single surgeon were reviewed. The mean time from injury to surgery was 43.6 (range, 3-104) months. 10 patients had grade-I (n=4), grade-III (n=2), and grade-IV (n=4) lesions of the medial femoral condyles. Seven patients had medial (n=6) and lateral (n=1) meniscus tears. At the 2-year follow-up, patients were asked to complete a questionnaire consisting of the Lysholm score, Tegner activity level, and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Evaluation Form. Posterior drawer test, KT-2000 arthrometer test for posterior translation of the tibia, and military health grade (MHG) were assessed by an independent assessor. At the 2-year follow-up, the mean Lysholm score was 83; the score was excellent in 2 patients, good in 9, fair in 4, and poor in one. The mean IKDC subjective score was 74. The median Tegner activity level increased from 5.5 to 6. The posterior drawer test of 11 patients improved to grade I and the remaining 5 remained at grade II. The mean posterior translation of the tibia was 2.4 mm postoperatively; the posterior translation was normal in 8 patients, nearly normal in 7, and abnormal (≥ 6 mm) in one. The MHG improved in 14 patients and remained unchanged in 2. The latter 2 patients had no chondral lesion or meniscus injury. The first one was 40 years old with a postoperative IKDC score of 55 and a Tegner activity level of 2. The second one was 34 years old with a postoperative IKDC score of 65 and posterior translation of the tibia of 6 mm. Surgical reconstruction for chronic grade-II PCL injury achieved satisfactory outcome and may be appropriate for military personnel.

  3. Transient laxity of an anterior cruciate ligament-reconstructed knee related to pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Blecher, A M; Richmond, J C

    1998-01-01

    Transient laxity was documented around the end of pregnancy in a woman who had undergone anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction 2 months before conception. This temporary laxity in the 3rd trimester and a few months postpartum corresponded to a time when substantial remodeling from large diameter to small diameter collagen fibers has been noted in the ACL graft ligamentization process. This is also a time of high levels of the hormone relaxin (member of the family of insulin-like growth factors), whose action in animals leads to dissociation of large collagen fibrils to smaller disorganized fibrils. The temporary laxity resolved. Careful observation of women who become pregnant in the first few months after ACL reconstruction is recommended.

  4. The immediate intervention effects of robotic training in patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Ye, Miao

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate effects of robot-assisted therapy on functional activity level after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included 10 patients (8 males and 2 females) following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy and treadmill exercise on different days. The Timed Up-and-Go test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and maximal extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated in both groups before and after the experiment. [Results] The results for the Timed Up-and-Go Test and the 10-Meter Walk Test improved in the robot-assisted rehabilitation group. Surface electromyography of the vastus medialis muscle showed significant increases in maximum and average discharge after the intervention. [Conclusion] The results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic training. PMID:27512258

  5. Ligament length relationships in the moving knee.

    PubMed

    Sidles, J A; Larson, R V; Garbini, J L; Downey, D J; Matsen, F A

    1988-01-01

    This article presents an investigation of potential ligament attachment sites for surgical reconstruction of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments as well as for the lateral extraarticular iliotibial band tenodesis. Our methodology was based on quantitative measurements of knee anatomy and motion in fresh cadavers, not on biomechanical modeling. Using computer search techniques, we located all the ligament insertion sites that were nearly isometric for motion of the intact knee.

  6. [Application of the method of anatomic coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction for distal clavicle fractures].

    PubMed

    Fang, J H; Tang, G L; Chen, H; Song, L J; Li, X

    2017-04-04

    Objective: To assess the clinical results of the method of anatomic coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction for distal clavicle fractures. Methods: From August 2013 to January 2015, the super image system was used to measure the CT data of 16 patients suffering distal clavicle fractures before operation in Department of Orthopaedics , the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical Univerisity. The fractures' morphological features and acromioclavicular dislocation degree were assessed. By referring to the data collected by the my research group on Chinese people's coracoclavicular ligament, the injuries of the coracoclavicular ligament were estimated, which was then to verify the actual injuries detected during operation. Coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction was performed on patients and screws or suture anchors fixing small bone blocks was used as an adjuvant therapy. Clinical and radiological follow-up was at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after the procedure. The clinical outcomes were assessed pre- and postoperatively with Constant Scores. Anteroposterior radiographs for the bilateral acromioclavicular joints were obtained immediately after surgery and every follow-up.To compare the reduction maintenance, coracoclavicular distances of the injured shoulders were measured in preoperative and postoperative standard radiographs. Results: All patients received satisfactory fracture and acromioclavicular joint reduction. The average follow-up period was (12.6±3.9) months (ranging from 6 to 22 months). Fractures healed six months after the operation. The coracoclavicular distances increased from (7.8±1.4)mm at one month follow-up to (7.9±1.2)mm at the final follow-up (P>0.05), which could be considered as no difference statistically. The constant score significantly increased from (49.1±4.4) at one month follow-up to (93.8±2.1) at the final evaluation (P<0.001). Obvious loss of acromioclavicular joint reduction was not observed after the operation. Coracoid process

  7. The anatomy of the anterior cruciate ligament and its relevance to the technique of reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Śmigielski, R; Zdanowicz, U; Drwięga, M; Ciszek, B; Williams, A

    2016-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is commonly performed and has been for many years. Despite this, the technical details related to ACL anatomy, such as tunnel placement, are still a topic for debate. In this paper, we introduce the flat ribbon concept of the anatomy of the ACL, and its relevance to clinical practice. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:1020-6.

  8. Inferior Lateral Genicular Artery Injury during Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lamo-Espinosa, J. M.; Llombart Blanco, R.; Valentí, J. R.

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of inferior lateral genicular artery (ILG) injury during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery with lateral partial meniscectomy. This is a rare arthroscopy complication. A review of the literature has been made with the aim to define the anatomy of ILG across the lateral articular line and the risk of lesion during knee arthroscopy. We propose embolization as a good treatment option for this type of injuries. PMID:22957293

  9. Septic arthritis following arthroscopic reconstruction of cruciate ligaments of the knee: retrospective case review.

    PubMed

    Erice, Alejo; Neira, M Inmaculada; Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Chiaraviglio, Ana; Gutiérrez-Guisado, Javier; Rodríguez de Oya, Ricardo

    2017-06-23

    Rupture of cruciate ligaments of the knee is a common injury that is repaired by arthroscopic reconstruction, which can give rise to septic arthritis. The objective of this article is to describe the clinical and microbiological aspects of this entity. Retrospective review of cases of septic arthritis following arthroscopic reconstruction of cruciate ligaments of the knee that occurred at a single institution from 2000-2015. According to time elapsed from surgery, infections were classified as acute (< 14 days), subacute (> 14 days and<30 days), and late (> 30 days). A descriptive and comparative analysis stratified by type of infection and causative microorganism was performed. 3,219 patients underwent arthroscopic reconstruction of cruciate ligaments of the knee and 30 (0.9%) developed septic arthritis. Seventeen (57%) were acute infections and 12 (40%) subacute; there was one late infection. The causative microorganisms were coagulase-negative Staphylococci (n=13; 43%), Staphylococcus aureus (n=12; 40%), other grampositive cocci (n=3; 10%), and gramnegative bacilli (n=2; 7%). All patients underwent arthroscopic debridement; no grafts were removed. All patients received antibiotic therapy for a median of 23.5 days (range: 14 - 78 days); all infections were cured. No significant differences were found in any of the variables analysed among the infection type or the causative microorganism. Septic arthritis after arthroscopic reconstruction of cruciate ligaments of the knee is uncommon. It generally presents within 4 weeks of surgery and is caused by Staphylococci. Its treatment consists of arthroscopic debridement (without necessarily removing the graft) and antibiotic therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  10. Hamstring Tendon Regeneration After Harvest for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Papalia, Rocco; Franceschi, Francesco; D'Adamio, Stefano; Diaz Balzani, Lorenzo; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2015-06-01

    To assess whether the portions of the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons harvested for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction have the potential to regenerate and, if so, to evaluate the histologic properties and actual function of this newly formed tissue. We performed a comprehensive search of CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), Embase, Medline, the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials, and SPORTDiscus from inception of the databases to July 2014, using various combinations of keywords. Studies focusing on hamstring tendon and muscle regeneration through imaging and histology, as well as on the related functional outcomes, were selected. We included studies assessing evidence of tissue regeneration with imaging (magnetic resonance imaging, 3-dimensional computed tomography, ultrasonography) or with histologic examination of biopsy samples (or a combination thereof). Nineteen articles were included in this review, with a total of 400 patients observed. The overall rate of tissue regeneration was 86.0%, with similar values shown in most studies regardless of the methodology of the assessment. Biopsy confirmed that the tissue found at the site in 74% of the cases showed typical histologic features of the tendon. The mean modified Coleman Methodology Score of the studies included was 52.7 points, showing a modest methodologic quality for the studies published to date. In over 85% of the cases analyzed, regeneration signs of the harvested tendon were found through different imaging and histologic methodologies. A torque deficit in deep knee flexion is always present postoperatively, but the cause for this is still unclear. There is a need for better-designed trials featuring a higher level of evidence to further investigate this matter, and the effects of postoperative care and the surgical approach used on the regeneration process should be analyzed in the future. Level IV, systematic review of Level II, III, and IV

  11. Optimizing the reconstruction filter in cone-beam CT to improve periodontal ligament space visualization: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Houno, Yuuki; Hishikawa, Toshimitsu; Gotoh, Ken-Ichi; Naitoh, Munetaka; Mitani, Akio; Noguchi, Toshihide; Ariji, Eiichiro; Kodera, Yoshie

    2017-09-01

    Evaluation of alveolar bone is important in the diagnosis of dental diseases. The periodontal ligament space is difficult to clearly depict in cone-beam computed tomography images because the reconstruction filter conditions during image processing cause image blurring, resulting in decreased spatial resolution. We examined different reconstruction filters to assess their ability to improve spatial resolution and allow for a clearer visualization of the periodontal ligament space. Cone-beam computed tomography projections of 2 skull phantoms were reconstructed using 6 reconstruction conditions and then compared using the Thurstone paired comparison method. Physical evaluations, including the modulation transfer function and the Wiener spectrum, as well as an assessment of space visibility, were undertaken using experimental phantoms. Image reconstruction using a modified Shepp-Logan filter resulted in better sensory, physical, and quantitative evaluations. The reconstruction conditions substantially improved the spatial resolution and visualization of the periodontal ligament space. The difference in sensitivity was obtained by altering the reconstruction filter. Modifying the characteristics of a reconstruction filter can generate significant improvement in assessments of the periodontal ligament space. A high-frequency enhancement filter improves the visualization of thin structures and will be useful when accurate assessment of the periodontal ligament space is necessary.

  12. Optimizing the reconstruction filter in cone-beam CT to improve periodontal ligament space visualization: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Houno, Yuuki; Gotoh, Ken-ichi; Naitoh, Munetaka; Mitani, Akio; Noguchi, Toshihide; Ariji, Eiichiro; Kodera, Yoshie

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Evaluation of alveolar bone is important in the diagnosis of dental diseases. The periodontal ligament space is difficult to clearly depict in cone-beam computed tomography images because the reconstruction filter conditions during image processing cause image blurring, resulting in decreased spatial resolution. We examined different reconstruction filters to assess their ability to improve spatial resolution and allow for a clearer visualization of the periodontal ligament space. Materials and Methods Cone-beam computed tomography projections of 2 skull phantoms were reconstructed using 6 reconstruction conditions and then compared using the Thurstone paired comparison method. Physical evaluations, including the modulation transfer function and the Wiener spectrum, as well as an assessment of space visibility, were undertaken using experimental phantoms. Results Image reconstruction using a modified Shepp-Logan filter resulted in better sensory, physical, and quantitative evaluations. The reconstruction conditions substantially improved the spatial resolution and visualization of the periodontal ligament space. The difference in sensitivity was obtained by altering the reconstruction filter. Conclusion Modifying the characteristics of a reconstruction filter can generate significant improvement in assessments of the periodontal ligament space. A high-frequency enhancement filter improves the visualization of thin structures and will be useful when accurate assessment of the periodontal ligament space is necessary.

  13. Visual biofeedback exercises for improving body balance control after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Molka, Alicja Zyta; Lisiński, Przemysław; Huber, Juliusz

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the effects of balance training after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Sixteen patients (mean 33 ± 8 years old) who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction three months prior to participating in a one-month rehabilitation program. The control group included 15 people aged 34 ± 4 years. Patients’ functional level was evaluated according to the Lysholm knee score, and balance quality was ascertained by static and dynamic tests. A balance platform was used to measure the center of foot pressure deflection. Two dynamic balance tests evaluated time of task execution. [Results] Lysholm knee score improved significantly after rehabilitation. Balance in the sagittal plane with eyes closed improved significantly after rehabilitation. The average velocity of center of foot pressure swing in both the frontal and sagittal planes with eyes closed differed significantly from those of controls. Execution time required for the two dynamic tests decreased significantly after rehabilitation and were significantly better than those in the controls. [Conclusion] Maintaining static balance with eyes closed is very challenging after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Maintaining balance in the sagittal plane is particularly difficult. A one-month rehabilitation program partially improves static and dynamic balance. PMID:26311983

  14. [Reconstructing coracoclavicular ligament in treating Rockwood - III Acromioclavicular dislocation by palmaris longus muscle with polyester suture].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian-lin; Mo, Huan-peng

    2015-06-01

    To explore therapeutic effects of reconstructing coracoclavicular ligament for the treatment of Rockwood-III Acromioclavicular dislocation by palmaris longus muscle with polyester suture. From August 2011 to November 2013,37 cases with Rockwood-III acromioclavicular dislocation were treated with reconstructing coracoclavicular ligament by palmaris longus muscle with polyester suture. Among patients, 24 were males and 13 were females, ranging the age from 19 to 46 years old, with an average of 32 years old. There were 11 cases on the left side and 26 cases on the right side. Twenty-nine cases were fresh dislocation and 8 cases were old dislocation. Blood loss, operative time were observed, and Karlsson evaltae standard were applied for assessing postoperative recovery of shoulder joint function. All patients were followed up from 2.5 to 5 months with an average of 3.5 months. Operative time ranged from 52 to 98 (meaned 72) min, blood loss ranged from 50 to 180 (meaned 75) ml. All operative incision were healed at the satge I . According to Karlsson standard, 32 cases obtained excellent results and 5 cases were moderate. For Rockwood-III acromioclavicular dislocation,reconstructing coracoclavicular ligament by palmaris longus muscle with polyester suture has advantages of simple operation, and rapid recovery of shoulder joint function.

  15. Tibial rotation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knees during single limb hop and drop landings.

    PubMed

    Webster, Kate E; Feller, Julian A

    2012-06-01

    Alterations in knee joint kinematics have been suggested as a potential mechanism that influences the development of osteoarthritis of the knee after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Whilst previous work has shown changes in internal-external tibial rotation during level walking, many patients aim to return to high impact activities following surgery. This study examined tibial rotation during single limb hop and drop landings in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knees compared to a control group, and also evaluated the influence of graft type (hamstring or patellar tendon). In 48 participants (17 patellar tendon graft, 18 hamstring graft and 13 controls) internal-external rotation was measured during single limb hop and drop landings in a gait laboratory at mean of 10 months after surgery. There was no difference between the two graft types and both patient groups had less internal rotation when compared to the control group. For 60% of patients, internal rotation values were at least 5° less than the control group mean. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knees with both hamstring tendon and patellar tendon grafts show altered rotational kinematic patterns during high impact dynamic load activities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Selection of Tendon Grafts for Distal Radioulnar Ligament Reconstruction and Report of a Modified Technique

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Eugene; Dy, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the graft length necessary to complete a distal radioulnar ligament reconstruction and assess the suitability of several tendon graft sources. Methods We measured the graft length needed to complete the distal radioulnar ligament reconstruction in 7 fresh-frozen cadaver specimens. The pure tendon lengths of 7 tendon graft sources were measured: palmaris longus, extensor indicis proprius, slips of extensor digiti minimi and abductor pollicis longus, and portions of flexor carpi ulnaris, flexor carpi radialis, and extensor carpi ulnaris. A modified technique which allows for a shorter length of graft is also described, and the suitability of each graft source for this technique was assessed. Results The mean graft length needed to complete the original and modified reconstructions were 138 mm and 89 mm, respectively. The average length of the tendon graft when measured as pure tendon were: palmaris longus (127 mm), slip of extensor digiti minimi (112 mm), extensor indicis proprius (100 mm), partial flexor carpi radialis (87 mm), slip of abductor pollicis longus (69 mm), partial flexor carpi ulnaris (67 mm), and partial extensor carpi ulnaris (67 mm). The palmaris longus was too short for the original technique in the majority of specimens but was sufficient to complete the modified technique in every specimen that had a palmaris longus. Six specimens also had an extensor indicis proprius of suitable length for the modified technique. Discussion The length of donor graft required for the modified reconstruction was significantly less than that needed for the original reconstruction. Three specimens had no donor tendons sufficiently long to complete the original technique if a pure tendon graft were used, whereas the modified technique could be completed in all specimens. Clinical Relevance Many tendon graft sources in the upper extremity are of insufficient length to complete the distal radioulnar ligament reconstruction as described. A modified

  17. Testing for isometry during reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament. Anatomic and biomechanical considerations.

    PubMed

    Covey, D C; Sapega, A A; Sherman, G M

    1996-01-01

    The change in the distance of linear separation between each pair of osseous fiber attachment sites of the posterior cruciate ligaments was measured and plotted as a function of the knee flexion angle from 0 degree to 120 degrees. Data were collected under four sequential test conditions that had in common quadriceps relaxation, absence of tibial rotation forces, and horizontal femoral stabilization. The posterior cruciate ligament fibers were intact or transected (excursion wires left intact) with gravitational joint distraction of the lower leg unconstrained or constrained. The small, posterior oblique fiber region was the most isometric of the four tested fiber regions. Progressively increasing deviations from isometry were seen in the posterior longitudinal, central, and anterior fiber regions, in that order. Transection of the posterior cruciate ligament, combined with unconstrained gravitational distraction of the knee joint, further increased the magnitude of deviation from isometry of the anterior and central fibers, but only changed the pattern of deviation for the more nearly isometric posterior fibers. Under simulated operative conditions, most of the posterior cruciate ligament's anatomic attachment sites exhibit nonisometric behavior, with near isometry demonstrated only by the relatively small posterior fiber attachment sites. If isometry alone is used for bone tunnel placement, the large anterior and central fiber regions will be left largely unreconstructed. Because the normal behavior of most of the fibers of the posterior cruciate ligament involves 4 to 6 mm of end-to-end length increase with progressive knee flexion, this pattern and degree of deviation from isometry should be sought to approximate an anatomic reconstruction of the anterocentral bulk of the ligament.

  18. Speed, not magnitude, of knee extensor torque production is associated with self-reported knee function early after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chao-Jung; Indelicato, Peter A; Moser, Michael W; Vandenborne, Krista; Chmielewski, Terese L

    2015-11-01

    To examine the magnitude and speed of knee extensor torque production at the initiation of advanced anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction rehabilitation and the associations with self-reported knee function. Twenty-eight subjects who were 12 weeks post-ACL reconstruction and 28 age- and sex-matched physically active controls participated in this study. Knee extensor torque was assessed bilaterally with an isokinetic dynamometer at 60°/s. The variables of interest were peak torque, average rate of torque development, time to peak torque and quadriceps symmetry index. Knee function was assessed with the International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Form (IKDC-SKF). Peak torque and average rate of torque development were lower on the surgical side compared to the non-surgical side and controls. Quadriceps symmetry index was lower in subjects with ACL reconstruction compared to controls. On the surgical side, average rate of torque development was positively correlated with IKDC-SKF score (r = 0.379) while time to peak torque was negatively correlated with IKDC-SKF score (r = -0.407). At the initiation of advanced ACL reconstruction rehabilitation, the surgical side displayed deficits in peak torque and average rate of torque development. A higher rate of torque development and shorter time to peak torque were associated with better self-reported knee function. The results suggest that the rate of torque development should be addressed during advanced ACL reconstruction rehabilitation and faster knee extensor torque generation may lead to better knee function. III.

  19. Posterior tibial slope and further anterior cruciate ligament injuries in the anterior cruciate ligament-reconstructed patient.

