Science.gov

Sample records for ligand-field analysis inspiration

  1. INSPIRE and SPIRES Log File Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Cole; /Wheaton Coll. /SLAC

    2012-08-31

    SPIRES, an aging high-energy physics publication data base, is in the process of being replaced by INSPIRE. In order to ease the transition from SPIRES to INSPIRE it is important to understand user behavior and the drivers for adoption. The goal of this project was to address some questions in regards to the presumed two-thirds of the users still using SPIRES. These questions are answered through analysis of the log files from both websites. A series of scripts were developed to collect and interpret the data contained in the log files. The common search patterns and usage comparisons are made between INSPIRE and SPIRES, and a method for detecting user frustration is presented. The analysis reveals a more even split than originally thought as well as the expected trend of user transition to INSPIRE.

  2. INSPIRE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Bill; Pine, Bill

    2003-01-01

    INSPIRE (Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment - http://image.gsfc.nasa.gov/poetry/inspire) is a non-profit scientific, educational organization whose objective is to bring the excitement of observing natural and manmade radio waves in the audio region to high school students and others. The project consists of building an audio frequency radio receiver kit, making observations of natural and manmade radio waves and analyzing the data. Students also learn about NASA and our natural environment through the study of lightning, the source of many of the audio frequency waves, the atmosphere, the ionosphere, and the magnetosphere where the waves travel.

  3. How Do Heavier Halide Ligands Affect the Signs and Magnitudes of the Zero-Field Splittings in Halogenonickel(II) Scorpionate Complexes? A Theoretical Investigation Coupled to Ligand-Field Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shengfa; Neese, Frank

    2012-07-10

    This work presents a detailed analysis of the physical origin of the zero-field splittings (ZFSs) in a series of high-spin (S = 1) nickel(II) scorpionate complexes Tp*NiX (Tp* = hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazole)borate, X = Cl, Br, I) using quantum chemical approaches. High-frequency and -field electron paramagnetic resonance studies have shown that the complexes with heavier halide ligands (Br, I) have greater magnitudes but opposite signs of the ZFSs compared with the chloro congener (Desrochers, P. J.; Telser, J.; Zvyagin, S. A.; Ozarowski, A.; Krzystek, J.; Vicic, D. A. Inorg. Chem.2006, 45, 8930-8941). To rationalize the experimental findings, quantum chemical calculations of the ZFSs in this Ni(II) halide series have been conducted. The computed ZFS using wave-function-based ab initio methods (state-averaged CASSCF, NEVPT2, and SORCI) are in good agreement with the experiment. For comparison, density functional theory was only marginally successful. The ligand-field analysis demonstrates that the signs and magnitudes of the ZFSs are subtly determined by the trade-off between the negative contributions from the (1,3)A1(1e→2e) transitions relative to the positive contributions from the remaining d-d excited states. The term from (1,3)A1(1e→2e) stems from the structural feature that the metal center displaces out of the equatorial plane, and gains the importance when heavier halide ligand is involved.

  4. Analysis of bio-inspired propulsors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Melissa A.

    The locomotion of fish and aquatic animals is achieved by the oscillation of fins and flukes, which creates highly three-dimensional, unsteady flow fields that are not yet well-understood. The principal non-dimensional parameter presently used to describe these flows is the Strouhal number, St = fA/U, which depends on the frequency of oscillation ( f), the width of the wake (A), and the freestream velocity (U). In previous work on two-dimensional foils, wake structure and thrust performance have been shown to scale with this parameter, but it does not include considerations of three-dimensionality, which become important in the study of low-aspect ratio propulsors. In the current work, a new nondimensional scaling parameter is proposed which, for a rigid rectangular pitching panel, collapses measurements of pressure, thrust, and circulation when plotted again Strouhal number. Dye flow visualization and Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) were used to investigate the wakes of rigid pitching panels with a trapezoidal panel geometry, chosen to model idealized fish caudal fins. A Lagrangian Coherent Structure (LCS) analysis was employed to investigate the formation and evolution of the panel wake. The LCS analysis, based on calculations of the Direct Lyapunov Exponent (DLE) has several advantages over Eulerian methods, including greater detail and the ability to define structure boundaries without relying on a preselected threshold. A bifurcation of the LCS structure in the wake of the trapezoidal pitching panels coincided with an observed transition of the wake structure. Also, the LCS analysis provided evidence of the "trapping" of vortices on trapezoidal panel surfaces with low sweep angles or at low Strouhal numbers.

  5. Reverse engineering for biologically inspired cognitive architectures: a critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Schierwagen, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Research initiatives on both sides of the Atlantic try to utilize the operational principles of organisms and brains to develop biologically inspired, artificial cognitive systems. This paper describes the standard way bio-inspiration is gained, i.e. decompositional analysis or reverse engineering. The indisputable complexity of brain and mind raise the issue of whether they can be understood by applying the standard method. Using Robert Rosen's modeling relation, the scientific analysis method itself is made a subject of discussion. It is concluded that the fundamental assumption of cognitive science, i.e. complex cognitive systems are decomposable, must be abandoned. Implications for investigations of organisms and behavior as well as for engineering artificial cognitive systems are discussed.

  6. A Guided Inquiry Activity for Teaching Ligand Field Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Brian J.; Graham, Kate J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe a guided inquiry activity for teaching ligand field theory. Previous research suggests the guided inquiry approach is highly effective for student learning. This activity familiarizes students with the key concepts of molecular orbital theory applied to coordination complexes. Students will learn to identify factors that…

  7. Sound Classification in Hearing Aids Inspired by Auditory Scene Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büchler, Michael; Allegro, Silvia; Launer, Stefan; Dillier, Norbert

    2005-12-01

    A sound classification system for the automatic recognition of the acoustic environment in a hearing aid is discussed. The system distinguishes the four sound classes "clean speech," "speech in noise," "noise," and "music." A number of features that are inspired by auditory scene analysis are extracted from the sound signal. These features describe amplitude modulations, spectral profile, harmonicity, amplitude onsets, and rhythm. They are evaluated together with different pattern classifiers. Simple classifiers, such as rule-based and minimum-distance classifiers, are compared with more complex approaches, such as Bayes classifier, neural network, and hidden Markov model. Sounds from a large database are employed for both training and testing of the system. The achieved recognition rates are very high except for the class "speech in noise." Problems arise in the classification of compressed pop music, strongly reverberated speech, and tonal or fluctuating noises.

  8. Status of the joint LIGO TAMA300 inspiral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairhurst, Stephen; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Takahashi, Hirotaka; TAMA Collaboration

    2005-09-01

    We present the status of the joint search for gravitational waves from inspiraling neutron star binaries in the LIGO Science Run 2 and TAMA300 Data Taking Run 8 data, which were taken from 14 February to 14 April 2003, by the LIGO and TAMA Collaborations. In this paper, we discuss what has been learned from an analysis of a subset of the data sample reserved as a 'playground'. We determine the coincidence conditions for parameters such as the coalescence time and chirp mass by injecting simulated Galactic binary neutron star signals into the data stream. We select coincidence conditions so as to maximize our efficiency of detecting simulated signals. We obtain an efficiency for our coincident search of 78% and show that we are missing primarily very distant signals for TAMA300. We perform a time-slide analysis to estimate the background due to accidental coincidence of noise triggers. We find that the background triggers have a very different character from the triggers of simulated signals.

  9. A ligand field model for MCD spectra of biological cupric complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Landrum, G A; Ekberg, C A; Whittaker, J W

    1995-01-01

    A ligand field calculation of magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra is described that provides new insights into the information contained in electronic spectra of copper sites in metalloenzymes and synthetic analogs. The ligand field model uses metal-centered p- and f-orbitals to model sigma, pi LMCT mixing mechanism for intensity, allowing the basic features of optical absorption, MCD, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectra to be simultaneously computed from a single set of parameters and the crystallographically determined ligand coordinates. We have used the model to predict changes in spectra resulting from the transformation of electronic wavefunctions under systematic variation in geometry in pentacoordinate ML5 complexes. The effectiveness of the calculation is demonstrated for two synthetic copper model compounds and a galactose oxidase enzyme complex representing limiting coordination geometries. This analysis permits immediate recognition of characteristic patterns of MCD intensity and correlation with geometry. A complementarity principle between MCD and CD spectra of transition metal complexes is discussed. Images Scheme 3 PMID:8527681

  10. Scrutinizing Sexuality and Psychopathology: A Foucauldian Inspired Strategy for Qualitative Data Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwood, Valerie; Rasmussen, Mary Louise

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses a Foucauldian-inspired strategy applied to the analysis of the production of truths about psychopathology, sexuality and young people. Drawing on an interpretation of Foucault's genealogical tactics, this strategy involves the deployment of four angles of scrutiny: discontinuity, contingency, emergences and subjugated…

  11. Huygens' inspired multi-pendulum setups: Experiments and stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogeboom, F. N.; Pogromsky, A. Y.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2016-11-01

    This paper examines synchronization of a set of metronomes placed on a lightweight foam platform. Two configurations of the set of metronomes are considered: a row setup containing one-dimensional coupling and a cross setup containing two-dimensional coupling. Depending on the configuration and coupling between the metronomes, i.e., the platform parameters, in- and/or anti-phase synchronized behavior is observed in the experiments. To explain this behavior, mathematical models of a metronome and experimental setups have been derived and used in a local stability analysis. It is numerically and experimentally demonstrated that varying the coupling parameters for both configurations has a significant influence on the stability of the synchronized solutions.

  12. Performance Analysis of the Enhanced Bio-Inspired Planning Algorithm for Rapid Situation Awareness Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-18

    AFRL-RV- PS - AFRL-RV- PS - TR-2013-0106 TR-2013-0106 PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF THE ENHANCED BIO-INSPIRED PLANNING ALGORITHM FOR RAPID SITUATION...Qualified requestors may obtain copies of this report from the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC) (http://www.dtic.mil). AFRL-RV- PS -TR...SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 NUMBER(S) AFRL-RV- PS -TR-2013-0106 12. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved

  13. Writing Inspired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tischhauser, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Students need inspiration to write. Assigning is not teaching. In order to inspire students to write fiction worth reading, teachers must take them through the process of writing. Physical objects inspire good writing with depth. In this article, the reader will be taken through the process of inspiring young writers through the use of boxes.…

  14. Analysis and classification of broadband echoes using bio-inspired dolphin pulses.

    PubMed

    Pailhas, Yan; Capus, Chris; Brown, Keith; Moore, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    To date most sonars use narrow band pulses and often only the echo envelope is used for object detection and classification. This paper considers the advantages afforded by bio-inspired sonar for object identification and classification through the analysis and the understanding of the broadband echo structure. Using the biomimetic dolphin based sonar system in conjunction with bio-inspired pulses developed from observations of bottlenose dolphins performing object identification tasks, results are presented from experiments carried out in a wave tank and harbor. In these experiments responses of various targets to two different bio-inspired signals are measured and analyzed. The differences in response demonstrate the strong dependency between signal design and echo interpretation. In the simulations and empirical data, the resonance phenomena of these targets cause strong notches and peaks in the echo spectra. With precision in the localization of these peaks and dips of around 1 kHz, the locations are very stable for broadside insonification of the targets and they can be used as features for classification. This leads to the proposal of a broadband classifier which operates by extracting the notch positions in the target echo spectra.

  15. Inspired Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Carol Frederick

    2011-01-01

    In terms of teacher quality, Steele believes the best teachers have reached a stage she terms inspired, and that teachers move progressively through the stages of unaware, aware, and capable until the most reflective teachers finally reach the inspired level. Inspired teachers have a wide repertoire of teaching and class management techniques and…

  16. LINEBACKER: LINE-speed Bio-inspired Analysis and Characterization for Event Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Oehmen, Christopher S.; Bruillard, Paul J.; Matzke, Brett D.; Phillips, Aaron R.; Star, Keith T.; Jensen, Jeffrey L.; Nordwall, Douglas J.; Thompson, Seth R.; Peterson, Elena S.

    2016-08-04

    The cyber world is a complex domain, with digital systems mediating a wide spectrum of human and machine behaviors. While this is enabling a revolution in the way humans interact with each other and data, it also is exposing previously unreachable infrastructure to a worldwide set of actors. Existing solutions for intrusion detection and prevention that are signature-focused typically seek to detect anomalous and/or malicious activity for the sake of preventing or mitigating negative impacts. But a growing interest in behavior-based detection is driving new forms of analysis that move the emphasis from static indicators (e.g. rule-based alarms or tripwires) to behavioral indicators that accommodate a wider contextual perspective. Similar to cyber systems, biosystems have always existed in resource-constrained hostile environments where behaviors are tuned by context. So we look to biosystems as an inspiration for addressing behavior-based cyber challenges. In this paper, we introduce LINEBACKER, a behavior-model based approach to recognizing anomalous events in network traffic and present the design of this approach of bio-inspired and statistical models working in tandem to produce individualized alerting for a collection of systems. Preliminary results of these models operating on historic data are presented along with a plugin to support real-world cyber operations.

  17. Ligand field density functional theory for the prediction of future domestic lighting.

    PubMed

    Ramanantoanina, Harry; Urland, Werner; García-Fuente, Amador; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Daul, Claude

    2014-07-28

    We deal with the computational determination of the electronic structure and properties of lanthanide ions in complexes and extended structures having open-shell f and d configurations. Particularly, we present conceptual and methodological issues based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) enabling the reliable calculation and description of the f → d transitions in lanthanide doped phosphors. We consider here the optical properties of the Pr(3+) ion embedded into various solid state fluoride host lattices, for the prospection and understanding of the so-called quantum cutting process, being important in the further quest of warm-white light source in light emitting diodes (LED). We use the conceptual formulation of the revisited ligand field (LF) theory, fully compatibilized with the quantum chemistry tools: LFDFT. We present methodological advances for the calculations of the Slater-Condon parameters, the ligand field interaction and the spin-orbit coupling constants, important in the non-empirical parameterization of the effective Hamiltonian adjusted from the ligand field theory. The model shows simple procedure using less sophisticated computational tools, which is intended to contribute to the design of modern phosphors and to help to complement the understanding of the 4f(n) → 4f(n-1)5d(1) transitions in any lanthanide system.

  18. Viscous-Inviscid Methods in Unsteady Aerodynamic Analysis of Bio-Inspired Morphing Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhruv, Akash V.

    Flight has been one of the greatest realizations of human imagination, revolutionizing communication and transportation over the years. This has greatly influenced the growth of technology itself, enabling researchers to communicate and share their ideas more effectively, extending the human potential to create more sophisticated systems. While the end product of a sophisticated technology makes our lives easier, its development process presents an array of challenges in itself. In last decade, scientists and engineers have turned towards bio-inspiration to design more efficient and robust aerodynamic systems to enhance the ability of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) to be operated in cluttered environments, where tight maneuverability and controllability are necessary. Effective use of UAVs in domestic airspace will mark the beginning of a new age in communication and transportation. The design of such complex systems necessitates the need for faster and more effective tools to perform preliminary investigations in design, thereby streamlining the design process. This thesis explores the implementation of numerical panel methods for aerodynamic analysis of bio-inspired morphing wings. Numerical panel methods have been one of the earliest forms of computational methods for aerodynamic analysis to be developed. Although the early editions of this method performed only inviscid analysis, the algorithm has matured over the years as a result of contributions made by prominent aerodynamicists. The method discussed in this thesis is influenced by recent advancements in panel methods and incorporates both viscous and inviscid analysis of multi-flap wings. The surface calculation of aerodynamic coefficients makes this method less computationally expensive than traditional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solvers available, and thus is effective when both speed and accuracy are desired. The morphing wing design, which consists of sequential feather-like flaps installed

  19. The Inspiring Science Education project and the resources for HEP analysis by university students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassouliotis, Dimitris; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Vourakis, Stylianos

    2016-11-01

    The Inspiring Science Education outreach project has been running for more than two years, creating a large number of inquiry based educational resources for high-school teachers and students. Its goal is the promotion of science education in schools though new methods built on the inquiry based education techniques, involving large consortia of European partners and implementation of large-scale pilots in schools. Recent hands-on activities, developing and testing the above mentioned innovative applications are reviewed. In general, there is a lack for educational scenaria and laboratory courses earmarked for more advanced, namely university, students. At the University of Athens for the last four years, the HYPATIA on-line event analysis tool has been used as a lab course for fourth year undergraduate physics students, majoring in HEP. Up to now, the course was limited to visual inspection of a few tens of ATLAS events. Recently the course was enriched with additional analysis exercises, which involve large samples of events. The students through a user friendly interface can analyse the samples and optimize the cut selection in order to search for new physics. The implementation of this analysis is described.

  20. Cheminformatics analysis of natural products: lessons from nature inspiring the design of new drugs.

    PubMed

    Ertl, Peter; Schuffenhauer, Ansgar

    2008-01-01

    Natural products (NPs) have evolved over a very long natural selection process to form optimal interactions with biological macromolecules. NPs are therefore an extremely useful source of inspiration for the design of new drugs. In the present study we report the results of a cheminformatics analysis of more than 130,000 NP structures. The physicochemical properties of NPs and their typical structural features are compared to those of bioactive molecules and average organic molecules. The relationship between the structure of NPs and the type of organism from which they have come has also been analyzed. The aim of this study was to identify those properties and structural features which are typical for NPs and discriminate this class of molecules from common synthetic molecules, with the ultimate goal being to provide a guide for the design of novel NP-like bioactive structures. Hopefully the results of this analysis help to eliminate the old myth about NPs as being 'too complex' or having 'bad properties', as well as help us to focus on these areas of NP structural space which are essential for biological activity, taking advantage of the process of natural selection over billions of years to guide us to new and as yet unexplored areas of the Chemical Structure Universe.

  1. An insect-inspired model for visual binding II: functional analysis and visual attention.

    PubMed

    Northcutt, Brandon D; Higgins, Charles M

    2017-04-01

    We have developed a neural network model capable of performing visual binding inspired by neuronal circuitry in the optic glomeruli of flies: a brain area that lies just downstream of the optic lobes where early visual processing is performed. This visual binding model is able to detect objects in dynamic image sequences and bind together their respective characteristic visual features-such as color, motion, and orientation-by taking advantage of their common temporal fluctuations. Visual binding is represented in the form of an inhibitory weight matrix which learns over time which features originate from a given visual object. In the present work, we show that information represented implicitly in this weight matrix can be used to explicitly count the number of objects present in the visual image, to enumerate their specific visual characteristics, and even to create an enhanced image in which one particular object is emphasized over others, thus implementing a simple form of visual attention. Further, we present a detailed analysis which reveals the function and theoretical limitations of the visual binding network and in this context describe a novel network learning rule which is optimized for visual binding.

  2. Visual Cortex Inspired CNN Model for Feature Construction in Text Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hongping; Niu, Zhendong; Zhang, Chunxia; Ma, Jing; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Recently, biologically inspired models are gradually proposed to solve the problem in text analysis. Convolutional neural networks (CNN) are hierarchical artificial neural networks, which include a various of multilayer perceptrons. According to biological research, CNN can be improved by bringing in the attention modulation and memory processing of primate visual cortex. In this paper, we employ the above properties of primate visual cortex to improve CNN and propose a biological-mechanism-driven-feature-construction based answer recommendation method (BMFC-ARM), which is used to recommend the best answer for the corresponding given questions in community question answering. BMFC-ARM is an improved CNN with four channels respectively representing questions, answers, asker information and answerer information, and mainly contains two stages: biological mechanism driven feature construction (BMFC) and answer ranking. BMFC imitates the attention modulation property by introducing the asker information and answerer information of given questions and the similarity between them, and imitates the memory processing property through bringing in the user reputation information for answerers. Then the feature vector for answer ranking is constructed by fusing the asker-answerer similarities, answerer's reputation and the corresponding vectors of question, answer, asker, and answerer. Finally, the Softmax is used at the stage of answer ranking to get best answers by the feature vector. The experimental results of answer recommendation on the Stackexchange dataset show that BMFC-ARM exhibits better performance. PMID:27471460

  3. Computational analysis of a tip vortex structure shed from a bio-inspired blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Sebastian; Gilkey, Lindsay N.; Kaiser, Bryan E.; Poroseva, Svetlana V.

    2013-11-01

    Understanding and predicting a tip vortex structure and its dynamics is of significant importance for all branches of aerodynamics. A particular focus of our research is the rotorcraft performance which is substantially influenced by a tip vortex. A tip vortex also is a major source of energy losses and acoustic noise. In the present study, an impact of a blade shape on a tip vortex structure is analyzed. Simulations are conducted of flows around a rectangular blade and a bio-inspired blade of the same area. An insect wing is chosen as a blade prototype. Indeed, insects developed physical characteristics that reduce energy consumption while permitting sustained and controlled flight at low level of noise. Analysis has been done to determine what insect poses flight characteristics closest to the small rotorcraft design goals. Commercial CFD software STAR-CCM + is used for conducting computations on structured and unstructured grids and for data post-processing. The authors acknowledge support from UNM CARC in a form of access to HPC and from CD-Adapco for providing Star-CCM+ for academic purposes. The first author's work was supported by the New Mexico Space Grant Consortium.

  4. Improved analytic extreme-mass-ratio inspiral model for scoping out eLISA data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Alvin J. K.; Gair, Jonathan R.

    2015-12-01

    The space-based gravitational-wave detector eLISA has been selected as the ESA L3 mission, and the mission design will be finalized by the end of this decade. To prepare for mission formulation over the next few years, several outstanding and urgent questions in data analysis will be addressed using mock data challenges, informed by instrument measurements from the LISA Pathfinder satellite launching at the end of 2015. These data challenges will require accurate and computationally affordable waveform models for anticipated sources such as the extreme-mass-ratio inspirals (EMRIs) of stellar-mass compact objects into massive black holes. Previous data challenges have made use of the well-known analytic EMRI waveforms of Barack and Cutler, which are extremely quick to generate but dephase relative to more accurate waveforms within hours, due to their mismatched radial, polar and azimuthal frequencies. In this paper, we describe an augmented Barack-Cutler model that uses a frequency map to the correct Kerr frequencies, along with updated evolution equations and a simple fit to a more accurate model. The augmented waveforms stay in phase for months and may be generated with virtually no additional computational cost.

  5. Ligand field and intermolecular interactions tuning the magnetic properties of spin-crossover Fe(II) polymer with 4,4′-bipyridine

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Yang-Hui; Liu, Qing-Ling; Yang, Li-Jing; Ling, Yang; Wang, Wei; Sun, Bai-Wang

    2015-02-15

    A new spin crossover coordination polymer (SCO-CPs) of Fe(II)-4,4′-bipyridine (4,4′-bipy) family: (Fe(4,4′-bipy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2})·(4,4′-bipy)· 8(H{sub 2}O)·2(ClO{sub 4}) (3), which displays half spin transitions between 100 and 300 K, has been synthesized and structurally characterized. Compound 3 featured with two-dimensional (2-D) grids connected by hydrogen bonds and π…π packing between one-dimensional (1-D) chains, the 2-D grids expand to three-dimensional (3-D) architecture supported by a “S-shaped holder” involving lattice 4-4′-bipy, water molecules and perchlorate anion. We compared 3 with the other two analogous complexes: ((Fe(4,4′-bipy) (H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (NCS){sub 2})·4,4′-bipy, 1 and (Fe(4,4′-bipy){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2})·mSolv, 2) through Hirshfeld surfaces analysis, which revealed that the low ligand field strength (NCS{sup −}) and lone-pair…H contacts contribute to the stabilization of HS (high-spin) state of the Fe(II) ion, while the high ligand field strength (4,4′-bipy) and strong intermolecular contacts (hydrogen bonds and π…π packing interactions) make for the LS (low-spin) state. - Highlights: ●A new member of Fe(||)-4,4′-bipy family has been prepared. ●It displays half spin transitions tuned by ligand field and intermolecular interactions. ●We have made a detailed comparison of this new member with two other analogous complexes.

  6. Development and applications of the LFDFT: the non-empirical account of ligand field and the simulation of the f-d transitions by density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Ramanantoanina, Harry; Sahnoun, Mohammed; Barbiero, Andrea; Ferbinteanu, Marilena; Cimpoesu, Fanica

    2015-07-28

    Ligand field density functional theory (LFDFT) is a methodology consisting of non-standard handling of DFT calculations and post-computation analysis, emulating the ligand field parameters in a non-empirical way. Recently, the procedure was extended for two-open-shell systems, with relevance for inter-shell transitions in lanthanides, of utmost importance in understanding the optical and magnetic properties of rare-earth materials. Here, we expand the model to the calculation of intensities of f → d transitions, enabling the simulation of spectral profiles. We focus on Eu(2+)-based systems: this lanthanide ion undergoes many dipole-allowed transitions from the initial 4f(7)((8)S7/2) state to the final 4f(6)5d(1) ones, considering the free ion and doped materials. The relativistic calculations showed a good agreement with experimental data for a gaseous Eu(2+) ion, producing reliable Slater-Condon and spin-orbit coupling parameters. The Eu(2+) ion-doped fluorite-type lattices, CaF2:Eu(2+) and SrCl2:Eu(2+), in sites with octahedral symmetry, are studied in detail. The related Slater-Condon and spin-orbit coupling parameters from the doped materials are compared to those for the free ion, revealing small changes for the 4f shell side and relatively important shifts for those associated with the 5d shell. The ligand field scheme, in Wybourne parameterization, shows a good agreement with the phenomenological interpretation of the experiment. The non-empirical computed parameters are used to calculate the energy and intensity of the 4f(7)-4f(6)5d(1) transitions, rendering a realistic convoluted spectrum.

  7. Bio-inspired group modeling and analysis for intruder detection in mobile sensor/robotic networks.

    PubMed

    Fu, Bo; Xiao, Yang; Liang, Xiannuan; Philip Chen, C L

    2015-01-01

    Although previous bio-inspired models have concentrated on invertebrates (such as ants), mammals such as primates with higher cognitive function are valuable for modeling the increasingly complex problems in engineering. Understanding primates' social and communication systems, and applying what is learned from them to engineering domains is likely to inspire solutions to a number of problems. This paper presents a novel bio-inspired approach to determine group size by researching and simulating primate society. Group size does matter for both primate society and digital entities. It is difficult to determine how to group mobile sensors/robots that patrol in a large area when many factors are considered such as patrol efficiency, wireless interference, coverage, inter/intragroup communications, etc. This paper presents a simulation-based theoretical study on patrolling strategies for robot groups with the comparison of large and small groups through simulations and theoretical results.

  8. Phase stability of transition metal dichalcogenide by competing ligand field stabilization and charge density wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    C, Santosh K.; Zhang, Chenxi; Hong, Suklyun; Wallace, Robert M.; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2015-09-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have been investigated extensively for potential application as device materials in recent years. TMDs are found to be stable in trigonal prismatic (H), octahedral (T), or distorted octahedral (Td) coordination of the transition metal. However, the detailed understanding of stabilities of TMDs in a particular phase is lacking. In this work, the detailed TMD phase stability using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) has been investigated to clarify the mechanism of phase stabilities of TMDs, consistent with the experimental observation. Our results indicate that the phase stability of TMDs can be explained considering the relative strength of two competing mechanisms: ligand field stabilization of d-orbitals corresponding to transition metal coordination geometry, and charge density wave (CDW) instability accompanied by a periodic lattice distortion (PLD) causing the phase transition in particular TMDs.

  9. Communication analysis for feedback control of civil infrastructure using cochlea-inspired sensing nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peckens, Courtney A.; Cook, Ireana; Lynch, Jerome P.

    2016-04-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have emerged as a reliable, low-cost alternative to the traditional wired sensing paradigm. While such networks have made significant progress in the field of structural monitoring, significantly less development has occurred for feedback control applications. Previous work in WSNs for feedback control has highlighted many of the challenges of using this technology including latency in the wireless communication channel and computational inundation at the individual sensing nodes. This work seeks to overcome some of those challenges by drawing inspiration from the real-time sensing and control techniques employed by the biological central nervous system and in particular the mammalian cochlea. A novel bio-inspired wireless sensor node was developed that employs analog filtering techniques to perform time-frequency decomposition of a sensor signal, thus encompassing the functionality of the cochlea. The node then utilizes asynchronous sampling of the filtered signal to compress the signal prior to communication. This bio-inspired sensing architecture is extended to a feedback control application in order to overcome the traditional challenges currently faced by wireless control. In doing this, however, the network experiences high bandwidths of low-significance information exchange between nodes, resulting in some lost data. This study considers the impact of this lost data on the control capabilities of the bio-inspired control architecture and finds that it does not significantly impact the effectiveness of control.

  10. Inspire Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohach, Barbara M.; Meade, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    The authors collaborated on hosting a "Spring Inspire Day." planned and delivered by preservice elementary teachers as a social studies/science methods project. Projects that have authentic application opportunities can make learning meaningful for prospective teachers as well as elementary students. With the impetus for an integrated…

  11. Inspired Landscapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Robert; Spruch, Arthur

    2008-01-01

    It has been nearly 400 years since Harvard College was created, and since then, thousands of colleges and universities have been built across the United States. From the classically inspired lines of Thomas Jefferson's University of Virginia to the Spanish architecture at Stanford University, every campus has its own personality. It's not unusual,…

  12. International Inspiration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Ed

    2017-01-01

    As the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) expands its Registered Apprenticeship College Consortium (RACC) among community colleges and employer partners, those involved are looking to countries like Germany and Switzerland for inspiration. In some cases, that has meant partnering with companies from those countries, which have had more comprehensive…

  13. Ligand field and intermolecular interactions tuning the magnetic properties of spin-crossover Fe(II) polymer with 4,4‧-bipyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yang-Hui; Liu, Qing-Ling; Yang, Li-Jing; Ling, Yang; Wang, Wei; Sun, Bai-Wang

    2015-02-01

    A new spin crossover coordination polymer (SCO-CPs) of Fe(II)-4,4‧-bipyridine (4,4‧-bipy) family: {Fe(4,4‧-bipy)2(H2O)2}·(4,4‧-bipy)· 8(H2O)·2(ClO4) (3), which displays half spin transitions between 100 and 300 K, has been synthesized and structurally characterized. Compound 3 featured with two-dimensional (2-D) grids connected by hydrogen bonds and π…π packing between one-dimensional (1-D) chains, the 2-D grids expand to three-dimensional (3-D) architecture supported by a "S-shaped holder" involving lattice 4-4‧-bipy, water molecules and perchlorate anion. We compared 3 with the other two analogous complexes: ({Fe(4,4‧-bipy) (H2O)2 (NCS)2}·4,4‧-bipy, 1 and {Fe(4,4‧-bipy)2(NCS)2}·mSolv, 2) through Hirshfeld surfaces analysis, which revealed that the low ligand field strength (NCS-) and lone-pair…H contacts contribute to the stabilization of HS (high-spin) state of the Fe(II) ion, while the high ligand field strength (4,4‧-bipy) and strong intermolecular contacts (hydrogen bonds and π…π packing interactions) make for the LS (low-spin) state.

  14. A Fluid-solid Numerical Model for the Analysis of Bio-inspired UUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Santanu; Krishnamurthy, Nagendra; Tafti, Danesh; Priya, Shashank

    2012-11-01

    This research will describe how a biology-inspired approach to engineering has placed jellyfish at the center of efforts to build next-generation underwater vehicles. In order to swim, jellyfish contract the circular muscles that line the undersurface of their bell. The motion of the bell from the relaxed position to the fully contracted position results in the mesoglea interacting with the surrounding water in such a way that causes the jellyfish to move forward. The present method uses two-dimensional fluid elements and plain strain hyperelastic structural elements for the numerical simulation of the problem. The equations of motion of the fluid are expressed as full N-S equation. A new type of bio-inspired boundary condition has been proposed. A prototype of the jellyfish setup has been developed for the experimental validation of the simulation results. The solution of the coupled system is accomplished by solving the two systems separately with the interaction effects using immersed boundary method. This study will be useful in accurate calculation of pressure distribution, maximum blocking stress, strain rate and actuator system for submerged autonomous vehicle. This study will also help in designing efficient propulsion and thruster mechanism for unmanned underwater vehicle. It is believed that the research presented in this paper advances the understanding of the dynamic behavior of bio-inspired UUV.

  15. Ligand field and Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters of samarium doped tellurite glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanko, Y. A.; Ghoshal, S. K.; Sahar, M. R.

    2016-08-01

    We report the samarium ions (Sm3+) contents dependent ligand field and Judd-Ofelt (JO) intensity parameters (Ω2, Ω4, Ω6) of zinc tellurite glass. The amorphous nature of the melt-quench synthesized glasses is confirmed using XRD. The lower energy region of the absorption spectra is used to calculate JO intensity parameters and the UV edge is exploited to determine the Nephelauxetic ratio, bonding, and Racah parameters. The Nephelauxetic ratio and Racah parameter is reduced and the bonding parameter is enhanced with the increase of Sm3+ concentration. The enhancement in covalency is found to increase the non-bridging oxygen and crystal field strength by delocalizing more d-shell electrons. Furthermore, Nephelauxetic function revealed an increase due to the reduction of localized d-electrons that is aroused from the overlap of d-orbital and ligand orbital. The JO intensity parameters displayed the Ω4>Ω6>Ω2 trend. Increase in Ω2 and decrease in Ω2 and Ω2 with the increase of Sm3+ concentration indicated an increase in the Smsbnd O covalency and coordination in the asymmetry of the prepared glasses. The large vale of spectroscopic quality factor (greater than unity) makes the proposed glass system prospective for various optical devices fabrication.

  16. Analytical development of a binuclear oxo-manganese complex bio-inspired on oxidase enzyme for doping control analysis of acetazolamide.

    PubMed

    Machini, Wesley B S; Teixeira, Marcos F S

    2016-05-15

    A bio-inspired electrochemical sensor using a binuclear oxo-manganese complex was evaluated and applied in the detection of a substance associated with doping in sports: acetazolamide (ACTZ). Investigation was made of the influence of different experimental variables on the electrocatalytic oxidation of ACTZ by the bio-inspired sensor, such as pH and interfering species. The bio-inspired sensor showed the best response in the range from 5.00×10(-9) to 7.00×10(-8) mol L(-1) ACTZ, with a linear range from 5.00×10(-9) to 2.50×10(-8) mol L(-1) and a detection limit of 4.76×10(-9) mol L(-1). The sensor exhibited characteristics similar to the Michaelis-Menten model of an enzymatic electrode, due to the use of a multinucleated complex of manganese with μ-oxo units, which was able to mimic the properties of enzymes with manganese as a cofactor in their composition, such as Mn-containing oxidase. The determination of ACTZ with the bio-inspired sensor was evaluated using three different synthetic biological fluids (plasma, saliva, and urine), demonstrating its viability for use with real samples. The analysis of ACTZ in real urine samples using the bio-inspired sensor, simulating the method adopted by the World Anti-Doping Agency, which revealed viable, suggesting a new and promising platform to be used in these analysis.

  17. Entropy-based analysis and bioinformatics-inspired integration of global economic information transfer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinkyu; Kim, Gunn; An, Sungbae; Kwon, Young-Kyun; Yoon, Sungroh

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of information transfer in the global economic network helps to understand the current environment and the outlook of an economy. Most approaches on global networks extract information transfer based mainly on a single variable. This paper establishes an entirely new bioinformatics-inspired approach to integrating information transfer derived from multiple variables and develops an international economic network accordingly. In the proposed methodology, we first construct the transfer entropies (TEs) between various intra- and inter-country pairs of economic time series variables, test their significances, and then use a weighted sum approach to aggregate information captured in each TE. Through a simulation study, the new method is shown to deliver better information integration compared to existing integration methods in that it can be applied even when intra-country variables are correlated. Empirical investigation with the real world data reveals that Western countries are more influential in the global economic network and that Japan has become less influential following the Asian currency crisis.

  18. Numerical analysis of bio-inspired corrugated airfoil at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Partha Protim; Rahman, Md. Masudur; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique

    2016-07-01

    A numerical study was conducted to investigate the aerodynamic performance of a bio-inspired corrugated airfoil at the chord Reynolds number of Rec=80,000 to explore the potential advantages of such airfoils at low Reynolds numbers. This study represents the transient nature of corrugated airfoils at low Reynolds number where flow is assumed to be laminar, unsteady, incompressible and two dimensional. The simulations include a sharp interface Cartesian grid based meshing employed with laminar viscous model. The flow field surrounding the corrugated airfoil has been analyzed using structured grid Finite Volume Method (FVM) based on Navier-Stokes equation. All parameters used in flow simulation are expressed in non-dimensional quantities for better understanding of flow behavior, regardless of dimensions or the fluid that is used. The simulated results revealed that the corrugated airfoil provides high lift with moderate drag and prevents large scale flow separation at higher angles of attack. This happens due to the negative shear drag produced by the recirculation zones which occurs in the valleys of the corrugated airfoils. The existence of small circulation bubbles sitting in the valleys prevents large scale flow separation thus increasing the aerodynamic performance of the corrugated airfoil.

  19. Entropy-Based Analysis and Bioinformatics-Inspired Integration of Global Economic Information Transfer

    PubMed Central

    An, Sungbae; Kwon, Young-Kyun; Yoon, Sungroh

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of information transfer in the global economic network helps to understand the current environment and the outlook of an economy. Most approaches on global networks extract information transfer based mainly on a single variable. This paper establishes an entirely new bioinformatics-inspired approach to integrating information transfer derived from multiple variables and develops an international economic network accordingly. In the proposed methodology, we first construct the transfer entropies (TEs) between various intra- and inter-country pairs of economic time series variables, test their significances, and then use a weighted sum approach to aggregate information captured in each TE. Through a simulation study, the new method is shown to deliver better information integration compared to existing integration methods in that it can be applied even when intra-country variables are correlated. Empirical investigation with the real world data reveals that Western countries are more influential in the global economic network and that Japan has become less influential following the Asian currency crisis. PMID:23300959

  20. Effect of Ligand Field Tuning on the SMM Behavior for Three Related Alkoxide-Bridged Dysprosium Dimers.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yan; Mereacre, Valeriu; Baniodeh, Amer; Lan, Yanhua; Schlageter, Martin; Kostakis, George E; Powell, Annie K

    2016-01-04

    The synthesis and characterization of three Dy2 compounds, [Dy2(HL1)2(NO3)4] (1), [Dy2(L2)2(NO3)4] (2), and [Dy2(HL3)2(NO3)4] (3), formed using related tripodal ligands with a central tertiary amine bearing picolyl and alkoxy arms, 2-[(2-hydroxy-ethyl)-pyridin-2-ylmethylamino]-ethanol (H2L1), 2-(bis-pyridin-2-ylmethylamino)-ethanol (HL2), and 2-(bis-pyridin-2-ylmethylamino)-propane-1,3-diol (H2L3), are reported. The compounds are rare examples of alkoxide-bridged {Dy2} complexes and display capped square antiprism coordination geometry around each Dy(III) ion. Changes in the ligand field environment around the Dy(III) ions brought about through variations in the ligand donors can be gauged from the magnetic properties, with compounds 1 and 2 showing antiparallel coupling between the Dy(III) ions and 3 showing parallel coupling. Furthermore, slow relaxation of the magnetization typical of SMM behavior could be observed for compounds 2 and 3, suggesting that small variations in the ligand field can have a significant influence on the slow relaxation processes responsible for SMM behavior of Dy(III)-based systems.

  1. LINEBACkER: Bio-inspired Data Reduction Toward Real Time Network Traffic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Teuton, Jeremy R.; Peterson, Elena S.; Nordwall, Douglas J.; Akyol, Bora A.; Oehmen, Christopher S.

    2013-09-28

    Abstract—One essential component of resilient cyber applications is the ability to detect adversaries and protect systems with the same flexibility adversaries will use to achieve their goals. Current detection techniques do not enable this degree of flexibility because most existing applications are built using exact or regular-expression matching to libraries of rule sets. Further, network traffic defies traditional cyber security approaches that focus on limiting access based on the use of passwords and examination of lists of installed or downloaded programs. These approaches do not readily apply to network traffic occurring beyond the access control point, and when the data in question are combined control and payload data of ever increasing speed and volume. Manual analysis of network traffic is not normally possible because of the magnitude of the data that is being exchanged and the length of time that this analysis takes. At the same time, using an exact matching scheme to identify malicious traffic in real time often fails because the lists against which such searches must operate grow too large. In this work, we introduce an alternative method for cyber network detection based on similarity-measuring algorithms for gene sequence analysis. These methods are ideal because they were designed to identify similar but nonidentical sequences. We demonstrate that our method is generally applicable to the problem of network traffic analysis by illustrating its use in two different areas both based on different attributes of network traffic. Our approach provides a logical framework for organizing large collections of network data, prioritizing traffic of interest to human analysts, and makes it possible to discover traffic signatures without the bias introduced by expert-directed signature generation. Pattern recognition on reduced representations of network traffic offers a fast, efficient, and more robust way to detect anomalies.

  2. An educationally inspired illustration of two-dimensional Quantitative Microbiological Risk Assessment (QMRA) and sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Vásquez, G A; Busschaert, P; Haberbeck, L U; Uyttendaele, M; Geeraerd, A H

    2014-11-03

    Quantitative Microbiological Risk Assessment (QMRA) is a structured methodology used to assess the risk involved by ingestion of a pathogen. It applies mathematical models combined with an accurate exploitation of data sets, represented by distributions and - in the case of two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations - their hyperparameters. This research aims to highlight background information, assumptions and truncations of a two-dimensional QMRA and advanced sensitivity analysis. We believe that such a detailed listing is not always clearly presented in actual risk assessment studies, while it is essential to ensure reliable and realistic simulations and interpretations. As a case-study, we are considering the occurrence of listeriosis in smoked fish products in Belgium during the period 2008-2009, using two-dimensional Monte Carlo and two sensitivity analysis methods (Spearman correlation and Sobol sensitivity indices) to estimate the most relevant factors of the final risk estimate. A risk estimate of 0.018% per consumption of contaminated smoked fish by an immunocompromised person was obtained. The final estimate of listeriosis cases (23) is within the actual reported result obtained for the same period and for the same population. Variability on the final risk estimate is determined by the variability regarding (i) consumer refrigerator temperatures, (ii) the reference growth rate of L. monocytogenes, (iii) the minimum growth temperature of L. monocytogenes and (iv) consumer portion size. Variability regarding the initial contamination level of L. monocytogenes tends to appear as a determinant of risk variability only when the minimum growth temperature is not included in the sensitivity analysis; when it is included the impact regarding the variability on the initial contamination level of L. monocytogenes is disappearing. Uncertainty determinants of the final risk indicated the need of gathering more information on the reference growth rate and the minimum

  3. The Clubbers' Guide: "Be Inspired, Inspire Others"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Liz

    2012-01-01

    "Be inspired, inspire others" is this author's school motto and also something she aims to achieve by running the Science Club at The Warwick School in Redhill, Surrey, UK, an 11-16 specialist technology comprehensive. The Science Club is part of an extensive science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) programme that has…

  4. Ligand field density functional theory calculation of the 4f2→ 4f15d1 transitions in the quantum cutter Cs2KYF6:Pr3+.

    PubMed

    Ramanantoanina, Harry; Urland, Werner; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Daul, Claude

    2013-09-07

    Herein we present a Ligand Field Density Functional Theory (LFDFT) based methodology for the analysis of the 4f(n)→ 4f(n-1)5d(1) transitions in rare earth compounds and apply it for the characterization of the 4f(2)→ 4f(1)5d(1) transitions in the quantum cutter Cs2KYF6:Pr(3+) with the elpasolite structure type. The methodological advances are relevant for the analysis and prospection of materials acting as phosphors in light-emitting diodes. The positions of the zero-phonon energy corresponding to the states of the electron configurations 4f(2) and 4f(1)5d(1) are calculated, where the praseodymium ion may occupy either the Cs(+)-, K(+)- or the Y(3+)-site, and are compared with available experimental data. The theoretical results show that the occupation of the three undistorted sites allows a quantum-cutting process. However size effects due to the difference between the ionic radii of Pr(3+) and K(+) as well as Cs(+) lead to the distortion of the K(+)- and the Cs(+)-site, which finally exclude these sites for quantum-cutting. A detailed discussion about the origin of this distortion is also described.

  5. Bio-inspired controller for a dexterous prosthetic hand based on Principal Components Analysis.

    PubMed

    Matrone, G; Cipriani, C; Secco, E L; Carrozza, M C; Magenes, G

    2009-01-01

    Controlling a dexterous myoelectric prosthetic hand with many degrees of freedom (DoFs) could be a very demanding task, which requires the amputee for high concentration and ability in modulating many different muscular contraction signals. In this work a new approach to multi-DoF control is proposed, which makes use of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to reduce the DoFs space dimensionality and allow to drive a 15 DoFs hand by means of a 2 DoFs signal. This approach has been tested and properly adapted to work onto the underactuated robotic hand named CyberHand, using mouse cursor coordinates as input signals and a principal components (PCs) matrix taken from the literature. First trials show the feasibility of performing grasps using this method. Further tests with real EMG signals are foreseen.

  6. TERMA Framework for Biomedical Signal Analysis: An Economic-Inspired Approach

    PubMed Central

    Elgendi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Biomedical signals contain features that represent physiological events, and each of these events has peaks. The analysis of biomedical signals for monitoring or diagnosing diseases requires the detection of these peaks, making event detection a crucial step in biomedical signal processing. Many researchers have difficulty detecting these peaks to investigate, interpret and analyze their corresponding events. To date, there is no generic framework that captures these events in a robust, efficient and consistent manner. A new method referred to for the first time as two event-related moving averages (“TERMA”) involves event-related moving averages and detects events in biomedical signals. The TERMA framework is flexible and universal and consists of six independent LEGO building bricks to achieve high accuracy detection of biomedical events. Results recommend that the window sizes for the two moving averages (W1 and W2) have to follow the inequality (8×W1)≥W2≥(2×W1). Moreover, TERMA is a simple yet efficient event detector that is suitable for wearable devices, point-of-care devices, fitness trackers and smart watches, compared to more complex machine learning solutions. PMID:27827852

  7. TERMA Framework for Biomedical Signal Analysis: An Economic-Inspired Approach.

    PubMed

    Elgendi, Mohamed

    2016-11-02

    Biomedical signals contain features that represent physiological events, and each of these events has peaks. The analysis of biomedical signals for monitoring or diagnosing diseases requires the detection of these peaks, making event detection a crucial step in biomedical signal processing. Many researchers have difficulty detecting these peaks to investigate, interpret and analyze their corresponding events. To date, there is no generic framework that captures these events in a robust, efficient and consistent manner. A new method referred to for the first time as two event-related moving averages ("TERMA") involves event-related moving averages and detects events in biomedical signals. The TERMA framework is flexible and universal and consists of six independent LEGO building bricks to achieve high accuracy detection of biomedical events. Results recommend that the window sizes for the two moving averages ( W 1 and W 2 ) have to follow the inequality ( 8 × W 1 ) ≥ W 2 ≥ ( 2 × W 1 ) . Moreover, TERMA is a simple yet efficient event detector that is suitable for wearable devices, point-of-care devices, fitness trackers and smart watches, compared to more complex machine learning solutions.

  8. The Inspirational Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benigni, Mark D.; Hughes, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Amid the focus on improved standardized test scores, differentiated instruction, value-added initiatives and improved teacher evaluation, one must not ignore an education leader's need to inspire and be inspired. But how do education leaders inspire their students and teachers during some of the most difficult economic times the nation has ever…

  9. Ligand field theory and the origin of life as an emergent feature of the periodic table of elements.

    PubMed

    Morowitz, Harold J; Srinivasan, Vijayasarathy; Smith, Eric

    2010-08-01

    The assumption that all biological catalysts are either proteins or ribozymes leads to an outstanding enigma of biogenesis-how to determine the synthetic pathways to the monomers for the efficient formation of catalytic macromolecules in the absence of any such macromolecules. The last 60 years have witnessed chemists developing an understanding of organocatalysis and ligand field theory, both of which give demonstrable low-molecular-weight catalysts. We assume that transition-metal-ligand complexes are likely to have occurred in the deep ocean trenches by the combination of naturally occurring oceanic metals and ligands synthesized from the emergent CO(2), H(2), NH(3), H(2)S, and H(3)PO(4). We are now in a position to investigate experimentally the metal-ligand complexes, their catalytic function, and the reaction networks that could have played a role in the development of metabolism and life itself.

  10. Synthesis and photophysical properties of zeolite-entrapped bisterpyridine ruthenium(II). Dramatic consequences of ligand-field-state destabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuiyan, A.A.; Kincaid, J.R.

    1998-05-18

    A bisterpyridine complex of ruthenium(II) (Ru(tpy){sub 2}{sup 2+}) has been prepared in zeolite Y supercages and investigated by electronic absorption, electronic emission, and resonance Raman spectroscopy. In free solution this complex is practically nonluminescent, having a very short excited-state lifetime (250 ps) at room temperature. However, entrapment within the zeolite supercage results in dramatic increases in emission intensity and excited-state lifetime (140 ns) at room temperature. The observed temperature dependence of the excited-state lifetime has been modeled by a kinetic equation with two thermal terms corresponding to the so-called fourth {sup 3}MLCT state and ligand-field state (LF), respectively. It is shown that the increased lifetime of the entrapped complex results from zeolite-induced destabilization of the LFe state, a conclusion which is in agreement with results obtained for a number of other zeolite-entrapped ruthenium(II)polypyridine complexes.

  11. Tunable infrared solid-state laser materials based on Cr/sup 3 +/ in low ligand fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, P.T.; Andrews, L.; Lempick, A.; McCollum, B.

    1982-08-01

    A new class of solid-state tunable lasers based on Cr/sup 3 +/ in low ligand field materials is described. Spectroscopic and calculated laser properties have been obtained for the /sup 4/T/sub 2/ emission in two low field crystals: K/sub 2/Na Sc/sub 1-x/ Cr/sub x/F/sub 6/ and Al/sub 1-x/ Cr/sub x/ (PO/sub 3/)/sub 3/. A comparison is made with two d/sup 3/ laser materials (Cr/sup 3 +/:alexandrite and V/sup 2 +/:MgF/sub 2/). The prospect of expanding this class of materials is assessed.

  12. Ligand field effect at oxide-metal interface on the chemical reactivity of ultrathin oxide film surface.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaehoon; Shin, Hyung-Joon; Kim, Yousoo; Kawai, Maki

    2012-06-27

    Ultrathin oxide film is currently one of the paramount candidates for a heterogeneous catalyst because it provides an additional dimension, i.e., film thickness, to control chemical reactivity. Here, we demonstrate that the chemical reactivity of ultrathin MgO film grown on Ag(100) substrate for the dissociation of individual water molecules can be systematically controlled by interface dopants over the film thickness. Density functional theory calculations revealed that adhesion at the oxide-metal interface can be addressed by the ligand field effect and is linearly correlated with the chemical reactivity of the oxide film. In addition, our results indicate that the concentration of dopant at the interface can be controlled by tuning the drawing effect of oxide film. Our study provides not only profound insight into chemical reactivity control of ultrathin oxide film supported by a metal substrate but also an impetus for investigating ultrathin oxide films for a wider range of applications.

  13. Risk–Benefit Analysis of Pediatric-Inspired Versus Hyperfractionated Cyclophosphamide, Vincristine, Doxorubicin, and Dexamethasone Protocols for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Guzauskas, Gregory F.; Villa, Kathleen F.; Vanhove, Geertrui F.; Fisher, Vicki L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the risk–benefit trade-off of a pediatric-inspired regimen versus hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone (hyper-CVAD) for first-line treatment of adolescents/young adult (AYA; ages 16–39 years) patients with Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods: Patient outcomes were simulated using a 6-state Markov model, including complete response (CR), no CR, first relapse, second CR, second relapse, and death. A Weibull distribution was fit to the progression-free survival curve of hyper-CVAD–treated AYA patients from a single-center study, and comparable patient data from a retrospective study of pediatric regimen–treated AYA patients were utilized to estimate a relative progression difference (hazard ratio = 0.51) and model survival differences. Health-state utilities were estimated based on treatment stage, with an assumption that the pediatric protocol had 0.10 disutility compared with hyper-CVAD before the maintenance phase of treatment. Total life-years and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were compared between treatment protocols at 1, 5, and 10 years, with additional probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Results: Treatment with the pediatric-inspired protocol was associated with a 0.04 increase in life-years, but a 0.01 decrease in QALYs at 1 year. By years 5 and 10, the pediatric-inspired protocol resulted in 0.18 and 0.24 increase in life-years and 0.25 and 0.32 increase in QALYs, respectively, relative to hyper-CVAD. The lower quality of life associated with the induction and intensification phases of pediatric treatment was offset by more favorable progression-free survival and overall survival relative to hyper-CVAD. Conclusions: Our exploratory analysis suggests that, compared with hyper-CVAD, pediatric-inspired protocols may increase life-years throughout treatment stages and QALYs in the long term. PMID:27779442

  14. Inspire Your Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, William E.; Taylor, William W. L.

    1991-01-01

    Describes a science project, Interactive Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiments (INSPIRE), that allows students to work with physicists to address unanswered questions about the physics of space. (ZWH)

  15. Origin of the Anomalous Color of Egyptian and Han Blue Historical Pigments: Going beyond the Complex Approximation in Ligand Field Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García-Fernandez, Pablo; Moreno, Miguel; Aramburu, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The complex approximation is widely used in the framework of the Ligand Field Theory for explaining the optical properties of crystalline coordination compounds. Here, we show that there are essential features of these systems that cannot be understood with the usual approximation that only considers an isolated complex at the correct equilibrium…

  16. Resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy reveals d-d ligand-field states involved in the self-assembly of a square-planar platinum complex.

    PubMed

    Garino, Claudio; Gallo, Erik; Smolentsev, Nikolay; Glatzel, Pieter; Gobetto, Roberto; Lamberti, Carlo; Sadler, Peter J; Salassa, Luca

    2012-11-28

    Resonant X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (RXES) is used to characterize the ligand field states of the prototypic self-assembled square-planar complex, [Pt(tpy)Cl]Cl (tpy=2,2':6',2''-terpyridine), and determine the effect of weak metal-metal and π-π interactions on their energy.

  17. Using a Combination of Experimental and Computational Methods to Explore the Impact of Metal Identity and Ligand Field Strength on the Electronic Structure of Metal Ions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pernicone, Naomi C.; Geri, Jacob B.; York, John T.

    2011-01-01

    In this exercise, students apply a combination of techniques to investigate the impact of metal identity and ligand field strength on the spin states of three d[superscript 5] transition-metal complexes: Fe(acac)[subscript 3], K[subscript 3][Fe(CN)[subscript 6

  18. Ligand-field symmetry effects in Fe(II) polypyridyl compounds probed by transient X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hana; Strader, Matthew L.; Hong, Kiryong; Jamula, Lindsey; Kim, Tae Kyu; Groot, Frank M. F. de; McCusker, James K.; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Huse, Nils

    2012-02-28

    Ultrafast excited-state evolution in polypyridyl FeII complexes are of fundamental interest for understanding the origins of the sub-ps spin-state changes that occur upon photoexcitation of this class of compounds as well as for the potential impact such ultrafast dynamics have on incorporation of these compounds in solar energy conversion schemes or switchable optical storage technologies. We have demonstrated that ground-state and, more importantly, ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption methods can offer unique insights into the interplay between electronic and geometric structure that underpin the photo-induced dynamics of this class of compounds. The present contribution examines in greater detail how the symmetry of the ligand field surrounding the metal ion can be probed using these x-ray techniques. In particular, we show that steady-state K-edge spectroscopy of the nearest-neighbour nitrogen atoms reveals the characteristic chemical environment of the respective ligands and suggests an interesting target for future charge-transfer femtosecond and attosecond spectroscopy in the x-ray water window.

  19. Clay Bells: Edo Inspiration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The ceremonial copper and iron bells at the Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art were the author's inspiration for an interdisciplinary unit with a focus on the contributions various cultures make toward the richness of a community. The author of this article describes an Edo bell-inspired ceramic project incorporating slab-building…

  20. Ligand Field Strength Mediates Electron Delocalization in Octahedral [((H)L)2Fe6(L')m](n+) Clusters.

    PubMed

    Hernández Sánchez, Raúl; Zheng, Shao-Liang; Betley, Theodore A

    2015-09-02

    To assess the impact of terminal ligand binding on a variety of cluster properties (redox delocalization, ground-state stabilization, and breadth of redox state accessibility), we prepared three electron-transfer series based on the hexanuclear iron cluster [((H)L)2Fe6(L')m](n+) in which the terminal ligand field strength was modulated from weak to strong (L' = DMF, MeCN, CN). The extent of intracore M-M interactions is gauged by M-M distances, spin ground state persistence, and preference for mixed-valence states as determined by electrochemical comproportionation constants. Coordination of DMF to the [((H)L)2Fe6] core leads to weaker Fe-Fe interactions, as manifested by the observation of ground states populated only at lower temperatures (<100 K) and by the greater evidence of valence trapping within the mixed-valence states. Comproportionation constants determined electrochemically (Kc = 10(4)-10(8)) indicate that the redox series exhibits electronic delocalization (class II-III), yet no intervalence charge transfer (IVCT) bands are observable in the near-IR spectra. Ligation of the stronger σ donor acetonitrile results in stabilization of spin ground states to higher temperatures (∼300 K) and a high degree of valence delocalization (Kc = 10(2)-10(8)) with observable IVCT bands. Finally, the anionic cyanide-bound series reveals the highest degree of valence delocalization with the most intense IVCT bands (Kc = 10(12)-10(20)) and spin ground state population beyond room temperature. Across the series, at a given formal oxidation level, the capping ligand on the hexairon cluster dictates the overall properties of the aggregate, modulating the redox delocalization and the persistence of the intracore coupling of the metal sites.

  1. Determining the magnitude and direction of photoinduced ligand field switching in photochromic metal-organic complexes: molybdenum-tetracarbonyl spirooxazine complexes.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Michelle M; Patrick, Brian O; Frank, Natia L

    2011-07-06

    The ability to optically switch or tune the intrinsic properties of transition metals (e.g., redox potentials, emission/absorption energies, and spin states) with photochromic metal-ligand complexes is an important strategy for developing "smart" materials. We have described a methodology for using metal-carbonyl complexes as spectroscopic probes of ligand field changes associated with light-induced isomerization of photochromic ligands. Changes in ligand field between the ring-closed spirooxazine (SO) and ring-opened photomerocyanine (PMC) forms of photochromic azahomoadamantyl and indolyl phenanthroline-spirooxazine ligands are demonstrated through FT-IR, (13)C NMR, and computational studies of their molybdenum-tetracarbonyl complexes. The frontier molecular orbitals (MOs) of the SO and PMC forms differ considerably in both electron density distributions and energies. Of the multiple π* MOs in the SO and PMC forms of the ligands, the LUMO+1, a pseudo-b(1)-symmetry phenanthroline-based MO, mixes primarily with the Mo(CO)(4) fragment and provides the major pathway for Mo(d)→phen(π*) backbonding. The LUMO+1 is found to be 0.2-0.3 eV lower in energy in the SO form relative to the PMC form, suggesting that the SO form is a better π-acceptor. Light-induced isomerization of the photochromic ligands was therefore found to lead to changes in the energies of their frontier MOs, which in turn leads to changes in π-acceptor ability and ligand field strength. Ligand field changes associated with photoisomerizable ligands allow tuning of excited-state and ground-state energies that dictate energy/electron transfer, optical/electrical properties, and spin states of a metal center upon photoisomerization, positioning photochromic ligand-metal complexes as promising targets for smart materials.

