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Sample records for ligament reconstruction surgical

  1. Tibial inlay posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: surgical technique and results.

    PubMed

    McAllister, David R; Hussain, Suleman M

    2010-12-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries occur much less frequently than other ligament injuries of the knee such as anterior cruciate ligament injuries. There is general agreement for nonoperative treatment for lower grade injuries such as type I PCL injuries. However, for more severe injuries which may require surgery, there is no consensus on an optimal reconstruction method. Multiple arthroscopic and open techniques exist to reconstruct the PCL. Limited clinical outcomes data reveals good short-term clinical results with different reconstruction options. Biomechanical data has helped further the understanding regarding the performance of different reconstructions. This article will present a surgical technique for single bundle tibial inlay reconstruction of the PCL along with the objective biomechanical data that supports this reconstruction.

  2. The anatomic coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction: surgical technique and indications.

    PubMed

    Carofino, Brad C; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2010-03-01

    The anatomic coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction (ACCR) is a surgical procedure to address acriomioclavicular joint instability. The coracoclavicular ligaments are reconstructed using a semitendinosus allograft passed beneath the coracoid and through bone tunnels in the clavicle. The graft is secured with interference screw fixation, and the acromioclavicular joint is retained. Here we describe the authors' surgical technique, indications, and rehabilitation protocol. Also, a preliminary case series of seventeen patients is presented. Patients demonstrated significant improvement in pain levels and function. The mean ASES score increased from 52 preoperatively to 92. The Constant Murley rose from 66.6 to 94.7. There were three failures in this series, and two required revision surgery. PMID:20188267

  3. Results of the surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Zelić, Zoran; Jovanović, Savo; Wertheimer, Vjekoslav; Sarić, Gordan; Biuk, Egon; Gulan, Gordan

    2012-03-01

    Results of the surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), using as a graft fourfold hamstring tendons (gracilis and semitendinosus) and middle third of the patellar ligament, were compared. In all patients that were participating in this study clinical examination and magnetic resonance showed ACL rupture, and apart from the choice of the graft, surgical technique was identical. We evaluated 112 patients with implemented patellar ligament graft and fourfold hamstring tendons graft six months after the procedure. Both groups were similar according to age, sex, activity level, knee instability level and rehabilitation program. The results showed that there was no significant difference between groups regarding Lysholm Knee score, IKDC 2000 score, activity level, musculature hypotrophy, and knee joint stability 6 months after the surgery. Anterior knee pain incidence is significantly higher in the group with patellar ligament graft (44% vs. 21%). Both groups had a significant musculature hypotrophy of the upper leg of the knee joint that was surgically treated, six months after the procedure. Both grafts showed good subjective and objective results.

  4. Double bundle posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: surgical technique and results.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Gregory C; Beck, John D; Edson, Craig J

    2010-12-01

    The keys to successful posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are to identify and treat all pathology, use strong graft material, accurately place tunnels in anatomic insertion sites, minimize graft bending, use a mechanical graft tensioning device, use primary and back-up graft fixation, and use the appropriate postoperative rehabilitation program. Adherence to these technical principles results in successful single and double-bundle arthroscopic transtibial tunnel posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction based upon stress radiography, arthrometer, knee ligament rating scales, and patient satisfaction measurements.

  5. Comparison of Surgical Techniques for Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction in Overhead Athletes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Edward S; Dodson, Christopher C; Ciccotti, Michael G

    2016-03-01

    Several surgical techniques and modifications for ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) reconstruction have been proposed since this procedure was first performed in 1974. The goal of these techniques has been restoration of stability to the medial elbow with minimal alteration to the surrounding anatomy. Outcome studies and systematic reviews on modified techniques for UCL reconstruction have shown a trend toward increased return to play in patients, particularly overhead athletes. Abandonment of flexor pronator mass detachment in favor of a muscle-splitting or muscle-elevating approach, minimal handling of the ulnar nerve, and the docking technique may result in improved outcomes and decreased complications without diminished performance. Several biomechanical studies have compared the structural properties of these techniques with those of the native UCL. However, a clear, concise surgical algorithm for UCL reconstruction is lacking. Additional studies that use sport-specific outcome measures and performance metrics may better demonstrate the true return to preinjury performance after UCL reconstruction in overhead athletes.

  6. Reconstruction of medial patello-femoral ligament: Comparison of two surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Criscenti, G; De Maria, C; Sebastiani, E; Tei, M; Placella, G; Speziali, A; Vozzi, G; Cerulli, G

    2016-06-01

    The medial patello-femoral ligament is considered the most important passive patellar stabilizer and its proper functionality is essential for the patello-femoral joint stability. In this work, 18 human knees were randomly divided into two groups and reconstructed through two different surgical techniques: the "Through tunnel tendon" and the "Double converging tunnel" reconstructions. Subsequently, the samples were mechanically tested to evaluate the structural properties of reconstructed femur-MPFL-Patella complex (rFMPC). Particular attention was given to maintain the anatomical orientation between the patella and the graft. Both procedures showed lower stiffness and higher ultimate strain and absorbed energy compared to the native MPFL, but the advantages of the double converging tunnel technique are related to the restoration of the native MPFL sail-shape, to a better stress distribution on the patella, to the use of a single interference screw as fixation device and to the simplicity, rapidity and cost-effectivity of the surgical procedure. The evaluation of the structural properties of rMPFL is fundamental to evaluate the adequacy of the different techniques to restore the physiological structural properties of the native MPFL. PMID:26894660

  7. Dynamic medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction in recurrent patellar instability: A surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    Kiran, Kopuri Ravi; Srikanth, I Muni; Chinnusamy, Lenin; Deepti, K

    2015-01-01

    The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is the primary stabilizer of the patellofemoral joint; its reconstruction has been recommended in adults over the past decade after recurrent patellar instability. However, there has been no standardized technique for reconstruction, therefore, ideal graft and technique for reconstruction are yet undetermined. However, dynamic MPFL reconstruction studies claim to be superior to other procedures as it is more anatomical. This preliminary study aims at assessing the outcomes of MPFL reconstruction in a dynamic pattern using hamstring graft. We performed this procedure in four consecutive patients with chronic patellar instability following trauma. MPFL reconstruction was done with hamstring tendons detached distally and secured to patellar periosteum after being passed through a bony tunnel in the patella without an implant and using the medial collateral ligament as a pulley. In all 4 knees, the MPFL reconstruction was isolated and was not associated with any other realignment procedures. No recurrent episodes of dislocation or subluxation were reported at 24 months followup. PMID:26806970

  8. Effectiveness of surgical reconstruction to restore radiocarpal joint mechanics after scapholunate ligament injury: an in vivo modeling study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joshua E; Lee, Phil; McIff, Terence E; Toby, E Bruce; Fischer, Kenneth J

    2013-05-31

    Disruption of the scapholunate ligament can cause a loss of normal scapholunate mechanics and eventually lead to osteoarthritis. Surgical reconstruction attempts to restore scapholunate relationship show improvement in functional outcomes, but postoperative effectiveness in restoring normal radiocarpal mechanics still remains a question. The objective of this study was to investigate the benefits of surgical repair by observing changes in contact mechanics on the cartilage surface before and after surgical treatment. Six patients with unilateral scapholunate dissociation were enrolled in the study, and displacement driven magnetic resonance image-based surface contact modeling was used to investigate normal, injured and postoperative radiocarpal mechanics. Model geometry was acquired from images of wrists taken in a relaxed position. Kinematics were acquired from image registration between the relaxed images, and images taken during functional loading. Results showed a trend for increase in radiocarpal contact parameters with injury. Peak and mean contact pressures significantly decreased after surgery in the radiolunate articulation and there were no significant differences between normal and postoperative wrists. Results indicated that surgical repair improves contact mechanics after injury and that contact mechanics can be surgically restored to be similar to normal. This study provides novel contact mechanics data on the effects of surgical repair after scapholunate ligament injury. With further work, it may be possible to more effectively differentiate between treatments and degenerative changes based on in vivo contact mechanics data.

  9. 3D Printing Surgical Implants at the clinic: A Experimental Study on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liu, An; Xue, Guang-huai; Sun, Miao; Shao, Hui-feng; Ma, Chi-yuan; Gao, Qing; Gou, Zhong-ru; Yan, Shi-gui; Liu, Yan-ming; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Desktop three-dimensional (3D) printers (D3DPs) have become a popular tool for fabricating personalized consumer products, favored for low cost, easy operation, and other advantageous qualities. This study focused on the potential for using D3DPs to successfully, rapidly, and economically print customized implants at medical clinics. An experiment was conducted on a D3DP-printed anterior cruciate ligament surgical implant using a rabbit model. A well-defined, orthogonal, porous PLA screw-like scaffold was printed, then coated with hydroxyapatite (HA) to improve its osteoconductivity. As an internal fixation as well as an ideal cell delivery system, the osteogenic scaffold loaded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were evaluated through both in vitro and in vivo tests to observe bone-ligament healing via cell therapy. The MSCs suspended in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel on PLA/HA screw-like scaffold showed the highest cell proliferation and osteogenesis in vitro. In vivo assessment of rabbit anterior cruciate ligament models for 4 and 12 weeks showed that the PLA/HA screw-like scaffold loaded with MSCs suspended in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel exhibited significant bone ingrowth and bone-graft interface formation within the bone tunnel. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that fabricating surgical implants at the clinic (fab@clinic) with D3DPs can be feasible, effective, and economical. PMID:26875826

  10. 3D Printing Surgical Implants at the clinic: A Experimental Study on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, An; Xue, Guang-huai; Sun, Miao; Shao, Hui-feng; Ma, Chi-yuan; Gao, Qing; Gou, Zhong-ru; Yan, Shi-gui; Liu, Yan-ming; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Desktop three-dimensional (3D) printers (D3DPs) have become a popular tool for fabricating personalized consumer products, favored for low cost, easy operation, and other advantageous qualities. This study focused on the potential for using D3DPs to successfully, rapidly, and economically print customized implants at medical clinics. An experiment was conducted on a D3DP-printed anterior cruciate ligament surgical implant using a rabbit model. A well-defined, orthogonal, porous PLA screw-like scaffold was printed, then coated with hydroxyapatite (HA) to improve its osteoconductivity. As an internal fixation as well as an ideal cell delivery system, the osteogenic scaffold loaded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were evaluated through both in vitro and in vivo tests to observe bone-ligament healing via cell therapy. The MSCs suspended in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel on PLA/HA screw-like scaffold showed the highest cell proliferation and osteogenesis in vitro. In vivo assessment of rabbit anterior cruciate ligament models for 4 and 12 weeks showed that the PLA/HA screw-like scaffold loaded with MSCs suspended in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel exhibited significant bone ingrowth and bone-graft interface formation within the bone tunnel. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that fabricating surgical implants at the clinic (fab@clinic) with D3DPs can be feasible, effective, and economical. PMID:26875826

  11. 3D Printing Surgical Implants at the clinic: A Experimental Study on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liu, An; Xue, Guang-huai; Sun, Miao; Shao, Hui-feng; Ma, Chi-yuan; Gao, Qing; Gou, Zhong-ru; Yan, Shi-gui; Liu, Yan-ming; He, Yong

    2016-02-15

    Desktop three-dimensional (3D) printers (D3DPs) have become a popular tool for fabricating personalized consumer products, favored for low cost, easy operation, and other advantageous qualities. This study focused on the potential for using D3DPs to successfully, rapidly, and economically print customized implants at medical clinics. An experiment was conducted on a D3DP-printed anterior cruciate ligament surgical implant using a rabbit model. A well-defined, orthogonal, porous PLA screw-like scaffold was printed, then coated with hydroxyapatite (HA) to improve its osteoconductivity. As an internal fixation as well as an ideal cell delivery system, the osteogenic scaffold loaded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were evaluated through both in vitro and in vivo tests to observe bone-ligament healing via cell therapy. The MSCs suspended in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel on PLA/HA screw-like scaffold showed the highest cell proliferation and osteogenesis in vitro. In vivo assessment of rabbit anterior cruciate ligament models for 4 and 12 weeks showed that the PLA/HA screw-like scaffold loaded with MSCs suspended in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel exhibited significant bone ingrowth and bone-graft interface formation within the bone tunnel. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that fabricating surgical implants at the clinic (fab@clinic) with D3DPs can be feasible, effective, and economical.

  12. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. A prospective randomized study of three surgical methods.

    PubMed

    Anderson, A F; Snyder, R B; Lipscomb, A B

    2001-01-01

    A prospective randomized study was performed to determine the differences in results between three methods of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: autogenous bone-patellar tendon-bone graft (group 1), semitendinosus and gracilis tendon graft reconstruction combined with an extraarticular procedure (group 2), and semitendinosus and gracilis tendon graft reconstruction alone (group 3). Preoperatively, there were no significant differences between groups. At a mean of 35.4 +/- 11.6 months postoperatively, 102 patients returned for evaluation. International Knee Documentation Committee knee evaluation revealed no significant differences in symptoms, function, return to pre-injury activity, harvest site abnormalities, or limitation of motion between groups 1 and 3. Patients in group 2 had a higher incidence of patellofemoral crepitation and loss of motion than did patients in group 3. The mean manual maximum KT-1000 arthrometer side-to-side difference was 2.1 +/- 2.0 mm in group 1, which was statistically significantly better than the difference in group 3 (3.1 +/- 2.3 mm). Final knee rating showed that 34 of 35 patients in group 1, 23 of 34 patients in group 2, and 26 of 33 patients in group 3 had a normal or nearly normal overall knee rating. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with a semitendinosus and gracilis or a patellar tendon autograft may yield similar subjective results; however, the patellar tendon autograft may provide better objective stability in the long term. In addition, there appears to be no benefit to combining an intraarticular anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with an extraarticular procedure.

  13. Surgical reconstruction of PIP joint collateral ligament in chronic instability in a high performance athlete: case report and description of technique.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Gustavo; Pavan, Alexandre; Aita, Marcio A; Argintar, Evan

    2011-06-01

    We present a case report describing the surgical technique for the reconstruction of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint collateral ligament using autograft palmaris longus tendon graft. We accomplished this successfully in a high performance professional athlete presenting with chronic instability of the PIP joint. Our surgical reconstructive technique recreated anatomic ligament position, while correcting multidirectional instability without disruption of the other dynamic anatomic structures of the PIP joint. Our results demonstrated excellent clinical and functional results, and we offer our technique as an alternative to tenodesis procedures for individuals with professions that demand PIP motion.

  14. Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infections Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Michael V; Du, Dongyi Tony; Hua, Wei; Cortez, Karoll J; Butler, Melissa G; Davis, Robert L; DeCoster, Thomas A; Johnson, Laura; Li, Lingling; Nakasato, Cynthia; Nordin, James D; Ramesh, Mayur; Schum, Michael; Von Worley, Ann; Zinderman, Craig; Platt, Richard; Klompas, Michael

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of graft choice (allograft, bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft, or hamstring autograft) on deep tissue infections following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. SETTING AND POPULATION Patients from 6 US health plans who underwent ACL reconstruction from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2008. METHODS We identified ACL reconstructions and potential postoperative infections using claims data. A hierarchical stratified sampling strategy was used to identify patients for medical record review to confirm ACL reconstructions and to determine allograft vs autograft tissue implanted, clinical characteristics, and infection status. We estimated infection rates overall and by graft type. We used logistic regression to assess the association between infections and patients' demographic characteristics, comorbidities, and choice of graft. RESULTS On review of 1,452 medical records, we found 55 deep wound infections. With correction for sampling weights, infection rates varied by graft type: 0.5% (95% CI, 0.3%-0.8%) with allografts, 0.6% (0.1%-1.5%) with bone-patellar tendon-bone autografts, and 2.5% (1.9%-3.1%) with hamstring autograft. After adjusting for potential confounders, we found an increased infection risk with hamstring autografts compared with allografts (odds ratio, 5.9; 95% CI, 2.8-12.8). However, there was no difference in infection risk among bone-patellar tendon-bone autografts vs allografts (odds ratio, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.3-4.8). CONCLUSIONS The overall risk for deep wound infections following ACL reconstruction is low but it does vary by graft type. Infection risk was highest in hamstring autograft recipients compared with allograft recipients and bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft recipients. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:827-833.

  15. Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infections Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Michael V; Du, Dongyi Tony; Hua, Wei; Cortez, Karoll J; Butler, Melissa G; Davis, Robert L; DeCoster, Thomas A; Johnson, Laura; Li, Lingling; Nakasato, Cynthia; Nordin, James D; Ramesh, Mayur; Schum, Michael; Von Worley, Ann; Zinderman, Craig; Platt, Richard; Klompas, Michael

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of graft choice (allograft, bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft, or hamstring autograft) on deep tissue infections following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. SETTING AND POPULATION Patients from 6 US health plans who underwent ACL reconstruction from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2008. METHODS We identified ACL reconstructions and potential postoperative infections using claims data. A hierarchical stratified sampling strategy was used to identify patients for medical record review to confirm ACL reconstructions and to determine allograft vs autograft tissue implanted, clinical characteristics, and infection status. We estimated infection rates overall and by graft type. We used logistic regression to assess the association between infections and patients' demographic characteristics, comorbidities, and choice of graft. RESULTS On review of 1,452 medical records, we found 55 deep wound infections. With correction for sampling weights, infection rates varied by graft type: 0.5% (95% CI, 0.3%-0.8%) with allografts, 0.6% (0.1%-1.5%) with bone-patellar tendon-bone autografts, and 2.5% (1.9%-3.1%) with hamstring autograft. After adjusting for potential confounders, we found an increased infection risk with hamstring autografts compared with allografts (odds ratio, 5.9; 95% CI, 2.8-12.8). However, there was no difference in infection risk among bone-patellar tendon-bone autografts vs allografts (odds ratio, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.3-4.8). CONCLUSIONS The overall risk for deep wound infections following ACL reconstruction is low but it does vary by graft type. Infection risk was highest in hamstring autograft recipients compared with allograft recipients and bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft recipients. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:827-833. PMID:27340734

  16. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Jeffrey; Bedi, Asheesh; Altchek, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common surgical procedures, with more than 200,000 ACL tears occurring annually. Although primary ACL reconstruction is a successful operation, success rates still range from 75% to 97%. Consequently, several thousand revision ACL reconstructions are performed annually and are unfortunately associated with inferior clinical outcomes when compared with primary reconstructions. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from peer-reviewed literature through a search of the PubMed database (1988-2013) as well as from textbook chapters and surgical technique papers. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: The clinical outcomes after revision ACL reconstruction are largely based on level IV case series. Much of the existing literature is heterogenous with regard to patient populations, primary and revision surgical techniques, concomitant ligamentous injuries, and additional procedures performed at the time of the revision, which limits generalizability. Nevertheless, there is a general consensus that the outcomes for revision ACL reconstruction are inferior to primary reconstruction. Conclusion: Excellent results can be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability but are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction. A staged approach with autograft reconstruction is recommended in any circumstance in which a single-stage approach results in suboptimal graft selection, tunnel position, graft fixation, or biological milieu for tendon-bone healing. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): Good results may still be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability, but results are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction: Level B. PMID:25364483

  17. “The Superficial Quad Technique” for Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction: The Surgical Video Technique

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    With the introduction of the superficial quad technique, there has been a recent revival of interest in the quadriceps tendon as a graft choice for medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction. The superficial quad technique has many anatomic advantages because the length, breadth, and thickness of the graft are similar to those of the native MPFL; moreover, the graft provides a continuous patellar attachment at the superior half of the medial border of the patella. The technique requires neither a patellar bony procedure nor patellar hardware. Biomechanically, the mean strength and stiffness of the graft are very similar to those of the native MPFL. The anatomic and biomechanical advantages depend on correct identification of the anatomic superficial lamina of the quadriceps tendon; hence the correct harvesting technique for the superficial lamina is crucial. Various sub-techniques for harvesting the quadriceps graft have emerged recently, such as superficial strip, pedicled, or partial graft harvesting; these can create confusion for surgeons. Additional confusion related to the preparation and fixation of the graft should also be addressed to avoid any potential complications. A step-by-step video of the superficial quad technique is presented, covering the exact dissection of the graft material and its preparation, delivery, and fixation. PMID:26900556

  18. Surgical treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injury in adults.

    PubMed

    Alazzawi, Sulaiman; Sukeik, Mohamed; Ibrahim, Mazin; Haddad, Fares S

    2016-04-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury is among the most common soft tissue injuries of the knee joint and reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament is the gold standard treatment for young active symptomatic patients. This review summarizes the surgical treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injury.

  19. Coracoclavicular Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi; Hsueh, Pei-ling; Chen, Yun-feng

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Operative intervention is recommended for complete acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation to restore AC stability, but the best operative technique is still controversial. Twelve fresh-frozen male cadaveric shoulders (average age, 62.8 ± 7.8 years) were equally divided into endobutton versus the modified Weaver-Dunn groups. Each potted scapula and clavicle was fixed in a custom made jig to allow translation and load to failure testing using a Zwick BZ2.5/TS1S material testing machine (Zwick/Roell Co, Germany). A systematic review of 21 studies evaluating reconstructive methods for coracoclavicular or AC joints using a cadaveric model was also performed. From our biomechanical study, after ligament reconstruction, the triple endobutton technique demonstrated superior, anterior, and posterior displacements similar to that of the intact state (P > 0.05). In the modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction group, however, there was significantly greater anterior (P < 0.001) and posterior (P = 0.003) translation after ligament reconstruction. In addition, there was no significant difference after reconstruction between failure load of the triple endobutton group and that of the intact state (686.88 vs 684.9 N, P > 0.05), whereas the failure load after the modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction was decreased compared with the intact state (171.64 vs 640.86 N, P < 0.001). From our systematic review of 21 studies, which involved comparison of the modified Weaver-Dunn technique with other methods, the majority showed that the modified Weaver-Dunn procedure had significantly (P < .05) greater laxity than other methods including the endobutton technique. The triple endobutton reconstruction proved superior to the modified Weaver-Dunn technique in restoration of AC joint stability and strength. Triple endobutton reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligament is superior to the modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction in controlling both superior and

  20. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J.; Bach, Bernard R.; Cohen, Mark S.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Cole, Brian J.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Nicholson, Gregory P.; Romeo, Anthony A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) is a common surgery performed in professional, collegiate, and high school athletes. Purpose: To report patient demographics, surgical techniques, and outcomes of all UCLRs performed at a single institution from 2004 to 2014. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: All patients who underwent UCLR from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2014, at a single institution were identified. Charts were reviewed to determine patient age, sex, date of surgery, sport played, athletic level, surgical technique, graft type, and complications. Data were collected prospectively, and patients were contacted via phone calls to obtain the return-to-sport rate, Conway-Jobe score, Andrews-Timmerman score, and Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic (KJOC) Shoulder and Elbow score. Continuous variable data were reported as weighted means, and categorical variable data were reported as frequencies with percentages. Results: A total of 187 patients (188 elbows) underwent UCLR during the study period (92% male; mean age, 19.6 ± 4.7 years; 78.2% right elbows). There were 165 baseball players (87.8% of all patients), 155 of whom were pitchers (82.5% of all patients). Ninety-seven (51.6%) were college athletes, 68 (36.2%) high school athletes, and 7 (3.7%) professional athletes at the time of surgery. The docking technique was used in 110 (58.5%) patients while the double-docking technique was used in 78 (41.5%). An ipsilateral palmaris longus graft was used in 110 (58.5%) patients while a hamstring autograft was used in 48 (25.5%) patients. The ulnar nerve was subcutaneously transposed in 79 (42%) patients. Clinical follow-up data were available on 85 patients. Mean follow-up was 60 ± 30.8 months. Overall, 94.1% of patients were able to return to sport and had a Conway-Jobe score of good/excellent while 4.3% had a score of fair. The mean KJOC score was 90.4 ± 6.7 and mean Andrews-Timmerman score was 92.5 ± 7

  1. Individualized anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    van Eck, Carola F; Widhalm, Harrald; Murawski, Christopher; Fu, Freddie H

    2015-02-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are often seen in young participants in sports such as soccer, football, and basketball. Treatment options include conservative management as well as surgical intervention, with the goal of enabling the patient to return to cutting and pivoting sports and activities. Individualized anatomic ACL reconstruction is a surgical technique that tailors the procedure to the individual patient using preoperative measurements on plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging and intraoperative measurement to map the patients' native ACL anatomy in order to replicate it as closely as possible. Anatomic ACL reconstruction, therefore, is defined as reconstruction of the ACL to its native dimensions, collagen orientation, and insertion site. The surgical reconstruction is followed by a specific rehabilitation protocol that is designed to enable the patient to regain muscle strength and proprioception while facilitating healing of the reconstructed ACL prior to the patient's returning to sports activities.

  2. Anterior cruciate ligament tears: reconstruction and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mary Atkinson; Smith, W Todd; Kosko, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are common knee injuries experienced by athletes and people with active lifestyles. It is important for members of the healthcare team to take an evidence-based approach to the diagnosis, surgical management, and postoperative rehabilitation of patients with an ACL-deficient knee. Mechanism of ACL injury and diagnostic testing is consistent throughout the literature. Patients frequently opt for ACL reconstruction, and many surgical techniques for ACL reconstruction are available with no clear consensus regarding superiority. Surgeon preference dictates the type of reconstruction and graft choice utilized. No standardized pre- and postoperative rehabilitation protocol exists. However, rehabilitation plays an important role in functional outcomes. A comprehensive rehabilitation program is needed pre- and postoperatively to produce positive patient outcomes.

  3. Return to Play Following Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cain, Edward Lyle; McGonigle, Owen

    2016-10-01

    Ulnar collateral ligament injury in the overhead athlete typically presents as activity-related pain with loss of velocity and control. Treatment options range from nonoperative rehabilitation to ligament reconstruction. Surgical reconstruction is frequently required to allow the athlete to return to competition and many surgical techniques have been described. The rehabilitation process to return back to overhead athletics, in particular pitching, is prolonged and requires progression through multiple phases. Despite this, surgical treatment has been shown by multiple investigators to be successful at returning athletes to their previous level of competition.

  4. Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction Technique: An Anatomic-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Menge, Travis J; Mitchell, Justin J; Dean, Chase S; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-06-01

    Restoration of anteroposterior laxity after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction has been predictable with traditional open and endoscopic techniques. However, anterolateral rotational stability has been difficult to achieve in a subset of patients, even with appropriate anatomic techniques. Therefore, differing techniques have attempted to address this rotational laxity by augmenting or reconstructing lateral-sided structures about the knee. In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in the anterolateral ligament as a potential contributor to residual anterolateral rotatory instability in anterior cruciate ligament-deficient patients. Numerous anatomic and biomechanical studies have been performed to further define the functional importance of the anterolateral ligament, highlighting the need for surgical techniques to address these injuries in the unstable knee. This article details our technique for an anatomic anterolateral ligament reconstruction using a semitendinosus tendon allograft. PMID:27656361

  5. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-June

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that in the majority of patellar dislocation cases, the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is disrupted with a high recurrence rate especially in female patients. Although MPFL tear is not the primary cause of instability, MPFL reconstruction is effective for stabilizing the knee and may alone prevent lateral patellar dislocation. There is limited but growing evidence that MPFL reconstruction for patellofemoral instability leads to excellent functional outcomes. Growing awareness of the biomechanical contribution of the MPFL has led to an upsurge in the publication of techniques and trials dealing with reconstructive techniques, warranting a review that includes the most recent evidence. The aim of this article was to review and summarize the recent literatures concerning MPFL reconstruction and provide a comprehensive review of previous studies ranging from basic science to current surgical techniques and results. PMID:26389065

  6. Surgical Dissection of the Anterolateral Ligament.

    PubMed

    Daggett, Matthew; Busch, Kyle; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand

    2016-02-01

    Recent investigations into the structure and function of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) have resulted in renewed interest in the role of the lateral extra-articular structures in rotational control of the knee. With increased focus on the ALL, debate about the anatomic characteristics, the functional role in knee stability, and even the existence of this lateral structure has ensued. This article describes our dissection method for the ALL. Through careful dissection and precise elevation of the iliotibial band, the ALL can be clearly identified as a distinct structure with an attachment near the lateral epicondyle on the femur and an insertion in a fan-like fashion onto the tibia, between the Gerdy tubercle and the fibular head. This investigation provides the surgeon with anatomic landmarks to use during surgical reconstruction of the ALL. PMID:27274451

  7. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Arcuri, Francisco; Barclay, Fernando; Nacul, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The most recent advances in ACL reconstruction try to reproduce the anatomic femoral and tibial footprints as close as possible. Creating independent tunnels would allow an optimal of the entry point and the femoral tunnel obliquity, and together with an adequate reamer diameter they wouldreproduce with greater certainty the anatomy. Objective: To compare the radiographic parameters of the femoral and tibial tunnel positions in two groups of patients, one operated with a transtibial and other with transportal anatomic techniques. Materials and Methods: From December 2012 to December 2013, 59 patients with a primary ACL reconstruction divided in two groups, a trans tibial technique (TT), 19 patients, and an transportal one (TP) with 40 patients were prospectively evaluated with AP and lateral X-rays. The femoral tunnel angle, the insertion site with respect of the Blumensaat line, the trans osseous distance, the tibial tunnel position as a percentage of the tibial plateau in the AP and lateral views. And finally the tibial tunnel angle in the AP and Lateral views. Results: The femoral tunnel angle was in the TP group of 45,92º and in the TT one 24,53º, p 0,002. The insertion site percentage of the Blumensaat line was of 20,96 in TP and 20,74 in the TT, p 0,681.Trans osseous distance was in the TP of 3,43 cm and in the TT of 4,79 cm, p <0,000. The tibial tunnel position as a percentage in the AP tibial plateau was of 44,35 in TP and of 40,80 TT with a p of 0,076. The tibial tunnel position as a percentage of the lateral tibial plateau was of 28,70 in TP and 34,53 in TT with a p 0,367. Tibial tunnel angle in the AP was of 73,48º in TP and 62,81 in TT with a p of 0,002, and in the lateral plateau of 114,69º in TP and 112,79º in TT with a p of 0,427. Conclusion: It is possible to create tibial and femoral tunnel in optimal positions but not equal between both groups. Creating independent tunnels allow a more anterior and vertical tibial tunnel

  8. Ligament reconstruction and tendon interposition for thumb basal arthritis.

    PubMed

    Elfar, John C; Burton, Richard I

    2013-02-01

    Arthritis at the base of the thumb is common and debilitating. Arthroplasty has evolved over 3 decades to become a highly refined surgical procedure, with excellent results. This article summarizes the history, method, and expected results of basal joint arthroplasty, and the authors describe their method of ligament reconstruction and tendon interposition for thumb basal arthritis.

  9. Reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament and anterolateral ligament using interlinked hamstrings - technical note.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Marcio de Castro; Zidan, Flavio Ferreira; Miduati, Francini Belluci; Fortuna, Caio Cesar; Mizutani, Bruno Moreira; Abdalla, Rene Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Recent anatomical and biomechanical studies on the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee have shown that this structure has an important function in relation to joint stability, especially when associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, the criteria for its reconstruction have not yet been fully established and the surgical techniques that have been described present variations regarding anatomical points and fixation materials. This study presents a reproducible technique for ALL and ACL reconstruction using hamstring tendons, in which three interference screws are used for fixation.

  10. Reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament and anterolateral ligament using interlinked hamstrings - technical note.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Marcio de Castro; Zidan, Flavio Ferreira; Miduati, Francini Belluci; Fortuna, Caio Cesar; Mizutani, Bruno Moreira; Abdalla, Rene Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Recent anatomical and biomechanical studies on the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee have shown that this structure has an important function in relation to joint stability, especially when associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, the criteria for its reconstruction have not yet been fully established and the surgical techniques that have been described present variations regarding anatomical points and fixation materials. This study presents a reproducible technique for ALL and ACL reconstruction using hamstring tendons, in which three interference screws are used for fixation. PMID:27517028

  11. Bone tunnel enlargement on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, Adriano Barros de Aguiar; Duarte, Aires; Severino, Nilson Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the presence of tibial bone tunnel enlargement after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using quadruple graft of the flexor tendons and correlate the functional results in their presence. Methods: The studied lasted six months and included 25 patients, with ages ranging from 18 to 43 years old. Assessment was based on radiographs taken immediately postoperatively and at the third and sixth month of follow up in the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Reconstruction of ligaments was performed with tendon grafts of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscle fixated in the femur with transverse metal screw and in the tibia with interference screws. Patients were evaluated objectively by tests ligament, graded from zero to four crosses and subjectively by the Lysholm method preoperative and after sixth month follow up. Results: Significant increase in the tunnels diameters were observed, 20.56% for radiographs in the anteroposterior view, 26.48% in profile view and 23.22% in computed tomography. Descriptive statistics showed significant improvement in subjective and objective clinical parameters. Conclusions: The bone tunnel enlargement is a phenomenon found in the first months after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament and it has no implications on clinical outcomes in the short term. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Study. PMID:25328430

  12. Popliteal artery injury during posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cenni, Marcos Henrique Frauendorf; do Nascimento, Bruno Fajardo; Carneiro, Guilherme Galvão Barreto; de Andrade, Rodrigo Cristiano; Pinheiro Júnior, Lúcio Flávio Biondi; Nicolai, Oscar Pinheiro

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a case of popliteal artery injury during arthroscopic reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament. The evolution of the injury is described and comments are made regarding the anatomy of this artery and potential risks of this surgical technique. This study had the aims of alerting the medical community, especially knee surgeons, regarding a severe surgical complication and discussing the ways of preventing it.

  13. Medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction in patellar instability

    PubMed Central

    Krishna Kumar, MS; Renganathan, Sankarram; Joseph, Clement J; Easwar, TR; Rajan, David V

    2014-01-01

    Background: Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is one of the major static medial stabilising structures of the patella. MPFL is most often damaged in patients with patellar instability. Reconstruction of MPFL is becoming a common surgical procedure in treating patellar instability. We hypothesised that MPFL reconstruction was adequate to treat patients with patellar instability if the tibial tubercle and the centre of the trochlear groove (TT-TG) value was less than 20 mm and without a dysplastic trochlea. Materials and Methods: 30 patients matching our inclusion criteria and operated between April 2009 and May 2011 were included in the study. MPFL reconstruction was performed using gracilis tendon fixed with endobutton on the patellar side and bio absorbable interference screw or staple on the femoral side. Patients were followed up with subjective criteria, Kujala score and Lysholm score. Results: The mean duration of followup was 25 months (range 14-38 months). The mean preoperative Kujala score was 47.5 and Lysholm score was 44.7. The mean postoperative Kujala score was 87 and Lysholm score was 88.06. None of the patients had redislocation. Conclusion: MPFL reconstruction using gracilis tendon gives excellent results in patients with patellar instability with no redislocations. Some patients may have persistence of apprehension. PMID:25298558

  14. Combined anterolateral ligament and anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction of the knee.

    PubMed

    Smith, James O; Yasen, Sam K; Lord, Breck; Wilson, Adrian J

    2015-11-01

    Although anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is established for the surgical treatment of anterolateral knee instability, there remains a significant cohort of patients who continue to experience post-operative instability. Recent advances in our understanding of the anatomic, biomechanical and radiological characteristics of the native anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee have led to a resurgent interest in reconstruction of this structure as part of the management of knee instability. This technical note describes our readily reproducible combined minimally invasive technique to reconstruct both the ACL and ALL anatomically using autologous semitendinosus and gracilis grafts. This method of ALL reconstruction can be easily integrated with all-inside ACL reconstruction, requiring minimal additional operative time, equipment and expertise. Level of evidence V.

  15. Current concepts in rehabilitation following ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ellenbecker, Todd S; Wilk, Kevin E; Altchek, David W; Andrews, James R

    2009-07-01

    Injuries to the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) in throwing athletes frequently occurs from the repetitive valgus loading of the elbow during the throwing motion, which often results in surgical reconstruction of the UCL requiring a structured postoperative rehabilitation program. Several methods are currently used and recommended for UCL reconstruction using autogenous grafts in an attempt to reproduce the stabilizing function of the native UCL. Rehabilitation following surgical reconstruction of the UCL begins with range of motion and initial protection of the surgical reconstruction, along with resistive exercise for the entire upper extremity kinetic chain. Progressions for resistive exercise are followed that attempt to fully restore strength and local muscular endurance in the rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers, in addition to the distal upper extremity musculature, to allow for a return to throwing and overhead functional activities. Rehabilitation following UCL reconstruction has produced favorable outcomes, allowing for a return to throwing in competitive environments.

  16. Psychological Aspects of Recovery Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Christino, Melissa A; Fantry, Amanda J; Vopat, Bryan G

    2015-08-01

    Recovery following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is an arduous process that requires a significant mental and physical commitment to rehabilitation. Orthopaedic research in recent years has focused on optimizing anterior cruciate ligament surgical techniques; however, despite stable anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions, many athletes still never achieve their preinjury ability or even return to sport. Psychological factors associated with patient perceptions and functional outcomes following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are important to acknowledge and understand. Issues related to emotional disturbance, motivation, self-esteem, locus of control, and self-efficacy can have profound effects on patients' compliance, athletic identity, and readiness to return to sport. The psychological aspects of recovery play a critical role in functional outcomes, and a better understanding of these concepts is essential to optimize the treatment of patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, particularly those who plan to return to sport. Identifying at-risk patients, encouraging a multidisciplinary approach to patient care, and providing early referral to a sports psychologist may improve patient outcomes and increase return-to-play rates among athletes.

  17. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction; the Rush Experience

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J.; Bach, Bernard R.; Cohen, Mark S.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Cole, Brian J.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Nicholson, Gregory P.; Romeo, Anthony A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Background: Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) is now a common surgery performed in both professional, as well as high level athletes Purpose: To report the patient demographics, surgical techniques, and outcomes of all UCLR performed at a single institution from 2004-2014 Hypothesis: UCLR will be performed mostly in male pitchers and will have a complication rate of less than 5%. Methods: Methods: The surgical database of one institution was searched from January 1st 2004-December 31st 2014 for the current procedural terminology (CPT) code 24346 “Reconstruction medial collateral ligament, elbow, with tendon graft (includes harvesting of graft)”. Charts were reviewed to determine patient age, gender, date of surgery, sport played, athletic level, surgical technique, graft type, and complications were recorded. Patients were contacted via phone calls to obtain the return to sport rate, Conway-Jobe score, Timmerman & Andrews score, and Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic (KJOC) Shoulder and Elbow score. Results: Results: One hundred eighty-nine patients underwent UCLR during the study period (92% male, average age 19.6 +/- 4.9 years, 77.8% were right elbows). There were 166 baseball players (87.8% of all patients), 156 of which were pitchers (82.5% of all patients). Ninety-eight (51.6%) were college athletes, 62 (36%) were high school athletes, and 25 (13.2%) were professional athletes at the time of surgery. The docking technique was used in 111 (58.7%) patients while the double docking technique was used in 78 (41.3%). An ipsilateral palmaris longus graft was used in 111 (58.7%) of patients while a hamstring autograft was used in 48 (25.4%) patients. The ulnar nerve was subcutaneously transposed in 79 (41.8%) patients. Overall 95.7% of patients were able to return to sport and had a Conway-Jobe score of good/excellent while 4.3% had a score of fair. The average KJOC score was 94.7 +/- 5.7 and average Timmerman-Andrews score was 93.7 +/- 7

  18. Anterior cruciate ligament allograft transplantation for intraarticular ligamentous reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Goertzen, M; Dellmann, A; Gruber, J; Clahsen, H; Bürrig, K F

    1992-01-01

    A multiplicity of surgical operations have been developed in an attempt to achieve satisfactory function after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair. None of these procedures have been able to reproduce the fiber organization anatomy of attachment site, vascularity, or function of the ACL. Twenty-nine foxhounds received a deep-frozen bone-ACL-bone allograft and a ligament augmentation device (LAD). Biomechanical, microvascular, and histological changes were evaluated 3, 6, and 12 months following implantation. The maximum loads of the allograft/LADs were 34.3% (387.2 N) after 3 months, 49.3% (556.6 N) after 6 months, and 61.1% (698.8 N) after a year. The maximum load was 69.1% (780 N). In general, after 6 months the allografts showed normal collagen orientation. The allografts demonstrated no evidence of infection or immune reaction. No bone ingrowth into the LAD was observed. Polarized light microscopy and periodic acid-schiff staining showed that the new bone-ligament substance interface had intact fiber orientation at the area of the ligament insertion. Microvascular examination using the Spalteholtz technique revealed revascularization and the importance of an infrapatellar fat pad for the nourishment of ACL allografts.

  19. Anterior cruciate ligament allograft transplantation for intraarticular ligamentous reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Goertzen, M; Dellmann, A; Gruber, J; Clahsen, H; Bürrig, K F

    1992-01-01

    A multiplicity of surgical operations have been developed in an attempt to achieve satisfactory function after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair. None of these procedures have been able to reproduce the fiber organization anatomy of attachment site, vascularity, or function of the ACL. Twenty-nine foxhounds received a deep-frozen bone-ACL-bone allograft and a ligament augmentation device (LAD). Biomechanical, microvascular, and histological changes were evaluated 3, 6, and 12 months following implantation. The maximum loads of the allograft/LADs were 34.3% (387.2 N) after 3 months, 49.3% (556.6 N) after 6 months, and 61.1% (698.8 N) after a year. The maximum load was 69.1% (780 N). In general, after 6 months the allografts showed normal collagen orientation. The allografts demonstrated no evidence of infection or immune reaction. No bone ingrowth into the LAD was observed. Polarized light microscopy and periodic acid-schiff staining showed that the new bone-ligament substance interface had intact fiber orientation at the area of the ligament insertion. Microvascular examination using the Spalteholtz technique revealed revascularization and the importance of an infrapatellar fat pad for the nourishment of ACL allografts. PMID:1389780

  20. A Finite Element Analysis of Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    DeVries Watson, Nicole A.; Duchman, Kyle R.; Bollier, Matthew J.; Grosland, Nicole M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The medial patellofemoral ligament is the primary soft-tissue restraint to lateral patella translation. Medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction has become a viable surgical option to provide patellar stability in patients with recurrent instability. The primary goal of this study was to determine the effect of medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction on the lateral force-displacement behavior of the patella using finite element analyses. Methods A finite element model of the knee was created using cadaveric image data. Experimental testing was performed to validate the computational model. After validation, the model was modified to study the effect of various medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction insertion sites, allowing comparison of patellofemoral contact force and pressure. Results For the intact anatomic model, the lateral restraining force was 80.0 N with a corresponding patellar contact area of 54.97 mm2. For the anatomic reconstructed medial patellofemoral ligament model, the lateral restraining force increased to 148.9 N with a contact area of 71.78 mm2. This compared favorably to the corresponding experimental study. The force required to laterally displace the patella increased when the femoral insertion site was moved anteriorly or distally. The lateral restraining force decreased when the femoral insertion site moved proximally and the patellar insertion site moved either proximal or distal by 5 mm. Conclusion The line of action was altered with insertion site position, which in turn changed the amount of force it took to displace the patella laterally. Considering the model constraints, an anterior femoral attachment may over constrain the patella and increase cartilage wear due to increase contact area and restraining force. Clinical Relevance A malpositioned femoral tunnel in MPFL reconstruction could increase restraining forces and PF contact pressure, thus it is suggested to use intra-operative fluoroscopy to confirm

  1. Two-Stage Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Brandon J; Cvetanovich, Gregory; Waliullah, Khalid; Khair, Michael; Smith, Patrick; Bach, Bernard; Sherman, Seth

    2016-05-01

    The number of primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears is rapidly increasing. In patients who wish to return to their preoperative level of function, specifically as it pertains to participation in sports, the gold standard of treatment following an ACL tear remains an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Despite a majority of good/excellent results following primary ACL reconstruction, there is a growing subset of patients with persistent or recurrent functional instability who require revision ACL reconstruction. Preoperative planning for revision ACL reconstruction requires a careful understanding of the root cause of ACL failure, including possible technical causes of primary ACL failure and the presence of combined knee pathology that was not addressed at the index ACL reconstruction. The decision to perform 2-stage revision ACL reconstruction is multifactorial and is reached by technical considerations that may make a 1-stage revision less optimal, including tunnel widening, arthrofibrosis, active infection, and others. Concomitant knee pathology such as meniscal deficiency, malalignment (including an increase in posterior tibial slope), chondral lesions, and other ligamentous laxity may also require a staged approach to treatment. This evidence-based review covers the indications for 2-stage revision ACL reconstruction, surgical techniques, evidence for and technique of bone grafting prior ACL tunnels, and outcomes of 2-stage revision stratified by initial cause of ACL reconstruction failure. With proper preoperative planning and an understanding of the cause of failure following the primary ACL reconstruction, revision ACL reconstruction can offer excellent outcomes in the motivated patient. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e456-e464.]. PMID:27045480

  2. Anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: a logical approach

    PubMed Central

    Gali, Julio Cesar

    2015-01-01

    We describe the surgical approach that we have used over the last years for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, highlighting the importance of arthroscopic viewing through the anteromedial portal (AMP) and femoral tunnel drilling through an accessory anteromedial portal (AMP). The AMP allows direct view of the ACL femoral insertion site on the medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle, does not require guides for anatomic femoral tunnel reaming, prevents an additional lateral incision in the distal third of the thigh (as would be unavoidable when the outside-in technique is used) and also can be used for double-bundle ACL reconstruction. PMID:26417571

  3. Posterior Wall Blowout in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Justin J.; Dean, Chase S.; Chahla, Jorge; Menge, Travis J.; Cram, Tyler R.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Violation of the posterior femoral cortex, commonly referred to as posterior wall blowout, can be a devastating intraoperative complication in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and lead to loss of graft fixation or early graft failure. If cortical blowout occurs despite careful planning and adherence to proper surgical technique, a thorough knowledge of the anatomy and alternative fixation techniques is imperative to ensure optimal patient outcomes. This article highlights anatomic considerations for femoral tunnel placement in ACL reconstruction and techniques for avoidance and salvage of a posterior wall blowout. PMID:27335885

  4. LARS Artificial Ligament Versus ABC Purely Polyester Ligament for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Iliadis, Dimitrios Ph.; Bourlos, Dimitrios N.; Mastrokalos, Dimitrios S.; Chronopoulos, Efstathios; Babis, George C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Graft choice for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is of critical importance. Various grafts have been used so far, with autografts long considered the optimal solution for the treatment of ACL-deficient knees. Limited data are available on the long-term survivorship of synthetic grafts. Purpose: To compare the functional outcome and survivorship of ACL reconstructions performed using the LARS (ligament augmentation and reconstruction system) ligament and the ABC (active biosynthetic composite) purely polyester ligament. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: The results of 72 patients who underwent primary arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with the LARS ligament and 31 cases with an ABC purely polyester ligament were reviewed. The mean follow-up periods for the LARS and ABC groups were 9.5 and 5.1 years, respectively. A survivorship analysis of the 2 synthetic grafts was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method with a log-rank test (Mantel-Cox, 95% CI). Lysholm, Tegner activity, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores as well as laxity measurements obtained using a KT-1000 arthrometer were recorded for all intact grafts, and a Mann-Whitney U test was used for comparison reasons. Results: The rupture rates for LARS and ABC grafts were 31% (95% CI, 20%-42%) and 42% (95% CI, 25%-59%), respectively. For intact grafts, the mean Lysholm score was good for both groups (90 for the LARS group and 89 for the ABC group), with the majority of patients returning to their preinjury level of activities, and the mean IKDC score was 90 for the LARS group and 86 for the ABC group. Conclusion: The rupture rates of both LARS and ABC grafts were both high. However, the LARS ligament provided significantly better survivorship compared with the ABC ligament at short- to midterm follow-up (95% CI). PMID:27453894

  5. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction of the Elbow: The Docking Technique.

    PubMed

    Camp, Christopher L; Dines, Joshua S; Voleti, Pramod B; James, Evan W; Altchek, David W

    2016-06-01

    Reconstruction of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures in overhead throwing athletes. Since its initial description, the procedure has undergone a number of technical modifications and advancements. This has resulted in multiple described techniques for UCL reconstruction. One of the most commonly performed UCL reconstruction methods is the docking technique. It has the advantages of minimizing injury to the flexor-pronator mass, avoiding the ulnar nerve, allowing robust graft tensioning, and reducing the amount of bone removed from the medial epicondyle compared with previously described techniques. This article provides a detailed description and video demonstration of how to perform this technique. When precise surgical steps are followed and postoperative rehabilitation appropriately progresses, this procedure has a well-documented history of reliably returning athletes to competitive throwing. PMID:27656372

  6. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction of the Elbow: The Docking Technique.

    PubMed

    Camp, Christopher L; Dines, Joshua S; Voleti, Pramod B; James, Evan W; Altchek, David W

    2016-06-01

    Reconstruction of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures in overhead throwing athletes. Since its initial description, the procedure has undergone a number of technical modifications and advancements. This has resulted in multiple described techniques for UCL reconstruction. One of the most commonly performed UCL reconstruction methods is the docking technique. It has the advantages of minimizing injury to the flexor-pronator mass, avoiding the ulnar nerve, allowing robust graft tensioning, and reducing the amount of bone removed from the medial epicondyle compared with previously described techniques. This article provides a detailed description and video demonstration of how to perform this technique. When precise surgical steps are followed and postoperative rehabilitation appropriately progresses, this procedure has a well-documented history of reliably returning athletes to competitive throwing.

  7. All-inside anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Blackman, Andrew J; Stuart, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    All-inside anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has undergone a series of modifications over the past 20 years. Current techniques offer the advantages of improved cosmesis, less postoperative pain, decreased bone removal, and gracilis preservation. Few all-inside ACL reconstruction outcome studies are available; therefore, additional research is necessary to compare the results to conventional techniques. The purpose of this article is to review the evolution of all-inside ACL reconstruction, the advantages and disadvantages, our preferred technique, and clinical experience to date.

  8. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction of the Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J.; Chalmers, Peter N.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Romeo, Anthony A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) is a common procedure in both professional and high-level athletes. Purpose: To determine the effect of technique and level of play with UCLR on return to sport (RTS). Hypothesis: When comparing different surgical techniques or preoperative level of sports participation, there is no difference in rate of RTS after UCLR. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review was registered with PROSPERO and performed following PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines using 3 publicly available free databases. Therapeutic clinical outcome investigations reporting UCLR outcomes with level of evidence 1 through 4 were eligible for inclusion. All study, subject, and surgical technique demographics were analyzed and compared between continents and countries. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and 2-proportion 2-sample z-test calculators with α = .05 were used to compare RTS between level of play and technique. Results: Twenty studies (2019 patients/elbows; mean age, 22.13 ± 4 years; 97% male; mean follow-up, 39.9 ± 16.2 months) were included. The majority of patients were baseball players (94.5%), specifically pitchers (80%). The most common level of play was collegiate (44.6%). Palmaris longus (71.2%) and the American Sports Medicine Institute (ASMI) technique (65.6%) were the most common graft choice and surgical technique, respectively. There was a pooled 86.2% RTS rate, and 90% of players scored excellent/good on the Conway-Jobe scale. RTS rates were higher among collegiate athletes (95.5%) than either high school (89.4%, P = .023) or professional athletes (86.4%, P < .0001). RTS rates were higher for the docking technique (97.0%, P = .001) and the ASMI technique (93.3%, P = .0034) than the Jobe technique (66.7%). Conclusion: UCLR is performed most commonly in collegiate athletes. Collegiate athletes have the highest RTS rate

  9. Compression of the Popliteal Artery after Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using the Tibial Inlay Technique

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Seung Suk; Kim, Do Hun; Park, Byung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Popliteal artery compression rarely occurs after posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction using the tibial inlay technique that allows for direct visualization of the surgical field. However, we experienced a popliteal artery compression after PCL reconstruction performed using the technique, which eventually required re-operation. Here, we report this rare case and discuss reasons of popliteal artery compression. PMID:26673356

  10. Graft impingement in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Iriuchishima, Takanori; Shirakura, Kenji; Fu, Freddie H

    2013-03-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft impingement is one of the most troubling complications in ACL reconstruction. In the previous strategy of isometric "non-anatomical" ACL reconstruction, posterior tibial tunnel placement and notchplasty were recommended to avoid graft impingement. Recently, the strategy of ACL reconstruction is shifting towards "anatomical" reconstruction. In anatomical ACL reconstruction, the potential risk of graft impingement is higher than in non-anatomical reconstruction because the tibial tunnel is placed at a more anterior portion on the tibia. However, there have been few studies reporting on graft impingement in anatomical ACL reconstruction. This study will provide a review of graft impingement status in both non-anatomical and the more recent anatomical ACL reconstruction techniques. In conclusion, with the accurate creation of bone tunnels within ACL native footprint, the graft impingement might not happen in anatomical ACL reconstruction. For the clinical relevance, to prevent graft impingement, surgeons should pay attention of creating correct anatomical tunnels when they perform ACL reconstruction. Level of evidence IV.

  11. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and rehabilitation: predictors of functional outcome

    PubMed Central

    DELLA VILLA, FRANCESCO; RICCI, MARGHERITA; PERDISA, FRANCESCO; FILARDO, GIUSEPPE; GAMBERINI, JACOPO; CAMINATI, DANIELE; DELLA VILLA, STEFANO

    2015-01-01

    Surgical reconstruction of an injured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) leads to full recovery of function and sports activity in a high percentage of cases. The aim of the present study was to analyze variables related to the patient, the surgical technique and the post-surgical rehabilitation methods, seeking to identify predictors of outcome and recovery time after ACL reconstruction. One hundred and four patients (81 M, 23 F) undergoing a step-based rehabilitation protocol after ACL reconstruction were evaluated. 43.2% of them had an isolated ACL lesion, whereas 56.8% had one or more concurrent injuries. Data relating to personal characteristics, surgery and post-operative management were collected and analyzed for correlation. Clinical outcome was evaluated with IKDC subjective score and the Tegner score, and the time to reach full recovery was noted as well. Young patients with a higher pre-injury Tegner activity level or who practice sport at professional level, no concurrent capsular lesions and no postoperative knee bracing had better clinical results and took shorter time to recover. Also, a higher percentage of on-the-field rehabilitation sessions, and absence of significant muscle strength deficits at the first knee isokinetic test emerged as rehabilitation-related factors leading to a better post-surgical outcome. Personal, surgical and rehabilitation factors should be considered in order to optimize patient management and maximize the expected results. Further studies are needed to find the strongest factors in different patients. Level of evidence Level IV, retrospective study. PMID:26904523

  12. A new simplified onlay technique for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Salim, Rodrigo; Fogagnolo, Fabricio; Kfuri, Mauricio

    2014-08-01

    The integrity of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is essential for the normal kinematics of the knee. Injury to the PCL has adverse consequences, with worsening of functional performance and an increased risk to develop osteoarthritis. Conservative treatment is sometimes adopted, not only because it is an acceptable option for selected patients but also due to the lack of consensus in the orthopedic literature regarding the best surgical method. Hereby we describe a simplified technique for onlay PCL reconstruction pointing out possible advantages if compared with the traditional transtibial or inlay techniques.

  13. Rehabilitation after anatomical ankle ligament repair or reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Christopher J; Tourné, Yves; Zellers, Jennifer; Terrier, Romain; Toschi, Pascal; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare

    2016-04-01

    The selection, implementation of and adherence to a post-operative regimen are all essential in order to achieve the best outcomes after ankle ligament surgery. The purpose of this paper is to present a best-evidence approach to this, with grounding in basic science and a consensus opinion from the members of the ESSKA-AFAS Ankle Instability Group. Basic science and clinical evidence surrounding tissue healing after surgical repair or reconstruction of the ligaments as well as around the re-establishment of sensorimotor control are reviewed. A consensus opinion based on this evidence as to the recommended rehabilitation protocol after ankle ligament surgery was then obtained from the members of the ESSKA-AFAS Ankle Instability Group. Rehabilitation recommendations are presented for the initial post-operative period, the early recovery phase and a goal-orientated late rehabilitation and return-to-sport phase. This paper presents practical, evidenced-based guidelines for rehabilitation and return to activity after lateral ankle ligament surgery.

  14. A modified surgical technique for reconstruction of an acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Marchie, Anthony; Kumar, Arun; Catre, Melanio

    2009-01-01

    We report a modified surgical technique for reconstruction of coracoclavicular and acromioclavicular ligaments after acute dislocation of acromioclavicular joint using suture anchors. We have repaired 3 consecutive type III acromioclavicular dislocations with good results. This technique is simple and safe and allows anatomical reconstruction of the ligaments in acute dislocations. PMID:20671868

  15. Infections in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Stucken, Charlton; Garras, David N.; Shaner, Julie L.; Cohen, Steven B.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a safe, common, and effective method of restoring stability to the knee after injury, but evolving techniques of reconstruction carry inherent risk. Infection after ACL reconstruction, while rare, carries a high morbidity, potentially resulting in a poor clinical outcome. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from previously published peer-reviewed literature through a search of the entire PubMed database (up to December 2012) as well as from textbook chapters. Results: Treatment with culture-specific antibiotics and debridement with graft retention is recommended as initial treatment, but with persistent infection, consideration should be given to graft removal. Graft type likely has no effect on infection rates. Conclusion: The early diagnosis of infection and appropriate treatment are necessary to avoid the complications of articular cartilage damage and arthrofibrosis. PMID:24427432

  16. Osteonecrosis of the Knee After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lansdown, Drew A.; Shaw, Jeremy; Allen, Christina R.; Ma, C. Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is performed commonly, with a low risk of complication. Osteonecrosis of the knee is a potentially devastating condition and has been observed both spontaneously and after meniscectomy, although osteonecrosis has not been described as a complication after ACL reconstruction. Purpose: To describe the development of osteonecrosis of the knee in 5 patients after arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: This study involved 5 patients (mean age, 33.2 years) who developed osteonecrosis of the knee after ACL reconstruction. A retrospective chart review was performed to identify clinical characteristics and surgical factors present in each of the 5 cases. Results: In 4 cases, the pathologic changes were present in both the medial and lateral femoral condyles, with isolated lateral condyle changes in the other case. The mean time to diagnosis was 11.6 months. These patients underwent an average of 1.8 additional surgical procedures after the diagnosis of osteonecrosis. Conclusion: Osteonecrosis of the knee is a rare outcome after ACL reconstruction. We are unable to identify clear risk factors for the development of this complication, although we hope the presentation of these cases will help promote the identification of other cases in future studies. PMID:26665035

  17. Predictors of Revision Surgery After Primary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yabroudi, Mohammad A.; Björnsson, Haukur; Lynch, Andrew D.; Muller, Bart; Samuelsson, Kristian; Tarabichi, Majd; Karlsson, Jón; Fu, Freddie H.; Harner, Christopher D.; Irrgang, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery occurs in 5% to 15% of individuals undergoing ACL reconstruction. Identifying predictors for revision ACL surgery is of essence in the pursuit of creating adequate prevention programs and to identify individuals at risk for reinjury and revision. Purpose: To determine predictors of revision ACL surgery after failed primary ACL reconstruction. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 251 participants (mean age ± SD, 26.1 ± 9.9 years) who had undergone primary ACL reconstruction 1 to 5 years earlier completed a comprehensive survey to determine predictors of revision ACL surgery at a mean 3.4 ± 1.3 years after the primary ACL reconstruction. Potential predictors that were assessed included subject characteristics (age at the time of surgery, time from injury to surgery, sex, body mass index, preinjury activity level, return to sport status), details of the initial injury (mechanism; concomitant injury to other ligaments, menisci, and cartilage), surgical details of the primary reconstruction (Lachman and pivot shift tests under anesthesia, graft type, femoral drilling technique, reconstruction technique), and postoperative course (length of rehabilitation, complications). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors that predicted the need for revision ACL surgery. Results: Overall, 21 (8.4%) subjects underwent revision ACL surgery. Univariate analysis showed that younger age at the time of surgery (P = .003), participation in sports at a competitive level (P = .023), and double-bundle ACL reconstruction (P = .024) predicted increased risk of revision ACL surgery. Allograft reconstructions also demonstrated a trend toward greater risk of revision ACL surgery (P = .076). No other variables were significantly associated with revision ACL surgery. Multivariate analysis revealed that revision ACL surgery was

  18. Management of septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a review of current practices and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Edwin R; Makhni, Eric C; Mehran, Nima; Schulz, Brian M

    2013-11-01

    Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is a rare and potentially devastating complication that often leads to articular destruction and adverse clinical outcomes. Because of its rare occurrence, best practices for diagnosis and management have yet to be established. However, graft retention and favorable outcomes are possible with early diagnosis, surgical intervention, and appropriate antibiotic management. Clinicians must be familiar with the diagnostic criteria and management options for septic arthritis. Most patients require multiple procedures to effectively eradicate infection. When the original reconstructed graft cannot be salvaged, a staged anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction revision is required.

  19. Return to Play Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Morris, Ryan C; Hulstyn, Michael J; Fleming, Braden C; Owens, Brett D; Fadale, Paul D

    2016-10-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions are commonly performed in an attempt to return an athlete to sports activities. Accelerated rehabilitation has made recovery for surgery more predictable and shortened the timeline for return to play. Despite success with and advancements in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions, some athletes still fail to return to play. PMID:27543405

  20. Endoscopic Ankle Lateral Ligament Graft Anatomic Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Michels, Frederick; Cordier, Guillaume; Guillo, Stéphane; Stockmans, Filip

    2016-09-01

    Chronic instability is a common complication of lateral ankle sprains. If nonoperative treatment fails, a surgical repair or reconstruction may be indicated. Today, endoscopic techniques to treat ankle instability are becoming more popular. This article describes an endoscopic technique, using a step-by-step approach, to reconstruct the ATFL and CFL with a gracilis graft. The endoscopic technique is reproducible and safe with regard to the surrounding anatomic structures. Short and midterm results confirm the benefits of this technique. PMID:27524711

  1. Reconstruction of medial patellofemoral ligament using quadriceps tendon combined with reconstruction of medial patellotibial ligament using patellar tendon: initial experience☆

    PubMed Central

    Hinckel, Betina Bremer; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe a surgical technique for anatomical reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the quadriceps tendon, combined with reconstruction of the medial patellotibial ligament using the patellar tendon; and to present the initial results from a case series. Method The proposed technique was used on a series of cases of patients with diagnoses of patellofemoral instability and indications for surgical treatment, who were attended by the Knee Group of HC-IOT, University of São Paulo. The following were evaluated before and after the operation: range of motion (ROM), apprehension test, lateral translation test, patellar inclination test, inverted J sign, subluxation upon extension, pain from compression of the patella and pain from contraction of the quadriceps. After the operation, the patients were asked whether any new episode of dislocation had occurred, what their degree of satisfaction with the surgery was (on a scale from 0 to 10) and whether they would be prepared to go through this operation again. Results Seven knees were operated, in seven patients, with a mean follow-up of 5.46 months (±2.07). Four patients who presented apprehension before the operation did not show this after the operation. The lateral translation test became normal for all the patients, while the patellar inclination test remained positive for two patients. The patients with an inverted J sign continued to be positive for this sign. Five patients were positive for subluxation upon extension before the operation, but all patients were negative for this after the operation. None of the patients presented any new episode of dislocation of the patella. All of them stated that they were satisfied: five gave a satisfaction score of 9 and two, a score of 10. All of them said that they would undergo the operation again. Only one patient presented a postoperative complication: dehiscence of the wound. Conclusion Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament

  2. Rehabilitation concerns following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Frndak, P A; Berasi, C C

    1991-11-01

    Rehabilitation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is a subject of controversy in the orthopaedic and rehabilitation literature. With an increasing number of these operations currently being performed and with the advent of arthroscopically assisted ACL reconstruction over the past several years, particular rehabilitation needs and problems have been identified in association with these patients. Various authors have stressed one or a combination of a few basic themes which outline the basic rehabilitation concerns following ACL reconstruction. The most fundamental concern is the need to initiate motion very soon after surgery. Prolonged postoperative immobilisation is known to cause serious complications after ACL reconstruction which can be avoided by early motion. Positions or activities which may apply excessive stress to a newly reconstructed ACL must also be considered. The amount of protection required by the graft will vary depending upon the type of graft used and the quality of fixation obtained intraoperatively. Most authors agree that nonweightbearing, active resistive quadriceps exercises should be avoided for an extended period, while closed chain exercises may be initiated much earlier. Strength recovery is obviously important for the quadriceps postoperatively, but maximal strength returns of all of the muscles about the knee must be pursued. Hamstring strength is of particular concern as this may provide an active support to the reconstructed ACL. Sensory loss in the knee after ACL disruption should also be addressed during rehabilitation, prior to a patient's return to full athletic activity. Progressive neuromuscular re-education exercises which rely on sensory input from intact pericapsular structures are encouraged. A final concern is the role of bracing after ACL reconstruction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1763251

  3. Biomechanical Evaluation of Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Duchman, Kyle R; DeVries, Nicole A; McCarthy, Mark A; Kuiper, Justin J; Grosland, Nicole M; Bollier, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Background The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is the most frequently injured soft tissue structure following acute lateral patellar dislocation. MPFL reconstruction has become a popular option to restore patellar stability following lateral patellar dislocation due to the high incidence of recurrent instability following conservative management. Anatomic reconstruction of the MPFL minimizes graft length changes during full knee range of motion and restores patellar stability. Materials & Methods Four fresh frozen cadaver specimens underwent biomechanical testing in a materials testing machine. With the knee fixed in 30° of flexion, the patella was translated laterally a distance of 10 mm and continuous force-displace- ment data was collected with the intact MPFL and again following a newly described MPFL reconstruction technique. Lateral force-displacement and stiffness data were calculated, allowing comparison between the intact and reconstructed MPFL. Results The average lateral restraining force provided by the intact MPFL was 10.6 ± 5.7, 36.6 ± 2.7, and 69.0 ± 5.9 N while the lateral restraining force following MPFL reconstruction was 0.4 ± 4.3, 50.3 ± 16.3, and 110.2 ± 17.5 N at 1, 5, and 10 mm of lateral displacement, respectively. Conclusion Anatomic MPFL reconstruction displays similar lateral restraining force compared to the intact MPFL at low levels of lateral displacement. At higher levels of displacement, the reconstructed MPFL provides increased lateral restraining force compared to the intact MPFL, improving patellar stability in pathologic knees. PMID:24027463

  4. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction: Fixation Technique Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Russo, Franco; Doan, Joshua; Chase, Derek C; Farnsworth, Christine L; Pennock, Andrew T

    2016-05-01

    Introduction The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is the primary soft-tissue stabilizer of the patella and it is often reconstructed in patients with recurrent patella instability. This biomechanical analysis evaluates the integrity of four methods of MPFL reconstruction subjected to cyclic loading using a porcine model. Methods Four techniques of MPFL reconstruction were analyzed using a 4 mm flexor tendon graft, all with two points of patellar fixation to best recreate the native MPFL anatomy. The four techniques were: (1) interference screw technique, (2) suture anchor technique, (3) converging tunnel technique, and (4) two bone tunnel technique. Maximum load, yield load, and stiffness of the graft fixation/bone complex were analyzed, and statistics were performed with SPSS and significance set at a p-value of < 0.05. Results The converging tunnel technique demonstrated the highest maximum load and yield load, significantly higher than the interference screw or suture anchor groups (p = 0.007). In addition, the converging tunnel technique demonstrated the greatest stiffness with significantly greater stiffness than the two bone tunnel techniques (p = 0.016). Conclusion The combination of strength and stiffness, the avoidance of patella implants, and the creation of a single transosseous tunnel make the converging tunnel technique a desirable technique for MPFL reconstructions. PMID:26190788

  5. Late quadriceps tendon rupture at the donor site following cruciate ligament reconstruction using central quadriceps tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vivek; Madi, Sandesh; Joseph, Amy; Acharya, Kiran

    2015-10-16

    Central quadriceps tendon (CQT) graft has been successfully used as a viable autograft option in cruciate ligament reconstruction of the knee. The prime emphasis in the majority of the literature is given to surgical details of quadriceps graft harvesting and outcome of cruciate ligament reconstruction. There is less discussion about donor site morbidity in CQT graft, and it is less frequent as compared to that in bone patellar tendon bone graft. We report an extremely unusual case of late quadriceps tendon rupture at the donor site following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using CQT graft.