    PubMed

    Webb, Justin M; Salmon, Lucy J; Leclerc, Etienne; Pinczewski, Leo A; Roe, Justin P

    2013-12-01

    An injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a multifactorial event influenced by intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors. Recently, the geometry of the proximal tibia has come under focus as a possible risk factor for an ACL injury. An increased posterior tibial slope is associated with an increased risk of further ACL injuries in the previously ACL-reconstructed patient. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 200 consecutive patients with isolated ACL ruptures who underwent primary reconstruction with hamstring autografts were enrolled in a prospective longitudinal study over 15 years. The posterior tibial slope was measured from a lateral knee radiograph by 2 blinded observers. The data were analyzed for the association between an increased posterior tibial slope and the incidence of further ACL injuries. Interobserver reliability of the posterior tibial slope measurements was assessed. Radiographs and follow-up were available for 181 of the 200 enrolled patients. Fifty patients had a further injury to either the ACL graft or the contralateral knee. The mean posterior tibial slope of those with a further ACL injury was 9.9° compared with 8.5° for those with no further injury (P = .001). The mean posterior tibial slope for those with both an ACL graft and contralateral ACL rupture was 12.9°. The odds of further ACL injuries after reconstruction were increased by a factor of 5, to an incidence of 59%, in those with a posterior tibial slope of ≥12°. An increased posterior tibial slope is associated with increased odds of a further ACL injury after ACL reconstruction. The increased risk is most pronounced in those with a posterior tibial slope of ≥12°.

  20. Injury to the Anterior Tibial Artery during Bicortical Tibial Drilling in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Bum; Lim, Jin Woo; Seo, Jeong Gook

    2016-01-01

    Many complications have been reported during or after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, including infection, bleeding, tibial tunnel widening, arthrofibrosis, and graft failure. However, arterial injury has been rarely reported. This paper reports a case of an anterior tibial arterial injury during bicortical tibial drilling in arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, associated with an asymptomatic occlusion of the popliteal artery. The patient had a vague pain which led to delayed diagnosis of compartment syndrome and delayed treatment with fasciotomy. All surgeons should be aware of these rare but critical complications because the results may be disastrous like muscle necrosis as in this case. PMID:26929808

  1. Failure of osteointegration of hamstring tendon autograft after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun Kyoo; Rowe, Sung Man; Chung, Jae Yoon; Moon, Eun Sun; Lee, Keun Bae

    2004-04-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is completed after implantation, when the graft material used undergoes extensive biologic remodelling and osteointegration. Failure of the osteointegration between the graft tendon and bone decreases the graft strength and induces anterior instability. We experienced 2 cases of failed osteointegration between tendon and bone after ACL reconstruction using 4 strands of the hamstring tendon. Surprisingly, osteointegration between the bone and tendon junction was not shown by intraoperative findings. The histologic findings also presented no evidence of osteointegration or biologic remodeling of the tendon. Two cases of failure of osteointegration are reported, with a review of the literature.

  2. Arthroscopic-assisted posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using patellar tendon autograft: a technique for graft passage.

    PubMed

    Mariani, P P; Adriani, E; Maresca, G

    1996-08-01

    During arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction, passage of the graft into the knee joint may be difficult, especially when using the patellar tendon. Because of the angle of passage, the bone block ends may become entangled or caught on the superior edge of the posterior tibial tunnel when passing the graft from the tibia to the femur. The use of a blunt trocar through the posteromedial portal avoids impingement of the bone block against the edge of the tibial tunnel. This method uses the pulley principle and permits the graft to pass freely into the knee. This method has been used successfully by the authors in more than 40 PCL arthroscopic reconstructions.

  3. Asymmetric ground reaction forces and knee kinematics during squat after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Brooke A; Williams, John L; Zucker-Levin, Audrey; Mihalko, William M

    2016-10-01

    This bilateral squat study tests whether people with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have symmetric three-dimensional ground reaction forces (GRFs) and symmetric anterior-posterior (AP) translation rates of the femur with respect to the tibia when compared with healthy control subjects. We hypothesized that there would be no long-term asymmetry in knee kinematics and kinetics in ACL reconstructed subjects following surgery and rehabilitation. Position and GRF data were collected on eight ACL reconstructed and eight control subjects during bilateral squat. The rate of relative AP translation was determined for each subject. Principal component models were developed for each of the three GRF waveforms. Principal component scores were used to assess symmetry within the ACL reconstructed group and within the control group. ACL reconstructed knees analyzed in early flexion during squat descent displayed a four-fold greater rate of change in anterior translation in the reconstructed knee relative to the contralateral side than did a similar comparison of normal knees. Differences were found between the ACL reconstructed subjects' injured and uninjured limbs for all GRFs. Subjects following ACL reconstruction had asymmetric GRFs and relative rates of AP translation at an average of seven years after ACL reconstructive surgery when compared with control subjects. These alterations in loading may lead to altered load distributions across the knee joint and may put some subjects at risk for future complications such as osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Surgical treatment of avulsion fractures at the tibial insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament: functional result☆

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Marcos Alexandre; Cervone, Gabriel Lopes de Faria; Costa, André Luis Serigatti

    2015-01-01

    Objective To objectively and subjectively evaluate the functional result from before to after surgery among patients with a diagnosis of an isolated avulsion fracture of the posterior cruciate ligament who were treated surgically. Method Five patients were evaluated by means of reviewing the medical files, applying the Lysholm questionnaire, physical examination and radiological examination. For the statistical analysis, a significance level of 0.10 and 95% confidence interval were used. Results According to the Lysholm criteria, all the patients were classified as poor (<64 points) before the operation and evolved to a mean of 96 points six months after the operation. We observed that 100% of the posterior drawer cases became negative, taking values less than 5 mm to be negative. Conclusion Surgical methods with stable fixation for treating avulsion fractures at the tibial insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament produce acceptable functional results from the surgical and radiological points of view, with a significance level of 0.042. PMID:27218073

  5. Factors associated with meniscus repair in patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Ronald W B; Inacio, Maria C S; Liddle, Kate D; Maletis, Gregory B

    2013-12-01

    Meniscus injuries are common in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears. Patient demographics, surgeon characteristics, and concurrent diagnostic factors affecting the prevalence of meniscus repairs in patients undergoing ACL reconstruction (ACLR) by community-based orthopaedic surgeons have not been fully studied. Patient (age, sex, race, and body mass index [BMI]), surgeon (sports medicine fellowship training status and case volume), and injury characteristics (1 or both menisci injured, injury location, and concurrent cartilage injury) and surgical venue (case volume) are associated with a higher likelihood of meniscus repair. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A cross-sectional study using data from a large community-based ACLR registry was performed. Patients with a meniscus injury and primary ACLR between February 2005 and June 2010 were included in the study. Meniscus repair rates by patient, surgeon, and injury characteristics were described. Associations were evaluated using generalized linear models. During the study period, 5712 primary ACLRs with a meniscus tear diagnosis were registered. There was 1 torn meniscus in 4248 (74.4%) patients, and both menisci were torn in 1464 (25.6%) patients. Medial meniscus tears were repaired in 1192 (31.2%) of 3818 cases; the remaining 2626 (68.8%) tears were not repaired, underwent alternative treatment (meniscectomy, trephination, rasped), or were left in situ. Lateral meniscus tears were repaired in 893 (26.6%) of 3358 cases; the remaining 2465 (73.4%) tears underwent alternative treatment or were left in situ. Adjusted models showed that younger patient age (P < .001), lower patient BMI (P < .001), surgeon's sports medicine fellowship training (P < .001), higher surgeon case volume (P < .001), higher surgical venue volume (P = .019), and medial meniscus tears (P < .001) were all associated with a higher likelihood of a meniscus repair. Younger patient age, lower patient BMI, surgeon's sports

  6. Quadriceps strength and weight acceptance strategies continue to improve two years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Roewer, Ben D.; Di Stasi, Stephanie L.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most commonly-injured knee ligament during sporting activities. After injury, most individuals experience episodes of the knee giving way during daily activities (non-copers). Non-copers demonstrate asymmetrical quadriceps strength and movement patterns which could have long-term deleterious effects on the integrity of the knee joint. The purpose of this study was to determine if non-copers resolve their strength and movement asymmetries within two years after surgery. 26 non-copers were recruited to undergo pre-operative quadriceps strength testing and 3-dimensional gait analysis. Subjects underwent surgery to reconstruct the ligament followed by physical therapy focused on restoring normal range of motion, quadriceps strength, and function. Subjects returned for quadriceps strength testing and gait analysis six months and two years after surgery. Acutely after injury, quadriceps strength was asymmetric between limbs, but resolved six months after surgery. Asymmetric knee angles, knee moments, and knee and hip power profiles were also observed acutely after injury and persisted six months after surgery despite subjects achieving symmetrical quadriceps strength. Two years after surgery, quadriceps strength in the involved limb continued to improve and most kinematic and kinetic asymmetries resolved. These findings suggest that adequate quadriceps strength does not immediately resolve gait asymmetries in non-copers. They also suggest that non-copers have the capacity to improve their quadriceps strength and gait symmetry long after ACL reconstruction. PMID:21592482

  7. THE TIBIAL APERTURE SURFACE ANALYSIS IN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION PROCESS.

    PubMed

    Milojević, Zoran; Tabaković, Slobodan; Vićević, Marija; Obradović, Mirko; Vranjes, Miodrag; Milankov, Miroslav Z

    2016-01-01

    The tibial tunnel aperture in the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is usually analyzed as an ellipse, generated as an intersection between a tibial plateau and a tibial bone tunnel. The aim of this study is to show that the tibial tunnel aperture, which utilizes 3D tibial surface bone model, differs significantly from common computations which present the tibial tunnel anterior cruciate ligament aperture surface as an ellipse. An interactive program system was developed for the tibial tunnel aperture analysis which included the real tibia 3D surface bone model generated from a series of computed tomography images of ten male patients, their mean age being 25 years. In aperture calculation, the transverse drill angle of 10 degrees was used, whereas sagittal drill angles of 40 degrees, 50 degrees and 60 degrees were used with the drill-bit diameter set to 10 mm. The real 3D and 2D tibial tunnel aperture surface projection was calculated and compared with an ellipse. According to the calculations, generated 3D aperture surfaces were different for every patient even though the same drill parameters were used. For the sagittal drill angles of 40 degrees, 50 degrees and 60 degrees, the mean difference between the projected 3D and 2D area on the tibial plateau was 19.6 +/- 5.4%, 21.1 +/- 8.0% and 21.3 +/- 9.6%, respectively. The difference between the projected 3D area on the tibial plateau and ellipse surface was 54.8 +/- 16.3%, 39.6 +/- 10.4% and 25.0 +/- 8.0% for sagittal drill angles of 40 degrees, 50 degrees and 60 degrees, respectively. The tibial tunnel aperture surface area differs significantly from the ellipse surface area, which is commonly used in the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction analysis. Inclusion of the 3D shape of the tibial attachment site in the preoperative anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction planning process can lead to a more precise individual anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction on the tibial bone. Both

  8. Knee stiffness following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: the incidence and associated factors of knee stiffness following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Robertson, G A J; Coleman, S G S; Keating, J F

    2009-08-01

    We reviewed 100 patients retrospectively following primary ACL reconstruction with quadruple hamstring autografts to evaluate the incidence and factors associated with postoperative stiffness. Stiffness was defined as any loss of motion using the contra-lateral leg as a control. The median delay between injury and operation was 15 months. The incidence of stiffness was 12% at 6 months post-reconstruction. Both incomplete attendance at physiotherapy (p<0.005) and previous knee surgery (p<0.005) were the strongest predictors of the stiffness. Anterior knee pain was also associated with the stiffness (p<0.029). Factors that failed to show a significant association with the stiffness included associated MCL sprain at injury (p=0.32), post-injury stiffness (p=1.00) and concomitant menisectomy at reconstruction (p=0.54). Timing of surgery also did not appear to influence the onset of stiffness (median delays: 29 months for stiff patients; 14 months for non-stiff patients). The rate of stiffness fell to 5% at 12 months postreconstruction, without operative intervention.

  9. Biomechanical Measures During Landing and Postural Stability Predict Second Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Return to Sport

    PubMed Central

    Paterno, Mark V.; Schmitt, Laura C.; Ford, Kevin R.; Rauh, Mitchell J.; Myer, Gregory D.; Huang, Bin; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Athletes who return to sport participation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) have a higher risk of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury (either reinjury or contralateral injury) compared with non–anterior cruciate ligament–injured athletes. Hypotheses Prospective measures of neuromuscular control and postural stability after ACLR will predict relative increased risk for a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Study Design Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods Fifty-six athletes underwent a prospective biomechanical screening after ACLR using 3-dimensional motion analysis during a drop vertical jump maneuver and postural stability assessment before return to pivoting and cutting sports. After the initial test session, each subject was followed for 12 months for occurrence of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Lower extremity joint kinematics, kinetics, and postural stability were assessed and analyzed. Analysis of variance and logistic regression were used to identify predictors of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Results Thirteen athletes suffered a subsequent second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Transverse plane hip kinetics and frontal plane knee kinematics during landing, sagittal plane knee moments at landing, and deficits in postural stability predicted a second injury in this population (C statistic = 0.94) with excellent sensitivity (0.92) and specificity (0.88). Specific predictive parameters included an increase in total frontal plane (valgus) movement, greater asymmetry in internal knee extensor moment at initial contact, and a deficit in single-leg postural stability of the involved limb, as measured by the Biodex stability system. Hip rotation moment independently predicted second anterior cruciate ligament injury (C = 0.81) with high sensitivity (0.77) and specificity (0.81). Conclusion Altered neuromuscular control of the hip and knee during a dynamic landing task

  10. ANATOMICAL RECONSTRUCTION OF ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT OF THE KNEE: DOUBLE BAND OR SINGLE BAND?

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Luiz Antonio Zanotelli; Junior, Adair Bervig; Badotti, Augusto Alves; Michelin, Alexandre Froes; Algarve, Rodrigo Ilha; de Quadros Martins, Cesar Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the double-band and single-band techniques for anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee and demonstrate that the double-band technique not only provides greater anterior stability but also causes less pain and a better subjective patient response. Methods: We selected 42 patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, by means of either the single-band anatomical reconstruction technique, using flexor tendon grafts with two tunnels, or the double-band anatomical reconstruction technique, using four tunnels and grafts from the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons. All fixations were performed using interference screws. There was no variation in the sample. Before the operation, the objective and subjective IKDC scores, Lysholm score and length of time with the injury were evaluated. All these variables were reassessed six months later, and the KT-1000 correlation with the contralateral knee was also evaluated. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in subjective evaluations, but the single-band group showed better results in relation to range of motion and objective evaluations including KT-1000 (with statistical significance). Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that there was no difference between the two groups in subjective evaluations, but better results were found using the single-band anatomical technique, in relation to objective evaluations. PMID:27042621

  11. Return to prelesional Tegner level after anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Seijas, Roberto; Ares, Oscar; Sallent, Andrea; Alvarez, Pedro; Cusco, Xavier; Cugat, Ramón

    2016-12-01

    Injury and surgery of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are very frequent within the sports environment. The purpose of the present study is to assess the level at which a group of athletes were able to return to play (RTP) after ACL reconstruction, and most importantly, the time for RTP. A prospective study with patients who presented an ACL injury and underwent ligament reconstruction surgery; a bone-tendon-bone reconstruction and a minimum follow-up of 24 months. The rates of RTP as well as correlations with IKDC and KT-1000 were collected. 42 patients were included (mean age 31.7 years old). Mean Tegner level was 6.7. 9.5 % of patients returned to sports 6 months after surgery, 52.3 % at 1 year, and 73.8 % at 2 years after ACL reconstruction. 11 patients did not achieve their preoperative Tegner level after 2 years of follow-up. Levels of KT-1000 of the operated side were normal, and IKDC levels reached 90 % of total. Fear to a new injury, psychological factors, personality, type of life, and sports level previous to the injury are factors that influence when it comes to RTP after an ACL surgery. Level of evidence Level II descriptive analysis.

  12. Risk for Revision After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Is Higher Among Adolescents: Results From the Danish Registry of Knee Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Faunø, Peter; Rahr-Wagner, Lene; Lind, Martin

    2014-10-01

    The number of children and adolescents with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions is increasing, and disturbing reports on high rerupture rates in this group have been noted. To describe the outcome of ACL reconstruction in children and adolescents based on data from the Danish Knee Ligament Reconstruction Registry (DKRR). Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Data were retrieved from the DKRR, a national population-based registry. The analysis was based on a population of 14,806 ACL-reconstructed patients. The outcome was evaluated using risk of ACL revision, subjective outcome score (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score [KOOS]), Tegner function score, and objective knee laxity. Three age groups were defined (A, <13 years; B, 13-15 years; and C, 15-20 years) and compared with D, patients ≥20 years (adults). There were 95 patients in group A, 327 in B, 2888 in C, and 11,496 in D. There was a significantly increased risk of revision surgery in the age groups B (6.7%) and C (4.9%) compared with the adults in group D (2.0%). Objective knee laxity did not differ between the 4 groups. Groups A, B, and C had a higher score on the combined KOOS symptoms, pain, sport, and quality of life subscales (KOOS4; 79.6, 76.6, and 73.1, respectively) compared with the adults (69.7). Group B had higher KOOS quality of life (76.6) and sports (71.1) scores than did group C (73.1 and 66.4, respectively). The Tegner activity score did not differ between the 4 groups. No impact of the use of extracortical graft fixation was detected in the youngest age group. Study results indicated an increased risk of graft failure in patients between 13 and 20 years of age. This is in contrast to the better subjective and equal objective knee score found in the same age groups. The new knowledge about the high revision rate among ACL-reconstructed teenagers is important for evidence-based preoperative information of ACL patients and their parents.

  13. Asymmetries in explosive strength following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Knezevic, Olivera M.; Mirkov, Dragan M.; Kadija, Marko; Nedeljkovic, Aleksandar; Jaric, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite its apparent functional importance, there is a general lack of data regarding the time-related changes in explosive strength and the corresponding side-to-side asymmetries in individuals recovering from an ACL reconstruction (ACLR). The present study was designed to assess changes in the maximum and explosive strength of the quadriceps and hamstrings muscle in athletes recovering from an ACLR. Methods Twenty male athletes with an ACL injury completed a standard isometric testing protocol pre-ACLR, 4 and 6 months post-ACLR. In addition to the maximum strength (Fmax), the explosive strength of quadriceps and hamstrings was assessed through 4 variables derived from the slope of the force-time curves over various time intervals (RFDmax, RFD50, RFD150 and RFD250). Side-to-side asymmetries were calculated relative to post-ACLR measures of the uninvolved leg (“standard” asymmetries), and relative to pre-ACLR value of the uninvolved leg (“real” asymmetries). Results Pre-ACLR asymmetries in quadriceps RFD (average 26%) were already larger than in Fmax (14%) (p < 0.05). Six months post-ACLR real asymmetries in RFD variables (33-39%) were larger than the corresponding standard asymmetries (26-28%; p < 0.01). Average asymmetries in hamstrings RFD and Fmax were 10%, 25% and 15% for pre-ACLR and two post-ACLR sessions, respectively (all p>0.05). Conclusions In addition to the maximum strength, the indices of explosive strength should also be included in monitoring recovery of muscle function following an ACLR. Furthermore, pre-injury/reconstruction values should be used for the post-ACLR side-to-side comparisons, providing a more valid criterion regarding the muscle recovery and readiness for a return to sports. PMID:25112209

  14. Posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction via tibial inlay technique in multiligament knee injuries.

    PubMed

    Zehir, Sinan; Elmalı, Nurzat; Şahin, Ercan; Çalbıyık, Murat; Karakaplan, Mustafa; Taşdemir, Zeki

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report our institution's experience regarding the use of open tibial inlay technique in patients undergoing single-stage combined posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction. Records of 17 patients who underwent PCL reconstruction with tibial inlay technique were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with ipsilateral femoral or tibial osteochondral avulsion fractures or ipsilateral concomitant tibia and femur shaft fractures were excluded. Out of these 17 patients, six cases underwent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) + PCL reconstruction, nine cases underwent ACL+ PCL + posterolateral corner reconstruction, one case underwent ACL + PCL + MCL reconstruction and one case underwent ACL+ PCL + posterolateral corner + MCL reconstruction. Mean follow-up was 14.27±6.77 (range: 6-30) months. In preoperative assessments, all patients had 3+ posterior laxity in posterior drawer test; at final follow-up, 6 patients had 0 laxity, 7 patients had 1+ laxity, and 4 patients had 2+ laxity (p<0.001). International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) objective evaluation showed severe disability in all patients preoperatively, whereas 5 knees were grade A, 8 knees were grade B, 3 knees were grade C, and 1 knee was grade D at final follow-up. Mean IKDC subjective score was 75.22±7.53 at final follow-up. Postoperatively, mean side-to-side difference in KT-1000 arthrometer measurement was 2.45±1.80 mm. At final follow-up, mean range of motion (ROM) was 0º on extension and 123.56±6.31º on flexion. Open tibial inlay approach is beneficial during PCL reconstruction. Further study is warranted to establish its effectiveness on functional outcomes and prevention of complications.

  15. Patellofemoral Osteoarthritis: Are We Missing an Important Source of Symptoms After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction?