  2. Comprehensive analysis of the symmetries and conservation laws of the geodesic equations for a particular string inspired FRLW solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahangari, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Scalar-field cosmology can be regarded as one of the significant fields of research in recent years. This paper is dedicated to a thorough investigation of the symmetries and conservation laws of the geodesic equations associated to a specific exact cosmological solution of a scalar-field potential which was originally motivated by six-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell theory. The mentioned string inspired Friedmann-Robertson-Lamai ^tre-Walker (FRLW) solution is one of the noteworthy solutions of Einstein field equations. For this purpose, first of all the Christoffel symbols and the corresponding system of geodesic equations are computed and then the associated Lie symmetries are totally analyzed. Moreover, the algebraic structure of the Lie algebra of local symmetries is briefly investigated and a complete classification of the symmetry subalgebras is presented. Besides by applying the resulted symmetry operators the invariant solutions of the system of geodesic equations are discussed. In addition, the Noether symmetries and the Killing vector fields of the geodesic Lagrangian are determined and the corresponding optimal system of one-dimensional subalgebras is constructed. Mainly, an entire set of local conservation laws is computed for our analyzed scalar-field cosmological solution. For this purpose, two distinct procedures are applied: the celebrated Noether's theorem and the direct method which is fundamentally based on a systematic application of Euler differential operators which annihilate any divergence expression identically.

  3. Intrinsically incompatible crystal (ligand) field parameter sets for transition ions at orthorhombic and lower symmetry sites in crystals and their implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudowicz, C.; Gnutek, P.

    2010-01-01

    Central quantities in spectroscopy and magnetism of transition ions in crystals are crystal (ligand) field parameters (CFPs). For orthorhombic, monoclinic, and triclinic site symmetry CF analysis is prone to misinterpretations due to large number of CFPs and existence of correlated sets of alternative CFPs. In this review, we elucidate the intrinsic features of orthorhombic and lower symmetry CFPs and their implications. The alternative CFP sets, which yield identical energy levels, belong to different regions of CF parameter space and hence are intrinsically incompatible. Only their ‘images’ representing CFP sets expressed in the same region of CF parameter space may be directly compared. Implications of these features for fitting procedures and meaning of fitted CFPs are categorized into negative: pitfalls and positive: blessings. As a case study, the CFP sets for Tm 3+ ions in KLu(WO 4) 2 are analysed and shown to be intrinsically incompatible. Inadvertent, so meaningless, comparisons of incompatible CFP sets result in various pitfalls, e.g., controversial claims about the values of CFPs obtained by other researchers as well as incorrect structural conclusions or faulty systematics of CF parameters across rare-earth ion series based on relative magnitudes of incompatible CFPs. Such pitfalls bear on interpretation of, e.g., optical spectroscopy, inelastic neutron scattering, and magnetic susceptibility data. An extensive survey of pertinent literature was carried out to assess recognition of compatibility problems. Great portion of available orthorhombic and lower symmetry CFP sets are found intrinsically incompatible, yet these problems and their implications appear barely recognized. The considerable extent and consequences of pitfalls revealed by our survey call for concerted remedial actions of researchers. A general approach based on the rhombicity ratio standardization may solve compatibility problems. Wider utilization of alternative CFP sets in the

  4. Inspiration is "Mission Critical"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, D. W.; DeVore, E.; Lebofsky, L.

    2014-07-01

    In spring 2013, the President's budget proposal restructured the nation's approach to STEM education, eliminating ˜$50M of NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) funding with the intent of transferring it to the Dept. of Education, National Science Foundation, and Smithsonian Institution. As a result, Education and Public Outreach (EPO) would no longer be a NASA mission requirement and funds that had already been competed, awarded, and productively utilized were lost. Since 1994, partnerships of scientists, engineers, and education specialists were required to create innovative approaches to EPO, providing a direct source of inspiration for today's youth that may now be lost. Although seldom discussed or evaluated, "inspiration" is the beginning of lasting education. For decades, NASA's crewed and robotic missions have motivated students of all ages and have demonstrated a high degree of leverage in society. Through personal experiences we discuss (1) the importance of inspiration in education, (2) how NASA plays a vital role in STEM education, (3) examples of high-leverage educational materials showing why NASA should continue embedding EPO specialists within mission teams, and (4) how we can document the role of inspiration. We believe that personal histories are an important means of assessing the success of EPO. We hope this discussion will lead other people to document similar stories of educational success and perhaps to undertake longitudinal studies of the impact of inspiration.

  5. Design and experimental gait analysis of a multi-segment in-pipe robot inspired by earthworm's peristaltic locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hongbin; Wang, Chenghao; Li, Suyi; Xu, Jian; Wang, K. W.

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports the experimental progress towards developing a multi-segment in-pipe robot inspired by earthworm's body structure and locomotion mechanism. To mimic the alternating contraction and elongation of a single earthworm's segment, a robust, servomotor based actuation mechanism is developed. In each robot segment, servomotor-driven cords and spring steel belts are utilized to imitate the earthworm's longitudinal and circular muscles, respectively. It is shown that the designed segment can contract and relax just like an earthworm's body segment. The axial and radial deformation of a single segment is measured experimentally, which agrees with the theoretical predictions. Then a multisegment earthworm-like robot is fabricated by assembling eight identical segments in series. The locomotion performance of this robot prototype is then extensively tested in order to investigate the correlation between gait design and dynamic locomotion characteristics. Based on the principle of retrograde peristalsis wave, a gait generator is developed for the multi-segment earthworm-like robot, following which gaits of the robot can be constructed. Employing the generated gaits, the 8-segment earthworm-like robot can successfully perform both horizontal locomotion and vertical climb in pipes. By changing gait parameters, i.e., with different gaits, locomotion characteristics including average speed and anchor slippage can be significantly tailored. The proposed actuation method and prototype of the multi-segment in-pipe robot as well as the gait generator provide a bionic realization of earthworm's locomotion with promising potentials in various applications such as pipeline inspection and cleaning.

  6. Nature as Inspiration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tank, Kristina; Moore, Tamara; Strnat, Meg

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the final lesson within a seven-day STEM and literacy unit that is part of the Picture STEM curriculum (pictureSTEM. org) and uses engineering to integrate science and mathematics learning in a meaningful way (Tank and Moore 2013). For this engineering challenge, students used nature as a source of inspiration for designs to…

  7. In Search of Inspiration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Keeping one's self inspired in the music classroom is all about connections. Sometimes educators need to look at what they're doing from a different perspective. Luckily, there's no shortage of ways to revitalize one's classroom approach, and to help the author explores a few, he made use of some connections of his own, turning to five educators…

  8. Summer Reading That Inspires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana

    2012-01-01

    Why did you decide on science as a career? For many, it was the inspiration of a mentor or model--an explorer who could communicate excitement and a sense of adventure to others. During the school year, teachers take on that role of motivator for students. But as they recharge over summer break, it is great to treat themselves again to the stories…

  9. Inspired by Oceans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Stephanie

    2005-01-01

    Several years ago, the school system discussed in this article, agreed on a five-year cycle of nature themes to integrate instruction across disciplines. Last year, students studied artists and artworks inspired by oceans. Students also explored the theme with their own artistic expressions. Teachers began the year with lessons based on sea…

  10. Ndebele Inspired Houses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    The house paintings of the South African Ndebele people are more than just an attempt to improve the aesthetics of a community; they are a source of identity and significance for Ndebele women. In this article, the author describes an art project wherein students use the tradition of Ndebele house painting as inspiration for creating their own…

  11. Inspired by Nevelson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egenes, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Louise Nevelson's circular assemblage, "Collegiate School" (1972), was the inspiration for an art class with the preschoolers at the Kent Children's Center. Nevelson (1899-1988) was the ultimate "found art" artist. Finding interesting throwaway objects, in and out of trash bins, she constructed assemblages that completely changed their former use.…

  12. Quantum-Inspired Maximizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2008-01-01

    A report discusses an algorithm for a new kind of dynamics based on a quantum- classical hybrid-quantum-inspired maximizer. The model is represented by a modified Madelung equation in which the quantum potential is replaced by different, specially chosen 'computational' potential. As a result, the dynamics attains both quantum and classical properties: it preserves superposition and entanglement of random solutions, while allowing one to measure its state variables, using classical methods. Such optimal combination of characteristics is a perfect match for quantum-inspired computing. As an application, an algorithm for global maximum of an arbitrary integrable function is proposed. The idea of the proposed algorithm is very simple: based upon the Quantum-inspired Maximizer (QIM), introduce a positive function to be maximized as the probability density to which the solution is attracted. Then the larger value of this function will have the higher probability to appear. Special attention is paid to simulation of integer programming and NP-complete problems. It is demonstrated that the problem of global maximum of an integrable function can be found in polynomial time by using the proposed quantum- classical hybrid. The result is extended to a constrained maximum with applications to integer programming and TSP (Traveling Salesman Problem).

  13. Astronomy. Inspiration. Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanic, N.

    2008-10-01

    This paper speculates how poetry and other kind of arts are tightly related to astronomy. Hence the connection between art and natural sciences in general will be discussed in the frame of ongoing multidisciplinary project `Astronomy. Inspiration. Art' at Public Observatory in Belgrade (started in 2004). This project tends to inspire (better to say `infect') artist with a cosmic themes and fantastic sceneries of the Universe. At the very beginning of the project, Serbian poet and philosopher Laza Lazić (who published 49 books of poetry, stories and novels), as well as writer Gordana Maletić (with 25 published novels for children) were interested to work on The Inspiration by Astronomical Phenomena in Serbian Literature. Five young artists and scientists include their new ideas and new approach to multidisciplinary studies too (Srdjan Djukić, Nenad Jeremić, Olivera Obradović, Romana Vujasinović, Elena Dimoski). Two books that will be presented in details in the frame of this Project, "STARRY CITIES" (http://zavod.co.yu) and "ASTROLIES", don't offer only interesting illustrations, images from the latest astronomical observations and currently accepted cosmological theories -- those books induces, provoking curiosity in a specific and witty way, an adventure and challenge to explore and create.

  14. Biologically inspired intelligent robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Breazeal, Cynthia

    2003-07-01

    Humans throughout history have always sought to mimic the appearance, mobility, functionality, intelligent operation, and thinking process of biological creatures. This field of biologically inspired technology, having the moniker biomimetics, has evolved from making static copies of human and animals in the form of statues to the emergence of robots that operate with realistic behavior. Imagine a person walking towards you where suddenly you notice something weird about him--he is not real but rather he is a robot. Your reaction would probably be "I can't believe it but this robot looks very real" just as you would react to an artificial flower that is a good imitation. You may even proceed and touch the robot to check if your assessment is correct but, as oppose to the flower case, the robot may be programmed to respond physical and verbally. This science fiction scenario could become a reality as the current trend continues in developing biologically inspired technologies. Technology evolution led to such fields as artificial muscles, artificial intelligence, and artificial vision as well as biomimetic capabilities in materials science, mechanics, electronics, computing science, information technology and many others. This paper will review the state of the art and challenges to biologically-inspired technologies and the role that EAP is expected to play as the technology evolves.

  15. Network theory inspired analysis of time-resolved expression data reveals key players guiding P. patens stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Bao, Jie; Hanke, Sebastian T; Hiss, Manuel; Tiko, Theodhor; Rensing, Stefan A

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) often trigger developmental decisions, yet, their transcripts are often only moderately regulated and thus not easily detected by conventional statistics on expression data. Here we present a method that allows to determine such genes based on trajectory analysis of time-resolved transcriptome data. As a proof of principle, we have analysed apical stem cells of filamentous moss (P. patens) protonemata that develop from leaflets upon their detachment from the plant. By our novel correlation analysis of the post detachment transcriptome kinetics we predict five out of 1,058 TFs to be involved in the signaling leading to the establishment of pluripotency. Among the predicted regulators is the basic helix loop helix TF PpRSL1, which we show to be involved in the establishment of apical stem cells in P. patens. Our methodology is expected to aid analysis of key players of developmental decisions in complex plant and animal systems.

  16. Ligand field splittings in core level transitions for transition metal (TM) oxides: Tanabe-Sugano diagrams and (TM) dangling bonds in vacated O-atom defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucovsky, Gerry; Wu, Kun; Pappas, Brian; Whitten, Jerry

    2013-04-01

    Defect states in the forbidden band-gap below the conduction band edge are active as electron traps in nano-grain high-) transition metal (TM) oxides with thickness >0.3 nm, e.g., ZrO2 and HfO2. These oxides have received considerable attention as gate-dielectrics in complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices, and more recently are emerging as candidates for charge storage and memory devices. To provide a theoretical basis for device functionality, ab-initio many-electron theory is combined with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to study O K edge and TM core level transitions. These studies identify ligand field splittings (ΔLF) for defect state features,. When compared with those obtained from O-atom and TM-atom core spectroscopic transitions, this provides direct information about defect state sun-nm bonding arrangements. comparisons are made for (i) elemental TiO2 and Ti2O3 with different formal ionic charges, Ti4+ and Ti3+ and for (ii) Magneli Phase alloys, TinO2n-1, n is an integer 9>=n>3, and (TiO2)x(HfO2)1-x alloys. The alloys display multi-valent behavior from (i) different ionic-charge states, (ii} local bond-strain, and (iii) metallic hopping transport. The intrinsic bonding defects in TM oxides are identified as pairs of singly occupied dangling bonds. For 6-fold coordinated Ti-oxides defect excited states in 2nd derivative O K pre-edge spectra are essentially the same as single Ti-atom d2 transitions in Tanabe-Sugano (T-S) diagrams. O-vacated site defects in 8-fold coordinated ZrO2 and HfO2 are described by d8 T-S diagrams. T-S defect state ordering and splittings are functions of the coordination and symmetry of vacated site bordering TM atoms. ΔLF values from the analysis of T-S diagrams indicate medium range order (MRO) extending to 3rd and 4th nearest-neighbor (NN) TM-atoms. Values are different for 6-fold Ti, and 8-fold ZrO2 and HfO2, and scale inversely with differences in respective formal ionic radii. O-vacated site bonding

  17. Professional caregivers' work with the dying in nursing homes--a Foucault-inspired analysis of discourses in the last decade in a Danish context.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Karen T; Glasdam, Stinne

    2013-12-01

    International studies on the death of elderly nursing home residents show the complexity in the understanding of the professionals who care for the dying. The aim of this study is to explore the discourses about professional caregivers caring for those dying in Denmark in the last decade. A discourse analysis inspired by Foucault was constructed. The material consists of different source documents: research articles, newspaper articles, theses, books, websites - 35 sources in total. There are constructed six positions of speech, five discourses and three themes: (1) 'the work of the professional caregivers - a complex low-status work'; (2) 'the education of the professionals - the way to ensure a good death or possessing the right qualifications' and (3) 'the vulnerable professionals'. The study concludes that an economical/political discourse is dominating and sets up the frames within which the professionals care for dying residents, although the medical, the social/critical and the religious discourses attempt to speak against it. All positions articulate that the professional caregivers' job has a low status and that it is not possible to provide an optimal care due to lack of time, resources and education. Psychical or mental demands make the professionals vulnerable. The meaning of optimal care varies according to the positions of speech.

  18. Deep inspiration breath-hold technique for left-sided breast cancer: An analysis of predictors for organ-at-risk sparing

    SciTech Connect

    Register, Steven; Takita, Cristiane; Reis, Isildinha; Zhao, Wei; Amestoy, William; Wright, Jean

    2015-04-01

    To identify anatomic and treatment characteristics that correlate with organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique to guide patient selection for this technique. Anatomic and treatment characteristics and radiation doses to OARs were compared between free-breathing and DIBH plans. Linear regression analysis was used to identify factors independently predicting for cardiac sparing. We identified 64 patients: 44 with intact breast and 20 postmastectomy. For changes measured directly on treatment planning scans, DIBH plans decreased heart-chest wall length (6.5 vs 5.0 cm, p < 0.001), and increased lung volume (1074.4 vs 1881.3 cm{sup 3}, p < 0.001), and for changes measured after fields are set, they decreased maximum heart depth (1.1 vs 0.3 cm, p < 0.001) and heart volume in field (HVIF) (9.1 vs 0.9 cm{sup 3}, p < 0.001). DIBH reduced the mean heart dose (3.4 vs 1.8 Gy, p < 0.001) and lung V{sub 20} (19.6% vs 15.3%, p < 0.001). Regression analysis found that only change in HVIF independently predicted for cardiac sparing. We identified patients in the bottom quartile of the dosimetric benefits seen with DIBH and categorized the cause of this “minimal benefit.” Overall, 29% of patients satisfied these criteria for minimal benefit with DIBH and the most common cause was favorable baseline anatomy. Only the reduction in HVIF predicted for reductions in mean heart dose; no specific anatomic surrogate for the dosimetric benefits of DIBH technique could be identified. Most patients have significant dosimetric benefit with DIBH, and this technique should be planned and evaluated for all patients receiving left-sided breast/chest wall radiation.

  19. Biologically inspired oxidation catalysis.

    PubMed

    Que, Lawrence; Tolman, William B

    2008-09-18

    The development of processes for selective hydrocarbon oxidation is a goal that has long been pursued. An additional challenge is to make such processes environmentally friendly, for example by using non-toxic reagents and energy-efficient catalytic methods. Excellent examples are naturally occurring iron- or copper-containing metalloenzymes, and extensive studies have revealed the key chemical principles that underlie their efficacy as catalysts for aerobic oxidations. Important inroads have been made in applying this knowledge to the development of synthetic catalysts that model enzyme function. Such biologically inspired hydrocarbon oxidation catalysts hold great promise for wide-ranging synthetic applications.

  20. Image Analysis for MRI Based Brain Tumor Detection and Feature Extraction Using Biologically Inspired BWT and SVM.

    PubMed

    Bahadure, Nilesh Bhaskarrao; Ray, Arun Kumar; Thethi, Har Pal

    2017-01-01

    The segmentation, detection, and extraction of infected tumor area from magnetic resonance (MR) images are a primary concern but a tedious and time taking task performed by radiologists or clinical experts, and their accuracy depends on their experience only. So, the use of computer aided technology becomes very necessary to overcome these limitations. In this study, to improve the performance and reduce the complexity involves in the medical image segmentation process, we have investigated Berkeley wavelet transformation (BWT) based brain tumor segmentation. Furthermore, to improve the accuracy and quality rate of the support vector machine (SVM) based classifier, relevant features are extracted from each segmented tissue. The experimental results of proposed technique have been evaluated and validated for performance and quality analysis on magnetic resonance brain images, based on accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and dice similarity index coefficient. The experimental results achieved 96.51% accuracy, 94.2% specificity, and 97.72% sensitivity, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed technique for identifying normal and abnormal tissues from brain MR images. The experimental results also obtained an average of 0.82 dice similarity index coefficient, which indicates better overlap between the automated (machines) extracted tumor region with manually extracted tumor region by radiologists. The simulation results prove the significance in terms of quality parameters and accuracy in comparison to state-of-the-art techniques.

  1. Flux Balance Analysis Inspired Bioprocess Upgrading for Lycopene Production by a Metabolically Engineered Strain of Yarrowia lipolytica

    PubMed Central

    Nambou, Komi; Jian, Xingxing; Zhang, Xinkai; Wei, Liujing; Lou, Jiajia; Madzak, Catherine; Hua, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models embody a significant advantage of systems biology since their applications as metabolic flux simulation models enable predictions for the production of industrially-interesting metabolites. The biotechnological production of lycopene from Yarrowia lipolytica is an emerging scope that has not been fully scrutinized, especially for what concerns cultivation conditions of newly generated engineered strains. In this study, by combining flux balance analysis (FBA) and Plackett-Burman design, we screened chemicals for lycopene production from a metabolically engineered strain of Y. lipolytica. Lycopene concentrations of 126 and 242 mg/L were achieved correspondingly from the FBA-independent and the FBA-assisted designed media in fed-batch cultivation mode. Transcriptional studies revealed upregulations of heterologous genes in media designed according to FBA, thus implying the efficiency of model predictions. Our study will potentially support upgraded lycopene and other terpenoids production from existing or prospect bioengineered strains of Y. lipolytica and/or closely related yeast species. PMID:26703753

  2. Sequentially-coupled space-time FSI analysis of bio-inspired flapping-wing aerodynamics of an MAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizawa, Kenji; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.; Kostov, Nikolay

    2014-08-01

    We present a sequentially-coupled space-time (ST) computational fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analysis of flapping-wing aerodynamics of a micro aerial vehicle (MAV). The wing motion and deformation data, whether prescribed fully or partially, is from an actual locust, extracted from high-speed, multi-camera video recordings of the locust in a wind tunnel. The core computational FSI technology is based on the Deforming-Spatial-Domain/Stabilized ST (DSD/SST) formulation. This is supplemented with using NURBS basis functions in temporal representation of the wing and mesh motion, and in remeshing. Here we use the version of the DSD/SST formulation derived in conjunction with the variational multiscale (VMS) method, and this version is called "DSD/SST-VMST." The structural mechanics computations are based on the Kirchhoff-Love shell model. The sequential-coupling technique is applicable to some classes of FSI problems, especially those with temporally-periodic behavior. We show that it performs well in FSI computations of the flapping-wing aerodynamics we consider here. In addition to the straight-flight case, we analyze cases where the MAV body has rolling, pitching, or rolling and pitching motion. We study how all these influence the lift and thrust.

  3. Image Analysis for MRI Based Brain Tumor Detection and Feature Extraction Using Biologically Inspired BWT and SVM

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Arun Kumar; Thethi, Har Pal

    2017-01-01

    The segmentation, detection, and extraction of infected tumor area from magnetic resonance (MR) images are a primary concern but a tedious and time taking task performed by radiologists or clinical experts, and their accuracy depends on their experience only. So, the use of computer aided technology becomes very necessary to overcome these limitations. In this study, to improve the performance and reduce the complexity involves in the medical image segmentation process, we have investigated Berkeley wavelet transformation (BWT) based brain tumor segmentation. Furthermore, to improve the accuracy and quality rate of the support vector machine (SVM) based classifier, relevant features are extracted from each segmented tissue. The experimental results of proposed technique have been evaluated and validated for performance and quality analysis on magnetic resonance brain images, based on accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and dice similarity index coefficient. The experimental results achieved 96.51% accuracy, 94.2% specificity, and 97.72% sensitivity, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed technique for identifying normal and abnormal tissues from brain MR images. The experimental results also obtained an average of 0.82 dice similarity index coefficient, which indicates better overlap between the automated (machines) extracted tumor region with manually extracted tumor region by radiologists. The simulation results prove the significance in terms of quality parameters and accuracy in comparison to state-of-the-art techniques. PMID:28367213

  4. Geophysics in INSPIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sőrés, László

    2013-04-01

    INSPIRE is a European directive to harmonize spatial data in Europe. Its' aim is to establish a transparent, multidisciplinary network of environmental information by using international standards and OGC web services. Spatial data themes defined in the annex of the directive cover 34 domains that are closely bundled to environment and spatial information. According to the INSPIRE roadmap all data providers must setup discovery, viewing and download services and restructure data stores to provide spatial data as defined by the underlying specifications by 2014 December 1. More than 3000 institutions are going to be involved in the progress. During the data specification process geophysics as an inevitable source of geo information was introduced to Annex II Geology. Within the Geology theme Geophysics is divided into core and extended model. The core model contains specifications for legally binding data provisioning and is going to be part of the Implementation Rules of the INSPIRE directives. To minimize the work load of obligatory data transformations the scope of the core model is very limited and simple. It covers the most essential geophysical feature types that are relevant in economic and environmental context. To fully support the use cases identified by the stake holders the extended model was developed. It contains a wide range of spatial object types for geophysical measurements, processed and interpreted results, and wrapper classes to help data providers in using the Observation and Measurements (O&M) standard for geophysical data exchange. Instead of introducing the traditional concept of "geophysical methods" at a high structural level the data model classifies measurements and geophysical models based on their spatial characteristics. Measurements are classified as geophysical station (point), geophysical profile (curve) and geophysical swath (surface). Generic classes for processing results and interpretation models are curve model (1D), surface

  5. An Exploration of Design Students' Inspiration Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dazkir, Sibel S.; Mower, Jennifer M.; Reddy-Best, Kelly L.; Pedersen, Elaine L.

    2013-01-01

    Our purpose was to explore how different sources of inspiration influenced two groups of students' inspiration process and their attitudes toward their design projects. Assigned sources of inspiration and instructor's assistance in the search for inspiration varied for two groups of students completing a small culture inspired product design…

  6. Holography inspired stringy hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenschein, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Holography inspired stringy hadrons (HISH) is a set of models that describe hadrons: mesons, baryons and glueballs as strings in flat four dimensional space-time. The models are based on a "map" from stringy hadrons of holographic confining backgrounds. In this note we review the "derivation" of the models. We start with a brief reminder of the passage from the AdS5 ×S5 string theory to certain flavored confining holographic models. We then describe the string configurations in holographic backgrounds that correspond to a Wilson line, a meson, a baryon and a glueball. The key ingredients of the four dimensional picture of hadrons are the "string endpoint mass" and the "baryonic string vertex". We determine the classical trajectories of the HISH. We review the current understanding of the quantization of the hadronic strings. We end with a summary of the comparison of the outcome of the HISH models with the PDG data about mesons and baryons. We extract the values of the tension, masses and intercepts from best fits, write down certain predictions for higher excited hadrons and present attempts to identify glueballs.

  7. The Role of INSPIRE in HEP Data Preservation Efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Travis C.; /SLAC

    2010-06-11

    INSPIRE is a new community resource for HEP literature and associated information. It is based on the combination of SPIRES content and features and the powerful Invenio software developed at CERN. The INSPIRE service will come online in fall of 2009, and be run by CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC. Data preservation, to be successful, must not only preserve the data, but must also organize it and allow it to be found by those who would make use of it, and resources such as INSPIRE are ideally positioned and ready to provide this organization and context. In addition, INSPIRE will soon be ready to provide storage of smaller datasets, such as high-level analysis objects, as stand-alone objects placed in the repository or as objects associated with an analysis paper. This small project could pave the way towards the context and organization which is one piece of the infrastructure needed for all levels of data preservation.

  8. Constraint density functional calculations for multiplets in ligand-fields: Applications to Fe-phthalocyanine and Al2O3:Cr^3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaoka, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Akiyama, T.; Ito, T.; Weinert, M.; Freeman, A. J.

    2012-02-01

    In transition-metal-based complexes and molecules, multiplet structures are essential in understanding the electronic structure. However, it is often difficult to evaluate a true ground state or the lowest state within a given ligand (or crystal) symmetry from first principles calculations based on density-functional theory (DFT). Here, we propose a simple DFT approach, implemented into the FLAPW methodootnotetextWimmer, Krakauer, Weinert, Freeman, PRB24, 864; Weinert, Wimmer, Freeman, PRB26, 4571, to treat multiplets in ligand-fields, by imposing a density matrix constraint on the d-orbital occupation numbers. We demonstrate the utility of this approach for the case of an isolated single Fe phthalocyanine (FePc) and a Cr impurity in a corundum Al2O3. For the FePc, results predict that there are three stationary states of ^3Eg, ^3B2, and ^3A2 in the Fe^2+ ion, and our total energy calculations clearly demonstrate that the ground state is ^3A2g. In the case of the Al2O3:Cr^3+, where an on-site Coulomb correlation correction (+U) is incorporated, the ground state is ^4A2 and the total energy difference between the ground state and the excited state ^4T2, 2.9 eV, roughly agrees with an experimental value of 2.23 eV.

  9. Bio-inspired vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posch, C.

    2012-01-01

    Nature still outperforms the most powerful computers in routine functions involving perception, sensing and actuation like vision, audition, and motion control, and is, most strikingly, orders of magnitude more energy-efficient than its artificial competitors. The reasons for the superior performance of biological systems are subject to diverse investigations, but it is clear that the form of hardware and the style of computation in nervous systems are fundamentally different from what is used in artificial synchronous information processing systems. Very generally speaking, biological neural systems rely on a large number of relatively simple, slow and unreliable processing elements and obtain performance and robustness from a massively parallel principle of operation and a high level of redundancy where the failure of single elements usually does not induce any observable system performance degradation. In the late 1980`s, Carver Mead demonstrated that silicon VLSI technology can be employed in implementing ``neuromorphic'' circuits that mimic neural functions and fabricating building blocks that work like their biological role models. Neuromorphic systems, as the biological systems they model, are adaptive, fault-tolerant and scalable, and process information using energy-efficient, asynchronous, event-driven methods. In this paper, some basics of neuromorphic electronic engineering and its impact on recent developments in optical sensing and artificial vision are presented. It is demonstrated that bio-inspired vision systems have the potential to outperform conventional, frame-based vision acquisition and processing systems in many application fields and to establish new benchmarks in terms of redundancy suppression/data compression, dynamic range, temporal resolution and power efficiency to realize advanced functionality like 3D vision, object tracking, motor control, visual feedback loops, etc. in real-time. It is argued that future artificial vision systems

  10. Physicists Get INSPIREd: INSPIRE Project and Grid Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klem, Jukka; Iwaszkiewicz, Jan

    2011-12-01

    INSPIRE is the new high-energy physics scientific information system developed by CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC. INSPIRE combines the curated and trusted contents of SPIRES database with Invenio digital library technology. INSPIRE contains the entire HEP literature with about one million records and in addition to becoming the reference HEP scientific information platform, it aims to provide new kinds of data mining services and metrics to assess the impact of articles and authors. Grid and cloud computing provide new opportunities to offer better services in areas that require large CPU and storage resources including document Optical Character Recognition (OCR) processing, full-text indexing of articles and improved metrics. D4Science-II is a European project that develops and operates an e-Infrastructure supporting Virtual Research Environments (VREs). It develops an enabling technology (gCube) which implements a mechanism for facilitating the interoperation of its e-Infrastructure with other autonomously running data e-Infrastructures. As a result, this creates the core of an e-Infrastructure ecosystem. INSPIRE is one of the e-Infrastructures participating in D4Science-II project. In the context of the D4Science-II project, the INSPIRE e-Infrastructure makes available some of its resources and services to other members of the resulting ecosystem. Moreover, it benefits from the ecosystem via a dedicated Virtual Organization giving access to an array of resources ranging from computing and storage resources of grid infrastructures to data and services.

  11. The electronic spectrum of AgBr 2: Ab initio benchmark vs. DFT calculations on the lowest ligand-field states including spin-orbit effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoyo-Castillo, I.; Ramírez-Solís, A.

    2010-10-01

    The X 2Π g, 2Σ g+ and 2Δ g states of AgBr 2 have been studied through benchmark ab initio CASSCF + Averaged Coupled Pair Functional (ACPF) and DFT calculations using especially developed valence basis sets to study the transition energies, geometries, vibrational frequencies, Mulliken charges and spin densities. The spin-orbit (SO) effects were included through the effective hamiltonian formalism using the |ΛSΣ> ACPF energies as diagonal elements. At the ACPF level, the ground state is 2Π g, in contradiction with ligand-field theory and Hartree-Fock results. The ACPF adiabatic excitation energies of the 2Σ g+ and 2Δ g states are 3825 and 20 152 cm -1, respectively. The inclusion of the SO effects leads to a pure Ω = 3/2 ( 2Π g) ground state, a Ω = 1/2 (97% 2Π g + 3% 2Σ g+) A state, a Ω = 1/2 (3% 2Π g + 97% 2Σ g+) B state, a Ω = 5/2 ( 2Δ g) C state and a Ω = 3/2 (99% 2Δ g) D state. The B97, B3LYP and PBE0 functionals, which were shown to yield accurate transition energies for CuCl 2, overestimate the X 2Π g- 2Σ g+ T e by around 25% but provide a qualitative energetic ordering in agreement with CASSCF and ACPF results. The nature of the bonding in the X 2Π g ground state is different from that of AgCl 2 since the Mulliken charge on the metal is 0.95 while the spin density is only 0.39. DFT strongly delocalizes the spin density providing even smaller values of around 0.13 on Ag not only for the ground state, but also for the 2Σ g+ state.

  12. [Inspirations from natural products based drug research and development for Chinese medicine research--analysis of natural products recoded in TTD].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiu-Ping; Lu, Jin-Jian; Guo, Jia-Jie; Bao, Jiao-Lin; Xu, Wen-Shan; Ding, Qian; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2012-11-01

    Natural product is an important source of new drug research and development (R&D). Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) innovation is the key step for its modernization and internationalization. However, due to the complexity of TCM, there are many difficulties and confusions in this process. Target-based drug discovery is the mainstream model and method of R&D. TTD, short for therapeutic target database, is developed by National University of Singapore. Besides a large amount of information on drug targets, the database also contains considerable information related to natural products. This paper briefly introduces the TTD, analyzes the natural products derived drugs/compounds recorded in TTD, which we think might provide some inspiration for the innovation of TCM.

  13. Prospecting Lighting Applications with Ligand Field Tools and Density Functional Theory: A First-Principles Account of the 4f(7)-4f(6)5d(1) Luminescence of CsMgBr3:Eu(2+).

    PubMed

    Ramanantoanina, Harry; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Göttel, Christian; Sahnoun, Mohammed; Herden, Benjamin; Suta, Markus; Wickleder, Claudia; Urland, Werner; Daul, Claude

    2015-09-08

    The most efficient way to provide domestic lighting nowadays is by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) technology combined with phosphors shifting the blue and UV emission toward a desirable sunlight spectrum. A route in the quest for warm-white light goes toward the discovery and tuning of the lanthanide-based phosphors, a difficult task, in experimental and technical respects. A proper theoretical approach, which is also complicated at the conceptual level and in computing efforts, is however a profitable complement, offering valuable structure-property rationale as a guideline in the search of the best materials. The Eu(2+)-based systems are the prototypes for ideal phosphors, exhibiting a wide range of visible light emission. Using the ligand field concepts in conjunction with density functional theory (DFT), conducted in nonroutine manner, we develop a nonempirical procedure to investigate the 4f(7)-4f(6)5d(1) luminescence of Eu(2+) in the environment of arbitrary ligands, applied here on the CsMgBr3:Eu(2+)-doped material. Providing a salient methodology for the extraction of the relevant ligand field and related parameters from DFT calculations and encompassing the bottleneck of handling large matrices in a model Hamiltonian based on the whole set of 33,462 states, we obtained an excellent match with the experimental spectrum, from first-principles, without any fit or adjustment. This proves that the ligand field density functional theory methodology can be used in the assessment of new materials and rational property design.

  14. Revealing the consequences and errors of substance arising from the inverse confusion between the crystal (ligand) field quantities and the zero-field splitting ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudowicz, Czesław; Karbowiak, Mirosław

    2015-01-01

    Survey of recent literature has revealed a doubly-worrying tendency concerning the treatment of the two distinct types of Hamiltonians, namely, the physical crystal field (CF), or equivalently ligand field (LF), Hamiltonians and the zero-field splitting (ZFS) Hamiltonians, which appear in the effective spin Hamiltonians (SH). The nature and properties of the CF (LF) Hamiltonians have been mixed up in various ways with those of the ZFS Hamiltonians. Such cases have been identified in a rapidly growing number of studies of the transition-ion based systems using electron magnetic resonance (EMR), optical spectroscopy, and magnetic measurements. These findings have far ranging implications since these Hamiltonians are cornerstones for interpretation of magnetic and spectroscopic properties of the single transition ions in various crystals or molecules as well as the exchange coupled systems (ECS) of transition ions, e.g. single molecule magnets (SMM) or single ion magnets (SIM). The seriousness of the consequences of such conceptual problems and related terminological confusions has reached a level that goes far beyond simple semantic issues or misleading keyword classifications of papers in journals and scientific databases. The prevailing confusion, denoted as the CF=ZFS confusion, pertains to the cases of labeling the true ZFS quantities as purportedly the CF (LF) quantities. Here we consider the inverse confusion between the CF (LF) quantities and the SH (ZFS) ones, denoted the ZFS=CF confusion, which consists in referring to the parameters (or Hamiltonians), which are the true CF (LF) quantities, as purportedly the ZFS (or SH) quantities. Specific cases of the ZFS=CF confusion identified in recent textbooks, reviews and papers, especially SMM- and SIM-related ones, are surveyed and the pertinent misconceptions are clarified. The serious consequences of the terminological confusions include misinterpretation of data from a wide range of experimental techniques and

  15. Biology-Inspired Autonomous Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-31

    understanding the mechanisms of biological flight through collaboration with various experimental biology academic research laboratories around the world ...around the world . The research focus addressed two broad, complementary research areas: autonomous systems concepts inspired by the behavior and...freedom to do so”.2 This definition characterizes the most obvious feature of biological flight: flying organisms exploit real- world aerial

  16. In Search of Scientific Inspiration.

    PubMed

    2017-01-12

    In the ever-expanding sea of scientific advances, how do you find inspiration for your own study? Cell editor Jiaying Tan talked with Mark Lemmon and Joseph (Yossi) Schlessinger about the importance of fueling your research creativity with the conceptual excitement and technical advance from the broad scientific field. An excerpt of the conversation appears below.

  17. London: An Art Teacher's Inspiration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guhin, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Often overshadowed in people's minds by Paris, London is truly an artist's jewel. The art and architecture, history, gardens and museums are inspiring, yes, but there's so much more to this ancient city. The performances, attractions and markets are a boon to the creative soul. London can be surprisingly inexpensive to visit. Gazing at statues,…

  18. Inspiring the Best in Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erwin, Jonathan C.

    2010-01-01

    Students' success in school and later in life is highly dependent on their ability to 1) regulate their emotions and control their behavior and 2) get along with their teachers and peers. In this book, the author wants to teach you how to inspire students to learn, behave responsibly, and improve their relationships with themselves, other…

  19. Inspiration: One Percent and Rising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Donovan R.

    2009-01-01

    Inventor Thomas Edison once famously declared, "Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration." If that's the case, then the students the author witnessed at the International Student Media Festival (ISMF) last November in Orlando, Florida, are geniuses and more. The students in the ISMF pre-conference workshop…

  20. Novel locomotion via biological inspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Roger D.; Boxerbaum, Alexander; Palmer, Luther; Chiel, Hillel; Diller, Eric; Hunt, Alexander; Bachmann, Richard

    2011-05-01

    Animal behavioral, physiological and neurobiological studies are providing a wealth of inspirational data for robot design and control. Several very different biologically inspired mobile robots will be reviewed. A robot called DIGbot is being developed that moves independent of the direction of gravity using Distributed Inward Gripping (DIG) as a rapid and robust attachment mechanism observed in climbing animals. DIGbot is an 18 degree of freedom hexapod with onboard power and control systems. Passive compliance in its feet, which is inspired by the flexible tarsus of the cockroach, increases the robustness of the adhesion strategy and enables DIGbot to execute large steps and stationary turns while walking on mesh screens. A Whegs™ robot, inspired by insect locomotion principles, is being developed that can be rapidly reconfigured between tracks and wheel-legs and carry GeoSystems Zipper Mast. The mechanisms that cause it to passively change its gait on irregular terrain have been integrated into its hubs for a compact and modular design. The robot is designed to move smoothly on moderately rugged terrain using its tracks and run on irregular terrain and stairs using its wheel-legs. We are also developing soft bodied robots that use peristalsis, the same method of locomotion earthworms use. We present a technique of using a braided mesh exterior to produce fluid waves of motion along the body of the robot that increase the robot's speed relative to previous designs. The concept is highly scalable, for endoscopes to water, oil or gas line inspection.

  1. INSPIRED High School Computing Academies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doerschuk, Peggy; Liu, Jiangjiang; Mann, Judith

    2011-01-01

    If we are to attract more women and minorities to computing we must engage students at an early age. As part of its mission to increase participation of women and underrepresented minorities in computing, the Increasing Student Participation in Research Development Program (INSPIRED) conducts computing academies for high school students. The…

  2. The mutual inspirations of machine learning and neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Helmstaedter, Moritz

    2015-04-08

    Neuroscientists are generating data sets of enormous size, which are matching the complexity of real-world classification tasks. Machine learning has helped data analysis enormously but is often not as accurate as human data analysis. Here, Helmstaedter discusses the challenges and promises of neuroscience-inspired machine learning that lie ahead.

  3. Inspire Me! Pupils' Views of What Inspires Them and What Constitutes an Inspiring Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darlington, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Both "pupil voice" and "staff voice" can be powerful tools in developing various aspects of a school, but only if there is a strong dialogue between the two. This project used a number of different approaches--questionnaires, lesson observations and planning discussions--to investigate pupils' views of what inspires them to…

  4. A Tony Thomas-Inspired Guide to INSPIRE

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, Heath B.; /Fermilab

    2010-04-01

    The SPIRES database was created in the late 1960s to catalogue the high energy physics preprints received by the SLAC Library. In the early 1990s it became the first database on the web and the first website outside of Europe. Although indispensible to the HEP community, its aging software infrastructure is becoming a serious liability. In a joint project involving CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC, a new database, INSPIRE, is being created to replace SPIRES using CERN's modern, open-source Invenio database software. INSPIRE will maintain the content and functionality of SPIRES plus many new features. I describe this evolution from the birth of SPIRES to the current day, noting that the career of Tony Thomas spans this timeline.

  5. What Students Value as Inspirational and Transformative Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Sally; Kirby, Emma; Madriaga, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Evidence presented here stems from an analysis of student comments derived from a student-nominated inspirational teaching awards scheme at a large university in the United Kingdom (UK). There is a plethora of literature on teaching excellence and the scholarship of teaching, frequently based upon portfolios or personal claims of excellence, and…

  6. Non-empirical Prediction of the Photophysical and Magnetic Properties of Systems with Open d- and f-Shells Based on Combined Ligand Field and Density Functional Theory (LFDFT).

    PubMed

    Daul, Claude

    2014-09-01

    Despite the important growth of ab initio and computational techniques, ligand field theory in molecular science or crystal field theory in condensed matter offers the most intuitive way to calculate multiplet energy levels arising from systems with open shells d and/or f electrons. Over the past decade we have developed a ligand field treatment of inorganic molecular modelling taking advantage of the dominant localization of the frontier orbitals within the metal-sphere. This feature, which is observed in any inorganic coordination compound, especially if treated by Density Functional Theory calculation, allows the determination of the electronic structure and properties with a surprising good accuracy. In ligand field theory, the theoretical concepts consider only a single atom center; and treat its interaction with the chemical environment essentially as a perturbation. Therefore success in the simple ligand field theory is no longer questionable, while the more accurate molecular orbital theory does in general over-estimate the metal-ligand covalence, thus yields wave functions that are too delocalized. Although LF theory has always been popular as a semi-empirical method when dealing with molecules of high symmetry e.g. cubic symmetry where the number of parameters needed is reasonably small (3 or 5), this is no more the case for molecules without symmetry and involving both an open d- and f-shell (# parameters ∼90). However, the combination of LF theory and Density Functional (DF) theory that we introduced twenty years ago can easily deal with complex molecules of any symmetry with two and more open shells. The accuracy of these predictions from 1(st) principles achieves quite a high accuracy (<5%) in terms of states energies. Hence, this approach is well suited to predict the magnetic and photo-physical properties arbitrary molecules and materials prior to their synthesis, which is the ultimate goal of each computational chemist. We will illustrate the

  7. Natural photonics for industrial inspiration.

    PubMed

    Parker, Andrew R

    2009-05-13

    There are two considerations for optical biomimetics: the diversity of submicrometre architectures found in the natural world, and the industrial manufacture of these. A review exists on the latter subject, where current engineering methods are considered along with those of the natural cells. Here, on the other hand, I will provide a modern review of the different categories of reflectors and antireflectors found in animals, including their optical characterization. The purpose of this is to inspire designers within the $2 billion annual optics industry.

  8. Bio-inspired odor-based navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Maynard J., III; Vasquez, Juan R.

    2006-05-01

    The ability of many insects, especially moths, to locate either food or a member of the opposite sex is an amazing achievement. There are numerous scenarios where having this ability embedded into ground-based or aerial vehicles would be invaluable. This paper presents results from a 3-D computer simulation of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) autonomously tracking a chemical plume to its source. The simulation study includes a simulated dynamic chemical plume, 6-degree of freedom, nonlinear aircraft model, and a bio-inspired navigation algorithm. The emphasis of this paper is the development and analysis of the navigation algorithm. The foundation of this algorithm is a fuzzy controller designed to categorize where in the plume the aircraft is located: coming into the plume, in the plume, exiting the plume, or out of the plume.

  9. Has the London 2012 Olympic Inspire Programme Inspired a Generation? A Realist View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girginov, Vassil

    2016-01-01

    The organisers of the 2012 London Olympics have endeavoured explicitly to use the Games to inspire a generation. This is nothing short of putting the main claim of Olympism to the test, but surprisingly the Inspire project has received virtually no scholarly scrutiny. Using an educationally-informed view of inspiration, this paper interrogates the…

  10. Maitotoxin: An Inspiration for Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Aversa, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Maitotoxin holds a special place in the annals of natural products chemistry as the largest and most toxic secondary metabolite known to date. Its fascinating, ladder-like, polyether molecular structure and diverse spectrum of biological activities elicited keen interest from chemists and biologists who recognized its uniqueness and potential as a probe and inspiration for research in chemistry and biology. Synthetic studies in the area benefited from methodologies and strategies that were developed as part of chemical synthesis programs directed toward the total synthesis of some of the less complex members of the polyether marine biotoxin class, of which maitotoxin is the flagship. This account focuses on progress made in the authors’ laboratories in the synthesis of large maitotoxin domains with emphasis on methodology development, strategy design, and structural comparisons of the synthesized molecules with the corresponding regions of the natural product. The article concludes with an overview of maitotoxin’s biological profile and future perspectives. PMID:21709816

  11. [Nikola Tesla: flashes of inspiration].

    PubMed

    Villarejo-Galende, Albero; Herrero-San Martín, Alejandro

    2013-01-16

    Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) was one of the greatest inventors in history and a key player in the revolution that led to the large-scale use of electricity. He also made important contributions to such diverse fields as x-rays, remote control, radio, the theory of consciousness or electromagnetism. In his honour, the international unit of magnetic induction was named after him. Yet, his fame is scarce in comparison with that of other inventors of the time, such as Edison, with whom he had several heated arguments. He was a rather odd, reserved person who lived for his inventions, the ideas for which came to him in moments of inspiration. In his autobiography he relates these flashes with a number of neuropsychiatric manifestations, which can be seen to include migraine auras, synaesthesiae, obsessions and compulsions.

  12. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  13. Decrypting SO (10)-inspired leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bari, Pasquale; Marzola, Luca; Re Fiorentin, Michele

    2015-04-01

    Encouraged by the recent results from neutrino oscillation experiments, we perform an analytical study of SO (10)-inspired models and leptogenesis with hierarchical right-handed (RH) neutrino spectrum. Under the approximation of negligible misalignment between the neutrino Yukawa basis and the charged lepton basis, we find an analytical expression for the final asymmetry directly in terms of the low energy neutrino parameters that fully reproduces previous numerical results. This expression also shows that it is possible to identify an effective leptogenesis phase for these models. When we also impose the wash-out of a large pre-existing asymmetry NB-Lp,i, the strong thermal (ST) condition, we derive analytically all those constraints on the low energy neutrino parameters that characterise the ST- SO (10)-inspired leptogenesis solution, confirming previous numerical results. In particular we show why, though neutrino masses have to be necessarily normally ordered, the solution implies an analytical lower bound on the effective neutrino-less double beta decay neutrino mass, mee ≳ 8 meV, for NB-Lp,i =10-3, testable with next generation experiments. This, in combination with an upper bound on the atmospheric mixing angle, necessarily in the first octant, forces the lightest neutrino mass within a narrow range m1 ≃ (10- 30) meV (corresponding to ∑imi ≃ (75- 125) meV). We also show why the solution could correctly predict a non-vanishing reactor neutrino mixing angle and requires the Dirac phase to be in the fourth quadrant, implying sin ⁡ δ (and JCP) negative as hinted by current global analyses. Many of the analytical results presented (expressions for the orthogonal matrix, RH neutrino mixing matrix, masses and phases) can have applications beyond leptogenesis.

  14. Kidney-inspired algorithm for optimization problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaddi, Najmeh Sadat; Alvankarian, Jafar; Abdullah, Salwani

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a population-based algorithm inspired by the kidney process in the human body is proposed. In this algorithm the solutions are filtered in a rate that is calculated based on the mean of objective functions of all solutions in the current population of each iteration. The filtered solutions as the better solutions are moved to filtered blood and the rest are transferred to waste representing the worse solutions. This is a simulation of the glomerular filtration process in the kidney. The waste solutions are reconsidered in the iterations if after applying a defined movement operator they satisfy the filtration rate, otherwise it is expelled from the waste solutions, simulating the reabsorption and excretion functions of the kidney. In addition, a solution assigned as better solution is secreted if it is not better than the worst solutions simulating the secreting process of blood in the kidney. After placement of all the solutions in the population, the best of them is ranked, the waste and filtered blood are merged to become a new population and the filtration rate is updated. Filtration provides the required exploitation while generating a new solution and reabsorption gives the necessary exploration for the algorithm. The algorithm is assessed by applying it on eight well-known benchmark test functions and compares the results with other algorithms in the literature. The performance of the proposed algorithm is better on seven out of eight test functions when it is compared with the most recent researches in literature. The proposed kidney-inspired algorithm is able to find the global optimum with less function evaluations on six out of eight test functions. A statistical analysis further confirms the ability of this algorithm to produce good-quality results.

  15. Business Inspiration: Small Business Leadership in Recovery?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rae, David; Price, Liz; Bosworth, Gary; Parkinson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Business Inspiration was a short, action-centred leadership and innovation development programme designed for owners and managers of smaller firms to address business survival and repositioning needs arising from the UK's economic downturn. The article examines the design and delivery of Business Inspiration and the impact of the programme on…

  16. Inspiring a Life Full of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasse, Saul

    2010-01-01

    After being appointed as Controller of BBC Learning, this author reflected on how the BBC had inspired his own love of learning. He realised that unlocking the learning potential of the full range of BBC outputs would be the key to inspiring a "life full of learning" for all its audiences. In this article, the author describes four new…

  17. Vibration isolation by exploring bio-inspired structural nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhijing; Jing, Xingjian; Bian, Jing; Li, Fengming; Allen, Robert

    2015-10-08

    Inspired by the limb structures of animals/insects in motion vibration control, a bio-inspired limb-like structure (LLS) is systematically studied for understanding and exploring its advantageous nonlinear function in passive vibration isolation. The bio-inspired system consists of asymmetric articulations (of different rod lengths) with inside vertical and horizontal springs (as animal muscle) of different linear stiffness. Mathematical modeling and analysis of the proposed LLS reveal that, (a) the system has very beneficial nonlinear stiffness which can provide flexible quasi-zero, zero and/or negative stiffness, and these nonlinear stiffness properties are adjustable or designable with structure parameters; (b) the asymmetric rod-length ratio and spring-stiffness ratio present very beneficial factors for tuning system equivalent stiffness; (c) the system loading capacity is also adjustable with the structure parameters which presents another flexible benefit in application. Experiments and comparisons with existing quasi-zero-stiffness isolators validate the advantageous features above, and some discussions are also given about how to select structural parameters for practical applications. The results would provide an innovative bio-inspired solution to passive vibration control in various engineering practice.

  18. Highly eccentric inspirals into a black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osburn, Thomas; Warburton, Niels; Evans, Charles R.

    2016-03-01

    We model the inspiral of a compact stellar-mass object into a massive nonrotating black hole including all dissipative and conservative first-order-in-the-mass-ratio effects on the orbital motion. The techniques we develop allow inspirals with initial eccentricities as high as e ˜0.8 and initial separations as large as p ˜50 to be evolved through many thousands of orbits up to the onset of the plunge into the black hole. The inspiral is computed using an osculating elements scheme driven by a hybridized self-force model, which combines Lorenz-gauge self-force results with highly accurate flux data from a Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli code. The high accuracy of our hybrid self-force model allows the orbital phase of the inspirals to be tracked to within ˜0.1 radians or better. The difference between self-force models and inspirals computed in the radiative approximation is quantified.

  19. From biologically-inspired physics to physics-inspired biology From biologically-inspired physics to physics-inspired biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornyshev, Alexei A.

    2010-10-01

    The conference 'From DNA-Inspired Physics to Physics-Inspired Biology' (1-5 June 2009, International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy) that myself and two former presidents of the American Biophysical Society—Wilma Olson (Rutgers University) and Adrian Parsegian (NIH), with the support of an ICTP team (Ralf Gebauer (Local Organizer) and Doreen Sauleek (Conference Secretary)), have organized was intended to establish stronger links between the biology and physics communities on the DNA front. The relationships between them were never easy. In 1997, Adrian published a paper in Physics Today ('Harness the Hubris') summarizing his thoughts about the main obstacles for a successful collaboration. The bottom line of that article was that physicists must seriously learn biology before exploring it and even having an interpreter, a friend or co-worker, who will be cooperating with you and translating the problems of biology into a physical language, may not be enough. He started his story with a joke about a physicist asking a biologist: 'I want to study the brain. Tell me something about it!' Biologist: 'First, the brain consists of two parts, and..' Physicist: 'Stop. You have told me too much.' Adrian listed a few direct avenues where physicists' contributions may be particularly welcome. This gentle and elegantly written paper caused, however, a stormy reaction from Bob Austin (Princeton), published together with Adrian's notes, accusing Adrian of forbidding physicists to attack big questions in biology straightaway. Twelve years have passed and many new developments have taken place in the biologist-physicist interaction. This was something I addressed in my opening conference speech, with my position lying somewhere inbetween Parsegian's and Austin's, which is briefly outlined here. I will first recall certain precepts or 'dogmas' that fly in the air like Valkyries, poisoning those relationships. Since the early seventies when I was a first year Ph

  20. Correlation of the structural information obtained for europium-chelate ensembles from gas-phase photoluminescence and ion-mobility spectroscopy with density-functional computations and ligand-field theory.

    PubMed

    Greisch, Jean-François; Chmela, Jiří; Harding, Michael E; Wunderlich, Dirk; Schäfer, Bernhard; Ruben, Mario; Klopper, Wim; Schooss, Detlef; Kappes, Manfred M

    2017-02-22

    We report a combined investigation of europium(iii)9-oxo-phenalen-1-one (PLN) coordination complexes, [Eu(PLN)4AE](+) with AE = Mg, Ca, and Sr, using gas-phase photoluminescence, trapped ion-mobility spectrometry and density-functional computations. In order to sort out the structural impact of the alkali earth dications on the photoluminescence spectra, the experimental data are compared to the predicted ligand-field splittings as well as to the collision cross-sections for different isomers of [Eu(PLN)4AE](+). The best fitting interpretation is that one isomer family predominantly contributes to the recorded luminescence. The present work demonstrates the complexity of the coordination patterns of multicenter lanthanoid chelates involved in dynamical equilibria and the pertinence of using isolation techniques to elucidate their photophysical properties.

  1. Curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms: from electron localization function (ELF) analysis to valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) inspired interpretation.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Juan; Berski, Sławomir; Silvi, Bernard

    2016-07-07

    Probing the electron density transfers during a chemical reaction can provide important insights, making possible to understand and control chemical reactions. This aim has required extensions of the relationships between the traditional chemical concepts and the quantum mechanical ones. The present work examines the detailed chemical insights that have been generated through 100 years of work worldwide on G. N. Lewis's ground breaking paper on The Atom and the Molecule (Lewis, G. N. The Atom and the Molecule, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1916, 38, 762-785), with a focus on how the determination of reaction mechanisms can be reached applying the bonding evolution theory (BET), emphasizing how curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms and how the Lewis structure can be recovered. BET that combines the topological analysis of the electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory (CT) provides a powerful tool providing insight into molecular mechanisms of chemical rearrangements. In agreement with physical laws and quantum theoretical insights, BET can be considered as an appropriate tool to tackle chemical reactivity with a wide range of possible applications. Likewise, the present approach retrieves the classical curly arrows used to describe the rearrangements of chemical bonds for a given reaction mechanism, providing detailed physical grounds for this type of representation. The ideas underlying the valence-shell-electron pair-repulsion (VSEPR) model applied to non-equilibrium geometries provide simple chemical explanations of density transfers. For a given geometry around a central atom, the arrangement of the electronic domain may comply or not with the VSEPR rules according with the valence shell population of the considered atom. A deformation yields arrangements which are either VSEPR defective (at least a domain is missing to match the VSEPR arrangement corresponding to the geometry of the ligands), VSEPR compliant

  2. Biologically Inspired Phosphino Platinum Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Avijita; Helm, Monte L.; Linehan, John C.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2012-08-01

    Platinum complexes containing phosphino amino acid and amino acid ester ligands, built upon the PPhNR’2 platform, have been synthesized and characterized (PPhNR’2= [1,3-diaza]-5-phenyl phosphacyclohexane, R’=glycine or glycine ester). These complexes were characterized by 31P, 13C, 1H, 195Pt NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The X-ray crystal structure of one of the complexes, [PtCl2(PPhNGlyester 2)2], is also reported. These biologically inspired ligands have potential use in homogeneous catalysis, with special applications in chiral chemistry and water soluble chemistry. These complexes also provide a foundation upon which larger peptides can be attached, to allow the introduction of enzyme-like features onto small molecule catalysts. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  3. Berengario's drill: origin and inspiration.

    PubMed

    Chorney, Michael A; Gandhi, Chirag D; Prestigiacomo, Charles J

    2014-04-01

    Craniotomies are among the oldest neurosurgical procedures, as evidenced by early human skulls discovered with holes in the calvaria. Though devices change, the principles to safely transgress the skull are identical. Modern neurosurgeons regularly use electric power drills in the operating theater; however, nonelectric trephining instruments remain trusted by professionals in certain emergent settings in the rare instance that an electric drill is unavailable. Until the late Middle Ages, innovation in craniotomy instrumentation remained stunted without much documented redesign. Jacopo Berengario da Carpi's (c. 1457-1530 CE) text Tractatus de Fractura Calvae sive Cranei depicts a drill previously unseen in a medical volume. Written in 1518 CE, the book was motivated by defeat over the course of Lorenzo II de'Medici's medical care. Berengario's interchangeable bit with a compound brace ("vertibulum"), known today as the Hudson brace, symbolizes a pivotal device in neurosurgery and medical tool design. This drill permitted surgeons to stock multiple bits, perform the craniotomy faster, and decrease equipment costs during a period of increased incidence of cranial fractures, and thus the need for craniotomies, which was attributable to the introduction of gunpowder. The inspiration stemmed from a school of thought growing within a population of physicians trained as mathematicians, engineers, and astrologers prior to entering the medical profession. Berengario may have been the first to record the use of such a unique drill, but whether he invented this instrument or merely adapted its use for the craniotomy remains clouded.

  4. Bio-Inspired Innovation and National Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    119 Michael Ladisch chapter 9 Bio-inspired Materials and operations...123 figure 8–3. scheme of lignocellulosic Material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125...9–1. areas in Which natural Biological Materials excel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 table 9–2

  5. NASA Celebrates Atlantis as Pioneer, Inspiration

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronauts and senior NASA management noted the contributions of space shuttle Atlantis as they signed the spacecraft over for a new mission of inspiration as it goes on public display at the Kenne...