  6. Clinical Outcomes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tibor, Lisa M.; Long, Joy L.; Schilling, Peter L.; Lilly, Ryan J.; Carpenter, James E.; Miller, Bruce S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Clinical outcomes of autograft and allograft anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions are mixed, with some reports of excellent to good outcomes and other reports of early graft failure or significant donor site morbidity. Objective: To determine if there is a difference in functional outcomes, failure rates, and stability between autograft and allograft ACL reconstructions. Data Sources: Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Evidence Based Medicine Reviews Collection), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Web of Science, CINAHL, and SPORTDiscus were searched for articles on ACL reconstruction. Abstracts from annual meetings of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, and Arthroscopy Association of North America were searched for relevant studies. Study Selection: Inclusion criteria for studies were as follows: primary unilateral ACL injuries, mean patient age less than 41 years, and follow-up for at least 24 months postreconstruction. Exclusion criteria for studies included the following: skeletally immature patients, multiligament injuries, and publication dates before 1990. Data Extraction: Joint stability measures included Lachman test, pivot-shift test, KT-1000 arthrometer assessment, and frequency of graft failures. Functional outcome measures included Tegner activity scores, Cincinnati knee scores, Lysholm scores, and IKDC (International Knee Documentation Committee) total scores. Results: More than 5000 studies were identified. After full text review of 576 studies, 56 were included, of which only 1 directly compared autograft and allograft reconstruction. Allograft ACL reconstructions were more lax when assessed by the KT-1000 arthrometer. For all other outcome measures, there was no statistically significant difference between autograft and allograft ACL reconstruction. For all outcome measures, there was strong evidence of statistical heterogeneity between

  7. All-Inside Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: GraftLink Technique

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Matthew R.; Stuart, Michael J.; King, Alexander H.; Sousa, Paul L.; Levy, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries account for nearly 20% of knee ligament injuries. PCL injuries can occur in isolation or, more commonly, in the setting of multiligamentous knee injuries. Isolated PCL disruptions are commonly treated nonoperatively; however, symptomatic grade III injuries, as well as PCL injuries found in multiligamentous injuries, are frequently treated surgically. Several reconstructive techniques exist for the treatment of PCL deficiency without a clear optimal approach. We describe our preferred operative technique to reconstruct the PCL using an all-inside arthroscopic approach with a quadrupled tibialis anterior or peroneus longus allograft with both tibial and femoral suspensory fixation. PMID:26900564

  8. All-Inside Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: GraftLink Technique.

    PubMed

    Prince, Matthew R; Stuart, Michael J; King, Alexander H; Sousa, Paul L; Levy, Bruce A

    2015-10-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries account for nearly 20% of knee ligament injuries. PCL injuries can occur in isolation or, more commonly, in the setting of multiligamentous knee injuries. Isolated PCL disruptions are commonly treated nonoperatively; however, symptomatic grade III injuries, as well as PCL injuries found in multiligamentous injuries, are frequently treated surgically. Several reconstructive techniques exist for the treatment of PCL deficiency without a clear optimal approach. We describe our preferred operative technique to reconstruct the PCL using an all-inside arthroscopic approach with a quadrupled tibialis anterior or peroneus longus allograft with both tibial and femoral suspensory fixation. PMID:26900564

  9. Suspensory Anterior Tibial Fixation in the Anatomic Transtibial Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Elazab, Ashraf; Lee, Yong Seuk; Kang, Seo Goo

    2016-01-01

    The transtibial technique is the most relevant among many surgical techniques for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and many types of fixation devices are used for tibial fixation according to the technique and the length of the graft. However, bone density in the fixation areas should be taken into consideration when choosing the fixation device to achieve rigid and stable fixation. However, density is not a substantial issue for anteromedial cortical fixation using a cortical suspension device. We describe tibial fixation with a TightRope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL), which is a cortical suspension device, in anatomic transtibial posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. PMID:27073781

  10. Bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft versus LARS artificial ligament for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyun; Wen, Hong; Wang, Lide; Ge, Tichi

    2013-10-01

    The optimized graft for use in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is still in controversy. The bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft has been accepted as the gold standard for ACL reconstruction. However, donor site morbidities cannot be avoided after this treatment. The artificial ligament of ligament advanced reinforcement system (LARS) has been recommended for ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this study is to compare the midterm outcome of ACL reconstruction using BPTB autografts or LARS ligaments. Between July 2004 and March 2006, the ACL reconstruction using BPTB autografts in 30 patients and LARS ligaments in 32 patients was performed. All patients were followed up for at least 4 years and evaluated using the Lysholm knee score, Tegner score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, and KT-1000 arthrometer test. There were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to the data of Lysholm scores, Tegner scores, IKDC scores, and KT-1000 arthrometer test at the latest follow-up. Our study demonstrates that the similarly good clinical results are obtained after ACL reconstruction using BPTB autografts or LARS ligaments at midterm follow-up. In addition to BPTB autografts, the LARS ligament may be a satisfactory treatment option for ACL rupture.

  11. Combined Intra- and Extra-articular Reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament: The Reconstruction of the Knee Anterolateral Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2015-01-01

    We present a new technique for the combined intra- and extra-articular reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. Intra-articular reconstruction is performed in an outside-in manner according to the precepts of the anatomic femoral tunnel technique. Extra-articular reconstruction is performed with the gracilis tendon while respecting the anatomic parameters of the origin and insertion points and the path described for the knee anterolateral ligament. PMID:26258037

  12. Surgical treatment of posterior cruciate ligament insufficiency in the United States.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dean; Berger, Neal; Cohen, Jeremiah R; Lord, Elizabeth L; Wang, Jeffrey C; Hame, Sharon L

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the latest trends and demographics of surgical treatment of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) insufficiency in the United States. Patients who underwent surgical treatment of PCL insufficiency from 2007 to 2011 were identified by searching the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes and Current Procedural Terminology codes in the PearlDiver Patient Records Database (PearlDiver Technologies, Warsaw, Indiana), a publicly available national database of insurance records. The chronicity of injury, year of procedure, age, sex, region of the United States the surgery was performed, and other concomitant meniscus and ligamentous operations were elicited for each patient. In total, 701 cases of surgical PCL procedures (222 isolated and 479 combined) were identified. More PCL surgeries were completed for acute injuries (74%) than for chronic injuries (26%). Among associated procedures, meniscectomies and meniscus repairs were performed for 293 (41%) and 51 (7%) patients, respectively. Meniscectomies were completed in 77 (35%) isolated reconstructions vs 216 (45%) combined reconstructions (P=.01; odds ratio, 0.65). Of the combined PCL surgeries, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)/PCL was the most common (62%), followed by ACL/PCL/collateral ligament repair (11%) and PCL/other ligamentous reconstruction (9%). No specific trends were observed in the yearly number of PCL procedures performed. The peak number of isolated PCL surgeries was observed in a younger age group (20-29 years) than that of combined PCL surgeries (30-39 years) (P<.01). Surgical treatment for PCL insufficiency remains reserved for acute multiligamentous knee injuries, with ACL/PCL operations being the most common combined procedure.

  13. Evidence based medicine in clinical practice: how to advise patients on the influence of age on the outcome of surgical anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Sloane, P; Brazier, H; Murphy, A; Collins, T; Best, T

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine, using a literature search, whether patient age influences the outcome of surgical reconstruction of a torn anterior cruciate ligament. Methods: Medline (1966 to present) was searched using the PubMed interface, Embase (1974 to present) using the Datastar system, and the Cochrane Library at the Update Software web site. Papers retrieved from the three databases were independently assessed by two reviewers using preliminary inclusion criteria. Reference lists of papers satisfying the preliminary criteria were then scanned and appropriate papers reviewed. Any new papers in turn had their reference lists scanned, this process continuing until no new papers were identified. Final inclusion criteria were then applied to all papers satisfying the preliminary inclusion criteria. Results: The initial search identified 661 papers. Exclusion of duplicates produced 536 unique papers. Medline contained 445, Embase 185, and the Cochrane Library 31. Of the 536, 523 were assessed by abstract and 12 by full text; one paper was not retrieved. Application of the preliminary inclusion criteria produced 33 papers. Their reference lists contained 950 references. Scanning of these added six new papers to the dataset. These six had their reference lists assessed; no new papers were identified. Four of the 39 papers in the completed dataset satisfied the final inclusion criteria. There was wide variation in the total number of subjects in the four studies, ranging from 22 to 203 patients. The total number of different outcome measures was 17; only one measure was used by all four studies. None of the objective outcome measures showed any significant difference between age groups, and the subjective measures, which did show differences, were contradictory. A total of 108 interlibrary loans were requested, by a full time researcher, at a total cost of IR£432.00 over a 10 week period. Conclusions: When advising patients on the outcome of anterior cruciate ligament

  14. Adaptation Strategies of Individuals With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Roper, Jaimie A.; Terza, Matthew J.; Tillman, Mark D.; Hass, Chris J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the strong implications for rehabilitation design, the capability of individuals with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) to adapt and store novel gait patterns have not been well studied. Purpose: To investigate how reconstructive surgery may affect the ability to adapt and store novel gait patterns in persons with ACLR while walking on a split-belt treadmill. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Gait adaptation was compared between 20 participants with ACLR and 20 healthy controls during split-belt treadmill walking. Gait adaptation was assessed in slow- and fast-adapting parameters by (1) the magnitude of symmetry during late adaptation and (2) the amount of the asymmetry during de-adaptation. Results: Healthy individuals adapted a new walking pattern and stored the new walking pattern equally in both the dominant and nondominant limbs. Conversely, individuals with ACLR displayed impairments in both slow-adapting and fast-adapting derived gait adaptation and significant differences in behavior between the reconstructed and uninjured limb. Conclusion: While surgical reconstruction and physical therapy are aimed at improving mechanical stability to the knee, the study data suggest that fundamental features of motor control remain altered. After ACLR, participants display an altered ability to learn and store functional gait patterns. PMID:26894200

  15. Gait patterns after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bulgheroni, P; Bulgheroni, M V; Andrini, L; Guffanti, P; Giughello, A

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse the changes in select gait parameters following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The study was performed on 15 subjects who underwent ACL reconstruction by the bone-patellar tendon-bone technique. Gait analysis was performed using the Elite three-dimensional (3D) optoelectronic system (BTS), a Kistler force platform and the Telemg telemetric electromyograph (BTS). Kinematic data were recorded for the principal lower limb joints (hip, knee and ankle). The examined muscles include vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris and semitendinosus. The results obtained from the operated subjects were compared with those of 10 untreated subjects and 5 subjects without ACL damage. In the operated subjects the knee joint angular values regained a normal flexion pattern for the injured limb during the stance phase. The analysis of joint moments shows: (a) sagittal plane: recovery of the knee flexion moment at loading response and during preswing; (b) frontal plane: recovery of the normal patterns for both hip and knee adduction-abduction moments during the entire stance phase. The examination of ground reaction forces reveals the recovery of frontal component features. The EMG traces show the normal biphasic pattern for the operated subjects as compared to the untreated subjects. The results suggest that the gait parameters shift towards normal value patterns.

  16. Digital infrared thermal imaging following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Barker, Lauren E; Markowski, Alycia M; Henneman, Kimberly

    2012-03-01

    This case describes the selective use of digital infrared thermal imaging for a 48-year-old woman who was being treated by a physical therapist following left anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with a semitendinosus autograft. PMID:22383168

  17. Current Trends in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Review.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Ingole, Sachin; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is an accepted and established surgical technique for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and is now being practiced across the globe in increasing numbers. Although most patients get good to excellent results in the short-term after ACLR, its consequences in the long-term in prevention or acceleration of knee osteoarthritis (OA) are not yet well-defined. Still, there are many debatable issues related to ACLR, such as the appropriate timing of surgery, graft selection, fixation methods of the graft, operative techniques, rehabilitation after surgery, and healing augmentation techniques. Most surgeons prefer not to wait long after an ACL injury to do an ACLR, as delayed reconstruction is associated with secondary damages to the intra- and periarticular structures of the knee. Autografts are the preferred choice of graft in primary ACLR, and hamstring tendons are the most popular amongst surgeons. Single bundle ACLR is being practiced by the majority, but double bundle ACLR is getting popular due to its theoretical advantage of providing more anatomical reconstruction. A preferred construct is the interference fixation (Bio-screw) at the tibial site and the suspensory method of fixation at the femoral site. In a single bundle hamstring graft, a transportal approach for creating a femoral tunnel has recently become more popular than the trans-tibial technique. Various healing augmentation techniques, including the platelet rich plasma (PRP), have been tried after ACLR, but there is still no conclusive proof of their efficacy. Accelerated rehabilitation is seemingly more accepted immediately after ACLR. PMID:26697280

  18. Current Trends in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Ingole, Sachin; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is an accepted and established surgical technique for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and is now being practiced across the globe in increasing numbers. Although most patients get good to excellent results in the short-term after ACLR, its consequences in the long-term in prevention or acceleration of knee osteoarthritis (OA) are not yet well-defined. Still, there are many debatable issues related to ACLR, such as the appropriate timing of surgery, graft selection, fixation methods of the graft, operative techniques, rehabilitation after surgery, and healing augmentation techniques. Most surgeons prefer not to wait long after an ACL injury to do an ACLR, as delayed reconstruction is associated with secondary damages to the intra- and periarticular structures of the knee. Autografts are the preferred choice of graft in primary ACLR, and hamstring tendons are the most popular amongst surgeons. Single bundle ACLR is being practiced by the majority, but double bundle ACLR is getting popular due to its theoretical advantage of providing more anatomical reconstruction. A preferred construct is the interference fixation (Bio-screw) at the tibial site and the suspensory method of fixation at the femoral site. In a single bundle hamstring graft, a transportal approach for creating a femoral tunnel has recently become more popular than the trans-tibial technique. Various healing augmentation techniques, including the platelet rich plasma (PRP), have been tried after ACLR, but there is still no conclusive proof of their efficacy. Accelerated rehabilitation is seemingly more accepted immediately after ACLR. PMID:26697280

  19. REHABILITATION PROTOCOL AFTER ISOLATED POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Leite Cury, Ricardo; Kiyomoto, Henry Dan; Rosal, Gustavo Fogolin; Bryk, Flávio Fernandes; de Oliveira, Victor Marques; de Camargo, Osmar Pedro Arbix

    2015-01-01

    To create a rehabilitation protocol following reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), through a literature review. The literature review was conducted in the Medline and Embase databases, to search for data on biomechanical concepts and analyses relating to the posterior cruciate ligament of the knee. The search strategy was set up using the following rules: problem or injury in association with anatomical location terms; or surgical intervention procedure in association with rehabilitation terms. We began the process in this manner and subsequently introduced restrictions on certain terms to improve the search specificity. To design the protocol, a table was created for better data assessment, based on the time that elapsed between surgery and the start of physiotherapy. A rehabilitation protocol was created to improve weight-bearing control in the initial weeks after surgery, with the aid of a knee brace. Our aim was to achieve gains in total range of motion of the knee, which should be attained by the third month, thereby avoiding contractures resulting from the tissue healing process. Strengthening exercises and sensory-motor training were guided accordingly, thus avoiding overload on the graft and respecting the healing phases. The protocol proposed through this review was based on the current evidence relating to this subject. PMID:27047844

  20. REHABILITATION PROTOCOL AFTER ISOLATED POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION.

    PubMed

    de Paula Leite Cury, Ricardo; Kiyomoto, Henry Dan; Rosal, Gustavo Fogolin; Bryk, Flávio Fernandes; de Oliveira, Victor Marques; de Camargo, Osmar Pedro Arbix

    2012-01-01

    To create a rehabilitation protocol following reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), through a literature review. The literature review was conducted in the Medline and Embase databases, to search for data on biomechanical concepts and analyses relating to the posterior cruciate ligament of the knee. The search strategy was set up using the following rules: problem or injury in association with anatomical location terms; or surgical intervention procedure in association with rehabilitation terms. We began the process in this manner and subsequently introduced restrictions on certain terms to improve the search specificity. To design the protocol, a table was created for better data assessment, based on the time that elapsed between surgery and the start of physiotherapy. A rehabilitation protocol was created to improve weight-bearing control in the initial weeks after surgery, with the aid of a knee brace. Our aim was to achieve gains in total range of motion of the knee, which should be attained by the third month, thereby avoiding contractures resulting from the tissue healing process. Strengthening exercises and sensory-motor training were guided accordingly, thus avoiding overload on the graft and respecting the healing phases. The protocol proposed through this review was based on the current evidence relating to this subject.

  1. [Method of surgical treatment of stenosing ligamentitis of fingers].

    PubMed

    Dzatseeva, D V; Titarenko, I V

    2008-01-01

    The authors present results of surgical treatment of patients with stenosing ligamentitis of fingers using different methods. A new method of operative treatment is described. The strategy of decision on this method is grounded, its practicability and results of treatment. PMID:18411674

  2. Biomechanics of the anterior cruciate ligament: Physiology, rupture and reconstruction techniques.

    PubMed

    Domnick, Christoph; Raschke, Michael J; Herbort, Mirco

    2016-02-18

    The influences and mechanisms of the physiology, rupture and reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) on kinematics and clinical outcomes have been investigated in many biomechanical and clinical studies over the last several decades. The knee is a complex joint with shifting contact points, pressures and axes that are affected when a ligament is injured. The ACL, as one of the intra-articular ligaments, has a strong influence on the resulting kinematics. Often, other meniscal or ligamentous injuries accompany ACL ruptures and further deteriorate the resulting kinematics and clinical outcomes. Knowing the surgical options, anatomic relations and current evidence to restore ACL function and considering the influence of concomitant injuries on resulting kinematics to restore full function can together help to achieve an optimal outcome.

  3. Biomechanics of the anterior cruciate ligament: Physiology, rupture and reconstruction techniques

    PubMed Central

    Domnick, Christoph; Raschke, Michael J; Herbort, Mirco

    2016-01-01

    The influences and mechanisms of the physiology, rupture and reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) on kinematics and clinical outcomes have been investigated in many biomechanical and clinical studies over the last several decades. The knee is a complex joint with shifting contact points, pressures and axes that are affected when a ligament is injured. The ACL, as one of the intra-articular ligaments, has a strong influence on the resulting kinematics. Often, other meniscal or ligamentous injuries accompany ACL ruptures and further deteriorate the resulting kinematics and clinical outcomes. Knowing the surgical options, anatomic relations and current evidence to restore ACL function and considering the influence of concomitant injuries on resulting kinematics to restore full function can together help to achieve an optimal outcome. PMID:26925379

  4. Autograft versus allograft in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Shun-Li; Yuan, Zhi-Fang; Ning, Guang-Zhi; Yang, Bo; Li, Hai-Liang; Sun, Jing-Cheng; Feng, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is considered as the standard surgical procedure for the treatment of ACL tear. However, there is a crucial controversy in terms of whether to use autograft or allograft in ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to compare autograft with allograft for patients undergoing ACL reconstruction. Methods: PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were searched for randomized controlled trials that compared autograft with allograft in ACL reconstruction up to January 31, 2016. The relative risk or mean difference with 95% confidence interval was calculated using either a fixed- or random-effects model. The risk of bias for individual studies according to the Cochrane Handbook. The trial sequential analysis was used to test the robustness of our findings and get more conservative estimates. Results: Thirteen trials were included, involving 1636 participants. The results of this meta-analysis indicated that autograft brought about lower clinical failure, better overall International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) level, better pivot-shift test, better Lachman test, greater Tegner score, and better instrumented laxity test (P < 0.05) than allograft. Autograft was not statistically different from allograft in Lysholm score, subjective IKDC score, and Daniel 1-leg hop test (P > 0.05). Subgroup analyses demonstrated that autograft was superior to irradiated allograft for patients undergoing ACL reconstruction in clinical failure, Lysholm score, pivot-shift test, Lachman test, Tegner score, instrumented laxity test, and subjective IKDC score (P < 0.05). Moreover, there were no significant differences between autograft and nonirradiated allograft. Conclusions: Autograft is superior to irradiated allograft for patients undergoing ACL reconstruction concerning knee function and laxity, but there are no significant differences between autograft and nonirradiated allograft. However

  5. Return to sport following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Feller, Julian; Webster, Kate E

    2013-02-01

    Rates of return to pre-injury sport following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are less than might be expected from standard outcome measures and there appears to be a rapid decline in sporting participation after two to three years. There are many factors that influence whether an individual will return to sport following this type of surgery. They include not only surgical details and rehabilitation, but also social and psychological factors, as well as demographic characteristics. Age is of particular importance with older patients being less likely to resume their pre-injury sport. It is important that future research clearly identify the pre-injury characteristics of the study cohort when investigating return to sport, and also that there is consistent and precise terminology used to report rates of return to sporting activities. Little is known about how to determine when it is safe to return to sport following ACL reconstruction or how to predict whether an athlete will be able to successfully return to sport. Finally, it needs to be recognised that return to sport following ACL reconstruction is associated with a risk of further injury and the development of osteoarthritis.

  6. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in patients older than 35 years.

    PubMed

    El-Sallakh, Sameh; Pastides, Philip; Thomas, Panos

    2014-12-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is an increasingly established method even in patients older than 35 years. Our hypothesis is that functional outcome after ACL reconstruction is comparable in patients younger and older than 35 years. A total of 28 patients (5 women and 23 men) with average age of 41.5 years (36-68) were retrospectively evaluated. The average follow-up period was 33 months. All of them were treated operatively with arthroscopic single-bundle four-strand hamstring tendon autograft. The functional outcome was determined by clinical scores (Tegner activity scale and Lysholm knee score). The median values for the Lysholm knee score were preoperatively 77 and postoperatively 96 points (range, 90-100) with significant improvement (p < 0.05) and that for the Tegner activity scale were preoperatively 4.6 points (range, 3-6), which is the same pre- and postoperatively with an overall return to baseline for all patients. No significant correlation between functional outcome and patients' age was present and no reported significant complications. The good results and a high level of patient satisfaction show that ACL reconstruction is justified even in patients (older than 35 years) with symptomatic anterior knee instability. We commonly propose surgical treatment in symptomatic patients who express the need to restore their preinjury activity levels, regardless of their age.

  7. Intraarticular iliotibial band reconstruction for anterior cruciate ligament insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Yost, J G; Chekofsky, K; Schoscheim, P; Nolan, P; Slovin, H; Scott, W N

    1981-01-01

    Intraarticular reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament by transferring the distal aspect and insertion of the iliotibial band has been clinically successful. Our surgical technique theoretically retains normal neurovascular supply, and thus, the potential for dynamic repair exists. Thirty-five patients, 28 men and 7 women, underwent this reconstruction. The average age was 24 years, with a range from 18 to 46. There were 27 chronic and 8 acute injuries. Pathological findings included an absent anterior cruciate (14 knees), severe stretching (13), failed reconstruction or repair (4), midportion tears (3), and avulsion (1). Postoperative patients were evaluated according to the Kennedy criteria. An anterior drawer of 2+ was not observed in any patient. There were no cases of 2+ rotary instability, and no pivot shifts. The possibility of a dynamic or proprioceptive repair was assessed by electromyography. While no evidence of electrical activity was recorded on the gluteus maximus on 60 normal knee examinations, all 10 tested postoperative iliotibial band patients had electrical activity. The failed results of the series showed no evidence of activity.

  8. Arthroscopic All-Inside Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Overcoming the "Killer Turn".

    PubMed

    Vasdev, Attique; Rajgopal, Ashok; Gupta, Himanshu; Dahiya, Vivek; Tyagi, Vipin Chand

    2016-06-01

    One of the most challenging arthroscopic surgical procedures is posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction. PCL injuries account for 20% of all knee ligament-related injuries. These may be isolated or occur as part of poly-ligament injuries. With the possibility of PCL reconstruction with the all-inside technique, there has been a surge in interest in treating PCL injuries. With the PCL being one of the strongest ligaments in the body and a primary restraint to posterior translation of the tibia, the need for PCL reconstruction is being more and more recognized. Surgeons often find it difficult to negotiate the so-called killer turn while attempting arthroscopic PCL reconstruction. We describe the use of the GraftLink graft construct through the posteromedial portal in 7 patients (6 male and 1 female patient) with isolated PCL injuries, which we believe not only allows us to perform the all-inside PCL reconstruction but also does away with the difficulty of the killer turn encountered while performing the arthroscopic PCL reconstruction.

  9. [Rehabilitation after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Smékal, D; Kalina, R; Urban, J

    2006-12-01

    Rehabilitation is an important part of therapy in patients who have had arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. A well-designed rehabilitation program avoids potential graft damage and speeds up patients' return to their full function level. The course of rehabilitation depends on the type of surgery, mode of fixation and possible co-existing injury to the knee's soft tissues. The rehabilitation program presented here is based on the present-day knowledge of neurophysiological and biomechanical principles and is divided into five phases. In the pre-operative phase (I), the main objective is to prepare patients for surgery in terms of maximum muscle strength and range of motion. It also includes providing full information on the procedure. In the early post-operative phase (II) we are concerned with pain alleviation and reduction of knee edema. After suture removal we begin with soft techniques for the patella and post-operative physical therapy to reduce scarring. In the next post-operative phase (III) patients are able to walk with their full weight on the extremity operated on, and we continue doing exercises that improve flexor/extensor co-contraction. In this phase we also begin with exercises improving the patient's proprioceptive and sensorimotor functions. In the late post-operative phase (IV) we go on with exercises promoting proprioception of both lower extremities with the aim of increasing muscle control of the knee joints. In the convalescent phase (V) patients gradually return to their sports activities.

  10. Failure of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Samitier, Gonzalo; Marcano, Alejandro I; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Cugat, Ramon; Farmer, Kevin W; Moser, Michael W

    2015-10-01

    The present review classifies and describes the multifactorial causes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery failure, concentrating on preventing and resolving such situations. The article particularly focuses on those causes that require ACL revision due to recurrent instability, without neglecting those that affect function or produce persistent pain. Although primary ACL reconstruction has satisfactory outcome rates as high as 97%, it is important to identify the causes of failure, because satisfactory outcomes in revision surgery can drop to as much as 76%. It is often possible to identify a primary or secondary cause of ACL surgery failure; even the most meticulous planning can give rise to unexpected findings during the intervention. The adopted protocol should therefore be sufficiently flexible to adapt to the course of surgery. Preoperative patient counseling is essential. The surgeon should limit the patient's expectations for the outcome by explaining the complexity of this kind of procedure. With adequate preoperative planning, close attention to details and realistic patient expectations, ACL revision surgery may offer beneficial and satisfactory results for the patient. PMID:26550585

  11. Failure of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Samitier, Gonzalo; Marcano, Alejandro I.; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Cugat, Ramon; Farmer, Kevin W; Moser, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The present review classifies and describes the multifactorial causes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery failure, concentrating on preventing and resolving such situations. The article particularly focuses on those causes that require ACL revision due to recurrent instability, without neglecting those that affect function or produce persistent pain. Although primary ACL reconstruction has satisfactory outcome rates as high as 97%, it is important to identify the causes of failure, because satisfactory outcomes in revision surgery can drop to as much as 76%. It is often possible to identify a primary or secondary cause of ACL surgery failure; even the most meticulous planning can give rise to unexpected findings during the intervention. The adopted protocol should therefore be sufficiently flexible to adapt to the course of surgery. Preoperative patient counseling is essential. The surgeon should limit the patient’s expectations for the outcome by explaining the complexity of this kind of procedure. With adequate preoperative planning, close attention to details and realistic patient expectations, ACL revision surgery may offer beneficial and satisfactory results for the patient. PMID:26550585

  12. Arthroscopically assisted combined anterior and posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, G C; Giannotti, B F; Edson, C J

    1996-02-01

    This article presents the minimum 2-year results (range, 24 to 48 months) of 20 arthroscopically assisted combined anterior cruciate ligament/posterior cruciate ligament (ACL/PCL) reconstructions, evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively using the Tegner, Lysholm, and Hospital for Special Surgery knee ligament rating scales, and the KT 1000 knee ligament arthrometer (Medmetric Corp, San Diego, CA). There were 16 men or boys, 4 women or girls; 9 right, 11 left; 10 acute, and 10 chronic knee injuries. Ligament injuries included 1 ACL/PCL tear, 2 ACL/PCL/medial collateral ligament (MCL)/posterior lateral corner tears. 7 ACL/PCL/MCL tears, and 10 ACL/PCL/posterior lateral corner tears. ACLs were reconstructed using autograft or allograft patellar tendons. PCLs were reconstructed using allograft Achilles tendon, or autograft patellar tendon. MCL tears were successfully treated with bracing. Posterior lateral instability was successfully treated with long head of the biceps femoris tendon tenodesis. Tegner, Lysholm, and Hospital for Special Surgery knee ligament rating scales significantly improved preoperatively to postoperatively (P = .0001). Corrected anterior KT 1000 measurements improved from preoperative to postoperative status (P = .0078).

  13. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a look at prosthetics - past, present and possible future

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas, Randy; MacDonald, Peter B.

    2008-01-01

    Biological tissue autograft reconstruction using the patellar tendon or quadrupled semitendinosus/gracilis tendons has become the most popular procedure in surgical treatment of a ruptured ACL. This article provides a review of the history of the use of prosthetics with respect to ACL reconstruction grafts including Carbon Fibre, Gore-Tex and Dacron prosthetics as well as the Leeds-Keio Artificial Ligament and the Kennedy Ligament Augmentation Device (LAD). Emphasis is placed on the Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS) as preliminary investigations of its use have been encouraging. Significant progress has been made recently with respect to the understanding of ACL anatomy, composition, biomechanics, and healing processes, leading to innovative techniques using approaches based in tissue engineering principles and computer – assisted surgery. While research into improved ACL treatment options continues, the synthesis of recent advancements provides a new optimism towards the regeneration of an ACL mirroring its original stability, function, and longevity. PMID:18523530

  14. Factors Associated with Infection Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Brophy, Robert H.; Wright, Rick W.; Huston, Laura J.; Nwosu, Samuel K.; Spindler, Kurt P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although rare, infection can be devastating after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to test the association between infection after ACL reconstruction and potential risk factors such as age, body mass index (BMI), smoking, diabetes, and graft choice. Methods: We reviewed the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) cohort from 2002 to 2005 to identify patients with a postoperative infection. The age, BMI, smoking status, history of diabetes, and graft choice were recorded for each patient. A multivariable regression analysis was constructed to examine which baseline risk factors were independently associated with postoperative infection after ACL reconstruction requiring surgical intervention. Results: There were 2198 eligible patients in the cohort, with seventeen (0.8%) reporting a postoperative infection. Diabetes was found to be a significant risk factor for infection (odds ratio [OR] = 18.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.8 to 94.0; p < 0.001). Compared with bone-tendon-bone autograft, both hamstring autograft and other grafts (e.g., the majority of allografts, with some that were both autograft and allograft) also increased the risk of infection (OR = 4.6 [95% CI = 1.2 to 17.9; p = 0.026] for hamstrings and 4.3 [95% CI = 1.0 to 18.1; p = 0.047] for other grafts). Although the OR for infection in smokers was 2.5, this finding did not reach significance. Conclusions: Patients with diabetes undergoing ACL reconstruction have a significantly elevated risk of postoperative infection (18.8-times higher odds) compared with that for patients without diabetes. Use of bone-tendon-bone autograft is associated with a lower risk of infection after ACL reconstruction. Level of Evidence: Prognostic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:25788300

  15. Repair and reconstruction of the lateral ulnar collateral ligament.

    PubMed

    Bonnaig, Nicholas S; Throckmorton, Thomas Quin

    2015-01-01

    Lateral ulnar collateral ligament repair and reconstruction are techniques used to treat posterolateral rotatory instability of the elbow. The choice to perform repair versus reconstruction is typically dependent on the chronicity of the injury and the quality of tissue available at the time of surgery.

  16. Anatomic Reconstruction Technique for a Plantar Calcaneonavicular (Spring) Ligament Tear.

    PubMed

    Palmanovich, Ezequiel; Shabat, Shay; Brin, Yaron S; Feldman, Viktor; Kish, Benny; Nyska, Meir

    2015-01-01

    Acquired flatfoot deformity in adults is usually due to partial or complete tearing of the posterior tibial tendon, with secondary failure of other structures such as the plantar calcaneonavicular (spring) ligament (SL), which maintain the medial longitudinal arch. In flexible cases, the tibialis posterior can be replaced with the flexor digitorum longus. It is common practice to suture the SL directly in the case of a tear; however, if the tear is complete, suturing directly to the ligament alone will not be possible. Reconstruction of the ligament is needed; however, no validated methods are available to reconstruct this ligament. The operative technique of SL reconstruction described in this report as a part of acquired flatfoot deformity reconstruction consists of augmenting remnants of the spring from the navicularis to the sustentaculum tali and suspending it to the medial malleolus using 2-mm-wide, long-chain polyethylene suture tape. This technique results in the firm anatomic reconstruction of the SL, in addition to "classic" medial arch reconstruction. We recommend SL reconstruction for medial arch reconstruction when the SL is torn. PMID:26253476

  17. Graft selection in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Miller, Suzanne L; Gladstone, James N

    2002-10-01

    Selecting the appropriate graft for ACL reconstruction depends on numerous factors including surgeon philosophy and experience, tissue availability (affected by anatomical anomalies or prior injury or surgery), and patient activity level and desires. Although the patella tendon autograft has the widest experience in the literature, and is probably the most commonly used graft source, this must be tempered with the higher reported incidences of potential morbidity and pitfalls associated with its use. The hamstring tendons are gaining increasing popularity, mostly due to reduced harvest morbidity and improved soft tissue fixation techniques, and many recent studies in the literature report equal results to BTB ACL reconstruction with respect to functional outcome and patient satisfaction. On the other hand, many of these studies report higher degrees of instrument (KT-100) tested laxity for hamstring reconstruction, and some have reported lower returns to preinjury levels of activity. One question that remains to be addressed is how closely objectively measured laxity tests correlate with subjectively assessed outcomes and ability to return to high levels of competitive sports. Allograft use, which decreased in popularity during the 1990s, appears to be undergoing a resurgence, with better sterilization processes and new graft sources (tibialis tendons), leading to increased availability and improved fixation techniques. The benefits of decreased surgical morbidity and easier rehabilitation must be weighed against the potential for greater failure of biologic incorporation, infection, and possibly slower return to activities. In our practice, for high-demand individuals (those playing cutting, pivoting, or jumping sports and skiing) BTB tends to be the graft of choice. For lower demand or older individuals, hamstring reconstructions will be performed. Allograft tissue will be used in older individuals (generally over 45 years old), those with signs of arthritis (and

  18. Graft selection in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Miller, Suzanne L; Gladstone, James N

    2002-10-01

    Selecting the appropriate graft for ACL reconstruction depends on numerous factors including surgeon philosophy and experience, tissue availability (affected by anatomical anomalies or prior injury or surgery), and patient activity level and desires. Although the patella tendon autograft has the widest experience in the literature, and is probably the most commonly used graft source, this must be tempered with the higher reported incidences of potential morbidity and pitfalls associated with its use. The hamstring tendons are gaining increasing popularity, mostly due to reduced harvest morbidity and improved soft tissue fixation techniques, and many recent studies in the literature report equal results to BTB ACL reconstruction with respect to functional outcome and patient satisfaction. On the other hand, many of these studies report higher degrees of instrument (KT-100) tested laxity for hamstring reconstruction, and some have reported lower returns to preinjury levels of activity. One question that remains to be addressed is how closely objectively measured laxity tests correlate with subjectively assessed outcomes and ability to return to high levels of competitive sports. Allograft use, which decreased in popularity during the 1990s, appears to be undergoing a resurgence, with better sterilization processes and new graft sources (tibialis tendons), leading to increased availability and improved fixation techniques. The benefits of decreased surgical morbidity and easier rehabilitation must be weighed against the potential for greater failure of biologic incorporation, infection, and possibly slower return to activities. In our practice, for high-demand individuals (those playing cutting, pivoting, or jumping sports and skiing) BTB tends to be the graft of choice. For lower demand or older individuals, hamstring reconstructions will be performed. Allograft tissue will be used in older individuals (generally over 45 years old), those with signs of arthritis (and

  19. Synthetic grafts for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Rizzello, Giacomo; Berton, Alessandra; Fumo, Caterina; Maltese, Ludovica; Khan, Wasim S; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2013-11-01

    Several artificial biomaterials are available as ligament grafts. No ideal prosthesis mimicking natural human tissue have been found to date. The emerging field of tissue engineering holds the promise to use artificial ligaments as a viable alternative to the patellar or hamstring tendon autografts. Preliminary studies support the idea that these biomaterials have the ability to provide an alternative for autogenous grafts. However, no definitive conclusions have been found. Additionally, the incidence of postoperative complications varies within different studies. Prospective investigations are required to better understand the potential of artificial biomaterials as ligament grafts.

  20. Functional results from reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using the central third of the patellar ligament and flexor tendons☆

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Leao, Marcos George; Pampolha, Abelardo Gautama Moreira; Orlando Junior, Nilton

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate knee function in patients undergoing reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using the central third of the patellar ligament or the medial flexor tendons of the knee, i.e. quadruple ligaments from the semitendinosus and gracilis (ST-G), by means of the Knee Society Score (KSS) and the Lysholm scale. Methods This was a randomized prospective longitudinal study on 40 patients who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction between September 2013 and August 2014. They comprised 37 males and three females, with ages ranging from 16 to 52 years. The patients were numbered randomly from 1 to 40: the even numbers underwent surgical correction using the ST-G tendons and the odd numbers, using the patellar tendon. Functional evaluations were made using the KSS and Lysholm scale, applied in the evening before the surgical procedure and six months after the operation. Results From the statistical analysis, it could be seen that the patients’ functional capacity was significantly greater after the operation than before the operation. There was strong evidence that the two forms of therapy had similar results (p = >0.05), in all the comparisons. Conclusions The results from the ACL reconstructions were similar with regard to functional recovery of the knee and improvement of quality of life, independent of the type of graft. It was not possible to identify the best method of surgical treatment. The surgeon's clinical and technical experience and the patient are the factors that determine the choice of graft type for use in ACL surgery. PMID:27218084

  1. The 5-Strand Hamstring Graft in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Rushyuan Jay; Ganley, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in the pediatric and adolescent population has been increasing in recent years. Autograft hamstring graft is favored in this population, but these patients often have smaller hamstring tendons that yield smaller final graft constructs. These smaller grafts are associated with an increased need for revision surgery. We describe a technique for obtaining a larger-diameter anterior cruciate ligament graft construct from autologous hamstring graft without allograft supplementation. PMID:25473619

  2. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction Using a Femoral Loop Button Fixation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Godin, Jonathan A.; Karas, Vasili; Visgauss, Julia D.; Garrett, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction is a common procedure used to treat both acute and chronic patellar instability. Although many variations of MPFL reconstruction have been described, there is no consensus regarding the optimal surgical technique. We describe a technique for MPFL reconstruction with a looped gracilis tendon autograft using suture anchors to secure the graft to the patella and a suspensory loop button system for fixation to the femur. This technique replicates the native shape of the MPFL while minimizing the risk of patellar fracture and allowing for gradual tensioning of the graft. PMID:26900561

  3. Cable-Augmented, Quad Ligament Tenodesis Scapholunate Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bain, Gregory I; Watts, Adam C; McLean, James; Lee, Yu C; Eng, Kevin

    2015-11-01

    Maintaining reduction of the scapholunate interval after reconstruction can be difficult. The authors performed scapholunate reconstruction using tensionable suture anchors in 8 patients. The anchors provide a fixed cable that both fixes the graft, and reduces the scapholunate diastasis and maintains reduction. The flexor carpi radialis tendon graft stabilizes not only the volar scaphotrapezial ligament, and dorsal scapholunate ligament, but also the dorsal intercarpal and dorsal radiocarpal ligament. The Berger flap is closed using an ulnar advancement capsulodesis that further reinforces the dorsal intercarpal and dorsal radiocarpal ligament. The mean pain score improved from 5.8 to 2.1. Mean extension was 56° (91% of contralateral side), flexion 44° (70% of contralateral side), and grip strength was 41kg (95% of the contralateral side). The mean scapholunate angle was 71°, radiolunate angle 16° and scapholunate interval 3.0 mm. The cable augmented, quad ligament scapholunate ligament reconstruction offers theoretical advantages but long term follow up is required.

  4. Combined Reconstruction of the Medial Patellofemoral Ligament With Quadricipital Tendon and the Medial Patellotibial Ligament With Patellar Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Hinckel, Betina Bremer; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2016-01-01

    Although the medial patellotibial ligament (MPTL) has been neglected regarding its function in patellar stability, recently, its importance in terminal extension and during flexion has been recognized. Indications for reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament combined with the MPTL are extension subluxation, flexion instability, children with anatomic risk factors for patellar instability, and knee hyperextension associated with generalized laxity. We describe a combined reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament with quadricipital tendon and reconstruction of the MPTL with patellar tendon autografts. PMID:27073782

  5. Anterolateral Ligament of the Knee: Back to the Future in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; D’Amelio, Andrea; Pellegrino, Pietro; Rosso, Federica; Rossi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Although the importance of the anterolateral stabilizing structures of the knee in the setting of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries has been recognized since many years, most of orthopedic surgeons do not take into consideration the anterolateral structures when performing an ACL reconstruction. Anatomic single or double bundle ACL reconstruction will improve knee stability, but a small subset of patients may experience some residual anteroposterior and rotational instability. For this reason, some researchers have turned again towards the anterolateral aspect of the knee and specifically the anterolateral ligament. The goal of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge regarding the anterolateral ligament of the knee, including anatomy, histology, biomechanics and imaging. In addition, the most common anterolateral reconstruction/tenodesis techniques are described together with their respective clinical outcomes. PMID:26330991

  6. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Autologous Hamstring

    PubMed Central

    Grawe, Brian M.; Williams, Phillip N.; Burge, Alissa; Voigt, Marcia; Altchek, David W.; Hannafin, Jo A.; Allen, Answorth A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent clinical investigations have identified inadequate autograft hamstring graft diameter (<8 mm) to be predictive of failure after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Purpose/Hypothesis: The objective of this study was to determine the utility of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) variables of the hamstring tendons for the prediction of graft diameter at the time of surgery. The hypothesis was that cross-sectional area (CSA) of the hamstring tendon measured on MRI could accurately predict graft diameter, and threshold measurements could be established to predict graft diameter at the time of surgery. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A total of 84 consecutive skeletally mature patients prospectively enrolled in our ACL reconstruction patient registry were identified for study purposes. Patients were included if they underwent an MRI of the affected knee at our institution prior to ACL reconstruction with hamstring (HT) autograft. Graft preparation was performed via a standard quadrupled hamstring technique after harvesting both the gracilis and semitendinosus (4-GST). The smallest diameter end of the HT autograft was then utilized for measurement analysis. Total CSA was calculated for both hamstring tendons using the “region of interest tool” on the corresponding proton density–weighted axial image of the knee at the widest condylar dimension. Three independent reviewers measured the MRI scans so that intra- and interrater reliability of the measurements could be determined. A trend analysis was then undertaken to establish correlations between the MRI CSA and graft diameter. Predictive analysis was then performed to establish threshold MRI measurement values for specific graft diameters and determine whether any patient-specific factors would affect graft diameter (age, sex, and body mass index). Results: Mean patient age at the time of surgery was 36 years (range, 11

  7. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Williams, John; Hutt, Jonathan; Rickman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This report details the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in an 18-year-old man with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). The reduced mechanical properties of the tissue in EDS can pose a challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon. In this case, we describe the use of a hamstring autograft combined with a Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS). There was a good radiographical, clinical, and functional outcome after two years. This technique gave a successful outcome in the reconstruction of the ACL in a patient with EDS and therefore may help surgeons faced with the same clinical scenario. PMID:26221555

  8. Arthroscopically assisted anatomical coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction using tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yon-Sik; Seo, Young-Jin; Noh, Kyu-Cheol; Patro, Bishu Prasad; Kim, Do-Young

    2011-07-01

    We describe a method of arthroscopically assisted, mini-open, anatomical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligament. This method restores both components of the native ligament with the aim of achieving maximum stability with minimal disruption of the normal anatomy. Using the same principles of ligament reconstruction that are employed in other joints, transosseous tunnels are created following the native footprints of the conoid and trapezoid ligaments and an autologous graft is fixed using a PEEK screw. Adequate healing of the ligament occurs within the bone, to prevent stress risers with an appropriate working length. This procedure is unique, as it replaces the torn ligament with a natural substitute, in the appropriate location, through a minimally invasive procedure. This technique would be suitable for treatment of patients with either grade III or V acute acromioclavicular dislocations. Clinical outcomes for the first 13 consecutive patients treated with this procedure are reported, revealing excellent satisfaction rates with a Constant score of 96.6 at final follow-up.

  9. Reconstruction of the Scapholunate Ligament Using Capitohamate Bone-Ligament-Bone.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toshiyasu; Abe, Koji; Iwamoto, Takuji; Ochi, Kensuke; Sato, Kazuki

    2015-11-01

    Background The biomechanical properties of the capitohamate (CH) ligament are equivalent to those of the scapholunate (SL) interosseous ligament. We reconstructed the SL ligament using the CH bone-ligament-bone substitute for chronic injury of the SL ligament. Patients and Methods Beginning in 2008, 15 wrists of 14 patients with an average age of 38 years underwent this procedure with a minimum follow-up of 2 years. Thirteen wrists had an SL joint gap more than 3 mm, and two had a complete SL ligament disruption with a severe dorsal intercalated segment instability (DISI) deformity. Kirschner wires (K-wires) were removed 8 weeks after the surgery, then active ROM exercise began. Pain (on visual analog scale [VAS]), wrist motion (angle), radiographic characteristics, such as SL gap (mm) and SL angle, and Modified Mayo Wrist Score (MMWS) were evaluated. Technique The SL joint was reduced by manipulation or with the use of joysticks, then temporary fixed with K-wires. A dorsal trough was then made between the scaphoid and the lunate. The proximal half of the CH ligament was harvested with attached bone from the capitate and hamate (CH bone-ligament-bone), inset into the SL trough, and fixed firmly with 1.2-mm diameter titanium screws in the scaphoid and lunate, respectively. Results The VAS improved from 77 preoperatively to 12 postoperatively. The average wrist extension/flexion was 74°/60°. There was no ossification of the reconstructed SL at the final follow-up. The SL gap improved from an average of 4.8 mm to an average of 2.1 mm, and the SL angle changed from 67° to 55°. The MMWS improved to 82 points postoperatively from a preoperative average of 47 with eight excellent, five good, and two fair results.

  10. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Patients with Generalized Joint Laxity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Kumar, Praveen

    2010-01-01

    Generalized joint laxity is a genetically determined component of overall joint flexibility. The incidence of joint laxity in the overall population is approximately 5% to 20%, and its prevalence is higher in females. Recently it was noticed that individuals with generalized joint laxity are not only prone to anterior cruciate ligament injuries but also have inferior results after a reconstruction. Therefore, an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in patients with generalized laxity should be undertaken with caution due to the higher expected failure rate from the complexity of problems associated with this condition. It is also necessary to identify the risk factors for the injury as well as for the post operative outcome in this population. A criterion that includes all the associated components is necessary for the proper screening of individuals for generalized joint laxity. Graft selection for an anterior cruciate reconstruction in patients with ligament laxity is a challenge. According to the senior author, a hamstring autograft is an inferior choice and a double bundle reconstruction with a quadriceps tendon-bone autograft yields better results than a single bundle bone-patella tendon-bone autograft. Future studies comparing the different grafts available might be needed to determine the preferred graft for this subset of patients. Improved results after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction can be achieved by proper planning and careful attention to each step beginning from the clinical examination to the postoperative rehabilitation. PMID:20808583

  11. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in patients with generalized joint laxity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Kumar, Praveen; Kim, Sung-Hwan

    2010-09-01

    Generalized joint laxity is a genetically determined component of overall joint flexibility. The incidence of joint laxity in the overall population is approximately 5% to 20%, and its prevalence is higher in females. Recently it was noticed that individuals with generalized joint laxity are not only prone to anterior cruciate ligament injuries but also have inferior results after a reconstruction. Therefore, an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in patients with generalized laxity should be undertaken with caution due to the higher expected failure rate from the complexity of problems associated with this condition. It is also necessary to identify the risk factors for the injury as well as for the post operative outcome in this population. A criterion that includes all the associated components is necessary for the proper screening of individuals for generalized joint laxity. Graft selection for an anterior cruciate reconstruction in patients with ligament laxity is a challenge. According to the senior author, a hamstring autograft is an inferior choice and a double bundle reconstruction with a quadriceps tendon-bone autograft yields better results than a single bundle bone-patella tendon-bone autograft. Future studies comparing the different grafts available might be needed to determine the preferred graft for this subset of patients. Improved results after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction can be achieved by proper planning and careful attention to each step beginning from the clinical examination to the postoperative rehabilitation.

  12. Anatomic Reconstruction of the Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Using the Fascia Lata as an Autograft

    PubMed Central

    Haupert, Alexander; Lorbach, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) ensures stability of the patella against lateral forces. In cases of recurrent lateral patellar luxation, surgical reconstruction of the MPFL has an important role in treating lateral patellar instability. Several biomechanical studies have presented valuable pieces of information about various techniques for re-creating this medial patellofemoral complex mainly using the gracilis tendon as an autograft. However, with the increasing number of MPFL reconstructions, there are also an increasing number of patients requiring revision MPFL reconstruction. Therefore alternative graft options may become more relevant. Furthermore, the gracilis tendon as a tubular graft may not be able to fully restore patellofemoral kinematics compared with the native MPFL. This article introduces a surgical technique using the fascia lata as an alternative graft option for the anatomic reconstruction of the MPFL. PMID:25973375

  13. Minimally Invasive Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction in the Setting of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    PubMed

    Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Barbosa, Nuno Camelo; Tuteja, Sanesh; Daggett, Matt; Kajetanek, Charles; Thaunat, Mathieu

    2016-02-01

    Recent evidence on the anatomy, function, and biomechanical properties of the anterolateral ligament has led to the recognition of the importance of this structure in the rotational control of the knee. This article describes a technique that allows for minimally invasive anterolateral ligament reconstruction as a complement to most techniques of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. A gracilis tendon autograft is harvested and prepared in a double-strand, inverted V-shaped graft. The graft is percutaneously placed through a femoral stab incision, and each strand is then passed deep to the iliotibial band, emerging through each tibial stab incision. After the femoral-end loop graft is fixed, the tibial fixation of each strand is performed in full extension for optimal isometry. PMID:27274456

  14. Compartment syndrome with mononeuropathies after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kindle, Brett J; Murthy, Naveen; Stolp, Kathryn

    2015-05-01

    Compartment syndrome rarely follows anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. However, when it does, it may result in mononeuropathies that are amenable to neurolysis. The authors of this study present an 18-yr-old woman who sustained a right anterior cruciate ligament tear and underwent uneventful anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using femoral and popliteal nerve blocks. Postoperatively, she developed compartment syndrome requiring emergent fasciotomies. At 11 wks after fasciotomy, results of electrophysiologic tests showed evidence of severe fibular and tibial neuropathies. Magnetic resonance images showed extensive tricompartmental myonecrosis. Fibular and tibial neurolysis as well as decompression were performed, followed by intensive outpatient rehabilitation. At the 6-mo follow-up, she reported resolution of pain as well as significant improvement in sensation, strength, and function. Early recognition and intervention are crucial to prevent serious neurologic damage. Excessive tourniquet pressure and anesthetic nerve blocks may have been responsible.

  15. Interfascicular reconstruction of the peroneal nerve after knee ligament injury.

    PubMed

    McMahon, M S; Craig, S M

    1994-06-01

    Peroneal palsy is the most common lower extremity nerve injury. Although most studies emphasize particularly poor prognosis after traction injuries to the peroneal nerve, interfascicular nerve grafting has emerged as a promising technique. We describe the case of a 20-year-old man who sustained a traction injury to the peroneal nerve (0/5 foot dorsiflexion and eversion) concomitant with tears of the anterior cruciate and lateral collateral ligaments. Interfascicular sural nerve grafting (10-14 cm in length) was performed 7 months after injury and 6 months after ligament reconstruction. The patient recovered motor strength (4+/5) in both anterior and lateral compartments by 2 years' postsurgery. The results obtained indicate that interfascicular nerve grafting is a valuable technique for reconstruction of the disrupted peroneal nerve; it provides sufficient benefit to justify the time, expense, and effort involved. An aggressive approach is thus recommended in patients with peroneal nerve disruption in the setting of multiple knee ligament injuries.

  16. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Patients with Generalized Joint Laxity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Chang, Ji-Hoon

    2008-01-01

    Generalized joint laxity has been considered a risk factor causing late failure of reconstructed anterior cruciate ligaments, although it is unknown whether that is the case for reconstructed posterior cruciate ligaments. We hypothesized patients with generalized joint laxity, compared with those without laxity, would have similar postoperative knee stability, range of motion, and functional scores after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The Beighton and Horan criteria were used to determine generalized joint laxity. We enrolled 24 patients with generalized joint laxity (Group L) and 29 patients without any positive findings of joint laxity (Group N) matched by gender and age. The average side-by-side differences of posterior tibial translation were 4.72 mm in Group L and 3.63 mm in Group N. We observed no differences in posterior tibial translation with differing graft materials or combined procedures. In Group L the International Knee Documentation Committee score was normal in 12.5% and nearly normal in 45.8% whereas in Group N, 24.1% were normal and 55.2% nearly normal. Patients with generalized joint laxity showed more posterior laxity than patients without joint laxity. Generalized joint laxity therefore appears to be a risk factor associated with posterior laxity after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Level of Evidence: Level III, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18843524

  17. Editorial Commentary: Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Auto or Allo?

    PubMed

    Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-01-01

    Considerable controversy exists regarding appropriate graft choice for patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Allografts pretreated with high-dose irradiation should be avoided. Otherwise, multiple factors should be considered to individualize patient decision making, including patient age and activity level, graft type, and fixation type. PMID:26743418

  18. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction in a Below-Knee Amputee

    PubMed Central

    El-Tawil, Sherif; Elfons Tawafig, Marian; Miles, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Patellar instability is a common finding in patients with below-knee amputation and yet management options are not commonly described in the literature. We describe the first reported case of a medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction using allograft in a patient with a below-knee amputation. Clinical outcome at two-year follow-up remains very good. PMID:26579321

  19. Editorial Commentary: Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Auto or Allo?

    PubMed

    Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-01-01

    Considerable controversy exists regarding appropriate graft choice for patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Allografts pretreated with high-dose irradiation should be avoided. Otherwise, multiple factors should be considered to individualize patient decision making, including patient age and activity level, graft type, and fixation type.

  20. Anatomic Double-Bundle Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Nitri, Marco; Civitarese, David; Dean, Chase S; Moulton, Samuel G; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is known to be the main posterior stabilizer of the knee. Anatomic single-bundle PCL reconstruction, focusing on reconstruction of the larger anterolateral bundle, is the most commonly performed procedure. Because of the residual posterior and rotational tibial instability after the single-bundle procedure and the inability to restore the normal knee kinematics, an anatomic double-bundle PCL reconstruction has been proposed in an effort to re-create the native PCL footprint more closely and to restore normal knee kinematics. We detail our technique for an anatomic double-bundle PCL reconstruction using Achilles and anterior tibialis tendon allografts. PMID:27284530

  1. Surgical Reconstruction of Radiation Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Patients with cancer receive benefits from radiation therapy; however, it may have adverse effects on normal tissue such as causing radiation-induced ulcer and osteoradionecrosis. The most reliable method to treat a radiation ulcer is wide excision of the affected tissue, followed by coverage with well-vascularized tissue. As usual, radiation-induced skin ulcers are due to therapeutic irradiation for residual cancer or lymph nodes; the locations of radiation ulcers are relatively limited, including the head, neck, chest wall, lumbar, groin, and sacral areas. Thus, suitable reconstructive methods vary according to functional and aesthetic conditions. I reviewed the practices and surgical results for radiation ulcers over the past 30 years, and present the recommended surgical methods for these hard-to-heal ulcers. Recent Advances: At a minimum, flaps are required to treat radiation ulcers. Surgeons can recommend earlier debridement, followed by immediate coverage with axial-pattern musculocutaneous and fasciocutaneous flaps. Free flaps are also a useful soft tissue coverage option. The choice of flap varies with the location and size of the wounds. Critical Issues: The most crucial procedure is the complete resection of the radiation-affected area, followed by coverage with well-vascularized tissue. Future Directions: Recent developments in perforator flap techniques, which are defined as flaps with a blood supply from isolated perforating vessels of a stem artery, have allowed the surgeons to successfully resurface these difficult wounds with reduced morbidity. PMID:24761342

  2. The sacrotuberous and the sacrospinous ligament--a virtual reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hammer, N; Steinke, H; Slowik, V; Josten, C; Stadler, J; Böhme, J; Spanel-Borowski, K

    2009-10-01

    Little is known about the morphometric properties of the sacrotuberous ligament (ST) and the sacrospinous ligament (SS). The influence of ligaments on pelvic stability and the extent of reconstruction in case of instability are controversially discussed. The ST and the SS of 55 human subjects fixed in alcohol solution and of four fresh cadavers were measured. Both ligaments were defined as geometric figures. The ST was a contorted bifrustum, while the SS was a contorted frustum, both with elliptic planes. In all cases investigated, the ST and the SS fibres were twisted. For men, the ST and the SS had a mean length of 64 and 38 mm. For women, lengths of 70 and 46 mm were measured in the ST and the SS. The ST length, height and cross-sectional area showed gender-specific differences at statistically significant level. The ST and the SS volumes correlated closely, regardless of gender or side. Measurements of fresh ligaments of four unfixed cadavers showed similar results. The data obtained were then used to generate computer-based three-dimensional models of both ligaments, using the Catia software. Conclusively, the virtually generated ST and SS are suitable models to be included in pelvic fracture simulation, using the finite element method.

  3. Effectiveness of interference screw fixation in ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Carl W

    2008-07-01

    Ulnar collateral ligament disruptions of the elbow are increasingly common for athletes involved in overhead sports. One newer reconstructive technique combines the use of a biotenodesis screw for ulnar fixation with the docking procedure for humeral fixation referred to as the DANE procedure. Biomechanical evaluations have determined that the combined procedure has properties similar to previous methods, but few comparative clinical studies have been performed. The current study compares the DANE procedure to a traditional method of ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction with a medium range follow-up. Twelve ulnar collateral ligament reconstructions were observed for a minimum of 21 months. Six reconstructions were performed using bone tunnels on the ulna. The other 6 used a biotenodesis interference screw on the ulna. Both groups used the docking procedure on the humerus. Identical rehabilitation phases were followed by both groups. Attention was paid not only to the time to return to play and the level able to be returned to but also to interoperative differences, including tourniquet time. We concluded that the DANE reconstruction is an appropriate and effective method. Results are similar to those achieved with a traditional reconstructive method. The study also demonstrates that tourniquet time and, therefore, operative time is less for the DANE procedure.

  4. Editorial Commentary: Medial Collateral Ligament and Posteromedial Corner Reconstruction Techniques Vary and Indications Are Not Clear.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-11-01

    Medial collateral ligament (MCL) and posteromedial corner (PMC) reconstruction techniques vary. Anatomic reconstruction results in outcomes superior to nonanatomic reconstruction, but it remains unclear as to when reconstruction is indicated versus MCL and PMC primary repair. PMID:26542207

  5. Histological characteristics and ultrastructure of polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament after the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shao-Bin; Yang, Rong-Hua; Zuo, Zhong-Nan; Dong, Qi-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament were the remnant of LARS ligament used for repairing posterior cruciate ligament obtained from operation. We want to study histological characteristics and ultrastructure of polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament after the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament in rabbits. Therefore, we replaced the original ACL with polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament which was covering with the remnant of ACL in 9 rabbits (L-LARS group), while just only polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament were transplanted in 3 rabbits (LARS group) with the remnant of ACL. Compared with group LARS, inflammatory cell reaction and foreign body reaction were more significant in group L-LARS. Moreover, electron microscopy investigation showed the tissue near LARS fibers was highly cellular with a matrix of thin collagen fibrils (50-100 nm) in group L-LARS. These above findings suggest the polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament possess the high biocompatibility, which contributes to the polyethylene terephthalate LARS covered with recipient connective tissues. PMID:25356104

  6. Combined anterior cruciate ligament and posterolateral reconstruction of the knee using allograft tissue in chronic knee injuries.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Gregory C; Fanelli, David G; Edson, Craig J; Fanelli, Matthew G

    2014-10-01

    Combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterolateral injury of the knee can result in significant functional instability for the affected individual. Both components of the instability must be treated to maximize the probability of success for the surgical procedure. Higher failure rates of the ACL reconstruction have been reported when the posterolateral instability has been left untreated. The purpose of this article is to describe our surgical technique, and present the results of 34 chronic combined ACL posterolateral reconstructions in 34 knees using allograft tissue, and evaluating these patient outcomes with KT 1000 knee ligament arthrometer, Lysholm, Tegner, and Hospital for Special Surgery knee ligament rating scales. In addition, observations regarding patient demographics with combined ACL posterolateral instability, postoperative range of motion loss, postinjury degenerative joint disease, infection rate, return to function, and the use of radiated and nonirradiated allograft tissues will be presented.

  7. Combined anterior cruciate ligament and posterolateral reconstruction of the knee using allograft tissue in chronic knee injuries.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Gregory C; Fanelli, David G; Edson, Craig J; Fanelli, Matthew G

    2014-10-01

    Combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterolateral injury of the knee can result in significant functional instability for the affected individual. Both components of the instability must be treated to maximize the probability of success for the surgical procedure. Higher failure rates of the ACL reconstruction have been reported when the posterolateral instability has been left untreated. The purpose of this article is to describe our surgical technique, and present the results of 34 chronic combined ACL posterolateral reconstructions in 34 knees using allograft tissue, and evaluating these patient outcomes with KT 1000 knee ligament arthrometer, Lysholm, Tegner, and Hospital for Special Surgery knee ligament rating scales. In addition, observations regarding patient demographics with combined ACL posterolateral instability, postoperative range of motion loss, postinjury degenerative joint disease, infection rate, return to function, and the use of radiated and nonirradiated allograft tissues will be presented. PMID:24949986

  8. MEDIAL PATELLOFEMORAL LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION TO TREAT RECURRENT PATELLAR DISLOCATION

    PubMed Central

    Gonçaives, Matheus Braga Jacques; Júnior, Lúcio Honório de Carvalho; Soares, Luiz Fernando Machado; Gonçaives, Tiago Jacques; dos Santos, Rogério Luciano; Pereira, Marcelo Lobo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present a new technique for reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) in patients with recurrent patellar dislocation and to evaluate the clinical findings from this. Methods: Between January 2007 and January 2008, 23 patients underwent reconstruction of the MPFL with a free graft from the semitendinosus tendon. After a minimum of 24 months of follow-up, 22 patients were evaluated using the Kujala and Lysholm clinical protocols. Results: The mean follow up was 26.2 months. According to the Lysholm protocol, the patients had a mean score of 53.72 points preoperatively and 93.36 points postoperatively (p = 0.000006). According to the Kujala protocol, the mean score was 59.81 points preoperatively and 83.54 points postoperatively (p = 0.002173). Conclusion: Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the proposed technique showed excellent results over the short term, when evaluated by means of clinical protocols. PMID:27027005

  9. Psychological Factors Associated With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Christino, Melissa A.; Fleming, Braden C.; Machan, Jason T.; Shalvoy, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Psychological factors may have underappreciated effects on surgical outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction; however, few studies have investigated the relationship between specific psychological factors, objective clinical data, and patient-oriented outcomes. Purpose: Psychological factors are significantly associated with patient perceptions and functional outcomes after ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate relationships between self-esteem, health locus of control, and psychological distress with objective clinical outcomes, patient-oriented outcomes, and return to sport. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Twenty-seven patients who were 6 to 24 months post–computer-assisted ACL reconstruction by a single surgeon consented to participate in the study (52% response rate). Participants had a 1-time visit with a physician consisting of: a physical examination, a single-leg hop test, KT-1000 arthrometer measurements, and survey completion. Psychological measures included the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and Brief Profile of Mood States. Outcome measures included the Tegner activity scale, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Score, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score–Quality of Life subscale (KOOS-QOL), and Short Form–36 (SF-36). Patient charts were also reviewed for pertinent operative details. Results: The mean age of patients (±SD) was 25.7 ± 8.4 years, and the mean duration of time since surgery was 16.5 ± 5.9 months. The majority (89%) of the patients identified themselves as athletes, and of these, 65% reported returning to sports at a competitive level. Sport returners were found to have higher levels of self-esteem (P = .002) and higher reported KOOS-QOL scores (P = .02). Self-esteem was significantly associated with IKDC scores (r = 0.46, P < .05), KOOS-QOL scores (r = 0

  10. Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with quadriceps tendon autograft: clinical outcome in 4-7 years.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hwa; Chuang, Tai-Yuan; Wang, Kun-Chuang; Chen, Wen-Jer; Shih, Chun-Hsiung

    2006-11-01

    Surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is indicated in the ACL-deficient knee with symptomatic instability and multiple ligaments injuries. In the present study, we describe the clinical results of quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft for ACL reconstruction. From 1996 to 1998, the graft has been used in 38 patients. Thirty-four patients with complete final follow-up for 4-7 years were analyzed. The average follow-up time was 62 (48-84) months. Thirty-two patients (94%) achieved good or excellent results by Lysholm knee rating. Twenty-six patients (76%) could return to moderate or strenuous activity after reconstruction. Twenty-eight patients (82%) had ligament laxity of less than 2 mm. Finally; 31 patients (91%) were assessed as normal or nearly normal rating by IKDC guideline. Twenty-five patients (73%) had less than 10 mm difference in thigh girth between their reconstructed and normal limbs. Thirty-two (94%) and 31 (91%) patients could achieve recovery of the extensor and flexor muscle strength in the reconstructed knee to 80% or more of normal knee strength, respectively. A statistically significant difference exists in thigh girth difference, extensor strength ratio, and flexor strength ratio before and after reconstruction. Tunnel expansion with more than 1 mm was identified in 2 (6%) tibial tunnels. Our study revealed satisfactory clinical subjective and objective results at 4-7 years follow-up. Quadriceps tendon autograft has the advantage of being self-available, relatively easier arthroscopic technique, and having a suitable size, making it an acceptable graft choice for ACL reconstruction. There is little quadriceps muscle strength loss after quadriceps harvest. A quadriceps tendon-patellar autograft is an adequate graft choice to ACL reconstruction.

  11. Allograft safety in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Steven B; Sekiya, Jon K

    2007-10-01

    Allograft tissue seems to provide an excellent option for reconstruction of the ACL in the primary and revision setting. Although in general the risks of using allograft tissue in ACL reconstruction are low, the consequences of complications associated with disease or infection transmission or of recurrent instability secondary to graft failure are large. Surgeons should provide patients with the information available regarding allograft risks and should have thorough knowledge of the source and preparation of the grafts by their tissue bank before implantation for ACL reconstruction.