    PubMed

    Culvenor, Adam G; Crossley, Kay M

    2016-04-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a well-established risk factor for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Fifty to ninety percent of individuals will develop radiographic tibiofemoral OA within a decade after ACL injury and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). Although less well recognized, radiographic patellofemoral OA is present in approximately 50% of individuals at more than 10 years after ACLR. This early-onset OA and its associated pain and functional limitations pose a particular challenge to younger adults with OA compared to an older OA population. Targeted interventions need to be developed to reduce the burden of early-onset OA following ACLR. Emerging evidence suggests that such interventions should target both the patellofemoral and tibiofemoral joints.

  16. Impaired voluntary quadriceps force control following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: relationship with knee function.

    PubMed

    Perraton, Luke; Clark, Ross; Crossley, Kay; Pua, Yong-Hao; Whitehead, Tim; Morris, Hayden; Telianidis, Stacey; Bryant, Adam

    2017-05-01

    Impairments in quadriceps force control and altered quadriceps and hamstring muscle activation strategies have been observed following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction; however, the functional implications of these impairments are unclear. This study examined the cross-sectional associations between quadriceps force control, quadriceps activation, hamstring coactivation and clinically assessed knee function following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with a hamstring graft. Sixty-six patients (18 ± 3 months following surgery) and 41 uninjured individuals participated. Quadriceps force control was assessed using an isometric knee extension task. Participants cyclically increased and decreased quadriceps force at slow speeds between 5 and 30 % maximum voluntary isometric contraction matching a moving target displayed on a screen. Quadriceps activation and hamstring coactivation were assessed concurrently using surface electromyography. Knee function was assessed with the Cincinnati Knee Rating Scale and three single-leg hop tests. The reconstructed group completed the task with 48 % greater root-mean-square error (RMSE), indicating significantly worse quadriceps force control (p < 0.001). In a multivariable model adjusted for sex, greater RMSE and greater lateral hamstring coactivation were significantly associated with worse knee function that is greater odds of scoring <85 % on one or more knee functional assessment. Less-accurate quadriceps force output and greater hamstring coactivation are associated with worse knee joint function following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and may contribute to irregular knee joint loading and the onset or progression of knee osteoarthritis. Impairments in quadriceps force control and altered muscle activation strategies may be modifiable through neuromuscular training, and this is an area for future research. Case-control study, Level III.

  17. Tibial plateau fracture following gracilis-semitendinosus anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: The tibial tunnel stress-riser.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, R O; Cohen, D; Barton-Hanson, N

    2006-06-01

    Tibial plateau fractures following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are extremely rare. This is the first reported case of a tibial plateau fracture following four-strand gracilis-semitendinosus autograft ACL reconstruction. The tibial tunnel alone may behave as a stress riser which can significantly reduce bone strength.

  18. A comparison of acute and chronic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using LARS artificial ligaments: a randomized prospective study with a 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Gu, Aiqun; Jiang, Haitao; Zhang, Wenjie; Yu, Xiangrong

    2015-01-01

    This prospective randomized study compared acute and chronic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using ligament advanced reinforcement system (LARS) artificial ligament in young active adults with a 5-year follow-up. Fifty-five patients were enrolled in this study and divided into two groups based on the elapsed time between the injury and reconstruction: the acute group (3-7 weeks) and the chronic group (6-11 months). The clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Lysholm knee scoring scale, the Tegner activity rating, a KT-1000 Arthrometer, and the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scoring system. Isokinetic strength of the quadriceps and hamstring was assessed using the Biodex System 3 isokinetic dynamometer. Anterior laxity was decreased and quadriceps/hamstring muscle strength was increased in the acute group compared to the chronic group (p > 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences in Lysholm scores, Tegner activity scores, and the IKDC evaluation form between the two groups. These results suggest that earlier ACL reconstruction using a LARS artificial ligament may provide an advantage in the treatment and rehabilitation of ACL rupture.

  19. Comparative Study on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Determination of Isometric Points with and Without Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Fabio J.; Albuquerque, Roberto F. M.; Sasaki, Sandra U.; Camanho, Gilberto L.; Hernandez, Arnaldo J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the accuracy of tunnel placement and graft isometry for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction performed using a computer-assisted navigation system (Orthopilot) and using traditional instruments. METHODS: The anterior cruciate ligament was removed intact from 36 pairs of human cadaver knees. From each pair, one knee was randomized to Group 1 (conventional) and the other to Group 2 (Orthopilot). An inelastic suture was then passed through the central points of the tibial and femoral tunnels. Neither of the tunnels was drilled. All knees were then dissected, and six parameters were obtained: distances from the tibial tunnel center to the 1) posterior cruciate ligament, 2) anterior horn of the lateral meniscus and 3) medial tibial spine; 4) distance from the femoral tunnel center to the posterior femoral cortex; 5) femoral tunnel coronal angle; and 6) variation of the distance from the femoral to the tibial tunnel with the knee extended and at 90 degrees of flexion. RESULTS: The variation of the distance from the femoral to the tibial tunnel during flexion and extension was smaller in the Orthopilot group (better isometry) compared to the conventional group. There were no statistical differences in any other parameters between the groups, and all tunnels were considered to be in satisfactory positions. DISCUSSION: The results obtained for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction depend on precise isometric point positioning, and a navigation system is a precision tool that can assist surgeons in tunnel positioning. CONCLUSION: No differences in tunnel position were observed between the groups. Nonetheless, better isometry was achieved in the Orthopilot group than with conventional instruments. PMID:20668625

  20. Biomechanical Comparison of Anterolateral Procedures Combined With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Inderhaug, Eivind; Stephen, Joanna M; Williams, Andy; Amis, Andrew A

    2017-02-01

    Anterolateral soft tissue structures of the knee have a role in controlling anterolateral rotational laxity, and they may be damaged at the time of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures. To compare the kinematic effects of anterolateral operative procedures in combination with intra-articular ACL reconstruction for combined ACL plus anterolateral-injured knees. Controlled laboratory study. Twelve cadaveric knees were tested in a 6 degrees of freedom rig using an optical tracking system to record the kinematics through 0° to 90° of knee flexion with no load, anterior drawer, internal rotation, and combined loading. Testing was first performed in ACL-intact, ACL-deficient, and combined ACL plus anterolateral-injured (distal deep insertions of the iliotibial band and the anterolateral ligament [ALL] and capsule cut) states. Thereafter, ACL reconstruction was performed alone and in combination with the following: modified MacIntosh tenodesis, modified Lemaire tenodesis passed both superficial and deep to the lateral collateral ligament, and ALL reconstruction. Anterolateral grafts were fixed at 30° of knee flexion with both 20 and 40 N of tension. Statistical analysis used repeated-measures analyses of variance and paired t tests with Bonferroni adjustments. ACL reconstruction alone failed to restore native knee kinematics in combined ACL plus anterolateral-injured knees ( P < .05 for all). All combined reconstructions with 20 N of tension, except for ALL reconstruction ( P = .002-.01), restored anterior translation. With 40 N of tension, the superficial Lemaire and MacIntosh procedures overconstrained the anterior laxity in deep flexion. Only the deep Lemaire and MacIntosh procedures-with 20 N of tension-restored rotational kinematics to the intact state ( P > .05 for all), while the ALL underconstrained and the superficial Lemaire overconstrained internal rotation. The same procedures with 40 N of tension led to similar findings. In a combined ACL plus

  1. Anatomical study of the ligamentous attachments and articular surfaces of the trapeziometacarpal joint. Consequences on surgical management of its osteoarthrosis.

    PubMed

    Maes-Clavier, C; Bellemère, P; Gabrion, A; David, E; Rotari, V; Havet, E

    2014-04-01

    In the goal to optimize conservative surgical techniques of the trapeziometacarpal joint in cases of moderate osteoarthritis, we have defined the relationships between the ligamentous attachments and the articular surfaces onto the trapezium and the first metacarpal bone on the one hand, and the dorsovolar and the transverse diameters of the articular surfaces on the other hand. Thirty-six trapeziometacarpal joints (from 18 fresh cadavers) were studied. They were separated into two groups depending on the macroscopic assessment of chondral disease. Group A included stages I to III (no osteoarthritis or moderate osteoarthritis), group B included stages IV (major cartilage destruction). The dorsovolar and transverse sizes of the articular surfaces were measured. Dorsoradial ligament (DRL), posterior oblique ligament (POL), intermetacarpal ligament (IML), ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) and anterior oblique ligament (AOL) were dissected and the distance between their attachments and the articular surfaces were measured. Group A included 17 joints (71% males) and group B included 19 joints (95% females). For the first metacarpal bone, the average ratio between the dorsovolar diameter and the transverse diameter of metacarpal articular surfaces was significantly higher in group B and the average distance between the ligamentous attachments and the articular surface was more than two millimeters, except for the DRL in group B. For the trapezium, only the posterior ligaments (DRL and POL) of group A were inserted at a mean distance more than two millimeters from the articular surfaces. Dorsovolar length of the metacarpal articular surface was higher for osteoarthritis cases. This difference can be explained by the existence of a palmar osteophyte that was always found in stage IV. Describing a map of the ligamentous attachment distance from the articular surface could help surgeons to avoid the ligamentous injury during minimal osteochondral resection.

  2. The Effect of Kinesiotaping Implementation After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ural, İbrahim Halil; Duymaz, Tomris; Özgönenel, Levent

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The main aim of this study was to measure effects of kinesiotaping on pain and range of motion in the conservative treatment of postoperative anterior cruciate ligament(ACL) rupture. Material-Methods: A total of 26 patients(24 women, 2 men) who had unilateral ACL rupture 64.46±9.00 years old(46-81years), 13 had physiotherapy only(mean age 64.46±9.35 years),13 had physiotherapy and kinesiotape(mean age 64.46±9.01 years).The patients in both groups received physiotherapy program (ultrasound with 1 MHz, 1W/cm2 during 5minutes; CPM; strength exercise for quadriceps muscle and cold pack during 15 minute). Kinesiotape was applied to the knee and quadriceps of the patient’s leg using a prescribed application to facilitate muscle performance for the experimental group versus a only physiotherapy group.The patients were treated 20 times for four weeks. Socio-demographic variables (gender, age, body mass index, Kellgren-Lawrence system for classification of knee osteoarthritis, use of analgesic drug, pain during rest and activity (VAS=Visual Analog Scale), range of motion of knee flexion and extansion (universal goniometer), circumference measurements of the knee and the quadriceps muscle (up to 10 cm of patella) were measured at baseline, mid the treatment program and after the treatment program. Statistical analysis was conducted using SPSS 22.0 for Windows.Frequency and percentage (average, standard deviation)were used as descriptive statistics of the study.The Wilcoxon test was used to compare the differences between before and after treatment measurements.The Kruskal Wallis test was used to compare groups.Significance was accepted as p<0.05. Results: No significant differences were found in age and BMI between groups (p=0.898, 0.505). The data of stage 3(n=22) and 4(n=4) patients with osteoarthritis were gathered according to the Kellgren-Lawrence classification. Mean day of use of analgesic drug were 17.30±7.33 in KT group, 18.23±9.84 in physiotherapy

  3. PERI-INCISIONAL DYSESTHESIA FOLLOWING ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION USING CENTRAL THIRD OF PATELLAR TENDON

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Júnior, Lúcio Honório; Machado, Soares Luiz Fernando; Gonçalves, Matheus Braga Jacques; Júnior, Paulo Randal Pires; Baumfeld, Daniel Soares; Pereira, Marcelo Lobo; Lessa, Rodrigo Rosa; Costa, Lincoln Paiva; Bisinoto, Henrique Barra

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the prevalence and type of dysesthesia around the incision used to obtain the patellar tendon for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery. Methods: Out of a population of 1368 ACL reconstructions using the central third of the patellar tendon, 102 patients (111 knees) were evaluated by means of telephone interview. Results: The mean follow-up was 52 months (ranging from 12 to 88 months). The patients' ages ranged from 16 to 58 years (mean: 34.7 years). There was some degree of peri-incisional dysesthesia in 66 knees (59.46%). In 40.54% of the knees, this condition was not found. In all the cases of dysesthesia, the type encountered was Highet's type II. Conclusion: Peri-incisional dysesthesia following ACL reconstruction using the central third of the patellar tendon is highly prevalent. It affected more than half of the cases in this series. PMID:27026983

  4. Early anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction can save meniscus without any complications

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Chang-Ik; Song, Eun-Kyoo; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Lee, Seung-Hun; Seon, Jong-Keun

    2017-01-01

    Background: Early ACL reconstruction, before retuning to activity eliminates recurrent episodes of instability and thereby decreases chances of meniscal and cartilage injury. However, there are no clear and uniform guidelines regarding the timing of ACL reconstruction or clarity in the definition of early and delayed reconstruction to reduce the complications after reconstruction in the ACL injured knee. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcome, stability, muscle power, and postural control after early and delayed anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Materials and Methods: Patients who had ACL reconstruction with a quadruple hamstring tendon with a minimum 2-year followup were evaluated. Early (within 3 weeks) reconstruction group was 48 knees and delayed (more than 3 months) group was 43 knees. We compared the two groups with regard to Lysholm knee score, range of motion (ROM), Lachman test, Tegner activity scale, associated meniscal or chondral injuries, and anterior laxity. We also compared muscle strength with an isokinetic dynamometer and postural control with computed dynamic posturography at the final followup. Results: While 50% of early and 70% of delayed group had meniscal injuries (P = 0.06), of which were reparable in 42% of early group and 17% of delayed group (P = 0.04). However, there was no significant difference in cartilage injury (P = 0.14). At the final followup, no significant differences were found between two groups for Lysholm score (P = 0.28), Tegner activity scale (P = 0.27), and ROM. The stabilities regarding Lachman and pivot-shift tests, and anterior laxity also showed no significant differences between two groups. The mean extension and flexion muscles power, and postural control showed no significant inter-group differences (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Early ACL reconstruction had excellent clinical results and stability as good as delayed reconstruction without the problem of knee motion, muscle power

  5. Gender differences in the restoration of knee joint biomechanics during gait after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Asaeda, Makoto; Deie, Masataka; Fujita, Naoto; Kono, Yoshifumi; Terai, Chiaki; Kuwahara, Wataru; Watanabe, Hodaka; Kimura, Hiroaki; Adachi, Nobuo; Sunagawa, Toru; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2017-03-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of gender on recovery of knee joint biomechanics over the stance phase of gait after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Gait parameters and knee joint kinematics and kinetics were compared in 32 patients (16 male and 16 female) who underwent ACL reconstruction for a unilateral ACL deficiency, with comparison to an age-, height-, and weight-matched Control group. Knee flexion, adduction and tibial rotation angles were measured and knee extension and abduction moment was calculated by inverse dynamics methods. Females exhibited more tibial external rotation, in both the Control and ACL groups (P<0.05), which was not changed after ACL reconstruction. Prior to reconstruction, sagittal plane biomechanics were changed, in both males and females, compared to the Control groups (P<0.05). These abnormal sagittal plane mechanics were recovered at 12months, but not six months post-reconstruction. We identified gender-based differences in tibial rotation that influenced the kinematics and kinetics of the knee over the stance phase of gait, both pre-operatively and post-ACL reconstruction. Evaluation of biomechanical effects of ACL injury, before and after reconstruction, should be separately evaluated for females and males. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of screw length and diameter on tibial strain energy density distribution after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jie; Kuang, Guan-Ming; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Niu, Wen-Xin; Zhang, Ming; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2014-04-01

    Postoperative tunnel enlargement has been frequently reported after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Interference screw, as a surgical implant in ACL reconstruction, may influence natural loading transmission and contribute to tunnel enlargement. The aims of this study are (1) to quantify the alteration of strain energy den sity (SED) distribution after the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction; and (2) to characterize the influence of screw length and diameter on the degree of the SED alteration. A validated finite element model of human knee joint was used. The screw length ranging from 20 to 30mm with screw diameter ranging from 7 to 9 mm were investigated. In the post-operative knee, the SED increased steeply at the extra-articular tunnel aperture under compressive and complex loadings, whereas the SED decreased beneath the screw shaft and nearby the intra-articular tunnel aperture. Increasing the screw length could lower the SED deprivation in the proximal part of the bone tunnel; whereas increasing either screw length or diameter could aggravate the SED deprivation in the distal part of the bone tunnel. Decreasing the elastic modulus of the screw could lower the bone SED deprivation around the screw. In consideration of both graft stability and SED alteration, a biodegradable interference screw with a long length is recommended, which could provide a beneficial mechanical environment at the distal part of the tunnel, and meanwhile decrease the bone-graft motion and synovial fluid propagation at the proximal part of the tunnel. These findings together with the clinical and histological factors could help to improve surgical outcome, and serve as a preliminary knowledge for the following study of biodegradable interference screw. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Short-term complications in intra- and extra-articular anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Comparison with the literature on isolated intra-articular reconstruction. A multicenter study by the French Society of Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Panisset, J C; Pailhé, R; Schlatterer, B; Sigwalt, L; Sonnery-Cottet, B; Lutz, C; Lustig, S; Batailler, C; Bertiaux, S; Ehkirch, F P; Colombet, P; Steltzlen, C; Louis, M L; D'ingrado, P; Dalmay, F; Imbert, P; Saragaglia, D

    2017-09-13

    Lateral tenodesis (LT) is performed to limit the risk of iterative tear following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in at-risk patients. By adding an extra procedure to isolated ACL graft, LT reconstruction increases operating time and may complicate postoperative course. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the rate of early complications. The study hypothesis was that associating ALL reconstruction to ACL reconstruction does not increase the complications rate found with isolated ACL reconstruction. A prospective multicenter study included 392 patients: 70% male; mean age, 29.9 years; treated by associated ACL and LT reconstruction. All adverse events were inventoried. Mean hospital stay was 2 days, with 46% day-surgery. Walking was resumed at a mean 27 days, with an advantage for patients treated by the hamstring technique. The early postoperative complications rate was 12%, with 1.7% specifically implicating LT reconstruction: pain, hematoma, stiffness in flexion and extension, and infection. There was a 5% rate of surgical revision during the first year, predominantly comprising arthrolysis for extension deficit. The 1-year recurrence rate was 2.8%. The complications rate for combined intra- and extra-articular reconstruction was no higher than for isolated intra-articular ACL reconstruction, with no increase in infection or stiffness rates. The rate of complications specific to ALL reconstruction was low, at 1.7%, and mainly involved fixation error causing lateral soft-tissue impingement. IV, prospective multicenter study. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. Sacrotuberous Ligament Healing following Surgical Division during Transgluteal Pudendal Nerve Decompression: A 3-Tesla MR Neurography Study

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Jan; Fritz, Benjamin; Dellon, A. Lee

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic pain due to chronic pudendal nerve (PN) compression, when treated surgically, is approached with a transgluteal division of the sacrotuberous ligament (STL). Controversy exists as to whether the STL heals spontaneously or requires grafting. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine how surgically divided and unrepaired STL heal. A retrospective evaluation of 10 patients who had high spatial resolution 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3T MRI) exams of the pelvis was done using an IRB-approved protocol. Each patient was referred for residual pelvic pain after a transgluteal STL division for chronic pudendal nerve pain. Of the 10 patients, 8 had the STL divided and not repaired, while 2 had the STL divided and reconstructed with an allograft tendon. Of the 8 that were left unrepaired, 6 had bilateral surgery. Outcome variables included STL integrity and thickness. Normative data for the STL were obtained through a control group of 20 subjects. STL integrity and thickness were measured directly on 3 T MR Neurography images, by two independent Radiologists. The integrity and thickness of the post-surgical STL was evaluated 39 months (range, 9–55) after surgery. Comparison was made with the native contra-lateral STL in those who had unilateral STL division, and with normal, non-divided STL of subjects of the control group. The normal STL measured 3 mm (minimum and maximum of absolute STL thickness, 2–3 mm). All post-operative STL were found to be continuous regardless of the surgical technique used. Measured at level of Alcock’s canal in the same plane as the obturator internus tendon posterior to the ischium, the mean anteroposterior STL diameter was 5 mm (range, 4–5 mm) in the group of prior STL division without repair and 8 mm (range, 8–9 mm) in the group with the STL reconstructed with grafts (p<0.05). The group of healed STLs were significantly thicker than the normal STL (p<0.05). We conclude that a surgically divided STL will heal

  9. Longitudinal changes in knee joint biomechanics during level walking following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery.

    PubMed

    Webster, Kate E; Feller, Julian A; Wittwer, Joanne E

    2012-06-01

    Following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL) patients have altered movement patterns in the reconstructed knee during walking. There is limited information about these alterations over an extended period of time. This study was designed to present a longitudinal analysis of gait patterns following ACL reconstruction surgery. Assessments of level walking were undertaken in 16 participants at a mean 10 months (initial assessment) and again at 3 years (follow-up assessment) after ACL reconstruction surgery. Kinematic and kinetic variables were analysed using a two factor (time, limb) repeated measures ANOVA. Kinematic data showed that patients were able to achieve greater extension about the reconstructed knee at follow-up than at initial assessment. The reconstructed knee was significantly less internally rotated than the contralateral knee at the initial assessment but not at follow-up. Kinetic data showed a significant increase in the external knee extension moment for the reconstructed limb over time. There were also significant increases in the external knee adduction moment for both limbs at the follow-up assessment. The external knee adduction moment was however smaller in the reconstructed knee than the contralateral knee at both assessments. The results indicate that gait variables do change over time and that measurement at a single time point may not reflect the long term outcome of ACL reconstruction surgery. The changes were however small and may not be clinically relevant. However, the consistently reduced external knee adduction moment seen about the reconstructed knee in this study may suggest that factors other than joint moments influence degenerative change over time.