  6. Biologically inspired toys using artificial muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Recent developments in electroactive polymers, so-called artificial muscles, could one day be used to make bionics possible. Meanwhile, as this technology evolves novel mechanisms are expected to emerge that are biologically inspired.

  7. Biologically Inspired Technology Using Electroactive Polymers (EAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2006-01-01

    Evolution allowed nature to introduce highly effective biological mechanisms that are incredible inspiration for innovation. Humans have always made efforts to imitate nature's inventions and we are increasingly making advances that it becomes significantly easier to imitate, copy, and adapt biological methods, processes and systems. This brought us to the ability to create technology that is far beyond the simple mimicking of nature. Having better tools to understand and to implement nature's principles we are now equipped like never before to be inspired by nature and to employ our tools in far superior ways. Effectively, by bio-inspiration we can have a better view and value of nature capability while studying its models to learn what can be extracted, copied or adapted. Using electroactive polymers (EAP) as artificial muscles is adding an important element to the development of biologically inspired technologies.

  8. Development of OA Abroad and Its Inspirations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bi, Jing

    2010-01-01

    This study introduces the concept and characteristics of open access (OA), analyses the status quo and development of OA in foreign countries, and discusses its inspiration to its future development in China.

  9. Bio-inspired dynamic robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Alan S.; Wax, Steven G.; Christodoulou, Leo

    2003-09-01

    The unique performance of biological systems across a wide spectrum of phylogenetic species has historically provided inspirations for roboticists in new designs and fabrication of new robotic platforms. Of particular interest to a number of important applications is to create dynamic robots able to adapt to a change in their world, unplanned events that are sometimes unexpected, and sometimes unstable, harsh conditions. It is likely that the exploring dynamics in biological systems will continue to provide rich solutions to attaining robots capable of more complex tasks for this purpose. This is because the long-term design process of evolution utilizes a natural selection process that responds to such changes. Recently, there have been significant advances across a number of interdisciplinary efforts that have generated new capabilities in biorobotics. Whole body dynamics that capture the force dynamics and functional stability of legged systems over rough terrain have been elucidated and applied in legged robotic systems. Exploying the force dynamics of flapping winged insect flight has provided key discoveries and enabled the fabrication of new micro air vehicles. New classes of materials are being developed that emulate the ability of natural muscle, capturing the compliant and soft subtle movement and performance of biological appendages. In addition, classes of new multifunctional materials are being developed to enable the design of biorobotics with the structural and functional efficiency of living organisms. Optical flow and other sensors based on the principles of invertebrate vision have been implemented on robotic platforms for autonomous robotic guidance and control. These fundamental advances have resulted in the emergence of a new generation of bioinspired dynamic robots which show significant performance improvements in early prototype testing and that could someday be useful in a number of significant applications such as search and rescue and

  10. Effect of inspiration on bolus injection

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, P.M.; Moreno, A.J.; Berger, D.E.; Sorensen, K.A.; Farnum, G.D.

    1986-03-01

    Adequate compact intravenous (i.v.) bolus injections of radiopharmaceuticals are essential for many quantitative radionuclide studies. Techniques have been described to obtain optimum bolus injections. The effect of inspiration on i.v. bolus injections was studied in 36 individuals. A slow, deep inspiration just prior to the arrival of the bolus within the superior vena cava significantly improved the quality of the bolus.

  11. Endogenous Biologically Inspired Art of Complex Systems.

    PubMed

    Ji, Haru; Wakefield, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Since 2007, Graham Wakefield and Haru Ji have looked to nature for inspiration as they have created a series of "artificial natures," or interactive visualizations of biologically inspired complex systems that can evoke nature-like aesthetic experiences within mixed-reality art installations. This article describes how they have applied visualization, sonification, and interaction design in their work with artificial ecosystems and organisms using specific examples from their exhibited installations.

  12. Obtaining gravitational waves from inspiral binary systems using LIGO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antelis, Javier M.; Moreno, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of the astrophysical events GW150926 and GW151226 has experimentally confirmed the existence of gravitational waves (GW) and has demonstrated the existence of binary stellar-mass black hole systems. This finding marks the beginning of a new era that will reveal unexpected features of our universe. This work presents a basic insight to the fundamental theory of GW emitted by inspiral binary systems and describes the scientific and technological efforts developed to measure these waves using the interferometer-based detector called LIGO. Subsequently, the work presents a comprehensive data analysis methodology based on the matched filter algorithm, which aims to recovery GW signals emitted by inspiral binary systems of astrophysical sources. This algorithm was evaluated with freely available LIGO data containing injected GW waveforms. Results of the experiments performed to assess detection accuracy showed the recovery of 85% of the injected GW.

  13. Temperature dependence of the ligand field strength in systems with modulated potential-energy surfaces. A suggestion for interpreting spectroscopic properties of metalloproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacci, M.

    1984-07-01

    The structural and spectroscopic properties of physical systems having different potential-energy wells are strongly affected by temperature where energy barriers are comparable to the thermal energy. A theoretical analysis has been performed using an asymmetric double-well potential and, on the basis of the results obtained, an interpretation of the temperature-dependent properties of some real systems, such as the active sites in copper proteins, is proposed.

  14. A locust-inspired miniature jumping robot.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, Valentin; Gvirsman, Omer; Ben Hanan, Uri; Weiss, Avi; Ayali, Amir; Kosa, Gabor

    2015-11-25

    Unmanned ground vehicles are mostly wheeled, tracked, or legged. These locomotion mechanisms have a limited ability to traverse rough terrain and obstacles that are higher than the robot's center of mass. In order to improve the mobility of small robots it is necessary to expand the variety of their motion gaits. Jumping is one of nature's solutions to the challenge of mobility in difficult terrain. The desert locust is the model for the presented bio-inspired design of a jumping mechanism for a small mobile robot. The basic mechanism is similar to that of the semilunar process in the hind legs of the locust, and is based on the cocking of a torsional spring by wrapping a tendon-like wire around the shaft of a miniature motor. In this study we present the jumping mechanism design, and the manufacturing and performance analysis of two demonstrator prototypes. The most advanced jumping robot demonstrator is power autonomous, weighs 23 gr, and is capable of jumping to a height of 3.35 m, covering a distance of 1.37 m.

  15. Modulation of the ligand-field anisotropy in a series of ferric low-spin cytochrome c mutants derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytochrome c-551 and Nitrosomonas europaea cytochrome c-552: a nuclear magnetic resonance and electron paramagnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Zoppellaro, Giorgio; Harbitz, Espen; Kaur, Ravinder; Ensign, Amy A; Bren, Kara L; Andersson, K Kristoffer

    2008-11-19

    Cytochromes of the c type with histidine-methionine (His-Met) heme axial ligation play important roles in electron-transfer reactions and in enzymes. In this work, two series of cytochrome c mutants derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa c-551) and from the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea (Ne c-552) were engineered and overexpressed. In these proteins, point mutations were induced in a key residue (Asn64) near the Met axial ligand; these mutations have a considerable impact both on heme ligand-field strength and on the Met orientation and dynamics (fluxionality), as judged by low-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. Ne c-552 has a ferric low-spin (S = 1/2) EPR signal characterized by large g anisotropy with g(max) resonance at 3.34; a similar large g(max) value EPR signal is found in the mitochondrial complex III cytochrome c1. In Ne c-552, deletion of Asn64 (NeN64Delta) changes the heme ligand field from more axial to rhombic (small g anisotropy and g(max) at 3.13) and furthermore hinders the Met fluxionality present in the wild-type protein. In Pa c-551 (g(max) at 3.20), replacement of Asn64 with valine (PaN64V) induces a decrease in the axial strain (g(max) at 3.05) and changes the Met configuration. Another set of mutants prepared by insertion (ins) and/or deletion (Delta) of a valine residue adjacent to Asn64, resulting in modifications in the length of the axial Met-donating loop (NeV65Delta, NeG50N/V65Delta, PaN50G/V65ins), did not result in appreciable alterations of the originally weak (Ne c-552) or very weak (Pa c-551) axial field but had an impact on Met orientation, fluxionality, and relaxation dynamics. Comparison of the electronic fingerprints in the overexpressed proteins and their mutants reveals a linear relationship between axial strain and average paramagnetic heme methyl shifts, irrespective of Met orientation or dynamics. Thus, for these His-Met axially coordinated Fe

  16. The Inspiring Teacher: New Beginnings for the 21st Century. The Inspired Classroom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullo, Robert A.

    This book provides educators with information on how to become an inspiring teacher. Nine chapters look at: (1) "The Qualities of an Inspiring Teacher" (e.g., passion for learning, lifelong learners, and actions match words); (2) "Choice Theory" (genetic instructions affecting behavior, the quality world, and perception); (3)…

  17. Product and technology innovation: what can biomimicry inspire?

    PubMed

    Lurie-Luke, Elena

    2014-12-01

    Biomimicry (bio- meaning life in Greek, and -mimesis, meaning to copy) is a growing field that seeks to interpolate natural biological mechanisms and structures into a wide range of applications. The rise of interest in biomimicry in recent years has provided a fertile ground for innovation. This review provides an eco-system based analysis of biomimicry inspired technology and product innovation. A multi-disciplinary framework has been developed to accomplish this analysis and the findings focus on the areas that have been most strikingly affected by the application of biomimicry and also highlight the emerging trends and opportunity areas.

  18. Case study on visualizing hurricanes using illustration-inspired techniques.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Alark; Caban, Jesus; Rheingans, Penny; Sparling, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    The devastating power of hurricanes was evident during the 2005 hurricane season, the most active season on record. This has prompted increased efforts by researchers to understand the physical processes that underlie the genesis, intensification, and tracks of hurricanes. This research aims at facilitating an improved understanding into the structure of hurricanes with the aid of visualization techniques. Our approach was developed by a mixed team of visualization and domain experts. To better understand these systems, and to explore their representation in NWP models, we use a variety of illustration-inspired techniques to visualize their structure and time evolution. Illustration-inspired techniques aid in the identification of the amount of vertical wind shear in a hurricane, which can help meteorologists predict dissipation. Illustration-style visualization, in combination with standard visualization techniques, helped explore the vortex rollup phenomena and the mesovortices contained within. We evaluated the effectiveness of our visualization with the help of six hurricane experts. The expert evaluation showed that the illustration-inspired techniques were preferred over existing tools. Visualization of the evolution of structural features is a prelude to a deeper visual analysis of the underlying dynamics.

  19. Magnitude of shift of tumor position as a function of moderated deep inspiration breath-hold: An analysis of pooled data of lung patients with active breath control in image-guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Muralidhar, K. R.; Murthy, P. Narayana; Mahadev, D. Shankar; Subramanyam, K.; Sudarshan, G.; Raju, A. Krishnam

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility and magnitude of shift of tumor position by using active breathing control and iView-GT for patients with lung cancer with moderate deep-inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH) technique. Eight patients with 10 lung tumors were studied. CT scans were performed in the breath-holding phase. Moderate deep-inspiration breath-hold under spirometer-based monitoring system was used. Few important bony anatomic details were delineated by the radiation oncologist. To evaluate the interbreath-hold reproducibility of the tumor position, we compared the digital reconstruction radiographs (DRRs) from planning system with the DRRs from the iView-GT in the machine room. We measured the shift in x, y, and z directions. The reproducibility was defined as the difference between the bony landmarks from the DRR of the planning system and those from the DRR of the iView-GT. The maximum shift of the tumor position was 3.2 mm, 3.0 mm, and 2.9 mm in the longitudinal, lateral, and vertical directions. In conclusion, the moderated deep-inspiration breath-hold method using a spirometer is feasible, with relatively good reproducibility of the tumor position for image-guided radiotherapy in lung cancers. PMID:19893708

  20. Bio-inspired variable structural color materials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanjin; Xie, Zhuoying; Gu, Hongcheng; Zhu, Cun; Gu, Zhongze

    2012-04-21

    Natural structural color materials, especially those that can undergo reversible changes, are attracting increasing interest in a wide variety of research fields. Inspired by the natural creatures, many elaborately nanostructured photonic materials with variable structural colors were developed. These materials have found important applications in switches, display devices, sensors, and so on. In this critical review, we will provide up-to-date research concerning the natural and bio-inspired photonic materials with variable structural colors. After introducing the variable structural colors in natural creatures, we will focus on the studies of artificial variable structural color photonic materials, including their bio-inspired designs, fabrications and applications. The prospects for the future development of these fantastic variable structural color materials will also be presented. We believe this review will promote the communications among biology, bionics, chemistry, optical physics, and material science (196 references).

  1. Compact and Thermosensitive Nature-inspired Micropump.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyejeong; Kim, Kiwoong; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-10-31

    Liquid transportation without employing a bulky power source, often observed in nature, has been an essential prerequisite for smart applications of microfluidic devices. In this report, a leaf-inspired micropump (LIM) which is composed of thermo-responsive stomata-inspired membrane (SIM) and mesophyll-inspired agarose cryogel (MAC) is proposed. The LIM provides a durable flow rate of 30 μl/h · cm(2) for more than 30 h at room temperature without external mechanical power source. By adapting a thermo-responsive polymer, the LIM can smartly adjust the delivery rate of a therapeutic liquid in response to temperature changes. In addition, as the LIM is compact, portable, and easily integrated into any liquid, it might be utilized as an essential component in advanced hand-held drug delivery devices.

  2. Compact and Thermosensitive Nature-inspired Micropump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyejeong; Kim, Kiwoong; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-10-01

    Liquid transportation without employing a bulky power source, often observed in nature, has been an essential prerequisite for smart applications of microfluidic devices. In this report, a leaf-inspired micropump (LIM) which is composed of thermo-responsive stomata-inspired membrane (SIM) and mesophyll-inspired agarose cryogel (MAC) is proposed. The LIM provides a durable flow rate of 30 μl/h · cm2 for more than 30 h at room temperature without external mechanical power source. By adapting a thermo-responsive polymer, the LIM can smartly adjust the delivery rate of a therapeutic liquid in response to temperature changes. In addition, as the LIM is compact, portable, and easily integrated into any liquid, it might be utilized as an essential component in advanced hand-held drug delivery devices.

  3. Biologically Inspired Micro-Flight Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raney, David L.; Waszak, Martin R.

    2003-01-01

    Natural fliers demonstrate a diverse array of flight capabilities, many of which are poorly understood. NASA has established a research project to explore and exploit flight technologies inspired by biological systems. One part of this project focuses on dynamic modeling and control of micro aerial vehicles that incorporate flexible wing structures inspired by natural fliers such as insects, hummingbirds and bats. With a vast number of potential civil and military applications, micro aerial vehicles represent an emerging sector of the aerospace market. This paper describes an ongoing research activity in which mechanization and control concepts for biologically inspired micro aerial vehicles are being explored. Research activities focusing on a flexible fixed- wing micro aerial vehicle design and a flapping-based micro aerial vehicle concept are presented.

  4. Compact and Thermosensitive Nature-inspired Micropump

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyejeong; Kim, Kiwoong; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-01-01

    Liquid transportation without employing a bulky power source, often observed in nature, has been an essential prerequisite for smart applications of microfluidic devices. In this report, a leaf-inspired micropump (LIM) which is composed of thermo-responsive stomata-inspired membrane (SIM) and mesophyll-inspired agarose cryogel (MAC) is proposed. The LIM provides a durable flow rate of 30 μl/h · cm2 for more than 30 h at room temperature without external mechanical power source. By adapting a thermo-responsive polymer, the LIM can smartly adjust the delivery rate of a therapeutic liquid in response to temperature changes. In addition, as the LIM is compact, portable, and easily integrated into any liquid, it might be utilized as an essential component in advanced hand-held drug delivery devices. PMID:27796357

  5. Blood Clotting Inspired Polymer Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sing, Charles Edward

    The blood clotting process is one of the human body's masterpieces in targeted molecular manipulation, as it requires the activation of the clotting cascade at a specific place and a specific time. Recent research in the biological sciences have discovered that one of the protein molecules involved in the initial stages of the clotting response, von Willebrand Factor (vWF), exhibits counterintuitive and technologically useful properties that are driven in part by the physical environment in the bloodstream at the site of a wound. In this thesis, we take inspiration from initial observations of the vWF in experiments, and aim to describe the behaviors observed in this process within the context of polymer physics. By understanding these physical principles, we hope to harness nature's ability to both direct molecules in both spatial and conformational coordinates. This thesis is presented in three complementary sections. After an initial introduction describing the systems of interest, we first describe the behavior of collapsed Lennard-Jones polymers in the presence of an infinite medium. It has been shown that simple bead-spring homopolymer models describe vWF quite well in vitro. We build upon this previous work to first describe the behavior of a collapsed homopolymer in an elongational fluid flow. Through a nucleation-protrusion mechanism, scaling relationships can be developed to provide a clear picture of a first-order globule-stretch transition and its ramifications in dilute-solution rheology. The implications of this behavior and its relation to the current literature provides qualitative explanations for the physiological process of vasoconstriction. In an effort to generalize these observations, we present an entire theory on the behavior of polymer globules under influence of any local fluid flow. Finally, we investigate the internal dynamics of these globules by probing their pulling response in an analogous fashion to force spectroscopy. We elucidate

  6. Towards a Pedagogy of Inspirational Parables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pio, Edwina; Haigh, Neil

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to present a rationale for a learning and assessment activity involving students in the construction of inspirational parables for diversity management within a university business studies programme. The paper reviews processes from teacher and student perspectives, describes initial outcomes and foreshadows further…

  7. Using "1 = 2" to Inspire and Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Premadasa, Kirthi; Samaranayake, Geetha

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical fallacies have an embedded sense of awe and mystery that can be used effectively in a classroom to inspire students to tackle a fallacy and find the "hidden" violation. In doing so, the student may discover the consequence of a rule violation in a stimulating manner, thus making a lasting impact of the rule as well as providing the…

  8. Inspiring a Life Full of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludlam, John

    2012-01-01

    The Secrets and Words films had everything one would expect from a BBC drama--great writing, acting and directing allied with high production values. But the dramas were also powerful learning tools, co-commissioned by BBC Learning and aimed at inspiring people who have difficulty with reading and writing to seek help. The BBC's learning vision is…

  9. Pop Art--Inspired Self-Portraits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Donna J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art lesson that was inspired by Andy Warhol's mass-produced portraits. Warhol began his career as a graphic artist and illustrator. His artwork was a response to the redundancy of the advertising images put in front of the American public. Celebrities and famous people in magazines and newspapers were seen…

  10. Water Treatment Technologies Inspire Healthy Beverages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    Mike Johnson, a former technician at Johnson Space Center, drew on his expertise as a wastewater engineer to create a line of kombucha-based probiotic drinks. Unpeeled Inc., based in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, employs 12 people and has sold more than 6 million units of its NASA-inspired beverage.

  11. Art Works ... when Students Find Inspiration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herberholz, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Artworks are not produced in a vacuum, but by the interaction of experiences, and interrelationships of ideas, perceptions and feelings acknowledged and expressed in some form. Students, like mature artists, may be inspired and motivated by their memories and observations of their surroundings. Like adult artists, students may find that their own…

  12. Inspired by Athletes, Myths, and Poets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melvin, Samantha

    2010-01-01

    Tales of love and hate, of athleticism, heroism, devotion to gods and goddesses that influenced myth and culture are a way of sharing ancient Greece's rich history. In this article, the author describes how her students created their own Greek-inspired clay vessels as artifacts of their study. (Contains 6 online resources.)

  13. Inspiring Students to Create the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Cynthia; Vespia, Kristin M.; Fitzpatrick, Colleen

    2007-01-01

    An exemplary program based at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay greatly increases the odds that at-risk youngsters will not only graduate from high school, but will go on to higher education. The program is also a model of university/community collaboration. ["Inspiring Students to Create the Future" was written with Timothy U.…

  14. Bio-Inspired Self-Cleaning Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kesong; Jiang, Lei

    2012-08-01

    Self-cleaning surfaces have drawn a lot of interest for both fundamental research and practical applications. This review focuses on the recent progress in mechanism, preparation, and application of self-cleaning surfaces. To date, self-cleaning has been demonstrated by the following four conceptual approaches: (a) TiO2-based superhydrophilic self-cleaning, (b) lotus effect self-cleaning (superhydrophobicity with a small sliding angle), (c) gecko setae-inspired self-cleaning, and (d) underwater organisms-inspired antifouling self-cleaning. Although a number of self-cleaning products have been commercialized, the remaining challenges and future outlook of self-cleaning surfaces are also briefly addressed. Through evolution, nature, which has long been a source of inspiration for scientists and engineers, has arrived at what is optimal. We hope this review will stimulate interdisciplinary collaboration among material science, chemistry, biology, physics, nanoscience, engineering, etc., which is essential for the rational design and reproducible construction of bio-inspired multifunctional self-cleaning surfaces in practical applications.

  15. Basket Weaving Inspired by the Gullah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Rita

    2010-01-01

    Many different cultures created and used the basket not only for utilitarian purposes, but also for ceremonial uses. In this article, the author describes an eighth-grade project inspired by the basket making of the Gullah people, who live along the coast of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida.

  16. Eric Carle-Inspired Insect Collages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palamountain, Eileen; Turner, Kim

    2000-01-01

    Describes a lesson in which students create collage insects inspired by the work of Eric Carle (The Very Hungry Caterpillar). Connects art, language arts, and science. Discusses how students make paper to use as the collage material and how students create the insects. (CMK)

  17. NIH Abroad: Inspiring the Next Generation of Global Health Researchers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Special Section NIH Abroad: Inspiring the Next Generation of Global Health Researchers Past Issues / Spring 2008 ... page please turn Javascript on. Inspiring the Next Generation of Global Health Researchers Fogarty scholar helps Zambians ...

  18. Bio-inspired cell concentration and deformability monitoring chips.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young-Ho; Youn, Sechan; Lee, Dong Woo

    2007-11-01

    The paper presents a couple of biofluidic devices, whose functions are inspired from biological cell concentration and deformability monitoring functions. The cell concentration monitoring chip is inspired from RBC control mechanism in kidney, performing cell concentration monitoring functions. The cell deformability chip, inspired from selective RBC destruction mechanism in spleen, performs mechanical cell deformability monitoring functions. The structures and principles of the bio-inspired chips are presented and compared with those of the biological organs. The unique features and performance characteristics of the bio-inspired chips are analyzed and verified from experimental study. The bio-inspired cell concentration monitoring chips perform flow-rate insensitive concentration measurement, while the bio-inspired cell deformability monitoring chips achieve size-independent cell deformability measurement. Common advantages of the bio-inspired chips include simple structures, digital signals and high integrability, thus making them suitable for use in integrated digital biomedical systems.

  19. Recent developments in bio-inspired special wettability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kesong; Yao, Xi; Jiang, Lei

    2010-08-01

    Nature is a school for scientists and engineers. After four and a half billion years of stringent evolution, some creatures in nature exhibit fascinating surface wettability. Biomimetics, mimicking nature for engineering solutions, provides a model for the development of functional surfaces with special wettability. Recently, bio-inspired special wetting surfaces have attracted wide scientific attention for both fundamental research and practical applications, which has become an increasingly hot research topic. This Critical Review summarizes the recent work in bio-inspired special wettability, with a focus on lotus leaf inspired self-cleaning surfaces, plants and insects inspired anisotropic superhydrophobic surfaces, mosquito eyes inspired superhydrophobic antifogging coatings, insects inspired superhydrophobic antireflection coatings, rose petals and gecko feet inspired high adhesive superhydrophobic surfaces, bio-inspired water collecting surfaces, and superlyophobic surfaces, with particular focus on the last two years. The research prospects and directions of this rapidly developing field are also briefly addressed (159 references).

  20. Kittens! Inspired by Kittens! Undergraduate Theorists Inspired by YouTube

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Diane Downer; Lewis, Mark; Peterson, Sarah; Griggs, Samantha; Grubb, Gina; Singer, Nicole; Fried, Simone; Krone, Elizabeth; Elko, Leigh; Narang, Jasmine

    2010-01-01

    A professor and students in an undergraduate honors research seminar were inspired to playfully link old and contemporary literacy theories to a 2.0 media artifact, the popular YouTube video Kittens! Inspired by Kittens! (KIbK) starring 6 year-old Maddie. In this article KIbK is theorized drawing on frames of school-based reading instruction,…

  1. Writer-Reader Contagion of Inspiration and Related States: Conditional Process Analyses Within a Cross-Classified Writer × Reader Framework.

    PubMed

    Thrash, Todd M; Maruskin, Laura A; Moldovan, Emil G; Oleynick, Victoria C; Belzak, Will C

    2016-04-28

    A longstanding tradition in the humanities holds that a writer's inspiration is infectious, but this thesis has not been tested. We hypothesized that (a) inspiration is infectious, such that inspired writers are more inspiring to the average reader; (b) contagion is mediated by the insightfulness of the text; and (c) contagion is moderated by readers' openness to experience, such that open readers are more prone to contagion. To test these hypotheses, a sample of 195 student writers, each of whom wrote 1 poem, was crossed with a sample of 220 student readers, who read all poems. Data were available for 36,020 cells of the resulting Writer × Reader matrix. Our analytic approach integrated cross-classified multilevel modeling with conditional process analysis. As hypothesized, writers who were more inspired elicited higher levels of inspiration in the average reader. Inspiration contagion was mediated by the insightfulness and pleasantness of the text and was partially suppressed by originality. Inspiration contagion was moderated by reader openness. Moderated mediation analyses indicated that open readers were prone to contagion because they were tolerant of the originality and sublimity of inspired writing. Additional analyses differentiated contagion of inspiration from contagion of its covariates (awe, positive affect), documented effects of writer inspiration on reader enthrallment (awe, chills), and showed that writer effort is a poor predictor of reader states. The infectiousness of inspiration-through poetry, if not also through scripture and academic writing-suggests that a given instance of inspiration may have far-reaching cultural implications, including dissemination of innovations and ideologies. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. The Inspiration of Hope in Substance Abuse Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehn, Corinne; Cutcliffe, John R.

    2012-01-01

    This study used a grounded theory method to explore how counselors inspire hope in clients struggling with substance abuse. Findings from 10 participants revealed that hope inspiration occurred in 3 phases and consisted of several categories of hope-inspiring processes. Implications for counseling practice, counselor education, and research are…

  3. Bio-inspired method and system for actionable intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosla, Deepak; Chelian, Suhas E.

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes a bio-inspired VISion based actionable INTelligence system (VISINT) that provides automated capabilities to (1) understand objects, patterns, events and behaviors in vision data; (2) translate this understanding into timely recognition of novel and anomalous entities; and (3) discover underlying hierarchies and relationships between disparate labels entered by multiple users to provide a consistent data representation. VISINT is both a system and a novel collection of novel bio-inspired algorithms/modules. These modules can be used independently for various aspects of the actionable intelligence problem or sequenced together for an end-to-end actionable intelligence system. The algorithms can be useful in many other applications such as scene understanding, behavioral analysis, automatic surveillance systems, etc. The bio-inspired algorithms are a novel combination of hierarchical spatial and temporal networks based on the Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART). The novel aspects of this work are that it is an end-to-end system for actionable intelligence that combines existing and novel implementations of various modules in innovative ways to develop a system concept for actionable intelligence. Although there are other algorithms/implementations of several of the modules in VISINT, they suffer from various limitations and often system integration is not considered. The overall VISINT system can be viewed an incremental learning system where no offline training is required and data from multiple sources and times can be seamlessly integrated. The user is in the loop, but due to the semi-supervised nature of the underlying algorithms, only significant variations of entities, not all false alarms, are shown to the user. It does not forget the past even with new learning. While VISINT is designed as a vision-based system, it could also work with other kinds of sensor data that can recognize and locate individual objects in the scene. Beyond that stage

  4. Shadow of noncommutative geometry inspired black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Shao-Wen; Cheng, Peng; Zhong, Yi; Zhou, Xiang-Nan E-mail: pcheng14@lzu.edu.cn E-mail: zhouxn10@lzu.edu.cn

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the shadow casted by the rotating black hole inspired by noncommutative geometry is investigated. In addition to the dimensionless spin parameter a/M{sub 0} with M{sub 0} black hole mass and inclination angle i, the dimensionless noncommutative parameter √θ/M{sub 0} is also found to affect the shape of the black hole shadow. The result shows that the size of the shadow slightly decreases with the parameter √θ/M{sub 0}, while the distortion increases with it. Compared to the Kerr black hole, the parameter √θ/M{sub 0} increases the deformation of the shadow. This may offer a way to distinguish noncommutative geometry inspired black hole from Kerr one via astronomical instruments in the near future.

  5. Taxonomic etymology – in search of inspiration

    PubMed Central

    Jóźwiak, Piotr; Rewicz, Tomasz; Pabis, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We present a review of the etymology of zoological taxonomic names with emphasis on the most unusual examples. The names were divided into several categories, starting from the most common – given after morphological features – through inspiration from mythology, legends, and classic literature but also from fictional and nonfictional pop-culture characters (e.g., music, movies or cartoons), science, and politics. A separate category includes zoological names created using word-play and figures of speech such as tautonyms, acronyms, anagrams, and palindromes. Our intention was to give an overview of possibilities of how and where taxonomists can find the inspirations that will be consistent with the ICZN rules and generate more detail afterthought about the naming process itself, the meaningful character of naming, as well as the recognition and understanding of names. PMID:26257573

  6. Additive manufacturing of biologically-inspired materials.

    PubMed

    Studart, André R

    2016-01-21

    Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies offer an attractive pathway towards the fabrication of functional materials featuring complex heterogeneous architectures inspired by biological systems. In this paper, recent research on the use of AM approaches to program the local chemical composition, structure and properties of biologically-inspired materials is reviewed. A variety of structural motifs found in biological composites have been successfully emulated in synthetic systems using inkjet-based, direct-writing, stereolithography and slip casting technologies. The replication in synthetic systems of design principles underlying such structural motifs has enabled the fabrication of lightweight cellular materials, strong and tough composites, soft robots and autonomously shaping structures with unprecedented properties and functionalities. Pushing the current limits of AM technologies in future research should bring us closer to the manufacturing capabilities of living organisms, opening the way for the digital fabrication of advanced materials with superior performance, lower environmental impact and new functionalities.

  7. Spider's web inspires fibres for industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacey, James

    2010-03-01

    Spiders may not be everybody's idea of natural beauty, but nobody can deny the artistry in the webs that they spin, especially when decorated with water baubles in the morning dew. Inspired by this spectacle, a group of researchers in China has mimicked the structural properties of the spider's web to create a fibre for industry that can manipulate water with the same skill and efficiency, writes James Dacey.

  8. Bio-Inspired Ceramic/Carbon Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    be observed (Fig. 6). 3 µm Spark Plasma Sintering We have developed an approach for the SPS of the ceramic scaffolds filled with CNTs...with other C precursors such as pitch. Spark plasma sintering can be used to compress these infiltrated materials to create brick-and-mortar structures...objective to fabricate bio-inspired ceramic/CNT or ceramic/carbon composites with nacre-like structures by combining freeze casting with spark plasma

  9. Cognitively Inspired Neural Network for Situation Recognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-14

    Neurodynamics of Higher-Level Cognition and Consciousness, Eds. Perlovsky, 1.I., Kozma, R. Springer Verlag, Heidelberg, Germany. Perlovsky, L.I., Deming...Perlovsky L. I., Kozma R. (2007) Eds. Neurodynamics of Higher-Level Cognition and Consciousness. Heidelberg, Germany: Springer-Verlag. Perlovsky, L.1...AFRL-RY -HS-TR-20 10-0028 Cognitively Inspired Neural Network for Situation Recognition Roman Ilin and Leonid Perlovsky AFRURYHE 80 Scott Drive

  10. Biologically Inspired Nano-Contact Mechanics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-20

    mechanics and micro / nano - fabrication, with potentially significant benefits if we can understand and mimic some of nature’s optimized solutions for...2000) has demonstrated that the micro and nano -scale architectures of the gecko foot fibers are responsible for the animal’s excellent attachment...2. REPORT TYPE Final DATES COVERED (From - To) 01 April 2005-30 Jun 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE BIOLOGICALLY INSPIRED NANO -CONTACT MECHANICS 5a

  11. A Biologically-Inspired Autonomous Robot

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-13

    AD-A273 909 DTIC ELECTE SDEC,2 01993 A PERFORMANCE REPORT A Biologically-Inspired Autonomous Robot Grant N00014-90-J- 1545 Period of Performance: 3...rough estimate of the torque generated by the electrical activation of the muscle dunng the movement. " The previous simulation of the robot has been...reaction forces for the robot that shares features with Full’s force measurements of cockroach walking. "* The 18 motor driver circuits for the robot have

  12. Neurobiologically Inspired Mobile Robot Navigation and Planning

    PubMed Central

    Cuperlier, Nicolas; Quoy, Mathias; Gaussier, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    After a short review of biologically inspired navigation architectures, mainly relying on modeling the hippocampal anatomy, or at least some of its functions, we present a navigation and planning model for mobile robots. This architecture is based on a model of the hippocampal and prefrontal interactions. In particular, the system relies on the definition of a new cell type “transition cells” that encompasses traditional “place cells”. PMID:18958274

  13. Biologically Inspired Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Jun; Lee, Jaeho; Yang, Sung-Pyo; Kim, Ha Gon; Kweon, Hee-Seok; Yoo, Seunghyup; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2016-05-11

    Many animal species employ highly conspicuous traits as courtship signals for successful mating. Fireflies utilize their bioluminescent light as visual courtship signals. In addition to efficient bioluminescent light emission, the structural components of the firefly lantern also contribute to the enhancement of conspicuous optical signaling. Recently, these firefly lantern ultrastructures have attracted much interest and inspired highly efficient light management approaches. Here we report on the unique optical function of the hierarchical ultrastructures found in a firefly (Pyrocoelia rufa) and their biological inspiration of highly efficient organic light-emitting diode (OLED) applications. The hierarchical structures are comprised of longitudinal nanostructures and asymmetric microstructures, which were successfully replicated using geometry-guided resist reflow, replica molding, and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) oxidation. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) of the bioinspired OLEDs was enhanced by up to 61%. The bioinspired OLEDs clearly showed side-enhanced super-Lambertian emission with a wide-viewing angle. The highly efficient light extraction and wide-angle illumination suggest how the hierarchical structures likely improve the recognition of firefly optical courtship signals over a wide-angle range. At the same time, the biologically inspired designs provide a new paradigm for designing functional optical surfaces for lighting or display applications.

  14. Gravitational radiation, inspiraling binaries, and cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, David F.; Finn, Lee S.

    1993-01-01

    We show how to measure cosmological parameters using observations of inspiraling binary neutron star or black hole systems in one or more gravitational wave detectors. To illustrate, we focus on the case of fixed mass binary systems observed in a single Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)-like detector. Using realistic detector noise estimates, we characterize the rate of detections as a function of a threshold SNR Rho(0), H0, and the binary 'chirp' mass. For Rho(0) = 8, H0 = 100 km/s/Mpc, and 1.4 solar mass neutron star binaries, the sample has a median redshift of 0.22. Under the same assumptions but independent of H0, a conservative rate density of coalescing binaries implies LIGO will observe about 50/yr binary inspiral events. The precision with which H0 and the deceleration parameter q0 may be determined depends on the number of observed inspirals. For fixed mass binary systems, about 100 observations with Rho(0) = 10 in the LIGO will give H0 to 10 percent in an Einstein-DeSitter cosmology, and 3000 will give q0 to 20 percent. For the conservative rate density of coalescing binaries, 100 detections with Rho(0) = 10 will require about 4 yrs.

  15. The electronic spectrum of AgCl2: Ab initio benchmark versus density-functional theory calculations on the lowest ligand-field states including spin-orbit effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Solís, A.; Poteau, R.; Daudey, J. P.

    2006-01-01

    The XΠg2, Σg+2, and Δg2 states of AgCl2 have been studied through benchmark ab initio complete active space self-consistent field plus second-order complete active space multireference Möller-Plesset algorithm (CASSCF +CASPT2) and complete active space self-consistent field plus averaged coupled pair functional (CASSCF +ACPF) and density-functional theory (DFT) calculations using especially developed basis sets to study the transition energies, geometries, vibrational frequencies, Mulliken charges, and spin densities. The spin-orbit (SO) effects were included through the effective Hamiltonian formalism using the ΛSΣ ACPF energies as diagonal elements. At the ACPF level, the ground state is Πg2 in contradiction with ligand-field theory, SCF, and large CASSCF; the adiabatic excitation energies for the Σg+2 and Δg2 states are 1640 and 18230cm-1, respectively. The inclusion of the SO effects leads to a pure Ω =3/2(Πg2) ground state, a Ω =1/2 (66%Πg2 and 34%Σg+2) A state, a Ω =1/2 (34%Πg2 and 66%Σg+2) B state, a Ω =5/2(Δg2)C state, and a Ω =3/2(99%Δg2)D state. The X-A, X-B, X-C, and X-D transition energies are 485, 3715, 17 246, and 20110cm-1, respectively. The B97-2, B3LYP, and PBE0 functionals overestimate by ≈100% the XΠg2-Σg+2Te but provide a qualitative energetic ordering in good agreement with ACPF results. B3LYP with variable exchange leads to a 42% optimal Hartree-Fock exchange for transition energies but all equilibrium geometries get worsened. Asymptotic corrections to B3LYP do not provide improved values. The nature of the bonding in the XΠg2 state is very different from that of CuCl2 since the Mulliken charge on the metal is 1.1 while the spin density is only 0.35. DFT strongly delocalizes the spin density providing even smaller values of around 0.18 on Ag not only for the ground state, but also for the Σg+2 state.

  16. Effects of lanthanoid cations on the first electronic transition of liquid water studied using attenuated total reflection far-ultraviolet spectroscopy: ligand field splitting of lanthanoid hydrates in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Goto, Takeyoshi; Ikehata, Akifumi; Morisawa, Yusuke; Higashi, Noboru; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2012-10-15

    The effects of the lanthanoid cations (Ln(3+)) on the first electronic transition (à ← X̃) of liquid water were studied from the attenuated total reflection far-ultraviolet (ATR-FUV) spectra of trivalent Ln(3+) electrolyte solutions (1 M), except Pm(3+). The à ← X̃ transition energies of the Ln(3+) electrolyte solutions show a distinct tetrad in their dependence on the number of 4f electrons of the Ln(3+) cations. For the half occupation period of the 4f electrons, the à ← X̃ transition energies decrease from La(3+) (4f(0), 8.0375 eV) to Nd(3+) (4f(3), 8.0277 eV) and increase from Sm(3+) (4f(5), 8.0279 eV) to Gd(3+) (4f(7), 8.0374 eV). For the complete occupation period, there are two local minima at Dy(3+) (4f(9), 8.0349 eV) and Yb(3+) (4f(13), 8.0355 eV). The à ← X̃ transition energies of the tetrad nodes (La(3+), Gd(3+), Ho(3+) (4f(10)), and Lu(3+) (4f(14))) increase slightly, as the nuclear charge increases in accordance with the hydration energies of the Ln(3+) cations. The energy difference (ΔE) between the à ← X̃ transition energies and the line between La(3+) and Lu(3+) is largest at Nd(3+) (80.5 cm(-1)) for the half occupation period and at Dy(3+) (26.1 cm(-1)) and Yb(3+) (24.5 cm(-1)) for the complete occupation period. The order of magnitude of ΔE is comparable to the ligand field splitting (LFS) of the ground state multiplets of Ln(3+) complexes. The observed tetrad trend of the à ← X̃ transition energies of the Ln(3+) electrolyte solutions across the 4f period reflects the hydration energies of the Ln(3+) cations and the LFS induced by water ligands.

  17. Optimized bio-inspired stiffening design for an engine nacelle.

    PubMed

    Lazo, Neil; Vodenitcharova, Tania; Hoffman, Mark

    2015-11-04

    Structural efficiency is a common engineering goal in which an ideal solution provides a structure with optimized performance at minimized weight, with consideration of material mechanical properties, structural geometry, and manufacturability. This study aims to address this goal in developing high performance lightweight, stiff mechanical components by creating an optimized design from a biologically-inspired template. The approach is implemented on the optimization of rib stiffeners along an aircraft engine nacelle. The helical and angled arrangements of cellulose fibres in plants were chosen as the bio-inspired template. Optimization of total displacement and weight was carried out using a genetic algorithm (GA) coupled with finite element analysis. Iterations showed a gradual convergence in normalized fitness. Displacement was given higher emphasis in optimization, thus the GA optimization tended towards individual designs with weights near the mass constraint. Dominant features of the resulting designs were helical ribs with rectangular cross-sections having large height-to-width ratio. Displacement reduction was at 73% as compared to an unreinforced nacelle, and is attributed to the geometric features and layout of the stiffeners, while mass is maintained within the constraint.

  18. Confined swimming of bio-inspired microrobots in rectangular channels.

    PubMed

    Temel, Fatma Zeynep; Yesilyurt, Serhat

    2015-02-02

    Controlled swimming of bio-inspired microrobots in confined spaces needs to be understood well for potential use in medical applications in conduits and vessels inside the body. In this study, experimental and computational studies are performed for analysis of swimming modes of a bio-inspired microrobot in rectangular channels at low Reynolds number. Experiments are performed on smooth and rough surfaces using a magnetic helical swimmer (MHS), having 0.5 mm diameter and 2 mm length, with left-handed helical tail and radially polarized magnetic head within rotating magnetic field obtained by two electromagnetic coil pairs. Experiments indicate three motion modes of the MHS with respect to the rotation frequency: (i) lateral motion under the effect of a perpendicular force such as gravity and the surface traction at low frequencies, (ii) lateral motion under the effect of fluid forces and gravity at transition frequencies, and (iii) circular motion under the effect of fluid forces at high frequencies. Observed modes of motion for the MHS are investigated with computational fluid dynamics simulations by calculating translational and angular velocities and studying the induced flow fields for different radial positions inside the channel. Results indicate the importance of rotation frequency, surface roughness and flow field on the swimming modes and behaviour of the MHS inside the rectangular channel.

  19. Clinically-inspired automatic classification of ovarian carcinoma subtypes

    PubMed Central

    BenTaieb, Aïcha; Nosrati, Masoud S; Li-Chang, Hector; Huntsman, David; Hamarneh, Ghassan

    2016-01-01

    Context: It has been shown that ovarian carcinoma subtypes are distinct pathologic entities with differing prognostic and therapeutic implications. Histotyping by pathologists has good reproducibility, but occasional cases are challenging and require immunohistochemistry and subspecialty consultation. Motivated by the need for more accurate and reproducible diagnoses and to facilitate pathologists’ workflow, we propose an automatic framework for ovarian carcinoma classification. Materials and Methods: Our method is inspired by pathologists’ workflow. We analyse imaged tissues at two magnification levels and extract clinically-inspired color, texture, and segmentation-based shape descriptors using image-processing methods. We propose a carefully designed machine learning technique composed of four modules: A dissimilarity matrix, dimensionality reduction, feature selection and a support vector machine classifier to separate the five ovarian carcinoma subtypes using the extracted features. Results: This paper presents the details of our implementation and its validation on a clinically derived dataset of eighty high-resolution histopathology images. The proposed system achieved a multiclass classification accuracy of 95.0% when classifying unseen tissues. Assessment of the classifier's confusion (confusion matrix) between the five different ovarian carcinoma subtypes agrees with clinician's confusion and reflects the difficulty in diagnosing endometrioid and serous carcinomas. Conclusions: Our results from this first study highlight the difficulty of ovarian carcinoma diagnosis which originate from the intrinsic class-imbalance observed among subtypes and suggest that the automatic analysis of ovarian carcinoma subtypes could be valuable to clinician's diagnostic procedure by providing a second opinion. PMID:27563487

  20. Bio-inspired approach for intelligent unattended ground sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueber, Nicolas; Raymond, Pierre; Hennequin, Christophe; Pichler, Alexander; Perrot, Maxime; Voisin, Philippe; Moeglin, Jean-Pierre

    2015-05-01

    Improving the surveillance capacity over wide zones requires a set of smart battery-powered Unattended Ground Sensors capable of issuing an alarm to a decision-making center. Only high-level information has to be sent when a relevant suspicious situation occurs. In this paper we propose an innovative bio-inspired approach that mimics the human bi-modal vision mechanism and the parallel processing ability of the human brain. The designed prototype exploits two levels of analysis: a low-level panoramic motion analysis, the peripheral vision, and a high-level event-focused analysis, the foveal vision. By tracking moving objects and fusing multiple criteria (size, speed, trajectory, etc.), the peripheral vision module acts as a fast relevant event detector. The foveal vision module focuses on the detected events to extract more detailed features (texture, color, shape, etc.) in order to improve the recognition efficiency. The implemented recognition core is able to acquire human knowledge and to classify in real-time a huge amount of heterogeneous data thanks to its natively parallel hardware structure. This UGS prototype validates our system approach under laboratory tests. The peripheral analysis module demonstrates a low false alarm rate whereas the foveal vision correctly focuses on the detected events. A parallel FPGA implementation of the recognition core succeeds in fulfilling the embedded application requirements. These results are paving the way of future reconfigurable virtual field agents. By locally processing the data and sending only high-level information, their energy requirements and electromagnetic signature are optimized. Moreover, the embedded Artificial Intelligence core enables these bio-inspired systems to recognize and learn new significant events. By duplicating human expertise in potentially hazardous places, our miniature visual event detector will allow early warning and contribute to better human decision making.

  1. Nasal and Oral Inspiration During Natural Speech Breathing

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Rosemary A.; Hoit, Jeannette D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the typical pattern for inspiration during speech breathing in healthy adults, as well as the factors that might influence it. Method Ten healthy adults, 18–45 years of age, performed a variety of speaking tasks while nasal ram pressure, audio, and video recordings were obtained. Inspirations were categorized as a nasal only, oral only, simultaneous nasal and oral, or alternating nasal and oral inspiration. The method was validated using nasal airflow, oral airflow, audio, and video recordings for two participants. Results The predominant pattern was simultaneous nasal and oral inspirations for all speaking tasks. This pattern was not affected by the nature of the speaking task or by the phonetic context surrounding the inspiration. The validation procedure confirmed that nearly all inspirations during counting and paragraph reading were simultaneous nasal and oral inspirations; whereas for sentence reading, the predominant pattern was alternating nasal and oral inspirations across the three phonetic contexts. Conclusions Healthy adults inspire through both the nose and mouth during natural speech breathing. This pattern of inspiration is likely beneficial in reducing pathway resistance while preserving some of the benefits of nasal breathing. PMID:24129013

  2. The "Biologically-Inspired Computing" Column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Self-managing systems, whether viewed from the perspective of Autonomic Computing, or from that of another initiative, offers a holistic vision for the development and evolution of biologically-inspired computer-based systems. It aims to bring new levels of automation and dependability to systems, while simultaneously hiding their complexity and reducing costs. A case can certainly be made that all computer-based systems should exhibit autonomic properties [6], and we envisage greater interest in, and uptake of, autonomic principles in future system development.

  3. A bio-inspired spatial patterning circuit.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai-Yuan; Joe, Danial J; Shealy, James B; Land, Bruce R; Shen, Xiling

    2014-01-01

    Lateral Inhibition (LI) is a widely conserved patterning mechanism in biological systems across species. Distinct from better-known Turing patterns, LI depend on cell-cell contact rather than diffusion. We built an in silico genetic circuit model to analyze the dynamic properties of LI. The model revealed that LI amplifies differences between neighboring cells to push them into opposite states, hence forming stable 2-D patterns. Inspired by this insight, we designed and implemented an electronic circuit that recapitulates LI patterning dynamics. This biomimetic system serve as a physical model to elucidate the design principle of generating robust patterning through spatial feedback, regardless of the underlying devices being biological or electrical.

  4. Dynamical Systems and Control Theory Inspired by Molecular Biology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-02

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0282 DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS AND CONTROL THEORY INSPIRED BY MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Eduardo Sontag RUTGERS THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW JERSEY...Standard Form 298 (Re . 8-98) v Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS AND CONTROL THEORY INSPIRED BY MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AFOSR FA9550-11-1-0247...is to develop new concepts, theory, and algorithms for control and signal processing using ideas inspired by molecular systems biology. Cell biology

  5. Measurement of the flow past a cactus-inspired cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oweis, Ghanem F.; El-Makdah, Adnan M.

    2012-11-01

    Desert cacti are tall cylindrical plants characterized by longitudinal u- or v-shaped grooves that run parallel to the plant axis, covering its surface area. We study the wake flow modifications resulting from the introduction of cactus-inspired surface grooves to a circular cylinder. Particle image velocimetry PIV is implemented in a wind tunnel to visualize and quantify the wake flow from a cactus cylinder in cross wind and an equivalent circular cylinder at Re O(1E5). The cactus wake exhibits superior behavior over its circular counterpart as seen from the mean and turbulent velocity profiles. The surface flow within the grooves is also probed to elucidate the origins of the wake alterations. Lastly, we use simple statistical analysis based only on the wake velocity fields, under the assumption of periodicity of the shedding, to recover the time varying flow from the randomly acquired PIV snapshots.

  6. Analytic Gravitational Waveforms for Generic Precessing Binary Inspirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatziioannou, Katerina; Klein, Antoine; Cornish, Neil; Yunes, Nicolás

    2017-02-01

    Binary systems of two compact objects circularize and spiral toward each other via the emission of gravitational waves. The coupling of the spins of each object with the orbital angular momentum causes the orbital plane to precess, which leads to modulation of the gravitational wave signal. Until now, generating frequency-domain waveforms for fully precessing systems for use in gravitational wave data analysis meant numerically integrating the equations of motion, then Fourier transforming the result, which is very computationally intensive for systems that complete hundreds or thousands of cycles in the sensitive band of a detector. Previously, analytic solutions were only available for certain special cases or for simplified models. Here we describe the construction of closed-form, frequency-domain waveforms for fully precessing, quasicircular binary inspirals.

  7. An introduction to bio-inspired artificial neural network architectures.

    PubMed

    Fasel, B

    2003-03-01

    In this introduction to artificial neural networks we attempt to give an overview of the most important types of neural networks employed in engineering and explain shortly how they operate and also how they relate to biological neural networks. The focus will mainly be on bio-inspired artificial neural network architectures and specifically to neo-perceptions. The latter belong to the family of convolutional neural networks. Their topology is somewhat similar to the one of the human visual cortex and they are based on receptive fields that allow, in combination with sub-sampling layers, for an improved robustness with regard to local spatial distortions. We demonstrate the application of artificial neural networks to face analysis--a domain we human beings are particularly good at, yet which poses great difficulties for digital computers running deterministic software programs.

  8. Analytic Gravitational Waveforms for Generic Precessing Binary Inspirals.

    PubMed

    Chatziioannou, Katerina; Klein, Antoine; Cornish, Neil; Yunes, Nicolás

    2017-02-03

    Binary systems of two compact objects circularize and spiral toward each other via the emission of gravitational waves. The coupling of the spins of each object with the orbital angular momentum causes the orbital plane to precess, which leads to modulation of the gravitational wave signal. Until now, generating frequency-domain waveforms for fully precessing systems for use in gravitational wave data analysis meant numerically integrating the equations of motion, then Fourier transforming the result, which is very computationally intensive for systems that complete hundreds or thousands of cycles in the sensitive band of a detector. Previously, analytic solutions were only available for certain special cases or for simplified models. Here we describe the construction of closed-form, frequency-domain waveforms for fully precessing, quasicircular binary inspirals.

  9. Tidal interactions of inspiraling compact binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bildsten, Lars; Cutler, Curt

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the tidal interaction in neutron star-neutron star and neutron star-black hole binaries and argue that they will not be tidally locked during the gravitational inspiral. More specifically, we show that, for inspiraling neutron stars of mass greater than about 1.2 solar mass, the shortest possible tidal synchronization time exceeds the gravitational decay time, so that the neutron star cannot be tidally locked prior to tidal disruption, regardless of its internal viscosity. For smaller mass neutron stars, an implausibly large kinematic viscosity - nearly the speed of light times the stellar radius - is required for tidal locking. We also argue that the mass transfer which occurs when the neutron star reaches the tidal radius will be unstable in neutron star-black hole binaries, and the instability will destroy the neutron star in a few orbital periods. The implications of our work for the detection of these sources by LIGO and other gravitational wave observatories and for the gamma-ray burst scenarios of Paczynski (1986, 1991) are discussed.

  10. Bio-inspired self-shaping ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargardi, Fabio L.; Le Ferrand, Hortense; Libanori, Rafael; Studart, André R.

    2016-12-01

    Shaping ceramics into complex and intricate geometries using cost-effective processes is desirable in many applications but still remains an open challenge. Inspired by plant seed dispersal units that self-fold on differential swelling, we demonstrate that self-shaping can be implemented in ceramics by programming the material's microstructure to undergo local anisotropic shrinkage during heat treatment. Such microstructural design is achieved by magnetically aligning functionalized ceramic platelets in a liquid ceramic suspension, subsequently consolidated through an established enzyme-catalysed reaction. By fabricating alumina compacts exhibiting bio-inspired bilayer architectures, we achieve deliberate control over shape change during the sintering step. Bending, twisting or combinations of these two basic movements can be successfully programmed to obtain a myriad of complex shapes. The simplicity and the universality of such a bottom-up shaping method makes it attractive for applications that would benefit from low-waste ceramic fabrication, temperature-resistant interlocking structures or unusual geometries not accessible using conventional top-down manufacturing.

  11. Bio-inspired Fillers for Mechanical Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korley, Lashanda

    2012-02-01

    An examination of natural materials has offered a new perspective on the development of multi-functional materials with enhanced mechanical properties. One important lesson from nature is the utilization of composite structures to impart improved mechanical behavior and enhanced functionality using nanofillers. A relatively unexplored expansion of this bio-inspired, nanoscale filler approach to high performance materials is the incorporation of responsive, multi-functional reinforcing elements in polymeric composites with the goal of combining superior mechanical behavior that can be tuned with additional functionality, such as sensing and bioactivity. One approach is the use of self-assembling small molecules that form uniform, one-dimensional nanostructures as an emerging class of filler components. Another pathway toward mechanical enhancement is the incorporation of stimuli-responsive and high-modulus electrospun nanofibers. We have probed the utilization of high-aspect ratio, self-assembled small molecules and responsive electrospun nanofibers as all-organic nanofillers to achieve significant modulus changes within elastomeric matrices. The influence of matrix-filler interactions and the role of hierarchical organization in these nature-inspired composites will be discussed. Potential applications in barrier technology and drug delivery have also been explored.

  12. From biomimetic apatites to biologically inspired composites.

    PubMed

    Tampieri, A; Celotti, G; Landi, E

    2005-02-01

    Hydroxyapatite is an elective material for bone substitution. In this outline of our recent activity the crucial role of nanostructured ceramics in the design and preparation of ceramic scaffolds will be described, focussing on our more recent interest in biomimetic apatites, in particular apatites containing HPO42- CO32- and Mg2+ which are similar to the mineral component of bone. The paper describes such nanostructured products and, in particular, innovative synthetic techniques capable of yielding powders with higher reactivity and bioactivity. However, so far the characteristics of artificial bone tissues have been shown to be very different from those of natural bone, mainly because of the absence of the peculiar self-organizing interaction between apatites and the protein component. This causes modification of the structure of apatites and of the features of the overall composite forming human bone tissue. Therefore, attempts to mimic the features and structure of natural bone tissue, leading toward so-called bio-inspired materials, will be speculated upon. New techniques used to reproduce a composite in which a nanosize blade-like crystal of hydroxyapatite (HA) grows in contact with self-assembling fibres of natural polymer will be presented. In this specific case, the amazing ability of biological systems to store and process information at the molecular level, nucleating nanosize apatites (bio-inspired material), is exploited.

  13. Bio-inspired self-shaping ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Bargardi, Fabio L.; Le Ferrand, Hortense; Libanori, Rafael; Studart, André R.

    2016-01-01

    Shaping ceramics into complex and intricate geometries using cost-effective processes is desirable in many applications but still remains an open challenge. Inspired by plant seed dispersal units that self-fold on differential swelling, we demonstrate that self-shaping can be implemented in ceramics by programming the material's microstructure to undergo local anisotropic shrinkage during heat treatment. Such microstructural design is achieved by magnetically aligning functionalized ceramic platelets in a liquid ceramic suspension, subsequently consolidated through an established enzyme-catalysed reaction. By fabricating alumina compacts exhibiting bio-inspired bilayer architectures, we achieve deliberate control over shape change during the sintering step. Bending, twisting or combinations of these two basic movements can be successfully programmed to obtain a myriad of complex shapes. The simplicity and the universality of such a bottom-up shaping method makes it attractive for applications that would benefit from low-waste ceramic fabrication, temperature-resistant interlocking structures or unusual geometries not accessible using conventional top–down manufacturing. PMID:28008930

  14. Bio-inspired self-shaping ceramics.

    PubMed

    Bargardi, Fabio L; Le Ferrand, Hortense; Libanori, Rafael; Studart, André R

    2016-12-23

    Shaping ceramics into complex and intricate geometries using cost-effective processes is desirable in many applications but still remains an open challenge. Inspired by plant seed dispersal units that self-fold on differential swelling, we demonstrate that self-shaping can be implemented in ceramics by programming the material's microstructure to undergo local anisotropic shrinkage during heat treatment. Such microstructural design is achieved by magnetically aligning functionalized ceramic platelets in a liquid ceramic suspension, subsequently consolidated through an established enzyme-catalysed reaction. By fabricating alumina compacts exhibiting bio-inspired bilayer architectures, we achieve deliberate control over shape change during the sintering step. Bending, twisting or combinations of these two basic movements can be successfully programmed to obtain a myriad of complex shapes. The simplicity and the universality of such a bottom-up shaping method makes it attractive for applications that would benefit from low-waste ceramic fabrication, temperature-resistant interlocking structures or unusual geometries not accessible using conventional top-down manufacturing.

  15. Impact of changes in inspired oxygen and carbon dioxide on respiratory instability in the lamb.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Malcolm H; Sia, Kah-Ling; Skuza, Elizabeth M; Brodecky, Vojta; Berger, Philip J

    2005-02-01

    We examined the effect of hypoxia and hypercapnia administered during deliberately induced periodic breathing (PB) in seven lambs following posthyperventilation apnea. Based on our theoretical analysis, the sensitivity or loop gain (LG) of the respiratory control system of the lamb is directly proportional to the difference between alveolar PO2 and inspired PO2. This analysis indicates that during PB, when by necessity LG is >1, replacement of the inspired gas with one of reduced PO2 lowers LG; if we made inspired PO2 approximate alveolar PO2, we predict that LG would be approximately zero and breathing would promptly stabilize. In six lambs, we switched the inspired gas from an inspiratory oxygen fraction of 0.4 to one of 0.12 during an epoch of PB; PB was immediately suppressed, supporting the view that the peripheral chemoreceptors play a pivotal role in the genesis and control of unstable breathing in the lamb. In the six lambs in which we administered hypercapnic gas during PB, breathing instability was also suppressed, but only after a considerable time lag, indicating the CO2 effect is likely to have been mediated through the central chemoreceptors. When we simulated both interventions in a published model of the adult respiratory controller, PB was immediately suppressed by CO2 inhalation and exacerbated by inhalation of hypoxic gas. These fundamentally different responses in lambs and adult humans demonstrate that PB has differing underlying mechanisms in the two species.