  12. Allograft safety in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Steven B; Sekiya, Jon K

    2007-10-01

    Allograft tissue seems to provide an excellent option for reconstruction of the ACL in the primary and revision setting. Although in general the risks of using allograft tissue in ACL reconstruction are low, the consequences of complications associated with disease or infection transmission or of recurrent instability secondary to graft failure are large. Surgeons should provide patients with the information available regarding allograft risks and should have thorough knowledge of the source and preparation of the grafts by their tissue bank before implantation for ACL reconstruction. PMID:17920955

  13. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. Method: We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance images to reconstruct solid bones and attachments of ligaments, and assemble femoral and tibial components according representative literatures and operational specifications. Dynamic data of axial tibial rotation and femoral translation from full-extension to 135 were measured for analyzing the motion of knee models. Findings: The computational simulation results show that comparing with the posterior cruciate ligament retained knee model and the posterior cruciate ligament substituted knee model, reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament improves the posterior movement of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation through a full range of flexion. The maximum posterior translations of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee are 15.3 mm, 4.6 mm and 20.6 at 135 of flexion. Interpretation: Reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty has been approved to be an more efficient way of maintaining normal knee kinematics comparing to posterior cruciate ligament retained and posterior cruciate ligament substituted total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27347334

  14. Ligament-muscle reflex arc after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: electromyographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Biedert, R M; Zwick, E B

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a ligament-muscle reflex arc exists between the bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and the hamstring muscle group. We studied four patients, average age 34.2 years (range 32-36 years). The mean time between the ACL reconstruction and the study examination was 56.2 months (range 5-108 months). All patients underwent a second-look arthroscopy for meniscal injuries, cyclops lesions, or adhesions. Five patients with a normal ACL served as a control group before we performed an arthroscopic meniscectomy. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was measured using fine wire electrodes under two different testing conditions. No unequivocal EMG activity could be detected in the ACL-reconstructed knees when we pulled on the graft or in the controls. Three of four patients and all controls felt pain when we touched the graft or normal ACL or applied strain on it with the hook. In conclusion, the ACL autograft presents a noxious sensory innervation, the Lachman test maneuver stimulates a reflex arc with hamstrings activation, and an unequivocal ligament-muscle reflex arc from the graft to the hamstring muscle group could not be demonstrated. PMID:9833113

  15. Tibial cyst formation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zabala, Ibon López; Solsona, Sergi Sastre

    2014-10-01

    The patient was a 31-year-old man who had undergone anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction of the right knee 2 years prior using a hamstring autograft, with tibial fixation achieved using a bioabsorbable interference screw. Evaluation of the region by radiography revealed widening of the tibial tunnel, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed cystic formation in the tibial tunnel and the fragmentation of the bioabsorbable interference screw. PMID:25098192

  16. Anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with quadriceps tendon autograft.

    PubMed

    Rabuck, Stephen J; Musahl, Volker; Fu, Freddie H; West, Robin V

    2013-01-01

    A multitude of graft options exist including both allograft and autograft sources for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. With recent concerns regarding the early graft failure and cost-effectiveness of allograft sources, more attention has been directed toward autograft options. However, autograft harvest has been associated with specific morbidity that can result in suboptimal outcomes. The quadriceps tendon is an excellent biomechanical and biologic option.

  17. Bilateral medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction in high-level athletes.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yuichi; Matsushita, Takehiko; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Kawakami, Yohei; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Kuroda, Ryosuke

    2014-10-01

    This report presents two cases of high-level athletes with bilateral patellar dislocations who were able to return to their preinjury level of activity after bilateral medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction, without any major complications. Patient 1 was a 19-year-old male volleyball player for a top-level college volleyball team, and patient 2 was a 24-year-old woman who was a member of a national-level adult softball team. MPFL reconstruction could be an effective treatment for bilateral patellar dislocation in high-level athletes. Level of evidence V.

  18. Lateral collateral ligament reconstruction for chronic varus instability of the hallux interphalangeal joint.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jaeho

    2014-01-01

    Chronic varus instability of the hallux interphalangeal joint is a rare injury, and only a few reports of this injury have been published. In some studies, this injury has been related to taekwondo. Taekwondo is an essential martial art in the Korean military. We have described a case of varus instability of the hallux interphalangeal joint in a professional soldier who had practiced taekwondo for 5 years and the surgical outcome after reconstruction of the lateral collateral ligament with the fourth toe extensor tendon.

  19. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft tendons.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Sabrina M; MacGillivray, John D; Warren, Russell F

    2003-01-01

    Allograft tissue allows reconstruction of the ACL without the donor site morbidity that can be caused by autograft harvesting. Patients who must kneel as a part of their occupation or chosen sport are particularly good candidates for allograft reconstruction. Patients over 45 years of age and those requiring revision ACL surgery can also benefit from the use and availability of allograft tendons. In some cases, patients or surgeons may opt for allograft tendons to maximize the result or morbidity ratio. Despite advances in cadaver screening and graft preparation, there remain risks of disease transmission and joint infection after allograft implantation. Detailed explanation and informed consent is vitally important in cases in which allograft tissue is used.

  20. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft tendons.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Sabrina M; MacGillivray, John D; Warren, Russell F

    2003-01-01

    Allograft tissue allows reconstruction of the ACL without the donor site morbidity that can be caused by autograft harvesting. Patients who must kneel as a part of their occupation or chosen sport are particularly good candidates for allograft reconstruction. Patients over 45 years of age and those requiring revision ACL surgery can also benefit from the use and availability of allograft tendons. In some cases, patients or surgeons may opt for allograft tendons to maximize the result or morbidity ratio. Despite advances in cadaver screening and graft preparation, there remain risks of disease transmission and joint infection after allograft implantation. Detailed explanation and informed consent is vitally important in cases in which allograft tissue is used. PMID:12735200

  1. Ultrastructure of periprosthetic Dacron knee ligament tissue. Two cases of ruptured anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Salvi, M; Velluti, C; Misasi, M; Bartolozzi, P; Quacci, D; Dell'Orbo, C

    1991-04-01

    Light- and electron-microscopic investigations were performed on two failed Dacron ligaments that had been removed from 2 patients shortly after failure of the implant 2-3 years after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. Two different cell populations and matrices were correlated with closeness to the Dacron threads. Fibroblasts surrounded by connective tissue with collagen fibrils were located far from the Dacron threads. Roundish cells, appearing to be myofibroblasts surrounded by a more lax connective tissue and elastic fibers, were found close to the Dacron threads. The presence of myofibroblasts and the matrix differentiation could be attributed to the different mechanical forces acting on the Dacron and on the connective tissue because of their different coefficients of elasticity. The sparse occurrence of inflammatory cells in the synovial membrane and in the connective tissue surrounding the Dacron supports the biologic inertness of this artificial material. However, the repair tissue was not structured to resist tension stresses.

  2. RANDOMIZED PROSPECTIVE STUDY COMPARING TRANSVERSE AND EXTRACORTICAL FIXATION IN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Guarilha, Eduardo; de Andrade Fígaro Caldeira, Paulo Roberto; de Almeida Lira Neto, Ozorio; Navarro, Marcelo Schmidt; Milani, Antonio; Filho, Mario Carneiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study had the objective of prospectively comparing transverse fixation (Cross-Pin™) with extracortical fixation (EZLoc™) for the femur, in surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament, from a clinical, biomechanical and functional point of view. Methods: Between April 2007 and November 2009, 50 patients with acute or chronic anterior cruciate ligament injuries underwent arthroscopic reconstruction using the homologous flexor tendons (gracilis and semitendinosus). Randomization of the femoral fixation method was done by means of a draw at the time of the procedure. Patients were excluded if they presented multiple ligament lesions, fractures, previous surgery, autoimmune disease and impairment of the contralateral knee. The Lysholm scale, SF36 quality-of-life questionnaire and KT1000™ arthrometer were used. Results: After a mean follow-up of 18.1 months, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups regarding the Lysholm scale and KT1000™ measurements. However, the SF36 questionnaire showed a statistical difference such that transverse fixation was superior regarding pain and vitality. Conclusion: Both techniques were shown to be efficient for transfemoral fixation, but with almost no statistically significant difference between them. We believe that new studies will be necessary for better understanding of these differences. PMID:27042646

  3. Transphyseal anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in a skeletally immature knee using anterior tibialis allograft.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yool; Jang, Soo-Jin; Son, Jung-Hwan

    2011-05-18

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in the skeletally immature individual is being recognized with increasing frequency. Nonoperative treatment of ACL injuries in skeletally immature patients have not been favorable. Surgical treatment options for complete ACL tears include primary ligament repair, extraarticular tenodesis, transphyseal reconstruction, partial transphyseal reconstruction, and physeal-sparing reconstruction. The advantage of transphyseal reconstruction is placement of the graft tissue in an isometric position, which provides better results, according to the literature. The potential disadvantage is angular or limb-length discrepancy caused by physeal violation. Controversy exists in allograft selection about whether bone or soft tissue passes into physes. The use of standard tunnels provides reliable results, but carries the risk of iatrogenic growth disturbance from physeal injury.This article presents 4 cases of transphyseal ACL reconstruction using anterior tibialis allograft in skeletally immature patients that had satisfactory functional outcomes with no growth disturbances. This is the first report of transphyseal ACL reconstruction using anterior tibialis allograft in skeletally immature patients in the English-speaking literature. All patients underwent transphyseal ACL reconstruction using anterior tibialis tendon allograft. None of the patients had angular deformities. No early physeal arrest was measured between the preoperative and postoperative radiographs. At last follow-up, the results of the Lachman test were normal for 3 patients and nearly normal for 1 patient. All patients demonstrated full range of knee motion (comparing the reconstructed knee to the contralateral knee). The results of the pivot-shift test were normal for 3 patients and nearly normal for 1 patient. No patients reported giving way.

  4. Troubleshooting the Femoral Attachment During Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Burrus, M. Tyrrell; Werner, Brian C.; Conte, Evan J.; Diduch, David R.

    2015-01-01

    The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) has been recognized as an important soft tissue restraint in preventing lateral patellar translation. As many patients with acute or chronic patellar instability will have a deficient MPFL, reconstruction of this ligament is becoming more common. Appropriately, significant research has been undertaken regarding graft biomechanics and techniques, as intraoperative errors in graft placement often result in poor patient outcomes. Although the research has not answered all of the dilemmas encountered during reconstruction, publications consistently emphasize the importance of re-establishing an anatomic femoral attachment. The purpose of this study was to briefly review the current literature on MPFL reconstruction. Graft selection and patellar graft attachment and fixation are discussed, but the main focus is the femoral attachment as this is where most errors are seen and, unfortunately, where getting it right appears to matter the most. Using a sawbones knee model, the concepts of an MPFL graft that is “high and tight” or “low and loose” are presented, with the goal of providing physicians with intraoperative tools to adjust an incorrectly placed femoral MPFL attachment. This model is also used to justify the recommendation of graft fixation in 30° to 45° of knee flexion. PMID:26535373

  5. The effect of immediate weightbearing after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tyler, T F; McHugh, M P; Gleim, G W; Nicholas, S J

    1998-12-01

    Immediate weightbearing has been advocated after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and is thought to enhance the return of quadriceps muscle activity and knee extension range of motion without jeopardizing graft integrity. This study examined the effect of immediate weightbearing after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction on the return of vastus medialis oblique electromyography activity, knee extension range of motion, knee stability, physical examination, Lysholm score, and anterior knee pain. Forty-nine patients (24 men and 25 women) undergoing endoscopic central third patella tendon autograft reconstruction were randomized prospectively into two groups. Group 1 patients underwent immediate weightbearing as tolerated. Group 2 patients were kept nonweightbearing for 2 weeks. All measurements were taken before surgery, 2 weeks after surgery, and between 6 and 14 months (average, 7.3 months) followup. There was no effect of weightbearing on knee extension range of motion or vastus medialis oblique function at followup. In addition, knee stability was not compromised after surgery. Seven of 20 (35%) nonweightbearing patients and only two of 25 (8%) immediate weightbearing patients reported anterior knee pain at followup. Overall, immediate weightbearing did not compromise knee joint stability and resulted in a better outcome with a decreased incidence of anterior knee pain.

  6. Thumb Carpometacarpal Arthroplasty with Ligament Reconstruction and Interposition Costochondral Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Trumble, Thomas; Rafijah, Gregory; Heaton, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Background Thumb arthritis at the carpometacarpal (CMC) joint is one of the most common sites of arthritis, especially in women. Thumb arthroplasty is an effective method of relieving pain and improving function. Materials and Methods Qualitative and quantitative outcomes were assessed clinically and radiographically in 58 patients (66 thumbs) with thumb basal joint arthritis limited to the trapeziometacarpal joint, treated with hemiresection arthroplasty of the trapezium, flexor carpi radialis (FCR) ligament reconstruction, and allograft costochondral interposition graft. Description of Technique The thumb CMC joint arthroplasty is performed using an FCR tendon for ligament reconstruction combined with removal of the distal half of the trapezium, which is replaced with a life preserver-shaped spacer that is carved out of allograft cartilage. Results Results of the validated Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire at a mean follow-up time of 56 months (range, 24-103 months) revealed that 90% of the patients had a high level of function with minimal symptoms. Important improvements in web space with increased palmar and radial abduction and grip and pinch strength measurements were observed. The trapeziometacarpal space had decreased 21% after surgery, while trapeziometacarpal subluxation was 14% compared with 21% before surgery. There was an inverse correlation between the loss of trapezial height and subluxation and clinical outcome. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate that, although the preoperative trapezial height was not maintained, the reconstructed thumbs remained stable, with little subluxation and improved clinical outcomes. Level of Evidence IV, retrospective case series PMID:24436820

  7. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction: A Longitudinal Study Comparison of 2 Techniques with 2 and 5-Years Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Astur, Diego C; Gouveia, Gustavo B; Borges, José H. de Souza; Astur, Nelson; Arliani, Gustavo G; Kaleka, Camila C; Cohen, Moises

    2015-01-01

    Background : The purpose of this study was to compare the results of two popular surgical techniques for medial patellofemoral ligament MPFL reconstruction with a minimum of two-year follow-up. Methods : Fifty-eight patients with traumatic tear of the medial patellofemoral ligament were included in one of the two surgical groups. Group 1 MPFLs were reconstructed through graft endobutton fixation and Group 2 through graft anchor fixation into the patella. After two to five-year follow-up, patients were asked to answer knee function questionnaires (Fulkerson and Kujala) as well as the SF-36 life quality score. Results : There were no statistical difference among postoperative Kujala, Fulkerson, and SF-36 questionnaires scores between Groups 1 and 2. There were statistical significant differences favorable to patients in Group 1 with a shorter follow-up length (2-5 years) compared to those with a longer period of 5-10 years for both Kujala and Fulkerson scores and no difference for group 2. Conclusion : Both medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction techniques had similar results in a two to ten-year follow-up according to functions and life quality questionnaires. Furthermore, endobutton fixation for the patellar edge of the graft had better results in patients with 2 years of follow-up than those with 5 years. Gender was not significant for surgical results. Moreover, group 1 patients had higher number of complications. PMID:26161157

  8. Editorial Commentary: Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction--Do Not Abandon the C-Arm Quite Yet.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Timothy J

    2016-03-01

    Accurate tibial tunnel placement using the arthroscopically-assisted anatomic fovea landmark technique in transtibial posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is possible without the use of fluoroscopic imaging. However, until a prospective, randomized controlled trial comparing the C-arm and anatomic fovea landmark techniques is completed, abandonment of the C-arm in posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction cannot be recommended.

  9. Treatment of ligament laxity by electrothermal shrinkage or surgical plication: a morphologic and mechanical comparison.

    PubMed

    Hill, Adam M; Jones, Ioan T; Hansen, Ulrich; Suri, Amrita; Sandison, Ann; Moss, Jill; Wallace, Andrew L

    2007-01-01

    Capsular plication or thermal shrinkage can be used to enhance surgical joint stabilization. We compared mechanical or morphologic properties of the medial collateral ligament of the rabbit knee treated by either bipolar radiofrequency electrothermal shrinkage or surgical plication. After 12 weeks, the medial collateral ligaments were procured from treated and contralateral knees to undergo viscoelastic (creep) testing, quantitative transmission electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry. Creep strain in thermal (1.85% +/- 0.32%) and plicated (1.92% +/- 0.36%) ligaments was almost twice that of the control group (1.04% +/- 0.15%), although there was no difference between treatment modalities. The morphologic parameters of all 3 groups were significantly different (P < .001). The thermal ligaments demonstrated predominantly small fibrils, whereas the plicated group displayed an intermediate distribution of heterogeneous fibrils, suggesting a different pattern of remodeling. Viscoelastic properties are similar after thermal shrinkage or plication, though inferior to those of intact ligaments. PMID:17030129

  10. The effect of graft choice on functional outcome in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sajovic, Matjaz; Strahovnik, Andrej; Komadina, Radko; Dernovsek, Mojca Z

    2008-08-01

    A prospective, randomised, 5-year follow-up study was designed to compare the functional results between patellar tendon and hamstring tendon autografts after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Primary reconstruction was performed in 32 patients using the central third of the patellar ligament and in 32 patients using double-looped semitendinosus and gracilis tendons. All reconstructions were performed by a single surgeon, with identical surgical technique and rehabilitation protocol. Of the total 64 patients in the study, 54 (85%) were available for the 5-year follow-up. No statistically significant differences were seen with respect to Lysholm score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) classification, clinical and KT-2000 arthrometer laxity testing, single-legged hop test and anterior knee pain. Graft rupture occurred in two patients (8%) in the patellar tendon group and in two patients (7%) in the hamstring tendon group; 23 patients (88%) in the patellar tendon group and 23 patients (82%) in the hamstring tendon group returned to their pre-injury activity level. Good subjective outcome and stability can be obtained by using either graft; no statistically significant differences were found in functional outcome between the grafts.

  11. Surgical reconstruction in female genital mutilation.

    PubMed

    Gültekin, İsmail Burak; Altınboğa, Orhan; Dur, Rıza; Kara, Osman Fadıl; Küçüközkan, Tuncay

    2016-06-01

    Female genital mutilation (FGM) is an unusual condition for our country. However, an increase in FGM in future days can be predicted with the increasing numbers of exchange students coming from African countries, migration of refugees and socioeconomic relations with the African countries. We want to share our experience of two FGM victims admitted to our clinic with the request of reconstructive vulvar surgery before their marriage. Both women had WHO Type III FGM. Physical examination findings and surgical reconstruction techniques were presented.

  12. Reconstruction of the ulnar collateral ligament in athletes.

    PubMed

    Jobe, F W; Stark, H; Lombardo, S J

    1986-10-01

    Reconstruction of the ulnar collateral ligament using a free tendon graft was performed on sixteen athletes. All participated in sports that involved throwing (mostly professional baseball), and all had valgus instability of the elbow. After reconstruction and rehabilitation, ten of the sixteen patients returned to their previous level of participation in sports, one returned to a lower level of participation, and five retired from professional athletics. Despite precautions, there was a high incidence of complications related to the ulnar nerve. Two patients had postoperative ulnar neuropathy (one late and one early) that required a secondary operation, but they eventually recovered completely. Three others reported some transient postoperative hypoesthesia along the ulnar aspect of the forearm that resolved after a few weeks or months.

  13. Review of evolution of tunnel position in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Rayan, Faizal; Nanjayan, Shashi Kumar; Quah, Conal; Ramoutar, Darryl; Konan, Sujith; Haddad, Fares S

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is one of the commonest knee sport injuries. The annual incidence of the ACL injury is between 100000-200000 in the United States. Worldwide around 400000 ACL reconstructions are performed in a year. The goal of ACL reconstruction is to restore the normal knee anatomy and kinesiology. The tibial and femoral tunnel placements are of primordial importance in achieving this outcome. Other factors that influence successful reconstruction are types of grafts, surgical techniques and rehabilitation programmes. A comprehensive understanding of ACL anatomy has led to the development of newer techniques supplemented by more robust biological and mechanical concepts. In this review we are mainly focussing on the evolution of tunnel placement in ACL reconstruction, focusing on three main categories, i.e., anatomical, biological and clinical outcomes. The importance of tunnel placement in the success of ACL reconstruction is well researched. Definite clinical and functional data is lacking to establish the superiority of the single or double bundle reconstruction technique. While there is a trend towards the use of anteromedial portals for femoral tunnel placement, their clinical superiority over trans-tibial tunnels is yet to be established. PMID:25793165

  14. Virtual Surgical Planning for Orbital Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Susarla, Srinivas M.; Duncan, Katherine; Mahoney, Nicholas R.; Merbs, Shannath L.; Grant, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The advent of computer-assisted technology has revolutionized planning for complex craniofacial operations, including orbital reconstruction. Orbital reconstruction is ideally suited for virtual planning, as it allows the surgeon to assess the bony anatomy and critical neurovascular structures within the orbit, and plan osteotomies, fracture reductions, and orbital implant placement with efficiency and predictability. In this article, we review the use of virtual surgical planning for orbital decompression, posttraumatic midface reconstruction, reconstruction of a two-wall orbital defect, and reconstruction of a large orbital floor defect with a custom implant. The surgeon managing orbital pathology and posttraumatic orbital deformities can benefit immensely from utilizing virtual planning for various types of orbital pathology. PMID:26692714

  15. An electromyographic analysis of the knee during functional activities. II. The anterior cruciate ligament-deficient and -reconstructed profiles.

    PubMed

    Ciccotti, M G; Kerlan, R K; Perry, J; Pink, M

    1994-01-01

    This study compared the electromyographic activity of normal (N = 22), rehabilitated anterior cruciate ligament-deficient (N = 8), and -reconstructed knees (N = 10) while subjects performed activities. Each subject had evaluation of 8 muscles during 7 functional activities. Sixty-seven percent of the differences in the quadriceps muscle reflected increased activity in the vastus lateralis muscle of the rehabilitated group; 75% of the differences in the hamstrings muscles noted increased biceps femoris muscle activity in the rehabilitated group; 56% of the differences in the lower leg musculature showed increased tibialis anterior muscle activity in the rehabilitated group. Eighty-six percent of the statistically different intervals involved rehabilitated subjects demonstrating increased activity over reconstructed or normal subjects or both. The presence of a quadriceps-hamstrings muscles coordinated response was identified consistently in all 3 groups in each activity. This study supports surgical reconstruction for the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee. It also demonstrates the importance of the vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, and tibialis anterior musculature in the rehabilitation of the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient patient. The presence of a quadriceps-hamstrings muscles coordinated response indicates that mechanoreceptors mediating this reflex arc exist in structures other than the cruciate ligament.

  16. Gait patterns before and after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Zsolt; Kocsis, László; Kiss, Rita M

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine how selected gait parameters may change as a result of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency and following ACL reconstruction. The study was performed on 25 ACL-deficient subjects prior to and 6 weeks, 4 months, 8 months and 12 months after ACL reconstructive surgery by the bone-patellar tendon-bone technique. Gait analysis was performed using the zebris three-dimensional ultrasound-based system with surface electromyograph (zebris Medizintechnik GmbH, Germany). Kinematic data were recorded for the lower limb. The muscles examined include vastus lateralis and medialis, biceps femoris and adductor longus. The results obtained from the injured subjects were compared with those of 51 individuals without ACL damage. The acute ACL-deficient patients exhibited a quadriceps avoidance pattern prior to and 6 weeks after surgery. The quadriceps avoidance phenomenon does not develop in chronic ACL-deficient patients. In the individuals operated on, the spatial-temporal parameters and the knee angle had already regained a normal pattern for the ACL-deficient limb during gait 4 months after surgery. However, the relative ACL movement parameter-which describes the tibial translation into the direction of ACL-and the EMG traces show no significant statistical difference compared with the values of healthy control group just 8 months after surgery. The results suggest that: (1) development of a quadriceps avoidance pattern is less common than previously reported, (2) anterior cruciate ligament deficiency and reconstruction significantly alter the lower extremity gait pattern, (3) the gait parameters shift towards the normal value pattern, and (4) the re-establishment of pre-injury gait patterns--including the normal biphase of muscles--takes at least 8 months to occur.

  17. Posterior Wall Blowout During Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Suspensory Cortical Fixation With a Screw and Washer Post.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Justin J; Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S; Menge, Travis J; Vap, Alexander R; Cram, Tyler R; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-06-01

    Posterior wall blowout can be a devastating intraoperative complication in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. This loss of osseous containment can cause difficulty with graft fixation and can potentially lead to early graft failure if unrecognized and left untreated. If cortical blowout occurs despite careful planning and proper surgical technique, a thorough knowledge of the local anatomy and surgical salvage options is paramount to ensure positive patient outcomes. This article highlights our preferred salvage technique using suspensory cortical fixation with a screw and washer construct. PMID:27656377

  18. Popliteal pseudoaneurysm after arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    van Dorp, Karin B; Breugem, Stefan J M; Driessen, Marcel J M

    2014-09-01

    This report presents the case of a 30-year-old motocross (BMX) cyclist with a third-degree posterior cruciate ligament rupture. The technique used for reconstruction was the transtibial single-bundle autologous hamstring technique. Unfortunately, the procedure was complicated by a popliteal pseudoaneurysm, which was located in line with the tibial canal. The pseudoaneurysm was treated with an end-to-end anastomosis and the patient recovered without further complaints. In this case, the popliteal artery was damaged most probably by the edge of the reamer or the guide wire during removal. Vascular complications can be limb- and life-threatening. This case report aims to increase the awareness of this serious complication with a review of the literature. PMID:25229050

  19. Transient Superficial Peroneal Nerve Palsy After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Alrowaili, Majed

    2016-04-26

    A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage and knee brace was removed and a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was ruled out. After eight hours, post-operatively, the patient started receiving physiotherapy. He complained of numbness and tingling in the same area. After 24 h, post-operatively, the patient started to regain dorsiflexion and eversion gradually. Two days after the surgery, the patient exhibited complete recovery of neurological status.

  20. Transient Superficial Peroneal Nerve Palsy After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage and knee brace was removed and a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was ruled out. After eight hours, post-operatively, the patient started receiving physiotherapy. He complained of numbness and tingling in the same area. After 24 h, post-operatively, the patient started to regain dorsiflexion and eversion gradually. Two days after the surgery, the patient exhibited complete recovery of neurological status. PMID:27478579

  1. Medial collateral ligament reconstruction in the baseball Pitcher's elbow.

    PubMed

    Erne, Holger C; Zouzias, Ioannis C; Rosenwasser, Melvin P

    2009-08-01

    Pitchers are prone to elbow injuries because of high and repetitive valgus stresses on the elbow. The anterior bundle of the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MCL) of the elbow is the primary restraint and is often attenuated with time, leading to functional incompetence and ultimate failure. Pitchers with a history of medial elbow pain, reduced velocity, and loss of command may have an MCL injury in evolution. Physical examination and imaging can confirm the diagnosis. Treatment begins with rest and activity modification. All medial elbow pain is not MCL injury. Surgery is considered only for talented athletes who wish to return to competitive play and may include elite scholastic and other collegiates and professionals. The technique for MCL reconstruction was first described in 1986. Many variations have been offered since then, which can result in predictable outcomes, allowing many to return to the same level of competitive play.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A practical guide

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Alberto; Bailey, James R; Signorelli, Cecilia; Carbone, Giuseppe; Tchonang Wakam, Andy; Lucidi, Gian Andrea; Zaffagnini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is one of the most common orthopedic procedures performed worldwide. In this regard, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represents a useful pre-operative tool to confirm a disruption of the ACL and to assess for potential associated injuries. However, MRI is also valuable post-operatively, as it is able to identify, in a non-invasive way, a number of aspects and situations that could suggest potential problems to clinicians. Graft signal and integrity, correct tunnel placement, tunnel widening, and problems with fixation devices or the donor site could all compromise the surgical outcomes and potentially predict the failure of the ACL reconstruction. Furthermore, several anatomical features of the knee could be associated to worst outcomes or higher risk of failure. This review provides a practical guide for the clinician to evaluate the post-surgical ACL through MRI, and to analyze all the parameters and features directly or indirectly related to ACL reconstruction, in order to assess for normal or pathologic conditions. PMID:27795945

  3. Soft-Tissue Loop for Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Miswan, Mohd Fairudz Bin Mohd; Al-Fayyadh, Mohamed Zubair Mohamed; Seow Hui, Teo; Mohamed Ali, Mohamed Razif Bin; Ng, Wuey Min

    2016-04-01

    A patient with patellar instability frequently presents with anterior knee pain, patellar subluxation, or dislocation. Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) has a key role for normal patella tracking and stability. Reconstruction of the MPFL using a hamstring graft is a commonly used procedure for the treatment of chronic lateral subluxation of patella. Anchor sutures and bony tunnels are used for the patellar attachment of the graft. This can be associated with complications such as patella fracture; besides, it does not produce an anatomical reconstruction for the native MPFL that can alter the direction of tension applied on the patella. To overcome these problems, a soft-tissue loop technique is used for MPFL reconstruction. During this procedure, a semitendinosus graft was passed through the prepatellar extensor retinaculum and secured with sutures. The free ends of the graft were then passed between the second and third layers of the medial patellofemoral retinaculum and fixed to a femoral tunnel on the medial femoral condyle with an interference screw. The desired amount of tension on the graft is achieved under direct vision of patella tracking arthroscopically. We found this method to be relatively safe and fast. It is more anatomical and can avoid the complications during the conventional bony procedures. PMID:27354953

  4. Bicondylar tibial plateau fracture after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Griesser, Michael J; McCoy, Brett W; Hussain, Waqas M; Saluan, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The authors present a report of a bicondylar tibial plateau fracture in an adolescent athlete after posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction. The procedure was performed via arthroscopic transtibial PCL reconstruction with quadrupled semi-tendinosus and gracilis autograft. The patient recovered uneventfully postoperatively and was able to participate in high-level sports activity, such as baseball and track, with no limitations, no subjective complaints, and no episodes of instability. He continued to be asymptomatic up to 3.5 years postoperatively. Almost 4 years postoperatively, the patient reinjured the left knee during recreational noncontact football and was seen emergently. Plain radiographs, magnetic resonance image scan, and computed tomography scan at the time of injury showed a bicondylar tibial plateau fracture with intra-articular involvement. Operative intervention was undertaken for open reduction and internal fixation of the bicondylar tibial plateau fracture. A plate was placed along the medial aspect of the tibia with locking and nonlocking screws, and the joint line was restored appropriately. The patient recovered uneventfully and at the most recent follow-up had full active and passive range of motion, had no subjective or objective evidence of instability, and had returned to full activity with no restrictions. The patient had no history of multiple fractures or any medical or pharmacologic history that predisposed him to decreased bone density. This case shows a unique possible complication after transtibial PCL reconstruction in an adolescent patient.

  5. Complications of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Chung, Christine B; Chanchairujira, Kullanuch; Resnick, Donald L

    2003-05-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using autografts or allografts is being performed with increasing frequency, particularly in young athletes. Although the procedure is generally well tolerated, with good success rates, early and late complications have been documented. As clinical manifestations of graft complications are often non-specific and plain radiographs cannot directly visualize the graft and the adjacent soft tissues, MR imaging has a definite role in the diagnosis of complications after ACL reconstruction and may direct subsequent therapeutic management. Our purpose is to review the normal MR imaging of the ACL graft and present the MR imaging findings of a wide spectrum of complications after ACL reconstruction, such as graft impingement, graft rupture, cystic degeneration of the graft, postoperative infection of the knee, diffuse and localized (i.e., cyclops lesion) arthrofibrosis, and associated donor site abnormalities. Awareness of the MR imaging findings of complications as well as the normal appearances of the normal ACL graft is essential for correct interpretation.

  6. Complications of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Chung, Christine B; Chanchairujira, Kullanuch; Resnick, Donald L

    2003-05-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using autografts or allografts is being performed with increasing frequency, particularly in young athletes. Although the procedure is generally well tolerated, with good success rates, early and late complications have been documented. As clinical manifestations of graft complications are often non-specific and plain radiographs cannot directly visualize the graft and the adjacent soft tissues, MR imaging has a definite role in the diagnosis of complications after ACL reconstruction and may direct subsequent therapeutic management. Our purpose is to review the normal MR imaging of the ACL graft and present the MR imaging findings of a wide spectrum of complications after ACL reconstruction, such as graft impingement, graft rupture, cystic degeneration of the graft, postoperative infection of the knee, diffuse and localized (i.e., cyclops lesion) arthrofibrosis, and associated donor site abnormalities. Awareness of the MR imaging findings of complications as well as the normal appearances of the normal ACL graft is essential for correct interpretation. PMID:12695835

  7. Bicondylar tibial plateau fracture after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Griesser, Michael J; McCoy, Brett W; Hussain, Waqas M; Saluan, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The authors present a report of a bicondylar tibial plateau fracture in an adolescent athlete after posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction. The procedure was performed via arthroscopic transtibial PCL reconstruction with quadrupled semi-tendinosus and gracilis autograft. The patient recovered uneventfully postoperatively and was able to participate in high-level sports activity, such as baseball and track, with no limitations, no subjective complaints, and no episodes of instability. He continued to be asymptomatic up to 3.5 years postoperatively. Almost 4 years postoperatively, the patient reinjured the left knee during recreational noncontact football and was seen emergently. Plain radiographs, magnetic resonance image scan, and computed tomography scan at the time of injury showed a bicondylar tibial plateau fracture with intra-articular involvement. Operative intervention was undertaken for open reduction and internal fixation of the bicondylar tibial plateau fracture. A plate was placed along the medial aspect of the tibia with locking and nonlocking screws, and the joint line was restored appropriately. The patient recovered uneventfully and at the most recent follow-up had full active and passive range of motion, had no subjective or objective evidence of instability, and had returned to full activity with no restrictions. The patient had no history of multiple fractures or any medical or pharmacologic history that predisposed him to decreased bone density. This case shows a unique possible complication after transtibial PCL reconstruction in an adolescent patient. PMID:25760514

  8. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Balazs, George C; Grimm, Patrick D; Donohue, Michael A; Keblish, David J; Rue, John-Paul

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to report the clinical and functional outcomes of revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in a young, active duty military population. Patients undergoing revision ACL reconstruction were enrolled in an institutional clinical database and followed prospectively. The primary outcomes were patients' scores on a timed run, as compared with recorded scores before reinjury. Secondary outcomes included scores on the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), the International Knee Documentation Committee subjective (IKDC subjective), the Short Form - 36 health survey (SF-36) version 2, the Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE), and the Tegner activity scale. A total of 13 patients were identified who met the inclusion criteria and had complete follow-up. The mean age at revision ACL reconstruction was 20.5 years (range, 19-22 years), and mean follow-up was 40.2 months (range, 13-66 months). All patients underwent a single stage revision ACL reconstruction with ipsilateral bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft, ipsilateral hamstring autograft, or bone-tendon-bone allograft. Mean physical readiness test (PRT) score at final follow-up was not statistically different than documented preinjury PRT score (77.9 vs. 85.5, p > 0.05), nor was the mean run time (7:12 vs. 6:43/mile, p > 0.05). Significant improvements exceeding published minimal clinically important differences were seen in SANE score, SF-36 physical component summary score, KOOS sports and recreation, KOOS quality of life, WOMAC pain score, and WOMAC function score. Patients undergoing revision ACL reconstruction at our facility show good recovery of baseline physical performance as measured by the semiannual PRT and timed run test, and significant improvements in patient-reported outcome scores. Level of Evidence Level IV, case series.

  9. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Balazs, George C; Grimm, Patrick D; Donohue, Michael A; Keblish, David J; Rue, John-Paul

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to report the clinical and functional outcomes of revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in a young, active duty military population. Patients undergoing revision ACL reconstruction were enrolled in an institutional clinical database and followed prospectively. The primary outcomes were patients' scores on a timed run, as compared with recorded scores before reinjury. Secondary outcomes included scores on the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), the International Knee Documentation Committee subjective (IKDC subjective), the Short Form - 36 health survey (SF-36) version 2, the Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE), and the Tegner activity scale. A total of 13 patients were identified who met the inclusion criteria and had complete follow-up. The mean age at revision ACL reconstruction was 20.5 years (range, 19-22 years), and mean follow-up was 40.2 months (range, 13-66 months). All patients underwent a single stage revision ACL reconstruction with ipsilateral bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft, ipsilateral hamstring autograft, or bone-tendon-bone allograft. Mean physical readiness test (PRT) score at final follow-up was not statistically different than documented preinjury PRT score (77.9 vs. 85.5, p > 0.05), nor was the mean run time (7:12 vs. 6:43/mile, p > 0.05). Significant improvements exceeding published minimal clinically important differences were seen in SANE score, SF-36 physical component summary score, KOOS sports and recreation, KOOS quality of life, WOMAC pain score, and WOMAC function score. Patients undergoing revision ACL reconstruction at our facility show good recovery of baseline physical performance as measured by the semiannual PRT and timed run test, and significant improvements in patient-reported outcome scores. Level of Evidence Level IV, case series. PMID:26524090

  10. Surgical reconstruction in female genital mutilation

    PubMed Central

    Gültekin, İsmail Burak; Altınboğa, Orhan; Dur, Rıza; Kara, Osman Fadıl; Küçüközkan, Tuncay

    2016-01-01

    Female genital mutilation (FGM) is an unusual condition for our country. However, an increase in FGM in future days can be predicted with the increasing numbers of exchange students coming from African countries, migration of refugees and socioeconomic relations with the African countries. We want to share our experience of two FGM victims admitted to our clinic with the request of reconstructive vulvar surgery before their marriage. Both women had WHO Type III FGM. Physical examination findings and surgical reconstruction techniques were presented. PMID:27274899

  11. How to avoid the risk of intraoperative cartilage damage in anatomic four tunnel double bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Siebold, Rainer; Benetos, Ioannis S; Sartory, Nico; He, Zhenming; Hariri, Nawid; Pässler, Hans H

    2010-01-01

    Double bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is technically demanding. In order to create four anatomical anteromedial (AM) and posterolateral (PL) bone tunnels many surgeons adopt new ways of tibial and femoral bone tunnel drilling. From surgical experience, these technical changes might increase the risk for intraoperative pitfalls. An intraoperative articular cartilage damage to the medial femoral condyle or the medial tibial plateau could be disastrous for the patient. It may be caused by an insufficient anteromedial portal technique for femoral AM and PL bone tunnel drilling or flat tibial AM or PL bone tunnel reaming. Potential pitfalls may be avoided by small modifications to the surgical technique. In this present technical note, a sequence of surgical steps are described, which may help to avoid articular cartilage damage to the medial femoral condyle and medial tibial plateau in anatomical four tunnel DB ACL reconstruction.

  12. Arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft versus autograft

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiujiang; Zhang, Jianfeng; Qu, Xiaoyi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to compare and analyze retrospectively the outcomes of arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with autograft versus allograft. Material and methods Seventy-one patients who underwent arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with an autograft or allograft met our inclusion criteria. There were 36 patients in the autograft group and 35 patients in the allograft group. All the patients were evaluated by physical examination and a functional ligament test. Comparative analysis was done in terms of operation time, incision length, fever time, postoperative infection rate, incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision, as well as a routine blood test. Results The average follow-up of the autograft group was 3.2 ±0.2 years and that of the allograft group was 3.3 ±0.6 years; there was no significant difference (p > 0.05). No differences existed in knee range of motion, Lysholm scores, International Knee Documentation Committee standard evaluation form and Tegner activity score at final follow-up (p > 0.05), except that patients in the allograft group had a shorter operation time and incision length and a longer fever time (p < 0.05). We found a difference in posterior drawer test and KT-2000 arthrometer assessment (p < 0.05). The posterior tibia displacement averaged 3.8 ±1.5 mm in the autograft group and 4.8 ±1.7 mm in the allograft group (p < 0.05). The incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision in the autograft group was higher than that in the allograft group (p < 0.05). There was no infection postoperatively. The white blood cells and neutrophils in the allograft group increased more than those in the autograft group postoperatively (p < 0.05). Conclusions Both groups of patients had satisfactory outcomes after the operation. However, in the instrumented posterior laxity test, the autograft gave better results than the allograft. No differences in functional scores

  13. Spatial Change of Cruciate Ligaments in Rat Embryo Knee Joint by Three-Dimensional Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangkai; Aoyama, Tomoki; Takaishi, Ryota; Higuchi, Shinya; Yamada, Shigehito; Kuroki, Hiroshi; Takakuwa, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the spatial developmental changes of rat cruciate ligaments by three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction using episcopic fluorescence image capture (EFIC). Cruciate ligaments of Wister rat embryos between embryonic day (E) 16 and E20 were analyzed. Samples were sectioned and visualized using EFIC. 3D reconstructions were generated using Amira software. The length of the cruciate ligaments, distances between attachment points to femur and tibia, angles of the cruciate ligaments and the cross angle of the cruciate ligaments were measured. The shape of cruciate ligaments was clearly visible at E17. The lengths of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) increased gradually from E17 to E19 and drastically at E20. Distances between attachment points to the femur and tibia gradually increased. The ACL angle and PCL angle gradually decreased. The cross angle of the cruciate ligaments changed in three planes. The primordium of the 3D structure of rat cruciate ligaments was constructed from the early stage, with the completion of the development of the structures occurring just before birth.

  14. The incidence of secondary pathology after anterior cruciate ligament rupture in 5086 patients requiring ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sri-Ram, K; Salmon, L J; Pinczewski, L A; Roe, J P

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed 5086 patients with a mean age of 30 years (9 to 69) undergoing primary reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in order to determine the incidence of secondary pathology with respect to the time between injury and reconstruction. There was an increasing incidence of medial meniscal tears and chondral damage, but not lateral meniscal tears, with increasing intervals before surgery. The chances of requiring medial meniscal surgery was increased by a factor of two if ACL reconstruction was delayed more than five months, and increased by a factor of six if surgery was delayed by > 12 months. The effect of delaying surgery on medial meniscal injury was also pronounced in the patients aged < 17 years, where a delay of five to 12 months doubled the odds of medial meniscal surgery (odds ratio (OR) 2.0, p = 0.001) and a delay of > 12 months quadrupled the odds (OR 4.3, p = 0.001). Increasing age was associated with a greater odds of chondral damage (OR 4.6, p = 0.001) and medial meniscal injury (OR 2.9, p = 0.001), but not lateral meniscal injury. The gender split (3251 men, 1835 women) revealed that males had a greater incidence of both lateral (34% (n = 1114) vs 20% (n = 364), p = 0.001) and medial meniscal tears (28% (n = 924) vs 25% (n = 457), p = 0.006), but not chondral damage (35% (n = 1152) vs 36% (n = 665), p = 0.565). We conclude that ideally, and particularly in younger patients, ACL reconstruction should not be delayed more than five months from injury.

  15. Massage Therapy Protocol for Post–Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Zalta, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Background: The intent of the present study was to determine the effectiveness of massage therapy in the rehabilitation of post–anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction patellofemoral pain syndrome. The primary complications following surgical repair of the anterior cruciate ligament—classified as patellofemoral pain syndrome—are hamstring flexion contracture and quadriceps weakness, leading to patellofemoral dysfunction and retropatellar pain. Methods: Treatment included lymphatic drainage, myofascial release, neuromuscular techniques including trigger point release, muscle energy techniques and cross-fiber friction. Orthopedic physical assessment tests were used to chart changes in patellofemoral function and changes in range of motion in the knee during the course of the massage interventions. Subjective reporting on pain level and function were also documented. Results: A decrease in pain level, hamstring flexion contracture and lateral tracking of the patella were documented. Conclusion: Massage therapy was determined to be an effective complementary therapy in the treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:21589717

  16. A dynamic test of lower extremity function following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Juris, P M; Phillips, E M; Dalpe, C; Edwards, C; Gotlin, R S; Kane, D J

    1997-10-01

    It is essential to assess the functional status of patients with surgically reconstructed and rehabilitated anterior cruciate ligaments prior to discharge. This study established a testing paradigm for functional force production and absorption. Data were obtained from 100 healthy subjects for maximal hops, controlled leaps, and hopping and leaping symmetry. Only 10% of symptomatic patients met maximal hopping criteria, while 15% achieved controlled leaping norms. Ninety-five percent of these patients failed to reach both hopping and leaping symmetry norms. Asymptomatic patients were 63% successful in meeting hopping criteria, and 57% were successful in meeting leaping criteria. Hop symmetry and leap symmetry were achieved at rates of 70% and 60%, respectively. The performance of both groups fell significantly below that of normal subjects (p < .05). Data suggest that this protocol does accurately assess functional and dysfunctional knees, and that force absorption may be more critical than force production in the determination of functional capacity.

  17. Current Australian trends in rehabilitation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Feller, Julian A; Cooper, Randall; Webster, Kate E

    2002-05-01

    This study documented the current approaches to rehabilitation following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction by Australian orthopaedic surgeons. A two-page questionnaire was mailed to the 40 members of the Australian Knee Society to obtain information regarding (1) pre-operative requirements; (2) immediate post-operative requirements; and (3) the timing of the introduction of rehabilitation phases and return to sport following ACL reconstruction. The response rate of practising surgeons was 95%. Twenty-two surgeons (61%) regularly performed both hamstring tendon (HS) and patellar tendon (PT) ACL reconstruction. Eighty-three percent had a standard rehabilitation protocol, and of these, 23% had separate protocols for the two graft types. There were no significant differences between the responses for the two graft types for any question. Approximately three-quarters of surgeons (HS: 75%, PT: 78%) had specific pre-operative requirements. Most surgeons (HS: 96%, PT: 93%) had specific post-operative requirements. Physiotherapy was routinely used by 96% and 93% of surgeons for HS and PT grafts, respectively, commencing at a mean of 2 weeks post-operatively for HS grafts and a mean of 1.5 weeks for PT grafts. Progression through rehabilitation and the timing of return to various levels of sporting activity was similar for both graft types. Few surgeons used strength testing (HS: 25%, PT: 23%) or knee arthrometry (HS: 22%, PT: 17%) prior to return to sport and the use of a brace was rarely recommended for return to sport (HS: 7%, PT: 3%). The results of this survey indicate little variation in the post-operative management of HS and PT ACL reconstruction among members of the Australian Knee Society. Future research should, however, be directed towards the rate of progression through rehabilitation, as this was shown to be more conservative than other recent reports.

  18. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Flexible Reamer System

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Judd; Saluan, Paul; Richter, Dustin L.; Huff, Nathan; Schenck, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Anatomic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has been shown to improve stability of the knee, particularly rotational stability, potentially leading to superior clinical outcomes and a shorter return to sport. Nonanatomic ACL reconstruction has been linked to graft failure and abnormal cartilage loading thought to contribute to progression of degenerative joint disease. Use of the far anteromedial portal (FAMP) to uncouple the tibial and femoral tunnels has led to improved reproduction of the femoral footprint and facilitates drilling of the femoral tunnel in an anatomic position. The use of the FAMP and straight reamer systems introduces its own set of potential complications, including short femoral tunnels and peroneal nerve injury. These potential complications have been addressed by drilling the femoral tunnel in a hyperflexed position, which can lead to difficulty with positioning the operative extremity, visualization, and identification of anatomic landmarks. The purpose of this case report was to review the advantages and technical aspects of using a flexible reamer system and the FAMP to achieve an anatomic ACL reconstruction while avoiding potential complications and pitfalls. Flexible reamer systems allow an additional way of uncoupling the tibial and femoral tunnels to clearly visualize and establish an anatomic starting point within the femoral footprint of the native ACL while avoiding the complications associated with knee hyperflexion and straight reamers with the far anteromedial portal. In the authors’ experience, an anatomic reconstruction of the ACL can be achieved safely using flexible reamers while avoiding some of the difficulties seen with straight reamers used in conjunction with an uncoupled, far anteromedial approach. PMID:26673860

  19. Long Term Gait Deviations in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstructed Females

    PubMed Central

    Noehren, Brian; Wilson, Hilary; Miller, Casey; Lattermann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Little is known of the potential long term gait alterations that occur after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. In particular, variables such as impact loading which have been previously associated with joint deterioration have not been studied in walking and running after an ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to define the alterations in impact forces, loading rates, and the accompanying sagittal plane kinematic and kinetic mechanics at the time of impact between the ACL reconstructed group and a healthy control group. Methods 40 females (20 ACL reconstruction, 20 controls) participated in the study. An instrumented gait analysis was performed on all subjects. Between group and limb comparisons were made for initial vertical impact force, loading rate, sagittal plane knee and hip angles as well as moments. Results During walking and running the ACL cohort had significantly greater initial vertical impact force (p=0.002 and p= 0.001), and loading rates (p=0.03 and p= 0.01), as well as a smaller knee extensor moment and hip angle during walking (p=0.000 and p=0.01). There was a trend towards a smaller knee moment and hip angle during running (p=0.08 and p=0.06) as well as a larger hip extensor moment during walking (p=0.06) in the ACL group. No differences were found for hip extensor moment during running, knee angles between groups during walking or running. Lastly, no between limb differences were found for any variable. Conclusion Gait deviations such as elevated impact loading and loading rates do not resolve long term after the individual has resumed previous activity levels and may contribute to the greater risk of early joint degeneration in this population. PMID:23568090

  20. Surgical treatment of acute and chronic anterior and posterior cruciate ligament and lateral side injuries of the knee.

    PubMed

    Levy, Bruce A; Boyd, Joel L; Stuart, Michael J

    2011-06-01

    Combined anterior cruciate ligament, posterior cruciate ligament, and lateral-sided injuries of the knee most often occurs secondary to a forced varus moment or after knee dislocation. Management controversies include the optimal timing of surgery, operative techniques, and postoperative rehabilitation. Recent systematic literature reviews have demonstrated higher rates of failure with repair of the lateral and posterolateral corner structures, as opposed to reconstruction. However, the ideal ligament reconstruction techniques remain unclear. This chapter will review the combined anterior cruciate ligament/posterior cruciate ligament/lateral-sided injury pattern, including the physical examination findings, imaging, timing of surgery, graft selection, operative techniques, and postoperative rehabilitation protocols.

  1. Lateral patellofemoral ligament reconstruction to restore functional capacity in patients previously undergoing lateral retinacular release

    PubMed Central

    Beckert, Mitch; Crebs, Dylan; Nieto, Michael; Gao, Yubo; Albright, John

    2016-01-01

    AIM To study patient outcomes after surgical correction for iatrogenic patellar instability. METHODS This retrospective study looked at 17 patients (19 knees) suffering from disabling medial patellar instability following lateral release surgery. All patients underwent lateral patellofemoral ligament (LPFL) reconstruction by a single surgeon. Assessments in all 19 cases included functional outcome scores, range of motion, and assessment for the presence of apprehension sign of the patella to determine if LPFL reconstruction surgery was successful at restoring patellofemoral stability. RESULTS No patients reported any residual postoperative symptoms of patellar instability. Also no patients demonstrated medial patellar apprehension or examiner induced subluxation with the medial instability test described earlier following LPFL reconstruction. Furthermore, all patients recovered normal range of motion compared to the contralateral limb. For patients with pre and postoperative outcome scores, the mean overall knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score increased significantly, from 34.39 preoperatively (range: 7.7-70.12) to 69.54 postoperatively (range: 26.82-91.46) at final follow-up (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION This novel technique for LPFL reconstruction is effective at restoring lateral restraint of the patellofemoral joint and improving joint functionality. PMID:27574606

  2. Neuromuscular training techniques to target deficits before return to sport after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Myer, Gregory D; Paterno, Mark V; Ford, Kevin R; Hewett, Timothy E

    2008-05-01

    Surgical intervention and early-phase rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have undergone a relatively rapid and global evolution over the past 25 years. Despite the advances that have significantly improved outcomes, decreases in healthcare coverage (limited visits allowed for physical therapy) have increased the role of the strength and conditioning specialist in the rehabilitation of athletes returning to sport after ACL reconstruction. In addition, there is an absence of standardized, objective criteria to accurately assess an athlete's ability to progress through the end stages of rehabilitation and safely return to sport. The purpose of this Scientific Commentary is to present an example of a progressive, end-stage return to sport protocol that is targeted to measured deficits of neuromuscular control, strength, power, and functional symmetry that are rehabilitative landmarks after ACL reconstruction. The proposed return to sport training protocol incorporates quantitative measurement tools that will provide the athlete with objective feedback and targeted goal setting. Objective feedback and targeted goal setting may aid the strength and conditioning specialist with exercise selection and progression. In addition, a rationale for exercise selection is outlined to provide the strength and conditioning specialist with a flexible decision-making approach that will aid in the modification of return to sport training to meet the individual athlete's abilities and to target objectively measured deficits. This algorithmic approach may improve the potential for athletes to return to sport after ACL reconstruction at the optimal performance level and with minimized risk of reinjury.

  3. Anatomical Single-bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Freehand Transtibial Technique

    PubMed Central

    Nha, Kyung-Wook; Han, Jae-Hwi; Kwon, Jae-Ho; Kang, Kyung-Woon; Park, Hyung-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In anatomical single-bundle (SB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, the traditional transtibial approach can limit anatomical placement of the femoral tunnel. Surgical Technique We present a novel three-point freehand technique that allows for anatomic SB ACL reconstruction with the transtibial technique. Materials and Methods Between January 2012 and December 2012, 55 ACL reconstructions were performed using the three-point freehand technique. All the patients were followed for a minimum of 12 months post-operatively. Clinical evaluation was done using the Lysholm score and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) grade. All patients were analyzed by 3-dimensional computed tomography (3D CT) at 1 week after surgery. Results The mean Lysholm score improved from 68.2±12.7 points preoperatively to 89.2±8.2 points at final follow-up. At final follow-up, the IKDC grade was normal in 42 patients and nearly normal in 13 patients. None of the patients had a positive pivot shift test, anterior drawer test and Lachman test at final follow-up. The anatomical position of the femoral tunnel was confirmed on 3D CT scans. Conclusions The three-point freehand technique for SB transtibial ACL reconstruction is a simple, anatomic technique showing good clinical results. PMID:26060611

  4. Rehabilitation and recovery after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: patients' experiences.

    PubMed

    Heijne, A; Axelsson, K; Werner, S; Biguet, G

    2008-06-01

    The aim was to explore patients' experiences of the rehabilitation process after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Ten participants were enrolled in the study. Semi-structured interviews were performed, focusing on challenges during the post-operative rehabilitation to 1 year after ACL reconstruction. The participants perceived no real choice between operative and non-operative treatment. Only surgery symbolized a full return to the pre-injury level of sports, and surgery was understood as the only way to become a completely restored "functional human being." A major source of frustration was that the meaning of and progress during the rehabilitation did not match their expectations. Three different responses to the challenge of a prolonged rehabilitation were expressed: "going for it,"being ambivalent," and "giving in." Fear of re-injury was common; however, some participants decided not to return to their pre-injury level of sports due to reasons other than physical limitations or fear of re-injury. From a patient perspective, it seems important that the choice of operative or non-operative treatment should be discussed in terms of the meaning and extent of the post-operative rehabilitation and the expected outcomes. There also seems to be a need for more guidance in realistic goal setting and coaching throughout the rehabilitation process.

  5. Basket-Weave Technique for Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kodkani, Pranjal S.

    2015-01-01

    The anatomy of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) has been well defined, with parts of its uppermost fibers having a soft-tissue insertion onto the vastus intermedius. Bone tunnels and implants on the patellar side therefore cannot replicate this anatomic construct precisely. Because of implants and tunnels, complications have been reported with bone tunnel fracture. Similarly, on the femoral side, rigid fixation with implants can result in over-constraint with compromised results. Moreover, bone tunnels cannot be used in skeletally immature cases. To overcome issues related to bone tunneling and implants, as well as to reconstruct the MPFL in a precise anatomic manner, an all–soft-tissue fixation technique was devised. Bony landmarks were used as reference points instead of radiologic markers to achieve a more precise construct and to eliminate intraoperative radiography. Hamstring graft was used to reconstruct the MPFL. Special suturing techniques were used to achieve optimal graft fixation with minimal suture knots. A special tissue elevator–suture passer device was designed to facilitate graft passage and ease in performing the procedure. This technique permits differential tensioning, and therefore one achieves stability throughout the range of motion. PMID:26258044

  6. Long-term Outcomes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Patients 60 Years and Older

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Champ L.; Jones, Jaclyn C.; Zhang, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Background: Studies evaluating the benefit of surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in middle-aged patients have shown promising results, but study populations were limited primarily to patients who were 40 to 60 years old. Some authors have suggested that surgery may benefit these older patients. Hypothesis: Patients aged ≥60 years with functional instability after ACL injury would benefit from ACL reconstruction. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Medical records from 1984 through 2010 were searched for patients aged ≥60 years who had undergone primary arthroscopic ACL reconstruction at a single institution. Fifteen patients (15 knees) were identified as meeting the above criteria. All patients were contacted for a telephone interview, and they completed Short Form–36 and modified Cincinnati Knee Score forms. One patient was deceased, and 1 had undergone revision to total knee arthroplasty. Among the remaining 13 patients, the mean age at surgery was 63.5 years (range, 60-73 years), and the mean patient age at the time of follow-up was 73 years (range, 65-85 years). Preoperative radiographs showed no obvious evidence of arthritis in 10 (77%) of the 13 patients; small osteophytes without loss of joint space were seen in 3 (23%) patients. The mean length of follow up was 115.7 months (range, 53-193 months). Results: At their last clinic visits, all 13 patients had regained full range of motion and returned to sports or exercise, such as tennis, golf, gym exercise, and yoga. Twelve patients reported no joint laxity. Conclusion: Patients aged ≥60 years with symptomatic instability from ACL injury can have good to excellent subjective outcomes with surgical reconstruction. Clinical Relevance: Physicians who treat active patients older than 60 years should not exclude ACL reconstruction based on the patient’s age alone. PMID:26535289

  7. Rates of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolus After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J.; Saltzman, Bryan M.; Campbell, Kirk A.; Fillingham, Yale A.; Harris, Joshua D.; Gupta, Anil K.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Venous thromboembolic (VTE) disease is thought to be an uncommon but serious problem after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Rates of VTE after ACL reconstruction are not well documented. Objective: To determine the rates of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and symptomatic pulmonary emboli (PE) after ACL reconstruction. Data Sources: Five publicly available databases (PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Scopus, Embase, and CINAHL Complete) were utilized. Study Selection: All studies that screened patients for DVT and reported rates of DVT and PE after ACL reconstruction were eligible for inclusion. Level 5 evidence, cadaver, biomechanical, and basic science studies; studies reporting only multiligament reconstruction outcomes; studies where rates of DVT and PE could not be separated out from patients undergoing other types of arthroscopic knee procedures; and classification studies were excluded. Study Design: Systematic review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Data Extraction: All study, subject, and surgical data were analyzed. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Results: Six studies met the inclusion criteria, with a mean Modified Colman Methodology Score of 30 ± 8.22. A total of 692 patients (488 men [70.5%]; mean age, 31.6 ± 2.82 years; mean follow-up, 7 ± 18.4 months) underwent ACL reconstruction using either semitendinosus-gracilis autograft (77.6%), bone–patellar tendon–bone (BTB) autograft (22%), or allograft (0.4%). No patient received postoperative pharmacological anticoagulation. Fifty-eight patients (8.4%) had a DVT (81% below knee and 19% above knee), while only 1 patient (0.2%) had a symptomatic PE. When reported, 27% of DVT episodes were symptomatic. Conclusion: The rate of DVT after ACL reconstruction in patients who did not receive postoperative pharmacological anticoagulation is 8.4%, while the rate of symptomatic PE is 0.2%. Of the DVT episodes that occurred, 73% were asymptomatic. PMID:26131305

  8. Functional Performance Testing After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Geoffrey D.; Harris, Joshua D.; Gupta, Anil K.; McCormick, Frank M.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Cole, Brian J.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: When to allow an athlete to return to unrestricted sporting activity after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction remains controversial. Purpose: To report the results of functional performance testing reported in the literature for individuals at differing time points following ACL reconstruction and to examine differences between graft types. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review of Medline, Scopus, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was performed using PRISMA guidelines. Inclusion criteria were English-language studies that examined any functional rehabilitation test from 6 months to 2 years following ACL reconstruction. All patient-, limb-, and knee-specific demographics were extracted from included investigations. All functional rehabilitation tests were analyzed and compared when applicable. Results: The search term returned a total of 890 potential studies, with 88 meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria. A total of 4927 patients were included, of which 66% were male. The mean patient age was 26.5 ± 3.4 years. The predominant graft choices for reconstruction were bone–patellar tendon–bone (BPTB) autograft (59.8%) and hamstring autograft (37.9%). The most commonly reported functional tests were the hop tests. The results of these functional tests, as reported in the Limb Symmetry Index (LSI), improved with increasing time, with nearly all results greater than 90% at 1 year following primary ACL reconstruction. At 6 months postoperatively, a number of isokinetic strength measurements failed to reach 80% LSI, most commonly isokinetic knee extension testing in both BPTB and hamstring autograft groups. The knee flexion strength deficit was significantly less in the BPTB autograft group as compared with those having hamstring autograft at 1 year postoperatively, while no significant differences were found in isokinetic extension strength between the 2 groups. Conclusion: Hop

  9. Reconstructive methods in hearing disorders - surgical methods

    PubMed Central

    Zahnert, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Restoration of hearing is associated in many cases with resocialisation of those affected and therefore occupies an important place in a society where communication is becoming ever faster. Not all problems can be solved surgically. Even 50 years after the introduction of tympanoplasty, the hearing results are unsatisfactory and often do not reach the threshold for social hearing. The cause of this can in most cases be regarded as incomplete restoration of the mucosal function of the middle ear and tube, which leads to ventilation disorders of the ear and does not allow real vibration of the reconstructed middle ear. However, a few are also caused by the biomechanics of the reconstructed ossicular chain. There has been progress in reconstructive middle ear surgery, which applies particularly to the development of implants. Implants made of titanium, which are distinguished by outstanding biocompatibility, delicate design and by biomechanical possibilities in the reconstruction of chain function, can be regarded as a new generation. Metal implants for the first time allow a controlled close fit with the remainder of the chain and integration of micromechanical functions in the implant. Moreover, there has also been progress in microsurgery itself. This applies particularly to the operative procedures for auditory canal atresia, the restoration of the tympanic membrane and the coupling of implants. This paper gives a summary of the current state of reconstructive microsurgery paying attention to the acousto-mechanical rules. PMID:22073050

  10. Evidence-based rehabilitation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    van Grinsven, S; van Cingel, R E H; Holla, C J M; van Loon, C J M

    2010-08-01

    Following a bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft (BPTB) or four-stranded semitendinosus/gracilis tendons autograft (ST/G) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, the speed and safety with which an athlete returns to sports (or regains the pre-injury level of function) depends on the rehabilitation protocol. Considering the large differences in clinical and outpatient protocols, there is no consensus regarding the content of such a rehabilitation program. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review to develop an optimal evidence-based rehabilitation protocol to enable unambiguous, practical and useful treatment after ACL reconstruction. The systematic literature search identified 1,096 citations published between January 1995 and December 2006. Thirty-two soundly based rehabilitation programs, randomized clinical trials (RCT's) and reviews were included in which common physical therapy modalities (instruction, bracing, cryotherapy, joint mobility training, muscle-strength training, gait re-education, training of neuromuscular function/balance and proprioception) or rehabilitation programs were evaluated following ACL reconstruction with a BPTB or ST/G graft. Two reviews were excluded because of poor quality. Finally, the extracted data were combined with information from background literature to develop an optimal evidence-based rehabilitation protocol. The results clearly indicated that an accelerated protocol without postoperative bracing, in which reduction of pain, swelling and inflammation, regaining range of motion, strength and neuromuscular control are the most important aims, has important advantages and does not lead to stability problems. Preclinical sessions, clear starting times and control of the rehabilitation aims with objective and subjective tests facilitate an uncomplicated rehabilitation course. Consensus about this evidence-based accelerated protocol will not only enhance the speed and safety with which an athlete returns to sports, but

  11. Pre-tibial synovial cyst after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: case report.

    PubMed

    Bulisani, Luís Eduardo Pedigoni; Bulisani, Erickson

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament has been modernized through new surgical techniques and new materials. When tibial fixation is performed using an absorbable screw, complications may occur, such as formation of a pre-tibial cyst. The case described here is about a patient who presented an anteromedial synovial cyst in his right knee, three years after having undergone ACL reconstruction. The patient did not present any pain nor any complaints other than a mass that progressively increased in size, worsened after physical activities. Imaging examinations were requested: simple radiography of the knee and magnetic resonance. Anteromedial imaging of the knee showed a mass with well-delimited borders and internal fluid content, suggestive of a synovial cyst, with communication with the joint cavity through the tibial tunnel, without presenting enlargement or absorption of the bone tunnel. The cyst was surgically resected and the tibial tunnel occlusion was performed using a bone plug. The diagnosis of a synovial cyst was subsequently confirmed through the results from the anatomopathological examination. The patient presented good clinical evolution, with disappearance of the symptoms and a return to physical activities. PMID:26229880

  12. Pre-tibial synovial cyst after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: case report.

    PubMed

    Bulisani, Luís Eduardo Pedigoni; Bulisani, Erickson

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament has been modernized through new surgical techniques and new materials. When tibial fixation is performed using an absorbable screw, complications may occur, such as formation of a pre-tibial cyst. The case described here is about a patient who presented an anteromedial synovial cyst in his right knee, three years after having undergone ACL reconstruction. The patient did not present any pain nor any complaints other than a mass that progressively increased in size, worsened after physical activities. Imaging examinations were requested: simple radiography of the knee and magnetic resonance. Anteromedial imaging of the knee showed a mass with well-delimited borders and internal fluid content, suggestive of a synovial cyst, with communication with the joint cavity through the tibial tunnel, without presenting enlargement or absorption of the bone tunnel. The cyst was surgically resected and the tibial tunnel occlusion was performed using a bone plug. The diagnosis of a synovial cyst was subsequently confirmed through the results from the anatomopathological examination. The patient presented good clinical evolution, with disappearance of the symptoms and a return to physical activities.

  13. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Remnant–Preserving Reconstruction Using a “Lasso-Loop” Knot Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Boutsiadis, Achilleas; Karampalis, Christos; Tzavelas, Anastasios; Vraggalas, Vasileios; Christodoulou, Pavlos; Bisbinas, Ilias

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture predisposes to altered kinematics and possible knee joint degeneration. Graft fiber maturation and ligamentization may eliminate this risk during ACL reconstruction procedures. ACL remnant–sparing techniques support the theory that the preserved tissue enhances revascularization, preserves the mechanoreceptors, and leads to anatomic remodeling. The purpose of this article is to present a simple and reproducible technique of tensioning the preserved ACL remnant over the femur. A nonabsorbable suture is passed through the ACL remnant with a “lasso-loop” technique using a curved rotator cuff hook. Femoral and tibial tunnel preparation is performed according to a standard surgical technique for the EndoButton device (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA). The free ends of the ACL remnant suture are retrieved through the tibial tunnel and passed through each outside hole of the EndoButton device. The hamstring graft is passed through the tibial and femoral tunnels and fixed to the femoral cortex by flipping the EndoButton and to the tibia by an interference screw. Finally, non-sliding half-stitch locking knots are made to secure the ACL remnant suture on the EndoButton device, by use of a knot pusher. This technique offers simple and secure tensioning of the ACL remnant on the fixation device. PMID:26870656

  14. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Remnant-Preserving Reconstruction Using a "Lasso-Loop" Knot Configuration.

    PubMed

    Boutsiadis, Achilleas; Karampalis, Christos; Tzavelas, Anastasios; Vraggalas, Vasileios; Christodoulou, Pavlos; Bisbinas, Ilias

    2015-12-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture predisposes to altered kinematics and possible knee joint degeneration. Graft fiber maturation and ligamentization may eliminate this risk during ACL reconstruction procedures. ACL remnant-sparing techniques support the theory that the preserved tissue enhances revascularization, preserves the mechanoreceptors, and leads to anatomic remodeling. The purpose of this article is to present a simple and reproducible technique of tensioning the preserved ACL remnant over the femur. A nonabsorbable suture is passed through the ACL remnant with a "lasso-loop" technique using a curved rotator cuff hook. Femoral and tibial tunnel preparation is performed according to a standard surgical technique for the EndoButton device (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA). The free ends of the ACL remnant suture are retrieved through the tibial tunnel and passed through each outside hole of the EndoButton device. The hamstring graft is passed through the tibial and femoral tunnels and fixed to the femoral cortex by flipping the EndoButton and to the tibia by an interference screw. Finally, non-sliding half-stitch locking knots are made to secure the ACL remnant suture on the EndoButton device, by use of a knot pusher. This technique offers simple and secure tensioning of the ACL remnant on the fixation device. PMID:26870656

  15. Carpal tunnel release with subneural reconstruction of the transverse carpal ligament compared with isolated open and endoscopic release.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Li, Y; Wen, S; Zhu, H; Shao, X; Yu, Y

    2015-02-01

    We report a new surgical technique of open carpal tunnel release with subneural reconstruction of the transverse carpal ligament and compare this with isolated open and endoscopic carpal tunnel release. Between December 2007 and October 2011, 213 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (70 male, 143 female; mean age 45.6 years; 29 to 67) were recruited from three different centres and were randomly allocated to three groups: group A, open carpal tunnel release with subneural reconstruction of the transverse carpal ligament (n = 68); group B, isolated open carpal tunnel release (n = 92); and group C, endoscopic carpal tunnel release (n = 53). At a mean final follow-up of 24 months (22 to 26), we found no significant difference between the groups in terms of severity of symptoms or lateral grip strength. Compared with groups B and C, group A had significantly better functional status, cylindrical grip strength and pinch grip strength. There were significant differences in Michigan Hand Outcome scores between groups A and B, A and C, and B and C. Group A had the best functional status, cylindrical grip strength, pinch grip strength and Michigan Hand Outcome score. Subneural reconstruction of the transverse carpal ligament during carpal tunnel decompression maximises hand strength by stabilising the transverse carpal arch. PMID:25628286

  16. Surgical treatment of simultaneous rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament and the patellar tendon.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Kyohei; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Hino, Kazunori; Watanabe, Seiji; Yamaoka, Gotaro; Shirakata, Haruo; Fujii, Yuko; Miura, Hiromasa

    2013-12-01

    Although the rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common sports injury, a simultaneous rupture of the patellar tendon (PT) is relatively rare. We experienced a case in which a patient simultaneously ruptured the ACL, the medial collateral ligament (MCL), and the PT while sliding during a baseball game. We sutured the PT and MCL during the acute stage, and 7 months later we conducted a double-bundle reconstruction of the ACL. To our knowledge, this is the first report of PT repair using only fiber wire thread, and two-phase double-bundle ACL reconstruction.