  10. A three-dimensional finite element stress analysis for tunnel placement and buttons in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony G; Raso, V James; Liggins, Adrian B; Otto, David D; Amirfazli, A

    2005-04-01

    This communication reports the results of a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model of stresses in a surgically altered femur and tibia. The model incorporated a novel approach in implementing orthotropic and inhomogeneous bone properties and non-uniform distributed loading. Cortical, cancellous, and subchondral bone of the femur and the tibia were modeled. Mechanical properties for the cortical and cancellous bone were mapped from published data characterizing the anisotropy and inhomogeneity of the bone properties. Mesh adequacy was determined using stress convergence and strain energy error convergence. Qualitatively, the results of the study compare well with experimental principal compressive strains from the literature. With respect to tunnel placement in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, the model predicted stress-shielding at the postero-lateral region of the tunnel wall, and increased stress at the postero-medial region of the tunnel wall. The stresses in the cancellous bone beneath the tunnel were, in general, lower than those above the tunnel. Prolonged stress shielding leads to bone resorption of the posterior tunnel wall leading to tunnel enlargement, and possible compromise of the ACL reconstruction. The stresses on the femoral cortex produced from a button-type fixation were noticeable for low levels of loading; the stress levels were very similar in models incorporating bone properties of patients aged 45 and 65. Repeated compression of the femoral cortex at these stress levels may cause microdamage to the cortex eventually resulting in fatigue failure.

  11. Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using autologous graft from quadriceps tendon to treat recurrent patellar dislocation☆

    PubMed Central

    Calapodopulos, Constantino Jorge; Nogueira, Marcelo Corvino; Eustáquio, José Martins Juliano; Calapodopulos Júnior, Constantino Jorge; Rodrigues, Oreston Alves

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the surgical technique using the quadriceps tendon as a graft in static reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament. Methods This was a prospective case series study in which the participants were 22 patients with a diagnosis of recurrent patellar dislocation without any other anatomical alterations that required surgical treatment. The functional results from the technique were evaluated using clinical data and the Lysholm questionnaire, one year after the operation. Results It was observed that the patients were predominantly female (86%) and under 21 years of age (73%), just like in the literature. At the first annual return after the surgery, there was no significant pain on medium efforts, no loss of range of motion and a positive apprehension test. According to the questionnaire used, the results were graded as good. The patients who reported having severe pain on greater effort were involved in employment-related legal disputes. Conclusion This technique showed low morbidity and good functional results over the short term. PMID:27069888

  12. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction with the LARS ligament in professional versus non-professional athletes.

    PubMed

    Marcheggiani Muccioli, Giulio Maria; Manning, Christopher; Wright, Philip; Grassi, Alberto; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Funk, Lennard

    2016-06-01

    To compare outcomes of acromioclavicular (AC) joint reconstruction with ligament augmentation and reconstruction system (LARS) ligament in professional and non-professional athletes at 2-year minimum follow-up. Forty-three patients (men; mean age 30, range 19-54 years) with Rockwood type III to V chronic AC joint dislocations underwent AC joint reconstruction with LARS ligament and standardized rehabilitation. Patients were divided into two groups: professionals (22) and non-professionals (21). Clinical and radiological evaluations were performed preoperatively, at 3- and 24-month follow-up. All clinical (Oxford and Constant) scores and patient satisfaction improved significantly from preoperative to follow-up intervals (p < 0.00001). However, professionals showed nonsignificant improvements from 3- to 24-month follow-up in Constant. Although groups differed preoperatively in Constant (p = 0.037), they were not different in preoperative-to-postoperative differences in clinical scores, postoperative final satisfaction and median time to return to unrestricted activity [4 (interquartiler range 3-5) months to return to full sport in professionals]. Follow-up radiographs revealed an AC joint ratio (clavicle inferior-to-superior translation as ratio of AC joint height) of 0.09 and 0.16 in 8/22 professionals, 0.19 and 0.31 in 9/21 non-professionals, 0.14 and 0.24 in 17/43 overall patients at 3- and 24-month follow-up, respectively. Slight loss of reduction (0.25 < AC joint ratio < 0.50): 21 %. There were no significant clinical-radiographic correlations. Complication: one coracoid fracture at follow-up and one wound infection. AC joint reconstruction with LARS ligament did not reveal differences in clinical outcomes between groups, with 2 % of failures (re-dislocations) at 2-year minimum follow-up. Superior radiological outcomes in professionals were not correlated to clinical results. Therapeutic study-prospective comparative study, Level II.

  13. A Technique of Superficial Medial Collateral Ligament Reconstruction Using an Adjustable-Loop Suspensory Fixation Device.

    PubMed

    Deo, Shaneel; Getgood, Alan

    2015-06-01

    This report describes superficial medial collateral ligament reconstruction of the knee using a novel method of graft fixation with the ACL Tightrope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL). After tibial fixation with either a standard interference screw or staple, femoral fixation of the semitendinosus tendon is performed with the adjustable-loop suspensory fixation device, which allows for both initial graft tensioning and re-tensioning after cyclical knee range of motion. This provides the ability for the graft to accommodate for resultant soft-tissue creep and stress relaxation, thereby allowing for optimal soft-tissue tension and reduction in laxity at the end of the procedure.

  14. Biological enhancement of graft-tunnel healing in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    SACCOMANNO, MARISTELLA F.; CAPASSO, LUIGI; FRESTA, LUCA; MILANO, GIUSEPPE

    2016-01-01

    The sites where graft healing occurs within the bone tunnel and where the intra-articular ligamentization process takes place are the two most important sites of biological incorporation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, since they help to determine the mechanical behavior of the femur-ACL graft-tibia complex. Graft-tunnel healing is a complex process influenced by several factors, such as type of graft, preservation of remnants, bone quality, tunnel length and placement, fixation techniques and mechanical stress. In recent years, numerous experimental and clinical studies have been carried out to evaluate potential strategies designed to enhance and optimize the biological environment of the graft-tunnel interface. Modulation of inflammation, tissue engineering and gene transfer techniques have been applied in order to obtain a direct-type fibrocartilaginous insertion of the ACL graft, similar to that of native ligament, and to accelerate the healing process of tendon grafts within the bone tunnel. Although animal studies have given encouraging results, clinical studies are lacking and their results do not really support the use of the various strategies in clinical practice. Further investigations are therefore needed to optimize delivery techniques, therapeutic concentrations, maintenance of therapeutic effects over time, and to reduce the risk of undesirable effects in clinical practice. PMID:27900311

  15. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction combined with valgus tibial osteotomy (combined procedure).

    PubMed

    Boss, A; Stutz, G; Oursin, C; Gächter, A

    1995-01-01

    We assessed the patients who were operated on in a combined procedure from 1980 to 1992 with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiency, cartilaginous lesions of the medial compartment, lesion of medial meniscus and varus malalignment. The combined operative procedure was autologous intra-articular ACL reconstruction with the middle third of the patellar ligament--partially augmented with Kennedy-ligament augmentation device (LAD) in hot dog technique--and high tibial osteotomy. The patients were examined according to the criteria of IKDC including testing of anterior stability with the KT-1000 arthrometer. Radiographically we checked axis and arthritis according to a modified score of Kannus. Twenty-seven of 34 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria could be followed up in three categories (2-5 years post-operatively, 5-10 years postoperatively, over 10 years post-operatively). Total qualification was good in 37%; there were no perioperative complications. Rehabilitation was not prolonged. Eighty-nine percent practised their preoperative job, over 50% had a higher level of sports activities than preoperatively, and more than 25% regained their pretraumatic sports capacity. Two-thirds had no giving way and less than 3 mm translation difference in comparison to the contralateral knee. Seventy-five percent of patients would accept the operation again. Radiological findings had no correlation to overall qualification. The encouraging results with respect to many of the criteria suggest using the combined procedure in a young patient with ACL insufficiency, varus malalignment and medial compartment damage including medial meniscus lesion.

  16. Symptomatic Heterotopic Ossification After Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction: Clinical Significance and Treatment Outcome.

    PubMed

    Andrachuk, John S; Scillia, Anthony J; Aune, Kyle T; Andrews, James R; Dugas, Jeffrey R; Cain, E Lyle

    2016-05-01

    Ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) reconstruction is an increasingly common procedure being performed in overhead throwing athletes. Recently, postoperative imaging has revealed the presence of heterotopic ossification (HO) in symptomatic patients. To determine the incidence of symptomatic HO after UCL reconstruction as well as the clinical outcomes after nonoperative or operative treatment of HO. Case series, Level of evidence, 4. A search was performed of diagnostic codes for all UCL reconstructions at a single institution between 2002 and 2012, and the charts were then reviewed of patients who returned to clinic for symptomatic HO after UCL reconstruction. All relevant clinical information, imaging findings, and return-to-play data were obtained. Eight patients were found to have developed symptomatic HO after UCL reconstruction. Of the 8 patients, 6 had gracilis tendon autograft at their primary surgery. All 8 patients had HO on the proximal end of their graft. Two patients were treated nonoperatively, and the remainder had excision of HO performed either arthroscopically or open. Six patients were able to return to the same or higher level of competition after treatment of HO. Symptomatic HO after UCL reconstruction is very uncommon but may prove to be a significant complication among athletes. With appropriate treatment, the majority of patients were able to return to the same level of play. Early identification of this complication is important, as revision surgery with excision of osteophytes resulted in a return to a similar level of play in most patients. © 2016 The Author(s).

  17. Fungal osteomyelitis after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a case report with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Kai; Wang, Wei; Tian, Min

    2012-10-01

    Fungal osteomyelitis is a very rare complication after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction associated with catastrophic consequences. Herein, we present a case of such disastrous complication after ACL reconstruction. A 23-year-old man developed fever, swelling and pain of the affected knee from 18 days after arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. Therefore, he underwent arthroscopic debridement, removal of the graft and internal fixators, irrigation and suction drainage, successively. Negative results for serial bacterial cultures and smear examinations are obtained. However, computer tomography and X-ray examination showed massive bone destruction at 48 days after ACL reconstruction. As the first open debridement was performed at 50 days after ACL reconstruction, fungal infection was diagnosed based on finding Aspergillus hyphae in pathologic examination of the debrided bone sample. After the final debridement, a 12-cm bone loss in the distal femur was treated by Ilizarov's bone transport. The patient got solid arthrodesis of the affected knee without clinical infection at a year after the initial operation. In addition, a review of the literature regarding case reports of fungal osteomyelitis after ACL reconstruction is presented.

  18. The use of autologous chondrocyte implantation following and combined with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, W.; Gooding, C. R.; Sood, M.; Skinner, J. A.; Carrington, R. W.J.; Briggs, T. W.R.; Bentley, G.

    2005-01-01

    We report our experience of using autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) to treat osteochondral defects of the knee in combination with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The outcome of symptomatic osteochondral lesions treated with ACI following previous successful ACL reconstruction is also reviewed. Patients were followed for a mean of 23 months. Nine patients underwent ACL reconstruction in combination with ACI. Mean modified Cincinnati knee scores improved from 42 to 69 following surgery. Seven patients described their knee as better and two as the same. A second group of nine patients underwent ACI for symptomatic articular cartilage defects following previous ACL reconstruction. In this group, the mean modified Cincinnati knee score improved from 53 to 62 after surgery. Six patients described their knee as better and three as worse. Combined treatment using ACI with ACL reconstruction is technically feasible and resulted in sustained improvement in pain and function. The results following previous ACL reconstruction also resulted in clinical improvement, although results were not as good as following the combined procedure. PMID:16320051

  19. Tibiofemoral cartilage contact biomechanics in patients after reconstruction of a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Ali; Van de Velde, Samuel; Gill, Thomas J; Li, Guoan

    2012-11-01

    We investigated the in vivo cartilage contact biomechanics of the tibiofemoral joint in patients after reconstruction of a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A dual fluoroscopic and MR imaging technique was used to investigate the cartilage contact biomechanics of the tibiofemoral joint during in vivo weight-bearing flexion of the knee in eight patients 6 months following clinically successful reconstruction of an acute isolated ACL rupture. The location of tibiofemoral cartilage contact, size of the contact area, cartilage thickness at the contact area, and magnitude of the cartilage contact deformation of the ACL-reconstructed knees were compared with those previously measured in intact (contralateral) knees and ACL-deficient knees of the same subjects. Contact biomechanics of the tibiofemoral cartilage after ACL reconstruction were similar to those measured in intact knees. However, at lower flexion, the abnormal posterior and lateral shift of cartilage contact location to smaller regions of thinner tibial cartilage that has been described in ACL-deficient knees persisted in ACL-reconstructed knees, resulting in an increase of the magnitude of cartilage contact deformation at those flexion angles. Reconstruction of the ACL restored some of the in vivo cartilage contact biomechanics of the tibiofemoral joint to normal. Clinically, recovering anterior knee stability might be insufficient to prevent post-operative cartilage degeneration due to lack of restoration of in vivo cartilage contact biomechanics.

  20. “Basket weave technique” for medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction: Clinical outcome of a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Kodkani, Pranjal S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bone tunneling and implants with rigid fixations for medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction are known to compromise results and are avoidable, especially in skeletally immature subjects. This study was to assess if these deficiencies were overcome with the technique devised by the author which avoids implants and bone tunnels. Results were assessed for complication rate and outcome. Materials and Methods: Fifty six knees of recurrent lateral patellar dislocation were treated in the past 49 months by MPFL reconstruction. Thirty nine were female and 17 male knees. The mean age was 20.6 years (range 9-48 years). Mean followup was 26 months. Five knees had previously failed stabilization procedures. Thirty one cases had Dejours Type A or B and 12 had Type C trochlear dysplasia. Arthroscopy was performed for associated injuries and loose bodies. Seven knees required loose body removal. Five knees underwent lateral retinacular release. Four knees had tibial tuberosity transfer. One knee had an associated anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. An anatomical MPFL reconstruction was performed using hamstring autograft without the need for intraoperative fluoroscopy. Only soft tissue fixation was necessary with this newly devised technique and suturing. A rapid rehabilitation protocol was implemented with monthly followup until normalcy and 6 monthly thereafter. Results: All achieved full range of motion and normal mediolateral stability. There was no recurrence of dislocation. No major surgery related complications. One patella fracture at 8 months was due to a fall developed terminal restriction of flexion. Those in sports could return to their sporting activities (Tegner 1–9). Cases with osteochondral fractures had occasional pain that subsided in 1 year. Mean Kujala score improved from 64.3 to 99.69 with KOOS score near normal in all. Conclusion: This new method of MPFL reconstruction gives excellent results. It avoids complications

  1. Lower Limb Kinematics and Dynamic Postural Stability in Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Reconstructed Female Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Delahunt, Eamonn; Chawke, Mark; Kelleher, Judy; Murphy, Katie; Prendiville, Anna; Sweeny, Lauren; Patterson, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Context: Deficits in lower limb kinematics and postural stability are predisposing factors to the development of knee ligamentous injury. The extent to which these deficits are present after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is still largely unknown. The primary hypothesis of the present study was that female athletes who have undergone ACL reconstruction and who have returned to sport participation would exhibit deficits in dynamic postural stability as well as deficiencies in hip- and knee-joint kinematics when compared with an age-, activity-, and sex-matched uninjured control group. Objective: To investigate dynamic postural stability as quantified by the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) and simultaneous hip- and knee-joint kinematic profiles in female athletes who have undergone ACL reconstruction. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: University motion-analysis laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Fourteen female athletes who had previously undergone ACL reconstruction (ACL-R) and 17 age- and sex-matched uninjured controls. Intervention(s): Each participant performed 3 trials of the anterior, posterior-medial, and posterior-lateral directional components of the SEBT. Main Outcome Measure(s): Reach distances for each directional component were quantified and expressed as a percentage of leg length. Simultaneous hip- and knee-joint kinematic profiles were recorded using a motion-analysis system. Results: The ACL-R group had decreased reach distances on the posterior-medial (P < .01) and posterior-lateral (P < .01) directional components of the SEBT. During performance of the directional components of the SEBT, ACL-R participants demonstrated altered hip-joint frontal-, sagittal-, and transverse-plane kinematic profiles (P < .05), as well as altered knee-joint sagittal-plane kinematic profiles (P < .05). Conclusions: Deficits in dynamic postural stability and concomitant altered hip- and knee-joint kinematics are present after ACL

  2. Some clinical aspects of reconstruction for chronic anterior cruciate ligament deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Dandy, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    A total of 250 patients was reviewed 71.8 months (range 49-105 months) after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction for disabling instability that had not responded to conservative treatment or correction of internal derangements. Knees that had undergone previous operation or had damage to other ligaments were excluded. Four techniques were used; MacIntosh extra-articular lateral substitution alone (n = 18), extra-articular reconstruction plus intra-articular carbon fibre (n = 29), extra-articular reconstruction plus a free graft from the medial third of the patellar tendon (n = 74), or extra-articular reconstruction plus a Leeds-Keio prosthesis (n = 129). The knees were assessed 1, 3 and 6 years after reconstruction using the Lysholm score and clinical examination for the anterior drawer, Lachman and pivot shift signs. The mean Lysholm score after 6 years was 77.4 (range 31-100) in the extra-articular group; 74.4 (range 34-100) in the carbon fibre group; 95.4 (range 43-100) in the patellar tendon group; and 91.2 (range 45-100) in the Leeds-Keio group. The patellar tendon group had the highest scores (P < 0.003). The pivot shift sign returned in 39% of the extra-articular group; 48% of the carbon fibre group; 1% of the patellar tendon group, and 36% of the Leeds-Keio group. The pivot shift returned least often in the patellar tendon group (P < 0.001). There were 44% satisfactory results (pivot shift negative and Lysholm score 77 or more) in the extra-articular group; 55% in the carbon fibre group; 92% in the patellar tendon group; and 60% in the Leeds-Keio group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7574323

  3. Does posteromedial chondromalacia reduce rate of return to play after ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction?