  16. Astronomy-inspired Atomic and Molecular Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, A. R. P.

    2002-02-01

    Aimed at senior undergraduate and first-year graduate students in departments of physics and astronomy, this textbook gives a systematic treatment of atomic and molecular structure and spectra, together with the effect of weak and strong external electromagnetic fields. Topics chosen are those of interest in astronomy and indeed many were inspired by specific astronomical contexts. Examples include the negative ion of hydrogen and the effects of strong magnetic fields such as those occurring on certain white dwarfs and neutron stars. Adiabatic and non-adiabatic handling of electron correlations and application to processes such as dielectronic recombination are included. Astronomical examples are provided throughout as well as end-of-the chapter problems and exercises. Over seventy illustrative diagrams complete this unique and comprehensive volume. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-0467-2

  17. Inspiration Today: Music, Astronomy, and Popular Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraknoi, A.

    2016-01-01

    We explore a variety of examples of music inspired by serious astronomy (as opposed to simply an astronomical title or quick allusion to spooning in June to the light of the Moon). The examples are drawn from my recently published catalog of 133 such pieces, including both classical and popular genres of music. We discuss operas based on the life and work of astronomers, six songs based on a reasonable understanding of the properties of black holes, constellation pieces written by composers from around the world who are or were active amateur astronomers, the song that compares walking on the Moon to being in love, the little-known rock song that became a reference in the Astrophysical Journal, pieces that base the patterns of the music on the rhythms of astronomical phenomena, and a number of others.

  18. The periodic table: icon and inspiration.

    PubMed

    Poliakoff, Martyn; Tang, Samantha

    2015-03-13

    To start this discussion meeting on the new chemistry of the elements held on 12 May 2014, Martyn Poliakoff, Foreign Secretary of the Royal Society, was invited to give the opening remarks. As a chemist and a presenter of the popular online video channel 'The periodic table of videos', Martyn communicates his personal and professional interest in the elements to the public, who in turn use these videos both as an educational resource and for entertainment purposes. Ever since Mendeleev's first ideas for the periodic table were published in 1869, the table has continued to grow as new elements have been discovered, and it serves as both icon and inspiration; its form is now so well established that it is recognized the world over as a symbol for science. This paper highlights but a few of the varied forms that the table can take, such as an infographic, which can convey the shortage of certain elements with great impact.

  19. Reconfigurable origami-inspired acoustic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Babaee, Sahab; Overvelde, Johannes T B; Chen, Elizabeth R; Tournat, Vincent; Bertoldi, Katia

    2016-11-01

    We combine numerical simulations and experiments to design a new class of reconfigurable waveguides based on three-dimensional origami-inspired metamaterials. Our strategy builds on the fact that the rigid plates and hinges forming these structures define networks of tubes that can be easily reconfigured. As such, they provide an ideal platform to actively control and redirect the propagation of sound. We design reconfigurable systems that, depending on the externally applied deformation, can act as networks of waveguides oriented along one, two, or three preferential directions. Moreover, we demonstrate that the capability of the structure to guide and radiate acoustic energy along predefined directions can be easily switched on and off, as the networks of tubes are reversibly formed and disrupted. The proposed designs expand the ability of existing acoustic metamaterials and exploit complex waveguiding to enhance control over propagation and radiation of acoustic energy, opening avenues for the design of a new class of tunable acoustic functional systems.

  20. Cognition inspired framework for indoor scene annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhipeng; Liu, Peng; Zhao, Wei; Tang, Xianglong

    2015-09-01

    We present a simple yet effective scene annotation framework based on a combination of bag-of-visual words (BoVW), three-dimensional scene structure estimation, scene context, and cognitive theory. From a macroperspective, the proposed cognition-based hybrid motivation framework divides the annotation problem into empirical inference and real-time classification. Inspired by the inference ability of human beings, common objects of indoor scenes are defined for experience-based inference, while in the real-time classification stage, an improved BoVW-based multilayer abstract semantics labeling method is proposed by introducing abstract semantic hierarchies to narrow the semantic gap and improve the performance of object categorization. The proposed framework was evaluated on a variety of common data sets and experimental results proved its effectiveness.

  1. A skin-inspired organic digital mechanoreceptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tee, Benjamin C.-K.; Chortos, Alex; Berndt, Andre; Nguyen, Amanda Kim; Tom, Ariane; McGuire, Allister; Lin, Ziliang Carter; Tien, Kevin; Bae, Won-Gyu; Wang, Huiliang; Mei, Ping; Chou, Ho-Hsiu; Cui, Bianxiao; Deisseroth, Karl; Ng, Tse Nga; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-10-01

    Human skin relies on cutaneous receptors that output digital signals for tactile sensing in which the intensity of stimulation is converted to a series of voltage pulses. We present a power-efficient skin-inspired mechanoreceptor with a flexible organic transistor circuit that transduces pressure into digital frequency signals directly. The output frequency ranges between 0 and 200 hertz, with a sublinear response to increasing force stimuli that mimics slow-adapting skin mechanoreceptors. The output of the sensors was further used to stimulate optogenetically engineered mouse somatosensory neurons of mouse cortex in vitro, achieving stimulated pulses in accordance with pressure levels. This work represents a step toward the design and use of large-area organic electronic skins with neural-integrated touch feedback for replacement limbs.

  2. Biologically Inspired Mushroom-Shaped Adhesive Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heepe, Lars; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-07-01

    Adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon with great importance in technology, in our everyday life, and in nature. In this article, we review physical interactions that resist the separation of two solids in contact. By using examples of biological attachment systems, we summarize and categorize various principles that contribute to the so-called gecko effect. Emphasis is placed on the contact geometry and in particular on the mushroom-shaped geometry, which is observed in long-term biological adhesive systems. Furthermore, we report on artificial model systems with this bio-inspired geometry and demonstrate that surface microstructures with this geometry are promising candidates for technical applications, in which repeatable, reversible, and residue-free adhesion under different environmental conditions—such as air, fluid, and vacuum—is required. Various applications in robotic systems and in industrial pick-and-place processes are discussed.

  3. Spider web-inspired acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniaci, Marco; Krushynska, Anastasiia; Movchan, Alexander B.; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-08-01

    Spider silk is a remarkable example of bio-material with superior mechanical characteristics. Its multilevel structural organization of dragline and viscid silk leads to unusual and tunable properties, extensively studied from a quasi-static point of view. In this study, inspired by the Nephila spider orb web architecture, we propose a design for mechanical metamaterials based on its periodic repetition. We demonstrate that spider-web metamaterial structure plays an important role in the dynamic response and wave attenuation mechanisms. The capability of the resulting structure to inhibit elastic wave propagation in sub-wavelength frequency ranges is assessed, and parametric studies are performed to derive optimal configurations and constituent mechanical properties. The results show promise for the design of innovative lightweight structures for tunable vibration damping and impact protection, or the protection of large scale infrastructure such as suspended bridges.

  4. A Bio-Inspired Spatial Patterning Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai-Yuan; Joe, Danial J.; Shealy, James B.; Land, Bruce R.; Shen, Xiling

    2015-01-01

    Lateral Inhibition (LI) is a widely conserved patterning mechanism in biological systems across species. Distinct from better-known Turing patterns, LI depend on cell-cell contact rather than diffusion. We built an in silico genetic circuit model to analyze the dynamic properties of LI. The model revealed that LI amplifies differences between neighboring cells to push them into opposite states, hence forming stable 2-D patterns. Inspired by this insight, we designed and implemented an electronic circuit that recapitulates LI patterning dynamics. This biomimetic system serve as a physical model to elucidate the design principle of generating robust patterning through spatial feedback, regardless of the underlying devices being biological or electrical. PMID:25569903

  5. Fall Meeting abstract submission inspires science poetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-08-01

    When the 4 August deadline for submitting Fall Meeting abstracts passed, AGU had received more than 20,000 abstracts, a record-breaking number. The submission process had an unexpected by-product: It inspired some scientists to write haiku on Twitter. (Haiku is a form of Japanese poetry typically having three lines, the first with five syllables, the second with seven, and the third with five.) The following are examples of the haiku tweets, with the hashtag #AGU11AbstractHaiku. (For those who want to keep updated about the Fall Meeting on Twitter, the hashtag is #AGU11.) For more information about the meeting, including registration and housing, visit http://sites.agu.org/fallmeeting/.

  6. Compact stars in Eddington inspired gravity.

    PubMed

    Pani, Paolo; Cardoso, Vitor; Delsate, Térence

    2011-07-15

    A new, Eddington inspired theory of gravity was recently proposed by Bañados and Ferreira. It is equivalent to general relativity in vacuum, but differs from it inside matter. This viable, one-parameter theory was shown to avoid cosmological singularities and turns out to lead to many other exciting new features that we report here. First, for a positive coupling parameter, the field equations have a dramatic impact on the collapse of dust, and do not lead to singularities. We further find that the theory supports stable, compact pressureless stars made of perfect fluid, which provide interesting models of self-gravitating dark matter. Finally, we show that the mere existence of relativistic stars imposes a strong, near optimal constraint on the coupling parameter, which can even be improved by observations of the moment of inertia of the double pulsar.

  7. Integrated bio-inspired fluidic imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Frank S.; Johnson, Daniel; Cho, Sung Hwan; Qiao, Wen; Arianpour, Ashkan; Francis, Cameron S.; Kim, Nam-Hyong; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2010-02-01

    We developed a new type of optical lens device that can change its curvature like crystalline lens in human eye. The curvature changing capability of the lens allows for a tremendous tuning range in its optical power and subsequently enables miniaturized imaging systems that can perform autofocus, optical zoom, and other advanced functions. In this paper, we study the physical properties of bio-inspired fluidic lenses and demonstrate the optical functionality through miniaturized optical systems constructed with such lenses. We report an auto-focusing optical system that can turn from a camera to a microscope, and demonstrate more than 4X optical zoom with a very short total track length. Finally, we demonstrate the benefits of fluidic lens zoom camera through minimally invasive gallbladder removal surgery.

  8. A Biologically Inspired Network Design Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoge; Adamatzky, Andrew; Chan, Felix T.S.; Deng, Yong; Yang, Hai; Yang, Xin-She; Tsompanas, Michail-Antisthenis I.; Sirakoulis, Georgios Ch.; Mahadevan, Sankaran

    2015-01-01

    A network design problem is to select a subset of links in a transport network that satisfy passengers or cargo transportation demands while minimizing the overall costs of the transportation. We propose a mathematical model of the foraging behaviour of slime mould P. polycephalum to solve the network design problem and construct optimal transport networks. In our algorithm, a traffic flow between any two cities is estimated using a gravity model. The flow is imitated by the model of the slime mould. The algorithm model converges to a steady state, which represents a solution of the problem. We validate our approach on examples of major transport networks in Mexico and China. By comparing networks developed in our approach with the man-made highways, networks developed by the slime mould, and a cellular automata model inspired by slime mould, we demonstrate the flexibility and efficiency of our approach. PMID:26041508

  9. Reconfigurable origami-inspired acoustic waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Babaee, Sahab; Overvelde, Johannes T. B.; Chen, Elizabeth R.; Tournat, Vincent; Bertoldi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    We combine numerical simulations and experiments to design a new class of reconfigurable waveguides based on three-dimensional origami-inspired metamaterials. Our strategy builds on the fact that the rigid plates and hinges forming these structures define networks of tubes that can be easily reconfigured. As such, they provide an ideal platform to actively control and redirect the propagation of sound. We design reconfigurable systems that, depending on the externally applied deformation, can act as networks of waveguides oriented along one, two, or three preferential directions. Moreover, we demonstrate that the capability of the structure to guide and radiate acoustic energy along predefined directions can be easily switched on and off, as the networks of tubes are reversibly formed and disrupted. The proposed designs expand the ability of existing acoustic metamaterials and exploit complex waveguiding to enhance control over propagation and radiation of acoustic energy, opening avenues for the design of a new class of tunable acoustic functional systems. PMID:28138527

  10. Tough, bio-inspired hybrid materials

    SciTech Connect

    Munch, Etienne; Launey, Maximimilan E.; Alsem, Daan H.; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2008-10-06

    The notion of mimicking natural structures in the synthesis of new structural materials has generated enormous interest but has yielded few practical advances. Natural composites achieve strength and toughness through complex hierarchical designs extremely difficult to replicate synthetically. Here we emulate Nature's toughening mechanisms through the combination of two ordinary compounds, aluminum oxide and polymethylmethacrylate, into ice-templated structures whose toughness can be over 300 times (in energy terms) that of their constituents. The final product is a bulk hybrid ceramic material whose high yield strength and fracture toughness ({approx}200 MPa and {approx}30 MPa{radical}m) provide specific properties comparable to aluminum alloys. These model materials can be used to identify the key microstructural features that should guide the synthesis of bio-inspired ceramic-based composites with unique strength and toughness.

  11. Bio-inspired accommodating fluidic intraocular lens.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Wen; Johnson, Daniel; Tsai, Frank S; Cho, Sung Hwan; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2009-10-15

    The invention of intraocular lens (IOL), a substitute for crystalline lens, represents a major advancement in cataract surgery. After about sixty years of IOL development, one key remaining problem is its limited accommodation range compared with natural eyes. To overcome this performance limit, we explore bio-inspired fluidic IOL. By mimicking the working principle of natural eyes, a fluidic intraocular lens can achieve an exceedingly large accommodation range. An experiment on fluidic IOL demonstrated a very high tuning range of 12 D. This accommodation range was achieved with a modest amount of force (0.06 N) and equatorial radius change (0.286 mm), in conditions matching well with the characteristics of aged eyes.

  12. Bio-inspired photonic crystals with superwettability.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Minxuan; Wang, Jingxia; Jiang, Lei

    2016-12-21

    Photonic crystals (PCs) have attracted enormous research interest due to their unique light manipulation and potential applications in sensing, catalysts, detection, displays, solar cells and other fields. In particular, many novel applications of PCs are derived from their surface wettability. Generally, the wettability of PCs is determined by a combination of its surface geometrical structures and surface chemical compositions. This review focuses on the recent developments in the mechanism, fabrication and application of bio-inspired PCs with superwettability. It includes information on constructing superwetting PCs based on designing the topographical structure and regulating the surface chemical composition, and information on extending the practical applications of superwetting PCs in humidity/oil/solvent sensing, actuating, anti-fouling and liquid-impermeable surface, chemical detection, etc.

  13. Bio-inspired networks for optoelectronic applications.

    PubMed

    Han, Bing; Huang, Yuanlin; Li, Ruopeng; Peng, Qiang; Luo, Junyi; Pei, Ke; Herczynski, Andrzej; Kempa, Krzysztof; Ren, Zhifeng; Gao, Jinwei

    2014-11-28

    Modern optoelectronics needs development of new materials characterized not only by high optical transparency and electrical conductivity, but also by mechanical strength, and flexibility. Recent advances employ grids of metallic micro- and nanowires, but the overall performance of the resulting material composites remains unsatisfactory. In this work, we propose a new strategy: application of natural scaffoldings perfected by evolution. In this context, we study two bio-inspired networks for two specific optoelectronic applications. The first network, intended for solar cells, light sources and similar devices, has a quasi-fractal structure and is derived directly from a chemically extracted leaf venation system. The second network is intended for touch screens and flexible displays, and is obtained by metalizing a spider's silk web. We demonstrate that each of these networks attain an exceptional optoelectonic and mechanical performance for its intended purpose, providing a promising direction in the development of more efficient optoelectronic devices.

  14. Bio-inspired Computing for Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufenberg, Larry

    2003-01-01

    Living creatures may provide algorithms to enable active sensing/control systems in robots. Active sensing could enable planetary rovers to feel their way in unknown environments. The surface of Jupiter's moon Europa consists of fractured ice over a liquid sea that may contain microbes similar to those on Earth. To explore such extreme environments, NASA needs robots that autonomously survive, navigate, and gather scientific data. They will be too far away for guidance from Earth. They must sense their environment and control their own movements to avoid obstacles or investigate a science opportunity. To meet this challenge, CICT's Information Technology Strategic Research (ITSR) Project is funding neurobiologists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and selected universities to search for biologically inspired algorithms that enable robust active sensing and control for exploratory robots. Sources for these algorithms are living creatures, including rats and electric fish.

  15. A skin-inspired organic digital mechanoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Tee, Benjamin C-K; Chortos, Alex; Berndt, Andre; Nguyen, Amanda Kim; Tom, Ariane; McGuire, Allister; Lin, Ziliang Carter; Tien, Kevin; Bae, Won-Gyu; Wang, Huiliang; Mei, Ping; Chou, Ho-Hsiu; Cui, Bianxiao; Deisseroth, Karl; Ng, Tse Nga; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-10-16

    Human skin relies on cutaneous receptors that output digital signals for tactile sensing in which the intensity of stimulation is converted to a series of voltage pulses. We present a power-efficient skin-inspired mechanoreceptor with a flexible organic transistor circuit that transduces pressure into digital frequency signals directly. The output frequency ranges between 0 and 200 hertz, with a sublinear response to increasing force stimuli that mimics slow-adapting skin mechanoreceptors. The output of the sensors was further used to stimulate optogenetically engineered mouse somatosensory neurons of mouse cortex in vitro, achieving stimulated pulses in accordance with pressure levels. This work represents a step toward the design and use of large-area organic electronic skins with neural-integrated touch feedback for replacement limbs.

  16. Bio-inspired networks for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bing; Huang, Yuanlin; Li, Ruopeng; Peng, Qiang; Luo, Junyi; Pei, Ke; Herczynski, Andrzej; Kempa, Krzysztof; Ren, Zhifeng; Gao, Jinwei

    2014-11-01

    Modern optoelectronics needs development of new materials characterized not only by high optical transparency and electrical conductivity, but also by mechanical strength, and flexibility. Recent advances employ grids of metallic micro- and nanowires, but the overall performance of the resulting material composites remains unsatisfactory. In this work, we propose a new strategy: application of natural scaffoldings perfected by evolution. In this context, we study two bio-inspired networks for two specific optoelectronic applications. The first network, intended for solar cells, light sources and similar devices, has a quasi-fractal structure and is derived directly from a chemically extracted leaf venation system. The second network is intended for touch screens and flexible displays, and is obtained by metalizing a spider’s silk web. We demonstrate that each of these networks attain an exceptional optoelectonic and mechanical performance for its intended purpose, providing a promising direction in the development of more efficient optoelectronic devices.

  17. Mapping the 2017 Eclipse: Education, Navigation, Inspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiler, M.

    2015-12-01

    Eclipse maps are a unique vessel of knowledge. At a glance, they communicate the essential knowledge of where and when to successfully view a total eclipse of the sun. An eclipse map also provides detailed knowledge of eclipse circumstances superimposed on the highway system for optimal navigation, especially in the event that weather forces relocation. Eclipse maps are also a vital planning tool for solar physicists and astrophotographers capturing high-resolution imagery of the solar corona. Michael Zeiler will speak to the role of eclipse maps in educating the American public and inspiring people to make the effort to reach the path of totality for the sight of a lifetime. Michael will review the role of eclipse maps in astronomical research and discuss a project under development, the 2017 Eclipse Atlas for smartphones, tablets, and desktop computers.

  18. Lipoprotein-inspired nanoparticles for cancer theranostics.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kenneth K; Lovell, Jonathan F; Zheng, Gang

    2011-10-18

    Over hundreds of millions of years, animals have evolved endogenous lipoprotein nanoparticles for shuttling hydrophobic molecules to different parts of the body. In the last 70 years, scientists have developed an understanding of lipoprotein function, often in relationship to lipid transport and heart disease. Such biocompatible, lipid-protein complexes are also ideal for loading and delivering cancer therapeutic and diagnostic agents, which means that lipoprotein and lipoprotein-inspired nanoparticles also offer opportunities for cancer theranostics. By mimicking the endogenous shape and structure of lipoproteins, the nanocarrier can remain in circulation for an extended period of time, while largely evading the reticuloendothelial cells in the body's defenses. The small size (less than 30 nm) of the low-density (LDL) and high-density (HDL) classes of lipoproteins allows them to maneuver deeply into tumors. Furthermore, lipoproteins can be targeted to their endogenous receptors, when those are implicated in cancer, or to other cancer receptors. In this Account, we review the field of lipoprotein-inspired nanoparticles related to the delivery of cancer imaging and therapy agents. LDL has innate cancer targeting potential and has been used to incorporate diverse hydrophobic molecules and deliver them to tumors. Nature's method of rerouting LDL in atherosclerosis provides a strategy to extend the cancer targeting potential of lipoproteins beyond its narrow purview. Although LDL has shown promise as a drug nanocarrier for cancer imaging and therapy, increasing evidence indicates that HDL, the smallest lipoprotein, may also be of use for drug targeting and uptake into cancer cells. We also discuss how synthetic HDL-like nanoparticles, which do not include human or recombinant proteins, can deliver molecules directly to the cytoplasm of certain cancer cells, effectively bypassing the endosomal compartment. This strategy could allow HDL-like nanoparticles to be used to

  19. Bio-inspired nano tools for neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Das, Suradip; Carnicer-Lombarte, Alejandro; Fawcett, James W; Bora, Utpal

    2016-07-01

    Research and treatment in the nervous system is challenged by many physiological barriers posing a major hurdle for neurologists. The CNS is protected by a formidable blood brain barrier (BBB) which limits surgical, therapeutic and diagnostic interventions. The hostile environment created by reactive astrocytes in the CNS along with the limited regeneration capacity of the PNS makes functional recovery after tissue damage difficult and inefficient. Nanomaterials have the unique ability to interface with neural tissue in the nano-scale and are capable of influencing the function of a single neuron. The ability of nanoparticles to transcend the BBB through surface modifications has been exploited in various neuro-imaging techniques and for targeted drug delivery. The tunable topography of nanofibers provides accurate spatio-temporal guidance to regenerating axons. This review is an attempt to comprehend the progress in understanding the obstacles posed by the complex physiology of the nervous system and the innovations in design and fabrication of advanced nanomaterials drawing inspiration from natural phenomenon. We also discuss the development of nanomaterials for use in Neuro-diagnostics, Neuro-therapy and the fabrication of advanced nano-devices for use in opto-electronic and ultrasensitive electrophysiological applications. The energy efficient and parallel computing ability of the human brain has inspired the design of advanced nanotechnology based computational systems. However, extensive use of nanomaterials in neuroscience also raises serious toxicity issues as well as ethical concerns regarding nano implants in the brain. In conclusion we summarize these challenges and provide an insight into the huge potential of nanotechnology platforms in neuroscience.

  20. NASA Missions Inspire Online Video Games

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    Fast forward to 2035. Imagine being part of a community of astronauts living and working on the Moon. Suddenly, in the middle of just another day in space, a meteorite crashes into the surface of the Moon, threatening life as you know it. The support equipment that provides oxygen for the entire community has been compromised. What would you do? While this situation is one that most people will never encounter, NASA hopes to place students in such situations - virtually - to inspire, engage, and educate about NASA technologies, job opportunities, and the future of space exploration. Specifically, NASA s Learning Technologies program, part of the Agency s Office of Education, aims to inspire and motivate students to pursue careers in the science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) disciplines through interactive technologies. The ultimate goal of these educational programs is to support the growth of a pool of qualified scientific and technical candidates for future careers at places like NASA. STEM education has been an area of concern in the United States; according to the results of the 2009 Program for International Student Assessment, 23 countries had higher average scores in mathematics literacy than the United States. On the science literacy scale, 18 countries had higher average scores. "This is part of a much bigger picture of trying to grow skilled graduates for places like NASA that will want that technical expertise," says Daniel Laughlin, the Learning Technologies project manager at Goddard Space Flight Center. "NASA is trying to increase the number of students going into those fields, and so are other government agencies."

  1. An acetylcholinesterase-inspired biomimetic toxicity sensor.

    PubMed

    Wujcik, Evan K; Londoño, Nicolas J; Duirk, Stephen E; Monty, Chelsea N; Masel, Richard I

    2013-05-01

    This work demonstrates the ability of an acetylcholinesterase-inspired biomimetic sensor to accurately predict the toxicity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors. In surface waters used for municipal drinking water supplies, numerous pesticides and other anthropogenic chemicals have been found that inhibit AChE; however, there is currently no portable toxicity assay capable of determining the potential neurotoxicity of water samples and complex mixtures. Biological assays have been developed to determine the toxicity of unknown samples, but the short shelf-life of cells and other biological materials often make them undesirable for use in portable assays. Chemical methods and structure-activity-relationships, on the other hand, require prior knowledge on the compounds of interest that is often unavailable when analyzing environmental samples. In the toxicity assay presented here, the acetylcholinesterase enzyme has been replaced with 1-phenyl-1,2,3-butanetrione 2-oxime (PBO) a biomimetic compound that is structurally similar to the AChE active site. Using a biomimetic compound in place of the native enzyme allows for a longer shelf-life while maintaining the selective and kinetic ability of the enzyme itself. Previous work has shown the success of oxime-based sensors in the selective detection of AChE inhibitors and this work highlights the ability of an AChE-inspired biomimetic sensor to accurately predict the toxicity (LD50 and LC50) for a range of AChE inhibitors. The biomimetic assay shows strong linear correlations to LD50 (oral, rat) and LC50 (fish) values. Using a test set of eight AChE inhibitors, the biomimetic assay accurately predicted the LC50 value for 75% of the inhibitors within one order of magnitude.

  2. Engaging Generation Now, Inspiring Generation Next

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, Mike; Gay, P.

    2008-05-01

    In 2008, the Education and Public Outreach Committee of the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) initiated several new strategies for disseminating accurate, stimulating, engaging information on general astronomy and variable star science to thousands of students, parents, and amateur astronomers each year through astronomy clubs, societies, and star party events. We are initiating contact with astronomy clubs and organizations to offer qualified speakers from the AAVSO Speakers Bureau for their meetings and activities. The current roster of speakers include, professional astronomers, doctors, engineers, teachers and some of the world's leading variable star observers. Request information is available on the AAVSO website. For organizations and individuals unable to engage one of our speakers due to time, distance or financial constraints, we have made PowerPoint presentations used in previous talks available free for download from the same web pages. Thousands of amateur astronomers and their children attend star parties each year. As an extension of our speakers’ bureau, our goal is to have an AAVSO representative at each of the major star parties each year giving an enthusiastic talk on variable stars or related astronomical subject and supplying inspirational printed materials on astronomy and amateur contributions to science. The nation's largest astronomy clubs have monthly newsletters they distribute to their membership. Newsletter editors are constantly in need of quality, interesting content to fill out their issues each month. We are offering a `writers’ bureau’ service to newsletter editors, similar to the news wire services used by newspapers. We will supply up to a half dozen articles on astronomy and variable star science each month for editors to use at their discretion in their publications. Our goal is to provide information, inspiration and encourage participation among amateur astronomers and their kids, our next

  3. Origami-inspired active structures: a synthesis and review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peraza-Hernandez, Edwin A.; Hartl, Darren J.; Malak, Richard J., Jr.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2014-09-01

    Origami, the ancient art of paper folding, has inspired the design of engineering devices and structures for decades. The underlying principles of origami are very general, which has led to applications ranging from cardboard containers to deployable space structures. More recently, researchers have become interested in the use of active materials (i.e., those that convert various forms of energy into mechanical work) to effect the desired folding behavior. When used in a suitable geometry, active materials allow engineers to create self-folding structures. Such structures are capable of performing folding and/or unfolding operations without being kinematically manipulated by external forces or moments. This is advantageous for many applications including space systems, underwater robotics, small scale devices, and self-assembling systems. This article is a survey and analysis of prior work on active self-folding structures as well as methods and tools available for the design of folding structures in general and self-folding structures in particular. The goal is to provide researchers and practitioners with a systematic view of the state-of-the-art in this important and evolving area. Unifying structural principles for active self-folding structures are identified and used as a basis for a quantitative and qualitative comparison of numerous classes of active materials. Design considerations specific to folded structures are examined, including the issues of crease pattern identification and fold kinematics. Although few tools have been created with active materials in mind, many of them are useful in the overall design process for active self-folding structures. Finally, the article concludes with a discussion of open questions for the field of origami-inspired engineering.

  4. BATMAV: a 2-DOF bio-inspired flapping flight platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunget, Gheorghe; Seelecke, Stefan

    2010-04-01

    Due to the availability of small sensors, Micro-Aerial Vehicles (MAVs) can be used for detection missions of biological, chemical and nuclear agents. Traditionally these devices used fixed or rotary wings, actuated with electric DC motortransmission, a system which brings the disadvantage of a heavier platform. The overall objective of the BATMAV project is to develop a biologically inspired bat-like MAV with flexible and foldable wings for flapping flight. This paper presents a flight platform that features bat-inspired wings which are able to actively fold their elbow joints. A previous analysis of the flight physics for small birds, bats and large insects, revealed that the mammalian flight anatomy represents a suitable flight platform that can be actuated efficiently using Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) artificial-muscles. A previous study of the flight styles in bats based on the data collected by Norberg [1] helped to identify the required joint angles as relevant degrees of freedom for wing actuation. Using the engineering theory of robotic manipulators, engineering kinematic models of wings with 2 and 3-DOFs were designed to mimic the wing trajectories of the natural flier Plecotus auritus. Solid models of the bat-like skeleton were designed based on the linear and angular dimensions resulted from the kinematic models. This structure of the flight platform was fabricated using rapid prototyping technologies and assembled to form a desktop prototype with 2-DOFs wings. Preliminary flapping test showed suitable trajectories for wrist and wingtip that mimic the flapping cycle of the natural flyer.

  5. INSPIRE: A VLF Radio Project for High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Jill A.; Pine, Bill; Taylor, William W. L.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1988 the Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionospheric Radio Experiment, or INSPIRE, has given students the opportunity to build research-quality VLF radio receivers and make observations of both natural and stimulated radio waves in the atmosphere. Any high school science class is eligible to join the INSPIRE volunteer observing network and…

  6. Cultural Contrasts and Commonalities in Inspiring Language Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Martin; Wedell, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Inspiring teaching is the kind of pedagogy that motivates pupils to study autonomously, in their own time, of their own volition beyond the classroom, and may be particularly important for long-term endeavours such as learning a second language. This study aimed to find out the prevalence and nature of inspiring English language teaching in the…

  7. Kids as Airborne Mission Scientists: Designing PBL To Inspire Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koszalka, Tiffany A.; Grabowski, Barbara L.; Kim, Younghoon

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has great potential for inspiring K-12 learning. KaAMS, a NASA funded project and an example of PBL, was designed to help teachers inspire middle school students to learn science. The students participate as scientists investigating environmental problems using NASA airborne remote sensing data. Two PBL modules were…

  8. Bio-inspired synthesis of metal nanomaterials and applications.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiale; Lin, Liqin; Sun, Daohua; Chen, Huimei; Yang, Dapeng; Li, Qingbiao

    2015-10-07

    This critical review focuses on recent advances in the bio-inspired synthesis of metal nanomaterials (MNMs) using microorganisms, viruses, plants, proteins and DNA molecules as well as their applications in various fields. Prospects in the design of bio-inspired MNMs for novel applications are also discussed.

  9. Supporting STEM Teachers to Inspire through Everyday Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bienkowski, Marie; Shechtman, Nicole; Remold, Julie; Knudsen, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Science teachers inspire in part by their constant adaptation to the learning needs of their students and to evolving content, curriculum, technology, and student populations. Innovation--bringing novel things to a situation to confer a benefit--is an integral part of teaching overall, and in especially inspired science teaching. While innovation…

  10. Topology evolution model for wireless multi-hop network based on socially inspired mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiaojuan; Hu, Yuhen; Zhu, Yu

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, topology evolution problem is addressed for improving the network performance in wireless multi-hop networks. A novel topology model based on social inspired mechanism with energy-aware and local-world features is proposed to handle the time-varying nature of wireless multi-hop network. A series of theoretical analysis and numerical simulation to the social inspired evolution network are conducted. Firstly, the degree distribution of this social inspired model represents a transition between exponential to power-law scaling with increasing the local world scale. Secondly, the clustering coefficient and the average path length decrease sharply as generally local-world scale increases a little. Finally, we found that the robustness and fragility of the proposed network model against random failures and attacks also display a transition between the random and the scale-free ones when the scale of local-world increasing. This local-world social inspired network model can maintain the robustness of scale-free networks and can improve the network reliance against intentional attacks.

  11. Learning from nature: building bio-inspired smart nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xu; Jiang, Lei

    2009-11-24

    Learning from nature has inspired the fabrication of novel artificial materials that enable researchers to understand and to imitate biology. Bio-inspired research, in particular, owes much of its current development to advances in materials science and creative "smart" system design. The development and application of bio-inspired nanochannels is a burgeoning area in this field of research. Bio-inspired nanochannels enable many potential approaches to study various biomolecules in confined spaces and in real-time by current measurements. In this Perspective, we describe how these bio-inspired systems can be used to build novel, smart nanodevices with precisely controlled functions. Applications for these systems range from simulating the process of ion transport in living organisms by using biomimetic nanochannels to applying artificial nanochannel systems to investigate the chemistry, structure, size, and conformational states of biomolecules.

  12. Evaluation of bio-inspired morphing concepts with regard to aircraft dynamics and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickenheiser, Adam M.; Garcia, Ephrahim; Waszak, Martin

    2004-07-01

    This paper will discuss the application of various bio-inspired morphing concepts to unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) designs. Several analysis tools will be introduced to calculate the aerodynamic benefits, dynamic response, and mission-level benefits of morphing shape changes. Empirical relations are employed to calculate the effects of various geometry changes on the aerodynamics of the vehicle. A six-degree-of-freedom simulation will evaluate the stability and dynamic response of each vehicle configuration as well as "snapshots" of the morphing change. Subsequently, an aircraft performance analysis will be conducted for various shape configurations. Specifically, the performance of a bio-inspired wing is compared to conventional designs. The aircraft dynamic improvements that morphing technologies introduce will be discussed.

  13. Perspective of an Artist Inspired by Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanborn, Jim

    2010-02-01

    Using digital images and video I will be presenting thirty years of my science based artwork. Beginning in the late 1970's my gallery and museum installations used lodestones and suspended compasses to reveal the earths' magnetic field. Through the 1980's my work included these compass installations and geologically inspired tableaux that had one thing in common, they were designed to expose the invisible forces of nature. Tectonics, the Coriolis force, and magnetism were among the subjects of study. In 1988, on the basis of my work with invisible forces, I was selected for a commission from the General Services Administration for the new Central Intelligence Agency headquarters in Langley Virginia. This work titled Kryptos included a large cryptographic component that remains undeciphered twenty years after its installation. In the 1990's Kryptos inspired several of my museum and gallery installations using cryptography and secrecy as their main themes. From 1995-1998 I completed a series of large format projections on the landscape in the western US and Ireland. These projections and the resulting series of photographs emulated the 19th century cartographers hired by the United States Government to map the western landscape. In 1998 I began my project titled Atomic Time. This installation shown for the first time in 2004 at the Corcoran Gallery in Washington DC, then again in the Gwangju Biennale in South Korea was a recreation of the 1944 Manhattan Project laboratory that built the first Atomic Bomb. This installation used original equipment and prototypes from the Los Alamos Lab and was an extremely accurate representation of the laboratory and the first nuclear bomb called the ``Trinity Device.'' I began my current project Terrestrial Physics in 2005. This installation to be shown in June 2010 at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Denver is a recreation of the large particle accelerator and the experiment that fissioned Uranium in 1939 at the Carnegie

  14. Bio-Inspired Engineering of Exploration Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sanita

    2003-01-01

    The multidisciplinary concept of "bioinspired engineering of exploration systems" (BEES) is described, which is a guiding principle of the continuing effort to develop biomorphic explorers as reported in a number of articles in the past issues of NASA Tech Briefs. The intent of BEES is to distill from the principles found in successful nature-tested mechanisms of specific crucial functions that are hard to accomplish by conventional methods but that are accomplished rather deftly in nature by biological organisms. The intent is not just to mimic operational mechanisms found in a specific biological organism but to imbibe the salient principles from a variety of diverse bio-organisms for the desired crucial function. Thereby, we can build explorer systems that have specific capabilities endowed beyond nature, as they will possess a combination of the best nature-tested mechanisms for that particular function. The approach consists of selecting a crucial function, for example, flight or some selected aspects of flight, and develop an explorer that combines the principles of those specific attributes as seen in diverse flying species into one artificial entity. This will allow going beyond biology and achieving unprecedented capability and adaptability needed in encountering and exploring what is as yet unknown. A classification of biomorphic flyers into two main classes of surface and aerial explorers is illustrated in the figure, with examples of a variety of biological organisms that provide the inspiration in each respective subclass. Such biomorphic explorers may possess varied mobility modes: surface-roving, burrowing, hopping, hovering, or flying, to accomplish surface, subsurface, and aerial exploration. Preprogrammed for a specific function, they could serve as one-way communicating beacons, spread over the exploration site, autonomously looking for/at the targets of interest. In a hierarchical organization, these biomorphic explorers would report to the next

  15. Lunabotics Mining Competition: Inspiration Through Accomplishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Lunabotics Mining Competition is designed to promote the development of interest in space activities and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) fields. The competition uses excavation, a necessary first step towards extracting resources from the regolith and building bases on the moon. The unique physical properties of lunar regolith and the reduced 1/6th gravity, vacuum environment make excavation a difficult technical challenge. Advances in lunar regolith mining have the potential to significantly contribute to our nation's space vision and NASA space exploration operations. The competition is conducted annually by NASA at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. The teams that can use telerobotic or autonomous operation to excavate a lunar regolith geotechnical simulant, herein after referred to as Black Point-1 (or BP-1) and score the most points (calculated as an average of two separate 10-minute timed competition attempts) will eam points towards the Joe Kosmo Award for Excellence and the scores will reflect ranking in the on-site mining category of the competition. The minimum excavation requirement is 10.0 kg during each competition attempt and the robotic excavator, referred to as the "Lunabot", must meet all specifications. This paper will review the achievements of the Lunabotics Mining Competition in 2010 and 2011, and present the new rules for 2012. By providing a framework for robotic design and fabrication, which culminates in a live competition event, university students have been able to produce sophisticated lunabots which are tele-operated. Multi-disciplinary teams are encouraged and the extreme sense of accomplishment provides a unique source of inspiration to the participating students, which has been shown to translate into increased interest in STEM careers. Our industrial sponsors (Caterpillar, Newmont Mining, Harris, Honeybee Robotics) have all stated that there is a strong need for skills in the workforce related

  16. INSPIRE: A new scientific information system for HEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, R.; Raae, L.

    2010-04-01

    The status of high-energy physics (HEP) information systems has been jointly analyzed by the libraries of CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC. As a result, the four laboratories have started the INSPIRE project - a new platform built by moving the successful SPIRES features and content, curated at DESY, Fermilab and SLAC, into the open-source CDS Invenio digital library software that was developed at CERN. INSPIRE will integrate current acquisition workflows and databases to host the entire body of the HEP literature (about one million records), aiming to become the reference HEP scientific information platform worldwide. It will provide users with fast access to full text journal articles and preprints, but also material such as conference slides and multimedia. INSPIRE will empower scientists with new tools to discover and access the results most relevant to their research, enable novel text- and data-mining applications, and deploy new metrics to assess the impact of articles and authors. In addition, it will introduce the "Web 2.0" paradigm of user-enriched content in the domain of sciences, with community-based approaches to scientific publishing. INSPIRE represents a natural evolution of scholarly communication built on successful community-based information systems, and it provides a vision for information management in other fields of science. Inspired by the needs of HEP, we hope that the INSPIRE project will be inspiring for other communities.

  17. High Strength and Light-weight Materials Inspired by the Exoskeleton of Arthropods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    previous study, where Homarus americanus (American lobster ) and Callinectes sapidus (Atlantic blue crab) were investigated [1]. Image analysis via SEM...Glancey JL and Karlsson AM, Mechanical behavior of bio-inspired laminate composites, in review Page 3 of 6 (A) Blue Crab and Lobster (B...Japanese Beetle Fig. 1 Schematic of the upper structural levels of a (A) Homarus americanus (American lobster ) exoskeleton [1] and (B) Popillia

  18. An improved bio-inspired algorithm for the directed shortest path problem.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoge; Zhang, Yajuan; Deng, Yong

    2014-11-18

    Because most networks are intrinsically directed, the directed shortest path problem has been one of the fundamental issues in network optimization. In this paper, a novel algorithm for finding the shortest path in directed networks is proposed. It extends a bio-inspired path finding model of Physarum polycephalum, which is designed only for undirected networks, by adopting analog circuit analysis. Illustrative examples are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in finding the directed shortest path.

  19. Physics-inspired image analytics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Bahram; Asghari, Mohamad

    2016-09-01

    We describe a new computational approach to image analytics and its application to feature enhancement. The algorithm reveals latent features in the image by a transformation known as the Phase Stretch Transform. This computationally efficient transform emulates the propagation of light through a physical medium followed by detection of light's complex amplitude. We show that the phase of the transform reveals transitions in image intensity and can be used for edge detection with excellent low light level sensitivity. When the diffractive medium has a warped frequency response, the transform engineers the space-bandwidth product of the image with potential application in data compression. Image processing inspired by optical physics has emerged from the research on Photonic Time Stretch, a time-domain signal processing technique that employs temporal dispersion to slow down, capture, and digitally process fast waveforms in real time. This talk will focus on the Phase Stretch Transform (PST), its extension to machine learning and applications in radiology, astronomy and security image analytics.

  20. Bio-Inspired Solar Energy Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warncke, Kurt

    2009-11-01

    The areas of solar-powered catalysts for energy rich fuels formation and bio-inspired molecular assemblies for integrating photon-to-fuels pathways have been identified by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U. S. Department of Energy as challenges for the next generation of sustainable, high-efficiency solar energy conversion systems [1]. The light-harvesting, energy-transducing and carbon compound-synthesizing (carbon dioxide-fixing) reactions that are encompassed by natural photosynthesis offer molecular paradigms for efficient free energy capture and storage. We seek to emulate these features in cell-free, protein-based systems. Our goal is to transform the robust (alpha,beta)8-barrel fold of an enzyme that naturally catalyzes radical reactions into a catalytic module for the reduction of carbon dioxide to formate, by using the cobalt-containing cobalamins and other organocobalt centers. The activation of the catalytic center will be driven by photo-reduction, by using soluble and attached organic or semiconductor architectures. Progress on the biochemical, chemical, physical, and molecular biological (including rational design of high binding affinity and reactivity towards carbon dioxide) approaches to the development of the photocatalytic system will be presented.[4pt] [1] Lewis, N.; Crabtree, G. In: Basic Research Needs for Solar Energy Utilization, Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Solar Energy Utilization, Energy, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science: 2005.

  1. Bio-inspired hemispherical compound eye camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jianliang; Song, Young Min; Xie, Yizhu; Malyarchuk, Viktor; Jung, Inhwa; Choi, Ki-Joong; Liu, Zhuangjian; Park, Hyunsung; Lu, Chaofeng; Kim, Rak-Hwan; Li, Rui; Crozier, Kenneth B.; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2014-03-01

    Compound eyes in arthropods demonstrate distinct imaging characteristics from human eyes, with wide angle field of view, low aberrations, high acuity to motion and infinite depth of field. Artificial imaging systems with similar geometries and properties are of great interest for many applications. However, the challenges in building such systems with hemispherical, compound apposition layouts cannot be met through established planar sensor technologies and conventional optics. We present our recent progress in combining optics, materials, mechanics and integration schemes to build fully functional artificial compound eye cameras. Nearly full hemispherical shapes (about 160 degrees) with densely packed artificial ommatidia were realized. The number of ommatidia (180) is comparable to those of the eyes of fire ants and bark beetles. The devices combine elastomeric compound optical elements with deformable arrays of thin silicon photodetectors, which were fabricated in the planar geometries and then integrated and elastically transformed to hemispherical shapes. Imaging results and quantitative ray-tracing-based simulations illustrate key features of operation. These general strategies seem to be applicable to other compound eye devices, such as those inspired by moths and lacewings (refracting superposition eyes), lobster and shrimp (reflecting superposition eyes), and houseflies (neural superposition eyes).

  2. Biology-inspired Architecture for Situation Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kennie H.; Lodding, Kenneth N.; Olariu, Stephan; Wilson, Larry; Xin, Chunsheng

    2006-01-01

    Situation Management is a rapidly developing science combining new techniques for data collection with advanced methods of data fusion to facilitate the process leading to correct decisions prescribing action. Current research focuses on reducing increasing amounts of diverse data to knowledge used by decision makers and on reducing time between observations, decisions and actions. No new technology is more promising for increasing the diversity and fidelity of observations than sensor networks. However, current research on sensor networks concentrates on a centralized network architecture. We believe this trend will not realize the full potential of situation management. We propose a new architecture modeled after biological ecosystems where motes are autonomous and intelligent, yet cooperate with local neighborhoods. Providing a layered approach, they sense and act independently when possible, and cooperate with neighborhoods when necessary. The combination of their local actions results in global effects. While situation management research is currently dominated by military applications, advances envisioned for industrial and business applications have similar requirements. NASA has requirements for intelligent and autonomous systems in future missions that can benefit from advances in situation management. We describe requirements for the Integrated Vehicle Health Management program where our biology-inspired architecture provides a layered approach and decisions can be made at the proper level to improve safety, reduce costs, and improve efficiency in making diagnostic and prognostic assessments of the structural integrity, aerodynamic characteristics, and operation of aircraft.

  3. Biologically inspired circuitry that mimics mammalian hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Allyn; Cohen, Howard; Karl, Christian; Freedman, David; Mountain, David; Ziph-Schatzberg, Leah; Nourzad Karl, Marianne; Kelsall, Sarah; Gore, Tyler; Pu, Yirong; Yang, Zibing; Xing, Xinyu; Deligeorges, Socrates

    2009-05-01

    We are developing low-power microcircuitry that implements classification and direction finding systems of very small size and small acoustic aperture. Our approach was inspired by the fact that small mammals are able to localize sounds despite their ears may be separated by as little as a centimeter. Gerbils, in particular are good low-frequency localizers, which is a particularly difficult task, since a wavelength at 500 Hz is on the order of two feet. Given such signals, crosscorrelation- based methods to determine direction fail badly in the presence of a small amount of noise, e.g. wind noise and noise clutter common to almost any realistic environment. Circuits are being developed using both analog and digital techniques, each of which process signals in fundamentally the same way the peripheral auditory system of mammals processes sound. A filter bank represents filtering done by the cochlea. The auditory nerve is implemented using a combination of an envelope detector, an automatic gain stage, and a unique one-bit A/D, which creates what amounts to a neural impulse. These impulses are used to extract pitch characteristics, which we use to classify sounds such as vehicles, small and large weaponry from AK-47s to 155mm cannon, including mortar launches and impacts. In addition to the pitchograms, we also use neural nets for classification.

  4. Biologically Inspired Purification and Dispersion of SWCNTs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeback, Daniel L.; Clarke, Mark S.; Nikolaev, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    A biologically inspired method has been developed for (1) separating single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) from other materials (principally, amorphous carbon and metal catalysts) in raw production batches and (2) dispersing the SWCNTs as individual particles (in contradistinction to ropes and bundles) in suspension, as required for a number of applications. Prior methods of purification and dispersal of SWCNTs involve, variously, harsh physical processes (e.g., sonication) or harsh chemical processes (e.g., acid reflux). These processes do not completely remove the undesired materials and do not disperse bundles and ropes into individual suspended SWCNTs. Moreover, these processes cut long SWCNTs into shorter pieces, yielding typical nanotube lengths between 150 and 250 nm. In contrast, the present method does not involve harsh physical or chemical processes. The method involves the use of biologically derived dispersal agents (BDDAs) in an aqueous solution that is mechanically homogenized (but not sonicated) and centrifuged. The dense solid material remaining after centrifugation is resuspended by vortexing in distilled water, yielding an aqueous suspension of individual, separated SWCNTs having lengths from about 10 to about 15 microns.

  5. Bio-inspired Artificial Apposition Compound Eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jianliang; Song, Youngmin; Xie, Yizhu; Malyarchuk, Viktor; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John

    2014-03-01

    In arthropods, evolution has created a remarkably sophisticated class of imaging system, with wide angle field of view, low aberrations, high acuity to motion and infinite depth of field. A challenge in building digital cameras with the hemispherical, compound apposition layouts of arthropod eyes is that essential design requirements cannot be met with existing planar sensor technologies or conventional optics. We present ideas in materials, mechanics and integration schemes that enable scalable pathways to working, arthropod-inspired cameras in nearly full hemispherical shapes with surfaces densely populated by imaging elements (i.e. artificial ommatidia). The devices combine elastomeric compound optical elements with deformable arrays of thin silicon photodetectors, in co-integrated sheets that can be elastically transformed from the planar geometries in which they are fabricated, to hemispherical shapes for integration into apposition cameras. Experimental and theoretical studies reveal key aspects of the materials science and physics of these systems. Imaging results and quantitative ray-tracing based modeling illustrate essential features of their operation.

  6. Biologically inspired robots as artificial inspectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2002-06-01

    Imagine an inspector conducting an NDE on an aircraft where you notice something is different about him - he is not real but rather he is a robot. Your first reaction would probably be to say 'it's unbelievable but he looks real' just as you would react to an artificial flower that is a good imitation. This science fiction scenario could become a reality at the trend in the development of biologically inspired technologies, and terms like artificial intelligence, artificial muscles, artificial vision and numerous others are increasingly becoming common engineering tools. For many years, the trend has been to automate processes in order to increase the efficiency of performing redundant tasks where various systems have been developed to deal with specific production line requirements. Realizing that some parts are too complex or delicate to handle in small quantities with a simple automatic system, robotic mechanisms were developed. Aircraft inspection has benefitted from this evolving technology where manipulators and crawlers are developed for rapid and reliable inspection. Advancement in robotics towards making them autonomous and possibly look like human, can potentially address the need to inspect structures that are beyond the capability of today's technology with configuration that are not predetermined. The operation of these robots may take place at harsh or hazardous environments that are too dangerous for human presence. Making such robots is becoming increasingly feasible and in this paper the state of the art will be reviewed.

  7. Continuum robot arms inspired by cephalopods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Ian D.; Dawson, Darren M.; Flash, Tamar; Grasso, Frank W.; Hanlon, Roger T.; Hochner, Binyamin; Kier, William M.; Pagano, Christopher C.; Rahn, Christopher D.; Zhang, Qiming M.

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we describe our recent results in the development of a new class of soft, continuous backbone ("continuum") robot manipulators. Our work is strongly motivated by the dexterous appendages found in cephalopods, particularly the arms and suckers of octopus, and the arms and tentacles of squid. Our ongoing investigation of these animals reveals interesting and unexpected functional aspects of their structure and behavior. The arrangement and dynamic operation of muscles and connective tissue observed in the arms of a variety of octopus species motivate the underlying design approach for our soft manipulators. These artificial manipulators feature biomimetic actuators, including artificial muscles based on both electro-active polymers (EAP) and pneumatic (McKibben) muscles. They feature a "clean" continuous backbone design, redundant degrees of freedom, and exhibit significant compliance that provides novel operational capacities during environmental interaction and object manipulation. The unusual compliance and redundant degrees of freedom provide strong potential for application to delicate tasks in cluttered and/or unstructured environments. Our aim is to endow these compliant robotic mechanisms with the diverse and dexterous grasping behavior observed in octopuses. To this end, we are conducting fundamental research into the manipulation tactics, sensory biology, and neural control of octopuses. This work in turn leads to novel approaches to motion planning and operator interfaces for the robots. The paper describes the above efforts, along with the results of our development of a series of continuum tentacle-like robots, demonstrating the unique abilities of biologically-inspired design.

  8. Sensory architectures for biologically inspired autonomous robotics.

    PubMed

    Higgins, C M

    2001-04-01

    Engineers have a lot to gain from studying biology. The study of biological neural systems alone provides numerous examples of computational systems that are far more complex than any man-made system and perform real-time sensory and motor tasks in a manner that humbles the most advanced artificial systems. Despite the evolutionary genesis of these systems and the vast apparent differences between species, there are common design strategies employed by biological systems that span taxa, and engineers would do well to emulate these strategies. However, biologically-inspired computational architectures, which are continuous-time and parallel in nature, do not map well onto conventional processors, which are discrete-time and serial in operation. Rather, an implementation technology that is capable of directly realizing the layered parallel structure and nonlinear elements employed by neurobiology is required for power- and space-efficient implementation. Custom neuromorphic hardware meets these criteria and yields low-power dedicated sensory systems that are small, light, and ideal for autonomous robot applications. As examples of how this technology is applied, this article describes both a low-level neuromorphic hardware emulation of an elementary visual motion detector, and a large-scale, system-level spatial motion integration system.

  9. Enhanced photovoltaics inspired by the fovea centralis

    PubMed Central

    Shalev, Gil; Schmitt, Sebastian W.; Embrechts, Heidemarie; Brönstrup, Gerald; Christiansen, Silke

    2015-01-01

    The fovea centralis is a closely-packed vertical array of inverted-cone photoreceptor cells located in the retina that is responsible for high acuity binocular vision. The cones are operational in well-lit environments and are responsible for trapping the impinging illumination. We present the vertical light-funnel silicon array as a light-trapping technique for photovoltaic applications that is bio-inspired by the properties of the fovea centralis. We use opto-electronic simulations to evaluate the performance of light-funnel solar cell arrays. Light-funnel arrays present ~65% absorption enhancement compared to a silicon film of identical thickness and exhibit power conversion efficiencies that are 60% higher than those of optimized nanowire arrays of the same thickness although nanowire arrays consist of more than 2.3 times the amount of silicon. We demonstrate the superior absorption of the light-funnel arrays as compared with recent advancements in the field. Fabrication of silicon light-funnel arrays using low-cost processing techniques is demonstrated. PMID:25709091

  10. Viscous pumping inspired by flexible propulsion.

    PubMed

    Arco, Roger M; Vélez-Cordero, J Rodrigo; Lauga, Eric; Zenit, Roberto

    2014-09-01

    Fluid-suspended microorganisms have evolved different swimming and feeding strategies in order to cope with an environment dominated by viscous effects. For instance, ciliated organisms rely on the collective motion of flexible appendages to move and feed. By performing a non-reciprocal motion, flexible filaments can produce a net propulsive force, or pump fluid, in the absence of inertia. Inspired by such a fundamental concept, we propose a strategy to produce macroscopic pumping and mixing in creeping flow. We measured experimentally the net motion of a Newtonian viscous fluid induced by the reciprocal motion of a flapper. When the flapper is rigid no net motion is induced. In contrast, when the flapper is made of a flexible material, a net fluid pumping is measured. We quantify the effectiveness of this pumping strategy and show that optimal pumping is achieved when the length of the flapper is on the same order as the elasto-hydrodynamic penetration length. We finally discuss the possible applications of flexible impellers in mixing operations at low Reynolds numbers.

  11. Liquid crystal assemblies in biologically inspired systems

    PubMed Central

    Safinya, Cyrus R.; Deek, Joanna; Beck, Roy; Jones, Jayna B.; Leal, Cecilia; Ewert, Kai K.; Li, Youli

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, which is part of a collection in honor of Noel Clark's remarkable career on liquid crystal and soft matter research, we present examples of biologically inspired systems, which form liquid crystal (LC) phases with their LC nature impacting biological function in cells or being important in biomedical applications. One area focuses on understanding network and bundle formation of cytoskeletal polyampholytes (filamentous-actin, microtubules, and neurofilaments). Here, we describe studies on neurofilaments (NFs), the intermediate filaments of neurons, which form open network nematic liquid crystal hydrogels in axons. Synchrotron small-angle-x-ray scattering studies of NF-protein dilution experiments and NF hydrogels subjected to osmotic stress show that neurofilament networks are stabilized by competing long-range repulsion and attractions mediated by the neurofilament's polyampholytic sidearms. The attractions are present both at very large interfilament spacings, in the weak sidearm-interpenetrating regime, and at smaller interfilament spacings, in the strong sidearm-interpenetrating regime. A second series of experiments will describe the structure and properties of cationic liposomes (CLs) complexed with nucleic acids (NAs). CL-NA complexes form liquid crystalline phases, which interact in a structure-dependent manner with cellular membranes enabling the design of complexes for efficient delivery of nucleic acid (DNA, RNA) in therapeutic applications. PMID:24558293

  12. The nanotechnology of life-inspired systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzybowski, Bartosz A.; Huck, Wilhelm T. S.

    2016-07-01

    For some decades now, nanotechnology has been touted as the 'next big thing' with potential impact comparable to the steam, electricity or Internet revolutions -- but has it lived up to these expectations? While advances in top-down nanolithography, now reaching 10-nm resolution, have resulted in devices that are rapidly approaching mass production, attempts to produce nanoscale devices using bottom-up approaches have met with only limited success. We have been inundated with nanoparticles of almost any shape, material and composition, but their societal impact has been far from revolutionary, with growing concerns over their toxicity. Despite nebulous hopes that making hierarchical nanomaterials will lead to new, emergent properties, no breakthrough applications seem imminent. In this Perspective, we argue that the time is ripe to look beyond individual nano-objects and their static assemblies, and instead focus on systems comprising different types of 'nanoparts' interacting and/or communicating with one another to perform desired functions. Such systems are interesting for a variety of reasons: they can act autonomously without external electrical or optical connections, can be dynamic and reconfigurable, and can act as 'nanomachines' by directing the flow of mass, energy or information . In thinking how this systems nanoscience approach could be implemented to design useful -- as opposed to toy-model -- nanosystems, our choice of applications and our nanoengineering should be inspired by living matter.

  13. A Biologically-Inspired Symmetric Bidirectional Switch

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kahye; Chang, Shyr-Shea; Roper, Marcus; Kim, Hyejeong; Lee, Sang Joon

    2017-01-01

    Stimuli-sensitive hydrogels have been intensively studied because of their potential applications in drug delivery, cell culture, and actuator design. Although hydrogels with directed unidirectional response, i.e. capable of bending actuated by different chemical components reaction in response to several stimuli including water and electric fields, these hydrogels are capable of being actuated in one direction only by the stimulus. By contrast the challenge of building a device that is capable of responding to the same cue (in this case a temperature gradient) to bend in either direction remains unmet. Here, inspired by the structure of pine cone scales, we design a temperature-sensitive hydrogel with bending directed an imposed fishing line. The layers with same PNIPAAm always shrinks in response to the heat. Even the layers made with different chemical property, bends away from a warm surface, whether the warm surface is applied at its upper or lower boundary. To design the bending hydrogel we exploited the coupled responses of the hydrogel; a fishing line intercalating structure and change its construction. In addition to revealing a new capability of stimulus sensitive hydrogels, our study gives insight into the structural features of pine cone bending. PMID:28068391

  14. Copper removal using bio-inspired polydopamine coated natural zeolites.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Shapter, Joseph G; Popelka-Filcoff, Rachel; Bennett, John W; Ellis, Amanda V

    2014-05-30

    Herein, for the first time, natural clinoptilolite-rich zeolite powders modified with a bio-inspired adhesive, polydopamine (PDA), have been systematically studied as an adsorbent for copper cations (Cu(II)) from aqueous solution. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) revealed successful grafting of PDA onto the zeolite surface. The effects of pH (2-5.5), PDA treatment time (3-24h), contact time (0 to 24h) and initial Cu(II) ion concentrations (1 to 500mgdm(-3)) on the adsorption of Cu(II) ions were studied using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and neutron activation analysis (NAA). The adsorption behavior was fitted to a Langmuir isotherm and shown to follow a pseudo-second-order reaction model. The maximum adsorption capacities of Cu(II) were shown to be 14.93mgg(-1) for pristine natural zeolite and 28.58mgg(-1) for PDA treated zeolite powders. This impressive 91.4% increase in Cu(II) ion adsorption capacity is attributed to the chelating ability of the PDA on the zeolite surface. Furthermore studies of recyclability using NAA showed that over 50% of the adsorbed copper could be removed in mild concentrations (0.01M or 0.1M) of either acid or base.