  17. Simultaneous surgical management of chronic grade-2 valgus instability of the knee and anterior cruciate ligament deficiency in athletes.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Papalia, Rocco; Del Buono, Angelo; Merlo, Franco; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-03-01

    We report on 22 patients with chronic grade-2 valgus laxity of the knee combined with chronic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiency, in whom the two lesions were addressed at the same surgical setting. At a minimum follow-up of 24 months, clinical and functional variables had improved significantly (P < 0.001), and 20 of the 22 patients (91%) had returned to sport at pre-injury level. There were no operative complications in this series. In selected athletes with chronic symptomatic valgus laxity of the knee combined with ACL insufficiency, surgical repair of the MCL in association with ACL reconstruction is a suitable and reliable option to restore knee stability and allow return to pre-injury activity level.

  18. Systematic Review of Biological Modulation of Healing in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Sai-Chuen; Cheuk, Yau-Chuk; Yung, Shu-Hang; Rolf, Christer Gustav; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background: Whether biological modulation is effective to promote healing in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction remains unclear. Purpose: To perform a systematic review of both clinical and experimental evidence of preclinical animal studies on biological modulation to promote healing in ACL reconstruction. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A systematic search was performed using the PubMed, Ovid, and Scopus search engines. Inclusion criteria were clinical and animal studies involving subjects with ACL injury with the use of biological modulation to promote healing outcomes. Methodological quality of clinical studies was evaluated using the Critical Appraisal Skill Programme (CASP) appraisal tool, and animal studies were evaluated by a scoring system based on a published checklist of good animal studies. Results: Ten clinical studies and 50 animal studies were included. Twenty-five included studies were regarded as good quality, with a methodological score ≥5. These studies suggested that transforming growth factor–beta (TGF-β), mesenchymal stem cells, osteogenic factors, and modalities that reduce local inflammation may be beneficial to promote graft healing in ACL reconstruction. Conclusion: This systematic review suggests that biological modulation is able to promote healing on top of surgical treatment for ACL injuries. This treatment strategy chiefly works through promotion of healing at the tunnel-graft interface, but the integrity of the intra-articular midsubstance of the graft would be another target for biological modulation. PMID:26535311

  19. Hybrid Graft Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Predictable Graft for Knee Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Pinzon, Andres M; Barksdale, Leticia; Krill, Michael K; Leo, Brian M

    2015-06-01

    Trauma to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a season-ending injury and involves months of activity modification and rehabilitation. The annual incidence of ACL tears in the United States is approximately 200,000, which allows for a broad range of individualized treatment options. Various surgical techniques, including transtibial and independent tunnel drilling, allograft and autograft tissue, and various implants, have been described in the literature. This article describes the indications and technique for a hybrid soft tissue graft for ACL reconstruction. Autologous grafts eliminate the risk of disease transmission and have recently been shown to have a lower rerupture rate, particularly in younger, active patients; however, the harvesting of autologous hamstring grafts carries a risk of donor-site morbidity, iatrogenic injury of the graft, and inadequate graft size. In contrast to a traditional autologous soft tissue graft, the hybrid graft allows for graft size customization for a desired reconstruction, especially in cases where autograft hamstrings may be iatrogenically damaged or of inadequate size when harvested. The goal of a hybrid graft ACL reconstruction is to provide a favorable-sized graft with clinical outcomes comparable with autologous soft tissue grafts. In contrast to a traditional autologous soft tissue graft, this technique provides another option in the event of unforeseen deficiencies or complications associated with harvesting and preparation of the autologous gracilis and semitendinosis soft tissue graft. PMID:26091219

  20. Hybrid Graft Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Predictable Graft for Knee Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Pinzon, Andres M; Barksdale, Leticia; Krill, Michael K; Leo, Brian M

    2015-06-01

    Trauma to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a season-ending injury and involves months of activity modification and rehabilitation. The annual incidence of ACL tears in the United States is approximately 200,000, which allows for a broad range of individualized treatment options. Various surgical techniques, including transtibial and independent tunnel drilling, allograft and autograft tissue, and various implants, have been described in the literature. This article describes the indications and technique for a hybrid soft tissue graft for ACL reconstruction. Autologous grafts eliminate the risk of disease transmission and have recently been shown to have a lower rerupture rate, particularly in younger, active patients; however, the harvesting of autologous hamstring grafts carries a risk of donor-site morbidity, iatrogenic injury of the graft, and inadequate graft size. In contrast to a traditional autologous soft tissue graft, the hybrid graft allows for graft size customization for a desired reconstruction, especially in cases where autograft hamstrings may be iatrogenically damaged or of inadequate size when harvested. The goal of a hybrid graft ACL reconstruction is to provide a favorable-sized graft with clinical outcomes comparable with autologous soft tissue grafts. In contrast to a traditional autologous soft tissue graft, this technique provides another option in the event of unforeseen deficiencies or complications associated with harvesting and preparation of the autologous gracilis and semitendinosis soft tissue graft.

  1. Suggestions from the field for return to sports participation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: basketball.

    PubMed

    Waters, Eric

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline the final, functional phases of rehabilitation that address exercises, drills, and return-to-play criteria for the sport of basketball, following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. ACL injuries can be debilitating and affect the quality of life for recreational and elite athletes alike. Tears of the ACL are common in both male and female basketball players, with a higher incidence rate in females. Incidence of a retear to the existing graft or contralateral knee within 5 years of ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon autograft in young (less than 18 to 25 years of age), active basketball players can be as high as 52%. Reducing the number of ACL injuries or reinjury, of which there are an estimated 80 000 per year at an associated cost of over a billion dollars, can have significant potential long-term fiscal and health benefits. Following surgical reconstruction of the ACL, implementing a tailored rehabilitation protocol can ensure a successful return to sport. When searching the literature for such protocols, clinicians may struggle to find specific exercises, drills, and return-to-play criteria for particular sports. The intent of this manuscript is to present such a rehabilitation protocol for basketball.

  2. Return to work in miners following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tiftikci, Ugur; Serbest, Sancar; Kilinc, Cem Yalin; Karabicak, Gül Öznur; Vergili, Özge

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study is retrospectively investigated durations for returning to work following anatomic ACL reconstruction by hamstring autograft in miners and the reasons in patients who were delayed to return to work. Methods Miners with symptomatic anterior cruciate ligament rupture underwent arthroscopic reconstruction. Patients were evaluated in terms of range of motion (ROM) values; Lysholm, Cincinati and Tegner activity scales; laxity testing and complications. By modifying the method used by Fitzgerald et al. we decided for the criteria returning to work. Results Thirty three patients were evaluated with mean followup of 22.7 ± 8.3 months (range 13-46 months). Mean age at the surgery was 27.8 (18-38) years. Lysholm, Cincinati and Tegner activity scales were signifi cantly higher from preoperative scores (Lysholm scores: preoperative: 60.7 ± 12.5, postoperative: 90.3 ± 4.8 (P < 0.001); Tegner activity scores: Preoperative 3.5 ± 1.4, postoperative: 6.2 ± 1.5 (P < 0.001); Cincinati scores: Preoperative: 14.8 ± 5.3, postoperative: 26.9 ± 1.6 (P < 0.001). The average time for returning to work was determined as 15,3 ± 4 weeks. There was no significant difference for knee scores and time for returning to work between patients with meniscal injuries and don't have meniscus lesions. Conclusion The reasons for delays in returning to work was work accident. Hematoma or effusion and pain inside the knee were the most significant reason which affected returning to work. PMID:26918069

  3. Preoperative cryotherapy use in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Koyonos, Loukas; Owsley, Kevin; Vollmer, Emily; Limpisvasti, Orr; Gambardella, Ralph

    2014-12-01

    Unrelieved postoperative pain may impair rehabilitation, compromise functional outcomes, and lead to patient dissatisfaction. Preemptive multimodal analgesic techniques may improve outcomes after surgery. We hypothesized that patients using preoperative cryotherapy plus a standardized postoperative treatment plan will have lower pain scores and require less pain medication compared with patients receiving a standardized postoperative treatment plan alone after arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). A total of 53 consecutive patients undergoing arthroscopically assisted ACLR performed by one of seven surgeons were randomly assigned to one of two groups. Group 1 received no preoperative cryotherapy and group 2 received 30 to 90 minutes of preoperative cryotherapy to the operative leg using a commercial noncompressive cryotherapy unit. Visual analog scale pain scores and narcotic use were recorded for the first 4 days postoperatively. Total hours of cold therapy and continuous passive motion (CPM) use and highest degree of flexion achieved were recorded as well. Group 1 consisted of 26 patients (15 allograft Achilles tendon and 11 autograft bone patellar tendon bone [BPTB]), and group 2 consisted of 27 patients (16 allograft Achilles tendon and 11 autograft BPTB). Group 2 patients reported less pain (average 1.3 units, p < 0.02) and used less narcotic use (average 1.7 tablets, p < 0.02) for the first 36 hours compared with group 1. No statistically significant differences were identified between the two groups with regard to demographics, hours of postoperative cryotherapy, hours of CPM use, or maximum knee flexion achieved. Complications did not occur in either group. This is the first report we are aware of showing the postoperative effects of preoperative cryotherapy. Our results support the safety and efficacy of preoperative cryotherapy in a multimodal pain regimen for patients undergoing ACL reconstruction.

  4. Postoperative rehabilitation of the posterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Edson, Craig J; Fanelli, Gregory C; Beck, John D

    2010-12-01

    Diagnosis and management of posterior cruciate ligament injuries has evolved, and now the treatment often includes surgical intervention. The purpose of this paper is to define the current approach to postsurgical management after the posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, review conservative management, and discuss surgical outcomes using a specified program.

  5. Can anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction be performed routinely in day clinic?

    PubMed

    De Beule, J; Vandenneucker, H; Claes, S; Bellemans, J

    2014-09-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is performed as an outpatient procedure in selected cases. Whether it can be safely performed on a routine basis in day clinic remains unclear. Our hypothesis was that routinely performing outpatient anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction would be equally safe as compared to inpatient procedures. A cohort of 355 patients who underwent outpatient primary reconstruction was analysed at an average follow-up of 3.8 years. Four patients (1.1%) could not be discharged or were readmitted within 24 hours. The 1-month readmission rate was 1.4%. The overall complication rate was 12.1% (43 cases) of which 4.2% (15 patients) occurred within the first 30 days. Performing anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions routinely in day clinic is associated with almost negligible readmission rates and has similar complication rates as for standard in-hospital anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. Outpatient anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions can therefore be safely performed without specific preoperative patient selection protocols.

  6. Tracking patient outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cupido, Colleen; Peterson, Devin; Sutherland, Melanie Stevens; Ayeni, Olufemi; Stratford, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    Objet: Modéliser comment l'amplitude du mouvement (ADM) du genou des patients, la douleur et l'état fonctionnel autodéclaré des membres inférieurs (MI) changent au cours des 26 premières semaines suivant la reconstruction du ligament croisé antérieur (LCA) et estimer la fiabilité de test-retest de ces mesures. Méthodes: On a évalué les patients une fois par semaine pendant les 26 semaines qui ont suivi une reconstruction du LCA. L'ADM du genou, l'état fonctionnel des MI mesuré en fonction de l'échelle fonctionnelle des membres inférieurs (EFMI) et la douleur mesurée par le questionnaire sur l'intensité de la douleur à quatre questions (P4) ont constitué les résultats. Nous avons appliqué un modèle non linéaire pour décrire le changement de chaque résultat. Nous avons aussi appliqué des coefficients de corrélation intra-classe et les erreurs de mesure types pour estimer la fiabilité de test-retest et le changement détectable minimal. Résultats: Un modèle non linéaire a produit les valeurs suivantes d'adaptation du modèle (R(2)): P4=0,71, ADM extension=0,51, ADM flexion=0,99, EFMI=0,97. Dans le cas de la douleur et de l'ADM, les valeurs maximales ont été atteintes vers la 12(e) semaine suivant la reconstruction et les valeurs EFMI ont continué d'augmenter jusqu'à 26 semaines. Les coefficients de fiabilité de test-retest ont varié de 0,85 à 0,95. Conclusions: L'amélioration la plus importante s'est produite au cours des huit semaines suivant l'intervention chirurgicale. Le rétablissement était presque complet à 12 semaines en ce qui a trait à la douleur et à l'ADM, même si l'état fonctionnel des membres inférieurs a continué de s'améliorer durant toute la période d'étude. Les résultats de toutes les mesures ont démontré de la fiabilité, ce qui appuie leur utilisation avec des patients particuliers.

  7. Subsequent Surgery after Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ding, David; Group, Mars

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Failure or reinjury after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction can lead to recurrent instability and concomitant intra-articular injuries. While revision ACL reconstruction (rACLR) can be performed to restore knee stability and improve patient activity level, outcomes after these surgeries are reported to be inferior to primary ACL reconstruction. Further reoperation after rACLR can have an even more profound effect on patient satisfaction and outcome. Yet, there is a current lack of information regarding the rate and risk factors for subsequent surgery after rACLR. Methods: 1205 patients who underwent rACLR were enrolled between 2006 and 2011, comprising the prospective cohort. Two-year questionnaire follow-up was obtained on 989 (82%), while telephone follow-up was obtained on 1112 (92%). If a patient reported having a subsequent surgery, operative reports detailing the subsequent procedure(s) were obtained and categoriezed. A repeated meaures ANOVA was used to reveal significatnt differences in patient reported outcomes. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to determine independent risk factors for reoperation. Results: One hundred and twenty-two patients (10.1%) underwent a total of 172 subsequent procedures on the ipsilateral knee at 2-year follow-up. Of the reoperation procedures, 26.7% were meniscus procedures (69% meniscectomy, 26% repair), 18.6% were subsequent rACLR, 17.4% were cartilage procedures (61% chondroplasty, 17% microfracture, and 13% mosaicplasty), 10% hardware removal, and 9.3% were procedures for arthrofibrosis such has lysis of adhesions and synovectomy. Patients who had reoperations had significantly lower IKDC, KOOS symptoms and pain scores, and WOMAC stiffness scores at two-year follow up. Multivariate analysis revealed that patients under 20 years old were 2.1 times more likely than patients aged 20-29 to have a reoperation. Use of allograft at the time of rACLR and staged revision (bone grafting of

  8. COMPLICATIONS OF THE SCREW/WASHER TIBIAL FIXATION TECHNIQUE FOR KNEE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Alexandre; Roveda, Gilberto; Valin, Márcio Rangel; Almeida, Nayvaldo Couto de; Sartor, Vanderlei; Alves, Soraya Melina

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the presence of pain at the site of the surgical incision and the need to remove the tibial fixation screw in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, in relation to sex and body mass index (BMI). Methods: A group of 265 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction with ipsilateral flexor tendon grafts from the thigh in which the tibial fixation technique consisted of using a cortical screw and metal washer, between July 2000 and November 2007, were evaluated. Results: 176 patients were evaluated for an average of 33.3 ± 19.5 months; median of 29.5 months; IIQ: 17-45 months; minimum of 8 and maximum of 87 months. There was no statistical difference regarding complaints of pain at the site of the screw (p = 0.272) and the need to remove the tibial screw (p = 0.633) between sexes. There was no statistical difference regarding complaints of pain at the site of the screw (p = 0.08) and the need to remove the tibial screw (p = 0.379) according to BMI. Conclusion: The pain complaint rate at the screw site from the screw and metal washer method used for tibial fixation in ACL reconstruction was of the order of 25%, and the screw had to be removed in 10.8% of the cases. There was no predominance of pain complaints at the surgical wound between the sexes. There was a greater tendency to complain about pain among patients with BMI < 25. There was no predominance of screw and washer removal between the sexes or between individuals with different BMIs. PMID:27022587

  9. The Weak Link in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: What is the Evidence for Graft Fixation Devices?

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kirk A; Looze, Christopher; Bosco, Joseph A; Strauss, Eric J

    2016-03-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common injury that mostly affects young adults. The mechanisms of injury and surgical treatment have been extensively studied in both the laboratory and clinical arenas; however, great controversy still exists in regards to the best surgical technique, graft choice, and graft fixation device. In the area graft fixation, multiple breakthroughs have occurred in terms of fixation devices. These devices generally fall within the broad categories of interference screw, cross-pins, or cortical-based devices. Furthermore, some of these devices are available in either metal or bioabsorbable materials, which adds to the already great variety of options. Although biomechanically these devices have been shown to be able to withstand the typical forces experienced by the ACL graft during the early phases of rehabilitation before the graft has fully incorporated into the bone, little is known about the clinical outcomes. It is well recognized that graft fixation is the weakest link in the early postoperative period after ACL reconstruction. This review of the outcomes of ACL fixation devices explores some of the evidence available for the different devices. PMID:26977545

  10. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, rehabilitation, and return to play: 2015 update

    PubMed Central

    Nyland, John; Mattocks, Alma; Kibbe, Shane; Kalloub, Alaa; Greene, Joe W; Caborn, David N M

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical discoveries and a growing appreciation of the knee as a complex organ are driving innovations in patient care decision-making following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Surgeons are increasing their efforts to restore combined mechanical-neurosensory ACL function and placing more consideration on when to reconstruct versus repair native anatomical structures. Surgical options now include primary repair with or without reinforcing the injured ACL with suture-based internal bracing, and growing evidence supports biological augmentation using platelet-rich plasma and mesenchymal stem cells to enhance tissue healing. Physical therapists and athletic trainers are increasing their efforts to facilitate greater athlete cognitive engagement during therapeutic exercise performance to better restore nonimpaired neuromuscular control activation amplitude and timing. Knee brace design and use needs to evolve to better match these innovations and their influence on the rehabilitation plan timetable. There is a growing appreciation for the multifaceted characteristics of the rehabilitation process and how they influence neuromuscular, educational, and psychobehavioral treatment goal achievement. Multiple sources may influence the athlete during the return to sports process and clinical outcome measures need to be refined to better evaluate these influences. This update summarizes contemporary ACL surgical, medical, and rehabilitation interventions and future trends. PMID:26955296

  11. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, rehabilitation, and return to play: 2015 update.

    PubMed

    Nyland, John; Mattocks, Alma; Kibbe, Shane; Kalloub, Alaa; Greene, Joe W; Caborn, David N M

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical discoveries and a growing appreciation of the knee as a complex organ are driving innovations in patient care decision-making following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Surgeons are increasing their efforts to restore combined mechanical-neurosensory ACL function and placing more consideration on when to reconstruct versus repair native anatomical structures. Surgical options now include primary repair with or without reinforcing the injured ACL with suture-based internal bracing, and growing evidence supports biological augmentation using platelet-rich plasma and mesenchymal stem cells to enhance tissue healing. Physical therapists and athletic trainers are increasing their efforts to facilitate greater athlete cognitive engagement during therapeutic exercise performance to better restore nonimpaired neuromuscular control activation amplitude and timing. Knee brace design and use needs to evolve to better match these innovations and their influence on the rehabilitation plan timetable. There is a growing appreciation for the multifaceted characteristics of the rehabilitation process and how they influence neuromuscular, educational, and psychobehavioral treatment goal achievement. Multiple sources may influence the athlete during the return to sports process and clinical outcome measures need to be refined to better evaluate these influences. This update summarizes contemporary ACL surgical, medical, and rehabilitation interventions and future trends. PMID:26955296

  12. Anatomic Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction of the Knee Leads to Overconstraint at any Fixation Angle

    PubMed Central

    Schon, Jason; Brady, Alex; Moatshe, Gilbert; Cruz, Raphael; Chahla, Jorge; Dornan, Grant; Turnbull, Travis L.; Engebretsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are one of the most common injuries among athletes. However, the ability to fully restore rotational stability with ACL reconstruction (ACLR) remains a challenge because up to 25% of patients may present with a residual pivot shift following surgery. Advocacy for reconstruction of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) is rapidly increasing because biomechanical studies have reported that the ALL is a significant contributor to internal rotational stability of the knee. Although several graft fixation angles for the anatomic ALL reconstruction (ALLR) have been reported in literature, none have been biomechanically validated. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the effect of ALLR graft fixation angle on knee joint kinematics in the clinically relevant setting of a concomitant ACLR. The goal was to find the optimal knee flexion angle for fixation of the ALLR graft that would most accurately restore native knee kinematics without introducing overconstraint to the knee. It was hypothesized that all fixation angles would significantly reduce rotational laxity compared to the sectioned ALL state and that fixation at 30° would best reproduce native joint kinematics. Methods: Eight non-paired fresh-frozen human cadaveric knees with no prior injury, surgical history, or gross anatomic abnormality were evaluated with a 6 degree-of-freedom robotic system. Each specimen underwent a full kinematic assessment in each of the following states: 1) intact, 2) anatomic single-bundle (SB) ACLR with intact ALL, 3) anatomic SB ACLR with sectioned ALL, 4) 7 anatomic SB ACLR and ALLR states utilizing ALL graft fixation knee flexion angles of 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75° and 90°, and 5) sectioned ACL and ALL. Internal rotation during a 5 N-m internal rotation torque and anterior displacement during an 88 N anterior load were recorded at 15° intervals between 0° and 120° of knee flexion. Axial plane displacement and

  13. Treatment of the ulnar nerve for overhead throwing athletes undergoing ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Matthew S; Camp, Christopher L; Elattrache, Neal S; Altchek, David W; Dines, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    Ulnar nerve (UN) injuries are a common complaint amongst overhead athletes. The UN is strained during periods of extreme valgus stress at the elbow, especially in the late-cocking and early acceleration phases of throwing. Although early ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) reconstruction techniques frequently included routine submuscular UN transposition, this is becoming less common with more modern techniques. We review the recent literature on the sites of UN compression, techniques to evaluate the UN nerve, and treatment of UN pathology in the overhead athlete. We also discuss our preferred techniques for selective decompression and anterior transposition of the UN when indicated. More recent studies support the use of UN transpositions only when there are specific preoperative symptoms. Athletes with isolated ulnar neuropathy are increasingly being treated with subcutaneous anterior transposition of the nerve rather than submuscular transposition. When ulnar neuropathy occurs with UCL insufficiency, adoption of the muscle-splitting approach for UCL reconstructions, as well as using a subcutaneous UN transposition have led to fewer postoperative complications and improved outcomes. Prudent handling of the UN in addition to appropriate surgical technique can lead to a high percentage of athletes who return to competitive sports following surgery for ulnar neuropathy. PMID:27795946

  14. Clinical outcomes of allograft versus autograft in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Baer, Geoffrey S; Harner, Christopher D

    2007-10-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are the most common complete ligamentous injury to the knee. The optimal graft should be able to reproduce the anatomy and biomechanics of the ACL, be incorporated rapidly with strong initial fixation, and cause low graft-site morbidity. This article reviews the literature comparing the clinical outcomes following allograft and autograft ACL reconstruction and examines current issues regarding graft choice.

  15. Clinical outcomes of allograft versus autograft in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Baer, Geoffrey S; Harner, Christopher D

    2007-10-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are the most common complete ligamentous injury to the knee. The optimal graft should be able to reproduce the anatomy and biomechanics of the ACL, be incorporated rapidly with strong initial fixation, and cause low graft-site morbidity. This article reviews the literature comparing the clinical outcomes following allograft and autograft ACL reconstruction and examines current issues regarding graft choice. PMID:17920959

  16. Preparing a female collegiate athlete for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Leech, Edward

    2003-01-01

    An anterior cruciate ligament injury is common among athletes involved in sports where cutting or sudden changes of position occur. This is a case study of a female collegiate athlete who sustained an anterior cruciate ligament injury, with a small meniscus tear, and decides on a course of surgery. Questions she has about the initial injury, as well as subsequent questions concerning reconstructive surgery using a patellar graft and the course of rehabilitation, are answered. A chart of her rehabilitation protocol is provided.

  17. Baseline Predictors of Health-Related Quality of Life After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Warren R.; Wolf, Brian R.; Harrell, Frank E.; Reinke, Emily K.; Huston, Laura J.; Spindler, Kurt P.; Nwosu, Samuel K.; Kaeding, Christopher C.; Parker, Richard D.; Wright, Rick W.; Andrish, Jack T.; McCarty, Eric C.; Amendola, Annunziato; Marx, Robert G.; Wolcott, Michelle L.; Liu, Zhouwen; Alvarez, JoAnn M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Limited information exists regarding predictors of general quality of life following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with up to six-year follow-up. We hypothesized that certain variables evaluated at the time of ACL reconstruction will predict the general quality of life as measured by the Short Form-36 (SF-36). Methods: All unilateral ACL reconstructions from 2002 to 2004 in patients currently enrolled in a prospective multicenter cohort were evaluated. Patients preoperatively completed the SF-36 validated outcome instrument. Surgeons documented intra-articular pathological conditions and treatment, as well as the ACL reconstruction surgical technique. At baseline and at a minimum of two and six years postoperatively, patients completed the SF-36. Longitudinal analysis was performed for the two-year and six-year end points. Results: Of the initial 1512 subjects, at least one follow-up questionnaire was obtained from 1411 subjects (93%). The cohort was 44% female, and the median patient age at enrollment was twenty-three years. The mean scores were 41.9 points for the Physical Component Summary (PCS) and 51.7 points for the Mental Component Summary (MCS) at baseline, 53.6 points for the PCS and 52.0 points for the MCS at two years, and 54.0 points for the PCS and 52.4 points for the MCS at six years. Significant predictors of a higher PCS score were a higher baseline PCS score, younger age, lower baseline body mass index, having >50% of the lateral meniscus excised, or having no treatment done on a lateral meniscal tear. In contrast, significant predictors of a lower PCS score were a shorter follow-up time since surgery, revision ACL reconstruction, smoking at baseline, fewer years of education, and chondromalacia of the lateral tibial plateau. The mean utility gained at six years after ACL reconstruction was 5.3 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Conclusions: Large improvements in the PCS (with an effect size of 1.2) were noted at two

  18. RISKS AND CONSEQUENCES OF USING THE TRANSPORTAL TECHNIQUE IN RECONSTRUCTING THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN THE FEMORAL TUNNEL, LATERAL SUPERIOR GENICULAR ARTERY AND LATERAL EPICONDYLE OF THE FEMORAL CONDYLE

    PubMed Central

    Astur, Diego Costa; Aleluia, Vinicius; Santos, Ciro Veronese; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Badra, Ricardo; Oliveira, Saulo Gomes; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Define a security zone to avoid possibles vascular and ligamentar complications during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Methods: Arthroscopic reconstruction using the transtibial and transportal technique in cadaver knees was performed followed by dissection and measurement of the distance between the femoral tunnel and the proximal attachment of the lateral collateral ligament and the femoral tunnel and the lateral superior genicular artery. Results: The measure of the analysed distances show us an aproximation between the major branch of the lateral superior genicular artery and the femoral insertion of the colateral lateral ligament and the femoral tunnel during the transportal technique. Conclusion: We realize that the use of technical ship it to arthroscopic ACL reconstruction has a higher probability of injury to the lateral geniculate artery and insertion of the lateral collateral ligament, promoting post-surgical complications such as instability of the knee, osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle and ligamentização graft. PMID:27047873

  19. Influence of patellar ligament insertion angle on quadriceps usage during walking in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed subjects.

    PubMed

    Shin, Choongsoo S; Chaudhari, Ajit M; Dyrby, Chris O; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2009-06-01

    Reduced quadriceps contraction has been suggested as an adaptation to prevent anterior tibial translation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient knees. This theory has been supported by a recent study that peak knee flexion moment (thought to be created by a decrease of quadriceps contraction) during walking was negatively correlated with patellar ligament insertion angle (PLIA) in ACL-deficient knees, but not in contralateral, uninjured knees. In addition, the PLIA was significantly smaller in ACL-deficient knees than in contralateral, uninjured knees. However, it is unknown whether ACL reconstruction restores the PLIA or whether the relationship between the PLIA and knee flexion moments previously observed in ACL-deficient knees disappears. This study tested the following hypotheses: (1) The PLIA of ACL-reconstructed knees is significantly smaller than the PLIA of uninjured contralateral knees; (2) Peak knee flexion moment (balanced by net quadriceps moment) during walking is negatively correlated with the PLIA in ACL-reconstructed knees. The PLIA of 24 ACL-reconstructed and contralateral knees were measured using MRI, and peak knee flexion moments during walking were measured. Results showed that the PLIA of ACL-reconstructed (22.9 +/- 4.4 degrees) knees was not significantly smaller (p = 0.09, power = 0.99) than the PLIA of contralateral (24.1 +/- 4.8 degrees) knees. Peak knee flexion moment was not correlated with the PLIA following ACL reconstruction (R2 = 0.016, power = 0.99). However, the magnitude of the knee flexion moment remained significantly lower in ACL-reconstructed knees. In summary, this study has shown that the PLIA of ACL-reconstructed knees returned to normal and that patients no longer adapt their gait in response to the PLIA, though quadriceps function did not return to normal levels.

  20. Treatment of medial collateral ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Ryan G; Bosco, Joseph A; Sherman, Orrin H

    2009-03-01

    The medial collateral ligament is the most frequently injured ligament of the knee. The anatomy and biomechanical role of this ligament and the associated posteromedial structures of the knee continue to be explored. Prophylactic knee bracing has shown promise in preventing injury to the medial collateral ligament, although perhaps at the cost of functional performance. Most isolated injuries are treated nonsurgically. Recent studies have investigated ligament-healing variables, including modalities such as ultrasound and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Concomitant damage to the anterior or posterior cruciate ligaments is a common indication to surgically address the high-grade medial collateral ligament injury. The optimal treatment of multiligamentous knee injuries continues to evolve, and controversy exists surrounding the role of medial collateral ligament repair/reconstruction, with data supporting both conservative and surgical management. PMID:19264708

  1. Multiple Looping Technique for Tibial Fixation in Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jung Ho; Yoon, Kyoung Ho; Song, Sang Jun; Roh, Young Hak; Lee, Jae Woo

    2015-01-01

    The outcomes of posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction may be negatively affected by insufficient tibial tunnel fixation due to relatively lower bone density of the proximal tibia. We introduce a new technique of tibial fixation for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using free tendon Achilles allograft that is less affected by the bone density of the tibial metaphysis. PMID:25973367

  2. Arthroscopic-Assisted Management of Unstable Distal-Third Clavicle Fractures: Conoid Ligament Reconstruction and Fracture Cerclage With Sutures

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, Luis Natera; Reiriz, Juan Sarasquete

    2015-01-01

    Surgical treatment is usually indicated for the management of Neer type IIB fractures of the distal third of the clavicle. These unstable injuries have shown a rate of nonunion that oscillates around 30% to 45% when managed conservatively, and surgical strategies often require a second operation for implant removal. We describe an arthroscopic-assisted technique for the treatment of Neer type IIB unstable distal-third clavicle fractures that overcomes the issues related to open surgery, metal hardware, and implant irritation. This technique increases the load to failure of the construct by means of adding a synthetic conoid ligament reconstruction with a nonrigid suspension device, and it allows the diagnosis and treatment of associated glenohumeral injuries. Our technique incorporates a fracture interfragmentary fixation with sutures, thus avoiding a second operation for implant removal. PMID:26870642

  3. Autograft Versus Nonirradiated Allograft Tissue for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mariscalco, Michael W.; Magnussen, Robert A.; Mehta, Divyesh; Hewett, Timothy E.; Flanigan, David C.; Kaeding, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Background An autograft has traditionally been the gold standard for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), but the use of allograft tissue has increased in recent years. While numerous studies have demonstrated that irradiated allografts are associated with increased failure rates, some report excellent results after ACLR with nonirradiated allografts. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine whether the use of nonirradiated allograft tissue is associated with poorer outcomes when compared with autografts. Hypothesis Patients undergoing ACLR with autografts versus nonirradiated allografts will demonstrate no significant differences in graft failure risk, laxity on postoperative physical examination, or differences in patient-oriented outcome scores. Study Design Systematic review. Methods A systematic review was performed to identify prospective or retrospective comparative studies (evidence level 1, 2, or 3) of autografts versus nonirradiated allografts for ACLR. Outcome data included graft failure based on clinical findings and instrumented laxity, postoperative laxity on physical examination, and patient-reported outcome scores. Studies were excluded if they did not specify whether the allograft had been irradiated. Quality assessment and data extraction were performed by 2 examiners. Results Nine studies comparing autografts and nonirradiated allografts were included. Six of the 9 studies compared bone– patellar tendon–bone (BPTB) autografts with BPTB allografts. Two studies compared hamstring tendon autografts to hamstring tendon allografts, and 1 study compared hamstring tendon autografts to tibialis anterior allografts. The mean patient age in 7 of 9 studies ranged from 24.5 to 32 years, with 1 study including only patients older than 40 years and another not reporting patient age. The mean follow-up duration was 24 to 94 months. Six of 9 studies reported clinical graft failure rates, 8 of 9 reported postoperative instrumented

  4. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Screw Fixation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizari, Mahmoud; Wang, Bin; Snow, Martyn; Barrett, Mel

    2008-09-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental and finite element analysis of tibial screw fixation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The mechanical properties of the bone and tendon graft are obtained from experiments using porcine bone and bovine tendon. The results of the numerical study are compared with those from mechanical testing. Analysis shows that the model may be used to establish the optimum placement of the tunnel in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by predicting mechanical parameters such as stress, strain and displacement at regions in the tunnel wall.

  5. The Impact of the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) Research on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Orthopaedic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, T. Sean; Parker, Richard D.; Patel, Ronak M.; Andrish, Jack T.; Spindler, Kurt P.

    2015-01-01

    With an estimated 200,000 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions performed annually in the United States, there is an emphasis on determining patient-specific information to help educate patients on expected clinically relevant outcomes. The Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network consortium was created in 2002 to enroll and longitudinally follow a large population cohort of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. The study group has enrolled >4,400 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions from seven institutions to establish the large level I prospective anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction outcomes cohort. The group has become more than a database with information regarding anterior cruciate ligament injuries; it has helped to establish a new benchmark for conducting multicenter, multisurgeon orthopaedic research. The changes in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction practice resulting from the group include the use of autograft for high school, college, and competitive athletes in their primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. Other modifications include treatment options for meniscus and cartilage injuries, as well as lifestyle choices made after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. PMID:25667401

  6. The Impact of the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) Research on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Orthopaedic Practice.

    PubMed

    Lynch, T Sean; Parker, Richard D; Patel, Ronak M; Andrish, Jack T; Spindler, Kurt P; Amendola, Annunziata; Brophy, Robert H; Dunn, Warren R; Flanigan, David C; Huston, Laura J; Jones, Morgan H; Kaeding, Christopher C; Marx, Robert G; Matava, Matthew J; McCarty, Eric C; Pedroza, Angela D; Reinke, Emily K; Wolf, Brian R; Wright, Rick W

    2015-03-01

    With an estimated 200,000 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions performed annually in the United States, there is an emphasis on determining patient-specific information to help educate patients on expected clinically relevant outcomes. The Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network consortium was created in 2002 to enroll and longitudinally follow a large population cohort of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. The study group has enrolled >4,400 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions from seven institutions to establish the large level I prospective anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction outcomes cohort. The group has become more than a database with information regarding anterior cruciate ligament injuries; it has helped to establish a new benchmark for conducting multicenter, multisurgeon orthopaedic research. The changes in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction practice resulting from the group include the use of autograft for high school, college, and competitive athletes in their primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. Other modifications include treatment options for meniscus and cartilage injuries, as well as lifestyle choices made after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  7. Evaluation of Polycaprolactone Scaffold with Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor and Fibroblasts in an Athymic Rat Model for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Nima; Arshi, Armin; Nazemi, Azadeh; Wu, Ben; Petrigliano, Frank A.; McAllister, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common ligamentous injury often necessitating surgery. Current surgical treatment options include ligament reconstruction with autograft or allograft, which have their inherent limitations. Thus, there is interest in a tissue-engineered substitute for use in ACL regeneration. However, there have been relatively few in vivo studies to date. In this study, an athymic rat model of ACL reconstruction was used to evaluate electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) grafts, with and without the addition of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and human foreskin fibroblasts. We examined the regenerative potential of tissue-engineered ACL grafts using histology, immunohistochemistry, and mechanical testing up to 16 weeks postoperatively. Histology showed infiltration of the grafts with cells, and immunohistochemistry demonstrated aligned collagen deposition with minimal inflammatory reaction. Mechanical testing of the grafts demonstrated significantly higher mechanical properties than immediately postimplantation. Acellular grafts loaded with bFGF achieved 58.8% of the stiffness and 40.7% of the peak load of healthy native ACL. Grafts without bFGF achieved 31.3% of the stiffness and 28.2% of the peak load of healthy native ACL. In this in vivo rodent model study for ACL reconstruction, the histological and mechanical evaluation demonstrated excellent healing and regenerative potential of our electrospun PCL ligament graft. PMID:25744933

  8. Evaluation of polycaprolactone scaffold with basic fibroblast growth factor and fibroblasts in an athymic rat model for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Leong, Natalie Luanne; Kabir, Nima; Arshi, Armin; Nazemi, Azadeh; Wu, Ben; Petrigliano, Frank A; McAllister, David R

    2015-06-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common ligamentous injury often necessitating surgery. Current surgical treatment options include ligament reconstruction with autograft or allograft, which have their inherent limitations. Thus, there is interest in a tissue-engineered substitute for use in ACL regeneration. However, there have been relatively few in vivo studies to date. In this study, an athymic rat model of ACL reconstruction was used to evaluate electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) grafts, with and without the addition of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and human foreskin fibroblasts. We examined the regenerative potential of tissue-engineered ACL grafts using histology, immunohistochemistry, and mechanical testing up to 16 weeks postoperatively. Histology showed infiltration of the grafts with cells, and immunohistochemistry demonstrated aligned collagen deposition with minimal inflammatory reaction. Mechanical testing of the grafts demonstrated significantly higher mechanical properties than immediately postimplantation. Acellular grafts loaded with bFGF achieved 58.8% of the stiffness and 40.7% of the peak load of healthy native ACL. Grafts without bFGF achieved 31.3% of the stiffness and 28.2% of the peak load of healthy native ACL. In this in vivo rodent model study for ACL reconstruction, the histological and mechanical evaluation demonstrated excellent healing and regenerative potential of our electrospun PCL ligament graft. PMID:25744933

  9. Evaluation of polycaprolactone scaffold with basic fibroblast growth factor and fibroblasts in an athymic rat model for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Leong, Natalie Luanne; Kabir, Nima; Arshi, Armin; Nazemi, Azadeh; Wu, Ben; Petrigliano, Frank A; McAllister, David R

    2015-06-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common ligamentous injury often necessitating surgery. Current surgical treatment options include ligament reconstruction with autograft or allograft, which have their inherent limitations. Thus, there is interest in a tissue-engineered substitute for use in ACL regeneration. However, there have been relatively few in vivo studies to date. In this study, an athymic rat model of ACL reconstruction was used to evaluate electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) grafts, with and without the addition of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and human foreskin fibroblasts. We examined the regenerative potential of tissue-engineered ACL grafts using histology, immunohistochemistry, and mechanical testing up to 16 weeks postoperatively. Histology showed infiltration of the grafts with cells, and immunohistochemistry demonstrated aligned collagen deposition with minimal inflammatory reaction. Mechanical testing of the grafts demonstrated significantly higher mechanical properties than immediately postimplantation. Acellular grafts loaded with bFGF achieved 58.8% of the stiffness and 40.7% of the peak load of healthy native ACL. Grafts without bFGF achieved 31.3% of the stiffness and 28.2% of the peak load of healthy native ACL. In this in vivo rodent model study for ACL reconstruction, the histological and mechanical evaluation demonstrated excellent healing and regenerative potential of our electrospun PCL ligament graft.

  10. Biomechanical jumping differences among elite female handball players with and without previous anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a novel inertial sensor unit study.

    PubMed

    Setuain, Igor; Millor, Nora; González-Izal, Miriam; Gorostiaga, Esteban M; Gómez, Marisol; Alfaro-Adrián, Jesús; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2015-09-01

    Persistent biomechanical and jumping capacity alterations have been observed among female athletes who have sustained anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. The purpose of this study was to examine if biomechanical jumping differences persist among a cohort of elite female handball players with previous ACL reconstruction several years after return to top-level competition. In order to achieve this goal, a direct mechanics simplified analysis by using a single Inertial Sensor Unit (IU) was used. Twenty-one elite female (6 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed and 15 uninjured control players) handball players were recruited and evaluated 6.0 ± 3.5 years after surgical anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Bilateral and unilateral vertical jumps were performed to evaluate the functional performance and a single inertial sensor unit was employed in order to collect 3D acceleration and 3D orientation data. Previously ACL-reconstructed analysed athletes demonstrated significant (p < 0.05) alterations in relation to the three-dimensional axis (X-Y-Z) supported accelerations and differing jump phase durations, including jumping performance values, in both bilateral and unilateral jumping manoeuvres several years after ACL reconstruction. Identification of the encountered deficits through the use of an IU devise could provide clinicians with a new reliable tool for movement analysis in a clinical setting.

  11. Implementation of Open and Closed Kinetic Chain Quadriceps Strengthening Exercises after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Michael D.; Denegar, Craig R.; Winzenried, Jay A.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the effects of open kinetic chain (OKC) and closed kinetic chain (CKC) exercise on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) strain and patellofemoral joint stress, suggesting a combination of the two for quadriceps strengthening after ACL reconstruction. Both OKC and CKC exercises may be modified and implemented for quadriceps strengthening after…

  12. How to overcome severed sutures of the tibial bone peg in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yip, Daniel K H; Wong, Jimmy W K; Chien, Eric P

    2002-03-01

    We report a case of severed sutures of the tibial bone peg during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The graft retracted proximally in the bone tunnel. We describe a simple and aesthetically acceptable method to salvage this rare complication by use of a small arthrotomy through the defect in the remaining patellar tendon.

  13. Neural Excitability Alterations After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Pietrosimone, Brian G.; Lepley, Adam S.; Ericksen, Hayley M.; Clements, Amy; Sohn, David H.; Gribble, Phillip A.

    2015-01-01

    Context Neuromuscular dysfunction is common after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R). However, little is known about quadriceps spinal-reflex and descending corticomotor excitability after ACL-R. Understanding the effects of ACL-R on spinal-reflex and corticomotor excitability will help elucidate the origins of neuromuscular dysfunction. Objective To determine whether spinal-reflex excitability and corticomotor excitability differed between the injured and uninjured limbs of patients with unilateral ACL-R and between these limbs and the matched limbs of healthy participants. Design Case-control study. Setting Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants A total of 28 patients with unilateral ACL-R (9 men, 19 women; age = 21.28 ± 3.79 years, height = 170.95 ± 10.04 cm, mass = 73.18 ± 18.02 kg, time after surgery = 48.10 ± 36.17 months) and 29 participants serving as healthy controls (9 men, 20 women; age = 21.55 ± 2.70 years, height = 170.59 ± 8.93 cm, mass = 71.89 ± 12.70 kg) volunteered. Main Outcome Measure(s) Active motor thresholds (AMTs) were collected from the vastus medialis (VM) using transcranial magnetic stimulation. We evaluated VM spinal reflexes using the Hoffmann reflex normalized to maximal muscle responses (H : M ratio). Voluntary quadriceps activation was measured with the superimposed-burst technique and calculated using the central activation ratio (CAR). We also evaluated whether ACL-R patients with high or low voluntary activation had different outcomes. Results The AMT was higher in the injured than in the uninjured limb in the ACL-R group (t27 = 3.32, P = .003) and in the matched limb of the control group (t55 = 2.05, P = .04). The H : M ratio was bilaterally higher in the ACL-R than the control group (F1,55 = 5.17, P = .03). The quadriceps CAR was bilaterally lower in the ACL-R compared with the control group (F1,55 = 10.5, P = .002). The ACL-R group with low voluntary activation (CAR < 0.95) had higher AMT than

  14. Surgical treatment of acute and chronic anterior and posterior cruciate ligament and medial-side injuries of the knee.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Mark G; Stannard, James P

    2011-06-01

    KD-IIIM knee injuries are challenging injuries that can do well when anatomic reconstruction techniques are used. This article describes the authors preferred reconstructions, timing of surgery, and rehabilitation techniques. The reconstructions are generally initiated 3 or 4 weeks after the injury when the local soft tissue injury allows and associated fractures have already been stabilized. The posterior cruciate ligament, posteromedial corner, and meniscus injuries are addressed in the initial operation. The corresponding author prefers to come back 6 weeks later and reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament and assure that acceptable progress has been made regarding knee motion.

  15. A Retrospective Review of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Patellar Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Chahal, Jaskarndip; Lee, Andrew; Heard, Wendell; Bach, Bernard R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The comparative data in the literature regarding rates of reoperation, revision ligament surgery, and contralateral surgery following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) are variable and are often derived from studies with multiple surgeons, multiple centers, different surgical techniques, and a wide variety of graft choices. Purpose: To describe and analyze a single surgeon’s experience with ACLR using bone–patellar tendon–bone (BPTB) as the primary graft choice over a 25-year period. Study Design: Retrospective case series. Methods: All patients who underwent ACLR from 1986 to 2012 were identified from a prospectively maintained database. Traditional follow-up was only for patients who sought subsequent surgery with the index surgeon or presented with contralateral ACL injury. Covariates of interest included age, sex, time, and graft selection. Outcomes of interest included reoperation rates after primary/revision ACLR, rate of revision ACLR, success of meniscal repair with concomitant ACLR, and the proportion of patients undergoing contralateral surgery. Results: A total of 1981 patients (mean age, 29 years; 49% male) were identified. Of patients undergoing primary ACLR (n = 1809), 74% had BPTB autograft and 26% had a central third BPTB allograft. The mean age of patients undergoing autograft and allograft ACLR was 26 and 36 years, respectively (P < .05). Allograft tissue usage increased over time (P < .05). The rate of personal ACLR revision surgery was 1.7% (n = 30) for primary cases and 3.5% (n = 6) for revision cases. There were no significant differences in revision rates between primary autograft (1.6%) and allograft (2.0%) ACLR. With allograft use, the method of sterilization did not affect revision rates. The overall reoperation rate following primary ACLR was 10%; the 5-year reoperation rate was 7.7%. The reoperation rate was lower for primary cases reconstructed with allograft versus autograft (5% vs 12%) (P < .0001

  16. Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using tendon allografts--Florida and Louisiana, 2000.

    PubMed

    2001-12-01

    In the United States, approximately 50,000 knee surgeries are performed each year for repairing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Tissue allografts frequently are used for ACL reconstruction, and septic arthritis is a rare complication of such procedures. This report describes four patients who acquired postsurgical septic arthritis probably associated with contaminated bone-tendon-bone allografts used for ACL reconstruction. Effective sterilization methods that do not functionally alter musculoskeletal tissue are needed to prevent allograft-related infections.

  17. Results of meniscectomy and meniscal repair in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    DELEDDA, DAVIDE; ROSSO, FEDERICA; COTTINO, UMBERTO; BONASIA, DAVIDE EDOARDO; ROSSI, ROBERTO

    2015-01-01

    Meniscal tears are commonly associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. A deficient medial meniscus results in knee instability and could lead to higher stress forces on the ACL reconstruction. Comparison of results in meniscectomy and meniscal repairs revealed worse clinical outcomes in meniscectomy, but higher re-operation rates in meniscal repairs. Our aim was to review the results of ACL reconstruction associated with meniscectomy or meniscal repair. PMID:26889472

  18. Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using tendon allografts--Florida and Louisiana, 2000.

    PubMed

    2001-12-01

    In the United States, approximately 50,000 knee surgeries are performed each year for repairing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Tissue allografts frequently are used for ACL reconstruction, and septic arthritis is a rare complication of such procedures. This report describes four patients who acquired postsurgical septic arthritis probably associated with contaminated bone-tendon-bone allografts used for ACL reconstruction. Effective sterilization methods that do not functionally alter musculoskeletal tissue are needed to prevent allograft-related infections. PMID:11770503

  19. Antecedent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery and optimal duration of supervised physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Darain, Haider; Alkitani, Abdulhameed; Yates, Christopher; Bailey, Andrea; Roberts, Simon; Coutts, Fiona; Gleeson, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old patient undergoing unilateral surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the right knee volunteered for the research project and followed an established contemporary hospital-based rehabilitation programme. The patient was supervised post-surgically by an experienced and clinically specialized physiotherapist. The clinical outcomes of rehabilitation were assessed by selected validated patient-reported and objectively-measured outcomes of functional performance capability on four different occasions (pre-surgery, 6th, 12th and 24th week post-surgery). The patient scored 30, 56, 60 and 85 on IKDC (maximum score, 100); 46, 53, 90 and 91 on Lysholm (maximum score, 100); 141, 73, 128 and 175 on K-SES (maximum score, 220); 17, 12, 6 and 6 on the symptom subsection of KOOS (maximum score, 28); 7, 7, 5 and 5 on the pain subsection (maximum score, 36); 1, 0, 3 and 1 on the daily function subsection (maximum score, 68); 0, 0, 5 and 5 on the sport and recreation function subsection (maximum score, 20); 13, 11, 15 and 13 on the quality of life subsection (maximum score, 16) of KOOS at pre-surgery and at the 6th, 12th and 24th week following ACL reconstruction, respectively. Moreover, the patient scored 1.96 m, 1.92 m and 1.99 m on single-leg hop (injured leg) when assessed at pre-surgery and at the 12th and 24th week post-surgery, respectively, following ACL reconstruction. The total time spent in supervised rehabilitation by the patient (675 minutes) was computed as the aggregate patient-reported time spent in exercise during each hospital-based rehabilitation session (verified by physiotherapist evaluation) across the total number of sessions. The patient managed to return to the sport in which he had participated prior to the injury, immediately after the completion of the contemporary rehabilitation programme, at 24 weeks post-surgery. A total of fifteen physiotherapy sessions supervised by the physiotherapist, were attended by the

  20. Do pre-operative knee laxity values influence post-operative ones after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction?

    PubMed

    Signorelli, C; Bonanzinga, T; Lopomo, N; Marcheggiani Muccioli, G M; Bignozzi, S; Filardo, G; Zaffagnini, S; Marcacci, M

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to verify whether pre-reconstruction laxity condition effects post-reconstruction outcome. A total of 100 patients who underwent navigated Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction were included in the study and knee laxity analysed retrospectively. The knee was assessed in six different laxity tests before and after ACL reconstruction, namely antero-posterior (AP) and internal-external (IE) at 30° and 90°, and varus-valgus (VV) rotations at 0° and 30° of flexion. For each test, the least square (LS) fitting line based on pre-operative-to-post-operative laxity value was calculated. To what degree the post-operative laxity value is explainable by the corresponding pre-operative condition was evaluated by the LS line slope. Post-operatively, for each single patient, the grade of laxity decreased at any evaluated test. The strongest influence of pre-operative-to-post-operative laxity values was found during IE30 and IE90 tests. While AP30 and VV0 tests seem to be those in which the post-reconstruction laxity was barely affected by the pre-surgery condition. The analysis of the global laxity reduction confirms the previous results. Following this hypothesis, our study remarks on the importance of combined lesions to secondary restraints and the importance of fully understanding the residual laxity to optimize the surgical technique.

  1. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in the skeletally immature athlete: a review of current concepts: AAOS exhibit selection.

    PubMed

    Fabricant, Peter D; Jones, Kristofer J; Delos, Demetris; Cordasco, Frank A; Marx, Robert G; Pearle, Andrew D; Warren, Russell F; Green, Daniel W

    2013-03-01

    Intrasubstance tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) were once considered a rare injury in skeletally immature athletes but are now observed with increasing frequency. Treatment strategies have evolved as recent studies have identified unique considerations specific to the skeletally immature patient. The current literature now supports the trend toward early operative treatment to restore knee stability and prevent progressive meniscal and/or articular cartilage damage, but the optimal approach to ACL reconstruction in this age group remains controversial. Despite the reported clinical success of transphyseal reconstruction, iatrogenic growth disturbance secondary to physeal damage remains a genuine concern. The reluctance to place drill-holes across open physes has led to the development of numerous "physeal-sparing" reconstruction techniques using anatomic femoral and tibial footprints that have adequately restored anteroposterior and rotational knee stability in biomechanical studies but have demonstrated mixed results in the clinical setting. The intent of this review is to (1) highlight the unique anatomic considerations pertaining to ACL reconstruction in the skeletally immature athlete, (2) discuss preoperative clinical and radiographic assessment of the pediatric patient with a suspected ACL injury, (3) review transphyseal and physeal-sparing reconstruction techniques and highlight surgical technical considerations, (4) present clinical outcomes according to patient and technique-specific factors, and (5) review age-specific injury prevention treatment strategies and a novel treatment algorithm based on skeletal maturity. ACL reconstruction in the skeletally immature athlete typically results in a successful clinical outcome, yet the optimal surgical technique is still controversial. This review will help guide the management of ACL injuries in the pediatric athlete. PMID:23467876

  2. PHYSICAL THERAPY INTERVENTION FOR MEDIAL PATELLOFEMORAL LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION AFTER REPEATED LATERAL PATELLAR SUBLUXATION/DISLOCATION

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Brianne; Vitale, Ashley; Apergis, Demitra; Wirth, Stephen; Grossman, Mark G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The incidence of patellar subluxation or dislocation has been documented up to 43/100,000 with females more prevalent then males. There are many contributing factors involving the hip, knee, and ankle that lead to patellar subluxation. A patellar position of lateral tilt with lateral glide may indicate weakness of the vastus medialis oblique (VMO) and adductors, increased tightness in the iliotibial band, and overpowering of the vastus lateralis. Patella alta can predispose an individual to lateral dislocation due to the patella placement outside of the femoral trochlear groove with a disadvantage of boney stability. Other factors that may cause the patella to laterally sublux or dislocate during a functional activity or sporting activity include a position of femoral external rotation, tibial internal rotation, and excessive contraction of the vastus lateralis. The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) aids in the prevention of a lateral patellar subluxation or dislocation. In cases where there is recurrent subluxation/dislocation and Magnetic Resonance Imaging confirms a MPFL tear, a reconstruction may be the treatment of choice. Purpose The purpose of this case series is to describe the post-surgical physical therapy management of MPFL reconstructions, outcomes using the Modified Cincinnati Knee Outcome Measure (MCKOM) and to propose staged physical therapy interventions for this pathology in the form of a treatment progression. Methods Post-operative management data and outcomes were retrospectively collected using a detailed chart review methodology from seven subjects who underwent MPFL reconstruction. Findings The Modified Cincinnati Knee Outcome Measure (MCKOM) was analyzed for each participant in four sections that were most important to the return and maintenance of participation in sport. At follow-up the mean scores for the seven subjects in Section 3 (instability) was 19.3/20, Section 4 (overall activity level) was 17.3/20, Section

  3. The effect of graft strength on knee laxity and graft in-situ forces after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Shu; Chen, Wen-Chuan; Huang, Chang-Hung; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Chan, Kam-Kong; Chang, Ting-Kuo

    2015-01-01

    Surgical reconstruction is generally recommended for posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries; however, the use of grafts is still a controversial problem. In this study, a three-dimensional finite element model of the human tibiofemoral joint with articular cartilage layers, menisci, and four main ligaments was constructed to investigate the effects of graft strengths on knee kinematics and in-situ forces of PCL grafts. Nine different graft strengths with stiffness ranging from 0% (PCL rupture) to 200%, in increments of 25%, of an intact PCL's strength were used to simulate the PCL reconstruction. A 100 N posterior tibial drawer load was applied to the knee joint at full extension. Results revealed that the maximum posterior translation of the PCL rupture model (0% stiffness) was 6.77 mm in the medial compartment, which resulted in tibial internal rotation of about 3.01°. After PCL reconstruction with any graft strength, the laxity of the medial tibial compartment was noticeably improved. Tibial translation and rotation were similar to the intact knee after PCL reconstruction with graft strengths ranging from 75% to 125% of an intact PCL. When the graft's strength surpassed 150%, the medial tibia moved forward and external tibial rotation greatly increased. The in-situ forces generated in the PCL grafts ranged from 13.15 N to 75.82 N, depending on the stiffness. In conclusion, the strength of PCL grafts have has a noticeable effect on anterior-posterior translation of the medial tibial compartment and its in-situ force. Similar kinematic response may happen in the models when the PCL graft's strength lies between 75% and 125% of an intact PCL.

  4. The effect of graft strength on knee laxity and graft in-situ forces after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Shu; Chen, Wen-Chuan; Huang, Chang-Hung; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Chan, Kam-Kong; Chang, Ting-Kuo

    2015-01-01

    Surgical reconstruction is generally recommended for posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries; however, the use of grafts is still a controversial problem. In this study, a three-dimensional finite element model of the human tibiofemoral joint with articular cartilage layers, menisci, and four main ligaments was constructed to investigate the effects of graft strengths on knee kinematics and in-situ forces of PCL grafts. Nine different graft strengths with stiffness ranging from 0% (PCL rupture) to 200%, in increments of 25%, of an intact PCL's strength were used to simulate the PCL reconstruction. A 100 N posterior tibial drawer load was applied to the knee joint at full extension. Results revealed that the maximum posterior translation of the PCL rupture model (0% stiffness) was 6.77 mm in the medial compartment, which resulted in tibial internal rotation of about 3.01°. After PCL reconstruction with any graft strength, the laxity of the medial tibial compartment was noticeably improved. Tibial translation and rotation were similar to the intact knee after PCL reconstruction with graft strengths ranging from 75% to 125% of an intact PCL. When the graft's strength surpassed 150%, the medial tibia moved forward and external tibial rotation greatly increased. The in-situ forces generated in the PCL grafts ranged from 13.15 N to 75.82 N, depending on the stiffness. In conclusion, the strength of PCL grafts have has a noticeable effect on anterior-posterior translation of the medial tibial compartment and its in-situ force. Similar kinematic response may happen in the models when the PCL graft's strength lies between 75% and 125% of an intact PCL. PMID:26001045

  5. The Effect of Graft Strength on Knee Laxity and Graft In-Situ Forces after Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yu-Shu; Chen, Wen-Chuan; Huang, Chang-Hung; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Chan, Kam-Kong; Chang, Ting-Kuo

    2015-01-01

    Surgical reconstruction is generally recommended for posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries; however, the use of grafts is still a controversial problem. In this study, a three-dimensional finite element model of the human tibiofemoral joint with articular cartilage layers, menisci, and four main ligaments was constructed to investigate the effects of graft strengths on knee kinematics and in-situ forces of PCL grafts. Nine different graft strengths with stiffness ranging from 0% (PCL rupture) to 200%, in increments of 25%, of an intact PCL’s strength were used to simulate the PCL reconstruction. A 100 N posterior tibial drawer load was applied to the knee joint at full extension. Results revealed that the maximum posterior translation of the PCL rupture model (0% stiffness) was 6.77 mm in the medial compartment, which resulted in tibial internal rotation of about 3.01°. After PCL reconstruction with any graft strength, the laxity of the medial tibial compartment was noticeably improved. Tibial translation and rotation were similar to the intact knee after PCL reconstruction with graft strengths ranging from 75% to 125% of an intact PCL. When the graft’s strength surpassed 150%, the medial tibia moved forward and external tibial rotation greatly increased. The in-situ forces generated in the PCL grafts ranged from 13.15 N to 75.82 N, depending on the stiffness. In conclusion, the strength of PCL grafts have has a noticeable effect on anterior-posterior translation of the medial tibial compartment and its in-situ force. Similar kinematic response may happen in the models when the PCL graft’s strength lies between 75% and 125% of an intact PCL. PMID:26001045

  6. Arterial complications, venous thromboembolism and deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Rob Paulus Augustinus; Reijman, Max; Janssen, Daan Martijn; van Mourik, Jan Bernardus Antonius

    2016-01-01

    AIM To summarize the current knowledge on vascular complications and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. METHODS A systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, Web of Science, CINAHL, PubMed publisher, and Google scholar medical literature databases were searched up to November 10, 2015. Any arthroscopic surgical method of primary or revision intra-articular ACL reconstruction of all graft types in humans was included. A risk of bias assessment was determined. RESULTS Fourty-seven studies were included in the review. Pseudaneurysms were the most frequently reported arterial complication after ACL reconstruction, irrespective of graft type or method of graft fixation with an incidence of 0.3%. The time to diagnosis of arterial complications after ACL reconstruction varied from days to mostly weeks but even years. After ACL reconstruction without thromboprophylaxis, the incidence of DVT was 9.7%, of which 2.1% was symptomatic. The incidence of pulmonary embolism was 0.1%. Tourniquet time > 2 h was related to venous thromboembolism. Thromboprophylaxis is indicated in patients with risk factors for venous thromboembolism. CONCLUSION After ACL reconstruction, the incidence of arterial complications, symptomatic DVT and pulmonary embolism was 0.3%, 2.1% and 0.1% respectively. Arterial complications may occur with all types of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, methods of graft fixation as well as any type of graft. Patients considered to be at moderate or high risk of venous thromboembolism should routinely receive thromboprophylaxis after ACL reconstruction.

  7. Arterial complications, venous thromboembolism and deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Rob Paulus Augustinus; Reijman, Max; Janssen, Daan Martijn; van Mourik, Jan Bernardus Antonius

    2016-01-01

    AIM To summarize the current knowledge on vascular complications and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. METHODS A systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, Web of Science, CINAHL, PubMed publisher, and Google scholar medical literature databases were searched up to November 10, 2015. Any arthroscopic surgical method of primary or revision intra-articular ACL reconstruction of all graft types in humans was included. A risk of bias assessment was determined. RESULTS Fourty-seven studies were included in the review. Pseudaneurysms were the most frequently reported arterial complication after ACL reconstruction, irrespective of graft type or method of graft fixation with an incidence of 0.3%. The time to diagnosis of arterial complications after ACL reconstruction varied from days to mostly weeks but even years. After ACL reconstruction without thromboprophylaxis, the incidence of DVT was 9.7%, of which 2.1% was symptomatic. The incidence of pulmonary embolism was 0.1%. Tourniquet time > 2 h was related to venous thromboembolism. Thromboprophylaxis is indicated in patients with risk factors for venous thromboembolism. CONCLUSION After ACL reconstruction, the incidence of arterial complications, symptomatic DVT and pulmonary embolism was 0.3%, 2.1% and 0.1% respectively. Arterial complications may occur with all types of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, methods of graft fixation as well as any type of graft. Patients considered to be at moderate or high risk of venous thromboembolism should routinely receive thromboprophylaxis after ACL reconstruction. PMID:27672574

  8. The Value of Accurate Magnetic Resonance Characterization of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Tears in the Setting of Multiligament Knee Injury: Imaging Features Predictive of Early Repair vs Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Goiney, Christoper C; Porrino, Jack; Twaddle, Bruce; Richardson, Michael L; Mulcahy, Hyojeong; Chew, Felix S

    2016-01-01

    Multiligament knee injury (MLKI) represents a complex set of pathologies treated with a wide variety of surgical approaches. If early surgical intervention is performed, the disrupted posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) can be treated with primary repair or reconstruction. The purpose of our study was to retrospectively identify a critical length of the distal component of the torn PCL on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that may predict the ability to perform early proximal femoral repair of the ligament, as opposed to reconstruction. A total of 50 MLKIs were managed at Harborview Medical Center from May 1, 2013, through July 15, 2014, by an orthopedic surgeon. Following exclusions, there were 27 knees with complete disruption of the PCL that underwent either early reattachment to the femoral insertion or reconstruction and were evaluated using preoperative MRI. In a consensus fashion, 2 radiologists measured the proximal and distal fragments of each disrupted PCL using preoperative MRI in multiple planes, as needed. MRI findings were correlated with what was performed at surgery. Those knees with a distal fragment PCL length of ≥41mm were capable of, and underwent, early proximal femoral repair. With repair, the distal stump was attached to the distal femur. Alternatively, those with a distal PCL length of ≤32mm could not undergo repair because of insufficient length and as such, were reconstructed. If early surgical intervention for an MLKI involving disruption of the PCL is considered, attention should be given to the length of the distal PCL fragment on MRI to plan appropriately for proximal femoral reattachment vs reconstruction. If the distal PCL fragment measures ≥41mm, surgical repair is achievable and can be considered as a surgical option.

  9. Systematic review of surgical treatments for cranial cruciate ligament disease in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bergh, Mary Sarah; Sullivan, Carly; Ferrell, Christopher L; Troy, Jarrod; Budsberg, Steven C

    2014-01-01

    Surgery for cranial cruciate ligament disease is often recommended; however, it is unclear if one procedure is superior. The aim of this systematic review was to answer the a priori question, "Is there a surgical procedure that will allow a consistent return to normal clinical function in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament disease and is that procedure superior to others?" A systematic literature search was performed through September 2013. Peer reviewed publication in the English language and 6 mo of postoperative follow-up were required. In total, 444 manuscripts were identified and reviewed, and 34 met the inclusion criteria. Two studies provided level 1, 6 provided level 2, 6 provided level 3, and 20 provided level 4 evidence relative to the study question. The most common surgical procedures included tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO, n = 14), lateral extracapsular suture (n = 13), tibial tuberosity advancement (n = 6). The strength of the evaluated evidence most strongly supports the ability of the TPLO in the ability to return dogs to normal function. It also provided strong support that functional recovery in the intermediate postoperative time period was superior following TPLO compared with lateral extracapsular suture. There was insufficient data to adequately evaluate other surgical procedures.

  10. Septic arthritis of the knee following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: results of a survey of sports medicine fellowship directors.

    PubMed

    Matava, M J; Evans, T A; Wright, R W; Shively, R A

    1998-10-01

    To determine the incidence of joint sepsis following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and the prevailing attitudes toward its treatment, we surveyed the directors of Sports Medicine Fellowship programs about their practices in treating and preventing this complication. Of the 74 surgeons surveyed, 61 (82%) responded. These 61 surgeons performed an average of 98 ACL reconstructions yearly; 31 (51 %) routinely used a drain after ACL surgery, 18 (30%) had treated an ACL infection within the past 2 years, and 26 (43%) had treated an infection within the past 5 years. There was no significant difference in the number of infections and the surgeons' case load, graft choice, or method of reconstruction. Fifty-two surgeons (85%) selected culture-specific intravenous (IV) antibiotics and surgical irrigation of the joint with graft retention as initial treatment for the infected patellar tendon autograft, and 39 (64%) chose this regimen to treat the infected allograft. For the resistant infection unresponsive to initial treatment, IV antibiotics with surgical irrigation and graft retention were also selected as the most common treatment combination for 25 (39%) of the 61 respondents. After graft removal, the earliest a revision procedure would be considered was 6 to 9 months. The results of this survey confirm the widely held belief that septic arthritis of the knee is a relatively rare complication following ACL reconstruction. Once an infection is encountered, culture-specific IV antibiotics and surgical joint irrigation with graft retention are recommended as initial treatment. Graft excision and hardware removal is considered only for those infections resistant to initial treatment and for the infected allograft.

  11. Septic arthritis of the knee following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: results of a survey of sports medicine fellowship directors.