    PubMed

    Osbahr, Daryl C; Dines, Joshua S; Rosenbaum, Andrew J; Nguyen, Joseph T; Altchek, David W

    2012-06-01

    Biomechanical studies suggest ulnohumeral chondral and ligamentous overload (UCLO) explains the development of posteromedial chondromalacia (PMC) in throwing athletes with ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) insufficiency. UCL reconstruction reportedly allows 90% of baseball players to return to prior or a higher level of play; however, players with concomitant posteromedial chondromalacia may experience lower rates of return to play. The purpose of this investigation is to determine: (1) the rates of return to play of baseball players undergoing UCL reconstruction and posteromedial chondromalacia; and (2) the complications occurring after UCL reconstruction in the setting of posteromedial chondromalacia. We retrospectively reviewed 29 of 161 (18%) baseball players who were treated for the combined posteromedial chondromalacia and UCL injury. UCL reconstruction was accomplished with the docking technique, and the PMC was addressed with nothing or débridement if Grade 2 or 3 and with débridement or microfracture if Grade 4. The mean age was 19.6 years (range, 16-23 years). Most players were college athletes (76%) and pitchers (93%). We used a modified four-level scale of Conway et al. to assess return to play with 1 being the highest level (return to preinjury level of competition or performance for at least one season after UCL reconstruction). The minimum followup was 24 months (mean, 37 months; range, 24-52 months). Return to play was Level 1 in 22 patients (76%), Level 2 in four patients (14%), Level 3 in two patients (7%), and Level 4 in one (3%) patient. Our data suggest baseball players with concomitant PMC, may have lower rates of return to the same or a higher level of play compared with historical controls. Level IV, case series. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  4. Patellofemoral Pressure Changes After Static and Dynamic Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Rood, Akkie; Hannink, Gerjon; Lenting, Anke; Groenen, Karlijn; Koëter, Sander; Verdonschot, Nico; van Kampen, Albert

    2015-10-01

    Reconstructing the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) has become a key procedure for stabilizing the patella. Different techniques to reconstruct the MPFL have been described: static techniques in which the graft is fixed rigidly to the bone or dynamic techniques with soft tissue fixation. Static MPFL reconstruction is most commonly used. However, dynamic reconstruction deforms more easily and presumably functions more like the native MPFL. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of the different MPFL fixation techniques on patellofemoral pressures compared with the native situation. The hypothesis was that dynamic reconstruction would result in patellofemoral pressures closer to those generated in an intact knee. Controlled laboratory study. Seven fresh-frozen knee specimens were tested in an in vitro knee joint loading apparatus. Tekscan pressure-sensitive films fixed to the retropatellar cartilage measured mean patellofemoral and peak pressures, contact area, and location of the center of force (COF) at fixed flexion angles from 0° to 110°. Four different conditions were tested: intact, dynamic, partial dynamic, and static MPFL reconstruction. Data were analyzed using linear mixed models. Static MPFL reconstruction resulted in higher peak and mean pressures from 60° to 110° of flexion (P < .001). There were no differences in pressure between the 2 different dynamic reconstructions and the intact situation (P > .05). The COF in the static reconstruction group moved more medially on the patella from 50° to 110° of flexion compared with the other conditions. The contact area showed no significant differences between the test conditions. After static MPFL reconstruction, the patellofemoral pressures in flexion angles from 60° to 110° were 3 to 5 times higher than those in the intact situation. The pressures after dynamic MPFL reconstruction were similar as compared with those in the intact situation, and therefore, dynamic MPFL reconstruction

  5. Ankle instability and arthroscopic lateral ligament repair.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Jorge I; Mangone, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Over the last 50 years, the surgical management of chronic lateral ankle ligament insufficiency has focused on 2 main categories: local soft-tissue reconstruction and tendon grafts/transfer procedures. There is an increasing interest in the arthroscopic solutions for chronic instability of the ankle. Recent biomechanical studies suggest the at least one of the arthroscopic techniques can provide equivalent results to current open local soft-tissue reconstruction (such as the modified Brostrom technique). Arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament reconstruction is becoming an increasingly acceptable method for the surgical management of chronic lateral ankle instability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of culture complex of BMSCs and sodium hydroxide- and GRGDSPC-treated PET on the reconstruction of injured anterior cruciate ligament in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianming; Chen, Fengrong; Jian, Guojian; Ye, Zhiyang; Wang, Zimin; Liu, Haoyuan; Kang, Yifan

    2015-01-01

    Ligament reconstruction is an effective therapy for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligaments have recently gained popularity in clinical ACL reconstruction for its advantage in the improvement of keen function. However, the application of PET in clinical treatment is limited by its poor bioactivity and biocompatibility. Recently, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been widely studied in regenerative medical therapy due to their multi-lineage differentiation. Previous study also indicated that BMSCs may promote the healing of tendon-bone interface of injured ligament. We speculate that BMSCs may enhance the curative effect of PET artificial ligament on the tendon-bone-healing in ligament reconstruction. In this study, the PET materials were first modified with sodium hydroxide hydrolysis and GRGDSPC peptide which was able to improve its bioactivity and biocompatibility. Then, the effects of modified PET materials on the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs were examined. The in vitro co-culture of BMSCs and modified PET showed the modified PET promoted the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs. Further, the effect of culture complex of BMSCs and modified PET artificial ligament co-culture system on the injured ligament reconstruction was investigated in vivo. Results showed not only better growth and differentiation of BMSCs but also satisfactory healing of the injured ligament was observed after implantation of this culture complex into the injured ligament of rabbits. Our study provides a brand-new solution for ACL reconstruction. PMID:26221227

  7. Biomechanical Evaluation of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Quadriceps Versus Achilles Tendon Bone Block Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Brian; Haro, Marc S.; Bogunovic, Ljiljana; Collins, Michael J.; Arns, Thomas A.; Trella, Katie J.; Shewman, Elizabeth F.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Long-term studies of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction suggest that normal stability is not restored in the majority of patients. The Achilles tendon allograft is frequently utilized, although recently, the quadriceps tendon has been introduced as an alternative option due to its size and high patellar bone density. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical strength of PCL reconstructions using a quadriceps versus an Achilles allograft. The hypothesis was that quadriceps bone block allograft has comparable mechanical properties to those of Achilles bone block allograft. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-nine fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: (1) intact PCL, (2) PCL reconstruction with Achilles tendon allograft, or (3) PCL reconstruction with quadriceps tendon allograft. After reconstruction, all supporting capsular and ligamentous tissues were removed. Posterior tibial translation was measured at neutral and 20° external rotation. Each specimen underwent a preload, 2 cyclic loading protocols of 500 cycles, then load to failure. Results: Construct creep deformation was significantly lower in the intact group compared with both Achilles and quadriceps allograft (P = .008). The intact specimens reached the greatest ultimate load compared with both reconstructions (1974 ± 752 N, P = .0001). The difference in ultimate load for quadriceps versus Achilles allograft was significant (P = .048), with the quadriceps group having greater maximum force during failure testing. No significant differences were noted between quadriceps versus Achilles allograft for differences in crosshead excursion during cyclic testing (peak-valley [P-V] extension stretch), creep deformation, or stiffness. Construct stiffness measured during the failure test was greatest in the intact group (117 ± 9 N/mm, P = .0001) compared with the Achilles (43 ± 11 N/mm) and quadriceps (43

  8. Mohs Surgical Reconstruction Educational Activity: a resident education tool

    PubMed Central

    Croley, Julie A; Malone, C Helen; Goodwin, Brandon P; Phillips, Linda G; Cole, Eric L; Wagner, Richard F

    2017-01-01

    Background Surgical reconstructive planning following Mohs surgery can be a difficult subject for dermatology residents to master. Prior research demonstrates that active learning is preferred and more effective compared to passive learning models and that dermatology residents desire greater complexity and volume in surgical training. We present a novel, active, problem-based learning tool for the education of Mohs reconstruction with the goal of improving residents’ ability to plan surgical reconstructions. Materials and methods The Mohs Surgical Reconstruction Educational Activity is an active, problem-based learning activity in which residents designed repairs for planned Mohs defects prior to surgery on an iPad application or on a printed photograph. The attending Mohs surgeon reviewed the reconstructive designs, provided feedback, guided discussion, and facilitated insight into additional issues requiring further review. Residents performed or observed the Mohs and reconstructive surgical procedures for respective repairs. Surveys were administered to participants before and after participating in the Mohs Surgical Reconstruction Educational Activity to assess the educational value of the activity. Survey responses were recorded on a 5-point Likert scale. Results Mean participant-reported confidence in flap and graft knowledge, flap and graft planning, and flap and graft performance increased 1.50–2.50 Likert scale points upon completion of the Mohs surgery rotation by residents participating in the educational activity. The observed trend was larger in the dermatology resident subset, with increases of 2.00–3.50 Likert scale points reported for these questions. Mean participant-reported likelihoods of performing flaps and grafts in the future increased 0.25–0.50 Likert scale points among all residents participating in the educational activity and 0.50–1.00 Likert scale points in the dermatology resident subset. All residents participating in the

  9. Mohs Surgical Reconstruction Educational Activity: a resident education tool.

    PubMed

    Croley, Julie A; Malone, C Helen; Goodwin, Brandon P; Phillips, Linda G; Cole, Eric L; Wagner, Richard F

    2017-01-01

    Surgical reconstructive planning following Mohs surgery can be a difficult subject for dermatology residents to master. Prior research demonstrates that active learning is preferred and more effective compared to passive learning models and that dermatology residents desire greater complexity and volume in surgical training. We present a novel, active, problem-based learning tool for the education of Mohs reconstruction with the goal of improving residents' ability to plan surgical reconstructions. The Mohs Surgical Reconstruction Educational Activity is an active, problem-based learning activity in which residents designed repairs for planned Mohs defects prior to surgery on an iPad application or on a printed photograph. The attending Mohs surgeon reviewed the reconstructive designs, provided feedback, guided discussion, and facilitated insight into additional issues requiring further review. Residents performed or observed the Mohs and reconstructive surgical procedures for respective repairs. Surveys were administered to participants before and after participating in the Mohs Surgical Reconstruction Educational Activity to assess the educational value of the activity. Survey responses were recorded on a 5-point Likert scale. Mean participant-reported confidence in flap and graft knowledge, flap and graft planning, and flap and graft performance increased 1.50-2.50 Likert scale points upon completion of the Mohs surgery rotation by residents participating in the educational activity. The observed trend was larger in the dermatology resident subset, with increases of 2.00-3.50 Likert scale points reported for these questions. Mean participant-reported likelihoods of performing flaps and grafts in the future increased 0.25-0.50 Likert scale points among all residents participating in the educational activity and 0.50-1.00 Likert scale points in the dermatology resident subset. All residents participating in the educational activity somewhat or completely agreed

  10. Reconstruction of compound loss of lateral malleolus and lateral ankle ligaments with double-bundle Achilles tendon-bone allograft.

    PubMed

    Ko, Dukhwan; Jung, Hong-Geun; Kim, Hyeung-June; Cha, Seung-Han; Nam, Kyoung-Mo

    2014-01-01

    Open ankle fracture, including compound loss of the lateral malleolus, lateral ankle ligaments, and overlying skin, is a severe injury and can result in ankle instability and permanent disability. Treatment of this injury is challenging and requires bone grafting and soft tissue reconstruction. In the present report, we describe a unique reconstruction technique for compound loss of the lateral malleolus, lateral ankle ligaments, and the overlying skin using a double-bundle Achilles tendon-bone allograft combined with a reverse sural fasciocutaneous flap. The patient obtained a stable ankle with nearly full range of motion and displayed satisfactory function during the follow-up period.

  11. Anterior cruciate ligament augmentation for rotational instability following primary reconstruction with an accelerated physical therapy protocol.

    PubMed

    Carey, Timothy; Oliver, David; Pniewski, Josh; Mueller, Terry; Bojescul, John

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to present the results of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) augmentation for patients having rotational instability despite an intact vertical graft in lieu of conventional revision ACL reconstruction. ACL augmentation surgery with a horizontal graft was performed to augment a healed vertical graft on five patients and an accelerated rehabilitation protocol was instituted. Functional outcomes were assessed by the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) and the Modified Cincinnati Rating System (MCRS). All patients completed physical therapy within 5 months and were able to return to full military duty without limitation. LEFS and MCRS were significantly improved. ACL augmentation with a horizontal graft provides an excellent alternative to ACL revision reconstruction for patients with an intact vertical graft, allowing an earlier return to duty for military service members.

  12. Comparison of analgesic effects of intra-articular tenoxicam and morphine in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Guler, Gulen; Karaoglu, Sinan; Velibasoglu, Hediye; Ramazanogullari, Nesrin; Boyaci, Adem

    2002-07-01

    This study compared the analgesic effect of intra-articular injection of tenoxicam with that of morphine on postoperative pain after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Forty-two patients undergoing arthroscopically ACL reconstructions using hamstring tendons underwent the same anesthetic protocol. The patients were randomized to receive 25 ml normal saline, 20 mg tenoxicam in 25 ml normal saline, or 2 mg morphine in 25 ml normal saline. Postoperative pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale and measuring analgesic requirements. We found both that both intra-articular tenoxicam and intra-articular morphine provided better analgesia than that in the control group. Although pain scores were similar between tenoxicam and morphine groups 30 min postoperative, the analgesic requirements in with tenoxicam were significantly lower than those with morphine group 3-6 h postoperatively.

  13. Mycobacterium fortuitum infection after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a polylactic acid bioabsorbable screw: Case report.

    PubMed

    Oh, Horng Lii; Chen, Darren B; Seeto, Bradley G; Macdessi, Samuel J

    2010-03-01

    We report a case of pretibial sinus and abscess after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a polylactic acid tricalcium phosphate bioabsorbable screw for tibial fixation. Mycobacterium fortuitum was identified as the pathogen after specific mycobacterial cultures were obtained from operative specimens. M. fortuitum is a known but rare cause of periprosthetic infection. Diagnosis is often delayed as routine microbiological cultures do not utilise specific culture requirements for mycobacterial growth. There have been several reports in the literature of sterile abscesses associated with bioabsorbable screws. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection associated with a bioabsorbable implant. This case illustrates that post-operative Mycobacterium infection can occur as a complication of ACL reconstruction with bioabsorbable screw fixation and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of post-operative periprosthetic infection.

  14. Increased Compliance With Supervised Rehabilitation Improves Functional Outcome and Return to Sport After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Recreational Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fucai; Banerjee, Anirban; Shen, Liang; Krishna, Lingaraj

    2015-01-01

    Background: Successful return to sport is an important outcome measure after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and a reason for patients’ decisions to elect surgery. Rehabilitation programs supervised by physical therapists are routinely prescribed after ACL reconstruction surgery. However, the added advantage of supervised physical therapy after ACL reconstruction is still debatable. Hypothesis: Attending more supervised physical therapy sessions after arthroscopic ACL reconstruction in recreational athletes increases their chance of successful return to sport. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: The authors analyzed 93 recreational athletes who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. After arthroscopic single-bundle ACL reconstruction, patients were advised to attend 20 supervised physical therapy sessions. Patients’ demographics, surgical details, and outcome measures (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score [KOOS], Lysholm scale, and Short Form–36 Health Survey [SF-36]) were recorded presurgery and at 1-year follow-up. Ability to return to sports was documented through patients’ self-report. The attendance at physical therapy by each patient was obtained by examining database records and assessed as fully compliant (>15 sessions), moderately compliant (6-15 sessions), or noncompliant (<6 sessions). Results: Patients in the fully compliant group had significantly greater odds (odds ratio [OR], 18.5; 95% CI, 1.9-184.5; P = .013) of a successful return to sport as compared with the noncompliant group. Patients in the moderately compliant group also had greater odds of returning to sport as compared with the noncompliant group (OR, 4.2; 95% CI, 1.0-16.6; P = .043). Patients in the fully compliant group had significantly greater scores on the Lysholm (P < .001), KOOS Sports and Recreation subscale (P = .021), KOOS Symptoms subscale (P = .040), and SF-36 physical component summary (PCS) (P = .012) as compared with

  15. Long-term interventions effects of robotic training on patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Rui; Ye, Miao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the long-term interventions effects of robot-assisted therapy rehabilitation on functional activity levels after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 8 patients (6 males and 2 females) who received anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy lasting for one month. The Timed Up-and-Go test, 10-Meter Walk test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] The average value of the of vastus medialis EMG, Functional Reach Test, and the maximum and average extensor strength of the knee joint isokinetic movement increased significantly, and the time of the 10-Meter Walk test decreased significantly. [Conclusion] These results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic walking training as a long-term intervention. PMID:27630396

  16. Proprioception and Clinical Results of Anterolateral Single-Bundle Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction with Remnant Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dung Chul; Kwack, Byung Hoon; Lee, Sung Jun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical and radiological results and proprioception following anterolateral single-bundle posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction with remnant preservation for PCL injury. Materials and Methods Twenty patients with an isolated PCL injury (16 males and 4 females) were included in this study. The mean follow-up period was 61 months (≥24 months) and the mean age of the patients was 36 years. Knee joint instability was evaluated using posterior drawer stress radiography. Knee function, level of activities, and individual satisfaction were assessed using the Lysholm knee score, Tegner activity score, and 2000 International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score. Knee proprioception was assessed using an isokinetic machine. Results The mean ligament laxity assessed using the posterior drawer stress radiography was improved from 10.8-3.2 mm. The mean Lysholm knee score was improved from 70.0-88.9 points, and the mean Tegner activity score was improved from 2.7-6.2 points. Individual satisfaction assessed using the IKDC score was improved from 62.7-85.4 points (p<0.05). Knee proprioception was not significantly different between the treated and the uninjured knees. Conclusions Single-bundle PCL reconstruction with remnant preservation for PCL injury exhibited satisfactory outcomes regarding functional outcome, joint stability, and proprioception. PMID:24032101

  17. Effects of Wii balance board exercises on balance after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Puh, Urška; Majcen, Nia; Hlebš, Sonja; Rugelj, Darja

    2014-05-01

    To establish the effects of training on Wii balance board (WBB) after posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction on balance. Included patient injured her posterior cruciate ligament 22 months prior to the study. Training on WBB was performed 4 weeks, 6 times per week, 30-45 min per day. Center of pressure (CoP) sway during parallel and one-leg stance, and body weight distribution in parallel stance were measured. Additionally, measurements of joint range of motion and limb circumferences were taken before and after training. After training, the body weight was almost equally distributed on both legs. Decrease in CoP sway was most significant for one-leg stance with each leg on compliant surface with eyes open and closed. The knee joint range of motion increased and limb circumferences decreased. According to the results of this single case report, we might recommend the use of WBB for balance training after PCL reconstruction. Case series with no comparison group, Level IV.

  18. Transphyseal Reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Using Hamstring Autograft in Skeletally Immature Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Seon, Jong Keun; Yoon, Taek Rim; Park, Sang Jin

    2005-01-01

    Eleven skeletally immature adolescents underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a transphyseal tibial and femoral tunnel. An autologous quadrupled hamstring tendon was used in all cases and the average follow-up was 77.7 months. Clinical results were evaluated using Lysholm knee scores and a return to pre-injury sports activities. Radiological results were evaluated using side-to-side differences of instrumented laxities and growth disturbances compared with the uninjured side on final follow-up orthoroentgenograms. The mean Lysholm score was 97.8 (range 94-100) and mean side-to-side laxity difference was 2.4 mm (range 1-4). Ten of 11 patients returned to pre-injury sports activity. No patient had a leg length discrepancy of over 1 cm or a significant abnormal angular deformity of the knee joint. Therefore, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using the transphyseal tunnel and hamstring autograft in skeletally immature adolescents is believed to be a reliable treatment method, which is not associated with significant leg length discrepancy or abnormal angular deformity of the knee joint. PMID:16361818

  19. Proprioception and clinical results of anterolateral single-bundle posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with remnant preservation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dung Chul; Shon, Oog Jin; Kwack, Byung Hoon; Lee, Sung Jun

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the clinical and radiological results and proprioception following anterolateral single-bundle posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction with remnant preservation for PCL injury. Twenty patients with an isolated PCL injury (16 males and 4 females) were included in this study. The mean follow-up period was 61 months (≥24 months) and the mean age of the patients was 36 years. Knee joint instability was evaluated using posterior drawer stress radiography. Knee function, level of activities, and individual satisfaction were assessed using the Lysholm knee score, Tegner activity score, and 2000 International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score. Knee proprioception was assessed using an isokinetic machine. The mean ligament laxity assessed using the posterior drawer stress radiography was improved from 10.8-3.2 mm. The mean Lysholm knee score was improved from 70.0-88.9 points, and the mean Tegner activity score was improved from 2.7-6.2 points. Individual satisfaction assessed using the IKDC score was improved from 62.7-85.4 points (p<0.05). Knee proprioception was not significantly different between the treated and the uninjured knees. Single-bundle PCL reconstruction with remnant preservation for PCL injury exhibited satisfactory outcomes regarding functional outcome, joint stability, and proprioception.

  20. Prognosis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a data-driven approach

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Abhijit; Kar, Oliva; Wu, Kuan-Chuen; Hall, Michelle; Gillette, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Individuals who suffer anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury are at higher risk of developing knee osteoarthritis (OA) and almost 50% display symptoms 10–20 years post injury. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) often does not protect against knee OA development. Accordingly, a multi-scale formulation for data-driven prognosis (DDP) of post-ACLR is developed. Unlike traditional predictive strategies that require controlled off-line measurements or ‘training’ for determination of constitutive parameters to derive the transitional statistics, the proposed DDP algorithm relies solely on in situ measurements. The proposed DDP scheme is capable of predicting onset of instabilities. As the need for off-line testing (or training) is obviated, it can be easily implemented for ACLR, where such controlled a priori testing is almost impossible to conduct. The DDP algorithm facilitates hierarchical handling of the large dataset and can assess the state of recovery in post-ACLR conditions based on data collected from stair ascent and descent exercises of subjects. The DDP algorithm identifies inefficient knee varus motion and knee rotation as primary difficulties experienced by some of the post-ACLR population. In such cases, levels of energy dissipation rate at the knee, and its fluctuation may be used as measures for assessing progress after ACL reconstruction. PMID:27547072

  1. Trends in primary and revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction among National Basketball Association team physicians.

    PubMed

    Mall, Nathan A; Abrams, Geoffrey D; Azar, Frederick M; Traina, Steve M; Allen, Answorth A; Parker, Richard; Cole, Brian J

    2014-06-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are common in athletes. Techniques and methods of treatment for these injuries continue to vary among surgeons. Thirty National Basketball Association (NBA) team physicians were surveyed during the NBA Pre-Draft Combine. Survey questions involved current and previous practice methods of primary and revision ACL reconstruction, including technique, graft choice, rehabilitation, and treatment of combined ACL and medial collateral ligament injuries. Descriptive parametric statistics, Fisher exact test, and logistic regression were used, and significance was set at α = 0.05. All 30 team physicians completed the survey. Eighty-seven percent indicated they use autograft (81% bone-patellar tendon-bone) for primary ACL reconstruction in NBA athletes, and 43% indicated they use autograft for revision cases. Fourteen surgeons (47%) indicated they use an anteromedial portal (AMP) for femoral tunnel drilling, whereas 5 years earlier only 4 (13%) used this technique. There was a significant (P = .009) positive correlation between fewer years in practice and AMP use. NBA team physicians' use of an AMP for femoral tunnel drilling has increased over the past 5 years.