  15. 7. VIEW FROM NEAR INSPIRATION POINT, MOUNT RAINIER IN BACKGROUND, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW FROM NEAR INSPIRATION POINT, MOUNT RAINIER IN BACKGROUND, HAER HISTORIAN RICHARD QUIN HOLDING SCALE STICK - Stevens Canyon Highway, Between Paradise, WA, & State Highway 123, Ashford, Pierce County, WA

  16. Biomimetics - using nature as an inspiring model for innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2006-01-01

    In this presentation, various aspects of the field of biomimetics will be reviewed, examples of inspiring biological models and practical applications will be described, and challenges and potential direction of the field will be discussed.

  17. Recent Advances in Skin-Inspired Sensors Enabled by Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Kenneth J.; Azhari, Faezeh

    2012-07-01

    The highly optimized performance of nature's creations and biological assemblies has inspired the development of their bio-inspired artificial counterparts that can potentially outperform conventional systems. In particular, the skin of humans, animals, and insects exhibits unique functionalities and properties and has subsequently led to active research in developing skin-inspired sensors. This paper presents a summary of selected work related to skin-inspired tactile, distributed strain, and artificial hair cell flow sensors, with a particular focus on technologies enabled by recent advancements in the nanotechnology domain. The purpose is not to present a comprehensive review on this broad subject matter but rather to use selected work to outline the diversity of current research activities.

  18. Biologically Inspired Flagella-Templated Silica Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Wonjin

    The desire and need for various types of nanostructures have been met with challenges of feasibility, reproducibility, and long fabrication time. To work towards improved bottom-up methods of nanofabrication, bacterial flagella are particularly attractive bio-templates for nanotubes due to their tubular structures and small inner and outer diameters. In this work, flagella isolated from Salmonella typhimurium are used as bio-templates to fabricate silica mineralized nanotubes. The process involves as well-controlled hydrolysis and condensation reaction with aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), followed by the addition of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). By controlling the concentration of TEOS and the reaction time, a simple and precise method is developed for creating silica-mineralized flagella nanotubes (SMFNs) with various thicknesses of the silica layer. In addition, the SMFNs are further modified to multifunctional nanotubes by coating metal nanoparticles (NPs) or metal oxide NPs such as gold, palladium, and iron oxide. The metallized SMFNs are achieved through reactions including reductive metallization or oxidative hydrolysis. The results from these studies provide evidence for the complete coating of SMFNs with uniform metal NP sizes and high surface area coverage. The metallized SMFNs are found to be electrically conductive along their network structures. The current-voltage characteristics show remarkably improved electrical conductivities depending on the types of metal NPs loading and SMFN networks concentration. The biologically inspired SMFNs with metal loading will allow have controlled electrical properties that can lead to the potential of creating unique and precise nanoelectronic materials. Lastly, the randomly entangled SMFNs are characterized to demonstrate their capabilities for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surface applications.

  19. Bio-Inspired Sampling and Reconstruction Framework for Scientific Visualization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-17

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0287 Bio-Inspired Sampling and Reconstruction Framework for Scientific Visualization Alireza Entezari UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA...Final Report 09/17/2015 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. AF Office Of Scientific Research (AFOSR)/ RTA2 Arlington, Virginia...TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Bio-inspired Sampling and Reconstruction Framework for Scientific Visualization 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550

  20. INSPIRE - Premission. [Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, William W. L.; Mideke, Michael; Pine, William E.; Ericson, James D.

    1992-01-01

    The Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment (INSPIRE) designed to assist in a Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) project is discussed. INSPIRE is aimed at recording data from a large number of receivers on the ground to determine the exact propagation paths and absorption of radio waves at frequencies between 50 Hz and 7 kHz. It is indicated how to participate in the experiment that will involve high school classes, colleges, and amateur radio operators.

  1. Bayesian inference on compact binary inspiral gravitational radiation signals in interferometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röver, Christian; Meyer, Renate; Christensen, Nelson

    2006-08-01

    In this paper we present a description of a Bayesian analysis framework for use with interferometric gravitational radiation data in search of binary neutron star inspiral signals. Five parameters are investigated, and the information extracted from the data is illustrated and quantified. The posterior integration is carried out using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. Implementation details include the use of importance resampling for improved convergence and informative priors reflecting the conditions expected for realistic measurements. An example is presented from an application using realistic, albeit fictitious, data. We expect that these parameter estimation techniques will prove useful at the end of a binary inspiral detection pipeline for interferometric detectors like LIGO or Virgo.

  2. Biophysics and Thermodynamics: The Scientific Building Blocks of Bio-inspired Drug Delivery Nano Systems.

    PubMed

    Demetzos, Costas

    2015-06-01

    Biophysics and thermodynamics are considered as the scientific milestones for investigating the properties of materials. The relationship between the changes of temperature with the biophysical variables of biomaterials is important in the process of the development of drug delivery systems. Biophysics is a challenge sector of physics and should be used complementary with the biochemistry in order to discover new and promising technological platforms (i.e., drug delivery systems) and to disclose the 'silence functionality' of bio-inspired biological and artificial membranes. Thermal analysis and biophysical approaches in pharmaceuticals present reliable and versatile tools for their characterization and for the successful development of pharmaceutical products. The metastable phases of self-assembled nanostructures such as liposomes should be taken into consideration because they represent the thermal events can affect the functionality of advanced drug delivery nano systems. In conclusion, biophysics and thermodynamics are characterized as the building blocks for design and development of bio-inspired drug delivery systems.

  3. Distinct failure modes in bio-inspired 3D-printed staggered composites under non-aligned loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slesarenko, Viacheslav; Kazarinov, Nikita; Rudykh, Stephan

    2017-03-01

    The superior mechanical properties of biological materials originate in their complex hierarchical microstructures, combining stiff and soft constituents at different length scales. In this work, we employ a three-dimensional multi-materials printing to fabricate the bio-inspired staggered composites, and study their mechanical properties and failure mechanisms. We observe that bio-inspired staggered composites with inclined stiff tablets are able to undergo two different failure modes, depending on the inclination angle. We find that such artificial structure demonstrates high toughness only under loading applied at relatively small angle to the tablets stacking direction, while for higher angles the composites fail catastrophically. This aspect of the failure behavior was captured experimentally as well as by means of the finite element analysis. We show that even a relatively simple failure model with a strain energy limiter, can be utilized to qualitatively distinguish these two different modes of failure, occurring in the artificial bio-inspired composites.

  4. Quantum-inspired immune clonal algorithm for global optimization.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Licheng; Li, Yangyang; Gong, Maoguo; Zhang, Xiangrong

    2008-10-01

    Based on the concepts and principles of quantum computing, a novel immune clonal algorithm, called a quantum-inspired immune clonal algorithm (QICA), is proposed to deal with the problem of global optimization. In QICA, the antibody is proliferated and divided into a set of subpopulation groups. The antibodies in a subpopulation group are represented by multistate gene quantum bits. In the antibody's updating, the general quantum rotation gate strategy and the dynamic adjusting angle mechanism are applied to accelerate convergence. The quantum not gate is used to realize quantum mutation to avoid premature convergences. The proposed quantum recombination realizes the information communication between subpopulation groups to improve the search efficiency. Theoretical analysis proves that QICA converges to the global optimum. In the first part of the experiments, 10 unconstrained and 13 constrained benchmark functions are used to test the performance of QICA. The results show that QICA performs much better than the other improved genetic algorithms in terms of the quality of solution and computational cost. In the second part of the experiments, QICA is applied to a practical problem (i.e., multiuser detection in direct-sequence code-division multiple-access systems) with a satisfying result.

  5. Spontaneous structural transition in phospholipid-inspired aromatic phosphopeptide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Pellach, Michal; Atsmon-Raz, Yoav; Simonovsky, Eyal; Gottlieb, Hugo; Jacoby, Guy; Beck, Roy; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Miller, Yifat; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipid membranes could be considered a prime example of the ability of nature to produce complex yet ordered structures, by spontaneous and efficient self-assembly. Inspired by the unique properties and architecture of phospholipids, we designed simple amphiphilic decapeptides, intended to fold in the center of the peptide sequence, with a phosphorylated serine "head" located within a central turn segment, and two hydrophobic "tails". The molecular design also included the integration of the diphenylalanine motif, previously shown to facilitate self-assembly and increase nanostructure stability. Secondary structure analysis of the peptides indeed indicated the presence of stabilized conformations in solution, with a central turn connecting two hydrophobic "tails", and interactions between the hydrophobic strands. The mechanisms of assembly into supramolecular structures involved structural transitions between different morphologies, which occurred over several hours, leading to the formation of distinctive nanostructures, including half-elliptical nanosheets and curved tapes. The phosphopeptide building blocks appear to self-assemble via a particular combination of aromatic, hydrophobic and ionic interactions, as well as hydrogen bonding, as demonstrated by proposed constructed simulated models of the peptides and self-assembled nanostructures. Molecular dynamics simulations also gave insight into mechanisms of structural transitions of the nanostructures at a molecular level. Because of the biocompatibility of peptides, the phosphopeptide assemblies allow for expansion of the library of biomolecular nanostructures available for future design and application of biomedical devices.

  6. The flow past a cactus-inspired grooved cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Makdah, Adnan M.; Oweis, Ghanem F.

    2013-02-01

    The star-shaped cross section of giant cylindrical cactus plants is thought to be aerodynamically favorable for protection against toppling by strong winds. Particle image velocimetry is used to investigate the flow details within the surface grooves and in the immediate wake of a cactus-inspired model cylinder with eight longitudinal grooves, at biologically relevant Reynolds numbers between 50 × 103 and 170 × 103. The wake flow is analyzed and compared to a similarly sized circular cylinder. At the lowest Re tested, the wakes from the two geometries are similar. At higher Re, the cactus wake exhibits superior behavior as seen from the mean and turbulent velocities, suggesting that the flow mechanisms are Re dependent. The flow within the surface grooves reveals counter rotating rollers, while the geometrical ridges act as vortex generators known to help with the surface flow attachment. Lastly, a simplistic analysis is described to recover, qualitatively, certain time-dependent flow features from the randomly acquired PIV realizations.

  7. Functional surfaces for tribological applications: inspiration and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aal, Hisham A.

    2016-12-01

    Surface texturing has been recognized as a method for enhancing the tribological properties of surfaces for many years. Adding a controlled texture to one of two faces in relative motion can have many positive effects, such as reduction of friction and wear and increase in load capacity. To date, the true potential of texturing has not been realized not because of the lack of enabling texturing technologies but because of the severe lack of detailed information about the mechanistic functional details of texturing in a tribological situation. Experimental as well as theoretical analysis of textured surfaces define important metrics for performance evaluation. These metrics represent the interaction between geometry of the texturing element and surface topology. To date, there is no agreement on the optimal values that should be implemented given a particular surface. More importantly, a well-defined methodology for the generation of deterministic textures of optimized designs virtually does not exist. Nature, on the other hand, offers many examples of efficient texturing strategies (geometries and topologies) specifically applied to mitigate frictional effects in a variety of situations. Studying these examples may advance the technology of surface engineering. This paper therefore, provides a comparative review of surface texturing that manifest viable synergy between tribology and biology. We attempt to provide successful emerging examples where borrowing from nature has inspired viable surface solutions that address difficult tribological problems both in dry and lubricated contact situations.

  8. Optimization of bio-inspired multi-segment IPMC cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sareh, S.; Conn, A. T.; Rossiter, J. M.; Ieropoulos, I.; Walters, P.

    2010-04-01

    In nature, unidirectional fluid flows are often induced at micro-scales by cilia and related organelles. A controllable unidirectional flow is beneficial at these scales for a range of novel robotic and medical applications, whether the flow is used for propulsion (e.g. swimming robots) or mass transfer (e.g. prosthetic trachea). Ionic Polymer Metal Composites (IPMCs) are innovative smart materials that can be used directly as active propulsive surfaces rather than a traditional motor and propeller. IPMC actuators with two segmented electrodes that attempt to mimic the motion of cilia-like organelles have been realized. In this paper the optimization of these actuators towards producing unidirectional flows is described. A parametric study of the kinematic and hydrodynamic effect of modulating the drive signal has been conducted. As with eukaryotic cilia and flagella found in mammals, the segmented IPMC actuator can generate both flexural (asymmetric) and undulatory (symmetric) motions from the same physical structure. The motion is controlled by applying profiles of driving frequencies and phase differences. Kinematic analysis using a camera and laser displacement sensor has been used to measure and classify different motion types. The hydrodynamic forces produced by each motion type have been estimated using particle-tracking flow visualization. This allows drive signal profiles to be ranked in terms of fluid flow momentum transfer and directionality. Using the results of the parametric study, the IPMC motion is optimized towards producing unidirectional flow via repeatable cilia-inspired motion.

  9. Signal processing inspired from the olfactory bulb for electronic noses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ya-Qi; Meng, Qing-Hao; Qi, Pei-Feng; Zeng, Ming; Liu, Ying-Jie

    2017-01-01

    A bio-inspired signal processing method is proposed for electronic noses (e-noses). The proposed method contains an olfactory bulb model and a feature generation step. The structure of the olfactory bulb model is similar to the anatomical structure of mammals’ olfactory bulb. It consists of olfactory receptor neurons, mitral cells, granule cells, periglomerular cells, and short axon cells. This model uses gas sensors’ original response curves and transforms them to neuron spiking series no matter what kind the response curve is. This largely simplifies the follow-up feature generation step. Recurrence quantification analysis is employed to perform feature generation and the five most important features are selected. Finally, in order to verify the performance of the proposed method, seven kinds of Chinese liquors are tested and three classification methods are used to classify them. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method has a higher classification rate (99.05%) and also a steadier performance with the change of sensor number and types than the classic one.

  10. Evaporation-induced transition from Nepenthes pitcher-inspired slippery surfaces to lotus leaf-inspired superoleophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junping; Wu, Lei; Li, Bucheng; Li, Lingxiao; Seeger, Stefan; Wang, Aiqin

    2014-12-02

    The newly developed Nepenthes pitcher (NP)-inspired slippery surfaces, formed by immobilizing fluoroliquids on lotus leaf (LL)-inspired superoleophobic surfaces, are of great general interest, whereas there are many interesting phenomena and fundamental scientific issues remaining to be unveiled. Here we present our findings of the effects of evaporation of the fluoroliquid, an inevitable process in most cases, -induced transition from NP-inspired to LL-inspired surfaces on the wettability, transparency, and self-cleaning property of the surfaces. The transition is controlled by regulating the evaporation temperature of the model fluoroliquid, Krytox100. The evaporation of Krytox100 has great a influence on the wettability, transparency, and self-cleaning property. An intermediate "sticky" state is observed in the transition process. We believe that our findings in the transition process are helpful in understanding the similarities and differences between the NP-inspired and LL-inspired surfaces and in designing new bioinspired antiwetting surfaces and exploring their potential applications.

  11. Description of ligand field splitting in terms of density functional theory: Split levels of the lowest-lying subterms of the 4f{sup n{minus}1}6s{sup 2} (n=3{endash}14) configurations in lanthanide monofluorides LnF (Ln=Pr{endash}Yb)

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, J.; Whangbo, M.; Dai, D.; Li, L.

    1998-05-01

    The split levels associated with the lowest-lying subterms of the 4f{sup n{minus}1}6s{sup 2} (n=3{endash}14) configurations of lanthanide monofluorides LnF (Ln=Pr{endash}Yb) were calculated by employing the combined ligand field and density functional theory (CLDT) method recently proposed. The 288 calculated split levels are in excellent agreement with experiment and hence shows that the CLDT method can accurately reproduce the low-lying electronic excited states of lanthanide compounds. To quantitatively describe the low-lying electronic states of a lanthanide compound, therefore, the effective ligand potential must include the Coulomb and exchange-correlation potentials of the compound as well as the pseudopotentials of the ligands. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Biologically inspired highly efficient buoyancy engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akle, Barbar; Habchi, Wassim; Abdelnour, Rita; Blottman, John, III; Leo, Donald

    2012-04-01

    Undersea distributed networked sensor systems require a miniaturization of platforms and a means of both spatial and temporal persistence. One aspect of this system is the necessity to modulate sensor depth for optimal positioning and station-keeping. Current approaches involve pneumatic bladders or electrolysis; both require mechanical subsystems and consume significant power. These are not suitable for the miniaturization of sensor platforms. Presented in this study is a novel biologically inspired method that relies on ionic motion and osmotic pressures to displace a volume of water from the ocean into and out of the proposed buoyancy engine. At a constant device volume, the displaced water will alter buoyancy leading to either sinking or floating. The engine is composed of an enclosure sided on the ocean's end by a Nafion ionomer and by a flexible membrane separating the water from a gas enclosure. Two electrodes are placed one inside the enclosure and the other attached to the engine on the outside. The semi-permeable membrane Nafion allows water motion in and out of the enclosure while blocking anions from being transferred. The two electrodes generate local concentration changes of ions upon the application of an electrical field; these changes lead to osmotic pressures and hence the transfer of water through the semi-permeable membrane. Some aquatic organisms such as pelagic crustacean perform this buoyancy control using an exchange of ions through their tissue to modulate its density relative to the ambient sea water. In this paper, the authors provide an experimental proof of concept of this buoyancy engine. The efficiency of changing the engine's buoyancy is calculated and optimized as a function of electrode surface area. For example electrodes made of a 3mm diameter Ag/AgCl proved to transfer approximately 4mm3 of water consuming 4 Joules of electrical energy. The speed of displacement is optimized as a function of the surface area of the Nafion

  13. Lunabotics Mining Competition: Inspiration through Accomplishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Space Mining for resources such as water ice, and regolith, which contain many elements in the form of metals, minerals, volatiles and other compounds, is a necessary step in Space Resource Utilization. One of the primary goals is to extract propellants from the regolith such as oxygen and hydrogen which could then be used for in-space transportation. In addition, the space mining system can be used for various construction tasks that can benefit human and robotic exploration as well as scientific investigations based on the exposed topography. The National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) Lunabotics Mining Competition is a university-level competition designed to engage and retain students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). NASA will directly benefit from the competition by encouraging the development of innovative lunar excavation concepts from universities which may result in clever ideas and solutions which could be applied to an actual lunar excavation device or payload. The challenge is for students to design and build a remote controlled or autonomous excavator, called a lunabot, that can collect and deposit a minimum of 10 kilograms of lunar simulant within 15 minutes. The complexities of the challenge include the abrasive characteristics of the lunar simulant, the weight and size limitations of the lunabot, and the ability to control the lunabot from a remote control center or operate autonomously. This paper will present an update of the results and lessons learned during the first and second annual Lunabotics Mining Competitions held in May 2010 and May 2011. It will also preview the 2012 competition with a review of the revised rules. In 2010,22 United States (US) universities competed, and in May 2011 the competition was opened to international participation. In 2011, 36 teams actually competed from 26 USA states and 4 foreign countries (India, Bangladesh, Colombia and Canada). This combined total directly inspired an

  14. Caterpillar locomotion-inspired valveless pneumatic micropump using a single teardrop-shaped elastomeric membrane.

    PubMed

    So, Hongyun; Pisano, Albert P; Seo, Young Ho

    2014-07-07

    This paper presents a microfluidic pump operated by an asymmetrically deformed membrane, which was inspired by caterpillar locomotion. Almost all mechanical micropumps consist of two major components of fluid halting and fluid pushing parts, whereas the proposed caterpillar locomotion-inspired micropump has only a single, bilaterally symmetric membrane-like teardrop shape. A teardrop-shaped elastomeric membrane was asymmetrically deformed and then consecutively touched down to the bottom of the chamber in response to pneumatic pressure, thus achieving fluid pushing. Consecutive touchdown motions of the teardrop-shaped membrane mimicked the propagation of a caterpillar's hump during its locomotory gait. The initial touchdown motion of the teardrop-shaped membrane at the centroid worked as a valve that blocked the inlet channel, and then, the consecutive touchdown motions pushed fluid in the chamber toward the tail of the chamber connected to the outlet channel. The propagation of the touchdown motion of the teardrop-shaped membrane was investigated using computational analysis as well as experimental studies. This caterpillar locomotion-inspired micropump composed of only a single membrane can provide new opportunities for simple integration of microfluidic systems.

  15. Neurally inspired rapid detection of sparse objects in videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosla, Deepak; Huber, David J.; Bhattacharyya, Rajan; Daily, Mike; Tasinga, Penn

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we describe COGNIVA, a closed-loop Cognitive-Neural method and system for image and video analysis that combines recent technological breakthroughs in bio-vision cognitive algorithms and neural signatures of human visual processing. COGNIVA is an "operational neuroscience" framework for intelligent and rapid search and categorization of Items Of Interest (IOI) in imagery and video. The IOI could be a single object, group of objects, specific image regions, specific spatio-temporal pattern/sequence or even the category that the image itself belongs to (e.g., vehicle or non-vehicle). There are two main types of approach for rapid search and categorization of IOI in imagery and video. The first approach uses conventional machine vision or bio-inspired cognitive algorithms. These usually need a predefined set of IOI and suffer from high false alarm rates. The second class of algorithms is based on neural signatures of target detection. These algorithms usually break the entire image into sub-images and process EEG data from these images and classify them based on it. This approach may suffer from high false alarms and is slow because the entire image is chipped and presented to the human observer. The proposed COGNIVA overcomes the limitations of both methods by combining them resulting in a low false alarm rate and high detection with high throughput making it applicable to both image and video analysis. In the most basic form, COGNIVA first uses bioinspired cognitive algorithms for deciding potential IOI in a sequence of images/video. These potential IOI are then shown to a human and neural signatures of visual detection of IOI are collected and processed. The resulting signatures are used to categorize and provide final IOI. We will present the concept and typical results of COGNIVA for detecting Items of interest in image data.

  16. Biologically inspired LED lens from cuticular nanostructures of firefly lantern

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Jun; Lee, Youngseop; Kim, Ha Gon; Choi, Ki-Ju; Kweon, Hee-Seok; Park, Seongchong; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2012-01-01

    Cuticular nanostructures found in insects effectively manage light for light polarization, structural color, or optical index matching within an ultrathin natural scale. These nanostructures are mainly dedicated to manage incoming light and recently inspired many imaging and display applications. A bioluminescent organ, such as a firefly lantern, helps to out-couple light from the body in a highly efficient fashion for delivering strong optical signals in sexual communication. However, the cuticular nanostructures, except the light-producing reactions, have not been well investigated for physical principles and engineering biomimetics. Here we report a unique observation of high-transmission nanostructures on a firefly lantern and its biological inspiration for highly efficient LED illumination. Both numerical and experimental results clearly reveal high transmission through the nanostructures inspired from the lantern cuticle. The nanostructures on an LED lens surface were fabricated by using a large-area nanotemplating and reconfigurable nanomolding with heat-induced shear thinning. The biologically inspired LED lens, distinct from a smooth surface lens, substantially increases light transmission over visible ranges, comparable to conventional antireflection coating. This biological inspiration can offer new opportunities for increasing the light extraction efficiency of high-power LED packages. PMID:23112185

  17. Biomimetics as a Model for Inspiring Human Innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2006-01-01

    Electroactive polymers (EAP) are human made actuators that are the closest to mimic biological muscles. Technology was advanced to the level that biologically inspired robots are taking increasing roles in the world around us and making science fiction ideas a closer engineering reality. Artificial technologies (AI, AM, and others) are increasingly becoming practical tools for making biologically inspired devices and instruments with enormous potential for space applications. Polymer materials are used to produce figures that resemble human and animals. These materials are widely employed by the movie industry for making acting figures and by the orthopedic industry to construct cyborg components. There are still many challenges ahead that are critical to making such possibilities practical. The annual armwrestling contest is providing an exciting measure of how well advances in EAP are implemented to address the field challenges. There is a need to document natures inventions in an engineering form to possibly inspire new capabilities.

  18. Bio-inspired nanocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Grumelli, Doris; Wurster, Benjamin; Stepanow, Sebastian; Kern, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical conversions at fuel cell electrodes are complex processes. In particular, the oxygen reduction reaction has substantial overpotential limiting the electrical power output efficiency. Effective and inexpensive catalytic interfaces are therefore essential for increased performance. Taking inspiration from enzymes, earth-abundant metal centres embedded in organic environments present remarkable catalytic active sites. Here we show that these enzyme-inspired centres can be effectively mimicked in two-dimensional metal-organic coordination networks self-assembled on electrode surfaces. Networks consisting of trimesic acid and bis-pyridyl-bispyrimidine coordinating to single iron and manganese atoms on Au(111) effectively catalyse the oxygen reduction and reveal distinctive catalytic activity in alkaline media. These results demonstrate the potential of surface-engineered metal-organic networks for electrocatalytic conversions. Specifically designed coordination complexes at surfaces inspired by enzyme cofactors represent a new class of nanocatalysts with promising applications in electrocatalysis.

  19. Bio-inspired nanocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grumelli, Doris; Wurster, Benjamin; Stepanow, Sebastian; Kern, Klaus

    2013-12-01

    Electrochemical conversions at fuel cell electrodes are complex processes. In particular, the oxygen reduction reaction has substantial overpotential limiting the electrical power output efficiency. Effective and inexpensive catalytic interfaces are therefore essential for increased performance. Taking inspiration from enzymes, earth-abundant metal centres embedded in organic environments present remarkable catalytic active sites. Here we show that these enzyme-inspired centres can be effectively mimicked in two-dimensional metal-organic coordination networks self-assembled on electrode surfaces. Networks consisting of trimesic acid and bis-pyridyl-bispyrimidine coordinating to single iron and manganese atoms on Au(111) effectively catalyse the oxygen reduction and reveal distinctive catalytic activity in alkaline media. These results demonstrate the potential of surface-engineered metal-organic networks for electrocatalytic conversions. Specifically designed coordination complexes at surfaces inspired by enzyme cofactors represent a new class of nanocatalysts with promising applications in electrocatalysis.

  20. Documentation of cultural heritage sites using the INSPIRE directive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkadolou, Eleni; Prastacos, Poulicos

    2016-08-01

    The INSPIRE directive, adopted by the EC in 2007 provides the guidelines for the organization of all geographic data and is the basis for establishing a Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI). Documentation of cultural heritage sites such as archeological areas, historic places and others is not a thematic area addressed in the directive. However, as discussed in this paper the directive can be extended to cover the documentation of these sites as well. The location of an archaeological area and its monuments, its legal status, the surrounding physical environment (NATURA protected areas), the protection zones around the site and the permitted development can be documented following the INSPIRE directive. Additionally, results of research carried out in these sites such as geophysical surveys, use of satellite images or topographical surveys can be also organized using the INSPIRE guidelines.

  1. BATMAV: a biologically inspired micro air vehicle for flapping flight: kinematic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunget, Gheorghe; Seelecke, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    The overall objective of the BATMAV project is the development of a biologically inspired bat-like Micro-Aerial Vehicle (MAV) with flexible and foldable wings, capable of flapping flight. This first phase of the project focuses particularly on the kinematical analysis of the wing motion in order to build an artificial-muscle-driven actuation system in the future. While flapping flight in MAV has been previously studied and a number of models were realized using light-weight nature-inspired rigid wings, this paper presents a first model for a platform that features bat-inspired wings with a number of flexible joints which allows mimicking the kinematics of the real flyer. The bat was chosen after an extensive analysis of the flight physics of small birds, bats and large insects characterized by superior gust rejection and obstacle avoidance. Typical engineering parameters such as wing loading, wing beat frequency etc. were studied and it was concluded that bats are a suitable platform that can be actuated efficiently using artificial muscles. Also, due to their wing camber variation, they can operate effectively at a large range of speeds and allow remarkably maneuverable flight. In order to understand how to implement the artificial muscles on a bat-like platform, the analysis was followed by a study of bat flight kinematics. Due to their obvious complexity, only a limited number of degrees of freedom (DOF) were selected to characterize the flexible wing's stroke pattern. An extended analysis of flight styles in bats based on the data collected by Norberg and the engineering theory of robotic manipulators resulted in a 2 and 4-DOF models which managed to mimic the wingbeat cycle of the natural flyer. The results of the kinematical model can be used to optimize the lengths and the attachment locations of the wires such that enough lift, thrust and wing stroke are obtained.

  2. INSPIRE: Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzen, K. A.; Garcia, L. N.; Webb, P. A.; Green, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    The INSPIRE Project is a non-profit scientific and educational corporation whose objective is to bring the excitement of observing very low frequency (VLF) natural radio waves to high school students. Underlying this objective is the conviction that science and technology are the underpinnings of our modern society, and that only with an understanding of these disciplines can people make correct decisions in their lives. Since 1989, the INSPIRE Project has provided specially designed radio receiver kits to over 2,500 students and other groups to make observations of signals in the VLF frequency range. These kits provide an innovative and unique opportunity for students to actively gather data that can be used in a basic research project. Natural VLF emissions that can be studied with the INSPIRE receiver kits include sferics, tweeks, whistlers, and chorus, which originate from phenomena such as lightning. These emissions can either come from the local atmospheric environment within a few tens of kilometers of the receiver or from outer space thousands of kilometers from the Earth. VLF emissions are at such low frequencies that they can be received, amplified and turned into sound that we can hear, with each emission producing in a distinctive sound. In 2006 INSPIRE was re-branded and its mission has expanded to developing new partnerships with multiple science projects. Links to magnetospheric physics, astronomy, and meteorology are being identified. This presentation will introduce the INSPIRE project, display the INSPIRE receiver kits, show examples of the types of VLF emissions that can be collected and provide information on scholarship programs being offered.

  3. Biologically-Inspired Concepts for Self-Management of Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterritt, Roy; Hinchey, G.

    2006-01-01

    Inherent complexity in large-scale applications may be impossible to eliminate or even ameliorate despite a number of promising advances. In such cases, the complexity must be tolerated and managed. Such management may be beyond the abilities of humans, or require such overhead as to make management by humans unrealistic. A number of initiatives inspired by concepts in biology have arisen for self-management of complex systems. We present some ideas and techniques we have been experimenting with, inspired by lesser-known concepts in biology that show promise in protecting complex systems and represent a step towards self-management of complexity.

  4. Self-organization, embodiment, and biologically inspired robotics.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Rolf; Lungarella, Max; Iida, Fumiya

    2007-11-16

    Robotics researchers increasingly agree that ideas from biology and self-organization can strongly benefit the design of autonomous robots. Biological organisms have evolved to perform and survive in a world characterized by rapid changes, high uncertainty, indefinite richness, and limited availability of information. Industrial robots, in contrast, operate in highly controlled environments with no or very little uncertainty. Although many challenges remain, concepts from biologically inspired (bio-inspired) robotics will eventually enable researchers to engineer machines for the real world that possess at least some of the desirable properties of biological organisms, such as adaptivity, robustness, versatility, and agility.

  5. Bio-inspired algorithms applied to molecular docking simulations.

    PubMed

    Heberlé, G; de Azevedo, W F

    2011-01-01

    Nature as a source of inspiration has been shown to have a great beneficial impact on the development of new computational methodologies. In this scenario, analyses of the interactions between a protein target and a ligand can be simulated by biologically inspired algorithms (BIAs). These algorithms mimic biological systems to create new paradigms for computation, such as neural networks, evolutionary computing, and swarm intelligence. This review provides a description of the main concepts behind BIAs applied to molecular docking simulations. Special attention is devoted to evolutionary algorithms, guided-directed evolutionary algorithms, and Lamarckian genetic algorithms. Recent applications of these methodologies to protein targets identified in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome are described.

  6. Protein multiple sequence alignment by hybrid bio-inspired algorithms.

    PubMed

    Cutello, Vincenzo; Nicosia, Giuseppe; Pavone, Mario; Prizzi, Igor

    2011-03-01

    This article presents an immune inspired algorithm to tackle the Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA) problem. MSA is one of the most important tasks in biological sequence analysis. Although this paper focuses on protein alignments, most of the discussion and methodology may also be applied to DNA alignments. The problem of finding the multiple alignment was investigated in the study by Bonizzoni and Vedova and Wang and Jiang, and proved to be a NP-hard (non-deterministic polynomial-time hard) problem. The presented algorithm, called Immunological Multiple Sequence Alignment Algorithm (IMSA), incorporates two new strategies to create the initial population and specific ad hoc mutation operators. It is based on the 'weighted sum of pairs' as objective function, to evaluate a given candidate alignment. IMSA was tested using both classical benchmarks of BAliBASE (versions 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0), and experimental results indicate that it is comparable with state-of-the-art multiple alignment algorithms, in terms of quality of alignments, weighted Sums-of-Pairs (SP) and Column Score (CS) values. The main novelty of IMSA is its ability to generate more than a single suboptimal alignment, for every MSA instance; this behaviour is due to the stochastic nature of the algorithm and of the populations evolved during the convergence process. This feature will help the decision maker to assess and select a biologically relevant multiple sequence alignment. Finally, the designed algorithm can be used as a local search procedure to properly explore promising alignments of the search space.

  7. Optogenetically inspired deep brain stimulation: linking basic with clinical research.

    PubMed

    Lüscher, Christian; Pollak, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, optogenetics has revolutionised the neurosciences. The technique, which allows for cell-type specific excitation and inhibition of neurons in the brain of freely moving rodents, has been used to tighten the links of causality between neural activity and behaviour. Optogenetics is also enabling an unprecedented characterisation of circuits and their dysfunction in a number of brain diseases, above all those conditions that are not caused by neurodegeneration. Notable progress has been made in addiction, depression and obsessive-compulsive disorders, as well as other anxiety disorders. By extension, the technique has also been used to propose blueprints for innovative rational treatment of these diseases. The goal is to design manipulations that disrupt pathological circuit function or restore normal activity. This can be achieved by targeting specific projections in order to apply specific stimulation protocols validated by ex-vivo analysis of the mechanisms underlying the dysfunction. In a number of cases, specific forms of pathological synaptic plasticity have been implicated. For example, addictive drugs via strong increase of dopamine trigger a myriad of alterations of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid transmission, also called drug-evoked synaptic plasticity. This opens the way to the design of optogenetic reversal protocols, which might restore normal transmission with the hope to abolish the pathological behaviour. Several proof of principle studies for this approach have recently been published. However, for many reasons, optogenetics will not be translatable to human applications in the near future. Here, we argue that an intermediate step is novel deep brain stimulation (DBS) protocols that emulate successful optogenetic approaches in animal models. We provide a roadmap for a translational path to rational, optogenetically inspired DBS protocols to refine existing approaches and expand to novel indications.

  8. Performance Analysis for Lateral-Line-Inspired Sensor Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    frequency is encoded in the nerve fibers connected to the lateral line [10], indicating that at least some high level information about vortices is being...Mogdans. Responses to dipole stimuli of anterior lateral line nerve fibres in goldfish, carassius auratus, under still and running water conditions...M. Humphreys. Wall-pressure-array measure- ments beneath a separating/ reattaching flow region. Physics of Fluids, 15(3):706–717, March 2003. [37

  9. Inspiration and Intellect: Significant Learning in Musical Forms and Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Bruce C.

    2009-01-01

    In his book "Creating Significant Learning Experiences" (2003), Dee Fink challenges professors to create a deep vision for the courses they teach. Educators often have a vision for what their courses could be, but often lack a model for instituting change. Fink's book provides that model. In this article, the author describes how this model helped…

  10. Reproduction and optical analysis of Morpho-inspired polymeric nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tippets, Cary A.; Fu, Yulan; Jackson, Anne-Martine; Donev, Eugenii U.; Lopez, Rene

    2016-06-01

    The brilliant blue coloration of the Morpho rhetenor butterfly originates from complex nanostructures found on the surface of its wings. The Morpho butterfly exhibits strong short-wavelength reflection and a unique two-lobe optical signature in the incident (θ) and reflected (ϕ) angular space. Here, we report the large-area fabrication of a Morpho-like structure and its reproduction in perfluoropolyether. Reflection comparisons of periodic and quasi-random ‘polymer butterfly’ nanostructures show similar normal-incidence spectra but differ in the angular θ-ϕ dependence. The periodic sample shows strong specular reflection and simple diffraction. However, the quasi-random sample produces a two-lobe angular reflection pattern with minimal specular refection, approximating the real butterfly’s optical behavior. Finite-difference time-domain simulations confirm that this pattern results from the quasi-random periodicity and highlights the significance of the inherent randomness in the Morpho’s photonic structure.

  11. Emergent Structural Mechanisms for High-Density Collective Motion Inspired by Human Crowds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottinelli, Arianna; Sumpter, David T. J.; Silverberg, Jesse L.

    2016-11-01

    Collective motion of large human crowds often depends on their density. In extreme cases like heavy metal concerts and black Friday sales events, motion is dominated by physical interactions instead of conventional social norms. Here, we study an active matter model inspired by situations when large groups of people gather at a point of common interest. Our analysis takes an approach developed for jammed granular media and identifies Goldstone modes, soft spots, and stochastic resonance as structurally driven mechanisms for potentially dangerous emergent collective motion.

  12. Dew inspired breathing-based detection of genetic point mutation visualized by naked eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Liping; Wang, Tongzhou; Huang, Tianqi; Hou, Wei; Huang, Guoliang; Du, Yanan

    2014-09-01

    A novel label-free method based on breathing-induced vapor condensation was developed for detection of genetic point mutation. The dew-inspired detection was realized by integration of target-induced DNA ligation with rolling circle amplification (RCA). The vapor condensation induced by breathing transduced the RCA-amplified variances in DNA contents into visible contrast. The image could be recorded by a cell phone for further or even remote analysis. This green assay offers a naked-eye-reading method potentially applied for point-of-care liver cancer diagnosis in resource-limited regions.

  13. Investigations into Gravitational Wave Emission from Compact Body Inspiral into Massive Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    In contrast to year 1 (when much of the activity associated with this grant focused upon developing our group at MIT), year 2 was a period of very focused attention on research problems. We made significant progress developing relativistic waveforms for the extreme mass ratio inspiral problem; we have pushed forward a formalism our group developed for mapping the spacetimes of massive compact objects; and, in collaboration with the Caltech group, we began to develop a framework for addressing issues in LISA data analysis for extreme mass ratio systems.

  14. Petal-Inspired Diffractive Grating on a Wavy Surface: Deterministic Fabrications and Applications to Colorizations and LED Devices.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Jin; Park, Jae Hoon; Huh, Ji-Hyeok; Kim, Chan Ho; Ho, Dong Hae; Choi, Gwan H; Yoo, Pil J; Cho, Sung Min; Cho, Jeong Ho; Lee, Seungwoo

    2017-03-22

    Interestingly, the petals of flowering plants display unique hierarchical structures, in which surface relief gratings (SRGs) are conformably coated on a curved surface with a large radius of curvature (hereafter referred to as wavy surface). However, systematic studies on the interplay between the diffractive modes and the wavy surface have not yet been reported, due to the absence of deterministic nanofabrication methods capable of generating combinatorially diverse SRGs on a wavy surface. Here, by taking advantage of the recently developed nanofabrication composed of evaporative assembly and photofluidic holography inscription, we were able to achieve (i) combinatorially diverse petal-inspired SRGs with controlled curvatures, periodicities, and dimensionalities, and (ii) systematic optical studies of the relevant diffraction modes. Furthermore, the unique diffraction modes of the petal-inspired SRGs were found to be useful for the enhancement of the outcoupling efficiency of an organic light emitting diode (OLED). Thus, our systematic analysis of the interplay between the diffractive modes and the petal-inspired SRGs provides a basis for making more informed decisions in the design of petal-inspired diffractive grating and its applications to optoelectronics.

  15. Inspiring Middle School Minds: Gifted, Creative, and Challenging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Judy

    2009-01-01

    Teaching adolescents can be quite challenging. Dr. Judy Willis, a neurologist and teacher, explains the inner workings of the adolescent brain. She uses the findings of brain research in her classroom to explain how parents and teachers can trigger untapped inspiration in students. Middle school education has often been a "black hole" for gifted…

  16. Multifunctional integration: from biological to bio-inspired materials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kesong; Jiang, Lei

    2011-09-27

    Nature is a school for human beings. Learning from nature has long been a source of bioinspiration for scientists and engineers. Multiscale structures are characteristic for biological materials, exhibiting inherent multifunctional integration. Optimized biological solutions provide inspiration for scientists and engineers to design and to fabricate multiscale structured materials for multifunctional integration.

  17. Sculpture, view of the classically inspired, tiered fountain made of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Sculpture, view of the classically inspired, tiered fountain made of marble and located in the center of DeWitt Circle in the front of Main - National Park Seminary, Bounded by Capitol Beltway (I-495), Linden Lane, Woodstove Avenue, & Smith Drive, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  18. Inside and outside: Boxes Inspired by Joseph Cornell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Laurel

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art project inspired by the work of Joseph Cornell. The project called for designing both the outside and the inside of a cigar box according to the student's theme. Thus, students needed to consider the viewer's vantage point with the box both closed and open, general design elements, two-dimensional and…

  19. A Project-Based Biologically-Inspired Robotics Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowder, R. M.; Zauner, K.-P.

    2013-01-01

    The design of any robotic system requires input from engineers from a variety of technical fields. This paper describes a project-based module, "Biologically-Inspired Robotics," that is offered to Electronics and Computer Science students at the University of Southampton, U.K. The overall objective of the module is for student groups to…

  20. Biologically Inspired Robots to Assist Areonauts on the Martian Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, G. P.; Saaj, C. M.

    Long before humans set foot on the surface of Mars, significant exploration of the surface will have been completed. Orbital spacecraft have certainly helped provide information about the surface to date, but significant advances are made through surface-based exploration. Not only does this include the Viking landers of years past, but also current and next generation mobile robots traversing the surface with scientific experiments for humans to better learn about this mostly unexplored environment. Many robotic vehicles have been proposed in recent years to assist astronauts on planetary surfaces. Only a few of these vehicles, or some aspects therein, have been inspired from biological creatures. With regards to the vehicle's locomotion system, looking into biologically inspired concepts is incredibly important because of the expectation of these astronauts exploring more complex terrain than current wheeled robotic explorers have yet traversed. This paper will review a number of robotic systems designed to assist Mars areonauts (astronauts specifically exploring Mars) before proposing a multi-purpose legged microrover assistant. This vehicle has a biologically inspired locomotion system which provides the capability to follow the areonauts over the most complex Martian terrain, or even traverse areas too complex for the areonaut to negotiate, in order to perform on-the-spot scientific experimentation as needed. The results of the biologically inspired vehicle's capability to traverse Mars terrain, both with regards to tractive capability in soil and ability to access more hostile terrain than its wheeled or tracked counterparts, will also be presented.

  1. Dale Chihuly: An Inspiration in Art, Science, and Math!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbert, Beth

    2009-01-01

    Connecting students to the arts in a concrete way can be an effective teaching tool. In this article, the author describes how Dale Chihuly's "Hart Window," which features hand-blown glass disks affixed to the framework of the window, can be an inspiration for interdisciplinary connections in art, science and math. (Contains 4 online resources.)

  2. Bio-Inspired Stretchable Network-Based Intelligent Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-03

    single filament in Toray T800H carbon fiber is 5 mm in diam- eter.6 Additionally, this fabrication technique has an inverse relation between the...Toray Carbon Fibers America Inc. Toray T800H data sheet. Santa Ana, CA, Technical Data Sheet CFA-007, 2011. 7. Guo Z, et al. Bio-inspired smart skin

  3. Music Inspired by Astronomy: A Great Outreach Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraknoi, A.

    2015-11-01

    We discuss and explain a selection of musical pieces (both classical and popular) that were inspired by astronomical ideas or observations. While the ideas behind such musical pieces can sometimes be a bit abstract, they make for good discussion in many educational and outreach settings.

  4. Nasal and Oral Inspiration during Natural Speech Breathing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Rosemary A.; Hoit, Jeannette D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the typical pattern for inspiration during speech breathing in healthy adults, as well as the factors that might influence it. Method: Ten healthy adults, 18-45 years of age, performed a variety of speaking tasks while nasal ram pressure, audio, and video recordings were obtained. Inspirations…

  5. Clay Corner: Italian Inspiration...An Interview with Susan Snyder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Harriet

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with Susan Snyder, a ceramic artist who produces pottery inspired by Italian designs from the 13th to 18th centuries. Presents her discussion of topics such as her development as an artist, techniques used when creating her art, and her thoughts on the importance of art education. (CMK)

  6. Inspiring Woodworking Students to Reach for New Heights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Judy

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author presents "Fresh Wood", a book that features award-winning student furniture projects. Woodworking teachers use the new book to get students inspired and motivated to excel with their own woodworking projects. The book features the impressive work of more than 40 high school and college students who submitted…

  7. In the Zone: Vygotskian-Inspired Pedagogy for Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Cosette

    2015-01-01

    In this study, Lev Vygotsky's (1978) Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) provides inspiration for a teaching approach for sustainability in a social science discipline, where students often lack or have widely varied levels of foundational understanding. This qualitative case study describes intellectual processes and aspects of the educational…

  8. Inspiring Students to a Lifetime of Physical Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Lawrence F.; Anderson, Steven P.

    2002-01-01

    Presents strategies that physical education teachers can use to encourage their students to lead physically active lives. The strategies include: focus on lifelong physical activity; use goal setting and self-assessment; inspire students by personal example; model skills (either a teacher or skilled student may do the modeling); and combine…

  9. Heterogeneous Sensor Networks: A Bio-Inspired Overlay Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    using bio-inspired technologies Figure 1A: Swimming behavior in Escherichia Coli. Fairly straight motion arises when the flagella rotate...counter clockwise. When the flagella rotate clockwise, the motion of the bacteria exhibits a random change in direction. Figure 1B: Stochastic

  10. The Teacher 50: Critical Questions for Inspiring Classroom Excellence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafele, Baruti

    2016-01-01

    In this thoughtful guide for novice and veteran educators alike, Baruti K. Kafele takes readers on a reflective journey designed to reignite their passion for teaching. Kafele's 50 questions and penetrating insights reveal how you can: (1) Inspire students of all racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic backgrounds to strive for academic excellence; (2)…

  11. Learning to Document in Reggio-Inspired Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wien, Carol Anne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses how teachers in child care and elementary schools learn to work with Reggio-inspired pedagogical documentation. While teachers grasp the value of such documentation theoretically, it is most challenging but exciting to use in practical settings. Documentation illuminates teacher theories about children's understanding:…

  12. Teaching from the Heart: Reflections, Encouragement, and Inspiration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Sharon M.

    This book offers inspiration and encouragement to any person who may have lost sight of the rewards of teaching from a teacher who was the 1997 Teacher of the Year. It features essays, conversations, and poems that can provide a boost when teachers need one. The chapters are: "First Days--My First Days of School, as a Student Teacher, as a…

  13. Towards an Ancient Chinese-Inspired Theory of Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    In this philosophical paper, I propose a theory of music education inspired by ancient Chinese philosophy. In particular, I draw on five classical Chinese philosophical texts: the Analects (lunyu [Chinese characters omitted]), the Mencius (Mengzi [Chinese characters omitted]), the Zhuangzi ([Chinese characters omitted]), the Xunzi ([Chinese…

  14. Music Inspired by Astronomy: A Resource Guide Organized by Topic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This annotated resource guide presents 133 pieces of music inspired by astronomical ideas, discoveries, or history, organized in 22 subject categories. Both classical and popular music are included, but only when a clear connection to astronomy could be established. Depending on your musical tastes, you are likely to find some pieces resonating…

  15. Biologically Inspired Polymer Microfibrillar Arrays for Mask Sealing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    Mask sealing Fibrillar adhesion Face masks Gecko adhesion Adhesion 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE...donning practices. One promising area is biologically inspired dry adhesives. Geckos , spiders, beetles, flies, and many other climbing lizards and

  16. Excellent Educators: ISTE's Award Winners Inspire, Captivate, and Motivate!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fingal, Diana

    2012-01-01

    In the impassioned debate about school reform, there is one point that all sides agree on: Classroom teachers have a huge impact on student success. Great teachers don't just teach. They inspire, they captivate, and they motivate their students to create, investigate, solve, and continue learning long after their school years are over. This…

  17. Using biological inspiration to engineer functional nanostructured materials.

    PubMed

    Wendell, David W; Patti, Jordan; Montemagno, Carlo D

    2006-11-01

    Humans have always looked to nature for design inspiration, and material design on the molecular level is no different. Here we explore how this idea applies to nanoscale biomimicry, specifically examining both recent advances and our own work on engineering lipid and polymer membrane systems with cellular processes.

  18. Rube Goldberg: Inspired Drawings of How Art Is Made.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakley, Thomas A.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses an art lesson in which the students were asked to think about how art is created and then develop a schematic drawing or cartoon illustrating this process. Explains that the drawings of Rube Goldberg were used as inspiration for the project. (CMK)

  19. Pedagogy and Space: Design Inspirations for Early Childhood Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zane, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    The intersection of design and learning is a new and burgeoning area of interest in all levels of education. "Pedagogy and Space" combines architectural design information with early childhood theory to enhance children's learning and educators' experience within the space. Filled with colorful, inspiring photographs of intentionally…

  20. Contrast-Independent Biologically Inspired Motion Detection

    PubMed Central

    Babies, Birthe; Lindemann, Jens Peter; Egelhaaf, Martin; Möller, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Optic flow, i.e., retinal image movement resulting from ego-motion, is a crucial source of information used for obstacle avoidance and course control in flying insects. Optic flow analysis may prove promising for mobile robotics although it is currently not among the standard techniques. Insects have developed a computationally cheap analysis mechanism for image motion. Detailed computational models, the so-called elementary motion detectors (EMDs), describe motion detection in insects. However, the technical application of EMDs is complicated by the strong effect of local pattern contrast on their motion response. Here we present augmented versions of an EMD, the (s)cc-EMDs, which normalise their responses for contrast and thereby reduce the sensitivity to contrast changes. Thus, velocity changes of moving natural images are reflected more reliably in the detector response. The (s)cc-EMDs can easily be implemented in hardware and software and can be a valuable novel visual motion sensor for mobile robots. PMID:22163800

  1. Bio-Inspired Flexible Cellular Actuating Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-21

    commercial finite element software.  We performed multi-axial tensile testing with different biaxial loading ratio to calibrate the material model...surface deformation analysis will be used  to compare with  finite   element  analysis in order to investigate the role of stiffeners.     4. Analytical...2 1 1 1 2 2 2 21 2 1 1 2 E hE I E I h E a w E a w                           (7)  5. Computational simulation  Finite   element  method

  2. THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT IN THE EXTREME-MASS RATIO INSPIRAL PROBLEM

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Brem, Patrick; Cuadra, Jorge; Armitage, Philip J. E-mail: pbrem@ari.uni-heidelberg.de E-mail: pja@jilau1.colorado.edu

    2012-01-10

    Measurements of gravitational waves from the inspiral of a stellar-mass compact object into a massive black hole are unique probes to test general relativity (GR) and massive black hole (MBH) properties, as well as the stellar distribution about these holes in galactic nuclei. Current data analysis techniques can provide us with parameter estimation with very narrow errors. However, an extreme-mass ratio inspiral (EMRI) is not a two-body problem, since other stellar bodies orbiting nearby will influence the capture orbit. Any deviation from the isolated inspiral will induce a small, though observable, deviation from the idealized waveform which could be misinterpreted as a failure of GR. Based on conservative analysis of mass segregation in a Milky-Way-like nucleus, we estimate that the possibility that another star has a semimajor axis comparable to that of the EMRI is non-negligible, although probably very small. This star introduces an observable perturbation in the orbit in the case in which we consider only loss of energy via gravitational radiation. When considering the two first-order non-dissipative post-Newtonian contributions (the periapsis shift of the orbit), the evolution of the orbital elements of the EMRI turns out to be chaotic in nature. The implications of this study are twofold. From the one side, the application to testing GR and measuring MBH parameters with the detection of EMRIs in galactic nuclei with a millihertz mission will be even more challenging than believed. From the other side, this behavior could in principle be used as a signature of mass segregation in galactic nuclei.

  3. Issues in Applying Bio-Inspiration, Cognitive Critical Mass and Developmental-Inspired Principles to Advanced Intelligent Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg-Cross, Gary; Samsonovich, Alexei V.

    This Chapter summarizes ideas presented at the special PerMIS 2008 session on Biological Inspiration for Intelligent Systems. Bio-inspired principles of development and evolution are a special part of the bio-models and principles that can be used to improve intelligent systems and related artifacts. Such principles are not always explicit. They represent an alternative to incremental engineering expansion using new technology to replicate human intelligent capabilities. They are more evident in efforts to replicate and produce a “critical mass” of higher cognitive functions of the human mind or their emergence through cognitive developmental robotics (DR) and self-regulated learning (SRL). DR approaches takes inspiration from natural processes, so that intelligently engineered systems may create solutions to problems in ways similar to what we hypothesize is occurring with biologics in their natural environment. This Chapter discusses how an SRL-based approach to bootstrap a “critical mass” can be assessed by a set of cognitive tests. It also uses a three-level bio-inspired framework to illustrate methodological issues in DR research. The approach stresses the importance of using bio-realistic developmental principles to guide and constrain research. Of particular importance is keeping models and implementation separate to avoid the possible of falling into a Ptolemaic paradigm that may lead to endless tweaking of models. Several of Lungarella's design principles [36] for developmental robotics are discussed as constraints on intelligence as it emerges from an ecologically balanced, three-way interaction between an agents' control systems, physical embodiment, and the external environment. The direction proposed herein is to explore such principles to avoid slavish following of superficial bio-inspiration. Rather we should proceed with a mature and informed developmental approach using developmental principles based on our incremental understanding of how

  4. The scientific study of inspiration in the creative process: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Oleynick, Victoria C.; Thrash, Todd M.; LeFew, Michael C.; Moldovan, Emil G.; Kieffaber, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Inspiration is a motivational state that compels individuals to bring ideas into fruition. Creators have long argued that inspiration is important to the creative process, but until recently, scientists have not investigated this claim. In this article, we review challenges to the study of creative inspiration, as well as solutions to these challenges afforded by theoretical and empirical work on inspiration over the past decade. First, we discuss the problem of definitional ambiguity, which has been addressed through an integrative process of construct conceptualization. Second, we discuss the challenge of how to operationalize inspiration. This challenge has been overcome by the development and validation of the Inspiration Scale (IS), which may be used to assess trait or state inspiration. Third, we address ambiguity regarding how inspiration differs from related concepts (creativity, insight, positive affect) by discussing discriminant validity. Next, we discuss the preconception that inspiration is less important than “perspiration” (effort), and we review empirical evidence that inspiration and effort both play important—but different—roles in the creative process. Finally, with many challenges overcome, we argue that the foundation is now set for a new generation of research focused on neural underpinnings. We discuss potential challenges to and opportunities for the neuroscientific study of inspiration. A better understanding of the biological basis of inspiration will illuminate the process through which creative ideas “fire the soul,” such that individuals are compelled to transform ideas into products and solutions that may benefit society. PMID:25009483

  5. Bio-inspired band gap engineering of zinc oxide by intracrystalline incorporation of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Brif, Anastasia; Ankonina, Guy; Drathen, Christina; Pokroy, Boaz

    2014-01-22

    Bandgap engineering of zinc oxide semiconductors can be achieved using a bio-inspired method. During a bioInspired crystallization process, incorporation of amino acids into the crystal structure of ZnO induces lattice strain that leads to linear bandgap shifts. This allows for fine tuning of the bandgap in a bio-inspired route.

  6. Development of a bio-inspired UAV perching system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Pu

    Although technologies of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) including micro air vehicles (MAVs) have been greatly advanced in the recent years, it is still very difficult for a UAV to perform some very challenging tasks such as perching to any desired spot reliably and agilely like a bird. Unlike the UAVs, the biological control mechanism of birds has been optimized through millions of year evolution and hence, they can perform many extremely maneuverability tasks, such as perching or grasping accurately and robustly. Therefore, we have good reason to learn from the nature in order to significantly improve the capabilities of UAVs. The development of a UAV perching system is becoming feasible, especially after a lot of research contributions in ornithology which involve the analysis of the bird's functionalities. Meanwhile, as technology advances in many engineering fields, such as airframes, propulsion, sensors, batteries, micro-electromechanical-system (MEMS), and UAV technology is also advancing rapidly. All of these research efforts in ornithology and the fast growing development technologies in UAV applications are motivating further interests and development in the area of UAV perching and grasping research. During the last decade, the research contributions about UAV perching and grasping were mainly based on fixed-wing, flapping-wing, and rotorcraft UAVs. However, most of the current researches in UAV systems with perching and grasping capability are focusing on either active (powered) grasping and perching or passive (unpowered) perching. Although birds do have both active and passive perching capabilities depending on their needs, there is no UAV perching system with both capabilities. In this project, we focused on filling this gap. Inspired by the anatomy analysis of bird legs and feet, a novel perching system has been developed to implement the bionics action for both active grasping and passive perching. In addition, for developing a robust and

  7. A Muscle Synergy-Inspired Adaptive Control Scheme for a Hybrid Walking Neuroprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Alibeji, Naji A; Kirsch, Nicholas Andrew; Sharma, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid neuroprosthesis that uses an electric motor-based wearable exoskeleton and functional electrical stimulation (FES) has a promising potential to restore walking in persons with paraplegia. A hybrid actuation structure introduces effector redundancy, making its automatic control a challenging task because multiple muscles and additional electric motor need to be coordinated. Inspired by the muscle synergy principle, we designed a low dimensional controller to control multiple effectors: FES of multiple muscles and electric motors. The resulting control system may be less complex and easier to control. To obtain the muscle synergy-inspired low dimensional control, a subject-specific gait model was optimized to compute optimal control signals for the multiple effectors. The optimal control signals were then dimensionally reduced by using principal component analysis to extract synergies. Then, an adaptive feedforward controller with an update law for the synergy activation was designed. In addition, feedback control was used to provide stability and robustness to the control design. The adaptive-feedforward and feedback control structure makes the low dimensional controller more robust to disturbances and variations in the model parameters and may help to compensate for other time-varying phenomena (e.g., muscle fatigue). This is proven by using a Lyapunov stability analysis, which yielded semi-global uniformly ultimately bounded tracking. Computer simulations were performed to test the new controller on a 4-degree of freedom gait model.

  8. Final Report for Bio-Inspired Approaches to Moving-Target Defense Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, Glenn A.; Oehmen, Christopher S.

    2012-09-01

    This report records the work and contributions of the NITRD-funded Bio-Inspired Approaches to Moving-Target Defense Strategies project performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory under the technical guidance of the National Security Agency’s R6 division. The project has incorporated a number of bio-inspired cyber defensive technologies within an elastic framework provided by the Digital Ants. This project has created the first scalable, real-world prototype of the Digital Ants Framework (DAF)[11] and integrated five technologies into this flexible, decentralized framework: (1) Ant-Based Cyber Defense (ABCD), (2) Behavioral Indicators, (3) Bioinformatic Clas- sification, (4) Moving-Target Reconfiguration, and (5) Ambient Collaboration. The DAF can be used operationally to decentralize many such data intensive applications that normally rely on collection of large amounts of data in a central repository. In this work, we have shown how these component applications may be decentralized and may perform analysis at the edge. Operationally, this will enable analytics to scale far beyond current limitations while not suffering from the bandwidth or computational limitations of centralized analysis. This effort has advanced the R6 Cyber Security research program to secure digital infrastructures by developing a dynamic means to adaptively defend complex cyber systems. We hope that this work will benefit both our client’s efforts in system behavior modeling and cyber security to the overall benefit of the nation.