    PubMed

    Matava, M J; Evans, T A; Wright, R W; Shively, R A

    1998-10-01

    To determine the incidence of joint sepsis following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and the prevailing attitudes toward its treatment, we surveyed the directors of Sports Medicine Fellowship programs about their practices in treating and preventing this complication. Of the 74 surgeons surveyed, 61 (82%) responded. These 61 surgeons performed an average of 98 ACL reconstructions yearly; 31 (51 %) routinely used a drain after ACL surgery, 18 (30%) had treated an ACL infection within the past 2 years, and 26 (43%) had treated an infection within the past 5 years. There was no significant difference in the number of infections and the surgeons' case load, graft choice, or method of reconstruction. Fifty-two surgeons (85%) selected culture-specific intravenous (IV) antibiotics and surgical irrigation of the joint with graft retention as initial treatment for the infected patellar tendon autograft, and 39 (64%) chose this regimen to treat the infected allograft. For the resistant infection unresponsive to initial treatment, IV antibiotics with surgical irrigation and graft retention were also selected as the most common treatment combination for 25 (39%) of the 61 respondents. After graft removal, the earliest a revision procedure would be considered was 6 to 9 months. The results of this survey confirm the widely held belief that septic arthritis of the knee is a relatively rare complication following ACL reconstruction. Once an infection is encountered, culture-specific IV antibiotics and surgical joint irrigation with graft retention are recommended as initial treatment. Graft excision and hardware removal is considered only for those infections resistant to initial treatment and for the infected allograft. PMID:9788367

  12. Two-Stage Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Bone Grafting Technique Using an Allograft Bone Matrix.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S; Cram, Tyler R; Civitarese, David; O'Brien, Luke; Moulton, Samuel G; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    Outcomes of primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have been reported to be far superior to those of revision reconstruction. However, as the incidence of ACL reconstruction is rapidly increasing, so is the number of failures. The subsequent need for revision ACL reconstruction is estimated to occur in up to 13,000 patients each year in the United States. Revision ACL reconstruction can be performed in one or two stages. A two-stage approach is recommended in cases of improper placement of the original tunnels or in cases of unacceptable tunnel enlargement. The aim of this study was to describe the technique for allograft ACL tunnel bone grafting in patients requiring a two-stage revision ACL reconstruction. PMID:27274452

  13. Two-Stage Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Bone Grafting Technique Using an Allograft Bone Matrix.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S; Cram, Tyler R; Civitarese, David; O'Brien, Luke; Moulton, Samuel G; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    Outcomes of primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have been reported to be far superior to those of revision reconstruction. However, as the incidence of ACL reconstruction is rapidly increasing, so is the number of failures. The subsequent need for revision ACL reconstruction is estimated to occur in up to 13,000 patients each year in the United States. Revision ACL reconstruction can be performed in one or two stages. A two-stage approach is recommended in cases of improper placement of the original tunnels or in cases of unacceptable tunnel enlargement. The aim of this study was to describe the technique for allograft ACL tunnel bone grafting in patients requiring a two-stage revision ACL reconstruction.

  14. Non-anatomical reconstruction of lateral ulnar collateral ligament of the elbow after tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Masuo; Kadota, H; Matsunobu, T; Shimada, E; Iwamoto, Y

    2015-11-01

    We present the case of an 80-year-old man with a tumor recurrence on his right arm 6 years after initial treatment. The lateral aspect of the elbow joint, involving overlaying skin, muscles, tendons, joint capsule, lateral collateral ligament complex, the lateral 1/3 of the capitellum, and lateral epicondyle of humerus were excised in the tumor resection. Intraoperative assessment revealed multidirectional instability of the elbow, and joint stabilization was needed. Because the lateral epicondyle was resected, graft placement in an anatomical position was impossible to carry out. Therefore, non-anatomical reconstruction of lateral ulnar collateral ligament with palmaris longus tendon graft was performed. The skin was reconstructed using an antegrade pedicled radial forearm flap. For wrist extension reconstruction, the pronator quadratus tendon was transferred to the extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon. One year after the operation, elbow range of motion was 5-130°. The patient remains symptom free. The Mayo elbow performance score is good. The Musculoskeletal Tumor Society rating score is excellent. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an elbow lateral ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction after tumor resection.

  15. Long-term outcomes of allograft reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Lenehan, Eric A; Payne, W Barrett; Askam, Brad M; Grana, William A; Farrow, Lutul D

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have found higher rates of failed reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with use of allograft when compared with autograft reconstruction. To evaluate the long-term outcomes of allograft ACL reconstruction, we retrospectively reviewed the cases of all patients who underwent allograft (n=99) or autograft (n=24) ACL reconstruction by 2 senior surgeons at a single institution over an 8-year period. Seventeen (17%) of the 99 allograft reconstructions required additional surgery. Reoperation and revision ACL reconstruction rates (30.8% and 20.5%, respectively) were much higher for patients 25 years of age or younger than for patients older than 25 years. In our cohort of NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) Division I athletes, the revision ACL reconstruction rate was 62% for allograft ACL reconstruction and 0% for autograft reconstruction. Our study found that reoperation and revision rates for irradiated soft-tissue allograft ACL reconstruction were higher than generally quoted for autograft reconstruction. Given the extremely high graft failure rates in patients younger than 25 years, we recommend against routine use of irradiated soft-tissue allograft for ACL reconstruction in younger patients. PMID:25950536

  16. Long-term outcomes of allograft reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Lenehan, Eric A; Payne, W Barrett; Askam, Brad M; Grana, William A; Farrow, Lutul D

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have found higher rates of failed reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with use of allograft when compared with autograft reconstruction. To evaluate the long-term outcomes of allograft ACL reconstruction, we retrospectively reviewed the cases of all patients who underwent allograft (n=99) or autograft (n=24) ACL reconstruction by 2 senior surgeons at a single institution over an 8-year period. Seventeen (17%) of the 99 allograft reconstructions required additional surgery. Reoperation and revision ACL reconstruction rates (30.8% and 20.5%, respectively) were much higher for patients 25 years of age or younger than for patients older than 25 years. In our cohort of NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) Division I athletes, the revision ACL reconstruction rate was 62% for allograft ACL reconstruction and 0% for autograft reconstruction. Our study found that reoperation and revision rates for irradiated soft-tissue allograft ACL reconstruction were higher than generally quoted for autograft reconstruction. Given the extremely high graft failure rates in patients younger than 25 years, we recommend against routine use of irradiated soft-tissue allograft for ACL reconstruction in younger patients.

  17. Pre-tibial synovial cyst after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: case report☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Bulisani, Luís Eduardo Pedigoni; Bulisani, Erickson

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament has been modernized through new surgical techniques and new materials. When tibial fixation is performed using an absorbable screw, complications may occur, such as formation of a pre-tibial cyst. The case described here is about a patient who presented an anteromedial synovial cyst in his right knee, three years after having undergone ACL reconstruction. The patient did not present any pain nor any complaints other than a mass that progressively increased in size, worsened after physical activities. Imaging examinations were requested: simple radiography of the knee and magnetic resonance. Anteromedial imaging of the knee showed a mass with well-delimited borders and internal fluid content, suggestive of a synovial cyst, with communication with the joint cavity through the tibial tunnel, without presenting enlargement or absorption of the bone tunnel. The cyst was surgically resected and the tibial tunnel occlusion was performed using a bone plug. The diagnosis of a synovial cyst was subsequently confirmed through the results from the anatomopathological examination. The patient presented good clinical evolution, with disappearance of the symptoms and a return to physical activities. PMID:26229880

  18. [Carbon-fiber implants for knee ligament reconstruction. 10-year results].

    PubMed

    Hehl, G; Kinzl, L; Reichel, R

    1997-11-01

    The retrospective results of carbon prostheses for knee ligament reconstruction in 120 patients, as established by questionnaire, are reported at 10 +/- 2 years follow-up. Eighty patients could also be reviewed clinically. Some 60% of the patients showed good subjective function at reduced activity level. Complications were seen in 72.5% of the patients with rupture of the carbon prosthesis and in 68% of those with synovitis. X-ray showed osteoarthritis in up to 59% of the patients. Carbon prostheses for collateral ligament reconstruction (85% medial, 5.8% lateral) were successful in 75% of cases. Activity and time seem to be less responsible for failure of the carbon prostheses than the features of growing in. Destruction of the knee joint over time is due to reactive synovitis and catabolic enzyme reaction and correlates with joint effusion and pain. If these problems appear, (arthroscopic) resection of the synovia is indicated to interrupt the circulus vitiosus.

  19. Anatomic Single-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Remnant Preservation Using Outside-In Technique

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung-Ill; Kwon, Sai-Won; Choi, Hyung-Suk; Chun, Dong-Il; Kim, Yong-Beom; Kim, Byoung-Min

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a modified anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction technique using the FlipCutter guide pin (Arthrex, Naples, FL) as a retrograde drill and a cortical suspensory fixation device (TightRope; Arthrex) with an adjustable graft loop length. Preservation of the ACL remnant as a biological sleeve for the graft is an important issue from the viewpoints of acceleration of revascularization and ligamentization, preservation of the proprioceptive nerve fibers, enhancement of the biological environment for healing, and maintenance of the anchor point at the native tibial attachment, in addition to yielding a lower incidence of tibial bone tunnel enlargement. The goal of our technique is to obtain some advantages of the remnant-preserving technique through an anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction, which is performed to minimize damage to the ACL tibial remnant. PMID:26759771

  20. Anatomic Single-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Remnant Preservation Using Outside-In Technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Ill; Kwon, Sai-Won; Choi, Hyung-Suk; Chun, Dong-Il; Kim, Yong-Beom; Kim, Byoung-Min

    2015-08-01

    This report describes a modified anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction technique using the FlipCutter guide pin (Arthrex, Naples, FL) as a retrograde drill and a cortical suspensory fixation device (TightRope; Arthrex) with an adjustable graft loop length. Preservation of the ACL remnant as a biological sleeve for the graft is an important issue from the viewpoints of acceleration of revascularization and ligamentization, preservation of the proprioceptive nerve fibers, enhancement of the biological environment for healing, and maintenance of the anchor point at the native tibial attachment, in addition to yielding a lower incidence of tibial bone tunnel enlargement. The goal of our technique is to obtain some advantages of the remnant-preserving technique through an anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction, which is performed to minimize damage to the ACL tibial remnant. PMID:26759771

  1. The immediate intervention effects of robotic training in patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Ye, Miao

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate effects of robot-assisted therapy on functional activity level after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included 10 patients (8 males and 2 females) following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy and treadmill exercise on different days. The Timed Up-and-Go test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and maximal extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated in both groups before and after the experiment. [Results] The results for the Timed Up-and-Go Test and the 10-Meter Walk Test improved in the robot-assisted rehabilitation group. Surface electromyography of the vastus medialis muscle showed significant increases in maximum and average discharge after the intervention. [Conclusion] The results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic training. PMID:27512258

  2. Free Bone Plug Quadriceps Tendon Harvest and Suspensory Button Attachment for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Todor, Adrian; Caterev, Sergiu; Nistor, Dan Viorel; Khallouki, Youssef

    2016-06-01

    The most commonly used autografts for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are the bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstring tendons. Each has its advantages and limitations. The bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft can lead to more donor-site morbidity, and the hamstring autograft can be unpredictable in size. The quadriceps tendon, with or without a bone block, has been described as an alternative graft source and has been used especially in revision cases, but in recent years, it has attracted attention even for primary cases. We report a technique for harvesting a free bone quadriceps tendon graft and attaching an extracortical button for femoral fixation for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. PMID:27656375

  3. Anatomic All-Inside Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Quadriceps Tendon Autograft.

    PubMed

    Crall, Timothy S; Gilmer, Brian B

    2015-12-01

    All-inside anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction has recently gained popularity, in part because of its bone-sparing socket preparation and reported lower pain levels after surgery. However, because this technique uses suture loops and cortical suspension buttons for graft fixation, it has mostly been limited to looped graft constructs (e.g., hamstring autograft, peroneus longus allograft). Quadriceps tendon autograft offers several advantages in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction but, until recently, has not been compatible with suture-loop and cortical suspensory fixation. We describe a technique that allows a relatively short (<75 mm) quadriceps tendon autograft (without bone block) to be used with established all-inside anatomic techniques. PMID:27284521

  4. The immediate intervention effects of robotic training in patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Ye, Miao

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate effects of robot-assisted therapy on functional activity level after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included 10 patients (8 males and 2 females) following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy and treadmill exercise on different days. The Timed Up-and-Go test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and maximal extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated in both groups before and after the experiment. [Results] The results for the Timed Up-and-Go Test and the 10-Meter Walk Test improved in the robot-assisted rehabilitation group. Surface electromyography of the vastus medialis muscle showed significant increases in maximum and average discharge after the intervention. [Conclusion] The results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic training. PMID:27512258

  5. Long-term interventions effects of robotic training on patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Rui; Ye, Miao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the long-term interventions effects of robot-assisted therapy rehabilitation on functional activity levels after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 8 patients (6 males and 2 females) who received anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy lasting for one month. The Timed Up-and-Go test, 10-Meter Walk test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] The average value of the of vastus medialis EMG, Functional Reach Test, and the maximum and average extensor strength of the knee joint isokinetic movement increased significantly, and the time of the 10-Meter Walk test decreased significantly. [Conclusion] These results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic walking training as a long-term intervention.

  6. The immediate intervention effects of robotic training in patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Ye, Miao

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate effects of robot-assisted therapy on functional activity level after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included 10 patients (8 males and 2 females) following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy and treadmill exercise on different days. The Timed Up-and-Go test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and maximal extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated in both groups before and after the experiment. [Results] The results for the Timed Up-and-Go Test and the 10-Meter Walk Test improved in the robot-assisted rehabilitation group. Surface electromyography of the vastus medialis muscle showed significant increases in maximum and average discharge after the intervention. [Conclusion] The results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic training.

  7. Long-term interventions effects of robotic training on patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Rui; Ye, Miao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the long-term interventions effects of robot-assisted therapy rehabilitation on functional activity levels after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 8 patients (6 males and 2 females) who received anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy lasting for one month. The Timed Up-and-Go test, 10-Meter Walk test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] The average value of the of vastus medialis EMG, Functional Reach Test, and the maximum and average extensor strength of the knee joint isokinetic movement increased significantly, and the time of the 10-Meter Walk test decreased significantly. [Conclusion] These results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic walking training as a long-term intervention.

  8. Tibial Tunnel Cyst Formation after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Non-Bioabsorbable Interference Screw.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Yogesh V; Bhaskar, Deepu; Phaltankar, Padmanabh M; Charalambous, Charalambos P

    2015-12-01

    Tibial cyst formation following the use of bioabsorbable interference screws in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is well-described; however, cyst formation after the use of metallic interference screws is not well-documented. We describe a case of osteolytic lesion of the proximal tibia presenting to us 20 years after ACL reconstruction using an autologous bone-tendon-bone graft. The original graft fixation technique was interference fixation with a metal screw in the tibial and femoral tunnels. A two-stage revision reconstruction of the ACL was undertaken with curettage and bone grafting of the tibial lesion in the first stage and reconstruction using a four-strand hamstring tendon in the second stage. The patient recovered satisfactorily with complete healing of the cyst and returned to pre-injury level of activities. We have reviewed case reports and case series that describe the aetiology of intra-osseous cyst formation following ACL reconstruction. PMID:26673117

  9. Technical tips: reconstruction of deep and superficial deltoid ligaments by peroneus longus tendon in stage 4 posterior tibial tendon dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lui, T H

    2014-12-01

    The deltoid ligament is composed of the superficial and deep layers. Disruption of the deltoid ligament can occur in rotational ankle fracture, chronic ankle instability, or stage 4 posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. Correcting valgus tilt at the time of flatfoot reconstruction in case of stage 4 posterior tibial tendon dysfunction may prevent future collapse and the need for ankle arthrodesis or possibly ankle arthroplasty. We describe a technique of reconstruction of both the superficial and deep deltoid ligaments by peroneus longus tendon. PMID:25457670

  10. The modified bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft in single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Huijun; Wang, Fei

    2011-06-01

    Bone-patellar tendon-bone graft has been an attractive option for single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in clinical practice. However, the graft-tunnel mismatch in the proximal part of the tibial tunnel and the ultimate strength after postoperative ligamentization process have been potential problems for the traditional 10-mm wide graft. We modified the traditional bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft to make it double-layer, as an ideal substitute graft for single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with better graft-tunnel match and higher initial graft strength.

  11. Re-Tensioning Technique to Cover the Graft With Remnant in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jung Ho; Yoon, Kyoung Ho; Song, Sang Jun; Roh, Young Hak

    2014-01-01

    A number of remnant-preserving techniques to restore proprioceptive function in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction have been described. However, they might not cover the significant amount of the graft with the synovium of the remnant in many cases. We introduce a simple technique that can cover nearly the entire graft with the synovium by re-tensioning the remnant, which might enhance synovialization of the graft and restoration of proprioception. PMID:25685673

  12. Arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using four-strand hamstring tendon graft and interference screws.

    PubMed

    Pinczewski, L A; Thuresson, P; Otto, D; Nyquist, F

    1997-10-01

    We describe an arthroscopic technique for reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) using a four-strand hamstring tendon graft. The femoral tunnel is drilled via the anterolateral portal and the tibial tunnel through the skin incision from the graft harvest. The graft is pulled through the tunnels with pullout sutures and fastened with interference screws. The results to date are good and the procedure can often be performed as day surgery. PMID:9343661

  13. Arthroscopic autograft reconstruction of the inferior glenohumeral ligament: Exploration of technical feasibility in cadaveric shoulder specimens.

    PubMed

    Bouaicha, Samy; Moor, Beat K

    2013-01-01

    Failure of primary arthroscopic Bankart repair in anterior-inferior glenohumeral instability is low, but in some cases revision surgery is required. Revision procedures show good to excellent results but typically are done open and do not respect the anatomical functionality of the joint capsule. The purpose of this cadaveric study was to explore the feasibility of a completely arthroscopic anatomical reconstruction of the inferior glenohumeral ligament using a hamstring autograft.

  14. Bicruciate Ligament Reconstruction in a Professional Rugby Player: Clinical Presentation and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Bohu, Yoann; Klouche, Shahnaz; Herman, Serge; Gerometta, Antoine; Lefevre, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The association of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear and a posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury is rare in athletes, and to our knowledge it has never been described in a professional rugby player. We report the case of a 27-year-old international professional rugby player who presented with an ACL tear associated with chronic posterior laxity on a former PCL tear. The procedure associated arthroscopic ACL and PCL reconstruction in a one-stage operation with two autografts, bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstring tendon, respectively. At 7 months postoperatively, the patient had returned to playing rugby at the same level of play. The therapeutic strategy successfully met the established goals of returning to sports at the same level of play with excellent functional results after 2 years of follow-up. A literature review was performed via PubMed. The inclusion criteria were the studies in English language, assessing the return-to-sport after bicruciate ligament reconstruction in athletes. Eight studies were included in analysis. Only one study has focused on the return-to-sport in 24 competitive athletes and two other studies have included 1 professional athlete each. The overall rate of the return-to-sport after bicruciate reconstruction varied between 100% and 50%. PMID:26491590

  15. Short-term recovery after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a prospective comparison of three autografts.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Michael; Fulkerson, John; Nissen, Carl; Sheehan, T Joseph

    2006-03-01

    Sixty-four patients with three different autografts were prospectively evaluated following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction for motion return, thigh girth, quadriceps activity, assistive device usage, and duration of pain medication usage. The quadriceps tendon group achieved knee extension sooner than the patellar tendon group. The hamstring group used assistive devices for less time than the patellar tendon group. The quadriceps group required less pain medication than either of the groups. There are significant differences in short-term pain medication requirements and restoration of function among patients following ACL reconstruction using different autografts.

  16. Anatomic Graft Passage in Remnant-Preserving Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jin Hwan; Lee, Sang Hak

    2014-01-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction with preservation of the remnant PCL fibers has been performed under the assumption that preserving the fibers contributes to knee kinematics, grafted tendon healing, and recovery of proprioception. This technical note presents a single-bundle, transtibial PCL reconstruction with anatomic graft passage between the remnant PCL fibers. The operation is performed using the posterior trans-septal portal, which can provide excellent visualization while preserving a large amount of remnant PCL fibers. In addition, this technique allows for anatomic graft passage without soft-tissue impingement, and it minimizes the risk of nonanatomic positioning of the PCL grafts. PMID:25473610

  17. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with fresh-frozen patellar tendon allografts.

    PubMed

    Valenti, J R; Sala, D; Schweitzer, D

    1994-01-01

    A prospective study was performed on 30 patients who underwent an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with fresh-frozen patellar tendon allograft. An arthroscopic technique alone was used in 10 patients, and in the other 20 patients this was combined with a miniarthrotomy. After a mean follow up of 35 months, the overall functional results were satisfactory in 85%. There were no cases of infection, disease transmission or tissue rejection. Fresh-frozen patellar tendon allografts are a good method of anterior cruciate reconstruction.

  18. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with fresh-frozen patellar tendon allografts.

    PubMed

    Valenti, J R; Sala, D; Schweitzer, D

    1994-01-01

    A prospective study was performed on 30 patients who underwent an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with fresh-frozen patellar tendon allograft. An arthroscopic technique alone was used in 10 patients, and in the other 20 patients this was combined with a miniarthrotomy. After a mean follow up of 35 months, the overall functional results were satisfactory in 85%. There were no cases of infection, disease transmission or tissue rejection. Fresh-frozen patellar tendon allografts are a good method of anterior cruciate reconstruction. PMID:8002109

  19. Quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Francesco; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Ruzzini, Laura; Papalia, Rocco; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    The quadriceps tendon autograft can be used for primary and revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Despite several successful clinical reports, graft fixation issues remain, and the ideal technique for fixation continues to be controversial. We present a technique of ACL reconstruction with quadriceps tendon autograft (QTA) using a patellar bone block. The tendon end is fixed in the femoral tunnel and the bone plug in the tibial tunnel using reabsorbable interference screws. The advantages of this technique are related to the increase in stiffness of the graft, the achievement of a more anatomic fixation, and a reduction in synovial fluid leakage.

  20. Injury to the Anterior Tibial Artery during Bicortical Tibial Drilling in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Bum; Lim, Jin Woo; Seo, Jeong Gook; Ha, Jeong Ku

    2016-03-01

    Many complications have been reported during or after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, including infection, bleeding, tibial tunnel widening, arthrofibrosis, and graft failure. However, arterial injury has been rarely reported. This paper reports a case of an anterior tibial arterial injury during bicortical tibial drilling in arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, associated with an asymptomatic occlusion of the popliteal artery. The patient had a vague pain which led to delayed diagnosis of compartment syndrome and delayed treatment with fasciotomy. All surgeons should be aware of these rare but critical complications because the results may be disastrous like muscle necrosis as in this case. PMID:26929808

  1. Injury to the Anterior Tibial Artery during Bicortical Tibial Drilling in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Bum; Lim, Jin Woo; Seo, Jeong Gook

    2016-01-01

    Many complications have been reported during or after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, including infection, bleeding, tibial tunnel widening, arthrofibrosis, and graft failure. However, arterial injury has been rarely reported. This paper reports a case of an anterior tibial arterial injury during bicortical tibial drilling in arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, associated with an asymptomatic occlusion of the popliteal artery. The patient had a vague pain which led to delayed diagnosis of compartment syndrome and delayed treatment with fasciotomy. All surgeons should be aware of these rare but critical complications because the results may be disastrous like muscle necrosis as in this case. PMID:26929808

  2. Choosing a Graft for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Surgeon Influence Reigns Supreme.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Matthew; Kraeutler, Matthew J; Freedman, Kevin B; Tucker, Brad S; Salvo, John P; Ciccotti, Michael G; Cohen, Steven B

    2016-01-01

    Selection of a graft type is an important decision for patients undergoing reconstructive surgery for a ligamentous injury. The purpose of this study was to determine the weight of key factors affecting patient selection of graft type for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and to assess patients' knowledge of their particular graft type. We prospectively enrolled 304 patients who underwent primary ACL reconstruction. Patients filled out questionnaires at their first follow-up appointment after surgery and at least 1 year postoperatively. Questionnaires asked which type of graft was used and why they chose that graft. At their first postoperative appointment, 88% of autograft patients and 71% of allograft patients were accurate in stating their graft type and harvest location. The most common factor influencing graft selection was physician recommendation (81.6%). At the time of follow-up, 96% of patients were satisfied with their graft choice. There is a high rate of accuracy with which patients remember the type of graft used for their ACL reconstruction. The majority of patients undergoing ACL reconstruction are primarily influenced by the physician's recommendation. PMID:27327925

  3. Reconstruction of Exenterated Orbit using Combined Surgical and Prosthetic Approach.

    PubMed

    Prithviraj, D R; Gupta, Anish; Khare, Sumit; Garg, Pooja; Pujari, Malesh

    2011-05-01

    Reconstruction of an exenterated orbit remains a challenge. Orbital prostheses are nowadays are made of silicone elastomers. A major limitation with silicone orbital prostheses is their relatively short life span. This case report describes the treatment of a patient with an exenterated orbit using a combined surgical and prosthetic approach. The upper and lower eyelids were reconstructed surgically using a deltopectoral flap. A sectional eye prosthesis was made and placed in the modified bottle-neck shaped defect to restore the patient's appearance and confidence. PMID:21969903

  4. Tibial translation and muscle activation during rehabilitation exercises 5 weeks after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tagesson, S; Oberg, B; Kvist, J

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare different rehabilitation exercises with respect to dynamic anterior tibial translation and muscle activation 5 weeks after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Another aim was to compare the ACL-reconstructed knee with the ACL-injured and the uninjured knees for differences in anterior tibial translation and muscle activation during the exercises. Sagittal tibial translation and muscle activation were measured during the Lachman test (static translation) and during seven rehabilitation exercises (dynamic translation) in 19 patients. Results obtained 5 weeks after ACL reconstruction were compared with those obtained before the ACL reconstruction (ACL-deficient and uninjured knee). After ACL reconstruction the seated knee extension produced more anterior tibial translation than the straight leg raise and standing on one leg. The ACL reconstruction reduced the static and the dynamic tibial translation and the tibial translations measured in ACL-reconstructed knees were similar to those measured in uninjured knees. After ACL reconstruction, the patients used a joint stiffening strategy that used more hamstring activation and reduced the dynamic tibial translation. Although all exercises tested are suitable for rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction, to protect the graft from excessive strain, the straight leg raise and squat on one leg are preferable for quadriceps training in the early phase of rehabilitation.

  5. Biomechanical Evaluation of Human Allograft Compression in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Breck; Yasen, Sam; Amis, Andrew; Wilson, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A common problem encountered during ACL reconstruction is asymmetry of proximal-distal graft diameter leading to tunnel upsizing and potential graft-tunnel mismatch. Human allografts are often oedematous, compounding this issue in the context of multi-ligament reconstructions. Tunnel upsizing reduces bone stock, increases the complexity of multi-bundle surgery and may compromise graft-osseous integration if cortical suspensory fixation is used. Graft compression provides uniform size, allowing easy passage into a smaller tunnel, potentially improving the ‘press-fit’ graft-osseous interaction whilst preserving bone stock. To our knowledge, no biomechanical evaluation of this increasing popular technique has been reported. Hypotheses: Graft compression would not cause any significant changes in the biomechanical properties of human allograft tendon that would be detrimental to the function of an ACL reconstruction. Compressed Bioclense® allograft will increase in size when soaked in Ringer’s solution at 36° improving the ‘press-fit’ within the bone socket, decreasing micro-motion at the graft-osseous interface following ACL reconstruction. Method: In-vitro laboratory study. Sixteen samples of Bioclense® treated peroneus longus allograft were quadrupled into GraftLink constructs randomly divided into control and compressed groups. Cross-sectional area (CSA) was determined using alginate moulds and specimens immersed, under tension, in Ringer’s solution at 36.5°. CSA was measured at 8 hours. A further 32 samples were randomised and evaluated under cyclic loading of 70N-220N (1020 cycles) followed by test to failure. A further 30 samples were quadrupled into GraftLink constructs and mounted within porcine femurs using suspensory fixation. High resolution videometer recorded motion at the graft-osseous interface under the same cyclic loading protocol. An independent samples t-test was used to compare changes in CSA whilst a one-way ANOVA was

  6. Quadriceps strength and weight acceptance strategies continue to improve two years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Roewer, Ben D; Di Stasi, Stephanie L; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2011-07-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most commonly-injured knee ligament during sporting activities. After injury, most individuals experience episodes of the knee giving way during daily activities (non-copers). Non-copers demonstrate asymmetrical quadriceps strength and movement patterns, which could have long-term deleterious effects on the integrity of the knee joint. The purpose of this study was to determine if non-copers resolve their strength and movement asymmetries within two years after surgery. 26 Non-copers were recruited to undergo pre-operative quadriceps strength testing and 3-dimensional gait analysis. Subjects underwent surgery to reconstruct the ligament followed by physical therapy focused on restoring normal range of motion, quadriceps strength, and function. Subjects returned for quadriceps strength testing and gait analysis six months and two years after surgery. Acutely after injury, quadriceps strength was asymmetric between limbs, but resolved six months after surgery. Asymmetric knee angles, knee moments, and knee and hip power profiles were also observed acutely after injury and persisted six months after surgery despite subjects achieving symmetrical quadriceps strength. Two years after surgery, quadriceps strength in the involved limb continued to improve and most kinematic and kinetic asymmetries resolved. These findings suggest that adequate quadriceps strength does not immediately resolve gait asymmetries in non-copers. They also suggest that non-copers have the capacity to improve their quadriceps strength and gait symmetry long after ACL reconstruction.

  7. Biomechanical Measures During Landing and Postural Stability Predict Second Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Return to Sport

    PubMed Central

    Paterno, Mark V.; Schmitt, Laura C.; Ford, Kevin R.; Rauh, Mitchell J.; Myer, Gregory D.; Huang, Bin; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Athletes who return to sport participation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) have a higher risk of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury (either reinjury or contralateral injury) compared with non–anterior cruciate ligament–injured athletes. Hypotheses Prospective measures of neuromuscular control and postural stability after ACLR will predict relative increased risk for a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Study Design Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods Fifty-six athletes underwent a prospective biomechanical screening after ACLR using 3-dimensional motion analysis during a drop vertical jump maneuver and postural stability assessment before return to pivoting and cutting sports. After the initial test session, each subject was followed for 12 months for occurrence of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Lower extremity joint kinematics, kinetics, and postural stability were assessed and analyzed. Analysis of variance and logistic regression were used to identify predictors of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Results Thirteen athletes suffered a subsequent second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Transverse plane hip kinetics and frontal plane knee kinematics during landing, sagittal plane knee moments at landing, and deficits in postural stability predicted a second injury in this population (C statistic = 0.94) with excellent sensitivity (0.92) and specificity (0.88). Specific predictive parameters included an increase in total frontal plane (valgus) movement, greater asymmetry in internal knee extensor moment at initial contact, and a deficit in single-leg postural stability of the involved limb, as measured by the Biodex stability system. Hip rotation moment independently predicted second anterior cruciate ligament injury (C = 0.81) with high sensitivity (0.77) and specificity (0.81). Conclusion Altered neuromuscular control of the hip and knee during a dynamic landing task

  8. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with preservation of remnant bundle using hamstring autograft: technical note.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin Hwan; Lee, Yong Seuk; Ha, Hae Chan

    2009-08-01

    During an arthroscopic examination for an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, there is a relatively thick remnant ACL tibial stump attached to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) or rarely remained between the femur origin and the tibia insertion. We thought that preservation of the remnant ACL original bundle might promote graft healing or be helpful in preserving the proprioception and function to stabilize the knee. Therefore, we established a remnant preservation procedure without additional instruments during an ACL reconstruction using a bio-cross pin (RIGIDfix system: Mitek, Johnson & Johnson, USA) for the femoral tunnel fixation. The remnant ACL was sutured (usually three stitches) using a suture hook (Linvatec, Largo, FL), and both ends of the sutures were pulled to the far anteromedial (AM) portal. These sutures protected the remnant tissue during the ACL reconstruction because medial traction of these sutures can provide a wide view during the reconstruction. After the femoral and tibial tunnel formation, these sutures were pulled out to the inferior sleeve of the cross pin using a previously inserted wire loop via an inferior sleeve. After graft passage, a superior cross pin was first fixed and tibial fixation was then performed. Finally, inferior cross pin fixation was performed and ties were made at the entrance of the inferior cross pin. PMID:18299859

  9. ANATOMICAL RECONSTRUCTION OF ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT OF THE KNEE: DOUBLE BAND OR SINGLE BAND?

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Luiz Antonio Zanotelli; Junior, Adair Bervig; Badotti, Augusto Alves; Michelin, Alexandre Froes; Algarve, Rodrigo Ilha; de Quadros Martins, Cesar Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the double-band and single-band techniques for anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee and demonstrate that the double-band technique not only provides greater anterior stability but also causes less pain and a better subjective patient response. Methods: We selected 42 patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, by means of either the single-band anatomical reconstruction technique, using flexor tendon grafts with two tunnels, or the double-band anatomical reconstruction technique, using four tunnels and grafts from the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons. All fixations were performed using interference screws. There was no variation in the sample. Before the operation, the objective and subjective IKDC scores, Lysholm score and length of time with the injury were evaluated. All these variables were reassessed six months later, and the KT-1000 correlation with the contralateral knee was also evaluated. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in subjective evaluations, but the single-band group showed better results in relation to range of motion and objective evaluations including KT-1000 (with statistical significance). Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that there was no difference between the two groups in subjective evaluations, but better results were found using the single-band anatomical technique, in relation to objective evaluations. PMID:27042621

  10. Influence of screw length and diameter on tibial strain energy density distribution after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jie; Kuang, Guan-Ming; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Niu, Wen-Xin; Zhang, Ming; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2014-04-01

    Postoperative tunnel enlargement has been frequently reported after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Interference screw, as a surgical implant in ACL reconstruction, may influence natural loading transmission and contribute to tunnel enlargement. The aims of this study are (1) to quantify the alteration of strain energy den sity (SED) distribution after the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction; and (2) to characterize the influence of screw length and diameter on the degree of the SED alteration. A validated finite element model of human knee joint was used. The screw length ranging from 20 to 30mm with screw diameter ranging from 7 to 9 mm were investigated. In the post-operative knee, the SED increased steeply at the extra-articular tunnel aperture under compressive and complex loadings, whereas the SED decreased beneath the screw shaft and nearby the intra-articular tunnel aperture. Increasing the screw length could lower the SED deprivation in the proximal part of the bone tunnel; whereas increasing either screw length or diameter could aggravate the SED deprivation in the distal part of the bone tunnel. Decreasing the elastic modulus of the screw could lower the bone SED deprivation around the screw. In consideration of both graft stability and SED alteration, a biodegradable interference screw with a long length is recommended, which could provide a beneficial mechanical environment at the distal part of the tunnel, and meanwhile decrease the bone-graft motion and synovial fluid propagation at the proximal part of the tunnel. These findings together with the clinical and histological factors could help to improve surgical outcome, and serve as a preliminary knowledge for the following study of biodegradable interference screw. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Late Occurrence of Cervicothoracic Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligaments in a Surgically Treated Thoracic OPLL Patient

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Seung-Jae; Hong, Seung-Chyul

    2010-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) in the thoracic spine is rare, even in the Far East. A 45-year-old female presented with a 4-month history of progressive motor weakness in the lower extremities, numbness below the midthoracic area, and spastic gait disturbance. Neuroradiological examinations revealed massive OPLLs at the T4-T6 levels with severe anterior compression of the spinal cord. Anterior decompressive corpectomies with bone grafts were performed from T4 to T6 using a trans-thoracic approach. After surgery, the patient made an uneventful recovery. However, eleven years after surgery, the patient developed recurrent lower extremity weakness and spastic gait disturbance. De novo OPLLs at the C6-T2 levels were responsible for the severe spinal cord compression on this occasion. After second surgery, paralysis in both legs was resolved. We present a rare case of late cervicothoracic OPLL in a patient surgically treated for thoracic OPLL. PMID:20157380

  12. Knee stiffness following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: the incidence and associated factors of knee stiffness following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Robertson, G A J; Coleman, S G S; Keating, J F

    2009-08-01

    We reviewed 100 patients retrospectively following primary ACL reconstruction with quadruple hamstring autografts to evaluate the incidence and factors associated with postoperative stiffness. Stiffness was defined as any loss of motion using the contra-lateral leg as a control. The median delay between injury and operation was 15 months. The incidence of stiffness was 12% at 6 months post-reconstruction. Both incomplete attendance at physiotherapy (p<0.005) and previous knee surgery (p<0.005) were the strongest predictors of the stiffness. Anterior knee pain was also associated with the stiffness (p<0.029). Factors that failed to show a significant association with the stiffness included associated MCL sprain at injury (p=0.32), post-injury stiffness (p=1.00) and concomitant menisectomy at reconstruction (p=0.54). Timing of surgery also did not appear to influence the onset of stiffness (median delays: 29 months for stiff patients; 14 months for non-stiff patients). The rate of stiffness fell to 5% at 12 months postreconstruction, without operative intervention.

  13. Coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction: coracoid tunnel diameter correlates with failure risk.

    PubMed

    Rylander, Lucas S; Baldini, Todd; Mitchell, Justin J; Messina, Michael; Justl Ellis, Ian A; McCarty, Eric C

    2014-06-01

    The current study compared tunnel diameter as an independent risk factor for fixation failure from the coracoid after transcoracoid coracoclavicular reconstruction. The effect of variation in coracoid size and scapular bone density on fixation failure was also studied. Sixty-two cadaveric scapulae were randomized into 1 of 4 groups: a control group with no coracoid hole, a group with a 4-mm transcoracoid tunnel, a group with a 6-mm transcoracoid tunnel, and a group with a socket technique using a 6-mm hole superiorly with a 4-mm hole inferiorly. Bone density measures for all specimens were performed. Coracoid dimensions were quantified. Using a cortical button device, all specimens were loaded to failure with an Instron servohydraulic testing machine (Instron Corp, Canton, Massachusetts). All drilled specimens failed by button pullout, and all control specimens failed by coracoid fracture. Average pullout strength for each tunnel subgroup was as follows: 4 mm, 296.9 N; 6 mm, 146.2 N; 6-4 socket, 261.8 N; control, 762.9 N. No difference was found with respect to tunnel subgroups in base height (P=.25) or bone density (P=.44). Load to failure for the control group was significantly higher than for the other 3 techniques. The 4-mm tunnel load to failure was significantly higher than that for the 6-mm tunnel (P=.006). No difference was found between the 4-mm tunnel and the 6-4 socket technique (P=.853). Although it was not statistically significant, a very strong trend was seen toward increased strength of the 6-4 socket over the 6-mm tunnel (P=.051). The study results show that when employing a transcoracoid reconstruction technique, a 4-mm tunnel technique is significantly stronger than a 6-mm tunnel technique. None of the coracoids drilled with the various tunnels approached the strength of the native coracoid controls using a looped wire technique. PMID:24972433

  14. Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using autologous graft from quadriceps tendon to treat recurrent patellar dislocation☆

    PubMed Central

    Calapodopulos, Constantino Jorge; Nogueira, Marcelo Corvino; Eustáquio, José Martins Juliano; Calapodopulos Júnior, Constantino Jorge; Rodrigues, Oreston Alves

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the surgical technique using the quadriceps tendon as a graft in static reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament. Methods This was a prospective case series study in which the participants were 22 patients with a diagnosis of recurrent patellar dislocation without any other anatomical alterations that required surgical treatment. The functional results from the technique were evaluated using clinical data and the Lysholm questionnaire, one year after the operation. Results It was observed that the patients were predominantly female (86%) and under 21 years of age (73%), just like in the literature. At the first annual return after the surgery, there was no significant pain on medium efforts, no loss of range of motion and a positive apprehension test. According to the questionnaire used, the results were graded as good. The patients who reported having severe pain on greater effort were involved in employment-related legal disputes. Conclusion This technique showed low morbidity and good functional results over the short term. PMID:27069888

  15. Comparison of the clinical effects of open and closed chain exercises after medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Wang, Jun; Wang, Fei

    2014-10-01

    [Purpose] To compare the effects of open-chain exercise (OCE) and closed-chain exercise (CCE) for patients after medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Forty patients after MPFL reconstruction were randomly divided into an OCE group and a CCE group. All the patients were evaluated at four different time points. [Results] The mean change of thigh circumference decrease in the CCE group was lower than that in the OCE group at both the 3rd and 6th month after surgery. The Lysholm score of the CCE group was higher than that of the OCE group at both the 3rd and 6th month. At the 3rd month after surgery, the visual analog scale score of the CCE group was lower than that of the OCE group. [Conclusion] CCE is better than OCE for both short and long term outcomes of patients after MPFL reconstruction. PMID:25364112

  16. Bilateral Medial Tibial Plateau Fracture after Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Chul Hyun; Lee, Kyung Jae; Jeon, Jong Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Tibial plateau fractures after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are rare, and only isolated cases have been reported. The authors describe a case of bilateral medial tibial plateau fracture following a minor motorcycle accident in a patient who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction in the past. Two years and four months before the accident, the patient underwent an arthroscopically assisted ACL reconstruction using double-bundle technique on his left knee at a hospital. He had the same surgery using single-bundle technique on his right knee about eight months ago at another hospital. The fractures in his both involved knees occurred through the tibial tunnel and required open reduction with internal fixation. At three weeks after fixation, a second-look arthroscopy revealed intact ACLs in both knees. At five months follow-up, he was able to walk without instability on physical examination. Follow-up radiographs of the patient showed callus formations with healed fractures. PMID:26060613

  17. Graft infection following arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Wee, James; Lee, Keng Thiam

    2014-04-01

    Septic arthritis following arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL) is a rare complication and associated with severe morbidity. Its risk factors include (1) concomitant procedures during the reconstruction, (2) previous knee surgery, (3) allograft usage, (4) peri-operative wound contamination, and (5) presence of intra-articular foreign bodies. We present a series of 3 men and one woman aged 22 to 35 years who developed septic arthritis following ACL reconstruction. The risk factors identified were local infection (n=2), previous ipsilateral knee surgery (n=2), and the use of an allograft (n=1). All patients underwent emergency knee washout and debridement with graft retention within 24 hours, together with a course of intravenous antibiotic therapy. All the patients achieved eradication of their infections (with intact ACL grafts) and satisfactory functional outcome at a mean follow-up of 32 (range, 25-45) months.

  18. Post-operative imaging of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction techniques across the spectrum of skeletal maturity.

    PubMed

    Zbojniewicz, Andrew M; Meyers, Arthur B; Wall, Eric J

    2016-04-01

    Due to an increased frequency of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in young patients and improved outcomes in athletic performance following ACL reconstruction, surgery is increasingly being performed across the spectrum of skeletal maturity. We present a review of the range of reconstruction techniques performed in skeletally immature patients (physeal sparing techniques, which may involve epiphyseal tunnels or the utilization of an iliotibial band autograft), those performed in patients nearing skeletal maturity (transphyseal techniques), and the more conventional ACL reconstruction techniques performed in skeletally mature adolescents. It is important that radiologists be aware of the range of techniques being performed throughout the spectrum of skeletal maturity in order to accurately characterize the expected post-operative appearance as well as to identify complications, including those unique to this younger population. PMID:26646675

  19. PERI-INCISIONAL DYSESTHESIA FOLLOWING ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION USING CENTRAL THIRD OF PATELLAR TENDON

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Júnior, Lúcio Honório; Machado, Soares Luiz Fernando; Gonçalves, Matheus Braga Jacques; Júnior, Paulo Randal Pires; Baumfeld, Daniel Soares; Pereira, Marcelo Lobo; Lessa, Rodrigo Rosa; Costa, Lincoln Paiva; Bisinoto, Henrique Barra

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the prevalence and type of dysesthesia around the incision used to obtain the patellar tendon for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery. Methods: Out of a population of 1368 ACL reconstructions using the central third of the patellar tendon, 102 patients (111 knees) were evaluated by means of telephone interview. Results: The mean follow-up was 52 months (ranging from 12 to 88 months). The patients' ages ranged from 16 to 58 years (mean: 34.7 years). There was some degree of peri-incisional dysesthesia in 66 knees (59.46%). In 40.54% of the knees, this condition was not found. In all the cases of dysesthesia, the type encountered was Highet's type II. Conclusion: Peri-incisional dysesthesia following ACL reconstruction using the central third of the patellar tendon is highly prevalent. It affected more than half of the cases in this series. PMID:27026983

  20. Graft infection following arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Wee, James; Lee, Keng Thiam

    2014-04-01

    Septic arthritis following arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL) is a rare complication and associated with severe morbidity. Its risk factors include (1) concomitant procedures during the reconstruction, (2) previous knee surgery, (3) allograft usage, (4) peri-operative wound contamination, and (5) presence of intra-articular foreign bodies. We present a series of 3 men and one woman aged 22 to 35 years who developed septic arthritis following ACL reconstruction. The risk factors identified were local infection (n=2), previous ipsilateral knee surgery (n=2), and the use of an allograft (n=1). All patients underwent emergency knee washout and debridement with graft retention within 24 hours, together with a course of intravenous antibiotic therapy. All the patients achieved eradication of their infections (with intact ACL grafts) and satisfactory functional outcome at a mean follow-up of 32 (range, 25-45) months. PMID:24781628

  1. Arthroscopic coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction using biologic and suture fixation.

    PubMed

    Pennington, William T; Hergan, David J; Bartz, Brian A

    2007-07-01

    Presented in this report is a modified arthroscopic approach to acromioclavicular joint reconstruction via suture and allograft fixation. An arthroscopic approach is used to expose the base of the coracoid by use of electrocautery. After an open distal clavicle excision is performed, clavicular and coracoid tunnels are created under arthroscopic visualization as previously described by Wolf and Pennington. The myotendinous end of a semitendinosus allograft is sutured to a Spider plate (Kinetikos Medical, San Diego, CA). The tendinous end of the graft is prepared with a running baseball stitch. A Nitinol wire with a loop end (Arthrex, Naples, FL) is used to pass 2 free FiberTape sutures (Arthrex) and the leading sutures from the tendinous end of the graft through the clavicular and coracoid tunnels, exiting out the anterior portal. One of the FiberTape sutures is retrieved with a grasper and passed over the anterior aspect of the distal clavicle. The second FiberTape suture and the allograft are passed over the distal end of the resected clavicle. While the acromioclavicular joint is held reduced, the FiberTape sutures are tied to the plate and the allograft is tensioned medially until the plate is embedded against the superior surface of the clavicle. The tendinous end of the graft is secured to the superior surface of the clavicle with a Bio-tenodesis screw (Arthrex) medial to the clavicular tunnel.

  2. [Sports capacity after rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament--surgical versus non-surgical therapy].

    PubMed

    Fink, C; Hoser, C; Benedetto, K P

    1993-12-01

    Using a new rating system (Innsbruck Knee-Sports Rating Scale) 75 patients 5 to 6 years after ACL-injury have been compared to their sports activity (47 patients with ACL reconstruction and 28 conservative treated patients). Under the viewpoint of knee load and especially the demand on stability sports activities have been divided into 3 categories: High Risk, Low Risk and Non Risk Pivoting Sports. Operative therapy shows an advantage in High Risk Pivoting sports (e.g. soccer, basketball) and in Low Risk Pivoting (e.g. running, hiking) sports, expressed by fewer knee related symptoms and higher participation levels. In the Non Risk Pivoting category (e.g. swimming, cycling) good results could also be achieved by conservative therapy. The careful evaluation of each patient's sports activities is therefore an important factor in the decision for the right therapy on one hand, and for comparing the results of different therapy programs or patient collectives on the other.

  3. Gait adaptation in ACL deficient patients before and after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Zsolt; Kiss, Rita M; Kocsis, László

    2004-06-01

    The objective of this study is to determine how kinematical parameters and electromyography data of selected muscles may change as a result of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency and following ACL reconstruction. The study was conducted on 25 anterior cruciate ligament deficient subjects prior to and 6 weeks, 4 months, 8 months and 12 months following ACL reconstructive surgery using the bone-patellar tendon-bone technique. Gait analysis was performed by applying the zebris three-dimensional ultrasound-based system with surface electromyograph (zebris). Kinematic data were recorded for the lower limb. The muscles surveyed include vastus lateralis and medialis, biceps femoris and adductor longus. The results obtained from the injured subjects were compared with those of 51 individuals without any ACL damage whatsoever. Acute ACL deficient patients exhibited a quadriceps avoidance pattern prior to and 6 weeks following surgery. No quadriceps avoidance phenomenon develops in chronic ACL deficient patients. In operated individuals, tempo-spatial parameters and the knee angle regained a normal pattern for the ACL-deficient limb during gait as early as 4 months following surgery. However, the relative ACL movement parameter, which describes the tibial translation into the direction of ACL, and the EMG traces show no significant statistical difference compared with the same values of the healthy control group just 8 months following surgery. The analysis of spatial-temporal parameters and EMG traces show that the development of a quadriceps avoidance pattern is less common than previously reported. These data suggest that anterior cruciate ligament deficiency and reconstruction produce considerable changes in the lower extremity gait pattern. The results suggest that gait parameters tend to shift towards a normal value pattern; and the re-establishment of pre-injury gait patterns-including the normal biphase of muscles-takes at least 8 months to occur.

  4. Rotational and translational laxity after computer-navigated single- and double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hofbauer, M; Valentin, P; Kdolsky, R; Ostermann, R C; Graf, A; Figl, M; Aldrian, S

    2010-09-01

    Based on biomechanical cadaver studies, anatomic double-bundle reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was introduced to achieve better stability in the knee, particularly in respect of rotatory loads. Previously, the success of ACL reconstruction was believed to be mainly dependent on correct positioning of the graft, irrespective of the number of reconstructed bundles for which computer-assisted surgery was developed to avoid malpositioning of the tunnel. The aim of the present study is to compare rotational and translational stability after computer-navigated standard single-bundle, and anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction. The authors investigated 55 consecutive patients who had undergone the single-bundle or double-bundle ACL reconstruction procedure with the use of autogenous hamstring tendon grafts and EndoButton fixation, and the patients had been followed for a minimum period of 24 months. Intraoperative, anteroposterior and rotational laxity was measured with the computer navigation system, and compared between groups. Both surgical procedures significantly reduced anteroposterior displacement (AP) and internal rotation (IR) of the tibia compared to the pre-operative ACL-deficient knee (P < 0.05). No significant differences were registered between groups with regard to anteroposterior displacement of the tibia. A significantly greater reduction in internal rotation was noted in the double-bundle group (15.6 degrees) compared to the single-bundle group (7.1 degrees). The IKDC and Lysholm score were significantly higher in the double-bundle group. However, the results were excellent in both groups. The use of a computer-assisted ACL reconstruction, which is a highly accurate method of graft placement, could be useful for inexperienced surgeons to avoid malposition. Whether double-bundle ACL reconstruction, which was associated with improved rotational laxity and significantly better IKDC and Lysholm scores compared to the standard single

  5. A Technique of Superficial Medial Collateral Ligament Reconstruction Using an Adjustable-Loop Suspensory Fixation Device.

    PubMed

    Deo, Shaneel; Getgood, Alan

    2015-06-01

    This report describes superficial medial collateral ligament reconstruction of the knee using a novel method of graft fixation with the ACL Tightrope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL). After tibial fixation with either a standard interference screw or staple, femoral fixation of the semitendinosus tendon is performed with the adjustable-loop suspensory fixation device, which allows for both initial graft tensioning and re-tensioning after cyclical knee range of motion. This provides the ability for the graft to accommodate for resultant soft-tissue creep and stress relaxation, thereby allowing for optimal soft-tissue tension and reduction in laxity at the end of the procedure. PMID:26258041

  6. A Technique of Superficial Medial Collateral Ligament Reconstruction Using an Adjustable-Loop Suspensory Fixation Device.

    PubMed

    Deo, Shaneel; Getgood, Alan

    2015-06-01

    This report describes superficial medial collateral ligament reconstruction of the knee using a novel method of graft fixation with the ACL Tightrope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL). After tibial fixation with either a standard interference screw or staple, femoral fixation of the semitendinosus tendon is performed with the adjustable-loop suspensory fixation device, which allows for both initial graft tensioning and re-tensioning after cyclical knee range of motion. This provides the ability for the graft to accommodate for resultant soft-tissue creep and stress relaxation, thereby allowing for optimal soft-tissue tension and reduction in laxity at the end of the procedure.

  7. Embolism of the popliteal artery after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Sala, H. A. G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Arterial complications after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) are rare. We present a case report of a 44-year-old male patient with a subtotal occlusion of the popliteal artery, with sensory loss in the foot, 17 days after ACLR. Embolectomy and anticoagulant therapy led to full recovery of the peripheral arterial circulation. The sensory loss of the foot also fully recovered. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of an embolus of the popliteal artery after ACLR without relation to graft fixation. A literature review on vascular complications after ACLR is presented. PMID:17579836

  8. A Technique of Superficial Medial Collateral Ligament Reconstruction Using an Adjustable-Loop Suspensory Fixation Device

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Shaneel; Getgood, Alan

    2015-01-01

    This report describes superficial medial collateral ligament reconstruction of the knee using a novel method of graft fixation with the ACL Tightrope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL). After tibial fixation with either a standard interference screw or staple, femoral fixation of the semitendinosus tendon is performed with the adjustable-loop suspensory fixation device, which allows for both initial graft tensioning and re-tensioning after cyclical knee range of motion. This provides the ability for the graft to accommodate for resultant soft-tissue creep and stress relaxation, thereby allowing for optimal soft-tissue tension and reduction in laxity at the end of the procedure. PMID:26258041

  9. Anatomical reconstruction of popliteofibular ligament using looped biceps femoris tendon: a case report.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Nobuyoshi; Yoshino, Nobuyuki; Fukuda, Yukihisa; Fujita, Nobuhiko; Takai, Shinro

    2008-04-01

    We describe a case of popliteofibular ligament (PFL) injury, successfully treated with a new anatomic reconstruction technique looping the biceps femoris tendon (BT). The anterior half of the BT was split longitudinally from the fibular insertion, cut at the proximal end and left attached at the insertion. The proximal end of the BT was looped back in a slit made in the popliteal tendon (PT) at the original anatomical insertion site of the PFL, and passed through the tunnel from the posterior and the baseball suture was tightened on the anterior cortex of fibular head.

  10. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament with carbon fibres: unsatisfactory results after 8 years.

    PubMed

    Mäkisalo, S E; Visuri, T; Viljanen, A; Jokio, P

    1996-01-01

    A total of 37 patients were operated on for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiency between 1980 and 1989 using two types of carbon fibre ligament substitutes. The average age of the population was 23.6 years. The carbon fibre prostheses were covered with either a strip of medial joint capsule or lyophilized dura. Follow-up averaged 8.1 years (range 4-13 years), most of the operations being done from 1983 to 1985. Evaluation included a questionnaire, physical examination, Lysholm scoring, radiographs and cruciometer testing. The operated ACLs were looser than those in the contralateral healthy knees. The Lysholm scoring system gave acceptable results (excellent and good) in 43.5%, fair in 31.4% and poor in 24.1% of cases. Acceptable results provided better stability and muscle strength. During the follow-up there was an evident deterioration in stability as well as in Lysholm score. The results between the two types of ligaments did not become statistically different. Osteoarthrosis increased in all the knees examined radiographically (28/37). The results indicate that the ACL reconstructions using these types of carbon fibre prostheses lead to unacceptable results in the long-term follow-up.

  11. Effect of culture complex of BMSCs and sodium hydroxide- and GRGDSPC-treated PET on the reconstruction of injured anterior cruciate ligament in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianming; Chen, Fengrong; Jian, Guojian; Ye, Zhiyang; Wang, Zimin; Liu, Haoyuan; Kang, Yifan

    2015-01-01

    Ligament reconstruction is an effective therapy for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligaments have recently gained popularity in clinical ACL reconstruction for its advantage in the improvement of keen function. However, the application of PET in clinical treatment is limited by its poor bioactivity and biocompatibility. Recently, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been widely studied in regenerative medical therapy due to their multi-lineage differentiation. Previous study also indicated that BMSCs may promote the healing of tendon-bone interface of injured ligament. We speculate that BMSCs may enhance the curative effect of PET artificial ligament on the tendon-bone-healing in ligament reconstruction. In this study, the PET materials were first modified with sodium hydroxide hydrolysis and GRGDSPC peptide which was able to improve its bioactivity and biocompatibility. Then, the effects of modified PET materials on the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs were examined. The in vitro co-culture of BMSCs and modified PET showed the modified PET promoted the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs. Further, the effect of culture complex of BMSCs and modified PET artificial ligament co-culture system on the injured ligament reconstruction was investigated in vivo. Results showed not only better growth and differentiation of BMSCs but also satisfactory healing of the injured ligament was observed after implantation of this culture complex into the injured ligament of rabbits. Our study provides a brand-new solution for ACL reconstruction. PMID:26221227

  12. Effect of culture complex of BMSCs and sodium hydroxide- and GRGDSPC-treated PET on the reconstruction of injured anterior cruciate ligament in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianming; Chen, Fengrong; Jian, Guojian; Ye, Zhiyang; Wang, Zimin; Liu, Haoyuan; Kang, Yifan

    2015-01-01

    Ligament reconstruction is an effective therapy for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligaments have recently gained popularity in clinical ACL reconstruction for its advantage in the improvement of keen function. However, the application of PET in clinical treatment is limited by its poor bioactivity and biocompatibility. Recently, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been widely studied in regenerative medical therapy due to their multi-lineage differentiation. Previous study also indicated that BMSCs may promote the healing of tendon-bone interface of injured ligament. We speculate that BMSCs may enhance the curative effect of PET artificial ligament on the tendon-bone-healing in ligament reconstruction. In this study, the PET materials were first modified with sodium hydroxide hydrolysis and GRGDSPC peptide which was able to improve its bioactivity and biocompatibility. Then, the effects of modified PET materials on the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs were examined. The in vitro co-culture of BMSCs and modified PET showed the modified PET promoted the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs. Further, the effect of culture complex of BMSCs and modified PET artificial ligament co-culture system on the injured ligament reconstruction was investigated in vivo. Results showed not only better growth and differentiation of BMSCs but also satisfactory healing of the injured ligament was observed after implantation of this culture complex into the injured ligament of rabbits. Our study provides a brand-new solution for ACL reconstruction.

  13. Effect of culture complex of BMSCs and sodium hydroxide- and GRGDSPC-treated PET on the reconstruction of injured anterior cruciate ligament in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianming; Chen, Fengrong; Jian, Guojian; Ye, Zhiyang; Wang, Zimin; Liu, Haoyuan; Kang, Yifan

    2015-01-01

    Ligament reconstruction is an effective therapy for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligaments have recently gained popularity in clinical ACL reconstruction for its advantage in the improvement of keen function. However, the application of PET in clinical treatment is limited by its poor bioactivity and biocompatibility. Recently, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been widely studied in regenerative medical therapy due to their multi-lineage differentiation. Previous study also indicated that BMSCs may promote the healing of tendon-bone interface of injured ligament. We speculate that BMSCs may enhance the curative effect of PET artificial ligament on the tendon-bone-healing in ligament reconstruction. In this study, the PET materials were first modified with sodium hydroxide hydrolysis and GRGDSPC peptide which was able to improve its bioactivity and biocompatibility. Then, the effects of modified PET materials on the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs were examined. The in vitro co-culture of BMSCs and modified PET showed the modified PET promoted the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs. Further, the effect of culture complex of BMSCs and modified PET artificial ligament co-culture system on the injured ligament reconstruction was investigated in vivo. Results showed not only better growth and differentiation of BMSCs but also satisfactory healing of the injured ligament was observed after implantation of this culture complex into the injured ligament of rabbits. Our study provides a brand-new solution for ACL reconstruction. PMID:26221227

  14. Massive bone loss from fungal infection after anterior cruciate ligament arthroscopic reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Muscolo, D Luis; Carbo, Lisandro; Aponte-Tinao, Luis A; Ayerza, Miguel A; Makino, Arturo

    2009-09-01

    Although there are numerous reports of septic pyogenic arthritis after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, there is limited information regarding the outcomes of fungal infection. We determined the outcomes of six patients with mycotic infection after regular ACL reconstruction. There were four males and two females with a mean age of 33 years. We determined the number of procedures performed, bone loss originating to control infection, and final reconstruction in these patients. An average of five arthroscopic lavage procedures had been performed at the referring centers. Fungal infection was diagnosed based on pathologic samples; five infections were the result of mucormycosis and one was Candida. After final débridement, the mean segmental bone loss was 12.8 cm. All patients were treated with intravenous antifungal coverage and cement spacers before final reconstruction. At final followup, all patients were free of clinical infection. Three had reconstruction with an allograft-prosthesis composite, two with hemicylindrical allografts, and one with an intercalary allograft arthrodesis. Despite the extremely unusual presentation of this complication, surgeons should be aware of potential and catastrophic consequences of this severe complication after ACL reconstruction.

  15. Massive bone loss from fungal infection after anterior cruciate ligament arthroscopic reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Muscolo, D Luis; Carbo, Lisandro; Aponte-Tinao, Luis A; Ayerza, Miguel A; Makino, Arturo

    2009-09-01

    Although there are numerous reports of septic pyogenic arthritis after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, there is limited information regarding the outcomes of fungal infection. We determined the outcomes of six patients with mycotic infection after regular ACL reconstruction. There were four males and two females with a mean age of 33 years. We determined the number of procedures performed, bone loss originating to control infection, and final reconstruction in these patients. An average of five arthroscopic lavage procedures had been performed at the referring centers. Fungal infection was diagnosed based on pathologic samples; five infections were the result of mucormycosis and one was Candida. After final débridement, the mean segmental bone loss was 12.8 cm. All patients were treated with intravenous antifungal coverage and cement spacers before final reconstruction. At final followup, all patients were free of clinical infection. Three had reconstruction with an allograft-prosthesis composite, two with hemicylindrical allografts, and one with an intercalary allograft arthrodesis. Despite the extremely unusual presentation of this complication, surgeons should be aware of potential and catastrophic consequences of this severe complication after ACL reconstruction. PMID:19190972

  16. Recovery of gait pattern after medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction for objective patellar instability.

    PubMed

    Carnesecchi, O; Philippot, R; Boyer, B; Farizon, F; Edouard, P

    2016-01-01

    Gait pattern alterations were previously reported in association with objective patellar instability (OPI). Gait pattern comparison between a series of patients having undergone medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction and a sample of control subjects. Thirty patients at 6 months postoperatively after MPFL reconstruction and thirty control subjects were enrolled in the study for a clinical and biomechanical assessment including gait analysis at three selected walking rates using the GAITRite(®) system. The mean raw IKDC score was 73 (± 19), and the mean Kujala knee function was 84 (± 17.5). The study of gait did not demonstrate any significant difference between the two groups at a normal and fast walking rate. At a 10 km/h running speed, the single-support phase was significantly shortened by a mean 2.33% (p < 0.05), the swing phase by a mean 2.64% (p < 0.05) and the double-support phase by a mean 3.49% (p < 0.05) on the operated side. MPFL reconstruction reported good midterm functional and clinical results in the management of OPI. At 6 months postoperatively, the patient gait pattern was similar to that observed in healthy subjects at a normal and fast walking speed. However, our study revealed persistent gait abnormalities at a 10 km/h running speed. These gait alterations seemed to be related to the ligament reconstruction in itself due to the higher strain applied on the reconstructed MPFL during running cycle (10 km/h). Level of evidence IV.

  17. Lower Limb Kinematics and Dynamic Postural Stability in Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Reconstructed Female Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Delahunt, Eamonn; Chawke, Mark; Kelleher, Judy; Murphy, Katie; Prendiville, Anna; Sweeny, Lauren; Patterson, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Context: Deficits in lower limb kinematics and postural stability are predisposing factors to the development of knee ligamentous injury. The extent to which these deficits are present after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is still largely unknown. The primary hypothesis of the present study was that female athletes who have undergone ACL reconstruction and who have returned to sport participation would exhibit deficits in dynamic postural stability as well as deficiencies in hip- and knee-joint kinematics when compared with an age-, activity-, and sex-matched uninjured control group. Objective: To investigate dynamic postural stability as quantified by the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) and simultaneous hip- and knee-joint kinematic profiles in female athletes who have undergone ACL reconstruction. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: University motion-analysis laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Fourteen female athletes who had previously undergone ACL reconstruction (ACL-R) and 17 age- and sex-matched uninjured controls. Intervention(s): Each participant performed 3 trials of the anterior, posterior-medial, and posterior-lateral directional components of the SEBT. Main Outcome Measure(s): Reach distances for each directional component were quantified and expressed as a percentage of leg length. Simultaneous hip- and knee-joint kinematic profiles were recorded using a motion-analysis system. Results: The ACL-R group had decreased reach distances on the posterior-medial (P < .01) and posterior-lateral (P < .01) directional components of the SEBT. During performance of the directional components of the SEBT, ACL-R participants demonstrated altered hip-joint frontal-, sagittal-, and transverse-plane kinematic profiles (P < .05), as well as altered knee-joint sagittal-plane kinematic profiles (P < .05). Conclusions: Deficits in dynamic postural stability and concomitant altered hip- and knee-joint kinematics are present after ACL

  18. “Basket weave technique” for medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction: Clinical outcome of a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Kodkani, Pranjal S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bone tunneling and implants with rigid fixations for medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction are known to compromise results and are avoidable, especially in skeletally immature subjects. This study was to assess if these deficiencies were overcome with the technique devised by the author which avoids implants and bone tunnels. Results were assessed for complication rate and outcome. Materials and Methods: Fifty six knees of recurrent lateral patellar dislocation were treated in the past 49 months by MPFL reconstruction. Thirty nine were female and 17 male knees. The mean age was 20.6 years (range 9-48 years). Mean followup was 26 months. Five knees had previously failed stabilization procedures. Thirty one cases had Dejours Type A or B and 12 had Type C trochlear dysplasia. Arthroscopy was performed for associated injuries and loose bodies. Seven knees required loose body removal. Five knees underwent lateral retinacular release. Four knees had tibial tuberosity transfer. One knee had an associated anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. An anatomical MPFL reconstruction was performed using hamstring autograft without the need for intraoperative fluoroscopy. Only soft tissue fixation was necessary with this newly devised technique and suturing. A rapid rehabilitation protocol was implemented with monthly followup until normalcy and 6 monthly thereafter. Results: All achieved full range of motion and normal mediolateral stability. There was no recurrence of dislocation. No major surgery related complications. One patella fracture at 8 months was due to a fall developed terminal restriction of flexion. Those in sports could return to their sporting activities (Tegner 1–9). Cases with osteochondral fractures had occasional pain that subsided in 1 year. Mean Kujala score improved from 64.3 to 99.69 with KOOS score near normal in all. Conclusion: This new method of MPFL reconstruction gives excellent results. It avoids complications

  19. Biomechanical Evaluation of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Quadriceps Versus Achilles Tendon Bone Block Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Brian; Haro, Marc S.; Bogunovic, Ljiljana; Collins, Michael J.; Arns, Thomas A.; Trella, Katie J.; Shewman, Elizabeth F.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Long-term studies of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction suggest that normal stability is not restored in the majority of patients. The Achilles tendon allograft is frequently utilized, although recently, the quadriceps tendon has been introduced as an alternative option due to its size and high patellar bone density. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical strength of PCL reconstructions using a quadriceps versus an Achilles allograft. The hypothesis was that quadriceps bone block allograft has comparable mechanical properties to those of Achilles bone block allograft. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-nine fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: (1) intact PCL, (2) PCL reconstruction with Achilles tendon allograft, or (3) PCL reconstruction with quadriceps tendon allograft. After reconstruction, all supporting capsular and ligamentous tissues were removed. Posterior tibial translation was measured at neutral and 20° external rotation. Each specimen underwent a preload, 2 cyclic loading protocols of 500 cycles, then load to failure. Results: Construct creep deformation was significantly lower in the intact group compared with both Achilles and quadriceps allograft (P = .008). The intact specimens reached the greatest ultimate load compared with both reconstructions (1974 ± 752 N, P = .0001). The difference in ultimate load for quadriceps versus Achilles allograft was significant (P = .048), with the quadriceps group having greater maximum force during failure testing. No significant differences were noted between quadriceps versus Achilles allograft for differences in crosshead excursion during cyclic testing (peak-valley [P-V] extension stretch), creep deformation, or stiffness. Construct stiffness measured during the failure test was greatest in the intact group (117 ± 9 N/mm, P = .0001) compared with the Achilles (43 ± 11 N/mm) and quadriceps (43

  20. Increased Compliance With Supervised Rehabilitation Improves Functional Outcome and Return to Sport After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Recreational Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fucai; Banerjee, Anirban; Shen, Liang; Krishna, Lingaraj

    2015-01-01

    Background: Successful return to sport is an important outcome measure after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and a reason for patients’ decisions to elect surgery. Rehabilitation programs supervised by physical therapists are routinely prescribed after ACL reconstruction surgery. However, the added advantage of supervised physical therapy after ACL reconstruction is still debatable. Hypothesis: Attending more supervised physical therapy sessions after arthroscopic ACL reconstruction in recreational athletes increases their chance of successful return to sport. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: The authors analyzed 93 recreational athletes who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. After arthroscopic single-bundle ACL reconstruction, patients were advised to attend 20 supervised physical therapy sessions. Patients’ demographics, surgical details, and outcome measures (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score [KOOS], Lysholm scale, and Short Form–36 Health Survey [SF-36]) were recorded presurgery and at 1-year follow-up. Ability to return to sports was documented through patients’ self-report. The attendance at physical therapy by each patient was obtained by examining database records and assessed as fully compliant (>15 sessions), moderately compliant (6-15 sessions), or noncompliant (<6 sessions). Results: Patients in the fully compliant group had significantly greater odds (odds ratio [OR], 18.5; 95% CI, 1.9-184.5; P = .013) of a successful return to sport as compared with the noncompliant group. Patients in the moderately compliant group also had greater odds of returning to sport as compared with the noncompliant group (OR, 4.2; 95% CI, 1.0-16.6; P = .043). Patients in the fully compliant group had significantly greater scores on the Lysholm (P < .001), KOOS Sports and Recreation subscale (P = .021), KOOS Symptoms subscale (P = .040), and SF-36 physical component summary (PCS) (P = .012) as compared with

  1. Reconstruction of compound loss of lateral malleolus and lateral ankle ligaments with double-bundle Achilles tendon-bone allograft.