  2. Posteromedial meniscal tears may be missed during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Adrien; Lording, Timothy D; Lustig, Sébastien; Servien, Elvire; Maubisson, Laurent; Neyret, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to assess the benefit of using an arthroscopic intercondylar view and a posterior medial viewing portal during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in the diagnosis of posterior horn of the medial meniscus (PHMM) tears. A secondary objective was to determine clinical and radiological risk factors for the PHMM. Forty-one patients undergoing isolated ACL reconstruction were prospectively evaluated. At ACL reconstruction, the PHMM was assessed using a standard 30° arthroscope in 3 sequential stages: a "classic" anterolateral portal view, an intercondylar view, and a view through a posteromedial portal. Thirty-nine patients were included (12 female patients and 27 male patients). A posteromedial tear of the medial meniscus was found in 17 patients using the anterolateral portal view. The intercondylar view identified 4 new additional lesions and extensions of 3 previously identified lesions. The posteromedial portal view identified 6 new lesions and 5 extensions of known lesions compared with the anterolateral portal view. Two lesions seen through the posteromedial portal were not identified by either the anterolateral portal view or the intercondylar view. Tears of the PHMM may be underdiagnosed by intraoperative assessment using only an anterolateral portal view during ACL reconstruction. The intercondylar view combined with a posteromedial portal aids in the diagnosis of PHMM tears and should be considered in routine ACL reconstruction to assess meniscal status, particularly when the interval from injury to surgery is prolonged. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Principal component analysis of knee kinematics and kinetics after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Brooke A; Zucker-Levin, Audrey R; Williams, John L; Mihalko, William M; Jacobs, Eddie L

    2012-07-01

    This study compared the gait of 10 subjects with unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction to a group of 12 height- and weight-matched control subjects. The analysis was based on knee flexion, adduction, and internal rotation angles and moments. The objective was to use principal component analysis (PCA) to identify knees of the ACL reconstructed subjects that fell outside normal ranges as determined by control subjects. Gait data were collected on all subjects in a motion analysis laboratory. Principal component (PC) models were developed for each gait measure based on the control subjects' data and used to assess gait waveforms of ACL reconstructed subjects. PCA allows analysis of entire gait waveforms for comparisons. In a sample of 10 ACL reconstructed subjects (7 years after surgery, on average), six of the ACL reconstructed knees had not returned to normal following surgery and eight of the contralateral knees functioned differently from controls. A majority of the differences were noted to occur in the abduction-adduction knee moment with corresponding infrequency in the differences seen in abduction-adduction rotation. PCA enabled us to identify subjects with abnormal gait waveforms as outliers relative to the normal control group. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Quadriceps muscle function after rehabilitation with cryotherapy in patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hart, Joseph M; Kuenze, Christopher M; Diduch, David R; Ingersoll, Christopher D

    2014-01-01

    Persistent muscle weakness after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction may be due to underlying activation failure and arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI). Knee-joint cryotherapy has been shown to improve quadriceps function transiently in those with AMI, thereby providing an opportunity to improve quadriceps muscle activation and strength in patients with a reconstructed ACL. To compare quadriceps muscle function in patients with a reconstructed ACL who completed a 2-week intervention including daily cryotherapy (ice bag), daily exercises, or both. Cross-sectional study. Laboratory. A total of 30 patients with reconstructed ACLs who were at least 6 months post-index surgery and had measurable quadriceps AMI. The patients attended 4 supervised visits over a 2-week period. They were randomly assigned to receive 20 minutes of knee-joint cryotherapy, 1 hour of therapeutic rehabilitation exercises, or cryotherapy followed by exercises. We measured quadriceps Hoffmann reflex, normalized maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque, central activation ratio using the superimposed-burst technique, and patient-reported outcomes before and after the intervention period. After the 2-week intervention period, patients who performed rehabilitation exercises immediately after cryotherapy had higher normalized maximal voluntary isometric contraction torques (P = .002, Cohen d effect size = 1.4) compared with those who received cryotherapy alone (P = .16, d = 0.58) or performed exercise alone (P = .16, d = 0.30). After ACL reconstruction, patients with AMI who performed rehabilitation exercises immediately after cryotherapy experienced greater strength gains than those who performed cryotherapy or exercises alone.

  5. Quantification of tibial bone loss in antegrade versus retrograde tunnel placement for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Osti, Michael; Krawinkel, Alessa; Hoffelner, Thomas; Benedetto, Karl Peter

    2015-08-01

    Tibial bone destruction during primary graft tunnel placement and tibial bone loss following tunnel enlargement represent major challenges in revision reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Initial all-inside ACL reconstruction facilitates the preparation of tibial bone sockets rather than full tunnels that potentially preserve tibial bone stock. The purpose of this study was to comparatively assess length, diameter and volume of tibial graft tunnels following all-inside and conventional ACL reconstruction. Postoperative computed tomography (CT) scans of 59 patients were assessed following ACL reconstruction. In 35 patients we used conventional antegrade tibial tunnel drilling and in 24 all-inside retrograde tibial bone sockets. Imaging analysis included total, minimal and maximal tunnel length and tunnel diameter. Tunnel volumes were calculated corresponding to these parameters. Statistically significant group differences (p < 0.01) could be detected for tibial tunnel volume, length and diameter between conventional antegrade and all-inside retrograde tibial bone tunnels and sockets, respectively. Compared with conventional techniques, all-inside retrograde drilling of tibial bone sockets is effective in preserving significant bone stock, which might be beneficial for revision reconstruction in cases of eventual primary graft failure.

  6. A Comparison between Clinical Results of Selective Bundle and Double Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yon-Sik; Song, Si Young; Yang, Cheol Jung; Ha, Jong Mun; Kim, Yoon Sang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic anatomical double bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with either selective anteromedial (AM) or posterolateral (PL) bundle reconstruction while preserving a relatively healthy ACL bundle. Materials and Methods The authors evaluated 98 patients with a mean follow-up of 30.8±4.0 months who had undergone DB or selective bundle ACL reconstructions. Of these, 34 cases underwent DB ACL reconstruction (group A), 34 underwent selective AM bundle reconstruction (group B), and 30 underwent selective PL bundle reconstructions (group C). These groups were compared with respect to Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, side-to-side differences of anterior laxity measured by KT-2000 arthrometer at 30 lbs, and stress radiography and Lachman and pivot shift test results. Pre- and post-operative data were objectively evaluated using a statistical approach. Results The preoperative anterior instability measured by manual stress radiography at 90° of knee flexion in group A was significantly greater than that in groups B and C (all p<0.001). At last follow-up, mean side-to-side instrumented laxities measured by the KT-2000 and manual stress radiography were significantly improved from preoperative data in all groups (all p<0.001). There were no significant differences between the three groups in anterior instability measured by KT-2000 arthrometer, pivot shift, or functional scores. Conclusion Selective bundle reconstruction in partial ACL tears offers comparable clinical results to DB reconstruction in complete ACL tears. PMID:27401652

  7. Morden synthetic material is a safe and effective alterative for medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul Y F; Golding, David; Rozewicz, Sam; Chandratreya, Amit

    2017-09-19

    Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction is often performed using gracilis autografts, which may be associated with donor site morbidity and complications. The use of a synthetic material can circumvent a harvest operation and has previously been demonstrated to be effective in other types of reconstructive procedures and may be effective in MPFL reconstruction. This study reports the clinical result with the use of a morden ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene with a braided jacket of polyester tape (FT) in MPFL reconstruction compared to using standard autografts. Data were collected prospectively in 50 MPFL reconstructions. The first 27 underwent reconstruction using gracilis tendon (GT) autograft; the following 23 patients were treated with FT. All patients were clinically and radiologically assessed and underwent pre- and post-operative scoring using the Kujala score, Bartlett score, Tegner activity rating scale, SF-12 score and Lysholm score. Statistical significance was tested between groups using ANOVA with repeated measures. There were no significant differences in the pre-operative scores between the FT and GT groups (n.s.). Both groups showed significant improvements across all scoring modalities between pre- and post-operative periods 12, 24 and 48 months of follow-up (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in knee function scores between the GT and FT groups. The use of FiberTape in MPFL reconstruction is safe and effective, and it significantly improves patient's quality of life and related post-operative outcome measures. There were no significant differences in all knee scores compared to GT autografts. Using this technique for MPFL reconstruction, tendon harvesting is unnecessary and hence eliminates donor site morbidity-associated complications. II.

  8. Predictive parameters for return to pre-injury level of sport 6 months following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ulrike; Krüger-Franke, Michael; Schmidt, Michael; Rosemeyer, Bernd

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to find predictive parameters for a successful resumption of pre-injury level of sport 6 months post anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. In a prospective study, 40 patients with a ruptured ACL were surgically treated with semitendinosus tendon autograft. Six months after surgery, strength of knee extensors and flexors, four single-leg hop tests, Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Return to Sport after Injury Scale (ACL-RSI), subjective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) 2000 and the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia-11 (TSK-11) were assessed. Seven months post-operatively, a standardized interview was conducted to identify "return to sport" (RS) and "non-return to sport" (nRS) patients. Logistic regression and "Receiver Operating Characteristic" (ROC) analyses were used to determine predictive parameters. No significant differences could be detected between RS and nRS patients concerning socio-demographic data, muscle tests, square hop and TSK-11. In nRS patients, the Limb Symmetry Index (LSI) of single hop for distance (p = 0.005), crossover hop (p = 0.008) and triple hop (p = 0.001) were significantly lower, in addition to the ACL-RSI (p = 0.013) and IKDC 2000 (p = 0.037). The cut-off points for LSI single hop for distance were 75.4 % (sensitivity 0.74; specificity 0.88), and for ACL-RSI 51.3 points (sensitivity 0.97; specificity 0.63). Logistic regression distinguished between RS and nRS subjects (sensitivity 0.97; specificity 0.63). The single hop for distance and ACL-RSI were found to be the strongest predictive parameters, assessing both the objective functional and the subjective psychological aspects of returning to sport. Both tests may help to identify patients at risk of not returning to pre-injury sport. II.

  9. Outcome of cartilage at 12years of follow-up after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cantin, O; Lustig, S; Rongieras, F; Saragaglia, D; Lefèvre, N; Graveleau, N; Hulet, C

    2016-11-01

    In cases of chronic anterior laxity, reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) can slow the development of osteoarthritis. This study was conducted to determine the overall prevalence of osteoarthritis and to identify the risk factors after ACL reconstruction. Meniscus tears, time from injury to surgery, body mass index (BMI), residual laxity, and cartilage lesions influence the progression towards osteoarthritis. This multicenter, retrospective study on the outcome of cruciate ligaments at 12 years of follow-up was conducted within the 2014 SOFCOT Symposium. The cohort included 675 arthroscopic reconstructions of the ACL from January 2002 to December 2003. The clinical evaluation included the objective and subjective IKDC score. Osteoarthritis was analyzed on 589 knee X-rays according to the IKDC classification. The predictive factors of osteoarthritis development studied were age, gender, BMI, time from injury to surgery, activity level, medial or lateral meniscectomy, type of graft, medial or lateral chondropathy, tunnel positioning, and residual laxity. Univariate and multivariate analyses with logistic regression were performed. The mean follow-up was 11.9±0.8 years. The subjective IKDC score was 83.7±13. At 12 years, the rate of moderate to severe osteoarthritis l (IKDCC or D) was 19% (16% medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis, 4% lateral tibiofemoral osteoarthritis, and 2% patellofemoral osteoarthritis). The prognostic factors were age at surgery greater than 34 years (P<0.05), cartilage lesions at surgery (P<0.05), medial or lateral meniscectomy (P<0.05), and residual laxity (P<0.05). This large-scale study identified risk factors for osteoarthritis that should improve the information provided to patients on long-term progression after ACL reconstruction. Retrospective cohort study, level IV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. A quantitative assessment of the insertional footprints of the hip joint capsular ligaments and their spanning fibers for reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Telleria, Jessica J M; Lindsey, Derek P; Giori, Nicholas J; Safran, Marc R

    2014-04-01

    Quantitative descriptions of the hip joint capsular ligament insertional footprints have been reported. Using a three-dimensional digitizing system, and computer modeling, the area, and dimensions of the three main hip capsular ligaments and their insertional footprints were quantified in eight cadaveric hips. The iliofemoral ligament (ILFL) attaches proximally to the anterolateral supra-acetabular region (mean area = 4.2 cm(2)). The mean areas of the ILFL lateral and medial arm insertional footprints are 4.8 and 3.1 cm(2), respectively. The pubofemoral ligament (proximal footprint mean area = 1.4 cm(2)) blends with the medial ILFL anteriorly and the proximal ischiofemoral ligament (ISFL) distally without a distal bony insertion. The proximal and distal ISFL footprint mean areas are 6.4 and 1.2 cm(2), respectively. The hip joint capsular ligaments have consistent anatomic and insertional patterns. Quantification of the ligaments and their attachment sites may aid in improving anatomic repairs and reconstructions of the hip joint capsule using open and/or arthroscopic techniques.

  11. Neuromuscular Fatigue Alters Postural Control and Sagittal Plane Hip Biomechanics in Active Females With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Barnett S.; Gilsdorf, Christine M.; Goerger, Benjamin M.; Prentice, William E.; Padua, Darin A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Females with history of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and subsequent ligament reconstruction are at high risk for future ACL injury. Fatigue may influence the increased risk of future injury in females by altering lower extremity biomechanics and postural control. Hypothesis: Fatigue will promote lower extremity biomechanics and postural control deficits associated with ACL injury. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Fourteen physically active females with ACL reconstruction (mean age, 19.64 ± 1.5 years; mean height, 163.52 ± 6.18 cm; mean mass, 62.6 ± 13.97 kg) volunteered for this study. Postural control and lower extremity biomechanics were assessed in the surgical limb during single-leg balance and jump-landing tasks before and after a fatigue protocol. Main outcome measures were 3-dimensional hip and knee joint angles at initial contact, peak angles, joint angular displacements and peak net joint moments, anterior tibial shear force, and vertical ground reaction force during the first 50% of the loading phase of the jump-landing task. During the single-leg stance task, the main outcome measure was center of pressure sway speed. Results: Initial contact hip flexion angle decreased (t = −2.82, P = 0.01; prefatigue, 40.98° ± 9.79°; postfatigue, 36.75° ± 8.61°) from pre- to postfatigue. Hip flexion displacement (t = 2.23, P = 0.04; prefatigue, 45.19° ± 14.1°; postfatigue, 47.48° ± 14.21°) and center of pressure sway speed (t = 3.95, P < 0.05; prefatigue, 5.18 ± 0.96 cm/s; postfatigue, 6.20 ± 1.72 cm/s) increased from pre- to postfatigue. There was a trending increase in hip flexion moment (t = 2.14, P = 0.05; prefatigue, 1.66 ± 0.68 Nm/kg/m; postfatigue, 1.91 ± 0.62 Nm/kg/m) from pre- to postfatigue. Conclusion: Fatigue may induce lower extremity biomechanics and postural control deficits that may be associated with ACL injury in physically active females with ACL reconstruction. Clinical Relevance

  12. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: bone-patellar tendon-bone compared with double semitendinosus and gracilis tendon grafts. A prospective, randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Aglietti, Paolo; Giron, Francesco; Buzzi, Roberto; Biddau, Flavio; Sasso, Francesco

    2004-10-01

    The choice of graft for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is a matter of debate, with patellar and hamstring tendons being the two most popular autologous graft options. The objective of this study was to determine in a prospective, randomized clinical trial whether two grafts (bone-patellar tendon-bone or doubled hamstring tendons) fixed with modern devices affect the two-year minimum clinical and radiographic outcomes of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. One hundred and twenty patients with a chronic unilateral rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament underwent arthroscopically assisted reconstruction with use of either autologous bone-patellar tendon-bone or doubled hamstring tendon grafts, in a strictly alternating manner. Both groups were comparable with regard to demographic data, preoperative activity level, mechanism of injury, interval between the injury and the operation, and the amount of knee laxity present preoperatively. The same well-proven surgical technique and aggressive controlled rehabilitation was used. An independent observer, who was blinded with regard to the involved leg and the type of graft, performed the outcome assessment with use of a visual analog scale, the new International Knee Documentation Committee form, the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, the Functional Knee Score for Anterior Knee Pain, and an arthrometric and an isokinetic dynamometric evaluation. Radiographs were also made. At the two-year follow-up evaluation, no differences were found in terms of the visual analog score, the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, the new International Knee Documentation Committee subjective and objective evaluation scores, the KT-1000 side-to-side laxity measurements, the Functional Knee Score for Anterior Knee Pain, muscle strength recovery, or return to sports activities. In the bone-patellar tendon-bone group, we found a higher prevalence of postoperative kneeling discomfort (p < 0.01) and an

  13. Predictors of Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction in Major League Baseball Pitchers.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, David; Martini, Douglas N; Lepley, Adam S; Zernicke, Ronald F; Goulet, Grant C

    2016-09-01

    Ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) reconstruction surgeries in Major League Baseball (MLB) have increased significantly in recent decades. Although several risk factors have been proposed, a scientific consensus is yet to be reached, providing challenges to those tasked with preventing UCL injuries. To identify significant predictors of UCL reconstruction in MLB pitchers. Case control study; Level of evidence, 3. Demographic and pitching performance data were sourced from public databases for 104 MLB pitchers who underwent UCL reconstruction surgery and 104 age- and position-matched controls. These variables were compared between groups and inserted into a binary logistic regression to identify significant predictors of UCL reconstruction. Two machine learning models (naïve Bayes and support vector machine) were also employed to predict UCL reconstruction in this cohort. The binary linear regression model was statistically significant (χ(2)(12) = 33.592; P = .001), explained 19.9% of the variance in UCL reconstruction surgery, and correctly classified 66.8% of cases. According to this model, (1) fewer days between consecutive games, (2) a smaller repertoire of pitches, (3) a less pronounced horizontal release location, (4) a smaller stature, (5) greater mean pitch speed, and (6) greater mean pitch counts per game were all significant predictors of UCL reconstruction. More specifically, an increase in mean days between consecutive games (odds ratio [OR], 0.685; 95% CI, 0.542-0.865) or number of unique pitch types thrown (OR, 0.672; 95% CI, 0.492-0.917) was associated with a significantly smaller likelihood of UCL reconstruction. In contrast, an increase in mean pitch speed (OR, 1.381; 95% CI, 1.103-1.729) or mean pitches per game (OR, 1.020; 95% CI, 1.007-1.033) was associated with significantly higher odds of UCL reconstruction surgery. The naïve Bayes classifier predicted UCL reconstruction with an accuracy of 72% and the support vector machine classifier with an

  14. [Surgical reconstruction of maxillary defects using computer-assisted techniques].

    PubMed

    Zhang, W B; Yu, Y; Wang, Y; Liu, X J; Mao, C; Guo, C B; Yu, G Y; Peng, X

    2017-02-18

    The maxilla is the most important bony support of the mid-face skeleton and is critical for both esthetics and function. Maxillary defects, resulting from tumor resection, can cause severe functional and cosmetic deformities. Furthermore, maxillary reconstruction presents a great challenge for oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Nowadays, vascularized composite bone flap transfer has been widely used for functional maxillary reconstruction. In the last decade, we have performed a comprehensive research on functional maxillary reconstruction with free fibula flap and reported excellent functional and acceptable esthetic results. However, this experience based clinical procedure still remainssome problems in accuracy and efficiency. In recent years, computer assisted techniques are now widely used in oral and maxillofacial surgery. We have performed a series of study on maxillary reconstruction with computer assisted techniques. The computer assisted techniques used for maxillary reconstruction mainly include: (1) Three dimensional (3D) reconstruction and tumor mapping: providing a 3D view of maxillary tumor and adjacent structures and helping to make the diagnosis of maxillary tumor accurate and objective; (2) Virtual planning: simulating tumor resection and maxillectomy as well as fibula reconstruction on the computer, so that to make an ideal surgical plan; (3) 3D printing: producing a 3D stereo model for prebending individualized titanium mesh and also providing template or cutting guide for the surgery; (4) Surgical navigation: the bridge between virtual plan and real surgery, confirming the virtual plan during the surgery and guarantee the accuracy; (5) Computer assisted analyzing and evaluating: making a quantitative and objective of the final result and evaluating the outcome. We also performed a series of studies to evaluate the application of computer assisted techniques used for maxillary reconstruction, including: (1) 3D tumor mapping technique for accurate

  15. Arthrofibrosis of the knee following ligament surgery.

    PubMed

    DeHaven, Kenneth E; Cosgarea, Andrew J; Sebastianelli, Wayne J

    2003-01-01

    Arthrofibrosis of the knee is one of the most serious complications that can result from ligament surgery. Reported incidence of arthrofibrosis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction ranges from 4% to 35%. The loss of motion caused by arthrofibrosis can be even more disabling than the instability for which the reconstruction was performed, often requiring extensive physical therapy and/or surgical lysis of adhesions. With aggressive rehabilitation and modifications in the bracing of knees undergoing ligament reconstruction, the incidence of this complication has decreased significantly. Additionally, delaying anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction until the acute inflammatory period has resolved has also been shown to be a significant factor in the reduction of postoperative knee stiffness.