  9. Fluorimetric Mercury Test Strips with Suppressed "Coffee Stains" by a Bio-inspired Fabrication Strategy.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yuchun; Shang, Jizhen; Li, Shuying; Feng, Luping; Jiang, Yao; Duan, Zhiqiang; Lv, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Chunxian; Yao, Tiantian; Dong, Zhichao; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Hua

    2016-11-04

    A fluorimetric Hg(2+) test strip has been developed using a lotus-inspired fabrication method for suppressing the "coffee stains" toward the uniform distribution of probe materials through creating a hydrophobic drying pattern for fast solvent evaporation. The test strips were first loaded with the model probes of fluorescent gold-silver nanoclusters and then dried in vacuum on the hydrophobic pattern. On the one hand, here, the hydrophobic constraining forces from the lotus surface-like pattern could control the exterior transport of dispersed nanoclusters on strips leading to the minimized "coffee stains". On the other hand, the vacuum-aided fast solvent evaporation could boost the interior Marangoni flow of probe materials on strips to expect the further improved probe distribution on strips. High aqueous stability and enhanced fluorescence of probes on test strips were realized by the hydrophilic treatment with amine-derivatized silicane. A test strips-based fluorimetry has thereby been developed for probing Hg(2+) ions in wastewater, showing the detection performances comparable to the classic instrumental analysis ones. Such a facile and efficient fabrication route for the bio-inspired suppression of "coffee stains" on test strips may expand the scope of applications of test strips-based "point-of-care" analysis methods or detection devices in the biomedical and environmental fields.

  10. A Muscle Synergy-Inspired Adaptive Control Scheme for a Hybrid Walking Neuroprosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Alibeji, Naji A.; Kirsch, Nicholas Andrew; Sharma, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid neuroprosthesis that uses an electric motor-based wearable exoskeleton and functional electrical stimulation (FES) has a promising potential to restore walking in persons with paraplegia. A hybrid actuation structure introduces effector redundancy, making its automatic control a challenging task because multiple muscles and additional electric motor need to be coordinated. Inspired by the muscle synergy principle, we designed a low dimensional controller to control multiple effectors: FES of multiple muscles and electric motors. The resulting control system may be less complex and easier to control. To obtain the muscle synergy-inspired low dimensional control, a subject-specific gait model was optimized to compute optimal control signals for the multiple effectors. The optimal control signals were then dimensionally reduced by using principal component analysis to extract synergies. Then, an adaptive feedforward controller with an update law for the synergy activation was designed. In addition, feedback control was used to provide stability and robustness to the control design. The adaptive-feedforward and feedback control structure makes the low dimensional controller more robust to disturbances and variations in the model parameters and may help to compensate for other time-varying phenomena (e.g., muscle fatigue). This is proven by using a Lyapunov stability analysis, which yielded semi-global uniformly ultimately bounded tracking. Computer simulations were performed to test the new controller on a 4-degree of freedom gait model. PMID:26734606

  11. Testing SO(10)-inspired leptogenesis with low energy neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bari, Pasquale Di; Riotto, Antonio E-mail: Antonio.Riotto@cern.ch

    2011-04-01

    We extend the results of a previous analysis of ours showing that, when both heavy and light flavour effects are taken into account, successful minimal (type I + thermal) leptogenesis with SO(10)-inspired relations is possible. Barring fine tuned choices of the parameters, these relations enforce a hierarchical RH neutrino mass spectrum that results into a final asymmetry dominantly produced by the next-to-lightest RH neutrino decays (N{sub 2} dominated leptogenesis). We present the constraints on the whole set of low energy neutrino parameters. Allowing a small misalignment between the Dirac basis and the charged lepton basis as in the quark sector, the allowed regions enlarge and the lower bound on the reheating temperature gets relaxed to values as low as ∼ 10{sup 10} GeV. It is confirmed that for normal ordering (NO) there are two allowed ranges of values for the lightest neutrino mass: m{sub 1} ≅ (1−5) × 10{sup −3} eV and m{sub 1} ≅ (0.03−0.1) eV. For m{sub 1}∼<0.01 eV the allowed region in the plane θ{sub 13}-θ{sub 23} is approximately given by θ{sub 23}∼<49°+0.65 (θ{sub 13}−5°), while the neutrinoless double beta decay effective neutrino mass falls in the range m{sub ee} = (1−3) × 10{sup −3} eV for θ{sub 13} = (6°−11.5°). For m{sub 1}∼>0.01 eV, one has quite sharply m{sub ee} ≅ m{sub 1} and an upper bound θ{sub 23}∼<46°. These constraints will be tested by low energy neutrino experiments during next years. We also find that inverted ordering (IO), though quite strongly constrained, is not completely ruled out. In particular, we find approximately θ{sub 23} ≅ 43°+12° log (0.2 eV/m{sub 1}), that will be fully tested by future experiments.

  12. Control of Biologically Inspired Robotic Microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kei Cheang, U.; Lee, Jun Hee; Roy, Dheeraj; Kim, Min Jun

    2010-11-01

    Flagella have been employed as nanoactuators for biomimetic microswimmers in low Reynolds number fluidic environments. The microswimmers utilize flagellar filaments isolated from Salmonella typhimurium to mimic the spiral-type propulsion mechanism of flagellated bacteria. The microswimmer included a polystyrene microbead conjugated to one or multiple magnetic nanobeads via flagellar filaments using avidin-biotin linkages. Wireless propulsion energy was supplied to magnetic bead by an AC magnetic field, which in turn rotate the bead and induce spiral-type swimming. A magnetic controller consisted of electromagnetic coils arranged in an approximate Helmholtz configuration was designed and constructed. In conjunction with a LabVIEW input interface, a DAQ controller was used as a function generator to induce AC current outputs from the power supply to the magnetic controller in order to generate an AC magnetic field. Numerical analysis was performed to characterize the magnetic controller. A high-speed camera provided real-time imaging of the microswimmer motion in a static fluidic environment. The robotic microswimmers exhibited active propulsion under an AC magnetic field, which demonstrates the possibility for future biomedical applications for drug delivery.

  13. Inspiral-merger-ringdown (2, 0) mode waveforms for aligned-spin black-hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhoujian; Han, Wen-Biao

    2016-08-01

    Based on spin weighted spherical harmonic decomposition, the (2,+/- 2) modes dominate the gravitational waveforms generated by binary black holes. Several recent works found that other modes including (l,0) ones are also important to gravitational wave data analysis. For aligned-spin binaries, these (l,0) modes are related to the memory effect of gravitational wave. Based on the post-Newtonian analysis, quasi-normal modes analysis and the results of numerical relativity simulations, we present a full inspiral-merger-ringdown gravitational waveform model for the (2,0) mode generated by binary black holes. Our model includes the quasinormal ringing part and includes the effect of a black hole’s spin. It is complementary to the previous results.

  14. Biologically-inspired, electrically small antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Amir Reza

    First, the motivation behind adding a passive external coupling network after antenna arrays is discussed, the concept of biomimetic antenna arrays (BMAAs) introduced and some of the previous work done in this area have been reviewed. Next, a BMAA which achieves an angular resolution of roughly 15 times its regular counterpart is introduced and fully characterized. The introduced BMAA employs transformers which considerably degrade its performance, namely its output power. To cicumvent this shortcoming a new architecture of a BMAA that does not employ transformers and therefore yields a higher output power for the same angular resolution has been subsequently presented. Moreover, a detailed noise analysis of this BMAA is carried out and the output noise of the new architecture is compared with the output noise of the original design. The modified twoelement BMAA architecture is then extended to multiple elements. A novel nonlinear optimization process is introduced that maximizes the total power captured by the BMAA for a given angular resolution and the concept illustrated for a three-element antenna array. Next an optimum two-element BMAA which achieves the maximum possible angular resolution while obtaining the same output power level of a regular antenna array with the same elements and spacing is introduced. A novel two-element superdirective array based on this optimum BMAA has been also discussed. The passive BMAAs discussed in this thesis have a relatively narrow bandwidth. To extend the bandwidth of BMAAs, non- Foster networks have been employed in their external coupling networks and it has been demonstrated that they can increase their bandwidth by a factor of roughly 33. Finally, the BMAA concept has been extended to nano-antenna arrays and a concept for designing sub-wavelength angle-sensing detectors at optical wavelengths has been introduced.

  15. Biologically Inspired mm-size Gliding UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihs, Daniel; Zussman, Eyal; Yarin, Alexander

    2002-11-01

    We present a first design of an unmanned aerial vehicle whose aerodynamic loads are carried by comb-like permeable surfaces. This concept was based on observation and analysis of the flight capabilities of the Thrip family of insects, whose have wings of this form and various plant seeds which use this concept to form an aerodynamic decelerator. This concept is only practical for at low Reynolds numbers, as the viscous trace of bodies moving in fluid becomes thicker as Re becomes smaller. When Re<1, a cylinder moving in fluid can drag along fluid up to several cylinder diameters. This drag effect can be used to produce a comb structure, where the ratio of comb rod to inter-rod distance can be up to 0.1 without significant throughflow, i.e. the comb is equivalent to a continuous surface. To demonstrate this principle, we have built artificial ``dandelion seeds", i.e. stable aerodynamic decelerators (parachutes) made of permeable light mats of submicron diameter nanofibers. We produced the nanofiber matrices (mats) by electrospinning of polymer solutions, obtaining fibers of 200-400 nm diameter. These fibers were then deposited on frames that serve to define the aerodynamic surfaces, thus producing the mat, with controllable density. For stability, the aerodynamic surfaces had positive dihedral ( inverted umbrella) forms with the fuselage hanging below. When dropped, the platforms fell freely through the air, apex down, reaching terminal velocity very quickly. By comparing the sink rate of the permeable structures with equivalent decelerators with continuous (Saran-wrap) surfaces we show that the permeable surfaces are equivalent to continuous surfaces, with significant weight savings, as long as the local Reynolds number is o(1).

  16. A test bed for insect-inspired robotic control.

    PubMed

    Reiser, Michael B; Dickinson, Michael H

    2003-10-15

    Flying insects are remarkable examples of sophisticated sensory-motor control systems. Insects have solved the fundamental challenge facing the field of mobile robots: robust sensory-motor mapping. Control models based on insects can contribute much to the design of robotic control systems. We present our work on a preliminary robotic control system inspired by current behavioural and physiological models of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. We designed a five-degrees-of-freedom robotic system that serves as a novel simulation/mobile robot hybrid. This design has allowed us to implement a fly-inspired control system that uses visual and mechanosensory feedback. Our results suggest that a simple control scheme can yield surprisingly robust fly-like robotic behaviour.

  17. High-performance mussel-inspired adhesives of reduced complexity

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, B. Kollbe; Das, Saurabh; Linstadt, Roscoe; Kaufman, Yair; Martinez-Rodriguez, Nadine R.; Mirshafian, Razieh; Kesselman, Ellina; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Lipshutz, Bruce H.; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Despite the recent progress in and demand for wet adhesives, practical underwater adhesion remains limited or non-existent for diverse applications. Translation of mussel-inspired wet adhesion typically entails catechol functionalization of polymers and/or polyelectrolytes, and solution processing of many complex components and steps that require optimization and stabilization. Here we reduced the complexity of a wet adhesive primer to synthetic low-molecular-weight catecholic zwitterionic surfactants that show very strong adhesion (∼50 mJ m−2) and retain the ability to coacervate. This catecholic zwitterion adheres to diverse surfaces and self-assembles into a molecularly smooth, thin (<4 nm) and strong glue layer. The catecholic zwitterion holds particular promise as an adhesive for nanofabrication. This study significantly simplifies bio-inspired themes for wet adhesion by combining catechol with hydrophobic and electrostatic functional groups in a small molecule. PMID:26478273

  18. High-performance mussel-inspired adhesives of reduced complexity.

    PubMed

    Ahn, B Kollbe; Das, Saurabh; Linstadt, Roscoe; Kaufman, Yair; Martinez-Rodriguez, Nadine R; Mirshafian, Razieh; Kesselman, Ellina; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Lipshutz, Bruce H; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-10-19

    Despite the recent progress in and demand for wet adhesives, practical underwater adhesion remains limited or non-existent for diverse applications. Translation of mussel-inspired wet adhesion typically entails catechol functionalization of polymers and/or polyelectrolytes, and solution processing of many complex components and steps that require optimization and stabilization. Here we reduced the complexity of a wet adhesive primer to synthetic low-molecular-weight catecholic zwitterionic surfactants that show very strong adhesion (∼50 mJ m(-2)) and retain the ability to coacervate. This catecholic zwitterion adheres to diverse surfaces and self-assembles into a molecularly smooth, thin (<4 nm) and strong glue layer. The catecholic zwitterion holds particular promise as an adhesive for nanofabrication. This study significantly simplifies bio-inspired themes for wet adhesion by combining catechol with hydrophobic and electrostatic functional groups in a small molecule.

  19. Bio-inspired polarized skylight navigation: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Wan, Yongqin; Li, Lijing

    2015-12-01

    The idea of using skylight polarization in navigation is learned from animals such as desert ants and honeybees. Various research groups have been working on the development of novel navigation systems inspired by polarized skylight. The research of background in polarized skylight navigation is introduced, and basic principle of the insects navigation is expatiated. Then, the research progress status at home and abroad in skylight polarization pattern, three bio-inspired polarized skylight navigation sensors and polarized skylight navigation are reviewed. Finally, the research focuses in the field of polarized skylight navigation are analyzed. At the same time, the trend of development and prospect in the future are predicted. It is believed that the review is helpful to people understand polarized skylight navigation and polarized skylight navigation sensors.

  20. Semiconductor Devices Inspired By and Integrated With Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, John

    2012-04-25

    Biology is curved, soft and elastic; silicon wafers are not. Semiconductor technologies that can bridge this gap in form and mechanics will create new opportunities in devices that adopt biologically inspired designs or require intimate integration with the human body. This talk describes the development of ideas for electronics that offer the performance of state-of-the-art, wafer- based systems but with the mechanical properties of a rubber band. We explain the underlying materials science and mechanics of these approaches, and illustrate their use in (1) bio- integrated, ‘tissue-like’ electronics with unique capabilities for mapping cardiac and neural electrophysiology, and (2) bio-inspired, ‘eyeball’ cameras with exceptional imaging properties enabled by curvilinear, Petzval designs.

  1. High-performance mussel-inspired adhesives of reduced complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, B. Kollbe; Das, Saurabh; Linstadt, Roscoe; Kaufman, Yair; Martinez-Rodriguez, Nadine R.; Mirshafian, Razieh; Kesselman, Ellina; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Lipshutz, Bruce H.; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2015-10-01

    Despite the recent progress in and demand for wet adhesives, practical underwater adhesion remains limited or non-existent for diverse applications. Translation of mussel-inspired wet adhesion typically entails catechol functionalization of polymers and/or polyelectrolytes, and solution processing of many complex components and steps that require optimization and stabilization. Here we reduced the complexity of a wet adhesive primer to synthetic low-molecular-weight catecholic zwitterionic surfactants that show very strong adhesion (~50 mJ m-2) and retain the ability to coacervate. This catecholic zwitterion adheres to diverse surfaces and self-assembles into a molecularly smooth, thin (<4 nm) and strong glue layer. The catecholic zwitterion holds particular promise as an adhesive for nanofabrication. This study significantly simplifies bio-inspired themes for wet adhesion by combining catechol with hydrophobic and electrostatic functional groups in a small molecule.

  2. Biologically-inspired hexapod robot design and simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espenschied, Kenneth S.; Quinn, Roger D.

    1994-01-01

    The design and construction of a biologically-inspired hexapod robot is presented. A previously developed simulation is modified to include models of the DC drive motors, the motor driver circuits and their transmissions. The application of this simulation to the design and development of the robot is discussed. The mechanisms thought to be responsible for the leg coordination of the walking stick insect were previously applied to control the straight-line locomotion of a robot. We generalized these rules for a robot walking on a plane. This biologically-inspired control strategy is used to control the robot in simulation. Numerical results show that the general body motion and performance of the simulated robot is similar to that of the robot based on our preliminary experimental results.

  3. Immune Inspired Security Approach for Manets: a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Yasir Abdelgadir

    2011-06-01

    This paper extends the work that has earlier been established. Immune inspired approach for securing mobile ad hoc networks is specified there. Although it is clearly indicated there that the research scope is the wireless networks in general and hybrid mobile ad hoc networks in particular, we have seen that specifying the security system in one of the communications applications that need further security approach may help to understand how effectively the system can contribute to this vital and important networks sector. Security in this type of networks is important and controversial as it plays a key role in users' eagerness or reluctance for the services provided by these networks. In this paper, the immune inspired security system is specified to secure web services in converged networks.

  4. Inspiration and application in the evolution of biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Huebsch, Nathaniel; Mooney, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Biomaterials, traditionally defined as materials used in medical devices, have been used since antiquity, but recently their degree of sophistication has increased significantly. Biomaterials made today are routinely information rich and incorporate biologically active components derived from nature. In the future, biomaterials will assume an even greater role in medicine and will find use in a wide variety of non-medical applications through biologically inspired design and incorporation of dynamic behaviour. PMID:19940912

  5. Mussel-inspired plasmonic nanohybrids for light harvesting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minah; Kim, Jong Uk; Lee, Joon Seok; Lee, Byung Il; Shin, Jonghwa; Park, Chan Beum

    2014-07-09

    Core-shell plasmonic nanohybrids are synthesized through a simple solutionbased process utilizing mussel-inspired polydopamine (PDA). The multi-purpose PDA not only facilitates plasmonic metal formation, but also serves as a scaffold to incorporate photosensitizers around the metal cores, as well as an adhesive between the nanohybrids and the substrate. The resulting plasmonic assembly exhibits highly enhanced light absorption in photo catalytic systems to augment artificial photosynthesis.

  6. Biologically-Inspired Anisotropic Flexible Wing for Optimal Flapping Flight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    flapping wing MAV with parameters similar to several biological systems like the bumblebee, hawkmoth, and hummingbird was identified and used as the...have been measure. Leading edge pivot produces much higher force that trailing edge pivot. Also at high pitch rates the flow evolution is more two...small synthetic wings which were biologically inspired by hummingbirds as they are comparable in size, shape, and flapping frequency. The focus was

  7. Bio-Inspired Human-Level Machine Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-25

    cue integration , grounded concept learning , and interaction of vision and language . We believe that the bio-inspired human-level machine learning ...hypernetwork model, and designed in vitro experimental protocols to implement online language learning from a stream of text corpus. In the third year, we...model, and designed in vitro experimental protocols to implement online language learning from a stream of text corpus. In the third year, we

  8. Neural networks and neuroscience-inspired computer vision.

    PubMed

    Cox, David Daniel; Dean, Thomas

    2014-09-22

    Brains are, at a fundamental level, biological computing machines. They transform a torrent of complex and ambiguous sensory information into coherent thought and action, allowing an organism to perceive and model its environment, synthesize and make decisions from disparate streams of information, and adapt to a changing environment. Against this backdrop, it is perhaps not surprising that computer science, the science of building artificial computational systems, has long looked to biology for inspiration. However, while the opportunities for cross-pollination between neuroscience and computer science are great, the road to achieving brain-like algorithms has been long and rocky. Here, we review the historical connections between neuroscience and computer science, and we look forward to a new era of potential collaboration, enabled by recent rapid advances in both biologically-inspired computer vision and in experimental neuroscience methods. In particular, we explore where neuroscience-inspired algorithms have succeeded, where they still fail, and we identify areas where deeper connections are likely to be fruitful.

  9. Importance of transient resonances in extreme-mass-ratio inspirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Christopher P. L.; Cole, Robert H.; Cañizares, Priscilla; Gair, Jonathan R.

    2016-12-01

    The inspiral of stellar-mass compact objects, like neutron stars or stellar-mass black holes, into supermassive black holes provides a wealth of information about the strong gravitational-field regime via the emission of gravitational waves. In order to detect and analyze these signals, accurate waveform templates which include the effects of the compact object's gravitational self-force are required. For computational efficiency, adiabatic templates are often used. These accurately reproduce orbit-averaged trajectories arising from the first-order self-force, but neglect other effects, such as transient resonances, where the radial and poloidal fundamental frequencies become commensurate. During such resonances the flux of gravitational waves can be diminished or enhanced, leading to a shift in the compact object's trajectory and the phase of the waveform. We present an evolution scheme for studying the effects of transient resonances and apply this to an astrophysically motivated population. We find that a large proportion of systems encounter a low-order resonance in the later stages of inspiral; however, the resulting effect on signal-to-noise recovery is small as a consequence of the low eccentricity of the inspirals. Neglecting the effects of transient resonances leads to a loss of 4% of detectable signals.

  10. Origami-Inspired Folding of Thick, Rigid Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trease, Brian P.; Thomson, Mark W.; Sigel, Deborah A.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Zirbel, Shannon; Howell, Larry; Lang, Robert

    2014-01-01

    To achieve power of 250 kW or greater, a large compression ratio of stowed-to-deployed area is needed. Origami folding patterns were used to inspire the folding of a solar array to achieve synchronous deployment; however, origami models are generally created for near-zero-thickness material. Panel thickness is one of the main challenges of origami-inspired design. Three origami-inspired folding techniques (flasher, square twist, and map fold) were created with rigid panels and hinges. Hinge components are added to the model to enable folding of thick, rigid materials. Origami models are created assuming zero (or near zero) thickness. When a material with finite thickness is used, the panels are required to bend around an increasingly thick fold as they move away from the center of the model. The two approaches for dealing with material thickness are to use membrane hinges to connect the panels, or to add panel hinges, or hinges of the same thickness, at an appropriate width to enable folding.

  11. Artificial heartbeat: design and fabrication of a biologically inspired pump.

    PubMed

    Walters, Peter; Lewis, Amy; Stinchcombe, Andrew; Stephenson, Robert; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2013-12-01

    We present a biologically inspired actuator exhibiting a novel pumping action. The design of the 'artificial heartbeat' actuator is inspired by physical principles derived from the structure and function of the human heart. The actuator employs NiTi artificial muscles and is powered by electrical energy generated by microbial fuel cells (MFCs). We describe the design and fabrication of the actuator and report the results of tests conducted to characterize its performance. This is the first artificial muscle-driven pump to be powered by MFCs fed on human urine. Results are presented in terms of the peak pumping pressure generated by the actuator, as well as for the volume of fluid transferred, when the actuator was powered by energy stored in a capacitor bank, which was charged by 24 MFCs fed on urine. The results demonstrate the potential for the artificial heartbeat actuator to be employed as a fluid circulation pump in future generations of MFC-powered robots ('EcoBots') that extract energy from organic waste. We also envisage that the actuator could in the future form part of a bio-robotic artwork or 'bio-automaton' that could help increase public awareness of research in robotics, bio-energy and biologically inspired design.

  12. Eccentric Inspirals with Self-Force and Spin-Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Charles; Osburn, Thomas; Warburton, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Eccentric inspirals of a small mass about a more massive Schwarzschild black hole (EMRIs or IMRIs) are calculated using the gravitational self-force and the Mathisson-Papapetrou spin-force. These calculations include all dissipative and conservative effects that are first order in the mass ratio. We compute systems with initial eccentricities as high as e = 0.8, initial separations as large as 50 M, and arbitrary spin orientations. Including the spin-force causes the orbital plane to precess. Inspirals are calculated using an osculating-orbits scheme that is driven by self-force data from a hybrid self-force code and time-domain spin-force calculations. The hybrid approach uses both self-force data from a Lorenz gauge code and highly accurate flux data from a Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli code, allowing the hybrid model to track orbital phase of inspirals to within 0.1 radians or better over hundreds or thousands of orbits. NSF PHY15-06182.

  13. E6 inspired supersymmetric models with exact custodial symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevzorov, Roman

    2013-01-01

    The breakdown of E6 gauge symmetry at high energies may lead to supersymmetric models based on the standard model gauge group together with extra U(1)ψ and U(1)χ gauge symmetries. To ensure anomaly cancellation the particle content of these E6 inspired models involves extra exotic states that generically give rise to nondiagonal flavor transitions and rapid proton decay. We argue that a single discrete Z˜2H symmetry can be used to forbid tree-level flavor changing transitions, as well as the most dangerous baryon and lepton number violating operators. We present 5D and 6D orbifold grand unified theory constructions that lead to the E6 inspired supersymmetric models of this type. The breakdown of U(1)ψ and U(1)χ gauge symmetries that preserves E6 matter parity assignment guarantees that ordinary quarks and leptons and their superpartners, as well as the exotic states which originate from 27 representations of E6, survive to low energies. These E6 inspired models contain two dark matter candidates and must also include additional TeV scale vectorlike lepton or vectorlike down-type quark states to render the lightest exotic quark unstable. We examine gauge coupling unification in these models and discuss their implications for collider phenomenology and cosmology.

  14. INSPIRE: Initiating New Science Partnerships in Rural Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Donna M.; McNeal, K. S.; Bruce, L. M.; Harpole, S. H.; Schmitz, D. W.

    2010-10-01

    INSPIRE, Initiating New Science Partnerships in Rural Education, is a partnership between Mississippi State University and three school districts in Mississippi's Golden Triangle (Starkville, Columbus, West Point). This program recruits ten graduate fellows each year from geosciences, physics, astronomy, and engineering and pairs them with a participating middle school or high school teacher. The graduate fellows provide technology-supported inquiry-based learning in the earth and space sciences by incorporating their research into classroom instruction and using multiple resources such as Google Earth, geographic information systems (GIS), Celestia, and others. In addition to strengthening the communication skills of the graduate fellows, INSPIRE will increase the content knowledge of participating teachers, provide high-quality instruction using multiple technologies, promote higher education to area high-school students, and provide fellows and teachers with international research experience through our partners in Australia, The Bahamas, England, and Poland. INSPIRE is funded by the Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education Program (GK-12; Award No. DGE-0947419), which is part of the Division for Graduate Education of the National Science Foundation.

  15. SABRE: a bio-inspired fault-tolerant electronic architecture.

    PubMed

    Bremner, P; Liu, Y; Samie, M; Dragffy, G; Pipe, A G; Tempesti, G; Timmis, J; Tyrrell, A M

    2013-03-01

    As electronic devices become increasingly complex, ensuring their reliable, fault-free operation is becoming correspondingly more challenging. It can be observed that, in spite of their complexity, biological systems are highly reliable and fault tolerant. Hence, we are motivated to take inspiration for biological systems in the design of electronic ones. In SABRE (self-healing cellular architectures for biologically inspired highly reliable electronic systems), we have designed a bio-inspired fault-tolerant hierarchical architecture for this purpose. As in biology, the foundation for the whole system is cellular in nature, with each cell able to detect faults in its operation and trigger intra-cellular or extra-cellular repair as required. At the next level in the hierarchy, arrays of cells are configured and controlled as function units in a transport triggered architecture (TTA), which is able to perform partial-dynamic reconfiguration to rectify problems that cannot be solved at the cellular level. Each TTA is, in turn, part of a larger multi-processor system which employs coarser grain reconfiguration to tolerate faults that cause a processor to fail. In this paper, we describe the details of operation of each layer of the SABRE hierarchy, and how these layers interact to provide a high systemic level of fault tolerance.

  16. Swarm intelligence inspired shills and the evolution of cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Haibin; Sun, Changhao

    2014-01-01

    Many hostile scenarios exist in real-life situations, where cooperation is disfavored and the collective behavior needs intervention for system efficiency improvement. Towards this end, the framework of soft control provides a powerful tool by introducing controllable agents called shills, who are allowed to follow well-designed updating rules for varying missions. Inspired by swarm intelligence emerging from flocks of birds, we explore here the dependence of the evolution of cooperation on soft control by an evolutionary iterated prisoner's dilemma (IPD) game staged on square lattices, where the shills adopt a particle swarm optimization (PSO) mechanism for strategy updating. We demonstrate that not only can cooperation be promoted by shills effectively seeking for potentially better strategies and spreading them to others, but also the frequency of cooperation could be arbitrarily controlled by choosing appropriate parameter settings. Moreover, we show that adding more shills does not contribute to further cooperation promotion, while assigning higher weights to the collective knowledge for strategy updating proves a efficient way to induce cooperative behavior. Our research provides insights into cooperation evolution in the presence of PSO-inspired shills and we hope it will be inspirational for future studies focusing on swarm intelligence based soft control. PMID:24909519

  17. Material requirements for bio-inspired sensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggins, Peter; Lloyd, Peter; Salmond, David; Kusterbeck, Anne

    2008-10-01

    The aim of developing bio-inspired sensing systems is to try and emulate the amazing sensitivity and specificity observed in the natural world. These capabilities have evolved, often for specific tasks, which provide the organism with an advantage in its fight to survive and prosper. Capabilities cover a wide range of sensing functions including vision, temperature, hearing, touch, taste and smell. For some functions, the capabilities of natural systems are still greater than that achieved by traditional engineering solutions; a good example being a dog's sense of smell. Furthermore, attempting to emulate aspects of biological optics, processing and guidance may lead to more simple and effective devices. A bio-inspired sensing system is much more than the sensory mechanism. A system will need to collect samples, especially if pathogens or chemicals are of interest. Other functions could include the provision of power, surfaces and receptors, structure, locomotion and control. In fact it is possible to conceive of a complete bio-inspired system concept which is likely to be radically different from more conventional approaches. This concept will be described and individual component technologies considered.

  18. Expanding Earth and Space Science through the Initiating New Science Partnerships In Rural Education (INSPIRE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radencic, S.; McNeal, K. S.; Pierce, D.; Hare, D.

    2010-12-01

    school year aided in fostering a community atmosphere to ensure successful classroom experiences. Including stakeholders in the progress of lesson plan product development during a workshop luncheon was another key part to building a community of support for INSPIRE. These planning components are essential to the success of the project and are recommended to similar projects. The INSPIRE project external evaluation includes: (i) interviews of participants and K-12 students involved in INSPIRE, (ii) pre-post technology and teaching attitude surveys of graduate students and teachers, (iii) thematic analysis of daily feedback forms from the workshop, (iv) summary of end of workshop evaluations, and (v) constant surveying of program progress towards meeting its goals. Internal evaluation includes: (i) classroom observations of graduate student interactions with students (ii) bi-weekly journal entries from both teachers and graduate students, and (iii) weekly feedback from graduate students. Preliminary evaluation of the workshop daily feedback forms indicate a high level of approval for the technology and inquiry activities modeled. Journal entries indicate that the majority of Fellow-teacher teams experience positive interactions in the classroom.

  19. Electrowetting-Controlled and Electrically-Tunable Bio-Inspired Micro/Nanostructures and Optofluidic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manakasettharn, Supone

    Many man-made structures and devices have been inspired by the ingenious structures, mechanisms, properties, and functions of plants and animals. This work has been inspired by a number of unique properties, which biological organisms possess such as dynamic tunable iridescence, self-cleaning properties, and brilliant structural color. The objective of this work is to model, design, fabricate, and characterize novel bio-inspired micro-/nanostructures and optofluidic devices. To conceptually mimic the iridescence of cephalopods, microflowers have been modeled and designed based on elasto-capillary bending, which is the interplay between the elastic energy of petals and the capillary energy of a liquid droplet, which is used to actuate petal movement. After microfabrication of the polycrystalline Si microflowers, two methods of petal actuation have been demonstrated---one by volume change of the water droplet and the other by change of water contact angle on the petals using the electrowetting process. The experimental results are in good agreement with a theoretical model. By taking into account the self-cleaning properties of lotus leaves, transparent Ta2O5 nanostructured thin films have been fabricated using a multi-step anodization process of sputter-deposited Al-Ta bilayers on a quartz substrate. The films then have been made superhydrophobic by using a combination of nanostructures, called nanograss, along with the deposition of hydrophobic coatings. The films also have been characterized by measuring water contact angles and by obtaining optical transmittance spectra and SEM micrographs. The measured contact angles and transmittance spectra are in good agreement with theoretical calculations. Inspired by biological nanostructured surfaces possessing structural color and wettability control, reflective Ta2O5 nanostructured thin films have been fabricated using the multi-step anodization process of sputter-deposited Al-Ta bilayers on a Si substrate. The films

  20. Integration of bio-inspired, control-based visual and olfactory data for the detection of an elusive target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Tuan A.; Duong, Nghi; Le, Duong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present an integration technique using a bio-inspired, control-based visual and olfactory receptor system to search for elusive targets in practical environments where the targets cannot be seen obviously by either sensory data. Bio-inspired Visual System is based on a modeling of extended visual pathway which consists of saccadic eye movements and visual pathway (vertebrate retina, lateral geniculate nucleus and visual cortex) to enable powerful target detections of noisy, partial, incomplete visual data. Olfactory receptor algorithm, namely spatial invariant independent component analysis, that was developed based on data of old factory receptor-electronic nose (enose) of Caltech, is adopted to enable the odorant target detection in an unknown environment. The integration of two systems is a vital approach and sets up a cornerstone for effective and low-cost of miniaturized UAVs or fly robots for future DOD and NASA missions, as well as for security systems in Internet of Things environments.

  1. Bioinspirations: cell-inspired small-scale systems for enabling studies in experimental biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Ruder, Warren C; Leduc, Philip R

    2011-07-01

    Biomechanical forces govern the behaviors of organisms and their environment and examining these behaviors to understand the underlying phenomena is an important challenge. One experimental approach for probing these interactions between organisms and their biomechanical environment uses biologically-inspired, artificial surrogates that reproduce organic mechanical systems. For the case of complex, multicellular organisms, robot surrogates have been particularly effective, such as in the analysis of the fins of fish and insects' wings. This biologically-inspired approach is also exciting when examining cell-scale responses as multicellular organisms' behavior is directly influenced by the integrated interactions of smaller-scale components (i.e., cells). In this review, we introduce the burgeoning field of engineering of artificial cells, which focuses on developing cell-scale entities replicating cellular behaviors. We describe both a bottom-up approach to constructing artificial cells, using molecular components to directly assemble artificial cells, as well as a top-down approach, in which living cells are encapsulated in a single entity whose behavior is determined by its constituent members. In particular, we discuss the potential role of these artificial cells as implantable controllers, designed to alter the mechanical behavior of a host organism. Eventually, artificial cells designed to function as small-scale controllers may help alter organisms' phenotypes.

  2. A bio-inspired aquatic flow sensor using an artificial cell membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Preston A.; Garrison, Kevin; Leo, Donald J.; Sarles, Stephen A.

    2012-04-01

    Receptors known as hair cells give many animals this ability to sense a wide range of stimuli, such as sound, orientation, vibration, and flow. Previous researchers have mimicked natural hair cells by building electromechanical sensor systems that produce an electric response due to the bending of artificial hairs. Inspired by the roles of sensory hairs in fish, this work builds on previous research by investigating the flow dependent electrical response of a 'skin'-encapsulated artificial hair cell in an aqueous flow. This study presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a flow sensor that will help close the loop between the sensing mechanisms and control strategies that aquatic organisms employ for functions such as locomotion regulation, prey capture, and particulate capture. The system is fabricated with a durable, artificial bilayer that forms at the interface between lipid-encased aqueous volumes contained in a flexible encapsulated polyurethane substrate. Flow experiments are conducted by placing the bio-inspired sensor in a flow chamber and subjecting it to pulse-like flows. Specifically, through temporal responses of the measured current and power spectral density (PSD) analysis, our results show that the amplitude and frequency of the current response are related to the flow over the hair. This preliminary study demonstrates that the encapsulated artificial hair cell flow sensor is capable of sensing changes in flow through a mechanoelectrical response and that its sensing capabilities may be altered by varying its surface morphology.

  3. Network Community Detection based on the Physarum-inspired Computational Framework.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao; Liang, Mingxin; Li, Xianghua; Zhang, Zili; Wang, Zhen; Zhou, Zhili

    2016-12-13

    Community detection is a crucial and essential problem in the structure analytics of complex networks, which can help us understand and predict the characteristics and functions of complex networks. Many methods, ranging from the optimization-based algorithms to the heuristic-based algorithms, have been proposed for solving such a problem. Due to the inherent complexity of identifying network structure, how to design an effective algorithm with a higher accuracy and a lower computational cost still remains an open problem. Inspired by the computational capability and positive feedback mechanism in the wake of foraging process of Physarum, which is a large amoeba-like cell consisting of a dendritic network of tube-like pseudopodia, a general Physarum-based computational framework for community detection is proposed in this paper. Based on the proposed framework, the inter-community edges can be identified from the intra-community edges in a network and the positive feedback of solving process in an algorithm can be further enhanced, which are used to improve the efficiency of original optimization-based and heuristic-based community detection algorithms, respectively. Some typical algorithms (e.g., genetic algorithm, ant colony optimization algorithm, and Markov clustering algorithm) and real-world datasets have been used to estimate the efficiency of our proposed computational framework. Experiments show that the algorithms optimized by Physarum-inspired computational framework perform better than the original ones, in terms of accuracy and computational cost. Moreover, a computational complexity analysis verifies the scalability of our framework.

  4. Confined Swimming of Bio-Inspired Magnetic Microswimmers in Rectangular Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temel, Fatma Zeynep; Yesilyurt, Serhat

    2014-11-01

    Bio-inspired microswimmers have great potential for medical procedures in conduits and vessels inside the body; hence, controlled swimming in confined spaces needs to be well understood. In this study, analysis of swimming modes of a bio-inspired microswimmer in a rectangular channel at low Reynolds number is performed with experimental and computational studies. A left-handed magnetic helical swimmer (MHS), having 0.5 mm diameter and 2 mm length, is used in experiments by utilizing rotating magnetic field actuation obtained by electromagnetic coil pairs. Three motion modes are observed in experiments depending on the rotation frequency: (i) lateral motion under the effect of gravity and surface traction at low frequencies, (ii) lateral motion under the effect of gravity and fluid forces at transition frequencies, and (iii) circular motion under the effect of fluid forces at high frequencies. Translational and angular velocities of the MHS are calculated using CFD simulations to investigate the motion modes. In addition, induced flow fields for different radial positions of the MHS are studied. Results demonstrate the significance of rotation frequency, flow fields and pressure distribution on swimming modes and behaviour of the MHS inside rectangular channels.

  5. Wide-frequency-bandwidth whisker-inspired MEMS vector hydrophone encapsulated with parylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Renxin; Liu, Yuan; Bai, Bing; Guo, Nan; Guo, Jing; Wang, Xubo; Liu, Mengran; Zhang, Guojun; Zhang, Binzhen; Xue, Chenyang; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Wendong

    2016-02-01

    In order to eliminate polyurethane hat resonance frequency intervention and reduce fluid influence, a whisker-inspired MEMS vector hydrophone (WIVH) encapsulated with parylene is proposed to broaden frequency bandwidth and improve sensitivity-frequency response performance, compared to the lateral line-inspired MEMS vector hydrophone (LLIVH). Parylene that is conformally deposited on the device surface replaces polyurethane encapsulating hat and silicone oil existing in current encapsulation technology. The main advantage of WIVH as demonstrated by modelling and characterization is the enhanced bandwidth response, which is the critical factor in hydrophone design. Acoustic pressure gradient properties of the WIVH and LLIVH are analyzed to demonstrate the influence of the polyurethane hat. The interactions of the parylene membrane with fluid and the influences on vibrating performance are also investigated. Resonance measurement and sensitivity-frequency response analysis demonstrate the frequency bandwidth of the WIVH could be extended twice compared to that of the LLIVH. Moreover, the WIVH is proved to act as a typical pressure gradient hydrophone with an increment of 6 dB per octave in the linear region.

  6. Measuring the dimensionality of compact extra dimensions with inspiral gravitational waves from black-hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Li-E.; Zhao, Shu Hong; Xu, Peng

    2016-12-01

    Gravitational waves from coalescing black-hole binaries (BHBs) were recently observed by the advanced LIGO detectors. Based on the perturbation analysis, for general Kaluza-Klein theories with compact extra dimensions, we find a 1st-order post-Newtonian correction to the inspiral gravitational waveforms of black-hole binaries, that comes from the variations of the volume of the extra dimensions in near source zones. Such correction depends on a new parameter χ=\\frac{n}{2+n} with n the dimensionality of the extra space and it is irrelevant to the particular choice of the topology of the extra space. For the ideal case of a black-hole binary system following nearly circular orbital motion with almost equal or intermediate mass ratio, such higher-dimensional corrections to the chirping amplitude are worked out. Giving the power of tracing inspiral waves from coalescing massive BHBs with high signal-to-noise ratios, the planned space-borne antennas such as the eLISA and DECIGO may give us a measurement of the parameter χ in the near future and may serve us as new probes in the searching for the evidence of the hidden compact dimensions.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of gum acacia inspired silica hybrid xerogels for mercury(II) adsorption.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vandana; Singh, Somit Kumar

    2011-04-01

    In a sol-gel process, gum acacia inspired silica xerogels have been synthesized from tetraethylorthosilicate. Besides showing photoluminescence under ultraviolet excitation, the hybrid xerogels were very efficient in capturing mercury(II) from synthetic solution. To synthesize the optimum sample (in terms of Hg(II) uptake), different ratios of H(2)O:TEOS:EtOH were taken at fixed GA and catalyst concentrations where 4:1:1 ratio was found to be most favorable. Calcination in air further enhanced the mercury binding capacity of this sample. Optimum sample (H4) was obtained on calcination of the gel at 600°C. The hybrids have been structurally characterized using Infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermo gravimetric analysis, photoluminescence spectroscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis. In a preliminary batch adsorption experiment, H4 was evaluated to be highly efficient in the removal Hg(II) from synthetic aqueous solution.

  8. Scaffolding the "Scaffolding" Metaphor: From Inspiration to a Practical Tool for Kindergarten Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshach, Haim; Dor-Ziderman, Yair; Arbel, Yael

    2011-10-01

    The present research aims shifting `scaffolding' from an inspiring metaphor to a practical tool to be used by kindergarten teachers when conducting scientific activities. It identifies scaffolding strategies that three experienced kindergarten teachers, ones acknowledged as excelling in science teaching, implicitly used when conducting science activities. For this end 20 whole-day observations were recorded in each of the three kindergartens and transcribed verbatim. The scaffolding strategies were identified through an inductive analysis performed on the observations and through the relevant literature. The strategies yielded from the analysis were grouped into affective and cognitive domains, each divided into categories and subcategories. The complete set of identified strategies was termed the scaffolding scheme. The scaffolding scheme can assist kindergarten and primary school teachers, as well as researchers, in analyzing scientific activities conducted in the kindergarten and judging how efficient the employed strategies are, what strategies to eliminate, and what other strategies might be needed.

  9. Binary Black Hole Late Inspiral: Simulations for Gravitational Wave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.; vanMeter, James R.; Centrella, Joan; Choi, Dae-Il; Kelly, Bernard J.; Koppitz, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Coalescing binary black hole mergers are expected to be the strongest gravitational wave sources for ground-based interferometers, such as the LIGO, VIRGO, and GEO600, as well as the spacebased interferometer LISA. Until recently it has been impossible to reliably derive the predictions of General Relativity for the final merger stage, which takes place in the strong-field regime. Recent progress in numerical relativity simulations is, however, revolutionizing our understanding of these systems. We examine here the specific case of merging equal-mass Schwarzschild black holes in detail, presenting new simulations in which the black holes start in the late inspiral stage on orbits with very low eccentricity and evolve for approximately 1200M through approximately 7 orbits before merging. We study the accuracy and consistency of our simulations and the resulting gravitational waveforms, which encompass approximately 14 cycles before merger, and highlight the importance of using frequency (rather than time) to set the physical reference when comparing models. Matching our results to PN calculations for the earlier parts of the inspiral provides a combined waveform with less than half a cycle of accumulated phase error through the entire coalescence. Using this waveform, we calculate signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for iLIGO, adLIGO, and LISA, highlighting the contributions from the late-inspiral and merger-ringdown parts of the waveform which can now be simulated numerically. Contour plots of SNR as a function of z and M show that adLIGO can achieve SNR 2 10 for some IMBBHs out to z approximately equals 1, and that LISA can see MBBHs in the range 3 x 10(exp 4) approximately < M/Mo approximately < 10(exp 7) at SNR > 100 out to the earliest epochs of structure formation at z > 15.

  10. Modeling airway resistance dynamics after tidal and deep inspirations.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, C William; Salome, Cheryl M; Berend, Norbert; King, Gregory G

    2004-11-01

    Using the forced oscillation technique, we tracked airway resistance continuously during quiet breathing (QB) and deep inspiration (DI), thus observing fluctuations in resistance that may reflect mechanisms of airway stretch and renarrowing. After DI, however, the resistance may be depressed for a period not related to volume changes. We hypothesized that this gradual increase in resistance after DI-induced dilation was determined by a simple time constant. Furthermore, to the extent that this effect reflects dynamic characteristics of airway renarrowing, the resistance change after each tidal inspiration should also be constrained by this temporal limit. A model relating resistance fluctuations to the breathing pattern, including both instantaneous and delayed effects, was developed and applied to data from 14 nonasthmatic and 17 asthmatic subjects (forced expiratory volume in 1 s = 103 +/- 13 and 83 +/- 12%, respectively, means +/- SD) after methacholine challenge (dose 145 +/- 80 and 3.0 +/- 3.4 micromol, respectively) that resulted in respective forced expiratory volume in 1 s reductions of 16 +/- 7 and 24 +/- 6% from baseline. Resistance was measured continuously for 1 min of QB, a DI, followed by a further minute of QB. Resistance values at end expiration (Ree) and end inspiration were calculated. We found that the sequence of Ree after DI was best modeled by a power-law function of time rather than an exponential decay (r2 = 0.82 +/- 0.18 compared with 0.63 +/- 0.16; P < 0.01). Furthermore, the coefficient characterizing this "renarrowing function" was close to equal to the coefficient characterizing the equivalent function of resistance change between each resistance value at end inpiration and subsequent Ree during QB, particularly in the nonasthmatic subjects for whom the intraclass correlation was 0.66. This suggests that the same time-dependent factors determine renarrowing after both large and small breaths.

  11. Modulating material interfaces through biologically-inspired intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazar, Melis; Steward, Robert L.; Chang, Chia-Jung; Orndoff, Cynthia J.; Zeng, Yukai; Ho, Mon-Shu; LeDuc, Philip R.; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2011-12-01

    This letter describes the control of molecular filament organization through biologically inspired intermediates, enabling us to obtain large-area regular nanopatterns. We first studied cultured single filamentous actins on an unmodified glass surface (hydrophilic surface) and introduced myosin-II to modify the control. We then utilized an inorganic salt crystallization approach on the response of these two proteins, actin filament and myosin-II, to analyze the resultant spatially localized patterns. Through the utilization of myosin-II and the salt crystallization approach, we were able to induce the filament orientation of 63°; while without myosin-II, we induced an orientation of 90°.

  12. Deep inspiration increases the absorption of inhaled sodium cromoglycate.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, R; Fowler, C; Simpson, S F; Renwick, A G; Holgate, S T

    1989-01-01

    The plasma concentrations of sodium cromoglycate were measured for 4 h following a single dose of 20 mg given by inhalation to six normal volunteers. A series of forced expiratory manoeuvres was performed 2 h after the dose, which resulted in a rapid and marked increase in the plasma concentrations of the drug. A similar increase was found in three volunteers who undertook a single deep inspiration at 4 h. These data indicate that the absorption of cromoglycate from the airways can be affected by manoeuvres used to assess lung function. PMID:2503020

  13. First controlled vertical flight of a biologically inspired microrobot.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Arancibia, Néstor O; Ma, Kevin Y; Galloway, Kevin C; Greenberg, Jack D; Wood, Robert J

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we present experimental results on altitude control of a flying microrobot. The problem is approached in two stages. In the first stage, system identification of two relevant subsystems composing the microrobot is performed, using a static flapping experimental setup. In the second stage, the information gathered through the static flapping experiments is employed to design the controller used in vertical flight. The design of the proposed controller relies on the idea of treating an exciting signal as a subsystem of the microrobot. The methods and results presented here are a key step toward achieving total autonomy of bio-inspired flying microrobots.

  14. Demonstration of an infrared microcamera inspired by Xenos peckii vision.

    PubMed

    Druart, Guillaume; Guérineau, Nicolas; Haïdar, Riad; Thétas, Sophie; Taboury, Jean; Rommeluère, Sylvain; Primot, Jérôme; Fendler, Manuel

    2009-06-20

    We present an original and compact optical system inspired by the unusual eyes of a Strepsipteran insect called Xenos peckii. It is designed for a field of view of 30 degrees and is composed of multiple telescopes. An array of prisms of various angles is placed in front of these telescopes in order to set a different field of view for each channel. This type of camera operates in the [3-5 microm] spectral bandwidth and is entirely integrated in a Dewar in order to maximize its compactness. Experimental images are presented to validate this design.

  15. Signal Processing For Chemical Sensing: Statistics or Biological Inspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco, Santiago

    2011-09-01

    Current analytical instrumentation and continuous sensing can provide huge amounts of data. Automatic signal processing and information evaluation is needed to overcome drowning in data. Today, statistical techniques are typically used to analyse and extract information from continuous signals. However, it is very interesting to note that biology (insects and vertebrates) has found alternative solutions for chemical sensing and information processing. This is a brief introduction to the developments in the European Project: Bio-ICT NEUROCHEM: Biologically Inspired Computation for Chemical Sensing (grant no. 216916) Fp7 project devoted to biomimetic olfactory systems.

  16. Biologically inspired load balancing mechanism in neocortical competitive learning

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Amir; Peled, Noam; Siegelmann, Hava T.

    2014-01-01

    A unique delayed self-inhibitory pathway mediated by layer 5 Martinotti Cells was studied in a biologically inspired neural network simulation. Inclusion of this pathway along with layer 5 basket cell lateral inhibition caused balanced competitive learning, which led to the formation of neuronal clusters as were indeed reported in the same region. Martinotti pathway proves to act as a learning “conscience,” causing overly successful regions in the network to restrict themselves and let others fire. It thus spreads connectivity more evenly throughout the net and solves the “dead unit” problem of clustering algorithms in a local and biologically plausible manner. PMID:24653679

  17. Surface singularities in Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld gravity.

    PubMed

    Pani, Paolo; Sotiriou, Thomas P

    2012-12-21

    Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld gravity was recently proposed as an alternative to general relativity that offers a resolution of spacetime singularities. The theory differs from Einstein's gravity only inside matter due to nondynamical degrees of freedom, and it is compatible with all current observations. We show that the theory is reminiscent of Palatini f(R) gravity and that it shares the same pathologies, such as curvature singularities at the surface of polytropic stars and unacceptable Newtonian limit. This casts serious doubt on its viability.

  18. Naturally Inspired Firefly Controller For Stabilization Of Double Inverted Pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srikanth, Kavirayani; Nagesh, Gundavarapu

    2015-12-01

    A double inverted pendulum plant as an established model that is analyzed as part of this work was tested under the influence of time delay, where the controller was fine tuned using a firefly algorithm taking into considering the fitness function of variation of the cart position and to minimize the cart position displacement and still stabilize it effectively. The naturally inspired algorithm which imitates the fireflies definitely is an energy efficient method owing to the inherent logic of the way the fireflies respond collectively and has shown that critical time delays makes the system healthy.

  19. A plane mirror experiment inspired by a comic strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lúcio Prados Ribeiro, Jair

    2016-01-01

    A comic strip about a plane mirror was used in a high school optics test, and it was perceived that a large portion of the students believed that the mirror should be larger than the object so the virtual image could be entirely visible. Inspired on the comic strip, an experimental demonstration with flat mirrors was developed, in order to readdress this topic learning. Students were encouraged to create their own investigation of the phenomenon with a simple instrumental apparatus and also suggest different experimental approaches.

  20. Mussel-Inspired Surface Chemistry for Multifunctional Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Haeshin; Dellatore, Shara M.; Miller, William M.; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2007-10-01

    We report a method to form multifunctional polymer coatings through simple dip-coating of objects in an aqueous solution of dopamine. Inspired by the composition of adhesive proteins in mussels, we used dopamine self-polymerization to form thin, surface-adherent polydopamine films onto a wide range of inorganic and organic materials, including noble metals, oxides, polymers, semiconductors, and ceramics. Secondary reactions can be used to create a variety of ad-layers, including self-assembled monolayers through deposition of long-chain molecular building blocks, metal films by electroless metallization, and bioinert and bioactive surfaces via grafting of macromolecules.

  1. Towards a fish-inspired underwater hearing device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, Tony C. H.; Lo, Ho Cheong; Montgomery, John; Anderson, Iain

    2014-03-01

    We draw inspiration from the fish "hearing" organ, the otolith, to create a portable engineering device that can augment a human diver's ability to hear underwater. The otolith is an inertial displacement sensor, consisting of a dense bony mass that acts as a reference to the surrounding sensory hair cells. The challenges in adapting the otolith into a hearing device are discussed. For our proposed sensor, we have explored the use of capacitive sensing for measuring displacement. A proof of concept prototype and a finite element model of the sensor are presented.

  2. Biologically inspired robots elicit a robust fear response in zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladu, Fabrizio; Bartolini, Tiziana; Panitz, Sarah G.; Butail, Sachit; Macrı, Simone; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the behavioral response of zebrafish to three fear-evoking stimuli. In a binary choice test, zebrafish are exposed to a live allopatric predator, a biologically-inspired robot, and a computer-animated image of the live predator. A target tracking algorithm is developed to score zebrafish behavior. Unlike computer-animated images, the robotic and live predator elicit a robust avoidance response. Importantly, the robotic stimulus elicits more consistent inter-individual responses than the live predator. Results from this effort are expected to aid in hypothesis-driven studies on zebrafish fear response, by offering a valuable approach to maximize data-throughput and minimize animal subjects.

  3. Increasing Digging Efficiency Using Two Biologically-Inspired Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendell, Dawn; Hosoi, Peko

    2011-03-01

    The mechanics of digging through granular materials often neglect the inhomogeneities present in granular packings. This work reports on two biologically-inspired mechanisms that aim to increase the efficiency of digging through granular materials by taking advantage of the variety of forces found in granular packings. First, flexible diggers demonstrate that a slight increase in flexibility can lead to more efficient digging using a completely passive mechanism. Secondly, a digger with an actuated tip is investigated to find optimum parameters for energy efficient digging with actuated mechanisms. This work is funded by Schlumberger-Doll Research.

  4. Artificial helical microswimmers with mastigoneme-inspired appendages

    PubMed Central

    Tottori, Soichiro; Nelson, Bradley J.

    2013-01-01

    A smooth flagellum moves in the opposite direction of the propagation of flagellar waves. Conversely, a flagellum covered with appendages perpendicular to the main flagellum, called mastigonemes, moves in the same direction as the propagation of flagellar waves. Inspired by mastigoneme structures in nature, we report the reversal of the swimming direction of magnetically actuated artificial helical microswimmers. The main flagella and mastigonemes of these microswimmers are fabricated together using three-dimensional lithography and electron beam evaporation of ferromagnetic thin films. The results show that the swimming speed and direction can be controlled by changing the length/spacing ratio of the mastigonemes. PMID:24396533

  5. Bio-inspired robotic legs drive viscous recirculating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Daisuke; Hayashi, Rintaro

    2015-11-01

    Crustaceans actuate multiple legs in a well-coordinated sequence to generate suitable flow for feeding and swimming. Inspired by tiny crustacean larvae operating at low Reynolds number, we study a scaled-up model in which slender rods oscillate independently in a bath of glycerol. Experiments reveal qualitatively different flow patterns depending on the phase and orientation of actuated rods. The observations are analyzed in the framework of slender-body theory for Stokes flow. This study shows that simple oscillatory motion of multiple legs can produce complex recirculating flows, with potential applications for mixing and pumping.

  6. Bio-inspired self-organizing cellular systems.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, André; Mange, Daniel; Rossier, Joël; Vannel, Fabien

    2008-01-01

    Bio-inspiration borrows three properties characteristic of living organisms: multicellular architecture, cellular division, and cellular differentiation. Implemented in silicon according to these properties, our self-organizing systems are able to grow, to self-replicate, and to self-repair. The growth and branching processes, performed by the so-called Tom Thumb algorithm, lead thus to the configuration and cloning mechanisms of the systems. The repair processes allow its cicatrization and regeneration mechanisms. The cellular design and hardware implementation of these mechanisms constitute the core of this paper.

  7. Bio-inspired Iron Catalysts for Hydrocarbon Oxidations

    SciTech Connect

    Que, Jr., Lawrence

    2016-03-22

    Stereoselective oxidation of C–H and C=C bonds are catalyzed by nonheme iron enzymes. Inspired by these bioinorganic systems, our group has been exploring the use of nonheme iron complexes as catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons using H2O2 as an environmentally friendly and atom-efficient oxidant in order to gain mechanistic insights into these novel transformations. In particular, we have focused on clarifying the nature of the high-valent iron oxidants likely to be involved in these transformations.

  8. Bio-inspired synthetic receptor molecules towards mimicry of vancomycin.

    PubMed

    Monnee, M C; Brouwer, A J; Verbeek, L M; van Wageningen, A M; Liskamp, R M

    2001-06-18

    A 512-member library of bio-inspired synthetic receptor molecules was prepared featuring a triazacyclophane scaffold. The purpose of this scaffold was to orient three (identical) peptide 'binding arms' in order to mimic an antibiotic binding cavity as is present in the vancomycin antibiotics. The library was screened with D-Ala-D-Ala and D-Ala-D-Lac containing ligands, which are present in the cell wall precursors of pathogenic bacteria. Screening and validation led to identification of a synthetic receptor capable of binding these ligands.

  9. Mobile robots for localizing gas emission sources on landfill sites: is bio-inspiration the way to go?

    PubMed

    Hernandez Bennetts, Victor; Lilienthal, Achim J; Neumann, Patrick P; Trincavelli, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Roboticists often take inspiration from animals for designing sensors, actuators, or algorithms that control the behavior of robots. Bio-inspiration is motivated with the uncanny ability of animals to solve complex tasks like recognizing and manipulating objects, walking on uneven terrains, or navigating to the source of an odor plume. In particular the task of tracking an odor plume up to its source has nearly exclusively been addressed using biologically inspired algorithms and robots have been developed, for example, to mimic the behavior of moths, dung beetles, or lobsters. In this paper we argue that biomimetic approaches to gas source localization are of limited use, primarily because animals differ fundamentally in their sensing and actuation capabilities from state-of-the-art gas-sensitive mobile robots. To support our claim, we compare actuation and chemical sensing available to mobile robots to the corresponding capabilities of moths. We further characterize airflow and chemosensor measurements obtained with three different robot platforms (two wheeled robots and one flying micro-drone) in four prototypical environments and show that the assumption of a constant and unidirectional airflow, which is the basis of many gas source localization approaches, is usually far from being valid. This analysis should help to identify how underlying principles, which govern the gas source tracking behavior of animals, can be usefully "translated" into gas source localization approaches that fully take into account the capabilities of mobile robots. We also describe the requirements for a reference application, monitoring of gas emissions at landfill sites with mobile robots, and discuss an engineered gas source localization approach based on statistics as an alternative to biologically inspired algorithms.