    PubMed

    Ko, Dukhwan; Jung, Hong-Geun; Kim, Hyeung-June; Cha, Seung-Han; Nam, Kyoung-Mo

    2014-01-01

    Open ankle fracture, including compound loss of the lateral malleolus, lateral ankle ligaments, and overlying skin, is a severe injury and can result in ankle instability and permanent disability. Treatment of this injury is challenging and requires bone grafting and soft tissue reconstruction. In the present report, we describe a unique reconstruction technique for compound loss of the lateral malleolus, lateral ankle ligaments, and the overlying skin using a double-bundle Achilles tendon-bone allograft combined with a reverse sural fasciocutaneous flap. The patient obtained a stable ankle with nearly full range of motion and displayed satisfactory function during the follow-up period.

  2. Combined Reconstruction of the Medial Collateral Ligament and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Using Ipsilateral Quadriceps Tendon-Bone and Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone Autografts.

    PubMed

    Hetsroni, Iftach; Mann, Gideon

    2016-06-01

    The exclusive autograft choice for medial collateral ligament (MCL) reconstruction that has been described until today is the semitendinosus tendon. However, this has some potential disadvantages in a knee with combined MCL-anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, including weakening of the hamstring's anterior restraining action in an already ACL-injured knee and nonanatomic distal MCL graft insertion when leaving the semitendinosus insertion intact at the pes anserinus during reconstruction. Moreover, because some surgeons prefer to use the hamstring for autologous ACL reconstruction, the contralateral uninjured knee hamstring needs to be harvested as a graft source for the MCL reconstruction if autografts and not allografts are the surgeons' preference. We describe a technique for performing combined reconstruction of the MCL and ACL using ipsilateral quadriceps tendon-bone and bone-patellar tendon-bone autografts. This technique of MCL reconstruction spares the hamstring tendons and benefits from the advantage provided by bone-to-bone healing on the femur with distal and proximal MCL tibial fixation that closely reproduces the native MCL tibia insertion. PMID:27656381

  3. Combined Reconstruction of the Medial Collateral Ligament and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Using Ipsilateral Quadriceps Tendon-Bone and Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone Autografts.

    PubMed

    Hetsroni, Iftach; Mann, Gideon

    2016-06-01

    The exclusive autograft choice for medial collateral ligament (MCL) reconstruction that has been described until today is the semitendinosus tendon. However, this has some potential disadvantages in a knee with combined MCL-anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, including weakening of the hamstring's anterior restraining action in an already ACL-injured knee and nonanatomic distal MCL graft insertion when leaving the semitendinosus insertion intact at the pes anserinus during reconstruction. Moreover, because some surgeons prefer to use the hamstring for autologous ACL reconstruction, the contralateral uninjured knee hamstring needs to be harvested as a graft source for the MCL reconstruction if autografts and not allografts are the surgeons' preference. We describe a technique for performing combined reconstruction of the MCL and ACL using ipsilateral quadriceps tendon-bone and bone-patellar tendon-bone autografts. This technique of MCL reconstruction spares the hamstring tendons and benefits from the advantage provided by bone-to-bone healing on the femur with distal and proximal MCL tibial fixation that closely reproduces the native MCL tibia insertion.

  4. Neuromuscular Fatigue Alters Postural Control and Sagittal Plane Hip Biomechanics in Active Females With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Barnett S.; Gilsdorf, Christine M.; Goerger, Benjamin M.; Prentice, William E.; Padua, Darin A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Females with history of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and subsequent ligament reconstruction are at high risk for future ACL injury. Fatigue may influence the increased risk of future injury in females by altering lower extremity biomechanics and postural control. Hypothesis: Fatigue will promote lower extremity biomechanics and postural control deficits associated with ACL injury. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Fourteen physically active females with ACL reconstruction (mean age, 19.64 ± 1.5 years; mean height, 163.52 ± 6.18 cm; mean mass, 62.6 ± 13.97 kg) volunteered for this study. Postural control and lower extremity biomechanics were assessed in the surgical limb during single-leg balance and jump-landing tasks before and after a fatigue protocol. Main outcome measures were 3-dimensional hip and knee joint angles at initial contact, peak angles, joint angular displacements and peak net joint moments, anterior tibial shear force, and vertical ground reaction force during the first 50% of the loading phase of the jump-landing task. During the single-leg stance task, the main outcome measure was center of pressure sway speed. Results: Initial contact hip flexion angle decreased (t = −2.82, P = 0.01; prefatigue, 40.98° ± 9.79°; postfatigue, 36.75° ± 8.61°) from pre- to postfatigue. Hip flexion displacement (t = 2.23, P = 0.04; prefatigue, 45.19° ± 14.1°; postfatigue, 47.48° ± 14.21°) and center of pressure sway speed (t = 3.95, P < 0.05; prefatigue, 5.18 ± 0.96 cm/s; postfatigue, 6.20 ± 1.72 cm/s) increased from pre- to postfatigue. There was a trending increase in hip flexion moment (t = 2.14, P = 0.05; prefatigue, 1.66 ± 0.68 Nm/kg/m; postfatigue, 1.91 ± 0.62 Nm/kg/m) from pre- to postfatigue. Conclusion: Fatigue may induce lower extremity biomechanics and postural control deficits that may be associated with ACL injury in physically active females with ACL reconstruction. Clinical Relevance

  5. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction best practice: A review of graft choice

    PubMed Central

    Shaerf, Daniel A; Pastides, Philip S; Sarraf, Khaled M; Willis-Owen, Charles A

    2014-01-01

    There is much literature about differing grafts used in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Much of this is of poor quality and of a low evidence base. We review and summarise the literature looking at the four main classes of grafts used in ACL reconstruction; bone-patella tendon-bone, hamstrings, allograft and synthetic grafts. Each graft has the evidence for its use reviewed and then compared, where possible, to the others. We conclude that although there is no clear “best” graft, there are clear differences between the differing graft choices. Surgeon’s need to be aware of the evidence behind these differences, in order to have appropriate discussions with their patients, so as to come to an informed choice of graft type to best suit each individual patient and their requirements. PMID:24649411

  6. Anterior cruciate ligament augmentation for rotational instability following primary reconstruction with an accelerated physical therapy protocol.

    PubMed

    Carey, Timothy; Oliver, David; Pniewski, Josh; Mueller, Terry; Bojescul, John

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to present the results of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) augmentation for patients having rotational instability despite an intact vertical graft in lieu of conventional revision ACL reconstruction. ACL augmentation surgery with a horizontal graft was performed to augment a healed vertical graft on five patients and an accelerated rehabilitation protocol was instituted. Functional outcomes were assessed by the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) and the Modified Cincinnati Rating System (MCRS). All patients completed physical therapy within 5 months and were able to return to full military duty without limitation. LEFS and MCRS were significantly improved. ACL augmentation with a horizontal graft provides an excellent alternative to ACL revision reconstruction for patients with an intact vertical graft, allowing an earlier return to duty for military service members.

  7. ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION USING THE DOUBLE-BUNDLE TECHNIQUE – EVALUATION IN THE BIOMECHANICS LABORATORY

    PubMed Central

    D'Elia, Caio Oliveira; Bitar, Alexandre Carneiro; Castropil, Wagner; Garofo, Antônio Guilherme Padovani; Cantuária, Anita Lopes; Orselli, Maria Isabel Veras; Luques, Isabela Ugo; Duarte, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the methodology of knee rotation analysis using biomechanics laboratory instruments and to present the preliminary results from a comparative study on patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using the double-bundle technique. Methods: The protocol currently used in our laboratory was described. Three-dimensional kinematic analysis was performed and knee rotation amplitude was measured on eight normal patients (control group) and 12 patients who were operated using the double-bundle technique, by means of three tasks in the biomechanics laboratory. Results: No significant differences between operated and non-operated sides were shown in relation to the mean amplitudes of gait, gait with change in direction or gait with change in direction when going down stairs (p > 0.13). Conclusion: The preliminary results did not show any difference in the double-bundle ACL reconstruction technique in relation to the contralateral side and the control group. PMID:27027003

  8. Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a comprehensive review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Scully, William F; Fisher, Susan G; Parada, Stephen A; Arrington, Edward D; Arrington, Edward A

    2013-01-01

    Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is an uncommon but potentially serious complication. The incidence of infection is approximately 0.44%. Staphylococcus and streptococcus strains are the most common infectious pathogens. Infection is typically via direct inoculation. Articular cartilage damage is primarily the result of the unregulated host inflammatory response. The timing of presentation is typically <2 months following surgery. Presenting symptoms commonly mirror normal postoperative findings, making diagnosis difficult. Although laboratory inflammatory markers are often elevated, knee arthrocentesis is the gold standard for diagnosis. Treatment involves serial arthroscopic or open irrigation and debridement procedures and antibiotic management. Graft retention is often possible, although fixation implants may require removal or exchange. Successful results have been reported following infection eradication in both graft retention and early revision ACL reconstruction scenarios.

  9. Prognosis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a data-driven approach

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Abhijit; Kar, Oliva; Wu, Kuan-Chuen; Hall, Michelle; Gillette, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Individuals who suffer anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury are at higher risk of developing knee osteoarthritis (OA) and almost 50% display symptoms 10–20 years post injury. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) often does not protect against knee OA development. Accordingly, a multi-scale formulation for data-driven prognosis (DDP) of post-ACLR is developed. Unlike traditional predictive strategies that require controlled off-line measurements or ‘training’ for determination of constitutive parameters to derive the transitional statistics, the proposed DDP algorithm relies solely on in situ measurements. The proposed DDP scheme is capable of predicting onset of instabilities. As the need for off-line testing (or training) is obviated, it can be easily implemented for ACLR, where such controlled a priori testing is almost impossible to conduct. The DDP algorithm facilitates hierarchical handling of the large dataset and can assess the state of recovery in post-ACLR conditions based on data collected from stair ascent and descent exercises of subjects. The DDP algorithm identifies inefficient knee varus motion and knee rotation as primary difficulties experienced by some of the post-ACLR population. In such cases, levels of energy dissipation rate at the knee, and its fluctuation may be used as measures for assessing progress after ACL reconstruction. PMID:27547072

  10. Trends in primary and revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction among National Basketball Association team physicians.

    PubMed

    Mall, Nathan A; Abrams, Geoffrey D; Azar, Frederick M; Traina, Steve M; Allen, Answorth A; Parker, Richard; Cole, Brian J

    2014-06-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are common in athletes. Techniques and methods of treatment for these injuries continue to vary among surgeons. Thirty National Basketball Association (NBA) team physicians were surveyed during the NBA Pre-Draft Combine. Survey questions involved current and previous practice methods of primary and revision ACL reconstruction, including technique, graft choice, rehabilitation, and treatment of combined ACL and medial collateral ligament injuries. Descriptive parametric statistics, Fisher exact test, and logistic regression were used, and significance was set at α = 0.05. All 30 team physicians completed the survey. Eighty-seven percent indicated they use autograft (81% bone-patellar tendon-bone) for primary ACL reconstruction in NBA athletes, and 43% indicated they use autograft for revision cases. Fourteen surgeons (47%) indicated they use an anteromedial portal (AMP) for femoral tunnel drilling, whereas 5 years earlier only 4 (13%) used this technique. There was a significant (P = .009) positive correlation between fewer years in practice and AMP use. NBA team physicians' use of an AMP for femoral tunnel drilling has increased over the past 5 years.

  11. Trapeziectomy and ligament reconstruction tendon interposition for isolated scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthritis of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Langenhan, R; Hohendorff, B; Probst, A

    2014-10-01

    Isolated osteoarthritis of the scaphotrapeziotrapezoid joint is rather rare compared with thumb trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the outcome of 15 consecutive patients treated with trapeziectomy/ligament reconstruction tendon interposition for isolated scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthritis of the wrist. After a mean follow-up of 54 months, 14 patients (15 wrists) were available for clinical and radiological examination. The median pain intensity was 0 on a 0-10 visual analogue scale, both at rest and with activity, mean grip strength averaged 24 kg, pinch strength 5 kg. The disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) score was 16, and a modified Mayo Wrist Score 84. Correlation between the degree of scaphotrapezoid osteoarthritis and pain at rest, pain with activity, and DASH score was not significant. The findings from our study suggest that trapeziectomy/ligament reconstruction tendon interposition is an effective procedure for treating isolated scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthritis, and that additional partial trapezoid excision is not necessary.

  12. Long-term interventions effects of robotic training on patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Rui; Ye, Miao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the long-term interventions effects of robot-assisted therapy rehabilitation on functional activity levels after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 8 patients (6 males and 2 females) who received anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy lasting for one month. The Timed Up-and-Go test, 10-Meter Walk test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] The average value of the of vastus medialis EMG, Functional Reach Test, and the maximum and average extensor strength of the knee joint isokinetic movement increased significantly, and the time of the 10-Meter Walk test decreased significantly. [Conclusion] These results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic walking training as a long-term intervention. PMID:27630396

  13. Long-term interventions effects of robotic training on patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Rui; Ye, Miao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the long-term interventions effects of robot-assisted therapy rehabilitation on functional activity levels after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 8 patients (6 males and 2 females) who received anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy lasting for one month. The Timed Up-and-Go test, 10-Meter Walk test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] The average value of the of vastus medialis EMG, Functional Reach Test, and the maximum and average extensor strength of the knee joint isokinetic movement increased significantly, and the time of the 10-Meter Walk test decreased significantly. [Conclusion] These results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic walking training as a long-term intervention. PMID:27630396

  14. RANDOMIZED PROSPECTIVE STUDY ON TRAUMATIC PATELLAR DISLOCATION: CONSERVATIVE TREATMENT VERSUS RECONSTRUCTION OF THE MEDIAL PATELLOFEMORAL LIGAMENT USING THE PATELLAR TENDON, WITH A MINIMUM OF TWO YEARS OF FOLLOW-UP

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Alexandre Carneiro; D'Elia, Caio Oliveira; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Viegas, Alexandre Christo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the surgical results from reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) with non-operative treatment of primary patellar dislocation. Methods: Thirty-nine patients (41 knees) with patellar dislocation were randomized into two groups. One group was treated conservatively (immobilization and physiotherapy) and other was treated surgically with reconstruction of the MPFL, and the results were evaluated with a minimum follow-up of two years. The Kujala questionnaire was applied to assess pain and quality of life, and recurrences were evaluated. Pearson's chi-square test and Fisher's exact test were used in the statistical evaluation. Results: The statistical analysis showed that the mean Kujala score was significantly lower in the conservative group (70.8), compared with the mean value in the surgical group (88.9), with p = 0.001. The surgical group presented a higher percentage of “good/excellent” Kujala score results (71.43%) than in the conservative group (25.0%), with p = 0.003. The conservative group presented a greater number of recurrences (35% of the cases), while in the surgical group there were no reports of recurrences and/or subluxation. Conclusions: Treatment with reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the patellar tendon produced better results, based on the analysis of post-treatment recurrences and the better final results from the Kujala questionnaire after a minimum follow-up period of two years. PMID:27027072

  15. Ability of a new hop test to determine functional deficits after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Augustsson, Jesper; Thomeé, Roland; Karlsson, Jon

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of a new hop test to determine functional deficits after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The test consists of a pre-exhaustion exercise protocol combined with a single-leg hop. Nineteen male patients with ACL reconstruction (mean time after operation 11 months) who exhibited normal single-leg hop symmetry values (> or =90% compared with the non-involved extremity) were tested for one-repetition maximum (1 RM) strength of a knee-extension exercise. The patients then performed single-leg hops following a standardised pre-exhaustion exercise protocol, which consisted of unilateral weight machine knee-extensions until failure at 50% of 1 RM. Although no patients displayed abnormal hop symmetry when non-fatigued, 68% of the patients showed abnormal hop symmetry for the fatigued test condition. Sixty-three per cent exhibited 1 RM strength scores of below 90% of the non-involved leg. Eighty-four percent of the patients exhibited abnormal symmetry in at least one of the tests. Our findings indicate that patients are not fully rehabilitated 11 months after ACL reconstruction. It is concluded that the pre-exhaustion exercise protocol, combined with the single-leg hop test, improved testing sensitivity when evaluating lower-extremity function after ACL reconstruction. For a more comprehensive evaluation of lower-extremity function after ACL reconstruction, it is therefore suggested that functional testing should be performed both under non-fatigued and fatigued test conditions.

  16. Joint infection unique to hamstring tendon harvester used during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery.

    PubMed

    Tuman, Jeffrey; Diduch, David R; Baumfeld, Joshua A; Rubino, L Joseph; Hart, Joseph M

    2008-05-01

    Joint infection after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a rare but important clinical issue that must be resolved quickly to prevent secondary joint damage and preserve the graft. After careful analysis, we observed 3 infection cases within a 12-month period after ACL reconstruction, which represented an abnormally elevated risk. All reconstructions were performed by the same surgeon and used hamstring tendon allograft. For each surgery, the Target Tendon Harvester (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA) was used to harvest hamstring tendons. Through our review, we learned that this instrument was sterilized while assembled. It is our belief that ineffective sterilization of this hamstring graft harvester served as the origin for these infections. We have determined that appropriate sterilization technique involves disassembly of this particular hamstring tendon harvester before sterilization because of the tube-within-a-tube configuration. We have since continued to use the Target Tendon Harvester, disassembling it before sterilization. There have been no infections in the ensuing 12 months during which the surgeon performed over 40 primary ACL reconstructions via hamstring autograft. The information from this report is intended to provide arthroscopists with information about potential sources of infection after ACL reconstruction surgery. PMID:18442698

  17. Joint infection unique to hamstring tendon harvester used during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery.

    PubMed

    Tuman, Jeffrey; Diduch, David R; Baumfeld, Joshua A; Rubino, L Joseph; Hart, Joseph M

    2008-05-01

    Joint infection after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a rare but important clinical issue that must be resolved quickly to prevent secondary joint damage and preserve the graft. After careful analysis, we observed 3 infection cases within a 12-month period after ACL reconstruction, which represented an abnormally elevated risk. All reconstructions were performed by the same surgeon and used hamstring tendon allograft. For each surgery, the Target Tendon Harvester (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA) was used to harvest hamstring tendons. Through our review, we learned that this instrument was sterilized while assembled. It is our belief that ineffective sterilization of this hamstring graft harvester served as the origin for these infections. We have determined that appropriate sterilization technique involves disassembly of this particular hamstring tendon harvester before sterilization because of the tube-within-a-tube configuration. We have since continued to use the Target Tendon Harvester, disassembling it before sterilization. There have been no infections in the ensuing 12 months during which the surgeon performed over 40 primary ACL reconstructions via hamstring autograft. The information from this report is intended to provide arthroscopists with information about potential sources of infection after ACL reconstruction surgery.

  18. A Comparison between Clinical Results of Selective Bundle and Double Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yon-Sik; Song, Si Young; Yang, Cheol Jung; Ha, Jong Mun; Kim, Yoon Sang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic anatomical double bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with either selective anteromedial (AM) or posterolateral (PL) bundle reconstruction while preserving a relatively healthy ACL bundle. Materials and Methods The authors evaluated 98 patients with a mean follow-up of 30.8±4.0 months who had undergone DB or selective bundle ACL reconstructions. Of these, 34 cases underwent DB ACL reconstruction (group A), 34 underwent selective AM bundle reconstruction (group B), and 30 underwent selective PL bundle reconstructions (group C). These groups were compared with respect to Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, side-to-side differences of anterior laxity measured by KT-2000 arthrometer at 30 lbs, and stress radiography and Lachman and pivot shift test results. Pre- and post-operative data were objectively evaluated using a statistical approach. Results The preoperative anterior instability measured by manual stress radiography at 90° of knee flexion in group A was significantly greater than that in groups B and C (all p<0.001). At last follow-up, mean side-to-side instrumented laxities measured by the KT-2000 and manual stress radiography were significantly improved from preoperative data in all groups (all p<0.001). There were no significant differences between the three groups in anterior instability measured by KT-2000 arthrometer, pivot shift, or functional scores. Conclusion Selective bundle reconstruction in partial ACL tears offers comparable clinical results to DB reconstruction in complete ACL tears. PMID:27401652

  19. Two-strand posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with a quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft: technical considerations and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Noyes, Frank R; Barber-Westin, Sue D

    2006-01-01

    In patients with complete posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) ruptures in which 10 mm or more of increased posterior tibial translation is detected, associated knee disorders must be treated at the same time as the PCL injury. Varus malalignment and any abnormal medial or lateral ligament deficiency must be corrected before or with PCL reconstruction to avoid the risk of failure of the PCL graft. Gait retraining is recommended for patients with abnormal knee hyperextension patterns before ligament reconstruction is performed. Advances in PCL reconstruction include the use of a two-strand graft that may be placed using either a tibial inlay or an all-arthroscopic tibial tunnel technique. Biomechanical studies have shown a reduction in graft tension and improved load sharing in these constructs compared with single-strand reconstructions. The tibial inlay method can be used in athletic patients, and it also is required in PCL revisions in which a prior tibial tunnel must be avoided to achieve graft fixation. The tibial tunnel technique is used to treat dislocated knees for which reconstruction of multiple knee ligaments is required or when prior arterial injury or posterior skin or muscle damage limits the indications for a posterior open approach. Postoperative rehabilitation should protect the PCL graft from high forces and repetitive cyclic knee motions during the first 4 weeks postoperatively.

  20. Effect of pretension in reconstructions of the anterior cruciate ligament with a Dacron prosthesis. A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    van Heerwaarden, R J; Stellinga, D; Frudiger, A J

    1996-01-01

    To study the effect of the pretension level in reconstructions of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) we examined 26 patients with isolated ACL insufficiency and intact Dacron ligament prosthesis at 4-year follow-up. The patients were divided into two groups of 13 each, based on pretension level applied at the reconstruction: in group I the ligament was pretensioned to 60 N and in group II to 40 N. The patients were evaluated by the Tegner and Lysholm scores, KT-1000 arthrometer measurements, and isokinetic muscle performance testing and were assessed by the Knee Ligament Standard Evaluation Form of the International Knee Documentation Committee. At follow-up there were no differences between the two groups in any of the evaluated parameters except for squatting ability. The two groups differed significantly (P < 0.01) with regard to the squatting score: 11 patients in group I had decreased squatting ability, and 6 of these were not able to squat beyond 90 degrees of flexion. In contrast, only 4 patients in group II had slightly impaired squatting ability. It is likely that this difference between the two groups is related to the magnitude of the pretension applied to the ligament prosthesis, and that the pretension exerts its influence through a change in the knee kinematics introduced at the time of the reconstruction.

  1. Good results five years after surgical management of anterior cruciate ligament tears, and meniscal and cartilage injuries.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Papalia, Rocco; Del Buono, Angelo; Amato, Cirino; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-10-01

    In athletes with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears combined with meniscal and cartilage injuries, the goals are to restore knee laxity and relieve symptoms, while long-term goals are the return to pre-injury sport activity and to prevent onset of degenerative changes. We compared the post-operative (minimum 5 years) clinical and radiological outcomes of 50 patients, similar for ACL rupture and meniscal tears, but different for the grade of cartilage lesion. The patient population was divided into two groups similar for ACL reconstruction and surgical meniscal management. Group 1 included 25 patients undergoing microfracture management of grade III-IV cartilage lesions, while Group 2 included 25 patients with grade I-II cartilage lesions, managed by radiofrequency. Comparing pre- and post-operative status, Lachman test, pivot shift values and KT 1000 side to side difference measurements improved significantly (<.001) in both groups, with NS difference between the two groups (>0.05) at the intermediate and latest assessments. At both post-operative appointments, in both groups, the average Lysholm score and IKDC ranking rates improved significantly (<0.001) compared to pre-operative values, but slight worsening was observed in Group 1 patients at the latest review. At the latest assessment, 10 knees (40%) in Group 1 and 3 knees (15%) in Group 2 demonstrated degenerative changes according to Fairbank grading. Concerning the WOMAC index score and sport activity level rating, Group 1 patients had significantly lower scores than Group 2 patients (P < 0.05). In patients with symptomatic ACL instability combined to grade III-IV cartilage lesions, microfractures give excellent short-term clinical and functional improvement but do not prevent the evolution of degenerative changes.

  2. Comparison of Clinical Outcome of Autograft and Allograft Reconstruction for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yu-Hua; Sun, Peng-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hamstring (HS) autograft and bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft are the most common choice for reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). There was a little report about the clinical outcome and difference of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction using allograft and autograft. This study aimed to compare the clinical outcome of autograft and allograft reconstruction for ACL tears. Methods: A total of 106 patients who underwent surgery because of ACL tear were included in this study. The patients were randomly divided into two groups, including 53 patients in each group. The patients in group I underwent standard ACL reconstruction with HS tendon autografts, while others in group II underwent reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft. All the patients were followed up and analyzed; the mean follow-up was 81 months (range: 28–86 months). Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Lysholm scores, physical instability tests, and patient satisfaction questionnaires. The complication rates of both groups were compared. Tibial and femoral tunnel widening were assessed using lateral and anteroposterior radiographs. Results: At the end of follow-up, no significant differences were found between the groups in terms of IKDC, Lysholm scores, physical instability tests, patient satisfaction questionnaires, and incidences of arthrofibrosis. Tibial and femoral tunnel widening was less in the HS tendon autografts. This difference was more significant on the tibial side. Conclusions: In the repair of ACL tears, allograft reconstruction is as effective as the autograft reconstruction, but the allograft can lead to more tunnel widening evidently in the tibial tunnel, particularly. PMID:26612290

  3. Arthroscopic anatomical double bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A prospective longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Devgan, Ashish; Singh, Amanpreet; Gogna, Paritosh; Singla, Rohit; Magu, Narender Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Reetadyuti

    2015-01-01

    Background: Single bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has been the current standard of treatment for ACL deficiency. However, a significant subset of patients continue to report residual symptoms of instability with a poor pivot control. Cadaveric biomechanical studies have shown double bundle (DB) ACL reconstructions to restore the knee kinematics better. This study evaluates the outcome of DB ACL reconstruction. Materials and Methods: 30 consecutive patients who underwent anatomic DB ACL reconstruction were included in this prospective longitudinal study. There were all males with a mean age of 25 ± 7.45 years. All patients were prospectively evaluated using GeNouRoB (GNRB) arthrometer, functional knee scores (International Knee Documentation Committee [IKDC] and Lysholm) and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for comparing the graft orientation and footprint of the reconstructed ACL with that of the normal knee. Results: The average followup was 36.2 months. At the time of final followup the mean Lysholm score was 93.13 ± 3.31. As per the objective IKDC score, 26 patients (86.6%) were in Group A while 4 patients (13.3%) were in Group B. The mean differential anterior tibial translation by GNRB, arthrometer was 1.07 ± 0.8 mm (range 0.1-2.3 mm). All cases had a negative pivot shift test. MRI scans of operated and the contralateral normal knee showed the mean sagittal ACL tibial angle coronal ACL tibial angle and tibial ACL footprint to be in accordance with the values of the contralateral, normal knee. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that DB ACL reconstruction restores the ACL anatomically in terms of size and angle of orientation. However, long term studies are needed to further substantiate its role in decreasing the incidence of early osteoarthritic changes compared to the conventional single bundle reconstructions. PMID:26015600

  4. Inside-Out Antegrade Tibial Tunnel Drilling Through the Posterolateral Portal Using a Flexible Reamer in Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Stuart, Joseph J.; Choi, J.H. James; Toth, Alison P.; Moorman, Claude T.; Taylor, Dean C.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction using the transtibial drilling or arthroscopic tibial-inlay technique has a risk of injury to the popliteal neurovascular bundle because a pin is drilled anterior to posterior. Intraoperative fluoroscopy is used to decrease the risk of neurovascular injury. In addition, graft passage in the transtibial technique may be problematic because of a sharp turn when placing the graft into the tibial tunnel, which may damage graft fibers. In the surgical technique described in this report, the posteromedial portal is used for visualization and the posterolateral portal is used for debridement of the PCL tibial footprint and the synovial fold closest to the PCL. A curved guide is placed from the posterolateral portal to the tibial footprint, and a flexible pin is drilled across the tibia. The tibial tunnel is then created using a flexible reamer under direct visualization up to the desired length, and a graft can be positioned in the tibial tunnel through the posterolateral portal. This technique has the potential advantages of decreasing the risk of injury to the popliteal neurovascular bundle (use of anteriorly directed, inside-out drilling), avoiding a sharp turn during graft passage, and allowing accurate and anatomic tibial tunnel placement without intraoperative fluoroscopy. PMID:26900551

  5. Medial ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction of the elbow in major league baseball players: Where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Erickson, Brandon J; Bach, Bernard R; Bush-Joseph, Charles A; Verma, Nikhil N; Romeo, Anthony A

    2016-06-18

    The ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) is a vital structure to the overhead athlete, especially the baseball pitcher. For reasons not completely understood, UCL injuries have become increasingly more common in major league baseball (MLB) pitchers over the past 10 years. UCL reconstruction (UCLR) is the current gold standard of treatment for these injuries in MLB pitchers who wish to return to sport (RTS) at a high level and who have failed a course of non-operative treatment. Results following UCLR in MLB pitchers have been encouraging, with multiple RTS rates now cited at greater than 80%. Unfortunately, with the rising number of UCLR, there has also been a spike in the number of revision UCLR in MLB pitchers. Similar to primary UCLR, the etiology of the increase in revision UCLR, aside from an increase in the number of pitchers who have undergone a primary UCLR, remains elusive. The current literature has attempted to address several questions including those surrounding surgical technique (method of exposure, graft choice, management of the ulnar nerve, concomitant elbow arthroscopy, etc.), post-operative rehabilitation strategies, and timing of RTS following UCLR. While some questions have been answered, many remain unknown. The literature surrounding UCLR in MLB pitchers will be reviewed, and future directions regarding this injury in these high level athletes will be discussed.

  6. RESIDENTS CASE REPORT: DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS IN A HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL PITCHER FOLLOWING ULNAR COLLATERAL LIGAMENT (UCL) RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Garrison, Craig; Conway, John

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Accurate diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis in an outpatient setting is difficult; however, proper screening and prompt referral can be lifesaving. The purpose of this case report is to present the unusual findings of a Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) in an otherwise healthy young male following an upper extremity surgery. Case Description: An 18 year-old male high school baseball pitcher presented to the clinic for his four month follow up visit after Ulnar Collateral Ligament (UCL) reconstruction surgery. Patient complained of a recent “groin strain” and “calf strain” following baseball conditioning, that upon examination demonstrated signs and symptoms consistent with a deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Outcomes: Following emergent referral the patient was diagnosed with multiple emboli and was treated with Lovenox and Coumadin. Discussion: Lower extremity DVT is a serious and potentially life threatening disorder. Physical therapists need to be vigilant in their subjective and objective examination of any patient that presents with lower extremity pain and swelling. This case report presents the unlikely findings of a DVT in a young, healthy, male high school baseball pitcher after surgical repair of the UCL. Level of Evidence: 4 PMID:24175133

  7. Assessment of functional impairment after knee anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using cardiorespiratory parameters: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A dynamic sub-maximum exercise with the same absolute intensity, performed with different muscle groups, may present exacerbated cardiorespiratory responses. Therefore, cardiorespiratory responses to unilateral exercise may identify bilateral differences. The purpose of this study was to verify whether the cardiorespiratory responses to lower limb exercise display counter-lateral differences, and if they could be used to assist athletes and health professionals involved in rehabilitation. Methods Nine individuals participated in this cross-sectional study. They had been treated in a private rehabilitation clinic and submitted to intra-articular reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. The cycling exercise with the same sub-maximal intensity and with one lower limb was used to gather data. Cardiorespiratory responses to exercise were compared between exercises performed with the involved and uninvolved limb after five minutes of exercise. Results Cardiorespiratory responses to exercise performed with the involved limb presented higher values after five minutes of cycling: oxygen uptake (+7%), carbon dioxide production (+10%), minute ventilation (+20%), breathing frequency (+19%), ventilatory equivalent for oxygen (+14%), end-tidal pressure of O2 oxygen (+4%), end-tidal pressure of O2 carbon dioxide (-9%) and heart rate (+9%). Conclusions The exacerbated responses, including increase of the ventilatory equivalent and decrease of end-tidal pressure of carbon dioxide, indicate that this exercise protocol may be useful in the characterization of the functional deficit of the surgical limb during rehabilitation. PMID:24885115

  8. Medial ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction of the elbow in major league baseball players: Where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J; Bach Jr, Bernard R; Bush-Joseph, Charles A; Verma, Nikhil N; Romeo, Anthony A

    2016-01-01

    The ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) is a vital structure to the overhead athlete, especially the baseball pitcher. For reasons not completely understood, UCL injuries have become increasingly more common in major league baseball (MLB) pitchers over the past 10 years. UCL reconstruction (UCLR) is the current gold standard of treatment for these injuries in MLB pitchers who wish to return to sport (RTS) at a high level and who have failed a course of non-operative treatment. Results following UCLR in MLB pitchers have been encouraging, with multiple RTS rates now cited at greater than 80%. Unfortunately, with the rising number of UCLR, there has also been a spike in the number of revision UCLR in MLB pitchers. Similar to primary UCLR, the etiology of the increase in revision UCLR, aside from an increase in the number of pitchers who have undergone a primary UCLR, remains elusive. The current literature has attempted to address several questions including those surrounding surgical technique (method of exposure, graft choice, management of the ulnar nerve, concomitant elbow arthroscopy, etc.), post-operative rehabilitation strategies, and timing of RTS following UCLR. While some questions have been answered, many remain unknown. The literature surrounding UCLR in MLB pitchers will be reviewed, and future directions regarding this injury in these high level athletes will be discussed. PMID:27335810

  9. Medial ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction of the elbow in major league baseball players: Where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Erickson, Brandon J; Bach, Bernard R; Bush-Joseph, Charles A; Verma, Nikhil N; Romeo, Anthony A

    2016-06-18

    The ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) is a vital structure to the overhead athlete, especially the baseball pitcher. For reasons not completely understood, UCL injuries have become increasingly more common in major league baseball (MLB) pitchers over the past 10 years. UCL reconstruction (UCLR) is the current gold standard of treatment for these injuries in MLB pitchers who wish to return to sport (RTS) at a high level and who have failed a course of non-operative treatment. Results following UCLR in MLB pitchers have been encouraging, with multiple RTS rates now cited at greater than 80%. Unfortunately, with the rising number of UCLR, there has also been a spike in the number of revision UCLR in MLB pitchers. Similar to primary UCLR, the etiology of the increase in revision UCLR, aside from an increase in the number of pitchers who have undergone a primary UCLR, remains elusive. The current literature has attempted to address several questions including those surrounding surgical technique (method of exposure, graft choice, management of the ulnar nerve, concomitant elbow arthroscopy, etc.), post-operative rehabilitation strategies, and timing of RTS following UCLR. While some questions have been answered, many remain unknown. The literature surrounding UCLR in MLB pitchers will be reviewed, and future directions regarding this injury in these high level athletes will be discussed. PMID:27335810

  10. Local delivery of controlled-release simvastatin to improve the biocompatibility of polyethylene terephthalate artificial ligaments for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Han, Fei; Li, Yunxia; Chen, Jiwu; Chen, Tianwu; Zhi, Yunlong; Jiang, Jia; Lin, Chao; Chen, Shiyi; Zhao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System has recently been widely used as the primary graft of choice in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. But the biological graft-bone healing still remains a problem. Previous studies have shown that simvastatin (SIM) stimulates bone formation. The objective of this study was to investigate whether surface coating with collagen containing low-dose SIM microsphere could enhance the surface biocompatibility of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligaments to accelerate graft-to-bone healing. The in vitro studies demonstrated that bone marrow stromal cells on the collagen-coated PET scaffolds (COL/PET) and simvastatin/collagen-coated PET scaffolds (SIM/COL/PET) proliferated vigorously. Compared with the PET group and the COL/PET group, SIM could induce bone marrow stromal cells' osteoblastic differentiation, high alkaline phosphatase activity, more mineralization deposition, and more expression of osteoblast-related genes, such as osteocalcin, runt-related transcription factor 2, bone morphogenetic protein-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor, in the SIM/COL/PET group. In vivo, rabbits received ACL reconstruction with different scaffolds. Histological analysis demonstrated that graft-bone healing was significantly greater with angiogenesis and osteogenesis in the SIM/COL/PET group than the other groups. In addition, biomechanical testing at the eighth week demonstrated a significant increase in the ultimate failure load and stiffness in the SIM/COL/PET group. The low dose of SIM-sustained release from SIM/COL/PET promoted the graft-bone healing via its effect on both angiogenesis and osteogenesis. This study suggested that collagen containing low-dose SIM microsphere coating on the surface of PET artificial ligaments could be potentially applied for ACL reconstruction. PMID:26869789

  11. Local delivery of controlled-release simvastatin to improve the biocompatibility of polyethylene terephthalate artificial ligaments for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Han, Fei; Li, Yunxia; Chen, Jiwu; Chen, Tianwu; Zhi, Yunlong; Jiang, Jia; Lin, Chao; Chen, Shiyi; Zhao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System has recently been widely used as the primary graft of choice in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. But the biological graft–bone healing still remains a problem. Previous studies have shown that simvastatin (SIM) stimulates bone formation. The objective of this study was to investigate whether surface coating with collagen containing low-dose SIM microsphere could enhance the surface biocompatibility of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligaments to accelerate graft-to-bone healing. The in vitro studies demonstrated that bone marrow stromal cells on the collagen-coated PET scaffolds (COL/PET) and simvastatin/collagen-coated PET scaffolds (SIM/COL/PET) proliferated vigorously. Compared with the PET group and the COL/PET group, SIM could induce bone marrow stromal cells’ osteoblastic differentiation, high alkaline phosphatase activity, more mineralization deposition, and more expression of osteoblast-related genes, such as osteocalcin, runt-related transcription factor 2, bone morphogenetic protein-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor, in the SIM/COL/PET group. In vivo, rabbits received ACL reconstruction with different scaffolds. Histological analysis demonstrated that graft–bone healing was significantly greater with angiogenesis and osteogenesis in the SIM/COL/PET group than the other groups. In addition, biomechanical testing at the eighth week demonstrated a significant increase in the ultimate failure load and stiffness in the SIM/COL/PET group. The low dose of SIM-sustained release from SIM/COL/PET promoted the graft–bone healing via its effect on both angiogenesis and osteogenesis. This study suggested that collagen containing low-dose SIM microsphere coating on the surface of PET artificial ligaments could be potentially applied for ACL reconstruction. PMID:26869789

  12. Local delivery of controlled-release simvastatin to improve the biocompatibility of polyethylene terephthalate artificial ligaments for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Han, Fei; Li, Yunxia; Chen, Jiwu; Chen, Tianwu; Zhi, Yunlong; Jiang, Jia; Lin, Chao; Chen, Shiyi; Zhao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System has recently been widely used as the primary graft of choice in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. But the biological graft-bone healing still remains a problem. Previous studies have shown that simvastatin (SIM) stimulates bone formation. The objective of this study was to investigate whether surface coating with collagen containing low-dose SIM microsphere could enhance the surface biocompatibility of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligaments to accelerate graft-to-bone healing. The in vitro studies demonstrated that bone marrow stromal cells on the collagen-coated PET scaffolds (COL/PET) and simvastatin/collagen-coated PET scaffolds (SIM/COL/PET) proliferated vigorously. Compared with the PET group and the COL/PET group, SIM could induce bone marrow stromal cells' osteoblastic differentiation, high alkaline phosphatase activity, more mineralization deposition, and more expression of osteoblast-related genes, such as osteocalcin, runt-related transcription factor 2, bone morphogenetic protein-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor, in the SIM/COL/PET group. In vivo, rabbits received ACL reconstruction with different scaffolds. Histological analysis demonstrated that graft-bone healing was significantly greater with angiogenesis and osteogenesis in the SIM/COL/PET group than the other groups. In addition, biomechanical testing at the eighth week demonstrated a significant increase in the ultimate failure load and stiffness in the SIM/COL/PET group. The low dose of SIM-sustained release from SIM/COL/PET promoted the graft-bone healing via its effect on both angiogenesis and osteogenesis. This study suggested that collagen containing low-dose SIM microsphere coating on the surface of PET artificial ligaments could be potentially applied for ACL reconstruction.

  13. Gluteal tendon repair augmented with a synthetic ligament: surgical technique and a case series.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Thomas A; Darcy, Peter; Ebert, Jay R; Smith, Anne; Janes, Greg

    2014-01-01

    We describe an augmented surgical repair technique for gluteus minimus and medius tears, along with a supportive case series. A consecutive series of 22 patients presenting with clinical and radiological findings consistent with hip abductor tears, who had undergone failed prior conservative treatments, were prospectively recruited. Patients underwent open bursectomy, Y-iliotibial release, debridement of the diseased tendon, decortication of the trochanteric foot-plate and reattachment augmented with a LARS ligament through a trans-osseous tunnel, together with suture anchors. All patients were assessed pre- and postoperatively to 12 months with the Oxford Hip Score (OHS), the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) and a Visual Analogue Pain Scale (VAS), while a satisfaction scale was employed at 12 months. A statistically significant improvement (p<0.05) was observed for all patient reported outcome measures, while all patients were at least 'satisfied' with the procedure at 12 months. One patient reported some lateral hip discomfort at 10 months, and removal of the LARS interference screw provided immediate relief. One patient had a urological catheter-related complication. With no other complications and no clinical failures of the repair, we believe the technique to be safe and reliable, whilst reducing the incidence of re-tears as reported in the existing literature. PMID:24186680

  14. Fear of re-injury: a hindrance for returning to sports after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kvist, Joanna; Ek, Anna; Sporrstedt, Katja; Good, Lars

    2005-07-01

    Unrestricted participation in sports activities and return to the pre-injury level is often reported as an indicator of the success of ACL reconstruction. The athletes' choice not to return to their pre-injury level may depend on the knee function, but some times, social reasons or psychological hindrances such as fear of re-injury may influence their return to sports. The aim of this study was to investigate whether fear of re-injury due to movement is of significance for returning to previous level of activity in patients who have undergone anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK), the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and some general questions were mailed to 87 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction 3-4 years before the study was conducted. Sixty-two patients (74%) answered the questionnaires (34 men and 28 women). Fifty-three percent of the patients returned to their pre-injury activity level. The patients who did not return to their pre-injury activity level had more fear of re-injury, which was reflected in the TSK. In addition, high fear of re-injury was correlated with low knee-related quality of life. Fear of re-injury must be considered in the rehabilitation and evaluation of the effects of an ACL reconstruction.

  15. An Australian survey of in-patient protocols for quadriceps exercises following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Shaw, T; McEvoy, M; McClelland, J

    2002-12-01

    Current practices regarding in-patient strengthening exercise prescription following anterior cruclate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are scarcely addressed in the literature and remain unreported for Australian hospitals. An observational, questionnaire-based study was used to Investigate in-patient quadriceps strengthening practices in Australian hospitals after ACL reconstruction. Questionnaires were returned by 248 hospitals (76% response rate) and of these 88 hospitals reported performing ACL reconstructions. These hospitals were surveyed to determine the types of quadriceps strengthening exercises prescribed during the in-patient period. Information was sought regarding routine management strengthening practices. A variety of quadriceps exercises such as static quadriceps contractions (SQC), straight leg raises (SLR) and inner range quadriceps (IRQ) were frequently prescribed, although no standard practice currently exists. Static quadriceps exercises were prescribed by 91% of hospitals surveyed, IRQ exercises were used by 30%, and 49% reported using SLR exercises. Current literature tends to support the performance of SQC and SLR exercises during the early postoperative period following ACL reconstruction. Conversely, current clinical practice is incongruent with regard to the scientific recommendations for IRQ performance.

  16. Outcome of combined autologous chondrocyte implantation and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Dhinsa, Baljinder S; Nawaz, Syed Z; Gallagher, Kieran R; Skinner, John; Briggs, Tim; Bentley, George

    2015-01-01

    Background: Instability of the knee joint, after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, is contraindication to osteochondral defect repair. This prospective study is to investigate the role of combined autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) with ACL reconstruction. Materials and Methods: Three independent groups of patients with previous ACL injuries undergoing ACI were identified and prospectively followed up. The first group had ACI in combination with ACL reconstruction (combined group); the 2nd group consisted of individuals who had an ACI procedure having had a previously successful ACL reconstruction (ACL first group); and the third group included patients who had an ACI procedure to a clinically stable knee with documented nonreconstructed ACL disruption (No ACL group). Their outcomes were assessed using the modified cincinnati rating system, the Bentley functional (BF) rating system (BF) and a visual analog scale (VAS). Results: At a mean followup of 64.24 months for the ACL first group, 63 months for combined group and 78.33 months for the No ACL group; 60% of ACL first patients, 72.73% of combined group and 83.33% of the No ACL group felt their outcome was better following surgery. There was no significant difference demonstrated in BF and VAS between the combined and ACL first groups. Results revealed a significant affect of osteochondral defect size on outcome measures. Conclusion: The study confirms that ACI in combination with ACL reconstruction is a viable option with similar outcomes as those patients who have had the procedures staged. PMID:26015603

  17. Sex differences in knee strength deficit 1 year after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Kyung; Park, Won Hah

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Little is known about the outcome differences between men and women after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Therefore, the present study aimed to compare knee muscle strength between men and women 1 year after ACL reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Retrospective and outcome study. Between 2012 and 2015, 35 males (mean age, 29.7 ± 010.7 years) and 35 females (mean age, 28.2 ± 11.3 years) who had undergone primary ACL reconstruction were recruited from Samsung medical centers. We assessed the strength deficit in the quadriceps (extensor) and hamstrings (flexor) at 60°/sec and 180°/sec with isokinetic testing equipment. Statistical analysis was conducted with a t-test to determine if sex differences existed in knee strength deficit. [Results] Significant differences were noted between men and women with respect to extensor muscle strength deficit. Women reported less extensor muscle strength than men did, at the angular velocities 60°/sec and 180°/sec. However, no significant sex differences were found at either velocity with respect to the strength deficit of the knee flexor muscles. [Conclusion] Compared to male patients, female patients reported significantly less extensor muscle strength and less improvement 1 year after reconstruction. PMID:26834366

  18. Assessment of the quality and content of information on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction on the internet.

    PubMed

    Bruce-Brand, Robert A; Baker, Joseph F; Byrne, Damien P; Hogan, Niall A; McCarthy, Tom

    2013-06-01

    The Internet has become a major source of health information for the public. However, there are concerns regarding the quality, accuracy, and currency of medical information available online. We assessed the quality of information about anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction on the first 60 websites returned by the 4 most popular search engines. Each site was categorized by type and assessed for quality and validity using the DISCERN score, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) benchmark criteria, and a novel ACL reconstruction-specific content score. The presence of the Health On the Net Code (HONcode), a purported quality assurance marker, was noted. The quality of information on ACL reconstruction available online is variable, with many websites omitting basic information regarding treatment options, risks, and prognosis. Commercial websites predominate. Academic and allied health professional websites attained the highest DISCERN and JAMA benchmark scores, whereas physician sites achieved the highest content scores. Sites that bore the HONcode seal obtained higher DISCERN and ACL reconstruction content scores than those without this certification. The HONcode seal is a reliable indicator of website quality, and we can confidently advise our patients to search for this marker. PMID:23582738

  19. Comparison of Short-term Complications Between 2 Methods of Coracoclavicular Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Rush, Lane N.; Lake, Nicholas; Stiefel, Eric C.; Hobgood, Edward R.; Ramsey, J. Randall; O’Brien, Michael J.; Field, Larry D.; Savoie, Felix H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Numerous techniques have been used to treat acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation, with anatomic reconstruction of the coracoclavicular (CC) ligaments becoming a popular method of fixation. Anatomic CC ligament reconstruction is commonly performed with cortical fixation buttons (CFBs) or tendon grafts (TGs). Purpose: To report and compare short-term complications associated with AC joint stabilization procedures using CFBs or TGs. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of the operative treatment of AC joint injuries between April 2007 and January 2013 at 2 institutions. Thirty-eight patients who had undergone a procedure for AC joint instability were evaluated. In these 38 patients with a mean age of 36.2 years, 18 shoulders underwent fixation using the CFB technique and 20 shoulders underwent reconstruction using the TG technique. Results: The overall complication rate was 42.1% (16/38). There were 11 complications in the 18 patients in the CFB group (61.1%), including 7 construct failures resulting in a loss of reduction. The most common mode of failure was suture breakage (n = 3), followed by button migration (n = 2) and coracoid fracture (n = 2). There were 5 complications in the TG group (25%), including 3 cases of asymptomatic subluxation, 1 symptomatic suture granuloma, and 1 superficial infection. There were no instances of construct failure seen in TG fixations. CFB fixation was found to have a statistically significant increase in complications (P = .0243) and construct failure (P = .002) compared with TG fixation. Conclusion: CFB fixation was associated with a higher rate of failure and higher rate of early complications when compared with TG fixation. PMID:27504468

  20. [Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using double anteromedial and posterolateral bundles].

    PubMed

    Franceschi, J P; Sbihi, A; Champsaur, P

    2002-11-01

    We propose a method for repairing the anterior cruciate ligament which takes advantage of the multifascular nature of the ligament to achieve better physiological anteroposterior and rotational stability compared with conventional methods. Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anteromedial and posterolateral bundles of the ligament closely reproduces normal anatomy. We have used this technique in 92 patients with anterior cruciate ligament laxity and present here the mid-term results. The hamstring tendons (gracilis and semitendinosus) are harvested carefully to obtain good quality grafts. Arthroscopic preparation of the notch allows careful cleaning of the axial aspect of the lateral condyle; it is crucial to well visualize the region over the top and delimit the 9 h-12 h zone for the right knee or the 12-15 h zone for the left knee. The femoral end of the anteromedial tunnel lies close to the floor of the intercondylar notch, 5 to 10 mm in front of the posterior border of the lateral condyle, at 13 h for the left knee and 11 h for the right knee. The femoral end of the posterolateral tunnel lies more anteriorly, at 14 h for the left knee and 10 h for the right knee. The tibial end of the posterolateral tunnel faces the anterolateral spike of the tibia. The tibial end of the anteromedial tunnel lies in front of the apex of the two tibial spikes half way between the anteromedial spike and the anterolateral spike, 8 mm in front of the protrusion of the posteriolateral pin. The posterolateral graft is run through the femoral and tibial tunnels first. A cortical fixation is used for the femoral end. The femoral end of the anteromedial graft is then fixed in the same way. The tibial fixation begins with the posterolateral graft with the knee close to full extension. The anteromedial graft is fixed with the knee in 90 degrees flexion. Thirty patients were reviewed at least six months after the procedure. Mean age was 28.2 years. Mean overall IKDC score was 86% (36% A and

  1. Factors Influencing Graft Choice in Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in the MARS Group.

    PubMed

    Group, Mars

    2016-08-01

    It has not been known what drives revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction graft choice in the past. We undertook this study to utilize the Multicenter ACL Revision Study (MARS) group and propensity score statistical analysis to determine the drivers of revision ACL reconstruction graft choice. We hypothesized that propensity analysis would demonstrate that individual surgeons still have significant impact on revision ACL reconstruction. Twelve hundred patients were enrolled in this longitudinal revision cohort by 83 surgeons at 52 sites. The median age was 26 years and 505 (42%) were females. One thousand forty-nine (87%) patients were undergoing their first ACL revision. Graft choice for revision ACL reconstruction for these patients was 48% autograft, 49% allograft, and 3% combination. The independent variables of this model included gender, age, ethnicity, body mass index, smoking status, sport, activity level, previous graft, revision number, surgeon, surgeon's opinion of failure, previous technical aspects, etc. Surgeons were defined as those who contributed more than 15 patients during the enrollment period. . We calculated a propensity score for graft type based on the predicted probability of receiving an allograft from a logistic regression model. Propensity scores demonstrated that surgeon, prior graft choice, and patient age each had significant influence on which graft type was chosen for the revision ACL reconstruction (p  < 0.0001). The revising surgeon had the largest impact upon graft choice: ∼ 5 times that of the second-most important factor (prior graft). If the prior graft type was an autograft, then an allograft was 3.6 times more likely to be chosen for the revision. This current study demonstrates that the individual surgeon is ultimately the most important factor in revision ACL reconstruction graft choice. Additional statistically significant influences of graft choice included age, gender, previous graft choice, ACL

  2. Factors Influencing Graft Choice in Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in the MARS Group.

    PubMed

    Group, Mars

    2016-08-01

    It has not been known what drives revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction graft choice in the past. We undertook this study to utilize the Multicenter ACL Revision Study (MARS) group and propensity score statistical analysis to determine the drivers of revision ACL reconstruction graft choice. We hypothesized that propensity analysis would demonstrate that individual surgeons still have significant impact on revision ACL reconstruction. Twelve hundred patients were enrolled in this longitudinal revision cohort by 83 surgeons at 52 sites. The median age was 26 years and 505 (42%) were females. One thousand forty-nine (87%) patients were undergoing their first ACL revision. Graft choice for revision ACL reconstruction for these patients was 48% autograft, 49% allograft, and 3% combination. The independent variables of this model included gender, age, ethnicity, body mass index, smoking status, sport, activity level, previous graft, revision number, surgeon, surgeon's opinion of failure, previous technical aspects, etc. Surgeons were defined as those who contributed more than 15 patients during the enrollment period. . We calculated a propensity score for graft type based on the predicted probability of receiving an allograft from a logistic regression model. Propensity scores demonstrated that surgeon, prior graft choice, and patient age each had significant influence on which graft type was chosen for the revision ACL reconstruction (p  < 0.0001). The revising surgeon had the largest impact upon graft choice: ∼ 5 times that of the second-most important factor (prior graft). If the prior graft type was an autograft, then an allograft was 3.6 times more likely to be chosen for the revision. This current study demonstrates that the individual surgeon is ultimately the most important factor in revision ACL reconstruction graft choice. Additional statistically significant influences of graft choice included age, gender, previous graft choice, ACL

  3. Outcome of double bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using crosspin and aperture fixation

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Deepak; Jain, Vineet; Goyal, Ankit; Bahl, Vibhu; Modi, Prashant; Chaudhary, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Background: Double bundle anterior cruciate ligament (DBACL) reconstruction is said to reproduce the native anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) anatomy better than single bundle anterior cruciate ligament, whether it leads to better functional results is debatable. Different fixation methods have been used for DBACL reconstruction, the most common being aperture fixation on tibial side and cortical suspensory fixation on the femoral side. We present the results of DBACL reconstruction technique, wherein on the femoral side anteromedial (AM) bundle is fixed with a crosspin and aperture fixation was done for the posterolateral (PL) bundle. Materials and Methods: Out of 157 isolated ACL injury patients who underwent ACL reconstruction, 100 were included in the prospective study. Arthroscopic DBACL reconstruction was done using ipsilateral hamstring autograft. AM bundle was fixed using Transfix (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) on the femoral side and bio interference screw (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) on the tibial side. PL bundle was fixed on femoral as well as on tibial side with a biointerference screw. Patients were evaluated using KT-1000 arthrometer, Lysholm score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Score and isokinetic muscle strength testing. Methods: Out of 157 isolated ACL injury patients who underwent ACL reconstruction, 100 were included in the prospective study. Arthroscopic DBACL reconstruction was done using ipsilateral hamstring autograft. AM bundle was fixed using Transfix (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) on the femoral side and bio interference screw (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) on the tibial side. PL bundle was fixed on femoral as well as on tibial side with a biointerference screw. Patients were evaluated using KT-1000 arthrometer, Lysholm score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Score and isokinetic muscle strength testing. Results: The KT-1000 results were evaluated using paired t test with the P value set at 0.001. At the end of 1

  4. Revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft and extra-articular iliotibial band tenodesis.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Randy; McConkey, Mark O; Forsythe, Brian; Harner, Christopher D

    2015-04-01

    Revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a technically demanding procedure with outcomes that generally fail to reach those seen with primary ACL reconstruction. With most index procedures using autograft tissue, it is not uncommon for allograft tissue to be required for revision ACL reconstruction. Compared with autografts, allografts take longer to incorporate and lead to more episodes of instability. In this article, we describe ipsilateral iliotibial band tenodesis performed to augment use of bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft in revision ACL reconstruction. This technique adds rotational stability to protect the allograft tissue while it incorporates. PMID:25844596

  5. Revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft and extra-articular iliotibial band tenodesis.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Randy; McConkey, Mark O; Forsythe, Brian; Harner, Christopher D

    2015-04-01

    Revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a technically demanding procedure with outcomes that generally fail to reach those seen with primary ACL reconstruction. With most index procedures using autograft tissue, it is not uncommon for allograft tissue to be required for revision ACL reconstruction. Compared with autografts, allografts take longer to incorporate and lead to more episodes of instability. In this article, we describe ipsilateral iliotibial band tenodesis performed to augment use of bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft in revision ACL reconstruction. This technique adds rotational stability to protect the allograft tissue while it incorporates.

  6. Comparison of Results between Hook Plate Fixation and Ligament Reconstruction for Acute Unstable Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jong Pil; Lee, Byoung-Joo; Nam, Sang Jin; Chung, Seok Won; Jeong, Won-Ju; Min, Woo-Kie

    2015-01-01

    Background In the present study, we aimed to compare clinical and radiographic outcomes between hook plate fixation and coracoclavicular (CC) ligament reconstruction for the treatment of acute unstable acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation. Methods Forty-two patients who underwent surgery for an unstable acute dislocation of the AC joint were included. We divided them into two groups according to the treatment modality: internal fixation with a hook plate (group I, 24 cases) or CC ligament reconstruction (group II, 18 cases). We evaluated the clinical outcomes using a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and Constant-Murley score, and assessed the radiographic outcomes based on the reduction and loss of CC distance on preoperative, postoperative, and final follow-up plain radiographs. Results The mean VAS scores at the final follow-up were 1.6 ± 1.5 and 1.3 ± 1.3 in groups I and II, respectively, which were not significantly different. The mean Constant-Murley scores were 90.2 ± 9.9 and 89.2 ± 3.5 in groups I and II, respectively, which were also not significantly different. The AC joints were well reduced in both groups, whereas CC distance improved from a mean of 215.7% ± 50.9% preoperatively to 106.1% ± 10.2% at the final follow-up in group I, and from 239.9% ± 59.2% preoperatively to 133.6% ± 36.7% at the final follow-up in group II. The improvement in group I was significantly superior to that in group II (p < 0.001). Furthermore, subluxation was not observed in any case in group I, but was noted in six cases (33%) in group II. Erosions of the acromion undersurface were observed in 9 cases in group I. Conclusions In cases of acute unstable AC joint dislocation, hook plate fixation and CC ligament reconstruction yield comparable satisfactory clinical outcomes. However, radiographic outcomes based on the maintenance of reduction indicate that hook plate fixation is a better treatment option. PMID:25729525

  7. Early active extension after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction does not result in increased laxity of the knee.

    PubMed

    Isberg, Jonas; Faxén, Eva; Brandsson, Sveinbjörn; Eriksson, Bengt I; Kärrholm, Johan; Karlsson, Jon

    2006-11-01

    If permission of full active and passive extension immediately after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction will increase the post-operative laxity of the knee has been a subject of discussion. We investigated whether a post-operative rehabilitation protocol including active and passive extension without any restrictions in extension immediately after an ACL reconstruction would increase the post-operative anterior-posterior knee laxity (A-P laxity). Our hypothesis was that full active and passive extension immediately after an ACL reconstruction would have no effect on the A-P laxity and clinical results up to 2 years after the operation. Twenty-two consecutive patients (14 men, 8 women, median age 21 years, range 17-41) were included. All the patients had a unilateral ACL rupture and no other ligament injuries or any other history of previous knee injuries. The surgical procedure was identical in all patients and one experienced surgeon operated on all the patients, using the bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft. The post-operative rehabilitation programme was identical in both groups, except for extension training during the first 4 weeks post-operatively. The patients were randomly allocated to post-operative rehabilitation programmes either allowing (Group A, n=11) or not allowing [Group B (30 to -10 degrees ), n=11] full active and passive extension immediately after the operation. They were evaluated pre-operatively and at 6 months and 2 years after the reconstruction. To evaluate the A-P knee laxity, radiostereometric analysis (RSA) and KT-1000 arthrometer (KT-1000) measurements were used, range of motion, Lysholm score, Tegner activity level, the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) evaluation system and one-leg-hop test quotient were used. Pre-operatively, the RSA measurements revealed side-to-side differences in Group A of 8.6 mm (2.3-15.4), median (range) and in Group B of 7.2 mm (2.2-17.4) (n.s.). The corresponding KT-1000

  8. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Combination of Autograft and Allograft Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Darnley, James E.; Léger-St-Jean, Benjamin; Pedroza, Angela D.; Flanigan, David C.; Kaeding, Christopher C.; Magnussen, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with hamstring autografts less than 8.5 mm in diameter is associated with worse patient-reported outcome scores and increased risk of revision surgery compared with reconstructions performed with larger grafts. One proposed solution to small autograft harvest is to create a hybrid graft by augmenting autografts with allograft tissue to increase graft diameter. Purpose: To compare hybrid autograft/allograft ACL reconstruction to autograft ACL reconstruction, specifically analyzing the patient-reported outcome scores and the risk of revision surgery at 2 years postoperative. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: From the years 2002 to 2009, a total of 34 patients were identified from a prospectively collected database as having undergone hybrid ACL reconstruction. Twenty-seven of 34 (79.4%) patients had a 2-year follow-up. These 27 patients were matched by age (within 1 year) and sex to 27 patients who underwent hamstring autograft ACL reconstruction during the same period. At the 2-year mark, revision surgery risk and patient-reported outcome scores were compared between the 2 groups. Results: The mean age for the hybrid and matched groups (±SD) was 20.9 ± 7.0 years. Both the hybrid and control groups had 17 males and 10 females. There was no significant difference in preoperative patient-reported outcome scores, meniscus tears, or cartilage lesions between the 2 groups. Graft size was larger in the hybrid group (9.5 ± 0.6 mm) than in the autograft group (8.4 ± 0.9 mm) (P < .001). At 2 years postoperative, patient-reported outcome scores were similar between the hybrid and autograft groups. Revision surgery was required in 5 (18.5%) patients who underwent hybrid reconstruction compared with 2 (7.4%) of those who underwent autograft reconstruction (P = .26). Conclusion: Patients who undergo ACL reconstruction with hybrid hamstring grafts and hamstring autografts report similar

  9. The relationship between knee strength and functional stability before and after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Keays, S L; Bullock-Saxton, J E; Newcombe, P; Keays, A C

    2003-03-01

    Functional stability of the knee is dependent on an intact ligamentous system and the timely and efficient contraction of supporting musculature. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between muscle strength and functional stability in 31 patients pre- and post-operatively, following a unilateral anterior cruciate ligament rupture. All subjects underwent reconstructive surgery using semitendonosis and gracilis tendons. Isokinetic strength assessment of quadriceps and hamstring muscles was performed at a rate of movement of 60 degrees /s and 120 degrees /s. Functional stability was determined by performance during five functional stability tests that included the shuttle run, side step, carioca, single and triple hop tests. Pearson's correlation coefficient statistics were applied to pre-operative and post-operative data respectively. These analyses demonstrated a significant positive correlation between quadriceps strength indices at both testing speeds and the two hop tests pre-operatively (p's<0.007) and between quadriceps strength indices at both speeds and all five functional tests post-operatively (p's<0.01). Assessed using Steiger's formula, there was a significant increase in the correlation between quadriceps strength indices and three functional tests post-operatively compared to pre-operatively (p<0.05). No significant correlation between hamstring strength indices and functional scores existed pre- or post-operatively. This study has shown a significant correlation exists between quadriceps strength indices and functional stability both before and after surgery, this relationship does not reach significance between hamstring strength indices and functional stability.

  10. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with synthetic grafts. A review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Alberto; Terzaghi, Clara; Borgo, Enrico; Albisetti, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, one of the most common knee injuries in sports, results in anteroposterior laxity, which often leads to an unstable knee. Traditional ACL reconstruction is performed with autograft; disadvantages of this technique are donor site morbidity and a long rehabilitation period. In the 1980s, artificial ligaments became an attractive alternative to biological grafts. The initial enthusiasm surrounding their introduction stemmed from their lack of donor morbidity, their abundant supply and significant strength, immediate loading and reduced postoperative rehabilitation. Synthetic grafts made of different materials such as carbon fibers, polypropylene, Dacron and polyester have been utilised either as a prosthesis or as an augmentation for a biological ACL graft substitute. Nevertheless, every material presented serious drawbacks: cross-infections, immunological responses, breakage, debris dispersion leading to synovitis, chronic effusions, recurrent instability and knee osteoarthritis. Recently, a resurgence of interest in the use of synthetic prostheses has occurred and studies regarding new artificial grafts have been reported. Although many experimental studies have been made and much effort has been put forth, currently no ideal prosthesis mimicking natural human tissue has been found. PMID:20157811

  11. [Anatomical study of Cooper's ligament. Value in the surgical cure of urinary incontinence in women].

    PubMed

    Perdu, M; Darai, E; Goffinet, F; Madelenat, P

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the study was to measure Cooper's ligament thickness in the middle and at 1, 2, 3, 4 cm and to find the best place to fix the stitches of colposuspension. This study was performed on fresh cadavers. Sixteen Cooper's ligaments were studied (8 women, mean age 78 +/- 6 years). The length, the width and thickness of Cooper's ligament at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 cm from the middle were measured. The limits of Cooper's ligament are indefinite. This ligament is significantly thicker (p < 0.01) in the middle and at 4 cm from the middle (2.2 +/- 0.4 mm) than 1 cm (1.4 +/- 0.5), 2 cm (1.4 +/- 0.5 mm) and at 3 cm (1.9 +/- 0.3 mm) from the middle. Cooper's ligament is used to fix the stitches for colposuspension derived from Burch colposuspension (non-incision percutaneous colposuspension to Cooper's ligament, laparoscopic colposuspension...) and sometime help to fix meshes in frondes procedures and the vagina in the Bologna procedure. This study showed the best point to fix the stitches (by its thickness) for colposuspension on this ligament at 4 cm from the middle (the fixation at the origin exposing to periostitis).

  12. Single-leg postural stability deficits following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in pediatric and adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Dai; Howell, David R; Micheli, Lyle J; Meehan, William P

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the postural stability of pediatric and adolescent athletes without anterior cruciate ligament injury with those who underwent anterior cruciate reconstruction (ACLR). Postural stability ratings derived from a video-force plate system during the three stances of the modified Balance Error Scoring System were collected from pediatric and adolescent athletes who underwent ACLR (N=24; mean 1.2 years after surgery) and from uninjured controls (N=479). The postural control rating was calculated as the mean of the displacement and variance of the torso and center of pressure data, normalized on a scale from 0 to 100. A higher rating indicates greater postural stability. Participants who underwent ACLR showed lower postural stability ratings during single-leg stance compared with uninjured controls (40.0 vs. 48.7; P=0.037). ACLR is associated with deficits in postural stability.