  16. Factors used to determine return to unrestricted sports activities after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Barber-Westin, Sue D; Noyes, Frank R

    2011-12-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is commonly performed in athletes, with the goal of return to sports activities. Unfortunately, this operation may fail, and the rates of either reinjuring an ACL-reconstructed knee or sustaining an ACL rupture to the contralateral knee range from 3% to 49%. One problem that exists is a lack of information and consensus regarding the appropriate criteria for releasing patients to unrestricted sports activities postoperatively. The purpose of this study was to determine the published criteria used to allow athletes to return to unrestricted sports activities after ACL reconstruction. A systematic search was performed to identify the factors investigators used to determine when return to athletics was allowed after primary ACL reconstruction. Inclusion criteria were English language, publication within the last 10 years, clinical trial, all adult patients, primary ACL reconstruction, original research investigation, and minimum 12 months' follow-up. Of 716 studies identified, 264 met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 105 (40%) failed to provide any criteria for return to sports after ACL reconstruction. In 84 studies (32%) the amount of time postoperatively was the only criterion provided. In 40 studies (15%) the amount of time along with subjective criteria were given. Only 35 studies (13%) noted objective criteria required for return to athletics. These criteria included muscle strength or thigh circumference (28 studies), general knee examination (15 studies), single-leg hop tests (10 studies), Lachman rating (1 study), and validated questionnaires (1 study). The results of this systematic review show noteworthy problems and a lack of objective assessment before release to unrestricted sports activities. General recommendations are made for quantification of muscle strength, stability, neuromuscular control, and function in patients who desire to return to athletics after ACL reconstruction, with acknowledgment of

  17. Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the adductor magnus tendon: an anatomic study.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Matthias; Reischl, Nikolaus; Bergmann, Mathias; Bouaicha, Samy; Djonov, Valentin; Magnussen, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the anatomic feasibility of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction using a part of the adductor magnus tendon and to identify possible risks. Twenty cadaveric knees were dissected. The distal part of the adductor magnus tendon was evaluated with respect to the anatomic topography and its utility for MPFL reconstruction. To estimate the risk of injuring the neurovascular structures, the distance from the adductor tubercle to the adductor hiatus was evaluated. An MPFL reconstruction was carried out by preserving the distal insertion on the adductor tubercle and redirecting the proximal portion of the tendon to the medial aspect of the patella. The anatomic investigation showed the following relationships: The mean distance from the adductor tubercle to the adductor hiatus was 99 ± 14 mm (range, 80 to 120 mm). A graft length of 52 ± 5 mm (range, 45 to 63 mm) with the addition of 10 to 20 mm for fixation was found to be necessary for MPFL reconstruction. The difference between the desired graft length and the distance to the adductor hiatus was found to be at least 30 mm in all cases (mean, 46 mm). Leaving the graft attached to the adductor tubercle resulted in a nearly anatomic femoral attachment of the reconstructed MPFL. Complete detachment of the distal adductor magnus attachment was consistently avoidable. The adductor magnus tendon was found to be a useful graft for MPFL reconstruction. However, anatomic dangers (damage to the neurovascular bundle of the adductor hiatus, the saphenous nerve, or the saphenous branch of the descending genicular artery) during graft harvest must be considered. Anatomic knowledge is essential during adductor magnus tendon harvest to avoid damage to neurovascular structures. The adductor magnus tendon is an interesting alternative graft option for MPFL reconstruction if anatomic dangers are considered and avoided. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America

  18. Arthroscopic anatomical double bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A prospective longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Devgan, Ashish; Singh, Amanpreet; Gogna, Paritosh; Singla, Rohit; Magu, Narender Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Reetadyuti

    2015-01-01

    Background: Single bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has been the current standard of treatment for ACL deficiency. However, a significant subset of patients continue to report residual symptoms of instability with a poor pivot control. Cadaveric biomechanical studies have shown double bundle (DB) ACL reconstructions to restore the knee kinematics better. This study evaluates the outcome of DB ACL reconstruction. Materials and Methods: 30 consecutive patients who underwent anatomic DB ACL reconstruction were included in this prospective longitudinal study. There were all males with a mean age of 25 ± 7.45 years. All patients were prospectively evaluated using GeNouRoB (GNRB) arthrometer, functional knee scores (International Knee Documentation Committee [IKDC] and Lysholm) and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for comparing the graft orientation and footprint of the reconstructed ACL with that of the normal knee. Results: The average followup was 36.2 months. At the time of final followup the mean Lysholm score was 93.13 ± 3.31. As per the objective IKDC score, 26 patients (86.6%) were in Group A while 4 patients (13.3%) were in Group B. The mean differential anterior tibial translation by GNRB, arthrometer was 1.07 ± 0.8 mm (range 0.1-2.3 mm). All cases had a negative pivot shift test. MRI scans of operated and the contralateral normal knee showed the mean sagittal ACL tibial angle coronal ACL tibial angle and tibial ACL footprint to be in accordance with the values of the contralateral, normal knee. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that DB ACL reconstruction restores the ACL anatomically in terms of size and angle of orientation. However, long term studies are needed to further substantiate its role in decreasing the incidence of early osteoarthritic changes compared to the conventional single bundle reconstructions. PMID:26015600

  19. Revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: clinical outcome and evidence for return to sport.

    PubMed

    Andriolo, Luca; Filardo, Giuseppe; Kon, Elizaveta; Ricci, Margherita; Della Villa, Francesco; Della Villa, Stefano; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2015-10-01

    An increasing number of patients undergo revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, with the intention of returning to sport being a major indication. The aim of this study is to assess the available evidence for clinical improvement and return to sport, to understand the real potential of this procedure in regaining functional activity, and to facilitate improved counselling of patients regarding the expected outcome after revision ACL reconstruction. The search was conducted on the PubMed database. Articles reporting clinical results for revision ACL reconstruction were included. A meta-analysis was performed on return to sport, and results were compared to the literature on primary ACL reconstruction. Other specific clinical outcomes (Lysholm, Tegner, IKDC Objective scores) were also included in the meta-analysis. Of the 503 identified records, a total of 59 studies involving 5365 patients were included in the qualitative data synthesis. Only 31 articles reported the rate of return to sport. Whereas 73 % of good objective results and satisfactory subjective results were documented, 57 % of patients did not return to the same level of sport activity, significantly inferior to that of a primary procedure. The real potential of revision ACL reconstruction should not be overestimated due to the low number of patients able to return to their previous activity level, significantly inferior with respect to that reported for primary ACL reconstruction. This finding will help physicians in the clinical practice providing realistic expectations to the patients. Future studies should focus on participation-based outcome measures such as return to sport and in strategies to improve the results in terms of return to previous activities after revision ACL reconstruction. Systematic review and meta-analysis including Level IV studies, Level IV.

  20. Local delivery of controlled-release simvastatin to improve the biocompatibility of polyethylene terephthalate artificial ligaments for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Han, Fei; Li, Yunxia; Chen, Jiwu; Chen, Tianwu; Zhi, Yunlong; Jiang, Jia; Lin, Chao; Chen, Shiyi; Zhao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System has recently been widely used as the primary graft of choice in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. But the biological graft-bone healing still remains a problem. Previous studies have shown that simvastatin (SIM) stimulates bone formation. The objective of this study was to investigate whether surface coating with collagen containing low-dose SIM microsphere could enhance the surface biocompatibility of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligaments to accelerate graft-to-bone healing. The in vitro studies demonstrated that bone marrow stromal cells on the collagen-coated PET scaffolds (COL/PET) and simvastatin/collagen-coated PET scaffolds (SIM/COL/PET) proliferated vigorously. Compared with the PET group and the COL/PET group, SIM could induce bone marrow stromal cells' osteoblastic differentiation, high alkaline phosphatase activity, more mineralization deposition, and more expression of osteoblast-related genes, such as osteocalcin, runt-related transcription factor 2, bone morphogenetic protein-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor, in the SIM/COL/PET group. In vivo, rabbits received ACL reconstruction with different scaffolds. Histological analysis demonstrated that graft-bone healing was significantly greater with angiogenesis and osteogenesis in the SIM/COL/PET group than the other groups. In addition, biomechanical testing at the eighth week demonstrated a significant increase in the ultimate failure load and stiffness in the SIM/COL/PET group. The low dose of SIM-sustained release from SIM/COL/PET promoted the graft-bone healing via its effect on both angiogenesis and osteogenesis. This study suggested that collagen containing low-dose SIM microsphere coating on the surface of PET artificial ligaments could be potentially applied for ACL reconstruction.

  1. A symptomatic cyclops lesion 4 years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nuccion, S L; Hame, S L

    2001-02-01

    The cyclops lesion is a fibrous nodule with central granulation tissue located anterolateral to the tibial tunnel after intra-articular reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) that has been shown to be a cause of failure to regain full extension in the early postoperative period. We present the case of a 23-year-old woman who had undergone arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with a patellar tendon autograft 4 years prior to presentation. Following her reconstruction, she regained full range of motion and returned to collegiate cheerleading. At presentation, she complained of a gradual loss of full extension and joint-line pain with terminal extension. On examination, her graft was stable and she lacked 3 degrees of extension. Magnetic resonance imaging documented a 1-cm mass of low signal intensity immediately anterior to the ACL graft within the intercondylar notch. At arthroscopy, a large amount of thick, immobile scar tissue was found immediately anterior to the ACL, consistent with a cyclops lesion. The lesion was debrided and the patient did well postoperatively. Patients who present with delayed-onset loss of extension after ACL reconstruction should undergo careful evaluation including radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. If a cyclops lesion is diagnosed, arthroscopic resection should be undertaken.

  2. Revascularisation pattern of ruptured flexor tendon grafts in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A histological study.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, D; Martínez, R; Calvo, R; Scheu, M; Gallegos, M; Vaisman, A; Martínez, C; González, A

    For successful anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, revascularisation and histological maturation are necessary, as their failure can cause graft rupture. The purpose of this study was to describe differences in the histological maturation of early failed plasty (less than 12 months after surgery) and late failed plasty (more than 12 months after surgery) in patients with re-rupture after ACL reconstruction with hamstring tendons. A descriptive observational study was conducted on a consecutive series of 20 patients whose ACL reconstruction had failed. Graft biopsy samples were obtained during the revision surgery from the proximal, medial, and distal graft remnants. The samples were evaluated by light microscopy, and the vascularity and maturation of the samples were established by histological scoring. The most common aetiology of reconstruction failure (86.6%) was a specific event with non-contact mechanism. The patients with re-rupture of their ACL plasty less than 12 months after surgery had substance vessels that were less deep. The distal segment of the graft in those patients showed a delay in histological maturation with fewer collagen fibres. In patients whose ACL grafts failed less than 12 months after surgery, a lower distribution of blood vessels and collagen fibres was found that were less ordered in the distal graft. These results indicate a delay in maturation, which leads to a higher risk of graft failure. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Outcome of combined autologous chondrocyte implantation and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dhinsa, Baljinder S; Nawaz, Syed Z; Gallagher, Kieran R; Skinner, John; Briggs, Tim; Bentley, George

    2015-01-01

    Instability of the knee joint, after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, is contraindication to osteochondral defect repair. This prospective study is to investigate the role of combined autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) with ACL reconstruction. Three independent groups of patients with previous ACL injuries undergoing ACI were identified and prospectively followed up. The first group had ACI in combination with ACL reconstruction (combined group); the 2(nd) group consisted of individuals who had an ACI procedure having had a previously successful ACL reconstruction (ACL first group); and the third group included patients who had an ACI procedure to a clinically stable knee with documented nonreconstructed ACL disruption (No ACL group). Their outcomes were assessed using the modified cincinnati rating system, the Bentley functional (BF) rating system (BF) and a visual analog scale (VAS). At a mean followup of 64.24 months for the ACL first group, 63 months for combined group and 78.33 months for the No ACL group; 60% of ACL first patients, 72.73% of combined group and 83.33% of the No ACL group felt their outcome was better following surgery. There was no significant difference demonstrated in BF and VAS between the combined and ACL first groups. Results revealed a significant affect of osteochondral defect size on outcome measures. The study confirms that ACI in combination with ACL reconstruction is a viable option with similar outcomes as those patients who have had the procedures staged.

  4. Functional Outcome of Transphyseal Reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament in Skeletally Immature Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Shim, Dong-Woo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, conventional adult reconstruction techniques have to face the potential risk of growth disturbance or angular deformities in skeletally immature patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of ACL reconstruction by conventional transphyseal tunnel technique. Materials and Methods On a retrospective basis, we reviewed 25 skeletally immature patients; all the patients showed skeletal maturity at last follow-up, and the mean age was 16.4 years. The average injury to surgery interval was 12.6 months. Clinical outcomes were assessed at a mean of 74.4 months postoperatively using the Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale, the Tegner activity level, the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), and plain radiographs. Results All the patients had undergone transphyseal reconstruction of ACL. The mean Lysholm score was 48.36 points preoperatively and 93.32 points postoperatively; the mean Tegner activity level was changed from 3.0 points to 5.6 points. The mean IKDC level was categorized as C preoperatively and changed to A postoperatively. Conclusions Our midterm outcome at an average 6 years after surgery was satisfactory without significant leg length discrepancies or abnormal alignment of the knee joint. Transphyseal reconstruction of ACL is a good treatment modality in the skeletally immature patient. PMID:22977795

  5. Comparison of Short-term Complications Between 2 Methods of Coracoclavicular Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Rush, Lane N.; Lake, Nicholas; Stiefel, Eric C.; Hobgood, Edward R.; Ramsey, J. Randall; O’Brien, Michael J.; Field, Larry D.; Savoie, Felix H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Numerous techniques have been used to treat acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation, with anatomic reconstruction of the coracoclavicular (CC) ligaments becoming a popular method of fixation. Anatomic CC ligament reconstruction is commonly performed with cortical fixation buttons (CFBs) or tendon grafts (TGs). Purpose: To report and compare short-term complications associated with AC joint stabilization procedures using CFBs or TGs. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of the operative treatment of AC joint injuries between April 2007 and January 2013 at 2 institutions. Thirty-eight patients who had undergone a procedure for AC joint instability were evaluated. In these 38 patients with a mean age of 36.2 years, 18 shoulders underwent fixation using the CFB technique and 20 shoulders underwent reconstruction using the TG technique. Results: The overall complication rate was 42.1% (16/38). There were 11 complications in the 18 patients in the CFB group (61.1%), including 7 construct failures resulting in a loss of reduction. The most common mode of failure was suture breakage (n = 3), followed by button migration (n = 2) and coracoid fracture (n = 2). There were 5 complications in the TG group (25%), including 3 cases of asymptomatic subluxation, 1 symptomatic suture granuloma, and 1 superficial infection. There were no instances of construct failure seen in TG fixations. CFB fixation was found to have a statistically significant increase in complications (P = .0243) and construct failure (P = .002) compared with TG fixation. Conclusion: CFB fixation was associated with a higher rate of failure and higher rate of early complications when compared with TG fixation. PMID:27504468

  6. Arthroscopic Control for Safe and Secure Seating of Suspensory Devices for Femoral Fixation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Three Different Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seo Goo; Lee, Yong Seuk

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of our technique that allows direct visualization of seating of suspensory devices in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Materials and Methods Three different suspensory devices (TightRope RT, RetroButton, and EndoButton) were used in ACL reconstruction using 3 different techniques (outside-in, anteromedial [AM] portal, and transtibial techniques). Positioning of a guiding material and seating pattern of the suspensory devices were evaluated according to the surgical technique and suspensory device used. Results On the transtibial technique, 21 of total 26 cases (81%) of single bundle reconstructions and 22 of total 22 cases (100%) of double bundle reconstructions required superolateral capsulotomy where buttons were found in 21 of total 21 cases (100%) and 17 of 22 cases (77%), respectively. On the AM portal technique, all patients required capsulotomy and the button was found in only 18 of total 32 cases (56%) even after capsulotomy. On the outside-in technique, all patients required capsulotomy and the button was found in 86 of total 86 cases (100%). Conclusions Our technique for direct visualization of seating of the suspensory devices was more effective in outside-in and single bundle transtibial ACL reconstruction. However, it was less effective in double bundle transtibial and AM portal ACL reconstructions. PMID:28231646

  7. Adolescents and female patients are at increased risk for contralateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a cohort study from the Swedish National Knee Ligament Register based on 17,682 patients.

    PubMed

    Snaebjörnsson, Thorkell; Hamrin Senorski, Eric; Sundemo, David; Svantesson, Eleonor; Westin, Olof; Musahl, Volker; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Samuelsson, Kristian

    2017-03-15

    The impact of different surgical techniques in index ACL reconstruction for patients undergoing contralateral ACL reconstruction was investigated. The study was based on data from the Swedish National Knee Ligament Register. Patients undergoing index ACL reconstruction and subsequent contralateral ACL reconstruction using hamstring graft under the study period were included. The following variables were evaluated: age at index surgery, gender, concomitant meniscal or cartilage injury registered at index injury, transportal femoral bone tunnel drilling and transtibial femoral bone tunnel drilling. The end-point of primary contralateral ACL surgery was analysed as well as the time-to-event outcomes using survivorship methods including Kaplan-Meier estimation and Cox proportional hazards regression models. A total of 17,682 patients [n = 10,013 males (56.6%) and 7669 females (43.4%)] undergoing primary ACL reconstruction from 1 January 2005 through 31 December 2014 were included in the study. A total of 526 (3.0%) patients [n = 260 males (49.4%) and 266 females (50.6%)] underwent primary contralateral ACL reconstruction after index ACL reconstruction during the study period. Females had a 33.7% greater risk of contralateral ACL surgery [HR 1.337 (95% CI 1.127-1.586); (P = 0 0.001)]. The youngest age group (13-15 years) showed an increased risk of contralateral ACL surgery compared with the reference (36-49) age group [HR 2.771 (95% CI 1.456-5.272); (P = 0.002)]. Decreased risk of contralateral ACL surgery was seen amongst patients with concomitant cartilage injury at index surgery [HR 0.765 (95% CI 0.623-0.939); (P = 0.010)]. No differences in terms of the risk of contralateral ACL surgery were found between anatomic and non-anatomic techniques of primary single-bundle ACL reconstruction, comparing transportal anatomic technique to transtibial non-anatomic, anatomic and partial-anatomic. Age and gender were identified as risk factors for

  8. Factors Influencing Graft Choice in Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in the MARS Group.

    PubMed

    Group, Mars

    2016-08-01

    It has not been known what drives revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction graft choice in the past. We undertook this study to utilize the Multicenter ACL Revision Study (MARS) group and propensity score statistical analysis to determine the drivers of revision ACL reconstruction graft choice. We hypothesized that propensity analysis would demonstrate that individual surgeons still have significant impact on revision ACL reconstruction. Twelve hundred patients were enrolled in this longitudinal revision cohort by 83 surgeons at 52 sites. The median age was 26 years and 505 (42%) were females. One thousand forty-nine (87%) patients were undergoing their first ACL revision. Graft choice for revision ACL reconstruction for these patients was 48% autograft, 49% allograft, and 3% combination. The independent variables of this model included gender, age, ethnicity, body mass index, smoking status, sport, activity level, previous graft, revision number, surgeon, surgeon's opinion of failure, previous technical aspects, etc. Surgeons were defined as those who contributed more than 15 patients during the enrollment period. . We calculated a propensity score for graft type based on the predicted probability of receiving an allograft from a logistic regression model. Propensity scores demonstrated that surgeon, prior graft choice, and patient age each had significant influence on which graft type was chosen for the revision ACL reconstruction (p  < 0.0001). The revising surgeon had the largest impact upon graft choice: ∼ 5 times that of the second-most important factor (prior graft). If the prior graft type was an autograft, then an allograft was 3.6 times more likely to be chosen for the revision. This current study demonstrates that the individual surgeon is ultimately the most important factor in revision ACL reconstruction graft choice. Additional statistically significant influences of graft choice included age, gender, previous graft choice, ACL

  9. Surgical treatment of partial anterior cruciate ligament lesions: medium-term results

    PubMed Central

    BERRUTO, MASSIMO; GALA, LUCA; FERRUA, PAOLO; UBOLDI, FRANCESCO; FERRARA, FABRIZIO; PASQUALOTTO, STEFANO; MARELLI, BRUNO M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose this study was conducted to evaluate subjective and objective clinical outcomes of partial reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in comparison with complete ACL reconstruction. Methods three groups, each comprising 20 patients, were evaluated at a minimum follow-up of 12 months. The group 1 patients underwent partial ACL reconstruction, while those in group 2 and group 3 underwent complete ACL reconstruction, performed using either bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) or quadrupled hamstring tendon (HT) grafts, respectively. The subjective outcome was evaluated using the Lysholm knee scale and the subjective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scoring system. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used for pain assessment and sporting activity was rated using the Tegner activity scale. Objective evaluation was performed using the IKDC objective form, KT-1000 arthrometer and KiRA triaxial accelerometer. Results at the follow-up evaluation, the mean subjective IKDC score was 86.1±10.3 in group 1, 85.2±11.1 in group 2, and 82.7±7.8 in group 3. The Lysholm score was 91.3±7.3 in group 1, 91.7±9.6 in group 2, and 89.4±6.1 in group 3. KT-1000 tests showed a mean side-to-side difference of 1.1 mm ± 1.5 mm (range, 0–5 mm) in group 1; 0.79 mm ± 0.8 mm (range, 0–2mm) in group 2; and 1.45 mm ± 1 mm (range, 0–3 mm) in group 3. The differences between groups were not statistically significant. Conclusions both subjective and objective outcomes of partial ACL reconstruction were comparable to those of complete reconstruction, but partial reconstruction in the presence of a partial lesion of the ACL is considered by the authors to be more respectful of the native vascularization, innervation and anatomy of the ACL, conferring an advantage in terms of recovery of the complete function of the knee. Level of evidence Level III, retrospective comparative study. PMID:25750906

  10. Revision pediatric anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction after failure of iliotibial band technique treated with all-epiphyseal technique in a prepubescent with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Erdman, Mary K; Warnick, Drew E

    2017-09-01

    The increasing number of pediatric anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and the failure of nonoperative management of these patients has elicited a concordant response in the surgical community to devise reconstruction techniques that stabilize the knee joint without causing iatrogenic growth disturbances. Likewise, the rise in pediatric ACL reconstructions forecasts a consequent rise in revision ACL reconstructions in patients with open physes. In this case report, we describe a prepubescent with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and congenital ACL deficiency, who underwent physeal-sparing iliotibial band ACL reconstruction and revision to an all-epiphyseal ACL reconstruction with allograft. We also underscore the lack of evidence addressing graft choice and outcomes for ACL reconstructions in patients with connective tissue disorders.