  10. Limited Bandwidth Recognition of Collective Behaviors in Bio-Inspired Swarms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    Limited Bandwidth Recognition of Collective Behaviors in Bio - Inspired Swarms Daniel S. Brown AFRL Information Directorate 26 Electronic Parkway Rome...that impedes scalable human interaction with large bio - inspired robot swarms, namely, how do you know what the swarm is doing if you can’t ob- serve...through limited samples from a small subset of agents. We present a novel framework for classifying the collective behavior of a bio - inspired robot

  11. Synthesis and Evaluation of a 2,11-Cembranoid-Inspired Library.

    PubMed

    Welford, Amanda J; Caldwell, John J; Liu, Manjuan; Richards, Meirion; Brown, Nathan; Lomas, Cara; Tizzard, Graham J; Pitak, Mateusz B; Coles, Simon J; Eccles, Suzanne A; Raynaud, Florence I; Collins, Ian

    2016-04-11

    The 2,11-cembranoid family of natural products has been used as inspiration for the synthesis of a structurally simplified, functionally diverse library of octahydroisobenzofuran-based compounds designed to augment a typical medicinal chemistry library screen. Ring-closing metathesis, lactonisation and SmI2 -mediated methods were exemplified and applied to the installation of a third ring to mimic the nine-membered ring of the 2,11-cembranoids. The library was assessed for aqueous solubility and permeability, with a chemical-space analysis performed for comparison to the family of cembranoid natural products and a sample set of a screening library. Preliminary investigations in cancer cells showed that the simpler scaffolds could recapitulate the reported anti-migratory activity of the natural products.

  12. Hořava–Lifshitz gravity inspired Bianchi-II cosmology and the mixmaster universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giani, Leonardo; Kamenshchik, Alexander Y.

    2017-04-01

    We study different aspects of the Hořava-Lifshitz inspired Bianchi-II cosmology and its relations with the mixmaster universe model. First, we present exact solutions for a toy model, where only the cubic in spatial curvature terms are present in the action; then we briefly discuss some exotic singularities, which can appear in this toy model. We study also the toy model where only the quadratic in spatial curvature terms are present in the action. We establish relations between our results and those obtained by using the Hamiltonian formalism. Finally, we apply the results obtained by studying Bianchi-II cosmology to describe the evolution of the mixmaster universe in terms of the Belinsky–Khalatnikov–Lifshitz formalism. Generally, our analysis gives some arguments in favour of the existence of the oscillatory approach to the singularity in a universe governed by the Hořava–Lifshitz type gravity.

  13. A bio-inspired methodology of identifying influential nodes in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Gao, Cai; Lan, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoge; Deng, Yong

    2013-01-01

    How to identify influential nodes is a key issue in complex networks. The degree centrality is simple, but is incapable to reflect the global characteristics of networks. Betweenness centrality and closeness centrality do not consider the location of nodes in the networks, and semi-local centrality, leaderRank and pageRank approaches can be only applied in unweighted networks. In this paper, a bio-inspired centrality measure model is proposed, which combines the Physarum centrality with the K-shell index obtained by K-shell decomposition analysis, to identify influential nodes in weighted networks. Then, we use the Susceptible-Infected (SI) model to evaluate the performance. Examples and applications are given to demonstrate the adaptivity and efficiency of the proposed method. In addition, the results are compared with existing methods.

  14. A principled approach to bio-inspired design of legged locomotion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koditschek, Daniel E.; Full, Robert J.; Buehler, Martin

    2004-09-01

    Casual daily observation provides convincing evidence that animals offer a wealth of inspiration for legged machines. However the lessons of animal motor science are largely written in the grammar of materials properties, and their meaning hidden by the complex interaction of multiply layered functional hierarchies. This paper will review some of the lessons of biological running that we have been able to articulate and begin to prescribe rigorously as manifest in the hexapod robot RHex. Although there is a long way to go before our mathematical analysis catches up with the full range of behaviors this remarkable machine exhibits, we are nevertheless able to make increasingly precise statements about certain control principles and the role they may play in RHex's performance. This ongoing research effort serves as a test case to underscore the huge and still largely untapped potential for mining bioinspiration in legged locomotion systems.

  15. Synthesis and Evaluation of a 2,11‐Cembranoid‐Inspired Library

    PubMed Central

    Welford, Amanda J; Liu, Manjuan; Richards, Meirion; Brown, Nathan; Lomas, Cara; Tizzard, Graham J.; Pitak, Mateusz B.; Coles, Simon J.; Eccles, Suzanne A.; Raynaud, Florence I.; Collins, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The 2,11‐cembranoid family of natural products has been used as inspiration for the synthesis of a structurally simplified, functionally diverse library of octahydroisobenzofuran‐based compounds designed to augment a typical medicinal chemistry library screen. Ring‐closing metathesis, lactonisation and SmI2‐mediated methods were exemplified and applied to the installation of a third ring to mimic the nine‐membered ring of the 2,11‐cembranoids. The library was assessed for aqueous solubility and permeability, with a chemical‐space analysis performed for comparison to the family of cembranoid natural products and a sample set of a screening library. Preliminary investigations in cancer cells showed that the simpler scaffolds could recapitulate the reported anti‐migratory activity of the natural products. PMID:26929153

  16. Merger of Ayurveda and Tissue Culture-Based Functional Genomics: Inspirations from Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Deocaris, Custer C; Widodo, Nashi; Wadhwa, Renu; Kaul, Sunil C

    2008-01-01

    Ayurveda is one of the ancient systems of health care of Indian origin. Roughly translated into "Knowledge of life", it is based on the use of natural herbs and herb products for therapeutic measures to boost physical, mental, social and spiritual harmony and improve quality of life. Although sheltered with long history and high trust, ayurveda principles have not entered laboratories and only a handful of studies have identified pure components and molecular pathways for its life-enhancing effects. In the post-genomic era, genome-wide functional screenings for targets for diseases is the most recent and practical approach. We illustrate here the merger of ayurveda and functional genomics in a systems biology scenario that reveals the pathway analysis of crude and active components and inspire ayurveda practice for health benefits, disease prevention and therapeutics. PMID:18348714

  17. Bio-Inspired Cyber Security for Smart Grid Deployments

    SciTech Connect

    McKinnon, Archibald D.; Thompson, Seth R.; Doroshchuk, Ruslan A.; Fink, Glenn A.; Fulp, Errin W.

    2013-05-01

    mart grid technologies are transforming the electric power grid into a grid with bi-directional flows of both power and information. Operating millions of new smart meters and smart appliances will significantly impact electric distribution systems resulting in greater efficiency. However, the scale of the grid and the new types of information transmitted will potentially introduce several security risks that cannot be addressed by traditional, centralized security techniques. We propose a new bio-inspired cyber security approach. Social insects, such as ants and bees, have developed complex-adaptive systems that emerge from the collective application of simple, light-weight behaviors. The Digital Ants framework is a bio-inspired framework that uses mobile light-weight agents. Sensors within the framework use digital pheromones to communicate with each other and to alert each other of possible cyber security issues. All communication and coordination is both localized and decentralized thereby allowing the framework to scale across the large numbers of devices that will exist in the smart grid. Furthermore, the sensors are light-weight and therefore suitable for implementation on devices with limited computational resources. This paper will provide a brief overview of the Digital Ants framework and then present results from test bed-based demonstrations that show that Digital Ants can identify a cyber attack scenario against smart meter deployments.

  18. Arrival times of gravitational radiation peaks for binary inspiral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Richard H.; Khanna, Gaurav

    2016-11-01

    Modeling of gravitational waves (GWs) from binary black hole inspiral brings together early post-Newtonian waveforms and late quasinormal ringing waveforms. Attempts to bridge the two limits without recourse to numerical relativity involve predicting the time of the peak GW amplitude. This prediction will require solving the question of why the peak of the "source," i.e., the peak of the binary angular velocity, does not correspond to the peak of the GW amplitude. We show here that this offset can be understood as due to the existence of two distinct components of the radiation: the "direct" radiation analogous to that in flat spacetime and "scattered" radiation associated with curved spacetime. The time dependence of these two components and of their relative phases determines the location of the peak amplitude. We use a highly simplified model to clarify the two-component nature of the source, then demonstrate that the explanation is valid also for an extreme mass-ratio binary inspiral.

  19. Progress in Insect-Inspired Optical Navigation Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita; Chahl, Javaan; Zometzer, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Progress has been made in continuing efforts to develop optical flight-control and navigation sensors for miniature robotic aircraft. The designs of these sensors are inspired by the designs and functions of the vision systems and brains of insects. Two types of sensors of particular interest are polarization compasses and ocellar horizon sensors. The basic principle of polarization compasses was described (but without using the term "polarization compass") in "Insect-Inspired Flight Control for Small Flying Robots" (NPO-30545), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 1 (January 2005), page 61. To recapitulate: Bees use sky polarization patterns in ultraviolet (UV) light, caused by Rayleigh scattering of sunlight by atmospheric gas molecules, as direction references relative to the apparent position of the Sun. A robotic direction-finding technique based on this concept would be more robust in comparison with a technique based on the direction to the visible Sun because the UV polarization pattern is distributed across the entire sky and, hence, is redundant and can be extrapolated from a small region of clear sky in an elsewhere cloudy sky that hides the Sun.

  20. Insect-Inspired Optical-Flow Navigation Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita; Morookian, John M.; Chahl, Javan; Soccol, Dean; Hines, Butler; Zornetzer, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Integrated circuits that exploit optical flow to sense motions of computer mice on or near surfaces ( optical mouse chips ) are used as navigation sensors in a class of small flying robots now undergoing development for potential use in such applications as exploration, search, and surveillance. The basic principles of these robots were described briefly in Insect-Inspired Flight Control for Small Flying Robots (NPO-30545), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 1 (January 2005), page 61. To recapitulate from the cited prior article: The concept of optical flow can be defined, loosely, as the use of texture in images as a source of motion cues. The flight-control and navigation systems of these robots are inspired largely by the designs and functions of the vision systems and brains of insects, which have been demonstrated to utilize optical flow (as detected by their eyes and brains) resulting from their own motions in the environment. Optical flow has been shown to be very effective as a means of avoiding obstacles and controlling speeds and altitudes in robotic navigation. Prior systems used in experiments on navigating by means of optical flow have involved the use of panoramic optics, high-resolution image sensors, and programmable imagedata- processing computers.

  1. Simulating binary inspirals in a corotating spherical coordinate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Travis Marshall

    The gravitational waves produced by the inspiral and merger of two black holes are expected to be the first detected by the newly constructed gravitational wave observatories. Accurate theoretical models that describe the generation and shape of these gravitational waves need to be constructed. These theoretical waveforms will aid in the detection of astrophysical wave sources, and will allow us to test general relativity in the strong field regime. Numerical relativity is the leading candidate for constructing accurate waveforms, and in this thesis we develop methods to help advance the field. In particular we use a corotating spherical coordinate system to simulate the evolution of a compact binary system as it produces gravitational radiation. We combine this method with both the Weak Radiation Reaction and Hydro-without- Hydro approximations to produce stable dynamical evolutions. We also utilize Nordström's conformally flat theory of gravitation as a relativistic laboratory during the development process. Additionally we perform semi-analytic calculations to determine the approximate way in which binaries decay in Nordström's theory. We find an excellent agreement between our semi-analytic calculations and the orbital evolutions produced by the code, and thus conclude that these methods form a solid basis for simulating binary inspirals and the gravitational waves they produce in general relativity.

  2. Multiple hindered rotators in a gyroscope-inspired tribenzylamine hemicryptophane.

    PubMed

    Khan, Najat S; Perez-Aguilar, Jose Manuel; Kaufmann, Tara; Hill, P Aru; Taratula, Olena; Lee, One-Sun; Carroll, Patrick J; Saven, Jeffery G; Dmochowski, Ivan J

    2011-03-04

    A gyroscope-inspired tribenzylamine hemicryptophane provides a vehicle for exploring the structure and properties of multiple p-phenylene rotators within one molecule. The hemicryptophane was synthesized in three steps in good overall yield using mild conditions. Three rotator-forming linkers were cyclized to form a rigid cyclotriveratrylene (CTV) stator framework, which was then closed with an amine. The gyroscope-like molecule was characterized by (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, and the structure was solved by X-ray crystallography. The rigidity of the two-component CTV-trismethylamine stator was investigated by (1)H variable-temperature (VT) NMR experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. These techniques identified gyration of the three p-phenylene rotators on the millisecond time scale at -93 °C, with more dynamic but still hindered motion at room temperature (27 °C). The activation energy for the p-phenylene rotation was determined to be ~10 kcal mol(-1). Due to the propeller arrangement of the p-phenylenes, their rotation is hindered but not strongly correlated. The compact size, simple synthetic route, and molecular motions of this gyroscope-inspired tribenzylamine hemicryptophane make it an attractive starting point for controlling the direction and coupling of rotators within molecular systems.

  3. Dry friction of microstructured polymer surfaces inspired by snake skin

    PubMed Central

    Heepe, Lars; Fadeeva, Elena; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2014-01-01

    Summary The microstructure investigated in this study was inspired by the anisotropic microornamentation of scales from the ventral body side of the California King Snake (Lampropeltis getula californiae). Frictional properties of snake-inspired microstructured polymer surface (SIMPS) made of epoxy resin were characterised in contact with a smooth glass ball by a microtribometer in two perpendicular directions. The SIMPS exhibited a considerable frictional anisotropy: Frictional coefficients measured along the microstructure were about 33% lower than those measured in the opposite direction. Frictional coefficients were compared to those obtained on other types of surface microstructure: (i) smooth ones, (ii) rough ones, and (iii) ones with periodic groove-like microstructures of different dimensions. The results demonstrate the existence of a common pattern of interaction between two general effects that influence friction: (1) molecular interaction depending on real contact area and (2) the mechanical interlocking of both contacting surfaces. The strongest reduction of the frictional coefficient, compared to the smooth reference surface, was observed at a medium range of surface structure dimensions suggesting a trade-off between these two effects. PMID:25161844

  4. A bio-inspired electrocommunication system for small underwater robots.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Jindong; Xie, Guangming; Wen, Li; Zhang, Jianwei

    2017-03-29

    Weakly electric fishes (Gymnotid and Mormyrid) use an electric field to communicate efficiently (termed electrocommunication) in the turbid waters of confined spaces where other communication modalities fail. Inspired by this biological phenomenon, we design an artificial electrocommunication system for small underwater robots and explore the capabilities of such an underwater robotic communication system. An analytical model for electrocommunication is derived to predict the effect of the key parameters such as electrode distance and emitter current of the system on the communication performance. According to this model, a low-dissipation, and small-sized electrocommunication system is proposed and integrated into a small robotic fish. We characterize the communication performance of the robot in still water, flowing water, water with obstacles and natural water conditions. The results show that underwater robots are able to communicate electrically at a speed of around 1 k baud within about 3 m with a low power consumption (less than 1 W). In addition, we demonstrate that two leader-follower robots successfully achieve motion synchronization through electrocommunication in the three-dimensional underwater space, indicating that this bio-inspired electrocommunication system is a promising setup for the interaction of small underwater robots.

  5. Bio-inspired Fabrication of Complex Hierarchical Structure in Silicon.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Peng, Zhengchun; Shi, Tielin; Tan, Xianhua; Zhang, Deqin; Huang, Qiang; Zou, Chuanping; Liao, Guanglan

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we developed a top-down method to fabricate complex three dimensional silicon structure, which was inspired by the hierarchical micro/nanostructure of the Morpho butterfly scales. The fabrication procedure includes photolithography, metal masking, and both dry and wet etching techniques. First, microscale photoresist grating pattern was formed on the silicon (111) wafer. Trenches with controllable rippled structures on the sidewalls were etched by inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching Bosch process. Then, Cr film was angled deposited on the bottom of the ripples by electron beam evaporation, followed by anisotropic wet etching of the silicon. The simple fabrication method results in large scale hierarchical structure on a silicon wafer. The fabricated Si structure has multiple layers with uniform thickness of hundreds nanometers. We conducted both light reflection and heat transfer experiments on this structure. They exhibited excellent antireflection performance for polarized ultraviolet, visible and near infrared wavelengths. And the heat flux of the structure was significantly enhanced. As such, we believe that these bio-inspired hierarchical silicon structure will have promising applications in photovoltaics, sensor technology and photonic crystal devices.

  6. Biomimetic and bio-inspired uses of mollusc shells.

    PubMed

    Morris, J P; Wang, Y; Backeljau, T; Chapelle, G

    2016-06-01

    Climate change and ocean acidification are likely to have a profound effect on marine molluscs, which are of great ecological and economic importance. One process particularly sensitive to climate change is the formation of biominerals in mollusc shells. Fundamental research is broadening our understanding of the biomineralization process, as well as providing more informed predictions on the effects of climate change on marine molluscs. Such studies are important in their own right, but their value also extends to applied sciences. Biominerals, organic/inorganic hybrid materials with many remarkable physical and chemical properties, have been studied for decades, and the possibilities for future improved use of such materials for society are widely recognised. This article highlights the potential use of our understanding of the shell biomineralization process in novel bio-inspired and biomimetic applications. It also highlights the potential for the valorisation of shells produced as a by-product of the aquaculture industry. Studying shells and the formation of biominerals will inspire novel functional hybrid materials. It may also provide sustainable, ecologically- and economically-viable solutions to some of the problems created by current human resource exploitation.

  7. Electronic and optoelectronic materials and devices inspired by nature.

    PubMed

    Meredith, P; Bettinger, C J; Irimia-Vladu, M; Mostert, A B; Schwenn, P E

    2013-03-01

    Inorganic semiconductors permeate virtually every sphere of modern human existence. Micro-fabricated memory elements, processors, sensors, circuit elements, lasers, displays, detectors, etc are ubiquitous. However, the dawn of the 21st century has brought with it immense new challenges, and indeed opportunities-some of which require a paradigm shift in the way we think about resource use and disposal, which in turn directly impacts our ongoing relationship with inorganic semiconductors such as silicon and gallium arsenide. Furthermore, advances in fields such as nano-medicine and bioelectronics, and the impending revolution of the 'ubiquitous sensor network', all require new functional materials which are bio-compatible, cheap, have minimal embedded manufacturing energy plus extremely low power consumption, and are mechanically robust and flexible for integration with tissues, building structures, fabrics and all manner of hosts. In this short review article we summarize current progress in creating materials with such properties. We focus primarily on organic and bio-organic electronic and optoelectronic systems derived from or inspired by nature, and outline the complex charge transport and photo-physics which control their behaviour. We also introduce the concept of electrical devices based upon ion or proton flow ('ionics and protonics') and focus particularly on their role as a signal interface with biological systems. Finally, we highlight recent advances in creating working devices, some of which have bio-inspired architectures, and summarize the current issues, challenges and potential solutions. This is a rich new playground for the modern materials physicist.

  8. Wind Energy Conversion by Plant-Inspired Designs.

    PubMed

    McCloskey, Michael A; Mosher, Curtis L; Henderson, Eric R

    2017-01-01

    In 2008 the U.S. Department of Energy set a target of 20% wind energy by 2030. To date, induction-based turbines form the mainstay of this effort, but turbines are noisy, perceived as unattractive, a potential hazard to bats and birds, and their height hampers deployment in residential settings. Several groups have proposed that artificial plants containing piezoelectric elements may harvest wind energy sufficient to contribute to a carbon-neutral energy economy. Here we measured energy conversion by cottonwood-inspired piezoelectric leaves, and by a "vertical flapping stalk"-the most efficient piezo-leaf previously reported. We emulated cottonwood for its unusually ordered, periodic flutter, properties conducive to piezo excitation. Integrated over 0°-90° (azimuthal) of incident airflow, cottonwood mimics outperformed the vertical flapping stalk, but they produced < daW per conceptualized tree. In contrast, a modest-sized cottonwood tree may dissipate ~ 80 W via leaf motion alone. A major limitation of piezo-transduction is charge generation, which scales with capacitance (area). We thus tested a rudimentary, cattail-inspired leaf with stacked elements wired in parallel. Power increased systematically with capacitance as expected, but extrapolation to acre-sized assemblages predicts < daW. Although our results suggest that present piezoelectric materials will not harvest mid-range power from botanic mimics of convenient size, recent developments in electrostriction and triboelectric systems may offer more fertile ground to further explore this concept.

  9. Flectofin: a hingeless flapping mechanism inspired by nature.

    PubMed

    Lienhard, J; Schleicher, S; Poppinga, S; Masselter, T; Milwich, M; Speck, T; Knippers, J

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a novel biomimetic approach to the kinematics of deployable systems for architectural purposes. Elastic deformation of the entire structure replaces the need for local hinges. This change becomes possible by using fibre-reinforced polymers (FRP) such as glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) that can combine high tensile strength with low bending stiffness, thus offering a large range of calibrated elastic deformations. The employment of elasticity within a structure facilitates not only the generation of complex geometries, but also takes the design space a step further by creating elastic kinetic structures, here referred to as pliable structures. In this paper, the authors give an insight into the abstraction strategies used to derive elastic kinetics from plants, which show a clear interrelation of form, actuation and kinematics. Thereby, the focus will be on form-finding and simulation methods which have been adopted to generate a biomimetic principle which is patented under the name Flectofin®. This bio inspired hingeless flapping device is inspired by the valvular pollination mechanism that was derived and abstracted from the kinematics found in the Bird-Of-Paradise flower (Strelitzia reginae, Strelitziaceae).

  10. Spontaneous water filtration of bio-inspired membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kiwoong; Kim, Hyejeong; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-11-01

    Water is one of the most important elements for plants, because it is essential for various metabolic activities. Thus, water management systems of vascular plants, such as water collection and water filtration have been optimized through a long history. In this view point, bio-inspired technologies can be developed by mimicking the nature's strategies for the survival of the fittest. However, most of the underlying biophysical features of the optimized water management systems remain unsolved In this study, the biophysical characteristics of water filtration phenomena in the roots of mangrove are experimentally investigated. To understand water-filtration features of the mangrove, the morphological structures of its roots are analyzed. The electrokinetic properties of the root surface are also examined. Based on the quantitatively analyzed information, filtration of sodium ions in the roots are visualized. Motivated by this mechanism, spontaneous desalination mechanism in the root of mangrove is proposed by combining the electrokinetics and hydrodynamic transportation of ions. This study would be helpful for understanding the water-filtration mechanism of the roots of mangrove and developing a new bio-inspired desalination technology. This research was financially supported by the National Research Foundation (NRF) of Korea (Contract Grant Number: 2008-0061991).

  11. Bio-inspired fluidic lens surgical camera for MIS.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Frank S; Johnson, Daniel; Cho, Sung Hwan; Qiao, Wen; Arianpour, Ashkan; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2009-01-01

    We report a new type of surgical camera that will greatly improve minimally invasive surgery (MIS). The key enabling technology for this camera is a unique type of lens-bio-inspired fluidic lens, which is a bio-mimetic lens that can change its curvature, just like the way human crystalline lens can accommodate. Because of its curvature changing capability, it is now possible to design a new regime of optical systems where auto-focusing and optical zoom can be performed without moving the lens positions, as is done in typical cameras. Hence, miniaturized imaging system with high functionality can be achieved with such technology. MIS is a surgical technique where small incisions are made on the abdominal wall as opposed to a large cut in open surgery. This type of surgery ensures faster patient recovery. The key tool for MIS is its surgical camera, or laparoscope. Traditional laparoscope is long and rigid and limits the field of view. To further advance MIS technology, we utilized bio-inspired fluidic lens to design a highly versatile imager that is small, can change its field of view or zoom optically, works in low light conditions, and varies the viewing angles. The surgical camera prototype is small (total track<17 mm), possesses 3X optical zoom, operates with light emitting diode (LED) lighting, among many other unique features.

  12. Heterogeneous sensor networks: a bio-inspired overlay architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burman, Jerry; Hespanha, Joao; Madhow, Upamanyu; Klein, Daniel; Isaacs, Jason; Venkateswaran, Sriram; Pham, Tien

    2010-04-01

    Teledyne Scientific Company, the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) and the Army Research Lab are developing technologies for automated data exfiltration from heterogeneous sensor networks through the Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies (ICB). Unmanned air vehicles (UAV) provide an effective means to autonomously collect data from unattended ground sensors (UGSs) that cannot communicate with each other. UAVs are used to reduce the system reaction time by generating autonomous data-driven collection routes. Bio-inspired techniques for search provide a novel strategy to detect, capture and fuse data across heterogeneous sensors. A fast and accurate method has been developed for routing UAVs and localizing an event by fusing data from a sparse number of UGSs; it leverages a bio-inspired technique based on chemotaxis or the motion of bacteria seeking nutrients in their environment. The system was implemented and successfully tested using a high level simulation environment using a flight simulator to emulate a UAV. A field test was also conducted in November 2009 at Camp Roberts, CA using a UAV provided by AeroMech Engineering. The field test results showed that the system can detect and locate the source of an acoustic event with an accuracy of about 3 meters average circular error.

  13. Biomimetics inspired surfaces for drag reduction and oleophobicity/philicity.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat

    2011-01-01

    The emerging field of biomimetics allows one to mimic biology or nature to develop nanomaterials, nanodevices, and processes which provide desirable properties. Hierarchical structures with dimensions of features ranging from the macroscale to the nanoscale are extremely common in nature and possess properties of interest. There are a large number of objects including bacteria, plants, land and aquatic animals, and seashells with properties of commercial interest. Certain plant leaves, such as lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) leaves, are known to be superhydrophobic and self-cleaning due to the hierarchical surface roughness and presence of a wax layer. In addition to a self-cleaning effect, these surfaces with a high contact angle and low contact angle hysteresis also exhibit low adhesion and drag reduction for fluid flow. An aquatic animal, such as a shark, is another model from nature for the reduction of drag in fluid flow. The artificial surfaces inspired from the shark skin and lotus leaf have been created, and in this article the influence of structure on drag reduction efficiency is reviewed. Biomimetic-inspired oleophobic surfaces can be used to prevent contamination of the underwater parts of ships by biological and organic contaminants, including oil. The article also reviews the wetting behavior of oil droplets on various superoleophobic surfaces created in the lab.

  14. Wind Energy Conversion by Plant-Inspired Designs

    PubMed Central

    Mosher, Curtis L.; Henderson, Eric R.

    2017-01-01

    In 2008 the U.S. Department of Energy set a target of 20% wind energy by 2030. To date, induction-based turbines form the mainstay of this effort, but turbines are noisy, perceived as unattractive, a potential hazard to bats and birds, and their height hampers deployment in residential settings. Several groups have proposed that artificial plants containing piezoelectric elements may harvest wind energy sufficient to contribute to a carbon-neutral energy economy. Here we measured energy conversion by cottonwood-inspired piezoelectric leaves, and by a “vertical flapping stalk”—the most efficient piezo-leaf previously reported. We emulated cottonwood for its unusually ordered, periodic flutter, properties conducive to piezo excitation. Integrated over 0°–90° (azimuthal) of incident airflow, cottonwood mimics outperformed the vertical flapping stalk, but they produced << daW per conceptualized tree. In contrast, a modest-sized cottonwood tree may dissipate ~ 80 W via leaf motion alone. A major limitation of piezo-transduction is charge generation, which scales with capacitance (area). We thus tested a rudimentary, cattail-inspired leaf with stacked elements wired in parallel. Power increased systematically with capacitance as expected, but extrapolation to acre-sized assemblages predicts << daW. Although our results suggest that present piezoelectric materials will not harvest mid-range power from botanic mimics of convenient size, recent developments in electrostriction and triboelectric systems may offer more fertile ground to further explore this concept. PMID:28085933

  15. Miniaturized unified imaging system using bio-inspired fluidic lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Frank S.; Cho, Sung Hwan; Qiao, Wen; Kim, Nam-Hyong; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2008-08-01

    Miniaturized imaging systems have become ubiquitous as they are found in an ever-increasing number of devices, such as cellular phones, personal digital assistants, and web cameras. Until now, the design and fabrication methodology of such systems have not been significantly different from conventional cameras. The only established method to achieve focusing is by varying the lens distance. On the other hand, the variable-shape crystalline lens found in animal eyes offers inspiration for a more natural way of achieving an optical system with high functionality. Learning from the working concepts of the optics in the animal kingdom, we developed bio-inspired fluidic lenses for a miniature universal imager with auto-focusing, macro, and super-macro capabilities. Because of the enormous dynamic range of fluidic lenses, the miniature camera can even function as a microscope. To compensate for the image quality difference between the central vision and peripheral vision and the shape difference between a solid-state image sensor and a curved retina, we adopted a hybrid design consisting of fluidic lenses for tunability and fixed lenses for aberration and color dispersion correction. A design of the world's smallest surgical camera with 3X optical zoom capabilities is also demonstrated using the approach of hybrid lenses.

  16. The Mars imperative: Species survival and inspiring a globalized culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Donald C.

    2015-02-01

    Humanity has crossed a unique technological threshold enabling self-guided survival, a first in the history of life on Earth. From a human perspective the Earth may be considered as a single interconnected ecosystem, and given our tenuous understanding and control over the environment as well as our own behaviors, ever-looming specters of social collapse or even extinction dictate enacting immediate off-world diversification and self-preservation efforts. Herein, Mars is touted as the most tenable and sustainable location in which to initiate such permanent diversification. Scientific curiosity alone cannot initiate nor drive such off-world settlement and concerted impetus and public support for such an endeavor is shown to be constrained by human attention span. Lastly, the initial act of settlement uniquely serves as humanities greatest globally inspiring self-initiated endeavor, a tangible benefit capable of inspiring generations, connecting cultures and motivating college enrollments and career path choices in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) in a manner similar to the dawn of human space exploration.

  17. Multi-objective optimization of aerostructures inspired by nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, Adam C.

    The focus of this doctoral work is on the optimization of aircraft wing structures. The optimization was performed against the shape, size and topology of simple aircraft wing designs. A simple morphing wing actuator optimization is performed as well as a wing panel buckling topology optimization. This is done with biologically-inspired mathematical systems including a map L-system, a multi-objective genetic algorithm, and cellular structures represented by Voronoi diagrams. As with most aircraft optimizations, both studies aim to minimize the total weight of a wing while simultaneously meeting stiffness and strength requirements. Optimization is performed with the scripts developed in MATLAB as well as through the use of finite element codes, NASTRAN and LS-Dyna. The intent of this methodology is to develop unique designs inspired by nature and optimized through natural selection. The optimal designs are those with minimal weight as well as additional requirements specific to the problems. The designs and methodology have the potential to be of use in determining minimum weight designs in aircraft structures. A literature review of optimization techniques, methodology and method validation, and optimization comparisons is presented. The buckling panel optimization considered here also includes composite buckling failure and manufacturing assumptions for composite panels. The panels are optimized for mass and strength by controlling the laminate stacking sequence, stiffener size, and topology. The morphing wing is optimized for actuator loading and redundancy.

  18. Bio-inspired nano-sensor-enhanced CNN visual computer.

    PubMed

    Porod, Wolfgang; Werblin, Frank; Chua, Leon O; Roska, Tamas; Rodriguez-Vazquez, Angel; Roska, Botond; Fay, Patrick; Bernstein, Gary H; Huang, Yih-Fang; Csurgay, Arpad I

    2004-05-01

    Nanotechnology opens new ways to utilize recent discoveries in biological image processing by translating the underlying functional concepts into the design of CNN (cellular neural/nonlinear network)-based systems incorporating nanoelectronic devices. There is a natural intersection joining studies of retinal processing, spatio-temporal nonlinear dynamics embodied in CNN, and the possibility of miniaturizing the technology through nanotechnology. This intersection serves as the springboard for our multidisciplinary project. Biological feature and motion detectors map directly into the spatio-temporal dynamics of CNN for target recognition, image stabilization, and tracking. The neural interactions underlying color processing will drive the development of nanoscale multispectral sensor arrays for image fusion. Implementing such nanoscale sensors on a CNN platform will allow the implementation of device feedback control, a hallmark of biological sensory systems. These biologically inspired CNN subroutines are incorporated into the new world of analog-and-logic algorithms and software, containing also many other active-wave computing mechanisms, including nature-inspired (physics and chemistry) as well as PDE-based sophisticated spatio-temporal algorithms. Our goal is to design and develop several miniature prototype devices for target detection, navigation, tracking, and robotics. This paper presents an example illustrating the synergies emerging from the convergence of nanotechnology, biotechnology, and information and cognitive science.

  19. Electronic and optoelectronic materials and devices inspired by nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, P.; Bettinger, C. J.; Irimia-Vladu, M.; Mostert, A. B.; Schwenn, P. E.

    2013-03-01

    Inorganic semiconductors permeate virtually every sphere of modern human existence. Micro-fabricated memory elements, processors, sensors, circuit elements, lasers, displays, detectors, etc are ubiquitous. However, the dawn of the 21st century has brought with it immense new challenges, and indeed opportunities—some of which require a paradigm shift in the way we think about resource use and disposal, which in turn directly impacts our ongoing relationship with inorganic semiconductors such as silicon and gallium arsenide. Furthermore, advances in fields such as nano-medicine and bioelectronics, and the impending revolution of the ‘ubiquitous sensor network’, all require new functional materials which are bio-compatible, cheap, have minimal embedded manufacturing energy plus extremely low power consumption, and are mechanically robust and flexible for integration with tissues, building structures, fabrics and all manner of hosts. In this short review article we summarize current progress in creating materials with such properties. We focus primarily on organic and bio-organic electronic and optoelectronic systems derived from or inspired by nature, and outline the complex charge transport and photo-physics which control their behaviour. We also introduce the concept of electrical devices based upon ion or proton flow (‘ionics and protonics’) and focus particularly on their role as a signal interface with biological systems. Finally, we highlight recent advances in creating working devices, some of which have bio-inspired architectures, and summarize the current issues, challenges and potential solutions. This is a rich new playground for the modern materials physicist.

  20. Multiple Hindered Rotators in a Gyroscope-Inspired Tribenzylamine Hemicryptophane

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Najat S.; Perez-Aguilar, Jose Manuel; Kaufmann, Tara; Hill, P. Aru; Taratula, Olena; Lee, One-Sun; Carroll, Patrick J.; Saven, Jeffery G.; Dmochowski, Ivan J.

    2011-01-01

    A gyroscope-inspired tribenzylamine hemicryptophane provides a vehicle for exploring the structure and properties of multiple p-phenylene rotators within one molecule. The hemicryptophane was synthesized in three steps in good overall yield using mild conditions. Three rotator-forming linkers were cyclized to form a rigid cyclotriveratrylene (CTV) stator framework, which was then closed with an amine. The gyroscope-like molecule was characterized by 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy and the structure was solved by X-ray crystallography. Rigidity of the two-component CTV-trismethylamine stator was investigated by 1H variable temperature (VT) NMR experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. These techniques identified gyration of the three p-phenylene rotators on the millisecond time scale at −93 °C, with more dynamic but still hindered motion at room temperature (27 °C). The activation energy for the p-phenylene rotation was determined to be ~10 kcal mol−1. Due to the propeller arrangement of the p-phenylenes, their rotation is hindered but not strongly correlated. The compact size, simple synthetic route and molecular motions of this gyroscope-inspired tribenzylamine hemicryptophane make it an attractive starting point for controlling the direction and coupling of rotators within molecular systems. PMID:21271707

  1. Bio-inspired magnetic swimming microrobots for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyer, Kathrin E.; Zhang, Li; Nelson, Bradley J.

    2013-01-01

    Microrobots have been proposed for future biomedical applications in which they are able to navigate in viscous fluidic environments. Nature has inspired numerous microrobotic locomotion designs, which are suitable for propulsion generation at low Reynolds numbers. This article reviews the various swimming methods with particular focus on helical propulsion inspired by E. coli bacteria. There are various magnetic actuation methods for biomimetic and non-biomimetic microrobots, such as rotating fields, oscillating fields, or field gradients. They can be categorized into force-driven or torque-driven actuation methods. Both approaches are reviewed and a previous publication has shown that torque-driven actuation scales better to the micro- and nano-scale than force-driven actuation. Finally, the implementation of swarm or multi-agent control is discussed. The use of multiple microrobots may be beneficial for in vivo as well as in vitro applications. Thus, the frequency-dependent behavior of helical microrobots is discussed and preliminary experimental results are presented showing the decoupling of an individual agent within a group of three microrobots.

  2. The NASA Education Enterprise: Inspiring the Next Generation of Explorers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    On April 12, 2002, NASA Administrator Sean O Keefe opened a new window to the future of space exploration with these words in his Pioneering the Future address. Thus began the conceptual framework for structuring the new Education Enterprise. The Agency s mission is to understand and protect our home planet; to explore the universe in search for life; and to inspire the next generation of explorers as only NASA can. In adopting this mission, education became a core element and is now a vital part of every major NASA research and development mission. NASA s call to inspire the next generation of explorers is now resounding throughout the NASA community and schools of all levels all around the country. The goal is to capture student interest, nurture their natural curiosities, and intrigue their minds with new and exciting scientific research; as well as to provide educators with the creative tools they need to improve America s scientific literacy. The future of NASA begins with America s youngest scholars. According to Administrator O Keefe s address, if NASA does not motivate the youngest generation now, there is little prospect this generation will choose to pursue scientific disciplines later. Since embracing Administrator O Keefe s educational mandate over a year ago, NASA has been fully devoted to broadening its roadmap to motivation. The efforts have generated a whole new showcase of thoughtprovoking and fun learning opportunities, through printed material, Web sites and Webcasts, robotics, rocketry, aerospace design contests, and various other resources as only NASA can.

  3. Dark matter in a constrained E 6 inspired SUSY model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athron, P.; Harries, D.; Nevzorov, R.; Williams, A. G.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate dark matter in a constrained E 6 inspired supersymmetric model with an exact custodial symmetry and compare with the CMSSM. The breakdown of E 6 leads to an additional U(1) N symmetry and a discrete matter parity. The custodial and matter symmetries imply there are two stable dark matter candidates, though one may be extremely light and contribute negligibly to the relic density. We demonstrate that a predominantly Higgsino, or mixed bino-Higgsino, neutralino can account for all of the relic abundance of dark matter, while fitting a 125 GeV SM-like Higgs and evading LHC limits on new states. However we show that the recent LUX 2016 limit on direct detection places severe constraints on the mixed bino-Higgsino scenarios that explain all of the dark matter. Nonetheless we still reveal interesting scenarios where the gluino, neutralino and chargino are light and discoverable at the LHC, but the full relic abundance is not accounted for. At the same time we also show that there is a huge volume of parameter space, with a predominantly Higgsino dark matter candidate that explains all the relic abundance, that will be discoverable with XENON1T. Finally we demonstrate that for the E 6 inspired model the exotic leptoquarks could still be light and within range of future LHC searches.

  4. Innovation Inspired by Nature: Capabilities, Potentials and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2012-01-01

    Through evolution, nature came up with many effective solutions to its challenges and continually improving them. By mimicking, coping and being inspired, humans have been using Nature's solutions to address their own challenges. In recent years, the implementation of nature's capabilities has intensified with our growing understanding of the various biological and nastic mechanisms and processes. Successes include even the making of humanlike robots that perform such lifelike tasks as walking, talking, making eye-contact, interpreting speech and facial expressions, as well as many other humanlike functions. Generally, once humans are able to implement a function then, thru rapid advances in technology, capabilities are developed that can significantly exceed the original source of inspiration in Nature. Examples include flight where there is no species that can fly as high, carry so much mass, has so large dimensions and fly so fast, and operate at as such extreme conditions as our aircraft and other aerospace systems. However, using the capabilities of today's technology, there are many challenges that are not feasible to address in mimicking characteristics of species and plants. In this manuscript, state-of-the-art of biomimetic capabilities, potentials and challenges are reviewed.

  5. Digital cameras with designs inspired by the arthropod eye.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Min; Xie, Yizhu; Malyarchuk, Viktor; Xiao, Jianliang; Jung, Inhwa; Choi, Ki-Joong; Liu, Zhuangjian; Park, Hyunsung; Lu, Chaofeng; Kim, Rak-Hwan; Li, Rui; Crozier, Kenneth B; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2013-05-02

    In arthropods, evolution has created a remarkably sophisticated class of imaging systems, with a wide-angle field of view, low aberrations, high acuity to motion and an infinite depth of field. A challenge in building digital cameras with the hemispherical, compound apposition layouts of arthropod eyes is that essential design requirements cannot be met with existing planar sensor technologies or conventional optics. Here we present materials, mechanics and integration schemes that afford scalable pathways to working, arthropod-inspired cameras with nearly full hemispherical shapes (about 160 degrees). Their surfaces are densely populated by imaging elements (artificial ommatidia), which are comparable in number (180) to those of the eyes of fire ants (Solenopsis fugax) and bark beetles (Hylastes nigrinus). The devices combine elastomeric compound optical elements with deformable arrays of thin silicon photodetectors into integrated sheets that can be elastically transformed from the planar geometries in which they are fabricated to hemispherical shapes for integration into apposition cameras. Our imaging results and quantitative ray-tracing-based simulations illustrate key features of operation. These general strategies seem to be applicable to other compound eye devices, such as those inspired by moths and lacewings (refracting superposition eyes), lobster and shrimp (reflecting superposition eyes), and houseflies (neural superposition eyes).

  6. Bio-inspired magnetic swimming microrobots for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Peyer, Kathrin E; Zhang, Li; Nelson, Bradley J

    2013-02-21

    Microrobots have been proposed for future biomedical applications in which they are able to navigate in viscous fluidic environments. Nature has inspired numerous microrobotic locomotion designs, which are suitable for propulsion generation at low Reynolds numbers. This article reviews the various swimming methods with particular focus on helical propulsion inspired by E. coli bacteria. There are various magnetic actuation methods for biomimetic and non-biomimetic microrobots, such as rotating fields, oscillating fields, or field gradients. They can be categorized into force-driven or torque-driven actuation methods. Both approaches are reviewed and a previous publication has shown that torque-driven actuation scales better to the micro- and nano-scale than force-driven actuation. Finally, the implementation of swarm or multi-agent control is discussed. The use of multiple microrobots may be beneficial for in vivo as well as in vitro applications. Thus, the frequency-dependent behavior of helical microrobots is discussed and preliminary experimental results are presented showing the decoupling of an individual agent within a group of three microrobots.

  7. Autonomous UAV persistent surveillance using bio-inspired strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burman, Jerry; Hespanha, Joao; Madhow, Upamanyu; Isaacs, Jason; Venkateswaran, Sriram; Pham, Tien

    2012-06-01

    A team consisting of Teledyne Scientific Company, the University of California at Santa Barbara, the Army Research Laboratory, the Engineer Research and Development Center, and IBM UK is developing technologies in support of automated data exfiltration from heterogeneous battlefield sensor networks to enhance situational awareness for dismounts and command echelons. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) provide an effective means to autonomously collect data from a sparse network of unattended ground sensors (UGSs) that cannot communicate with each other. UAVs are used to reduce the system reaction time by generating autonomous collection routes that are data-driven. Bioinspired techniques for autonomous search provide a novel strategy to detect, capture and fuse data from heterogeneous sensor networks. The bio-inspired algorithm is based on chemotaxis or the motion of bacteria seeking nutrients in their environment. Field tests of a bio-inspired system that routed UAVs were conducted in June 2011 at Camp Roberts, CA. The field test results showed that such a system can autonomously detect and locate the source of terrestrial events with very high accuracy and visually verify the event. In June 2011, field tests of the system were completed and include the use of multiple autonomously controlled UAVs, detection and disambiguation of multiple acoustic events occurring in short time frames, optimal sensor placement based on local phenomenology and the use of the International Technology Alliance (ITA) Sensor Network Fabric. The system demonstrated TRL 6 performance in the field at Camp Roberts.

  8. Biomimetics inspired surfaces for drag reduction and oleophobicity/philicity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Summary The emerging field of biomimetics allows one to mimic biology or nature to develop nanomaterials, nanodevices, and processes which provide desirable properties. Hierarchical structures with dimensions of features ranging from the macroscale to the nanoscale are extremely common in nature and possess properties of interest. There are a large number of objects including bacteria, plants, land and aquatic animals, and seashells with properties of commercial interest. Certain plant leaves, such as lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) leaves, are known to be superhydrophobic and self-cleaning due to the hierarchical surface roughness and presence of a wax layer. In addition to a self-cleaning effect, these surfaces with a high contact angle and low contact angle hysteresis also exhibit low adhesion and drag reduction for fluid flow. An aquatic animal, such as a shark, is another model from nature for the reduction of drag in fluid flow. The artificial surfaces inspired from the shark skin and lotus leaf have been created, and in this article the influence of structure on drag reduction efficiency is reviewed. Biomimetic-inspired oleophobic surfaces can be used to prevent contamination of the underwater parts of ships by biological and organic contaminants, including oil. The article also reviews the wetting behavior of oil droplets on various superoleophobic surfaces created in the lab. PMID:21977417

  9. Code lists for interoperability - Principles and best practices in INSPIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, M.; Portele, C.; Cox, S.; Murray, K.

    2012-04-01

    Using free text for attribute values when exchanging geoscience data can lead to a number of problems, e.g. because different data providers and consumers use different languages, terminology or spellings. To overcome these issues, well-defined schemes of codes or concepts, known as code lists1, are preferred to free text in defining the value domain of an attribute. The "code list" concept is well established in geospatial modelling standards (e.g. ISO 191032), however, it has been used in many different ways. Here we present some considerations relating to code lists and related interoperability requirements in spatial data infrastructures (SDIs), in particular as discussed in the INSPIRE3 data specifications working groups. These will form the basis for the specification of code list requirements in the INSPIRE Implementing Rules on interoperability of spatial data sets and services4, which provide binding legal obligations for EU Member States for the interoperable provision of data related to the environment. Requirements or recommendations for code lists should address the following aspects: Governance: When modeling an application domain, for each feature attribute whose value is a 'term', should we re-use an existing code list or specify a new code list for the SDI initiative? Use of existing code lists is likely to maximize cross-initiative interoperability. Level of obligation: For each use of a code list, what is the level of obligation? Is use of a specified code list(s) mandatory or just recommended? This is particularly important where the specifications carry a legal mandate (as in the case of INSPIRE). Extensibility: Must data providers use only the specified values or may they extend the code list? Are arbitrary extensions allowed or do additional values have to be specialisations of existing values? Specifying values: For each code list, the allowed values have to be specified, either directly in the specification, or by reference to an existing

  10. An Approach of Bio-inspired Hybrid Model for Financial Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simić, Dragan; Gajić, Vladeta; Simić, Svetlana

    Biological systems are inspiration for the design of optimisation and classification models. Applying various forms of bio-inspired algorithms may be a very high-complex system. Modelling of financial markets is challenging for several reasons, because many plausible factors impact on it. An automated trading on financial market is not a new phenomenon. The model of bio-inspired hybrid adaptive trading system based on technical indicators usage by grammatical evolution and moving window is presented in this paper. The proposed system is just one of possible bio-inspired system which can be used in financial forecast, corporate failure prediction or bond rating company.

  11. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia relapsing after first-line pediatric-inspired therapy: a retrospective GRAALL study

    PubMed Central

    Desjonquères, A; Chevallier, P; Thomas, X; Huguet, F; Leguay, T; Bernard, M; Bay, J-O; Tavernier, E; Charbonnier, A; Isnard, F; Hunault, M; Turlure, P; Renaud, M; Bastié, J-N; Himberlin, C; Lepretre, S; Lioure, B; Lhéritier, V; Asnafi, V; Beldjord, K; Lafage-Pochitaloff, M; Béné, M C; Ifrah, N; Dombret, H

    2016-01-01

    The outcome of adult patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph− ALL) relapsing after pediatric-inspired front-line therapy is ill known. Here 229 relapsing Ph− ALL younger adults (18–63 years) treated within the Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL)-2003/-2005 trials were considered. Salvage regimens consisted of potentially curative therapies in 194 cases, low-intensity therapies in 21, allogeneic stem cell transplant (allo-SCT) in 6 and best supportive care in 8. Overall, 77 patients received allo-SCT after relapse. The median follow-up was 3.1 years. A second complete remission (CR2) was achieved in 121 patients (53%). In multivariate analysis, only younger age <45 years (P=0.008) and CR1 duration ⩾18 months (P=0.009) predicted CR2. Overall survival (OS) at 2 and 5 years was 19.3% (14–24%) and 13.3% (8–18%), respectively. In CR2 patients, disease-free survival (DFS) at 2 and 5 years was 29.0% (21–38%) and 25% (17–33%). In multivariate analysis, CR1 duration ⩾18 months and allo-SCT after relapse were associated with longer DFS (P<0.009 and P=0.004, respectively) and longer OS (P=0.004 and P<0.0001, respectively). In conclusion, although younger adults relapsing after pediatric-inspired ALL therapies retain a poor outcome, some of them may be cured if CR1 duration ⩾18 months and if allo-SCT can be performed in CR2. New therapies are definitely needed for these patients. PMID:27935576

  12. Gecko-Inspired, Controlled Adhesion and Its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menguc, Yigit

    This thesis work is primarily concerned with taking inspiration from the principles of gecko-adhesion in order to control the attachment of synthetic structured adhesives. We present gecko-inspired angled elastomer micropillars with flat or round tip endings as compliant pick-and-place micromanipulators. The pillars are 35 mum in diameter, 90 mum tall, and angled at an inclination of 20°. By gently pressing the tip of a pillar to a part, the pillar adheres to it through intermolecular forces. Next, by retracting quickly, the part is picked from a given donor substrate. During transferring, the adhesion between the pillar and the part is high enough to withstand disturbances due to external forces or the weight of the part. During release of the part onto a receiver substrate, the contact area of the pillar to the part is drastically reduced by controlled vertical or shear displacement, which results in reduced adhesive forces. The maximum repeatable ratio of pick-to-release adhesive forces was measured as 39 to 1. We find that a flat tip shape and shear displacement control provide a higher pick-to-release adhesion ratio than a round tip and vertical displacement control, respectively. We present a model of forces to serve as a framework for the operation of this micromanipulator. Finally, demonstrations of pick-and-place manipulation of mum-scale silicon microplatelets and a cm-scale glass cover slip serve as proofs of concept. The compliant polymer micropillars are safe for use with fragile parts, and, due to exploiting intermolecular forces, could be effective on most materials and in air, vacuum, and liquid environments. We present a study of the self-cleaning and contamination resistance phenomena of synthetic gecko-inspired adhesives made from elastomeric polyurethane. The phenomenon of self-cleaning makes the adhesive foot of the gecko robust against dirt, and makes it effectively sticky throughout the lifetime of the material (within the molting cycles

  13. Gravitational self-force meets the post-Newtonian approximation in extreme-mass ratio inspiral of binary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detweiler, Steven

    2010-02-01

    Post-Newtonian analysis, numerical relativity and, now, perturbation-based gravitational self-force analysis are all being used to describe various aspects of black hole binary systems. Recent comparisons between self-force analysis, with m1m2, and post-Newtonian analysis, with v/c 1 show excellent agreement in their common domain of validity. This lends credence to the two very different regularization procedures which are invoked in these approximations. When self-force analysis is able to create gravitational waveforms from extreme mass-ratio inspiral, then unprecedented cross cultural comparisons of these three distinct approaches to understanding gravitational waves will reveal the strengths and weaknesses of each. )

  14. Performance of a bio-inspired spider web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lingyue; Behrooz, Majid; Li, Rui; Wang, Xiaojie; Gordaninejad, Faramarz

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate dynamic properties and the total energy change of a bio-inspired spider web. To better understand performance, the effects of preload, radial and spiral string stiffness and damping ratio on the natural frequency and total energy of the web are theoretically examined. Different types of web materials and configurations, such as damaged webs are investigated. It is demonstrated that the pretension, stiffness and damping ratio of the web's strings can significantly affect the natural frequency and total energy of the full and damaged webs. In addition, it is shown that by increasing the pretension in the radial strings one can compensate for the damaged strings and increase the capability of the damaged web to reach that of the full web.

  15. A survey of bio-inspired compliant legged robot designs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Bi, Shusheng

    2012-12-01

    The roles of biological springs in vertebrate animals and their implementations in compliant legged robots offer significant advantages over the rigid legged ones in certain types of scenarios. A large number of robotics institutes have been attempting to work in conjunction with biologists and incorporated these principles into the design of biologically inspired robots. The motivation of this review is to investigate the most published compliant legged robots and categorize them according to the types of compliant elements adopted in their mechanical structures. Based on the typical robots investigated, the trade-off between each category is summarized. In addition, the most significant performances of these robots are compared quantitatively, and multiple available solutions for the future compliant legged robot design are suggested. Finally, the design challenges for compliant legged robots are analysed. This review will provide useful guidance for robotic designers in creating new designs by inheriting the virtues of those successful robots according to the specific tasks.

  16. Cicada-inspired cell-instructive nanopatterned arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diu, Ting; Faruqui, Nilofar; Sjöström, Terje; Lamarre, Baptiste; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Su, Bo; Ryadnov, Maxim G.

    2014-11-01

    Biocompatible surfaces hold key to a variety of biomedical problems that are directly related to the competition between host-tissue cell integration and bacterial colonisation. A saving solution to this is seen in the ability of cells to uniquely respond to physical cues on such surfaces thus prompting the search for cell-instructive nanoscale patterns. Here we introduce a generic rationale engineered into biocompatible, titanium, substrates to differentiate cell responses. The rationale is inspired by cicada wing surfaces that display bactericidal nanopillar patterns. The surfaces engineered in this study are titania (TiO2) nanowire arrays that are selectively bactericidal against motile bacteria, while capable of guiding mammalian cell proliferation according to the type of the array. The concept holds promise for clinically relevant materials capable of differential physico-mechanical responses to cellular adhesion.

  17. Cicada-inspired cell-instructive nanopatterned arrays.

    PubMed

    Diu, Ting; Faruqui, Nilofar; Sjöström, Terje; Lamarre, Baptiste; Jenkinson, Howard F; Su, Bo; Ryadnov, Maxim G

    2014-11-20

    Biocompatible surfaces hold key to a variety of biomedical problems that are directly related to the competition between host-tissue cell integration and bacterial colonisation. A saving solution to this is seen in the ability of cells to uniquely respond to physical cues on such surfaces thus prompting the search for cell-instructive nanoscale patterns. Here we introduce a generic rationale engineered into biocompatible, titanium, substrates to differentiate cell responses. The rationale is inspired by cicada wing surfaces that display bactericidal nanopillar patterns. The surfaces engineered in this study are titania (TiO2) nanowire arrays that are selectively bactericidal against motile bacteria, while capable of guiding mammalian cell proliferation according to the type of the array. The concept holds promise for clinically relevant materials capable of differential physico-mechanical responses to cellular adhesion.

  18. Fly Ear Inspired Miniature Acoustic Sensors for Detection and Localization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-31

    Journal of Biological Physics Research) 2) A. Lisiewshi, H. Liu , M. Yu, L. Currano, and D . Gee, “Fly-ear inspired micro-sensor for sound source...m Torsional spring k3 5.18 N/m Torsional dashpot c3 2.88×10-5 N s/m Separation of force locations d 1.2×10-3 m Tympanum area s 0.288×10-6 m2...Γ−−Ω + Ω ⎪ ⎪⎩ ⎭ ⎩ ⎭ ⎩ ⎭ , (5) where 2 1 2 2 2 1 2 , 2 sin , 2 j d j ξ φ πχ θ χ η ηξ λ −Ω + Ω Γ = = = −Ω + Ω

  19. Charles Hard Townes: Remarkable Scientist and Inspiring Teacher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, P. F.

    2015-05-01

    Charles Townes is renowned for his work elucidating the structure of molecules through microwave spectroscopy and for his invention of the maser and the laser. He also had a lifelong interest in astronomy, and in the later portion of his remarkable and long career devoted himself to astronomical research, pioneering the study of molecules in interstellar space and the development of infrared spectroscopy, first from the ground and then from airborne facilities. His interest in high angular resolution, as well as high spectral resolution observations, led to development of the first infrared spatial interferometer employing coherent signal processing techniques. In this short review I will only touch on some of Townes' many scientific contributions, concentrating on astronomy, and will also give some personal thoughts about how he inspired students in their research, helping to make the "Townes Group" at the University of California, Berkeley, an ideal environment in which to start a career in research.

  20. Mussel-inspired dendritic polymers as universal multifunctional coatings.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qiang; Achazi, Katharina; Liebe, Hendrik; Schulz, Andrea; Noeske, Paul-Ludwig Michael; Grunwald, Ingo; Haag, Rainer

    2014-10-20

    A rapid and universal approach for multifunctional material coatings was developed based on a mussel-inspired dendritic polymer. This new kind of polymer mimics not only the functional groups of mussel foot proteins (mfps) but also their molecular weight and molecular structure. The large number of catechol and amine groups set the basis for heteromultivalent anchoring and crosslinking. The molecular weight reaches 10 kDa, which is similar to the most adhesive mussel foot protein mfp-5. Also, the dendritic structure exposes its functional groups on the surface like the folded proteins. As a result, a very stable coating can be prepared on virtually any type of material surface within 10 min by a simple dip-coating method, which is as fast as the formation of mussel byssal threads in nature.

  1. An Epigenetics‐Inspired DNA‐Based Data Storage System

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Clemens; McInroy, Gordon R.; Murat, Pierre; Van Delft, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Biopolymers are an attractive alternative to store and circulate information. DNA, for example, combines remarkable longevity with high data storage densities and has been demonstrated as a means for preserving digital information. Inspired by the dynamic, biological regulation of (epi)genetic information, we herein present how binary data can undergo controlled changes when encoded in synthetic DNA strands. By exploiting differential kinetics of hydrolytic deamination reactions of cytosine and its naturally occurring derivatives, we demonstrate how multiple layers of information can be stored in a single DNA template. Moreover, we show that controlled redox reactions allow for interconversion of these DNA‐encoded layers of information. Overall, such interlacing of multiple messages on synthetic DNA libraries showcases the potential of chemical reactions to manipulate digital information on (bio)polymers. PMID:27440712

  2. Tables: A Spreadsheet-Inspired Programming Model for Sensor Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Horey, James L; Maccabe, Arthur Barney; Nelson, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Current programming interfaces for sensor networks often target experienced developers and lack important features. Tables is a spreadsheet inspired programming environment that enables rapid development of complex applications by a wide range of users. Tables emphasizes ease-of-use by employing spreadsheet abstractions, including pivot tables and data-driven functions. Using these tools, users are able to construct applications that incorporate local and collective computation and communication. We evaluate the design and implementation of Tables on the TelosB platform, and show how Tables can be used to construct data monitoring, classification, and object tracking applications. We discuss the relative computation, memory, and network overhead imposed by the Tables environment. With this evaluation, we show that the Tables programming environment represents a feasible alternative to existing programming systems.

  3. Superparamagnetic tunnel junctions for bio-inspired computing (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grollier, Julie; Torrejon, Jacob; Riou, Mathieu; Cros, Vincent; Querlioz, Damien; Tsunegi, Sumito; Fukushima, Akio; Kubota, Hitoshi; Yuasa, Shinji; Stiles, Mark D.; Khalsa, Guru

    2016-10-01

    The brain displays many features typical of non-linear dynamical networks, such as synchronization or chaotic behaviour. These observations have inspired a whole class of models that harness the power of complex non-linear dynamical networks for computing. In this framework, neurons are modeled as non-linear oscillators, and synapses as the coupling between oscillators. These abstract models are very good at processing waveforms for pattern recognition or at generating precise time sequences useful for robotic motion. However there are very few hardware implementations of these systems, because large numbers of interacting non-linear oscillators are indeed. In this talk, I will show that coupled spin-torque nano-oscillators are very promising for realizing cognitive computing at the nanometer and nanosecond scale, and will present our first results in this direction.