  13. Lessons learnt from an atypical mycobacterium infection post-anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ng, Stacy W L; Yee Han, Dave Lee

    2015-03-01

    Infections following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are rare, with no previous reports citing Mycobacterium abscessus as the culprit pathogen. A 22-year-old man presented twice over three years with a painful discharging sinus over his right tibia tunnel site necessitating repeated arthroscopy and washout, months of antibiotic therapy, and ultimately culminating in the removal of the implants. In both instances, M. abscessus was present in the wound cultures, along with a coinfection of Staphyloccocus aureus during the second presentation. Though rare, M. abscessus is an important pathogen to consider in postoperative wounds presenting with chronic discharging sinuses, even in healthy non-immunocompromised patients. This case illustrates how the organism can cause an indolent infection, and how the removal of implants can be necessary to prevent the persistence of infection. Coinfection with a second organism is not uncommon and necessitates a timely change in treatment regime as well.

  14. Factors affecting return to play after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Matthew; Feeley, Brian T; Wawrzyniak, John R; Pinkowsky, Gregory; Gallo, Robert A

    2014-11-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction has been reported to produce normal or near-normal knee results in > 90% of patients. A recent meta-analysis suggested that, despite normal or near-normal knees, many athletes do not return to sports. Rates and timing of return to competitive athletics are quite variable depending on the graft type, the age of the patient, the sport, and the level of play. Even when athletes do return to play, often they do not return to their previous level. Graft failure, subjective physical factors, and psychological factors, including fear of reinjury and lack of motivation, appear to play a large role in patients' ability to return to sporting activities. PMID:25419890

  15. Athletic Performance at the National Basketball Association Combine After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mehran, Nima; Williams, Phillip N.; Keller, Robert A.; Khalil, Lafi S.; Lombardo, Stephen J.; Kharrazi, F. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are significant injuries in elite-level basketball players. In-game statistical performance after ACL reconstruction has been demonstrated; however, few studies have reviewed functional performance in National Basketball Association (NBA)–caliber athletes after ACL reconstruction. Purpose: To compare NBA Combine performance of athletes after ACL reconstruction with an age-, size-, and position-matched control group of players with no previous reported knee injury requiring surgery. We hypothesized that there is no difference between the 2 groups in functional performance. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 1092 NBA-caliber players who participated in the NBA Combine between 2000 and 2015 were reviewed. Twenty-one athletes were identified as having primary ACL reconstruction prior to participation in the combine. This study group was compared with an age-, size-, and position-matched control group in objective functional performance testing, including the shuttle run test, lane agility test, three-quarter court sprint, vertical jump (no step), and maximum vertical jump (running start). Results: With regard to quickness and agility, both ACL-reconstructed athletes and controls scored an average of 11.5 seconds in the lane agility test and 3.1 seconds in the shuttle run test (P = .745 and .346, respectively). Speed and acceleration was measured by the three-quarter court sprint, in which both the study group and the control group averaged 3.3 seconds (P = .516). In the maximum vertical jump, which demonstrates an athlete’s jumping ability with a running start, the ACL reconstruction group had an average height of 33.6 inches while the controls averaged 33.9 inches (P = .548). In the standing vertical jump, the ACL reconstruction group averaged 28.2 inches while the control group averaged 29.2 inches (P = .067). Conclusion: In athletes who are able to return to sport

  16. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Hamstring Tendon Autograft With Preserved Insertions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ravi; Bahadur, Raj; Malhotra, Anubhav; Masih, Gladson David; Gupta, Parmanand

    2016-04-01

    We present a technique for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using hamstring tendon autograft with preserved tibial insertions. The tendons, harvested with an open-ended tendon stripper while their tibial insertions are preserved, are looped around to prepare a quadrupled graft. The femoral tunnel is drilled independently through a transportal technique, whereas the tibial tunnel is drilled in a standard manner. The length of the quadrupled graft and loop of the RetroButton is adjusted so that it matches the calculated length of both tunnels and the intra-articular part of the proposed ACL graft. After the RetroButton is flipped, the graft is manually tensioned with maximal stretch on the free end, which is then sutured to the other end with preserved insertions. We propose that preserving the insertions is more biological and may provide better proprioception. The technique eliminates the need for a tibial-side fixation device, thus reducing the cost of surgery. Furthermore, tibial-side fixation of the free graft is the weakest link in the overall stiffness of the reconstructed ACL, and this technique circumvents this problem. Postoperative mechanical stability and functional outcome with this technique need to be explored and compared with those of ACL reconstruction using free hamstring autograft. PMID:27354946

  17. BIOMECHANICAL ACCESS METHOD FOR ANALYZING ISOMETRICITY IN RECONSTRUCTING THE MEDIAL PATELLOFEMORAL LIGAMENT

    PubMed Central

    Sadigursky, David; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pereira, César Augusto Martins; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present a biomechanical device for evaluating medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction and its isometricity. Methods: An accessible biomechanical method that allowed application of physiological and non-physiological forces to the knee using a mechanical arm and application of weights and counterweights was developed, so as to enable many different evaluations and have a very accurate measurement system for distances between different structures, for analysis on experiments. This article describes the assembly of this system, and suggests some practical applications. Six cadaver knees were studied. The knees were prepared in a testing machine developed at the Biomechanics Laboratory of IOT–HCFMUSP, which allowed dynamic evaluation of patellar behavior, with quantification of patellar lateralization between 0° and 120°. The differences between the distances found with and without load applied to the patella were grouped according to the graft fixation angle (0°, 30°, 60° or 90°) and knee position (intact, damaged or reconstructed). Results: There was a tendency for smaller lateral displacement to occur at fixation angles greater than 30 degrees of flexion, especially between the angles of 45° and 60° degrees of flexion, after the reconstruction. For the other angles, there was no statistical significance. Conclusion: The method developed is a useful tool for studies on the patellofemoral joint and the MPFL, and has a very accurate measurement system for distances between different structures. It can be used in institutions with fewer resources available. PMID:27047872

  18. Minimally invasive reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using quadriceps tendon.

    PubMed

    Fink, Christian; Veselko, Matjaz; Herbort, Mirco; Hoser, Christian

    2014-06-01

    Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) for the treatment of patellar instability has received increased attention over the past few years. Most operative techniques use hamstring grafts fixed with bone tunnels and/or anchors on the patella. Despite good clinical results using these techniques, complications such as implant breakage, patellar fractures through bone tunnels, and loss of knee motion have occurred. We present a minimally invasive technique for MPFL reconstruction using a strip of quadriceps tendon. With the use of specially designed instruments, the graft is harvested through a 3-cm transverse incision at the proximal pole of the patella. The tendon strip is then dissected distally on the patella, left attached, and diverged 90° medially underneath the medial prepatellar tissue. The graft is fixed on the femur in 20° of knee flexion in a bone tunnel with a bioabsorbable interference screw (adults) or a bone anchor (children). We think that this technique presents a valuable alternative to common hamstring techniques for primary MPFL reconstruction in children and adults, as well as for MPFL revision surgery. PMID:25126496

  19. Glucosamine supplementation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in athletes: a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Eraslan, Ali; Ulkar, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    Although glucosamine is commonly consumed by athletes, its effectiveness in sports injuries is still under debate. We aimed to investigate the effects of glucosamine to the rehabilitation outcomes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructed athletes. Glucosamine-sulfate (1000 mg daily, for 8 weeks) was administered to half of the cohort of 30 male athletes, the other half used a placebo. Both groups received the same rehabilitation protocol. Knee pain and functions were evaluated by a visual analogue scale (VAS), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) and Lysholm scores before and after oral administration. Additionally, an isokinetic test was performed after the administration period. The scores revealed significant improvements in both groups after 8 weeks, but no significant difference was detected between groups in any of the parameters. Glucosamine supplementation did not improve the rehabilitation outcomes of athletes after ACL reconstruction. This is the first study investigating this topic. Further studies will help to obtain clear evidence about glucosamine efficacy on ACL injured or ACL reconstructed athletes.

  20. Assessing post-anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction ambulation using wireless wearable integrated sensors.

    PubMed

    Arosha Senanayake, S M N; Ahmed Malik, Owais; Mohammad Iskandar, Pg; Zaheer, Dansih

    2013-11-01

    Abstract A hardware/software co-design for assessing post-Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction ambulation is presented. The knee kinematics and neuromuscular data during walking (2-6 km h(-1)) have been acquired using wireless wearable motion and electromyography (EMG) sensors, respectively. These signals were integrated by superimposition and mixed signals processing techniques in order to provide visual analyses of bio-signals and identification of the recovery progress of subjects. Monitoring overlapped signals simultaneously helps in detecting variability and correlation of knee joint dynamics and muscles activities for an individual subject as well as for a group. The recovery stages of subjects have been identified based on combined features (knee flexion/extension and EMG signals) using an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). The proposed system has been validated for 28 test subjects (healthy and ACL-reconstructed). Results of ANFIS showed that the ambulation data can be used to distinguish subjects at different levels of recuperation after ACL reconstruction. PMID:24117351

  1. Glucosamine supplementation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in athletes: a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Eraslan, Ali; Ulkar, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    Although glucosamine is commonly consumed by athletes, its effectiveness in sports injuries is still under debate. We aimed to investigate the effects of glucosamine to the rehabilitation outcomes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructed athletes. Glucosamine-sulfate (1000 mg daily, for 8 weeks) was administered to half of the cohort of 30 male athletes, the other half used a placebo. Both groups received the same rehabilitation protocol. Knee pain and functions were evaluated by a visual analogue scale (VAS), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) and Lysholm scores before and after oral administration. Additionally, an isokinetic test was performed after the administration period. The scores revealed significant improvements in both groups after 8 weeks, but no significant difference was detected between groups in any of the parameters. Glucosamine supplementation did not improve the rehabilitation outcomes of athletes after ACL reconstruction. This is the first study investigating this topic. Further studies will help to obtain clear evidence about glucosamine efficacy on ACL injured or ACL reconstructed athletes. PMID:25630243

  2. Immediate effects of neuromuscular joint facilitation intervention after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the immediate effects of neuromuscular joint facilitation (NJF) on the functional activity level after rehabilitation of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Ten young subjects (8 males and 2 females) who underwent ACL reconstruction were included in the study. The subjects were divided into two groups, namely, knee joint extension muscle strength training (MST) group and knee joint extension outside rotation pattern of NJF group. Extension strength was measured in both groups before and after the experiment. Surface electromyography (sEMG) of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis muscles and joint position error (JPE) test of the knee joint were also conducted. [Results] JPE test results and extension strength measurements in the NJF group were improved compared with those in the MST group. Moreover, the average discharge of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis muscles on sEMG in the NJF group was significantly increased after MST and NJF treatments. [Conclusion] The obtained results suggest that NJF training in patients with ACL reconstruction can improve knee proprioception ability and muscle strength. PMID:27512270

  3. Immediate effects of neuromuscular joint facilitation intervention after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the immediate effects of neuromuscular joint facilitation (NJF) on the functional activity level after rehabilitation of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Ten young subjects (8 males and 2 females) who underwent ACL reconstruction were included in the study. The subjects were divided into two groups, namely, knee joint extension muscle strength training (MST) group and knee joint extension outside rotation pattern of NJF group. Extension strength was measured in both groups before and after the experiment. Surface electromyography (sEMG) of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis muscles and joint position error (JPE) test of the knee joint were also conducted. [Results] JPE test results and extension strength measurements in the NJF group were improved compared with those in the MST group. Moreover, the average discharge of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis muscles on sEMG in the NJF group was significantly increased after MST and NJF treatments. [Conclusion] The obtained results suggest that NJF training in patients with ACL reconstruction can improve knee proprioception ability and muscle strength. PMID:27512270

  4. Allograft Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Patients Younger than 25 Years.

    PubMed

    Carter, Thomas R; Rabago, Michael T

    2016-05-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes for patients younger than 25 years who had anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions with allograft tissue. Methods A total of 52 ACL reconstructions performed with fresh-frozen, nonirradiated tibialis or Achilles allografts in active patients younger than 25 years. Outcome evaluations included the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) objective and subjective forms, KT-1000 arthrometry and Lysholm. Results Forty-two patients were available for follow-up at an average follow-up of 65 months (range, 33-99 months). The average age at surgery was 17 years and 7 months (range, 11 years 10 months-24 years 8 months). Objective and subjective data were obtained from 37 patients with 1 requiring revision, and 5 patients had only subjective data. IKDC objective results were 29-A and 5-B. KT-1000 differences were 0 mm for 4 patients, 1 mm for 23, 2 mm for 8, 3 mm for 1, and > 5 mm for 1 patient. The average IKDC subjective score was 90.2 ± 15.0 and average Lysholm score was 90.0 ± 11. Conclusion The result of our study found that using nonirradiated Achilles or tibialis tendon allografts for ACL reconstructions in active patients younger than 25 years can achieve good outcomes, with a low rate of failure. PMID:26227787

  5. Allograft Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Patients Younger than 25 Years.

    PubMed

    Carter, Thomas R; Rabago, Michael T

    2016-05-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes for patients younger than 25 years who had anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions with allograft tissue. Methods A total of 52 ACL reconstructions performed with fresh-frozen, nonirradiated tibialis or Achilles allografts in active patients younger than 25 years. Outcome evaluations included the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) objective and subjective forms, KT-1000 arthrometry and Lysholm. Results Forty-two patients were available for follow-up at an average follow-up of 65 months (range, 33-99 months). The average age at surgery was 17 years and 7 months (range, 11 years 10 months-24 years 8 months). Objective and subjective data were obtained from 37 patients with 1 requiring revision, and 5 patients had only subjective data. IKDC objective results were 29-A and 5-B. KT-1000 differences were 0 mm for 4 patients, 1 mm for 23, 2 mm for 8, 3 mm for 1, and > 5 mm for 1 patient. The average IKDC subjective score was 90.2 ± 15.0 and average Lysholm score was 90.0 ± 11. Conclusion The result of our study found that using nonirradiated Achilles or tibialis tendon allografts for ACL reconstructions in active patients younger than 25 years can achieve good outcomes, with a low rate of failure.

  6. Muscle activity amplitudes and co-contraction during stair ambulation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hall, Michelle; Stevermer, Catherine A; Gillette, Jason C

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare muscle activity amplitudes and co-contraction in those with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction to healthy controls during stair negotiation. Eighteen participants with unilateral ACL reconstruction and 17 healthy controls performed stair ascent and descent while surface electromyography was recorded from knee and hip musculature. During stair ascent, the ACL group displayed higher gluteus maximus activity (1-50% stance, p = 0.02), higher vastus lateralis:biceps femoris co-contraction (51-100% stance, p = 0.01), and higher vastus lateralis:vastus medialis co-contraction (51-100% stance, p = 0.05). During stair descent, the ACL group demonstrated higher gluteus maximus activity (1-50% stance, p = 0.01; 51-100% stance, p < 0.01), lower rectus femoris activity (1-50% stance, p = 0.04), higher semimembranosus activity (1-50% stance, p=0.01), higher gluteus medius activity (51-100% stance, p = 0.01), and higher vastus medialis:semimembranosus co-contraction (1-50% stance, p = 0.02). While the altered muscle activity strategies observed in the ACL group may act to increase joint stability, these strategies may alter joint loading and contribute to post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis often observed in this population. Our results warrant further investigation to determine the longterm effects of altered muscle activity on the knee joint following ACL reconstruction.

  7. Immediate effects of neuromuscular joint facilitation intervention after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the immediate effects of neuromuscular joint facilitation (NJF) on the functional activity level after rehabilitation of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Ten young subjects (8 males and 2 females) who underwent ACL reconstruction were included in the study. The subjects were divided into two groups, namely, knee joint extension muscle strength training (MST) group and knee joint extension outside rotation pattern of NJF group. Extension strength was measured in both groups before and after the experiment. Surface electromyography (sEMG) of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis muscles and joint position error (JPE) test of the knee joint were also conducted. [Results] JPE test results and extension strength measurements in the NJF group were improved compared with those in the MST group. Moreover, the average discharge of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis muscles on sEMG in the NJF group was significantly increased after MST and NJF treatments. [Conclusion] The obtained results suggest that NJF training in patients with ACL reconstruction can improve knee proprioception ability and muscle strength.

  8. Electromyographic biofeedback and recovery of quadriceps femoris muscle function following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Draper, V

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of biofeedback-facilitated exercise with exercise alone on the recovery rate of quadriceps femoris muscle function following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Functional measures included 1) a dynamometric test of quadriceps femoris muscle isometric peak torque during the 12th postoperative week and 2) the number of days post-operatively that a patient achieved full active extension of the knee. Twenty-two patients with acute ACL injury were randomly assigned to a Treatment (biofeedback) Group (n = 11) or a Control (nonfeedback) Group (n = 11) during the first therapy session one week after reconstructive surgery. After the patients had completed the 12-week exercise program, the quadriceps femoris muscle isometric peak torque in the operative limb was compared with that in the nonoperative limb at three angles (90 degrees, 60 degrees, and 45 degrees) of extension. An analysis of variance revealed significant differences between the Treatment and Control Groups at all three angles. Mean recovery time was calculated for each group, and a t test for independent samples indicated a significant difference between the groups. These results demonstrate that the addition of biofeedback to muscle strengthening exercises facilitates the rate of recovery of quadriceps femoris muscle function following ACL reconstruction.

  9. Injury patterns in patients presenting with a recurrent anterior cruciate ligament tear following primary reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sayampanathan, Andrew A.; Bin Abd Razak, Hamid Rahmatullah; Chong, Hwei Chi; Tan, Hwee-Chye Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft rupture or a primary ACL injury in the contralateral knee is one of the greatest concerns of patients following primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). Our study describes the epidemiology and presence of concomitant meniscal injuries of patients with a graft rupture following primary ACLR or a primary rupture of the contralateral ACL following primary ACLR of the ipsilateral knee. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 42 patients who underwent a second ACLR. ACLR was performed using the ipsilateral semitendinosus and gracilis autograft. Variables extracted included the presence of concomitant MM and LM injuries intra-operatively, the patients’ level of intensity of sport (light, moderate, strenuous), duration of rehabilitation and mechanism of injury (contact, non-contact). Results Twenty-four (57.1%) patients had graft rupture of a previously reconstructed ACL of which 20 (83.3%) were male and 18 (42.9%) patients had a primary ACL tear of the contralateral knee following ACLR of the ipsilateral knee of which 18 (100%) were male. Patient who sustained a graft rupture were younger (29.5 vs. 31.9 years), had a higher body mass index (BMI) (26.42 vs. 25.10 kg/m2) and had a longer time before re-injury (6.18 vs. 4.94 years). Concomitant meniscal injury rates were comparable in both groups and the medial meniscus was injured more often. Conclusions This study describes the demographics of 2nd ACL injuries in the Asian population. Additional studies that investigate the differences in knee anatomy of Asians and Caucasians and their impact on ACL injuries should be performed. PMID:27429958

  10. Variables Associated With Return to Sport Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Czuppon, Sylvia; Racette, Brad A.; Klein, Sandra E.; Harris-Hayes, Marcie

    2014-01-01

    Background As one of the purposes of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is to return athletes to their pre-injury activity level, it is critical to understand variables influencing return to sport. Associations between return to sport and variables representing knee impairment, function and psychological status have not been well studied in athletes following ACLR. Purpose The purpose of this review is to summarize the literature reporting on variables proposed to be associated with return to sport following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Study Design Systematic Review Methods Medline, Embase, CINAHL and Cochrane databases were searched for articles published before November 2012. Articles included in this review met these criteria: 1) included patients with primary ACLR, 2) reported at least one knee impairment, function or psychological measure, 3) reported a return to sport measure and 4) analyzed the relationship between the measure and return to sport. Results Weak evidence existed in sixteen articles suggesting variables associated with return to sport included higher quadriceps strength, less effusion, less pain, greater tibial rotation, higher Marx Activity score, higher athletic confidence, higher pre-operative knee self-efficacy, lower kinesiophobia and higher pre-operative self-motivation. Conclusion Weak evidence supports an association between knee impairment, functional, and psychological variables and return to sport. Current return to sport guidelines should be updated to reflect all variables associated with return to sport. Utilizing evidence-based return to sport guidelines following ACLR may ensure athletes are physically and psychologically capable of sports participation, which may reduce re-injury rates and the need for subsequent surgery. PMID:24124040

  11. Effect of knee angle on quadriceps strength and activation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Theuerkauf, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Quadriceps strength and activation deficits after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury or surgery are typically evaluated at joint positions that are biomechanically advantageous to the quadriceps muscle. However, the effect of knee joint position and the associated changes in muscle length on strength and activation is currently unknown in this population. Here, we examined the effect of knee angle on quadriceps strength, activation, and electrically evoked torque in individuals with ACL reconstruction. Furthermore, we evaluated whether knee angle mediated the relationship between quadriceps weakness and functional performance after ACL reconstruction. Knee strength and activation were tested bilaterally at 90° and 45° of knee flexion in 11 subjects with ACL reconstruction using an interpolated triplet technique. The magnitude of electrically evoked torque at rest was used to quantify peripheral muscle contractile property changes, and the single-leg hop for distance test was used to evaluate functional performance. The results indicated that although quadriceps strength deficits were similar between knee angles, voluntary activation deficits were significantly higher in the reconstructed leg at 45° of knee flexion. On the contrary, the side-to-side evoked torque at rest ratio [i.e., (reconstructed/nonreconstructed) × 100] was significantly lower at 90° than at 45° of knee flexion. The association between quadriceps strength and functional performance was stronger at 45° of knee flexion. The results provide novel evidence that quadriceps activation is selectively affected at 45° of knee flexion and emphasize the importance of assessing quadriceps strength and activation at this position when feasible because it better captures activation deficits. PMID:25997949

  12. Quadriceps Muscle Function After Rehabilitation With Cryotherapy in Patients With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Joseph M.; Kuenze, Christopher M.; Diduch, David R.; Ingersoll, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Persistent muscle weakness after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction may be due to underlying activation failure and arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI). Knee-joint cryotherapy has been shown to improve quadriceps function transiently in those with AMI, thereby providing an opportunity to improve quadriceps muscle activation and strength in patients with a reconstructed ACL. Objective: To compare quadriceps muscle function in patients with a reconstructed ACL who completed a 2-week intervention including daily cryotherapy (ice bag), daily exercises, or both. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 30 patients with reconstructed ACLs who were at least 6 months post-index surgery and had measurable quadriceps AMI. Intervention(s): The patients attended 4 supervised visits over a 2-week period. They were randomly assigned to receive 20 minutes of knee-joint cryotherapy, 1 hour of therapeutic rehabilitation exercises, or cryotherapy followed by exercises. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured quadriceps Hoffmann reflex, normalized maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque, central activation ratio using the superimposed-burst technique, and patient-reported outcomes before and after the intervention period. Results: After the 2-week intervention period, patients who performed rehabilitation exercises immediately after cryotherapy had higher normalized maximal voluntary isometric contraction torques (P = .002, Cohen d effect size = 1.4) compared with those who received cryotherapy alone (P = .16, d = 0.58) or performed exercise alone (P = .16, d = 0.30). Conclusions: After ACL reconstruction, patients with AMI who performed rehabilitation exercises immediately after cryotherapy experienced greater strength gains than those who performed cryotherapy or exercises alone. PMID:25299442

  13. Changes of muscle mechanics associated with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency and reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Shih-Fen; Chou, Pei-Hsi; Hsu, Horng-Chaung; Lue, Yi-Jing

    2014-02-01

    Isometric and isokinetic knee strength deficits were examined on patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury before and after ACL reconstruction. Muscle strengths of the uninjured and injured knees were measured from an ACL injured (n = 12) and a control (n = 15) group. Five isometric (10, 30, 50, 70, and 90° of knee flexion) and 5 isokinetic (50, 100, 150, 200, and 250°·s) strengths of quadriceps and hamstrings were measured prereconstruction and postreconstruction (3 and 6 months). Compared with the controls, the uninjured knee showed normal strength and patterns of length-tension and force-velocity relationships. Compared with the uninjured knee, the injured knees showed a generally 25-30% decrease in quadriceps and hamstrings strength with normal patterns of length-tension and force-velocity relationships. By 3 months of reconstruction, weakness of quadriceps of the injured knees was exacerbated, particularly at lengthened positions (∼ 40% of the uninjured knees at knee flexion 70 and 90°) and at slower velocities (∼35% of the uninjured knees at the 50 and 100°·s, p < 0.05), with flattened patterns of mechanical output. By 6 months of reconstruction, the quadriceps of the injured knees still showed significant weakness (∼50% of the uninjured knees) in both contraction types (isometric at knee flexion 90° and isokinetic at 50°·s, p < 0.05). The hamstrings of the injured knees had not shown significant changes after reconstruction. A strengthening program placing emphasis on greater knee flexion angles and slower movement speed with sufficient training duration post ACL reconstruction is recommended because of long-lasting and exacerbated weakness during 3 and 6 months postreconstruction.

  14. Effect of knee angle on quadriceps strength and activation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Chandramouli; Theuerkauf, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Quadriceps strength and activation deficits after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury or surgery are typically evaluated at joint positions that are biomechanically advantageous to the quadriceps muscle. However, the effect of knee joint position and the associated changes in muscle length on strength and activation is currently unknown in this population. Here, we examined the effect of knee angle on quadriceps strength, activation, and electrically evoked torque in individuals with ACL reconstruction. Furthermore, we evaluated whether knee angle mediated the relationship between quadriceps weakness and functional performance after ACL reconstruction. Knee strength and activation were tested bilaterally at 90° and 45° of knee flexion in 11 subjects with ACL reconstruction using an interpolated triplet technique. The magnitude of electrically evoked torque at rest was used to quantify peripheral muscle contractile property changes, and the single-leg hop for distance test was used to evaluate functional performance. The results indicated that although quadriceps strength deficits were similar between knee angles, voluntary activation deficits were significantly higher in the reconstructed leg at 45° of knee flexion. On the contrary, the side-to-side evoked torque at rest ratio [i.e., (reconstructed/nonreconstructed) × 100] was significantly lower at 90° than at 45° of knee flexion. The association between quadriceps strength and functional performance was stronger at 45° of knee flexion. The results provide novel evidence that quadriceps activation is selectively affected at 45° of knee flexion and emphasize the importance of assessing quadriceps strength and activation at this position when feasible because it better captures activation deficits.

  15. Neuromuscular function after reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament--a case study using evoked electromyography.

    PubMed

    Daikuya, S; Suzuki, T; Yabe, K

    2008-01-01

    To clarify the neuro-muscular function of a lower extremity after reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), we studied the alteration of H reflex and Silent period (SP) from the soleus muscle in a patient with ACL reconstruction. Subject was an eighteen year-old male and high school basketball player after a reconstruction of right ACL. Recording of H reflex and SP was started at one month after operation, and ended at six months post operation with a test at every month. As a result of this study, the amplitude ratio of H/M(max) was increased at post four months after ACL reconstruction on operative side. Little variation of SP was acquired in non-operative side. However, that in operative side was increased compared with non-operative side and gradually decreased until post six months. Post six months, the variation of SP in operative side was recovered as that of non-operative side. And, on the operation side, long-latency reflex (LLR) was appeared during SP from one month to five months after, especially its appearance pattern was most markedly post four months. However, post six months, LLR disappeared during SP. The result of H reflex, SP and LLR appearance suggested a following hypothesis; until post six months after ACL reconstruction, even the small and simple task (i.e. an ankle planter flexion with a slight effort) needs to an intervention of a various supra-spinal function. In this case, autonomy of central nervous system related to an out-put mechanism in lower-extremity was acquired post six months.

  16. A Novel Device to Apply Controlled Flexion and Extension to the Rat Knee Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Mark Stasiak M.; Wiznia, Dan; Alzoobae, Saif; Ciccotti, Michael; Imhauser, Carl; Voigt, Clifford; Torzilli, Peter; Deng, Xenghua; Rodeo, Scott

    2013-01-01

    We designed and validated a novel device for applying flexion-extension cycles to a rat knee in an in-vivo model of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R). Our device is intended to simulate rehabilitation motion and exercise post ACL-R to optimize physical rehabilitation treatments for the improved healing of tendon graft ligament reconstructions. The device was validated for repeatability of the knee kinematic motion by measuring the force versus angular rotation response from repeated trials using cadaver rats. The average maximum force required for rotating an ACL reconstructed rat knee through 100 degrees of flexion-extension was 0.4 N with 95 % variability for all trials within ±0.1 N PMID:22667683

  17. Dynamic Simulation of the Effects of Graft Fixation Errors During Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Elias, John J.; Kelly, Michael J.; Smith, Kathryn E.; Gall, Kenneth A.; Farr, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Background: Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction is performed to prevent recurrent instability, but errors in femoral fixation can elevate graft tension. Hypothesis: Errors related to femoral fixation will overconstrain the patella and increase medial patellofemoral pressures. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Five knees with patellar instability were represented with computational models. Kinematics during knee extension were characterized from computational reconstruction of motion performed within a dynamic computed tomography (CT) scanner. Multibody dynamic simulation of knee extension, with discrete element analysis used to quantify contact pressures, was performed for the preoperative condition and after MPFL reconstruction. A standard femoral attachment and graft resting length were set for each knee. The resting length was decreased by 2 mm, and the femoral attachment was shifted 5 mm posteriorly. The simulated errors were also combined. Root-mean-square errors were quantified for the comparison of preoperative patellar lateral shift and tilt between computationally reconstructed motion and dynamic simulation. Simulation output was compared between the preoperative and MPFL reconstruction conditions with repeated-measures Friedman tests and Dunnett comparisons against a control, which was the standard MPFL condition, with statistical significance set at P < .05. Results: Root-mean-square errors for simulated patellar tilt and shift were 5.8° and 3.3 mm, respectively. Patellar lateral tracking for the preoperative condition was significantly larger near full extension compared with the standard MPFL reconstruction (mean differences of 8 mm and 13° for shift and tilt, respectively, at 0°), and lateral tracking was significantly smaller for a posterior femoral attachment (mean differences of 3 mm and 4° for shift and tilt, respectively, at 0°). The maximum medial pressure was also larger for the short graft with a

  18. The outcome at 15 years of endoscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using hamstring tendon autograft for 'isolated' anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Bourke, H E; Gordon, D J; Salmon, L J; Waller, A; Linklater, J; Pinczewski, L A

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the outcome of 'isolated' anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures treated with anatomical endoscopic reconstruction using hamstring tendon autograft at a mean of 15 years (14.25 to 16.9). A total of 100 consecutive men and 100 consecutive women with 'isolated' ACL rupture underwent four-strand hamstring tendon reconstruction with anteromedial portal femoral tunnel drilling and interference screw fixation by a single surgeon. Details were recorded pre-operatively and at one, two, seven and 15 years post-operatively. Outcomes included clinical examination, subjective and objective scoring systems, and radiological assessment. At 15 years only eight of 118 patients (7%) had moderate or severe osteo-arthritic changes (International Knee Documentation Committee Grades C and D), and 79 of 152 patients (52%) still performed very strenuous activities. Overall graft survival at 15 years was 83% (1.1% failure per year). Patients aged < 18 years at the time of surgery and patients with > 2 mm of laxity at one year had a threefold increase in the risk of suffering a rupture of the graft (p = 0.002 and p = 0.001, respectively). There was no increase in laxity of the graft over time. ACL reconstructive surgery in patients with an 'isolated' rupture using this technique shows good results 15 years post-operatively with respect to ligamentous stability, objective and subjective outcomes, and does not appear to cause osteoarthritis.

  19. Force Production and Reactive Strength Capabilities After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Eamonn P; Galvin, Lorcan; Harrison, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    Context: Ambiguity exists in the literature regarding whether individuals can restore function to 100% after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The response of force production and reactive strength in stretch-shortening cycle activities after surgery has not been established. Objective: To compare reactive strength and force production capabilities between the involved and uninvolved legs of participants who had undergone ACL reconstruction and rehabilitation with the reactive strength and force production capabilities of a control group. Design: Repeated measures, cross-sectional. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten participants with ACL reconstructions who had returned to their chosen sports and 10 age-matched and activity-matched control subjects. Intervention(s): We screened the ACL group with the International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Evaluation Form and functional performance tests to measure a basic level of function. We assessed force production capabilities and reactive strength using squat, countermovement, drop, and rebound jump protocols on a force sledge apparatus. Main Outcome Measure(s): The dependent variables were flight time, peak vertical ground reaction force, leg spring stiffness, and reactive strength index. Results: No participant in the ACL group exhibited functional deficits in comparison with normative values or the control group. Using the force sledge apparatus, we found no notable differences in force production capabilities and reactive strength in the ACL group when comparing the involved with uninvolved legs or the degree of difference between legs with the control group. Conclusions: After ACL reconstruction, rehabilitated participants did not exhibit deficits in force production or reactive strength capabilities. Our results suggest that force production and reactive strength capabilities can be restored to levels comparable with the uninjured control limb and may not

  20. Comparing Transtibial and Anteromedial Drilling Techniques for Single-bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sukur, Erhan; Akman, , Yunus Emre; Senel, , Ahmet; Unkar, Ethem Ayhan; Topcu, , Huseyin Nevzat; Ozturkmen, , and Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Background: Among the many factors that determine the outcome following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, the position of the femoral tunnel is known to be critically important and is still the subject of extensive research. Objective: We aimed to retrospectively compare the outcomes of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction using transtibial (TT) or anteromedial (AMP) drilling techniques for femoral tunnel placement. Methods: ACL reconstruction was performed using the TT technique in 49 patients and the AMP technique in 56 patients. Lachman and pivot-shift tests, the Lysholm Knee Scale, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, Tegner activity scale and visual analog scale (VAS) were used for the clinical and functional evaluation of patients. Time to return to normal life and time to jogging were assessed in addition to the radiological evaluation of femoral tunnel placement. Results: In terms of the Lysholm, IKDC, Tegner score, and stability tests, no significant differences were found between the two groups (p > 0.05). Statistical analysis revealed reduced time to return to normal life and jogging in the AMP group (p < 0.05). The VAS score was also significantly reduced in the AMP group (p < 0.05). The position of the femoral tunnel was anatomically appropriate in 51 patients in the AMP group and 5 patients in the TT group. Conclusion: The AMP technique is superior to the TT technique in creating anatomical femoral tunnel placement during single-bundle ACL reconstruction and provides faster recovery in terms of return to normal life and jogging at short-term follow-up. PMID:27733884

  1. Arthroscopy-assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon or hamstring autografts.

    PubMed

    Doral, M N; Leblebicioglu, G; Atay, O A; Baydar, M L; Tetik, O; Atik, S

    2000-01-01

    Isolated ACL reconstructions were performed in 138 patients between 1994 and 1998. Patellar bone-patellar tendon-bone, and hamstring tendon autografts were used in 88 patients, and allografts were used in 50 patients. Eighty-eight knees of 88 patients with autograft reconstructions (17 female, 71 male) were included in this study and evaluation of the patients with allograft reconstruction reported separately. The mean age at the time of the operation was 32 years. All ACL reconstructions were performed arthroscopically. Twenty-seven bone-patellar tendon-bone, and 61 hamstring tendon autografts were used. The mean follow-up was 29 months. In the postoperative course the Lachman test was negative in 62 patients, 1+ in 22 patients, and 2+ in 4 patients. In 17 patients, anterior drawer sign were 1+ in comparison to the contralateral side. Pivot shift test was moderately positive only in 5 cases in the bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstring tendon autograft groups postoperatively. There were 3 patients with subjective "giving way" symptoms. Second look arthroscopy revealed rupture of the neo-ligament. Arthroscopic washout and debridement were performed, and no revision ligamentoplasties were performed. Two of these patients improved with accelerated proprioceptive physical therapy, and one had to decrease his previous level of activity. There were no cases of arthrofibrosis, infection, or extension lag. Clinical results of patellar bone-tendon-bone and hamstring groups did not show any significant clinical difference. Avoiding the disturbance of the extensor mechanism of the knee is probably the most significant advantage of the hamstring autograft.

  2. Mechanoreceptor Reinnervation of Autografts Versus Allografts After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon W.; Valladares, Roberto D.; Loi, Florence; Dragoo, Jason L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Loss of proprioceptive function occurs after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Clinical, motor, and proprioceptive function is known to improve after ACL reconstruction but does not return to normal. While histological studies of human ACL allografts have been unable to demonstrate mechanoreceptor reinnervation, animal data suggest that reinnervation may occur when an autograft is used. Purpose: To compare the presence or absence of mechanoreceptors between allograft versus autograft after ACL reconstruction in humans. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Ten patients with previous ACL reconstruction presenting for either revision ACL surgery or knee arthroscopy for other reasons were enrolled in a prospective, comparative study. Five patients had a previous autograft ACL and 5 patients had an allograft. Biopsies, either from intact or ruptured grafts, were taken from identical locations as close to the femoral and tibial insertions as possible. Specimens were stained with hematoxylin-eosin (H-E) and monoclonal antibodies against neurofilament protein (NFP), known to be present in mechanoreceptor tissue. Immunohistochemical examination was carried out, and the number of NFP+ neural tissue analogs was counted and compared with that of native ACL tissue. Results: The mean time between original graft and biopsy was 6.9 years (range, 0.5-15 years). Histological examination showed significantly less NFP+ neural analogs in allograft and autograft patients than control tissue (mean number of NFP+ analogs per high-power field, 0.7 ± 0.9 [allograft] and 0.5 ± 0.8 [autograft] vs 4.7 ± 0.9 [controls]; P < .0001). There was no significant difference in NFP analogs between autograft and allograft tissue. Conclusion: We found a reduced concentration of NFP+ neural analogs in ACL grafts compared with native ACL tissue. This deficit exists irrespective of whether allograft or autograft is used. These findings may explain the continued

  3. Arthroscopy-assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon or hamstring autografts.

    PubMed

    Doral, M N; Leblebicioglu, G; Atay, O A; Baydar, M L; Tetik, O; Atik, S

    2000-01-01

    Isolated ACL reconstructions were performed in 138 patients between 1994 and 1998. Patellar bone-patellar tendon-bone, and hamstring tendon autografts were used in 88 patients, and allografts were used in 50 patients. Eighty-eight knees of 88 patients with autograft reconstructions (17 female, 71 male) were included in this study and evaluation of the patients with allograft reconstruction reported separately. The mean age at the time of the operation was 32 years. All ACL reconstructions were performed arthroscopically. Twenty-seven bone-patellar tendon-bone, and 61 hamstring tendon autografts were used. The mean follow-up was 29 months. In the postoperative course the Lachman test was negative in 62 patients, 1+ in 22 patients, and 2+ in 4 patients. In 17 patients, anterior drawer sign were 1+ in comparison to the contralateral side. Pivot shift test was moderately positive only in 5 cases in the bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstring tendon autograft groups postoperatively. There were 3 patients with subjective "giving way" symptoms. Second look arthroscopy revealed rupture of the neo-ligament. Arthroscopic washout and debridement were performed, and no revision ligamentoplasties were performed. Two of these patients improved with accelerated proprioceptive physical therapy, and one had to decrease his previous level of activity. There were no cases of arthrofibrosis, infection, or extension lag. Clinical results of patellar bone-tendon-bone and hamstring groups did not show any significant clinical difference. Avoiding the disturbance of the extensor mechanism of the knee is probably the most significant advantage of the hamstring autograft. PMID:10983256

  4. A novel silk-based artificial ligament and tricalcium phosphate/polyether ether ketone anchor for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction - safety and efficacy in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; He, Jiankang; Bian, Weiguo; Li, Zheng; Zhang, Wenyou; Li, Dichen; Snedeker, Jess G

    2014-08-01

    Loss of ligament graft tension in early postoperative stages following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction can come from a variety of factors, with slow graft integration to bone being widely viewed as a chief culprit. Toward an off-the-shelf ACL graft that can rapidly integrate to host tissue, we have developed a silk-based ACL graft combined with a tricalcium phosphate (TCP)/polyether ether ketone anchor. In the present study we tested the safety and efficacy of this concept in a porcine model, with postoperative assessments at 3months (n=10) and 6months (n=4). Biomechanical tests were performed after euthanization, with ultimate tensile strengths at 3months of ∼370N and at 6months of ∼566N - comparable to autograft and allograft performance in this animal model. Comprehensive histological observations revealed that TCP substantially enhanced silk graft to bone attachment. Interdigitation of soft and hard tissues was observed, with regenerated fibrocartilage characterizing a transitional zone from silk graft to bone that was similar to native ligament bone attachments. We conclude that both initial stability and robust long-term biological attachment were consistently achieved using the tested construct, supporting a large potential for silk-TCP combinations in the repair of the torn ACL.

  5. Patient Outcomes and Predictors of Success After Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, William R.; Makani, Amun; Wall, Andrew J.; Hosseini, Ali; Hampilos, Perry; Li, Guoan; Gill, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patient outcomes and predictors of success after revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are currently limited in the literature. Existing studies either have a small study size or are difficult to interpret because of the multiple surgeons involved in the care of the study sample. Purpose: To determine patient outcomes and predictors of success or failure after a single-stage revision ACL reconstruction by a single fellowship-trained senior surgeon at a single institution. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A total of 78 patients who underwent revision ACL reconstruction by a single surgeon from 2010 to 2014 were contacted and available for follow-up. The mean time from revision procedure to follow-up was 52 months. Those patients who were able to participate in the study sent in a completed Tegner activity level scale, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Evaluation Form, and IKDC Current Health Assessment Form. The patients’ medical records were also thoroughly reviewed. Results: Five patients had subsequent failure after revision surgery. The median Tegner score was 6 at follow-up, and the mean subjective IKDC score was 72.5. There was no statistically significant difference in outcome scores when comparing revision graft type, body mass index, sex, need for bone grafting, and time from failure to revision. Patients with failures after primary ACL reconstruction secondary to a traumatic event were found to have statistically significantly higher IKDC scores (mean, 76.6) after revision when compared with nontraumatic failures (mean, 67.1), even when controlling for confounders (P < .017). Conclusion: Revision ACL reconstruction is effective in improving patient activity levels and satisfaction. However, the subjective IKDC results are quite variable and likely based on multiple factors. Patients with traumatic injuries contributing to graft failure after primary ACL reconstruction

  6. Surgical Treatment of a Rare Isolated Bilateral Agenesis of Anterior and Posterior Cruciate Ligaments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The isolated bilateral agenesis of both cruciate ligaments is a rare congenital disorder. A 17-year-old male came to our attention due to an alteration in gait pattern, pain, and tendency to walk on the forefoot with his knee flexed. The patient did not recall previous injuries. Upon physical examination anterior and posterior chronic instability were observed. Radiographic examination of both knees showed hypoplasia of the tibial eminence, a hypoplastic lateral femoral condyle, and a narrow intercondylar notch. MRI brought to light a bilateral agenesis of both posterior cruciate ligaments. Arthroscopic evaluation confirmed bilateral isolated agenesis of both cruciate ligaments. We recommended a rehabilitation program to prepare the patient for the arthroscopic construction of both cruciate ligaments. PMID:25197599

  7. Surgical treatment of a rare isolated bilateral agenesis of anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Cerulli, G; Amanti, A; Placella, G

    2014-01-01

    The isolated bilateral agenesis of both cruciate ligaments is a rare congenital disorder. A 17-year-old male came to our attention due to an alteration in gait pattern, pain, and tendency to walk on the forefoot with his knee flexed. The patient did not recall previous injuries. Upon physical examination anterior and posterior chronic instability were observed. Radiographic examination of both knees showed hypoplasia of the tibial eminence, a hypoplastic lateral femoral condyle, and a narrow intercondylar notch. MRI brought to light a bilateral agenesis of both posterior cruciate ligaments. Arthroscopic evaluation confirmed bilateral isolated agenesis of both cruciate ligaments. We recommended a rehabilitation program to prepare the patient for the arthroscopic construction of both cruciate ligaments.

  8. Initial evaluation of posterior cruciate ligament injuries: history, physical examination, imaging studies, surgical and nonsurgical indications.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Vidriero, Emilio; Simon, David A; Johnson, Donald H

    2010-12-01

    Compared with anterior cruciate ligament injuries, posterior cruciate ligament injuries are a rare event. The mechanisms are predictable and a thorough physical examination is mandatory to rule out or define combined injury patterns. Stress radiography and magnetic resonance imaging studies are very helpful adjuncts. Acute and chronic injuries require slightly different approaches. As our understanding of normal and pathologic knee joint kinematics develops, nonoperative rehabilitation goals and operative techniques continue to evolve.

  9. Long-term effects of knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and osteoarthritis prevention.

    PubMed

    Shen, Weiliang; Chen, Xiao; Hu, Yejun; Yin, Zi; Zhu, Ting; Hu, Jiajie; Chen, Jialin; Zheng, Zefeng; Zhang, Wei; Ran, Jisheng; Heng, Boon Chin; Ji, Junfeng; Chen, Weishan; Ouyang, Hong-Wei

    2014-09-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is difficult to heal after injury due to the dynamic fluid environment of joint. Previously, we have achieved satisfactory regeneration of subcutaneous tendon/ligament with knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold due to its specific "internal-space-preservation" property. This study aims to investigate the long-term effects of knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold on ACL regeneration and osteoarthritis prevention. The knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold was fabricated and implanted into a rabbit ACL injury model. The knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold was found to enhance migration and adhesion of spindle-shaped cells into the scaffold at 2 months post-surgery. After 6 months, ACL treated with the knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold exhibited increased expression of ligament genes and better microstructural morphology. After 18 months, the knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold-treated group had more mature ligament structure and direct ligament-to-bone healing. Implanted knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffolds degraded much more slowly compared to subcutaneous implantation. Furthermore, the knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold effectively protected joint surface cartilage and preserved joint space for up to 18 months post-surgery. These findings thus demonstrated that the knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold can regenerate functional ACL and prevent osteoarthritis in the long-term, suggesting its clinical use as a functional bioscaffold for ACL reconstruction.

  10. The Restoration of Passive Rotational Tibio-Femoral Laxity after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Moewis, Philippe; Duda, Georg N.; Jung, Tobias; Heller, Markus O.; Boeth, Heide; Kaptein, Bart; Taylor, William R.

    2016-01-01

    While the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is considered one of the most important ligaments for providing knee joint stability, its influence on rotational laxity is not fully understood and its role in resisting rotation at different flexion angles in vivo remains unknown. In this prospective study, we investigated the relationship between in vivo passive axial rotational laxity and knee flexion angle, as well as how they were altered with ACL injury and reconstruction. A rotometer device was developed to assess knee joint rotational laxity under controlled passive testing. An axial torque of ±2.5Nm was applied to the knee while synchronised fluoroscopic images of the tibia and femur allowed axial rotation of the bones to be accurately determined. Passive rotational laxity tests were completed in 9 patients with an untreated ACL injury and compared to measurements at 3 and 12 months after anatomical single bundle ACL reconstruction, as well as to the contralateral controls. Significant differences in rotational laxity were found between the injured and the healthy contralateral knees with internal rotation values of 8.7°±4.0° and 3.7°±1.4° (p = 0.003) at 30° of flexion and 9.3°±2.6° and 4.0°±2.0° (p = 0.001) at 90° respectively. After 3 months, the rotational laxity remained similar to the injured condition, and significantly different to the healthy knees. However, after 12 months, a considerable reduction of rotational laxity was observed towards the levels of the contralateral controls. The significantly greater laxity observed at both knee flexion angles after 3 months (but not at 12 months), suggests an initial lack of post-operative rotational stability, possibly due to reduced mechanical properties or fixation stability of the graft tissue. After 12 months, reduced levels of rotational laxity compared with the injured and 3 month conditions, both internally and externally, suggests progressive rotational stability of the reconstruction with

  11. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Single-Bundle Achilles Allograft with Open Tibial Inlay Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Zehir, Sinan; Elmalı, Nurzat; Çalbıyık, Murat; Taşdemir, Zeki; Sağlam, Fevzi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: PCL reconstruction research has shown that the tibial inlay and transtibial tunnel procedures offer similar biomechanical results. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the early results of PCL reconstruction using a single-bundle Achilles allograft and tibial inlay fixation. Methods: We retrospectively studied 14 patients who had undergone PCL reconstruction using the direct tibial inlay fixation technique from 2009 to 2013, with a mean follow-up of 13.4 months. (6-28 months). The patients were 11males and 3 females with an average age of 29.2 years (17-41 years). Ipsilateral femoral shaft fractures were determined in 2 cases, ipsilateral trochanteric fracture in 1 case and popliteal artery injury in 1 case. Surgery was performed within 2-4 weeks. Spanning-joint external fixation was applied to 2 patients because of gross instability with failure to maintain reduction in a brace. Combined reconstructions involving the posterolateral corner (9/14), anterior cruciate ligament (ACL (11/14)), or medial collateral ligament (MCL (1/14)) were performed. All PCL reconstructions were performed with Achilles allograft. In 1 case with arterial injury, the repair was made by a cardiovascular surgeon. In 2 case, deep infection developed, which was controlled with debridement and antibiotic treatment. Superficial peroneal nerve injury in 1 case was treated with tenolysis in the 6th month, then partial healing was seen at 18 months. In all patients, the preoperative posterior drawer (PD) examination was positive. All patients were evaluated with preoperative and postoperative examination and x-rays. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) evaluation was applied to all patients at the final follow-up. Results: Postoperative PD examination demonstrated the following: 0 (normal) in 4 patients, 1+ in 7 patients, and 2+ in 3 patients, compared to the preoperative PD of 3+ or greater in all patients. Preoperative IKDC objective evaluation rated all knees

  12. Outcome of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with emphasis on sex-related differences.

    PubMed

    Ahldén, M; Sernert, N; Karlsson, J; Kartus, J

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the results after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using the four-strand semitendinosus-gracilis (ST/G) autograft in male (n=141) vs female (n=103) patients. The patients were operated on between 1996 and 2005, using interference screw fixation and drilling the femoral tunnel through the anteromedial portal. The pre-operative assessments and demographics, apart from age (males 29 years, females 26 years; P=0.02), were comparable at the time of surgery. At 25 (23-36) months post-operatively, no significant differences were found between the study groups in terms of anterior side-to-side knee laxity, manual Lachman test, Tegner activity level, Lysholm knee score, range of motion or donor-site morbidity. Both study groups improved significantly in most clinical assessments and functional scores compared with their pre-operative values. Two years after ACL reconstruction using ST/G autografts, there were no significant differences between male and female patients in terms of clinical outcome or functional scores.

  13. Evaluation of open and closed kinetic chain exercises in rehabilitation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Uçar, Mehmet; Koca, Irfan; Eroglu, Mehmet; Eroglu, Selma; Sarp, Umit; Arik, Hasan Onur; Yetisgin, Alparslan

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] To compare outcomes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction after open kinetic chain (OKC) exercises and closed kinetic chain (CKC) exercises. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects comprised 11 female and 47 male patients who are randomly divided into two groups: which performed a CKC exercise program Group I and Group II which performed an OKC exercise program. Pain intensity was evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS). Knee flexion was evaluated using a universal goniometer, and thigh circumference measurements were taken with a tape measure at baseline and at 3 months and 6 months after the treatment. Lysholm scores were used to assess knee function. [Results] There were no significant differences between the two groups at baseline. Within each group, VAS values and knee flexion were improved after the surgery. These improvements were significantly higher in the CKC group than in the OKC group. There were increases in thigh circumference difference at the 3 and 6 month assessments post-surgery. A greater improvement in the Lysholm score was observed in the CKC group at 6 months. [Conclusion] The CKC exercise program was more effective than OKC in improving the knee functions of patients with ACL reconstruction. PMID:25540486

  14. Lateral Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction: An Analysis of Ulnar Tunnel Locations.

    PubMed

    Anakwenze, Oke A; Khanna, Krishn; Levine, William N; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2016-02-01

    We conducted a study to determine precise ulnar tunnel location during lateral ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction to maximize bony bridge and graft construct perpendicularity. Three-dimensional computer models of 15 adult elbows were constructed. These elbow models were manipulated for simulated 4-mm tunnel drilling. The proximal ulna tunnels were placed at the radial head-neck junction and sequentially 0, 5, and 10 mm posterior to the supinator crest. The bony bridges created by these tunnels were measured. Location of the humeral isometric point was determined and marked as the humeral tunnel location. Graft configuration was simulated. Using all the simulated ulna tunnels, we measured the proximal and distal limbs of the graft. In addition, we measured the degree of perpendicularity of the graft limbs. The ulnar tunnel bony bridge was significantly longer with more posterior placement of the proximal tunnel relative to the supinator crest. An increase in degree of perpendicularity of graft to ulnar tunnels was noted with posterior shifts in proximal tunnel location. Posterior placement of the proximal ulna tunnel allows for a larger bony bridge and a more geometrically favorable reconstruction.

  15. Effects of neuromuscular training on knee joint stability after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jae-Kwang; Choi, Ho-Suk; Shin, Jun-Ho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of neuromuscular training on knee joint stability after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 16 adults who underwent arthroscopic anterior cruciate reconstruction and neuromuscular training. The Lysholm scale was used to assess functional disorders on the affected knee joint. A KT-2000 arthrometer was used to measure anterior displacement of the tibia against the femur. Surface electromyography was used to detect the muscle activation of the vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, and semitendinosus before and after neuromuscular training. [Results] There was significant relaxation in tibial anterior displacement of the affected and sound sides in the supine position before neuromuscular training. Furthermore, the difference in the tibial anterior displacement of the affected knee joints in the standing position was reduced after neuromuscular training. Moreover, the variation of the muscle activation evoked higher muscle activation of the vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, and semitendinosus. [Conclusion] Neuromuscular training may improve functional joint stability in patients with orthopedic musculoskeletal injuries in the postoperative period. PMID:26834316

  16. Effects of neuromuscular training on knee joint stability after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jae-Kwang; Choi, Ho-Suk; Shin, Jun-Ho

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of neuromuscular training on knee joint stability after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 16 adults who underwent arthroscopic anterior cruciate reconstruction and neuromuscular training. The Lysholm scale was used to assess functional disorders on the affected knee joint. A KT-2000 arthrometer was used to measure anterior displacement of the tibia against the femur. Surface electromyography was used to detect the muscle activation of the vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, and semitendinosus before and after neuromuscular training. [Results] There was significant relaxation in tibial anterior displacement of the affected and sound sides in the supine position before neuromuscular training. Furthermore, the difference in the tibial anterior displacement of the affected knee joints in the standing position was reduced after neuromuscular training. Moreover, the variation of the muscle activation evoked higher muscle activation of the vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, and semitendinosus. [Conclusion] Neuromuscular training may improve functional joint stability in patients with orthopedic musculoskeletal injuries in the postoperative period.

  17. Knee functions and a return to sports activity in competitive athletes following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Y; Shirai, Y; Narita, T; Mori, A; Kobayashi, K

    2000-06-01

    We investigated knee functions and a return to sports in 50 competitive athlete patients treated with arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using double-looped STG augmented by woven polyester at a 1-year follow-up. There were 25 males and 25 females with a mean age of 24.3 years (range: 19-39 years). The majority of preinjury sports were basketball, volleyball and soccer. Athletic rehabilitation including agility training and sports-specific training was started at 12 weeks. Fourty patients (80%) was rated as normal or nearly normal on the assessment of International Knee Documentation Commitee postoperatively. Fourty-eight patients (96%) obtained full range of motion, and the mean quadriceps muscle strength of the injured side was 91.3%of that of the uninjured side. As for a return to sports, 46 patients (92%) were able to do fully competitive sports at a mean of 8.1 postoperative months. These results suggest that arthroscopic reconstruction using augmented double-looped STG allows early athletic rehabilitation, and lead satisfactory outcome as well as a reliable and early return to preinjury level of sport activity for the majority of the competitive athlete patients.

  18. Double-loop locking cross-stitch suture and suspension fixation for medial collateral ligament origin reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Li, C J; Wang, B C; Liu, D Q

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to summarize the clinical application and results of the double-loop locking cross-stitch suture and suspension fixation method for medial collateral ligament origin reconstruction. Thirty-six patients (21 males, 15 females) with an average age of 40 years (range = 17-58 years), who underwent treatment for acute fracture of the medial collateral ligament at our hospital from February 2008 to May 2009, were included in this study. All patients presented unilateral injuries (17 right-sided, 19 left-sided) and underwent repair with the double-loop locking cross-stitch suture and suspension fixation method. All incisions in this group of patients healed by first intention. Thirty-two patients were followed up for 6-20 months (average = 12 months). There were no reports of wound infection, ligament re-fracture or other complications in the follow-up period. Based on the Lysholm knee-scoring scale, the patients received a 100% excellent and good rating (20 patients - excellent score, 12 patients - good score) postoperatively. The advantages of the double-loop locking cross-stitch suture and suspension fixation method are a smaller incision, reliable fixation, and early restoration of knee joint stability. It is, therefore, an effective and low-risk method for the reconstruction of medial collateral ligament origin. PMID:25078597

  19. Allograft tissue irradiation and failure rate after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Dashe, Jesse; Parisien, Robert L; Cusano, Antonio; Curry, Emily J; Bedi, Asheesh; Li, Xinning

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft irradiation is effective for sterility without compromising graft integrity and increasing failure rate. METHODS: A literature search was conducted using PubMed, Cochrane, and Google. The following search terms were used: “Gamma irradiation AND anterior cruciate ligament AND allograft” with a return of 30 items. Filters used included: English language, years 1990-2015. There were 6 hits that were not reviewed, as there were only abstracts available. Another 5 hits were discarded, as they did not pertain to the topic of interest. There were 9 more articles that were excluded: Three studies were performed on animals and 6 studies were meta-analyses. Therefore, a total of 10 articles were applicable to review. RESULTS: There is a delicate dosing crossover where gamma irradiation is both effective for sterility without catastrophically compromising the structural integrity of the graft. Of note, low dose irradiation is considered less than 2.0 Mrad, moderate dose is between 2.1-2.4 Mrad, and high dose is greater than or equal to 2.5 Mrad. Based upon the results of the literature search, the optimal threshold for sterilization was found to be sterilization at less than 2.2 Mrad of gamma irradiation with the important caveat of being performed at low temperatures. The graft selection process also must include thorough donor screening and testing as well as harvesting the tissue in a sterile fashion. Utilization of higher dose (≥ 2.5 Mrad) of irradiation causes greater allograft tissue laxity that results in greater graft failure rate clinically in patients after ACL reconstruction. CONCLUSION: Allograft ACL graft gamma irradiated with less than 2.2 Mrad appears to be a reasonable alternative to autograft for patients above 25 years of age. PMID:27335815

  20. Association Between Meniscal and Chondral Lesions and Timing of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    de Campos, Gustavo Constantino; Nery, Wilton; Teixeira, Paulo Eduardo Portes; Araujo, Paulo Henrique; Alves, Wilson de Mello

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common sports injury and is known to be associated with an increased risk of knee osteoarthritis. Several studies have indicated that the risk of additional injuries to the menisci and articular cartilage increases with delays in the treatment of ACL tears. However, no consensus has been reached regarding the ideal timing for ACL reconstruction in terms of preventing secondary lesions. Purpose: To determine how the time elapsed between an ACL lesion and its reconstruction affects the incidence of meniscal and chondral lesions. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Medical records of 764 patients who underwent primary ACL reconstruction were reviewed. Data from arthroscopic findings that included information about meniscal lesions and full-thickness articular cartilage lesions at the time of surgery were collected. The association between time elapsed between ACL lesion and reconstruction surgery and incidence of articular cartilage and meniscal lesions was analyzed by chi-square or Fisher exact test. The risk of secondary lesion was calculated by odds ratios (ORs) obtained from simple logistic regression analysis. Results: A positive correlation was observed between time after injury and the presence of any articular lesions (P = .003), cartilage lesions (P = .01), and medial meniscus lesions (P < .001). When analyzing the risk of secondary lesion relative to the reference period (<2 months), it was observed that the odds of finding any articular injury at the time of ACL reconstruction increased when the time from ACL injury to surgery was between 12 and 24 months (OR = 2.62) and >24 months (OR = 5.88). Furthermore, the odds of lesions on the medial meniscus increased when the timing between injury and surgery was 6 to 12 months (OR = 2.71) and continued to increase when the timing was 12 to 24 months (OR = 3.78) and >24 months (OR = 9.07). Conclusion: Associated articular lesions

  1. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with BPTB autograft, irradiated versus non-irradiated allograft: a prospective randomized clinical study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kang; Tian, Shaoqi; Zhang, Jihua; Xia, Changsuo; Zhang, Cailong; Yu, Tengbo

    2009-05-01

    The effect of using gamma irradiation to sterilize bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) allograft on the clinical outcomes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with irradiated allograft remains controversial. Our study was aimed to analyze the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with irradiated BPTB allograft compared with non-irradiated allograft and autograft. All BPTB allografts were obtained from a single tissue bank and the irradiated allografts were sterilized with 2.5 Mrad of irradiation prior to distribution. A total of 102 patients undergoing arthroscopic ACL reconstruction were prospectively randomized consecutively into three groups. The same surgical technique was used in all operations done by the same senior surgeon. Before surgery and at the average of 31 months follow-up (range 24-47 months) patients were evaluated by the same observer according to objective and subjective clinical evaluations. Of these patients, 99 (autograft 33, non-irradiated allograft 34, irradiated allograft 32) were available for full evaluation. When compared the irradiated allograft group to non-irradiated allograft group or autograft group at 31 months follow-up by the Lachman test, ADT, pivot shift test and KT-2000 arthrometer testing, statistically significant differences were found. Most importantly, 87.8% of patients in the Auto group, 85.3% in the Non-Ir-Auto group and just only 31.3% in the Ir-Allo group had a side-to-side difference of less than 3 mm according to KT-2000. The failure rate of the ACL reconstruction with irradiated allograft (34.4%) was higher than that with autograft (6.1%) and non-irradiated allograft (8.8%). The anterior and rotational stability decreased significantly in the irradiated allograft group. According to the overall IKDC, functional, subjective evaluations and activity level testing, no statistically significant differences were found between the three groups. However, there was a trend that the functional and

  2. Effects of 4 weeks preoperative exercise on knee extensor strength after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Kyung; Hwang, Ji Hye; Park, Won Hah

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] After an anterior cruciate ligament injury and subsequent reconstruction, quadriceps muscle weakness and disruption of proprioceptive function are common. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a 4 weeks preoperative exercise intervention on knee strength power and function post-surgery. [Subjects and Methods] Eighty male patients (27.8±5.7 age), scheduled for reconstruction surgery, were randomly assigned to two groups, the preoperative exercise group (n=40) and a no preoperative exercise group (n=40). The preoperative exercise group participated in a 4-week preoperative and 12-week post-operative programs, while the no preoperative exercise group participated only in the 12-week postoperative exercise program. Isokinetic measured of quadriceps strength were obtained at 4 weeks before and 3 months after surgery. [Results] The knee extensor strength deficits measured at 60°/s and 180°/s was significantly lower in the preoperative exercise group compared with the no preoperative exercise group. At 3 months after surgery, the extensor strength deficit was 28.5±9.0% at 60°/sec and 23.3±9.0% at 180°/sec in the preoperative exercise group, whereas the no preoperative exercise group showed extensor strength deficits of 36.5±10.7% and 27.9±12.6% at 60°/sec and 180°/sec, respectively. The preoperative exercise group demonstrated significant improvement the single-leg hop distance. [Conclusion] Four week preoperative exercise may produce many positive effects post reconstruction surgery, including faster recovery of knee extensor strength and function, as measured by single-leg hop ability. PMID:26504270

  3. A long-term study of anterior cruciate ligament allograft reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, K F; Willaert, Pieter; De Brabandere, S; Criel, K; Verdonk, R

    2009-07-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the long-term clinical outcome of unilateral arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction. From October 1995 to December 1997, 64 arthroscopic ACL reconstructions were performed. Multiligamentous knee injuries and ACL injuries in polytrauma patients were excluded and out of the remaining 60 patients 55 were available for follow-up. Three patients had suffered a rerupture caused by major trauma. One patient had a rerupture without significant trauma and one failure was caused by deep infection. These five patients were revised. Fifty patients (36 males, 14 females) were included in the final follow-up. At the time of evaluation, the mean duration of follow-up was 10 years and 6 months. All patients were examined by an independent examiner. Seven patients had an extension lag (<5 degrees) and all patients had a knee flexion of at least 120 degrees, with a mean flexion of 135 +/- 5 degrees compared to 135 +/- 8 degrees. At the time of follow-up, the median IKDC score was 97 (74-100). The Lysholm scoring scale had a median value of 95 (76-100). The median sports level on the Tegner scale was 6 (4-9). The one-leg-hop test showed a mean value of 95 +/- 5%. One patient did not perform the one-leg-hop test because of recent surgery to the Achilles tendon. In conclusion, the tibialis anterior or tibialis posterior tendon allograft ACL reconstruction produced good clinical results in the majority of patients at long-term follow-up.

  4. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with a novel porcine xenograft: the initial Italian experience

    PubMed Central

    ZAFFAGNINI, STEFANO; GRASSI, ALBERTO; MUCCIOLI, GIULIO MARIA MARCHEGGIANI; DI SARSINA, TOMMASO ROBERTI; RAGGI, FEDERICO; BENZI, ANDREA; MARCACCI, MAURILIO

    2015-01-01

    At the current state of the art in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, multiple techniques have been presented but none has given clearly defined and improved results. One of the main issues concerns the choice of graft. The concept of using xenograft tissue, defined as a graft tissue from one species and destined for implantation in an unlike species, was introduced in order to try to overcome the mechanical and biological concerns associated with synthetic materials and the safety and quality concerns and availability problems of allograft tissue. Xenograft tissue carries the risk of producing an immunological reaction. In order to try to overcome or attenuate the immune response against porcine xenograft tissue, the Z-Process® (Aperion Biologics Inc, San Antonio, Texas, USA) has been developed and used to produce the Z-Lig® family of devices for ACL reconstruction procedures. Z-Lig® is a tendon graft with or without bone blocks, sourced from animal tissue in a manner consistent with what has normally been sourced from human tissue, and processed to overcome anti-Gal-mediated rejection and to attenuate other immunological recognition in humans. All this while ensuring sterility, viral inactivation and preservation of mechanical proprieties appropriate for an ACL reconstruction device. The Z-Lig® device has been tested in skeletally mature monkeys and given interesting and promising results from the preclinical performance and safety profile point of view. On this basis, it was possible to proceed with the first clinical trial involving humans, which gave similar encouraging results. The Z-Lig® device has also been implanted in Italy at the Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute in Bologna, as a part of international multicenter prospective randomized blinded controlled study aimed at comparing xenograft with allograft tissue. PMID:26605257

  5. Prediction of quadruple hamstring graft diameter for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by anthropometric measurements

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Naiyer; Ranjan, Rahul; Ahmed, Sohail; Sabir, Aamir B; Jilani, Latif Z; Qureshi, Owais A

    2016-01-01

    Background: The literature is scanty regarding the anthropometric predictors on the diameter of quadruple hamstring graft obtained in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in Indian population. Minimum diameter of the graft for ACL reconstruction should be >7 mm to preclude failure. The objective of this study was to assess the prediction of the hamstring graft diameter by several anthropometric parameters including age, thigh circumference, weight, height and body mass index (BMI). Materials and Methods: 46 consecutive patients who had undergone ACL reconstruction by the same surgeon using quadruple hamstring grafts were evaluated. The age, thigh circumference of the normal side, height, weight and BMI were recorded preoperatively and Pearson correlation was done using these parameters with graft diameter measured intraoperatively. Regression analysis in a stepwise manner was undertaken to assess the influence of individual anthropometric parameters on the graft diameter. Results: There were 44 males and 2 females. Mean age was 29.4 years, mean height was 172.6 cm, mean weight was 70.9 kg, mean BMI was 23.8 kg/m2, mean thigh circumference was 47.1 cm and mean graft diameter was 7.9 mm. There was a positive correlation individually between the thigh circumference and graft diameter obtained (r = 0.8, P < 0.01, n = 46), and between the height and graft diameter (r = 0.8, P < 0.01, n = 46). On the regression analysis thigh circumference and height were found to be significant predictors of graft diameter giving the following equation: Graft diameter (mm) = 0. 079 height (cm) +0.068 thigh circumference (cm) −9.031. Conclusion: Preoperatively using the above equation if graft diameter came out to be <7 mm then alternate options of graft material must be kept in mind in order to prevent failure. PMID:26955176

  6. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with a novel porcine xenograft: the initial Italian experience.