  11. Outcome of double bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using crosspin and aperture fixation

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Deepak; Jain, Vineet; Goyal, Ankit; Bahl, Vibhu; Modi, Prashant; Chaudhary, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Background: Double bundle anterior cruciate ligament (DBACL) reconstruction is said to reproduce the native anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) anatomy better than single bundle anterior cruciate ligament, whether it leads to better functional results is debatable. Different fixation methods have been used for DBACL reconstruction, the most common being aperture fixation on tibial side and cortical suspensory fixation on the femoral side. We present the results of DBACL reconstruction technique, wherein on the femoral side anteromedial (AM) bundle is fixed with a crosspin and aperture fixation was done for the posterolateral (PL) bundle. Materials and Methods: Out of 157 isolated ACL injury patients who underwent ACL reconstruction, 100 were included in the prospective study. Arthroscopic DBACL reconstruction was done using ipsilateral hamstring autograft. AM bundle was fixed using Transfix (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) on the femoral side and bio interference screw (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) on the tibial side. PL bundle was fixed on femoral as well as on tibial side with a biointerference screw. Patients were evaluated using KT-1000 arthrometer, Lysholm score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Score and isokinetic muscle strength testing. Methods: Out of 157 isolated ACL injury patients who underwent ACL reconstruction, 100 were included in the prospective study. Arthroscopic DBACL reconstruction was done using ipsilateral hamstring autograft. AM bundle was fixed using Transfix (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) on the femoral side and bio interference screw (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) on the tibial side. PL bundle was fixed on femoral as well as on tibial side with a biointerference screw. Patients were evaluated using KT-1000 arthrometer, Lysholm score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Score and isokinetic muscle strength testing. Results: The KT-1000 results were evaluated using paired t test with the P value set at 0.001. At the end of 1

  12. Surgical reconstruction of attempted suicide charcoal burns.

    PubMed

    Burd, Andrew; Ahmed, Kawser; Noronha, Frederick V; Chan, Jimmy Y W; Pang, Peter C W

    2006-01-01

    Burning charcoal in an enclosed space is now the second most-common method of committing suicide in Hong Kong. When the suicide is unsuccessful, the patients can still sustain extensive tissue destruction from both direct and indirect thermal burns. We report a series of three patients who sustained deep injuries that, after débridement, left exposed bones and joints needing acute coverage. Free tissue transfer was required in each case to close the wounds. This short series illustrates the extensive destruction that can occur from both contact burns and radiant heat injury and the reconstructive challenges that can result. Of particular note was that serial débridment was necessary in the radiant heat injury because of the evolving and more extensive nature of the wound.

  13. Revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft and extra-articular iliotibial band tenodesis.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Randy; McConkey, Mark O; Forsythe, Brian; Harner, Christopher D

    2015-04-01

    Revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a technically demanding procedure with outcomes that generally fail to reach those seen with primary ACL reconstruction. With most index procedures using autograft tissue, it is not uncommon for allograft tissue to be required for revision ACL reconstruction. Compared with autografts, allografts take longer to incorporate and lead to more episodes of instability. In this article, we describe ipsilateral iliotibial band tenodesis performed to augment use of bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft in revision ACL reconstruction. This technique adds rotational stability to protect the allograft tissue while it incorporates.

  14. Complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation treated with reconstructed ligament by trapezius muscle fascia and observation of fascial metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chaoliang; Huang, Sufang; Wang, Yingzhen; Sun, Xuesheng; Zhu, Tao; Li, Qiang; Lin, Chu

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the long-term clinical results of acute complete acromioclavicular dislocations treated by reconstruction of the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligament using trapezius muscle fascia. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed using the clavicular hook plate in 12 patients with acute complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation, and the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments were reconstructed using trapezius muscle fascia. Radiographic evaluations were conducted postoperatively. We evaluated the functional results with constant scoring system and radiological results at the final follow-up visit. The mean Constant score at the final follow-up visit was 91.67 (range, 81 to 100). The results were excellent in eight patients (66.7%) and good in four patients (33.3%). Three patients with scores from 80 to 90 had mild pain during activity, but this did not affect the range of motion of the shoulder. All patients have returned to their preoperative work without any limitations. Compared with the contralateral side, radiography showed anatomical reposition in the vertical plane in all cases. The hook-plate fixation with ligament reconstruction was successful in treating AC dislocations. The acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligament were reconstructed by trapezius muscle fascia that keep the distal clavicle stable both vertically and horizontally after type III injuries.

  15. Complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation treated with reconstructed ligament by trapezius muscle fascia and observation of fascial metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chaoliang; Huang, Sufang; Wang, Yingzhen; Sun, Xuesheng; Zhu, Tao; Li, Qiang; Lin, Chu

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the long-term clinical results of acute complete acromioclavicular dislocations treated by reconstruction of the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligament using trapezius muscle fascia. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed using the clavicular hook plate in 12 patients with acute complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation, and the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments were reconstructed using trapezius muscle fascia. Radiographic evaluations were conducted postoperatively. We evaluated the functional results with constant scoring system and radiological results at the final follow-up visit. The mean Constant score at the final follow-up visit was 91.67 (range, 81 to 100). The results were excellent in eight patients (66.7%) and good in four patients (33.3%). Three patients with scores from 80 to 90 had mild pain during activity, but this did not affect the range of motion of the shoulder. All patients have returned to their preoperative work without any limitations. Compared with the contralateral side, radiography showed anatomical reposition in the vertical plane in all cases. The hook-plate fixation with ligament reconstruction was successful in treating AC dislocations. The acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligament were reconstructed by trapezius muscle fascia that keep the distal clavicle stable both vertically and horizontally after type III injuries. PMID:28352721

  16. Intensity of physiotherapy after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a comparison of two rehabilitation regimen.

    PubMed

    Iriuchishima, Takanori; Horaguchi, Takashi; Morimoto, Yusuke; Negishi, Shinichi; Kubomura, Tatsuya; Motojima, Sayaka; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Suzuki, Shigeru; Saito, Akiyoshi

    2010-08-01

    Rehabilitation is one of the most critical points after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. However, the recent trend of low-cost, short-term hospitalization makes sufficient rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction difficult. 34 patients who underwent non-anatomical single bundle ACL reconstruction using a hamstring auto graft were evaluated. Twenty patients (12 males and 8 females) were transferred to a special rehabilitation hospital (RH hospital group) after operation and concentrated rehabilitation was performed up to 4 h per day. Fourteen (9 males and 5 females) patients performed clinic-based rehabilitation at a university hospital three times per week (clinic group). Strength of quadriceps and knee flexion muscles was assessed at 60 degrees /s using a Cybex II dynamometer (Lumex, Ronkonkoma, NY, USA) at 3, 6 and 9 months after ACL reconstruction. Anterior tibial translation (ATT) and pivot shift test were also evaluated. No significant difference in muscle recovery in the lower extremity was observed at any time point after ACL reconstruction between the clinic group and the RH hospital group. However, 3 months after operation, the average muscle strength of the RH hospital group tended to be higher than that of the clinic group. There was no significant difference in ATT or pivot shift (each group included 4 positive pivot shift subjects) in the patients who were tested between the clinic group and the RH hospital group. Concentrated rehabilitation at a rehabilitation hospital after ACL reconstruction has the potential to improve muscle strength in the lower extremities more dramatically in the early stages of post operation. However, the initial benefits of intensive physiotherapy disappear after 6 months.

  17. Return to Sport After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in the Skeletally Immature Athlete.

    PubMed

    Chicorelli, Anne M; Micheli, Lyle J; Kelly, Michael; Zurakowski, David; MacDougall, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Determine the percentage of skeletally immature athletes returning to sports after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstruction. Retrospective case series. Boston Children's Hospital Division of Sports Medicine. Eligible participants were identified by chart review. Males and females aged ≤14 year old who were greater than 2 years after ACL reconstruction surgery seen between January 2001 and May 2009. A total of 250 patients completed the questionnaires. Age, sex, mechanism, and sport played at time of ACL injury. Response to the survey was 75% (250 of 333) which was analyzed using descriptive statistics to provide a summary of the study cohort. Kaplan-Meier survivorship analysis was applied to determine time to return to sports participation after ACL reconstruction with Greenwood formula used to calculate 95% confidence intervals around the estimated percentage returning at 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24-month follow-up. After undergoing ACL reconstruction, 96% of skeletally immature athletes are able to return to sports at the same skill level. Median time to return to sports was 9 months postoperative, with most athletes returning to sports (85%) by 12 months. After undergoing ACL reconstruction, most child athletes are able to return to sports and 50% of these athletes return within 9 months after surgery. After undergoing ACL reconstruction, 96% of athletes ≤14 year old are able to return to sports at the same skill level. Median time to return to sports was 9 months postoperative, with most athletes returning to sports (85%) by 12 months. In our study, patients cited physical limitation, loss of interest in sport, and fear of reinjury as reasons for not returning to previous level of sport. Return to sport may be improved by additional research into sports-specific training and rehabilitation in this cohort.

  18. Clinical outcome after reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament in patients with recurrent patella instability.

    PubMed

    Enderlein, Ditte; Nielsen, Torsten; Christiansen, Svend Erik; Faunø, Peter; Lind, Martin

    2014-10-01

    We present the clinical results of a large consecutive, prospective, single-clinic series of patients treated with medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction for recurrent patellar instability. The study included 224 patients undergoing MPFL reconstruction in a total of 240 knees between 2008 and 2011. Indication for surgery was two or more patellar dislocations and ADL limitations due to patella instability. A gracilis tendon autograft was fixed in drill holes in the medial edge of the patella and with screws at the femoral MPFL insertion point. Outcomes were evaluated with the Kujala Anterior Knee Pain Score and pain scores preoperatively and at follow-up (12-60 months). Furthermore, incidences of re-dislocations, subluxations and revision surgery were evaluated. The Kujala score improved from 62.5 (17) to 80.4 (18) (p<0.001) at the 1-year follow-up. Pain during activity improved from 3.2 (2.6) to 1.3 (2.7) at 1 year (p<0.001). The revision rate was 2.8%. Some degree of pain at the medial femoral condyle was seen in 30% of the patients. The reconstruction was supplemented with a tibial tuberosity osteotomy in 23% of cases. The outcome for these patients did not differ from that of patients with isolated MPFL reconstruction. Female gender BMI>30, age>30 years and grade 3-4 cartilage injury predisposed a poor subjective outcome. The present study is the largest MPFL reconstruction patient material reported to date. MPFL reconstruction with a gracilis tendon autograft consistently normalised the patella stability and improved knee function. Moderate medial pain was seen. Age above 30, obesity, cartilage injury and female gender are predictors of a poor subjective outcome. Level IV.

  19. Cryotherapy with dynamic intermittent compression for analgesia after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Murgier, J; Cassard, X

    2014-05-01

    Cryotherapy is a useful adjunctive analgesic measure in patients with postoperative pain following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery. Either static permanent compression or dynamic intermittent compression can be added to increase the analgesic effect of cryotherapy. Our objective was to compare the efficacy of these two compression modalities combined with cryotherapy in relieving postoperative pain and restoring range of knee motion after ligament reconstruction surgery. When combined with cryotherapy, a dynamic and intermittent compression is associated with decreased analgesic drug requirements, less postoperative pain, and better range of knee motion compared to static compression. We conducted a case-control study of consecutive patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction at a single institution over a 3-month period. Both groups received the same analgesic drug protocol. One group was managed with cryotherapy and dynamic intermittent compression (Game Ready(®)) and the other with cryotherapy and static compression (IceBand(®)). Of 39 patients, 20 received dynamic and 19 static compression. In the post-anaesthesia recovery unit, the mean visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score was 2.4 (range, 0-6) with dynamic compression and 2.7 (0-7) with static compression (P=0.3); corresponding values were 1.85 (0-9) vs. 3 (0-8) (P=0.16) after 6 hours and 0.6 (0-3) vs. 1.14 (0-3) (P=0.12) at discharge. The cumulative mean tramadol dose per patient was 57.5mg (0-200mg) with dynamic compression and 128.6 mg (0-250 mg) with static compression (P=0.023); corresponding values for morphine were 0mg vs. 1.14 mg (0-8 mg) (P<0.05). Mean range of knee flexion at discharge was 90.5° (80°-100°) with dynamic compression and 84.5° (75°-90°) with static compression (P=0.0015). Dynamic intermittent compression combined with cryotherapy decreases analgesic drug requirements after ACL reconstruction and improves the postoperative recovery of range of knee

  20. Comparison of results between hook plate fixation and ligament reconstruction for acute unstable acromioclavicular joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jong Pil; Lee, Byoung-Joo; Nam, Sang Jin; Chung, Seok Won; Jeong, Won-Ju; Min, Woo-Kie; Oh, Joo Han

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, we aimed to compare clinical and radiographic outcomes between hook plate fixation and coracoclavicular (CC) ligament reconstruction for the treatment of acute unstable acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation. Forty-two patients who underwent surgery for an unstable acute dislocation of the AC joint were included. We divided them into two groups according to the treatment modality: internal fixation with a hook plate (group I, 24 cases) or CC ligament reconstruction (group II, 18 cases). We evaluated the clinical outcomes using a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and Constant-Murley score, and assessed the radiographic outcomes based on the reduction and loss of CC distance on preoperative, postoperative, and final follow-up plain radiographs. The mean VAS scores at the final follow-up were 1.6 ± 1.5 and 1.3 ± 1.3 in groups I and II, respectively, which were not significantly different. The mean Constant-Murley scores were 90.2 ± 9.9 and 89.2 ± 3.5 in groups I and II, respectively, which were also not significantly different. The AC joints were well reduced in both groups, whereas CC distance improved from a mean of 215.7% ± 50.9% preoperatively to 106.1% ± 10.2% at the final follow-up in group I, and from 239.9% ± 59.2% preoperatively to 133.6% ± 36.7% at the final follow-up in group II. The improvement in group I was significantly superior to that in group II (p < 0.001). Furthermore, subluxation was not observed in any case in group I, but was noted in six cases (33%) in group II. Erosions of the acromion undersurface were observed in 9 cases in group I. In cases of acute unstable AC joint dislocation, hook plate fixation and CC ligament reconstruction yield comparable satisfactory clinical outcomes. However, radiographic outcomes based on the maintenance of reduction indicate that hook plate fixation is a better treatment option.

  1. Medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction using semitendinosus tendons: polyester suture augmentation versus nonaugmentation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guoming; Zhao, Jinzhong; Huangfu, Xiaoqiao; He, Yaohua

    2012-06-01

    The comparative clinical outcome of medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction (MPFLR) using semitendinosus tendons with and without polyester suture augmentation for recurrent patellar instability is unknown. Medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction with polyester suture augmentation will yield better results than MPFLR without augmentation for recurrent patellar instability in adults. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 2. One hundred patients with recurrent patellar instability receiving MPFLR using semitendinosus tendons were randomly divided into 2 groups either with or without polyester suture augmentation. Tibial tubercle transfer was performed in most cases. Follow-ups were performed at 12, 24, and 60 months postoperatively, and computed tomography (CT) was performed immediately after the operation and at follow-up. The passive patellar glide test was performed before surgery, immediately after MPFLR during the operation, and at each follow-up point. The degree of knee function was evaluated preoperatively and at 2 and 5 years postoperatively using the International Knee Documentation Committee, Lysholm, and Kujala rating scales. Redislocation or multiple episodes of patellar instability were considered failures. Forty-two patients in the augmentation group and 43 patients in the nonaugmentation group were followed for 5 years and received complete serial CT examinations and functional evaluations. The correction of the static patellar position deteriorated over time in the nonaugmentation group but not in the augmentation group. The results of the passive patellar glide test indicated stable patellae in all patients immediately after MPFLR and more stable patellae in the augmentation group at each follow-up point. Functional evaluations at 2 and 5 years revealed statistically significant superior results in the augmentation group. Finally, no patient in the augmentation group and 2 (4.7%) in the nonaugmentation group experienced

  2. Assessment of functional impairment after knee anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using cardiorespiratory parameters: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Marília Santos; de Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa; Vancini, Rodrigo Luiz; Nakamoto, Fernanda Patti; Cohen, Moisés; da Silva, Antonio Carlos

    2014-05-20

    A dynamic sub-maximum exercise with the same absolute intensity, performed with different muscle groups, may present exacerbated cardiorespiratory responses. Therefore, cardiorespiratory responses to unilateral exercise may identify bilateral differences. The purpose of this study was to verify whether the cardiorespiratory responses to lower limb exercise display counter-lateral differences, and if they could be used to assist athletes and health professionals involved in rehabilitation. Nine individuals participated in this cross-sectional study. They had been treated in a private rehabilitation clinic and submitted to intra-articular reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. The cycling exercise with the same sub-maximal intensity and with one lower limb was used to gather data. Cardiorespiratory responses to exercise were compared between exercises performed with the involved and uninvolved limb after five minutes of exercise. Cardiorespiratory responses to exercise performed with the involved limb presented higher values after five minutes of cycling: oxygen uptake (+7%), carbon dioxide production (+10%), minute ventilation (+20%), breathing frequency (+19%), ventilatory equivalent for oxygen (+14%), end-tidal pressure of O2 oxygen (+4%), end-tidal pressure of O2 carbon dioxide (-9%) and heart rate (+9%). The exacerbated responses, including increase of the ventilatory equivalent and decrease of end-tidal pressure of carbon dioxide, indicate that this exercise protocol may be useful in the characterization of the functional deficit of the surgical limb during rehabilitation.

  3. A new technique for femoral and tibial tunnel bone grafting using the OATS harvesters in revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Said, Hatem G; Baloch, Khalid; Green, Marcus

    2006-07-01

    Revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is becoming more frequent, especially in specialized centers, because of the large numbers of primary ACL procedures performed. In 2-stage revisions, bone grafting of the tunnels may be undertaken if the primary position was inaccurate or if osteolysis has caused widening of the tunnels. This will allow the desired placement of the new tunnels without the risk of loss of structural integrity. It is technically difficult to deliver and impact bone graft into the femoral tunnel with the standard surgical and arthroscopic instruments. We describe a new technique for femoral and tibial tunnel impaction grafting in 2-stage ACL revisions, using the OATS grafting instruments (Osteochondral Autologous Transfer System; Arthrex, Naples, FL). The appropriately sized OATS harvester is chosen 1 mm larger than the tunnel size and is used to harvest bone graft from the iliac crest through a percutaneous approach. This provides a cylindrical graft, which is delivered to the femoral tunnel through the arthroscopic portal. The inside punch of the harvester is tapped and this allows delivery of the graft in a controlled manner and its impaction into the tunnel. The same is repeated for the tibial tunnel while providing support for the proximal end of the tunnel.

  4. Medial ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction of the elbow in major league baseball players: Where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J; Bach Jr, Bernard R; Bush-Joseph, Charles A; Verma, Nikhil N; Romeo, Anthony A

    2016-01-01

    The ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) is a vital structure to the overhead athlete, especially the baseball pitcher. For reasons not completely understood, UCL injuries have become increasingly more common in major league baseball (MLB) pitchers over the past 10 years. UCL recon