  4. Kirigami artificial muscles with complex biologically inspired morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sareh, Sina; Rossiter, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present bio-inspired smart structures which exploit the actuation of flexible ionic polymer composites and the kirigami design principle. Kirigami design is used to convert planar actuators into active 3D structures capable of large out-of-plane displacement and that replicate biological mechanisms. Here we present the burstbot, a fluid control and propulsion mechanism based on the atrioventricular cuspid valve, and the vortibot, a spiral actuator based on Vorticella campanula, a ciliate protozoa. Models derived from biological counterparts are used as a platform for design optimization and actuator performance measurement. The symmetric and asymmetric fluid interactions of the burstbot are investigated and the effectiveness in fluid transport applications is demonstrated. The vortibot actuator is geometrically optimized as a camera positioner capable of 360° scanning. Experimental results for a one-turn spiral actuator show complex actuation derived from a single degree of freedom control signal.

  5. Extreme-mass-ratio inspirals into a black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osburn, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The inspiral of a compact stellar-mass object (black hole, neutron star, or white dwarf) into a super-massive black hole is modeled perturbatively. All dissipative and conservative effects on the orbital motion are included up to first-order in the mass-ratio via the gravitational self-force. To calculate the self-force, a number of advanced numerical tools were developed. These tools are able to describe the complete range of astrophysically relevant orbital configurations for the first time (for non-rotating binary components), and at an accuracy never before achieved. The accuracy is high enough to aid in the detection of gravitational waves while correctly determining the physical parameters of the source.

  6. Human opinion dynamics: An inspiration to solve complex optimization problems

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Rishemjit; Kumar, Ritesh; Bhondekar, Amol P.; Kapur, Pawan

    2013-01-01

    Human interactions give rise to the formation of different kinds of opinions in a society. The study of formations and dynamics of opinions has been one of the most important areas in social physics. The opinion dynamics and associated social structure leads to decision making or so called opinion consensus. Opinion formation is a process of collective intelligence evolving from the integrative tendencies of social influence with the disintegrative effects of individualisation, and therefore could be exploited for developing search strategies. Here, we demonstrate that human opinion dynamics can be utilised to solve complex mathematical optimization problems. The results have been compared with a standard algorithm inspired from bird flocking behaviour and the comparison proves the efficacy of the proposed approach in general. Our investigation may open new avenues towards understanding the collective decision making. PMID:24141795

  7. Nature inspires sensors to do more with less.

    PubMed

    Mulvaney, Shawn P; Sheehan, Paul E

    2014-10-28

    The world is filled with widely varying chemical, physical, and biological stimuli. Over millennia, organisms have refined their senses to cope with these diverse stimuli, becoming virtuosos in differentiating closely related antigens, handling extremes in concentration, resetting the spent sensing mechanisms, and processing the multiple data streams being generated. Nature successfully deals with both repeating and new stimuli, demonstrating great adaptability when confronted with the latter. Interestingly, nature accomplishes these feats using a fairly simple toolbox. The sensors community continues to draw inspiration from nature's example: just look at the antibodies used as biosensor capture agents or the neural networks that process multivariate data streams. Indeed, many successful sensors have been built by simply mimicking natural systems. However, some of the most exciting breakthroughs occur when the community moves beyond mimicking nature and learns to use nature's tools in innovative ways.

  8. Inspiring pupils in STEM through Tim Peake's Principia Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    This poster looks at a particular case study of how a science programme with a lot of media attention can be embedded into schools to inspire pupils in STEM subjects. In this case, the UK has become very excited about their first publicly funded British astronaut, Tim Peake, visiting the International Space Station between December 2015 and June 2016. Tim is particularly keen to dedicate a lot of his time to education initiatives including undertaking a live radio contact with a handful of UK schools so that pupils can ask him their questions. A group of schools in Norfolk have won this opportunity and will host a live radio contact in February 2015. As part of this initiative, local schools (primary and secondary) are being encouraged to embed the mission into their curriculum in various ways using many excellent resources developed by a number of agencies. The range of these and our proposed methods for judging their efficacies are explored in this poster.

  9. Modified Chaplygin gas inspired inflationary model in braneworld scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawad, Abdul; Rani, Shamaila; Mohsaneen, Sidra

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the modified Chaplygin gas inspired inflationary regime in the brane-world framework in the presence of standard and tachyon scalar fields. We consider the intermediate inflationary scenario and construct the slow-roll parameters, e-folding numbers, spectral index, scalar and tensor power spectra, tensor to scalar ratio for both scalar field models. We develop the ns - N and r - N planes and concluded that ns˜eq96^{+0.5}_{-0.5} and r≤0.0016 for N˜eq60^{+5}_{-5} in both cases of scalar field models as well as for all values of m. These constraints are consistent with observational data such as WMAP7, WMAP9 and Planck data.

  10. Gecko inspired carbon nanotube based thermal gap pads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, Sunny; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2012-02-01

    Thermal management has become a critical factor in designing the next generation of microprocessors. The bottleneck in design of material for efficient heat transfer from electronic units to heat sinks is to enhance heat flow across interface between two dissimilar, rough surfaces. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been shown to be promising candidates for thermal transport. However, the heat transport across the interface continues to be a challenging hurdle. In the current work we designed free standing thermal pads based on gecko-inspired carbon nanotube adhesives. The pads were made of metallic carbon nanotubes and the structure was designed such that it would allow large area of intimate contact. We showed that these adhesive pads can be used as electrical and thermal interconnects.

  11. Polymorphic beams and Nature inspired circuits for optical current

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, José A.; Alieva, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Laser radiation pressure is a basis of numerous applications in science and technology such as atom cooling, particle manipulation, material processing, etc. This light force for the case of scalar beams is proportional to the intensity-weighted wavevector known as optical current. The ability to design the optical current according to the considered application brings new promising perspectives to exploit the radiation pressure. However, this is a challenging problem because it often requires confinement of the optical current within tight light curves (circuits) and adapting its local value for a particular task. Here, we present a formalism to handle this problem including its experimental demonstration. It consists of a Nature-inspired circuit shaping with independent control of the optical current provided by a new kind of beam referred to as polymorphic beam. This finding is highly relevant to diverse optical technologies and can be easily extended to electron and x-ray coherent beams. PMID:27734940

  12. Aquariums Inspiring Hope and Action Against Climate Change (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernon, C. L.

    2010-12-01

    The mission of the Monterey Bay Aquarium is to “inspire conservation of the oceans.” We do this by connecting people emotionally with the animals, plants, and habitats of Monterey Bay and beyond, and by giving them tools and encouragement to act on behalf of ocean health. Because of our mission, it would seem natural to talk with visitors about the greatest threat to our ocean: global climate change. But does interpreting climate change conflict with the expectations of most visitors to spend a fun, social time with their friends and family? How do informal science education venues, which are seen as trusted sources of information about natural history and conservation, most effectively convey information that is at best distressing and at worst, downright depressing? This presentation will highlight ways that the Monterey Bay Aquarium is meeting the challenge of engaging and educating visitors about climate change and the ocean through exhibits, auditorium programs, humorous video, musical theater, and conversations.

  13. A stochastic micro-machine inspired by bacterial chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Hossein; Esckandariun, Banafsheh; Najafi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by bacterial chemotaxis, we propose and study the dynamics of a 3D hydrodynamical search-machine at micrometer scale. Chemotactic memory of the proposed system that is borrowed from bacteria, allows it to search the fluid medium and find the required target. As the motion in micron size length scale is dominated by random forces, we analyze the statistical properties of the model. Mean square displacements, orientational correlation functions and also the chemotactic index (CI) of the system are investigated in detail. Because of the chemotactic memory, the system shows superdiffusing displacements in all directions and the diffusion exponents are anisotropic for the directions along or perpendicular to a preferred direction given by the gradient of attractant molecules transmitted by the target.

  14. Polymorphic beams and Nature inspired circuits for optical current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, José A.; Alieva, Tatiana

    2016-10-01

    Laser radiation pressure is a basis of numerous applications in science and technology such as atom cooling, particle manipulation, material processing, etc. This light force for the case of scalar beams is proportional to the intensity-weighted wavevector known as optical current. The ability to design the optical current according to the considered application brings new promising perspectives to exploit the radiation pressure. However, this is a challenging problem because it often requires confinement of the optical current within tight light curves (circuits) and adapting its local value for a particular task. Here, we present a formalism to handle this problem including its experimental demonstration. It consists of a Nature-inspired circuit shaping with independent control of the optical current provided by a new kind of beam referred to as polymorphic beam. This finding is highly relevant to diverse optical technologies and can be easily extended to electron and x-ray coherent beams.

  15. Butterfly effects: novel functional materials inspired from the wings scales.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wang; Gu, Jiajun; Liu, Qinglei; Su, Huilan; Fan, Tongxiang; Zhang, Di

    2014-10-07

    Through millions of years of evolutionary selection, nature has created biological materials with various functional properties for survival. Many complex natural architectures, such as shells, bones, and honeycombs, have been studied and imitated in the design and fabrication of materials with enhanced hardness and stiffness. Recently, more and more researchers have started to research the wings of butterflies, mostly because of their dazzling colors. It was found that most of these iridescent colors are caused by periodic photonic structures on the scales that make up the surfaces of these wings. These materials have recently become a focus of multidiscipline research because of their promising applications in the display of structural colors, and in advanced sensors, photonic crystals, and solar cells. This paper review aims to provide a perspective overview of the research inspired by these wing structures in recent years.

  16. Bio-inspired artificial iriodphores based on capillary origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manakasettharn, Supone; Taylor, J. Ashley; Krupenkin, Tom

    2011-03-01

    Many marine organisms have evolved complex optical mechanisms of dynamic skin color control that allow them to drastically change their visual appearance. In particular, cephalopods have developed especially effective dynamic color control mechanism based on the mechanical actuation of the micro-scale optical structures, which produce either variable degrees of area coverage by a given color (chromatophores) or variations in spatial orientation of the reflective and diffractive surfaces (iridophores). In this work we describe bio-inspired artificial iridophores based on electrowetting-controlled capillary origami. We describe the developed microfabrication approach, characterize mechanical and optical properties of the obtained microstructures and discuss their electrowetting-based actuation. The obtained experimental results are in good agreement with a simple theoretical model based on electrocapillarity and elasticity theory. The results of the work can enable a broad range of novel optical devices.

  17. Efficient Biologically Inspired Photocell Enhanced by Delocalized Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creatore, C.; Parker, M. A.; Emmott, S.; Chin, A. W.

    2013-12-01

    Artificially implementing the biological light reactions responsible for the remarkably efficient photon-to-charge conversion in photosynthetic complexes represents a new direction for the future development of photovoltaic devices. Here, we develop such a paradigm and present a model photocell based on the nanoscale architecture and molecular elements of photosynthetic reaction centers. Quantum interference of photon absorption and emission induced by the dipole-dipole interaction between molecular excited states guarantees an enhanced light-to-current conversion and power generation for a wide range of electronic, thermal, and optical parameters for optimized dipolar geometries. This result opens a promising new route for designing artificial light-harvesting devices inspired by biological photosynthesis and quantum technologies.

  18. Mechanically Robust, Negative-Swelling, Mussel-Inspired Tissue Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Devin G.; Bushnell, Grace G.

    2013-01-01

    Most synthetic polymer hydrogel tissue adhesives and sealants swell considerably in physiologic conditions, which can result in mechanical weakening and adverse medical complications. Herein, we describe the synthesis and characterization of mechanically tough zero- or negative-swelling mussel-inspired surgical adhesives based on catechol-modified amphiphilic poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) block copolymers. The formation, swelling, bulk mechanical, and tissue adhesive properties of the resulting thermosensitive gels were characterized. Catechol oxidation at or below room temperature rapidly resulted in a chemically cross-linked network, with subsequent warming to physiological temperature inducing a thermal hydrophobic transition in the PPO domains and providing a mechanism for volumetric reduction and mechanical toughening. The described approach can be easily adapted for other thermally sensitive block copolymers and cross-linking strategies, representing a general approach that can be employed to control swelling and enhance mechanical properties of polymer hydrogels used in a medical context. PMID:23184616

  19. A bio-inspired feature extraction for robust speech recognition.

    PubMed

    Zouhir, Youssef; Ouni, Kaïs

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a feature extraction method for robust speech recognition in noisy environments is proposed. The proposed method is motivated by a biologically inspired auditory model which simulates the outer/middle ear filtering by a low-pass filter and the spectral behaviour of the cochlea by the Gammachirp auditory filterbank (GcFB). The speech recognition performance of our method is tested on speech signals corrupted by real-world noises. The evaluation results show that the proposed method gives better recognition rates compared to the classic techniques such as Perceptual Linear Prediction (PLP), Linear Predictive Coding (LPC), Linear Prediction Cepstral coefficients (LPCC) and Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MFCC). The used recognition system is based on the Hidden Markov Models with continuous Gaussian Mixture densities (HMM-GM).

  20. Supramolecular polymer adhesives: advanced materials inspired by nature.

    PubMed

    Heinzmann, Christian; Weder, Christoph; de Espinosa, Lucas Montero

    2016-01-21

    Due to their dynamic, stimuli-responsive nature, non-covalent interactions represent versatile design elements that can be found in nature in many molecular processes or materials, where adaptive behavior or reversible connectivity is required. Examples include molecular recognition processes, which trigger biological responses or cell-adhesion to surfaces, and a broad range of animal secreted adhesives with environment-dependent properties. Such advanced functionalities have inspired researchers to employ similar design approaches for the development of synthetic polymers with stimuli-responsive properties. The utilization of non-covalent interactions for the design of adhesives with advanced functionalities such as stimuli responsiveness, bonding and debonding on demand capability, surface selectivity or recyclability is a rapidly emerging subset of this field, which is summarized in this review.

  1. A Forgotten Small Telescope that Inspired the Discovery of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, J. W.

    2013-04-01

    A 6-inch Clark refractor was built in 1884 for the University of the Pacific. A young instructor came with no prior training in astronomy, but left inspired to return to graduate school in astronomy at the University of Virginia. This was Heber D. Curtis, who became one of the great astronomers of the 20th century and famous for his early recognition of the true nature of galaxies. Donald E. Osterbrock was aware of the telescope and hoped to examine it, but it remained in obscure storage for decades with a missing objective lens. The original lens to this unusually beautiful and historic instrument recently has been discovered in Texas and now has potential to be re-united with the surviving tube and mounting.

  2. Cicada-inspired cell-instructive nanopatterned arrays

    PubMed Central

    Diu, Ting; Faruqui, Nilofar; Sjöström, Terje; Lamarre, Baptiste; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Su, Bo; Ryadnov, Maxim G.

    2014-01-01

    Biocompatible surfaces hold key to a variety of biomedical problems that are directly related to the competition between host-tissue cell integration and bacterial colonisation. A saving solution to this is seen in the ability of cells to uniquely respond to physical cues on such surfaces thus prompting the search for cell-instructive nanoscale patterns. Here we introduce a generic rationale engineered into biocompatible, titanium, substrates to differentiate cell responses. The rationale is inspired by cicada wing surfaces that display bactericidal nanopillar patterns. The surfaces engineered in this study are titania (TiO2) nanowire arrays that are selectively bactericidal against motile bacteria, while capable of guiding mammalian cell proliferation according to the type of the array. The concept holds promise for clinically relevant materials capable of differential physico-mechanical responses to cellular adhesion. PMID:25409910

  3. A biologically inspired hydrophobic membrane for application in pervaporation.

    PubMed

    Jullok, Nora; Martínez, Rodrigo; Wouters, Christine; Luis, Patricia; Sanz, María Teresa; Van der Bruggen, Bart

    2013-02-05

    An artificial polydimethylsiloxane/polyphenylsulfone (PDMS/PPSU) membrane, which emulates the hydrophobic behavior of natural membranes, was synthesized. Hydrophobicity was achieved by coating the membrane surface sublayer using conventional silicon material, which imitates the character of epicuticular wax (EW) of Prunus laurocerasus L. leaves. It was then applied as a separation medium in pervaporation (PV) of diluted mixtures of ethyl acetate and aroma compounds. The membrane's biomimetic characteristics were evaluated using surface morphology analyses, that is, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), water contact angle measurements, and SEM imaging. A comparison of properties of the membranes synthesized in this work against selected hydrophobic plant leaves indicated a good agreement. PV using these biologically inspired artificial membranes demonstrated preference for the permeation of ethyl acetate. Besides intrinsic characteristics, it was also observed that the chemical potential is highly influential in activating sorption, diffusion, and desorption of a specific compound.

  4. Enabling, empowering, inspiring: research and mentorship through the years*

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Sherrilynne S.

    2000-01-01

    The interrelationship between research and mentorship in an association such as the Medical Library Association (MLA) is revealed through the contributions of individuals and significant association activities in support of research. Research is vital to the well-being and ultimate survival of health sciences librarianship and is not an ivory tower academic activity. Mentorship plays a critical role in setting a standard and model for those individuals who want to be involved in research and, ultimately, for the preparation of the next generation of health sciences librarians. Research and mentorship are discussed in the context of personal experiences, scholarship, and problem solving in a practice environment. Through research and mentorship, we are enabled to enhance our services and programs, empowered to look beyond our own operations for information puzzles to be solved, and inspired to serve society by improving health. PMID:10658958

  5. Strong, reversible underwater adhesion via gecko-inspired hydrophobic fibers.

    PubMed

    Soltannia, Babak; Sameoto, Dan

    2014-12-24

    Strong, reversible underwater adhesion using gecko-inspired surfaces is achievable through the use of a hydrophobic structural material and does not require surface modification or suction cup effects for this adhesion to be effective. Increased surface energy can aid in dry adhesion in an air environment but strongly degrades wet adhesion via reduction of interfacial energy underwater. A direct comparison of structurally identical but chemically different mushroom shaped fibers shows that strong, reversible adhesion, even in a fully wetted, stable state, is feasible underwater if the structural material of the fibers is hydrophobic and the mating surface is not strongly hydrophilic. The exact adhesion strength will be a function of the underwater interfacial energy between surfaces and the specific failure modes of individual fibers. This underwater adhesion has been calculated to be potentially greater than the dry adhesion for specific combinations of hydrophobic surfaces.

  6. Mechanization and Control Concepts for Biologically Inspired Micro Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raney, David L.; Slominski, Eric C.

    2003-01-01

    It is possible that MAV designs of the future will exploit flapping flight in order to perform missions that require extreme agility, such as rapid flight beneath a forest canopy or within the confines of a building. Many of nature's most agile flyers generate flapping motions through resonant excitation of an aeroelastically tailored structure: muscle tissue is used to excite a vibratory mode of their flexible wing structure that creates propulsion and lift. A number of MAV concepts have been proposed that would operate in a similar fashion. This paper describes an ongoing research activity in which mechanization and control concepts with application to resonant flapping MAVs are being explored. Structural approaches, mechanical design, sensing and wingbeat control concepts inspired by hummingbirds, bats and insects are examined. Experimental results from a testbed capable of generating vibratory wingbeat patterns that approximately match those exhibited by hummingbirds in hover, cruise, and reverse flight are presented.

  7. A biomimetic accelerometer inspired by the cricket's clavate hair.

    PubMed

    Droogendijk, H; de Boer, M J; Sanders, R G P; Krijnen, G J M

    2014-08-06

    Crickets use so-called clavate hairs to sense (gravitational) acceleration to obtain information on their orientation. Inspired by this clavate hair system, a one-axis biomimetic accelerometer has been developed and fabricated using surface micromachining and SU-8 lithography. An analytical model is presented for the design of the accelerometer, and guidelines are derived to reduce responsivity due to flow-induced contributions to the accelerometer's output. Measurements show that this microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) hair-based accelerometer has a resonance frequency of 320 Hz, a detection threshold of 0.10 ms(-2) and a dynamic range of more than 35 dB. The accelerometer exhibits a clear directional response to external accelerations and a low responsivity to airflow. Further, the accelerometer's physical limits with respect to noise levels are addressed and the possibility for short-term adaptation of the sensor to the environment is discussed.

  8. Charles Hard Townes: Remarkable Scientist and Inspiring Teacher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, P. F.

    2016-05-01

    Charles Townes is renowned for his work elucidating the structure of molecules through microwave spectroscopy and for his invention of the maser and the laser. He also had a lifelong interest in astronomy, and in the later portion of his remarkable and long career devoted himself to astronomical research, pioneering the study of molecules in interstellar space and the development of infrared spectroscopy, first from the ground and then from airborne facilities. His interest in high angular resolution, as well as high spectral resolution observations, led to development of the first infrared spatial interferometer employing coherent signal processing techniques. In this short review I will only touch on some of Townes' many scientific contributions, concentrating on astronomy, and will also give some personal thoughts about how he inspired students in their research, helping to make the "Townes Group" at the University of California, Berkeley, an ideal environment in which to start a career in research.

  9. Enabling, empowering, inspiring: research and mentorship through the years.

    PubMed

    Fuller, S S

    2000-01-01

    The interrelationship between research and mentorship in an association such as the Medical Library Association (MLA) is revealed through the contributions of individuals and significant association activities in support of research. Research is vital to the well-being and ultimate survival of health sciences librarianship and is not an ivory tower academic activity. Mentorship plays a critical role in setting a standard and model for those individuals who want to be involved in research and, ultimately, for the preparation of the next generation of health sciences librarians. Research and mentorship are discussed in the context of personal experiences, scholarship, and problem solving in a practice environment. Through research and mentorship, we are enabled to enhance our services and programs, empowered to look beyond our own operations for information puzzles to be solved, and inspired to serve society by improving health.

  10. A Bio-Inspired Electromechanical System: Artificial Hair Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kang-Hun

    Inspired by recent biophysical study on the auditory sensory organs, we study electromechanical system which functions similar to the hair cell of the ear. One of the important mechanisms of hair cells, adaptation, is mimicked by an electromechanical feedback loop. The proposed artificial hair cell functions similar to a living sensory organ in the sense that it senses input force signal in spite of the relatively strong noise. Numerical simulation of the proposed system shows otoacoustic sound emission, which was observed in the experiments on the hair cells of the bullfrog. This spontaneous motion is noise-induced periodic motion which is controlled by the time scale of adaptation process and the mechanical damping.

  11. Inspiring hope in our rehabilitation patients, their families, and ourselves.

    PubMed

    Kautz, Donald

    2008-01-01

    When confronted with a devastating disability or chronic illness, rehabilitation nurses play a key role in inspiring hope for patients and their families. This article examines strategies nurses can implement in everyday practice: creating an environment of hope in a rehabilitation unit; assisting patients to manage their negative feelings about their disability; relieving chronic neuropathic pain; sustaining patient relationships with staff and family; helping patients to forgive themselves and others; enhancing patient intimacy with others; using literature to promote hope; acknowledging a patient's belief that nothing is impossible; using humor therapeutically; and maintaining hope for the moment. It is the moment-the time we spend with our patients-that is essential. In that moment, we are promoting hope.

  12. Dreaming as inspiration evidence from religion, philosophy, literature, and film.

    PubMed

    Bulkeley, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents evidence from the history of religion, philosophy, literature, and film to suggest that dreaming is a primal wellspring of creative inspiration. Powerful, reality-bending dreams have motivated the cultural creativity of people all over the world and throughout history. Examples include the dream revelations of Egyptian Pharaohs, the philosophical insights of Socrates, the dark literary themes of Fyodor Dostoevsky, and the cinematic artistry of Akira Kurusawa. Although the conclusions that can be drawn from these sources are limited by several methodological factors, the evidence gives contemporary researchers good reasons to explore the creative potentials of dreaming and the impact on waking life behavior of certain types of extraordinary dream experience.

  13. Polymorphic beams and Nature inspired circuits for optical current.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, José A; Alieva, Tatiana

    2016-10-13

    Laser radiation pressure is a basis of numerous applications in science and technology such as atom cooling, particle manipulation, material processing, etc. This light force for the case of scalar beams is proportional to the intensity-weighted wavevector known as optical current. The ability to design the optical current according to the considered application brings new promising perspectives to exploit the radiation pressure. However, this is a challenging problem because it often requires confinement of the optical current within tight light curves (circuits) and adapting its local value for a particular task. Here, we present a formalism to handle this problem including its experimental demonstration. It consists of a Nature-inspired circuit shaping with independent control of the optical current provided by a new kind of beam referred to as polymorphic beam. This finding is highly relevant to diverse optical technologies and can be easily extended to electron and x-ray coherent beams.

  14. A Proposed Biologically Inspired Model for Object Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Absi, Hamada R. H.; Abdullah, Azween B.

    Object recognition has attracted the attention of many researchers as it is considered as one of the most important problems in computer vision. Two main approaches have been utilized to develop object recognition solutions i.e. machine and biological vision. Many algorithms have been developed in machine vision. Recently, Biology has inspired computer scientist to map the features of the human and primate's visual systems into computational models. Some of these models are based on the feed-forward mechanism of information processing in cortex; however, the performance of these models has been affected by the increase of clutter in the scene. Another mechanism of information processing in cortex is called the feedback. This mechanism has also been mapped into computational models. However, the results were also not satisfying. In this paper an object recognition model based on the integration of the feed-forward and feedback functions in the visual cortex is proposed.

  15. Bioengineering the infarcted heart by applying bio-inspired materials.

    PubMed

    Ruvinov, Emil; Harel-Adar, Tamar; Cohen, Smadar

    2011-10-01

    Induction of cardiac muscle regeneration following myocardial infarction (MI) represents a major challenge in cardiovascular therapy, as the current clinical approaches are limited in their ability to regenerate a new muscle tissue and to replace infarcted myocardium. Here, we describe the conception of two strategies based on bio-inspired materials, aimed at myocardial repair after MI. In the first strategy, alginate biomaterial was designed with affinity-binding moieties, enabling the binding of heparin-binding proteins and their controlled presentation and release. The combined features of this unique alginate hydrogel, as a temporary extracellular matrix replacement and a depot for bio-molecules such as insulin-like growth factor-1 and hepatocyte growth factor, led to improvements in cardiac structure and function, as demonstrated by the biomaterial's abilities to thicken the scar and prevent left-ventricular remodeling and dilatation. Endogenous regeneration occurring at the infarct as manifested by the enhanced angiogenesis, cardiomyocyte proliferation, and appearance of cardiac-related stem cells is likely to have contributed to this. In the second strategy, phosphatidylserine (PS)-presenting liposomes were developed to mimic apoptotic cells bodies, specifically their capability of immunomodulating activated macrophages into anti-inflammatory state. In a rat model of acute MI, targeting of PS-presenting liposomes to infarct macrophages after injection via the femoral vein was demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging. The treatment promoted angiogenesis, the preservation of small scars, and prevention of ventricular dilatation and remodeling. Collectively, the two bio-inspired material-based strategies presented herein represent unique and clinical accessible approaches for myocardial infarct repair.

  16. Three-Dimensional-Printing of Bio-Inspired Composites.

    PubMed

    Xiang Gu, Grace; Su, Isabelle; Sharma, Shruti; Voros, Jamie L; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J

    2016-02-01

    Optimized for millions of years, natural materials often outperform synthetic materials due to their hierarchical structures and multifunctional abilities. They usually feature a complex architecture that consists of simple building blocks. Indeed, many natural materials such as bone, nacre, hair, and spider silk, have outstanding material properties, making them applicable to engineering applications that may require both mechanical resilience and environmental compatibility. However, such natural materials are very difficult to harvest in bulk, and may be toxic in the way they occur naturally, and therefore, it is critical to use alternative methods to fabricate materials that have material functions similar to material function as their natural counterparts for large-scale applications. Recent progress in additive manufacturing, especially the ability to print multiple materials at upper micrometer resolution, has given researchers an excellent instrument to design and reconstruct natural-inspired materials. The most advanced 3D-printer can now be used to manufacture samples to emulate their geometry and material composition with high fidelity. Its capabilities, in combination with computational modeling, have provided us even more opportunities for designing, optimizing, and testing the function of composite materials, in order to achieve composites of high mechanical resilience and reliability. In this review article, we focus on the advanced material properties of several multifunctional biological materials and discuss how the advanced 3D-printing techniques can be used to mimic their architectures and functions. Lastly, we discuss the limitations of 3D-printing, suggest possible future developments, and discuss applications using bio-inspired materials as a tool in bioengineering and other fields.

  17. CIRCUMBINARY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC ACCRETION INTO INSPIRALING BINARY BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, Scott C.; Mundim, Bruno C.; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Campanelli, Manuela; Zlochower, Yosef; Krolik, Julian H.; Yunes, Nicolas

    2012-08-10

    We have simulated the magnetohydrodynamic evolution of a circumbinary disk surrounding an equal-mass binary comprising two non-spinning black holes during the period in which the disk inflow time is comparable to the binary evolution time due to gravitational radiation. Both the changing spacetime and the binary orbital evolution are described by an innovative technique utilizing high-order post-Newtonian approximations. Prior to the beginning of the inspiral, the structure of the circumbinary disk is predicted well by extrapolation from Newtonian results: a gap of roughly two binary separation radii is cleared, and matter piles up at the outer edge of this gap as inflow is retarded by torques exerted by the binary; the accretion rate is roughly half its value at large radius. During inspiral, the inner edge of the disk initially moves inward in coordination with the shrinking binary, but-as the orbital evolution accelerates-the inward motion of the disk edge falls behind the rate of binary compression. In this stage, the binary torque falls substantially, but the accretion rate decreases by only 10%-20%. When the binary separation is tens of gravitational radii, the rest-mass efficiency of disk radiation is a few percent, suggesting that supermassive binary black holes could be very luminous at this stage of their evolution. Inner disk heating is modulated at a beat frequency comparable to the binary orbital frequency. However, a disk with sufficient surface density to be luminous may be optically thick, suppressing periodic modulation of the luminosity.

  18. Three-Dimensional-Printing of Bio-Inspired Composites

    PubMed Central

    Xiang Gu, Grace; Su, Isabelle; Sharma, Shruti; Voros, Jamie L.; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J.

    2016-01-01

    Optimized for millions of years, natural materials often outperform synthetic materials due to their hierarchical structures and multifunctional abilities. They usually feature a complex architecture that consists of simple building blocks. Indeed, many natural materials such as bone, nacre, hair, and spider silk, have outstanding material properties, making them applicable to engineering applications that may require both mechanical resilience and environmental compatibility. However, such natural materials are very difficult to harvest in bulk, and may be toxic in the way they occur naturally, and therefore, it is critical to use alternative methods to fabricate materials that have material functions similar to material function as their natural counterparts for large-scale applications. Recent progress in additive manufacturing, especially the ability to print multiple materials at upper micrometer resolution, has given researchers an excellent instrument to design and reconstruct natural-inspired materials. The most advanced 3D-printer can now be used to manufacture samples to emulate their geometry and material composition with high fidelity. Its capabilities, in combination with computational modeling, have provided us even more opportunities for designing, optimizing, and testing the function of composite materials, in order to achieve composites of high mechanical resilience and reliability. In this review article, we focus on the advanced material properties of several multifunctional biological materials and discuss how the advanced 3D-printing techniques can be used to mimic their architectures and functions. Lastly, we discuss the limitations of 3D-printing, suggest possible future developments, and discuss applications using bio-inspired materials as a tool in bioengineering and other fields. PMID:26747791

  19. Development of a bio-inspired transformable robotic fin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yikun; Xia, Yu; Qin, Fenghua; Xu, Min; Li, Weihua; Zhang, Shiwu

    2016-08-31

    Fish swim by oscillating their pectoral fins forwards and backwards in a cyclic motion such that their geometric parameters and aspect ratios change according to how fast or slow a fish wants to swim; these complex motions result in a complicated hydrodynamic response. This paper focuses on the dynamic change in the shape of a fin to improve the underwater propulsion of bio-inspired mechanism. To do this, a novel transformable robotic fin has been developed to investigate how this change in shape affects the hydrodynamic forces acting on the fin. This robotic fin has a multi-link frame and a flexible surface skin where changes in shape are activated by a purpose designed multi-link mechanism driven by a transformation motor. A drag platform has been designed to study the performance of this variable robotic fin. Numerous experiments were carried out to determine how various controlling modes affect the thrust capability of this fin. The kinematic parameters associated with this robotic fin include the oscillating frequency and amplitude, and the drag velocity. The fin has four modes to control the cyclic motion; these were also investigated in combination with the variable kinematic parameters. The results will help us understand the locomotion performance of this transformable robotic fin. Note that different controlling modes influence the propulsive performance of this robotic fin, which means its propulsive performance can be optimized in a changing environment by adapting its shape. This study facilitates the development of bio-inspired unmanned underwater vehicles with a very high swimming performance.

  20. Bio-inspired Autonomic Structures: a middleware for Telecommunications Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzalini, Antonio; Minerva, Roberto; Moiso, Corrado

    Today, people are making use of several devices for communications, for accessing multi-media content services, for data/information retrieving, for processing, computing, etc.: examples are laptops, PDAs, mobile phones, digital cameras, mp3 players, smart cards and smart appliances. One of the most attracting service scenarios for future Telecommunications and Internet is the one where people will be able to browse any object in the environment they live: communications, sensing and processing of data and services will be highly pervasive. In this vision, people, machines, artifacts and the surrounding space will create a kind of computational environment and, at the same time, the interfaces to the network resources. A challenging technological issue will be interconnection and management of heterogeneous systems and a huge amount of small devices tied together in networks of networks. Moreover, future network and service infrastructures should be able to provide Users and Application Developers (at different levels, e.g., residential Users but also SMEs, LEs, ASPs/Web2.0 Service roviders, ISPs, Content Providers, etc.) with the most appropriate "environment" according to their context and specific needs. Operators must be ready to manage such level of complication enabling their latforms with technological advanced allowing network and services self-supervision and self-adaptation capabilities. Autonomic software solutions, enhanced with innovative bio-inspired mechanisms and algorithms, are promising areas of long term research to face such challenges. This chapter proposes a bio-inspired autonomic middleware capable of leveraging the assets of the underlying network infrastructure whilst, at the same time, supporting the development of future Telecommunications and Internet Ecosystems.

  1. Demonstrations of bio-inspired perching landing gear for UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tieu, Mindy; Michael, Duncan M.; Pflueger, Jeffery B.; Sethi, Manik S.; Shimazu, Kelli N.; Anthony, Tatiana M.; Lee, Christopher L.

    2016-04-01

    Results are presented which demonstrate the feasibility and performance of two concepts of biologically-inspired landing-gear systems that enable bird-sized, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV's) to land, perch, and take-off from branchlike structures and/or ledges. The first concept follows the anatomy of birds that can grasp ahold of a branch and perch as tendons in their legs are tensioned. This design involves a gravity-activated, cable-driven, underactuated, graspingfoot mechanism. As the UAV lands, its weight collapses a four-bar linkage pulling a cable which curls two opposing, multi-segmented feet to grasp the landing target. Each foot is a single, compliant mechanism fabricated by simultaneouly 3D-printing a flexible thermo-plastic and a stiffer ABS plastic. The design is optimized to grasp structures over a range of shapes and sizes. Quasi-static and flight tests of this landing gear affixed to RC rotorcraft (24 cm to 550 cm in diameter) demonstrate that the aircraft can land, perch, and take-off from a tree branch, rectangular wood board, PVC pipe, metal hand rail, chair armrest, and in addition, a stone wall ledge. Stability tests show that perching is maintained under base and wind disturbances. The second design concept, inspired by roosting bats, is a two-material, 3D-printed hooking mechanism that enables the UAV to stably suspend itself from a wire or small-diameter branch. The design balances structural stiffness for support and flexibility for the perching process. A flight-test demonstrates the attaching and dis-engaging of a small, RC quadcopter from a suspended line.

  2. Stingray-inspired robot with simply actuated intermediate motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neely, Lincoln; Gaiennie, Jack; Noble, Nick; Erickson, Jonathan C.

    2016-04-01

    Batoids, or rays, utilize unique forms of locomotion that may offer more efficient techniques of motorized propulsion in various marine environments. We present a novel biomimetic engineering design and assembly of a stingray-inspired robot swimmer. The robots locomotion mimics the Dasyatis americana, or southern stingray, whose distinction among rays is its intermediate motion, characterized by sweeping strokes that propagate between 1/2-1 wavelength of the fin profile in the posterior direction. Though oscillatory (<1/2 wavelength) and undulatory (> wavelengths) ray-based robots have been created, this project demonstrates new engineering possibilities in what is, to the best of our knowledge, the first intermediately propelled batoid-based robot. The robots fins were made of silicone rubber, cast in a 3-D printed mold, with wingspan of 42 cm (1/2 - 1/5 scale for males and females, respectively, scale of model organism). Two anteriorly placed servomotors per fin were used, all controlled by one wirelessly enabled Arduino microcontroller. Each servomotor oscillated a flexible rod with cylindrical joint, whose frequency, speed, and front-back phase delay were user-programmed over wireless connection. During free-swimming tests, the fin profile developed about 0.8 wavelength, qualifying for successful mimicry of its biological inspiration. The robot satisfactorily maintained straight-line motion, reaching average peak velocity of 9.4+/-1.0 cm/s (0.27-0.03 body lengths/second) at its optimum flapping frequency of 1.4 Hz. This is in the same order of magnitude of speed normalized to body length achieved by others in two recent batoid-based projects. In summary, our robot performed intermediate stingray locomotion with relatively fewer components, which reveals robust potential for innovation of the simple intermediate batoid-based robot swimmer.

  3. Cellular automaton model of crowd evacuation inspired by slime mould

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalogeiton, V. S.; Papadopoulos, D. P.; Georgilas, I. P.; Sirakoulis, G. Ch.; Adamatzky, A. I.

    2015-04-01

    In all the living organisms, the self-preservation behaviour is almost universal. Even the most simple of living organisms, like slime mould, is typically under intense selective pressure to evolve a response to ensure their evolution and safety in the best possible way. On the other hand, evacuation of a place can be easily characterized as one of the most stressful situations for the individuals taking part on it. Taking inspiration from the slime mould behaviour, we are introducing a computational bio-inspired model crowd evacuation model. Cellular Automata (CA) were selected as a fully parallel advanced computation tool able to mimic the Physarum's behaviour. In particular, the proposed CA model takes into account while mimicking the Physarum foraging process, the food diffusion, the organism's growth, the creation of tubes for each organism, the selection of optimum tube for each human in correspondence to the crowd evacuation under study and finally, the movement of all humans at each time step towards near exit. To test the model's efficiency and robustness, several simulation scenarios were proposed both in virtual and real-life indoor environments (namely, the first floor of office building B of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of Democritus University of Thrace). The proposed model is further evaluated in a purely quantitative way by comparing the simulation results with the corresponding ones from the bibliography taken by real data. The examined fundamental diagrams of velocity-density and flow-density are found in full agreement with many of the already published corresponding results proving the adequacy, the fitness and the resulting dynamics of the model. Finally, several real Physarum experiments were conducted in an archetype of the aforementioned real-life environment proving at last that the proposed model succeeded in reproducing sufficiently the Physarum's recorded behaviour derived from observation of the aforementioned

  4. Trends and Challenges in Neuroengineering: Toward "Intelligent" Neuroprostheses through Brain-"Brain Inspired Systems" Communication.

    PubMed

    Vassanelli, Stefano; Mahmud, Mufti

    2016-01-01

    Future technologies aiming at restoring and enhancing organs function will intimately rely on near-physiological and energy-efficient communication between living and artificial biomimetic systems. Interfacing brain-inspired devices with the real brain is at the forefront of such emerging field, with the term "neurobiohybrids" indicating all those systems where such interaction is established. We argue that achieving a "high-level" communication and functional synergy between natural and artificial neuronal networks in vivo, will allow the development of a heterogeneous world of neurobiohybrids, which will include "living robots" but will also embrace "intelligent" neuroprostheses for augmentation of brain function. The societal and economical impact of intelligent neuroprostheses is likely to be potentially strong, as they will offer novel therapeutic perspectives for a number of diseases, and going beyond classical pharmaceutical schemes. However, they will unavoidably raise fundamental ethical questions on the intermingling between man and machine and more specifically, on how deeply it should be allowed that brain processing is affected by implanted "intelligent" artificial systems. Following this perspective, we provide the reader with insights on ongoing developments and trends in the field of neurobiohybrids. We address the topic also from a "community building" perspective, showing through a quantitative bibliographic analysis, how scientists working on the engineering of brain-inspired devices and brain-machine interfaces are increasing their interactions. We foresee that such trend preludes to a formidable technological and scientific revolution in brain-machine communication and to the opening of new avenues for restoring or even augmenting brain function for therapeutic purposes.

  5. Transportation Network with Fluctuating Input/Output Designed by the Bio-Inspired Physarum Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shin; Takamatsu, Atsuko

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose designing transportation network topology and traffic distribution under fluctuating conditions using a bio-inspired algorithm. The algorithm is inspired by the adaptive behavior observed in an amoeba-like organism, plasmodial slime mold, more formally known as plasmodium of Physarum plycephalum. This organism forms a transportation network to distribute its protoplasm, the fluidic contents of its cell, throughout its large cell body. In this process, the diameter of the transportation tubes adapts to the flux of the protoplasm. The Physarum algorithm, which mimics this adaptive behavior, has been widely applied to complex problems, such as maze solving and designing the topology of railroad grids, under static conditions. However, in most situations, environmental conditions fluctuate; for example, in power grids, the consumption of electric power shows daily, weekly, and annual periodicity depending on the lifestyles or the business needs of the individual consumers. This paper studies the design of network topology and traffic distribution with oscillatory input and output traffic flows. The network topology proposed by the Physarum algorithm is controlled by a parameter of the adaptation process of the tubes. We observe various rich topologies such as complete mesh, partial mesh, Y-shaped, and V-shaped networks depending on this adaptation parameter and evaluate them on the basis of three performance functions: loss, cost, and vulnerability. Our results indicate that consideration of the oscillatory conditions and the phase-lags in the multiple outputs of the network is important: The building and/or maintenance cost of the network can be reduced by introducing the oscillating condition, and when the phase-lag among the outputs is large, the transportation loss can also be reduced. We use stability analysis to reveal how the system exhibits various topologies depending on the parameter. PMID:24586616

  6. Transportation network with fluctuating input/output designed by the bio-inspired Physarum algorithm.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shin; Takamatsu, Atsuko

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose designing transportation network topology and traffic distribution under fluctuating conditions using a bio-inspired algorithm. The algorithm is inspired by the adaptive behavior observed in an amoeba-like organism, plasmodial slime mold, more formally known as plasmodium of Physarum plycephalum. This organism forms a transportation network to distribute its protoplasm, the fluidic contents of its cell, throughout its large cell body. In this process, the diameter of the transportation tubes adapts to the flux of the protoplasm. The Physarum algorithm, which mimics this adaptive behavior, has been widely applied to complex problems, such as maze solving and designing the topology of railroad grids, under static conditions. However, in most situations, environmental conditions fluctuate; for example, in power grids, the consumption of electric power shows daily, weekly, and annual periodicity depending on the lifestyles or the business needs of the individual consumers. This paper studies the design of network topology and traffic distribution with oscillatory input and output traffic flows. The network topology proposed by the Physarum algorithm is controlled by a parameter of the adaptation process of the tubes. We observe various rich topologies such as complete mesh, partial mesh, Y-shaped, and V-shaped networks depending on this adaptation parameter and evaluate them on the basis of three performance functions: loss, cost, and vulnerability. Our results indicate that consideration of the oscillatory conditions and the phase-lags in the multiple outputs of the network is important: The building and/or maintenance cost of the network can be reduced by introducing the oscillating condition, and when the phase-lag among the outputs is large, the transportation loss can also be reduced. We use stability analysis to reveal how the system exhibits various topologies depending on the parameter.

  7. Introducing Students to Bio-Inspiration and Biomimetic Design: A Workshop Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santulli, Carlo; Langella, Carla

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, bio-inspired approach to design has gained considerable interest between designers, engineers and end-users. However, there are difficulties in introducing bio-inspiration concepts in the university curriculum in that they involve multi-disciplinary work, which can only possibly be successfully delivered by a team with integrated…

  8. Fish-inspired robots: design, sensing, actuation, and autonomy--a review of research.

    PubMed

    Raj, Aditi; Thakur, Atul

    2016-04-13

    Underwater robot designs inspired by the behavior, physiology, and anatomy of fishes can provide enhanced maneuverability, stealth, and energy efficiency. Over the last two decades, robotics researchers have developed and reported a large variety of fish-inspired robot designs. The purpose of this review is to report different types of fish-inspired robot designs based upon their intended locomotion patterns. We present a detailed comparison of various design features like sensing, actuation, autonomy, waterproofing, and morphological structure of fish-inspired robots reported in the past decade. We believe that by studying the existing robots, future designers will be able to create new designs by adopting features from the successful robots. The review also summarizes the open research issues that need to be taken up for the further advancement of the field and also for the deployment of fish-inspired robots in practice.

  9. Insect-Inspired Flight Control for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita; Stange, G.; Srinivasan, M.; Chahl, Javaan; Hine, Butler; Zornetzer, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Flight-control and navigation systems inspired by the structure and function of the visual system and brain of insects have been proposed for a class of developmental miniature robotic aircraft called "biomorphic flyers" described earlier in "Development of Biomorphic Flyers" (NPO-30554), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 11 (November 2004), page 54. These form a subset of biomorphic explorers, which, as reported in several articles in past issues of NASA Tech Briefs ["Biomorphic Explorers" (NPO-20142), Vol. 22, No. 9 (September 1998), page 71; "Bio-Inspired Engineering of Exploration Systems" (NPO-21142), Vol. 27, No. 5 (May 2003), page 54; and "Cooperative Lander-Surface/Aerial Microflyer Missions for Mars Exploration" (NPO-30286), Vol. 28, No. 5 (May 2004), page 36], are proposed small robots, equipped with microsensors and communication systems, that would incorporate crucial functions of mobility, adaptability, and even cooperative behavior. These functions are inherent to biological organisms but are challenging frontiers for technical systems. Biomorphic flyers could be used on Earth or remote planets to explore otherwise difficult or impossible to reach sites. An example of an exploratory task of search/surveillance functions currently being tested is to obtain high-resolution aerial imagery, using a variety of miniaturized electronic cameras. The control functions to be implemented by the systems in development include holding altitude, avoiding hazards, following terrain, navigation by reference to recognizable terrain features, stabilization of flight, and smooth landing. Flying insects perform these and other functions remarkably well, even though insect brains contains fewer than 10(exp -4) as many neurons as does the human brain. Although most insects have immobile, fixed-focus eyes and lack stereoscopy (and hence cannot perceive depth directly), they utilize a number of ingenious strategies for perceiving, and navigating in, three dimensions. Despite

  10. Bio-inspired routes for synthesizing efficient nanoscale platinum electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Jennifer N.; Wang, Joseph

    2014-08-31

    The overall objective of the proposed research is to use fundamental advances in bionanotechnology to design powerful platinum nanocrystal electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications. The new economically-viable, environmentally-friendly, bottom-up biochemical synthetic strategy will produce platinum nanocrystals with tailored size, shape and crystal orientation, hence leading to a maximum electrochemical reactivity. There are five specific aims to the proposed bio-inspired strategy for synthesizing efficient electrocatalytic platinum nanocrystals: (1) isolate peptides that both selectively bind particular crystal faces of platinum and promote the nucleation and growth of particular nanocrystal morphologies, (2) pattern nanoscale 2-dimensional arrays of platinum nucleating peptides from DNA scaffolds, (3) investigate the combined use of substrate patterned peptides and soluble peptides on nanocrystal morphology and growth (4) synthesize platinum crystals on planar and large-area carbon electrode supports, and (5) perform detailed characterization of the electrocatalytic behavior as a function of catalyst size, shape and morphology. Project Description and Impact: This bio-inspired collaborative research effort will address key challenges in designing powerful electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications by employing nucleic acid scaffolds in combination with peptides to perform specific, environmentally-friendly, simultaneous bottom-up biochemical synthesis and patterned assembly of highly uniform and efficient platinum nanocrystal catalysts. Bulk synthesis of nanoparticles usually produces a range of sizes, accessible catalytic sites, crystal morphologies, and orientations, all of which lead to inconsistent catalytic activities. In contrast, biological systems routinely demonstrate exquisite control over inorganic syntheses at neutral pH and ambient temperature and pressures. Because the orientation and arrangement of the templating biomolecules can be precisely

  11. Earth Science community support in the EGI-Inspire Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwichtenberg, H.

    2012-04-01

    The Earth Science Grid community is following its strategy of propagating Grid technology to the ES disciplines, setting up interactive collaboration among the members of the community and stimulating the interest of stakeholders on the political level since ten years already. This strategy was described in a roadmap published in an Earth Science Informatics journal. It was applied through different European Grid projects and led to a large Grid Earth Science VRC that covers a variety of ES disciplines; in the end, all of them were facing the same kind of ICT problems. .. The penetration of Grid in the ES community is indicated by the variety of applications, the number of countries in which ES applications are ported, the number of papers in international journals and the number of related PhDs. Among the six virtual organisations belonging to ES, one, ESR, is generic. Three others -env.see-grid-sci.eu, meteo.see-grid-sci.eu and seismo.see-grid-sci.eu- are thematic and regional (South Eastern Europe) for environment, meteorology and seismology. The sixth VO, EGEODE, is for the users of the Geocluster software. There are also ES users in national VOs or VOs related to projects. The services for the ES task in EGI-Inspire concerns the data that are a key part of any ES application. The ES community requires several interfaces to access data and metadata outside of the EGI infrastructure, e.g. by using grid-enabled database interfaces. The data centres have also developed service tools for basic research activities such as searching, browsing and downloading these datasets, but these are not accessible from applications executed on the Grid. The ES task in EGI-Inspire aims to make these tools accessible from the Grid. In collaboration with GENESI-DR (Ground European Network for Earth Science Interoperations - Digital Repositories) this task is maintaining and evolving an interface in response to new requirements that will allow data in the GENESI-DR infrastructure to

  12. 42 CFR 84.97 - Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and... carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable limits. (a) Open-circuit apparatus. (1) The concentration of carbon dioxide in inspired gas in open-circuit apparatus...

  13. 42 CFR 84.97 - Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and... carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable limits. (a) Open-circuit apparatus. (1) The concentration of carbon dioxide in inspired gas in open-circuit apparatus...

  14. Inspired Teachers, Inspired Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prescott, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Last November, more than 700 school leaders, educators, and reporters gathered in Washington, D.C., to celebrate the promise of innovative teaching and project learning to change global future. The event was the Microsoft Partners in Learning Global Forum, and its purpose was for educators worldwide to connect, learn, and collaborate on some of…

  15. Training mechanical engineering students to utilize biological inspiration during product development.

    PubMed

    Bruck, Hugh A; Gershon, Alan L; Golden, Ira; Gupta, Satyandra K; Gyger, Lawrence S; Magrab, Edward B; Spranklin, Brent W

    2007-12-01

    The use of bio-inspiration for the development of new products and devices requires new educational tools for students consisting of appropriate design and manufacturing technologies, as well as curriculum. At the University of Maryland, new educational tools have been developed that introduce bio-inspired product realization to undergraduate mechanical engineering students. These tools include the development of a bio-inspired design repository, a concurrent fabrication and assembly manufacturing technology, a series of undergraduate curriculum modules and a new senior elective in the bio-inspired robotics area. This paper first presents an overview of the two new design and manufacturing technologies that enable students to realize bio-inspired products, and describes how these technologies are integrated into the undergraduate educational experience. Then, the undergraduate curriculum modules are presented, which provide students with the fundamental design and manufacturing principles needed to support bio-inspired product and device development. Finally, an elective bio-inspired robotics project course is present, which provides undergraduates with the opportunity to demonstrate the application of the knowledge acquired through the curriculum modules in their senior year using the new design and manufacturing technologies.

  16. Sundew-Inspired Adhesive Hydrogels Combined with Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Leming; Huang, Yujian; Bian, Zehua; Petrosino, Jennifer; Fan, Zhen; Wang, Yongzhong; Park, Ki Ho; Yue, Tao; Schmidt, Michael; Galster, Scott; Ma, Jianjie; Zhu, Hua; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-01-01

    The potential to harness the unique physical, chemical, and biological properties of the sundew (Drosera) plant’s adhesive hydrogels has long intrigued researchers searching for novel wound-healing applications. However, the ability to collect sufficient quantities of the sundew plant’s adhesive hydrogels is problematic and has eclipsed their therapeutic promise. Inspired by these natural hydrogels, we asked if sundew-inspired adhesive hydrogels could overcome the drawbacks associated with natural sundew hydrogels and be used in combination with stem-cell-based therapy to enhance wound-healing therapeutics. Using a bioinspired approach, we synthesized adhesive hydrogels comprised of sodium alginate, gum arabic, and calcium ions to mimic the properties of the natural sundew-derived adhesive hydrogels. We then characterized and showed that these sundew-inspired hydrogels promote wound healing through their superior adhesive strength, nanostructure, and resistance to shearing when compared to other hydrogels in vitro. In vivo, sundew-inspired hydrogels promoted a “suturing” effect to wound sites, which was demonstrated by enhanced wound closure following topical application of the hydrogels. In combination with mouse adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and compared to other therapeutic biomaterials, the sundew-inspired hydrogels demonstrated superior wound-healing capabilities. Collectively, our studies show that sundew-inspired hydrogels contain ideal properties that promote wound healing and suggest that sundew-inspired-ADSCs combination therapy is an efficacious approach for treating wounds without eliciting noticeable toxicity or inflammation. PMID:26731614

  17. Sundew-Inspired Adhesive Hydrogels Combined with Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Leming; Huang, Yujian; Bian, Zehua; Petrosino, Jennifer; Fan, Zhen; Wang, Yongzhong; Park, Ki Ho; Yue, Tao; Schmidt, Michael; Galster, Scott; Ma, Jianjie; Zhu, Hua; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-01-27

    The potential to harness the unique physical, chemical, and biological properties of the sundew (Drosera) plant's adhesive hydrogels has long intrigued researchers searching for novel wound-healing applications. However, the ability to collect sufficient quantities of the sundew plant's adhesive hydrogels is problematic and has eclipsed their therapeutic promise. Inspired by these natural hydrogels, we asked if sundew-inspired adhesive hydrogels could overcome the drawbacks associated with natural sundew hydrogels and be used in combination with stem-cell-based therapy to enhance wound-healing therapeutics. Using a bioinspired approach, we synthesized adhesive hydrogels comprised of sodium alginate, gum arabic, and calcium ions to mimic the properties of the natural sundew-derived adhesive hydrogels. We then characterized and showed that these sundew-inspired hydrogels promote wound healing through their superior adhesive strength, nanostructure, and resistance to shearing when compared to other hydrogels in vitro. In vivo, sundew-inspired hydrogels promoted a "suturing" effect to wound sites, which was demonstrated by enhanced wound closure following topical application of the hydrogels. In combination with mouse adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and compared to other therapeutic biomaterials, the sundew-inspired hydrogels demonstrated superior wound-healing capabilities. Collectively, our studies show that sundew-inspired hydrogels contain ideal properties that promote wound healing and suggest that sundew-inspired-ADSCs combination therapy is an efficacious approach for treating wounds without eliciting noticeable toxicity or inflammation.

  18. Fluorimetric Mercury Test Strips with Suppressed “Coffee Stains” by a Bio-inspired Fabrication Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yuchun; Shang, Jizhen; Li, Shuying; Feng, Luping; Jiang, Yao; Duan, Zhiqiang; Lv, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Chunxian; Yao, Tiantian; Dong, Zhichao; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Hua

    2016-11-01

    A fluorimetric Hg2+ test strip has been developed using a lotus-inspired fabrication method for suppressing the “coffee stains” toward the uniform distribution of probe materials through creating a hydrophobic drying pattern for fast solvent evaporation. The test strips were first loaded with the model probes of fluorescent gold-silver nanoclusters and then dried in vacuum on the hydrophobic pattern. On the one hand, here, the hydrophobic constraining forces from the lotus surface-like pattern could control the exterior transport of dispersed nanoclusters on strips leading to the minimized “coffee stains”. On the other hand, the vacuum-aided fast solvent evaporation could boost the interior Marangoni flow of probe materials on strips to expect the further improved probe distribution on strips. High aqueous stability and enhanced fluorescence of probes on test strips were realized by the hydrophilic treatment with amine-derivatized silicane. A test strips-based fluorimetry has thereby been developed for probing Hg2+ ions in wastewater, showing the detection performances comparable to the classic instrumental analysis ones. Such a facile and efficient fabrication route for the bio-inspired suppression of “coffee stains” on test strips may expand the scope of applications of test strips-based “point-of-care” analysis methods or detection devices in the biomedical and environmental fields.

  19. Fluorimetric Mercury Test Strips with Suppressed “Coffee Stains” by a Bio-inspired Fabrication Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yuchun; Shang, Jizhen; Li, Shuying; Feng, Luping; Jiang, Yao; Duan, Zhiqiang; Lv, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Chunxian; Yao, Tiantian; Dong, Zhichao; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    A fluorimetric Hg2+ test strip has been developed using a lotus-inspired fabrication method for suppressing the “coffee stains” toward the uniform distribution of probe materials through creating a hydrophobic drying pattern for fast solvent evaporation. The test strips were first loaded with the model probes of fluorescent gold-silver nanoclusters and then dried in vacuum on the hydrophobic pattern. On the one hand, here, the hydrophobic constraining forces from the lotus surface-like pattern could control the exterior transport of dispersed nanoclusters on strips leading to the minimized “coffee stains”. On the other hand, the vacuum-aided fast solvent evaporation could boost the interior Marangoni flow of probe materials on strips to expect the further improved probe distribution on strips. High aqueous stability and enhanced fluorescence of probes on test strips were realized by the hydrophilic treatment with amine-derivatized silicane. A test strips-based fluorimetry has thereby been developed for probing Hg2+ ions in wastewater, showing the detection performances comparable to the classic instrumental analysis ones. Such a facile and efficient fabrication route for the bio-inspired suppression of “coffee stains” on test strips may expand the scope of applications of test strips-based “point-of-care” analysis methods or detection devices in the biomedical and environmental fields. PMID:27812040

  20. Active Osmotic Exchanger for Efficient Nanofiltration Inspired by the Kidney

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marbach, Sophie; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the physical mechanisms underlying one of the most efficient filtration devices: the kidney. Building on a minimal model of the Henle loop—the central part of the kidney filtration—we investigate theoretically the detailed out-of-equilibrium fluxes in this separation process in order to obtain absolute theoretical bounds for its efficiency in terms of separation ability and energy consumption. We demonstrate that this separation process operates at a remarkably small energy cost as compared to traditional sieving processes while working at much smaller pressures. This unique energetic efficiency originates in the double-loop geometry of the nephron, which operates as an active osmotic exchanger. The principles for an artificial-kidney-inspired filtration device could be readily mimicked based on existing soft technologies to build compact and low-energy artificial dialytic devices. Such a "kidney on a chip" also points to new avenues for advanced water recycling, targeting, in particular, sea-water pretreatment for decontamination and hardness reduction.