    PubMed

    Zaffagnini, Stefano; Grassi, Alberto; Marcheggiani Muccioli, Giulio Maria; Roberti Di Sarsina, Tommaso; Raggi, Federico; Benzi, Andrea; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2015-01-01

    At the current state of the art in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, multiple techniques have been presented but none has given clearly defined and improved results. One of the main issues concerns the choice of graft. The concept of using xenograft tissue, defined as a graft tissue from one species and destined for implantation in an unlike species, was introduced in order to try to overcome the mechanical and biological concerns associated with synthetic materials and the safety and quality concerns and availability problems of allograft tissue. Xenograft tissue carries the risk of producing an immunological reaction. In order to try to overcome or attenuate the immune response against porcine xenograft tissue, the Z-Process® (Aperion Biologics Inc, San Antonio, Texas, USA) has been developed and used to produce the Z-Lig® family of devices for ACL reconstruction procedures. Z-Lig® is a tendon graft with or without bone blocks, sourced from animal tissue in a manner consistent with what has normally been sourced from human tissue, and processed to overcome anti-Gal-mediated rejection and to attenuate other immunological recognition in humans. All this while ensuring sterility, viral inactivation and preservation of mechanical proprieties appropriate for an ACL reconstruction device. The Z-Lig® device has been tested in skeletally mature monkeys and given interesting and promising results from the preclinical performance and safety profile point of view. On this basis, it was possible to proceed with the first clinical trial involving humans, which gave similar encouraging results. The Z-Lig® device has also been implanted in Italy at the Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute in Bologna, as a part of international multicenter prospective randomized blinded controlled study aimed at comparing xenograft with allograft tissue. PMID:26605257

  7. A long-term study of anterior cruciate ligament allograft reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, K F; Willaert, Pieter; De Brabandere, S; Criel, K; Verdonk, R

    2009-07-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the long-term clinical outcome of unilateral arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction. From October 1995 to December 1997, 64 arthroscopic ACL reconstructions were performed. Multiligamentous knee injuries and ACL injuries in polytrauma patients were excluded and out of the remaining 60 patients 55 were available for follow-up. Three patients had suffered a rerupture caused by major trauma. One patient had a rerupture without significant trauma and one failure was caused by deep infection. These five patients were revised. Fifty patients (36 males, 14 females) were included in the final follow-up. At the time of evaluation, the mean duration of follow-up was 10 years and 6 months. All patients were examined by an independent examiner. Seven patients had an extension lag (<5 degrees) and all patients had a knee flexion of at least 120 degrees, with a mean flexion of 135 +/- 5 degrees compared to 135 +/- 8 degrees. At the time of follow-up, the median IKDC score was 97 (74-100). The Lysholm scoring scale had a median value of 95 (76-100). The median sports level on the Tegner scale was 6 (4-9). The one-leg-hop test showed a mean value of 95 +/- 5%. One patient did not perform the one-leg-hop test because of recent surgery to the Achilles tendon. In conclusion, the tibialis anterior or tibialis posterior tendon allograft ACL reconstruction produced good clinical results in the majority of patients at long-term follow-up. PMID:19421736

  8. Effects of 4 weeks preoperative exercise on knee extensor strength after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Kyung; Hwang, Ji Hye; Park, Won Hah

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] After an anterior cruciate ligament injury and subsequent reconstruction, quadriceps muscle weakness and disruption of proprioceptive function are common. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a 4 weeks preoperative exercise intervention on knee strength power and function post-surgery. [Subjects and Methods] Eighty male patients (27.8±5.7 age), scheduled for reconstruction surgery, were randomly assigned to two groups, the preoperative exercise group (n=40) and a no preoperative exercise group (n=40). The preoperative exercise group participated in a 4-week preoperative and 12-week post-operative programs, while the no preoperative exercise group participated only in the 12-week postoperative exercise program. Isokinetic measured of quadriceps strength were obtained at 4 weeks before and 3 months after surgery. [Results] The knee extensor strength deficits measured at 60°/s and 180°/s was significantly lower in the preoperative exercise group compared with the no preoperative exercise group. At 3 months after surgery, the extensor strength deficit was 28.5±9.0% at 60°/sec and 23.3±9.0% at 180°/sec in the preoperative exercise group, whereas the no preoperative exercise group showed extensor strength deficits of 36.5±10.7% and 27.9±12.6% at 60°/sec and 180°/sec, respectively. The preoperative exercise group demonstrated significant improvement the single-leg hop distance. [Conclusion] Four week preoperative exercise may produce many positive effects post reconstruction surgery, including faster recovery of knee extensor strength and function, as measured by single-leg hop ability.

  9. Orthopedic Practice Patterns Relating to Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Elite Athletes.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Brandon J; Harris, Joshua D; Fillingham, Yale A; Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Bush-Joseph, Charles; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R; Verma, Nikhil N

    2015-12-01

    We conducted an online survey of National Hockey League (NHL), Major League Soccer (MLS), and US Olympic/World Cup Ski/Snowboard (Olympic) team orthopedic surgeons to determine practice patterns relating to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in elite athletes. Of the 94 team orthopedic surgeons surveyed, 47 (50%) responded. Mean (SD) experience as a team physician was 7.73 (5.33) years for NHL, 6.77 (6.64) years for MLS, and 1.14 (0.36) years for Olympic. Mean (SD) number of ACL reconstructions performed in 2012 was 101 (51) for NHL, 78 (38) for MLS, and 110 (105) for Olympic. Overall, 33 surgeons (70.2%) indicated they would use bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft to treat their starting athletes. Twenty-one (44.7%) drilled the femoral tunnel through a transtibial portal, 36.2% through an anteromedial portal, and 12.8% by a 2-incision technique. All the surgeons used a single-bundle technique. Thirty-three (70.2%) did not recommend a brace for their elite athletes during play on return to sport (RTS). Twenty-seven NHL and MLS surgeons (81.8%) recommended RTS only after an athlete has passed a series of RTS tests (eg, Vail, single-leg hop). Most of the NHL, MLS, and Olympic team orthopedic surgeons who were surveyed perform their ACL reconstructions using BPTB autograft, using a single-bundle technique, and through a transtibial portal, and do not require bracing for their athletes returning to sport. Most required their athletes to complete a series of RTS tests before resuming competitive play. PMID:26665248

  10. Treatment of patellar instability in a case of hereditary onycho-osteodysplasia (nail-patella syndrome) with medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction: A case report

    PubMed Central

    GONG, YUBAO; YANG, CHEN; LIU, YANG; LIU, JIANGUO; QI, XIN

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary onycho-osteodysplasia, also known as nail-patella syndrome (NPS), is a rare genetic disorder that is primarily characterized by poorly developed nails and patella. Patients with NPS frequently suffer from patellar instability that requires surgical management. The present case report describes a 25-year-old man with NPS. The patient presented with left knee pain and was found to have recurrent left patellar dislocation. The knee pain was first reported 1-year after a minor knee trauma incident. Following complete evaluation, a diagnosis of NPS was reached. The patient underwent surgical intervention using medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction with a gracilis tendon autograft looped through two transverse 3.2-mm drill holes in the patella and fixed at the natural MPFL insertion site on the medial femoral condyle with an interference screw. The surgery resulted in stabilization of the patella in the femoral trochlea and the patient did not have any subsequent dislocations or subluxations. The patient had an excellent range of knee movement in the follow-up period. This case indicates that MPFL reconstruction in patients with patellar dislocation secondary to NPS can successfully restore normal patellar tracking and result in good range of movement and functional activity. PMID:27284321

  11. Anatomy of the inferior extensor retinaculum and its role in lateral ankle ligament reconstruction: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Dalmau-Pastor, M; Yasui, Y; Calder, J D; Karlsson, J; Kerkhoffs, G M M J; Kennedy, J G

    2016-04-01

    The inferior extensor retinaculum (IER) is an aponeurotic structure, which is in continuation with the anterior part of the sural fascia. The IER has often been used to augment the reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments, for instance in the Broström-Gould procedure, with good outcomes reported. However, its anatomy has not been described in detail and only a few studies are available on this structure. The presence of a non-constant oblique supero-lateral band appears to be important. This structure defines whether the augmentation of the lateral ankle ligaments reconstruction is performed using true IER or only the anterior part of the sural fascia. It is concluded that the use of this structure will have an impact on the resulting ankle stability.

  12. Correlation Analysis of Potential Factors Influencing Graft Maturity After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Chen, Shuang; Tao, Hongyue; Li, Hongyun; Chen, Shiyi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Postoperatively, signal changes of the reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images commonly occurs, which may be a cause for concern. The signal intensity changes are usually expressed by signal/noise quotient (SNQ) value, representing graft maturity. To date, little is known about the factors influencing the SNQ value of the reconstructed ACL graft. Purpose: To evaluate ACL graft SNQ value and associated factors after ACL reconstruction. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Male patients who underwent ACL reconstruction using autograft or allograft tendon from September 2004 to September 2011 were randomly invited to take part in this investigation, including functional scores, physical examination, and MRI scan. The femoral side graft was fixed with Endobutton CL or Rigidfix pins, and the tibial side graft was fixed with a bio-intrafix. SNQ values of each graft were measured on MRI to represent graft maturity. Sagittal ACL angle, ACL–Blumensaat line angle, and medial and lateral posterior tibial slope (PTS) were measured using MRI 3-dimensional dual-echo steady-state images. Potential risk factors, including age, body mass index, postoperative time, Tegner activity scale (TAS), sagittal ACL angle, ACL–Blumensaat line angle, medial PTS, lateral PTS, and primary graft diameter, were tested for their association with the graft SNQ value by multivariate stepwise regression analysis. Results: A total of 104 male subjects (mean follow-up, 30.7 months) were examined, including 62 allograft and 42 autograft reconstructions. There was a significant association between graft SNQ and postoperative time (r = −0.431, P < .001), TAS (r = 0.295, P = .002), and ACL–Blumensaat line angle (r = −0.304, P = .002). Univariate regression analysis showed that TAS (β = 6.15, P < .001) positively correlated, postoperative time (β = −0.26, P < .001) negatively correlated, and ACL

  13. Patellar tendon or hamstring graft anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions in patients aged above 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Tarun; Nagraj, Raghu; Kumar, Malhar N; Chandy, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background: The treatment of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury consists of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon or hamstring graft. Satisfactory results have been reported so far in the younger age group. Dilemma arises regarding the suitability of ACL reconstruction in patients aged 50 years and above. This retrospective analyses the outcome of ACL reconstruction in patients aged 50 years and above. Materials and Methods: 55 patients aged 50 years and above presented to our institution with symptomatic ACL tear and were managed with arthroscopic reconstruction with patellar tendon/hamstring graft. 22 patients underwent ACL reconstruction with bone- patellar tendon-bone graft and the remaining 33 with a hamstring graft. Evaluation of functional outcome was performed using International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) and Lysholm scoring in the preoperative period, at the end of 1 year and at the final followup. Radiographic evaluation was performed using the Kellgren–Lawrence grading system. Results: The mean preoperative IKDC score was 39.7 ± 3.3. At the end of 1-year following the operation, the mean IKDC score was 73.6 ± 4.9 and at the final followup was 67.8 ± 7.7. The mean preoperative Lysholm score was 40.4 ± 10.3. At the end of 1-year following the intervention, the mean Lysholm score was 89.7 ± 2.1 and at final followup was 85.3 ± 2.5. Overall, 14 out of 42 patients who underwent radiographic assessment showed progression of osteoarthritis changes at the final followup after the intervention. Conclusion: In our study, there was a statistically significant improvement in the IKDC and Lysholm scores following the intervention. There was a slight deterioration in the scores at the final followup but the overall rate of satisfaction was still high and most of the patients were able to do their routine chores and light exercises suitable for their age group. Around one-third of patients show progression of radiographic changes

  14. HOW CAN BONE TUNNEL ENLARGEMENT IN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION SURGERY BE MEASURED? DESCRIPTION OF A TECHNIQUE

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar Leonardi, Adriano Barros de; Severino, Nilson Roberto; Junior, Aires Duarte

    2015-01-01

    To assess the presence of tibial bone tunnel enlargement after surgery to reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament using quadruple flexor tendon grafts, and to propose a new technique for its measurement. Methods: The study involved 25 patients aged 18-43 years over a six-month period. The assessment was based on radiographs taken immediately postoperatively and in the third and sixth months of evolution after operations to reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament using grafts from the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles, fixed in the femur with a transverse metal screw and in the tibia with an interference screw. The radiographs were evaluated in terms of the relative value between the diameter of the tunnel and the bone, both at 2 cm below the medial tibial condyle. Results: There were significant increases in tunnel diameters: 20.56% for radiographs in anteroposterior view and 26.48% in lateral view. Enlargement was present in 48% of anteroposterior and lateral radiographs, but was present in both views in only 16% of the cases. Conclusions: Bone tunnel enlargement is a phenomenon found in the first months after surgery to reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament. The measurement technique proposed in this study was sufficient to detect it. PMID:27027030

  15. The effects of "decelerated" rehabilitation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction on a hyperelastic female adolescent: a case study.

    PubMed

    Hardin, J A; Voight, M L; Blackburn, T A; Canner, G C; Soffer, S R

    1997-07-01

    Current concepts in postoperative anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction management include participation in an "accelerated" rehabilitation program. There are no published reports examining the effects of accelerated or conservative rehabilitation on subjects with generalized ligamentous hyperelasticity. The purpose of this case study was to examine the effects of a conservative or "decelerated" rehabilitation program on the functional outcome of a hyperelastic female adolescent athlete following ACL reconstruction. The subject was a 15-year-old female basketball player who sustained a unilateral ACL tear and underwent subsequent ACL reconstruction using a patellar tendon autograft. The subject immediately began participation in a "decelerated" rehabilitation program in which the intensity and rate of progression was decelerated, emphasizing a prolonged period of maximum graft protection. Progress was objectively quantified with a battery of diagnosis-specific tests at scheduled intervals. Results at 52 weeks postoperative revealed normal range of motion, proprioception, balance, knee stability, quadriceps strength, hamstring strength, and subjective assessment values, and only a 4.0% deficit in functional scores. Our results suggest a "decelerated" rehabilitation program may be appropriate for the population with generalized ligamentous hyperelasticity by yielding excellent functional results without compromising the integrity of the graft and, ultimately, knee stability.

  16. Surgical treatment of combined PCL-ACL medial and lateral side injuries (global laxity): surgical technique and 2- to 18-year results.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Gregory C; Edson, Craig J

    2012-09-01

    The multiple ligament injured knee is a severe injury that may also involve neurovascular injuries, fractures, and other systemic injuries. Surgical treatment offers good functional results documented in the literature by physical examination, arthrometer testing, stress radiography, and knee ligament rating scales. Mechanical tensioning devices are helpful with cruciate ligament tensioning. Some low grade medial collateral ligament (MCL) complex injuries may be amenable to brace treatment, while high grade medial side injuries require combined surgical repair-reconstruction. Lateral posterolateral injuries are most successfully treated with combined surgical repair-reconstruction. Surgical timing in acute multiple ligament injured knee cases depends on the ligaments injured, injured extremity vascular status, skin condition of the extremity, degree of instability, and the patients overall health. Allograft tissue is preferred for these complex surgical procedures. Delayed reconstruction of 2 to 3 weeks may decrease the incidence of arthrofibrosis, and it is important to address all components of the instability. Currently, there is no conclusive evidence that double-bundle posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction provides superior results to single-bundle PCL reconstruction in the multiple ligament injured knee. The purpose of this article is to discuss G.F.'s surgical technique for combined PCL and anterior cruciate ligament, medial, and lateral side reconstructions in acute and chronic multiple ligament injured knees with global laxity. This article will focus on recognizing and defining the instability pattern, the use of external fixation, surgical timing, graft selection and preparation, G.F.'s preferred surgical technique, mechanical graft tensioning, perioperative antibiotics, specialized operating teams, postoperative rehabilitation, and our results of treatment in these complex surgical cases.

  17. Distal Radius Attachments of the Radiocarpal Ligaments: An Anatomical Study

    PubMed Central

    Zumstein, M. A.; Hasan, A. P.; McGuire, D. T.; Eng, Kevin; Bain, Gregory Ian

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the anatomy of the ligaments of the distal radius aids in the surgical repair of ligamentous injuries and the prediction of intraarticular fracture patterns. Purposes (1) to measure the horizontal and vertical distances of the origins of the radiocarpal ligaments from the most ulnar corner of the sigmoid notch and the joint line, respectively; and (2) to express them as a percentile of the total width of the bony distal radius. Methods We dissected 8 cadaveric specimens and identified the dorsal radiocarpal, radioscaphocapitate, and the long and short radiolunate ligaments. Results The dorsal radiocarpal ligament attached from the 16th to the 52nd percentile of the radial width. The radioscaphocapitate ligament attached around the radial styloid from the 86th percentile volarly to the 87th percentile dorsally. The long radiolunate ligament attached from the 59th to the 85th percentile, and the short radiolunate ligament attached from the 14th to the 41st percentile. Discussion There was a positive correlation between the radial width and the horizontal distance of the ligaments from the sigmoid notch. These findings may aid individualized surgical repair or reconstruction adjusted to patient size and enable further standardized research on distal radial fractures and their relationship with radiocarpal ligaments. PMID:24436840

  18. Enhancement of tendon-to-bone healing after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells genetically modified with bFGF/BMP2

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Biao; Li, Bin; Qi, Yong-Jian; Ni, Qu-Bo; Pan, Zheng-Qi; Wang, Hui; Chen, Liao-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Many strategies, including various growth factors and gene transfer, have been used to augment healing after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The biological environment regulated by the growth factors during the stage of tendon-bone healing was considered important in controlling the integrating process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) genetically modified with bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on healing after ACL reconstruction. BMSCs were infected with an adenoviral vector encoding BMP2 (AdBMP2) or bFGF (AdbFGF). Then, the infected BMSCs were surgically implanted into the tendon-bone interface. At 12 weeks postoperatively, the formation of abundant cartilage-like cells, smaller tibial bone tunnel and significantly higher ultimate load and stiffness levels, through histological analysis, micro-computed tomography and biomechanical testing, were observed. In addition, the AdBMP2-plus-AdbFGF group had the smallest bone tunnel and the best mechanical properties among all the groups. The addition of BMP2 or bFGF by gene transfer resulted in better cellularity, new bone formation and higher mechanical property, which contributed to the healing process after ACL reconstruction. Furthermore, the co-application of these two genes was more powerful and efficient than either single gene therapy. PMID:27173013

  19. Enhancement of tendon-to-bone healing after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells genetically modified with bFGF/BMP2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Biao; Li, Bin; Qi, Yong-Jian; Ni, Qu-Bo; Pan, Zheng-Qi; Wang, Hui; Chen, Liao-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Many strategies, including various growth factors and gene transfer, have been used to augment healing after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The biological environment regulated by the growth factors during the stage of tendon-bone healing was considered important in controlling the integrating process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) genetically modified with bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on healing after ACL reconstruction. BMSCs were infected with an adenoviral vector encoding BMP2 (AdBMP2) or bFGF (AdbFGF). Then, the infected BMSCs were surgically implanted into the tendon-bone interface. At 12 weeks postoperatively, the formation of abundant cartilage-like cells, smaller tibial bone tunnel and significantly higher ultimate load and stiffness levels, through histological analysis, micro-computed tomography and biomechanical testing, were observed. In addition, the AdBMP2-plus-AdbFGF group had the smallest bone tunnel and the best mechanical properties among all the groups. The addition of BMP2 or bFGF by gene transfer resulted in better cellularity, new bone formation and higher mechanical property, which contributed to the healing process after ACL reconstruction. Furthermore, the co-application of these two genes was more powerful and efficient than either single gene therapy. PMID:27173013

  20. Risk factors for Recurrent Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Population Study in Ontario, Canada with 5-year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    FRCSC, David Wasserstein; Khoshbin, Amir; Dwyer, Tim; Chahal, Jaskarndip; Gandhi, Rajiv; Mahomed, Nizar; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is routinely performed to treat symptomatic instability. Despite being a common procedure, significant variation persists in technique and graft choice. How patient, provider and surgical factors influence the risk of revision or contralateral primary ACLR has not been investigated using administrative data. The goal of our study was to define the rate and risk factors for ACL re-operation in Ontario. Methods: All primary elective ACLR performed in Ontario, Canada from July 2003 to March 2008 in patients aged 15 to 60 years were identified via billing, diagnosis and procedural databases. The main outcomes were revision and contralateral ACLR, sought until January 2012. Patient factors (age, gender, co-morbidity, income quintile, and length of index hospital admission), provider factors (surgeon volume, academic hospital status) and surgical factors (allograft vs. autograft; fixation: screw, button, staple; concomitant operative procedures) were used as covariates in a Cox Proportional Hazards survivorship model to generate Hazard Ratios (HR) with confidence intervals (alpha 0.05). Kaplan-Meier survivorship curves to revision were generated. Results: A total of 12,967 ACLR with a mean follow-up of 5.2 years were identified. The revision rate was 2.6% [after a median 2.72 years (interquartile range 1.38, 4.11)]. The rate of primary contralateral ACLR was 4.6% [after a median 2.71 years (interquartile range 1.49, 4.22)]. In the Cox model, younger age [15-19 years; HR=2.1 (95% CI: 1.5-2.9), p<0.001], ACLR performed at an academic hospital [HR=1.6 (95% CI: 1.2-2.1), p<0.001] and the use of allograft [HR=1.7 (95% CI: 1.1-2.6), p=0.02] significantly increased the risk of revision ACLR. The K-M curves to revision ACLR for allograft and autograft demonstrated equivalent survivorship for approximately 3 years, after which allograft ACLR were more commonly revised (Figure 1). Only younger age [15-19 years; HR=2

  1. Isokinetic Identification of Knee Joint Torques before and after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Czaplicki, Adam; Jarocka, Marta; Walawski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the serial change of isokinetic muscle strength of the knees before and after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) in physically active males and to estimate the time of return to full physical fitness. Extension and flexion torques were measured for the injured and healthy limbs at two angular velocities approximately 1.5 months before the surgery and 3, 6, and 12 months after ACLR. Significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) in peak knee extension and flexion torques, hamstring/quadriceps (H/Q) strength ratios, uninvolved/involved limb peak torque ratios, and the normalized work of these muscles between the four stages of rehabilitation were identified. Significant differences between extension peak torques for the injured and healthy limbs were also detected at all stages. The obtained results showed that 12 months of rehabilitation were insufficient for the involved knee joint to recover its strength to the level of strength of the uninvolved knee joint. The results helped to evaluate the progress of the rehabilitation and to implement necessary modifications optimizing the rehabilitation training program. The results of the study may also be used as referential data for physically active males of similar age. PMID:26646385

  2. Suggestions from the field for return to sports participation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: American football.

    PubMed

    Verstegen, Mark; Falsone, Susan; Orr, Russell; Smith, Steve

    2012-04-01

    Returning an American football player to sport after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is challenging on several fronts. First, there are approximately 15 different positions a football player could play, depending on how specifically you define the positions on the field. Each of these positions has specific demands for optimal size, strength, power, body composition, cardiovascular fitness, and movement. Understanding all of these factors is paramount to returning a football player not only to his sport but also to his specific position. Second, the chaotic, contact-rich nature of the sport requires that heavy demands be placed on the lower extremities to attenuate external contact forces from other players and from ground reaction forces associated with accelerating, decelerating, quick stops and starts, and changing direction. Finally, return to a competitive level of performance is further influenced by playing surface, shoe selection, the equipment the player wears, and various potential psychosocial factors. It is the responsibility of the clinician to provide a progressive and systematic rehabilitation program by first introducing preprogrammed movements that, once mastered, are progressed with elements of more reactive and random movement patterns. The precise nature of this systematic progression of advanced rehabilitation is key in developing return-to-play criteria and, ultimately, in readying an American football player for eventual return to sport and a particular position.

  3. Muscle strength and function before and after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using semitendonosus and gracilis.

    PubMed

    Keays, S L; Bullock-Saxton, J; Keays, A C; Newcombe, P

    2001-10-01

    This study assessed the quadriceps and hamstring strength before and 6 months after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructive surgery using the hamstrings and related the findings to functional performance. Six months after surgery is a critical time for assessment as this is when players are returning to sport. Maximum isokinetic strength of 31 patients with complete unilateral ACL ruptures was measured at speeds of 60 degrees and 120 degrees per second. Functional assessment included the single hop, the triple hop, the shuttle run, side-step and carioca tests. All patients underwent a controlled quadriceps emphasized home-based physiotherapy program both before and after surgery. Results show that before surgery there was a 7.3% quadriceps strength deficit at 60 degrees per second compared to the uninjured leg but no hamstring strength deficit. After surgery there was a statistically significant but relatively small loss of muscle strength. The quadriceps strength deficit had increased to 12% and there was a 10% hamstring deficit. Post-operatively there was an 11% and 6.3% improvement in the hop tests, a 9% (P < 0.01) improvement in the shuttle run, a 15% (P < 0.001) improvement in the side step and a 24% (P < 0.001) improvement in the carioca tests (P < 0.001) despite the loss of muscle strength.

  4. A review of systematic reviews on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Lobb, Ryan; Tumilty, Steve; Claydon, Leica S

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this systematic review of systematic reviews was to critically appraise systematic reviews on Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction rehabilitation to determine which interventions are supported by the highest quality evidence. Electronic searches were undertaken, of MEDLINE, AMED, EMBASE, EBM reviews, PEDro, Scopus, and Web of Science to identify systematic reviews of ACL rehabilitation. Two reviewers independently selected the studies, extracted data, and applied quality criteria. Study quality was assessed using PRISMA and a best evidence synthesis was performed. Five systematic reviews were included assessing eight rehabilitation components. There was strong evidence (consistent evidence from multiple high quality randomised controlled trials (RCTs)) of no added benefit of bracing (0-6 weeks post-surgery) compared to standard treatment in the short term. Moderate evidence (consistent evidence from multiple low quality RCTs and/or one high quality RCT) supported no added benefit of continuous passive motion to standard treatment for increasing range of motion. There was moderate evidence of equal effectiveness of closed versus open kinetic chain exercise and home versus clinic based rehabilitation, on a range of short term outcomes. There was inconsistent or limited evidence for some interventions. Recommendations for clinical practice are made at specific time points for specific outcomes. PMID:23068905

  5. Posterior Cruciate Ligament (pcl) Reconstruction by Transtibial Tunnel:. Suggestions of Lengthening and Slippage Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jay-Jung; Kim, Cheol-Woong

    This paper examined the biomechanical fatigue behavior of Achilles tendon autograft after posterior cruciate ligament (PLC) reconstructions. It experimented with various fixation devices and locations on the degree of initial lengthening and slippage to investigate the relationship between lengthening and slippage ratios among calcaneal and soft tissue fixation methods. Eight specimens of proximal tibia and Achilles tendon grafts were harvested from cadavers and classified into four groups according to the type of transtibial fixation technique. A cyclic load ranging from 50N to 250N was applied to each graft when fixed to the proximal tibia at 55 degrees. The soft tissue fixation method, which uses an interference screw, demonstrated a 56.4% ratio of slippage to total elongation. The use of a double cross-pin with the same method demonstrated a 45.4% slippage ratio. The former was associated with approximately 2 mm less total elongation and 13% more slippage than lengthening compared to the latter. This result was predominantly due to the poor standard of fixation compared to the same method using a double cross-pin.

  6. [Peculiarities of early rehabilitation of mountain ski athletes after plastic reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament].

    PubMed

    Sidorenko, E V; Preobrazhenskiĭ, V Iu; Vnukov, D V; Preobrazhenskaia, M V

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of the present study was to estimate the effectiveness of the new methods of physical rehabilitation for mountain ski athletes designed to optimize and accelerate restoration of their professional capabilities after arthroscopic plastic reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). This open controlled prospective study involved 26 alpine skiers aged from 18 to 25 who were recruited into the regular follow up program based at our Centre during the last 3 years. The athletes proved able to start balance training on the Biodex platform 4 weeks earlier than with the use of the conventional approach. These exercises were supplemented by the training of speed endurance on the Speed Courte tensor platform and Sky Teck ski simulators. Control studies were carried out on the 16th and 24th weeks of the rehabilitation period. Their results were compared with the results shown by the same athletes before injury. It was found that the early introduction of exercises designed to normalize proprioception into the rehabilitative treatment allowed the injured mountain ski athletes to restore the strength of femoral muscles and specific professional skills by the 4th month of the rehabilitation period. It is concluded that the combination of classical rehabilitative techniques with balance training, Speed Court training, and training on the alpine ski simulator makes it possible to begin special of alpine ski training on the snow 2 months earlier than with the use of conventkional methods.

  7. An Ambulatory Method of Identifying Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstructed Gait Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Matthew R.; Delahunt, Eamonn; Sweeney, Kevin T.; Caulfield, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The use of inertial sensors to characterize pathological gait has traditionally been based on the calculation of temporal and spatial gait variables from inertial sensor data. This approach has proved successful in the identification of gait deviations in populations where substantial differences from normal gait patterns exist; such as in Parkinsonian gait. However, it is not currently clear if this approach could identify more subtle gait deviations, such as those associated with musculoskeletal injury. This study investigates whether additional analysis of inertial sensor data, based on quantification of gyroscope features of interest, would provide further discriminant capability in this regard. The tested cohort consisted of a group of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed (ACL-R) females and a group of non-injured female controls, each performed ten walking trials. Gait performance was measured simultaneously using inertial sensors and an optoelectronic marker based system. The ACL-R group displayed kinematic and kinetic deviations from the control group, but no temporal or spatial deviations. This study demonstrates that quantification of gyroscope features can successfully identify changes associated with ACL-R gait, which was not possible using spatial or temporal variables. This finding may also have a role in other clinical applications where small gait deviations exist. PMID:24451464

  8. An ambulatory method of identifying anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed gait patterns.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Matthew R; Delahunt, Eamonn; Sweeney, Kevin T; Caulfield, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The use of inertial sensors to characterize pathological gait has traditionally been based on the calculation of temporal and spatial gait variables from inertial sensor data. This approach has proved successful in the identification of gait deviations in populations where substantial differences from normal gait patterns exist; such as in Parkinsonian gait. However, it is not currently clear if this approach could identify more subtle gait deviations, such as those associated with musculoskeletal injury. This study investigates whether additional analysis of inertial sensor data, based on quantification of gyroscope features of interest, would provide further discriminant capability in this regard. The tested cohort consisted of a group of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed (ACL-R) females and a group of non-injured female controls, each performed ten walking trials. Gait performance was measured simultaneously using inertial sensors and an optoelectronic marker based system. The ACL-R group displayed kinematic and kinetic deviations from the control group, but no temporal or spatial deviations. This study demonstrates that quantification of gyroscope features can successfully identify changes associated with ACL-R gait, which was not possible using spatial or temporal variables. This finding may also have a role in other clinical applications where small gait deviations exist.

  9. Isokinetic Identification of Knee Joint Torques before and after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Czaplicki, Adam; Jarocka, Marta; Walawski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the serial change of isokinetic muscle strength of the knees before and after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) in physically active males and to estimate the time of return to full physical fitness. Extension and flexion torques were measured for the injured and healthy limbs at two angular velocities approximately 1.5 months before the surgery and 3, 6, and 12 months after ACLR. Significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) in peak knee extension and flexion torques, hamstring/quadriceps (H/Q) strength ratios, uninvolved/involved limb peak torque ratios, and the normalized work of these muscles between the four stages of rehabilitation were identified. Significant differences between extension peak torques for the injured and healthy limbs were also detected at all stages. The obtained results showed that 12 months of rehabilitation were insufficient for the involved knee joint to recover its strength to the level of strength of the uninvolved knee joint. The results helped to evaluate the progress of the rehabilitation and to implement necessary modifications optimizing the rehabilitation training program. The results of the study may also be used as referential data for physically active males of similar age.

  10. Trapeziectomy and ligament reconstruction tendon interposition after failed trapeziometacarpal joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, H; Erbland, A; Lumens, D; Coulet, B; Chammas, M

    2016-02-01

    Total trapeziometacarpal (TMC) joint replacement is increasingly being performed for the treatment of basal joint arthritis. However, complications such as instability or loosening are also frequent with TMC ball-and-socket joint replacement. Management of these complications lacks consensus. The purpose of this study was to report the results of 12 cases of failed TMC joint replacement that were treated by trapeziectomy with ligament reconstruction and tendon interposition (LRTI) arthroplasty. The follow-up consisted of functional (numerical scale, DASH score, satisfaction), physical (range of motion, strength) and radiological (Barron and Eaton ratio measurement) assessments. At a mean follow-up of 21 months, 11 patients were satisfied or very satisfied after surgery. The mean pain score was 2/10 and the mean DASH score 30/100. Mean thumb palmar and radial abduction was 40°. Thumb opposition measured by the Kapandji technique was 9/10. The height ratio was slightly increased. Trapeziectomy with LRTI after TMC joint replacement appears to be an attractive salvage procedure.

  11. Evaluation of hamstring muscle strength and morphology after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Y; Kuramochi, R; Fukubayashi, T

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to clarify the relationship between knee flexor strength and hamstring muscle morphology after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using the semitendinosus (ST) tendon and to determine the causative factors of decreased knee flexor muscle strength. Fourteen male and ten female patients who resumed sports activities after surgery participated in the experiment. Isometric knee flexion torque was measured at 30°, 45°, 60°, 90°, and 105° of knee flexion. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to calculate ST muscle length and hamstring muscle volume, and to confirm the status of ST tendon regeneration. The correlation between the MRI findings and flexor strength was analyzed. Regenerated ST tendon was confirmed in 21 of the 24 patients, but muscle volume (87.6%) and muscle length (74.5%) of the ST in the operated limb were significantly smaller than those in the normal limb. The percentage of the knee flexion torque of the operated limb compared with that of the normal was apparently lower at 105° (69.1%) and 90° (68.6%) than at 60° (84.4%). Tendon regeneration, ST muscle shortening, and ST muscle atrophy correlated with decreased knee flexion torque. These results indicated that preserving the morphology of the ST muscle-tendon complex is important.

  12. Mechanism of quadriceps femoris muscle weakness in patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Y; Fukubayashi, T; Takeshita, D

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate gamma loop function in the quadriceps femoris muscle in patients who with less than 6 month-history of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. For this purpose, we compared the response to vibration stimulation in 10 patients with ACL repair and 12 normal healthy subjects, by measuring the maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) and integrated electromyograms (I-EMG) of the quadriceps muscles. Pre-vibration data were obtained from each subject by measuring the MVC of the knee extension and the I-EMG from the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, and rectus femoris muscles. Vibration stimulation was applied to the infrapatellar tendons, followed immediately by repeating the MVC and I-EMG recording. Prolonged vibration resulted in a significant decrease of both MVC and I-EMG in the control group. In contrast, the same stimulus failed to elicit changes in ACL-repair group. Our results suggest the presence of abnormal gamma loop function in the quadriceps femoris muscle of patients with ACL repair, which may explain the muscle weakness often described in such patients.

  13. The main factor causing prolonged reaction time on force producing process following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, F; Onari, K; Kawaguchi, K; Tsukisaka, K

    2000-12-01

    This study investigated the electromechanical properties of atrophied human quadriceps femoris muscle during a voluntarily elicited maximal isometric contraction (MVC) and a peripherally stimulated twitch contraction. Nineteen patients were recruited 2-3 months following a unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Both the involved leg as well as the uninvolved leg were studied. Maximal twitch response was elicited and surface electromyograms (EMG) were recorded from the vastus lateralis. Total reaction time (TRT) for both MVC and twitch on involved leg was prolonged (251.47 msec, 26.01 msec). This prolongation suggests an extended lag in avoiding injury such as during sports. Pre-motor time during both MVC and twitch (PMTmvc, PMTtwitch) did not differ between both groups. Electromechanical delay during MVC (EMDmvc) was prolonged on involved leg (53.42 msec), and also evoked twitch EMD (EMDtwitch) (20.04 msec) as compared to the opposite side. Prolonged EMDtwitch may be due to a decrease in stiffness of the series elastic component, changes of peripheral muscle composition to containing more slow type muscle fibers, or a decrease in function of the excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling process. A prolonged EMDtwitch can also explain the prolonged EMDmvc. These findings also suggested that prolonged TRTmvc to visual stimulus during MVC in atrophied human quadriceps femoris muscle after disuse was principally due to prolongation of EMDmvc. Prolonged EMDmvc may have resulted from decreased muscle stiffness, which was evident in the prolongation of the EMDtwitch.

  14. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction for Recurrent Patellar Instability Using a Gracilis Autograft without Bone Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Seong; Kim, Hee-June; Ra, In-Hoo

    2015-01-01

    Background Several tendon graft and fixation methods have been introduced in medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction for recurrent patellar dislocation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of MPFL reconstruction using a gracilis autograft fixation without bone tunnel in patients with recurrent patellar instability. Methods Nine patients (four males and five females) diagnosed with recurrent patellar instability from July 2009 to January 2013 and had MPFL reconstruction using a gracilis autograft were included. The average age of the patients was 24.6 years (range, 13 to 48 years), and the average follow-up period was 19.3 months (range, 12 to 30 months). For every patient, femoral attachment was fixed using suture anchors securing the patella by suturing the periosteum and surrounding soft tissue. Clinical evaluation included the Kujala, Lysholm, and Tegner scores; in addition, patients were examined for any complication including recurrent dislocation. The congruence angle and patella alta were assessed radiologically before and after surgery. Results The Kujala score improved from an average of 42.7 ± 8.4 before surgery to 79.6 ± 13.6 (p = 0.008) at final follow-up; the Lysholm score improved from 45.8 ± 5.7 to 82.0 ± 10.5 (p = 0.008); and the Tegner score improved from 2.8 ± 0.8 to 5.6 ± 1.5 (p = 0.007). The Insall-Salvati ratio changed from 1.16 ± 0.1 (range, 0.94 to 1.35) before surgery to 1.14 ± 0.1 (range, 0.96 to 1.29; p = 0.233) at the final follow-up without significance. The congruence angle significantly improved from 26.5° ± 10.6° (range, 12° to 43°) before surgery to -4.0° ± 4.3° (range, -12° to 5°; p = 0.008) at final follow-up. Subluxation was observed in one patient and hemarthrosis occurred in another patient 2 years after surgery, but these patients were asymptomatic. Conclusions We achieved good results with a patellar fixation technique in MPFL reconstruction using a gracilis autograft employing

  15. Efficacy of Osteoconductive Ceramics in Bioresorbable Screws for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Johannes; Akritopoulos, Panagiotis; Graveleau, Nicolas; Barthelemy, Renaud; Toanen, Cécile; Saffarini, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteoconductive additives are used in resorbable interference screws for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction to improve graft incorporation and mitigate adverse effects. There are no published studies that compare biological performances of bioresorbable and biocomposite screws without artifacts due to different follow-up times and intrinsic patient characteristics. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of osteoconductive agents in bioresorbable screws for ACL reconstruction at minimum follow-up of 2 years by intrapatient comparison. The hypothesis was that osteoconductive ceramics would result in slower resorption, improved ossification, and less tunnel widening. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A total of 28 ACL reconstructions at 2 centers were randomly assigned into 2 comparable groups: (1) the graft was fixed in the tibia using standard bioresorbable screws and in the femur using biocomposite screws with osteoconductive agents (biphasic calcium phosphate), and (2) the graft was fixed in the femur using a standard bioresorbable screw and in the tibia using a biocomposite screw with osteoconductive agents. Results: Twenty-seven patients completed evaluations at 29.9 ± 4.0 months. Resorption was complete for more bioresorbable (81%) than biocomposite (37%) screws (P = .0029), whereas satisfactory ossification was observed in more biocomposite (52%) than bioresorbable (15%) screws (P = .0216). The tunnel shape was normal in more biocomposite (81%) than bioresorbable (48%) screws (P = .0126), and marked cortical formation was twice more frequent for biocomposite (78%) than bioresorbable (37%) screws (P = .0012). Bioresorbable screws exhibited faster resorption in the femur (P = .0202) but not in the tibia (not significant). Conversely, biocomposite screws demonstrated better ossification, less tunnel widening, and more cortical formation in the tibia (P < .0001, P = .0227, and P

  16. Anatomical anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: transtibial versus outside-in technique

    PubMed Central

    MATASSI, FABRIZIO; SIRLEO, LUIGI; CARULLI, CHRISTIAN; INNOCENTI, MASSIMO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study was to compare clinical results and location of the femoral tunnel with transtibial (TT) and outside-in (OI) techniques in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using in vivo 3D CT analysis. Methods we prospectively followed up 40 ACL reconstructions in which femoral tunnel placement was performed using two different techniques: TT [20] and OI [20]. Clinical evaluation was based on IKDC and KOOS scores and radiographic analysis with specific 3D CT scans. Tunnel coordinates were calculated using the Bernard-Hertel quadrant method to define the insertion point of the ACL. Results excellent clinical results were achieved in both groups, which showed comparable IKDC and KOOS scores. Two failures were recorded, both in the TT group. In the high-to-low direction, the position of the femoral tunnel, as measured using the quadrant method, was too high in the TT group, compared to what was observed in the OI group: 10.5 ± 6.9% (0–29%) and 30.2 ± 5.4% (19–42%), (p=0.043). Conclusions we found that with the TT technique, compared with the OI technique, the femoral tunnel was located higher in the high-to-low direction and was in a slightly shallower position in the deep-to-shallow direction. Using the OI technique the femoral tunnel was in a position closer to the anatomical ACL footprint than with the TT technique. A femoral tunnel position far from the anatomical footprint of the native ACL would result in a higher failure rate. Level of evidence level II, prospective comparative study. PMID:26151033

  17. Adaptations in single-leg hop biomechanics following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Orishimo, Karl F; Kremenic, Ian J; Mullaney, Michael J; McHugh, Malachy P; Nicholas, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    When a patient performs a clinically normal hop test based on distance, it cannot be assumed that the biomechanics are similar between limbs. The objective was to compare takeoff and landing biomechanics between legs in patients who have undergone anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Kinematics and ground reaction forces were recorded as 13 patients performed the single-leg hop on each leg. Distance hopped, joint range of motion, peak joint kinetics and the peak total extensor moment were compared between legs during both takeoff and landing. Average hop distance ratio (involved/noninvolved) was 93 ± 4%. Compared to the noninvolved side, knee motion during takeoff on the involved side was significantly reduced (P = 0.008). Peak moments and powers on the involved side were lower at the knee and higher at the ankle and hip compared with the noninvolved side (Side by Joint P = 0.011; P = 0.003, respectively). The peak total extensor moment was not different between legs (P = 0.305) despite a decrease in knee moment and increases in ankle and hip moments (Side by Joint P = 0.015). During landing, knee motion was reduced (P = 0.043), and peak power absorbed was decreased at the knee and hip and increased at the ankle on the involved side compared to the noninvolved side (P = 0.003). The compensations by other joints may indicate protective adaptations to avoid overloading the reconstructed knee.

  18. Radiographic Findings in Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstructions from the MARS Cohort

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Multicenter ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) Revision Study (MARS) group was developed to investigate revision ACL reconstruction outcomes. An important part of this is obtaining and reviewing radiographic studies. The goal for this radiographic analysis is to establish radiographic findings for a large revision ACL cohort to allow comparison with future studies. The study was designed as a cohort study. Various established radiographic parameters were measured by three readers. These included sagittal and coronal femoral and tibial tunnel position, joint space narrowing, and leg alignment. Inter- and intraobserver comparisons were performed. Femoral sagittal position demonstrated 42% were more than 40% anterior to the posterior cortex. On the sagittal tibia tunnel position, 49% demonstrated some impingement on full-extension lateral radiographs. Limb alignment averaged 43% medial to the medial edge of the tibial plateau. On the Rosenberg view (45-degree flexion view), the minimum joint space in the medial compartment averaged 106% of the opposite knee, but it ranged down to a minimum of 4.6%. Lateral compartment narrowing at its minimum on the Rosenberg view averaged 91.2% of the opposite knee, but it ranged down to a minimum of 0.0%. On the coronal view, verticality as measured by the angle from the center of the tibial tunnel aperture to the center of the femoral tunnel aperture measured 15.8 degree ± 6.9% from vertical. This study represents the radiographic findings in the largest revision ACL reconstruction series ever assembled. Findings were generally consistent with those previously demonstrated in the literature. PMID:23404491

  19. Time Line for Noncopers to Pass Return-to-Sports Criteria After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hartigan, Erin H.; Axe, Michael J.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Randomized clinical trial. OBJECTIVES Determine effective interventions for improving readiness to return to sports post-operatively in patients with complete, unilateral, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture who do not compensate well after the injury (noncopers). Specifically, we compared the effects of 2 preoperative interventions on quadriceps strength and functional outcomes. BACKGROUND The percentage of athletes who return to sports after ACL reconstruction varies considerably, possibly due to differential responses after acute ACL rupture and different management. Prognostic data for noncopers following ACL reconstruction is absent in the literature. METHODS Forty noncopers were randomly assigned to receive either progressive quadriceps strength-training exercises (STR group) or perturbation training in conjunction with strength-training exercises (PERT group) for 10 preoperative rehabilitation sessions. Postoperative rehabilitation was similar between groups. Data on quadriceps strength indices [(involved limb/uninvolved limb force) ×100], 4 hop score indices, and 2 self-report questionnaires were collected preoperatively and 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare functional differences between the groups. Chi-square tests were used to compare frequencies of passing functional criteria and reasons for differences in performance between groups postoperatively. RESULTS Functional outcomes were not different between groups, except a greater number of patients in the PERT group achieved global rating scores (current knee function expressed as a percentage of overall knee function prior to injury) necessary to pass return-to-sports criteria 6 and 12 months after surgery. Mean scores for each functional outcome met return-to-sports criteria 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Frequency counts of individual data, however, indicated that 5% of noncopers passed RTS criteria at 3, 48% at 6, and 78% at 12 months

  20. A Systematic Review of Failed Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Autograft Compared With Allograft in Young Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wasserstein, David; Sheth, Ujash; Cabrera, Alison; Spindler, Kurt P.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The advantages of allograft anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), which include shorter surgical time, less postoperative pain, and no donor site morbidity, may be offset by a higher risk of failure. Previous systematic reviews have inconsistently shown a difference in failure prevalence by graft type; however, such reviews have never been stratified for younger or more active patients. Objective: To determine whether there is a different ACLR failure prevalence of autograft compared with allograft in young, active patients. Data Sources: EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane trials registry. Study Selection: Comparative studies of allograft versus autograft primary ACL reconstruction in patients <25 years of age or of high-activity level (military, Marx activity score >12 points, collegiate or semiprofessional athletes). Study Design: Systematic review with meta-analysis. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Data Extraction: Manual extraction of available data from eligible studies. Quantitative synthesis of failure prevalence and Lysholm score (outcomes in ≥3 studies) and I2 test for heterogeneity. Assessment of study quality using CLEAR NPT and Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Results: Seven studies met inclusion criteria (1 level 1; 2 level 2, 4 level 3), including 788 patients treated with autograft tissue and 228 with various allografts. The mean age across studies was 21.7 years (64% male), and follow-up ranged between 24 and 51 months. The pooled failure prevalence was 9.6% (76/788) for autografts and 25.0% (57/228) for allografts (relative risk, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.24-0.53; P < 0.00001; I2 = 16%). The number needed to benefit to prevent 1 failure by using autograft was 7 patients (95% CI, 5-10). No difference between hamstrings autograft and patella tendon autograft was noted. Lysholm score was reported in 3 studies and did not differ between autograft and allograft. Conclusion: While systematic reviews comparing allograft and autograft ACLR have been equivocal

  1. Femoral Condyle Fracture during Revision of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Case Report and a Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Keyhani, Sohrab; Vaziri, Arash Sharafat; shafiei, Hossein; Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    A rare and devastating complication following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) revision reconstruction is femoral fracture. A 35-year old male soccer player with a history of ACL tear from one year ago, who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction and functioned well until another similar injury caused ACL re-rupture. Revision of ACL reconstruction was performed and after failure of graft tension during the pumping, a fluoroscopic assessment showed a femoral condyle fracture. The patient referred to our knee clinic and was operated on in two stages first fixation of the fracture and then ACL re-revision after fracture healing was complete. Not inserting multiple guide pins, keeping a safe distance from the posterior cortex and giving more attention during graft tensioning, especially in revision surgeries, are all small points that can reduce the risk of fracture during the revision of ACL reconstruction. PMID:26110183

  2. A modified arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament double-bundle reconstruction technique with autogenous quadriceps tendon graft: remnant-preserving technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Jo, Seung-Bae; Kim, Tai-Won; Chang, Ji-Hoon; Choi, Heon-Sik; Oh, Kyung-Soo

    2009-03-01

    Several techniques of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) double-bundle reconstruction have been introduced to improve the functional outcome and restore normal kinematics of the knee. Meanwhile, a remnant-preserving technique was developed to preserve the proprioception and to enhance the revascularization of the reconstructed ACL. We developed double-bundle ACL reconstruction technique using autogenous quadriceps tendon graft while preserving the remnant. With this technique, two femoral sockets and one tibial tunnel are made. To preserve the remnant of the ACL, the rotational direction of the reamer was set to counterclockwise just before perforation of the tibial tunnel. To pass the graft more easily without disturbance of the remnant, the graft passage was achieved through the tibial tunnel. We suggest that the remnant-preserving technique could be an effective alternative considering its mechanical stability as well as the proprioception and vascularization recovery in arthroscopic double-bundle ACL reconstruction.

  3. Neuromuscular efficiency of the vastus medialis obliquus and postural balance in professional soccer athletes after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Shalimá Figueirêdo; Marques, Natália Pereira; Silva, Rômulo Lemos E; Rebouças, Nahra Santos; de Freitas, Luise Monteiro; de Paula Lima, Pedro Olavo; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Ribeiro

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the neuromuscular efficiency of the vastus medialis obliquus and postural balance in high-performance soccer athletes after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, compared to the uninvolved leg. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 22 male professional soccer players after ACL reconstruction (4-12 months postoperatively). The athletes were submitted to functional rehabilitation with an accelerated protocol on the soccer team. They were evaluated using isokinetic dynamometer, surface electromyography and electronic baropodometer. There was no decrease or difference between neuromuscular efficiency of the VMO when comparing both the limbs after ACL reconstruction in the professional soccer athletes under treatment. The same result was found in postural balance. It can be concluded that the NME of the VMO in the involved member and postural balance were successfully re-established after the reconstruction procedure of the ACL in the sample group studied.

  4. Jump-Landing Mechanics After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Landing Error Scoring System Study

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David Robert; Smith, Mason D.; Pennuto, Anthony P.; Stiffler, Mikel R.; Olson, Matthew E.

    2014-01-01

    Context: The Landing Error Scoring System (LESS) is a clinical evaluation of jump-landing mechanics and may provide useful information in assisting with return-to-sport decisions in patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). However, it is currently unknown how patients with ACLR perform on the LESS compared with healthy controls. Objective: To determine if the total LESS score differed between individuals with ACLR and healthy controls and to determine the types of errors that differ between groups. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 27 individuals with unilateral ACLR (age = 19.8 ± 1.8 years, height = 170 ± 5.5 cm, mass = 68.8 ± 11.9 kg) and 27 controls (age = 20.5 ± 1.7 years, height = 169 ± 8.4 cm, mass = 66.6 ± 9.0 kg) with no history of ACLR. Intervention(s): Each participant completed 3 trials of a standardized jump-landing task. Main Outcome Measure(s): Each jump landing was assessed for specific postures using standardized LESS criteria by a blinded evaluator. Individual LESS items were summed to create a total LESS score. The dominant limb was assessed in the control group, and the reconstructed limb was assessed in the ACLR group. Results: The ACLR group had higher LESS scores compared with controls (ACLR: 6.7 ± 2.1 errors, control: 5.6 ± 1.5 errors, P = .04). Additionally, the ACLR group was more likely to err when landing with lateral trunk flexion (Fisher exact test, P = .002). Conclusions: Individuals with ACLR had worse landing mechanics as measured by the LESS. Lateral trunk deviation may be related to quadriceps avoidance in the reconstructed limb or poor trunk neuromuscular control. The LESS is useful for evaluating landing errors in patients with ACLR and may help to identify areas of focus during rehabilitation and before return to sport. PMID:24905666

  5. A Novel Small Animal Model of Differential Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Graft Strain.

    PubMed

    Ma, Richard; Ju, Xiaodong; Deng, Xiang-Hua; Rodeo, Scott A

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to establish a small animal research model of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction where ACL graft force can be predictably altered with knee motion. Cadaveric rat knees (n = 12) underwent ACL resection followed by reconstruction. Six knees received anterior (high-tension) femoral graft tunnels and six knees received posterior (isometric) graft tunnels. All the 12 knees and ACL grafts were pretensioned to 3 N at 15 or 45 degrees of knee flexion. ACL graft force (N) was recorded as the knee was ranged from extension to 90-degree flexion. Distinct ACL graft force patterns were generated for a high-tension and isometric femoral graft tunnels. For a high-tension femoral tunnel, the rat ACL graft remained relatively isometric at lower knee flexion angles but increased as the knee was flexed beyond 45 degrees. At 90 degrees, high-tension grafts had significantly greater mean graft tension for both pretensioning at 15 degrees (5.58 ± 1.34 N, p = 0.005) and 45 degrees (6.35 ± 1.24 N, p = 0.001). In contrast, the graft forces for isometric ACL grafts remained relatively constant with knee flexion. Compared with a high-tension ACL grafts, the graft force for grafts placed in an isometric tunnel had significantly lower ACL graft forces at 60, 75, and 90 degrees of knee flexion for both pretensioning at 15 and 45 degrees, respectively. We were able to demonstrate that ACL graft forces in our rat model of ACL reconstruction were sensitive to femoral tunnel position similar to human knees. We were also able to establish two reproducible femoral graft tunnel positions in this small animal model, which yielded significantly different ACL graft tension patterns with knee range of motion. This model would permit further research on how ACL graft tension may affect graft healing. PMID:25343473

  6. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with Achilles tendon allografts in revisions and in patients older than 30.

    PubMed

    Grafe, Michael W; Kurzweil, Peter R

    2008-06-01

    We evaluated the results of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using an Achilles tendon allograft in revisions and in patients older than 30. Results from 23 consecutive patients (mean age, 43 years) who underwent ACL reconstruction with fresh-frozen, irradiated (22/23) Achilles allografts were retrospectively reviewed. Seven cases were revisions. Patients were evaluated with physical examination, questionnaires, and x-rays. Twenty of the 23 patients were evaluated a mean of 28 months after surgery. There were 5 failures (21%); 3 acute failures were not evaluated at follow-up. One patient had an infection that required graft removal, 2 patients had mechanical failure of the grafts, and 2 had displacements of more than 5.5 mm as measured with a KT-1000 arthrometer. The 18 clinically successful cases had full motion, no thigh atrophy, and no effusion. Pivot shift scores were 55% A and 45% B on the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scale. Lachman scores were 40% A, 55% B, and 5% C on the IKDC scale. The KT-1000 difference was a mean of 2.9 mm at final follow-up. However, knees loosened a mean of 4.5 mm from the immediate postoperative measurements (P<.0001). Mean Lysholm and Tegner scores were 86.8 and 5.2, respectively. Tibial tunnel diameter increased by 3.1 mm on anteroposterior x-rays and 3.0 mm on lateral x-rays. Five patients developed mild medial compartment arthritis. Four of the 5 grafts with failures were from donors older than 40. Postoperative complications included deep vein thrombosis and inflammatory effusion (white blood cell count, 15,000). Twenty-one percent of ACL reconstructions with Achilles tendon allografts failed. Grafts deemed successful still had significant loosening at final follow-up. Allografts from donors older than 40 may have played a role in these failures. From the data in this study, it appears that surgeons should scrutinize the source of the allograft tissue and the age of the donor.

  7. Neuromuscular Evaluation With Single-Leg Squat Test at 6 Months After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael P.; Paik, Ronald S.; Ware, Anthony J.; Mohr, Karen J.; Limpisvasti, Orr

    2015-01-01

    Background: Criteria for return to unrestricted activity after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction varies, with some using time after surgery as the sole criterion—most often at 6 months. Patients may have residual neuromuscular deficits, which may increase the risk of ACL injury. A single-leg squat test (SLST) can dynamically assess for many of these deficits prior to return to unrestricted activity. Hypothesis: A significant number of patients will continue to exhibit neuromuscular deficits with SLST at 6 months after ACL reconstruction. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Patients using a standardized accelerated rehabilitation protocol at their 6-month follow-up after primary ACL reconstruction were enrolled. Evaluation included bilateral SLST, single-leg hop distance, hip abduction strength, and the subjective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score. Results: Thirty-three patients were enrolled. Poor performance of the operative leg SLST was found in 15 of 33 patients (45%). Of those 15 patients, 7 (45%) had concomitant poor performance of the nonoperative leg compared with 2 of 18 patients (11%) in those who demonstrated good performance in the operative leg. The poor performers were significantly older (33.6 years) than the good performers (24.2 years) (P = .007). Those with poor performance demonstrated decreased hip abduction strength (17.6 kg operative leg vs 20.5 kg nonoperative leg) (P = .024), decreased single-leg hop distance (83.3 cm operative leg vs 112.3 cm nonoperative leg) (P = .036), and lower IKDC scores (67.9 vs 82.3) (P = .001). Conclusion: Nearly half of patients demonstrated persistent neuromuscular deficits on SLST at 6 months, which is when many patients return to unrestricted activity. Those with poor performance were of a significantly older age, decreased hip abduction strength, decreased single-leg hop distance, and lower IKDC subjective scores. Clinical Relevance: The SLST

  8. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with Achilles tendon allografts in revisions and in patients older than 30.

    PubMed

    Grafe, Michael W; Kurzweil, Peter R

    2008-06-01

    We evaluated the results of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using an Achilles tendon allograft in revisions and in patients older than 30. Results from 23 consecutive patients (mean age, 43 years) who underwent ACL reconstruction with fresh-frozen, irradiated (22/23) Achilles allografts were retrospectively reviewed. Seven cases were revisions. Patients were evaluated with physical examination, questionnaires, and x-rays. Twenty of the 23 patients were evaluated a mean of 28 months after surgery. There were 5 failures (21%); 3 acute failures were not evaluated at follow-up. One patient had an infection that required graft removal, 2 patients had mechanical failure of the grafts, and 2 had displacements of more than 5.5 mm as measured with a KT-1000 arthrometer. The 18 clinically successful cases had full motion, no thigh atrophy, and no effusion. Pivot shift scores were 55% A and 45% B on the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scale. Lachman scores were 40% A, 55% B, and 5% C on the IKDC scale. The KT-1000 difference was a mean of 2.9 mm at final follow-up. However, knees loosened a mean of 4.5 mm from the immediate postoperative measurements (P<.0001). Mean Lysholm and Tegner scores were 86.8 and 5.2, respectively. Tibial tunnel diameter increased by 3.1 mm on anteroposterior x-rays and 3.0 mm on lateral x-rays. Five patients developed mild medial compartment arthritis. Four of the 5 grafts with failures were from donors older than 40. Postoperative complications included deep vein thrombosis and inflammatory effusion (white blood cell count, 15,000). Twenty-one percent of ACL reconstructions with Achilles tendon allografts failed. Grafts deemed successful still had significant loosening at final follow-up. Allografts from donors older than 40 may have played a role in these failures. From the data in this study, it appears that surgeons should scrutinize the source of the allograft tissue and the age of the donor. PMID:18716694

  9. Acceleration of tendon-bone healing in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using an enamel matrix derivative in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Kadonishi, Y; Deie, M; Takata, T; Ochi, M

    2012-02-01

    We examined whether enamel matrix derivative (EMD) could improve healing of the tendon-bone interface following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using a hamstring tendon in a rat model. ACL reconstruction was performed in both knees of 30 Sprague-Dawley rats using the flexor digitorum tendon. The effect of commercially available EMD (EMDOGAIN), a preparation of matrix proteins from developing porcine teeth, was evaluated. In the left knee joint the space around the tendon-bone interface was filled with 40 µl of EMD mixed with propylene glycol alginate (PGA). In the right knee joint PGA alone was used. The ligament reconstructions were evaluated histologically and biomechanically at four, eight and 12 weeks (n = 5 at each time point). At eight weeks, EMD had induced a significant increase in collagen fibres connecting to bone at the tendon-bone interface (p = 0.047), whereas the control group had few fibres and the tendon-bone interface was composed of cellular and vascular fibrous tissues. At both eight and 12 weeks, the mean load to failure in the treated specimens was higher than in the controls (p = 0.009). EMD improved histological tendon-bone healing at eight weeks and biomechanical healing at both eight and 12 weeks. EMD might therefore have a human application to enhance tendon-bone repair in ACL reconstruction.

  10. Medial instability of the elbow in throwing athletes. Treatment by repair or reconstruction of the ulnar collateral ligament.

    PubMed

    Conway, J E; Jobe, F W; Glousman, R E; Pink, M

    1992-01-01

    From September 1974 to December 1987, seventy-one patients were operated on for valgus instability of the elbow. The average length of follow-up of sixty-eight patients (seventy operations) was 6.3 years (range, two to fifteen years). At the operation, a torn or incompetent ulnar collateral ligament was found. Fourteen patients had a direct repair of the ligament, and fifty-six had a reconstruction of the ligament using a free tendon graft. The result was excellent or good in ten patients in the repair group and in forty-five (80 per cent) in the reconstruction group. Seven of the fourteen patients who had a direct repair returned to the previous level of participation in their sport. Of the fifty-six who had a reconstruction, thirty-eight (68 per cent) returned to the previous level of participation. Twelve of the sixteen major-league baseball players who had a reconstruction as the primary operation (no previous operation on the elbow) were able to return to playing major-league baseball, and two of the seven major-league players who had a direct repair returned to playing major-league baseball. Previous operations on the elbow decreased the chance of returning to the previous level of sports participation (p = 0.04). Fifteen patients had postoperative ulnar neuropathy. This was transient in six patients, only one of whom was unable to return to the previous level of sport. The other nine patients had an additional operation for the neuropathy; four were able to return to the previous level of sport.

  11. Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with the tibial-remnant preserving technique using a hamstring graft.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Ill; Min, Kyung-Dae; Choi, Hyung-Suk; Kim, Jun-Bum; Kim, Seong-Tae

    2006-03-01

    We propose that the tibial remnant of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is able to enhance the revascularization and cellular proliferation of the graft, to preserve proprioceptive function, and to be able to acquire anatomic placement of the graft without roof impingement. Therefore, it seems reasonable to assume that preserving the tibial remnant as much as possible as a source of reinnervation, if technically possible without causing impingement, would be of potential benefit to the patient. Our surgical technique was developed to maximize the preservation of the tibial remnant. The distally attached semitendinosus and gracilis tendons are harvested using the tendon stripper. After satisfactory placement of 2 guide pins convergently, a closed-end socket in the lateral femoral condyle is created using an adequately sized curved curette. For anatomic placement of the graft, the tibial tunnel should be positioned within the boundaries of the normal ACL tibial remnant. The reamer must be advanced very carefully to minimize injury to the residual remnant at the intra-articular margin of the tibial tunnel. Penetration should stop at the base of the stump. The folded grafts are then pulled intra-articularly through the tibial tunnel, the tibial remnant, and the femoral socket by pulling sutures under arthroscopic visualization. The ACL tibial remnant is compacted by the tendon passage. The graft is secured proximally by tying sutures in the lateral femoral condyle and distally at the tibia with double staples by a belt-buckle method. The advantages of our technique include maximal preservation of the tibial remnant, no roof impingement caused by intrasynovial anatomic placement of the graft, the simplicity of the procedure, the minimal need for hardware or special instruments, the economic benefit, and the potential prevention of tibial tunnel enlargement by preventing synovial fluid leakage. PMID:16517320

  12. Comparative Analysis of Surgical Options for Medial Collateral Ligament Repair in Terrible Triad Injury of the Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Hatta, Taku; Nobuta, Shingo; Aizawa, Toshitake; Sasajima, Koichi; Nakajima, Soichi; Honda, Masahito; Oki, Gosuke; Yamanaka, Yoshiaki; Itoi, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study is to evaluate the clinical and radiologic outcomes in patients with terrible triad injury, who underwent surgical treatment with or without the medial collateral ligament (MCL) repair. Fourteen patients who underwent surgery with a minimum of 12-month follow-up (mean, 17 months) were reviewed. Based on the systematic treatment protocol, radial head fracture, lateral collateral ligament, and coracoid fracture were treated. Subsequently, torn MCL was repaired in 7 patients, whereas in the remaining 7 patients, the MCL was not treated. Range of motion, elbow function, and radiographs regarding the arthrosis and heterotopic ossification were assessed. At final follow-up, no significant differences were found in elbow motion or function between the groups with and without MCL repair; except the pronation and supination which had superior range in repair group. In contrast, radiologic findings such as the arthrosis were seen more frequently in patients without MCL repair than those with repair. Our results indicate the effect of MCL repair on elbow motion and function might be small, whereas osteoarthritic changes occurred more frequently in elbows without MCL repair. PMID:27761222

  13. Differences in Mechanisms of Failure, Intraoperative Findings, and Surgical Characteristics Between Single- and Multiple-Revision ACL Reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, James L.; Allen, Christina R.; Stephens, Thomas E.; Haas, Amanda K.; Huston, Laura J.; Wright, Rick W.; Feeley, Brian T.

    2013-01-01

    Background The factors that lead to patients failing multiple anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions are not well understood. Hypothesis Multiple-revision ACL reconstruction will have different characteristics than first-time revision in terms of previous and current graft selection, mode of failure, chondral/meniscal injuries, and surgical charactieristics. Study Design Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods A prospective multicenter ACL revision database was utilized for the time period from March 2006 to June 2011. Patients were divided into those who underwent a single-revision ACL reconstruction and those who underwent multiple-revision ACL reconstructions. The primary outcome variable was Marx activity level. Primary data analyses between the groups included a comparison of graft type, perceived mechanism of failure, associated injury (meniscus, ligament, and cartilage), reconstruction type, and tunnel position. Data were compared by analysis of variance with a post hoc Tukey test. Results A total of 1200 patients (58% men; median age, 26 years) were enrolled, with 1049 (87%) patients having a primary revision and 151 (13%) patients having a second or subsequent revision. Marx activity levels were significantly higher (9.77) in the primary-revision group than in those patients with multiple revisions (6.74). The most common cause of reruptures was a traumatic, noncontact ACL graft injury in 55% of primary-revision patients; 25% of patients had a nontraumatic, gradual-onset recurrent injury, and 11% had a traumatic, contact injury. In the multiple-revision group, a nontraumatic, gradual-onset injury was the most common cause of recurrence (47%), followed by traumatic noncontact (35%) and nontraumatic sudden onset (11%) (P < .01 between groups). Chondral injuries in the medial compartment were significantly more common in the multiple-revision group than in the single-revision group, as were chondral injuries in the patellofemoral

  14. A phenomenological contact model: Understanding the graft-tunnel interaction in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Salehghaffari, Shahab; Dhaher, Yasin Y

    2015-07-16

    In this paper, we sought to expand the fidelity of a validated model of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) procedure by incorporating a stick-slip contact model with linear pressure-overclosure relationship at the interface. The suggested model is characterized by three unknown parameters, friction coefficient, shear stress softening and contact stiffness. In the absence of any isolated experiments exploring the graft-tunnel interactions during an aggregate joint load, the calibration data used in this study are derived from a reported biomechanical study. A Bayesian calibration procedure was employed to find the unknown probability distribution function (PDF) of these contact parameters. Initially, the response surface approximations of the predicted graft forces from laxity test simulations was adopted to estimate the likelihood of noisy experimental data reported in the literature. Then, the wide domain of contact parameters was sampled sequentially based on the Marcov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method with acceptance-rejection criteria to search for population of samples in significantly narrower domain of unknown parameters that are associated with the highest occurrence likelihood of noisy experimental data. Our simulations with calibrated contact parameters indicate that pre-tensioning applied at 30° of flexion leads to larger graft force after the joint is fully extended compared to the graft force when the same pre-tensioning force is applied at full extension. Moreover, regardless of the pre-tensioning force, the graft-tunnel contact pressure is larger when the fixation of the graft is performed at full extension, increasing with the pre-tensioning force.

  15. A phenomenological contact model: Understanding the graft-tunnel interaction in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructive surgery.